WorldWideScience

Sample records for modeling energy flow

  1. Observing and Modeling Earth's Energy Flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevens, Bjorn; Schwartz, Stephen E.

    2012-07-01

    This article reviews, from the authors' perspective, progress in observing and modeling energy flows in Earth's climate system. Emphasis is placed on the state of understanding of Earth's energy flows and their susceptibility to perturbations, with particular emphasis on the roles of clouds and aerosols. More accurate measurements of the total solar irradiance and the rate of change of ocean enthalpy help constrain individual components of the energy budget at the top of the atmosphere to within ±2 W m-2. The measurements demonstrate that Earth reflects substantially less solar radiation and emits more terrestrial radiation than was believed even a decade ago. Active remote sensing is helping to constrain the surface energy budget, but new estimates of downwelling surface irradiance that benefit from such methods are proving difficult to reconcile with existing precipitation climatologies. Overall, the energy budget at the surface is much more uncertain than at the top of the atmosphere. A decade of high-precision measurements of the energy budget at the top of the atmosphere is providing new opportunities to track Earth's energy flows on timescales ranging from days to years, and at very high spatial resolution. The measurements show that the principal limitation in the estimate of secular trends now lies in the natural variability of the Earth system itself. The forcing-feedback-response framework, which has developed to understand how changes in Earth's energy flows affect surface temperature, is reviewed in light of recent work that shows fast responses (adjustments) of the system are central to the definition of the effective forcing that results from a change in atmospheric composition. In many cases, the adjustment, rather than the characterization of the compositional perturbation (associated, for instance, with changing greenhouse gas concentrations, or aerosol burdens), limits accurate determination of the radiative forcing. Changes in clouds contribute

  2. A new energy transfer model for turbulent free shear flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liou, William W.-W.

    1992-01-01

    A new model for the energy transfer mechanism in the large-scale turbulent kinetic energy equation is proposed. An estimate of the characteristic length scale of the energy containing large structures is obtained from the wavelength associated with the structures predicted by a weakly nonlinear analysis for turbulent free shear flows. With the inclusion of the proposed energy transfer model, the weakly nonlinear wave models for the turbulent large-scale structures are self-contained and are likely to be independent flow geometries. The model is tested against a plane mixing layer. Reasonably good agreement is achieved. Finally, it is shown by using the Liapunov function method, the balance between the production and the drainage of the kinetic energy of the turbulent large-scale structures is asymptotically stable as their amplitude saturates. The saturation of the wave amplitude provides an alternative indicator for flow self-similarity.

  3. Flow based vs. demand based energy-water modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rozos, Evangelos; Nikolopoulos, Dionysis; Efstratiadis, Andreas; Koukouvinos, Antonios; Makropoulos, Christos

    2015-04-01

    The water flow in hydro-power generation systems is often used downstream to cover other type of demands like irrigation and water supply. However, the typical case is that the energy demand (operation of hydro-power plant) and the water demand do not coincide. Furthermore, the water inflow into a reservoir is a stochastic process. Things become more complicated if renewable resources (wind-turbines or photovoltaic panels) are included into the system. For this reason, the assessment and optimization of the operation of hydro-power systems are challenging tasks that require computer modelling. This modelling should not only simulate the water budget of the reservoirs and the energy production/consumption (pumped-storage), but should also take into account the constraints imposed by the natural or artificial water network using a flow routing algorithm. HYDRONOMEAS, for example, uses an elegant mathematical approach (digraph) to calculate the flow in a water network based on: the demands (input timeseries), the water availability (simulated) and the capacity of the transmission components (properties of channels, rivers, pipes, etc.). The input timeseries of demand should be estimated by another model and linked to the corresponding network nodes. A model that could be used to estimate these timeseries is UWOT. UWOT is a bottom up urban water cycle model that simulates the generation, aggregation and routing of water demand signals. In this study, we explore the potentials of UWOT in simulating the operation of complex hydrosystems that include energy generation. The evident advantage of this approach is the use of a single model instead of one for estimation of demands and another for the system simulation. An application of UWOT in a large scale system is attempted in mainland Greece in an area extending over 130×170 km². The challenges, the peculiarities and the advantages of this approach are examined and critically discussed.

  4. Energy flow in passive and active 3D cochlear model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Yanli; Steele, Charles [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Stanford University, Stanford, California (United States); Puria, Sunil [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Stanford University, Stanford, California (United States); Department of Otolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery, Stanford University, Stanford, California (United States)

    2015-12-31

    Energy flow in the cochlea is an important characteristic of the cochlear traveling wave, and many investigators, such as von Békésy and Lighthill, have discussed this phenomenon. Particularly after the discovery of the motility of the outer hair cells (OHCs), the nature of the power gain of the cochlea has been a fundamental research question. In the present work, direct three-dimensional (3D) calculations of the power on cross sections of the cochlea and on the basilar membrane are performed based on a box model of the mouse cochlea. The distributions of the fluid pressure and fluid velocity in the scala vestibuli are presented. The power output from the OHCs and the power loss due to fluid viscous damping are calculated along the length of the cochlea. This work provides a basis for theoretical calculations of the power gain of the OHCs from mechanical considerations.

  5. A Variable Refrigerant Flow Heat Pump Computer Model in EnergyPlus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raustad, Richard A. [Florida Solar Energy Center

    2013-01-01

    This paper provides an overview of the variable refrigerant flow heat pump computer model included with the Department of Energy's EnergyPlusTM whole-building energy simulation software. The mathematical model for a variable refrigerant flow heat pump operating in cooling or heating mode, and a detailed model for the variable refrigerant flow direct-expansion (DX) cooling coil are described in detail.

  6. Energy-Dependent Octagonal Lattice Boltzmann Modeling for Compressible Flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavlo, Pavol; Vahala, Linda; Vahala, George

    2000-10-01

    There has been much interest in thermal lattice Boltzmann modeling (TLBM) for compressible flows because of their inherent parallelizeability. Instead of applying CFD techniques to the nonlinear conservation equations, one instead solves a linear BGK kinetic equation. To reduce storage requirements, the velocity space is discretized and lattice geometries are so chosen to minimize the number of degrees of freedom that must be retained in the Chapman-Enskog recovery of the original macroscopic equations. The simplest (and most efficient) TLBM runs at a CFL=1, so that no numerical diffusion or dissipation is introduced. The algorithm involves Lagrangian streaming (shift operator) and purely local operations. Because of the underlying discrete lattice symmetry, the relaxation distributions cannot be Maxwellian and hence the inherent numerical instability problem in TLBM. We are investigating the use of energy-dependent lattices so as to allow simulation of problems of interest in divertor physics, The appeal of TLBM is that it can provide a unified representation for both strongly collisional (‘fluid’) and weakly collisional (‘Monte Carlo’) regimes. Moreover, our TLBM code is more efficiently solved on mulit-PE platforms than the corresponding CFD codes and is readily extended to 3D. MHD can also be handled by TLBM.

  7. Elliptic flow in a hadron-string cascade model at 130 GeV energy

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    P K Sahu; A Ohnishi; M Isse; N Otuka; S C Phatak

    2006-08-01

    We present the analysis of elliptic flow at $\\sqrt{s} = 130$ A GeV energy in a hadron-string cascade model. We find that the final hadronic yields are qualitatively described. The elliptic flow 2 is reasonably well-described at low transverse momentum (T < 1 GeV/c) in mid-central collisions. On the other hand, this model does not explain 2 at high T or in peripheral collisions and thus generally, it underestimates the elliptic flow at RHIC energy.

  8. Boltzmann rovibrational collisional coarse-grained model for internal energy excitation and dissociation in hypersonic flows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munafò, A; Panesi, M; Magin, T E

    2014-02-01

    A Boltzmann rovibrational collisional coarse-grained model is proposed to reduce a detailed kinetic mechanism database developed at NASA Ames Research Center for internal energy transfer and dissociation in N(2)-N interactions. The coarse-grained model is constructed by lumping the rovibrational energy levels of the N(2) molecule into energy bins. The population of the levels within each bin is assumed to follow a Boltzmann distribution at the local translational temperature. Excitation and dissociation rate coefficients for the energy bins are obtained by averaging the elementary rate coefficients. The energy bins are treated as separate species, thus allowing for non-Boltzmann distributions of their populations. The proposed coarse-grained model is applied to the study of nonequilibrium flows behind normal shock waves and within converging-diverging nozzles. In both cases, the flow is assumed inviscid and steady. Computational results are compared with those obtained by direct solution of the master equation for the rovibrational collisional model and a more conventional multitemperature model. It is found that the proposed coarse-grained model is able to accurately resolve the nonequilibrium dynamics of internal energy excitation and dissociation-recombination processes with only 20 energy bins. Furthermore, the proposed coarse-grained model provides a superior description of the nonequilibrium phenomena occurring in shock heated and nozzle flows when compared with the conventional multitemperature models.

  9. Collision Energy Evolution of Elliptic and Triangular Flow in a Hybrid Model

    CERN Document Server

    Auvinen, Jussi

    2013-01-01

    While the existence of a strongly interacting state of matter, known as 'quark-gluon plasma' (QGP), has been established in heavy ion collision experiments in the past decade, the task remains to map out the transition from the hadronic matter to the QGP. This is done by measuring the dependence of key observables (such as particle suppression and elliptic flow) on the collision energy of the heavy ions. This procedure, known as 'beam energy scan', has been most recently performed at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC). Utilizing a Boltzmann+hydrodynamics hybrid model, we study the collision energy dependence of initial state eccentricities and the final state elliptic and triangular flow. This approach is well suited to investigate the relative importance of hydrodynamics and hadron transport at different collision energies.

  10. Self-Energy Closure for Inhomogeneous Turbulent Flows and Subgrid Modeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorgen S. Frederiksen

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available A new statistical dynamical closure theory for general inhomogeneous turbulent flows and subgrid modeling is presented. This Self-Energy (SE closure represents all eddy interactions through nonlinear dissipation or forcing ‘self-energy’ terms in the mean-field, covariance and response function equations. This makes the renormalization of the bare dissipation and forcing, and the subgrid modeling problem, transparent. The SE closure generalizes the quasi-diagonal direct interaction closure to allow for more complex interactions. The SE closure is applicable to flows in different geometries, is exact near maximum entropy states corresponding to canonical equilibrium, and provides a framework for deriving simpler realizable closures.

  11. Experimental Modeling of the Overtopping Flow on the Wave Dragon Wave Energy Converter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Parmeggiani, Stefano; Kofoed, Jens Peter; Friis-Madsen, Erik

    2011-01-01

    The Wave Dragon Wave Energy Converter is currently facing a precommercial phase. At this stage of development a reliable overtopping model is highly required, in order to predict the performance of the device at possible deployment locations. A model formulation derived for an overtopping device...... with general geometry has been used so far. The paper presents an updated formulation drawn through the tank testing of a scaled model the Wave Dragon. The sensitivity analysis of the main features influencing the overtopping flow led to an updated model formulation which can be specifically suited...... for the Wave Dragon....

  12. Experimental Modeling of the Overtopping Flow on the Wave Dragon Wave Energy Converter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Parmeggiani, Stefano; Kofoed, Jens Peter; Friis-Madsen, Erik

    2011-01-01

    The Wave Dragon Wave Energy Converter is currently facing a precommercial phase. At this stage of development a reliable overtopping model is highly required, in order to predict the performance of the device at possible deployment locations. A model formulation derived for an overtopping device...... with general geometry has been used so far. The paper presents an updated formulation drawn through the tank testing of a scaled model the Wave Dragon. The sensitivity analysis of the main features influencing the overtopping flow led to an updated model formulation which can be specifically suited...... for the Wave Dragon....

  13. Modeling of dissociation and energy transfer in shock-heated nitrogen flows

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Munafò, A., E-mail: munafo@illinois.edu [Department of Aerospace Engineering, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Talbot Laboratory, 104 S. Wright St., Urbana, Illinois 61801 (United States); NASA Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, California 94035 (United States); Liu, Y., E-mail: yen.liu@nasa.gov [NASA Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, California 94035 (United States); Panesi, M., E-mail: mpanesi@illinois.edu [Department of Aerospace Engineering, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Talbot Laboratory, 104 S. Wright St., Urbana, Illinois 61801 (United States)

    2015-12-15

    This work addresses the modeling of dissociation and energy transfer processes in shock heated nitrogen flows by means of the maximum entropy linear model and a newly proposed hybrid bin vibrational collisional model. Both models aim at overcoming two of the main limitations of the state of the art non-equilibrium models: (i) the assumption of equilibrium between rotational and translational energy modes of the molecules and (ii) the reliance on the quasi-steady-state distribution for the description of the population of the internal levels. The formulation of the coarse-grained models is based on grouping the energy levels into bins, where the population is assumed to follow a Maxwell-Boltzmann distribution at its own temperature. Different grouping strategies are investigated. Following the maximum entropy principle, the governing equations are obtained by taking the zeroth and first-order moments of the rovibrational master equations. The accuracy of the proposed models is tested against the rovibrational master equation solution for both flow quantities and population distributions. Calculations performed for free-stream velocities ranging from 5 km/s to 10 km/s demonstrate that dissociation can be accurately predicted by using only 2-3 bins. It is also shown that a multi-temperature approach leads to an under-prediction of dissociation, due to the inability of the former to account for the faster excitation of high-lying vibrational states.

  14. B-spline image model for energy minimization-based optical flow estimation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Besnerais, Guy; Champagnat, Frédéric

    2006-10-01

    Robust estimation of the optical flow is addressed through a multiresolution energy minimization. It involves repeated evaluation of spatial and temporal gradients of image intensity which rely usually on bilinear interpolation and image filtering. We propose to base both computations on a single pyramidal cubic B-spline model of image intensity. We show empirically improvements in convergence speed and estimation error and validate the resulting algorithm on real test sequences.

  15. Modelling and study on the output flow characteristics of expansion energy used hydropneumatic transformer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shi, Yan; Wu, Tiecheng; Cai, Maolin; Liu, Chong [Beihang University, Beijing (China)

    2016-03-15

    Hydropneumatic transformer (short for HP transformer) is used to pump pressurized hydraulic oil. Whereas, due to its insufficient usage of energy and low efficiency, a new kind of HP transformer: EEUHP transformer (Expansion energy used hydropneumatic transformer) was proposed. To illustrate the characteristics of the EEUHP transformer, a mathematical model was built. To verify the mathematical model, an experimental prototype was setup and studied. Through simulation and experimental study on the EEUHP transformer, the influence of five key parameters on the output flow of the EEUHP transformer were obtained, and some conclusions can be drawn. Firstly, the mathematical model was proved to be valid. Furthermore, the EEUHP transformer costs fewer of compressed air than the normal HP transformer when the output flow of the two kinds of transformers are almost same. Moreover, with an increase in the output pressure, the output flow decreases sharply. Finally, with an increase in the effective area of hydraulic output port, the output flow increases distinctly. This research can be referred to in the performance and design optimization of the EEUHP transformers.

  16. Experimental modelling of the overtopping flow on the Wave Dragon Wave Energy Converter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parmeggiani, S.; Kofoed, J.P.

    2010-11-15

    The Wave Dragon is a floating slack-moored Wave Energy Converter (WEC) of the overtopping type. Oncoming waves are focused by two wing reflectors towards the ramp of the device, surge-up and overtop into a reservoir placed at a higher level than the surface of the sea. The energy production takes place as the water is led back to the sea through a set of low-head hydro-turbines. After many years of development, Wave Dragon (WD) is now facing the phase of pre-commercial demonstration. In this phase it is very important to be able to use the available data to predict the performances of the device at different scales and locations. A flexible and comprehensive modelling tool is therefore highly required. Wave Dragon produces power through different steps of energy conversion: 1. Primary energy conversion: overtopping - The energy content of the wave (partly in the kinetic and partly in the potential form) is transferred to the device in the form of volumes of water coming into the reservoir. These volumes are stored at a higher level than the surrounding sea, being a stock of potential energy. 2. Secondary energy conversion: turbines - The potential energy stored in the reservoir is transformed into mechanical energy as the water flows back to the sea, activating the lowhead hydro-turbines. 3. Tertiary energy conversion step: generators - The turbines shaft rotation activates the permanent magnet generators, converting mechanical energy into electrical energy. 4. Grid connection and delivery of the power - The electricity produced is delivered to the grid at the right frequency, by means of a frequency converter. The present research is focused on the overtopping. Being the primary energy conversion mechanism of the WD, the overtopping is indeed the stage where the performances of the device are influenced by local conditions and the geometric features of the set-up. This makes it the right step where to account for these features through an accurate modelling

  17. A generation-attraction model for renewable energy flows in Italy: A complex network approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valori, Luca; Giannuzzi, Giovanni Luca; Facchini, Angelo; Squartini, Tiziano; Garlaschelli, Diego; Basosi, Riccardo

    2016-10-01

    In recent years, in Italy, the trend of the electricity demand and the need to connect a large number of renewable energy power generators to the power-grid, developed a novel type of energy transmission/distribution infrastructure. The Italian Transmission System Operator (TSO) and the Distribution System Operator (DSO), worked on a new infrastructural model, based on electronic meters and information technology. In pursuing this objective it is crucial importance to understand how even more larger shares of renewable energy can be fully integrated, providing a constant and reliable energy background over space and time. This is particularly true for intermittent sources as photovoltaic installations due to the fine-grained distribution of them across the Country. In this work we use an over-simplified model to characterize the Italian power grid as a graph whose nodes are Italian municipalities and the edges cross the administrative boundaries between a selected municipality and its first neighbours, following a Delaunay triangulation. Our aim is to describe the power flow as a diffusion process over a network, and using open data on the solar irradiation at the ground level, we estimate the production of photovoltaic energy in each node. An attraction index was also defined using demographic data, in accordance with average per capita energy consumption data. The available energy on each node was calculated by finding the stationary state of a generation-attraction model.

  18. A Comparison of Wind Flow Models for Wind Resource Assessment in Wind Energy Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mathieu Landry

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this work was to assess the accuracy of various coupled mesoscale-microscale wind flow modeling methodologies for wind energy applications. This is achieved by examining and comparing mean wind speeds from several wind flow modeling methodologies with observational measurements from several 50 m met towers distributed across the study area. At the mesoscale level, with a 5 km resolution, two scenarios are examined based on the Mesoscale Compressible Community Model (MC2 model: the Canadian Wind Energy Atlas (CWEA scenario, which is based on standard input data, and the CWEA High Definition (CWEAHD scenario where high resolution land cover input data is used. A downscaling of the obtained mesoscale wind climate to the microscale level is then performed, where two linear microscale models, i.e., MsMicro and the Wind Atlas Analysis and Application Program (WAsP, are evaluated following three downscaling scenarios: CWEA-WAsP, CWEA-MsMicro and CWEAHD-MsMicro. Results show that, for the territory studied, with a modeling approach based on the MC2 and MsMicro models, also known as Wind Energy Simulation Toolkit (WEST, the use of high resolution land cover and topography data at the mesoscale level helps reduce modeling errors for both the mesoscale and microscale models, albeit only marginally. At the microscale level, results show that the MC2-WAsP modeling approach gave substantially better results than both MC2 and MsMicro modeling approaches due to tweaked meso-micro coupling.

  19. Indirect Energy Flows in Niche Model Food Webs: Effects of Size and Connectance.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jane Shevtsov

    Full Text Available Indirect interactions between species have long been of interest to ecologists. One such interaction type takes place when energy or materials flow via one or more intermediate species between two species with a direct predator-prey relationship. Previous work has shown that, although each such flow is small, their great number makes them important in ecosystems. A new network analysis method, dynamic environ approximation, was used to quantify the fraction of energy flowing from prey to predator over paths of length greater than 1 (flow indirectness or FI in a commonly studied food web model. Web structure was created using the niche model and dynamics followed the Yodzis-Innes model. The effect of food web size (10 to 40 species and connectance (0.1 to 0.48 on FI was examined. For each of 250 model realizations run for each pair of size and connectance values, the FI of every predator-prey interaction in the model was computed and then averaged over the whole network. A classification and regression tree (CART analysis was then used to find the best predictors of FI. The mean FI of the model food webs is 0.092, with a standard deviation of 0.0279. It tends to increase with system size but peaks at intermediate connectance levels. Of 27 potential predictor variables, only five (mean path length, dominant eigenvalue of the adjacency matrix, connectance, mean trophic level and fraction of species belonging to intermediate trophic levels were selected by the CART algorithm as best accounting for variation in the data; mean path length and the dominant eigenvalue of the adjacency matrix were dominant.

  20. Collision energy dependence of elliptic flow splitting between particles and their antiparticles from an extended multiphase transport model

    CERN Document Server

    Xu, Jun

    2016-01-01

    Based on an extended multiphase transport model, which includes mean-field potentials in both the partonic and hadronic phases, uses the mix-event coalescence, and respects charge conservation during the hadronic evolution, we have studied the collision energy dependence of the elliptic flow splitting between particles and their antiparticles. This extended transport model reproduces reasonably well the experimental data at lower collision energies but only describes qualitatively the elliptic flow splitting at higher beam energies. The present study thus indicates the existence of other mechanisms for the elliptic flow splitting besides the mean-field potentials and the need of further improvements of the multiphase transport model.

  1. Compare Energy Use in Variable Refrigerant Flow Heat Pumps Field Demonstration and Computer Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sharma, Chandan; Raustad, Richard

    2013-07-01

    Variable Refrigerant Flow (VRF) heat pumps are often regarded as energy efficient air-conditioning systems which offer electricity savings as well as reduction in peak electric demand while providing improved individual zone setpoint control. One of the key advantages of VRF systems is minimal duct losses which provide significant reduction in energy use and duct space. However, there is limited data available to show their actual performance in the field. Since VRF systems are increasingly gaining market share in the US, it is highly desirable to have more actual field performance data of these systems. An effort was made in this direction to monitor VRF system performance over an extended period of time in a US national lab test facility. Due to increasing demand by the energy modeling community, an empirical model to simulate VRF systems was implemented in the building simulation program EnergyPlus. This paper presents the comparison of energy consumption as measured in the national lab and as predicted by the program. For increased accuracy in the comparison, a customized weather file was created by using measured outdoor temperature and relative humidity at the test facility. Other inputs to the model included building construction, VRF system model based on lab measured performance, occupancy of the building, lighting/plug loads, and thermostat set-points etc. Infiltration model inputs were adjusted in the beginning to tune the computer model and then subsequent field measurements were compared to the simulation results. Differences between the computer model results and actual field measurements are discussed. The computer generated VRF performance closely resembled the field measurements.

  2. Energy balance and mass conservation in reduced order models of fluid flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohebujjaman, Muhammad; Rebholz, Leo G.; Xie, Xuping; Iliescu, Traian

    2017-10-01

    In this paper, we investigate theoretically and computationally the conservation properties of reduced order models (ROMs) for fluid flows. Specifically, we investigate whether the ROMs satisfy the same (or similar) energy balance and mass conservation as those satisfied by the Navier-Stokes equations. All of our theoretical findings are illustrated and tested in numerical simulations of a 2D flow past a circular cylinder at a Reynolds number Re = 100. First, we investigate the ROM energy balance. We show that using the snapshot average for the centering trajectory (which is a popular treatment of nonhomogeneous boundary conditions in ROMs) yields an incorrect energy balance. Then, we propose a new approach, in which we replace the snapshot average with the Stokes extension. Theoretically, the Stokes extension produces an accurate energy balance. Numerically, the Stokes extension yields more accurate results than the standard snapshot average, especially for longer time intervals. Our second contribution centers around ROM mass conservation. We consider ROMs created using two types of finite elements: the standard Taylor-Hood (TH) element, which satisfies the mass conservation weakly, and the Scott-Vogelius (SV) element, which satisfies the mass conservation pointwise. Theoretically, the error estimates for the SV-ROM are sharper than those for the TH-ROM. Numerically, the SV-ROM yields significantly more accurate results, especially for coarser meshes and longer time intervals.

  3. Mathematical Modeling of the Concentrated Energy Flow Effect on Metallic Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergey Konovalov

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Numerous processes take place in materials under the action of concentrated energy flows. The most important ones include heating together with the temperature misdistribution throughout the depth, probable vaporization on the surface layer, melting to a definite depth, and hydrodynamic flotation; generation of thermo-elastic waves; dissolution of heterogeneous matrix particles; and formation of nanolayers. The heat-based model is presented in an enthalpy statement involving changes in the boundary conditions, which makes it possible to consider melting and vaporization on the material surface. As a result, a linear dependence of penetration depth vs. energy density has been derived. The model of thermo-elastic wave generation is based on the system of equations on the uncoupled one-dimensional problem of dynamic thermo-elasticity for a layer with the finite thickness. This problem was solved analytically by the symbolic method. It has been revealed for the first time that the generated stress pulse comprises tension and compression zones, which are caused by increases and decreases in temperature on the boundary. The dissolution of alloying elements is modeled on the example of a titanium-carbon system in the process of electron beam action. The mathematical model is proposed to describe it, and a procedure is suggested to solve the problem of carbon distribution in titanium carbide and liquid titanium-carbide solution in terms of the state diagram and temperature changes caused by phase transitions. Carbon concentration vs. spatial values were calculated for various points of time at diverse initial temperatures of the cell. The dependence of carbon particle dissolution on initial temperature and radius of the particle were derived. A hydrodynamic model based on the evolution of Kelvin-Helmholtz instability in shear viscous flows has been proposed to specify the formation of nanostructures in materials subjected to the action of concentrated

  4. Modeling energy flow in a large Neotropical reservoir: a tool do evaluate fishing and stability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ronaldo Angelini

    Full Text Available Recently, there is an increasing perception that the ecosystem approach gives important insights to support fisheries stock assessment and management. This paper aims to quantify energy flows in the Itaipu Reservoir (Brazil and to simulate increase of the fishing effort of some species, using Ecopath with Ecosim software, which could allow inferences on stability. Therefore, two steady-state Itaipu models were built (1983-87 and 1988-92. Results showed that: a there are no differences between models, and results on aging trends do not vary over time indicating that fishery does not alter the ecosystem as a whole; b results of fisheries simulations are approximate to mono-specific stock assessment for the same species and periods; c many authors believe that tropical ecosystems are environments where biotic and abiotic oscillations are annual and sometimes unexpected, but the results found for the Itaipu Reservoir indicate that stability was met after 16 years.

  5. Modelling of the Overtopping Flow on the Wave Dragon Wave Energy Converter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Parmeggiani, Stefano; Pecher, Arthur; Kofoed, Jens Peter

    2010-01-01

    The Wave Dragon is a floating slack-moored Wave Energy Converter of the overtopping type, which is facing now the last phase of development before the commercial exploitation: the deployment of a full-scale demonstrator. In this phase a modelling tool allowing for accurate predictions of the perf......The Wave Dragon is a floating slack-moored Wave Energy Converter of the overtopping type, which is facing now the last phase of development before the commercial exploitation: the deployment of a full-scale demonstrator. In this phase a modelling tool allowing for accurate predictions...... of the performance of the device at different scaling ratios and locations of interest is strongly required. The overtopping, depending on the local conditions of the deployment site, is identified as the right stage to be considered in the modelling. The existing formulation of the overtopping model needs...... to be updated in order to represent more accurately the effects of the geometrical features and stability of the device and of the local conditions and nonscalable parameters on the overtopping flow. The paper analyses the conditions at which the present formulation has been established and proposes a strategy...

  6. Modeling energy flow and nutrient cycling in natural semiarid grassland ecosystems with the aid of thematic mapper data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, James K.

    1987-01-01

    Energy flow and nutrient cycling were modeled as affected by herbivory on selected intensive sites along gradients of precipitation and soils, validating the model output by monitoring selected parameters with data derived from the Thematic Mapper (TM). Herbivore production was modeled along the gradient of soils and herbivory, and validated with data derived from TM in a spatial data base.

  7. A stock-flow consistent input-output model with applications to energy price shocks, interest rates, and heat emissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berg, Matthew; Hartley, Brian; Richters, Oliver

    2015-01-01

    By synthesizing stock-flow consistent models, input-output models, and aspects of ecological macroeconomics, a method is developed to simultaneously model monetary flows through the financial system, flows of produced goods and services through the real economy, and flows of physical materials through the natural environment. This paper highlights the linkages between the physical environment and the economic system by emphasizing the role of the energy industry. A conceptual model is developed in general form with an arbitrary number of sectors, while emphasizing connections with the agent-based, econophysics, and complexity economics literature. First, we use the model to challenge claims that 0% interest rates are a necessary condition for a stationary economy and conduct a stability analysis within the parameter space of interest rates and consumption parameters of an economy in stock-flow equilibrium. Second, we analyze the role of energy price shocks in contributing to recessions, incorporating several propagation and amplification mechanisms. Third, implied heat emissions from energy conversion and the effect of anthropogenic heat flux on climate change are considered in light of a minimal single-layer atmosphere climate model, although the model is only implicitly, not explicitly, linked to the economic model.

  8. Energy loss and coronary flow simulation following hybrid stage I palliation: a hypoplastic left heart computational fluid dynamic model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shuhaiber, Jeffrey H; Niehaus, Justin; Gottliebson, William; Abdallah, Shaaban

    2013-08-01

    The theoretical differences in energy losses as well as coronary flow with different band sizes for branch pulmonary arteries (PA) in hypoplastic left heart syndrome (HLHS) remain unknown. Our objective was to develop a computational fluid dynamic model (CFD) to determine the energy losses and pulmonary-to-systemic flow rates. This study was done for three different PA band sizes. Three-dimensional computer models of the hybrid procedure were constructed using the standard commercial CFD softwares Fluent and Gambit. The computer models were controlled for bilateral PA reduction to 25% (restrictive), 50% (intermediate) and 75% (loose) of the native branch pulmonary artery diameter. Velocity and pressure data were calculated throughout the heart geometry using the finite volume numerical method. Coronary flow was measured simultaneously with each model. Wall shear stress and the ratio of pulmonary-to-systemic volume flow rates were calculated. Computer simulations were compared at fixed points utilizing echocardiographic and catheter-based metric dimensions. Restricting the PA band to a 25% diameter demonstrated the greatest energy loss. The 25% banding model produced an energy loss of 16.76% systolic and 24.91% diastolic vs loose banding at 7.36% systolic and 17.90% diastolic. Also, restrictive PA bands had greater coronary flow compared with loose PA bands (50.2 vs 41.9 ml/min). Shear stress ranged from 3.75 Pascals with restrictive PA banding to 2.84 Pascals with loose banding. Intermediate PA banding at 50% diameter achieved a Qp/Qs (closest to 1) at 1.46 systolic and 0.66 diastolic compared with loose or restrictive banding without excess energy loss. CFD provides a unique platform to simulate pressure, shear stress as well as energy losses of the hybrid procedure. PA banding at 50% provided a balanced pulmonary and systemic circulation with adequate coronary flow but without extra energy losses incurred.

  9. Analysis of free-surface flows through energy considerations: Single-phase versus two-phase modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marrone, Salvatore; Colagrossi, Andrea; Di Mascio, Andrea; Le Touzé, David

    2016-05-01

    The study of energetic free-surface flows is challenging because of the large range of interface scales involved due to multiple fragmentations and reconnections of the air-water interface with the formation of drops and bubbles. Because of their complexity the investigation of such phenomena through numerical simulation largely increased during recent years. Actually, in the last decades different numerical models have been developed to study these flows, especially in the context of particle methods. In the latter a single-phase approximation is usually adopted to reduce the computational costs and the model complexity. While it is well known that the role of air largely affects the local flow evolution, it is still not clear whether this single-phase approximation is able to predict global flow features like the evolution of the global mechanical energy dissipation. The present work is dedicated to this topic through the study of a selected problem simulated with both single-phase and two-phase models. It is shown that, interestingly, even though flow evolutions are different, energy evolutions can be similar when including or not the presence of air. This is remarkable since, in the problem considered, with the two-phase model about half of the energy is lost in the air phase while in the one-phase model the energy is mainly dissipated by cavity collapses.

  10. Insight from elliptic flow of open charm mesons using quark coalescence model at RHIC and LHC energies

    CERN Document Server

    Esha, Roli; Huang, Huan Zhong

    2016-01-01

    A study of elliptic flow of open charm mesons, $D^0$ and $D_S ^\\pm$ using quark coalescence as a mechanism of hadronization within the framework of a multi-phase transport model has been presented. We have studied the transverse momentum dependence of the elliptic flow parameter at mid-rapidity ($|y|$ $<$ 1.0) for minimum bias Au+Au collisions at $\\sqrt{s_{NN}} = 200$ GeV (RHIC) and Pb+Pb collisions $\\sqrt{s_{NN}} = 2.76$ TeV (LHC) for different values of partonic interaction cross-section and QCD coupling constant. We have compared our calculations with the experimentally measured data at the LHC energy. We have also studied the effect of specific viscosity on elliptic flow of open charm mesons within the transport model approach. Our study indicates that the elliptic flow of open charmed mesons is more sensitive to viscous properties of QGP medium compared to light hadrons.

  11. Insight from elliptic flow of open charm mesons using quark coalescence model at RHIC and LHC energies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esha, Roli; Nasim, Md.; Huang, Huan Zhong

    2017-01-01

    A study of elliptic flow of open charm mesons, D 0 and using quark coalescence as the mechanism of hadronization of heavy quarks will be presented. The coalescing partons are taken from a multi-phase transport model. The transverse momentum dependence of the elliptic flow parameter at mid-rapidity (|y| = 200 GeV (RHIC) and Pb+Pb collisions = 2.76 TeV (LHC) for different values of partonic interaction cross-section and QCD coupling constant will be discussed. We have compared our calculations with the experimentally measured data at the LHC energy. We will also present the effect of specific viscosity on elliptic flow of open charm mesons within the transport model approach. Our study indicates that the elliptic flow of open charmed mesons is more sensitive to viscous properties of QGP medium compared to light hadrons.

  12. An improved multiscale model for dilute turbulent gas particle flows based on the equilibration of energy concept

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Ying [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2004-01-01

    Many particle-laden flows in engineering applications involve turbulent gas flows. Modeling multiphase turbulent flows is an important research topic with applications in fluidized beds and particle conveying. A predictive multiphase turbulence model can help CFD codes to be more useful for engineering applications, such as the scale-up in the design of circulating fluidized combustor and coal gasifications. In engineering applications, the particle volume fraction can vary from dilute (<10-4) to dense (~ 50%). It is reasonable to expect that multiphase turbulence models should at least satisfy some basic modeling and performance criteria and give reasonable predictions for the canonical problems in dilute particle-laden turbulent flows. In this research, a comparative assessment of predictions from Simonin and Ahmadi's turbulence models is performed with direct numerical simulation (DNS) for two canonical problems in particle-laden turbulent flows. Based on the comparative assessment, some criteria and the areas for model improvement are identified: (1) model for interphase TKE transfer, especially the time scale of interphase TKE transfer, and (2) correct prediction of TKE evolution with variation of particle Stokes number. Some deficiencies that are identified in the Simonin and Ahmadi models, limit the applicability. A new multiphase turbulence model, the Equilibration of Energy Model (EEM), is proposed in this work. In EEM, a multiscale interaction time scale is proposed to account for the interaction of a particle with a range of eddy sizes. EEM shows good agreement with the DNS results for particle-laden isotropic turbulence. For particle-laden homogeneous shear flows, model predictions from EEM can be further improved if the dissipation rate in fluid phase is modeled with more accuracy.

  13. Modelling of Energy Flow, Rotational Grazing and Potential Productivity in an Alpine Meadow Grazing Ecosystem

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    An eight-compartment model of the energy dynamics of an alpine meadow-sheep grazing ecosystem was proposed based on SHIYOMI's system approach. The compartments were the above-ground plant portion, the underground live portion including roots, the underground dead portion including roots, the above-ground litter Ⅰ (degradable portion), the above-ground litter Ⅱ (undegradable portion), the sheep intake, the sheep liveweight, and the faeces. Energy flows between the eight compartments were described by eight simultaneous differential equations. All parameters in the model were determined from paddock experiments.The model was designed to provide a practical method for estimating the effects of the number of rotational grazing subplots, grazing period, and grazing pressure on the performance of grazing systems for perennial alpine meadow pasture. The model provides at least 28 different attributes for characterizing the performance of the grazing system. Analyses of 270 simulated rotational grazing systems of summer-autumn meadow pasture (grazing from 1st June to 30 October each year) provided an inference base to support two recommendations concerning management variables. First, with a three-paddock, 29-day grazing period and 30.14kJ·m-2·day-1 grazing pressure scheme, the system has the highest total grazing intake, 4250.44 kJ·m-2, during the grazing season. Secondly, with a three-paddock, 7-day grazing period and 28.89kJ·m-2·day-1 grazing pressure scheme, the accumulated graze is 4073.34kJ*m-2.The potential productivity of the alpine meadow under grazing is defined in this paper as the maximal dry biomass of herbage grazed by the grazing animals over the whole growing season. It has been analysed by applying optimal control theory to the model. The productivity is regarded as the objective function to be maximized through optimization of the time course of the grazing pressure, the control variable. The results show that: (1) under constant grazing pressure

  14. Energy Flow in Agriculture: Bangladesh

    OpenAIRE

    M. S. Alam; Alam, M.R; Islam, K. K.

    2005-01-01

    In this paper, a qualitative energy flow analysis in Bangladesh agriculture has been made for a period from 1980-81 to 2000-01 to evaluate the impact of energy input to produce output. Human & animal muscle power and machinery energy for tillage operation, electricity and diesel energy for irrigation, fertilizer and pesticides energy for growth and protection are taken into account. Energy values are calculated by multiplying respective quantity by their respective energy equivalents with...

  15. Experimental Modelling of the Overtopping Flow on the Wave Dragon Wave Energy Converter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Parmeggiani, Stefano; Kofoed, Jens Peter

    The Wave Dragon is a floating slack-moored Wave Energy Converter (WEC) of the overtopping type. Oncoming waves are focused by two wing reflectors towards the ramp of the device, surge-up and overtop into a reservoir placed at a higher level than the surface of the sea. The energy production takes...... place as the water is led back to the sea through a set of low-head hydro-turbines. After many years of development, Wave Dragon (WD) is now facing the phase of pre-commercial demonstration. In this phase it is very important to be able to use the available data to predict the performances of the device...... at different scales and locations. A flexible and comprehensive modelling tool is therefore highly required. Wave Dragon produces power through different steps of energy conversion: 1. Primary energy conversion: overtopping – The energy content of the wave (partly in the kinetic and partly in the potential...

  16. Modelling of the Overtopping Flow on the Wave Dragon Wave Energy Converter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Parmeggiani, Stefano; Pecher, Arthur; Kofoed, Jens Peter

    2010-01-01

    The Wave Dragon is a floating slack-moored Wave Energy Converter of the overtopping type, which is facing now the last phase of development before the commercial exploitation: the deployment of a full-scale demonstrator. In this phase a modelling tool allowing for accurate predictions of the perf......The Wave Dragon is a floating slack-moored Wave Energy Converter of the overtopping type, which is facing now the last phase of development before the commercial exploitation: the deployment of a full-scale demonstrator. In this phase a modelling tool allowing for accurate predictions...

  17. Model for seawater fouling and effects of temperature, flow velocity and surface free energy on seawater fouling☆

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Dazhang Yang; Jianhua Liu; Xiaoxue E; Linlin Jiang

    2016-01-01

    A kinetic model was proposed to predict the seawater fouling process in the seawater heat exchangers. The new model adopted an expression combining depositional and removal behaviors for seawater fouling based on the Kern–Seaton model. The present model parameters include the integrated kinetic rate of deposition (kd) and the integrated kinetic rate of removal (kr), which have clear physical significance. A seawater-fouling monitoring de-vice was established to validate the model. The experimental data were wel fitted to the model, and the param-eters were obtained in different conditions. SEM and EDX analyses were performed after the experiments, and the results show that the main components of seawater fouling are magnesium hydroxide and aluminum hy-droxide. The effects of surface temperature, flow velocity and surface free energy were assessed by the model and the experimental data. The results indicate that the seawater fouling becomes aggravated as the surface tem-perature increased in a certain range, and the seawater fouling resistance reduced as the flow velocity of seawater increased. Furthermore, the effect of the surface free energy of metals was analyzed, showing that the lower sur-face free energy mitigates the seawater fouling accumulation.

  18. 2007 Estimated International Energy Flows

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, C A; Belles, R D; Simon, A J

    2011-03-10

    An energy flow chart or 'atlas' for 136 countries has been constructed from data maintained by the International Energy Agency (IEA) and estimates of energy use patterns for the year 2007. Approximately 490 exajoules (460 quadrillion BTU) of primary energy are used in aggregate by these countries each year. While the basic structure of the energy system is consistent from country to country, patterns of resource use and consumption vary. Energy can be visualized as it flows from resources (i.e. coal, petroleum, natural gas) through transformations such as electricity generation to end uses (i.e. residential, commercial, industrial, transportation). These flow patterns are visualized in this atlas of 136 country-level energy flow charts.

  19. Numerical Modeling of Porous Flow in Fractured Rock and Its Applications in Geothermal Energy Extraction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yucang Wang; Shimin Wang; Sheng Xue; Deepak Adhikary

    2015-01-01

    Understanding the characteristics of hydraulic fracture, porous flow and heat transfer in fractured rock is critical for geothermal power generation applications, and numerical simulation can provide a powerful approach for systematically and thoroughly investigating these problems. In this paper, we present a fully coupled solid-fluid code using discrete element method (DEM) and lattice Boltzmann method (LBM). The DEM with bonded particles is used to model the deformation and fracture in solid, while the LBM is used to model the fluid flow. The two methods are two-way coupled, i.e., the solid part provides a moving boundary condition and transfers momentum to fluid, while the fluid exerts a dragging force to the solid. Two widely used open source codes, the ESyS_Particle and the OpenLB, are integrated into one code and paralleled with Message Passing Interface (MPI) library. Some preliminary 2D simulations, including particles moving in a fluid and hydraulic fracturing in-duced by injection of fluid into a borehole, are carried out to validate the integrated code. The prelimi-nary results indicate that the new code is capable of reproducing the basic features of hydraulic frac-ture and thus offers a promising tool for multiscale simulation of porous flow and heat transfer in fractured rock.

  20. A free energy-based surface tension force model for simulation of multiphase flows by level-set method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, H. Z.; Chen, Z.; Shu, C.; Wang, Y.; Niu, X. D.; Shu, S.

    2017-09-01

    In this paper, a free energy-based surface tension force (FESF) model is presented for accurately resolving the surface tension force in numerical simulation of multiphase flows by the level set method. By using the analytical form of order parameter along the normal direction to the interface in the phase-field method and the free energy principle, FESF model offers an explicit and analytical formulation for the surface tension force. The only variable in this formulation is the normal distance to the interface, which can be substituted by the distance function solved by the level set method. On one hand, as compared to conventional continuum surface force (CSF) model in the level set method, FESF model introduces no regularized delta function, due to which it suffers less from numerical diffusions and performs better in mass conservation. On the other hand, as compared to the phase field surface tension force (PFSF) model, the evaluation of surface tension force in FESF model is based on an analytical approach rather than numerical approximations of spatial derivatives. Therefore, better numerical stability and higher accuracy can be expected. Various numerical examples are tested to validate the robustness of the proposed FESF model. It turns out that FESF model performs better than CSF model and PFSF model in terms of accuracy, stability, convergence speed and mass conservation. It is also shown in numerical tests that FESF model can effectively simulate problems with high density/viscosity ratio, high Reynolds number and severe topological interfacial changes.

  1. ATOMIZATION CAUSED BY BOTTOM FLOW ENERGY DISSIPATION

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Bottom flow energy dissipation is one of the common energydissipation methods for flood-releasing structures with high water head. Measures of this energy dissipation depend mainly on the turbulent action of hydraulic jump.In this paper, the physical process and the calculating methods of the atomization caused by bottom flow energy dissipation were studied, the computation models of atomization quantity for the self-aerated flow in overflow and hydraulic jump regions are presented, and the main results are of theoretical and practical significance for the hydraulic and electric engineering.

  2. Comparison of Model and Experimental Results for Material and Energy Flow in a Titanium Evaporation System with Deforming Interfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McClelland, M A; Westerberg, K W; Meier, T C; Braun, D G; Frischknecht, K D; Anklam, T M

    2003-05-12

    Finite element calculations and measurements are compared for material and energy flow in a system to evaporate pure titanium. A 40 kW electron beam is used to heat the end of a 7.62 cm diameter cylindrical rod which is fed vertically through a water-cooled crucible. Vapor emanates from a liquid pool in which flow is driven strongly by buoyancy and capillary forces. At high evaporation rates, the vapor exerts strong shear and normal forces on the liquid-vapor interface. The MELT finite element code is used to calculate steady-state, axisymmetric flow and temperature fields along with liquid-solid and liquid-vapor interface locations. The influence of the vapor on the liquid top surface is treated using boundary conditions with parameters derived from Monte Carlo simulations. The upper and lower interfaces of the liquid pool are tracked using a mesh structured with rotating spines. Experimental evaporation rates are obtained from measured feed rates, and heat flow rates are determined from measured temperature rises in the cooling water. The finite element model provides a good representation of the measured evaporation rates, heat flows, and lower pool boundary locations.

  3. A Hierarchy of Energy- and Flux-Budget (EFB) Turbulence Closure Models for Stably-Stratified Geophysical Flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zilitinkevich, S. S.; Elperin, T.; Kleeorin, N.; Rogachevskii, I.; Esau, I.

    2013-03-01

    Here we advance the physical background of the energy- and flux-budget turbulence closures based on the budget equations for the turbulent kinetic and potential energies and turbulent fluxes of momentum and buoyancy, and a new relaxation equation for the turbulent dissipation time scale. The closure is designed for stratified geophysical flows from neutral to very stable and accounts for the Earth's rotation. In accordance with modern experimental evidence, the closure implies the maintaining of turbulence by the velocity shear at any gradient Richardson number Ri, and distinguishes between the two principally different regimes: "strong turbulence" at {Ri ≪ 1} typical of boundary-layer flows and characterized by the practically constant turbulent Prandtl number Pr T; and "weak turbulence" at Ri > 1 typical of the free atmosphere or deep ocean, where Pr T asymptotically linearly increases with increasing Ri (which implies very strong suppression of the heat transfer compared to the momentum transfer). For use in different applications, the closure is formulated at different levels of complexity, from the local algebraic model relevant to the steady-state regime of turbulence to a hierarchy of non-local closures including simpler down-gradient models, presented in terms of the eddy viscosity and eddy conductivity, and a general non-gradient model based on prognostic equations for all the basic parameters of turbulence including turbulent fluxes.

  4. Early Cretaceous terrestrial ecosystems in East Asia based on food-web and energy-flow models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsukawa, M.; Saiki, K.; Ito, M.; Obata, I.; Nichols, D.J.; Lockley, M.G.; Kukihara, R.; Shibata, K.

    2006-01-01

    In recent years, there has been global interest in the environments and ecosystems around the world. It is helpful to reconstruct past environments and ecosystems to help understand them in the present and the future. The present environments and ecosystems are an evolving continuum with those of the past and the future. This paper demonstrates the contribution of geology and paleontology to such continua. Using fossils, we can make an estimation of past population density as an ecosystem index based on food-web and energy-flow models. Late Mesozoic nonmarine deposits are distributed widely on the eastern Asian continent and contain various kinds of fossils such as fishes, amphibians, reptiles, dinosaurs, mammals, bivalves, gastropods, insects, ostracodes, conchostracans, terrestrial plants, and others. These fossil organisms are useful for late Mesozoic terrestrial ecosystem reconstruction using food-web and energy-flow models. We chose Early Cretaceous fluvio-lacustrine basins in the Choyr area, southeastern Mongolia, and the Tetori area, Japan, for these analyses and as a potential model for reconstruction of other similar basins in East Asia. The food-web models are restored based on taxa that occurred in these basins. They form four or five trophic levels in an energy pyramid consisting of rich primary producers at its base and smaller biotas higher in the food web. This is the general energy pyramid of a typical ecosystem. Concerning the population densities of vertebrate taxa in 1 km2 in these basins, some differences are recognized between Early Cretaceous and the present. For example, Cretaceous estimates suggest 2.3 to 4.8 times as many herbivores and 26.0 to 105.5 times the carnivore population. These differences are useful for the evaluation of past population densities of vertebrate taxa. Such differences may also be caused by the different metabolism of different taxa. Preservation may also be a factor, and we recognize that various problems occur in

  5. Modeling and energy simulation of the variable refrigerant flow air conditioning system with water-cooled condenser under cooling conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Yueming; Wu, Jingyi [Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Institute of Refrigeration and Cryogenics (China); Shiochi, Sumio [Daikin Industries Ltd. (Japan)

    2009-09-15

    As a new system, variable refrigerant flow system with water-cooled condenser (water-cooled VRF) can offer several interesting characteristics for potential users. However, at present, its dynamic simulation simultaneously in association with building and other equipments is not yet included in the energy simulation programs. Based on the EnergyPlus's codes, and using manufacturer's performance parameters and data, the special simulation module for water-cooled VRF is developed and embedded in the software of EnergyPlus. After modeling and testing the new module, on the basis of a typical office building in Shanghai with water-cooled VRF system, the monthly and seasonal cooling energy consumption and the breakdown of the total power consumption are analyzed. The simulation results show that, during the whole cooling period, the fan-coil plus fresh air (FPFA) system consumes about 20% more power than the water-cooled VRF system does. The power comparison between the water-cooled VRF system and the air-cooled VRF system is performed too. All of these can provide designers some ideas to analyze the energy features of this new system and then to determine a better scheme of the air conditioning system. (author)

  6. Modeling Energy Flow and Economic Analysis for Walnut Production in Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Narges Banaeian and Morteza Zangeneh

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available The aims of this study were to determine energy use pattern, to obtain relationship between energy inputs and yield, and to make an economical analysis in walnut orchards in Hamadan, Iran. Required data were obtained from 47 walnut orchards based on random sampling method. The results indicate that walnut production consumed a total energy of 15196.1 MJ/ha where chemical fertilizers with about 41% were the major energy consumer. Energy use efficiency, energy productivity and specific energy of walnut production were 2.9, 0.3 and 3.4 MJ/kg, respectively. Econometric estimation results revealed that energy inputs of human labor, farmyard manure, chemical fertilizers, water for irrigation and transformation contributed significantly to the yield. The results of sensitivity analysis of the energy inputs showed that the Marginal Physical Productivity (MPP value of human labor was the highest, followed by farmyard manure and water for irrigation energy inputs, respectively. The results also showed that direct, indirect and renewable and nonrenewable, energy forms had a positive impact on output level and the MPP value of direct and renewable energy were higher. The benefit to cost ratio, mean net return and productivity from walnut production was obtained as 2.1, 2043.7 $/ha and 0.3 kg/$, respectively.

  7. ENERGY FLOWS IN COMPLEX ECOLOGICAL SYSTEMS: A REVIEW

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jiang ZHANG

    2009-01-01

    Energy flow drives the complex systems to evolve. The allometric scaling as the universal energy flow pattern has been found in different scales of ecological systems. It reflects the general power law relationship between flow and store. The underlying mechanisms of energy flow patterns are explained as the branching transportation networks which can be regarded as the result of systematic optimization of a biological target under constraints. Energy flows in the ecological system may be modelled by the food web model and population dynamics on the network. This paper reviews the latest progress on the energy flow patterns, explanatory models for the allometric scaling and modelling approach of flow and network evolution dynamics in ecology. Furthermore, the possibility of generalizing these flow patterns, modelling approaches to other complex systems is discussed.

  8. Nuclear energy in Europe: uranium flow modeling and fuel cycle scenario trade-offs from a sustainability perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tendall, Danielle M; Binder, Claudia R

    2011-03-15

    The European nuclear fuel cycle (covering the EU-27, Switzerland and Ukraine) was modeled using material flow analysis (MFA).The analysis was based on publicly available data from nuclear energy agencies and industries, national trade offices, and nongovernmental organizations. Military uranium was not considered due to lack of accessible data. Nuclear fuel cycle scenarios varying spent fuel reprocessing, depleted uranium re-enrichment, enrichment assays, and use of fast neutron reactors, were established. They were then assessed according to environmental, economic and social criteria such as resource depletion, waste production, chemical and radiation emissions, costs, and proliferation risks. The most preferable scenario in the short term is a combination of reduced tails assay and enrichment grade, allowing a 17.9% reduction of uranium demand without significantly increasing environmental, economic, or social risks. In the long term, fast reactors could theoretically achieve a 99.4% decrease in uranium demand and nuclear waste production. However, this involves important costs and proliferation risks. Increasing material efficiency is not systematically correlated with the reduction of other risks. This suggests that an overall optimization of the nuclear fuel cycle is difficult to obtain. Therefore, criteria must be weighted according to stakeholder interests in order to determine the most sustainable solution. This paper models the flows of uranium and associated materials in Europe, and provides a decision support tool for identifying the trade-offs of the alternative nuclear fuel cycles considered.

  9. Experimental Modelling of the Overtopping Flow on the Wave Dragon Wave Energy Converter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Parmeggiani, Stefano; Kofoed, Jens Peter

    The Wave Dragon is a floating slack-moored Wave Energy Converter (WEC) of the overtopping type. Oncoming waves are focused by two wing reflectors towards the ramp of the device, surge-up and overtop into a reservoir placed at a higher level than the surface of the sea. The energy production takes...... place as the water is led back to the sea through a set of low-head hydro-turbines. After many years of development, Wave Dragon (WD) is now facing the phase of pre-commercial demonstration. In this phase it is very important to be able to use the available data to predict the performances of the device...... form) is transferred to the device in the form of volumes of water coming into the reservoir. These volumes are stored at a higher level than the surrounding sea, being a stock of potential energy. 2. Secondary energy conversion: turbines – The potential energy stored in the reservoir is transformed...

  10. Numerical and Physical Modelling of Bubbly Flow Phenomena - Final Report to the Department of Energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andrea Prosperetti

    2004-12-21

    This report describes the main features of the results obtained in the course of this project. A new approach to the systematic development of closure relations for the averaged equations of disperse multiphase flow is outlined. The focus of the project is on spatially non-uniform systems and several aspects in which such systems differ from uniform ones are described. Then, the procedure used in deriving the closure relations is given and some explicit results shown. The report also contains a list of publications supported by this grant and a list of the persons involved in the work.

  11. Technical Subtopic 2.1: Modeling Variable Refrigerant Flow Heat Pump and Heat Recovery Equipment in EnergyPlus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raustad, Richard; Nigusse, Bereket; Domitrovic, Ron

    2013-09-30

    The University of Central Florida/Florida Solar Energy Center, in cooperation with the Electric Power Research Institute and several variable-refrigerant-flow heat pump (VRF HP) manufacturers, provided a detailed computer model for a VRF HP system in the United States Department of Energy's (U.S. DOE) EnergyPlus? building energy simulation tool. Detailed laboratory testing and field demonstrations were performed to measure equipment performance and compare this performance to both the manufacturer's data and that predicted by the use of this new model through computer simulation. The project goal was to investigate the complex interactions of VRF HP systems from an HVAC system perspective, and explore the operational characteristics of this HVAC system type within a laboratory and real world building environment. Detailed laboratory testing of this advanced HVAC system provided invaluable performance information which does not currently exist in the form required for proper analysis and modeling. This information will also be useful for developing and/or supporting test standards for VRF HP systems. Field testing VRF HP systems also provided performance and operational information pertaining to installation, system configuration, and operational controls. Information collected from both laboratory and field tests were then used to create and validate the VRF HP system computer model which, in turn, provides architects, engineers, and building owners the confidence necessary to accurately and reliably perform building energy simulations. This new VRF HP model is available in the current public release version of DOE?s EnergyPlus software and can be used to investigate building energy use in both new and existing building stock. The general laboratory testing did not use the AHRI Standard 1230 test procedure and instead used an approach designed to measure the field installed full-load operating performance. This projects test methodology used the air

  12. Modeling of energy transfer from vibrationally excited CO2 molecules: cross sections and probabilities for kinetic modeling of atmospheres, flows, and plasmas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lombardi, Andrea; Faginas-Lago, Noelia; Pacifici, Leonardo; Costantini, Alessandro

    2013-11-14

    We present extended applications of an established theoretical and computational machinery suitable for the study of the dynamics of CO2+CO2 collisions, focusing on vibrational energy exchange, considered over a wide range of energies and rotational temperatures. Calculations are based on quasi-classical trajectories on a potential energy function (a critical component of dynamics simulations), tailored to accurately describe the intermolecular interactions, modeled by the recently proposed bond-bond semiempirical formulation that allows the colliding molecules to be stretchable, rather than frozen at their equilibrium geometry. In a previous work, the same potential energy surface has been used to show that modifications in the geometry (and in physical properties such as polarizability and charge distribution) of the colliding partners affect the intermolecular interaction and determine the features of the energy exchange, to a large extent driven by long-range forces. As initial partitioning of the energy among the molecular degrees of freedom, we consider the excitation of the vibrational bending mode, assuming an initial rotational distribution and a rotational temperature. The role of the vibrational angular momentum is also carefully assessed. Results are obtained by portable implementations of this approach in a Grid-computing framework and on high performance platforms. Cross sections are basic ingredients to obtain rate constants of use in advanced state-to-state kinetic models, under equilibrium or nonequilibrium conditions, and this approach is suitable for gas dynamics applications to plasmas and modeling of hypersonic flows.

  13. Comparison of Radiative Energy Flows in Observational Datasets and Climate Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raschke, Ehrhard; Kinne, Stefan; Rossow, William B.; Stackhouse, Paul W. Jr.; Wild, Martin

    2016-01-01

    This study examines radiative flux distributions and local spread of values from three major observational datasets (CERES, ISCCP, and SRB) and compares them with results from climate modeling (CMIP3). Examinations of the spread and differences also differentiate among contributions from cloudy and clear-sky conditions. The spread among observational datasets is in large part caused by noncloud ancillary data. Average differences of at least 10Wm(exp -2) each for clear-sky downward solar, upward solar, and upward infrared fluxes at the surface demonstrate via spatial difference patterns major differences in assumptions for atmospheric aerosol, solar surface albedo and surface temperature, and/or emittance in observational datasets. At the top of the atmosphere (TOA), observational datasets are less influenced by the ancillary data errors than at the surface. Comparisons of spatial radiative flux distributions at the TOA between observations and climate modeling indicate large deficiencies in the strength and distribution of model-simulated cloud radiative effects. Differences are largest for lower-altitude clouds over low-latitude oceans. Global modeling simulates stronger cloud radiative effects (CRE) by +30Wmexp -2) over trade wind cumulus regions, yet smaller CRE by about -30Wm(exp -2) over (smaller in area) stratocumulus regions. At the surface, climate modeling simulates on average about 15Wm(exp -2) smaller radiative net flux imbalances, as if climate modeling underestimates latent heat release (and precipitation). Relative to observational datasets, simulated surface net fluxes are particularly lower over oceanic trade wind regions (where global modeling tends to overestimate the radiative impact of clouds). Still, with the uncertainty in noncloud ancillary data, observational data do not establish a reliable reference.

  14. Metallurgical technologies, energy conversion, and magnetohydrodynamic flows

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Branover, H.; Unger, Y.

    1993-01-01

    The present volume discusses metallurgical applications of MHD, R D on MHD devices employing liquid working medium for process applications, electromagnetic (EM) modulation of molten metal flow, EM pump performance of superconducting MHD devices, induction EM alkali-metal pumps, a physical model for EM-driven flow in channel-induction furnaces, grain refinement in Al alloys via EM vibrational method, dendrite growth of solidifying metal in dc magnetic field, MHD for mass and heat transfer in single-crystal melt growth, inverse EM shaping, and liquid-metal MHD development in Israel. Also discussed are the embrittlement of steel by lead, an open cycle MHD disk generator, the acceleration of gas-liquid piston flows for molten-metal MHD generators, MHD flow around a cylinder, new MHD drag coefficients, liquid-metal MHD two-phase flow, and two-phase liquid gas mixers for MHD energy conversion.

  15. Analytical solutions for benchmarking cold regions subsurface water flow and energy transport models: one-dimensional soil thaw with conduction and advection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurylyk, Barret L.; McKenzie, Jeffrey M; MacQuarrie, Kerry T. B.; Voss, Clifford I.

