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Sample records for model tumor growth

  1. In silico modeling for tumor growth visualization.

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    Jeanquartier, Fleur; Jean-Quartier, Claire; Cemernek, David; Holzinger, Andreas

    2016-08-08

    Cancer is a complex disease. Fundamental cellular based studies as well as modeling provides insight into cancer biology and strategies to treatment of the disease. In silico models complement in vivo models. Research on tumor growth involves a plethora of models each emphasizing isolated aspects of benign and malignant neoplasms. Biologists and clinical scientists are often overwhelmed by the mathematical background knowledge necessary to grasp and to apply a model to their own research. We aim to provide a comprehensive and expandable simulation tool to visualizing tumor growth. This novel Web-based application offers the advantage of a user-friendly graphical interface with several manipulable input variables to correlate different aspects of tumor growth. By refining model parameters we highlight the significance of heterogeneous intercellular interactions on tumor progression. Within this paper we present the implementation of the Cellular Potts Model graphically presented through Cytoscape.js within a Web application. The tool is available under the MIT license at https://github.com/davcem/cpm-cytoscape and http://styx.cgv.tugraz.at:8080/cpm-cytoscape/ . In-silico methods overcome the lack of wet experimental possibilities and as dry method succeed in terms of reduction, refinement and replacement of animal experimentation, also known as the 3R principles. Our visualization approach to simulation allows for more flexible usage and easy extension to facilitate understanding and gain novel insight. We believe that biomedical research in general and research on tumor growth in particular will benefit from the systems biology perspective.

  2. Model of vascular desmoplastic multispecies tumor growth.

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    Ng, Chin F; Frieboes, Hermann B

    2017-10-07

    We present a three-dimensional nonlinear tumor growth model composed of heterogeneous cell types in a multicomponent-multispecies system, including viable, dead, healthy host, and extra-cellular matrix (ECM) tissue species. The model includes the capability for abnormal ECM dynamics noted in tumor development, as exemplified by pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma, including dense desmoplasia typically characterized by a significant increase of interstitial connective tissue. An elastic energy is implemented to provide elasticity to the connective tissue. Cancer-associated fibroblasts (myofibroblasts) are modeled as key contributors to this ECM remodeling. The tumor growth is driven by growth factors released by these stromal cells as well as by oxygen and glucose provided by blood vasculature which along with lymphatics are stimulated to proliferate in and around the tumor based on pro-angiogenic factors released by hypoxic tissue regions. Cellular metabolic processes are simulated, including respiration and glycolysis with lactate fermentation. The bicarbonate buffering system is included for cellular pH regulation. This model system may be of use to simulate the complex interactions between tumor and stromal cells as well as the associated ECM and vascular remodeling that typically characterize malignant cancers notorious for poor therapeutic response. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Mathematical Modeling of Tumor-Tumor Distant Interactions Supports a Systemic Control of Tumor Growth.

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    Benzekry, Sebastien; Lamont, Clare; Barbolosi, Dominique; Hlatky, Lynn; Hahnfeldt, Philip

    2017-09-15

    Interactions between different tumors within the same organism have major clinical implications, especially in the context of surgery and metastatic disease. Three main explanatory theories (competition, angiogenesis inhibition, and proliferation inhibition) have been proposed, but precise determinants of the phenomenon remain poorly understood. Here, we formalized these theories into mathematical models and performed biological experiments to test them with empirical data. In syngeneic mice bearing two simultaneously implanted tumors, growth of only one of the tumors was significantly suppressed (61% size reduction at day 15, P < 0.05). The competition model had to be rejected, whereas the angiogenesis inhibition and proliferation inhibition models were able to describe the data. Additional models including a theory based on distant cytotoxic log-kill effects were unable to fit the data. The proliferation inhibition model was identifiable and minimal (four parameters), and its descriptive power was validated against the data, including consistency in predictions of single tumor growth when no secondary tumor was present. This theory may also shed new light on single cancer growth insofar as it offers a biologically translatable picture of how local and global action may combine to control local tumor growth and, in particular, the role of tumor-tumor inhibition. This model offers a depiction of concomitant resistance that provides an improved theoretical basis for tumor growth control and may also find utility in therapeutic planning to avoid postsurgery metastatic acceleration. Cancer Res; 77(18); 5183-93. ©2017 AACR . ©2017 American Association for Cancer Research.

  4. Modeling and testing treated tumor growth using cubic smoothing splines.

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    Kong, Maiying; Yan, Jun

    2011-07-01

    Human tumor xenograft models are often used in preclinical study to evaluate the therapeutic efficacy of a certain compound or a combination of certain compounds. In a typical human tumor xenograft model, human carcinoma cells are implanted to subjects such as severe combined immunodeficient (SCID) mice. Treatment with test compounds is initiated after tumor nodule has appeared, and continued for a certain time period. Tumor volumes are measured over the duration of the experiment. It is well known that untreated tumor growth may follow certain patterns, which can be described by certain mathematical models. However, the growth patterns of the treated tumors with multiple treatment episodes are quite complex, and the usage of parametric models is limited. We propose using cubic smoothing splines to describe tumor growth for each treatment group and for each subject, respectively. The proposed smoothing splines are quite flexible in modeling different growth patterns. In addition, using this procedure, we can obtain tumor growth and growth rate over time for each treatment group and for each subject, and examine whether tumor growth follows certain growth pattern. To examine the overall treatment effect and group differences, the scaled chi-squared test statistics based on the fitted group-level growth curves are proposed. A case study is provided to illustrate the application of this method, and simulations are carried out to examine the performances of the scaled chi-squared tests. Copyright © 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  5. A new ODE tumor growth modeling based on tumor population dynamics

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    Oroji, Amin; Omar, Mohd bin [Institute of Mathematical Sciences, Faculty of Science University of Malaya, 50603 Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia amin.oroji@siswa.um.edu.my, mohd@um.edu.my (Malaysia); Yarahmadian, Shantia [Mathematics Department Mississippi State University, USA Syarahmadian@math.msstate.edu (United States)

    2015-10-22

    In this paper a new mathematical model for the population of tumor growth treated by radiation is proposed. The cells dynamics population in each state and the dynamics of whole tumor population are studied. Furthermore, a new definition of tumor lifespan is presented. Finally, the effects of two main parameters, treatment parameter (q), and repair mechanism parameter (r) on tumor lifespan are probed, and it is showed that the change in treatment parameter (q) highly affects the tumor lifespan.

  6. A new ODE tumor growth modeling based on tumor population dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oroji, Amin; Omar, Mohd bin; Yarahmadian, Shantia

    2015-01-01

    In this paper a new mathematical model for the population of tumor growth treated by radiation is proposed. The cells dynamics population in each state and the dynamics of whole tumor population are studied. Furthermore, a new definition of tumor lifespan is presented. Finally, the effects of two main parameters, treatment parameter (q), and repair mechanism parameter (r) on tumor lifespan are probed, and it is showed that the change in treatment parameter (q) highly affects the tumor lifespan

  7. A Big Bang model of human colorectal tumor growth.

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    Sottoriva, Andrea; Kang, Haeyoun; Ma, Zhicheng; Graham, Trevor A; Salomon, Matthew P; Zhao, Junsong; Marjoram, Paul; Siegmund, Kimberly; Press, Michael F; Shibata, Darryl; Curtis, Christina

    2015-03-01

    What happens in early, still undetectable human malignancies is unknown because direct observations are impractical. Here we present and validate a 'Big Bang' model, whereby tumors grow predominantly as a single expansion producing numerous intermixed subclones that are not subject to stringent selection and where both public (clonal) and most detectable private (subclonal) alterations arise early during growth. Genomic profiling of 349 individual glands from 15 colorectal tumors showed an absence of selective sweeps, uniformly high intratumoral heterogeneity (ITH) and subclone mixing in distant regions, as postulated by our model. We also verified the prediction that most detectable ITH originates from early private alterations and not from later clonal expansions, thus exposing the profile of the primordial tumor. Moreover, some tumors appear 'born to be bad', with subclone mixing indicative of early malignant potential. This new model provides a quantitative framework to interpret tumor growth dynamics and the origins of ITH, with important clinical implications.

  8. Mathematical Modeling of Branching Morphogenesis and Vascular Tumor Growth

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    Yan, Huaming

    Feedback regulation of cell lineages is known to play an important role in tissue size control, but the effect in tissue morphogenesis has yet to be explored. We first use a non-spatial model to show that a combination of positive and negative feedback on stem and/or progenitor cell self-renewal leads to bistable or bi-modal growth behaviors and ultrasensitivity to external growth cues. Next, a spatiotemporal model is used to demonstrate spatial patterns such as local budding and branching arise in this setting, and are not consequences of Turing-type instabilities. We next extend the model to a three-dimensional hybrid discrete-continuum model of tumor growth to study the effects of angiogenesis, tumor progression and cancer therapies. We account for the crosstalk between the vasculature and cancer stem cells (CSCs), and CSC transdifferentiation into vascular endothelial cells (gECs), as observed experimentally. The vasculature stabilizes tumor invasiveness but considerably enhances growth. A gEC network structure forms spontaneously within the hypoxic core, consistent with experimental findings. The model is then used to study cancer therapeutics. We demonstrate that traditional anti-angiogenic therapies decelerate tumor growth, but make the tumor highly invasive. Chemotherapies help to reduce tumor sizes, but cannot control the invasion. Anti-CSC therapies that promote differentiation or disturb the stem cell niche effectively reduce tumor invasiveness. However, gECs inherit mutations present in CSCs and are resistant to traditional therapies. We show that anti-gEC treatments block the support on CSCs by gECs, and reduce both tumor size and invasiveness. Our study suggests that therapies targeting the vasculature, CSCs and gECs, when combined, are highly synergistic and are capable of controlling both tumor size and shape.

  9. Cyclophosphamide Enhances Human Tumor Growth in Nude Rat Xenografted Tumor Models

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    Yingjen Jeffrey Wu

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available The effect of the immunomodulatory chemotherapeutic agent cyclophosphamide (CTX on tumor growth was investigated in primary and metastatic intracerebral and subcutaneous rat xenograft models. Nude rats were treated with CTX (100 mg/kg, intraperitoneally 24 hours before human ovarian carcinoma (SKOV3, small cell lung carcinoma (LX-1 SCLC, and glioma (UW28, U87MG, and U251 tumor cells were inoculated subcutaneously, intraperitoneally, or in the right cerebral hemisphere or were infused into the right internal carotid artery. Tumor development was monitored and recorded. Potential mechanisms were further investigated. Only animals that received both CTX and Matrigel showed consistent growth of subcutaneous tumors. Cyclophosphamide pretreatment increased the percentage (83.3% vs 0% of animals showing intraperitoneal tumors. In intracerebral implantation tumor models, CTX pretreatment increased the tumor volume and the percentage of animals showing tumors. Cyclophosphamide increased lung carcinoma bone and facial metastases after intra-arterial injection, and 20% of animals showed brain metastases. Cyclophosphamide transiently decreased nude rat white blood cell counts and glutathione concentration, whereas serum vascular endothelial growth factor was significantly elevated. Cyclophosphamide also increased CD31 reactivity, a marker of vascular endothelium, and macrophage (CD68-positive infiltration into glioma cell-inoculated rat brains. Cyclophosphamide may enhance primary and metastatic tumor growth through multiple mechanisms, including immune modulation, decreased response to oxidative stress, increased tumor vascularization, and increased macrophage infiltration. These findings may be clinically relevant because chemotherapy may predispose human cancer subjects to tumor growth in the brain or other tissues.

  10. Mathematical models of tumor growth: translating absorbed dose to tumor control probability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sgouros, G.

    1996-01-01

    Full text: The dose-rate in internal emitter therapy is low and time-dependent as compared to external beam radiotherapy. Once the total absorbed dose delivered to a target tissue is calculated, however, most dosimetric analyses of radiopharmaceuticals are considered complete. To translate absorbed dose estimates obtained for internal emitter therapy to biologic effect, the growth characteristics, repair capacity, and radiosensitivity of the tumor must be considered. Tumor growth may be represented by the Gompertz equation in which tumor cells increase at an exponential growth rate that is itself decreasing at an exponential rate; as the tumor increases in size, the growth rate diminishes. The empirical Gompertz expression for tumor growth may be derived from a mechanistic model in which growth is represented by a balance between tumor-cell birth and loss. The birth rate is assumed to be fixed, while the cell loss rate is time-dependent and increases with tumor size. The birth rate of the tumors may be related to their potential doubling time. Multiple biopsies of individual tumors have demonstrated a heterogeneity in the potential doubling time of tumors. By extending the mechanistic model described above to allow for sub-populations of tumor cells with different birth rates, the effect of kinetic heterogeneity within a tumor may be examined. Model simulations demonstrate that the cell kinetic parameters of a tumor are predicted to change over time and measurements obtained using a biopsy are unlikely to reflect the kinetics of the tumor throughout its growth history. A decrease in overall tumor mass, in which each sub-population is reduced in proportion to its cell number, i.e., the log-kill assumption, leads to re-growth of a tumor that has a greater proliferation rate. Therapy that is linked to the potential doubling time or to the effective proliferation rate of the tumor may lead to re-growth of a tumor that is kinetically unchanged. The simplest model of

  11. Building Context with Tumor Growth Modeling Projects in Differential Equations

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    Beier, Julie C.; Gevertz, Jana L.; Howard, Keith E.

    2015-01-01

    The use of modeling projects serves to integrate, reinforce, and extend student knowledge. Here we present two projects related to tumor growth appropriate for a first course in differential equations. They illustrate the use of problem-based learning to reinforce and extend course content via a writing or research experience. Here we discuss…

  12. Fluctuation of Parameters in Tumor Cell Growth Model

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    Ai, Bao-Quan; Wang, Xian-Ju; Liu, Guo-Tao; Liu, Liang-Gang

    2003-07-01

    We study the steady state properties of a logistic growth model in the presence of Gaussian white noise. Based on the corresponding Fokker-Planck equation the steady state solution of the probability distribution function and its extrema have been investigated. It is found that the fluctuation of the tumor birth rate reduces the population of the cells while the fluctuation of predation rate can prevent the population of tumor cells from going into extinction. Noise in the system can induce the phase transition. The project supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China under Grant No. 10275099 and Natural Science Foundation of Guangdong Province of China under Grant Nos. 021707 and 001182

  13. Finite Element Modeling of Avascular Tumor Growth Using a Stress-Driven Model.

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    Iranmanesh, Faezeh; Nazari, Mohammad Ali

    2017-08-01

    Tumor growth being a multistage process has been investigated from different aspects. In the present study, an attempt is made to represent a constitutive-structure-based model of avascular tumor growth in which the effects of tensile stresses caused by collagen fibers are considered. Collagen fibers as a source of anisotropy in the structure of tissue are taken into account using a continuous fiber distribution formulation. To this end, a finite element modeling is implemented in which a neo-Hookean hyperelastic material is assigned to the tumor and its surrounding host. The tumor is supplied with a growth term. The growth term includes the effect of parameters such as nutrient concentration on the tumor growth and the tumor's solid phase content in the formulation. Results of the study revealed that decrease of solid phase is indicative of decrease in growth rate and the final steady-state value of tumor's radius. Moreover, fiber distribution affects the final shape of the tumor, and it could be used to control the shape and geometry of the tumor in complex morphologies. Finally, the findings demonstrated that the exerted stresses on the tumor increase as time passes. Compression of tumor cells leads to the reduction of tumor growth rate until it gradually reaches an equilibrium radius. This finding is in accordance with experimental data. Hence, this formulation can be deployed to evaluate both the residual stresses induced by growth and the mechanical interactions with the host tissue.

  14. Dynamic density functional theory of solid tumor growth: Preliminary models

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    Arnaud Chauviere

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Cancer is a disease that can be seen as a complex system whose dynamics and growth result from nonlinear processes coupled across wide ranges of spatio-temporal scales. The current mathematical modeling literature addresses issues at various scales but the development of theoretical methodologies capable of bridging gaps across scales needs further study. We present a new theoretical framework based on Dynamic Density Functional Theory (DDFT extended, for the first time, to the dynamics of living tissues by accounting for cell density correlations, different cell types, phenotypes and cell birth/death processes, in order to provide a biophysically consistent description of processes across the scales. We present an application of this approach to tumor growth.

  15. Human tumor infiltrating lymphocytes cooperatively regulate prostate tumor growth in a humanized mouse model.

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    Roth, Michael D; Harui, Airi

    2015-01-01

    The complex interactions that occur between human tumors, tumor infiltrating lymphocytes (TIL) and the systemic immune system are likely to define critical factors in the host response to cancer. While conventional animal models have identified an array of potential anti-tumor therapies, mouse models often fail to translate into effective human treatments. Our goal is to establish a humanized tumor model as a more effective pre-clinical platform for understanding and manipulating TIL. The immune system in NOD/SCID/IL-2Rγnull (NSG) mice was reconstituted by the co-administration of human peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBL) or subsets (CD4+ or CD8+) and autologous human dendritic cells (DC), and animals simultaneously challenged by implanting human prostate cancer cells (PC3 line). Tumor growth was evaluated over time and the phenotype of recovered splenocytes and TIL characterized by flow cytometry and immunohistochemistry (IHC). Serum levels of circulating cytokines and chemokines were also assessed. A tumor-bearing huPBL-NSG model was established in which human leukocytes reconstituted secondary lymphoid organs and promoted the accumulation of TIL. These TIL exhibited a unique phenotype when compared to splenocytes with a predominance of CD8+ T cells that exhibited increased expression of CD69, CD56, and an effector memory phenotype. TIL from huPBL-NSG animals closely matched the features of TIL recovered from primary human prostate cancers. Human cytokines were readily detectible in the serum and exhibited a different profile in animals implanted with PBL alone, tumor alone, and those reconstituted with both. Immune reconstitution slowed but could not eliminate tumor growth and this effect required the presence of CD4+ T cell help. Simultaneous implantation of human PBL, DC and tumor results in a huPBL-NSG model that recapitulates the development of human TIL and allows an assessment of tumor and immune system interaction that cannot be carried out in humans

  16. Human tumor infiltrating lymphocytes cooperatively regulate prostate tumor growth in a humanized mouse model

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    Roth, Michael D; Harui, Airi

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The complex interactions that occur between human tumors, tumor infiltrating lymphocytes (TIL) and the systemic immune system are likely to define critical factors in the host response to cancer. While conventional animal models have identified an array of potential anti-tumor therapies, mouse models often fail to translate into effective human treatments. Our goal is to establish a humanized tumor model as a more effective pre-clinical platform for understanding and manipulating ...

  17. Coupled Hybrid Continuum-Discrete Model of Tumor Angiogenesis and Growth.

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    Jie Lyu

    Full Text Available The processes governing tumor growth and angiogenesis are codependent. To study the relationship between them, we proposed a coupled hybrid continuum-discrete model. In this model, tumor cells, their microenvironment (extracellular matrixes, matrix-degrading enzymes, and tumor angiogenic factors, and their network of blood vessels, described by a series of discrete points, were considered. The results of numerical simulation reveal the process of tumor growth and the change in microenvironment from avascular to vascular stage, indicating that the network of blood vessels develops gradually as the tumor grows. Our findings also reveal that a tumor is divided into three regions: necrotic, semi-necrotic, and well-vascularized. The results agree well with the previous relevant studies and physiological facts, and this model represents a platform for further investigations of tumor therapy.

  18. Two Dimensional Mathematical Model of Tumor Angiogenesis: Coupling of Avascular Growth and Vascularization

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    Farideh Hosseini

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction As a tumor grows, the demand for oxygen and nutrients increases and it grows further if acquires the ability to induce angiogenesis. In this study, we aimed to present a two-dimensional continuous mathematical model for avascular tumor growth, coupled with a discrete model of angiogenesis. Materials and Methods In the avascular growth model, tumor is considered as a single mass, which uptakes oxygen through diffusion and invades the extracellular matrix (ECM. After the tumor reaches its maximum size in the avascular growth phase, tumor cells may be in three different states (proliferative, quiescent and apoptotic, depending on oxygen availability. Quiescent cells are assumed to secrete tumor angiogenic factors, which diffuse into the surrounding tissue until reaching endothelial cells. The mathematical model for tumor angiogenesis is consisted of a five-point finite difference scheme to simulate the progression of endothelial cells in ECM and their penetration into the tumor. Results The morphology of produced networks was investigated, based on various ECM degradation patterns. The generated capillary networks involved the rules of microvascular branching and anastomosis. Model predictions were in qualitative agreement with experimental observations and might have implications as a supplementary model to facilitate mathematical analyses for anti-cancer therapies. Conclusion Our numerical simulations could facilitate the qualitative comparison between three layers of tumor cells, their TAF-producing abilities and subsequent penetration of micro-vessels in order to determine the dynamics of microvascular branching and anastomosis in ECM and three different parts of the tumor.

  19. Halofuginone Inhibits Angiogenesis and Growth in Implanted Metastatic Rat Brain Tumor Model-an MRI Study

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    Rinat Abramovitch

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available Tumor growth and metastasis depend on angiogenesis; therefore, efforts are made to develop specific angiogenic inhibitors. Halofuginone (HF is a potent inhibitor of collagen type α1(I. In solid tumor models, HF has a potent antitumor and antiangiogenic effect in vivo, but its effect on brain tumors has not yet been evaluated. By employing magnetic resonance imaging (MRI, we monitored the effect of HF on tumor progression and vascularization by utilizing an implanted malignant fibrous histiocytoma metastatic rat brain tumor model. Here we demonstrate that treatment with HF effectively and dose-dependently reduced tumor growth and angiogenesis. On day 13, HF-treated tumors were fivefold smaller than control (P < .001. Treatment with HF significantly prolonged survival of treated animals (142%; P = .001. In HF-treated rats, tumor vascularization was inhibited by 30% on day 13 and by 37% on day 19 (P < .05. Additionally, HF treatment inhibited vessel maturation (P = .03. Finally, in HF-treated rats, we noticed the appearance of a few clusters of satellite tumors, which were distinct from the primary tumor and usually contained vessel cores. This phenomenon was relatively moderate when compared to previous reports of other antiangiogenic agents used to treat brain tumors. We therefore conclude that HF is effective for treatment of metastatic brain tumors.

  20. Tumor Growth Model with PK Input for Neuroblastoma Drug Development

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    2015-09-01

    is the most common extracranial solid tumor of childhood accounting for approximately 8-10% of all pediatric malignancies and 15% of cancer deaths in...participants were able to present their results to date at the annual American Association for Cancer Research annual meeting in April, 2015.  How...individual tumors. Using IHC techniques we will measure tumor response spatial patterns ( bread loafing fixed tumor tissue). We will use IHC

  1. Molecular Understanding of Growth Inhibitory Effect from Irradiated to Bystander Tumor Cells in Mouse Fibrosarcoma Tumor Model.

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    Sejal Desai

    Full Text Available Even though bystander effects pertaining to radiation risk assessment has been extensively studied, the molecular players of radiation induced bystander effect (RIBE in the context of cancer radiotherapy are poorly known. In this regard, the present study is aimed to investigate the effect of irradiated tumor cells on the bystander counterparts in mouse fibrosarcoma (WEHI 164 cells tumor model. Mice co-implanted with WEHI 164 cells γ-irradiated with a lethal dose of 15 Gy and unirradiated (bystander WEHI 164 cells showed inhibited tumor growth, which was measured in terms of tumor volume and Luc+WEHI 164 cells based bioluminescence in vivo imaging. Histopathological analysis and other assays revealed decreased mitotic index, increased apoptosis and senescence in these tumor tissues. In addition, poor angiogenesis was observed in these tumor tissues, which was further confirmed by fluorescence imaging of tumor vascularisation and CD31 expression by immuno-histochemistry. Interestingly, the growth inhibitory bystander effect was exerted more prominently by soluble factors obtained from the irradiated tumor cells than the cellular fraction. Cytokine profiling of the supernatants obtained from the irradiated tumor cells showed increased levels of VEGF, Rantes, PDGF, GMCSF and IL-2 and decreased levels of IL-6 and SCF. Comparative proteomic analysis of the supernatants from the irradiated tumor cells showed differential expression of total 24 protein spots (21 up- and 3 down-regulated when compared with the supernatant from the unirradiated control cells. The proteins which showed substantially higher level in the supernatant from the irradiated cells included diphosphate kinase B, heat shock cognate, annexin A1, angiopoietin-2, actin (cytoplasmic 1/2 and stress induced phosphoprotein 1. However, the levels of proteins like annexin A2, protein S100 A4 and cofilin was found to be lower in this supernatant. In conclusion, our results provided deeper

  2. A mathematical model for IL-6-mediated, stem cell driven tumor growth and targeted treatment

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    Nör, Jacques Eduardo

    2018-01-01

    Targeting key regulators of the cancer stem cell phenotype to overcome their critical influence on tumor growth is a promising new strategy for cancer treatment. Here we present a modeling framework that operates at both the cellular and molecular levels, for investigating IL-6 mediated, cancer stem cell driven tumor growth and targeted treatment with anti-IL6 antibodies. Our immediate goal is to quantify the influence of IL-6 on cancer stem cell self-renewal and survival, and to characterize the subsequent impact on tumor growth dynamics. By including the molecular details of IL-6 binding, we are able to quantify the temporal changes in fractional occupancies of bound receptors and their influence on tumor volume. There is a strong correlation between the model output and experimental data for primary tumor xenografts. We also used the model to predict tumor response to administration of the humanized IL-6R monoclonal antibody, tocilizumab (TCZ), and we found that as little as 1mg/kg of TCZ administered weekly for 7 weeks is sufficient to result in tumor reduction and a sustained deceleration of tumor growth. PMID:29351275

  3. Model of avascular tumor growth and response to low dose exposure

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    Rodriguez Aguirre, J. M.; Custidiano, E. R.

    2011-12-01

    A single level cellular automata model is described and used to simulate early tumor growth, and the response of the tumor cells under low dose radiation affects. In this model the cell cycle of the population of normal and cancer cells is followed. The invasion mechanism of the tumor is simulated by a local factor that takes into account the microenvironment hardness to cell development, in a picture similar to the AMTIH model. The response of normal and cancer cells to direct effects of radiation is tested for various models and a model of bystander response is implemented.

  4. Model of avascular tumor growth and response to low dose exposure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodriguez Aguirre, J M; Custidiano, E R

    2011-01-01

    A single level cellular automata model is described and used to simulate early tumor growth, and the response of the tumor cells under low dose radiation affects. In this model the cell cycle of the population of normal and cancer cells is followed. The invasion mechanism of the tumor is simulated by a local factor that takes into account the microenvironment hardness to cell development, in a picture similar to the AMTIH model. The response of normal and cancer cells to direct effects of radiation is tested for various models and a model of bystander response is implemented.

  5. Block of purinergic P2X7R inhibits tumor growth in a C6 glioma brain tumor animal model.

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    Ryu, Jae K; Jantaratnotai, Nattinee; Serrano-Perez, Maria C; McGeer, Patrick L; McLarnon, James G

    2011-01-01

    We examined the expression and pharmacological modulation of the purinergic receptor P2X7R in a C6 glioma model. Intrastriatal injection of C6 cells induced a time-dependent growth of tumor; at 2 weeks postinjection immunohistochemical analysis demonstrated higher levels of P2X7R in glioma-injected versus control vehicle-injected brains. P2X7R immunoreactivity colocalized with tumor cells and microglia, but not endogenous astrocytes. Intravenous administration of the P2X7R antagonist brilliant blue G (BBG) inhibited tumor growth in a spatially dependent manner from the C6 injection site. Treatment with BBG reduced tumor volume by 52% versus that in controls. Double immunostaining indicated that BBG treatment did not alter microgliosis, astrogliosis, or vasculature vessels in C6-injected animals. In vitro, BBG reduced the expression of P2X7R and glioma chemotaxis induced by the P2X7R ligand, 2',3'-O-(4-benzoyl-benzoyl)adenosine triphosphate (BzATP). Immunohistochemical staining of human glioblastoma tissue samples demonstrated greater expression of P2X7R compared to control nontumor samples. These results suggest that the efficacy of BBG in inhibiting tumor growth is primarily mediated by direct actions of the compound on P2X7R in glioma cells and that pharmacological inhibition of this purinergic receptor might serve as a strategy to slow the progression of brain tumors.

  6. Adoptively transferred human lung tumor specific cytotoxic T cells can control autologous tumor growth and shape tumor phenotype in a SCID mouse xenograft model

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    Ferrone Soldano

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The anti-tumor efficacy of human immune effector cells, such as cytolytic T lymphocytes (CTLs, has been difficult to study in lung cancer patients in the clinical setting. Improved experimental models for the study of lung tumor-immune cell interaction as well as for evaluating the efficacy of adoptive transfer of immune effector cells are needed. Methods To address questions related to the in vivo interaction of human lung tumor cells and immune effector cells, we obtained an HLA class I + lung tumor cell line from a fresh surgical specimen, and using the infiltrating immune cells, isolated and characterized tumor antigen-specific, CD8+ CTLs. We then established a SCID mouse-human tumor xenograft model with the tumor cell line and used it to study the function of the autologous CTLs provided via adoptive transfer. Results The tumor antigen specific CTLs isolated from the tumor were found to have an activated memory phenotype and able to kill tumor cells in an antigen specific manner in vitro. Additionally, the tumor antigen-specific CTLs were fully capable of homing to and killing autologous tumors in vivo, and expressing IFN-γ, each in an antigen-dependent manner. A single injection of these CTLs was able to provide significant but temporary control of the growth of autologous tumors in vivo without the need for IL-2. The timing of injection of CTLs played an essential role in the outcome of tumor growth control. Moreover, immunohistochemical analysis of surviving tumor cells following CTL treatment indicated that the surviving tumor cells expressed reduced MHC class I antigens on their surface. Conclusion These studies confirm and extend previous studies and provide additional information regarding the characteristics of CTLs which can be found within a patient's tumor. Moreover, the in vivo model described here provides a unique window for observing events that may also occur in patients undergoing adoptive cellular

  7. A Mathematical Model of Prostate Tumor Growth Under Hormone Therapy with Mutation Inhibitor

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    Tao, Youshan; Guo, Qian; Aihara, Kazuyuki

    2010-04-01

    This paper extends Jackson’s model describing the growth of a prostate tumor with hormone therapy to a new one with hypothetical mutation inhibitors. The new model not only considers the mutation by which androgen-dependent (AD) tumor cells mutate into androgen-independent (AI) ones but also introduces inhibition which is assumed to change the mutation rate. The tumor consists of two types of cells (AD and AI) whose proliferation and apoptosis rates are functions of androgen concentration. The mathematical model represents a free-boundary problem for a nonlinear system of parabolic equations, which describe the evolution of the populations of the above two types of tumor cells. The tumor surface is a free boundary, whose velocity is equal to the cell’s velocity there. Global existence and uniqueness of solutions of this model is proved. Furthermore, explicit formulae of tumor volume at any time t are found in androgen-deprived environment under the assumption of radial symmetry, and therefore the dynamics of tumor growth under androgen-deprived therapy could be predicted by these formulae. Qualitative analysis and numerical simulation show that controlling the mutation may improve the effect of hormone therapy or delay a tumor relapse.

  8. 3D cell culture systems modeling tumor growth determinants in cancer target discovery.

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    Thoma, Claudio R; Zimmermann, Miriam; Agarkova, Irina; Kelm, Jens M; Krek, Wilhelm

    2014-04-01

    Phenotypic heterogeneity of cancer cells, cell biological context, heterotypic crosstalk and the microenvironment are key determinants of the multistep process of tumor development. They sign responsible, to a significant extent, for the limited response and resistance of cancer cells to molecular-targeted therapies. Better functional knowledge of the complex intra- and intercellular signaling circuits underlying communication between the different cell types populating a tumor tissue and of the systemic and local factors that shape the tumor microenvironment is therefore imperative. Sophisticated 3D multicellular tumor spheroid (MCTS) systems provide an emerging tool to model the phenotypic and cellular heterogeneity as well as microenvironmental aspects of in vivo tumor growth. In this review we discuss the cellular, chemical and physical factors contributing to zonation and cellular crosstalk within tumor masses. On this basis, we further describe 3D cell culture technologies for growth of MCTS as advanced tools for exploring molecular tumor growth determinants and facilitating drug discovery efforts. We conclude with a synopsis on technological aspects for on-line analysis and post-processing of 3D MCTS models. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Dopamine receptor antagonist thioridazine inhibits tumor growth in a murine breast cancer model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Tao; He, Sisi; Shen, Guobo; Ye, Tinghong; Guo, Fuchun; Wang, Yongsheng

    2015-09-01

    Neuropsychological factors have been shown to influence tumor progression and therapeutic response. The present study investigated the effect of the dopamine receptor antagonist thioridazine on murine breast cancer. The anti‑tumor efficacy of thioridazine was assessed using a murine breast cancer model. Cell apoptosis and proliferation were analyzed in vitro using flow cytometry (FCM) and the MTT assay, respectively. Western blot analysis was performed to assess Akt, phosphorylated (p)‑Akt, signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT) 3, p‑STAT3 and p‑p65 in tumor cells following treatment with thioridazine. The Ki67 index and the number of terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL)‑positive apoptotic cells were assessed in the tumor sections. Thioridazine was found to reduce tumor growth, inhibit tumor cell proliferation and induce apoptosis in a dose‑ and time‑dependent manner in vitro. Thioridazine was also found to markedly inhibit tumor proliferation and induce tumor cell apoptosis in vivo as shown by the lower Ki67 index and increase in TUNEL‑positive cells. In addition, thioridazine was observed to inhibit the activation of the canonical nuclear factor κ‑light‑chain‑enhancer of activated B cells pathway and exert anti‑tumor effects by remodeling the tumor stroma, as well as inhibit angiogenesis in the tumor microenvironment. In conclusion, thioridazine was found to significantly inhibit breast tumor growth and the potential for thioridazine to be used in cancer therapy may be re‑evaluated and investigated in clinical settings.

  10. Classical mathematical models for description and prediction of experimental tumor growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benzekry, Sébastien; Lamont, Clare; Beheshti, Afshin; Tracz, Amanda; Ebos, John M L; Hlatky, Lynn; Hahnfeldt, Philip

    2014-08-01

    Despite internal complexity, tumor growth kinetics follow relatively simple laws that can be expressed as mathematical models. To explore this further, quantitative analysis of the most classical of these were performed. The models were assessed against data from two in vivo experimental systems: an ectopic syngeneic tumor (Lewis lung carcinoma) and an orthotopically xenografted human breast carcinoma. The goals were threefold: 1) to determine a statistical model for description of the measurement error, 2) to establish the descriptive power of each model, using several goodness-of-fit metrics and a study of parametric identifiability, and 3) to assess the models' ability to forecast future tumor growth. The models included in the study comprised the exponential, exponential-linear, power law, Gompertz, logistic, generalized logistic, von Bertalanffy and a model with dynamic carrying capacity. For the breast data, the dynamics were best captured by the Gompertz and exponential-linear models. The latter also exhibited the highest predictive power, with excellent prediction scores (≥80%) extending out as far as 12 days in the future. For the lung data, the Gompertz and power law models provided the most parsimonious and parametrically identifiable description. However, not one of the models was able to achieve a substantial prediction rate (≥70%) beyond the next day data point. In this context, adjunction of a priori information on the parameter distribution led to considerable improvement. For instance, forecast success rates went from 14.9% to 62.7% when using the power law model to predict the full future tumor growth curves, using just three data points. These results not only have important implications for biological theories of tumor growth and the use of mathematical modeling in preclinical anti-cancer drug investigations, but also may assist in defining how mathematical models could serve as potential prognostic tools in the clinic.

  11. Classical mathematical models for description and prediction of experimental tumor growth.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sébastien Benzekry

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Despite internal complexity, tumor growth kinetics follow relatively simple laws that can be expressed as mathematical models. To explore this further, quantitative analysis of the most classical of these were performed. The models were assessed against data from two in vivo experimental systems: an ectopic syngeneic tumor (Lewis lung carcinoma and an orthotopically xenografted human breast carcinoma. The goals were threefold: 1 to determine a statistical model for description of the measurement error, 2 to establish the descriptive power of each model, using several goodness-of-fit metrics and a study of parametric identifiability, and 3 to assess the models' ability to forecast future tumor growth. The models included in the study comprised the exponential, exponential-linear, power law, Gompertz, logistic, generalized logistic, von Bertalanffy and a model with dynamic carrying capacity. For the breast data, the dynamics were best captured by the Gompertz and exponential-linear models. The latter also exhibited the highest predictive power, with excellent prediction scores (≥80% extending out as far as 12 days in the future. For the lung data, the Gompertz and power law models provided the most parsimonious and parametrically identifiable description. However, not one of the models was able to achieve a substantial prediction rate (≥70% beyond the next day data point. In this context, adjunction of a priori information on the parameter distribution led to considerable improvement. For instance, forecast success rates went from 14.9% to 62.7% when using the power law model to predict the full future tumor growth curves, using just three data points. These results not only have important implications for biological theories of tumor growth and the use of mathematical modeling in preclinical anti-cancer drug investigations, but also may assist in defining how mathematical models could serve as potential prognostic tools in the clinic.

  12. Monitoring Prostate Tumor Growth in an Orthotopic Mouse Model Using Three-Dimensional Ultrasound Imaging Technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jie Ni

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Prostate cancer (CaP is the most commonly diagnosed and the second leading cause of death from cancer in males in USA. Prostate orthotopic mouse model has been widely used to study human CaP in preclinical settings. Measurement of changes in tumor size obtained from noninvasive diagnostic images is a standard method for monitoring responses to anticancer modalities. This article reports for the first time the usage of a three-dimensional (3D ultrasound system equipped with photoacoustic (PA imaging in monitoring longitudinal prostate tumor growth in a PC-3 orthotopic NODSCID mouse model (n = 8. Two-dimensional and 3D modes of ultrasound show great ability in accurately depicting the size and shape of prostate tumors. PA function on two-dimensional and 3D images showed average oxygen saturation and average hemoglobin concentration of the tumor. Results showed a good fit in representative exponential tumor growth curves (n = 3; r2 = 0.948, 0.955, and 0.953, respectively and a good correlation of tumor volume measurements performed in vivo with autopsy (n = 8, r = 0.95, P < .001. The application of 3D ultrasound imaging proved to be a useful imaging modality in monitoring tumor growth in an orthotopic mouse model, with advantages such as high contrast, uncomplicated protocols, economical equipment, and nonharmfulness to animals. PA mode also enabled display of blood oxygenation surrounding the tumor and tumor vasculature and angiogenesis, making 3D ultrasound imaging an ideal tool for preclinical cancer research.

