WorldWideScience

Sample records for modeling gadolinium-lead-borate glasses

  1. Towards modeling gadolinium-lead-borate glasses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rada, S., E-mail: Simona.Rada@phys.utcluj.ro [Department of Physics, Technical University of Cluj-Napoca, 400641 Cluj-Napoca (Romania); Ristoiu, T. [Department of Physics, Technical University of Cluj-Napoca, 400641 Cluj-Napoca (Romania); Rada, M. [Department of Mechatronic, Technical University of Cluj-Napoca, 400641 Cluj-Napoca (Romania); Coroiu, I. [Department of Physics, Technical University of Cluj-Napoca, 400641 Cluj-Napoca (Romania); Maties, V. [Department of Mechatronic, Technical University of Cluj-Napoca, 400641 Cluj-Napoca (Romania); Culea, E. [Department of Physics, Technical University of Cluj-Napoca, 400641 Cluj-Napoca (Romania)

    2010-01-15

    Infrared spectra of gadolinium-lead-borate glasses of the xGd{sub 2}O{sub 3}.(100 - x)[3B{sub 2}O{sub 3}.PbO] system, where x = 0, 5, 10, 15, 25, 35 and 50 mol.%, have been recorded to explore the role of content of gadolinium ions behaving as glass modifier. The FTIR spectroscopy data for the xGd{sub 2}O{sub 3}.(1 - x)[3B{sub 2}O{sub 3}.PbO] glasses show the structural role of lead ions as a network-formers and of the gadolinium ions network modifiers. Adding of the rare earth ion up to 35 mol.% into the glass matrix, the IR bands characteristic to the studied glasses become sharper and more pronounced. Structural changes, as recognized by analyzing band shapes of IR spectra, revealed that Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3} causes a change from the continuous borate network to the continuous lead-borate network interconnected through Pb-O-B and B-O-B bridges and the transformation of some tetrahedral [BO{sub 4}] units into trigonal [BO{sub 3}] units. Then, gadolinium ions have affinity towards [BO{sub 3}] structural units which contain non-bridging oxygens necessary for the charge compensation because the more electronegative [BO{sub 3}] structural units were implied in the formation of B-O-Gd bonds and the transformation of glass network into a glass ceramic. We propose a possible structural model of building blocks for the formation of continuous random 3B{sub 2}O{sub 3}.PbO network glass used by density functional theory (DFT) calculations. DFT calculations show that lead atoms occupy three different sites in the proposed model. The first is coordinated with six oxygen atoms forming distorted octahedral geometries. The second lead atom has an octahedral oxygen environment and the five longer Pb-O bonds are considered as participating in the metal coordination scheme. The third lead atom has ionic character. In agreement with the results offered by the experimental FTIR data, the theoretical IR data confirm that our proposed structure is highly possible.

  2. Defense HLW Glass Degradation Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D. Strachan

    2004-10-20

    The purpose of this report is to document the development of a model for calculating the release rate for radionuclides and other key elements from high-level radioactive waste (HLW) glasses under exposure conditions relevant to the performance of the repository. Several glass compositions are planned for the repository, some of which have yet to be identified (i.e., glasses from Hanford and Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory). The mechanism for glass dissolution is the same for these glasses and the glasses yet to be developed for the disposal of DOE wastes. All of these glasses will be of a quality consistent with the glasses used to develop this report.

  3. Database and Interim Glass Property Models for Hanford HLW Glasses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hrma, Pavel R; Piepel, Gregory F; Vienna, John D; Cooley, Scott K; Kim, Dong-Sang; Russell, Renee L

    2001-07-24

    The purpose of this report is to provide a methodology for an increase in the efficiency and a decrease in the cost of vitrifying high-level waste (HLW) by optimizing HLW glass formulation. This methodology consists in collecting and generating a database of glass properties that determine HLW glass processability and acceptability and relating these properties to glass composition. The report explains how the property-composition models are developed, fitted to data, used for glass formulation optimization, and continuously updated in response to changes in HLW composition estimates and changes in glass processing technology. Further, the report reviews the glass property-composition literature data and presents their preliminary critical evaluation and screening. Finally the report provides interim property-composition models for melt viscosity, for liquidus temperature (with spinel and zircon primary crystalline phases), and for the product consistency test normalized releases of B, Na, and Li. Models were fitted to a subset of the screened database deemed most relevant for the current HLW composition region.

  4. Critical review of glass performance modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bourcier, W.L. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)

    1994-07-01

    Borosilicate glass is to be used for permanent disposal of high-level nuclear waste in a geologic repository. Mechanistic chemical models are used to predict the rate at which radionuclides will be released from the glass under repository conditions. The most successful and useful of these models link reaction path geochemical modeling programs with a glass dissolution rate law that is consistent with transition state theory. These models have been used to simulate several types of short-term laboratory tests of glass dissolution and to predict the long-term performance of the glass in a repository. Although mechanistically based, the current models are limited by a lack of unambiguous experimental support for some of their assumptions. The most severe problem of this type is the lack of an existing validated mechanism that controls long-term glass dissolution rates. Current models can be improved by performing carefully designed experiments and using the experimental results to validate the rate-controlling mechanisms implicit in the models. These models should be supported with long-term experiments to be used for model validation. The mechanistic basis of the models should be explored by using modern molecular simulations such as molecular orbital and molecular dynamics to investigate both the glass structure and its dissolution process.

  5. Modeling of Residual Stresses In Toughened Glass

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Jens Henrik

    2006-01-01

    -depth knowledge of the residual stresses in toughened glass near holes and edges where the total stress state is a combination of contact stresses and residual stresses. The present paper, presenting the derivation and results for a model predicting the residual stresses in a glass plate far from edges and holes......, is a step towards such a model. The model is based on the Instant Freeze concept with a few modifications. Current work, using a partial differential equation approach for the modeling and state-of-the-art in modeling residual stresses in glass is briefly presented, and a short description of the toughening...

  6. A consortium approach to glass furnace modeling.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, S.-L.; Golchert, B.; Petrick, M.

    1999-04-20

    Using computational fluid dynamics to model a glass furnace is a difficult task for any one glass company, laboratory, or university to accomplish. The task of building a computational model of the furnace requires knowledge and experience in modeling two dissimilar regimes (the combustion space and the liquid glass bath), along with the skill necessary to couple these two regimes. Also, a detailed set of experimental data is needed in order to evaluate the output of the code to ensure that the code is providing proper results. Since all these diverse skills are not present in any one research institution, a consortium was formed between Argonne National Laboratory, Purdue University, Mississippi State University, and five glass companies in order to marshal these skills into one three-year program. The objective of this program is to develop a fully coupled, validated simulation of a glass melting furnace that may be used by industry to optimize the performance of existing furnaces.

  7. Ongoing Model Development Analyzing Glass Fracture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Molnar, G.; Bojtar, I.; Nielsen, Jens Henrik

    2013-01-01

    Present subject deals with an ongoing experimental and numerical analysis of inplane loaded glass plates. The main goal of the investigation is to develop a hybrid – discrete and finite element – model which could follow the fracture process in annealed and in tempered glass. Measurements...

  8. Ongoing Model Development Analyzing Glass Fracture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Molnar, G.; Bojtar, I.; Nielsen, Jens Henrik

    2013-01-01

    Present subject deals with an ongoing experimental and numerical analysis of inplane loaded glass plates. The main goal of the investigation is to develop a hybrid – discrete and finite element – model which could follow the fracture process in annealed and in tempered glass. Measurements...... an overview of the structure of the research and a summary of current status archived so far....

  9. Modeling of Residual Stresses In Toughened Glass

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Jens Henrik

    2006-01-01

    The motivation for this work is the need for more extended guidelines considering structural design of glass structures. Realistic models predicting the strength of bolted connections are a step towards improvement of such guidelines. Improvement of guidelines for bolted connections require in......-depth knowledge of the residual stresses in toughened glass near holes and edges where the total stress state is a combination of contact stresses and residual stresses. The present paper, presenting the derivation and results for a model predicting the residual stresses in a glass plate far from edges and holes......, is a step towards such a model. The model is based on the Instant Freeze concept with a few modifications. Current work, using a partial differential equation approach for the modeling and state-of-the-art in modeling residual stresses in glass is briefly presented, and a short description of the toughening...

  10. Glass powder blended cement hydration modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saeed, Huda

    .17, H/S ratio of 2.5 and N/S ratio of 0.18. In the second phase of this research, theoretical models are built using a modified version of an existing cement hydration modelling code, "CEMHYD3D", to simulate the chemical reaction of the activated glass powder hydration and glass powder in cement. The modified model, which is referred to as the "MOD-model" is further used to predict the types, compositions and quantities of reaction products. Furthermore, the glass powder hydration data, which is obtained experimentally, is incorporated into the MOD-model to determine the effect of adding glass powder to the paste on the process of cement hydration and resulting paste properties. Comparisons between theoretical and experimental results are made to evaluate the developed models. The MOD-model predictions have been validated using the experimental results, and were further used to investigate various properties of the hydrated glass powder cement paste. These properties include, for example, CH content of the paste, porosity, hydration degree of the glass powder and conventional C-S-H and GP CS-H contents. The results show that the MOD-model is capable of accurately simulating the hydration process of glass powder-blended cement paste and can be used to predict various properties of the hydrating paste.

  11. Glass Transition Temperature- and Specific Volume- Composition Models for Tellurite Glasses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Riley, Brian J. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Vienna, John D. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2017-09-01

    This report provides models for predicting composition-properties for tellurite glasses, namely specific gravity and glass transition temperature. Included are the partial specific coefficients for each model, the component validity ranges, and model fit parameters.

  12. Modeling of Microimprinting of Bulk Metallic Glasses

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ming CHENG; John A. Wert

    2006-01-01

    A finite element analysis (FEA) model has been developed to analyze microimprinting of bulk metallic glasses (BMG) near the glass transition temperature (Tg). The results reveal an approximately universal imprinting response for BMG, independent of surface feature length scale. The scale-independent nature of BMG imprinting derives from the flow characteristics of BMG in the temperature range above Tg. It also shows that the lubrication condition has a mild influence on BMG imprinting in the temperature range above Tg.

  13. Modelling aqueous corrosion of nuclear waste phosphate glass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poluektov, Pavel P.; Schmidt, Olga V.; Kascheev, Vladimir A.; Ojovan, Michael I.

    2017-02-01

    A model is presented on nuclear sodium alumina phosphate (NAP) glass aqueous corrosion accounting for dissolution of radioactive glass and formation of corrosion products surface layer on the glass contacting ground water of a disposal environment. Modelling is used to process available experimental data demonstrating the generic inhibiting role of corrosion products on the NAP glass surface.

  14. Glass Property Data and Models for Estimating High-Level Waste Glass Volume

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vienna, John D.; Fluegel, Alexander; Kim, Dong-Sang; Hrma, Pavel R.

    2009-10-05

    This report describes recent efforts to develop glass property models that can be used to help estimate the volume of high-level waste (HLW) glass that will result from vitrification of Hanford tank waste. The compositions of acceptable and processable HLW glasses need to be optimized to minimize the waste-form volume and, hence, to save cost. A database of properties and associated compositions for simulated waste glasses was collected for developing property-composition models. This database, although not comprehensive, represents a large fraction of data on waste-glass compositions and properties that were available at the time of this report. Glass property-composition models were fit to subsets of the database for several key glass properties. These models apply to a significantly broader composition space than those previously publised. These models should be considered for interim use in calculating properties of Hanford waste glasses.

  15. Engineering Glass Passivation Layers -Model Results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Skorski, Daniel C.; Ryan, Joseph V.; Strachan, Denis M.; Lepry, William C.

    2011-08-08

    The immobilization of radioactive waste into glass waste forms is a baseline process of nuclear waste management not only in the United States, but worldwide. The rate of radionuclide release from these glasses is a critical measure of the quality of the waste form. Over long-term tests and using extrapolations of ancient analogues, it has been shown that well designed glasses exhibit a dissolution rate that quickly decreases to a slow residual rate for the lifetime of the glass. The mechanistic cause of this decreased corrosion rate is a subject of debate, with one of the major theories suggesting that the decrease is caused by the formation of corrosion products in such a manner as to present a diffusion barrier on the surface of the glass. Although there is much evidence of this type of mechanism, there has been no attempt to engineer the effect to maximize the passivating qualities of the corrosion products. This study represents the first attempt to engineer the creation of passivating phases on the surface of glasses. Our approach utilizes interactions between the dissolving glass and elements from the disposal environment to create impermeable capping layers. By drawing from other corrosion studies in areas where passivation layers have been successfully engineered to protect the bulk material, we present here a report on mineral phases that are likely have a morphological tendency to encrust the surface of the glass. Our modeling has focused on using the AFCI glass system in a carbonate, sulfate, and phosphate rich environment. We evaluate the minerals predicted to form to determine the likelihood of the formation of a protective layer on the surface of the glass. We have also modeled individual ions in solutions vs. pH and the addition of aluminum and silicon. These results allow us to understand the pH and ion concentration dependence of mineral formation. We have determined that iron minerals are likely to form a complete incrustation layer and we plan

  16. Models of agglomeration and glass transition

    CERN Document Server

    Kerner, Richard

    2007-01-01

    This book is for any physicist interested in new vistas in the domain of non-crystalline condensed matter, aperiodic and quasi-crystalline networks and especially glass physics and chemistry. Students with an elementary background in thermodynamics and statistical physics will find the book accessible. The physics of glasses is extensively covered, focusing on their thermal and mechanical properties, as well as various models leading to the formation of the glassy states of matter from overcooled liquids. The models of agglomeration and growth are also applied to describe the formation of quasicrystals, fullerenes and, in biology, to describe virus assembly pathways.

  17. Evaporation experiments and modelling for glass melts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Limpt, J.A.C. van; Beerkens, R.G.C.

    2007-01-01

    A laboratory test facility has been developed to measure evaporation rates of different volatile components from commercial and model glass compositions. In the set-up the furnace atmosphere, temperature level, gas velocity and batch composition are controlled. Evaporation rates have been measured

  18. Evaporation experiments and modelling for glass melts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Limpt, J.A.C. van; Beerkens, R.G.C.

    2007-01-01

    A laboratory test facility has been developed to measure evaporation rates of different volatile components from commercial and model glass compositions. In the set-up the furnace atmosphere, temperature level, gas velocity and batch composition are controlled. Evaporation rates have been measured f

  19. Mean field models for spin glasses

    CERN Document Server

    Talagrand, Michel

    2011-01-01

    This is a new, completely revised, updated and enlarged edition of the author's Ergebnisse vol. 46: "Spin Glasses: A Challenge for Mathematicians". This new edition will appear in two volumes, the present first volume presents the basic results and methods, the second volume is expected to appear in 2011. In the eighties, a group of theoretical physicists introduced several models for certain disordered systems, called "spin glasses". These models are simple and rather canonical random structures, of considerable interest for several branches of science (statistical physics, neural networks and computer science). The physicists studied them by non-rigorous methods and predicted spectacular behaviors. This book introduces in a rigorous manner this exciting new area to the mathematically minded reader. It requires no knowledge whatsoever of any physics. The first volume of this new and completely rewritten edition presents six fundamental models and the basic techniques to study them.

  20. Glass viscosity calculation based on a global statistical modelling approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fluegel, Alex

    2007-02-01

    A global statistical glass viscosity model was developed for predicting the complete viscosity curve, based on more than 2200 composition-property data of silicate glasses from the scientific literature, including soda-lime-silica container and float glasses, TV panel glasses, borosilicate fiber wool and E type glasses, low expansion borosilicate glasses, glasses for nuclear waste vitrification, lead crystal glasses, binary alkali silicates, and various further compositions from over half a century. It is shown that within a measurement series from a specific laboratory the reported viscosity values are often over-estimated at higher temperatures due to alkali and boron oxide evaporation during the measurement and glass preparation, including data by Lakatos et al. (1972) and the recently published High temperature glass melt property database for process modeling by Seward et al. (2005). Similarly, in the glass transition range many experimental data of borosilicate glasses are reported too high due to phase separation effects. The developed global model corrects those errors. The model standard error was 9-17°C, with R^2 = 0.985-0.989. The prediction 95% confidence interval for glass in mass production largely depends on the glass composition of interest, the composition uncertainty, and the viscosity level. New insights in the mixed-alkali effect are provided.

  1. An improved computational constitutive model for glass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmquist, Timothy J.; Johnson, Gordon R.; Gerlach, Charles A.

    2017-01-01

    In 2011, Holmquist and Johnson presented a model for glass subjected to large strains, high strain rates and high pressures. It was later shown that this model produced solutions that were severely mesh dependent, converging to a solution that was much too strong. This article presents an improved model for glass that uses a new approach to represent the interior and surface strength that is significantly less mesh dependent. This new formulation allows for the laboratory data to be accurately represented (including the high tensile strength observed in plate-impact spall experiments) and produces converged solutions that are in good agreement with ballistic data. The model also includes two new features: one that decouples the damage model from the strength model, providing more flexibility in defining the onset of permanent deformation; the other provides for a variable shear modulus that is dependent on the pressure. This article presents a review of the original model, a description of the improved model and a comparison of computed and experimental results for several sets of ballistic data. Of special interest are computed and experimental results for two impacts onto a single target, and the ability to compute the damage velocity in agreement with experiment data. This article is part of the themed issue 'Experimental testing and modelling of brittle materials at high strain rates'.

  2. Temperature Modeling of the Molten Glass in Tin Bath

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WEI Zhihua; CHEN Jinshu; NIE Yingsong

    2009-01-01

    Based on the experimental investigation by quantitative analysis, temperature fields of the molten glass in tin bath were numerically simulated by the finite elememt method. The ex-perimental results show that the cooling rate of glass is directly proportional to the draught speed, but inversely proportional to the thickness of the glass. This model lays the foundation for computer simulation system about float glass.

  3. Thermal modeling of wafer-based precision glass molding process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Yang; Shen, Lianguan; Zhou, Jian; Li, Mujun

    2016-10-01

    Wafer based precision glass optics manufacturing has been an innovative approach for combining high accuracy with mass production. However, due to the small ratio of thickness and diameter of the glass wafer, deformation and residual stress would be induced for the nonuniform temperature distribution in the glass wafer after molding. Therefore, thermal modelling of the heating system in the wafer based precision glass molding (PGM) process is of great importance in optimizing the heating system and the technique of the process. The current paper deals with a transient thermal modelling of a self-developed heating system for wafer based PGM process. First, in order to investigate the effect of radiation from the surface and interior of the glass wafer, the thermal modeling is simulated with a discrete ordinates radiation model in the CFD software FLUENT. Temperature distribution of the glass wafer obtained from the simulations is then used to evaluate the performance of heating system and investigate some importance parameters in the model, such as interior and surface radiation in glass wafer, thermal contact conductance between glass wafer and molds, thickness to diameter ratio of glass wafer. Finally, structure modification in the molding chamber is raised to decrease the temperature gradient in the glass wafer and the effect is significant.

  4. Application of the model of delocalized atoms to metallic glasses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanditov, D. S.; Darmaev, M. V.; Sanditov, B. D.

    2017-01-01

    The parameters of the model of delocalized atoms applied to metallic glasses have been calculated using the data on empirical constants of the Vogel-Fulcher-Tammann equation (for the temperature dependence of viscosity). It has been shown that these materials obey the same glass-formation criterion as amorphous organic polymers and inorganic glasses. This fact qualitatively confirms the universality of the main regularities of the liquid-glass transition process for all amorphous materials regardless of their origin. The energy of the delocalization of an atom in metallic glasses, Δɛ e ≈ 20-25 kJ/mol, coincides with the results obtained for oxide inorganic glasses. It is substantially lower than the activation energies for a viscous flow and for ion diffusion. The delocalization of an atom (its displacement from the equilibrium position) for amorphous metallic alloys is a low-energy small-scale process similar to that for other glass-like systems.

  5. Computational studies of the glass-forming ability of model bulk metallic glasses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Kai; Wang, Minglei; Papanikolaou, Stefanos; Liu, Yanhui; Schroers, Jan; Shattuck, Mark D; O'Hern, Corey S

    2013-09-28

    Bulk metallic glasses (BMGs) are produced by rapidly thermally quenching supercooled liquid metal alloys below the glass transition temperature at rates much faster than the critical cooling rate R(c) below which crystallization occurs. The glass-forming ability of BMGs increases with decreasing R(c), and thus good glass-formers possess small values of R(c). We perform molecular dynamics simulations of binary Lennard-Jones (LJ) mixtures to quantify how key parameters, such as the stoichiometry, particle size difference, attraction strength, and heat of mixing, influence the glass-formability of model BMGs. For binary LJ mixtures, we find that the best glass-forming mixtures possess atomic size ratios (small to large) less than 0.92 and stoichiometries near 50:50 by number. In addition, weaker attractive interactions between the smaller atoms facilitate glass formation, whereas negative heats of mixing (in the experimentally relevant regime) do not change R(c) significantly. These results are tempered by the fact that the slowest cooling rates achieved in our simulations correspond to ~10(11) K/s, which is several orders of magnitude higher than R(c) for typical BMGs. Despite this, our studies represent a first step in the development of computational methods for quantitatively predicting glass-formability.

  6. Computational studies of the glass-forming ability of model bulk metallic glasses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Kai; Wang, Minglei; Papanikolaou, Stefanos; Liu, Yanhui; Schroers, Jan; Shattuck, Mark D.; O'Hern, Corey S.

    2013-09-01

    Bulk metallic glasses (BMGs) are produced by rapidly thermally quenching supercooled liquid metal alloys below the glass transition temperature at rates much faster than the critical cooling rate Rc below which crystallization occurs. The glass-forming ability of BMGs increases with decreasing Rc, and thus good glass-formers possess small values of Rc. We perform molecular dynamics simulations of binary Lennard-Jones (LJ) mixtures to quantify how key parameters, such as the stoichiometry, particle size difference, attraction strength, and heat of mixing, influence the glass-formability of model BMGs. For binary LJ mixtures, we find that the best glass-forming mixtures possess atomic size ratios (small to large) less than 0.92 and stoichiometries near 50:50 by number. In addition, weaker attractive interactions between the smaller atoms facilitate glass formation, whereas negative heats of mixing (in the experimentally relevant regime) do not change Rc significantly. These results are tempered by the fact that the slowest cooling rates achieved in our simulations correspond to ˜1011 K/s, which is several orders of magnitude higher than Rc for typical BMGs. Despite this, our studies represent a first step in the development of computational methods for quantitatively predicting glass-formability.

  7. Modeling and simulation of a simple glass window

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ismail, K.A.R. [FEM-UNICAMP, Campinas (Brazil). Depto de Engenharia Termica e de Fluidos; Henriquez, J.R. [UFPE, Recife, PE (Brazil). Depto de Engenharia Mecanica

    2003-11-01

    This paper presents a mathematical model with numerical simulations of the heat transfer across a simple glass window. The model is two-dimensional, transient based upon the energy equation with a source term to account for the solar radiation absorbed through the glass sheet. Variable incident solar radiation and external ambient temperature are considered in the numerical simulations. The governing equations and the associated boundary conditions are discretized by the finite difference approach and the ADI scheme. Numerical simulations are realized for the cases of clear and absorbing glass to show the effect of the glass thickness on the total heat gain, the solar heat gain and the shading coefficient. (author)

  8. Modelling the crystallisation of alkaline earth boroaluminosilicate glass ceramics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svenson, Mouritz Nolsøe; Agersted, Karsten; Holm, Paul Martin

    2014-01-01

    To investigate the potential use of a thermochemical software package (FactSage 6.2), in the design of alkaline earth boroaluminosilicate glass ceramics, experimental and modelled results on four glass ceramics were compared. Initially large discrepancies were found. These are described and related...... for the topology of multicomponent melts, before accurate prediction of phase relations within boron-containing glass ceramics can be obtained....

  9. Hierarchical models and chaotic spin glasses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berker, A. Nihat; McKay, Susan R.

    1984-09-01

    Renormalization-group studies in position space have led to the discovery of hierarchical models which are exactly solvable, exhibiting nonclassical critical behavior at finite temperature. Position-space renormalization-group approximations that had been widely and successfully used are in fact alternatively applicable as exact solutions of hierarchical models, this realizability guaranteeing important physical requirements. For example, a hierarchized version of the Sierpiriski gasket is presented, corresponding to a renormalization-group approximation which has quantitatively yielded the multicritical phase diagrams of submonolayers on graphite. Hierarchical models are now being studied directly as a testing ground for new concepts. For example, with the introduction of frustration, chaotic renormalization-group trajectories were obtained for the first time. Thus, strong and weak correlations are randomly intermingled at successive length scales, and a new microscopic picture and mechanism for a spin glass emerges. An upper critical dimension occurs via a boundary crisis mechanism in cluster-hierarchical variants developed to have well-behaved susceptibilities.

  10. Three-Dimensional Modeling of Glass Lens Molding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sarhadi, Ali; Hattel, Jesper Henri; Hansen, Hans Nørgaard

    2015-01-01

    The required accuracy for the final dimensions of the molded lenses in wafer-based precision glass molding as well as the need for elimination of costly experimental trial and error calls for numerical simulations. This study deals with 3D thermo-mechanical modeling of the wafer-based precision...... glass lens molding process. First, a comprehensive 3D thermo-mechanical model of glass is implemented into a FORTRAN user subroutine (UMAT) in the FE program ABAQUS, and the developed FE model is validated with both a well-known sandwich seal test and experimental results of precision molding of several...... glass rings. Afterward, 3D thermo-mechanical modeling of the wafer-based glass lens manufacturing is performed to suggest a proper molding program (i.e., the proper set of process parameters including preset force-time and temperature-time histories) for molding a wafer to a desired dimension...

  11. Super-Potts glass: A disordered model for glass-forming liquids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angelini, Maria Chiara; Biroli, Giulio

    2014-12-01

    We introduce a disordered system, the super-Potts model, which is a more frustrated version of the Potts glass. Its elementary degrees of freedom are variables that can take M values and are coupled via pairwise interactions. Its exact solution on a completely connected lattice demonstrates that, for large enough M , it belongs to the class of mean-field systems solved by a one-step replica symmetry breaking ansatz. Numerical simulations by the parallel tempering technique show that in three dimensions it displays a phenomenological behavior similar to the one of glass-forming liquids. The super-Potts glass is therefore a disordered model allowing one to perform extensive and detailed studies of the random first-order transition in finite dimensions. We also discuss its behavior for small values of M , which is similar to the one of spin glasses in a field.

  12. EMPIRICAL MODEL FOR FORMULATION OF CRYSTAL-TOLERANT HLW GLASSES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    KRUGER AA; MATYAS J; HUCKLEBERRY AR; VIENNA JD; RODRIGUEZ CA

    2012-03-07

    Historically, high-level waste (HLW) glasses have been formulated with a low liquideus temperature (T{sub L}), or temperature at which the equilibrium fraction of spinel crystals in the melt is below 1 vol % (T{sub 0.01}), nominally below 1050 C. These constraints cannot prevent the accumulation of large spinel crystals in considerably cooler regions ({approx} 850 C) of the glass discharge riser during melter idling and significantly limit the waste loading, which is reflected in a high volume of waste glass, and would result in high capital, production, and disposal costs. A developed empirical model predicts crystal accumulation in the riser of the melter as a function of concentration of spinel-forming components in glass, and thereby provides guidance in formulating crystal-tolerant glasses that would allow high waste loadings by keeping the spinel crystals small and therefore suspended in the glass.

  13. Surface tension driven flow in glass melts and model fluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mcneil, T. J.; Cole, R.; Subramanian, R. S.

    1982-01-01

    Surface tension driven flow has been investigated analytically and experimentally using an apparatus where a free column of molten glass or model fluids was supported at its top and bottom faces by solid surfaces. The glass used in the experiments was sodium diborate, and the model fluids were silicone oils. In both the model fluid and glass melt experiments, conclusive evidence was obtained to prove that the observed flow was driven primarily by surface tension forces. The experimental observations are in qualitative agreement with predictions from the theoretical model.

  14. Glasses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dyre, Jeppe

    2004-01-01

    The temperature dependence of the viscosity of most glassforming liquids is known to depart significantly from the classical Arrhenius behaviour of simple fluids. The discovery of an unexpected correlation between the extent of this departure and the Poisson ratio of the resulting glass could lead...... to new understanding of glass ageing and viscous liquid dynamics....

  15. Glasses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dyre, Jeppe

    2004-01-01

    The temperature dependence of the viscosity of most glassforming liquids is known to depart significantly from the classical Arrhenius behaviour of simple fluids. The discovery of an unexpected correlation between the extent of this departure and the Poisson ratio of the resulting glass could lead...... to new understanding of glass ageing and viscous liquid dynamics....

  16. Orientational glass: Full replica symmetry breaking in generalized spin glass-like models without reflection symmetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tareyeva, E.E. [Institute for High Pressure Physics, Russian Academy of Sciences, 142190 Troitsk (Russian Federation); Schelkacheva, T.I., E-mail: tanschelk@gmail.com [Institute for High Pressure Physics, Russian Academy of Sciences, 142190 Troitsk (Russian Federation); Chtchelkatchev, N.M. [Institute for High Pressure Physics, Russian Academy of Sciences, 142190 Troitsk (Russian Federation); L.D. Landau Institute for Theoretical Physics, Russian Academy of Sciences, 117940 Moscow (Russian Federation); Department of Theoretical Physics, Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology, 141700 Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2013-02-15

    We investigate near the point of glass transition the expansion of the free energy corresponding to the generalized Sherrington–Kirkpatrick model with arbitrary diagonal operators U{sup -hat} standing instead of Ising spins. We focus on the case when U{sup -hat} is an operator with broken reflection symmetry. Such a consideration is important for understanding the behavior of spin glass-like phases in a number of real physical systems, mainly in orientational glasses in mixed molecular crystals which present just the case. We build explicitly a full replica symmetry breaking (FRSB) solution of the equations for the orientational glass order parameters when the nonsymmetric part of U{sup -hat} is small. This particular result presents a counterexample in the context of usually adopted conjecture of the absence of FRSB solution in systems with no reflection symmetry.

  17. Orientational glass: Full replica symmetry breaking in generalized spin glass-like models without reflection symmetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tareyeva, E. E.; Schelkacheva, T. I.; Chtchelkatchev, N. M.

    2013-02-01

    We investigate near the point of glass transition the expansion of the free energy corresponding to the generalized Sherrington-Kirkpatrick model with arbitrary diagonal operators Uˆ standing instead of Ising spins. We focus on the case when Uˆ is an operator with broken reflection symmetry. Such a consideration is important for understanding the behavior of spin glass-like phases in a number of real physical systems, mainly in orientational glasses in mixed molecular crystals which present just the case. We build explicitly a full replica symmetry breaking (FRSB) solution of the equations for the orientational glass order parameters when the nonsymmetric part of Uˆ is small. This particular result presents a counterexample in the context of usually adopted conjecture of the absence of FRSB solution in systems with no reflection symmetry.

  18. Mesoscale Phase Field Modeling of Glass Strengthening Under Triaxial Compression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Yulan; Sun, Xin

    2016-09-30

    Recent hydraulic bomb and confined sleeve tests on transparent armor glass materials such as borosilicate glass and soda-lime glass showed that the glass strength was a function of confinement pressure. The measured stress-strain relation is not a straight line as most brittle materials behave under little or no confinement. Moreover, borosilicate glass exhibited a stronger compressive strength when compared to soda-lime glass, even though soda-lime has higher bulk and shear moduli as well as apparent yield strength. To better understand these experimental findings, a mesoscale phase field model is developed to simulate the nonlinear stress versus strain behaviors under confinement by considering heterogeneity formation under triaxial compression and the energy barrier of a micro shear banding event (referred to as pseudo-slip hereafter) in the amorphous glass. With calibrated modeling parameters, the simulation results demonstrate that the developed phase field model can quantitatively predict the pressure-dependent strength, and it can also explain the difference between the two types of glasses from the perspective of energy barrier associated with a pseudo-slip event.

  19. Integrated thermomechanical model for forming of glass containers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martins Bruno

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In this work an integrated model for all the process of glass forming of glass containers is presented. The model addresses press-and-blow and blow-and-blow procedures from the gob forming to the final product. Glass forming involves coupled thermal-mechanical physical phenomena, in which the material viscous flow is highly dependent on heat transfer which, in turn, is dependent changes of shape due to material flow. Numerical aspects associated with the model implementation and its validation with real formed products are discussed.

  20. Infinite-Range Quantum Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya Spin Glass Model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    商育民; 姚凯伦

    2003-01-01

    Based on the replica method and the imaginary time functional-integral technique,we investigate the infiniterange quantum Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya spin glass model.It is found that the quantum Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya spin glass model behaves in a Heisenberg-like manner.The specific heat has the crossover behaviour.The broad Maximum in specific heat is shifted to higher temperature with increasing applied field.These features are in good agreement with the observation of Brodale et al.[J.Magn.Magn.Matter.31-34(1983)1331] The susceptibility of the system has the typical spin glass feature.

  1. Modeling of Glass Making Processes for Improved Efficiency

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomas P. Seward III

    2003-03-31

    The overall goal of this project was to develop a high-temperature melt properties database with sufficient reliability to allow mathematical modeling of glass melting and forming processes for improved product quality, improved efficiency and lessened environmental impact. It was initiated by the United States glass industry through the NSF Industry/University Center for Glass Research (CGR) at Alfred University [1]. Because of their important commercial value, six different types/families of glass were studied: container, float, fiberglass (E- and wool-types), low-expansion borosilicate, and color TV panel glasses. CGR member companies supplied production-quality glass from all six families upon which we measured, as a function of temperature in the molten state, density, surface tension, viscosity, electrical resistivity, infrared transmittance (to determine high temperature radiative conductivity), non-Newtonian flow behavior, and oxygen partial pres sure. With CGR cost sharing, we also studied gas solubility and diffusivity in each of these glasses. Because knowledge of the compositional dependencies of melt viscosity and electrical resistivity are extremely important for glass melting furnace design and operation, these properties were studied more fully. Composition variations were statistically designed for all six types/families of glass. About 140 different glasses were then melted on a laboratory scale and their viscosity and electrical resistivity measured as a function of temperature. The measurements were completed in February 2003 and are reported on here. The next steps will be (1) to statistically analyze the compositional dependencies of viscosity and electrical resistivity and develop composition-property response surfaces, (2) submit all the data to CGR member companies to evaluate the usefulness in their models, and (3) publish the results in technical journals and most likely in book form.

  2. Real space renormalization group theory of disordered models of glasses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angelini, Maria Chiara; Biroli, Giulio

    2017-03-28

    We develop a real space renormalization group analysis of disordered models of glasses, in particular of the spin models at the origin of the random first-order transition theory. We find three fixed points, respectively, associated with the liquid state, with the critical behavior, and with the glass state. The latter two are zero-temperature ones; this provides a natural explanation of the growth of effective activation energy scale and the concomitant huge increase of relaxation time approaching the glass transition. The lower critical dimension depends on the nature of the interacting degrees of freedom and is higher than three for all models. This does not prevent 3D systems from being glassy. Indeed, we find that their renormalization group flow is affected by the fixed points existing in higher dimension and in consequence is nontrivial. Within our theoretical framework, the glass transition results in an avoided phase transition.

  3. Overview of chemical modeling of nuclear waste glass dissolution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bourcier, W.L.

    1991-02-01

    Glass dissolution takes place through metal leaching and hydration of the glass surface accompanied by development of alternation layers of varying crystallinity. The reaction which controls the long-term glass dissolution rate appears to be surface layer dissolution. This reaction is reversible because the buildup of dissolved species in solution slows the dissolution rate due to a decreased dissolution affinity. Glass dissolution rates are therefore highly dependent on silica concentrations in solution because silica is the major component of the alteration layer. Chemical modeling of glass dissolution using reaction path computer codes has successfully been applied to short term experimental tests and used to predict long-term repository performance. Current problems and limitations of the models include a poorly defined long-term glass dissolution mechanism, the use of model parameters determined from the same experiments that the model is used to predict, and the lack of sufficient validation of key assumptions in the modeling approach. Work is in progress that addresses these issues. 41 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs.

  4. Modelization of coupled heat transfer inside a cylindrical glass block

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tanguier, J.L.; Kheiri, A.; Kleinclauss, J. [Faculte des Sciences, 54 - Vandoeuvre-les-Nancy (France)

    1995-01-01

    Modelization of coupled heat transfer inside a cylindrical glass block. In crystal industry, the furnaces used to warm up glass before forming are supplied with 4 bar pressure gas. They are noisy, polluting and high consumers of energy. To limit these effects and improve the energetic performances, an electrical infrared furnace is studied. To perfect it, it is necessary to identify the mechanisms of heat transfer which govern the evolution of the temperature into a cylindrical semitransparent media. After a long and thorough bibliography relative to the thermo-optical properties of crystal, the measurement of the field of temperature into the cylindrical block during the phases of working is led into the factory. To do this, it was necessary to adapt a reliable technical measurement device adjusted to industrial surrounding. A fundamental analysis of the results allows us to propose a model of the coupled heat transfer (radiation, conduction and convection) inside glass and between glass and its surroundings. The model is built on brightness and it is based on a triple discretization: temporal, spectral and zonal. This model provides the spectral distribution of the infrared radiation and the electrical power necessary to obtain a good heating of the crystal according to the manufactory charges. The first tests made with the experimental furnace, built by us, show that it is possible to warm up glass with infrared radiation and that this proceeding reduces the energy consumption and the nuisances. (authors). 19 refs., 7 figs.

  5. Glass Property Models and Constraints for Estimating the Glass to be Produced at Hanford by Implementing Current Advanced Glass Formulation Efforts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vienna, John D.; Kim, Dong-Sang; Skorski, Daniel C.; Matyas, Josef

    2013-07-31

    Recent glass formulation and melter testing data have suggested that significant increases in waste loading in HLW and LAW glasses are possible over current system planning estimates. The data (although limited in some cases) were evaluated to determine a set of constraints and models that could be used to estimate the maximum loading of specific waste compositions in glass. It is recommended that these models and constraints be used to estimate the likely HLW and LAW glass volumes that would result if the current glass formulation studies are successfully completed. It is recognized that some of the models are preliminary in nature and will change in the coming years. Plus the models do not currently address the prediction uncertainties that would be needed before they could be used in plant operations. The models and constraints are only meant to give an indication of rough glass volumes and are not intended to be used in plant operation or waste form qualification activities. A current research program is in place to develop the data, models, and uncertainty descriptions for that purpose. A fundamental tenet underlying the research reported in this document is to try to be less conservative than previous studies when developing constraints for estimating the glass to be produced by implementing current advanced glass formulation efforts. The less conservative approach documented herein should allow for the estimate of glass masses that may be realized if the current efforts in advanced glass formulations are completed over the coming years and are as successful as early indications suggest they may be. Because of this approach there is an unquantifiable uncertainty in the ultimate glass volume projections due to model prediction uncertainties that has to be considered along with other system uncertainties such as waste compositions and amounts to be immobilized, split factors between LAW and HLW, etc.

  6. Glass Property Models and Constraints for Estimating the Glass to be Produced at Hanford by Implementing Current Advanced Glass Formulation Efforts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vienna, John D. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Kim, Dong-Sang [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Skorski, Daniel C. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Matyas, Josef [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2013-07-01

    Recent glass formulation and melter testing data have suggested that significant increases in waste loading in HLW and LAW glasses are possible over current system planning estimates. The data (although limited in some cases) were evaluated to determine a set of constraints and models that could be used to estimate the maximum loading of specific waste compositions in glass. It is recommended that these models and constraints be used to estimate the likely HLW and LAW glass volumes that would result if the current glass formulation studies are successfully completed. It is recognized that some of the models are preliminary in nature and will change in the coming years. Plus the models do not currently address the prediction uncertainties that would be needed before they could be used in plant operations. The models and constraints are only meant to give an indication of rough glass volumes and are not intended to be used in plant operation or waste form qualification activities. A current research program is in place to develop the data, models, and uncertainty descriptions for that purpose. A fundamental tenet underlying the research reported in this document is to try to be less conservative than previous studies when developing constraints for estimating the glass to be produced by implementing current advanced glass formulation efforts. The less conservative approach documented herein should allow for the estimate of glass masses that may be realized if the current efforts in advanced glass formulations are completed over the coming years and are as successful as early indications suggest they may be. Because of this approach there is an unquantifiable uncertainty in the ultimate glass volume projections due to model prediction uncertainties that has to be considered along with other system uncertainties such as waste compositions and amounts to be immobilized, split factors between LAW and HLW, etc.

  7. Drilling in tempered glassmodelling and experiments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Jens Henrik

    The present paper reports experimentally and numerically obtained results for the process of drilling in tempered glass. The experimental results are drilling depths on the edge in 19mm tempered glass with a known residual stress state measured by a scattered light polariscope. The experiments have...... been modelled using a state-of-the-art model and compared with satisfying result to the performed experiments. The numerical model has been used for a parametric study, investigating the redistribution of residual stresses during the process of drilling. This is done for investigating the possibility...... of applying forces in such holes and thereby being able to mechanically assemble tempered glass without the need of drilling holes before the tempering process. The paper is the result of currently ongoing research and the results should be treated as so....

  8. Modeling the crystallisation of alkaline earth boroaluminosilicate glass ceramics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svenson, Mouritz N.; Agersted, Karsten; Holm, Paul Martin

    2014-01-01

    To investigate the potential use of a thermochemical software package (FactSage 6.2), in the design of alkaline earth boroaluminosilicate glass ceramics, experimental and modelled results on four glass ceramics were compared. Initially large discrepancies were found. These are described and related......-empirical optimisation of boron and alkali/alkali earth oxide activities in the liquid oxide solution, significantly improved fits between modelled and experimental results were obtained. Based on these results, it is suggested that more precise descriptions of higher order interactions need to be addressed, to account...

  9. Modelling the crystallisation of alkaline earth boroaluminosilicate glass ceramics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svenson, Mouritz Nolsøe; Agersted, Karsten; Holm, Paul Martin

    2014-01-01

    To investigate the potential use of a thermochemical software package (FactSage 6.2), in the design of alkaline earth boroaluminosilicate glass ceramics, experimental and modelled results on four glass ceramics were compared. Initially large discrepancies were found. These are described and related......-empirical optimisation of boron and alkali/alkali earth oxide activities in the liquid oxide solution, significantly improved fits between modelled and experimental results were obtained. Based on these results, it is suggested that more precise descriptions of higher order interactions need to be addressed, to account...

  10. Thermodynamic model for glass forming ability of ternary metallic glass systems

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    The thermodynamic model of multicomponent chemical short range order (MCSRO) was established in order to evaluate the glass forming ability (GFA) of ternary alloys. Comprehensive numerical calculations using MSCRO software were conducted to obtain the composition dependence of the MCSRO undercooling in Zr-Ni-Cu, Zr-Si-Cu and Pd-Si-Cu ternary systems. By the MCSRO undercooling principle, the composition range of Zr-Ni-Cu system with optimum GFA is determined to be 62.5~75Zr, 5~20Cu, 12.5~25Ni (n(Ni)/n(Cu)=1~5). The TTT curves of Zr-Ni-Cu system were also calculated based on the MCSRO model. The critical cooling rates for Zr-based alloy with deep MSCRO undercooling are estimated to be as low as 100?K/s, which is consistent with the practical cooling rate in the preparation of Zr-based bulk metallic glass (BMG). The calculation also illustrates that the easy glass forming systems such as Pd-based alloys exhibit an extraordinary deep MCSRO undercooling. It is shown that the thermodynamic model of MCSRO provides an effective method for the alloy designing of BMG.

  11. Modelling glass alteration in an altered argillaceous environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bildstein, O.; Trotignon, L.; Pozo, C.; Jullien, M.

    2007-05-01

    The long term behaviour of materials such as glass, steel and clay has been investigated in the context of deep geological disposal of radioactive wastes. The interactions between vitrified wastes, canister corrosion products (CPs) and clay are studied using a modified version of the reaction-transport code Crunch, especially looking at pH changes and possible cementation at the interface with the clayey materials. These perturbations may indeed affect the lifetime of glass matrix in deep repositories, e.g., high pH enhances the rate of glass alteration. This work focuses on the argillite of Bure. The calculations were performed at 323 K with a glass alteration rate switching from a high initial rate to a residual rate according to the sorption capacity of CPs. The time at which this sorption capacity is saturated is crucial to the system in terms of wastes package lifetime. The results show that the glass alteration imposes a high pH value at the interface with CPs and clay: up to a value of 9.2, compared to 7.3 which is the initial pH value in the argillite. Experimental data show that the rate of glass alteration is much higher in such pH conditions. For a R7T7-type glass, the rate is about five times higher at pH 9 than at pH 7. This pH perturbation migrates through the clayey domain as a result of the migration of mobile elements such as boron and sodium, and despite the existence of strong pH buffers in the argillite. The cementation of porosity at the interface between glass and clay is predicted by the model due to the massive precipitation of iron corrosion products and glass alteration products. At this point of the evolution of the system, the pH starts to decrease and the alteration rate of the glass could be significantly reduced. This porosity clogging effect is difficult to confirm by experiments especially since existing data on short term experiments tend to show a pervasive precipitation of silica in the domain instead of a localized precipitation

  12. QCD Color Glass Condensate Model in Warped Brane Models

    CERN Document Server

    Ziaeepour, H

    2004-01-01

    Hadron-hadron interaction and Deep Inelastic Scattering (DIS) at very high energies is dominated by events at small-$x_B$ regime. Interesting and complex physical content of this regime is described by a phenomenological model called McLerran-Venugopalan Color Glass Condensate (MVCGC) model. The advantage of this formalism is the existence of a renormalization-type equation which relates directly observable low energy (small-$x_B$) physics to high energy scales where one expects the appearance of phenomena beyond Standard model. After a brief argument about complexity of observations and their interpretation, we extend CGC to warped space-times with brane boundaries and show that in a hadron-hadron collision or DIS all the events - and not just hard processes - have an extended particle distribution in the bulk. In other word, particles living on the visible brane escape to the bulk. For an observer on the brane the phenomenon should appear as time decoherence in the outgoing particles or missing energy, depe...

  13. Interface free energies in p-spin glass models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, M A

    2006-04-07

    The replica method is used to calculate the interface free energy associated with the change from periodic to antiperiodic boundary conditions in finite-dimensional p-spin glass models in the phase which at mean-field level has one-step replica symmetry breaking (1RSB). In any finite dimension the interface free energy is exponentially small for a large system. This result implies that, in finite dimensions, the 1RSB state does not exist, as it is destroyed by thermal excitation of arbitrarily large droplets. The implications of this for the theory of structural glasses are discussed.

  14. A Model for the Color Glass Condensate Versus Jet Quenching

    CERN Document Server

    Contogouris, Andreas P; Papachristou, P K

    2002-01-01

    A model for the Color Glass Condensate as opposed to jet quenching is proposed for the explanation of the presently available RHIC data. Good fits to these data are presented. A clear way to distinguish between the two possible explanations is also given.

  15. Modelling bubble rise and interaction with a glass surface

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Manica, Rogerio; Hendrix, Maurice H.W.; Gupta, Raghvendra; Klaseboer, Evert; Ohl, Claus-Dieter; Chan, Derek Y.C.

    2014-01-01

    A theoretical model has been developed to analyse bubble rise in water and subsequent impact and bounce against a horizontal glass plate. The multiscale nature of the problem, where the bubble size is on the millimetre range and the film drainage process happens on the micrometre to nanometre scale

  16. Damage progression from impact in layered glass modeled with peridynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bobaru, Florin; Ha, Youn; Hu, Wenke

    2012-12-01

    Dynamic fracture in brittle materials has been difficult to model and predict. Interfaces, such as those present in multi-layered glass systems, further complicate this problem. In this paper we use a simplified peridynamic model of a multi-layer glass system to simulate damage evolution under impact with a high-velocity projectile. The simulation results are compared with results from recently published experiments. Many of the damage morphologies reported in the experiments are captured by the peridynamic results. Some finer details seen in experiments and not replicated by the computational model due to limitations in available computational resources that limited the spatial resolution of the model, and to the simple contact conditions between the layers instead of the polyurethane bonding used in the experiments. The peridynamic model uncovers a fascinating time-evolution of damage and the dynamic interaction between the stress waves, propagating cracks, interfaces, and bending deformations, in three-dimensions.

  17. Structure and molecular modeling of tungsten borotellurate glasses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rada, S., E-mail: Simona.Rada@phys.utcluj.ro [Department of Physics and Chemistry, Technical University of Cluj-Napoca, Cluj-Napoca 400020 (Romania); Rada, M. [Nat. Inst. for R and D of Isotopic and Molec. Technologies, Cluj-Napoca 400293 (Romania); Culea, E., E-mail: eugen.culea@phys.utcluj.ro [Department of Physics and Chemistry, Technical University of Cluj-Napoca, Cluj-Napoca 400020 (Romania)

    2013-03-05

    Highlights: ► The [WO{sub 6}] structural units are highly deformed. ► EPR spectra reveal the existence of W{sup +5} ions situated in distorted octahedral positions and the oxygen ions defects. ► The presence of W{sup +5} ions confers to the glass colors that change with composition. -- Abstract: Glasses of the xWO{sub 3} (100−x)[3TeO{sub 2}·2B{sub 2}O{sub 3}] system where x = 0–40 mol% WO{sub 3} were synthesized and characterized by investigations on FTIR, UV–VIS, EPR spectroscopy and molecular modeling calculations in order to obtain information about the structural changes of the glass network determined by the evolution of tungsten ions states, glass composition and WO{sub 3} concentration. Our spectroscopic data show that the incorporation of WO{sub 3} into borate–tellurate glasses causes both the formation of Te–O–W as well as B–O–W linkages and the increase of the number of non-bridging oxygens. The accommodation of the network with the excess of oxygen and the higher capacity of migration of the tungsten ions inside the host network can be associated with a change of tungsten coordination, from [WO{sub 4}] to [WO{sub 6}] structural units. This conversion is accompaniment of a large displacement of the tungsten atom from the centre of the octahedral geometry. EPR spectra reveal the existence of two signals associated with the presence of W{sup +5} ions situated in distorted octahedral positions and the oxygen ions defects. The presence of W{sup +5} ions confers to the glass colors that change with composition.

  18. Integrated modelling of the glass-iron-clay system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bildstein, O

    2007-01-15

    This report summarizes the results of integrated calculations on the near-field evolution in the VHLW/steel/bentonite/clay system. The calculations of the near-field evolution include different components: the vitrified waste packages, the steel container, the bentonite-based EBS (optional), the EDZ and the geological medium. Coupled reaction-transport (X-T) is used to simulate the corrosion of the steel canister and the glass alteration phase in presence of corrosion products (CPs), looking at mass transfer for chemical elements, especially iron and silica, pH, and porosity change. Calculations as performed give actual parameters for PA calculations: rate of glass alteration (through the calculated pH) as a function of time, extension of altered zone for iron-clay interactions with their own transport parameters, nature of CPs, effect on porosity distribution. According to the operational model currently used at the CEA and the calculations performed on the glass-iron-clay system, the alteration rate of glass and the evolution of the system strongly depend on the timing of CPs saturation with respect to silica sorption. The fate of silica which can be sorbed or precipitate is crucial to the lifetime of glass and to the overall evolution of the system. The other process that might influence the glass is the porosity decrease due to the precipitation of CPs and silica rich phases. However, it is difficult to assign a safety functions to clogging. It is scarcely observed in experiments, either because the conditions are not met for clogging or because the timescale of experiments does not allow for observable clogging. Moreover, the effect of mechanical stress in the NF has to be accounted for in the assessment of the effect of porosity changes. (author)

  19. Glass transitions in the cellular Potts model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiang, M.; Marenduzzo, D.

    2016-10-01

    We study the dynamical transition between a fluid-like and a solid-like phase in a confluent cell monolayer, by using the cellular Potts model and computer simulations. We map out the phase diagram as a function of interfacial tension and of cell motility. While in the fluid phase there is normal diffusion, in the solid phase we observe sub-diffusion, very slow relaxation, and ageing, thereby strongly suggesting that this phase is glassy. Our results complement previous theoretical work within the vertex model and show that the cellular Potts model can account for the experimentally observed glassy dynamics of some biological tissues.

  20. Parallel tempering and 3D spin glass models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papakonstantinou, T.; Malakis, A.

    2014-03-01

    We review parallel tempering schemes and examine their main ingredients for accuracy and efficiency. We discuss two selection methods of temperatures and some alternatives for the exchange of replicas, including all-pair exchange methods. We measure specific heat errors and round-trip efficiency using the two-dimensional (2D) Ising model, and also test the efficiency for the ground state production in 3D spin glass models. We find that the optimization of the GS problem is highly influenced by the choice of the temperature range of the PT process. Finally, we present numerical evidence concerning the universality aspects of an anisotropic case of the 3D spin-glass model.

  1. Thermodynamic Development of Corrosion Rate Modeling in Iron Phosphate Glasses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schlesinger, Mark [Missouri Univ. of Science and Technology, Rolla, MO (United States); Brow, Richard [Missouri Univ. of Science and Technology, Rolla, MO (United States)

    2011-10-31

    A two-year research program investigated links between the thermodynamic properties of phosphate glasses and their corrosion rates in different solutions. Glasses in the Na2O-CaO-P2O5 and Na2O-Fe2O3-PO5 systems were prepared and characterized. These glasses were then exposed in bulk and powder form to acid (0.1M HCl), basic (0.1M KOH) and neutral (deionized water) solutions at varying exposure times and temperatures. Analysis of the solution and the glass after exposure determined the rate and type of corrosion that occurred. Simultaneously, efforts were made to determine the thermodynamic properties of solid iron phosphate compounds. This included measurement of low temperature (5-300 K) heat capacities, measured at Brigham Young University; the attempted use of a Parr calorimeter to measure ambient temperature enthalpies of formation; and attempted measurement of temperature heat capacities. Only the first of the three tasks was successfully accomplished. In lieu of experimental measurement of enthalpies of formation, first-principles calculation of enthalpies of formation was performed at Missouri S&T; these results will be used in subsequent modeling efforts.

  2. Mixture models versus free energy of hydration models for waste glass durability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Piepel, G.; Redgate, T.; Masuga, P.

    1996-03-01

    Two approaches for modeling high-level waste glass durability as a function of glass composition are compared. The mixture approach utilizes first-order mixture (FOM) or second-order mixture (SOM) polynomials in composition, whereas the free energy of hydration (FEH) approach assumes durability is linearly related to the FEH of glass. Both approaches fit their models to data using least squares regression. The mixture and FEH approaches are used to model glass durability as a function of glass composition for several simulated waste glass data sets. The resulting FEH and FOM model coefficients and goodness-of-fit statistics are compared, both within and across data sets. The goodness-of-fit statistics show that the FOM model fits/predicts durability in each data set better (sometimes much better) than the FEH model. Considerable differences also exist between some FEH and FOM model component coefficients for each of the data sets. These differences are due to the mixture approach having a greater flexibility to account for the effect of a glass component depending on the level and range of the component and on the levels of other glass components. The mixture approach can also account for higher-order (e.g., curvilinear or interactive) effects of components, whereas the FEH approach cannot. SOM models were developed for three of the data sets, and are shown to improve on the corresponding FOM models. Thus, the mixture approach has much more flexibility than the FEH approach for approximating the relationship between glass composition and durability for various glass composition regions.

  3. An approach to thermochemical modeling of nuclear waste glass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Besmann, T.M.; Beahm, E.C. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Spear, K.E. [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States)

    1998-11-01

    This initial work is aimed at developing a basic understanding of the phase equilibria and solid solution behavior of the constituents of waste glass. Current, experimentally determined values are less than desirable since they depend on measurement of the leach rate under non-realistic conditions designed to accelerate processes that occur on a geologic time scale. The often-used assumption that the activity of a species is either unity or equal to the overall concentration of the metal can also yield misleading results. The associate species model, a recent development in thermochemical modeling, will be applied to these systems to more accurately predict chemical activities in such complex systems as waste glasses.

  4. Models and optimization of solar-control automotive glasses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blume, Russell Dale

    Efforts to develop automotive glasses with enhanced solar control characteristics have been motivated by the desire for increased consumer comfort, reduced air-conditioning loads, and improved fuel-economy associated with a reduction in the total solar energy transmitted into the automotive interior. In the current investigation, the base soda-lime-silicate glass (72.7 wt.% SiO 2, 14.2% Na2O, 10.0% CaO, 2.5% MgO, 0.6% Al2O 3 with 0.3 Na2SO4 added to the batch as a fining agent) was modified with Fe2O3 (0.0 to 0.8%), NiO (0.0 to 0.15%), CoO (0.0 to 0.15%), V2O5 (0.0 to 0.225%), TiO2 (0.0 to 1.5%), SnO (0.0 to 3.0%), ZnS (0.0 to 0.09%), ZnO (0.0 to 2.0%), CaF2 (0.0 to 2.0%), and P2O5 (0.0 to 2.0%) to exploit reported non-linear mechanistic interactions among the dopants by which the solar-control characteristics of the base glass can be modified. Due to the large number of experimental variables under consideration, a D-optimal experimental design methodology was utilized to model the solar-optical properties as a function of batch composition. The independent variables were defined as the calculated batch concentrations of the primary (Fe2O 3, NiO, CoO, V2O5) and interactive (CaF2 , P2O5, SnO, ZnS, ZnO, TiO2) dopants in the glass. The dependent variable was defined as the apparent optical density over a wavelength range of 300--2700 nm at 10 nm intervals. The model form relating the batch composition to the apparent optical density was a modified Lambert-Beer absorption law; which, in addition to the linear terms, contained quadratic terms of the primary dopants, and a series of binary and ternary non-linear interactions amongst the primary and interactive dopants. Utilizing the developed model, exceptional fit in terms of both the discrete response (the transmission curves) and the integrated response (visible and solar transmittance) were realized. Glasses utilizing Fe2O 3, CoO, NiO, V2O5, ZnO and P2O 5 have generated innovative glasses with substantially improved

  5. 2014 Enhanced LAW Glass Property-Composition Models, Phase 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muller, Isabelle [The Catholic Univ. of America, Washington, DC (United States); Pegg, Ian L. [The Catholic Univ. of America, Washington, DC (United States); Joseph, Innocent [Energy Solutions, Salt Lake City, UT (United States); Gilbo, Konstantin [The Catholic Univ. of America, Washington, DC (United States)

    2015-10-28

    This report describes the results of testing specified by the Enhanced LAW Glass Property-Composition Models, VSL-13T3050-1, Rev. 0 Test Plan. The work was performed in compliance with the quality assurance requirements specified in the Test Plan. Results required by the Test Plan are reported. The te4st results and this report have been reviewed for correctness, technical adequacy, completeness, and accuracy.

  6. An extended topological model for binary phosphate glasses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hermansen, Christian [Section of Chemistry, Aalborg University, 9220 Aalborg (Denmark); Rodrigues, Bruno P.; Wondraczek, Lothar [Otto Schott Institute of Materials Research, University of Jena, 07743 Jena (Germany); Yue, Yuanzheng, E-mail: yy@bio.aau.dk [Section of Chemistry, Aalborg University, 9220 Aalborg (Denmark); State Key Laboratory of Silicate Materials for Architecture, Wuhan University of Technology, Wuhan 430070 (China)

    2014-12-28

    We present a topological model for binary phosphate glasses that builds on the previously introduced concepts of the modifying ion sub-network and the strength of modifier constraints. The validity of the model is confirmed by the correct prediction of T{sub g}(x) for covalent polyphosphoric acids where the model reduces to classical constraint counting. The constraints on the modifying cations are linear constraints to first neighbor non-bridging oxygens, and all angular constraints are broken as expected for ionic bonding. For small modifying cations, such as Li{sup +}, the linear constraints are almost fully intact, but for larger ions, a significant fraction is broken. By accounting for the fraction of intact modifying ion related constraints, q{sub γ}, the T{sub g}(x) of alkali phosphate glasses is predicted. By examining alkali, alkaline earth, and rare earth metaphosphate glasses, we find that the effective number of intact constraints per modifying cation is linearly related to the charge-to-distance ratio of the modifying cation to oxygen.