    2014-01-01

    Numerous cold regions water flow and energy transport models have emerged in recent years. Dissimilarities often exist in their mathematical formulations and/or numerical solution techniques, but few analytical solutions exist for benchmarking flow and energy transport models that include pore water phase change. This paper presents a detailed derivation of the Lunardini solution, an approximate analytical solution for predicting soil thawing subject to conduction, advection, and phase change. Fifteen thawing scenarios are examined by considering differences in porosity, surface temperature, Darcy velocity, and initial temperature. The accuracy of the Lunardini solution is shown to be proportional to the Stefan number. The analytical solution results obtained for soil thawing scenarios with water flow and advection are compared to those obtained from the finite element model SUTRA. Three problems, two involving the Lunardini solution and one involving the classic Neumann solution, are recommended as standard benchmarks for future model development and testing.

  16. A Mathematical Model of Membrane Gas Separation with Energy Transfer by Molecules of Gas Flowing in a Channel to Molecules Penetrating this Channel from the Adjacent Channel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Szwast Maciej

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents the mathematical modelling of selected isothermal separation processes of gaseous mixtures, taking place in plants using membranes, in particular nonporous polymer membranes. The modelling concerns membrane modules consisting of two channels - the feeding and the permeate channels. Different shapes of the channels cross-section were taken into account. Consideration was given to co-current and counter-current flows, for feeding and permeate streams, respectively, flowing together with the inert gas receiving permeate. In the proposed mathematical model it was considered that pressure of gas changes along the length of flow channels was the result of both - the drop of pressure connected with flow resistance, and energy transfer by molecules of gas flowing in a given channel to molecules which penetrate this channel from the adjacent channel. The literature on membrane technology takes into account only the drop of pressure connected with flow resistance. Consideration given to energy transfer by molecules of gas flowing in a given channel to molecules which penetrate this channel from the adjacent channel constitute the essential novelty in the current study. The paper also presents results of calculations obtained by means of a computer program which used equations of the derived model. Physicochemical data concerning separation of the CO2/CH4 mixture with He as the sweep gas and data concerning properties of the membrane made of PDMS were assumed for calculations.

  17. Validated dynamic flow model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knudsen, Torben

    2011-01-01

    The purpose with this deliverable 2.5 is to use fresh experimental data for validation and selection of a flow model to be used for control design in WP3-4. Initially the idea was to investigate the models developed in WP2. However, in the project it was agreed to include and focus on a additive...... model turns out not to be useful for prediction of the flow. Moreover, standard Box Jenkins model structures and multiple output auto regressive models proves to be superior as they can give useful predictions of the flow....

  18. Technical Subtopic 2.1: Modeling Variable Refrigerant Flow Heat Pump and Heat Recovery Equipment in EnergyPlus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raustad, Richard; Nigusse, Bereket; Domitrovic, Ron

    2013-09-30

    The University of Central Florida/Florida Solar Energy Center, in cooperation with the Electric Power Research Institute and several variable-refrigerant-flow heat pump (VRF HP) manufacturers, provided a detailed computer model for a VRF HP system in the United States Department of Energy's (U.S. DOE) EnergyPlus? building energy simulation tool. Detailed laboratory testing and field demonstrations were performed to measure equipment performance and compare this performance to both the manufacturer's data and that predicted by the use of this new model through computer simulation. The project goal was to investigate the complex interactions of VRF HP systems from an HVAC system perspective, and explore the operational characteristics of this HVAC system type within a laboratory and real world building environment. Detailed laboratory testing of this advanced HVAC system provided invaluable performance information which does not currently exist in the form required for proper analysis and modeling. This information will also be useful for developing and/or supporting test standards for VRF HP systems. Field testing VRF HP systems also provided performance and operational information pertaining to installation, system configuration, and operational controls. Information collected from both laboratory and field tests were then used to create and validate the VRF HP system computer model which, in turn, provides architects, engineers, and building owners the confidence necessary to accurately and reliably perform building energy simulations. This new VRF HP model is available in the current public release version of DOE?s EnergyPlus software and can be used to investigate building energy use in both new and existing building stock. The general laboratory testing did not use the AHRI Standard 1230 test procedure and instead used an approach designed to measure the field installed full-load operating performance. This projects test methodology used the air

  19. Data flow modeling techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kavi, K. M.

    1984-01-01

    There have been a number of simulation packages developed for the purpose of designing, testing and validating computer systems, digital systems and software systems. Complex analytical tools based on Markov and semi-Markov processes have been designed to estimate the reliability and performance of simulated systems. Petri nets have received wide acceptance for modeling complex and highly parallel computers. In this research data flow models for computer systems are investigated. Data flow models can be used to simulate both software and hardware in a uniform manner. Data flow simulation techniques provide the computer systems designer with a CAD environment which enables highly parallel complex systems to be defined, evaluated at all levels and finally implemented in either hardware or software. Inherent in data flow concept is the hierarchical handling of complex systems. In this paper we will describe how data flow can be used to model computer system.

  20. Validation of a coupled wave-flow model in a high-energy setting: the mouth of the Columbia River

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elias, Edwin P.L.; Gelfenbaum, Guy R.; van der Westhuysen, André J.

    2012-01-01

     A monthlong time series of wave, current, salinity, and suspended-sediment measurements was made at five sites on a transect across the Mouth of Columbia River (MCR). These data were used to calibrate and evaluate the performance of a coupled hydrodynamic and wave model for the MCR based on the Delft3D modeling system. The MCR is a dynamic estuary inlet in which tidal currents, river discharge, and wave-driven currents are all important. Model tuning consisted primarily of spatial adjustments to bottom drag coefficients. In combination with (near-) default parameter settings, the MCR model application is able to simulate the dominant features in the tidal flow, salinity and wavefields observed in field measurements. The wave-orbital averaged method for representing the current velocity profile in the wave model is considered the most realistic for the MCR. The hydrodynamic model is particularly effective in reproducing the observed vertical residual and temporal variations in current structure. Density gradients introduce the observed and modeled reversal of the mean flow at the bed and augment mean and peak flow in the upper half of the water column. This implies that sediment transport during calmer summer conditions is controlled by density stratification and is likely net landward due to the reversal of flow near the bed. The correspondence between observed and modeled hydrodynamics makes this application a tool to investigate hydrodynamics and associated sediment transport.

  1. Lattice Solid/Boltzmann Microscopic Model to Simulate Solid/Fluid Systems-A Tool to Study Creation of Fluid Flow Networks for Viable Deep Geothermal Energy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Peter Mora; Yucang Wang; Fernando Alonso-Marroquin

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY:Realizing the potential of geothermal energy as a cheap, green, sustainable resource to provide for the planet’s future energy demands that a key geophysical problem be solved first:how to develop and maintain a network of multiple fluid flow pathways for the time required to deplete the heat within a given region. We present the key components for micro-scale particle-based nu-merical modeling of hydraulic fracture, and fluid and heat flow in geothermal reservoirs. They are based on the latest developments of ESyS-Particle—the coupling of the lattice solid model (LSM) to simulate the nonlinear dynamics of complex solids with the lattice Boltzmann method (LBM) ap-plied to the nonlinear dynamics of coupled fluid and heat flow in the complex solid-fluid system. The coupled LSM/LBM can be used to simulate development of fracture systems in discontinuous media, elastic stress release, fluid injection and the consequent slip at joint surfaces, and hydraulic fractur-ing; heat exchange between hot rocks and water within flow pathways created through hydraulic fracturing;and fluid flow through complex, narrow, compact and gouge-or powder-filled fracture and joint systems. We demonstrate the coupled LSM/LBM to simulate the fundamental processes listed above, which are all components for the generation and sustainability of the hot-fractured rock geothermal energy fracture systems required to exploit this new green-energy resource.

  2. Piezoelectric Energy Harvesting in Internal Fluid Flow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyeong Jae Lee

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available We consider piezoelectric flow energy harvesting in an internal flow environment with the ultimate goal powering systems such as sensors in deep oil well applications. Fluid motion is coupled to structural vibration via a cantilever beam placed in a converging-diverging flow channel. Two designs were considered for the electromechanical coupling: first; the cantilever itself is a piezoelectric bimorph; second; the cantilever is mounted on a pair of flextensional actuators. We experimentally investigated varying the geometry of the flow passage and the flow rate. Experimental results revealed that the power generated from both designs was similar; producing as much as 20 mW at a flow rate of 20 L/min. The bimorph designs were prone to failure at the extremes of flow rates tested. Finite element analysis (FEA showed fatigue failure was imminent due to stress concentrations near the bimorph’s clamped region; and that robustness could be improved with a stepped-joint mounting design. A similar FEA model showed the flextensional-based harvester had a resonant frequency of around 375 Hz and an electromechanical coupling of 0.23 between the cantilever and flextensional actuators in a vacuum. These values; along with the power levels demonstrated; are significant steps toward building a system design that can eventually deliver power in the Watts range to devices down within a well.

  3. Framework for systematic flow manipulation by renewable energy turbine arrays

    OpenAIRE

    Mandre, Shreyas; Mangan, Niall M.

    2016-01-01

    Renewable energy turbines are often constrained to locations where the available energy is limited by the operation of the turbines themselves. In two-dimensions, we describe how an array can manipulate the flow, redirecting more fluid kinetic energy to itself. Two computational, Navier-Stokes simulations of turbine arrays illustrate the feasibility of flow manipulation, and motivate an idealized model. Using inviscid fluid dynamics, we underscore the relation between bound vorticity and flow...

  4. Energy modelling software

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Osburn, L

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The construction industry has turned to energy modelling in order to assist them in reducing the amount of energy consumed by buildings. However, while the energy loads of buildings can be accurately modelled, energy models often under...

  5. Multicomponent flow modeling

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GIOVANGIGLI; Vincent

    2012-01-01

    We present multicomponent flow models derived from the kinetic theory of gases and investigate the symmetric hyperbolic-parabolic structure of the resulting system of partial differential equations.We address the Cauchy problem for smooth solutions as well as the existence of deflagration waves,also termed anchored waves.We further discuss related models which have a similar hyperbolic-parabolic structure,notably the SaintVenant system with a temperature equation as well as the equations governing chemical equilibrium flows.We next investigate multicomponent ionized and magnetized flow models with anisotropic transport fluxes which have a different mathematical structure.We finally discuss numerical algorithms specifically devoted to complex chemistry flows,in particular the evaluation of multicomponent transport properties,as well as the impact of multicomponent transport.

  6. Whistler Wave Energy Flow in the Plasmasphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kletzing, Craig; Santolik, Ondrej; Kurth, William; Hospodarsky, George; Christopher, Ivar; Bounds, Scott

    2016-07-01

    The measured wave properties of plasmaspheric hiss are important to constrain models of the generation of hiss as well as its propagation and amplification. For example, the generation mechanism for plasmaspheric hiss has been suggested to come from one of three possible mechanisms: 1) local generation and amplification, 2) whistlers from lightning, and 3) chorus emissions which have refracted into the plasmasphere. The latter two mechanisms are external sources which produce an incoherent hiss signature as the original waves mix in a stochastic manner, propagating in both directions along the background magnetic field. In contrast, local generation of plasmaspheric hiss within the plasmasphere should produce a signature of waves propagating away from the source region. For all three mechanisms scattering of energetic particles into the loss cone transfers some energy from the particles to the waves. By examining the statistical characteristics of the Poynting flux of plasmaspheric hiss, we can determine the properties of wave energy flow in the plasmasphere. We report on the statistics of observations from the Electric and Magnetic Field Instrument Suite and Integrated Science (EMFISIS) Waves instrument on the Van Allen Probes for periods when the spacecraft is inside the plasmasphere. We find that the Poynting flux associated with plasmaspheric hiss has distinct and unexpected radial structure which shows that there can be significant energy flow towards the magnetic equator. We show the properties of this electromagnetic energy flow as a function of position and frequency.

  7. Dark energy domination in the Virgocentric flow

    CERN Document Server

    Chernin, A D; Nasonova, O G; Teerikorpi, P; Valtonen, M J; Dolgachev, V P; Domozhilova, L M; Byrd, G G

    2010-01-01

    The standard \\LambdaCDM cosmological model implies that all celestial bodies are embedded in a perfectly uniform dark energy background, represented by Einstein's cosmological constant, and experience its repulsive antigravity action. Can dark energy have strong dynamical effects on small cosmic scales as well as globally? Continuing our efforts to clarify this question, we focus now on the Virgo Cluster and the flow of expansion around it. We interpret the Hubble diagram, from a new database of velocities and distances of galaxies in the cluster and its environment, using a nonlinear analytical model which incorporates the antigravity force in terms of Newtonian mechanics. The key parameter is the zero-gravity radius, the distance at which gravity and antigravity are in balance. Our conclusions are: 1. The interplay between the gravity of the cluster and the antigravity of the dark energy background determines the kinematical structure of the system and controls its evolution. 2. The gravity dominates the qu...

  8. Linear and Energy Dissipative Scheme for Two-Phase-Flows of Quasi-Incompressible Navier-Stokes Cahn-Hilliard Models

    CERN Document Server

    Simsek, Gorkem; Roudbari, Mahnaz Shokrpour; van Brummelen, E Harald

    2016-01-01

    We derive a new form of a thermodynamically consistent quasi-incompressible diffuse-interface Navier-Stokes Cahn-Hilliard model for a two-phase-flow of incompressible fluids with different densities. The derivation is based on mixture theory by invoking the second law of thermodynamics and Coleman-Noll procedure. In addition, we develop a linear and unconditionally energy stable time-integration scheme for the derived model. Such a scheme is nontrivial, because it has to suitably deal with all nonlinear terms in the model. Our proposed scheme is the first linear method satisfying a discrete energy law for quasi-incompressible two-phase flows. The scheme also preserves mass. Numerical experiments verify the suitability of the scheme for high density ratios and for large time step sizes by considering the coalescence and break-up dynamics of droplets including pinching due to gravity.

  9. Modeling Malaysia's Energy System: Some Preliminary Results

    OpenAIRE

    Ahmad M. Yusof

    2011-01-01

    Problem statement: The current dynamic and fragile world energy environment necessitates the development of new energy model that solely caters to analyze Malaysias energy scenarios. Approach: The model is a network flow model that traces the flow of energy carriers from its sources (import and mining) through some conversion and transformation processes for the production of energy products to final destinations (energy demand sectors). The integration to the economic sectors is done exogene...

  10. Flow Energy Piezoelectric Bimorph Nozzle Harvester

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherrit, Stewart; Lee, Hyeong Jae; Kim, Namhyo; Sun, Kai; Corbett, Gary; Walkemeyer, Phillip; Hasenoehrl, Jennifer; Hall, Jeffery L.; Colonius, Tim; Tosi, Luis Phillipe; Arrazola, Alvaro

    2014-01-01

    There is a need for a long-life power generation scheme that could be used downhole in an oil well to produce 1 Watt average power. There are a variety of existing or proposed energy harvesting schemes that could be used in this environment but each of these has its own limitations. The vibrating piezoelectric structure is in principle capable of operating for very long lifetimes (decades) thereby possibly overcoming a principle limitation of existing technology based on rotating turbo-machinery. In order to determine the feasibility of using piezoelectrics to produce suitable flow energy harvesting, we surveyed experimentally a variety of nozzle configurations that could be used to excite a vibrating piezoelectric structure in such a way as to enable conversion of flow energy into useful amounts of electrical power. These included reed structures, spring mass-structures, drag and lift bluff bodies and a variety of nozzles with varying flow profiles. Although not an exhaustive survey we identified a spline nozzle/piezoelectric bimorph system that experimentally produced up to 3.4 mW per bimorph. This paper will discuss these results and present our initial analyses of the device using dimensional analysis and constitutive electromechanical modeling. The analysis suggests that an order-of-magnitude improvement in power generation from the current design is possible.

  11. Characteristics of energy dissipation in hyperconcentrated flows

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    An-ping SHU; Qing-quan LIU; Yu-jun YI; Zhi-dong ZHANG

    2008-01-01

    An equilibrium equation for the turbulence energy in sediment-laden flows was derived on the basis of solid-liquid two-phase flow theory.The equation was simplified for two-dimensional,uniform,steady and fully developed turbulent hyperconcentrated flows.An energy efficiency coefficient of suspended-load motion was obtained from the turbulence energy equation,which is defined as the ratio of the sediment suspension energy to the turbulence energy of the sediment-laden flows.Laboratory experiments were conducted to investigate the characteristics of energy dissipation in hyperconcentrated flows.A total of 115 experimental runs were carried out,comprising 70 runs with natural sediments and 45 runs with cinder powder.Effects of sediment concentration on sediment suspension energy and flow resistance were analyzed and the relation between the energy efficiency coefficient of suspended-load motion and sediment concentration was established on the basis of experimental data.Furthermore,the characteristics of energy dissipation in hyperconcentrated flows were identified and described.It was found that the high sediment concentration does not increase the energy dissipation;on the contrary,it decreases flow resistance.

  12. Energy transfer upon collision of selectively excited CO{sub 2} molecules: State-to-state cross sections and probabilities for modeling of atmospheres and gaseous flows

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lombardi, A., E-mail: ebiu2005@gmail.com; Faginas-Lago, N.; Pacifici, L.; Grossi, G. [Dipartimento di Chimica, Università di Perugia, via Elce di Sotto 8, 06123 Perugia (Italy)

    2015-07-21

    Carbon dioxide molecules can store and release tens of kcal/mol upon collisions, and such an energy transfer strongly influences the energy disposal and the chemical processes in gases under the extreme conditions typical of plasmas and hypersonic flows. Moreover, the energy transfer involving CO{sub 2} characterizes the global dynamics of the Earth-atmosphere system and the energy balance of other planetary atmospheres. Contemporary developments in kinetic modeling of gaseous mixtures are connected to progress in the description of the energy transfer, and, in particular, the attempts to include non-equilibrium effects require to consider state-specific energy exchanges. A systematic study of the state-to-state vibrational energy transfer in CO{sub 2} + CO{sub 2} collisions is the focus of the present work, aided by a theoretical and computational tool based on quasiclassical trajectory simulations and an accurate full-dimension model of the intermolecular interactions. In this model, the accuracy of the description of the intermolecular forces (that determine the probability of energy transfer in molecular collisions) is enhanced by explicit account of the specific effects of the distortion of the CO{sub 2} structure due to vibrations. Results show that these effects are important for the energy transfer probabilities. Moreover, the role of rotational and vibrational degrees of freedom is found to be dominant in the energy exchange, while the average contribution of translations, under the temperature and energy conditions considered, is negligible. Remarkable is the fact that the intramolecular energy transfer only involves stretching and bending, unless one of the colliding molecules has an initial symmetric stretching quantum number greater than a threshold value estimated to be equal to 7.

  13. Energy transfer upon collision of selectively excited CO2 molecules: State-to-state cross sections and probabilities for modeling of atmospheres and gaseous flows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lombardi, A; Faginas-Lago, N; Pacifici, L; Grossi, G

    2015-07-21

    Carbon dioxide molecules can store and release tens of kcal/mol upon collisions, and such an energy transfer strongly influences the energy disposal and the chemical processes in gases under the extreme conditions typical of plasmas and hypersonic flows. Moreover, the energy transfer involving CO2 characterizes the global dynamics of the Earth-atmosphere system and the energy balance of other planetary atmospheres. Contemporary developments in kinetic modeling of gaseous mixtures are connected to progress in the description of the energy transfer, and, in particular, the attempts to include non-equilibrium effects require to consider state-specific energy exchanges. A systematic study of the state-to-state vibrational energy transfer in CO2 + CO2 collisions is the focus of the present work, aided by a theoretical and computational tool based on quasiclassical trajectory simulations and an accurate full-dimension model of the intermolecular interactions. In this model, the accuracy of the description of the intermolecular forces (that determine the probability of energy transfer in molecular collisions) is enhanced by explicit account of the specific effects of the distortion of the CO2 structure due to vibrations. Results show that these effects are important for the energy transfer probabilities. Moreover, the role of rotational and vibrational degrees of freedom is found to be dominant in the energy exchange, while the average contribution of translations, under the temperature and energy conditions considered, is negligible. Remarkable is the fact that the intramolecular energy transfer only involves stretching and bending, unless one of the colliding molecules has an initial symmetric stretching quantum number greater than a threshold value estimated to be equal to 7.

  14. Prosumers strategy for DHC energy flow optimization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vasek Lubomir

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This article introduces the proposal of discrete model of district heating and cooling system (DHC for energy flow optimization. The aim is to achieve the best solution of the objective function, usually determined by minimizing the production and distribution costs and providing meets the needs of energy consumers. The model also introduces the idea of general prosumers strategy, where all active elements within the modern DHC system are representing by prosumers object. The prosumers are perceived as objects able to actively participate in the planning of production and consumption of energy. It is assumed that the general behaviour of the object in DHC is the same, no matter how they differ in sizes and designs. Thus, all the objects are defined by two characteristics - the ability to produce and consume. The model based on this basic principle, of course, with the most accurate information about the particular values at a time, object properties and other, should provide tools for simulation and control of modern DHC, possibly superior units as Smart Energy Grids - understood as a system integrating Smart Grids (electricity and Smart Thermal Grids (heat a cool.

  15. Flow Energy Piezoelectric Bimorph Nozzle Harvester

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherrit, Stewart (Inventor); Walkemeyer, Phillip E. (Inventor); Hall, Jeffrey L. (Inventor); Lee, Hyeong Jae (Inventor); Colonius, Tim (Inventor); Tosi, Phillipe (Inventor); Kim, Namhyo (Inventor); Sun, Kai (Inventor); Corbett, Thomas Gary (Inventor); Arrazola, Alvaro Jose (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    A flow energy harvesting device having a harvester pipe includes a flow inlet that receives flow from a primary pipe, a flow outlet that returns the flow into the primary pipe, and a flow diverter within the harvester pipe having an inlet section coupled to the flow inlet, a flow constriction section coupled to the inlet section and positioned at a midpoint of the harvester pipe and having a spline shape with a substantially reduced flow opening size at a constriction point along the spline shape, and an outlet section coupled to the constriction section. The harvester pipe may further include a piezoelectric structure extending from the inlet section through the constriction section and point such that the fluid flow past the constriction point results in oscillatory pressure amplitude inducing vibrations in the piezoelectric structure sufficient to cause a direct piezoelectric effect and to generate electrical power for harvesting.

  16. Transport hub flow modelling

    OpenAIRE

    Despagne, Wilfried; Frenod, Emmanuel

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to investigate the road freight haulage activity. Using the physical and data flow information from a freight forwarder, we intend to model the flow of inbound and outbound goods in a freight transport hub. Approach: This paper presents the operation of a road haulage group. To deliver goods within two days to any location in France, a haulage contractor needs to be part of a network. This network handles the processing of both physical goods and data. We...

  17. A hierarchy of energy- and flux-budget (EFB) turbulence closure models for stably stratified geophysical flows

    CERN Document Server

    Zilitinkevich, S S; Kleeorin, N; Rogachevskii, I; Esau, I

    2011-01-01

    In this paper we advance physical background of the EFB turbulence closure and present its comprehensive description. It is based on four budget equations for the second moments: turbulent kinetic and potential energies (TKE and TPE) and vertical turbulent fluxes of momentum and buoyancy; a new relaxation equation for the turbulent dissipation time-scale; and advanced concept of the inter-component exchange of TKE. The EFB closure is designed for stratified, rotating geophysical flows from neutral to very stable. In accordance to modern experimental evidence, it grants maintaining turbulence by the velocity shear at any gradient Richardson number Ri, and distinguishes between the two principally different regimes: "strong turbulence" at Ri 1 typical of the free atmosphere or deep ocean, where Pr_T asymptotically linearly increases with increasing Ri that implies strong suppressing of the heat transfer compared to momentum transfer. For use in different applications, the EFB turbulence closure is formulated a...

  18. Irreversible energy flow in forced Vlasov dynamics

    KAUST Repository

    Plunk, Gabriel G.

    2014-10-01

    © EDP Sciences, Società Italiana di Fisica, Springer-Verlag. The recent paper of Plunk [G.G. Plunk, Phys. Plasmas 20, 032304 (2013)] considered the forced linear Vlasov equation as a model for the quasi-steady state of a single stable plasma wavenumber interacting with a bath of turbulent fluctuations. This approach gives some insight into possible energy flows without solving for nonlinear dynamics. The central result of the present work is that the forced linear Vlasov equation exhibits asymptotically zero (irreversible) dissipation to all orders under a detuning of the forcing frequency and the characteristic frequency associated with particle streaming. We first prove this by direct calculation, tracking energy flow in terms of certain exact conservation laws of the linear (collisionless) Vlasov equation. Then we analyze the steady-state solutions in detail using a weakly collisional Hermite-moment formulation, and compare with numerical solution. This leads to a detailed description of the Hermite energy spectrum, and a proof of no dissipation at all orders, complementing the collisionless Vlasov result.

  19. [Energy flow in arctic aquatic ecosystems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schell, D.M.

    1985-12-31

    This study is aimed at determining the major pathways of energy flow in freshwater ecosystems of the Alaskan arctic coastal plain. Selected sites for study of the processes supplying energy to streams and lakes to verify the generality of past findings will be surveyed for collection of organisms including the Colville River drainage and the lake region around Teshekpuk Lake. Specific objectives are to collect food web apex organisms (fish and birds) from a variety of sites in the coastal plain to verify descriptive models of ecosystem structure and food web pathways and to compare the utilization rates by insect larvae of fresh litter and in situ primary production relative to more refractory peaty materials through seasonal sampling for isotopic analysis.

  20. [Energy flow in arctic aquatic ecosystems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schell, D.M.

    1985-01-01

    This study is aimed at determining the major pathways of energy flow in freshwater ecosystems of the Alaskan arctic coastal plain. Selected sites for study of the processes supplying energy to streams and lakes to verify the generality of past findings will be surveyed for collection of organisms including the Colville River drainage and the lake region around Teshekpuk Lake. Specific objectives are to collect food web apex organisms (fish and birds) from a variety of sites in the coastal plain to verify descriptive models of ecosystem structure and food web pathways and to compare the utilization rates by insect larvae of fresh litter and in situ primary production relative to more refractory peaty materials through seasonal sampling for isotopic analysis.

  1. The mechanical energy equation for total flow in open channels

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘士和; 范敏; 薛娇

    2014-01-01

    The mechanical energy equation is a fundamental equation of a 1-D mathematical model in Hydraulics and Engineering Fluid Mechanics. This equation for the total flow used to be deduced by extending the Bernoulli’s equation for the ideal fluid in the streamline to a stream tube, and then revised by considering the viscous effect and integrated on the cross section. This derivation is not rigorous and the effect of turbulence is not considered. In this paper, the energy equation for the total flow is derived by using the Navier-Stokes equations in Fluid Mechanics, the results are as follows:(1) A new energy equation for steady channel flows of in-compressible homogeneous liquid is obtained, which includes the variation of the turbulent kinetic energy along the channel, the for-mula for the mechanical energy loss of the total flow can be determined directly in the deduction process. (2) The theoretical solution of the velocity field for laminar flows in a rectangular open channel is obtained and the mechanical energy loss in the energy equa-tion is calculated. The variations of the coefficient of the mechanical energy loss against the Reynolds number and the width-depth ratio are obtained. (3) The turbulent flow in a rectangular open channel is simulated using 3-D Reynolds averaged equations closed by the Reynolds stress model (RSM), and the variations of the coefficient of the mechanical energy loss against the Reynolds number and the width-depth ratio are discussed.

  2. Towards a Model of Reactive-Cracking: the Role of Reactions, Elasticity and Surface Energy Driven Flow in Poro-elastic Media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, O.; Spiegelman, M. W.; Wilson, C. R.; Kelemen, P. B.

    2016-12-01

    Many critical processes can be described by reactive fluid flow in brittle media, including hydration/alteration of oceanic plates near spreading ridges, chemical weathering, and dehydration/decarbonation of subducting plates. Such hydration reactions can produce volume changes that may induce stresses large enough to drive fracture in the rock, in turn exposing new reactive surface and modifying the permeability. A better understanding of this potentially rich feedback could also be critical in the design of engineered systems for geologic carbon sequestration. To aid understanding of these processes we have developed a macroscopic continuum description of reactive fluid flow in an elastically deformable porous media. We explore the behaviour of this model by considering a simplified hydration reaction (e.g. olivine + H20 -> serpentine + brucite). In a closed system, these hydration reactions will continue to consume available fluids until the permeability reaches zero, leaving behind it a highly stressed residuum. Our model demonstrates this limiting behaviour, and that the elastic stresses generated are large enough to cause failure/fracture of the host rock. Whilst it is understood that `reactive fracture' is an important mechanism for the continued evolution of this process, it is also proposed that imbibition/surface energy driven flow may play a role. Through a simplified set of computational experiments, we investigate the relative roles of elasticity and surface energy in both a non-reactive purely poro-elastic framework, and then in the presence of reaction. We demonstrate that surface energy can drive rapid diffusion of porosity, thus allowing the reaction to propagate over larger areas. As we expect both surface energy and fracture/failure to be of importance in these processes, we plan to integrate the current model into one that allows for fracture once critical stresses are exceeded.

  3. Energy density and energy flow of magnetoplasmonic waves on graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moradi, Afshin

    2017-03-01

    By means the linearized magnetohydrodynamic theory, expressions for energy density and energy flow are derived for the p-polarized surface magnetoplasmon polaritons on graphene in the Voigt configuration, where a static magnetic field is normal to the graphene surface. Numerical results show that the external magnetic field has significant impact on the energy density and energy transport velocity of magnetoplasmon waves in the long-wavelength region, while total power flow vary only weakly with magnetostatic field. The velocity of energy propagation is proved to be identical with group velocity of the surface waves.

  4. Electromagnetic inertia, reactive energy and energy flow velocity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaiser, Gerald, E-mail: kaiser@wavelets.com [Center for Signals and Waves, Austin, TX (United States)

    2011-08-26

    In a recent paper titled 'Coherent electromagnetic wavelets and their twisting null congruences', I defined the local inertia density I(x,t), reactive energy density R(x,t) and energy flow velocity v(x,t) of an electromagnetic field. These are the field equivalents of the mass, rest energy and velocity of a relativistic particle. Thus, R=Ic{sup 2} is Lorentz-invariant and |v|{<=}c, with equality if and only if R=0. The exceptional fields with |v|=c were called coherent because their energy moves in complete harmony with the field, leaving no inertia or reactive energy behind. Generic electromagnetic fields become coherent only in the far zone. Elsewhere, their energy flows at speeds v(x,t)energy flow in several common systems: a time-harmonic electric dipole field, a time-dependent electric dipole field and a standing plane wave. For these fields, the energy current (Poynting vector) is too weak to carry all of the energy, thus leaving reactive energy in its wake. For the time-dependent dipole field, we find that the energy can flow both transversally and inward, back to the source. Neither of these phenomena show up in the usual computation of the energy transport velocity which considers only averages over one period in the time-harmonic case.

  5. Energy-dependent variability from accretion flows

    OpenAIRE

    Zdziarski, Andrzej A.

    2005-01-01

    We develop a formalism to calculate energy-dependent fractional variability (rms) in accretion flows. We consider rms spectra resulting from radial dependencies of the level of local variability (as expected from propagation of disturbances in accretion flows) assuming the constant shape of the spectrum emitted at a given radius. We consider the cases when the variability of the flow is either coherent or incoherent between different radial zones. As example local emission, we consider blackb...

  6. State flows of energy in 1975

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rice, P.L.

    1979-11-01

    This report highlights the distribution or flows of energy between states; it provides a supplement to Energy Availabilities for State and Local Development: 1975 Data Volume (ORNL/TM-6951). State flows are reported for the ten energy regions defined by the Department of Energy. Energy imports and exports are disaggregated into foreign and inter-regional components and the mode of transport indicated. The best analysis and presentation of energy flows is for natural gas. The report provides reference material on natural gas consumption, production, and distribution and has potential utility for: (1) determining the potential impact of curtailments; and (2) conducting cost-benefit analyses of the redistribution of natural gas between users and between states. Of equal significance is the integration and consolidation of data for crude oil and petroleum-product flows. Unpublished state-to-state flows by tanker and barge from PAD III (the largest petroleum-producing region) were combined with information on inter-regional pipeline shipments and foreign shipments to create a complete picture of the production, consumption, and distribution of all petroleum products, such as gasoline. There is additional information on flows of coal and electricity. The data for bituminous coal shipments between states is for utilities with 25 megawatts or greater capacity. The electricity data is based on the Form 412 reports filed by large utilities in 1974.

  7. Functional units and lead topologies: a hierarchical framework for observing and modeling the interplay of structures, storage dynamics and integral mass and energy flows in lower mesoscale catchments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zehe, Erwin; Jackisch, Conrad; Blume, Theresa; Haßler, Sibylle; Allroggen, Niklas; Tronicke, Jens

    2013-04-01

    /mass and thermal energy flows and so on. The idea is that members of EFU classes interact within lead topologies along a hierarchy of driving potential gradients and that these interactions are mediated by a hierarchy of connected flow networks like macropores, root networks or lateral pipe systems. We hypothesize that members of a functional unit class are similar with respect to the time invariant controls of the vertical gradients (soil hydraulic potentials, soil temperature, plant water potential) and the flow resistances in vertical direction (plant and soil albedo, soil hydraulic and thermal conductivity, vertical macropore networks). This implies that members of an EFU class behave functionally similar at least with respect to vertical flows of water and heat: we may gain exemplary understanding of the typical dynamic behavior of the class, by thoroughly studying a few class members. In the following we will thus use the term "elementary functional units, EFUs" and "elementary functional unit class, EFU class" as synonyms. We propose that a thorough understanding of the behavior of a few representatives of the most important EFU classes and of their interactions within a hierarchy of lead topology classes is sufficient for understanding and distributed modeling of event scale stream flow production under rainfall driven conditions and energy exchange with the atmosphere under radiation driven conditions. Good and not surprising news is that lead topologies controlling stream flow contribution, are an interconnected, ordered arrangement of the lead topologies that control energy exchange. We suggests that a combination of the related model approaches which simplified but physical based approaches to simulate dynamics in the saturated zone, riparian zone and the river network results in a structurally more adequate model framework for catchments of organized complexity. The feasibility of this concept is currently tested in the Attert catchment by setting up pseudo

  8. Dark Energy Domination In The Virgocentric Flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byrd, Gene; Chernin, A. D.; Karachentsev, I. D.; Teerikorpi, P.; Valtonen, M.; Dolgachev, V. P.; Domozhilova, L. M.

    2011-04-01

    Dark energy (DE) was first observationally detected at large Gpc distances. If it is a vacuum energy formulated as Einstein's cosmological constant, Λ, DE should also have dynamical effects at much smaller scales. Previously, we found its effects on much smaller Mpc scales in our Local Group (LG) as well as in other nearby groups. We used new HST observations of member 3D distances from the group centers and Doppler shifts. We find each group's gravity dominates a bound central system of galaxies but DE antigravity results in a radial recession increasing with distance from the group center of the outer members. Here we focus on the much larger (but still cosmologically local) Virgo Cluster and systems around it using new observations of velocities and distances. We propose an analytic model whose key parameter is the zero-gravity radius (ZGR) from the cluster center where gravity and DE antigravity balance. DE brings regularity to the Virgocentric flow. Beyond Virgo's 10 Mpc ZGR, the flow curves to approach a linear global Hubble law at larger distances. The Virgo cluster and its outer flow are similar to the Local Group and its local outflow with a scaling factor of about 10; the ZGR for Virgo is 10 times larger than that of the LG. The similarity of the two systems on the scales of 1 to 30 Mpc suggests that a quasi-stationary bound central component and an expanding outflow applies to a wide range of groups and clusters due to small scale action of DE as well as gravity. Chernin, et al 2009 Astronomy and Astrophysics 507, 1271 http://arxiv.org/abs/1006.0066 http://arxiv.org/abs/1006.0555

  9. California energy flow in 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borg, I.Y.; Briggs, C.K.

    1995-04-01

    Energy consumption in the state of California decreased about 3% in 1993 reflecting continuation of the recession that was manifest in a moribund construction industry and a high state unemployment that ran counter to national recovery trends. Residential/commercial use decreased slightly reflecting a mild winter in the populous southern portion of the state, a decrease that was offset to some extent by an increase in the state population. Industrial consumption of purchased energy declined substantially as did production of self-generated electricity for in-house use. Consumption in the transportation sector decreased slightly. The amount of power transmitted by the utilities was at 1992 levels; however a smaller proportion was produced by the utilities themselves. Generation of electricity by nonutilities, primarily cogenerators and small power producers, was the largest of any state in the US. The growth in the number of private power producers combined with increased amounts of electricity sold to the public utilities set the stage for the sweeping proposals before the California Public Utility Commission to permit direct sales from the nonutilities to retail customers. California production of both oil and natural gas declined; however, to meet demand only the imports of natural gas increased. A break in the decade-long drought during the 1992--1993 season resulted in a substantial increase in the amount of hydroelectricity generated during the year. Geothermal energy`s contribution increased substantially because of the development of new resources by small power producers. Decline in steam production continued at The Geysers, the state`s largest field, principally owned and managed by a public utility. Increases in windpower constituted 1--1/2% of the total electric supply--up slightly from 1992. Several solar photo voltaic demonstration plants were in operation, but their contribution remained small.

  10. Energy flow lines as light paths a didactical analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Horn, M E

    2006-01-01

    Analyses of interviews with secondary school students about their conceptions of light at the University of Potsdam indicate that numerous students have a deterministic view of light. With regard to these results the model of energy flow lines, which has been discussed recently in the didactical literature, is of special interest. Following this model, light is presumed to move along energy flow lines as trajectories. In an analysis of the model of energy flow lines four didactical dimensions (didactical content, internal structure, present-day relevance and future significance) are investigated. It can be shown that a discussion of this model in physics at school can increase the meta-conceptional knowledge of the students about the models of light. On the other hand, this can promote deterministic conceptions and the Bohm interpretation of quantum mechanics. But the question remains: Should the nature of light really be described as deterministic?

  11. Traffic flow modeling: a Genealogy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Wageningen-Kessels, F.L.M.; Hoogendoorn, S.P.; Vuik, C.; Van Lint, J.W.C.

    2014-01-01

    80 years ago, Bruce Greenshields presented the first traffic flow model at the Annual Meeting of the Highway Research Board. Since then, many models and simulation tools have been developed. We show a model tree with four families of traffic flow models, all descending from Greenshields' model. The

  12. SUTRA: A model for 2D or 3D saturated-unsaturated, variable-density ground-water flow with solute or energy transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voss, Clifford I.; Provost, A.M.

    2002-01-01

    SUTRA (Saturated-Unsaturated Transport) is a computer program that simulates fluid movement and the transport of either energy or dissolved substances in a subsurface environment. This upgraded version of SUTRA adds the capability for three-dimensional simulation to the former code (Voss, 1984), which allowed only two-dimensional simulation. The code employs a two- or three-dimensional finite-element and finite-difference method to approximate the governing equations that describe the two interdependent processes that are simulated: 1) fluid density-dependent saturated or unsaturated ground-water flow; and 2) either (a) transport of a solute in the ground water, in which the solute may be subject to: equilibrium adsorption on the porous matrix, and both first-order and zero-order production or decay; or (b) transport of thermal energy in the ground water and solid matrix of the aquifer. SUTRA may also be used to simulate simpler subsets of the above processes. A flow-direction-dependent dispersion process for anisotropic media is also provided by the code and is introduced in this report. As the primary calculated result, SUTRA provides fluid pressures and either solute concentrations or temperatures, as they vary with time, everywhere in the simulated subsurface system. SUTRA flow simulation may be employed for two-dimensional (2D) areal, cross sectional and three-dimensional (3D) modeling of saturated ground-water flow systems, and for cross sectional and 3D modeling of unsaturated zone flow. Solute-transport simulation using SUTRA may be employed to model natural or man-induced chemical-species transport including processes of solute sorption, production, and decay. For example, it may be applied to analyze ground-water contaminant transport problems and aquifer restoration designs. In addition, solute-transport simulation with SUTRA may be used for modeling of variable-density leachate movement, and for cross sectional modeling of saltwater intrusion in

  13. Flow Element Models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heiselberg, Per; Nielsen, Peter V.

    Air distribution in ventilated rooms is a flow process that can be divided into different elements such as supply air jets, exhaust flows, thermal plumes, boundary layer flows, infiltration and gravity currents. These flow elements are isolated volumes where the air movement is controlled...... by a restricted number of parameters, and the air movement is fairly independent of the general flow in the enclosure. In many practical situations, the most convenient· method is to design the air distribution system using flow element theory....

  14. Exploring Geothermal Energy Potential in Ireland through 3-D Geophysical-Petrological Modelling of Surface Heat-Flow and Crustal and Upper-Mantle Structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fullea, J.; Muller, M. R.; Jones, A. G.

    2012-04-01

    Little is known of Ireland's deep, low-enthalpy geothermal resources and the potential for space heating and/or electricity generation based on geothermal energy to displace Ireland's significant reliance on carbon-based fuels. IRETHERM (www.iretherm.ie) is a four-and-a-half year, all-island, academic-government-industry collaborative project, initiated in 2011, with the overarching objective of developing a strategic and holistic understanding of Ireland's geothermal energy potential through integrated modelling of new and existing geophysical and geological data. One of the challenges in searching for deep geothermal resources in the relatively unexplored setting of Ireland lies in identifying those areas most likely to support significantly elevated temperatures at depth. Available borehole data, although sparse and clustered around areas of mineral and hydrocarbon interest, suggest a marked regional increase in surface heat-flow across Ireland, from ~40 mW/m2 in the south to >80 mW/m2 in the north. The origins of both the observed regional heat-flow trend and local temperature anomalies have not been investigated and are not currently understood. Although variations in the structure of the crust and lithosphere have been revealed by a number of active-source seismic and teleseismic experiments, their effects on surface heat-flow have not been modelled. Bulk 3-D variation in crustal heat-production across Ireland, which may contribute significantly to the observed regional and local temperature variations, has also not been determined. We investigate the origins of Ireland's regional heat-flow trend and regional and local temperature variations using the software package LitMod. This software combines petrological and geophysical modelling of the lithosphere and sub-lithospheric upper mantle within an internally consistent thermodynamic-geophysical framework, where all relevant properties are functions of temperature, pressure and chemical composition. The major

  15. Energy flow in photonic crystal waveguides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søndergaard, Thomas; Dridi, Kim

    2000-01-01

    Theoretical and numerical investigations of energy flow in photonic crystal waveguides made of line defects and branching points are presented. It is shown that vortices of energy flow may occur, and the net energy flow along: the line defect is described via the effective propagation velocity....... Single-mode and multimode operations are studied, and dispersion relations are computed for different waveguide widths. Both strong positive, strong negative, and zero dispersion an possible. It is shown that geometric parameters such as the nature of the lattice, the line defect orientation, the defect...... width, and the branching-point geometry have a significant influence on the electrodynamics. These are important issues for the fabrication of photonic crystal structures....

  16. Screening for suitable areas for Aquifer Thermal Energy Storage within the Brussels Capital Region, Belgium using coupled groundwater flow and heat transport modelling tools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anibas, Christian; Kukral, Janik; Touhidul Mustafa, Syed Md; Huysmans, Marijke

    2017-04-01

    Urban areas have a great potential for shallow geothermal systems. Their energy demand is high, but currently they have only a limited potential to cover their own energy demand. The transition towards a low-carbon energy regime offers alternative sources of energy an increasing potential. Urban areas however pose special challenges for the successful exploitation of shallow geothermal energy. High building densities limit the available space for drillings and underground investigations. Urban heat island effects and underground structures influence the thermal field, groundwater pollution and competing water uses limit the available subsurface. To tackle these challenges in the Brussels Capital Region, Belgium two projects 'BruGeo' and the recently finished 'Prospective Research of Brussels project 2015-PRFB-228' address the investigation in urban geothermal systems. They aim to identify the key factors of the underground with respect to Aquifer Thermal Energy Storage (ATES) installations like thermal properties, aquifer thicknesses, groundwater flow velocities and their heterogeneity. Combined numerical groundwater and heat transport models are applied for the assessment of both open and closed loop shallow geothermal systems. The Brussels Capital Region comprises of the Belgian Capital, the City of Brussels and 18 other municipalities covering 161 km2 with almost 1.2 million inhabitants. Beside the high population density the Brussels Capital Region has a pronounced topography and a relative complex geology. This is both a challenge and an opportunity for the exploitation of shallow geothermal energy. The most important shallow hydrogeological formation in the Brussels-Capital Region are the Brussels Sands with the Brussels Sands Aquifer. Scenarios where developed using criteria for the hydrogeological feasibility of ATES installations such as saturated aquifer thickness, groundwater flow velocity and the groundwater head below surface. The Brussels Sands

  17. Flow effects on jet energy loss with detailed balance

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHENG Luan; LIU Jia; WANG EnKe

    2014-01-01

    In the presence of collective flow a new model potential describing the interaction of the hard jet with scattering centers is derived based on the static color-screened Yukawa potential.The flow effect on jet quenching with detailed balance is investigated in pQCD.It turns out,considering the collective flow with velocity vz along the jet direction,the collective flow decreases the LPM destructive interference comparing to that in the static medium.The gluon absorption plays a more important role in the moving medium.The collective flow increases the energy gain from gluon absorption,however,decreases the energy loss from gluon radiation,which is (1-vz) times as that in the static medium to the first order of opacity.In the presence of collective flow,the second order in opacity correction is relatively small compared to the first order.So that the total effective energy loss is decreased.The flow dependence of the energy loss will affect the suppression of high PT hadron spectrum and anisotropy parameter v2 in high-energy heavy-ion collisions.

  18. Stochastic power flow modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1980-06-01

    The stochastic nature of customer demand and equipment failure on large interconnected electric power networks has produced a keen interest in the accurate modeling and analysis of the effects of probabilistic behavior on steady state power system operation. The principle avenue of approach has been to obtain a solution to the steady state network flow equations which adhere both to Kirchhoff's Laws and probabilistic laws, using either combinatorial or functional approximation techniques. Clearly the need of the present is to develop sound techniques for producing meaningful data to serve as input. This research has addressed this end and serves to bridge the gap between electric demand modeling, equipment failure analysis, etc., and the area of algorithm development. Therefore, the scope of this work lies squarely on developing an efficient means of producing sensible input information in the form of probability distributions for the many types of solution algorithms that have been developed. Two major areas of development are described in detail: a decomposition of stochastic processes which gives hope of stationarity, ergodicity, and perhaps even normality; and a powerful surrogate probability approach using proportions of time which allows the calculation of joint events from one dimensional probability spaces.

  19. Turbomachinery Flows Modeled

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adamczyk, John J.

    1997-01-01

    Last year, researchers at the NASA Lewis Research Center used the average passage code APNASA to complete the largest three-dimensional simulation of a multistage axial flow compressor to date. Consisting of 29 blade rows, the configuration is typical of those found in aeroengines today. The simulation, which was executed on the High Performance Computing and Communications (HPCC) Program IBM SP2 parallel computer located at the NASA Ames Research Center, took nearly 90 hr to complete. Since the completion of this activity, a fine-grain, parallel version of APNASA has been written by a team of researchers from General Electric, NASA Lewis, and NYMA. Timing studies performed on the SP2 have shown that, with eight processors assigned to each blade row, the simulation time is reduced by a factor of six. For this configuration, the simulation time would be 15 hr. The reduction in computing time indicates that an overnight turnaround of a multistage configuration simulation is feasible. In addition, average passage forms of two-equation turbulence models were formulated. These models are currently being incorporated into APNASA.

  20. Velocity and energy relaxation in two-phase flows

    CERN Document Server

    Meyapin, Yannick; Gisclon, Marguerite

    2009-01-01

    In the present study we investigate analytically the process of velocity and energy relaxation in two-phase flows. We begin our exposition by considering the so-called six equations two-phase model [Ishii1975, Rovarch2006]. This model assumes each phase to possess its own velocity and energy variables. Despite recent advances, the six equations model remains computationally expensive for many practical applications. Moreover, its advection operator may be non-hyperbolic which poses additional theoretical difficulties to construct robust numerical schemes |Ghidaglia et al, 2001]. In order to simplify this system, we complete momentum and energy conservation equations by relaxation terms. When relaxation characteristic time tends to zero, velocities and energies are constrained to tend to common values for both phases. As a result, we obtain a simple two-phase model which was recently proposed for simulation of violent aerated flows [Dias et al, 2010]. The preservation of invariant regions and incompressible li...

  1. On the kinetic energy of the divergent and nondivergent flow in the atmosphere

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Tsing-Chang; Wiin-Nielsen, Aksel C.

    2011-01-01

    The kinetic energy of horizontal flow in a hydrostatic atmosphere is divided into the kinetic energies of its divergent and nondivergent components. The law of conversion between these two energies for large-scale flows in the atmosphere is derived and discussed using balanced and unbalanced models of circulations in the atmosphere. It is shown that the total potential energy is converted into the kinetic energy of the divergent flow which, in turn, is converted into the kinetic energy of the...

  2. NUMERICAL MODEL FOR FLOW MOTION WITH VEGETATION

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Jian-tao; SU Xiao-hui

    2008-01-01

    A set of governing equations for turbulent flows in vegetated area were derived with the assumption that vegetation is of straight and rigid cylinder. The effect of vegetation on flow motion was represented by additional inertial and drag forces. The new model was validated by available experimental data for open channel flows passing through vegetated areas with different vegetation size, density and distribution. Numerical results are in good agreement with the experimental data. Finally, the flow around a supposed isolated vegetated pile was simulated and the effects of vegetation density on the wake flow were discussed. It is found that the presence of vegetation, even at a very low density, has the pronounced influence on the dissipation of flow energy, both inside the vegetation domain and outside it in the wake flow region.

  3. UZ Flow Models and Submodels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    P. Dixon

    2004-02-11

    The purpose of this Model Report is to document the unsaturated zone (UZ) fluid flow and tracer transport models and submodels as well as the flow fields generated utilizing the UZ Flow and Transport Model of Yucca Mountain (UZ Model), Nevada. This work was planned in ''Technical Work Plan (TWP) for: Performance Assessment Unsaturated Zone'' (BSC 2002 [160819], Section 1.10, Work Package AUZM06). The UZ Model has revised, updated, and enhanced the previous UZ Flow Model REV 00 ICN 01 (BSC 2001 [158726]) by incorporation of the conceptual repository design with new grids, recalibration of property sets, and more comprehensive validation effort. The flow fields describe fracture-fracture, matrix-matrix, and fracture-matrix liquid flow rates and their spatial distributions as well as moisture conditions in the UZ system. These 3-D UZ flow fields are used directly by Performance Assessment (PA). The model and submodels evaluate important hydrogeologic processes in the UZ as well as geochemistry and geothermal conditions. These provide the necessary framework to test conceptual hypotheses of flow and transport at different scales and predict flow and transport behavior under a variety of climatic conditions. In addition, this Model Report supports several PA activities, including abstractions, particle-tracking transport simulations, and the UZ Radionuclide Transport Model.

  4. Energy-consumption modelling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reiter, E.R.

    1980-01-01

    A highly sophisticated and accurate approach is described to compute on an hourly or daily basis the energy consumption for space heating by individual buildings, urban sectors, and whole cities. The need for models and specifically weather-sensitive models, composite models, and space-heating models are discussed. Development of the Colorado State University Model, based on heat-transfer equations and on a heuristic, adaptive, self-organizing computation learning approach, is described. Results of modeling energy consumption by the city of Minneapolis and Cheyenne are given. Some data on energy consumption in individual buildings are included.

  5. Energy based prediction models for building acoustics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brunskog, Jonas

    2012-01-01

    In order to reach robust and simplified yet accurate prediction models, energy based principle are commonly used in many fields of acoustics, especially in building acoustics. This includes simple energy flow models, the framework of statistical energy analysis (SEA) as well as more elaborated...... principles as, e.g., wave intensity analysis (WIA). The European standards for building acoustic predictions, the EN 12354 series, are based on energy flow and SEA principles. In the present paper, different energy based prediction models are discussed and critically reviewed. Special attention is placed...

  6. Flutter Phenomenon in Flow Driven Energy Harvester-A Unified Theoretical Model for “Stiff” and “Flexible” Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yu; Mu, Xiaojing; Wang, Tao; Ren, Weiwei; Yang, Ya; Wang, Zhong Lin; Sun, Chengliang; Gu, Alex Yuandong

    2016-10-01

    Here, we report a stable and predictable aero-elastic motion in the flow-driven energy harvester, which is different from flapping and vortex-induced-vibration (VIV). A unified theoretical frame work that describes the flutter phenomenon observed in both “stiff” and “flexible” materials for flow driven energy harvester was presented in this work. We prove flutter in both types of materials is the results of the coupled effects of torsional and bending modes. Compared to “stiff” materials, which has a flow velocity-independent flutter frequency, flexible material presents a flutter frequency that almost linearly scales with the flow velocity. Specific to “flexible” materials, pre-stress modulates the frequency range in which flutter occurs. It is experimentally observed that a double-clamped “flexible” piezoelectric P(VDF-TrFE) thin belt, when driven into the flutter state, yields a 1,000 times increase in the output voltage compared to that of the non-fluttered state. At a fixed flow velocity, increase in pre-stress level of the P(VDF-TrFE) thin belt up-shifts the flutter frequency. In addition, this work allows the rational design of flexible piezoelectric devices, including flow-driven energy harvester, triboelectric energy harvester, and self-powered wireless flow speed sensor.

  7. Energy and material flows of megacities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, Christopher A.; Stewart, Iain; Facchini, Angelo; Cersosimo, Igor; Mele, Renata; Chen, Bin; Uda, Mariko; Kansal, Arun; Chiu, Anthony; Kim, Kwi-gon; Dubeux, Carolina; Lebre La Rovere, Emilio; Cunha, Bruno; Pincetl, Stephanie; Keirstead, James; Barles, Sabine; Pusaka, Semerdanta; Gunawan, Juniati; Adegbile, Michael; Nazariha, Mehrdad; Hoque, Shamsul; Marcotullio, Peter J.; González Otharán, Florencia; Genena, Tarek; Ibrahim, Nadine; Farooqui, Rizwan; Cervantes, Gemma; Sahin, Ahmet Duran

    2015-01-01

    Understanding the drivers of energy and material flows of cities is important for addressing global environmental challenges. Accessing, sharing, and managing energy and material resources is particularly critical for megacities, which face enormous social stresses because of their sheer size and complexity. Here we quantify the energy and material flows through the world’s 27 megacities with populations greater than 10 million people as of 2010. Collectively the resource flows through megacities are largely consistent with scaling laws established in the emerging science of cities. Correlations are established for electricity consumption, heating and industrial fuel use, ground transportation energy use, water consumption, waste generation, and steel production in terms of heating-degree-days, urban form, economic activity, and population growth. The results help identify megacities exhibiting high and low levels of consumption and those making efficient use of resources. The correlation between per capita electricity use and urbanized area per capita is shown to be a consequence of gross building floor area per capita, which is found to increase for lower-density cities. Many of the megacities are growing rapidly in population but are growing even faster in terms of gross domestic product (GDP) and energy use. In the decade from 2001–2011, electricity use and ground transportation fuel use in megacities grew at approximately half the rate of GDP growth. PMID:25918371

  8. Energy and material flows of megacities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, Christopher A; Stewart, Iain; Facchini, Angelo; Cersosimo, Igor; Mele, Renata; Chen, Bin; Uda, Mariko; Kansal, Arun; Chiu, Anthony; Kim, Kwi-Gon; Dubeux, Carolina; Lebre La Rovere, Emilio; Cunha, Bruno; Pincetl, Stephanie; Keirstead, James; Barles, Sabine; Pusaka, Semerdanta; Gunawan, Juniati; Adegbile, Michael; Nazariha, Mehrdad; Hoque, Shamsul; Marcotullio, Peter J; González Otharán, Florencia; Genena, Tarek; Ibrahim, Nadine; Farooqui, Rizwan; Cervantes, Gemma; Sahin, Ahmet Duran

    2015-05-12

    Understanding the drivers of energy and material flows of cities is important for addressing global environmental challenges. Accessing, sharing, and managing energy and material resources is particularly critical for megacities, which face enormous social stresses because of their sheer size and complexity. Here we quantify the energy and material flows through the world's 27 megacities with populations greater than 10 million people as of 2010. Collectively the resource flows through megacities are largely consistent with scaling laws established in the emerging science of cities. Correlations are established for electricity consumption, heating and industrial fuel use, ground transportation energy use, water consumption, waste generation, and steel production in terms of heating-degree-days, urban form, economic activity, and population growth. The results help identify megacities exhibiting high and low levels of consumption and those making efficient use of resources. The correlation between per capita electricity use and urbanized area per capita is shown to be a consequence of gross building floor area per capita, which is found to increase for lower-density cities. Many of the megacities are growing rapidly in population but are growing even faster in terms of gross domestic product (GDP) and energy use. In the decade from 2001-2011, electricity use and ground transportation fuel use in megacities grew at approximately half the rate of GDP growth.

  9. Energy flow and energy dissipation in a free surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldburg, Walter; Cressman, John

    2005-11-01

    Turbulent flows on a free surface are strongly compressible [1] and do not conserve energy in the absence of viscosity as bulk fluids do. Despite violation of assumptions essential to Kolmogorov's theory of 1941 (K41) [2, 3], surface flows show strong agreement with Kolmogorov scaling, though intermittency is larger there. Steady state turbulence is generated in a tank of water, and the spatially averaged energy flux is measured from the four-fifth's law at each instant of time. Likewise, the energy dissipation rate as measured from velocity gradients is also a random variable in this experiment. The energy flux - dissipation rate cross-correlation is measured to be correlated in incompressible bulk flows, but strongly anti-correlated on the surface. We argue that the reason for this discrepancy between surface and bulk flows is due to compressible effects present on the surface. [1] J. R. Cressman, J. Davoudi, W. I. Goldburg, and J. Schumacher, New Journal of Physics, 6, 53, 2004. [2] U. Frisch. Turbulence: The legacy of A. N. Kolmogorov, Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, 1995. [3] A. N. Kolmogorov, Doklady Akad. Nauk SSSR, 32, 16, 1941.

  10. UZ Flow Models and Submodels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Y. Wu

    2004-11-01

    The purpose of this report is to document the unsaturated zone (UZ) flow models and submodels, as well as the flow fields that have been generated using the UZ flow model(s) of Yucca Mountain, Nevada. In this report, the term ''UZ model'' refers to the UZ flow model and the several submodels, which include tracer transport, temperature or ambient geothermal, pneumatic or gas flow, and geochemistry (chloride, calcite, and strontium) submodels. The term UZ flow model refers to the three-dimensional models used for calibration and simulation of UZ flow fields. This work was planned in the ''Technical Work Plan (TWP) for: Unsaturated Zone Flow Analysis and Model Report Integration'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 169654], Section 1.2.7). The table of included Features, Events, and Processes (FEPs), Table 6.2-11, is different from the list of included FEPs assigned to this report in the ''Technical Work Plan for: Unsaturated Zone Flow Analysis and Model Report Integration'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 169654], Table 2.1.5-1), as discussed in Section 6.2.6. The UZ model has revised, updated, and enhanced the previous UZ model (BSC 2001 [DIRS 158726]) by incorporating the repository design with new grids, recalibration of property sets, and more comprehensive validation effort. The flow fields describe fracture-fracture, matrix-matrix, and fracture-matrix liquid flow rates, and their spatial distributions as well as moisture conditions in the UZ system. These three-dimensional UZ flow fields are used directly by Total System Performance Assessment (TSPA). The model and submodels evaluate important hydrogeologic processes in the UZ as well as geochemistry and geothermal conditions. These provide the necessary framework to test hypotheses of flow and transport at different scales, and predict flow and transport behavior under a variety of climatic conditions. In addition, the limitations of the UZ model are discussed in Section 8.11.

  11. Does Global seismic energy release increase? An analysis based on the Lithospheric Seismic Energy Flow Model (LSEFM). The case of mega - earthquakes (M > 9)

    CERN Document Server

    Thanassoulas, C; Verveniotis, G; Zymaris, N

    2012-01-01

    In this work the data of the earthquake catalog of the NOAA, National Geophysical Data Center (NGDC) are processed in terms of global seismic energy release. The determined Global Cumulative Seismic Energy Release (GCSER) graph as a function of time, is analyzed in the magnitude domain (discrete energy windows). Characteristic components of the analyzed graph are: its accelerated deformation character observed for energy windows lower than the background seismicity (M = 7.0 - 7.5), its lock state that started on 1923 and long seismic quiescence periods that preceded recent mega - earthquakes. The background GCSER value oscillates during the last century with a period of 60 years and with increasing amplitude. The recent (1952 - 2012) 5 mega - earthquakes are closely related to the amplitude increase of the GCSER oscillation. Hence, it is suggested that more mega - earthquakes are probable due to occur in the future. A global mechanism is postulated for the generation of the mega - earthquakes based on the pri...