  13. Nicotine promotes tumor growth and metastasis in mouse models of lung cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rebecca Davis

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Nicotine is the major addictive component of tobacco smoke. Although nicotine is generally thought to have limited ability to initiate cancer, it can induce cell proliferation and angiogenesis in a variety of systems. These properties might enable nicotine to facilitate the growth of tumors already initiated. Here we show that nicotine significantly promotes the progression and metastasis of tumors in mouse models of lung cancer. This effect was observed when nicotine was administered through intraperitoneal injections, or through over-the-counter transdermal patches.In the present study, Line1 mouse adenocarcinoma cells were implanted subcutaneously into syngenic BALB/c mice. Nicotine administration either by intraperitoneal (i.p. injection or transdermal patches caused a remarkable increase in the size of implanted Line1 tumors. Once the tumors were surgically removed, nicotine treated mice had a markedly higher tumor recurrence (59.7% as compared to the vehicle treated mice (19.5%. Nicotine also increased metastasis of dorsally implanted Line1 tumors to the lungs by 9 folds. These studies on transplanted tumors were extended to a mouse model where the tumors were induced by the tobacco carcinogen, NNK. Lung tumors were initiated in A/J mice by i.p. injection of NNK; administration of 1 mg/kg nicotine three times a week led to an increase in the size and the number of tumors formed in the lungs. In addition, nicotine significantly reduced the expression of epithelial markers, E-Cadherin and beta-Catenin as well as the tight junction protein ZO-1; these tumors also showed an increased expression of the alpha(7 nAChR subunit. We believe that exposure to nicotine either by tobacco smoke or nicotine supplements might facilitate increased tumor growth and metastasis.Our earlier results indicated that nicotine could induce invasion and epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT in cultured lung, breast and pancreatic cancer cells. This study

  14. Towards an integrative computational model for simulating tumor growth and response to radiation therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marrero, Carlos Sosa; Aubert, Vivien; Ciferri, Nicolas; Hernández, Alfredo; de Crevoisier, Renaud; Acosta, Oscar

    2017-11-01

    Understanding the response to irradiation in cancer radiotherapy (RT) may help devising new strategies with improved tumor local control. Computational models may allow to unravel the underlying radiosensitive mechanisms intervening in the dose-response relationship. By using extensive simulations a wide range of parameters may be evaluated providing insights on tumor response thus generating useful data to plan modified treatments. We propose in this paper a computational model of tumor growth and radiation response which allows to simulate a whole RT protocol. Proliferation of tumor cells, cell life-cycle, oxygen diffusion, radiosensitivity, RT response and resorption of killed cells were implemented in a multiscale framework. The model was developed in C++, using the Multi-formalism Modeling and Simulation Library (M2SL). Radiosensitivity parameters extracted from literature enabled us to simulate in a regular grid (voxel-wise) a prostate cell tissue. Histopathological specimens with different aggressiveness levels extracted from patients after prostatectomy were used to initialize in silico simulations. Results on tumor growth exhibit a good agreement with data from in vitro studies. Moreover, standard fractionation of 2 Gy/fraction, with a total dose of 80 Gy as a real RT treatment was applied with varying radiosensitivity and oxygen diffusion parameters. As expected, the high influence of these parameters was observed by measuring the percentage of survival tumor cell after RT. This work paves the way to further models allowing to simulate increased doses in modified hypofractionated schemes and to develop new patient-specific combined therapies.

  15. Stochastic fluctuation induced the competition between extinction and recurrence in a model of tumor growth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Dongxi; Xu, Wei; Sun, Chunyan; Wang, Liang

    2012-01-01

    We investigate the phenomenon that stochastic fluctuation induced the competition between tumor extinction and recurrence in the model of tumor growth derived from the catalytic Michaelis–Menten reaction. We analyze the probability transitions between the extinction state and the state of the stable tumor by the Mean First Extinction Time (MFET) and Mean First Return Time (MFRT). It is found that the positional fluctuations hinder the transition, but the environmental fluctuations, to a certain level, facilitate the tumor extinction. The observed behavior could be used as prior information for the treatment of cancer. -- Highlights: ► Stochastic fluctuation induced the competition between extinction and recurrence. ► The probability transitions are investigated. ► The positional fluctuations hinder the transition. ► The environmental fluctuations, to a certain level, facilitate the tumor extinction. ► The observed behavior can be used as prior information for the treatment of cancer.

  16. Radiotherapy planning for glioblastoma based on a tumor growth model: implications for spatial dose redistribution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Unkelbach, Jan; Dittmann, Florian; Shih, Helen A; Menze, Bjoern H; Ayache, Nicholas; Konukoglu, Ender

    2014-01-01

    Gliomas differ from many other tumors as they grow infiltratively into the brain parenchyma rather than forming a solid tumor mass with a well-defined boundary. Tumor cells can be found several centimeters away from the central tumor mass that is visible using current imaging techniques. The infiltrative growth characteristics of gliomas question the concept of a radiotherapy target volume that is irradiated to a homogeneous dose—the standard in current clinical practice. We discuss the use of the Fisher–Kolmogorov glioma growth model in radiotherapy treatment planning. The phenomenological tumor growth model assumes that tumor cells proliferate locally and migrate into neighboring brain tissue, which is mathematically described via a partial differential equation for the spatio-temporal evolution of the tumor cell density. In this model, the tumor cell density drops approximately exponentially with distance from the visible gross tumor volume, which is quantified by the infiltration length, a parameter describing the distance at which the tumor cell density drops by a factor of e. This paper discusses the implications for the prescribed dose distribution in the periphery of the tumor. In the context of the exponential cell kill model, an exponential fall-off of the cell density suggests a linear fall-off of the prescription dose with distance. We introduce the dose fall-off rate, which quantifies the steepness of the prescription dose fall-off in units of Gy mm −1 . It is shown that the dose fall-off rate is given by the inverse of the product of radiosensitivity and infiltration length. For an infiltration length of 3 mm and a surviving fraction of 50% at 2 Gy, this suggests a dose fall-off of approximately 1 Gy mm −1 . The concept is illustrated for two glioblastoma patients by optimizing intensity-modulated radiotherapy plans. The dose fall-off rate concept reflects the idea that infiltrating gliomas lack a defined boundary and are characterized by a

  17. Interleukin-12 Inhibits Tumor Growth in a Novel Angiogenesis Canine Hemangiosarcoma Xenograft Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nasim Akhtar

    2004-03-01

    Full Text Available We established a canine hemangiosarcoma cell line derived from malignant endothelial cells comprising a spontaneous tumor in a dog to provide a renewable source of endothelial cells for studies of angiogenesis in malignancy. Pieces of the hemangiosarcoma biopsy were engrafted subcutaneously in a bg/nu/XID mouse allowing the tumor cells to expand in vivo. A cell line, SB-HSA, was derived from the xenograft. SB-HSA cells expressed vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF receptors 1 and 2, CD31, CD146, and αvβ3 integrin, and produced several growth factors and cytokines, including VEGF, basic fibroblast growth factor, and interleukin (IL-8 that are stimulatory to endothelial cell growth. These results indicated that the cells recapitulated features of mitotically activated endothelia. In vivo, SB-HSA cells stimulated robust angiogenic responses in mice and formed tumor masses composed of aberrant vascular channels in immunocompromised mice providing novel opportunities for investigating the effectiveness of antiangiogenic agents. Using this model, we determined that IL-12, a cytokine with both immunostimulatory and antiangiogenic effects, suppressed angiogenesis induced by, and tumor growth of, SB-HSA cells. The endothelial cell model we have described offers unique opportunities to pursue further investigations with IL-12, as well as other antiangiogenic approaches in cancer therapy.

  18. Interleukin-12 Inhibits Tumor Growth in a Novel Angiogenesis Canine Hemangiosarcoma Xenograft Model1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickerson, Erin B; Steinberg, Howard; Breen, Matthew; Auerbach, Robert; Helfand, Stuart C

    2004-01-01

    Abstract We established a canine hemangiosarcoma cell line derived from malignant endothelial cells comprising a spontaneous tumor in a dog to provide a renewable source of endothelial cells for studies of angiogenesis in malignancy. Pieces of the hemangiosarcoma biopsy were engrafted subcutaneously in a bg/nu/XID mouse allowing the tumor cells to expand in vivo. A cell line, SB-HSA, was derived from the xenograft. SB-HSA cells expressed vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) receptors 1 and 2, CD31, CD146, and αvβ3 integrin, and produced several growth factors and cytokines, including VEGF, basic fibroblast growth factor, and interleukin (IL)-8 that are stimulatory to endothelial cell growth. These results indicated that the cells recapitulated features of mitotically activated endothelia. In vivo, SB-HSA cells stimulated robust angiogenic responses in mice and formed tumor masses composed of aberrant vascular channels in immunocompromised mice providing novel opportunities for investigating the effectiveness of antiangiogenic agents. Using this model, we determined that IL-12, a cytokine with both immunostimulatory and antiangiogenic effects, suppressed angiogenesis induced by, and tumor growth of, SB-HSA cells. The endothelial cell model we have described offers unique opportunities to pursue further investigations with IL-12, as well as other antiangiogenic approaches in cancer therapy. PMID:15140399

  19. Analysis of a diffuse interface model of multispecies tumor growth

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Dai, M.; Feireisl, Eduard; Rocca, E.; Schimperna, G.; Schonbek, M.E.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 30, č. 4 (2017), s. 1639-1658 ISSN 0951-7715 EU Projects: European Commission(XE) 320078 - MATHEF Institutional support: RVO:67985840 Keywords : Cahn-Hilliard equation * Darcy law * diffuse interface model Subject RIV: BA - General Mathematics OBOR OECD: Pure mathematics Impact factor: 1.767, year: 2016 http://iopscience.iop.org/article/10.1088/1361-6544/aa6063/meta

  20. Analysis of a diffuse interface model of multispecies tumor growth

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Dai, M.; Feireisl, Eduard; Rocca, E.; Schimperna, G.; Schonbek, M.E.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 30, č. 4 (2017), s. 1639-1658 ISSN 0951-7715 EU Projects: European Commission(XE) 320078 - MATHEF Institutional support: RVO:67985840 Keywords : Cahn-Hilliard equation * Darcy law * diffuse interface model Subject RIV: BA - General Mathematics OBOR OECD: Pure mathematics Impact factor: 1.767, year: 2016 http://iopscience.iop.org/article/10.1088/1361-6544/aa6063/meta;jsessionid=73B30CFD9F74DD027762D29C83D3094F.c3.iopscience.cld.iop.org

  1. Sunitinib malate provides activity against murine bladder tumor growth and invasion in a preclinical orthotopic model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Eddie Shu-yin; Patel, Amit R; Hansel, Donna E; Larchian, William A; Heston, Warren D

    2012-09-01

    To evaluate the effects of sunitinib on localized bladder cancer in a mouse orthotopic bladder tumor model. We used an established orthotopic mouse bladder cancer model in syngeneic C3H/He mice. Treatment doses of 40 mg/kg of sunitinib or placebo sterile saline were administrated daily by oral gavage. Tumor volume, intratumoral perfusion, and in vivo vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-2 expression were measured using a targeted contrast-enhanced micro-ultrasound imaging system. The findings were correlated with the total bladder weight, tumor stage, and survival. The effects of sunitinib malate on angiogenesis and cellular proliferation were measured by immunostaining of CD31 and Ki-67. Significant inhibition of tumor growth was seen after sunitinib treatment compared with the control. The incidence of extravesical extension of the bladder tumor and hydroureter in the sunitinib-treated group (30% and 20%, respectively) was lower than the incidence in the control group (66.7% and 55.6%, respectively). Sunitinib therapy prolonged the survival in mice, with statistical significance (log-rank test, P = .03). On targeted contrast-enhanced micro-ultrasound imaging, in vivo vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-2 expression was reduced in the sunitinib group and correlated with a decrease in microvessel density. The results of our study have demonstrated the antitumor effects of sunitinib in the mouse localized bladder cancer model. Sunitinib inhibited the growth of bladder tumors and prolonged survival. Given that almost 30% of cases in our treatment arm developed extravesical disease, sunitinib might be suited as a part of a multimodal treatment regimen for bladder cancer. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Ecto-5'-Nucleotidase Overexpression Reduces Tumor Growth in a Xenograph Medulloblastoma Model.

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    Angélica R Cappellari

    Full Text Available Ecto-5'-nucleotidase/CD73 (ecto-5'-NT participates in extracellular ATP catabolism by converting adenosine monophosphate (AMP into adenosine. This enzyme affects the progression and invasiveness of different tumors. Furthermore, the expression of ecto-5'-NT has also been suggested as a favorable prognostic marker, attributing to this enzyme contradictory functions in cancer. Medulloblastoma (MB is the most common brain tumor of the cerebellum and affects mainly children.The effects of ecto-5'-NT overexpression on human MB tumor growth were studied in an in vivo model. Balb/c immunodeficient (nude 6 to 14-week-old mice were used for dorsal subcutaneous xenograph tumor implant. Tumor development was evaluated by pathophysiological analysis. In addition, the expression patterns of adenosine receptors were verified.The human MB cell line D283, transfected with ecto-5'-NT (D283hCD73, revealed reduced tumor growth compared to the original cell line transfected with an empty vector. D283hCD73 generated tumors with a reduced proliferative index, lower vascularization, the presence of differentiated cells and increased active caspase-3 expression. Prominent A1 adenosine receptor expression rates were detected in MB cells overexpressing ecto-5'-NT.This work suggests that ecto-5'-NT promotes reduced tumor growth to reduce cell proliferation and vascularization, promote higher differentiation rates and initiate apoptosis, supposedly by accumulating adenosine, which then acts through A1 adenosine receptors. Therefore, ecto-5'-NT might be considered an important prognostic marker, being associated with good prognosis and used as a potential target for therapy.

  3. Ecto-5’-Nucleotidase Overexpression Reduces Tumor Growth in a Xenograph Medulloblastoma Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cappellari, Angélica R.; Pillat, Micheli M.; Souza, Hellio D. N.; Dietrich, Fabrícia; Oliveira, Francine H.; Figueiró, Fabrício; Abujamra, Ana L.; Roesler, Rafael; Lecka, Joanna; Sévigny, Jean; Battastini, Ana Maria O.; Ulrich, Henning

    2015-01-01

    Background Ecto-5’-nucleotidase/CD73 (ecto-5’-NT) participates in extracellular ATP catabolism by converting adenosine monophosphate (AMP) into adenosine. This enzyme affects the progression and invasiveness of different tumors. Furthermore, the expression of ecto-5’-NT has also been suggested as a favorable prognostic marker, attributing to this enzyme contradictory functions in cancer. Medulloblastoma (MB) is the most common brain tumor of the cerebellum and affects mainly children. Materials and Methods The effects of ecto-5’-NT overexpression on human MB tumor growth were studied in an in vivo model. Balb/c immunodeficient (nude) 6 to 14-week-old mice were used for dorsal subcutaneous xenograph tumor implant. Tumor development was evaluated by pathophysiological analysis. In addition, the expression patterns of adenosine receptors were verified. Results The human MB cell line D283, transfected with ecto-5’-NT (D283hCD73), revealed reduced tumor growth compared to the original cell line transfected with an empty vector. D283hCD73 generated tumors with a reduced proliferative index, lower vascularization, the presence of differentiated cells and increased active caspase-3 expression. Prominent A1 adenosine receptor expression rates were detected in MB cells overexpressing ecto-5’-NT. Conclusion This work suggests that ecto-5’-NT promotes reduced tumor growth to reduce cell proliferation and vascularization, promote higher differentiation rates and initiate apoptosis, supposedly by accumulating adenosine, which then acts through A1 adenosine receptors. Therefore, ecto-5’-NT might be considered an important prognostic marker, being associated with good prognosis and used as a potential target for therapy. PMID:26491983

  4. Fluctuations induced extinction and stochastic resonance effect in a model of tumor growth with periodic treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Dongxi; Xu Wei; Guo, Yongfeng; Xu Yong

    2011-01-01

    We investigate a stochastic model of tumor growth derived from the catalytic Michaelis-Menten reaction with positional and environmental fluctuations under subthreshold periodic treatment. Firstly, the influences of environmental fluctuations on the treatable stage are analyzed numerically. Applying the standard theory of stochastic resonance derived from the two-state approach, we derive the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) analytically, which is used to measure the stochastic resonance phenomenon. It is found that the weak environmental fluctuations could induce the extinction of tumor cells in the subthreshold periodic treatment. The positional stability is better in favor of the treatment of the tumor cells. Besides, the appropriate and feasible treatment intensity and the treatment cycle should be highlighted considered in the treatment of tumor cells.

  5. Inhibition of tumor growth in a glioma model treated with boron neutron capture therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goodman, J.H.; McGregor, J.M.; Clendenon, N.R.; Gahbauer, R.A.; Barth, R.F.; Soloway, A.H.; Fairchild, R.G.

    1990-01-01

    This investigation attempts to determine whether increased survival time seen when the F98 glioma model is treated with boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) is a result of inhibition of tumor growth caused by radiation-induced alterations in endothelial cells and normal tissue components. This indirect effect of radiation has been called the tumor bed effect. A series of tumor-bearing rats was studied, using a standardized investigational BNCT protocol consisting of 50 mg/kg of Na2B12H11SH injected intravenously 14 to 17 hours before neutron irradiation at 4 x 10(12) n/cm2. Ten rats, serving as controls, received no treatment either before or after tumor implantation. A second group of 10 rats was treated with BNCT 4 days before tumor implantation; these animals received no further treatment. The remaining group of 10 rats received no pretreatment but was treated with BNCT 10 days after implantation. Histological and ultrastructural analyses were performed in 2 animals from each group 17 days after implantation. Survival times of the untreated control animals (mean, 25.8 days) did not differ statistically from the survival times of the rats in the pretreated group (mean, 25.5 days). The rats treated with BNCT after implantation survived significantly longer (P less than 0.02; mean, 33.2 days) than the controls and the preirradiated animals. Tumor size indices calculated from measurements taken at the time of death were similar in all groups. These results indicate that, with this tumor model, BNCT does not cause a tumor bed effect in cerebral tissue. The therapeutic gains observed with BNCT result from direct effects on tumor cells or on the peritumoral neovascularity

  6. Kinetic modeling of tumor growth and dissemination in the craniospinal axis: implications for craniospinal irradiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Halperin Edward C

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Medulloblastoma and other types of tumors that gain access to the cerebrospinal fluid can spread throughout the craniospinal axis. The purpose of this study was to devise a simple multi-compartment kinetic model using established tumor cell growth and treatment sensitivity parameters to model the complications of this spread as well as the impact of treatment with craniospinal radiotherapy. Methods A two-compartment mathematical model was constructed. Rate constants were derived from previously published work and the model used to predict outcomes for various clinical scenarios. Results The model is simple and with the use of known and estimated clinical parameters is consistent with known clinical outcomes. Treatment outcomes are critically dependent upon the duration of the treatment break and the radiosensitivity of the tumor. Cross-plot analyses serve as an estimate of likelihood of cure as a function of these and other factors. Conclusion The model accurately describes known clinical outcomes for patients with medulloblastoma. It can help guide treatment decisions for radiation oncologists treating patients with this disease. Incorporation of other treatment modalities, such as chemotherapy, that enhance radiation sensitivity and/or reduce tumor burden, are predicted to significantly increase the probability of cure.

  7. Short hairpin RNA targeting of fibroblast activation protein inhibits tumor growth and improves the tumor microenvironment in a mouse model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fan Cai

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Fibroblast activation protein (FAP is a specific serine proteaseexpressed in tumor stroma proven to be a stimulatory factor inthe progression of some cancers. The purpose of this studywas to investigate the effects of FAP knockdown on tumorgrowth and the tumor microenvironment. Mice bearing 4T1subcutaneous tumors were treated with liposome-shRNAcomplexes targeting FAP. Tumor volumes and weights weremonitored, and FAP, collagen, microvessel density (MVD,and apoptosis were measured. Our studies showed thatshRNA targeting of FAP in murine breast cancer reduces FAPexpression, inhibits tumor growth, promotes collagenaccumulation (38%, and suppresses angiogenesis (71.7%, aswell as promoting apoptosis (by threefold. We suggest thatFAP plays a role in tumor growth and in altering the tumormicroenvironment. Targeting FAP may therefore represent asupplementary therapy for breast cancer. [BMB Reports 2013;46(5: 252-257

  8. Osteopontin induces growth of metastatic tumors in a preclinical model of non-small lung cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shojaei Farbod

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Osteopontin (OPN, also known as SPP1 (secreted phosphoprotein, is an integrin binding glyco-phosphoprotein produced by a variety of tissues. In cancer patients expression of OPN has been associated with poor prognosis in several tumor types including breast, lung, and colorectal cancers. Despite wide expression in tumor cells and stroma, there is limited evidence supporting role of OPN in tumor progression and metastasis. Using phage display technology we identified a high affinity anti-OPN monoclonal antibody (hereafter AOM1. The binding site for AOM1 was identified as SVVYGLRSKS sequence which is immediately adjacent to the RGD motif and also spans the thrombin cleavage site of the human OPN. AOM1 efficiently inhibited OPNa binding to recombinant integrin αvβ3 with an IC50 of 65 nM. Due to its unique binding site, AOM1 is capable of inhibiting OPN cleavage by thrombin which has been shown to produce an OPN fragment that is biologically more active than the full length OPN. Screening of human cell lines identified tumor cells with increased expression of OPN receptors (αvβ3 and CD44v6 such as mesothelioma, hepatocellular carcinoma, breast, and non-small cell lung adenocarcinoma (NSCLC. CD44v6 and αvβ3 were also found to be highly enriched in the monocyte, but not lymphocyte, subset of human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (hPBMCs. In vitro, OPNa induced migration of both tumor and hPBMCs in a transwell migration assay. AOM1 significantly blocked cell migration further validating its specificity for the ligand. OPN was found to be enriched in mouse plasma in a number of pre-clinical tumor model of non-small cell lung cancers. To assess the role of OPN in tumor growth and metastasis and to evaluate a potential therapeutic indication for AOM1, we employed a KrasG12D-LSLp53fl/fl subcutaneously implanted in vivo model of NSCLC which possesses a high capacity to metastasize into the lung. Our data indicated that treatment of tumor

  9. Hmgb1-IL-23-IL-17-IL-6-Stat3 Axis Promotes Tumor Growth in Murine Models of Melanoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiu Tang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In order to understand how tumor cells can escape immune surveillance mechanisms and thus develop antitumor therapies, it is critically important to investigate the mechanisms by which the immune system interacts with the tumor microenvironment. In our current study, IL-17 deficiency results in reduced melanoma tumor size, diminished numbers of proliferating cells and blood vessels, and decreased percentage of CD11b+Gr-1+ MDSCs in tumor tissues. IL-17 promotes IL-6 induction and Stat3 activation. Treatment of Stat3 inhibitor WP1066 in B16-F10 tumor cells inoculated wild-type mice inhibits tumor growth. Additional administration of recombinant IL-6 into B16-F10 tumor-bearing IL-17−/− mice results in markedly increased tumor size and p-Stat3 expression, whereas additional recombinant IL-17 administration into B16-F10 tumor-bearing wild-type mice treated with anti-IL-6 mAb does not significantly alter the tumor growth and p-Stat3 expression. In our further study, blockade of Hmgb1-RAGE pathway inhibits melanoma tumor growth and reduces production of IL-23 and IL-17. All these data suggest that Hmgb1-IL-23-IL-17-IL-6-Stat3 axis plays a pivotal role in tumor development in murine models of melanoma, and blocking any portion of this axis will attenuate melanoma tumor growth.

  10. Cystatin C deficiency suppresses tumor growth in a breast cancer model through decreased proliferation of tumor cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Završnik, Janja; Butinar, Miha; Prebanda, Mojca Trstenjak; Krajnc, Aleksander; Vidmar, Robert; Fonović, Marko; Grubb, Anders; Turk, Vito; Turk, Boris; Vasiljeva, Olga

    2017-09-26

    Cysteine cathepsins are proteases that, in addition to their important physiological functions, have been associated with multiple pathologies, including cancer. Cystatin C (CstC) is a major endogenous inhibitor that regulates the extracellular activity of cysteine cathepsins. We investigated the role of cystatin C in mammary cancer using CstC knockout mice and a mouse model of breast cancer induced by expression of the polyoma middle T oncoprotein (PyMT) in the mammary epithelium. We showed that the ablation of CstC reduced the rate of mammary tumor growth. Notably, a decrease in the proliferation of CstC knockout PyMT tumor cells was demonstrated ex vivo and in vitro , indicating a role for this protease inhibitor in signaling pathways that control cell proliferation. An increase in phosphorylated p-38 was observed in CstC knockout tumors, suggesting a novel function for cystatin C in cancer development, independent of the TGF-β pathway. Moreover, proteomic analysis of the CstC wild-type and knockout PyMT primary cell secretomes revealed a decrease in the levels of 14-3-3 proteins in the secretome of knock-out cells, suggesting a novel link between cysteine cathepsins, cystatin C and 14-3-3 proteins in tumorigenesis, calling for further investigations.

  11. Numerical modelling of the influence of stromal cells on tumor growth and angiogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakiyama, Nobuyuki; Nagayama, Katsuya

    2018-01-01

    According to the statistics provided by the Ministry of Health, Labor and Welfare the death of one in 3.5 Japanese people is attributed to tumor highlighting the need for active research on malignant tumors. Early detection can be cited as a countermeasure against malignant tumors, but it is often difficult to observe the growth process, and thorough understanding of the phenomena will aid in more efficient detection of such tumors. A malnourished benign tumor may create new blood vessels from existing ones and proliferate abnormally by absorbing nutrients from these newly created blood vessels to become malignant. Different factors influence the shape of tumors and shape is an important factor in evaluating their malignancy. Because interstitial cells greatly influence tumor growth, investigating the influence of stromal cells on tumor growth will help in developing a better understanding of the phenomenon.

  12. Tocotrienol-adjuvanted dendritic cells inhibit tumor growth and metastasis: a murine model of breast cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sitti Rahma Abdul Hafid

    Full Text Available Tocotrienol-rich fraction (TRF from palm oil is reported to possess anti-cancer and immune-enhancing effects. In this study, TRF supplementation was used as an adjuvant to enhance the anti-cancer effects of dendritic cells (DC-based cancer vaccine in a syngeneic mouse model of breast cancer. Female BALB/c mice were inoculated with 4T1 cells in mammary pad to induce tumor. When the tumor was palpable, the mice in the experimental groups were injected subcutaneously with DC-pulsed with tumor lysate (TL from 4T1 cells (DC+TL once a week for three weeks and fed daily with 1 mg TRF or vehicle. Control mice received unpulsed DC and were fed with vehicle. The combined therapy of using DC+TL injections and TRF supplementation (DC+TL+TRF inhibited (p<0.05 tumor growth and metastasis. Splenocytes from the DC+TL+TRF group cultured with mitomycin-C (MMC-treated 4T1 cells produced higher (p<0.05 levels of IFN-γ and IL-12. The cytotoxic T-lymphocyte (CTL assay also showed enhanced tumor-specific killing (p<0.05 by CD8(+ T-lymphocytes isolated from mice in the DC+TL+TRF group. This study shows that TRF has the potential to be used as an adjuvant to enhance effectiveness of DC-based vaccines.

  13. Picropodophyllin inhibits tumor growth of human nasopharyngeal carcinoma in a mouse model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yin, Shu-Cheng; Guo, Wei; Tao, Ze-Zhang

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: •We identified that PPP inhibits IGF-1R/Akt pathway in NPC cells. •PPP dose-dependently inhibits NPC cell proliferation in vitro. •PPP suppresses tumor growth of NPC in nude mice. •PPP have little effect on microtubule assembly. -- Abstract: Insulin-like growth factor-1 receptor (IGF-1R) is a cell membrane receptor with tyrosine kinase activity and plays important roles in cell transformation, tumor growth, tumor invasion, and metastasis. Picropodophyllin (PPP) is a selective IGF-1R inhibitor and shows promising antitumor effects for several human cancers. However, its antitumor effects in nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) remain unclear. The purpose of this study is to investigate the antitumor activity of PPP in NPC using in vitro cell culture and in vivo animal model. We found that PPP dose-dependently decreased the IGF-induced phosphorylation and activity of IGF-1R and consequently reduced the phosphorylation of Akt, one downstream target of IGF-1R. In addition, PPP inhibited NPC cell proliferation in vitro. The half maximal inhibitory concentration (IC50) of PPP for NPC cell line CNE-2 was ⩽1 μM at 24 h after treatment and ⩽0.5 μM at 48 h after treatment, respectively. Moreover, administration of PPP by intraperitoneal injection significantly suppressed the tumor growth of xenografted NPC in nude mice. Taken together, these results suggest targeting IGF-1R by PPP may represent a new strategy for treatment of NPCs with positive IGF-1R expression

  14. Action of hexachlorobenzene on tumor growth and metastasis in different experimental models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pontillo, Carolina Andrea, E-mail: caroponti@hotmail.com [Laboratorio de Efectos Biológicos de Contaminantes Ambientales, Departamento de Bioquímica Humana, Facultad de Medicina, Universidad de Buenos Aires, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Rojas, Paola, E-mail: parojas2010@gmail.com [Laboratorio de Carcinogénesis Hormonal, Instituto de Biología y Medicina Experimental (IBYME-CONICET), Buenos Aires (Argentina); Chiappini, Florencia, E-mail: florenciachiappini@hotmail.com [Laboratorio de Efectos Biológicos de Contaminantes Ambientales, Departamento de Bioquímica Humana, Facultad de Medicina, Universidad de Buenos Aires, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Sequeira, Gonzalo, E-mail: chicon27_7@hotmail.com [Laboratorio de Carcinogénesis Hormonal, Instituto de Biología y Medicina Experimental (IBYME-CONICET), Buenos Aires (Argentina); Cocca, Claudia, E-mail: cm_cocca@hotmail.com [Laboratorio de Radioisótopos, Facultad de Farmacia y Bioquímica, Universidad de Buenos Aires, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Crocci, Máximo, E-mail: info@crescenti.com.ar [Instituto de Inmunooncología Crescenti, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Colombo, Lucas, E-mail: lucascol2003@yahoo.com.ar [Instituto de Oncología Angel Roffo, Universidad de Buenos Aires, Buenos Aires,Argentina (Argentina); Lanari, Claudia, E-mail: lanari.claudia@gmail.com [Laboratorio de Carcinogénesis Hormonal, Instituto de Biología y Medicina Experimental (IBYME-CONICET), Buenos Aires (Argentina); and others

    2013-05-01

    Hexachlorobenzene (HCB) is a widespread organochlorine pesticide, considered a possible human carcinogen. It is a dioxin-like compound and a weak ligand of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR). We have found that HCB activates c-Src/HER1/STAT5b and HER1/ERK1/2 signaling pathways and cell migration, in an AhR-dependent manner in MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells. The aim of this study was to investigate in vitro the effect of HCB (0.005, 0.05, 0.5, 5 μM) on cell invasion and metalloproteases (MMPs) 2 and 9 activation in MDA-MB-231 cells. Furthermore, we examined in vivo the effect of HCB (0.3, 3, 30 mg/kg b.w.) on tumor growth, MMP2 and MMP9 expression, and metastasis using MDA-MB-231 xenografts and two syngeneic mouse breast cancer models (spontaneous metastasis using C4-HI and lung experimental metastasis using LM3). Our results show that HCB (5 μM) enhances MMP2 expression, as well as cell invasion, through AhR, c-Src/HER1 pathway and MMPs. Moreover, HCB increases MMP9 expression, secretion and activity through a HER1 and AhR-dependent mechanism, in MDA-MB-231 cells. HCB (0.3 and 3 mg/kg b.w.) enhances subcutaneous tumor growth in MDA-MB-231 and C4-HI in vivo models. In vivo, using MDA-MB-231 model, the pesticide (0.3, 3 and 30 mg/kg b.w.) activated c-Src, HER1, STAT5b, and ERK1/2 signaling pathways and increased MMP2 and MMP9 protein levels. Furthermore, we observed that HCB stimulated lung metastasis regardless the tumor hormone-receptor status. Our findings suggest that HCB may be a risk factor for human breast cancer progression. - Highlights: ► HCB enhances MMP2 and MMP9 expression and cell invasion in MDA-MB-231, in vitro. ► HCB-effects are mediated through AhR, HER1 and/or c-Src. ► HCB increases subcutaneous tumor growth in MDA-MB-231 and C4-HI in vivo models. ► HCB activates c-Src/HER1 pathway and increases MMPs levels in MDA-MB-231 tumors. ► HCB stimulates lung metastasis in C4-HI and LM3 in vivo models.

  15. Numerical simulation of a thermodynamically consistent four-species tumor growth model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawkins-Daarud, Andrea; van der Zee, Kristoffer G; Oden, J Tinsley

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, we develop a thermodynamically consistent four-species model of tumor growth on the basis of the continuum theory of mixtures. Unique to this model is the incorporation of nutrient within the mixture as opposed to being modeled with an auxiliary reaction-diffusion equation. The formulation involves systems of highly nonlinear partial differential equations of surface effects through diffuse-interface models. A mixed finite element spatial discretization is developed and implemented to provide numerical results demonstrating the range of solutions this model can produce. A time-stepping algorithm is then presented for this system, which is shown to be first order accurate and energy gradient stable. The results of an array of numerical experiments are presented, which demonstrate a wide range of solutions produced by various choices of model parameters.

  16. CysLT(1)R antagonists inhibit tumor growth in a xenograft model of colon cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savari, Sayeh; Liu, Minghui; Zhang, Yuan; Sime, Wondossen; Sjölander, Anita

    2013-01-01

    The expression of the inflammatory G-protein coupled receptor CysLT1R has been shown to be upregulated in colon cancer patients and associated with poor prognosis. The present study investigated the correlation between CysLT1R and colon cancer development in vivo using CysLT1R antagonists (ZM198,615 or Montelukast) and the nude mouse xenograft model. Two drug administration regimens were established. The first regimen was established to investigate the importance of CysLT1R in tumor initiation. Nude mice were inoculated with 50 µM CysLT1R antagonist-pretreated HCT-116 colon cancer cells and received continued treatment (5 mg/kg/day, intraperitoneally). The second regimen aimed to address the role of CysLT1R in tumor progression. Nude mice were inoculated with non-pretreated HCT-116 cells and did not receive CysLT1R antagonist treatment until recordable tumor appearance. Both regimens resulted in significantly reduced tumor size, attributed to changes in proliferation and apoptosis as determined by reduced Ki-67 levels and increased levels of p21(WAF/Cip1) (Pcolon cancer cell line HCT-116 and CysLT1R antagonists. In addition to significant reductions in cell proliferation, adhesion and colony formation, we observed induction of cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in a dose-dependent manner. The ability of Montelukast to inhibit growth of human colon cancer xenograft was further validated by using two additional colon cancer cell lines, SW-480 and HT-29. Our results demonstrate that CysLT1R antagonists inhibit growth of colon cancer xenografts primarily by reducing proliferation and inducing apoptosis of the tumor cells.

  17. Nonlinear simulations of solid tumor growth using a mixture model: invasion and branching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cristini, Vittorio; Li, Xiangrong; Lowengrub, John S.; Wise, Steven M.

    2011-01-01

    We develop a thermodynamically consistent mixture model for avascular solid tumor growth which takes into account the effects of cell-to-cell adhesion, and taxis inducing chemical and molecular species. The mixture model is well-posed and the governing equations are of Cahn–Hilliard type. When there are only two phases, our asymptotic analysis shows that earlier single-phase models may be recovered as limiting cases of a two-phase model. To solve the governing equations, we develop a numerical algorithm based on an adaptive Cartesian block-structured mesh refinement scheme. A centered-difference approximation is used for the space discretization so that the scheme is second order accurate in space. An implicit discretization in time is used which results in nonlinear equations at implicit time levels. We further employ a gradient stable discretization scheme so that the nonlinear equations are solvable for very large time steps. To solve those equations we use a nonlinear multilevel/multigrid method which is of an optimal order O (N) where N is the number of grid points. Spherically symmetric and fully two dimensional nonlinear numerical simulations are performed. We investigate tumor evolution in nutrient-rich and nutrient-poor tissues. A number of important results have been uncovered. For example, we demonstrate that the tumor may suffer from taxis-driven fingering instabilities which are most dramatic when cell proliferation is low, as predicted by linear stability theory. This is also observed in experiments. This work shows that taxis may play a role in tumor invasion and that when nutrient plays the role of a chemoattractant, the diffusional instability is exacerbated by nutrient gradients. Accordingly, we believe this model is capable of describing complex invasive patterns observed in experiments. PMID:18787827

  18. Quantitation and gompertzian analysis of tumor growth

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rygaard, K; Spang-Thomsen, M

    1998-01-01

    to transform the experimental data into useful growth curves. A transformed Gompertz function is used as the basis for calculating relevant parameters pertaining to tumor growth and response to therapy. The calculations are facilitated by use of a computer program which performs the necessary calculations......Human tumor xenografts in immune-deficient animals are used to establish tumor growth curves and for studying the effect of experimental therapy on tumor growth. In this review we describe a method for making serial measurements of tumor size in the nude mouse model as well as methods used...

  19. Quantitation and gompertzian analysis of tumor growth

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rygaard, K; Spang-Thomsen, M

    1998-01-01

    Human tumor xenografts in immune-deficient animals are used to establish tumor growth curves and for studying the effect of experimental therapy on tumor growth. In this review we describe a method for making serial measurements of tumor size in the nude mouse model as well as methods used...... to transform the experimental data into useful growth curves. A transformed Gompertz function is used as the basis for calculating relevant parameters pertaining to tumor growth and response to therapy. The calculations are facilitated by use of a computer program which performs the necessary calculations...

  20. The let-7 microRNA reduces tumor growth in mouse models of lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esquela-Kerscher, Aurora; Trang, Phong; Wiggins, Jason F; Patrawala, Lubna; Cheng, Angie; Ford, Lance; Weidhaas, Joanne B; Brown, David; Bader, Andreas G; Slack, Frank J

    2008-03-15

    MicroRNAs have been increasingly implicated in human cancer and interest has grown about the potential to use microRNAs to combat cancer. Lung cancer is the most prevalent form of cancer worldwide and lacks effective therapies. Here we have used both in vitro and in vivo approaches to show that the let-7 microRNA directly represses cancer growth in the lung. We find that let-7 inhibits the growth of multiple human lung cancer cell lines in culture, as well as the growth of lung cancer cell xenografts in immunodeficient mice. Using an established orthotopic mouse lung cancer model, we show that intranasal let-7 administration reduces tumor formation in vivo in the lungs of animals expressing a G12D activating mutation for the K-ras oncogene. These findings provide direct evidence that let-7 acts as a tumor suppressor gene in the lung and indicate that this miRNA may be useful as a novel therapeutic agent in lung cancer.

  1. Bifurcation for a free boundary problem modeling the growth of tumors with a drug induced nonlinear proliferation rate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Fengjie; Liu, Bingchen

    2017-12-01

    In this paper, we study a free boundary model describing growth of tumors under action of drugs. To our knowledge, in theoretical discussion for free boundary problems, the proliferation rate in tumor models discussed in previous bifurcation results is a linear function of nutrients and inhibitors. Whereas in this paper we consider the net proliferation rate as a nonlinear function depending on both nutrients and drugs. First, the existence and the uniqueness of radially symmetric stationary solutions are obtained. Second, we prove that symmetry-breaking solutions bifurcate from the radially symmetric stationary solutions when the concentration of drug on the boundary of tumor is less than one in the rescaled model.

  2. Selection and Validation of Predictive Models of Radiation Effects on Tumor Growth Based on Noninvasive Imaging Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lima, E A B F; Oden, J T; Wohlmuth, B; Shahmoradi, A; Hormuth, D A; Yankeelov, T E; Scarabosio, L; Horger, T

    2017-12-01

    The use of mathematical and computational models for reliable predictions of tumor growth and decline in living organisms is one of the foremost challenges in modern predictive science, as it must cope with uncertainties in observational data, model selection, model parameters, and model inadequacy, all for very complex physical and biological systems. In this paper, large classes of parametric models of tumor growth in vascular tissue are discussed including models for radiation therapy. Observational data is obtained from MRI of a murine model of glioma and observed over a period of about three weeks, with X-ray radiation administered 14.5 days into the experimental program. Parametric models of tumor proliferation and decline are presented based on the balance laws of continuum mixture theory, particularly mass balance, and from accepted biological hypotheses on tumor growth. Among these are new model classes that include characterizations of effects of radiation and simple models of mechanical deformation of tumors. The Occam Plausibility Algorithm (OPAL) is implemented to provide a Bayesian statistical calibration of the model classes, 39 models in all, as well as the determination of the most plausible models in these classes relative to the observational data, and to assess model inadequacy through statistical validation processes. Discussions of the numerical analysis of finite element approximations of the system of stochastic, nonlinear partial differential equations characterizing the model classes, as well as the sampling algorithms for Monte Carlo and Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) methods employed in solving the forward stochastic problem, and in computing posterior distributions of parameters and model plausibilities are provided. The results of the analyses described suggest that the general framework developed can provide a useful approach for predicting tumor growth and the effects of radiation.

