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Sample records for modeling blast-related brain

  1. Modeling Blast-Related Brain Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-12-01

    02139 D. Moore Defense and Veterans Brain Injury Center (WRAMC) 6900 Georgia Ave. NW, Washington, DC 20307 L. Noels University of Liege Chemin des...chevreuils 1, B4000 Liege , Belgium ABSTRACT Recent military conflicts in Iraq and Afghanistan have highlighted the wartime effect of traumatic brain in

  2. Influence of Combat Blast-Related Mild Traumatic Brain Injury Acute Symptoms on Mental Health and Service Discharge Outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-15

    is a stronger predictor of outcome in blast related TBI compared with blunt trauma. Further, sports concussions may not be a good model for blast...the multi variate model. Although a history of previous concussions was not predictive of any outcomes, undiagnosed concussions may have oc curred...during these blast events. The cumulative effect of brain in juries has been well documented in repeat concussions occurring in sports related injuries

  3. The nature of white matter abnormalities in blast-related mild traumatic brain injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jasmeet P. Hayes

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Blast-related traumatic brain injury (TBI has been a common injury among returning troops due to the widespread use of improvised explosive devices in the Iraq and Afghanistan Wars. As most of the TBIs sustained are in the mild range, brain changes may not be detected by standard clinical imaging techniques such as CT. Furthermore, the functional significance of these types of injuries is currently being debated. However, accumulating evidence suggests that diffusion tensor imaging (DTI is sensitive to subtle white matter abnormalities and may be especially useful in detecting mild TBI (mTBI. The primary aim of this study was to use DTI to characterize the nature of white matter abnormalities following blast-related mTBI, and in particular, examine the extent to which mTBI-related white matter abnormalities are region-specific or spatially heterogeneous. In addition, we examined whether mTBI with loss of consciousness (LOC was associated with more extensive white matter abnormality than mTBI without LOC, as well as the potential moderating effect of number of blast exposures. A second aim was to examine the relationship between white matter integrity and neurocognitive function. Finally, a third aim was to examine the contribution of PTSD symptom severity to observed white matter alterations. One hundred fourteen OEF/OIF veterans underwent DTI and neuropsychological examination and were divided into three groups including a control group, blast-related mTBI without LOC (mTBI - LOC group, and blast-related mTBI with LOC (mTBI + LOC group. Hierarchical regression models were used to examine the extent to which mTBI and PTSD predicted white matter abnormalities using two approaches: 1 a region-specific analysis and 2 a measure of spatial heterogeneity. Neurocognitive composite scores were calculated for executive functions, attention, memory, and psychomotor speed. Results showed that blast-related mTBI + LOC was associated with greater odds of

  4. White Matter Abnormalities are Associated with Chronic Postconcussion Symptoms in Blast-Related Mild Traumatic Brain Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Danielle R.; Hayes, Jasmeet P.; Lafleche, Ginette; Salat, David H.; Verfaellie, Mieke

    2016-01-01

    Blast-related mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) is a common injury among Iraq and Afghanistan military veterans due to the frequent use of improvised explosive devices. A significant minority of individuals with mTBI report chronic postconcussion symptoms (PCS), which include physical, emotional, and cognitive complaints. However, chronic PCS are non-specific and are also associated with mental health disorders such as posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Identifying the mechanisms that contribute to chronic PCS is particularly challenging in blast-related mTBI, where the incidence of co-morbid PTSD is high. In this study, we examined whether blast-related mTBI is associated with diffuse white matter changes, and whether these neural changes are associated with chronic PCS. Ninety Operation Enduring Freedom/Operation Iraqi Freedom (OEF/OIF) Veterans were assigned to one of three groups including a blast-exposed no-TBI group, a blast-related mTBI without loss of consciousness (LOC) group (mTBI−LOC), and a blast-related mTBI with LOC group (mTBI+LOC). PCS were measured with the Rivermead Postconcussion Questionnaire. Results showed that participants in the mTBI+LOC group had more spatially heterogeneous white matter abnormalities than those in the no-TBI group. These white matter abnormalities were significantly associated with physical PCS severity even after accounting for PTSD symptoms, but not with cognitive or emotional PCS severity. A mediation analysis revealed that mTBI+LOC significantly influenced physical PCS severity through its effect on white matter integrity. These results suggest that white matter abnormalities are associated with chronic PCS independent of PTSD symptom severity and that these abnormalities are an important mechanism explaining the relationship between mTBI and chronic physical PCS. PMID:26497829

  5. White matter abnormalities are associated with chronic postconcussion symptoms in blast-related mild traumatic brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Danielle R; Hayes, Jasmeet P; Lafleche, Ginette; Salat, David H; Verfaellie, Mieke

    2016-01-01

    Blast-related mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) is a common injury among Iraq and Afghanistan military veterans due to the frequent use of improvised explosive devices. A significant minority of individuals with mTBI report chronic postconcussion symptoms (PCS), which include physical, emotional, and cognitive complaints. However, chronic PCS are nonspecific and are also associated with mental health disorders such as posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Identifying the mechanisms that contribute to chronic PCS is particularly challenging in blast-related mTBI, where the incidence of comorbid PTSD is high. In this study, we examined whether blast-related mTBI is associated with diffuse white matter changes, and whether these neural changes are associated with chronic PCS. Ninety Operation Enduring Freedom/Operation Iraqi Freedom (OEF/OIF) veterans were assigned to one of three groups including a blast-exposed no--TBI group, a blast-related mTBI without loss of consciousness (LOC) group (mTBI--LOC), and a blast-related mTBI with LOC group (mTBI + LOC). PCS were measured with the Rivermead Postconcussion Questionnaire. Results showed that participants in the mTBI + LOC group had more spatially heterogeneous white matter abnormalities than those in the no--TBI group. These white matter abnormalities were significantly associated with physical PCS severity even after accounting for PTSD symptoms, but not with cognitive or emotional PCS severity. A mediation analysis revealed that mTBI + LOC significantly influenced physical PCS severity through its effect on white matter integrity. These results suggest that white matter abnormalities are associated with chronic PCS independent of PTSD symptom severity and that these abnormalities are an important mechanism explaining the relationship between mTBI and chronic physical PCS.

  6. Radiological-Pathological Correlations Following Blast-Related Traumatic Brain Injury in the Whole Human Brain Using ex Vivo Diffusion Tensor Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    injuries caused by non-blast related trauma (e.g. falls, motor vehicle accidents, etc.), post - mortem pathological analyses have revealed that...issues: 1) Selection of control cases: we will select only young, otherwise healthy patients who died from non-head trauma and had a short post - mortem ...20 Oppenheimer, D. R. (1968). "Microscopic lesions in the brain following head injury." J Neurol Neurosurg Psychiatry 31(4): 299-306. http

  7. High prevalence of chronic pituitary and target-organ hormone abnormalities after blast-related mild traumatic brain injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charles W. Wilkinson

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Studies of traumatic brain injury from all causes have found evidence of chronic hypopituitarism, defined by deficient production of one or more pituitary hormones at least one year after injury, in 25-50% of cases. Most studies found the occurrence of posttraumatic hypopituitarism (PTHP to be unrelated to injury severity. Growth hormone deficiency (GHD and hypogonadism were reported most frequently. Hypopituitarism, and in particular adult GHD, is associated with symptoms that resemble those of PTSD, including fatigue, anxiety, depression, irritability, insomnia, sexual dysfunction, cognitive deficiencies, and decreased quality of life. However, the prevalence of PTHP after blast-related mild TBI (mTBI, an extremely common injury in modern military operations, has not been characterized. We measured concentrations of 12 pituitary and target-organ hormones in two groups of male US Veterans of combat in Iraq or Afghanistan. One group consisted of participants with blast-related mTBI whose last blast exposure was at least one year prior to the study. The other consisted of Veterans with similar military deployment histories but without blast exposure. Eleven of 26, or 42% of participants with blast concussions were found to have abnormal hormone levels in one or more pituitary axes, a prevalence similar to that found in other forms of TBI. Five members of the mTBI group were found with markedly low age-adjusted insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I levels indicative of probable GHD, and three had testosterone and gonadotropin concentrations consistent with hypogonadism. If symptoms characteristic of both PTHP and PTSD can be linked to pituitary dysfunction, they may be amenable to treatment with hormone replacement. Routine screening for chronic hypopituitarism after blast concussion shows promise for appropriately directing diagnostic and therapeutic decisions that otherwise may remain unconsidered and for markedly facilitating recovery and

  8. Neuronal DNA Methylation Profiling of Blast-Related Traumatic Brain Injury

    OpenAIRE

    Haghighi, Fatemeh; Ge, Yongchao; Chen, Sean; Xin, Yurong; Umali, Michelle U.; De Gasperi, Rita; Gama Sosa, Miguel A.; Ahlers, Stephen T.; Elder, Gregory A.

    2015-01-01

    Long-term molecular changes in the brain resulting from blast exposure may be mediated by epigenetic changes, such as deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) methylation, that regulate gene expression. Aberrant regulation of gene expression is associated with behavioral abnormalities, where DNA methylation bridges environmental signals to sustained changes in gene expression. We assessed DNA methylation changes in the brains of rats exposed to three 74.5 kPa blast overpressure events, conditions that hav...

  9. Neuronal DNA Methylation Profiling of Blast-Related Traumatic Brain Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ge, Yongchao; Chen, Sean; Xin, Yurong; Umali, Michelle U.; De Gasperi, Rita; Gama Sosa, Miguel A.; Ahlers, Stephen T.; Elder, Gregory A.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Long-term molecular changes in the brain resulting from blast exposure may be mediated by epigenetic changes, such as deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) methylation, that regulate gene expression. Aberrant regulation of gene expression is associated with behavioral abnormalities, where DNA methylation bridges environmental signals to sustained changes in gene expression. We assessed DNA methylation changes in the brains of rats exposed to three 74.5 kPa blast overpressure events, conditions that have been associated with long-term anxiogenic manifestations weeks or months following the initial exposures. Rat frontal cortex eight months post-exposure was used for cell sorting of whole brain tissue into neurons and glia. We interrogated DNA methylation profiles in these cells using Expanded Reduced Representation Bisulfite Sequencing. We obtained data for millions of cytosines, showing distinct methylation profiles for neurons and glia and an increase in global methylation in neuronal versus glial cells (p<10−7). We detected DNA methylation perturbations in blast overpressure–exposed animals, compared with sham blast controls, within 458 and 379 genes in neurons and glia, respectively. Differentially methylated neuronal genes showed enrichment in cell death and survival and nervous system development and function, including genes involved in transforming growth factor β and nitric oxide signaling. Functional validation via gene expression analysis of 30 differentially methylated neuronal and glial genes showed a 1.2 fold change in gene expression of the serotonin N-acetyltransferase gene (Aanat) in blast animals (p<0.05). These data provide the first genome-based evidence for changes in DNA methylation induced in response to multiple blast overpressure exposures. In particular, increased methylation and decreased gene expression were observed in the Aanat gene, which is involved in converting serotonin to the circadian hormone melatonin and is implicated in

  10. Assessing Neuro-Systemic & Behavioral Components in the Pathophysiology of Blast-Related Brain Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Firas H Kobeissy

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Among the U.S. military personnel, blast injury is among the leading causes of brain injury. During the past decade, it has become apparent that even blast injury as a form of mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI may lead to multiple different adverse outcomes, such as neuropsychiatric symptoms and long-term cognitive disability. Blast injury is characterized by blast overpressure (BOP, blast duration, and blast impulse. While the blast injuries of a victim close to the explosion will be severe, majority of victims are usually at a distance leading to milder form described as mild blast TBI (mbTBI. A major feature of mbTBI is its complex manifestation occurring in concert at different organ levels involving systemic, cerebral, neuronal and neuropsychiatric responses; some of which are shared with other forms of brain trauma such as acute brain injury and other neuropsychiatric disorders such as PTSD. The pathophysiology of blast injury exposure involves complex cascades of chronic psychological stress, autonomic dysfunction and neuro/systemic inflammation. These factors render blast injury as an arduous challenge in terms of diagnosis and treatment as well as identification of sensitive and specific biomarkers distinguishing mTBI from other non-TBI pathologies and from neuropsychiatric disorders with similar symptoms. This is due to the distinct but shared and partially identified biochemical pathways and neuro-histopathological changes that might be linked to behavioral deficits observed. Taken together, this article aims to provide an overview of the current status of the cellular and pathological mechanisms involved in blast overpressure injury and argues for the urgent need to identify potential biomarkers that can hint at the different mechanisms involved.

  11. Disruption of caudate working memory activation in chronic blast-related traumatic brain injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mary R. Newsome

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Mild to moderate traumatic brain injury (TBI due to blast exposure is frequently diagnosed in veterans returning from the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan. However, it is unclear whether neural damage resulting from blast TBI differs from that found in TBI due to blunt-force trauma (e.g., falls and motor vehicle crashes. Little is also known about the effects of blast TBI on neural networks, particularly over the long term. Because impairment in working memory has been linked to blunt-force TBI, the present functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI study sought to investigate whether brain activation in response to a working memory task would discriminate blunt-force from blast TBI. Twenty-five veterans (mean age = 29.8 years, standard deviation = 6.01 years, 1 female who incurred TBI due to blast an average of 4.2 years prior to enrollment and 25 civilians (mean age = 27.4 years, standard deviation = 6.68 years, 4 females with TBI due to blunt-force trauma performed the Sternberg Item Recognition Task while undergoing fMRI. The task involved encoding 1, 3, or 5 items in working memory. A group of 25 veterans (mean age = 29.9 years, standard deviation = 5.53 years, 0 females and a group of 25 civilians (mean age = 27.3 years, standard deviation = 5.81 years, 0 females without history of TBI underwent identical imaging procedures and served as controls. Results indicated that the civilian TBI group and both control groups demonstrated a monotonic relationship between working memory set size and activation in the right caudate during encoding, whereas the blast TBI group did not (p < 0.05, corrected for multiple comparisons using False Discovery Rate. Blast TBI was also associated with worse performance on the Sternberg Item Recognition Task relative to the other groups, although no other group differences were found on neuropsychological measures of episodic memory, inhibition, and general processing speed. These results

  12. A Systems Science Approach to Understanding Polytrauma and Blast-Related Injury: Bayesian Network Model of Data From a Survey of the Florida National Guard.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toyinbo, Peter A; Vanderploeg, Rodney D; Belanger, Heather G; Spehar, Andrea M; Lapcevic, William A; Scott, Steven G

    2017-01-15

    We sought to further define the epidemiology of the complex, multiple injuries collectively known as polytrauma/blast-related injury (PT/BRI). Using a systems science approach, we performed Bayesian network modeling to find the most accurate representation of the complex system of PT/BRI and identify key variables for understanding the subsequent effects of blast exposure in a sample of Florida National Guard members (1,443 deployed to Operation Enduring Freedom/Operation Iraqi Freedom and 1,655 not deployed) who completed an online survey during the period from 2009 to 2010. We found that postdeployment symptoms reported as present at the time of the survey were largely independent of deployment per se. Blast exposure, not mild traumatic brain injury (TBI), acted as the primary military deployment-related driver of PT/BRI symptoms. Blast exposure was indirectly linked to mild TBI via other deployment-related traumas and was a significant risk for a high level of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) arousal symptoms. PTSD arousal symptoms and tinnitus were directly dependent upon blast exposure, with both acting as bridge symptoms to other postdeployment mental health and physical symptoms, respectively. Neurobehavioral or postconcussion-like symptoms had no significant dependence relationship with mild TBI, but they were synergistic with blast exposure in influencing PTSD arousal symptoms. A replication of this analysis using a larger PT/BRI database is warranted.

  13. Development of an Anatomically Accurate Finite Element Human Ocular Globe Model for Blast-Related Fluid-Structure Interaction Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-02-01

    I, Eilaghi A, Portnoy S, Sled JG, Ethier CR. Dimensions of the human sclera: thickness measurement and regional changes with axial length. Exp Eye ...for throughout the development of this model. 2. Full Human Ocular Globe Model The full eye model is developed from averaged anatomic measures ...first model, a second-generation model was developed with an offset ONH, as shown in Fig 9. The anterior region of the eye model, up to the

  14. Prevention of Blast-Related Injuries

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-07-01

    to add two procedures to our swine testing protocol. One was to monitor the electroencephalographic ( EEG ) signals from the swine brain pre- and post...brain injury, Open field testing of swine and PMHS, Computer modeling of swine and human brain, brain injury mechanisms 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION ...Investigation of the over predicted intracranial pressure 22 ICP) at the frontal lobe 3. Analysis of sensor location sensitivity on model predicted 25 ICP

  15. Prevention of Blast-Related Injuries

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-07-01

    curvature changes. Figure 38. Locations with element disconnect issues 2. Modeling air blast wave propagation using a 2-D to 3-D mapping...sagittal sinus, transverse sinus, cerebral spinal fluid (CSF), hemispheres of the cerebrum with distinct white and gray matter, cerebellum, brainstem...brain and cerebral spinal fluid (CSF) were meshed and defined with Lagrangian formulation-based elements. The CSF fills the subarachnoid space

  16. Prevention of Blast-Related Injuries

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-01

    2010).A three-dimensional digital segmented and deformable brain atlas of the domestic pig.J Neurosci Methods. 192(1):102-109. Sajja VS, Galloway...Ophthalmol, 83(10):1106-1111. Viano, D. C., Casson, I. R., Pellman, E. J., Zhang, L., King, A. I., Yang, K. H., (2005) Concussion in professional football

  17. Brain Network Modelling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Kasper Winther

    Three main topics are presented in this thesis. The first and largest topic concerns network modelling of functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI) and Diffusion Weighted Imaging (DWI). In particular nonparametric Bayesian methods are used to model brain networks derived from resting state f...... for their ability to reproduce node clustering and predict unseen data. Comparing the models on whole brain networks, BCD and IRM showed better reproducibility and predictability than IDM, suggesting that resting state networks exhibit community structure. This also points to the importance of using models, which...... allow for complex interactions between all pairs of clusters. In addition, it is demonstrated how the IRM can be used for segmenting brain structures into functionally coherent clusters. A new nonparametric Bayesian network model is presented. The model builds upon the IRM and can be used to infer...

  18. Prevention of Blast-Related Injuries

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-07-14

    incubation in an appropriate secondary antibody followed by routine avidin biotin peroxidase technique. These trials are ongoing. We also undertook dual ...study. Finally, an implantable telemetry technique can be used to measure qEEG in subacute and chronically awake swine models in the future

  19. Blast Exposure Induces Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder-Related Traits in a Rat Model of Mild Traumatic Brain Injury

    OpenAIRE

    Elder, Gregory A; Dorr, Nathan P.; De Gasperi, Rita; Gama Sosa, Miguel A.; Shaughness, Michael C.; Maudlin-Jeronimo, Eric; Hall, Aaron A; McCarron, Richard M.; Ahlers, Stephen T

    2012-01-01

    Blast related traumatic brain injury (TBI) has been a major cause of injury in the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan. A striking feature of the mild TBI (mTBI) cases has been the prominent association with post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). However, because of the overlapping symptoms, distinction between the two disorders has been difficult. We studied a rat model of mTBI in which adult male rats were exposed to repetitive blast injury while under anesthesia. Blast exposure induced a variety ...

  20. Blast exposure induces post-traumatic stress disorder-related traits in a rat model of mild traumatic brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elder, Gregory A; Dorr, Nathan P; De Gasperi, Rita; Gama Sosa, Miguel A; Shaughness, Michael C; Maudlin-Jeronimo, Eric; Hall, Aaron A; McCarron, Richard M; Ahlers, Stephen T

    2012-11-01

    Blast related traumatic brain injury (TBI) has been a major cause of injury in the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan. A striking feature of the mild TBI (mTBI) cases has been the prominent association with post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). However, because of the overlapping symptoms, distinction between the two disorders has been difficult. We studied a rat model of mTBI in which adult male rats were exposed to repetitive blast injury while under anesthesia. Blast exposure induced a variety of PTSD-related behavioral traits that were present many months after the blast exposure, including increased anxiety, enhanced contextual fear conditioning, and an altered response in a predator scent assay. We also found elevation in the amygdala of the protein stathmin 1, which is known to influence the generation of fear responses. Because the blast overpressure injuries occurred while animals were under general anesthesia, our results suggest that a blast-related mTBI exposure can, in the absence of any psychological stressor, induce PTSD-related traits that are chronic and persistent. These studies have implications for understanding the relationship of PTSD to mTBI in the population of veterans returning from the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan.

  1. Hierarchical models in the brain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karl Friston

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes a general model that subsumes many parametric models for continuous data. The model comprises hidden layers of state-space or dynamic causal models, arranged so that the output of one provides input to another. The ensuing hierarchy furnishes a model for many types of data, of arbitrary complexity. Special cases range from the general linear model for static data to generalised convolution models, with system noise, for nonlinear time-series analysis. Crucially, all of these models can be inverted using exactly the same scheme, namely, dynamic expectation maximization. This means that a single model and optimisation scheme can be used to invert a wide range of models. We present the model and a brief review of its inversion to disclose the relationships among, apparently, diverse generative models of empirical data. We then show that this inversion can be formulated as a simple neural network and may provide a useful metaphor for inference and learning in the brain.

  2. New Ideas for Brain Modelling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kieran Greer

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes some biologically-inspired processes that could be used to build the sort of networks that we associate with the human brain. New to this paper, a ‘refined’ neuron will be proposed. This is a group of neurons that by joining together can produce a more analogue system, but with the same level of control and reliability that a binary neuron would have. With this new structure, it will be possible to think of an essentially binary system in terms of a more variable set of values. The paper also shows how recent research can be combined with established theories, to produce a more complete picture.The propositions are largely in line with conventional thinking, but possibly with one or two more radical suggestions. An earlier cognitive model can be filled in with more specific details, based on the new research results, where the components appear to fit together almost seamlessly. The intention of the research has been to describe plausible ‘mechanical’ processes that can produce the appropriate brain structures and mechanisms, but that could be used without the magical ‘intelligence’ part that is still not fully understood.There are also some important updates from an earlier version of this paper.Keywords: neuron, neural network, cognitive model, self-organise, analogue, resonance.

  3. Exposure to a predator scent induces chronic behavioral changes in rats previously exposed to low-level blast: Implications for the relationship of blast-related TBI to PTSD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Georgina Perez-Garcia

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Blast-related mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI has been unfortunately common in veterans who served in the recent conflicts in Iraq and Afghanistan. The postconcussion syndrome associated with these mTBIs has frequently appeared in combination with post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD. The presence of PTSD has complicated diagnosis since clinically PTSD and the postconcussion syndrome of mTBI have many overlapping symptoms. In particular establishing how much of the symptom complex can be attributed to the psychological trauma associated with PTSD in contrast to the physical injury of TBI has proven difficult. Indeed some have suggested that much of what is now being called blast-related postconcussion syndrome is better explained by PTSD. The relationship between the postconcussion syndrome of mTBI and PTSD is complex. Association of the two disorders might be viewed as additive effects of independent psychological and physical traumas suffered in a war zone. However we previously found that rats exposed to repetitive low-level blast exposure in the absence of a psychological stressor developed a variety of anxiety and PTSD-related behavioral traits that were present months following the last blast exposure. Here we show that a single predator scent challenge delivered 8 months after the last blast exposure induces chronic anxiety related changes in blast-exposed rats that are still present 45 days later. These observations suggest that in addition to independently inducing PTSD-related traits, blast exposure sensitizes the brain to react abnormally to a subsequent psychological stressor. These studies have implications for conceptualizing the relationship between blast-related mTBI and PTSD and suggest that blast-related mTBI in humans may predispose to the later development of PTSD in reaction to subsequent psychological stressors.

  4. A model for brain life history evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Forero, Mauricio; Faulwasser, Timm; Lehmann, Laurent

    2017-03-01

    Complex cognition and relatively large brains are distributed across various taxa, and many primarily verbal hypotheses exist to explain such diversity. Yet, mathematical approaches formalizing verbal hypotheses would help deepen the understanding of brain and cognition evolution. With this aim, we combine elements of life history and metabolic theories to formulate a metabolically explicit mathematical model for brain life history evolution. We assume that some of the brain's energetic expense is due to production (learning) and maintenance (memory) of energy-extraction skills (or cognitive abilities, knowledge, information, etc.). We also assume that individuals use such skills to extract energy from the environment, and can allocate this energy to grow and maintain the body, including brain and reproductive tissues. The model can be used to ask what fraction of growth energy should be allocated at each age, given natural selection, to growing brain and other tissues under various biological settings. We apply the model to find uninvadable allocation strategies under a baseline setting ("me vs nature"), namely when energy-extraction challenges are environmentally determined and are overcome individually but possibly with maternal help, and use modern-human data to estimate model's parameter values. The resulting uninvadable strategies yield predictions for brain and body mass throughout ontogeny and for the ages at maturity, adulthood, and brain growth arrest. We find that: (1) a me-vs-nature setting is enough to generate adult brain and body mass of ancient human scale and a sequence of childhood, adolescence, and adulthood stages; (2) large brains are favored by intermediately challenging environments, moderately effective skills, and metabolically expensive memory; and (3) adult skill is proportional to brain mass when metabolic costs of memory saturate the brain metabolic rate allocated to skills.

  5. Modeling Pediatric Brain Trauma: Piglet Model of Controlled Cortical Impact.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pareja, Jennifer C Munoz; Keeley, Kristen; Duhaime, Ann-Christine; Dodge, Carter P

    2016-01-01

    The brain has different responses to traumatic injury as a function of its developmental stage. As a model of injury to the immature brain, the piglet shares numerous similarities in regards to morphology and neurodevelopmental sequence compared to humans. This chapter describes a piglet scaled focal contusion model of traumatic brain injury that accounts for the changes in mass and morphology of the brain as it matures, facilitating the study of age-dependent differences in response to a comparable mechanical trauma.

  6. Modeling premature brain injury and recovery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scafidi, Joey; Fagel, Devon M.; Ment, Laura R.; Vaccarino, Flora M.

    2009-01-01

    Premature birth is a growing and significant public health problem because of the large number of infants that survive with neurodevelopmental sequelae from brain injury. Recent advances in neuroimaging have shown that although some neuroanatomical structures are altered, others improve over time. This review outlines recent insights into brain structure and function in these preterm infants at school age and relevant animal models. These animal models have provided scientists with an opportunity to explore in depth the molecular and cellular mechanisms of injury as well as the potential of the brain for recovery. The endogenous potential that the brain has for neurogenesis and gliogenesis, and how environment contributes to recovery, are also outlined. These preclinical models will provide important insights into the genetic and epigenetic mechanisms responsible for variable degrees of injury and recovery, permitting the exploration of targeted therapies to facilitate recovery in the developing preterm brain. PMID:19482072

  7. Computational Intelligence in a Human Brain Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viorel Gaftea

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper focuses on the current trends in brain research domain and the current stage of development of research for software and hardware solutions, communication capabilities between: human beings and machines, new technologies, nano-science and Internet of Things (IoT devices. The proposed model for Human Brain assumes main similitude between human intelligence and the chess game thinking process. Tactical & strategic reasoning and the need to follow the rules of the chess game, all are very similar with the activities of the human brain. The main objective for a living being and the chess game player are the same: securing a position, surviving and eliminating the adversaries. The brain resolves these goals, and more, the being movement, actions and speech are sustained by the vital five senses and equilibrium. The chess game strategy helps us understand the human brain better and easier replicate in the proposed ‘Software and Hardware’ SAH Model.

  8. Computational Intelligence in a Human Brain Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viorel Gaftea

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper focuses on the current trends in brain research domain and the current stage of development of research for software and hardware solutions, communication capabilities between: human beings and machines, new technologies, nano-science and Internet of Things (IoT devices. The proposed model for Human Brain assumes main similitude between human intelligence and the chess game thinking process. Tactical & strategic reasoning and the need to follow the rules of the chess game, all are very similar with the activities of the human brain. The main objective for a living being and the chess game player are the same: securing a position, surviving and eliminating the adversaries. The brain resolves these goals, and more, the being movement, actions and speech are sustained by the vital five senses and equilibrium. The chess game strategy helps us understand the human brain better and easier replicate in the proposed ‘Software and Hardware’ SAH Model.

  9. Simple models of human brain functional networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vértes, Petra E; Alexander-Bloch, Aaron F; Gogtay, Nitin; Giedd, Jay N; Rapoport, Judith L; Bullmore, Edward T

    2012-04-10

    Human brain functional networks are embedded in anatomical space and have topological properties--small-worldness, modularity, fat-tailed degree distributions--that are comparable to many other complex networks. Although a sophisticated set of measures is available to describe the topology of brain networks, the selection pressures that drive their formation remain largely unknown. Here we consider generative models for the probability of a functional connection (an edge) between two cortical regions (nodes) separated by some Euclidean distance in anatomical space. In particular, we propose a model in which the embedded topology of brain networks emerges from two competing factors: a distance penalty based on the cost of maintaining long-range connections; and a topological term that favors links between regions sharing similar input. We show that, together, these two biologically plausible factors are sufficient to capture an impressive range of topological properties of functional brain networks. Model parameters estimated in one set of functional MRI (fMRI) data on normal volunteers provided a good fit to networks estimated in a second independent sample of fMRI data. Furthermore, slightly detuned model parameters also generated a reasonable simulation of the abnormal properties of brain functional networks in people with schizophrenia. We therefore anticipate that many aspects of brain network organization, in health and disease, may be parsimoniously explained by an economical clustering rule for the probability of functional connectivity between different brain areas.

  10. Functional Status after Blast-Plus-Impact Complex Concussive Traumatic Brain Injury in Evacuated United States Military Personnel

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    vulnerability to PTSD and depression, blast-related hormonal abnormalities,51 and blast-related injuries to specific parts of the brain causing impaired emotional ...Homaifar, B.Y., Gutierrez, P.M., Staves, P.J., Harwood, J.E., Reeves , D., Adler, L.E., Ivins, B.J., Helmick, K., and Warden, D. (2010

  11. Melanoma Brain Metastasis: Mechanisms, Models, and Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kircher, David A; Silvis, Mark R; Cho, Joseph H; Holmen, Sheri L

    2016-09-02

    The development of brain metastases in patients with advanced stage melanoma is common, but the molecular mechanisms responsible for their development are poorly understood. Melanoma brain metastases cause significant morbidity and mortality and confer a poor prognosis; traditional therapies including whole brain radiation, stereotactic radiotherapy, or chemotherapy yield only modest increases in overall survival (OS) for these patients. While recently approved therapies have significantly improved OS in melanoma patients, only a small number of studies have investigated their efficacy in patients with brain metastases. Preliminary data suggest that some responses have been observed in intracranial lesions, which has sparked new clinical trials designed to evaluate the efficacy in melanoma patients with brain metastases. Simultaneously, recent advances in our understanding of the mechanisms of melanoma cell dissemination to the brain have revealed novel and potentially therapeutic targets. In this review, we provide an overview of newly discovered mechanisms of melanoma spread to the brain, discuss preclinical models that are being used to further our understanding of this deadly disease and provide an update of the current clinical trials for melanoma patients with brain metastases.

  12. Neural and Behavioral Sequelae of Blast-Related Traumatic Brain Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-01

    concussions , and 8 (38%) reported multiple concussions (range 3-10; data on additional concussions was not available for 2 participants in this group...A chi-square analysis comparing the civTBI and milTBI groups on the proportion with multiple concussions was not significant. Injury relevant...occurred in the context of blast exposure. Finally, although our two TBI groups had a comparable proportion of single vs. multiple concussions , the

  13. Neural and Behavioral Sequelae of Blast-Related Traumatic Brain Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-11-01

    a pre-application to TATRC entitled “Advanced Neuroimaging of Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy in Retired NFL Football Players.” This pre...Radiology Jones, Stephen; Cleveland Clinic, Diagnostic Radiology Newsome, Mary; Baylor College of Medicine, PM&R Cognitive Neuroscience Laboratory...Center, Neurology Levin, Harvey; Baylor College of Medicine, Cognitive Neuroscience Laboratory Rao, Stephen; Cleveland Clinic, Schey Center for

  14. D-galactose-induced brain ageing model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sadigh-Eteghad, Saeed; Majdi, Alireza; McCann, Sarah K.

    2017-01-01

    Animal models are commonly used in brain ageing research. Amongst these, models where rodents are exposed to d-galactose are held to recapitulate a number of features of ageing including neurobehavioral and neurochemical changes. However, results from animal studies are often inconsistent...

  15. Modelling Brain Tissue using Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dyrby, Tim Bjørn

    2008-01-01

    Diffusion MRI, or diffusion weighted imaging (DWI), is a technique that measures the restricted diffusion of water molecules within brain tissue. Different reconstruction methods quantify water-diffusion anisotropy in the intra- and extra-cellular spaces of the neural environment. Fibre tracking...... models then use the directions of greatest diffusion as estimates of white matter fibre orientation. Several fibre tracking algorithms have emerged in the last few years that provide reproducible visualizations of three-dimensional fibre bundles. One class of these algorithms is probabilistic...... be used. Within a two year period, no statistical inter- or intra-brain difference in the diffusion coefficient was found in perfusion fixated minipig brains. However, a decreasing tendency in the diffusion coefficient was found at the last time points about 24 months post mortem and might be explained...

  16. Brain-inspired Stochastic Models and Implementations

    KAUST Repository

    Al-Shedivat, Maruan

    2015-05-12

    One of the approaches to building artificial intelligence (AI) is to decipher the princi- ples of the brain function and to employ similar mechanisms for solving cognitive tasks, such as visual perception or natural language understanding, using machines. The recent breakthrough, named deep learning, demonstrated that large multi-layer networks of arti- ficial neural-like computing units attain remarkable performance on some of these tasks. Nevertheless, such artificial networks remain to be very loosely inspired by the brain, which rich structures and mechanisms may further suggest new algorithms or even new paradigms of computation. In this thesis, we explore brain-inspired probabilistic mechanisms, such as neural and synaptic stochasticity, in the context of generative models. The two questions we ask here are: (i) what kind of models can describe a neural learning system built of stochastic components? and (ii) how can we implement such systems e ̆ciently? To give specific answers, we consider two well known models and the corresponding neural architectures: the Naive Bayes model implemented with a winner-take-all spiking neural network and the Boltzmann machine implemented in a spiking or non-spiking fashion. We propose and analyze an e ̆cient neuromorphic implementation of the stochastic neu- ral firing mechanism and study the e ̄ects of synaptic unreliability on learning generative energy-based models implemented with neural networks.

  17. Comparing Structural Brain Connectivity by the Infinite Relational Model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ambrosen, Karen Marie Sandø; Herlau, Tue; Dyrby, Tim;

    2013-01-01

    The growing focus in neuroimaging on analyzing brain connectivity calls for powerful and reliable statistical modeling tools. We examine the Infinite Relational Model (IRM) as a tool to identify and compare structure in brain connectivity graphs by contrasting its performance on graphs from...... modeling tool for the identification of structure and quantification of similarity in graphs of brain connectivity in general....

  18. Blast and the Consequences on Traumatic Brain Injury-Multiscale Mechanical Modeling of Brain

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-17

    brain and spinal cord injury, is the largest contributor to a poor neurological outcome in survivors of brain and spinal cord trauma. Microscale...anatomical features of a 50th percentile male head, including the brain, falx and tentorium, cerebral spinal fluid (CSF), duramater, piamater, facial...discretized finite elements. (b) Sections of the head model; the right half of the head model is shown with the brain, the meningeal layers (dura

  19. Central nervous system and musculoskeletal medication profile of a veteran cohort with blast-related injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    French, Dustin D; Bair, Matthew J; Bass, Elizabeth; Campbell, Robert R; Siddharthan, Kris

    2009-01-01

    Little is known about the utilization of central nervous system (CNS) and musculoskeletal (MS) medications in Operation Iraqi Freedom/Operation Enduring Freedom (OIF/OEF) veterans with blast-related injuries (BRIs). We followed prescription drug use among a cohort of 133 OIF/OEF veterans with BRIs by using the Joint Theatre Trauma Registry, the Tampa Polytrauma Registry, and electronic medical records. We extracted 12 months of national medication records from the Veterans Health Administration Decision Support System and analyzed them with descriptive statistics. Over the 12-month period (fiscal year 2007), CNS medications comprised 27.9% (4,225/15,143) of total prescriptions dispensed to 90.2% (120/133) of our cohort. Approximately one-half (48.9%) of the 133 patients were treated with opioid analgesics. Nearly 60% received antidepressants. More than one-half (51.1%) of patients were treated with anticonvulsants. Benzodiazepines and antipsychotics were dispensed to 17.3% and 15.8%, respectively. For MS medicines, 804 were prescribed for 48.1% (64/133) of veterans. Nearly one-fourth (24.8%) were treated with skeletal muscle relaxants. The CNS and MS medications, in general, were continuously prescribed over the 12-month study period. This study provides insight into the complex medical management involved in the care of veterans with BRIs.

  20. Neural mass model-based tracking of anesthetic brain states

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuhlmann, Levin; Freestone, Dean R.; Manton, Jonathan H.; Heyse, Bjorn; Vereecke, Hugo E. M.; Lipping, Tarmo; Struys, Michel M. R. F.; Liley, David T. J.

    2016-01-01

    Neural mass model-based tracking of brain states from electroencephalographic signals holds the promise of simultaneously tracking brain states while inferring underlying physiological changes in various neuroscientific and clinical applications. Here, neural mass model-based tracking of brain state

  1. On a Quantum Model of Brain Activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fichtner, K.-H.; Fichtner, L.; Freudenberg, W.; Ohya, M.

    2010-01-01

    One of the main activities of the brain is the recognition of signals. A first attempt to explain the process of recognition in terms of quantum statistics was given in [6]. Subsequently, details of the mathematical model were presented in a (still incomplete) series of papers (cf. [7, 2, 5, 10]). In the present note we want to give a general view of the principal ideas of this approach. We will introduce the basic spaces and justify the choice of spaces and operations. Further, we bring the model face to face with basic postulates any statistical model of the recognition process should fulfill. These postulates are in accordance with the opinion widely accepted in psychology and neurology.

  2. Diffusion Based Modeling of Human Brain Response to External Stimuli

    CERN Document Server

    Namazi, Hamidreza

    2012-01-01

    Human brain response is the overall ability of the brain in analyzing internal and external stimuli in the form of transferred energy to the mind/brain phase-space and thus, making the proper decisions. During the last decade scientists discovered about this phenomenon and proposed some models based on computational, biological, or neuropsychological methods. Despite some advances in studies related to this area of the brain research there was less effort which have been done on the mathematical modeling of the human brain response to external stimuli. This research is devoted to the modeling of human EEG signal, as an alert state of overall human brain activity monitoring, due to receiving external stimuli, based on fractional diffusion equation. The results of this modeling show very good agreement with the real human EEG signal and thus, this model can be used as a strong representative of the human brain activity.

  3. A Culture-Behavior-Brain Loop Model of Human Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Shihui; Ma, Yina

    2015-11-01

    Increasing evidence suggests that cultural influences on brain activity are associated with multiple cognitive and affective processes. These findings prompt an integrative framework to account for dynamic interactions between culture, behavior, and the brain. We put forward a culture-behavior-brain (CBB) loop model of human development that proposes that culture shapes the brain by contextualizing behavior, and the brain fits and modifies culture via behavioral influences. Genes provide a fundamental basis for, and interact with, the CBB loop at both individual and population levels. The CBB loop model advances our understanding of the dynamic relationships between culture, behavior, and the brain, which are crucial for human phylogeny and ontogeny. Future brain changes due to cultural influences are discussed based on the CBB loop model.

  4. Modeling brain resonance phenomena using a neural mass model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreas Spiegler

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Stimulation with rhythmic light flicker (photic driving plays an important role in the diagnosis of schizophrenia, mood disorder, migraine, and epilepsy. In particular, the adjustment of spontaneous brain rhythms to the stimulus frequency (entrainment is used to assess the functional flexibility of the brain. We aim to gain deeper understanding of the mechanisms underlying this technique and to predict the effects of stimulus frequency and intensity. For this purpose, a modified Jansen and Rit neural mass model (NMM of a cortical circuit is used. This mean field model has been designed to strike a balance between mathematical simplicity and biological plausibility. We reproduced the entrainment phenomenon observed in EEG during a photic driving experiment. More generally, we demonstrate that such a single area model can already yield very complex dynamics, including chaos, for biologically plausible parameter ranges. We chart the entire parameter space by means of characteristic Lyapunov spectra and Kaplan-Yorke dimension as well as time series and power spectra. Rhythmic and chaotic brain states were found virtually next to each other, such that small parameter changes can give rise to switching from one to another. Strikingly, this characteristic pattern of unpredictability generated by the model was matched to the experimental data with reasonable accuracy. These findings confirm that the NMM is a useful model of brain dynamics during photic driving. In this context, it can be used to study the mechanisms of, for example, perception and epileptic seizure generation. In particular, it enabled us to make predictions regarding the stimulus amplitude in further experiments for improving the entrainment effect.

  5. Model human heart or brain signals

    CERN Document Server

    Tuncay, Caglar

    2008-01-01

    A new model is suggested and used to mimic various spatial or temporal designs in biological or non biological formations where the focus is on the normal or irregular electrical signals coming from human heart (ECG) or brain (EEG). The electrical activities in several muscles (EMG) or neurons or other organs of human or various animals, such as lobster pyloric neuron, guinea pig inferior olivary neuron, sepia giant axon and mouse neocortical pyramidal neuron and some spatial formations are also considered (in Appendix). In the biological applications, several elements (cells or tissues) in an organ are taken as various entries in a representative lattice (mesh) where the entries are connected to each other in terms of some molecular diffusions or electrical potential differences. The biological elements evolve in time (with the given tissue or organ) in terms of the mentioned connections (interactions) besides some individual feedings. The anatomical diversity of the species (or organs) is handled in terms o...

  6. A Blast Model of Traumatic Brain Injury in Swine

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-05-01

    public release; distribution unlimited Although blast-induced traumatic brain injury (BI- TBI ) is a significant cause of morbidity and behavioral...survival model of BI- TBI in swine. Traumatic Brain Injury , Swine, Blast, Model Development U U U 7 USAMRMC W81XWH-08-2-0082... Injury , TBI Scientific Advisor, Defense Center of Excellence for Psychological Health and Traumatic Brain Injury ) and Dr. Tamara Crowder at the DoD

  7. Field theory model of brain extracellular matrix

    OpenAIRE

    Molochkov, Alexander; Goy, Vladimir; Tolstonogov, Anton

    2014-01-01

    The perineural net (PNN) is responsible for synaptic stabilization of adult brain. It plays an important role in brain signal processing and non-synaptic signal transfer as well [ 1]. Since it is composed of largely negatively charged chains of disaccharides, it can be easily affected by strong external electromagnetic field irradiated by high-energy particles passing brain tissues. One of the effects of such exposure is a cognitive impairment. Since outside of the Bragg peak area local elect...

  8. Individual brain structure and modelling predict seizure propagation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Proix, Timothée; Bartolomei, Fabrice; Guye, Maxime; Jirsa, Viktor K

    2017-03-01

    See Lytton (doi:10.1093/awx018) for a scientific commentary on this article.Neural network oscillations are a fundamental mechanism for cognition, perception and consciousness. Consequently, perturbations of network activity play an important role in the pathophysiology of brain disorders. When structural information from non-invasive brain imaging is merged with mathematical modelling, then generative brain network models constitute personalized in silico platforms for the exploration of causal mechanisms of brain function and clinical hypothesis testing. We here demonstrate with the example of drug-resistant epilepsy that patient-specific virtual brain models derived from diffusion magnetic resonance imaging have sufficient predictive power to improve diagnosis and surgery outcome. In partial epilepsy, seizures originate in a local network, the so-called epileptogenic zone, before recruiting other close or distant brain regions. We create personalized large-scale brain networks for 15 patients and simulate the individual seizure propagation patterns. Model validation is performed against the presurgical stereotactic electroencephalography data and the standard-of-care clinical evaluation. We demonstrate that the individual brain models account for the patient seizure propagation patterns, explain the variability in postsurgical success, but do not reliably augment with the use of patient-specific connectivity. Our results show that connectome-based brain network models have the capacity to explain changes in the organization of brain activity as observed in some brain disorders, thus opening up avenues towards discovery of novel clinical interventions. © The Author (2017). Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Guarantors of Brain.

  9. Mathematical modelling of blood-brain barrier failure and edema

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waters, Sarah; Lang, Georgina; Vella, Dominic; Goriely, Alain

    2015-11-01

    Injuries such as traumatic brain injury and stroke can result in increased blood-brain barrier permeability. This increase may lead to water accumulation in the brain tissue resulting in vasogenic edema. Although the initial injury may be localised, the resulting edema causes mechanical damage and compression of the vasculature beyond the original injury site. We employ a biphasic mixture model to investigate the consequences of blood-brain barrier permeability changes within a region of brain tissue and the onset of vasogenic edema. We find that such localised changes can indeed result in brain tissue swelling and that the type of damage that results (stress damage or strain damage) depends on the ability of the brain to clear edema fluid.

  10. Fluid-percussion–induced traumatic brain injury model in rats

    OpenAIRE

    2010-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a major cause of mortality and morbidity. Various attempts have been made to replicate clinical TBI using animal models. The fluid-percussion model (FP) is one of the oldest and most commonly used models of experimentally induced TBI. Both central (CFP) and lateral (LFP) variations of the model have been used. Developed initially for use in larger species, the standard FP device was adapted more than 20 years ago to induce consistent degrees of brain injury in ...

  11. Similarity on neural stem cells and brain tumor stem cells in transgenic brain tumor mouse models

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Guanqun Qiao; Qingquan Li; Gang Peng; Jun Ma; Hongwei Fan; Yingbin Li

    2013-01-01

    Although it is believed that glioma is derived from brain tumor stem cells, the source and molecular signal pathways of these cells are stil unclear. In this study, we used stable doxycycline-inducible transgenic mouse brain tumor models (c-myc+/SV40Tag+/Tet-on+) to explore the malignant trans-formation potential of neural stem cells by observing the differences of neural stem cel s and brain tumor stem cells in the tumor models. Results showed that chromosome instability occurred in brain tumor stem cells. The numbers of cytolysosomes and autophagosomes in brain tumor stem cells and induced neural stem cel s were lower and the proliferative activity was obviously stronger than that in normal neural stem cells. Normal neural stem cells could differentiate into glial fibril ary acidic protein-positive and microtubule associated protein-2-positive cells, which were also negative for nestin. However, glial fibril ary acidic protein/nestin, microtubule associated protein-2/nestin, and glial fibril ary acidic protein/microtubule associated protein-2 double-positive cells were found in induced neural stem cells and brain tumor stem cel s. Results indicate that induced neural stem cells are similar to brain tumor stem cells, and are possibly the source of brain tumor stem cells.

  12. Animal models of brain dysfunction in phenylketonuria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Martynyuk, A. E.; van Spronsen, F. J.; Van der Zee, E. A.

    2010-01-01

    Phenylketonuria (PKU) is a metabolic disorder that results in significant brain dysfunction if untreated. Although phenylalanine restricted diets instituted at birth have clearly improved PKU outcomes, neuropsychological deficits and neurological changes still represent substantial problems. The spe

  13. CSF transthyretin neuroprotection in a mouse model of brain ischemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Santos, Sofia Duque; Lambertsen, Kate Lykke; Clausen, Bettina Hjelm

    2010-01-01

    Brain injury caused by ischemia is a major cause of human mortality and physical/cognitive disability worldwide. Experimentally, brain ischemia can be induced surgically by permanent middle cerebral artery occlusion. Using this model, we studied the influence of transthyretin in ischemic stroke...... neuronal cell death, edema and inflammation, thereby influencing the survival of endangered neurons in cerebral ischemia....

  14. Progress on the paternal brain: theory, animal models, human brain research, and mental health implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swain, J E; Dayton, C J; Kim, P; Tolman, R M; Volling, B L

    2014-01-01

    With a secure foundation in basic research across mammalian species in which fathers participate in the raising of young, novel brain-imaging approaches are outlining a set of consistent brain circuits that regulate paternal thoughts and behaviors in humans. The newest experimental paradigms include increasingly realistic baby-stimuli to provoke paternal cognitions and behaviors with coordinated hormone measures to outline brain networks that regulate motivation, reflexive caring, emotion regulation, and social brain networks with differences and similarities to those found in mothers. In this article, on the father brain, we review all brain-imaging studies on PubMed to date on the human father brain and introduce the topic with a selection of theoretical models and foundational neurohormonal research on animal models in support of the human work. We discuss potentially translatable models for the identification and treatment of paternal mood and father-child relational problems, which could improve infant mental health and developmental trajectories with potentially broad public health importance. © 2014 Michigan Association for Infant Mental Health.

  15. Reptiles: a new model for brain evo-devo research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nomura, Tadashi; Kawaguchi, Masahumi; Ono, Katsuhiko; Murakami, Yasunori

    2013-03-01

    Vertebrate brains exhibit vast amounts of anatomical diversity. In particular, the elaborate and complex nervous system of amniotes is correlated with the size of their behavioral repertoire. However, the evolutionary mechanisms underlying species-specific brain morphogenesis remain elusive. In this review we introduce reptiles as a new model organism for understanding brain evolution. These animal groups inherited ancestral traits of brain architectures. We will describe several unique aspects of the reptilian nervous system with a special focus on the telencephalon, and discuss the genetic mechanisms underlying reptile-specific brain morphology. The establishment of experimental evo-devo approaches to studying reptiles will help to shed light on the origin of the amniote brains.

  16. Modeling the brain morphology distribution in the general aging population

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huizinga, W.; Poot, D. H. J.; Roshchupkin, G.; Bron, E. E.; Ikram, M. A.; Vernooij, M. W.; Rueckert, D.; Niessen, W. J.; Klein, S.

    2016-03-01

    Both normal aging and neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's disease cause morphological changes of the brain. To better distinguish between normal and abnormal cases, it is necessary to model changes in brain morphology owing to normal aging. To this end, we developed a method for analyzing and visualizing these changes for the entire brain morphology distribution in the general aging population. The method is applied to 1000 subjects from a large population imaging study in the elderly, from which 900 were used to train the model and 100 were used for testing. The results of the 100 test subjects show that the model generalizes to subjects outside the model population. Smooth percentile curves showing the brain morphology changes as a function of age and spatiotemporal atlases derived from the model population are publicly available via an interactive web application at agingbrain.bigr.nl.

  17. Modeling of Brain Shift Phenomenon for Different Craniotomies and Solid Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alvaro Valencia

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This study investigates the effects of different solid models on predictions of brain shift for three craniotomies. We created a generic 3D brain model based on healthy human brain and modeled the brain parenchyma as single continuum and constrained by a practically rigid skull. We have used elastic model, hyperelastic 1st, 2nd, and 3rd Ogden models, and hyperelastic Mooney-Rivlin with 2- and 5-parameter models. A pressure on the brain surface at craniotomy region was applied to load the model. The models were solved with the finite elements package ANSYS. The predictions on stress and displacements were compared for three different craniotomies. The difference between the predictions of elastic solid model and a hyperelastic Ogden solid model of maximum brain displacement and maximum effective stress is relevant.

  18. Mathematical modeling of brain tumors: effects of radiotherapy and chemotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Powathil, G [Department of Applied Mathematics, University of Waterloo, Waterloo, Ontario, N2L 3G1 (Canada); Kohandel, M [Department of Applied Mathematics, University of Waterloo, Waterloo, Ontario, N2L 3G1 (Canada); Sivaloganathan, S [Department of Applied Mathematics, University of Waterloo, Waterloo, Ontario, N2L 3G1 (Canada); Oza, A [Center for Mathematical Medicine, Fields Institute for Research in Mathematical Sciences, Toronto, Ontario M5T 3J1 (Canada); Milosevic, M [Radiation Medicine Program, Princess Margaret Hospital, and Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario M5G 2M9 (Canada)

    2007-06-07

    Gliomas, the most common primary brain tumors, are diffusive and highly invasive. The standard treatment for brain tumors consists of a combination of surgery, radiation therapy and chemotherapy. Over the past few years, mathematical models have been applied to study untreated and treated brain tumors. In an effort to improve treatment strategies, we consider a simple spatio-temporal mathematical model, based on proliferation and diffusion, that incorporates the effects of radiotherapeutic and chemotherapeutic treatments. We study the effects of different schedules of radiation therapy, including fractionated and hyperfractionated external beam radiotherapy, using a generalized linear quadratic (LQ) model. The results are compared with published clinical data. We also discuss the results for combination therapy (radiotherapy plus temozolomide, a new chemotherapy agent), as proposed in recent clinical trials. We use the model to predict optimal sequencing of the postoperative (combination of radiotherapy and adjuvant, neo-adjuvant or concurrent chemotherapy) treatments for brain tumors.

  19. Avoiding Boltzmann Brain domination in holographic dark energy models

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Horvat, R

    2015-01-01

    .... The models of Dark Energy invoking holographic principle fit naturally into such a category, and spontaneous formation of isolated brains in otherwise empty space seems the most perplexing, creating...

  20. A novel three-phase model of brain tissue microstructure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gevertz, Jana L; Torquato, Salvatore

    2008-08-15

    We propose a novel biologically constrained three-phase model of the brain microstructure. Designing a realistic model is tantamount to a packing problem, and for this reason, a number of techniques from the theory of random heterogeneous materials can be brought to bear on this problem. Our analysis strongly suggests that previously developed two-phase models in which cells are packed in the extracellular space are insufficient representations of the brain microstructure. These models either do not preserve realistic geometric and topological features of brain tissue or preserve these properties while overestimating the brain's effective diffusivity, an average measure of the underlying microstructure. In light of the highly connected nature of three-dimensional space, which limits the minimum diffusivity of biologically constrained two-phase models, we explore the previously proposed hypothesis that the extracellular matrix is an important factor that contributes to the diffusivity of brain tissue. Using accurate first-passage-time techniques, we support this hypothesis by showing that the incorporation of the extracellular matrix as the third phase of a biologically constrained model gives the reduction in the diffusion coefficient necessary for the three-phase model to be a valid representation of the brain microstructure.

  1. A novel three-phase model of brain tissue microstructure.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jana L Gevertz

    Full Text Available We propose a novel biologically constrained three-phase model of the brain microstructure. Designing a realistic model is tantamount to a packing problem, and for this reason, a number of techniques from the theory of random heterogeneous materials can be brought to bear on this problem. Our analysis strongly suggests that previously developed two-phase models in which cells are packed in the extracellular space are insufficient representations of the brain microstructure. These models either do not preserve realistic geometric and topological features of brain tissue or preserve these properties while overestimating the brain's effective diffusivity, an average measure of the underlying microstructure. In light of the highly connected nature of three-dimensional space, which limits the minimum diffusivity of biologically constrained two-phase models, we explore the previously proposed hypothesis that the extracellular matrix is an important factor that contributes to the diffusivity of brain tissue. Using accurate first-passage-time techniques, we support this hypothesis by showing that the incorporation of the extracellular matrix as the third phase of a biologically constrained model gives the reduction in the diffusion coefficient necessary for the three-phase model to be a valid representation of the brain microstructure.

  2. A porcine model of haematogenous brain infectionwith staphylococcus aureus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Astrup, Lærke Boye; Agerholm, Jørgen Steen; Nielsen, Ole Lerberg;

    2012-01-01

    A PORCINE MODEL OF HAEMATOGENOUS BRAIN INFECTION WITH STAPHYLOCOCCUS AUREUS Astrup Lærke1, Agerholm Jørgen1, Nielsen Ole1, Jensen Henrik1, Leifsson Páll1, Iburg Tine2. 1: Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences, University of Copenhagen, Denmark boye@life.ku.dk 2: National Veterinary Institute......, Uppsala, Sweden Introduction Staphylococcus aureus (S.aureus) is a common cause of sepsis and brain abscesses in man and a frequent cause of porcine pyaemia. Here we present a porcine model of haematogenous S. aureus-induced brain infection. Materials and Methods Four pigs had two intravenous catheters...

  3. A hierarchical model of the evolution of human brain specializations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrett, H Clark

    2012-06-26

    The study of information-processing adaptations in the brain is controversial, in part because of disputes about the form such adaptations might take. Many psychologists assume that adaptations come in two kinds, specialized and general-purpose. Specialized mechanisms are typically thought of as innate, domain-specific, and isolated from other brain systems, whereas generalized mechanisms are developmentally plastic, domain-general, and interactive. However, if brain mechanisms evolve through processes of descent with modification, they are likely to be heterogeneous, rather than coming in just two kinds. They are likely to be hierarchically organized, with some design features widely shared across brain systems and others specific to particular processes. Also, they are likely to be largely developmentally plastic and interactive with other brain systems, rather than canalized and isolated. This article presents a hierarchical model of brain specialization, reviewing evidence for the model from evolutionary developmental biology, genetics, brain mapping, and comparative studies. Implications for the search for uniquely human traits are discussed, along with ways in which conventional views of modularity in psychology may need to be revised.

  4. Model of local temperature changes in brain upon functional activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, Christopher M; Smith, Michael B; Turner, Robert

    2004-12-01

    Experimental results for changes in brain temperature during functional activation show large variations. It is, therefore, desirable to develop a careful numerical model for such changes. Here, a three-dimensional model of temperature in the human head using the bioheat equation, which includes effects of metabolism, perfusion, and thermal conduction, is employed to examine potential temperature changes due to functional activation in brain. It is found that, depending on location in brain and corresponding baseline temperature relative to blood temperature, temperature may increase or decrease on activation and concomitant increases in perfusion and rate of metabolism. Changes in perfusion are generally seen to have a greater effect on temperature than are changes in metabolism, and hence active brain is predicted to approach blood temperature from its initial temperature. All calculated changes in temperature for reasonable physiological parameters have magnitudes <0.12 degrees C and are well within the range reported in recent experimental studies involving human subjects.

  5. A family of hyperelastic models for human brain tissue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mihai, L. Angela; Budday, Silvia; Holzapfel, Gerhard A.; Kuhl, Ellen; Goriely, Alain

    2017-09-01

    Experiments on brain samples under multiaxial loading have shown that human brain tissue is both extremely soft when compared to other biological tissues and characterized by a peculiar elastic response under combined shear and compression/tension: there is a significant increase in shear stress with increasing axial compression compared to a moderate increase with increasing axial tension. Recent studies have revealed that many widely used constitutive models for soft biological tissues fail to capture this characteristic response. Here, guided by experiments of human brain tissue, we develop a family of modeling approaches that capture the elasticity of brain tissue under varying simple shear superposed on varying axial stretch by exploiting key observations about the behavior of the nonlinear shear modulus, which can be obtained directly from the experimental data.

  6. Brain Neuroendoscopy: Experience in Experimental Models and Clinical Application

    OpenAIRE

    Alvarez Peña, Carlos; Departamento de Neurocirugía Hospital Guillermo Almenara Irigoyen EsSALUD Lima, Perú; Rocca, Uldarico; Departamento de Neurocirugía Hospital Guillermo Almenara Irigoyen EsSALUD Lima, Perú; Rosell, Pío; Departamento de Neurocirugía Hospital Guillermo Almenara Irigoyen EsSALUD Lima, Perú; Ramos, Aurora; Departamento de Neurocirugía Hospital Guillermo Almenara Irigoyen EsSALUD Lima, Perú

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Experimental models (EM) design to acquire brain neuroendoscopy (BNE) skill to be applied on patients. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Study performed in three phases. For the first two -design and training- we used bovine and human coipses randomly assigned to groups A and B according to physiological sodium chloride solution (SCS) volume needed to produce satisfactory hydrocephalus to perform BNE. During phase three, BNE was performed in 5 patients with brain pathology confirmed by CAT or ...

  7. Realistic modeling of neurons and networks: towards brain simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Angelo, Egidio; Solinas, Sergio; Garrido, Jesus; Casellato, Claudia; Pedrocchi, Alessandra; Mapelli, Jonathan; Gandolfi, Daniela; Prestori, Francesca

    2013-01-01

    Realistic modeling is a new advanced methodology for investigating brain functions. Realistic modeling is based on a detailed biophysical description of neurons and synapses, which can be integrated into microcircuits. The latter can, in turn, be further integrated to form large-scale brain networks and eventually to reconstruct complex brain systems. Here we provide a review of the realistic simulation strategy and use the cerebellar network as an example. This network has been carefully investigated at molecular and cellular level and has been the object of intense theoretical investigation. The cerebellum is thought to lie at the core of the forward controller operations of the brain and to implement timing and sensory prediction functions. The cerebellum is well described and provides a challenging field in which one of the most advanced realistic microcircuit models has been generated. We illustrate how these models can be elaborated and embedded into robotic control systems to gain insight into how the cellular properties of cerebellar neurons emerge in integrated behaviors. Realistic network modeling opens up new perspectives for the investigation of brain pathologies and for the neurorobotic field.

  8. Dynamic causal modelling of brain-behaviour relationships.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rigoux, L; Daunizeau, J

    2015-08-15

    In this work, we expose a mathematical treatment of brain-behaviour relationships, which we coin behavioural Dynamic Causal Modelling or bDCM. This approach aims at decomposing the brain's transformation of stimuli into behavioural outcomes, in terms of the relative contribution of brain regions and their connections. In brief, bDCM places the brain at the interplay between stimulus and behaviour: behavioural outcomes arise from coordinated activity in (hidden) neural networks, whose dynamics are driven by experimental inputs. Estimating neural parameters that control network connectivity and plasticity effectively performs a neurobiologically-constrained approximation to the brain's input-outcome transform. In other words, neuroimaging data essentially serves to enforce the realism of bDCM's decomposition of input-output relationships. In addition, post-hoc artificial lesions analyses allow us to predict induced behavioural deficits and quantify the importance of network features for funnelling input-output relationships. This is important, because this enables one to bridge the gap with neuropsychological studies of brain-damaged patients. We demonstrate the face validity of the approach using Monte-Carlo simulations, and its predictive validity using empirical fMRI/behavioural data from an inhibitory control task. Lastly, we discuss promising applications of this work, including the assessment of functional degeneracy (in the healthy brain) and the prediction of functional recovery after lesions (in neurological patients).

  9. Regional mechanical properties of human brain tissue for computational models of traumatic brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finan, John D; Sundaresh, Sowmya N; Elkin, Benjamin S; McKhann, Guy M; Morrison, Barclay

    2017-06-01

    To determine viscoelastic shear moduli, stress relaxation indentation tests were performed on samples of human brain tissue resected in the course of epilepsy surgery. Through the use of a 500µm diameter indenter, regional mechanical properties were measured in cortical grey and white matter and subregions of the hippocampus. All regions were highly viscoelastic. Cortical grey matter was significantly more compliant than the white matter or hippocampus which were similar in modulus. Although shear modulus was not correlated with the age of the donor, cortex from male donors was significantly stiffer than from female donors. The presented material properties will help to populate finite element models of the brain as they become more anatomically detailed. We present the first mechanical characterization of fresh, post-operative human brain tissue using an indentation loading mode. Indentation generates highly localized data, allowing structure-specific mechanical properties to be determined from small tissue samples resected during surgery. It also avoids pitfalls of cadaveric tissue and allows data to be collected before degenerative processes alter mechanical properties. To correctly predict traumatic brain injury, finite element models must calculate intracranial deformation during head impact. The functional consequences of injury depend on the anatomical structures injured. Therefore, morbidity depends on the distribution of deformation across structures. Accurate prediction of structure-specific deformation requires structure-specific mechanical properties. This data will facilitate deeper understanding of the physical mechanisms that lead to traumatic brain injury. Copyright © 2017 Acta Materialia Inc. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Creating physical 3D stereolithograph models of brain and skull.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel J Kelley

    Full Text Available The human brain and skull are three dimensional (3D anatomical structures with complex surfaces. However, medical images are often two dimensional (2D and provide incomplete visualization of structural morphology. To overcome this loss in dimension, we developed and validated a freely available, semi-automated pathway to build 3D virtual reality (VR and hand-held, stereolithograph models. To evaluate whether surface visualization in 3D was more informative than in 2D, undergraduate students (n = 50 used the Gillespie scale to rate 3D VR and physical models of both a living patient-volunteer's brain and the skull of Phineas Gage, a historically famous railroad worker whose misfortune with a projectile tamping iron provided the first evidence of a structure-function relationship in brain. Using our processing pathway, we successfully fabricated human brain and skull replicas and validated that the stereolithograph model preserved the scale of the VR model. Based on the Gillespie ratings, students indicated that the biological utility and quality of visual information at the surface of VR and stereolithograph models were greater than the 2D images from which they were derived. The method we developed is useful to create VR and stereolithograph 3D models from medical images and can be used to model hard or soft tissue in living or preserved specimens. Compared to 2D images, VR and stereolithograph models provide an extra dimension that enhances both the quality of visual information and utility of surface visualization in neuroscience and medicine.

  11. Classical Wave Model of Quantum-Like Processing in Brain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khrennikov, A.

    2011-01-01

    We discuss the conjecture on quantum-like (QL) processing of information in the brain. It is not based on the physical quantum brain (e.g., Penrose) - quantum physical carriers of information. In our approach the brain created the QL representation (QLR) of information in Hilbert space. It uses quantum information rules in decision making. The existence of such QLR was (at least preliminary) confirmed by experimental data from cognitive psychology. The violation of the law of total probability in these experiments is an important sign of nonclassicality of data. In so called "constructive wave function approach" such data can be represented by complex amplitudes. We presented 1,2 the QL model of decision making. In this paper we speculate on a possible physical realization of QLR in the brain: a classical wave model producing QLR . It is based on variety of time scales in the brain. Each pair of scales (fine - the background fluctuations of electromagnetic field and rough - the cognitive image scale) induces the QL representation. The background field plays the crucial role in creation of "superstrong QL correlations" in the brain.

  12. Permeability of PEGylated Immunoarsonoliposomes Through In Vitro Blood Brain Barrier-Medulloblastoma Co-culture Models for Brain Tumor Therapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Al-Shehri, A.; Favretto, M.E.; Ioannou, P.V.; Romero, I.A.; Couraud, P.O.; Weksler, B.B.; Parker, T.L.; Kallinteri, P.

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE: Owing to restricted access of pharmacological agents into the brain due to blood brain barrier (BBB) there is a need: 1. to develop a more representative 3-D-co-culture model of tumor-BBB interaction to investigate drug and nanoparticle transport into the brain for diagnostic and therapeuti

  13. Evaluation of cat brain infarction model using microPET

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jong Jin; Lee, Dong Soo; Kim, Yun Hui; Hwang, Do Won; Kim, Jin Su; Chung, June Key; Lee, Myung Chul [College of Medicine, Seoul National Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lim, Sang Moo [Korea Institite of Radiological and Medical Sciences, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2004-12-01

    PET has some disadvantage in the imaging of small animal due to poor resolution. With the advent of microPET scanner, it is possible to image small animals. However, the image quality was not good enough as human image. Due to larger brain, cat brain imaging was superior to mouse or rat. In this study, we established the cat brain infarction model and evaluate it and its temporal change using microPET scanner. Two adult male cats were used. Anesthesia was done with xylazine and ketamine HCI. A burr hole was made at 1 cm right lateral to the bregma. Collagenase type IV 10 {mu}l was injected using 30 G needle for 5 minutes to establish the infarction model. {sup 18}F-FDG microPET (Concorde Microsystems Inc., Knoxville, TN) scans were performed 1, 11 and 32 days after the infarction. In addition, {sup 18}F-FDG PET scans were performed using human PET scanner (Gemini, Philips medical systems, CA, USA) 13 and 47 days after the infarction. Two cat brain infarction models were established. The glucose metabolism of an infarction lesion improved with time. An infarction lesion was also distinguishable in the human PET scan. We successfully established the cat brain infarction model and evaluated the infarcted lesion and its temporal change using {sup 18}F-FDG microPET scanner.