  12. Modelling Canopy Flows over Complex Terrain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grant, Eleanor R.; Ross, Andrew N.; Gardiner, Barry A.

    2016-06-01

    Recent studies of flow over forested hills have been motivated by a number of important applications including understanding CO_2 and other gaseous fluxes over forests in complex terrain, predicting wind damage to trees, and modelling wind energy potential at forested sites. Current modelling studies have focussed almost exclusively on highly idealized, and usually fully forested, hills. Here, we present model results for a site on the Isle of Arran, Scotland with complex terrain and heterogeneous forest canopy. The model uses an explicit representation of the canopy and a 1.5-order turbulence closure for flow within and above the canopy. The validity of the closure scheme is assessed using turbulence data from a field experiment before comparing predictions of the full model with field observations. For near-neutral stability, the results compare well with the observations, showing that such a relatively simple canopy model can accurately reproduce the flow patterns observed over complex terrain and realistic, variable forest cover, while at the same time remaining computationally feasible for real case studies. The model allows closer examination of the flow separation observed over complex forested terrain. Comparisons with model simulations using a roughness length parametrization show significant differences, particularly with respect to flow separation, highlighting the need to explicitly model the forest canopy if detailed predictions of near-surface flow around forests are required.

  13. Modelling Canopy Flows over Complex Terrain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grant, Eleanor R.; Ross, Andrew N.; Gardiner, Barry A.

    2016-12-01

    Recent studies of flow over forested hills have been motivated by a number of important applications including understanding CO_2 and other gaseous fluxes over forests in complex terrain, predicting wind damage to trees, and modelling wind energy potential at forested sites. Current modelling studies have focussed almost exclusively on highly idealized, and usually fully forested, hills. Here, we present model results for a site on the Isle of Arran, Scotland with complex terrain and heterogeneous forest canopy. The model uses an explicit representation of the canopy and a 1.5-order turbulence closure for flow within and above the canopy. The validity of the closure scheme is assessed using turbulence data from a field experiment before comparing predictions of the full model with field observations. For near-neutral stability, the results compare well with the observations, showing that such a relatively simple canopy model can accurately reproduce the flow patterns observed over complex terrain and realistic, variable forest cover, while at the same time remaining computationally feasible for real case studies. The model allows closer examination of the flow separation observed over complex forested terrain. Comparisons with model simulations using a roughness length parametrization show significant differences, particularly with respect to flow separation, highlighting the need to explicitly model the forest canopy if detailed predictions of near-surface flow around forests are required.

  14. A Marine Traffic Flow Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsz Leung Yip

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available A model is developed for studying marine traffic flow through classical traffic flow theories, which can provide us with a better understanding of the phenomenon of traffic flow of ships. On one hand, marine traffic has its special features and is fundamentally different from highway, air and pedestrian traffic. The existing traffic models cannot be simply extended to marine traffic without addressing marine traffic features. On the other hand, existing literature on marine traffic focuses on one ship or two ships but does not address the issues in marine traffic flow.

  15. Flow Over a Model Submarine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiménez, Juan; Smits, Alexander

    2003-11-01

    Experimental investigation over a DARPA SUBOFF submarine model (SUBOFF Model) was performed using flow visualization and Digital Particle Image Velocimetry (DPIV). The model has an axisymmetric body with sail and fins, and it was supported by a streamlined strut that was formed by the extension of the sail appendage. The range of flow conditions studied correspond to a Reynolds numbers based on model length, Re_L, of about 10^5. Velocity vector fields, turbulence intensities, vorticity fields, and flow visualization in the vicinity of the junction flows are presented. In the vicinity of the control surface and sail hull junctions, the presence of streamwise vortices in the form of horseshoe or necklace vortices locally dominates the flow. The effects of unsteady motions about an axis passing through the sail are also investigated to understand the evolution of the unsteady wake.

  16. Water flow energy harvesters for autonomous flowmeters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boisseau, Sebastien; Duret, Alexandre-Benoit; Perez, Matthias; Jallas, Emmanuel; Jallas, Eric

    2016-11-01

    This paper reports on a water flow energy harvester exploiting a horizontal axis turbine with distributed magnets of alternate polarities at the rotor periphery and air coils outside the pipe. The energy harvester operates down to 1.2L/min with an inlet section of 20mm of diameter and up to 25.2mW are provided at 20L/min in a 2.4V NiMH battery through a BQ25504 power management circuit. The pressure loss induced by the insertion of the energy harvester in the hydraulic circuit and by the extraction of energy has been limited to 0.05bars at 30L/min, corresponding to a minor loss coefficient of KEH=3.94.

  17. Energy-dependent variability from accretion flows

    CERN Document Server

    Zdziarski, A A

    2005-01-01

    We develop a formalism to calculate energy-dependent fractional variability (rms) in accretion flows. We consider rms spectra resulting from radial dependencies of the level of local variability (as expected from propagation of disturbances in accretion flows) assuming the constant shape of the spectrum emitted at a given radius. We consider the cases when the variability of the flow is either coherent or incoherent between different radial zones. As example local emission, we consider blackbody, Wien and thermal Comptonization spectra. In addition to numerical results, we present a number of analytical formulae for the resulting rms. We also find an analytical formula for the disc Wien spectrum, which we find to be a very good approximation to the disc blackbody. We compare our results to the rms spectrum observed in an ultrasoft state of GRS 1915+105.

  18. Control of energy flow in residential buildings; Energieflussregelung in Wohngebaeuden

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weiss, Martin

    2011-07-01

    Energy systems in residential buildings are changing from monovalent, combustion based systems to multivalent systems containing technologies such as solar collectors, pellet boilers, heat pumps, CHP and multiple storages. Multivalent heat and electricity generation and additional storages raise the number of possible control signals in the system. This creates additional degrees of freedom regarding the choice of the energy converter and the instant of time for energy conversion. New functionality of controllers such as prioritisation of energy producers, optimization of electric self consumption and control of storages and energy feed-in are required. Within the scope of this thesis, new approaches for demand-driven optimal control of energy flows in multivalent building energy systems are developed and evaluated. The approaches are evaluated by means of system energy costs and operating emissions. For parametrisation of the controllers an easily understandable operating concept is developed. The energy flow controllers are implemented as a multi agent system (MAS) and a nonlinear model predictive controller (MPC). Proper functionality and stability are demonstrated in simulations of two example energy systems. In both example systems the MPC controller achieves less energy costs and operating emissions due to system wide global optimization and the more detailed system model within the controller. The multi agent approach turns out to perform better for systems with a huge number of components, e.g. in home automation and energy management systems. Due to the good performance of the reference control strategies, a significant reduction of energy costs and operating emissions is only possible with limitations. Systems for heat generation show only an especially low potential for optimization because of marginal variation ins heat production costs. The adaptation of the operation mode to user priorities, changing utilization characteristics and dynamic energy

  19. Modeling Size Polydisperse Granular Flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lueptow, Richard M.; Schlick, Conor P.; Isner, Austin B.; Umbanhowar, Paul B.; Ottino, Julio M.

    2014-11-01

    Modeling size segregation of granular materials has important applications in many industrial processes and geophysical phenomena. We have developed a continuum model for granular multi- and polydisperse size segregation based on flow kinematics, which we obtain from discrete element method (DEM) simulations. The segregation depends on dimensionless control parameters that are functions of flow rate, particle sizes, collisional diffusion coefficient, shear rate, and flowing layer depth. To test the theoretical approach, we model segregation in tri-disperse quasi-2D heap flow and log-normally distributed polydisperse quasi-2D chute flow. In both cases, the segregated particle size distributions match results from full-scale DEM simulations and experiments. While the theory was applied to size segregation in steady quasi-2D flows here, the approach can be readily generalized to include additional drivers of segregation such as density and shape as well as other geometries where the flow field can be characterized including rotating tumbler flow and three-dimensional bounded heap flow. Funded by The Dow Chemical Company and NSF Grant CMMI-1000469.

  20. Viscoelastic flow simulations in model porous media

    Science.gov (United States)

    De, S.; Kuipers, J. A. M.; Peters, E. A. J. F.; Padding, J. T.

    2017-05-01

    We investigate the flow of unsteadfy three-dimensional viscoelastic fluid through an array of symmetric and asymmetric sets of cylinders constituting a model porous medium. The simulations are performed using a finite-volume methodology with a staggered grid. The solid-fluid interfaces of the porous structure are modeled using a second-order immersed boundary method [S. De et al., J. Non-Newtonian Fluid Mech. 232, 67 (2016), 10.1016/j.jnnfm.2016.04.002]. A finitely extensible nonlinear elastic constitutive model with Peterlin closure is used to model the viscoelastic part. By means of periodic boundary conditions, we model the flow behavior for a Newtonian as well as a viscoelastic fluid through successive contractions and expansions. We observe the presence of counterrotating vortices in the dead ends of our geometry. The simulations provide detailed insight into how flow structure, viscoelastic stresses, and viscoelastic work change with increasing Deborah number De. We observe completely different flow structures and different distributions of the viscoelastic work at high De in the symmetric and asymmetric configurations, even though they have the exact same porosity. Moreover, we find that even for the symmetric contraction-expansion flow, most energy dissipation is occurring in shear-dominated regions of the flow domain, not in extensional-flow-dominated regions.

  1. NUMERICAL MODELING OF COMPOUND CHANNEL FLOWS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    A numerical model capable of predicting flow characteristics in a compound channel was established with the 3-D steady continuity and momentum equations along with the transport equations for turbulence kinetic energy and dissipation rate. Closure was achieved with the aid of algebraic relations for turbulent shear stresses. The above equations were discretized with implicit difference approach and solved with a step method along the flow direction. The computational results showing the lateral distribution of vertical average velocities and the latio of total flow in the compound channel agree well with the available experimental data.

  2. Modeling of curvilinear suspension flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, Jeffrey F.; Boulay, Fabienne

    1996-11-01

    The curvilinear parallel-plate and cone-and-plate rheometric flows of monodisperse noncolloidal suspensions have been modeled. Although nonuniform in shear rate, dotγ, the parallel-plate flow has been shown experimentally(A. W. Chow, S. W. Sinton, J. H. Iwayima & T. S. Stephens 1994 Phys. Fluids) 6, 2561. not to exhibit particle migration, contrary to predictions of prior suspension-flow modeling. Predictions of nonuniform particle volume fraction, φ, by the suspension-balance model(P. R. Nott & J. F. Brady 1994 J. Fluid Mech.) 275, 157. for parallel-plate and cone-and-plate flow without normal stress differences are presented. The ``nonmigration'' in parallel-plate flow may be attributed to bulk suspension normal stress differences: assuming the bulk stress has the form Σ ~ η dotγ Q(φ) with η the fluid viscosity, nonmigration is predicted for parallel-plate flow provided that Q_33 = (1/2) Q_11 at the bulk φ of interest, with 1 the flow direction and 3 the vorticity direction. Extending the model to include normal stress differences satisfying this requirement, a range of migration behavior is predicted for the cone-and-plate flow depending upon the ratio Q_11/Q_22.

  3. Effect of External Pressure and Catheter Gauge on Flow Rate, Kinetic Energy, and Endothelial Injury During Intravenous Fluid Administration in a Rabbit Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Mei-Hua; Chan, Wei-Hung; Chen, Yao-Chang; Cherng, Chen-Hwan; Lin, Chih-Kung; Tsai, Chien-Sung; Chou, Yu-Ching; Huang, Go-Shine

    2016-01-01

    The effects of intravenous (IV) catheter gauge and pressurization of IV fluid (IVF) bags on fluid flow rate have been studied. However, the pressure needed to achieve a flow rate equivalent to that of a 16 gauge (G) catheter through smaller G catheters and the potential for endothelial damage from the increased kinetic energy produced by higher pressurization are unclear. Constant pressure on an IVF bag was maintained by an automatic adjustable pneumatic pressure regulator of our own design. Fluids running through 16 G, 18 G, 20 G, and 22 G catheters were assessed while using IV bag pressurization to achieve the flow rate equivalent to that of a 16 G catheter. We assessed flow rates, kinetic energy, and flow injury to rabbit inferior vena cava endothelium. By applying sufficient external constant pressure to an IVF bag, all fluids could be run through smaller (G) catheters at the flow rate in a 16 G catheter. However, the kinetic energy increased significantly as the catheter G increased. Damage to the venous endothelium was negligible or minimal/patchy cell loss. We designed a new rapid infusion system, which provides a constant pressure that compresses the fluid volume until it is free from visible residual fluid. When large-bore venous access cannot be obtained, multiple smaller catheters, external pressure, or both should be considered. However, caution should be exercised when fluid pressurized to reach a flow rate equivalent to that in a 16 G catheter is run through a smaller G catheter because of the profound increase in kinetic energy that can lead to venous endothelium injury.

  4. An inter-company approach to improve resource and energy efficiency and reduce greenhouse gas emissions in metal industries by linking flow sheet models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Froehling, Magnus; Bartusch, Hauke; Schwaderer, Frank; Schultmann, Frank [Karlsruhe Univ. (T.H.) (Germany). Inst. fuer Industriebetriebslehre und Industrielle Produktion

    2009-09-15

    Regarding sustainability, one of the greatest advantages of metals is their possibility to be recycled generally without a loss of quality. At the same time, Germany depends on the import of most primary resources, has comparable high energy prices and is facing global competition. Also, the use of energy is often connected to emissions of greenhouse gases which are becoming another important cost driver. Thus, the German metal industry aims on enhancing resource and energy efficiency. As internal improvement potentials which are related to a single company or process plant are to a large extent exploited, future potentials can be found by an integrated consideration of internal and external recycling possibilities. This paper presents an approach in which companies are not considered isolated but as a network. Zinc is used to an increasing degree as coating of steel products. After utilisation these products are recycled. The production of steel in Electric Arc Furnaces (EAF) mostly bases on scrap as raw material. In the oxygen steel production approximately 20 % of the raw materials in the converter is scrap. Most of the zinc in the feed can be found in residues like EAF-dust. These dusts can be recycled to a certain degree internally and afterwards treated by specialised recycling companies. Thereby, we investigate which recycling rate is optimal considering the steelmaking and recycling process as well as transportation and further influencing parameters. Our approach comprises a combination of flow sheet simulation to achieve detailed models of the processes and the development of methods to investigate internal and external recycling options. We consider an integrated steel works, an EAF, two recycling companies as well as a hydrometallurgical zinc smelter. (orig.)

  5. Energy interactions in homogeneously sheared magnetohydrodynamic flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collard, Diane; Praturi, Divya Sri; Girimaji, Sharath

    2016-11-01

    We investigate the behavior of homogeneously sheared magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) flows subject to perturbations in various directions. We perform rapid distortion theory (RDT) analysis and direct numerical simulations (DNS) to examine the interplay between magnetic, kinetic, and internal energies. For perturbation wavevectors oriented along the spanwise direction, RDT analysis shows that the magnetic and velocity fields are decoupled. In the case of streamwise wavevectors, the magnetic and velocity fields are tightly coupled. The coupling is "harmonic" in nature. DNS is then used to confirm the RDT findings. Computations of spanwise perturbations indeed exhibit behavior that is impervious to the magnetic field. Computed streamwise perturbations exhibit oscillatory evolution of kinetic and magnetic energies for low magnetic field strength. As the strength of magnetic field increases, the oscillatory behavior intensifies even as the energy magnitude decays, indicating strong stabilization.

  6. Linking material and energy flow analyses and social theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schiller, Frank [The Open University, Faculty of Maths, Computing and Technology, Walton Hall, Milton Keynes, MK7 6AA (United Kingdom)

    2009-04-15

    The paper explores the potential of Habermas' theory of communicative action to alter the social reflexivity of material and energy flow analysis. With his social macro theory Habermas has provided an alternative, critical justification for social theory that can be distinguished from economic libertarianism and from political liberalism. Implicitly, most flow approaches draw from these theoretical traditions rather than from discourse theory. There are several types of material and energy flow analyses. While these concepts basically share a system theoretical view, they lack a specific interdisciplinary perspective that ties the fundamental insight of flows to disciplinary scientific development. Instead of simply expanding micro-models to the social macro-dimension social theory suggests infusing the very notion of flows to the progress of disciplines. With regard to the functional integration of society, material and energy flow analyses can rely on the paradigm of ecological economics and at the same time progress the debate between strong and weak sustainability within the paradigm. However, placing economics at the centre of their functional analyses may still ignore the broader social integration of society, depending on their pre-analytic outline of research and the methods used. (author)

  7. Base Flow Model Validation Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The program focuses on turbulence modeling enhancements for predicting high-speed rocket base flows. A key component of the effort is the collection of high-fidelity...

  8. Flow dynamics and energy efficiency of flow in the left ventricle during myocardial infarction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasudevan, Vivek; Low, Adriel Jia Jun; Annamalai, Sarayu Parimal; Sampath, Smita; Poh, Kian Keong; Totman, Teresa; Mazlan, Muhammad; Croft, Grace; Richards, A Mark; de Kleijn, Dominique P V; Chin, Chih-Liang; Yap, Choon Hwai

    2017-03-31

    Cardiovascular disease is a leading cause of death worldwide, where myocardial infarction (MI) is a major category. After infarction, the heart has difficulty providing sufficient energy for circulation, and thus, understanding the heart's energy efficiency is important. We induced MI in a porcine animal model via circumflex ligation and acquired multiple-slice cine magnetic resonance (MR) images in a longitudinal manner-before infarction, and 1 week (acute) and 4 weeks (chronic) after infarction. Computational fluid dynamic simulations were performed based on MR images to obtain detailed fluid dynamics and energy dynamics of the left ventricles. Results showed that energy efficiency flow through the heart decreased at the acute time point. Since the heart was observed to experience changes in heart rate, stroke volume and chamber size over the two post-infarction time points, simulations were performed to test the effect of each of the three parameters. Increasing heart rate and stroke volume were found to significantly decrease flow energy efficiency, but the effect of chamber size was inconsistent. Strong complex interplay was observed between the three parameters, necessitating the use of non-dimensional parameterization to characterize flow energy efficiency. The ratio of Reynolds to Strouhal number, which is a form of Womersley number, was found to be the most effective non-dimensional parameter to represent energy efficiency of flow in the heart. We believe that this non-dimensional number can be computed for clinical cases via ultrasound and hypothesize that it can serve as a biomarker for clinical evaluations.

  9. Numerical experiments modelling turbulent flows

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Trefilík Jiří

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The work aims at investigation of the possibilities of modelling transonic flows mainly in external aerodynamics. New results are presented and compared with reference data and previously achieved results. For the turbulent flow simulations two modifications of the basic k – ω model are employed: SST and TNT. The numerical solution was achieved by using the MacCormack scheme on structured non-ortogonal grids. Artificial dissipation was added to improve the numerical stability.

  10. Collective flows in high-energy heavy-ion collisions at AGS and SPS energies

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A Ohnishi; M Isse; N Otuka; P K Sahu; Y Nara

    2006-04-01

    Proton collective flows in heavy-ion collisions from AGS ((2–11) A GeV) to SPS ((40, 158) A GeV) energies are investigated in a nonequilibrium transport model with nuclear mean-field (MF). Sideward , directed 1, and elliptic 2 flows are systematically studied with different assumptions on the nuclear equation of state (EoS). We find that momentum dependence in the nuclear MF is important for understanding the proton collective flows at AGS and SPS energies. Calculated results with momentum-dependent MF qualitatively reproduce the experimental data of proton sideward, directed, and elliptic flows in an incident energy range of (2–158) A GeV.

  11. Computational modeling of concrete flow

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Roussel, Nicolas; Geiker, Mette Rica; Dufour, Frederic

    2007-01-01

    This paper provides a general overview of the present status regarding computational modeling of the flow of fresh concrete. The computational modeling techniques that can be found in the literature may be divided into three main families: single fluid simulations, numerical modeling of discrete...

  12. Optimal Power Flow in Microgrids with Energy Storage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Levron, Yoash; Guerrero, Josep M.; Beck, Yuval

    2013-01-01

    , these works assume flat, highly simplified network models, which overlook the physical connectivity. This work proposes an optimal power flow solution that considers the entire system: the storage device limits, voltages limits, currents limits, and power limits. The power network may be arbitrarily complex......Energy storage may improve power management in microgrids that include renewable energy sources. The storage devices match energy generation to consumption, facilitating a smooth and robust energy balance within the microgrid. This paper addresses the optimal control of the microgrid’s energy...... storage devices. Stored energy is controlled to balance power generation of renewable sources to optimize overall power consumption at the microgrid point of common coupling. Recent works emphasize constraints imposed by the storage device itself, such as limited capacity and internal losses. However...

  13. Adaptive Lattice Boltzmann Model for Compressible Flows

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    A new lattice Boltzmann model for compressible flows is presented. The main difference from the standard lattice Boltzmann model is that the particle velocities are no longer constant, but vary with the mean velocity and internal energy. The adaptive nature of the particle velocities permits the mean flow to have a high Mach number. The introduction of a particle potential energy makes the model suitable for a perfect gas with arbitrary specific heat ratio. The Navier-Stokes (N-S) equations are derived by the Chapman-Enskog method from the BGK Boltzmann equation. Two kinds of simulations have been carried out on the hexagonal lattice to test the proposed model. One is the Sod shock-tube simulation. The other is a strong shock of Mach number 5.09 diffracting around a corner.

  14. Multiple Temperature Model for Near Continuum Flows

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    XU, Kun; Liu, Hongwei [Hong Kong University of Science and Technology, Kowloon (Hong Kong); Jiang, Jianzheng [Chinese Academy ofSciences, Beijing (China)

    2007-09-15

    In the near continuum flow regime, the flow may have different translational temperatures in different directions. It is well known that for increasingly rarefied flow fields, the predictions from continuum formulation, such as the Navier-Stokes equations, lose accuracy. These inaccuracies may be partially due to the single temperature assumption in the Navier-Stokes equations. Here, based on the gas-kinetic Bhatnagar-Gross-Krook (BGK) equation, a multitranslational temperature model is proposed and used in the flow calculations. In order to fix all three translational temperatures, two constraints are additionally proposed to model the energy exchange in different directions. Based on the multiple temperature assumption, the Navier-Stokes relation between the stress and strain is replaced by the temperature relaxation term, and the Navier-Stokes assumption is recovered only in the limiting case when the flow is close to the equilibrium with the same temperature in different directions. In order to validate the current model, both the Couette and Poiseuille flows are studied in the transition flow regime.

  15. Flow at AGS energies a barometer for high density effects?

    CERN Document Server

    Kahana, D E; Shuryak, E V

    1996-01-01

    Preliminary data on transverse energy `flow' and event asymmetries reported by the E877(814) collaborations are compared to ARC model calculations for Au+Au at full AGS beam energy. ARC triple differential cross-sections for protons and pions are presented. Proton flow is produced in ARC, with the maximum in-plane momentum about 120 MeV/c. For central events the directed momentum for pions is near zero, consistent with experiment. Pion momentum opposite to the nucleons' is evident in a peripheral sample, however, indicating that this pion `anti-flow' involves absorption by `spectator' matter. `Squeeze-out' of protons in central events at mid-rapidity is suggested by the ARC distributions.

  16. National Energy Modeling System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Skinner, C.W. (Energy Information Administration, Washington, DC (United States))

    1993-01-01

    The Energy Information Administration is developing a new National Energy Modeling System to provide annual forecasts of energy supply, demand, and prices on a regional basis in the United States and, to a limited extent, in the rest of the world. The design for the system was based on a requirements analysis, a comparison of requirements with existing modeling capabilities, and a series of widely circulated issue papers defining the choices and tradeoffs for 13 key design decisions. An initial prototpye of the new NEMS was implemented in late 1992, with a more complete, operational version in 1993. NEMS is expected to provide EIA and other users with a greatly enhanced ability to illustrate quickly and effectively the effects of a wide range of energy policy proposals.

  17. Forward energy flow and diffraction at ATLAS

    CERN Document Server

    Staroba, P; The ATLAS collaboration

    2012-01-01

    First measurements of forward energy flow and diffractive dissociation processes at ATLAS are presented. Measurements are based on 7 TeV minimum bias (7.1μb−1) and dijet (585μb−1) data samples taken during March-May 2010 in the low pileup accelerator setup. Measurement of transverse energy density as a function of pseudorapidity was performed using the full acceptance of ATLAS detectors. Stable charged particles with PT > 500 MeV and stable neutral particles with PT > 200 MeV were included. Manifestation of diffractive processes of three classes (single, double and central diffractive dissociation) was studied using inelastic differential cross section in forward rapidity gap size ΔηF bins. Experimental distributions are compared with several Monte Carlo predictions (PYTHIA6, PYTHIA8, PHOJET, HERWIG++ and EPOS) using different tunes.

  18. Officer Accessions Flow Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-31

    18]) General Charles Campbell noted that , although…. “the Army has a system for organizing, staffing, equipping, training, deploying, sustaining...Harrell, Charles , Ghosh, Biman K., & Bowden Jr.,Royce O. 2004. Simulation Using ProModel. Second edition. McGraw Hill, New York. [22] Klimas, J...RUNS: A Senior Leader Reference Handbook. U.S. Army War College, Carlisle, PA. [24] McNeill , Dan K. 2005 (August). Army Force Generation

  19. Modelling fluid flow in a reciprocating compressor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tuhovcak Jan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Efficiency of reciprocating compressor is strongly dependent on the valves characteristics, which affects the flow through the suction and discharge line. Understanding the phenomenon inside the compressor is necessary step in development process. Commercial CFD tools offer wide capabilities to simulate the flow inside the reciprocating compressor, however they are too complicated in terms of computational time and mesh creation. Several parameters describing compressor could be therefore examined without the CFD analysis, such is valve characteristic, flow through the cycle and heat transfer. The aim of this paper is to show a numerical tool for reciprocating compressor based on the energy balance through the cycle, which provides valve characteristics, flow through the cycle and heat losses from the cylinder. Spring-damping-mass model was used for the valve description. Boundary conditions were extracted from the performance test of 4-cylinder semihermetic compressor and numerical tool validation was performed with indicated p-V diagram comparison.

  20. Modelling fluid flow in a reciprocating compressor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuhovcak, Jan; Hejčík, Jiří; Jícha, Miroslav

    2015-05-01

    Efficiency of reciprocating compressor is strongly dependent on the valves characteristics, which affects the flow through the suction and discharge line. Understanding the phenomenon inside the compressor is necessary step in development process. Commercial CFD tools offer wide capabilities to simulate the flow inside the reciprocating compressor, however they are too complicated in terms of computational time and mesh creation. Several parameters describing compressor could be therefore examined without the CFD analysis, such is valve characteristic, flow through the cycle and heat transfer. The aim of this paper is to show a numerical tool for reciprocating compressor based on the energy balance through the cycle, which provides valve characteristics, flow through the cycle and heat losses from the cylinder. Spring-damping-mass model was used for the valve description. Boundary conditions were extracted from the performance test of 4-cylinder semihermetic compressor and numerical tool validation was performed with indicated p-V diagram comparison.

  1. Pulsatile blood flow, shear force, energy dissipation and Murray's Law

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bengtsson Hans-Uno

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Murray's Law states that, when a parent blood vessel branches into daughter vessels, the cube of the radius of the parent vessel is equal to the sum of the cubes of the radii of daughter blood vessels. Murray derived this law by defining a cost function that is the sum of the energy cost of the blood in a vessel and the energy cost of pumping blood through the vessel. The cost is minimized when vessel radii are consistent with Murray's Law. This law has also been derived from the hypothesis that the shear force of moving blood on the inner walls of vessels is constant throughout the vascular system. However, this derivation, like Murray's earlier derivation, is based on the assumption of constant blood flow. Methods To determine the implications of the constant shear force hypothesis and to extend Murray's energy cost minimization to the pulsatile arterial system, a model of pulsatile flow in an elastic tube is analyzed. A new and exact solution for flow velocity, blood flow rate and shear force is derived. Results For medium and small arteries with pulsatile flow, Murray's energy minimization leads to Murray's Law. Furthermore, the hypothesis that the maximum shear force during the cycle of pulsatile flow is constant throughout the arterial system implies that Murray's Law is approximately true. The approximation is good for all but the largest vessels (aorta and its major branches of the arterial system. Conclusion A cellular mechanism that senses shear force at the inner wall of a blood vessel and triggers remodeling that increases the circumference of the wall when a shear force threshold is exceeded would result in the observed scaling of vessel radii described by Murray's Law.

  2. The Onset of Nonlinear Flow in Three-Dimensional Heterogeneous Flow Domains Based on Energy Dissipation Measures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meakin, P.; Basagaoglu, H.; Succi, S.; Welhan, J.

    2005-12-01

    The onset of nonlinear flow in three-dimensional random disordered porous flow domains was analyzed using participation numbers based on local kinetic energies, and energy dissipation rates computed via non-equilibrium kinetic tensors. A three-dimensional lattice Boltzmann model was used to simulate gravity-driven single-phase flow over a range of Reynolds numbers that included the crossover from linear to nonlinear flow. The simulations results indicated that the kinetic energy participation number characterized the onset of nonlinear flow in terms of transition to a more dispersed (uniform) distribution of kinetic energy densities as the flow rate increased. However, the energy dissipation participation number characterized the onset of nonlinear flow in terms of a transition to a more locally concentrated distribution of energy dissipation densities at higher flows. The flow regime transition characterized by the energy dissipation participation number occurred over a nearly equal or a narrower range of Reynolds numbers compared to the transition characterized by the kinetic energy participation number. The results also revealed that the boundary conditions (periodic vs. no-slip) parallel to the main flow direction have an insignificant effect on the magnitude of the critical Reynolds number, that characterizes the onset of nonlinear effects, although they did influence the spatial correlations of the pore-scale kinetic energy and the energy dissipation densities in all Cartesian directions. Flow domains with periodic boundaries resulted in less-localized (more dispersed) steady-state flows than domains with no-slip boundaries. These results should be useful for designing future experiment like those of Zeria et al. 2005 (Transport in Porous Media, 60:159-181) that would have significant potential implications in diverse fields.

  3. Modeling Malaysia's Energy System: Some Preliminary Results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmad M. Yusof

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: The current dynamic and fragile world energy environment necessitates the development of new energy model that solely caters to analyze Malaysia’s energy scenarios. Approach: The model is a network flow model that traces the flow of energy carriers from its sources (import and mining through some conversion and transformation processes for the production of energy products to final destinations (energy demand sectors. The integration to the economic sectors is done exogeneously by specifying the annual sectoral energy demand levels. The model in turn optimizes the energy variables for a specified objective function to meet those demands. Results: By minimizing the inter temporal petroleum product imports for the crude oil system the annual extraction level of Tapis blend is projected at 579600 barrels per day. The aggregate demand for petroleum products is projected to grow at 2.1% year-1 while motor gasoline and diesel constitute 42 and 38% of the petroleum products demands mix respectively over the 5 year planning period. Petroleum products import is expected to grow at 6.0% year-1. Conclusion: The preliminary results indicate that the model performs as expected. Thus other types of energy carriers such as natural gas, coal and biomass will be added to the energy system for the overall development of Malaysia energy model.

  4. Review and selection of unsaturated flow models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reeves, M.; Baker, N.A.; Duguid, J.O. [INTERA, Inc., Las Vegas, NV (United States)

    1994-04-04

    Since the 1960`s, ground-water flow models have been used for analysis of water resources problems. In the 1970`s, emphasis began to shift to analysis of waste management problems. This shift in emphasis was largely brought about by site selection activities for geologic repositories for disposal of high-level radioactive wastes. Model development during the 1970`s and well into the 1980`s focused primarily on saturated ground-water flow because geologic repositories in salt, basalt, granite, shale, and tuff were envisioned to be below the water table. Selection of the unsaturated zone at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, for potential disposal of waste began to shift model development toward unsaturated flow models. Under the US Department of Energy (DOE), the Civilian Radioactive Waste Management System Management and Operating Contractor (CRWMS M&O) has the responsibility to review, evaluate, and document existing computer models; to conduct performance assessments; and to develop performance assessment models, where necessary. This document describes the CRWMS M&O approach to model review and evaluation (Chapter 2), and the requirements for unsaturated flow models which are the bases for selection from among the current models (Chapter 3). Chapter 4 identifies existing models, and their characteristics. Through a detailed examination of characteristics, Chapter 5 presents the selection of models for testing. Chapter 6 discusses the testing and verification of selected models. Chapters 7 and 8 give conclusions and make recommendations, respectively. Chapter 9 records the major references for each of the models reviewed. Appendix A, a collection of technical reviews for each model, contains a more complete list of references. Finally, Appendix B characterizes the problems used for model testing.

  5. Modeling the effect of unsteady flows on the time average flow field of a blade row embedded in an axial flow multistage turbomachine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adamczyk, John J.

    1996-01-01

    The role of unsteady flow processes in establishing the performance of axial flow turbomachinery was investigated. The development of the flow model, as defined by the time average flow equations associated with the passage of the blade row embedded in a multistage configuration, is presented. The mechanisms for unsteady momentum and energy transport is outlined. The modeling of the unsteady momentum and energy transport are discussed. The procedure for simulating unsteady multistage turbomachinery flows is described.

  6. Vanadium Flow Battery for Energy Storage: Prospects and Challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Cong; Zhang, Huamin; Li, Xianfeng; Liu, Tao; Xing, Feng

    2013-04-18

    The vanadium flow battery (VFB) as one kind of energy storage technique that has enormous impact on the stabilization and smooth output of renewable energy. Key materials like membranes, electrode, and electrolytes will finally determine the performance of VFBs. In this Perspective, we report on the current understanding of VFBs from materials to stacks, describing the factors that affect materials' performance from microstructures to the mechanism and new materials development. Moreover, new models for VFB stacks as well as structural design will be summarized as well. Finally, the challenges, the overall cost evaluation, and future research directions will be briefly proposed.

  7. Unsaturated Zone Flow Model Expert Elicitation Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coppersmith, K. J.

    1997-05-30

    This report presents results of the Unsaturated Zone Flow Model Expert Elicitation (UZFMEE) project at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. This project was sponsored by the US Department of Energy (DOE) and managed by Geomatrix Consultants, Inc. (Geomatrix), for TRW Environmental Safety Systems, Inc. The objective of this project was to identify and assess the uncertainties associated with certain key components of the unsaturated zone flow system at Yucca Mountain. This assessment reviewed the data inputs, modeling approaches, and results of the unsaturated zone flow model (termed the ''UZ site-scale model'') being developed by Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) and the US Geological Survey (USGS). In addition to data input and modeling issues, the assessment focused on percolation flux (volumetric flow rate per unit cross-sectional area) at the potential repository horizon. An understanding of unsaturated zone processes is critical to evaluating the performance of the potential high-level nuclear waste repository at Yucca Mountain. A major goal of the project was to capture the uncertainties involved in assessing the unsaturated flow processes, including uncertainty in both the models used to represent physical controls on unsaturated zone flow and the parameter values used in the models. To ensure that the analysis included a wide range of perspectives, multiple individual judgments were elicited from members of an expert panel. The panel members, who were experts from within and outside the Yucca Mountain project, represented a range of experience and expertise. A deliberate process was followed in facilitating interactions among the experts, in training them to express their uncertainties, and in eliciting their interpretations. The resulting assessments and probability distributions, therefore, provide a reasonable aggregate representation of the knowledge and uncertainties about key issues regarding the unsaturated zone at the Yucca

  8. SIMULATION OF THE ATOMIZED FLOW BY SLIT TYPE BUCKET ENERGY DISSIPATOR

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Shi-he; DUAN Hong-dong

    2005-01-01

    Slit type bucket is one kind of flip bucket for energy dissipation generally used in the hydraulic project.In this paper the atomized flow produced behind this energy dissipator is analyzed, a numerical model for the aerated jet considering air entrainment and air resistance force is suggested, and simulation of the rain resulted by the atomized flow is also discussed.Furthermore, the prototype observation data for the atomized flow of Dongjiang Hydropower Station is used to verify the model suggested.

  9. Variable time flow as an alternative to dark energy

    CERN Document Server

    Magain, Pierre

    2016-01-01

    Time is a parameter playing a central role in our most fundamental modelling of natural laws. Relativity theory shows that the comparison of times measured by different clocks depends on their relative motions and on the strength of the gravitational field in which they are embedded. In standard cosmology, the time parameter is the one measured by fundamental clocks, i.e. clocks at rest with respect to the expanding space. This proper time is assumed to flow at a constant rate throughout the whole history of the Universe. We make the alternative hypothesis that the rate at which cosmological time flows depends on the global geometric curvature the Universe. Using a simple one-parameter model for the relation between proper time and curvature, we build a cosmological model that fits the Type Ia Supernovae data (the best cosmological standard candles) without the need for dark energy nor probably exotic dark matter.

  10. Modeling and Design of Semi-Solid Flow Batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunini, Victor Eric

    A three-dimensional dynamic model of the recently introduced semi-solid flow battery system is developed and applied to address issues with important design and operation implications. Because of the high viscosity of semi-solid flow battery suspensions, alternative modes of operation not typically used in conventional redox flow battery systems must be explored to reduce pumping energy losses. Modeling results are presented .and compared to experimental observations to address important considerations for both stoichiometric and intermittent flow operation. The importance of active material selection, and its impact on efficient stoichiometric flow operation is discussed. Electrochemically active zone considerations relevant to intermittent flow operation of semi-solid flow batteries (or other potential electronically conductive flow battery systems) are addressed. Finally, the use of the model as a design tool for optimizing flow channel design to improve system level performance is demonstrated.(Copies available exclusively from MIT Libraries, libraries.mit.edu/docs - docs@mit.edu)

  11. Heat transfer and flow in solar energy and bioenergy systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Ben

    The demand for clean and environmentally benign energy resources has been a great concern in the last two decades. To alleviate the associated environmental problems, reduction of the use of fossil fuels by developing more cost-effective renewable energy technologies becomes more and more significant. Among various types of renewable energy sources, solar energy and bioenergy take a great proportion. This dissertation focuses on the heat transfer and flow in solar energy and bioenergy systems, specifically for Thermal Energy Storage (TES) systems in Concentrated Solar Power (CSP) plants and open-channel algal culture raceways for biofuel production. The first part of this dissertation is the discussion about mathematical modeling, numerical simulation and experimental investigation of solar TES system. First of all, in order to accurately and efficiently simulate the conjugate heat transfer between Heat Transfer Fluid (HTF) and filler material in four different solid-fluid TES configurations, formulas of an e?ective heat transfer coe?cient were theoretically developed and presented by extending the validity of Lumped Capacitance Method (LCM) to large Biot number, as well as verifications/validations to this simplified model. Secondly, to provide design guidelines for TES system in CSP plant using Phase Change Materials (PCM), a general storage tank volume sizing strategy and an energy storage startup strategy were proposed using the enthalpy-based 1D transient model. Then experimental investigations were conducted to explore a novel thermal storage material. The thermal storage performances were also compared between this novel storage material and concrete at a temperature range from 400 °C to 500 °C. It is recommended to apply this novel thermal storage material to replace concrete at high operating temperatures in sensible heat TES systems. The second part of this dissertation mainly focuses on the numerical and experimental study of an open-channel algae

  12. Bootstrapping the energy flow in the beginning of life

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hengeveld, R.; Fedonkin, M.A.

    2007-01-01

    This paper suggests that the energy flow on which all living structures depend only started up slowly, the low-energy, initial phase starting up a second, slightly more energetic phase, and so on. In this way, the build up of the energy flow follows a bootstrapping process similar to that found in t

  13. Bootstrapping the energy flow in the beginning of life

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hengeveld, R.; Fedonkin, M.A.

    2007-01-01

    This paper suggests that the energy flow on which all living structures depend only started up slowly, the low-energy, initial phase starting up a second, slightly more energetic phase, and so on. In this way, the build up of the energy flow follows a bootstrapping process similar to that found in

  14. Scheduling to Minimize Energy and Flow Time in Broadcast Scheduling

    CERN Document Server

    Moseley, Benjamin

    2010-01-01

    In this paper we initiate the study of minimizing power consumption in the broadcast scheduling model. In this setting there is a wireless transmitter. Over time requests arrive at the transmitter for pages of information. Multiple requests may be for the same page. When a page is transmitted, all requests for that page receive the transmission simulteneously. The speed the transmitter sends data at can be dynamically scaled to conserve energy. We consider the problem of minimizing flow time plus energy, the most popular scheduling metric considered in the standard scheduling model when the scheduler is energy aware. We will assume that the power consumed is modeled by an arbitrary convex function. For this problem there is a $\\Omega(n)$ lower bound. Due to the lower bound, we consider the resource augmentation model of Gupta \\etal \\cite{GuptaKP10}. Using resource augmentation, we give a scalable algorithm. Our result also gives a scalable non-clairvoyant algorithm for minimizing weighted flow time plus energ...

  15. Asymmetric energy flow in liquid alkylbenzenes: A computational study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leitner, David M., E-mail: dml@unr.edu [Department of Chemistry and Chemical Physics Program, University of Nevada, Reno, Nevada 89557 (United States); Freiburg Institute for Advanced Studies (FRIAS), Freiburg (Germany); Pandey, Hari Datt [Department of Chemistry and Chemical Physics Program, University of Nevada, Reno, Nevada 89557 (United States)

    2015-10-14

    Ultrafast IR-Raman experiments on substituted benzenes [B. C. Pein et al., J. Phys. Chem. B 117, 10898–10904 (2013)] reveal that energy can flow more efficiently in one direction along a molecule than in others. We carry out a computational study of energy flow in the three alkyl benzenes, toluene, isopropylbenzene, and t-butylbenzene, studied in these experiments, and find an asymmetry in the flow of vibrational energy between the two chemical groups of the molecule due to quantum mechanical vibrational relaxation bottlenecks, which give rise to a preferred direction of energy flow. We compare energy flow computed for all modes of the three alkylbenzenes over the relaxation time into the liquid with energy flow through the subset of modes monitored in the time-resolved Raman experiments and find qualitatively similar results when using the subset compared to all the modes.

  16. Energy considerations in accelerating rapid shear granular flows

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. P. Pudasaini

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available We present a complete expression for the total energy associated with a rapid frictional granular shear flow down an inclined surface. This expression reduces to the often used energy for a non-accelerating flow of an isotropic, ideal fluid in a horizontal channel, or to the energy for a vertically falling mass. We utilize thickness-averaged mass and momentum conservation laws written in a slope-defined coordinate system. Both the enhanced gravity and friction are taken into account in addition to the bulk motion and deformation. The total energy of the flow at a given spatial position and time is defined as the sum of four energy components: the kinetic energy, gravity, pressure and the friction energy. Total energy is conserved for stationary flow, but for non-stationary flow the non-conservative force induced by the free-surface gradient means that energy is not conserved. Simulations and experimental results are used to sketch the total energy of non-stationary flows. Comparison between the total energy and the sum of the kinetic and pressure energy shows that the contribution due to gravity acceleration and frictional resistance can be of the same order of magnitude, and that the geometric deformation plays an important role in the total energy budget of the cascading mass. Relative importance of the different constituents in the total energy expression is explored. We also introduce an extended Froude number that takes into account the apparent potential energy induced by gravity and pressure.

  17. Dynamic simulation of energy consumption in mixed traffic flow considering highway toll station

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, Yong-Sheng; Zhang, Xiao-Long; Zeng, Jun-Wei; Shao, Xiao-Ming; Wang, Neng

    2015-01-01

    An improved model of energy consumption including toll station is presented in this paper. Using the model, we study the influences of mixed ratio, the idling energy consumption of vehicle, vehicle peak velocity, dwell time and random deceleration probability on energy consumption of Electronic Toll Collection or Manual Toll Collection mixed traffic flow on single lane under periodic condition. Simulating results indicate that the above five parameters are all increasing functions of total energy consumption, in which the idling energy consumption represents the major amounts with the increase of mixed ratio and occupancy rate. Thus, the existence of toll station has significant effect on the energy consumption of mixed traffic flow.

  18. High energy density Z-pinch plasmas using flow stabilization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shumlak, U., E-mail: shumlak@uw.edu; Golingo, R. P., E-mail: shumlak@uw.edu; Nelson, B. A., E-mail: shumlak@uw.edu; Bowers, C. A., E-mail: shumlak@uw.edu; Doty, S. A., E-mail: shumlak@uw.edu; Forbes, E. G., E-mail: shumlak@uw.edu; Hughes, M. C., E-mail: shumlak@uw.edu; Kim, B., E-mail: shumlak@uw.edu; Knecht, S. D., E-mail: shumlak@uw.edu; Lambert, K. K., E-mail: shumlak@uw.edu; Lowrie, W., E-mail: shumlak@uw.edu; Ross, M. P., E-mail: shumlak@uw.edu; Weed, J. R., E-mail: shumlak@uw.edu [Aerospace and Energetics Research Program, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington, 98195-2250 (United States)

    2014-12-15

    The ZaP Flow Z-Pinch research project[1] at the University of Washington investigates the effect of sheared flows on MHD instabilities. Axially flowing Z-pinch plasmas are produced that are 100 cm long with a 1 cm radius. The plasma remains quiescent for many radial Alfvén times and axial flow times. The quiescent periods are characterized by low magnetic mode activity measured at several locations along the plasma column and by stationary visible plasma emission. Plasma evolution is modeled with high-resolution simulation codes – Mach2, WARPX, NIMROD, and HiFi. Plasma flow profiles are experimentally measured with a multi-chord ion Doppler spectrometer. A sheared flow profile is observed to be coincident with the quiescent period, and is consistent with classical plasma viscosity. Equilibrium is determined by diagnostic measurements: interferometry for density; spectroscopy for ion temperature, plasma flow, and density[2]; Thomson scattering for electron temperature; Zeeman splitting for internal magnetic field measurements[3]; and fast framing photography for global structure. Wall stabilization has been investigated computationally and experimentally by removing 70% of the surrounding conducting wall to demonstrate no change in stability behavior.[4] Experimental evidence suggests that the plasma lifetime is only limited by plasma supply and current waveform. The flow Z-pinch concept provides an approach to achieve high energy density plasmas,[5] which are large, easy to diagnose, and persist for extended durations. A new experiment, ZaP-HD, has been built to investigate this approach by separating the flow Z-pinch formation from the radial compression using a triaxial-electrode configuration. This innovation allows more detailed investigations of the sheared flow stabilizing effect, and it allows compression to much higher densities than previously achieved on ZaP by reducing the linear density and increasing the pinch current. Experimental results and

  19. Online traffic flow model applying dynamic flow-density relation

    CERN Document Server

    Kim, Y

    2002-01-01

    This dissertation describes a new approach of the online traffic flow modelling based on the hydrodynamic traffic flow model and an online process to adapt the flow-density relation dynamically. The new modelling approach was tested based on the real traffic situations in various homogeneous motorway sections and a motorway section with ramps and gave encouraging simulation results. This work is composed of two parts: first the analysis of traffic flow characteristics and second the development of a new online traffic flow model applying these characteristics. For homogeneous motorway sections traffic flow is classified into six different traffic states with different characteristics. Delimitation criteria were developed to separate these states. The hysteresis phenomena were analysed during the transitions between these traffic states. The traffic states and the transitions are represented on a states diagram with the flow axis and the density axis. For motorway sections with ramps the complicated traffic fl...

  20. Modeling soil detachment capacity by rill flow using hydraulic parameters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Dongdong; Wang, Zhanli; Shen, Nan; Chen, Hao

    2016-04-01

    The relationship between soil detachment capacity (Dc) by rill flow and hydraulic parameters (e.g., flow velocity, shear stress, unit stream power, stream power, and unit energy) at low flow rates is investigated to establish an accurate experimental model. Experiments are conducted using a 4 × 0.1 m rill hydraulic flume with a constant artificial roughness on the flume bed. The flow rates range from 0.22 × 10-3 m2 s-1 to 0.67 × 10-3 m2 s-1, and the slope gradients vary from 15.8% to 38.4%. Regression analysis indicates that the Dc by rill flow can be predicted using the linear equations of flow velocity, stream power, unit stream power, and unit energy. Dc by rill flow that is fitted to shear stress can be predicted with a power function equation. Predictions based on flow velocity, unit energy, and stream power are powerful, but those based on shear stress, especially on unit stream power, are relatively poor. The prediction based on flow velocity provides the best estimates of Dc by rill flow because of the simplicity and availability of its measurements. Owing to error in measuring flow velocity at low flow rates, the predictive abilities of Dc by rill flow using all hydraulic parameters are relatively lower in this study compared with the results of previous research. The measuring accuracy of experiments for flow velocity should be improved in future research.

  1. Polytropic dark matter flows illuminate dark energy and accelerated expansion

    CERN Document Server

    Kleidis, K

    2014-01-01

    Currently, a large amount of data implies that the matter constituents of the cosmological dark sector might be collisional. An attractive feature of such a possibility is that, it can reconcile dark matter (DM) and dark energy (DE) in terms of a single component, accommodated in the context of a polytropic-DM fluid. Accordingly, we explore the time evolution and the dynamical characteristics of a spatially-flat cosmological model, in which, in principle, there is no DE at all. Instead, in this model, the DM itself possesses some sort of fluid-like properties, i.e., the fundamental units of the Universe matter-energy content are the volume elements of a DM fluid, performing polytropic flows. In this case, the energy of this fluid's internal motions is also taken into account as a source of the universal gravitational field. This form of energy can compensate for the extra energy needed to compromise spatial flatness, namely, to justify that, today, the total-energy density parameter is exactly unity. The poly...

  2. A stable isotope ( δ13C, δ15N) model for the North Water food web: implications for evaluating trophodynamics and the flow of energy and contaminants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hobson, Keith A.; Fisk, Aaron; Karnovsky, Nina; Holst, Meike; Gagnon, Jean-Marc; Fortier, Martin

    fundamentally in transferring energy and carbon flux to higher trophic-level seabirds and marine mammals. We measured PCB 153 among selected organisms to investigate the behavior of bioaccumulating contaminants within the food web. Our isotopic model confirmed the trophic magnification of PCB 153 in this high-Arctic food web due to a strong correlation between contaminant concentration and organism δ15N values, demonstrating the utility of combining isotopic and contaminant approaches to food-web studies. Stable-carbon isotope analysis confirmed an enrichment in 13C between POM and ice algae (-22.3 vs. -17.7‰). Benthic organisms were generally enriched in 13C compared to pelagic species. We discuss individual species isotopic data and the general utility of our stable isotope model for defining carbon flux and contaminant flow through the North Water food web.

  3. Energy Operation Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2017-04-27

    Energy Operation Model (EOM) simulates the operation of the electric grid at the zonal scale, including inter-zonal transmission constraints. It generates the production cost, power generation by plant and category, fuel usage, and locational marginal price (LMP) with a flexible way to constrain the power production by environmental constraints, e.g. heat waves, drought conditions). Different from commercial software such as PROMOD IV where generator capacity and heat rate efficiency can only be adjusted on a monthly basis, EOM calculates capacity impacts and plant efficiencies based on hourly ambient conditions (air temperature and humidity) and cooling water availability for thermal plants. What is missing is a hydro power dispatch.

  4. Numerical modelling in wave energy conversion systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    El Marjani, A. [Labo. de Turbomachines, Ecole Mohammadia d' Ingenieurs (EMI), Universite Mohammed V Agdal, Av Ibn Sina, B.P. 765 Agdal, Rabat (Morocco); Castro Ruiz, F.; Rodriguez, M.A.; Parra Santos, M.T. [Depto. de Ingenieria Energetica y Fluidomecanica, Escuela Tecnica Superior de Ingenieros Industriales, Universidad de Valladolid, Paseo del Cauce s/n, E-47011 Valladolid (Spain)

    2008-08-15

    This paper deals with a numerical modelling devoted to predict the flow characteristics in the components of an oscillating water column (OWC) system used for the wave energy capture. In the present paper, the flow behaviour is modelled by using the FLUENT code. Two numerical flow models have been elaborated and tested independently in the geometries of an air chamber and a turbine, which is chosen of a radial impulse type. The flow is assumed to be three-dimensional (3D), viscous, turbulent and unsteady. The FLUENT code is used with a solver of the coupled conservation equations of mass, momentum and energy, with an implicit time scheme and with the adoption of the dynamic mesh and the sliding mesh techniques in areas of moving surfaces. Turbulence is modelled with the k-{epsilon} model. The obtained results indicate that the developed models are well suitable to analyse the air flows both in the air chamber and in the turbine. The performances associated with the energy transfer processes have been well predicted. For the turbine, the numerical results of pressure and torque were compared to the experimental ones. Good agreements between these results have been observed. (author)

  5. Stochastic models for turbulent reacting flows

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kerstein, A. [Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA (United States)

    1993-12-01

    The goal of this program is to develop and apply stochastic models of various processes occurring within turbulent reacting flows in order to identify the fundamental mechanisms governing these flows, to support experimental studies of these flows, and to further the development of comprehensive turbulent reacting flow models.

  6. National Energy Outlook Modelling System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Volkers, C.M. [ECN Policy Studies, Petten (Netherlands)

    2013-12-15

    For over 20 years, the Energy research Centre of the Netherlands (ECN) has been developing the National Energy Outlook Modelling System (NEOMS) for Energy projections and policy evaluations. NEOMS enables 12 energy models of ECN to exchange data and produce consistent and detailed results.

  7. Thermal power system analysis using a generalized network flow model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumar, John Arun [Former Senior Design Engineer, Power System Analysis and Control Group, Bharat Heavy Electricals Limited, New Delhi (India); Chebiyam, Radhakrishna [Former Director, Academic Staff College, JNT University, Hyderabad-72 (India)

    2012-07-01

    This paper analyzes an Integrated Thermal Power System using a Multiperiod Generalized Network Flow Model. The thermal system analysis is carried out by taking into account the complex dynamics involved in utilizing multiple energy carriers (coal, diesel and natural gas). The model comprises energy source nodes, energy transformation nodes, energy storage nodes, energy demand nodes and their interconnections. The solution to the integrated energy system problem involves the evaluation of energy flows that meet the electricity demand at minimum total cost, while satisfying system constraints. This is illustrated through the India case study using a minimum time-step of one hour. MATLAB based software was developed for carrying out this study. TOMLAB/CPLEX software was utilized for obtaining the optimal solution. The model and the methodology utilized for conducting the study would be of interest to those involved in integrated energy system planning for a country or a region.

  8. Energy System Modeling with REopt

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simpkins, Travis; Anderson, Kate; Cutler, Dylan; Olis, Dan; Elgqvist, Emma; DiOrio, Nick; Walker, Andy

    2016-07-15

    This poster details how REopt - NREL's software modeling platform for energy systems integration and optimization - can help to model energy systems. Some benefits of modeling with REopt include optimizing behind the meter storage for cost and resiliency, optimizing lab testing, optimizing dispatch of utility scale storage, and quantifying renewable energy impact on outage survivability.

  9. Electromagnetic energy flow lines as possible paths of photons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davidovic, M [Faculty of Civil Engineering, University of Belgrade, Bulevar Kralja Aleksandra 73, 11000 Belgrade (Serbia); Sanz, A S; Miret-Artes, S [Instituto de Fisica Fundamental, Consejo Superior de Investigaciones CientIficas, Serrano 123, 28006 Madrid (Spain); Arsenovic, D; Bozic, M [Institute of Physics, University of Belgrade, Pregrevica 118, 11080 Belgrade (Serbia)], E-mail: milena@grf.bg.ac.yu, E-mail: asanz@imaff.cfmac.csic.es, E-mail: arsenovic@phy.bg.ac.yu, E-mail: bozic@phy.bg.ac.yu, E-mail: s.miret@imaff.cfmac.csic.es

    2009-07-15

    Motivated by recent experiments where interference patterns behind a grating are obtained by accumulating single photon events, we provide here an electromagnetic energy flow-line description to explain the emergence of such patterns. We find and discuss an analogy between the equation describing these energy flow lines and the equation of Bohmian trajectories used to describe the motion of massive particles.

  10. Large Eddy Simulation of Turbulent Flows in Wind Energy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chivaee, Hamid Sarlak

    This research is devoted to the Large Eddy Simulation (LES), and to lesser extent, wind tunnel measurements of turbulent flows in wind energy. It starts with an introduction to the LES technique associated with the solution of the incompressible Navier-Stokes equations, discretized using a finite...... Reynolds numbers, and thereafter, the fully-developed infinite wind farm boundary later simulations are performed. Sources of inaccuracy in the simulations are investigated and it is found that high Reynolds number flows are more sensitive to the choice of the SGS model than their low Reynolds number...... of attack. Laminar-turbulent transition, generation of laminar boundary layer separation, and formation of stall cells are investigated. The simulated airfoil characteristics are validated against measurements. It is concluded that the LES computations and wind tunnel measurements are in good agreement...

  11. Energy flow theory of nonlinear dynamical systems with applications

    CERN Document Server

    Xing, Jing Tang

    2015-01-01

    This monograph develops a generalised energy flow theory to investigate non-linear dynamical systems governed by ordinary differential equations in phase space and often met in various science and engineering fields. Important nonlinear phenomena such as, stabilities, periodical orbits, bifurcations and chaos are tack-led and the corresponding energy flow behaviors are revealed using the proposed energy flow approach. As examples, the common interested nonlinear dynamical systems, such as, Duffing’s oscillator, Van der Pol’s equation, Lorenz attractor, Rössler one and SD oscillator, etc, are discussed. This monograph lights a new energy flow research direction for nonlinear dynamics. A generalised Matlab code with User Manuel is provided for readers to conduct the energy flow analysis of their nonlinear dynamical systems. Throughout the monograph the author continuously returns to some examples in each chapter to illustrate the applications of the discussed theory and approaches. The book can be used as ...

  12. Experimental Studies on Turbulence Kinetic Energy in Confined Vortex Flows

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    L.Yan; G.H.Vatistas; 等

    2000-01-01

    Turbulence kinetic energies in confined vortex flows have been studied.The studies were based on the experiments performed in a vortex chamber,In the experiments,a Laser Doppler Anemometry(LDA) was used to perform flow measurements inside the vortex chamber,which provided the data for the kinetic energy analysis.The studies concentrated on the influences of the contraction ratio and the inlet air flow rate on the kinetic energy,and analyzed the characteristics of the kinetic energy in the confined vortex flows,including the distributions of the tangential component,radial component and total turbulence kinetic energy,In the paper,both the experimental techniques and the experimental results were presented.Based on a similarity analyis and the experimental data,an empirical scaling formula was proposed so that the tangential component of the turbulence kinetic energy was dependent only on the parameter of the contraction ratio.

  13. Collective Flow in Heavy Ion Collisions at Low to Relativistic Energies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lisa, M. A.

    1997-04-01

    Recently, the phenomenon of collective flow in heavy ion collisions has been the subject of intense study. First observed at the Bevalac more than a decade ago, flow is now recognized as a universal feature of heavy ion collisions at all bombarding energies. Recent developments in three identified forms of flow-- sidewards flow, radial flow, and squeeze-out-- will be reviewed. At low energies (EOS and FOPI collaborations have considerably extended the work begun by the Plastic Ball group; here, studies of the flow of nucleons, fragments, and pions lead to a better understanding of the Equation of State of nuclear matter, momentum dependent interactions, and pion shadowing. The squeeze-out effect at Bevalac energies may be the most sensitive form of flow to the equation of state. Recent studies suggest that squeeze-out may be considered as an azimuthal modulation of the radial flow. The E895 collaboration is continuing the flow excitation function of the EOS/FOPI groups for 2-10 A GeV bombarding energies, with the aim of increasing the sensitivity to Equation of State parameters, as well as searching for flow signatures of Quark Gluon Plasma creation. Sidewards flow at the highest AGS energy for Au beams(11 A GeV) has been reported by the E877 collaboration, which has correlated the effect with pion interferometry measurements to identify possible dynamical correlations in the collision. Finally, at the highest energies currently available, the NA49 collaboration has found sidewards flow at SPS energies (160 A GeV); preliminary comparisons to RQMD calculations indicate that the model reproduces the flow well. At all of these bombarding energies (over 3 orders of magnitude!), the particle spectra show a strong non-thermal component which has been identified as largely isotropic or "radial" flow. While the sidewards flow accounts for only ~5% of emitted particles' energy, roughly 30-50% of the energy of emitted particles is found in radial flow. Several groups are

  14. The thermodynamics of diastole: kinematic modeling-based derivation of the P-V loop to transmitral flow energy relation with in vivo validation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mossahebi, Sina; Shmuylovich, Leonid; Kovács, Sándor J

    2011-02-01

    Pressure-volume (P-V) loop-based analysis facilitates thermodynamic assessment of left ventricular function in terms of work and energy. Typically these quantities are calculated for a cardiac cycle using the entire P-V loop, although thermodynamic analysis may be applied to a selected phase of the cardiac cycle, specifically, diastole. Diastolic function is routinely quantified by analysis of transmitral Doppler E-wave contours. The first law of thermodynamics requires that energy (ε) computed from the Doppler E-wave (εE-wave) and the same portion of the P-V loop (εP-V E-wave) be equivalent. These energies have not been previously derived nor have their predicted equivalence been experimentally validated. To test the hypothesis that εP-V E-wave and εE-wave are equivalent, we used a validated kinematic model of filling to derive εE-wave in terms of chamber stiffness, relaxation/viscoelasticity, and load. For validation, simultaneous (conductance catheter) P-V and echocadiographic data from 12 subjects (205 total cardiac cycles) having a range of diastolic function were analyzed. For each E-wave, εE-wave was compared with εP-V E-wave calculated from simultaneous P-V data. Linear regression yielded the following: εP-V E-wave=αεE-wave+b (R2=0.67), where α=0.95 and b=6e(-5). We conclude that E-wave-derived energy for suction-initiated early rapid filling εE-wave, quantitated via kinematic modeling, is equivalent to invasive P-V-defined filling energy. Hence, the thermodynamics of diastole via εE-wave generate a novel mechanism-based index of diastolic function suitable for in vivo phenotypic characterization.