  3. Optimal distributed control of a diffuse interface model of tumor growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colli, Pierluigi; Gilardi, Gianni; Rocca, Elisabetta; Sprekels, Jürgen

    2017-06-01

    In this paper, a distributed optimal control problem is studied for a diffuse interface model of tumor growth which was proposed by Hawkins-Daruud et al in Hawkins-Daruud et al (2011 Int. J. Numer. Math. Biomed. Eng. 28 3-24). The model consists of a Cahn-Hilliard equation for the tumor cell fraction φ coupled to a reaction-diffusion equation for a function σ representing the nutrient-rich extracellular water volume fraction. The distributed control u monitors as a right-hand side of the equation for σ and can be interpreted as a nutrient supply or a medication, while the cost function, which is of standard tracking type, is meant to keep the tumor cell fraction under control during the evolution. We show that the control-to-state operator is Fréchet differentiable between appropriate Banach spaces and derive the first-order necessary optimality conditions in terms of a variational inequality involving the adjoint state variables. The financial support of the FP7-IDEAS-ERC-StG #256872 (EntroPhase) and of the project Fondazione Cariplo-Regione Lombardia MEGAsTAR ‘Matematica d’Eccellenza in biologia ed ingegneria come accelleratore di una nuona strateGia per l’ATtRattività dell’ateneo pavese’ is gratefully acknowledged. The paper also benefited from the support of the MIUR-PRIN Grant 2015PA5MP7 ‘Calculus of Variations’ for PC and GG, and the GNAMPA (Gruppo Nazionale per l’Analisi Matematica, la Probabilità e le loro Applicazioni) of INdAM (Istituto Nazionale di Alta Matematica) for PC, GG and ER.

  4. Tumor cells growth and survival time with the ketogenic diet in animal models: A systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soheila Khodadadi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Recently, interest in targeted cancer therapies via metabolic pathways has been renewed with the discovery that many tumors become dependent on glucose uptake during anaerobic glycolysis. Also the inability of ketone bodies metabolization due to various deficiencies in mitochondrial enzymes is the major metabolic changes discovered in malignant cells. Therefore, administration of a ketogenic diet (KD which is based on high in fat and low in carbohydrates might inhibit tumor growth and provide a rationale for therapeutic strategies. So, we conducted this systematic review to assess the effects of KD on the tumor cells growth and survival time in animal studies. All databases were searched from inception to November 2015. We systematically searched the PubMed, Scopus, Google Scholars, Science Direct and Cochrane Library according to the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses statement. To assess the quality of included studies we used SYRCLE's RoB tool. 268 articles were obtained from databases by primary search. Only 13 studies were eligible according to inclusion criteria. From included studies, 9 articles indicate that KD had a beneficial effect on tumor growth and survival time. Tumor types were included pancreatic, prostate, gastric, colon, brain, neuroblastoma and lung cancers. In conclusions, although studies in this field are rare and inconsistence, recent findings have demonstrated that KD can potentially inhibit the malignant cell growth and increase the survival time. Because of differences physiology between animals and humans, future studies in cancer patients treated with a KD are needed.

  5. Tumor Cells Growth and Survival Time with the Ketogenic Diet in Animal Models: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khodadadi, Soheila; Sobhani, Nafiseh; Mirshekar, Somaye; Ghiasvand, Reza; Pourmasoumi, Makan; Miraghajani, Maryam; Dehsoukhteh, Somayeh Shahraki

    2017-01-01

    Recently, interest in targeted cancer therapies via metabolic pathways has been renewed with the discovery that many tumors become dependent on glucose uptake during anaerobic glycolysis. Also the inability of ketone bodies metabolization due to various deficiencies in mitochondrial enzymes is the major metabolic changes discovered in malignant cells. Therefore, administration of a ketogenic diet (KD) which is based on high in fat and low in carbohydrates might inhibit tumor growth and provide a rationale for therapeutic strategies. So, we conducted this systematic review to assess the effects of KD on the tumor cells growth and survival time in animal studies. All databases were searched from inception to November 2015. We systematically searched the PubMed, Scopus, Google Scholars, Science Direct and Cochrane Library according to the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses statement. To assess the quality of included studies we used SYRCLE's RoB tool. 268 articles were obtained from databases by primary search. Only 13 studies were eligible according to inclusion criteria. From included studies, 9 articles indicate that KD had a beneficial effect on tumor growth and survival time. Tumor types were included pancreatic, prostate, gastric, colon, brain, neuroblastoma and lung cancers. In conclusions, although studies in this field are rare and inconsistence, recent findings have demonstrated that KD can potentially inhibit the malignant cell growth and increase the survival time. Because of differences physiology between animals and humans, future studies in cancer patients treated with a KD are needed.

  6. A switching control law approach for cancer immunotherapy of an evolutionary tumor growth model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doban, Alina I; Lazar, Mircea

    2017-02-01

    We propose a new approach for tumor immunotherapy which is based on a switching control strategy defined on domains of attraction of equilibria of interest. For this, we consider a recently derived model which captures the effects of the tumor cells on the immune system and viceversa, through predator-prey competition terms. Additionally, it incorporates the immune system's mechanism for producing hunting immune cells, which makes the model suitable for immunotherapy strategies analysis and design. For computing domains of attraction for the tumor nonlinear dynamics, and thus, for deriving immunotherapeutic strategies we employ rational Lyapunov functions. Finally, we apply the switching control strategy to destabilize an invasive tumor equilibrium and steer the system trajectories to tumor dormancy. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Inhibition of Tumor Growth and Metastasis in Pancreatic Cancer Models by Interference With CD44v6 Signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matzke-Ogi, Alexandra; Jannasch, Katharina; Shatirishvili, Marine; Fuchs, Beatrix; Chiblak, Sara; Morton, Jennifer; Tawk, Bouchra; Lindner, Thomas; Sansom, Owen; Alves, Frauke; Warth, Arne; Schwager, Christian; Mier, Walter; Kleeff, Jörg; Ponta, Helmut; Abdollahi, Amir; Orian-Rousseau, Véronique

    2016-02-01

    Cancer cells with high metastatic potential and stem cell-like characteristics express the cell surface marker CD44. CD44 isoforms that include the v6 exon are co-receptors for the receptor tyrosine kinases MET and Vascular Endothelial Growth factor Receptor-2 (VEGFR-2). We studied CD44v6 signaling in several pancreatic cancer cell lines, and its role in tumor growth and metastasis in several models of pancreatic cancer. We analyzed the effects of v6 peptides that interfere with the co-receptor functions of CD44v6 for MET and VEGFR-2 in tumors and metastases grown from cells that express different CD44 isoforms, including CD44v6. The peptides were injected into rats with syngeneic tumors and mice with orthotopic or xenograft tumors. We also tested the effects of the peptides in mice with xenograft tumors grown from patient tumor samples and mice that express an oncogenic form of RAS and develop spontaneous pancreatic cancer (KPC mice). We measured levels of CD44v6 messenger RNA (mRNA) in pancreatic cancer tissues from 136 patients. Xenograft tumors grown from human cancer cells injected with v6 peptides were smaller and formed fewer metastases in mice. The v6 peptide was more efficient than the MET inhibitor crizotinib and/or the VEGFR-2 inhibitor pazopanib in reducing xenograft tumor growth and metastasis. Injection of KPC mice with the v6 peptide increased their survival time. Injection of mice and rats bearing metastases with the v6 peptide induced regression of metastases. Higher levels of CD44v6 mRNA in human pancreatic tumor tissues were associated with increased expression of MET, tumor metastasis, and shorter patient survival times. Peptide inhibitors of CD44v6 isoforms block tumor growth and metastasis in several independent models of pancreatic cancer. The v6 peptides induced regression of metastases. Levels of CD44v6 mRNA are increased, along with those of MET mRNA, in patients with metastatic pancreatic tumors, compared with nonmetastatic tumors

  8. High-fat Western diet-induced obesity contributes to increased tumor growth in mouse models of human colon cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Neill, Ann Marie; Burrington, Christine M; Gillaspie, Erin A; Lynch, Darin T; Horsman, Melissa J; Greene, Michael W

    2016-12-01

    Strong epidemiologic evidence links colon cancer to obesity. The increasing worldwide incidence of colon cancer has been linked to the spread of the Western lifestyle, and in particular consumption of a high-fat Western diet. In this study, our objectives were to establish mouse models to examine the effects of high-fat Western diet-induced obesity on the growth of human colon cancer tumor xenografts, and to examine potential mechanisms driving obesity-linked human colon cancer tumor growth. We hypothesize that mice rendered insulin resistant due to consumption of a high-fat Western diet will show increased and accelerated tumor growth. Homozygous Rag1 tm1Mom mice were fed either a low-fat Western diet or a high-fat Western diet (HFWD), then human colon cancer xenografts were implanted subcutaneously or orthotopically. Tumors were analyzed to detect changes in receptor tyrosine kinase-mediated signaling and expression of inflammatory-associated genes in epididymal white adipose tissue. In both models, mice fed an HFWD weighed more and had increased intra-abdominal fat, and tumor weight was greater compared with in the low-fat Western diet-fed mice. They also displayed significantly higher levels of leptin; however, there was a negative correlation between leptin levels and tumor size. In the orthotopic model, tumors and adipose tissue from the HFWD group displayed significant increases in both c-Jun N-terminal kinase activation and monocyte chemoattractant protein 1 expression, respectively. In conclusion, this study suggests that human colon cancer growth is accelerated in animals that are obese and insulin resistant due to the consumption of an HFWD. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Inhibition of Neuroblastoma Tumor Growth by Ketogenic Diet and/or Calorie Restriction in a CD1-Nu Mouse Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morscher, Raphael Johannes; Aminzadeh-Gohari, Sepideh; Feichtinger, René Gunther; Mayr, Johannes Adalbert; Lang, Roland; Neureiter, Daniel; Sperl, Wolfgang; Kofler, Barbara

    2015-01-01

    Neuroblastoma is a malignant pediatric cancer derived from neural crest cells. It is characterized by a generalized reduction of mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation. The goal of the present study was to investigate the effects of calorie restriction and ketogenic diet on neuroblastoma tumor growth and monitor potential adaptive mechanisms of the cancer's oxidative phosphorylation system. Xenografts were established in CD-1 nude mice by subcutaneous injection of two neuroblastoma cell lines having distinct genetic characteristics and therapeutic sensitivity [SH-SY5Y and SK-N-BE(2)]. Mice were randomized to four treatment groups receiving standard diet, calorie-restricted standard diet, long chain fatty acid based ketogenic diet or calorie-restricted ketogenic diet. Tumor growth, survival, metabolic parameters and weight of the mice were monitored. Cancer tissue was evaluated for diet-induced changes of proliferation indices and multiple oxidative phosphorylation system parameters (respiratory chain enzyme activities, western blot analysis, immunohistochemistry and mitochondrial DNA content). Ketogenic diet and/or calorie restriction significantly reduced tumor growth and prolonged survival in the xenograft model. Neuroblastoma growth reduction correlated with decreased blood glucose concentrations and was characterized by a significant decrease in Ki-67 and phospho-histone H3 levels in the diet groups with low tumor growth. As in human tumor tissue, neuroblastoma xenografts showed distinctly low mitochondrial complex II activity in combination with a generalized low level of mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation, validating the tumor model. Neuroblastoma showed no ability to adapt its mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation activity to the change in nutrient supply induced by dietary intervention. Our data suggest that targeting the metabolic characteristics of neuroblastoma could open a new front in supporting standard therapy regimens. Therefore, we propose

  10. Inhibition of Neuroblastoma Tumor Growth by Ketogenic Diet and/or Calorie Restriction in a CD1-Nu Mouse Model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raphael Johannes Morscher

    Full Text Available Neuroblastoma is a malignant pediatric cancer derived from neural crest cells. It is characterized by a generalized reduction of mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation. The goal of the present study was to investigate the effects of calorie restriction and ketogenic diet on neuroblastoma tumor growth and monitor potential adaptive mechanisms of the cancer's oxidative phosphorylation system.Xenografts were established in CD-1 nude mice by subcutaneous injection of two neuroblastoma cell lines having distinct genetic characteristics and therapeutic sensitivity [SH-SY5Y and SK-N-BE(2]. Mice were randomized to four treatment groups receiving standard diet, calorie-restricted standard diet, long chain fatty acid based ketogenic diet or calorie-restricted ketogenic diet. Tumor growth, survival, metabolic parameters and weight of the mice were monitored. Cancer tissue was evaluated for diet-induced changes of proliferation indices and multiple oxidative phosphorylation system parameters (respiratory chain enzyme activities, western blot analysis, immunohistochemistry and mitochondrial DNA content.Ketogenic diet and/or calorie restriction significantly reduced tumor growth and prolonged survival in the xenograft model. Neuroblastoma growth reduction correlated with decreased blood glucose concentrations and was characterized by a significant decrease in Ki-67 and phospho-histone H3 levels in the diet groups with low tumor growth. As in human tumor tissue, neuroblastoma xenografts showed distinctly low mitochondrial complex II activity in combination with a generalized low level of mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation, validating the tumor model. Neuroblastoma showed no ability to adapt its mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation activity to the change in nutrient supply induced by dietary intervention.Our data suggest that targeting the metabolic characteristics of neuroblastoma could open a new front in supporting standard therapy regimens

  11. Numerical simulation of brain tumor growth model using two-stage ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In the recent years, the study of glioma growth to be an active field of research Mathematical models that describe the proliferation and diffusion properties of the growth have been developed by many researchers. In this work, the performance analysis of two-stage Gauss-Seidel (TSGS) method to solve the glioma growth ...

  12. The effect of carbohydrate restriction on prostate cancer tumor growth in a castrate mouse xenograft model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caso, Jorge; Masko, Elizabeth M; Ii, Jean A Thomas; Poulton, Susan H; Dewhirst, Mark; Pizzo, Salvatore V; Freedland, Stephen J

    2013-04-01

    No- and low-carbohydrate diets delay tumor growth compared to western diet (WD) in prostate cancer (PCa) xenograft studies. The effect of these diets in concert with androgen deprivation is unknown. A total of 160 male SCID mice were injected with 1× 10(5) LAPC-4 human PCa cells. Of these, 150 mice were castrated and randomized to an ad libitum WD or fed via a paired-feeding protocol with a no-carbohydrate ketogenic diet (NCKD), 10% carbohydrate diet, or 20% carbohydrate diet. The remaining 10 mice were not castrated and were fed an ad libitum WD. The mice were sacrificed once volumes reached 1,000 mm3 and survival tested using the log-rank test. Serum from the median surviving 8 mice/group was assayed for insulin, IGF-1, and IGFBP-3. Body weights were roughly equal among groups. The 10 non-castrated mice experienced accelerated tumor growth. Among castrated mice, WD had the most rapid tumor growth; 20% carbohydrate diet the slowest (P = 0.046). Survival was not significantly different among the various carbohydrate restricted groups (P = 0.51). When pooled, there was a non-significant trend (P = 0.11) in improved survival among the carbohydrate restricted diets versus WD. No significant difference in serum insulin, IGF-1, and IGFBP-3 levels was noted among all groups at pre-randomization or at sacrifice. A 20% carbohydrate diet slowed tumor growth versus a WD. Though the benefit of carbohydrate restriction was somewhat less than in prior studies in non-castrate mice, these data still suggest diets achievable in humans may play a role in PCa management. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Diclofenac inhibits tumor growth in a murine model of pancreatic cancer by modulation of VEGF levels and arginase activity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nina Mayorek

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Diclofenac is one of the oldest anti-inflammatory drugs in use. In addition to its inhibition of cyclooxygenases (COX, diclofenac potently inhibits phospholipase A(2 (PLA(2, thus yielding a broad anti-inflammatory effect. Since inflammation is an important factor in the development of pancreatic tumors we explored the potential of diclofenac to inhibit tumor growth in mice inoculated with PANCO2 cells orthotopically. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We found that diclofenac treatment (30 mg/kg/bw for 11 days of mice inoculated with PANC02 cells, reduced the tumor weight by 60%, correlating with increased apoptosis of tumor cells. Since this effect was not observed in vitro on cultured PANCO2 cells, we theorized that diclofenac beneficial treatment involved other mediators present in vivo. Indeed, diclofenac drastically decreased tumor vascularization by downregulating VEGF in the tumor and in abdominal cavity fluid. Furthermore, diclofenac directly inhibited vascular sprouting ex vivo. Surprisingly, in contrast to other COX-2 inhibitors, diclofenac increased arginase activity/arginase 1 protein content in tumor stroma cells, peritoneal macrophages and white blood cells by 2.4, 4.8 and 2 fold, respectively. We propose that the subsequent arginine depletion and decrease in NO levels, both in serum and peritoneal cavity, adds to tumor growth inhibition by malnourishment and poor vasculature development. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: In conclusion, diclofenac shows pronounced antitumoral properties in pancreatic cancer model that can contribute to further treatment development. The ability of diclofenac to induce arginase activity in tumor stroma, peritoneal macrophages and white blood cells provides a tool to study a controversial issue of pro-and antitumoral effects of arginine depletion.

  14. Diclofenac inhibits tumor growth in a murine model of pancreatic cancer by modulation of VEGF levels and arginase activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayorek, Nina; Naftali-Shani, Nili; Grunewald, Myriam

    2010-09-15

    Diclofenac is one of the oldest anti-inflammatory drugs in use. In addition to its inhibition of cyclooxygenases (COX), diclofenac potently inhibits phospholipase A(2) (PLA(2)), thus yielding a broad anti-inflammatory effect. Since inflammation is an important factor in the development of pancreatic tumors we explored the potential of diclofenac to inhibit tumor growth in mice inoculated with PANCO2 cells orthotopically. We found that diclofenac treatment (30 mg/kg/bw for 11 days) of mice inoculated with PANC02 cells, reduced the tumor weight by 60%, correlating with increased apoptosis of tumor cells. Since this effect was not observed in vitro on cultured PANCO2 cells, we theorized that diclofenac beneficial treatment involved other mediators present in vivo. Indeed, diclofenac drastically decreased tumor vascularization by downregulating VEGF in the tumor and in abdominal cavity fluid. Furthermore, diclofenac directly inhibited vascular sprouting ex vivo. Surprisingly, in contrast to other COX-2 inhibitors, diclofenac increased arginase activity/arginase 1 protein content in tumor stroma cells, peritoneal macrophages and white blood cells by 2.4, 4.8 and 2 fold, respectively. We propose that the subsequent arginine depletion and decrease in NO levels, both in serum and peritoneal cavity, adds to tumor growth inhibition by malnourishment and poor vasculature development. In conclusion, diclofenac shows pronounced antitumoral properties in pancreatic cancer model that can contribute to further treatment development. The ability of diclofenac to induce arginase activity in tumor stroma, peritoneal macrophages and white blood cells provides a tool to study a controversial issue of pro-and antitumoral effects of arginine depletion.

  15. Bigh3 silencing increases retinoblastoma tumor growth in the murine SV40-TAg-Rb model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allaman-Pillet, Nathalie; Oberson, Anne; Schorderet, Daniel F

    2017-02-28

    BIGH3, a secreted protein of the extracellular matrix interacts with collagen and integrins on the cell surface. BIGH3 can have opposing functions in cancer, acting either as tumor suppressor or promoter by enhancing tumor progression and angiogenesis. In the eye, BIGH3 is expressed in the cornea and the retinal pigment epithelium and could impact on the development of retinoblastoma, the most common paediatric intraocular neoplasm. Retinoblastoma initiation requires the inactivation of both alleles of the RB1 tumor suppressor gene in the developing retina and tumor progression involves additional genomic changes. To determine whether BIGH3 affects retinoblastoma development, we generated a retinoblastoma mouse model with disruption of the Bigh3 genomic locus. Bigh3 silencing in these mice resulted in enhanced tumor development in the retina. A decrease in apoptosis is involved in the initial events of tumorigenesis, followed by an increased activity of the pro-survival ERK pathway as well as an upregulation of cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs). Taken together, these data suggest that BIGH3 acts as a tumor suppressor in the retina.

  16. Macrophage Ablation Reduces M2-Like Populations and Jeopardizes Tumor Growth in a MAFIA-Based Glioma Model12

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabrusiewicz, Konrad; Hossain, Mohammad B.; Cortes-Santiago, Nahir; Fan, Xuejun; Kaminska, Bozena; Marini, Frank C.; Fueyo, Juan; Gomez-Manzano, Candelaria

    2015-01-01

    Monocytes/macrophages are an influential component of the glioma microenvironment. However, understanding their diversity and plasticity constitute one of the most challenging areas of research due to the paucity of models to study these cells' inherent complexity. Herein, we analyzed the role of monocytes/macrophages in glioma growth by using a transgenic model that allows for conditional ablation of this cell population. We modeled glioma using intracranial GL261-bearing CSF-1R–GFP+ macrophage Fas-induced apoptosis (MAFIA) transgenic mice. Conditional macrophage ablation was achieved by exposure to the dimerizer AP20187. Double immunofluorescence was used to characterize M1- and M2-like monocytes/macrophages during tumor growth and after conditional ablation. During glioma growth, the monocyte/macrophage population consisted predominantly of M2 macrophages. Conditional temporal depletion of macrophages reduced the number of GFP+ cells, targeting mainly the repopulation of M2-polarized cells, and altered the appearance of M1-like monocytes/macrophages, which suggested a shift in the M1/M2 macrophage balance. Of interest, compared with control-treated mice, macrophage-depleted mice had a lower tumor mitotic index, microvascular density, and reduced tumor growth. These results demonstrated the possibility of studying in vivo the role and phenotype of macrophages in gliomas and suggested that transitory depletion of CSF-1R+ population influences the reconstitutive phenotypic pool of these cells, ultimately suppressing tumor growth. The MAFIA model provides a much needed advance in defining the role of macrophages in gliomas. PMID:25925380

  17. Macrophage Ablation Reduces M2-Like Populations and Jeopardizes Tumor Growth in a MAFIA-Based Glioma Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabrusiewicz, Konrad; Hossain, Mohammad B; Cortes-Santiago, Nahir; Fan, Xuejun; Kaminska, Bozena; Marini, Frank C; Fueyo, Juan; Gomez-Manzano, Candelaria

    2015-04-01

    Monocytes/macrophages are an influential component of the glioma microenvironment. However, understanding their diversity and plasticity constitute one of the most challenging areas of research due to the paucity of models to study these cells' inherent complexity. Herein, we analyzed the role of monocytes/macrophages in glioma growth by using a transgenic model that allows for conditional ablation of this cell population. We modeled glioma using intracranial GL261-bearing CSF-1R-GFP(+) macrophage Fas-induced apoptosis (MAFIA) transgenic mice. Conditional macrophage ablation was achieved by exposure to the dimerizer AP20187. Double immunofluorescence was used to characterize M1- and M2-like monocytes/macrophages during tumor growth and after conditional ablation. During glioma growth, the monocyte/macrophage population consisted predominantly of M2 macrophages. Conditional temporal depletion of macrophages reduced the number of GFP(+) cells, targeting mainly the repopulation of M2-polarized cells, and altered the appearance of M1-like monocytes/macrophages, which suggested a shift in the M1/M2 macrophage balance. Of interest, compared with control-treated mice, macrophage-depleted mice had a lower tumor mitotic index, microvascular density, and reduced tumor growth. These results demonstrated the possibility of studying in vivo the role and phenotype of macrophages in gliomas and suggested that transitory depletion of CSF-1R(+) population influences the reconstitutive phenotypic pool of these cells, ultimately suppressing tumor growth. The MAFIA model provides a much needed advance in defining the role of macrophages in gliomas. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Comparison between two meshless methods based on collocation technique for the numerical solution of four-species tumor growth model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dehghan, Mehdi; Mohammadi, Vahid

    2017-03-01

    As is said in [27], the tumor-growth model is the incorporation of nutrient within the mixture as opposed to being modeled with an auxiliary reaction-diffusion equation. The formulation involves systems of highly nonlinear partial differential equations of surface effects through diffuse-interface models [27]. Simulations of this practical model using numerical methods can be applied for evaluating it. The present paper investigates the solution of the tumor growth model with meshless techniques. Meshless methods are applied based on the collocation technique which employ multiquadrics (MQ) radial basis function (RBFs) and generalized moving least squares (GMLS) procedures. The main advantages of these choices come back to the natural behavior of meshless approaches. As well as, a method based on meshless approach can be applied easily for finding the solution of partial differential equations in high-dimension using any distributions of points on regular and irregular domains. The present paper involves a time-dependent system of partial differential equations that describes four-species tumor growth model. To overcome the time variable, two procedures will be used. One of them is a semi-implicit finite difference method based on Crank-Nicolson scheme and another one is based on explicit Runge-Kutta time integration. The first case gives a linear system of algebraic equations which will be solved at each time-step. The second case will be efficient but conditionally stable. The obtained numerical results are reported to confirm the ability of these techniques for solving the two and three-dimensional tumor-growth equations.

  19. Raloxifene inhibits tumor growth and lymph node metastasis in a xenograft model of metastatic mammary cancer

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    Li Zhong-Lian

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The effects of raloxifene, a novel selective estrogen receptor modulator, were studied in a mouse metastatic mammary cancer model expressing cytoplasmic ERα. Methods Mammary tumors, induced by inoculation of syngeneic BALB/c mice with BJMC3879luc2 cells, were subsequently treated with raloxifene at 0, 18 and 27 mg/kg/day using mini-osmotic pumps. Results In vitro study demonstrated that the ERα in BJMC3879luc2 cells was smaller (between 50 and 64 kDa than the normal-sized ERα (66 kDa and showed cytoplasmic localization. A statistically significant but weak estradiol response was observed in this cell line. When BJMC3879luc2 tumors were implanted into mice, the ERα mRNA levels were significantly higher in females than in males. In vitro studies showed that raloxifene induced mitochondria-mediated apoptosis and cell-cycle arrest in the G1-phase and a decrease in the cell population in the S-phase. In animal experiments, tumor volumes were significantly suppressed in the raloxifene-treated groups. The multiplicity of lymph node metastasis was significantly decreased in the 27 mg/kg group. Levels of apoptosis were significantly increased in the raloxifene-treated groups, whereas the levels of DNA synthesis were significantly decreased in these groups. No differences in microvessel density in tumors were observed between the control and raloxifene-treated groups. The numbers of dilated lymphatic vessels containing intraluminal tumor cells were significantly reduced in mammary tumors in the raloxifene-treated groups. The levels of ERα mRNA in mammary tumors tended to be decreased in the raloxifene-treated groups. Conclusion These results suggest that the antimetastatic activity of raloxifene in mammary cancer expressing cytoplasmic ERα may be a crucial finding with clinical applications and that raloxifene may be useful as an adjuvant therapy and for the chemoprevention of breast cancer development.

  20. Asparagus polysaccharide and gum with hepatic artery embolization induces tumor growth and inhibits angiogenesis in an orthotopic hepatocellular carcinoma model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weng, Ling-Ling; Xiang, Jian-Feng; Lin, Jin-Bo; Yi, Shang-Hui; Yang, Li-Tao; Li, Yi-Sheng; Zeng, Hao-Tao; Lin, Sheng-Ming; Xin, Dong-Wei; Zhao, Hai-Liang; Qiu, Shu-Qi; Chen, Tao; Zhang, Min-Guang

    2014-01-01

    Liver cancer is one of leading digestive malignancies with high morbidity and mortality. There is an urgent need for the development of novel therapies for this deadly disease. It has been proven that asparagus polysaccharide, one of the most active derivates from the traditional medicine asparagus, possesses notable antitumor properties. However, little is known about the efficacy of asparagus polysaccharide as an adjuvant for liver cancer chemotherapy. Herein, we reported that asparagus polysaccharide and its embolic agent form, asparagus gum, significantly inhibited liver tumor growth with transcatheter arterial chemoembolization (TACE) therapy in an orthotopic hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) tumor model, while significantly inhibiting angiogenesis and promoting tumor cell apoptosis. Moreover, asparagine gelatinous possessed immunomodulatory functions and showed little toxicity to the host. These results highlight the chemotherapeutic potential of asparagus polysaccharide and warrant a future focus on development as novel chemotherapeutic agent for liver cancer TACE therapy.

  1. FXR Controls the Tumor Suppressor NDRG2 and FXR Agonists Reduce Liver Tumor Growth and Metastasis in an Orthotopic Mouse Xenograft Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deuschle, Ulrich; Schüler, Julia; Schulz, Andreas; Schlüter, Thomas; Kinzel, Olaf; Abel, Ulrich; Kremoser, Claus

    2012-01-01

    The farnesoid X receptor (FXR) is expressed predominantly in tissues exposed to high levels of bile acids and controls bile acid and lipid homeostasis. FXR−/− mice develop hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and show an increased prevalence for intestinal malignancies, suggesting a role of FXR as a tumor suppressor in enterohepatic tissues. The N-myc downstream-regulated gene 2 (NDRG2) has been recognized as a tumor suppressor gene, which is downregulated in human hepatocellular carcinoma, colorectal carcinoma and many other malignancies. We show reduced NDRG2 mRNA in livers of FXR−/− mice compared to wild type mice and both, FXR and NDRG2 mRNAs, are reduced in human HCC compared to normal liver. Gene reporter assays and Chromatin Immunoprecipitation data support that FXR directly controls NDRG2 transcription via IR1-type element(s) identified in the first introns of the human, mouse and rat NDRG2 genes. NDRG2 mRNA was induced by non-steroidal FXR agonists in livers of mice and the magnitude of induction of NDRG2 mRNA in three different human hepatoma cell lines was increased when ectopically expressing human FXR. Growth and metastasis of SK-Hep-1 cells was strongly reduced by non-steroidal FXR agonists in an orthotopic liver xenograft tumor model. Ectopic expression of FXR in SK-Hep1 cells reduced tumor growth and metastasis potential of corresponding cells and increased the anti-tumor efficacy of FXR agonists, which may be partly mediated via increased NDRG2 expression. FXR agonists may show a potential in the prevention and/or treatment of human hepatocellular carcinoma, a devastating malignancy with increasing prevalence and limited therapeutic options. PMID:23056173

  2. FXR controls the tumor suppressor NDRG2 and FXR agonists reduce liver tumor growth and metastasis in an orthotopic mouse xenograft model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ulrich Deuschle

    Full Text Available The farnesoid X receptor (FXR is expressed predominantly in tissues exposed to high levels of bile acids and controls bile acid and lipid homeostasis. FXR(-/- mice develop hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC and show an increased prevalence for intestinal malignancies, suggesting a role of FXR as a tumor suppressor in enterohepatic tissues. The N-myc downstream-regulated gene 2 (NDRG2 has been recognized as a tumor suppressor gene, which is downregulated in human hepatocellular carcinoma, colorectal carcinoma and many other malignancies.We show reduced NDRG2 mRNA in livers of FXR(-/- mice compared to wild type mice and both, FXR and NDRG2 mRNAs, are reduced in human HCC compared to normal liver. Gene reporter assays and Chromatin Immunoprecipitation data support that FXR directly controls NDRG2 transcription via IR1-type element(s identified in the first introns of the human, mouse and rat NDRG2 genes. NDRG2 mRNA was induced by non-steroidal FXR agonists in livers of mice and the magnitude of induction of NDRG2 mRNA in three different human hepatoma cell lines was increased when ectopically expressing human FXR. Growth and metastasis of SK-Hep-1 cells was strongly reduced by non-steroidal FXR agonists in an orthotopic liver xenograft tumor model. Ectopic expression of FXR in SK-Hep1 cells reduced tumor growth and metastasis potential of corresponding cells and increased the anti-tumor efficacy of FXR agonists, which may be partly mediated via increased NDRG2 expression. FXR agonists may show a potential in the prevention and/or treatment of human hepatocellular carcinoma, a devastating malignancy with increasing prevalence and limited therapeutic options.

  3. Knockdown of platinum-induced growth differentiation factor 15 abrogates p27-mediated tumor growth delay in the chemoresistant ovarian cancer model A2780cis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meier, Julia C; Haendler, Bernard; Seidel, Henrik; Groth, Philip; Adams, Robert; Ziegelbauer, Karl; Kreft, Bertolt; Beckmann, Georg; Sommer, Anette; Kopitz, Charlotte

    2015-01-01

    Molecular mechanisms underlying the development of resistance to platinum-based treatment in patients with ovarian cancer remain poorly understood. This is mainly due to the lack of appropriate in vivo models allowing the identification of resistance-related factors. In this study, we used human whole-genome microarrays and linear model analysis to identify potential resistance-related genes by comparing the expression profiles of the parental human ovarian cancer model A2780 and its platinum-resistant variant A2780cis before and after carboplatin treatment in vivo. Growth differentiation factor 15 (GDF15) was identified as one of five potential resistance-related genes in the A2780cis tumor model. Although A2780-bearing mice showed a strong carboplatin-induced increase of GDF15 plasma levels, the basal higher GDF15 plasma levels of A2780cis-bearing mice showed no further increase after short-term or long-term carboplatin treatment. This correlated with a decreased DNA damage response, enhanced AKT survival signaling and abrogated cell cycle arrest in the carboplatin-treated A2780cis tumors. Furthermore, knockdown of GDF15 in A2780cis cells did not alter cell proliferation but enhanced cell migration and colony size in vitro. Interestingly, in vivo knockdown of GDF15 in the A2780cis model led to a basal-enhanced tumor growth, but increased sensitivity to carboplatin treatment as compared to the control-transduced A2780cis tumors. This was associated with larger necrotic areas, a lobular tumor structure and increased p53 and p16 expression of the carboplatin-treated shGDF15-A2780cis tumors. Furthermore, shRNA-mediated GDF15 knockdown abrogated p27 expression as compared to control-transduced A2780cis tumors. In conclusion, these data show that GDF15 may contribute to carboplatin resistance by suppressing tumor growth through p27. These data show that GDF15 might serve as a novel treatment target in women with platinum-resistant ovarian cancer

  4. Withaferin A Suppresses Liver Tumor Growth in a Nude Mouse ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: To investigate the effect of withaferin A on tumor growth and metastasis in liver in a nude mouse model. Methods: Withaferin A was injected through a portal vein to the orthotopic liver tumor in a nude mice model. Xenogen in vivo imaging system was used to monitor tumor growth and metastasis. The effect of ...

  5. Cross-correlation enhanced stability in a tumor cell growth model with immune surveillance driven by cross-correlated noises

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zeng Chunhua; Zhou Xiaofeng; Tao Shufen

    2009-01-01

    The transient properties of a tumor cell growth model with immune surveillance driven by cross-correlated multiplicative and additive noises are investigated. The explicit expression of extinction rate from the state of a stable tumor to the state of extinction is obtained. Based on the numerical computations, we find the following: (i) the intensity of multiplicative noise D and the intensity of additive noise α enhance the extinction rate for the case of λ ≤ 0 (i.e. λ denotes cross-correlation intensity between two noises), but for the case of λ > 0, a critical noise intensity D or α exists at which the extinction rate is the smallest; D and α at first weaken the extinction rate and then enhance it. (ii) The immune rate β and the cross-correlation intensity λ play opposite roles on the extinction rate, i.e. β enhances the extinction rate of the tumor cell, while λ weakens the extinction rate of the tumor cell. Namely, the immune rate can enhance the extinction of the tumor cell and the cross-correlation between two noises can enhance stability of the cancer state.

  6. Microultrasound Molecular Imaging of Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor Receptor 2 in a Mouse Model of Tumor Angiogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joshua J. Rychak

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available High-frequency microultrasound imaging of tumor progression in mice enables noninvasive anatomic and functional imaging at excellent spatial and temporal resolution, although microultrasonography alone does not offer molecular scale data. In the current study, we investigated the use of microbubble ultrasound contrast agents bearing targeting ligands specific for molecular markers of tumor angiogenesis using high-frequency microultrasound imaging. A xenograft tumor model in the mouse was used to image vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2 (VEGFR-2 expression with microbubbles conjugated to an anti-VEGFR-2 monoclonal antibody or an isotype control. Microultrasound imaging was accomplished at a center frequency of 40 MHz, which provided lateral and axial resolutions of 40 and 90 μm, respectively. The B-mode (two-dimensional mode acoustic signal from microbubbles bound to the molecular target was determined by an ultrasound-based destruction-subtraction scheme. Quantification of the adherent microbubble fraction in nine tumor-bearing mice revealed significant retention of VEGFR-2-targeted microbubbles relative to control-targeted microbubbles. These data demonstrate that contrast-enhanced microultrasound imaging is a useful method for assessing molecular expression of tumor angiogenesis in mice at high resolution.

  7. Curcumin Inhibits Tumor Growth and Angiogenesis in an Orthotopic Mouse Model of Human Pancreatic Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabrina Bimonte

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Pancreatic cancer is a malignant neoplasm originating from transformed cells arising in tissues forming the pancreas. The best chemotherapeutic agent used to treat pancreatic cancer is the gemcitabine. However, gemcitabine treatment is associated with many side effects. Thus novel strategies involving less toxic agents for treatment of pancreatic cancer are necessary. Curcumin is one such agent that inhibits the proliferation and angiogenesis of a wide variety of tumor cells, through the modulation of many cell signalling pathways. In this study, we investigated whether curcumin plays antitumor effects in MIA PaCa-2 cells. In vitro studies showed that curcumin inhibits the proliferation and enhances apoptosis of MIA PaCa-2 cells. To test whether the antitumor activity of curcumin is also observed in vivo, we generated an orthotopic mouse model of pancreatic cancer by injection of MIA PaCa-2 cells in nude mice. We placed mice on diet containing curcumin at 0.6% for 6 weeks. In these treated mice tumors were smaller with respect to controls and showed a downregulation of the transcription nuclear factor NF-κB and NF-κB-regulated gene products. Overall, our data indicate that curcumin has a great potential in treatment of human pancreatic cancer through the modulation of NF-κB pathway.

  8. Chemo-mechanical modeling of tumor growth in elastic epithelial tissue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bratsun, Dmitry A.; Zakharov, Andrey P.; Pismen, Len

    2016-08-01

    We propose a multiscale chemo-mechanical model of the cancer tumor development in the epithelial tissue. The epithelium is represented by an elastic 2D array of polygonal cells with its own gene regulation dynamics. The model allows the simulation of the evolution of multiple cells interacting via the chemical signaling or mechanically induced strain. The algorithm includes the division and intercalation of cells as well as the transformation of normal cells into a cancerous state triggered by a local failure of the spatial synchronization of the cellular rhythms driven by transcription/translation processes. Both deterministic and stochastic descriptions of the system are given for chemical signaling. The transformation of cells means the modification of their respective parameters responsible for chemo-mechanical interactions. The simulations reproduce a distinct behavior of invasive and localized carcinoma. Generally, the model is designed in such a way that it can be readily modified to take account of any newly understood gene regulation processes and feedback mechanisms affecting chemo-mechanical properties of cells.

  9. Chemo-mechanical modeling of tumor growth in elastic epithelial tissue

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bratsun, Dmitry A., E-mail: bratsun@pspu.ru [Department of Applied Physics, Perm National Research Polytechnical University, Perm, 614990 (Russian Federation); Zakharov, Andrey P. [Department of Chemical Engineering, Technion-Israel Institute of Technology, Haifa, 32000 Israel (Israel); Theoretical Physics Department, Perm State Humanitarian Pedagogical University, Perm, 614990 (Russian Federation); Pismen, Len [Department of Chemical Engineering, Technion-Israel Institute of Technology, Haifa, 32000 Israel (Israel)

    2016-08-02

    We propose a multiscale chemo-mechanical model of the cancer tumor development in the epithelial tissue. The epithelium is represented by an elastic 2D array of polygonal cells with its own gene regulation dynamics. The model allows the simulation of the evolution of multiple cells interacting via the chemical signaling or mechanically induced strain. The algorithm includes the division and intercalation of cells as well as the transformation of normal cells into a cancerous state triggered by a local failure of the spatial synchronization of the cellular rhythms driven by transcription/translation processes. Both deterministic and stochastic descriptions of the system are given for chemical signaling. The transformation of cells means the modification of their respective parameters responsible for chemo-mechanical interactions. The simulations reproduce a distinct behavior of invasive and localized carcinoma. Generally, the model is designed in such a way that it can be readily modified to take account of any newly understood gene regulation processes and feedback mechanisms affecting chemo-mechanical properties of cells.

  10. Cells competition in tumor growth poroelasticity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fraldi, Massimiliano; Carotenuto, Angelo R.