  14. Evaluation of cat brain infarction model using microPET

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, J. J.; Lee, D. S.; Kim, J. H.; Hwang, D. W.; Jung, J. G.; Lee, M. C [College of Medicine, Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lim, S. M [Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2004-07-01

    PET has some disadvantage in the imaging of small animal due to poor resolution. With the advance of microPET scanner, it is possible to image small animals. However, the image quality was not so much satisfactory as human image. As cats have relatively large sized brain, cat brain imaging was superior to mice or rat. In this study, we established the cat brain infarction model and evaluate it and its temporal change using microPET scanner. Two adult male cats were used. Anesthesia was done with xylazine and ketamine HCl. A burr hole was made at 1cm right lateral to the bregma. Collagenase type IV 10 ul was injected using 30G needle for 5 minutes to establish the infarction model. F-18 FDG microPET (Concorde Microsystems Inc., Knoxville. TN) scans were performed 1. 11 and 32 days after the infarction. In addition. 18F-FDG PET scans were performed using Gemini PET scanner (Philips medical systems. CA, USA) 13 and 47 days after the infarction. Two cat brain infarction models were established. The glucose metabolism of an infraction lesion improved with time. An infarction lesion was also distinguishable in the Gemini PET scan. We successfully established the cat brain infarction model and evaluated the infarcted lesion and its temporal change using F-18 FDG microPET scanner.

  15. Data-driven forward model inference for EEG brain imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Sofie Therese; Hauberg, Søren; Hansen, Lars Kai

    2016-01-01

    Electroencephalography (EEG) is a flexible and accessible tool with excellent temporal resolution but with a spatial resolution hampered by volume conduction. Reconstruction of the cortical sources of measured EEG activity partly alleviates this problem and effectively turns EEG into a brain......-of-concept study, we show that, even when anatomical knowledge is unavailable, a suitable forward model can be estimated directly from the EEG. We propose a data-driven approach that provides a low-dimensional parametrization of head geometry and compartment conductivities, built using a corpus of forward models....... Combined with only a recorded EEG signal, we are able to estimate both the brain sources and a person-specific forward model by optimizing this parametrization. We thus not only solve an inverse problem, but also optimize over its specification. Our work demonstrates that personalized EEG brain imaging...

  16. Data-driven forward model inference for EEG brain imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Sofie Therese; Hauberg, Søren; Hansen, Lars Kai

    2016-01-01

    Electroencephalography (EEG) is a flexible and accessible tool with excellent temporal resolution but with a spatial resolution hampered by volume conduction. Reconstruction of the cortical sources of measured EEG activity partly alleviates this problem and effectively turns EEG into a brain......-of-concept study, we show that, even when anatomical knowledge is unavailable, a suitable forward model can be estimated directly from the EEG. We propose a data-driven approach that provides a low-dimensional parametrization of head geometry and compartment conductivities, built using a corpus of forward models....... Combined with only a recorded EEG signal, we are able to estimate both the brain sources and a person-specific forward model by optimizing this parametrization. We thus not only solve an inverse problem, but also optimize over its specification. Our work demonstrates that personalized EEG brain imaging...

  17. Joint Modelling of Structural and Functional Brain Networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Kasper Winther; Herlau, Tue; Mørup, Morten

    Functional and structural magnetic resonance imaging have become the most important noninvasive windows to the human brain. A major challenge in the analysis of brain networks is to establish the similarities and dissimilarities between functional and structural connectivity. We formulate a non...... significant structures that are consistently shared across subjects and data splits. This provides an unsupervised approach for modeling of structure-function relations in the brain and provides a general framework for multimodal integration.......-parametric Bayesian network model which allows for joint modelling and integration of multiple networks. We demonstrate the model’s ability to detect vertices that share structure across networks jointly in functional MRI (fMRI) and diffusion MRI (dMRI) data. Using two fMRI and dMRI scans per subject, we establish...

  18. Resolving structural variability in network models and the brain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Florian Klimm

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Large-scale white matter pathways crisscrossing the cortex create a complex pattern of connectivity that underlies human cognitive function. Generative mechanisms for this architecture have been difficult to identify in part because little is known in general about mechanistic drivers of structured networks. Here we contrast network properties derived from diffusion spectrum imaging data of the human brain with 13 synthetic network models chosen to probe the roles of physical network embedding and temporal network growth. We characterize both the empirical and synthetic networks using familiar graph metrics, but presented here in a more complete statistical form, as scatter plots and distributions, to reveal the full range of variability of each measure across scales in the network. We focus specifically on the degree distribution, degree assortativity, hierarchy, topological Rentian scaling, and topological fractal scaling--in addition to several summary statistics, including the mean clustering coefficient, the shortest path-length, and the network diameter. The models are investigated in a progressive, branching sequence, aimed at capturing different elements thought to be important in the brain, and range from simple random and regular networks, to models that incorporate specific growth rules and constraints. We find that synthetic models that constrain the network nodes to be physically embedded in anatomical brain regions tend to produce distributions that are most similar to the corresponding measurements for the brain. We also find that network models hardcoded to display one network property (e.g., assortativity do not in general simultaneously display a second (e.g., hierarchy. This relative independence of network properties suggests that multiple neurobiological mechanisms might be at play in the development of human brain network architecture. Together, the network models that we develop and employ provide a potentially useful

  19. A Bayesian model of category-specific emotional brain responses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tor D Wager

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Understanding emotion is critical for a science of healthy and disordered brain function, but the neurophysiological basis of emotional experience is still poorly understood. We analyzed human brain activity patterns from 148 studies of emotion categories (2159 total participants using a novel hierarchical Bayesian model. The model allowed us to classify which of five categories--fear, anger, disgust, sadness, or happiness--is engaged by a study with 66% accuracy (43-86% across categories. Analyses of the activity patterns encoded in the model revealed that each emotion category is associated with unique, prototypical patterns of activity across multiple brain systems including the cortex, thalamus, amygdala, and other structures. The results indicate that emotion categories are not contained within any one region or system, but are represented as configurations across multiple brain networks. The model provides a precise summary of the prototypical patterns for each emotion category, and demonstrates that a sufficient characterization of emotion categories relies on (a differential patterns of involvement in neocortical systems that differ between humans and other species, and (b distinctive patterns of cortical-subcortical interactions. Thus, these findings are incompatible with several contemporary theories of emotion, including those that emphasize emotion-dedicated brain systems and those that propose emotion is localized primarily in subcortical activity. They are consistent with componential and constructionist views, which propose that emotions are differentiated by a combination of perceptual, mnemonic, prospective, and motivational elements. Such brain-based models of emotion provide a foundation for new translational and clinical approaches.

  20. Inferring brain-computational mechanisms with models of activity measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kriegeskorte, Nikolaus; Diedrichsen, Jörn

    2016-10-01

    High-resolution functional imaging is providing increasingly rich measurements of brain activity in animals and humans. A major challenge is to leverage such data to gain insight into the brain's computational mechanisms. The first step is to define candidate brain-computational models (BCMs) that can perform the behavioural task in question. We would then like to infer which of the candidate BCMs best accounts for measured brain-activity data. Here we describe a method that complements each BCM by a measurement model (MM), which simulates the way the brain-activity measurements reflect neuronal activity (e.g. local averaging in functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) voxels or sparse sampling in array recordings). The resulting generative model (BCM-MM) produces simulated measurements. To avoid having to fit the MM to predict each individual measurement channel of the brain-activity data, we compare the measured and predicted data at the level of summary statistics. We describe a novel particular implementation of this approach, called probabilistic representational similarity analysis (pRSA) with MMs, which uses representational dissimilarity matrices (RDMs) as the summary statistics. We validate this method by simulations of fMRI measurements (locally averaging voxels) based on a deep convolutional neural network for visual object recognition. Results indicate that the way the measurements sample the activity patterns strongly affects the apparent representational dissimilarities. However, modelling of the measurement process can account for these effects, and different BCMs remain distinguishable even under substantial noise. The pRSA method enables us to perform Bayesian inference on the set of BCMs and to recognize the data-generating model in each case.This article is part of the themed issue 'Interpreting BOLD: a dialogue between cognitive and cellular neuroscience'.

  1. Inferring brain-computational mechanisms with models of activity measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diedrichsen, Jörn

    2016-01-01

    High-resolution functional imaging is providing increasingly rich measurements of brain activity in animals and humans. A major challenge is to leverage such data to gain insight into the brain's computational mechanisms. The first step is to define candidate brain-computational models (BCMs) that can perform the behavioural task in question. We would then like to infer which of the candidate BCMs best accounts for measured brain-activity data. Here we describe a method that complements each BCM by a measurement model (MM), which simulates the way the brain-activity measurements reflect neuronal activity (e.g. local averaging in functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) voxels or sparse sampling in array recordings). The resulting generative model (BCM-MM) produces simulated measurements. To avoid having to fit the MM to predict each individual measurement channel of the brain-activity data, we compare the measured and predicted data at the level of summary statistics. We describe a novel particular implementation of this approach, called probabilistic representational similarity analysis (pRSA) with MMs, which uses representational dissimilarity matrices (RDMs) as the summary statistics. We validate this method by simulations of fMRI measurements (locally averaging voxels) based on a deep convolutional neural network for visual object recognition. Results indicate that the way the measurements sample the activity patterns strongly affects the apparent representational dissimilarities. However, modelling of the measurement process can account for these effects, and different BCMs remain distinguishable even under substantial noise. The pRSA method enables us to perform Bayesian inference on the set of BCMs and to recognize the data-generating model in each case. This article is part of the themed issue ‘Interpreting BOLD: a dialogue between cognitive and cellular neuroscience’. PMID:27574316

  2. Animal models of brain maldevelopment induced by cycad plant genotoxins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kisby, Glen E; Moore, Holly; Spencer, Peter S

    2013-12-01

    Cycads are long-lived tropical and subtropical plants that contain azoxyglycosides (e.g., cycasin, macrozamin) and neurotoxic amino acids (notably β-N-methylamino-l-alanine l-BMAA), toxins that have been implicated in the etiology of a disappearing neurodegenerative disease, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and parkinsonism-dementia complex that has been present in high incidence among three genetically distinct populations in the western Pacific. The neuropathology of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis/parkinsonism-dementia complex includes features suggestive of brain maldevelopment, an experimentally proven property of cycasin attributable to the genotoxic action of its aglycone methylazoxymethanol (MAM). This property of MAM has been exploited by neurobiologists as a tool to study perturbations of brain development. Depending on the neurodevelopmental stage, MAM can induce features in laboratory animals that model certain characteristics of epilepsy, schizophrenia, or ataxia. Studies in DNA repair-deficient mice show that MAM perturbs brain development through a DNA damage-mediated mechanism. The brain DNA lesions produced by systemic MAM appear to modulate the expression of genes that regulate neurodevelopment and contribute to neurodegeneration. Epigenetic changes (histone lysine methylation) have also been detected in the underdeveloped brain after MAM administration. The DNA damage and epigenetic changes produced by MAM and, perhaps by chemically related substances (e.g., nitrosamines, nitrosoureas, hydrazines), might be an important mechanism by which early-life exposure to genotoxicants can induce long-term brain dysfunction.

  3. A neurovascular blood-brain barrier in vitro model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zehendner, Christoph M; White, Robin; Hedrich, Jana; Luhmann, Heiko J

    2014-01-01

    The cerebral microvasculature possesses certain cellular features that constitute the blood-brain barrier (BBB) (Abbott et al., Neurobiol Dis 37:13-25, 2010). This dynamic barrier separates the brain parenchyma from peripheral blood flow and is of tremendous clinical importance: for example, BBB breakdown as in stroke is associated with the development of brain edema (Rosenberg and Yang, Neurosurg Focus 22:E4, 2007), inflammation (Kuhlmann et al., Neurosci Lett 449:168-172, 2009; Coisne and Engelhardt, Antioxid Redox Signal 15:1285-1303, 2011), and increased mortality. In vivo, the BBB consists of brain endothelial cells (BEC) that are embedded within a precisely regulated environment containing astrocytes, pericytes, smooth muscle cells, and glial cells. These cells experience modulation by various pathways of intercellular communication and by pathophysiological processes, e.g., through neurovascular coupling (Attwell et al., Nature 468:232-243, 2010), cortical spreading depression (Gursoy-Ozdemir et al., J Clin Invest 113:1447-1455, 2004), or formation of oxidative stress (Yemisci et al., Nat Med 15:1031-1037, 2009). Hence, this interdependent assembly of cells is referred to as the neurovascular unit (NVU) (Zlokovic, Nat Med 16:1370-1371, 2010; Zlokovic, Neuron 57:178-201, 2008). Experimental approaches to investigate the BBB in vitro are highly desirable to study the cerebral endothelium in health and disease. However, due to the complex interactions taking place within the NVU in vivo, it is difficult to mimic this interplay in vitro.Here, we describe a murine blood-brain barrier coculture model consisting of cortical organotypic slice cultures and brain endothelial cells that includes most of the cellular components of the NVU including neurons, astrocytes, and brain endothelial cells. This model allows the experimental analysis of several crucial BBB parameters such as transendothelial electrical resistance or tight junction protein localization by

  4. Development of a Comprehensive Blast-Related Auditory Injury Database (BRAID)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-05-01

    Environmental and Preventive Medicine Unit Five, San Diego, CA; 2Medical Modeling , Simulation, and Mis- sion Support Department, Naval Health Research Center...loss as the most common VA service-connected disabilities [20,33]. A hearing loss cost-probability model demonstrated that a typical retired...Internet]. Washington (DC): VA VBA ; 2013 Jun [cited 2015 Mar]. 166 p. Available from: http://benefits.va.gov/ REPORTS/abr/2012_abr.pdf 33. Henry JL

  5. Efficient multilevel brain tumor segmentation with integrated bayesian model classification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corso, J J; Sharon, E; Dube, S; El-Saden, S; Sinha, U; Yuille, A

    2008-05-01

    We present a new method for automatic segmentation of heterogeneous image data that takes a step toward bridging the gap between bottom-up affinity-based segmentation methods and top-down generative model based approaches. The main contribution of the paper is a Bayesian formulation for incorporating soft model assignments into the calculation of affinities, which are conventionally model free. We integrate the resulting model-aware affinities into the multilevel segmentation by weighted aggregation algorithm, and apply the technique to the task of detecting and segmenting brain tumor and edema in multichannel magnetic resonance (MR) volumes. The computationally efficient method runs orders of magnitude faster than current state-of-the-art techniques giving comparable or improved results. Our quantitative results indicate the benefit of incorporating model-aware affinities into the segmentation process for the difficult case of glioblastoma multiforme brain tumor.

  6. Nano-Modeling and Computation in Bio and Brain Dynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paolo Di Sia

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The study of brain dynamics currently utilizes the new features of nanobiotechnology and bioengineering. New geometric and analytical approaches appear very promising in all scientific areas, particularly in the study of brain processes. Efforts to engage in deep comprehension lead to a change in the inner brain parameters, in order to mimic the external transformation by the proper use of sensors and effectors. This paper highlights some crossing research areas of natural computing, nanotechnology, and brain modeling and considers two interesting theoretical approaches related to brain dynamics: (a the memory in neural network, not as a passive element for storing information, but integrated in the neural parameters as synaptic conductances; and (b a new transport model based on analytical expressions of the most important transport parameters, which works from sub-pico-level to macro-level, able both to understand existing data and to give new predictions. Complex biological systems are highly dependent on the context, which suggests a “more nature-oriented” computational philosophy.

  7. Research on Perfusion CT in Rabbit Brain Tumor Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ha, Bon Chul; Kwak, Byung Kook; Jung, Ji Sung [Dept. of Diagnostic Radiology, Chung Ang University Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lim, Cheong Hwan; Jung, Hong Ryang [Dept. of Radiological Science, Hanseo University, Seosan (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-06-15

    We investigated the vascular characteristics of tumors and normal tissue using perfusion CT in the rabbit brain tumor model. The VX2 carcinoma concentration of 1 x 10{sup 7} cells/ml(0.1 ml) was implanted in the brain of nine New Zealand white rabbits (weight: 2.4 kg-3.0 kg, mean: 2.6 kg). The perfusion CT was scanned when the tumors were grown up to 5 mm. The tumor volume and perfusion value were quantitatively analyzed by using commercial workstation (advantage windows workstation, AW, version 4.2, GE, USA). The mean volume of implanted tumors was 316{+-}181 mm{sup 3}, and the biggest and smallest volumes of tumor were 497 mm{sup 3} and 195 mm{sup 3}, respectively. All the implanted tumors in rabbits are single-nodular tumors, and intracranial metastasis was not observed. In the perfusion CT, cerebral blood volume (CBV) were 74.40{+-}9.63, 16.8{+-}0.64, 15.24{+-}3.23 ml/100g in the tumor core, ipsilateral normal brain, and contralateral normal brain, respectively (p{<=}0.05). In the cerebral blood flow (CBF), there were significant differences between the tumor core and both normal brains (p{<=}0.05), but no significant differences between ipsilateral and contralateral normal brains (962.91{+-}75.96 vs. 357.82{+-}12.82 vs. 323.19{+-}83.24 ml/100g/min). In the mean transit time (MTT), there were significant differences between the tumor core and both normal brains (p{<=}0.05), but no significant differences between ipsilateral and contralateral normal brains (4.37{+-}0.19 vs. 3.02{+-}0.41 vs. 2.86{+-}0.22 sec). In the permeability surface (PS), there were significant differences among the tumor core, ipsilateral and contralateral normal brains (47.23{+-}25.44 vs. 14.54{+-}1.60 vs. 6.81{+-}4.20 ml/100g/min)(p{<=}0.05). In the time to peak (TTP) were no significant differences among the tumor core, ipsilateral and contralateral normal brains. In the positive enhancement integral (PEI), there were significant differences among the tumor core, ipsilateral and

  8. Experimental model for civilian ballistic brain injury biomechanics quantification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jiangyue; Yoganandan, Narayan; Pintar, Frank A; Guan, Yabo; Gennarelli, Thomas A

    2007-01-01

    Biomechanical quantification of projectile penetration using experimental head models can enhance the understanding of civilian ballistic brain injury and advance treatment. Two of the most commonly used handgun projectiles (25-cal, 275 m/s and 9 mm, 395 m/s) were discharged to spherical head models with gelatin and Sylgard simulants. Four ballistic pressure transducers recorded temporal pressure distributions at 308kHz, and temporal cavity dynamics were captured at 20,000 frames/second (fps) using high-speed digital video images. Pressures ranged from 644.6 to -92.8 kPa. Entry pressures in gelatin models were higher than exit pressures, whereas in Sylgard models entry pressures were lower or equivalent to exit pressures. Gelatin responded with brittle-type failure, while Sylgard demonstrated a ductile pattern through formation of micro-bubbles along projectile path. Temporary cavities in Sylgard models were 1.5-2x larger than gelatin models. Pressures in Sylgard models were more sensitive to projectile velocity and diameter increase, indicating Sylgard was more rate sensitive than gelatin. Based on failure patterns and brain tissue rate-sensitive characteristics, Sylgard was found to be an appropriate simulant. Compared with spherical projectile data, full-metal jacket (FMJ) projectiles produced different temporary cavity and pressures, demonstrating shape effects. Models using Sylgard gel and FMJ projectiles are appropriate to enhance understanding and mechanisms of ballistic brain injury.

  9. Calcium-activated potassium channels mediated blood-brain tumor barrier opening in a rat metastatic brain tumor model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ong John M

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The blood-brain tumor barrier (BTB impedes the delivery of therapeutic agents to brain tumors. While adequate delivery of drugs occurs in systemic tumors, the BTB limits delivery of anti-tumor agents into brain metastases. Results In this study, we examined the function and regulation of calcium-activated potassium (KCa channels in a rat metastatic brain tumor model. We showed that intravenous infusion of NS1619, a KCa channel agonist, and bradykinin selectively enhanced BTB permeability in brain tumors, but not in normal brain. Iberiotoxin, a KCa channel antagonist, significantly attenuated NS1619-induced BTB permeability increase. We found KCa channels and bradykinin type 2 receptors (B2R expressed in cultured human metastatic brain tumor cells (CRL-5904, non-small cell lung cancer, metastasized to brain, human brain microvessel endothelial cells (HBMEC and human lung cancer brain metastasis tissues. Potentiometric assays demonstrated the activity of KCa channels in metastatic brain tumor cells and HBMEC. Furthermore, we detected higher expression of KCa channels in the metastatic brain tumor tissue and tumor capillary endothelia as compared to normal brain tissue. Co-culture of metastatic brain tumor cells and brain microvessel endothelial cells showed an upregulation of KCa channels, which may contribute to the overexpression of KCa channels in tumor microvessels and selectivity of BTB opening. Conclusion These findings suggest that KCa channels in metastatic brain tumors may serve as an effective target for biochemical modulation of BTB permeability to enhance selective delivery of chemotherapeutic drugs to metastatic brain tumors.

  10. Predicting functional brain ROIs via fiber shape models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Tuo; Guo, Lei; Li, Kaiming; Zhu, Dajing; Cui, Guangbin; Liu, Tianming

    2011-01-01

    Study of structural and functional connectivities of the human brain has received significant interest and effort recently. A fundamental question arises when attempting to measure the structural and/or functional connectivities of specific brain networks: how to best identify possible Regions of Interests (ROIs)? In this paper, we present a novel ROI prediction framework that localizes ROIs in individual brains based on learned fiber shape models from multimodal task-based fMRI and diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) data. In the training stage, ROIs are identified as activation peaks in task-based fMRI data. Then, shape models of white matter fibers emanating from these functional ROIs are learned. In addition, ROIs' location distribution model is learned to be used as an anatomical constraint. In the prediction stage, functional ROIs are predicted in individual brains based on DTI data. The ROI prediction is formulated and solved as an energy minimization problem, in which the two learned models are used as energy terms. Our experiment results show that the average ROI prediction error is 3.45 mm, in comparison with the benchmark data provided by working memory task-based fMRI. Promising results were also obtained on the ADNI-2 longitudinal DTI dataset.

  11. Stochastic model of Tsc1 lesions in mouse brain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shilpa Prabhakar

    Full Text Available Tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC is an autosomal dominant disorder due to mutations in either TSC1 or TSC2 that affects many organs with hamartomas and tumors. TSC-associated brain lesions include subependymal nodules, subependymal giant cell astrocytomas and tubers. Neurologic manifestations in TSC comprise a high frequency of mental retardation and developmental disorders including autism, as well as epilepsy. Here, we describe a new mouse model of TSC brain lesions in which complete loss of Tsc1 is achieved in multiple brain cell types in a stochastic pattern. Injection of an adeno-associated virus vector encoding Cre recombinase into the cerebral ventricles of mice homozygous for a Tsc1 conditional allele on the day of birth led to reduced survival, and pathologic findings of enlarged neurons, cortical heterotopias, subependymal nodules, and hydrocephalus. The severity of clinical and pathologic findings as well as survival was shown to be dependent upon the dose and serotype of Cre virus injected. Although several other models of TSC brain disease exist, this model is unique in that the pathology reflects a variety of TSC-associated lesions involving different numbers and types of cells. This model provides a valuable and unique addition for therapeutic assessment.

  12. QSAR model for blood-brain barrier permeation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toropov, Andrey A; Toropova, Alla P; Beeg, Marten; Gobbi, Marco; Salmona, Mario

    2017-05-02

    Predicting blood-brain barrier permeability for novel compounds is an important goal for neurotherapeutics-focused drug discovery. It is impossible to determine experimentally the blood-brain barrier partitioning of all possible candidates. Consequently, alternative evaluation methods based on computational models are desirable or even necessary. The CORAL software (http://www.insilico.eu/coral) has been checked up as a tool to build up quantitative structure - activity relationships for blood-brain barrier permeation. The Monte Carlo technique gives possibility to build up predictive model of an endpoint by means of selection of so-called correlation weights of various molecular features. Descriptors calculated with these weights are basis for correlations "structure-endpoint". The approach gives good models for three random splits into the training and validation sets. The best model characterized by the following statistics for the external validation set: the number of compounds is 41, determination coefficient is equal to 0.896, root mean squared error is equal to 0.175. The suggested approach can be applied as a tool for prediction of blood-brain barrier permeation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Models to Tailor Brain Stimulation Therapies in Stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. B. Plow

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A great challenge facing stroke rehabilitation is the lack of information on how to derive targeted therapies. As such, techniques once considered promising, such as brain stimulation, have demonstrated mixed efficacy across heterogeneous samples in clinical studies. Here, we explain reasons, citing its one-type-suits-all approach as the primary cause of variable efficacy. We present evidence supporting the role of alternate substrates, which can be targeted instead in patients with greater damage and deficit. Building on this groundwork, this review will also discuss different frameworks on how to tailor brain stimulation therapies. To the best of our knowledge, our report is the first instance that enumerates and compares across theoretical models from upper limb recovery and conditions like aphasia and depression. Here, we explain how different models capture heterogeneity across patients and how they can be used to predict which patients would best respond to what treatments to develop targeted, individualized brain stimulation therapies. Our intent is to weigh pros and cons of testing each type of model so brain stimulation is successfully tailored to maximize upper limb recovery in stroke.

  14. Modelling Brain Temperature and Perfusion for Cerebral Cooling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blowers, Stephen; Valluri, Prashant; Marshall, Ian; Andrews, Peter; Harris, Bridget; Thrippleton, Michael

    2015-11-01

    Brain temperature relies heavily on two aspects: i) blood perfusion and porous heat transport through tissue and ii) blood flow and heat transfer through embedded arterial and venous vasculature. Moreover brain temperature cannot be measured directly unless highly invasive surgical procedures are used. A 3D two-phase fluid-porous model for mapping flow and temperature in brain is presented with arterial and venous vessels extracted from MRI scans. Heat generation through metabolism is also included. The model is robust and reveals flow and temperature maps in unprecedented 3D detail. However, the Karmen-Kozeny parameters of the porous (tissue) phase need to be optimised for expected perfusion profiles. In order to optimise the K-K parameters a reduced order two-phase model is developed where 1D vessels are created with a tree generation algorithm embedded inside a 3D porous domain. Results reveal that blood perfusion is a strong function of the porosity distribution in the tissue. We present a qualitative comparison between the simulated perfusion maps and those obtained clinically. We also present results studying the effect of scalp cooling on core brain temperature and preliminary results agree with those observed clinically.

  15. Modeling and Targeting MYC Genes in Childhood Brain Tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutter, Sonja; Bolin, Sara; Weishaupt, Holger; Swartling, Fredrik J

    2017-03-23

    Brain tumors are the second most common group of childhood cancers, accounting for about 20%-25% of all pediatric tumors. Deregulated expression of the MYC family of transcription factors, particularly c-MYC and MYCN genes, has been found in many of these neoplasms, and their expression levels are often correlated with poor prognosis. Elevated c-MYC/MYCN initiates and drives tumorigenesis in many in vivo model systems of pediatric brain tumors. Therefore, inhibition of their oncogenic function is an attractive therapeutic target. In this review, we explore the roles of MYC oncoproteins and their molecular targets during the formation, maintenance, and recurrence of childhood brain tumors. We also briefly summarize recent progress in the development of therapeutic approaches for pharmacological inhibition of MYC activity in these tumors.

  16. Quantitative genetic analysis of brain size variation in sticklebacks: support for the mosaic model of brain evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noreikiene, Kristina; Herczeg, Gábor; Gonda, Abigél; Balázs, Gergely; Husby, Arild; Merilä, Juha

    2015-07-07

    The mosaic model of brain evolution postulates that different brain regions are relatively free to evolve independently from each other. Such independent evolution is possible only if genetic correlations among the different brain regions are less than unity. We estimated heritabilities, evolvabilities and genetic correlations of relative size of the brain, and its different regions in the three-spined stickleback (Gasterosteus aculeatus). We found that heritabilities were low (average h(2) = 0.24), suggesting a large plastic component to brain architecture. However, evolvabilities of different brain parts were moderate, suggesting the presence of additive genetic variance to sustain a response to selection in the long term. Genetic correlations among different brain regions were low (average rG = 0.40) and significantly less than unity. These results, along with those from analyses of phenotypic and genetic integration, indicate a high degree of independence between different brain regions, suggesting that responses to selection are unlikely to be severely constrained by genetic and phenotypic correlations. Hence, the results give strong support for the mosaic model of brain evolution. However, the genetic correlation between brain and body size was high (rG = 0.89), suggesting a constraint for independent evolution of brain and body size in sticklebacks.

  17. Fuzzy local Gaussian mixture model for brain MR image segmentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Zexuan; Xia, Yong; Sun, Quansen; Chen, Qiang; Xia, Deshen; Feng, David Dagan

    2012-05-01

    Accurate brain tissue segmentation from magnetic resonance (MR) images is an essential step in quantitative brain image analysis. However, due to the existence of noise and intensity inhomogeneity in brain MR images, many segmentation algorithms suffer from limited accuracy. In this paper, we assume that the local image data within each voxel's neighborhood satisfy the Gaussian mixture model (GMM), and thus propose the fuzzy local GMM (FLGMM) algorithm for automated brain MR image segmentation. This algorithm estimates the segmentation result that maximizes the posterior probability by minimizing an objective energy function, in which a truncated Gaussian kernel function is used to impose the spatial constraint and fuzzy memberships are employed to balance the contribution of each GMM. We compared our algorithm to state-of-the-art segmentation approaches in both synthetic and clinical data. Our results show that the proposed algorithm can largely overcome the difficulties raised by noise, low contrast, and bias field, and substantially improve the accuracy of brain MR image segmentation.

  18. Dosha brain-types: A neural model of individual differences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frederick T Travis

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper explores brain patterns associated with the three categories of regulatory principles of the body, mind, and behavior in Ayurveda, called Vata, Pitta, and Kapha dosha. A growing body of research has reported patterns of blood chemistry, genetic expression, physiological states, and chronic diseases associated with each dosha type. Since metabolic and growth factors are controlled by the nervous system, each dosha type should be associated with patterns of functioning of six major areas of the nervous system: The prefrontal cortex, the reticular activating system, the autonomic nervous system, the enteric nervous system, the limbic system, and the hypothalamus. For instance, the prefrontal cortex, which includes the anterior cingulate, ventral medial, and the dorsal lateral cortices, would exhibit a high range of functioning in the Vata brain-type leading to the possibility of being easily overstimulated. The Vata brain-type performs activity quickly. Learns quickly and forgets quickly. Their fast mind gives them an edge in creative problem solving. The Pitta brain-type reacts strongly to all challenges leading to purposeful and resolute actions. They never give up and are very dynamic and goal oriented. The Kapha brain-type is slow and steady leading to methodical thinking and action. They prefer routine and needs stimulation to get going. A model of dosha brain-types could provide a physiological foundation to understand individual differences. This model could help individualize treatment modalities to address different mental and physical dysfunctions. It also could explain differences in behavior seen in clinical as well as in normal populations.

  19. Corticonic models of brain mechanisms underlying cognition and intelligence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farhat, Nabil H.

    The concern of this review is brain theory or more specifically, in its first part, a model of the cerebral cortex and the way it: (a) interacts with subcortical regions like the thalamus and the hippocampus to provide higher-level-brain functions that underlie cognition and intelligence, (b) handles and represents dynamical sensory patterns imposed by a constantly changing environment, (c) copes with the enormous number of such patterns encountered in a lifetime by means of dynamic memory that offers an immense number of stimulus-specific attractors for input patterns (stimuli) to select from, (d) selects an attractor through a process of “conjugation” of the input pattern with the dynamics of the thalamo-cortical loop, (e) distinguishes between redundant (structured) and non-redundant (random) inputs that are void of information, (f) can do categorical perception when there is access to vast associative memory laid out in the association cortex with the help of the hippocampus, and (g) makes use of “computation” at the edge of chaos and information driven annealing to achieve all this. Other features and implications of the concepts presented for the design of computational algorithms and machines with brain-like intelligence are also discussed. The material and results presented suggest, that a Parametrically Coupled Logistic Map network (PCLMN) is a minimal model of the thalamo-cortical complex and that marrying such a network to a suitable associative memory with re-entry or feedback forms a useful, albeit, abstract model of a cortical module of the brain that could facilitate building a simple artificial brain. In the second part of the review, the results of numerical simulations and drawn conclusions in the first part are linked to the most directly relevant works and views of other workers. What emerges is a picture of brain dynamics on the mesoscopic and macroscopic scales that gives a glimpse of the nature of the long sought after brain code

  20. Self-organized criticality model for brain plasticity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Arcangelis, Lucilla; Perrone-Capano, Carla; Herrmann, Hans J

    2006-01-20

    Networks of living neurons exhibit an avalanche mode of activity, experimentally found in organotypic cultures. Here we present a model that is based on self-organized criticality and takes into account brain plasticity, which is able to reproduce the spectrum of electroencephalograms (EEG). The model consists of an electrical network with threshold firing and activity-dependent synapse strengths. The system exhibits an avalanche activity in a power-law distribution. The analysis of the power spectra of the electrical signal reproduces very robustly the power-law behavior with the exponent 0.8, experimentally measured in EEG spectra. The same value of the exponent is found on small-world lattices and for leaky neurons, indicating that universality holds for a wide class of brain models.

  1. MR Vascular Fingerprinting in Stroke and Brain Tumors Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemasson, B.; Pannetier, N.; Coquery, N.; Boisserand, Ligia S. B.; Collomb, Nora; Schuff, N.; Moseley, M.; Zaharchuk, G.; Barbier, E. L.; Christen, T.

    2016-11-01

    In this study, we evaluated an MRI fingerprinting approach (MRvF) designed to provide high-resolution parametric maps of the microvascular architecture (i.e., blood volume fraction, vessel diameter) and function (blood oxygenation) simultaneously. The method was tested in rats (n = 115), divided in 3 models: brain tumors (9 L, C6, F98), permanent stroke, and a control group of healthy animals. We showed that fingerprinting can robustly distinguish between healthy and pathological brain tissues with different behaviors in tumor and stroke models. In particular, fingerprinting revealed that C6 and F98 glioma models have similar signatures while 9 L present a distinct evolution. We also showed that it is possible to improve the results of MRvF and obtain supplemental information by changing the numerical representation of the vascular network. Finally, good agreement was found between MRvF and conventional MR approaches in healthy tissues and in the C6, F98, and permanent stroke models. For the 9 L glioma model, fingerprinting showed blood oxygenation measurements that contradict results obtained with a quantitative BOLD approach. In conclusion, MR vascular fingerprinting seems to be an efficient technique to study microvascular properties in vivo. Multiple technical improvements are feasible and might improve diagnosis and management of brain diseases.

  2. Neuroinflammation in animal models of traumatic brain injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiu, Chong-Chi; Liao, Yi-En; Yang, Ling-Yu; Wang, Jing-Ya; Tweedie, David; Karnati, Hanuma K.; Greig, Nigel H.; Wang, Jia-Yi

    2016-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a leading cause of mortality and morbidity worldwide. Neuroinflammation is prominent in the short and long-term consequences of neuronal injuries that occur after TBI. Neuroinflammation involves the activation of glia, including microglia and astrocytes, to release inflammatory mediators within the brain, and the subsequent recruitment of peripheral immune cells. Various animal models of TBI have been developed that have proved valuable to elucidate the pathophysiology of the disorder and to assess the safety and efficacy of novel therapies prior to clinical trials. These models provide an excellent platform to delineate key injury mechanisms that associate with types of injury (concussion, contusion, and penetration injuries) that occur clinically for the investigation of mild, moderate, and severe forms of TBI. Additionally, TBI modeling in genetically engineered mice, in particular, has aided the identification of key molecules and pathways for putative injury mechanisms, as targets for development of novel therapies for human TBI. This Review details the evidence showing that neuroinflammation, characterized by the activation of microglia and astrocytes and elevated production of inflammatory mediators, is a critical process occurring in various TBI animal models, provides a broad overview of commonly used animal models of TBI, and overviews representative techniques to quantify markers of the brain inflammatory process. A better understanding of neuroinflammation could open therapeutic avenues for abrogation of secondary cell death and behavioral symptoms that may mediate the progression of TBI. PMID:27382003

  3. Closed Loop Brain Model of Neocortical Information Based Exchange

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James eKozloski

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Here we describe an information based exchange' model of brain function that ascribes to neocortex, basal ganglia, and thalamus distinct network functions. The model allows us to analyze whole brain system set point measures, such as the rate and heterogeneity of transitions in striatum and neocortex, in the context of neuromodulation and other perturbations. Our closed-loop model is grounded in neuroanatomical observations, proposing a novel Grand Loop through neocortex, and invokes different forms of plasticity at specific tissue interfaces and their principle cell synapses to achieve these transitions. By implementing a system for maximum information based exchange of action potentials between modeled neocortical areas, we observe changes to these measures in simulation. We hypothesize that similar dynamic set points and modulations exist in the brain's resting state activity, and that different modifications to information based exchange may shift the risk profile of different component tissues, resulting in different neurodegenerative diseases. This model is targeted for further development using IBM's Neural Tissue Simulator, which allows scalable elaboration of networks, tissues, and their neural and synaptic components towards ever greater complexity and biological realism.

  4. Relationship between the Whole Brain Creativity Model and Kolb’s Experiential Learning Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E Potgieter

    1999-09-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this article is to illustrate the relation between the cognitive styles in Kolb’s experiential learning model and dominance in brain functioning. A descriptive analytical study of the literature on creativity and the development of creative thinking, explored various theories and definitions of creativity, and the nature of creative learning. Congruences between cognitive styles and the four quadrants of the Whole Brain Model were detected. This article focuses specifically on Kolb’s cognitive styles in relation to the Whole Brain Model and the implications thereof for nursing education.

  5. Combination radiotherapy in an orthotopic mouse brain tumor model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kramp, Tamalee R; Camphausen, Kevin

    2012-03-06

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) are the most common and aggressive adult primary brain tumors. In recent years there has been substantial progress in the understanding of the mechanics of tumor invasion, and direct intracerebral inoculation of tumor provides the opportunity of observing the invasive process in a physiologically appropriate environment. As far as human brain tumors are concerned, the orthotopic models currently available are established either by stereotaxic injection of cell suspensions or implantation of a solid piece of tumor through a complicated craniotomy procedure. In our technique we harvest cells from tissue culture to create a cell suspension used to implant directly into the brain. The duration of the surgery is approximately 30 minutes, and as the mouse needs to be in a constant surgical plane, an injectable anesthetic is used. The mouse is placed in a stereotaxic jig made by Stoetling (figure 1). After the surgical area is cleaned and prepared, an incision is made; and the bregma is located to determine the location of the craniotomy. The location of the craniotomy is 2 mm to the right and 1 mm rostral to the bregma. The depth is 3 mm from the surface of the skull, and cells are injected at a rate of 2 μl every 2 minutes. The skin is sutured with 5-0 PDS, and the mouse is allowed to wake up on a heating pad. From our experience, depending on the cell line, treatment can take place from 7-10 days after surgery. Drug delivery is dependent on the drug composition. For radiation treatment the mice are anesthetized, and put into a custom made jig. Lead covers the mouse's body and exposes only the brain of the mouse. The study of tumorigenesis and the evaluation of new therapies for GBM require accurate and reproducible brain tumor animal models. Thus we use this orthotopic brain model to study the interaction of the microenvironment of the brain and the tumor, to test the effectiveness of different therapeutic agents with and without

  6. Avoiding Boltzmann Brain domination in holographic dark energy models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horvat, R.

    2015-11-01

    In a spatially infinite and eternal universe approaching ultimately a de Sitter (or quasi-de Sitter) regime, structure can form by thermal fluctuations as such a space is thermal. The models of Dark Energy invoking holographic principle fit naturally into such a category, and spontaneous formation of isolated brains in otherwise empty space seems the most perplexing, creating the paradox of Boltzmann Brains (BB). It is thus appropriate to ask if such models can be made free from domination by Boltzmann Brains. Here we consider only the simplest model, but adopt both the local and the global viewpoint in the description of the Universe. In the former case, we find that if a dimensionless model parameter c, which modulates the Dark Energy density, lies outside the exponentially narrow strip around the most natural c = 1 line, the theory is rendered BB-safe. In the latter case, the bound on c is exponentially stronger, and seemingly at odds with those bounds on c obtained from various observational tests.

  7. Data-driven forward model inference for EEG brain imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Sofie Therese; Hauberg, Søren; Hansen, Lars Kai

    2016-06-13

    Electroencephalography (EEG) is a flexible and accessible tool with excellent temporal resolution but with a spatial resolution hampered by volume conduction. Reconstruction of the cortical sources of measured EEG activity partly alleviates this problem and effectively turns EEG into a brain imaging device. The quality of the source reconstruction depends on the forward model which details head geometry and conductivities of different head compartments. These person-specific factors are complex to determine, requiring detailed knowledge of the subject's anatomy and physiology. In this proof-of-concept study, we show that, even when anatomical knowledge is unavailable, a suitable forward model can be estimated directly from the EEG. We propose a data-driven approach that provides a low-dimensional parametrization of head geometry and compartment conductivities, built using a corpus of forward models. Combined with only a recorded EEG signal, we are able to estimate both the brain sources and a person-specific forward model by optimizing this parametrization. We thus not only solve an inverse problem, but also optimize over its specification. Our work demonstrates that personalized EEG brain imaging is possible, even when the head geometry and conductivities are unknown.

  8. Avoiding Boltzmann Brain domination in holographic dark energy models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Horvat

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available In a spatially infinite and eternal universe approaching ultimately a de Sitter (or quasi-de Sitter regime, structure can form by thermal fluctuations as such a space is thermal. The models of Dark Energy invoking holographic principle fit naturally into such a category, and spontaneous formation of isolated brains in otherwise empty space seems the most perplexing, creating the paradox of Boltzmann Brains (BB. It is thus appropriate to ask if such models can be made free from domination by Boltzmann Brains. Here we consider only the simplest model, but adopt both the local and the global viewpoint in the description of the Universe. In the former case, we find that if a dimensionless model parameter c, which modulates the Dark Energy density, lies outside the exponentially narrow strip around the most natural c=1 line, the theory is rendered BB-safe. In the latter case, the bound on c is exponentially stronger, and seemingly at odds with those bounds on c obtained from various observational tests.

  9. Visualization and modelling of STLmax topographic brain activity maps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mammone, Nadia; Principe, José C; Morabito, Francesco C; Shiau, Deng S; Sackellares, J Chris

    2010-06-15

    This paper evaluates the descriptive power of brain topography based on a dynamical parameter, the Short-Term Maximum Lyapunov Exponent (STLmax), estimated from EEG, for finding out a relationship of STLmax spatial distribution with the onset zone and with the mechanisms leading to epileptic seizures. Our preliminary work showed that visual assessment of STLmax topography exhibited a link with the location of seizure onset zone. The objective of the present work is to model the spatial distribution of STLmax in order to automatically extract these features from the maps. One-hour preictal segments from four long-term continuous EEG recordings (two scalp and two intracranial) were processed and the corresponding STLmax profiles were estimated. The spatial STLmax maps were modelled by a combination of two Gaussians functions. The parameters of the fitted model allow automatic extraction of quantitative information about the spatial distribution of STLmax: the EEG signal recorded from the brain region where seizures originate exhibited low-STLmax levels, long before the seizure onset, in 3 out of 4 patients (1 out of 2 of scalp patients and 2 out of 2 in intracranial patients). Topographic maps extracted directly from the EEG power did not provide useful information about the location, therefore we conclude that the analysis so far carried out suggests the possibility of using a model of STLmax topography as a tool for monitoring the evolution of epileptic brain dynamics. In the future, a more elaborate approach will be investigated in order to improve the specificity of the method.

  10. A mouse model of human repetitive mild traumatic brain injury

    OpenAIRE

    Kane, Michael J; Pérez, Mariana Angoa; Briggs, Denise I.; Viano, David C.; Kreipke, Christian W.; Kuhn, Donald M.

    2011-01-01

    A novel method for the study of repetitive mild traumatic brain injury (rmTBI) that models the most common form of head injury in humans is presented. Existing animal models of TBI impart focal, severe damage unlike that seen in repeated and mild concussive injuries, and few are configured for repetitive application. Our model is a modification of the Marmarou weight drop method and allows repeated head impacts to lightly anesthetized mice. A key facet of this method is the delivery of an imp...

  11. Genetic mouse models of brain ageing and Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilkei-Gorzo, Andras

    2014-05-01

    Progression of brain ageing is influenced by a complex interaction of genetic and environmental factors. Analysis of genetically modified animals with uniform genetic backgrounds in a standardised, controlled environment enables the dissection of critical determinants of brain ageing on a molecular level. Human and animal studies suggest that increased load of damaged macromolecules, efficacy of DNA maintenance, mitochondrial activity, and cellular stress defences are critical determinants of brain ageing. Surprisingly, mouse lines with genetic impairment of anti-oxidative capacity generally did not show enhanced cognitive ageing but rather an increased sensitivity to oxidative challenge. Mouse lines with impaired mitochondrial activity had critically short life spans or severe and rapidly progressing neurodegeneration. Strains with impaired clearance in damaged macromolecules or defects in the regulation of cellular stress defences showed alterations in the onset and progression of cognitive decline. Importantly, reduced insulin/insulin-like growth factor signalling generally increased life span but impaired cognitive functions revealing a complex interaction between ageing of the brain and of the body. Brain ageing is accompanied by an increased risk of developing Alzheimer's disease. Transgenic mouse models expressing high levels of mutant human amyloid precursor protein showed a number of symptoms and pathophysiological processes typical for early phase of Alzheimer's disease. Generally, therapeutic strategies effective against Alzheimer's disease in humans were also active in the Tg2576, APP23, APP/PS1 and 5xFAD lines, but a large number of false positive findings were also reported. The 3xtg AD model likely has the highest face and construct validity but further studies are needed. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Imatinib treatment reduces brain injury in a murine model of traumatic brain injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enming Joe Su

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Current therapies for Traumatic brain injury (TBI focus on stabilizing individuals and on preventing further damage from the secondary consequences of TBI. A major complication of TBI is cerebral edema, which can be caused by the loss of blood brain barrier (BBB integrity. Recent studies in several CNS pathologies have shown that activation of latent platelet derived growth factor-CC (PDGF-CC within the brain can promote BBB permeability through PDGF receptor α (PDGFRα signaling, and that blocking this pathway improves outcomes. In this study we examine the efficacy for the treatment of TBI of an FDA approved antagonist of the PDGFRα, Imatinib. Using a murine model we show that Imatinib treatment, begun 45 minutes after TBI and given twice daily for 5 days, significantly reduces BBB dysfunction. This is associated with significantly reduced lesion size 24 hours, 7 days, and 21 days after TBI, reduced cerebral edema, determined from apparent diffusion co-efficient (ADC measurements, and with the preservation of cognitive function. Finally, analysis of CSF from human TBI patients suggests a possible correlation between high PDGF-CC levels and increased injury severity. Thus, our data suggests a novel strategy for the treatment of TBI with an existing FDA approved antagonist of the PDGFRα.

  13. Avoiding Boltzmann Brain domination in holographic dark energy models

    CERN Document Server

    Horvat, R

    2015-01-01

    In a spatially infinite and eternal universe approaching ultimately a de Sitter (or quasi-de Sitter) regime, structure can form by thermal fluctuations as such a space is thermal. The models of Dark Energy invoking holographic principle fit naturally into such a category, and spontaneous formation of isolated brains in otherwise empty space seems the most perplexing, creating the paradox of Boltzmann Brains (BB). It is thus appropriate to ask if such models can be made free from domination by Boltzmann Brains. Here we consider only the simplest model, but adopt both the local and the global viewpoint in the description of the Universe. In the former case, we find that if a parameter $c$, which modulates the Dark Energy density, lies outside the exponentially narrow strip around the most natural $c = 1$ line, the theory is rendered BB-safe. In the later case, the bound on $c$ is exponentially stronger, and seemingly at odds with those bounds on $c$ obtained from various observational tests.

  14. In vitro models of the blood-brain barrier: An overview of commonly used brain endothelial cell culture models and guidelines for their use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helms, Hans C; Abbott, N Joan; Burek, Malgorzata; Cecchelli, Romeo; Couraud, Pierre-Olivier; Deli, Maria A; Förster, Carola; Galla, Hans J; Romero, Ignacio A; Shusta, Eric V; Stebbins, Matthew J; Vandenhaute, Elodie; Weksler, Babette; Brodin, Birger

    2016-05-01

    The endothelial cells lining the brain capillaries separate the blood from the brain parenchyma. The endothelial monolayer of the brain capillaries serves both as a crucial interface for exchange of nutrients, gases, and metabolites between blood and brain, and as a barrier for neurotoxic components of plasma and xenobiotics. This "blood-brain barrier" function is a major hindrance for drug uptake into the brain parenchyma. Cell culture models, based on either primary cells or immortalized brain endothelial cell lines, have been developed, in order to facilitate in vitro studies of drug transport to the brain and studies of endothelial cell biology and pathophysiology. In this review, we aim to give an overview of established in vitro blood-brain barrier models with a focus on their validation regarding a set of well-established blood-brain barrier characteristics. As an ideal cell culture model of the blood-brain barrier is yet to be developed, we also aim to give an overview of the advantages and drawbacks of the different models described. © The Author(s) 2016.

  15. In vitro models of the blood–brain barrier: An overview of commonly used brain endothelial cell culture models and guidelines for their use

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helms, Hans C; Abbott, N Joan; Burek, Malgorzata; Cecchelli, Romeo; Couraud, Pierre-Olivier; Deli, Maria A; Förster, Carola; Galla, Hans J; Romero, Ignacio A; Shusta, Eric V; Stebbins, Matthew J; Vandenhaute, Elodie; Weksler, Babette

    2016-01-01

    The endothelial cells lining the brain capillaries separate the blood from the brain parenchyma. The endothelial monolayer of the brain capillaries serves both as a crucial interface for exchange of nutrients, gases, and metabolites between blood and brain, and as a barrier for neurotoxic components of plasma and xenobiotics. This “blood-brain barrier” function is a major hindrance for drug uptake into the brain parenchyma. Cell culture models, based on either primary cells or immortalized brain endothelial cell lines, have been developed, in order to facilitate in vitro studies of drug transport to the brain and studies of endothelial cell biology and pathophysiology. In this review, we aim to give an overview of established in vitro blood–brain barrier models with a focus on their validation regarding a set of well-established blood–brain barrier characteristics. As an ideal cell culture model of the blood–brain barrier is yet to be developed, we also aim to give an overview of the advantages and drawbacks of the different models described. PMID:26868179

  16. MEG inversion using spherical head model combined with brain-shaped head model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Jun

    2001-01-01

    The spherical head model has been widely used in magnetoen cephalography (MEG) as a simple forward model for calculating the external mag netic field producing by neural currents in a human brain. But this model may lead to an inaccurate result, even if the computation speed is fast. For more precise computation, realistic brain-shaped head model is used with the boundary element method (BME), but at greatly increased computational cost. When solving MEG inverse problem by using optimization methods, the forward problem must often be solved for thousands of possible source configurations. So if the brain-shaped head model is used in all iterative steps of optimization, it may be computationally infeasible for practical application. In this paper, we present a method about using compound head model in MEG inverse solution. In this method, first spherical head model is used for a rough estimation, then brain-shaped head model is adopted for more precise solution. Numerical simulation indicates that under the condition of same accuracy, the computation speed for the present method is about three times faster than a method using the brain-shaped head model at all iterations.

  17. Drosophila melanogaster as a Model Organism of Brain Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Werner Paulus

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Drosophila melanogaster has been utilized to model human brain diseases. In most of these invertebrate transgenic models, some aspects of human disease are reproduced. Although investigation of rodent models has been of significant impact, invertebrate models offer a wide variety of experimental tools that can potentially address some of the outstanding questions underlying neurological disease. This review considers what has been gleaned from invertebrate models of neurodegenerative diseases, including Alzheimer’s disease, Parkinson’s disease, metabolic diseases such as Leigh disease, Niemann-Pick disease and ceroid lipofuscinoses, tumor syndromes such as neurofibromatosis and tuberous sclerosis, epilepsy as well as CNS injury. It is to be expected that genetic tools in Drosophila will reveal new pathways and interactions, which hopefully will result in molecular based therapy approaches.

  18. Building better biomarkers: brain models in translational neuroimaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woo, Choong-Wan; Chang, Luke J; Lindquist, Martin A; Wager, Tor D

    2017-02-23

    Despite its great promise, neuroimaging has yet to substantially impact clinical practice and public health. However, a developing synergy between emerging analysis techniques and data-sharing initiatives has the potential to transform the role of neuroimaging in clinical applications. We review the state of translational neuroimaging and outline an approach to developing brain signatures that can be shared, tested in multiple contexts and applied in clinical settings. The approach rests on three pillars: (i) the use of multivariate pattern-recognition techniques to develop brain signatures for clinical outcomes and relevant mental processes; (ii) assessment and optimization of their diagnostic value; and (iii) a program of broad exploration followed by increasingly rigorous assessment of generalizability across samples, research contexts and populations. Increasingly sophisticated models based on these principles will help to overcome some of the obstacles on the road from basic neuroscience to better health and will ultimately serve both basic and applied goals.

  19. A theoretical model of phase transitions in the human brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jirsa, V K; Friedrich, R; Haken, H; Kelso, J A

    1994-01-01

    An experiment using a multisensor SQUID (superconducting quantum interference device) array was performed by Kelso and colleagues (1992) which combined information from three different sources: perception, motor response, and brain signals. When an acoustic stimulus frequency is changed systematically, a spontaneous transition in coordination occurs at a critical frequency in both motor behavior and brain signals. Qualitatively analogous transitions are known for physical and biological systems such as changes in the coordination of human hand movements (Kelso 1981, 1984). In this paper we develop a theoretical model based on methods from the interdisciplinary field of synergetics (Haken 1983, 1987) and nonlinear oscillator theory that reproduces the main experimental features very well and suggests a formulation of a fundamental biophysical coupling.

  20. Biomedical Simulation Models of Human Auditory Processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bicak, Mehmet M. A.

    2012-01-01

    Detailed acoustic engineering models that explore noise propagation mechanisms associated with noise attenuation and transmission paths created when using hearing protectors such as earplugs and headsets in high noise environments. Biomedical finite element (FE) models are developed based on volume Computed Tomography scan data which provides explicit external ear, ear canal, middle ear ossicular bones and cochlea geometry. Results from these studies have enabled a greater understanding of hearing protector to flesh dynamics as well as prioritizing noise propagation mechanisms. Prioritization of noise mechanisms can form an essential framework for exploration of new design principles and methods in both earplug and earcup applications. These models are currently being used in development of a novel hearing protection evaluation system that can provide experimentally correlated psychoacoustic noise attenuation. Moreover, these FE models can be used to simulate the effects of blast related impulse noise on human auditory mechanisms and brain tissue.

  1. A reaction-diffusion model of human brain development.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julien Lefèvre

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Cortical folding exhibits both reproducibility and variability in the geometry and topology of its patterns. These two properties are obviously the result of the brain development that goes through local cellular and molecular interactions which have important consequences on the global shape of the cortex. Hypotheses to explain the convoluted aspect of the brain are still intensively debated and do not focus necessarily on the variability of folds. Here we propose a phenomenological model based on reaction-diffusion mechanisms involving Turing morphogens that are responsible for the differential growth of two types of areas, sulci (bottom of folds and gyri (top of folds. We use a finite element approach of our model that is able to compute the evolution of morphogens on any kind of surface and to deform it through an iterative process. Our model mimics the progressive folding of the cortical surface along foetal development. Moreover it reveals patterns of reproducibility when we look at several realizations of the model from a noisy initial condition. However this reproducibility must be tempered by the fact that a same fold engendered by the model can have different topological properties, in one or several parts. These two results on the reproducibility and variability of the model echo the sulcal roots theory that postulates the existence of anatomical entities around which the folding organizes itself. These sulcal roots would correspond to initial conditions in our model. Last but not least, the parameters of our model are able to produce different kinds of patterns that can be linked to developmental pathologies such as polymicrogyria and lissencephaly. The main significance of our model is that it proposes a first approach to the issue of reproducibility and variability of the cortical folding.

  2. Multiscale modeling and simulation of brain blood flow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perdikaris, Paris, E-mail: parisp@mit.edu [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States); Grinberg, Leopold, E-mail: leopoldgrinberg@us.ibm.com [IBM T.J Watson Research Center, 1 Rogers St, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02142 (United States); Karniadakis, George Em, E-mail: george-karniadakis@brown.edu [Division of Applied Mathematics, Brown University, Providence, Rhode Island 02912 (United States)

    2016-02-15

    The aim of this work is to present an overview of recent advances in multi-scale modeling of brain blood flow. In particular, we present some approaches that enable the in silico study of multi-scale and multi-physics phenomena in the cerebral vasculature. We discuss the formulation of continuum and atomistic modeling approaches, present a consistent framework for their concurrent coupling, and list some of the challenges that one needs to overcome in achieving a seamless and scalable integration of heterogeneous numerical solvers. The effectiveness of the proposed framework is demonstrated in a realistic case involving modeling the thrombus formation process taking place on the wall of a patient-specific cerebral aneurysm. This highlights the ability of multi-scale algorithms to resolve important biophysical processes that span several spatial and temporal scales, potentially yielding new insight into the key aspects of brain blood flow in health and disease. Finally, we discuss open questions in multi-scale modeling and emerging topics of future research.

  3. Cyclosporin safety in a simplified rat brain tumor implantation model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco H. C. Felix

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Brain cancer is the second neurological cause of death. A simplified animal brain tumor model using W256 (carcinoma 256, Walker cell line was developed to permit the testing of novel treatment modalities. Wistar rats had a cell tumor solution inoculated stereotactically in the basal ganglia (right subfrontal caudate. This model yielded tumor growth in 95% of the animals, and showed absence of extracranial metastasis and systemic infection. Survival median was 10 days. Estimated tumor volume was 17.08±6.7 mm³ on the 7th day and 67.25±19.8 mm³ on 9th day post-inoculation. Doubling time was 24.25 h. Tumor growth induced cachexia, but no hematological or biochemical alterations. This model behaved as an undifferentiated tumor and can be promising for studying tumor cell migration in the central nervous system. Dexamethasone 3.0 mg/kg/day diminished significantly survival in this model. Cyclosporine 10 mg/kg/day administration was safely tolerated.

  4. Using data-driven model-brain mappings to constrain formal models of cognition.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jelmer P Borst

    Full Text Available In this paper we propose a method to create data-driven mappings from components of cognitive models to brain regions. Cognitive models are notoriously hard to evaluate, especially based on behavioral measures alone. Neuroimaging data can provide additional constraints, but this requires a mapping from model components to brain regions. Although such mappings can be based on the experience of the modeler or on a reading of the literature, a formal method is preferred to prevent researcher-based biases. In this paper we used model-based fMRI analysis to create a data-driven model-brain mapping for five modules of the ACT-R cognitive architecture. We then validated this mapping by applying it to two new datasets with associated models. The new mapping was at least as powerful as an existing mapping that was based on the literature, and indicated where the models were supported by the data and where they have to be improved. We conclude that data-driven model-brain mappings can provide strong constraints on cognitive models, and that model-based fMRI is a suitable way to create such mappings.

  5. Performance modeling of a wearable brain PET (BET) camera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidtlein, C. R.; Turner, J. N.; Thompson, M. O.; Mandal, K. C.; Häggström, I.; Zhang, J.; Humm, J. L.; Feiglin, D. H.; Krol, A.

    2016-03-01

    Purpose: To explore, by means of analytical and Monte Carlo modeling, performance of a novel lightweight and low-cost wearable helmet-shaped Brain PET (BET) camera based on thin-film digital Geiger Avalanche Photo Diode (dGAPD) with LSO and LaBr3 scintillators for imaging in vivo human brain processes for freely moving and acting subjects responding to various stimuli in any environment. Methods: We performed analytical and Monte Carlo modeling PET performance of a spherical cap BET device and cylindrical brain PET (CYL) device, both with 25 cm diameter and the same total mass of LSO scintillator. Total mass of LSO in both the BET and CYL systems is about 32 kg for a 25 mm thick scintillator, and 13 kg for 10 mm thick scintillator (assuming an LSO density of 7.3 g/ml). We also investigated a similar system using an LaBr3 scintillator corresponding to 22 kg and 9 kg for the 25 mm and 10 mm thick systems (assuming an LaBr3 density of 5.08 g/ml). In addition, we considered a clinical whole body (WB) LSO PET/CT scanner with 82 cm ring diameter and 15.8 cm axial length to represent a reference system. BET consisted of distributed Autonomous Detector Arrays (ADAs) integrated into Intelligent Autonomous Detector Blocks (IADBs). The ADA comprised of an array of small LYSO scintillator volumes (voxels with base a×a: 1.0 50% better noise equivalent count (NEC) performance relative to the CYL geometry, and >1100% better performance than a WB geometry for 25 mm thick LSO and LaBr3. For 10 mm thick LaBr3 equivalent mass systems LSO (7 mm thick) performed ~40% higher NEC than LaBr3. Analytic and Monte Carlo simulations also showed that 1×1×3 mm scintillator crystals can achieve ~1.2 mm FWHM spatial resolution. Conclusions: This study shows that a spherical cap brain PET system can provide improved NEC while preserving spatial resolution when compared to an equivalent dedicated cylindrical PET brain camera and shows greatly improved PET performance relative to a conventional

  6. A Mixed Approach for Modeling Blood Flow in Brain Microcirculation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peyrounette, M.; Sylvie, L.; Davit, Y.; Quintard, M.

    2014-12-01

    We have previously demonstrated [1] that the vascular system of the healthy human brain cortex is a superposition of two structural components, each corresponding to a different spatial scale. At small-scale, the vascular network has a capillary structure, which is homogeneous and space-filling over a cut-off length. At larger scale, veins and arteries conform to a quasi-fractal branched structure. This structural duality is consistent with the functional duality of the vasculature, i.e. distribution and exchange. From a modeling perspective, this can be viewed as the superposition of: (a) a continuum model describing slow transport in the small-scale capillary network, characterized by a representative elementary volume and effective properties; and (b) a discrete network approach [2] describing fast transport in the arterial and venous network, which cannot be homogenized because of its fractal nature. This problematic is analogous to modeling problems encountered in geological media, e.g, in petroleum engineering, where fast conducting channels (wells or fractures) are embedded in a porous medium (reservoir rock). An efficient method to reduce the computational cost of fractures/continuum simulations is to use relatively large grid blocks for the continuum model. However, this also makes it difficult to accurately couple both structural components. In this work, we solve this issue by adapting the "well model" concept used in petroleum engineering [3] to brain specific 3-D situations. We obtain a unique linear system of equations describing the discrete network, the continuum and the well model coupling. Results are presented for realistic geometries and compared with a non-homogenized small-scale network model of an idealized periodic capillary network of known permeability. [1] Lorthois & Cassot, J. Theor. Biol. 262, 614-633, 2010. [2] Lorthois et al., Neuroimage 54 : 1031-1042, 2011. [3] Peaceman, SPE J. 18, 183-194, 1978.

  7. Modelling Human Cortical Network in Real Brain Space

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAO Qing-Bai; FENG Hong-Bo; TANG Yi-Yuan

    2007-01-01

    Highly specific structural organization is of great significance in the topology of cortical networks.We introduce a human cortical network model.taking the specific cortical structure into account,in which nodes are brain sites placed in the actual positions of cerebral cortex and the establishment of edges depends on the spatial path length rather than the linear distance.The resulting network exhibits the essential features of cortical connectivity,properties of small-world networks and multiple clusters structure.Additionally.assortative mixing is also found in this roodel.All of these findings may be attributed to the spedtic cortical architecture.

  8. A simulation model for analysing brain structure deformations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bona, Sergio Di [Institute for Information Science and Technologies, Italian National Research Council (ISTI-8211-CNR), Via G Moruzzi, 1-56124 Pisa (Italy); Lutzemberger, Ludovico [Department of Neuroscience, Institute of Neurosurgery, University of Pisa, Via Roma, 67-56100 Pisa (Italy); Salvetti, Ovidio [Institute for Information Science and Technologies, Italian National Research Council (ISTI-8211-CNR), Via G Moruzzi, 1-56124 Pisa (Italy)

    2003-12-21

    Recent developments of medical software applications from the simulation to the planning of surgical operations have revealed the need for modelling human tissues and organs, not only from a geometric point of view but also from a physical one, i.e. soft tissues, rigid body, viscoelasticity, etc. This has given rise to the term 'deformable objects', which refers to objects with a morphology, a physical and a mechanical behaviour of their own and that reflects their natural properties. In this paper, we propose a model, based upon physical laws, suitable for the realistic manipulation of geometric reconstructions of volumetric data taken from MR and CT scans. In particular, a physically based model of the brain is presented that is able to simulate the evolution of different nature pathological intra-cranial phenomena such as haemorrhages, neoplasm, haematoma, etc and to describe the consequences that are caused by their volume expansions and the influences they have on the anatomical and neuro-functional structures of the brain.

  9. Experimental models of perinatal hypoxic-ischemic brain damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vannucci, R C

    1993-01-01

    Animal research has provided important information on the pathogenesis of and neuropathologic responses to perinatal cerebral hypoxia-ischemia. In experimental animals, structural brain damage from hypoxia-ischemia has been produced in immature rats, rabbits, guinea pigs, sheep and monkeys (18, 20, 24, 25, 38). Of the several available animal models, the fetal and newborn rhesus monkey and immature rat have been studied most extensively because of their similarities to humans in respect to the physiology of reproduction and their neuroanatomy at or shortly following birth. Given the frequency of occurrence of human perinatal hypoxic-ischemic brain damage and the multiple, often severe neurologic handicaps which ensue in infants and children, it is not surprising that the above described animal models have been developed. These models have provided the basis for investigations to clarify not only physiologic and biochemical mechanisms of tissue injury but also the efficacy of specific management strategies. Hopefully, such animal research will continue to provide important information regarding how best to prevent or minimize the devastating consequences of perinatal cerebral hypoxia-ischemia.

  10. Brain Dynamics An Introduction to Models and Simualtions

    CERN Document Server

    Haken, Hermann

    2008-01-01

    Brain Dynamics serves to introduce graduate students and nonspecialists from various backgrounds to the field of mathematical and computational neurosciences. Some of the advanced chapters will also be of interest to the specialists. The book approaches the subject through pulse-coupled neural networks, with at their core the lighthouse and integrate-and-fire models, which allow for the highly flexible modelling of realistic synaptic activity, synchronization and spatio-temporal pattern formation. Topics also include pulse-averaged equations and their application to movement coordination. The book closes with a short analysis of models versus the real neurophysiological system. The second edition has been thoroughly updated and augmented by two extensive chapters that discuss the interplay between pattern recognition and synchronization. Further, to enhance the usefulness as textbook and for self-study, the detailed solutions for all 34 exercises throughout the text have been added.

  11. Postconcussive symptoms after blast and nonblast-related mild traumatic brain injuries in Afghanistan and Iraq war veterans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lippa, Sara M; Pastorek, Nicholas J; Benge, Jared F; Thornton, G Matthew

    2010-09-01

    Blast injury is common in current warfare, but little is known about the effects of blast-related mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI). Profile analyses were conducted investigating differences in self-reported postconcussive (PC) symptoms in 339 veteran outpatients with mTBI histories reporting current symptoms based on mechanism of injury (blast only, nonblast only, or both blast and nonblast), number of blast injuries, and distance from the blast. Veterans with any blast-related mTBI history were younger and reported higher posttraumatic stress symptoms than veterans with nonblast-related mTBI histories, with a marginally significant difference in posttraumatic stress symptom report between veterans reporting blast-related mTBI only and those reporting nonblast-related mTBI. The groups did not differ in terms of PC symptom severity or PC symptom cluster profiles. Among veterans with blast-related mTBI histories, PC symptom report did not vary by number of blast-related mTBIs or proximity to blast. Overall, posttraumatic stress symptoms accounted for a substantial portion of variance in PC symptom report. In veteran outpatients with remote mTBI histories who have enduring symptom complaints related to the mTBI, mechanism of injury did not clearly contribute to differential PC symptom severity or PC symptom cluster profile. Proximal rather than distal factors may be important intervention targets in returning symptomatic veterans with mTBI histories.