  15. Computational modelling of SCC flow

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Geiker, Mette Rica; Thrane, Lars Nyholm; Szabo, Peter

    2005-01-01

    To benefit from the full potential of self-compacting concrete (SCC) prediction tools are needed for the form filling of SCC. Such tools should take into account the properties of the concrete, the shape and size of the structural element, the position of rebars, and the casting technique. Exampl...... of computational models for the time dependent flow behavior are given, and advantages and disadvantages of discrete particle and single fluid models are briefly described.......To benefit from the full potential of self-compacting concrete (SCC) prediction tools are needed for the form filling of SCC. Such tools should take into account the properties of the concrete, the shape and size of the structural element, the position of rebars, and the casting technique. Examples...

  16. An improved treatment of radiation energy flow in the radiation-hydrodynamics code CHARTD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rottler, J.S.

    1987-05-01

    An improved treatment of radiation transport has been added to the energy flow model in CHARTD. The new energy flow model was derived based on the assumption that the directional dependence of the radiation energy density can be represented by the first two terms of a spherical harmonic expansion, and that the photon energy spectrum can be partitioned into energy groups. This treatment of radiation transport is called the multigroup P-1 approximation, and is an effective description of radiation transport for a broad class of radiation-hydrodynamics problems. A synthetic acceleration scheme is used to solve the differenced multigroup P-1 equations. The coupling between the material field and the radiation field is fully explicit. This report describes the new energy flow model and the acceleration scheme used to solve the difference equations. 15 refs.

  17. Energy storage: Redox Flow Batteries Go Organic

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Wei; Sprenkle, Vincent L.

    2016-02-19

    Access to sustainable and affordable energy is the foundation for the economic growth of our current society and its future prosperity. Energy harvested from renewable resources, such as solar and wind, although currently at a small fraction, is on a steady trajectory of increasing installation accompanied with falling cost. Driven also by the need to reduce the carbon footprint from electricity generation, they could provide a clean and sustainable energy future. The caveat, however, is the intermittent and fluctuating nature of the renewables, which threatens the stability of the grid when its share surpasses 20% of the overall energy capacity. 1 Besides the on-demand power generation, electrical energy storage is another potentially cost-effective way to provide massive energy storage for not only renewable energy integration, but to balance the mismatch between supply and demand, and the improvement of grid reliability and efficiency also.

  18. Mutiscale Modeling of Segregation in Granular Flows

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun, Jin [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2007-01-01

    Modeling and simulation of segregation phenomena in granular flows are investigated. Computational models at different scales ranging from particle level (microscale) to continuum level (macroscale) are employed in order to determine the important microscale physics relevant to macroscale modeling. The capability of a multi-fluid model to capture segregation caused by density difference is demonstrated by simulating grain-chaff biomass flows in a laboratory-scale air column and in a combine harvester. The multi-fluid model treats gas and solid phases as interpenetrating continua in an Eulerian frame. This model is further improved by incorporating particle rotation using kinetic theory for rapid granular flow of slightly frictional spheres. A simplified model is implemented without changing the current kinetic theory framework by introducing an effective coefficient of restitution to account for additional energy dissipation due to frictional collisions. The accuracy of predicting segregation rate in a gas-fluidized bed is improved by the implementation. This result indicates that particle rotation is important microscopic physics to be incorporated into the hydrodynamic model. Segregation of a large particle in a dense granular bed of small particles under vertical. vibration is studied using molecular dynamics simulations. Wall friction is identified as a necessary condition for the segregation. Large-scale force networks bearing larger-than-average forces are found with the presence of wall friction. The role of force networks in assisting rising of the large particle is analyzed. Single-point force distribution and two-point spatial force correlation are computed. The results show the heterogeneity of forces and a short-range correlation. The short correlation length implies that even dense granular flows may admit local constitutive relations. A modified minimum spanning tree (MST) algorithm is developed to asymptotically recover the force statistics in the

  19. Relationships among the energy, emergy, and money flows of the United States from 1900 to 2011.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Energy Systems Language models of the resource base for the U.S. economy and of economic exchange were used, respectively, (1) to show how energy consumption and emergy use contribute to real and nominal gross domestic product (GDP) and (2) to propose a model of coupled flows tha...

  20. Concepts and parameterisation of Perla and FLM model using Flow-R for debris flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horton, P.; Jaboyedoff, M.; Rudaz, B.

    2012-04-01

    The Flow-R software was built to allow regional debris flow susceptibility assessment. It uses propagation algorithms such as the friction model from Perla and friction-limited models (FLM). By using concepts from both models, a methodology is proposed to evaluate the friction angle and mass-to-drag ratio based on the maximum velocity estimation for debris flows, and on the observed runout on the debris fan. The goal is to use the energy line concept, the debris fan slope, and the runout on the latter, to estimate the friction angle, the Mass to Drag ratio and maximum flow velocity for a given debris flow event and specific conditions of a catchment. A relation between those parameters themselves and between them and the observed characteristics of the flow (runout, speed of flow, viscosity, thickness) is established. The sensitivity of the Flow-R model is tested on two real cases and a theoretical topography for both model types. The importance of the friction angle, relative to M/D, is established. It demonstrates that the FLM model gives results similar to the Perla model, and is useful to determine the friction angle and M/D parameters on debris fan topography, using known events as calibration for each case. Those parameters can then be used as input for local hazard simulation and prediction. In addition, using a broad set of parameters instead of of an ideal one, inducing different propagation results, is proposed for debris flow hazard mapping and assessment.

  1. Modeling energy transport in nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pattamatta, Arvind

    Heat transfer in nanostructures differ significantly from that in the bulk materials since the characteristic length scales associated with heat carriers, i.e., the mean free path and the wavelength, are comparable to the characteristic length of the nanostructures. Nanostructure materials hold the promise of novel phenomena, properties, and functions in the areas of thermal management and energy conversion. Example of thermal management in micro/nano electronic devices is the use of efficient nanostructured materials to alleviate 'hot spots' in integrated circuits. Examples in the manipulation of heat flow and energy conversion include nanostructures for thermoelectric energy conversion, thermophotovoltaic power generation, and data storage. One of the major challenges in Metal-Oxide Field Effect Transistor (MOSFET) devices is to study the 'hot spot' generation by accurately modeling the carrier-optical phonon-acoustic phonon interactions. Prediction of hotspot temperature and position in MOSFET devices is necessary for improving thermal design and reliability of micro/nano electronic devices. Thermoelectric properties are among the properties that may drastically change at nanoscale. The efficiency of thermoelectric energy conversion in a material is measured by a non-dimensional figure of merit (ZT) defined as, ZT = sigmaS2T/k where sigma is the electrical conductivity, S is the Seebeck coefficient, T is the temperature, and k is the thermal conductivity. During the last decade, advances have been made in increasing ZT using nanostructures. Three important topics are studied with respect to energy transport in nanostructure materials for micro/nano electronic and thermoelectric applications; (1) the role of nanocomposites in improving the thermal efficiency of thermoelectric devices, (2) the interfacial thermal resistance for the semiconductor/metal contacts in thermoelectric devices and for metallic interconnects in micro/nano electronic devices, (3) the

  2. Energy flow lines and the spot of Poisson-Arago

    CERN Document Server

    Gondran, Michel

    2009-01-01

    We show how energy flow lines answer the question about diffraction phenomena presented in 1818 by the French Academy: "deduce by mathematical induction, the movements of the rays during their crossing near the bodies". This provides a complementary answer to Fresnel's wave theory of light. A numerical simulation of these energy flow lines proves that they can reach the bright spot of Poisson-Arago in the shadow center of a circular opaque disc. For a monochromatic wave in vacuum, these energy flow lines correspond to the diffracted rays of Newton's Opticks.

  3. Revolutions in energy through modeling and simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tatro, M.; Woodard, J.

    1998-08-01

    The development and application of energy technologies for all aspects from generation to storage have improved dramatically with the advent of advanced computational tools, particularly modeling and simulation. Modeling and simulation are not new to energy technology development, and have been used extensively ever since the first commercial computers were available. However, recent advances in computing power and access have broadened the extent and use, and, through increased fidelity (i.e., accuracy) of the models due to greatly enhanced computing power, the increased reliance on modeling and simulation has shifted the balance point between modeling and experimentation. The complex nature of energy technologies has motivated researchers to use these tools to understand better performance, reliability and cost issues related to energy. The tools originated in sciences such as the strength of materials (nuclear reactor containment vessels); physics, heat transfer and fluid flow (oil production); chemistry, physics, and electronics (photovoltaics); and geosciences and fluid flow (oil exploration and reservoir storage). Other tools include mathematics, such as statistics, for assessing project risks. This paper describes a few advancements made possible by these tools and explores the benefits and costs of their use, particularly as they relate to the acceleration of energy technology development. The computational complexity ranges from basic spreadsheets to complex numerical simulations using hardware ranging from personal computers (PCs) to Cray computers. In all cases, the benefits of using modeling and simulation relate to lower risks, accelerated technology development, or lower cost projects.

  4. Recent trends in energy flows through the Arctic climate system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayer, Michael; Haimberger, Leo

    2016-04-01

    While Arctic climate change can be diagnosed in many parameters, a comprehensive assessment of long-term changes and low frequency variability in the coupled Arctic energy budget still remains challenging due to the complex physical processes involved and the lack of observations. Here we draw on strongly improved observational capabilities of the past 15 years and employ observed radiative fluxes from CERES along with state-of-the-art atmospheric as well as coupled ocean-ice reanalyses to explore recent changes in energy flows through the Arctic climate system. Various estimates of ice volume and ocean heat content trends imply that the energy imbalance of the Arctic climate system was >1 Wm-2 during the 2000-2015 period, where most of the extra heat warmed the ocean and a comparatively small fraction was used to melt sea ice. The energy imbalance was partly fed by enhanced oceanic heat transports into the Arctic, especially in the mid 2000s. Seasonal trends of net radiation show a very clear signal of the ice-albedo feedback. Stronger radiative energy input during summer means increased seasonal oceanic heat uptake and accelerated sea ice melt. In return, lower minimum sea ice extent and higher SSTs lead to enhanced heat release from the ocean during fall season. These results are consistent with modeling studies finding an enhancement of the annual cycle of surface energy exchanges in a warming Arctic. Moreover, stronger heat fluxes from the ocean to the atmosphere in fall tend to warm the arctic boundary layer and reduce meridional temperature gradients, thereby reducing atmospheric energy transports into the polar cap. Although the observed results are a robust finding, extended high-quality datasets are needed to reliably separate trends from low frequency variability.

  5. Cellular automata models for synchronized traffic flow

    CERN Document Server

    Jiang Rui

    2003-01-01

    This paper presents a new cellular automata model for describing synchronized traffic flow. The fundamental diagrams, the spacetime plots and the 1 min average data have been analysed in detail. It is shown that the model can describe the outflow from the jams, the light synchronized flow as well as heavy synchronized flow with average speed greater than approximately 24 km h sup - sup 1. As for the synchronized flow with speed lower than 24 km h sup - sup 1 , it is unstable and will evolve into the coexistence of jams, free flow and light synchronized flow. This is consistent with the empirical findings (Kerner B S 1998 Phys. Rev. Lett. 81 3797).

  6. Inventory of state energy models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Melcher, A.G.; Gist, R.L.; Underwood, R.G.; Weber, J.C.

    1980-03-31

    These models address a variety of purposes, such as supply or demand of energy or of certain types of energy, emergency management of energy, conservation in end uses of energy, and economic factors. Fifty-one models are briefly described as to: purpose; energy system; applications;status; validation; outputs by sector, energy type, economic and physical units, geographic area, and time frame; structure and modeling techniques; submodels; working assumptions; inputs; data sources; related models; costs; references; and contacts. Discussions in the report include: project purposes and methods of research, state energy modeling in general, model types and terminology, and Federal legislation to which state modeling is relevant. Also, a state-by-state listing of modeling efforts is provided and other model inventories are identified. The report includes a brief encylopedia of terms used in energy models. It is assumed that many readers of the report will not be experienced in the technical aspects of modeling. The project was accomplished by telephone conversations and document review by a team from the Colorado School of Mines Research Institute and the faculty of the Colorado School of Mines. A Technical Committee (listed in the report) provided advice during the course of the project.

  7. Modeling steam pressure under martian lava flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dundas, Colin M.; Keszthelyi, Laszlo P.

    2013-01-01

    Rootless cones on Mars are a valuable indicator of past interactions between lava and water. However, the details of the lava–water interactions are not fully understood, limiting the ability to use these features to infer new information about past water on Mars. We have developed a model for the pressurization of a dry layer of porous regolith by melting and boiling ground ice in the shallow subsurface. This model builds on previous models of lava cooling and melting of subsurface ice. We find that for reasonable regolith properties and ice depths of decimeters, explosive pressures can be reached. However, the energy stored within such lags is insufficient to excavate thick flows unless they draw steam from a broader region than the local eruption site. These results indicate that lag pressurization can drive rootless cone formation under favorable circumstances, but in other instances molten fuel–coolant interactions are probably required. We use the model results to consider a range of scenarios for rootless cone formation in Athabasca Valles. Pressure buildup by melting and boiling ice under a desiccated lag is possible in some locations, consistent with the expected distribution of ice implanted from atmospheric water vapor. However, it is uncertain whether such ice has existed in the vicinity of Athabasca Valles in recent history. Plausible alternative sources include surface snow or an aqueous flood shortly before the emplacement of the lava flow.

  8. Energy flow and thermal comfort in buildings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Le Dreau, Jerome

    insulated buildings (R > 5 m2.K/W). In case of single-storey building with a low level of insulation, the effectiveness of radiant terminals is lower due to the larger back losses, and an air-based terminal might be more energy-efficient than a radiant terminal (in terms of delivered energy). Regarding...... is based on both radiation and convection. Radiant terminals have the advantage of making use of low grade sources (i.e. low temperature heating and high temperature cooling), thus decreasing the primary energy consumption of buildings. But there is a lack of knowledge on the heat transfer from...... beam. The higher the air change rate and the warmer the outdoor air, the larger the savings achieved with a radiant cooling terminals. Therefore radiant terminals have a large potential of energy savings for buildings with high ventilation rates (e.g. shop, train station, industrial storage). Among...

  9. Elliptic flow in heavy-ion collisions at NICA energies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ivanov, Yu.B. [National Research Centre ' ' Kurchatov Institute' ' (NRC ' ' Kurchatov Institute' ' ), Moscow (Russian Federation); National Research Nuclear University ' ' MEPhI' ' (Moscow Engineering Physics Institute), Moscow (Russian Federation); Soldatov, A.A. [National Research Nuclear University ' ' MEPhI' ' (Moscow Engineering Physics Institute), Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2016-08-15

    The transverse-momentum-integrated elliptic flow of charged particles at midrapidity, v{sub 2} (charged), and that of identified hadrons from Au+Au collisions are analyzed in the range of incident energies relevant to the Nuclotron-based Ion Collider Facility (NICA). Simulations are performed within a three-fluid model employing three different equations of state (EoSs): a purely hadronic EoS and two versions of the EoS involving the deconfinement transition-a first-order phase transition and a smooth crossover one. The present simulations demonstrate low sensitivity of v{sub 2} (charged) to the EoS. All considered scenarios equally well reproduce recent STAR data on v{sub 2} (charged) for mid-central Au+Au collisions and properly describe its change of sign at the incident energy decrease below √(s{sub NN}) ∼ 3.5 GeV. The predicted integrated elliptic flow of various species exhibits a stronger dependence on the EoS. A noticeable sensitivity to the EoS is found for anti-protons and, to a lesser extent, for K{sup -} mesons. Presently there are no experimental data that could verify these predictions. Future experiments at NICA could corroborate these findings. (orig.)

  10. A speed-flow relationship model of highway traffic flow

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Wei; LI Wei; REN Gang

    2005-01-01

    In the view that the generally used speed-flow relationship model is insufficient in the traffic analysis under over-saturated conditions, this paper first establishes the theoretical models of speed flow relationship for each highway class based upon a large number of traffic data collected from the field. Then by analyzing the traffic flow dissipation mechanism under peak hour over-saturated traffic conditions, the speed flow relationship model structures for each highway class are reviewed under different traffic load conditions. Through curve-fitting of large numbers of observed data, functional equations of general speed-flow relationship models for each highway class under any traffic load conditions are established. The practical model parameters for each highway class under different design speeds are also put forward. This model is successful in solving the speed-forecasting problem of the traffic flow under peak hour over-saturated conditions. This provides the theoretical bases for the development of projects related to highway network planning, economic analysis, etc.

  11. A toy terrestrial carbon flow model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parton, William J.; Running, Steven W.; Walker, Brian

    1992-01-01

    A generalized carbon flow model for the major terrestrial ecosystems of the world is reported. The model is a simplification of the Century model and the Forest-Biogeochemical model. Topics covered include plant production, decomposition and nutrient cycling, biomes, the utility of the carbon flow model for predicting carbon dynamics under global change, and possible applications to state-and-transition models and environmentally driven global vegetation models.

  12. Network-based representation of energy transfer in unsteady separated flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nair, Aditya; Taira, Kunihiko

    2015-11-01

    We construct a network-based representation of energy pathways in unsteady separated flows using a POD-Galerkin projection model. In this formulation, we regard the POD modes as the network nodes and the energy transfer between the modes as the network edges. Based on the energy transfer analysis performed by Noack et al. (2008), edge weights are characterized on the interaction graph. As an example, we examine the energy transfer within the two-dimensional incompressible flow over a circular cylinder. In particular, we analyze the energy pathways involved in flow transition from the unstable symmetric steady state to periodic shedding cycle. The growth of perturbation energy over the network is examined to highlight key features of flow physics and to determine how the energy transfer can be influenced. Furthermore, we implement closed-loop flow control on the POD-Galerkin model to alter the energy interaction path and modify the global behavior of the wake dynamics. The insights gained will be used to perform further network analysis on fluid flows with added complexity. Work supported by US Army Research Office (W911NF-14-1-0386) and US Air Force Office of Scientific Research (YIP: FA9550-13-1-0183).

  13. Self-powered water splitting using flowing kinetic energy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Wei; Han, Yu; Han, Chang Bao; Gao, Cai Zhen; Cao, Xia; Wang, Zhong Lin

    2015-01-14

    By utilizing a water-flow-driven triboelectric nanogenerator, a fully self-powered water-splitting process is demonstrated using the electricity converted from a water flow without additional energy costs. Considering the extremely low costs, the demonstrated approach is universally applicable and practically usable for future water electrolysis, which may initiate a research direction in the field of triboelectrolysis and possibly impacts energy science in general. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  14. Analysis of changing hidden energy flow in Vietnam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nguyen Thi Anh Tuyet [Graduate School of Energy Science, Kyoto University, Yoshida Honmachi, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto, 606-8501 (Japan)]. E-mail: a_tuyet@yahoo.com; Ishihara, Keiichi N. [Graduate School of Energy Science, Kyoto University, Yoshida Honmachi, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto, 606-8501 (Japan)]. E-mail: ishihara@energy.kyoto-u.ac.jp

    2006-09-15

    The energy consumption in production process is changing especially in developing countries by substituting technology. Input-output analysis for energy flows has been developing and is one of the best solutions for investigating macroscopic exchanges of both economy and energy. Since each element in the Leontief inverse contains both direct and indirect effects of any change in final demand, to separate those direct and indirect effects, the power series expansion is available. In this work, the changes of embodied energy intensity in Vietnam from 1996 to 2000 were analyzed using the structural decomposition and its power series expansion. By illustrating the change of causal relationship between direct energy consumption and embodied energy consumption, the change of hidden energy flow, which indicates how the changing embodied energy builds up the change of direct energy consumption in every sector, can be seen. In the case study, the rice processing sector, which is one of the important food processing sectors in Vietnam, is focused. By drawing a diagrammatic map for the change of hidden energy flow, it is clarified that in the case of raising embodied energy intensity, cultivation sector and trade and repaired service sector are the main contributors, and, on the contrary, in the case of reducing embodied energy intensity, paper pulp sector is the main contributor.

  15. Sex differences of human cortical blood flow and energy metabolism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aanerud, Joel; Borghammer, Per; Rodell, Anders

    2017-01-01

    cortex. Women had significant decreases of cerebral blood flow as function of age in frontal and parietal lobes. Young women had significantly higher cerebral blood flow than men in frontal and temporal lobes, but these differences had disappeared at age 65. The absent sex difference of cerebral energy...

  16. Objective information about energy models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hale, D.R. (Energy Information Administration, Washington, DC (United States))

    1993-01-01

    This article describes the Energy Information Administration's program to develop objective information about its modeling systems without hindering model development and applications, and within budget and human resource constraints. 16 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs.

  17. Site-Scale Saturated Zone Flow Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    G. Zyvoloski

    2003-12-17

    The purpose of this model report is to document the components of the site-scale saturated-zone flow model at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, in accordance with administrative procedure (AP)-SIII.lOQ, ''Models''. This report provides validation and confidence in the flow model that was developed for site recommendation (SR) and will be used to provide flow fields in support of the Total Systems Performance Assessment (TSPA) for the License Application. The output from this report provides the flow model used in the ''Site-Scale Saturated Zone Transport'', MDL-NBS-HS-000010 Rev 01 (BSC 2003 [162419]). The Site-Scale Saturated Zone Transport model then provides output to the SZ Transport Abstraction Model (BSC 2003 [164870]). In particular, the output from the SZ site-scale flow model is used to simulate the groundwater flow pathways and radionuclide transport to the accessible environment for use in the TSPA calculations. Since the development and calibration of the saturated-zone flow model, more data have been gathered for use in model validation and confidence building, including new water-level data from Nye County wells, single- and multiple-well hydraulic testing data, and new hydrochemistry data. In addition, a new hydrogeologic framework model (HFM), which incorporates Nye County wells lithology, also provides geologic data for corroboration and confidence in the flow model. The intended use of this work is to provide a flow model that generates flow fields to simulate radionuclide transport in saturated porous rock and alluvium under natural or forced gradient flow conditions. The flow model simulations are completed using the three-dimensional (3-D), finite-element, flow, heat, and transport computer code, FEHM Version (V) 2.20 (software tracking number (STN): 10086-2.20-00; LANL 2003 [161725]). Concurrently, process-level transport model and methodology for calculating radionuclide transport in the saturated zone at Yucca

  18. Energy Cost Accounting: Conventional and Flow-oriented Approaches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bierer Annett

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available In more and more companies, energy efficiency and energy cost come to the fore. The scope ranges from energy consumption and energy delivery cost to energy losses and the infrastruc-ture facilitating the use of energy. Their increasing importance asks for more trans¬parency of the cost of energy consumption, losses, and conservation potentials. However, despite of the identified relevance, no mature concepts exist to record energy-related cost in a way that con-sumption and losses become transparent. Consequently, based on the charac¬teris¬tics of the production factor energy, the paper presents options for a sophisticated energy cost accu¬mu¬la-tion and assignment in conventional cost accounting and flow cost accounting methodology.

  19. Modeling interregional freight flow by distribution systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Davydenko, I.; Tavasszy, L.A.; Blois, C.J. de

    2013-01-01

    Distribution Centers with a warehousing function have an important influence on the flow of goods from production to consumption, generating substantial goods flow and vehicle movements. This paper extends the classical 4-step freight modeling framework with a logistics chain model, explicitly model

  20. U.S. Energy Flow -- 1995

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, H; Mui, N; Pasternak, A

    1997-12-01

    Energy consumption in 1995 increased slightly for the fifth year in a row (from 89 to 91 quadrillion [1015Btu). U.S. economic activity slowed from the fast-paced recovery of 1994, even with the continued low unemployment rates and low inflation rates. The annual increase in U.S. real GDP dropped to 4.6% from 1994's increase of 5.8%. Energy consumption in all major end-use sectors surpassed the record-breaking highs achieved in 1994, with the largest gains (2.5%) occurring in the residential/commercial sector. Crude oil imports decreased for the first time this decade. There was also a decline in domestic oil production. Venezuela replaced Saudi Arabia as the principal supplier of imported oil. Imports of natural gas, mainly from Canada, continued to increase. The demand for natural gas reached a level not seen since the peak levels of the early 1970s and the demand was met by a slight increase in both natural gas production and imports. Electric utilities had the largest percentage increase of n.atural gas consumption, a climb of 7% above 1994 levels. Although coal production decreased, coal exports continued to make a comeback after 3 years of decline. Coal once again become the primary U.S. energy export. Title IV of the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 (CAAA90) consists of two phases. Phase I (in effect as of January 1, 1995) set emission restrictions on 110 mostly coal-burning plants in the eastern and midwestem United States. Phase II, planned to begin in the year 2000, places additional emission restrictions on about 1,000 electric plants. As of January 1, 1995, the reformulated gasoline program, also part of the CAAA90, was finally initiated. As a result, this cleaner-burning fuel was made available in areas of the United States that failed to meet the Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA's) ozone standards. In 1995, reformulated gasoline represented around 28% of total gasoline sales in the United States. The last commercial

  1. Modelling of the Czochralski flow

    OpenAIRE

    Jan Franc

    1998-01-01

    The Czochralski method of the industrial production of a silicon single crystal consists of pulling up the single crystal from the silicon melt. The flow of the melt during the production is called the Czochralski flow. The mathematical description of the flow consists of a coupled system of six P.D.E. in cylindrical coordinates containing Navier-Stokes equations (with the stream function), heat convection-conduction equations, convection-diffusion equation for oxygen impurity and an equation...

  2. Overland flow : interfacing models with measurements

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Loon, van E.E.

    2002-01-01

    Index words: overland flow, catchment scale, system identification, ensemble simulations.This study presents new techniques to identify scale-dependent overland flow models and use these for ensemble-based predictions. The techniques are developed on the basis of overland flow, rain, discharge, soil

  3. Development of a coupled wave-flow-vegetation interaction model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beudin, Alexis; Kalra, Tarandeep; Ganju, Neil Kamal; Warner, John C.

    2017-01-01

    Emergent and submerged vegetation can significantly affect coastal hydrodynamics. However, most deterministic numerical models do not take into account their influence on currents, waves, and turbulence. In this paper, we describe the implementation of a wave-flow-vegetation module into a Coupled-Ocean-Atmosphere-Wave-Sediment Transport (COAWST) modeling system that includes a flow model (ROMS) and a wave model (SWAN), and illustrate various interacting processes using an idealized shallow basin application. The flow model has been modified to include plant posture-dependent three-dimensional drag, in-canopy wave-induced streaming, and production of turbulent kinetic energy and enstrophy to parameterize vertical mixing. The coupling framework has been updated to exchange vegetation-related variables between the flow model and the wave model to account for wave energy dissipation due to vegetation. This study i) demonstrates the validity of the plant posture-dependent drag parameterization against field measurements, ii) shows that the model is capable of reproducing the mean and turbulent flow field in the presence of vegetation as compared to various laboratory experiments, iii) provides insight into the flow-vegetation interaction through an analysis of the terms in the momentum balance, iv) describes the influence of a submerged vegetation patch on tidal currents and waves separately and combined, and v) proposes future directions for research and development.

  4. Development of a coupled wave-flow-vegetation interaction model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beudin, Alexis; Kalra, Tarandeep S.; Ganju, Neil K.; Warner, John C.

    2017-03-01

    Emergent and submerged vegetation can significantly affect coastal hydrodynamics. However, most deterministic numerical models do not take into account their influence on currents, waves, and turbulence. In this paper, we describe the implementation of a wave-flow-vegetation module into a Coupled-Ocean-Atmosphere-Wave-Sediment Transport (COAWST) modeling system that includes a flow model (ROMS) and a wave model (SWAN), and illustrate various interacting processes using an idealized shallow basin application. The flow model has been modified to include plant posture-dependent three-dimensional drag, in-canopy wave-induced streaming, and production of turbulent kinetic energy and enstrophy to parameterize vertical mixing. The coupling framework has been updated to exchange vegetation-related variables between the flow model and the wave model to account for wave energy dissipation due to vegetation. This study i) demonstrates the validity of the plant posture-dependent drag parameterization against field measurements, ii) shows that the model is capable of reproducing the mean and turbulent flow field in the presence of vegetation as compared to various laboratory experiments, iii) provides insight into the flow-vegetation interaction through an analysis of the terms in the momentum balance, iv) describes the influence of a submerged vegetation patch on tidal currents and waves separately and combined, and v) proposes future directions for research and development.

  5. Microfluidic energy conversion by application of two phase flow

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Xie, Yanbo

    2013-01-01

    The classical electrokinetic energy conversion mechanism relies on a single stage conversion by forcing liquid through a channel with charged walls. When the net charges inside the electrical double layer (EDL) are transported by water flow, the produced electrical energy can be harvested via connec

  6. Energy dissipation in flows through curved spaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Debus, J.-D.; Mendoza, M.; Succi, S.; Herrmann, H. J.

    2017-01-01

    Fluid dynamics in intrinsically curved geometries is encountered in many physical systems in nature, ranging from microscopic bio-membranes all the way up to general relativity at cosmological scales. Despite the diversity of applications, all of these systems share a common feature: the free motion of particles is affected by inertial forces originating from the curvature of the embedding space. Here we reveal a fundamental process underlying fluid dynamics in curved spaces: the free motion of fluids, in the complete absence of solid walls or obstacles, exhibits loss of energy due exclusively to the intrinsic curvature of space. We find that local sources of curvature generate viscous stresses as a result of the inertial forces. The curvature- induced viscous forces are shown to cause hitherto unnoticed and yet appreciable energy dissipation, which might play a significant role for a variety of physical systems involving fluid dynamics in curved spaces. PMID:28195148

  7. Energy flow and thermal comfort in buildings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Le Dreau, Jerome

    the terminal towards the space and on the parameters influencing the effectiveness of terminals. Therefore the comfort conditions and energy consumption of four types of terminals (active chilled beam, radiant floor, wall and ceiling) have been compared for a typical office room, both numerically...... beam. The higher the air change rate and the warmer the outdoor air, the larger the savings achieved with a radiant cooling terminals. Therefore radiant terminals have a large potential of energy savings for buildings with high ventilation rates (e.g. shop, train station, industrial storage). Among...... comfort, a similar global level has been observed for the radiant and air-based terminals in both numerical and experimental investigations. But the different terminals did not achieve the same uniformity in space. The active chilled beam theoretically achieves the most uniform comfort conditions (when...

  8. U.S. energy flow - 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borg, I.Y.; Briggs, C.K.

    1994-10-01

    With continued improvement in the economic health of the nation, energy consumption in 1993 increased by almost 2.5%. Use of energy in all major end-use sectors increased, with the largest gains registered in the residential/commercial sector. In this sector, substantial increase in the use of natural gas reflected a harsh 1993-1994 winter as well as broader availability of the fuel for space heating. Crude oil imports rose 8% but stood below the all-time high set in 1977. About half of the increase reflected declining domestic oil production. Imports of natural gas, principally from Canada, increased as they have every year since 1986. They comprise 11% of supply and supplement domestic production, which has similarly risen over the same time span. Increased demand for natural gas is evident in most sectors but especially in the industrial sector, where a growing number of cogenerators of electricity burn natural gas. Although coal consumption in the United States rose 3% in 1993, domestic coal production declined by a greater margin due to a coal strike. Because of increased international competition, exports fell 27%. Electricity transmitted by the utilities again increased, following a decade-long trend interrupted only in 1992 by the national economic recession. The provisions of the Energy Policy Act of 1992 dealing with transport of nonutility-generated electricity by the public utilities began to be implemented in 1993. The provisions of the Energy Policy Act as well as those of the Public Utility Regulatory Policies Act of 1978 are setting the stage for increased competition for customers and for what promises to be a restructuring of the historically monopolistic industry. Nuclear power from the United States`s 109 operable reactors constituted 21% of utility-generated electricity. With the continued retirement of outmoded and flawed reactors, nuclear capacity factors attained 71 in 1993, up from 56% a decade earlier.

  9. Spectral kinetic energy transfer in turbulent premixed reacting flows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Towery, C A Z; Poludnenko, A Y; Urzay, J; O'Brien, J; Ihme, M; Hamlington, P E

    2016-05-01

    Spectral kinetic energy transfer by advective processes in turbulent premixed reacting flows is examined using data from a direct numerical simulation of a statistically planar turbulent premixed flame. Two-dimensional turbulence kinetic-energy spectra conditioned on the planar-averaged reactant mass fraction are computed through the flame brush and variations in the spectra are connected to terms in the spectral kinetic energy transport equation. Conditional kinetic energy spectra show that turbulent small-scale motions are suppressed in the burnt combustion products, while the energy content of the mean flow increases. An analysis of spectral kinetic energy transfer further indicates that, contrary to the net down-scale transfer of energy found in the unburnt reactants, advective processes transfer energy from small to large scales in the flame brush close to the products. Triadic interactions calculated through the flame brush show that this net up-scale transfer of energy occurs primarily at spatial scales near the laminar flame thermal width. The present results thus indicate that advective processes in premixed reacting flows contribute to energy backscatter near the scale of the flame.

  10. High energy density redox flow device

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carter, W. Craig; Chiang, Yet-Ming; Duduta, Mihai; Limthongkul, Pimpa

    2017-04-04

    Redox flow devices are described including a positive electrode current collector, a negative electrode current collector, and an ion-permeable membrane separating said positive and negative current collectors, positioned and arranged to define a positive electroactive zone and a negative electroactive zone; wherein at least one of said positive and negative electroactive zone comprises a flowable semi-solid composition comprising ion storage compound particles capable of taking up or releasing said ions during operation of the cell, and wherein the ion storage compound particles have a polydisperse size distribution in which the finest particles present in at least 5 vol % of the total volume, is at least a factor of 5 smaller than the largest particles present in at least 5 vol % of the total volume.

  11. Modelling of two-phase flow based on separation of the flow according to velocity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Narumo, T. [VTT Energy, Espoo (Finland). Nuclear Energy

    1997-12-31

    The thesis concentrates on the development work of a physical one-dimensional two-fluid model that is based on Separation of the Flow According to Velocity (SFAV). The conventional way to model one-dimensional two-phase flow is to derive conservation equations for mass, momentum and energy over the regions occupied by the phases. In the SFAV approach, the two-phase mixture is divided into two subflows, with as distinct average velocities as possible, and momentum conservation equations are derived over their domains. Mass and energy conservation are treated equally with the conventional model because they are distributed very accurately according to the phases, but momentum fluctuations follow better the flow velocity. Submodels for non-uniform transverse profile of velocity and density, slip between the phases within each subflow and turbulence between the subflows have been derived. The model system is hyperbolic in any sensible flow conditions over the whole range of void fraction. Thus, it can be solved with accurate numerical methods utilizing the characteristics. The characteristics agree well with the used experimental data on two-phase flow wave phenomena Furthermore, the characteristics of the SFAV model are as well in accordance with their physical counterparts as of the best virtual-mass models that are typically optimized for special flow regimes like bubbly flow. The SFAV model has proved to be applicable in describing two-phase flow physically correctly because both the dynamics and steady-state behaviour of the model has been considered and found to agree well with experimental data This makes the SFAV model especially suitable for the calculation of fast transients, taking place in versatile form e.g. in nuclear reactors. 45 refs. The thesis includes also five previous publications by author.

  12. Numerical modeling of fluidic flow meters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choudhury, D.; Patel, B. R.

    1992-05-01

    The transient fluid flow in fluidic flow meters has been modeled using Creare.x's flow modeling computer program FLUENT/BFC that solves the Navier-Stokes equations in general curvilinear coordinates. The numerical predictions of fluid flow in a fluidic flow meter have been compared with the available experimental results for a particular design, termed the PC-4 design. Overall flow structures such as main jet bending, and primary and secondary vortices predicted by FLUENT/BFC are in excellent agreement with flow visualization results. The oscillation frequencies of the PC-4 design have been predicted for a range of flow rates encompassing laminar and turbulent flow and the results are in good agreement with experiments. The details of the flow field predictions reveal that an important factor that determines the onset of oscillations in the fluidic flow meter is the feedback jet momentum relative to the main jet momentum. The insights provided by the analysis of the PC-4 fluidic flow meter design have led to an improved design. The improved design has sustained oscillations at lower flow rates compared with the PC-4 design and has a larger rangeability.

  13. Energy demand modeling for Uzbekistan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bobur Khodjaev

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available The paper is devoted to energy demand forecasting in Uzbekistan. Studies show that in spite of the abundant reserves of hydrocarbons, low energy efficiency can have an adverse impact on energy security in Uzbekistan in the future. Oil and gas are the main primary energy source and they ensure energy security of Uzbekistan. Energy demand forecasting is essential in order to develop an effective energy policy. Such forecast can be useful to plan oil and gas production volumes, to identify priorities for the industrial modernization and to create favorable conditions for sustainable economic development in the future. Author proposes model based on translog function for developing medium-and long-term development programs in energy sector and the modernization and technological re-equipment of industry.

  14. Energy-Consistent Multiscale Algorithms for Granular Flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-08-07

    8-98) v Prescribed by ANSI Std. Z39.18 30-07-2014 Final 01-MAY-2011 - 30-APR-2014 AFOSR YIP Energy-Consistent Multiscale Algorithms for Granular...document the achievements made as a result of this Young Investigator Program ( YIP ) project. We worked on the development of multi scale energy... YIP ) project. We worked on the development of multi scale energy-consistent algorithms to simulate and capture flow phenomena in granular

  15. Far from equilibrium energy flow in quantum critical systems

    CERN Document Server

    Bhaseen, M J; Lucas, Andrew; Schalm, Koenraad

    2013-01-01

    We investigate far from equilibrium energy transport in strongly coupled quantum critical systems. Combining results from gauge-gravity duality, relativistic hydrodynamics, and quantum field theory, we argue that long-time energy transport occurs via a universal steady-state for any spatial dimensionality. This is described by a boosted thermal state. We determine the transport properties of this emergent steady state, including the average energy flow and its long-time fluctuations.

  16. Non-energy use and related carbon dioxide emissions in Germany: a carbon flow analysis with the NEAT model for the period of 1990–2003

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weiss, M.; Neelis, M.L.; Blok, K.; Patel, M.K.

    2008-01-01

    Non-energy use of fossil fuels accounts for 7% of the Total Primary Energy Supply (TPES) of Germany and represents an important potential source of CO2 (carbon dioxide) emissions. To gain a better understanding of emissions associated with non-energy use in Germany, we conduct a bottom-up carbon flo

  17. Energy amplification in channel flows of viscoelastic fluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoda, Nazish; Jovanovi?, Mihailo R.; Kumar, Satish

    Energy amplification in channel flows of Oldroyd-B fluids is studied from an input-output point of view by analysing the ensemble-average energy density associated with the velocity field of the linearized governing equations. The inputs consist of spatially distributed and temporally varying body forces that are harmonic in the streamwise and spanwise directions and stochastic in the wall-normal direction and in time. Such inputs enable the use of powerful tools from linear systems theory that have recently been applied to analyse Newtonian fluid flows. It is found that the energy density increases with a decrease in viscosity ratio (ratio of solvent viscosity to total viscosity) and an increase in Reynolds number and elasticity number. In most of the cases, streamwise-constant perturbations are most amplified and the location of maximum energy density shifts to higher spanwise wavenumbers with an increase in Reynolds number and elasticity number and a decrease in viscosity ratio. For similar parameter values, the maximum in the energy density occurs at a higher spanwise wavenumber for Poiseuille flow, whereas the maximum energy density achieves larger maxima for Couette flow. At low Reynolds numbers, the energy density decreases monotonically when the elasticity number is sufficiently small, but shows a maximum when the elasticity number becomes sufficiently large, suggesting that elasticity can amplify disturbances even when inertial effects are weak.

  18. Study of energy flows in Pantanal - Brazil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santanna, F. B.; Arruda, P. H. Z. D.; Pinto-Jr, O. B.

    2014-12-01

    The main goal of this work was to estimate fluxes using the eddy covariance method in a wetland area, basically with herb-shrub physiognomy, sparse woody vegetation and approximately 4m height. The geographical position of the Pantanal, altitude, latitude, longitude, climate and weather conditions are determined by the dynamics of the atmosphere that affects the whole South America and consequently influence the ecological framework of ecosystems. The results shown by the components considered in the energy balance were more significant during the day, which the atmospheric boundary layer extends from the ground to about 50 or 100 meters height, showing greater instability and turbulence (u* > 0.2 m / s), and this turbulence is what justifies the use of the eddy covariance method to estimate the sensible and latent heat flux. The Pantanal presents seasonal difference between the densities estimates of sensible (H) and latent (LE) heat flux. During the rainy season the sensible heat flux (H) was 30% and the latent heat flux (LE) 58%. During the dry season the sensible heat flux (H) was 46% and the latent heat flux (LE) 40% of the energy budget.

  19. Modelling of the Czochralski flow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Franc

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available The Czochralski method of the industrial production of a silicon single crystal consists of pulling up the single crystal from the silicon melt. The flow of the melt during the production is called the Czochralski flow. The mathematical description of the flow consists of a coupled system of six P.D.E. in cylindrical coordinates containing Navier-Stokes equations (with the stream function, heat convection-conduction equations, convection-diffusion equation for oxygen impurity and an equation describing magnetic field effect.

  20. Microgravity two-phase flow regime modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, D.; Best, F.R.; Faget, N.

    1987-01-01

    A flow pattern or flow regime is the characteristics spatial distribution of the phases of fluid in a duct. Since heat transfer and pressure drop are dependent on the characteristic distribution of the phases, it is necessary to describe flow patterns in an appropriate manner so that a hydrodynamic or heat transfer theory applicable to that pattern can be chosen. The objective of the present analysis is to create a flow regime map based on physical modeling of vapor/liquid interaction phenomena in a microgravity environment. In the present work, four basic flow patterns are defined: dispersed flow, stratified flow, slug flow, and annular flow. Fluid properties, liquid and vapor flow rates, and pipe size were chosen as the principal parameters. It is assumed that a transition from one flow pattern to another will occur when there is a change in the dominant force which controls that flow pattern. The forces considered in this modeling are surface tension force, both force, inertial force, friction, and turbulent fluctuations.

  1. Average-passage flow model development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adamczyk, John J.; Celestina, Mark L.; Beach, Tim A.; Kirtley, Kevin; Barnett, Mark

    1989-01-01

    A 3-D model was developed for simulating multistage turbomachinery flows using supercomputers. This average passage flow model described the time averaged flow field within a typical passage of a bladed wheel within a multistage configuration. To date, a number of inviscid simulations were executed to assess the resolution capabilities of the model. Recently, the viscous terms associated with the average passage model were incorporated into the inviscid computer code along with an algebraic turbulence model. A simulation of a stage-and-one-half, low speed turbine was executed. The results of this simulation, including a comparison with experimental data, is discussed.

  2. Modeling interregional freight flow by distribution systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Davydenko, I.; Tavasszy, L.A.; Blois, C.J. de

    2013-01-01

    Distribution Centers with a warehousing function have an important influence on the flow of goods from production to consumption, generating substantial goods flow and vehicle movements. This paper extends the classical 4-step freight modeling framework with a logistics chain model, explicitly

  3. An energy flow analysis in a paper-based industry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saidur, R. [University of Malaya, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia); Sambandam, M.T.; Rajakarunakaran, S. [Kalasalingam University, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Krishnankoil (India); Hasanuzzaman, M. [University of Malaya, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia); University of Malaya, UM Power Energy Dedicated Advanced Centre (UMPEDAC), Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia); Devaraj, D. [Kalasalingam University, Department of Electrical Engineering, Krishnankoil (India); Islam, M.D. [The Petroleum Institute, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Abu Dhabi (United Arab Emirates)

    2012-10-15

    Industrial sector is the largest user of energy in India and many parts of the world. More than half of the total energy is used in industries to operate various energy-using machineries. Energy conservation is a cost-effective approach in any energy optimization program that can be implemented in industrial activities. Energy-intensive industries in developing economies offer significant energy-saving potential owing to the technology gap as well as lower operating efficiency. A detailed energy flow analysis was conducted in a paper carton manufacturing unit in India to quantify the energy-saving potential. The study revealed that the compressed air leakage is responsible for about 50% of the total energy loss. The specific electrical and thermal energy consumption was estimated and found to be 91.85 kWh/ton and 1,619 MJ/ton of biomass, respectively. Annual energy saving potential was found to be 5.9% of the total annual energy consumption. The cost of DG power is found to be 389% higher than the grid power. The share of self-generated DG power is estimated to be 41% of the total power consumed. Electrical energy intensity of the plant could be reduced by 6.36% implementing energy conservation measures proposed in this study. (orig.)

  4. Regions in Energy Market Models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Short, W.

    2007-02-01

    This report explores the different options for spatial resolution of an energy market model--and the advantages and disadvantages of models with fine spatial resolution. It examines different options for capturing spatial variations, considers the tradeoffs between them, and presents a few examples from one particular model that has been run at different levels of spatial resolution.

  5. Regions in Energy Market Models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2009-01-18

    This report explores the different options for spatial resolution of an energy market model and the advantages and disadvantages of models with fine spatial resolution. It examines different options for capturing spatial variations, considers the tradeoffs between them, and presents a few examples from one particular model that has been run at different levels of spatial resolution.

  6. Rapid Energy Modeling Workflow Demonstration

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-31

    sustainable building . Models produced through the REM process can be updated and accessed continually, thus allowing energy managers to continuously explore...time and cost of audits 4. Review the energy analysis findings under the High Performance and Sustainable Building Guiding Principles Compliance

  7. Brookhaven buildings energy conservation optimization model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carhart, S C; Mulherkar, S S; Sanborn, Y

    1978-01-01

    The Brookhaven Buildings Energy Conservation Optimization Model is a linear programming representation of energy use in buildings. Starting with engineering and economic data on cost and performance of energy technologies used in buildings, including both conversion devices (such as heat pumps) and structural improvements, the model constructs alternative flows for energy through the technologies to meet demands for space heating, air conditioning, thermal applications, and electric lighting and appliances. Alternative paths have different costs and efficiencies. Within constraints such as total demand for energy services, retirement of existing buildings, seasonal operation of certain devices, and others, the model calculates an optimal configuration of energy technologies in buildings. The penetration of the various basic technologies within this configuration is specified in considerable detail, covering new and retrofit markets for nine building types in four regions. Each market may choose from several appropriate conversion devices and four levels each of new and retrofit structural improvement. The principal applications for which the model was designed described briefly.

  8. Experimental and mathematical modeling of flow in headboxes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shariati, Mohammad Reza

    The fluid flow patterns in a paper-machine headbox have a strong influence on the quality of the paper produced by the machine. Due to increasing demand for high quality paper there is a need to investigate the details of the fluid flow in the paper machine headbox. The objective of this thesis is to use experimental and computational methods of modeling the flow inside a typical headbox in order to evaluate and understand the mean flow patterns and turbulence created there. In particular, spatial variations of the mean flow and of the turbulence quantities and the turbulence generated secondary flows are studied. In addition to the flow inside the headbox, the flow leaving the slice is also modeled both experimentally and computationally. Comparison of the experimental and numerical results indicated that streamwise mean components of the velocities in the headbox are predicted well by all the turbulence models considered in this study. However, the standard k-epsilon model and the algebraic turbulence models fail to predict the turbulence quantities accurately. Standard k-epsilon-model also fails to predict the direction and magnitude of the secondary flows. Significant improvements in the k-epsilon model predictions were achieved when the turbulence production term was artificially set to zero. This is justified by observations of the turbulent velocities from the experiments and by a consideration of the form of the kinetic energy equation. A better estimation of the Reynolds normal stress distribution and the degree of anisotropy of turbulence was achieved using the Reynolds stress turbulence model. Careful examination of the measured turbulence velocity results shows that after the initial decay of the turbulence in the headbox, there is a short region close to the exit, but inside the headbox, where the turbulent kinetic energy actually increases as a result of the distortion imposed by the contraction. The turbulence energy quickly resumes its decay in the

  9. U.S. energy flow -- 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borg, I.Y.; Briggs, C.K.

    1995-12-01

    Energy consumption in 1994 increased for the fourth year in a row, reaching an all-time high. It was associated with a robust economy, low inflation, and low unemployment rates. Of the populous states, California lagged substantially behind the national recovery. Consumption in all major end-use sectors reached historic highs. Transmission of electrical power by the utilities increased almost 3%. However, this understates the increase of the total amount of electricity used in the nation because the amount of electricity used ``in-house`` by a growing number of self-generators is unrecorded. Imports of both fossil fuels and electricity increased. About half of the total oil consumed was imported, with Saudi Arabia being the principal supplier. Domestic oil production continued to decline; however, the sharp decline in Alaskan production was slowed. The increase in the demand for natural gas was met by both a modest increase in domestic production and imports from Canada, which comprised 10% of supply. The residential/commercial sector is the largest single consumer of natural gas; however, use by electric generators has increased annually for the past decade. The regulated utilities increased their consumption 11% in 1994. The year was noteworthy for the US nuclear power industry. Work was halted on the last nuclear power plant under construction in the country. Because of the retirement of aged and poorly performing nuclear plants and because of improved efficiencies, the capacity factor for the remaining 109 operable plants reached a record 74%.

  10. Approximate Model for Turbulent Stagnation Point Flow.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dechant, Lawrence [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2016-01-01

    Here we derive an approximate turbulent self-similar model for a class of favorable pressure gradient wedge-like flows, focusing on the stagnation point limit. While the self-similar model provides a useful gross flow field estimate this approach must be combined with a near wall model is to determine skin friction and by Reynolds analogy the heat transfer coefficient. The combined approach is developed in detail for the stagnation point flow problem where turbulent skin friction and Nusselt number results are obtained. Comparison to the classical Van Driest (1958) result suggests overall reasonable agreement. Though the model is only valid near the stagnation region of cylinders and spheres it nonetheless provides a reasonable model for overall cylinder and sphere heat transfer. The enhancement effect of free stream turbulence upon the laminar flow is used to derive a similar expression which is valid for turbulent flow. Examination of free stream enhanced laminar flow suggests that the rather than enhancement of a laminar flow behavior free stream disturbance results in early transition to turbulent stagnation point behavior. Excellent agreement is shown between enhanced laminar flow and turbulent flow behavior for high levels, e.g. 5% of free stream turbulence. Finally the blunt body turbulent stagnation results are shown to provide realistic heat transfer results for turbulent jet impingement problems.

  11. Anticipation Driving Behavior and Related Reduction of Energy Consumption in Traffic Flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Wei; Wei, Yan-Fang; Song, Tao; Dai, Shi-Qiang; Dong, Li-Yun

    In view that drivers would pay attention to the variation of headway on roads, an extended optimal velocity model is proposed by considering anticipation driving behavior. A stability criterion is given through linear stability analysis of traffic flows. The mKdV equation is derived with the reductive perturbation method for headway evolution which could be used to describe the stop-and-go traffic phenomenon. The results show a good effect of anticipation driving behavior on the stabilization of car flows and the anticipation driving behavior can improve the numerical stability of the model as well. In addition, the fluctuation of kinetic energy and the consumption of average energy in congested traffic flows are systematically analyzed. The results show that the reasonable level of anticipation driving behavior can save energy consumption in deceleration process effectively and lead to an associated relation like a "bow-tie" between the energy-saving and the value of anticipation factor.

  12. Energy transformation and flow topology in an elbow draft tube

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Štefan D.

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Paper presents a computational study of energy transformation in two geometrical configurations of Kaplan turbine elbow draft tube. Pressure recovery, hydraulic efficiency and loss coefficient are evaluated for a series of flow rates and swirl numbers corresponding to operating regimes of the turbine. These integral characteristics are then correlated with local flow field properties identified by extraction of topological features. Main focus is to find the reasons for hydraulic efficiency drop of the elbow draft tube.

  13. Analytical models for complex swirling flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borissov, A.; Hussain, V.

    1996-11-01

    We develops a new class of analytical solutions of the Navier-Stokes equations for swirling flows, and suggests ways to predict and control such flows occurring in various technological applications. We view momentum accumulation on the axis as a key feature of swirling flows and consider vortex-sink flows on curved axisymmetric surfaces with an axial flow. We show that these solutions model swirling flows in a cylindrical can, whirlpools, tornadoes, and cosmic swirling jets. The singularity of these solutions on the flow axis is removed by matching them with near-axis Schlichting and Long's swirling jets. The matched solutions model flows with very complex patterns, consisting of up to seven separation regions with recirculatory 'bubbles' and vortex rings. We apply the matched solutions for computing flows in the Ranque-Hilsch tube, in the meniscus of electrosprays, in vortex breakdown, and in an industrial vortex burner. The simple analytical solutions allow a clear understanding of how different control parameters affect the flow and guide selection of optimal parameter values for desired flow features. These solutions permit extension to other problems (such as heat transfer and chemical reaction) and have the potential of being significantly useful for further detailed investigation by direct or large-eddy numerical simulations as well as laboratory experimentation.

  14. Modeling and simulation of reactive flows

    CERN Document Server

    Bortoli, De AL; Pereira, Felipe

    2015-01-01

    Modelling and Simulation of Reactive Flows presents information on modeling and how to numerically solve reactive flows. The book offers a distinctive approach that combines diffusion flames and geochemical flow problems, providing users with a comprehensive resource that bridges the gap for scientists, engineers, and the industry. Specifically, the book looks at the basic concepts related to reaction rates, chemical kinetics, and the development of reduced kinetic mechanisms. It considers the most common methods used in practical situations, along with equations for reactive flows, and va

  15. The Redox Flow System for solar photovoltaic energy storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Odonnell, P.; Gahn, R. F.; Pfeiffer, W.

    1976-01-01

    The interfacing of a Solar Photovoltaic System and a Redox Flow System for storage was workable. The Redox Flow System, which utilizes the oxidation-reduction capability of two redox couples, in this case iron and titanium, for its storage capacity, gave a relatively constant output regardless of solar activity so that a load could be run continually day and night utilizing the sun's energy. One portion of the system was connected to a bank of solar cells to electrochemically charge the solutions, while a separate part of the system was used to electrochemically discharge the stored energy.

  16. 100% DD Energy Model Update

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None, None

    2011-06-30

    The Miami Science Museum energy model has been used during DD to test the building's potential for energy savings as measured by ASHRAE 90.1-2007 Appendix G. This standard compares the designed building's yearly energy cost with that of a code-compliant building. The building is currently on track show 20% or better improvement over the ASHRAE 90.1-2007 Appendix G baseline; this performance would ensure minimum compliance with both LEED 2.2 and current Florida Energy Code, which both reference a less strict version of ASHRAE 90.1. In addition to being an exercise in energy code compliance, the energy model has been used as a design tool to show the relative performance benefit of individual energy conservation measures (ECMs). These ECMs are areas where the design team has improved upon code-minimum design paths to improve the energy performance of the building. By adding ECMs one a time to a code-compliant baseline building, the current analysis identifies which ECMs are most effective in helping the building meet its energy performance goals.

  17. Flow in a model turbine stator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buggeln, R. C.; Shamroth, S. J.; Briley, W. R.

    1985-10-01

    In view of the complex nature of the flowfield in the hot section of gas turbine engines, the need to predict heat transfer and flow losses, the possible appearance of separation and strong secondary flows, etc., the present effort is focusing upon a Navier-Stokes approach to the three dimensional turbine stator problem. The advantages of a full Navier-Stokes approach are clear since when combined with a suitable turbulence model these equations represent the flow and heat transfer physics. In particular, the Navier-Stokes equations accurately represent possible separated regions and regions of significant secondary flow. In addition, the Navier-Stokes approach allows representation of the entire flow field by a single set of equations, thus avoiding problems associated with representing different regions of the flow by different equations and then matching flow regions.

  18. Regression modeling of ground-water flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooley, R.L.; Naff, R.L.

    1985-01-01

    Nonlinear multiple regression methods are developed to model and analyze groundwater flow systems. Complete descriptions of regression methodology as applied to groundwater flow models allow scientists and engineers engaged in flow modeling to apply the methods to a wide range of problems. Organization of the text proceeds from an introduction that discusses the general topic of groundwater flow modeling, to a review of basic statistics necessary to properly apply regression techniques, and then to the main topic: exposition and use of linear and nonlinear regression to model groundwater flow. Statistical procedures are given to analyze and use the regression models. A number of exercises and answers are included to exercise the student on nearly all the methods that are presented for modeling and statistical analysis. Three computer programs implement the more complex methods. These three are a general two-dimensional, steady-state regression model for flow in an anisotropic, heterogeneous porous medium, a program to calculate a measure of model nonlinearity with respect to the regression parameters, and a program to analyze model errors in computed dependent variables such as hydraulic head. (USGS)

  19. Distributed energy storage: Time-dependent tree flow design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bejan, A.; Ziaei, S.; Lorente, S.

    2016-05-01

    This article proposes "distributed energy storage" as a basic design problem of distributing energy storage material on an area. The energy flows by fluid flow from a concentrated source to points (users) distributed equidistantly on the area. The flow is time-dependent. Several scenarios are analyzed: sensible-heat storage, latent-heat storage, exergy storage vs energy storage, and the distribution of a finite supply of heat transfer surface between the source fluid and the distributed storage material. The chief conclusion is that the finite amount of storage material should be distributed proportionally with the distribution of the flow rate of heating agent arriving on the area. The total time needed by the source stream to "invade" the area is cumulative (the sum of the storage times required at each storage site) and depends on the energy distribution paths and the sequence in which the users are served by the source stream. Directions for future designs of distributed storage and retrieval are outlined in the concluding section.

  20. Dynamic modelling of packaging material flow systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsiliyannis, Christos A

    2005-04-01

    A dynamic model has been developed for reused and recycled packaging material flows. It allows a rigorous description of the flows and stocks during the transition to new targets imposed by legislation, product demand variations or even by variations in consumer discard behaviour. Given the annual reuse and recycle frequency and packaging lifetime, the model determines all packaging flows (e.g., consumption and reuse) and variables through which environmental policy is formulated, such as recycling, waste and reuse rates and it identifies the minimum number of variables to be surveyed for complete packaging flow monitoring. Simulation of the transition to the new flow conditions is given for flows of packaging materials in Greece, based on 1995--1998 field inventory and statistical data.

  1. Flow visualization using momentum and energy transport tubes and applications to turbulent flow in wind farms

    CERN Document Server

    Meyers, Johan

    2012-01-01

    As a generalization of the mass-flux based classical stream-tube, the concept of momentum and energy transport tubes is discussed as a flow visualization tool. These transport tubes have the property, respectively, that no fluxes of momentum or energy exist over their respective tube mantles. As an example application using data from large-eddy simulation, such tubes are visualized for the mean-flow structure of turbulent flow in large wind farms, in fully developed wind-turbine-array boundary layers. The three-dimensional organization of energy transport tubes changes considerably when turbine spacings are varied, enabling the visualization of the path taken by the kinetic energy flux that is ultimately available at any given turbine within the array.

  2. Modeling process flow using diagrams

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kemper, B.; de Mast, J.; Mandjes, M.