    2018-03-01

    Growth of biological tissues has been recently treated within the framework of Continuum Mechanics, by adopting heterogeneous poroelastic models where the interaction between soft matrix and interstitial fluid flow is coupled with inelastic effects ad hoc introduced to simulate the macroscopic volumetric growth determined by cells division, cells growth and extracellular matrix changes occurring at the micro-scale level. These continuum models seem to overcome some limitations intrinsically associated to other alternative approaches based on mass balances in multiphase systems, because the crucial role played by residual stresses accompanying growth and nutrients walkway is preserved. Nevertheless, when these strategies are applied to analyze solid tumors, mass growth is usually assigned in a prescribed form that essentially copies the in vitro measured intrinsic growth rates of the cell species. As a consequence, some important cell-cell dynamics governing mass evolution and invasion rates of cancer cells, as well as their coupling with feedback mechanisms associated to in situ stresses, are inevitably lost and thus the spatial distribution and the evolution with time of the growth inside the tumor -which would be results rather than inputs- are forced to enter in the model simply as data. In order to solve this paradox, it is here proposed an enhanced multi-scale poroelastic model undergoing large deformations and embodying inelastic growth, where the net growth terms directly result from the "interspecific" predator-prey (Volterra/Lotka-like) competition occurring at the micro-scale level between healthy and abnormal cell species. In this way, a system of fully-coupled non-linear PDEs is derived to describe how the fight among cell species to grab the available common resources, stress field, pressure gradients, interstitial fluid flows driving nutrients and inhomogeneous growth all simultaneously interact to decide the tumor fate.

  11. Olive phenolics as c-Met inhibitors: (--Oleocanthal attenuates cell proliferation, invasiveness, and tumor growth in breast cancer models.

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    Mohamed R Akl

    Full Text Available Dysregulation of the Hepatocyte growth factor (HGF/c-Met signaling axis upregulates diverse tumor cell functions, including cell proliferation, survival, scattering and motility, epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT, angiogenesis, invasion, and metastasis. (--Oleocanthal is a naturally occurring secoiridoid from extra-virgin olive oil, which showed antiproliferative and antimigratory activity against different cancer cell lines. The aim of this study was to characterize the intracellular mechanisms involved in mediating the anticancer effects of (--oleocanthal treatment and the potential involvement of c-Met receptor signaling components in breast cancer. Results showed that (--oleocanthal inhibits the growth of human breast cancer cell lines MDA-MB-231, MCF-7 and BT-474 while similar treatment doses were found to have no effect on normal human MCF10A cell growth. In addition, (--oleocanthal treatment caused a dose-dependent inhibition of HGF-induced cell migration, invasion and G1/S cell cycle progression in breast cancer cell lines. Moreover, (--oleocanthal treatment effects were found to be mediated via inhibition of HGF-induced c-Met activation and its downstream mitogenic signaling pathways. This growth inhibitory effect is associated with blockade of EMT and reduction in cellular motility. Further results from in vivo studies showed that (--oleocanthal treatment suppressed tumor cell growth in an orthotopic model of breast cancer in athymic nude mice. Collectively, the findings of this study suggest that (--oleocanthal is a promising dietary supplement lead with potential for therapeutic use to control malignancies with aberrant c-Met activity.

  12. Tumor-penetrating nanosystem strongly suppresses breast tumor growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Shweta; Kotamraju, Venkata Ramana; Mölder, Tarmo; Tobi, Allan; Teesalu, Tambet; Ruoslahti, Erkki

    2018-01-01

    Antiangiogenic and vascular disrupting compounds have shown promise in cancer therapy, but tend to be only partially effective. We previously reported a potent theranostic nanosystem that was highly effective in glioblastoma and breast cancer mouse models, retarding tumor growth and producing some cures [Agemy et al. 2011,2013]. The nanosystem consists of iron oxide NPs (“nanoworms”) coated with a composite peptide with tumor-homing and pro-apoptotic domains. The homing component targets tumor vessels by binding to p32/gC1qR at the surface or tumor endothelial cells. We sought to further improve the efficacy nanosystem by searching for an optimally effective homing peptide that would also incorporate a tumor-penetrating function. To this effect, we tested a panel of candidate p32 binding peptides with a sequence motif that conveys tumor-penetrating activity (CendR motif). We identified a peptide designated as Linear TT1 (Lin TT1) (sequence: AKRGARSTA) as most effective in causing tumor homing and penetration of the nanosystem. This peptide had the lowest affinity for p32 among the peptides tested. The low affinity may have moderated the avidity effect from the multivalent presentation on nanoparticles (NPs), such that the NPs avoid getting trapped by the so called “binding-site barrier”, which can hinder tissue penetration of compounds with a high affinity for their receptors. Treatment of breast cancer mice with the LinTT1 nanosystem showed greatly improved efficacy compared to the original system. These results identify a promising treatment modality and underscore the value of tumor penetration effect in improving the efficacy tumor treatment. PMID:28178415

  13. Determination of vascular endothelial- and fibroblast- growth factor receptors in a mouse fibrosarcoma tumor model following photodynamic therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ziolkowski, P.; Osieka, B.J.; Symonwicz, K.; Chmielwski, P.; Latos-Grazynski, L.; Bronowicz, A.

    2004-01-01

    The role of angiogenic molecules, like vascular endothelial growth factor and fibroblast growth factor in tumor angio genesis was well confirmed. Photodynamic therapy action is, to very high degree, based on tumor vasculature damage. Therefore, it seemed to be important to evaluate growth factor receptors after photodynamic therapy. The extent of receptor expression was studied by immuno-histochemical method. In this study, vascular endothelial growth factor receptor and fibroblast growth factor receptor have been evaluated at different time points after photodynamic therapy of tumor- bearing BALB/c mice. Two sensitizer: hematoporphyrin derivative and 21, 23-dithia porphyrin were given intraperitoneally in doses: 1.25, 2.5 and 5.0 mg/kg followed by light irradiation at total doses: 50 and 100 J/sq.cm 24 hours later. The number of vascular endothelial growth factor and receptor and fibroblast growth factor in control samples did not exceed 40 per one vessel, whereas after photodynamic therapy, a significant decrease in the number of both receptors was observed. No differences between hematoporphyrin derivative and dithia porphyrin- photodynamic therapy in anti- receptor activities were observed (p<0.001 for vascular endothelial growth factor and p<0.002 for receptor and fibroblast growth factor ). The observed decrease in vascular endothelial growth factor and receptor and fibroblast growth factor amount confirms that after photodynamic therapy, some proteins are inactivated and such a decrease may influence photodynamic therapy effectiveness

  14. Androgenic dependence of exophytic tumor growth in a transgenic mouse model of bladder cancer: a role for thrombospondin-1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yao Jorge L

    2008-04-01

    FPDCT allows longitudinal monitoring of exophytic tumor growth in the UPII-SV40T model of BC that bypasses need for chemical carcinogens, which confound analysis of androgen effects. Androgens increase tumor cell growth in vitro and in vivo and decrease TSP1 expression, possibly explaining the therapeutic effect of castration. This effect may, in part, explain gender differences in BC incidence and implies anti-androgenic therapies may be effective in preventing and treating BC.

  15. DIF-1 inhibits tumor growth in vivo reducing phosphorylation of GSK-3β and expressions of cyclin D1 and TCF7L2 in cancer model mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi-Yanaga, Fumi; Yoshihara, Tatsuya; Jingushi, Kentaro; Igawa, Kazuhiro; Tomooka, Katsuhiko; Watanabe, Yutaka; Morimoto, Sachio; Nakatsu, Yoshimichi; Tsuzuki, Teruhisa; Nakabeppu, Yusaku; Sasaguri, Toshiyuki

    2014-06-01

    We reported that differentiation-inducing factor-1 (DIF-1), synthesized by Dictyostelium discoideum, inhibited proliferation of various tumor cell lines in vitro by suppressing the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway. However, it remained unexplored whether DIF-1 also inhibits tumor growth in vivo. In the present study, therefore, we examined in-vivo effects of DIF-1 using three cancer models: Mutyh-deficient mice with oxidative stress-induced intestinal tumors and nude mice xenografted with the human colon cancer cell line HCT-116 and cervical cancer cell line HeLa. In exploration for an appropriate route of administration, we found that orally administered DIF-1 was absorbed through the digestive tract to elevate its blood concentration to levels enough to suppress tumor cell proliferation. Repeated oral administration of DIF-1 markedly reduced the number and size of intestinal tumors that developed in Mutyh-deficient mice, reducing the phosphorylation level of GSK-3β Ser(9) and the expression levels of early growth response-1 (Egr-1), transcription factor 7-like 2 (TCF7L2) and cyclin D1. DIF-1 also inhibited the growth of HCT-116- and HeLa-xenograft tumors together with decreasing phosphorylation level of GSK-3β Ser(9), although it was not statistically significant in HeLa-xenograft tumors. DIF-1 also suppressed the expressions of Egr-1, TCF7L2 and cyclin D1 in HCT-116-xenograft tumors and those of β-catenin, TCF7L2 and cyclin D1 in HeLa-xenograft tumors. This is the first report to show that DIF-1 inhibits tumor growth in vivo, consistent with its in-vitro action, suggesting that this compound may have potential as a novel anti-tumor agent. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Model of interconnection of temperature and vascular parameters of experimental S-45 tumor on growth and radiation action

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Venkhvadze, R.Ya.; Gedenavishvili, Eh.G.; Karpov, V.V.

    1988-01-01

    The aim of this investigation was to search for analytical description of changes in vascularization, which could serve as the basis for a mathematical model to control without invasion the state of tumoral neoplasms in therapy 264 mongrel rats with tumor C-45 vaccinated subcutaneously and intramuscularly in the region of a right femur were examined; they were irradiated locally and once using X-ray unit with 15 and 30 Gy doses. Tumor and vascular tissue temperatures, area being under vessels are studied. Models, which can be used to estimate vascularization of tumoral tissue and to describe interaction of a vacular factor and temperature under radiation effect, are suggested. 4 refs

  17. Diclofenac Inhibits Tumor Growth in a Murine Model of Pancreatic Cancer by Modulation of VEGF Levels and Arginase Activity

    OpenAIRE

    Mayorek, Nina; Naftali-Shani, Nili; Grunewald, Myriam

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Diclofenac is one of the oldest anti-inflammatory drugs in use. In addition to its inhibition of cyclooxygenases (COX), diclofenac potently inhibits phospholipase A(2) (PLA(2)), thus yielding a broad anti-inflammatory effect. Since inflammation is an important factor in the development of pancreatic tumors we explored the potential of diclofenac to inhibit tumor growth in mice inoculated with PANCO2 cells orthotopically. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We found that diclofenac tre...

  18. Long-term High Fat Ketogenic Diet Promotes Renal Tumor Growth in a Rat Model of Tuberous Sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liśkiewicz, Arkadiusz D; Kasprowska, Daniela; Wojakowska, Anna; Polański, Krzysztof; Lewin-Kowalik, Joanna; Kotulska, Katarzyna; Jędrzejowska-Szypułka, Halina

    2016-02-19

    Nutritional imbalance underlies many disease processes but can be very beneficial in certain cases; for instance, the antiepileptic action of a high fat and low carbohydrate ketogenic diet. Besides this therapeutic feature it is not clear how this abundant fat supply may affect homeostasis, leading to side effects. A ketogenic diet is used as anti-seizure therapy i.a. in tuberous sclerosis patients, but its impact on concomitant tumor growth is not known. To examine this we have evaluated the growth of renal lesions in Eker rats (Tsc2+/-) subjected to a ketogenic diet for 4, 6 and 8 months. In spite of existing opinions about the anticancer actions of a ketogenic diet, we have shown that this anti-seizure therapy, especially in its long term usage, leads to excessive tumor growth. Prolonged feeding of a ketogenic diet promotes the growth of renal tumors by recruiting ERK1/2 and mTOR which are associated with the accumulation of oleic acid and the overproduction of growth hormone. Simultaneously, we observed that Nrf2, p53 and 8-oxoguanine glycosylase α dependent antitumor mechanisms were launched by the ketogenic diet. However, the pro-cancerous mechanisms finally took the ascendency by boosting tumor growth.

  19. siRNA-mediated Erc gene silencing suppresses tumor growth in Tsc2 mutant renal carcinoma model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imamura, Osamu; Okada, Hiroaki; Takashima, Yuuki; Zhang, Danqing; Kobayashi, Toshiyuki; Hino, Okio

    2008-09-18

    Silencing of gene expression by small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) is rapidly becoming a powerful tool for genetic analysis and represents a potential strategy for therapeutic product development. However, there are no reports of systemic delivery of siRNAs for stable treatment except short hairpin RNAs (shRNAs). On the other hand, there are many reports of systemic delivery of siRNAs for transient treatment using liposome carriers and others. With regard to shRNAs, a report showed fatality in mice due to oversaturation of cellular microRNA/short hairpin RNA pathways. Therefore, we decided to use original siRNA microspheres instead of shRNA for stable treatment of disease. In this study, we designed rat-specific siRNA sequences for Erc/mesothelin, which is a tumor-specific gene expressed in the Eker (Tsc2 mutant) rat model of hereditary renal cancer and confirmed the efficacy of gene silencing in vitro. Then, by using siRNA microspheres, we found that the suppression of Erc/mesothelin caused growth inhibition of Tsc2 mutant renal carcinoma cells in tumor implantation experiments in mice.

  20. Improvement of Parameter Estimations in Tumor Growth Inhibition Models on Xenografted Animals: Handling Sacrifice Censoring and Error Caused by Experimental Measurement on Larger Tumor Sizes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierrillas, Philippe B; Tod, Michel; Amiel, Magali; Chenel, Marylore; Henin, Emilie

    2016-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore the impact of censoring due to animal sacrifice on parameter estimates and tumor volume calculated from two diameters in larger tumors during tumor growth experiments in preclinical studies. The type of measurement error that can be expected was also investigated. Different scenarios were challenged using the stochastic simulation and estimation process. One thousand datasets were simulated under the design of a typical tumor growth study in xenografted mice, and then, eight approaches were used for parameter estimation with the simulated datasets. The distribution of estimates and simulation-based diagnostics were computed for comparison. The different approaches were robust regarding the choice of residual error and gave equivalent results. However, by not considering missing data induced by sacrificing the animal, parameter estimates were biased and led to false inferences in terms of compound potency; the threshold concentration for tumor eradication when ignoring censoring was 581 ng.ml(-1), but the true value was 240 ng.ml(-1).

  1. Genetic ablation of Bcl-x attenuates invasiveness without affecting apoptosis or tumor growth in a mouse model of pancreatic neuroendocrine cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeffrey H Hager

    Full Text Available Tumor cell death is modulated by an intrinsic cell death pathway controlled by the pro- and anti-apoptotic members of the Bcl-2 family. Up-regulation of anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 family members has been shown to suppress cell death in pre-clinical models of human cancer and is implicated in human tumor progression. Previous gain-of-function studies in the RIP1-Tag2 model of pancreatic islet carcinogenesis, involving uniform or focal/temporal over-expression of Bcl-x(L, demonstrated accelerated tumor formation and growth. To specifically assess the role of endogenous Bcl-x in regulating apoptosis and tumor progression in this model, we engineered a pancreatic beta-cell-specific knockout of both alleles of Bcl-x using the Cre-LoxP system of homologous recombination. Surprisingly, there was no appreciable effect on tumor cell apoptosis rates or on tumor growth in the Bcl-x knockout mice. Other anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 family members were expressed but not substantively altered at the mRNA level in the Bcl-x-null tumors, suggestive of redundancy without compensatory transcriptional up-regulation. Interestingly, the incidence of invasive carcinomas was reduced, and tumor cells lacking Bcl-x were impaired in invasion in a two-chamber trans-well assay under conditions mimicking hypoxia. Thus, while the function of Bcl-x in suppressing apoptosis and thereby promoting tumor growth is evidently redundant, genetic ablation implicates Bcl-x in selectively facilitating invasion, consistent with a recent report documenting a pro-invasive capability of Bcl-x(L upon exogenous over-expression.

  2. Inhibition of Tumor Growth of Human Hepatocellular Carcinoma HepG2 Cells in a Nude Mouse Xenograft Model by the Total Flavonoids from Arachniodes exilis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huimin Li

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available A tumor growth model of human hepatocellular carcinoma HepG2 cells in nude mice was employed to investigate the antitumor activity of the total flavonoids extracted from Arachniodes exilis (TFAE in vivo. Several biochemical assays including hematoxylin-eosin (HE staining, immunohistochemistry, and Western blot were performed to elucidate the mechanism of action of total flavonoids extracted from Arachniodes exilis (TFAE. The results showed that TFAE effectively inhibited the tumor growth of hepatocellular carcinoma in nude mice and had no significant effect on body weight, blood system, and functions of liver and kidney. Expression levels of proapoptotic proteins Bax and cleaved caspase-3 remarkably increased while the expressions of Bcl-2, HIF-1α, and VEGF were suppressed by TFAE. These results suggested that the antitumor potential of TFEA was implied by the apoptosis of tumor cells and the inhibition of angiogenesis in tumor tissue.

  3. Nanoelectroablation of Murine Tumors Triggers a CD8-Dependent Inhibition of Secondary Tumor Growth.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard Nuccitelli

    Full Text Available We have used both a rat orthotopic hepatocellular carcinoma model and a mouse allograft tumor model to study liver tumor ablation with nanosecond pulsed electric fields (nsPEF. We confirm that nsPEF treatment triggers apoptosis in rat liver tumor cells as indicated by the appearance of cleaved caspase 3 and 9 within two hours after treatment. Furthermore we provide evidence that nsPEF treatment leads to the translocation of calreticulin (CRT to the cell surface which is considered a damage-associated molecular pattern indicative of immunogenic cell death. We provide direct evidence that nanoelectroablation triggers a CD8-dependent inhibition of secondary tumor growth by comparing the growth rate of secondary orthotopic liver tumors in nsPEF-treated rats with that in nsPEF-treated rats depleted of CD8+ cytotoxic T-cells. The growth of these secondary tumors was severely inhibited as compared to tumor growth in CD8-depleated rats, with their average size only 3% of the primary tumor size after the same one-week growth period. In contrast, when we depleted CD8+ T-cells the second tumor grew more robustly, reaching 54% of the size of the first tumor. In addition, we demonstrate with immunohistochemistry that CD8+ T-cells are highly enriched in the secondary tumors exhibiting slow growth. We also showed that vaccinating mice with nsPEF-treated isogenic tumor cells stimulates an immune response that inhibits the growth of secondary tumors in a CD8+-dependent manner. We conclude that nanoelectroablation triggers the production of CD8+ cytotoxic T-cells resulting in the inhibition of secondary tumor growth.

  4. Chronic alcohol intake promotes tumor growth in a diethylnitrosamine-induced hepatocarcinogenesis mouse model through increased Wnt/Beta-catenin signaling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ethanol (EtOH) metabolism is involved in both initiating and promoting mechanisms in hepatocellular carcinoma progression in chronic alcoholics. In this study, we developed a mouse model to test the hypothesis that chronic EtOH consumption promotes tumor growth irrespective of EtOH-related initiati...

  5. Panaxanthone isolated from pericarp of Garcinia mangostana L. suppresses tumor growth and metastasis of a mouse model of mammary cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doi, Hitoshi; Shibata, Masa-Aki; Shibata, Eiko; Morimoto, Junji; Akao, Yukihiro; Iinuma, Munekazu; Tanigawa, Nobuhiko; Otsuki, Yoshinori

    2009-07-01

    The antitumor growth and antimetastatic activity of panaxanthone (approximately 80% alpha-mangostin and 20% gamma-mangostin) were studied in a mouse metastatic mammary cancer model that produces a metastatic spectrum similar to that seen in human breast cancer. Mammary tumors, induced by inoculation of syngeneic BALB/c mice with BJMC3879 cells, were subsequently treated with panaxanthone at 0, 2,500, or 5,000 ppm in their diet. In vitro studies were also conducted to evaluate the effects of alpha-mangostin, the main component of panaxanthone, on BJMC3879 cells. In the in vivo study, tumor volumes were significantly suppressed in mice treated with 2,500 and 5,000 ppm panaxanthone in their diet. The multiplicity of lung metastasis was significantly lower in the 5,000 ppm group. Lymph node metastasis also tended to decrease in the 5,000 ppm group but not significantly. The antitumor effects of panaxanthone were associated with elevation of apoptotic cell death, antiproliferation (inhibition of PCNA) and antiangiogenesis (inhibition of microvessel density). The in vitro study demonstrated that alpha-mangostin induced apoptosis, as evidenced by increased numbers of TUNEL-positive cells, elevated activities of caspases and a decrease in mitochondrial membrane potential, cell cycle arrest in the G(1)-phase and decreases in the cell population in the S- and G(2)/M-phases. These results suggest that the observed antimetastatic activity of panaxanthone may be of clinical significance as adjuvant therapy in metastatic human breast cancer, and may also be useful as a chemopreventative of breast cancer development.

  6. Local delivery of cannabinoid-loaded microparticles inhibits tumor growth in a murine xenograft model of glioblastoma multiforme.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dolores Hernán Pérez de la Ossa

    Full Text Available Cannabinoids, the active components of marijuana and their derivatives, are currently investigated due to their potential therapeutic application for the management of many different diseases, including cancer. Specifically, Δ(9-Tetrahydrocannabinol (THC and Cannabidiol (CBD - the two major ingredients of marijuana - have been shown to inhibit tumor growth in a number of animal models of cancer, including glioma. Although there are several pharmaceutical preparations that permit the oral administration of THC or its analogue nabilone or the oromucosal delivery of a THC- and CBD-enriched cannabis extract, the systemic administration of cannabinoids has several limitations in part derived from the high lipophilicity exhibited by these compounds. In this work we analyzed CBD- and THC-loaded poly-ε-caprolactone microparticles as an alternative delivery system for long-term cannabinoid administration in a murine xenograft model of glioma. In vitro characterization of THC- and CBD-loaded microparticles showed that this method of microencapsulation facilitates a sustained release of the two cannabinoids for several days. Local administration of THC-, CBD- or a mixture (1:1 w:w of THC- and CBD-loaded microparticles every 5 days to mice bearing glioma xenografts reduced tumour growth with the same efficacy than a daily local administration of the equivalent amount of those cannabinoids in solution. Moreover, treatment with cannabinoid-loaded microparticles enhanced apoptosis and decreased cell proliferation and angiogenesis in these tumours. Our findings support that THC- and CBD-loaded microparticles could be used as an alternative method of cannabinoid delivery in anticancer therapies.

  7. SU-G-IeP4-11: Monitoring Tumor Growth in Subcutaneous Murine Tumor Model in Vivo: A Comparison Between MRI and Small Animal CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, B; He, W; Cvetkovic, D; Chen, L; Fan, J; Ma, C [Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, PA (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: The purpose of the study is to compare the volume measurement of subcutaneous tumors in mice with different imaging platforms, namely a GE MRI and a Sofie-Biosciences small animal CT scanner. Methods: A549 human lung carcinoma cells and FaDu human head and neck squamous cell carcinoma cells were implanted subcutaneously into flanks of nude mice. Three FaDu tumors and three A549 tumors were included in this study. The MRI scans were done with a GE Signa 1.5 Tesla MR scanner using a fast T2-weighted sequence (70mm FOV and 1.2mm slice thickness), while the CT scans were done with the CT scanner on a Sofie-Biosciences G8 PET/CT platform dedicated for small animal studies (48mm FOV and 0.2mm slice thickness). Imaging contrast agent was not used in this study. Based on the DICOM images from MRI and CT scans, the tumors were contoured with Philips DICOM Viewer and the tumor volumes were obtained by summing up the contoured area and multiplied by the slice thickness. Results: The volume measurements based on the CT scans agree reasonably with that obtained with MR images for the subcutaneous tumors. The mean difference in the absolute tumor volumes between MRI- and CT-based measurements was found to be −6.2% ± 1.0%, with the difference defined as (VMR – VCT)*100%/VMR. Furthermore, we evaluated the normalized tumor volumes, which were defined for each tumor as V/V{sub 0} where V{sub 0} stands for the volume from the first MR or CT scan. The mean difference in the normalized tumor volumes was found to be 0.10% ± 0.96%. Conclusion: Despite the fact that the difference between normal and abnormal tissues is often less clear on small animal CT images than on MR images, one can still obtain reasonable tumor volume information with the small animal CT scans for subcutaneous murine xenograft models.

  8. Methylseleninic acid restricts tumor growth in nude mice model of metastatic breast cancer probably via inhibiting angiopoietin-2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, Xiaojing; Zhang, Yidi; Pei, Zengyang; Chen, Si; Yang, Xu; Chen, Yin; Lin, Degui; Ma, Runlin Z

    2012-01-01

    Angiopoietin-2 (Ang-2) plays critical roles in vascular morphogenesis and its upregulation is frequently associated with various tumors. Previous studies showed that certain selenium compounds possess anti-tumor effects. However, the underlining mechanism has not been elucidated in detail. Plus, results of research on the anti-tumor effects of selenium compounds remain controversial. We investigated levels of Ang-2 and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) on the estrogen-independent bone metastatic mammary cancer (MDA-MB-231) cells in response to treatment by methylseleninic acid (MSeA), and further examined the effects of MSeA oral administration on xenograft mammary tumors of athymic nude mice by RT-PCR, Western, radioimmuno assay, and Immunohistochemistry. Treatment of MDA-MB-231 cells with MSeA caused significant reduction of Ang-2 mRNA transcripts and secretion of Ang-2 proteins by the cells. Level of VEGF protein was accordingly decreased following the treatment. Compared with the controls, oral administration of MSeA (3 mg/kg/day for 18 days) to the nude mice carrying MDA-MB-231 induced tumors resulted in significant reduction in xenograft tumor volume and weights, significant decrease in microvascular density, and promotion of vascular normalization by increasing pericytes coverage. As expected, level of VEGF was also decreased in MSeA treated tumors. Our results point out that MSeA exerts its anti-tumor effects, at least in part, by inhibiting the Ang-2/Tie2 pathway, probably via inhibiting VEGF

  9. Inhibition of Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor A and Hypoxia-Inducible Factor 1α Maximizes the Effects of Radiation in Sarcoma Mouse Models Through Destruction of Tumor Vasculature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Hae-June; Yoon, Changhwan; Park, Do Joong; Kim, Yeo-Jung; Schmidt, Benjamin; Lee, Yoon-Jin; Tap, William D.; Eisinger-Mathason, T.S. Karin; Choy, Edwin; Kirsch, David G.; Simon, M. Celeste

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To examine the addition of genetic or pharmacologic inhibition of hypoxia-inducible factor 1α (HIF-1α) to radiation therapy (RT) and vascular endothelial growth factor A (VEGF-A) inhibition (ie trimodality therapy) for soft-tissue sarcoma. Methods and Materials: Hypoxia-inducible factor 1α was inhibited using short hairpin RNA or low metronomic doses of doxorubicin, which blocks HIF-1α binding to DNA. Trimodality therapy was examined in a mouse xenograft model and a genetically engineered mouse model of sarcoma, as well as in vitro in tumor endothelial cells (ECs) and 4 sarcoma cell lines. Results: In both mouse models, any monotherapy or bimodality therapy resulted in tumor growth beyond 250 mm 3 within the 12-day treatment period, but trimodality therapy with RT, VEGF-A inhibition, and HIF-1α inhibition kept tumors at <250 mm 3 for up to 30 days. Trimodality therapy on tumors reduced HIF-1α activity as measured by expression of nuclear HIF-1α by 87% to 95% compared with RT alone, and cytoplasmic carbonic anhydrase 9 by 79% to 82%. Trimodality therapy also increased EC-specific apoptosis 2- to 4-fold more than RT alone and reduced microvessel density by 75% to 82%. When tumor ECs were treated in vitro with trimodality therapy under hypoxia, there were significant decreases in proliferation and colony formation and increases in DNA damage (as measured by Comet assay and γH2AX expression) and apoptosis (as measured by cleaved caspase 3 expression). Trimodality therapy had much less pronounced effects when 4 sarcoma cell lines were examined in these same assays. Conclusions: Inhibition of HIF-1α is highly effective when combined with RT and VEGF-A inhibition in blocking sarcoma growth by maximizing DNA damage and apoptosis in tumor ECs, leading to loss of tumor vasculature

  10. Inhibition of vascular endothelial growth factor A and hypoxia-inducible factor 1α maximizes the effects of radiation in sarcoma mouse models through destruction of tumor vasculature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hae-June; Yoon, Changhwan; Park, Do Joong; Kim, Yeo-Jung; Schmidt, Benjamin; Lee, Yoon-Jin; Tap, William D; Eisinger-Mathason, T S Karin; Choy, Edwin; Kirsch, David G; Simon, M Celeste; Yoon, Sam S

    2015-03-01

    To examine the addition of genetic or pharmacologic inhibition of hypoxia-inducible factor 1α (HIF-1α) to radiation therapy (RT) and vascular endothelial growth factor A (VEGF-A) inhibition (ie trimodality therapy) for soft-tissue sarcoma. Hypoxia-inducible factor 1α was inhibited using short hairpin RNA or low metronomic doses of doxorubicin, which blocks HIF-1α binding to DNA. Trimodality therapy was examined in a mouse xenograft model and a genetically engineered mouse model of sarcoma, as well as in vitro in tumor endothelial cells (ECs) and 4 sarcoma cell lines. In both mouse models, any monotherapy or bimodality therapy resulted in tumor growth beyond 250 mm(3) within the 12-day treatment period, but trimodality therapy with RT, VEGF-A inhibition, and HIF-1α inhibition kept tumors at <250 mm(3) for up to 30 days. Trimodality therapy on tumors reduced HIF-1α activity as measured by expression of nuclear HIF-1α by 87% to 95% compared with RT alone, and cytoplasmic carbonic anhydrase 9 by 79% to 82%. Trimodality therapy also increased EC-specific apoptosis 2- to 4-fold more than RT alone and reduced microvessel density by 75% to 82%. When tumor ECs were treated in vitro with trimodality therapy under hypoxia, there were significant decreases in proliferation and colony formation and increases in DNA damage (as measured by Comet assay and γH2AX expression) and apoptosis (as measured by cleaved caspase 3 expression). Trimodality therapy had much less pronounced effects when 4 sarcoma cell lines were examined in these same assays. Inhibition of HIF-1α is highly effective when combined with RT and VEGF-A inhibition in blocking sarcoma growth by maximizing DNA damage and apoptosis in tumor ECs, leading to loss of tumor vasculature. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Inhibition of Neuroblastoma Tumor Growth by Ketogenic Diet and/or Calorie Restriction in a CD1-Nu Mouse Model

    OpenAIRE

    Morscher, Raphael Johannes; Aminzadeh-Gohari, Sepideh; Feichtinger, Ren? Gunther; Mayr, Johannes Adalbert; Lang, Roland; Neureiter, Daniel; Sperl, Wolfgang; Kofler, Barbara

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Neuroblastoma is a malignant pediatric cancer derived from neural crest cells. It is characterized by a generalized reduction of mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation. The goal of the present study was to investigate the effects of calorie restriction and ketogenic diet on neuroblastoma tumor growth and monitor potential adaptive mechanisms of the cancer?s oxidative phosphorylation system. Methods Xenografts were established in CD-1 nude mice by subcutaneous injection of two ne...

  12. Pyranoxanthones: Synthesis, growth inhibitory activity on human tumor cell lines and determination of their lipophilicity in two membrane models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Goncalves de Azavedo, Carlos M. B. P.; Afonso, C. M.; Soares, J. X.

    2013-01-01

    The benzopyran and dihydrobenzopyran moieties can be considered as "privileged motifs" in drug discovery being good platforms for the search of new bioactive compounds. These moieties are commonly found fused to the xanthonic scaffold belonging to the biologically important family of the generally...... hard to be established. Accordingly, with the aim of rationalizing the importance of the fused ring orientation and oxygenation pattern in pyranoxanthones, this study describes the synthesis of 14 new pyranoxanthones and evaluation of their cell growth inhibitory activity in four human tumor cell lines...... as particularly promising, presenting a potent cell growth inhibitory activity and suitable drug-like lipophilicity....

  13. Pulsed Radiation Therapy With Concurrent Cisplatin Results in Superior Tumor Growth Delay in a Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma Murine Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meyer, Kurt; Krueger, Sarah A.; Kane, Jonathan L.; Wilson, Thomas G.; Hanna, Alaa; Dabjan, Mohamad; Hege, Katie M.; Wilson, George D.; Grills, Inga; Marples, Brian, E-mail: brian.marples@beaumont.edu

    2016-09-01

    Purpose: To assess the efficacy of 3-week schedules of low-dose pulsed radiation treatment (PRT) and standard radiation therapy (SRT), with concurrent cisplatin (CDDP) in a head and neck squamous cell carcinoma xenograft model. Methods and Materials: Subcutaneous UT-SCC-14 tumors were established in athymic NIH III HO female mice. A total of 30 Gy was administered as 2 Gy/d, 5 d/wk for 3 weeks, either by PRT (10 × 0.2 Gy/d, with a 3-minute break between each 0.2-Gy dose) or SRT (2 Gy/d, uninterrupted delivery) in combination with concurrent 2 mg/kg CDDP 3 times per week in the final 2 weeks of radiation therapy. Treatment-induced growth delays were defined from twice-weekly tumor volume measurements. Tumor hypoxia was assessed by {sup 18}F-fluoromisonidazole positron emission tomography imaging, and calculated maximum standardized uptake values compared with tumor histology. Tumor vessel density and hypoxia were measured by quantitative immunohistochemistry. Normal tissues effects were evaluated in gut and skin. Results: Untreated tumors grew to 1000 mm{sup 3} in 25.4 days (±1.2), compared with delays of 62.3 days (±3.5) for SRT + CDDP and 80.2 days (±5.0) for PRT + CDDP. Time to reach 2× pretreatment volume ranged from 8.2 days (±1.8) for untreated tumors to 67.1 days (±4.7) after PRT + CDDP. Significant differences in tumor growth delay were observed for SRT versus SRT + CDDP (P=.04), PRT versus PRT + CDDP (P=.035), and SRT + CDDP versus PRT + CDDP (P=.033), and for survival between PRT versus PRT + CDDP (P=.017) and SRT + CDDP versus PRT + CDDP (P=.008). Differences in tumor hypoxia were evident by {sup 18}F-fluoromisonidazole positron emission tomography imaging between SRT and PRT (P=.025), although not with concurrent CDDP. Tumor vessel density differed between SRT + CDDP and PRT + CDDP (P=.011). No differences in normal tissue parameters were seen. Conclusions: Concurrent CDDP was more effective in combination PRT than SRT at

  14. Impact of associating liver partition and portal vein occlusion for staged hepatectomy on tumor growth in a mouse model of liver metastasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kikuchi, Yutaro; Hiroshima, Yukihiko; Matsuo, Kenichi; Murakami, Takashi; Kawaguchi, Daisuke; Kasahara, Kohei; Tanaka, Kuniya

    2018-01-01

    The impact of associating liver partition and portal vein occlusion for staged hepatectomy (ALPPS) on tumor growth activity was investigated. A BALB/c mouse model (male, 8-10 weeks old) of liver metastasis labeled by red fluorescent protein was established. Changes in future liver remnant (FLR) volumes, tumor growth activity, and levels of cytokines and growth factors in liver tissues during the treatment period were compared among the models involving ALPPS, portal vein ligation (PVL), or sham operation. The ratio of the FLR volume to body weight at 24 h after the procedure was greater for ALPPS (4.45 ± 0.12 × 10 -2 ) than for PVL (3.79 ± 0.12 × 10 -2 ; P = 0.003) and sham operation (3.18 ± 0.16 × 10 -2 ; P < 0.001). No differences in tumor progression in the FLR were observed at any time point after the procedures. Within the deportalized liver (DL), although tumor progression was observed during a later period after ALPPS (9 days postoperative) and PVL (12 days postoperative), no acceleration of tumor growth after ALPPS was observed in an early period similar to PVL. ALPPS induces a rapid increase in FLR volume and avoids remnant tumor progression during the early postoperative period. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd, BASO ~ The Association for Cancer Surgery, and the European Society of Surgical Oncology. All rights reserved.

  15. Experimental rat lung tumor model with intrabronchial tumor cell implantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomes Neto, Antero; Simão, Antônio Felipe Leite; Miranda, Samuel de Paula; Mourão, Lívia Talita Cajaseiras; Bezerra, Nilfácio Prado; Almeida, Paulo Roberto Carvalho de; Ribeiro, Ronaldo de Albuquerque

    2008-01-01

    The objective of this study was to develop a rat lung tumor model for anticancer drug testing. Sixty-two female Wistar rats weighing 208 +/- 20 g were anesthetized intraperitoneally with 2.5% tribromoethanol (1 ml/100 g live weight), tracheotomized and intubated with an ultrafine catheter for inoculation with Walker's tumor cells. In the first step of the experiment, a technique was established for intrabronchial implantation of 10(5) to 5 x 10(5) tumor cells, and the tumor take rate was determined. The second stage consisted of determining tumor volume, correlating findings from high-resolution computed tomography (HRCT) with findings from necropsia and determining time of survival. The tumor take rate was 94.7% for implants with 4 x 10(5) tumor cells, HRCT and necropsia findings matched closely (r=0.953; p<0.0001), the median time of survival was 11 days, and surgical mortality was 4.8%. The present rat lung tumor model was shown to be feasible: the take rate was high, surgical mortality was negligible and the procedure was simple to perform and easily reproduced. HRCT was found to be a highly accurate tool for tumor diagnosis, localization and measurement and may be recommended for monitoring tumor growth in this model.

  16. Inferring the Impact of Regulatory Mechanisms that Underpin CD8+ T Cell Control of B16 Tumor GrowthIn vivoUsing Mechanistic Models and Simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klinke, David J; Wang, Qing

    2016-01-01

    A major barrier for broadening the efficacy of immunotherapies for cancer is identifying key mechanisms that limit the efficacy of tumor infiltrating lymphocytes. Yet, identifying these mechanisms using human samples and mouse models for cancer remains a challenge. While interactions between cancer and the immune system are dynamic and non-linear, identifying the relative roles that biological components play in regulating anti-tumor immunity commonly relies on human intuition alone, which can be limited by cognitive biases. To assist natural intuition, modeling and simulation play an emerging role in identifying therapeutic mechanisms. To illustrate the approach, we developed a multi-scale mechanistic model to describe the control of tumor growth by a primary response of CD8+ T cells against defined tumor antigens using the B16 C57Bl/6 mouse model for malignant melanoma. The mechanistic model was calibrated to data obtained following adenovirus-based immunization and validated to data obtained following adoptive transfer of transgenic CD8+ T cells. More importantly, we use simulation to test whether the postulated network topology, that is the modeled biological components and their associated interactions, is sufficient to capture the observed anti-tumor immune response. Given the available data, the simulation results also provided a statistical basis for quantifying the relative importance of different mechanisms that underpin CD8+ T cell control of B16F10 growth. By identifying conditions where the postulated network topology is incomplete, we illustrate how this approach can be used as part of an iterative design-build-test cycle to expand the predictive power of the model.

  17. Self-scaling tumor growth

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmiegel, Jürgen

    We study the statistical properties of the star-shaped approximation of in vitro tumor profiles. The emphasis is on the two-point correlation structure of the radii of the tumor as a function of time and angle. In particular, we show that spatial two-point correlators follow a cosine law....... Furthermore, we observe self-scaling behaviour of two-point correlators of different orders, i.e. correlators of a given order are a power law of the correlators of some other order. This power-law dependence is similar to what has been observed for the statistics of the energy-dissipation in a turbulent flow...