  12. Brain anatomical structure segmentation by hybrid discriminative/generative models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tu, Z; Narr, K L; Dollar, P; Dinov, I; Thompson, P M; Toga, A W

    2008-04-01

    In this paper, a hybrid discriminative/generative model for brain anatomical structure segmentation is proposed. The learning aspect of the approach is emphasized. In the discriminative appearance models, various cues such as intensity and curvatures are combined to locally capture the complex appearances of different anatomical structures. A probabilistic boosting tree (PBT) framework is adopted to learn multiclass discriminative models that combine hundreds of features across different scales. On the generative model side, both global and local shape models are used to capture the shape information about each anatomical structure. The parameters to combine the discriminative appearance and generative shape models are also automatically learned. Thus, low-level and high-level information is learned and integrated in a hybrid model. Segmentations are obtained by minimizing an energy function associated with the proposed hybrid model. Finally, a grid-face structure is designed to explicitly represent the 3-D region topology. This representation handles an arbitrary number of regions and facilitates fast surface evolution. Our system was trained and tested on a set of 3-D magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) volumes and the results obtained are encouraging.

  13. The Simulation and Correction to the Brain Deformation Based on the Linear Elastic Model in IGS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MU Xiao-lan; SONG Zhi-jian

    2004-01-01

    @@ The brain deformation is a vital factor affecting the precision of the IGS and it becomes a hotspot to simulate and correct the brain deformation recently.The research organizations, which firstly resolved the brain deformation with the physical models, have the Image Processing and Analysis department of Yale University, Biomedical Modeling Lab of Vanderbilt University and so on. The former uses the linear elastic model; the latter uses the consolidation model.The linear elastic model only needs to drive the model using the surface displacement of exposed brain cortex,which is more convenient to be measured in the clinic.

  14. The Simulation and Correction to the Brain Deformation Based on the Linear Elastic Model in IGS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MUXiao-lan; SONGZhi-jian

    2004-01-01

    The brain deformation is a vital factor affecting the precision of the IGS and it becomes a hotspot to simulate and correct the brain deformation recently.The research organizations, which firstly resolved the brain deformation with the physical models, have the Image Processing and Analysis department of Yale University, Biomedical Modeling Lab of Vanderbilt University and so on. The former uses the linear elastic model; the latter uses the consolidation model.

  15. Using data-driven model-brain mappings to constrain formal models of cognition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Borst, Jelmer P; Nijboer, Menno; Taatgen, Niels A; van Rijn, Hedderik; Anderson, John R

    2015-01-01

    In this paper we propose a method to create data-driven mappings from components of cognitive models to brain regions. Cognitive models are notoriously hard to evaluate, especially based on behavioral measures alone. Neuroimaging data can provide additional constraints, but this requires a mapping f

  16. Model sparsity and brain pattern interpretation of classification models in neuroimaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Peter Mondrup; Madsen, Kristoffer Hougaard; Churchill, Nathan W

    2012-01-01

    Interest is increasing in applying discriminative multivariate analysis techniques to the analysis of functional neuroimaging data. Model interpretation is of great importance in the neuroimaging context, and is conventionally based on a ‘brain map’ derived from the classification model...

  17. Modeling the brain-pituitary-gonad axis in salmon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jonghan; Hayton, William L.; Schultz, Irv R.

    2006-08-24

    To better understand the complexity of the brain-pituitary-gonad axis (BPG) in fish, we developed a biologically based pharmacodynamic model capable of accurately predicting the normal functioning of the BPG axis in salmon. This first-generation model consisted of a set of 13 equations whose formulation was guided by published values for plasma concentrations of pituitary- (FSH, LH) and ovary- (estradiol, 17a,20b-dihydroxy-4-pregnene-3-one) derived hormones measured in Coho salmon over an annual spawning period. In addition, the model incorporated pertinent features of previously published mammalian models and indirect response pharmacodynamic models. Model-based equations include a description of gonadotropin releasing hormone (GnRH) synthesis and release from the hypothalamus, which is controlled by environmental variables such as photoperiod and water temperature. GnRH stimulated the biosynthesis of mRNA for FSH and LH, which were also influenced by estradiol concentration in plasma. The level of estradiol in the plasma was regulated by the oocytes, which moved along a maturation progression. Estradiol was synthesized at a basal rate and as oocytes matured, stimulation of its biosynthesis occurred. The BPG model can be integrated with toxico-genomic, -proteomic data, allowing linkage between molecular based biomarkers and reproduction in fish.

  18. Cluster imaging of multi-brain networks (CIMBN: a general framework for hyperscanning and modeling a group of interacting brains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lian eDuan

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Studying the neural basis of human social interactions is a key topic in the field of social neuroscience. Brain imaging studies in this field usually focus on the neural correlates of the social interactions between two participants. However, as the participant number further increases, even by a small amount, great difficulties raise. One challenge is how to concurrently scan all the interacting brains with high ecological validity, especially for a large number of participants. The other challenge is how to effectively model the complex group interaction behaviors emerging from the intricate neural information exchange among a group of socially organized people. Confronting these challenges, we propose a new approach called Cluster Imaging of Multi-brain Networks (CIMBN. CIMBN consists of two parts. The first part is a cluster imaging technique with high ecological validity based on multiple functional near-infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS systems. Using this technique, we can easily extend the simultaneous imaging capacity of social neuroscience studies up to dozens of participants. The second part of CIMBN is a multi-brain network (MBN modeling method based on graph theory. By taking each brain as a network node and the relationship between any two brains as a network edge, one can construct a network model for a group of interacting brains. The emergent group social behaviors can then be studied using the network’s properties, such as its topological structure and information exchange efficiency. Although there is still much work to do, as a general framework for hyperscanning and modeling a group of interacting brains, CIMBN can provide new insights into the neural correlates of group social interactions, and advance social neuroscience and social psychology.

  19. Fast, Sequence Adaptive Parcellation of Brain MR Using Parametric Models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Puonti, Oula; Iglesias, Juan Eugenio; Van Leemput, Koen

    2013-01-01

    -of-the-art segmentation performance in both cortical and subcortical structures, while retaining all the benefits of generative parametric models, including high computational speed, automatic adaptiveness to changes in image contrast when different scanner platforms and pulse sequences are used, and the ability......In this paper we propose a method for whole brain parcellation using the type of generative parametric models typically used in tissue classification. Compared to the non-parametric, multi-atlas segmentation techniques that have become popular in recent years, our method obtains state...... to handle multi-contrast (vector-valued intensities) MR data. We have validated our method by comparing its segmentations to manual delineations both within and across scanner platforms and pulse sequences, and show preliminary results on multi-contrast test-retest scans, demonstrating the feasibility...

  20. Modeling of electromagnetic stimulation of the human brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazutkin, Dmitry; Husar, Peter

    2010-01-01

    The World Health Organization estimates depression as a serious threat to the health of millions of people worldwide. The purpose of this paper is to introduce the ongoing research devoted to the investigation of a possibility to use low-field electromagnetic stimulation of the human brain in the treatment of depressive disorder. In the course of the work the 3D models of transcranial magnetic stimulation and low-field magnetic stimulation based upon the use of a layered sphere head model have been developed. An initial approach towards the realistic human head reconstruction has been made. The revealed order of the stimulating electromagnetic field suitable for operation makes it possible to draft a technical specification for the stimulation device.

  1. In vitro models of the blood-brain barrier

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Helms, Hans Christian Cederberg; Abbott, N Joan; Burek, Malgorzata

    2016-01-01

    components of plasma and xenobiotics. This "blood-brain barrier" function is a major hindrance for drug uptake into the brain parenchyma. Cell culture models, based on either primary cells or immortalized brain endothelial cell lines, have been developed, in order to facilitate in vitro studies of drug...

  2. Language Model Applications to Spelling with Brain-Computer Interfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anderson Mora-Cortes

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Within the Ambient Assisted Living (AAL community, Brain-Computer Interfaces (BCIs have raised great hopes as they provide alternative communication means for persons with disabilities bypassing the need for speech and other motor activities. Although significant advancements have been realized in the last decade, applications of language models (e.g., word prediction, completion have only recently started to appear in BCI systems. The main goal of this article is to review the language model applications that supplement non-invasive BCI-based communication systems by discussing their potential and limitations, and to discern future trends. First, a brief overview of the most prominent BCI spelling systems is given, followed by an in-depth discussion of the language models applied to them. These language models are classified according to their functionality in the context of BCI-based spelling: the static/dynamic nature of the user interface, the use of error correction and predictive spelling, and the potential to improve their classification performance by using language models. To conclude, the review offers an overview of the advantages and challenges when implementing language models in BCI-based communication systems when implemented in conjunction with other AAL technologies.

  3. Multistability in Large Scale Models of Brain Activity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mathieu Golos

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Noise driven exploration of a brain network's dynamic repertoire has been hypothesized to be causally involved in cognitive function, aging and neurodegeneration. The dynamic repertoire crucially depends on the network's capacity to store patterns, as well as their stability. Here we systematically explore the capacity of networks derived from human connectomes to store attractor states, as well as various network mechanisms to control the brain's dynamic repertoire. Using a deterministic graded response Hopfield model with connectome-based interactions, we reconstruct the system's attractor space through a uniform sampling of the initial conditions. Large fixed-point attractor sets are obtained in the low temperature condition, with a bigger number of attractors than ever reported so far. Different variants of the initial model, including (i a uniform activation threshold or (ii a global negative feedback, produce a similarly robust multistability in a limited parameter range. A numerical analysis of the distribution of the attractors identifies spatially-segregated components, with a centro-medial core and several well-delineated regional patches. Those different modes share similarity with the fMRI independent components observed in the "resting state" condition. We demonstrate non-stationary behavior in noise-driven generalizations of the models, with different meta-stable attractors visited along the same time course. Only the model with a global dynamic density control is found to display robust and long-lasting non-stationarity with no tendency toward either overactivity or extinction. The best fit with empirical signals is observed at the edge of multistability, a parameter region that also corresponds to the highest entropy of the attractors.

  4. Mild Traumatic Brain Injury in Translation

    OpenAIRE

    Levin, Harvey S.; Robertson, Claudia S.

    2013-01-01

    This Introduction to a Special Issue on Mild Traumatic Brain Injury (mTBI) highlights the methodological challenges in outcome studies and clinical trials involving patients who sustain mTBI. Recent advances in brain imaging and portable, computerized cognitive tasks have contributed to protocols that are sensitive to the effects of mTBI and efficient in time for completion. Investigation of civilian mTBI has been extended to single and repeated injuries in athletes and blast-related mTBI in ...

  5. Modeling the effects of noninvasive transcranial brain stimulation at the biophysical, network, and cognitive Level

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hartwigsen, Gesa; Bergmann, Til Ole; Herz, Damian Marc

    2015-01-01

    Noninvasive transcranial brain stimulation (NTBS) is widely used to elucidate the contribution of different brain regions to various cognitive functions. Here we present three modeling approaches that are informed by functional or structural brain mapping or behavior profiling and discuss how...... predictions regarding the impact of interindividual variations in cortical anatomy on the injected electric fields or the influence of the orientation of current flow on the physiological stimulation effects. (ii) Functional brain mapping of the spatiotemporal neural dynamics during cognitive tasks can...

  6. Phase lagging model of brain response to external stimuli - modeling of single action potential

    CERN Document Server

    Seetharaman, Karthik; Kulish, Vladimir V

    2012-01-01

    In this paper we detail a phase lagging model of brain response to external stimuli. The model is derived using the basic laws of physics like conservation of energy law. This model eliminates the paradox of instantaneous propagation of the action potential in the brain. The solution of this model is then presented. The model is further applied in the case of a single neuron and is verified by simulating a single action potential. The results of this modeling are useful not only for the fundamental understanding of single action potential generation, but also they can be applied in case of neuronal interactions where the results can be verified against the real EEG signal.

  7. Computational modeling of pedunculopontine nucleus deep brain stimulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zitella, Laura M.; Mohsenian, Kevin; Pahwa, Mrinal; Gloeckner, Cory; Johnson, Matthew D.

    2013-08-01

    Objective. Deep brain stimulation (DBS) near the pedunculopontine nucleus (PPN) has been posited to improve medication-intractable gait and balance problems in patients with Parkinson's disease. However, clinical studies evaluating this DBS target have not demonstrated consistent therapeutic effects, with several studies reporting the emergence of paresthesia and oculomotor side effects. The spatial and pathway-specific extent to which brainstem regions are modulated during PPN-DBS is not well understood. Approach. Here, we describe two computational models that estimate the direct effects of DBS in the PPN region for human and translational non-human primate (NHP) studies. The three-dimensional models were constructed from segmented histological images from each species, multi-compartment neuron models and inhomogeneous finite element models of the voltage distribution in the brainstem during DBS. Main Results. The computational models predicted that: (1) the majority of PPN neurons are activated with -3 V monopolar cathodic stimulation; (2) surgical targeting errors of as little as 1 mm in both species decrement activation selectivity; (3) specifically, monopolar stimulation in caudal, medial, or anterior PPN activates a significant proportion of the superior cerebellar peduncle (up to 60% in the human model and 90% in the NHP model at -3 V) (4) monopolar stimulation in rostral, lateral or anterior PPN activates a large percentage of medial lemniscus fibers (up to 33% in the human model and 40% in the NHP model at -3 V) and (5) the current clinical cylindrical electrode design is suboptimal for isolating the modulatory effects to PPN neurons. Significance. We show that a DBS lead design with radially-segmented electrodes may yield improved functional outcome for PPN-DBS.

  8. A dynamic in vivo-like organotypic blood-brain barrier model to probe metastatic brain tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Hui; Li, Zhongyu; Yu, Yue; Sizdahkhani, Saman; Ho, Winson S.; Yin, Fangchao; Wang, Li; Zhu, Guoli; Zhang, Min; Jiang, Lei; Zhuang, Zhengping; Qin, Jianhua

    2016-11-01

    The blood-brain barrier (BBB) restricts the uptake of many neuro-therapeutic molecules, presenting a formidable hurdle to drug development in brain diseases. We proposed a new and dynamic in vivo-like three-dimensional microfluidic system that replicates the key structural, functional and mechanical properties of the blood-brain barrier in vivo. Multiple factors in this system work synergistically to accentuate BBB-specific attributes–permitting the analysis of complex organ-level responses in both normal and pathological microenvironments in brain tumors. The complex BBB microenvironment is reproduced in this system via physical cell-cell interaction, vascular mechanical cues and cell migration. This model possesses the unique capability to examine brain metastasis of human lung, breast and melanoma cells and their therapeutic responses to chemotherapy. The results suggest that the interactions between cancer cells and astrocytes in BBB microenvironment might affect the ability of malignant brain tumors to traverse between brain and vascular compartments. Furthermore, quantification of spatially resolved barrier functions exists within a single assay, providing a versatile and valuable platform for pharmaceutical development, drug testing and neuroscientific research.

  9. Resuscitation speed affects brain injury in a large animal model of traumatic brain injury and shock

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sillesen, Martin; Jin, Guang; Johansson, Pär I

    2014-01-01

    infusion speed increment NS (n¿=¿7). Hemodynamic variables over a 6-hour observation phase were recorded. Following euthanasia, brains were harvested and lesion size as well as brain swelling was measured.ResultsBolus FFP resuscitation resulted in greater brain swelling (22.36¿±¿1.03% vs. 15.58¿±¿2.52%, p...

  10. Modeling Brain Circuitry over a Wide Range of Scales

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pascal eFua

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available If we are ever to unravel the mysteries of brain function at its most fundamental level, we will need a precise understanding of how its component neurons connect to each other. Electron Microscopes (EM can now provide the nanometer resolution that is needed to image synapses, and therefore connections, while Light Microscopes (LM see at the micrometer resolution required to model the 3D structure of the dendritic network. Since both the topology and the connection strength are integral parts of the brain's wiring diagram, being able to combine these two modalities is critically important.In fact, these microscopes now routinely produce high-resolution imagery in such large quantities that the bottleneck becomes automated processing and interpretation, which is needed for such data to be exploited to its full potential. In this paper, we briefly review the Computer Vision techniques we have developed at EPFL to address this need. They include delineating dendritic arbors from LM imagery, segmenting organelles from EM, and combining the two into a consistent representation.

  11. Modeling of a segmented electrode for desynchronizing deep brain stimulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julia eBuhlmann

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Deep brain stimulation (DBS is an effective therapy for medically refrac- tory movement disorders like Parkinson’s disease. The electrodes, implanted in the target area within the human brain, generate an electric field which activates nerve fibers and cell bodies in the proximate vicinity. Even though the different target nuclei display considerable differences in their anatomical structure, only few types of electrodes are currently commercially available. It is desirable to adjust the electric field and in particular the volume of tissue activated around the electrode with respect to the corresponding target nucleus in a such way that side effects can be reduced. Furthermore, a more selective and partial activation of the target structure is desirable for an optimal application of novel stimulation strate- gies, e.g. coordinated reset neuromodulation. Hence we designed a DBS electrode with a segmented design allowing a more selective activation of the target struc- ture. We created a finite element model (FEM of the electrode and analyzed the volume of tissue activated for this electrode design. The segmented electrode ac- tivated an area in a targeted manner, of which the dimension and position relative to the electrode could be controlled by adjusting the stimulation parameters for each contact. According to our computational analysis, this directed stimulation might be superior with respect to the occurrence of side effects and it enables the application of coordinated reset neuromodulation under optimal conditions.

  12. Longitudinal Examination of Resilience after Traumatic Brain Injury: A Traumatic Brain Injury Model Systems Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marwitz, Jennifer H; Sima, Adam P; Kreutzer, Jeffrey S; Dreer, Laura E; Bergquist, Thomas F; Zafonte, Ross; Johnson-Greene, Douglas; Felix, Elizabeth R

    2017-07-19

    To evaluate the trajectory of resilience during the first year following a moderate-severe TBI, factors associated with resilience at 3, 6 and 12-months post-injury, and changing relationships over time between resilience and other factors. Longitudinal analysis of an observational cohort. Five inpatient rehabilitation centers. Patients with TBI (N = 195) enrolled in the resilience module of the TBI Model Systems study with data collected at 3, 6, and 12-month follow-up. Not applicable. Connor-Davidson Resilience Scale. Initially, resilience levels appeared to be stable during the first year post-injury. Individual growth curve models were used to examine resilience over time in relation to demographic, psychosocial, and injury characteristics. After adjusting for these characteristics, resilience actually declined over time. Higher levels of resilience were related to non-minority status, absence of pre-injury substance abuse, lower anxiety and disability level, and greater life satisfaction. Resilience is a construct that is relevant to understanding brain injury outcomes and has potential value in planning clinical interventions. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  13. Combat-Related Heterotopic Ossification: Development of Animal Models for Identifying Mechanisms and Testing Therapeutics

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-03-01

    etiology, treatment, and prevention is the absence of a reliable and reproducible small animal model that can be used to characterize combat‐related HO...contamination and subsequent wound colonization may be a key risk factor. Using a small animal model of blast-related extremity injury involving a...to the systemic and perhaps local antimicrobial therapies geared towards decreasing bioburden in combat wounds. 6 Using our blast-related HO

  14. Informing pedagogy through the brain-targeted teaching model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardiman, Mariale

    2012-01-01

    Improving teaching to foster creative thinking and problem-solving for students of all ages will require two essential changes in current educational practice. First, to allow more time for deeper engagement with material, it is critical to reduce the vast number of topics often required in many courses. Second, and perhaps more challenging, is the alignment of pedagogy with recent research on cognition and learning. With a growing focus on the use of research to inform teaching practices, educators need a pedagogical framework that helps them interpret and apply research findings. This article describes the Brain-Targeted Teaching Model, a scheme that relates six distinct aspects of instruction to research from the neuro- and cognitive sciences.

  15. A propositional representation model of anatomical and functional brain data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maturana, Pablo; Batrancourt, Bénédicte

    2011-01-01

    Networks can represent a large number of systems. Recent advances in the domain of networks have been transferred to the field of neuroscience. For example, the graph model has been used in neuroscience research as a methodological tool to examine brain networks organization, topology and complex dynamics, as well as a framework to test the structure-function hypothesis using neuroimaging data. In the current work we propose a graph-theoretical framework to represent anatomical, functional and neuropsychological assessment instruments information. On the one hand, interrelationships between anatomic elements constitute an anatomical graph. On the other hand, a functional graph contains several cognitive functions and their more elementary cognitive processes. Finally, the neuropsychological assessment instruments graph includes several neuropsychological tests and scales linked with their different sub-tests and variables. The two last graphs are connected by relations of type "explore" linking a particular instrument with the cognitive function it explores. We applied this framework to a sample of patients with focal brain damage. Each patient was related to: (i) the cerebral entities injured (assessed with structural neuroimaging data) and (ii) the neusopsychological assessment tests carried out (weight by performance). Our model offers a suitable platform to visualize patients' relevant information, facilitating the representation, standardization and sharing of clinical data. At the same time, the integration of a large number of patients in this framework will make possible to explore relations between anatomy (injured entities) and function (performance in different tests assessing different cognitive functions) and the use of neurocomputational tools for graph analysis may help diagnostic and contribute to the comprehension of neural bases of cognitive functions.

  16. A reproducible brain tumour model established from human glioblastoma biopsies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Xingang

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Establishing clinically relevant animal models of glioblastoma multiforme (GBM remains a challenge, and many commonly used cell line-based models do not recapitulate the invasive growth patterns of patient GBMs. Previously, we have reported the formation of highly invasive tumour xenografts in nude rats from human GBMs. However, implementing tumour models based on primary tissue requires that these models can be sufficiently standardised with consistently high take rates. Methods In this work, we collected data on growth kinetics from a material of 29 biopsies xenografted in nude rats, and characterised this model with an emphasis on neuropathological and radiological features. Results The tumour take rate for xenografted GBM biopsies were 96% and remained close to 100% at subsequent passages in vivo, whereas only one of four lower grade tumours engrafted. Average time from transplantation to the onset of symptoms was 125 days ± 11.5 SEM. Histologically, the primary xenografts recapitulated the invasive features of the parent tumours while endothelial cell proliferations and necrosis were mostly absent. After 4-5 in vivo passages, the tumours became more vascular with necrotic areas, but also appeared more circumscribed. MRI typically revealed changes related to tumour growth, several months prior to the onset of symptoms. Conclusions In vivo passaging of patient GBM biopsies produced tumours representative of the patient tumours, with high take rates and a reproducible disease course. The model provides combinations of angiogenic and invasive phenotypes and represents a good alternative to in vitro propagated cell lines for dissecting mechanisms of brain tumour progression.

  17. Traumatic brain injury–Modeling neuropsychiatric symptoms in rodents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oz eMalkesman

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Each year in the United States, approximately 1.5 million people sustain a traumatic brain injury (TBI. Victims of TBI can suffer from chronic post-TBI symptoms, such as sensory and motor deficits, cognitive impairments including problems with memory, learning, and attention, and neuropsychiatric symptoms such as depression, anxiety, irritability, aggression, and suicidal rumination. Although partially associated with the site and severity of injury, the biological mechanisms associated with many of these symptoms—and why some patients experience differing assortments of persistent maladies—are largely unknown. The use of animal models is a promising strategy for elucidation of the mechanisms of impairment and treatment, and learning, memory, sensory and motor tests have widespread utility in rodent models of TBI and psychopharmacology. Comparatively, behavioral tests for the evaluation of neuropsychiatric symptomatology are rarely employed in animal models of TBI and, as determined in this review, the results have been inconsistent. Animal behavioral studies contribute to the understanding of the biological mechanisms by which TBI is associated with neurobehavioral symptoms and offer a powerful means for pre-clinical treatment validation. Therefore, further exploration of the utility of animal behavioral tests for the study of injury mechanisms and therapeutic strategies for the alleviation of emotional symptoms are relevant and essential.

  18. [Pathogenic variants of brain injuries and pharmalogic cerebroprotection performed on the model of brain condition during cardiovascular bypass surgery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsygan, N V; Trashkov, A P

    2014-10-01

    Developed and approved a pathogenic grounded experimental model of brain condition during cardiovascular bypass surgery. Undertaken in Wistar rats research allowed to evaluate in detail effectiveness and safety of protracted cerebroprotective treatment. Advantages of this model are researches in laboratory animals with the aim to research condition of nerve tissue, not intensive procedures and consequently high reproducibility and possibility of complex evaluation of changes at every stage of research. Results of neurons, neuroglia and activation of neurotrophic mechanisms prove that simulation of brain condition during cardiovascular bypass surgery is accompanied with acute and delayed brain injuries. Use of Cytoflavin under pharmalogic cerebroprotection had prolonged multimodal and neuroprotactive effect, leading to improvement of neurotrophic protection from the first days.

  19. MR brain image analysis in dementia: From quantitative imaging biomarkers to ageing brain models and imaging genetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niessen, Wiro J

    2016-10-01

    MR brain image analysis has constantly been a hot topic research area in medical image analysis over the past two decades. In this article, it is discussed how the field developed from the construction of tools for automatic quantification of brain morphology, function, connectivity and pathology, to creating models of the ageing brain in normal ageing and disease, and tools for integrated analysis of imaging and genetic data. The current and future role of the field in improved understanding of the development of neurodegenerative disease is discussed, and its potential for aiding in early and differential diagnosis and prognosis of different types of dementia. For the latter, the use of reference imaging data and reference models derived from large clinical and population imaging studies, and the application of machine learning techniques on these reference data, are expected to play a key role. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Using chaotic artificial neural networks to model memory in the brain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aram, Zainab; Jafari, Sajad; Ma, Jun; Sprott, Julien C.; Zendehrouh, Sareh; Pham, Viet-Thanh

    2017-03-01

    In the current study, a novel model for human memory is proposed based on the chaotic dynamics of artificial neural networks. This new model explains a biological fact about memory which is not yet explained by any other model: There are theories that the brain normally works in a chaotic mode, while during attention it shows ordered behavior. This model uses the periodic windows observed in a previously proposed model for the brain to store and then recollect the information.

  1. Lateral Fluid Percussion: Model of Traumatic Brain Injury in Mice

    OpenAIRE

    2011-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) research has attained renewed momentum due to the increasing awareness of head injuries, which result in morbidity and mortality. Based on the nature of primary injury following TBI, complex and heterogeneous secondary consequences result, which are followed by regenerative processes 1,2. Primary injury can be induced by a direct contusion to the brain from skull fracture or from shearing and stretching of tissue causing displacement of brain due to movement 3,4. ...

  2. 3D brain atlas reconstructor service--online repository of three-dimensional models of brain structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majka, Piotr; Kowalski, Jakub M; Chlodzinska, Natalia; Wójcik, Daniel K

    2013-10-01

    Brain atlases are important tools of neuroscience. Traditionally prepared in paper book format, more and more commonly they take digital form which extends their utility. To simplify work with different atlases, to lay the ground for developing universal tools which could abstract from the origin of the atlas, efforts are being made to provide common interfaces to these atlases. 3D Brain Atlas Reconstructor service (3dBARs) described here is a repository of digital representations of different brain atlases in CAF format which we recently proposed and a repository of 3D models of brain structures. A graphical front-end is provided for creating and viewing the reconstructed models as well as the underlying 2D atlas data. An application programming interface (API) facilitates programmatic access to the service contents from other websites. From a typical user's point of view, 3dBARs offers an accessible way to mine publicly available atlasing data with a convenient browser based interface, without the need to install extra software. For a developer of services related to brain atlases, 3dBARs supplies mechanisms for enhancing functionality of other software. The policy of the service is to accept new datasets as delivered by interested parties and we work with the researchers who obtain original data to make them available to the neuroscience community at large. The functionality offered by the 3dBARs situates it at the core of present and future general atlasing services tying it strongly to the global atlasing neuroinformatics infrastructure.

  3. Effects of tetrahydroxystilbene - glucoside on Animal Models of Dementia or Brain Aging

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LinLi; JinChu; LiLiu; LingZhao; LanZhang

    2004-01-01

    Aim: To investigate the effects of 2, 3, 5, 4'-tetrahydroxystilbene-2-O-β-D-glucoside(TSG) from a Chinese Medicinal Herb polygonum multiflorum on dementia or brain aging. Methods. The brain aging model of mice was developed by s. c. injection of D-galactose (50mg/kg/day) for 60 days. The Alzheimer disease (AD) model of mice

  4. Local Model of Arteriovenous Malformation of the Human Brain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nadezhda Telegina, Ms; Aleksandr Chupakhin, Mr; Aleksandr Cherevko, Mr

    2013-02-01

    Vascular diseases of the human brain are one of the reasons of deaths and people's incapacitation not only in Russia, but also in the world. The danger of an arteriovenous malformation (AVM) is in premature rupture of pathological vessels of an AVM which may cause haemorrhage. Long-term prognosis without surgical treatment is unfavorable. The reduced impact method of AVM treatment is embolization of a malformation which often results in complete obliteration of an AVM. Pre-surgical mathematical modeling of an arteriovenous malformation can help surgeons with an optimal sequence of the operation. During investigations, the simple mathematical model of arteriovenous malformation is developed and calculated, and stationary and non-stationary processes of its embolization are considered. Various sequences of embolization of a malformation are also considered. Calculations were done with approximate steady flow on the basis of balanced equations derived from conservation laws. Depending on pressure difference, a fistula-type AVM should be embolized at first, and then small racemose AVMs are embolized. Obtained results are in good correspondence with neurosurgical AVM practice.

  5. Using computational models to relate structural and functional brain connectivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hlinka, Jaroslav; Coombes, Stephen

    2012-07-01

    Modern imaging methods allow a non-invasive assessment of both structural and functional brain connectivity. This has lead to the identification of disease-related alterations affecting functional connectivity. The mechanism of how such alterations in functional connectivity arise in a structured network of interacting neural populations is as yet poorly understood. Here we use a modeling approach to explore the way in which this can arise and to highlight the important role that local population dynamics can have in shaping emergent spatial functional connectivity patterns. The local dynamics for a neural population is taken to be of the Wilson-Cowan type, whilst the structural connectivity patterns used, describing long-range anatomical connections, cover both realistic scenarios (from the CoComac database) and idealized ones that allow for more detailed theoretical study. We have calculated graph-theoretic measures of functional network topology from numerical simulations of model networks. The effect of the form of local dynamics on the observed network state is quantified by examining the correlation between structural and functional connectivity. We document a profound and systematic dependence of the simulated functional connectivity patterns on the parameters controlling the dynamics. Importantly, we show that a weakly coupled oscillator theory explaining these correlations and their variation across parameter space can be developed. This theoretical development provides a novel way to characterize the mechanisms for the breakdown of functional connectivity in diseases through changes in local dynamics.

  6. Fractional Diffusion Based Modelling and Prediction of Human Brain Response to External Stimuli

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamidreza Namazi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Human brain response is the result of the overall ability of the brain in analyzing different internal and external stimuli and thus making the proper decisions. During the last decades scientists have discovered more about this phenomenon and proposed some models based on computational, biological, or neuropsychological methods. Despite some advances in studies related to this area of the brain research, there were fewer efforts which have been done on the mathematical modeling of the human brain response to external stimuli. This research is devoted to the modeling and prediction of the human EEG signal, as an alert state of overall human brain activity monitoring, upon receiving external stimuli, based on fractional diffusion equations. The results of this modeling show very good agreement with the real human EEG signal and thus this model can be used for many types of applications such as prediction of seizure onset in patient with epilepsy.

  7. Brain mechanisms of Change in Addictions Treatment: Models, Methods, and Emerging Findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Tammy; Noronha, Antonio; Carroll, Kathleen M; Potenza, Marc N; Hutchison, Kent; Calhoun, Vince D; Gabrieli, John D E; Morgenstern, Jon; Nixon, Sara Jo; Wexler, Bruce E; Brewer, Judson; Ray, Lara; Filbey, Francesca; Strauman, Timothy J; Kober, Hedy; Feldstein Ewing, Sarah W

    2016-09-01

    Increased understanding of "how" and "for whom" treatment works at the level of the brain has potential to transform addictions treatment through the development of innovative neuroscience-informed interventions. The 2015 Science of Change meeting bridged the fields of neuroscience and psychotherapy research to identify brain mechanisms of behavior change that are "common" across therapies, and "specific" to distinct behavioral interventions. Conceptual models of brain mechanisms underlying effects of Cognitive Behavioral Therapy, mindfulness interventions, and Motivational Interviewing were discussed. Presentations covered methods for integrating neuroimaging into psychotherapy research, and novel analytic approaches. Effects of heavy substance use on the brain, and recovery of brain functioning with sustained abstinence, which may be facilitated by cognitive training, were reviewed. Neuroimaging provides powerful tools for determining brain mechanisms underlying psychotherapy and medication effects, predicting and monitoring outcomes, developing novel interventions that target specific brain circuits, and identifying for whom an intervention will be effective.

  8. Stroke and Drug Delivery--In Vitro Models of the Ischemic Blood-Brain Barrier

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tornabene, Erica; Brodin, Birger

    2016-01-01

    Stroke is a major cause of death and disability worldwide. Both cerebral hypoperfusion and focal cerebral infarcts are caused by a reduction of blood flow to the brain, leading to stroke and subsequent brain damage. At present, only few medical treatments of stroke are available, with the Food...... and Drug Administration-approved tissue plasminogen activator for treatment of acute ischemic stroke being the most prominent example. A large number of potential drug candidates for treatment of ischemic brain tissue have been developed and subsequently failed in clinical trials. A deeper understanding...... of permeation pathways across the barrier in ischemic and postischemic brain endothelium is important for development of new medical treatments. The blood-brain barrier, that is, the endothelial monolayer lining the brain capillaries, changes properties during an ischemic event. In vitro models of the blood-brain...

  9. A Comparative Study of Theoretical Graph Models for Characterizing Structural Networks of Human Brain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaojin Li

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Previous studies have investigated both structural and functional brain networks via graph-theoretical methods. However, there is an important issue that has not been adequately discussed before: what is the optimal theoretical graph model for describing the structural networks of human brain? In this paper, we perform a comparative study to address this problem. Firstly, large-scale cortical regions of interest (ROIs are localized by recently developed and validated brain reference system named Dense Individualized Common Connectivity-based Cortical Landmarks (DICCCOL to address the limitations in the identification of the brain network ROIs in previous studies. Then, we construct structural brain networks based on diffusion tensor imaging (DTI data. Afterwards, the global and local graph properties of the constructed structural brain networks are measured using the state-of-the-art graph analysis algorithms and tools and are further compared with seven popular theoretical graph models. In addition, we compare the topological properties between two graph models, namely, stickiness-index-based model (STICKY and scale-free gene duplication model (SF-GD, that have higher similarity with the real structural brain networks in terms of global and local graph properties. Our experimental results suggest that among the seven theoretical graph models compared in this study, STICKY and SF-GD models have better performances in characterizing the structural human brain network.

  10. The research of constructing dynamic cognition model based on brain network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fang Chunying

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Estimating the functional interactions and connections between brain regions to corresponding process in cognitive, behavioral and psychiatric domains is a central pursuit for understanding the human connectome. Few studies have examined the effects of dynamic evolution on cognitive processing and brain activation using brain network model in scalp electroencephalography (EEG data. Aim of this study was to investigate the brain functional connectivity and construct dynamic programing model from EEG data and to evaluate a possible correlation between topological characteristics of the brain connectivity and cognitive evolution processing. Here, functional connectivity between brain regions is defined as the statistical dependence between EEG signals in different brain areas and is typically determined by calculating the relationship between regional time series using wavelet coherence. We present an accelerated dynamic programing algorithm to construct dynamic cognitive model that we found that spatially distributed regions coherence connection difference, the topologic characteristics with which they can transfer information, producing temporary network states. Our findings suggest that brain dynamics give rise to variations in complex network properties over time after variation audio stimulation, dynamic programing model gives the dynamic evolution processing at different time and frequency. In this paper, by applying a new construct approach to understand whole brain network dynamics, firstly, brain network is constructed by wavelet coherence, secondly, different time active brain regions are selected by network topological characteristics and minimum spanning tree. Finally, dynamic evolution model is constructed to understand cognitive process by dynamic programing algorithm, this model is applied to the auditory experiment, results showed that, quantitatively, more correlation was observed after variation audio stimulation, the EEG function

  11. Effect of pharmacologic resuscitation on the brain gene expression profiles in a swine model of traumatic brain injury and hemorrhage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dekker, Simone E; Bambakidis, Ted; Sillesen, Martin

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: We have previously shown that addition of valproic acid (VPA; a histone deacetylase inhibitor) to hetastarch (Hextend [HEX]) resuscitation significantly decreases lesion size in a swine model of traumatic brain injury (TBI) and hemorrhagic shock (HS). However, the precise mechanisms...... have not been well defined. As VPA is a transcriptional modulator, the aim of this study was to investigate its effect on brain gene expression profiles. METHODS: Swine were subjected to controlled TBI and HS (40% blood volume), kept in shock for 2 hours, and resuscitated with HEX or HEX + VPA (n = 5...... per group). Following 6 hours of observation, brain RNA was isolated, and gene expression profiles were measured using a Porcine Gene ST 1.1 microarray (Affymetrix, Santa Clara, CA). Pathway analysis was done using network analysis tools Gene Ontology, Ingenuity Pathway Analysis, and Parametric Gene...

  12. Ex vivo Evans blue assessment of the blood brain barrier in three breast cancer brain metastasis models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Do, John; Foster, Deshka; Renier, Corinne; Vogel, Hannes; Rosenblum, Sahar; Doyle, Timothy C; Tse, Victor; Wapnir, Irene

    2014-02-01

    The limited entry of anticancer drugs into the central nervous system represents a special therapeutic challenge for patients with brain metastases and is primarily due to the blood brain barrier (BBB). Albumin-bound Evans blue (EB) dye is too large to cross the BBB but can grossly stain tissue blue when the BBB is disrupted. The course of tumor development and the integrity of the BBB were studied in three preclinical breast cancer brain metastasis (BCBM) models. A luciferase-transduced braintropic clone of MDA-231 cell line was used. Nude mice were subjected to stereotactic intracerebral inoculation, mammary fat pad-derived tumor fragment implantation, or carotid artery injections. EB was injected 30 min prior to euthanasia at various timepoints for each of the BCBM model animals. Serial bioluminescent imaging demonstrated exponential tumor growth in all models. Carotid BCBM appeared as diffuse multifocal cell clusters. EB aided the localization of metastases ex vivo. Tumor implants stained blue at 7 days whereas gross staining was not evident until day 14 in the stereotactic model and day 28 for the carotid model. EB assessment of the integrity of the BBB provides useful information relevant to drug testing in preclinical BCBM models.

  13. Insular dwarfism in hippos and a model for brain size reduction in Homo floresiensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weston, Eleanor M; Lister, Adrian M

    2009-05-07

    Body size reduction in mammals is usually associated with only moderate brain size reduction, because the brain and sensory organs complete their growth before the rest of the body during ontogeny. On this basis, 'phyletic dwarfs' are predicted to have a greater relative brain size than 'phyletic giants'. However, this trend has been questioned in the special case of dwarfism of mammals on islands. Here we show that the endocranial capacities of extinct dwarf species of hippopotamus from Madagascar are up to 30% smaller than those of a mainland African ancestor scaled to equivalent body mass. These results show that brain size reduction is much greater than predicted from an intraspecific 'late ontogenetic' model of dwarfism in which brain size scales to body size with an exponent of 0.35. The nature of the proportional change or grade shift observed here indicates that selective pressures on brain size are potentially independent of those on body size. This study demonstrates empirically that it is mechanistically possible for dwarf mammals on islands to evolve significantly smaller brains than would be predicted from a model of dwarfing based on the intraspecific scaling of the mainland ancestor. Our findings challenge current understanding of brain-body allometric relationships in mammals and suggest that the process of dwarfism could in principle explain small brain size, a factor relevant to the interpretation of the small-brained hominin found on the Island of Flores, Indonesia.

  14. Modeling localized delivery of Doxorubicin to the brain following focused ultrasound enhanced blood-brain barrier permeability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nhan, Tam; Burgess, Alison; Lilge, Lothar; Hynynen, Kullervo

    2014-10-01

    Doxorubicin (Dox) is a well-established chemotherapeutic agent, however it has limited efficacy in treating brain malignancies due to the presence of the blood-brain barrier (BBB). Recent preclinical studies have demonstrated that focused ultrasound induced BBB disruption (BBBD) enables efficient delivery of Dox to the brain. For future treatment planning of BBBD-based drug delivery, it is crucial to establish a mathematical framework to predict the effect of transient BBB permeability enhancement on the spatiotemporal distribution of Dox at the targeted area. The constructed model considers Dox concentrations within three compartments (plasma, extracellular, intracellular) that are governed by various transport processes (e.g. diffusion in interstitial space, exchange across vessel wall, clearance by cerebral spinal fluid, uptake by brain cells). By examining several clinical treatment aspects (e.g. sonication scheme, permeability enhancement, injection mode), our simulation results support the experimental findings of optimal interval delay between two consecutive sonications and therapeutically-sufficient intracellular concentration with respect to transfer constant Ktrans range of 0.01-0.03 min-1. Finally, the model suggests that infusion over a short duration (20-60 min) should be employed along with single-sonication or multiple-sonication at 10 min interval to ensure maximum delivery to the intracellular compartment while attaining minimal cardiotoxicity via suppressing peak plasma concentration.

  15. Task-Driven Activity Reduces the Cortical Activity Space of the Brain: Experiment and Whole-Brain Modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponce-Alvarez, Adrián; He, Biyu J; Hagmann, Patric; Deco, Gustavo

    2015-08-01

    How a stimulus or a task alters the spontaneous dynamics of the brain remains a fundamental open question in neuroscience. One of the most robust hallmarks of task/stimulus-driven brain dynamics is the decrease of variability with respect to the spontaneous level, an effect seen across multiple experimental conditions and in brain signals observed at different spatiotemporal scales. Recently, it was observed that the trial-to-trial variability and temporal variance of functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) signals decrease in the task-driven activity. Here we examined the dynamics of a large-scale model of the human cortex to provide a mechanistic understanding of these observations. The model allows computing the statistics of synaptic activity in the spontaneous condition and in putative tasks determined by external inputs to a given subset of brain regions. We demonstrated that external inputs decrease the variance, increase the covariances, and decrease the autocovariance of synaptic activity as a consequence of single node and large-scale network dynamics. Altogether, these changes in network statistics imply a reduction of entropy, meaning that the spontaneous synaptic activity outlines a larger multidimensional activity space than does the task-driven activity. We tested this model's prediction on fMRI signals from healthy humans acquired during rest and task conditions and found a significant decrease of entropy in the stimulus-driven activity. Altogether, our study proposes a mechanism for increasing the information capacity of brain networks by enlarging the volume of possible activity configurations at rest and reliably settling into a confined stimulus-driven state to allow better transmission of stimulus-related information.

  16. Task-Driven Activity Reduces the Cortical Activity Space of the Brain: Experiment and Whole-Brain Modeling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adrián Ponce-Alvarez

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available How a stimulus or a task alters the spontaneous dynamics of the brain remains a fundamental open question in neuroscience. One of the most robust hallmarks of task/stimulus-driven brain dynamics is the decrease of variability with respect to the spontaneous level, an effect seen across multiple experimental conditions and in brain signals observed at different spatiotemporal scales. Recently, it was observed that the trial-to-trial variability and temporal variance of functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI signals decrease in the task-driven activity. Here we examined the dynamics of a large-scale model of the human cortex to provide a mechanistic understanding of these observations. The model allows computing the statistics of synaptic activity in the spontaneous condition and in putative tasks determined by external inputs to a given subset of brain regions. We demonstrated that external inputs decrease the variance, increase the covariances, and decrease the autocovariance of synaptic activity as a consequence of single node and large-scale network dynamics. Altogether, these changes in network statistics imply a reduction of entropy, meaning that the spontaneous synaptic activity outlines a larger multidimensional activity space than does the task-driven activity. We tested this model's prediction on fMRI signals from healthy humans acquired during rest and task conditions and found a significant decrease of entropy in the stimulus-driven activity. Altogether, our study proposes a mechanism for increasing the information capacity of brain networks by enlarging the volume of possible activity configurations at rest and reliably settling into a confined stimulus-driven state to allow better transmission of stimulus-related information.

  17. Gallic acid improved behavior, brain electrophysiology, and inflammation in a rat model of traumatic brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarkaki, Alireza; Farbood, Yaghoub; Gharib-Naseri, Mohammad Kazem; Badavi, Mohammad; Mansouri, Mohammad Taghi; Haghparast, Abbas; Mirshekar, Mohammad Ali

    2015-08-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is one of the main causes of intellectual and cognitive disabilities. In the clinic it is essential to limit the development of cognitive impairment after TBI. In this study, the effects of gallic acid (GA; 100 mg/kg, per oral, from 7 days before to 2 days after TBI induction) on neurological score, passive avoidance memory, long-term potentiation (LTP) deficits, and levels of proinflammatory cytokines including interleukin-1 beta (IL-1β), interleukin 6 (IL-6), and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) in the brain have been evaluated. Brain injury was induced following Marmarou's method. Data were analyzed by one-way and repeated measures ANOVA followed by Tukey's post-hoc test. The results indicated that memory was significantly impaired (p memory and LTP in the TBI rats. The brain tissue levels of IL-1β, IL-6, and TNF-α were significantly reduced (p electrophysiological, and inflammatory disorders, probably via the decrease of cerebral proinflammatory cytokines.

  18. Immortalized endothelial cell lines for in vitro blood-brain barrier models: A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, Nurul Adhwa; Rasil, Alifah Nur'ain Haji Mat; Meyding-Lamade, Uta; Craemer, Eva Maria; Diah, Suwarni; Tuah, Ani Afiqah; Muharram, Siti Hanna

    2016-07-01

    Endothelial cells play the most important role in construction of the blood-brain barrier. Many studies have opted to use commercially available, easily transfected or immortalized endothelial cell lines as in vitro blood-brain barrier models. Numerous endothelial cell lines are available, but we do not currently have strong evidence for which cell lines are optimal for establishment of such models. This review aimed to investigate the application of immortalized endothelial cell lines as in vitro blood-brain barrier models. The databases used for this review were PubMed, OVID MEDLINE, ProQuest, ScienceDirect, and SpringerLink. A narrative systematic review was conducted and identified 155 studies. As a result, 36 immortalized endothelial cell lines of human, mouse, rat, porcine and bovine origins were found for the establishment of in vitro blood-brain barrier and brain endothelium models. This review provides a summary of immortalized endothelial cell lines as a guideline for future studies and improvements in the establishment of in vitro blood-brain barrier models. It is important to establish a good and reproducible model that has the potential for multiple applications, in particular a model of such a complex compartment such as the blood-brain barrier.

  19. Revisiting hydrocephalus as a model to study brain resilience.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matheus Fernandes De Oliveira

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Hydrocephalus is an entity which embraces a variety of diseases whose final result is the enlarged size of cerebral ventricular system, partially or completely. The physiopathology of hydrocephalus lies in the dynamics of circulation of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF. The consequent CSF stasis in hydrocephalus interferes with cerebral and ventricular system development. Children and adults who sustain congenital or acquired brain injury typically experience a diffuse insult that impacts many areas of the brain. Development and recovery after such injuries reflects both restoration and reorganization of cognitive functions. Classic examples were already reported in literature. This suggests the presence of biological mechanisms associated with resilient adaptation of brain networks. We will settle a link between the notable modifications to neurophysiology secondary to hydrocephalus and the ability of neuronal tissue to reassume and reorganize its functions.Key words: hydrocephalus; resilience; brain; neural networks; plasticity.

  20. Opioid Abuse after Traumatic Brain Injury: Evaluation Using Rodent Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-01

    rats induces structural changes in brain regions associated with reward/risk circuitry including the nucleus accumbens, amygdala, hippocampus , and...to injury, animals underwent surgical implantation of a chronic indwelling venous catheter under isoflurane anesthesia with morphine pretreatment. A

  1. Bio-electromagnetic model of deep brain stimulation

    OpenAIRE

    Walckiers, Grégoire

    2009-01-01

    Functional stimulation is one of the most fascinating applications of bioelectromagnetism. It deals with the stimulation of excitable biological tissues by electromagnetic fields. One of its most impressive medical applications is the subthalamic nucleus deep brain stimulation (DBS). It consists in the insertion of an electrode into the deep brain, delivering electric pulses to treat Parkinson's disease and other movement disorders. But despite its wide use throughout the world for almost twe...

  2. A mathematical model to elucidate brain tumor abrogation by immunotherapy with T11 target structure.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandip Banerjee

    Full Text Available T11 Target structure (T11TS, a membrane glycoprotein isolated from sheep erythrocytes, reverses the immune suppressed state of brain tumor induced animals by boosting the functional status of the immune cells. This study aims at aiding in the design of more efficacious brain tumor therapies with T11 target structure. We propose a mathematical model for brain tumor (glioma and the immune system interactions, which aims in designing efficacious brain tumor therapy. The model encompasses considerations of the interactive dynamics of glioma cells, macrophages, cytotoxic T-lymphocytes (CD8(+ T-cells, TGF-β, IFN-γ and the T11TS. The system undergoes sensitivity analysis, that determines which state variables are sensitive to the given parameters and the parameters are estimated from the published data. Computer simulations were used for model verification and validation, which highlight the importance of T11 target structure in brain tumor therapy.

  3. Using Structural Equation Modeling to Assess Functional Connectivity in the Brain: Power and Sample Size Considerations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sideridis, Georgios; Simos, Panagiotis; Papanicolaou, Andrew; Fletcher, Jack

    2014-01-01

    The present study assessed the impact of sample size on the power and fit of structural equation modeling applied to functional brain connectivity hypotheses. The data consisted of time-constrained minimum norm estimates of regional brain activity during performance of a reading task obtained with magnetoencephalography. Power analysis was first…

  4. Development of luciferase tagged brain tumour models in mice for chemotherapy intervention studies.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kemper, E.M.; Leenders, W.P.J.; Kusters, B.; Lyons, S.; Buckle, T.; Heerschap, A.; Boogerd, W.; Beijnen, J.H.; Tellingen, O.

    2006-01-01

    The blood-brain barrier (BBB) is considered one of the major causes for the low efficacy of cytotoxic compounds against primary brain tumours. The aim of this study was to develop intracranial tumour models in mice featuring intact or locally disrupted BBB properties, which can be used in testing ch

  5. Characterization of a novel brain barrier ex vivo insect-based P-glycoprotein screening model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersson, O.; Badisco, L.; Hansen, A. H.;

    2014-01-01

    In earlier studies insects were proposed as suitable models for vertebrate blood–brain barrier (BBB) permeability prediction and useful in early drug discovery. Here we provide transcriptome and functional data demonstrating the presence of a P-glycoprotein (Pgp) efflux transporter in the brain b...

  6. Computational model of an infant brain subjected to periodic motion simplified modelling and Bayesian sensitivity analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batterbee, D C; Sims, N D; Becker, W; Worden, K; Rowson, J

    2011-11-01

    Non-accidental head injury in infants, or shaken baby syndrome, is a highly controversial and disputed topic. Biomechanical studies often suggest that shaking alone cannot cause the classical symptoms, yet many medical experts believe the contrary. Researchers have turned to finite element modelling for a more detailed understanding of the interactions between the brain, skull, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), and surrounding tissues. However, the uncertainties in such models are significant; these can arise from theoretical approximations, lack of information, and inherent variability. Consequently, this study presents an uncertainty analysis of a finite element model of a human head subject to shaking. Although the model geometry was greatly simplified, fluid-structure-interaction techniques were used to model the brain, skull, and CSF using a Eulerian mesh formulation with penalty-based coupling. Uncertainty and sensitivity measurements were obtained using Bayesian sensitivity analysis, which is a technique that is relatively new to the engineering community. Uncertainty in nine different model parameters was investigated for two different shaking excitations: sinusoidal translation only, and sinusoidal translation plus rotation about the base of the head. The level and type of sensitivity in the results was found to be highly dependent on the excitation type.

  7. From animal model to human brain networking: dynamic causal modeling of motivational systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonen, Tal; Admon, Roee; Podlipsky, Ilana; Hendler, Talma

    2012-05-23

    An organism's behavior is sensitive to different reinforcements in the environment. Based on extensive animal literature, the reinforcement sensitivity theory (RST) proposes three separate neurobehavioral systems to account for such context-sensitive behavior, affecting the tendency to react to punishment, reward, or goal-conflict stimuli. The translation of animal findings to complex human behavior, however, is far from obvious. To examine whether the neural networks underlying humans' motivational processes are similar to those proposed by the RST model, we conducted a functional MRI study, in which 24 healthy subjects performed an interactive game that engaged the different motivational systems using distinct time periods (states) of punishment, reward, and conflict. Crucially, we found that the different motivational states elicited activations in brain regions that corresponded exactly to the brain systems underlying RST. Moreover, dynamic causal modeling of each motivational system confirmed that the coupling strengths between the key brain regions of each system were enabled selectively by the appropriate motivational state. These results may shed light on the impairments that underlie psychopathologies associated with dysfunctional motivational processes and provide a translational validity for the RST.

  8. A cancer stem cell model for studying brain metastases from primary lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nolte, Sara M; Venugopal, Chitra; McFarlane, Nicole; Morozova, Olena; Hallett, Robin M; O'Farrell, Erin; Manoranjan, Branavan; Murty, Naresh K; Klurfan, Paula; Kachur, Edward; Provias, John P; Farrokhyar, Forough; Hassell, John A; Marra, Marco; Singh, Sheila K

    2013-04-17

    Brain metastases are most common in adults with lung cancer, predicting uniformly poor patient outcome, with a median survival of only months. Despite their frequency and severity, very little is known about tumorigenesis in brain metastases. We applied previously developed primary solid tumor-initiating cell models to the study of brain metastases from the lung to evaluate the presence of a cancer stem cell population. Patient-derived brain metastases (n = 20) and the NCI-H1915 cell line were cultured as stem-enriching tumorspheres. We used in vitro limiting-dilution and sphere-forming assays, as well as intracranial human-mouse xenograft models. To determine genes overexpressed in brain metastasis tumorspheres, we performed comparative transcriptome analysis. All statistical analyses were two-sided. Patient-derived brain metastasis tumorspheres had a mean sphere-forming capacity of 33 spheres/2000 cells (SD = 33.40) and median stem-cell frequency of 1/60 (range = 0-1/141), comparable to that of primary brain tumorspheres (P = .53 and P = .20, respectively). Brain metastases also expressed CD15 and CD133, markers suggestive of a stemlike population. Through intracranial xenotransplantation, brain metastasis tumorspheres were found to recapitulate the original patient tumor heterogeneity. We also identified several genes overexpressed in brain metastasis tumorspheres as statistically significant predictors of poor survival in primary lung cancer. For the first time, we demonstrate the presence of a stemlike population in brain metastases from the lung. We also show that NCI-H1915 tumorspheres could be useful in studying self-renewal and tumor initiation in brain metastases. Our candidate genes may be essential to metastatic stem cell populations, where pathway interference may be able to transform a uniformly fatal disease into a more localized and treatable one.

  9. Brain slices as models for neurodegenerative disease and screening platforms to identify novel therapeutics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Seongeun; Wood, Andrew; Bowlby, Mark R

    2007-03-01

    Recent improvements in brain slice technology have made this biological preparation increasingly useful for examining pathophysiology of brain diseases in a tissue context. Brain slices maintain many aspects of in vivo biology, including functional local synaptic circuitry with preserved brain architecture, while allowing good experimental access and precise control of the extracellular environment, making them ideal platforms for dissection of molecular pathways underlying neuronal dysfunction. Importantly, these ex vivo systems permit direct treatment with pharmacological agents modulating these responses and thus provide surrogate therapeutic screening systems without recourse to whole animal studies. Virus or particle mediated transgenic expression can also be accomplished relatively easily to study the function of novel genes in a normal or injured brain tissue context.In this review we will discuss acute brain injury models in organotypic hippocampal and co-culture systems and the effects of pharmacological modulation on neurodegeneration. The review will also cover the evidence of developmental plasticity in these ex vivo models, demonstrating emergence of injury-stimulated neuronal progenitor cells, and neurite sprouting and axonal regeneration following pathway lesioning. Neuro-and axo-genesis are emerging as significant factors contributing to brain repair following many acute and chronic neurodegenerative disorders. Therefore brain slice models may provide a critical contextual experimental system to explore regenerative mechanisms in vitro.

  10. Mathematical modeling of the human energy metabolism based on the Selfish Brain Theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Matthias; Göbel, Britta

    2012-01-01

    Deregulations in the human energy metabolism may cause diseases such as obesity and type 2 diabetes mellitus. The origins of these pathologies are fairly unknown. The key role of the brain is the regulation of the complex whole body energy metabolism. The Selfish Brain Theory identifies the priority of brain energy supply in the competition for available energy resources within the organism. Here, we review mathematical models of the human energy metabolism supporting central aspects of the Selfish Brain Theory. First, we present a dynamical system modeling the whole body energy metabolism. This model takes into account the two central control mechanisms of the brain, i.e., allocation and appetite. Moreover, we present mathematical models of regulatory subsystems. We examine a neuronal model which specifies potential elements of the brain to sense and regulate cerebral energy content. We investigate a model of the HPA system regulating the allocation of energy within the organism. Finally, we present a robust modeling approach of appetite regulation. All models account for a systemic understanding of the human energy metabolism and thus do shed light onto defects causing metabolic diseases.

  11. Multi-modal approach for investigating brain and behavior changes in an animal model of traumatic brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heffernan, Meghan E; Huang, Wei; Sicard, Kenneth M; Bratane, Bernt T; Sikoglu, Elif M; Zhang, Nanyin; Fisher, Marc; King, Jean A

    2013-06-01

    Use of novel approaches in imaging modalities is needed for enhancing diagnostic and therapeutic outcomes of persons with a traumatic brain injury (TBI). This study explored the feasibility of using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) in conjunction with behavioral measures to target dynamic changes in specific neural circuitries in an animal model of TBI. Wistar rats were randomly assigned to one of two groups (traumatic brain injury/sham operation). TBI rats were subjected to the closed head injury (CHI) model. Any observable motor deficits and cognitive deficits associated with the injury were measured using beam walk and Morris water maze tests, respectively. fMRI was performed to assess the underlying post-traumatic cerebral anatomy and function in acute (24 hours after the injury) and chronic (7 and 21 days after the injury) phases. Beam walk test results detected no significant differences in motor deficits between groups. The Morris water maze test indicated that cognitive deficits persisted for the first week after injury and, to a large extent, resolved thereafter. Resting state functional connectivity (rsFC) analysis detected initially diminished connectivity between cortical areas involved in cognition for the TBI group; however, the connectivity patterns normalized at 1 week and remained so at the 3 weeks post-injury time point. Taken together, we have demonstrated an objective in vivo marker for mapping functional brain changes correlated with injury-associated cognitive behavior deficits and offer an animal model for testing potential therapeutic interventions options.

  12. Brain Based Teaching Model as Transformation of Learning Paradigm in Higher Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zulfani Sesmiarni

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Brain -based teaching model is a new paradigm that can facilitate students in optimizing student learning by the functioning the brain as a whole. Lessons are held today assume that all students equally so that learning provide the same services to each student in the class. With this model, the students are given different stimulation according to their abilities and needs. Base on brain learning theory -based teaching, the learning should pay attention to the five needs of the brain in general. The fifth factor is the need for a sense of comfort, the need for interaction, the need for knowledge, the need for the activity and the need for self-reflection. All these needs will be connected if the lecturers able to present emotional learning, social learning, cognitive learning, physical learning and teaching reflection. Key Word : Instrucetional, Brain Based teaching, Learning.Copyright © 2015 by Al-Ta'lim All right reserved

  13. Novel brain arteriovenous malformation mouse models for type 1 hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eun-Jung Choi

    Full Text Available Endoglin (ENG is a causative gene of type 1 hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia (HHT1. HHT1 patients have a higher prevalence of brain arteriovenous malformation (AVM than the general population and patients with other HHT subtypes. The pathogenesis of brain AVM in HHT1 patients is currently unknown and no specific medical therapy is available to treat patients. Proper animal models are crucial for identifying the underlying mechanisms for brain AVM development and for testing new therapies. However, creating HHT1 brain AVM models has been quite challenging because of difficulties related to deleting Eng-floxed sequence in Eng(2fl/2fl mice. To create an HHT1 brain AVM mouse model, we used several Cre transgenic mouse lines to delete Eng in different cell-types in Eng(2fl/2fl mice: R26CreER (all cell types after tamoxifen treatment, SM22α-Cre (smooth muscle and endothelial cell and LysM-Cre (lysozyme M-positive macrophage. An adeno-associated viral vector expressing vascular endothelial growth factor (AAV-VEGF was injected into the brain to induce focal angiogenesis. We found that SM22α-Cre-mediated Eng deletion in the embryo caused AVMs in the postnatal brain, spinal cord, and intestines. Induction of Eng deletion in adult mice using R26CreER plus local VEGF stimulation induced the brain AVM phenotype. In both models, Eng-null endothelial cells were detected in the brain AVM lesions, and formed mosaicism with wildtype endothelial cells. However, LysM-Cre-mediated Eng deletion in the embryo did not cause AVM in the postnatal brain even after VEGF stimulation. In this study, we report two novel HHT1 brain AVM models that mimic many phenotypes of human brain AVM and can thus be used for studying brain AVM pathogenesis and testing new therapies. Further, our data indicate that macrophage Eng deletion is insufficient and that endothelial Eng homozygous deletion is required for HHT1 brain AVM development.

  14. Adolescent emotional maturation through divergent models of brain organization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jose Víctor Orón Semper

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available In this article we introduce the hypothesis that neuropsychological adolescent maturation, and in particular emotional management, may have opposing explanations depending on the interpretation of the assumed brain architecture, that is, whether a componential computational account (CCA or a dynamic systems perspective (DSP is used. According to CCA, cognitive functions are associated with the action of restricted brain regions, and this association is temporally stable; by contrast, DSP argues that cognitive functions are better explained by interactions between several brain areas, whose engagement in specific functions is temporal and context-dependent and based on neural reuse. We outline the main neurobiological facts about adolescent maturation, focusing on the neuroanatomical and neurofunctional processes associated with adolescence. We then explain the importance of emotional management in adolescent maturation. We explain the interplay between emotion and cognition under the scope of CCA and DSP, both at neural and behavioral levels. Finally, we justify why, according to CCA, emotional management is understood as regulation, specifically because the cognitive aspects of the brain are in charge of regulating emotion-related modules. However, the key word in DSP is integration, since neural information from different brain areas is integrated from the beginning of the process. Consequently, although the terms should not be conceptually confused, there is no cognition without emotion, and vice versa. Thus, emotional integration is not an independent process that just happens to the subject, but a crucial part of personal growth. Considering the importance of neuropsychological research in the development of educational and legal policies concerning adolescents, we intend to expose that the holistic view of adolescents is dependent on whether one holds the implicit or explicit interpretation of brain functioning.

  15. Effects of midazolam and phenobarbital on brain oxidative reactions induced by pentylenetetrazole in a convulsion model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arai, Yukiko; Maeda, Shigeru; Higuchi, Hitoshi; Tomoyasu, Yumiko; Shimada, Masahiko; Miyawaki, Takuya

    2012-04-01

    Brain oxidative reactions are involved in epilepsy as well as neurodegenerative diseases. In animal convulsion models, some anticonvulsants have been found to suppress oxidative reactions associated with convulsions. However, the effect of anticonvulsants on brain oxidative reactions has not fully been clarified. Midazolam and phenobarbital are often used as an intravenous anesthetic, and are known to have anticonvulsive effect, but antioxidative effect of these drugs has rarely been studied. Thus, the purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of these drugs on the degree of convulsions and brain oxidative reactions in an animal convulsion model. In order to evaluate brain oxidative reactions, we measured malondialdehyde (MDA) level and heme oxygenase (HO)-1 mRNA expression level in the brain of mice in a convulsion model generated by a single injection of pentylenetetrazole (PTZ). We evaluated the effects of midazolam and phenobarbital on the degree of PTZ-induced convulsions and on the changes in brain MDA level and HO-1 mRNA expression level. After PTZ injection, severe convulsions were observed in all mice. MDA level was increased in the whole brain, while HO-1 mRNA expression level was increased only in the hippocampus. Both midazolam and phenobarbital prevented the convulsions and suppressed the increase in both MDA level and HO-1 mRNA expression level in the brain. In this study, both midazolam and phenobarbital suppressed PTZ-induced MDA and HO-1 reactions in the brain, suggesting that these drugs inhibit brain oxidative reactions in a convulsion model.

  16. Standing and travelling waves in a spherical brain model: The Nunez model revisited

    Science.gov (United States)

    Visser, S.; Nicks, R.; Faugeras, O.; Coombes, S.

    2017-06-01

    The Nunez model for the generation of electroencephalogram (EEG) signals is naturally described as a neural field model on a sphere with space-dependent delays. For simplicity, dynamical realisations of this model either as a damped wave equation or an integro-differential equation, have typically been studied in idealised one dimensional or planar settings. Here we revisit the original Nunez model to specifically address the role of spherical topology on spatio-temporal pattern generation. We do this using a mixture of Turing instability analysis, symmetric bifurcation theory, centre manifold reduction and direct simulations with a bespoke numerical scheme. In particular we examine standing and travelling wave solutions using normal form computation of primary and secondary bifurcations from a steady state. Interestingly, we observe spatio-temporal patterns which have counterparts seen in the EEG patterns of both epileptic and schizophrenic brain conditions.

  17. Technical pitfalls in a porcine brain retraction model. The impact of brain spatula on the retracted brain tissue in a porcine model: a feasibility study and its technical pitfalls

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thiex, R.; Hans, F.J.; Gilsbach, J.M. [Aachen University, Department of Neurosurgery, Aachen (Germany); Krings, T. [Aachen University, Department of Neuroradiology, Aachen (Germany); Sellhaus, B. [Aachen University, Department of Neuropathology, Aachen (Germany)

    2005-10-01

    We describe technical pitfalls of a porcine brain injury model for identifying primary and secondary pathological sequelae following brain retraction by brain spatula. In 16 anaesthetised male pigs, the right frontal brain was retracted in the interhemispheric fissure by a brain spatulum with varying pressures applied by the gravitational force of weights from 10 to 70 g for a duration of 30 min. The retracted brain tissue was monitored for changes in intracranial pressure and perfusion of the cortex using a Laser Doppler Perfusion Imager (MoorLDI). To evaluate the extent of oedema and cortical contusions, MRI was performed 30 min and 72 h after brain retraction. Following the MR scan, the retracted brain areas were histopathologically assessed using H and E and Fluoro-Jade B staining for neuronal damage. Sinus occlusion occurred in four animals, resulting in bilateral cortical contusions and extensive brain oedema. Retracting the brain with weights of 70 g (n=4) caused extensive oedema on FLAIR images that correlated clinically with a hemiparesis in three animals. Morphologically, an increased number of Fluoro-Jade B-positive neurons were found. A sequential decrease in weights prevented functional deficits in animals. A retraction pressure applied by 10-g weights (n=7) caused a mean rise in intracranial pressure to 4.0{+-}3.1 mm Hg, and a decrement in mean cortical perfusion from 740.8{+-}41.5 to 693.8{+-}72.4 PU/cm2, (P<0.24). A meticulous dissection of the interhemispheric fissure and a reduction of weights to 10 g were found to be mandatory to study the cortical impact caused by brain spatula reproducibly. (orig.)