  7. Ion-Exchange Interdiffusion Model with Potential Application to Long-Term Nuclear Waste Glass Performance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neeway, James J.; Kerisit, Sebastien N.; Liu, Jia; Zhang, Jiandong; Zhu, Zihua; Riley, Brian J.; Ryan, Joseph V.

    2016-05-05

    Abstract: Ion exchange is an integral mechanism influencing the corrosion of glasses. Due to the formation of alteration layers in aqueous conditions, it is difficult to conclusively deconvolute the process of ion exchange from other processes, principally dissolution of the glass matrix. Therefore, we have developed a method to isolate alkali diffusion that involves contacting glass coupons with a solution of 6LiCl dissolved in functionally inert dimethyl sulfoxide. We employ the method at temperatures ranging from 25 to 150 °C with various glass formulations. Glass compositions include simulant nuclear waste glasses, such as SON68 and the international simple glass (ISG), glasses in which the nature of the alkali element was varied, and glasses that contained more than one alkali element. An interdiffusion model based on Fick’s second law was developed and applied to all experiments to extract diffusion coefficients. The model expands established models of interdiffusion to the case where multiple types of alkali sites are present in the glass. Activation energies for alkali ion exchange were calculated and the results are in agreement with those obtained in glass strengthening experiments but are nearly five times higher than values reported for diffusion-controlled processes in nuclear waste glass corrosion experiments. A discussion of the root causes for this apparent discrepancy is provided. The interdiffusion model derived from laboratory experiments is expected to be useful for modeling glass corrosion in a geological repository when the silicon concentration is high.

  8. Oscillatory athermal quasistatic deformation of a model glass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiocco, Davide; Foffi, Giuseppe; Sastry, Srikanth

    2013-08-01

    We report computer simulations of oscillatory athermal quasistatic shear deformation of dense amorphous samples of a three-dimensional model glass former. A dynamical transition is observed as the amplitude of the deformation is varied: For large values of the amplitude the system exhibits diffusive behavior and loss of memory of the initial conditions, whereas localization is observed for small amplitudes. Our results suggest that the same kind of transition found in driven colloidal systems is present in the case of amorphous solids (e.g., metallic glasses). The onset of the transition is shown to be related to the onset of energy dissipation. Shear banding is observed for large system sizes, without, however, affecting qualitative aspects of the transition.

  9. Spin Glass Models of Syntax and Language Evolution

    CERN Document Server

    Siva, Karthik; Marcolli, Matilde

    2015-01-01

    Using the SSWL database of syntactic parameters of world languages, and the MIT Media Lab data on language interactions, we construct a spin glass model of language evolution. We treat binary syntactic parameters as spin states, with languages as vertices of a graph, and assigned interaction energies along the edges. We study a rough model of syntax evolution, under the assumption that a strong interaction energy tends to cause parameters to align, as in the case of ferromagnetic materials. We also study how the spin glass model needs to be modified to account for entailment relations between syntactic parameters. This modification leads naturally to a generalization of Potts models with external magnetic field, which consists of a coupling at the vertices of an Ising model and a Potts model with q=3, that have the same edge interactions. We describe the results of simulations of the dynamics of these models, in different temperature and energy regimes. We discuss the linguistic interpretation of the paramete...

  10. Numerical evidence of spin-chirality decoupling in the three-dimensional heisenberg spin glass model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viet, Dao Xuan; Kawamura, Hikaru

    2009-01-16

    Ordering of the three-dimensional Heisenberg spin glass with Gaussian coupling is studied by extensive Monte Carlo simulations. The model undergoes successive chiral-glass and spin-glass transitions at nonzero temperatures T_{CG}>T_{SG}>0, exhibiting spin-chirality decoupling.

  11. Interface free energies in p-spin glass models

    OpenAIRE

    2006-01-01

    The replica method has been used to calculate the interface free energy associated with the change from periodic to anti-periodic boundary conditions in finite-dimensional p-spin glass models in the phase which at mean-field level has one-step replica symmetry breaking (1RSB). In any finite dimension the interface free energy is exponentially small for a large system. This result implies that in finite dimensions, the 1RSB state does not exist, as it is destroyed by thermal excitation of arbi...

  12. Time of Flight Transients in the Dipolar Glass Model

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    Using Monte Carlo simulation we investigated time of flight current transients predicted by the dipolar glass model for a random spatial distribution of hopping centers. Behavior of the carrier drift mobility was studied at room temperature over a broad range of electric field and sample thickness. A flat plateau followed by $j\\propto t^{-2}$ current decay is the most common feature of the simulated transients. Poole-Frenkel mobility field dependence was confirmed over 5 to 200 V/$\\mu$m as we...

  13. Ion leaching of a glass-ionomer glass: an empirical model and effects on setting characteristics and strength.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prentice, Leon H; Tyas, Martin J; Burrow, Michael F

    2007-01-01

    The release of ions from a glass-ionomer glass, which in the polyacid matrix effects the cross-linking and setting of a cement, can be modelled and initiated by acid-treatment in a dilute acid. This study examined the effect of time of acetic acid leaching on the working time, setting time, and strength of a model GIC. A reactive fluoride glass was immersed in hot acetic acid for 0 (control), 5, 15, 35, 65, 95 and 125 min, filtered and dried. The glass was mixed with an experimental GI liquid in a capsule system and the mixed pastes assessed for working and initial setting time. Compressive strength testing was undertaken according to ISO9917:2003. Immersion time had a significant effect on both working and setting time of the resultant pastes only up to 65 min of immersion, and corresponded with a thin-film ion diffusion model. Compressive strength did not vary significantly with immersion time. The glass-ionomer setting reaction can be conveniently retarded by immersion of the powder in acetic acid, without affecting strength. A reactivity model was developed, whereby the effects of various changes to the leaching process may be usefully examined.

  14. A Discrete Element Model of Armor Glass Fragmentation and Comminution Failure Under Compression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Wei [Advanced Computing, Mathematics, and Data Division, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland Washington 99354; Sun, Xin [Advanced Computing, Mathematics, and Data Division, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland Washington 99354

    2016-02-15

    Because of its exceptional compressive resistance and crystal-clear appearance, lightweight glass has been traditionally used in transparent armor applications. However, due to its brittle nature, glass fails differently from ductile materials in the sense that glass fragmentation occurs instantly ahead of the projectile tip upon penetration. The effective residual strength of the armor glass then inevitably relies on the damaged glass strength within such comminuted zones with confinement from the surrounding intact materials. Physical understanding of damaged glass strength therefore becomes highly critical to the further development of armor designs. In the present study, a discrete element based modeling framework has been developed to understand and predict the evolution of compressive damages and residual strength of armor glasses. With the characteristic fragmentation and comminution failures explicitly resolved, their influences on the mechanical degradation of the loaded glass materials have been evaluated. The effects of essential loading conditions and material properties have also been investigated.

  15. Nano-Continuum Modeling of a Nuclear Glass Specimen Altered for 25 Years

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steefel, Carl

    2014-01-06

    The purpose of this contribution is to report on preliminary nano-continuum scale modeling of nuclear waste glass corrosion. The focus of the modeling is an experiment involving a French glass SON68 specimen leached for 25 years in a granitic environment. In this report, we focus on capturing the nano-scale concentration profiles. We use a high resolution continuum model with a constant grid spacing of 1 nanometer to investigate the glass corrosion mechanisms.

  16. Nano-Continuum Modeling of a Nuclear Glass Specimen Altered for 25 Years

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steefel, Carl

    2014-01-06

    The purpose of this contribution is to report on preliminary nano-continuum scale modeling of nuclear waste glass corrosion. The focus of the modeling is an experiment involving a French glass SON68 specimen leached for 25 years in a granitic environment. In this report, we focus on capturing the nano-scale concentration profiles. We use a high resolution continuum model with a constant grid spacing of 1 nanometer to investigate the glass corrosion mechanisms.

  17. Atomistic modelling and prediction of glass forming ability in bulk metallic glasses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sedighi, Sina

    Atomistic modeling (via molecular dynamics with EAM interaction potentials) was conducted for the detailed investigation of kinetics, thermodynamics, structure, and bonding in Ni-Al and Cu-Zr metallic glasses. This work correlates GFA with the nature of atomic-level bonding and vibrational properties, with results potentially extensible to the Transition Metal -- Transition Metal and Transition Metal -- Metalloid alloy classes in general. As a first step in the development of a liquid-only GFA tuning approach, an automated tool has also been created for the broad compositional sampling of liquid and glassy phase properties in multicomponent (binary, ternary, quaternary) alloy systems. Its application to the Cu-Zr alloy system shows promising results, including the successful identification of the two highest GFA compositions, Cu50Zr50 and Cu64Zr 36. Combined, the findings of this work highlight the critical importance of incorporating more complex alloy-specific information regarding the nature of bonding and ordering at the atomic level into such an approach.

  18. Optimized GPU simulation of continuous-spin glass models

    CERN Document Server

    Yavors'kii, Taras

    2012-01-01

    We develop a highly optimized code for simulating the Edwards-Anderson Heisenberg model on graphics processing units (GPUs). Using a number of computational tricks such as tiling, data compression and appropriate memory layouts, the simulation code combining over-relaxation, heat bath and parallel tempering moves achieves a peak performance of 0.29 ns per spin update on realistic system sizes, corresponding to a more than 150 fold speed-up over a serial CPU reference implementation. The optimized implementation is used to study the spin-glass transition in a random external magnetic field to probe the existence of a de Almeida-Thouless line in the model, for which we give benchmark results.

  19. Optimized GPU simulation of continuous-spin glass models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yavors'kii, T.; Weigel, M.

    2012-08-01

    We develop a highly optimized code for simulating the Edwards-Anderson Heisenberg model on graphics processing units (GPUs). Using a number of computational tricks such as tiling, data compression and appropriate memory layouts, the simulation code combining over-relaxation, heat bath and parallel tempering moves achieves a peak performance of 0.29 ns per spin update on realistic system sizes, corresponding to a more than 150 fold speed-up over a serial CPU reference implementation. The optimized implementation is used to study the spin-glass transition in a random external magnetic field to probe the existence of a de Almeida-Thouless line in the model, for which we give benchmark results.

  20. Numerical modeling of the conduction and radiation heating in precision glass moulding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sarhadi, Ali; Hattel, Jesper Henri; Hansen, Hans Nørgaard

    2012-01-01

    and the temperature uniformity in the glass wafer are evaluated for both heating mechanisms. Subsequently, the approximate radiation heat loss from the glass wafer during cooling is calculated using both numerical and analytical methods and the temperature change in the glass wafer versus time is obtained...... wafer, heating can be performed by either conduction or radiation. The numerical simulation of these two heating mechanisms in the wafer based glass moulding process is the topic of the present paper. First, the transient heating of the glass wafer is simulated by the FEM software ABAQUS. Temperature...... dependent material data of the glass wafer are taken into account in the simulation to have a more realistic model of the material. Heating curves depicting temperature as a function of time inside the glass wafer are predicted for both radiation and conduction heating and based on that the heating time...

  1. Atomistic Model of Physical Ageing in Se-rich As-Se Glasses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Golovchak,R.; Shpotyuk, O.; Kozdras, A.; Bureau, B.; Vlcek, M.; Ganjoo, A.; Jain, H.

    2007-01-01

    Thermal, optical, X-ray excited and magnetic methods were used to develop a microstructural model of physical ageing in Se-rich glasses. The glass composition As10Se90, possessing a typical cross-linked chain structure, was chosen as a model object for the investigations. The effect of physical ageing in this glass was revealed by differential scanning calorimetry, whereas the corresponding changes in its atomic arrangement were studied by extended X-ray absorption fine structure, Raman and solid-state 77Se nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Straightening-shrinkage processes are shown to be responsible for the physical ageing in this Se-rich As-Se glass.

  2. Simplified model evaluation of cooling rates for glass-containing lunar compositions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uhlmann, D. R.; Yinnon, H.; Fang, C.-Y.

    1982-01-01

    The simplified model of glass formation and the development of partial crystallinity in cooled bodies has been applied to lunar compositions 10060, 15028, 15086, 15101, 15286, 15301, 15498, 15499, 60255, 65016, 77017, Apollo 15 green glass and LUNA 24 highland basalt. The critical cooling rates for glass formation predicted by the simplified model are found to be in good agreement (to within an order of magnitude) with those predicted by the exact treatment of crystallization statistics. These predicted critical cooling rates are in even better agreement (a factor of 2) with measured values of the rates required to form glasses of the materials.

  3. Finite Element Implementation of a Glass Tempering Model in Three Dimensions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Jens Henrik; Olesen, John Forbes; Poulsen, Peter Noe

    2010-01-01

    The present paper develops and validates a 3D model for the simulation of glass tempering. It is assembled from well-known models of temperature dependent viscoelasticity and structural relaxation and predicts both transient and steady-state stresses in complex 3D glass geometries. The theory and...

  4. CHEMICAL ANALYSIS OF SIMULATED HIGH LEVEL WASTE GLASSES TO SUPPORT SULFATE SOLUBILITY MODELING

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fox, K.; Marra, J.

    2014-08-14

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Environmental Management (EM) is sponsoring an international, collaborative project to develop a fundamental model for sulfate solubility in nuclear waste glass. The solubility of sulfate has a significant impact on the achievable waste loading for nuclear waste forms both within the DOE complex and to some extent at U.K. sites. The development of enhanced borosilicate glass compositions with improved sulfate solubility will allow for higher waste loadings and accelerated cleanup missions. Much of the previous work on improving sulfate retention in waste glasses has been done on an empirical basis, making it difficult to apply the findings to future waste compositions despite the large number of glass systems studied. A more fundamental, rather than empirical, model of sulfate solubility in glass, under development at Sheffield Hallam University (SHU), could provide a solution to the issues of sulfate solubility. The model uses the normalized cation field strength index as a function of glass composition to predict sulfate capacity, and has shown early success for some glass systems. The objective of the current scope is to mature the sulfate solubility model to the point where it can be used to guide glass composition development for DOE waste vitrification efforts, allowing for enhanced waste loadings and waste throughput. A series of targeted glass compositions was selected to resolve data gaps in the current model. SHU fabricated these glasses and sent samples to the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) for chemical composition analysis. SHU will use the resulting data to enhance the sulfate solubility model and resolve any deficiencies. In this report, SRNL provides chemical analyses for simulated waste glasses fabricated SHU in support of sulfate solubility model development. A review of the measured compositions revealed that there are issues with the B{sub 2}O{sub 3} and Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} concentrations

  5. Double-bond defect modelling in As-S glasses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boyko, V; Shpotyuk, O; Hyla, M, E-mail: shpotyuk@novas.lviv.ua

    2010-11-15

    Ab initio calculations with the RHF/6-311G* basis set are used for geometrical optimization of regular pyramidal and defect quasi-tetrahedral clusters in binary As-S glasses. It is shown that quasi-tetrahedral S=AsS{sub 3/2} structural units are impossible as main network-building blocks in these glasses.

  6. Nonequilibrium relaxation study of Ising spin glass models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozeki, Yukiyasu; Ito, Nobuyasu

    2001-07-01

    As an analysis of equilibrium phase transitions, the nonequilibrium relaxation method is extended to the spin glass (SG) transition. The +/-J Ising SG model is analyzed for three-dimensional (cubic) lattices up to the linear size of L=127 and for four-dimensional (hypercubic) lattice up to L=41. These sizes of systems are quite large as compared with those calculated, so far, by equilibrium simulations. As a dynamical order parameter, we calculate the clone correlation function (CCF) Q(t,tw)≡[F], which is a spin correlation of two replicas produced after the waiting time tw from a simple starting state. It is found that the CCF shows an exponential decay in the paramagnetic phase, and a power-law decay after aginglike development (t>>tw) in the SG phase. This provides a reliable upper bound of the transition temperature Tg. It is also found that a scaling relation, Q(t,tw)=t-λqwq¯(t/tw), holds just around the transition point providing the lower bound of Tg. Together with these two bounds, we propose a new dynamical way for the estimation of Tg from much larger systems. In the SG phase, the power-law behavior of the CCF for t>>tw suggests that the SG phase in short-range Ising models has a rugged phase space.

  7. Long-term modeling of glass waste in portland cement- and clay-based matrices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stockman, H.W.; Nagy, K.L. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Morris, C.E. [Wollongong Univ., NSW (Australia). Dept. of Civil and Mining Engineering

    1995-12-01

    A set of ``templates`` was developed for modeling waste glass interactions with cement-based and clay-based matrices. The templates consist of a modified thermodynamic database, and input files for the EQ3/6 reaction path code, containing embedded rate models and compositions for waste glass, cement, and several pozzolanic materials. Significant modifications were made in the thermodynamic data for Th, Pb, Ra, Ba, cement phases, and aqueous silica species. It was found that the cement-containing matrices could increase glass corrosion rates by several orders of magnitude (over matrixless or clay matrix systems), but they also offered the lowest overall solubility for Pb, Ra, Th and U. Addition of pozzolans to cement decreased calculated glass corrosion rates by up to a factor of 30. It is shown that with current modeling capabilities, the ``affinity effect`` cannot be trusted to passivate glass if nuclei are available for precipitation of secondary phases that reduce silica activity.

  8. Foundation of three—dimensional mathematical models for glass furnace regenerator

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    沈锦林; 宋晨路; 等

    2002-01-01

    This paper presents a practical three-dimensional meathematical model of circulation and heat transfer in generator of glass melting furnaces.The model was based on the heat transfer between the smoke flow and the lattice units,and between the air flow and the lattice units.This model not only bypassed the difficulty of complicated computation of the heat transfer process in the regenerator of glass furnaces,but also avoided the irrationality of fixing the temperature distribution on the surfaces.Use of the model yielded very important data and also the method for the design of the regenerator of glass furnaces in practical production.

  9. A model for foam formation, stability, and breakdown in glass-melting furnaces

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schaaf, J. van der; Beerkens, R.G.C.

    2006-01-01

    A dynamic model for describing the build-up and breakdown of a glass-melt foam is presented. The foam height is determined by the gas flux to the glass-melt surface and the drainage rate of the liquid lamellae between the gas bubbles. The drainage rate is determined by the average gas bubble radius

  10. Chemical composition analysis and product consistency tests to support enhanced Hanford waste glass models: Results for the January, March, and April 2015 LAW glasses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fox, K. M. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Edwards, T. B. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Riley, W. T. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Best, D. R. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2015-09-03

    In this report, the Savannah River National Laboratory provides chemical analyses and Product Consistency Test (PCT) results for several simulated low activity waste (LAW) glasses (designated as the January, March, and April 2015 LAW glasses) fabricated by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. The results of these analyses will be used as part of efforts to revise or extend the validation regions of the current Hanford Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant glass property models to cover a broader span of waste compositions.

  11. Chemical composition analysis and product consistency tests to support Enhanced Hanford Waste Glass Models. Results for the Augusta and October 2014 LAW Glasses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fox, K. M. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Edwards, T. B. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Best, D. R. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2015-07-07

    In this report, the Savannah River National Laboratory provides chemical analyses and Product Consistency Test (PCT) results for several simulated low activity waste (LAW) glasses (designated as the August and October 2014 LAW glasses) fabricated by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. The results of these analyses will be used as part of efforts to revise or extend the validation regions of the current Hanford Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant glass property models to cover a broader span of waste compositions.

  12. Progress toward bridging from atomistic to continuum modeling to predict nuclear waste glass dissolution.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zapol, Peter (Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL); Bourg, Ian (Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratories, Berkeley, CA); Criscenti, Louise Jacqueline; Steefel, Carl I. (Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratories, Berkeley, CA); Schultz, Peter Andrew

    2011-10-01

    This report summarizes research performed for the Nuclear Energy Advanced Modeling and Simulation (NEAMS) Subcontinuum and Upscaling Task. The work conducted focused on developing a roadmap to include molecular scale, mechanistic information in continuum-scale models of nuclear waste glass dissolution. This information is derived from molecular-scale modeling efforts that are validated through comparison with experimental data. In addition to developing a master plan to incorporate a subcontinuum mechanistic understanding of glass dissolution into continuum models, methods were developed to generate constitutive dissolution rate expressions from quantum calculations, force field models were selected to generate multicomponent glass structures and gel layers, classical molecular modeling was used to study diffusion through nanopores analogous to those in the interfacial gel layer, and a micro-continuum model (K{mu}C) was developed to study coupled diffusion and reaction at the glass-gel-solution interface.

  13. Study of interaction in silica glass via model potential approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mann, Sarita; Rani, Pooja

    2016-05-01

    Silica is one of the most commonly encountered substances in daily life and in electronics industry. Crystalline SiO2 (in several forms: quartz, cristobalite, tridymite) is an important constituent of many minerals and gemstones, both in pure form and mixed with related oxides. Cohesive energy of amorphous SiO2 has been investigated via intermolecular potentials i.e weak Van der Waals interaction and Morse type short-range interaction. We suggest a simple atom-atom based Van der Waals as well as Morse potential to find cohesive energy of glass. It has been found that the study of silica structure using two different model potentials is significantly different. Van der Waals potential is too weak (P.E =0.142eV/molecule) to describe the interaction between silica molecules. Morse potential is a strong potential, earlier given for intramolecular bonding, but if applied for intermolecular bonding, it gives a value of P.E (=-21.92eV/molecule) to appropriately describe the structure of silica.

  14. VITRAIL: Acquisition, Modeling, and Rendering of Stained Glass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thanikachalam, Niranjan; Baboulaz, Loic; Prandoni, Paolo; Trumpler, Stefan; Wolf, Sophie; Vetterli, Martin

    2016-10-01

    Stained glass windows are designed to reveal their powerful artistry under diverse and time-varying lighting conditions; virtual relighting of stained glass, therefore, represents an exceptional tool for the appreciation of this age old art form. However, as opposed to most other artifacts, stained glass windows are extremely difficult if not impossible to analyze using controlled illumination because of their size and position. In this paper, we present novel methods built upon image based priors to perform virtual relighting of stained glass artwork by acquiring the actual light transport properties of a given artifact. In a preprocessing step, we build a material-dependent dictionary for light transport by studying the scattering properties of glass samples in a laboratory setup. We can now use the dictionary to recover a light transport matrix in two ways: under controlled illuminations the dictionary constitutes a sparsifying basis for a compressive sensing acquisition, while in the case of uncontrolled illuminations the dictionary is used to perform sparse regularization. The proposed basis preserves volume impurities and we show that the retrieved light transport matrix is heterogeneous, as in the case of real world objects. We present the rendering results of several stained glass artifacts, including the Rose Window of the Cathedral of Lausanne, digitized using the presented methods.

  15. Modeling and simulation of residual stresses during glass bulb pressing process

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    The residual stresses accumulated in the forming process have great effects on the product quality of the glass bulb. Based on the characteristics analysis of glass bulb forming, a mathematical model has been established for calculating residual stresses of glass pressing process. The material is assumed as thermorheologi-cally simple thermoviscoelastic material, and the flow-induced stress is neglected. The consequences of equilibrium and compatibility equations are discussed in detail, and the boundary conditions are specified for various stages of the forming process. The numerical solution is based on the theory of thin layers, combined with finite difference method in the time and layer difference in the thickness di-rection. The presented model and solution method could easily be extended to general pressing process of glass, and applied to problems relative to glass pressing, providing extensive reference values.

  16. Irreversible transitions in the exchange-striction model of spin-glass state

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valkov, V. I.; Golovchan, A. V.

    2014-08-01

    Based on the assumption of a negative volume dependence of random exchange integrals, it is possible to switch to a compressible Sherrington-Kirkpatrick spin-glass model. Within the proposed model, temperature-pressure phase diagrams were calculated and pressure- and magnetic-field-induced first-order phase transitions from the initial paramagnetic and spin-glass states to the ferromagnetic state were predicted. It was shown that the application of pressure in the spin-glass state not only increases and shifts magnetic susceptibility, but also reduces the critical magnetic fields of irreversible induced phase transitions from the spin-glass to the ferromagnetic state. The obtained results are used to describe the spin-glass state in (Sm1-xGdx)0.55Sr0.45MnO3.

  17. Long-term modeling of alteration-transport coupling: Application to a fractured Roman glass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verney-Carron, Aurélie; Gin, Stéphane; Frugier, Pierre; Libourel, Guy

    2010-04-01

    To improve confidence in glass alteration models, as used in nuclear and natural applications, their long-term predictive capacity has to be validated. For this purpose, we develop a new model that couples geochemical reactions with transport and use a fractured archaeological glass block that has been altered for 1800 years under well-constrained conditions in order to test the capacity of the model. The chemical model considers three steps in the alteration process: (1) formation of a hydrated glass by interdiffusion, whose kinetics are controlled by a pH and temperature dependent diffusion coefficient; (2) the dissolution of the hydrated glass, whose kinetics are based on an affinity law; (3) the precipitation of secondary phases if thermodynamic saturation is reached. All kinetic parameters were determined from experiments. The model was initially tested on alteration experiments in different solutions (pure water, Tris, seawater). It was then coupled with diffusive transport in solution to simulate alteration in cracks within the glass. Results of the simulations run over 1800 years are in good agreement with archaeological glass block observations concerning the nature of alteration products (hydrated glass, smectites, and carbonates) and crack alteration thicknesses. External cracks in direct contact with renewed seawater were altered at the forward dissolution rate and are filled with smectites (400-500 μm). Internal cracks are less altered (by 1 or 2 orders of magnitude) because of the strong coupling between alteration chemistry and transport. The initial crack aperture, the distance to the surface, and sealing by secondary phases account for these low alteration thicknesses. The agreement between simulations and observations thus validates the predictive capacity of this coupled geochemical model and increases more generally the robustness and confidence in glass alteration models to predict long-term behavior of nuclear waste in geological disposal or

  18. Mixture experiment techniques for reducing the number of components applied for modeling waste glass sodium release

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Piepel, G.; Redgate, T. [Pacific Northwest National Lab., Richland, WA (United States). Statistics Group

    1997-12-01

    Statistical mixture experiment techniques were applied to a waste glass data set to investigate the effects of the glass components on Product Consistency Test (PCT) sodium release (NR) and to develop a model for PCT NR as a function of the component proportions. The mixture experiment techniques indicate that the waste glass system can be reduced from nine to four components for purposes of modeling PCT NR. Empirical mixture models containing four first-order terms and one or two second-order terms fit the data quite well, and can be used to predict the NR of any glass composition in the model domain. The mixture experiment techniques produce a better model in less time than required by another approach.

  19. Resolution of conflicting views on thermodynamics of glass transition: A unified model

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    K T Jacob; Sagar Prabhudev; R M Mallya

    2010-10-01

    Classical description of thermodynamic properties during glass transition has been questioned by the entropy-loss model. The uncompensated loss of entropy at the glass transition temperature and zero residual entropy is at the heart of the controversy. Both the models are critically reviewed. A unified model is presented which incorporates features of both entropy loss and residual entropy. It implies two different types of contributions to the entropy of the supercooled liquid, one of which vanishes at the transition and the other which contributes to residual entropy. Entropy gain during spontaneous relaxation of glass, and the nature of heat capacity ‘hysteresis’ during cooling and heating through the glass transition range support the proposed model. Experiments are outlined for differentiating between the models.

  20. Memory effects in schematic models of glasses subjected to oscillatory deformation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiocco, Davide; Foffi, Giuseppe; Sastry, Srikanth

    2015-05-01

    We consider two schematic models of glasses subjected to oscillatory shear deformation, motivated by the observations, in computer simulations of a model glass, of a nonequilibrium transition from a localized to a diffusive regime as the shear amplitude is increased, and of persistent memory effects in the localized regime. The first of these schematic models is the NK model, a spin model with disordered multi-spin interactions previously studied as a model for sheared amorphous solids. The second model, a transition matrix model, is an abstract formulation of the manner in which occupancy of local energy minima evolves under oscillatory deformation cycles. In both of these models, we find a behavior similar to that of an atomic model glass studied earlier. We discuss possible further extensions of the approaches outlined.

  1. Towards optimization of nuclear waste glass: Constraints, property models, and waste loading

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hrma, P.

    1994-04-01

    Vitrification of both low- and high-level wastes from 177 tanks at Hanford poses a great challenge to glass makers, whose task is to formulate a system of glasses that are acceptable to the federal repository for disposal. The enormous quantity of the waste requires a glass product of the lowest possible volume. The incomplete knowledge of waste composition, its variability, and lack of an appropriate vitrification technology further complicates this difficult task. A simple relationship between the waste loading and the waste glass volume is presented and applied to the predominantly refractory (usually high-activity) and predominantly alkaline (usually low-activity) waste types. Three factors that limit waste loading are discussed, namely product acceptability, melter processing, and model validity. Glass formulation and optimization problems are identified and a broader approach to uncertainties is suggested.

  2. Simplified model for a ventilated glass window under forced air flow conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ismail, K.A.R. [Depto. de Engenharia Termica e de Fluidos-FEM-UNICAMP CP: 6122 CEP 13083-970 Campinas, SP (Brazil); Henriquez, J.R. [Depto. de Eng. Mecanica-DEMEC, UFPE Av. Academico Helio Ramos, S/N CEP 50740-530, Recife, PE (Brazil)

    2006-02-01

    This paper presents a study on a ventilated window composed of two glass sheets separated by a spacing through which air is forced to flow. The proposed model is one dimensional and unsteady based upon global energy balance over the glass sheets and the flowing fluid. The external glass sheet of the cavity is subjected to variable heat flow due to the solar radiation as well as variable external ambient temperature. The exchange of radiation energy (infrared radiation) between the glass sheets is also included in the formulation. Effects of the spacing between the glass sheets, variation of the forced mass flow rate on the total heat gain and the shading coefficients are investigated. The results show that the effect of the increase of the mass flow rate is found to reduce the mean solar heat gain and the shading coefficients while the increase of the fluid entry temperature is found to deteriorate the window thermal performance. (author)

  3. AFM assessment of the surface nano/microstructure on chemically damaged historical and model glasses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carmona, Noemi [Centro Nacional de Investigaciones Metalurgicas, CSIC, Avda. Gregorio del Amo, 8, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Kowal, Andrzej [Institute of Catalysis and Surface Chemistry, PAN, ul. Niezapominajek 8, 30239 Cracow (Poland); Rincon, Jesus-Maria [Instituto Eduardo Torroja de Ciencias de la Construccion, CSIC, C. Serrano Galvache s/n, 28033 Madrid (Spain); Villegas, Maria-Angeles, E-mail: mariangeles.villegas@cchs.csic.es [Centro Nacional de Investigaciones Metalurgicas, CSIC, Avda. Gregorio del Amo, 8, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Instituto de Historia, Centro de Ciencias Humanas y Sociales, CSIC, C. Albasanz, 26-28, 28037 Madrid (Spain)

    2010-01-15

    Surface chemical damage on selected historical glasses from 13th to 19th centuries was evaluated by means of atomic force microscopy (AFM). Nano- and microstructure, roughness and topography of ancient glass samples have been compared with those of model glasses prepared by conventional melting at the laboratory with similar compositions to those most frequently found in historical glass pieces. The results obtained allow discussing the chemical degradation mechanisms in terms of the acid and/or basic chemical attack carried out by the combination of gaseous pollutants and environmental humidity. Even though deep corrosion features escape to the observation order of magnitude of the AF microscope used, the AFM technique proves to be quite useful for the study and evaluation of the most common surface pathologies of historical glasses with different compositions once submitted to natural weathering.

  4. Chemical analysis of simulated high level waste glasses to support stage III sulfate solubility modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fox, K. M. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2016-03-17

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Environmental Management (EM) is sponsoring an international, collaborative project to develop a fundamental model for sulfate solubility in nuclear waste glass. The solubility of sulfate has a significant impact on the achievable waste loading for nuclear waste forms within the DOE complex. These wastes can contain relatively high concentrations of sulfate, which has low solubility in borosilicate glass. This is a significant issue for low-activity waste (LAW) glass and is projected to have a major impact on the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP). Sulfate solubility has also been a limiting factor for recent high level waste (HLW) sludge processed at the Savannah River Site (SRS) Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF). The low solubility of sulfate in glass, along with melter and off-gas corrosion constraints, dictate that the waste be blended with lower sulfate concentration waste sources or washed to remove sulfate prior to vitrification. The development of enhanced borosilicate glass compositions with improved sulfate solubility will allow for higher waste loadings and accelerate mission completion.The objective of the current scope being pursued by SHU is to mature the sulfate solubility model to the point where it can be used to guide glass composition development for DWPF and WTP, allowing for enhanced waste loadings and waste throughput at these facilities. A series of targeted glass compositions was selected to resolve data gaps in the model and is identified as Stage III. SHU fabricated these glasses and sent samples to SRNL for chemical composition analysis. SHU will use the resulting data to enhance the sulfate solubility model and resolve any deficiencies. In this report, SRNL provides chemical analyses for the Stage III, simulated HLW glasses fabricated by SHU in support of the sulfate solubility model development.

  5. Chemical composition analysis and product consistency tests to support enhanced Hanford waste glass models. Results for the third set of high alumina outer layer matrix glasses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fox, K. M. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States); Edwards, T. B. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States)

    2015-12-01

    In this report, the Savannah River National Laboratory provides chemical analyses and Product Consistency Test (PCT) results for 14 simulated high level waste glasses fabricated by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. The results of these analyses will be used as part of efforts to revise or extend the validation regions of the current Hanford Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant glass property models to cover a broader span of waste compositions. The measured chemical composition data are reported and compared with the targeted values for each component for each glass. All of the measured sums of oxides for the study glasses fell within the interval of 96.9 to 100.8 wt %, indicating recovery of all components. Comparisons of the targeted and measured chemical compositions showed that the measured values for the glasses met the targeted concentrations within 10% for those components present at more than 5 wt %. The PCT results were normalized to both the targeted and measured compositions of the study glasses. Several of the glasses exhibited increases in normalized concentrations (NCi) after the canister centerline cooled (CCC) heat treatment. Five of the glasses, after the CCC heat treatment, had NCB values that exceeded that of the Environmental Assessment (EA) benchmark glass. These results can be combined with additional characterization, including X-ray diffraction, to determine the cause of the higher release rates.

  6. Modeling relations between the composition and properties of French light water reactor waste containment glass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghaleb, D.; Dussossoy, J.L.; Fillet, C.; Pacaud, F.; Jacquet-Francillon, N.

    1994-12-31

    Models have been developed to calculate the density, molten-state viscosity and initial corrosion rate according to the chemical composition of glass formulations used to vitrify high-level fission product solutions from reprocessed light water reactor fuel. Developed from other published work, these models have been adapted to allow for the effects of platinoid (Ru, Pd, Rh) inclusions on the molten glass rheology. (authors). 15 refs., 10 figs., 1 tab.

  7. Spectra of the Wells lunar glass simulants: New old data for reflectance modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stockstill-Cahill, Karen R.; Blewett, David T.; Cahill, Joshua T. S.; Denevi, Brett W.; Lawrence, Samuel J.; Coman, Ecaterina I.

    2014-05-01

    Silicate glasses are an important constituent in the regolith of airless planetary bodies, and knowledge of glass reflectance characteristics is important for remote-sensing studies of the Moon, Mercury, and asteroids. We recovered reflectance spectra for 20 vacuum-melted lunar glass simulants measured by Wells (1977), which cover a wider range of Fe and Ti contents (0-17.5 wt % FeO and 0-15 wt % TiO2) and a wider wavelength range than those of the better-known Bell et al. (1976) study. We examine the spectra in terms of known absorptions, explore the relationship between ultraviolet spectral parameters and composition, and apply the Hapke radiative transfer model to predict the reflectance spectra of the Wells glasses. The imaginary part of the refractive index (k) at each wavelength was computed based on the Ti and Fe composition using the linear relationship presented by Wilcox et al. (2006) and with a new linear-exponential hybrid relationship. Comparison of the model spectra with the measured spectra reveals that the samples rich in Fe and Ti are best modeled by the linear relationship, because the linear model was developed using the Fe- and/or Ti-rich Bell et al. (1976) glasses. For Fe- and Ti-poor glasses, the hybrid model provides a better fit to the measured spectra, because this model for k is based on the wider compositional range of the Wells glasses. In the future, better linear model fits might be obtained if optical parameters were derived for a wider compositional range, from low-Fe/low-Ti to the higher-Fe/higher-Ti compositions of Apollo volcanic glasses.

  8. Property-Composition-Temperature Modeling of Waste Glass Melt Data Subject to a Randomization Restriction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Piepel, Gregory F.; Heredia-Langner, Alejandro; Cooley, Scott K.

    2008-10-01

    Properties such as viscosity and electrical conductivity of glass melts are functions of melt temperature as well as glass composition. When measuring such a property for several glasses, the property is typically measured at several temperatures for one glass, then at several temperatures for the next glass, and so on. This data-collection process involves a restriction on randomization, which is referred to as split-plot experiment. The split-plot data structure must be accounted for in developing property-composition-temperature models and the corresponding uncertainty equations for model predictions. Instead of ordinary least squares (OLS) regression methods, generalized least squares (GLS) regression methods using restricted maximum likelihood (REML) estimation must be used. This article describes the methodology for developing property-composition-temperature models and corresponding prediction uncertainty equations using the GLS/REML regression approach. Viscosity data collected on 197 simulated nuclear waste glasses are used to illustrate the GLS/REML methods for developing a viscosity-composition-temperature model and corresponding equations for model prediction uncertainties. The correct results using GLS/REML regression are compared to the incorrect results obtained using OLS regression.

  9. Heat Transfer Model of a Small-Scale Waste Glass Melter with Cold Cap Layer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abboud, Alexander; Guillen, Donna Post; Pokorny, Richard

    2016-09-01

    At the Hanford site in the state of Washington, more than 56 million gallons of radioactive waste is stored in underground tanks. The cleanup plan for this waste is vitrification at the Waste Treatment Plant (WTP), currently under construction. At the WTP, the waste will be blended with glass-forming materials and heated to 1423K, then poured into stainless steel canisters to cool and solidify. A fundamental understanding of the glass batch melting process is needed to optimize the process to reduce cost and decrease the life cycle of the cleanup effort. The cold cap layer that floats on the surface of the glass melt is the primary reaction zone for the feed-to-glass conversion. The conversion reactions include water release, melting of salts, evolution of batch gases, dissolution of quartz and the formation of molten glass. Obtaining efficient heat transfer to this region is crucial to achieving high rates of glass conversion. Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) modeling is being used to understand the heat transfer dynamics of the system and provide insight to optimize the process. A CFD model was developed to simulate the DM1200, a pilot-scale melter that has been extensively tested by the Vitreous State Laboratory (VSL). Electrodes are built into the melter to provide Joule heating to the molten glass. To promote heat transfer from the molten glass into the reactive cold cap layer, bubbling of the molten glass is used to stimulate forced convection within the melt pool. A three-phase volume of fluid approach is utilized to model the system, wherein the molten glass and cold cap regions are modeled as separate liquid phases, and the bubbling gas and plenum regions are modeled as one lumped gas phase. The modeling of the entire system with a volume of fluid model allows for the prescription of physical properties on a per-phase basis. The molten glass phase and the gas phase physical properties are obtained from previous experimental work. Finding representative

  10. Liquid-Liquid Phase Transition and Glass Transition in a Monoatomic Model System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicolas Giovambattista

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available We review our recent study on the polyamorphism of the liquid and glass states in a monatomic system, a two-scale spherical-symmetric Jagla model with both attractive and repulsive interactions. This potential with a parametrization for which crystallization can be avoided and both the glass transition and the liquid-liquid phase transition are clearly separated, displays water-like anomalies as well as polyamorphism in both liquid and glassy states, providing a unique opportunity to study the interplay between the liquid-liquid phase transition and the glass transition. Our study on a simple model may be useful in understanding recent studies of polyamorphism in metallic glasses.

  11. Symmetry foundations of a polymer model for close-packed metallic liquids and glasses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraposhin, V. S.; Talis, A. L.

    2016-02-01

    The atomic packing density of metallic melts and glasses is too high for their structures to be considered as chaotic. To remove this contradiction, we propose to describe the structures of metallic liquids and the glasses that form from them using (i) a base set of three spirals made of regular tetrahedra with specific noncrystallographic symmetry and (ii) combinatorial permutations of the vertices of a set of the coordination polyhedra that describe the polymorphic transformations in metals. The symmetry base of the proposed model of the structures of liquids and glasses is represented by projective linear groups PSL(2, p), where the order of the Galois field is p = 3, 7, and 11. These groups uniquely determine a tetrahedron, the 7-vertex joining of four tetrahedra along their faces (tetrablock), the 11-vertex joining of two tetrablocks into a spiral, and the throwing over of the diagonals in a rhombus from two triangular faces of neighboring tetrahedra. The throwing over of the diagonals in a rhombus is considered as a unit act of any structural transformation and ensures the melt-crystal, melt-glass, and glass-crystal transitions and the structural relaxation of metallic glasses. In terms of the proposed scheme, the high density of melts and glasses is caused by tetrahedral packing (up to 78%), and the absence of a diffraction pattern of melts and glasses is explained by the absence of translation along the spiral axis. The suggested polymer model also explains the collective effects (string vibrations) that were detected upon measuring the shear modulus relaxation of a metallic glass.

  12. Complex oscillatory yielding of model hard-sphere glasses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koumakis, N; Brady, J F; Petekidis, G

    2013-04-26

    The yielding behavior of hard sphere glasses under large-amplitude oscillatory shear has been studied by probing the interplay of Brownian motion and shear-induced diffusion at varying oscillation frequencies. Stress, structure and dynamics are followed by experimental rheology and Browian dynamics simulations. Brownian-motion-assisted cage escape dominates at low frequencies while escape through shear-induced collisions at high ones, both related with a yielding peak in G''. At intermediate frequencies a novel, for hard sphere glasses, double peak in G'' is revealed reflecting both mechanisms. At high frequencies and strain amplitudes a persistent structural anisotropy causes a stress drop within the cycle after strain reversal, while higher stress harmonics are minimized at certain strain amplitudes indicating an apparent harmonic response.

  13. A Simple Ballistic Material Model for Soda-Lime Glass

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-01-01

    for soda-lime glass devel- oped and parameterized in the previous sections is next imple- mented in a VUMAT Material User Subroutine of the commercial...each element. The essential features of the coupling between the ABAQUS/ Explicit finite-element solver and the VUMAT Material User Subroutine at...state as well as values of the material state variables at the end of the time increment are determined within the VUMAT and returned to the ABAQUS

  14. Modeling of Stone-impact Resistance of Monolithic Glass Ply Using Continuum Damage Mechanics

    OpenAIRE

    Sun, Xin; Khaleel, Mohammad A.; Davies, Richard W.

    2005-01-01

    Abstract The stone-impact resistance of a monolithic glass ply is studied using a combined experimental and computational approach. Instrumented stone-impact tests are first carried out in a controlled environment. Explicit finite element analyses are then used to simulate the interactions of the indentor and the glass layer during the impact event, and a continuum damage mechanics (CDM) model is used to de...

  15. Current Understanding and Remaining Challenges in Modeling Long-Term Degradation of Borosilicate Nuclear Waste Glasses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vienna, John D. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Ryan, Joseph V. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Gin, Stephane [CEA Marcoule, DTCD SECM, Bagnols-sur-Ceze (France); Inagaki, Yaohiro [Dept. of Applied Quantum Physics and Nuclear Engineering, Kyushu University, Fukuoda (Japan)

    2013-12-01

    Chemical durability is not a single material property that can be uniquely measured. Instead it is the response to a host of coupled material and environmental processes whose rates are estimated by a combination of theory, experiment, and modeling. High-level nuclear waste (HLW) glass is perhaps the most studied of any material yet there remain significant technical gaps regarding their chemical durability. The phenomena affecting the long-term performance of HLW glasses in their disposal environment include surface reactions, transport properties to and from the reacting glass surface, and ion exchange between the solid glass and the surrounding solution and alteration products. The rates of these processes are strongly influenced and are coupled through the solution chemistry, which is in turn influenced by the reacting glass and also by reaction with the near-field materials and precipitation of alteration products. Therefore, those processes must be understood sufficiently well to estimate or bound the performance of HLW glass in its disposal environment over geologic time-scales. This article summarizes the current state of understanding of surface reactions, transport properties, and ion exchange along with the near-field materials and alteration products influences on solution chemistry and glass reaction rates. Also summarized are the remaining technical gaps along with recommended approaches to fill those technical gaps.

  16. Evaluation of borate bioactive glass scaffolds with different pore sizes in a rat subcutaneous implantation model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deliormanli, Aylin M; Liu, Xin; Rahaman, Mohamed N

    2014-01-01

    Borate bioactive glass has been shown to convert faster and more completely to hydroxyapatite and enhance new bone formation in vivo when compared to silicate bioactive glass (such as 45S5 and 13-93 bioactive glass). In this work, the effects of the borate glass microstructure on its conversion to hydroxyapatite (HA) in vitro and its ability to support tissue ingrowth in a rat subcutaneous implantation model were investigated. Bioactive borate glass scaffolds, designated 13-93B3, with a grid-like microstructure and pore widths of 300, 600, and 900 µm were prepared by a robocasting technique. The scaffolds were implanted subcutaneously for 4 weeks in Sprague Dawley rats. Silicate 13-93 glass scaffolds with the same microstructure were used as the control. The conversion of the scaffolds to HA was studied as a function of immersion time in a simulated body fluid. Histology and scanning electron microscopy were used to evaluate conversion of the bioactive glass implants to hydroxyapatite, as well as tissue ingrowth and blood vessel formation in the implants. The pore size of the scaffolds was found to have little effect on tissue infiltration and angiogenesis after the 4-week implantation.

  17. A model for phosphate glass topology considering the modifying ion sub-network

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hermansen, Christian; Mauro, J.C.; Yue, Yuanzheng

    2014-01-01

    In the present paper we establish a temperature dependent constraint model of alkali phosphate glasses considering the structural and topological role of the modifying ion sub-network constituted by alkali ions and their non-bonding oxygen coordination spheres. The model is consistent with availa......In the present paper we establish a temperature dependent constraint model of alkali phosphate glasses considering the structural and topological role of the modifying ion sub-network constituted by alkali ions and their non-bonding oxygen coordination spheres. The model is consistent...... with available structural data by NMR and molecular dynamics simulation and dynamic data such glass transition temperature (Tg) and liquid fragility (m). Alkali phosphate glasses are exemplary systems for developing constraint model since the modifying cation network plays an important role besides the primary...... phosphate network. The proposed topological model predicts the changing trend of the Tg and m with increasing alkali oxide content for alkali phosphate glasses, including an anomalous minimum at around 20 mol% alkali oxide content. We find that the minimum in Tg and m is caused by increased connectivity...

  18. Mechanical Relaxation of Metallic Glasses: An Overview of Experimental Data and Theoretical Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chaoren Liu

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Relaxation phenomena in glasses are a subject of utmost interest, as they are deeply connected with their structure and dynamics. From a theoretical point of view, mechanical relaxation allows one to get insight into the different atomic-scale processes taking place in the glassy state. Focusing on their possible applications, relaxation behavior influences the mechanical properties of metallic glasses. This paper reviews the present knowledge on mechanical relaxation of metallic glasses. The features of primary and secondary relaxations are reviewed. Experimental data in the time and frequency domain is presented, as well as the different models used to describe the measured relaxation spectra. Extended attention is paid to dynamic mechanical analysis, as it is the most important technique allowing one to access the mechanical relaxation behavior. Finally, the relevance of the relaxation behavior in the mechanical properties of metallic glasses is discussed.

  19. Simple solvable energy-landscape model that shows a thermodynamic phase transition and a glass transition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naumis, Gerardo G

    2012-06-01

    When a liquid melt is cooled, a glass or phase transition can be obtained depending on the cooling rate. Yet, this behavior has not been clearly captured in energy-landscape models. Here, a model is provided in which two key ingredients are considered in the landscape, metastable states and their multiplicity. Metastable states are considered as in two level system models. However, their multiplicity and topology allows a phase transition in the thermodynamic limit for slow cooling, while a transition to the glass is obtained for fast cooling. By solving the corresponding master equation, the minimal speed of cooling required to produce the glass is obtained as a function of the distribution of metastable states.

  20. Effect of the initial stage of annealing on modeling of enthalpy relaxation in a hyperquenched glass

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Yanfei; Guo, Xiaoju; Yue, Yuanzheng

    2013-01-01

    relaxation in both HQG and AHQG during the initial stage of both the sub-Tg and above-Tg annealing cannot be captured by the existing models. In this Letter we show that the combination of a modified stretched exponential equation [M. Peyron, et al., J. Magn. Reson, Series A 118 (1996) 214] and the recently......One of the major challenges in glass relaxation study is to establish a universal model describing the enthalpy relaxation in both the hyperquenched glass (HQG) (i.e., far from equilibrium) and the partially annealed hyperquenched glass(AHQG). In particular, the detailed features of the enthalpy...... proposed composite relaxation function [L. Hornboell, et al., Chem. Phys. Lett. 1-3 (2010) 37] is a reasonable approach for describing those features. In addition, our modeling results imply that the structural heterogeneity plays a crucial role in relaxation of HQG....

  1. Native metastability in chalcogenide glasses described within configuration-coordinate model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shpotyuk, M [Institute of Materials of Scientific Research Company ' Carat' , 202, Stryjska str., Lviv (Ukraine); Vakiv, M [Institute of Materials of Scientific Research Company ' Carat' , 202, Stryjska str., Lviv (Ukraine)

    2007-08-15

    It was created configuration-coordinate model for describing of native metastability in chalcogenide glasses. It was shown that potential should be at least triple-well. System of differential equations for describing transitions between the atomic states was made and solved within present configuration-coordinate model.

  2. CORRELATION OF THE GLASS TRANSITION TEMPERATURE OF PLASTICIZED PVC USING A LATTICE FLUID MODEL

    Science.gov (United States)

    A model has been developed to describe the composition dependence of the glass transition temperature (Tg) of polyvinyl chloride (PVC) + plasticizer mixtures. The model is based on Sanchez-Lacombe equation of state and the Gibbs-Di Marzio criterion, which states that th...

  3. Mathematical Modeling and Optimal Blank Generation in Glass Manufacturing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raymond Phillips

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper discusses the stock size selection problem (Chambers and Dyson, 1976, which is of relevance in the float glass industry. Given a fixed integer N, generally between 2 and 6 (but potentially larger, we find the N best sizes for intermediate stock from which to cut a roster of orders. An objective function is formulated with the purpose of minimizing wastage, and the problem is phrased as a combinatorial optimization problem involving the selection of columns of a cost matrix. Some bounds and heuristics are developed, and two exact algorithms (depth-first search and branch-and-bound are applied to the problem, as well as one approximate algorithm (NOMAD. It is found that wastage reduces dramatically as N increases, but this trend becomes less pronounced for larger values of N (beyond 6 or 7. For typical values of N, branch-and-bound is able to find the exact solution within a reasonable amount of time.

  4. Modeling the evolution of complex conductivity during calcite precipitation on glass beads

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leroy, Philippe; Li, Shuai; Jougnot, Damien; Revil, André; Wu, Yuxin

    2017-01-01

    SUMMARYWhen pH and alkalinity increase, calcite frequently precipitates and hence modifies the petrophysical properties of porous media. The complex conductivity method can be used to directly monitor calcite precipitation in porous media because it is sensitive to the evolution of the mineralogy, pore structure and its connectivity. We have developed a mechanistic grain polarization model considering the electrochemical polarization of the Stern and diffuse layer surrounding calcite particles. Our complex conductivity model depends on the surface charge density of the Stern layer and on the electrical potential at the onset of the diffuse layer, which are computed using a basic Stern model of the calcite/water interface. The complex conductivity measurements of Wu et al. (2010) on a column packed with glass beads where calcite precipitation occurs are reproduced by our surface complexation and complex conductivity models. The evolution of the size and shape of calcite particles during the calcite precipitation experiment is estimated by our complex conductivity model. At the early stage of the calcite precipitation experiment, modeled particles sizes increase and calcite particles flatten with time because calcite crystals nucleate at the surface of glass beads and grow into larger calcite grains around glass beads. At the later stage of the calcite precipitation experiment, modeled sizes and cementation exponents of calcite particles decrease with time because large calcite grains aggregate over multiple glass beads, a percolation threshold is achieved, and small and discrete calcite crystals polarize.

  5. Characterization & Modeling of Materials in Glass-To-Metal Seals: Part I

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chambers, Robert S. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States). Computer Science and Mechanics; Emery, John M. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States). Solid Mechanics; Tandon, Rajan [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States). Materials Reliability; Antoun, Bonnie R. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States). Mechanics of Materials; Stavig, Mark E. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States). Organic Materials Science; Newton, Clay S. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States). Materials Reliability

    2014-01-01

    To support higher fidelity modeling of residual stresses in glass-to-metal (GTM) seals and to demonstrate the accuracy of finite element analysis predictions, characterization and validation data have been collected for Sandia’s commonly used compression seal materials. The temperature dependence of the storage moduli, the shear relaxation modulus master curve and structural relaxation of the Schott 8061 glass were measured and stress-strain curves were generated for SS304L VAR in small strain regimes typical of GTM seal applications spanning temperatures from 20 to 500 C. Material models were calibrated and finite element predictions are being compared to measured data to assess the accuracy of predictions.

  6. Spin glasses

    CERN Document Server

    Bovier, Anton

    2007-01-01

    Spin glass theory is going through a stunning period of progress while finding exciting new applications in areas beyond theoretical physics, in particular in combinatorics and computer science. This collection of state-of-the-art review papers written by leading experts in the field covers the topic from a wide variety of angles. The topics covered are mean field spin glasses, including a pedagogical account of Talagrand's proof of the Parisi solution, short range spin glasses, emphasizing the open problem of the relevance of the mean-field theory for lattice models, and the dynamics of spin glasses, in particular the problem of ageing in mean field models. The book will serve as a concise introduction to the state of the art of spin glass theory, usefull to both graduate students and young researchers, as well as to anyone curious to know what is going on in this exciting area of mathematical physics.

  7. Exploration and Modeling of Structural changes in Waste Glass Under Corrosion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pantano, Carlos; Ryan, Joseph; Strachan, Denis

    2013-11-10

    Vitrification is currently the world-wide treatment of choice for the disposition of high-level nuclear wastes. In glasses, radionuclides are atomistically bonded into the solid, resulting in a highly durable product, with borosilicate glasses exhibiting particularly excellent durability in water. Considering that waste glass is designed to retain the radionuclides within the waste form for long periods, it is important to understand the long-term stability of these materials when they react in the environment, especially in the presence of water. Based on a number of previous studies, there is general consensus regarding the mechanisms controlling the initial rate of nuclear waste glass dissolution. Agreement regarding the cause of the observed decrease in dissolution rate at extended times, however, has been elusive. Two general models have been proposed to explain this behavior, and it has been concluded that both concepts are valid and must be taken into account when considering the decrease in dissolution rate. Furthermore, other processes such as water diffusion, ion exchange, and precipitation of mineral phases onto the glass surface may occur in parallel with dissolution of the glass and can influence long-term performance. Our proposed research will address these issues through a combination of aqueous-phase dissolution/reaction experiments and probing of the resulting surface layers with state-of-the-art analytical methods. These methods include solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (SSNMR) and time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (TOF-SIMS). The resulting datasets will then be coupled with computational chemistry and reaction-rate modeling to address the most persistent uncertainties in the understanding of glass corrosion, which indeed have limited the performance of the best corrosion models to date. With an improved understanding of corrosion mechanisms, models can be developed and improved that, while still conservative, take advantage of

  8. Application of Argonne's Glass Furnace Model to longhorn glass corporation oxy-fuel furnace for the production of amber glass.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Golchert, B.; Shell, J.; Jones, S.; Energy Systems; Shell Glass Consulting; Anheuser-Busch Packaging Group

    2006-09-06

    The objective of this project is to apply the Argonne National Laboratory's Glass Furnace Model (GFM) to the Longhorn oxy-fuel furnace to improve energy efficiency and to investigate the transport of gases released from the batch/melt into the exhaust. The model will make preliminary estimates of the local concentrations of water, carbon dioxide, elemental oxygen, and other subspecies in the entire combustion space as well as the concentration of these species in the furnace exhaust gas. This information, along with the computed temperature distribution in the combustion space may give indications on possible locations of crown corrosion. An investigation into the optimization of the furnace will be performed by varying several key parameters such as the burner firing pattern, exhaust number/size, and the boost usage (amount and distribution). Results from these parametric studies will be analyzed to determine more efficient methods of operating the furnace that reduce crown corrosion. Finally, computed results from the GFM will be qualitatively correlated to measured values, thus augmenting the validation of the GFM.

  9. THE SEMIEMPIRICAL MODEL OF THE MULTICOMPONENT BUBBLE BEHAVIOUR IN GLASS MELTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LUBOMÍR NĚMEC

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available A semi-empirical model of the bubble growth and dissolution in glasses with a fining agent has been derived. This model applies the experimental data from bubble observation at melting and fining temperatures. The experimental data needed for the model involved the temperature dependences of the average growth rate of the bubble radius and the average concentration of the fining gas in the bubbles. Both sets of values were measured in the laboratory in the glass of the float type and applied in the model. The measurements of the solubilities and diffusion coefficients of the gases present in the glass – needed for the analytical model of multicomponent bubbles – were thus avoided. The course of the partial bubble absorption with the temperature decreasing was simulated by means of two factors modifying the experimental values of the bubble growth rates at constant temperature. The temperature dependence of the resulting bubble growth rate qualitatively corresponded to the experimental observations in the soda-lime-silica glass, but a more detailed experimental and comparative study has yet to be performed. Such a study is being prepared.

  10. Glass Composition Constraint Recommendations for Use in Life-Cycle Mission Modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McCloy, John S.; Vienna, John D.

    2010-05-03

    The component concentration limits that most influence the predicted Hanford life-cycle HLW glass volume by HTWOS were re-evaluated. It was assumed that additional research and development work in glass formulation and melter testing would be performed to improve the understanding of component effects on the processability and product quality of these HLW glasses. Recommendations were made to better estimate the potential component concentration limits that could be applied today while technology development is underway to best estimate the volume of HLW glass that will eventually be produced at Hanford. The limits for concentrations of P2O5, Bi2O3, and SO3 were evaluated along with the constraint used to avoid nepheline formation in glass. Recommended concentration limits were made based on the current HLW glass property models being used by HTWOS (Vienna et al. 2009). These revised limits are: 1) The current ND should be augmented by the OB limit of OB ≤ 0.575 so that either the normalized silica (NSi) is less that the 62% limit or the OB is below the 0.575 limit. 2) The mass fraction of P2O5 limit should be revised to allow for up to 4.5 wt%, depending on CaO concentrations. 3) A Bi2O3 concentration limit of 7 wt% should be used. 4) The salt accumulation limit of 0.5 wt% SO3 may be increased to 0.6 wt%. Again, these revised limits do not obviate the need for further testing, but make it possible to more accurately predict the impact of that testing on ultimate HLW glass volumes.

  11. Mechanical relaxation in a Zr-based bulk metallic glass: Analysis based on physical models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiao, J. C.; Pelletier, J. M.

    2012-08-01

    The mechanical relaxation behavior in a Zr55Cu30Ni5Al10 bulk metallic glass is investigated by dynamic mechanical analysis in both temperature and frequency domains. Master curves can be obtained for the storage modulus G' and for the loss modulus G'', confirming the validity of the time-temperature superposition principle. Different models are discussed to describe the main (α) relaxation, e.g., Debye model, Havriliak-Negami (HN) model, Kohlrausch-Williams-Watt (KWW) model, and quasi-point defects (QPDs) model. The main relaxation in bulk metallic glass cannot be described using a single relaxation time. The HN model, the KWW model, and the QPD theory can be used to fit the data of mechanical spectroscopy experiments. However, unlike the HN model and the KWW model, some physical parameters are introduced in QPD model, i.e., atomic mobility and correlation factor, giving, therefore, a new physical approach to understand the mechanical relaxation in bulk metallic glasses.

  12. Excited state absorption in glasses activated with rare earth ions: Experiment and modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piatkowski, Dawid; Mackowski, Sebastian

    2012-10-01

    We present semiempirical approach based on the Judd-Ofelt theory and apply it for modeling the spectral properties of fluoride glasses activated with the rare earth (RE) ions. This method provide a powerful tool for simulating both ground state absorption (GSA) and excited state absorption (ESA) spectra of RE ions, e.g. Nd3+, Ho3+, Er3+ and Tm3+ in the ZBLAN glass matrix. The results of theoretical calculations correspond to the experimentally measured data. We also demonstrate that the spectra obtained using the presented approach are applicable in the analysis of up-conversion excitation schemes in these optoelectronically relevant materials.