    2010-01-01

    In the practice of process improvement, tools such as the flowchart, the value-stream map (VSM), and a variety of ad hoc variants of such diagrams are commonly used. The purpose of this paper is to present a clear, precise, and consistent framework for the use of such flow diagrams in process

  3. Modeling process flow using diagrams

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kemper, B.; de Mast, J.; Mandjes, M.

    2010-01-01

    In the practice of process improvement, tools such as the flowchart, the value-stream map (VSM), and a variety of ad hoc variants of such diagrams are commonly used. The purpose of this paper is to present a clear, precise, and consistent framework for the use of such flow diagrams in process improv

  4. The elliptic flow of neutral transverse energy in heavy ion interactions at SPS energies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saturnini, Pierre; Abreu, M.C.; Alessandro, B.; Alexa, C.; Arnaldi, R.; Astruc, J.; Atayan, M.; Baglin, C.; Baldit, A.; Bedjidian, M.; Bellaiche, F.; Beole, S.; Boldea, V.; Bordalo, P.; Bussiere, A.; Capelli, L.; Caponi, V.; Casagrande, L.; Castor, J.; Chambon, T.; Chaurand, B.; Chevrot, I.; Cheynis, B.; Chiavassa, E.; Cicalo, C.; Comets, M.P.; Constans, N.; Constantinescu, S.; Cruz, J.; De Falco, A.; De Marco, N.; Dellacasa, G.; Devaux, A.; Dita, S.; Drapier, O.; Ducroux, L.; Espagnon, B.; Fargeix, J.; Filippov, S.N.; Fleuret, F.; Force, P.; Gallio, M.; Gavrilov, Y.K.; Gerschel, C.; Giubellino, P.; Golubeva, M.B.; Gonin, M.; Grigorian, A.A.; Grossiord, J.Y.; Guber, F.F.; Guichard, A.; Gulkanyan, H.; Hakobyan, R.; Haroutunian, R.; Idzik, M.; Jouan, D.; Karavitcheva, T.L.; Kluberg, L.; Kurepin, A.B.; Le Bornec, Y.; Lourenco, C.; Macciotta, P.; Mac Cormick, M.; Marzari-Chiesa, A.; Masera, M.; Masoni, A.; Mehrabyan, S.; Monteno, M.; Mourgues, S.; Musso, A.; Ohlsson-Malek, F.; Petiau, P.; Piccotti, A.; Pizzi, J.R.; Prado da Silva, W.L.; Puddu, G.; Quintans, C.; Racca, C.; Ramello, L.; Ramos, S.; Rato-Mendes, P.; Riccati, L.; Romana, A.; Ropotar, I.; Scomparin, E.; Serci, S.; Shaboyan, R.; Silva, S.; Sitta, M.; Soave, C.; Sonderegger, P.; Tarrago, X.; Topilskaya, N.S.; Usai, G.L.; Vercellin, E.; Villatte, L.; Willis, N

    1999-12-27

    The threshold effect in the J/{psi} suppression seen in the NA50 data in lead on lead interactions at the CERN SPS can't be taken into account by conventional models. Other candidate models use a phase transition, and therefore let suppose that the thermodynamic variables are defined everywhere that is the so-called thermalization. The in-plane elliptic flow, which has been proposed in order to probe the thermalization at these beam energies, is found to be actually present in lead on lead interactions at 158A GeV/c, but can't be observed in sulphur on sulphur at 200A GeV/c in the NA38 data.

  5. A review of mass and energy flow through a lava flow system: insights provided from a non-equilibrium perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarquini, Simone

    2017-08-01

    A simple formula relates lava discharge rate to the heat radiated per unit time from the surface of active lava flows (the "thermal proxy"). Although widely used, the physical basis of this proxy is still debated. In the present contribution, lava flows are approached as open, dissipative systems that, under favorable conditions, can attain a non-equilibrium stationary state. In this system framework, the onset, growth, and demise of lava flow units can be explained as a self-organization phenomenon characterized by a given temporal frequency defined by the average life span of active lava flow units. Here, I review empirical, physical, and experimental models designed to understand and link the flow of mass and energy through a lava flow system, as well as measurements and observations that support a "real-world" view. I set up two systems: active lava flow system (or ALFS) for flowing, fluid lava and a lava deposit system for solidified, cooling lava. The review highlights surprising similarities between lava flows and electric currents, which typically work under stationary conditions. An electric current propagates almost instantaneously through an existing circuit, following the Kirchhoff law (a least dissipation principle). Flowing lavas, in contrast, build up a slow-motion "lava circuit" over days, weeks, or months by following a gravity-driven path down the steepest slopes. Attainment of a steady-state condition is hampered (and the classic thermal proxy does not hold) if the supply stops before completion of the "lava circuit." Although gravity determines initial flow path and extension, the least dissipation principle means that subsequent evolution of mature portions of the active lava flow system is controlled by increasingly insulated conditions.

  6. Incorporating groundwater flow into the WEPP model

    Science.gov (United States)

    William Elliot; Erin Brooks; Tim Link; Sue Miller

    2010-01-01

    The water erosion prediction project (WEPP) model is a physically-based hydrology and erosion model. In recent years, the hydrology prediction within the model has been improved for forest watershed modeling by incorporating shallow lateral flow into watershed runoff prediction. This has greatly improved WEPP's hydrologic performance on small watersheds with...

  7. Natural Regulation of Energy Flow in a Green Quantum Photocell

    OpenAIRE

    Arp, Trevor B.; Barlas, Yafis; Aji, Vivek; Gabor, Nathaniel M.

    2015-01-01

    Manipulating the flow of energy in nanoscale and molecular photonic devices is of both fundamental interest and central importance for applications in light harvesting optoelectronics. Under erratic solar irradiance conditions, unregulated power fluctuations in a light harvesting photocell lead to inefficient energy storage in conventional solar cells and potentially fatal oxidative damage in photosynthesis. Here, we show that regulation against these fluctuations arises naturally within a tw...

  8. Analysis of Cortical Flow Models In Vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benink, Hélène A.; Mandato, Craig A.; Bement, William M.

    2000-01-01

    Cortical flow, the directed movement of cortical F-actin and cortical organelles, is a basic cellular motility process. Microtubules are thought to somehow direct cortical flow, but whether they do so by stimulating or inhibiting contraction of the cortical actin cytoskeleton is the subject of debate. Treatment of Xenopus oocytes with phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) triggers cortical flow toward the animal pole of the oocyte; this flow is suppressed by microtubules. To determine how this suppression occurs and whether it can control the direction of cortical flow, oocytes were subjected to localized manipulation of either the contractile stimulus (PMA) or microtubules. Localized PMA application resulted in redirection of cortical flow toward the site of application, as judged by movement of cortical pigment granules, cortical F-actin, and cortical myosin-2A. Such redirected flow was accelerated by microtubule depolymerization, showing that the suppression of cortical flow by microtubules is independent of the direction of flow. Direct observation of cortical F-actin by time-lapse confocal analysis in combination with photobleaching showed that cortical flow is driven by contraction of the cortical F-actin network and that microtubules suppress this contraction. The oocyte germinal vesicle serves as a microtubule organizing center in Xenopus oocytes; experimental displacement of the germinal vesicle toward the animal pole resulted in localized flow away from the animal pole. The results show that 1) cortical flow is directed toward areas of localized contraction of the cortical F-actin cytoskeleton; 2) microtubules suppress cortical flow by inhibiting contraction of the cortical F-actin cytoskeleton; and 3) localized, microtubule-dependent suppression of actomyosin-based contraction can control the direction of cortical flow. We discuss these findings in light of current models of cortical flow. PMID:10930453

  9. Optimal schooling formations using a potential flow model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tchieu, Andrew; Gazzola, Mattia; de Brauer, Alexia; Koumoutsakos, Petros

    2012-11-01

    A self-propelled, two-dimensional, potential flow model for agent-based swimmers is used to examine how fluid coupling affects schooling formation. The potential flow model accounts for fluid-mediated interactions between swimmers. The model is extended to include individual agent actions by means of modifying the circulation of each swimmer. A reinforcement algorithm is applied to allow the swimmers to learn how to school in specified lattice formations. Lastly, schooling lattice configurations are optimized by combining reinforcement learning and evolutionary optimization to minimize total control effort and energy expenditure.

  10. Simulation and modeling of turbulent flows

    CERN Document Server

    Gatski, Thomas B; Lumley, John L

    1996-01-01

    This book provides students and researchers in fluid engineering with an up-to-date overview of turbulent flow research in the areas of simulation and modeling. A key element of the book is the systematic, rational development of turbulence closure models and related aspects of modern turbulent flow theory and prediction. Starting with a review of the spectral dynamics of homogenous and inhomogeneous turbulent flows, succeeding chapters deal with numerical simulation techniques, renormalization group methods and turbulent closure modeling. Each chapter is authored by recognized leaders in their respective fields, and each provides a thorough and cohesive treatment of the subject.

  11. Analysis of atmospheric flow over a surface protrusion using the turbulence kinetic energy equation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frost, W.; Harper, W. L.; Fichtl, G. H.

    1975-01-01

    Atmospheric flow fields resulting from a semi-elliptical surface obstruction in an otherwise horizontally homogeneous statistically stationary flow are modelled with the boundary-layer/Boussinesq-approximation of the governing equation of fluid mechanics. The turbulence kinetic energy equation is used to determine the dissipative effects of turbulent shear on the mean flow. Mean-flow results are compared with those given in a previous paper where the same problem was attacked using a Prandtl mixing-length hypothesis. Iso-lines of turbulence kinetic energy and turbulence intensity are plotted in the plane of the flow. They highlight regions of high turbulence intensity in the stagnation zone and sharp gradients in intensity along the transition from adverse to favourable pressure gradient.

  12. Laying foundation for energy policy making in Uganda by indicating the energy flow

    OpenAIRE

    Nilsson, Amanda; Johansson, Ingrid

    2015-01-01

    This study aims to support the policymakers of Uganda to develop a sustainable and environmental friendly energy system by indicating the energy flow. An analysis of the interconnections between Climate-, Land-, Water- and Energy use (CLEWs) is conducted, and the most important connection between the hydropower and agriculture’s water use is identified. In this report, the sections energy and economy are analysed, please see “…” for a further analysis of the water- and land use. Uganda is tod...

  13. The Use of Energy in Malaysia: Tracing Energy Flows from Primary Source to End Use

    OpenAIRE

    Chinhao Chong; Weidou Ni; Linwei Ma; Pei Liu; Zheng Li

    2015-01-01

    Malaysia is a rapidly developing country in Southeast Asia that aims to achieve high-income country status by 2020; its economic growth is highly dependent on its abundant energy resources, especially natural gas and crude oil. In this paper, a complete picture of Malaysia’s energy use from primary source to end use is presented by mapping a Sankey diagram of Malaysia’s energy flows, together with ongoing trends analysis of the main factors influencing the energy flows. The results indicate t...

  14. Simple models for shear flow transition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barkley, Dwight

    2011-11-01

    I will discuss recent developments in modeling transitional shear flows with simple two-variable models. Both pipe flow and plane Couette flow are considered. The essential insight is that most large-scale features of these shear flows can be traced to a change from excitability to bistability in the local dynamics. Models are presented in two variables, turbulence intensity and mean shear. A PDE model of pipe flow captures the essence of the puff-slug transition as a change from excitability to bistability. Extended models with turbulence as deterministic transient chaos or multiplicative noise reproduce almost all large-scale features of transitional pipe flow. In particular they capture metastable localized puffs, puff splitting, slugs, localized edge states, a continuous transition to sustained turbulence via spatiotemporal intermittency (directed percolation), and a subsequent increase in turbulence fraction towards uniform, featureless turbulence. A model that additionally takes into account the symmetries of plane Couette flow reproduces localized turbulence and periodic turbulent-laminar bands.

  15. Control volume based modelling of compressible flow in reciprocating machines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Stig Kildegård; Thomsen, Per Grove; Carlsen, Henrik

    2004-01-01

    conservation laws for mass, energy, and momentum applied to a staggered mesh consisting of two overlapping strings of control volumes. Loss mechanisms can be included directly in the governing equations of models by including them as terms in the conservation laws. Heat transfer, flow friction......, and multidimensional effects must be calculated using empirical correlations; correlations for steady state flow can be used as an approximation. A transformation that assumes ideal gas is presented for transforming equations for masses and energies in control volumes into the corresponding pressures and temperatures...

  16. A General Thermal Equilibrium Discharge Flow Model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAO; Min-fu; ZHANG; Dong-xu; LV; Yu-feng

    2015-01-01

    In isentropic and thermal equilibrium assumptions,a discharge flow model was derived,which unified the rules of normal temperature water discharge,high temperature and high pressure water discharge,two-phase critical flow,saturated steam and superheated steam critical

  17. Improved Soft Abrasive Flow Finishing Method Based on Turbulent Kinetic Energy Enhancing

    Science.gov (United States)

    LI, Jun; JI, Shiming; TAN, Dapeng

    2017-03-01

    Soft abrasive flow(SAF) finishing can process the irregular geometric surfaces, but with the matter of low processing efficiency. To address the issue, an improved SAF finishing method based on turbulent kinetic energy enhancing is proposed. A constrained flow passage with serration cross-section is constructed to increase the turbulence intensity. Taking the constrained flow passage as the objective, a two-phase fluid dynamic model is set up by using particle trajectory model and standard k-ɛ turbulence model, and the flow field characteristics of the flow passage are acquired. The numerical results show that the serration flow passage can enhance the turbulence intensity, uniform the particles distribution, and increase the particle concentration near the bottom wall. The observation results by particle image velocimetry(PIV) show that the internal vortex structures are formed in flow passage, and the abrasive flow takes on turbulence concentrating phenomenon in near-wall region. The finishing experiments prove that the proposed method can obtain better surface uniformity, and the processing efficiency can be improved more 35%. This research provides an abrasive flow modeling method to reveal the particle motion regulars, and can offer references to the technical optimization of fluid-based precision processing.

  18. Modeling Rotating Turbulent Flows with the Body Force Potential Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharya, Amitabh; Perot, Blair

    2000-11-01

    Like a Reynolds Stress Transport equation model, the turbulent potential model has an explicit Coriolis acceleration term that appears in the model that accounts for rotation effects. In this work the additional secondary effects that system rotation has on the dissipation rate, return-to-isotropy, and fast pressure strain terms are also included in the model. The resulting model is tested in the context of rotating isotropic turbulence, rotating homogeneous shear flow, rotating channel flow, and swirling pipe flow. Many of the model changes are applicable to Reynolds stress transport equation models. All model modifications are frame indifferent.

  19. Electromagnetic effects on the energy flows saturating microturbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whelan, Garth; Pueschel, Moritz; Terry, Paul

    2015-11-01

    In kinetic plasma turbulence mode coupling in perpendicular wavenumber excites large-scale stable modes, allowing both the perpendicular cascade and stable-mode damping to saturate the instability. Using GENE, we evaluate the dominant triad energy transfer function via zonal flows, distinguishing between energy transfer to stable modes and transfer to higher wavenumber. We find that in cyclone base case ITG turbulence, the zonal flows are excited primarily by modes with poloidal wavenumber equal to or below the wavenumber responsible for the peak in transport, while modes with larger poloidal wavenumber produce a smaller nonlinear energy transfer out of zonal flows. We investigate the dissipation that balances the net excitation by varying collisionality and the rate of geodesic acoustic mode damping. Increasing the temperature gradient sharpens the nonlinear zonal flow drive peak around the peak in transport. As plasma beta is increased, proportionally more energy is transferred to stable modes within the wavenumber region of instability, providing an effect responsible for the increased nonlinear stabilization of ITG turbulence with plasma beta. We also investigate Kelvin-Helmholtz like saturation mechanisms of ETG turbulence.

  20. Neutron radigoraphy of fluid flow for geothermal energy research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bingham, Philip R [ORNL; Polsky, Yarom [ORNL; Anovitz, Lawrence {Larry} M [ORNL; Carmichael, Justin R [ORNL; Bilheux, Hassina Z [ORNL; Hussey, Dan [NIST Center for Neutron Research (NCRN), Gaithersburg, MD; Jacobson, David [National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST)

    2015-01-01

    Enhanced geothermal systems seek to expand the potential for geothermal energy by engineering heat exchange systems within the earth. A neutron radiography imaging method has been developed for the study of fluid flow through rock under environmental conditions found in enhanced geothermal energy systems. For this method, a pressure vessel suitable for neutron radiography was designed and fabricated, modifications to imaging instrument setups were tested, multiple contrast agents were tested, and algorithms developed for tracking of flow. The method has shown success for tracking of single phase flow through a manufactured crack in a 3.81 cm (1.5 inch) diameter core within a pressure vessel capable of confinement up to 69 MPa (10,000 psi) using a particle tracking approach with bubbles of fluorocarbon-based fluid as the “particles” and imaging with 10 ms exposures.

  1. Computational modelling flow and transport

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stelling, G.S.; Booij, N.

    1999-01-01

    Lecture notes CT wa4340. Derivation of equations using balance principles; numerical treatment of ordinary differential equations; time dependent partial differential equations; the strucure of a computer model:DUFLO; usage of numerical models.

  2. Bottlenecks to vibrational energy flow in OCS: Structures and mechanisms

    CERN Document Server

    Paškauskas, R; Uzer, T

    2008-01-01

    Finding the causes for the nonstatistical vibrational energy relaxation in the planar carbonyl sulfide (OCS) molecule is a longstanding problem in chemical physics: Not only is the relaxation incomplete long past the predicted statistical relaxation time, but it also consists of a sequence of abrupt transitions between long-lived regions of localized energy modes. We report on the phase space bottlenecks responsible for this slow and uneven vibrational energy flow in this Hamiltonian system with three degrees of freedom. They belong to a particular class of two-dimensional invariant tori which are organized around elliptic periodic orbits. We relate the trapping and transition mechanisms with the linear stability of these structures.

  3. A new dynamics model for traffic flow

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    As a study method of traffic flow, dynamics models were developedand applied in the last few decades. However, there exist some flaws in most existing models. In this note, a new dynamics model is proposed by using car-following theory and the usual connection method of micro-macro variables, which can overcome some ubiquitous problems in the existing models. Numerical results show that the new model can very well simulate traffic flow conditions, such as congestion, evacuation of congestion, stop-and-go phenomena and phantom jam.

  4. Control of 2D Flexible Structures by Confinement of Vibrations and Regulation of Their Energy Flow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fakhreddine Landolsi

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we investigate the control of 2D flexible structures by vibration confinement and the regulation of their energy flow along prespecified spatial paths. A discretized-model-based feedback strategy, aiming at confining and suppressing simultaneously the vibration, is proposed. It is assumed that the structure consists of parts that are sensitive to vibrations. The control design introduces a new pseudo-modal matrix derived from the computed eigenvectors of the discretized model. Simulations are presented to show the efficacy of the proposed control law. A parametric study is carried out to examine the effects of the different control parameters on the simultaneous confinement and suppression of vibrations. In addition, we conducted a set of simulations to investigate the flow control of vibrational energy during the confinement-suppression process. We found that the energy flow can be regulated via a set of control parameters for different confinement configurations.

  5. Economic Modeling of Compressed Air Energy Storage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rui Bo

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Due to the variable nature of wind resources, the increasing penetration level of wind power will have a significant impact on the operation and planning of the electric power system. Energy storage systems are considered an effective way to compensate for the variability of wind generation. This paper presents a detailed production cost simulation model to evaluate the economic value of compressed air energy storage (CAES in systems with large-scale wind power generation. The co-optimization of energy and ancillary services markets is implemented in order to analyze the impacts of CAES, not only on energy supply, but also on system operating reserves. Both hourly and 5-minute simulations are considered to capture the economic performance of CAES in the day-ahead (DA and real-time (RT markets. The generalized network flow formulation is used to model the characteristics of CAES in detail. The proposed model is applied on a modified IEEE 24-bus reliability test system. The numerical example shows that besides the economic benefits gained through energy arbitrage in the DA market, CAES can also generate significant profits by providing reserves, compensating for wind forecast errors and intra-hour fluctuation, and participating in the RT market.

  6. Study of flow instability in a centrifugal fan based on energy gradient theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xiao, Meina; Dou, Hua-Shu; Ma, Xiaoyang [Zhejiang Sci-Tech University, Hangzhou (China); Xiao, Qing [University of Strathclyde, Glasgow (United Kingdom); Chen, Yongning; He, Haijiang; Ye, Xinxue [Zhejiang Yilida Ventilator Co. Ltd, Taizhou (China)

    2016-02-15

    Flow instability in a centrifugal fan was studied using energy gradient theory. Numerical simulation was performed for the three dimensional turbulent flow field in a centrifugal fan. The flow is governed by the three-dimensional incompressible Navier-Stokes equations coupled with the RNG k-ε turbulent model. The finite volume method was used to discretize the governing equations and the Semiimplicit method for pressure linked equation (SIMPLE) algorithm is employed to iterate the system of the equations. The interior flow field in the centrifugal fan and the distribution of the energy gradient function K are obtained at different flow rates. According to the energy gradient method, the area with larger value of K is the place where the flow loses stability easier. The results show that instability is easier to generate in the regions of impeller outlet and volute tongue. The air flow near the hub is more stable than that near the shroud. That is due to the influences of variations of the velocity and the inlet angle along the axial direction. With the decrease of the flow rate, instability zone in a blade channel moves to the impeller inlet from the outlet and the unstable regions in different channels develop in opposite direction to the rotation of impeller.

  7. Fully localised nonlinear energy growth optimals in pipe flow

    CERN Document Server

    Pringle, Chris C T; Kerswell, Rich R

    2014-01-01

    A new, fully-localised, energy growth optimal is found over large times and in long pipe domains at a given mass flow rate. This optimal emerges at a threshold disturbance energy below which a nonlinear version of the known (streamwise-independent) linear optimal (Schmid \\& Henningson 1994) is selected, and appears to remain the optimal up until the critical energy at which transition is triggered. The form of this optimal is similar to that found in short pipes (Pringle et al.\\ 2012) albeit now with full localisation in the streamwise direction. This fully-localised optimal perturbation represents the best approximation yet of the {\\em minimal seed} (the smallest perturbation capable of triggering a turbulent episode) for `real' (laboratory) pipe flows.

  8. The propagation of kinetic energy across scales in turbulent flows

    CERN Document Server

    Cardesa, José I; Dong, Siwei; Jiménez, Javier

    2015-01-01

    A temporal study of energy transfer across length scales is performed in 3D numerical simulations of homogeneous shear flow and isotropic turbulence, at Reynolds numbers in the range $Re_{\\lambda}=107-384$. The average time taken by perturbations in the energy flux to travel between scales is measured and shown to be additive, as inferred from the agreement between the total travel time from a given scale to the smallest dissipative motions, and the time estimated from successive jumps through intermediate scales. Our data suggests that the propagation of disturbances in the energy flux is independent of the forcing and that it defines a `velocity' that determines the energy flux itself. These results support that the cascade is, on average, a scale-local process where energy is continuously transmitted from one scale to the next in order of decreasing size.

  9. Beam-Energy and Centrality Dependence of Directed Flow of Identified Particles

    CERN Document Server

    ,

    2015-01-01

    These proceedings present directed flow ($v_1$) measurements in Au+Au collisions from STAR's Beam Energy Scan (BES) program at the Relativistic Heavy-Ion Collider, for $p$, $\\bar{p}$, $\\Lambda$, $\\bar\\Lambda$, $K^\\pm$, $K^0_S$ and $\\pi^\\pm$. At intermediate centrality, protons show a minimum in directed flow slope, $dv_1/dy\\,|_{y\\leq0.8}$, as a function of beam energy. Proton $dv_1/dy$ changes sign near 10 GeV, and the directed flow for $\\Lambda$ is consistent with the proton result. The directed flow slope for net protons shows a clear minimum at 14.5 GeV and becomes positive at beam energies below 10 GeV and above 30 GeV. New results for net-kaon directed flow slope resemble net protons from high energy down to 14.5 GeV, but remain negative at lower energies. The slope $dv_1/dy$ shows a strong centrality dependence, especially for $p$ and $\\Lambda$ at the lower beam energies. Available model calculations are in poor agreement.

  10. High energy sodium based room temperature flow batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shamie, Jack

    As novel energy sources such as solar, wind and tidal energies are explored it becomes necessary to build energy storage facilities to load level the intermittent nature of these energy sources. Energy storage is achieved by converting electrical energy into another form of energy. Batteries have many properties that are attractive for energy storage including high energy and power. Among many different types of batteries, redox flow batteries (RFBs) offer many advantages. Unlike conventional batteries, RFBs store energy in a liquid medium rather than solid active materials. This method of storage allows for the separation of energy and power unlike conventional batteries. Additionally flow batteries may have long lifetimes because there is no expansion or contraction of electrodes. A major disadvantage of RFB's is its lower energy density when compared to traditional batteries. In this Thesis, a novel hybrid Na-based redox flow battery (HNFB) is explored, which utilizes a room temperature molten sodium based anode, a sodium ion conducting solid electrolyte and liquid catholytes. The sodium electrode leads to high voltages and energy and allows for the possibility of multi-electron transfer per molecule. Vanadium acetylacetonate (acac) and TEMPO have been investigated for their use as catholytes. In the vanadium system, 2 electrons transfers per vanadium atom were found leading to a doubling of capacity. In addition, degradation of the charged state was found to be reversible within the voltage range of the cell. Contamination by water leads to the formation of vanadyl acetylacetonate. Although it is believed that vanadyl complex need to be taken to low voltages to be reduced back to vanadium acac, a new mechanism is shown that begins at higher voltages (2.1V). Vanadyl complexes react with excess ligand and protons to reform the vanadium complex. During this reaction, water is reformed leading to the continuous cycle in which vanadyl is formed and then reduced back

  11. Structured Process Energy-Exergy-Flow Diagram and Ideality Index for Analysis of Energy Transformation in Chemical Processes (Part 1)

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Hiroshi OAKI; Masaru ISHIDA; Tsuneo IKAWA

    1981-01-01

      A new diagram called structured process energy-exergy-flow diagram (SPEED) is proposed to systematically analyze the structure of energy flow in chemical processes and to design the process structures effectively...

  12. Holographic dark-energy models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Campo, Sergio; Fabris, Júlio. C.; Herrera, Ramón; Zimdahl, Winfried

    2011-06-01

    Different holographic dark-energy models are studied from a unifying point of view. We compare models for which the Hubble scale, the future event horizon or a quantity proportional to the Ricci scale are taken as the infrared cutoff length. We demonstrate that the mere definition of the holographic dark-energy density generally implies an interaction with the dark-matter component. We discuss the relation between the equation-of-state parameter and the energy density ratio of both components for each of the choices, as well as the possibility of noninteracting and scaling solutions. Parameter estimations for all three cutoff options are performed with the help of a Bayesian statistical analysis, using data from supernovae type Ia and the history of the Hubble parameter. The ΛCDM model is the clear winner of the analysis. According to the Bayesian information criterion (BIC), all holographic models should be considered as ruled out, since the difference ΔBIC to the corresponding ΛCDM value is >10. According to the Akaike information criterion (AIC), however, we find ΔAIC<2 for models with Hubble-scale and Ricci-scale cutoffs, indicating, that they may still be competitive. As we show for the example of the Ricci-scale case, also the use of certain priors, reducing the number of free parameters to that of the ΛCDM model, may result in a competitive holographic model.

  13. Soap film flow visualization investigations of oscillating wing energy harvesters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirschmeier, Benjamin; Bryant, Matthew

    2015-03-01

    With increasing population and proliferation of wireless electronics, significant research attention has turned to harvesting energy from ambient sources such as wind and water flows at scales ranging from micro-watt to mega-watt levels. One technique that has recently attracted attention is the application of bio-inspired flapping wings for energy harvesting. This type of system uses a heaving and pitching airfoil to extract flow energy and generate electricity. Such a device can be realized using passive devices excited by aeroelastic flutter phenomena, kinematic mechanisms driven by mechanical linkages, or semi-active devices that are actively controlled in one degree of freedom and passively driven in another. For these types of systems, numerical simulations have showed strong dependence on efficiency and vortex interaction. In this paper we propose a new apparatus for reproducing arbitrary pitch-heave waveforms to perform flow visualization experiments in a soap film tunnel. The vertically falling, gravity driven soap film tunnel is used to replicate flows with a chord Reynolds number on the order of 4x104. The soap film tunnel is used to investigate leading edge vortex (LEV) and trailing edge vortex (TEV) interactions for sinusoidal and non-sinusoidal waveforms. From a qualitative analysis of the fluid structure interaction, we have been able to demonstrate that the LEVs for non-sinusoidal motion convect faster over the airfoil compared with sinusoidal motion. Signifying that optimal flapping frequency is dependent on the motion profile.

  14. Tracer technology modeling the flow of fluids

    CERN Document Server

    Levenspiel, Octave

    2012-01-01

    A vessel’s behavior as a heat exchanger, absorber, reactor, or other process unit is dependent upon how fluid flows through the vessel.  In early engineering, the designer would assume either plug flow or mixed flow of the fluid through the vessel.  However, these assumptions were oftentimes inaccurate, sometimes being off by a volume factor of 100 or more.  The result of this unreliable figure produced ineffective products in multiple reaction systems.   Written by a pioneering researcher in the field of chemical engineering, the tracer method was introduced to provide more accurate flow data.  First, the tracer method measured the actual flow of fluid through a vessel.  Second, it developed a suitable model to represent the flow in question.  Such models are used to follow the flow of fluid in chemical reactors and other process units, like in rivers and streams, or solid and porous structures.  In medicine, the tracer method is used to study the flow of chemicals—harmful  and harmless—in the...

  15. Energy harvesting by means of flow-induced vibrations on aerospace vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Daochun; Wu, Yining; Da Ronch, Andrea; Xiang, Jinwu

    2016-10-01

    This paper reviews the design, implementation, and demonstration of energy harvesting devices that exploit flow-induced vibrations as the main source of energy. Starting with a presentation of various concepts of energy harvesters that are designed to benefit from a general class of flow-induced vibrations, specific attention is then given at those technologies that may offer, today or in the near future, a potential benefit to extend the operational capabilities and to monitor critical parameters of unmanned aerial vehicles. Various phenomena characterized by flow-induced vibrations are discussed, including limit cycle oscillations of plates and wing sections, vortex-induced and galloping oscillations of bluff bodies, vortex-induced vibrations of downstream structures, and atmospheric turbulence and gusts. It was found that linear or linearized modeling approaches are commonly employed to support the design phase of energy harvesters. As a result, highly nonlinear and coupled phenomena that characterize flow-induced vibrations are neglected in the design process. The Authors encourage a shift in the current design paradigm: considering coupled nonlinear phenomena, and adequate modeling tools to support their analysis, from a design limitation to a design opportunity. Special emphasis is placed on identifying designs and implementations applicable to aircraft configurations. Application fields of flow-induced vibrations-based energy harvesters are discussed including power supply for wireless sensor networks and simultaneous energy harvest and control. A large body of work on energy harvesters is included in this review journal. Whereas most of the references claim direct applications to unmanned aerial vehicles, it is apparent that, in most of the cases presented, the working principles and characteristics of the energy harvesters are incompatible with any aerospace applications. Finally, the challenges that hold back the integration of energy harvesting

  16. Design verification and cold-flow modeling test report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-07-01

    This report presents a compilation of the following three test reports prepared by TRW for Alaska Industrial Development and Export Authority (AIDEA) as part of the Healy Clean Coal Project, Phase 1 Design of the TRW Combustor and Auxiliary Systems, which is co-sponsored by the Department of Energy under the Clean Coal Technology 3 Program: (1) Design Verification Test Report, dated April 1993, (2) Combustor Cold Flow Model Report, dated August 28, 1992, (3) Coal Feed System Cold Flow Model Report, October 28, 1992. In this compilation, these three reports are included in one volume consisting of three parts, and TRW proprietary information has been excluded.

  17. Energy Flows in Low-Entropy Complex Systems

    CERN Document Server

    Chaisson, Eric J

    2015-01-01

    Nature's many complex systems--physical, biological, and cultural--are islands of low-entropy order within increasingly disordered seas of surrounding, high-entropy chaos. Energy is a principal facilitator of the rising complexity of all such systems in the expanding Universe, including galaxies, stars, planets, life, society, and machines. A large amount of empirical evidence--relating neither entropy nor information, rather energy--suggests that an underlying simplicity guides the emergence and growth of complexity among many known, highly varied systems in the 14-billion-year-old Universe, from big bang to humankind. Energy flows are as centrally important to life and society as they are to stars and galaxies. In particular, the quantity energy rate density--the rate of energy flow per unit mass--can be used to explicate in a consistent, uniform, and unifying way a huge collection of diverse complex systems observed throughout Nature. Operationally, those systems able to utilize optimal amounts of energy t...

  18. Dark Energy and the quietness of the Local Hubble Flow

    CERN Document Server

    Axenides, M

    2002-01-01

    The linearity and quietness of the Local ($< 10 Mpc$) Hubble Flow (LHF) in view of the very clumpy local universe is a long standing puzzle in standard and in open CDM cosmogony. The question addressed in this paper is whether the antigravity component of the recently discovered dark energy can cool the velocity flow enough to provide a solution to this puzzle. We calculate the growth of matter fluctuations in a flat universe containing a fraction $\\Omega_X(t_0)$ of dark energy obeying the time independent equation of state $p_X = w \\rho_X$. We find that dark energy can indeed cool the LHF. However the dark energy parameter values required to make the predicted velocity dispersion consistent with the observed value $v_{rms}\\simeq 40km/sec$ have been ruled out by other observational tests constraining the dark energy parameters $w$ and $\\Omega_X$. Therefore despite the claims of recent qualitative studies dark energy with time independent equation of state can not by itself explain the quietness and lineari...

  19. Energy technologies and energy efficiency in economic modelling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klinge Jacobsen, Henrik

    1998-01-01

    This paper discusses different approaches to incorporating energy technologies and technological development in energy-economic models. Technological development is a very important issue in long-term energy demand projections and in environmental analyses. Different assumptions on technological ...... of renewable energy and especially wind power will increase the rate of efficiency improvement. A technologically based model in this case indirectly makes the energy efficiency endogenous in the aggregate energy-economy model.......This paper discusses different approaches to incorporating energy technologies and technological development in energy-economic models. Technological development is a very important issue in long-term energy demand projections and in environmental analyses. Different assumptions on technological...... development are one of the main causes for the very diverging results which have been obtained using bottom-up and top-down models for analysing the costs of greenhouse gas mitigation. One of the objectives for studies comparing model results have been to create comparable model assumptions regarding...

  20. Flow field mapping in data rack model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matěcha J.

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The main objective of this study was to map the flow field inside the data rack model, fitted with three 1U server models. The server model is based on the common four-processor 1U server. The main dimensions of the data rack model geometry are taken fully from the real geometry. Only the model was simplified with respect to the greatest possibility in the experimental measurements. The flow field mapping was carried out both experimentally and numerically. PIV (Particle Image Velocimetry method was used for the experimental flow field mapping, when the flow field has been mapped for defined regions within the 2D/3D data rack model. Ansys CFX and OpenFOAM software were used for the numerical solution. Boundary conditions for numerical model were based on data obtained from experimental measurement of velocity profile at the output of the server mockup. This velocity profile was used as the input boundary condition in the calculation. In order to achieve greater consistency of the numerical model with experimental data, the numerical model was modified with regard to the results of experimental measurements. Results from the experimental and numerical measurements were compared and the areas of disparateness were identified. In further steps the obtained proven numerical model will be utilized for the real geometry of data racks and data.

  1. Eight energy and material flow characteristics of urban ecosystems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Xuemei

    2016-11-01

    Recent decades have seen an expanding literature exploring urban energy and material flows, loosely branded as urban metabolism analysis. However, this has occurred largely in parallel to the mainstream studies of cities as ecosystems. This paper aims to conceptually bridge these two distinctive fields of research, by (a) identifying the common aspects between them; (b) identifying key characteristics of urban ecosystems that can be derived from energy and material flow analysis, namely energy and material budget and pathways; flow intensity; energy and material efficiency; rate of resource depletion, accumulation and transformation; self-sufficiency or external dependency; intra-system heterogeneity; intersystem and temporal variation; and regulating mechanism and governing capacity. I argue that significant ecological insight can be, or has the potential to be, drawn from the rich and rapidly growing empirical findings of urban metabolism studies to understand the behaviour of cities as human-dominated, complex systems. A closer intellectual linkage and cross pollination between urban metabolism and urban ecosystem studies will advance our scientific understanding and better inform urban policy and management practices.

  2. Turbulence Modeling of Flows with Extensive Crossflow Separation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Argyris G. Panaras

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The reasons for the difficulty in simulating accurately strong 3-D shock wave/turbulent boundary layer interactions (SBLIs and high-alpha flows with classical turbulence models are investigated. These flows are characterized by the appearance of strong crossflow separation. In view of recent additional evidence, a previously published flow analysis, which attributes the poor performance of classical turbulence models to the observed laminarization of the separation domain, is reexamined. According to this analysis, the longitudinal vortices into which the separated boundary layer rolls up in this type of separated flow, transfer external inviscid air into the part of the separation adjacent to the wall, decreasing its turbulence. It is demonstrated that linear models based on the Boussinesq equation provide solutions of moderate accuracy, while non-linear ones and others that consider the particular structure of the flow are more efficient. Published and new Reynolds Averaged Navier–Stokes (RANS simulations are reviewed, as well as results from a recent Large Eddy Simulation (LES study, which indicate that in calculations characterized by sufficient accuracy the turbulent kinetic energy of the reverse flow inside the separation vortices is very low, i.e., the flow is almost laminar there.

  3. Water flow experiments and analyses on the cross-flow type mercury target model with the flow guide plates

    CERN Document Server

    Haga, K; Kaminaga, M; Hino, R

    2001-01-01

    A mercury target is used in the spallation neutron source driven by a high-intensity proton accelerator. In this study, the effectiveness of the cross-flow type mercury target structure was evaluated experimentally and analytically. Prior to the experiment, the mercury flow field and the temperature distribution in the target container were analyzed assuming a proton beam energy and power of 1.5 GeV and 5 MW, respectively, and the feasibility of the cross-flow type target was evaluated. Then the average water flow velocity field in the target mock-up model, which was fabricated from Plexiglass for a water experiment, was measured at room temperature using the PIV technique. Water flow analyses were conducted and the analytical results were compared with the experimental results. The experimental results showed that the cross-flow could be realized in most of the proton beam path area and the analytical result of the water flow velocity field showed good correspondence to the experimental results in the case w...

  4. Computational Models for Turbomachinery Flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-12-01

    conductivity k averaged kinectic energy m meridional distance it normal to streamsurface p pressure p rotary stagnation pressure r radius r gas...one can completely define the velocity field through two families of streamfunctions ij/j and v2 , Yih (1979). •+ •+ The steady state continuity...z 3z r p 3r K fr Br 6 6 m F + f + v2 /r fr Br V (2.2.79) where the right hand side is unimportant for the properties of the system

  5. Base Flow Model Validation Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The innovation is the systematic "building-block" validation of CFD/turbulence models employing a GUI driven CFD code (RPFM) and existing as well as new data sets to...

  6. Energy Dissipation in the Smagorinsky Model of Turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Layton, William

    2016-01-01

    The Smagorinsky model, unmodified, is often reported to severely overdiffuse flows. Previous estimates of the energy dissipation rate of the Smagorinsky model for shear flows reflect a blow up of model energy dissipation as Re increases. This blow up is consistent with the numerical evidence and leads to the question: Is the over dissipation due to the influence of the turbulent viscosity in boundary layers alone or is its action on small scales generated by the nonlinearity through the cascade also a contributor? This report develops model dissipation estimates for body force driven flow under periodic boundary conditions (and thus only with nonlinearity generated small scales). It is proven that the model's time averaged energy dissipation rate satisfies the same upper bound as for the NSE plus one additional term that vanishes uniformly in the Reynolds number as the Smagorinsky length scale decreases. Since this estimate is consistent with that observed for the NSE, it establishes that, without boundary la...

  7. NUMERICAL SIMULATION OF TURBULENT FLOW THROUGH THROAT-TYPE ENERGY-DISSIPATORS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    The flow through the throat-type energy-dissi-pators is calculated by using an axis-symmetrical K-ε turbu-lence model. The velocity field, the pressure field and the dis-tributions of turbulent energy and its dissipation rate are ac-quired. The energy dissipation through the throat-type ener-gy-dissipators can be seen in detail. The calculated pressuredistribution is compared with the measured and in good agree-ment. The results are useful to understand deeply the flowcharacteristics of the throat-type energy-dissipators.

  8. Model studies for determining whether combined-cycle plants can participate in control of frequency and power flows in unified energy systems of Russia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davydov, N. I.; Zorchenko, N. V.; Davydov, A. V.; Radin, Yu. A.

    2009-10-01

    Approximating transfer functions of a PGU-39 combined-cycle plant as a technological system with a controlled power output are presented, a structure of a system for automatic closed-loop control of the combined-cycle plant power output is proposed, and results from model investigations of this system are presented.

  9. Sulphur-impregnated flow cathode to enable high-energy-density lithium flow batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hongning; Zou, Qingli; Liang, Zhuojian; Liu, Hao; Li, Quan; Lu, Yi-Chun

    2015-01-01

    Redox flow batteries are promising technologies for large-scale electricity storage, but have been suffering from low energy density and low volumetric capacity. Here we report a flow cathode that exploits highly concentrated sulphur-impregnated carbon composite, to achieve a catholyte volumetric capacity 294 Ah l-1 with long cycle life (>100 cycles), high columbic efficiency (>90%, 100 cycles) and high energy efficiency (>80%, 100 cycles). The demonstrated catholyte volumetric capacity is five times higher than the all-vanadium flow batteries (60 Ah l-1) and 3-6 times higher than the demonstrated lithium-polysulphide approaches (50-117 Ah l-1). Pseudo-in situ impedance and microscopy characterizations reveal superior electrochemical and morphological reversibility of the sulphur redox reactions. Our approach of exploiting sulphur-impregnated carbon composite in the flow cathode creates effective interfaces between the insulating sulphur and conductive carbon-percolating network and offers a promising direction to develop high-energy-density flow batteries.

  10. Was the magnitude (M = 9.0R) of the mega-earthquake of Japan (11th of March, 2011) predictable? An analysis based on the Lithospheric Seismic Energy Flow Model (LSEFM)

    CERN Document Server

    Thanassoulas, C; Verveniotis, G

    2012-01-01

    The Tohoku EQ (11th of March, 2011, M = 9.0) in Japan falsified the proposed EQ magnitude range (M = 7.0 - 8.5) of the same seismogenic regional area that had been determined by the compiled hazard maps, study of historical data, or other probabilistic methods while a larger magnitude (M > 9.0) had been proposed for all subduction zones. The observed discrepancy between the proposed EQ magnitude range and the actual one of the Tohoku EQ is studied in this work in terms of the cumulative seismic energy release of the study area and by the use of the Lithospheric Seismic Energy Flow Model (LSEFM). The results indicate that the Tohoku mega-earthquake magnitude could be predicted quite accurately provided that a long past seismic history had been available for use by the LSEFM procedure. Moreover, the presence, of the missing historic 1855 EQ (7.0 < M < 8.0) from seismic catalogs, was predicted backwards by the LSEFM method and its existence was verified by the Ishibashi (2004) work on Japanese historic sei...

  11. Compressive sampling for energy spectrum estimation of turbulent flows

    CERN Document Server

    Adalsteinsson, Gudmundur F

    2014-01-01

    Recent results from compressive sampling (CS) have demonstrated that accurate reconstruction of sparse signals often requires far fewer samples than suggested by the classical Nyquist--Shannon sampling theorem. Typically, signal reconstruction errors are measured in the $\\ell^2$ norm and the signal is assumed to be sparse, compressible or having a prior distribution. Our spectrum estimation by sparse optimization (SpESO) method uses prior information about isotropic homogeneous turbulent flows with power law energy spectra and applies the methods of CS to 1-D and 2-D turbulence signals to estimate their energy spectra with small logarithmic errors. SpESO is distinct from existing energy spectrum estimation methods which are based on sparse support of the signal in Fourier space. SpESO approximates energy spectra with an order of magnitude fewer samples than needed with Shannon sampling. Our results demonstrate that SpESO performs much better than lumped orthogonal matching pursuit (LOMP), and as well or bette...

  12. Material and energy flow analysis (MEFA – first step in eco-innovation approach to assessment of steel production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Korol

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The main goal of the study was to evaluate material and energy flow analysis (MEFA of steel production. The application of umberto universal software to devise MEFA for the steel production was presented. The material and energy flow analysis of steel production includes a range of technologies through each unit process in integrated steelmaking route in Poland. Modelling MEFA helps a high level of technology to be reached through the effective use of resources and energy.

  13. A PCM/forced convection conjugate transient analysis of energy storage systems with annular and countercurrent flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Y.; Faghri, A.; Juhasz, A.

    1991-01-01

    Latent heat energy storage systems with both annular and countercurrent flows are modeled numerically. The change of phase of the phase-change material (PCM) and the transient forced convective heat transfer for the transfer fluid are solved simultaneously as a conjugate problem. A parametric study and a system optimization are conducted. It is found that the energy storage system with the countercurrent flow is an efficient way to absorb heat energy in a short period for pulsed power load space applications.

  14. Improved modeling techniques for turbomachinery flow fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lakshminarayana, B.; Fagan, J.R. Jr.

    1995-12-31

    This program has the objective of developing an improved methodology for modeling turbomachinery flow fields, including the prediction of losses and efficiency. Specifically, the program addresses the treatment of the mixing stress tensor terms attributed to deterministic flow field mechanisms required in steady-state Computational Fluid Dynamic (CFD) models for turbomachinery flow fields. These mixing stress tensors arise due to spatial and temporal fluctuations (in an absolute frame of reference) caused by rotor-stator interaction due to various blade rows and by blade-to-blade variation of flow properties. This will be accomplished in a cooperative program by Penn State University and the Allison Engine Company. These tasks include the acquisition of previously unavailable experimental data in a high-speed turbomachinery environment, the use of advanced techniques to analyze the data, and the development of a methodology to treat the deterministic component of the mixing stress tenor.

  15. MCRG Flow for the nonlinear Sigma Model

    CERN Document Server

    Koerner, Daniel; Wipf, Andreas

    2013-01-01

    A study of the renormalization group flow in the three-dimensional nonlinear O(N) sigma model using Monte Carlo Renormalization Group (MCRG) techniques is presented. To achieve this, we combine an improved blockspin transformation with the canonical demon method to determine the flow diagram for a number of different truncations. Systematic errors of the approach are highlighted. Results are discussed with hindsight on the fixed point structure of the model and the corresponding critical exponents. Special emphasis is drawn on the existence of a nontrivial ultraviolet fixed point as required for theories modeling the asymptotic safety scenario of quantum gravity.

  16. ENERGY COMPONENTS OF GAS-LIQUID FLOW IN AEROTANK

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frolova Anna Olegovna

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available In the article the main processes of hydrodynamic regime of aeration tank are observed: the formation and ascent of air bubbles during aeration and motion of the water-sludge mixture. The formulas for determining the potential speed of an air bubble during aeration and energy of the water-sludge stream motion are presented. The investigation of interaction mechanism of purified waste water and air bubbles in the process of aeration in relation to the flow dynamics is poorly explored and challenging. Interaction of energetic components of the bubbles flow during aeration and uniform stream motion in the aerotank is the part of mass transfer and diffusion. The increase in total energy of the system by means of summing and raising potentials of the stream and bubbles speed can lead to increasing the purification effect, that means speeding up the diffusion processes.

  17. Flow Structures and Energy Capture from an Oscillating Hydrofoil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franck, Jennifer; Frank, Sarah; Mandre, Shreyas

    2013-11-01

    The flow surrounding an oscillating hydrofoil in a uniform freestream is computationally investigated for hydrokinetic energy capture. Simulations are performed on an elliptical hydrofoil using 2D Direct Numerical Simulation (DNS) for low Reynolds number and 3D Large-Eddy Simulations (LES) for high Reynolds number simulations at 80,000. A non-inertial reference frame is utilized for rigid-body motion of the hydrofoil, which is prescribed a sinusoidal motion in pitch and heave. The kinematic parameters are varied and the resulting flow features are correlated with positive or negative energy capture. In an effort to optimize the stroke, variations in the sinusoidal heave and pitch signals are systematically explored and analyzed for future closed-loop control.

  18. Energy flow of tulips and hyacinths; Energiestroom tulp en hyacint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wildschut, J. [Praktijkonderzoek Plant en Omgeving PPO, Bloembollen, Boomkwekerij en Fruit, Lisse (Netherlands); Kok, M.; Bisschop, B. [DLV Plant, Wageningen (Netherlands)

    2006-07-15

    The project objectives are: (1) to update and to create an improved map of energy flows for cultivation (natural gas and electricity) and forcing (electricity) of tulips; (2) To update and improve the map of energy flows (natural gas and electricity) for cultivation and forcing of hyacinths; and (3) Deriving the most optimal drying and storage method from an analysis of the distribution in natural gas use/ha in the cultivation of tulips [Dutch] De projectdoelstellingen zijn (1) Het actualiseren en beter in kaart brengen van de energiestromen voor teelt (aardgas en elektriciteit) en broei (elektriciteit) van tulpen; (2) Het actualiseren en beter in kaart brengen van de energiestromen (aardgas en elektriciteit) voor teelt en broei van hyacint; en (3) Het afleiden van de meest optimale droog- en bewaarmethode uit een analyse van de spreiding in aardgasverbruik/ha bij de teelt van tulpen.

  19. Lithium-Based High Energy Density Flow Batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bugga, Ratnakumar V. (Inventor); West, William C. (Inventor); Kindler, Andrew (Inventor); Smart, Marshall C. (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    Systems and methods in accordance with embodiments of the invention implement a lithium-based high energy density flow battery. In one embodiment, a lithium-based high energy density flow battery includes a first anodic conductive solution that includes a lithium polyaromatic hydrocarbon complex dissolved in a solvent, a second cathodic conductive solution that includes a cathodic complex dissolved in a solvent, a solid lithium ion conductor disposed so as to separate the first solution from the second solution, such that the first conductive solution, the second conductive solution, and the solid lithium ionic conductor define a circuit, where when the circuit is closed, lithium from the lithium polyaromatic hydrocarbon complex in the first conductive solution dissociates from the lithium polyaromatic hydrocarbon complex, migrates through the solid lithium ionic conductor, and associates with the cathodic complex of the second conductive solution, and a current is generated.

  20. Energy Flows in Low-Entropy Complex Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric J. Chaisson

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Nature’s many complex systems—physical, biological, and cultural—are islands of low-entropy order within increasingly disordered seas of surrounding, high-entropy chaos. Energy is a principal facilitator of the rising complexity of all such systems in the expanding Universe, including galaxies, stars, planets, life, society, and machines. A large amount of empirical evidence—relating neither entropy nor information, rather energy—suggests that an underlying simplicity guides the emergence and growth of complexity among many known, highly varied systems in the 14-billion-year-old Universe, from big bang to humankind. Energy flows are as centrally important to life and society as they are to stars and galaxies. In particular, the quantity energy rate density—the rate of energy flow per unit mass—can be used to explicate in a consistent, uniform, and unifying way a huge collection of diverse complex systems observed throughout Nature. Operationally, those systems able to utilize optimal amounts of energy tend to survive and those that cannot are non-randomly eliminated.

  1. Energy minimization for the flow in ducts and networks

    CERN Document Server

    Sochi, Taha

    2014-01-01

    The present paper is an attempt to demonstrate how the energy minimization principle may be considered as a governing rule for the physical equilibrium that determines the flow fields in tubes and networks. We previously investigated this issue using a numerical stochastic method, specifically simulated annealing, where we demonstrated the problem by some illuminating examples and concluded that energy minimization principle can be a valid hypothesis. The investigation in this paper is more general as it is based to a certain extent on an analytical approach.

  2. Mesoscopic Rhelogical Model for Polymeric Media Flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koshelev, K.; Kuznetcov, A.; Merzlikina, D.; Pyshnograi, G.; Pyshnograi, I.; Tolstykh, M. Y.

    2017-01-01

    The paper compares hydrodynamic properties of three-dimensional flows of polymer melts. A modified Vinogradov and Pokrovskii rheological model is used for the mathematical description of nonlinear viscoelastic fluid flows in a planeparallel channel with a sudden convergence. Discrete analogs for partial differential equations were obtained via the control volume method separating physical processes. The numerical implementation is carried out using the GPU-based parallel computing technology. Velocity and pressure fields have been calculated for two samples of polyethylene melts and the circulating flow at the entrance of the slit channel is noticeable. It is shown that the size of the vortex zone depends significantly on melt rheology.

  3. Particle in the Brusselator Model with Flow

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kuptsov, P.V.; Kuznetsov, S.P.; Mosekilde, Erik

    2002-01-01

    We consider the interaction of a small moving particle with a stationary space-periodic pattern in a chemical reaction-diffusion system with a flow. The pattern is produced by a one-dimensional Brusselator model that is perturbed by a constant displacement from the equilibrium state at the inlet....... By partially blocking the flow, the particle gives rise to a local increment of the flow rate. For certain parameter values a response with intermittent Hopf and Turing type structures is observed. In other regimes a wave of substitution of missing peaks runs across the pattern....

  4. Online Speed Scaling Based on Active Job Count to Minimize Flow Plus Energy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lam, Tak-Wah; Lee, Lap Kei; To, Isaac K. K.;

    2013-01-01

    ) that changes speed discretely. This is in contrast to the previous algorithms which change the speed continuously. More interestingly, AJC admits a better competitive ratio, and without using extra speed. In the second part, we extend the study to a more general speed scaling model where the processor can......This paper is concerned with online scheduling algorithms that aim at minimizing the total flow time plus energy usage. The results are divided into two parts. First, we consider the well-studied “simple” speed scaling model and show how to analyze a speed scaling algorithm (called AJC...... enter a sleep state to further save energy. A new sleep management algorithm called IdleLonger is presented. This algorithm, when coupled with AJC, gives the first competitive algorithm for minimizing total flow time plus energy in the general model....

  5. SIMPLE LATTICE BOLTZMANN MODEL FOR TRAFFIC FLOWS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yan Guangwu; Hu Shouxin

    2000-01-01

    A lattice Boltzmann model with 5-bit lattice for traffic flows is proposed.Using the Chapman-Enskog expansion and multi-scale technique,we obtain the higher-order moments of equilibrium distribution function.A simple traffic light problem is simulated by using the present lattice Boltzmann model,and the result agrees well with analytical solution.

  6. Energy modelling for economies in transition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van Leeuwen, M.L.; Velthuijsen, J.W. [Foundation for Economic Research SEO, University of Amsterdam UvA, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Van Oostvoorn, F.; Voogt, M. [ECN Policy Study, Petten (Netherlands)

    1998-12-31

    The model system composed of a Computable General Equilibrium (CGE) E3 model and the least-cost energy sector model Energy Flow Optimization Model - Environment (EFOM-ENV) proved to be a useful support in developing long-term scenarios for several Central European and Eastern European (CEE) countries. Calculation results obtained from using the model.system could be used to support energy policy decisions in the framework of different possible future developments in energy demand and supply and related emissions, which is also consistent with macro-economic developments in the national economies. Also, and most important, the developments within the national (transition) economy could be made consistent with external developments (on a world and European Union (EU) level) that are envisioned in EC-scenarios. This facilitates the analysis of an increasing convergence process of different CEE countries towards the EU and could be useful in the policy dialogue on convergence. Empirical studies with the model system have shown that the interrelations between macro-economic indicators and important factors determining energy supply and demand could be dealt with in a transparent way. An assessment could be made of the impact of changes in economic structure, employment rate, trade balance, social security and public spending on the structure of energy demand, fuel mix, capacity requirements and related energy costs, and vice versa. Specific policy issues such as a restructuring of the Polish coal industry or determining the scope for CO2 reduction in Romania could be addressed and instruments could be identified to encounter these issues. Especially for policy makers in transition economies who are faced with many interactive changes, it is important to have a realistic insight in the scope and restrictions of future policy. Ambitions are often very high, but reaching certain objectives could be conflicting with others. Results obtained from calculations with the model

  7. Is flow velocity a significant parameter in flood damage modelling?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Kreibich

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Flow velocity is generally presumed to influence flood damage. However, this influence is hardly quantified and virtually no damage models take it into account. Therefore, the influences of flow velocity, water depth and combinations of these two impact parameters on various types of flood damage were investigated in five communities affected by the Elbe catchment flood in Germany in 2002. 2-D hydraulic models with high to medium spatial resolutions were used to calculate the impact parameters at the sites in which damage occurred. A significant influence of flow velocity on structural damage, particularly on roads, could be shown in contrast to a minor influence on monetary losses and business interruption. Forecasts of structural damage to road infrastructure should be based on flow velocity alone. The energy head is suggested as a suitable flood impact parameter for reliable forecasting of structural damage to residential buildings above a critical impact level of 2 m of energy head or water depth. However, general consideration of flow velocity in flood damage modelling, particularly for estimating monetary loss, cannot be recommended.

  8. Mathematical model of two-phase flow in accelerator channel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    О.Ф. Нікулін

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available  The problem of  two-phase flow composed of energy-carrier phase (Newtonian liquid and solid fine-dispersed phase (particles in counter jet mill accelerator channel is considered. The mathematical model bases goes on the supposition that the phases interact with each other like independent substances by means of aerodynamics’ forces in conditions of adiabatic flow. The mathematical model in the form of system of differential equations of order 11 is represented. Derivations of equations by base physical principles for cross-section-averaged quantity are produced. The mathematical model can be used for estimation of any kinematic and thermodynamic flow characteristics for purposely parameters optimization problem solving and transfer functions determination, that take place in  counter jet mill accelerator channel design.

  9. Mathematical Modelling of Fluid Flow in Cone and Cavitation Formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milada KOZUBKOVÁ

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Problem of cavitation is the undesirable phenomena occuring in the fluid flow in many hydraulic application (pumps, turbines, valves, etc.. Therefore this is in the focus of interest using experimental and mathematical methods. Based on cavitation modelling in Laval nozzle results and experience [1], [2], [4], following problem described as the water flow at the outlet from turbine blade wheel was solved. Primarily the problem is simplified into modelling of water flow in cone. Profiles of axial, radial and tangential velocity are defined on inlet zone. The value of pressure is defined on the outlet. Boundary conditions were defined by main investigator of the grant project – Energy Institute, Victor Kaplan’s Department of Fluid Engineering, Faculty of Mechanical Engineering, Brno University of Technology. The value of air volume was insignificant. Cavitation was solved by Singhal model of cavitation.

  10. A model for transonic plasma flow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guazzotto, Luca, E-mail: luca.guazzotto@rochester.edu [Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14623 (United States); Hameiri, Eliezer, E-mail: hameiri@cims.nyu.edu [Courant Institute of Mathematical Sciences, New York University, New York, New York 10012 (United States)

    2014-02-15

    A linear, two-dimensional model of a transonic plasma flow in equilibrium is constructed and given an explicit solution in the form of a complex Laplace integral. The solution indicates that the transonic state can be solved as an elliptic boundary value problem, as is done in the numerical code FLOW [Guazzotto et al., Phys. Plasmas 11, 604 (2004)]. Moreover, the presence of a hyperbolic region does not necessarily imply the presence of a discontinuity or any other singularity of the solution.

  11. Modelling of gas flow through metallic foams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crosnier, S. [CEA Grenoble, Dept. de Thermohydraulique et de Physique, 38 (France); Riva, R. [CEA Cadarache, 13 - Saint Paul lez Durance (France); Bador, B.; Blet, V.