  18. Early treatment with lyophilized plasma protects the brain in a large animal model of combined traumatic brain injury and hemorrhagic shock

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Imam, Ayesha M; Jin, Guang; Sillesen, Martin

    2013-01-01

    Combination of traumatic brain injury (TBI) and hemorrhagic shock (HS) can result in significant morbidity and mortality. We have previously shown that early administration of fresh frozen plasma (FFP) in a large animal model of TBI and HS reduces the size of the brain lesion as well as the assoc......Combination of traumatic brain injury (TBI) and hemorrhagic shock (HS) can result in significant morbidity and mortality. We have previously shown that early administration of fresh frozen plasma (FFP) in a large animal model of TBI and HS reduces the size of the brain lesion as well...

  19. 5-lipoxygenase expression in a brain damage model induced by chronic oral administration of aluminum

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yongquan Pan; Peng Zhang; Junqing Yang; Qiang Su

    2010-01-01

    A preliminary study has found that the 5-lipoxygenase inhibitor, caffeic acid, has a marked protective effect on acute brain injury induced by intracerebroventricular microinjection of aluminum.In this experiment, chronic brain injury and neuronal degeneration model was established in rats by chronic oral administration of aluminum, and then intervened using caffeic acid. Results showed that caffeic acid can downregulate chronic aluminum overload-induced 5-lipoxygenase mRNA and protein expression, and repair the aluminum overload-induced hippocampal neuronal damage andspatial orientation impairment. It is suggested that direct intervention of 5-lipoxygenase expression has a neuroprotective role in the degeneration induced by chronic aluminum overload brain injury model.

  20. Investigation of Brain Arterial Circle Malformations Using Electrical Modelling and Simulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Klara Capova

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper deals with the cerebral arterial system investigation by means of electrical modelling and simulations. The main attention is paid to the brain arterial circle malformations (stenoses and aneurysms and their determination and evaluation by computer-aided methods as tools of a non-invasive diagnostics. The compensation possibilities of brain arterial circle in case of presence of concrete arterial malformations are modelled and simulated. The simulation results of brain arteries blood pressures and volume flow velocities time dependences are presented and discussed under various health conditions.

  1. Opioid Abuse after Traumatic Brain Injury: Evaluation Using Rodent Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-01

    compulsive buying and the burden perceived by caregivers after moderate-to-severe traumatic brain injury. Psychopathology. 2011;44:158-164. Rochat L...well as the progression from abuse to compulsive drug taking and addiction (Coluzzi and Pappagallo, 2005; Koob and Volkow, 2010). Physical dependence

  2. Opioid Abuse After Traumatic Brain Injury: Evaluation Using Rodet Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-07-01

    impulsivity relates to compulsive buying and the burden perceived by caregivers after moderate-to-severe traumatic brain injury. Psychopathology...mechanism for the continued misuse/abuse of opioid drugs as well as the progression from abuse to compulsive drug taking and addiction (Coluzzi and

  3. Using induced pluripotent stem cells derived neurons to model brain diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cindy E McKinney

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The ability to use induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSC to model brain diseases is a powerful tool for unraveling mechanistic alterations in these disorders. Rodent models of brain diseases have spurred understanding of pathology but the concern arises that they may not recapitulate the full spectrum of neuron disruptions associated with human neuropathology. iPSC derived neurons, or other neural cell types, provide the ability to access pathology in cells derived directly from a patient's blood sample or skin biopsy where availability of brain tissue is limiting. Thus, utilization of iPSC to study brain diseases provides an unlimited resource for disease modelling but may also be used for drug screening for effective therapies and may potentially be used to regenerate aged or damaged cells in the future. Many brain diseases across the spectrum of neurodevelopment, neurodegenerative and neuropsychiatric are being approached by iPSC models. The goal of an iPSC based disease model is to identify a cellular phenotype that discriminates the disease-bearing cells from the control cells. In this mini-review, the importance of iPSC cell models validated for pluripotency, germline competency and function assessments is discussed. Selected examples for the variety of brain diseases that are being approached by iPSC technology to discover or establish the molecular basis of the neuropathology are discussed.

  4. Brain Tumor Segmentation Using a Generative Model with an RBM Prior on Tumor Shape

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Agn, Mikael; Puonti, Oula; Rosenschöld, Per Munck af;

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we present a fully automated generative method for brain tumor segmentation in multi-modal magnetic resonance images. The method is based on the type of generative model often used for segmenting healthy brain tissues, where tissues are modeled by Gaussian mixture models combined...... with a spatial atlas-based tissue prior. We extend this basic model with a tumor prior, which uses convolutional restricted Boltzmann machines (cRBMs) to model the shape of both tumor core and complete tumor, which includes edema and core. The cRBMs are trained on expert segmentations of training images, without...

  5. Non-human Primate Models for Brain Disorders - Towards Genetic Manipulations via Innovative Technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Zilong; Li, Xiao

    2017-04-01

    Modeling brain disorders has always been one of the key tasks in neurobiological studies. A wide range of organisms including worms, fruit flies, zebrafish, and rodents have been used for modeling brain disorders. However, whether complicated neurological and psychiatric symptoms can be faithfully mimicked in animals is still debatable. In this review, we discuss key findings using non-human primates to address the neural mechanisms underlying stress and anxiety behaviors, as well as technical advances for establishing genetically-engineered non-human primate models of autism spectrum disorders and other disorders. Considering the close evolutionary connections and similarity of brain structures between non-human primates and humans, together with the rapid progress in genome-editing technology, non-human primates will be indispensable for pathophysiological studies and exploring potential therapeutic methods for treating brain disorders.

  6. Paving the way towards complex blood-brain barrier models using pluripotent stem cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lauschke, Karin; Frederiksen, Lise; Hall, Vanessa Jane

    2017-01-01

    to the unique tightness and selective permeability of the BBB and has been shown to be disrupted in many diseases and brain disorders, such as, vascular dementia, stroke, multiple sclerosis and Alzheimer's disease. Given the progress that pluripotent stem cells (PSCs) have made in the last two decades......A tissue with great need to be modelled in vitro is the blood-brain barrier (BBB). The BBB is a tight barrier that covers all blood vessels in the brain and separates the brain microenvironment from the blood system. It consists of three cell types (neurovascular unit (NVU)) that contribute......, it is now possible to produce many cell types from the BBB and even partially recapitulate this complex tissue in vitro. In this review, we summarize the most recent developments in PSC differentiation and modelling of the BBB. We also suggest how patient-specific human induced PSCs could be used to model...

  7. Experimental study on the establishment and maintenance of brain death model with pigs

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Shuijun; SHI Jihua; ZHAI Wenlong; SONG Yan; CHEN Shi

    2007-01-01

    It remains controversial that after the transplantation of using grafts from brain-dead donors,organs injury and rejection can influence the effects of transplantation.This study sought to explore methods of establishing a stable brain death(BD)model using Bama mini pigs and to maintain the brain-dead state for a comparatively long period to provide a model for investigating changes in brain death.Sixteen anesthetized Bama mini pigs were randomized into a control group(n=5)and a BD group(n=11).Intracranial pressure (ICP)was increased in a modified,slow,and intermittent way to establish BD.Respiration and circulation were sustained during the brain-dead state.Hemodynamic changes were monitored during the experiment.In the BD group,10 pigs met the requirements for brain death and 1 died of cardiopulmonary complications following an increase in ICP.Brain death was maintained for more than 48 hours with artificial life support.During the experiment,the heart rate and blood pressure showed characteristic changes due to increased ICP.Prior to BD being established,a"tic reaction"inevitably occurred.We used an improved method of increasing ICP to establish a stable BD model.The BD state could be maintained for more than 48 hours with effective respiratory and circulatory support.Disappearance of the tic reaction was considered to be one of the verified indexes for BD via encephalic pressure increase.

  8. Comparing translational population-PBPK modelling of brain microdialysis with bottom-up prediction of brain-to-plasma distribution in rat and human.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ball, Kathryn; Bouzom, François; Scherrmann, Jean-Michel; Walther, Bernard; Declèves, Xavier

    2014-11-01

    The prediction of brain extracellular fluid (ECF) concentrations in human is a potentially valuable asset during drug development as it can provide the pharmacokinetic input for pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic models. This study aimed to compare two translational modelling approaches that can be applied at the preclinical stage of development in order to simulate human brain ECF concentrations. A population-PBPK model of the central nervous system was developed based on brain microdialysis data, and the model parameters were translated to their corresponding human values to simulate ECF and brain tissue concentration profiles. In parallel, the PBPK modelling software Simcyp was used to simulate human brain tissue concentrations, via the bottom-up prediction of brain tissue distribution using two different sets of mechanistic tissue composition-based equations. The population-PBPK and bottom-up approaches gave similar predictions of total brain concentrations in both rat and human, while only the population-PBPK model was capable of accurately simulating the rat ECF concentrations. The choice of PBPK model must therefore depend on the purpose of the modelling exercise, the in vitro and in vivo data available and knowledge of the mechanisms governing the membrane permeability and distribution of the drug.

  9. A developmental ontology for the mammalian brain based on the prosomeric model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puelles, Luis; Harrison, Megan; Paxinos, George; Watson, Charles

    2013-10-01

    In the past, attempts to create a hierarchical classification of brain structures (an ontology) have been limited by the lack of adequate data on developmental processes. Recent studies on gene expression during brain development have demonstrated the true morphologic interrelations of different parts of the brain. A developmental ontology takes into account the progressive rostrocaudal and dorsoventral differentiation of the neural tube, and the radial migration of derivatives from progenitor areas, using fate mapping and other experimental techniques. In this review, we used the prosomeric model of brain development to build a hierarchical classification of brain structures based chiefly on gene expression. Because genomic control of neural morphogenesis is remarkably conservative, this ontology should prove essentially valid for all vertebrates, aiding terminological unification.

  10. SU-E-T-549: Modeling Relative Biological Effectiveness of Protons for Radiation Induced Brain Necrosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mirkovic, D; Peeler, C; Grosshans, D; Titt, U; Taleei, R; Mohan, R [UT M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To develop a model of the relative biological effectiveness (RBE) of protons as a function of dose and linear energy transfer (LET) for induction of brain necrosis using clinical data. Methods: In this study, treatment planning information was exported from a clinical treatment planning system (TPS) and used to construct a detailed Monte Carlo model of the patient and the beam delivery system. The physical proton dose and LET were computed in each voxel of the patient volume using Monte Carlo particle transport. A follow-up magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) study registered to the treatment planning CT was used to determine the region of the necrosis in the brain volume. Both, the whole brain and the necrosis volumes were segmented from the computed tomography (CT) dataset using the contours drawn by a physician and the corresponding voxels were binned with respect to dose and LET. The brain necrosis probability was computed as a function of dose and LET by dividing the total volume of all necrosis voxels with a given dose and LET with the corresponding total brain volume resulting in a set of NTCP-like curves (probability as a function of dose parameterized by LET). Results: The resulting model shows dependence on both dose and LET indicating the weakness of the constant RBE model for describing the brain toxicity. To the best of our knowledge the constant RBE model is currently used in all clinical applications which may Result in increased rate of brain toxicities in patients treated with protons. Conclusion: Further studies are needed to develop more accurate brain toxicity models for patients treated with protons and other heavy ions.

  11. A Blast Model of Traumatic Brain Injury in Swine

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-01

    information if it does not display a currently valid OMB control number. PLEASE DO NOT RETURN YOUR FORM TO THE ABOVE ADDRESS. 1. REPORT DATE (DD-MM...swine brain. The animals in the second set were given ketorolac (30 mg) s.c. for analgesia. The anesthesia was gradually reduced and the animals were...The second set of 6 animals were deeply anesthetized with isoflurane, then were euthanized with an i.v. injection of saturated KCl. When all

  12. LDA-SVM-based EGFR mutation model for NSCLC brain metastases: an observational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Nan; Wang, Ge; Wu, Yu-Hao; Chen, Shi-Feng; Liu, Guo-Dong; Chen, Chuan; Wang, Dong; He, Zhong-Shi; Yang, Xue-Qin; He, Yong; Xiao, Hua-Liang; Huang, Ding-De; Xiong, Kun-Lin; Wu, Yan; Huang, Ming; Yang, Zhen-Zhou

    2015-02-01

    Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) activating mutations are a predictor of tyrosine kinase inhibitor effectiveness in the treatment of non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). The objective of this study is to build a model for predicting the EGFR mutation status of brain metastasis in patients with NSCLC. Observation and model set-up. This study was conducted between January 2003 and December 2011 in 6 medical centers in Southwest China. The study included 31 NSCLC patients with brain metastases. Eligibility requirements were histological proof of NSCLC, as well as sufficient quantity of paraffin-embedded lung and brain metastases specimens for EGFR mutation detection. The linear discriminant analysis (LDA) method was used for analyzing the dimensional reduction of clinical features, and a support vector machine (SVM) algorithm was employed to generate an EGFR mutation model for NSCLC brain metastases. Training-testing-validation (3 : 1 : 1) processes were applied to find the best fit in 12 patients (validation test set) with NSCLC and brain metastases treated with a tyrosine kinase inhibitor and whole-brain radiotherapy. Primary and secondary outcome measures: EGFR mutation analysis in patients with NSCLC and brain metastases and the development of a LDA-SVM-based EGFR mutation model for NSCLC brain metastases patients. EGFR mutation discordance between the primary lung tumor and brain metastases was found in 5 patients. Using LDA, 13 clinical features were transformed into 9 characteristics, and 3 were selected as primary vectors. The EGFR mutation model constructed with SVM algorithms had an accuracy, sensitivity, and specificity for determining the mutation status of brain metastases of 0.879, 0.886, and 0.875, respectively. Furthermore, the replicability of our model was confirmed by testing 100 random combinations of input values. The LDA-SVM-based model developed in this study could predict the EGFR status of brain metastases in this small cohort of

  13. LDA-SVM-Based EGFR Mutation Model for NSCLC Brain Metastases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Nan; Wang, Ge; Wu, Yu-Hao; Chen, Shi-Feng; Liu, Guo-Dong; Chen, Chuan; Wang, Dong; He, Zhong-Shi; Yang, Xue-Qin; He, Yong; Xiao, Hua-Liang; Huang, Ding-De; Xiong, Kun-Lin; Wu, Yan; Huang, Ming; Yang, Zhen-Zhou

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) activating mutations are a predictor of tyrosine kinase inhibitor effectiveness in the treatment of non–small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). The objective of this study is to build a model for predicting the EGFR mutation status of brain metastasis in patients with NSCLC. Observation and model set-up. This study was conducted between January 2003 and December 2011 in 6 medical centers in Southwest China. The study included 31 NSCLC patients with brain metastases. Eligibility requirements were histological proof of NSCLC, as well as sufficient quantity of paraffin-embedded lung and brain metastases specimens for EGFR mutation detection. The linear discriminant analysis (LDA) method was used for analyzing the dimensional reduction of clinical features, and a support vector machine (SVM) algorithm was employed to generate an EGFR mutation model for NSCLC brain metastases. Training-testing-validation (3 : 1 : 1) processes were applied to find the best fit in 12 patients (validation test set) with NSCLC and brain metastases treated with a tyrosine kinase inhibitor and whole-brain radiotherapy. Primary and secondary outcome measures: EGFR mutation analysis in patients with NSCLC and brain metastases and the development of a LDA-SVM-based EGFR mutation model for NSCLC brain metastases patients. EGFR mutation discordance between the primary lung tumor and brain metastases was found in 5 patients. Using LDA, 13 clinical features were transformed into 9 characteristics, and 3 were selected as primary vectors. The EGFR mutation model constructed with SVM algorithms had an accuracy, sensitivity, and specificity for determining the mutation status of brain metastases of 0.879, 0.886, and 0.875, respectively. Furthermore, the replicability of our model was confirmed by testing 100 random combinations of input values. The LDA-SVM-based model developed in this study could predict the EGFR status of brain metastases in this

  14. EEG model and location in brain when enjoying music.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Huisheng; Wang, Mingshi; Yu, Hongqiang

    2005-01-01

    The aim of this study was to confirm the character of EEG and the location in brain when a person was enjoying different rhythm music. It made the subjects excited when they enjoyed different rhythm music, the EEG signals are collected with Phoenix Digital EEG with 128 channels, and compared with the ones before the subjects enjoying the music. Obvious differences have been found between them. And the character of EEG has a little differences when the subjects enjoyed different rhythm music. The character of EEG is 30 Hz when the subjects enjoyed Skating Waltz, the height of wave crest is about 200; the character of EEG is 32 Hz when the subjects enjoyed Radetzy-March, the height of wave crest is about 300-500; the character of EEG is 28 Hz and 38 Hz when the subjects enjoyed Disco music, the height of wave crest is about 200. Then using the software of ASA 3 Course designed by ANT company of Germany, the location in brain was confirmed when a person had excited. The region of the location in brain when a person was excited was focused in the area of the middle abdomen in the pons' side.

  15. Automatic procedure for realistic 3D finite element modelling of human brain for bioelectromagnetic computations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aristovich, K Y; Khan, S H, E-mail: kirill.aristovich.1@city.ac.u [School of Engineering and Mathematical Sciences, City University London, Northampton Square, London EC1V 0HB (United Kingdom)

    2010-07-01

    Realistic computer modelling of biological objects requires building of very accurate and realistic computer models based on geometric and material data, type, and accuracy of numerical analyses. This paper presents some of the automatic tools and algorithms that were used to build accurate and realistic 3D finite element (FE) model of whole-brain. These models were used to solve the forward problem in magnetic field tomography (MFT) based on Magnetoencephalography (MEG). The forward problem involves modelling and computation of magnetic fields produced by human brain during cognitive processing. The geometric parameters of the model were obtained from accurate Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) data and the material properties - from those obtained from Diffusion Tensor MRI (DTMRI). The 3D FE models of the brain built using this approach has been shown to be very accurate in terms of both geometric and material properties. The model is stored on the computer in Computer-Aided Parametrical Design (CAD) format. This allows the model to be used in a wide a range of methods of analysis, such as finite element method (FEM), Boundary Element Method (BEM), Monte-Carlo Simulations, etc. The generic model building approach presented here could be used for accurate and realistic modelling of human brain and many other biological objects.

  16. Development of luciferase tagged brain tumour models in mice for chemotherapy intervention studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kemper, E M; Leenders, W; Küsters, B; Lyons, S; Buckle, T; Heerschap, A; Boogerd, W; Beijnen, J H; van Tellingen, O

    2006-12-01

    The blood-brain barrier (BBB) is considered one of the major causes for the low efficacy of cytotoxic compounds against primary brain tumours. The aim of this study was to develop intracranial tumour models in mice featuring intact or locally disrupted BBB properties, which can be used in testing chemotherapy against brain tumours. These tumours were established by intracranial injection of suspensions of different tumour cell lines. All cell lines had been transfected with luciferase to allow non-invasive imaging of tumour development using a super-cooled CCD-camera. Following their implantation, tumours developed which displayed the infiltrative, invasive or expansive growth patterns that are also found in primary brain cancer or brain metastases. Contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging showed that the Mel57, K1735Br2 and RG-2 lesions grow without disruption of the BBB, whereas the BBB was leaky in the U87MG and VEGF-A-transfected Mel57 lesions. This was confirmed by immunohistochemistry. Bioluminescence measurements allowed the visualisation of tumour burden already within 4 days after injection of the tumour cells. The applicability of our models for performing efficacy studies was demonstrated in an experiment using temozolomide as study drug. In conclusion, we have developed experimental brain tumour models with partly disrupted, or completely intact BBB properties. In vivo imaging by luciferase allows convenient follow-up of tumour growth and these models will be useful for chemotherapeutic intervention studies.

  17. Quantum-like model of processing of information in the brain based on classical electromagnetic field

    CERN Document Server

    Khrennikov, Andrei

    2010-01-01

    We propose a model of quantum-like (QL) processing of mental information. This model is based on quantum information theory. However, in contrast to models of ``quantum physical brain'' reducing mental activity (at least at the highest level) to quantum physical phenomena in the brain, our model matches well with the basic neuronal paradigm of the cognitive science. QL information processing is based (surprisingly) on classical electromagnetic signals induced by joint activity of neurons. This novel approach to quantum information is based on representation of quantum mechanics as a version of classical signal theory which was recently elaborated by the author. The brain uses the QL representation (QLR) for working with abstract concepts; concrete images are described by classical information theory. Two processes, classical and QL, are performed parallely. Moreover, information is actively transmitted from one representation to another. A QL concept given in our model by a density operator can generate a var...

  18. The Effects of Exercise on Cognitive Recovery after Acquired Brain Injury in Animal Models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wogensen, Elise; Rytter, Hana Malá; Mogensen, Jesper

    2015-01-01

    The objective of the present paper is to review the current status of exercise as a tool to promote cognitive rehabilitation after acquired brain injury (ABI) in animal model-based research. Searches were conducted on the PubMed, Scopus, and psycINFO databases in February 2014. Search strings used...... were: exercise (and) animal model (or) rodent (or) rat (and) traumatic brain injury (or) cerebral ischemia (or) brain irradiation. Studies were selected if they were (1) in English, (2) used adult animals subjected to acquired brain injury, (3) used exercise as an intervention tool after inflicted...... injury, (4) used exercise paradigms demanding movement of all extremities, (5) had exercise intervention effects that could be distinguished from other potential intervention effects, and (6) contained at least one measure of cognitive and/or emotional function. Out of 2308 hits, 22 publications...

  19. The brain's router: a cortical network model of serial processing in the primate brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zylberberg, Ariel; Fernández Slezak, Diego; Roelfsema, Pieter R; Dehaene, Stanislas; Sigman, Mariano

    2010-04-29

    The human brain efficiently solves certain operations such as object recognition and categorization through a massively parallel network of dedicated processors. However, human cognition also relies on the ability to perform an arbitrarily large set of tasks by flexibly recombining different processors into a novel chain. This flexibility comes at the cost of a severe slowing down and a seriality of operations (100-500 ms per step). A limit on parallel processing is demonstrated in experimental setups such as the psychological refractory period (PRP) and the attentional blink (AB) in which the processing of an element either significantly delays (PRP) or impedes conscious access (AB) of a second, rapidly presented element. Here we present a spiking-neuron implementation of a cognitive architecture where a large number of local parallel processors assemble together to produce goal-driven behavior. The precise mapping of incoming sensory stimuli onto motor representations relies on a "router" network capable of flexibly interconnecting processors and rapidly changing its configuration from one task to another. Simulations show that, when presented with dual-task stimuli, the network exhibits parallel processing at peripheral sensory levels, a memory buffer capable of keeping the result of sensory processing on hold, and a slow serial performance at the router stage, resulting in a performance bottleneck. The network captures the detailed dynamics of human behavior during dual-task-performance, including both mean RTs and RT distributions, and establishes concrete predictions on neuronal dynamics during dual-task experiments in humans and non-human primates.

  20. Finite element modeling of human brain response to football helmet impacts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darling, T; Muthuswamy, J; Rajan, S D

    2016-10-01

    The football helmet is used to help mitigate the occurrence of impact-related traumatic (TBI) and minor traumatic brain injuries (mTBI) in the game of American football. While the current helmet design methodology may be adequate for reducing linear acceleration of the head and minimizing TBI, it however has had less effect in minimizing mTBI. The objectives of this study are (a) to develop and validate a coupled finite element (FE) model of a football helmet and the human body, and (b) to assess responses of different regions of the brain to two different impact conditions - frontal oblique and crown impact conditions. The FE helmet model was validated using experimental results of drop tests. Subsequently, the integrated helmet-human body FE model was used to assess the responses of different regions of the brain to impact loads. Strain-rate, strain, and stress measures in the corpus callosum, midbrain, and brain stem were assessed. Results show that maximum strain-rates of 27 and 19 s(-1) are observed in the brain-stem and mid-brain, respectively. This could potentially lead to axonal injuries and neuronal cell death during crown impact conditions. The developed experimental-numerical framework can be used in the study of other helmet-related impact conditions.

  1. Mathematical modeling of human glioma growth based on brain topological structures: study of two clinical cases.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cecilia Suarez

    Full Text Available Gliomas are the most common primary brain tumors and yet almost incurable due mainly to their great invasion capability. This represents a challenge to present clinical oncology. Here, we introduce a mathematical model aiming to improve tumor spreading capability definition. The model consists in a time dependent reaction-diffusion equation in a three-dimensional spatial domain that distinguishes between different brain topological structures. The model uses a series of digitized images from brain slices covering the whole human brain. The Talairach atlas included in the model describes brain structures at different levels. Also, the inclusion of the Brodmann areas allows prediction of the brain functions affected during tumor evolution and the estimation of correlated symptoms. The model is solved numerically using patient-specific parametrization and finite differences. Simulations consider an initial state with cellular proliferation alone (benign tumor, and an advanced state when infiltration starts (malign tumor. Survival time is estimated on the basis of tumor size and location. The model is used to predict tumor evolution in two clinical cases. In the first case, predictions show that real infiltrative areas are underestimated by current diagnostic imaging. In the second case, tumor spreading predictions were shown to be more accurate than those derived from previous models in the literature. Our results suggest that the inclusion of differential migration in glioma growth models constitutes another step towards a better prediction of tumor infiltration at the moment of surgical or radiosurgical target definition. Also, the addition of physiological/psychological considerations to classical anatomical models will provide a better and integral understanding of the patient disease at the moment of deciding therapeutic options, taking into account not only survival but also life quality.

  2. Modeling the effects of noninvasive transcranial brain stimulation at the biophysical, network, and cognitive level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartwigsen, Gesa; Bergmann, Til Ole; Herz, Damian Marc; Angstmann, Steffen; Karabanov, Anke; Raffin, Estelle; Thielscher, Axel; Siebner, Hartwig Roman

    2015-01-01

    Noninvasive transcranial brain stimulation (NTBS) is widely used to elucidate the contribution of different brain regions to various cognitive functions. Here we present three modeling approaches that are informed by functional or structural brain mapping or behavior profiling and discuss how these approaches advance the scientific potential of NTBS as an interventional tool in cognitive neuroscience. (i) Leveraging the anatomical information provided by structural imaging, the electric field distribution in the brain can be modeled and simulated. Biophysical modeling approaches generate testable predictions regarding the impact of interindividual variations in cortical anatomy on the injected electric fields or the influence of the orientation of current flow on the physiological stimulation effects. (ii) Functional brain mapping of the spatiotemporal neural dynamics during cognitive tasks can be used to construct causal network models. These models can identify spatiotemporal changes in effective connectivity during distinct cognitive states and allow for examining how effective connectivity is shaped by NTBS. (iii) Modeling the NTBS effects based on neuroimaging can be complemented by behavior-based cognitive models that exploit variations in task performance. For instance, NTBS-induced changes in response speed and accuracy can be explicitly modeled in a cognitive framework accounting for the speed-accuracy trade-off. This enables to dissociate between behavioral NTBS effects that emerge in the context of rapid automatic responses or in the context of slow deliberate responses. We argue that these complementary modeling approaches facilitate the use of NTBS as a means of dissecting the causal architecture of cognitive systems of the human brain.

  3. Descriptive modeling of longitudinal outcome measures in traumatic brain injury: a National Institute on Disability and Rehabilitation Research Traumatic Brain Injury Model Systems study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pretz, Christopher R; Kozlowski, Allan J; Dams-O'Connor, Kristen; Kreider, Scott; Cuthbert, Jeffery P; Corrigan, John D; Heinemann, Allen W; Whiteneck, Gale

    2013-03-01

    Establishing accurate mathematical models of outcome measures is essential in understanding change throughout the rehabilitation process. The goal of this study is to identify the best-fitting descriptive models for a set of commonly adopted outcome measures found within the Traumatic Brain Injury Model Systems National Database where the modeling is based on data submission through 2011 and the complete range of recorded time points since injury for each individual, where time points range from admission to rehabilitation to 20 years postinjury. The statistical methodology and the application of the methodology contained herein may be used to assist researchers and clinicians in (1) modeling the outcome measures considered, (2) modeling various portions of these outcomes by stratification and/or truncating time periods, (3) modeling longitudinal outcome measures not considered, and (4) establishing models as a necessary precursor in conducting individual growth curve analysis.

  4. Brain and behavioral pathology in an animal model of Wernicke's encephalopathy and Wernicke-Korsakoff Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vetreno, Ryan P; Ramos, Raddy L; Anzalone, Steven; Savage, Lisa M

    2012-02-03

    Animal models provide the opportunity for in-depth and experimental investigation into the anatomical and physiological underpinnings of human neurological disorders. Rodent models of thiamine deficiency have yielded significant insight into the structural, neurochemical and cognitive deficits associated with thiamine deficiency as well as proven useful toward greater understanding of memory function in the intact brain. In this review, we discuss the anatomical, neurochemical and behavioral changes that occur during the acute and chronic phases of thiamine deficiency and describe how rodent models of Wernicke-Korsakoff Syndrome aid in developing a more detailed picture of brain structures involved in learning and memory.

  5. Reverse brain drain in South Korea: state-led model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, B L

    1992-01-01

    Korea's reverse brain drain (RBD) has been an organized government effort, rather than a spontaneous social phenomenon, in that various policies and the political support of President Park, Chung-Hee were instrumental in laying the groundwork for its success. Particular features of Korea's RBD policies are the creation of a conducive domestic environment (i.e., government-sponsored strategic R & D institution-building, legal, and administrative reforms), and importantly, the empowerment of returnees (via, i.e., exceptionally good maternal benefits, guarantees of research autonomy). President Park played the cardinal role in empowering repatriates at the expense of his own civil bureaucracy, and his capacity for such patronage derived from Korea's bureaucratic-authoritarian political system. Returning scientists and engineers directly benefitted from this political system as well as Park's personal guardianship. For Park, empowerment of returning "brains" was necessary to accomplish his national industrialization plan, thereby enhancing his political legitimacy in domestic politics. An alliance with the R & D cadre was functionally necessary to successfully consolidate strong presidential power, and politically nonthreatening due to the particular form of "pact of domination" in Korea's power structure. RBD in Korea will continue in the near future given Korea's drive for high technology, and the remarkable expansion of local industrial and educational sectors. Korea's future RBD, however, needs to pay closer attention to the following 4 problems: research autonomy; equality issues; skill-based repatriation of technicians and engineers rather than Ph.Ds; and subsidies to small and medium industry for RBD.

  6. Models and theories of brain function in cognition within a framework of behavioral cognitive psychology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karakaş, Sirel; Başar, Erol

    2006-05-01

    The present article presents a nonexhaustive collection of contemporary models and theories on brain function and discusses these models and theories within a framework of explanatory formulations in behavioral cognitive psychology. Such a mission was accomplished by evaluating the cognitive implications in the explanatory formulations with respect to established laws/principles and models/theories of behavioral cognitive psychology. The article also points to problem areas of behavioral cognitive psychology for which the explanatory formulations have solutions to offer. The article shows that the cinematographic hypothesis, the new visual model, the synergetic model, and the theory of whole-brain-work emphasize various aspects of perception. The formulations on P300 theory emphasize attention and also working memory. The theory on cognits is a comprehensive account of memory. Characteristic to all of these explanatory formulations and also to that on the complexity and its evolution and that on neurocognitive networks is the emphasis on selective distribution, integration to the point of supersynergy, and dynamicity. Such a viewpoint was not only applied to the operations of the brain but also of cognition. With such a conceptualization, the explanatory formulations could account for cognitive processes other than the ones emphasized. A common aspect in a majority of the formulations is the utilization of the oscillatory activity as the valid activity of the brain. The article points out that a frontier in cognitive psychophysiology would be the study of the genetics of brain oscillations.

  7. Donor pretreatment with carbamylated erythropoietin in a brain death model reduces inflammation more effectively than erythropoietin while preserving renal function

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nijboer, Willemijn N.; Ottens, Petra J.; van Dijk, Antony; van Goor, Harry; Ploeg, Rutger J.; Leuvenink, Henri G. D.

    2010-01-01

    Objective: We hypothesized that donor treatment of deceased brain dead donors would lead to a decrease in inflammatory responses seen in brain death and lead to a restoration of kidney function. Design: A standardized slow-induction rat brain death model followed by evaluation of kidney function in

  8. Donor pretreatment with carbamylated erythropoietin in a brain death model reduces inflammation more effectively than erythropoietin while preserving renal function.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nijboer, W.N.; Ottens, P.J.; Dijk, A.P.J. van; Goor, H. van; Ploeg, R.J.; Leuvenink, H.G.

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: We hypothesized that donor treatment of deceased brain dead donors would lead to a decrease in inflammatory responses seen in brain death and lead to a restoration of kidney function. DESIGN: A standardized slow-induction rat brain death model followed by evaluation of kidney function in

  9. Analysis of radiation therapy in a model of triple-negative breast cancer brain metastasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smart, DeeDee; Garcia-Glaessner, Alejandra; Palmieri, Diane; Wong-Goodrich, Sarah J; Kramp, Tamalee; Gril, Brunilde; Shukla, Sudhanshu; Lyle, Tiffany; Hua, Emily; Cameron, Heather A; Camphausen, Kevin; Steeg, Patricia S

    2015-10-01

    Most cancer patients with brain metastases are treated with radiation therapy, yet this modality has not yet been meaningfully incorporated into preclinical experimental brain metastasis models. We applied two forms of whole brain radiation therapy (WBRT) to the brain-tropic 231-BR experimental brain metastasis model of triple-negative breast cancer. When compared to sham controls, WBRT as 3 Gy × 10 fractions (3 × 10) reduced the number of micrometastases and large metastases by 87.7 and 54.5 %, respectively (both p < 0.01); whereas a single radiation dose of 15 Gy × 1 (15 × 1) was less effective, reducing metastases by 58.4 % (p < 0.01) and 47.1 % (p = 0.41), respectively. Neuroinflammation in the adjacent brain parenchyma was due solely to a reaction from metastases, and not radiotherapy, while adult neurogenesis in brains was adversely affected following both radiation regimens. The nature of radiation resistance was investigated by ex vivo culture of tumor cells that survived initial WBRT ("Surviving" cultures). The Surviving cultures surprisingly demonstrated increased radiosensitivity ex vivo. In contrast, re-injection of Surviving cultures and re-treatment with a 3 × 10 WBRT regimen significantly reduced the number of large and micrometastases that developed in vivo, suggesting a role for the microenvironment. Micrometastases derived from tumor cells surviving initial 3 × 10 WBRT demonstrated a trend toward radioresistance upon repeat treatment (p = 0.09). The data confirm the potency of a fractionated 3 × 10 WBRT regimen and identify the brain microenvironment as a potential determinant of radiation efficacy. The data also nominate the Surviving cultures as a potential new translational model for radiotherapy.

  10. Whole-brain mapping of neuronal activity in the learned helplessness model of depression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yongsoo eKim

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Some individuals are resilient, whereas others succumb to despair in repeated stressful situations. The neurobiological mechanisms underlying such divergent behavioral responses remain unclear. Here, we employed an automated method for mapping neuronal activity in search of signatures of stress responses in the entire mouse brain. We used serial two-photon tomography to detect expression of c-FosGFP – a marker of neuronal activation – in c-fosGFP transgenic mice subjected to the learned helplessness (LH procedure, a widely used model of stress-induced depression-like phenotype in laboratory animals. We found that mice showing helpless behavior had an overall brain-wide reduction in the level of neuronal activation compared with mice showing resilient behavior, with the exception of a few brain areas, including the locus coeruleus, that were more activated in the helpless mice. In addition, the helpless mice showed a strong trend of having higher similarity in whole brain activity profile among individuals, suggesting that helplessness is represented by a more stereotypic brain-wide activation pattern. This latter effect was confirmed in rats subjected to the LH procedure, using 2-deoxy-2[18F]fluoro-D-glucose positron emission tomography to assess neural activity. Our findings reveal distinct brain activity markings that correlate with adaptive and maladaptive behavioral responses to stress, and provide a framework for further studies investigating the contribution of specific brain regions to maladaptive stress responses.

  11. Modeling dynamic functional information flows on large-scale brain networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lv, Peili; Guo, Lei; Hu, Xintao; Li, Xiang; Jin, Changfeng; Han, Junwei; Li, Lingjiang; Liu, Tianming

    2013-01-01

    Growing evidence from the functional neuroimaging field suggests that human brain functions are realized via dynamic functional interactions on large-scale structural networks. Even in resting state, functional brain networks exhibit remarkable temporal dynamics. However, it has been rarely explored to computationally model such dynamic functional information flows on large-scale brain networks. In this paper, we present a novel computational framework to explore this problem using multimodal resting state fMRI (R-fMRI) and diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) data. Basically, recent literature reports including our own studies have demonstrated that the resting state brain networks dynamically undergo a set of distinct brain states. Within each quasi-stable state, functional information flows from one set of structural brain nodes to other sets of nodes, which is analogous to the message package routing on the Internet from the source node to the destination. Therefore, based on the large-scale structural brain networks constructed from DTI data, we employ a dynamic programming strategy to infer functional information transition routines on structural networks, based on which hub routers that most frequently participate in these routines are identified. It is interesting that a majority of those hub routers are located within the default mode network (DMN), revealing a possible mechanism of the critical functional hub roles played by the DMN in resting state. Also, application of this framework on a post trauma stress disorder (PTSD) dataset demonstrated interesting difference in hub router distributions between PTSD patients and healthy controls.

  12. BRAIN INJURY BIOMECHANICS IN REAL WORLD VEHICLE ACCIDENT USING MATHEMATICAL MODELS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Jikuang; XU Wei; OTTE Dietmar

    2008-01-01

    This paper aims at investigating brain injury mechanisms and predicting head injuries in real world accidents. For this purpose, a 3D human head finite element model (HBM-head) was developed based on head-brain anatomy. The HBM head model was validated with two experimental tests. Then the head finite element(FE) model and a multi-body system (MBS) model were used to carry out reconstructions of real world vehicle-pedestrian accidents and brain injuries. The MBS models were used for calculating the head impact conditions in vehicle impacts. The HBM-head model was used for calculating the injury related physical parameters, such as intracranial pressure, stress, and strain. The calculated intracranial pressure and strain distribution were correlated with the injury outcomes observed from accidents. It is shown that this model can predict the intracranial biomechanical response and calculate the injury related physical parameters. The head FE model has good biofidelity and will be a valuable tool for the study of injury mechanisms and the tolerance level of the brain.

  13. Establishment of C6 brain glioma models through stereotactic technique for laser interstitial thermotherapy research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian Shi

    2015-01-01

    Conclusion: The rat C6 brain glioma model established in the study was a perfect model to study LITT of glioma. Infrared thermograph technique measured temperature conveniently and effectively. The technique is noninvasive, and the obtained data could be further processed using software used in LITT research. To measure deep-tissue temperature, combining thermocouple with infrared thermograph technique would present better results.

  14. Self-organized Critical Model Based on Complex Brain Networks with Hierarchical Organization

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Ying-Yue; ZHANG Gui-Qing; YANG Qiu-Ying; CHEN Tian-Lun

    2008-01-01

    The dynamical behavior in the cortical brain network of macaque is studied by modelling each cortical area with a subnetwork of interacting excitable neurons.We find that the avalanche of our model on different levels exhibits power-law.Furthermore the power-law exponent of the distribution and the average avalanche Size are affected by the topology of the network.

  15. Development of a Conceptual Model to Predict Physical Activity Participation in Adults with Brain Injuries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Driver, Simon

    2008-01-01

    The purpose was to examine psychosocial factors that influence the physical activity behaviors of adults with brain injuries. Two differing models, based on Harter's model of self-worth, were proposed to examine the relationship between perceived competence, social support, physical self-worth, affect, and motivation. Adults numbering 384 with…

  16. Reconstruction of Head Injury Cases Arising from Falls Using the UCD Brain Trauma Model

    OpenAIRE

    Doorly, Mary C.; Horgan, T. J.; Gilchrist, M. D.

    2005-01-01

    While Road Traffic Accidents continue to be the largest contributor to head injury, falls are usually second in prevalence. This paper looks at numerical modelling techniques, namely multibody body dynamics and finite element methods, in order to reconstruct two real-life accident cases arising from falls. Various modelling strategies are explored, and the results are compared with existing published brain injury tolerance levels.

  17. Development of a Rat Plasma and Brain Extracellular Fluid Pharmacokinetic Model for Bupropion and Hydroxybupropion Based on Microdialysis Sampling, and Application to Predict Human Brain Concentrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cremers, Thomas I F H; Flik, Gunnar; Folgering, Joost H A; Rollema, Hans; Stratford, Robert E

    2016-05-01

    Administration of bupropion [(±)-2-(tert-butylamino)-1-(3-chlorophenyl)propan-1-one] and its preformed active metabolite, hydroxybupropion [(±)-1-(3-chlorophenyl)-2-[(1-hydroxy-2-methyl-2-propanyl)amino]-1-propanone], to rats with measurement of unbound concentrations by quantitative microdialysis sampling of plasma and brain extracellular fluid was used to develop a compartmental pharmacokinetics model to describe the blood-brain barrier transport of both substances. The population model revealed rapid equilibration of both entities across the blood-brain barrier, with resultant steady-state brain extracellular fluid/plasma unbound concentration ratio estimates of 1.9 and 1.7 for bupropion and hydroxybupropion, respectively, which is thus indicative of a net uptake asymmetry. An overshoot of the brain extracellular fluid/plasma unbound concentration ratio at early time points was observed with bupropion; this was modeled as a time-dependent uptake clearance of the drug across the blood-brain barrier. Translation of the model was used to predict bupropion and hydroxybupropion exposure in human brain extracellular fluid after twice-daily administration of 150 mg bupropion. Predicted concentrations indicate that preferential inhibition of the dopamine and norepinephrine transporters by the metabolite, with little to no contribution by bupropion, would be expected at this therapeutic dose. Therefore, these results extend nuclear imaging studies on dopamine transporter occupancy and suggest that inhibition of both transporters contributes significantly to bupropion's therapeutic efficacy.

  18. Using connectome-based predictive modeling to predict individual behavior from brain connectivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Xilin; Finn, Emily S; Scheinost, Dustin; Rosenberg, Monica D; Chun, Marvin M; Papademetris, Xenophon; Constable, R Todd

    2017-03-01

    Neuroimaging is a fast-developing research area in which anatomical and functional images of human brains are collected using techniques such as functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), diffusion tensor imaging (DTI), and electroencephalography (EEG). Technical advances and large-scale data sets have allowed for the development of models capable of predicting individual differences in traits and behavior using brain connectivity measures derived from neuroimaging data. Here, we present connectome-based predictive modeling (CPM), a data-driven protocol for developing predictive models of brain-behavior relationships from connectivity data using cross-validation. This protocol includes the following steps: (i) feature selection, (ii) feature summarization, (iii) model building, and (iv) assessment of prediction significance. We also include suggestions for visualizing the most predictive features (i.e., brain connections). The final result should be a generalizable model that takes brain connectivity data as input and generates predictions of behavioral measures in novel subjects, accounting for a considerable amount of the variance in these measures. It has been demonstrated that the CPM protocol performs as well as or better than many of the existing approaches in brain-behavior prediction. As CPM focuses on linear modeling and a purely data-driven approach, neuroscientists with limited or no experience in machine learning or optimization will find it easy to implement these protocols. Depending on the volume of data to be processed, the protocol can take 10-100 min for model building, 1-48 h for permutation testing, and 10-20 min for visualization of results.

  19. Quantitative analysis of the brain-targeted delivery of drugs and model compounds using nano-delivery systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozlovskaya, Luba; Stepensky, David

    2013-10-10

    The blood-brain barrier (BBB) prevents drugs' permeability into the brain and limits management of brain diseases. Specialized drug delivery systems (DDSs) are utterly required to overcome this barrier and to achieve efficient delivery of therapeutic agents to the brain. For this purpose, drug-encapsulating nanoparticles or vesicles, drug conjugates and other types of DDSs are being developed by many research groups worldwide. However, efficiency of the brain drug/DDS delivery and targeting is usually presented in indirect and vague form and it is hard to quantitatively estimate it based on the reported data. We searched for the scientific papers that were published in 1970-2012 that reported delivery of drugs or model compounds to the brain following systemic administration of DDSs via parenteral routes and contained quantitative data on brain drug/DDS delivery and targeting efficiency. We identified 123 publications that matched the search criteria and analyzed their experimental settings, formulation types, analytical methods, and the claimed efficiencies of drug/DDS brain targeting (brain/plasma or brain/tissue concentration ratios) and brain accumulation (% of the administered dose that accumulated in the brain). Based on the outcomes of this analysis, we describe the major research trends, discuss the efficiencies of the different drug/DDS brain targeting approaches, and provide recommendations for quantitative assessment of brain-targeting DDSs in the appropriately designed studies. © 2013.

  20. Dynamics of the brain: Mathematical models and non-invasive experimental studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toronov, V.; Myllylä, T.; Kiviniemi, V.; Tuchin, V. V.

    2013-10-01

    Dynamics is an essential aspect of the brain function. In this article we review theoretical models of neural and haemodynamic processes in the human brain and experimental non-invasive techniques developed to study brain functions and to measure dynamic characteristics, such as neurodynamics, neurovascular coupling, haemodynamic changes due to brain activity and autoregulation, and cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen. We focus on emerging theoretical biophysical models and experimental functional neuroimaging results, obtained mostly by functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) and near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS). We also included our current results on the effects of blood pressure variations on cerebral haemodynamics and simultaneous measurements of fast processes in the brain by near-infrared spectroscopy and a very novel functional MRI technique called magnetic resonance encephalography. Based on a rapid progress in theoretical and experimental techniques and due to the growing computational capacities and combined use of rapidly improving and emerging neuroimaging techniques we anticipate during next decade great achievements in the overall knowledge of the human brain.

  1. Optimal Gaussian Mixture Models of Tissue Intensities in Brain MRI of Patients with Multiple-Sclerosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Yiming; Shah, Mohak; Francis, Simon; Arnold, Douglas L.; Arbel, Tal; Collins, D. Louis

    Brain tissue segmentation is important in studying markers in human brain Magnetic Resonance Images (MRI) of patients with diseases such as Multiple Sclerosis (MS). Parametric segmentation approaches typically assume unimodal Gaussian distributions on MRI intensities of individual tissue classes, even in applications on multi-spectral images. However, this assumption has not been rigorously verified especially in the context of MS. In this work, we evaluate the local MRI intensities of both healthy and diseased brain tissues of 21 multi-spectral MRIs (63 volumes in total) of MS patients for adherence to this assumption. We show that the tissue intensities are not uniform across the brain and vary across (anatomical) regions of the brain. Consequently, we show that Gaussian mixtures can better model the multi-spectral intensities. We utilize an Expectation Maximization (EM) based approach to learn the models along with a symmetric Jeffreys divergence criterion to study differences in intensity distributions. The effects of these findings are also empirically verified on automatic segmentation of brains with MS.

  2. The CLAIR model: Extension of Brodmann areas based on brain oscillations and connectivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Başar, Erol; Düzgün, Aysel

    2016-05-01

    Since the beginning of the last century, the localization of brain function has been represented by Brodmann areas, maps of the anatomic organization of the brain. They are used to broadly represent cortical structures with their given sensory-cognitive functions. In recent decades, the analysis of brain oscillations has become important in the correlation of brain functions. Moreover, spectral connectivity can provide further information on the dynamic connectivity between various structures. In addition, brain responses are dynamic in nature and structural localization is almost impossible, according to Luria (1966). Therefore, brain functions are very difficult to localize; hence, a combined analysis of oscillation and event-related coherences is required. In this study, a model termed as "CLAIR" is described to enrich and possibly replace the concept of the Brodmann areas. A CLAIR model with optimum function may take several years to develop, but this study sets out to lay its foundation. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. A model of posttraumatic epilepsy induced by lateral fluid-percussion brain injury in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kharatishvili, I; Nissinen, J P; McIntosh, T K; Pitkänen, A

    2006-06-30

    Although traumatic brain injury is a major cause of symptomatic epilepsy, the mechanism by which it leads to recurrent seizures is unknown. An animal model of posttraumatic epilepsy that reliably reproduces the clinical sequelae of human traumatic brain injury is essential to identify the molecular and cellular substrates of posttraumatic epileptogenesis, and perform preclinical screening of new antiepileptogenic compounds. We studied the electrophysiologic, behavioral, and structural features of posttraumatic epilepsy induced by severe, non-penetrating lateral fluid-percussion brain injury in rats. Data from two independent experiments indicated that 43% to 50% of injured animals developed epilepsy, with a latency period between 7 weeks to 1 year. Mean seizure frequency was 0.3+/-0.2 seizures per day and mean seizure duration was 113+/-46 s. Behavioral seizure severity increased over time in the majority of animals. Secondarily-generalized seizures comprised an average of 66+/-37% of all seizures. Mossy fiber sprouting was increased in the ipsilateral hippocampus of animals with posttraumatic epilepsy compared with those subjected to traumatic brain injury without epilepsy. Stereologic cell counts indicated a loss of dentate hilar neurons ipsilaterally following traumatic brain injury. Our data suggest that posttraumatic epilepsy occurs with a frequency of 40% to 50% after severe non-penetrating fluid-percussion brain injury in rats, and that the lateral fluid percussion model can serve as a clinically-relevant tool for pathophysiologic and preclinical studies.

  4. Neuroimaging Biomarkers Predict Brain Structural Connectivity Change in a Mouse Model of Vascular Cognitive Impairment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boehm-Sturm, Philipp; Füchtemeier, Martina; Foddis, Marco; Mueller, Susanne; Trueman, Rebecca C.; Zille, Marietta; Rinnenthal, Jan Leo; Kypraios, Theodore; Shaw, Laurence; Dirnagl, Ulrich

    2017-01-01

    Background and Purpose— Chronic hypoperfusion in the mouse brain has been suggested to mimic aspects of vascular cognitive impairment, such as white matter damage. Although this model has attracted attention, our group has struggled to generate a reliable cognitive and pathological phenotype. This study aimed to identify neuroimaging biomarkers of brain pathology in aged, more severely hypoperfused mice. Methods— We used magnetic resonance imaging to characterize brain degeneration in mice hypoperfused by refining the surgical procedure to use the smallest reported diameter microcoils (160 μm). Results— Acute cerebral blood flow decreases were observed in the hypoperfused group that recovered over 1 month and coincided with arterial remodeling. Increasing hypoperfusion resulted in a reduction in spatial learning abilities in the water maze that has not been previously reported. We were unable to observe severe white matter damage with histology, but a novel approach to analyze diffusion tensor imaging data, graph theory, revealed substantial reorganization of the hypoperfused brain network. A logistic regression model from the data revealed that 3 network parameters were particularly efficient at predicting group membership (global and local efficiency and degrees), and clustering coefficient was correlated with performance in the water maze. Conclusions— Overall, these findings suggest that, despite the autoregulatory abilities of the mouse brain to compensate for a sudden decrease in blood flow, there is evidence of change in the brain networks that can be used as neuroimaging biomarkers to predict outcome. PMID:28070001

  5. Neuroimaging Biomarkers Predict Brain Structural Connectivity Change in a Mouse Model of Vascular Cognitive Impairment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boehm-Sturm, Philipp; Füchtemeier, Martina; Foddis, Marco; Mueller, Susanne; Trueman, Rebecca C; Zille, Marietta; Rinnenthal, Jan Leo; Kypraios, Theodore; Shaw, Laurence; Dirnagl, Ulrich; Farr, Tracy D

    2017-02-01

    Chronic hypoperfusion in the mouse brain has been suggested to mimic aspects of vascular cognitive impairment, such as white matter damage. Although this model has attracted attention, our group has struggled to generate a reliable cognitive and pathological phenotype. This study aimed to identify neuroimaging biomarkers of brain pathology in aged, more severely hypoperfused mice. We used magnetic resonance imaging to characterize brain degeneration in mice hypoperfused by refining the surgical procedure to use the smallest reported diameter microcoils (160 μm). Acute cerebral blood flow decreases were observed in the hypoperfused group that recovered over 1 month and coincided with arterial remodeling. Increasing hypoperfusion resulted in a reduction in spatial learning abilities in the water maze that has not been previously reported. We were unable to observe severe white matter damage with histology, but a novel approach to analyze diffusion tensor imaging data, graph theory, revealed substantial reorganization of the hypoperfused brain network. A logistic regression model from the data revealed that 3 network parameters were particularly efficient at predicting group membership (global and local efficiency and degrees), and clustering coefficient was correlated with performance in the water maze. Overall, these findings suggest that, despite the autoregulatory abilities of the mouse brain to compensate for a sudden decrease in blood flow, there is evidence of change in the brain networks that can be used as neuroimaging biomarkers to predict outcome. © 2017 The Authors.

  6. Terahertz spectroscopy of brain tissue from a mouse model of Alzheimer's disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Lingyan; Shumyatsky, Pavel; Rodríguez-Contreras, Adrián; Alfano, Robert

    2016-01-01

    The terahertz (THz) absorption and index of refraction of brain tissues from a mouse model of Alzheimer's disease (AD) and a control wild-type (normal) mouse were compared using THz time-domain spectroscopy (THz-TDS). Three dominating absorption peaks associated to torsional-vibrational modes were observed in AD tissue, at about 1.44, 1.8, and 2.114 THz, closer to the peaks of free tryptophan molecules than in normal tissue. A possible reason is that there is more free tryptophan in AD brain tissue, while in normal brain tissue more tryptophan is attached to other molecules. Our study suggests that THz-absorption modes may be used as an AD biomarker fingerprint in brain, and that THz-TDS is a promising technique for early diagnosis of AD.

  7. A Simulation Model of Periarterial Clearance of Amyloid-beta from the Brain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandra Katharina Diem

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The accumulation of soluble and insoluble amyloid-beta (A-beta in the brain indicates failure of elimination of A-beta from the brain with age and Alzheimer's disease. There is a variety of mechanisms for elimination of A-beta from the brain. They include the action of microglia and enzymes together with receptor-mediated absorption of A-beta into the blood and periarterial lymphatic drainage of A-beta. Although the brain possesses no conventional lymphatics, experimental studies have shown that fluid and solutes, such as A-beta, are eliminated from the brain along 100 nm wide basement membranes in the walls of cerebral capillaries and arteries. This lymphatic drainage pathway is reflected in the deposition of A-beta in the walls of human arteries with age and Alzheimer's disease as cerebral amyloid angiopathy (CAA. Initially, A-beta diffuses through the extracellular spaces of grey matter in the brain and then enters basement membranes in capillaries and arteries to flow out of the brain. Although diffusion through the extracellular spaces of the brain has been well characterised, the exact mechanism whereby perivascular elimination of A-beta occurs has not been resolved. Here we use a computational model to describe the process of periarterial drainage in the context of diffusion in the brain, demonstrating that periarterial drainage along basement membranes is very rapid compared with diffusion. Our results are a validation of experimental data and are significant in the context of failure of periarterial drainage as a mechanism underlying the pathogenesis of AD as well as complications associated with its immunotherapy.

  8. Whitening of Background Brain Activity via Parametric Modeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nidal Kamel

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Several signal subspace techniques have been recently suggested for the extraction of the visual evoked potential signals from brain background colored noise. The majority of these techniques assume the background noise as white, and for colored noise, it is suggested to be whitened, without further elaboration on how this might be done. In this paper, we investigate the whitening capabilities of two parametric techniques: a direct one based on Levinson solution of Yule-Walker equations, called AR Yule-Walker, and an indirect one based on the least-squares solution of forward-backward linear prediction (FBLP equations, called AR-FBLP. The whitening effect of the two algorithms is investigated with real background electroencephalogram (EEG colored noise and compared in time and frequency domains.

  9. A pairwise maximum entropy model accurately describes resting-state human brain networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Takamitsu; Hirose, Satoshi; Wada, Hiroyuki; Imai, Yoshio; Machida, Toru; Shirouzu, Ichiro; Konishi, Seiki; Miyashita, Yasushi; Masuda, Naoki

    2013-01-01

    The resting-state human brain networks underlie fundamental cognitive functions and consist of complex interactions among brain regions. However, the level of complexity of the resting-state networks has not been quantified, which has prevented comprehensive descriptions of the brain activity as an integrative system. Here, we address this issue by demonstrating that a pairwise maximum entropy model, which takes into account region-specific activity rates and pairwise interactions, can be robustly and accurately fitted to resting-state human brain activities obtained by functional magnetic resonance imaging. Furthermore, to validate the approximation of the resting-state networks by the pairwise maximum entropy model, we show that the functional interactions estimated by the pairwise maximum entropy model reflect anatomical connexions more accurately than the conventional functional connectivity method. These findings indicate that a relatively simple statistical model not only captures the structure of the resting-state networks but also provides a possible method to derive physiological information about various large-scale brain networks.

  10. Predictors of social integration for individuals with brain injury: An application of the ICF model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ditchman, Nicole; Sheehan, Lindsay; Rafajko, Sean; Haak, Christopher; Kazukauskas, Kelly

    2016-01-01

    People with brain injury often experience significant challenges to social and community engagement following injury. The purpose of this study was to investigate factors impacting social integration for adults with brain injury using the International Classification and Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF) as a conceptual model. Adults with brain injury (n = 103) recruited through two US state brain injury associations participated in a survey study. Hierarchical regression analysis was used to examine the predictive impact of components of the ICF model on social integration outcomes. Specifically, demographic (age, gender, SES), disability (severity of functional limitations), personal (disability acceptance, social self-efficacy) and environmental (neighbourhood climate, stigma, social support network) factors were entered as four conceptual groups of predictors to examine the incremental contribution of the variance in social integration explained by each set. As hypothesized, the inclusion of each block of predictors significantly improved the model. The overall regression model explained 41% of the variance in social integration. Specifically, SES (β = 0.25), severity of functional limitations (β = 0.29) and social support network (β = 0.29) emerged as the strongest independent predictors. Findings from this study highlight the importance of adopting a biopsychosocial approach to understanding social integration for people with brain injury.

  11. Pig Brain Mitochondria as a Biological Model for Study of Mitochondrial Respiration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fišar, Z; Hroudová, J

    2016-01-01

    Oxidative phosphorylation is a key process of intracellular energy transfer by which mitochondria produce ATP. Isolated mitochondria serve as a biological model for understanding the mitochondrial respiration control, effects of various biologically active substances, and pathophysiology of mitochondrial diseases. The aim of our study was to evaluate pig brain mitochondria as a proper biological model for investigation of activity of the mitochondrial electron transport chain. Oxygen consumption rates of isolated pig brain mitochondria were measured using high-resolution respirometry. Mitochondrial respiration of crude mitochondrial fraction, mitochondria purified in sucrose gradient, and mitochondria purified in Percoll gradient were assayed as a function of storage time. Oxygen flux and various mitochondrial respiratory control ratios were not changed within two days of mitochondria storage on ice. Leak respiration was found higher and Complex I-linked respiration lower in purified mitochondria compared to the crude mitochondrial fraction. Damage to both outer and inner mitochondrial membrane caused by the isolation procedure was the greatest after purification in a sucrose gradient. We confirmed that pig brain mitochondria can serve as a biological model for investigation of mitochondrial respiration. The advantage of this biological model is the stability of respiratory parameters for more than 48 h and the possibility to isolate large amounts of mitochondria from specific brain areas without the need to kill laboratory animals. We suggest the use of high-resolution respirometry of pig brain mitochondria for research of the neuroprotective effects and/or mitochondrial toxicity of new medical drugs.

  12. BrainK for Structural Image Processing: Creating Electrical Models of the Human Head.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Kai; Papademetris, Xenophon; Tucker, Don M

    2016-01-01

    BrainK is a set of automated procedures for characterizing the tissues of the human head from MRI, CT, and photogrammetry images. The tissue segmentation and cortical surface extraction support the primary goal of modeling the propagation of electrical currents through head tissues with a finite difference model (FDM) or finite element model (FEM) created from the BrainK geometries. The electrical head model is necessary for accurate source localization of dense array electroencephalographic (dEEG) measures from head surface electrodes. It is also necessary for accurate targeting of cerebral structures with transcranial current injection from those surface electrodes. BrainK must achieve five major tasks: image segmentation, registration of the MRI, CT, and sensor photogrammetry images, cortical surface reconstruction, dipole tessellation of the cortical surface, and Talairach transformation. We describe the approach to each task, and we compare the accuracies for the key tasks of tissue segmentation and cortical surface extraction in relation to existing research tools (FreeSurfer, FSL, SPM, and BrainVisa). BrainK achieves good accuracy with minimal or no user intervention, it deals well with poor quality MR images and tissue abnormalities, and it provides improved computational efficiency over existing research packages.

  13. BrainK for Structural Image Processing: Creating Electrical Models of the Human Head

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kai Li

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available BrainK is a set of automated procedures for characterizing the tissues of the human head from MRI, CT, and photogrammetry images. The tissue segmentation and cortical surface extraction support the primary goal of modeling the propagation of electrical currents through head tissues with a finite difference model (FDM or finite element model (FEM created from the BrainK geometries. The electrical head model is necessary for accurate source localization of dense array electroencephalographic (dEEG measures from head surface electrodes. It is also necessary for accurate targeting of cerebral structures with transcranial current injection from those surface electrodes. BrainK must achieve five major tasks: image segmentation, registration of the MRI, CT, and sensor photogrammetry images, cortical surface reconstruction, dipole tessellation of the cortical surface, and Talairach transformation. We describe the approach to each task, and we compare the accuracies for the key tasks of tissue segmentation and cortical surface extraction in relation to existing research tools (FreeSurfer, FSL, SPM, and BrainVisa. BrainK achieves good accuracy with minimal or no user intervention, it deals well with poor quality MR images and tissue abnormalities, and it provides improved computational efficiency over existing research packages.

  14. PLATO: data-oriented approach to collaborative large-scale brain system modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kannon, Takayuki; Inagaki, Keiichiro; Kamiji, Nilton L; Makimura, Kouji; Usui, Shiro

    2011-11-01

    The brain is a complex information processing system, which can be divided into sub-systems, such as the sensory organs, functional areas in the cortex, and motor control systems. In this sense, most of the mathematical models developed in the field of neuroscience have mainly targeted a specific sub-system. In order to understand the details of the brain as a whole, such sub-system models need to be integrated toward the development of a neurophysiologically plausible large-scale system model. In the present work, we propose a model integration library where models can be connected by means of a common data format. Here, the common data format should be portable so that models written in any programming language, computer architecture, and operating system can be connected. Moreover, the library should be simple so that models can be adapted to use the common data format without requiring any detailed knowledge on its use. Using this library, we have successfully connected existing models reproducing certain features of the visual system, toward the development of a large-scale visual system model. This library will enable users to reuse and integrate existing and newly developed models toward the development and simulation of a large-scale brain system model. The resulting model can also be executed on high performance computers using Message Passing Interface (MPI).

  15. Topology of whole-brain functional MRI networks: Improving the truncated scale-free model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz Vargas, E.; Mitchell, D. G. V.; Greening, S. G.; Wahl, L. M.

    2014-07-01

    Networks of connections within the human brain have been the subject of intense recent research, yet their topology is still only partially understood. We analyze weighted networks calculated from functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) data acquired during task performance. Expanding previous work in the area, our analysis retains all of the connections between all of the voxels in the full brain fMRI data, computing correlations between approximately 200,000 voxels per subject for 10 subjects. We evaluate the extent to which this rich dataset can be described by existing models of scale-free or exponentially truncated scale-free topology, comparing results across a large number of more complex topological models as well. Our results suggest that the novel “log quadratic” model presented in this paper offers a significantly better fit to networks of functional connections at the voxel level in the human brain.

  16. Frequency dependence of complex moduli of brain tissue using a fractional Zener model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kohandel, M [Department of Applied Mathematics, University of Waterloo, Waterloo, Ontario N2L 3G1 (Canada); Sivaloganathan, S [Department of Applied Mathematics, University of Waterloo, Waterloo, Ontario N2L 3G1 (Canada); Tenti, G [Department of Applied Mathematics, University of Waterloo, Waterloo, Ontario N2L 3G1 (Canada); Darvish, K [Center for Applied Biomechanics, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA (United States)

    2005-06-21

    Brain tissue exhibits viscoelastic behaviour. If loading times are substantially short, static tests are not sufficient to determine the complete viscoelastic behaviour of the material, and dynamic test methods are more appropriate. The concept of complex modulus of elasticity is a powerful tool for characterizing the frequency domain behaviour of viscoelastic materials. On the other hand, it is well known that classical viscoelastic models can be generalized by means of fractional calculus to describe more complex viscoelastic behaviour of materials. In this paper, the fractional Zener model is investigated in order to describe the dynamic behaviour of brain tissue. The model is fitted to experimental data of oscillatory shear tests of bovine brain tissue to verify its behaviour and to obtain the material parameters.

  17. Simultaneous Whole-Brain Segmentation and White Matter Lesion Detection Using Contrast-Adaptive Probabilistic Models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Puonti, Oula; Van Leemput, Koen

    2016-01-01

    In this paper we propose a new generative model for simultaneous brain parcellation and white matter lesion segmentation from multi-contrast magnetic resonance images. The method combines an existing whole-brain segmentation technique with a novel spatial lesion model based on a convolutional...... restricted Boltzmann machine. Unlike current state-of-the-art lesion detection techniques based on discriminative modeling, the proposed method is not tuned to one specific scanner or imaging protocol, and simultaneously segments dozens of neuroanatomical structures. Experiments on a public benchmark dataset...... in multiple sclerosis indicate that the method’s lesion segmentation accuracy compares well to that of the current state-of-the-art in the field, while additionally providing robust whole-brain segmentations....

  18. Describing the Neuron Axons Network of the Human Brain by Continuous Flow Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hizanidis, J.; Katsaloulis, P.; Verganelakis, D. A.; Provata, A.

    2014-12-01

    The multifractal spectrum Dq (Rényi dimensions) is used for the analysis and comparison between the Neuron Axons Network (NAN) of healthy and pathological human brains because it conveys information about the statistics in many scales, from the very rare to the most frequent network configurations. Comparison of the Fractional Anisotropy Magnetic Resonance Images between healthy and pathological brains is performed with and without noise reduction. Modelling the complex structure of the NAN in the human brain is undertaken using the dynamics of the Lorenz model in the chaotic regime. The Lorenz multifractal spectra capture well the human brain characteristics in the large negative q's which represent the rare network configurations. In order to achieve a closer approximation in the positive part of the spectrum (q > 0) two independent modifications are considered: a) redistribution of the dense parts of the Lorenz model's phase space into their neighbouring areas and b) inclusion of additive uniform noise in the Lorenz model. Both modifications, independently, drive the Lorenz spectrum closer to the human NAN one in the positive q region without destroying the already good correspondence of the negative spectra. The modelling process shows that the unmodified Lorenz model in its full chaotic regime has a phase space distribution with high fluctuations in its dense parts, while the fluctuations in the human brain NAN are smoother. The induced modifications (phase space redistribution or additive noise) moderate the fluctuations only in the positive part of the Lorenz spectrum leading to a faithful representation of the human brain axons network in all scales.