  13. The glass-forming ability of model metal-metalloid alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Kai; Liu, Yanhui; Schroers, Jan [Department of Mechanical Engineering and Materials Science, Yale University, New Haven, Connecticut 06520 (United States); Center for Research on Interface Structures and Phenomena, Yale University, New Haven, Connecticut 06520 (United States); Shattuck, Mark D. [Department of Physics and Benjamin Levich Institute, The City College of the City University of New York, New York, New York 10031 (United States); Department of Mechanical Engineering and Materials Science, Yale University, New Haven, Connecticut 06520 (United States); O’Hern, Corey S. [Department of Mechanical Engineering and Materials Science, Yale University, New Haven, Connecticut 06520 (United States); Center for Research on Interface Structures and Phenomena, Yale University, New Haven, Connecticut 06520 (United States); Department of Physics, Yale University, New Haven, Connecticut 06520 (United States); Department of Applied Physics, Yale University, New Haven, Connecticut 06520 (United States)

    2015-03-14

    Bulk metallic glasses (BMGs) are amorphous alloys with desirable mechanical properties and processing capabilities. To date, the design of new BMGs has largely employed empirical rules and trial-and-error experimental approaches. Ab initio computational methods are currently prohibitively slow to be practically used in searching the vast space of possible atomic combinations for bulk glass formers. Here, we perform molecular dynamics simulations of a coarse-grained, anisotropic potential, which mimics interatomic covalent bonding, to measure the critical cooling rates for metal-metalloid alloys as a function of the atomic size ratio σ{sub S}/σ{sub L} and number fraction x{sub S} of the metalloid species. We show that the regime in the space of σ{sub S}/σ{sub L} and x{sub S} where well-mixed, optimal glass formers occur for patchy and LJ particle mixtures, coincides with that for experimentally observed metal-metalloid glass formers. Thus, our simple computational model provides the capability to perform combinatorial searches to identify novel glass-forming alloys.

  14. The glass-forming ability of model metal-metalloid alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Kai; Liu, Yanhui; Schroers, Jan; Shattuck, Mark D.; O'Hern, Corey S.

    2015-03-01

    Bulk metallic glasses (BMGs) are amorphous alloys with desirable mechanical properties and processing capabilities. To date, the design of new BMGs has largely employed empirical rules and trial-and-error experimental approaches. Ab initio computational methods are currently prohibitively slow to be practically used in searching the vast space of possible atomic combinations for bulk glass formers. Here, we perform molecular dynamics simulations of a coarse-grained, anisotropic potential, which mimics interatomic covalent bonding, to measure the critical cooling rates for metal-metalloid alloys as a function of the atomic size ratio σS/σL and number fraction xS of the metalloid species. We show that the regime in the space of σS/σL and xS where well-mixed, optimal glass formers occur for patchy and LJ particle mixtures, coincides with that for experimentally observed metal-metalloid glass formers. Thus, our simple computational model provides the capability to perform combinatorial searches to identify novel glass-forming alloys.

  15. Precision Glass Molding: Validation of an FE Model for Thermo-Mechanical Simulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sarhadi, Ali; Hattel, Jesper Henri; Hansen, Hans Nørgaard

    2014-01-01

    In precision glass molding process, the required accuracy for the final size and shape of the molded lenses as well as the complexity of this technology calls for a numerical simulation. The current paper addresses the development of an FE model for thermo-mechanical simulation of the precision...

  16. Crossover to potential energy landscape dominated dynamics in a model glass-forming liquid

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schrøder, Thomas; Sastry, S.; Dyre, Jeppe;

    2000-01-01

    An equilibrated model glass-forming liquid is studied by mapping successive configurations produced by molecular dynamics simulation onto a time series of inherent structures (local minima in the potential energy). Using this "inherent dynamics" approach we find direct numerical evidence for the ...

  17. The ground state energy of the mean field spin glass model

    CERN Document Server

    Koukiou, Flora

    2008-01-01

    From the study of a functional equation of Gibbs measures we calculate the limiting free energy of the Sherrington-Kirkpatrick spin glass model at a particular value of (low) temperature. This implies the following lower bound for the ground state energy $\\epsilon_0$ \\[\\epsilon_0\\geq -0.7833...,\\] close to the replica symmetry breaking and numerical simulations values.

  18. Physical modeling of joule heated ceramic glass melters for high level waste immobilization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Quigley, M.S.; Kreid, D.K.

    1979-03-01

    This study developed physical modeling techniques and apparatus suitable for experimental analysis of joule heated ceramic glass melters designed for immobilizing high level waste. The physical modeling experiments can give qualitative insight into the design and operation of prototype furnaces and, if properly verified with prototype data, the physical models could be used for quantitative analysis of specific furnaces. Based on evaluation of the results of this study, it is recommended that the following actions and investigations be undertaken: It was not shown that the isothermal boundary conditions imposed by this study established prototypic heat losses through the boundaries of the model. Prototype wall temperatures and heat fluxes should be measured to provide better verification of the accuracy of the physical model. The VECTRA computer code is a two-dimensional analytical model. Physical model runs which are isothermal in the Y direction should be made to provide two-dimensional data for more direct comparison to the VECTRA predictions. The ability of the physical model to accurately predict prototype operating conditions should be proven before the model can become a reliable design tool. This will require significantly more prototype operating and glass property data than were available at the time of this study. A complete set of measurements covering power input, heat balances, wall temperatures, glass temperatures, and glass properties should be attempted for at least one prototype run. The information could be used to verify both physical and analytical models. Particle settling and/or sludge buildup should be studied directly by observing the accumulation of the appropriate size and density particles during feeding in the physical model. New designs should be formulated and modeled to minimize the potential problems with melter operation identifed by this study.

  19. Multiscale Modeling of Non-crystalline Ceramics (Glass) (FY11)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    method to model (i.e., via density functional theory, MD, Monte Carlo methods, or master equation techniques) this archetypal material for prediction...ring statistics. We used two different methods to generate the random connected networks (1) a Monte -Carlo bond switching model (72 and 114 atom models...NO. OF COPIES ORGANIZATION 1 (PDF ONLY) DEFENSE TECHNICAL INFORMATION CTR DTIC OCA 8725 JOHN J KINGMAN RD STE 0944 FORT BELVOIR VA 22060-6218 1

  20. Glass Furnace Model (GFM) development and technology transfer program final report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lottes, S. A.; Petrick, M.; Energy Systems

    2007-12-04

    A Glass Furnace Model (GFM) was developed under a cost-shared R&D program by the U.S. Department of Energy's Argonne National Laboratory in close collaboration with a consortium of five glass industry members: Techneglas, Inc., Owens-Corning, Libbey, Inc., Osram Sylvania, Inc., and Visteon, Inc. Purdue University and Mississippi State University's DIAL Laboratory were also collaborators in the consortium. The GFM glass furnace simulation model that was developed is a tool industry can use to help define and evaluate furnace design changes and operating strategies to: (1) reduce energy use per unit of production; (2) solve problems related to production and glass quality by defining optimal operating windows to reduce cullet generation due to rejects and maximize throughput; and (3) make changes in furnace design and/or operation to reduce critical emissions, such as NO{sub x} and particulates. A two-part program was pursued to develop and validate the furnace model. The focus of the Part I program was to develop a fully coupled furnace model which had the requisite basic capabilities for furnace simulation. The principal outcome from the Phase I program was a furnace simulation model, GFM 2.0, which was copyrighted. The basic capabilities of GFM 2.0 were: (1) built-in burner models that can be included in the combustion space simulation; (2) a participating media spectral radiation model that maintains local and global energy balances throughout the furnace volume; and (3) a multiphase (liquid, solid) melt model that calculates (does not impose) the batch-melting rate and the batch length. The key objectives of the Part II program, which overlapped the Part I program were: (1) to incorporate a full multiphase flow analytical capability with reduced glass chemistry models in the glass melt model and thus be able to compute and track key solid, gas, and liquid species through the melt and the combustion space above; and (2) to incorporate glass quality

  1. Model for the conversion of nuclear waste melter feed to glass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pokorny, Richard; Hrma, Pavel

    2014-02-01

    The rate of batch-to-glass conversion is a primary concern for the vitrification of nuclear waste, as it directly influences the life cycle of the cleanup process. This study describes the development of an advanced model of the cold cap, which augments the previous model by further developments on the structure and the dynamics of the foam layer. The foam layer on the bottom of the cold cap consists of the primary foam, cavities, and the secondary foam, and forms an interface through which the heat is transferred to the cold cap. Other model enhancements include the behavior of intermediate crystalline phases and the dissolution of quartz particles. The model relates the melting rate to feed properties and melter conditions, such as the molten glass temperature, foaminess of the melt, or the heat fraction supplied to the cold cap from the plenum space. The model correctly predicts a 25% increase in melting rate when changing the alumina source in the melter feed from Al(OH)3 to AlO(OH). It is expected that this model will be incorporated in the full glass melter model as its integral component.

  2. Model for the conversion of nuclear waste melter feed to glass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pokorny, Richard [Inst. of Chemical Technology Prague (Czech Republic). Dept. of Chemical Engineering; Hrma, Pavel R. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Pohang Univ. of Science and Technology, Pohang (Korea, Republic of). Division of Advanced Nuclear Engineering

    2014-02-01

    The rate of batch-to-glass conversion is a primary concern for the vitrification of nuclear waste, as it directly influences the life cycle of the cleanup process. This study describes the development of an advanced model of the cold cap, which augments the previous model by further developments on the structure and the dynamics of the foam layer. The foam layer on the bottom of the cold cap consists of the primary foam, cavities, and the secondary foam, and forms an interface through which the heat is transferred to the cold cap. Other model enhancements include the behavior of intermediate crystalline phases and the dissolution of quartz particles. The model relates the melting rate to feed properties and melter conditions, such as the molten glass temperature, foaminess of the feed, or the heat fraction supplied to the cold cap from the plenum space. The model correctly predicts a 25% increase in melting rate when changing the alumina source in the melter feed from Al(OH)3 to AlO(OH). It is expected that this model will be incorporated in the full glass melter model as its integral component.

  3. Modelling of ultrasound tomography technique for Glass Fibre Reinforced Epoxy (GFRE) composites liquid transportation pipeline

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siow, L. T.; Rahiman, M. H. F.; Majid, M. S. Abdul; Rahim, R. A.; Zakaria, Z.; Thomas W. K., T.; Ang, Vernoon

    2017-03-01

    The purpose of this paper is to model the ultrasonic tomography on the E-glass fibre reinforced epoxy composite pipe for process monitoring and control. Finite element software and mathematical estimation were applied to model and study the ultrasound wave propagation, especially the reflection and transmission coefficient. While there is a significant result achieved between mathematical estimation and finite element analysis with maximum percentage distinctly in 2.33.

  4. A Simple Model for the Non-Arrhenius Ionic Conductivity in Superionic Glasses

    OpenAIRE

    Indoh, Takaki; Aniya, Masaru; インドウ, タカキ; アニヤ, マサル; 犬童, 貴樹; 安仁屋, 勝

    2010-01-01

    Many superionic conducting glasses follow the Arrhenius type temperature dependence of ionic conductivity. However, in some superionic conductors it has been discovered that the conductivity deviate from the Arrhenius type behavior. In this paper, we present a simple model that describes the non-Arrhenius type ionic conductivity based on the Zwanzig model of diffusion. From the theory, the condition for the appearance of non-Arrhenius type ionic conductivity has been obtained.

  5. Multiscale Modeling of Non-crystalline Ceramics (Glass)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-01

    theory, MD, Monte Carlo methods, or master equation techniques) this archetypal material to predict of elastic properties, diffusivity, surface...connected networks (1) a Monte -Carlo bond switching model (72- and 114-atom models) and (2) MD simulated annealing of melted silica. The ring statistics...INFORMATION CTR DTIC OCA 8725 JOHN J KINGMAN RD STE 0944 FORT BELVOIR VA 22060-6218 1 DIRECTOR US ARMY RESEARCH LAB IMAL HRA 2800 POWDER MILL RD ADELPHI

  6. Finite size scaling study of dynamical phase transitions in two dimensional models: ferromagnet, symmetric and non symmetric spin glasses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neumann, A.U.; Derrida, B.

    1988-10-01

    We study the time evolution of two configurations submitted to the same thermal noise for several two dimensional models (Ising ferromagnet, symmetric spin glass, non symmetric spin glass). For all these models, we find a non zero critical temperature above which the two configurations always meet. Using finite size scaling ideas, we determine for these three models this dynamical phase transition and some of the critical exponents. For the ferromagnet, the transition T/sub c/ approx. = 2.25 coincides with the Curie temperature whereas for the two spin glass models +- J distribution of bonds) we obtain T/sub c/ approx. = 1.5-1.7.

  7. Critical slowing down exponents in structural glasses: Random orthogonal and related models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caltagirone, F.; Ferrari, U.; Leuzzi, L.; Parisi, G.; Rizzo, T.

    2012-08-01

    An important prediction of mode-coupling theory is the relationship between the power-law decay exponents in the β regime and the consequent definition of the so-called exponent parameter λ. In the context of a certain class of mean-field glass models with quenched disorder, the physical meaning of λ has recently been understood, yielding a method to compute it exactly in a static framework. In this paper we exploit this new technique to compute the critical slowing down exponents for such models including, as special cases, the Sherrington-Kirkpatrick model, the p-spin model, and the random orthogonal model.

  8. THE ANALYSIS OF FLAT GLASS EXPORTS FOR ROMANIA USING THE GRAVITY MODEL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Draghescu Florin

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The intense international competition and reduced rates of economics growth force the companies at dynamic and appropriate strategies to address internal and external market. The manufacturing industry from Romania has competitive advantages defined by tradition, qualified labour force, indigenous raw materials, and its products serve various industries – construction, automotive, food – that is expected to experience a future sustained development. With approximately 2,500 employees, the glassware sector from Romania is part of the manufacturing industry which has constantly decreased in the last 25 years. Romania has a long tradition in the glassware sector and remains a strategic player in the region being integrated in the global flows from the industry. Geographical orientation of Romanian trade of flat glass for export is analyzed using the gravity model. The purpose of this article is to determine the essential factors of flat glass export level from Romania to states with which has commercial partnerships using both a gravity static model, but also a gravity dynamic model – a common model in the literature, used to analyze the trade flows between world countries or polarization strength of cities and commercial centres. The empirical results of both models have shown that the gravity attraction of local and destination economies, transport costs – measured by the distances between capitals and lack of common border –, language interconnectivity, and also belonging to the BSEC (Organization of the Black Sea Economic Cooperation are the most important factors affecting the Romanian exports of the flat glass.

  9. An extended topological model for binary phosphate glasses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hermansen, Christian; Rodrigues, B.P.; Wondraczek, L.

    2014-01-01

    the model reduces to classical constraint counting. The constraints on the modifying cations are linear constraints to first neighbor NBOs, and all angular constraints are broken as expected for ionic bonding. For small modifying cations, such as Li+, the linear constraints are almost fully intact...

  10. Mid-gap phenomena in chalcogenide glasses and barrier-cluster-heating model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Banik, Ivan, E-mail: ivan.banik@stuba.sk; Kubliha, Marián; Lukovičová, Jozefa; Pavlendová, Gabriela [Faculty of Civil Engineering, Slovak University of Technology, 813 68 Bratislava (Slovakia)

    2015-12-07

    The physical mechanism of photoluminescence spectrum formation of chalcogenide glasses (CHG) belongs to the important unsolved problems in physics of non-crystalline materials. Photoluminescence is an important means of the electron spectrum investigation. PL spectrum in CHG is produced mostly in the middle of the band gap, and its profile is normal - Gaussian. Several features of PL spectra in CHG is still a great mystery. The aim of the paper is to make reader acquainted with the new insight into the problem. In this article we also deal with the issue of clarifying the nature of mid-gap absorption. From the experiments it is known that after excitation of the glass As{sub 2}S{sub 3} (or As{sub 2}Se{sub 3}) with primary radiation from Urbach-tail region the glass will be able to absorb the photons of low energy (IR) radiation from mid-gap region of spectra. This low photon absorption without action of the primary excitation radiation of the higher photon energy is impossible. Mid-gap absorption yields boost in the photoluminescence. The paper gives the reader the new insights into some, until now, unexplained effects and contexts in chalcogenide glasses from the position of barrier-cluster-heating model.

  11. First-order model for durability of Hanford waste glasses as a function of composition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hrma, P.; Piepel, G.F.; Schweiger, M.J.; Smith, D.E.

    1992-04-01

    Two standard chemical durability tests, the static leach test MCC-1 and product consistency test PCT, were conducted on simulated borosilicate glasses that encompass the expected range of compositions to be produced in the Hanford Waste Vitrification Plant (HWVP). A first-order empirical model was fitted to the data from each test method. The results indicate that glass durability is increased by addition of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, moderately increased by addition of ZrO{sub 2} and SiO{sub 2}, and decreased by addition of Li{sub 2}O, Na{sub 2}O, B{sub 2}O{sub 3}, and MgO. Addition of Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} and CaO produce an indifferent or reducing effect on durability according to the test method. This behavior and a statistically significant lack of fit are attributed to the effects of multiple chemical reactions occurring during glass-water interaction. Liquid-liquid immiscibility is suspected to be responsible for extremely low durability of some glasses.

  12. Orbital Dimer Model for the Spin-Glass State in Y2 Mo2 O7

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thygesen, Peter M. M.; Paddison, Joseph A. M.; Zhang, Ronghuan; Beyer, Kevin A.; Chapman, Karena W.; Playford, Helen Y.; Tucker, Matthew G.; Keen, David A.; Hayward, Michael A.; Goodwin, Andrew L.

    2017-02-01

    The formation of a spin glass generally requires that magnetic exchange interactions are both frustrated and disordered. Consequently, the origin of spin-glass behavior in Y2 Mo2 O7 —in which magnetic Mo4 + ions occupy a frustrated pyrochlore lattice with minimal compositional disorder—has been a longstanding question. Here, we use neutron and x-ray pair-distribution function (PDF) analysis to develop a disorder model that resolves apparent incompatibilities between previously reported PDF, extended x-ray-absorption fine structure spectroscopy, and NMR studies, and provides a new and physical explanation of the exchange disorder responsible for spin-glass formation. We show that Mo4 + ions displace according to a local "two-in-two-out" rule on each Mo4 tetrahedron, driven by orbital dimerization of Jahn-Teller active Mo4 + ions. Long-range orbital order is prevented by the macroscopic degeneracy of dimer coverings permitted by the pyrochlore lattice. Cooperative O2 - displacements yield a distribution of Mo-O-Mo angles, which in turn introduces disorder into magnetic interactions. Our study demonstrates experimentally how frustration of atomic displacements can assume the role of compositional disorder in driving a spin-glass transition.

  13. A micromechanical model to predict the flow of soft particle glasses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seth, Jyoti R; Mohan, Lavanya; Locatelli-Champagne, Clémentine; Cloitre, Michel; Bonnecaze, Roger T

    2011-09-25

    Soft particle glasses form a broad family of materials made of deformable particles, as diverse as microgels, emulsion droplets, star polymers, block copolymer micelles and proteins, which are jammed at volume fractions where they are in contact and interact via soft elastic repulsions. Despite a great variety of particle elasticity, soft glasses have many generic features in common. They behave like weak elastic solids at rest but flow very much like liquids above the yield stress. This unique feature is exploited to process high-performance coatings, solid inks, ceramic pastes, textured food and personal care products. Much of the understanding of these materials at volume fractions relevant in applications is empirical, and a theory connecting macroscopic flow behaviour to microstructure and particle properties remains a formidable challenge. Here we propose a micromechanical three-dimensional model that quantitatively predicts the nonlinear rheology of soft particle glasses. The shear stress and the normal stress differences depend on both the dynamic pair distribution function and the solvent-mediated EHD interactions among the deformed particles. The predictions, which have no adjustable parameters, are successfully validated with experiments on concentrated emulsions and polyelectrolyte microgel pastes, highlighting the universality of the flow properties of soft glasses. These results provide a framework for designing new soft additives with a desired rheological response.

  14. Orbital Dimer Model for the Spin-Glass State in Y_{2}Mo_{2}O_{7}.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thygesen, Peter M M; Paddison, Joseph A M; Zhang, Ronghuan; Beyer, Kevin A; Chapman, Karena W; Playford, Helen Y; Tucker, Matthew G; Keen, David A; Hayward, Michael A; Goodwin, Andrew L

    2017-02-10

    The formation of a spin glass generally requires that magnetic exchange interactions are both frustrated and disordered. Consequently, the origin of spin-glass behavior in Y_{2}Mo_{2}O_{7}-in which magnetic Mo^{4+} ions occupy a frustrated pyrochlore lattice with minimal compositional disorder-has been a longstanding question. Here, we use neutron and x-ray pair-distribution function (PDF) analysis to develop a disorder model that resolves apparent incompatibilities between previously reported PDF, extended x-ray-absorption fine structure spectroscopy, and NMR studies, and provides a new and physical explanation of the exchange disorder responsible for spin-glass formation. We show that Mo^{4+} ions displace according to a local "two-in-two-out" rule on each Mo_{4} tetrahedron, driven by orbital dimerization of Jahn-Teller active Mo^{4+} ions. Long-range orbital order is prevented by the macroscopic degeneracy of dimer coverings permitted by the pyrochlore lattice. Cooperative O^{2-} displacements yield a distribution of Mo-O-Mo angles, which in turn introduces disorder into magnetic interactions. Our study demonstrates experimentally how frustration of atomic displacements can assume the role of compositional disorder in driving a spin-glass transition.

  15. Contribution of Monte-Carlo modeling for understanding long-term behavior of nuclear glasses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Minet, Y.; Ledieu, A.; Devreux, F.; Barboux, P.; Frugier, P.; Gin, S

    2004-07-01

    Monte-Carlo methods have been developed at CEA and Ecole Polytechnique to improve our understanding of the basic mechanisms that control glass dissolution kinetics. The models, based on dissolution and recondensation rates of the atoms, can reproduce the observed alteration rates and the evolutions of the alteration layers on simplified borosilicate glasses (based on SiO{sub 2}-B{sub 2}O{sub 3}-Na{sub 2}O) over a large range of compositions and alteration conditions. The basic models are presented, as well as their current evolutions to describe more complex glasses (introduction of Al, Zr, Ca oxides) and to take into account phenomena which may be predominant in the long run (such as diffusion in the alteration layer or secondary phase precipitation). The predictions are compared with the observations performed by techniques giving structural or textural information on the alteration layer (e.g. NMR, Small Angle X-ray Scattering). The paper concludes with proposals for further evolutions of Monte-Carlo models towards integration into a predictive modeling framework. (authors)

  16. Mathematical modeling of photoinitiated coating degradation: Effects of coating glass transition temperature and light stabilizers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kiil, Søren; G.de With, R.A.T.M.Van Benthem

    2013-01-01

    A mathematical model, describing coating degradation mechanisms of thermoset coatings exposed to ultraviolet radiation and humidity at constant temperature, was extended to simulate the behavior of a coating with a low glass transition temperature. The effects of adding light stabilizers (a UV...... absorber and a radical scavenger) to the coating were also explored. The extended model includes photoinitiated oxidation reactions, intrafilm oxygen permeability, water absorption and diffusion, reduction of crosslink density, absorption of ultraviolet radiation, a radical scavenger reaction......, and simulates the transient development of an oxidation zone. Simulations are in good agreement with experimental data for a fast degrading epoxy-amine coating with a glass transition temperature of −50°C. It was found that the degradation rate of the non-stabilized coating was influenced significantly...

  17. First-order phase transitions in spin-glass models with multiple paramagnetic solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lozza, H.F. [Departamento de Fisica, FCEyN, Universidad de Buenos Aires, Pab. I, Ciudad Universitaria - (1428) Buenos Aires (Argentina)]. E-mail: homero@df.uba.ar

    2004-12-31

    The paramagnetic and the one-step replica-symmetry-breaking spin-glass solutions of a p-spin-glass model in the presence of a transverse field are studied in the neighborhood of the phase transition curve. Two qualitatively different regions are found in the phase diagram. For a transition temperature higher than a certain value Tc, the thermodynamic transition is of second order, otherwise it is of first order with latent heat. The temperature Tc is joined to a point in the phase diagram where a transition between two paramagnetic solutions happens. A discussion about the order of the thermodynamic-phase transition in the quantum random orthogonal model is presented.

  18. First-order phase transitions in spin-glass models with multiple paramagnetic solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lozza, H. F.

    2004-12-01

    The paramagnetic and the one-step replica-symmetry-breaking spin-glass solutions of a p-spin-glass model in the presence of a transverse field are studied in the neighborhood of the phase transition curve. Two qualitatively different regions are found in the phase diagram. For a transition temperature higher than a certain value Tc, the thermodynamic transition is of second order, otherwise it is of first order with latent heat. The temperature Tc is joined to a point in the phase diagram where a transition between two paramagnetic solutions happens. A discussion about the order of the thermodynamic-phase transition in the quantum random orthogonal model is presented.

  19. A probabilistic model for failure design of glass plates in buildings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernández Canteli, Alfonso

    1996-06-01

    Full Text Available A model for the design of glass plates to failure is presented, which, based on the theory of plates with gross deformations for the calculation of the stress state as well as on the empirical flaws statistical distribution in the glass surface, applies fracture Mechanics criteria to establish a probabilistic prediction of failure. The validity of the model has been experimentally proved for plates with different thicknesses and geometric characteristics.

    Se propone un modelo para el dimensionamiento a rotura de acristalamientos de vidrio, que, partiendo del estado tensional, obtenido mediante la teoría de placas con grandes deformaciones, y de la distribución empírica de defectos superficiales en el vidrio, utiliza criterios de Mecánica de la Fractura para predecir probabilísticamente la rotura. La validez del modelo ha podido ser contrastada experimentalmente en placas de diferentes espesores y con variadas relaciones geométricas.

  20. Multiple data sets converge on a geologic structural model for Glass Buttes, Oregon geothermal prospect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, P.; Martini, B.; Lide, C.; Boschmann, D.; Dilles, J. H.; Meigs, A.

    2010-12-01

    Geologic field work is being combined with multiple remote sensing and geophysical tools to model fault structure at the Glass Buttes geothermal prospect in central Oregon. Glass Buttes are a Pliocene volcanic center that sits near the junction of the Abert Rim and Brothers Fault Zones. West-northwest-striking faults, which typify the Brothers Fault Zone, bound Glass Buttes. Individual faults and fault intersections are anticipated to provide permeability for utility scale geothermal development in central Oregon. Existing temperature data reveal a maximum of 90° C measured at 600 m, with ~160° C/km bottom hole temperature gradient. High temperature surface alteration, abundant WNW-oriented faulting, and reported drilling mud losses indicate likely commercial temperatures and fracture-controlled permeability at depth. LiDAR, hyperspectral mineral mapping, and field mapping constrain near-surface structure and volcanic contacts; aeromagnetic data constrain surface to intermediate (<1000 m) structure; and gravity data constrain deeper structure (surface-2000 m). Data sets agree reasonably well in some areas, although gravity data reflect a few deep-seated faults more than the densely faulted surface structure. On the east side of the prospect, these interpreted faults trend ENE, nearly perpendicular to observed surface structures. To the north of Glass Buttes, a curvilinear gravity high and topographic low indicate that Glass Buttes sits on the southern end of a previously unidentified buried caldera or graben. Interpretation of subsurface and gravity data do not uniquely distinguish between these alternative interpretations. Exploratory drilling will target intersections of surface faults with deeper gravity-defined features.

  1. Effect of modularity on the Glauber dynamics of the dilute spin glass model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Jeong-Man [The Catholic University of Korea, Bucheon (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-11-15

    We study the Glauber dynamics of the dilute, infinite-ranged spin glass model, the so-called dilute Sherrington-Kirkpatrick (dSK) model. The dSK model has sparse couplings and can be classified by the modularity (M) of the coupling matrix. We investigate the effect of the modularity on the relaxation dynamics starting from a random initial state. By using the Glauber dynamics and the replica method, we derive the relaxation dynamics equations for the magnetization (m) and the energy per spin (r), in addition to the equation for the spin glass order parameter (q{sub α}β). In the replica symmetric (RS) analysis, we find that there are two solutions for the RS spin glass order parameter (q): q = 0 which is stable for r < 1/2 and q = (-1+4r{sup 2})/(32r{sup 4}) which is stable for r > 1/2 in the non-modular system and q = 0 which is stable for r < 1/ SQRT(8) and q = (-1+8r{sup 2})/(128r{sup 4}) which is stable for r > 1/ SQRT(8) in the completely modular system. By substituting the proper q values into the equations for r, we find that the relaxation dynamics of r depends on the modularity, M. These results suggest that, in the context of evolutionary theory, the modularity may emerge spontaneously in the point-mutation-only framework (Glauber dynamics) under a changing environment.

  2. Effect of modularity on the Glauber dynamics of the dilute spin glass model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jeong-Man

    2014-11-01

    We study the Glauber dynamics of the dilute, infinite-ranged spin glass model, the so-called dilute Sherrington-Kirkpatrick (dSK) model. The dSK model has sparse couplings and can be classified by the modularity ( M) of the coupling matrix. We investigate the effect of the modularity on the relaxation dynamics starting from a random initial state. By using the Glauber dynamics and the replica method, we derive the relaxation dynamics equations for the magnetization ( m) and the energy per spin ( r), in addition to the equation for the spin glass order parameter ( q αβ ). In the replica symmetric (RS) analysis, we find that there are two solutions for the RS spin glass order parameter ( q): q = 0which is stable for r 1/2 in the non-modular system and q = 0 which is stable for r 1/ in the completely modular system. By substituting the proper q values into the equations for r, we find that the relaxation dynamics of r depends on the modularity, M. These results suggest that, in the context of evolutionary theory, the modularity may emerge spontaneously in the point-mutation-only framework (Glauber dynamics) under a changing environment.

  3. Transverse isotropic modeling of the ballistic response of glass reinforced plastic composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taylor, P.A. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1997-12-31

    The use of glass reinforced plastic (GRP) composites is gaining significant attention in the DoD community for use in armor applications. These materials typically possess a laminate structure consisting of up to 100 plies, each of which is constructed of a glass woven roving fabric that reinforces a plastic matrix material. Current DoD attention is focused on a high strength, S-2 glass cross-weave (0/90) fabric reinforcing a polyester matrix material that forms each ply of laminate structure consisting anywhere from 20 to 70 plies. The resulting structure displays a material anisotropy that is, to a reasonable approximation, transversely isotropic. When subjected to impact and penetration from a metal fragment projectile, the GRP displays damage and failure in an anisotropic manner due to various mechanisms such as matrix cracking, fiber fracture and pull-out, and fiber-matrix debonding. In this presentation, the author will describe the modeling effort to simulate the ballistic response of the GRP material described above using the transversely isotropic (TI) constitutive model which has been implemented in the shock physics code, CTH. The results of this effort suggest that the model is able to describe the delamination behavior of the material but has some difficulty capturing the in-plane (i.e., transverse) response of the laminate due to its cross-weave fabric reinforcement pattern which causes a departure from transverse isotropy.

  4. Modeling the absorption spectra of Er3+ and Yb3+ in a phosphate glass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gruber, John B.; Sardar, Dhiraj K.; Zandi, Bahram; Hutchinson, J. Andrew; Trussell, C. Ward

    2003-10-01

    Absorption spectra of Er3+ and Yb3+ ions, codopants in a phosphate glass, are reported at 8 K and at wavelengths between 350 and 1600 nm. Detailed structure appearing in the spectra, associated with individual multiplet states, 2S+1LJ, of Er3+(4f11) and Yb3+(4f13) is interpreted using a ligand-field coordination sphere model to characterize the microscopic environment surrounding the rare earth ions in multiple sites. Inhomogeneous broadening of the spectra is likely due to different configurations of PO4 tetrahedra clustered about a caged rare earth ion in the amorphous host. Similarity between the Er3+ spectrum in the glass and in the spectrum of single-crystal LiErP4O12, where Er3+ occupies sites of C2 symmetry, suggests that an averaged site symmetry of C2 is a reasonable approximation for Er3+ and Yb3+ ions in the phosphate glass. Calculated splitting of multiplet states by the ligand-field cluster model are compared with energy levels derived from the observed absorption peaks and well-defined shoulders. Inhomogeneous broadening of the spectra limit the precision in establishing the energy of the multiplet splittings, but the analysis is useful for modeling studies of the Er:Yb:phosphate glass as an eye-safe laser (1.53 μm). The splitting of the Yb3+(4f13)2FJ states is determined using parameters obtained from the Er3+ set by means of the three-parameter theory. No adjustments were made to the Yb3+ parameters that predict multiplet splittings in reasonable agreement with experimental data.

  5. SON68 nuclear glass dissolution kinetics: Current state of knowledge and basis of the new GRAAL model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frugier, P.; Gin, S.; Minet, Y.; Chave, T. [CEA Marcoule, DTCD SECM LCLT, 30 (France)

    2009-06-15

    Complete text of publication follows: Based on a review of the current state of knowledge concerning the aqueous alteration of SON68 nuclear glass GRAAL (Glass Reactivity with Allowance for the Alteration Layer) mechanistic model has been proposed [1]: An amorphous layer at the glass/solution interface gradually reorganized by hydrolysis and condensation mechanisms constitutes a barrier against the transport of water toward the glass and of solvated glass ions into solution [2]. The existence of this transport-inhibiting effect rapidly causes this layer to control glass alteration. The reaction affinity responsible for the glass alteration rate drop is expressed with respect to this passivating reactive interphase (PRI). Some glass constituent elements precipitate as crystallized secondary phases on the external surface and can sustain glass alteration. Correctly modeling the seat of recondensation (PRI or secondary crystallized phases) of elements is a key point for understanding their effect on glass alteration. Describing not only (1) solution chemistry but also ion transport (2) in solution by at a macroscopic scale and (3) by reactive interdiffusion in the PRI at a nanometer scale by means of a single model at each point in space and time is a complex task. Most existing models describe only one or two of these aspects. GRAAL describes a simple and still effective manner of coupling theses three phenomena using a calculation code coupling chemistry and transport HYTEC [3]. The model results are compared with experimental data for SON68 glass leached in initially pure water both in a closed system and in renewed media. The comparison shows the model very satisfactorily accounts for variations in the pH and the element concentrations in solution as a function of time, glass surface area in contact with solution, and solution renewal rate. Interdiffusion through the PRI cannot be disregarded under most experimental conditions - if only to predict the solution p

  6. Interpretation of viscous deformation of Zr-based bulk metallic glass alloys based on Nabarro-Herring creep model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Na, Young-Sang; Lee, Jong-Hoon

    2006-04-01

    Superplastic-like viscous deformation of bulk metallic glass alloys around the glass transition temperature (Tg) was analyzed based on the Nabarro-Herring creep model, a classical creep model, where the diffusional motion of atoms or vacancies through the lattice (atomic configuration) is considered. The amorphous matrix of bulk metallic glasses that has a randomly-packed atomic configuration was assumed to behave in a manner similar to the grain boundary in polycrystalline metals so as to approximate the diffusivity of the major constituent element. In spite of rough approximation of the parameters in the Nabarro-Herring creep equation, a reasonable value of the diffusion path (d) could be obtained from the experimentally-obtained metal flow data, including the steady state stress and the strain rate. Due to the absence of vacancy sources such as grain boundaries in homogeneous metallic glasses, the diffusion path, which, in polycrystalline materials, generally is the average distance between vacancy sources such as grain boundaries, was considered in this work as the average distance between tunneling centers in bulk metallic glass alloys. The calculated diffusion path was comparable to the density of tunneling centers around Tg, proposed by M. H. Cohen and G. S. Grest based on free volume theory. The calculated diffusion path showed monotonous decrease with temperature over Tg for Zr-based bulk metallic glass alloys. Based on this analysis, a schematic model for viscous deformation of bulk metallic glass was proposed.

  7. About a solvable mean field model of a Gaussian spin glass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barra, Adriano; Genovese, Giuseppe; Guerra, Francesco; Tantari, Daniele

    2014-04-01

    In a series of papers, we have studied a modified Hopfield model of a neural network, with learned words characterized by a Gaussian distribution. The model can be represented as a bipartite spin glass, with one party described by dichotomic Ising spins, and the other party by continuous spin variables, with an a priori Gaussian distribution. By application of standard interpolation methods, we have found it useful to compare the neural network model (bipartite) from one side, with two spin glass models, each monopartite, from the other side. Of these, the first is the usual Sherrington-Kirkpatrick model, the second is a spin glass model, with continuous spins and inbuilt highly nonlinear smooth cut-off interactions. This model is an invaluable laboratory for testing all techniques which have been useful in the study of spin glasses. The purpose of this paper is to give a synthetic description of the most peculiar aspects, by stressing the necessary novelties in the treatment. In particular, it will be shown that the control of the infinite volume limit, according to the well-known Guerra-Toninelli strategy, requires in addition one to consider the involvement of the cut-off interaction in the interpolation procedure. Moreover, the control of the ergodic region, the annealed case, cannot be directly achieved through the standard application of the Borel-Cantelli lemma, but requires previous modification of the interaction. This remark could find useful application in other cases. The replica symmetric expression for the free energy can be easily reached through a suitable version of the doubly stochastic interpolation technique. However, this model shares the unique property that the fully broken replica symmetry ansatz can be explicitly calculated. A very simple sum rule connects the general expression of the fully broken free energy trial function with the replica symmetric one. The definite sign of the error term shows that the replica solution is optimal. Then

  8. A DAMAGE ACCUMULATING MODELING OF FAILURE WAVES IN GLASS UNDER HIGH VELOCITY IMPACT

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘占芳; 姚国文; 詹先义

    2001-01-01

    The failure wave phenomenon was interpreted in glass media under the high velocity impact with the stress levels below the Hugoniot elastic limit. In view of the plate impact experimental observations a damage-accumulating model predominated by the deviatoric stress impulse was proposed while Heaviside function was adopted in the damageaccumulating model to describe the failure delay in the interior of materials. Features of the failure layer and propagation mechanism as well as their dynamic characteristics were further presented. The reduction in failure wave propagation speed is pointed out as the reflected rarefaction waves reflect again from the failure layer boundary.

  9. Modeling of excimer laser radiation induced defect generation in fluoride phosphate glasses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Natura, U.; Ehrt, D.

    2001-03-01

    Fluoride phosphate (FP) glasses with low phosphate content are high-transparent in the deep ultraviolet (UV) range and attractive candidates for UV-optics. Their optical properties are complementary to fluoride crystals. The anomalous partial dispersion makes them desirable for optical lens designs to reduce the secondary spectrum. Their UV transmission is limited by trace impurities introduced by raw materials and decreases when exposed to UV-radiation (lamps, lasers). The experiments of the paper published previously in this journal were used in order to separate radiation induced absorption bands in the fluoride phosphate glass FP10. In this paper the generation mechanism of the phosphorus-oxygen related hole center POHC 2 is investigated in detail in glasses of various compositions (various phosphate and impurity contents) in order to predict the transmission loss in case of long-time irradiation. Experiments were carried out using ArF- and KrF-excimer lasers (ns-pulses). POHC 2 generation strongly depends on the phosphate content and on the content of Pb 2+. A model was developed on these terms. Rate equations are formulated, incorporating the influence of the Pb 2+-content on the defect generation, a two-step creation term including an energy transfer process and a one-photon bleaching term. This results in a set of coupled nonlinear differential equations. Absorption coefficients and lifetimes of the excited states were calculated as well. Experimental results compared well with the numerical analysis of the theoretical rate equations.

  10. Nonvibrating granular model for a glass-forming liquid: Equilibration and aging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tapia-Ignacio, C.; Garcia-Serrano, J.; Donado, F.

    2016-12-01

    We studied experimentally a model of a glass-forming liquid on the basis of a nonvibrating magnetic granular system under an unsteady magnetic field. A sudden quenching was produced that drove the system from a liquid state to a different final state with lower temperature; the latter could be a liquid state or a solid state. We determined the mean-squared displacement in temporal windows to obtain the dynamic evolution of the system, and we determined the radial distribution function to obtain its structural characteristics. The results were analyzed using the intermediate scattering function and the effective potential between two particles. We observed that when quenching drives the system to a final state in the liquid phase far from the glass-transition temperature, equilibration occurs very quickly. When the final state has a temperature far below the glass-transition temperature, the system reaches its equilibrium state very quickly. In contrast, when the final state has an intermediate temperature but is below that corresponding to the glass transition, the system falls into a state that evolves slowly, presenting aging. The system evolves by an aging process toward more ordered states. However, after a waiting time, the dynamic behavior changes. It was observed that some particles get close enough to overpass the repulsive interactions and form small stable aggregates. In the effective potential curves, it was observed that the emergence of a second effective well due to the attraction quickly evolves and results in a deeper well than the initial effective well due to the repulsion. With the increase in time, more particles fall in the attractive well forming inhomogeneities, which produce a frustration in the aging process.

  11. Computational Fluid Dynamics Modeling of Bubbling in a Viscous Fluid for Validation of Waste Glass Melter Modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abboud, Alexander William [Idaho National Laboratory; Guillen, Donna Post [Idaho National Laboratory

    2016-01-01

    At the Hanford site, radioactive waste stored in underground tanks is slated for vitrification for final disposal. A comprehensive knowledge of the glass batch melting process will be useful in optimizing the process, which could potentially reduce the cost and duration of this multi-billion dollar cleanup effort. We are developing a high-fidelity heat transfer model of a Joule-heated ceramic lined melter to improve the understanding of the complex, inter-related processes occurring with the melter. The glass conversion rates in the cold cap layer are dependent on promoting efficient heat transfer. In practice, heat transfer is augmented by inserting air bubblers into the molten glass. However, the computational simulations must be validated to provide confidence in the solutions. As part of a larger validation procedure, it is beneficial to split the physics of the melter into smaller systems to validate individually. The substitution of molten glass for a simulant liquid with similar density and viscosity at room temperature provides a way to study mixing through bubbling as an isolated effect without considering the heat transfer dynamics. The simulation results are compared to experimental data obtained by the Vitreous State Laboratory at the Catholic University of America using bubblers placed within a large acrylic tank that is similar in scale to a pilot glass waste melter. Comparisons are made for surface area of the rising air bubbles between experiments and CFD simulations for a variety of air flow rates and bubble injection depths. Also, computed bubble rise velocity is compared to a well-accepted expression for bubble terminal velocity.

  12. SON68 nuclear glass dissolution kinetics: Current state of knowledge and basis of the new GRAAL model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frugier, P. [CEA Marcoule, DTCD/SECM/LCLT, BP 17171, 30207 Bagnols-sur-Ceze cedex (France)], E-mail: pierre.frugier@cea.fr; Gin, S.; Minet, Y.; Chave, T. [CEA Marcoule, DTCD/SECM/LCLT, BP 17171, 30207 Bagnols-sur-Ceze cedex (France); Bonin, B. [CEA Saclay, DEN/DIR/DS, 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette cedex (France); Godon, N.; Lartigue, J.-E.; Jollivet, P. [CEA Marcoule, DTCD/SECM/LCLT, BP 17171, 30207 Bagnols-sur-Ceze cedex (France); Ayral, A. [IEM/CNRS-ENSCM Universite Montpellier 2, CC 047, Place Eugene Bataillon, 34095 Montpellier cedex 5 (France); De Windt, L. [ENSMP, CG, 35 rue St Honore, 77305 Fontainebleau cedex (France); Santarini, G. [CEA Saclay HC/CAB, 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette cedex (France)

    2008-10-15

    This article summarizes the present state of knowledge concerning aqueous alteration of R7T7-type nuclear containment glasses, represented mainly by the inactive reference glass designated SON68. Based on this review, we propose to describe the glass alteration kinetics up to and including the final residual rate regime by means of a new mechanistic model known as GRAAL (glassreactivitywithallowanceforthealterationlayer). Phenomenological analysis findings are reviewed for the various glass alteration regimes: interdiffusion, initial rate, rate drop, residual rate and, under very particular circumstances, resumption of alteration. These alteration regimes are associated with predominant mechanisms. Published work interpreting and modeling these mechanisms was examined in detail. There is a broad consensus on the general mechanisms of the initial rate and even the interdiffusion regime, whereas the mechanisms controlling the rate drop remain a subject of dispute not only with regard to nuclear glasses but also for the dissolution of silicate minerals. The reaction affinity responsible for the rate drop is expressed differently by different authors and depending on the underlying theories. The disagreement concerns the nature of the phase (glass or gel) or the activated complex controlling the rate drop, which in turn determines the elements that must be taken into account in the overall affinity term. Progress in recent years, especially in identifying the mechanisms responsible for the residual rate, has shed new light on these issues, allowing us to propose new theoretical foundations for modeling the different kinetic regimes of SON68 nuclear glass dissolution. The GRAAL model considers that water diffusion in the passivating reaction zone (the gel formed under saturation conditions) is a rate-limiting step in the overall glass dissolution kinetics. Moreover, this passivation zone is a soluble phase whose stability is directly dependent on the nature of the

  13. Droplet Reaction and Evaporation of Agents Model (DREAM). Glass model results; Sand model plans

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hin, A.R.T.

    2006-01-01

    The Agent Fate Program is generating an extensive set of quality agent fate data which is being used to develop highly accurate secondary evaporation predictive models. Models are being developed that cover a wide range of traditional chemical warfare agents deposited onto surfaces routinely found o

  14. Modeling deformation behavior of Cu-Zr-Al bulk metallic glass matrix composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pauly, S.; Liu, G.; Wang, G.; Das, J.; Kim, K. B.; Kühn, U.; Kim, D. H.; Eckert, J.

    2009-09-01

    In the present work we prepared an in situ Cu47.5Zr47.5Al5 bulk metallic glass matrix composite derived from the shape memory alloy CuZr. We use a strength model, which considers percolation and a three-microstructural-element body approach, to understand the effect of the crystalline phase on the yield stress and the fracture strain under compressive loading, respectively. The intrinsic work-hardenability due to the martensitic transformation of the crystalline phase causes significant work hardening also of the composite material.

  15. Tetraquark resonances, flip-flop and cherry in a broken glass model

    CERN Document Server

    Bicudo, P; Cardoso, N

    2010-01-01

    We develop a formalism to study tetraquarks using the generalized flip-flop potential, which include the tetraquark potential component. Technically this is a difficult problem, needing the solution of the Schr\\"odinger equation in a multidimensional space. Since the tetraquark may at any time escape to a pair of mesons, here we study a simplified two-variable toy model and explore the analogy with a cherry in a glass, but a broken one where the cherry may escape from. We also compute the decay width in this two-variable picture, solving the Schr\\"odinger equation for the outgoing spherical wave.

  16. Pyrolysis of arylglycol-[beta]-propylphenyl ether lignin model in the presence of borosilicate glass fibers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuroda, Ken-ichi (Institute of Agricultural and Forest Engineering, University of Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan))

    1994-12-01

    Two [beta]-aryl ether type model compounds, guaiacylglycol- and veratrylglycol-[beta]-propyl-phenyl ethers, were copyrolyzed with borosilicate glass fibers. The results provided a better understanding of the effect of copyrolysis with the fibers on the yields of lignin-derived products from lignocellulosics.The observed products indicated the following reactions occurring in the models; (1) cleavage of the C[alpha]-aromatic ring bond, (2) cleavage of the [beta]-ether bond, (3) cleavage of the C[alpha]-C[beta] bond, (4) [alpha],[beta]-dehydration, and (5) demethylation, and others. Of these reactions, reactions (1), (2) and (4) were the main pyrolysis reactions and fully explained the increase in the total yield of lignin-derived pyrolysis products from Japanese red pine (Pinus densiflora Sieb. et Zucc.) in the presence of borosilicate glass fibers. Reaction (1) was a particularly characteristic reaction in copyrolysis with the fibers. Important reactions relating to the increase in the total yield of lignin-derived pyrolysis products were reproduced on the models used

  17. Charge carrier transport in molecularly doped polycarbonate as a test case for the dipolar glass model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novikov, S V; Tyutnev, A P

    2013-03-14

    We present the results of Monte Carlo simulations of the charge carrier transport in a disordered molecular system containing spatial and energetic disorders using the dipolar glass model. Model parameters of the material were chosen to fit a typical polar organic photoconductor polycarbonate doped with 30% of aromatic hydrazone, whose transport properties are well documented in literature. Simulated carrier mobility demonstrates a usual Poole-Frenkel field dependence and its slope is very close to the experimental value without using any adjustable parameter. At room temperature transients are universal with respect to the electric field and transport layer thickness. At the same time, carrier mobility does not depend on the layer thickness and transients develop a well-defined plateau where the current does not depend on time, thus demonstrating a non-dispersive transport regime. Tails of the transients decay as power law with the exponent close to -2. This particular feature indicates that transients are close to the boundary between dispersive and non-dispersive transport regimes. Shapes of the simulated transients are in very good agreement with the experimental ones. In summary, we provide a first verification of a self-consistency of the dipolar glass transport model, where major transport parameters, extracted from the experimental transport data, are then used in the transport simulation, and the resulting mobility field dependence and transients are in very good agreement with the initial experimental data.

  18. A direct test of the correlation between elastic parameters and fragility of ten glass formers and their relationship to elastic models of the glass transition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torchinsky, Darius H.; Johnson, Jeremy A.; Nelson, Keith A.

    2009-02-01

    We present an impulsive stimulated scattering test of the "shoving model" of the glass transition and of the correlation between the fragility index and the ratio of instantaneous elastic moduli of eight supercooled liquids. Samples of triphenyl phosphite, DC704 (tetramethyl tetraphenyl trisiloxane), m-fluoroaniline, Ca(NO3)2ṡ4H2O, diethyl phthalate, propylene carbonate, m-toluidine, phenyl salicylate (salol), 2-benzylphenol, and Santovac 5 (5-phenyl 4-ether), were cooled to their respective glass transition temperatures and the elastic moduli directly measured at the highest accessible shear frequencies. The shear modulus was then measured every 2 K as deeply as permitted into the liquid state for all liquids except propylene carbonate. Our results, in conjunction with dynamical relaxation data for these liquids obtained from the literature, lend credence to the notion that the dynamics of the glass transition are governed by the evolution of the shear modulus but do not suggest a strong correlation between the fragility index and the ratio of the elastic moduli.

  19. On the dynamics of spin-glass models of neural networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jongen, Greetje

    1999-10-01

    In the first part of the thesis we have studied the parallel dynamics of the Q-Ising spin-glass model of an attractor neural network. The pattern retrieval is seen as a dynamical process of the spins in order to arrive at a configuration similar to one of the embedded patterns. The similarity is expressed by order parameters. Using a probabilistic signal-to-noise analysis we have calculated the time evolution of the order parameters for the asymmetrically and symmetrically diluted architectures and the fully connected architecture. For the first one we have obtained a closed-form solution. For the other architectures feedback correlations of the spins prevent such a closed-form solution, but we have developed a recursive scheme determining the complete time evolution of the order parameters, without any approximation. For these symmetric architectures we have also derived equilibrium fixed-point equations under certain conditions on the noise in the system. They are the same as those obtained in the replica-symmetric mean-field theory. In the second part of the thesis we have applied the replica-symmetric mean-field theory to the XY spin glass with coupled dynamics. In such a model both spins and couplings evolve stochastically, according to coupled equations, but on different time scales. We have defined relevant order parameters and derived a phase diagram. The system exhibits two different spin-glass phases: one describing freezing of the spins only, and one describing freezing of both spins and couplings. Finally, we have calculated the de Almeida-Thouless lines indicating replica-symmetry breaking.

  20. HLW glass dissolution in the presence of magnesium carbonate: Diffusion cell experiment and coupled modeling of diffusion and geochemical interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Debure, Mathieu, E-mail: mathieu.debure@gmail.com [CEA Marcoule, DTCD/SECM/LCLT, BP 17171, 30207 Bagnols-sur-Cèze Cedex (France); Geosciences Dept., Mines-ParisTech, 35 Rue St-Honoré, 77305 Fontainebleau (France); De Windt, Laurent [Geosciences Dept., Mines-ParisTech, 35 Rue St-Honoré, 77305 Fontainebleau (France); Frugier, Pierre; Gin, Stéphane [CEA Marcoule, DTCD/SECM/LCLT, BP 17171, 30207 Bagnols-sur-Cèze Cedex (France)

    2013-11-15

    Highlights: •Diffusion of dissolved elements in pore water impacts nuclear glass alteration. •The glass/magnesium carbonate system has been studied in diffusion cells. •Glass alteration is enhanced by Mg–silicates precipitation but slowed down by diffusion. •Coupling between dissolution, diffusion and secondary phases controls the glass alteration. •The ability of reactive transport models to simulate the whole processes is investigated. -- Abstract: The influence of diffusion of reactive species in aqueous solutions on the alteration rate of borosilicate glass of nuclear interest in the presence of magnesium carbonate (hydromagnesite: 4MgCO{sub 3}·Mg(OH){sub 2}·4H{sub 2}O) is investigated together with the ability of coupled chemistry/transport models to simulate the processes involved. Diffusion cells in which the solids are separated by an inert stainless steel sintered filter were used to establish parameters for direct comparison with batch experiments in which solids are intimately mixed. The chemistry of the solution and solid phases was monitored over time by various analytical techniques including ICP-AES, XRD, and SEM. The primary mechanism controlling the geochemical evolution of the system remains the consumption of silicon from the glass by precipitation of magnesium silicates. The solution chemistry and the dissolution and precipitation of solid phases are correctly described by 2D modeling with the GRAAL model implemented in the HYTEC reactive transport code. The spatial symmetry of the boron concentrations in both compartments of the cells results from dissolution coupled with simple diffusion, whereas the spatial asymmetry of the silicon and magnesium concentrations is due to strong coupling between dissolution, diffusion, and precipitation of secondary phases. A sensitivity analysis on the modeling of glass alteration shows that the choice of these phases and their thermodynamic constants have only a moderate impact whereas the

  1. Modeling of the fringe shift in multiple beam interference for glass fibers

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A M Hamed

    2008-04-01

    A quadratic model is suggested to describe the fringe shift occurred due to the phase variations of uncladded glass fiber introduced between the two plates of the liquid wedge interferometer. The fringe shift of the phase object is represented in the harmonic term which appears in the denominator of the Airy distribution formula of Fabry-Perot's interferometer. A computer program is written to plot the computed fringe shifts of the described model. An experiment is conducted using liquid wedge interferometer where the fiber of a nearly quadratic thickness variation is introduced between the two plates of the interferometer. The obtained fringe shift shows a good agreement with the proposed quadratic model. Also, it is compared with the previous theoretical shift based on ray optics of semi-circular shape.

  2. Calibration of a hysteretic model for glass fiber reinforced gypsum wall panels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janardhana, Maganti; Robin Davis, P.; Ravichandran, S. S.; Prasad, A. M.; Menon, D.

    2014-06-01

    Glass fiber reinforced gypsum (GFRG) wall panels are prefabricated panels with hollow cores, originally developed in Australia and subsequently adopted by India and China for use in buildings. This paper discusses identification and calibration of a suitable hysteretic model for GFRG wall panels filled with reinforced concrete. As considerable pinching was observed in the experimental results, a suitable hysteretic model with pinched hysteretic rule is used to conduct a series of quasi-static as inelastic hysteretic response analyses of GFRG panels with two different widths. The calibration of the pinching model parameters was carried out to approximately match the simulated and experimental responses up to 80% of the peak load in the post peak region. Interestingly, the same values of various parameters (energy dissipation and pinching related parameters) were obtained for all five test specimens.

  3. The Component Slope Linear Model for Calculating Intensive Partial Molar Properties: Application to Waste Glasses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reynolds, Jacob G. [Washington River Protection Solutions, Richland, WA (United States)

    2013-01-11

    Partial molar properties are the changes occurring when the fraction of one component is varied while the fractions of all other component mole fractions change proportionally. They have many practical and theoretical applications in chemical thermodynamics. Partial molar properties of chemical mixtures are difficult to measure because the component mole fractions must sum to one, so a change in fraction of one component must be offset with a change in one or more other components. Given that more than one component fraction is changing at a time, it is difficult to assign a change in measured response to a change in a single component. In this study, the Component Slope Linear Model (CSLM), a model previously published in the statistics literature, is shown to have coefficients that correspond to the intensive partial molar properties. If a measured property is plotted against the mole fraction of a component while keeping the proportions of all other components constant, the slope at any given point on a graph of this curve is the partial molar property for that constituent. Actually plotting this graph has been used to determine partial molar properties for many years. The CSLM directly includes this slope in a model that predicts properties as a function of the component mole fractions. This model is demonstrated by applying it to the constant pressure heat capacity data from the NaOH-NaAl(OH{sub 4}H{sub 2}O system, a system that simplifies Hanford nuclear waste. The partial molar properties of H{sub 2}O, NaOH, and NaAl(OH){sub 4} are determined. The equivalence of the CSLM and the graphical method is verified by comparing results detennined by the two methods. The CSLM model has been previously used to predict the liquidus temperature of spinel crystals precipitated from Hanford waste glass. Those model coefficients are re-interpreted here as the partial molar spinel liquidus temperature of the glass components.

  4. Structural model of homogeneous As–S glasses derived from Raman spectroscopy and high-resolution XPS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Golovchak, R.; Shpotyuk, O.; Mccloy, J. S.; Riley, B. J.; Windisch, C. F.; Sundaram, S. K.; Kovalskiy, A.; Jain, H.

    2010-11-28

    The structure of homogeneous bulk As x S100- x (25 ≤ x ≤ 42) glasses, prepared by the conventional rocking–melting–quenching method, was investigated using high-resolution X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and Raman spectroscopy. It is shown that the main building blocks of their glass networks are regular AsS3/2 pyramids and sulfur chains. In the S-rich domain, the existence of quasi-tetrahedral (QT) S = As(S1/2)3 units is deduced from XPS data, but with a concentration not exceeding ~3–5% of total atomic sites. Therefore, QT units do not appear as primary building blocks of the glass backbone in these materials, and an optimally-constrained network may not be an appropriate description for glasses when x < 40. Finally, it is shown that, in contrast to Se-based glasses, the ‘chain-crossing’ model is only partially applicable to sulfide glasses.

  5. Odd q-state clock spin-glass models in three dimensions, asymmetric phase diagrams, and multiple algebraically ordered phases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilker, Efe; Berker, A Nihat

    2014-12-01

    Distinctive orderings and phase diagram structures are found, from renormalization-group theory, for odd q-state clock spin-glass models in d=3 dimensions. These models exhibit asymmetric phase diagrams, as is also the case for quantum Heisenberg spin-glass models. No finite-temperature spin-glass phase occurs. For all odd q≥5, algebraically ordered antiferromagnetic phases occur. One such phase is dominant and occurs for all q≥5. Other such phases occupy small low-temperature portions of the phase diagrams and occur for 5≤q≤15. All algebraically ordered phases have the same structure, determined by an attractive finite-temperature sink fixed point where a dominant and a subdominant pair states have the only nonzero Boltzmann weights. The phase transition critical exponents quickly saturate to the high q value.

  6. Gluon production in the Color Glass Condensate model of collisions of ultrarelativistic finite nuclei

    CERN Document Server

    Krasnitz, A; Venugopalan, R; Krasnitz, Alex; Nara, Yasushi; Venugopalan, Raju

    2003-01-01

    We extend previous work on high energy nuclear collisions in the Color Glass Condensate model to study collisions of finite ultrarelativistic nuclei. The changes implemented include a) imposition of color neutrality at the nucleon level and b) realistic nuclear matter distributions of finite nuclei. The saturation scale characterizing the fields of color charge is explicitly position dependent, $\\Lambda_s=\\Lambda_s(x_T)$. We compute gluon distributions both before and after the collisions. The gluon distribution in the nuclear wavefunction before the collision is significantly suppressed below the saturation scale when compared to the simple McLerran-Venugopalan model prediction, while the behavior at large momentum $p_T\\gg \\Lambda_s$ remains unchanged. We study the centrality dependence of produced gluons and compare it to the centrality dependence of charged hadrons exhibited by the RHIC data. We demonstrate the geometrical scaling property of the initial gluon transverse momentum distributions for differen...