    2003-09-01

    The transport and distribution of gases (hydrogen at the anode and air at the cathode) and water over the front surfaces of the electrodes in contact with electrolyte membrane are of great importance for the enhancement of efficiency of the Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cells (PEMFC). The use of metallic foam as a flow distributor in comparison with grooved plate (formed by parallel channels) commonly used in commercial fuel cells may be advantageous since this porous material has a porosity close to unity and then high specific surface area. In fact, the potentially active surface area is generally considered to be almost equal to the front surface area of the electrodes. In order to ensure a homogeneous flow distribution all over the active surface of such devices, a good understanding of gas flow through these particular porous media is necessary. For that purpose, studying of two-phase flow (oxygen, hydrogen and water) through metallic foams must be undertaken. This is carried out in the present work but, in a first step, only for single-phase flow, since the behaviour of two-phase flow derives from the first one. Novels hydraulic models have then been developed in the literature these last years. However, these models do not take into account the viscous dissipation of the flow along the walls bordering the porous media. Unfortunately, metallic foam used as distributors in fuel cell have thigh thickness (of the order of the millimeter), that shedding a doubt on the validity of the latter assumption. In this paper, we review the different hydraulic models in order to discuss the relevance and the limits of each to describe single-phase flow through foams which could be used as distributor in a fuel cell. For that purpose, numerical solutions obtained using modified MC3D-REPO package originally developed for the modelling of multicomponent two-phase flows in granular porous media have been compared to experimental data measured on a dedicated hydraulic device

  12. The Modeling of Flow Around a Cylinder and Scour Hole

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, H. D.; Foster, D. L.

    2001-12-01

    The scouring of an erodible bed around a submarine object is a concern for hydraulic and coastal scientists. Our ability to model this process depends on how well we can resolve not only the flow around the obstacle, but the physics of sediment transport. As a first step in addressing this complicated problem, we are performing model-data comparisons of flow around a pipeline during five stages of the scour hole development. Currently, we are using the computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model, FLOW-3D, to simulate the velocity profiles around the pipeline and the scour hole. FLOW-3D has the option of five turbulence models (1-equation turbulent energy, 2-equation k-e, Renormalization-Group, Large Eddy Simulation, and Prandtl Mixing Length), resolves fluid-fluid and fluid-air interfaces, and has variable time steps to assure model stability. The model simulations are modeled after and then compared with laboratory investigations by B.L. Jensen et. al. in 1990 (Journal of Offshore Mechanics and Artic Engineering. Volume 112, pgs. 206-216). In the laboratory experiment, all surfaces were hydraulically smooth, however, adding a small roughness (0.5 mm) to the model was found to give improved correlations. The k-e model shows the highest model-data correlations and the lowest RMS deviations for both horizontal mean velocity and turbulent kinetic energy. Vertical mean velocity values are comparable between the different turbulence models. Model-data comparisons are made for the horizontal and vertical mean velocity profiles, as well as the turbulent kinetic energy profiles at several locations upstream and downstream of the cylinder. Model results are in general good agreement with R-squared correlations as high as 1.0 and RMS deviations as low as 0.24 cm/s. However, the poorest correlations are found in the estimations of the turbulent kinetic energy. The presence of the pipeline results in a 1.4 fold increase in the boundary layer eight cylinder diameters downstream

  13. Nonlocal modeling of granular flows down inclines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamrin, Ken; Henann, David L

    2015-01-07

    Flows of granular media down a rough inclined plane demonstrate a number of nonlocal phenomena. We apply the recently proposed nonlocal granular fluidity model to this geometry and find that the model captures many of these effects. Utilizing the model's dynamical form, we obtain a formula for the critical stopping height of a layer of grains on an inclined surface. Using an existing parameter calibration for glass beads, the theoretical result compares quantitatively to existing experimental data for glass beads. This provides a stringent test of the model, whose previous validations focused on driven steady-flow problems. For layers thicker than the stopping height, the theoretical flow profiles display a thickness-dependent shape whose features are in agreement with previous discrete particle simulations. We also address the issue of the Froude number of the flows, which has been shown experimentally to collapse as a function of the ratio of layer thickness to stopping height. While the collapse is not obvious, two explanations emerge leading to a revisiting of the history of inertial rheology, which the nonlocal model references for its homogeneous flow response.

  14. Unsaturated zone flow modeling for GWTT-95

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ho, C.K.; Altman, S.J.; McKenna, S.A.; Arnold, B.W. [Sandia National Labs., Albuqureque, NM (United States)

    1996-12-01

    Various models of unsaturated flow in fractured tuff have been developed and implemented to assess groundwater travel times at the potential repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. Kaplan used one-dimensional models to describe the uncertainty and sensitivity of travel times to various processes at Yucca Mountain. Robey and Arnold et al. used a two-dimensional equivalent continuum model (ECM) with inter- and intra-unit heterogeneity in an attempt to assess fast-flow paths through the unsaturated, fractured tuff at Yucca Mountain (GWTT-94). However, significant flow through the fractures in previous models was not simulated due to the characteristics of the ECM, which requires the matrix to be nearly saturated before flow through the fractures is initiated. In the current study (GWTT-95), four two-dimensional cross-sections at Yucca Mountain are simulated using both the ECM and dual-permeability (DK) models. The properties of both the fracture and matrix domains are geostatistically simulated, yielding completely heterogeneous continua. Then, simulations of flow through the four cross-sections are performed using spatially non-uniform infiltration boundary conditions. Steady-state groundwater travel times from the potential repository to the water table are calculated.

  15. Unsaturated zone flow modeling for GWTT-95

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ho, C.K.; Altman, S.J.; McKenna, S.A.; Arnold, B.W.

    1995-12-31

    In accordance with the Nuclear Regulatory Commission regulation regarding groundwater travel times at geologic repositories, various models of unsaturated flow in fractured tuff have been developed and implemented to assess groundwater travel times at the potential repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. Kaplan used one-dimensional models to describe the uncertainty and sensitivity of travel times to various processes at Yucca Mountain. Robey and Arnold et al. used a two-dimensional equivalent continuum model (ECM) with inter- and intra-unit heterogeneity in an attempt to assess fast-flow paths through the unsaturated, fractured tuff at Yucca Mountain (GWTT-94). However, significant flow through the fractures in previous models was not simulated due to the characteristics of the ECM, which requires the matrix to be nearly saturated before flow through the fractures is initiated. In the current study (GWTT-95), four two-dimensional cross-sections at Yucca Mountain are simulated using both the ECM and dual-permeability (DK) models. The properties of both the fracture and matrix domains are geostatistically simulated, yielding completely heterogeneous continua. Then, simulations of flow through the four cross-sections are performed using spatially nonuniform infiltration boundary conditions. Steady-state groundwater travel times from the potential repository to the water table are calculated.

  16. Global vs local energy dissipation: the energy cycle of the turbulent Von K\\'arm\\'an flow

    CERN Document Server

    Kuzzay, Denis; Dubrulle, Bérengère

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we investigate the relations between global and local energy transfers in a turbulent Von K\\'arm\\'an flow. The goal is to understand how and where energy is dissipated in such a flow and to reconstruct the energy cycle in an experimental device where local as well as global quantities can be measured. We use PIV measurements and we model the Reynolds stress tensor to take subgrid scales into account. This procedure involves a free parameter that is calibrated using angular momentum balance. We then estimate the local and global mean injected and dissipated power for several types of impellers, for various Reynolds numbers and for various flow topologies. These PIV-estimates are then compared with direct injected power estimates provided by torque measurements at the impellers. The agreement between PIV-estimates and direct measurements depends on the flow topology. In symmetric situations, we are able to capture up to 90% of the actual global energy dissipation rate. However, our results become...

  17. DISCRETE AND CONTINUUM MODELLING OF GRANULAR FLOW

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    H. P. Zhu; Y. H. WU; A. B. Yu

    2005-01-01

    This paper analyses three popular methods simulating granular flow at different time and length scales:discrete element method (DEM), averaging method and viscous, elastic-plastic continuum model. The theoretical models of these methods and their applications to hopper flows are discussed. It is shown that DEM is an effective method to study the fundamentals of granular flow at a particle or microscopic scale. By use of the continuum approach, granular flow can also be described at a continuum or macroscopic scale. Macroscopic quantities such as velocity and stress can be obtained by use of such computational method as FEM. However, this approach depends on the constitutive relationship of materials and ignores the effect of microscopic structure of granular flow. The combined approach of DEM and averaging method can overcome this problem. The approach takes into account the discrete nature of granular materials and does not require any global assumption and thus allows a better understanding of the fundamental mechanisms of granular flow. However, it is difficult to adapt this approach to process modelling because of the limited number of particles which can be handled with the present computational capacity, and the difficulty in handling non-spherical particles.Further work is needed to develop an appropriate approach to overcome these problems.

  18. PIV measurements and flow characteristics downstream of mangrove root models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazemi, Amirkhosro; Curet, Oscar

    2016-11-01

    Mangrove forests attracted attentions as a solution to protect coastal areas exposed to sea-level rising, frequent storms, and tsunamis. Mangrove forests found in tide-dominated flow regions are characterized by their massive and complex root systems, which play a prominent role in the structure of tidal flow currents. To understand the role of mangrove roots in flow structure, we modeled mangrove roots with rigid and flexible arrays of cylinders with different spacing between them as well as different configurations. In this work, we investigate the fluid dynamics downstream of the models using a 2-D time-resolved particle image velocimetry (PIV) and flow visualization. We carried out experiments for four different Reynolds number based on cylinder diameters ranges from 2200 to 12000. We present time-averaged and time-resolved flow parameters including velocity distribution, vorticity, streamline, Reynolds shear stress and turbulent kinetic energy. The results show that the flow structure has different vortex shedding downstream of the cylinders due to interactions of shear layers separating from cylinders surface. The spectral analysis of the measured velocity data is also performed to obtain Strouhal number of the unsteady flow in the cylinder wake.

  19. Modeling elements of energy systems for thermal energy transportation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shurygin A. M.

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Heating industrial facilities and the residential sector in recent years is the economic and technical challenge. It has been noted that the efficiency of the heat generating equipment depends not only on its sophistication, fuel type, but also on work of the distributing network taking into account the thermal, hydraulic losses, characteristics and modes of use of heating objects – buildings and technological processes. Possibility of supplying maximum heat flow from the heating system considering mismatch of highs and types of resources consumed from individual consumers should be provided by the right choice of energy equipment set, as well as bandwidth of transport systems and possibility of its regulation. It is important not just to configure the system to work effectively in the current mode (usually at the maximum load, but in the entire load range, as the calculated mode often takes a relatively small portion of the operating time. Thus, the efficiency of heating systems is largely determined by the method used for its control, including the possibility of regulating the main units and elements of the system. The paper considers the factors affecting the system efficiency. Mathematical models of the system elements allowing adjust the amount of released heat energy for consumers have been presented. Separately the mathematical model of the control system of electric drive vehicles used in the system has been considered and implemented.

  20. A general mixture model for sediment laden flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Lixin; Yu, Xiping; Bombardelli, Fabián

    2017-09-01

    A mixture model for general description of sediment-laden flows is developed based on an Eulerian-Eulerian two-phase flow theory, with the aim at gaining computational speed in the prediction, but preserving the accuracy of the complete two-fluid model. The basic equations of the model include the mass and momentum conservation equations for the sediment-water mixture, and the mass conservation equation for sediment. However, a newly-obtained expression for the slip velocity between phases allows for the computation of the sediment motion, without the need of solving the momentum equation for sediment. The turbulent motion is represented for both the fluid and the particulate phases. A modified k-ε model is used to describe the fluid turbulence while an algebraic model is adopted for turbulent motion of particles. A two-dimensional finite difference method based on the SMAC scheme was used to numerically solve the mathematical model. The model is validated through simulations of fluid and suspended sediment motion in steady open-channel flows, both in equilibrium and non-equilibrium states, as well as in oscillatory flows. The computed sediment concentrations, horizontal velocity and turbulent kinetic energy of the mixture are all shown to be in good agreement with available experimental data, and importantly, this is done at a fraction of the computational efforts required by the complete two-fluid model.

  1. System design and optimization study of axial flow turbine applied in an overtopping wave energy convertor

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Yuquan Zhang; Yuan Zheng; Chunxia Yang; Yantao Zhu; Xin Zhang

    2015-12-01

    The axial flow turbine applied in an overtopping wave energy convertor can continuously provide power with high efficiency and reliably. To study the rules between parameters of the turbine and flows, three different types of turbines with complete 3D flow-channel models were designed and optimized. It appears that diameter of the runner, flow rates, number of guide vanes and shape of outflow passage have a considerable impact on the performance of the whole convertor. The turbine with a diameter of 0.8 m, flow rate of 0.5 m3/s, double guide vanes and bent section in outflow passage shows the best comprehensive performance. Moreover, the results of the experiments indicate that the output power can be enhanced by increasing the wave overtopping rate.

  2. Amendment to Validated dynamic flow model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knudsen, Torben

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of WP2 is to establish flow models relating the wind speed at turbines in a farm. Until now, active control of power reference has not been included in these models as only data with standard operation has been available. In this report the first data series with power reference...... excitations from the Thanet farm are used for trying to update some of the models discussed in D2.5. Because of very limited amount of data only simple dynamic transfer function models can be obtained. The three obtained data series are somewhat different. Only the first data set seems to have the front...... turbine in undisturbed flow. For this data set both the multiplicative model and in particular the simple first order transfer function model can predict the down wind wind speed from upwind wind speed and loading....

  3. Multiphase reacting flows modelling and simulation

    CERN Document Server

    Marchisio, Daniele L

    2007-01-01

    The papers in this book describe the most widely applicable modeling approaches and are organized in six groups covering from fundamentals to relevant applications. In the first part, some fundamentals of multiphase turbulent reacting flows are covered. In particular the introduction focuses on basic notions of turbulence theory in single-phase and multi-phase systems as well as on the interaction between turbulence and chemistry. In the second part, models for the physical and chemical processes involved are discussed. Among other things, particular emphasis is given to turbulence modeling strategies for multiphase flows based on the kinetic theory for granular flows. Next, the different numerical methods based on Lagrangian and/or Eulerian schemes are presented. In particular the most popular numerical approaches of computational fluid dynamics codes are described (i.e., Direct Numerical Simulation, Large Eddy Simulation, and Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes approach). The book will cover particle-based meth...

  4. A Policy Model for Secure Information Flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adetoye, Adedayo O.; Badii, Atta

    When a computer program requires legitimate access to confidential data, the question arises whether such a program may illegally reveal sensitive information. This paper proposes a policy model to specify what information flow is permitted in a computational system. The security definition, which is based on a general notion of information lattices, allows various representations of information to be used in the enforcement of secure information flow in deterministic or nondeterministic systems. A flexible semantics-based analysis technique is presented, which uses the input-output relational model induced by an attacker’s observational power, to compute the information released by the computational system. An illustrative attacker model demonstrates the use of the technique to develop a termination-sensitive analysis. The technique allows the development of various information flow analyses, parametrised by the attacker’s observational power, which can be used to enforce what declassification policies.

  5. The simultaneous mass and energy evaporation (SM2E) model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choudhary, Rehan; Klauda, Jeffery B

    2016-01-01

    In this article, the Simultaneous Mass and Energy Evaporation (SM2E) model is presented. The SM2E model is based on theoretical models for mass and energy transfer. The theoretical models systematically under or over predicted at various flow conditions: laminar, transition, and turbulent. These models were harmonized with experimental measurements to eliminate systematic under or over predictions; a total of 113 measured evaporation rates were used. The SM2E model can be used to estimate evaporation rates for pure liquids as well as liquid mixtures at laminar, transition, and turbulent flow conditions. However, due to limited availability of evaporation data, the model has so far only been tested against data for pure liquids and binary mixtures. The model can take evaporative cooling into account and when the temperature of the evaporating liquid or liquid mixture is known (e.g., isothermal evaporation), the SM2E model reduces to a mass transfer-only model.

  6. A k-Model for Stably Stratified Nearly Horizontal Turbulent Flows

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kranenburg, C.

    1985-01-01

    A k-model is formulated that consists of the turbulent kinetic energy equation and an algebraic expression for the mixing length taking into account the influence of stratification. Applicability of the model is restricted to shallow, nearly horizontal flows. For local-equilibrium flows the model re

  7. Variational energy principle for compressible, baroclinic flow. 2: Free-energy form of Hamilton's principle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmid, L. A.

    1977-01-01

    The first and second variations are calculated for the irreducible form of Hamilton's Principle that involves the minimum number of dependent variables necessary to describe the kinetmatics and thermodynamics of inviscid, compressible, baroclinic flow in a specified gravitational field. The form of the second variation shows that, in the neighborhood of a stationary point that corresponds to physically stable flow, the action integral is a complex saddle surface in parameter space. There exists a form of Hamilton's Principle for which a direct solution of a flow problem is possible. This second form is related to the first by a Friedrichs transformation of the thermodynamic variables. This introduces an extra dependent variable, but the first and second variations are shown to have direct physical significance, namely they are equal to the free energy of fluctuations about the equilibrium flow that satisfies the equations of motion. If this equilibrium flow is physically stable, and if a very weak second order integral constraint on the correlation between the fluctuations of otherwise independent variables is satisfied, then the second variation of the action integral for this free energy form of Hamilton's Principle is positive-definite, so the action integral is a minimum, and can serve as the basis for a direct trail and error solution. The second order integral constraint states that the unavailable energy must be maximum at equilibrium, i.e. the fluctuations must be so correlated as to produce a second order decrease in the total unavailable energy.

  8. Chaos control in traffic flow models

    CERN Document Server

    Shahverdiev, E M; Shahverdiev, Elman Mohammed; Tadaki, Shin-ichi

    1998-01-01

    Chaos control in some of the one- and two-dimensional traffic flow dynamical models in the mean field theory is studied.One dimensional model is investigated taking into account the effect of random delay. Two dimensional model takes into account the effects of overpasses, symmetric distribution of cars and blockages of cars moving in the same direction. Chaos synchronization is performed within both replica and nonreplica approaches, and using parameter perturbation method.

  9. Energy-Efficient Multiprocessor Scheduling for Flow Time and Makespan

    CERN Document Server

    Sun, Hongyang; Hsu, Wen-Jing

    2010-01-01

    We consider energy-efficient scheduling on multiprocessors, where the speed of each processor can be individually scaled, and a processor consumes power $s^{\\alpha}$ if it runs at speed $s$, where $\\alpha>1$. A scheduling algorithm needs to decide both processor allocations and speeds for a set of parallel jobs whose parallelism can vary with time. The objective is to minimize the sum of overall energy consumption and some performance metric, which in this paper includes flow time and makespan. For both objectives, we present semi-clairvoyant algorithms that are aware of the instantaneous parallelism of the jobs but not their future information. We present U-CEQ algorithm for flow time plus energy, and show that it is O(1)-competitive. This is the first O(1)-competitive result for multiprocessor speed scaling on parallel jobs. We also consider, for the first time in the literature, makespan plus energy. We present P-FIRST algorithm and show that it is $O(\\ln^{1-1/\\alpha}P)$-competitive for parallel jobs consi...

  10. Importance of Atomic Contacts in Vibrational Energy Flow in Proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kondoh, Masato; Mizuno, Misao; Mizutani, Yasuhisa

    2016-06-02

    Vibrational energy flow in proteins was studied by monitoring the time-resolved anti-Stokes ultraviolet resonance Raman scattering of three myoglobin mutants in which a Trp residue substitutes a different amino acid residue near heme. The anti-Stokes Raman intensities of the Trp residue in the three mutants increased with similar rates after depositing excess vibrational energy at heme, despite the difference in distance between heme and each substituted Trp residue along the main chain of the protein. This indicates that vibrational energy is not transferred through the main chain of the protein but rather through atomic contacts between heme and the Trp residue. Distinct differences were observed in the amplitude of the band intensity change between the Trp residues at different positions, and the amplitude of the band intensity change exhibits a correlation with the extent of exposure of the Trp residue to solvent water. This correlation indicates that atomic contacts between an amino acid residue and solvent water play an important role in vibrational energy flow in a protein.

  11. Energy spectra and passive tracer cascades in turbulent flows

    CERN Document Server

    Jolly, Michael

    2016-01-01

    We study the influence of the energy spectrum on the extent of the cascade range of a passive tracer in turbulent flows. The interesting cases are when there are two different spectra over the potential range of the tracer cascade (in 2D when the tracer forcing is in the inverse energy cascade range, and in 3D when the Schmidt number Sc is large). The extent of the tracer cascade range is then limited by the width of the range for the shallower of the two energy spectra. Nevertheless, we show that in dimension $d=2,3$ the tracer cascade range extends (up to a logarithm) to $\\kappa_{d\\text{D}}^{p}$, where $\\kappa_{d\\text{D}}$ is the wavenumber beyond which diffusion should dominate and $p$ is arbitrarily close to 1, provided Sc is larger than a certain power (depending on $p$) of the Grashof number. We also derive estimates which suggest that in 2D, for Sc${}\\sim1$ a wide tracer cascade can coexist with a significant inverse energy cascade at Grashof numbers large enough to produce a turbulent flow.

  12. Dangerous situations in a synchronized flow model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Rui; Wu, Qing-Song

    2007-04-01

    This paper studies the dangerous situation (DS) in a synchronized flow model. The DS on the two branches of the fundamental diagram are investigated, respectively. It is shown that different relationship between DS probability and the density exists in the synchronized flow and in the jams. Moreover, we prove that there is no DS caused by non-stopped car although the model itself is a non-exclusion process. We classify the DS into four sub-types and study the probability of these four sub-types. The simulation result is consistent with the real traffic.

  13. Energy flow characteristics of vector X-Waves

    KAUST Repository

    Salem, Mohamed

    2011-01-01

    The vector form of X-Waves is obtained as a superposition of transverse electric and transverse magnetic polarized field components. It is shown that the signs of all components of the Poynting vector can be locally changed using carefully chosen complex amplitudes of the transverse electric and transverse magnetic polarization components. Negative energy flux density in the longitudinal direction can be observed in a bounded region around the centroid; in this region the local behavior of the wave field is similar to that of wave field with negative energy flow. This peculiar energy flux phenomenon is of essential importance for electromagnetic and optical traps and tweezers, where the location and momenta of microand nanoparticles are manipulated by changing the Poynting vector, and in detection of invisibility cloaks. © 2011 Optical Society of America.

  14. Critical resources in clean energy technologies and waste flows

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Habib, Komal

    A broader implementation of clean energy technologies in future is a widely motivated scenario for meeting the climate change goals as well as to reduce our dependency on the non‐renewable fossil fuels. However, the transition from the current fossil‐based society to a future low‐carbon society...... constraints for the emerging clean energy technologies in future, along with an insight into the resource criticality assessment methodologies, detailed material flow analysis (MFA) of critical resources, and recovery of critical resources from the waste streams. The key findings of this PhD study were......:  The demand of neodymium and dysprosium, driven by the clean energy technologies is estimated to be 10 times higher by 2050 compared to the present primary supply (mining). This implies that either a highly accelerated rate of mining is required to meet the future demand or a radical change in current...

  15. Using isotope, hydrochemical methods and energy-balance modelling to estimate contribution of different components to flow forming process in a high-altitude catchment (Dzhancuat river basin case study)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rets, Ekaterina; Loshakova, Nadezhda; Chizhova, Julia; Kireeva, Maria; Frolova, Natalia; Tokarev, Igor; Budantseva, Nadine; Vasilchuk, Yurij

    2016-04-01

    A multicomponent structure of sources of river runoff formation is characteristic of high-altitude territories: ice and firn melting; seasonal snow melting on glacier covered and non-glacier area of a watershed; liquid precipitation; underground waters. In addition, each of these components can run off the watershed surface in different ways. Use of isotopic, hydrochemical methods and energy balance modelling provides possibility to estimate contribution of different components to river runoff that is an essential to understand the mechanism of flow formation in mountainious areas. A study was carried out for Dzhancuat river basin that was chosen as representative for North Caucasus in course of the International Hydrological Decade. Complex glaciological, hydrological and meteorological observation have been carried in the basin since 1965. In years 2013-2015 the program also included daily collecting of water samples on natural stable isotopes on the Dzhancuat river gauging station, and sampling water nourishment sources (ice, snow, firn, liquid precipitation) within the study area. More then 800 water samples were collected. Application of an energy balance model of snow and ice melt with distributed parameters provided an opportunity to identify Dzhancuat river runoff respond to glaciers melt regime and seasonal redistribution of melt water. The diurnal amplitude of oscillation of the Dzhakuat river runoff in the days without precipitation is formed by melting at almost snow-free areas of the Dzhancuat glacier tongues. Snowmelt water from the non-glacierized part contributes to the formation of the next day runoff. A wave of snow and firn melt in upper zones of glacier flattens considerably during filtration through snow and run-off over the surface and in the body of the glacier. This determines a general significant inertia of the Dzhacuat river runoff. Some part of melt water is stored into natural regulating reservoirs of the watershed that supply the

  16. The Use of Energy in Malaysia: Tracing Energy Flows from Primary Source to End Use

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chinhao Chong

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Malaysia is a rapidly developing country in Southeast Asia that aims to achieve high-income country status by 2020; its economic growth is highly dependent on its abundant energy resources, especially natural gas and crude oil. In this paper, a complete picture of Malaysia’s energy use from primary source to end use is presented by mapping a Sankey diagram of Malaysia’s energy flows, together with ongoing trends analysis of the main factors influencing the energy flows. The results indicate that Malaysia’s energy use depends heavily on fossil fuels, including oil, gas and coal. In the past 30 years, Malaysia has successfully diversified its energy structure by introducing more natural gas and coal into its power generation. To sustainably feed the rapidly growing energy demand in end-use sectors with the challenge of global climate change, Malaysia must pay more attention to the development of renewable energy, green technology and energy conservation in the future.

  17. Development of Non-Conservative Joints in Beam Networks for Vibration Energy Flow Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jee-Hun Song

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Our work aims to find a general solution for the vibrational energy flow through a plane network of beams on the basis of an energy flow analysis. A joint between two semi-infinite beams are modeled by three sets of springs and dashpots. Thus, the results can incorporate the case of complaint and non-conservative in all the three degrees of freedom. In the cases of finite coupled structures connected at a certain angle, the derived non-conservative joints and developed wave energy equation were applied. The joint properties, the frequency, the coupling angle, and the internal loss factor were changed to evaluate the proposed methods for predicting medium-to-high frequency vibrational energy and intensity distributions.

  18. A droplet entrainment model for horizontal segregated flows

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Höhne, Thomas, E-mail: T.Hoehne@hzdr.de [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf (HZDR) – Institute of Fluid Dynamics, P.O. Box 510119, D-01314 Dresden (Germany); Hänsch, Susann [Imperial College, Department of Mechanical Engineering, South Kensington Campus, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom)

    2015-05-15

    Highlights: • We further developed the flow morphology detection model AIAD. • An advanced droplet entrainment model was introduced. • The new approach is applied against HAWAC experiments. - Abstract: One limitation in simulating horizontal segregated flows is that there is no treatment of droplet formation mechanisms at wavy surfaces. For self-generating waves and slugs, the interfacial momentum exchange and the turbulence parameters have to be modeled correctly. Furthermore, understanding the mechanism of droplet entrainment for heat and mass transfer processes is of great importance in the chemical and nuclear industry. The development of general computational fluid dynamics models is an essential precondition for the application of CFD codes to the modeling of flow related phenomena. The new formulation for the interfacial drag at the free surface and turbulence parameters within the algebraic interfacial area density model (AIAD) represents one step toward a more physical description of free surface flows including less empiricism. The AIAD approach allows the use of different physical models depending on the local fluid morphology inside a macro-scale multi-fluid framework. A further step of improving the modeling of free interfaces lies within the consideration of droplet entrainment mechanisms. In this paper a new sub-grid entrainment model is proposed, which assumes that due to liquid turbulence the interface gets rough and wavy leading to the formation of droplets. Therefore, the droplet entrainment model requires the consideration of an additional droplet phase, which is described with an own set of balance equations in the spirit of the particle model. Two local key factors determine the rate of droplet entrainment: the liquid turbulent kinetic energy as well as the outward velocity gradient of the liquid relative to the interface motion. The new droplet entrainment approach is included into CFD simulations for attempting to reproduce existing

  19. Numerical modeling of the debris flows runout

    Science.gov (United States)

    Federico, Francesco; Cesali, Chiara

    2017-06-01

    Rapid debris flows are identified among the most dangerous of all landslides. Due to their destructive potential, the runout length has to be predicted to define the hazardous areas and design safeguarding measures. To this purpose, a continuum model to predict the debris flows mobility is developed. It is based on the well known depth-integrated avalanche model proposed by Savage and Hutter (S&H model) to simulate the dry granular materials flows. Conservation of mass and momentum equations, describing the evolving geometry and the depth averaged velocity distribution, are re-written taking into account the effects of the interstitial pressures and the possible variation of mass along the motion due to erosion/deposition processes. Furthermore, the mechanical behaviour of the debris flow is described by a recently developed rheological law, which allows to take into account the dissipative effects of the grain inelastic collisions and friction, simultaneously acting within a `shear layer', typically at the base of the debris flows. The governing PDEs are solved by applying the finite difference method. The analysis of a documented case is finally carried out.

  20. Rossby wave energy dispersion from tropical cyclone in zonal basic flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Wenli; Fei, Jianfang; Huang, Xiaogang; Liu, Yudi; Ma, Zhanhong; Yang, Lu

    2016-04-01

    This study investigates tropical cyclone energy dispersion under horizontally sheared flows using a nonlinear barotropic model. In addition to common patterns, unusual features of Rossby wave trains are also found in flows with constant vorticity and vorticity gradients. In terms of the direction of the energy dispersion, the wave train can rotate clockwise and elongate southwestward under anticyclonic circulation (ASH), which contributes to the reenhancement of the tropical cyclone (TC). The wave train even splits into two obvious wavelike trains in flows with a southward vorticity gradient (WSH). Energy dispersed from TCs varies over time, and variations in the intensity of the wave train components typically occur in two stages. Wave-activity flux diagnosis and ray tracing calculations are extended to the frame that moves along with the TC to reveal the concrete progress of wave propagation. The direction of the wave-activity flux is primarily determined by the combination of the basic flow and the TC velocity. Along the flux, the distribution of pseudomomentum effectively illustrates the development of wave trains, particularly the rotation and split of wave propagation. Ray tracing involves the quantitative tracing of wave features along rays, which effectively coincide with the wave train regimes. Flows of a constant shear (parabolic meridional variation) produce linear (nonlinear) wave number variations. For the split wave trains, the real and complex wave number waves move along divergent trajectories and are responsible for different energy dispersion ducts.

  1. Evaluating energy efficiency policies with energy-economy models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mundaca, L.; Neij, L.; Worrell, E.; McNeil, M.

    2010-01-01

    The growing complexities of energy systems, environmental problems, and technology markets are driving and testing most energy-economy models to their limits. To further advance bottom-up models from a multidisciplinary energy efficiency policy evaluation perspective, we review and critically analyz

  2. SATURATED ZONE FLOW AND TRANSPORT MODEL ABSTRACTION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    B.W. ARNOLD

    2004-10-27

    The purpose of the saturated zone (SZ) flow and transport model abstraction task is to provide radionuclide-transport simulation results for use in the total system performance assessment (TSPA) for license application (LA) calculations. This task includes assessment of uncertainty in parameters that pertain to both groundwater flow and radionuclide transport in the models used for this purpose. This model report documents the following: (1) The SZ transport abstraction model, which consists of a set of radionuclide breakthrough curves at the accessible environment for use in the TSPA-LA simulations of radionuclide releases into the biosphere. These radionuclide breakthrough curves contain information on radionuclide-transport times through the SZ. (2) The SZ one-dimensional (I-D) transport model, which is incorporated in the TSPA-LA model to simulate the transport, decay, and ingrowth of radionuclide decay chains in the SZ. (3) The analysis of uncertainty in groundwater-flow and radionuclide-transport input parameters for the SZ transport abstraction model and the SZ 1-D transport model. (4) The analysis of the background concentration of alpha-emitting species in the groundwater of the SZ.

  3. Evaluating Energy Efficiency Policies with Energy-Economy Models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mundaca, Luis; Neij, Lena; Worrell, Ernst; McNeil, Michael A.

    2010-08-01

    The growing complexities of energy systems, environmental problems and technology markets are driving and testing most energy-economy models to their limits. To further advance bottom-up models from a multidisciplinary energy efficiency policy evaluation perspective, we review and critically analyse bottom-up energy-economy models and corresponding evaluation studies on energy efficiency policies to induce technological change. We use the household sector as a case study. Our analysis focuses on decision frameworks for technology choice, type of evaluation being carried out, treatment of market and behavioural failures, evaluated policy instruments, and key determinants used to mimic policy instruments. Although the review confirms criticism related to energy-economy models (e.g. unrealistic representation of decision-making by consumers when choosing technologies), they provide valuable guidance for policy evaluation related to energy efficiency. Different areas to further advance models remain open, particularly related to modelling issues, techno-economic and environmental aspects, behavioural determinants, and policy considerations.

  4. Flow harmonics within an analytically solvable viscous hydrodynamic model

    CERN Document Server

    Hatta, Yoshitaka; Torrieri, Giorgio; Xiao, Bo-Wen

    2014-01-01

    Based on a viscous hydrodynamic model with anisotropically perturbed Gubser flow and isothermal Cooper-Frye freezeout, we analytically compute the flow harmonics $v_n(p_T)$ and study how they scale with the harmonic number $n$ and transverse momentum, as well as the system size, shear and bulk viscosity coefficients, and collision energy. In particular, we find that the magnitude of shear viscous corrections grows linearly with $n$. The mixing between different harmonics is also discussed. While this model is rather simple as compared to realistic heavy-ion collisions, we argue that the scaling results presented here may be meaningfully compared to experimental data collected over many energies, system sizes, and geometries.

  5. Energy Efficient Thermal Management for Natural Gas Engine Aftertreatment via Active Flow Control

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    David K. Irick; Ke Nguyen; Vitacheslav Naoumov; Doug Ferguson

    2006-04-01

    The project is focused on the development of an energy efficient aftertreatment system capable of reducing NOx and methane by 90% from lean-burn natural gas engines by applying active exhaust flow control. Compared to conventional passive flow-through reactors, the proposed scheme cuts supplemental energy by 50%-70%. The system consists of a Lean NOx Trap (LNT) system and an oxidation catalyst. Through alternating flow control, a major amount of engine exhaust flows through a large portion of the LNT system in the absorption mode, while a small amount of exhaust goes through a small portion of the LNT system in the regeneration or desulfurization mode. By periodically reversing the exhaust gas flow through the oxidation catalyst, a higher temperature profile is maintained in the catalyst bed resulting in greater efficiency of the oxidation catalyst at lower exhaust temperatures. The project involves conceptual design, theoretical analysis, computer simulation, prototype fabrication, and empirical studies. This report details the progress during the first twelve months of the project. The primary activities have been to develop the bench flow reactor system, develop the computer simulation and modeling of the reverse-flow oxidation catalyst, install the engine into the test cell, and begin design of the LNT system.

  6. Energy Efficient Thermal Management for Natural Gas Engine Aftertreatment via Active Flow Control

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    David K. Irick; Ke Nguyen; Vitacheslav Naoumov; Doug Ferguson

    2005-04-01

    The project is focused on the development of an energy efficient aftertreatment system capable of reducing NOx and methane by 90% from lean-burn natural gas engines by applying active exhaust flow control. Compared to conventional passive flow-through reactors, the proposed scheme cuts supplemental energy by 50%-70%. The system consists of a Lean NOx Trap (LNT) system and an oxidation catalyst. Through alternating flow control, a major amount of engine exhaust flows through a large portion of the LNT system in the absorption mode, while a small amount of exhaust goes through a small portion of the LNT system in the regeneration or desulfurization mode. By periodically reversing the exhaust gas flow through the oxidation catalyst, a higher temperature profile is maintained in the catalyst bed resulting in greater efficiency of the oxidation catalyst at lower exhaust temperatures. The project involves conceptual design, theoretical analysis, computer simulation, prototype fabrication, and empirical studies. This report details the progress during the first twelve months of the project. The primary activities have been to develop the bench flow reactor system, develop the computer simulation and modeling of the reverse-flow oxidation catalyst, install the engine into the test cell, and begin design of the LNT system.

  7. ZaP-HD: High Energy Density Z-Pinch Plasmas using Sheared Flow Stabilization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golingo, R. P.; Shumlak, U.; Nelson, B. A.; Claveau, E. L.; Doty, S. A.; Forbes, E. G.; Hughes, M. C.; Kim, B.; Ross, M. P.; Weed, J. R.

    2015-11-01

    The ZaP-HD flow Z-pinch project investigates scaling the flow Z-pinch to High Energy Density Plasma, HEDP, conditions by using sheared flow stabilization. ZaP used a single power supply to produce 100 cm long Z-pinches that were quiescent for many radial Alfven times and axial flow-through times. The flow Z-pinch concept provides an approach to achieve HED plasmas, which are dimensionally large and persist for extended durations. The ZaP-HD device replaces the single power supply from ZaP with two separate power supplies to independently control the plasma flow and current in the Z-pinch. Equilibrium is determined by diagnostic measurements of the density with interferometry and digital holography, the plasma flow and temperature with passive spectroscopy, the magnetic field with surface magnetic probes, and plasma emission with optical imaging. The diagnostics fully characterize the plasma from its initiation in the coaxial accelerator, through the pinch, and exhaust from the assembly region. The plasma evolution is modeled with high resolution codes: Mach2, WARPX, and NIMROD. Experimental results and scaling analyses are presented. This work is supported by grants from the U.S. Department of Energy and the U.S. National Nuclear Security Administration.

  8. Improved modeling techniques for turbomachinery flow fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lakshminarayana, B. [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States); Fagan, J.R. Jr. [Allison Engine Company, Indianapolis, IN (United States)

    1995-10-01

    This program has the objective of developing an improved methodology for modeling turbomachinery flow fields, including the prediction of losses and efficiency. Specifically, the program addresses the treatment of the mixing stress tensor terms attributed to deterministic flow field mechanisms required in steady-state Computational Fluid Dynamic (CFD) models for turbo-machinery flow fields. These mixing stress tensors arise due to spatial and temporal fluctuations (in an absolute frame of reference) caused by rotor-stator interaction due to various blade rows and by blade-to-blade variation of flow properties. These tasks include the acquisition of previously unavailable experimental data in a high-speed turbomachinery environment, the use of advanced techniques to analyze the data, and the development of a methodology to treat the deterministic component of the mixing stress tensor. Penn State will lead the effort to make direct measurements of the momentum and thermal mixing stress tensors in high-speed multistage compressor flow field in the turbomachinery laboratory at Penn State. They will also process the data by both conventional and conditional spectrum analysis to derive momentum and thermal mixing stress tensors due to blade-to-blade periodic and aperiodic components, revolution periodic and aperiodic components arising from various blade rows and non-deterministic (which includes random components) correlations. The modeling results from this program will be publicly available and generally applicable to steady-state Navier-Stokes solvers used for turbomachinery component (compressor or turbine) flow field predictions. These models will lead to improved methodology, including loss and efficiency prediction, for the design of high-efficiency turbomachinery and drastically reduce the time required for the design and development cycle of turbomachinery.

  9. Calculating Method for Influence of Material Flow on Energy Consumption in Steel Manufacturing Process

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YU Qing-bo; LU Zhong-wu; CAI Jiu-ju

    2007-01-01

    From the viewpoint of systems energy conservation, the influences of material flow on its energy consumption in a steel manufacturing process is an important subject. The quantitative analysis of the relationship between material flow and the energy intensity is useful to save energy in steel industry. Based on the concept of standard material flow diagram, all possible situations of ferric material flow in steel manufacturing process are analyzed. The expressions of the influence of material flow deviated from standard material flow diagram on energy consumption are put forward.

  10. Centrality Dependence of Flow in High-Energy Nucleus-Nucleus Collisions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨红艳; 周代翠; 杨纯斌; 蔡勖

    2002-01-01

    Directed flow and elliptic flow of final state particles in high-energy nucleus-nucleus collisions in the EMU01 experiment have been studied. The dependences of directed flow and elliptic flow on incident energy and impact centrality of outgoing particles are presented. The results exhibit strong dependence of flow on centrality and energy. We also suggest a more reliable way to determine the event plane resolution here.

  11. Modelling distributed energy resources in energy service networks

    CERN Document Server

    Acha, Salvador

    2013-01-01

    Focuses on modelling two key infrastructures (natural gas and electrical) in urban energy systems with embedded technologies (cogeneration and electric vehicles) to optimise the operation of natural gas and electrical infrastructures under the presence of distributed energy resources

  12. Baroclinic flow and the Lorenz-84 model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veen, Lennaert van

    2002-01-01

    The bifurcation diagram of a truncation to six degrees of freedom of the equations for quasi-geostrophic, baroclinic flow is investigated. Period doubling cascades and Shil'nikov bifurcations lead to chaos in this model. The low dimension of the chaotic attractor suggests the possibility to reduce t

  13. Modelling of flow phenomena during DC casting

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zuidema, J.

    2005-01-01

    Modelling of Flow Phenomena during DC Casting Jan Zuidema The production of aluminium ingots, by semi-continuous casting, is a complex process. DC Casting stands for direct chill casting. During this process liquid aluminium transforms to solid aluminium while cooling down. This is not an instanta

  14. Modelling of flow phenomena during DC casting

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zuidema, J.

    2005-01-01

    Modelling of Flow Phenomena during DC Casting Jan Zuidema The production of aluminium ingots, by semi-continuous casting, is a complex process. DC Casting stands for direct chill casting. During this process liquid aluminium transforms to solid aluminium while cooling down. This is not an

  15. Energy dissipation rate limits for flow through rough channels and tidal flow across topography

    CERN Document Server

    Kerswell, R R

    2016-01-01

    An upper bound on the energy dissipation rate per unit mass, $\\epsilon$, for pressure-driven flow through a channel with rough walls is derived for the first time. For large Reynolds numbers, $Re$, the bound - $\\epsilon \\,\\leq \\, c\\, U^3/h$ where $U$ is the mean flow through the channel, $h$ the channel height and $c$ a numerical prefactor - is independent of $Re$ (i.e. the viscosity) as in the smooth channel case but the numerical prefactor $c$, which is only a function of the surface heights and surface gradients (i.e. not higher derivatives), is increased. Crucially, this new bound captures the correct scaling law of what is observed in rough pipes and demonstrates that while a smooth pipe is a singular limit of the Navier-Stokes equations (data suggests $\\epsilon \\, \\sim \\, 1/(\\log Re)^2\\, U^3/h$ as $Re \\rightarrow \\infty$), it is a regular limit for current bounding techniques. As an application, the bound is extended to oscillatory flow to estimate the energy dissipation rate for tidal flow across botto...

  16. Progress in Computational Physics (PiCP) Vol 2 Coupled Fluid Flow in Energy, Biology and Environmental Research

    CERN Document Server

    Ehrhardt, Matthias

    2012-01-01

    This second volume contains both, the mathematical analysis of the coupling between fluid flow and porous media flow and state-of-the art numerical techniques, like tailor-made finite element and finite volume methods. Readers will come across articles devoted to concrete applications of these models in the field of energy, biology and environmental research.

  17. On energy conversion in a sigma coordinate ocean model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eldevik, Tor

    1999-08-01

    Energy diagnostics are useful for understanding the transfer of energy through instabilities and between different scales. In this note the conservation equations for kinetic and potential energy, divided into suitable mean and eddy quantities, for a sigma coordinate ocean model are set up. By identifying the transfer terms responsible for the conservative conversions between the different energies, an energy flow diagram is suggested. The motivation for this is twofold. Firstly, the average operator required for dividing the quantities of the flow into mean and eddy parts is in general not well defined in Cartesian coordinates when the upper and lower boundaries are not at fixed vertical levels. This is overcome by introducing the ''terrain-following'' sigma as the vertical coordinate. Secondly, and most important, many of today's numerical ocean models have this as the vertical coordinate. (author)

  18. Scattering of inhomogeneous circularly polarized optical field and mechanical manifestation of the internal energy flows

    CERN Document Server

    Bekshaev, A Ya; Hanson, S G; Zenkova, C Yu

    2012-01-01

    Basing on the Mie theory and on the incident beam model via superposition of two plane waves, we analyze numerically the momentum flux of the field scattered by a spherical microparticle placed within the spatially inhomogeneous circularly polarized paraxial light beam. The asymmetry between the forward- and backward-scattered momentum fluxes in the Rayleigh scattering regime is revealed that appears due to the spin part of the internal energy flow in the incident beam. The transverse ponderomotive forces exerted on dielectric and conducting particles of different sizes are calculated, and special features of the mechanical actions produced by the spin and orbital parts of the internal energy flow have been recognized. In particular, the transverse orbital flow exerts on a subwavelength particle the transverse force that grows as a^3 for conducting and as a^6 for dielectric particle with radius a, in compliance with the dipole mechanism of the field-particle interaction; the force associated with the spin flo...

  19. Measurement of anisotropic energy transport in flowing polymers by using a holographic technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schieber, Jay D; Venerus, David C; Bush, Kendall; Balasubramanian, Venkat; Smoukov, Stoyan

    2004-09-07

    Almost no experimental data exist to test theories for the nonisothermal flow of complex fluids. To provide quantitative tests for newly proposed theories, we have developed a holographic grating technique to study energy transport in an amorphous polymer melt subject to flow. Polyisobutylene with weight-averaged molecular mass of 85 kDa is sheared at a rate of 10 s(-1), and all nonzero components of the thermal conductivity tensor are measured as a function of time, after cessation. Our results are consistent with proposed generalizations to the energy balance for microstructural fluids, including a generalized Fourier's law for anisotropic media. The data are also consistent with a proposed stress-thermal rule for amorphous polymer melts. Confirmation of the universality of these results would allow numerical modelers to make quantitative predictions for the nonisothermal flow of polymer melts.

  20. Mesoscale to microscale wind farm flow modeling and evaluation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sanz Rodrigo, Javier; Chávez Arroyo, Roberto Aurelio; Moriarty, Patrick

    2017-01-01

    of meteorological and wind engineering flow models and the definition of a formal model evaluation methodology, is a strong area of research for the next generation of wind conditions assessment and wind farm and wind turbine design tools. Some fundamental challenges are identified in order to guide future research...... design tools and meteorological models. The challenge is how to build the bridge between atmospheric and wind engineering model communities and how to establish a comprehensive evaluation process that identifies relevant physical phenomena for wind energy applications with modeling and experimental...... requirements. A framework for model verification, validation, and uncertainty quantification is established to guide this process by a systematic evaluation of the modeling system at increasing levels of complexity. In terms of atmospheric physics, 'building the bridge' means developing models for the so...

  1. A FLOW STRESS MODEL FOR AZ61 MAGNESIUM ALLOY

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    H.T.Zhou; X.Q.Zeng; Q.D Wang; W.J.Ding

    2004-01-01

    The flow stress behaviors of AZ61 alloy has been investigated at temperature range from 523 to 673K with the strain rates of 0.001-1s-1.It is found that the average activation energy,strain rate sensitive exponent and stress exponent are different at various deformation conditions changing from 1i3.6 to 176.3k J/mol,0.125 to 0.167 and 6 to 8 respectively.A flow stress model for AZ61 alloy is derived by analyzing the stress data based on hot compression test.It is demonstrated that the flow stress model including strain hardening exponent and strain softening exponent is suitable to predicate the flow stress.The prediction of the flow stress of AZ61 alloy has shown to be good agreement with the test data.The maximum differences of the peak stresses calculated by the model and obtained by experiment is less than 8%.

  2. Energy flow in plate assembles by hierarchical version of finite element method

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wachulec, Marcin; Kirkegaard, Poul Henning

    method has been proposed. In this paper a modified hierarchical version of finite element method is used for modelling of energy flow in plate assembles. The formulation includes description of in-plane forces so that planes lying in different planes can be modelled. Two examples considered are: L......-corner of two rectangular plates an a I-shaped plate girder made of five plates. Energy distribution among plates due to harmonic load is studied and the comparison of performance between the hierarchical and standard finite element formulation is presented....

  3. PIV quantification of the flow induced by an ultrasonic horn and numerical modeling of the flow and related processing times.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schenker, M C; Pourquié, M J B M; Eskin, D G; Boersma, B J

    2013-01-01

    The flow in a confined container induced by an ultrasonic horn is measured by Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV). This flow is caused by acoustic streaming and highly influenced by the presence of cavitation. The jet-like experimentally observed flow is compared with the available theoretical solution for a turbulent free round jet. The similarity between both flows enables a simplified numerical model to be made, whilst the phenomenon is very difficult to simulate otherwise. The numerical model requires only two parameters, i.e. the flow momentum and turbulent kinetic energy at the position of the horn tip. The simulated flow is used as a basis for the calculation of the time required for the entire liquid volume to pass through the active cavitation region.

  4. The total flow concept for geothermal energy conversion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Austin, A. L.

    1974-01-01

    A geothermal development project has been initiated at the Lawrence Livermore Laboratory (LLL) to emphasize development of methods for recovery and conversion of the energy in geothermal deposits of hot brines. Temperatures of these waters vary from 150 C to more than 300 C with dissolved solids content ranging from less than 0.1% to over 25% by weight. Of particular interest are the deposits of high-temperature/high-salinity brines, as well as less saline brines, known to occur in the Salton Trough of California. Development of this resource will depend on resolution of the technical problems of brine handling, scale and precipitation control, and corrosion/erosion resistant systems for efficient conversion of thermal to electrical energy. Research experience to date has shown these problems to be severe. Hence, the LLL program emphasizes development of an entirely different approach called the Total Flow concept.

  5. Natural Regulation of Energy Flow in a Green Quantum Photocell

    CERN Document Server

    Arp, Trevor B; Aji, Vivek; Gabor, Nathaniel M

    2015-01-01

    Manipulating the flow of energy in nanoscale and molecular photonic devices is of both fundamental interest and central importance for applications in light harvesting optoelectronics. Under erratic solar irradiance conditions, unregulated power fluctuations in a light harvesting photocell lead to inefficient energy storage in conventional solar cells and potentially fatal oxidative damage in photosynthesis. Here, we show that regulation against these fluctuations arises naturally within a two-channel quantum heat engine photocell, thus enabling the efficient conversion of varying incident solar spectrum at Earth's surface. Remarkably, absorption in the green portion of the spectrum is avoided, as it provides no inherent regulatory benefit. Our findings illuminate a quantum structural origin of regulation, provide a novel optoelectronic design strategy, and may elucidate the link between photoprotection in photosynthesis and the predominance of green plants on Earth.

  6. Traffic flow dynamics data, models and simulation

    CERN Document Server

    Treiber, Martin

    2013-01-01

    This textbook provides a comprehensive and instructive coverage of vehicular traffic flow dynamics and modeling. It makes this fascinating interdisciplinary topic, which to date was only documented in parts by specialized monographs, accessible to a broad readership. Numerous figures and problems with solutions help the reader to quickly understand and practice the presented concepts. This book is targeted at students of physics and traffic engineering and, more generally, also at students and professionals in computer science, mathematics, and interdisciplinary topics. It also offers material for project work in programming and simulation at college and university level. The main part, after presenting different categories of traffic data, is devoted to a mathematical description of the dynamics of traffic flow, covering macroscopic models which describe traffic in terms of density, as well as microscopic many-particle models in which each particle corresponds to a vehicle and its driver. Focus chapters on ...

  7. On the mixture model for multiphase flow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Manninen, M.; Taivassalo, V. [VTT Energy, Espoo (Finland). Nuclear Energy; Kallio, S. [Aabo Akademi, Turku (Finland)

    1996-12-31

    Numerical flow simulation utilising a full multiphase model is impractical for a suspension possessing wide distributions in the particle size or density. Various approximations are usually made to simplify the computational task. In the simplest approach, the suspension is represented by a homogeneous single-phase system and the influence of the particles is taken into account in the values of the physical properties. This study concentrates on the derivation and closing of the model equations. The validity of the mixture model is also carefully analysed. Starting from the continuity and momentum equations written for each phase in a multiphase system, the field equations for the mixture are derived. The mixture equations largely resemble those for a single-phase flow but are represented in terms of the mixture density and velocity. The volume fraction for each dispersed phase is solved from a phase continuity equation. Various approaches applied in closing the mixture model equations are reviewed. An algebraic equation is derived for the velocity of a dispersed phase relative to the continuous phase. Simplifications made in calculating the relative velocity restrict the applicability of the mixture model to cases in which the particles reach the terminal velocity in a short time period compared to the characteristic time scale of the flow of the mixture. (75 refs.)

  8. Experimental evaluations of the microchannel flow model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, K J

    2015-06-07

    Recent advances have enabled a new wave of biomechanics measurements, and have renewed interest in selecting appropriate rheological models for soft tissues such as the liver, thyroid, and prostate. The microchannel flow model was recently introduced to describe the linear response of tissue to stimuli such as stress relaxation or shear wave propagation. This model postulates a power law relaxation spectrum that results from a branching distribution of vessels and channels in normal soft tissue such as liver. In this work, the derivation is extended to determine the explicit link between the distribution of vessels and the relaxation spectrum. In addition, liver tissue is modified by temperature or salinity, and the resulting changes in tissue responses (by factors of 1.5 or greater) are reasonably predicted from the microchannel flow model, simply by considering the changes in fluid flow through the modified samples. The 2 and 4 parameter versions of the model are considered, and it is shown that in some cases the maximum time constant (corresponding to the minimum vessel diameters), could be altered in a way that has major impact on the observed tissue response. This could explain why an inflamed region is palpated as a harder bump compared to surrounding normal tissue.

  9. Modeling groundwater flow on massively parallel computers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ashby, S.F.; Falgout, R.D.; Fogwell, T.W.; Tompson, A.F.B.

    1994-12-31

    The authors will explore the numerical simulation of groundwater flow in three-dimensional heterogeneous porous media. An interdisciplinary team of mathematicians, computer scientists, hydrologists, and environmental engineers is developing a sophisticated simulation code for use on workstation clusters and MPPs. To date, they have concentrated on modeling flow in the saturated zone (single phase), which requires the solution of a large linear system. they will discuss their implementation of preconditioned conjugate gradient solvers. The preconditioners under consideration include simple diagonal scaling, s-step Jacobi, adaptive Chebyshev polynomial preconditioning, and multigrid. They will present some preliminary numerical results, including simulations of groundwater flow at the LLNL site. They also will demonstrate the code`s scalability.

  10. Symposium on unsaturated flow and transport modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arnold, E.M.; Gee, G.W.; Nelson, R.W. (eds.)

    1982-09-01

    This document records the proceedings of a symposium on flow and transport processes in partially saturated groundwater systems, conducted at the Battelle Seattle Research Center on March 22-24, 1982. The symposium was sponsored by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission for the purpose of assessing the state-of-the-art of flow and transport modeling for use in licensing low-level nuclear waste repositories in partially saturated zones. The first day of the symposium centered around research in flow through partially saturated systems. Papers were presented with the opportunity for questions following each presentation. In addition, after all the talks, a formal panel discussion was held during which written questions were addressed to the panel of the days speakers. The second day of the Symposium was devoted to solute and contaminant transport in partially saturated media in an identical format. Individual papers are abstracted.

  11. Dynamics of electrochemical flows 3 Closure models

    CERN Document Server

    Xu, Chengjun

    2013-01-01

    The electrolyte (comprising of solute ions and solvents) flow-through the porous media is frequently encountered in nature or in many engineering applications, such as the electrochemical systems, manufacturing of composites, oil production, geothermal engineering, nuclear thermal disposal, soil pollution. Our previous work derived the interfacial interaction terms between the solid and the fluid, which can be used to investigate the details of transports of mass, heat, electric flied, potential, or momentum in the process of the electrochemical flows-through porous electrode. In this work, we establish the closure models for these interfacial interaction terms to close the governing equations from mathematical algebra. The interfacial interaction terms regard to the electric field, potential and electric force are firstly revealed. Our new theory provides a new approach to describe the electrochemical flows-through porous media.

  12. Energy Blocks — A Physical Model for Teaching Energy Concepts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hertting, Scott

    2016-01-01

    Most physics educators would agree that energy is a very useful, albeit abstract topic. It is therefore important to use various methods to help the student internalize the concept of energy itself and its related ideas. These methods include using representations such as energy bar graphs, energy pie charts, or energy tracking diagrams. Activities and analogies like Energy Theater and Richard Feynman's blocks, as well as the popular money (or wealth) analogy, can also be very effective. The goal of this paper is to describe a physical model of Feynman's blocks that can be employed by instructors to help students learn the following energy-related concepts: 1. The factors affecting each individual mechanical energy storage mode (this refers to what has been traditionally called a form of energy, and while the Modeling Method of instruction is not the focus of this paper, much of the energy related language used is specific to the Modeling Method). For example, how mass or height affects gravitational energy; 2. Energy conservation; and 3. The graphical relationships between the energy storage mode and a factor affecting it. For example, the graphical relationship between elastic energy and the change in length of a spring.

  13. A Fractal Model for the Effective Thermal Conductivity of Granular Flow with Non-uniform Particles

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Duan-Ming; LEI Ya-Jie; YU Bo-Ming; ZHANG Mei-Jun; HUANG Ming-Tao; LI Zhi-Hua; GUAN Li

    2002-01-01

    The equipartition of energy applied in binary mixture of granular flow is extended to granular flow withnon-uniform particles. Based on the fractal characteristic of granular flow with non-uniform particles as well as energyequipartition, a fractal velocity distribution function and a fractal model of effective thermal conductivity are derived.Thermal conduction resulted from motions of particles in the granular flow, as well as the effect of fractal dimension oneffective thermal conductivity, is discussed.

  14. A physical five-equation model for compressible two-fluid flow, and its numerical treatment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kreeft, J.J.; Koren, B.

    2009-01-01

    A novel five-equation model for inviscid, non-heat-conducting, compressible two-fluid flow is derived, together with an appropriate numerical method. The model uses flow equations based on conservation laws and exchange laws only. The two fluids exchange momentum and energy, for which source terms a

  15. Compressible Turbulent Channel Flows: DNS Results and Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, P. G.; Coleman, G. N.; Bradshaw, P.; Rai, Man Mohan (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    The present paper addresses some topical issues in modeling compressible turbulent shear flows. The work is based on direct numerical simulation of two supersonic fully developed channel flows between very cold isothermal walls. Detailed decomposition and analysis of terms appearing in the momentum and energy equations are presented. The simulation results are used to provide insights into differences between conventional time-and Favre-averaging of the mean-flow and turbulent quantities. Study of the turbulence energy budget for the two cases shows that the compressibility effects due to turbulent density and pressure fluctuations are insignificant. In particular, the dilatational dissipation and the mean product of the pressure and dilatation fluctuations are very small, contrary to the results of simulations for sheared homogeneous compressible turbulence and to recent proposals for models for general compressible turbulent flows. This provides a possible explanation of why the Van Driest density-weighted transformation is so successful in correlating compressible boundary layer data. Finally, it is found that the DNS data do not support the strong Reynolds analogy. A more general representation of the analogy is analysed and shown to match the DNS data very well.

  16. Two sustainable energy system analysis models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, Henrik; Goran Krajacic, Neven Duic; da Graca Carvalho, Maria

    2005-01-01

    This paper presents a comparative study of two energy system analysis models both designed with the purpose of analysing electricity systems with a substantial share of fluctuating renewable energy.......This paper presents a comparative study of two energy system analysis models both designed with the purpose of analysing electricity systems with a substantial share of fluctuating renewable energy....

  17. Energy-based modelling and control of wind energy conversion system with DFIG

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, H. H.; Qu, Y. B.

    2011-02-01

    Focusing on wind energy conversion system (WECS) at the doubly-fed induction generator (DFIG) control level, a novel control approach was proposed to optimise wind energy capture from consideration of physical nature and energy relationship. According to energy flowing, the WECS was divided into several multi-ports energy conversion subsystems, and the structure matrices of the subsystems were elaborately designed. Based on this, port-controlled Hamiltonian models of the subsystems were obtained, and energy-based control using the models was provided to realise the machine side and the grid side control objectives of the WECS. The approach was applied on a 2 MW WECS, and compared with classical proportional-integral (PI) controller using MATLAB/Simulink. The results show that the energy-based control not only fully satisfies both side control requirements, but also has more robust control performances for a turbulent wind than the PI control.

  18. Prediction of heating rate controlled viscous flow activation energy during spark plasma sintering of amorphous alloy powders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, Tanaji; Harimkar, Sandip P.

    2017-07-01

    The viscous flow behavior of Fe-based amorphous alloy powder during isochronal spark plasma sintering was analyzed under the integrated theoretical background of the Arrhenius and directional structural relaxation models. A relationship between viscous flow activation energy and heating rate was derived. An extension of the pertinent analysis to Ti-based amorphous alloys confirmed the broad applicability of such a relationship for predicting the activation energy for sintering below the glass transition temperature (T g) of the amorphous alloy powders.