  19. Using 3D Printing to Create Personalized Brain Models for Neurosurgical Training and Preoperative Planning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ploch, Caitlin C; Mansi, Chris S S A; Jayamohan, Jayaratnam; Kuhl, Ellen

    2016-06-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) printing holds promise for a wide variety of biomedical applications, from surgical planning, practicing, and teaching to creating implantable devices. The growth of this cheap and easy additive manufacturing technology in orthopedic, plastic, and vascular surgery has been explosive; however, its potential in the field of neurosurgery remains underexplored. A major limitation is that current technologies are unable to directly print ultrasoft materials like human brain tissue. In this technical note, the authors present a new technology to create deformable, personalized models of the human brain. The method combines 3D printing, molding, and casting to create a physiologically, anatomically, and tactilely realistic model based on magnetic resonance images. Created from soft gelatin, the model is easy to produce, cost-efficient, durable, and orders of magnitude softer than conventionally printed 3D models. The personalized brain model cost $50, and its fabrication took 24 hours. In mechanical tests, the model stiffness (E = 25.29 ± 2.68 kPa) was 5 orders of magnitude softer than common 3D printed materials, and less than an order of magnitude stiffer than mammalian brain tissue (E = 2.64 ± 0.40 kPa). In a multicenter surgical survey, model size (100.00%), visual appearance (83.33%), and surgical anatomy (81.25%) were perceived as very realistic. The model was perceived as very useful for patient illustration (85.00%), teaching (94.44%), learning (100.00%), surgical training (95.00%), and preoperative planning (95.00%). With minor refinements, personalized, deformable brain models created via 3D printing will improve surgical training and preoperative planning with the ultimate goal to provide accurate, customized, high-precision treatment. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Prion Protein Deficiency Causes Diverse Proteome Shifts in Cell Models That Escape Detection in Brain Tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehrabian, Mohadeseh; Brethour, Dylan; Williams, Declan; Wang, Hansen; Arnould, Hélène; Schneider, Benoit; Schmitt-Ulms, Gerold

    2016-01-01

    A popular method for studying the function of a given protein is to generate and characterize a suitable model deficient for its expression. For the prion protein (PrP), best known for its role in several invariably fatal neurodegenerative diseases, a natural choice, therefore, would be to undertake such studies with brain samples. We recently documented the surprising observation that PrP deficiency caused a loss or enhancement of NCAM1 polysialylation, dependent on the cell model used. To identify possible causes for this disparity, we set out to systematically investigate the consequence of PrP deficiency on the global proteome in brain tissue and in four distinct cell models. Here we report that PrP deficiency causes robust but surprisingly divergent changes to the global proteomes of cell models but has no discernible impact on the global brain proteome. Amongst >1,500 proteins whose levels were compared in wild-type and PrP-deficient models, members of the MARCKS protein family exhibited pronounced, yet cell model-dependent changes to their steady-state levels. Follow-up experiments revealed that PrP collaborates with members of the MARCKS protein family in its control of NCAM1 polysialylation. We conclude that the physiological function of PrP may be masked in analyses of complex brain samples but its cell-type specific influence on a lipid raft-based NCAM1-related cell biology comes to the fore in investigations of specific cell types.

  1. A geometric network model of intrinsic grey-matter connectivity of the human brain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lo, Yi-Ping; O'Dea, Reuben; Crofts, Jonathan J.; Han, Cheol E.; Kaiser, Marcus

    2015-10-01

    Network science provides a general framework for analysing the large-scale brain networks that naturally arise from modern neuroimaging studies, and a key goal in theoretical neuroscience is to understand the extent to which these neural architectures influence the dynamical processes they sustain. To date, brain network modelling has largely been conducted at the macroscale level (i.e. white-matter tracts), despite growing evidence of the role that local grey matter architecture plays in a variety of brain disorders. Here, we present a new model of intrinsic grey matter connectivity of the human connectome. Importantly, the new model incorporates detailed information on cortical geometry to construct ‘shortcuts’ through the thickness of the cortex, thus enabling spatially distant brain regions, as measured along the cortical surface, to communicate. Our study indicates that structures based on human brain surface information differ significantly, both in terms of their topological network characteristics and activity propagation properties, when compared against a variety of alternative geometries and generative algorithms. In particular, this might help explain histological patterns of grey matter connectivity, highlighting that observed connection distances may have arisen to maximise information processing ability, and that such gains are consistent with (and enhanced by) the presence of short-cut connections.

  2. A new model of diffuse brain injury in rats. Part I: Pathophysiology and biomechanics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marmarou, A; Foda, M A; van den Brink, W; Campbell, J; Kita, H; Demetriadou, K

    1994-02-01

    This report describes the development of an experimental head injury model capable of producing diffuse brain injury in the rodent. A total of 161 anesthetized adult rats were injured utilizing a simple weight-drop device consisting of a segmented brass weight free-falling through a Plexiglas guide tube. Skull fracture was prevented by cementing a small stainless-steel disc on the calvaria. Two groups of rats were tested: Group 1, consisting of 54 rats, to establish fracture threshold; and Group 2, consisting of 107 animals, to determine the primary cause of death at severe injury levels. Data from Group 1 animals showed that a 450-gm weight falling from a 2-m height (0.9 kg-m) resulted in a mortality rate of 44% with a low incidence (12.5%) of skull fracture. Impact was followed by apnea, convulsions, and moderate hypertension. The surviving rats developed decortication flexion deformity of the forelimbs, with behavioral depression and loss of muscle tone. Data from Group 2 animals suggested that the cause of death was due to central respiratory depression; the mortality rate decreased markedly in animals mechanically ventilated during the impact. Analysis of mathematical models showed that this mass-height combination resulted in a brain acceleration of 900 G and a brain compression gradient of 0.28 mm. It is concluded that this simple model is capable of producing a graded brain injury in the rodent without a massive hypertensive surge or excessive brain-stem damage.

  3. A mechanical model predicts morphological abnormalities in the developing human brain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Budday, Silvia; Raybaud, Charles; Kuhl, Ellen

    2014-07-01

    The developing human brain remains one of the few unsolved mysteries of science. Advancements in developmental biology, neuroscience, and medical imaging have brought us closer than ever to understand brain development in health and disease. However, the precise role of mechanics throughout this process remains underestimated and poorly understood. Here we show that mechanical stretch plays a crucial role in brain development. Using the nonlinear field theories of mechanics supplemented by the theory of finite growth, we model the human brain as a living system with a morphogenetically growing outer surface and a stretch-driven growing inner core. This approach seamlessly integrates the two popular but competing hypotheses for cortical folding: axonal tension and differential growth. We calibrate our model using magnetic resonance images from very preterm neonates. Our model predicts that deviations in cortical growth and thickness induce morphological abnormalities. Using the gyrification index, the ratio between the total and exposed surface area, we demonstrate that these abnormalities agree with the classical pathologies of lissencephaly and polymicrogyria. Understanding the mechanisms of cortical folding in the developing human brain has direct implications in the diagnostics and treatment of neurological disorders, including epilepsy, schizophrenia, and autism.

  4. MRI surveillance of cancer cell fate in a brain metastasis model after early radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murrell, Donna H; Zarghami, Niloufar; Jensen, Michael D; Dickson, Fiona; Chambers, Ann F; Wong, Eugene; Foster, Paula J

    2017-10-01

    Incidence of brain metastasis attributed to breast cancer is increasing and prognosis is poor. It is thought that disseminated dormant cancer cells persist in metastatic organs and may evade treatments, thereby facilitating a mechanism for recurrence. Radiotherapy is used to treat brain metastases clinically, but assessment has been limited to macroscopic tumor volumes detectable by clinical imaging. Here, we use cellular MRI to understand the concurrent responses of metastases and nonproliferative or slowly cycling cancer cells to radiotherapy. MRI cell tracking was used to investigate the impact of early cranial irradiation on the fate of individual iron-labeled cancer cells and outgrowth of breast cancer brain metastases in the human MDA-MB-231-BR-HER2 cell model. Early whole-brain radiotherapy significantly reduced the outgrowth of metastases from individual disseminated cancer cells in treated animals compared to controls. However, the numbers of nonproliferative iron-retaining cancer cells in the brain were not significantly different. Radiotherapy, when given early in cancer progression, is effective in preventing the outgrowth of solitary cancer cells to brain metastases. Future studies of the nonproliferative cancer cells' clonogenic potentials are warranted, given that their persistent presence suggests that they may have evaded treatment. Magn Reson Med 78:1506-1512, 2017. © 2016 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine. © 2016 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine.

  5. Multilevel Segmentation and Integrated Bayesian Model Classification with an Application to Brain Tumor Segmentation

    OpenAIRE

    Corso, Jason J.; Eitan Sharon; Alan Yuille

    2006-01-01

    We present a new method for automatic segmentation of heterogeneous image data, which is very common in medical image analysis. The main contribution of the paper is a mathematical formulation for incorporating soft model assignments into the calculation of affinities, which are traditionally model free. We integrate the resulting model-aware affinities into the multilevel segmentation by weighted aggregation algorithm. We apply the technique to the task of detecting and segmenting brain tumo...

  6. A Multimodal Approach for Determining Brain Networks by Jointly Modeling Functional and Structural Connectivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenqiong eXue

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Recent innovations in neuroimaging technology have provided opportunities for researchers to investigate connectivity in the human brain by examining the anatomical circuitry as well as functional relationships between brain regions. Existing statistical approaches for connectivity generally examine resting-state or task-related functional connectivity (FC between brain regions or separately examine structural linkages. As a means to determine brain networks, we present a unified Bayesian framework for analyzing FC utilizing the knowledge of associated structural connections, which extends an approach by Patel et al.(2006a that considers only functional data. We introduce an FC measure that rests upon assessments of functional coherence between regional brain activity identified from functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI data. Our structural connectivity (SC information is drawn from diffusion tensor imaging (DTI data, which is used to quantify probabilities of SC between brain regions. We formulate a prior distribution for FC that depends upon the probability of SC between brain regions, with this dependence adhering to structural-functional links revealed by our fMRI and DTI data. We further characterize the functional hierarchy of functionally connected brain regions by defining an ascendancy measure that compares the marginal probabilities of elevated activity between regions. In addition, we describe topological properties of the network, which is composed of connected region pairs, by performing graph theoretic analyses. We demonstrate the use of our Bayesian model using fMRI and DTI data from a study of auditory processing. We further illustrate the advantages of our method by comparisons to methods that only incorporate functional information.

  7. Atlas-based segmentation of pathological MR brain images using a model of lesion growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuadra, Meritxell Bach; Pollo, Claudio; Bardera, Anton; Cuisenaire, Olivier; Villemure, Jean-Guy; Thiran, Jean-Philippe

    2004-10-01

    We propose a method for brain atlas deformation in the presence of large space-occupying tumors, based on an a priori model of lesion growth that assumes radial expansion of the lesion from its starting point. Our approach involves three steps. First, an affine registration brings the atlas and the patient into global correspondence. Then, the seeding of a synthetic tumor into the brain atlas provides a template for the lesion. The last step is the deformation of the seeded atlas, combining a method derived from optical flow principles and a model of lesion growth. Results show that a good registration is performed and that the method can be applied to automatic segmentation of structures and substructures in brains with gross deformation, with important medical applications in neurosurgery, radiosurgery, and radiotherapy.

  8. Comparison of in vitro cell models in predicting in vivo brain entry of drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hakkarainen, Jenni J; Jalkanen, Aaro J; Kääriäinen, Tiina M; Keski-Rahkonen, Pekka; Venäläinen, Tetta; Hokkanen, Juho; Mönkkönen, Jukka; Suhonen, Marjukka; Forsberg, Markus M

    2010-12-15

    Although several in vitro models have been reported to predict the ability of drug candidates to cross the blood-brain barrier, their real in vivo relevance has rarely been evaluated. The present study demonstrates the in vivo relevance of simple unidirectional permeability coefficient (P(app)) determined in three in vitro cell models (BBMEC, Caco-2 and MDCKII-MDR1) for nine model drugs (alprenolol, atenolol, metoprolol, pindolol, entacapone, tolcapone, baclofen, midazolam and ondansetron) by using dual probe microdialysis in the rat brain and blood as an in vivo measure. There was a clear correlation between the P(app) and the unbound brain/blood ratios determined by in vivo microdialysis (BBMEC r=0.99, Caco-2 r=0.91 and MDCKII-MDR1 r=0.85). Despite of the substantial differences in the absolute in vitro P(app) values and regardless of the method used (side-by-side vs. filter insert system), the capability of the in vitro models to rank order drugs was similar. By this approach, thus, the additional value offered by the true endothelial cell model (BBMEC) remains obscure. The present results also highlight the need of both in vitro as well as in vivo methods in characterization of blood-brain barrier passage of new drug candidates.

  9. Forecasting Age-Specific Brain Cancer Mortality Rates Using Functional Data Analysis Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keshav P. Pokhrel

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Incidence and mortality rates are considered as a guideline for planning public health strategies and allocating resources. We apply functional data analysis techniques to model age-specific brain cancer mortality trend and forecast entire age-specific functions using exponential smoothing state-space models. The age-specific mortality curves are decomposed using principal component analysis and fit functional time series model with basis functions. Nonparametric smoothing methods are used to mitigate the existing randomness in the observed data. We use functional time series model on age-specific brain cancer mortality rates and forecast mortality curves with prediction intervals using exponential smoothing state-space model. We also present a disparity of brain cancer mortality rates among the age groups together with the rate of change of mortality rates. The data were obtained from the Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results (SEER program of the United States. The brain cancer mortality rates, classified under International Classification Disease code ICD-O-3, were extracted from SEER*Stat software.

  10. Permeability analysis of neuroactive drugs through a dynamic microfluidic in vitro blood-brain barrier model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Booth, R; Kim, H

    2014-12-01

    This paper presents the permeability analysis of neuroactive drugs and correlation with in vivo brain/plasma ratios in a dynamic microfluidic blood-brain barrier (BBB) model. Permeability of seven neuroactive drugs (Ethosuximide, Gabapentin, Sertraline, Sunitinib, Traxoprodil, Varenicline, PF-304014) and trans-endothelial electrical resistance (TEER) were quantified in both dynamic (microfluidic) and static (transwell) BBB models, either with brain endothelial cells (bEnd.3) in monoculture, or in co-culture with glial cells (C6). Dynamic cultures were exposed to 15 dyn/cm(2) shear stress to mimic the in vivo environment. Dynamic models resulted in significantly higher average TEER (respective 5.9-fold and 8.9-fold increase for co-culture and monoculture models) and lower drug permeabilities (average respective decrease of 0.050 and 0.052 log(cm/s) for co-culture and monoculture) than static models; and co-culture models demonstrated higher average TEER (respective 90 and 25% increase for static and dynamic models) and lower drug permeability (average respective decrease of 0.063 and 0.061 log(cm/s) for static and dynamic models) than monoculture models. Correlation of the resultant logP e values [ranging from -4.06 to -3.63 log(cm/s)] with in vivo brain/plasma ratios (ranging from 0.42 to 26.8) showed highly linear correlation (R (2) > 0.85) for all model conditions, indicating the feasibility of the dynamic microfluidic BBB model for prediction of BBB clearance of pharmaceuticals.

  11. Transfer of opiorphin through a blood-brain barrier culture model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bocsik, Alexandra; Darula, Zsuzsanna; Tóth, Géza; Deli, Mária A; Wollemann, Mária

    2015-08-01

    Opioid peptides are potent analgesics with therapeutic potential in the treatment of acute and chronic pain. Their efficacy is limited by peptidases (enkephalinases). Opiorphin pentapeptide (QRFSR) is the first characterized human endogenous inhibitor of enkephalinases. The peptide is able to increase the binding and affinity of endogenous opiates to mu opioid receptors; thus, the mechanism of opiorphin may provide a new therapeutic approach in pain management. The analgesic effect of opiorphin was proven in several earlier published in vitro and in vivo studies. Our aim was to test the transfer of opiorphin through a blood-brain barrier model for the first time. The flux of opiorphin was tested on a blood-brain barrier culture model consisting of rat brain endothelial, glial and pericyte cells. Brain endothelial cells in this triple co-culture model form tight monolayers characterized by transendothelial electrical resistance measurement. Relative quantity of the peptide was estimated by mass spectrometry. The transfer of opiorphin through the blood-brain barrier model was estimated to be ∼3%, whereas the permeability coefficient was 0.53 ± 1.36 × 10(-6) cm/s (n = 4). We also observed rapid conversion of N-terminal glutamine into pyroglutamic acid during the transfer experiments. Our results indicate that opiorphin crosses cultured brain endothelial cells in the absence of serum factors in a significant amount. This is in agreement with previous in vivo data showing potentiation of enkephalin-mediated antinociception. We suggest that opiorphin may have a potential as a centrally acting novel drug to treat pain.

  12. Novel Genetic Models to Study the Role of Inflammation in Brain Injury-Induced Alzheimer’s Pathology

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-12-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-12-1-0629 TITLE: Novel Genetic Models to Study the Role of Inflammation in Brain Injury-Induced Alzheimer’s Pathology...30Sep2014 - 29Sep2015 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 12109018 TATRC Novel Genetic Models to Study the Role of Inflammation in Brain Injury...another avenue in which brain injury can occur and often a consequence of TBI. Comparing results from TBI and stroke studies will be important is

  13. Electric Field Encephalography as a tool for functional brain research: a modeling study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yury Petrov

    Full Text Available We introduce the notion of Electric Field Encephalography (EFEG based on measuring electric fields of the brain and demonstrate, using computer modeling, that given the appropriate electric field sensors this technique may have significant advantages over the current EEG technique. Unlike EEG, EFEG can be used to measure brain activity in a contactless and reference-free manner at significant distances from the head surface. Principal component analysis using simulated cortical sources demonstrated that electric field sensors positioned 3 cm away from the scalp and characterized by the same signal-to-noise ratio as EEG sensors provided the same number of uncorrelated signals as scalp EEG. When positioned on the scalp, EFEG sensors provided 2-3 times more uncorrelated signals. This significant increase in the number of uncorrelated signals can be used for more accurate assessment of brain states for non-invasive brain-computer interfaces and neurofeedback applications. It also may lead to major improvements in source localization precision. Source localization simulations for the spherical and Boundary Element Method (BEM head models demonstrated that the localization errors are reduced two-fold when using electric fields instead of electric potentials. We have identified several techniques that could be adapted for the measurement of the electric field vector required for EFEG and anticipate that this study will stimulate new experimental approaches to utilize this new tool for functional brain research.

  14. Generative models of rich clubs in Hebbian neuronal networks and large-scale human brain networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vértes, Petra E; Alexander-Bloch, Aaron; Bullmore, Edward T

    2014-10-05

    Rich clubs arise when nodes that are 'rich' in connections also form an elite, densely connected 'club'. In brain networks, rich clubs incur high physical connection costs but also appear to be especially valuable to brain function. However, little is known about the selection pressures that drive their formation. Here, we take two complementary approaches to this question: firstly we show, using generative modelling, that the emergence of rich clubs in large-scale human brain networks can be driven by an economic trade-off between connection costs and a second, competing topological term. Secondly we show, using simulated neural networks, that Hebbian learning rules also drive the emergence of rich clubs at the microscopic level, and that the prominence of these features increases with learning time. These results suggest that Hebbian learning may provide a neuronal mechanism for the selection of complex features such as rich clubs. The neural networks that we investigate are explicitly Hebbian, and we argue that the topological term in our model of large-scale brain connectivity may represent an analogous connection rule. This putative link between learning and rich clubs is also consistent with predictions that integrative aspects of brain network organization are especially important for adaptive behaviour.

  15. Differences in amyloid-β clearance across mouse and human blood-brain barrier models: kinetic analysis and mechanistic modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qosa, Hisham; Abuasal, Bilal S; Romero, Ignacio A; Weksler, Babette; Couraud, Pierre-Oliver; Keller, Jeffrey N; Kaddoumi, Amal

    2014-04-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) has a characteristic hallmark of amyloid-β (Aβ) accumulation in the brain. This accumulation of Aβ has been related to its faulty cerebral clearance. Indeed, preclinical studies that used mice to investigate Aβ clearance showed that efflux across blood-brain barrier (BBB) and brain degradation mediate efficient Aβ clearance. However, the contribution of each process to Aβ clearance remains unclear. Moreover, it is still uncertain how species differences between mouse and human could affect Aβ clearance. Here, a modified form of the brain efflux index method was used to estimate the contribution of BBB and brain degradation to Aβ clearance from the brain of wild type mice. We estimated that 62% of intracerebrally injected (125)I-Aβ40 is cleared across BBB while 38% is cleared by brain degradation. Furthermore, in vitro and in silico studies were performed to compare Aβ clearance between mouse and human BBB models. Kinetic studies for Aβ40 disposition in bEnd3 and hCMEC/D3 cells, representative in vitro mouse and human BBB models, respectively, demonstrated 30-fold higher rate of (125)I-Aβ40 uptake and 15-fold higher rate of degradation by bEnd3 compared to hCMEC/D3 cells. Expression studies showed both cells to express different levels of P-glycoprotein and RAGE, while LRP1 levels were comparable. Finally, we established a mechanistic model, which could successfully predict cellular levels of (125)I-Aβ40 and the rate of each process. Established mechanistic model suggested significantly higher rates of Aβ uptake and degradation in bEnd3 cells as rationale for the observed differences in (125)I-Aβ40 disposition between mouse and human BBB models. In conclusion, current study demonstrates the important role of BBB in the clearance of Aβ from the brain. Moreover, it provides insight into the differences between mouse and human BBB with regards to Aβ clearance and offer, for the first time, a mathematical model that describes

  16. Unified model of brain tissue microstructure dynamically binds diffusion and osmosis with extracellular space geometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yousefnezhad, Mohsen; Fotouhi, Morteza; Vejdani, Kaveh; Kamali-Zare, Padideh

    2016-09-01

    We present a universal model of brain tissue microstructure that dynamically links osmosis and diffusion with geometrical parameters of brain extracellular space (ECS). Our model robustly describes and predicts the nonlinear time dependency of tortuosity (λ =√{D /D* } ) changes with very high precision in various media with uniform and nonuniform osmolarity distribution, as demonstrated by previously published experimental data (D = free diffusion coefficient, D* = effective diffusion coefficient). To construct this model, we first developed a multiscale technique for computationally effective modeling of osmolarity in the brain tissue. Osmolarity differences across cell membranes lead to changes in the ECS dynamics. The evolution of the underlying dynamics is then captured by a level set method. Subsequently, using a homogenization technique, we derived a coarse-grained model with parameters that are explicitly related to the geometry of cells and their associated ECS. Our modeling results in very accurate analytical approximation of tortuosity based on time, space, osmolarity differences across cell membranes, and water permeability of cell membranes. Our model provides a unique platform for studying ECS dynamics not only in physiologic conditions such as sleep-wake cycles and aging but also in pathologic conditions such as stroke, seizure, and neoplasia, as well as in predictive pharmacokinetic modeling such as predicting medication biodistribution and efficacy and novel biomolecule development and testing.

  17. Data-Driven Extraction of a Nested Model of Human Brain Function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolt, Taylor; Nomi, Jason S; Yeo, B T Thomas; Uddin, Lucina Q

    2017-07-26

    Decades of cognitive neuroscience research have revealed two basic facts regarding task-driven brain activation patterns. First, distinct patterns of activation occur in response to different task demands. Second, a superordinate, dichotomous pattern of activation/deactivation, is common across a variety of task demands. We explore the possibility that a hierarchical model incorporates these two observed brain activation phenomena into a unifying framework. We apply a latent variable approach, exploratory bifactor analysis, to a large set of human (both sexes) brain activation maps (n = 108) encompassing cognition, perception, action, and emotion behavioral domains, to determine the potential existence of a nested structure of factors that underlie a variety of commonly observed activation patterns. We find that a general factor, associated with a superordinate brain activation/deactivation pattern, explained the majority of the variance (52.37%) in brain activation patterns. The bifactor analysis also revealed several subfactors that explained an additional 31.02% of variance in brain activation patterns, associated with different manifestations of the superordinate brain activation/deactivation pattern, each emphasizing different contexts in which the task demands occurred. Importantly, this nested factor structure provided better overall fit to the data compared with a non-nested factor structure model. These results point to a domain-general psychological process, representing a "focused awareness" process or "attentional episode" that is variously manifested according to the sensory modality of the stimulus and degree of cognitive processing. This novel model provides the basis for constructing a biologically informed, data-driven taxonomy of psychological processes.SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT A crucial step in identifying how the brain supports various psychological processes is a well-defined categorization or taxonomy of psychological processes and their

  18. The Virtual Brain: Modeling Biological Correlates of Recovery after Chronic Stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falcon, Maria Inez; Riley, Jeffrey D; Jirsa, Viktor; McIntosh, Anthony R; Shereen, Ahmed D; Chen, E Elinor; Solodkin, Ana

    2015-01-01

    There currently remains considerable variability in stroke survivor recovery. To address this, developing individualized treatment has become an important goal in stroke treatment. As a first step, it is necessary to determine brain dynamics associated with stroke and recovery. While recent methods have made strides in this direction, we still lack physiological biomarkers. The Virtual Brain (TVB) is a novel application for modeling brain dynamics that simulates an individual's brain activity by integrating their own neuroimaging data with local biophysical models. Here, we give a detailed description of the TVB modeling process and explore model parameters associated with stroke. In order to establish a parallel between this new type of modeling and those currently in use, in this work we establish an association between a specific TVB parameter (long-range coupling) that increases after stroke with metrics derived from graph analysis. We used TVB to simulate the individual BOLD signals for 20 patients with stroke and 10 healthy controls. We performed graph analysis on their structural connectivity matrices calculating degree centrality, betweenness centrality, and global efficiency. Linear regression analysis demonstrated that long-range coupling is negatively correlated with global efficiency (P = 0.038), but is not correlated with degree centrality or betweenness centrality. Our results suggest that the larger influence of local dynamics seen through the long-range coupling parameter is closely associated with a decreased efficiency of the system. We thus propose that the increase in the long-range parameter in TVB (indicating a bias toward local over global dynamics) is deleterious because it reduces communication as suggested by the decrease in efficiency. The new model platform TVB hence provides a novel perspective to understanding biophysical parameters responsible for global brain dynamics after stroke, allowing the design of focused therapeutic

  19. Global fractional anisotropy and mean diffusivity together with segmented brain volumes assemble a predictive discriminant model for young and elderly healthy brains: a pilot study at 3T

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-Lazaro, Haydee Guadalupe; Becerra-Laparra, Ivonne; Cortez-Conradis, David; Roldan-Valadez, Ernesto

    2016-01-01

    Summary Several parameters of brain integrity can be derived from diffusion tensor imaging. These include fractional anisotropy (FA) and mean diffusivity (MD). Combination of these variables using multivariate analysis might result in a predictive model able to detect the structural changes of human brain aging. Our aim was to discriminate between young and older healthy brains by combining structural and volumetric variables from brain MRI: FA, MD, and white matter (WM), gray matter (GM) and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) volumes. This was a cross-sectional study in 21 young (mean age, 25.71±3.04 years; range, 21–34 years) and 10 elderly (mean age, 70.20±4.02 years; range, 66–80 years) healthy volunteers. Multivariate discriminant analysis, with age as the dependent variable and WM, GM and CSF volumes, global FA and MD, and gender as the independent variables, was used to assemble a predictive model. The resulting model was able to differentiate between young and older brains: Wilks’ λ = 0.235, χ2 (6) = 37.603, p = .000001. Only global FA, WM volume and CSF volume significantly discriminated between groups. The total accuracy was 93.5%; the sensitivity, specificity and positive and negative predictive values were 91.30%, 100%, 100% and 80%, respectively. Global FA, WM volume and CSF volume are parameters that, when combined, reliably discriminate between young and older brains. A decrease in FA is the strongest predictor of membership of the older brain group, followed by an increase in WM and CSF volumes. Brain assessment using a predictive model might allow the follow-up of selected cases that deviate from normal aging. PMID:27027893

  20. An Actor-Partner Interdependence Model of Acquired Brain Injury Patient Impairments and Caregiver Psychosocial Functioning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Perrin, Paul B; Norup, Anne; Caracuel, Alfonso

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this study was to use actor-partner interdependence modeling (APIM) to examine the simultaneous effects of both acquired brain injury (ABI) patient and caregiver ratings of patient impairments on both patient and caregiver ratings of caregiver psychosocial dysfunction. M...

  1. Action and Language Mechanisms in the Brain: Data, Models and Neuroinformatics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arbib, Michael A.; Bonaiuto, James J.; Bornkessel-Schlesewsky, Ina

    2014-01-01

    We assess the challenges of studying action and language mechanisms in the brain, both singly and in relation to each other to provide a novel perspective on neuroinformatics, integrating the development of databases for encoding - separately or together - neurocomputational models and empirical...

  2. Evaluation of three-dimensional anisotropic head model for mapping realistic electromagnetic fields of brain tissues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Woo Chul Jeong

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Electromagnetic fields provide fundamental data for the imaging of electrical tissue properties, such as conductivity and permittivity, in recent magnetic resonance (MR-based tissue property mapping. The induced voltage, current density, and magnetic flux density caused by externally injected current are critical factors for determining the image quality of electrical tissue conductivity. As a useful tool to identify bio-electromagnetic phenomena, precise approaches are required to understand the exact responses inside the human body subject to an injected currents. In this study, we provide the numerical simulation results of electromagnetic field mapping of brain tissues using a MR-based conductivity imaging method. First, we implemented a realistic three-dimensional human anisotropic head model using high-resolution anatomical and diffusion tensor MR images. The voltage, current density, and magnetic flux density of brain tissues were imaged by injecting 1 mA of current through pairs of electrodes on the surface of our head model. The current density map of anisotropic brain tissues was calculated from the measured magnetic flux density based on the linear relationship between the water diffusion tensor and the electrical conductivity tensor. Comparing the current density to the previous isotropic model, the anisotropic model clearly showed the differences between the brain tissues. This originates from the enhanced signals by the inherent conductivity contrast as well as the actual tissue condition resulting from the injected currents.

  3. Evaluation of three-dimensional anisotropic head model for mapping realistic electromagnetic fields of brain tissues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Woo Chul; Wi, Hun; Sajib, Saurav Z. K.; Oh, Tong In; Kim, Hyung Joong; Kwon, Oh In; Woo, Eung Je

    2015-08-01

    Electromagnetic fields provide fundamental data for the imaging of electrical tissue properties, such as conductivity and permittivity, in recent magnetic resonance (MR)-based tissue property mapping. The induced voltage, current density, and magnetic flux density caused by externally injected current are critical factors for determining the image quality of electrical tissue conductivity. As a useful tool to identify bio-electromagnetic phenomena, precise approaches are required to understand the exact responses inside the human body subject to an injected currents. In this study, we provide the numerical simulation results of electromagnetic field mapping of brain tissues using a MR-based conductivity imaging method. First, we implemented a realistic three-dimensional human anisotropic head model using high-resolution anatomical and diffusion tensor MR images. The voltage, current density, and magnetic flux density of brain tissues were imaged by injecting 1 mA of current through pairs of electrodes on the surface of our head model. The current density map of anisotropic brain tissues was calculated from the measured magnetic flux density based on the linear relationship between the water diffusion tensor and the electrical conductivity tensor. Comparing the current density to the previous isotropic model, the anisotropic model clearly showed the differences between the brain tissues. This originates from the enhanced signals by the inherent conductivity contrast as well as the actual tissue condition resulting from the injected currents.

  4. Image identification from brain activity using the population receptive field model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zuiderbaan, Wietske; Harvey, Ben M.; Dumoulin, Serge O

    2017-01-01

    A goal of computational models is not only to explain experimental data but also to make new predictions. A current focus of computational neuroimaging is to predict features of the presented stimulus from measured brain signals. These computational neuroimaging approaches may be agnostic about the

  5. The dissipative quantum model of brain how do memory localize in correlated neuronal domains

    CERN Document Server

    Alfinito, E

    2000-01-01

    The mechanism of memory localization in extended domains is described in the framework of the parametric dissipative quantum model of brain. The size of the domains and the capability in memorizing depend on the number of links the system is able to establish with the external world.

  6. Multigrid Nonlocal Gaussian Mixture Model for Segmentation of Brain Tissues in Magnetic Resonance Images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yunjie; Zhan, Tianming; Zhang, Ji; Wang, Hongyuan

    2016-01-01

    We propose a novel segmentation method based on regional and nonlocal information to overcome the impact of image intensity inhomogeneities and noise in human brain magnetic resonance images. With the consideration of the spatial distribution of different tissues in brain images, our method does not need preestimation or precorrection procedures for intensity inhomogeneities and noise. A nonlocal information based Gaussian mixture model (NGMM) is proposed to reduce the effect of noise. To reduce the effect of intensity inhomogeneity, the multigrid nonlocal Gaussian mixture model (MNGMM) is proposed to segment brain MR images in each nonoverlapping multigrid generated by using a new multigrid generation method. Therefore the proposed model can simultaneously overcome the impact of noise and intensity inhomogeneity and automatically classify 2D and 3D MR data into tissues of white matter, gray matter, and cerebral spinal fluid. To maintain the statistical reliability and spatial continuity of the segmentation, a fusion strategy is adopted to integrate the clustering results from different grid. The experiments on synthetic and clinical brain MR images demonstrate the superior performance of the proposed model comparing with several state-of-the-art algorithms.

  7. A Dynamic Directional Model for Effective Brain Connectivity using Electrocorticographic (ECoG) Time Series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Tingting; Wu, Jingwei; Li, Fan; Caffo, Brian; Boatman-Reich, Dana

    2015-03-01

    We introduce a dynamic directional model (DDM) for studying brain effective connectivity based on intracranial electrocorticographic (ECoG) time series. The DDM consists of two parts: a set of differential equations describing neuronal activity of brain components (state equations), and observation equations linking the underlying neuronal states to observed data. When applied to functional MRI or EEG data, DDMs usually have complex formulations and thus can accommodate only a few regions, due to limitations in spatial resolution and/or temporal resolution of these imaging modalities. In contrast, we formulate our model in the context of ECoG data. The combined high temporal and spatial resolution of ECoG data result in a much simpler DDM, allowing investigation of complex connections between many regions. To identify functionally segregated sub-networks, a form of biologically economical brain networks, we propose the Potts model for the DDM parameters. The neuronal states of brain components are represented by cubic spline bases and the parameters are estimated by minimizing a log-likelihood criterion that combines the state and observation equations. The Potts model is converted to the Potts penalty in the penalized regression approach to achieve sparsity in parameter estimation, for which a fast iterative algorithm is developed. The methods are applied to an auditory ECoG dataset.

  8. LPA signaling initiates schizophrenia-like brain and behavioral changes in a mouse model of prenatal brain hemorrhage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirendil, H; Thomas, E A; De Loera, C; Okada, K; Inomata, Y; Chun, J

    2015-04-07

    Genetic, environmental and neurodevelopmental factors are thought to underlie the onset of neuropsychiatric disorders such as schizophrenia. How these risk factors collectively contribute to pathology is unclear. Here, we present a mouse model of prenatal intracerebral hemorrhage--an identified risk factor for schizophrenia--using a serum-exposure paradigm. This model exhibits behavioral, neurochemical and schizophrenia-related gene expression alterations in adult females. Behavioral alterations in amphetamine-induced locomotion, prepulse inhibition, thigmotaxis and social interaction--in addition to increases in tyrosine hydroxylase-positive dopaminergic cells in the substantia nigra and ventral tegmental area and decreases in parvalbumin-positive cells in the prefrontal cortex--were induced upon prenatal serum exposure. Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA), a lipid component of serum, was identified as a key molecular initiator of schizophrenia-like sequelae induced by serum. Prenatal exposure to LPA alone phenocopied many of the schizophrenia-like alterations seen in the serum model, whereas pretreatment with an antagonist against the LPA receptor subtype LPA1 prevented many of the behavioral and neurochemical alterations. In addition, both prenatal serum and LPA exposure altered the expression of many genes and pathways related to schizophrenia, including the expression of Grin2b, Slc17a7 and Grid1. These findings demonstrate that aberrant LPA receptor signaling associated with fetal brain hemorrhage may contribute to the development of some neuropsychiatric disorders.

  9. Neuronal and brain morphological changes in animal models of schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flores, Gonzalo; Morales-Medina, Julio César; Diaz, Alfonso

    2016-03-15

    Schizophrenia, a severe and debilitating disorder with a high social burden, affects 1% of the adult world population. Available therapies are unable to treat all the symptoms, and result in strong side effects. For this reason, numerous animal models have been generated to elucidate the pathophysiology of this disorder. All these models present neuronal remodeling and abnormalities in spine stability. It is well known that the complexity in dendritic arborization determines the number of receptive synaptic contacts. Also the loss of dendritic spines and arbor stability are strongly associated with schizophrenia. This review evaluates changes in spine density and dendritic arborization in animal models of schizophrenia. By understanding these changes, pharmacological treatments can be designed to target specific neural systems to attenuate neuronal remodeling and associated behavioral deficits.

  10. Improving the clinical management of traumatic brain injury through the pharmacokinetic modeling of peripheral blood biomarkers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dadas, Aaron; Washington, Jolewis; Marchi, Nicola; Janigro, Damir

    2016-11-30

    Blood biomarkers of neurovascular damage are used clinically to diagnose the presence severity or absence of neurological diseases, but data interpretation is confounded by a limited understanding of their dependence on variables other than the disease condition itself. These include half-life in blood, molecular weight, and marker-specific biophysical properties, as well as the effects of glomerular filtration, age, gender, and ethnicity. To study these factors, and to provide a method for markers' analyses, we developed a kinetic model that allows the integrated interpretation of these properties. The pharmacokinetic behaviors of S100B (monomer and homodimer), Glial Fibrillary Acidic Protein and Ubiquitin C-Terminal Hydrolase L1 were modeled using relevant chemical and physical properties; modeling results were validated by comparison with data obtained from healthy subjects or individuals affected by neurological diseases. Brain imaging data were used to model passage of biomarkers across the blood-brain barrier. Our results show the following: (1) changes in biomarker serum levels due to age or disease progression are accounted for by differences in kidney filtration; (2) a significant change in the brain-to-blood volumetric ratio, which is characteristic of infant and adult development, contributes to variation in blood concentration of biomarkers; (3) the effects of extracranial contribution at steady-state are predicted in our model to be less important than suspected, while the contribution of blood-brain barrier disruption is confirmed as a significant factor in controlling markers' appearance in blood, where the biomarkers are typically detected; (4) the contribution of skin to the marker S100B blood levels depends on a direct correlation with pigmentation and not ethnicity; the contribution of extracranial sources for other markers requires further investigation. We developed a multi-compartment, pharmacokinetic model that integrates the biophysical

  11. Lévy-based modelling in brain imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jónsdóttir, Kristjana Ýr; Rønn-Nielsen, Anders; Mouridsen, Kim

    2013-01-01

    A substantive problem in neuroscience is the lack of valid statistical methods for non-Gaussian random fields. In the present study, we develop a flexible, yet tractable model for a random field based on kernel smoothing of a so-called Lévy basis. The resulting field may be Gaussian, but there ar...

  12. Integration of Brain and Skull in Prenatal Mouse Models of Apert and Crouzon Syndromes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susan M. Motch Perrine

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The brain and skull represent a complex arrangement of integrated anatomical structures composed of various cell and tissue types that maintain structural and functional association throughout development. Morphological integration, a concept developed in vertebrate morphology and evolutionary biology, describes the coordinated variation of functionally and developmentally related traits of organisms. Syndromic craniosynostosis is characterized by distinctive changes in skull morphology and perceptible, though less well studied, changes in brain structure and morphology. Using mouse models for craniosynostosis conditions, our group has precisely defined how unique craniosynostosis causing mutations in fibroblast growth factor receptors affect brain and skull morphology and dysgenesis involving coordinated tissue-specific effects of these mutations. Here we examine integration of brain and skull in two mouse models for craniosynostosis: one carrying the FGFR2c C342Y mutation associated with Pfeiffer and Crouzon syndromes and a mouse model carrying the FGFR2 S252W mutation, one of two mutations responsible for two-thirds of Apert syndrome cases. Using linear distances estimated from three-dimensional coordinates of landmarks acquired from dual modality imaging of skull (high resolution micro-computed tomography and magnetic resonance microscopy of mice at embryonic day 17.5, we confirm variation in brain and skull morphology in Fgfr2cC342Y/+ mice, Fgfr2+/S252W mice, and their unaffected littermates. Mutation-specific variation in neural and cranial tissue notwithstanding, patterns of integration of brain and skull differed only subtly between mice carrying either the FGFR2c C342Y or the FGFR2 S252W mutation and their unaffected littermates. However, statistically significant and substantial differences in morphological integration of brain and skull were revealed between the two mutant mouse models, each maintained on a different strain. Relative

  13. Automated brain structure segmentation based on atlas registration and appearance models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van der Lijn, Fedde; de Bruijne, Marleen; Klein, Stefan;

    2012-01-01

    Accurate automated brain structure segmentation methods facilitate the analysis of large-scale neuroimaging studies. This work describes a novel method for brain structure segmentation in magnetic resonance images that combines information about a structure’s location and appearance. The spatial...... model is implemented by registering multiple atlas images to the target image and creating a spatial probability map. The structure’s appearance is modeled by a classi¿er based on Gaussian scale-space features. These components are combined with a regularization term in a Bayesian framework...... that is globally optimized using graph cuts. The incorporation of the appearance model enables the method to segment structures with complex intensity distributions and increases its robustness against errors in the spatial model. The method is tested in cross-validation experiments on two datasets acquired...

  14. A biphasic hyperelastic model for the analysis of fluid and mass transport in brain tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García, José Jaime; Smith, Joshua H

    2009-02-01

    A biphasic hyperelastic finite element model is proposed for the description of the mechanical behavior of brain tissue. The model takes into account finite deformations through an Ogden-type hyperelastic compressible function and a hydraulic conductivity dependent on deformation. The biphasic equations, implemented here for spherical symmetry using an updated Lagrangian algorithm, yielded radial coordinates and fluid velocities that were used with the convective-diffusive equation in order to predict mass transport in the brain. Results of the model were equal to those of a closed-form solution under infinitesimal deformations, however, for a wide range of material parameters, the model predicted important increments in the infusion sphere, reductions of the fluid velocities, and changes in the species content distribution. In addition, high localized deformation and stresses were obtained at the infusion sphere. Differences with the infinitesimal solution may be mainly attributed to geometrical nonlinearities related to the increment of the infusion sphere and not to material nonlinearities.

  15. Role of microglia in a mouse model of paediatric traumatic brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chhor, Vibol; Moretti, Raffaella; Le Charpentier, Tifenn; Sigaut, Stephanie; Lebon, Sophie; Schwendimann, Leslie; Oré, Marie-Virginie; Zuiani, Chiara; Milan, Valentina; Josserand, Julien; Vontell, Regina; Pansiot, Julien; Degos, Vincent; Ikonomidou, Chrysanthy; Titomanlio, Luigi; Hagberg, Henrik; Gressens, Pierre; Fleiss, Bobbi

    2016-11-04

    The cognitive and behavioural deficits caused by traumatic brain injury (TBI) to the immature brain are more severe and persistent than TBI in the mature brain. Understanding this developmental sensitivity is critical as children under four years of age sustain TBI more frequently than any other age group. Microglia (MG), resident immune cells of the brain that mediate neuroinflammation, are activated following TBI in the immature brain. However, the type and temporal profile of this activation and the consequences of altering it are still largely unknown. In a mouse model of closed head weight drop paediatric brain trauma, we characterized i) the temporal course of total cortical neuroinflammation and the phenotype of ex vivo isolated CD11B-positive microglia/macrophage (MG/MΦ) using a battery of 32 markers, and ii) neuropathological outcome 1 and 5days post-injury. We also assessed the effects of targeting MG/MΦ activation directly, using minocycline a prototypical microglial activation antagonist, on these processes and outcome. TBI induced a moderate increase in both pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines/chemokines in the ipsilateral hemisphere. Isolated cortical MG/MΦ expressed increased levels of markers of endogenous reparatory/regenerative and immunomodulatory phenotypes compared with shams. Blocking MG/MΦ activation with minocycline at the time of injury and 1 and 2days post-injury had only transient protective effects, reducing ventricular dilatation and cell death 1day post-injury but having no effect on injury severity at 5days. This study demonstrates that, unlike in adults, the role of MG/MΦ in injury mechanisms following TBI in the immature brain may not be negative. An improved understanding of MG/MΦ function in paediatric TBI could support translational efforts to design therapeutic interventions.

  16. Complement inhibition and statins prevent fetal brain cortical abnormalities in a mouse model of preterm birth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedroni, Silvia M A; Gonzalez, Juan M; Wade, Jean; Jansen, Maurits A; Serio, Andrea; Marshall, Ian; Lennen, Ross J; Girardi, Guillermina

    2014-01-01

    Premature babies are particularly vulnerable to brain injury. In this study we focus on cortical brain damage associated with long-term cognitive, behavioral, attentional or socialization deficits in children born preterm. Using a mouse model of preterm birth (PTB), we demonstrated that complement component C5a contributes to fetal cortical brain injury. Disruption of cortical dendritic and axonal cytoarchitecture was observed in PTB-mice. Fetuses deficient in C5aR (-/-) did not show cortical brain damage. Treatment with antibody anti-C5, that prevents generation of C5a, also prevented cortical fetal brain injury in PTB-mice. C5a also showed a detrimental effect on fetal cortical neuron development and survival in vitro. Increased glutamate release was observed in cortical neurons in culture exposed to C5a. Blockade of C5aR prevented glutamate increase and restored neurons dendritic and axonal growth and survival. Similarly, increased glutamate levels - measured by (1)HMRS - were observed in vivo in PTB-fetuses compared to age-matched controls. The blockade of glutamate receptors prevented C5a-induced abnormal growth and increased cell death in isolated fetal cortical neurons. Simvastatin and pravastatin prevented cortical fetal brain developmental and metabolic abnormalities -in vivo and in vitro. Neuroprotective effects of statins were mediated by Akt/PKB signaling pathways. This study shows that complement activation plays a crucial role in cortical fetal brain injury in PTL and suggests that complement inhibitors and statins might be good therapeutic options to improve neonatal outcomes in preterm birth. © 2013.

  17. Nanoparticle-assisted photothermal ablation of brain tumor in an orthotopic canine model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, Jon A.; Shetty, Anil M.; Price, Roger E.; Stafford, R. Jason; Wang, James C.; Uthamanthil, Rajesh K.; Pham, Kevin; McNichols, Roger J.; Coleman, Chris L.; Payne, J. Donald

    2009-02-01

    We report on a pilot study demonstrating a proof of concept for the passive delivery of nanoshells to an orthotopic tumor where they induce a local, confined therapeutic response distinct from that of normal brain resulting in the photo-thermal ablation of canine Transmissible Venereal Tumor (cTVT) in a canine brain model. cTVT fragments grown in SCID mice were successfully inoculated in the parietal lobe of immuno-suppressed, mixed-breed hound dogs. A single dose of near-infrared absorbing, 150 nm nanoshells was infused intravenously and allowed time to passively accumulate in the intracranial tumors which served as a proxy for an orthotopic brain metastasis. The nanoshells accumulated within the intracranial cTVT suggesting that its neo-vasculature represented an interruption of the normal blood-brain barrier. Tumors were thermally ablated by percutaneous, optical fiber-delivered, near-infrared radiation using a 3.5 W average, 3-minute laser dose at 808 nm that selectively elevated the temperature of tumor tissue to 65.8+/-4.1ºC. Identical laser doses applied to normal white and gray matter on the contralateral side of the brain yielded sub-lethal temperatures of 48.6+/-1.1ºC. The laser dose was designed to minimize thermal damage to normal brain tissue in the absence of nanoshells and compensate for variability in the accumulation of nanoshells in tumor. Post-mortem histopathology of treated brain sections demonstrated the effectiveness and selectivity of the nanoshell-assisted thermal ablation.

  18. Metabolic fingerprints of altered brain growth, osmoregulation and neurotransmission in a Rett syndrome model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angèle Viola

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Rett syndrome (RS is the leading cause of profound mental retardation of genetic origin in girls. Since RS is mostly caused by mutations in the MECP2 gene, transgenic animal models such as the Mecp2-deleted ("Mecp2-null" mouse have been employed to study neurological symptoms and brain function. However, an interdisciplinary approach drawing from chemistry, biology and neuroscience is needed to elucidate the mechanistic links between the genotype and phenotype of this genetic disorder. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We performed, for the first time, a metabolomic study of brain extracts from Mecp2-null mice by using high-resolution magnetic resonance spectroscopy. A large number of individual water-soluble metabolites and phospholipids were quantified without prior selection for specific metabolic pathways. Results were interpreted in terms of Mecp2 gene deletion, brain cell function and brain morphology. This approach provided a "metabolic window" to brain characteristics in Mecp2-null mice (n = 4, revealing (i the first metabolic evidence of astrocyte involvement in RS (decreased levels of the astrocyte marker, myo-inositol, vs. wild-type mice; p = 0.034; (ii reduced choline phospholipid turnover in Mecp2-null vs. wild-type mice, implying a diminished potential of cells to grow, paralleled by globally reduced brain size and perturbed osmoregulation; (iii alterations of the platelet activating factor (PAF cycle in Mecp2-null mouse brains, where PAF is a bioactive lipid acting on neuronal growth, glutamate exocytosis and other processes; and (iv changes in glutamine/glutamate ratios (p = 0.034 in Mecp2-null mouse brains potentially indicating altered neurotransmitter recycling. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: This study establishes, for the first time, detailed metabolic fingerprints of perturbed brain growth, osmoregulation and neurotransmission in a mouse model of Rett syndrome. Combined with morphological and neurological findings

  19. The brain's code and its canonical computational motifs. From sensory cortex to the default mode network: A multi-scale model of brain function in health and disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turkheimer, Federico E; Leech, Robert; Expert, Paul; Lord, Louis-David; Vernon, Anthony C

    2015-08-01

    A variety of anatomical and physiological evidence suggests that the brain performs computations using motifs that are repeated across species, brain areas, and modalities. The computational architecture of cortex, for example, is very similar from one area to another and the types, arrangements, and connections of cortical neurons are highly stereotyped. This supports the idea that each cortical area conducts calculations using similarly structured neuronal modules: what we term canonical computational motifs. In addition, the remarkable self-similarity of the brain observables at the micro-, meso- and macro-scale further suggests that these motifs are repeated at increasing spatial and temporal scales supporting brain activity from primary motor and sensory processing to higher-level behaviour and cognition. Here, we briefly review the biological bases of canonical brain circuits and the role of inhibitory interneurons in these computational elements. We then elucidate how canonical computational motifs can be repeated across spatial and temporal scales to build a multiplexing information system able to encode and transmit information of increasing complexity. We point to the similarities between the patterns of activation observed in primary sensory cortices by use of electrophysiology and those observed in large scale networks measured with fMRI. We then employ the canonical model of brain function to unify seemingly disparate evidence on the pathophysiology of schizophrenia in a single explanatory framework. We hypothesise that such a framework may also be extended to cover multiple brain disorders which are grounded in dysfunction of GABA interneurons and/or these computational motifs.

  20. Chimera in a neuronal network model of the cat brain

    OpenAIRE

    Santos, M. S.; Szezech Jr., J. D.; Borges, F. S.; Iarosz, K. C.; Caldas, I. L.; Batista, A. M.; Viana, R. L.; Kurths, J.

    2016-01-01

    Neuronal systems have been modeled by complex networks in different description levels. Recently, it has been verified that networks can simultaneously exhibit one coherent and other incoherent domain, known as chimera states. In this work, we study the existence of chimera states in a network considering the connectivity matrix based on the cat cerebral cortex. The cerebral cortex of the cat can be separated in 65 cortical areas organised into the four cognitive regions: visual, auditory, so...

  1. Petri Net Modeling of the Brain Circuit Involved in Aggressive Behavior

    OpenAIRE

    Moreno, Carlos B.; Díaz, José-Luis; Martínez, J. H.

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this work in to demonstrate the initial results of a research project having as its goal to develop dynamic models of the brain network involved in aggressive behavior. In this way, the complex neural process correlated to basic anger emotions and resulting in aggressive behaviors is purportedly schematized by the use of Petri nets, a work-flow computational tool. Initially, the modeling technique is introduced taking into account the most recent and accepted notion of the neur...

  2. Genetic mouse models to study blood–brain barrier development and function

    OpenAIRE

    Sohet, Fabien; Daneman, Richard

    2013-01-01

    The blood–brain barrier (BBB) is a complex physiological structure formed by the blood vessels of the central nervous system (CNS) that tightly regulates the movement of substances between the blood and the neural tissue. Recently, the generation and analysis of different genetic mouse models has allowed for greater understanding of BBB development, how the barrier is regulated during health, and its response to disease. Here we discuss: 1) Genetic mouse models that have been used to study th...

  3. Neural mass modeling of power-line magnetic fields effects on brain activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julien eModolo

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Neural mass models are an appropriate framework to study brain activity, combining a high degree of biological realism while being mathematically tractable. These models have been used, with a certain success, to simulate brain electric (electroencephalography, EEG and metabolic (functional magnetic resonance imaging, fMRI activity. However, concrete applications of neural mass models have remained limited to date. Motivated by experimental results obtained in humans, we propose in this paper a neural mass model designed to study the interaction between power-line magnetic fields (60 Hz in North America and brain activity. The model includes pyramidal cells; dendrite-projecting, slow GABAergic neurons; soma-projecting, fast GABAergic neurons; and glutamatergic interneurons. A simple phenomenological model of interaction between the induced electric field and neuron membranes is also considered, along with a model of post-synaptic calcium concentration and associated changes in synaptic weights Simulated EEG signals are produced in a simple protocol, both in the absence and presence of a 60 Hz magnetic field. These results are discussed based on results obtained previously in humans. Notably, results highlight that 1 EEG alpha (8-12 Hz power can be modulated by weak membrane depolarizations induced by the exposure; 2 the level of input noise has a significant impact on EEG alpha power modulation; and 3 neural mass network size results in a different alpha rhythm modulation than when an individual neural mass is considered. Results obtained from the model shed new light on the effects of power-line magnetic fields on brain activity, and will provide guidance in future human experiments. This may represent a valuable contribution to international regulation agencies setting guidelines on magnetic field values to which the general public and workers can be exposed.

  4. Modeling distributed axonal delays in mean-field brain dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, J. A.; Robinson, P. A.

    2008-11-01

    The range of conduction delays between connected neuronal populations is often modeled as a single discrete delay, assumed to be an effective value averaging over all fiber velocities. This paper shows the effects of distributed delays on signal propagation. A distribution acts as a linear filter, imposing an upper frequency cutoff that is inversely proportional to the delay width. Distributed thalamocortical and corticothalamic delays are incorporated into a physiologically based mean-field model of the cortex and thalamus to illustrate their effects on the electroencephalogram (EEG). The power spectrum is acutely sensitive to the width of the thalamocortical delay distribution, and more so than the corticothalamic distribution, because all input signals must travel along the thalamocortical pathway. This imposes a cutoff frequency above which the spectrum is overly damped. The positions of spectral peaks in the resting EEG depend primarily on the distribution mean, with only weak dependences on distribution width. Increasing distribution width increases the stability of fixed point solutions. A single discrete delay successfully approximates a distribution for frequencies below a cutoff that is inversely proportional to the delay width, provided that other model parameters are moderately adjusted. A pair of discrete delays together having the same mean, variance, and skewness as the distribution approximates the distribution over the same frequency range without needing parameter adjustment. Delay distributions with large fractional widths are well approximated by low-order differential equations.

  5. A stable and reproducible human blood-brain barrier model derived from hematopoietic stem cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Romeo Cecchelli

    Full Text Available The human blood brain barrier (BBB is a selective barrier formed by human brain endothelial cells (hBECs, which is important to ensure adequate neuronal function and protect the central nervous system (CNS from disease. The development of human in vitro BBB models is thus of utmost importance for drug discovery programs related to CNS diseases. Here, we describe a method to generate a human BBB model using cord blood-derived hematopoietic stem cells. The cells were initially differentiated into ECs followed by the induction of BBB properties by co-culture with pericytes. The brain-like endothelial cells (BLECs express tight junctions and transporters typically observed in brain endothelium and maintain expression of most in vivo BBB properties for at least 20 days. The model is very reproducible since it can be generated from stem cells isolated from different donors and in different laboratories, and could be used to predict CNS distribution of compounds in human. Finally, we provide evidence that Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway mediates in part the BBB inductive properties of pericytes.

  6. Novel models for studying the blood-brain and blood-eye barriers in Drosophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinsonneault, Robert L; Mayer, Nasima; Mayer, Fahima; Tegegn, Nebiyu; Bainton, Roland J

    2011-01-01

    In species as varied as humans and flies, humoral/central nervous system barrier structures are a major obstacle to the passive penetration of small molecules including endogenous compounds, environmental toxins, and drugs. In vivo measurement of blood-brain physiologic function in vertebrate animal models is difficult and current ex vivo models for more rapid experimentation using, for example, cultured brain endothelial cells, only partially reconstitute the anatomy and physiology of a fully intact blood-brain barrier (BBB). To address these problems, we and others continue to develop in vivo assays for studying the complex physiologic function of central nervous system (CNS) barriers using the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster (Dm). These methods involve the introduction of small molecule reporters of BBB physiology into the fly humoral compartment by direct injection. Since these reporters must cross the Dm BBB in order to be visible in the eye, we can directly assess genetic or chemical modulators of BBB function by monitoring retinal fluorescence. This assay has the advantage of utilizing a physiologically intact BBB in a model organism that is economical and highly amenable to genetic manipulation. In combination with other approaches outlined here, such as brain dissection and behavioral assessment, one can produce a fuller picture of BBB biology and physiology. In this chapter, we provide detailed methods for examining BBB biology in the fly, including a Dm visual assay to screen for novel modulators of the BBB.

  7. Modeling brain injury response for rotational velocities of varying directions and magnitudes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weaver, Ashley A; Danelson, Kerry A; Stitzel, Joel D

    2012-09-01

    An estimated 1.7 million people in the United States sustain a traumatic brain injury (TBI) annually. To investigate the effects of rotational motions on TBI risk and location, this study modeled rotational velocities of five magnitudes and 26 directions of rotation using the Simulated Injury Monitor finite element brain model. The volume fraction of the total brain exceeding a predetermined strain threshold, the Cumulative Strain Damage Measure (CSDM), was investigated to evaluate global model response. To evaluate regional response, this metric was computed relative to individual brain structures and termed the Structure Cumulative Strain Damage Measure (SCSDM). CSDM increased as input magnitude increased and varied with the direction of rotation. CSDM was 0.55-1.7 times larger in simulations with transverse plane rotation compared to those without transverse plane rotation. The largest SCSDM in the cerebrum and brainstem occurred with rotations in the transverse and sagittal planes, respectively. Velocities causing medial rotation of the cerebellum resulted in the largest SCSDM in this structure. For velocities of the same magnitude, injury risk calculated from CSDM varied from 0 to 97% with variations in the direction of rotation. These findings demonstrate injury risk, as estimated by CSDM and SCSDM, is affected by the direction of rotation and input magnitude, and these may be important considerations for injury prediction.

  8. Concise review: Patient-derived olfactory stem cells: new models for brain diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mackay-Sim, Alan

    2012-11-01

    Traditional models of brain diseases have had limited success in driving candidate drugs into successful clinical translation. This has resulted in large international pharmaceutical companies moving out of neuroscience research. Cells are not brains, obviously, but new patient-derived stem models have the potential to elucidate cell biological aspects of brain diseases that are not present in worm, fly, or rodent models, the work horses of disease investigations and drug discovery. Neural stem cells are present in the olfactory mucosa, the organ of smell in the nose. Patient-derived olfactory mucosa has demonstrated disease-associated differences in a variety of brain diseases and recently olfactory mucosa stem cells have been generated from patients with schizophrenia, Parkinson's disease, and familial dysautonomia. By comparison with cells from healthy controls, patient-derived olfactory mucosa stem cells show disease-specific alterations in gene expression and cell functions including: a shorter cell cycle and faster proliferation in schizophrenia, oxidative stress in Parkinson's disease, and altered cell migration in familial dysautonomia. Olfactory stem cell cultures thus reveal patient-control differences, even in complex genetic diseases such as schizophrenia and Parkinson's disease, indicating that multiple genes of small effect can converge on shared cell signaling pathways to present as a disease-specific cellular phenotype. Olfactory mucosa stem cells can be maintained in homogeneous cultures that allow robust and repeatable multiwell assays suitable for screening libraries of drug candidate molecules. Copyright © 2012 AlphaMed Press.

  9. Examining the multifactorial nature of a cognitive process using Bayesian brain-behavior modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Rong; Herskovits, Edward H

    2015-04-01

    Establishing relationships among brain structures and cognitive functions is a central task in cognitive neuroscience. Existing methods to establish associations among a set of function variables and a set of brain regions, such as dissociation logic and conjunction analysis, are hypothesis-driven. We propose a new data-driven approach to structure-function association analysis. We validated it by analyzing a simulated atrophy study. We applied the proposed method to a study of aging and dementia. We found that the most significant age-related and dementia-related volume reductions were in the hippocampal formation and the supramarginal gyrus, respectively. These findings suggest a multi-component brain-aging model.

  10. Detection of dynamic brain networks modulated by acupuncture using a graph theory model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lijun Bai; Wei Qin; Jie Tian; Jianping Dai; Wanhai Yang

    2009-01-01

    Neuroimaging studies involving acute acupuncture manipulation have already demonstrated significant modulatory effects on wide limbic/paralimbic nuclei, subcortical gray structures and the neocortical system of the brain. Due to the sustained effect of acupuncture, however, knowledge on the organization of such large-scale cortical networks behind the active needle stimulation phase is lacking. In this study, we originally adopted a network model analysis from graph theory to evaluate the functional connectivity among multiple brain regions during the post-stimulus phase. Evidence from our findings clearly supported the existence of a large organized functional connectivity network related to acupuncture function in the resting brain. More importantly, acupuncture can change such a network into a functional state underlying both pain perception and modulation, which is exhibited by significant changes in the functional con-nectivity of some brain regions. This analysis may help us to better understand the long-lasting effects of acupuncture on brain function, as well as the potential benefits of clinical treatments.

  11. Prenatal Brain Damage in Preeclamptic Animal Model Induced by Gestational Nitric Oxide Synthase Inhibition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Begoña Pellicer

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Cerebral palsy is a major neonatal handicap with unknown aetiology. There is evidence that prenatal brain injury is the leading cause of CP. Severe placental pathology accounts for a high percentage of cases. Several factors predispose to prenatal brain damage but when and how they act is unclear. The aim of this paper was to determine if hypoxia during pregnancy leads to damage in fetal brain and to evaluate the localization of this injury. An animal model of chronic hypoxia produced by chronic administration of a nitric oxide synthase inhibitor (L-NAME was used to evaluate apoptotic activity in fetal brains and to localize the most sensitive areas. L-NAME reproduces a preeclamptic-like condition with increased blood pressure, proteinuria, growth restriction and intrauterine mortality. Apoptotic activity was increased in L-NAME brains and the most sensitive areas were the subventricular and pallidum zone. These results may explain the clinical features of CP. Further studies are needed.

  12. Blood-Brain Barrier Alterations Provide Evidence of Subacute Diaschisis in an Ischemic Stroke Rat Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garbuzova-Davis, Svitlana; Rodrigues, Maria C. O.; Hernandez-Ontiveros, Diana G.; Tajiri, Naoki; Frisina-Deyo, Aric; Boffeli, Sean M.; Abraham, Jerry V.; Pabon, Mibel; Wagner, Andrew; Ishikawa, Hiroto; Shinozuka, Kazutaka; Haller, Edward; Sanberg, Paul R.; Kaneko, Yuji; Borlongan, Cesario V.

    2013-01-01

    Background Comprehensive stroke studies reveal diaschisis, a loss of function due to pathological deficits in brain areas remote from initial ischemic lesion. However, blood-brain barrier (BBB) competence in subacute diaschisis is uncertain. The present study investigated subacute diaschisis in a focal ischemic stroke rat model. Specific focuses were BBB integrity and related pathogenic processes in contralateral brain areas. Methodology/Principal Findings In ipsilateral hemisphere 7 days after transient middle cerebral artery occlusion (tMCAO), significant BBB alterations characterized by large Evans Blue (EB) parenchymal extravasation, autophagosome accumulation, increased reactive astrocytes and activated microglia, demyelinization, and neuronal damage were detected in the striatum, motor and somatosensory cortices. Vascular damage identified by ultrastuctural and immunohistochemical analyses also occurred in the contralateral hemisphere. In contralateral striatum and motor cortex, major ultrastructural BBB changes included: swollen and vacuolated endothelial cells containing numerous autophagosomes, pericyte degeneration, and perivascular edema. Additionally, prominent EB extravasation, increased endothelial autophagosome formation, rampant astrogliosis, activated microglia, widespread neuronal pyknosis and decreased myelin were observed in contralateral striatum, and motor and somatosensory cortices. Conclusions/Significance These results demonstrate focal ischemic stroke-induced pathological disturbances in ipsilateral, as well as in contralateral brain areas, which were shown to be closely associated with BBB breakdown in remote brain microvessels and endothelial autophagosome accumulation. This microvascular damage in subacute phase likely revealed ischemic diaschisis and should be considered in development of treatment strategies for stroke. PMID:23675488

  13. Blood-brain barrier alterations provide evidence of subacute diaschisis in an ischemic stroke rat model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Svitlana Garbuzova-Davis

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Comprehensive stroke studies reveal diaschisis, a loss of function due to pathological deficits in brain areas remote from initial ischemic lesion. However, blood-brain barrier (BBB competence in subacute diaschisis is uncertain. The present study investigated subacute diaschisis in a focal ischemic stroke rat model. Specific focuses were BBB integrity and related pathogenic processes in contralateral brain areas. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In ipsilateral hemisphere 7 days after transient middle cerebral artery occlusion (tMCAO, significant BBB alterations characterized by large Evans Blue (EB parenchymal extravasation, autophagosome accumulation, increased reactive astrocytes and activated microglia, demyelinization, and neuronal damage were detected in the striatum, motor and somatosensory cortices. Vascular damage identified by ultrastuctural and immunohistochemical analyses also occurred in the contralateral hemisphere. In contralateral striatum and motor cortex, major ultrastructural BBB changes included: swollen and vacuolated endothelial cells containing numerous autophagosomes, pericyte degeneration, and perivascular edema. Additionally, prominent EB extravasation, increased endothelial autophagosome formation, rampant astrogliosis, activated microglia, widespread neuronal pyknosis and decreased myelin were observed in contralateral striatum, and motor and somatosensory cortices. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These results demonstrate focal ischemic stroke-induced pathological disturbances in ipsilateral, as well as in contralateral brain areas, which were shown to be closely associated with BBB breakdown in remote brain microvessels and endothelial autophagosome accumulation. This microvascular damage in subacute phase likely revealed ischemic diaschisis and should be considered in development of treatment strategies for stroke.