  18. Inhibition of platelet-derived growth factor receptor α by MEDI-575 reduces tumor growth and stromal fibroblast content in a model of non-small cell lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laing, Naomi; McDermott, Brenda; Wen, Shenghua; Yang, David; Lawson, Deborah; Collins, Mike; Reimer, Corinne; Hall, Peter A; Andersén, Harriet; Snaith, Michael; Wang, Xin; Bedian, Vahe; Cao, Zhu A; Blakey, David

    2013-06-01

    Platelet-derived growth factor receptor α (PDGFRα) is a receptor tyrosine kinase that promotes cell survival and is expressed in both the tumor and the stromal components of human cancers. We have developed a fully human monoclonal antibody, MEDI-575, that selectively binds to human PDGFRα with high affinity, with no observable affinity for murine PDGFRα. To more fully characterize the role of PDGFRα in the regulation of tumor stroma, we evaluated the in vivo antitumor effects of MEDI-575 in tumor-bearing severe combined immunodeficient (SCID) mice and in genetically altered SCID mice expressing human PDGFRα in place of murine PDGFRα. We used the Calu-6 non-small cell lung cancer model because it lacks an in vitro proliferative response to PDGFRα activation. Antitumor activity was observed when the study was performed in mice expressing the human receptor, but no activity was observed in the mice expressing the murine receptor. Immunohistologic analysis of the tumors from mice expressing human PDGFRα showed a highly significant reduction in stromal fibroblast content and only minor changes in tumor proliferative index in tumors exposed to MEDI-575 compared with the results seen in vehicle-treated tumors or in tumors from mice expressing murine PDGFRα. Additional in vitro studies indicated that exposure of primary cancer-associated fibroblasts to MEDI-575 can directly affect proliferation and key signaling pathways in these cells. These results highlight the potential for observing antitumor activity with MEDI-575 through modulation of the stromal component of tumors and confirm that the PDGFRα pathway can play a role in maintaining a tumor microenvironment conducive to tumor growth.

  19. Modeling tumor growth and irradiation response in vitro--a combination of high-performance computing and web-based technologies including VRML visualization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stamatakos, G S; Zacharaki, E I; Makropoulou, M I; Mouravliansky, N A; Marsh, A; Nikita, K S; Uzunoglu, N K

    2001-12-01

    A simplified three-dimensional Monte Carlo simulation model of in vitro tumor growth and response to fractionated radiotherapeutic schemes is presented in this paper. The paper aims at both the optimization of radiotherapy and the provision of insight into the biological mechanisms involved in tumor development. The basics of the modeling philosophy of Duechting have been adopted and substantially extended. The main processes taken into account by the model are the transitions between the cell cycle phases, the diffusion of oxygen and glucose, and the cell survival probabilities following irradiation. Specific algorithms satisfactorily describing tumor expansion and shrinkage have been applied, whereas a novel approach to the modeling of the tumor response to irradiation has been proposed and implemented. High-performance computing systems in conjunction with Web technologies have coped with the particularly high computer memory and processing demands. A visualization system based on the MATLAB software package and the virtual-reality modeling language has been employed. Its utilization has led to a spectacular representation of both the external surface and the internal structure of the developing tumor. The simulation model has been applied to the special case of small cell lung carcinoma in vitro irradiated according to both the standard and accelerated fractionation schemes. A good qualitative agreement with laboratory experience has been observed in all cases. Accordingly, the hypothesis that advanced simulation models for the in silico testing of tumor irradiation schemes could substantially enhance the radiotherapy optimization process is further strengthened. Currently, our group is investigating extensions of the presented algorithms so that efficient descriptions of the corresponding clinical (in vivo) cases are achieved.

  20. Administration of the optimized β-Lapachone-poloxamer-cyclodextrin ternary system induces apoptosis, DNA damage and reduces tumor growth in a human breast adenocarcinoma xenograft mouse model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seoane, Samuel; Díaz-Rodríguez, Patricia; Sendon-Lago, Juan; Gallego, Rosalia; Pérez-Fernández, Román; Landin, Mariana

    2013-08-01

    β-Lapachone (β-Lap) is a 1,2-orthonaphthoquinone that selectively induces cell death in human cancer cells through NAD(P)H:quinone oxidoreductase-1 (NQO1). NQO1 is overexpressed in a variety of tumors, as compared to normal adjacent tissue. However, the low solubility and non-specific distribution of β-Lap limit its suitability for clinical assays. We formulated β-Lap in an optimal random methylated-β-cyclodextrin/poloxamer 407 mixture (i.e., β-Lap ternary system) and, using human breast adenocarcinoma MCF-7 cells and immunodeficient mice, performed in vitro and in vivo evaluation of its anti-tumor effects on proliferation, cell cycle, apoptosis, DNA damage, and tumor growth. This ternary system is fluid at room temperature, gels over 29 °C, and provides a significant amount of drug, thus facilitating intratumoral delivery, in situ gelation, and the formation of a depot for time-release. Administration of β-Lap ternary system to MCF-7 cells induces an increase in apoptosis and DNA damage, while producing no changes in cell cycle. Moreover, in a mouse xenograft tumor model, intratumoral injection of the system significantly reduces tumor volume, while increasing apoptosis and DNA damage without visible toxicity to liver or kidney. These anti-tumoral effects and lack of visible toxicity make this system a promising new therapeutic agent for breast cancer treatment. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Inhibition of IL-17A suppresses enhanced-tumor growth in low dose pre-irradiated tumor beds.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eun-Jung Lee

    Full Text Available Ionizing radiation induces modification of the tumor microenvironment such as tumor surrounding region, which is relevant to treatment outcome after radiotherapy. In this study, the effects of pre-irradiated tumor beds on the growth of subsequently implanted tumors were investigated as well as underlying mechanism. The experimental model was set up by irradiating the right thighs of C3H/HeN mice with 5 Gy, followed by the implantation of HCa-I and MIH-2. Both implanted tumors in the pre-irradiated bed showed accelerated-growth compared to the control. Tumor-infiltrated lymphocyte (TIL levels were increased, as well as pro-tumor factors such as IL-6 and transforming growth factor-beta1 (TGF-β1 in the pre-irradiated group. In particular, the role of pro-tumor cytokine interleukin-17A (IL-17A was investigated as a possible target mechanism because IL-6 and TGF-β are key factors in Th17 cells differentiation from naïve T cells. IL-17A expression was increased not only in tumors, but also in CD4+ T cells isolated from the tumor draining lymph nodes. The effect of IL-17A on tumor growth was confirmed by treating tumors with IL-17A antibody, which abolished the acceleration of tumor growth. These results indicate that the upregulation of IL-17A seems to be a key factor for enhancing tumor growth in pre-irradiated tumor beds.

  2. Mitochondrial ASncmtRNA-1 and ASncmtRNA-2 as potent targets to inhibit tumor growth and metastasis in the RenCa murine renal adenocarcinoma model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borgna, Vincenzo; Villegas, Jaime; Burzio, Verónica A; Belmar, Sebastián; Araya, Mariela; Jeldes, Emanuel; Lobos-González, Lorena; Silva, Verónica; Villota, Claudio; Oliveira-Cruz, Luciana; Lopez, Constanza; Socias, Teresa; Castillo, Octavio; Burzio, Luis O

    2017-07-04

    Knockdown of antisense noncoding mitochondrial RNAs (ASncmtRNAs) induces apoptosis in several human and mouse tumor cell lines, but not normal cells, suggesting this approach for a selective therapy against different types of cancer. Here we show that in vitro knockdown of murine ASncmtRNAs induces apoptotic death of mouse renal adenocarcinoma RenCa cells, but not normal murine kidney epithelial cells. In a syngeneic subcutaneous RenCa model, treatment delayed and even reversed tumor growth. Since the subcutaneous model does not reflect the natural microenviroment of renal cancer, we used an orthotopic model of RenCa cells inoculated under the renal capsule. These studies showed inhibition of tumor growth and metastasis. Direct metastasis assessment by tail vein injection of RenCa cells also showed a drastic reduction in lung metastatic nodules. In vivo treatment reduces survivin, N-cadherin and P-cadherin levels, providing a molecular basis for metastasis inhibition. In consequence, the treatment significantly enhanced mouse survival in these models. Our results suggest that the ASncmtRNAs could be potent and selective targets for therapy against human renal cell carcinoma.

  3. Styrene maleic acid-encapsulated RL71 micelles suppress tumor growth in a murine xenograft model of triple negative breast cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martey O

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Orleans Martey,1 Mhairi Nimick,1 Sebastien Taurin,1 Vignesh Sundararajan,1 Khaled Greish,2 Rhonda J Rosengren1 1Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, University of Otago, Dunedin, New Zealand; 2Department of Molecular Medicine, College of Medicine and Medical Sciences, Arabian Gulf University, Manama, Kingdom of Bahrain Abstract: Patients with triple negative breast cancer have a poor prognosis due in part to the lack of targeted therapies. In the search for novel drugs, our laboratory has developed a second-generation curcumin derivative, 3,5-bis(3,4,5-trimethoxybenzylidene-1-methylpiperidine-4-one (RL71, that exhibits potent in vitro cytotoxicity. To improve the clinical potential of this drug, we have encapsulated it in styrene maleic acid (SMA micelles. SMA-RL71 showed improved biodistribution, and drug accumulation in the tumor increased 16-fold compared to control. SMA-RL71 (10 mg/kg, intravenously, two times a week for 2 weeks also significantly suppressed tumor growth compared to control in a xenograft model of triple negative breast cancer. Free RL71 was unable to alter tumor growth. Tumors from SMA-RL71-treated mice showed a decrease in angiogenesis and an increase in apoptosis. The drug treatment also modulated various cell signaling proteins including the epidermal growth factor receptor, with the mechanisms for tumor suppression consistent with previous work with RL71 in vitro. The nanoformulation was also nontoxic as shown by normal levels of plasma markers for liver and kidney injury following weekly administration of SMA-RL71 (10 mg/kg for 90 days. Thus, we report clinical potential following encapsulation of a novel curcumin derivative, RL71, in SMA micelles. Keywords: curcumin derivatives, nanomedicine, EGFR, biodistribution

  4. Suppression of Tumor Growth and Muscle Wasting in a Transgenic Mouse Model of Pancreatic Cancer by the Novel Histone Deacetylase Inhibitor AR-42.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henderson, Sally E; Ding, Li-Yun; Mo, Xiaokui; Bekaii-Saab, Tanios; Kulp, Samuel K; Chen, Ching-Shih; Huang, Po-Hsien

    2016-12-01

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) is the third leading cause of cancer death in the United States. This study was aimed at evaluating the efficacy of AR-42 (formerly OSU-HDAC42), a novel histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitor currently in clinical trials, in suppressing tumor growth and/or cancer-induced muscle wasting in murine models of PDAC. The in vitro antiproliferative activity of AR-42 was evaluated in six human pancreatic cancer cell lines (AsPC-1, COLO-357, PANC-1, MiaPaCa-2, BxPC-3, SW1990). AsPC-1 subcutaneous xenograft and transgenic KP fl/fl C (LSL-Kras G12D ;Trp53 flox/flox ;Pdx-1-Cre) mouse models of pancreatic cancer were used to evaluate the in vivo efficacy of AR-42 in suppressing tumor growth and/or muscle wasting. Growth suppression in AR-42-treated cells was observed in all six human pancreatic cancer cell lines with dose-dependent modulation of proliferation and apoptotic markers, which was associated with the hallmark features of HDAC inhibition, including p21 upregulation and histone H3 hyperacetylation. Oral administration of AR-42 at 50 mg/kg every other day resulted in suppression of tumor burden in the AsPC-1 xenograft and KP fl/fl C models by 78% and 55%, respectively, at the end of treatment. Tumor suppression was associated with HDAC inhibition, increased apoptosis, and inhibition of proliferation. Additionally, AR-42 as a single agent preserved muscle size and increased grip strength in KP fl/fl C mice. Finally, the combination of AR-42 and gemcitabine in transgenic mice demonstrated a significant increase in survival than either agent alone. These results suggest that AR-42 represents a therapeutically promising strategy for the treatment of pancreatic cancer. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Tumor-Targeting Salmonella typhimurium A1-R Promotes Tumoricidal CD8+ T Cell Tumor Infiltration and Arrests Growth and Metastasis in a Syngeneic Pancreatic-Cancer Orthotopic Mouse Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murakami, Takashi; Hiroshima, Yukihiko; Zhang, Yong; Zhao, Ming; Kiyuna, Tasuku; Hwang, Ho Kyoung; Miyake, Kentaro; Homma, Yuki; Mori, Ryutaro; Matsuyama, Ryusei; Chishima, Takashi; Ichikawa, Yasushi; Tanaka, Kuniya; Bouvet, Michael; Endo, Itaru; Hoffman, Robert M

    2018-01-01

    The present study determined the effect of the tumor-targeting strain Salmonella typhimurium A1-R (S. typhimurium A1-R) on CD8 + tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes (TILs) in a syngeneic pancreatic-cancer orthotopic mouse model. The effect of tumor-targeting S. typhimurium A1-R on CD8 + TILs was determined on the Pan02 murine pancreatic-adenocarcinoma implanted orthotopically in the pancreatic tail of C57BL/6 immunocompromised mice. Three weeks after orthotopic implantation, mice were randomized as follows G1: untreated control group (n = 8); and G2: S. typhimurium A1-R-treatment group (n = 8, 1 × 10 7 colony forming units [CFU]/body, iv, weekly, 3 weeks). On the 22nd day from initial treatment, all mice were sacrificed and tumors were harvested. The tumor-volume ratio was defined as ratio of tumor volume on the 22nd day relative to the 1st day. The tumor volume ratio was significantly lower in the S. typhimurium A1-R-treated group (G2) (3.0 ± 2.8) than the untreated control (G1) (39.9 ± 30.7, P R-treated mice (G2). Six mice in G1 had peritoneal dissemination, whereas no mice showed peritoneal dissemination in G2 (P R promotes CD8 + T cell infiltration and inhibition of tumor growth and metastasis. J. Cell. Biochem. 119: 634-639, 2018. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Mesenchymal stem cell 1 (MSC1-based therapy attenuates tumor growth whereas MSC2-treatment promotes tumor growth and metastasis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruth S Waterman

    Full Text Available Currently, there are many promising clinical trials using mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs in cell-based therapies of numerous diseases. Increasingly, however, there is a concern over the use of MSCs because they home to tumors and can support tumor growth and metastasis. For instance, we established that MSCs in the ovarian tumor microenvironment promoted tumor growth and favored angiogenesis. In parallel studies, we also developed a new approach to induce the conventional mixed pool of MSCs into two uniform but distinct phenotypes we termed MSC1 and MSC2.Here we tested the in vitro and in vivo stability of MSC1 and MSC2 phenotypes as well as their effects on tumor growth and spread. In vitro co-culture of MSC1 with various cancer cells diminished growth in colony forming units and tumor spheroid assays, while conventional MSCs or MSC2 co-culture had the opposite effect in these assays. Co-culture of MSC1 and cancer cells also distinctly affected their migration and invasion potential when compared to MSCs or MSC2 treated samples. The expression of bioactive molecules also differed dramatically among these samples. MSC1-based treatment of established tumors in an immune competent model attenuated tumor growth and metastasis in contrast to MSCs- and MSC2-treated animals in which tumor growth and spread was increased. Also, in contrast to these groups, MSC1-therapy led to less ascites accumulation, increased CD45+leukocytes, decreased collagen deposition, and mast cell degranulation.These observations indicate that the MSC1 and MSC2 phenotypes may be convenient tools for the discovery of critical components of the tumor stroma. The continued investigation of these cells may help ensure that cell based-therapy is used safely and effectively in human disease.

  7. Monitoring of tumor growth and post-irradiation recurrence in a diffuse intrinsic pontine glioma mouse model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Caretti, V.; Zondervan, I.; Meijer, D.H.; Idema, S.; Vos, W. De; Hamans, B.C.; Bugiani, M.; Hulleman, E.; Wesseling, P.; Vandertop, W.P.; Noske, D.P.; Kaspers, G.; Molthoff, C.F.M.; Wurdinger, T.

    2011-01-01

    Diffuse intrinsic pontine glioma (DIPG) is a fatal malignancy because of its diffuse infiltrative growth pattern. Translational research suffers from the lack of a representative DIPG animal model. Hence, human E98 glioma cells were stereotactically injected into the pons of nude mice. The E98 DIPG

  8. Skull base tumor model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gragnaniello, Cristian; Nader, Remi; van Doormaal, Tristan; Kamel, Mahmoud; Voormolen, Eduard H J; Lasio, Giovanni; Aboud, Emad; Regli, Luca; Tulleken, Cornelius A F; Al-Mefty, Ossama

    2010-11-01

    Resident duty-hours restrictions have now been instituted in many countries worldwide. Shortened training times and increased public scrutiny of surgical competency have led to a move away from the traditional apprenticeship model of training. The development of educational models for brain anatomy is a fascinating innovation allowing neurosurgeons to train without the need to practice on real patients and it may be a solution to achieve competency within a shortened training period. The authors describe the use of Stratathane resin ST-504 polymer (SRSP), which is inserted at different intracranial locations to closely mimic meningiomas and other pathological entities of the skull base, in a cadaveric model, for use in neurosurgical training. Silicone-injected and pressurized cadaveric heads were used for studying the SRSP model. The SRSP presents unique intrinsic metamorphic characteristics: liquid at first, it expands and foams when injected into the desired area of the brain, forming a solid tumorlike structure. The authors injected SRSP via different passages that did not influence routes used for the surgical approach for resection of the simulated lesion. For example, SRSP injection routes included endonasal transsphenoidal or transoral approaches if lesions were to be removed through standard skull base approach, or, alternatively, SRSP was injected via a cranial approach if the removal was planned to be via the transsphenoidal or transoral route. The model was set in place in 3 countries (US, Italy, and The Netherlands), and a pool of 13 physicians from 4 different institutions (all surgeons and surgeons in training) participated in evaluating it and provided feedback. All 13 evaluating physicians had overall positive impressions of the model. The overall score on 9 components evaluated--including comparison between the tumor model and real tumor cases, perioperative requirements, general impression, and applicability--was 88% (100% being the best possible

  9. Small interfering RNA targeted to IGF-IR delays tumor growth and induces proinflammatory cytokines in a mouse breast cancer model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tiphanie Durfort

    Full Text Available Insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I and its type I receptor (IGF-IR play significant roles in tumorigenesis and in immune response. Here, we wanted to know whether an RNA interference approach targeted to IGF-IR could be used for specific antitumor immunostimulation in a breast cancer model. For that, we evaluated short interfering RNA (siRNAs for inhibition of in vivo tumor growth and immunological stimulation in immunocompetent mice. We designed 2'-O-methyl-modified siRNAs to inhibit expression of IGF-IR in two murine breast cancer cell lines (EMT6, C4HD. Cell transfection of IGF-IR siRNAs decreased proliferation, diminished phosphorylation of downstream signaling pathway proteins, AKT and ERK, and caused a G0/G1 cell cycle block. The IGF-IR silencing also induced secretion of two proinflammatory cytokines, TNF- α and IFN-γ. When we transfected C4HD cells with siRNAs targeting IGF-IR, mammary tumor growth was strongly delayed in syngenic mice. Histology of developing tumors in mice grafted with IGF-IR siRNA treated C4HD cells revealed a low mitotic index, and infiltration of lymphocytes and polymorphonuclear neutrophils, suggesting activation of an antitumor immune response. When we used C4HD cells treated with siRNA as an immunogen, we observed an increase in delayed-type hypersensitivity and the presence of cytotoxic splenocytes against wild-type C4HD cells, indicative of evolving immune response. Our findings show that silencing IGF-IR using synthetic siRNA bearing 2'-O-methyl nucleotides may offer a new clinical approach for treatment of mammary tumors expressing IGF-IR. Interestingly, our work also suggests that crosstalk between IGF-I axis and antitumor immune response can mobilize proinflammatory cytokines.

  10. Big Bang Tumor Growth and Clonal Evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Ruping; Hu, Zheng; Curtis, Christina

    2017-07-14

    The advent and application of next-generation sequencing (NGS) technologies to tumor genomes has reinvigorated efforts to understand clonal evolution. Although tumor progression has traditionally been viewed as a gradual stepwise process, recent studies suggest that evolutionary rates in tumors can be variable with periods of punctuated mutational bursts and relative stasis. For example, Big Bang dynamics have been reported, wherein after transformation, growth occurs in the absence of stringent selection, consistent with effectively neutral evolution. Although first noted in colorectal tumors, effective neutrality may be relatively common. Additionally, punctuated evolution resulting from mutational bursts and cataclysmic genomic alterations have been described. In this review, we contrast these findings with the conventional gradualist view of clonal evolution and describe potential clinical and therapeutic implications of different evolutionary modes and tempos. Copyright © 2017 Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press; all rights reserved.

  11. Treatment with rhenium-188-perrhenate and iodine-131 of NIS-expressing mammary cancer in a mouse model remarkably inhibited tumor growth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dadachova, Ekaterina; Nguyen, Andrew; Lin, Elaine Y.; Gnatovskiy, Leo; Lu, Ping; Pollard, Jeffrey W.

    2005-01-01

    Introduction: Novel therapeutic modalities are needed for breast cancer patients in whom standard treatments are not effective. Mammary gland sodium/iodide symporter has been identified as a molecular target in breast cancers in humans and in some transgenic mouse models. We report the results of a therapy study with 131 I - and 188 ReO 4 - of breast cancer in polyoma middle T oncoprotein (PyMT) transgenic mice endogenously expressing the Na + /I - symporter (NIS). Methods: PyMT mice (12-13 weeks old) with one palpable tumor of 0.5-0.8 cm in diameter were used. For the therapy studies, PyMT mice were (1) treated with two intraperitoneal injections of 1.5 mCi of 188 ReO 4 - 1 week apart, (2) pretreated for 1 week with 5 μg of triiodothyronine (T3) followed by two intraperitoneal injections of 1.5 mCi of 131 I - 1 week apart or (3) left untreated. The tumor and normal organ uptakes were assessed by scintigraphic imaging. The thyroid function of treated and control animals was evaluated at the completion of the study by measuring the T3/thyroxine (T4) ratio in their blood. Results: There was significant uptake of 131 I - and 188 ReO 4 - in the primary palpable tumors as well as in nonpalpable tumors, stomachs and thyroids. The tumor uptake after the second injection was 10 times lower in comparison with the first injection. Tumor growth was significantly inhibited in both the 131 I - and 188 ReO 4 - groups in comparison with the control group, and tumors in the 188 ReO 4 - group increased in size significantly less than in the 131 I - group. The T3/T4 ratios were calculated to be 27 and 25 for the control group and the 188 ReO 4 - group, respectively; for 131 I - , both the T3 and T4 levels were below detection limit, demonstrating much less effect on the thyroids of treatment with 188 ReO 4 - than with 131 I - . Conclusions: These results prove that NIS expression in breast tumors in animal models allows specific, efficient and safe treatment with a variety of

  12. In vivo preclinical low field MRI monitoring of tumor growth following a suicide gene therapy in an ortho-topic mice model of human glioblastoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Breton, E.; Goetz, Ch.; Aubertin, G.; Constantinesco, A.; Choquet, Ph.; Kintz, J.; Accart, N.; Grellier, B.; Erbs, Ph.; Rooke, R.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose The aim of this study was to monitor in vivo with low field MRI growth of a murine ortho-topic glioma model following a suicide gene therapy. Methods The gene therapy consisted in the stereotactic injection in the mice brain of a modified vaccinia virus Ankara (M.V.A.) vector encoding for a suicide gene (FCU1) that transforms a non toxic pro-drug 5-fluoro-cytosine (5-F.C.) to its highly cytotoxic derivatives 5-fluorouracil (5-F.U.) and 5-fluoro-uridine-5 monophosphate (5-F.U.M.P.). Using a warmed-up imaging cell, sequential 3D T1 and T2 0.1T MRI brain examinations were performed on 16 Swiss female nu/nu mice bearing ortho-topic human glioblastoma (U 87-MG cells). The 6-week in vivo MRI follow-up consisted in a weekly measurement of the intracerebral tumor volume leading to a total of 65 examinations. Mice were divided in four groups: sham group (n = 4), sham group treated with 5-F.C. only (n = 4), sham group with injection of M.V.A.-FCU1 vector only (n = 4), therapy group administered with M.V.A.-FCU1 vector and 5-F.C. (n = 4). Measurements of tumor volumes were obtained after manual segmentation of T1- and T2-weighted images. Results Intra-observer and inter-observer tumor volume measurements show no significant differences. No differences were found between T1 and T2 volume tumor doubling times between the three sham groups. A significant statistical difference (p < 0.05) in T1 and T2 volume tumor doubling times between the three sham groups and the animals treated with the intratumoral injection of M.V.A.-FCU1 vector in combination with 2 weeks per os 5-F.C. administration was demonstrated. Conclusion Preclinical low field MRI was able to monitor efficacy of suicide gene therapy in delaying the tumor growth in an in vivo mouse model of ortho-topic glioblastoma. (authors)

  13. Impact of gas(less) laparoscopy and laparotomy on peritoneal tumor growth and abdominal wall metastases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    N.D. Kannekens-Bouvy (Nicole); R.L. Marquet (Richard); H.J. Bonjer (Jaap); J. Jeekel (Hans)

    1996-01-01

    textabstractOBJECTIVE: A tumor model in the rat was used to study peritoneal tumor growth and abdominal wall metastases after carbon dioxide (CO2) pneumoperitoneum, gasless laparoscopy, and laparotomy. SUMMARY BACKGROUND DATA: The role of laparoscopic resection of

  14. Thymoquinone inhibits tumor growth and induces apoptosis in a breast cancer xenograft mouse model: the role of p38 MAPK and ROS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woo, Chern Chiuh; Hsu, Annie; Kumar, Alan Prem; Sethi, Gautam; Tan, Kwong Huat Benny

    2013-01-01

    Due to narrow therapeutic window of cancer therapeutic agents and the development of resistance against these agents, there is a need to discover novel agents to treat breast cancer. The antitumor activities of thymoquinone (TQ), a compound isolated from Nigella sativa oil, were investigated in breast carcinoma in vitro and in vivo. Cell responses after TQ treatment were assessed by using different assays including MTT assay, annexin V-propidium iodide staining, Mitosox staining and Western blot. The antitumor effect was studied by breast tumor xenograft mouse model, and the tumor tissues were examined by histology and immunohistochemistry. The level of anti-oxidant enzymes/molecules in mouse liver tissues was measured by commercial kits. Here, we show that TQ induced p38 phosphorylation and ROS production in breast cancer cells. These inductions were found to be responsible for TQ's anti-proliferative and pro-apoptotic effects. Moreover, TQ-induced ROS production regulated p38 phosphorylation but not vice versa. TQ treatment was found to suppress the tumor growth and this effect was further enhanced by combination with doxorubicin. TQ also inhibited the protein expression of anti-apoptotic genes, such as XIAP, survivin, Bcl-xL and Bcl-2, in breast cancer cells and breast tumor xenograft. Reduced Ki67 and increased TUNEL staining were observed in TQ-treated tumors. TQ was also found to increase the level of catalase, superoxide dismutase and glutathione in mouse liver tissues. Overall, our results demonstrated that the anti-proliferative and pro-apoptotic effects of TQ in breast cancer are mediated through p38 phosphorylation via ROS generation.

  15. Thymoquinone inhibits tumor growth and induces apoptosis in a breast cancer xenograft mouse model: the role of p38 MAPK and ROS.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chern Chiuh Woo

    Full Text Available Due to narrow therapeutic window of cancer therapeutic agents and the development of resistance against these agents, there is a need to discover novel agents to treat breast cancer. The antitumor activities of thymoquinone (TQ, a compound isolated from Nigella sativa oil, were investigated in breast carcinoma in vitro and in vivo. Cell responses after TQ treatment were assessed by using different assays including MTT assay, annexin V-propidium iodide staining, Mitosox staining and Western blot. The antitumor effect was studied by breast tumor xenograft mouse model, and the tumor tissues were examined by histology and immunohistochemistry. The level of anti-oxidant enzymes/molecules in mouse liver tissues was measured by commercial kits. Here, we show that TQ induced p38 phosphorylation and ROS production in breast cancer cells. These inductions were found to be responsible for TQ's anti-proliferative and pro-apoptotic effects. Moreover, TQ-induced ROS production regulated p38 phosphorylation but not vice versa. TQ treatment was found to suppress the tumor growth and this effect was further enhanced by combination with doxorubicin. TQ also inhibited the protein expression of anti-apoptotic genes, such as XIAP, survivin, Bcl-xL and Bcl-2, in breast cancer cells and breast tumor xenograft. Reduced Ki67 and increased TUNEL staining were observed in TQ-treated tumors. TQ was also found to increase the level of catalase, superoxide dismutase and glutathione in mouse liver tissues. Overall, our results demonstrated that the anti-proliferative and pro-apoptotic effects of TQ in breast cancer are mediated through p38 phosphorylation via ROS generation.

  16. Galectin-3C inhibits tumor growth and increases the anticancer activity of bortezomib in a murine model of human multiple myeloma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonardo Mirandola

    Full Text Available Galectin-3 is a human lectin involved in many cellular processes including differentiation, apoptosis, angiogenesis, neoplastic transformation, and metastasis. We evaluated galectin-3C, an N-terminally truncated form of galectin-3 that is thought to act as a dominant negative inhibitor, as a potential treatment for multiple myeloma (MM. Galectin-3 was expressed at varying levels by all 9 human MM cell lines tested. In vitro galectin-3C exhibited modest anti-proliferative effects on MM cells and inhibited chemotaxis and invasion of U266 MM cells induced by stromal cell-derived factor (SDF-1α. Galectin-3C facilitated the anticancer activity of bortezomib, a proteasome inhibitor approved by the FDA for MM treatment. Galectin-3C and bortezomib also synergistically inhibited MM-induced angiogenesis activity in vitro. Delivery of galectin-3C intravenously via an osmotic pump in a subcutaneous U266 cell NOD/SCID mouse model of MM significantly inhibited tumor growth. The average tumor volume of bortezomib-treated animals was 19.6% and of galectin-3C treated animals was 13.5% of the average volume of the untreated controls at day 35. The maximal effect was obtained with the combination of galectin-3C with bortezomib that afforded a reduction of 94% in the mean tumor volume compared to the untreated controls at day 35. In conclusion, this is the first study to show that inhibition of galectin-3 is efficacious in a murine model of human MM. Our results demonstrated that galectin-3C alone was efficacious in a xenograft mouse model of human MM, and that it enhanced the anti-tumor activity of bortezomib in vitro and in vivo. These data provide the rationale for continued testing of galectin-3C towards initiation of clinical trials for treatment of MM.

  17. Tumor growth-inhibitory effect of an angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor (captopril) in a lung cancer xenograft model analyzed using 18F-FDG-PET/CT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakaya, Koji; Otsuka, Hideki; Kondo, Kazuya; Otani, Tamaki; Nagata, Motoi

    2016-02-01

    We administered an angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor (captopril) to mice implanted with a human lung adenocarcinoma epithelial cell line (A549 cells) and investigated the tumor growth-inhibitory effect of captopril from the viewpoint of glucose metabolism using (18)F-fluorodeoxyglucose ((18)F-FDG)-PET/CT. Subcutaneous implantation of A549 cells (1.9×10(6) cells) was carried out in the lower right flank of mice. Fifteen days after the transplantation of A549 cells, mice (six in each group) were treated with captopril (3.0 mg/mouse) or saline (1000 μl/mouse) for 5 days. We performed (18)F-FDG-PET/CT imaging of the mice before and after the treatment and evaluated the degree of (18)F-FDG accumulation in tumors. In both groups (the captopril-administrated and control groups), values for the metabolic tumor volume (MTV), maximum standardized uptake value, total lesion glycolysis, and tumor volume after treatment had a tendency to increase. However, tumor growth was suppressed in the captopril-administrated group compared with the control group. In terms of the growth rate, the MTV and tumor volume were significantly different (Pcaptopril exerted a potential tumor growth-inhibitory effect; this was because the captopril-administrated group showed low values of MTV, maximum standardized uptake value, total lesion glycolysis, and tumor volume in comparison with the control group.

  18. CD248 facilitates tumor growth via its cytoplasmic domain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janssens Tom

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Stromal fibroblasts participate in the development of a permissive environment for tumor growth, yet molecular pathways to therapeutically target fibroblasts are poorly defined. CD248, also known as endosialin or tumor endothelial marker 1 (TEM1, is a transmembrane glycoprotein expressed on activated fibroblasts. We recently showed that the cytoplasmic domain of CD248 is important in facilitating an inflammatory response in a mouse model of arthritis. Others have reported that CD248 gene inactivation in mice results in dampened tumor growth. We hypothesized that the conserved cytoplasmic domain of CD248 is important in regulating tumor growth. Methods Mice lacking the cytoplasmic domain of CD248 (CD248CyD/CyD were generated and evaluated in tumor models, comparing the findings with wild-type mice (CD248WT/WT. Results As compared to the response in CD248WT/WT mice, growth of T241 fibrosarcomas and Lewis lung carcinomas was significantly reduced in CD248CyD/CyD mice. Tumor size was similar to that seen with CD248-deficient mice. Conditioned media from CD248CyD/CyD fibroblasts were less effective at supporting T241 fibrosarcoma cell survival. In addition to our previous observation of reduced release of activated matrix metalloproteinase (MMP-9, CD248CyD/CyD fibroblasts also had impaired PDGF-BB-induced migration and expressed higher transcripts of tumor suppressor factors, transgelin (SM22α, Hes and Hey1. Conclusions The multiple pathways regulated by the cytoplasmic domain of CD248 highlight its potential as a therapeutic target to treat cancer.

  19. Ultrasound and Microbubble Mediated Doxil Delivery in a Murine Breast Cancer Model: Therapeutic Efficacy Dependence on Tumor Growth Rate

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Seip, R.; Leyvi, E.; Raju, B.I.; Shi, W.T.; Bohmer, M.R.; Chlon, C.H.T.; Sio, C.F.; Reibling, K.; Swanson, T.

    2011-01-01

    Background, Motivation and Objective: Localized drug delivery couldimprove the therapeutic efficacy for treatment of pathological lesions and reduce toxic exposure to healthy organs and tissues. The objective is to develop image-guided, ultrasound-activated tumor chemotherapy with intravenously

  20. The second-generation ALK inhibitor alectinib effectively induces apoptosis in human neuroblastoma cells and inhibits tumor growth in a TH-MYCN transgenic neuroblastoma mouse model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Jiaxiong; Guan, Shan; Zhao, Yanling; Yu, Yang; Woodfield, Sarah E; Zhang, Huiyuan; Yang, Kristine L; Bieerkehazhi, Shayahati; Qi, Lin; Li, Xiaonan; Gu, Jerry; Xu, Xin; Jin, Jingling; Muscal, Jodi A; Yang, Tianshu; Xu, Guo-Tong; Yang, Jianhua

    2017-08-01

    Activating germline mutations of anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) occur in most cases of hereditary neuroblastoma (NB) and the constitutively active kinase activity of ALK promotes cell proliferation and survival in NB. Therefore, ALK kinase is a potential therapeutic target for NB. In this study, we show that the novel ALK inhibitor alectinib effectively suppressed cell proliferation and induces apoptosis in NB cell lines with either wild-type ALK or mutated ALK (F1174L and D1091N) by blocking ALK-mediated PI3K/Akt/mTOR signaling. In addition, alectinib enhanced doxorubicin-induced cytotoxicity and apoptosis in NB cells. Furthermore, alectinib induced apoptosis in an orthotopic xenograft NB mouse model. Also, in the TH-MYCN transgenic mouse model, alectinib resulted in decreased tumor growth and prolonged survival time. These results indicate that alectinib may be a promising therapeutic agent for the treatment of NB. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Modeling tumor invasion and metastasis in Drosophila

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wayne O. Miles

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Conservation of major signaling pathways between humans and flies has made Drosophila a useful model organism for cancer research. Our understanding of the mechanisms regulating cell growth, differentiation and development has been considerably advanced by studies in Drosophila. Several recent high profile studies have examined the processes constraining the metastatic growth of tumor cells in fruit fly models. Cell invasion can be studied in the context of an in vivo setting in flies, enabling the genetic requirements of the microenvironment of tumor cells undergoing metastasis to be analyzed. This Perspective discusses the strengths and limitations of Drosophila models of cancer invasion and the unique tools that have enabled these studies. It also highlights several recent reports that together make a strong case for Drosophila as a system with the potential for both testing novel concepts in tumor progression and cell invasion, and for uncovering players in metastasis.

  2. Impact of carbohydrate restriction in the context of obesity on prostate tumor growth in the Hi-Myc transgenic mouse model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allott, E H; Macias, E; Sanders, S; Knudsen, B S; Thomas, G V; Hursting, S D; Freedland, S J

    2017-06-01

    Previously, we showed that carbohydrate restriction with calorie restriction slowed tumor growth in xenograft mouse prostate cancer models. Herein, we examined the impact of carbohydrate restriction without calorie restriction on tumor development within the context of diet-induced obesity in the Hi-Myc transgenic mouse model of prostate cancer. Mice were randomized at 5 weeks of age to ad libitum western diet (WD; 40% fat, 42% carbohydrate; n=39) or ad libitum no carbohydrate ketogenic diet (NCKD; 82% fat, 1% carbohydrate; n=44). At age 3 or 6 months, mice were killed, prostates weighed and prostate histology, proliferation, apoptosis and macrophage infiltration evaluated by hematoxylin and eosin, Ki67, TUNEL and F4/80 staining, respectively. Body composition was assessed by DEXA, serum cytokines measured using multiplex, and Akt/mTOR signaling assessed by Western. Caloric intake was higher in the NCKD group, resulting in elevated body weights at 6 months of age, relative to the WD group (45 g vs 38g; P=0.008). Despite elevated body weights, serum monocyte chemoattractant protein (MCP)-1 and interleukin (IL)-1α levels were lower in NCKD versus WD mice (P=0.046 and P=0.118, respectively), and macrophage infiltration was reduced in prostates of NCKD versus WD mice (P=0.028). Relative Akt phosphorylation and phospho-S6 ribosomal protein levels were reduced in prostates of NCKD versus WD mice. However, while mice randomized to NCKD had smaller prostates after adjustment for body weight at 3 and 6 months (P=0.004 and P=0.002, respectively), NCKD mice had higher rates of adenocarcinoma at 6 months compared to WD mice (100 vs 80%, P=0.04). Despite higher caloric intake and elevated body weights, carbohydrate restriction lowered serum MCP-1 levels, reduced prostate macrophage infiltration, reduced prostate weight, but failed to slow adenocarcinoma development. Together, these data suggest that although carbohydrate restriction within the context of obesity may reduce

  3. T cell receptor (TCR-transgenic CD8 lymphocytes rendered insensitive to transforming growth factor beta (TGFβ signaling mediate superior tumor regression in an animal model of adoptive cell therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Quatromoni Jon G

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Tumor antigen-reactive T cells must enter into an immunosuppressive tumor microenvironment, continue to produce cytokine and deliver apoptotic death signals to affect tumor regression. Many tumors produce transforming growth factor beta (TGFβ, which inhibits T cell activation, proliferation and cytotoxicity. In a murine model of adoptive cell therapy, we demonstrate that transgenic Pmel-1 CD8 T cells, rendered insensitive to TGFβ by transduction with a TGFβ dominant negative receptor II (DN, were more effective in mediating regression of established B16 melanoma. Smaller numbers of DN Pmel-1 T cells effectively mediated tumor regression and retained the ability to produce interferon-γ in the tumor microenvironment. These results support efforts to incorporate this DN receptor in clinical trials of adoptive cell therapy for cancer.