  7. Organization and identification of solutions in the time-delayed Mackey-Glass model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amil, Pablo; Cabeza, Cecilia; Masoller, Cristina; Martí, Arturo C.

    2015-04-01

    Multistability in the long term dynamics of the Mackey-Glass (MG) delayed model is analyzed by using an electronic circuit capable of controlling the initial conditions. The system's phase-space is explored by varying the parameter values of two families of initial functions. The evolution equation of the electronic circuit is derived and it is shown that, in the continuous limit, it exactly corresponds to the MG model. In practice, when using a finite set of capacitors, an excellent agreement between the experimental observations and the numerical simulations is manifested. As the delay is increased, different periodic or aperiodic solutions appear. We observe abundant periodic solutions that have the same period but a different alternation of peaks of dissimilar amplitudes and propose a novel symbolic method to classify these solutions.

  8. Organization and identification of solutions in the time-delayed Mackey-Glass model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amil, Pablo; Cabeza, Cecilia; Martí, Arturo C. [Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad de la República, Igua 4225, Montevideo (Uruguay); Masoller, Cristina [Departament de Fisica i Enginyeria Nuclear, Universitat Politecnica de Catalunya, Colom 11, E-08222 Terrassa, Barcelona (Spain)

    2015-04-15

    Multistability in the long term dynamics of the Mackey-Glass (MG) delayed model is analyzed by using an electronic circuit capable of controlling the initial conditions. The system's phase-space is explored by varying the parameter values of two families of initial functions. The evolution equation of the electronic circuit is derived and it is shown that, in the continuous limit, it exactly corresponds to the MG model. In practice, when using a finite set of capacitors, an excellent agreement between the experimental observations and the numerical simulations is manifested. As the delay is increased, different periodic or aperiodic solutions appear. We observe abundant periodic solutions that have the same period but a different alternation of peaks of dissimilar amplitudes and propose a novel symbolic method to classify these solutions.

  9. Modeling of glass fusion furnaces; Modelisation des fours de fusion de verre

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mechitoua, N. [Electricite de France (EDF), 78 - Chatou (France). Direction des Etudes et Recherches; Plard, C. [Electricite de France, 77 - Moret sur Loing (France). Direction des Etudes et Recherches

    1997-12-31

    The furnaces used for glass melting are industrial installations inside which complex and coupled physical and chemical phenomena occur. Thermal engineering plays a major role and numerical simulation is a precious tool for the analysis of the different coupling, of their interaction and of the influence of the different parameters. In order to optimize the functioning of glass furnaces and to improve the quality of the glass produced, Electricite de France (EdF) has developed a specialized version of the ESTET fluid mechanics code, called `Joule`. This paper describes the functioning principle of glass furnaces, the interactions between heat transfers and flows inside the melted glass, the interactions between heat transfers and the thermal regulation of the furnace, the interactions between heat transfers and glass quality and the heat transfer interactions between the melted glass, the furnace walls and the combustion area. (J.S.)

  10. Localization model description of diffusion and structural relaxation in glass-forming Cu-Zr alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douglas, Jack F.; Pazmino Betancourt, Beatriz A.; Tong, Xuhang; Zhang, Hao

    2016-05-01

    We test the localization model (LM) prediction of a parameter-free relationship between the α-structural relaxation time τ α and the Debye-Waller factor    for a series of simulated glass-forming Cu-Zr metallic liquids having a range of alloy compositions. After validating this relationship between the picosecond (‘fast’) and long-time relaxation dynamics over the full range of temperatures and alloy compositions investigated in our simulations, we show that it is also possible to estimate the self-diffusion coefficients of the individual atomic species (D Cu, D Zr) and the average diffusion coefficient D using the LM, in conjunction with the empirical fractional Stokes-Einstein (FSE) relation linking these diffusion coefficients to τ α . We further observe that the fragility and extent of decoupling between D and τ α strongly correlate with    at the onset temperature of glass-formation T A where particle caging and the breakdown of Arrhenius relaxation first emerge.

  11. Effect of instantaneous and continuous quenches on the density of vibrational modes in model glasses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lerner, Edan; Bouchbinder, Eran

    2017-08-01

    Computational studies of supercooled liquids often focus on various analyses of their "underlying inherent states"—the glassy configurations at zero temperature obtained by an infinitely fast (instantaneous) quench from equilibrium supercooled states. Similar protocols are also regularly employed in investigations of the unjamming transition at which the rigidity of decompressed soft-sphere packings is lost. Here we investigate the statistics and localization properties of low-frequency vibrational modes of glassy configurations obtained by such instantaneous quenches. We show that the density of vibrational modes grows as ωβ with β depending on the parent temperature T0 from which the glassy configurations were instantaneously quenched. For quenches from high temperature liquid states we find β ≈3 , whereas β appears to approach the previously observed value β =4 as T0 approaches the glass transition temperature. We discuss the consistency of our findings with the theoretical framework of the soft potential model, and contrast them with similar measurements performed on configurations obtained by continuous quenches at finite cooling rates. Our results suggest that any physical quench at rates sufficiently slower than the inverse vibrational time scale—including all physically realistic quenching rates of molecular or atomistic glasses—would result in a glass whose density of vibrational modes is universally characterized by β =4 .

  12. Energy model for the Zr-based metallic glass alloy melt with clusters

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    An energy model for the melt of bulk metallic glass (BMG) with clusters was estab- lished, the Gibbs free energy and interfacial energy for the Zr-Al-Ni ternary alloy melt with Zr2Ni clusters were calculated, and the effects of the clusters on the Gibbs free energy, interfacial energy and nucleation rate were analyzed. The results showed that the existence of the clusters in the Zr-Al-Ni ternary alloy melt enables the Gibbs free energy to decrease in the composition range where bulk metallic glass forms easily, makes the interfacial energy increase and changes the distribu- tion of the interfacial energy with the alloy composition. Because of the clusters in the melt, the Gibbs free energy of the Zr66Al8Ni26 alloy melt decreases about 0.3-1 kJ/mol and the interfacial energy between the melt and crystal nucleus increases about 0.016 J/m2. The nucleation rate of the undercooled Zr66Al8Ni26 alloy melt de- creases evidently under the influence of the clusters on Gibbs free energy and the interfacial energy, and the maximum of the nucleation rate in the melt with the Zr2Ni clusters is only about 107 mol1s1.

  13. Energy model for the Zr-based metallic glass alloy melt with clusters

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG YuanSheng; LI HuiQiang; TONG WenHui

    2007-01-01

    An energy model for the melt of bulk metallic glass (BMG) with clusters was established, the Gibbs free energy and interfacial energy for the Zr-Al-Ni ternary alloy melt with Zr2Ni clusters were calculated, and the effects of the clusters on the Gibbs free energy, interfacial energy and nucleation rate were analyzed. The results showed that the existence of the clusters in the Zr-Al-Ni ternary alloy melt enables the Gibbs free energy to decrease in the composition range where bulk metallic glass forms easily, makes the interfacial energy increase and changes the distribution of the interfacial energy with the alloy composition. Because of the clusters in the melt, the Gibbs free energy of the Zr66Al8Ni26 alloy melt decreases about 0.3-1 kJ/mol and the interfacial energy between the melt and crystal nucleus increases about 0.016 J/m2. The nucleation rate of the undercooled Zr66Al8Ni26 alloy melt decreases evidently under the influence of the clusters on Gibbs free energy and the interfacial energy, and the maximum of the nucleation rate in the melt with the Zr2Ni clusters is only about 107 mol-1·s-1.

  14. Defense waste processing facility (DWPF) liquids model: revisions for processing higher TIO2 containing glasses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jantzen, C. M. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Edwards, T. B. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Trivelpiece, C. L. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2017-05-01

    Radioactive high level waste (HLW) at the Savannah River Site (SRS) has successfully been vitrified into borosilicate glass in the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) since 1996. Vitrification requires stringent product/process (P/P) constraints since the glass cannot be reworked once it is poured into ten foot tall by two foot diameter canisters. A unique “feed forward” statistical process control (SPC) was developed for this control rather than statistical quality control (SQC). In SPC, the feed composition to the DWPF melter is controlled prior to vitrification. In SQC, the glass product would be sampled after it is vitrified. Individual glass property-composition models form the basis for the “feed forward” SPC. The models transform constraints on the melt and glass properties into constraints on the feed composition going to the melter in order to guarantee, at the 95% confidence level, that the feed will be processable and that the durability of the resulting waste form will be acceptable to a geologic repository. This report documents the development of revised TiO2, Na2O, Li2O and Fe2O3 coefficients in the SWPF liquidus model and revised coefficients (a, b, c, and d).

  15. Application of the GRAAL model to leaching experiments with SON68 nuclear glass in initially pure water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frugier, P., E-mail: pierre.frugier@cea.f [CEA Marcoule, DTCD/SECM/LCLT, BP 17171, 30207 Bagnols-sur-Ceze Cedex (France); Chave, T. [ICSM Site de Marcoule, DEN/MAR/ICSM/LSFC, UMR 5257, BP 17171, 30207 Bagnols-sur-Ceze Cedex (France); Gin, S. [CEA Marcoule, DTCD/SECM/LCLT, BP 17171, 30207 Bagnols-sur-Ceze Cedex (France); Lartigue, J.-E. [CEA Cadarache, DEN/CAD/DTN/SMTM/LMTE, 13108 Saint-Paul-Lez-Durance Cedex (France)

    2009-08-01

    Based on a review of the current state of knowledge concerning the aqueous alteration of SON68 nuclear glass we have proposed a mechanistic model, GRAAL (Glass Reactivity with Allowance for the Alteration Layer) [P. Frugier, S. Gin, Y. Minet, T. Chave, B. Bonin, N. Godon, J.E. Lartigue, P. Jollivet, A. Ayral, L. De Windt, G. Santarini, J. Nucl. Mater. 380 (2008) 8]. This article describes how the GRAAL model hypotheses are solved using a calculation code coupling chemistry and transport. The geochemical solution of this model combines three major phenomena: chemical equilibria in solution, water and ion transport by convection or diffusion, and element diffusion through the passivating reactive interphase. The model results are compared with experimental data for SON68 glass leached in initially pure water both in a closed system and in renewed media. The comparison shows the model very satisfactorily accounts for variations in the pH and the element concentrations in solution as a function of time, the glass surface area in contact with solution, and the solution renewal rate. This success is due to the fact that the diffusion of elements through the alteration gel is taken into account in the model. This mechanism cannot be disregarded under most experimental conditions - if only to predict the solution pH - and must therefore be an integral part of the geochemical model.

  16. Impact-parameter dependent Color Glass Condensate dipole model and new combined HERA data

    CERN Document Server

    Rezaeian, Amir H

    2013-01-01

    The Impact-Parameter dependent Color Glass Condensate (b-CGC) dipole model is based on the Balitsky-Kovchegov non-linear evolution equation and improves the Iancu-Itakura-Munier dipole model by incorporating the impact-parameter dependence of the saturation scale. Here we confront the model to the recently released high precision combined HERA data and obtain its parameters. The b-CGC results are then compared to data at small-x for the structure function, the longitudinal structure function, the charm structure function, exclusive vector meson (J/\\psi, \\phi, \\rho) production and Deeply Virtual Compton Scattering (DVCS). We also compare our results with the Impact-Parameter dependent Saturation model (IP-Sat). We show that most features of inclusive DIS and exclusive diffractive data, including the Q^2, W, |t| and x dependence are correctly reproduced in both models. Nevertheless, the b-CGC and the IP-Sat models give different predictions beyond the current HERA kinematics, namely for the structure functions ...

  17. Structure of Se-Te glasses studied using neutron, X-ray diffraction and reverse Monte Carlo modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Itoh, Keiji

    2017-02-01

    Pulsed neutron diffraction and synchrotron X-ray diffraction measurements were performed on Se100-xTex bulk glasses with x=10, 20, 30 and 40. The coordination numbers obtained from the diffraction results demonstrate that Se and Te atoms are twofold coordinated and the glass structure is formed by the chain network. The three-dimensional structure model for Se60Te40 glass obtained by using reverse Monte Carlo modelling shows that the alternating arrangements of Se and Te atoms compose the major part of the chain clusters but several other fragments such as Sen chains and Te-Te dimers are also present in large numbers. The chain clusters have geometrically disordered forms and the interchain atomic order is different from those in the crystal structures of trigonal Se and trigonal Te.

  18. Evidence of Non-Mean-Field-Like Low-Temperature Behavior in the Edwards-Anderson Spin-Glass Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yucesoy, Burcu; Katzgraber, Helmut G.; Machta, Jonathan

    2013-03-01

    The three and four-dimensional Edwards-Anderson and mean-field Sherrington-Kirkpatrick Ising spin glasses are studied via large-scale Monte Carlo simulations at low temperatures, deep within the spin-glass phase. Performing a careful statistical analysis of several thousand independent disorder realizations and using an observable that detects peaks in the overlap distribution, we show that the Sherrington-Kirkpatrick and Edwards-Anderson models have a distinctly different low-temperature behavior. The structure of the spin-glass overlap distribution for the Edwards-Anderson model suggests that its low-temperature phase has only a single pair of pure states. J. M. and B. Y. are supported in part by the NSF (Grant No. DMR-0907235 and DMR-1208046).

  19. Modelling the local atomic structure of molybdenum in nuclear waste glasses with ab initio molecular dynamics simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konstantinou, Konstantinos; Sushko, Peter V; Duffy, Dorothy M

    2016-09-21

    The nature of chemical bonding of molybdenum in high level nuclear waste glasses has been elucidated by ab initio molecular dynamics simulations. Two compositions, (SiO2)57.5-(B2O3)10-(Na2O)15-(CaO)15-(MoO3)2.5 and (SiO2)57.3-(B2O3)20-(Na2O)6.8-(Li2O)13.4-(MoO3)2.5, were considered in order to investigate the effect of ionic and covalent components on the glass structure and the formation of the crystallisation precursors (Na2MoO4 and CaMoO4). The coordination environments of Mo cations and the corresponding bond lengths calculated from our model are in excellent agreement with experimental observations. The analysis of the first coordination shell reveals two different types of molybdenum host matrix bonds in the lithium sodium borosilicate glass. Based on the structural data and the bond valence model, we demonstrate that the Mo cation can be found in a redox state and the molybdate tetrahedron can be connected with the borosilicate network in a way that inhibits the formation of crystalline molybdates. These results significantly extend our understanding of bonding in Mo-containing nuclear waste glasses and demonstrate that tailoring the glass composition to specific heavy metal constituents can facilitate incorporation of heavy metals at high concentrations.

  20. Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) Viscosity Model: Revisions for Processing High TiO2 Containing Glasses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jantzen, C. M. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Edwards, T. B. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2016-08-30

    Radioactive high level waste (HLW) at the Savannah River Site (SRS) has successfully been vitrified into borosilicate glass in the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) since 1996. Vitrification requires stringent product/process (P/P) constraints since the glass cannot be reworked once it is poured into ten foot tall by two foot diameter canisters. A unique “feed forward” statistical process control (SPC) was developed for this control rather than statistical quality control (SQC). In SPC, the feed composition to the DWPF melter is controlled prior to vitrification. In SQC, the glass product would be sampled after it is vitrified. Individual glass property-composition models form the basis for the “feed forward” SPC. The models transform constraints on the melt and glass properties into constraints on the feed composition going to the melter in order to guarantee, at the 95% confidence level, that the feed will be processable and that the durability of the resulting waste form will be acceptable to a geologic repository.

  1. Thermal modelling of the multi-stage heating system with variable boundary conditions in the wafer based precision glass moulding process

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sarhadi, Ali; Hattel, Jesper Henri; Hansen, Hans Nørgaard;

    2012-01-01

    of the heating system in the glass moulding process considering detailed heating mechanisms therefore plays an important part in optimizing the heating system and the subsequent pressing stage in the lens manufacturing process.The current paper deals with three-dimensional transient thermal modelling...... of the multi-stage heating system in a wafer based glass moulding process. In order to investigate the importance of the radiation from the interior and surface of the glass, a simple finite volume code is developed to model one dimensional radiation–conduction heat transfer in the glass wafer for an extreme...... pressures. Finally, the three-dimensional modelling of the multi-stage heating system in the wafer based glass moulding process is simulated with the FEM software ABAQUS for a particular industrial application for mobile phone camera lenses to obtain the temperature distribution in the glass wafer...

  2. Solidification of a colloidal hard sphere like model system approaching and crossing the glass transition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franke, Markus; Golde, Sebastian; Schöpe, Hans Joachim

    2014-08-07

    We investigated the process of vitrification and crystallization in a model system of colloidal hard spheres. The kinetics of the solidification process was measured using time resolved static light scattering, while the time evolution of the dynamic properties was determined using time resolved dynamic light scattering. By performing further analysis we confirm that solidification of hard sphere colloids is mediated by precursors. Analyzing the dynamic properties we can show that the long time dynamics and thus the shear rigidity of the metastable melt is highly correlated with the number density of solid clusters (precursors) nucleated. In crystallization these objects convert into highly ordered crystals whereas in the case of vitrification this conversion is blocked and the system is (temporarily) locked in the metastable precursor state. From the early stages of solidification one cannot clearly conclude whether the melt will crystallize or vitrify. Furthermore our data suggests that colloidal hard sphere glasses can crystallize via homogeneous nucleation.

  3. Numerical results for the Edwards-Anderson spin-glass model at low temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández, Julio F.; Alonso, Juan J.

    2013-04-01

    We have simulated Edwards-Anderson (EA) as well as Sherrington-Kirkpatrick systems of L3 spins. After averaging over large sets of EA system samples of 3≤L≤10, we obtain accurate numbers for distributions p(q) of the overlap parameter q at very low-temperature T. We find p(0)/T→0.233(4) as T→0. This is in contrast with the droplet scenario of spin glasses. We also study the number of mismatched links—between replica pairs—that come with large scale excitations. Contributions from small scale excitations are discarded. We thus obtain for the fractal dimension of outer surfaces of q˜0 excitations in the EA model ds→2.59(3) as T→0. This is in contrast with ds→3 as T→0 that is predicted by mean-field theory for the macroscopic limit.

  4. Dynamical arrest, percolation, gelation, and glass formation in model nanoparticle dispersions with thermoreversible adhesive interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eberle, Aaron P R; Castañeda-Priego, Ramón; Kim, Jung M; Wagner, Norman J

    2012-01-24

    We report an experimental study of the dynamical arrest transition for a model system consisting of octadecyl coated silica suspended in n-tetradecane from dilute to concentrated conditions spanning the state diagram. The dispersion's interparticle potential is tuned by temperature affecting the brush conformation leading to a thermoreversible model system. The critical temperature for dynamical arrest, T*, is determined as a function of dispersion volume fraction by small-amplitude dynamic oscillatory shear rheology. We corroborate this transition temperature by measuring a power-law decay of the autocorrelation function and a loss of ergodicity via fiber-optic quasi-elastic light scattering. The structure at T* is measured using small-angle neutron scattering. The scattering intensity is fit to extract the interparticle pair-potential using the Ornstein-Zernike equation with the Percus-Yevick closure approximation, assuming a square-well interaction potential with a short-range interaction (1% of particle diameter). (1) The strength of attraction is characterized using the Baxter temperature (2) and mapped onto the adhesive hard sphere state diagram. The experiments show a continuous dynamical arrest transition line that follows the predicted dynamical percolation line until ϕ ≈ 0.41 where it subtends the predictions toward the mode coupling theory attractive-driven glass line. An alternative analysis of the phase transition through the reduced second virial coefficient B(2)* shows a change in the functional dependence of B(2)* on particle concentration around ϕ ≈ 0.36. We propose this signifies the location of a gel-to-glass transition. The results presented herein differ from those observed for depletion flocculated dispersion of micrometer-sized particles in polymer solutions, where dynamical arrest is a consequence of multicomponent phase separation, suggesting dynamical arrest is sensitive to the physical mechanism of attraction.

  5. Spin glass models from the point of view of spin distributions

    CERN Document Server

    Panchenko, Dmitry

    2010-01-01

    In many spin glass models, due to the symmetry between sites, any limiting joint distribution of spins under the annealed Gibbs measure admits the Aldous-Hoover representation encoded by a function $\\sigma: [0,1]^4\\to\\{-1,+1\\}$ and one can think of this function as a generic functional order parameter of the model. In a class of diluted models and in the Sherrington-Kirkpatrick model, we introduce novel perturbations of the Hamiltonians that yield certain invariance and self-consistency equations for this generic functional order parameter and we use these invariance properties to obtain representations for the free energy in terms of $\\sigma$. In the setting of the Sherrington-Kirkpatrick model the self-consistency equations imply that the joint distribution of spins is determined by the joint distributions of the overlaps and we give an explicit formula for $\\sigma$ under the Parisi ultrametricity hypothesis. In addition, we discuss some connections with the Ghirlanda-Guerra identities and stochastic stabil...

  6. Evidence of a one-step replica symmetry breaking in a three-dimensional Potts glass model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Takashi; Hukushima, Koji

    2015-02-01

    We study a seven-state Potts glass model in three dimensions with first-, second-, and third-nearest-neighbor interactions with a bimodal distribution of couplings by Monte Carlo simulations. Our results show the existence of a spin-glass transition at a finite temperature T(c), a discontinuous jump of an order parameter at T(c) without latent heat, and a nontrivial structure in the order parameter distribution below T(c). They are compatible with one-step replica symmetry breaking.

  7. A novel Deep Reactive Ion Etched (DRIE) glass micro-model for two-phase flow experiments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Karadimitriou, N.K.; Joekar-Niasar, V.; Hassanizadeh, S.M.; Kleingeld, P.J.; Pyrak-Nolte, L.J.

    2012-01-01

    In the last few decades, micro-models have become popular experimental tools for two-phase flow studies. In this work, the design and fabrication of an innovative, elongated, glass-etched micromodel with dimensions of 5 6 35 mm2 and constant depth of 43 microns is described. This is the first time t

  8. Low-temperature behavior of the statistics of the overlap distribution in Ising spin-glass models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wittmann, Matthew; Yucesoy, B.; Katzgraber, Helmut G.; Machta, J.; Young, A. P.

    2014-10-01

    Using Monte Carlo simulations, we study in detail the overlap distribution for individual samples for several spin-glass models including the infinite-range Sherrington-Kirkpatrick model, short-range Edwards-Anderson models in three and four space dimensions, and one-dimensional long-range models with diluted power-law interactions. We study three long-range models with different powers as follows: The first is approximately equivalent to a short-range model in three dimensions, the second to a short-range model in four dimensions, and the third to a short-range model in the mean-field regime. We study an observable proposed earlier by some of us which aims to distinguish the "replica symmetry breaking" picture of the spin-glass phase from the "droplet picture," finding that larger system sizes would be needed to unambiguously determine which of these pictures describes the low-temperature state of spin glasses best, except for the Sherrington-Kirkpatrick model, which is unambiguously described by replica symmetry breaking. Finally, we also study the median integrated overlap probability distribution and a typical overlap distribution, finding that these observables are not particularly helpful in distinguishing the replica symmetry breaking and the droplet pictures.

  9. Modelling the evaporation of boron species. Part 1: Alkali-free borosilicate glass melts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Limpt, J.A.C. van; Beerkens, R.G.C.; Cook, S.; O'Connor, R.; Simon, J.

    2011-01-01

    A laboratory test facility has been used to measure the boron evaporation rates from borosilicate glass melts. The impact of furnace atmosphere composition and glass melt composition on the temperature dependent boron evaporation rates has been investigated experimentally. In Part 1 of this paper th

  10. Modeling the nonlinear PMMA behavior near glass transition temperature: application to its thermoforming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilormini, P.; Chevalier, L.; Régnier, G.

    2011-01-01

    Using suitable constitutive equations, numerical simulation allows predicting the properties of transparencies that are thermoformed near their glass transition temperature. Such equations are presented, which describe the nonlinear viscoelastic behavior of poly(methyl methacrylate) at large deformations near glass transition. The simulation of the thermoforming of a transparency at constant and uniform temperature is performed and compared with experimental results.

  11. Modelling the evaporation of boron species. Part 1: Alkali-free borosilicate glass melts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Limpt, J.A.C. van; Beerkens, R.G.C.; Cook, S.; O'Connor, R.; Simon, J.

    2011-01-01

    A laboratory test facility has been used to measure the boron evaporation rates from borosilicate glass melts. The impact of furnace atmosphere composition and glass melt composition on the temperature dependent boron evaporation rates has been investigated experimentally. In Part 1 of this paper th

  12. Spin glass behavior of the antiferromagnetic Heisenberg model on scale free network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Surungan, Tasrief; Zen, Freddy P.; Williams, Anthony G.

    2015-09-01

    Randomness and frustration are considered to be the key ingredients for the existence of spin glass (SG) phase. In a canonical system, these ingredients are realized by the random mixture of ferromagnetic (FM) and antiferromagnetic (AF) couplings. The study by Bartolozzi et al. [Phys. Rev. B73, 224419 (2006)] who observed the presence of SG phase on the AF Ising model on scale free network (SFN) is stimulating. It is a new type of SG system where randomness and frustration are not caused by the presence of FM and AF couplings. To further elaborate this type of system, here we study Heisenberg model on AF SFN and search for the SG phase. The canonical SG Heisenberg model is not observed in d-dimensional regular lattices for (d ≤ 3). We can make an analogy for the connectivity density (m) of SFN with the dimensionality of the regular lattice. It should be plausible to find the critical value of m for the existence of SG behaviour, analogous to the lower critical dimension (dl) for the canonical SG systems. Here we study system with m = 2, 3, 4 and 5. We used Replica Exchange algorithm of Monte Carlo Method and calculated the SG order parameter. We observed SG phase for each value of m and estimated its corersponding critical temperature.

  13. Stability conditions for fermionic Ising spin-glass models in the presence of a transverse field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magalhães, S. G.; Zimmer, F. M.; Morais, C. V.

    2009-06-01

    The stability of a spin-glass (SG) phase is analyzed in detail for a fermionic Ising SG (FISG) model in the presence of a magnetic transverse field Γ. The fermionic path integral formalism, replica method and static approach have been used to obtain the thermodynamic potential within one step replica symmetry breaking ansatz. The replica symmetry (RS) results show that the SG phase is always unstable against the replicon. Moreover, the two other eigenvalues λ± of the Hessian matrix (related to the diagonal elements of the replica matrix) can indicate an additional instability to the SG phase, which enhances when Γ is increased. Therefore, this result suggests that the study of the replicon cannot be enough to guarantee the RS stability in the present quantum FISG model, especially near the quantum critical point. In particular, the FISG model allows changing the occupation number of sites, so one can get a first order transition when the chemical potential exceeds a certain value. In this region, the replicon and the λ± indicate instability problems for the SG solution close to all ranges of a first order boundary.

  14. Real beards and real networks: a spin-glass model for interacting individuals

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Neale, Dion

    ''I want to be different, just like all the other different people'' sang the band King Missile. Whether they are the Beatniks of the 1950s, the punks of the 1970s, or the hipsters of today, non-conformists often tend to look the same, seemingly at odds with their goal of non-conformity. The spin-glass model, originally developed to describe the interaction of magnetic spins, and since applied to situations as diverse as the electrical activity of networks of neurons, to trades on a financial market, has recently been used in social science to study populations of interacting individuals comprised of a mix of both conformists and anti-conformists - or hipsters. Including delay effects for the interactions between individuals has been shown to give a system with non-trivial dynamics with a phase transition from stable behaviour to periodic switching between two states (let's call them bushy bearded and clean shaven). Analytic solutions to such a model are possible, but only for particular assumptions about the interaction and delay matrices. In this work we will show what happens when the interactions in the model are based on real-world networks with ''small-world'' effects and clustering.

  15. Glass sealing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brow, R.K.; Kovacic, L.; Chambers, R.S. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1996-04-01

    Hernetic glass sealing technologies developed for weapons component applications can be utilized for the design and manufacture of fuel cells. Design and processing of of a seal are optimized through an integrated approach based on glass composition research, finite element analysis, and sealing process definition. Glass sealing procedures are selected to accommodate the limits imposed by glass composition and predicted calculations.

  16. Phase Diagrams, Criticality, and Local Properties of Spin Glasses and Random-Field Ising Models from Renormalization - Calculations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartford, Edward John

    This position-space renormalization-group study focuses on two systems with quenched disorder: the Ising spin glass and the asymmetric random-field Ising model. We have employed the Migdal-Kadanoff approach to determine local recursion relations and have retained the full correlated probability distribution of interactions and fields at each iteration in a series of histograms. We find an equilibrium spin-glass phase in three dimensions, but not in two. The spin glass is characterized by a distribution of effective interactions that broadens under iteration, signaling both the long-range order of the phase and the importance of competing interactions on all length scales. We have introduced a method to calculate the distribution of local properties by differentiating the free energy with respect to a particular magnetic field or interaction. Within the spin-glass phase, the nearest neighbor correlation ranges from negative one to one, showing the strong correlations and the local variation within the phase. The spin-glass-to-paramagnet phase transition is second order, with a smooth specific heat indicated by a negative critical exponent alpha. The multicritical point separating the spin-glass, paramagnetic, and ferromagnetic phases lies along the Nishimori line and also has a nondivergent specific heat. When the system undergoes quenched dilution, the resulting critical and multicritical behaviors are identical to those of the undiluted system. Even the addition of an infinitesimal magnetic field destroys the long-range spin-glass order; however, the characteristic broadening of the distribution continues for several iterations for small fields and low temperatures, suggesting the persistence of sizable spin-glass domains. Our study of the asymmetric random-field Ising model is motivated by recent experiments on phase transitions in porous media and mean-field treatments, which suggest that new critical behavior could occur when the distribution of fields is

  17. Nature of the spin-glass phase in models with long-range interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wittmann, Matthew C.

    Despite decades of effort, our understanding of low-temperature phase of spin glass models with short-range interactions remains incomplete. Replica symmetry breaking (RSB) theory, based on the solution of the Sherrington-Kirkpatrick mean-field model, predicts many pure states; meanwhile, competing theories of short-range systems, such as the droplet picture, predict a single pair of pure states related by time-reversal symmetry, analogously to the ferromagnet. Since RSB certainly holds for the mean-field (infinite-range) model, it is interesting to study short-range models in high dimensions to observe whether RSB also holds here; however, computer simulations of short-range models in high dimensions are difficult because the number of spins to equilibrate grows so rapidly with the linear size of the system. A relatively recent idea which has been fruitful is to instead study one-dimensional models with long-range (power-law) interactions, which are argued to have the same critical behavior as corresponding short-range models in high dimensions, but for which simulations for a range of sizes (crucial for finite-size scaling analysis) are feasible. For these one-dimensional long-range (1DLR) models, we fill in a previously unexplored region of parameter space where the interactions become sufficiently long-range that they must be rescaled with the system size to maintain the thermodynamic limit. We find strong evidence that detailed behavior of the 1DLR models everywhere in this "nonextensive regime" is identical to that of the Sherrington-Kirkpatrick model, lending support to a recent conjecture. In an attempt to distinguish the RSB and droplet pictures, we study recently-proposed observables based on the statistics of individual disorder samples, rather than simply averaging over the disorder as is most frequently done in previous studies. We compare Monte Carlo results for 1DLR models which are proxies for short-range models in 3, 4, and 10 dimensions with

  18. Numerical study of an ion-exchanged glass waveguide using both two-dimensional and three-dimensional models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Pengfei; Semenova, Yuliya; Zheng, Jie; Wu, Qiang; Muhamad Hatta, Agus; Farrell, Gerald

    2011-06-01

    A numerical study is carried out to compare the two-dimensional (2-D) case and three-dimensional (3-D) case for the modelling of an ion-exchanged glass waveguide. It is shown that different waveguide widths on the photomask correspond to different ion concentration distributions after an annealing process. A numerical example is presented of two waveguide sections with different widths indicates that due to the abrupt change of the waveguide width, a 3-D theoretical model is required for an accurate prediction of the parameters of ion-exchanged glass waveguides. The good agreement between the modelled and measured results proves that the developed 3-D numerical model can be beneficially utilized in the generalized design of optical devices based on ion-exchange waveguides.

  19. Measurement and modeling of the glass transition temperatures of multi-component solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shah, Binal N. [Department of Chemical and Environmental Engineering, University of Toledo, 2801 W. Bancroft Street, Toledo, OH 43606 (United States); Schall, Constance A. [Department of Chemical and Environmental Engineering, University of Toledo, 2801 W. Bancroft Street, Toledo, OH 43606 (United States)]. E-mail: cschall@eng.utoledo.edu

    2006-04-01

    Protein crystals are usually grown in multi-component aqueous solutions containing salts, buffers and other additives. To measure the X-ray diffraction data of the crystal, crystals are rapidly lowered to cryogenic temperatures. On flash cooling, ice frequently forms affecting the integrity of the sample. In order to eliminate this effect, substances called cryoprotectants are added to produce a glassy (vitrified) state rather than ice. Heretofore, the quantity of cryoprotectant needed to vitrify the sample has largely been established by trial and error. In this study, differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) was used to measure the melting (T {sub m}), devitrification (T {sub d}) and glass transition (T {sub g}) temperatures of solutions with a range of compositions typical of those used for growing protein crystals, with the addition of glycerol as cryoprotectant. The addition of cryoprotectant raises the T {sub g} and lowers the T {sub m} of bulk solution thereby decreasing the cooling rates required for vitrification of protein crystals. The theoretical T {sub g} value was calculated using the apparent volume fraction using the Miller/Fox equation extended for multi-component systems. The experimental values of T {sub g} were within approximately {+-}4% of that predicted by the model. Thus, the use of the model holds the promise of a rational method for the theoretical determination of the composition of cryoprotectant requirement of protein crystallization solutions.

  20. Dynamic decoupling and local atomic order of a model multicomponent metallic glass-former

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jeongmin; Sung, Bong June

    2015-06-01

    The dynamics of multicomponent metallic alloys is spatially heterogeneous near glass transition. The diffusion coefficient of one component of the metallic alloys may also decouple from those of other components, i.e., the diffusion coefficient of each component depends differently on the viscosity of metallic alloys. In this work we investigate the dynamic heterogeneity and decoupling of a model system for multicomponent Pd43Cu27Ni10P20 melts by using a hard sphere model that considers the size disparity of alloys but does not take chemical effects into account. We also study how such dynamic behaviors would relate to the local atomic structure of metallic alloys. We find, from molecular dynamics simulations, that the smallest component P of multicomponent Pd43Cu27Ni10P20 melts becomes dynamically heterogeneous at a translational relaxation time scale and that the largest major component Pd forms a slow subsystem, which has been considered mainly responsible for the stabilization of amorphous state of alloys. The heterogeneous dynamics of P atoms accounts for the breakdown of Stokes-Einstein relation and also leads to the dynamic decoupling of P and Pd atoms. The dynamically heterogeneous P atoms decrease the lifetime of the local short-range atomic orders of both icosahedral and close-packed structures by orders of magnitude.

  1. Modeling the relaxation of polymer glasses under shear and elongational loads

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fielding, S. M.; Moorcroft, R. L.; Larson, R. G.; Cates, M. E.

    2013-03-01

    Glassy polymers show "strain hardening": at constant extensional load, their flow first accelerates, then arrests. Recent experiments under such loading have found this to be accompanied by a striking dip in the segmental relaxation time. This can be explained by a minimal nonfactorable model combining flow-induced melting of a glass with the buildup of stress carried by strained polymers. Within this model, liquefaction of segmental motion permits strong flow that creates polymer-borne stress, slowing the deformation enough for the segmental (or solvent) modes then to re-vitrify. Here, we present new results for the corresponding behavior under step-stress shear loading, to which very similar physics applies. To explain the unloading behavior in the extensional case requires introduction of a "crinkle factor" describing a rapid loss of segmental ordering. We discuss in more detail here the physics of this, which we argue involves non-entropic contributions to the polymer stress, and which might lead to some important differences between shear and elongation. We also discuss some fundamental and possibly testable issues concerning the physical meaning of entropic elasticity in vitrified polymers. Finally, we present new results for the startup of steady shear flow, addressing the possible role of transient shear banding.

  2. Dynamic decoupling and local atomic order of a model multicomponent metallic glass-former.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jeongmin; Sung, Bong June

    2015-06-17

    The dynamics of multicomponent metallic alloys is spatially heterogeneous near glass transition. The diffusion coefficient of one component of the metallic alloys may also decouple from those of other components, i.e., the diffusion coefficient of each component depends differently on the viscosity of metallic alloys. In this work we investigate the dynamic heterogeneity and decoupling of a model system for multicomponent Pd43Cu27Ni10P20 melts by using a hard sphere model that considers the size disparity of alloys but does not take chemical effects into account. We also study how such dynamic behaviors would relate to the local atomic structure of metallic alloys. We find, from molecular dynamics simulations, that the smallest component P of multicomponent Pd43Cu27Ni10P20 melts becomes dynamically heterogeneous at a translational relaxation time scale and that the largest major component Pd forms a slow subsystem, which has been considered mainly responsible for the stabilization of amorphous state of alloys. The heterogeneous dynamics of P atoms accounts for the breakdown of Stokes-Einstein relation and also leads to the dynamic decoupling of P and Pd atoms. The dynamically heterogeneous P atoms decrease the lifetime of the local short-range atomic orders of both icosahedral and close-packed structures by orders of magnitude.

  3. Computational modelling of large deformations in layered-silicate/PET nanocomposites near the glass transition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Figiel, Łukasz; Dunne, Fionn P. E.; Buckley, C. Paul

    2010-01-01

    Layered-silicate nanoparticles offer a cost-effective reinforcement for thermoplastics. Computational modelling has been employed to study large deformations in layered-silicate/poly(ethylene terephthalate) (PET) nanocomposites near the glass transition, as would be experienced during industrial forming processes such as thermoforming or injection stretch blow moulding. Non-linear numerical modelling was applied, to predict the macroscopic large deformation behaviour, with morphology evolution and deformation occurring at the microscopic level, using the representative volume element (RVE) approach. A physically based elasto-viscoplastic constitutive model, describing the behaviour of the PET matrix within the RVE, was numerically implemented into a finite element solver (ABAQUS) using an UMAT subroutine. The implementation was designed to be robust, for accommodating large rotations and stretches of the matrix local to, and between, the nanoparticles. The nanocomposite morphology was reconstructed at the RVE level using a Monte-Carlo-based algorithm that placed straight, high-aspect ratio particles according to the specified orientation and volume fraction, with the assumption of periodicity. Computational experiments using this methodology enabled prediction of the strain-stiffening behaviour of the nanocomposite, observed experimentally, as functions of strain, strain rate, temperature and particle volume fraction. These results revealed the probable origins of the enhanced strain stiffening observed: (a) evolution of the morphology (through particle re-orientation) and (b) early onset of stress-induced pre-crystallization (and hence lock-up of viscous flow), triggered by the presence of particles. The computational model enabled prediction of the effects of process parameters (strain rate, temperature) on evolution of the morphology, and hence on the end-use properties.

  4. Glass science tutorial: Lecture No. 7, Waste glass technology for Hanford

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kruger, A.A.

    1995-07-01

    This paper presents the details of the waste glass tutorial session that was held to promote knowledge of waste glass technology and how this can be used at the Hanford Reservation. Topics discussed include: glass properties; statistical approach to glass development; processing properties of nuclear waste glass; glass composition and the effects of composition on durability; model comparisons of free energy of hydration; LLW glass structure; glass crystallization; amorphous phase separation; corrosion of refractories and electrodes in waste glass melters; and glass formulation for maximum waste loading.

  5. Modelling of graded index waveguide fabricated by ion exchange on Er3+ doped glass

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shao Gong-Wang; Jin Guo-Liang

    2009-01-01

    A general numerical tool, based on thermal diffusion equation and full-vectorial eigen-mode equation, has been presented for the systematic analysis of graded index channel waveguide fabricated by ion exchange on Er3+ doped glass. Finite difference method with full-vectorial formulation (FV-FDM) is applied to solving the full-vectorial modes of graded index channel waveguide for the first time. The coupled difference equations based on magnetic fields in FV-FDM are derived from the Taylor series expansion and accurate formulation of boundary conditions. Hybrid nature of vectorial guided modes for both pump (980 nm) and signal light (1550 nm) are demonstrated by the simulation. Results show that the fabrication parameters of ion exchange, such as channel opening width and time ratio of second step to first step in ion exchange, have large influence on the properties of waveguide. By optimizing the fabrication parameters, maintenance of monomode for signal light and improvement of the gain dynamics can be achieved in Er3+ doped waveguide amplifier (EDWA) fabricated by ion exchange technique. This theoretical model is significant for the design and fabrication of EDWA with ion exchange technique. Furthermore, a single polarization EDWA, which operates at wavelength from 1528 nm to 1541 nm for HE polarization, is numerically designed.

  6. The Fermi-Pasta-Ulam System as a Model for Glasses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carati, A.; Maiocchi, A.; Galgani, L.; Amati, G.

    2015-12-01

    We show that the standard Fermi-Pasta-Ulam system, with a suitable choice for the interparticle potential, constitutes a model for glasses, and indeed an extremely simple and manageable one. Indeed, it allows one to describe the landscape of the minima of the potential energy and to deal concretely with any one of them, determining the spectrum of frequencies and the normal modes. A relevant role is played by the harmonic energy {E} relative to a given minimum, i.e., the expansion of the Hamiltonian about the minimum up to second order. Indeed we find that there exists an energy threshold in {E} such that below it the harmonic energy {E} appears to be an approximate integral of motion for the whole observation time. Consequently, the system remains trapped near the minimum, in what may be called a vitreous or glassy state. Instead, for larger values of {E} the system rather quickly relaxes to a final equilibrium state. Moreover we find that the vitreous states present peculiar statistical behaviors, still involving the harmonic energy {E}. Indeed, the vitreous states are described by a Gibbs distribution with an effective Hamiltonian close to {E} and with a suitable effective inverse temperature. The final equilibrium state presents instead statistical properties which are in very good agreement with the Gibbs distribution relative to the full Hamiltonian of the system.

  7. Random free energy barrier hopping model for ac conduction in chalcogenide glasses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murti, Ram; Tripathi, S. K.; Goyal, Navdeep; Prakash, Satya

    2016-03-01

    The random free energy barrier hopping model is proposed to explain the ac conductivity (σac) of chalcogenide glasses. The Coulomb correlation is consistently accounted for in the polarizability and defect distribution functions and the relaxation time is augmented to include the overlapping of hopping particle wave functions. It is observed that ac and dc conduction in chalcogenides are due to same mechanism and Meyer-Neldel (MN) rule is the consequence of temperature dependence of hopping barriers. The exponential parameter s is calculated and it is found that s is subjected to sample preparation and measurement conditions and its value can be less than or greater than one. The calculated results for a - Se, As2S3, As2Se3 and As2Te3 are found in close agreement with the experimental data. The bipolaron and single polaron hopping contributions dominates at lower and higher temperatures respectively and in addition to high energy optical phonons, low energy optical and high energy acoustic phonons also contribute to the hopping process. The variations of hopping distance with temperature is also studied. The estimated defect number density and static barrier heights are compared with other existing calculations.

  8. Model of laser cooling in the Yb3+ -doped fluorozirconate glass ZBLAN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hehlen, Markus P.; Epstein, Richard I.; Inoue, Hiroyuki

    2007-04-01

    A quantitative description of optical refrigeration in Yb3+ -doped ZBLAN glass in the presence of transition-metal and OH impurities is presented. The model includes the competition of radiative processes with energy migration, energy transfer to transition-metal ions, and multiphonon relaxation. Molecular dynamics calculations of pure ZBLAN and ZBLAN doped with transition-metal ions provide the structural information that, when combined with spectroscopic data, allows for the calculation of electric-dipole energy-transfer rates in the framework of the Dexter theory. The structural data is further used to extend the traditional energy-gap law to multiphonon relaxation via vibrational impurities. The cooling efficiency is sensitive to the presence of both 3d metal ions with absorption in the near infrared and high-frequency vibrational impurities such as OH . The calculation establishes maximum impurity concentrations for different operating temperatures and finds Cu2+ , Fe2+ , Co2+ , Ni2+ , and OH to be the most problematic species. Cu2+ in particular has to be reduced to ZBLAN:Yb3+ optical cryocooler to operate at 100-150K .

  9. 77 FR 28533 - Special Conditions: Boeing, Model 737-800; Large Non-Structural Glass in the Passenger Compartment

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-15

    ... following items: Glass partitions. Glass attached to the ceiling. Wall/door mounted mirrors/glass panels...-Structural Glass in the Passenger Compartment AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT. ACTION... design feature associated with the installation of large non-structural glass items in the cabin area of...

  10. 77 FR 40255 - Special Conditions: Boeing, Model 737-800; Large Non-Structural Glass in the Passenger Compartment

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-09

    ... following items: Glass partitions. Glass attached to the ceiling. Wall/door mounted mirrors/glass panels...-Structural Glass in the Passenger Compartment AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT. ACTION... associated with the installation of large non-structural glass items in the cabin area of an executive...

  11. Spin-glass model predicts metastable brain states that diminish in anesthesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anthony G Hudetz

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Patterns of resting state connectivity change dynamically and may represent modes of cognitive information processing. The diversity of connectivity patterns (global brain states reflects the information capacity of the brain and determines the state of consciousness. In this work, computer simulation was used to explore the repertoire of global brain states as a function of cortical activation level. We implemented a modified spin glass model to describe UP/DOWN state transitions of neuronal populations at a mesoscopic scale based on resting state BOLD fMRI data. Resting state fMRI was recorded in 20 participants and mapped to 10,000 cortical regions defined on a group-aligned cortical surface map. Each region represented the population activity of a ~20mm2 area of the cortex. Cross-correlation matrices of the mapped BOLD time courses of the set of regions were calculated and averaged across subjects. In the model, each cortical region was allowed to interact with the 16 other regions that had the highest pair-wise correlation values. All regions stochastically transitioned between UP and DOWN states under the net influence of their 16 pairs. The probability of local state transitions was controlled by a single parameter T corresponding to the level of global cortical activation. To estimate the number of distinct global states, first we ran 10,000 simulations at T=0. Simulations were started from random configurations that converged to one of several distinct patterns. Using hierarchical clustering, at 99% similarity, close to 300 distinct states were found. At intermediate T, metastable state configurations were formed suggesting critical behavior with a sharp increase in the number of metastable states at an optimal T. Both reduced activation (anesthesia, sleep and increased activation (hyper-activation moved the system away from equilibrium, presumably incompatible with conscious mentation. During equilibrium, the diversity of large

  12. Spin-glass model predicts metastable brain states that diminish in anesthesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hudetz, Anthony G; Humphries, Colin J; Binder, Jeffrey R

    2014-01-01

    Patterns of resting state connectivity change dynamically and may represent modes of cognitive information processing. The diversity of connectivity patterns (global brain states) reflects the information capacity of the brain and determines the state of consciousness. In this work, computer simulation was used to explore the repertoire of global brain states as a function of cortical activation level. We implemented a modified spin glass model to describe UP/DOWN state transitions of neuronal populations at a mesoscopic scale based on resting state BOLD fMRI data. Resting state fMRI was recorded in 20 participants and mapped to 10,000 cortical regions (sites) defined on a group-aligned cortical surface map. Each site represented the population activity of a ~20 mm(2) area of the cortex. Cross-correlation matrices of the mapped BOLD time courses of the set of sites were calculated and averaged across subjects. In the model, each cortical site was allowed to interact with the 16 other sites that had the highest pair-wise correlation values. All sites stochastically transitioned between UP and DOWN states under the net influence of their 16 pairs. The probability of local state transitions was controlled by a single parameter T corresponding to the level of global cortical activation. To estimate the number of distinct global states, first we ran 10,000 simulations at T = 0. Simulations were started from random configurations that converged to one of several distinct patterns. Using hierarchical clustering, at 99% similarity, close to 300 distinct states were found. At intermediate T, metastable state configurations were formed suggesting critical behavior with a sharp increase in the number of metastable states at an optimal T. Both reduced activation (anesthesia, sleep) and increased activation (hyper-activation) moved the system away from equilibrium, presumably incompatible with conscious mentation. During equilibrium, the diversity of large-scale brain states

  13. Time-Dependent Deformation Modelling for a Chopped-Glass Fiber Composite for Automotive Durability Design Criteria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ren, W

    2001-08-24

    Time-dependent deformation behavior of a polymeric composite with chopped-glass-fiber reinforcement was investigated for automotive applications, The material under stress was exposed to representative automobile service environments. Results show that environment has substantial effects on time-dependent deformation behavior of the material. The data were analyzed and experimentally-based models developed for the time-dependent deformation behavior as a basis for automotive structural durability design criteria.

  14. Operational Modal Analysis on laminated glass beams

    OpenAIRE

    López Aenlle, Manuel; Fernández, Pelayo; Villa García, Luis Manuel; Barredo Egusquiza, Josu; Hermanns, Lutz Karl Heinz; Fraile de Lerma, Alberto

    2011-01-01

    Laminated glass is a sandwich element consisting of two or more glass sheets, with one or more interlayers of polyvinyl butyral (PVB). The dynamic response of laminated glass beams and plates can be predicted using analytical or numerical models in which the glass and the PVB are usually modelled as linear-elastic and linear viscoelastic materials, respectively. In this work the dynamic behavior of laminated glass beams are predicted using a finite element model and the analytical model ...

  15. Resin Versus Glass Microspheres for (90)Y Transarterial Radioembolization: Comparing Survival in Unresectable Hepatocellular Carcinoma Using Pretreatment Partition Model Dosimetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Der Gucht, Axel; Jreige, Mario; Denys, Alban; Blanc-Durand, Paul; Boubaker, Ariane; Pomoni, Anastasia; Mitsakis, Periklis; Silva-Monteiro, Marina; Gnesin, Silvano; Lalonde, Marie Nicod; Duran, Rafael; Prior, John O; Schaefer, Niklaus

    2017-08-01

    The aim of this study was to compare survival of patients treated for unresectable hepatocellular carcinoma (uHCC) with (90)Y transarterial radioembolization (TARE) using pretreatment partition model dosimetry (PMD). Methods: We performed a retrospective analysis of prospectively collected data on 77 patients consecutively treated (mean age ± SD, 66.4 ± 12.2 y) for uHCC (36 uninodular, 5 multinodular, 36 diffuse) with (90)Y TARE (41 resin, 36 glass) using pretreatment PMD. Study endpoints were progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS) assessed by Kaplan-Meier estimates. Several variables including Barcelona Clinic Liver Cancer (BCLC) staging system, tumor size, and serum α-fetoprotein (AFP) level were investigated using Cox proportional hazards regression. Results: The characteristics of 2 groups were comparable with regard to demographic data, comorbidities, Child-Pugh score, BCLC, serum AFP level, and (90)Y global administered activity. The median follow-up time was 7.7 mo (range, 0.4-50.1 mo). Relapse occurred in 44 patients (57%) at a median of 6 mo (range, 0.4-27.9 mo) after (90)Y TARE, and 41 patients (53%) died from tumor progression. Comparison between resin and glass microspheres revealed higher but not statistically significantly PFS and OS rates in the (90)Y resin group than the (90)Y glass group (resin PFS 6.1 mo [95% confidence interval CI, 4.7-7.4] and glass PFS 5 mo [95% CI, 0.9-9.2], P = 0.53; resin OS 7.7 mo [95% CI, 7.2-8.2] and glass OS 7 mo [95% CI 1.6-12.4], P = 0.77). No significant survival difference between both types of (90)Y microspheres was observed in any subgroups of patients with early/intermediate or advanced BCLC stages. Among the variables investigated, Cox analyses showed that only in the glass group, the BCLC staging system and the serum AFP level were associated with PFS (P = 0.04) and OS (P = 0.04). Tumor size was a prognostic factor without significant influence on PFS and OS after (90)Y TARE. Conclusion

  16. Unifying interatomic potential, g (r), elasticity, viscosity, and fragility of metallic glasses: analytical model, simulations, and experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lagogianni, A. E.; Krausser, J.; Evenson, Z.; Samwer, K.; Zaccone, A.

    2016-08-01

    An analytical framework is proposed to describe the elasticity, viscosity and fragility of metallic glasses in relation to their atomic-level structure and the effective interatomic interaction. The bottom-up approach starts with forming an effective Ashcroft-Born-Mayer interatomic potential based on Boltzmann inversion of the radial distribution function g (r) and on fitting the short-range part of g (r) by means of a simple power-law approximation. The power exponent λ represents a global repulsion steepness parameter. A scaling relation between atomic connectivity and packing fraction Z˜ {φ1+λ} is derived. This relation is then implemented in a lattice-dynamical model for the high-frequency shear modulus where the attractive anharmonic part of the effective interaction is taken into account through the thermal expansion coefficient which maps the ϕ-dependence into a T-dependence. The shear modulus as a function of temperature calculated in this way is then used within the cooperative shear model of the glass transition to yield the viscosity of the supercooled melt as a double-exponential function of T across the entire Angell plot. The model, which has only one adjustable parameter (the characteristic atomic volume for high-frequency cage deformation) is tested against new experimental data of ZrCu alloys and provides an excellent one-parameter description of the viscosity down to the glass transition temperature.

  17. Elemental analysis and magnetism of hydronium jarosites-model kagome antiferromagnets and topological spin glasses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wills, A S; Bisson, W G, E-mail: a.s.wills@ucl.ac.uk [Department of Chemistry, University College London, 20 Gordon Street, London WC1H 0AJ (United Kingdom)

    2011-04-27

    The jarosites are the most studied examples of kagome antiferromagnets. Research into them has inspired new directions in magnetism, such as the role of the Dzyaloshinsky-Moriya interaction in symmetry breaking, kagome spin ice, and whether spin glass-like phases can exist in the disorder-free limit. This last point is based around the observation of unconventional thermodynamic and kinetic responses in hydronium jarosite, H{sub 3}OFe{sub 3}(SO{sub 4}){sub 2}(OH){sub 6}, that have led to its classification as a 'topological' spin glass, reflecting the defining role that the underlying geometry of the kagome lattice plays in the formation of the spin glass state. In this paper we explore one of the fundamental questions concerning the frustrated magnetism in hydronium jarosite: whether the spin glass phase is the result of chemical disorder and concomitant randomness in the exchange interactions. Confirming previous crystallographic studies, we use elemental analysis to show that the nature of the low temperature magnetic state is not a simple function of chemical disorder and provide evidence to support the hypothesis that anisotropies drive the spin glass transition.

  18. Elemental analysis and magnetism of hydronium jarosites--model kagome antiferromagnets and topological spin glasses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wills, A S; Bisson, W G

    2011-04-27

    The jarosites are the most studied examples of kagome antiferromagnets. Research into them has inspired new directions in magnetism, such as the role of the Dzyaloshinsky-Moriya interaction in symmetry breaking, kagome spin ice, and whether spin glass-like phases can exist in the disorder-free limit. This last point is based around the observation of unconventional thermodynamic and kinetic responses in hydronium jarosite, H(3)OFe(3)(SO(4))(2)(OH)(6), that have led to its classification as a 'topological' spin glass, reflecting the defining role that the underlying geometry of the kagome lattice plays in the formation of the spin glass state. In this paper we explore one of the fundamental questions concerning the frustrated magnetism in hydronium jarosite: whether the spin glass phase is the result of chemical disorder and concomitant randomness in the exchange interactions. Confirming previous crystallographic studies, we use elemental analysis to show that the nature of the low temperature magnetic state is not a simple function of chemical disorder and provide evidence to support the hypothesis that anisotropies drive the spin glass transition.

  19. Solving the initial condition of the string relaxation equation of the string model for glass transition: part-Ⅱ

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhang Jin-Lu; Wang Li-Na; Zhao Xing-Yu; Zhang Li-Li; Zhou Heng-Wei; Wei Lai; Huang Yi-Neng

    2011-01-01

    The string model for the glass transition can quantitatively describe the universal α-relaxation in glassformers. The string relaxation equation (SRE) of the model simplifies the well-known Debye and Rouse-Zimm relaxation equations at high and low enough temperatures, respectively. However, its initial condition, necessary to the further model predictions of glassy dynamics, has not been solved. In this paper, the general initial condition of the SRE for stochastically spatially configurative strings is solved exactly based on the obtained special initial condition of the SRE for straight strings in a previous paper (J. L. Zhang et al. 2010 Chin. Phya. B 19, 056403).

  20. Local topological modeling of glass structure and radiation-induced rearrangements in connected networks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hobbs, L.W. [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering, Cambridge, MA (United States); Jesurum, C.E. [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Dept. of Mathematics, Cambridge, MA (United States); Pulim, V. [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Lab. for Computer Science, Cambridge, MA (United States)

    1997-07-01

    Topology is shown to govern the arrangement of connected structural elements in network glasses such as silica and related radiation-amorphized network compounds: A topological description of such topologically-disordered arrangements is possible which utilizes a characteristic unit of structure--the local cluster--not far in scale from the unit cells in crystalline arrangements. Construction of credible glass network structures and their aberration during cascade disordering events during irradiation can be effected using local assembly rules based on modification of connectivity-based assembly rules derived for crystalline analogues. These topological approaches may provide useful complementary information to that supplied by molecular dynamics about re-ordering routes and final configurations in irradiated glasses. (authors)

  1. Asymmetric crystallization upon heating and cooling in model glass-forming systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Minglei; Zhang, Kai; Liu, Yanhui; Schroers, Jan; Shattuck, Mark; O'Hern, Corey

    2014-03-01

    We perform molecular dynamics simulations of binary Lennard-Jones (LJ) and hard-sphere (HS) systems to understand the asymmetry in the critical cooling and heating rates for crystallization observed in experiments on bulk metallic glasses, where much faster heating rates are required to prevent crystallization. For the LJ systems, we cool the systems at different rates (above the critical cooling rate Rc) to temperatures below the glass transition, and subsequently begin heating the samples at different rates to measure the critical heating rate Rh below which the system crystallizes. We perform companion studies of HS systems, except we measure the asymmetry in the critical compression and dilation rates to enhance the asymmetry. We show that the asymmetry increases with the glass-formability of the binary mixtures and explain this result by characterizing the structural order of the systems.

  2. Mutual information reveals multiple structural relaxation mechanisms in a model glass former.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunleavy, Andrew J; Wiesner, Karoline; Yamamoto, Ryoichi; Royall, C Patrick

    2015-01-22

    Among the key challenges to our understanding of solidification in the glass transition is that it is accompanied by little apparent change in structure. Recently, geometric motifs have been identified in glassy liquids, but a causal link between these motifs and solidification remains elusive. One 'smoking gun' for such a link would be identical scaling of structural and dynamic lengthscales on approaching the glass transition, but this is highly controversial. Here we introduce an information theoretic approach to determine correlations in displacement for particle relaxation encoded in the initial configuration of a glass-forming liquid. We uncover two populations of particles, one inclined to relax quickly, the other slowly. Each population is correlated with local density and geometric motifs. Our analysis further reveals a dynamic lengthscale similar to that associated with structural properties, which may resolve the discrepancy between structural and dynamic lengthscales.

  3. Fluvial Transport Model from Spatial Distribution Analysis of Libyan Desert Glass Mass on the Great Sand Sea (Southwest Egypt: Clues to Primary Glass Distribution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nancy Jimenez-Martinez

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Libyan Desert Glass (LDG is a natural silica-rich melted rock found as pieces scattered over the sand and bedrock of the Western Desert of Egypt, northeast of the Gilf Kebir. In this work, a population mixture analysis serves to relate the present spatial distribution of LDG mass density with the Late Oligocene–Early Miocene fluvial dynamics in the Western Desert of Egypt. This was verified from a spatial distribution model that was predicted from the log-normal kriging method using the LDG–mass-dependent transformed variable, Y(x. Both low- and high-density normal populations (–9.2 < Y(x < –3.5 and –3.8 < Y(x < 2.1, respectively were identified. The low-density population was the result of an ordinary fluvial LDG transport/deposition sequence that was active from the time of the melting process, and which lasted until the end of activity of the Gilf River. The surface distribution of the high-density population allowed us to restrict the source area of the melting process. We demonstrate the importance of this geostatistical study in unveiling the probable location of the point where the melting of surficial material occurred and the role of the Gilf River in the configuration of the observed strewn field.