  14. Prenatal pharmacotherapy rescues brain development in a Down's syndrome mouse model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guidi, Sandra; Stagni, Fiorenza; Bianchi, Patrizia; Ciani, Elisabetta; Giacomini, Andrea; De Franceschi, Marianna; Moldrich, Randal; Kurniawan, Nyoman; Mardon, Karine; Giuliani, Alessandro; Calzà, Laura; Bartesaghi, Renata

    2014-02-01

    Intellectual impairment is a strongly disabling feature of Down's syndrome, a genetic disorder of high prevalence (1 in 700-1000 live births) caused by trisomy of chromosome 21. Accumulating evidence shows that widespread neurogenesis impairment is a major determinant of abnormal brain development and, hence, of intellectual disability in Down's syndrome. This defect is worsened by dendritic hypotrophy and connectivity alterations. Most of the pharmacotherapies designed to improve cognitive performance in Down's syndrome have been attempted in Down's syndrome mouse models during adult life stages. Yet, as neurogenesis is mainly a prenatal event, treatments aimed at correcting neurogenesis failure in Down's syndrome should be administered during pregnancy. Correction of neurogenesis during the very first stages of brain formation may, in turn, rescue improper brain wiring. The aim of our study was to establish whether it is possible to rescue the neurodevelopmental alterations that characterize the trisomic brain with a prenatal pharmacotherapy with fluoxetine, a drug that is able to restore post-natal hippocampal neurogenesis in the Ts65Dn mouse model of Down's syndrome. Pregnant Ts65Dn females were treated with fluoxetine from embryonic Day 10 until delivery. On post-natal Day 2 the pups received an injection of 5-bromo-2-deoxyuridine and were sacrificed after either 2 h or after 43 days (at the age of 45 days). Untreated 2-day-old Ts65Dn mice exhibited a severe neurogenesis reduction and hypocellularity throughout the forebrain (subventricular zone, subgranular zone, neocortex, striatum, thalamus and hypothalamus), midbrain (mesencephalon) and hindbrain (cerebellum and pons). In embryonically treated 2-day-old Ts65Dn mice, precursor proliferation and cellularity were fully restored throughout all brain regions. The recovery of proliferation potency and cellularity was still present in treated Ts65Dn 45-day-old mice. Moreover, embryonic treatment restored

  15. Deep brain stimulation during early adolescence prevents microglial alterations in a model of maternal immune activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadar, Ravit; Dong, Le; Del-Valle-Anton, Lucia; Guneykaya, Dilansu; Voget, Mareike; Edemann-Callesen, Henriette; Schweibold, Regina; Djodari-Irani, Anais; Goetz, Thomas; Ewing, Samuel; Kettenmann, Helmut; Wolf, Susanne A; Winter, Christine

    2017-07-01

    In recent years schizophrenia has been recognized as a neurodevelopmental disorder likely involving a perinatal insult progressively affecting brain development. The poly I:C maternal immune activation (MIA) rodent model is considered as a neurodevelopmental model of schizophrenia. Using this model we and others demonstrated the association between neuroinflammation in the form of altered microglia and a schizophrenia-like endophenotype. Therapeutic intervention using the anti-inflammatory drug minocycline affected altered microglia activation and was successful in the adult offspring. However, less is known about the effect of preventive therapeutic strategies on microglia properties. Previously we found that deep brain stimulation of the medial prefrontal cortex applied pre-symptomatically to adolescence MIA rats prevented the manifestation of behavioral and structural deficits in adult rats. We here studied the effects of deep brain stimulation during adolescence on microglia properties in adulthood. We found that in the hippocampus and nucleus accumbens, but not in the medial prefrontal cortex, microglial density and soma size were increased in MIA rats. Pro-inflammatory cytokine mRNA was unchanged in all brain areas before and after implantation and stimulation. Stimulation of either the medial prefrontal cortex or the nucleus accumbens normalized microglia density and soma size in main projection areas including the hippocampus and in the area around the electrode implantation. We conclude that in parallel to an alleviation of the symptoms in the rat MIA model, deep brain stimulation has the potential to prevent the neuroinflammatory component in this disease. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Astrogliosis in the brain of obese Zucker rat: a model of metabolic syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomassoni, Daniele; Nwankwo, Innocent Ejike; Gabrielli, Maria Gabriella; Bhatt, Siddhartha; Muhammad, Abdul Bari; Lokhandwala, Mustafa F; Tayebati, Seyed Khosrow; Amenta, Francesco

    2013-05-24

    Metabolic syndrome (MetS) is a disorder characterized primarily by the development of insulin resistance. Insulin resistance and subsequent hyperinsulinemia, originating from abdominal obesity, increases the risk of cerebrovascular and cardiovascular disease and all-cause mortality. Obesity is probably a risk factor for Alzheimer's disease and vascular dementia and is associated with impaired cognitive function. The obese Zucker rat (OZR) represents a model of type 2 diabetes exhibiting a moderate degree of arterial hypertension and of increased oxidative stress. To clarify the possible relationships between MetS and brain damage, the present study has investigated brain microanatomy in OZRs compared with their littermate controls lean Zucker rats (LZRs). Male OZRs and LZRs of 12 weeks of age were used. Their brain was processed for immunochemical and immunohistochemical analysis of glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP). In frontal and parietal cortex of OZRs a significant increase in the number of GFAP immunoreactive astrocytes was observed. Similar findings were found in the hippocampus, where an increased number of GFAP immunoreactive astrocytes were detected in the CA1 and CA3 subfields and dentate gyrus of OZRs compared to the LZRs. These findings indicating the occurrence of brain injury accompanied by astrogliosis in OZRs suggest that these rats, developed as an animal model of type 2 diabetes, may also represent a model for assessing the influence of MetS on brain. The identification of neurodegenerative changes in OZRs may represent the first step for better characterizing neuronal involvement in this model of MetS and possible treatment for countering it.

  17. Venous or arterial blood components trigger more brain swelling, tissue death after acute subdural hematoma compared to elderly atrophic brain with subdural effusion (SDE) model rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wajima, Daisuke; Sato, Fumiya; Kawamura, Kenya; Sugiura, Keisuke; Nakagawa, Ichiro; Motoyama, Yasushi; Park, Young-Soo; Nakase, Hiroyuki

    2017-09-01

    Acute subdural hematoma (ASDH) is a frequent complication of severe head injury, whose secondary ischemic lesions are often responsible for the severity of the disease. We focused on the differences of secondary ischemic lesions caused by the components, 0.4ml venous- or arterial-blood, or saline, infused in the subdural space, evaluating the differences in vivo model, using rats. The saline infused rats are made for elderly atrophic brain with subdural effusion (SDE) model. Our data showed that subdural blood, both venous- and arterial-blood, aggravate brain edema and lesion development more than SDE. This study is the first study, in which different fluids in rats' subdural space, ASDH or SDE are compared with the extension of early and delayed brain damage by measuring brain edema and histological lesion volume. Blood constituents started to affect the degree of ischemia underneath the subdural hemorrhage, leading to more pronounced breakdown of the blood-brain barrier and brain damage. This indicates that further strategies to treat blood-dependent effects more efficiently are in view for patients with ASDH. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Trastuzumab uptake and its relation to efficacy in an animal model of HER2-positive breast cancer brain metastasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis Phillips, Gail D; Nishimura, Merry C; Lacap, Jennifer Arca; Kharbanda, Samir; Mai, Elaine; Tien, Janet; Malesky, Kimberly; Williams, Simon P; Marik, Jan; Phillips, Heidi S

    2017-08-01

    The extent to which efficacy of the HER2 antibody Trastuzumab in brain metastases is limited by access of antibody to brain lesions remains a question of significant clinical importance. We investigated the uptake and distribution of trastuzumab in brain and mammary fat pad grafts of HER2-positive breast cancer to evaluate the relationship of these parameters to the anti-tumor activity of trastuzumab and trastuzumab emtansine (T-DM1). Mouse transgenic breast tumor cells expressing human HER2 (Fo2-1282 or Fo5) were used to establish intracranial and orthotopic tumors. Tumor uptake and tissue distribution of systemically administered (89)Zr-trastuzumab or muMAb 4D5 (murine parent of trastuzumab) were measured by PET and ELISA. Efficacy of muMAb 4D5, the PI3K/mTOR inhibitor GNE-317, and T-DM1 was also assessed. (89)Zr-trastuzumab and muMAb 4D5 exhibited robust uptake into Fo2-1282 brain tumors, but not normal brains. Uptake into brain grafts was similar to mammary grafts. Despite this, muMAb 4D5 was less efficacious in brain grafts. Co-administration of muMAb 4D5 and GNE-317, a brain-penetrant PI3K/mTOR inhibitor, provided longer survival in mice with brain lesions than either agent alone. Moreover, T-DM1 increased survival in the Fo5 brain metastasis model. In models of HER2-positive breast cancer brain metastasis, trastuzumab efficacy does not appear to be limited by access to intracranial tumors. Anti-tumor activity improved with the addition of a brain-penetrant PI3K/mTOR inhibitor, suggesting that combining targeted therapies is a more effective strategy for treating HER2-positive breast cancer brain metastases. Survival was also extended in mice with Fo5 brain lesions treated with T-DM1.

  19. A Simple Method for Assessing Free Brain/Free Plasma Ratios Using an In Vitro Model of the Blood Brain Barrier

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sevin, Emmanuel; Szorath, Erica; Martinsson, Stefan; Renftel, Mila; Hongmei, Yan; Cecchelli, Romeo; Lundquist, Stefan

    2013-01-01

    Historically, the focus has been to use in vitro BBB models to optimize rate of drug delivery to the CNS, whereas total in vivo brain/plasma ratios have been used for optimizing extent. However, these two parameters do not necessarily show good correlations with receptor occupancy data or other pharmacological readouts. In line with the free drug hypothesis, the use of unbound brain concentrations (Cu,br) has been shown to provide the best correlations with pharmacological data. However, typically the determination of this parameter requires microdialysis, a technique not ideally suited for screening in early drug development. Alternative, and less resource-demanding methodologies to determine Cu,br employ either equilibrium dialysis of brain homogenates or incubations of brain slices in buffer to determine fraction unbound brain (fu,br), which is subsequently multiplied by the total brain concentration to yield Cu,br. To determine Cu,br/Cu,pl ratios this way, still requires both in vitro and in vivo experiments that are quite time consuming. The main objective of this study was to explore the possibility to directly generate Cu,br/Cu,pl ratios in a single in vitro model of the BBB, using a co-culture of brain capillary endothelial and glial cells in an attempt to mimick the in vivo situation, thereby greatly simplifying existing experimental procedures. Comparison to microdialysis brain concentration profiles demonstrates the possibility to estimate brain exposure over time in the BBB model. A stronger correlation was found between in vitro Cu,br/Cu,pl ratios and in vivo Cu,br/Cu,pl obtained using fu,br from brain slice than with fu,br from brain homogenate for a set of 30 drugs. Overall, Cu,br/Cu,pl ratios were successfully predicted in vitro for 88% of the 92 studied compounds. This result supports the possibility to use this methodology for identifying compounds with a desirable in vivo response in the CNS early on in the drug discovery process. PMID:24312489

  20. Bio-Mechanical Model of the Brain for a Per-Operative Image-Guided Neuronavigator Compensating for "Brain-Shift" Deformations

    CERN Document Server

    Bucki, Marek; Payan, Yohan

    2007-01-01

    In this paper we present a methodology to address the problem of brain tissue deformation referred to as 'brain-shift'. This deformation occurs throughout a neurosurgery intervention and strongly alters the accuracy of the neuronavigation systems used to date in clinical routine which rely solely on pre-operative patient imaging to locate the surgical target, such as a tumour or a functional area. After a general description of the framework of our intra-operative image-guided system, we describe a procedure to generate patient specific finite element meshes of the brain and propose a biomechanical model which can take into account tissue deformations and surgical procedures that modify the brain structure, like tumour or tissue resection.

  1. Brain tumor modeling using the CRISPR/Cas9 system: state of the art and view to the future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Xiao-Yuan; Dai, Jin-Xiang; Zhou, Hong-Hao; Liu, Zhao-Qian; Jin, Wei-Lin

    2016-05-31

    Although brain tumors have been known tremendously over the past decade, there are still many problems to be solved. The etiology of brain tumors is not well understood and the treatment remains modest. There is in great need to develop a suitable brain tumor models that faithfully mirror the etiology of human brain neoplasm and subsequently get more efficient therapeutic approaches for these disorders. In this review, we described the current status of animal models of brain tumors and analyzed their advantages and disadvantages. Additionally, prokaryotic clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)/CRISPR-associated protein 9 (Cas9), a versatile genome editing technology for investigating the functions of target genes, and its application were also introduced in our present work. We firstly proposed that brain tumor modeling could be well established via CRISPR/Cas9 techniques. And CRISPR/Cas9-mediated brain tumor modeling was likely to be more suitable for figuring out the pathogenesis of brain tumors, as CRISPR/Cas9 platform was a simple and more efficient biological toolbox for implementing mutagenesis of oncogenes or tumor suppressors that were closely linked with brain tumors.

  2. The use of neurocomputational models as alternatives to animal models in the development of electrical brain stimulation treatments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beuter, Anne

    2017-05-01

    Recent publications call for more animal models to be used and more experiments to be performed, in order to better understand the mechanisms of neurodegenerative disorders, to improve human health, and to develop new brain stimulation treatments. In response to these calls, some limitations of the current animal models are examined by using Deep Brain Stimulation (DBS) in Parkinson's disease as an illustrative example. Without focusing on the arguments for or against animal experimentation, or on the history of DBS, the present paper argues that given recent technological and theoretical advances, the time has come to consider bioinspired computational modelling as a valid alternative to animal models, in order to design the next generation of human brain stimulation treatments. However, before computational neuroscience is fully integrated in the translational process and used as a substitute for animal models, several obstacles need to be overcome. These obstacles are examined in the context of institutional, financial, technological and behavioural lock-in. Recommendations include encouraging agreement to change long-term habitual practices, explaining what alternative models can achieve, considering economic stakes, simplifying administrative and regulatory constraints, and carefully examining possible conflicts of interest. 2017 FRAME.

  3. A numerical model for the study of photoacoustic imaging of brain tumours

    CERN Document Server

    Firouzi, Kamyar

    2015-01-01

    Photoacoustic imaging has shown great promise for medical imaging, where optical energy absorption by blood haemoglobin is used as the contrast mechanism. A numerical method was developed for the in-silico assessment of the photoacoustic image reconstruction of the brain. Image segmentation techniques were used to prepare a digital phantom from MR images. Light transport through brain tissue was modelled using a Finite Element approach. The resulting acoustic pressure was then estimated by pulsed photoacoustics considerations. The forward acoustic wave propagation was modelled by the linearized coupled first order wave equations and solved by an acoustic k-space method. Since skull bone is an elastic solid and strongly attenuates ultrasound (due to both scattering and absorption), a k-space method was developed for elastic media. To model scattering effects, a new approach was applied based on propagation in random media. In addition, absorption effects were incorporated using a power law. Finally, the acoust...

  4. Effect of glutathione on brain nitric oxide levels in an experimental epilepsy mouse model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Aylin Akcali; Sadrettin Pence; Naciye Kurtul; Mehmet Bosnak; Munife Neyal

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Oxidative stress plays an important role in the pathophysiology of epilepsy. Glutathione, known as one of the compounds of antioxidant defense, has been shown to inhibit convulsions. Nitric oxide has a proconvulsant effect on a pentylenetetrazole-induced animal model. OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the effects of glutathione administration on nitric oxide levels in brain regions of convulsive and kindling pentylenetetrazole-induced seizure models. DESIGN, TIME, AND SETTING: A randomized, controlled, animal experiment. The study was performed at the Department of Physiology, Gaziantep University and Department of Chemistry-Biochemistry, Kahramamaras Sutcu Imam University in 2006.MATERIALS: Pentylenetetrazole and glutathione were purchased from Sigma, USA. METHODS: A total of 80 mice were assigned to 8 groups (n=10): normal control, saline control (1 mL normal saline), convulsive pentylenetetrazole (single intraperitoneal administration of pentylenetetrazole, 60 mg/kg), convulsive pentylenetrazole plus glutathione (single administration of 60 mg/kg pentylenetetrazole and 200 mg/kg glutathione), five-dose glutathione (intraperitoneal injection of 200 mg/kg glutathione respectively at 1, 3, 5, 7, and 10 days), single-dose glutathione (single administration of 200 mg/kg glutathione), pentylenetetrazole kindling (intraperitoneal administration of pentylenetetrazole of 40 mg/kg at 1, 3, 5, 7, and 10 days), and pentylenetetrazole kindling plus glutathione group (intraperitoneal injection of 40 mg/kg pentylenetetrazole and 200 mg/kg glutathione respectively at 1, 3, 5, 7, and 10 days). MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: All mice were sacrificed 1 hour after the last administration. Brain nitric oxide levels were determined by spectrophotometry. RESULTS: There were no significant differences in nitric oxide levels between the normal control, saline control, five-dose glutathione, and single-dose glutathione groups (P>0.05). Nitric oxide levels in the cerebral hemisphere and

  5. Reconstruction of micron resolution mouse brain surface from large-scale imaging dataset using resampling-based variational model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jing; Quan, Tingwei; Li, Shiwei; Zhou, Hang; Luo, Qingming; Gong, Hui; Zeng, Shaoqun

    2015-08-06

    Brain surface profile is essential for brain studies, including registration, segmentation of brain structure and drawing neuronal circuits. Recent advances in high-throughput imaging techniques enable imaging whole mouse brain at micron spatial resolution and provide a basis for more fine quantitative studies in neuroscience. However, reconstructing micron resolution brain surface from newly produced neuronal dataset still faces challenges. Most current methods apply global analysis, which are neither applicable to a large imaging dataset nor to a brain surface with an inhomogeneous signal intensity. Here, we proposed a resampling-based variational model for this purpose. In this model, the movement directions of the initial boundary elements are fixed, the final positions of the initial boundary elements that form the brain surface are determined by the local signal intensity. These features assure an effective reconstruction of the brain surface from a new brain dataset. Compared with conventional typical methods, such as level set based method and active contour method, our method significantly increases the recall and precision rates above 97% and is approximately hundreds-fold faster. We demonstrated a fast reconstruction at micron level of the whole brain surface from a large dataset of hundreds of GB in size within 6 hours.

  6. Progressive brain damage, synaptic reorganization and NMDA activation in a model of epileptogenic cortical dysplasia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesca Colciaghi

    Full Text Available Whether severe epilepsy could be a progressive disorder remains as yet unresolved. We previously demonstrated in a rat model of acquired focal cortical dysplasia, the methylazoxymethanol/pilocarpine - MAM/pilocarpine - rats, that the occurrence of status epilepticus (SE and subsequent seizures fostered a pathologic process capable of modifying the morphology of cortical pyramidal neurons and NMDA receptor expression/localization. We have here extended our analysis by evaluating neocortical and hippocampal changes in MAM/pilocarpine rats at different epilepsy stages, from few days after onset up to six months of chronic epilepsy. Our findings indicate that the process triggered by SE and subsequent seizures in the malformed brain i is steadily progressive, deeply altering neocortical and hippocampal morphology, with atrophy of neocortex and CA regions and progressive increase of granule cell layer dispersion; ii changes dramatically the fine morphology of neurons in neocortex and hippocampus, by increasing cell size and decreasing both dendrite arborization and spine density; iii induces reorganization of glutamatergic and GABAergic networks in both neocortex and hippocampus, favoring excitatory vs inhibitory input; iv activates NMDA regulatory subunits. Taken together, our data indicate that, at least in experimental models of brain malformations, severe seizure activity, i.e., SE plus recurrent seizures, may lead to a widespread, steadily progressive architectural, neuronal and synaptic reorganization in the brain. They also suggest the mechanistic relevance of glutamate/NMDA hyper-activation in the seizure-related brain pathologic plasticity.

  7. Halofuginone Inhibits Angiogenesis and Growth in Implanted Metastatic Rat Brain Tumor Model-an MRI Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rinat Abramovitch

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available Tumor growth and metastasis depend on angiogenesis; therefore, efforts are made to develop specific angiogenic inhibitors. Halofuginone (HF is a potent inhibitor of collagen type α1(I. In solid tumor models, HF has a potent antitumor and antiangiogenic effect in vivo, but its effect on brain tumors has not yet been evaluated. By employing magnetic resonance imaging (MRI, we monitored the effect of HF on tumor progression and vascularization by utilizing an implanted malignant fibrous histiocytoma metastatic rat brain tumor model. Here we demonstrate that treatment with HF effectively and dose-dependently reduced tumor growth and angiogenesis. On day 13, HF-treated tumors were fivefold smaller than control (P < .001. Treatment with HF significantly prolonged survival of treated animals (142%; P = .001. In HF-treated rats, tumor vascularization was inhibited by 30% on day 13 and by 37% on day 19 (P < .05. Additionally, HF treatment inhibited vessel maturation (P = .03. Finally, in HF-treated rats, we noticed the appearance of a few clusters of satellite tumors, which were distinct from the primary tumor and usually contained vessel cores. This phenomenon was relatively moderate when compared to previous reports of other antiangiogenic agents used to treat brain tumors. We therefore conclude that HF is effective for treatment of metastatic brain tumors.

  8. Correlation of Brain Atrophy, Disability, and Spinal Cord Atrophy in a Murine Model of Multiple Sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paz Soldán, M Mateo; Raman, Mekala R; Gamez, Jeffrey D; Lohrey, Anne K; Chen, Yi; Pirko, Istvan; Johnson, Aaron J

    2015-01-01

    Disability progression in multiple sclerosis (MS) remains incompletely understood. Unlike lesional measures, central nervous system atrophy has a strong correlation with disability. Theiler's murine encephalomyelitis virus infection in SJL/J mice is an established model of progressive MS. We utilized in vivo MRI to quantify brain and spinal cord atrophy in this model and analyzed the temporal relationship between atrophy and disability. Infected and control mice were followed for 12 months. Disability was assessed periodically using rotarod assay. Volumetric MRI datasets were acquired at 7 Tesla. Ventricular volume and C4-5 spinal cord cross-sectional area measurements were performed using Analyze 10. At 3 months, brain atrophy reached statistical significance (P = .005). In contrast, disability did not differ until 4 months post-infection (P = .0005). Cord atrophy reached significance by 9 months (P = 0.009). By 12 months, brain atrophy resulted in 111.8% increased ventricular volume (P = .00003), while spinal cord cross-sectional area was 25.6% reduced (P = .001) among cases. Our results suggest that significant brain atrophy precedes and predicts the development of disability, while spinal cord atrophy occurs late and correlates with severe disability. The observed temporal relationship establishes a framework for mechanisms of disability progression and enables further investigations of their underlying substrate. Copyright © 2015 by the American Society of Neuroimaging.

  9. Using human brain imaging studies as a guide toward animal models of schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolkan, S S; Carvalho Poyraz, F; Kellendonk, C

    2016-05-03

    Schizophrenia is a heterogeneous and poorly understood mental disorder that is presently defined solely by its behavioral symptoms. Advances in genetic, epidemiological and brain imaging techniques in the past half century, however, have significantly advanced our understanding of the underlying biology of the disorder. In spite of these advances clinical research remains limited in its power to establish the causal relationships that link etiology with pathophysiology and symptoms. In this context, animal models provide an important tool for causally testing hypotheses about biological processes postulated to be disrupted in the disorder. While animal models can exploit a variety of entry points toward the study of schizophrenia, here we describe an approach that seeks to closely approximate functional alterations observed with brain imaging techniques in patients. By modeling these intermediate pathophysiological alterations in animals, this approach offers an opportunity to (1) tightly link a single functional brain abnormality with its behavioral consequences, and (2) to determine whether a single pathophysiology can causally produce alterations in other brain areas that have been described in patients. In this review we first summarize a selection of well-replicated biological abnormalities described in the schizophrenia literature. We then provide examples of animal models that were studied in the context of patient imaging findings describing enhanced striatal dopamine D2 receptor function, alterations in thalamo-prefrontal circuit function, and metabolic hyperfunction of the hippocampus. Lastly, we discuss the implications of findings from these animal models for our present understanding of schizophrenia, and consider key unanswered questions for future research in animal models and human patients.

  10. Prion Protein Deficiency Causes Diverse Proteome Shifts in Cell Models That Escape Detection in Brain Tissue.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohadeseh Mehrabian

    Full Text Available A popular method for studying the function of a given protein is to generate and characterize a suitable model deficient for its expression. For the prion protein (PrP, best known for its role in several invariably fatal neurodegenerative diseases, a natural choice, therefore, would be to undertake such studies with brain samples. We recently documented the surprising observation that PrP deficiency caused a loss or enhancement of NCAM1 polysialylation, dependent on the cell model used. To identify possible causes for this disparity, we set out to systematically investigate the consequence of PrP deficiency on the global proteome in brain tissue and in four distinct cell models. Here we report that PrP deficiency causes robust but surprisingly divergent changes to the global proteomes of cell models but has no discernible impact on the global brain proteome. Amongst >1,500 proteins whose levels were compared in wild-type and PrP-deficient models, members of the MARCKS protein family exhibited pronounced, yet cell model-dependent changes to their steady-state levels. Follow-up experiments revealed that PrP collaborates with members of the MARCKS protein family in its control of NCAM1 polysialylation. We conclude that the physiological function of PrP may be masked in analyses of complex brain samples but its cell-type specific influence on a lipid raft-based NCAM1-related cell biology comes to the fore in investigations of specific cell types.

  11. Using human brain imaging studies as a guide towards animal models of schizophrenia

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    BOLKAN, Scott S.; DE CARVALHO, Fernanda D.; KELLENDONK, Christoph

    2015-01-01

    Schizophrenia is a heterogeneous and poorly understood mental disorder that is presently defined solely by its behavioral symptoms. Advances in genetic, epidemiological and brain imaging techniques in the past half century, however, have significantly advanced our understanding of the underlying biology of the disorder. In spite of these advances clinical research remains limited in its power to establish the causal relationships that link etiology with pathophysiology and symptoms. In this context, animal models provide an important tool for causally testing hypotheses about biological processes postulated to be disrupted in the disorder. While animal models can exploit a variety of entry points towards the study of schizophrenia, here we describe an approach that seeks to closely approximate functional alterations observed with brain imaging techniques in patients. By modeling these intermediate pathophysiological alterations in animals, this approach offers an opportunity to (1) tightly link a single functional brain abnormality with its behavioral consequences, and (2) to determine whether a single pathophysiology can causally produce alterations in other brain areas that have been described in patients. In this review we first summarize a selection of well-replicated biological abnormalities described in the schizophrenia literature. We then provide examples of animal models that were studied in the context of patient imaging findings describing enhanced striatal dopamine D2 receptor function, alterations in thalamo-prefrontal circuit function, and metabolic hyperfunction of the hippocampus. Lastly, we discuss the implications of findings from these animal models for our present understanding of schizophrenia, and consider key unanswered questions for future research in animal models and human patients. PMID:26037801

  12. Evaluation of an intraoperative ultrasound training model based on a cadaveric sheep brain

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    Jan Vavruska

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The present study evaluates the effectiveness of an ultrasound (US practice course based on a sheep brain cadaver. Neurosurgical education is considerably restrained following patient safety objections and work time restrictions. It is therefore of vital importance to offer residents an opportunity to practice certain US techniques in a controlled environment without ethical or legal restrictions. We developed an US training model based on a sheep brain cadaver in order to demonstrate the feasibility of such a model, facilitate crucial anatomic knowledge, and demonstrate a learning curve from it. Methods: Over the course of 2 months from December 2012-January 2013, a total of 13 residents took part in a three part training session, each consisting of 20-30 min of individual US-training and performance evaluation based on a biological phantom. The first cadaver was a physiologic sheep brain. After initial familiarization with the US, the residents performed an US on a second cadaveric brain and tried to find a 0.5 cm big (in diameter echogenic structure. In a third brain they were asked to identify a cyst (Fogarty catheter filled with water. Results: Thirteen neurosurgical residents participated in the study. After the first training session, the learning curve improved significantly in the second and the third session. The ability to actuate the US device, the time needed to display crucial anatomic landmarks, and to locate the two different artificial masses increased, and respectively decreased remarkably by up to 80%. Conclusion: After 2 months and three training sessions, the handling of the US from the residents was excellent in the operating room. The accuracy and the dexterity in use of the US improved significantly. The participants found the model to be realistic and agreed on the need for further promotion of such courses.

  13. Application of radiosurgical techniques to produce a primate model of brain lesions

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    Jun eKunimatsu

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Behavioral analysis of subjects with discrete brain lesions provides important information about the mechanisms of various brain functions. However, it is generally difficult to experimentally produce discrete lesions in deep brain structures. Here we show that a radiosurgical technique, which is used as an alternative treatment for brain tumors and vascular malformations, is applicable to create non-invasive lesions in experimental animals for the research in systems neuroscience. We delivered highly focused radiation (130–150 Gy at ISO center to the frontal eye field of macaque monkeys using a clinical linear accelerator (LINAC. The effects of irradiation were assessed by analyzing oculomotor performance along with magnetic resonance (MR images before and up to 8 months following irradiation. In parallel with tissue edema indicated by MR images, deficits in saccadic and smooth pursuit eye movements were observed during several days following irradiation. Although initial signs of oculomotor deficits disappeared within a month, damage to the tissue and impaired eye movements gradually developed during the course of the subsequent 6 months. Postmortem histological examinations showed necrosis and hemorrhages within a large area of the white matter and, to a lesser extent, in the adjacent gray matter, which was centered at the irradiated target. These results indicated that the LINAC system was useful for making brain lesions in experimental animals, while the suitable radiation parameters to generate more focused lesions need to be further explored. We propose the use of a radiosurgical technique for establishing animal models of brain lesions, and discuss the possible uses of this technique for functional neurosurgical treatments in humans.

  14. Glucocorticoids Protect Neonatal Rat Brain in Model of Hypoxic-Ischemic Encephalopathy (HIE)

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    Harding, Benjamin; Conception, Katherine; Li, Yong; Zhang, Lubo

    2016-01-01

    Hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy (HIE) resulting from asphyxia in the peripartum period is the most common cause of neonatal brain damage and can result in significant neurologic sequelae, including cerebral palsy. Currently therapeutic hypothermia is the only accepted treatment in addition to supportive care for infants with HIE, however, many additional neuroprotective therapies have been investigated. Of these, glucocorticoids have previously been shown to have neuroprotective effects. HIE is also frequently compounded by infectious inflammatory processes (sepsis) and as such, the infants may be more amenable to treatment with an anti-inflammatory agent. Thus, the present study investigated dexamethasone and hydrocortisone treatment given after hypoxic-ischemic (HI) insult in neonatal rats via intracerebroventricular (ICV) injection and intranasal administration. In addition, we examined the effects of hydrocortisone treatment in HIE after lipopolysaccharide (LPS) sensitization in a model of HIE and sepsis. We found that dexamethasone significantly reduced rat brain infarction size when given after HI treatment via ICV injection; however it did not demonstrate any neuroprotective effects when given intranasally. Hydrocortisone after HI insult also significantly reduced brain infarction size when given via ICV injection; and the intranasal administration showed to be protective of brain injury in male rats at a dose of 300 µg. LPS sensitization did significantly increase the brain infarction size compared to controls, and hydrocortisone treatment after LPS sensitization showed a significant decrease in brain infarction size when given via ICV injection, as well as intranasal administration in both genders at a dose of 300 µg. To conclude, these results show that glucocorticoids have significant neuroprotective effects when given after HI injury and that these effects may be even more pronounced when given in circumstances of additional inflammatory injury, such

  15. Luria’s model of the functional units of the brain and the neuropsychology of dreaming

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    Téllez A.

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Traditionally, neuropsychology has focused on identifying the brain mechanisms of specific psychological processes, such as attention, motor skills, perception, memory, language, and consciousness, as well as their corresponding disorders. However, there are psychological processes that have received little attention in this field, such as dreaming. This study examined the clinical and experimental neuropsychological research relevant to dreaming, ranging from sleep disorders in patients with brain damage, to brain functioning during REM sleep, using different methods of brain imaging. These findings were analyzed within the framework of Luria’s Three Functional Unit Model of the Brain, and a proposal was made to explain certain of the essential characteristics of dreaming. This explanation describes how, during dreaming, an activation of the First Functional Unit occurs, comprising the reticular formation of the brainstem; this activates, in turn, the Second Functional Unit — which is formed by the parietal, occipital, and temporal lobes and Unit L, which is comprised of the limbic system, as well as simultaneous hypo-functioning of the Third Functional Unit (frontal lobe. This activity produces a perception of hallucinatory images of various sensory modes, as well as a lack of inhibition, a non-selfreflexive thought process, and a lack of planning and direction of such oneiric images. Dreaming is considered a type of natural confabulation, similar to the one that occurs in patients with frontal lobe damage or schizophrenia. The study also suggests that the confabulatory, bizarre, and impulsive nature of dreaming has a function in the cognitiveemotional homeostasis that aids proper brain function throughout the day.

  16. Oral administration of sitagliptin activates CREB and is neuroprotective in murine model of brain trauma

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    Brian Dellavalle

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Traumatic brain injury is a major cause of mortality and morbidity. We have previously shown that the injectable glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1 analogue, liraglutide, significantly improved the outcome in mice after severe traumatic brain injury (TBI. In this study we are interested in the effects of oral treatment of a different class of GLP-1 based therapy, dipeptidyl peptidase IV (DPP-IV inhibition on mice after TBI. DPP-IV inhibitors reduce the degradation of endogenous GLP-1 and extend circulation of this protective peptide in the bloodstream. This class has yet to be investigated as a potential therapy for TBI. Methods: Mice were administrated once-daily 50 mg/kg of sitagliptin in a Nutella® ball or Nutella® alone throughout the study, beginning two days before severe trauma was induced with a stereotactic cryo-lesion. At two days post trauma, lesion size was determined. Brains were isolated for immunoblotting for assessment of selected biomarkers for pathology and protection.Results: Sitagliptin treatment reduced lesion size at day 2 post-injury by ~28% (p0.05. Conversely, apoptotic tone (alpha-spectrin fragmentation, Bcl-2 levels and the neuroinflammatory markers IL-6, and Iba-1 were not affected by treatment.Conclusions: This study shows, for the first time, that DPP-IV inhibition ameliorates both anatomical and biochemical consequences of TBI and activates CREB in the brain. Moreover, this work supports previous studies suggesting that the effect of GLP-1 analogues in models of brain damage relates to GLP-1 receptor stimulation in a dose-dependent manner.Keywords: GLP-1, Traumatic Brain Injury, TBI, sitagliptin, liraglutide, CREB, Oxidative Stress, GIP, DPP-IV, DPP-4

  17. Negative correlation of CD34+ cells with blood-brain barrier permeability following traumatic brain injury in a rat model.

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    Jin, Xuelong; Wang, Feifei; Liu, Xingju; Liang, Bin; Chen, Zequn; He, Junfeng; Zhang, Hong; Zhang, Jianning

    2014-11-01

    TBI causes localized cerebral ischemia that, in turn, is accompanied by both changes in BBB permeability and recruitment of CD34(+) cells to the injured tissue. However, it remains unknown whether CD34(+) cell recruitment is linked to BBB permeability. This study is a preliminary investigation into possible correlations between CD34(+) cell recruitment and BBB permeability following TBI in a rat model. Male SD rats were subjected to mild fluid percussion injury. BBB permeability was assessed by measuring extrinsic EB dye extravasation and endogenous EBA expression at days 1, 3, 5, 7, and 12 post injury. The number of CD34(+) cells in the damaged tissue was analyzed by immunohistochemistry at each time point. EB dye extravasation reached a peak at day 3 following TBI, while EBA expression displayed the reverse profile. Accumulation of CD34(+) cells in injured brain tissue was evident at five days post injury. It revealed a negative linear correlation between CD34(+) cell and BBB permeability. The negative linear correlation between CD34(+) cell recruitment and BBB permeability following TBI provides a support for further study of CD34(+) cell transplantation for BBB repair after TBI. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. Development of prognostic models for patients with traumatic brain injury: a systematic review.

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    Gao, Jinxi; Zheng, Zhaocong

    2015-01-01

    Outcome prediction following traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a widely investigated field of research. Several outcome prediction models have been developed for prognosis after TBI. There are two main prognostic models: International Mission for Prognosis and Clinical Trials in Traumatic Brain Injury (IMPACT) prognosis calculator and the Corticosteroid Randomization after Significant Head Injury (CRASH) prognosis calculator. The prognosis model has three or four levels: (1) model A included age, motor GCS, and pupil reactivity; (2) model B included predictors from model A with CT characteristics; and (3) model C included predictors from model B with laboratory parameters. In consideration of the fact that interventions after admission, such as ICP management also have prognostic value for outcome predictions and may improve the models' performance, Yuan F et al developed another prediction model (model D) which includes ICP. With the development of molecular biology, a handful of brain injury biomarkers were reported that may improve the predictive power of prognostic models, including neuron-specific enolase (NSE), glial fibrillary acid protein (GFAP), S-100β protein, tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α), interleukin-6 (IL-6), myelin basic protein (MBP), cleaved tau protein (C-tau), spectrin breakdown products (SBDPs), and ubiquitin C-terminal hydrolase-L1 (UCH-L1), and sex hormones. A total of 40 manuscripts reporting 11 biomarkers were identified in the literature. Many substances have been implicated as potential biomarkers for TBI; however, no single biomarker has shown the necessary sensitivity and specificity for predicting outcome. The limited number of publications in this field underscores the need for further investigation. Through fluid biomarker analysis, the advent of multi-analyte profiling technology has enabled substantial advances in the diagnosis and treatment of a variety of conditions. Application of this technology to create a bio

  19. The application of a mathematical model linking structural and functional connectomes in severe brain injury

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    A. Kuceyeski

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Following severe injuries that result in disorders of consciousness, recovery can occur over many months or years post-injury. While post-injury synaptogenesis, axonal sprouting and functional reorganization are known to occur, the network-level processes underlying recovery are poorly understood. Here, we test a network-level functional rerouting hypothesis in recovery of patients with disorders of consciousness following severe brain injury. This hypothesis states that the brain recovers from injury by restoring normal functional connections via alternate structural pathways that circumvent impaired white matter connections. The so-called network diffusion model, which relates an individual's structural and functional connectomes by assuming that functional activation diffuses along structural pathways, is used here to capture this functional rerouting. We jointly examined functional and structural connectomes extracted from MRIs of 12 healthy and 16 brain-injured subjects. Connectome properties were quantified via graph theoretic measures and network diffusion model parameters. While a few graph metrics showed groupwise differences, they did not correlate with patients' level of consciousness as measured by the Coma Recovery Scale — Revised. There was, however, a strong and significant partial Pearson's correlation (accounting for age and years post-injury between level of consciousness and network diffusion model propagation time (r = 0.76, p < 0.05, corrected, i.e. the time functional activation spends traversing the structural network. We concluded that functional rerouting via alternate (and less efficient pathways leads to increases in network diffusion model propagation time. Simulations of injury and recovery in healthy connectomes confirmed these results. This work establishes the feasibility for using the network diffusion model to capture network-level mechanisms in recovery of consciousness after severe brain injury.

  20. A mathematical model of endovascular heat transfer for human brain cooling

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    Salsac, Anne-Virginie; Lasheras, Juan Carlos; Yon, Steven; Magers, Mike; Dobak, John

    2000-11-01

    Selective cooling of the brain has been shown to exhibit protective effects in cerebral ischemia, trauma, and spinal injury/ischemia. A multi-compartment, unsteady thermal model of the response of the human brain to endovascular cooling is discussed and its results compared to recent experimental data conducted with sheep and other mammals. The model formulation is based on the extension of the bioheat equation, originally proposed by Pennes(1) and later modified by Wissler(2), Stolwijk(3) and Werner and Webb(4). The temporal response of the brain temperature and that of the various body compartments to the cooling of the blood flowing through the common carotid artery is calculated under various scenarios. The effect of the boundary conditions as well as the closure assumptions used in the model, i.e. perfusion rate, metabolism heat production, etc. on the cooling rate of the brain are systematically investigated. (1) Pennes H. H., “Analysis of tissue and arterial blood temperature in the resting forearm.” J. Appl. Physiol. 1: 93-122, 1948. (2) Wissler E. H., “Steady-state temperature distribution in man”, J. Appl. Physiol., 16: 764-740, 1961. (3) Stolwick J. A. J., “Mathematical model of thermoregulation” in “Physiological and behavioral temperature regulation”, edited by J. D. Hardy, A. P. Gagge and A. J. Stolwijk, Charles C. Thomas Publisher, Springfiels, Ill., 703-721, 1971. (4) Werner J., Webb P., “A six-cylinder model of human thermoregulation for general use on personal computers”, Ann. Physiol. Anthrop., 12(3): 123-134, 1993.

  1. Through the Immune Looking Glass: A Model for Brain Memory Strategies.

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    Sánchez-Ramón, Silvia; Faure, Florence

    2016-01-01

    The immune system (IS) and the central nervous system (CNS) are complex cognitive networks involved in defining the identity (self) of the individual through recognition and memory processes that enable one to anticipate responses to stimuli. Brain memory has traditionally been classified as either implicit or explicit on psychological and anatomical grounds, with reminiscences of the evolutionarily-based innate-adaptive IS responses. Beyond the multineuronal networks of the CNS, we propose a theoretical model of brain memory integrating the CNS as a whole. This is achieved by analogical reasoning between the operational rules of recognition and memory processes in both systems, coupled to an evolutionary analysis. In this new model, the hippocampus is no longer specifically ascribed to explicit memory but rather it both becomes part of the innate (implicit) memory system and tightly controls the explicit memory system. Alike the antigen presenting cells for the IS, the hippocampus would integrate transient and pseudo-specific (i.e., danger-fear) memories and would drive the formation of long-term and highly specific or explicit memories (i.e., the taste of the Proust's madeleine cake) by the more complex and recent, evolutionarily speaking, neocortex. Experimental and clinical evidence is provided to support the model. We believe that the singularity of this model's approximation could help to gain a better understanding of the mechanisms operating in brain memory strategies from a large-scale network perspective.

  2. Experimental study of blast-induced traumatic brain injury using a physical head model.

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    Zhang, Jiangyue; Pintar, Frank A; Yoganandan, Narayan; Gennarelli, Thomas A; Son, Steven F

    2009-11-01

    This study was conducted to quantify intracranial biomechanical responses and external blast overpressures using physical head model to understand the biomechanics of blast traumatic brain injury and to provide experimental data for computer simulation of blast-induced brain trauma. Ellipsoidal-shaped physical head models, made from 3-mm polycarbonate shell filled with Sylgard 527 silicon gel, were used. Six blast tests were conducted in frontal, side, and 45 degrees oblique orientations. External blast overpressures and internal pressures were quantified with ballistic pressure sensors. Blast overpressures, ranging from 129.5 kPa to 769.3 kPa, were generated using a rigid cannon and 1.3 to 3.0 grams of pentaerythritol tetranitrate (PETN) plastic sheet explosive (explosive yield of 13.24 kJ and TNT equivalent mass of 2.87 grams for 3 grams of material). The PETN plastic sheet explosive consisted of 63% PETN powder, 29% plasticizer, and 8% nitrocellulose with a density of 1.48 g/cm3 and detonation velocity of 6.8 km/s. Propagation and reflection of the shockwave was captured using a shadowgraph technique. Shockwave speeds ranging from 423.3 m/s to 680.3 m/s were recorded. The model demonstrated a two-stage response: a pressure dominant (overpressure) stage followed by kinematic dominant (blast wind) stage. Positive pressures in the brain simulant ranged from 75.1 kPa to 1095 kPa, and negative pressures ranged from -43.6 kPa to -646.0 kPa. High- and normal-speed videos did not reveal observable deformations in the brain simulant from the neutral density markers embedded in the midsagittal plane of the head model. Amplitudes of the internal positive and negative pressures were found to linearly correlate with external overpressure. Results from the current study suggested a pressure-dominant brain injury mechanism instead of strain injury mechanism under the blast severity of the current study. These quantitative results also served as the validation and calibration

  3. Large-scale modeling - a tool for conquering the complexity of the brain

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    Mikael Djurfeldt

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Is there any hope of achieving a thorough understanding of higher functions such as perception, memory, thought and emotion or is the stunning complexity of the brain a barrier which will limit such efforts for the foreseeable future? In this perspective we discuss methods to handle complexity, approaches to model building, and point to detailed large-scale models as a new contribution to the toolbox of the computational neuroscientist. We elucidate some aspects which distinguishes large-scale models and some of the technological challenges which they entail.

  4. Application of non-linear control theory to a model of deep brain stimulation.

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    Davidson, Clare M; Lowery, Madeleine M; de Paor, Annraoi M

    2011-01-01

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) effectively alleviates the pathological neural activity associated with Parkinson's disease. Its exact mode of action is not entirely understood. This paper explores theoretically the optimum stimulation parameters necessary to quench oscillations in a neural-mass type model with second order dynamics. This model applies well established nonlinear control system theory to DBS. The analysis here determines the minimum criteria in terms of amplitude and pulse duration of stimulation, necessary to quench the unwanted oscillations in a closed loop system, and outlines the relationship between this model and the actual physiological system.

  5. Group-ICA model order highlights patterns of functional brain connectivity

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    Ahmed eAbou Elseoud

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Resting-state networks (RSNs can be reliably and reproducibly detected using independent component analysis (ICA at both individual subject and group levels. Altering ICA dimensionality (model order estimation can have a significant impact on the spatial characteristics of the RSNs as well as their parcellation into sub-networks. Recent evidence from several neuroimaging studies suggests that the human brain has a modular hierarchical organization which resembles the hierarchy depicted by different ICA model orders. We hypothesized that functional connectivity between-group differences measured with ICA might be affected by model order selection. We investigated differences in functional connectivity using so-called dual-regression as a function of ICA model order in a group of unmedicated seasonal affective disorder (SAD patients compared to normal healthy controls. The results showed that the detected disease-related differences in functional connectivity alter as a function of ICA model order. The volume of between-group differences altered significantly as a function of ICA model order reaching maximum at model order 70 (which seems to be an optimal point that conveys the largest between-group difference then stabilized afterwards. Our results show that fine-grained RSNs enable better detection of detailed disease-related functional connectivity changes. However, high model orders show an increased risk of false positives that needs to be overcome. Our findings suggest that multilevel ICA exploration of functional connectivity enables optimization of sensitivity to brain disorders.

  6. Simulating Radiotherapy Effect in High-Grade Glioma by Using Diffusive Modeling and Brain Atlases

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    Alexandros Roniotis

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Applying diffusive models for simulating the spatiotemporal change of concentration of tumour cells is a modern application of predictive oncology. Diffusive models are used for modelling glioblastoma, the most aggressive type of glioma. This paper presents the results of applying a linear quadratic model for simulating the effects of radiotherapy on an advanced diffusive glioma model. This diffusive model takes into consideration the heterogeneous velocity of glioma in gray and white matter and the anisotropic migration of tumor cells, which is facilitated along white fibers. This work uses normal brain atlases for extracting the proportions of white and gray matter and the diffusion tensors used for anisotropy. The paper also presents the results of applying this glioma model on real clinical datasets.

  7. The effects of ultrasound on BBB integration in ischemic brain injury model

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    Shuaib A.

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Ultrasound (US has been used in neuroprotection after cerebral ischemia, however the mechanism of action remains unclearly. We have previously shown the protective effect of ultrasound on infarction volume and brain edema in ischemic brain injured at normothermic condition. Ultrasound may also amplify the effect of fibrinolytic medications in thrombolysis process .We have also shown that hyperthermia can exacerbate cerebral ischemic injury and that the efficacy of tissue plasminogen activator (tPA is reduced in the presence of hyperthermia. In this study, the effects of US alone or in combination with tPA on brain ischemic injury were evaluated.Methods: Focal ischemic brain injury was induced by emblazing a pre-formed clot into the middle cerebral artery in rats. Principally, we examined whether US can reduce the perfusion deficits and, the damage of blood- brain barrier (BBB in the ischemic injured brain. There are two series of experiments at this study .in the first series, animals were randomly assigned to four groups (n=7 per group as follows: 1-control (saline, 2-US (1W/cm2, 10 duty cycle , 3- US+high- tPA (1W/cm2, 10 duty cycle +20 mg/kg and 4- high -tPA (20 mg/kg. We also examined the effects of US and tPA on BBB integrity after ischemic injury. The animals were assigned into four groups (n=7 per group, treatment is the same as above. BBB permeability was assessed by the Evans blue (EB extravasations method at 8 h after MCA occlusion. BBB permeability was evaluated by fluorescent detection of extravagated Evans blue dye and Perfusion deficits were analyzed using an Evans blue staining procedure. The perfused microvessels in the brain were visualized using fluorescent microscopy. Areas of perfusion deficits in the brain were traced, calculated and expressed in mm2.Results: The results showed that US improved neurological deficits significantly (p<0.05. The administration of US significantly decreased perfusion deficits and BBB

  8. Hierarchical statistical shape models of multiobject anatomical structures: application to brain MRI.

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    Cerrolaza, Juan J; Villanueva, Arantxa; Cabeza, Rafael

    2012-03-01

    The accurate segmentation of subcortical brain structures in magnetic resonance (MR) images is of crucial importance in the interdisciplinary field of medical imaging. Although statistical approaches such as active shape models (ASMs) have proven to be particularly useful in the modeling of multiobject shapes, they are inefficient when facing challenging problems. Based on the wavelet transform, the fully generic multiresolution framework presented in this paper allows us to decompose the interobject relationships into different levels of detail. The aim of this hierarchical decomposition is twofold: to efficiently characterize the relationships between objects and their particular localities. Experiments performed on an eight-object structure defined in axial cross sectional MR brain images show that the new hierarchical segmentation significantly improves the accuracy of the segmentation, and while it exhibits a remarkable robustness with respect to the size of the training set.

  9. Immediate Remote Ischemic Postconditioning Reduces Brain Nitrotyrosine Formation in a Piglet Asphyxia Model.

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    Rocha-Ferreira, Eridan; Rudge, Brogan; Hughes, Michael P; Rahim, Ahad A; Hristova, Mariya; Robertson, Nicola J

    2016-01-01

    Remote ischemic postconditioning (RIPostC) is a promising therapeutic intervention that could be administered as an alternative to cooling in cases of perinatal hypoxia-ischemia (HI). In the current study we hypothesized that RIPostC in the piglet model of birth asphyxia confers protection by reducing nitrosative stress and subsequent nitrotyrosine formation, as well as having an effect on glial immunoreactivity. Postnatal day 1 (P1) piglets underwent HI brain injury and were randomised to HI (control) or HI + RIPostC. Immunohistochemistry assessment 48 hours after HI revealed a significant decrease in brain nitrotyrosine deposits in the RIPostC-treated group (p = 0.02). This was accompanied by a significant increase in eNOS expression (p piglet model of neonatal asphyxia, which appears to be mediated by modulation of nitrosative stress, despite glial activation.

  10. Differential Temporal Evolution Patterns in Brain Temperature in Different Ischemic Tissues in a Monkey Model of Middle Cerebral Artery Occlusion

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    Zhihua Sun

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Brain temperature is elevated in acute ischemic stroke, especially in the ischemic penumbra (IP. We attempted to investigate the dynamic evolution of brain temperature in different ischemic regions in a monkey model of middle cerebral artery occlusion. The brain temperature of different ischemic regions was measured with proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy (1H MRS, and the evolution processes of brain temperature were compared among different ischemic regions. We found that the normal (baseline brain temperature of the monkey brain was 37.16°C. In the artery occlusion stage, the mean brain temperature of ischemic tissue was 1.16°C higher than the baseline; however, this increase was region dependent, with 1.72°C in the IP, 1.08°C in the infarct core, and 0.62°C in the oligemic region. After recanalization, the brain temperature of the infarct core showed a pattern of an initial decrease accompanied by a subsequent increase. However, the brain temperature of the IP and oligemic region showed a monotonously and slowly decreased pattern. Our study suggests that in vivo measurement of brain temperature could help to identify whether ischemic tissue survives.

  11. Selectionist models of perceptual and motor systems and implications for functionalist theories of brain function

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    Reeke, George N.; Sporns, Olaf

    1990-06-01

    Functionalism is at present widely accepted as a working basis for cognitive science and artificial intelligence. This view holds that psychological phenomena can be adequately described in terms of functional processes carried out in the brain, and that these processes can be understood independently of the detailed structure and mode of development of the brain. In the functionalist view, the brain is analogous to a computer; both can properly be described at the level of symbolic representations and algorithms. However, an analysis of the structure, development, and evolution of the brain makes it highly unlikely that it could be a Turing machine or that brain algorithms could be either acquired by experience in the world or transmitted between generations. An alternative view is that the brain is a selective system in which two different domains of stochastic variation, the world and neural repertoires, become mapped onto each other in an individual, historical manner. Neural systems capable of such mapping can generalize and can deal with novelty in an open-ended environment. Several models have been constructed to test these ideas, including automata of a new kind that can recognize and associate patterns of sensory input by selective mechanisms. In an approach called synthetic neural modelling, the environment, the phenotype, and the nervous system of such an automaton are integrated into a single computer model. One example is Darwin III, a sessile “creature” with an eye and a multi-jointed arm having a sense of touch; its environment consists of simple shapes moving on a featureless background; its nervous system consists of some 50 000 cells of 50 different kinds connected by about 620 000 synaptic junctions. Darwin III can be trained to track moving objects with its eye, to reach out and touch objects with its arm, to categorize objects according to combinations of visual and tactile cues, and to respond in a positive or negative way to such objects

  12. A neuroanatomically grounded Hebbian-learning model of attention-language interactions in the human brain.

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    Garagnani, Max; Wennekers, Thomas; Pulvermüller, Friedemann

    2008-01-01

    Meaningful familiar stimuli and senseless unknown materials lead to different patterns of brain activation. A late major neurophysiological response indexing 'sense' is the negative component of event-related potential peaking at around 400 ms (N400), an event-related potential that emerges in attention-demanding tasks and is larger for senseless materials (e.g. meaningless pseudowords) than for matched meaningful stimuli (words). However, the mismatch negativity (latency 100-250 ms), an early automatic brain response elicited under distraction, is larger to words than to pseudowords, thus exhibiting the opposite pattern to that seen for the N400. So far, no theoretical account has been able to reconcile and explain these findings by means of a single, mechanistic neural model. We implemented a neuroanatomically grounded neural network model of the left perisylvian language cortex and simulated: (i) brain processes of early language acquisition and (ii) cortical responses to familiar word and senseless pseudoword stimuli. We found that variation of the area-specific inhibition (the model correlate of attention) modulated the simulated brain response to words and pseudowords, producing either an N400- or a mismatch negativity-like response depending on the amount of inhibition (i.e. available attentional resources). Our model: (i) provides a unifying explanatory account, at cortical level, of experimental observations that, so far, had not been given a coherent interpretation within a single framework; (ii) demonstrates the viability of purely Hebbian, associative learning in a multilayered neural network architecture; and (iii) makes clear predictions on the effects of attention on latency and magnitude of event-related potentials to lexical items. Such predictions have been confirmed by recent experimental evidence.

  13. A Natural Language Processing-based Model to Automate MRI Brain Protocol Selection and Prioritization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Andrew D; Marotta, Thomas R

    2017-02-01

    Incorrect imaging protocol selection can contribute to increased healthcare cost and waste. To help healthcare providers improve the quality and safety of medical imaging services, we developed and evaluated three natural language processing (NLP) models to determine whether NLP techniques could be employed to aid in clinical decision support for protocoling and prioritization of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) brain examinations. To test the feasibility of using an NLP model to support clinical decision making for MRI brain examinations, we designed three different medical imaging prediction tasks, each with a unique outcome: selecting an examination protocol, evaluating the need for contrast administration, and determining priority. We created three models for each prediction task, each using a different classification algorithm-random forest, support vector machine, or k-nearest neighbor-to predict outcomes based on the narrative clinical indications and demographic data associated with 13,982 MRI brain examinations performed from January 1, 2013 to June 30, 2015. Test datasets were used to calculate the accuracy, sensitivity and specificity, predictive values, and the area under the curve. Our optimal results show an accuracy of 82.9%, 83.0%, and 88.2% for the protocol selection, contrast administration, and prioritization tasks, respectively, demonstrating that predictive algorithms can be used to aid in clinical decision support for examination protocoling. NLP models developed from the narrative clinical information provided by referring clinicians and demographic data are feasible methods to predict the protocol and priority of MRI brain examinations. Copyright © 2017 The Association of University Radiologists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Traumatic brain injury in the rat: characterization of a lateral fluid-percussion model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McIntosh, T K; Vink, R; Noble, L; Yamakami, I; Fernyak, S; Soares, H; Faden, A L

    1989-01-01

    Experimental fluid-percussion models produce brain injury by rapidly injecting saline into the closed cranium. In the present study we characterize the physiological, histopathological and neurological responses to mechanical brain injury in the rat produced by lateral fluid-percussion injury of graded severity. Physiological experiments (n = 105) demonstrated that all levels of injury produced an acute and transient systemic hypertension and bradycardia. Acute hypertension followed by significant hypotension occurred at higher magnitudes of injury. Post-injury suppression of electroencephalographic amplitude was related to the severity of injury. An increase in slow wave (delta/theta) electroencephalographic activity with a concomitant decrease in alpha/beta electroencephalographic activity were observed only at moderate and high magnitude of injury and were correlated with a worsened neurological outcome (r = 0.84; P less than 0.05) and increased mortality (r = 0.66; P less than 0.05). Alterations in brainstem auditory-evoked potentials were also observed only at the higher levels of injury. Histopathological analysis revealed that the extent of post-injury hemorrhage, cavitation and vascular disruption (as measured by extravasation of Evans Blue dye) was greater at the higher magnitudes of injury. Neurological scoring performed over a 4-week post-injury period demonstrated that lateral fluid-percussion brain injury produces a chronic neurological deficit that is directly related to the severity of injury. Survival was also significantly reduced at the higher magnitudes of injury. These data demonstrate that the lateral model of fluid-percussion injury in the rat reproduces many of the features of head injury observed in other models and species and may therefore be a useful experimental model for the study of the pathophysiology of traumatic brain injury.

  15. Imagine all the people: how the brain creates and uses personality models to predict behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassabis, Demis; Spreng, R Nathan; Rusu, Andrei A; Robbins, Clifford A; Mar, Raymond A; Schacter, Daniel L

    2014-08-01

    The behaviors of other people are often central to envisioning the future. The ability to accurately predict the thoughts and actions of others is essential for successful social interactions, with far-reaching consequences. Despite its importance, little is known about how the brain represents people in order to predict behavior. In this functional magnetic resonance imaging study, participants learned the unique personality of 4 protagonists and imagined how each would behave in different scenarios. The protagonists' personalities were composed of 2 traits: Agreeableness and Extraversion. Which protagonist was being imagined was accurately inferred based solely on activity patterns in the medial prefrontal cortex using multivariate pattern classification, providing novel evidence that brain activity can reveal whom someone is thinking about. Lateral temporal and posterior cingulate cortex discriminated between different degrees of agreeableness and extraversion, respectively. Functional connectivity analysis confirmed that regions associated with trait-processing and individual identities were functionally coupled. Activity during the imagination task, and revealed by functional connectivity, was consistent with the default network. Our results suggest that distinct regions code for personality traits, and that the brain combines these traits to represent individuals. The brain then uses this "personality model" to predict the behavior of others in novel situations.

  16. Novel active contour model based on multi-variate local Gaussian distribution for local segmentation of MR brain images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Qiang; Li, Honglun; Fan, Baode; Wu, Shuanhu; Xu, Jindong

    2017-09-01

    Active contour model (ACM) has been one of the most widely utilized methods in magnetic resonance (MR) brain image segmentation because of its ability of capturing topology changes. However, most of the existing ACMs only consider single-slice information in MR brain image data, i.e., the information used in ACMs based segmentation method is extracted only from one slice of MR brain image, which cannot take full advantage of the adjacent slice images' information, and cannot satisfy the local segmentation of MR brain images. In this paper, a novel ACM is proposed to solve the problem discussed above, which is based on multi-variate local Gaussian distribution and combines the adjacent slice images' information in MR brain image data to satisfy segmentation. The segmentation is finally achieved through maximizing the likelihood estimation. Experiments demonstrate the advantages of the proposed ACM over the single-slice ACM in local segmentation of MR brain image series.

  17. Interplay between pro-inflammatory cytokines and brain oxidative stress biomarkers: evidence of parallels between butyl paraben intoxication and the valproic acid brain physiopathology in autism rat model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hegazy, Hoda G; Ali, Elham H A; Elgoly, Amany H Mahmoud

    2015-02-01

    Butyl paraben is a preservative used in food, drugs and cosmetics. Neurotoxic effect was reported recently beside the potential estrogenic activity of parabens. There is controversy as to the potential harmful effects of butyl parabens, which are suspected to contribute to autism and learning disabilities. The purpose of this study was to examine the similarities between paraben intoxication signs in the rat brain and brain markers in an autistic like rat model. This study provides evidence of many parallels between the two, including (1) oxidative stress, (2) decreased reduced glutathione levels and elevated oxidised glutathione, (3) mitochondrial dysfunction, and (4) neuroinflammation and increased pro-inflammatory cytokine levels in the brain (tumour necrosis factor-alpha, interleukin-1-beta, and interleukin-6). (5) Increased protein oxidation reported by a significant increase in 3-nitrotyrosine (3-NT)/tyrosine ratio. (6) A marked disturbance was found in the production of energy carriers (AMP, ATP and AMP/ATP ratio) in comparison with the control. The evidence suggests that paraben may, to some extent, either cause or contribute to the brain physiopathology in ASDs or pathogens that produce the brain pathology observed in the diagnosed rat model of ASD.

  18. Plasmalemmal Vesicle Associated Protein-1 (PV-1 is a marker of blood-brain barrier disruption in rodent models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Zarina S

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Plasmalemmal vesicle associated protein-1 (PV-1 is selectively expressed in human brain microvascular endothelial cells derived from clinical specimens of primary and secondary malignant brain tumors, cerebral ischemia, and other central nervous system (CNS diseases associated with blood-brain barrier breakdown. In this study, we characterize the murine CNS expression pattern of PV-1 to determine whether localized PV-1 induction is conserved across species and disease state. Results We demonstrate that PV-1 is selectively upregulated in mouse blood vessels recruited by brain tumor xenografts at the RNA and protein levels, but is not detected in non-neoplastic brain. Additionally, PV-1 is induced in a mouse model of acute ischemia. Expression is confined to the cerebovasculature within the region of infarct and is temporally regulated. Conclusion Our results confirm that PV-1 is preferentially induced in the endothelium of mouse brain tumors and acute ischemic brain tissue and corresponds to blood-brain barrier disruption in a fashion analogous to human patients. Characterization of PV-1 expression in mouse brain is the first step towards development of rodent models for testing anti-edema and anti-angiogenesis therapeutic strategies based on this molecule.

  19. Computational modeling of chemotactic signaling and aggregation of microglia around implantation site during deep brain stimulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silchenko, A. N.; Tass, P. A.

    2013-10-01

    It is well established that prolonged electrical stimulation of brain tissue causes massive release of ATP in the extracellular space. The released ATP and the products of its hydrolysis, such as ADP and adenosine, become the main elements mediating chemotactic sensitivity and motility of microglial cells via subsequent activation of P2Y2,12 as well as A3A and A2A adenosine receptors. The size of the sheath around the electrode formed by the microglial cells is an important criterion for the optimization of the parameters of electrical current delivered to brain tissue. Here, we study a purinergic signaling pathway underlying the chemotactic motion of microglia towards the implanted electrode during deep brain stimulation. We present a computational model describing formation of a stable aggregate around the implantation site due to the joint chemo-attractive action of ATP and ADP together with a mixed influence of extracellular adenosine. The model was built in accordance with the classical Keller-Segel approach and includes an equation for the cells' density as well as equations describing the hydrolysis of extracellular ATP via successive reaction steps ATP →ADP →AMP →adenosine. The results of our modeling allowed us to reveal the dependence of the width of the encapsulating layer around the electrode on the amount of ATP released due to permanent electrical stimulation. The dependences of the aggregates' size on the parameter governing the nonlinearity of interaction between extracellular adenosine and adenosine receptors are also analyzed.

  20. Through the Immune Looking Glass: A Model for Brain Memory Strategies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia eSánchez-Ramón

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The immune system (IS and the central nervous system (CNS are complex cognitive networks involved in defining the identity (self of the individual through recognition and memory processes that enable one to anticipate responses to stimuli. Brain memory has traditionally been classified as either implicit or explicit on psychological and anatomical grounds, with reminiscences of the evolutionarily-based innate-adaptive IS responses. Beyond the multineuronal networks of the CNS, we propose a theoretical model of brain memory integrating the CNS as a whole. This is achieved by analogical reasoning between the operational rules of recognition and memory processes in both systems, coupled to an evolutionary analysis. In this new model, the hippocampus is no longer specifically ascribed to explicit memory but rather it both becomes part of the innate (implicit memory system and tightly controls the explicit memory system. Alike the antigen presenting cells for the IS, the hippocampus would integrate transient and pseudo-specific (i.e. danger-fear memories and would drive the formation of long-term and highly specific or explicit memories (i.e. the taste of the Proust’s madeleine cake by the more complex and recent, evolutionarily speaking, neocortex. Experimental and clinical evidence is provided to support the model. We believe that the singularity of this model’s approximation could help to gain a better understanding of the mechanisms operating in brain memory strategies from a large-scale network perspective.

  1. Measurements and models of electric fields in the in vivo human brain during transcranial electric stimulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yu; Liu, Anli A; Lafon, Belen; Friedman, Daniel; Dayan, Michael; Wang, Xiuyuan; Bikson, Marom; Doyle, Werner K; Devinsky, Orrin; Parra, Lucas C

    2017-01-01

    Transcranial electric stimulation aims to stimulate the brain by applying weak electrical currents at the scalp. However, the magnitude and spatial distribution of electric fields in the human brain are unknown. We measured electric potentials intracranially in ten epilepsy patients and estimated electric fields across the entire brain by leveraging calibrated current-flow models. When stimulating at 2 mA, cortical electric fields reach 0.4 V/m, the lower limit of effectiveness in animal studies. When individual whole-head anatomy is considered, the predicted electric field magnitudes correlate with the recorded values in cortical (r = 0.89) and depth (r = 0.84) electrodes. Accurate models require adjustment of tissue conductivity values reported in the literature, but accuracy is not improved when incorporating white matter anisotropy or different skull compartments. This is the first study to validate and calibrate current-flow models with in vivo intracranial recordings in humans, providing a solid foundation to target stimulation and interpret clinical trials. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.18834.001 PMID:28169833

  2. Measurements and models of electric fields in the in vivo human brain during transcranial electric stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yu; Liu, Anli A; Lafon, Belen; Friedman, Daniel; Dayan, Michael; Wang, Xiuyuan; Bikson, Marom; Doyle, Werner K; Devinsky, Orrin; Parra, Lucas C

    2017-02-07

    Transcranial electric stimulation aims to stimulate the brain by applying weak electrical currents at the scalp. However, the magnitude and spatial distribution of electric fields in the human brain are unknown. We measured electric potentials intracranially in ten epilepsy patients and estimated electric fields across the entire brain by leveraging calibrated current-flow models. When stimulating at 2 mA, cortical electric fields reach 0.4 V/m, the lower limit of effectiveness in animal studies. When individual whole-head anatomy is considered, the predicted electric field magnitudes correlate with the recorded values in cortical (r = 0.89) and depth (r = 0.84) electrodes. Accurate models require adjustment of tissue conductivity values reported in the literature, but accuracy is not improved when incorporating white matter anisotropy or different skull compartments. This is the first study to validate and calibrate current-flow models with in vivo intracranial recordings in humans, providing a solid foundation to target stimulation and interpret clinical trials.