  4. Prostate Tumor Growth and Recurrence Can Be Modulated by the ω-6:ω-3 Ratio in Diet: Athymic Mouse Xenograft Model Simulating Radical Prostatectomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uddhav P. Kelavkar

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available Evidence indicates that a diet rich in omega (ω-6 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs [e.g., linoleic acid (LA] increases prostate cancer (PCa risk, whereas a diet rich in ω-3 decreases risk. Precisely how these PUFAs affect disease development remains unclear. So we examined the roles that PUFAs play in PCa, and we determined if increased ω-3 consumption can impede tumor growth. We previously demonstrated an increased expression of an ω-6 LA-metabolizing enzyme, 15-lipoxygenase-1 (15-LO-1, ALOX15, in prostate tumor tissue compared with normal adjacent prostate tissue, and that elevated 15-LO-1 activity in PCa cells has a protumorigenic effect. A PCa cell line, Los Angeles Prostate Cancer-4 (LAPC-4, expresses prostate-specific antigen (PSA as well an active 15-LO-1 enzyme. Therefore, to study whether or not the protumorigenic role of 15-LO-1 and dietary ω-6 LA can be modulated by altering ω-3 levels through diet, we surgically removed tumors caused by LAPC-4 cells (mouse model to simulate radical prostatectomy. Mice were then randomly divided into three different diet groups—namely, high ω-6 LA, high ω-3 stearidonic acid (SDA, and no fat—and examined the effects of ω-6 and ω-3 fatty acids in diet on LAPC-4 tumor recurrence by monitoring for PSA. Mice in these diet groups were monitored for food consumption, body weight, and serum PSA indicative of the presence of LAPC-4 cells. Fatty acid methyl esters from erythrocyte membranes were examined for ω-6 and ω-3 levels to reflect long-term dietary intake. Our results provide evidence that prostate tumors can be modulated by the manipulation of ω-6:ω-3 ratios through diet and that the ω-3 fatty acid SDA [precursor of eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA] promotes apoptosis and decreases proliferation in cancer cells, causing decreased PSA doubling time, compared to ω-6 LA fatty acid, likely by competing with the enzymes of LA and AA pathways, namely, 15-LO-1 and cyclooxygenases (COXs. Thus

  5. Multiple gingival pregnancy tumors with rapid growth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei-Lian Sun

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Pregnancy gingivitis is an acute form of gingivitis that affects pregnant women, with a prevalence of 30%, possibly ranging up to 100%. Sometimes, pregnancy gingivitis shows a tendency toward a localized hyperplasia called gingival pyogenic granuloma. Pregnancy tumor is a benign gingival hyperplasia with the gingiva as the most commonly involved site, but rarely it involves almost the entire gingiva. A 22-year-old woman was referred to our clinic with a chief complaint of gingival swelling that had lasted for 2 days. The lesions progressed rapidly and extensively, and almost all the gingiva was involved a week later. Generalized erythema, edema, hyperplasia, a hemorrhagic tendency, and several typical hemangiomatous masses were noted. Pregnancy was denied by the patient at the first and second visits, but was confirmed 2 weeks after the primary visit. The patient was given oral hygiene instructions. She recovered well, and the mass gradually regressed and had disappeared completely at the end of 12 weeks of pregnancy, without recurrence. The gingival lesions were finally diagnosed as multiple gingival pregnancy tumors. The patient delivered a healthy infant. An extensive and rapid growth of gingival pregnancy tumors during the early first month of pregnancy is a rare occurrence that is not familiar to dentists, gynecologists, and obstetricians. Those practitioners engaged in oral medicine and periodontology, primary care obstetrics, and gynecology should be aware of such gingival lesions to avoid misdiagnosis and overtreatment.

  6. Intravital imaging of plasticity during tumor growth and metastasis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zomer, Anoek

    2015-01-01

    Most tumors consist of a heterogeneous mixture of genetically and epigenetically distinct tumor cells. In addition, tumors display regional differences in the tumor microenvironment comprising non-transformed cell types such as immune cells and non-cellular factors including growth factors and the

  7. Computational model of tumor growth for cell line MCF7 of multicellular sheroids; Modelo computacional de crecimiento tumoral para la linea celular MCF7 de esferoides multicelulares

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruiz-Arrebola, S.; Tornero-Lopez, A. M.; Guirado, D.; Aranda, M.; Villalobos, M.; Lallena, A. M.

    2013-07-01

    The ultimate goal is a computational model that will allow us to overcome the ethical constraints that exist for the realization of certain clinical trials, since putting up compromise the quality of treating real patients. Thus, for the study of important problems of Oncology, perhaps the last resort is the virtual simulation of the effects of certain forms of therapy. (Author)

  8. A novel BLK-induced tumor model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, David Leander; Berthelsen, Jens; Willerslev-Olsen, Andreas

    2017-01-01

    -hematological malignancies including breast, kidney, and lung cancers, suggesting that BLK could be a new potential target for therapy. Here, we studied the oncogenic potential of human BLK. We found that engrafted Ba/F3 cells stably expressing constitutive active human BLK formed tumors in mice, whereas neither Ba/F3 cells...... expressing wild type BLK nor non-transfected Ba/F3 cells did. Inhibition of BLK with the clinical grade and broadly reacting SRC family kinase inhibitor dasatinib inhibited growth of BLK-induced tumors. In conclusion, our study provides evidence that human BLK is a true proto-oncogene capable of inducing...... tumors, and we demonstrate a novel BLK activity-dependent tumor model suitable for studies of BLK-driven lymphomagenesis and screening of novel BLK inhibitors in vivo....

  9. HMGA1 Expression in Human Hepatocellular Carcinoma Correlates with Poor Prognosis and Promotes Tumor Growth and Migration in in vitro Models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andreozzi, Mariacarla; Quintavalle, Cristina; Benz, David; Quagliata, Luca; Matter, Matthias; Calabrese, Diego; Tosti, Nadia; Ruiz, Christian; Trapani, Francesca; Tornillo, Luigi; Fusco, Alfredo; Heim, Markus H; Ng, Charlotte Ky; Pallante, Pierlorenzo; Terracciano, Luigi M; Piscuoglio, Salvatore

    2016-12-01

    HMGA1 is a non-histone nuclear protein that regulates cellular proliferation, invasion and apoptosis and is overexpressed in many carcinomas. In this study we sought to explore the expression of HMGA1 in HCCs and cirrhotic tissues, and its effect in in vitro models. We evaluated HMGA1 expression using gene expression microarrays (59 HCCs, of which 37 were matched with their corresponding cirrhotic tissue and 5 normal liver donors) and tissue microarray (192 HCCs, 108 cirrhotic tissues and 79 normal liver samples). HMGA1 expression was correlated with clinicopathologic features and patient outcome. Four liver cancer cell lines with stable induced or knockdown expression of HMGA1 were characterized using in vitro assays, including proliferation, migration and anchorage-independent growth. HMGA1 expression increased monotonically from normal liver tissues to cirrhotic tissue to HCC (P<.01) and was associated with Edmondson grade (P<.01). Overall, 51% and 42% of HCCs and cirrhotic tissues expressed HMGA1, respectively. Patients with HMGA1-positive HCCs had earlier disease progression and worse overall survival. Forced expression of HMGA1 in liver cancer models resulted in increased cell growth and migration, and vice versa. Soft agar assay showed that forced expression of HMGA1 led to increased foci formation, suggesting an oncogenic role of HMGA1 in hepatocarcinogenesis. HMGA1 is frequently expressed in cirrhotic tissues and HCCs and its expression is associated with high Edmondson grade and worse prognosis in HCC. Our results suggest that HMGA1 may act as oncogenic driver of progression, implicating it in tumor growth and migration potential in liver carcinogenesis. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. A polymeric nanoparticle formulation of curcumin in combination with sorafenib synergistically inhibits tumor growth and metastasis in an orthotopic model of human hepatocellular carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hu, Bo [Department of Liver Surgery, Liver Cancer Institute, Zhongshan Hospital, Fudan University, Key Laboratory of Carcinogenesis and Cancer Invasion, Ministry of Education, Shanghai, 200032 (China); Sun, Ding [Department of Liver Surgery, Liver Cancer Institute, Zhongshan Hospital, Fudan University, Key Laboratory of Carcinogenesis and Cancer Invasion, Ministry of Education, Shanghai, 200032 (China); Department of Hepatobiliary Surgery, First Affiliated Hospital of Soochow University, Suzhou, 215004 (China); Sun, Chao; Sun, Yun-Fan; Sun, Hai-Xiang [Department of Liver Surgery, Liver Cancer Institute, Zhongshan Hospital, Fudan University, Key Laboratory of Carcinogenesis and Cancer Invasion, Ministry of Education, Shanghai, 200032 (China); Zhu, Qing-Feng [The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Division of Gastrointestinal and Liver Pathology, Baltimore, MD, 21205 (United States); Institute of Biomedical Sciences, Fudan University, Shanghai, 200032 (China); Yang, Xin-Rong [Department of Liver Surgery, Liver Cancer Institute, Zhongshan Hospital, Fudan University, Key Laboratory of Carcinogenesis and Cancer Invasion, Ministry of Education, Shanghai, 200032 (China); Gao, Ya-Bo [Department of Radiation Oncology, Zhongshan Hospital, Fudan University, Shanghai, 200032 (China); Tang, Wei-Guo [Department of Liver Surgery, Liver Cancer Institute, Zhongshan Hospital, Fudan University, Key Laboratory of Carcinogenesis and Cancer Invasion, Ministry of Education, Shanghai, 200032 (China); Fan, Jia [Department of Liver Surgery, Liver Cancer Institute, Zhongshan Hospital, Fudan University, Key Laboratory of Carcinogenesis and Cancer Invasion, Ministry of Education, Shanghai, 200032 (China); Institute of Biomedical Sciences, Fudan University, Shanghai, 200032 (China); Maitra, Anirban [The Sol Goldman Pancreatic Cancer Research Center, Departments of Oncology, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD, 21205 (United States); and others

    2015-12-25

    Curcumin, a yellow polyphenol extracted from the rhizome of turmeric root (Curcuma longa) has potent anti-cancer properties in many types of tumors with ability to reverse multidrug resistance of cancer cells. However, widespread clinical application of this agent in cancer and other diseases has been limited due to its poor aqueous solubility. The recent findings of polymeric nanoparticle formulation of curcumin (NFC) have shown the potential for circumventing the problem of poor solubility, however evidences for NFC's anti-cancer and reverse multidrug resistance properties are lacking. Here we provide models of human hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), the most common form of primary liver cancer, in vitro and in vivo to evaluate the efficacy of NFC alone and in combination with sorafenib, a kinase inhibitor approved for treatment of HCC. Results showed that NFC not only inhibited the proliferation and invasion of HCC cell lines in vitro, but also drastically suppressed primary tumor growth and lung metastases in vivo. Moreover, in combination with sorafenib, NFC induced HCC cell apoptosis and cell cycle arrest. Mechanistically, NFC and sorafenib synergistically down-regulated the expression of MMP9 via NF-κB/p65 signaling pathway. Furthermore, the combination therapy significantly decreased the population of CD133-positive HCC cells, which have been reported as cancer initiating cells in HCC. Taken together, NanoCurcumin provides an opportunity to expand the clinical repertoire of this agent. Additional studies utilizing a combination of NanoCurcumin and sorafenib in HCC are needed for further clinical development. - Highlights: • Polymeric nanoparticle formulation of curcumin not only inhibited the proliferation and invasion of HCC cell lines in vitro, but also drastically suppressed primary tumor growth and lung metastases in vivo. • In combination with sorafenib, NanoCurcumin induced HCC cell apoptosis and cell cycle arrest. • NanoCurcumin and

  11. A polymeric nanoparticle formulation of curcumin in combination with sorafenib synergistically inhibits tumor growth and metastasis in an orthotopic model of human hepatocellular carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hu, Bo; Sun, Ding; Sun, Chao; Sun, Yun-Fan; Sun, Hai-Xiang; Zhu, Qing-Feng; Yang, Xin-Rong; Gao, Ya-Bo; Tang, Wei-Guo; Fan, Jia; Maitra, Anirban

    2015-01-01

    Curcumin, a yellow polyphenol extracted from the rhizome of turmeric root (Curcuma longa) has potent anti-cancer properties in many types of tumors with ability to reverse multidrug resistance of cancer cells. However, widespread clinical application of this agent in cancer and other diseases has been limited due to its poor aqueous solubility. The recent findings of polymeric nanoparticle formulation of curcumin (NFC) have shown the potential for circumventing the problem of poor solubility, however evidences for NFC's anti-cancer and reverse multidrug resistance properties are lacking. Here we provide models of human hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), the most common form of primary liver cancer, in vitro and in vivo to evaluate the efficacy of NFC alone and in combination with sorafenib, a kinase inhibitor approved for treatment of HCC. Results showed that NFC not only inhibited the proliferation and invasion of HCC cell lines in vitro, but also drastically suppressed primary tumor growth and lung metastases in vivo. Moreover, in combination with sorafenib, NFC induced HCC cell apoptosis and cell cycle arrest. Mechanistically, NFC and sorafenib synergistically down-regulated the expression of MMP9 via NF-κB/p65 signaling pathway. Furthermore, the combination therapy significantly decreased the population of CD133-positive HCC cells, which have been reported as cancer initiating cells in HCC. Taken together, NanoCurcumin provides an opportunity to expand the clinical repertoire of this agent. Additional studies utilizing a combination of NanoCurcumin and sorafenib in HCC are needed for further clinical development. - Highlights: • Polymeric nanoparticle formulation of curcumin not only inhibited the proliferation and invasion of HCC cell lines in vitro, but also drastically suppressed primary tumor growth and lung metastases in vivo. • In combination with sorafenib, NanoCurcumin induced HCC cell apoptosis and cell cycle arrest. • NanoCurcumin and

  12. Vascular endothelial growth factor-D over-expressing tumor cells induce differential effects on uterine vasculature in a mouse model of endometrial cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Background It has been hypothesised that increased VEGF-D expression may be an independent prognostic factor for endometrial cancer progression and lymph node metastasis; however, the mechanism by which VEGF-D may promote disease progression in women with endometrial cancer has not been investigated. Our aim was to describe the distribution of lymphatic vessels in mouse uterus and to examine the effect of VEGF-D over-expression on these vessels in a model of endometrial cancer. We hypothesised that VEGF-D over-expression would stimulate growth of new lymphatic vessels into the endometrium, thereby contributing to cancer progression. Methods We initially described the distribution of lymphatic vessels (Lyve-1, podoplanin, VEGFR-3) and VEGF-D expression in the mouse uterus during the estrous cycle, early pregnancy and in response to estradiol-17beta and progesterone using immunohistochemistry. We also examined the effects of VEGF-D over-expression on uterine vasculature by inoculating uterine horns in NOD SCID mice with control or VEGF-D-expressing 293EBNA tumor cells. Results Lymphatic vessels positive for the lymphatic endothelial cell markers Lyve-1, podoplanin and VEGFR-3 profiles were largely restricted to the connective tissue between the myometrial circular and longitudinal muscle layers; very few lymphatic vessel profiles were observed in the endometrium. VEGF-D immunostaining was present in all uterine compartments (epithelium, stroma, myometrium), although expression was generally low. VEGF-D immunoexpression was slightly but significantly higher in estrus relative to diestrus; and in estradiol-17beta treated mice relative to vehicle or progesterone treated mice. The presence of VEGF-D over-expressing tumor cells did not induce endometrial lymphangiogenesis, although changes were observed in existing vessel profiles. For myometrial lymphatic and endometrial blood vessels, the percentage of profiles containing proliferating endothelial cells, and the cross

  13. Vascular endothelial growth factor-D over-expressing tumor cells induce differential effects on uterine vasculature in a mouse model of endometrial cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stacker Steven A

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background It has been hypothesised that increased VEGF-D expression may be an independent prognostic factor for endometrial cancer progression and lymph node metastasis; however, the mechanism by which VEGF-D may promote disease progression in women with endometrial cancer has not been investigated. Our aim was to describe the distribution of lymphatic vessels in mouse uterus and to examine the effect of VEGF-D over-expression on these vessels in a model of endometrial cancer. We hypothesised that VEGF-D over-expression would stimulate growth of new lymphatic vessels into the endometrium, thereby contributing to cancer progression. Methods We initially described the distribution of lymphatic vessels (Lyve-1, podoplanin, VEGFR-3 and VEGF-D expression in the mouse uterus during the estrous cycle, early pregnancy and in response to estradiol-17beta and progesterone using immunohistochemistry. We also examined the effects of VEGF-D over-expression on uterine vasculature by inoculating uterine horns in NOD SCID mice with control or VEGF-D-expressing 293EBNA tumor cells. Results Lymphatic vessels positive for the lymphatic endothelial cell markers Lyve-1, podoplanin and VEGFR-3 profiles were largely restricted to the connective tissue between the myometrial circular and longitudinal muscle layers; very few lymphatic vessel profiles were observed in the endometrium. VEGF-D immunostaining was present in all uterine compartments (epithelium, stroma, myometrium, although expression was generally low. VEGF-D immunoexpression was slightly but significantly higher in estrus relative to diestrus; and in estradiol-17beta treated mice relative to vehicle or progesterone treated mice. The presence of VEGF-D over-expressing tumor cells did not induce endometrial lymphangiogenesis, although changes were observed in existing vessel profiles. For myometrial lymphatic and endometrial blood vessels, the percentage of profiles containing proliferating

  14. Combination of vatalanib and a 20-HETE synthesis inhibitor results in decreased tumor growth in an animal model of human glioma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shankar A

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Adarsh Shankar,1 Thaiz F Borin,2 Asm Iskander,1 Nadimpalli RS Varma,3 Bhagelu R Achyut,1 Meenu Jain,1 Tom Mikkelsen,4 Austin M Guo,5 Wilson B Chwang,3 James R Ewing,6 Hassan Bagher-Ebadian,6 Ali S Arbab11Tumor Angiogenesis Laboratory, Cancer Center, Georgia Regents University, Augusta, GA, USA; 2Laboratory of Molecular Investigation of Cancer (LIMC, Faculty of Medicine of Sao Jose do Rio Preto, Sao Jose do Rio Preto, Brazil; 3Department of Radiology, Cellular and Molecular Imaging Laboratory, 4Department of Neurosurgery, Henry Ford Health System, Detroit, MI, 5Department of Pharmacology, New York Medical College, Valhalla, NY, 6Department of Neurology and Radiology, Henry Ford Health System, Detroit, MI, USA Background: Due to the hypervascular nature of glioblastoma (GBM, antiangiogenic treatments, such as vatalanib, have been added as an adjuvant to control angiogenesis and tumor growth. However, evidence of progressive tumor growth and resistance to antiangiogenic treatment has been observed. To counter the unwanted effect of vatalanib on GBM growth, we have added a new agent known as N-hydroxy-N'-(4-butyl-2 methylphenylformamidine (HET0016, which is a selective inhibitor of 20-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid (20-HETE synthesis. The aims of the studies were to determine 1 whether the addition of HET0016 can attenuate the unwanted effect of vatalanib on tumor growth and 2 whether the treatment schedule would have a crucial impact on controlling GBM.Methods: U251 human glioma cells (4×105 were implanted orthotopically. Two different treatment schedules were investigated. Treatment starting on day 8 (8–21 days treatment of the tumor implantation was to mimic treatment following detection of tumor, where tumor would have hypoxic microenvironment and well-developed neovascularization. Drug treatment starting on the same day of tumor implantation (0–21 days treatment was to mimic cases following radiation therapy or surgery. There were four

  15. Cytotoxic T lymphocyte-dependent tumor growth inhibition by a vascular endothelial growth factor–superantigen conjugate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun, Qingwen; Jiang, Songmin; Han, Baohui; Sun, Tongwen; Li, Zhengnan; Zhao, Lina; Gao, Qiang; Sun, Jialin

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► We construct and purify a fusion protein VEGF–SEA. ► VEGF–SEA strongly repressed the growth of murine solid sarcoma 180 (S180) tumors. ► T cells driven by VEGF–SEA were accumulated around tumor cells bearing VEGFR by mice image model. ► VEGF–SEA can serve as a tumor targeting agent and sequester CTLs into the tumor site. ► The induced CTLs could release the cytokines, perforins and granzyme B to kill the tumor cells. -- Abstract: T cells are major lymphocytes in the blood and passengers across the tumor vasculature. If these T cells are retained in the tumor site, a therapeutic potential will be gained by turning them into tumor-reactive cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs). A fusion protein composed of human vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and staphylococcal enterotoxin A (SEA) with a D227A mutation strongly repressed the growth of murine solid sarcoma 180 (S180) tumors (control versus VEGF–SEA treated with 15 μg, mean tumor weight: 1.128 g versus 0.252 g, difference = 0.876 g). CD4 + and CD8 + T cells driven by VEGF–SEA were accumulated around VEGFR expressing tumor cells and the induced CTLs could release the tumoricidal cytokines, such as interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma) and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha). Meanwhile, intratumoral CTLs secreted cytolytic pore-forming perforin and granzyme B proteins around tumor cells, leading to the death of tumor cells. The labeled fusion proteins were gradually targeted to the tumor site in an imaging mice model. These results show that VEGF–SEA can serve as a tumor targeting agent and sequester active infiltrating CTLs into the tumor site to kill tumor cells, and could therefore be a potential therapeutical drug for a variety of cancers.

  16. Cytotoxic T lymphocyte-dependent tumor growth inhibition by a vascular endothelial growth factor-superantigen conjugate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun, Qingwen [Shanghai Chest Hospital, Shanghai 200433 (China); State Key Laboratory of Genetic Engineering, Fudan University, Shanghai 200433 (China); Jiang, Songmin [State Key Laboratory of Genetic Engineering, Fudan University, Shanghai 200433 (China); Han, Baohui [Shanghai Chest Hospital, Shanghai 200433 (China); Sun, Tongwen [Wuhan Junyu Innovation Pharmaceuticals, Inc., Wuhan 430079 (China); Li, Zhengnan; Zhao, Lina; Gao, Qiang [College of Biotechnology, Tianjin University of Science and Technology, Tianjin 300457 (China); Sun, Jialin, E-mail: jialin_sun@126.com [Wuhan Junyu Innovation Pharmaceuticals, Inc., Wuhan 430079 (China)

    2012-11-02

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We construct and purify a fusion protein VEGF-SEA. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer VEGF-SEA strongly repressed the growth of murine solid sarcoma 180 (S180) tumors. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer T cells driven by VEGF-SEA were accumulated around tumor cells bearing VEGFR by mice image model. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer VEGF-SEA can serve as a tumor targeting agent and sequester CTLs into the tumor site. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The induced CTLs could release the cytokines, perforins and granzyme B to kill the tumor cells. -- Abstract: T cells are major lymphocytes in the blood and passengers across the tumor vasculature. If these T cells are retained in the tumor site, a therapeutic potential will be gained by turning them into tumor-reactive cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs). A fusion protein composed of human vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and staphylococcal enterotoxin A (SEA) with a D227A mutation strongly repressed the growth of murine solid sarcoma 180 (S180) tumors (control versus VEGF-SEA treated with 15 {mu}g, mean tumor weight: 1.128 g versus 0.252 g, difference = 0.876 g). CD4{sup +} and CD8{sup +} T cells driven by VEGF-SEA were accumulated around VEGFR expressing tumor cells and the induced CTLs could release the tumoricidal cytokines, such as interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma) and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha). Meanwhile, intratumoral CTLs secreted cytolytic pore-forming perforin and granzyme B proteins around tumor cells, leading to the death of tumor cells. The labeled fusion proteins were gradually targeted to the tumor site in an imaging mice model. These results show that VEGF-SEA can serve as a tumor targeting agent and sequester active infiltrating CTLs into the tumor site to kill tumor cells, and could therefore be a potential therapeutical drug for a variety of cancers.

  17. [Markers of angiogenesis in tumor growth].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nefedova, N A; Kharlova, O A; Danilova, N V; Malkov, P G; Gaifullin, N M

    2016-01-01

    Angiogenesis is a process of new blood vessels formation. The role of angiogenesis in growth, invasion and metastasis of malignant tumours is nowdays universally recognized. Though, investigation of mechanisms of blood vessels formation and elaboration methods for assessment of tumour angiogenesis are still up-dated. Another important concern are different aspects of usage of immunohistochemical markers of blood vessels endothelium (CD31 and CD34) for assessment of tumour aggressiveness and prognosis. The problems of malignant lymphangiogenesis are also up-to-date. The focus is on methods of immunohistochemical visualization of forming lymphatic vessels, role of podoplanin, the most reliable marker of lymphatic vessels, in their identification, and formulization of the main criteria for lymphangiogenesis estimation, its correlation with metastatic activity and prognostic potential. Studying of angiogenesis and lymph angiogenesis in malignant tumors is important and challenging direction for researching tumour progression and invention of antiangiogenic therapy.

  18. The Role of Complement in Tumor Growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pio, Ruben; Corrales, Leticia; Lambris, John D.

    2015-01-01

    Complement is a central part of the immune system that has developed as a first defense against non-self cells. Neoplastic transformation is accompanied by an increased capacity of the malignant cells to activate complement. In fact, clinical data demonstrate complement activation in cancer patients. On the basis of the use of protective mechanisms by malignant cells, complement activation has traditionally been considered part of the body's immunosurveillance against cancer. Inhibitory mechanisms of complement activation allow cancer cells to escape from complement-mediated elimination and hamper the clinical efficacy of monoclonal antibody–based cancer immunotherapies. To overcome this limitation, many strategies have been developed with the goal of improving complement-mediated effector mechanisms. However, significant work in recent years has identified new and surprising roles for complement activation within the tumor microenvironment. Recent reports suggest that complement elements can promote tumor growth in the context of chronic inflammation. This chapter reviews the data describing the role of complement activation in cancer immunity, which offers insights that may aid the development of more effective therapeutic approaches to control cancer. PMID:24272362

  19. Stromal Cell-Derived Factor-1 Promotes Cell Migration, Tumor Growth of Colorectal Metastasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Otto Kollmar

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available In a mouse model of established extrahepatic colorectal metastasis, we analyzed whether stromal cellderived factor (SDF 1 stimulates tumor cell migration in vitro, angiogenesis, tumor growth in vivo. METHODS: Using chemotaxis chambers, CT26.WT colorectal tumor cell migration was studied under stimulation with different concentrations of SDF-1. To evaluate angiogenesis, tumor growth in vivo, green fluorescent protein-transfected CT26.WT cells were implanted in dorsal skinfold chambers of syngeneic BALB/c mice. After 5 days, tumors were locally exposed to SDF-1. Cell proliferation, tumor microvascularization, growth were studied during a further 9-day period using intravital fluorescence microscopy, histology, immunohistochemistry. Tumors exposed to PBS only served as controls. RESULTS:In vitro, > 30% of unstimulated CT26.WT cells showed expression of the SDF-1 receptor CXCR4. On chemotaxis assay, SDF-1 provoked a dose-dependent increase in cell migration. In vivo, SDF-1 accelerated neovascularization, induced a significant increase in tumor growth. Capillaries of SDF-1-treated tumors showed significant dilation. Of interest, SDF-1 treatment was associated with a significantly increased expression of proliferating cell nuclear antigen, a downregulation of cleaved caspase-3. CONCLUSION: Our study indicates that the CXC chemokine SDF-1 promotes tumor cell migration in vitro, tumor growth of established extrahepatic metastasis in vivo due to angiogenesis-dependent induction of tumor cell proliferation, inhibition of apoptotic cell death.

  20. Endothelial Dll4 overexpression reduces vascular response and inhibits tumor growth and metastasization in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trindade, Alexandre; Djokovic, Dusan; Gigante, Joana; Mendonça, Liliana; Duarte, António

    2017-03-14

    The inhibition of Delta-like 4 (Dll4)/Notch signaling has been shown to result in excessive, nonfunctional vessel proliferation and significant tumor growth suppression. However, safety concerns emerged with the identification of side effects resulting from chronic Dll4/Notch blockade. Alternatively, we explored the endothelial Dll4 overexpression using different mouse tumor models. We used a transgenic mouse model of endothelial-specific Dll4 overexpression, previously produced. Growth kinetics and vascular histopathology of several types of solid tumors was evaluated, namely Lewis Lung Carcinoma xenografts, chemically-induced skin papillomas and RIP1-Tag2 insulinomas. We found that increased Dll4/Notch signaling reduces tumor growth by reducing vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)-induced endothelial proliferation, tumor vessel density and overall tumor blood supply. In addition, Dll4 overexpression consistently improved tumor vascular maturation and functionality, as indicated by increased vessel calibers, enhanced mural cell recruitment and increased network perfusion. Importantly, the tumor vessel normalization is not more effective than restricted vessel proliferation, but was found to prevent metastasis formation and allow for increased delivery to the tumor of concomitant chemotherapy, improving its efficacy. By reducing endothelial sensitivity to VEGF, these results imply that Dll4/Notch stimulation in tumor microenvironment could be beneficial to solid cancer patient treatment by reducing primary tumor size, improving tumor drug delivery and reducing metastization. Endothelial specific Dll4 overexpression thus appears as a promising anti-angiogenic modality that might improve cancer control.

  1. Senescence from glioma stem cell differentiation promotes tumor growth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ouchi, Rie [Division of Molecular Biotherapy, Cancer Chemotherapy Center, Japanese Foundation for Cancer Research, 3-8-31 Ariake, Koto-ku, Tokyo 135-8550 (Japan); Laboratory of Molecular Target Therapy of Cancer, Department of Computational Biology and Medical Sciences, Graduate School of Frontier Sciences, The University of Tokyo, 3-8-31 Ariake, Koto-ku, Tokyo 135-8550 (Japan); Okabe, Sachiko; Migita, Toshiro [Division of Molecular Biotherapy, Cancer Chemotherapy Center, Japanese Foundation for Cancer Research, 3-8-31 Ariake, Koto-ku, Tokyo 135-8550 (Japan); Nakano, Ichiro [Department of Neurosurgery, Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of Alabama at Birmingham, 1824 6th Avenue South, Birmingham, AL 35233 (United States); Seimiya, Hiroyuki, E-mail: hseimiya@jfcr.or.jp [Division of Molecular Biotherapy, Cancer Chemotherapy Center, Japanese Foundation for Cancer Research, 3-8-31 Ariake, Koto-ku, Tokyo 135-8550 (Japan); Laboratory of Molecular Target Therapy of Cancer, Department of Computational Biology and Medical Sciences, Graduate School of Frontier Sciences, The University of Tokyo, 3-8-31 Ariake, Koto-ku, Tokyo 135-8550 (Japan)

    2016-02-05

    Glioblastoma (GBM) is a lethal brain tumor composed of heterogeneous cellular populations including glioma stem cells (GSCs) and differentiated non-stem glioma cells (NSGCs). While GSCs are involved in tumor initiation and propagation, NSGCs' role remains elusive. Here, we demonstrate that NSGCs undergo senescence and secrete pro-angiogenic proteins, boosting the GSC-derived tumor formation in vivo. We used a GSC model that maintains stemness in neurospheres, but loses the stemness and differentiates into NSGCs upon serum stimulation. These NSGCs downregulated telomerase, shortened telomeres, and eventually became senescent. The senescent NSGCs released pro-angiogenic proteins, including vascular endothelial growth factors and senescence-associated interleukins, such as IL-6 and IL-8. Conditioned medium from senescent NSGCs promoted proliferation of brain microvascular endothelial cells, and mixed implantation of GSCs and senescent NSGCs into mice enhanced the tumorigenic potential of GSCs. The senescent NSGCs seem to be clinically relevant, because both clinical samples and xenografts of GBM contained tumor cells that expressed the senescence markers. Our data suggest that senescent NSGCs promote malignant progression of GBM in part via paracrine effects of the secreted proteins. - Highlights: • Non-stem glioma cells (NSGCs) lose telomerase and eventually become senescent. • Senescent NSGCs secrete pro-angiogenic proteins, such as VEGFs, IL-6, and IL-8. • Senescent NSGCs enhance the growth of brain microvascular endothelial cells. • Senescent NSGCs enhance the tumorigenic potential of glioma stem cells in vivo.

  2. Senescence from glioma stem cell differentiation promotes tumor growth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ouchi, Rie; Okabe, Sachiko; Migita, Toshiro; Nakano, Ichiro; Seimiya, Hiroyuki

    2016-01-01

    Glioblastoma (GBM) is a lethal brain tumor composed of heterogeneous cellular populations including glioma stem cells (GSCs) and differentiated non-stem glioma cells (NSGCs). While GSCs are involved in tumor initiation and propagation, NSGCs' role remains elusive. Here, we demonstrate that NSGCs undergo senescence and secrete pro-angiogenic proteins, boosting the GSC-derived tumor formation in vivo. We used a GSC model that maintains stemness in neurospheres, but loses the stemness and differentiates into NSGCs upon serum stimulation. These NSGCs downregulated telomerase, shortened telomeres, and eventually became senescent. The senescent NSGCs released pro-angiogenic proteins, including vascular endothelial growth factors and senescence-associated interleukins, such as IL-6 and IL-8. Conditioned medium from senescent NSGCs promoted proliferation of brain microvascular endothelial cells, and mixed implantation of GSCs and senescent NSGCs into mice enhanced the tumorigenic potential of GSCs. The senescent NSGCs seem to be clinically relevant, because both clinical samples and xenografts of GBM contained tumor cells that expressed the senescence markers. Our data suggest that senescent NSGCs promote malignant progression of GBM in part via paracrine effects of the secreted proteins. - Highlights: • Non-stem glioma cells (NSGCs) lose telomerase and eventually become senescent. • Senescent NSGCs secrete pro-angiogenic proteins, such as VEGFs, IL-6, and IL-8. • Senescent NSGCs enhance the growth of brain microvascular endothelial cells. • Senescent NSGCs enhance the tumorigenic potential of glioma stem cells in vivo.

  3. Dynamical analysis of fractional order model of immunogenic tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sadia Arshad

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available In this article, we examine the fractional order model of the cytotoxic T lymphocyte response to a growing tumor cell population. We investigate the long-term behavior of tumor growth and explore the conditions of tumor elimination analytically. We establish the conditions for the tumor-free equilibrium and tumor-infection equilibrium to be asymptotically stable and provide the expression of the basic reproduction number. Existence of physical significant tumor-infection equilibrium points is investigated analytically. We show that tumor growth rate, source rate of immune cells, and death rate of immune cells play vital role in tumor dynamics and system undergoes saddle-node and transcritical bifurcation based on these parameters. Furthermore, the effect of cancer treatment is discussed by varying the values of relevant parameters. Numerical simulations are presented to illustrate the analytical results.

  4. Growth Factors and Breast Tumors, Comparison of Selected Growth Factors with Traditional Tumor Markers

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kučera, R.; Černá, M.; Ňaršanská, A.; Svobodová, Š.; Straková, M.; Vrzalová, J.; Fuchsová, R.; Třešková, I.; Kydlíček, T.; Třeška, V.; Pecen, Ladislav; Topolčan, O.; Padziora, P.

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 31, č. 12 (2011), s. 4653-4656 ISSN 0250-7005 Grant - others:GA MZd(CZ) NS9727; GA MZd(CZ) NS10238; GA MZd(CZ) NS10253 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10300504 Keywords : growth factor * breast cancer * tumor markers * CA 15-3 * CEA * IGF1 * EGF * HGF Subject RIV: FD - Oncology ; Hematology Impact factor: 1.725, year: 2011

  5. Radiographically determined growth kinetics of primary lung tumors in the dog

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perry, R.E.; Weller, R.E.; Buschbom, R.L.; Dagle, G.E.; Park, J.F.

    1989-10-01

    Tumor growth rate patterns especially tumor doubling time (TDT), have been extensively evaluated in man. Studies involving the determination of TDT in humans are limited, however, by the number of cases, time consistent radiographic tumor measurements, and inability to perform experimental procedures. In animals similar constraints do not exist. Lifespan animal models lend themselves well to tumor growth pattern analysis. Experimental studies have been designed to evaluate both the biological effects and growth patterns of induced and spontaneous tumors. The purpose of this study was to calculate the tumor volume doubling times (TCDT) for radiation-induced and spontaneous primary pulmonary neoplasms in dogs to see if differences existed due to etiology, sex or histologic cell type, and to determine if the time of tumor onset could be extrapolated from the TVDT. 3 refs

  6. Epidermal growth factor receptor expression in radiation-induced dog lung tumors by immunocytochemical localization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leung, F.L.; Park, J.F.; Dagle, G.E.

    1993-06-01

    In studies to determine the role of growth factors in radiation-induced lung cancer, epidermal growth factor (EGFR) expression was examined by immunocytochemistry in 51 lung tumors from beagle dogs exposed to inhaled plutonium; 21 of 51 (41%) tumors were positive for EGFR. The traction of tumors positive for EGFR and the histological type of EGFR-positive tumors in the plutonium-exposed dogs were not different from spontaneous dog lung tumors, In which 36% were positive for EGFR. EGFR involvement in Pu-induced lung tumors appeared to be similar to that in spontaneous lung tumors. However, EGFR-positive staining was observed in only 1 of 16 tumors at the three lowest Pu exposure levels, compared to 20 of 35 tumors staining positive at the two highest Pu exposure levels. The results in dogs were in good agreement with the expression of EGFR reported in human non-small cell carcinoma of the lung, suggesting that Pu-induced lung tumors in the dog may be a suitable animal model to investigate the role of EGFR expression in lung carcinogenesis. In humans, EGFR expression in lung tumors has been primarily related to histological tumor types. In individual dogs with multiple primary lung tumors, the tumors were either all EGFR positive or EGFR negative, suggesting that EGFR expression may be related to the response of the individual dog as well as to the histological type of tumor.

  7. The anti-tumor effect of the quinoline-3-carboxamide tasquinimod: blockade of recruitment of CD11b+ Ly6Chi cells to tumor tissue reduces tumor growth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deronic, Adnan; Leanderson, Tomas; Ivars, Fredrik

    2016-01-01

    Previous work has demonstrated immunomodulatory, anti-tumor, anti-metastatic and anti-angiogenic effects of the small molecule quinoline-3-carboxamide tasquinimod in pre-clinical cancer models. To better understand the anti-tumor effects of tasquinimod in transplantable tumor models, we have evaluated the impact of the compound both on recruitment of myeloid cells to tumor tissue and on tumor-induced myeloid cell expansion as these cells are known to promote tumor development. Mice bearing subcutaneous 4 T1 mammary carcinoma tumors were treated with tasquinimod in the drinking water. A BrdU-based flow cytometry assay was utilized to assess the impact of short-term tasquinimod treatment on myeloid cell recruitment to tumors. Additionally, long-term treatment was performed to study the anti-tumor effect of tasquinimod as well as its effects on splenic myeloid cells and their progenitors. Myeloid cell populations were also immune-depleted by in vivo antibody treatment. Short-term tasquinimod treatment did not influence the proliferation of splenic Ly6C hi and Ly6G hi cells, but instead reduced the influx of Ly6C hi cells to the tumor. Treatment with tasquinimod for various periods of time after tumor inoculation revealed that the anti-tumor effect of this compound mainly operated during the first few days of tumor growth. Similar to tasquinimod treatment, antibody-mediated depletion of Ly6C hi cells within that same time frame, caused reduced tumor growth, thereby confirming a significant role for these cells in tumor development. Additionally, long-term tasquinimod treatment reduced the splenomegaly and expansion of splenic myeloid cells during a later phase of tumor development. In this phase, tasquinimod normalized the tumor-induced alterations in myeloerythroid progenitor cells in the spleen but had only limited impact on the same populations in the bone marrow. Our results indicate that tasquinimod treatment reduces tumor growth by operating early after tumor

  8. Phosphatidylcholine-specific phospholipase C inhibition reduces HER2-overexpression, cell proliferation and in vivo tumor growth in a highly tumorigenic ovarian cancer model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spadaro, Francesca; Abalsamo, Laura; Pisanu, Maria Elena; Ricci, Alessandro; Cecchetti, Serena; Altabella, Luisa; Buoncervello, Maria; Lozneanu, Ludmila; Bagnoli, Marina; Ramoni, Carlo; Canevari, Silvana; Mezzanzanica, Delia

    2017-01-01

    Antagonizing the oncogenic effects of human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) with current anti-HER2 agents has not yet yielded major progress in the treatment of advanced HER2-positive epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC). Using preclinical models to explore alternative molecular mechanisms affecting HER2 overexpression and oncogenicity may lead to new strategies for EOC patient treatment. We previously reported that phosphatidylcholine-specific phospholipase C (PC-PLC) exerts a pivotal role in regulating HER2 overexpression in breast cancer cells. The present study, conducted on two human HER2-overexpressing EOC cell lines - SKOV3 and its in vivo-passaged SKOV3.ip cell variant characterized by enhanced in vivo tumorigenicity - and on SKOV3.ip xenografts implanted in SCID mice, showed: a) about 2-fold higher PC-PLC and HER2 protein expression levels in SKOV3.ip compared to SKOV3 cells; b) physical association of PC-PLC with HER2 in non-raft domains; c) HER2 internalization and ca. 50% reduction of HER2 mRNA and protein expression levels in SKOV3.ip cells exposed to the PC-PLC inhibitor tricyclodecan-9-yl-potassium xanthate (D609); d) differential effects of D609 and trastuzumab on HER2 protein expression and cell proliferation; e) decreased in vivo tumor growth in SKOV3.ip xenografts during in vivo treatment with D609; f) potential use of in vivo magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) and imaging (MRI) parameters as biomarkers of EOC response to PC-PLC inhibition. Overall, these findings support the view that PC-PLC inhibition may represent an effective means to target the tumorigenic effects of HER2 overexpression in EOC and that in vivo MR approaches can efficiently monitor its effects. PMID:28903399

  9. Immunoediting: evidence of the multifaceted role of the immune system in self-metastatic tumor growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enderling, Heiko; Hlatky, Lynn; Hahnfeldt, Philip

    2012-07-28

    The role of the immune system in tumor progression has been a subject for discussion for many decades. Numerous studies suggest that a low immune response might be beneficial, if not necessary, for tumor growth, and only a strong immune response can counter tumor growth and thus inhibit progression. We implement a cellular automaton model previously described that captures the dynamical interactions between the cancer stem and non-stem cell populations of a tumor through a process of self-metastasis. By overlaying on this model the diffusion of immune reactants into the tumor from a peripheral source to target cells, we simulate the process of immune-system-induced cell kill on tumor progression. A low cytotoxic immune reaction continuously kills cancer cells and, although at a low rate, thereby causes the liberation of space-constrained cancer stem cells to drive self-metastatic progression and continued tumor growth. With increasing immune system strength, however, tumor growth peaks, and then eventually falls below the intrinsic tumor sizes observed without an immune response. With this increasing immune response the number and proportion of cancer stem cells monotonically increases, implicating an additional unexpected consequence, that of cancer stem cell selection, to the immune response. Cancer stem cells and immune cytotoxicity alone are sufficient to explain the three-step "immunoediting" concept - the modulation of tumor growth through inhibition, selection and promotion.