  4. Midtemperature solar systems test facility predictions for thermal performance based on test data. Polisolar model POL solar collector with glass reflector surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, T. D.

    1981-05-01

    Thermal performance predictions based on test data are presented for the Polisolar Model POL sola collector, with glass reflector surfaces, for three output temperatures at five cities in the United States.

  5. Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) Viscosity Model: Revisions for Processing High TiO2 Containing Glasses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jantzen, C. M. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Edwards, T. B. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2016-08-30

    Radioactive high-level waste (HLW) at the Savannah River Site (SRS) has successfully been vitrified into borosilicate glass in the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) since 1996. Vitrification requires stringent product/process (P/P) constraints since the glass cannot be reworked once it is poured into ten foot tall by two foot diameter canisters. A unique “feed forward” statistical process control (SPC) was developed for this control rather than statistical quality control (SQC). In SPC, the feed composition to the DWPF melter is controlled prior to vitrification. In SQC, the glass product would be sampled after it is vitrified. Individual glass property-composition models form the basis for the “feed forward” SPC. The models transform constraints on the melt and glass properties into constraints on the feed composition going to the melter in order to guarantee, at the 95% confidence level, that the feed will be processable and that the durability of the resulting waste form will be acceptable to a geologic repository. The DWPF SPC system is known as the Product Composition Control System (PCCS). The DWPF will soon be receiving wastes from the Salt Waste Processing Facility (SWPF) containing increased concentrations of TiO2, Na2O, and Cs2O . The SWPF is being built to pretreat the high-curie fraction of the salt waste to be removed from the HLW tanks in the F- and H-Area Tank Farms at the SRS. In order to process TiO2 concentrations >2.0 wt% in the DWPF, new viscosity data were developed over the range of 1.90 to 6.09 wt% TiO2 and evaluated against the 2005 viscosity model. An alternate viscosity model is also derived for potential future use, should the DWPF ever need to process other titanate-containing ion exchange materials. The ultimate limit on the amount of TiO2 that can be accommodated from SWPF will be determined by the three PCCS models, the waste composition of a given sludge

  6. Water leaching of borosilicate glasses: experiments, modeling and Monte Carlo simulations; Alteration par l'eau des verres borosilicates: experiences, modelisation et simulations Monte Carlo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ledieu, A

    2004-10-15

    This work is concerned with the corrosion of borosilicate glasses with variable oxide contents. The originality of this study is the complementary use of experiments and numerical simulations. This study is expected to contribute to a better understanding of the corrosion of nuclear waste confinement glasses. First, the corrosion of glasses containing only silicon, boron and sodium oxides has been studied. The kinetics of leaching show that the rate of leaching and the final degree of corrosion sharply depend on the boron content through a percolation mechanism. For some glass contents and some conditions of leaching, the layer which appears at the glass surface stops the release of soluble species (boron and sodium). This altered layer (also called the gel layer) has been characterized with nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) techniques. Second, additional elements have been included in the glass composition. It appears that calcium, zirconium or aluminum oxides strongly modify the final degree of corrosion so that the percolation properties of the boron sub-network is no more a sufficient explanation to account for the behavior of these glasses. Meanwhile, we have developed a theoretical model, based on the dissolution and the reprecipitation of the silicon. Kinetic Monte Carlo simulations have been used in order to test several concepts such as the boron percolation, the local reactivity of weakly soluble elements and the restructuring of the gel layer. This model has been fully validated by comparison with the results on the three oxide glasses. Then, it has been used as a comprehensive tool to investigate the paradoxical behavior of the aluminum and zirconium glasses: although these elements slow down the corrosion kinetics, they lead to a deeper final degree of corrosion. The main contribution of this work is that the final degree of corrosion of borosilicate glasses results from the competition of two opposite mechanisms

  7. Aqueous corrosion of borosilicate glasses: experiments, modeling and Monte-Carlo simulations; Alteration par l'eau des verres borosilicates: experiences, modelisation et simulations Monte-Carlo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ledieu, A

    2004-10-01

    This work is concerned with the corrosion of borosilicate glasses with variable oxide contents. The originality of this study is the complementary use of experiments and numerical simulations. This study is expected to contribute to a better understanding of the corrosion of nuclear waste confinement glasses. First, the corrosion of glasses containing only silicon, boron and sodium oxides has been studied. The kinetics of leaching show that the rate of leaching and the final degree of corrosion sharply depend on the boron content through a percolation mechanism. For some glass contents and some conditions of leaching, the layer which appears at the glass surface stops the release of soluble species (boron and sodium). This altered layer (also called the gel layer) has been characterized with nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) techniques. Second, additional elements have been included in the glass composition. It appears that calcium, zirconium or aluminum oxides strongly modify the final degree of corrosion so that the percolation properties of the boron sub-network is no more a sufficient explanation to account for the behavior of these glasses. Meanwhile, we have developed a theoretical model, based on the dissolution and the reprecipitation of the silicon. Kinetic Monte Carlo simulations have been used in order to test several concepts such as the boron percolation, the local reactivity of weakly soluble elements and the restructuring of the gel layer. This model has been fully validated by comparison with the results on the three oxide glasses. Then, it has been used as a comprehensive tool to investigate the paradoxical behavior of the aluminum and zirconium glasses: although these elements slow down the corrosion kinetics, they lead to a deeper final degree of corrosion. The main contribution of this work is that the final degree of corrosion of borosilicate glasses results from the competition of two opposite mechanisms

  8. Interpreting the nonlinear dielectric response of glass-formers in terms of the coupling model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ngai, K. L. [CNR-IPCF, Largo Bruno Pontecorvo 3, I-56127 Pisa, Italy and Dipartimento di Fisica, Università di Pisa, Largo B. Pontecorvo 3, I-56127 Pisa (Italy)

    2015-03-21

    Nonlinear dielectric measurements at high electric fields of glass-forming glycerol and propylene carbonate initially were carried out to elucidate the dynamic heterogeneous nature of the structural α-relaxation. Recently, the measurements were extended to sufficiently high frequencies to investigate the nonlinear dielectric response of faster processes including the so-called excess wing (EW), appearing as a second power law at high frequencies in the loss spectra of many glass formers without a resolved secondary relaxation. While a strong increase of dielectric constant and loss is found in the nonlinear dielectric response of the α-relaxation, there is a lack of significant change in the EW. A surprise to the experimentalists finding it, this difference in the nonlinear dielectric properties between the EW and the α-relaxation is explained in the framework of the coupling model by identifying the EW investigated with the nearly constant loss (NCL) of caged molecules, originating from the anharmonicity of the intermolecular potential. The NCL is terminated at longer times (lower frequencies) by the onset of the primitive relaxation, which is followed sequentially by relaxation processes involving increasing number of molecules until the terminal Kohlrausch α-relaxation is reached. These intermediate faster relaxations, combined to form the so-called Johari-Goldstein (JG) β-relaxation, are spatially and dynamically heterogeneous, and hence exhibit nonlinear dielectric effects, as found in glycerol and propylene carbonate, where the JG β-relaxation is not resolved and in D-sorbitol where it is resolved. Like the linear susceptibility, χ{sub 1}(f), the frequency dispersion of the third-order dielectric susceptibility, χ{sub 3}(f), was found to depend primarily on the α-relaxation time, and independent of temperature T and pressure P. I show this property of the frequency dispersions of χ{sub 1}(f) and χ{sub 3}(f) is the characteristic of the many

  9. Asymmetric crystallization during cooling and heating in model glass-forming systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Minglei; Zhang, Kai; Li, Zhusong; Liu, Yanhui; Schroers, Jan; Shattuck, Mark D; O'Hern, Corey S

    2015-03-01

    We perform molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of the crystallization process in binary Lennard-Jones systems during heating and cooling to investigate atomic-scale crystallization kinetics in glass-forming materials. For the cooling protocol, we prepared equilibrated liquids above the liquidus temperature Tl and cooled each sample to zero temperature at rate Rc. For the heating protocol, we first cooled equilibrated liquids to zero temperature at rate Rp and then heated the samples to temperature T>Tl at rate Rh. We measured the critical heating and cooling rates Rh* and Rc*, below which the systems begin to form a substantial fraction of crystalline clusters during the heating and cooling protocols. We show that Rh*>Rc* and that the asymmetry ratio Rh*/Rc* includes an intrinsic contribution that increases with the glass-forming ability (GFA) of the system and a preparation-rate dependent contribution that increases strongly as Rp→Rc* from above. We also show that the predictions from classical nucleation theory (CNT) can qualitatively describe the dependence of the asymmetry ratio on the GFA and preparation rate Rp from the MD simulations and results for the asymmetry ratio measured in Zr- and Au-based bulk metallic glasses (BMG). This work emphasizes the need for and benefits of an improved understanding of crystallization processes in BMGs and other glass-forming systems.

  10. The MV Model of the Color Glass Condensate for a Finite Number of Sources Including Coulomb Interactions

    CERN Document Server

    McLerran, Larry

    2016-01-01

    We modify the McLerran-Venugopalan model to include only a finite number of sources of color charge. We argue that Coulombic interactions between these color charges generates a source-source correlation function that properly includes the effects of color charge screening, a generalization of Debye screening for the Color Glass Condensate. Such a model may be useful for computing angular harmonics of flow measured in high energy hadron collisions for small systems. In this paper we provide a basic formulation of the problem on a lattice.

  11. Surface functionalization of bioactive glasses with natural molecules of biological significance, Part I: Gallic acid as model molecule

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xin; Ferraris, Sara; Prenesti, Enrico; Verné, Enrica

    2013-12-01

    Gallic acid (3,4,5-trihydroxybenzoic acid, GA) and its derivatives are a group of biomolecules (polyphenols) obtained from plants. They have effects which are potentially beneficial to heath, for example they are antioxidant, anticarcinogenic and antibacterial, as recently investigated in many fields such as medicine, food and plant sciences. The main drawbacks of these molecules are both low stability and bioavailability. In this research work the opportunity to graft GA to bioactive glasses is investigated, in order to deliver the undamaged biological molecule into the body, using the biomaterial surfaces as a localized carrier. GA was considered for functionalization since it is a good model molecule for polyphenols and presents several interesting biological activities, like antibacterial, antioxidant and anticarcinogenic properties. Two different silica based bioactive glasses (SCNA and CEL2), with different reactivity, were employed as substrates. UV photometry combined with the Folin&Ciocalteu reagent was adopted to test the concentration of GA in uptake solution after functionalization. This test verified how much GA consumption occurred with surface modification and it was also used on solid samples to test the presence of GA on functionalized glasses. XPS and SEM-EDS techniques were employed to characterize the modification of material surface properties and functional group composition before and after functionalization.

  12. Thermodynamical modeling of nuclear glasses: coexistence of amorphous phases; Modelisation thermodynamique des verres nucleaires: coexistence entre phases amorphes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adjanor, G

    2007-11-15

    Investigating the stability of borosilicate glasses used in the nuclear industry with respect to phase separation requires to estimate the Gibbs free energies of the various phases appearing in the material. In simulation, using current computational resources, a direct state-sampling of a glassy system with respect to its ensemble statistics is not ergodic and the estimated ensemble averages are not reliable. Our approach consists in generating, at a given cooling rate, a series of quenches, or paths connecting states of the liquid to states of the glass, and then in taking into account the probability to generate the paths leading to the different glassy states in ensembles averages. In this way, we introduce a path ensemble formalism and calculate a Landau free energy associated to a glassy meta-basin. This method was validated by accurately mapping the free energy landscape of a 38-atom glassy cluster. We then applied this approach to the calculation of the Gibbs free energies of binary amorphous Lennard-Jones alloys, and checked the correlation between the observed tendencies to order or to phase separate and the computed Gibbs free energies. We finally computed the driving force to phase separation in a simplified three-oxide nuclear glass modeled by a Born-Mayer-Huggins potential that includes a three-body term, and we compared the estimated quantities to the available experimental data. (author)

  13. SELF-CLEANING GLASS BASED ON ACID-TREATED TiO2 FILMS WITH PALMITIC ACID AS MODEL POLLUTANT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nurul Hidayat Aprilita

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Preparation and characterization of self-cleaning glass based on acid-treated TiO2 films as well as evaluation on their self-cleaning properties have been carried out. Palmitic acid photodegradation was used as model pollutant. Acid-treated TiO2 powders were deposited on glass surface by using spraying technique. The XRD results showed that acid-treated TiO2 film exhibited decreased anatase crystalline size. The corresponding SEM images showed porous surface morphology. Layer densification was observed as the film thickness increased. TiO2 photocatalytic activity increased as the length of UV radiation increased. Best results were obtained at experimental condition of 35 hours UV radiation time. It is also observed that the thickness of TiO2 layers influenced the efficiency of palmitic acid photodegradation. The film with 1.661 µm thick TiO2 layers and 6.933 mg weight (0.7164 mg/cm2 could degrade 97.54 % mg palmitic acid/cm2 thin film.   Keywords: TiO2 films, acid treatment, self-cleaning glass

  14. Spin-glass phase transition and behavior of nonlinear susceptibility in the Sherrington-Kirkpatrick model with random fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morais, C. V.; Zimmer, F. M.; Lazo, M. J.; Magalhães, S. G.; Nobre, F. D.

    2016-06-01

    The behavior of the nonlinear susceptibility χ3 and its relation to the spin-glass transition temperature Tf in the presence of random fields are investigated. To accomplish this task, the Sherrington-Kirkpatrick model is studied through the replica formalism, within a one-step replica-symmetry-breaking procedure. In addition, the dependence of the Almeida-Thouless eigenvalue λAT (replicon) on the random fields is analyzed. Particularly, in the absence of random fields, the temperature Tf can be traced by a divergence in the spin-glass susceptibility χSG, which presents a term inversely proportional to the replicon λAT. As a result of a relation between χSG and χ3, the latter also presents a divergence at Tf, which comes as a direct consequence of λAT=0 at Tf. However, our results show that, in the presence of random fields, χ3 presents a rounded maximum at a temperature T* which does not coincide with the spin-glass transition temperature Tf (i.e., T*>Tf for a given applied random field). Thus, the maximum value of χ3 at T* reflects the effects of the random fields in the paramagnetic phase instead of the nontrivial ergodicity breaking associated with the spin-glass phase transition. It is also shown that χ3 still maintains a dependence on the replicon λAT, although in a more complicated way as compared with the case without random fields. These results are discussed in view of recent observations in the LiHoxY1 -xF4 compound.

  15. A telemedicine wound care model using 4G with smart phones or smart glasses: A pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Junna; Zuo, Yanhai; Xie, Ting; Wu, Minjie; Ni, Pengwen; Kang, Yutian; Yu, Xiaoping; Sun, Xiaofang; Huang, Yao; Lu, Shuliang

    2016-08-01

    To assess the feasibility of a wound care model using 4th-generation mobile communication technology standards (4G) with smart phones or smart glasses for wound management.This wound care model is an interactive, real-time platform for implementing telemedicine changing wound dressings, or doing operations. It was set up in March 2015 between Jinhua in Zhejiang province and Shanghai, China, which are 328 km apart. It comprised of a video application (APP), 4G net, smart phones or smart glasses, and a central server.This model service has been used in 30 patients with wounds on their lower extremities for 109 times in 1 month. Following a short learning curve, the service worked well and was deemed to be user-friendly. Two (6.7%) patients had wounds healed, while others still required wound dressing changes after the study finished. Both local surgeons and patients showed good acceptance of this model (100% and 83.33%, respectively).This telemedicine model is feasible and valuable because it provides an opportunity of medical service about wound healing in remote areas where specialists are scarce.

  16. Thermodynamic prediction of glass formation tendency, cluster-in-jellium model for metallic glasses, ab initio tight-binding calculations, and new density functional theory development for systems with strong electron correlation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yao, Yongxin [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2009-01-01

    Solidification of liquid is a very rich and complicated field, although there is always a famous homogeneous nucleation theory in a standard physics or materials science text book. Depending on the material and processing condition, liquid may solidify to single crystalline, polycrystalline with different texture, quasi-crystalline, amorphous solid or glass (Glass is a kind of amorphous solid in general, which has short-range and medium-range order). Traditional oxide glass may easily be formed since the covalent directional bonded network is apt to be disturbed. In other words, the energy landcape of the oxide glass is so complicated that system need extremely long time to explore the whole configuration space. On the other hand, metallic liquid usually crystalize upon cooling because of the metallic bonding nature. However, Klement et.al., (1960) reported that Au-Si liquid underwent an amorphous or “glassy” phase transformation with rapid quenching. In recent two decades, bulk metallic glasses have also been found in several multicomponent alloys[Inoue et al., (2002)]. Both thermodynamic factors (e.g., free energy of various competitive phase, interfacial free energy, free energy of local clusters, etc.) and kinetic factors (e.g., long range mass transport, local atomic position rearrangement, etc.) play important roles in the metallic glass formation process. Metallic glass is fundamentally different from nanocrystalline alloys. Metallic glasses have to undergo a nucleation process upon heating in order to crystallize. Thus the short-range and medium-range order of metallic glasses have to be completely different from crystal. Hence a method to calculate the energetics of different local clusters in the undercooled liquid or glasses become important to set up a statistic model to describe metalllic glass formation. Scattering techniques like x-ray and neutron have widely been used to study the structues of metallic glasses. Meanwhile, computer simulation

  17. Recycle Glass in Foam Glass Production

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Rasmus Rosenlund; König, Jakob; Yue, Yuanzheng

    The foam glass industry turn recycle glass into heat insulating building materials. The foaming process is relative insensitive to impurities in the recycle glass. It is therefore considered to play an important role in future glass recycling. We show and discuss trends of use of recycled glasses...... in foam glass industry and the supply sources and capacity of recycle glass....

  18. Modelling the local atomic structure of molybdenum in nuclear waste glasses with ab initio molecular dynamics simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None, None

    2016-01-01

    The nature of chemical bonding of molybdenum in high level nuclear waste glasses has been elucidated by ab initio molecular dynamics simulations. Two compositions, (SiO2)57.5 – (B2O3)10 – (Na2O)15 – (CaO)15 – (MoO3)2.5 and (SiO2)57.3 – (B2O3)20 – (Na2O)6.8 – (Li2O)13.4 – (MoO3)2.5 , were considered in order to investigate the effect of ionic and covalent components on the glass structure and the formation of the crystallisation precursors (Na2MoO4 and CaMoO4). The coordination environments of Mo cations and the corresponding bond lengths calculated from our model are in excellent agreement with experimental observations. The analysis of the first coordination shell reveals two different types of molybdenum host matrix bonds in the lithium sodium borosilicate glass. Based on the structural data and the bond valence model, we demonstrate that the Mo cation can be found in a redox state and the molybdate tetrahedron can be connected with the borosilicate network in a way that inhibits the formation of crystalline molybdates. These results significantly extend our understanding of bonding in Mo-containing nuclear waste glasses and demonstrate that tailoring the glass composition to specific heavy metal constituents can facilitate incorporation of heavy metals at high concentrations. K.K. was supported through the Impact Studentship scheme at UCL co-funded by the IHI Corporation and UCL. P.V.S. thanks the Royal Society, which supported preliminary work on this project, and the Laboratory Directed Research and Development program at PNNL, a multiprogram national laboratory operated by Battelle for the U.S. Department of Energy. Via our membership of the UK's HEC Materials Chemistry Consortium, which is funded by EPSRC (EP/L000202), this work used the ARCHER UK National Supercomputing Service (http://www.archer.ac.uk).

  19. Cosmos & Glass

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beim, Anne

    1996-01-01

    The article unfolds the architectural visions of glass by Bruno Taut. It refers to inspirations by Paul Sheerbart and litterature and the Crystal Chain, also it analyses the tectonic univers that can be found in the glass pavillion for the Werkbund exposition in Cologne.......The article unfolds the architectural visions of glass by Bruno Taut. It refers to inspirations by Paul Sheerbart and litterature and the Crystal Chain, also it analyses the tectonic univers that can be found in the glass pavillion for the Werkbund exposition in Cologne....

  20. Effect of inclusion matrix model on temperature and thermal stress fields of K9-glass damaged by long-pulse laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Yunxiang; Wang, Bin; Shen, Zhonghua; Lu, Jian; Ni, Xiaowu

    2013-04-01

    A model containing an inclusion matrix heated by a millisecond laser is proposed to calculate temperature and thermal stress fields of K9-glass using a finite element method. First, the evolution of temperature and thermal stress fields is analyzed. Results show that both the upper and lower surfaces are damaged. K9-glass is primarily damaged by the combination of radial and axial stresses. Calculated damage morphology is mainly determined by radial stress. Then damage morphology evolution with the increase of the incident laser energy is investigated, which shows that damage area spreads inward from both the front and rear surfaces. Finally, experimental results of long-pulse laser damage of K9-glass are analyzed. The comparison of numerical results with experimental observations shows a good correlation in damage morphology, which indicates that the built inclusion matrix model is applicable to long-pulse laser damage in K9-glass.

  1. Study of the validity of a combined potential model using the Hybrid Reverse Monte Carlo method in Fluoride glass system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Kotbi

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The choice of appropriate interaction models is among the major disadvantages of conventional methods such as Molecular Dynamics (MD and Monte Carlo (MC simulations. On the other hand, the so-called Reverse Monte Carlo (RMC method, based on experimental data, can be applied without any interatomic and/or intermolecular interactions. The RMC results are accompanied by artificial satellite peaks. To remedy this problem, we use an extension of the RMC algorithm, which introduces an energy penalty term into the acceptance criteria. This method is referred to as the Hybrid Reverse Monte Carlo (HRMC method. The idea of this paper is to test the validity of a combined potential model of coulomb and Lennard-Jones in a Fluoride glass system BaMnMF7 (M = Fe,V using HRMC method. The results show a good agreement between experimental and calculated characteristics, as well as a meaningful improvement in partial pair distribution functions (PDFs. We suggest that this model should be used in calculating the structural properties and in describing the average correlations between components of fluoride glass or a similar system. We also suggest that HRMC could be useful as a tool for testing the interaction potential models, as well as for conventional applications.

  2. Study of bioadhesion on a flat plate with a yeast/glass model system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mercier-Bonin, M; Ouazzani, K; Schmitz, P; Lorthois, S

    2004-03-15

    The attachment of microorganisms to a surface is a critical first step of biofilm fouling in membrane processes. The shear-induced detachment of baker's yeast in adhesive contact with a plane glass surface was thus experimentally studied, using a specially designed shear stress flow chamber. The yeast was marketed either as rod-shaped pellets (type I yeast) or as spherical pellets (type II yeast). A complete series of experiments for measuring the shear stress necessary to detach a given proportion of individual yeast cells of type I or II was performed under different environmental conditions (ionic strength, contact time). In parallel, the surface physicochemical properties of the cells (surface charge, hydrophobicity, and electron donor and electron acceptor components) were determined. For the first type of yeast cells, which were rather hydrophilic, adhesion to the glass plate was weak. This was due to both electrostatic effects and hydrophilic repulsion. Furthermore, adhesion was not sensitive to any variation of the ionic strength. For yeast of the second type, adhesion was drastically increased. This could be explained by their physicochemical surface properties and especially their hydrophobic and electron acceptor components, which caused strong attractive van der Waals and Lewis acid-base interactions, counterbalancing the electrostatic repulsion. For increasing ionic strengths, adhesion was greater, due to lower electrostatic repulsion. The results were quantified through the definition of a critical wall shear stress ( tau w 50% ) required to detach 50% of the yeast cells initially deposited on the glass surface. The influence of the contact time was also evaluated and it was shown that, whatever the type of yeast, macromolecules such as proteins were released into the extracellular medium due to cell lysis and could contribute to the formation of a conditioning film. As a result, the cells were more strongly stuck to the glass plate.

  3. Density-temperature scaling of the fragility in a model glass-former

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schrøder, Thomas; Sengupta, Shiladitya; Sastry, Srikanth

    2013-01-01

    Dynamical quantities e.g. diffusivity and relaxation time for some glass-formers may depend on density and temperature through a specific combination, rather than independently, allowing the representation of data over ranges of density and temperature as a function of a single scaling variable...... of the activation free energy in the Adam-Gibbs relation, is consistent with the exponent values obtained by other means....

  4. Glass Glimpsed

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lock, Charles

    2015-01-01

    Glass in poetry as it reflects the viewer and as its power of reflection are both reduced and enhanced by technology.......Glass in poetry as it reflects the viewer and as its power of reflection are both reduced and enhanced by technology....

  5. Physical chemistry of glass fracture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Michalske, T.A. [Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1993-12-31

    Since silica glass is a brittle material, its susceptibility to fracture often limits its use in technological applications. Previous studies have demonstrated that the fracture resistance of silica glass is decreased greatly by the presence of chemically reactive species such as water. By studying the effect of controlled amounts of reactive gases on the fracture rate in silica glass, the authors have developed chemical kinetics based models to describe the molecular level processes that lead to stress corrosion fracture of glass. A key aspect of our chemical kinetics based model is the measurement of the stress dependence for the hydrolysis of siloxane bonds. The authors derive the stress dependence for hydrolysis from reaction rate studies that are conducted on strained cyclosiloxane model compounds. The chemical kinetic parameter derived from model compounds is used to successfully predict the fracture behavior of bulk silica glass and the mechanical fatigue of high-strength silica glass fibers in various reactive chemical environments.

  6. Potassium-and silver-double-ion-exchanged slab glass waveguides: characterization and modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Auger, P L; Najafi, S I

    1994-06-01

    Double-ion-exchanged glass waveguides are made first by a potassium-ion exchange followed by a silver-ion exchange. The inverse WKB method is used to determine the index profile. It is shown that a combination of a truncated quadratic function and a complementary error function represents the refractive index best. A direct WKB method is employed to find the maximum index change and the diffusion coefficient of the second exchange process. The concentration of silver, potassium, and sodium ions are measured by an x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy technique. The results agree well with the index profile when a quadratic function is used.

  7. Model-based control of glass melting furnaces and forehearths: first principles-based model of predictive control system design

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Backx, T.C.; Huisman, L.; Astrid, P.; Beerkens, R.G.C.

    2003-01-01

    The volume of the Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceeding (CESP) series, in which this paper is incorporated, contains a collection of papers dealing with issues in both traditional ceramics (i.e., glass, whitewares, refractories, and porcelain enamel) and advanced ceramics. Topics covered in the

  8. Shear modulus of simulated glass-forming model systems: Effects of boundary condition, temperature, and sampling time

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wittmer, J. P.; Xu, H.; Polińska, P.; Weysser, F.; Baschnagel, J.

    2013-03-01

    The shear modulus G of two glass-forming colloidal model systems in d = 3 and d = 2 dimensions is investigated by means of, respectively, molecular dynamics and Monte Carlo simulations. Comparing ensembles where either the shear strain γ or the conjugated (mean) shear stress τ are imposed, we compute G from the respective stress and strain fluctuations as a function of temperature T while keeping a constant normal pressure P. The choice of the ensemble is seen to be highly relevant for the shear stress fluctuations μF(T) which at constant τ decay monotonously with T following the affine shear elasticity μA(T), i.e., a simple two-point correlation function. At variance, non-monotonous behavior with a maximum at the glass transition temperature Tg is demonstrated for μF(T) at constant γ. The increase of G below Tg is reasonably fitted for both models by a continuous cusp singularity, G(T)∝(1 - T/Tg)1/2, in qualitative agreement with recent theoretical predictions. It is argued, however, that longer sampling times may lead to a sharper transition.

  9. The component slope linear model for calculating intensive partial molar properties /application to waste glasses and aluminate solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reynolds, Jacob G. [Washington River Protection Solutions, LLC, Richland, WA (United States)

    2013-01-11

    Partial molar properties are the changes occurring when the fraction of one component is varied while the fractions of all other component mole fractions change proportionally. They have many practical and theoretical applications in chemical thermodynamics. Partial molar properties of chemical mixtures are difficult to measure because the component mole fractions must sum to one, so a change in fraction of one component must be offset with a change in one or more other components. Given that more than one component fraction is changing at a time, it is difficult to assign a change in measured response to a change in a single component. In this study, the Component Slope Linear Model (CSLM), a model previously published in the statistics literature, is shown to have coefficients that correspond to the intensive partial molar properties. If a measured property is plotted against the mole fraction of a component while keeping the proportions of all other components constant, the slope at any given point on a graph of this curve is the partial molar property for that constituent. Actually plotting this graph has been used to determine partial molar properties for many years. The CSLM directly includes this slope in a model that predicts properties as a function of the component mole fractions. This model is demonstrated by applying it to the constant pressure heat capacity data from the NaOH-NaAl(OH){sub 4}-H{sub 2}O system, a system that simplifies Hanford nuclear waste. The partial molar properties of H{sub 2}O, NaOH, and NaAl(OH){sub 4} are determined. The equivalence of the CSLM and the graphical method is verified by comparing results determined by the two methods. The CSLM model has been previously used to predict the liquidus temperature of spinel crystals precipitated from Hanford waste glass. Those model coefficients are re-interpreted here as the partial molar spinel liquidus temperature of the glass components.

  10. The Component Slope Linear Model for Calculating Intensive Partial Molar Properties: Application to Waste Glasses and Aluminate Solutions - 13099

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reynolds, Jacob G. [Washington River Protection Solutions, LLC, P.O. Box 850, Richland, WA 99352 (United States)

    2013-07-01

    Partial molar properties are the changes occurring when the fraction of one component is varied while the fractions of all other component mole fractions change proportionally. They have many practical and theoretical applications in chemical thermodynamics. Partial molar properties of chemical mixtures are difficult to measure because the component mole fractions must sum to one, so a change in fraction of one component must be offset with a change in one or more other components. Given that more than one component fraction is changing at a time, it is difficult to assign a change in measured response to a change in a single component. In this study, the Component Slope Linear Model (CSLM), a model previously published in the statistics literature, is shown to have coefficients that correspond to the intensive partial molar properties. If a measured property is plotted against the mole fraction of a component while keeping the proportions of all other components constant, the slope at any given point on a graph of this curve is the partial molar property for that constituent. Actually plotting this graph has been used to determine partial molar properties for many years. The CSLM directly includes this slope in a model that predicts properties as a function of the component mole fractions. This model is demonstrated by applying it to the constant pressure heat capacity data from the NaOHNaAl(OH){sub 4}-H{sub 2}O system, a system that simplifies Hanford nuclear waste. The partial molar properties of H{sub 2}O, NaOH, and NaAl(OH){sub 4} are determined. The equivalence of the CSLM and the graphical method is verified by comparing results determined by the two methods. The CSLM model has been previously used to predict the liquidus temperature of spinel crystals precipitated from Hanford waste glass. Those model coefficients are re-interpreted here as the partial molar spinel liquidus temperature of the glass components. (authors)

  11. Numerical Modelling of the Compressive and Tensile Response of Glass and Ceramic under High Pressure Dynamic Loading

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clegg, Richard A.; Hayhurst, Colin J.

    1999-06-01

    Ceramic materials, including glass, are commonly used as ballistic protection materials. The response of a ceramic to impact, perforation and penetration is complex and difficult and/or expensive to instrument for obtaining detailed physical data. This paper demonstrates how a hydrocode, such as AUTODYN, can be used to aid in the understanding of the response of brittle materials to high pressure impact loading and thus promote an efficient and cost effective design process. Hydrocode simulations cannot be made without appropriate characterisation of the material. Because of the complexitiy of the response of ceramic materials this often requires a number of complex material tests. Here we present a methodology for using the results of flyer plate tests, in conjunction with numerical simulations, to derive input to the Johnson-Holmquist material model for ceramics. Most of the research effort in relation to the development of hydrocode material models for ceramics has concentrated on the material behaviour under compression and shear. While the penetration process is dominated by these aspects of the material response, the final damaged state of the material can be significantly influenced by the tensile behaviour. Modelling of the final damage state is important since this is often the only physical information which is available. In this paper we present a unique implementation, in a hydrocode, for improved modelling of brittle materials in the tensile regime. Tensile failure initiation is based on any combination of principal stress or strain while the post-failure tensile response of the material is controlled through a Rankine plasticity damaging failure surface. The tensile failure surface can be combined with any of the traditional plasticity and/or compressive damage models. Finally, the models and data are applied in both traditional grid based Lagrangian and Eulerian solution techniques and the relativley new SPH (Smooth Particle Hydrodynamics) meshless

  12. Phase field crystal modelling of the order-to-disordered atomistic structure transition of metallic glasses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, W.; Mi, J.

    2016-03-01

    Bulk metallic glass composites are a new class of metallic alloy systems that have very high tensile strength, ductility and fracture toughness. This unique combination of mechanical properties is largely determined by the presence of crystalline phases uniformly distributed within the glassy matrix. However, there have been very limited reports on how the crystalline phases are nucleated in the super-cooled liquid and their growth dynamics, especially lack of information on the order-to-disordered atomistic structure transition across the crystalline-amorphous interface. In this paper, we use phase field crystal (PFC) method to study the nucleation and growth of the crystalline phases and the glass formation of the super cooled liquid of a binary alloy. The study is focused on understanding the order-to-disordered transition of atomistic configuration across the interface between the crystalline phases and amorphous matrix of different chemical compositions at different thermal conditions. The capability of using PFC to simulate the order-to-disorder atomistic transition in the bulk material or across the interface is discussed in details.

  13. Prediction models of long-term leaching behavior and leaching mechanism of glass components and surrogated nuclides in radioactive vitrified waste forms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seo, Y. C.; Lee, K. S. [Department of Industrial Environment and Health, Yonsei University, Wonju (Korea, Republic of); Kim, I. T.; Kim, H. T.; Kim, J. H. [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI), Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1999-07-01

    Melting solidification is considered to be a perspective technology for stabilizing incineration ash remaining after incineration of combustible radioactive waste since it has the advantage of improving the physicochemical properties of waste forms. Final waste forms should be characterized to determine the degree to which they fulfills the acceptance criteria of the disposal facility. Chemical durability (leaching resistance) is known to be the most important factor in the assessment of waste forms. In this study, vitrified waste forms are manufactured and characterized. Feed materials consist of simulated radioactive incineration ash and base-glass with different mixing ratios. To assess the chemical durability of vitrified waste forms, the International Standard Organization (ISO) leach test has been conducted at 70 degree C with deionized distilled water as a leachant for 820 days, and the concentrations of glass components and surrogates in the leachates are then analyzed. Two models for predicting long-term leaching behavior of glass components and radionuclides in a glass form are applied to the leached data after 820 days. The model including a fitted parameter from the longer experimental data shows more accuracy, however, the model with shorter leaching test results offers the advantage of being able to predict the long-term behavior from the short-term experimental data. The leaching mechanisms of surrogates and glass components were also investigated by using two semi-empirical kinetic models and were found to be dissolution with diffusion. (author)

  14. Analytical Plan for Roman Glasses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Strachan, Denis M.; Buck, Edgar C.; Mueller, Karl T.; Schwantes, Jon M.; Olszta, Matthew J.; Thevuthasan, Suntharampillai; Heeren, Ronald M.

    2011-01-01

    Roman glasses that have been in the sea or underground for about 1800 years can serve as the independent “experiment” that is needed for validation of codes and models that are used in performance assessment. Two sets of Roman-era glasses have been obtained for this purpose. One set comes from the sunken vessel the Iulia Felix; the second from recently excavated glasses from a Roman villa in Aquileia, Italy. The specimens contain glass artifacts and attached sediment or soil. In the case of the Iulia Felix glasses quite a lot of analytical work has been completed at the University of Padova, but from an archaeological perspective. The glasses from Aquileia have not been so carefully analyzed, but they are similar to other Roman glasses. Both glass and sediment or soil need to be analyzed and are the subject of this analytical plan. The glasses need to be analyzed with the goal of validating the model used to describe glass dissolution. The sediment and soil need to be analyzed to determine the profile of elements released from the glass. This latter need represents a significant analytical challenge because of the trace quantities that need to be analyzed. Both pieces of information will yield important information useful in the validation of the glass dissolution model and the chemical transport code(s) used to determine the migration of elements once released from the glass. In this plan, we outline the analytical techniques that should be useful in obtaining the needed information and suggest a useful starting point for this analytical effort.

  15. Structure of shock compressed model basaltic glass: Insights from O K-edge X-ray Raman scattering and high-resolution 27Al NMR spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Sung Keun; Park, Sun Young; Kim, Hyo-Im; Tschauner, Oliver; Asimow, Paul; Bai, Ligang; Xiao, Yuming; Chow, Paul (UNLV); (SNU); (CIT); (CIW)

    2012-05-29

    The detailed atomic structures of shock compressed basaltic glasses are not well understood. Here, we explore the structures of shock compressed silicate glass with a diopside-anorthite eutectic composition (Di{sub 64}An{sub 36}), a common Fe-free model basaltic composition, using oxygen K-edge X-ray Raman scattering and high-resolution {sup 27}Al solid-state NMR spectroscopy and report previously unknown details of shock-induced changes in the atomic configurations. A topologically driven densification of the Di{sub 64}An{sub 36} glass is indicated by the increase in oxygen K-edge energy for the glass upon shock compression. The first experimental evidence of the increase in the fraction of highly coordinated Al in shock compressed glass is found in the {sup 27}Al NMR spectra. This unambiguous evidence of shock-induced changes in Al coordination environments provides atomistic insights into shock compression in basaltic glasses and allows us to microscopically constrain the magnitude of impact events or relevant processes involving natural basalts on Earth and planetary surfaces.

  16. Effect of gravity on colloid transport through water-saturated columns packed with glass beads: modeling and experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chrysikopoulos, Constantinos V; Syngouna, Vasiliki I

    2014-06-17

    The role of gravitational force on colloid transport in water-saturated columns packed with glass beads was investigated. Transport experiments were performed with colloids (clays: kaolinite KGa-1b, montmorillonite STx-1b). The packed columns were placed in various orientations (horizontal, vertical, and diagonal) and a steady flow rate of Q = 1.5 mL/min was applied in both up-flow and down-flow modes. All experiments were conducted under electrostatically unfavorable conditions. The experimental data were fitted with a newly developed, analytical, one-dimensional, colloid transport model. The effect of gravity is incorporated in the mathematical model by combining the interstitial velocity (advection) with the settling velocity (gravity effect). The results revealed that flow direction influences colloid transport in porous media. The rate of particle deposition was shown to be greater for up-flow than for down-flow direction, suggesting that gravity was a significant driving force for colloid deposition.

  17. Various sizes of sliding event bursts in the plastic flow of metallic glasses based on a spatiotemporal dynamic model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ren, Jingli, E-mail: renjl@zzu.edu.cn, E-mail: g.wang@shu.edu.cn; Chen, Cun [School of Mathematics and Statistics, Zhengzhou University, Zhengzhou 450001 (China); Wang, Gang, E-mail: renjl@zzu.edu.cn, E-mail: g.wang@shu.edu.cn [Laboratory for Microstructures, Shanghai University, Shanghai 200444 (China); Cheung, Wing-Sum [Department of Mathematics, The University of HongKong, HongKong (China); Sun, Baoan; Mattern, Norbert [IFW-dresden, Institute for Complex Materials, P.O. Box 27 01 16, D-01171 Dresden (Germany); Siegmund, Stefan [Department of Mathematics, TU Dresden, D-01062 Dresden (Germany); Eckert, Jürgen [IFW-dresden, Institute for Complex Materials, P.O. Box 27 01 16, D-01171 Dresden (Germany); Institute of Materials Science, TU Dresden, D-01062 Dresden (Germany)

    2014-07-21

    This paper presents a spatiotemporal dynamic model based on the interaction between multiple shear bands in the plastic flow of metallic glasses during compressive deformation. Various sizes of sliding events burst in the plastic deformation as the generation of different scales of shear branches occurred; microscopic creep events and delocalized sliding events were analyzed based on the established model. This paper discusses the spatially uniform solutions and traveling wave solution. The phase space of the spatially uniform system applied in this study reflected the chaotic state of the system at a lower strain rate. Moreover, numerical simulation showed that the microscopic creep events were manifested at a lower strain rate, whereas the delocalized sliding events were manifested at a higher strain rate.

  18. Network structure of molybdate glasses by neutron and X-ray diffraction and reverse Monte Carlo modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fabian, M.; Svab, E.; Krezhov, K.

    2016-09-01

    Rare-earth molybdate glasses have been prepared by rapid quench technique, the network structure was investigated by neutron and high-energy X-ray diffraction. For data evaluation the reverse Monte Carlo simulation technique was applied to obtain a possible 3dimensional network configuration, which is consistent with the experimental data. From the modelling the partial atomic correlation functions giJ(r) and the coordination number distributions CNij have been revealed. Formation of MoO4 (55%) and MoO6 (25%) units was established for the binary 90MoO3-10Nd2O3 glass. The B-O first neighbour distribution show a relatively broad first neighbour distance at 1.40A, the average coordination numbers show the presents of trigonal BO3 and tetrahedral BO4 groups. For 50MoO3-25Nd2O3-25B2O3 sample mixed MoO4-BO4 and MoO4-BO3 linkages form pronounced intermediate-range order.

  19. Are the dynamics of silicate glasses and glass-forming liquids embedded in their elastic properties?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Smedskjær, Morten Mattrup; Mauro, John C.

    According to the elastic theory of the glass transition, the dynamics of glasses and glass-forming liquids are controlled by the evolution of shear modulus. In particular, the elastic shoving model expresses dynamics in terms of an activation energy required to shove aside the surrounding atoms, ...... of the silicate glass transition are governed by additional factors beyond the evolution of the shear modulus....

  20. Constructive interference between disordered couplings enhances multiparty entanglement in quantum Heisenberg spin glass models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishra, Utkarsh; Rakshit, Debraj; Prabhu, R.; Sen(De, Aditi; Sen, Ujjwal

    2016-08-01

    Disordered systems form one of the centrestages of research in many body sciences and lead to a plethora of interesting phenomena and applications. A paradigmatic disordered system consists of a one-dimensional array of quantum spin-1/2 particles, governed by the Heisenberg spin glass Hamiltonian with natural or engineered quenched disordered couplings in an external magnetic field. These systems allow disorder-induced enhancement for bipartite and multipartite observables. Here we show that simultaneous application of independent quenched disorders results in disorder-induced enhancement, while the same is absent with individual application of the same disorders. We term the phenomenon as constructive interference and the corresponding parameter stretches as the Venus regions. Interestingly, it has only been observed for multiparty entanglement and is absent for the single- and two-party physical quantities.

  1. Glass forming ability of Zr-Al-Ni(Co,Cu) understood via cluster sharing model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jixiang Chen; Yi Cheng

    2014-01-01

    Clusters are shared atoms in different ways with their neighboring clusters in the crystalline phases. Cluster formula [effective cluster]1(glue atom)x can be used to describe crystalline phases, and the effective cluster means the true cluster composition due to cluster overlapping in the phase structure. Degree of cluster sharing of Zr6Al2Ni (InMg2), Zr2Co (Al2Cu) and Zr2Cu (MoSi2) phases is investigated in this paper. Ni3Zr9, Co3Zr8 and Cu5Zr10 clusters are highlighted because they have the least degree of sharing and can best represent the local atomic short-range order features of the formed phases. It is pointed out that the least sharing clusters are correlated with metallic glass formation and are verified by experiments.

  2. Which Oxide for Low-Emissivity Glasses? First-Principles Modeling of Silver Adhesion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornil, David; Wiame, Hugues; Lecomte, Benoit; Cornil, Jérôme; Beljonne, David

    2017-05-31

    Density functional theory (DFT) calculations were performed to assess the work of adhesion of silver layers deposited on metal oxide surfaces differing by their chemical nature (ZnO, TiO2, SnO2, and ZrO2) and their crystallographic face. The calculated work of adhesion values range from ∼0 to 3 J m(-2) and are shown to originate from the interplay between ionic (associated with charge transfer at the interface) and covalent (as probed by atomic bond orders between silver and the metal oxide atoms) interactions. The results are discussed in the context of the design of silver/metal oxide interfaces for low-emissivity glasses.

  3. Ground-state energy and entropy of the two-dimensional Edwards-Anderson spin-glass model with different bond distributions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez-Morelo, D. J.; Ramirez-Pastor, A. J.; Romá, F.

    2012-02-01

    We study the two-dimensional Edwards-Anderson spin-glass model using a parallel tempering Monte Carlo algorithm. The ground-state energy and entropy are calculated for different bond distributions. In particular, the entropy is obtained by using a thermodynamic integration technique and an appropriate reference state, which is determined with the method of high-temperature expansion. This strategy provides accurate values of this quantity for finite-size lattices. By extrapolating to the thermodynamic limit, the ground-state energy and entropy of the different versions of the spin-glass model are determined.

  4. Perspectives on spin glasses

    CERN Document Server

    Contucci, Pierluigi

    2013-01-01

    Presenting and developing the theory of spin glasses as a prototype for complex systems, this book is a rigorous and up-to-date introduction to their properties. The book combines a mathematical description with a physical insight of spin glass models. Topics covered include the physical origins of those models and their treatment with replica theory; mathematical properties like correlation inequalities and their use in the thermodynamic limit theory; main exact solutions of the mean field models and their probabilistic structures; and the theory of the structural properties of the spin glass phase such as stochastic stability and the overlap identities. Finally, a detailed account is given of the recent numerical simulation results and properties, including overlap equivalence, ultrametricity and decay of correlations. The book is ideal for mathematical physicists and probabilists working in disordered systems.

  5. Structural color from colloidal glasses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magkiriadou, Sofia

    When a material has inhomogeneities at a lengthscale comparable to the wavelength of light, interference can give rise to structural colors: colors that originate from the interaction of the material's microstructure with light and do not require absorbing dyes. In this thesis we study a class of these materials, called photonic glasses, where the inhomogeneities form a dense and random arrangement. Photonic glasses have angle-independent structural colors that look like those of conventional dyes. However, when this work started, there was only a handful of colors accessible with photonic glasses, mostly hues of blue. We use various types of colloidal particles to make photonic glasses, and we study, both theoretically and experimentally, how the optical properties of these glasses relate to their structure and constituent particles. Based on our observations from glasses of conventional particles, we construct a theoretical model that explains the scarcity of yellow, orange, and red photonic glasses. Guided by this model, we develop novel colloidal systems that allow a higher degree of control over structural color. We assemble glasses of soft, core-shell particles with scattering cores and transparent shells, where the resonant wavelength can be tuned independently of the reflectivity. We then encapsulate glasses of these core-shell particles into emulsion droplets of tunable size; in this system, we observe, for the first time, angle-independent structural colors that cover the entire visible spectrum. To enhance color saturation, we begin experimenting with inverse glasses, where the refractive index of the particles is lower than the refractive index of the medium, with promising results. Finally, based on our theoretical model for scattering from colloidal glasses, we begin an exploration of the color gamut that could be achieved with this technique, and we find that photonic glasses are a promising approach to a new type of long-lasting, non-toxic, and

  6. Thermal stability of the French nuclear waste glass - long term behavior modeling; Etude de la stabilite thermique du verre nucleaire. Modelisation de son evolution a long terme

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Orlhac, X

    2000-07-01

    The thermal stability of the French nuclear waste glass was investigated experimentally and by modeling to predict its long-term evolution at low temperature. The crystallization mechanisms were analyzed by studying devitrification in the supercooled liquid. Three main crystalline phases were characterized (CaMoO{sub 4}, CeCO{sub 2}, ZnCr{sub 2}O{sub 4}). Their crystallisation was TO 4.24 wt%, due to the low concentration of the constituent elements. The nucleation and growth curves showed that platinoid elements catalysed nucleation but did not affect growth, which was governed by volume diffusion. The criteria of classic nucleation theory were applied to determine the thermodynamic and diffusional activation energies. Viscosity measurements illustrate the analogy between the activation energy of viscous flow and diffusion, indicating control of crystallization by viscous flow phenomena. The combined action of nucleation and growth was assessed by TTT plots, revealing a crystallization equilibrium line that enables the crystallized fractions to be predicted over the long term. The authors show that hetero-genetics catalyze the transformation without modifying the maximum crystallized fraction. A kinetic model was developed to describe devitrification in the glass based on the nucleation and growth curves alone. The authors show that the low-temperature growth exhibits scale behavior (between time and temperature) similar to thermo-rheological simplicity. The analogy between the resulting activation energy and that of the viscosity was used to model growth on the basis of viscosity. After validation with a simplified (BaO{sub 2}SiO{sub 2}) glass, the model was applied to the containment glass. The result indicated that the glass remained completely vitreous after a cooling scenario with the one measured at the glass core. Under isothermal conditions, several million years would be required to reach the maximum theoretical crystallization fraction. (author)

  7. Glass Formation of n-Butanol: Coarse-grained Molecular Dynamics Simulations Using Gay-Berne Potential Model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Gui-long Xie; Yong-hong Zhang; Shi-ping Huang

    2012-01-01

    Using coarse-grained molecular dynamics simulations based on Gay-Berne potential model,we have simulated the cooling process of liquid n-butanol.A new set of GB parameters are obtained by fitting the results of density functional theory calculations.The simulations are carried out in the range of 290-50 K with temperature decrements of 10 K.The cooling characteristics are determined on the basis of the variations of the density,the potential energy and orientational order parameter with temperature,whose slopes all show discontinuity.Both the radial distribution function curves and the second-rank orientational correlation function curves exhibit splitting in the second peak.Using the discontinuous change of these thermodynamic and structure properties,we obtain the glass transition at an estimate of temperature Tg=120±10 K,which is in good agreement with experimental results 110±1 K.

  8. A Note on the Guerra and Talagrand Theorems for Mean Field Spin Glasses: The Simple Case of Spherical Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franz, Silvio; Tria, Francesca

    2006-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to discuss the main ideas of the Talagrand proof of the Parisi Ansatz for the free-energy of Mean Field Spin Glasses with a physicist's approach. We consider the case of the spherical p-spin model, which has the following advantages: (1) the Parisi Ansatz takes the simple "one step replica symmetry breaking form," (2) the replica free-energy as a function of the order parameters is simple enough to allow for numerical maximization with arbitrary precision. We present the essential ideas of the proof, we stress its connections with the theory of effective potentials for glassy systems, and we reduce the technically more difficult part of the Talagrand's analysis to an explicit evaluation of the solution of a variational problem.

  9. Phenomenological theory of a renormalized simplified model based on time-convolutionless mode-coupling theory near the glass transition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tokuyama, Michio

    2017-01-01

    The renormalized simplified model is proposed to investigate indirectly how the static structure factor plays an important role in renormalizing a quadratic nonlinear term in the ideal mode-coupling memory function near the glass transition. The renormalized simplified recursion equation is then derived based on the time-convolutionless mode-coupling theory (TMCT) proposed recently by the present author. This phenomenological approach is successfully applied to check from a unified point of view how strong liquids are different from fragile liquids. The simulation results for those two types of liquids are analyzed consistently by the numerical solutions of the recursion equation. Then, the control parameter dependence of the renormalized nonlinear exponent in both types of liquids is fully investigated. Thus, it is shown that there exists a novel difference between the universal behavior in strong liquids and that in fragile liquids not only for their transport coefficients but also for their dynamics.

  10. Magnetic-resonance imaging and simplified Kozeny-Carman-model analysis of glass-bead packs as a frame of reference to study permeability of reservoir rocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Dayong; Han, Dongyan; Li, Wenqiang; Zheng, Zhanpeng; Song, Yongchen

    2017-03-01

    Permeability variation in reservoir rocks results from the combined effects of various factors, and makes porosity-permeability (ϕ-k) relationships more complex, or, in some cases, non-existent. In this work, the ϕ-k relationship of macroscopically homogeneous glass-bead packs is deduced based on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) measurement and Kozeny-Carman (K-C) model analysis; these are used as a frame of reference to study permeability of reservoir rocks. The results indicate: (1) most of the commonly used simplified K-C models (e.g. the simplified traditional (omitting specific surface area), high-order, threshold, and fractal models) are suitable for estimating permeability of glass-bead packs. The simplified traditional model does not present obvious dependence on rock samples. Whether for the glass-bead packs or clean natural sandstones, the sample coefficients almost remain invariant. Comparably, the high-order, the fractal, and the threshold models are strongly sample-specific and cannot be extrapolated from the glass-bead packs to natural sandstones; (2) the ϕ-k relationships of quartz sands and silty sandstones resemble those of the glass-bead packs, but they significantly deviate from the K-C models at low porosities due to small pore entry radius; (3) a small amount of intergranular cements (<10%v) does not affect the general variation trend of permeability with porosity but can potentially increase predictive errors of the K-C models, whereas in the case of more cements, the ϕ-k relationships of sandstones become uncertain and cannot be described by any of these K-C models.

  11. Magnetic-resonance imaging and simplified Kozeny-Carman-model analysis of glass-bead packs as a frame of reference to study permeability of reservoir rocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Dayong; Han, Dongyan; Li, Wenqiang; Zheng, Zhanpeng; Song, Yongchen

    2017-08-01

    Permeability variation in reservoir rocks results from the combined effects of various factors, and makes porosity-permeability ( ϕ- k) relationships more complex, or, in some cases, non-existent. In this work, the ϕ- k relationship of macroscopically homogeneous glass-bead packs is deduced based on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) measurement and Kozeny-Carman (K-C) model analysis; these are used as a frame of reference to study permeability of reservoir rocks. The results indicate: (1) most of the commonly used simplified K-C models (e.g. the simplified traditional (omitting specific surface area), high-order, threshold, and fractal models) are suitable for estimating permeability of glass-bead packs. The simplified traditional model does not present obvious dependence on rock samples. Whether for the glass-bead packs or clean natural sandstones, the sample coefficients almost remain invariant. Comparably, the high-order, the fractal, and the threshold models are strongly sample-specific and cannot be extrapolated from the glass-bead packs to natural sandstones; (2) the ϕ- k relationships of quartz sands and silty sandstones resemble those of the glass-bead packs, but they significantly deviate from the K-C models at low porosities due to small pore entry radius; (3) a small amount of intergranular cements (<10%v) does not affect the general variation trend of permeability with porosity but can potentially increase predictive errors of the K-C models, whereas in the case of more cements, the ϕ- k relationships of sandstones become uncertain and cannot be described by any of these K-C models.

  12. Influence of chain topology and bond potential on the glass transition of polymer chains simulated with the bond fluctuation model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Freire, J J [Departamento de Ciencias y Tecnicas FisicoquImicas, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad Nacional de Educacion a Distancia (UNED), Senda del Rey 9, 28040 Madrid (Spain)], E-mail: jfreire@invi.uned.es

    2008-07-16

    The bond fluctuation model with a bond potential has been applied to investigation of the glass transition of linear chains and chains with a regular disposition of small branches. Cooling and subsequent heating curves are obtained for the chain energies and also for the mean acceptance probability of a bead jump. In order to mimic different trends to vitrification, a factor B gauging the strength of the bond potential with respect to the long-range potential (i.e. the intramolecular or intermolecular potential between indirectly bonded beads) has been introduced. (A higher value of B leads to a preference for the highest bond lengths and a higher total energy, implying a greater tendency to vitrify.) Different cases have been considered for linear chains: no long-range potential, no bond potential and several choices for B. Furthermore, two distinct values of B have been considered for alternate bonds in linear chains. In the case of the branched chains, mixed models with different values of B for bonds in the main chain and in the branches have also been investigated. The possible presence of ordering or crystallization has been characterized by calculating the collective light scattering function of the different samples after annealing at a convenient temperature below the onset of the abrupt change in the curves associated with a thermodynamic transition. It is concluded that ordering is inherited more efficiently in the systems with branched chains and also for higher values of B. The branched molecules with the highest B values in the main chain bonds exhibit two distinct transitions in the heating curves, which may be associated with two glass transitions. This behavior has been detected experimentally for chains with relatively long flexible branches.

  13. Who will buy smart glasses?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rauschnabel, Philipp; Brem, Alexander; Ivens, Bjørn S.

    2015-01-01

    Recent market studies reveal that augmented reality (AR) devices, such as smart glasses, will substantially influence the media landscape. Yet, little is known about the intended adoption of smart glasses, particularly: Who are the early adopters of such wearables? We contribute to the growing body...... of research that investigates the role of personality in predicting media usage by analyzing smart glasses, particularly Google Glass. First, we integrate AR devices into the current evolution of media and technologies. Then, we draw on the Big Five Model of human personality and present the results from two...... studies that investigate the direct and moderating effects of human personality on the awareness and innovation adoption of smart glasses. Our results show that open and emotionally stable consumers tend to be more aware of Google Glass. Consumers who perceive the potential for high functional benefits...

  14. Modeling the Effect of Glass Microballoon (GMB) Volume Fraction on Behavior of Sylgard/GMB Composites.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, Judith Alice [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Long, Kevin Nicholas [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2017-05-01

    This work was done to support customer questions about whether a Sylgard/Glass Microballoon (GMB) potting material in current use could be replaced with pure Sylgard and if this would significantly change stresses imparted to internal components under thermal cycling conditions. To address these questions, we provide micromechanics analysis of Sylgard/GMB materials using both analytic composite theory and finite element simulations to better understand the role of the GMB volume fraction in determining thermal expansion coefficient, elastic constants, and behavior in both confined and unconfined compression boundary value problems. A key finding is that damage accumulation in the material from breakage of GMBs significantly limits the global stress magnitude and results in a plateau stress behavior over large ranges of compressive strain. The magnitude of this plateau stress is reduced with higher volume fractions of GMBs. This effect is particularly pronounced in confined compression, which we estimate bears the most similarity to the application of interest. This stress-limiting damage mechanism is not present in pure Sylgard, however, and the result is much higher stresses under confined compression. Thus, we recommend that some volume fraction greater than 10% GMBs be used for confined deformation applications.

  15. Understanding the effects of alpha self-irradiation on the glass structure by coupling spectroscopic studies and atomistic modeling; Comprehension structurale des effets d'auto-irradiation alpha dans les verre: couplage entre etudes spectroscopiques et modelisation atomistique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bureau, G.

    2008-12-15

    Our objective was to assess irradiation effects on nuclear containment glass in order to guarantee glass performance when subjected to high alpha decay doses. Experimental studies and molecular dynamics modeling provided a better understanding of the impact of cumulative alpha decay on the structural behavior of complex nuclear glass formulations and of simplified glass models. A mechanism typical of sodium borosilicate glass was identified in response to nuclear interactions or ballistic collisions. The glass local order is slightly modified by the conversion of a fraction of the boron atoms from coordination number IV to III, releasing charge-compensating alkali ions that become available as network modifiers, and resulting in a slight increase in the number of non bridging oxygen atoms. The medium-range order shifts toward increasing disorder in the glass as indicated by broadening of the angular, radial, and size distributions. A model of accumulated quasi-thermal quenching is proposed to account for these changes, based on the two steps describing the reaction of the glass to the alpha decay recoil nucleus: a cascade generates a ballistic phase that completely destabilizes the glass structure with no short and medium-range order, resulting in the loss of the initial structure; glass reconstruction is controlled only by the 'quenching rate' in the displacement cascade, i.e. by its thermal history and the corresponding relaxation options. From this standpoint the final glass structure is the consequence of the ballistic changes and the regenerative capacity of the glass structure, resulting in a higher fictive-temperature glass corresponding to the structural changes identified in this study. (author)

  16. Thermomechanical Modeling of Laser-Induced Structural Relaxation and Deformation of Glass: Volume Changes in Fused Silica at High Temperatures [Thermo-mechanical modeling of laser-induced structural relaxation and deformation of SiO2 glass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vignes, Ryan M. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States). National Ignition Facility and Photon Sciences; Soules, Thomas F. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States). National Ignition Facility and Photon Sciences; Stolken, James S. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States). National Ignition Facility and Photon Sciences; Settgast, Randolph R. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States). National Ignition Facility and Photon Sciences; Elhadj, Selim [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States). National Ignition Facility and Photon Sciences; Matthews, Manyalibo J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States). National Ignition Facility and Photon Sciences; Mauro, J.