  3. Bovine Brain: An in vitro Translational Model in Developmental Neuroscience and Neurodegenerative Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peruffo, Antonella; Cozzi, Bruno

    2014-01-01

    Animal models provide convenient and clinically relevant tools in the research on neurodegenerative diseases. Studies on developmental disorders extensively rely on the use of laboratory rodents. The present mini-review proposes an alternative translational model based on the use of fetal bovine brain tissue. The bovine (Bos taurus) possesses a large and highly gyrencephalic brain and the long gestation period (41 weeks) is comparable to human pregnancy (38–40 weeks). Primary cultures obtained from fetal bovine brain constitute a validated in vitro model that allows examinations of neurons and/or glial cells under controlled and reproducible conditions. Physiological processes can be also studied on cultured bovine neural cells incubated with specific substrates or by electrically coupled electrolyte-oxide-semiconductor capacitors that permit direct recording from neuronal cells. Bovine neural cells and specific in vitro cell culture could be an alternative in comparative neuroscience and in neurodegenerative research, useful for studying development of normal and altered circuitry in a long gestation mammalian species. Use of bovine tissues would promote a substantial reduction in the use of laboratory animals. PMID:25072040

  4. Gene set based integrated data analysis reveals phenotypic differences in a brain cancer model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kjell Petersen

    Full Text Available A key challenge in the data analysis of biological high-throughput experiments is to handle the often low number of samples in the experiments compared to the number of biomolecules that are simultaneously measured. Combining experimental data using independent technologies to illuminate the same biological trends, as well as complementing each other in a larger perspective, is one natural way to overcome this challenge. In this work we investigated if integrating proteomics and transcriptomics data from a brain cancer animal model using gene set based analysis methodology, could enhance the biological interpretation of the data relative to more traditional analysis of the two datasets individually. The brain cancer model used is based on serial passaging of transplanted human brain tumor material (glioblastoma--GBM through several generations in rats. These serial transplantations lead over time to genotypic and phenotypic changes in the tumors and represent a medically relevant model with a rare access to samples and where consequent analyses of individual datasets have revealed relatively few significant findings on their own. We found that the integrated analysis both performed better in terms of significance measure of its findings compared to individual analyses, as well as providing independent verification of the individual results. Thus a better context for overall biological interpretation of the data can be achieved.

  5. Development of a Human Head FE Model and Impact Simulation on the Focal Brain Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Dai; Yuge, Kohei; Nishimoto, Tetsuya; Murakami, Shigeyuki; Takao, Hiroyuki

    In this paper, a three-dimensional digital human-head model was developed and several dynamic analyses on the head trauma were conducted. This model was built up by the VOXEL approach using 433 slice CT images (512×512 pixels) and made of 1.22 million parallelepiped finite elements with 10 anatomical tissue properties such as scalp, CSF, skull, brain, dura mater and so on. The numerical analyses were conducted using a finite element code the authors have developed. The main features of the code are 1) it is based on the explicit time integration method and 2) it uses the one point integration method to evaluate the equivalent nodal forces with the hourglass control proposed by Flanagan and Belytschko(1) and 3) it utilizes the parallel computation system based on MPI. In order to verify the developed model, the head impact experiment for a cadaver by Nahum et al.(2) was simulated. The calculated results showed good agreement with the experimental ones. A front and rear impact analyses were also performed to discuss on the characteristic measure of the brain injury, in which the von-Mises stress was high in the frontal lobe in both of the analyses because of the large deformations of a frontal cranial base. This result suggests that the von-Mises stress can be a good measure of the brain injury since it is empirically well known that the frontal lobe tends to get injured regardless of the impact positions.

  6. A comparison of hyperelastic constitutive models applicable to brain and fat tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mihai, L Angela; Chin, LiKang; Janmey, Paul A; Goriely, Alain

    2015-09-06

    In some soft biological structures such as brain and fat tissues, strong experimental evidence suggests that the shear modulus increases significantly under increasing compressive strain, but not under tensile strain, whereas the apparent Young's elastic modulus increases or remains almost constant when compressive strain increases. These tissues also exhibit a predominantly isotropic, incompressible behaviour. Our aim is to capture these seemingly contradictory mechanical behaviours, both qualitatively and quantitatively, within the framework of finite elasticity, by modelling a soft tissue as a homogeneous, isotropic, incompressible, hyperelastic material and comparing our results with available experimental data. Our analysis reveals that the Fung and Gent models, which are typically used to model soft tissues, are inadequate for the modelling of brain or fat under combined stretch and shear, and so are the classical neo-Hookean and Mooney-Rivlin models used for elastomers. However, a subclass of Ogden hyperelastic models are found to be in excellent agreement with the experiments. Our findings provide explicit models suitable for integration in large-scale finite-element computations.

  7. Multiscale modeling of brain dynamics: from single neurons and networks to mathematical tools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siettos, Constantinos; Starke, Jens

    2016-09-01

    The extreme complexity of the brain naturally requires mathematical modeling approaches on a large variety of scales; the spectrum ranges from single neuron dynamics over the behavior of groups of neurons to neuronal network activity. Thus, the connection between the microscopic scale (single neuron activity) to macroscopic behavior (emergent behavior of the collective dynamics) and vice versa is a key to understand the brain in its complexity. In this work, we attempt a review of a wide range of approaches, ranging from the modeling of single neuron dynamics to machine learning. The models include biophysical as well as data-driven phenomenological models. The discussed models include Hodgkin-Huxley, FitzHugh-Nagumo, coupled oscillators (Kuramoto oscillators, Rössler oscillators, and the Hindmarsh-Rose neuron), Integrate and Fire, networks of neurons, and neural field equations. In addition to the mathematical models, important mathematical methods in multiscale modeling and reconstruction of the causal connectivity are sketched. The methods include linear and nonlinear tools from statistics, data analysis, and time series analysis up to differential equations, dynamical systems, and bifurcation theory, including Granger causal connectivity analysis, phase synchronization connectivity analysis, principal component analysis (PCA), independent component analysis (ICA), and manifold learning algorithms such as ISOMAP, and diffusion maps and equation-free techniques. WIREs Syst Biol Med 2016, 8:438-458. doi: 10.1002/wsbm.1348 For further resources related to this article, please visit the WIREs website.

  8. Exercise modulates redox-sensitive small GTPase activity in the brain microvasculature in a model of brain metastasis formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolff, Gretchen; Balke, Jordan E; Andras, Ibolya E; Park, Minseon; Toborek, Michal

    2014-01-01

    Tumor cell extravasation into the brain requires passage through the blood-brain barrier (BBB). There is evidence that exercise can alter the oxidation status of the brain microvasculature and protect against tumor cell invasion into the brain, although the mechanisms are not well understood. In the current study, we focused on the role of microenvironment generated by exercise and metastasizing tumor cells at the levels of brain microvessels, influencing oxidative stress-mediated responses and activation of redox-sensitive small GTPases. Mature male mice were exercised for four weeks using a running wheel with the average voluntary running distance 9.0 ± 0.3 km/day. Mice were then infused with 1.0 × 10(6) D122 (murine Lewis lung carcinoma) cells into the brain microvasculature, and euthanized either 48 hours (in short-term studies) or 2-3 weeks (in long-term studies) post tumor cell administration. A significant increase in the level of reactive oxygen species was observed following 48 hours or 3 weeks of tumor cells growth, which was accompanied by a reduction in MnSOD expression in the exercised mice. Activation of the small GTPase Rho was negatively correlated with running distance in the tumor cell infused mice. Together, these data suggest that exercise may play a significant role during aggressive metastatic invasion, especially at higher intensities in pre-trained individuals.

  9. Exercise modulates redox-sensitive small GTPase activity in the brain microvasculature in a model of brain metastasis formation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gretchen Wolff

    Full Text Available Tumor cell extravasation into the brain requires passage through the blood-brain barrier (BBB. There is evidence that exercise can alter the oxidation status of the brain microvasculature and protect against tumor cell invasion into the brain, although the mechanisms are not well understood. In the current study, we focused on the role of microenvironment generated by exercise and metastasizing tumor cells at the levels of brain microvessels, influencing oxidative stress-mediated responses and activation of redox-sensitive small GTPases. Mature male mice were exercised for four weeks using a running wheel with the average voluntary running distance 9.0 ± 0.3 km/day. Mice were then infused with 1.0 × 10(6 D122 (murine Lewis lung carcinoma cells into the brain microvasculature, and euthanized either 48 hours (in short-term studies or 2-3 weeks (in long-term studies post tumor cell administration. A significant increase in the level of reactive oxygen species was observed following 48 hours or 3 weeks of tumor cells growth, which was accompanied by a reduction in MnSOD expression in the exercised mice. Activation of the small GTPase Rho was negatively correlated with running distance in the tumor cell infused mice. Together, these data suggest that exercise may play a significant role during aggressive metastatic invasion, especially at higher intensities in pre-trained individuals.

  10. Differential effects of fresh frozen plasma and normal saline on secondary brain damage in a large animal model of polytrauma, hemorrhage and traumatic brain injury

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hwabejire, John O; Imam, Ayesha M; Jin, Guang

    2013-01-01

    We have previously shown that the extent of traumatic brain injury (TBI) in large animal models can be reduced with early infusion of fresh frozen plasma (FFP), but the precise mechanisms remain unclear. In this study, we investigated whether resuscitation with FFP or normal saline differed...

  11. Physically-based in silico light sheet microscopy for visualizing fluorescent brain models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdellah, Marwan; Bilgili, Ahmet; Eilemann, Stefan; Markram, Henry; Schürmann, Felix

    2015-01-01

    We present a physically-based computational model of the light sheet fluorescence microscope (LSFM). Based on Monte Carlo ray tracing and geometric optics, our method simulates the operational aspects and image formation process of the LSFM. This simulated, in silico LSFM creates synthetic images of digital fluorescent specimens that can resemble those generated by a real LSFM, as opposed to established visualization methods producing visually-plausible images. We also propose an accurate fluorescence rendering model which takes into account the intrinsic characteristics of fluorescent dyes to simulate the light interaction with fluorescent biological specimen. We demonstrate first results of our visualization pipeline to a simplified brain tissue model reconstructed from the somatosensory cortex of a young rat. The modeling aspects of the LSFM units are qualitatively analysed, and the results of the fluorescence model were quantitatively validated against the fluorescence brightness equation and characteristic emission spectra of different fluorescent dyes. Modelling and simulation.

  12. Quantification of Brain Access of Exendin-4 in the C57BL Mouse Model by SPIM Fluorescence Imaging and the Allen Mouse Brain Reference Model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Casper Bo; Secher, Anna; Hecksher-Sørensen, Jacob

    2015-01-01

    -4, into the brain with the aim of developing medication for obesity. To investigate mode of action of the medication it is important to identify the specific anatomical brain nuclei that are targeted by the compound. Such segmentations can be obtained using an annotated digital brain atlas. We...

  13. Material characterization and computer model simulation of low density polyurethane foam used in a rodent traumatic brain injury model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Liying; Gurao, Manish; Yang, King H; King, Albert I

    2011-05-15

    Computer models of the head can be used to simulate the events associated with traumatic brain injury (TBI) and quantify biomechanical response within the brain. Marmarou's impact acceleration rodent model is a widely used experimental model of TBI mirroring axonal pathology in humans. The mechanical properties of the low density polyurethane (PU) foam, an essential piece of energy management used in Marmarou's impact device, has not been fully characterized. The foam used in Marmarou's device was tested at seven strain rates ranging from quasi-static to dynamic (0.014-42.86 s⁻¹) to quantify the stress-strain relationships in compression. Recovery rate of the foam after cyclic compression was also determined through the periods of recovery up to three weeks. The experimentally determined stress-strain curves were incorporated into a material model in an explicit Finite Element (FE) solver to validate the strain rate dependency of the FE foam model. Compression test results have shown that the foam used in the rodent impact acceleration model is strain rate dependent. The foam has been found to be reusable for multiple impacts. However the stress resistance of used foam is reduced to 70% of the new foam. The FU_CHANG_FOAM material model in an FE solver has been found to be adequate to simulate this rate sensitive foam.

  14. Breeding novel solutions in the brain: a model of Darwinian neurodynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szilágyi, András; Zachar, István; Fedor, Anna; de Vladar, Harold P; Szathmáry, Eörs

    2016-01-01

    Background: The fact that surplus connections and neurons are pruned during development is well established. We complement this selectionist picture by a proof-of-principle model of evolutionary search in the brain, that accounts for new variations in theory space. We present a model for Darwinian evolutionary search for candidate solutions in the brain. Methods: We combine known components of the brain - recurrent neural networks (acting as attractors), the action selection loop and implicit working memory - to provide the appropriate Darwinian architecture. We employ a population of attractor networks with palimpsest memory. The action selection loop is employed with winners-share-all dynamics to select for candidate solutions that are transiently stored in implicit working memory. Results: We document two processes: selection of stored solutions and evolutionary search for novel solutions. During the replication of candidate solutions attractor networks occasionally produce recombinant patterns, increasing variation on which selection can act. Combinatorial search acts on multiplying units (activity patterns) with hereditary variation and novel variants appear due to (i) noisy recall of patterns from the attractor networks, (ii) noise during transmission of candidate solutions as messages between networks, and, (iii) spontaneously generated, untrained patterns in spurious attractors. Conclusions: Attractor dynamics of recurrent neural networks can be used to model Darwinian search. The proposed architecture can be used for fast search among stored solutions (by selection) and for evolutionary search when novel candidate solutions are generated in successive iterations. Since all the suggested components are present in advanced nervous systems, we hypothesize that the brain could implement a truly evolutionary combinatorial search system, capable of generating novel variants.

  15. Establishment of a blunt impact-induced brain injury model in rabbits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LI Kui

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available 【Abstract】 Objective: To establish an animal model to replicate the blunt impact brain injury in forensic medicine. Methods: Twenty-four New Zealand white rabbits were randomly divided into control group (n=4, minor injury group (n=10 and severe injury group (n=10. Based on the BIM-Ⅱ Horizontal Bio-impact Machine, self-designed iron bar was used to produce blunt brain injury. Two rabbits from each injury group were randomly selected to monitor the change of intracranial pressure (ICP during the impact-ing process by pressure microsensors. Six hours after injury, all the rabbits were dissected to observe the injury mor-phology and underwent routine pathological examination. Results: Varying degrees of nervous system positive signs were observed in all the injured rabbits. Within 6 hours, the mortality rate was 1/10 in the minor injury group and 6/10 in the severe injury group. Morphological changes con-sisted of different levels of scalp hematoma, skull fracture, epidural hematoma, subdural hematoma, subarachnoid hemo-rrhage and brain injury. At the moment of hitting, the ICP was greater in severe injury group than in mild injury group; and within the same group, the impact side showed positive pressure while the opposite side showed negative pressure. Conclusions: Under the rigidly-controlled experimen-tal condition, this animal model has a good reproducibility and stable results. Meanwhile, it is able to simulate the mor-phology of iron strike-induced injury, thus can be used to study the mechanism of blunt head injury in forensic medicine. Key words: Brain injuries; Forensic medicine; Wounds, nonpenetrating; Models, animal; Rabbits

  16. Blood-brain barrier models and their relevance for a successful development of CNS drug delivery systems: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bicker, Joana; Alves, Gilberto; Fortuna, Ana; Falcão, Amílcar

    2014-08-01

    During the research and development of new drugs directed at the central nervous system, there is a considerable attrition rate caused by their hampered access to the brain by the blood-brain barrier. Throughout the years, several in vitro models have been developed in an attempt to mimic critical functionalities of the blood-brain barrier and reliably predict the permeability of drug candidates. However, the current challenge lies in developing a model that retains fundamental blood-brain barrier characteristics and simultaneously remains compatible with the high throughput demands of pharmaceutical industries. This review firstly describes the roles of all elements of the neurovascular unit and their influence on drug brain penetration. In vitro models, including non-cell based and cell-based models, and in vivo models are herein presented, with a particular emphasis on their methodological aspects. Lastly, their contribution to the improvement of brain drug delivery strategies and drug transport across the blood-brain barrier is also discussed.

  17. Fish with thermolabile sex determination (TSD) as models to study brain sex differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blázquez, Mercedes; Somoza, Gustavo M

    2010-05-01

    As fish are ectothermic animals, water temperature can affect their basic biological processes such as larval development, growth and reproduction. Similar to reptiles, the incubation temperature during early phases of development is capable to modify sex ratios in a large number of fish species. This phenomenon, known as thermolabile sex determination (TSD) was first reported in Menidia menidia, a species belonging to the family Atherinopsidae. Since then, an increasing number of fish have also been found to exhibit TSD. Traditionally, likewise in reptiles, several TSD patterns have been described in fish, however it has been recently postulated that only one, females at low temperatures and males at high temperatures, may represent the "real" or "true" TSD. Many studies regarding the influence of temperature on the final sex ratios have been focused on the expression and activity of gonadal aromatase, the enzyme involved in the conversion of androgens into estrogens and encoded by the cyp19a1a gene. In this regard, teleost fish, may be due to a whole genome duplication event, produce another aromatase enzyme, commonly named brain aromatase, encoded by the cyp19a1b gene. Contrary to what has been described in other vertebrates, fish exhibit very high levels of aromatase activity in the brain and therefore they synthesize high amounts of neuroestrogens. However, its biological significance is still not understood. In addition, the mechanism whereby temperature can induce the development of a testis or an ovary still remains elusive. In this context the present review is aimed to discuss several theories about the possible role of brain aromatase using fish as models. The relevance of brain aromatase and therefore of neuroestrogens as the possible cue for gonadal differentiation is raised. In addition, the possible role of brain aromatase as the way to keep the high levels of neurogenesis in fish is also considered. Several key examples of how teleosts and aromatase

  18. The ex-illiterate brain: The critical period, cognitive reserve and HAROLD model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Vania Silva Nunes

    Full Text Available Abstract The lifelong acquisition of cognitive skills shapes the biology of the brain. However, there are critical periods for the best use of the brain to process the acquired information. Objectives: To discuss the critical period of cognitive acquisition, the concept of cognitive reserve and the HAROLD (Hemispheric Asymmetry Reduction in Older adults model. Methods: Seven women who learned how to read and to write after the age of 50 (ex-illiterates and five women with 10 years of regular schooling (controls were submitted to a language recognition test while brain activity was being recorded using magnetoencephalography. Spoken words were delivered binaurally via two plastic tubs terminating in ear inserts, and recordings were made with a whole head magnetometer consisting of 148 magnetometer coils. Results: Both groups performed similarly on the task of identifying target words. Analysis of the number of sources of activity in the left and right hemispheres revealed significant differences between the two groups, showing that ex-illiterate subjects exhibited less brain functional asymmetry during the language task. Conclusions: These results should be interpreted with caution because the groups were small. However, these findings reinforce the concept that poorly educated subjects tend to use the brain for information processing in a different way to subjects with a high educational level or who were schooled at the regular time. Finally, the recruiting of both hemispheres to tackle the language recognition test occurred to a greater degree in the ex-illiterate group where this can be interpreted as a sign of difficulty performing the task.

  19. Brain network alterations in the inflammatory soup animal model of migraine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becerra, Lino; Bishop, James; Barmettler, Gabi; Kainz, Vanessa; Burstein, Rami; Borsook, David

    2017-04-01

    Advances in our understanding of the human pain experience have shifted much of the focus of pain research from the periphery to the brain. Current hypotheses suggest that the progression of migraine depends on abnormal functioning of neurons in multiple brain regions. Accordingly, we sought to capture functional brain changes induced by the application of an inflammatory cocktail known as inflammatory soup (IS), to the dura mater across multiple brain networks. Specifically, we aimed to determine whether IS alters additional neural networks indirectly related to the primary nociceptive pathways via the spinal cord to the thalamus and cortex. IS comprises an acidic combination of bradykinin, serotonin, histamine and prostaglandin PGE2 and was introduced to basic pain research as a tool to activate and sensitize peripheral nociceptors when studying pathological pain conditions associated with allodynia and hyperalgesia. Using this model of intracranial pain, we found that dural application of IS in awake, fully conscious, rats enhanced thalamic, hypothalamic, hippocampal and somatosensory cortex responses to mechanical stimulation of the face (compared to sham synthetic interstitial fluid administration). Furthermore, resting state MRI data revealed altered functional connectivity in a number of networks previously identified in clinical chronic pain populations. These included the default mode, sensorimotor, interoceptive (Salience) and autonomic networks. The findings suggest that activation and sensitization of meningeal nociceptors by IS can enhance the extent to which the brain processes nociceptive signaling, define new level of modulation of affective and cognitive responses to pain; set new tone for hypothalamic regulation of autonomic outflow to the cranium; and change cerebellar functions. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  20. Loss of neprilysin alters protein expression in the brain of Alzheimer's disease model mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nilsson, Per; Loganathan, Krishnapriya; Sekiguchi, Misaki; Winblad, Bengt; Iwata, Nobuhisa; Saido, Takaomi C; Tjernberg, Lars O

    2015-10-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a neurodegenerative disease displaying extracellular plaques formed by the neurotoxic amyloid β-peptide (Aβ), and intracellular neurofibrillary tangles consisting of protein tau. However, how these pathologies relate to the massive neuronal death that occurs in AD brains remain elusive. Neprilysin is the major Aβ-degrading enzyme and a lack thereof increases Aβ levels in the brain twofold. To identify altered protein expression levels induced by increased Aβ levels, we performed a proteomic analysis of the brain of the AD mouse model APPsw and compared it to that of APPsw mice lacking neprilysin. To this end we established an LC-MS/MS method to analyze brain homogenate, using an (18) O-labeled internal standard to accurately quantify the protein levels. To distinguish between alterations in protein levels caused by increased Aβ levels and those induced by neprilysin deficiency independently of Aβ, the brain proteome of neprilysin deficient APPsw mice was also compared to that of neprilysin deficient mice. By this approach we identified approximately 600 proteins and the levels of 300 of these were quantified. Pathway analysis showed that many of the proteins with altered expression were involved in neurological disorders, and that tau, presenilin and APP were key regulators in the identified networks. The data have been deposited to the ProteomeXchange Consortium with identifiers PXD000968 and PXD001786 (http://proteomecentral.proteomexchange.org/dataset/PXD000968 and (http://proteomecentral.proteomexchange.org/dataset/PXD001786). Interestingly, the levels of several proteins, including some not previously reported to be linked to AD, were associated with increased Aβ levels. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  1. Investigating Irregularly Patterned Deep Brain Stimulation Signal Design Using Biophysical Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samantha Rose Summerson

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Parkinson’s disease (PD is a neurodegenerative disorder which follows from cell loss of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra pars compacta (SNc, a nucleus in the basal ganglia (BG. Deep brain stimulation (DBS is an electrical therapy that modulates the pathological activity to treat the motor symptoms of PD. Although this therapy is currently used in clinical practice, the sufficient conditions for therapeutic efficacy are unknown. In this work we develop a model of critical motor circuit structures in the brain using biophysical cell models as the base components and then evaluate performance of different DBS signals in this model to perform comparative studies of their efficacy. Biological models are an important tool for gaining insights into neural function and, in this case, serve as effective tools for investigating innovative new DBS paradigms. Experiments were performed using the hemi-parkinsonian rodent model to test the same set of signals, verifying the obedience of the model to physiological trends. We show that antidromic spiking from DBS of the subthalamic nucleus (STN has a significant impact on cortical neural activity, which is frequency dependent and additionally modulated by the regularity of the stimulus pulse train used. Irregular spacing between stimulus pulses, where the amount of variability added is bounded, is shown to increase diversification of response of basal ganglia neurons and reduce entropic noise in cortical neurons, which may be fundamentally important to restoration of information flow in the motor circuit.

  2. Increased efflux of amyloid-β peptides through the blood-brain barrier by muscarinic acetylcholine receptor inhibition reduces pathological phenotypes in mouse models of brain amyloidosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paganetti, Paolo; Antoniello, Katia; Devraj, Kavi; Toni, Nicolas; Kieran, Dairin; Madani, Rime; Pihlgren, Maria; Adolfsson, Oskar; Froestl, Wolfgang; Schrattenholz, André; Liebner, Stefan; Havas, Daniel; Windisch, Manfred; Cirrito, John R; Pfeifer, Andrea; Muhs, Andreas

    2014-01-01

    The formation and accumulation of toxic amyloid-β peptides (Aβ) in the brain may drive the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease. Accordingly, disease-modifying therapies for Alzheimer's disease and related disorders could result from treatments regulating Aβ homeostasis. Examples are the inhibition of production, misfolding, and accumulation of Aβ or the enhancement of its clearance. Here we show that oral treatment with ACI-91 (Pirenzepine) dose-dependently reduced brain Aβ burden in AβPPPS1, hAβPPSL, and AβPP/PS1 transgenic mice. A possible mechanism of action of ACI-91 may occur through selective inhibition of muscarinic acetylcholine receptors (AChR) on endothelial cells of brain microvessels and enhanced Aβ peptide clearance across the blood-brain barrier. One month treatment with ACI-91 increased the clearance of intrathecally-injected Aβ in plaque-bearing mice. ACI-91 also accelerated the clearance of brain-injected Aβ in blood and peripheral tissues by favoring its urinal excretion. A single oral dose of ACI-91 reduced the half-life of interstitial Aβ peptide in pre-plaque mhAβPP/PS1d mice. By extending our studies to an in vitro model, we showed that muscarinic AChR inhibition by ACI-91 and Darifenacin augmented the capacity of differentiated endothelial monolayers for active transport of Aβ peptide. Finally, ACI-91 was found to consistently affect, in vitro and in vivo, the expression of endothelial cell genes involved in Aβ transport across the Blood Brain Brain (BBB). Thus increased Aβ clearance through the BBB may contribute to reduced Aβ burden and associated phenotypes. Inhibition of muscarinic AChR restricted to the periphery may present a therapeutic advantage as it avoids adverse central cholinergic effects.

  3. Blast-Associated Shock Waves Result in Increased Brain Vascular Leakage and Elevated ROS Levels in a Rat Model of Traumatic Brain Injury.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shushi Kabu

    Full Text Available Blast-associated shock wave-induced traumatic brain injury (bTBI remains a persistent risk for armed forces worldwide, yet its detailed pathophysiology remains to be fully investigated. In this study, we have designed and characterized a laboratory-scale shock tube to develop a rodent model of bTBI. Our blast tube, driven by a mixture of oxygen and acetylene, effectively generates blast overpressures of 20-130 psi, with pressure-time profiles similar to those of free-field blast waves. We tested our shock tube for brain injury response to various blast wave conditions in rats. The results show that blast waves cause diffuse vascular brain damage, as determined using a sensitive optical imaging method based on the fluorescence signal of Evans Blue dye extravasation developed in our laboratory. Vascular leakage increased with increasing blast overpressures and mapping of the brain slices for optical signal intensity indicated nonhomogeneous damage to the cerebral vasculature. We confirmed vascular leakage due to disruption in the blood-brain barrier (BBB integrity following blast exposure. Reactive oxygen species (ROS levels in the brain also increased with increasing blast pressures and with time post-blast wave exposure. Immunohistochemical analysis of the brain sections analyzed at different time points post blast exposure demonstrated astrocytosis and cell apoptosis, confirming sustained neuronal injury response. The main advantages of our shock-tube design are minimal jet effect and no requirement for specialized equipment or facilities, and effectively generate blast-associated shock waves that are relevant to battle-field conditions. Overall data suggest that increased oxidative stress and BBB disruption could be the crucial factors in the propagation and spread of neuronal degeneration following blast injury. Further studies are required to determine the interplay between increased ROS activity and BBB disruption to develop effective

  4. ERK inhibition with PD184161 mitigates brain damage in a mouse model of stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gladbach, Amadeus; van Eersel, Janet; Bi, Mian; Ke, Yazi D; Ittner, Lars M

    2014-05-01

    Ischemic stroke is a leading cause of death. It has previously been shown that blocking activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) with the MEK inhibitor U0126 mitigates brain damage in rodent models of ischemic stroke. Here we show that the newer MEK inhibitor PD184161 reduces cell death and altered gene expression in cultured neurons and mice undergoing excitotoxicity, and has similar protective effects in a mouse model of stroke. This further supports ERK inhibition as a potential treatment for stroke.

  5. Protein aggregation in association with delayed neuronal death in rat model of brain ischemia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Pengfei GE; Tianfei LUG; Shuanglin FU; Wenchen LI; Chonghao WANG; Chuibing ZHOU; Yinan LUO

    2008-01-01

    To investigate the relationship between protein aggregation and delayed neuronal death, we adopted rat models of 20 min ischemia. Brain ischemia was produced using the 2-vessel occlusion (2VO) model in rats Light microscopy, transmission electronic microscopy and Western blot analysis were performed for morphological analysis of neurons, and protein detection. The results showed delayed neuronal death took place at 72 h after ischemia-reperfusion, protein aggregates formed at 4 h after reperfusion and reached the peak at 24 h after reper-fusion, and Western blot analysis was consistent with transmission electronic microscopy. We conclude that protein aggregation is one of the important factors leading to delayed neuronal death.

  6. Functional neurology of a brain system: a 3D olfactory bulb model to process natural odorants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Migliore, Michele; Cavarretta, Francesco; Hines, Michael L; Shepherd, Gordon M

    2013-01-01

    The network of interactions between mitral and granule cells in the olfactory bulb is a critical step in the processing of odor information underlying the neural basis of smell perception. We are building the first computational model in 3 dimensions of this network in order to analyze the rules for connectivity and function within it. The initial results indicate that this network can be modeled to simulate experimental results on the activation of the olfactory bulb by natural odorants, providing a much more powerful approach for 3D simulation of brain neurons and microcircuits.

  7. Traumatic brain injury and gene knockout animal models: an up-to-date review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadjigeorgiou, Georgios F; Singh, Ranjodh; Dardiotis, Efthimios; Paterakis, Konstantinos; Hadjigeorgiou, Georgios M; Fountas, Kostas N

    2017-12-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a major cause of mortality and morbidity worldwide. Identification of endogenous neuroprotective mechanisms after TBI and the development of therapeutic targets to improve TBI outcomes are areas of intense scientific research. In this review, we summarize genetically modified TBI mouse models and highlight the recent scientific findings from using such models, including mediators of inflammation, programmed cell death and metabolism, modulators of vascular tone and membrane channel proteins. A deeper understanding of the complex biochemical processes and genetic pathways in TBI could offer personalized genomic-based therapies for and improve clinical outcomes in TBI patients.

  8. The brain ages optimally to model its environment: evidence from sensory learning over the adult lifespan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moran, Rosalyn J; Symmonds, Mkael; Dolan, Raymond J; Friston, Karl J

    2014-01-01

    The aging brain shows a progressive loss of neuropil, which is accompanied by subtle changes in neuronal plasticity, sensory learning and memory. Neurophysiologically, aging attenuates evoked responses--including the mismatch negativity (MMN). This is accompanied by a shift in cortical responsivity from sensory (posterior) regions to executive (anterior) regions, which has been interpreted as a compensatory response for cognitive decline. Theoretical neurobiology offers a simpler explanation for all of these effects--from a Bayesian perspective, as the brain is progressively optimized to model its world, its complexity will decrease. A corollary of this complexity reduction is an attenuation of Bayesian updating or sensory learning. Here we confirmed this hypothesis using magnetoencephalographic recordings of the mismatch negativity elicited in a large cohort of human subjects, in their third to ninth decade. Employing dynamic causal modeling to assay the synaptic mechanisms underlying these non-invasive recordings, we found a selective age-related attenuation of synaptic connectivity changes that underpin rapid sensory learning. In contrast, baseline synaptic connectivity strengths were consistently strong over the decades. Our findings suggest that the lifetime accrual of sensory experience optimizes functional brain architectures to enable efficient and generalizable predictions of the world.

  9. Commonality of neural representations of sentences across languages: Predicting brain activation during Portuguese sentence comprehension using an English-based model of brain function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Ying; Wang, Jing; Bailer, Cyntia; Cherkassky, Vladimir; Just, Marcel Adam

    2017-02-01

    The aim of the study was to test the cross-language generative capability of a model that predicts neural activation patterns evoked by sentence reading, based on a semantic characterization of the sentence. In a previous study on English monolingual speakers (Wang et al., submitted), a computational model performed a mapping from a set of 42 concept-level semantic features (Neurally Plausible Semantic Features, NPSFs) as well as 6 thematic role markers to neural activation patterns (assessed with fMRI), to predict activation levels in a network of brain locations. The model used two types of information gained from the English-based fMRI data to predict the activation for individual sentences in Portuguese. First, it used the mapping weights from NPSFs to voxel activation levels derived from the model for English reading. Second, the brain locations for which the activation levels were predicted were derived from a factor analysis of the brain activation patterns during English reading. These meta-language locations were defined by the clusters of voxels with high loadings on each of the four main dimensions (factors), namely people, places, actions and feelings, underlying the neural representations of the stimulus sentences. This cross-language model succeeded in predicting the brain activation patterns associated with the reading of 60 individual Portuguese sentences that were entirely new to the model, attaining accuracies reliably above chance level. The prediction accuracy was not affected by whether the Portuguese speaker was monolingual or Portuguese-English bilingual. The model's confusion errors indicated an accurate capture of the events or states described in the sentence at a conceptual level. Overall, the cross-language predictive capability of the model demonstrates the neural commonality between speakers of different languages in the representations of everyday events and states, and provides an initial characterization of the common meta

  10. Systemic platelet dysfunction is the result of local dysregulated coagulation and platelet activation in the brain in a rat model of isolated traumatic brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ploplis, Victoria A; Donahue, Deborah L; Sandoval-Cooper, Mayra J; MorenoCaffaro, Maria; Sheets, Patrick; Thomas, Scott G; Walsh, Mark; Castellino, Francis J

    2014-10-01

    Coagulopathy after severe traumatic brain injury (TBI) has been extensively reported. Clinical studies have identified a strong relationship between diminished platelet-rich thrombus formation, responsiveness to adenosine diphosphate agonism, and severity of TBI. The mechanisms that lead to platelet dysfunction in the acute response to TBI are poorly understood. The development of a rodent model of TBI that mimics the coagulopathy observed clinically has recently been reported. Using immunohistochemical techniques and thromboelastography platelet mapping, the current study demonstrated that the expression of coagulation (tissue factor and fibrin) and platelet activation (P-selectin) markers in the injured brain paralleled the alteration in systemic platelet responsiveness to the agonists, adenosine diphosphate and arachodonic acid. Results of this study demonstrate that local procoagulant changes in the injured brain have profound effects on systemic platelet function.

  11. Hyperbaric oxygen therapy ameliorates local brain metabolism, brain edema and inflammatory response in a blast-induced traumatic brain injury model in rabbits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yongming; Yang, Yanyan; Tang, Hong; Sun, Wenjiang; Xiong, Xiaoxing; Smerin, Daniel; Liu, Jiachuan

    2014-05-01

    Many studies suggest that hyperbaric oxygen therapy (HBOT) can provide some clinically curative effects on blast-induced traumatic brain injury (bTBI). The specific mechanism by which this occurs still remains unknown, and no standardized time or course of hyperbaric oxygen treatment is currently used. In this study, bTBI was produced by paper detonators equivalent to 600 mg of TNT exploding at 6.5 cm vertical to the rabbit's head. HBO (100% O2 at 2.0 absolute atmospheres) was used once, 12 h after injury. Magnetic resonance spectroscopy was performed to investigate the impact of HBOT on the metabolism of local injured nerves in brain tissue. We also examined blood-brain barrier (BBB) integrity, brain water content, apoptotic factors, and some inflammatory mediators. Our results demonstrate that hyperbaric oxygen could confer neuroprotection and improve prognosis after explosive injury by promoting the metabolism of local neurons, inhibiting brain edema, protecting BBB integrity, decreasing cell apoptosis, and inhibiting the inflammatory response. Furthermore, timely intervention within 1 week after injury might be more conducive to improving the prognosis of patients with bTBI.

  12. Uptake mechanism of ApoE-modified nanoparticles on brain capillary endothelial cells as a blood-brain barrier model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sylvia Wagner

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The blood-brain barrier (BBB represents an insurmountable obstacle for most drugs thus obstructing an effective treatment of many brain diseases. One solution for overcoming this barrier is a transport by binding of these drugs to surface-modified nanoparticles. Especially apolipoprotein E (ApoE appears to play a major role in the nanoparticle-mediated drug transport across the BBB. However, at present the underlying mechanism is incompletely understood. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In this study, the uptake of the ApoE-modified nanoparticles into the brain capillary endothelial cells was investigated to differentiate between active and passive uptake mechanism by flow cytometry and confocal laser scanning microscopy. Furthermore, different in vitro co-incubation experiments were performed with competing ligands of the respective receptor. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: This study confirms an active endocytotic uptake mechanism and shows the involvement of low density lipoprotein receptor family members, notably the low density lipoprotein receptor related protein, on the uptake of the ApoE-modified nanoparticles into the brain capillary endothelial cells. This knowledge of the uptake mechanism of ApoE-modified nanoparticles enables future developments to rationally create very specific and effective carriers to overcome the blood-brain barrier.

  13. Maternal separation as a model of brain-gut axis dysfunction.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Mahony, Siobhain M

    2011-03-01

    Early life stress has been implicated in many psychiatric disorders ranging from depression to anxiety. Maternal separation in rodents is a well-studied model of early life stress. However, stress during this critical period also induces alterations in many systems throughout the body. Thus, a variety of other disorders that are associated with adverse early life events are often comorbid with psychiatric illnesses, suggesting a common underlying aetiology. Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a functional gastrointestinal disorder that is thought to involve a dysfunctional interaction between the brain and the gut. Essential aspects of the brain-gut axis include spinal pathways, the hypothalamic pituitary adrenal axis, the immune system, as well as the enteric microbiota. Accumulating evidence suggest that stress, especially in early life, is a predisposing factor to IBS.

  14. Tailored delivery of analgesic ziconotide across a blood brain barrier model using viral nanocontainers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anand, Prachi; O'Neil, Alison; Lin, Emily; Douglas, Trevor; Holford, Mandë

    2015-08-01

    The blood brain barrier (BBB) is often an insurmountable obstacle for a large number of candidate drugs, including peptides, antibiotics, and chemotherapeutic agents. Devising an adroit delivery method to cross the BBB is essential to unlocking widespread application of peptide therapeutics. Presented here is an engineered nanocontainer for delivering peptidic drugs across the BBB encapsulating the analgesic marine snail peptide ziconotide (Prialt®). We developed a bi-functional viral nanocontainer based on the Salmonella typhimurium bacteriophage P22 capsid, genetically incorporating ziconotide in the interior cavity, and chemically attaching cell penetrating HIV-Tat peptide on the exterior of the capsid. Virus like particles (VLPs) of P22 containing ziconotide were successfully transported in several BBB models of rat and human brain microvascular endothelial cells (BMVEC) using a recyclable noncytotoxic endocytic pathway. This work demonstrates proof in principle for developing a possible alternative to intrathecal injection of ziconotide using a tunable VLP drug delivery nanocontainer to cross the BBB.

  15. Multiphasic growth models and the evolution of prolonged growth exemplified by human brain evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vrba, E S

    1998-02-07

    New models for multiphasic growth are presented. They are illustrated by analysis of brain growth in humans and chimpanzees, and the results are used to test the hypothesis of evolution by proportional growth prolongation: that all descendant growth phases are extended by the same factor while each remains at the ancestral growth rate. The results are consistent with the hypothesis and imply that gross brain weight increase towards humans required change in only one growth parameter: prolongation of the nonlinear ancestral growth phases. The restricted and orderly nature of the developmental changes hints at a basis in few genetic changes. Proportional growth prolongation is of general evolutionary importance because it can reorganize body proportions.

  16. A thalamo-cortical neural mass model for the simulation of brain rhythms during sleep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cona, F; Lacanna, M; Ursino, M

    2014-08-01

    Cortico-thalamic interactions are known to play a pivotal role in many brain phenomena, including sleep, attention, memory consolidation and rhythm generation. Hence, simple mathematical models that can simulate the dialogue between the cortex and the thalamus, at a mesoscopic level, have a great cognitive value. In the present work we describe a neural mass model of a cortico-thalamic module, based on neurophysiological mechanisms. The model includes two thalamic populations (a thalamo-cortical relay cell population, TCR, and its related thalamic reticular nucleus, TRN), and a cortical column consisting of four connected populations (pyramidal neurons, excitatory interneurons, inhibitory interneurons with slow and fast kinetics). Moreover, thalamic neurons exhibit two firing modes: bursting and tonic. Finally, cortical synapses among pyramidal neurons incorporate a disfacilitation mechanism following prolonged activity. Simulations show that the model is able to mimic the different patterns of rhythmic activity in cortical and thalamic neurons (beta and alpha waves, spindles, delta waves, K-complexes, slow sleep waves) and their progressive changes from wakefulness to deep sleep, by just acting on modulatory inputs. Moreover, simulations performed by providing short sensory inputs to the TCR show that brain rhythms during sleep preserve the cortex from external perturbations, still allowing a high cortical activity necessary to drive synaptic plasticity and memory consolidation. In perspective, the present model may be used within larger cortico-thalamic networks, to gain a deeper understanding of mechanisms beneath synaptic changes during sleep, to investigate the specific role of brain rhythms, and to explore cortical synchronization achieved via thalamic influences.

  17. Computational modeling of blast wave interaction with a human body and assessment of traumatic brain injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, X. G.; Przekwas, A. J.; Gupta, R. K.

    2017-07-01

    The modeling of human body biomechanics resulting from blast exposure poses great challenges because of the complex geometry and the substantial material heterogeneity. We developed a detailed human body finite element model representing both the geometry and the materials realistically. The model includes the detailed head (face, skull, brain and spinal cord), the neck, the skeleton, air cavities (lungs) and the tissues. Hence, it can be used to properly model the stress wave propagation in the human body subjected to blast loading. The blast loading on the human was generated from a simulated C4 explosion. We used the highly scalable solvers in the multi-physics code CoBi for both the blast simulation and the human body biomechanics. The meshes generated for these simulations are of good quality so that relatively large time-step sizes can be used without resorting to artificial time scaling treatments. The coupled gas dynamics and biomechanics solutions were validated against the shock tube test data. The human body models were used to conduct parametric simulations to find the biomechanical response and the brain injury mechanism due to blasts impacting the human body. Under the same blast loading condition, we showed the importance of inclusion of the whole body.

  18. Error-preceding brain activity reflects (mal-)adaptive adjustments of cognitive control: a modeling study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinhauser, Marco; Eichele, Heike; Juvodden, Hilde T; Huster, Rene J; Ullsperger, Markus; Eichele, Tom

    2012-01-01

    Errors in choice tasks are preceded by gradual changes in brain activity presumably related to fluctuations in cognitive control that promote the occurrence of errors. In the present paper, we use connectionist modeling to explore the hypothesis that these fluctuations reflect (mal-)adaptive adjustments of cognitive control. We considered ERP data from a study in which the probability of conflict in an Eriksen-flanker task was manipulated in sub-blocks of trials. Errors in these data were preceded by a gradual decline of N2 amplitude. After fitting a connectionist model of conflict adaptation to the data, we analyzed simulated N2 amplitude, simulated response times (RTs), and stimulus history preceding errors in the model, and found that the model produced the same pattern as obtained in the empirical data. Moreover, this pattern is not found in alternative models in which cognitive control varies randomly or in an oscillating manner. Our simulations suggest that the decline of N2 amplitude preceding errors reflects an increasing adaptation of cognitive control to specific task demands, which leads to an error when these task demands change. Taken together, these results provide evidence that error-preceding brain activity can reflect adaptive adjustments rather than unsystematic fluctuations of cognitive control, and therefore, that these errors are actually a consequence of the adaptiveness of human cognition.

  19. Nucleus accumbens deep brain stimulation in a rat model of binge eating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doucette, W T; Khokhar, J Y; Green, A I

    2015-12-15

    Binge eating (BE) is a difficult-to-treat behavior with high relapse rates, thus complicating several disorders including obesity. In this study, we tested the effects of high-frequency deep brain stimulation (DBS) in a rodent model of BE. We hypothesized that BE rats receiving high-frequency DBS in the nucleus accumbens (NAc) core would have reduced binge sizes compared with sham stimulation in both a 'chronic BE' model as well as in a 'relapse to chronic BE' model. Male Sprague-Dawley rats (N=18) were implanted with stimulating electrodes in bilateral NAc core, and they received either active stimulation (N=12) or sham stimulation (N=6) for the initial chronic BE experiments. After testing in the chronic BE state, rats did not engage in binge sessions for 1 month, and then resumed binge sessions (relapse to chronic BE) with active or sham stimulation (N=5-7 per group). A significant effect of intervention group was observed on binge size in the chronic BE state, but no significant difference between intervention groups was observed in the relapse to chronic BE experiments. This research, making use of both a chronic BE model as well as a relapse to chronic BE model, provides data supporting the hypothesis that DBS of the NAc core can decrease BE. Further research will be needed to learn how to increase the effect size and decrease deep brain stimulation-treatment outcome variability across the continuum of BE behavior.

  20. Spin-glass model predicts metastable brain states that diminish in anesthesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anthony G Hudetz

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Patterns of resting state connectivity change dynamically and may represent modes of cognitive information processing. The diversity of connectivity patterns (global brain states reflects the information capacity of the brain and determines the state of consciousness. In this work, computer simulation was used to explore the repertoire of global brain states as a function of cortical activation level. We implemented a modified spin glass model to describe UP/DOWN state transitions of neuronal populations at a mesoscopic scale based on resting state BOLD fMRI data. Resting state fMRI was recorded in 20 participants and mapped to 10,000 cortical regions defined on a group-aligned cortical surface map. Each region represented the population activity of a ~20mm2 area of the cortex. Cross-correlation matrices of the mapped BOLD time courses of the set of regions were calculated and averaged across subjects. In the model, each cortical region was allowed to interact with the 16 other regions that had the highest pair-wise correlation values. All regions stochastically transitioned between UP and DOWN states under the net influence of their 16 pairs. The probability of local state transitions was controlled by a single parameter T corresponding to the level of global cortical activation. To estimate the number of distinct global states, first we ran 10,000 simulations at T=0. Simulations were started from random configurations that converged to one of several distinct patterns. Using hierarchical clustering, at 99% similarity, close to 300 distinct states were found. At intermediate T, metastable state configurations were formed suggesting critical behavior with a sharp increase in the number of metastable states at an optimal T. Both reduced activation (anesthesia, sleep and increased activation (hyper-activation moved the system away from equilibrium, presumably incompatible with conscious mentation. During equilibrium, the diversity of large

  1. Spin-glass model predicts metastable brain states that diminish in anesthesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hudetz, Anthony G; Humphries, Colin J; Binder, Jeffrey R

    2014-01-01

    Patterns of resting state connectivity change dynamically and may represent modes of cognitive information processing. The diversity of connectivity patterns (global brain states) reflects the information capacity of the brain and determines the state of consciousness. In this work, computer simulation was used to explore the repertoire of global brain states as a function of cortical activation level. We implemented a modified spin glass model to describe UP/DOWN state transitions of neuronal populations at a mesoscopic scale based on resting state BOLD fMRI data. Resting state fMRI was recorded in 20 participants and mapped to 10,000 cortical regions (sites) defined on a group-aligned cortical surface map. Each site represented the population activity of a ~20 mm(2) area of the cortex. Cross-correlation matrices of the mapped BOLD time courses of the set of sites were calculated and averaged across subjects. In the model, each cortical site was allowed to interact with the 16 other sites that had the highest pair-wise correlation values. All sites stochastically transitioned between UP and DOWN states under the net influence of their 16 pairs. The probability of local state transitions was controlled by a single parameter T corresponding to the level of global cortical activation. To estimate the number of distinct global states, first we ran 10,000 simulations at T = 0. Simulations were started from random configurations that converged to one of several distinct patterns. Using hierarchical clustering, at 99% similarity, close to 300 distinct states were found. At intermediate T, metastable state configurations were formed suggesting critical behavior with a sharp increase in the number of metastable states at an optimal T. Both reduced activation (anesthesia, sleep) and increased activation (hyper-activation) moved the system away from equilibrium, presumably incompatible with conscious mentation. During equilibrium, the diversity of large-scale brain states

  2. Antiaging Effect of Metformin on Brain in Naturally Aged and Accelerated Senescence Model of Rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garg, Geetika; Singh, Sandeep; Singh, Abhishek Kumar; Rizvi, Syed Ibrahim

    2017-01-09

    Metformin, a biguanide, is a widely used antidiabetic drug, which inhibits gluconeogenesis and is used to treat hyperglycemia in type 2 diabetes. Through activation of AMPK (AMP-activated protein kinase) pathway, metformin also mimics caloric restriction health benefits. Aging causes substantial molecular to morphological changes in brain, the brain cells being more susceptible toward oxidative stress mediated damages due to the presence of high lipid content and higher oxygen consumption. Wistar rats (naturally aged and d-galactose induced rat model) were supplemented with metformin (300 mg/kg b.w. orally) for 6 weeks. The biomarkers of oxidative stress such as antioxidant capacity (ferric reducing antioxidant potential [FRAP]), malondialdehyde (MDA), reduced glutathione (GSH), protein carbonyl (PCO), reactive oxygen species (ROS), acetylcholinesterase (AChE) activity, and nitric oxide (NO) were measured in brain tissues of control and experimental groups. The results indicate that metformin treatment augmented the levels of FRAP and GSH in naturally aged, and d-gal induced aging model groups compared to the respective controls. In contrast, metformin treated groups exhibited significant reduction in MDA, PCO, ROS, and NO levels and a significant increase in AChE activity in induced aging rats. The administration of d-galactose upregulated the expression of sirtuin-2, interleukin-6 (IL-6), and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) and downregulated the expression of Beclin-1. Metformin supplementation downregulated the d-galactose induced expressions of sirtuin-2, IL-6, and TNF-α expression, whereas upregulated the Beclin-1 expression. Our data confirm that metformin restores the antioxidant status and improves healthy brain aging through the activation of autophagy and reduction in inflammation.

  3. The gradual onset brain death model : a relevant model to study organ donation and its consequences on the outcome after transplantation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kolkert, Joe L. P.; van Dijk, Antony; Ottens, Petra J.; Ploeg, Rutger J.; Leuvenink, Henri G. D.; 't Hart, Nils

    2007-01-01

    Organs used for transplantation are usually derived from heart-beating brain dead donors. However, brain death is known to have negative effects on donor organ quality, previously studied using a difficult to control sudden onset experimental model. We have now developed a reproducible gradual onset

  4. Low brain ascorbic acid increases susceptibility to seizures in mouse models of decreased brain ascorbic acid transport and Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warner, Timothy A; Kang, Jing-Qiong; Kennard, John A; Harrison, Fiona E

    2015-02-01

    Seizures are a known co-occurring symptom of Alzheimer's disease, and they can accelerate cognitive and neuropathological dysfunction. Sub-optimal vitamin C (ascorbic acid) deficiency, that is low levels that do not lead the sufferer to present with clinical signs of scurvy (e.g. lethargy, hemorrhage, hyperkeratosis), are easily obtainable with insufficient dietary intake, and may contribute to the oxidative stress environment of both Alzheimer's disease and epilepsy. The purpose of this study was to test whether mice that have diminished brain ascorbic acid in addition to carrying human Alzheimer's disease mutations in the amyloid precursor protein (APP) and presenilin 1 (PSEN1) genes, had altered electrical activity in the brain (electroencephalography; EEG), and were more susceptible to pharmacologically induced seizures. Brain ascorbic acid was decreased in APP/PSEN1 mice by crossing them with sodium vitamin C transporter 2 (SVCT2) heterozygous knockout mice. These mice have an approximately 30% decrease in brain ascorbic acid due to lower levels of SVCT2 that supplies the brain with ASC. SVCT2+/-APP/PSEN1 mice had decreased ascorbic acid and increased oxidative stress in brain, increased mortality, faster seizure onset latency following treatment with kainic acid (10 mg/kg i.p.), and more ictal events following pentylenetetrazol (50 mg/kg i.p.) treatment. Furthermore, we report the entirely novel phenomenon that ascorbic acid deficiency alone increased the severity of kainic acid- and pentylenetetrazol-induced seizures. These data suggest that avoiding ascorbic acid deficiency may be particularly important in populations at increased risk for epilepsy and seizures, such as Alzheimer's disease.

  5. Systemic and direct nose-to-brain transport pharmacokinetic model for remoxipride after intravenous and intranasal administration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevens, Jasper; Ploeger, Bart A; van der Graaf, Piet H; Danhof, Meindert; de Lange, Elizabeth C M

    2011-12-01

    Intranasal (IN) administration could be an attractive mode of delivery for drugs targeting the central nervous system, potentially providing a high bioavailability because of avoidance of a hepatic first-pass effect and rapid onset of action. However, controversy remains whether a direct transport route from the nasal cavity into the brain exists. Pharmacokinetic modeling is proposed to identify the existence of direct nose-to-brain transport in a quantitative manner. The selective dopamine-D2 receptor antagonist remoxipride was administered at different dosages, in freely moving rats, by the IN and intravenous (IV) route. Plasma and brain extracellular fluid (ECF) concentration-time profiles were obtained and simultaneously analyzed using nonlinear mixed-effects modeling. Brain ECF/plasma area under the curve ratios were 0.28 and 0.19 after IN and IV administration, respectively. A multicompartment pharmacokinetic model with two absorption compartments (nose-to-systemic and nose-to-brain) was found to best describe the observed pharmacokinetic data. Absorption was described in terms of bioavailability and rate. Total bioavailability after IN administration was 89%, of which 75% was attributed to direct nose-to brain transport. Direct nose-to-brain absorption rate was slow, explaining prolonged brain ECF exposure after IN compared with IV administration. These studies explicitly provide separation and quantitation of systemic and direct nose-to-brain transport after IN administration of remoxipride in the rat. Describing remoxipride pharmacokinetics at the target site (brain ECF) in a semiphysiology-based manner would allow for better prediction of pharmacodynamic effects.

  6. Prognostic model for brain metastases from lung adenocarcinoma identified with epidermal growth factor receptor mutation status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hongwei; Wang, Weili; Jia, Haixia; Lian, Jianhong; Cao, Jianzhong; Zhang, Xiaqin; Song, Xing; Jia, Sufang; Li, Zhengran; Cao, Xing; Zhou, Wei; Han, Songye; Yang, Weihua; Xi, Yanfen; Lian, Shenming

    2017-09-01

    Several indices have been developed to predict survival of brain metastases (BM) based on prognostic factors. However, such models were designed for general brain metastases from different kinds of cancers, and prognostic factors vary between cancers and histological subtypes. Recently, studies have indicated that epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) mutation status may be a potential prognostic biological factor in BM from lung adenocarcinoma. Thus, we sought to define the role of EGFR mutation in prognoses and introduce a prognostic model specific for BM from lung adenocarcinoma. Data of 256 patients with BM from lung adenocarcinoma identified with EGFR mutations were collected. Independent prognostic factors were confirmed using a Cox regression model. The new prognostic model was developed based on the results of multivariable analyses. The score of each factor was calculated by six-month survival. Prognostic groups were divided into low, medium, and high risk based on the total scores. The prediction ability of the new model was compared to the three existing models. EGFR mutation and Karnofsky performance status were independent prognostic factors and were thus integrated into the new prognostic model. The new model was superior to the three other scoring systems regarding the prediction of three, six, and 12-month survival by pairwise comparison of the area under the curve. Our proposed prognostic model specific for BM from lung adenocarcinoma incorporating EGFR mutation status was valid in predicting patient survival. Further verification is warranted, with prospective testing using large sample sizes. © 2017 The Authors. Thoracic Cancer published by China Lung Oncology Group and John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  7. Predicting 14-day mortality after severe traumatic brain injury: application of the IMPACT models in the brain trauma foundation TBI-trac® New York State database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roozenbeek, Bob; Chiu, Ya-Lin; Lingsma, Hester F; Gerber, Linda M; Steyerberg, Ewout W; Ghajar, Jamshid; Maas, Andrew I R

    2012-05-01

    Prognostic models for outcome prediction in patients with traumatic brain injury (TBI) are important instruments in both clinical practice and research. To remain current a continuous process of model validation is necessary. We aimed to investigate the performance of the International Mission on Prognosis and Analysis of Clinical Trials in TBI (IMPACT) prognostic models in predicting mortality in a contemporary New York State TBI registry developed and maintained by the Brain Trauma Foundation. The Brain Trauma Foundation (BTF) TBI-trac® database contains data on 3125 patients who sustained severe TBI (Glasgow Coma Scale [GCS] score ≤ 8) in New York State between 2000 and 2009. The outcome measure was 14-day mortality. To predict 14-day mortality with admission data, we adapted the IMPACT Core and Extended models. Performance of the models was assessed by determining calibration (agreement between observed and predicted outcomes), and discrimination (separation of those patients who die from those who survive). Calibration was explored graphically with calibration plots. Discrimination was expressed by the area under the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve (AUC). A total of 2513 out of 3125 patients in the BTF database met the inclusion criteria. The 14-day mortality rate was 23%. The models showed excellent calibration. Mean predicted probabilities were 20% for the Core model and 24% for the Extended model. Both models showed good discrimination with AUCs of 0.79 (Core) and 0.83 (Extended). We conclude that the IMPACT models validly predict 14-day mortality in the BTF database, confirming generalizability of these models for outcome prediction in TBI patients.

  8. Optical scatter imaging of cellular and mitochondrial swelling in brain tissue models of stroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Lee James

    2001-08-01

    The severity of brain edema resulting from a stroke can determine a patient's survival and the extent of their recovery. Cellular swelling is the microscopic source of a significant part of brain edema. Mitochondrial swelling also appears to be a determining event in the death or survival of the cells that are injured during a stroke. Therapies for reducing brain edema are not effective in many cases and current treatments of stroke do not address mitochondrial swelling at all. This dissertation is motivated by the lack of a complete understanding of cellular swelling resulting from stroke and the lack of a good method to begin to study mitochondrial swelling resulting from stroke in living brain tissue. In this dissertation, a novel method of detecting mitochondrial and cellular swelling in living hippocampal slices is developed and validated. The system is used to obtain spatial and temporal information about cellular and mitochondrial swelling resulting from various models of stroke. The effect of changes in water content on light scatter and absorption are examined in two models of brain edema. The results of this study demonstrate that optical techniques can be used to detect changes in water content. Mie scatter theory, the theoretical basis of the dual- angle scatter ratio imaging system, is presented. Computer simulations based on Mie scatter theory are used to determine the optimal angles for imaging. A detailed account of the early systems is presented to explain the motivations for the system design, especially polarization, wavelength and light path. Mitochondrial sized latex particles are used to determine the system response to changes in scattering particle size and concentration. The dual-angle scatter ratio imaging system is used to distinguish between osmotic and excitotoxic models of stroke injury. Such distinction cannot be achieved using the current techniques to study cellular swelling in hippocampal slices. The change in the scatter ratio is

  9. Studies on blast traumatic brain injury using in-vitro model with shock tube.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arun, Peethambaran; Spadaro, John; John, Jennifer; Gharavi, Robert B; Bentley, Timothy B; Nambiar, Madhusoodana P

    2011-06-11

    One of the major limitations in studying the mechanisms of blast-induced traumatic brain injury (bTBI) or screening therapeutics for protection is the lack of suitable laboratory model systems that can closely mimic the complex blast exposure. Although animal models of bTBI that use shock tubes to mimic blast exposure are available, no high throughput shock tube-based in-vitro models have been reported. Here, we report an in-vitro bTBI model using a compressed air-driven shock tube and mouse neuroblastoma/rat glioblastoma hybrid cells (NG108-15) or SH-SY5Y human neuroblastoma cells in tissue culture plates. Our data showed significant neurobiological effects with decreased adenosine triphosphate levels, increased cellular injury, lactate dehydrogenase release, and reactive oxygen species formation after blast exposure.

  10. The Chinese herbal formula Tongluo Jiunao promotes expression of brain-derived neurotrophic factor/tropomyosin-related kinase B pathways in a rat model of ischemic brain injury

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Peiman Alesheikh; Yangyang Yan; Huiling Tang; Pengtao Li; Wei Zhang; Yanshu Pan; Arezou Mashoufi; Liyun Zhao; Runjun Wang; Bo Di

    2011-01-01

    The neurotrophin-Trk receptor pathway is an intrinsic pathway to relieve damage to the central nervous system. The present study observed the effects of Tongluo Jiunao (TLJN), which comprises Panax Notoginseng and Gardenia Jasminoides, on expression of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and tropomyosin-related kinase B (TrkB) in a rat model of focal cerebral ischemic injury. Xue Sai Tong (XST), comprising Panax Notoginseng, served as the positive control. Mechanisms of neuroprotection were analyzed following TLJN injection. Following establishment of the middle cerebral artery occlusion models, TLJN and XST were intraperitoneally injected, and 2, 3, 5-triphenyltetrazolium chloride staining results revealed that TLJN injection reduced infarct volume, suggesting that TLJN exerted a neuroprotective effect. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay results showed that TLJN elevated BDNF and growth associated protein-43 expression in ischemic brain tissues, as well as serum BDNF levels. Reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction and western blot results showed that TLJN injection did not affect TrkB expression in the ischemic brain tissues of rats. These results suggested that TLJN injection reduced damage to ischemic brain tissues and increased BDNF expression. In addition, TLJN injection resulted in better promoting effects on neurotrophic factor expression compared with XST.

  11. A new PAMPA model using an in-house brain lipid extract for screening the blood-brain barrier permeability of drug candidates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bicker, Joana; Alves, Gilberto; Fortuna, Ana; Soares-da-Silva, Patrício; Falcão, Amílcar

    2016-03-30

    The determination of the permeability of drug candidates across the blood-brain barrier (BBB) is a fundamental step during drug discovery programs. The parallel artificial membrane permeability assay (PAMPA) is a high throughput screening tool applied to evaluate the passive permeability and adapted to predict BBB penetration. Herein, a new PAMPA model was developed using an in-house brain lipid extract capable of discriminating BBB permeable from non-permeable compounds. The apparent permeability (Papp) of 18 reference molecules and 10 test compounds was assessed and compared with phosphatidylcholine and commercial porcine polar brain lipid (PBL). The physicochemical selectivity of the in-house brain lipid extract was demonstrated by correlating Papp values with physicochemical properties and its predictive capacity estimated by establishing in vitro-in vivo correlations. The strong correlations achieved between 2% (w/v) in-house lipid extract and PBL for reference (r(2)=0.77) and test compounds (r(2)=0.94) support an equivalent discriminatory capacity and validate the presented model. Moreover, PAMPA studies performed with PBL and in-house lipid extract exhibited a higher correlation with the in vivo parameter logBB (r(2)=0.76 and r(2)=0.72, respectively) than phosphatidylcholine (r(2)=0.51). Overall, the applied lipid extraction process was reproducible, economical and provided lipid extracts that can be used to reliably assess BBB permeation.

  12. Neuroprotective mechanism of the novel melatonin derivative Neu-P11 in brain ischemia related models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buendia, Izaskun; Gómez-Rangel, Vanessa; González-Lafuente, Laura; Parada, Esther; León, Rafael; Gameiro, Isabel; Michalska, Patrycja; Laudon, Moshe; Egea, Javier; López, Manuela G

    2015-12-01

    Stopping the ischemic cascade by targeting its components is a potential strategy for acute ischemic stroke treatment. During ischemia and especially over reperfusion, oxidative stress plays a major role in causing neuronal cell death. Melatonin has been previously reported to provide neuroprotective effects in in vivo models of stroke by a mechanism that implicates melatonin receptors. In this context, this study was planned to test the potential neuroprotective effects of the novel melatonin MT1/MT2 receptor agonist, Neu-P11, against brain ischemia in in vitro and in vivo models, and to elucidate its underlying mechanism of action. Neu-P11 proved to be a good antioxidant, to protect against glutamate-induced excitotoxicity and oxygen and glucose deprivation in hippocampal slices, and to reduce infarct volume in an in vivo stroke model. Regarding its mechanism of action, the protective effect of Neu-P11 was reverted by luzindole (melatonin receptor antagonist), AG490 (JAK2 inhibitor), LY294002 (PI3/AKT inhibitor) and PD98059 (MEK/ERK1/2 inhibitor). In conclusion, Neu-P11 affords neuroprotection against brain ischemia in in vitro and in vivo models by activating a pro-survival signaling pathway that involves melatonin receptors, JAK/STAT, PI3K/Akt and MEK/ERK1/2.

  13. A dynamic extraversion model. The brain's response to a single dose of a stimulant drug.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amigó, Salvador; Caselles, Antonio; Micó, Joan C

    2008-05-01

    The aim of this paper is to present a mathematical dynamic modelling of the effect a stimulant drug has on different people which, at the same time, can be a useful tool for future brain studies. To this end, a dynamic model of the evolution of extraversion (considering its tonic and phasic aspects) has been constructed taking into account the unique personality trait theory and the general modelling methodology. This model consists of a delayed differential equation which, on one hand, considers that the active stimulus, a consequence of a single intake, is not constant; on the other hand, it contemplates that the state variable representing the phasic extraversion also represents the brain activation. The derivative of this state variable is calculated as the sum of the homeostatic control flow, the excitatory effect flow and the inhibitor effect flow. The solutions of this equation relate the tonic activation of an individual (that characterizes his or her personality) with his or her phasic activation level, whose evolution over time describes the organism's response to a single drug intake. These solutions quantitatively reproduce the predictions of current personality theories and anticipate vulnerability to drug misuse and addiction development.

  14. Brain mechanisms for predictive control by switching internal models: implications for higher-order cognitive functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imamizu, Hiroshi; Kawato, Mitsuo

    2009-07-01

    Humans can guide their actions toward the realization of their intentions. Flexible, rapid and precise realization of intentions and goals relies on the brain learning to control its actions on external objects and to predict the consequences of this control. Neural mechanisms that mimic the input-output properties of our own body and other objects can be used to support prediction and control, and such mechanisms are called internal models. We first summarize functional neuroimaging, behavioral and computational studies of the brain mechanisms related to acquisition, modular organization, and the predictive switching of internal models mainly for tool use. These mechanisms support predictive control and flexible switching of intentional actions. We then review recent studies demonstrating that internal models are crucial for the execution of not only immediate actions but also higher-order cognitive functions, including optimization of behaviors toward long-term goals, social interactions based on prediction of others' actions and mental states, and language processing. These studies suggest that a concept of internal models can consistently explain the neural mechanisms and computational principles needed for fundamental sensorimotor functions as well as higher-order cognitive functions.

  15. Semisupervised Soft Mumford-Shah Model for MRI Brain Image Segmentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong-Yuan Wang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available One challenge of unsupervised MRI brain image segmentation is the central gray matter due to the faint contrast with respect to the surrounding white matter. In this paper, the necessity of supervised image segmentation is addressed, and a soft Mumford-Shah model is introduced. Then, a framework of semisupervised image segmentation based on soft Mumford-Shah model is developed. The main contribution of this paper lies in the development a framework of a semisupervised soft image segmentation using both Bayesian principle and the principle of soft image segmentation. The developed framework classifies pixels using a semisupervised and interactive way, where the class of a pixel is not only determined by its features but also determined by its distance from those known regions. The developed semisupervised soft segmentation model turns out to be an extension of the unsupervised soft Mumford-Shah model. The framework is then applied to MRI brain image segmentation. Experimental results demonstrate that the developed framework outperforms the state-of-the-art methods of unsupervised segmentation. The new method can produce segmentation as precise as required.

  16. Oral Administration of Sitagliptin Activates CREB and Is Neuroprotective in Murine Model of Brain Trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DellaValle, Brian; Brix, Gitte S; Brock, Birgitte; Gejl, Michael; Rungby, Jørgen; Larsen, Agnete

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Traumatic brain injury is a major cause of mortality and morbidity. We have previously shown that the injectable glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) analog, liraglutide, significantly improved the outcome in mice after severe traumatic brain injury (TBI). In this study we are interested in the effects of oral treatment of a different class of GLP-1 based therapy, dipeptidyl peptidase IV (DPP-IV) inhibition on mice after TBI. DPP-IV inhibitors reduce the degradation of endogenous GLP-1 and extend circulation of this protective peptide in the bloodstream. This class has yet to be investigated as a potential therapy for TBI. Methods: Mice were administrated once-daily 50 mg/kg of sitagliptin in a Nutella® ball or Nutella® alone throughout the study, beginning 2 days before severe trauma was induced with a stereotactic cryo-lesion. At 2 days post trauma, lesion size was determined. Brains were isolated for immunoblotting for assessment of selected biomarkers for pathology and protection. Results: Sitagliptin treatment reduced lesion size at day 2 post-injury by ~28% (p < 0.05). Calpain-driven necrotic tone was reduced ~2-fold in sitagliptin-treated brains (p < 0.001) and activation of the protective cAMP-response element binding protein (CREB) system was significantly more pronounced (~1.5-fold, p < 0.05). The CREB-regulated, mitochondrial antioxidant protein manganese superoxide dismutase (MnSOD) was increased in sitagliptin-treated mice (p < 0.05). Conversely, apoptotic tone (alpha-spectrin fragmentation, Bcl-2 levels) and the neuroinflammatory markers IL-6, and Iba-1 were not affected by treatment. Conclusions: This study shows, for the first time, that DPP-IV inhibition ameliorates both anatomical and biochemical consequences of TBI and activates CREB in the brain. Moreover, this work supports previous studies suggesting that the effect of GLP-1 analogs in models of brain damage relates to GLP-1 receptor stimulation in a dose-dependent manner.