  10. mTOR inhibitors block Kaposi sarcoma growth by inhibiting essential autocrine growth factors and tumor angiogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Debasmita; Sin, Sang-Hoon; Lucas, Amy; Venkataramanan, Raman; Wang, Ling; Eason, Anthony; Chavakula, Veenadhari; Hilton, Isaac B; Tamburro, Kristen M; Damania, Blossom; Dittmer, Dirk P

    2013-04-01

    Kaposi sarcoma originates from endothelial cells and it is one of the most overt angiogenic tumors. In Sub-Saharan Africa, where HIV and the Kaposi sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) are endemic, Kaposi sarcoma is the most common cancer overall, but model systems for disease study are insufficient. Here, we report the development of a novel mouse model of Kaposi sarcoma, where KSHV is retained stably and tumors are elicited rapidly. Tumor growth was sensitive to specific allosteric inhibitors (rapamycin, CCI-779, and RAD001) of the pivotal cell growth regulator mTOR. Inhibition of tumor growth was durable up to 130 days and reversible. mTOR blockade reduced VEGF secretion and formation of tumor vasculature. Together, the results show that mTOR inhibitors exert a direct anti-Kaposi sarcoma effect by inhibiting angiogenesis and paracrine effectors, suggesting their application as a new treatment modality for Kaposi sarcoma and other cancers of endothelial origin. ©2012 AACR.

  11. Urban tree growth modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    E. Gregory McPherson; Paula J. Peper

    2012-01-01

    This paper describes three long-term tree growth studies conducted to evaluate tree performance because repeated measurements of the same trees produce critical data for growth model calibration and validation. Several empirical and process-based approaches to modeling tree growth are reviewed. Modeling is more advanced in the fields of forestry and...

  12. Triparanol suppresses human tumor growth in vitro and in vivo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bi, Xinyu; Han, Xingpeng; Zhang, Fang; He, Miao; Zhang, Yi; Zhi, Xiu-Yi; Zhao, Hong

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Demonstrate Triparanol can block proliferation in multiple cancer cells. ► Demonstrate Triparanol can induce apoptosis in multiple cancer cells. ► Proved Triparanol can inhibit Hedgehog signaling in multiple cancer cells. ► Demonstrated Triparanol can impede tumor growth in vivo in mouse xenograft model. -- Abstract: Despite the improved contemporary multidisciplinary regimens treating cancer, majority of cancer patients still suffer from adverse effects and relapse, therefore posing a significant challenge to uncover more efficacious molecular therapeutics targeting signaling pathways central to tumorigenesis. Here, our study have demonstrated that Triparanol, a cholesterol synthesis inhibitor, can block proliferation and induce apoptosis in multiple human cancer cells including lung, breast, liver, pancreatic, prostate cancer and melanoma cells, and growth inhibition can be rescued by exogenous addition of cholesterol. Remarkably, we have proved Triparanol can significantly repress Hedgehog pathway signaling in these human cancer cells. Furthermore, study in a mouse xenograft model of human lung cancer has validated that Triparanol can impede tumor growth in vivo. We have therefore uncovered Triparanol as potential new cancer therapeutic in treating multiple types of human cancers with deregulated Hedgehog signaling.

  13. Spherical Cancer Models in Tumor Biology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Louis-Bastien Weiswald

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Three-dimensional (3D in vitro models have been used in cancer research as an intermediate model between in vitro cancer cell line cultures and in vivo tumor. Spherical cancer models represent major 3D in vitro models that have been described over the past 4 decades. These models have gained popularity in cancer stem cell research using tumorospheres. Thus, it is crucial to define and clarify the different spherical cancer models thus far described. Here, we focus on in vitro multicellular spheres used in cancer research. All these spherelike structures are characterized by their well-rounded shape, the presence of cancer cells, and their capacity to be maintained as free-floating cultures. We propose a rational classification of the four most commonly used spherical cancer models in cancer research based on culture methods for obtaining them and on subsequent differences in sphere biology: the multicellular tumor spheroid model, first described in the early 70s and obtained by culture of cancer cell lines under nonadherent conditions; tumorospheres, a model of cancer stem cell expansion established in a serum-free medium supplemented with growth factors; tissue-derived tumor spheres and organotypic multicellular spheroids, obtained by tumor tissue mechanical dissociation and cutting. In addition, we describe their applications to and interest in cancer research; in particular, we describe their contribution to chemoresistance, radioresistance, tumorigenicity, and invasion and migration studies. Although these models share a common 3D conformation, each displays its own intrinsic properties. Therefore, the most relevant spherical cancer model must be carefully selected, as a function of the study aim and cancer type.

  14. Spherical cancer models in tumor biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiswald, Louis-Bastien; Bellet, Dominique; Dangles-Marie, Virginie

    2015-01-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) in vitro models have been used in cancer research as an intermediate model between in vitro cancer cell line cultures and in vivo tumor. Spherical cancer models represent major 3D in vitro models that have been described over the past 4 decades. These models have gained popularity in cancer stem cell research using tumorospheres. Thus, it is crucial to define and clarify the different spherical cancer models thus far described. Here, we focus on in vitro multicellular spheres used in cancer research. All these spherelike structures are characterized by their well-rounded shape, the presence of cancer cells, and their capacity to be maintained as free-floating cultures. We propose a rational classification of the four most commonly used spherical cancer models in cancer research based on culture methods for obtaining them and on subsequent differences in sphere biology: the multicellular tumor spheroid model, first described in the early 70s and obtained by culture of cancer cell lines under nonadherent conditions; tumorospheres, a model of cancer stem cell expansion established in a serum-free medium supplemented with growth factors; tissue-derived tumor spheres and organotypic multicellular spheroids, obtained by tumor tissue mechanical dissociation and cutting. In addition, we describe their applications to and interest in cancer research; in particular, we describe their contribution to chemoresistance, radioresistance, tumorigenicity, and invasion and migration studies. Although these models share a common 3D conformation, each displays its own intrinsic properties. Therefore, the most relevant spherical cancer model must be carefully selected, as a function of the study aim and cancer type. Copyright © 2014 Neoplasia Press, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. The Role of Tumor Associated Macrophage in Recurrent Growth of Tumor Stem Cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-01

    recent cancer stem cell (CSC) theory, recurrent tumor must arise from a dormant tumor stem cell whose re-growth is triggered by shifting of...microenvironment. This project aims at clarifying the roles of TAM in recurrent growth of dormant stem cell in breast cancer. We hypothesize that the balance of...dormancy and recurrence is determined by the ability of the tumor stem cells to recruit TAM which in turn promotes self-renewal of the stem cell . We

  16. Although Abundant in Tumor Tissue, Mast Cells Have No Effect on Immunological Micro-milieu or Growth of HPV-Induced or Transplanted Tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shanawaz Mohammed Ghouse

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Summary: High numbers of mast cells populate the stroma of many types of neoplasms, including human papilloma virus-induced benign and malignant tumors in man and mouse. Equipped with numerous pattern recognition receptors and capable of executing important pro-inflammatory responses, mast cells are considered innate sentinels that significantly impact tumor biology. Mast cells were reported to promote human papilloma virus (HPV-induced epithelial hyperproliferation and neo-angiogenesis in an HPV-driven mouse model of skin cancer. We analyzed HPV-induced epithelial hyperplasia and squamous cell carcinoma formation, as well as growth of tumors inoculated into the dermis, in mice lacking skin mast cells. Unexpectedly, the absence of mast cells had no effect on HPV-induced epithelial growth or angiogenesis, on growth kinetics of inoculated tumors, or on the immunological tumor micro-milieu. Thus, the conspicuous recruitment of mast cells into tumor tissues cannot necessarily be equated with important mast cell functions in tumor growth. : Mast cells accumulate in high numbers in many human tumors, and they are widely viewed as important promoters of tumor growth. Ghouse et al. show that growth, angiogenesis, and the immunological micro-milieu of tumors growing in mice genetically deficient for mast cells are unchanged compared to control tumors. Keywords: mast cells, HPV-induced skin cancer, tumor angiogenesis, tumor micro-milieu

  17. Therapeutic Implications from Sensitivity Analysis of Tumor Angiogenesis Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poleszczuk, Jan; Hahnfeldt, Philip; Enderling, Heiko

    2015-01-01

    Anti-angiogenic cancer treatments induce tumor starvation and regression by targeting the tumor vasculature that delivers oxygen and nutrients. Mathematical models prove valuable tools to study the proof-of-concept, efficacy and underlying mechanisms of such treatment approaches. The effects of parameter value uncertainties for two models of tumor development under angiogenic signaling and anti-angiogenic treatment are studied. Data fitting is performed to compare predictions of both models and to obtain nominal parameter values for sensitivity analysis. Sensitivity analysis reveals that the success of different cancer treatments depends on tumor size and tumor intrinsic parameters. In particular, we show that tumors with ample vascular support can be successfully targeted with conventional cytotoxic treatments. On the other hand, tumors with curtailed vascular support are not limited by their growth rate and therefore interruption of neovascularization emerges as the most promising treatment target. PMID:25785600

  18. Hazard plotting and estimates for the tumor rate and the tumor growth time for radiogenic osteosarcomas in man

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Groer, P.G.; Marshall, J.H.

    1976-01-01

    The tumor rate (hazard rate) and the tumor growth time were estimated from a multiply censored sample of observed tumor appearance times in persons with an initial intake of 226 Ra and 228 Ra larger than about 230 μCi/kg bone. The tumor appearance times in these individuals appear to be exponentially distributed and follow, therefore, a straight line if plotted against the cumulative hazard on linear paper, the hazard paper for an exponential failure time distribution. This implies a constant dose independent tumor rate for osteosarcoma induction in the limit of large radiation doses. An expression for tumor rate from a stochastic model, described earlier in detail showing this behavior, is discussed briefly

  19. Cryospectrophotometric determination of tumor intravascular oxyhemoglobin saturations: dependence on vascular geometry and tumor growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fenton, B M; Rofstad, E K; Degner, F L; Sutherland, R M

    1988-12-21

    To delineate the complex relationships between overall tumor oxygenation and vascular configuration, intravascular oxyhemoglobin (HbO2) saturation distributions were measured with cryospectrophotometric techniques. Four factors related to vascular morphometry and tumor growth were evaluated: a) vessel diameter, b) distance of vessel from the tumor surface, c) tumor volume, and d) vascular density. To measure intertumor heterogeneity, two murine sarcomas (RIF-1 and KHT) and two human ovarian carcinoma xenografts (OWI and MLS) were utilized. In contrast to skeletal muscle, a preponderance of very low HbO2 saturations was observed for both large and small tumors of all lines. Saturations up to about 90% were also generally present, however, even in very large tumors. Variations in vascular configuration were predominantly tumor-line dependent rather than due to inherent characteristics of the host vasculature, and widely disparate HbO2 distributions were found for alternate lines implanted in identical host mice. Although peripheral saturations remained fairly constant with tumor growth, HbO2 values were markedly lower for vessels nearer the tumor center and further decreased with increasing tumor volume. HbO2 saturations did not change substantially with increasing vascular density (except for KHT tumors), although density did decrease with increasing distance from tumor surface. Combined effects of vessel diameter, tumor volume, and vessel location on HbO2 saturations were complex and varied markedly with both tumor line and vessel class. For specific classes, HbO2 distributions correlated closely with radiobiological hypoxic fractions, i.e., for tumor lines in which hypoxic fraction increased substantially with tumor volume, corresponding HbO2 values decreased, while for lines in which hypoxic fraction remained constant, HbO2 values also were unchanged. Although these trends may also be a function of differing oxygen consumption rates between tumor lines

  20. Blood Outgrowth Endothelial Cells Increase Tumor Growth Rates and Modify Tumor Physiology: Relevance for Therapeutic Targeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pagan, Jonathan; Przybyla, Beata; Jamshidi-Parsian, Azemat; Gupta, Kalpna; Griffin, Robert J.

    2013-01-01

    Endothelial cell precursors from human peripheral blood have been shown to home to areas of neovascularization and may assist tumor growth by increasing or fortifying blood vessel growth. In the present study, the influence of these cells on tumor growth and physiology was investigated and the role of these cells as a therapeutic target or in determining treatment sensitivity was tested. After isolation from human blood and expansion in vitro, actively growing cells with verified endothelial phenotype (Blood Outgrowth Endothelial Cell, BOEC) were injected i.v. into tumor bearing mice for three consecutive days. The growth rate was significantly enhanced in relatively small RERF human lung tumors (i.e., less than 150 mm 3 ) grown in immunocompromised mice by an average of 1.5-fold while it had no effect when injections were given to animals bearing larger tumors. There were no signs of toxicity or unwanted systemic effects. We also observed evidence of increased perfusion, vessel number, response to 15 Gy radiation and oxygenation in RERF tumors of animals injected with BOECs compared to control tumors. In addition, FSaII murine fibrosarcoma tumors were found to grow faster upon injection of BOECs. When FSaII tumors were subjected to a partial thermal ablation treatment using high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) there was consistently elevated detection of fluorescently labeled and i.v. injected endothelial precursors in the tumor when analyzed with optical imaging and/or histological preparations. Importantly, we also observed that BOECs treated with the novel anti-angiogenic peptide anginex in-vitro, show decreased proliferation and increased sensitivity to radiation. In vivo, the normal increase in FSaII tumor growth induced by injected BOECs was blunted by the addition of anginex treatment. It appears that endothelial precursors may significantly contribute to tumor vessel growth, tumor progression and/or repair of tumor damage and may improve the

  1. Canine parvovirus NS1 protein exhibits anti-tumor activity in a mouse mammary tumor model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Shishir Kumar; Yadav, Pavan Kumar; Gandham, Ravi Kumar; Sahoo, A P; Harish, D R; Singh, Arvind Kumar; Tiwari, A K

    2016-02-02

    Many viral proteins have the ability to kill tumor cells specifically without harming the normal cells. These proteins, on ectopic expression, cause lysis or induction of apoptosis in the target tumor cells. Parvovirus NS1 is one of such proteins, which is known to kill high proliferating tumor cells. In the present study, we assessed the apoptosis inducing ability of canine parvovirus type 2 NS1 protein (CPV2.NS1) in vitro in 4T1 cells, and found it to cause significant cell death due to induction of apoptosis through intrinsic or mitochondrial pathway. Further, we also evaluated the oncolytic activity of CPV2.NS1 protein in a mouse mammary tumor model. The results suggested that CPV2.NS1 was able to inhibit the growth of 4T1 induced mouse mammary tumor as indicated by significantly reduced tumor volume, mitotic, AgNOR and PCNA indices. Further, inhibition of tumor growth was found to be because of induction of apoptosis in the tumor cells, which was evident by a significant increase in the number of TUNEL positive cells. Further, CPV2.NS1 was also able to stimulate the immune cells against the tumor antigens as indicated by the increased CD4+ and CD8+ counts in the blood of CVP2.NS1 treated mice. Further optimization of the delivery of NS1 protein and use of an adjuvant may further enhance its anti-tumor activity. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. LEAPS Vaccine Incorporating HER-2/neu Epitope Elicits Protection That Prevents and Limits Tumor Growth and Spread of Breast Cancer in a Mouse Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ken S. Rosenthal

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The prototype J-LEAPS T cell vaccine for HER-2/neu breast cancer (J-HER consists of the murine HER-2/neu66–74 H-2d CD8 T cell epitope covalently attached through a triglycine linker to the J-immune cell binding ligand (ICBL (human β2 microglobulin38–50 peptide. The J-ICBL was chosen for its potential to promote Th1/Tc1 responses. In this proof-of-concept study, the ability of J-HER to prevent or treat cancer was tested in the TUBO cell-challenged BALB/c mouse model for HER-2/neu-expressing tumors. The J-HER vaccine was administered as an emulsion in Montanide ISA-51 without the need for a more potent adjuvant. When administered as a prophylactic vaccination before tumor challenge, J-HER protected against tumor development for at least 48 days. Despite eliciting protection, antibody production in J-HER-immunized, TUBO-challenged mice was less than that in unimmunized mice. More importantly, therapeutic administration of J-HER one week after challenge with TUBO breast cancer cells limited the spread of the tumors and the morbidity and the mortality in the challenged mice. The ability to elicit responses that prevent spread of the TUBO tumor by J-HER suggests its utility as a neoimmunoadjuvant therapy to surgery. Individual or mixtures of J-LEAPS vaccines can be readily prepared to include different CD8 T cell epitopes to optimize tumor therapy and customize treatment for individuals with different HLA types.

  3. Withaferin A Suppresses Liver Tumor Growth in a Nude Mouse ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The effect of withaferin A on tumor volume, invasive growth pattern, expression of Pyk2, upregulation of BAX/P53, apoptotic signaling and ... the direct effect of withaferin A on liver cancer cells and endothelial cells was further investigated. Results: A significant ... tumor cell invasiveness in colon cancer [7] and is related to ...

  4. Combined Zoledronic Acid and Meloxicam Reduced Bone Loss and Tumor Growth in an Orthotopic Mouse Model of Bone-Invasive Oral Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, C.K.; Dirksen, W.P.; Carlton, M.M.; Lanigan, L.G.; Pillai, S.P.; Werbeck, J.L.; Simmons, J.K.; Hildreth, B.E.; London, C.A.; Toribio, R.E.; Rosol, T.J.

    2013-01-01

    Oral squamous cell carcinoma is common in cats and humans and invades oral bone. We hypothesized that the cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitor, meloxicam, with the bisphosphonate, zoledronic acid (ZOL), would inhibit tumor growth, osteolysis and invasion in feline oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) xenografts in mice. Human and feline OSCC cell lines expressed cyclooxygenase (COX)-1 and 2 and the SCCF2 cells had increased COX-2 mRNA expression with bone conditioned medium. Luciferase-expressing feline SCCF2Luc cells were injected beneath the perimaxillary gingiva and mice were treated with 0.1 mg/kg ZOL twice weekly, 0.3 mg/kg meloxicam daily, combined ZOL and meloxicam, or vehicle. ZOL inhibited osteoclastic bone resorption at the tumor-bone interface. Meloxicam was more effective than ZOL at reducing xenograft growth but did not affect osteoclastic bone resorption. Although a synergistic effect of combined ZOL and meloxicam was not observed, combination therapy was well tolerated and may be useful in the clinical management of bone-invasive feline OSCC. PMID:23651067

  5. Simulation of 3D tumor cell growth using nonlinear finite element method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Shoubing; Yan, Yannan; Tang, Liqun; Meng, Junping; Jiang, Yi

    2016-01-01

    We propose a novel parallel computing framework for a nonlinear finite element method (FEM)-based cell model and apply it to simulate avascular tumor growth. We derive computation formulas to simplify the simulation and design the basic algorithms. With the increment of the proliferation generations of tumor cells, the FEM elements may become larger and more distorted. Then, we describe a remesh and refinement processing of the distorted or over large finite elements and the parallel implementation based on Message Passing Interface to improve the accuracy and efficiency of the simulation. We demonstrate the feasibility and effectiveness of the FEM model and the parallelization methods in simulations of early tumor growth.

  6. Modern views on aetiology and pathogenesis of tumor growths and benign ovarian tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Serebrennikova K.G.

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available The article represents modern data of aetiology and pathogenesis of tumor growths and benign ovarian tumors as systemic diseases of organism. These diseases appear on the cellular level and involve the presence of polymorphous metabolic, endocrine and immune disorders. Exogenous and endogenous risk factors of ovarian carcinomas are considered

  7. Hypoxia promotes tumor growth in linking angiogenesis to immune escape

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salem eCHOUAIB

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Despite the impressive progress over the past decade, in the field of tumor immunology, such as the identification of tumor antigens and antigenic peptides as potential targets, there are still many obstacles in eliciting an effective immune response to eradicate cancer. It has become increasingly clear that tumor microenvironment plays a crucial role in the control of immune protection and contains many overlapping mechanisms to evade antigen specific immunotherapy. Obviously, tumors have evolved to utilize hypoxic stress to their own advantage by activating key biochemical and cellular pathways that are important in progression, survival and metastasis. Among the hypoxia-induced genes, hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF-1 and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF play a determinant role in promoting tumor cell growth and survival. In this regard, hypoxia is emerging as an attractive target for cancer therapy. How the microenvironmental hypoxia poses both obstacles and opportunities for new therapeutic immune interventions will be discussed.

  8. Evaluating the role of substance P in the growth of brain tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harford-Wright, E; Lewis, K M; Vink, R; Ghabriel, M N

    2014-03-07

    Recent research has investigated the expression and secretion of neuropeptides by tumors, and the potential of these peptides to facilitate tumor growth and spread. In particular, substance P (SP) and its receptor NK1 have been implicated in tumor cell growth and evasion of apoptosis, although few studies have examined this relationship in vivo. The present study used both in vitro and in vivo models to characterize the role of SP in tumor pathogenesis. Immunohistochemical assessment of human primary and secondary brain tumor tissue demonstrated a marked increase in SP and its NK1 receptor in all tumor types investigated. Of the metastatic tumors, melanoma demonstrated particularly elevated SP and NK1 receptor staining. Subsequently, A-375 human melanoma cell line was examined in vitro and found to express both SP and the NK1 receptor. Treatment with the NK1 receptor antagonist Emend IV resulted in decreased cell viability and an increase in cell death in this cell line in vitro. An animal model of brain tumors using the same cell line was employed to assess the effect of Emend IV on tumor growth in vivo. Administration of Emend IV was found to decrease tumor volume and decrease cellular proliferation indicating that SP may play a role in tumor pathogenesis within the brain. We conclude that SP may provide a novel therapeutic target in the treatment of certain types of brain tumors, with further research required to determine whether the role of SP in cancer is tumor-type dependent. Copyright © 2014 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Pancreatic Tumor Growth Prediction With Elastic-Growth Decomposition, Image-Derived Motion, and FDM-FEM Coupling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Ken C L; Summers, Ronald M; Kebebew, Electron; Yao, Jianhua

    2017-01-01

    Pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors are abnormal growths of hormone-producing cells in the pancreas. Unlike the brain which is protected by the skull, the pancreas can be significantly deformed by its surrounding organs. Consequently, the tumor shape differences observable from images at different time points arise from both tumor growth and pancreatic motion, and tumor growth model personalization may be compromised if such motion is ignored. Therefore, we incorporate pancreatic motion information derived from deformable image registration in model personalization. For more accurate mechanical interactions between tumor growth and pancreatic motion, elastic-growth decomposition is used with a hyperelastic constitutive law to model the mass effect, which allows growth modeling while conserving the mechanical properties. Furthermore, a way of coupling the finite difference method and the finite element method is proposed to greatly reduce the computation time. With both 2-[ 18 F]-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose positron emission tomographic and contrast-enhanced computed tomographic images, functional, structural, and motion data are combined for a patient-specific model. Experiments on synthetic and clinical data show the importance of image-derived motion on estimating pathophysiologically plausible mechanical properties and the promising performance of our framework. From seven patient data sets, the recall, precision, Dice coefficient, relative volume difference, and average surface distance between the personalized tumor growth simulations and the measurements were 83.2 ±8.8%, 86.9 ±8.3%, 84.4 ±4.0%, 13.9 ±9.8%, and 0.6 ±0.1 mm, respectively.

  10. Inhibition of GLO1 in Glioblastoma Multiforme Increases DNA-AGEs, Stimulates RAGE Expression, and Inhibits Brain Tumor Growth in Orthotopic Mouse Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rahul Jandial

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Cancers that exhibit the Warburg effect may elevate expression of glyoxylase 1 (GLO1 to detoxify the toxic glycolytic byproduct methylglyoxal (MG and inhibit the formation of pro-apoptotic advanced glycation endproducts (AGEs. Inhibition of GLO1 in cancers that up-regulate glycolysis has been proposed as a therapeutic targeting strategy, but this approach has not been evaluated for glioblastoma multiforme (GBM, the most aggressive and difficult to treat malignancy of the brain. Elevated GLO1 expression in GBM was established in patient tumors and cell lines using bioinformatics tools and biochemical approaches. GLO1 inhibition in GBM cell lines and in an orthotopic xenograft GBM mouse model was examined using both small molecule and short hairpin RNA (shRNA approaches. Inhibition of GLO1 with S-(p-bromobenzyl glutathione dicyclopentyl ester (p-BrBzGSH(Cp2 increased levels of the DNA-AGE N2-1-(carboxyethyl-2′-deoxyguanosine (CEdG, a surrogate biomarker for nuclear MG exposure; substantially elevated expression of the immunoglobulin-like receptor for AGEs (RAGE; and induced apoptosis in GBM cell lines. Targeting GLO1 with shRNA similarly increased CEdG levels and RAGE expression, and was cytotoxic to glioma cells. Mice bearing orthotopic GBM xenografts treated systemically with p-BrBzGSH(Cp2 exhibited tumor regression without significant off-target effects suggesting that GLO1 inhibition may have value in the therapeutic management of these drug-resistant tumors.

  11. Glycan Sulfation Modulates Dendritic Cell Biology and Tumor Growth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roland El Ghazal

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available In cancer, proteoglycans have been found to play roles in facilitating the actions of growth factors, and effecting matrix invasion and remodeling. However, little is known regarding the genetic and functional importance of glycan chains displayed by proteoglycans on dendritic cells (DCs in cancer immunity. In lung carcinoma, among other solid tumors, tumor-associated DCs play largely subversive/suppressive roles, promoting tumor growth and progression. Herein, we show that targeting of DC glycan sulfation through mutation in the heparan sulfate biosynthetic enzyme N-deacetylase/N-sulfotransferase-1 (Ndst1 in mice increased DC maturation and inhibited trafficking of DCs to draining lymph nodes. Lymphatic-driven DC migration and chemokine (CCL21-dependent activation of a major signaling pathway required for DC migration (as measured by phospho-Akt were sensitive to Ndst1 mutation in DCs. Lewis lung carcinoma tumors in mice deficient in Ndst1 were reduced in size. Purified CD11c+ cells from the tumors, which contain the tumor-infiltrating DC population, showed a similar phenotype in mutant cells. These features were replicated in mice deficient in syndecan-4, the major heparan sulfate proteoglycan expressed on the DC surface: Tumors were growth-impaired in syndecan-4–deficient mice and were characterized by increased infiltration by mature DCs. Tumors on the mutant background also showed greater infiltration by NK cells and NKT cells. These findings indicate the genetic importance of DC heparan sulfate proteoglycans in tumor growth and may guide therapeutic development of novel strategies to target syndecan-4 and heparan sulfate in cancer.

  12. Immune mechanisms in Ehrlich ascites tumor growth in mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marusic, M.

    1979-01-01

    Normal mice immunised with irradiated Ehrlich ascites tumor (EAT) cells rejected EAT challenge given 2 weeks later but T-cell-deficient thymectomised lethally irradiated, and bone-marrow-reconstituted (TIR) mice succumbed. However, when TIR mice were injected i.v. with thymus, lymph node, or spleen cells from normalsyngetic donors immediately following i.p. injection of irradiated EAT cells, they rejected the subsequent tumor challenge. This induction of immunity in TIR mice was shown to be T-cell dependent. Spleen cells from EAT- bearing mice given immediately after irradiated tumor cells were also able to promote rejection of EAT challenge in TIR mice. Spleen cells from EAT-immune mice inhibited EAT growth when admixed with tumor cells prior to i.p. injection into normal recipients, but had no effect on progressive tumor growth when given i.v. immediately after i.p. tumor injection. Immune serum inhibited i.p. EAT growth when given either i.p. or i.v. Whereas inhibition of EAT growth by admixed spleen cells was shown to be T-cell independent. The data indicate that T lymphocytes are required only in the induction phase of the immune reponse of mice against EAT, while the efferent phase of the response is accomplished by serum antibodies, perhaps through an interaction with host macrophages. (author)

  13. A peptide antagonist of the ErbB1 receptor inhibits receptor activation, tumor cell growth and migration in vitro and xenograft tumor growth in vivo

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xu, Ruodan; Povlsen, Gro Klitgaard; Soroka, Vladislav

    2010-01-01

    The epidermal growth factor family of receptor tyrosine kinases (ErbBs) plays essential roles in tumorigenesis and cancer disease progression, and therefore has become an attractive target for structure-based drug design. ErbB receptors are activated by ligand-induced homo- and heterodimerization......B1 phosphorylation, cell growth, and migration in two human tumor cell lines, A549 and HN5, expressing moderate and high ErbB1 levels, respectively. Furthermore, we show that Inherbin3 inhibits tumor growth in vivo and induces apoptosis in a tumor xenograft model employing the human non-small cell...... lung cancer cell line A549. The Inherbin3 peptide may be a useful tool for investigating the mechanisms of ErbB receptor homo- and heterodimerization. Moreover, the here described biological effects of Inherbin3 suggest that peptide-based targeting of ErbB receptor dimerization is a promising anti...

  14. Impact of adjuvant inhibition of vascular endothelial growth factor receptor tyrosine kinases on tumor growth delay and local tumor control after fractionated irradiation in human squamous cell carcinomas in nude mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zips, Daniel; Hessel, Franziska; Krause, Mechthild; Schiefer, Yvonne; Hoinkis, Cordelia; Thames, Howard D.; Haberey, Martin; Baumann, Michael

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: Previous experiments have shown that adjuvant inhibition of the vascular endothelial growth factor receptor after fractionated irradiation prolonged tumor growth delay and may also improve local tumor control. To test the latter hypothesis, local tumor control experiments were performed. Methods and materials: Human FaDu and UT-SCC-14 squamous cell carcinomas were studied in nude mice. The vascular endothelial growth factor receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitor PTK787/ZK222584 (50 mg/kg body weight b.i.d.) was administered for 75 days after irradiation with 30 fractions within 6 weeks. Tumor growth time and tumor control dose 50% (TCD 50 ) were determined and compared to controls (carrier without PTK787/ZK222584). Results: Adjuvant administration of PTK787/ZK222584 significantly prolonged tumor growth time to reach 5 times the volume at start of drug treatment by an average of 11 days (95% confidence interval 0.06;22) in FaDu tumors and 29 days (0.6;58) in UT-SCC-14 tumors. In both tumor models, TCD 50 values were not statistically significantly different between the groups treated with PTK787/ZK222584 compared to controls. Conclusions: Long-term inhibition of angiogenesis after radiotherapy significantly reduced the growth rate of local recurrences but did not improve local tumor control. This indicates that recurrences after irradiation depend on vascular endothelial growth factor-driven angiogenesis, but surviving tumor cells retain their clonogenic potential during adjuvant antiangiogenic treatment with PTK787/ZK222584

  15. Modified Gompertz equation for electrotherapy murine tumor growth kinetics: predictions and new hypotheses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabrales, Luis E Bergues; Nava, Juan J Godina; Aguilera, Andrés Ramírez; Joa, Javier A González; Ciria, Héctor M Camué; González, Maraelys Morales; Salas, Miriam Fariñas; Jarque, Manuel Verdecia; González, Tamara Rubio; Mateus, Miguel A O'Farril; Brooks, Soraida C Acosta; Palencia, Fabiola Suárez; Zamora, Lisset Ortiz; Quevedo, María C Céspedes; Seringe, Sarah Edward; Cuitié, Vladimir Crombet; Cabrales, Idelisa Bergues; González, Gustavo Sierra

    2010-10-28

    Electrotherapy effectiveness at different doses has been demonstrated in preclinical and clinical studies; however, several aspects that occur in the tumor growth kinetics before and after treatment have not yet been revealed. Mathematical modeling is a useful instrument that can reveal some of these aspects. The aim of this paper is to describe the complete growth kinetics of unperturbed and perturbed tumors through use of the modified Gompertz equation in order to generate useful insight into the mechanisms that underpin this devastating disease. The complete tumor growth kinetics for control and treated groups are obtained by interpolation and extrapolation methods with different time steps, using experimental data of fibrosarcoma Sa-37. In the modified Gompertz equation, a delay time is introduced to describe the tumor's natural history before treatment. Different graphical strategies are used in order to reveal new information in the complete kinetics of this tumor type. The first stage of complete tumor growth kinetics is highly non linear. The model, at this stage, shows different aspects that agree with those reported theoretically and experimentally. Tumor reversibility and the proportionality between regions before and after electrotherapy are demonstrated. In tumors that reach partial remission, two antagonistic post-treatment processes are induced, whereas in complete remission, two unknown antitumor mechanisms are induced. The modified Gompertz equation is likely to lead to insights within cancer research. Such insights hold promise for increasing our understanding of tumors as self-organizing systems and, the possible existence of phase transitions in tumor growth kinetics, which, in turn, may have significant impacts both on cancer research and on clinical practice.

  16. Modified Gompertz equation for electrotherapy murine tumor growth kinetics: predictions and new hypotheses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Quevedo María

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Electrotherapy effectiveness at different doses has been demonstrated in preclinical and clinical studies; however, several aspects that occur in the tumor growth kinetics before and after treatment have not yet been revealed. Mathematical modeling is a useful instrument that can reveal some of these aspects. The aim of this paper is to describe the complete growth kinetics of unperturbed and perturbed tumors through use of the modified Gompertz equation in order to generate useful insight into the mechanisms that underpin this devastating disease. Methods The complete tumor growth kinetics for control and treated groups are obtained by interpolation and extrapolation methods with different time steps, using experimental data of fibrosarcoma Sa-37. In the modified Gompertz equation, a delay time is introduced to describe the tumor's natural history before treatment. Different graphical strategies are used in order to reveal new information in the complete kinetics of this tumor type. Results The first stage of complete tumor growth kinetics is highly non linear. The model, at this stage, shows different aspects that agree with those reported theoretically and experimentally. Tumor reversibility and the proportionality between regions before and after electrotherapy are demonstrated. In tumors that reach partial remission, two antagonistic post-treatment processes are induced, whereas in complete remission, two unknown antitumor mechanisms are induced. Conclusion The modified Gompertz equation is likely to lead to insights within cancer research. Such insights hold promise for increasing our understanding of tumors as self-organizing systems and, the possible existence of phase transitions in tumor growth kinetics, which, in turn, may have significant impacts both on cancer research and on clinical practice.

  17. Model driven optimization of antiangiogenics + cytotoxics combination: application to breast cancer mice treated with bevacizumab + paclitaxel doublet leads to reduced tumor growth and fewer metastasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mollard, Severine; Ciccolini, Joseph; Imbs, Diane-Charlotte; El Cheikh, Raouf; Barbolosi, Dominique; Benzekry, Sebastien

    2017-04-04

    Bevacizumab is the first-in-class antiangiogenic drug and is almost always administrated in combination with cytotoxics. Reports have shown that bevacizumab could induce a transient phase of vascular normalization, thus ensuring a better drug delivery when cytotoxics administration is adjuvant. However, determining the best sequence remains challenging. We have developed a mathematical model describing the impact of antiangiogenics on tumor vasculature. A 3.4 days gap between bevacizumab and paclitaxel was first proposed by our model. To test its relevance, 84 mice were orthotopically xenografted with human MDA-231Luc+ refractory breast cancer cells. Two sets of experiments were performed, based upon different bevacizumab dosing (10 or 20 mg/kg) and inter-cycle intervals (7 or 10 days), comprising several combinations with paclitaxel. Results showed that scheduling bevacizumab 3 days before paclitaxel improved antitumor efficacy (48% reduction in tumor size compared with concomitant dosing, p optimal gap of 2.2 days. Our experimental data suggest that current concomitant dosing between bevacizumab and paclitaxel could be a sub-optimal strategy at bedside. In addition, this proof of concept study suggests that mathematical modelling could help to identify the optimal interval among a variety of possible alternate treatment modalities, thus refining the way experimental or clinical studies are conducted.

  18. A quantitative theory of solid tumor growth, metabolic rate and vascularization.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander B Herman

    Full Text Available The relationships between cellular, structural and dynamical properties of tumors have traditionally been studied separately. Here, we construct a quantitative, predictive theory of solid tumor growth, metabolic rate, vascularization and necrosis that integrates the relationships between these properties. To accomplish this, we develop a comprehensive theory that describes the interface and integration of the tumor vascular network and resource supply with the cardiovascular system of the host. Our theory enables a quantitative understanding of how cells, tissues, and vascular networks act together across multiple scales by building on recent theoretical advances in modeling both healthy vasculature and the detailed processes of angiogenesis and tumor growth. The theory explicitly relates tumor vascularization and growth to metabolic rate, and yields extensive predictions for tumor properties, including growth rates, metabolic rates, degree of necrosis, blood flow rates and vessel sizes. Besides these quantitative predictions, we explain how growth rates depend on capillary density and metabolic rate, and why similar tumors grow slower and occur less frequently in larger animals, shedding light on Peto's paradox. Various implications for potential therapeutic strategies and further research are discussed.

  19. Transforming growth factor-beta1 induces tumor stroma and reduces tumor infiltrate in cervical cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hazelbag, Suzanne; Gorter, Arko; Kenter, Gemma G.; van den Broek, Lambert; Fleuren, Gertjan

    2002-01-01

    Cervical carcinomas consist of tumor cell nests surrounded by varying amounts of intratumoral stroma containing different quantities and types of immune cells. Besides controlling (epithelial) cell growth, the multifunctional cytokine transforming growth factor-beta(1) (TGF-beta(1)) is involved in

  20. The effect of housing temperature on the growth of CT26 tumor expressing fluorescent protein EGFP

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuzhakova, Diana V.; Shirmanova, Marina V.; Lapkina, Irina V.; Serebrovskaya, Ekaterina O.; Lukyanov, Sergey A.; Zagaynova, Elena V.

    2016-04-01

    To date, the effect of housing temperature on tumor development in the immunocompetent mice has been studied on poorly immunogenic cancer models. Standard housing temperature 20-26°C was shown to cause chronic metabolic cold stress and promote tumor progression via suppression of the antitumor immune response, whereas a thermoneutral temperature 30-31°C was more preferable for normal metabolism of mice and inhibited tumor growth. Our work represents the first attempt to discover the potential effect of housing temperature on the development of highly immunogenic tumor. EGFP-expressing murine colon carcinoma CT26 generated in Balb/c mice was used as a tumor model. No statistically significant differences were shown in tumor incidences and growth rates at 20°C, 25°C and 30°C for non-modified CT26. Maintaining mice challenged with CT26-EGFP cells at 30°C led to complete inhibition of tumor development. In summary, we demonstrated that the housing temperature is important for the regulation of growth of highly immunogenic tumors in mice through antitumor immunity.