    2012-12-17

    In a fully coupled thermomechanical model of the nanoscale deformation in amorphous SiO2 due to laser heating is presented. Direct measurement of the transient, nonuniform temperature profiles was used to first validate a nonlinear thermal transport model. Densification due to structural relaxation above the glass transition point was modeled using the Tool-Narayanaswamy (TN) formulation for the evolution of structural relaxation times and fictive temperature. TN relaxation parameters were derived from spatially resolved confocal Raman scattering measurements of Si–O–Si stretching mode frequencies. These thermal and microstructural data were used to simulate fictive temperatures which are shown to scale nearly linearly with density, consistent with previous measurements from Shelby et al. Volumetric relaxation coupled with thermal expansion occurring in the liquid-like and solid-like glassy states lead to residual stresses and permanent deformation which could be quantified. But, experimental surface deformation profiles between 1700 and 2000 K could only be reconciled with our simulation by assuming a roughly 2 × larger liquid thermal expansion for a-SiO2 with a temperature of maximum density ~150 K higher than previously estimated by Bruckner et al. Calculated stress fields agreed well with recent laser-induced critical fracture measurements, demonstrating accurate material response prediction under processing conditions of practical interest.

  17. Contribution to the improved ultrasonic testing of glass fiber-reinforced polymers based on analytic modeling; Beitrag zur Verbesserung der Ultraschallpruefung glasfaserverstaerkter Polymere auf der Grundlage analytischer Modellierung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gripp, S.

    2001-04-01

    The non-destructive testing of acoustic anisotropic materials like fiber composites has been evaluated. Modelling enabled predictions about wave deflection, direction of wave propagation, and refractive angle of ultrasonic waves in these media. Thus, measurements could be carried out using unidirectional glass-fiber composites.

  18. NEW ERBIUM DOPED ANTIMONY GLASSES FOR LASER AND GLASS AMPLIFICATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Tioua

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Because of the special spectroscopic properties of the rare earth ions, rare earth doped glasses are widely used in bulk and fiber lasers or amplifiers. The modelling of lasers and searching for new laser transitions require a precise knowledge of the spectroscopic properties of rare earth ions in different host glasses. In this poster will offer new doped erbium glasses synthesized in silicate crucibles were obtained in the combination Sb2O3-WO3-Na2O. Several properties are measured and correlated with glass compositions. The absorption spectral studies have been performed for erbium doped glasses. The intensities of various absorption bands of the doped glasses are measured and the Judd-Ofelt parameters have been computed. From the theory of Judd-Ofelt, various radiative properties, such as transition probability, branching ratio and radiative life time for various emission levels of these doped glasses have been determined and reported. These results confirm the ability of antimony glasses for glass amplification.

  19. NEW ERBIUM DOPED ANTIMONY GLASSES FOR LASER AND GLASS AMPLIFICATIONmplification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Tioua

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Because of the special spectroscopic properties of the rare earth ions, rare earth doped glasses are widely used in bulk and fiber lasers or amplifiers. The modelling of lasers and searching for new laser transitions require a precise knowledge of the spectroscopic properties of rare earth ions in different host glasses. in this poster will offer new doped erbium glasses synthesized in silicate crucibles were obtained in the combination Sb2O3-WO3-Na2O. Several properties are measured and correlated with glass compositions. The absorption spectral studies have been performed for erbium doped glasses. The intensities of various absorption bands of the doped glasses are measured and the Judd-Ofelt parameters have been computed. From the theory of Judd-Ofelt, various radiative properties, such as transition probability, branching ratio and radiative life time for various emission levels of these doped glasses have been determined and reported. These results confirm the ability of antimony glasses for glass amplification.

  20. Final Report - Enhanced LAW Glass Property - Composition Models - Phase 1 VSL-13R2940-1, Rev. 0, dated 9/27/2013

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kruger, Albert A.; Muller, I.; Gilbo, K.; Joseph, I.; Pegg, I. L.

    2013-11-13

    The objectives of this work are aimed at the development of enhanced LAW propertycomposition models that expand the composition region covered by the models. The models of interest include PCT, VHT, viscosity and electrical conductivity. This is planned as a multi-year effort that will be performed in phases with the objectives listed below for the current phase.  Incorporate property- composition data from the new glasses into the database.  Assess the database and identify composition spaces in the database that need augmentation.  Develop statistically-designed composition matrices to cover the composition regions identified in the above analysis.  Prepare crucible melts of glass compositions from the statistically-designed composition matrix and measure the properties of interest.  Incorporate the above property-composition data into the database.  Assess existing models against the complete dataset and, as necessary, start development of new models.

  1. Elastic models for the non-Arrhenius relaxation time of glass-forming liquids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dyre, Jeppe

    We first review the phenomenology of viscous liquids and the standard models used for explaining the non-Arrhenius average relaxation time. Then the focus is turned to the so-called elastic models, arguing that these models are all equivalent in the Einstein approximation (where the short...

  2. Elastic models for the Non-Arrhenius Relaxation Time of Glass-Forming Liquids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dyre, J. C.

    2006-01-01

    We first review the phenomenology of viscous liquids and the standard models used for explaining the non-Arrhenius average relaxation time. Then the focus is turned to the so-called elastic models, arguing that these models are all equivalent in the Einstein approximation (where the short...

  3. Effect of hydrolyzed whey protein on surface morphology, water sorption, and glass transition temperature of a model infant formula.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Grace M; O'Mahony, James A; Kelly, Alan L; O'Callaghan, Donal J

    2016-09-01

    Physical properties of spray-dried dairy powders depend on their composition and physical characteristics. This study investigated the effect of hydrolyzed whey protein on the microstructure and physical stability of dried model infant formula. Model infant formulas were produced containing either intact (DH 0) or hydrolyzed (DH 12) whey protein, where DH=degree of hydrolysis (%). Before spray drying, apparent viscosities of liquid feeds (at 55°C) at a shear rate of 500 s(-1) were 3.02 and 3.85 mPa·s for intact and hydrolyzed infant formulas, respectively. On reconstitution, powders with hydrolyzed whey protein had a significantly higher fat globule size and lower emulsion stability than intact whey protein powder. Lactose crystallization in powders occurred at higher relative humidity for hydrolyzed formula. The Guggenheim-Anderson-de Boer equation, fitted to sorption isotherms, showed increased monolayer moisture when intact protein was present. As expected, glass transition decreased significantly with increasing water content. Partial hydrolysis of whey protein in model infant formula resulted in altered powder particle surface morphology, lactose crystallization properties, and storage stability.

  4. Compression-recovery model of absorptive glass mat (AGM) separator guided by X-ray micro-computed tomography analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kameswara Rao, P. V.; Rawal, Amit; Kumar, Vijay; Rajput, Krishn Gopal

    2017-10-01

    Absorptive glass mat (AGM) separators play a key role in enhancing the cycle life of the valve regulated lead acid (VRLA) batteries by maintaining the elastic characteristics under a defined level of compression force with the plates of the electrodes. Inevitably, there are inherent challenges to maintain the required level of compression characteristics of AGM separators during the charge and discharge of the battery. Herein, we report a three-dimensional (3D) analytical model for predicting the compression-recovery behavior of AGM separators by formulating a direct relationship with the constituent fiber and structural parameters. The analytical model of compression-recovery behavior of AGM separators has successfully included the fiber slippage criterion and internal friction losses. The presented work uses, for the first time, 3D data of fiber orientation from X-ray micro-computed tomography, for predicting the compression-recovery behavior of AGM separators. A comparison has been made between the theoretical and experimental results of compression-recovery behavior of AGM samples with defined fiber orientation characteristics. In general, the theory agreed reasonably well with the experimental results of AGM samples in both dry and wet states. Through theoretical modeling, fiber volume fraction was established as one of the key structural parameters that modulates the compression hysteresis of an AGM separator.

  5. Rayleigh Scattering of Moessbauer Radiation (RSMR) data, hydration effects and glass-like dynamical model of biopolymers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gol' danskii, V.I.; Krupyanskii, Yu.F.; Fleurov, V.N.

    1986-06-01

    Specific features of the Rayleigh Scattering of Moessbauer Radiation (RSMR) technique in the study of biological systems are described. Experimental data show that the temperature and hydration degree are the principal parameters which influence intramolecular mobility in biopolymers. Data on temperature dependencies of elastic fraction, f, and spectrum line-shape do not fit neither Debye or Einstein models of solids nor the free diffusion in liquids and demand for their explanation a multimode approximation (i.e. a wide spectrum of correlation times, at T=293 K from 10/sup -6/s to 10/sup -12/-10/sup -13/s). On the basis of RSMR, low temperature specific heat and X-ray dynamic analysis data and from the general conditions that information macromolecule must be in a non-equilibrium state (an independent confirmation of this fact comes from the kinetic model of protein folding) a glass-like dynamical model of biopolymers is formulated. A possible interpretation of RSMR data shows that fluctuatively prepared tunneling between quasiequilibrium positions (QEP) can prevail activated transitions up to a room temperature.

  6. NUMERICAL MODELING OF CONJUGATE HEAT TRANSFER IN AN INSULATED GLASS UNIT (IGU WITH ACCOUNT FOR ITS DEFORMATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Golubev Stanislav Sergeevich

    2012-12-01

    The effects of different climatic impacts lead to the deformation of glasses within an IGU (and its vertical cavity, respectively. Deformation of glasses and vertical cavities reduces the thermal resistance of an IGU. A numerical simulation of conjugate heat transfer within an IGU was implemented as part of the research into this phenomenon. Calculations were performed in ANSYS FLUENT CFD package. Basic equations describing the conservation of mass, conservation of momentum (in the Boussinesq approximation, conservation of energy were solved. Also, the radiation of the cavity wall was taken into account. Vertical walls were considered as non-isothermal, while horizontal walls were adiabatic. Calculations were made for several patterns of glass deformations. Calculation results demonstrate that the heat flow over vertical walls intensifies as the distance between centres of IGU glasses is reduced. The temperature in the central area of the hot glass drops.

  7. The appraisal of structural glass assemblies

    CERN Document Server

    Overend, M

    2002-01-01

    A design methodology is advanced primarily to determine the tensile strength of annealed and tempered glass. The proposed approach consists of an analytical method to assess the tensile strength of glass, sigma sub f , and a computer algorithm which is used to compute the applied equivalent uniform stress, sigma sub p. The glass design approach put forward endeavours to ensure that the surface tensile strength of glass is not exceeded by the equivalent uniform stress. The analytical method, referred to as the General Crack Growth Model, is related to the fundamental properties of the glass surface and incorporates all factors that are known to significantly affect the strength of glass. The General Crack Growth Model is based on the comparison of recent fracture mechanics methods and empirical formulations proposed elsewhere. The proposed glass strength equation or the derived glass strength charts may be used to determine the maximum allowable surface tension, sigma sub f. The performance of the proposed Gen...

  8. Elastic models for the non-Arrhenius relaxation time of glass-forming liquids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dyre, Jeppe

    We first review the phenomenology of viscous liquids and the standard models used for explaining the non-Arrhenius average relaxation time. Then the focus is turned to the so-called elastic models, arguing that these models are all equivalent in the Einstein approximation (where the short......-time elastic properties are all determined by just one effective, temperature-dependent force constant). We finally discuss the connection between the elastic models and two well-established research fields of condensed-matter physics: point defects in crystals and solid-state diffusion....

  9. Elastic models for the Non-Arrhenius Relaxation Time of Glass-Forming Liquids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dyre, J. C.

    2006-01-01

    We first review the phenomenology of viscous liquids and the standard models used for explaining the non-Arrhenius average relaxation time. Then the focus is turned to the so-called elastic models, arguing that these models are all equivalent in the Einstein approximation (where the short......-time elastic properties are all determined by just one effective, temperature-dependent force constant). We finally discuss the connection between the elastic models and two well-established research fields of condensed-matter physics: point defects in crystals and solid-state diffusion....

  10. An energy landscape model for glass-forming liquids in three dimensions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Ulf Rørbæk; Hecksher, Tina; Dyre, Jeppe;

    2006-01-01

    We present a three-dimensional lattice-gas model with trivial thermodynamics, but non-trivial dynamics. The model is characterized by each particle having its own random energy landscape. The equilibrium dynamics of the model were investigated by continuous time Monte Carlo simulations at two...... different densities at several temperatures. At high densities and low temperatures the model captures the important characteristics of viscous liquid dynamics. We thus observe non-exponential relaxation in the self part of the density auto-correlation function, and fragility plots of the self......-diffusion constant and relaxation times show non-Arrhenius behavior....

  11. Elastic Models for the Non-Arrhenius Relaxation Time of Glass-Forming Liquids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dyre, Jeppe C.

    2006-05-01

    We first review the phenomenology of viscous liquids and the standard models used for explaining the non-Arrhenius average relaxation time. Then the focus is turned to the so-called elastic models, arguing that these models are all equivalent in the Einstein approximation (where the short-time elastic properties are all determined by just one effective, temperature-dependent force constant). We finally discuss the connection between the elastic models and two well-established research fields of condensed-matter physics: point defects in crystals and solid-state diffusion.

  12. Random Fields and Spin Glasses

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Dominicis, Cirano; Giardina, Irene

    2010-06-01

    1. A brief introduction; 2. The Random Field Ising model; 3. The dynamical approach; 4. The p=2 spherical model; 5. Mean field spin glasses: one-step RSB; 6. The Sherrington-Kirkpatrick model; 7. Mean field via TAP equations; 8. Spin glass above D=6; 9. Propagators, mostly replicon; 10. Ward-Takahashi identities and Goldstone modes; 11. Alternative approaches and conclusions; Appendices; Index.

  13. Simulation of Glass Fiber Forming Processes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Von der Ohe, Renate

    Two glass fiber forming processes have been simulated using FEM, which are the drawing of continuous glass fibers for reinforcement purposes and the spinning of discontinuous glass fibers - stone wool for insulation. The aim of this work was to set up a numerical model for each process, and to use...

  14. Break-glass handling exceptional situations in access control

    CERN Document Server

    Petritsch, Helmut

    2014-01-01

    Helmut Petritsch describes the first holistic approach to Break-Glass which covers the whole life-cycle: from access control modeling (pre-access), to logging the security-relevant system state during Break-Glass accesses (at-access), and the automated analysis of Break-Glass accesses (post-access). Break-Glass allows users to override security restrictions in exceptional situations. While several Break-Glass models specific to given access control models have already been discussed in research (e.g., extending RBAC with Break-Glass), the author introduces a generic Break-Glass model. The pres

  15. Validity of the second Fick's law for modeling ion-exchange diffusion in non-crystalline viscoelastic media (glasses)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tagantsev, D. K.; Ivanenko, D. V.

    2016-04-01

    It is shown that, in general case, the diffusion equation (or the second Fick's law) does not provide an adequate description of ion-exchange transport phenomena in viscoelastic media, including glassy or any other non-crystalline media. In this connection the general phenomenological model of ion-exchange diffusion in viscoelastic media has been developed. A theoretical analysis of the model shows that, in the case of a linear dependence of medium density on the concentration of diffusing ions, the necessary and sufficient condition of the absolute validity of the diffusion equation in viscoelastic media is Φ ≫ 1, where Φ = τD/τR is the dimensionless value (or criterion of similarity), with τD = L2/D being the characteristic time of diffusion and τR = η/G being the characteristic time of stress relaxation, where L, D, η, and G are the characteristic length of diffusion, the diffusivity, the viscosity, and the shear modulus, respectively. The value of 1/Φ characterizes the accuracy which is provided if the second Fick's law is used in the simulation of ion-exchange diffusion in viscoelastic media. We have demonstrated the applicability of this criterion experimentally. Our experimental studies on ion-exchange diffusion in an oxide glass (typical viscoelastic media) have shown that under the condition the Φ > 105 the experimental concentration profiles are close to those predicted by the second Fick's law to within an accuracy of 1%.

  16. Highly optimized simulations on single- and multi-GPU systems of the 3D Ising spin glass model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lulli, M.; Bernaschi, M.; Parisi, G.

    2015-11-01

    We present a highly optimized implementation of a Monte Carlo (MC) simulator for the three-dimensional Ising spin-glass model with bimodal disorder, i.e., the 3D Edwards-Anderson model running on CUDA enabled GPUs. Multi-GPU systems exchange data by means of the Message Passing Interface (MPI). The chosen MC dynamics is the classic Metropolis one, which is purely dissipative, since the aim was the study of the critical off-equilibrium relaxation of the system. We focused on the following issues: (i) the implementation of efficient memory access patterns for nearest neighbours in a cubic stencil and for lagged-Fibonacci-like pseudo-Random Numbers Generators (PRNGs); (ii) a novel implementation of the asynchronous multispin-coding Metropolis MC step allowing to store one spin per bit and (iii) a multi-GPU version based on a combination of MPI and CUDA streams. Cubic stencils and PRNGs are two subjects of very general interest because of their widespread use in many simulation codes.

  17. Elastic models for the non-Arrhenius viscosity of glass-forming liquids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dyre, Jeppe; Christensen, Tage Emil; Olsen, Niels Boye

    2006-01-01

    on to review several related explanations for the non-Arrhenius viscosity. Most of these are also ‘elastic models’, i.e., they express the viscosity activation energy in terms of short-time elastic properties of the liquid. Finally, two alternative arguments for elastic models are given, a general solid......This paper first reviews the shoving model for the non-Arrhenius viscosity of viscous liquids. According to this model the main contribution to the activation energy of a flow event is the energy needed for molecules to shove aside the surrounding, an energy which is proportional...

  18. Determination of the Parameters of a Color Neutral 3D Color Glass Condensate Model

    CERN Document Server

    Ozonder, Sener

    2012-01-01

    We consider a version of the McLerran-Venugopalan model by Lam and Mahlon where confinement is implemented via colored noise in the infrared. This model does not assume an infinite momentum frame nor that the boosted nuclei are infinitely thin; rather, nuclei have a finite extension in the longitudinal direction and therefore depend on the longitudinal coordinate. In this fully three dimensional framework an x dependence of the gluon distribution function emerges naturally. In order to fix the parameters of the model, we calculate the gluon distribution function and compare it with the JR09 parametrization of the data. We explore the parameter space of the model to attain a working framework that can be used to calculate the initial conditions in heavy ion collisions.

  19. Extending the EGP constitutive model for polymer glasses to multiple relaxation times

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Breemen, L. C. A.; Klompen, E. T. J.; Govaert, L. E.; Meijer, H. E. H.

    2011-10-01

    The one-mode EGP (Eindhoven glassy polymer) model captures the plastic flow at yield and post-yield quantitatively, but behaves poor in the non-linear viscoelastic pre-yield region. Since a proper description here is important in cases of complex loading and unloading situations, such as e.g. in indentation and scratching, an extension to non-linear modeling is required using a spectrum of relaxation times. It is shown that such a reference spectrum can be obtained from simple tensile tests. It shifts to shorter times under the influence of stress and is independent of the two important time-dependent processes in polymers: the strain rate applied during testing and the aging time during storage and use. The multi-mode model is critically tested and proves quantitative in describing the intrinsic polymer response and, based thereupon, in predicting the correct response in tensile testing, including necking, in flat tip indentation and in notched loading.

  20. "Comments on Slavin": Through the Looking Glass--Experiments, Quasi-Experiments, and the Medical Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sloane, Finbarr

    2008-01-01

    Slavin (2008) has called for changing the criteria used for the inclusion of basic research in national research synthesis clearinghouses. The author of this article examines a number of the assumptions made by Slavin, provides critique with alternatives, and asks what it means to fully implement the medical model in educational settings.…

  1. Modeling of Self-Healing Polymer Composites Reinforced with Nanoporous Glass Fibers

    OpenAIRE

    Privman, Vladimir; Dementsov, Alexander; Sokolov, Igor

    2006-01-01

    We report on our progress towards continuum rate equation modeling, as well as numerical simulations, of self-healing of fatigue in composites reinforced with glue carrying nanoporous fibers. We conclude that with the proper choice of the material parameters, effects of fatigue can be partially overcome and degradation of mechanical properties can be delayed.

  2. Through the Immune Looking Glass: A Model for Brain Memory Strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-Ramón, Silvia; Faure, Florence

    2016-01-01

    The immune system (IS) and the central nervous system (CNS) are complex cognitive networks involved in defining the identity (self) of the individual through recognition and memory processes that enable one to anticipate responses to stimuli. Brain memory has traditionally been classified as either implicit or explicit on psychological and anatomical grounds, with reminiscences of the evolutionarily-based innate-adaptive IS responses. Beyond the multineuronal networks of the CNS, we propose a theoretical model of brain memory integrating the CNS as a whole. This is achieved by analogical reasoning between the operational rules of recognition and memory processes in both systems, coupled to an evolutionary analysis. In this new model, the hippocampus is no longer specifically ascribed to explicit memory but rather it both becomes part of the innate (implicit) memory system and tightly controls the explicit memory system. Alike the antigen presenting cells for the IS, the hippocampus would integrate transient and pseudo-specific (i.e., danger-fear) memories and would drive the formation of long-term and highly specific or explicit memories (i.e., the taste of the Proust's madeleine cake) by the more complex and recent, evolutionarily speaking, neocortex. Experimental and clinical evidence is provided to support the model. We believe that the singularity of this model's approximation could help to gain a better understanding of the mechanisms operating in brain memory strategies from a large-scale network perspective.

  3. Evaluation of glass model precipitation forecasts for North America during SOP-1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atlas, R.; Firestone, J.

    1984-01-01

    A study has been made of the accuracy of the GLAS fourth order forecast model's precipitation forecasts over North America during the first Special Observing Period (SOP-1) of FGGE and of the impact of the FGGE special observing systems on these forecasts. Fourteen 120 h predictions were generated using the coarse 4 deg latitude by 5 deg longitude version of the GLAS model from both the FGGE and NOSAT assimilation cycles. These forecasts were then verified against a detailed set of precipitation observations. Separate verifications were performed for precipitation accumulations or = .01 in., or = .1 in., and or = 1 in. occuring in 6, 12 and 24 time periods. In addition, three different methods of verification were applied. In the first method, model precipitation forecasts are verified against the greatest precipitation amount observed within a 4 deg latitude by 5 deg longitude gridbox centered on each gridpoint. For the prediction at a gridpoint to be verified only one observation within the gridbox is required. In the second method, a weighted mean of the closest observations to the gridpoint is used, provided that at least two observations on opposite sides of a gridpoint are available. For the third method, the model precipitation forecasts were interpolated to the observation locations.

  4. Negative differential mobility of weakly driven particles in models of glass formers

    OpenAIRE

    Jack, Robert L.; Kelsey, David; Juan P Garrahan; Chandler, David

    2008-01-01

    We study the response of probe particles to weak constant driving in kinetically constrained models of glassy systems, and show that the probe's response can be non-monotonic and give rise to negative differential mobility: increasing the applied force can reduce the probe's drift velocity in the force direction. Oth er significant non-linear effects are also demonstrated, such as the enhancement with increasing force of the probe's fluctuations away from the average path, a phenomenon known ...

  5. Through the Immune Looking Glass: A Model for Brain Memory Strategies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia eSánchez-Ramón

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The immune system (IS and the central nervous system (CNS are complex cognitive networks involved in defining the identity (self of the individual through recognition and memory processes that enable one to anticipate responses to stimuli. Brain memory has traditionally been classified as either implicit or explicit on psychological and anatomical grounds, with reminiscences of the evolutionarily-based innate-adaptive IS responses. Beyond the multineuronal networks of the CNS, we propose a theoretical model of brain memory integrating the CNS as a whole. This is achieved by analogical reasoning between the operational rules of recognition and memory processes in both systems, coupled to an evolutionary analysis. In this new model, the hippocampus is no longer specifically ascribed to explicit memory but rather it both becomes part of the innate (implicit memory system and tightly controls the explicit memory system. Alike the antigen presenting cells for the IS, the hippocampus would integrate transient and pseudo-specific (i.e. danger-fear memories and would drive the formation of long-term and highly specific or explicit memories (i.e. the taste of the Proust’s madeleine cake by the more complex and recent, evolutionarily speaking, neocortex. Experimental and clinical evidence is provided to support the model. We believe that the singularity of this model’s approximation could help to gain a better understanding of the mechanisms operating in brain memory strategies from a large-scale network perspective.

  6. INORGANIC PHOSPHORS IN GLASS BASED ON LEAD SILICATE GLASSES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. A. Aseev

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available We created and synthesized luminescent composite of the "phosphor in glass" type, based on the lead-silicate matrix and fine-dispersed powder of cerium-activated yttrium-aluminum garnet crystal. Lead-silicate system (40SiO2- 20PbO-(40-x PbF2-xAlF3, x = 0-25 was chosen as the glassy matrix. Initial glass was reduced to powder (frit for "phosphor in glass" composite with a particle size about 50 µm. Glass frit and powder of commercial YAG:Ce3+ phosphor were mixed in a ratio of 30 to 70 (wt %. Then this composite was pressed in a tablet and sintered on a quartz substrate at 823 К for 30 minutes. Thus, the plane parallel sheet for composite of the "phosphor in glass" was obtained with a diameter equal to 10 mm. For the purpose to reduce the loss of light in the presence of dispersion at a glass-phosphor boundary, optimization of glass mixture was done by adjusting the refractive index. X-ray phase and spectral-luminescent analysis of the derived composite were done. The results of these studies showed that there was no degradation of YAG: Ce powder during sintering. Dependence of luminescence intensity from temperature in the range from room temperature to 473 К was studied. It was shown, that with the phosphor in glass usage thermal quenching of luminescence was reduced in comparison with the silicone. The model of white LED was created with the "phosphor in glass" composite based on lead-silicate glasses with low temperature of vitrifying. The derived LED emits white light with a color temperature of 4370 K, and the luminous efficiency is equal to 58 lm/W. The developed luminescent composite based on the lead-silicate matrix can be used for the production of high-power white light LED.

  7. Non-equilibrium Monte Carlo dynamics of the Sherrington-Kirkpatrick mean field spin glass model

    OpenAIRE

    Baldassarri, Andrea

    1996-01-01

    We present a numerical study of the non-equilibrium dynamics of the Sherrington-Kirkpatrick model. We analize the overlap distribution between the configurations visited at the time t and in particular its scaling behaviour with the size of the system. We find two different non-equilibrium dynamical regimes. The first is a proper Out of Equilibrium Regime, that is the relevant regime for the dynamics of an infinite system. The second is an Intermediate Regime that separates the Out of Equilib...

  8. Joints in Tempered Glass Using Glass Dowel Discs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Jens Henrik; Poulsen, Peter Noe

    One of the major reasons for using glass in structures is its transparency; however, traditional mechanical joints such as friction joints and steel dowel pinned connections are compromising the transparency. The present paper describes a novel joint which is practically maintaining the complete...... transparency of the glass. This is achieved by using a dowel disc made entirely of tempered glass. The concept of the joint is proved by pilot tests and numerical models. From the work it is seen that the load-carrying capacity of such a connection is similar to what is found for traditionally in-plane loaded...

  9. Negative differential mobility of weakly driven particles in models of glass formers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jack, Robert L.; Kelsey, David; Garrahan, Juan P.; Chandler, David

    2008-04-01

    We study the response of probe particles to weak constant driving in kinetically constrained models of glassy systems, and show that the probe's response can be non-monotonic and give rise to negative differential mobility: increasing the applied force can reduce the probe's drift velocity in the force direction. Other significant non-linear effects are also demonstrated, such as the enhancement with increasing force of the probe's fluctuations away from the average path, a phenomenon known in other contexts as giant diffusivity. We show that these results can be explained analytically by a continuous-time random walk approximation where there is decoupling between persistence and exchange times for local displacements of the probe. This decoupling is due to dynamic heterogeneity in the glassy system, which also leads to bimodal distributions of probe particle displacements. We discuss the relevance of our results to experiments.

  10. Amplifying modeling for broad bandwidth pulse in Nd:glass based on hybrid-broaden mechanism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sujingqin; Lanqin, L; Wenyi, W; Feng, J; Xiaofeng, W; Xiaomin, Z [Research Center of Laser Fusion, China Academy of Engineering Physics, P. O. Box 919-988, Mianyang, China, 621900 (China); Bin, L [School of Computer and Communication Engineering, Southwest Jiaotong University, Chengdu. China, 610031 (China)], E-mail: sujingqin@tom.com

    2008-05-15

    In this paper, the cross relaxation time is proposed to combine the homogeneous and inhomogeneous broaden mechanism for broad bandwidth pulse amplification model. The corresponding velocity equation, which can describe the response of inverse population on upper and low energy level of gain media to different frequency of pulse, is also put forward. The gain saturation and energy relaxation effect are also included in the velocity equation. Code named CPAP has been developed to simulate the amplifying process of broad bandwidth pulse in multi-pass laser system. The amplifying capability of multi-pass laser system is evaluated and gain narrowing and temporal shape distortion are also investigated when bandwidth of pulse and cross relaxation time of gain media are different. Results can benefit the design of high-energy PW laser system in LFRC, CAEP.

  11. Analytic implementation of the GRAAL model: Application to a R7T7-type glass package in a geological disposal environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Minet, Y., E-mail: yves.minet@cea.f [CEA Marcoule, DTCD/SECM/LCLT, BP 17171, 30207 Bagnols-sur-Ceze Cedex (France); Bonin, B. [CEA Saclay, DEN/DIR/DS, 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette Cedex (France); Gin, S.; Frugier, P. [CEA Marcoule, DTCD/SECM/LCLT, BP 17171, 30207 Bagnols-sur-Ceze Cedex (France)

    2010-09-30

    The Glass Reactivity with Allowance for the Alteration Layer Model (GRAAL) was proposed in 2008 to describe borosilicate nuclear glass alteration based on coupling an affinity law with the formation and dissolution of a passivating reactive interface. It is examined here in a simplified form in which only the affinity with respect to silicon is taken into account with a concentration at saturation C{sub sat}, and the precipitation of neoformed phases is described by an affine relation for silicon above a precipitation threshold C{sub sat}{sup '}. This simplified 'analytical GRAAL' model is capable of predicting the quantities of altered glass and the silicon and boron concentration variations in analytical or semi-analytical form, and thereby identify the main characteristic quantities of the system. The model was tested against a series of laboratory experiments lasting from a few days to a few years; its sensitivity to the parameter values was examined, and the model was validated with respect to SON68 glass alteration in initially pure water. It was then applied to the alteration of a glass package in a repository over periods of up to a million years, by means of exploratory calculations comprising a sensitivity study of the internal model parameters and extrapolation to the temperatures expected in a geological repository in order to identify the parameters and mechanisms having the greatest impact on the residual alteration rate. Alteration is controlled by the precipitation of neoformed phases in every case. The transient conditions are of very limited duration with respect to either silicon or boron (no more than a 100 years, with less than 0.01% alteration of the package). In the precipitation law used in the model, the residual alteration rate and total package lifetime are determined primarily by two parameters: k' (the precipitation kinetics) and {sigma}' (the precipitate surface area per unit volume in the geological barrier

  12. Real-space renormalization for the finite temperature statics and dynamics of the Dyson long-ranged ferromagnetic and spin-glass models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monthus, Cécile

    2016-04-01

    The finite temperature dynamics of the Dyson hierarchical classical spins models is studied via real-space renormalization rules concerning the couplings and the relaxation times. For the ferromagnetic model involving long-ranged coupling J(r)\\propto {{r}-1-σ} in the region 1/2mean-field-like thermal ferromagnetic-paramagnetic transition, the RG flows are explicitly solved: the characteristic relaxation time τ (L) follows the critical power-law τ (L)\\propto {{L}{{z\\text{c}}(σ )}} at the phase transition and the activated law \\ln τ (L)\\propto {{L}\\psi} with \\psi =1-σ in the ferromagnetic phase. For the spin-glass model involving random long-ranged couplings of variance \\overline{{{J}2}(r)}\\propto {{r}-2σ} in the region 2/3mean-field-like thermal spin-glass-paramagnetic transition, the coupled RG flows of the couplings and of the relaxation times are studied numerically: the relaxation time τ (L) follows some power-law τ (L)\\propto {{L}{{z\\text{c}}(σ )}} at criticality and the activated law \\ln τ (L)\\propto {{L}\\psi} in the spin-glass phase with the dynamical exponent \\psi =1-σ =θ coinciding with the droplet exponent governing the flow of the couplings J(L)\\propto {{L}θ} .

  13. Modelling of short-wavelength operation of Nd 3+ doped fluorozirconate glass fiber laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klimczak, M.; Witonski, P.; Ryter, A.; Piramidowicz, R.

    2006-03-01

    In this paper we analyze the threshold violet and ultra-violet laser operation in Nd 3+ doped ZBLAN fibers, using relatively fast and accurate method, based on measured spectroscopic parameters like fluorescence lifetimes and emissiod/absorption cross-sections spectra. Our approach, which is based on energy theorem and threshold field approximation, extends the model presented in [1] by taking into account the longitudinal and transverse field distribution of the fiber laser mode. Specifically, in this work we compare the efficiency of two possible laser pumping schemes: direct and two-photon excitation. The problem of laser resonator optimization is discussed by providing the analytical formulas for small signal gain in active fiber medium as a function of structure parameters i.e. the cavity geometry, distributed losses of the active medium, output power level and the mirror reflectivity. As the result of the carried-out optimizations we can determine the conditions for obtaining short-wavelength lasing in Nd:ZBLAN fiber laser with minimal threshold and maximal output power level.

  14. The molten glass sewing machine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brun, P.-T.; Inamura, Chikara; Lizardo, Daniel; Franchin, Giorgia; Stern, Michael; Houk, Peter; Oxman, Neri

    2017-04-01

    We present a fluid-instability-based approach for digitally fabricating geometrically complex uniformly sized structures in molten glass. Formed by mathematically defined and physically characterized instability patterns, such structures are produced via the additive manufacturing of optically transparent glass, and result from the coiling of an extruded glass thread. We propose a minimal geometrical model-and a methodology-to reliably control the morphology of patterns, so that these building blocks can be assembled into larger structures with tailored functionally and optically tunable properties. This article is part of the themed issue 'Patterning through instabilities in complex media: theory and applications'.

  15. Healing of lithographically introduced flaws in glass and glass containing ceramics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ackler, H.D.

    1992-12-01

    The morphological evolution of cylindrical pores or channels'' and crack-like cavities in glass and glass-containing ceramics at elevated temperatures was studied. The systems studied were: Coming 7056 alkali borosilicate glass, soda-lime glass (microscope slides), a commercially available 96% Al[sub 2]O[sub 3]with [approx]5--10% intergranular glass, 96% Al[sub 2]O[sub 3] bonded to sapphire, and a model sapphire/glass/sapphire system fabricated by diffusion bonding etched and unetched pieces of sapphire onto which 30--50 nm of SiO[sub 2] had been sputter deposited. These systems span a broad range of glass contents, and permit observation of healing behavior with varying glass content. The results were compared with analytical models and results of similar studies in completely crystalline systems.

  16. Healing of lithographically introduced flaws in glass and glass containing ceramics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ackler, H.D.

    1992-12-01

    The morphological evolution of cylindrical pores or ``channels`` and crack-like cavities in glass and glass-containing ceramics at elevated temperatures was studied. The systems studied were: Coming 7056 alkali borosilicate glass, soda-lime glass (microscope slides), a commercially available 96% Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}with {approx}5--10% intergranular glass, 96% Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} bonded to sapphire, and a model sapphire/glass/sapphire system fabricated by diffusion bonding etched and unetched pieces of sapphire onto which 30--50 nm of SiO{sub 2} had been sputter deposited. These systems span a broad range of glass contents, and permit observation of healing behavior with varying glass content. The results were compared with analytical models and results of similar studies in completely crystalline systems.

  17. Disease, Models, Variants and Altered Pathways—Journeying RGD Through the Magnifying Glass

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victoria Petri

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Understanding the pathogenesis of disease is instrumental in delineating its progression mechanisms and for envisioning ways to counteract it. In the process, animal models represent invaluable tools for identifying disease-related loci and their genetic components. Amongst them, the laboratory rat is used extensively in the study of many conditions and disorders. The Rat Genome Database (RGD—http://rgd.mcw.edu has been established to house rat genetic, genomic and phenotypic data. Since its inception, it has continually expanded the depth and breadth of its content. Currently, in addition to rat genes, QTLs and strains, RGD houses mouse and human genes and QTLs and offers pertinent associated data, acquired through manual literature curation and imported via pipelines. A collection of controlled vocabularies and ontologies is employed for the standardized extraction and provision of biological data. The vocabularies/ontologies allow the capture of disease and phenotype associations of rat strains and QTLs, as well as disease and pathway associations of rat, human and mouse genes. A suite of tools enables the retrieval, manipulation, viewing and analysis of data. Genes associated with particular conditions or with altered networks underlying disease pathways can be retrieved. Genetic variants in humans or in sequenced rat strains can be searched and compared. Lists of rat strains and species-specific genes and QTLs can be generated for selected ontology terms and then analyzed, downloaded or sent to other tools. From many entry points, data can be accessed and results retrieved. To illustrate, diabetes is used as a case study to initiate and embark upon an exploratory journey.

  18. Glass Fibers: Quo Vadis?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edith Mäder

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Since the early 1930s, the process of melting glass and subsequently forming fibers, in particular discontinuous fiber glass or continuous glass filaments, evolved into commercial-scale manufacturing.[...

  19. Supersymmetric Spin Glass

    CERN Document Server

    Gukov, S G

    1997-01-01

    The evidently supersymmetric four-dimensional Wess-Zumino model with quenched disorder is considered at the one-loop level. The infrared fixed points of a beta-function form the moduli space $M = RP^2$ where two types of phases were found: with and without replica symmetry. While the former phase possesses only a trivial fixed point, this point become unstable in the latter phase which may be interpreted as a spin glass phase.

  20. Development of models and online diagnostic monitors of the high-temperature corrosion of refractories in oxy/fuel glass furnaces : final project report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Griffiths, Stewart K.; Gupta, Amul (Monofrax Inc., Falconer, NY); Walsh, Peter M.; Rice, Steven F.; Velez, Mariano (University of Missouri, Rolla, MO); Allendorf, Mark D.; Pecoraro, George A. (PPG Industries, Inc., Pittsburgh, PA); Nilson, Robert H.; Wolfe, H. Edward (ANH Refractories, Pittsburgh, PA); Yang, Nancy Y. C.; Bugeat, Benjamin () American Air Liquide, Countryside, IL); Spear, Karl E. (Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA); Marin, Ovidiu () American Air Liquide, Countryside, IL); Ghani, M. Usman (American Air Liquide, Countryside, IL)

    2005-02-01

    This report summarizes the results of a five-year effort to understand the mechanisms and develop models that predict the corrosion of refractories in oxygen-fuel glass-melting furnaces. Thermodynamic data for the Si-O-(Na or K) and Al-O-(Na or K) systems are reported, allowing equilibrium calculations to be performed to evaluate corrosion of silica- and alumina-based refractories under typical furnace operating conditions. A detailed analysis of processes contributing to corrosion is also presented. Using this analysis, a model of the corrosion process was developed and used to predict corrosion rates in an actual industrial glass furnace. The rate-limiting process is most likely the transport of NaOH(gas) through the mass-transport boundary layer from the furnace atmosphere to the crown surface. Corrosion rates predicted on this basis are in better agreement with observation than those produced by any other mechanism, although the absolute values are highly sensitive to the crown temperature and the NaOH(gas) concentration at equilibrium and at the edge of the boundary layer. Finally, the project explored the development of excimer laser induced fragmentation (ELIF) fluorescence spectroscopy for the detection of gas-phase alkali hydroxides (e.g., NaOH) that are predicted to be the key species causing accelerated corrosion in these furnaces. The development of ELIF and the construction of field-portable instrumentation for glass furnace applications are reported and the method is shown to be effective in industrial settings.

  1. Atomic-scale models of early-stage alkali depletion and SiO2-rich gel formation in bioactive glasses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tilocca, Antonio

    2015-01-28

    Molecular dynamics simulations of Na(+)/H(+)-exchanged 45S5 Bioglass® models reveal that a large fraction of the hydroxyl groups introduced into the proton-exchanged, hydrated glass structure do not initially form covalent bonds with Si and P network formers but remain free and stabilised by the modifier metal cations, whereas substantial Si-OH and P-OH bonding is observed only at higher Na(+)/H(+) exchange levels. The strong affinity between free OH groups and modifier cations in the highly fragmented 45S5 glass structure appears to represent the main driving force for this effect. This suggests an alternative direct route for the formation of a repolymerised silica-rich gel in the early stages of the bioactive mechanism, not considered before, which does not require sequential repeated breakings of Si-O-Si bonds and silanol condensations.

  2. CRYSTALLIZATION IN MULTICOMPONENT GLASSES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    KRUGER AA; HRMA PR

    2009-10-08

    In glass processing situations involving glass crystallization, various crystalline forms nucleate, grow, and dissolve, typically in a nonuniform temperature field of molten glass subjected to convection. Nuclear waste glasses are remarkable examples of multicomponent vitrified mixtures involving partial crystallization. In the glass melter, crystals form and dissolve during batch-to-glass conversion, melter processing, and product cooling. Crystals often agglomerate and sink, and they may settle at the melter bottom. Within the body of cooling glass, multiple phases crystallize in a non-uniform time-dependent temperature field. Self-organizing periodic distribution (the Liesegnang effect) is common. Various crystallization phenomena that occur in glass making are reviewed.

  3. Optical glass compatibility for the design of apochromatic systems

    OpenAIRE

    Gruescu C.; Nicoara I.; Popov D.; Bodea R.; Hora H.

    2008-01-01

    The design of apochromatic systems is difficult because of two problems: the glass sorts compatibility and the c1/ca arbitrary input ratio. The optical glass manufacturers offer a wide range of sorts, so that the choice of triplet compatible glasses becomes itself an important separate problem. The paper provides a solution of mathematical modeling for the glass compatibility and, practically, analyses the sorts presented by Schott GmbH. The original software provided 22 compatible glass trip...

  4. Predictive modeling of Time-Temperature-Transformation diagram of metallic glasses based on atomistically-informed classical nucleation theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Yuji; Nakai, Chiaki; Wakeda, Masato; Ogata, Shigenobu

    2017-08-03

    Theoretical prediction of glass forming ability (GFA) of metallic alloys is a key process in exploring metallic alloy compositions with excellent GFA and thus with the ability to form a large-sized bulk metallic glass. Molecular dynamics (MD) simulation is a promising tool to achieve a theoretical prediction. However, direct MD prediction continues to be challenging due to the time-scale limitation of MD. With respect to practical bulk metallic glass alloys, the time necessary for quenching at a typical cooling rate is five or more orders of magnitude higher than that at the MD time-scale. To overcome the time-scale issue, this study proposes a combined method of classical nucleation theory and MD simulations. The method actually allows to depict the time-temperature-transformation (TTT) diagram of the bulk metallic glass alloys. The TTT directly provides a prediction of the critical cooling rate and GFA. Although the method assumes conventional classical nucleation theory, all the material parameters appearing in the theory were determined by MD simulations using realistic interatomic potentials. The method is used to compute the TTT diagrams and critical cooling rates of two Cu-Zr alloy compositions (Cu50Zr50 and Cu20Zr80). The results indicate that the proposed method reasonably predicts the critical cooling rate based on the computed TTT.

  5. Predicting the glass transition temperature of bioactive glasses from their molecular chemical composition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Robert G; Brauer, Delia S

    2011-10-01

    A recently published paper (M.D. O'Donnell, Acta Biomaterialia 7 (2011) 2264-2269) suggests that it is possible to correlate the glass transition temperature (T(g)) of bioactive glasses with their molar composition, based on iterative least-squares fitting of published T(g) data. However, we show that the glass structure is an important parameter in determining T(g). Phase separation, local structural effects and components (intermediate oxides) which can switch their structural role in the glass network need to be taken into consideration, as they are likely to influence the glass transition temperature of bioactive glasses. Although the model suggested by O'Donnell works reasonably well for glasses within the composition range presented, it is oversimplified and fails for glasses outside certain compositional boundaries.

  6. Recycling of Glass

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Thomas Højlund; Damgaard, Anders

    2011-01-01

    system; this glass though has a long lifetime before ending up in the waste. Altogether these product types add up to 82% of the production of the European glass industry (IPCC, 2001). Recycling of glass in terms of cleaning and refilling of bottles as well as the use of broken glass in the production......Glass is used for many purposes, but in the waste system glass is predominantly found in terms of beverage and food containers with a relatively short lifetime before ending up in the waste. Furthermore there is a large amount of flat glass used in building materials which also ends up in the waste...... of new glass containers is well established in the glass industry. This chapter describes briefly howglass is produced and howwaste glass is recycled in the industry. Quality requirements and use of recycled products are discussed, as are the resource and environmental issues of glass recycling....

  7. Recycling of Glass

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Thomas Højlund; Damgaard, Anders

    2011-01-01

    Glass is used for many purposes, but in the waste system glass is predominantly found in terms of beverage and food containers with a relatively short lifetime before ending up in the waste. Furthermore there is a large amount of flat glass used in building materials which also ends up in the waste...... system; this glass though has a long lifetime before ending up in the waste. Altogether these product types add up to 82% of the production of the European glass industry (IPCC, 2001). Recycling of glass in terms of cleaning and refilling of bottles as well as the use of broken glass in the production...... of new glass containers is well established in the glass industry. This chapter describes briefly howglass is produced and howwaste glass is recycled in the industry. Quality requirements and use of recycled products are discussed, as are the resource and environmental issues of glass recycling....

  8. Effect of Pt Doping on Nucleation and Crystallization in Li2O.2SiO2 Glass: Experimental Measurements and Computer Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narayan, K. Lakshmi; Kelton, K. F.; Ray, C. S.

    1996-01-01

    Heterogeneous nucleation and its effects on the crystallization of lithium disilicate glass containing small amounts of Pt are investigated. Measurements of the nucleation frequencies and induction times with and without Pt are shown to be consistent with predictions based on the classical nucleation theory. A realistic computer model for the transformation is presented. Computed differential thermal analysis data (such as crystallization rates as a function of time and temperature) are shown to be in good agreement with experimental results. This modeling provides a new, more quantitative method for analyzing calorimetric data.

  9. Spin glasses and neural networks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parga, N. (Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica, San Carlos de Bariloche (Argentina). Centro Atomico Bariloche; Universidad Nacional de Cuyo, San Carlos de Bariloche (Argentina). Inst. Balseiro)

    1989-07-01

    The mean-field theory of spin glass models has been used as a prototype of systems with frustration and disorder. One of the most interesting related systems are models of associative memories. In these lectures we review the main concepts developed to solve the Sherrington-Kirkpatrick model and its application to neural networks. (orig.).

  10. Spin glasses on thin graphs

    CERN Document Server

    Baillie, C F; Johnston, D A; Plechác, P

    1995-01-01

    In a recent paper we found strong evidence from simulations that the Ising antiferromagnet on ``thin'' random graphs - Feynman diagrams - displayed a mean-field spin glass transition. The intrinsic interest of considering such random graphs is that they give mean field results without long range interactions or the drawbacks, arising from boundary problems, of the Bethe lattice. In this paper we reprise the saddle point calculations for the Ising and Potts ferromagnet, antiferromagnet and spin glass on Feynman diagrams. We use standard results from bifurcation theory that enable us to treat an arbitrary number of replicas and any quenched bond distribution. We note the agreement between the ferromagnetic and spin glass transition temperatures thus calculated and those derived by analogy with the Bethe lattice, or in previous replica calculations. We then investigate numerically spin glasses with a plus or minus J bond distribution fo rthe Ising and Q=3,3,10,50 state Potts models, paying particular attention t...

  11. Stress relaxation in tempered glass caused by heat soak testing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schneider, Jens; Hilcken, Jonas; Aronen, Antti

    2016-01-01

    Heat soak testing of tempered glass is a thermal process required after the tempering process itself to bring glasses of commercial soda-lime-silica-glass to failure that are contaminated with nickel sulphide inclusions, diameter 50 mm to 500 mm typically. Thus, the tests avoid a so-called "spont......Heat soak testing of tempered glass is a thermal process required after the tempering process itself to bring glasses of commercial soda-lime-silica-glass to failure that are contaminated with nickel sulphide inclusions, diameter 50 mm to 500 mm typically. Thus, the tests avoid a so...... of commercial soda-lime-silica glass, it causes stress relaxation in tempered glass and the fracture pattern of the glass changes accordingly, especially thin glasses are affected. Based on the Tool-Narayanaswamy-Model, this paper comprises the theoretical background of the stress...

  12. Glass-silicon column

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, Conrad M.

    2003-12-30

    A glass-silicon column that can operate in temperature variations between room temperature and about 450.degree. C. The glass-silicon column includes large area glass, such as a thin Corning 7740 boron-silicate glass bonded to a silicon wafer, with an electrode embedded in or mounted on glass of the column, and with a self alignment silicon post/glass hole structure. The glass/silicon components are bonded, for example be anodic bonding. In one embodiment, the column includes two outer layers of silicon each bonded to an inner layer of glass, with an electrode imbedded between the layers of glass, and with at least one self alignment hole and post arrangement. The electrode functions as a column heater, and one glass/silicon component is provided with a number of flow channels adjacent the bonded surfaces.

  13. Compositional threshold for nuclear waste glass durability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farooqi, Rahmatullah; Hrma, Pavel [Pohang Univ. of Science and Technology, Pohang (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-07-01

    The issue of major concern with the waste form, such as glass, is its chemical durability, I. e., the resistance to corrosion by aqueous media. A number of standard durability tests have been established for waste glasses, among which the product consistency test was selected as a criterion of HLW glass acceptability for the repository subsequently, a large PCT database has been collected containing over 1000 glasses. Such a database allows the development of models that relate PCT releases to glass is a strong function of composition, these models are used to formulate acceptable glasses in which the waste loading is maximized. Within the composition space of glasses, a distinct threshold appears to exist that separates 'good' glasses, I. e. these which are sufficiently durable, from 'bad' glasses of a low durability. According to Populate al., transition region between durable and less durable glasses lies around 2a m{sup -2} as determined by the 7-day PCT normalized B release. The objective of our research is to clarify the origin of this threshold by exploring the relationship between glass composition, glass structure and chemical durability around the threshold region. Our study is focused on the corrosion behavior of SiO{sub 2} - B{sub 2}O{sub 3} - Na{sub 2}O - Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} - Colleagues composition region. In particular, we try to identify the durability threshold separating durable from nondurable glasses in the composition space. So far we have explored the elemental releases of Na and B measured with the 7-day PCT.

  14. Some recent developments in spin glasses

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A P Young

    2005-06-01

    I give some experimental and theoretical background to spin glasses, and then discuss the nature of the phase transition in spin glasses with vector spins. Results of Monte Carlo simulations of the Heisenberg spin glass model in three dimensions are presented. A finite-size scaling analysis of the correlation length of the spins and chiralities shows that there is a single, finite-temperature transition at which both spins and chiralities order.

  15. Glass binder development for a glass-bonded sodalite ceramic waste form

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Riley, Brian J.; Vienna, John D.; Frank, Steven M.; Kroll, Jared O.; Peterson, Jacob A.; Canfield, Nathan L.; Zhu, Zihua; Zhang, Jiandong; Kruska, Karen; Schreiber, Daniel K.; Crum, Jarrod V.

    2017-06-01

    This paper discusses work to develop Na2O-B2O3-SiO2 glass binders for immobilizing LiCl-KCl eutectic salt waste in a glass-bonded sodalite waste form following electrochemical reprocessing of used metallic nuclear fuel. Here, five new glasses with high Na2O contents were designed to generate waste forms having higher sodalite contents and fewer stress fractures. The structural, mechanical, and thermal properties of the new glasses were measured using variety of analytical techniques. The glasses were then used to produce ceramic waste forms with surrogate salt waste. The materials made using the glasses developed during this study were formulated to generate more sodalite than materials made with previous baseline glasses used. The coefficients of thermal expansion for the glass phase in the glass-bonded sodalite waste forms made with the new binder glasses were closer to the sodalite phase in the critical temperature region near and below the glass transition temperature. These improvements should result in lower probability of cracking in the full-scale monolithic ceramic waste form, leading to better long-term chemical durability. Additionally, a model generated during this study for predicting softening temperature of silicate binder glasses is presented.

  16. Network-Forming Nanoclusters in Binary As-S/Se Glasses: From Ab Initio Quantum Chemical Modeling to Experimental Evidences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyla, M.

    2017-01-01

    Network-forming As2(S/Se)m nanoclusters are employed to recognize expected variations in a vicinity of some remarkable compositions in binary As-Se/S glassy systems accepted as signatures of optimally constrained intermediate topological phases in earlier temperature-modulated differential scanning calorimetry experiments. The ab initio quantum chemical calculations performed using the cation-interlinking network cluster approach show similar oscillating character in tendency to local chemical decomposition but obvious step-like behavior in preference to global phase separation on boundary chemical compounds (pure chalcogen and stoichiometric arsenic chalcogenides). The onsets of stability are defined for chalcogen-rich glasses, these being connected with As2Se5 ( Z = 2.29) and As2S6 ( Z = 2.25) nanoclusters for As-Se and As-S glasses, respectively. The physical aging effects result preferentially from global phase separation in As-S glass system due to high localization of covalent bonding and local demixing on neighboring As2Sem+1 and As2Sem-1 nanoclusters in As-Se system. These nanoclusters well explain the lower limits of reversibility windows in temperature-modulated differential scanning calorimetry, but they cannot be accepted as signatures of topological phase transitions in respect to the rigidity theory.

  17. Study of nuclear glasses alteration gel and synthesis of some model gels; Etude du gel d`alteration des verres nucleaires et synthese de gels modeles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ricol, S.

    1995-10-05

    This work deals with the general problem of alteration of the reference nuclear glass R7T7. Attention is paid particularly to the altered layer formed at the glass surface during alteration process. In opposition to previous works, related essentially to glass dissolution kinetics based on chemical analyses of lixiviated elements, this thesis deals with alteration problems through structural studies of the reference glass and derived gel. This approach allows the determination of mechanisms for the gel formation and a better understanding of the behaviour of glasses towards lixiviation. Both approaches appeared complementary. Based on several spectroscopic techniques, this work showed the particular role of cations such as calcium, zirconium and iron. Studies of silica-based synthetic gels showed the synergic effect of formers cation and of one highly coordinated cation. The variation of the wavenumber related to Si-O-Si asymmetric stretching vibration can be correlated to O/Si ratio for ternary systems Si/Na/Zr. On the contrary, the Si losses of the materials depend on the number of non-bridging oxygen atoms. In the perspective of long-term behaviour, the alteration gel presents better characteristics than initial glass. It is therefore a highly stable material in static conditions. In the same way, synthetic gels are materials with very low solubilities (much lower than the alteration gel) and could be used as confining matrices. (authors). refs., 71 figs., 37 tabs.

  18. Topological Principles of Borosilicate Glass Chemistry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Smedskjær, Morten Mattrup; Mauro, J. C.; Youngman, R. E.

    2011-01-01

    Borosilicate glasses display a rich complexity of chemical behavior depending on the details of their composition and thermal history. Noted for their high chemical durability and thermal shock resistance, borosilicate glasses have found a variety of important uses from common household...... and laboratory glassware to high-tech applications such as liquid crystal displays. In this paper, we investigate the topological principles of borosilicate glass chemistry covering the extremes from pure borate to pure silicate end members. Based on NMR measurements, we present a two-state statistical...... earthborosilicate glasses that enables the accurate prediction of properties such as glass transition temperature, liquid fragility, and hardness. The modeling approach enables an understanding of the microscopic mechanisms governing macroscopic properties. The implications of the glass topology are discussed...

  19. Compliant Glass Seals for SOFC Stacks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chou, Y. S.; Choi, Jung-Pyung; Xu, Wei; Stephens, Elizabeth V.; Koeppel, Brian J.; Stevenson, Jeffry W.; Lara-Curzio, Edgar

    2014-04-01

    This report summarizes results from experimental and modeling studies performed by participants in the Solid-State Energy Conversion Alliance (SECA) Core Technology Program, which indicate that compliant glass-based seals offer a number of potential advantages over conventional seals based on de-vitrifying glasses, including reduced stresses during stack operation and thermal cycling, and the ability to heal micro-damage induced during thermal cycling. The properties and composition of glasses developed and/or investigated in these studies are reported, along with results from long-term (up to 5,800h) evaluations of seals based on a compliant glass containing ceramic particles or ceramic fibers.

  20. Compliant Glass Seals for SOFC Stacks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chou, Yeong -Shyung [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Choi, Jung-Pyung [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Xu, Wei [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Stephens, Elizabeth V. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Koeppel, Brian J. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Stevenson, Jeffry W. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Lara-Curzio, Edgar [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2014-04-30

    This report summarizes results from experimental and modeling studies performed by participants in the Solid-State Energy Conversion Alliance (SECA) Core Technology Program, which indicate that compliant glass-based seals offer a number of potential advantages over conventional seals based on de-vitrifying glasses, including reduced stresses during stack operation and thermal cycling, and the ability to heal micro-damage induced during thermal cycling. The properties and composition of glasses developed and/or investigated in these studies are reported, along with results from long-term (up to 5,800h) evaluations of seals based on a compliant glass containing ceramic particles or ceramic fibers.

  1. lead glass brick

    CERN Multimedia

    When you look through the glass at a picture behind, the picture appears raised up because light is slowed down in the dense glass. It is this density (4.06 gcm-3) that makes lead glass attractive to physicists. The refractive index of the glass is 1.708 at 400nm (violet light), meaning that light travels in the glass at about 58% its normal speed. At CERN, the OPAL detector uses some 12000 blocks of glass like this to measure particle energies.

  2. Analysis of Measurement Model of Working Glass Container Based on Gravimetric Method%常用玻璃量器衡量法测量模型分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    沈峰

    2016-01-01

    Considering air density and water density, a new measurement model of working glass container based on gravimetric method is established on the basis of the original model. Through the analysis of the uncertainty of the new model, the influence of each source of the uncertainty is realized, and then measurement accuracy can be improved specifically.%在原测量模型的基础上,考虑空气密度和水密度影响,建立新的常用玻璃量器衡量法测量模型,并对其进行不确定度分析,了解各不确定度分量的影响,进而有针对性地提高测量准确度。

  3. Modelling of nuclear glasses by classical and ab initio molecular dynamics; Modelisation de verres intervenant dans le conditionnement des dechets radioactifs par dynamiques moleculaires classique et ab initio

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ganster, P

    2004-10-15

    A calcium aluminosilicate glass of molar composition 67 % SiO{sub 2} - 12 % Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} - 21 % CaO was modelled by classical and ab initio molecular dynamics. The size effect study in classical MD shows that the systems of 100 atoms are more ordered than the larger ones. These effects are mainly due to the 3-body terms in the empirical potentials. Nevertheless, these effects are small and the structures generated are in agreement with experimental data. In such kind of glass, we denote an aluminium avoidance and an excess of non bridging oxygens which can be compensated by tri coordinated oxygens. When the dynamics of systems of 100 and 200 atoms is followed by ab initio MD, some local arrangements occurs (bond length, angular distributions). Thus, more realistic vibrational properties are obtained in ab initio MD. The modelling of thin films shows that aluminium atoms extend to the most external part of the surface and they are all tri-coordinated. Calcium atoms are set in the sub layer part of the surface and they produce a depolymerization of the network. In classical MD, tri-coordinated aluminium atoms produce an important electric field above the surface. With non bridging oxygens, they constitute attractive sites for single water molecules. (author)

  4. Composition-structure-property relation of oxide glasses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hermansen, Christian

    The composition of glass can be varied continuously within their glass-forming regions. This compositional flexibility makes it possible to tailor the properties of a glass for a variety of specific uses. In the industry such tailoring is done on a trial-and-error basis with only the intuition...... also increases such properties. Yet, these rules are not strictly followed even for the simplest binary oxide glasses, such as alkali silicates, borates and phosphates. In this thesis it is argued that the missing link between composition and properties is the glass structure. Structural models...... capable of ab initio prediction of the oxide glass properties from composition....