  17. The interaction of carbon nanotubes with an in vitro blood-brain barrier model and mouse brain in vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kafa, Houmam; Wang, Julie Tzu-Wen; Rubio, Noelia; Venner, Kerrie; Anderson, Glenn; Pach, Elzbieta; Ballesteros, Belén; Preston, Jane E.; Abbott, N. Joan; Al-Jamal, Khuloud T.

    2015-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are a novel nanocarriers with interesting physical and chemical properties. Here we investigate the ability of amino-functionalized multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs-NH3+) to cross the Blood-Brain Barrier (BBB) in vitro using a co-culture BBB model comprising primary porcine brain endothelial cells (PBEC) and primary rat astrocytes, and in vivo following a systemic administration of radiolabelled f-MWNTs. Transmission Electron microscopy (TEM) confirmed that MWNTs-NH3+ crossed the PBEC monolayer via energy-dependent transcytosis. MWNTs-NH3+ were observed within endocytic vesicles and multi-vesicular bodies after 4 and 24 h. A complete crossing of the in vitro BBB model was observed after 48 h, which was further confirmed by the presence of MWNTs-NH3+ within the astrocytes. MWNT-NH3+ that crossed the PBEC layer was quantitatively assessed using radioactive tracers. A maximum transport of 13.0 ± 1.1% after 72 h was achieved using the co-culture model. f-MWNT exhibited significant brain uptake (1.1  ±  0.3% injected dose/g) at 5 min after intravenous injection in mice, after whole body perfusion with heparinized saline. Capillary depletion confirmed presence of f-MWNT in both brain capillaries and parenchyma fractions. These results could pave the way for use of CNTs as nanocarriers for delivery of drugs and biologics to the brain, after systemic administration. PMID:25890741

  18. Is 21st century neuroscience too focussed on the rat/mouse model of brain function and dysfunction?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul Manger

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Studies in the basic neurosciences are heavily reliant upon rat and mouse models. The brain is one of the most distinguishing features of the human species, but is enough being done to fully understand the evolution of the human brain and brain diversity in generalµ Without a clear understanding of the evolution of the nervous system we may be investing a great deal of effort into some limited specific animal models that may prove to be erroneous in terms of the overall usefulness in clinically applied research. Here we present an analysis that demonstrates that 75% of our research efforts are directed to the rat, mouse and human brain, or 0.0001% of the nervous systems on the planet. This extreme bias in research trends may provide a limited scope in the discovery of novel aspects of brain structure and function that would be of importance in understanding both the evolution of the human brain and in selecting appropriate animal models for use in clinically related research. We offer examples both from the historical and recent literature indicating the usefulness of comparative neurobiological investigation in elucidating both normal and abnormal structure and function of the brain.

  19. Neuropsychological outcome from blast versus non-blast: mild traumatic brain injury in U.S. military service members.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lange, Rael T; Pancholi, Sonal; Brickell, Tracey A; Sakura, Sara; Bhagwat, Aditya; Merritt, Victoria; French, Louis M

    2012-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the neuropsychological outcome from blast-related versus non-blast related mild traumatic brain injury (MTBI). Participants were 56 U.S. military service members who sustained an MTBI, divided into two groups based on mechanism of injury: (a) non-blast related (Non-blast; n = 21), and (b) blast plus secondary blunt trauma (Blast Plus; n = 35). All participants had sustained their injury in theatre whilst deployed during Operation Iraqi Freedom or Operation Enduring Freedom. Patients had been seen for neuropsychological evaluation at Walter Reed Army Medical Center on average 4.4 months (SD = 4.1) post-injury. Measures included 14 clinical scales from the Personality Assessment Inventory (PAI) and 12 common neurocognitive measures. For the PAI, there were no significant differences between groups on all scales (p > .05). However, medium effect sizes were found for the Depression (d = .49) and Stress (d = .47) scales (i.e., Blast Plus > Non-blast). On the neurocognitive measures, after controlling for the influence of psychological distress (i.e., Depression, Stress), there were no differences between the Non-blast and Blast Plus groups on all measures. These findings provide little evidence to suggest that blast exposure plus secondary blunt trauma results in worse cognitive or psychological recovery than blunt trauma alone. (JINS, 2012, 18, 595-605).

  20. Effects of early life adverse experiences on brain activity: Implications from maternal separation models in rodents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mayumi eNishi

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available During postnatal development, adverse early life experiences can affect the formation of neuronal circuits and exert long-lasting influences on neural function. Many studies have shown that daily repeated MS, an animal model of early life stress, can modulate the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis (HPA axis and can affect subsequent brain function and emotional behavior during adulthood. However, the molecular basis of the long-lasting effects of early life stress on brain function has not been completely elucidated. In this review, we introduce various cases of MS in rodents and illustrate the alterations in HPA axis activity by focusing on corticosterone (CORT, an end product of the HPA axis in rodents. We then present a characterization of the brain regions affected by various patterns of MS, including repeated MS and single time MS at various stages before weaning, by investigating c-Fos expression, a biological marker of neuronal activity. These CORT and c-Fos studies suggest that repeated early life stress may affect neuronal function in region- and temporal-specific manners, indicating a critical period for habituation to early life stress. Next, we discuss how early life stress can impact behavior, namely by inducing depression, anxiety or eating disorders. Furthermore, alterations in gene expression in adult mice exposed to MS, especially epigenetic changes of DNA methylation, are discussed.

  1. Light scattering change precedes loss of cerebral adenosine triphosphate in a rat global ischemic brain model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawauchi, Satoko; Sato, Shunichi; Ooigawa, Hidetoshi; Nawashiro, Hiroshi; Ishihara, Miya; Kikuchi, Makoto

    2009-08-14

    Measurement of intrinsic optical signals (IOSs) is an attractive technique for monitoring tissue viability in brains since it enables noninvasive, real-time monitoring of morphological characteristics as well as physiological and biochemical characteristics of tissue. We previously showed that light scattering signals reflecting cellular morphological characteristics were closely related to the IOSs associated with the redox states of cytochrome c oxidase in the mitochondrial respiratory chain. In the present study, we examined the relationship between light scattering and energy metabolism. Light scattering signals were transcranially measured in rat brains after oxygen and glucose deprivation, and the results were compared with concentrations of cerebral adenosine triphosphate (ATP) measured by luciferin-luciferase bioluminescence assay. Electrophysiological signal was also recorded simultaneously. After starting saline infusion, EEG activity ceased at 108+/-17s, even after which both the light scattering signal and ATP concentration remained at initial levels. However, light scattering started to change in three phases at 236+/-15s and then cerebral ATP concentration started to decrease at about 260s. ATP concentration significantly decreased during the triphasic scattering change, indicating that the start of scattering change preceded the loss of cerebral ATP. The mean time difference between the start of triphasic scattering change and the onset of ATP loss was about 24s in the present model. DC potential measurement showed that the triphasic scattering change was associated with anoxic depolarization. These findings suggest that light scattering signal can be used as an indicator of loss of tissue viability in brains.

  2. Gaussian mixture models and semantic gating improve reconstructions from human brain activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanne eSchoenmakers

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Better acquisition protocols and analysis techniques are making it possible to use fMRI to obtain highly detailed visualizations of brain processes. In particular we focus on the reconstruction of natural images from BOLD responses in visual cortex. We expand our linear Gaussian framework for percept decoding with Gaussian mixture models to better represent the prior distribution of natural images. Reconstruction of such images then boils down to probabilistic inference in a hybrid Bayesian network. In our set-up, different mixture components correspond to different character categories. Our framework can automatically infer higher-order semantic categories from lower-level brain areas. Furthermore the framework can gate semantic information from higher-order brain areas to enforce the correct category during reconstruction. When categorical information is not available, we show that automatically learned clusters in the data give a similar improvement in reconstruction. The hybrid Bayesian network leads to highly accurate reconstructions in both supervised and unsupervised settings.

  3. A Single-Cell Roadmap of Lineage Bifurcation in Human ESC Models of Embryonic Brain Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Zizhen; Mich, John K; Ku, Sherman; Menon, Vilas; Krostag, Anne-Rachel; Martinez, Refugio A; Furchtgott, Leon; Mulholland, Heather; Bort, Susan; Fuqua, Margaret A; Gregor, Ben W; Hodge, Rebecca D; Jayabalu, Anu; May, Ryan C; Melton, Samuel; Nelson, Angelique M; Ngo, N Kiet; Shapovalova, Nadiya V; Shehata, Soraya I; Smith, Michael W; Tait, Leah J; Thompson, Carol L; Thomsen, Elliot R; Ye, Chaoyang; Glass, Ian A; Kaykas, Ajamete; Yao, Shuyuan; Phillips, John W; Grimley, Joshua S; Levi, Boaz P; Wang, Yanling; Ramanathan, Sharad

    2017-01-05

    During human brain development, multiple signaling pathways generate diverse cell types with varied regional identities. Here, we integrate single-cell RNA sequencing and clonal analyses to reveal lineage trees and molecular signals underlying early forebrain and mid/hindbrain cell differentiation from human embryonic stem cells (hESCs). Clustering single-cell transcriptomic data identified 41 distinct populations of progenitor, neuronal, and non-neural cells across our differentiation time course. Comparisons with primary mouse and human gene expression data demonstrated rostral and caudal progenitor and neuronal identities from early brain development. Bayesian analyses inferred a unified cell-type lineage tree that bifurcates between cortical and mid/hindbrain cell types. Two methods of clonal analyses confirmed these findings and further revealed the importance of Wnt/β-catenin signaling in controlling this lineage decision. Together, these findings provide a rich transcriptome-based lineage map for studying human brain development and modeling developmental disorders. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Mouse models of human PIK3CA-related brain overgrowth have acutely treatable epilepsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Achira; Skibo, Jonathan; Kalume, Franck; Ni, Jing; Rankin, Sherri; Lu, Yiling; Dobyns, William B; Mills, Gordon B; Zhao, Jean J; Baker, Suzanne J; Millen, Kathleen J

    2015-01-01

    Mutations in the catalytic subunit of phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PIK3CA) and other PI3K-AKT pathway components have been associated with cancer and a wide spectrum of brain and body overgrowth. In the brain, the phenotypic spectrum of PIK3CA-related segmental overgrowth includes bilateral dysplastic megalencephaly, hemimegalencephaly and focal cortical dysplasia, the most common cause of intractable pediatric epilepsy. We generated mouse models expressing the most common activating Pik3ca mutations (H1047R and E545K) in developing neural progenitors. These accurately recapitulate all the key human pathological features including brain enlargement, cortical malformation, hydrocephalus and epilepsy, with phenotypic severity dependent on the mutant allele and its time of activation. Underlying mechanisms include increased proliferation, cell size and altered white matter. Notably, we demonstrate that acute 1 hr-suppression of PI3K signaling despite the ongoing presence of dysplasia has dramatic anti-epileptic benefit. Thus PI3K inhibitors offer a promising new avenue for effective anti-epileptic therapy for intractable pediatric epilepsy patients. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.12703.001 PMID:26633882

  5. Comparison of CT and MRI brain tumor imaging using a canine glioma model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whelan, H T; Clanton, J A; Wilson, R E; Tulipan, N B

    1988-01-01

    A canine gliosarcoma model was used to study the effectiveness of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with gadolinium contrast enhancement in defining the histologic margins of brain tumors. The effectiveness of this technique was compared to conventional computed tomography (CT) using iodinated contrast enhancement. Cultured canine gliosarcoma cells were injected into the left hemisphere of adult mongrel dogs. The dogs developed brain tumors and progressive clinical signs. Serial MRI with and without gadolinium diethylene triamine penta-acetic acid was compared to serial CT with and without sodium iothalamate obtained on the same days. After the final scans, animals were sacrificed; the brains were removed and processed for routine histopathologic study. All tumors were visualized with contrast-enhanced MRI which proved most sensitive. Gadolinium di-ethylene triamine penta-acetic acid caused bright enhancement of tumors in a distribution that consistently corresponded to areas of pathologically proved tumor infiltration. Gross and microscopic autopsy findings correlated better with MRI than with CT which tended to produce poorer resolution and underrepresent the size of viable tumor. Gadolinium-enhanced MRI is more accurate than unenhanced MRI, unenhanced CT, or enhanced CT in defining the histologic margins of tumors.

  6. Neurotransmitter Systems in a Mild Blast Traumatic Brain Injury Model: Catecholamines and Serotonin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawa, Lizan; Arborelius, Ulf P; Yoshitake, Takashi; Kehr, Jan; Hökfelt, Tomas; Risling, Mårten; Agoston, Denes

    2015-08-15

    Exposure to improvised explosive devices can result in a unique form of traumatic brain injury--blast-induced traumatic brain injury (bTBI). At the mild end of the spectrum (mild bTBI [mbTBI]), there are cognitive and mood disturbances. Similar symptoms have been observed in post-traumatic stress disorder caused by exposure to extreme psychological stress without physical injury. A role of the monoaminergic system in mood regulation and stress is well established but its involvement in mbTBI is not well understood. To address this gap, we used a rodent model of mbTBI and detected a decrease in immobility behavior in the forced swim test at 1 d post-exposure, coupled with an increase in climbing behavior, but not after 14 d or later, possibly indicating a transient increase in anxiety-like behavior. Using in situ hybridization, we found elevated messenger ribonucleic acid levels of both tyrosine hydroxylase and tryptophan hydroxylase 2 in the locus coeruleus and the dorsal raphe nucleus, respectively, as early as 2 h post-exposure. High-performance liquid chromatography analysis 1 d post-exposure primarily showed elevated noradrenaline levels in several forebrain regions. Taken together, we report that exposure to mild blast results in transient changes in both anxiety-like behavior and brain region-specific molecular changes, implicating the monoaminergic system in the pathobiology of mbTBI.

  7. How Anatomy Shapes Dynamics: A Semi-Analytical Study of the Brain at Rest by a Simple Spin Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gustavo eDeco

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Resting state networks show a surprisingly coherent and robust spatiotemporal organization. Previous theoretical studies demonstrated that these patterns can be understood as emergent on the basis of the underlying neuroanatomical connectivity skeleton. Integrating the biologically realistic DTI/DSI based neuroanatomical connectivity into a brain model of Ising spin dynamics, we found the presence of latent ghost multi-stable attractors, which can be studied analytically. The multistable attractor landscape defines a functionally meaningful dynamic repertoire of the brain network that is inherently present in the neuroanatomical connectivity. We demonstrate that the more entropy of attractors exists, the richer is the dynamical repertoire and consequently the brain network displays more capabilities of computation. We hypothesize therefore that human brain connectivity developed a scale free type of architecture in order to be able to store a large number of different and flexibly accessible brain functions

  8. Does kainic acid induce partial brain lesion in an invertebrate model: sepia officinalis? Comparison with electrolytic lesion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graindorge, Nicolas; Jozet-Alves, Christelle; Chichery, Raymond; Dickel, Ludovic; Bellanger, Cécile

    2008-10-31

    The present study investigates the feasibility of excitotoxic lesions in the cuttlefish in the mapping of brain functions in Cephalopods. Adult animals were injected locally with a neurotoxin, kainic acid. The brain region receiving the neurotoxin was the vertical lobe, a key brain structure for learning and memory processes. Brain damage induced by these injections was evaluated using different histological stainings: hematoxilin-eosin, Fink-Heimer and DAPI. The results were compared with histological changes after electrolytic lesion of the vertical lobe. Neurodegeneration was revealed in and around the injection site: an intense area of proliferative cells, degenerating terminal axon ramifications and cell death. In comparison with electrolytic lesion, excitotoxic lesion displays important advantages, since fibres of passage are not destroyed by kainic acid injection, which induces only a restricted lesion and so is an appropriate method of investigating the role of the vertical lobe or other brain regions in a Cephalopod model, Sepia officinalis.

  9. Region-specific tauopathy and synucleinopathy in brain of the alpha-synuclein overexpressing mouse model of Parkinson's disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masliah Eliezer

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background α-synuclein [α-Syn]-mediated activation of GSK-3β leading to increases in hyperphosphorylated Tau has been shown by us to occur in striata of Parkinson's diseased [PD] patients and in animal models of PD. In Alzheimer's disease, tauopathy exists in several brain regions; however, the pattern of distribution of tauopathy in other brain regions of PD or in animal models of PD is not known. The current studies were undertaken to analyze the distribution of tauopathy in different brain regions in a widely used mouse model of PD, the α-Syn overexpressing mouse. Results High levels of α-Syn levels were seen in the brain stem, with a much smaller increase in the frontal cortex; neither cerebellum nor hippocampus showed any overexpression of α-Syn. Elevated levels of p-Tau, hyperphosphorylated at Ser202, Ser262 and Ser396/404, were seen in brain stem, with lower levels seen in hippocampus. In both frontal cortex and cerebellum, increases were seen only in p-Ser396/404 Tau, but not in p-Ser202 and p-Ser262. p-GSK-3β levels were not elevated in any of the brain regions, although total GSK-3β was elevated in brain stem. p-p38MAPK levels were unchanged in all brain regions examined, while p-ERK levels were elevated in brain stem, hippocampus and cerebellum, but not the frontal cortex. p-JNK levels were increased in brain stem and cerebellum but not in the frontal cortex or hippocampus. Elevated levels of free tubulin, indicating microtubule destabilization, were seen only in the brain stem. Conclusion Our combined data suggest that in this animal model of PD, tauopathy, along with microtubule destabilization, exists primarily in the brain stem and striatum, which are also the two major brain regions known to express high levels of α-Syn and undergo the highest levels of degeneration in human PD. Thus, tauopathy in PD may have a very restricted pattern of distribution.

  10. Theoretical Compartment Modeling of DCE-MRI Data Based on the Transport across Physiological Barriers in the Brain

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    Laura Fanea

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Neurological disorders represent major causes of lost years of healthy life and mortality worldwide. Development of their quantitative interdisciplinary in vivo evaluation is required. Compartment modeling (CM of brain data acquired in vivo using magnetic resonance imaging techniques with clinically available contrast agents can be performed to quantitatively assess brain perfusion. Transport of 1H spins in water molecules across physiological compartmental brain barriers in three different pools was mathematically modeled and theoretically evaluated in this paper and the corresponding theoretical compartment modeling of dynamic contrast enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI data was analyzed. The pools considered were blood, tissue, and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF. The blood and CSF data were mathematically modeled assuming continuous flow of the 1H spins in these pools. Tissue data was modeled using three CMs. Results in this paper show that transport across physiological brain barriers such as the blood to brain barrier, the extracellular space to the intracellular space barrier, or the blood to CSF barrier can be evaluated quantitatively. Statistical evaluations of this quantitative information may be performed to assess tissue perfusion, barriers' integrity, and CSF flow in vivo in the normal or disease-affected brain or to assess response to therapy.

  11. Transcriptional profiling of human brain endothelial cells reveals key properties crucial for predictive in vitro blood-brain barrier models.

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    Eduard Urich

    Full Text Available Brain microvascular endothelial cells (BEC constitute the blood-brain barrier (BBB which forms a dynamic interface between the blood and the central nervous system (CNS. This highly specialized interface restricts paracellular diffusion of fluids and solutes including chemicals, toxins and drugs from entering the brain. In this study we compared the transcriptome profiles of the human immortalized brain endothelial cell line hCMEC/D3 and human primary BEC. We identified transcriptional differences in immune response genes which are directly related to the immortalization procedure of the hCMEC/D3 cells. Interestingly, astrocytic co-culturing reduced cell adhesion and migration molecules in both BECs, which possibly could be related to regulation of immune surveillance of the CNS controlled by astrocytic cells within the neurovascular unit. By matching the transcriptome data from these two cell lines with published transcriptional data from freshly isolated mouse BECs, we discovered striking differences that could explain some of the limitations of using cultured BECs to study BBB properties. Key protein classes such as tight junction proteins, transporters and cell surface receptors show differing expression profiles. For example, the claudin-5, occludin and JAM2 expression is dramatically reduced in the two human BEC lines, which likely explains their low transcellular electric resistance and paracellular leakiness. In addition, the human BEC lines express low levels of unique brain endothelial transporters such as Glut1 and Pgp. Cell surface receptors such as LRP1, RAGE and the insulin receptor that are involved in receptor-mediated transport are also expressed at very low levels. Taken together, these data illustrate that BECs lose their unique protein expression pattern outside of their native environment and display a more generic endothelial cell phenotype. A collection of key genes that seems to be highly regulated by the local

  12. Effect of whole-brain irradiation on the specific brain regions in a rat model: Metabolic and histopathological changes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bálentová, Soňa; Hnilicová, Petra; Kalenská, Dagmar; Murín, Peter; Hajtmanová, Eva; Lehotský, Ján; Adamkov, Marian

    2017-05-01

    Effect of ionizing radiation on the brain affects neuronal, glial, and endothelial cell population and lead to significant morphological, metabolic, and functional deficits. In the present study we investigated a dose- and time-dependent correlation between radiation-induced metabolic and histopathological changes. Adult male Wistar rats received a total dose of 35Gy delivered in 7 fractions (dose 5Gy per fraction) once per week in the same weekday during 7 consecutive weeks. Proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy ((1)H MRS), histochemistry, immunohistochemistry and confocal microscopy were used to determine whether radiation-induced alteration of the brain metabolites correlates with appropriate histopathological changes of neurogenesis and glial cell response in 2 neurogenic regions: the hippocampal dentate gyrus (DG) and the subventricular zone-olfactory bulb axis (SVZ-OB axis). Evaluation of the brain metabolites 18-19 weeks after irradiation performed by (1)H MRS revealed a significant decrease in the total N-acetylaspartate to total creatine (tNAA/tCr) ratio in the striatum and OB. A significant decline of gamma-aminobutyric acid to tCr (GABA/tCr) ratio was seen in the OB and hippocampus. MR revealed absence of gross inflammatory or necrotic lesions in these regions. Image analysis of the brain sections 18-21 weeks after the exposure showed a radiation-induced increase of neurodegeneration, inhibition of neurogenesis and strong resemblance to the reactive astrogliosis. Results showed that fractionated whole-brain irradiation led to the changes in neurotransmission and to the loss of neuronal viability in vivo. Metabolic changes were closely associated with histopathological findings, i.e. initiation of neuronal cell death, inhibition of neurogenesis and strong response of astrocytes indicated development of late radiation-induced changes. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Membrane configuration optimization for a murine in vitro blood-brain barrier model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wuest, Diane M; Wing, Allison M; Lee, Kelvin H

    2013-01-30

    A powerful experimental tool used to study the dynamic functions of the blood-brain barrier (BBB) is an in vitro cellular based system utilizing cell culture inserts in multi-well plates. Currently, usage of divergent model configurations without explanation of selected variable set points renders data comparisons difficult and limits widespread understanding. This work presents for the first time in literature a comprehensive screening study to optimize membrane configuration, with aims to unveil influential membrane effects on the ability of cerebral endothelial cells to form a tight monolayer. First, primary murine brain endothelial cells and astrocytes were co-cultured in contact and non-contact orientations on membranes of pore diameter sizes ranging from 0.4 μm to 8.0 μm, and the non-contact orientation and smallest pore diameter size were shown to support a significantly tighter monolayer formation. Then, membranes made from polyethylene terephthalate (PET) and polycarbonate (PC) purchased from three different commercial sources were compared, and PET membranes purchased from two manufacturers facilitated a significantly tighter monolayer formation. Models were characterized by transendothelial electrical resistance (TEER), sodium fluorescein permeability, and immunocytochemical labeling of tight junction proteins. Finally, a murine brain endothelial cell line, bEnd.3, was grown on the different membranes, and similar results were obtained with respect to optimal membrane configuration selection. The results and methodology presented here on high throughput 24-well plate inserts can be translated to other BBB systems to advance model understanding. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Voluntary Alcohol Intake following Blast Exposure in a Rat Model of Mild Traumatic Brain Injury

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    Lim, Yi Wei; Meyer, Nathan P.; Shah, Alok S.; Budde, Matthew D.; Stemper, Brian D.; Olsen, Christopher M.

    2015-01-01

    Alcoholism is a frequent comorbidity following mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI), even in patients without a previous history of alcohol dependence. Despite this correlational relationship, the extent to which the neurological effects of mTBI contribute to the development of alcoholism is unknown. In this study, we used a rodent blast exposure model to investigate the relationship between mTBI and voluntary alcohol drinking in alcohol naïve rats. We have previously demonstrated in Sprague Dawley rats that blast exposure leads to microstructural abnormalities in the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) and other brain regions that progress from four to thirty days. The mPFC is a brain region implicated in alcoholism and drug addiction, although the impact of mTBI on drug reward and addiction using controlled models remains largely unexplored. Alcohol naïve Sprague Dawley rats were subjected to a blast model of mTBI (or sham conditions) and then tested in several common measures of voluntary alcohol intake. In a seven-week intermittent two-bottle choice alcohol drinking test, sham and blast exposed rats had comparable levels of alcohol intake. In a short access test session at the conclusion of the two-bottle test, blast rats fell into a bimodal distribution, and among high intake rats, blast treated animals had significantly elevated intake compared to shams. We found no effect of blast when rats were tested for an alcohol deprivation effect or compulsive drinking in a quinine adulteration test. Throughout the experiment, alcohol drinking was modest in both groups, consistent with other studies using Sprague Dawley rats. In conclusion, blast exposure had a minimal impact on overall alcohol intake in Sprague Dawley rats, although intake was increased in a subpopulation of blast animals in a short access session following intermittent access exposure. PMID:25910266

  15. Animal Models of Cerebral Palsy: Hypoxic Brain Injury in the Newborn

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    Mark Daniel WILSON

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available How to Cite This Article: Wilson MD. Animal Models of Cerebral Palsy: Hypoxic Brain Injury in the Newborn. Iran J Child Neurol. Spring2015; 9(2:9-16.AbstractObjectiveHypoxic insults are implicated in the spectrum of fetal disorders, including cerebral palsy (CP. In view of the major contribution of intrapartum risk factors and prematurity to subsequent neurological morbidity and mortality in humans, this study aimed to clarify the pathophysiology of brain injury, especially periventricular white matter damage (WMD, that occur in utero to the immature and near-term fetal CNS.Materials & MethodsAn evaluation of the resulting neurological and behavioural phenotype in the newborn was performed by utilising a battery of neurobehavioural tests, including the Morris water-maze and the open-field test, followed by cerebral MRI and histopathology.ResultsThis study used a murine model to examine the deleterious effects of WMD brought about by cerebral hypoxia-ischemia (HI and the characteristic features of CP in mice. Murine models have proven themselves valuable in the area of experimental neuroscience.Conclusion Hypoxia-treated mice were observed to demonstrate a significant neurofunctional deficit compared with sham mice on two behavioral measures. Indeed, different brain regions, including the sensorimotor cortex, the striatum, and the hippocampus were noticeably damaged after HI insult, as determined by both MRI and histopathology. These results, albeit qualitative in nature, appear to support the pre-existing finding that the long-term neurofunctional outcome in animal subjects with CP is strongly associated with the anatomical extent and pattern of cerebral damage as determined by both delayed neuroimaging and histopathology.

  16. Evaluation of Axonal Strain as a Predictor for Mild Traumatic Brain Injuries Using Finite Element Modeling.

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    Giordano, Chiara; Kleiven, Svein

    2014-11-01

    Finite element (FE) models are often used to study the biomechanical effects of traumatic brain injury (TBI). Measures based on mechanical responses, such as principal strain or invariants of the strain tensor, are used as a metric to predict the risk of injury. However, the reliability of inferences drawn from these models depends on the correspondence between the mechanical measures and injury data, as well as the establishment of accurate thresholds of tissue injury. In the current study, a validated anisotropic FE model of the human head is used to evaluate the hypothesis that strain in the direction of fibers (axonal strain) is a better predictor of TBI than maximum principal strain (MPS), anisotropic equivalent strain (AESM) and cumulative strain damage measure (CSDM). An analysis of head kinematics-based metrics, such as head injury criterion (HIC) and brain injury criterion (BrIC), is also provided. Logistic regression analysis is employed to compare binary injury data (concussion/no concussion) with continuous strain/kinematics data. The threshold corresponding to 50% of injury probability is determined for each parameter. The predictive power (area under the ROC curve, AUC) is calculated from receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis. The measure with the highest AUC is considered to be the best predictor of mTBI. Logistic regression shows a statistical correlation between all the mechanical predictors and injury data for different regions of the brain. Peaks of axonal strain have the highest AUC and determine a strain threshold of 0.07 for corpus callosum and 0.15 for the brainstem, in agreement with previously experimentally derived injury thresholds for reversible axonal injury. For a data set of mild TBI from the national football league, the strain in the axonal direction is found to be a better injury predictor than MPS, AESM, CSDM, BrIC and HIC.

  17. Inborn and experience-dependent models of categorical brain organization. A position paper.

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    Gainotti, Guido

    2015-01-01

    The present review aims to summarize the debate in contemporary neuroscience between inborn and experience-dependent models of conceptual representations that goes back to the description of category-specific semantic disorders for biological and artifact categories. Experience-dependent models suggest that categorical disorders are the by-product of the differential weighting of different sources of knowledge in the representation of biological and artifact categories. These models maintain that semantic disorders are not really category-specific, because they do not respect the boundaries between different categories. They also argue that the brain structures which are disrupted in a given type of category-specific semantic disorder should correspond to the areas of convergence of the sensory-motor information which play a major role in the construction of that category. Furthermore, they provide a simple interpretation of gender-related categorical effects and are supported by studies assessing the importance of prior experience in the cortical representation of objects On the other hand, inborn models maintain that category-specific semantic disorders reflect the disruption of innate brain networks, which are shaped by natural selection to allow rapid identification of objects that are very relevant for survival. From the empirical point of view, these models are mainly supported by observations of blind subjects, which suggest that visual experience is not necessary for the emergence of category-specificity in the ventral stream of visual processing. The weight of the data supporting experience-dependent and inborn models is thoroughly discussed, stressing the fact observations made in blind subjects are still the subject of intense debate. It is concluded that at the present state of knowledge it is not possible to choose between experience-dependent and inborn models of conceptual representations.

  18. Cinnamon Extract Improves Insulin Sensitivity in the Brain and Lowers Liver Fat in Mouse Models of Obesity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sartorius, Tina; Peter, Andreas; Schulz, Nadja; Drescher, Andrea; Bergheim, Ina; Machann, Jürgen; Schick, Fritz; Siegel-Axel, Dorothea; Schürmann, Annette; Weigert, Cora; Häring, Hans-Ulrich; Hennige, Anita M.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Treatment of diabetic subjects with cinnamon demonstrated an improvement in blood glucose concentrations and insulin sensitivity but the underlying mechanisms remained unclear. This work intends to elucidate the impact of cinnamon effects on the brain by using isolated astrocytes, and an obese and diabetic mouse model. Methods Cinnamon components (eugenol, cinnamaldehyde) were added to astrocytes and liver cells to measure insulin signaling and glycogen synthesis. Ob/ob mice were supplemented with extract from cinnamomum zeylanicum for 6 weeks and cortical brain activity, locomotion and energy expenditure were evaluated. Insulin action was determined in brain and liver tissues. Results Treatment of primary astrocytes with eugenol promoted glycogen synthesis, whereas the effect of cinnamaldehyde was attenuated. In terms of brain function in vivo, cinnamon extract improved insulin sensitivity and brain activity in ob/ob mice, and the insulin-stimulated locomotor activity was improved. In addition, fasting blood glucose levels and glucose tolerance were greatly improved in ob/ob mice due to cinnamon extracts, while insulin secretion was unaltered. This corresponded with lower triglyceride and increased liver glycogen content and improved insulin action in liver tissues. In vitro, Fao cells exposed to cinnamon exhibited no change in insulin action. Conclusions Together, cinnamon extract improved insulin action in the brain as well as brain activity and locomotion. This specific effect may represent an important central feature of cinnamon in improving insulin action in the brain, and mediates metabolic alterations in the periphery to decrease liver fat and improve glucose homeostasis. PMID:24643026

  19. DREADDs suppress seizure-like activity in a mouse model of pharmacoresistant epileptic brain tissue

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Avaliani, N.; Andersson, M.; Thomsen, Annika Højrup Runegaard

    2016-01-01

    Epilepsy is a neurological disorder with a prevalence of ≈1% of general population. Available antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) have multiple side effects and are ineffective in 30% of patients. Therefore, development of effective treatment strategies is highly needed, requiring drug-screening models...... in mouse OHSCs. As we also found that STIB in mouse OHSCs is resistant to common AED, valproic acid, collectively our findings suggest that DREADD-based strategy may be effective in suppressing epileptiform activity in a pharamcoresitant epileptic brain tissue....

  20. NIR light propagation in a digital head model for traumatic brain injury (TBI).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francis, Robert; Khan, Bilal; Alexandrakis, George; Florence, James; MacFarlane, Duncan

    2015-09-01

    Near infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) is capable of detecting and monitoring acute changes in cerebral blood volume and oxygenation associated with traumatic brain injury (TBI). Wavelength selection, source-detector separation, optode density, and detector sensitivity are key design parameters that determine the imaging depth, chromophore separability, and, ultimately, clinical usefulness of a NIRS instrument. We present simulation results of NIR light propagation in a digital head model as it relates to the ability to detect intracranial hematomas and monitor the peri-hematomal tissue viability. These results inform NIRS instrument design specific to TBI diagnosis and monitoring.

  1. Deep brain stimulation in clinical trials and animal models of depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamani, Clement; Nóbrega, José N

    2010-10-01

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) is currently being investigated as a therapy for the treatment of depression. Despite promising results of recent clinical trials, neural and chemical mechanisms responsible for the effects of stimulation are still unclear. In this article, we review clinical and laboratory findings on DBS for depression. Particular emphasis will be given to aspects involved in the translation of data from animal models to humans and in our findings on the potential substrates involved in the antidepressant effects of DBS in rats.

  2. Transport characteristics of nanoparticle-based ferrofluids in a gel model of the brain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soubir Basak

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Soubir Basak1, David Brogan2, Hans Dietrich2, Rogers Ritter3, Ralph G Dacey2, Pratim Biswas11Aerosol and Air Quality Research Laboratory, Department of Energy, Environmental and Chemical Engineering, Washington University in St. Louis, St. Louis, MO, USA; 2Department of Neurological Surgery, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO, USA; 3Stereotaxis Inc., St. Louis, MO, USAAbstract: A current advance in nanotechnology is the selective targeting of therapeutics by external magnetic field-guided delivery. This is an important area of research in medicine. The use of magnetic forces results in the formation of agglomerated structures in the field region. The transport characteristics of these agglomerated structures are explored. A nonintrusive method based on in situ light-scattering techniques is used to characterize the velocity of such particles in a magnetic field gradient. A transport model for the chain-like agglomerates is developed based on these experimental observations. The transport characteristics of magnetic nanoparticle drug carriers are then explored in gel-based simulated models of the brain. Results of such measurements demonstrate decreased diffusion of magnetic nanoparticles when placed in a high magnetic field gradient.  Keywords: nanoparticle ferrofluid, gel-brain model, drug delivery, magnetic agglomeration, transport, magnetic fields

  3. Transport rankings of non-steroidal antiinflammatory drugs across blood-brain barrier in vitro models.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iveta Novakova

    Full Text Available The aim of this work was to conduct a comprehensive study about the transport properties of NSAIDs across the blood-brain barrier (BBB in vitro. Transport studies with celecoxib, diclofenac, ibuprofen, meloxicam, piroxicam and tenoxicam were accomplished across Transwell models based on cell line PBMEC/C1-2, ECV304 or primary rat brain endothelial cells. Single as well as group substance studies were carried out. In group studies substance group compositions, transport medium and serum content were varied, transport inhibitors verapamil and probenecid were added. Resulted permeability coefficients were compared and normalized to internal standards diazepam and carboxyfluorescein. Transport rankings of NSAIDs across each model were obtained. Single substance studies showed similar rankings as corresponding group studies across PBMEC/C1-2 or ECV304 cell layers. Serum content, glioma conditioned medium and inhibitors probenecid and verapamil influenced resulted permeability significantly. Basic differences of transport properties of the investigated NSAIDs were similar comparing all three in vitro BBB models. Different substance combinations in the group studies and addition of probenecid and verapamil suggested that transporter proteins are involved in the transport of every tested NSAID. Results especially underlined the importance of same experimental conditions (transport medium, serum content, species origin, cell line for proper data comparison.

  4. A Bayesian Double Fusion Model for Resting State Brain Connectivity Using Joint Functional and Structural Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Hakmook; Ombao, Hernando; Fonnesbeck, Christopher; Ding, Zhaohua; Morgan, Victoria L

    2017-03-19

    Current approaches separately analyze concurrently acquired diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) and functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) data. The primary limitation of these approaches is that they do not take advantage of the information from DTI that could potentially enhance estimation of resting state functional connectivity (FC) between brain regions. To overcome this limitation, we develop a Bayesian hierarchical spatio-temporal model that incorporates structural connectivity into estimating FC. In our proposed approach, structural connectivity (SC) based on DTI data is used to construct an informative prior for functional connectivity based on resting state fMRI data via the Cholesky decomposition. Simulation studies showed that incorporating the two data produced significantly reduced mean squared errors compared to the standard approach of separately analyzing the two data from different modalities. We applied our model to analyze the resting state DTI and fMRI data collected to estimate FC between the brain regions that were hypothetically important in the origination and spread of temporal lobe epilepsy seizures. Our analysis concludes that the proposed model achieves smaller false positive rates and is much robust to data decimation compared to the conventional approach.

  5. Electric field distribution in a finite-volume head model of deep brain stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grant, Peadar F; Lowery, Madeleine M

    2009-11-01

    This study presents a whole-head finite element model of deep brain stimulation to examine the effect of electrical grounding, the finite conducting volume of the head, and scalp, skull and cerebrospinal fluid layers. The impedance between the stimulating and reference electrodes in the whole-head model was found to lie within clinically reported values when the reference electrode was incorporated on a localized surface in the model. Incorporation of the finite volume of the head and inclusion of surrounding outer tissue layers reduced the magnitude of the electric field and activating function by approximately 20% in the region surrounding the electrode. Localized distortions of the electric field were also observed when the electrode was placed close to the skull. Under bipolar conditions the effect of the finite conducting volume was shown to be negligible. The results indicate that, for monopolar stimulation, incorporation of the finite volume and outer tissue layers can alter the magnitude of the electric field and activating function when the electrode is deep within the brain, and may further affect the shape if the electrode is close to the skull.

  6. Task decomposition: a framework for comparing diverse training models in human brain plasticity studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emily B. J. Coffey

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Training studies, in which the structural or functional neurophysiology is compared before and after expertise is acquired, are increasingly being used as models for understanding the human brain’s potential for reorganization. It is proving difficult to use these results to answer basic and important questions like how task training leads to both specific and general changes in behaviour and how these changes correspond with modifications in the brain. The main culprit is the diversity of paradigms used as complex task models. An assortment of activities ranging from juggling to deciphering Morse code has been reported. Even when working in the same general domain, few researchers use similar training models. New ways to meaningfully compare complex tasks are needed. We propose a method for characterizing and deconstructing the task requirements of complex training paradigms, which is suitable for application to both structural and functional neuroimaging studies. We believe this approach will aid brain plasticity research by making it easier to compare training paradigms, identify ‘missing puzzle pieces’, and encourage researchers to design training protocols to bridge these gaps.

  7. Growth inhibition in a brain metastasis model by antibody delivery using focused ultrasound-mediated blood-brain barrier disruption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobus, Thiele; Zervantonakis, Ioannis K; Zhang, Yongzhi; McDannold, Nathan J

    2016-09-28

    HER2-targeting antibodies (i.e. trastuzumab and pertuzumab) prolong survival in HER2-positive breast cancer patients with extracranial metastases. However, the response of brain metastases to these drugs is poor, and it is hypothesized that the blood-brain barrier (BBB) limits drug delivery to the brain. We investigated whether we could improve the response by temporary disruption of the BBB using focused ultrasound in combination with microbubbles. To study this, we inoculated 30 nude rats with HER2-positive cells derived from a brain metastasis of a breast cancer patient (MDA-MB-361). The animals were divided into three groups: a control-group that received no treatment; an antibody-only group that received six weekly treatments of trastuzumab and pertuzumab; and an ultrasound+antibody group that received trastuzumab and pertuzumab in combination with six weekly sessions of BBB disruption using focused ultrasound. In two animals, the leakiness of the tumors before disruption was evaluated using contrast-enhanced T1-weighted magnetic resonance imaging and found that the tumors were not leaky. The same technique was used to evaluate the effectiveness of BBB disruption, which was successful in all sessions. The tumor in the control animals grew exponentially with a growth constant of 0.042±0.011mm(3)/day. None of the antibody-only animals responded to the treatment and the growth constant was 0.033±0.009mm(3)/day during the treatment period. Four of the ten animals in the ultrasound+antibody-group showed a response to the treatment with an average growth constant of 0.010±0.007mm(3)/day, compared to a growth constant 0.043±0.013mm(3)/day for the six non-responders. After the treatment period, the tumors in all groups grew at similar rates. As the tumors were not leaky before BBB disruption and there were no responders in the antibody-only group, these results show that at least in some cases disruption of the BBB is necessary for a response to the antibodies in

  8. A Generative Probabilistic Model and Discriminative Extensions for Brain Lesion Segmentation - With Application to Tumor and Stroke

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Menze, Bjoern H.; Van Leemput, Koen; Lashkari, Danial

    2016-01-01

    jointly from the image data. It delineates lesion areas individually in each channel, allowing for differences in lesion appearance across modalities, an important feature of many brain tumor imaging sequences. We also propose discriminative model extensions to map the output of the generative model...... patient scans, and multimodal brain images of patients with acute and subacute ischemic stroke. We find the generative model that has been designed for tumor lesions to generalize well to stroke images, and the extended discriminative-discriminative model to be one of the top ranking methods in the BRATS...

  9. BOLD-based Techniques for Quantifying Brain Hemodynamic and Metabolic Properties – Theoretical Models and Experimental Approaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yablonskiy, Dmitriy A.; Sukstanskii, Alexander L.; He, Xiang

    2012-01-01

    Quantitative evaluation of brain hemodynamics and metabolism, particularly the relationship between brain function and oxygen utilization, is important for understanding normal human brain operation as well as pathophysiology of neurological disorders. It can also be of great importance for evaluation of hypoxia within tumors of the brain and other organs. A fundamental discovery by Ogawa and co-workers of the BOLD (Blood Oxygenation Level Dependent) contrast opened a possibility to use this effect to study brain hemodynamic and metabolic properties by means of MRI measurements. Such measurements require developing theoretical models connecting MRI signal to brain structure and functioning and designing experimental techniques allowing MR measurements of salient features of theoretical models. In our review we discuss several such theoretical models and experimental methods for quantification brain hemodynamic and metabolic properties. Our review aims mostly at methods for measuring oxygen extraction fraction, OEF, based on measuring blood oxygenation level. Combining measurement of OEF with measurement of CBF allows evaluation of oxygen consumption, CMRO2. We first consider in detail magnetic properties of blood – magnetic susceptibility, MR relaxation and theoretical models of intravascular contribution to MR signal under different experimental conditions. Then, we describe a “through-space” effect – the influence of inhomogeneous magnetic fields, created in the extravascular space by intravascular deoxygenated blood, on the MR signal formation. Further we describe several experimental techniques taking advantage of these theoretical models. Some of these techniques - MR susceptometry, and T2-based quantification of oxygen OEF – utilize intravascular MR signal. Another technique – qBOLD – evaluates OEF by making use of through-space effects. In this review we targeted both scientists just entering the MR field and more experienced MR researchers

  10. Reversing cognitive-motor impairments in Parkinson's disease patients using a computational modelling approach to deep brain stimulation programming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frankemolle, Anneke M M; Wu, Jennifer; Noecker, Angela M; Voelcker-Rehage, Claudia; Ho, Jason C; Vitek, Jerrold L; McIntyre, Cameron C; Alberts, Jay L

    2010-03-01

    Deep brain stimulation in the subthalamic nucleus is an effective and safe surgical procedure that has been shown to reduce the motor dysfunction of patients with advanced Parkinson's disease. Bilateral subthalamic nucleus deep brain stimulation, however, has been associated with declines in cognitive and cognitive-motor functioning. It has been hypothesized that spread of current to nonmotor areas of the subthalamic nucleus may be responsible for declines in cognitive and cognitive-motor functioning. The aim of this study was to assess the cognitive-motor performance in advanced Parkinson's disease patients with subthalamic nucleus deep brain stimulation parameters determined clinically (Clinical) to settings derived from a patient-specific computational model (Model). Data were collected from 10 patients with advanced Parkinson's disease bilaterally implanted with subthalamic nucleus deep brain stimulation systems. These patients were assessed off medication and under three deep brain stimulation conditions: Off, Clinical or Model based stimulation. Clinical stimulation parameters had been determined based on clinical evaluations and were stable for at least 6 months prior to study participation. Model-based parameters were selected to minimize the spread of current to nonmotor portions of the subthalamic nucleus using Cicerone Deep Brain Stimulation software. For each stimulation condition, participants performed a working memory (n-back task) and motor task (force tracking) under single- and dual-task settings. During the dual-task, participants performed the n-back and force-tracking tasks simultaneously. Clinical and Model parameters were equally effective in improving the Unified Parkinson's disease Rating Scale III scores relative to Off deep brain stimulation scores. Single-task working memory declines, in the 2-back condition, were significantly less under Model compared with Clinical deep brain stimulation settings. Under dual-task conditions, force

  11. High-Resolution Longitudinal Screening with Magnetic Resonance Imaging in a Murine Brain Cancer Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicholas A. Bock

    2003-11-01

    Full Text Available One of the main limitations of intracranial models of diseases is our present inability to monitor and evaluate the intracranial compartment noninvasively over time. Therefore, there is a growing need for imaging modalities that provide thorough neuropathological evaluations of xenograft and transgenic models of intracranial pathology. In this study, we have established protocols for multiple-mouse magnetic resonance imaging (MRI to follow the growth and behavior of intracranial xenografts of gliomas longitudinally. We successfully obtained weekly images on 16 mice for a total of 5 weeks on a 7-T multiple-mouse MRI. T2- and Ti-weighted imaging with gadolinium enhancement of vascularity was used to detect tumor margins, tumor size, and growth. These experiments, using 3D whole brain images obtained in four mice at once, demonstrate the feasibility of obtaining repeat radiological images in intracranial tumor models and suggest that MRI should be incorporated as a research modality for the investigation of intracranial pathobiology.

  12. A comparative study of two prediction models for brain tumor progression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Deqi; Tran, Loc; Wang, Jihong; Li, Jiang

    2015-03-01

    MR diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) technique together with traditional T1 or T2 weighted MRI scans supplies rich information sources for brain cancer diagnoses. These images form large-scale, high-dimensional data sets. Due to the fact that significant correlations exist among these images, we assume low-dimensional geometry data structures (manifolds) are embedded in the high-dimensional space. Those manifolds might be hidden from radiologists because it is challenging for human experts to interpret high-dimensional data. Identification of the manifold is a critical step for successfully analyzing multimodal MR images. We have developed various manifold learning algorithms (Tran et al. 2011; Tran et al. 2013) for medical image analysis. This paper presents a comparative study of an incremental manifold learning scheme (Tran. et al. 2013) versus the deep learning model (Hinton et al. 2006) in the application of brain tumor progression prediction. The incremental manifold learning is a variant of manifold learning algorithm to handle large-scale datasets in which a representative subset of original data is sampled first to construct a manifold skeleton and remaining data points are then inserted into the skeleton by following their local geometry. The incremental manifold learning algorithm aims at mitigating the computational burden associated with traditional manifold learning methods for large-scale datasets. Deep learning is a recently developed multilayer perceptron model that has achieved start-of-the-art performances in many applications. A recent technique named "Dropout" can further boost the deep model by preventing weight coadaptation to avoid over-fitting (Hinton et al. 2012). We applied the two models on multiple MRI scans from four brain tumor patients to predict tumor progression and compared the performances of the two models in terms of average prediction accuracy, sensitivity, specificity and precision. The quantitative performance metrics were

  13. Tracer kinetic modelling for DCE-MRI quantification of subtle blood–brain barrier permeability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heye, Anna K.; Thrippleton, Michael J.; Armitage, Paul A.; Valdés Hernández, Maria del C.; Makin, Stephen D.; Glatz, Andreas; Sakka, Eleni; Wardlaw, Joanna M.

    2016-01-01

    There is evidence that subtle breakdown of the blood–brain barrier (BBB) is a pathophysiological component of several diseases, including cerebral small vessel disease and some dementias. Dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI (DCE-MRI) combined with tracer kinetic modelling is widely used for assessing permeability and perfusion in brain tumours and body tissues where contrast agents readily accumulate in the extracellular space. However, in diseases where leakage is subtle, the optimal approach for measuring BBB integrity is likely to differ since the magnitude and rate of enhancement caused by leakage are extremely low; several methods have been reported in the literature, yielding a wide range of parameters even in healthy subjects. We hypothesised that the Patlak model is a suitable approach for measuring low-level BBB permeability with low temporal resolution and high spatial resolution and brain coverage, and that normal levels of scanner instability would influence permeability measurements. DCE-MRI was performed in a cohort of mild stroke patients (n = 201) with a range of cerebral small vessel disease severity. We fitted these data to a set of nested tracer kinetic models, ranking their performance according to the Akaike information criterion. To assess the influence of scanner drift, we scanned 15 healthy volunteers that underwent a “sham” DCE-MRI procedure without administration of contrast agent. Numerical simulations were performed to investigate model validity and the effect of scanner drift. The Patlak model was found to be most appropriate for fitting low-permeability data, and the simulations showed vp and KTrans estimates to be reasonably robust to the model assumptions. However, signal drift (measured at approximately 0.1% per minute and comparable to literature reports in other settings) led to systematic errors in calculated tracer kinetic parameters, particularly at low permeabilities. Our findings justify the growing use of the Patlak model

  14. Tracer kinetic modelling for DCE-MRI quantification of subtle blood-brain barrier permeability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heye, Anna K; Thrippleton, Michael J; Armitage, Paul A; Valdés Hernández, Maria del C; Makin, Stephen D; Glatz, Andreas; Sakka, Eleni; Wardlaw, Joanna M

    2016-01-15

    There is evidence that subtle breakdown of the blood-brain barrier (BBB) is a pathophysiological component of several diseases, including cerebral small vessel disease and some dementias. Dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI (DCE-MRI) combined with tracer kinetic modelling is widely used for assessing permeability and perfusion in brain tumours and body tissues where contrast agents readily accumulate in the extracellular space. However, in diseases where leakage is subtle, the optimal approach for measuring BBB integrity is likely to differ since the magnitude and rate of enhancement caused by leakage are extremely low; several methods have been reported in the literature, yielding a wide range of parameters even in healthy subjects. We hypothesised that the Patlak model is a suitable approach for measuring low-level BBB permeability with low temporal resolution and high spatial resolution and brain coverage, and that normal levels of scanner instability would influence permeability measurements. DCE-MRI was performed in a cohort of mild stroke patients (n=201) with a range of cerebral small vessel disease severity. We fitted these data to a set of nested tracer kinetic models, ranking their performance according to the Akaike information criterion. To assess the influence of scanner drift, we scanned 15 healthy volunteers that underwent a "sham" DCE-MRI procedure without administration of contrast agent. Numerical simulations were performed to investigate model validity and the effect of scanner drift. The Patlak model was found to be most appropriate for fitting low-permeability data, and the simulations showed vp and K(Trans) estimates to be reasonably robust to the model assumptions. However, signal drift (measured at approximately 0.1% per minute and comparable to literature reports in other settings) led to systematic errors in calculated tracer kinetic parameters, particularly at low permeabilities. Our findings justify the growing use of the Patlak model in low

  15. Cognitive improvement following transvenous adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cell transplantation in a rat model of traumatic brain injury

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Dongfei Li; Chun Yang; Rongmei Qu; Huiying Yang; Meichun Yu; Hui Tao; Jingxing Dai; Lin Yuan

    2011-01-01

    The effects of adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cell (ADMSC) transplantation for the repair of traumatic brain injury remain poorly understood. The present study observed neurological functional changes in a rat model of traumatic brain injury following ADMSC transplantation via the tail vein.Cell transplants were observed in injured cerebral cortex, and expression of brain-derived nerve growth factor was significantly increased in the injured hippocampus following transplantation. Results demonstrated that transvenous ADMSC transplants migrated to the injured cerebral cortex and significantly improved cognitive function.

  16. Enhanced microglial pro-inflammatory response to lipopolysaccharide correlates with brain infiltration and blood-brain barrier dysregulation in a mouse model of telomere shortening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raj, Divya D A; Moser, Jill; van der Pol, Susanne M A; van Os, Ronald P; Holtman, Inge R; Brouwer, Nieske; Oeseburg, Hisko; Schaafsma, Wandert; Wesseling, Evelyn M; den Dunnen, Wilfred; Biber, Knut P H; de Vries, Helga E; Eggen, Bart J L; Boddeke, Hendrikus W G M

    2015-12-01

    Microglia are a proliferative population of resident brain macrophages that under physiological conditions self-renew independent of hematopoiesis. Microglia are innate immune cells actively surveying the brain and are the earliest responders to injury. During aging, microglia elicit an enhanced innate immune response also referred to as 'priming'. To date, it remains unknown whether telomere shortening affects the proliferative capacity and induces priming of microglia. We addressed this issue using early (first-generation G1 mTerc(-/-) )- and late-generation (third-generation G3 and G4 mTerc(-/-) ) telomerase-deficient mice, which carry a homozygous deletion for the telomerase RNA component gene (mTerc). Late-generation mTerc(-/-) microglia show telomere shortening and decreased proliferation efficiency. Under physiological conditions, gene expression and functionality of G3 mTerc(-/-) microglia are comparable with microglia derived from G1 mTerc(-/-) mice despite changes in morphology. However, after intraperitoneal injection of bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS), G3 mTerc(-/-) microglia mice show an enhanced pro-inflammatory response. Nevertheless, this enhanced inflammatory response was not accompanied by an increased expression of genes known to be associated with age-associated microglia priming. The increased inflammatory response in microglia correlates closely with increased peripheral inflammation, a loss of blood-brain barrier integrity, and infiltration of immune cells in the brain parenchyma in this mouse model of telomere shortening. © 2015 The Authors. Aging Cell published by the Anatomical Society and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Breaking symmetry: the zebrafish as a model for understanding left-right asymmetry in the developing brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roussigne, Myriam; Blader, Patrick; Wilson, Stephen W

    2012-03-01

    How does left-right asymmetry develop in the brain and how does the resultant asymmetric circuitry impact on brain function and lateralized behaviors? By enabling scientists to address these questions at the levels of genes, neurons, circuitry and behavior,the zebrafish model system provides a route to resolve the complexity of brain lateralization. In this review, we present the progress made towards characterizing the nature of the gene networks and the sequence of morphogenetic events involved in the asymmetric development of zebrafish epithalamus. In an attempt to integrate the recent extensive knowledge into a working model and to identify the future challenges,we discuss how insights gained at a cellular/developmental level can be linked to the data obtained at a molecular/genetic level. Finally, we present some evolutionary thoughts and discuss how significant discoveries made in zebrafish should provide entry points to better understand the evolutionary origins of brain lateralization.

  18. Testing a dual-systems model of adolescent brain development using resting-state connectivity analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Duijvenvoorde, A C K; Achterberg, M; Braams, B R; Peters, S; Crone, E A

    2016-01-01

    The current study aimed to test a dual-systems model of adolescent brain development by studying changes in intrinsic functional connectivity within and across networks typically associated with cognitive-control and affective-motivational processes. To this end, resting-state and task-related fMRI data were collected of 269 participants (ages 8-25). Resting-state analyses focused on seeds derived from task-related neural activation in the same participants: the dorsal lateral prefrontal cortex (dlPFC) from a cognitive rule-learning paradigm and the nucleus accumbens (NAcc) from a reward-paradigm. Whole-brain seed-based resting-state analyses showed an age-related increase in dlPFC connectivity with the caudate and thalamus, and an age-related decrease in connectivity with the (pre)motor cortex. nAcc connectivity showed a strengthening of connectivity with the dorsal anterior cingulate cortex (ACC) and subcortical structures such as the hippocampus, and a specific age-related decrease in connectivity with the ventral medial PFC (vmPFC). Behavioral measures from both functional paradigms correlated with resting-state connectivity strength with their respective seed. That is, age-related change in learning performance was mediated by connectivity between the dlPFC and thalamus, and age-related change in winning pleasure was mediated by connectivity between the nAcc and vmPFC. These patterns indicate (i) strengthening of connectivity between regions that support control and learning, (ii) more independent functioning of regions that support motor and control networks, and (iii) more independent functioning of regions that support motivation and valuation networks with age. These results are interpreted vis-à-vis a dual-systems model of adolescent brain development.

  19. Changes in the Brain Endocannabinoid System in Rat Models of Depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smaga, Irena; Jastrzębska, Joanna; Zaniewska, Magdalena; Bystrowska, Beata; Gawliński, Dawid; Faron-Górecka, Agata; Broniowska, Żaneta; Miszkiel, Joanna; Filip, Małgorzata

    2017-04-01

    A growing body of evidence implicates the endocannabinoid (eCB) system in the pathophysiology of depression. The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of changes in the eCB system, such as levels of neuromodulators, eCB synthesizing and degrading enzymes, and cannabinoid (CB) receptors, in different brain structures in animal models of depression using behavioral and biochemical analyses. Both models used, i.e., bulbectomized (OBX) and Wistar Kyoto (WKY) rats, were characterized at the behavioral level by increased immobility time. In the OBX rats, anandamide (AEA) levels were decreased in the prefrontal cortex, hippocampus, and striatum and increased in the nucleus accumbens, while 2-arachidonoylglycerol (2-AG) levels were increased in the prefrontal cortex and decreased in the nucleus accumbens with parallel changes in the expression of eCB metabolizing enzymes in several structures. It was also observed that CB1 receptor expression decreased in the hippocampus, dorsal striatum, and nucleus accumbens, and CB2 receptor expression decreased in the prefrontal cortex and hippocampus. In WKY rats, the levels of eCBs were reduced in the prefrontal cortex (2-AG) and dorsal striatum (AEA) and increased in the prefrontal cortex (AEA) with different changes in the expression of eCB metabolizing enzymes, while the CB1 receptor density was increased in several brain regions. These findings suggest that dysregulation in the eCB system is implicated in the pathogenesis of depression, although neurochemical changes were linked to the particular brain structure and the factor inducing depression (surgical removal of the olfactory bulbs vs. genetic modulation).

  20. A novel transgenic zebrafish model for blood-brain and blood-retinal barrier development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sugimoto Masahiko

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Development and maintenance of the blood-brain and blood-retinal barrier is critical for the homeostasis of brain and retinal tissue. Despite decades of research our knowledge of the formation and maintenance of the blood-brain (BBB and blood-retinal (BRB barrier is very limited. We have established an in vivo model to study the development and maintenance of these barriers by generating a transgenic zebrafish line that expresses a vitamin D-binding protein fused with enhanced green fluorescent protein (DBP-EGFP in blood plasma, as an endogenous tracer. Results The temporal establishment of the BBB and BRB was examined using this transgenic line and the results were compared with that obtained by injection of fluorescent dyes into the sinus venosus of embryos at various stages of development. We also examined the expression of claudin-5, a component of tight junctions during the first 4 days of development. We observed that the BBB of zebrafish starts to develop by 3 dpf, with expression of claudin-5 in the central arteries preceding it at 2 dpf. The hyaloid vasculature in the zebrafish retina develops a barrier function at 3 dpf, which endows the zebrafish with unique advantages for studying the BRB. Conclusion Zebrafish embryos develop BBB and BRB function simultaneously by 3 dpf, which is regulated by tight junction proteins. The Tg(l-fabp:DBP-EGFP zebrafish will have great advantages in studying development and maintenance of the blood-neural barrier, which is a new application for the widely used vertebrate model.

  1. Establishment of a blunt impact-induced brain injury model in rabbits

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Kui; CAO Yun-xing; YANG Yong-qiang; YIN Zhi-yong; ZHAO Hui; WANG Li-jun

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To establish an animal model to replicate the blunt impact brain injury in forensic medicine.Methods:Twenty-four New Zealand white rabbits were randomly divided into control group (n=4),minor injury group (n=10) and severe injury group (n=10).Based on the BIM- Ⅱ Horizontal Bio-impact Machine,self-designed iron bar was used to produce blunt brain injury.Two rabbits from each injury group were randomly selected to monitor the change ofintracranial pressure (ICP) during the impacting process by pressure microsensors.Six hours after injury,all the rabbits were dissected to observe the injury morphology and underwent routine pathological examination.Results: Varying degrees of nervous system positive signs were observed in all the injured rabbits.Within 6 hours,the mortality rate was 1/10 in the minor injury group and 6/10 in the severe injury group.Morphological changes consisted of different levels of scalp hematoma,skull fracture,epiduraI hematoma,subdural hematoma,subarachnoid hemorrhage and brain injury.At the moment of hitting,the ICP was greater in severe injury group than in mild injury group; and within the same group,the impact side showed positive pressure while the opposite side showed negative pressure.Conclusions:Under the rigidly-controlled experimental condition,this animal model has a good reproducibility and stable results.Meanwhile,it is able to simulate the morphology of iron strike-induced injury,thus can be used to study the mechanism of blunt head injury in forensic medicine.

  2. The effect of ultrasound on thromboembolic model of brain stroke in rat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shabanzadeh A

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Ultrasound (US has been used in neuroprotection after cerebral ischemia; however, its use is controversial. Application of US in combination with fibrinolytic agents may improve fibrinolytic effects. In this study the effects of US, alone or in combination with tissue plasminogen activator (tPA, on brain ischemic injury were examined and we studied whether US is protective in the brain injured by ischemia under normothermic conditions. Methods: We performed two studies. In the first study, rectal and brain temperatures were compared. In the second study, we studied whether US alone or in combination with tPA is neuroprotective in thromboembolic stroke. To induce focal cerebral ischemia, a clot was formed in a catheter. Once the clot had formed, the catheter was advanced 17 mm in the internal carotid artery until its tip was 1-2 mm away from the origin of the middle cerebral artery (MCA. The preformed clot in the catheter was then injected, and the catheter was removed. The wound was then closed and the infarction volume, edema and neurological deficits were measured after MCA occlusion. Results: The temperature in the brain was approximately 0.50 ºC lower than the rectal temperature. In the control, US+low tPA, low tPA, US+high tPA and, high tPA groups, the infarct volume (% was 34.56±4.16, 17.09±6.72, 21.25±7.8, 13.5±10.72 and 20.61±6.17 (mean ±SD at 48 h after MCA occlusion, respectively. The results indicate that US alone reduces the infarct volume by 30% compared to that of the control group (P<0.05. US improved neurological deficits and reduced brain edema significantly (p<0.05. Conclusions: This study indicate that US appears to have a protective effect, alone and in combination with tPA, in an embolic model of stroke.

  3. Effects of Ecballium elaterium on brain in a rat model of sepsis-associated encephalopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arslan, Demet; Ekinci, Aysun; Arici, Akgul; Bozdemir, Eda; Akil, Esref; Ozdemir, Hasan Huseyin

    2017-12-01

    Despite recent advances in antibiotic therapy, sepsis remains a major clinical challenge in intensive care units. Here we examined the anti-inflammatory and antioxidant effects of Ecballium elaterium (EE) on brain, and explored its therapeutic potential in an animal model of sepsis-associated encephalopathy (SAE) [induced by cecal ligation and puncture (CLP)]. Thirty rats were divided into three groups of 10 each: control, sepsis, and treatment. Rats were subjected to CLP except for the control group, which underwent laparatomy only. The treatment group received 2.5 mg/kg EE while the sepsis group was administered by saline. Twenty-four hours after laparotomy, animals were sacrificied and the brains were removed. Brain homogenates were prepared to assess interleukin 1beta (IL-1β), interleukin 6 (IL-6), tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α), total antioxidant capacity (TAC), and total oxidant status (TOS). Brain tissue sections were stained by hematoxylin and eosin (H&E) to semi-quantitatively examine the histopathologic changes such as neuron degeneration, pericellular/perivascular edema and inflammatory cell infiltration in the cerebral cortex. We found a statistically significant reduction in brain tissue homogenate levels of TNF-α 59.5 ± 8.4/50.2 ± 6.2 (p = 0.007) and TOS 99.3 ± 16.9/82.3 ± 7.8 (p = 0.01) in rats treated with EE; although interleukin 6 levels were increased in the treatment group compared to the sepsis group, this was not statistically significant. Neuronal damage (p = 0.00), pericellular/perivascular edema and inflammatory cell infiltration (p = 0.001) were also significantly lower in the treatment group compared to those in the sepsis group. These data suggest that Ecballium elaterium contains some components that exert protective effects against SAE in part by attenuating accumulation of proinflammatory cytokines, which may be important contributors to its anti-inflammatory effects during sepsis.

  4. Testing Brain Overgrowth and Synaptic Models of Autism Using NPC’s and Neurons from Patient-Derived IPS Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-10-01

    interaction, and limited and repetitive interests and behavior. Recent studies have led to two major hypotheses for autism pathogenesis : early brain...interests and behavior. Recent studies have led to two major hypotheses for autism pathogenesis . First, early brain overgrowth appears to be a critical...Models of Autism Using NPC’s and Neurons from Patient- Derived IPS Cells PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Fred H. Gage, Ph.D

  5. Ultrasound Delivery of an Anti-Aβ Therapeutic Agent to the Brain in a Mouse Model of Alzheimer's Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordão, Jessica F.; Ayala-Grosso, Carlos A.; Chopra, Rajiv; McLaurin, JoAnne; Aubert, Isabelle; Hynynen, Kullervo

    2009-04-01

    Plaques composed of amyloid-beta (Aβ) peptides represent a pathological hallmark in the brain of patients with Alzheimer's disease. Aβ oligomers are considered cytotoxic and several therapeutic approaches focus on reducing Aβ load in the brain of Alzheimer's patients. The efficacy of most anti-Aβ agents is significantly limited because they do not cross the blood-brain-barrier. Innovative technologies capable of enhancing the permeability of the blood-brain barrier, thereby allowing entry of therapeutic agents into the brain, show great promise in circumventing this problem. The application of low-intensity focused ultrasound in the presence of an ultrasound contrast agent causes localized and transient permeability of the blood-brain barrier. We demonstrate the value of this technology for the delivery of anti-Aβ antibodies to the brain of TgCRND8 mice, a mouse model of Alzheimer's disease exhibiting Aβ plaques. BAM-10, an anti-Aβ antibody, was injected into the tail vein simultaneously with exposure to MRI-guided, low-intensity focused ultrasound (FUS) to one hemisphere of TgCNRD8 mice. Four hours after treatment, antibodies were detected at significant amounts only in the brain of mice receiving FUS in addition to BAM-10. This data provides a proof-of-concep