  19. Vibrational Energy Flow Analysis of Corrected Flexural Waves in Timoshenko Beam – Part II: Application to Coupled Timoshenko Beams

    OpenAIRE

    2006-01-01

    This paper presents the methodology for the energy flow analysis of coupled Timoshenko beam structures and various numerical applications to verify the developed methodology. To extend the application of the energy flow model for corrected flexural waves in the Timoshenko beam, which is developed in the other companion paper, to coupled structures, the wave transmission analyses of general coupled Timoshenko beam systems are performed. First, power transmission and reflection coefficients for...

  20. Complex Evaluation Model of Corporate Energy Management

    OpenAIRE

    Ágnes Kádár Horváth

    2014-01-01

    With the ever increasing energy problems at the doorstep alongside with political, economic, social and environmental challenges, conscious energy management has become of increasing importance in corporate resource management. Rising energy costs, stricter environmental and climate regulations as well as considerable changes in the energy market require companies to rationalise their energy consumption and cut energy costs. This study presents a complex evaluation model of corporate energy m...

  1. Energy: modelization and econometrics. Proceedings of colloquium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fericelli, J.; Lesourd, J.B.

    1985-01-01

    The document presents the communications of the ''applied econometric association'' symposium and introduces the description of various French and foreigner models: analysis of the energy demand and production functions with energy input. A detailed evaluation of the Translog function applied to energy is described. Other energy economic aspects are approched: energy prices and costs, energetic balances, energy management in enterprises, impact evaluation of alternative energy policies.

  2. The local Hubble flow a manifestation of dark energy

    CERN Document Server

    Baryshev, Yu V; Teerikorpi, P; Baryshev, Yurij; Chernin, Arthur; Teerikorpi, Pekka

    2000-01-01

    Our local environment at $r<10$ Mpc expands linearly and smoothly, as if ruled by a uniform matter distribution, while observations show the very clumpy local universe. This is a long standing enigma in cosmology. We argue that the recently discovered vacuum or quintessence (dark energy (DE) component with the equation of state $p_Q = w \\rho_Q c^2$, $w \\in [-1,0)$) from observations of the high-redshift universe may also manifest itself in the properties of the very local Hubble flow. We introduce the concept of the critical distance $r_Q$ where the repulsive force of dark energy starts to dominate over the gravity of a mass concentration. For the Local Group $r_Q$ is about 1.5 Mpc. Intriguingly, at the same distance 1.5 Mpc the linear and very "cold" Hubble flow emerges, with about the global Hubble constant. We also consider the critical epoch $t_Q$, when the DE antigravity began to dominate over the local matter gravity for a galaxy which at the present epoch is in the local DE dominated region. Our mai...

  3. Detection of Parametric Roll Resonance on Ships from Indication of Nonlinear Energy Flow

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Galeazzi, Roberto; Blanke, Mogens; Poulsen, Niels Kjølstad

    2009-01-01

    The detection of the onset of parametric roll resonance on ships is of a central importance in order to activate specific control strategies able to counteract the large roll motion. One of the main priorities is to have detectors with a small detection time, such that warnings can be issued when...... the roll oscillations are about 5◦. This paper proposes two different detection approaches: the first one based on sinusoidal detection in white gaussian noise; the second one utilizes an energy flow indicator in order to catch the onset of parametric roll based upon the transfer of energy from heave...... and pitch to roll. Both detectors have been validated against experimental data of a scale model of a container vessel excited with both regular and irregular waves. The detector based on the energy flow indicator proved to be very robust to different scenarios (regular/irregular waves) since it does...

  4. Effect of Mach number on the efficiency of microwave energy deposition in supersonic flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lashkov, V. A.; Karpenko, A. G.; Khoronzhuk, R. S.; Mashek, I. Ch.

    2016-05-01

    The article is devoted to experimental and numerical studies of the efficiency of microwave energy deposition into a supersonic flow around the blunt cylinder at different Mach numbers. Identical conditions for energy deposition have been kept in the experiments, thus allowing to evaluate the pure effect of varying Mach number on the pressure drop. Euler equations are solved numerically to model the corresponding unsteady flow compressed gas. The results of numerical simulations are compared to the data obtained from the physical experiments. It is shown that the momentum, which the body receives during interaction of the gas domain modified by microwave discharge with a shock layer before the body, increases almost linearly with rising of Mach number and the efficiency of energy deposition also rises.

  5. Numerical model of liquid metal flow in steel making tundish with flow modifiers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasantrao More, Manas; Saha, Sandip Kumar; Marje, Vishal; Balachandran, G.

    2017-04-01

    The optimum condition for clean steel production in the tundish of a continuous casting process reactor can be obtained using numerical modelling. Five different arrangements of flow modifier in the form of impact pad systems deployed in an eight ton, delta shaped, and two strand bloom caster tundish are analysed and optimum design of the impact pad to improve the inclusion removal efficiency is evolved. Reynolds Averaged Navier-Strokes (RANS) equations with standard k-ε model of turbulence and energy equation are used to study fluid flow and inclusion flotation in the tundish. The inclusion separation efficiency is evaluated by solving the inclusion transport equation. Height variations along with additional notch amongst different impact pads yield best micro inclusion separation efficiency.

  6. UNDERSTANDING FLOW OF ENERGY IN BUILDINGS USING MODAL ANALYSIS METHODOLOGY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    John Gardner; Kevin Heglund; Kevin Van Den Wymelenberg; Craig Rieger

    2013-07-01

    It is widely understood that energy storage is the key to integrating variable generators into the grid. It has been proposed that the thermal mass of buildings could be used as a distributed energy storage solution and several researchers are making headway in this problem. However, the inability to easily determine the magnitude of the building’s effective thermal mass, and how the heating ventilation and air conditioning (HVAC) system exchanges thermal energy with it, is a significant challenge to designing systems which utilize this storage mechanism. In this paper we adapt modal analysis methods used in mechanical structures to identify the primary modes of energy transfer among thermal masses in a building. The paper describes the technique using data from an idealized building model. The approach is successfully applied to actual temperature data from a commercial building in downtown Boise, Idaho.

  7. MODELING THE CHAIN CONFORMATION OF POLYMER MELTS IN CONTRACTION FLOW

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qing Shen; Jian-feng Hu; Qing-feng Gu

    2003-01-01

    A constitutive model of quasi-Newtonian fluid based on the type of flow is used in abrupt planar contraction flow.The numerical results from finite element analysis are consistent with experimental data for stress patterns and velocity profiles in the flow field. The chain conformations of polymer melts are then investigated in such a planar contraction by using the phenomenological model with internal parameters proposed by the author. That is, the shape and orientation of polymer chain coils are predicted and discussed in different flow regions of the contraction flow field that possess simple shear flow, extensional flow, vortical flow, and mixed flow respectively.

  8. Numerical modeling of a compressible multiphase flow through a nozzle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niedzielska, Urszula; Rabinovitch, Jason; Blanquart, Guillaume

    2012-11-01

    New thermodynamic cycles developed for more efficient low temperature resource utilization can increase the net power production from geothermal resources and sensible waste heat recovery by 20-40%, compared to the traditional organic Rankine cycle. These improved systems consist of a pump, a liquid heat exchanger, a two-phase turbine, and a condenser. The two-phase turbine is used to extract energy from a high speed multiphase fluid and consists of a nozzle and an axial impulse rotor. In order to model and optimize the fluid flow through this part of the system an analysis of two-phase flow through a specially designed convergent-divergent nozzle has to be conducted. To characterize the flow behavior, a quasi-one-dimensional steady-state model of the multiphase fluid flow through a nozzle has been constructed. A numerical code capturing dense compressible multiphase flow under subsonic and supersonic conditions and the coupling between both liquid and gas phases has been developed. The output of the code delivers data vital for the performance optimization of the two-phase nozzle.

  9. Graphical Models for Optimal Power Flow

    CERN Document Server

    Dvijotham, Krishnamurthy; Chertkov, Michael; Misra, Sidhant; Vuffray, Marc

    2016-01-01

    Optimal power flow (OPF) is the central optimization problem in electric power grids. Although solved routinely in the course of power grid operations, it is known to be strongly NP-hard in general, and weakly NP-hard over tree networks. In this paper, we formulate the optimal power flow problem over tree networks as an inference problem over a tree-structured graphical model where the nodal variables are low-dimensional vectors. We adapt the standard dynamic programming algorithm for inference over a tree-structured graphical model to the OPF problem. Combining this with an interval discretization of the nodal variables, we develop an approximation algorithm for the OPF problem. Further, we use techniques from constraint programming (CP) to perform interval computations and adaptive bound propagation to obtain practically efficient algorithms. Compared to previous algorithms that solve OPF with optimality guarantees using convex relaxations, our approach is able to work for arbitrary distribution networks an...

  10. Global energy modeling - A biophysical approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dale, Michael

    2010-09-15

    This paper contrasts the standard economic approach to energy modelling with energy models using a biophysical approach. Neither of these approaches includes changing energy-returns-on-investment (EROI) due to declining resource quality or the capital intensive nature of renewable energy sources. Both of these factors will become increasingly important in the future. An extension to the biophysical approach is outlined which encompasses a dynamic EROI function that explicitly incorporates technological learning. The model is used to explore several scenarios of long-term future energy supply especially concerning the global transition to renewable energy sources in the quest for a sustainable energy system.

  11. Measurement of the Turbulence Kinetic Energy Budget of a Turbulent Planar Wake Flow in Pressure Gradients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiao-Feng; Thomas, Flint O.; Nelson, Robert C.

    2001-01-01

    Turbulence kinetic energy (TKE) is a very important quantity for turbulence modeling and the budget of this quantity in its transport equation can provide insight into the flow physics. Turbulence kinetic energy budget measurements were conducted for a symmetric turbulent wake flow subjected to constant zero, favorable and adverse pressure gradients in year-three of research effort. The purpose of this study is to clarify the flow physics issues underlying the demonstrated influence of pressure gradient on wake development and provide experimental support for turbulence modeling. To ensure the reliability of these notoriously difficult measurements, the experimental procedure was carefully designed on the basis of an uncertainty analysis. Four different approaches, based on an isotropic turbulence assumption, a locally axisymmetric homogeneous turbulence assumption, a semi-isotropy assumption and a forced balance of the TKE equation, were applied for the estimate of the dissipation term. The pressure transport term is obtained from a forced balance of the turbulence kinetic energy equation. This report will present the results of the turbulence kinetic energy budget measurement and discuss their implication on the development of strained turbulent wakes.

  12. Turbulence modelling of thermal plasma flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shigeta, Masaya

    2016-12-01

    This article presents a discussion of the ideas for modelling turbulent thermal plasma flows, reviewing the challenges, efforts, and state-of-the-art simulations. Demonstrative simulations are also performed to present the importance of numerical methods as well as physical models to express turbulent features. A large eddy simulation has been applied to turbulent thermal plasma flows to treat time-dependent and 3D motions of multi-scale eddies. Sub-grid scale models to be used should be able to express not only turbulent but also laminar states because both states co-exist in and around thermal plasmas which have large variations of density as well as transport properties under low Mach-number conditions. Suitable solution algorithms and differencing schemes must be chosen and combined appropriately to capture multi-scale eddies and steep gradients of temperature and chemical species, which are turbulent features of thermal plasma flows with locally variable Reynolds and Mach numbers. Several simulations using different methods under different conditions show commonly that high-temperature plasma regions exhibit less turbulent structures, with only large eddies, whereas low-temperature regions tend to be more turbulent, with numerous small eddies. These numerical results agree with both theoretical insight and photographs that show the characteristics of eddies. Results also show that a turbulence transition of a thermal plasma jet through a generation-breakup process of eddies in a torch is dominated by fluid dynamic instability after ejection rather than non-uniform or unsteady phenomena.

  13. Modeling density segregation in granular flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Hongyi; Lueptow, Richard; Umbanhowar, Paul

    2015-11-01

    A recently developed continuum-based model accurately predicts segregation in flows of granular mixtures varying in particle size by considering the interplay of advection, diffusion and segregation. In this research, we extend the domain of the model to include density driven segregation. Discrete Element Method (DEM) simulations of density bidisperse flows of mono-sized particles in a quasi-2D bounded heap were performed to determine the dependence of the density driven segregation velocity on local shear rate, particle concentration, and a segregation length which scales with the particle size and the logarithm of the density ratio. With these inputs, the model yields theoretical predictions of density segregation patterns that quantitatively match the DEM simulations over a range of density ratios (1.11-3.33) and flow rates (19.2-113.6 cm3/s). Matching experiments with various combinations of glass, steel and ceramic particles were also performed which reproduced the segregation patterns obtained in both the simulations and the theory.

  14. Modelling debris flows down general channels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. P. Pudasaini

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper is an extension of the single-phase cohesionless dry granular avalanche model over curved and twisted channels proposed by Pudasaini and Hutter (2003. It is a generalisation of the Savage and Hutter (1989, 1991 equations based on simple channel topography to a two-phase fluid-solid mixture of debris material. Important terms emerging from the correct treatment of the kinematic and dynamic boundary condition, and the variable basal topography are systematically taken into account. For vanishing fluid contribution and torsion-free channel topography our new model equations exactly degenerate to the previous Savage-Hutter model equations while such a degeneration was not possible by the Iverson and Denlinger (2001 model, which, in fact, also aimed to extend the Savage and Hutter model. The model equations of this paper have been rigorously derived; they include the effects of the curvature and torsion of the topography, generally for arbitrarily curved and twisted channels of variable channel width. The equations are put into a standard conservative form of partial differential equations. From these one can easily infer the importance and influence of the pore-fluid-pressure distribution in debris flow dynamics. The solid-phase is modelled by applying a Coulomb dry friction law whereas the fluid phase is assumed to be an incompressible Newtonian fluid. Input parameters of the equations are the internal and bed friction angles of the solid particles, the viscosity and volume fraction of the fluid, the total mixture density and the pore pressure distribution of the fluid at the bed. Given the bed topography and initial geometry and the initial velocity profile of the debris mixture, the model equations are able to describe the dynamics of the depth profile and bed parallel depth-averaged velocity distribution from the initial position to the final deposit. A shock capturing, total variation diminishing numerical scheme is implemented to

  15. Incorporating immigrant flows into microsimulation models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duleep, Harriet Orcutt; Dowhan, Daniel J

    2008-01-01

    Building on the research on immigrant earnings reviewed in the first article of this series, "Research on Immigrant Earnings," the preceding article, "Adding Immigrants to Microsimulation Models," linked research results to various issues essential for incorporating immigrant earnings into microsimulation models. The discussions of that article were in terms of a closed system. That is, it examined a system in which immigrant earnings and emigration are forecast for a given population represented in the base sample in the microsimulation model. This article, the last in the series, addresses immigrant earnings projections for open systems--microsimulation models that include projections of future immigration. The article suggests a simple method to project future immigrants and their earnings. Including the future flow of immigrants in microsimulation models can dramatically affect the projected Social Security benefits of some groups.

  16. Nonlinear effects of energy sources and the jet at supersonic flow in the channel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zamuraev, V. P.; Kalinina, A. P.

    2016-10-01

    The work is devoted to the mathematical modeling of the influence of transversal jet and the near-wall energy sources on the shock wave structure of supersonic flow in channel with variable cross section. Stable regimes with the region of transonic velocities are obtained. Their stability is confirmed by the width of the corridor of the input power in the area of the regime existence.

  17. Energy flow, energy density of Timoshenko beam and wave mode incoherence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Jun; Rao, Zhushi; Ta, Na

    2015-10-01

    Time-averaged energy flow and energy density are of significance in vibration analysis. The wave decomposition method is more fruitful and global in physical sense than the state variables depicted point by point. By wave approach, the Timoshenko beam vibration field is decomposed into two distinct modes: travelling and evanescent waves. Consequently, the power and energy functions defined on these waves' amplitude and phase need to be established. However, such formulas on Timoshenko beam are hardly found in literatures. Furthermore, the incoherence between these two modes is of theoretical and practical significance. This characteristic guarantees that the resultant power or energy of a superposed wave field is equal to the sum of the power or energy that each wave mode would generate individually. Unlike Euler-Bernoulli beam, such incoherence in the Timoshenko beam case has not been theoretically proved so far. Initially, the power and energy formulas based on wave approach and the corresponding incoherence proof are achieved by present work, both in theoretical and numerical ways. Fortunately, the theoretical and numerical results show that the travelling and evanescent wave modes are incoherent with each other both on power and energy functions. Notably, the energy function is unconventional and self-defined in order to obtain the incoherence. Some remarkable power transmission characteristics of the evanescent wave are also illustrated meanwhile.

  18. Energy flow in plate assembles by hierarchical version of finite element method

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wachulec, Marcin; Kirkegaard, Poul Henning

    method has been proposed. In this paper a modified hierarchical version of finite element method is used for modelling of energy flow in plate assembles. The formulation includes description of in-plane forces so that planes lying in different planes can be modelled. Two examples considered are: L......The dynamic analysis of structures in medium and high frequencies are usually focused on frequency and spatial averages of energy of components, and not the displacement/velocity fields. This is especially true for structure-borne noise modelling. For the analysis of complicated structures......-corner of two rectangular plates an a I-shaped plate girder made of five plates. Energy distribution among plates due to harmonic load is studied and the comparison of performance between the hierarchical and standard finite element formulation is presented....

  19. Energy Recovery Efficiency of Flow-coupled Flywheel Vehicle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xin Yang

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available In this study a flow-coupled flywheel vehicle was proposed and its energy recovery efficiency was discussed. This new kind of flywheel vehicle has simpler configuration, fewer components and easier control method. And it was confirmed that this system had enough capability to recover vehicle kinetic energy that might otherwise be lost as heat during braking. Then, more attentions were paid to initial speed of recovery flywheel and displacement ratio of variable displacement pump/motor that influenced recovery efficiency of the proposed hybrid vehicle. Experimental results show that the maximum recovery efficiency will amount to about 82%. It is also significant to point out that in order to improve recovery efficiency, the displacement size of variable displacement pump/motor is required so as to make it operates as maximum displacement and the initial speed of the recovery flywheel is limited at a suitable scope (about 1000~3000 rpm with regard to the windage and axial loss and the amount of energy storage. Hence, it is indicated that this type of hybrid vehicle can be as an optional configuration to widely use in hybrid vehicle.

  20. Models of Energy Saving Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nørgård, Jørgen Stig

    1999-01-01

    The paper first describes the concepts and methods around energy saving, such as energy chain, energy services, end-use technologies, secondary energy, etc. Next are discussed the problems of defining and adding energy services and hence end-use energy efficiency or intensity. A section is devote...... service level and technology are demonstrated as the main determinants of future energy consumption. In the concluding remarks, the main flaws of present energy policy and some visions of the future are discussed.......The paper first describes the concepts and methods around energy saving, such as energy chain, energy services, end-use technologies, secondary energy, etc. Next are discussed the problems of defining and adding energy services and hence end-use energy efficiency or intensity. A section is devoted...... to what is termed lifestyle efficiency, including the cultural values and the ability of the economy to provide the services wanted. As explained, integrated resource planning with its optimizing the whole energy chain cannot be combined with sub-optimizing part of it, for instance the supply technology...

  1. Models of Energy Saving Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nørgård, Jørgen Stig

    1999-01-01

    The paper first describes the concepts and methods around energy saving, such as energy chain, energy services, end-use technologies, secondary energy, etc. Next are discussed the problems of defining and adding energy services and hence end-use energy efficiency or intensity. A section is devote...... service level and technology are demonstrated as the main determinants of future energy consumption. In the concluding remarks, the main flaws of present energy policy and some visions of the future are discussed.......The paper first describes the concepts and methods around energy saving, such as energy chain, energy services, end-use technologies, secondary energy, etc. Next are discussed the problems of defining and adding energy services and hence end-use energy efficiency or intensity. A section is devoted...... to what is termed lifestyle efficiency, including the cultural values and the ability of the economy to provide the services wanted. As explained, integrated resource planning with its optimizing the whole energy chain cannot be combined with sub-optimizing part of it, for instance the supply technology...

  2. Porosity model for flows in CMP

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Chao-hui; YE Wei; LUO Jian-bin; WEN Shi-zhu

    2006-01-01

    In an effort to explore the contribution of the pad which is usually full of pores,to the performance of CMP (chemical mechanical polishing),a three-dimensional flow model of CMP is presented by assuming that the fluids in the porous layer comply with Darcy's law,which states that the flow velocity is proportional to the pressure gradient and inverse proportional to the viscosity.The flow equation is deduced accordingly and,by taking advantage of the multilevel technique and line relaxation technique,numerical simulations are carried out to reveal the relationships between the load capacities and operational parameters (including pivot height,roll angle and pitch angle),under conditions with different porous parameters and different thicknesses of the porous layer.The little porous parameter will lead to a prominent increase of load capability (for instance,the load and the moment predicted),which is still augmented by the thicker layer parameter.This will result in a higher material removal ratio of CMP.A pad full of large pores will be used to deduce load capability,facilitating the free flow of the fluids through the pores.The research will add some insights on the mechanism of the CMP technique.

  3. An introduction to multilevel flow modeling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lind, Morten

    2011-01-01

    environment. MFM has a primary focus on plant goals and functions and provide a methodological way of using those concepts to represent complex industrial plant. The paper gives a brief introduction to the historical development, introduces the concepts of MFM and presents the application of the concepts......Multilevel Flow Modeling (MFM) is a methodology for functional modeling of industrial processes on several interconnected levels of means-end and part-whole abstractions. The basic idea of MFM is to represent an industrial plant as a system which provides the means required to serve purposes in its...

  4. Energy flow in non-equilibrium conformal field theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernard, Denis; Doyon, Benjamin

    2012-09-01

    We study the energy current and its fluctuations in quantum gapless 1d systems far from equilibrium modeled by conformal field theory, where two separated halves are prepared at distinct temperatures and glued together at a point contact. We prove that these systems converge towards steady states, and give a general description of such non-equilibrium steady states in terms of quantum field theory data. We compute the large deviation function, also called the full counting statistics, of energy transfer through the contact. These are universal and satisfy fluctuation relations. We provide a simple representation of these quantum fluctuations in terms of classical Poisson processes whose intensities are proportional to Boltzmann weights.

  5. Delayed energy injection model for gamma-ray burst afterglows

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geng, J. J.; Huang, Y. F.; Yu, Y. B. [Department of Astronomy, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China); Wu, X. F., E-mail: hyf@nju.edu.cn, E-mail: xfwu@pmo.ac.cn [Purple Mountain Observatory, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Nanjing 210008 (China)

    2013-12-10

    The shallow decay phase and flares in the afterglows of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are widely believed to be associated with the later activation of the central engine. Some models of energy injection involve a continuous energy flow since the GRB trigger time, such as the magnetic dipole radiation from a magnetar. However, in the scenario involving a black hole accretion system, the energy flow from the fall-back accretion may be delayed for a fall-back time ∼t {sub fb}. Thus, we propose a delayed energy injection model. The delayed energy would cause a notable rise to the Lorentz factor of the external shock, which will 'generate' a bump in the multiple band afterglows. If the delayed time is very short, our model degenerates to the previous models. Our model can explain the significant re-brightening in the optical and infrared light curves of GRB 081029 and GRB 100621A. A considerable fall-back mass is needed to provide the later energy; this indicates that GRBs accompanied with fall-back material may be associated with a low energy supernova so that the fraction of the envelope can survive during eruption. The fall-back time can give meaningful information on the properties of GRB progenitor stars.

  6. A Petri Net model for distributed energy system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Konopko, Joanna [Warsaw University of Technology, The Faculty of Electronics and Information Technology, Institute of Computer Science, Nowowiejska Street 15/19, Warsaw 00-665 (Poland)

    2015-12-31

    Electrical networks need to evolve to become more intelligent, more flexible and less costly. The smart grid is the next generation power energy, uses two-way flows of electricity and information to create a distributed automated energy delivery network. Building a comprehensive smart grid is a challenge for system protection, optimization and energy efficient. Proper modeling and analysis is needed to build an extensive distributed energy system and intelligent electricity infrastructure. In this paper, the whole model of smart grid have been proposed using Generalized Stochastic Petri Nets (GSPN). The simulation of created model is also explored. The simulation of the model has allowed the analysis of how close the behavior of the model is to the usage of the real smart grid.

  7. A Petri Net model for distributed energy system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konopko, Joanna

    2015-12-01

    Electrical networks need to evolve to become more intelligent, more flexible and less costly. The smart grid is the next generation power energy, uses two-way flows of electricity and information to create a distributed automated energy delivery network. Building a comprehensive smart grid is a challenge for system protection, optimization and energy efficient. Proper modeling and analysis is needed to build an extensive distributed energy system and intelligent electricity infrastructure. In this paper, the whole model of smart grid have been proposed using Generalized Stochastic Petri Nets (GSPN). The simulation of created model is also explored. The simulation of the model has allowed the analysis of how close the behavior of the model is to the usage of the real smart grid.

  8. Modelling Cerebral Blood Flow and Temperature Using a Vascular Porous Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blowers, Stephen; Thrippleton, Michael; Marshall, Ian; Harris, Bridget; Andrews, Peter; Valluri, Prashant

    2016-11-01

    Macro-modelling of cerebral blood flow can assist in determining the impact of temperature intervention to reduce permanent tissue damage during instances of brain trauma. Here we present a 3D two phase fluid-porous model for simulating blood flow through the capillary region linked to intersecting 1D arterial and venous vessel trees. This combined vasculature porous (VaPor) model simulates both flow and energy balances, including heat from metabolism, using a vasculature extracted from MRI data which are expanded upon using a tree generation algorithm. Validation of temperature balance has been achieved using rodent brain data. Direct flow validation is not as straight forward due to the method used in determining regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF). In-vivo measurements are achieved using a tracer, which disagree with direct measurements of simulated flow. However, by modelling a virtual tracer, rCBF values are obtained that agree with those found in literature. Temperature profiles generated with the VaPor model show a reduction in core brain temperature after cooling the scalp not seen previously in other models.

  9. Numerical models of Plinian eruption columns and pyroclastic flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valentine, Greg A.; Wohletz, Kenneth H.

    1989-02-01

    Numerical simulations of physical processes governing the large-scale dynamics of Plinian eruption columns reveal conditions contributing to column collapse and emplacement of pyroclastic flows. The simulations are based on numerical solution of the time-dependent, two-phase, compressible Navier-Stokes equations for jets in a gravitational field. This modeling effort is directed toward studying the steady discharge phase of eruptions in contrast to our previous models of the initial, unsteady blast phase. Analysis of 51 eruption models covers a wide range of vent exit pressures, inertial and buoyancy driving forces, and coupling of energy and momentum between gas and pyroclasts. Consideration of three dimensionless groups (Richardson and Rouse numbers and thermogravitational parameter) facilitates this analysis and defines conditions leading to column collapse. For eruptions with similar particle size characteristics, exit pressure ratios are also very important in determining column behavior; column behavior is much more sensitive to exit pressure ratio than to the density ratio between the column and the atmosphere. Model eruption columns with exit pressures exceeding atmospheric pressure have diamond-shaped patterns at their bases with internal dynamics that correspond closely to observations of overpressured jets in laboratory experiments. Collapsing fountains form pyroclastic flows that consist of low-concentration fronts, relatively thick heads, vortex development along the top surfaces, and rising clouds of buoyant ash. The presence of coarse-grained proximal deposits primarily reflects tephra size sorting within the eruption column before collapse, as opposed to that which occurs during lateral transport of the material in pyroclastic flows. The dynamics and particle behavior in the proximal zone around collapsing eruption columns is examined; the modeling indicates that flow within a few kilometers of a vent will be at its highest particle concentration

  10. CFEST Coupled Flow, Energy & Solute Transport Version CFEST005 Theory Guide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Freedman, Vicky L.; Chen, Yousu; Gupta, Sumant K.

    2005-11-01

    This document presents the mathematical theory implemented in the CFEST (Coupled Flow, Energy, and Solute Transport) simulator. The simulator is a three-dimensional finite element model that can be used for evaluating flow and solute mass transport. Although the theory for thermal transport is presented in this guide, it has not yet been fully implemented in the simulator. The flow module is capable of simulating both confined and unconfined aquifer systems, as well as constant and variable density fluid flows. For unconfined aquifers, the model uses a moving boundary for the water table, deforming the numerical mesh so that the uppermost nodes are always at the water table. For solute transport, changes in concentration of a single dissolved chemical constituent are computed for advective and hydrodynamic transport, linear sorption represented by a retardation factor, and radioactive decay. Once fully implemented, transport of thermal energy in the groundwater and solid matrix of the aquifer can also be used to model aquifer thermal regimes. Mesh construction employs “collapsible”, hexahedral finite elements in a three-dimensional coordinate system. CFEST uses the Galerkin finite element method to convert the partial differential equations to algebraic form. To solve the coupled equations for momentum, solute and heat transport, either Picard or Newton-Raphson iterative schemes are used to treat nonlinearities. An upstream weighted residual finite-element method is used to solve the advective-dispersive transport and energy transfer equations, which circumvents problems of numerical oscillation problems. Matrix solutions of the flow and transport problems are performed using efficient iterative solvers available in ITPACK and PETSc, solvers that are available in the public domain. These solvers are based on the preconditioned conjugate gradient and ORTHOMIN methods for symmetric and a nonsymmetric matrices, respectively.

  11. Improvement in Delay of Information flow in Energy Efficiency Organization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elham Hasanzadeh

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available One of the most important issues in task organization is service speed and reduction of delays. High speedin tasks and reduction of delay cause high performance in task organization. So many studies have done inthis field. Some of these studies during the past ten years are redesigning tasks in information process,using the simulation product development, designing and manufacturing managing supply chain, and FINCmethodology which has been used in military of American and Australia.In this article FINC methodology is modified for a business organization. The proposed method applied oninformation flows of current situation of Iran energy efficiency organization. Mind manager software isused for viewing it by social network analysis and then FINC methodology for calculation of delay rate onit. Sum of delay rate with delays in decision nodes was added and then improved.

  12. A MODEL FOR PREDICTING PHASE INVERSION IN OIL-WATER TWO-PHASE PIPE FLOW

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GONG Jing; LI Qing-ping; YAO Hai-yuan; YU Da

    2006-01-01

    Experiments of phase inversion characteristics for horizontal oil-water two-phase flow in a stainless steel pipe loop (25.7 mm inner diameter,52 m long) are conducted. A new viewpoint is brought forward about the process of phase inversion in oil-water two-phase pipe flow. Using the relations between the total free energies of the pre-inversion and post-inversion dispersions, a model for predicting phase inversion in oil-water two-phase pipe flow has been developed that considers the characteristics of pipe flow. This model is compared against other models with relevant data of phase inversion in oil-water two-phase pipe flow. Results indicate that this model is better than other models in terms of calculation precision and applicability. The model is useful for guiding the design for optimal performance and safety in the operation of oil-water two-phase pipe flow in oil fields.

  13. A survey of air flow models for multizone structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feustel, H.E.; Dieris, J.

    1991-03-01

    Air flow models are used to simulate the rates of incoming and outgoing air flows for a building with known leakage under given weather and shielding conditions. Additional information about the flow paths and air-mass flows inside the building can only by using multizone air flow models. In order to obtain more information on multizone air flow models, a literature review was performed in 1984. A second literature review and a questionnaire survey performed in 1989, revealed the existence of 50 multizone air flow models, all developed since 1966, two of which are still under development. All these programs use similar flow equations for crack flow but differ in the versatility to describe the full range of flow phenomena and the algorithm provided for solving the set of nonlinear equations. This literature review was found that newer models are able to describe and simulate the ventilation systems and interrelation of mechanical and natural ventilation. 27 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  14. Exploiting stiffness nonlinearities to improve flow energy capture from the wake of a bluff body

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alhadidi, Ali H.; Abderrahmane, Hamid; Daqaq, Mohammed F.

    2016-12-01

    Fluid-structure coupling mechanisms such as wake galloping have been recently utilized to develop scalable flow energy harvesters. Unlike traditional rotary-type generators which are known to suffer serious scalability issues because their efficiency drops significantly as their size decreases; wake-galloping flow energy harvesters (FEHs) operate using a very simple motion mechanism, and, hence can be scaled down to fit the desired application. Nevertheless, wake-galloping FEHs have their own shortcomings. Typically, a wake-galloping FEH has a linear restoring force which results in a very narrow lock-in region. As a result, it does not perform well under the broad range of shedding frequencies normally associated with a variable flow speed. To overcome this critical problem, this article demonstrates theoretically and experimentally that, a bi-stable restoring force can be used to broaden the steady-state bandwidth of wake galloping FEHs and, thereby to decrease their sensitivity to variations in the flow speed. An experimental case study is carried out in a wind tunnel to compare the performance of a bi-stable and a linear FEH under single- and multi-frequency vortex street. An experimentally-validated lumped-parameters model of the bi-stable harvester is also introduced, and solved using the method of multiple scales to study the influence of the shape of the potential energy function on the output voltage.

  15. Energy/material flows associated with cyclic petrochemicals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1979-10-01

    A detailed product flow analysis, starting with the refinery reformate stream, was prepared to identify the major products of interest. The selection of the products and their derivatives for detailed analysis was based on 1978 consumption data which is reported. The products selected for detailed analysis were: Benzene (from Toluene), Polystyrene, Polyester fibers, Cyclohexane, Nylon 6,6, Nylon 6, ABS + SAN, Phenolic resins, Urethane foams, Unsaturated polyesters and SBR. Data on the selling price of these products and the companies which market these products are tabulated. The production routes were analyzed to determine the key manufacturing processes available. A detailed analysis of the important steps in the production of these materials is presented. For each step in the manaufacturing process a process description, a block flow diagram, the energy consumption, and the feedstock conversions are provided. If more than one process was available and was determined to be commercially important, this route was also presented in detail. If the alternate process was not as significant, then this process was noted and briefly described.

  16. Energy Wave Model of Atom

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    伍细如

    2015-01-01

    proton emits energy wave, electron could sits any position away from nucleus, but be the most stable just when it sits at the trough of energy wave, and this position accords with Bohr radius and Schr?dinger equation.

  17. Modeling variability in porescale multiphase flow experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ling, Bowen; Bao, Jie; Oostrom, Mart; Battiato, Ilenia; Tartakovsky, Alexandre M.

    2017-07-01

    Microfluidic devices and porescale numerical models are commonly used to study multiphase flow in biological, geological, and engineered porous materials. In this work, we perform a set of drainage and imbibition experiments in six identical microfluidic cells to study the reproducibility of multiphase flow experiments. We observe significant variations in the experimental results, which are smaller during the drainage stage and larger during the imbibition stage. We demonstrate that these variations are due to sub-porescale geometry differences in microcells (because of manufacturing defects) and variations in the boundary condition (i.e.,fluctuations in the injection rate inherent to syringe pumps). Computational simulations are conducted using commercial software STAR-CCM+, both with constant and randomly varying injection rate. Stochastic simulations are able to capture variability in the experiments associated with the varying pump injection rate.

  18. Modeling variability in porescale multiphase flow experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ling, Bowen; Bao, Jie; Oostrom, Mart; Battiato, Ilenia; Tartakovsky, Alexandre M.

    2017-07-01

    Microfluidic devices and porescale numerical models are commonly used to study multiphase flow in biological, geological, and engineered porous materials. In this work, we perform a set of drainage and imbibition experiments in six identical microfluidic cells to study the reproducibility of multiphase flow experiments. We observe significant variations in the experimental results, which are smaller during the drainage stage and larger during the imbibition stage. We demonstrate that these variations are due to sub-porescale geometry differences in microcells (because of manufacturing defects) and variations in the boundary condition (i.e., fluctuations in the injection rate inherent to syringe pumps). Computational simulations are conducted using commercial software STAR-CCM+, both with constant and randomly varying injection rates. Stochastic simulations are able to capture variability in the experiments associated with the varying pump injection rate.

  19. Modelling energy systems for developing countries

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Urban, F.; Benders, R.M.J.; Moll, H.C.

    2007-01-01

    Developing countries' energy use is rapidly increasing, which affects global climate change and global and regional energy settings. Energy models are helpful for exploring the future of developing and industrialised countries. However, energy systems of developing countries differ from those of ind

  20. ENOR - An Energy-Model for Norway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Ek

    1981-01-01

    Full Text Available The Energy model for Norway, ENOR, is a dynamic, multisectoral economic stimulation model to be used for long term energy analyses. Energy sectors and energy carriers are in principle treated in the same way as other sectors and economic commodities and integrated in the same general framework. The model has a two-level structure - a central coordination module ensures economic consistency, while the behaviour of each production and consumption sector is modelled in separate sector models. The model framework is thus capable of handling both engineering and economic knowledge.

  1. Quadrature-based Lattice Boltzmann Model for Relativistic Flows

    CERN Document Server

    Blaga, Robert

    2016-01-01

    A quadrature-based finite-difference lattice Boltzmann model is developed that is suitable for simulating relativistic flows of massless particles. We briefly review the relativistc Boltzmann equation and present our model. The quadrature is constructed such that the stress-energy tensor is obtained as a second order moment of the distribution function. The results obtained with our model are presented for a particular instance of the Riemann problem (the Sod shock tube). We show that the model is able to accurately capture the behavior across the whole domain of relaxation times, from the hydrodynamic to the ballistic regime. The property of the model of being extendable to arbitrarily high orders is shown to be paramount for the recovery of the analytical result in the ballistic regime.

  2. Energy modeling. Volume 2: Inventory and details of state energy models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melcher, A. G.; Underwood, R. G.; Weber, J. C.; Gist, R. L.; Holman, R. P.; Donald, D. W.

    1981-05-01

    An inventory of energy models developed by or for state governments is presented, and certain models are discussed in depth. These models address a variety of purposes such as: supply or demand of energy or of certain types of energy; emergency management of energy; and energy economics. Ten models are described. The purpose, use, and history of the model is discussed, and information is given on the outputs, inputs, and mathematical structure of the model. The models include five models dealing with energy demand, one of which is econometric and four of which are econometric-engineering end-use models.

  3. VisFlow - Web-based Visualization Framework for Tabular Data with a Subset Flow Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Bowen; Silva, Claudio T

    2017-01-01

    Data flow systems allow the user to design a flow diagram that specifies the relations between system components which process, filter or visually present the data. Visualization systems may benefit from user-defined data flows as an analysis typically consists of rendering multiple plots on demand and performing different types of interactive queries across coordinated views. In this paper, we propose VisFlow, a web-based visualization framework for tabular data that employs a specific type of data flow model called the subset flow model. VisFlow focuses on interactive queries within the data flow, overcoming the limitation of interactivity from past computational data flow systems. In particular, VisFlow applies embedded visualizations and supports interactive selections, brushing and linking within a visualization-oriented data flow. The model requires all data transmitted by the flow to be a data item subset (i.e. groups of table rows) of some original input table, so that rendering properties can be assigned to the subset unambiguously for tracking and comparison. VisFlow features the analysis flexibility of a flow diagram, and at the same time reduces the diagram complexity and improves usability. We demonstrate the capability of VisFlow on two case studies with domain experts on real-world datasets showing that VisFlow is capable of accomplishing a considerable set of visualization and analysis tasks. The VisFlow system is available as open source on GitHub.

  4. Capabilities and accuracy of energy modelling software

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Osburn, L

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Energy modelling can be used in a number of different ways to fulfill different needs, including certification within building regulations or green building rating tools. Energy modelling can also be used in order to try and predict what the energy...

  5. Energy and exergy analysis of counter flow wet cooling towers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saravanan Mani

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Cooling tower is an open system direct contact heat exchanger, where it cools water by both convection and evaporation. In this paper, a mathematical model based on heat and mass transfer principle is developed to find the outlet condition of water and air. The model is solved using iterative method. Energy and exergy analysis infers that inlet air wet bulb temperature is found to be the most important parameter than inlet water temperature and also variation in dead state properties does not affect the performance of wet cooling tower. .

  6. Mapping the Energy Flow from Supply to End Use in three Geographic Regions of China

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mischke, Peggy; Xiong, Weiming

    and consumption were analysed across China's provincial units. Regional disparities in China's current energy flow are rarely visualised and quantified from a comprehensive, system-wide perspective that is tracing all major fuels and energy carriers in supply, transformation and final end-use in different sectors....... A few national and provincial energy flow diagrams of China were developed since 2000, althoug with limited detail on major regional disparities and inter-regional fuel flows. No regional energy flow charts are yet available for East-, Central- and West-China. This study maps and quantifies energy...

  7. DYNAMIC MODELING STRATEGY FOR FLOW REGIME TRANSITION IN GAS-LIQUID TWO-PHASE FLOWS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    X. Wang; X. Sun; H. Zhao

    2011-09-01

    In modeling gas-liquid two-phase flows, the concept of flow regime has been used to characterize the global interfacial structure of the flows. Nearly all constitutive relations that provide closures to the interfacial transfers in two-phase flow models, such as the two-fluid model, are often flow regime dependent. Currently, the determination of the flow regimes is primarily based on flow regime maps or transition criteria, which are developed for steady-state, fully-developed flows and widely applied in nuclear reactor system safety analysis codes, such as RELAP5. As two-phase flows are observed to be dynamic in nature (fully-developed two-phase flows generally do not exist in real applications), it is of importance to model the flow regime transition dynamically for more accurate predictions of two-phase flows. The present work aims to develop a dynamic modeling strategy for determining flow regimes in gas-liquid two-phase flows through the introduction of interfacial area transport equations (IATEs) within the framework of a two-fluid model. The IATE is a transport equation that models the interfacial area concentration by considering the creation and destruction of the interfacial area, such as the fluid particle (bubble or liquid droplet) disintegration, boiling and evaporation; and fluid particle coalescence and condensation, respectively. For the flow regimes beyond bubbly flows, a two-group IATE has been proposed, in which bubbles are divided into two groups based on their size and shape (which are correlated), namely small bubbles and large bubbles. A preliminary approach to dynamically identifying the flow regimes is provided, in which discriminators are based on the predicted information, such as the void fraction and interfacial area concentration of small bubble and large bubble groups. This method is expected to be applied to computer codes to improve their predictive capabilities of gas-liquid two-phase flows, in particular for the applications in

  8. The TopoFlow Hydrologic Model: A New Community Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peckham, S. D.

    2004-05-01

    TopoFlow is a powerful, spatially-distributed hydrologic model with a user-friendly, wizard-style point-and-click interface. It is an open-source model that was designed to be easily modified and extended by a user community of hydrologists. Its main purpose is to model many different physical processes in a watershed with the goal of accurately predicting how various hydrologic variables will evolve in time in response to climatic forcings. The streamlined graphical interface makes it easy to perform multiple runs with different settings and different methods for parameterizing various physical processes; this makes it an excellent tool for research and teaching. Time evolutions for single pixels (such as hydrographs), collections of pixels, or entire grids (as animations) are all supported as output options. The currently supported physical processes are: Snowmelt (degree-day or energy balance method), Precipitation (uniform or varying in space/time), Evapotranspiration (Priestley-Taylor or energy balance), Infiltration (Green-Ampt coming soon), Channel/overland flow (Manning or law of wall) and Darcian, multi-layer subsurface flow. For each physical process, the user selects a "method" to be used to model that process from a droplist of options, and then specifies the input data that is required for that method and the output variables that are of interest. The ability to handle springs, sinks and canals was recently added. TopoFlow is designed so that users can use existing methods, share methods with others, or add their own methods and incorporate them into the graphical user interface. A method called "None" is always available to turn off any given physical process, and cleanly-written templates are provided to simplify the task of adding new methods. Input variables may be specified as a scalar (to be distributed uniformly), a time series, a spatial grid, or a grid seqence indexed by time. Many of the physical process methods used in TopoFlow are based on

  9. Measurement of Forward Energy Flow at 13 TeV with the CMS Experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Cerci, Salim

    2016-01-01

    The measurement of the energy flow is performed with the forward (HF: $3.15 <\\mid \\eta \\mid) < 5.2$) and very-forward (CASTOR: $-6.6 < \\eta < -5.2$) calorimeters of CMS at the centre-of-mass energy of 13 TeV. The data were taken during the several periods of low luminosity operation in 2015. The results are compared to Monte Carlo (MC) model predictions as well as the earlier proton-proton data taken at $\\sqrt{s} = 0.9$ TeV and 7 TeV. Furthermore, the beam fragmentation which provides valuable input for tuning of MC models used to describe high energy hadronic interactions is also studied at the regions close to the beam rapidities.

  10. Energy harvesting through charged nanochannels using external flows of different salt concentrations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chanda, Sourayon; Tsai, Peichun Amy

    2016-11-01

    Renewable electricity may be generated by mixing of two solutions of different salt concentrations through charged nanochannels or pores, by leveraging ion-selective effect of the nano-confinements. We numerically investigate such a continuous power generation system using reverse electrodialysis (RED) with external flows. In the simulation model, two reservoirs are connected using a nanochannel of constant surface charge density. Solutions of high and low concentrations flow through the two reservoirs at a constant velocity. We examine the effects of (salt) concentration gradients and nanochannel dimensions on the power generation. Moreover, the effect of external flow velocity on the process is analyzed. Our results show that the maximum surface charge density, open circuit voltage, channel resistance, and energy conversion efficiency of the process are significantly affected by the difference of the high and low concentrations and the nanochannel dimension ratio.

  11. Differential Reynolds stress modeling for separating flows in industrial aerodynamics

    CERN Document Server

    2015-01-01

    This book presents recent progress in the application of RANS turbulence models based on the Reynolds stress transport equations. A variety of models has been implemented by different groups into different flow solvers and applied to external as well as to turbomachinery flows. Comparisons between the models allow an assessment of their performance in different flow conditions. The results demonstrate the general applicability of differential Reynolds stress models to separating flows in industrial aerodynamics.

  12. Consequence Reasoning in Multilevel Flow Modelling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Xinxin; Lind, Morten; Ravn, Ole

    2013-01-01

    Consequence reasoning is a major element for operation support system to assess the plant situations. The purpose of this paper is to elaborate how Multilevel Flow Models can be used to reason about consequences of disturbances in complex engineering systems. MFM is a modelling methodology...... for representing process knowledge for complex systems. It represents the system by using means-end and part-whole decompositions, and describes not only the purposes and functions of the system but also the causal relations between them. Thus MFM is a tool for causal reasoning. The paper introduces MFM modelling...... syntax and gives detailed reasoning formulas for consequence reasoning. The reasoning formulas offers basis for developing rule-based system to perform consequence reasoning based on MFM, which can be used for alarm design, risk monitoring, and supervision and operation support system design....

  13. Hybrid Energy System Modeling in Modelica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    William R. Binder; Christiaan J. J. Paredis; Humberto E. Garcia

    2014-03-01

    In this paper, a Hybrid Energy System (HES) configuration is modeled in Modelica. Hybrid Energy Systems (HES) have as their defining characteristic the use of one or more energy inputs, combined with the potential for multiple energy outputs. Compared to traditional energy systems, HES provide additional operational flexibility so that high variability in both energy production and consumption levels can be absorbed more effectively. This is particularly important when including renewable energy sources, whose output levels are inherently variable, determined by nature. The specific HES configuration modeled in this paper include two energy inputs: a nuclear plant, and a series of wind turbines. In addition, the system produces two energy outputs: electricity and synthetic fuel. The models are verified through simulations of the individual components, and the system as a whole. The simulations are performed for a range of component sizes, operating conditions, and control schemes.

  14. Fluxes and energy dissipation in thermal convection and shear flows

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eckhardt, B.; Grossmann, S.; Lohse, D.

    2007-01-01

    We expose analogies between turbulence in a fluid heated from below (Rayleigh-Bénard (RB) flow) and shear flows: The unifying theory for RB flow (see Grossmann S. and Lohse D., J. Fluid Mech., 407 (2000) 27 and subsequent refinements) can be extended to the flow between rotating cylinders (Taylor-Co

  15. Model documentation: Natural gas transmission and distribution model of the National Energy Modeling System. Volume 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-02-17

    The Natural Gas Transmission and Distribution Model (NGTDM) is the component of the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) that is used to represent the domestic natural gas transmission and distribution system. NEMS was developed in the Office of integrated Analysis and Forecasting of the Energy information Administration (EIA). NEMS is the third in a series of computer-based, midterm energy modeling systems used since 1974 by the EIA and its predecessor, the Federal Energy Administration, to analyze domestic energy-economy markets and develop projections. The NGTDM is the model within the NEMS that represents the transmission, distribution, and pricing of natural gas. The model also includes representations of the end-use demand for natural gas, the production of domestic natural gas, and the availability of natural gas traded on the international market based on information received from other NEMS models. The NGTDM determines the flow of natural gas in an aggregate, domestic pipeline network, connecting domestic and foreign supply regions with 12 demand regions. The methodology employed allows the analysis of impacts of regional capacity constraints in the interstate natural gas pipeline network and the identification of pipeline capacity expansion requirements. There is an explicit representation of core and noncore markets for natural gas transmission and distribution services, and the key components of pipeline tariffs are represented in a pricing algorithm. Natural gas pricing and flow patterns are derived by obtaining a market equilibrium across the three main elements of the natural gas market: the supply element, the demand element, and the transmission and distribution network that links them. The NGTDM consists of four modules: the Annual Flow Module, the Capacity F-expansion Module, the Pipeline Tariff Module, and the Distributor Tariff Module. A model abstract is provided in Appendix A.

  16. Differential flow of protons in Au+Au collisions at AGS energies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sahu, P.K. E-mail: pradip@iopb.res.in; Cassing, W

    2002-12-30

    We study the proton sideward and elliptic differential flow for Au+Au collisions at AGS energies (2-8 A GeV) in a microscopic relativistic transport model that includes all baryon resonances up to a mass of 2 GeV as well as string degrees of freedom for the higher hadronic excitations. In order to explore the sensitivity of the various differential flows to the nuclear equation of state (EoS) we use three different parameterizations of the scalar and vector mean-fields, i.e., NL2 (soft), NL23 (medium) and NL3 (hard), with their momentum dependence fitted to the experimental Schroedinger equivalent potential (at normal nuclear matter density {rho}{sub 0}) up to kinetic energies of 1 GeV. We calculate the excitation function of sideward and elliptic flow within these parameter sets for Au+Au collisions and compare with the recent data from the E895 Collaboration as a function of rapidity, impact parameter and transverse momentum, respectively. We find that the best description of the differential data is provided by a rather 'stiff' EoS at 2 A GeV (NL3) while at higher bombarding energies (4-8 A GeV) a 'medium' EoS leads to the lowest {chi}{sup 2} with respect to the data. However, the differences in the transverse and elliptic flows (from the different parameter sets) become of minor significance at 4-8 A GeV. We attribute this insensitivity to a similar reduction of the vector potential in all models and to the dominance of string degrees of freedom at these bombarding energies.

  17. A Bi-directional Energy Splitable Model for Energy Optimization in Wireless Sensor Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Rajeswari

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Wireless Sensor Networks is a budding  prototype of networking and computing, where a node may be self powered and individual node have the capability to sense and compute and communicate. Wireless Sensor Networks have been proposed for variety of applications such as Industrial control and monitoring and home automation and consumer electronics and security andMilitary sensing, Asset tracking and supply chain management, Intelligent Agriculture, Missile directing, Fire alarming, Landslide Warning, Environmental monitoring and health monitoring and commercial applications. In Wireless Sensor Network large number of nodes are deployed randomly. Depends on the network architecture the application may be personalized such as Energy Efficiency, Routing and Power Management and data dissemination. Energy Optimization involves in minimizing an energy expenditure and maximizing the lifetime of the complete network. In the proposed work, the placement of nodes are directly involved with residual energy. Energy Optimization in sensor network is very difficult task to achieve it. The optimization of energy is performed through Bidirectional Energy Splitable Model. The data flow in both forward and backward directions are considered, In order to achieve the best QOS in transmission, some parameters such as load, delay and direction of individual nodes are considered. A mathematical model is developed to determine the data flow of  individual node based on the residual energy.

  18. Emission and energy consumption characteristics of interrupted over-saturated flow for urban roads with heterogeneous traffic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hemant Kumar SHARMA

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Road transport is a major source of air pollution particularly in towns and cities. In urban areas road traffic accounts for more than half of the emissions of nitrogen oxides, carbon mono-oxide and volatile organic compounds. This paper presents emission and energy consumption characteristics of urban roads with interrupted oversaturated flow comprising of heterogeneous traffic. Model has been developed for heterogeneous traffic under constraints of roadway geometry, vehicle characteristics, driving behaviour and traffic controls and has been calibrated and validated for interrupted oversaturated traffic conditions. Interrupted oversaturated flow conditions prevail in urban areas of most of the developing countries. The model developed shall predict carbon mono- oxide (CO, nitrogen oxides (NOx, volatile organic compounds (VOC, carbon dioxide (CO2 and fuel and energy consumption estimates for urban roads operating under oversaturated conditions of flow. Since model provides improved estimates of speed, delay and congestion it provides better estimates of emissions and energy consumption.

  19. Energy Systems Modelling Research and Analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller Andersen, Frits; Alberg Østergaard, Poul

    2015-01-01

    This editorial introduces the seventh volume of the International Journal of Sustainable Energy Planning and Management. The volume presents part of the outcome of the project Energy Systems Modelling Research and Analysis (ENSYMORA) funded by the Danish Innovation Fund. The project carried out...... by 11 university and industry partners has improved the basis for decision-making within energy planning and energy scenario making by providing new and improved tools and methods for energy systems analyses....

  20. Modeling the turbulent kinetic energy equation for compressible, homogeneous turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aupoix, B.; Blaisdell, G. A.; Reynolds, William C.; Zeman, Otto

    1990-01-01

    The turbulent kinetic energy transport equation, which is the basis of turbulence models, is investigated for homogeneous, compressible turbulence using direct numerical simulations performed at CTR. It is shown that the partition between dilatational and solenoidal modes is very sensitive to initial conditions for isotropic decaying turbulence but not for sheared flows. The importance of the dilatational dissipation and of the pressure-dilatation term is evidenced from simulations and a transport equation is proposed to evaluate the pressure-dilatation term evolution. This transport equation seems to work well for sheared flows but does not account for initial condition sensitivity in isotropic decay. An improved model is proposed.

  1. Transition from in-plane to out-of-plane azimuthal enhancement in Au+Au collisions[25.75.Ld; 25.70.Pq; Nuclear reactions; E=90-400A MeV; Semicentral collisions; Flow angle; Azimuthal distributions; Transition energy; Quantum molecular dynamics model; Nuclear matter Equation of State

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andronic, A. E-mail: A.Andronic@gsi.de; Stoicea, G.; Petrovici, M.; Simion, V.; Crochet, P.; Alard, J.P.; Averbeck, R.; Barret, V.; Basrak, Z.; Bastid, N.; Bendarag, A.; Berek, G.; Caplar, R.; Devismes, A.; Dupieux, P.; Dzelalija, M.; Eskef, M.; Finck, Ch.; Fodor, Z.; Gobbi, A.; Grishkin, Y.; Hartmann, O.N.; Herrmann, N.; Hildenbrand, K.D.; Hong, B.; Kecskemeti, J.; Kim, Y.J.; Kirejczyk, M.; Korolija, M.; Kotte, R.; Kress, T.; Kutsche, R.; Lebedev, A.; Lee, K.S.; Leifels, Y.; Manko, V.; Merlitz, H.; Neubert, W.; Pelte, D.; Plettner, C.; Rami, F.; Reisdorf, W.; De Schauenburg, B.; Schuell, D.; Seres, Z.; Sikora, B.; Sim, K.S.; Siwek-Wilczynska, K.; Smolyankin, V.; Stockmeier, M.R.; Vasiliev, M.; Wagner, P.; Wisniewski, K.; Wohlfarth, D.; Yushmanov, I.; Zhilin, A

    2001-01-01

    The incident energy at which the azimuthal distributions in semicentral heavy-ion collisions change from in-plane to out-of-plane enhancement -- E{sub tran} is studied as a function of mass of emitted particles, their transverse momentum and centrality for Au+Au collisions. The analysis is performed in a reference frame rotated with the sidewards flow angle ({theta}{sub flow}) relative to the beam axis. A systematic decrease of E{sub tran} as function of mass of the reaction products, their transverse momentum and collision centrality is evidenced. The predictions of a microscopic transport model (IQMD) are compared with the experimental results.

  2. Chemistry Resolved Kinetic Flow Modeling of TATB Based Explosives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vitello, P A; Fried, L E; Howard, W M; Levesque, G; Souers, P C

    2011-07-21

    Detonation waves in insensitive, TATB based explosives are believed to have multi-time scale regimes. The initial burn rate of such explosives has a sub-microsecond time scale. However, significant late-time slow release in energy is believed to occur due to diffusion limited growth of carbon. In the intermediate time scale concentrations of product species likely change from being in equilibrium to being kinetic rate controlled. They use the thermo-chemical code CHEETAH linked to an ALE hydrodynamics code to model detonations. They term their model chemistry resolved kinetic flow as CHEETAH tracks the time dependent concentrations of individual species in the detonation wave and calculates EOS values based on the concentrations. A HE-validation suite of model simulations compared to experiments at ambient, hot, and cold temperatures has been developed. They present here a new rate model and comparison with experimental data.

  3. Model documentation: Natural Gas Transmission and Distribution Model of the National Energy Modeling System; Volume 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1994-02-24

    The Natural Gas Transmission and Distribution Model (NGTDM) is a component of the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) used to represent the domestic natural gas transmission and distribution system. NEMS is the third in a series of computer-based, midterm energy modeling systems used since 1974 by the Energy Information Administration (EIA) and its predecessor, the Federal Energy Administration, to analyze domestic energy-economy markets and develop projections. This report documents the archived version of NGTDM that was used to produce the natural gas forecasts used in support of the Annual Energy Outlook 1994, DOE/EIA-0383(94). The purpose of this report is to provide a reference document for model analysts, users, and the public that defines the objectives of the model, describes its basic design, provides detail on the methodology employed, and describes the model inputs, outputs, and key assumptions. It is intended to fulfill the legal obligation of the EIA to provide adequate documentation in support of its models (Public Law 94-385, Section 57.b.2). This report represents Volume 1 of a two-volume set. (Volume 2 will report on model performance, detailing convergence criteria and properties, results of sensitivity testing, comparison of model outputs with the literature and/or other model results, and major unresolved issues.) Subsequent chapters of this report provide: (1) an overview of the NGTDM (Chapter 2); (2) a description of the interface between the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) and the NGTDM (Chapter 3); (3) an overview of the solution methodology of the NGTDM (Chapter 4); (4) the solution methodology for the Annual Flow Module (Chapter 5); (5) the solution methodology for the Distributor Tariff Module (Chapter 6); (6) the solution methodology for the Capacity Expansion Module (Chapter 7); (7) the solution methodology for the Pipeline Tariff Module (Chapter 8); and (8) a description of model assumptions, inputs, and outputs (Chapter 9).

  4. A toy model for magnetized neutrino-dominated accretion flows

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    In this paper,we present a simplified model for a magnetized neutrino-dominated accretion flow(NDAF) in which the effect of black hole(BH) spin is taken into account by adopting a set of relativistic correction factors,and the magnetic field is parameterized as β,the ratio of the magnetic pressure to the total pressure.It is found that the disc properties are sensitive to the values of the BH spin and β,and more energy can be extracted from NDAFs by using a faster spin and lower β.

  5. Evaluation of bio-energy potential using world energy models; Sekai energy model ni yoru bio energy no potential hyoka

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fujino, J.; Yamaji, K. [The University of Tokyo, Tokyo (Japan); Yamamoto, H. [Central Research Institute of Electric Power Industry, Tokyo (Japan)

    1997-01-30

    Bio-energy potential is evaluated using world energy models. The world energy model is a dynamic model by which the total cost of energy systems between 1995 and 2055 can be minimized on the basis of the optimization type world energy demand and supply model. For the given utilization costs of transportation, recovery and planting, the utilization of bio-energy is promoted even under the cost minimization condition. However, the utilization amount varies in a wide range by changing the utilization costs. Among conversion technologies of bio-energy, it is biomass liquefaction that provides the largest utilization amount. Thermal demand, direct combustion for power generation, and biomass gasification follow to the above. Biomass-integrated gasifier/gas turbine (BIG/GT) is to be used up to 2020. It is not to be used after 2030, due to the complete shift to the biomass liquefaction. For a model including the utilization of fast breeder after 2030, the utilization amount of bio-energy is not to change. Competition with food and land utilization is to be investigated. 11 refs., 19 figs., 4 tabs.