  5. Precision glass molding of complex shaped chalcogenide glass lenses for IR applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staasmeyer, Jan-Helge; Wang, Yang; Liu, Gang; Dambon, Olaf; Klocke, Fritz

    2016-09-01

    The use of chalcogenide glass in the thermal infrared domain is an emerging alternative to commonly used crystalline materials such as germanium. The main advantage of chalcogenide glass is the possibility of mass production of complex shaped geometries with replicative processes such as precision glass molding. Thus costly single point diamond turning processes are shifted to mold manufacturing and do not have to be applied to every single lens produced. The usage of FEM-Simulation is mandatory for developing a molding process for complex e.g. non rotational symmetric chalcogenide glass lenses in order to predict the flow of glass. This talk will present state of the art modelling of the precision glass molding process for chalcogenide glass lenses, based on thermal- and mechanical models. Input data for modelling are a set of material properties of the specific chalcogenide glass in conjunction with properties of mold material and wear protective coatings. Specific properties for the mold-glass interaction such as stress relaxation or friction at the glassmold interface cannot be obtained from datasheets and must be determined experimentally. A qualified model is a powerful tool to optimize mold and preform designs in advance in order to achieve sufficient mold filling and compensate for glass shrinkage. Application of these models in an FEM-Simulation "case study" for molding a complex shaped non-rotational symmetric lens is shown. The outlook will examine relevant issues for modelling the precision glass molding process of chalcogenide glasses in order to realize scaled up production in terms of multi cavity- and wafer level molding.

  6. HLW Glass Studies: Development of Crystal-Tolerant HLW Glasses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matyas, Josef; Huckleberry, Adam R.; Rodriguez, Carmen P.; Lang, Jesse B.; Owen, Antionette T.; Kruger, Albert A.

    2012-04-02

    In our study, a series of lab-scale crucible tests were performed on designed glasses of different compositions to further investigate and simulate the effect of Cr, Ni, Fe, Al, Li, and RuO2 on the accumulation rate of spinel crystals in the glass discharge riser of the HLW melter. The experimental data were used to expand the compositional region covered by an empirical model developed previously (Matyáš et al. 2010b), improving its predictive performance. We also investigated the mechanism for agglomeration of particles and impact of agglomerates on accumulation rate. In addition, the TL was measured as a function of temperature and composition.

  7. Microstructuring of glasses

    CERN Document Server

    Hülsenberg, Dagmar; Bismarck, Alexander

    2008-01-01

    As microstructured glass becomes increasingly important for microsystems technology, the main application fields include micro-fluidic systems, micro-analysis systems, sensors, micro-actuators and implants. And, because glass has quite distinct properties from silicon, PMMA and metals, applications exist where only glass devices meet the requirements. The main advantages of glass derive from its amorphous nature, the precondition for its - theoretically - direction-independent geometric structurability. Microstructuring of Glasses deals with the amorphous state, various glass compositions and their properties, the interactions between glasses and the electromagnetic waves used to modify it. Also treated in detail are methods for influencing the geometrical microstructure of glasses by mechanical, chemical, thermal, optical, and electrical treatment, and the methods and equipment required to produce actual microdevices.

  8. Degradation of glass in the soil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Romich, H.; Gerlach, S.; Mottner, P. [Fraunhofer-Institut fur Silicatforschung (ISC), Wertheim-Bronnbach (Germany)

    2004-07-01

    Full text of publication follows: Glass has been produced and used in Europe for over 2000 years. Glass objects from the Roman period onwards have been excavated during the last centuries. In general, Roman glass is chemically quite stable, and often the only sign of chemical alteration is an iridescent surface, caused by the leaching of cations, which leads to the formation of a hydrated silica-rich layer. Medieval potash glasses are much less durable, and their surfaces are often found deeply leached, sometimes to a point that no unaltered glass remains. These surfaces may be coherent, though fragile, or they are laminar, with no cohesion between the layers at all. In this study an analytical examination of a series of fragments of archaeological glass retrieved from different sites near Cologne and Stuttgart (Germany) has been carried out. Samples of corroded glasses were analysed by optical microscopy and SEM/EDX (surface and cross sections) in order to obtain information about the chemical composition of the bulk glass and the weathered layers. Since the environmental parameters have constantly varied for archaeological objects, mechanistic studies have to rely on laboratory experiments under controlled conditions. For an extensive exposure programme standardised soil or natural garden earth was used, for which the pH was modified. Several corrosion sensitive potash-lime silicate glasses have been designed to study the effect of glass composition. A model glass consisting of SiO{sub 2} (54.2), CaO (28.8) and K{sub 2}O (17.0 weight-%) mostly lead to the formation of a crust on the leached layer, with a total thickness of 100 micrometer (for soil with pH 7 to 8, 12 months exposure). Model glasses also containing Al, Mg and P have built up preferably laminated structures (total thickness up to 200 micrometer). This presentation will give an overview about the variety of degradation phenomena observed on originals and compare the results with controlled laboratory

  9. Infrared Transparent Selenide Glasses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997-03-14

    crystalline halides, silica and fluoride glasses, and chalcogenide glasses. Crystalline halides undergo plastic deformation and are hygroscopic...mainly for applications operating at wavelengths less than 3 microns. Silicate and fluoride glasses have been developed as optical fiber amplifiers...activity. Preferred rare earths includes praseodymium, neodymium, erbium, cerium , dysprosium, holmium, thulium, terbium, ytterbium or mixtures of

  10. Late Byzantine mineral soda high alumina glasses from Asia Minor: a new primary glass production group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schibille, Nadine

    2011-04-19

    The chemical characterisation of archaeological glass allows the discrimination between different glass groups and the identification of raw materials and technological traditions of their production. Several lines of evidence point towards the large-scale production of first millennium CE glass in a limited number of glass making factories from a mixture of Egyptian mineral soda and a locally available silica source. Fundamental changes in the manufacturing processes occurred from the eight/ninth century CE onwards, when Egyptian mineral soda was gradually replaced by soda-rich plant ash in Egypt as well as the Islamic Middle East. In order to elucidate the supply and consumption of glass during this transitional period, 31 glass samples from the assemblage found at Pergamon (Turkey) that date to the fourth to fourteenth centuries CE were analysed by electron microprobe analysis (EPMA) and by laser ablation-inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS). The statistical evaluation of the data revealed that the Byzantine glasses from Pergamon represent at least three different glass production technologies, one of which had not previously been recognised in the glass making traditions of the Mediterranean. While the chemical characteristics of the late antique and early medieval fragments confirm the current model of glass production and distribution at the time, the elemental make-up of the majority of the eighth- to fourteenth-century glasses from Pergamon indicate the existence of a late Byzantine glass type that is characterised by high alumina levels. Judging from the trace element patterns and elevated boron and lithium concentrations, these glasses were produced with a mineral soda different to the Egyptian natron from the Wadi Natrun, suggesting a possible regional Byzantine primary glass production in Asia Minor.

  11. Late Byzantine mineral soda high alumina glasses from Asia Minor: a new primary glass production group.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nadine Schibille

    Full Text Available The chemical characterisation of archaeological glass allows the discrimination between different glass groups and the identification of raw materials and technological traditions of their production. Several lines of evidence point towards the large-scale production of first millennium CE glass in a limited number of glass making factories from a mixture of Egyptian mineral soda and a locally available silica source. Fundamental changes in the manufacturing processes occurred from the eight/ninth century CE onwards, when Egyptian mineral soda was gradually replaced by soda-rich plant ash in Egypt as well as the Islamic Middle East. In order to elucidate the supply and consumption of glass during this transitional period, 31 glass samples from the assemblage found at Pergamon (Turkey that date to the fourth to fourteenth centuries CE were analysed by electron microprobe analysis (EPMA and by laser ablation-inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS. The statistical evaluation of the data revealed that the Byzantine glasses from Pergamon represent at least three different glass production technologies, one of which had not previously been recognised in the glass making traditions of the Mediterranean. While the chemical characteristics of the late antique and early medieval fragments confirm the current model of glass production and distribution at the time, the elemental make-up of the majority of the eighth- to fourteenth-century glasses from Pergamon indicate the existence of a late Byzantine glass type that is characterised by high alumina levels. Judging from the trace element patterns and elevated boron and lithium concentrations, these glasses were produced with a mineral soda different to the Egyptian natron from the Wadi Natrun, suggesting a possible regional Byzantine primary glass production in Asia Minor.

  12. Kinetic competition during glass formation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perepezko, J.H., E-mail: perepezk@engr.wisc.edu [University of Wisconsin-Madison, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, 1509 University Ave., Madison, WI 53706 (United States); Santhaweesuk, C.; Wang, J.Q. [University of Wisconsin-Madison, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, 1509 University Ave., Madison, WI 53706 (United States); Imhoff, S.D. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Materials Science and Technology Div., Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States)

    2014-12-05

    Highlights: • The kinetics of glass formation has been elucidated in an Fe and Au-base alloy. • A critical cooling rate range should be considered for glass formation. • Wedge casting, calorimetry and upquenching data are used to model TTT curves. - Abstract: For vitrification of an alloy melt during cooling there is a kinetic competition with the nucleation and growth of metastable and stable crystalline phases. Many of the measures of glass forming ability (GFA) attempt to capture some of the features of the kinetic competition, but the GFA metrics are static measures and the kinetic processes are dynamic in nature. In fact, the critical cooling rate for glass formation should be viewed in terms of a critical cooling rate range to acknowledge the stochastic nature of crystal nucleation behavior. Direct measurements of the critical cooling rate range confirm this behavior and also provide useful input for kinetics analysis. Usually kinetics analyses are based upon crystallization behavior that is measured either isothermally or upon heating to temperatures near the crystallization onset, T{sub x} and the results are extrapolated to much higher temperatures. This practice is based upon a number of assumptions about transport behavior in the undercooled liquid. With rapid up-quenching of amorphous samples, the high temperature crystallization behavior can be measured and used to refine the kinetics analysis and provide useful insight on the kinetic competition and glass forming ability.

  13. Optical scattering in glass ceramics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mattarelli, M.; Montagna, M.; Verrocchio, P.

    2008-01-01

    The transparency of glass ceramics with nanocrystals is generally higher than that expected from the theory of Rayleigh scattering. We attribute this ultra-transparency to the spatial correlation of the nanoparticles. The structure factor is calculated for a simple model system, the random sequentia

  14. Response to "Comment on 'A model for phosphate glass topology considering the modifying ion sub-network"' [J. Chem. Phys. 142, 107103 (2015)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hermansen, Christian; Mauro, John C; Yue, Yuanzheng

    2015-03-14

    In our recent paper [C. Hermansen, J. C. Mauro, and Y.-Z. Yue, J. Chem. Phys. 140, 154501 (2014)], we applied temperature-dependent constraint theory to model the glass transition temperature (Tg) and liquid fragility index (m) of alkali phosphate glasses. Sidebottom commented on this paper concerning the m values obtained by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) [D. L. Sidebottom, J. Chem. Phys. 142, ⬛ (2015)]. We have considered Sidebottom's comments carefully and conclude that the m values of phosphate liquids obtained by DSC are reliable, except for the NaPO3 and possibly P2O5 compositions. Based on his dynamic light scattering measurements, Sidebottom has found that P2O5 is a strong liquid with m ≈ 20. However, based on the heat capacity jump at Tg and the stretching exponent of the relaxation function, P2O5 should be classified as an intermediate fragile liquid with m ≈ 40. We also argue that m cannot be universally related to the average connectivity of the network and point out several inconsistencies with this view.

  15. High density fluoride glass calorimeter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Q.; Scheltzbaum, J.; Akgun, U.

    2014-04-01

    The unprecedented radiation levels in current Large Hadron Collider runs, and plans to even increase the luminosity creates a need for new detector technologies to be investigated. Quartz plates to replace the plastic scintillators in current LHC calorimeters have been proposed in recent reports. Quartz based Cherenkov calorimeters can solve the radiation damage problem, however light production and transfer have proven to be challenging. This report summarizes the results from a computational study on the performance of a high-density glass calorimeter. High-density, scintillating, fluoride glass, CHG3, was used as the active material. This glass has been developed specifically for hadron collider experiments, and is known for fast response time, in addition to high light yield. Here, the details of a Geant4 model for a sampling calorimeter prototype with 20 layers, and its hadronic as well as electromagnetic performances are reported.

  16. Glass cullet as a new supplementary cementitious material (SCM)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirzahosseini, Mohammadreza

    Finely ground glass has the potential for pozzolanic reactivity and can serve as a supplementary cementitious material (SCM). Glass reaction kinetics depends on both temperature and glass composition. Uniform composition, amorphous nature, and high silica content of glass make ground glass an ideal material for studying the effects of glass type and particle size on reactivity at different temperature. This study focuses on how three narrow size ranges of clear and green glass cullet, 63--75 mum, 25--38 mum, and smaller than 25 mum, as well as combination of glass types and particle sizes affects the microstructure and performance properties of cementitious systems containing glass cullet as a SCM. Isothermal calorimetry, chemical shrinkage, thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), quantitative analysis of X-ray diffraction (XRD), and analysis of scanning electron microscope (SEM) images in backscattered (BS) mode were used to quantify the cement reaction kinetics and microstructure. Additionally, compressive strength and water sorptivity experiments were performed on mortar samples to correlate reactivity of cementitious materials containing glass to the performance of cementitious mixtures. A recently-developed modeling platform called "muic the model" was used to simulated pozzolanic reactivity of single type and fraction size and combined types and particle sizes of finely ground glass. Results showed that ground glass exhibits pozzolanic properties, especially when particles of clear and green glass below 25 mum and their combination were used at elevated temperatures, reflecting that glass cullet is a temperature-sensitive SCM. Moreover, glass composition was seen to have a large impact on reactivity. In this study, green glass showed higher reactivity than clear glass. Results also revealed that the simultaneous effect of sizes and types of glass cullet (surface area) on the degree of hydration of glass particles can be accounted for through a linear addition

  17. The stress distribution in tempered glass due to a crack

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arin, K.

    1976-01-01

    A model describing the failure in tempered glass is proposed and a method of solution is presented. An infinite elastic strip is assumed to represent the glass and the loads vanish everywhere on the boundary as well as at infinity. The problem is solved using the integral equations technique where the input is the residual stresses in the glass.

  18. Fluoride glass fiber optics

    CERN Document Server

    Aggarwal, Ishwar D

    1991-01-01

    Fluoride Glass Fiber Optics reviews the fundamental aspects of fluoride glasses. This book is divided into nine chapters. Chapter 1 discusses the wide range of fluoride glasses with an emphasis on fluorozirconate-based compositions. The structure of simple fluoride systems, such as BaF2 binary glass is elaborated in Chapter 2. The third chapter covers the intrinsic transparency of fluoride glasses from the UV to the IR, with particular emphasis on the multiphonon edge and electronic edge. The next three chapters are devoted to ultra-low loss optical fibers, reviewing methods for purifying and

  19. Multiple Glass Ceilings

    OpenAIRE

    Russo, Giovanni; Hassink, Wolter

    2011-01-01

    Both vertical (between job levels) and horizontal (within job levels) mobility can be sources of wage growth. We find that the glass ceiling operates at both margins. The unexplained part of the wage gap grows across job levels (glass ceiling at the vertical margin) and across the deciles of the intra-job-level wage distribution (glass ceiling at the horizontal margin). This implies that women face many glass ceilings, one for each job level above the second, and that the glass ceiling is a p...

  20. STRESS RELAXATION CHARACTERISTICS OF SELECTED COMMERCIALLY PRODUCED GLASSES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chocholoušek J.

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes a quantitative method of stress relaxation measurement in prismatic glass samples during two different time-temperature regimes using the Sénarmont compensator. Four types of glass (Barium crystal glass, Eutal, Simax, and Container glass were subjected to observation in an assembled measuring device. Results will be used for parameterization of the Tool-Narayanaswamy-Mazurin model and consequently implemented in a finite element method code.

  1. Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) Durability-Composition Models and the Applicability of the Associated Reduction of Constraints (ROC) Criteria for High TiO2 Containing Glasses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jantzen, C. M. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Edwards, T. B. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Trivelpiece, C. L. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2016-08-30

    Radioactive high level waste (HLW) at the Savannah River Site (SRS) has successfully been vitrified into borosilicate glass in the DWPF since 1996. Vitrification requires stringent product/process (P/P) constraints since the glass cannot be reworked once it has been poured into ten foot tall by two foot diameter canisters. A unique “feed forward” statistical process control (SPC) was developed for this control rather than relying on statistical quality control (SQC). In SPC, the feed composition to the DWPF melter is controlled prior to vitrification. In SQC, the glass product would be sampled after it is vitrified. Individual glass property-composition models form the basis for the “feed forward” SPC. The models transform constraints on the melt and glass properties into constraints on the feed composition going to the melter in order to determine, at the 95% confidence level, that the feed will be processable and that the durability of the resulting waste form will be acceptable to a geologic repository.

  2. Topological principles of borosilicate glass chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smedskjaer, Morten M; Mauro, John C; Youngman, Randall E; Hogue, Carrie L; Potuzak, Marcel; Yue, Yuanzheng

    2011-11-10

    Borosilicate glasses display a rich complexity of chemical behavior depending on the details of their composition and thermal history. Noted for their high chemical durability and thermal shock resistance, borosilicate glasses have found a variety of important uses from common household and laboratory glassware to high-tech applications such as liquid crystal displays. In this paper, we investigate the topological principles of borosilicate glass chemistry covering the extremes from pure borate to pure silicate end members. Based on NMR measurements, we present a two-state statistical mechanical model of boron speciation in which addition of network modifiers leads to a competition between the formation of nonbridging oxygen and the conversion of boron from trigonal to tetrahedral configuration. Using this model, we derive a detailed topological representation of alkali-alkaline earth-borosilicate glasses that enables the accurate prediction of properties such as glass transition temperature, liquid fragility, and hardness. The modeling approach enables an understanding of the microscopic mechanisms governing macroscopic properties. The implications of the glass topology are discussed in terms of both the temperature and thermal history dependence of the atomic bond constraints and the influence on relaxation behavior. We also observe a nonlinear evolution of the jump in isobaric heat capacity at the glass transition when substituting SiO(2) for B(2)O(3), which can be accurately predicted using a combined topological and thermodynamic modeling approach.

  3. Modeling of the Co2+saturable absorber Q-switch for the Er:Yb:glass laser (1.534 um)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gruber, John B.; Kennedy, Ann W.; Zandi, Bahram; Hutchinson, James A.

    2000-03-01

    We have modeled the passive Q-switch performance of divalent cobalt and its spectroscopic parameters in various host media for the Er:Yb:Glass laser that operates near 1.534 micrometers . Our method involves the use of rate equations that assume a three-level gain medium and a four-level absorber medium including excited-state absorption. Numerical integration techniques are used where analytical functions are unobtainable to describe the dynamics within the systems that we have examined. Input into the rate equations is obtained from experimental data that include Co2+ ion concentrations, cross-sections, and lifetimes obtained by time-resolved spectroscopy. The calculated laser output in terms of pulse energies and pulsewidths in ns is compared with experimental results based on different Co2+ absorber host matricies and different cavity designs.

  4. Relationship between topological order and glass forming ability in densely packed enstatite and forsterite composition glasses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohara, S; Akola, J; Morita, H; Suzuya, K; Weber, J K R; Wilding, M C; Benmore, C J

    2011-09-06

    The atomic structures of magnesium silicate melts are key to understanding processes related to the evolution of the Earth's mantle and represent precursors to the formation of most igneous rocks. Magnesium silicate compositions also represent a major component of many glass ceramics, and depending on their composition can span the entire fragility range of glass formation. The silica rich enstatite (MgSiO(3)) composition is a good glass former, whereas the forsterite (Mg(2)SiO(4)) composition is at the limit of glass formation. Here, the structure of MgSiO(3) and Mg(2)SiO(4) composition glasses obtained from levitated liquids have been modeled using Reverse Monte Carlo fits to diffraction data and by density functional theory. A ring statistics analysis suggests that the lower glass forming ability of the Mg(2)SiO(4) glass is associated with a topologically ordered and very narrow ring distribution. The MgO(x) polyhedra have a variety of irregular shapes in MgSiO(3) and Mg(2)SiO(4) glasses and a cavity analysis demonstrates that both glasses have almost no free volume due to a large contribution from edge sharing of MgO(x)-MgO(x) polyhedra. It is found that while the atomic volume of Mg cations in the glasses increases compared to that of the crystalline phases, the number of Mg-O contacts is reduced, although the effective chemical interaction of Mg(2+) remains similar. This unusual structure-property relation of Mg(2)SiO(4) glass demonstrates that by using containerless processing it may be possible to synthesize new families of dense glasses and glass ceramics with zero porosity.

  5. Glass shell manufacturing in space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nolen, R. L.; Downs, R. L.; Ebner, M. A.

    1982-01-01

    Highly-uniform, hollow glass spheres, which are used for inertial-confinement fusion targets, are formed from metal-organic gel powder feedstock in a drop-tower furnace. The modelling of this gel-to-sphere transformation has consisted of three phases: gel thermochemistry, furnance-to-gel heat transfer, and gravity-driven degradation of the concentricity of the molten shell. The heat transfer from the furnace to the free-falling gel particle was modelled with forced convection. The gel mass, dimensions, and specific heat as well as furnace temperature profile and furnace gas conductivity, were controlled variables. This model has been experimentally verified. In the third phase, a mathematical model was developed to describe the gravity-driven degradation of concentricity in molten glass shells.

  6. Electrical conduction and glass relaxation in alkali- silicate glasses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angel, Paul William

    Electrical response measurements from 1 Hz to 1 MHz between 50o and 540oC were made on potassium, sodium and lithium-silicate glasses with low alkali oxide contents. Conductivity and electrical relaxation responses for both annealed and air quenched glasses of the same composition were compared. Quenching was found to lower the dc conductivity, σdc, and activation energy as well as increase the pre-exponential term when compared to the corresponding annealed glass of the same composition. All of the glasses exhibited Arrhenius behavior in the log σdc against 1/T plots. A sharp decrease in σdc was observed for glasses containing alkali concentrations of 7 mol% or less. The σdc activation energy exhibited similar behavior when plotted as a function of alkali composition and was explained in terms of a mixture of the weak and strong electrolyte models. The depression angle for fits to the complex impedance data were also measured as a function of thermal history, alkali concentration and alkali species. These results were interpreted in terms of changes in the distribution of relaxation times. Annealed samples from a single melt of a 10 mol% K2O-90SiO2 glass were reheated to temperatures ranging from 450o to 800oC, held isothermally for 20 min, and then quenched in either air or silicon oil. The complex impedance of both an annealed and the quenched samples were then measured as a function of temperature from 120o to 250oC. The σdc was found to be remain unaffected by heat treatments below 450oC, to increase rapidly over an approximate 200oC range of temperatures that was dependent on cooling rate and to be constant for heat treatments above this range. This behavior is interpreted in terms of the mean structural relaxation time as a function of temperature and cooling rate near the glass transition temperature and glass transformation ranges. A more detailed definition for the transition and transformation temperatures and ranges was also provided.

  7. Glass and glass-ceramic photonic systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zur, Lidia; Thi Ngoc Tran, Lam; Meneghetti, Marcello; Varas, Stefano; Armellini, Cristina; Ristic, Davor; Chiasera, Alessandro; Scotognella, Francesco; Pelli, Stefano; Nunzi Conti, Gualtiero; Boulard, Brigitte; Zonta, Daniele; Dorosz, Dominik; Lukowiak, Anna; Righini, Giancarlo C.; Ramponi, Roberta; Ferrari, Maurizio

    2017-02-01

    The development of optically confined structure is a major topic in both basic and applied physics not solely ICT oriented but also concerning lighting, laser, sensing, energy, environment, biological and medical sciences, and quantum optics. Glasses and glass-ceramics activated by rare earth ions are the bricks of such structures. Glass-ceramics are nanocomposite systems that exhibit specific morphologic, structural and spectroscopic properties allowing developing new physical concepts, for instance the mechanism related to the transparency, as well as novel photonic devices based on the enhancement of the luminescence. The dependence of the final product on the specific parent glass and on the fabrication protocol still remain an important task of the research in material science. Looking to application, the enhanced spectroscopic properties typical of glass ceramic in respect to those of the amorphous structures constitute an important point for the development of integrated optics devices, including optical amplifiers, monolithic waveguide laser, novel sensors, coating of spherical microresonators, and up and down converters. This paper presents some results obtained by our consortium regarding glass-based photonics systems. We will comment the energy transfer mechanism in transparent glass ceramics taking as examples the up and down conversion systems and the role of SnO2 nanocrystals as sensitizers. Coating of spherical resonators by glass ceramics, 1D-Photonic Crystals for luminescence enhancement, laser action and disordered 1-D photonic structures will be also discussed. Finally, RF-Sputtered rare earth doped P2O5- SiO2-Al2O3-Na2O-Er2O3 planar waveguides, will be presented.

  8. Bioactive glass coatings for orthopedic metallic implants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lopez-Esteban, Sonia; Saiz, Eduardo; Fujino, Sigheru; Oku, Takeo; Suganuma, Katsuaki; Tomsia, Antoni P.

    2003-06-30

    The objective of this work is to develop bioactive glass coatings for metallic orthopedic implants. A new family of glasses in the SiO2-Na2O-K2O-CaO-MgO-P2O5 system has been synthesized and characterized. The glass properties (thermal expansion, softening and transformation temperatures, density and hardness) are in line with the predictions of established empirical models. The optimized firing conditions to fabricate coatings on Ti-based and Co-Cr alloys have been determined and related to the glass properties and the interfacial reactions. Excellent adhesion to alloys has been achieved through the formation of 100-200 nm thick interfacial layers (Ti5Si3 on Ti-based alloys and CrOx on Co-Cr). Finally, glass coatings, approximately 100 mu m thick, have been fabricated onto commercial Ti alloy-based dental implants.

  9. Experimental design of a waste glass study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Piepel, G.F.; Redgate, P.E.; Hrma, P.

    1995-04-01

    A Composition Variation Study (CVS) is being performed to support a future high-level waste glass plant at Hanford. A total of 147 glasses, covering a broad region of compositions melting at approximately 1150{degrees}C, were tested in five statistically designed experimental phases. This paper focuses on the goals, strategies, and techniques used in designing the five phases. The overall strategy was to investigate glass compositions on the boundary and interior of an experimental region defined by single- component, multiple-component, and property constraints. Statistical optimal experimental design techniques were used to cover various subregions of the experimental region in each phase. Empirical mixture models for glass properties (as functions of glass composition) from previous phases wee used in designing subsequent CVS phases.

  10. Photoelastic response of permanently densified oxide glasses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bechgaard, Tobias K.; Mauro, John C.; Thirion, Lynn M.; Rzoska, Sylwester J.; Bockowski, Michal; Smedskjaer, Morten M.

    2017-05-01

    The stress-induced birefringence (photoelastic response) in oxide glasses has important consequences for several applications, including glass for flat panel displays, chemically strengthened cover glass, and advanced optical glasses. While the effect of composition on the photoelastic response is relatively well documented, the effect of pressure has not been systematically studied. In this work, we evaluate the effect of hot isostatic compression on the photoelastic response of ten oxide glasses within two commonly used industrial glass families: aluminosilicates and boroaluminosilicates. Hot isostatic compression generally results in decreasing modifier-oxygen bond lengths and increasing network-former coordination numbers. These structural changes should lead to an increase in the stress optic coefficient (C) according to the model of Zwanziger et al., which can successfully predict the composition and structure dependence of C. However, in compressed glasses, we observe the opposite trend, viz., a decrease in the stress optic coefficient as a result of pressurization. We discuss this result based on measured changes in refractive index and elastic moduli within the context of atomic and lattice effects, building on the pioneering work of Mueller. We propose that the pressure-induced decrease in C is a result of changes in the shear modulus due to underlying topological changes in the glass network.

  11. Liquid Glass: A Facile Soft Replication Method for Structuring Glass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotz, Frederik; Plewa, Klaus; Bauer, Werner; Schneider, Norbert; Keller, Nico; Nargang, Tobias; Helmer, Dorothea; Sachsenheimer, Kai; Schäfer, Michael; Worgull, Matthias; Greiner, Christian; Richter, Christiane; Rapp, Bastian E

    2016-06-01

    Liquid glass is a photocurable amorphous silica nanocomposite that can be structured using soft replication molds and turned into glass via thermal debinding and sintering. Simple polymer bonding techniques allow the fabrication of complex microsystems in glass like microfluidic chips. Liquid glass is a step toward prototyping of glass microstructures at low cost without requiring cleanroom facilities or hazardous chemicals.

  12. Mechanically reinforced glass beams

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Jens Henrik; Olesen, John Forbes

    2007-01-01

    The use of glass as a load carrying material in structural elements is rarely seen even though glass is a popular material for many architects. This is owed to the unreliable and low tensile strength, which is due to surface flaws and high brittleness of the material. These properties lead...... to breakage without any warning or ductility, which can be catastrophic if no precautions are taken. One aspect of this issue is treated here by looking at the possibility of mechanically reinforcing glass beams in order to obtain ductile failure for such a structural component. A mechanically reinforced...... laminated float glass beam is constructed and tested in four-point bending. The beam consist of 4 layers of glass laminated together with a slack steel band glued onto the bottom face of the beam. The glass parts of the tested beams are \\SI{1700}{mm} long and \\SI{100}{mm} high, and the total width of one...

  13. Radiation effects in glasses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ehrt, D.; Vogel, W. (Otto-Schott-Inst., Chemische Fakultaet, Friedrich-Schiller-Univ., Jena (Germany))

    1992-03-01

    Glass was produced by man about 4000 years ago. The scientific exploration of glass is very young and closely connected with Jena. Fraunhofer, Goethe, Dobereiner, Abbe, Zeiss and Schott are famous names on this field. Both crystals and glasses are solids. However, there are fundamental differences in their properties and behavior. Glass is a thermodynamically unstable state and has a defect structure compared to the crystal. Glass and its properties are subject to a variety of changes under the influence of high energy radiation. In general, effects extend from the reduction of specific ions to the collapse of the entire network. Ultraviolet and X-ray radiation effects on UV-transmitting glasses will be discussed. (orig.).

  14. Homogeneity of Inorganic Glasses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Martin; Zhang, L.; Keding, Ralf;

    2011-01-01

    Homogeneity of glasses is a key factor determining their physical and chemical properties and overall quality. However, quantification of the homogeneity of a variety of glasses is still a challenge for glass scientists and technologists. Here, we show a simple approach by which the homogeneity...... of different glass products can be quantified and ranked. This approach is based on determination of both the optical intensity and dimension of the striations in glasses. These two characteristic values areobtained using the image processing method established recently. The logarithmic ratio between...... the dimension and the intensity is used to quantify and rank the homogeneity of glass products. Compared with the refractive index method, the image processing method has a wider detection range and a lower statistical uncertainty....

  15. Homogeneity of Inorganic Glasses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Martin; Zhang, L.; Keding, Ralf

    2011-01-01

    Homogeneity of glasses is a key factor determining their physical and chemical properties and overall quality. However, quantification of the homogeneity of a variety of glasses is still a challenge for glass scientists and technologists. Here, we show a simple approach by which the homogeneity...... of different glass products can be quantified and ranked. This approach is based on determination of both the optical intensity and dimension of the striations in glasses. These two characteristic values areobtained using the image processing method established recently. The logarithmic ratio between...... the dimension and the intensity is used to quantify and rank the homogeneity of glass products. Compared with the refractive index method, the image processing method has a wider detection range and a lower statistical uncertainty....

  16. Raman Spectra of Glasses

    Science.gov (United States)

    1986-11-30

    17), Raman spectra, plus a , . theoretical treatment of the data, f complex fluorozirconate 14 I anions in ZBLAN glasses and melts (16), and...based ZBLAN glasses ) 17. ICORS (International Conference on Raman Spectroscopy) Proceedings, London, England. Conferencf 5-9 Sep 88. (Molten silica...RESEARCH FINAL REPORT DTIC CONTRACT N00014-81-K-0501 &JELECTE 1 MAY 81 -- 30 NOV 86 EJJAN041989 V "RAMAN SPECTRA OF GLASSES " 0 During the five years of the

  17. Diamond turning of glass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blackley, W.S.; Scattergood, R.O.

    1988-12-01

    A new research initiative will be undertaken to investigate the critical cutting depth concepts for single point diamond turning of brittle, amorphous materials. Inorganic glasses and a brittle, thermoset polymer (organic glass) are the principal candidate materials. Interrupted cutting tests similar to those done in earlier research are Ge and Si crystals will be made to obtain critical depth values as a function of machining parameters. The results will provide systematic data with which to assess machining performance on glasses and amorphous materials

  18. Metal Halide Optical Glasses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-01-01

    while some of the multi- component "modified" glasses (e.g., ZBLAN ) could easily be cast into pieces several mm thick. 23 The difference between the...energy. 7-1 0 Typical plots pf 24 of log Iqi versus ]/Tf for ZB-I, ZBL, ZBLA, ZBLAN and ZBLALi glasses are presented in Fig. 3. These plots are linear... ZBLAN glasses are more resistant to devitrification than the corresponding ZBLLi or ZBLN glasses , although this does not appear to be manifested in

  19. Hollow glass for insulating layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merticaru, Andreea R.; Moagar-Poladian, Gabriel

    1999-03-01

    Common porous materials, some of which will be considered in the chapters of this book, include concrete, paper, ceramics, clays, porous semiconductors, chromotography materials, and natural materials like coral, bone, sponges, rocks and shells. Porous materials can also be reactive, such as in charcoal gasification, acid rock dissolution, catalyst deactivation and concrete. This study continues the investigations about the properties of, so-called, hollow glass. In this paper is presented a computer simulation approach in which the thermo-mechanical behavior of a 3D microstructure is directly computed. In this paper a computer modeling approach of porous glass is presented. One way to test the accuracy of the reconstructed microstructures is to computed their physical properties and compare to experimental measurement on equivalent systems. In this view, we imagine a new type of porous type of glass designed as buffer layer in multilayered printed boards in ICs. Our glass is a variable material with a variable pore size and surface area. The porosity could be tailored early from the deposition phases that permitting us to keep in a reasonable balance the dielectric constant and thermal conductivity.

  20. On the tail of the overlap probability distribution in the Sherrington-Kirkpatrick model 75.50.Lk Spin glasses and other random magnets; 75.10.Nr Spin-glass and other random models; 75.40.Gb Dynamic properties (dynamic susceptibility, spin waves, spin diffusion, dynamic scaling, etc.);

    CERN Document Server

    Billoire, A; Marinari, E

    2003-01-01

    We investigate the large deviation behaviour of the overlap probability density in the Sherrington-Kirkpatrick (SK) model using the coupled replica scheme, and we compare with the results of a large-scale numerical simulation. In the spin glass phase we show that, generically, for any model with continuous replica symmetry breaking (RSB), 1/N log P sub N (q)approx -A(|q| - q sub E sub A) sup 3 , and we compute the first correction to the expansion of A in powers of T sub c - T for the SK model. We also study the paramagnetic phase, where results are obtained in the replica symmetric scheme that do not involve an expansion in powers of q - q sub E sub A or T sub c - T. Finally we give precise semi-analytical estimates of P(|q| = 1). The overall agreement between the various points of view is very satisfactory.

  1. Glass dissolution rate measurement and calculation revisited

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fournier, Maxime; Ull, Aurélien; Nicoleau, Elodie; Inagaki, Yaohiro; Odorico, Michaël; Frugier, Pierre; Gin, Stéphane

    2016-08-01

    Aqueous dissolution rate measurements of nuclear glasses are a key step in the long-term behavior study of such waste forms. These rates are routinely normalized to the glass surface area in contact with solution, and experiments are very often carried out using crushed materials. Various methods have been implemented to determine the surface area of such glass powders, leading to differing values, with the notion of the reactive surface area of crushed glass remaining vague. In this study, around forty initial dissolution rate measurements were conducted following static and flow rate (SPFT, MCFT) measurement protocols at 90 °C, pH 10. The international reference glass (ISG), in the forms of powders with different particle sizes and polished monoliths, and soda-lime glass beads were examined. Although crushed glass grains clearly cannot be assimilated with spheres, it is when using the samples geometric surface (Sgeo) that the rates measured on powders are closest to those found for monoliths. Overestimation of the reactive surface when using the BET model (SBET) may be due to small physical features at the atomic scale-contributing to BET surface area but not to AFM surface area. Such features are very small compared with the thickness of water ingress in glass (a few hundred nanometers) and should not be considered in rate calculations. With a SBET/Sgeo ratio of 2.5 ± 0.2 for ISG powders, it is shown here that rates measured on powders and normalized to Sgeo should be divided by 1.3 and rates normalized to SBET should be multiplied by 1.9 in order to be compared with rates measured on a monolith. The use of glass beads indicates that the geometric surface gives a good estimation of glass reactive surface if sample geometry can be precisely described. Although data clearly shows the repeatability of measurements, results must be given with a high uncertainty of approximately ±25%.

  2. SLUDGE BATCH 7B GLASS VARIABILITY STUDY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, F.; Edwards, T.

    2011-10-25

    The Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) is preparing to initiate processing Sludge Batch 7b (SB7b). In support of the upcoming processing, the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) provided a recommendation to utilize Frits 418 with a 6% Na{sub 2}O addition (26 wt% Na{sub 2}O in sludge) and 702 with a 4% Na{sub 2}O addition (24 wt% Na{sub 2}O in sludge) to process SB7b. This recommendation was based on assessments of the compositional projections for SB7b available at the time from the Savannah River Remediation (SRR). To support qualification of SB7b, SRNL executed a variability study to assess the applicability of the current durability models for SB7b. The durability models were assessed over the expected composition range of SB7b, including potential caustic additions, combined with Frits 702 and 418 over a 32-40% waste loading (WL) range. Thirty four glasses were selected based on Frits 418 and 702 coupled with the sludge projections with an additional 4-6% Na{sub 2}O to reflect the potential caustic addition. Six of these glasses, based on average nominal sludge compositions including the appropriate caustic addition, were developed for both Frit 418 and Frit 702 at 32, 36 and 40% WL to provide coverage in the center of the anticipated SB7b glass region. All glasses were fabricated and characterized using chemical composition analysis, X-ray diffraction (XRD) and the Product Consistency Test (PCT). To comply with the DWPF Glass Product Control Program, a total of thirty four glasses were fabricated to assess the applicability of the current DWPF PCCS durability models. Based on the measured PCT response, all of the glasses were acceptable with respect to the Environmental Assessment (EA) benchmark glass regardless of thermal history. The NL[B] values of the SB7b variability study glasses were less than 1.99 g/L as compared to 16.695 g/L for EA. A small number of the D-optimally selected 'outer layer' extreme vertices (EV) glasses were not

  3. Structures and optical properties of tellurite glasses and glass ceramics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hart, Robert Theodore, Jr.

    The structures and optical properties of (K2O)15(Nb 2O5)15(TeO2)70 glass and glass ceramic have been studied in order to understand the second harmonic generation observed from the glass ceramic. We have used 93Nb NMR, Raman spectroscopy, differential scanning calorimetry, small angle x-ray scattering, transmission electron microscopy, and powder x-ray and neutron scattering. We find that there is a microstructure consistent with binodal phase separation leading to spherical inclusions ˜20 nm in size. Upon heat treatment, these domains become nanocrystals of K2Te 4O9. A theory of optical heterogeneity is used to describe the observed second harmonic generation which is ˜95 times more intense that quartz. The chi(2) value for this material is 3.0 x 10-9 esu. A second project has used 125Te and 17O NMR to study alkali tellurite glasses in the system (M2O) x(TeO2)10-x, where M = Li, Na or K and x = 1, 2 or 3. The 125Te results show that complex models of network modification are needed to explain the resulting spectra that include a distribution of polyhedral tellurite units at all compositions. The 17O results show that there is a clear distinction between bridging and non-bridging oxygen sites in tellurite crystals and that sophisticated NMR experiments should be able to distinguish them in the glasses. Further, we have used Extended Huckel theory tight-binding calculations to predict the 17O NMR shifts of SiO2, GeO 2 and TeO2. We find that these calculations allow accurate predictions of the chemical shifts based solely on the trend in valence orbital size, and that expensive calculations of electron currents need not be used for this application.

  4. Determination of Reactive Surface Area of Melt Glass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bourcier,W.L.; Roberts, S.; Smith, D.K.; Hulsey, S.; Newton,L.; Sawvel, A.; Bruton, C.; Papelis, C.; Um, W.; Russell, C. E.; Chapman,J.

    2000-10-01

    A comprehensive investigation of natural and manmade silicate glasses, and nuclear melt glass was undertaken in order to derive an estimate of glass reactive surface area. Reactive surface area is needed to model release rates of radionuclides from nuclear melt glass in the subsurface. Because of the limited availability of nuclear melt glasses, natural volcanic glass samples were collected which had similar textures and compositions as those of melt glass. A flow-through reactor was used to measure the reactive surface area of the analog glasses in the presence of simplified NTS site ground waters. A measure of the physical surface area of these glasses was obtained using the BET gas-adsorption method. The studies on analog glasses were supplemented by measurement of the surface areas of pieces of actual melt glass using the BET method. The variability of the results reflect the sample preparation and measurement techniques used, as well as textural heterogeneity inherent to these samples. Based on measurements of analog and actual samples, it is recommended that the hydraulic source term calculations employ a range of 0.001 to 0.01 m{sup 2}/g for the reactive surface area of nuclear melt glass.

  5. Stress analysis of laminated glass with different interlayer materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mostafa M. El-Shami

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The use of window glass in building design is becoming increasingly popular. Laminated glass has gained popularity as a suitable and practical alternative to monolithic and insulating glass in many design situations. Laminated glass plate performance is influenced by several factors such as glass thickness, glass type, temperature, aspect ratio, load duration, and hardness of the interlayer material. A new higher order finite element model (presented by the first two authors using 9-noded quadrilateral elements was applied to investigate laminated glass plates with both different interlayer materials. An experimental load-testing program is described. Two types of interlayer materials, regular polyvinyl butyral and strong formulation of polyvinyl butyral were used. First, simply supported rectangular laminated glass plates with regular polyvinyl butyral interlayer with aspect ratios 1–5 under different temperatures were tested. Second, one set of laminated glass plates with the strong formulation of polyvinyl butyral interlayer was tested under room temperature. The experimental and theoretical results are compared and discussed. In general, the performance of laminated glass with regular polyvinyl butyral interlayer is closer to that of layered glass at higher temperature. Also, laminated glass with strong formulation of polyvinyl butyral interlayer has a significantly larger load resistance than similar regular polyvinyl butyral samples.

  6. Plasmonic molecules via glass annealing in hydrogen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redkov, Alexey; Chervinskii, Semen; Baklanov, Alexander; Reduto, Igor; Zhurikhina, Valentina; Lipovskii, Andrey

    2014-11-01

    Growth of self-assembled metal nanoislands on the surface of silver ion-exchanged glasses via their thermal processing in hydrogen followed by out-diffusion of neutral silver is studied. The combination of thermal poling of the ion-exchanged glass with structured electrode and silver out-diffusion was used for simple formation of separated groups of several metal nanoislands presenting plasmonic molecules. The kinetics of nanoisland formation and temporal evolution of their size distribution on the surface of poled and unpoled glass are modeled.

  7. Dielectric and shear mechanical relaxations in glass-forming liquids: A test of the Gemant-DiMarzio-Bishop model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Niss, K.; Jakobsen, B.; Olsen, N.B.

    2005-01-01

    The Gemant-DiMarzio-Bishop model, which connects the frequency-dependent shear modulus to the frequency-dependent dielectric constant, is reviewed and a new consistent macroscopic formulation is derived. It is moreover shown that this version of the model can be tested without fitting parameters...... that the Gemant-DiMarzio-Bishop model is correct on a qualitative level. The quantitative agreement between the model and the data is on the other hand moderate to poor. It is discussed if a model-free comparison between the dielectric and shear mechanical relaxations is relevant, and it is concluded...... that the shear modulus should be compared with the rotational dielectric modulus, 1/(epsilon(omega)–n^2), which is extracted from the Gemant-DiMarzio-Bishop model, rather than to the dielectric susceptibility or the conventional dielectric modulus M=1/epsilon(omega)...

  8. Lanthanoides in Glass and Glass Ceramics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meinhardt, Jürgen; Kilo, Martin; Somorowsky, Ferdinand; Hopp, Werner

    2017-03-01

    Many types of glass contain lanthanoides; among them, special glass for optical applications is the one with the highest content of lanthanoides. The precise determination of the lanthanoides' concentration is performed by inductively coupled plasma-optical emission spectrometry (ICP-OES). However, up to now, there are no established standard processes guaranteeing a uniform approach to the lanthanoide analysis. The knowledge of the lanthanoides' concentrations is necessary on the microscale in some cases, especially if a suitable separation and recycling procedure is to be applied. Here, the analysis is performed by energy-dispersive X-ray (EDX) or wavelength-dispersive X-ray (WDX) analytics in the scanning electron microscope.

  9. Experimental Determination and Numerical Modelling of Process Induced Strains and Residual Stresses in Thick Glass/Epoxy Laminate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Michael Wenani; Hattel, Jesper Henri; Løgstrup Andersen, Tom;

    2012-01-01

    In this work, a cure hardening instantaneous linear elastic (CHILE) model and a path dependent (PD) constitutive approach are compared, for the case of modelling strain build-up during curing of a thick composite laminate part. The PD approach is a limiting case of viscoelasticity with path depen...

  10. Electric glass capturing markets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wikman, K.; Wikstroem, T.

    1996-11-01

    Electric glass has found its place on the construction market. In public buildings, electrically heatable windows are becoming the leading option for large glass walls. Studies on detached houses, both new and renovated, show that floor heating combined with electrically heatable windowpanes is the best choice with respect to resident`s comfort. (orig.)

  11. lead glass brick

    CERN Multimedia

    As well as accelerators to boost particles up to high energy, physicists need detectors to see what happens when those particles collide. This lead glass block is part of a CERN detector called OPAL. OPAL uses some 12 000 blocks of glass like this to measure particle energies.

  12. Glasses for photonic applications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Richardson, K.; Krol, D.M.; Hirao, K.

    2010-01-01

    Recent advances in the application of glassy materials in planar and fiber-based photonic structures have led to novel devices and components that go beyond the original thinking of the use of glass in the 1960s, when glass fibers were developed for low-loss, optical communication applications. Expl

  13. Getting Started with Glass

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Heather

    2007-01-01

    The metamorphosis of glass when heated is a magical process to students, yet teachers are often reluctant to try it in class. The biggest challenge in working with glass in the classroom is to simplify procedures just enough to ensure student success while maintaining strict safety practices so no students are injured. Project concepts and safety…

  14. Glass Sword of Damocles

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    A string of accidents draws attention to the safety of the gleaming glass-walled skyscrapers, now common in China’s major cities On July 8, as 19-year-old Zhu Yiyi was walking past a 23-story building in Hangzhou, east China’s Zhejiang Province, shards of glass falling

  15. Electric glass capturing markets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wikman, K.; Wikstroem, T.

    1996-11-01

    Electric glass has found its place on the construction market. In public buildings, electrically heatable windows are becoming the leading option for large glass walls. Studies on detached houses, both new and renovated, show that floor heating combined with electrically heatable windowpanes is the best choice with respect to resident`s comfort. (orig.)

  16. The Perfect Glass Paradigm: Disordered Hyperuniform Glasses Down to Absolute Zero

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, G.; Stillinger, F. H.; Torquato, S.

    2016-11-01

    Rapid cooling of liquids below a certain temperature range can result in a transition to glassy states. The traditional understanding of glasses includes their thermodynamic metastability with respect to crystals. However, here we present specific examples of interactions that eliminate the possibilities of crystalline and quasicrystalline phases, while creating mechanically stable amorphous glasses down to absolute zero temperature. We show that this can be accomplished by introducing a new ideal state of matter called a “perfect glass”. A perfect glass represents a soft-interaction analog of the maximally random jammed (MRJ) packings of hard particles. These latter states can be regarded as the epitome of a glass since they are out of equilibrium, maximally disordered, hyperuniform, mechanically rigid with infinite bulk and shear moduli, and can never crystallize due to configuration-space trapping. Our model perfect glass utilizes two-, three-, and four-body soft interactions while simultaneously retaining the salient attributes of the MRJ state. These models constitute a theoretical proof of concept for perfect glasses and broaden our fundamental understanding of glass physics. A novel feature of equilibrium systems of identical particles interacting with the perfect-glass potential at positive temperature is that they have a non-relativistic speed of sound that is infinite.

  17. Through the looking glass: making the design and output of economic models useful for setting medical policy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ollendorf, Daniel A; Pearson, Steven D

    2014-01-01

    Economic modeling has rarely been considered to be an essential component of healthcare policy-making in the USA, due to a lack of transparency in model design and assumptions, as well as political interests that equate examination of cost with unfair rationing. The Institute for Clinical and Economic Review has been involved in several efforts to bring economic modeling into public discussion of the comparative value of healthcare interventions, efforts that have evolved over time to suit the needs of multiple public forums. In this article, we review these initiatives and present a template that attempts to 'unpack' model output and present the major drivers of outcomes and cost. We conclude with a series of recommendations for effective presentation of economic models to US policy-makers.

  18. An Adaptive Neuro-Fuzzy Inference System Based Modeling for Corrosion-Damaged Reinforced HSC Beams Strengthened with External Glass Fibre Reinforced Polymer Laminates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. N. Raghunath

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: This study presents the results of ANFIS based model proposed for predicting the performance characteristics of reinforced HSC beams subjected to different levels of corrosion damage and strengthened with externally bonded glass fibre reinforced polymer laminates. Approach: A total of 21 beams specimens of size 150, 250×3000 mm were cast and tested. Results: Out of the 21 specimens, 7 specimens were tested without any corrosion damage (R-Series, 7 after inducing 10% corrosion damage (ASeries and another 7 after inducing 25% corrosion damage (B-Series. Out of the seven specimens in each series, one was tested without any laminate, three specimens were tested after applying 3 mm thick CSM, UDC and WR laminates and another three specimens after applying 5mm thick CSM, UDC and WR laminates. Conclusion/Recommendations: The test results show that the beams strengthened with externally bonded GFRP laminates exhibit increased strength, stiffness, ductility and composite action until failure. An Adaptive Neuro-Fuzzy Inference System (ANFIS model is developed for predicting the study parameters for input values lying within the range of this experimental study.

  19. Exact Calculation of Antiferromagnetic Ising Model on an Inhomogeneous Surface Recursive Lattice to Investigate Thermodynamics and Glass Transition on Surface/Thin Film

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Ran; Gujrati, Purushottam D.

    2017-01-01

    An inhomogeneous 2-dimensional recursive lattice formed by planar elements has been designed to investigate the thermodynamics of Ising spin system on the surface/thin film. The lattice is constructed as a hybrid of partial Husimi square lattice representing the bulk and 1D single bonds representing the surface. Exact calculations can be achieved with the recursive property of the lattice. The model has an anti-ferromagnetic interaction to give rise to an ordered phase identified as crystal, and a solution with higher energy to represent the amorphous/metastable phase. Free energy and entropy of the ideal crystal and supercooled liquid state of the model on the surface are calculated by the partial partition function. By analyzing the free energies and entropies of the crystal and supercooled liquid state, we are able to identify the melting and ideal glass transition on the surface. The results show that due to the variation of coordination number, the transition temperatures on the surface decrease significantly compared to the bulk system. Our calculation qualitatively agrees with both experimental and simulation works on the thermodynamics of surfaces and thin films conducted by others. Interactions between particles farther than the nearest neighbor distance are taken into consideration, and their effects are investigated. Supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China under Grant No. 11505110, the Shanghai Pujiang Talent Program under Grant No. 16PJ1431900, and the China Postdoctoral Science Foundation under Grant No. 2016M591666

  20. Critical fatigue behaviour in brittle glasses

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Rajat Banerjee; Bikas K Chakrabarti

    2001-04-01

    The dynamic fatigue fracture behaviour in different glasses under various sub-threshold loading conditions are analysed here employing an anomalous diffusion model. Critical dynamical behaviour in the time-to-fracture and the growth of the micro-crack sizes, similar to that observed in such materials in the case of quasi-static (``instantaneous”) failures for above-threshold conditions, are predicted and compared with some of the experimental observations in different glasses.

  1. The MV model of the color glass condensate for a finite number of sources including Coulomb interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLerran, Larry; Skokov, Vladimir V.

    2017-01-01

    We modify the McLerran-Venugopalan model to include only a finite number of sources of color charge. In the effective action for such a system of a finite number of sources, there is a point-like interaction and a Coulombic interaction. The point interaction generates the standard fluctuation term in the McLerran-Venugopalan model. The Coulomb interaction generates the charge screening originating from well known evolution in x. Such a model may be useful for computing angular harmonics of flow measured in high energy hadron collisions for small systems. In this paper we provide a basic formulation of the problem on a lattice.

  2. Modelling hybrid production systems through the ACD specification: a case study in the fibre-glass industry

    OpenAIRE

    Rossi, Tommaso; Noé, Carlo; Sianesi, Andrea

    2008-01-01

    Abstract This paper is aimed at formalizing a model for hybrid production systems where the interactions between the continuous process parts and the manufacturing sub-systems are given by minor stoppages. The proposal is to represent the effects of the continuous process dynamics on discrete manufacturing sub-systems using Autoregressive Conditional Duration (ACD) models originally conceived to treat high-frequency and irregularly spaced financial transaction data. The proposed me...

  3. Dynamics of glass-forming liquids. XX. Third harmonic experiments of non-linear dielectric effects versus a phenomenological model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Pyeongeun; Young-Gonzales, Amanda R.; Richert, Ranko

    2016-08-01

    We have re-measured the third harmonic non-linear dielectric response of supercooled glycerol using zero-bias sinusoidal electric fields, with the aim of comparing the resulting susceptibilities with a phenomenological model of non-linear dielectric responses. In the absence of known chemical effects in this liquid, the present model accounts for three sources of non-linear behavior: dielectric saturation, field induced entropy reduction, and energy absorption from the time dependent field. Using parameters obtained from static high field results, the present model reproduces the characteristic features observed in the third harmonic susceptibility spectra: a low frequency plateau originating from dielectric saturation and a peak positioned below the loss peak frequency whose amplitude increases with decreasing temperature. Semi-quantitative agreement is achieved between experiment and the present model, which does not involve spatial scales or dynamical correlations explicitly. By calculating the three contributions separately, the model reveals that the entropy effect is the main source of the "hump" feature of this third harmonic response.

  4. Composition-dependent metallic glass alloys correlate atomic mobility with collective glass surface dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Duc; Zhu, Zhi-Guang; Pringle, Brian; Lyding, Joseph; Wang, Wei-Hua; Gruebele, Martin

    2016-06-22

    Glassy metallic alloys are richly tunable model systems for surface glassy dynamics. Here we study the correlation between atomic mobility, and the hopping rate of surface regions (clusters) that rearrange collectively on a minute to hour time scale. Increasing the proportion of low-mobility copper atoms in La-Ni-Al-Cu alloys reduces the cluster hopping rate, thus establishing a microscopic connection between atomic mobility and dynamics of collective rearrangements at a glass surface made from freshly exposed bulk glass. One composition, La60Ni15Al15Cu10, has a surface resistant to re-crystallization after three heating cycles. When thermally cycled, surface clusters grow in size from about 5 glass-forming units to about 8 glass-forming units, evidence of surface aging without crystal formation, although its bulk clearly forms larger crystalline domains. Such kinetically stable glass surfaces may be of use in applications where glassy coatings stable against heating are needed.

  5. Instability of spin glass phase in divalent iron phosphate glass under a magnetic field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakatsuka, Yuko; Murai, Shunsuke; Fujita, Koji; Tanaka, Katsuhisa

    2017-01-01

    The spin glass behaviour of 50FeO · 50P2O5 (in mol%) glass has been examined under finite magnetic fields. The Sherrington-Kirkpatrick (SK) model, i.e. the mean field theory, is unsuitable for the interpretation of the frequency dependence of the ac magnetic susceptibility observed under an external field of 0.1 T; the critical exponent derived from the SK model is unphysically large. On the other hand, the droplet model explains well the frequency and field dependence of the spin-freezing temperature and the exponent of the thermally activated process is within the range defined by the droplet model. The results indicate that the spin glass phase of the 50FeO · 50P2O5 glass is unstable against magnetic fields.

  6. Thermal Conductivity of Foam Glass

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Rasmus Rosenlund; König, Jakob; Yue, Yuanzheng

    Due to the increased focus on energy savings and waste recycling foam glass materials have gained increased attention. The production process of foam glass is a potential low-cost recycle option for challenging waste, e.g. CRT glass and industrial waste (fly ash and slags). Foam glass is used...... as thermal insulating material in building and chemical industry. The large volume of gas (porosity 90 – 95%) is the main reason of the low thermal conductivity of the foam glass. If gases with lower thermal conductivity compared to air are entrapped in the glass melt, the derived foam glass will contain...... only closed pores and its overall thermal conductivity will be much lower than that of the foam glass with open pores. In this work we have prepared foam glass using different types of recycled glasses and different kinds of foaming agents. This enabled the formation of foam glasses having gas cells...

  7. DEVELOPMENT OF GLASS MATRICES FOR HLW RADIOACTIVE WASTES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jantzen, C.

    2010-03-18

    Vitrification is currently the most widely used technology for the treatment of high level radioactive wastes (HLW) throughout the world. Most of the nations that have generated HLW are immobilizing in either borosilicate glass or phosphate glass. One of the primary reasons that glass has become the most widely used immobilization media is the relative simplicity of the vitrification process, e.g. melt waste plus glass forming frit additives and cast. A second reason that glass has become widely used for HLW is that the short range order (SRO) and medium range order (MRO) found in glass atomistically bonds the radionuclides and governs the melt properties such as viscosity, resistivity, sulphate solubility. The molecular structure of glass controls contaminant/radionuclide release by establishing the distribution of ion exchange sites, hydrolysis sites, and the access of water to those sites. The molecular structure is flexible and hence accounts for the flexibility of glass formulations to waste variability. Nuclear waste glasses melt between 1050-1150 C which minimizes the volatility of radioactive components such as Tc{sup 99}, Cs{sup 137}, and I{sup 129}. Nuclear waste glasses have good long term stability including irradiation resistance. Process control models based on the molecular structure of glass have been mechanistically derived and have been demonstrated to be accurate enough to control the world's largest HLW Joule heated ceramic melter in the US since 1996 at 95% confidence.

  8. Chemical composition analysis and product consistency tests supporting refinement of the Nepheline Model for the high aluminum Hanford glass composition region

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fox, K. M. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Edwards, T. B. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Mcclane, D. L. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2016-03-01

    In this report, Savannah River National Laboratory provides chemical analyses and Product Consistency Test (PCT) results for a series of simulated high level waste (HLW) glasses fabricated by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) as part of an ongoing nepheline crystallization study. The results of these analyses will be used to improve the ability to predict crystallization of nepheline as a function of composition and heat treatment for glasses formulated at high alumina concentrations.

  9. Chemical composition analysis and product consistency tests supporting refinement of the Nepheline model for the high aluminum Hanford Glass composition region

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fox, K. M. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States); Edwards, T. B. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States); Mcclane, D. L. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States)

    2016-02-17

    In this report, SRNL provides chemical analyses and Product Consistency Test (PCT) results for a series of simulated HLW glasses fabricated by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) as part of an ongoing nepheline crystallization study. The results of these analyses will be used to improve the ability to predict crystallization of nepheline as a function of composition and heat treatment for glasses formulated at high alumina concentrations.

  10. Prevalence for the universal distribution of relaxation times near the glass transitions in experimental model systems: Rodlike liquid crystals and orientationally disordered crystals

    OpenAIRE

    Martínez García, Julio Cesar; Tamarit Mur, José Luis; Rzosca, S. J.

    2011-01-01

    Recently, Nielsen et al. [J. Chem. Phys. 130, 154508 (2009); Philos. Mag. 88, 4101 (2008)] demonstrated a universal pattern for the high frequency wing of the loss curve for primary relaxation time on approaching the glass transition for organic liquids. In this contribution it is presented that a similar universality occurs for glass-forming liquid crystals and orientationally disordered crystals (plastic crystals). Empirical correlations of the found behavior are also briefly di...

  11. Prevalence for the universal distribution of relaxation times near the glass transitions in experimental model systems: Rodlike liquid crystals and orientationally disordered crystals

    OpenAIRE

    2011-01-01

    Recently, Nielsen et al. [J. Chem. Phys. 130, 154508 (2009); Philos. Mag. 88, 4101 (2008)] demonstrated a universal pattern for the high frequency wing of the loss curve for primary relaxation time on approaching the glass transition for organic liquids. In this contribution it is presented that a similar universality occurs for glass-forming liquid crystals and orientationally disordered crystals (plastic crystals). Empirical correlations of the found behavior are also briefly di...

  12. Chemical ordering in Pd$_{81}$Ge$_{19}$ metallic glass studied by reverse Monte-Carlo modelling of XRD, ND and EXAFS experimental data

    CERN Document Server

    Pethes, Ildikó; Stoica, Mihai; Beuneu, Brigitte; Jóvári, Pál

    2016-01-01

    Pd$_{81}$Ge$_{19}$ metallic glass was investigated by neutron diffraction, X-ray diffraction and extended X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy (EXAFS) at the Ge K-edge. Large scale structural models were obtained by fitting the three measurements simultaneously in the framework of the reverse Monte Carlo simulation technique. It was found that the experimental data sets can be adequately fitted without Ge-Ge nearest neighbours. Mean Pd-Pd and Pd-Ge distances are 2.80$\\pm$0.02 {\\AA} and 2.50$\\pm$0.02 {\\AA}, respectively. The total average coordination number of Pd is 12.1$\\pm$0.5 while Ge is surrounded by 10.6$\\pm$1.1 Pd atoms. The coordination numbers calculated from partial pair correlation functions were compared to those obtained by Voronoi tessellation method. It was found that the latter technique overestimates the number of nearest neighbours by about 20% due to the significant contribution of distant pairs.

  13. Mechanisms of network collapse in GeO2 glass: high-pressure neutron diffraction with isotope substitution as arbitrator of competing models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wezka, Kamil; Salmon, Philip S.; Zeidler, Anita; Whittaker, Dean A. J.; Drewitt, James W. E.; Klotz, Stefan; Fischer, Henry E.; Marrocchelli, Dario

    2012-12-01

    The structure of the network forming glass GeO2 is investigated by making the first application of the method of in situ neutron diffraction with isotope substitution at pressures increasing from ambient to 8 GPa. Of the various models, the experimental results are in quantitative agreement only with molecular dynamics simulations made using interaction potentials that include dipole-polarization effects. When the reduced density ρ/ρ0 ≳ 1.16, where ρ0 is the value at ambient pressure, network collapse proceeds via an interplay between the predominance of distorted square pyramidal GeO5 units versus octahedral GeO6 units as they replace tetrahedral GeO4 units. This replacement necessitates the formation of threefold coordinated oxygen atoms and leads to an increase with density in the number of small rings, where a preference is shown for sixfold rings when ρ/ρ0 = 1 and fourfold rings when ρ/ρ0 = 1.64.

  14. Chemical ordering in Pd81Ge19 metallic glass studied by reverse Monte-Carlo modelling of XRD, ND and EXAFS experimental data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pethes, Ildikó; Kaban, Ivan; Stoica, Mihai; Beuneu, Brigitte; Jóvári, Pál

    2016-10-01

    Pd81Ge19 metallic glass was investigated by neutron diffraction, x-ray diffraction and extended x-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy at the Ge K-edge. Large scale structural models were obtained by fitting the three measurements simultaneously in the framework of the reverse Monte Carlo simulation technique. It was found that the experimental data sets can be adequately fitted without Ge-Ge nearest neighbours. Mean Pd-Pd and Pd-Ge distances are 2.80 ± 0.02 Å and 2.50 ± 0.02 Å, respectively. The total average coordination number of Pd is 12.1 ± 0.5 while Ge is surrounded by 10.6 ± 1.1 Pd atoms. The coordination numbers calculated from partial pair correlation functions were compared to those obtained by Voronoi tessellation method. It was found that the latter technique overestimates the number of nearest neighbours by about 20% due to the significant contribution of distant pairs.

  15. Augmenting a Waste Glass Mixture Experiment Study with Additional Glass Components and Experimental Runs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Piepel, Gregory F.(BATTELLE (PACIFIC NW LAB)); Cooley, Scott K.(BATTELLE (PACIFIC NW LAB)); Peeler, David K.(Savannah River Technology Center); Vienna, John D.(BATTELLE (PACIFIC NW LAB)); Edwards, Tommy B.(Savannah River Technology Center)

    2002-01-01

    A glass composition variation study (CVS) for high-level waste (HLW) stored in Idaho is being statistically designed and performed in phases over several years. The purpose of the CVS is to investigate and model how HLW-glass properties depend on glass composition. The resulting glass property-composition models will be used to develop desirable glass formulations and for other purposes. Phases 1 and 2 of the CVS have been completed and are briefly described. This paper focuses on the CVS Phase 3 experimental design, which was chosen to augment the Phase 1 and 2 data with additional data points, as well as to account for additional glass components not studied in Phases 1 and/or 2. In total, 16 glass components were varied in the Phase 3 experimental design. The paper describes how these Phase 3 experimental design augmentation challenges were addressed using the previous data, preliminary property-composition models, and statistical mixture experiment and optimal experimental design methods and software.

  16. Bioactive glasses and glass-ceramics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    de Aza, P. N.

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Since the late 1960´s, a great interest in the use of bioceramic materials for biomedical applications has been developed. In a previous paper, the authors reviewed crystalline bioceramic materials “sensus stricto”, it is to say, those ceramic materials, constituted for non-metallic inorganic compounds, crystallines and consolidates by thermal treatment of powders at high temperature. In the present review, the authors deal with those called bioactive glasses and glassceramics. Although all of them are also obtained by thermal treatment at high temperature, the first are amorphous and the second are obtained by devitrification of a glass, although the vitreous phase normally prevails on the crystalline phases. After an introduction to the concept of bioactive materials, a short historical review of the bioactive glasses development is made. Its preparation, reactivity in physiological media, mechanism of bonding to living tissues and mechanical strength of the bone-implant interface is also reported. Next, the concept of glass-ceramic and the way of its preparation are exposed. The composition, physicochemical properties and biological behaviour of the principal types of bioactive glasses and glass-ceramic materials: Bioglass®, Ceravital®, Cerabone®, Ilmaplant® and Bioverit® are also reviewed. Finally, a short review on the bioactive-glass coatings and bioactive-composites and most common uses of bioactive-glasses and glass-ceramics are carried out too.

    Desde finales de los años sesenta, se ha despertado un gran interés por el uso de los materiales biocerámicos para aplicaciones biomédicas. En un trabajo previo, los autores hicieron una revisión de los denominados materiales biocerámicos cristalinos en sentido estricto, es decir, de aquellos materiales, constituidos por compuestos inorgánicos no metálicos, cristalinos y consolidados mediante tratamientos térmicos a altas temperaturas. En el presente trabajo, los autores

  17. Nonlinear Properties of Soft Glass Waveguides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Steffensen, Henrik

    This thesis builds around the investigation into using soft glass materials for midinfrared and THz applications. Soft glasses is a term that cov ers a wide range of chemical compositions where many are yet to be fully investigated. The work in this thesis is separated in two parts, the mid......-infrared applications and the THz applications. In the mid-infrared, it is investigated whether soft glasses are a suitable candidate for supercontinuum generation (SCG). A few commercially available fluoride fibers are tested for their zero dispersion wavelength (ZDW), a key property when determining the possibility...... of SCG in a fiber. A group of soft glasses, namely the chalcogenides, are known to display two photon absorption (TPA) which could potentially limit the SCG when this is initiated within the frequency range where this nonlinear process occur. An analytic model is presented to estimate the soliton self...

  18. Liquidus Temperature Data for DWPF Glass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    GF Piepel; JD Vienna; JV Crum; M Mika; P Hrma

    1999-05-21

    This report provides new liquidus temperature (TL) versus composition data that can be used to reduce uncertainty in TL calculation for DWPF glass. According to the test plan and test matrix design PNNL has measured TL for 53 glasses within and just outside of the current DWPF processing composition window. The TL database generated under this task will directly support developing and enhancing the current TL process-control model. Preliminary calculations have shown a high probability of increasing HLW loading in glass produced at the SRS and Hanford. This increase in waste loading will decrease the lifecycle tank cleanup costs by decreasing process time and the volume of waste glass produced.

  19. Classical-to-quantum crossover in the critical behavior of the transverse-field Sherrington-Kirkpatrick spin glass model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukherjee, Sudip; Rajak, Atanu; Chakrabarti, Bikas K.

    2015-10-01

    We study the critical behavior of the Sherrington-Kirkpatrick model in transverse field (at finite temperature) using Monte Carlo simulation and exact diagonalization (at zero temperature). We determine the phase diagram of the model by estimating the Binder cumulant. We also determine the correlation length exponent from the collapse of the scaled data. Our numerical studies here indicate that critical Binder cumulant (indicating the universality class of the transition behavior) and the correlation length exponent cross over from their "classical" to "quantum" values at a finite temperature (unlike the cases of pure systems, where such crossovers occur at zero temperature). We propose a qualitative argument supporting such an observation, employing a simple tunneling picture.

  20. Configurons: Thermodynamic Parameters and Symmetry Changes at Glass Transition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael I. Ojovan

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Thermodynamic parameters of configurons – elementary excitations resulting from broken bonds in amorphous materials – are found from viscosity-temperature relationships. Glass-liquid transition phenomena and most popular models are described along with the configuron model of glass transition. The symmetry breaking, which occurs as a change of Hausdorff dimension of bonds, is examined at glass-liquid transition. Thermal history effects in the glass-liquid transition are interpreted in terms of configuron relaxation.

  1. Kinetics of Amorphous-Crystalline Transformation of Some Se-Te-In Chalcogenide Glasses Using Gao and Wang Model

    OpenAIRE

    Balbir Singh Patial; Nagesh Thakur; S.K. Tripathi

    2013-01-01

    The present study reports the assessment of activation energy for crystallization and crystallization reaction order (Avrami exponent n) for the amorphous-crystallization transformation process of Se85 − xTe15Inx (x  2, 6 and 10) amorphous alloys using differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) technique under non-isothermal conditions at four different heating rates (5, 10, 15 and 20 °C/min) through Gao and Wang model. The introduction of In to the Se-Te system is found to bring a change in cr...

  2. Shattering the Glass Ceiling

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2004-01-01

    @@ "Shattering the Glass Ceiling: the Myths, Opportunities and Chal lenges of Women in Corporate China" was the theme of CEIBS'first Women in Management Forum held on December l 1 on the school's main campus in Shanghai.

  3. Glass Stronger than Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yarris, Lynn

    2011-03-28

    A new type of damage-tolerant metallic glass, demonstrating a strength and toughness beyond that of steel or any other known material, has been developed and tested by a collaboration of researchers from Berkeley Lab and Caltech.

  4. Glass for Solar Concentrators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouquet, F. L.

    1984-01-01

    Report identifies four commercially available glasses as promising reflectors for solar concentrators. Have properties of high reflectance (80 to 96 percent), lower cost than first-surface silver metalization, and resistance to environmental forces.

  5. Evaluation of a short glass fibre-reinforced tube as a model for cat femur for biomechanical testing of orthopaedic implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibson, T W G; Moens, N M M; Runciman, R J; Holmberg, D L

    2008-01-01

    The biomechanical testing of tubes made of third generation short glass fibre-reinforced (SGFR) material approximating cat femurs was performed in order to determine their suitability as cat femur surrogates for the biomechanical testing of orthopaedic implants. The tubes were tested in compression, three-point bending, notch testing, and screw pullout. Thin walled (B1-tubes) had a 13% lower maximum load to failure, a 19% higher maximum strength and a 13% lower elastic modulus compared to cat femurs tested in compression. B1-tubes maximum load to failure in three-point bending and screw pullout strength were considerably lower compared to cat femurs (29% and 63%, respectively). Notch testing was not performed on B1-tubes due to low bending strength. Thicker walled (B2-tubes) had a 23% higher maximum load to failure, a 10% higher maximum strength and a 21% lower elastic modulus compared to cat femurs tested in compression. The comparison of B2-tubes and cat femurs in three-point bending revealed a 7% increase in maximum load to failure for the B2-tubes. Drilled B2-tubes (notch testing) were weaker with a 30% lower load to failure compared to cat femurs. A screw pullout comparison of B2-tubes and cat femurs revealed a 2% increase in maximum load to failure for the B2-tubes. These tubes were intended to provide a model as a suitable surrogate for cat femurs for testing the bending strength of various orthopaedic constructs involving plates and screws. Testing revealed that third generation SGFR tubes were not suitable for these purposes and emphasizes the need to carefully evaluate the suitability of any model.

  6. Mechanically reinforced glass beams

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Jens Henrik; Olesen, John Forbes

    2007-01-01

    to breakage without any warning or ductility, which can be catastrophic if no precautions are taken. One aspect of this issue is treated here by looking at the possibility of mechanically reinforcing glass beams in order to obtain ductile failure for such a structural component. A mechanically reinforced...... the mechanical behavior of the beam is explained. Finally, some design criterions for reinforced glass beams are discussed....

  7. Baseline LAW Glass Formulation Testing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kruger, Albert A. [USDOE Office of River Protection, Richland, WA (United States); Mooers, Cavin [The Catholic University of America, Washington, DC (United States). Vitreous State Lab.; Bazemore, Gina [The Catholic University of America, Washington, DC (United States). Vitreous State Lab; Pegg, Ian L. [The Catholic University of America, Washington, DC (United States). Vitreous State Lab; Hight, Kenneth [The Catholic University of America, Washington, DC (United States). Vitreous State Lab; Lai, Shan Tao [The Catholic University of America, Washington, DC (United States). Vitreous State Lab; Buechele, Andrew [The Catholic University of America, Washington, DC (United States). Vitreous State Lab; Rielley, Elizabeth [The Catholic University of America, Washington, DC (United States). Vitreous State Lab; Gan, Hao [The Catholic University of America, Washington, DC (United States). Vitreous State Lab; Muller, Isabelle S. [The Catholic University of America, Washington, DC (United States). Vitreous State Lab; Cecil, Richard [The Catholic University of America, Washington, DC (United States). Vitreous State Lab

    2013-06-13

    The major objective of the baseline glass formulation work was to develop and select glass formulations that are compliant with contractual and processing requirements for each of the LAW waste streams. Other objectives of the work included preparation and characterization of glasses with respect to the properties of interest, optimization of sulfate loading in the glasses, evaluation of ability to achieve waste loading limits, testing to demonstrate compatibility of glass melts with melter materials of construction, development of glass formulations to support ILAW qualification activities, and identification of glass formulation issues with respect to contract specifications and processing requirements.

  8. Applications of physical chemistry to glass technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, Ogie Gregory

    2001-07-01

    Industrial manufacturing of glass, called float glass, involves a process in which flat pieces of glass are produced by pouring molten glass on a bath of molten tin metal. The glass is then coated with thin film coatings for such applications as solar radiation control and "privacy" glass. In this thesis, principles of physical chemistry are applied to selected aspects of glass production and thin film coatings in an effort to better understand these processes with the hope of improving film and glass quality. The research described here consists of three major studies. Part 1 describes the production of thin films by Atmospheric Pressure Chemical Vapor Deposition (APCVD) and characterization of the films by various analytical techniques. Vanadium oxide films were produced from vanadium (IV) chloride and each of several alcohols to determine the feasibility of this method of deposition and to investigate its use in an electrochromic device. The focus here was to investigate the levels of carbon contamination in the films. It was found that the level of carbon present in the films depend on the type of amine used. Part 2 is an investigation of the flow dynamics that occur during the two thin film deposition processes. APCVD and Powder Spray Pyrolysis (PSP). Information regarding flow dynamics and particle distribution in the region above the films' substrates were obtained and related to film formation and quality. Part 3 is a kinetic study of the gas phase reactions that occur in the vapor region above the glass during float glass production. A kinetic model of the possible reactions was devised and integrated to predict the formation of these impurities with time. An experimental setup to test the model's predictions is also discussed. The research described in this thesis lays the groundwork for several possibilities for future work. Electrochromic films can be produced by APCVD to construct an all-solid-state device. Two dimensional imaging coupled with Laser

  9. Kinetic criteria of glass formation and the pressure dependence of the glass transition temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmelzer, Jürn W P

    2012-02-21

    An overview on different attempts of formulation of kinetic criteria of glass formation is given. It is analyzed which of the characteristic time scales-time of observation, time of relaxation, and time of change of external parameters-have to be employed to appropriately develop such criteria. Based on this analysis, a general model-independent kinetic criterion for glass formation is formulated. As a first consequence, it is shown that it is not-as often claimed-the Deborah number which governs glass formation. Based on this general kinetic criterion for glass formation, general expressions for the dependence of the glass transition temperature on pressure (and vice versa) are obtained being essentially ratios of the partial derivatives of the appropriate relaxation times with respect to pressure and temperature, respectively. Employing, as examples, further two different (free volume and entropy based) models for the description of viscous flow and relaxation, respectively, relations similar but, in general, not identical to the classical Ehrenfest relations describing second-order equilibrium phase transitions are obtained. In this way, it can be explained why one of the Ehrenfest's relations is usually fulfilled in glass transition and the other not and why the Prigogine-Defay ratio in glass transition is not equal to one as this is the case with Ehrenfest's ratio in second-order equilibrium phase transitions. © 2012 American Institute of Physics

  10. Density of States Simulations of Confined Glasses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faller, Roland; Ghosh, Jayeeta

    2008-03-01

    Glassy systems under confinement have been studied with great enthusiasm and effort for the last decades. They are relevant both fundamentally and technically because there is still debate about the nature of glass transition in small geometries which is important for lithographic processes in the semiconductor and other industries. In this work we are using the Wang-Landau approach also known as Density of States Monte Carlo to study glassy systems in bulk and under confinement. We apply the technique to a model binary Lennard Jones glass as well as the small organic glass former Ortho-terphenyl (OTP). For Lennard Jones glasses we use a well tested model. For OTP we start from a united atom model and then derive systematically a coarse grained representation by replacing each phenyl ring with a bead and using the Iterative Boltzmann Inversion. The properties of bulk Lennard Jones model show very good agreement with literature values. The atomistic and coarse grained representations of ortho-terphenyl in the bulk are in good agreement with experiments. Unsupported freestanding films show a lower glass transition than the bulk value.

  11. Experimental verification of the resistance of glass beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slivanský, M.

    2012-03-01

    Experimental research at the Department of Steel and Timber Structures at SUT in Bratislava focused on the verification of the behavior of modern glass structures. Four types of glass beams were tested - laminated beams made of annealed (ANG) and fully tempered glass (FTG) in interactions with or without steel elements (as reinforcement). The results of the experimental research were also compared with theoretical models using FEM calculations.

  12. Eye-safe laser glass development at SCHOTT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hong; Davis, Mark J.; Urruti, Eric H.

    2010-04-01

    SCHOTT has developed eye-safe laser glasses for laser range finder and medical/ biophotonics applications. The development described herein covers various combinations of key ions, Er, Yb, and Cr, with and without Ce, at controlled ratios and their perspective reduction - oxidation (REDOX) states to improve glass lasing, thermal lensing, and thermo-mechanical stability for field-based applications under high repetition rate operation. This report covers glass property characterizations and selective modeling results using statistically designed compositions.

  13. Stochastic qualifier of gel and glass transitions in laponite suspensions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shayeganfar, F.; Jabbari-Farouji, S.; Movahed, M. Sadegh; Jafari, G. R.; Tabar, M. Reza Rahimi

    2010-06-01

    The existence of the important similarities between gelation and glass transition makes it hard to distinguish between the two types of nonergodic states experimentally. Here, we report on a stochastic analysis of the scattered light intensity through a colloidal particles suspension during the gel and glass formation. In this analysis, we exploit the methods developed for complex hierarchical systems, such as turbulence. Using the multiplicative log-normal cascade models, we provide a criterion to distinguish gels from glasses.

  14. Bonding of metal oxides in sodium silicate glass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lam, D.J.; Veal, B.W.; Chen, H.; Knapp, G.S.

    1978-01-01

    X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and extended x-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) studies have been undertaken on sodium disilicate glasses containing varying amounts of Fe/sub 2/O/sub 3/ and UO/sub 2/. The XPS results enable one to distinguish the different bonding characteristics of iron and uranium in these glasses. A three dimensional model for the iron coordination in the sodium disilicate glass is inferred from the combined XPS and EXAFS results.

  15. Wastes based glasses and glass-ceramics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbieri, L.

    2001-12-01

    Full Text Available Actually, the inertization, recovery and valorisation of the wastes coming from municipal and industrial processes are the most important goals from the environmental and economical point of view. An alternative technology capable to overcome the problem of the dishomogeneity of the raw material chemical composition is the vitrification process that is able to increase the homogeneity and the constancy of the chemical composition of the system and to modulate the properties in order to address the reutilization of the waste. Moreover, the glasses obtained subjected to different controlled thermal treatments, can be transformed in semy-cristalline material (named glass-ceramics with improved properties with respect to the parent amorphous materials. In this review the tailoring, preparation and characterization of glasses and glass-ceramics obtained starting from municipal incinerator grate ash, coal and steel fly ashes and glass cullet are described.

    Realmente la inertización, recuperación y valorización de residuos que proceden de los procesos de incineración de residuos municipales y de residuos industriales son metas importantes desde el punto de vista ambiental y económico. Una tecnología alternativa capaz de superar el problema de la heterogeneidad de la composición química de los materiales de partida es el proceso de la vitrificación que es capaz de aumentar la homogeneidad y la constancia de la composición química del sistema y modular las propiedades a fin de la reutilización del residuo. En este artículo se presentan los resultados de vitrificación en que los vidrios fueron sometidos a tratamientos térmicos controlados diferentes, de manera que se transforman en materiales semicristalinos (también denominados vitrocerámicos con mejores propiedades respecto a los materiales amorfos originales. En esta revisión se muestra el diseño, preparación y caracterización de vidrios y vitrocerámicos partiendo de

  16. Equivalence of glass transition and colloidal glass transition in the hard-sphere limit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Ning; Haxton, Thomas K; Liu, Andrea J; Nagel, Sidney R

    2009-12-11

    We show that the slowing of the dynamics in simulations of several model glass-forming liquids is equivalent to the hard-sphere glass transition in the low-pressure limit. In this limit, we find universal behavior of the relaxation time by collapsing molecular-dynamics data for all systems studied onto a single curve as a function of T/p, the ratio of the temperature to the pressure. At higher pressures, there are deviations from this universal behavior that depend on the interparticle potential, implying that additional physical processes must enter into the dynamics of glass formation.

  17. Equilibrium avalanches in spin glasses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Doussal, Pierre; Müller, Markus; Wiese, Kay Jörg

    2012-06-01

    We study the distribution of equilibrium avalanches (shocks) in Ising spin glasses which occur at zero temperature upon small changes in the magnetic field. For the infinite-range Sherrington-Kirkpatrick (SK) model, we present a detailed derivation of the density ρ(ΔM) of the magnetization jumps ΔM. It is obtained by introducing a multicomponent generalization of the Parisi-Duplantier equation, which allows us to compute all cumulants of the magnetization. We find that ρ(ΔM)˜ΔM-τ with an avalanche exponent τ=1 for the SK model, originating from the marginal stability (criticality) of the model. It holds for jumps of size 1≪ΔMmodel. For finite-range models, using droplet arguments, we obtain the prediction τ=(df+θ)/dm where df,dm, and θ are the fractal dimension, magnetization exponent, and energy exponent of a droplet, respectively. This formula is expected to apply to other glassy disordered systems, such as the random-field model and pinned interfaces. We make suggestions for further numerical investigations, as well as experimental studies of the Barkhausen noise in spin glasses.

  18. IMPACTS OF SMALL COLUMN ION EXCHANGE STREAMS ON DWPF GLASS FORMULATION KT07-SERIES GLASS COMPOSITIONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fox, K.; Edwards, T.

    2011-01-12

    This report is the third in a series of studies of the impacts of the addition of Crystalline Silicotitanate (CST) and Monosodium Titanate (MST) from the Small Column Ion Exchange (SCIX) process on the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) glass waste form and the applicability of the DWPF process control models. MST from the Salt Waste Processing Facility is also considered in the study. The KT07-series glasses were selected to evaluate any potential impacts of noble metals on their properties and performance. The glasses characterized thus far for the SCIX study have not included noble metals since they are not typically tracked in sludge batch composition projections. However, noble metals can act as nucleation sites in glass melts, leading to enhanced crystallization. This crystallization can potentially influence the properties and performance of the glass, such as chemical durability, viscosity, and liquidus temperature. The noble metals Ag, Pd, Rh, and Ru were added to the KT07-series glasses in concentrations based on recent measurements of Sludge Batch 6, which was considered to contain a high concentration of noble metals. The KT04-series glasses were used as the baseline compositions. After fabrication, the glasses were characterized to determine their homogeneity, chemical composition, durability, and viscosity. Liquidus temperature measurements are also underway but were not complete at the time of this report. The liquidus temperature results for the KT07-series glasses, along with several of the earlier glasses in the SCIX study, will be documented separately. All of the KT07-series glasses, both quenched and slowly cooled, were found to be amorphous by X-ray diffraction. Chemical composition measurements showed that all of the glasses met their targeted compositions. The Product Consistency Test (PCT) results showed that all of the glasses had chemical durabilities that were far better than that of the Environmental Assessment benchmark glass

  19. Glass microsphere lubrication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geiger, Michelle; Goode, Henry; Ohanlon, Sean; Pieloch, Stuart; Sorrells, Cindy; Willette, Chris

    1991-01-01

    The harsh lunar environment eliminated the consideration of most lubricants used on earth. Considering that the majority of the surface of the moon consists of sand, the elements that make up this mixture were analyzed. According to previous space missions, a large portion of the moon's surface is made up of fine grained crystalline rock, about 0.02 to 0.05 mm in size. These fine grained particles can be divided into four groups: lunar rock fragments, glasses, agglutinates (rock particles, crystals, or glasses), and fragments of meteorite material (rare). Analysis of the soil obtained from the missions has given chemical compositions of its materials. It is about 53 to 63 percent oxygen, 16 to 22 percent silicon, 10 to 16 percent sulfur, 5 to 9 percent aluminum, and has lesser amounts of magnesium, carbon, and sodium. To be self-supporting, the lubricant must utilize one or more of the above elements. Considering that the element must be easy to extract and readily manipulated, silicon or glass was the most logical choice. Being a ceramic, glass has a high strength and excellent resistance to temperature. The glass would also not contaminate the environment as it comes directly from it. If sand entered a bearing lubricated with grease, the lubricant would eventually fail and the shaft would bind, causing damage to the system. In a bearing lubricated with a solid glass lubricant, sand would be ground up and have little effect on the system. The next issue was what shape to form the glass in. Solid glass spheres was the only logical choice. The strength of the glass and its endurance would be optimal in this form. To behave as an effective lubricant, the diameter of the spheres would have to be very small, on the order of hundreds of microns or less. This would allow smaller clearances between the bearing and the shaft, and less material would be needed. The production of glass microspheres was divided into two parts, production and sorting. Production includes the

  20. Optimized Synthesis of Foam Glass from Recycled CRT Panel Glass

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Rasmus Rosenlund; König, Jakob; Yue, Yuanzheng

    Most of the panel glass from cathode ray tubes (CRTs) is landfilled today. Instead of landfilling, the panel glass can be turned into new environment-friendly foam glass. Low density foam glass is an effective heat insulating material and can be produced just by using recycle glass and foaming...... additives. In this work we recycle the CRT panel glass to synthesize the foam glass as a crucial component of building and insulating materials. The synthesis conditions such as foaming temperature, duration, glass particle size, type and concentrations of foaming agents, and so on are optimized...... by performing systematic experiments. In particular, the concentration of foaming agents is an important parameter that influences the size of bubbles and the distribution of bubbles throughout the sample. The foam glasses are characterised regarding density and open/closed porosity. Differential scanning...

  1. DWPF GLASS BEADS AND GLASS FRIT TRANSPORT DEMONSTRATION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adamson, D; Bradley Pickenheim, B

    2008-11-24

    DWPF is considering replacing irregularly shaped glass frit with spherical glass beads in the Slurry Mix Evaporator (SME) process to decrease the yield stress of the melter feed (a non-Newtonian Bingham Plastic). Pilot-scale testing was conducted on spherical glass beads and glass frit to determine how well the glass beads would transfer when compared to the glass frit. Process Engineering Development designed and constructed the test apparatus to aid in the understanding and impacts that spherical glass beads may have on the existing DWPF Frit Transfer System. Testing was conducted to determine if the lines would plug with the glass beads and the glass frit slurry and what is required to unplug the lines. The flow loop consisted of vertical and horizontal runs of clear PVC piping, similar in geometry to the existing system. Two different batches of glass slurry were tested: a batch of 50 wt% spherical glass beads and a batch of 50 wt% glass frit in process water. No chemicals such as formic acid was used in slurry, only water and glass formers. The glass beads used for this testing were commercially available borosilicate glass of mesh size -100+200. The glass frit was Frit 418 obtained from DWPF and is nominally -45+200 mesh. The spherical glass beads did not have a negative impact on the frit transfer system. The transferring of the spherical glass beads was much easier than the glass frit. It was difficult to create a plug with glass bead slurry in the pilot transfer system. When a small plug occurred from setting overnight with the spherical glass beads, the plug was easy to displace using only the pump. In the case of creating a man made plug in a vertical line, by filling the line with spherical glass beads and allowing the slurry to settle for days, the plug was easy to remove by using flush water. The glass frit proved to be much more difficult to transfer when compared to the spherical glass beads. The glass frit impacted the transfer system to the point

  2. Glass dissolution rate measurement and calculation revisited

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fournier, Maxime, E-mail: maxime.fournier@cea.fr [CEA, DEN, DTCD, SECM, F-30207, Bagnols sur Cèze (France); Ull, Aurélien; Nicoleau, Elodie [CEA, DEN, DTCD, SECM, F-30207, Bagnols sur Cèze (France); Inagaki, Yaohiro [Department of Applied Quantum Physics & Nuclear Engineering, Kyushu University, Fukuoka, 819-0395 (Japan); Odorico, Michaël [ICSM-UMR5257 CEA/CNRS/UM2/ENSCM, Site de Marcoule, BP17171, F-30207, Bagnols sur Cèze (France); Frugier, Pierre; Gin, Stéphane [CEA, DEN, DTCD, SECM, F-30207, Bagnols sur Cèze (France)

    2016-08-01

    Aqueous dissolution rate measurements of nuclear glasses are a key step in the long-term behavior study of such waste forms. These rates are routinely normalized to the glass surface area in contact with solution, and experiments are very often carried out using crushed materials. Various methods have been implemented to determine the surface area of such glass powders, leading to differing values, with the notion of the reactive surface area of crushed glass remaining vague. In this study, around forty initial dissolution rate measurements were conducted following static and flow rate (SPFT, MCFT) measurement protocols at 90 °C, pH 10. The international reference glass (ISG), in the forms of powders with different particle sizes and polished monoliths, and soda-lime glass beads were examined. Although crushed glass grains clearly cannot be assimilated with spheres, it is when using the samples geometric surface (S{sub geo}) that the rates measured on powders are closest to those found for monoliths. Overestimation of the reactive surface when using the BET model (S{sub BET}) may be due to small physical features at the atomic scale—contributing to BET surface area but not to AFM surface area. Such features are very small compared with the thickness of water ingress in glass (a few hundred nanometers) and should not be considered in rate calculations. With a S{sub BET}/S{sub geo} ratio of 2.5 ± 0.2 for ISG powders, it is shown here that rates measured on powders and normalized to S{sub geo} should be divided by 1.3 and rates normalized to S{sub BET} should be multiplied by 1.9 in order to be compared with rates measured on a monolith. The use of glass beads indicates that the geometric surface gives a good estimation of glass reactive surface if sample geometry can be precisely described. Although data clearly shows the repeatability of measurements, results must be given with a high uncertainty of approximately ±25%. - Highlights: • Initial dissolution

  3. Formulation of heat absorbing glasses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Álvarez-Casariego, Pedro

    1996-06-01

    Full Text Available In the thermal exchanges between buildings and environment, glazing is an element of major importance, for it largely influences the so-called Solar Heat Gain and Thermal Losses. These parameters can be modified by applying different type of coatings onto glass surface or by adding colorant compounds during glass melting. The latter is a cheaper way to control the Solar Heat Gain. The knowledge of the laws governing the interaction between colorant compounds and solar radiation, allows us to define glass formulations achieving specific aesthetic requirements and solar energy absorption. In this paper two examples of application of the modelling of glass colorants spectral absorptance are presented. First is addressed to obtaining a glass with high luminous transmittance and low solar energy transmittance, and the other one to obtaining a glass with neutral colour appearance and minimized solar energy transmittance. Calculation formulas are defined together with photometric properties so-obtained. These type of glasses are particularly suitable to be used as building and automotive glazing, for they retain the mechanical characteristics and possibilities of transformation of standard glass.

    En los intercambios de energía entre un edificio y el medio exterior, el vidrio es el elemento de mayor importancia, por su influencia en la Ganancia de Calor Solar y en las Pérdidas Térmicas. Estos parámetros pueden ser modificados mediante el depósito de capas sobre el vidrio o mediante la adición de compuestos absorbentes de la radiación solar. Esta última vía es la más económica para controlar la Ganancia de Calor Solar. El conocimiento de las leyes que gobiernan la interacción de los diversos colorantes con la radiación solar, permite definir formulaciones de vidrios con características especificas de tipo estético y de absorción energética. En este trabajo se presentan dos ejemplos de aplicación de esta modelización de las

  4. Europium Structural Effect on a Borosilicate Glass of Nuclear Interest: Combining Experimental Techniques with Reverse Monte Carlo Modelling to Investigate Short to Medium Range Order

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouty, O.; Delaye, J. M.; Peuget, S.; Charpentier, T.

    In-depth understanding of the effects of actinides in borosilicate glass matrices used for nuclear waste disposal is of great importance for nuclear spent fuel reprocessing cycle and fission products immobilization. This work carried out on ternary simplified glasses (Si, B, Na) doped respectively with 1 mol. % and 3.85 mol. % europium, presents a comprehensive study on the behaviour of trivalent europium taken as a surrogate of trivalent actinides. Neutron scattering, Wide Angle X- ray Scattering, Nuclear Magnetic Resonance, Raman Spectroscopy and Reverse Monte Carlo simulations were performed. For both glasses, it was found that europium coordination number was around 6 ± 0.2, revealing an octahedral spatial configuration. Europium species accommodates in both silicate and borate site distributions but preferentially in the silicate network. Europium induces a IVB/IIIB ratio decrease and a silicate network polymerization according to NMR 29Si chemical shift and Raman spectra evolution.

  5. Sol-Gel Glasses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukherjee, S. P.

    1985-01-01

    Multicomponent homogeneous, ultrapure noncrystalline gels/gel derived glasses are promising batch materials for the containerless glass melting experiments in microgravity. Hence, ultrapure, homogeneous gel precursors could be used to: (1) investigate the effect of the container induced nucleation on the glass forming ability of marginally glass forming compositions; and (2) investigate the influence of gravity on the phase separation and coarsening behavior of gel derived glasses in the liquid-liquid immiscibility zone of the nonsilicate systems having a high density phase. The structure and crystallization behavior of gels in the SiO2-GeO2 as a function of gel chemistry and thermal treatment were investigated. As are the chemical principles involved in the distribution of a second network former in silica gel matrix being investigated. The procedures for synthesizing noncrystalline gels/gel-monoliths in the SiO2-GeO2, GeO2-PbO systems were developed. Preliminary investigations on the levitation and thermal treatment of germania silicate gel-monoliths in the Pressure Facility Acoustic Levitator were done.

  6. Optical glass compatibility for the design of apochromatic systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gruescu C.

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The design of apochromatic systems is difficult because of two problems: the glass sorts compatibility and the c1/ca arbitrary input ratio. The optical glass manufacturers offer a wide range of sorts, so that the choice of triplet compatible glasses becomes itself an important separate problem. The paper provides a solution of mathematical modeling for the glass compatibility and, practically, analyses the sorts presented by Schott GmbH. The original software provided 22 compatible glass triplets. The authors explored the possibilities of enlarging the c1/ca ratio from the value 0.6 indicated in the literature to a range of [0.5…0.8]. Therefore, they designed and analyzed a set of 88 triplets. A correct glass choice can insure twice-larger apertures than the traditional ones for best quality apochromats (diffraction-limited.

  7. Recent progress in criterions for glass forming ability

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Bing; DU Yong; LIU Yong

    2009-01-01

    The glass-forming ability(GFA) is an important factor in studying metallic glasses. So far, there are several criteria for evaluating the glass-forming ability. For predicting compositions for bulk metallic glasses, however, they show more or less accuracy and versatility for different cases. In this work, four types of criteria for the glass-forming ability are categorized and reviewed: 1) Indicators with characteristic temperatures; 2) Indicators involving structural factors; 3) Indicators based on Miedema's model; and 4) Indictors based on phase diagram. It is pointed out that a single indicator cannot be used to predict GFA of all the metallic glass systems correctly due to its limited theoretical framework, and the combination of multiple indicators shows more efficiency and accuracy. Though it is still very difficult to develop a universal indicator for GFA, recent indicators seem to be of more reliable physical meaning than those previously suggested.

  8. Crystallization study of Te–Bi–Se glasses

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Manish Saxena; P K Bhatnagar

    2003-08-01

    Crystallization studies are carried out under non-isothermal conditions with samples heated at several uniform rates. The dependence of the glass transition temperature (), the crystalline temperature () and the peak temperature of crystallization () on the composition and heating rate () has been studied. For a memory/switching material, the thermal stability and ease of glass formation are of crucial importance. The glass transition temperature, , increases slightly with the variation of Bi content. From the heating rate dependence of , the activation energy for glass transition () has been evaluated. The results are discussed on the basis of Kissinger’s approach and are interpreted using the chemically ordered network model (CONM).

  9. Bio-Glasses An Introduction

    CERN Document Server

    Jones, Julian

    2012-01-01

    This new work is dedicated to glasses and their variants which can be used as biomaterials to repair diseased and damaged tissues. Bio-glasses are superior to other biomaterials in many applications, such as healing bone by signaling stem cells to become bone cells.   Key features:  First book on biomaterials to focus on bio-glassesEdited by a leading authority on bio-glasses trained by one of its inventors, Dr Larry HenchSupported by the International Commission on Glass (ICG)Authored by members of the ICG Biomedical Glass Committee, with the goal of creating a seamless textb

  10. Glass strengthening and patterning methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harper, David C; Wereszczak, Andrew A; Duty, Chad E

    2015-01-27

    High intensity plasma-arc heat sources, such as a plasma-arc lamp, are used to irradiate glass, glass ceramics and/or ceramic materials to strengthen the glass. The same high intensity plasma-arc heat source may also be used to form a permanent pattern on the glass surface--the pattern being raised above the glass surface and integral with the glass (formed of the same material) by use of, for example, a screen-printed ink composition having been irradiated by the heat source.

  11. Glass formation - A contemporary view

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uhlmann, D. R.

    1983-01-01

    The process of glass formation is discussed from several perspectives. Particular attention is directed to kinetic treatments of glass formation and to the question of how fast a given liquid must be cooled in order to form a glass. Specific consideration is paid to the calculation of critical cooling rates for glass formation, to the effects of nucleating heterogeneities and transients in nucleation on the critical cooling rates, to crystallization on reheating a glass, to the experimental determination of nucleation rates and barriers to crystal nucleation, and to the characteristics of materials which are most conducive to glass formation.

  12. Heavy Metal Fluoride Glasses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-04-01

    i 2N E ihhhhh1112h MEmhhhhEEEohhhhE I.’....momo 111111111’-20 LA ’Ll2. AFWL-TR-86-37 AFWL-TR- 86-37 oT C ,l C ’-’ N HEAVY METAL FLUORIDE GLASSES 0nI...Secwrit CkasmfcationJ HEAVY METAL FLUORIDE GLASSES 12. PERSONAL AUTHOR(S) Reisfield, Renata; and Eyal, Mrek 13. TYPE OF REPORT 113b. TIME COVERED 114...glasses containing about 50 mole% of ZrF4 [which can be replaced by HfF 4 or TIF 4 (Refs. 1-3) or heavy metal fluorides based on PbF2 and on 3d-group

  13. First-principles computation of random-pinning glass transition, glass cooperative length scales, and numerical comparisons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cammarota, Chiara; Seoane, Beatriz

    2016-11-01

    As a guideline for experimental tests of the ideal glass transition (random-pinning glass transition, RPGT) that shall be induced in a system by randomly pinning particles, we performed first-principle computations within the hypernetted chain approximation and numerical simulations of a hard-sphere model of a glass former. We obtain confirmation of the expected enhancement of glassy behavior under the procedure of random pinning. We present the analytical phase diagram as a function of c and of the packing fraction ϕ , showing a line of RPGT ending in a critical point. We also obtain microscopic results on cooperative length scales characterizing medium-range amorphous order in hard-sphere glasses and indirect quantitative information on a key thermodynamic quantity defined in proximity to ideal glass transitions, the amorphous surface tension. Finally, we present numerical results of pair correlation functions able to differentiate the liquid and the glass phases, as predicted by the analytic computations.

  14. Toward Molecular Engineering of Polymer Glasses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Freed, Karl F [Univ. of Chicago, IL (United States); Xu, Wen-Sheng [Univ. of Chicago, IL (United States); Dudowicz, Jacek B [Univ. of Chicago, IL (United States); Douglas, Jack F [National Inst. of Standards and Technology (NIST), Boulder, CO (United States)

    2017-04-05

    to test the theory by directly comparing between the predictions of our generalized entropy theory with experiment and with simulations and to expand the vistas of the theory to describe a wider range of important systems (e.g. glass formation in binary blends and systems with specific interactions) and phenomena that are describable by the generalized entropy theory. In addition, we have addressed longstanding fundamental problems associated with the validity of the Adam-Gibbs theory, one of the underpinnings of the general entropy theory. Theoretical advances to enable describing the properties of glass-formation over a wider class of important polymeric systems, included semi-flexible systems, the more general situation of specific interactions, and more. Our recent work removes the simplest approximation uses the simplest model in which the interaction is approximated by a single, monomer average. Thus, the theory has been extended to allow some variations of the energy parameters between the atoms within the monomers. The theory has also been extended to include all the contributions from chain semi-flexibility. Both projects are extremely difficult, but the payback is that the process of solving the problems developed strong theoretical skills in Dr. Xu, who has recently begun a postdoc position at ORNL. The theory has also been extended to describe glass formation in partially miscible blends, with good general agreement with experiment. Again, the development of the theory presented an extremely difficult problem, but the payback is the development of a theory for a very important class of systems. Another project provides an extremely simple approximation for certain properties of glass formation in polymer melts and should make the theory more accessible to everyone.

  15. Study of rigidity of semiconducting vanadate glasses and its importance in use of coatings

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Yasser B Saddeek; M S Gaafar

    2014-05-01

    The elastic moduli of some multicomponent vanadate based glasses were analysed in terms of the bond compression model by some physical parameters such as, the density, average stretching force constant and average atomic ring size. These parameters were calculated for all the glass series and for all the glass composition to estimate the rigidity of these glasses. The results showed that the average force constant and the elastic moduli of these glasses are sensitive to the decrease in PbO content. This behaviour was attributed to the increase in the molar volume and the role of different modifiers. These parameters along with the coordination number of the glasses affect the glass transition temperature. The correlation between the elastic moduli and thermal properties of these samples showed that 0.25MoO3–0.25PbO–0.5V2O5 glass is the most rigid and has an applicable glass transition temperature for coating.

  16. Float glass innovation in the flat glass industry

    CERN Document Server

    Uusitalo, Olavi

    2014-01-01

    A thorough industry analysis is of utmost importance for a study on the impact of technological changes on industry structure. This book evaluates the consequences of a vaguely chosen level of an industry analysis. Too broad a definition of the industry may disaggregate sub-industries, processing industries and international aspects. This is illustrated by revisiting an industry study upon which the dominant design model was based. Readers will see and understand the consequences of too broadly defined industries together with quantitative research approach can have. The book argues that the nature of the industry should define the level of the analysis. This is done by revisiting the flat glass industry study, on which Anderson and Tushman’s (1990) dominant design model is partly based. In their study Anderson and Tushman defined the flat glass industry based on four-digit SIC codes. It is argued that this definition was too broad and it disaggregated important sub-industries, processing industries and int...

  17. Foam Glass for Construction Materials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Rasmus Rosenlund

    2016-01-01

    Foaming is commonly achieved by adding foaming agents such as metal oxides or metal carbonates to glass powder. At elevated temperature, the glass melt becomes viscous and the foaming agents decompose or react to form gas, causing a foamy glass melt. Subsequent cooling to room temperature, result...... in a solid foam glass. The foam glass industry employs a range of different melt precursors and foaming agents. Recycle glass is key melt precursors. Many parameters influence the foaming process and optimising the foaming conditions is very time consuming. The most challenging and attractive goal is to make...... low density foam glass for thermal insulation applications. In this thesis, it is argued that the use of metal carbonates as foaming agents is not suitable for low density foam glass. A reaction mechanism is proposed to justify this result. Furthermore, an in situ method is developed to optimise...

  18. Shattering women's glass ceiling

    OpenAIRE

    Camilleri Podesta, Marie Therese; Duca, Edward

    2013-01-01

    The role of women in academia has always greatly interested me. Several years ago, when I was asked to become Gender Issues Committee chairperson at the University of Malta, I readily accepted. http://www.um.edu.mt/think/shattering-womens-glass-ceiling/

  19. Glass as matter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beim, Anne

    2000-01-01

    Refraiming the Moderns - Substitute Windows and Glass. In general terms, the seminar has contributed to the growing interest in the problems concerning the restoration of Modern Movement architecture. More particularly, it has of course drawn our attention to modern windows, which are increasingly...

  20. What Glass Ceiling?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynch, Michael; Post, Katherine

    1996-01-01

    A recent study drawing on data from the Census Bureau and the Bureau of Labor Statistics suggests that the wage gap between men and women has virtually disappeared, and that the so-called "glass ceiling" results more from age and qualifications than from explicit discrimination. (SLD)

  1. Supercooled Liquids and Glasses

    OpenAIRE

    1999-01-01

    In these lectures, which were presented at "Soft and Fragile Matter, Nonequilibrium Dynamics, Metastability and Flow" University of St. Andrews, 8 July - 22 July, 1999, I give an introduction to the physics of supercooled liquids and glasses and discuss some computer simulations done to investigate these systems.

  2. Microchips on glass

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Keulemans, M.

    2007-01-01

    Microchips on glass. What about a mobile phone that uses a single microchip to receive all the available frequency bands, plus extras such as television, gps, and Internet access? Or, in due time, see-though implants that will monitor your state of health, and equipment that will let you see through

  3. Stained Glass and Flu

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2017-02-01

    Dr. Robert Webster, an Emeritus member of the Department of Infectious Diseases at St. Jude Children's Research Hospital, discusses his cover art story on stained glass and influenza.  Created: 2/1/2017 by National Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases (NCEZID).   Date Released: 2/1/2017.

  4. Triad ''Metal - Enamel - Glass''

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukhina, T.; Petrova, S.; Toporova, V.; Fedyaeva, T.

    2014-10-01

    This article shows how to change the color of metal and glass. Both these materials are self-sufficient, but sometimes used together. For example, enameling. In this case, the adhesion between metal substrate and stekloobraznae enamel layer, which was conducted on a stretching and a bend, was tested.

  5. Glass ceilings of professionalisation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stott, Dawn L

    2016-04-01

    The term glass ceiling is a political term often used to describe an unbreakable barrier that isnot visible with the human eye, but it keeps minorities from rising up i.e. it is a barrier to minoritygroups, in the past (and sometimes still) for women, that stops them from achieving theirtrue potential.

  6. Stained-Glass Pastels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laird, Shirley

    2009-01-01

    The author has always liked the look of stained-glass windows. Usually the designs are simplified and the shapes are easier for younger students to draw. This technique seemed to be the perfect place for her fifth-graders to try their hand at color mixing. The smaller spaces and simple shapes were just what she needed for this group. Her students…

  7. Stained Glass and Flu

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2016-02-01

    Dr. Robert Webster, an Emeritus member of the Department of Infectious Diseases at St. Jude Children's Research Hospital, discusses his cover art story on stained glass and influenza.  Created: 2/1/2016 by National Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases (NCEZID).   Date Released: 2/1/2016.

  8. "Stained Glass" Landscape Windows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vannata, Janine

    2008-01-01

    Both adults and children alike marvel at the grand vivid stained-glass windows created by American artist Louis Comfort Tiffany. Today he is commonly recognized as one of America's most influential designers and artists throughout the last nineteenth and early twentieth century. In the lesson described in this article, students created their own…

  9. Structural control of the stability of nuclear waste glasses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calas, G.; Galoisy, L.; Cormier, L.; Bergeron, B.; Jollivet, P.

    2009-05-01

    Vitrification of liquid high-level radioactive waste in borosilicate glasses has received a great attention in several countries. The fundamental properties of the waste forms are their chemical and mechanical durability. We present an overview of the local structure of inactive analogs of the French nuclear glass, using structural information obtained by a combination of X-ray absorption Fine Structure (XAFS) and Wide Angle X-ray Scattering (WAXS). We will first contrast several classes of elements, such as Zr, Mo or Zn, which give nuclear glasses peculiar positive or adverse properties for the industrial process: enhanced chemical stability, phase separation, crystal nucleation and separation. These properties may be rationalized using Pauling rules, familiar to Mineralogists, as other properties are correctly modelled in simplified glass compositions using molecular dynamics. We will also point out the importance of the melt-to-glass transition and the consequence of the glass structural properties on the resistance of glassy matrices to irradiation. Glass alteration affects the long-term stability of the glass. It is characterized by an amorphous (glass)-amorphous (gel) transformation. Depending on alteration conditions, alteration layers may have or not a protective character, which will influence radionuclide retention over time. We will present the structural modification of the surface chemistry of the glass monoliths during short-term experiments and the evolution towards a gel, which forms progressively at the expense of the glass. The protective character of the gel, observed during glass leaching under near-saturated conditions, will be rationalized by its structural properties.

  10. Integrated Disposal Facility FY 2012 Glass Testing Summary Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pierce, Eric M.; Kerisit, Sebastien N.; Krogstad, Eirik J.; Burton, Sarah D.; Bjornstad, Bruce N.; Freedman, Vicky L.; Cantrell, Kirk J.; Snyder, Michelle MV; Crum, Jarrod V.; Westsik, Joseph H.

    2013-03-29

    PNNL is conducting work to provide the technical basis for estimating radionuclide release from the engineered portion of the disposal facility for Hanford immobilized low-activity waste (ILAW). Before the ILAW can be disposed, DOE must conduct a performance assessment (PA) for the Integrated Disposal Facility (IDF) that describes the long-term impacts of the disposal facility on public health and environmental resources. As part of the ILAW glass testing program, PNNL is implementing a strategy, consisting of experimentation and modeling, to provide the technical basis for estimating radionuclide release from the glass waste form in support of future IDF PAs. Key activities in FY12 include upgrading the STOMP/eSTOMP codes to do near-field modeling, geochemical modeling of PCT tests to determine the reaction network to be used in the STOMP codes, conducting PUF tests on selected glasses to simulate and accelerate glass weathering, developing a Monte Carlo simulation tool to predict the characteristics of the weathered glass reaction layer as a function of glass composition, and characterizing glasses and soil samples exhumed from an 8-year lysimeter test. The purpose of this report is to summarize the progress made in fiscal year (FY) 2012 and the first quarter of FY 2013 toward implementing the strategy with the goal of developing an understanding of the long-term corrosion behavior of LAW glasses.

  11. Geoenvironmental weathering/deterioration of landfilled MSWI-BA glass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Yunmei; Saffarzadeh, Amirhomayoun; Shimaoka, Takayuki; Zhao, Chun; Peng, Xuya; Gao, Junmin

    2014-08-15

    Municipal solid waste incineration bottom ash (MSWI-BA) glass serves as a matrix of assorted bottom ash (BA) compounds. Deterioration of the BA glass phases is quite important as they regulate the distribution of a series of toxic elements. This paper studied landfilled MSWI-BA samples from the mineralogical and geochemical viewpoint to understand the deterioration behavior of the BA glass phases as well as mechanisms involved. Bulk analysis by PXRD as well as micro-scale analysis by optical microscopy and SEM/EDX was conducted for such purposes. The results revealed that dissolution of the BA glass phases has resulted in a deterioration layer of 10(0)-10(2)μm thickness after years of disposal. This rapid weathering process is highly relevant to the specific glass characteristics and solution pH. The BA glass phases with more embedded compounds and cracks/fissures tend to be more vulnerable. Moreover, the generally alkaline pH in ash deposit favors a rapid disruption of the glass phase. The weathering products are mainly gel phases (including Al-Si gel, Ca-Al-Si gel, Fe-Al-Si gel etc.) with iron oxide/hydroxide as accessory products. Breakdown of the BA glass phases triggers chemical evolution of the embedded compounds. Based on all the findings above, a model is proposed to illustrate a general evolution trend for the landfilled MSWI-BA glass phases. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) Durability-Composition Models and the Applicability of the Associated Reduction of Constraints (ROC) Criteria for High TiO2 Containing Glasses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jantzen, C. M. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Edwards, T. B. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Trivelpiece, C. L. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2016-08-30

    Radioactive high-level waste (HLW) at the Savannah River Site (SRS) has successfully been vitrified into borosilicate glass in the DWPF since 1996. Vitrification requires stringent product/process (P/P) constraints since the glass cannot be reworked once it has been poured into ten foot tall by two foot diameter canisters. A unique “feed forward” statistical process control (SPC) was developed for this control rather than relying on statistical quality control (SQC). In SPC, the feed composition to the DWPF melter is controlled prior to vitrification. In SQC, the glass product would be sampled after it is vitrified. Individual glass property-composition models form the basis for the “feed forward” SPC. The models transform constraints on the melt and glass properties into constraints on the feed composition going to the melter in order to determine, at the 95% confidence level, that the feed will be processable and that the durability of the resulting waste form will be acceptable to a geologic repository. The DWPF SPC system is known as the Product Composition Control System (PCCS). One of the process models within PCCS is known as the Thermodynamic Hydration Energy Reaction MOdel (THERMO™). The DWPF will soon be receiving increased concentrations of TiO2-, Na2O-, and Cs2O-enriched wastes from the Salt Waste Processing Facility (SWPF). The SWPF has been built to pretreat the high-curie fraction of the salt waste to be removed from the HLW tanks in the F- and H-Area Tank Farms at the SRS. In order to validate the existing TiO2 term in THERMO™ beyond 2.0 wt% in the DWPF, new durability data were developed over the target range of 2.00 to 6.00 wt% TiO2 and evaluated against the 1995 durability model. The durability was measured by the 7-day Product Consistency Test. This study documents the adequacy of the existing THERMO™ terms. It is recommended that the modified THERMO™ durability models and

  13. Yesterday's Trash Makes Tomorrow's "Glass"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wayne, Dale

    2010-01-01

    In this article, the author describes a glass art project inspired by Dale Chihuly. This project uses two-liter plastic soda bottles which are cut apart and trimmed. Applying heat using a hair dryer, the plastic curls and takes an uneven blown-glass quality. The "glass" is then painted using acrylic paint. (Contains 2 resources and 1 online…

  14. Yesterday's Trash Makes Tomorrow's "Glass"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wayne, Dale

    2010-01-01

    In this article, the author describes a glass art project inspired by Dale Chihuly. This project uses two-liter plastic soda bottles which are cut apart and trimmed. Applying heat using a hair dryer, the plastic curls and takes an uneven blown-glass quality. The "glass" is then painted using acrylic paint. (Contains 2 resources and 1 online…

  15. Molecular Mobility in Sugar Glasses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dries, van den I.J.

    2000-01-01

    Glasses are liquids that exhibit solid state behavior as a result of their extremely high viscosity. Regarding their application to foods, glasses play a role in the preservation of foods, due to their high viscosity and the concomitant low molecular mobility. This thesis focuses on sugar glasses. S

  16. Glass for Solid State Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey, R. F.

    1982-01-01

    Glass film has low intrinsic compressive stress for isolating active layers of magnetic-bubble and other solid-state devices. Solid-state device structure incorporates low-stress glasses as barrier and spacer layers. Glass layers mechanically isolate substrate, conductor, and nickel/iron layers.

  17. Bending stresses in Facetted Glass Shells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bagger, Anne; Jönsson, Jeppe; Almegaard, Henrik

    2008-01-01

    A shell structure of glass combines a highly effective structural principle with a material of optimal permeability to light. A facetted shell structure has a piecewise plane geometry, and together the facets form an approximation to a curved surface. A distributed load on a plane-based facetted...... structure will locally cause bending moments in the loaded facets. The bending stresses are dependent on the stiffness of the joints. Approximate solutions are developed to estimate the magnitude of the bending stresses. A FE-model of a facetted glass shell structure is used to validate the expressions...

  18. Cooling rates for glass containing lunar compositions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, C. Y.; Yinnon, H.; Uhlmann, D. R.

    1983-01-01

    Cooling rates required to form glassy or partly-crystalline bodies of 14 lunar compositions have been estimated using a previously introduced, simplified model. The calculated cooling rates are found to be in good agreement with cooling rates measured for the same compositions. Measurements are also reported of the liquidus temperature and glass transition temperature for each composition. Inferred cooling rates are combined with heat flow analyses to obtain insight into the thermal histories of samples 15422, 14162, 15025, 74220, 74241, 10084, 15425, and 15427. The critical cooling rates required to form glasses of 24 lunar compositions, including the 14 compositions of the present study, are suggested to increase systematically with increasing ratio of total network modifiers/total network formers in the compositions. This reflects the importance of melt viscosity in affecting glass formation.

  19. Composition and property measurements for PHA Phase 4 glasses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Edwards, T.B.

    2000-01-25

    The results presented in this report are for nine Precipitate Hydrolysis Aqueous (PHA) Phase 4 glasses. Three of the glasses contained HM sludge at 22, 26, and 30 wt% respectively, 10 wt% PHA and 1.25 wt% monosodium titanate (MST), all on an oxide basis. The remaining six glasses were selected from the Phase 1 and Phase 2 studies (Purex sludge) but with an increased amount of MST. The high-end target for MST of 2.5 wt% oxide was missed in Phases 1 and 2 due to {approximately}30 wt% water content of the MST. A goal of this Phase 4 study was to determine whether this increase in titanium concentration from the MST had any impact on glass quality or processibility. Two of the glasses, pha14c and pha15c, were rebatched and melted due to apparent batching errors with pha14 and pha15. The models currently in the Defense Waste Processing Facility's (DWPF) Product Composition Control System (PCCS) were used to predict durability, homogeneity, liquidus, and viscosity for these nine glasses. All of the HM glasses and half of the Purex glasses were predicted to be phase separated, and consequently prediction of glass durability is precluded with the cument models for those glasses that failed the homogeneity constraint. If one may ignore the homogeneity constraint, the measured durabilities were within the 95% prediction limits of the model. Further efforts will be required to resolve this issue on phase separation (inhomogeneity). The liquidus model predicted unacceptable liquidus temperatures for four of the nine glasses. The approximate, bounding liquidus temperatures measured for all had upper limits of 1,000 C or less. Given the fact that liquidus temperatures were only approximated, the 30 wt% loading of Purex may be near or at the edge of acceptability for liquidus. The measured viscosities were close to the predictions of the model. For the Purex glasses, pha12c and pha15c, the measured viscosities of 28 and 23 poise, respectively, indicate that DWPF processing

  20. The Sherrington-Kirkpatrick spin glass model in the presence of a random field with a joint Gaussian probability density function for the exchange interactions and random fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadjiagapiou, Ioannis A.

    2014-03-01

    The magnetic systems with disorder form an important class of systems, which are under intensive studies, since they reflect real systems. Such a class of systems is the spin glass one, which combines randomness and frustration. The Sherrington-Kirkpatrick Ising spin glass with random couplings in the presence of a random magnetic field is investigated in detail within the framework of the replica method. The two random variables (exchange integral interaction and random magnetic field) are drawn from a joint Gaussian probability density function characterized by a correlation coefficient ρ. The thermodynamic properties and phase diagrams are studied with respect to the natural parameters of both random components of the system contained in the probability density. The de Almeida-Thouless line is explored as a function of temperature, ρ and other system parameters. The entropy for zero temperature as well as for non zero temperatures is partly negative or positive, acquiring positive branches as h0 increases.