  6. Evaluation of bio-energy potential using world energy models; Sekai energy model ni yoru bio energy no potential hyoka

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fujino, J.; Yamaji, K. [The University of Tokyo, Tokyo (Japan); Yamamoto, H. [Central Research Institute of Electric Power Industry, Tokyo (Japan)

    1997-01-30

    Bio-energy potential is evaluated using world energy models. The world energy model is a dynamic model by which the total cost of energy systems between 1995 and 2055 can be minimized on the basis of the optimization type world energy demand and supply model. For the given utilization costs of transportation, recovery and planting, the utilization of bio-energy is promoted even under the cost minimization condition. However, the utilization amount varies in a wide range by changing the utilization costs. Among conversion technologies of bio-energy, it is biomass liquefaction that provides the largest utilization amount. Thermal demand, direct combustion for power generation, and biomass gasification follow to the above. Biomass-integrated gasifier/gas turbine (BIG/GT) is to be used up to 2020. It is not to be used after 2030, due to the complete shift to the biomass liquefaction. For a model including the utilization of fast breeder after 2030, the utilization amount of bio-energy is not to change. Competition with food and land utilization is to be investigated. 11 refs., 19 figs., 4 tabs.

  7. Efficient Ionization Investigation for Flow Control and Energy Extraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Steven J.; Kamhawi, Hani; Blankson, Isaiah M.

    2009-01-01

    Nonequilibrium ionization of air by nonthermal means is explored for hypersonic vehicle applications. The method selected for evaluation generates a weakly ionized plasma using pulsed nanosecond, high-voltage discharges sustained by a lower dc voltage. These discharges promise to provide a means of energizing and sustaining electrons in the air while maintaining a nearly constant ion/neutral molecule temperature. This paper explores the use of short approx.5 nsec, high-voltage approx.12 to 22 kV, repetitive (40 to 100 kHz) discharges in generating a weakly ionized gas sustained by a 1 kV dc voltage in dry air at pressures from 10 to 80 torr. Demonstrated lifetimes of the sustainer discharge current approx.10 to 25 msec are over three orders of magnitude longer than the 5 nsec pulse that generates the electrons. This life is adequate for many high speed flows, enabling the possibility of exploiting weakly ionized plasma phenomena in flow-fields such as those in hypersonic inlets, combustors, and nozzles. Results to date are obtained in a volume of plasma between electrodes in a bell jar. The buildup and decay of the visible emission from the pulser excited air is photographed on an ICCD camera with nanosecond resolution and the time constants for visible emission decay are observed to be between 10 to 15 nsec decreasing as pressure increases. The application of the sustainer voltage does not change the visible emission decay time constant. Energy consumption as indicated by power output from the power supplies is 194 to 669 W depending on pulse repetition rate.

  8. Global flow of the Higgs potential in a Yukawa model

    CERN Document Server

    Borchardt, Julia; Sondenheimer, René

    2016-01-01

    We study the renormalization flow of the Higgs potential as a function of both field amplitude and energy scale. This overcomes limitations of conventional techniques that rely, e.g., on an identification of field amplitude and RG scale, or on local field expansions. Using a Higgs-Yukawa model with discrete chiral symmetry as an example, our global flows in field space clarify the origin of possible meta-stabilities, the fate of the pseudo-stable phase, and provide new information about the renormalization of the tunnel barrier. Our results confirm the relaxation of the lower bound for the Higgs mass in the presence of more general microscopic interactions (higher-dimensional operators) to a high quantitative accuracy.

  9. Constitutive model of discontinuous plastic flow at cryogenic temperatures

    CERN Document Server

    Skoczen, B; Bielski, J; Marcinek, D

    2010-01-01

    FCC metals and alloys are frequently used in cryogenic applications, nearly down to the temperature of absolute zero, because of their excellent physical and mechanical properties including ductility. Some of these materials, often characterized by the low stacking fault energy (LSFE), undergo at low temperatures three distinct phenomena: dynamic strain ageing (DSA), plastic strain induced transformation from the parent phase (gamma) to the secondary phase (alpha) and evolution of micro-damage. The constitutive model presented in the paper is focused on the discontinuous plastic flow (serrated yielding) and takes into account the relevant thermodynamic background. The discontinuous plastic flow reflecting the DSA effect is described by the mechanism of local catastrophic failure of Lomer-Cottrell (LC) locks under the stress fields related to the accumulating edge dislocations (below the transition temperature from the screw dislocations to the edge dislocations mode T-1). The failure of LC locks leads to mass...

  10. Modeling Experiment of Break of Debris-Flow Dam

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHENG Zunlan; GENG Xueyong; DANG Chao; LIU Jingjing

    2007-01-01

    Glaciers are extensively developed in the southwest of Tibet and the moraines are widely distributed with large depth. Large-scale debris flows are often reported which blocked rivers and formed dams. In this paper, seven large debris flows in four valleys are discussed, among which five dams developed. 13 sets of experiments have been conducted in laboratory to simulate the formation and failure of the dam. Finally, a model of dam failure is proposed and a formula is established to calculate the flood discharge:Q = kbhhk/T (B)/LG0.41, where bk is the outlet width of the dam atthe original water level, ht the erosive depth, T the time fromoverflow to final state of failure, the average width of lake; L thelength of the lake, and G the total potential energy of the water inthe lake.

  11. Global flow of the Higgs potential in a Yukawa model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borchardt, Julia [Friedrich-Schiller-Universitaet Jena, Theoretisch-Physikalisches Institut, Jena (Germany); Friedrich Schiller University Jena, Abbe Center of Photonics, Jena (Germany); Gies, Holger [Friedrich-Schiller-Universitaet Jena, Theoretisch-Physikalisches Institut, Jena (Germany); Friedrich Schiller University Jena, Abbe Center of Photonics, Jena (Germany); Helmholtz-Institut Jena, Jena (Germany); Sondenheimer, Rene [Friedrich-Schiller-Universitaet Jena, Theoretisch-Physikalisches Institut, Jena (Germany)

    2016-08-15

    We study the renormalization flow of the Higgs potential as a function of both field amplitude and energy scale. This overcomes limitations of conventional techniques that rely, e.g., on an identification of field amplitude and RG scale, or on local field expansions. Using a Higgs-Yukawa model with discrete chiral symmetry as an example, our global flows in field space clarify the origin of possible metastabilities, the fate of the pseudo-stable phase, and provide new information as regards the renormalization of the tunnel barrier. Our results confirm the relaxation of the lower bound for the Higgs mass in the presence of more general microscopic interactions (higher-dimensional operators) to a high quantitative accuracy. (orig.)

  12. A Dynamic Model for Energy Structure Analysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    Energy structure is a complicated system concerning economic development, natural resources, technological innovation, ecological balance, social progress and many other elements. It is not easy to explain clearly the developmental mechanism of an energy system and the mutual relations between the energy system and its related environments by the traditional methods. It is necessary to develop a suitable dynamic model, which can reflect the dynamic characteristics and the mutual relations of the energy system and its related environments. In this paper, the historical development of China's energy structure was analyzed. A new quantitative analysis model was developed based on system dynamics principles through analysis of energy resources, and the production and consumption of energy in China and comparison with the world. Finally, this model was used to predict China's future energy structures under different conditions.

  13. Analysis of the dynamic energy flow associated with phagocytosis of bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul Okpala

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper treats the phenomenon of phagocytosis from the flow of energy point of view. Considerable efforts have been made towards elucidating the subject of phagocytosis in other fields of learning, but little has been said about the mechanical work that is done during phagocytosis. Phagocytosis without doubt is an interaction that involves the flow of energy. Energy equation model of phagocytosis is then presented in this paper to analyze the mechanical energy that is involved in the build-up of the engulfment of bacteria by the phagocytes. Data of the E Coli bacteria from published work was then applied to the solution of the energy equation. A borderline contact angle ϑ of 77.356° between the phagocyte and the bacteria at χ=0 was deduced in this work. It was shown that when ϑ77.356°, χ>0, engulfment is not favoured for E-coli. This condition is conceptually in line with ΔFNET approach reported in the literature. Data of four different bacterial species were also used to plot the graphs of the engulfment parameter χ against contact angle ϑ which revealed that the more hydrophobic bacteria are easily phagocytized than the more hydrophilic ones.

  14. Analysis of atmospheric flow over a surface protrusion using the turbulence kinetic energy equation with reference to aeronautical operating systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frost, W.; Harper, W. L.

    1975-01-01

    Flow over surface obstructions can produce significantly large wind shears such that adverse flying conditions can occur for aeronautical systems (helicopters, STOL vehicles, etc.). Atmospheric flow fields resulting from a semi-elliptical surface obstruction in an otherwise horizontally homogeneous statistically stationary flow are modelled with the boundary-layer/Boussinesq-approximation of the governing equation of fluid mechanics. The turbulence kinetic energy equation is used to determine the dissipative effects of turbulent shear on the mean flow. Iso-lines of turbulence kinetic energy and turbulence intensity are plotted in the plane of the flow and highlight regions of high turbulence intensity in the stagnation zone and sharp gradients in intensity along the transition from adverse to favourable pressure gradient. Discussion of the effects of the disturbed wind field in CTOL and STOL aircraft flight path and obstruction clearance standards is given. The results indicate that closer inspection of these presently recommended standards as influenced by wind over irregular terrains is required.

  15. Energy Flows in the Jupiter-Io System

    CERN Document Server

    Liu, Siming

    2016-01-01

    With the laws of mass conservation, momentum conservation and energy conservation, incorporating the processes of neutral gas ionization and ion diffusion, we develop a self-consistent model for the bright ribbon --- the most prominent feature in Io's plasma torus. The model parameters are well constrained by earlier {\\it in situ} observations with the Galileo and Voyager spacescrafts. Our model calculation indicates that the total power dissipated inside the torus is 3.6 times bigger than the total power transported to Jovian ionosphere via Birkeland current. The power dissipation inside the torus is relatively uniform. Most of the power transportation associated with the Birkeland current, however, is localized near the flux tube of Io. With a height-intergrated conductivity of 0.15$\\,$mho in Jovian ionosphere, consistent with earlier aeronomy models, the model gives a reasonable fit to the recent observations of the FUV Io tail on Jupiter. Extra mass loading near Io is required in the model. This excess of...

  16. Moving Forward on Sustainable Energy Transitions: The Smart Rural Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesca Poggi

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Among the different aspects that promote Sustainable Development, energy is a critical concern to meet the needs of present and future generations in a global-scale and long-term vision. Going beyond the emergence of local responses such as “Nearly Zero-Energy Buildings” or “Smart Cities” models, a more comprehensive view on sustainable energy planning, which involves urban and rural areas as an energetically balanced whole, has to be promoted. Central to this approach is the concept of transition which urges to be conceived in a broader and incremental change of society as pleaded by Rob Hopkins in Transition Towns. Spatial planning is able to manage the complex relationships between environment, economy and society and can represent the driver to implement integrated approaches and adaptive strategies towards the transition from “the actual fossil fuels system” to “a future net zero fossil fuels system”. This paper presents how such questions are being addressed and developed within the field of the doctoral thesis entitled “Smart Rural: energy efficiency and renewable energies in rural areas”. The interdisciplinary research design flow and expected results that support the Smart Rural model are presented in order to debate the thesis statement : “Can an integrated planning process for energy efficiency and renewable energies in rural areas, support the “Net-Zero Energy” balance at the municipal scale?” Keywords: Sustainable energy; transition towns; smart rural; energy efficiency; renewable energies; energy balance.

  17. Directory of Energy Information Administration models 1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-07-01

    This directory revises and updates the Directory of Energy Information Administration Models 1995, DOE/EIA-0293(95), Energy Information Administration (EIA), U.S. Department of Energy, July 1995. Four models have been deleted in this directory as they are no longer being used: (1) Market Penetration Model for Ground-Water Heat Pump Systems (MPGWHP); (2) Market Penetration Model for Residential Rooftop PV Systems (MPRESPV-PC); (3) Market Penetration Model for Active and Passive Solar Technologies (MPSOLARPC); and (4) Revenue Requirements Modeling System (RRMS).

  18. Death Valley regional ground-water flow system, Nevada and California -- hydrogeologic framework and transient ground-water flow model

    Science.gov (United States)

    : Belcher, Wayne R.

    2004-01-01

    A numerical three-dimensional (3D) transient ground-water flow model of the Death Valley region was developed by the U.S. Geological Survey for the U.S. Department of Energy programs at the Nevada Test Site and at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. Decades of study of aspects of the ground-water flow system and previous less extensive ground-water flow models were incorporated and reevaluated together with new data to provide greater detail for the complex, digital model. A 3D digital hydrogeologic framework model (HFM) was developed from digital elevation models, geologic maps, borehole information, geologic and hydrogeologic cross sections, and other 3D models to represent the geometry of the hydrogeologic units (HGUs). Structural features, such as faults and fractures, that affect ground-water flow also were added. The HFM represents Precambrian and Paleozoic crystalline and sedimentary rocks, Mesozoic sedimentary rocks, Mesozoic to Cenozoic intrusive rocks, Cenozoic volcanic tuffs and lavas, and late Cenozoic sedimentary deposits of the Death Valley Regional Ground-Water Flow System (DVRFS) region in 27 HGUs. Information from a series of investigations was compiled to conceptualize and quantify hydrologic components of the ground-water flow system within the DVRFS model domain and to provide hydraulic-property and head-observation data used in the calibration of the transient-flow model. These studies reevaluated natural ground-water discharge occurring through evapotranspiration and spring flow; the history of ground-water pumping from 1913 through 1998; ground-water recharge simulated as net infiltration; model boundary inflows and outflows based on regional hydraulic gradients and water budgets of surrounding areas; hydraulic conductivity and its relation to depth; and water levels appropriate for regional simulation of prepumped and pumped conditions within the DVRFS model domain. Simulation results appropriate for the regional extent and scale of the model were

  19. Modeling the dynamic modulation of light energy in photosynthetic algae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papadakis, Ioannis A; Kotzabasis, Kiriakos; Lika, Konstadia

    2012-05-01

    An integrated cell-based dynamic mathematical model that take into account the role of the photon absorbing process, the partition of excitation energy, and the photoinactivation and repair of photosynthetic units, under variable light and dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) availability is proposed. The modeling of the photon energy absorption and the energy dissipation is based on the photoadaptive changes of the underlying mechanisms. The partition of the excitation energy is based on the relative availability of light and DIC to the cell. The modeling of the photoinactivation process is based on the common aspect that it occurs under any light intensity and the modeling of the repair process is based on the evidence that it is controlled by chloroplast and nuclear-encoded enzymes. The present model links the absorption of photons and the partitioning of excitation energy to the linear electron flow and other quenchers with chlorophyll fluorescence emission parameters, and the number of the functional photosynthetic units with the photosynthetic oxygen production rate. The energy allocation to the LEF increases as DIC availability increases and/or light intensity decreases. The rate of rejected energy increases with light intensity and with DIC availability. The resulting rate coefficient of photoinactivation increases as light intensity and/or as DIC concentration increases. We test the model against chlorophyll fluorescence induction and photosynthetic oxygen production rate measurements, obtained from cultures of the unicellular green alga Scenedesmus obliquus, and find a very close quantitative and qualitative correspondence between predictions and data.

  20. Progress in modeling of fluid flows in crystal growth processes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qisheng Chen; Yanni Jiang; Junyi Yan; Ming Qin

    2008-01-01

    Modeling of fluid flows in crystal growth processes has become an important research area in theoretical and applied mechanics.Most crystal growth processes involve fluid flows,such as flows in the melt,solution or vapor.Theoretical modeling has played an important role in developing technologies used for growing semiconductor crystals for high performance electronic and optoelectronic devices.The application of devices requires large diameter crystals with a high degree of crystallographic perfection,low defect density and uniform dopant distribution.In this article,the flow models developed in modeling of the crystal growth processes such as Czochralski,ammono-thermal and physical vapor transport methods are reviewed.In the Czochralski growth modeling,the flow models for thermocapillary flow,turbulent flow and MHD flow have been developed.In the ammonothermal growth modeling,the buoyancy and porous media flow models have been developed based on a single-domain and continuum approach for the composite fluid-porous layer systems.In the physical vapor transport growth modeling,the Stefan flow model has been proposed based on the flow-kinetics theory for the vapor growth.In addition,perspectives for future studies on crystal growth modeling are proposed.

  1. Constitutive model development for flows of granular materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chialvo, Sebastian

    Granular flows are ubiquitous in both natural and industrial processes. When com- posed of dry, noncohesive particles, they manifest three different flow regimes---commonly referred to as the quasistatic, inertial, and intermediate regimes---each of which exhibits its own dependences on solids volume fraction, shear rate, and particle-level properties. The differences in these regimes can be attributed to microscale phenomena, with quasistatic flows being dominated by enduring, frictional contacts between grains, inertial flows by grain collisions, and intermediate flows by a combination of the two. Existing constitutive models for the solids-phase stress tend to focus on one or two regimes at a time, with a limited degree of success; the same is true of models for wall-boundary conditions for granular flows. Moreover, these models tend not to be based on detailed particle-level flow data, either from experiment or simulation. Clearly, a comprehensive modeling framework is lacking. The work in this thesis aims to address these issues by proposing continuum models constructed on the basis of discrete element method (DEM) simulations of granular shear flows. Specifically, we propose (a) a constitutive stress model that bridges the three dense flow regimes, (b) an modified kinetic-theory model that covers both the dense and dilute ends of the inertial regime, and (c) a boundary-condition model for dense, wall-bounded flows. These models facilitate the modeling of a wide range of flow systems of practical interest and provide ideas for further model development and refinement.

  2. Numerical modeling of fluid flow with rafts: An application to lava flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsepelev, Igor; Ismail-Zadeh, Alik; Melnik, Oleg; Korotkii, Alexander

    2016-07-01

    Although volcanic lava flows do not significantly affect the life of people, its hazard is not negligible as hot lava kills vegetation, destroys infrastructure, and may trigger a flood due to melting of snow/ice. The lava flow hazard can be reduced if the flow patterns are known, and the complexity of the flow with debris is analyzed to assist in disaster risk mitigation. In this paper we develop three-dimensional numerical models of a gravitational flow of multi-phase fluid with rafts (mimicking rigid lava-crust fragments) on a horizontal and topographic surfaces to explore the dynamics and the interaction of lava flows. We have obtained various flow patterns and spatial distribution of rafts depending on conditions at the surface of fluid spreading, obstacles on the way of a fluid flow, raft landing scenarios, and the size of rafts. Furthermore, we analyze two numerical models related to specific lava flows: (i) a model of fluid flow with rafts inside an inclined channel, and (ii) a model of fluid flow from a single vent on an artificial topography, when the fluid density, its viscosity, and the effusion rate vary with time. Although the studied models do not account for lava solidification, crust formation, and its rupture, the results of the modeling may be used for understanding of flows with breccias before a significant lava cooling.

  3. Death Valley regional groundwater flow system, Nevada and California-Hydrogeologic framework and transient groundwater flow model

    Science.gov (United States)

    : Belcher, Wayne R.; Sweetkind, Donald S.

    2010-01-01

    A numerical three-dimensional (3D) transient groundwater flow model of the Death Valley region was developed by the U.S. Geological Survey for the U.S. Department of Energy programs at the Nevada Test Site and at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. Decades of study of aspects of the groundwater flow system and previous less extensive groundwater flow models were incorporated and reevaluated together with new data to provide greater detail for the complex, digital model. A 3D digital hydrogeologic framework model (HFM) was developed from digital elevation models, geologic maps, borehole information, geologic and hydrogeologic cross sections, and other 3D models to represent the geometry of the hydrogeologic units (HGUs). Structural features, such as faults and fractures, that affect groundwater flow also were added. The HFM represents Precambrian and Paleozoic crystalline and sedimentary rocks, Mesozoic sedimentary rocks, Mesozoic to Cenozoic intrusive rocks, Cenozoic volcanic tuffs and lavas, and late Cenozoic sedimentary deposits of the Death Valley regional groundwater flow system (DVRFS) region in 27 HGUs. Information from a series of investigations was compiled to conceptualize and quantify hydrologic components of the groundwater flow system within the DVRFS model domain and to provide hydraulic-property and head-observation data used in the calibration of the transient-flow model. These studies reevaluated natural groundwater discharge occurring through evapotranspiration (ET) and spring flow; the history of groundwater pumping from 1913 through 1998; groundwater recharge simulated as net infiltration; model boundary inflows and outflows based on regional hydraulic gradients and water budgets of surrounding areas; hydraulic conductivity and its relation to depth; and water levels appropriate for regional simulation of prepumped and pumped conditions within the DVRFS model domain. Simulation results appropriate for the regional extent and scale of the model were provided

  4. A semiparametric approach to physiological flow models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verotta, D; Sheiner, L B; Ebling, W F; Stanski, D R

    1989-08-01

    By regarding sampled tissues in a physiological model as linear subsystems, the usual advantages of flow models are preserved while mitigating two of their disadvantages, (i) the need for assumptions regarding intratissue kinetics, and (ii) the need to simultaneously fit data from several tissues. To apply the linear systems approach, both arterial blood and (interesting) tissue drug concentrations must be measured. The body is modeled as having an arterial compartment (A) distributing drug to different linear subsystems (tissues), connected in a specific way by blood flow. The response (CA, with dimensions of concentration) of A is measured. Tissues receive input from A (and optionally from other tissues), and send output to the outside or to other parts of the body. The response (CT, total amount of drug in the tissue (T) divided by the volume of T) from the T-th one, for example, of such tissues is also observed. From linear systems theory, CT can be expressed as the convolution of CA with a disposition function, F(t) (with dimensions 1/time). The function F(t) depends on the (unknown) structure of T, but has certain other constant properties: The integral integral infinity0 F(t) dt is the steady state ratio of CT to CA, and the point F(0) is the clearance rate of drug from A to T divided by the volume of T. A formula for the clearance rate of drug from T to outside T can be derived. To estimate F(t) empirically, and thus mitigate disadvantage (i), we suggest that, first, a nonparametric (or parametric) function be fitted to CA data yielding predicted values, CA, and, second, the convolution integral of CA with F(t) be fitted to CT data using a deconvolution method. By so doing, each tissue's data are analyzed separately, thus mitigating disadvantage (ii). A method for system simulation is also proposed. The results of applying the approach to simulated data and to real thiopental data are reported.

  5. Money versus Time: Evaluation of Flow Control in Terms of Energy Consumption and Convenience

    CERN Document Server

    Frohnapfel, Bettina; Quadrio, Maurizio

    2012-01-01

    Flow control with the goal of reducing the skin friction drag on the fluid-solid interface is an active fundamental research area, motivated by its potential for significant energy savings and reduced emissions in the transport sector. Customarily, the performance of drag reduction techniques in internal flows is evaluated under two alternative flow conditions, i.e. at constant mass flow rate or constant pressure gradient. Successful control leads to reduction of drag and pumping power within the former approach, whereas the latter leads to an increase of the mass flow rate and pumping power. In practical applications, however, money and time define the flow control challenge: a compromise between the energy expenditure (money) and the corresponding convenience (flow rate) achieved with that amount of energy has to be reached so as to accomplish a goal which in general depends on the specific application. Based on this idea, we derive two dimensionless parameters which quantify the total energy consumption an...

  6. Macroscopic momentum and mechanical energy equations for incompressible single-phase flow in porous media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paéz-García, Catherine Teresa; Valdés-Parada, Francisco J.; Lasseux, Didier

    2017-02-01

    Modeling flow in porous media is usually focused on the governing equations for mass and momentum transport, which yield the velocity and pressure at the pore or Darcy scales. However, in many applications, it is important to determine the work (or power) needed to induce flow in porous media, and this can be achieved when the mechanical energy equation is taken into account. At the macroscopic scale, this equation may be postulated to be the result of the inner product of Darcy's law and the seepage velocity. However, near the porous medium boundaries, this postulate seems questionable due to the spatial variations of the effective properties (velocity, permeability, porosity, etc.). In this work we derive the macroscopic mechanical energy equation using the method of volume averaging for the simple case of incompressible single-phase flow in porous media. Our analysis shows that the result of averaging the pore-scale version of the mechanical energy equation at the Darcy scale is not, in general, the expected product of Darcy's law and the seepage velocity. As a matter of fact, this result is only applicable in the bulk region of the porous medium and, in the derivation of this result, the properties of the permeability tensor are determinant. Furthermore, near the porous medium boundaries, a more novel version of the mechanical energy equation is obtained, which incorporates additional terms that take into account the rapid variations of structural properties taking place in this particular portion of the system. This analysis can be applied to multiphase and compressible flows in porous media and in many other multiscale systems.

  7. Modeling Fluid Flow in Faulted Basins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Faille I.

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a basin simulator designed to better take faults into account, either as conduits or as barriers to fluid flow. It computes hydrocarbon generation, fluid flow and heat transfer on the 4D (space and time geometry obtained by 3D volume restoration. Contrary to classical basin simulators, this calculator does not require a structured mesh based on vertical pillars nor a multi-block structure associated to the fault network. The mesh follows the sediments during the evolution of the basin. It deforms continuously with respect to time to account for sedimentation, erosion, compaction and kinematic displacements. The simulation domain is structured in layers, in order to handle properly the corresponding heterogeneities and to follow the sedimentation processes (thickening of the layers. In each layer, the mesh is unstructured: it may include several types of cells such as tetrahedra, hexahedra, pyramid, prism, etc. However, a mesh composed mainly of hexahedra is preferred as they are well suited to the layered structure of the basin. Faults are handled as internal boundaries across which the mesh is non-matching. Different models are proposed for fault behavior such as impervious fault, flow across fault or conductive fault. The calculator is based on a cell centered Finite Volume discretisation, which ensures conservation of physical quantities (mass of fluid, heat at a discrete level and which accounts properly for heterogeneities. The numerical scheme handles the non matching meshes and guaranties appropriate connection of cells across faults. Results on a synthetic basin demonstrate the capabilities of this new simulator.

  8. Directory of Energy Information Administration Models 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-07-01

    This directory revises and updates the 1993 directory and includes 15 models of the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS). Three other new models in use by the Energy Information Administration (EIA) have also been included: the Motor Gasoline Market Model (MGMM), Distillate Market Model (DMM), and the Propane Market Model (PPMM). This directory contains descriptions about each model, including title, acronym, purpose, followed by more detailed information on characteristics, uses and requirements. Sources for additional information are identified. Included in this directory are 37 EIA models active as of February 1, 1994.

  9. Power Systems and Energy Storage Modeling for Directed Energy Weapons

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-06-01

    electron laser kW Kilo-watt LCS Littoral Combat Ship LAWS Laser Weapon System MLD Maritime Laser Demonstration MW Mega -watt NiMH Nickel metal...and various littoral combat ships. Also, an accurate, working model of the capacitor energy bank is being developed and the flywheel model is being

  10. A New Equation Solver for Modeling Turbulent Flow in Coupled Matrix-Conduit Flow Models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hubinger, Bernhard; Birk, Steffen; Hergarten, Stefan

    2016-07-01

    Karst aquifers represent dual flow systems consisting of a highly conductive conduit system embedded in a less permeable rock matrix. Hybrid models iteratively coupling both flow systems generally consume much time, especially because of the nonlinearity of turbulent conduit flow. To reduce calculation times compared to those of existing approaches, a new iterative equation solver for the conduit system is developed based on an approximated Newton-Raphson expression and a Gauß-Seidel or successive over-relaxation scheme with a single iteration step at the innermost level. It is implemented and tested in the research code CAVE but should be easily adaptable to similar models such as the Conduit Flow Process for MODFLOW-2005. It substantially reduces the computational effort as demonstrated by steady-state benchmark scenarios as well as by transient karst genesis simulations. Water balance errors are found to be acceptable in most of the test cases. However, the performance and accuracy may deteriorate under unfavorable conditions such as sudden, strong changes of the flow field at some stages of the karst genesis simulations.

  11. Developing a model system for simulation of changes induced by more effective circular flow concepts in industry and energy management. Systems technology and economic modelling aspects shown with the example of the materials flow in the paper industry; Entwicklung eines Modellsystems zur Simulation der energiewirtschaftlichen und strukturellen Veraenderungen einer verstaerkten Kreislaufwirtschaft. Systemtechnische und oekonomische Modellierung am Beispiel des Stoffstroms 'Papier'

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nathani, C.

    2000-02-01

    The impacts of a long-term change from our present industrial society to an economy based on circular flow concepts approaching the characteristics of the concept of sustainable development have to be taken into account in macroeconomic modelling as well, or else there is no appropriate basis for examination and assessment of the effects of various resource management policy options on the economy. One possible methodological approach is to link single, process-oriented models of sectors of the industry with input-output models and macroeconomic models. This study presents an approach using as an example the pulp and paper industry of Germany, covering the period from 1995 until 2020. The results are found to improve the methodological perspective between the process models and the MIS model of the family of IKARUS models and also offer an additional advantage in that they may serve as a data source for other input-output models and macroeconomic modelling. (orig./CB) [German] Diese Einfluesse eines langfristigen Wandels von einer heutigen Industriegesellschaft zu einer Kreislaufwirtschaft mit Merkmalen einer nachhaltigen Entwicklung muessen sich auch in den Strukturen makrooekonomischer Modelle wiederfinden, um die Auswirkungen verschiedener ressourcenpolitischer Optionen auf die Wirtschaft angemessen pruefen zu koennen. Ein methodischer Weg zu dieser Aufgabe ist die Verknuepfung einzelner prozessorientierter Branchenmodelle mit Input-Output-Modellen und makrooekonomischen Modellen. Der vorliegende Bericht will hierzu einen Baustein am Beispiel der Zellstoff- und Papierindustrie fuer die Bundesrepublik Deutschland fuer die Zeitperiode 1995-2020 beitragen. Diese Ergebnisse verbessern nicht nur die methodische Perspektive zwischen den Prozessmodellen und dem MIS-Modell der IKARUS-Modellfamilie, sondern koennen als Erfahrungs- und Datenquelle fuer andere Input-Output-Modelle und makrooekonomische Modelle genutzt werden. (orig.)

  12. Phase field modeling and simulation of three-phase flow on solid surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qian; Wang, Xiao-Ping

    2016-08-01

    Phase field models are widely used to describe the two-phase system. The evolution of the phase field variables is usually driven by the gradient flow of a total free energy functional. The generalization of the approach to an N phase (N ≥ 3) system requires some extra consistency conditions on the free energy functional in order for the model to give physically relevant results. A projection approach is proposed for the derivation of a consistent free energy functional for the three-phase Cahn-Hilliard equations. The system is then coupled with the Navier-Stokes equations to describe the three-phase flow on solid surfaces with moving contact line. An energy stable scheme is developed for the three-phase flow system. The discrete energy law of the numerical scheme is proved which ensures the stability of the scheme. We also show some numerical results for the dynamics of triple junctions and four phase contact lines.

  13. Numerical investigation on cavitation flow of hydrofoil and its flow noise with emphasis on turbulence models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanghyeon Kim

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available In this study, cavitation flow of hydrofoils is numerically investigated to characterize the effects of turbulence models on cavitation-flow patterns and the corresponding radiated sound waves. The two distinct flow conditions are considered by varying the mean flow velocity and angle of attack, which are categorized under the experimentally observed unstable or stable cavitation flows. To consider the phase interchanges between the vapor and the liquid, the flow fields around the hydrofoil are analyzed by solving the unsteady compressible Reynolds-averaged Navier–Stokes equations coupled with a mass-transfer model, also referred to as the cavitation model. In the numerical solver, a preconditioning algorithm with dual-time stepping techniques is employed in generalized curvilinear coordinates. The following three types of turbulence models are employed: the laminar-flow model, standard k − ε turbulent model, and filter-based model. Hydro-acoustic field formed by the cavitation flow of the hydrofoil is predicted by applying the Ffowcs Williams and Hawkings equation to the predicted flow field. From the predicted results, the effects of the turbulences on the cavitation flow pattern and radiated flow noise are quantitatively assessed in terms of the void fraction, sound-pressure-propagation directivities, and spectrum.

  14. Numerical investigation on cavitation flow of hydrofoil and its flow noise with emphasis on turbulence models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sanghyeon; Cheong, Cheolung; Park, Warn-Gyu

    2017-06-01

    In this study, cavitation flow of hydrofoils is numerically investigated to characterize the effects of turbulence models on cavitation-flow patterns and the corresponding radiated sound waves. The two distinct flow conditions are considered by varying the mean flow velocity and angle of attack, which are categorized under the experimentally observed unstable or stable cavitation flows. To consider the phase interchanges between the vapor and the liquid, the flow fields around the hydrofoil are analyzed by solving the unsteady compressible Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes equations coupled with a mass-transfer model, also referred to as the cavitation model. In the numerical solver, a preconditioning algorithm with dual-time stepping techniques is employed in generalized curvilinear coordinates. The following three types of turbulence models are employed: the laminar-flow model, standard k - ɛ turbulent model, and filter-based model. Hydro-acoustic field formed by the cavitation flow of the hydrofoil is predicted by applying the Ffowcs Williams and Hawkings equation to the predicted flow field. From the predicted results, the effects of the turbulences on the cavitation flow pattern and radiated flow noise are quantitatively assessed in terms of the void fraction, sound-pressure-propagation directivities, and spectrum.

  15. Studies on modelling of bubble driven flows in chemical reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grevskott, Sverre

    1997-12-31

    Multiphase reactors are widely used in the process industry, especially in the petrochemical industry. They very often are characterized by very good thermal control and high heat transfer coefficients against heating and cooling surfaces. This thesis first reviews recent advances in bubble column modelling, focusing on the fundamental flow equations, drag forces, transversal forces and added mass forces. The mathematical equations for the bubble column reactor are developed, using an Eulerian description for the continuous and dispersed phase in tensor notation. Conservation equations for mass, momentum, energy and chemical species are given, and the k-{epsilon} and Rice-Geary models for turbulence are described. The different algebraic solvers used in the model are described, as are relaxation procedures. Simulation results are presented and compared with experimental values. Attention is focused on the modelling of void fractions and gas velocities in the column. The energy conservation equation has been included in the bubble column model in order to model temperature distributions in a heated reactor. The conservation equation of chemical species has been included to simulate absorption of CO{sub 2}. Simulated axial and radial mass fraction profiles for CO{sub 2} in the gas phase are compared with measured values. Simulations of the dynamic behaviour of the column are also presented. 189 refs., 124 figs., 1 tab.

  16. World energy projection system: Model documentation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-06-01

    The World Energy Project System (WEPS) is an accounting framework that incorporates projects from independently documented models and assumptions about the future energy intensity of economic activity (ratios of total energy consumption divided by gross domestic product) and about the rate of incremental energy requirements met by hydropower, geothermal, coal, and natural gas to produce projections of world energy consumption published annually by the Energy Information Administration (EIA) in the International Energy Outlook (IEO) (Figure 1). Two independently documented models presented in Figure 1, the Oil Market Simulation (OMS) model and the World Integrated Nuclear Evaluation System (WINES) provide projections of oil and nuclear power consumption published in the IEO. Output from a third independently documented model, and the International Coal Trade Model (ICTM), is not published in the IEO but is used in WEPS as a supply check on projections of world coal consumption produced by WEPS and published in the IEO. A WEPS model of natural gas production documented in this report provides the same type of implicit supply check on the WEPS projections of world natural gas consumption published in the IEO. Two additional models are included in Figure 1, the OPEC Capacity model and the Non-OPEC Oil Production model. These WEPS models provide inputs to the OMS model and are documented in this report.

  17. G-corrected holographic dark energy model

    CERN Document Server

    Malekjani, M

    2013-01-01

    Here we investigate the holographic dark energy model in the framework of FRW cosmology where the Newtonian gravitational constant,$G$, is varying with cosmic time. Using the complementary astronomical data which support the time dependency of $G$, the evolutionary treatment of EoS parameter and energy density of dark energy model are calculated in the presence of time variation of $G$. It has been shown that in this case, the phantom regime can be achieved at the present time. We also calculate the evolution of $G$- corrected deceleration parameter for holographic dark energy model and show that the dependency of $G$ on the comic time can influence on the transition epoch from decelerated expansion to the accelerated phase. Finally we perform the statefinder analysis for $G$- corrected holographic model and show that this model has a shorter distance from the observational point in $s-r$ plane compare with original holographic dark energy model.

  18. Discrete Element Modeling of Complex Granular Flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Movshovitz, N.; Asphaug, E. I.

    2010-12-01

    Granular materials occur almost everywhere in nature, and are actively studied in many fields of research, from food industry to planetary science. One approach to the study of granular media, the continuum approach, attempts to find a constitutive law that determines the material's flow, or strain, under applied stress. The main difficulty with this approach is that granular systems exhibit different behavior under different conditions, behaving at times as an elastic solid (e.g. pile of sand), at times as a viscous fluid (e.g. when poured), or even as a gas (e.g. when shaken). Even if all these physics are accounted for, numerical implementation is made difficult by the wide and often discontinuous ranges in continuum density and sound speed. A different approach is Discrete Element Modeling (DEM). Here the goal is to directly model every grain in the system as a rigid body subject to various body and surface forces. The advantage of this method is that it treats all of the above regimes in the same way, and can easily deal with a system moving back and forth between regimes. But as a granular system typically contains a multitude of individual grains, the direct integration of the system can be very computationally expensive. For this reason most DEM codes are limited to spherical grains of uniform size. However, spherical grains often cannot replicate the behavior of real world granular systems. A simple pile of spherical grains, for example, relies on static friction alone to keep its shape, while in reality a pile of irregular grains can maintain a much steeper angle by interlocking force chains. In the present study we employ a commercial DEM, nVidia's PhysX Engine, originally designed for the game and animation industry, to simulate complex granular flows with irregular, non-spherical grains. This engine runs as a multi threaded process and can be GPU accelerated. We demonstrate the code's ability to physically model granular materials in the three regimes

  19. Flow under standing waves Part 1. Shear stress distribution, energy flux and steady streaming

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gislason, Kjartan; Fredsøe, Jørgen; Deigaard, Rolf

    2009-01-01

    The conditions for energy flux, momentum flux and the resulting streaming velocity are analysed for standing waves formed in front of a fully reflecting wall. The exchange of energy between the outer wave motion and the near bed oscillatory boundary layer is considered, determining the horizontal...... energy flux inside and outside the boundary layer. The momentum balance, the mean shear stress and the resulting time averaged streaming velocities are determined. For a laminar bed boundary layer the analysis of the wave drift gives results similar to the original work of Longuet-Higgins from 1953....... The work is extended to turbulent bed boundary layers by application of a numerical model. The similarities and differences between laminar and turbulent flow conditions are discussed, and quantitative results for the magnitude of the mean shear stress and drift velocity are presented. Full two...

  20. Modeling of renewable hybrid energy sources

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dumitru Cristian Dragos

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Recent developments and trends in the electric power consumption indicate an increasing use of renewable energy. Renewable energy technologies offer the promise of clean, abundant energy gathered from self-renewing resources such as the sun, wind, earth and plants. Virtually all regions of the world have renewable resources of one type or another. By this point of view studies on renewable energies focuses more and more attention. The present paper intends to present different mathematical models related to different types of renewable energy sources such as: solar energy and wind energy. It is also presented the validation and adaptation of such models to hybrid systems working in geographical and meteorological conditions specific to central part of Transylvania region. The conclusions based on validation of such models are also shown.

  1. Statefinder parameters in two dark energy models

    CERN Document Server

    Panotopoulos, Grigoris

    2007-01-01

    The statefinder parameters ($r,s$) in two dark energy models are studied. In the first, we discuss in four-dimensional General Relativity a two fluid model, in which dark energy and dark matter are allowed to interact with each other. In the second model, we consider the DGP brane model generalized by taking a possible energy exchange between the brane and the bulk into account. We determine the values of the statefinder parameters that correspond to the unique attractor of the system at hand. Furthermore, we produce plots in which we show $s,r$ as functions of red-shift, and the ($s-r$) plane for each model.

  2. Modelling cavitating flow around underwater missiles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabien Petitpas

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The diffuse interface model of Saurel et al. (2008 is used for the computation of compressible cavitating flows around underwater missiles. Such systems use gas injection and natural cavitation to reduce drag effects. Consequently material interfaces appear separating liquid and gas. These interfaces may have a really complex dynamics such that only a few formulations are able to predict their evolution. Contrarily to front tracking or interface reconstruction method the interfaces are computed as diffused numerical zones, that are captured in a routinely manner, as is done usually with gas dynamics solvers for shocks and contact discontinuity. With the present approach, a single set of partial differential equations is solved everywhere, with a single numerical scheme. This leads to very efficient solvers. The algorithm derived in Saurel et al. (2009 is used to compute cavitation pockets around solid bodies. It is first validated against experiments done in cavitation tunnel at CNU. Then it is used to compute flows around high speed underwater systems (Shkval-like missile. Performance data are then computed showing method ability to predict forces acting on the system.

  3. Stratified flows with variable density: mathematical modelling and numerical challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murillo, Javier; Navas-Montilla, Adrian

    2017-04-01

    Stratified flows appear in a wide variety of fundamental problems in hydrological and geophysical sciences. They may involve from hyperconcentrated floods carrying sediment causing collapse, landslides and debris flows, to suspended material in turbidity currents where turbulence is a key process. Also, in stratified flows variable horizontal density is present. Depending on the case, density varies according to the volumetric concentration of different components or species that can represent transported or suspended materials or soluble substances. Multilayer approaches based on the shallow water equations provide suitable models but are not free from difficulties when moving to the numerical resolution of the governing equations. Considering the variety of temporal and spatial scales, transfer of mass and energy among layers may strongly differ from one case to another. As a consequence, in order to provide accurate solutions, very high order methods of proved quality are demanded. Under these complex scenarios it is necessary to observe that the numerical solution provides the expected order of accuracy but also converges to the physically based solution, which is not an easy task. To this purpose, this work will focus in the use of Energy balanced augmented solvers, in particular, the Augmented Roe Flux ADER scheme. References: J. Murillo , P. García-Navarro, Wave Riemann description of friction terms in unsteady shallow flows: Application to water and mud/debris floods. J. Comput. Phys. 231 (2012) 1963-2001. J. Murillo B. Latorre, P. García-Navarro. A Riemann solver for unsteady computation of 2D shallow flows with variable density. J. Comput. Phys.231 (2012) 4775-4807. A. Navas-Montilla, J. Murillo, Energy balanced numerical schemes with very high order. The Augmented Roe Flux ADER scheme. Application to the shallow water equations, J. Comput. Phys. 290 (2015) 188-218. A. Navas-Montilla, J. Murillo, Asymptotically and exactly energy balanced augmented flux

  4. Resource efficiency of urban sanitation systems. A comparative assessment using material and energy flow analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meinzinger, Franziska

    2010-07-01

    Within the framework of sustainable development it is important to find ways of reducing natural resource consumption and to change towards closed-loop management. As in many other spheres increased resource efficiency has also become an important issue in sanitation. Particularly nutrient recovery for agriculture, increased energy-efficiency and saving of natural water resources, can make a contribution to more resource efficient sanitation systems. To assess the resource efficiency of alternative developments a systems perspective is required. The present study applies a combined cost, energy and material flow analysis (ceMFA) as a system analysis method to assess the resource efficiency of urban sanitation systems. This includes the discussion of relevant criteria and assessment methods. The main focus of this thesis is the comparative assessment of different systems, based on two case studies; Hamburg in Germany and Arba Minch in Ethiopia. A range of possible system developments including source separation (e.g. diversion of urine or blackwater) is defined and compared with the current situation as a reference system. The assessment is carried out using computer simulations based on model equations. The model equations not only integrate mass and nutrient flows, but also the energy and cost balances of the different systems. In order to assess the impact of different assumptions and calculation parameters, sensitivity analyses and parameter variations complete the calculations. Based on the simulations, following general conclusions can be drawn: None of the systems show an overall benefit with regard to all investigated criteria, namely nutrients, energy, water and costs. Yet, the results of the system analysis can be used as basis for decision making if a case-related weighting is introduced. The systems show varying potential for the recovery of nutrients from (source separated) wastewater flows. For the case study of Hamburg up to 29% of the mineral

  5. Relationships among the Energy, Emergy and Money Flows of the United States from 1900 to 2011

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Elliott Campbell

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Energy Systems Language models of the resource base for the U.S. economy and of economic exchange were used, respectively, (1 to show how energy consumption and emergy use contribute to real and nominal GDP and (2 to propose a model of coupled flows that explains high correlations of these inputs with measures of market-based economic activity. We examined a 3rd power law model of growth supported by excess resources and found evidence that it has governed U.S. economic growth since 1900, i.e., nominal GDP was best explained by a power function of total emergy use with exponent 2.8. We used a weight of evidence approach to identify relationships among emergy, energy, and money flows in the U.S. from 1900 to 2011. All measures of quality adjusted energy consumption had a relationship with nominal GDP that was best described by a hyperbolic function plus a constant and the relationship between all measures of energy consumption and real GDP was best described by a 2nd order polynomial. The fact that energy consumption per unit of real GDP declined after 1996 as real GDP continued to increase indicates that energy conservation or a shift toward less energy intensive industries has resulted in lower fossil fuel use and reduced CO2 emissions, while maintaining growth in real GDP. Since all energy consumption measures vs. real GDP deviated from a power law relationship after 1996; whereas, total emergy use did not, we concluded that total emergy use captured more of the factors responsible for the increase in real GDP than did energy measures alone, and as a result, total emergy use may be the best measure to quantify the biophysical basis for social and economic activity in the information age. The Emergy to Money Ratio measured as solar emjoules per nominal $ followed a decreasing trend from a high of 1.01E+14 semj/$ in 1902 to 1.56E+12 semj/$ in 2011 with fluctuations in its value corresponding to major periods of inflation and deflation over this

  6. A New Model to Simulate Energy Performance of VRF Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hong, Tianzhen; Pang, Xiufeng; Schetrit, Oren; Wang, Liping; Kasahara, Shinichi; Yura, Yoshinori; Hinokuma, Ryohei

    2014-03-30

    This paper presents a new model to simulate energy performance of variable refrigerant flow (VRF) systems in heat pump operation mode (either cooling or heating is provided but not simultaneously). The main improvement of the new model is the introduction of the evaporating and condensing temperature in the indoor and outdoor unit capacity modifier functions. The independent variables in the capacity modifier functions of the existing VRF model in EnergyPlus are mainly room wet-bulb temperature and outdoor dry-bulb temperature in cooling mode and room dry-bulb temperature and outdoor wet-bulb temperature in heating mode. The new approach allows compliance with different specifications of each indoor unit so that the modeling accuracy is improved. The new VRF model was implemented in a custom version of EnergyPlus 7.2. This paper first describes the algorithm for the new VRF model, which is then used to simulate the energy performance of a VRF system in a Prototype House in California that complies with the requirements of Title 24 ? the California Building Energy Efficiency Standards. The VRF system performance is then compared with three other types of HVAC systems: the Title 24-2005 Baseline system, the traditional High Efficiency system, and the EnergyStar Heat Pump system in three typical California climates: Sunnyvale, Pasadena and Fresno. Calculated energy savings from the VRF systems are significant. The HVAC site energy savings range from 51 to 85percent, while the TDV (Time Dependent Valuation) energy savings range from 31 to 66percent compared to the Title 24 Baseline Systems across the three climates. The largest energy savings are in Fresno climate followed by Sunnyvale and Pasadena. The paper discusses various characteristics of the VRF systems contributing to the energy savings. It should be noted that these savings are calculated using the Title 24 prototype House D under standard operating conditions. Actual performance of the VRF systems for real

  7. System Modeling for Ammonia Synthesis Energy Recovery System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bran Anleu, Gabriela; Kavehpour, Pirouz; Lavine, Adrienne; Ammonia thermochemical Energy Storage Team

    2015-11-01

    An ammonia thermochemical energy storage system is an alternative solution to the state-of-the-art molten salt TES system for concentrating solar power. Some of the advantages of this emerging technology include its high energy density, no heat losses during the storage duration, and the possibility of long storage periods. Solar energy powers an endothermic reaction to disassociate ammonia into hydrogen and nitrogen, which can be stored for future use. The reverse reaction is carried out in the energy recovery process; a hydrogen-nitrogen mixture flowing through a catalyst bed undergoes the exothermic ammonia synthesis reaction. The goal is to use the ammonia synthesis reaction to heat supercritical steam to temperatures on the order of 650°C as required for a supercritical steam Rankine cycle. The steam will flow through channels in a combined reactor-heat exchanger. A numerical model has been developed to determine the optimal design to heat supercritical steam while maintaining a stable exothermic reaction. The model consists of a transient one dimensional concentric tube counter-flow reactor-heat exchanger. The numerical model determines the inlet mixture conditions needed to achieve various steam outlet conditions.

  8. Energy and momentum flow in electromagnetic fields and plasma. [solar wind-magnetospheric interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parish, J. L.; Raitt, W. J.

    1983-01-01

    The energy momentum tensor for a perfect fluid in a magnetic field is used to predict the momentum density, energy density, momentum flow, and energy flow of the fluid and the electromagnetic field. It is shown that taking the momentum flow from the energy momentum tensor, rather than starting with differential magnetohydrodynamic equations, can produce more accurate results on the basis of magnetic field data. It is suggested that the use of the energy momentum tensor has the potential for application to analysis of data from the more dynamic regions of the solar system, such as the plasma boundaries of Venus, the Jovian ionosphere, and the terrestrial magnetopause.

  9. Energy flow between litter of Puccinellia tenuiflora community and soil microorganisms in Songnen Grassland in Northeast China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    The energy flow process between litter of Puccinellia tenuiflora community and soil microorganisms has been studied and a compartment model established to discuss the characteristics and function of microorganism during decomposing litter. The results show that during the process of energy flow through microorganism, the energy input is 1357.84 kJ@ m-2@a-1; the energy absorbed by microorganism is 733.97 kJ@ m-2@ a-1, in which up to 552. 29 kJ@m 2. a-1 energy is consumed for respiration and the energy about 181.23 kJ@ m-2@ a-1 is formed for microorganism biomass. 95 % of the litter accumulated on the ground annually would be decomposed in 1.85 years and the decomposition index is 1.93. The mathematical model of the energy x 1 ( t ) absorbed by microorganism of the year was described as x1(t) = 733.97 - 0.82e 1.85t and the model of the energy x2(t) formed for microorganism biomass of the year is expressed as x2 (t) = 181.23 - 0.37e-1.85t + 0.005e- 4.0st. The equilibrium state of the energy absorbed by microorganism is 733.97 kJ@m-2@a-1 and the equilibrium state of the energy formed for microorganism biomass is 181.23 kJ@m-2@a-1.

  10. A new gravitational model for dark energy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HUANG Chao-Guang; ZHANG Hai-Qing; GUO Han-Ying

    2008-01-01

    A new gravitational model for dark energy is presented based on the model of de Sitter gauge theory of gravity.In the model,in addition to the cosmological constant,the homogeneous and isotropic torsion and its coupling with curvature play an important role for dark energy.The model may supply the universe with a natural transit from decelerating expansion to accelerating expansion.

  11. Gas-kinetic unified algorithm for hypersonic flows covering various flow regimes solving Boltzmann model equation in nonequilibrium effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhihui; Wu, Junlin; Ma, Qiang; Jiang, Xinyu; Zhang, Hanxin

    2014-12-01

    Based on the Gas-Kinetic Unified Algorithm (GKUA) directly solving the Boltzmann model equation, the effect of rotational non-equilibrium is investigated recurring to the kinetic Rykov model with relaxation property of rotational degrees of freedom. The spin movement of diatomic molecule is described by moment of inertia, and the conservation of total angle momentum is taken as a new Boltzmann collision invariant. The molecular velocity distribution function is integrated by the weight factor on the internal energy, and the closed system of two kinetic controlling equations is obtained with inelastic and elastic collisions. The optimization selection technique of discrete velocity ordinate points and numerical quadrature rules for macroscopic flow variables with dynamic updating evolvement are developed to simulate hypersonic flows, and the gas-kinetic numerical scheme is constructed to capture the time evolution of the discretized velocity distribution functions. The gas-kinetic boundary conditions in thermodynamic non-equilibrium and numerical procedures are studied and implemented by directly acting on the velocity distribution function, and then the unified algorithm of Boltzmann model equation involving non-equilibrium effect is presented for the whole range of flow regimes. The hypersonic flows involving non-equilibrium effect are numerically simulated including the inner flows of shock wave structures in nitrogen with different Mach numbers of 1.5-Ma-25, the planar ramp flow with the whole range of Knudsen numbers of 0.0009-Kn-10 and the three-dimensional re-entering flows around tine double-cone body.

  12. Gas-kinetic unified algorithm for hypersonic flows covering various flow regimes solving Boltzmann model equation in nonequilibrium effect

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Zhihui; Ma, Qiang [Hypervelocity Aerodynamics Institute, China Aerodynamics Research and Development Center, P.O.Box 211, Mianyang 621000, China and National Laboratory for Computational Fluid Dynamics, No.37 Xueyuan Road, Beijing 100191 (China); Wu, Junlin; Jiang, Xinyu [Hypervelocity Aerodynamics Institute, China Aerodynamics Research and Development Center, P.O.Box 211, Mianyang 621000 (China); Zhang, Hanxin [National Laboratory for Computational Fluid Dynamics, No.37 Xueyuan Road, Beijing 100191 (China)

    2014-12-09

    Based on the Gas-Kinetic Unified Algorithm (GKUA) directly solving the Boltzmann model equation, the effect of rotational non-equilibrium is investigated recurring to the kinetic Rykov model with relaxation property of rotational degrees of freedom. The spin movement of diatomic molecule is described by moment of inertia, and the conservation of total angle momentum is taken as a new Boltzmann collision invariant. The molecular velocity distribution function is integrated by the weight factor on the internal energy, and the closed system of two kinetic controlling equations is obtained with inelastic and elastic collisions. The optimization selection technique of discrete velocity ordinate points and numerical quadrature rules for macroscopic flow variables with dynamic updating evolvement are developed to simulate hypersonic flows, and the gas-kinetic numerical scheme is constructed to capture the time evolution of the discretized velocity distribution functions. The gas-kinetic boundary conditions in thermodynamic non-equilibrium and numerical procedures are studied and implemented by directly acting on the velocity distribution function, and then the unified algorithm of Boltzmann model equation involving non-equilibrium effect is presented for the whole range of flow regimes. The hypersonic flows involving non-equilibrium effect are numerically simulated including the inner flows of shock wave structures in nitrogen with different Mach numbers of 1.5-Ma-25, the planar ramp flow with the whole range of Knudsen numbers of 0.0009-Kn-10 and the three-dimensional re-entering flows around tine double-cone body.

  13. International Energy Agency Ocean Energy Systems Task 10 Wave Energy Converter Modeling Verification and Validation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wendt, Fabian F.; Yu, Yi-Hsiang; Nielsen, Kim

    2017-01-01

    This is the first joint reference paper for the Ocean Energy Systems (OES) Task 10 Wave Energy Converter modeling verification and validation group. The group is established under the OES Energy Technology Network program under the International Energy Agency. OES was founded in 2001 and Task 10 ...

  14. Mathematical Modeling of Electrolyte Flow Dynamic Patterns and Volumetric Flow Penetrations in the Flow Channel over Porous Electrode Layered System in Vanadium Flow Battery with Serpentine Flow Field Design

    OpenAIRE

    Ke, Xinyou; Prahl, Joseph M.; Alexander, J. Iwan D.; Savinell, Robert F.

    2016-01-01

    In this work, a two-dimensional mathematical model is developed to study the flow patterns and volumetric flow penetrations in the flow channel over the porous electrode layered system in vanadium flow battery with serpentine flow field design. The flow distributions at the interface between the flow channel and porous electrode are examined. It is found that the non-linear pressure distributions can distinguish the interface flow distributions under the ideal plug flow and ideal parabolic fl...

  15. A Fractional-Flow Based Compressible Multiphase Flow Model with Newly Proposed Constitutive Retentions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, C.; Yeh, G.

    2011-12-01

    In this investigation, newly proposed constitutive retentions are implemented to a fractional-flow based compressible multiphase-phase flow model. With the new model, a compressible three-phase (water, non-aqueous phase liquid (NAPL) and air) flow problem is simulated. In fractional-flow approaches, the three mass balance equations written in terms of three phase pressures are transformed to those in terms of the total pressure, saturation of water, and saturation of total liquid. These three governing equations are discretized with the Galerkin finite element method (FEM). The resulted matrix equation is solved with Bi-CGSTAB. Several numerical experiments are presented to examine the accuracy and robustness of the proposed model. The results show the presented fractional-flow based multiphase flow model is feasible and yields physically realistic solutions for compressible three-phase flow problems in porous media.

  16. Modeling Flows Around Merging Black Hole Binaries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Centrella, Joan

    2008-01-01

    Coalescing massive black hole binaries are produced by the merger of galaxies. The final stages of the black hole coalescence produce strong gravitational radiation that can be detected by the space-borne LISA. In cases in which the black hole merger takes place in the presence of gas and magnetic fields, various types of electromagnetic signals may also be produced. Modeling such electromagnetic counterparts of the final merger requires evolving the behavior of both gas and fields in the strong-field regions around the black holes. We have taken a first step towards this problem by mapping the flow of pressureless matter in the dynamic, 3-D general relativistic spacetime around the merging black holes. We report on the results of these initial simulations and discuss their likely importance for future hydrodynamical simulations.

  17. Water Modeling of Optimizing Tundish Flow Field

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Jin-gang; YAN Hui-cheng; LIU Liu; WANG Xin-hua

    2007-01-01

    In the water modeling experiments, three cases were considered, i.e. , a bare tundish, a tundish equipped with a turbulence inhibitor, and a rectangular tundish equipped with weirs (dams) and a turbulence inhibitor. Comparing the RTD curves, inclusion separation, and the result of the streamline experiment, it can be found that the tundish equipped with weirs (dams) and a turbulence inhibitor has a great effect on the flow field and the inclusion separation when compared with the sole use or no use of the turbulent inhibitor or weirs (dams). In addition, the enlargement of the distance between the weir and dam will result in a better effect when the tundish equipped with weirs (dam) and a turbulence inhibitor was used.

  18. Measurements of Overtopping Flow Time Series on the Wave Dragon, Wave Energy Converter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tedd, James; Kofoed, Jens Peter

    2009-01-01

    A study of overtopping flow series on the Wave Dragon prototype, a low crested device designed to maximise flow, in a real sea, is presented. This study aims to fill the gap in the literature on time series of flow overtopping low crested structures. By comparing to a simulated flow the character......A study of overtopping flow series on the Wave Dragon prototype, a low crested device designed to maximise flow, in a real sea, is presented. This study aims to fill the gap in the literature on time series of flow overtopping low crested structures. By comparing to a simulated flow...... the characteristics of the overtopping flow are discussed and the simulation algorithm is tested. Measured data is shown from a storm build up in October 2006, from theWave Dragon prototype situated in an inland sea in Northern Denmark. This wave energy converter extracts energy from the waves, by funnelling them...

  19. Modeling the thermally governed transient flow surges in multitube condensing flow systems with thermal and flow distribution asymmetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wedekind, G.L.; Bhatt, B.L. (Oakland Univ., Rochester, MI (United States))

    1989-08-01

    In a tube-type condenser involving complete condensation, small changes in the inlet vapor flow rate momentarily cause very large transient surges in the outlet liquid flow rate. An equivalent single-tube model is proposed that predicts these transient flow surges for a multitube system. The model, based upon a system mean void fraction model developed earlier, includes the effects of thermal and flow distribution asymmetry associated with each individual condenser tube in the multitube system. Theoretical and experimental verification for a two-tube system is presented.

  20. Mathematical Modeling of Electrolyte Flow Dynamic Patterns and Volumetric Flow Penetrations in the Flow Channel over Porous Electrode Layered System in Vanadium Flow Battery with Serpentine Flow Field Design

    CERN Document Server

    Ke, Xinyou; Alexander, J Iwan D; Savinell, Robert F

    2016-01-01

    In this work, a two-dimensional mathematical model is developed to study the flow patterns and volumetric flow penetrations in the flow channel over the porous electrode layered system in vanadium flow battery with serpentine flow field design. The flow distributions at the interface between the flow channel and porous electrode are examined. It is found that the non-linear pressure distributions can distinguish the interface flow distributions under the ideal plug flow and ideal parabolic flow inlet boundary conditions. However, the volumetric flow penetration within the porous electrode beneath the flow channel through the integration of interface flow velocity reveals that this value is identical under both ideal plug flow and ideal parabolic flow inlet boundary conditions. The volumetric flow penetrations under the advection effects of flow channel and landing/rib are estimated. The maximum current density achieved in the flow battery can be predicted based on the 100% amount of electrolyte flow reactant ...