  1. Gliotoxin Targets Nuclear NOTCH2 in Human Solid Tumor Derived Cell Lines In Vitro and Inhibits Melanoma Growth in Xenograft Mouse Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rainer Hubmann

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Deregulation of NOTCH2 signaling is implicated in a wide variety of human neoplasias. The current concept of targeting NOTCH is based on using gamma secretase inhibitors (GSI to regulate the release of the active NOTCH intracellular domain. However, the clinical outcome of GSI remains unsatisfactory. Therefore we analyzed human solid tumor derived cell lines for their nuclear NOTCH activity and evaluated the therapeutic potential of the NOTCH2 transactivation inhibitor gliotoxin in comparison to the representative GSI DAPT. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays (EMSA were used as a surrogate method for the detection of NOTCH/CSL transcription factor complexes. The effect of gliotoxin on cell viability and its clinical relevance was evaluated in vitro and in a melanoma xenograft mouse model. Cell lines derived from melanoma (518A2, hepatocellular carcinoma (SNU398, HCC-3, Hep3B, and pancreas carcinoma (PANC1 express high amounts of nuclear NOTCH2. Gliotoxin efficiently induced apoptosis in these cell lines whereas the GSI DAPT was ineffective. The specificity of gliotoxin was demonstrated in the well differentiated nuclear NOTCH negative cell line Huh7, which was resistant to gliotoxin treatment in vitro. In xenotransplanted 518A2 melanomas, a single day dosing schedule of gliotoxin was well tolerated without any study limiting side effects. Gliotoxin significantly reduced the tumor volume in early (83 mm3 vs. 115 mm3, p = 0.008 as well as in late stage (218 mm3 vs. 576 mm3, p = 0.005 tumor models. In conclusion, NOTCH2 appears to be a key target of gliotoxin in human neoplasias and gliotoxin deserves further evaluation as a potential therapeutic agent in cancer management.

  2. UVB-irradiated apoptotic cells induce accelerated growth of co-implanted viable tumor cells in immune competent mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaurio, Ricardo; Janko, Christina; Schorn, Christine; Maueröder, Christian; Bilyy, Rostyslav; Gaipl, Udo; Schett, Georg; Berens, Christian; Frey, Benjamin; Munoz, Luis E

    2013-08-01

    The presence of a solid tumor is the result of a complex balance between rejection, tolerance and regeneration in which the interactions of tumor cells with cells of the host immune system contribute strongly to the final outcome. Here we report on a model where lethally UVB-irradiated cells cause accelerated growth of viable tumor cells in vitro and in allogeneic immune competent mice. UVB-irradiated tumor cells alone did not form tumors and failed to induce tolerance for a second challenge with the same allogeneic tumor. Our data show an important role for dying cells in promoting accelerated tumor cell growth of a small number of viable tumor cells in a large inoculum of UVB-irradiated tumor cells. This occurs when viable and dying/dead tumor cells are in close proximity, suggesting that mobile factors contribute to growth promotion. The anti-inflammatory and growth promoting properties of apoptotic cells are based on several independent effects. UVB-irradiated apoptotic cells directly release a growth promoting activity and clearance by macrophages of apoptotic cells is accompanied by the secretion of IL10, TGFß, and PGE2. Growth promotion is even observed with dying heterologous cells implying a conserved mechanism. Future experiments should focus on the effects of dying tumor cells generated in vivo on the outgrowth of surviving tumor cells which is prone to have implications for cancer therapy.

  3. Computer Implementation of a New Therapeutic Model for GBM Tumor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Jamali Nazari

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Modeling the tumor behavior in the host organ as function of time and radiation dose has been a major study in the previous decades. Here the effort in estimation of cancerous and normal cell proliferation and growth in glioblastoma multiform (GBM tumor is presented. This paper introduces a new mathematical model in the form of differential equation of tumor growth. The model contains dose delivery amount in the treatment scheme as an input term. It also can be utilized to optimize the treatment process in order to increase the patient survival period. Gene expression programming (GEP as a new concept is used for estimating this model. The LQ model has also been applied to GEP as an initial value, causing acceleration and improvement of the algorithm estimation. The model shows the number of the tumor and normal brain cells during the treatment process using the status of normal and cancerous cells in the initiation of treatment, the timing and amount of dose delivery to the patient, and a coefficient that describes the brain condition. A critical level is defined for normal cell when the patient’s death occurs. In the end the model has been verified by clinical data obtained from previous accepted formulae and some of our experimental resources. The proposed model helps to predict tumor growth during treatment process in which further treatment processes can be controlled.

  4. From the Cover: Glutamate antagonists limit tumor growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rzeski, Wojciech; Turski, Lechoslaw; Ikonomidou, Chrysanthy

    2001-05-01

    Neuronal progenitors and tumor cells possess propensity to proliferate and to migrate. Glutamate regulates proliferation and migration of neurons during development, but it is not known whether it influences proliferation and migration of tumor cells. We demonstrate that glutamate antagonists inhibit proliferation of human tumor cells. Colon adenocarcinoma, astrocytoma, and breast and lung carcinoma cells were most sensitive to the antiproliferative effect of the N-methyl-D-aspartate antagonist dizocilpine, whereas breast and lung carcinoma, colon adenocarcinoma, and neuroblastoma cells responded most favorably to the -amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazole-propionate antagonist GYKI52466. The antiproliferative effect of glutamate antagonists was Ca2+ dependent and resulted from decreased cell division and increased cell death. Morphological alterations induced by glutamate antagonists in tumor cells consisted of reduced membrane ruffling and pseudopodial protrusions. Furthermore, glutamate antagonists decreased motility and invasive growth of tumor cells. These findings suggest anticancer potential of glutamate antagonists.

  5. Cancer Associated Fibroblasts and Tumor Growth: Focus on Multiple Myeloma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Veirman, Kim, E-mail: kdeveirm@vub.ac.be [Department of Hematology and Immunology, Myeloma Center Brussels, Vrije Universiteit Brussel (VUB), Brussels 1090 (Belgium); Rao, Luigia [Department of Hematology and Immunology, Myeloma Center Brussels, Vrije Universiteit Brussel (VUB), Brussels 1090 (Belgium); Department of Biomedical Sciences and Human Oncology, Section of Internal Medicine, University of Bari Medical School, Bari I-70124 (Italy); De Bruyne, Elke; Menu, Eline; Van Valckenborgh, Els [Department of Hematology and Immunology, Myeloma Center Brussels, Vrije Universiteit Brussel (VUB), Brussels 1090 (Belgium); Van Riet, Ivan [Department of Hematology and Immunology, Myeloma Center Brussels, Vrije Universiteit Brussel (VUB), Brussels 1090 (Belgium); Stem Cell Laboratory, Division of Clinical Hematology, Universitair Ziekenhuis Brussel (UZ Brussel), Brussels 1090 (Belgium); Frassanito, Maria Antonia [Department of Biomedical Sciences and Human Oncology, Section of General Pathology, University of Bari Medical School, Bari I-70124 (Italy); Di Marzo, Lucia; Vacca, Angelo [Department of Biomedical Sciences and Human Oncology, Section of Internal Medicine, University of Bari Medical School, Bari I-70124 (Italy); Vanderkerken, Karin, E-mail: kdeveirm@vub.ac.be [Department of Hematology and Immunology, Myeloma Center Brussels, Vrije Universiteit Brussel (VUB), Brussels 1090 (Belgium)

    2014-06-27

    Cancer associated fibroblasts (CAFs) comprise a heterogeneous population that resides within the tumor microenvironment. They actively participate in tumor growth and metastasis by production of cytokines and chemokines, and the release of pro-inflammatory and pro-angiogenic factors, creating a more supportive microenvironment. The aim of the current review is to summarize the origin and characteristics of CAFs, and to describe the role of CAFs in tumor progression and metastasis. Furthermore, we focus on the presence of CAFs in hypoxic conditions in relation to multiple myeloma disease.

  6. Cancer Associated Fibroblasts and Tumor Growth: Focus on Multiple Myeloma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Veirman, Kim; Rao, Luigia; De Bruyne, Elke; Menu, Eline; Van Valckenborgh, Els; Van Riet, Ivan; Frassanito, Maria Antonia; Di Marzo, Lucia; Vacca, Angelo; Vanderkerken, Karin

    2014-01-01

    Cancer associated fibroblasts (CAFs) comprise a heterogeneous population that resides within the tumor microenvironment. They actively participate in tumor growth and metastasis by production of cytokines and chemokines, and the release of pro-inflammatory and pro-angiogenic factors, creating a more supportive microenvironment. The aim of the current review is to summarize the origin and characteristics of CAFs, and to describe the role of CAFs in tumor progression and metastasis. Furthermore, we focus on the presence of CAFs in hypoxic conditions in relation to multiple myeloma disease

  7. Mesenchymal stem cells promote growth and angiogenesis of tumors in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, W-H; Chang, M-C; Tsai, K-S; Hung, M-C; Chen, H-L; Hung, S-C

    2013-09-12

    Though the early integration of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) into tumor-associated stroma of cancer has been demonstrated, the functional contributions and underlying mechanisms of these cells to tumor growth and angiogenesis remain to be clarified. Using a xenograft model, human colorectal cancer cells, MSCs, and their cell mixture were introduced to a subcutaneous site of immunodeficient mice. The tumor growth rate and angiogenesis of each transplantation was then compared. We demonstrate that a variety of colorectal cancer cells, when mixed with otherwise non-tumorigenic MSCs, increase the tumor growth rate and angiogenesis more than that when mixed with carcinoma-associated fibroblasts or normal colonic fibroblasts. The secretion of interleukin-6 (IL-6) from MSCs increases the secretion of endothelin-1 (ET-1) in cancer cells, which induces the activation of Akt and ERK in endothelial cells, thereby enhancing their capacities for recruitment and angiogenesis to tumor. The IL-6/ET-1/Akt or ERK pathway of tumor-stroma interaction can be targeted by an antibody against IL-6 or Lentiviral-mediated RNAi against IL-6 in MSCs, by inhibition or knockdown of ET-1 in cancer cells, or by inhibition of ERK and Akt in host endothelial cells. These demonstrate that attempts to interrupt the interaction of MSCs and cancer cells help to abrogate angiogenesis and inhibit tumor growth in tumors formed by cancer cells admixed with MSCs. These data demonstrate that the tumor microenvironment, namely, MSCs-secreted IL-6, may enrich the proangiognic factors secreted by cancer cells to increase angiogenesis and tumor growth and that targeting this interaction may lead to novel therapeutic and preventive strategies.

  8. Cyclosporin safety in a simplified rat brain tumor implantation model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco H. C. Felix

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Brain cancer is the second neurological cause of death. A simplified animal brain tumor model using W256 (carcinoma 256, Walker cell line was developed to permit the testing of novel treatment modalities. Wistar rats had a cell tumor solution inoculated stereotactically in the basal ganglia (right subfrontal caudate. This model yielded tumor growth in 95% of the animals, and showed absence of extracranial metastasis and systemic infection. Survival median was 10 days. Estimated tumor volume was 17.08±6.7 mm³ on the 7th day and 67.25±19.8 mm³ on 9th day post-inoculation. Doubling time was 24.25 h. Tumor growth induced cachexia, but no hematological or biochemical alterations. This model behaved as an undifferentiated tumor and can be promising for studying tumor cell migration in the central nervous system. Dexamethasone 3.0 mg/kg/day diminished significantly survival in this model. Cyclosporine 10 mg/kg/day administration was safely tolerated.

  9. CHIP is a novel tumor suppressor in pancreatic cancer and inhibits tumor growth through targeting EGFR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Tianxiao; Yang, Jingxuan; Xu, Jianwei; Li, Jian; Cao, Zhe; Zhou, Li; You, Lei; Shu, Hong; Lu, Zhaohui; Li, Huihua; Li, Min; Zhang, Taiping; Zhao, Yupei

    2014-01-01

    Carboxyl terminus of heat shock protein 70-interacting protein (CHIP) is an E3 ubiquitin ligase that is involved in protein quality control and mediates several tumor-related proteins in many cancers, but the function of CHIP in pancreatic cancer is not known. Here we show that CHIP interacts and ubiquitinates epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) for proteasome-mediated degradation in pancreatic cancer cells, thereby inhibiting the activation of EGFR downstream pathways. CHIP suppressed cell proliferation, anchor-independent growth, invasion and migration, as well as enhanced apoptosis induced by erlotinib in vitro and in vivo. The expression of CHIP was decreased in pancreatic cancer tissues or sera. Low CHIP expression in tumor tissues was correlated with tumor differentiation and shorter overall survival. These observations indicate that CHIP serves as a novel tumor suppressor by down-regulating EGFR pathway in pancreatic cancer cells, decreased expression of CHIP was associated with poor prognosis in pancreatic cancer. PMID:24722501

  10. Combination therapy with gefitinib and doxorubicin inhibits tumor growth in transgenic mice with adrenal neuroblastoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawano, Kumi; Hattori, Yoshiyuki; Iwakura, Hiroshi; Akamizu, Takashi; Maitani, Yoshie

    2013-01-01

    Highly relevant mouse models of human neuroblastoma (NB) are needed to evaluate new therapeutic strategies against NB. In this study, we characterized transgenic mice with bilateral adrenal tumors. On the basis of information from the tumoral gene expression profiles, we examined the antitumor effects of unencapsulated and liposomal doxorubicin (DXR), alone and in combination with gefitinib, on adrenal NB. We showed that intravenous injection of unencapsulated or liposomal DXR alone inhibited tumor growth in a dose-dependent manner, as assessed by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). However, liposomal DXR did not exhibit greater antitumor effect than unencapsulated DXR. Immunohistochemical analysis revealed that the adrenal tumor vasculature with abundant pericyte coverage was a less leaky structure for liposomes. Combination therapy with unencapsulated or liposomal DXR plus gefitinib strongly suppressed tumor growth and delayed tumor regrowth than treatment with unencapsulated or liposomal DXR alone, even at a lower dose of DXR. Dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI analysis revealed that gefitinib treatment increased blood flow in the tumor, indicating that gefitinib treatment changes the tumor vascular environment in a manner that may increase the antitumor effect of DXR. In conclusion, the combination of gefitinib and DXR induces growth inhibition of adrenal NBs in transgenic mice. These findings will provide helpful insights into new treatments for NB

  11. Physical activity counteracts tumor cell growth in colon carcinoma C26-injected muscles: an interim report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charlotte Hiroux

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Skeletal muscle tissue is a rare site of tumor metastasis but is the main target of the degenerative processes occurring in cancer-associated cachexia syndrome. Beneficial effects of physical activity in counteracting cancer-related muscle wasting have been described in the last decades. Recently it has been shown that, in tumor xeno-transplanted mouse models, physical activity is able to directly affect tumor growth by modulating inflammatory responses in the tumor mass microenvironment. Here, we investigated the effect of physical activity on tumor cell growth in colon carcinoma C26 cells injected tibialis anterior muscles of BALB/c mice. Histological analyses revealed that 4 days of voluntary wheel running significantly counteracts tumor cell growth in C26-injected muscles compared to the non-injected sedentary controls. Since striated skeletal muscle tissue is the site of voluntary contraction, our results confirm that physical activity can also directly counteract tumor cell growth in a metabolically active tissue that is usually not a target for metastasis.

  12. Interleukin 21 therapy increases the density of tumor infiltrating CD8+ T cells and inhibits the growth of syngeneic tumors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søndergaard, Henrik; Frederiksen, Klaus S; Thygesen, Peter

    2007-01-01

    infiltrating T cells. We treated mice bearing established subcutaneous B16 melanomas or RenCa renal cell carcinomas with intraperitoneal (i.p.) or subcutaneous (s.c.) IL-21 protein therapy and subsequently scored the densities of tumor infiltrating CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells by immunohistochemistry. Whereas.......c. administration, which could account for the apparent increase in anti-tumor activity. Specific depletion of CD8(+) T cells with monoclonal antibodies completely abrogated the anti-tumor activity, whereas NK1.1(+) cell depletion did not affect tumor growth. In accordance, both routes of IL-21 administration...... significantly increased the density of tumor infiltrating CD8(+) T cells in both B16 and RenCa tumors; and in the RenCa model s.c. administration of IL-21 led to a significantly higher density of tumor infiltrating CD8(+) T cells compared to i.p. administration. The densities of CD4(+) T cells were unchanged...

  13. Silibinin inhibits accumulation of myeloid-derived suppressor cells and tumor growth of murine breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Forghani, Parvin; Khorramizadeh, Mohammad R; Waller, Edmund K

    2014-01-01

    Myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSC)s increase in blood and accumulate in the tumor microenvironment of tumor-bearing animals, contributing to immune suppression in cancer. Silibinin, a natural flavonoid from the seeds of milk thistle, has been developed as an anti-inflammatory agent and supportive care agent to reduce the toxicity of cancer chemotherapy. The goals of this study were to evaluate the effect of silibinin on MDSCs in tumor-bearing mice and antitumor activity of silibinin in a mouse model of breast cancer. 4T1 luciferase-transfected mammary carcinoma cells were injected into in the mammary fat pad female BALB/c mice, and female CB17-Prkdc Scid/J mice. Silibinin treatment started on day 4 or day 14 after tumor inoculation continued every other day. Tumor growth was monitored by bioluminescent imaging (BLI) measuring total photon flux. Flow cytometry measured total leukocytes, CD11b + Gr-1 + MDSC, and T cells in the blood and tumors of tumor-bearing mice. The effects of silibinin on 4T1 cell viability in vitro were measured by BLI. Treatment with silibinin increased overall survival in mice harboring tumors derived from the 4T1-luciferase breast cancer cell line, and reduced tumor volumes and numbers of CD11b + Gr-1 + MDSCs in the blood and tumor, and increased the content of T cells in the tumor microenvironment. Silibinin failed to inhibit tumor growth in immunocompromised severe combined immunodeficiency mice, supporting the hypothesis that anticancer effect of silibinin is immune-mediated. The antitumor activity of silibinin requires an intact host immune system and is associated with decreased accumulation of blood and tumor-associated MDSCs

  14. Stochastic ontogenetic growth model

    Science.gov (United States)

    West, B. J.; West, D.

    2012-02-01

    An ontogenetic growth model (OGM) for a thermodynamically closed system is generalized to satisfy both the first and second law of thermodynamics. The hypothesized stochastic ontogenetic growth model (SOGM) is shown to entail the interspecies allometry relation by explicitly averaging the basal metabolic rate and the total body mass over the steady-state probability density for the total body mass (TBM). This is the first derivation of the interspecies metabolic allometric relation from a dynamical model and the asymptotic steady-state distribution of the TBM is fit to data and shown to be inverse power law.

  15. B16 melanoma tumor growth is delayed in mice in an age-dependent manner

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christina Pettan-Brewer

    2012-08-01

    tumor volumes of 417.62 and 216.34 mm3 in the 16- and 24-month age groups, respectively (p≤0.005. Histologically, implanted tumors in young mice exhibited characteristics of aggressive, rapidly growing tumor cells including high vascularity, mitosis, and invasiveness compared to tumors in old mice. We contend that the decrease in B16 melanoma tumor growth seen with increasing age in B6 and CB6 F1 mice represents a biological process, which we are calling age-dependent cancer resistance (ADCR. Our data provide a detailed description of conditions necessary to use the model to investigate the mechanisms of ADCR and determine its biological and clinical relevance.

  16. Review of Growth Inhibitory Peptide as a biotherapeutic agent for tumor growth, adhesion, and metastasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muehlemann, M; Miller, K D; Dauphinee, M; Mizejewski, G J

    2005-09-01

    This review surveys the biological activities of an alpha-fetoprotein (AFP) derived peptide termed the Growth Inhibitory Peptide (GIP), which is a synthetic 34 amino acid segment produced from the full length 590 amino acid AFP molecule. The GIP has been shown to be growth-suppressive in both fetal and tumor cells but not in adult terminally-differentiated cells. The mechanism of action of this peptide has not been fully elucidated; however, GIP is highly interactive at the plasma membrane surface in cellular events such as endocytosis, cell contact inhibition and cytoskeleton-induced cell shape changes. The GIP was shown to be growth-suppressive in nine human tumor types and to suppress the spread of tumor infiltrates and metastases in human and mouse mammary cancers. The AFP-derived peptide and its subfragments were also shown to inhibit tumor cell adhesion to extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins and to block platelet aggregation; thus it was expected that the GIP would inhibit cell spreading/migration and metastatic infiltration into host tissues such as lung and pancreas. It was further found that the cyclic versus linear configuration of GIP determined its biological and anti-cancer efficacy. Genbank amino acid sequence identities with a variety of integrin alpha/beta chain proteins supported the GIP's linkage to inhibition of tumor cell adhesion and platelet aggregation. The combined properties of tumor growth suppression, prevention of tumor cell-to-ECM adhesion, and inhibition of platelet aggregation indicate that tumor-to-platelet interactions present promising targets for GIP as an anti-metastatic agent. Finally, based on cholinergic studies, it was proposed that GIP could influence the enzymatic activity of membrane acetylcholinesterases during tumor growth and metastasis. It was concluded that the GIP derived from full-length AFP represents a growth inhibitory motif possessing instrinsic properties that allow it to interfere in cell surface events such

  17. A model of tumor architecture and spatial interactions with tumor microenvironment in breast carcinoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben Cheikh, Bassem; Bor-Angelier, Catherine; Racoceanu, Daniel

    2017-03-01

    Breast carcinomas are cancers that arise from the epithelial cells of the breast, which are the cells that line the lobules and the lactiferous ducts. Breast carcinoma is the most common type of breast cancer and can be divided into different subtypes based on architectural features and growth patterns, recognized during a histopathological examination. Tumor microenvironment (TME) is the cellular environment in which tumor cells develop. Being composed of various cell types having different biological roles, TME is recognized as playing an important role in the progression of the disease. The architectural heterogeneity in breast carcinomas and the spatial interactions with TME are, to date, not well understood. Developing a spatial model of tumor architecture and spatial interactions with TME can advance our understanding of tumor heterogeneity. Furthermore, generating histological synthetic datasets can contribute to validating, and comparing analytical methods that are used in digital pathology. In this work, we propose a modeling method that applies to different breast carcinoma subtypes and TME spatial distributions based on mathematical morphology. The model is based on a few morphological parameters that give access to a large spectrum of breast tumor architectures and are able to differentiate in-situ ductal carcinomas (DCIS) and histological subtypes of invasive carcinomas such as ductal (IDC) and lobular carcinoma (ILC). In addition, a part of the parameters of the model controls the spatial distribution of TME relative to the tumor. The validation of the model has been performed by comparing morphological features between real and simulated images.

  18. Dichloroacetate induces tumor-specific radiosensitivity in vitro but attenuates radiation-induced tumor growth delay in vivo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zwicker, F.; Roeder, F.; Debus, J.; Huber, P.E. [University Hospital Center Heidelberg, Heidelberg (Germany). Dept. of Radiation Oncology; Deutsches Krebsforschungszentrum (DKFZ), Heidelberg (Germany). Clinical Cooperation Unit Molecular Radiation Oncology; Kirsner, A.; Weber, K.J. [University Hospital Center Heidelberg, Heidelberg (Germany). Dept. of Radiation Oncology; Peschke, P. [Deutsches Krebsforschungszentrum (DKFZ), Heidelberg (Germany). Clinical Cooperation Unit Molecular Radiation Oncology

    2013-08-15

    Background: Inhibition of pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase (PDK) by dichloroacetate (DCA) can shift tumor cell metabolism from anaerobic glycolysis to glucose oxidation, with activation of mitochondrial activity and chemotherapy-dependent apoptosis. In radiotherapy, DCA could thus potentially enhance the frequently moderate apoptotic response of cancer cells that results from their mitochondrial dysfunction. The aim of this study was to investigate tumor-specific radiosensitization by DCA in vitro and in a human tumor xenograft mouse model in vivo. Materials and methods: The interaction of DCA with photon beam radiation was investigated in the human tumor cell lines WIDR (colorectal) and LN18 (glioma), as well as in the human normal tissue cell lines HUVEC (endothelial), MRC5 (lung fibroblasts) and TK6 (lymphoblastoid). Apoptosis induction in vitro was assessed by DAPI staining and sub-G1 flow cytometry; cell survival was quantified by clonogenic assay. The effect of DCA in vivo was investigated in WIDR xenograft tumors growing subcutaneously on BALB/c-nu/nu mice, with and without fractionated irradiation. Histological examination included TUNEL and Ki67 staining for apoptosis and proliferation, respectively, as well as pinomidazole labeling for hypoxia. Results: DCA treatment led to decreased clonogenic survival and increased specific apoptosis rates in tumor cell lines (LN18, WIDR) but not in normal tissue cells (HUVEC, MRC5, TK6). However, this significant tumor-specific radiosensitization by DCA in vitro was not reflected by the situation in vivo: The growth suppression of WIDR xenograft tumors after irradiation was reduced upon additional DCA treatment (reflected by Ki67 expression levels), although early tumor cell apoptosis rates were significantly increased by DCA. This apparently paradoxical effect was accompanied by a marked DCA-dependent induction of hypoxia in tumor-tissue. Conclusion: DCA induced tumor-specific radiosensitization in vitro but not in vivo

  19. Oncolytic adenovirus targeting cyclin E overexpression repressed tumor growth in syngeneic immunocompetent mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheng, Pei-Hsin; Rao, Xiao-Mei; Wechman, Stephen L.; Li, Xiao-Feng; McMasters, Kelly M.; Zhou, Heshan Sam

    2015-01-01

    Clinical trials have indicated that preclinical results obtained with human tumor xenografts in mouse models may overstate the potential of adenovirus (Ad)-mediated oncolytic therapies. We have previously demonstrated that the replication of human Ads depends on cyclin E dysregulation or overexpression in cancer cells. ED-1 cell derived from mouse lung adenocarcinomas triggered by transgenic overexpression of human cyclin E may be applied to investigate the antitumor efficacy of oncolytic Ads. Ad-cycE was used to target cyclin E overexpression in ED-1 cells and repress tumor growth in a syngeneic mouse model for investigation of oncolytic virotherapies. Murine ED-1 cells were permissive for human Ad replication and Ad-cycE repressed ED-1 tumor growth in immunocompetent FVB mice. ED-1 cells destroyed by oncolytic Ads in tumors were encircled in capsule-like structures, while cells outside the capsules were not infected and survived the treatment. Ad-cycE can target cyclin E overexpression in cancer cells and repress tumor growth in syngeneic mouse models. The capsule structures formed after Ad intratumoral injection may prevent viral particles from spreading to the entire tumor. The online version of this article (doi:10.1186/s12885-015-1731-x) contains supplementary material, which is available to authorized users

  20. Lidocaine Induces Apoptosis and Suppresses Tumor Growth in Human Hepatocellular Carcinoma Cells In Vitro and in a Xenograft Model In Vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xing, Wei; Chen, Dong-Tai; Pan, Jia-Hao; Chen, Yong-Hua; Yan, Yan; Li, Qiang; Xue, Rui-Feng; Yuan, Yun-Fei; Zeng, Wei-An

    2017-05-01

    Recent epidemiologic studies have focused on the potential beneficial effects of regional anesthetics, and the differences in cancer prognosis may be the result of anesthetics on cancer biologic behavior. However, the function and underlying mechanisms of lidocaine in hepatocellular carcinoma both in vitro and in vivo have been poorly studied. Human HepG2 cells were treated with lidocaine. Cell viability, colony formation, cell cycle, and apoptosis were assessed. The effects of lidocaine on apoptosis-related and mitogen-activated protein kinase protein expression were evaluated by Western blot analysis. The antitumor activity of lidocaine in hepatocellular carcinoma with or without cisplatin was investigated with in vitro experiments and also with animal experiments. Lidocaine inhibited the growth of HepG2 cells in a dose- and time-dependent manner. The authors also found that lidocaine arrested cells in the G0/G1 phase of the cell cycle (63.7 ± 1.7% vs. 72.4 ± 3.2%; P = 0.0143) and induced apoptosis (1.7 ± 0.3% vs. 5.0 ± 0.7%; P = 0.0009). Lidocaine may exert these functions by causing an increase in Bax protein and activated caspase-3 and a corresponding decrease in Bcl-2 protein through the extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 and p38 pathways. More importantly, for the first time, xenograft experiments (n = 8 per group) indicated that lidocaine suppressed tumor development (P lidocaine vs. control) and enhanced the sensitivity of cisplatin (P = 0.0008; lidocaine plus cisplatin vs. cisplatin). The authors' findings suggest that lidocaine may exert potent antitumor activity in hepatocellular carcinoma. Furthermore, combining lidocaine with cisplatin may be a novel treatment option for hepatocellular carcinoma.

  1. Taguchi method for partial differential equations with application in tumor growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilea, M; Turnea, M; Rotariu, M; Arotăriţei, D; Popescu, Marilena

    2014-01-01

    The growth of tumors is a highly complex process. To describe this process, mathematical models are needed. A variety of partial differential mathematical models for tumor growth have been developed and studied. Most of those models are based on the reaction-diffusion equations and mass conservation law. A variety of modeling strategies have been developed, each focusing on tumor growth. Systems of time-dependent partial differential equations occur in many branches of applied mathematics. The vast majority of mathematical models in tumor growth are formulated in terms of partial differential equations. We propose a mathematical model for the interactions between these three cancer cell populations. The Taguchi methods are widely used by quality engineering scientists to compare the effects of multiple variables, together with their interactions, with a simple and manageable experimental design. In Taguchi's design of experiments, variation is more interesting to study than the average. First, Taguchi methods are utilized to search for the significant factors and the optimal level combination of parameters. Except the three parameters levels, other factors levels other factors levels would not be considered. Second, cutting parameters namely, cutting speed, depth of cut, and feed rate are designed using the Taguchi method. Finally, the adequacy of the developed mathematical model is proved by ANOVA. According to the results of ANOVA, since the percentage contribution of the combined error is as small. Many mathematical models can be quantitatively characterized by partial differential equations. The use of MATLAB and Taguchi method in this article illustrates the important role of informatics in research in mathematical modeling. The study of tumor growth cells is an exciting and important topic in cancer research and will profit considerably from theoretical input. Interpret these results to be a permanent collaboration between math's and medical oncologists.

  2. Growth of Malignant Non-CNS Tumors Alters Brain Metabolome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovalchuk, Anna; Nersisyan, Lilit; Mandal, Rupasri; Wishart, David; Mancini, Maria; Sidransky, David; Kolb, Bryan; Kovalchuk, Olga

    2018-01-01

    Cancer survivors experience numerous treatment side effects that negatively affect their quality of life. Cognitive side effects are especially insidious, as they affect memory, cognition, and learning. Neurocognitive deficits occur prior to cancer treatment, arising even before cancer diagnosis, and we refer to them as “tumor brain.” Metabolomics is a new area of research that focuses on metabolome profiles and provides important mechanistic insights into various human diseases, including cancer, neurodegenerative diseases, and aging. Many neurological diseases and conditions affect metabolic processes in the brain. However, the tumor brain metabolome has never been analyzed. In our study we used direct flow injection/mass spectrometry (DI-MS) analysis to establish the effects of the growth of lung cancer, pancreatic cancer, and sarcoma on the brain metabolome of TumorGraft™ mice. We found that the growth of malignant non-CNS tumors impacted metabolic processes in the brain, affecting protein biosynthesis, and amino acid and sphingolipid metabolism. The observed metabolic changes were similar to those reported for neurodegenerative diseases and brain aging, and may have potential mechanistic value for future analysis of the tumor brain phenomenon. PMID:29515623

  3. Dietary rice component, Oryzanol, inhibits tumor growth in tumor-bearing Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scope: We investigated the effects of rice bran and components on tumor growth in mice. Methods and results: Mice fed standard diets supplemented with rice bran, '-oryzanol, Ricetrienol®, ferulic acid, or phytic acid for 2 weeks were inoculated with CT-26 colon cancer cells and fed the same diet fo...

  4. Comparison of oral and transdermal administration of rasagiline mesylate on human melanoma tumor growth in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meier-Davis, Susan R; Dines, Kevin; Arjmand, Fatima M; Hamlin, Richard; Huang, Betsy; Wen, Jainye; Christianson, Chad; Shudo, Jutaro; Nagata, Tetsuto

    2012-12-01

    Transdermal patch administration results in a locally high concentration of drug that induce local toxicity, including tumorogenicity. As a worst-case scenario for consequences of repeated application on neoplastic growth, the melanin-binding drug, rasagiline, was used in a transdermal formulation applied directly to a human-derived melanoma to determine the effects on tumor growth. Rasagiline mesylate was administered either orally or transdermally to athymic mice implanted with human melanoma (SKMEL28) to determine the effects on tumor growth and survival. Over a 21-day period, animals were administered daily oral gavage (15 mg/kg) or one or two rasagiline mesylate transdermal patches every 3 days. After the last dose administration, blood samples were collected to confirm drug exposure. All animals from the untreated, vehicle and rasagiline groups survived to the end of the study; however, 7 out of the 10 cisplatin-treated animals died before the end of the study. Rasagiline mesylate dosed either via the oral or transdermal routes had comparable plasma exposure and, unexpectedly, significantly reduced absolute tumor volumes and tumor growth rates in the nude mouse SKMEL28 xenograft model. Transdermal delivery of melanin-binding rasagiline does not increase melanoma growth in the xenograft model. Because rasagiline decreases melanoma growth, it may be candidate for combination therapy for melanoma.

  5. Human STEAP3 maintains tumor growth under hypoferric condition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Isobe, Taichi, E-mail: tisobe@intmed1.med.kyushu-u.ac.jp [Department of Medicine and Biosystemic Science, Kyushu University Graduate School of Medical Sciences, 3-1-1 Maidashi, Higashi-ku, Fukuoka 812-8582 (Japan); Baba, Eishi, E-mail: e-baba@intmed1.med.kyushu-u.ac.jp [Department of Medicine and Biosystemic Science, Kyushu University Graduate School of Medical Sciences, 3-1-1 Maidashi, Higashi-ku, Fukuoka 812-8582 (Japan); Arita, Shuji, E-mail: arita.s@nk-cc.go.jp [Department of Medicine and Biosystemic Science, Kyushu University Graduate School of Medical Sciences, 3-1-1 Maidashi, Higashi-ku, Fukuoka 812-8582 (Japan); Komoda, Masato, E-mail: komoda@intmed1.med.kyushu-u.ac.jp [Department of Medicine and Biosystemic Science, Kyushu University Graduate School of Medical Sciences, 3-1-1 Maidashi, Higashi-ku, Fukuoka 812-8582 (Japan); Tamura, Shingo, E-mail: tamshin@intmed1.med.kyushu-u.ac.jp [Department of Medicine and Biosystemic Science, Kyushu University Graduate School of Medical Sciences, 3-1-1 Maidashi, Higashi-ku, Fukuoka 812-8582 (Japan); Shirakawa, Tsuyoshi, E-mail: t-w-r@intmed1.med.kyushu-u.ac.jp [Department of Medicine and Biosystemic Science, Kyushu University Graduate School of Medical Sciences, 3-1-1 Maidashi, Higashi-ku, Fukuoka 812-8582 (Japan); Ariyama, Hiroshi, E-mail: hariyama@kyumed.jp [Department of Medicine and Biosystemic Science, Kyushu University Graduate School of Medical Sciences, 3-1-1 Maidashi, Higashi-ku, Fukuoka 812-8582 (Japan); Takaishi, Shigeo, E-mail: takaishi@med.kyushu-u.ac.jp [Department of Medicine and Biosystemic Science, Kyushu University Graduate School of Medical Sciences, 3-1-1 Maidashi, Higashi-ku, Fukuoka 812-8582 (Japan); Kusaba, Hitoshi, E-mail: hkusaba@intmed1.med.kyushu-u.ac.jp [Department of Medicine and Biosystemic Science, Kyushu University Graduate School of Medical Sciences, 3-1-1 Maidashi, Higashi-ku, Fukuoka 812-8582 (Japan); and others

    2011-11-01

    Iron is essential in cellular proliferation and survival based on its crucial roles in DNA and ATP synthesis. Tumor cells proliferate rapidly even in patients with low serum iron, although their actual mechanisms are not well known. To elucidate molecular mechanisms of efficient tumor progression under the hypoferric condition, we studied the roles of six-transmembrane epithelial antigen of the prostate family member 3 (STEAP3), which was reported to facilitate iron uptake. Using Raji cells with low STEAP3 mRNA expression, human STEAP3-overexpressing cells were established. The impact of STEAP3 expression was analyzed about the amount of iron storage, the survival under hypoferric conditions in vitro and the growth of tumor in vivo. STEAP3 overexpression increased ferritin, an indicator of iron storage, in STEAP3-overexpressing Raji cells. STEAP3 gave Raji cells the resistance to iron deprivation-induced apoptosis. These STEAP3-overexpressing Raji cells preserved efficient growth even in hypoferric mice, while parental Raji cells grew less rapidly. In addition, iron deficiency enhanced STEAP3 mRNA expression in tumor cells. Furthermore, human colorectal cancer tissues exhibited more STEAP3 mRNA expression and iron storage compared with normal colon mucosa. These findings indicate that STEAP3 maintains iron storage in human malignant cells and tumor proliferation under the hypoferric condition. -- Highlights: {yields} STEAP3 expression results in increment of stored intracellular iron. {yields} Iron deprivation induces expression of STEAP3. {yields} Colorectal cancer expresses STEAP3 highly and stores iron much. {yields} STEAP3 expressing tumors preserves growth even in mice being hypoferremia.

  6. Radix Astragali and Tanshinone Help Carboplatin Inhibit B16 Tumor Cell Growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jinyi; Xu, Haiming; Zhang, Lei; Zhang, Xiuying

    2016-08-01

    Excessive UV radiation causes increased melanoma incidence. Postoperation chemotherapy will destroy lymphocytes and compromise immune response. Immunodepression is also detected in patients with cancers. Previous studies suggested that polysaccharide-protein complexes manifested immunomodulatory and antitumor activities. Radix Astragali (RA) extract is a product of polysaccharide-protein complexes, which has been used in the treatment of a variety of diseases because of its low toxicity to the host. Tanshinone (TA) is a derivative of phenanthrenequinone isolated from Danshen, which is suggested to inhibit tumor growth by inducing apoptosis in tumor cells. Carboplatin (CA) is a commonly used chemotherapeutic drug in melanoma treatment. Therefore, we hypothesized that the combination of RA and TA will help CA better inhibit the B16 cell growth. The study will test that the efficacy of growth inhibition of tumor cell produced by CA + RA + TA is better than CA + RA or CA + TA. The B16 tumor cells were injected to Swiss-Hauschka (ICR) mice subcutaneously. Twenty-four hours later, mice received CA intraperitoneally, CA + RA (RA were administered gastrically at the dosage of 10 g/kg body weight), CA + TA (TA were administered gastrically at the dosage of 0.5 g/kg body weight), or no treatment (model group). Tumor weight, volume, latency, incidence, the percentage of CD4(+) and CD8(+) in spleen, and natural killer (NK), and cytotoxic lymphocyte (CTL) activities were measured and compared among different groups. Compared with mice treated with CA + RA, CA + TA, or CA alone, the mice treated with CA + RA + TA showed (1) significantly smaller tumor weight and tumor volume; (2) significantly longer tumor latency; (3) significantly lower tumor incidence; and (4) significantly increased percentage of CD4(+) and CD8(+) in spleen and increased activities of NK and CTL. Combination of RA and TA can help CA produce more effective inhibition on B16 cell growth. © The Author(s) 2015.

  7. Modeling the Effect of Tumor Size in Early Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verschraegen, Claire; Vinh-Hung, Vincent; Cserni, Gábor; Gordon, Richard; Royce, Melanie E.; Vlastos, Georges; Tai, Patricia; Storme, Guy

    2005-01-01

    Summary Background Data: The purpose of this study was to determine the type of relationship between tumor size and mortality in early breast carcinoma. Methods: The data was abstracted from 83,686 cases registered in the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results Program of women diagnosed with primary breast carcinoma between 1988 and 1997 presenting with a T1–T2 lesion and no metastasis in whom axillary node dissection was performed: 58,070 women were node-negative (N0) and 25,616 were node-positive (N+). End point was death from any cause. Tumor size was modeled as a continuous variable by proportional hazards using a generalized additive models procedure. Results: Functionally, a Gompertzian expression exp(-exp(-(size-15)/10)) provided a good fit to the effect of tumor size (in millimeters) on mortality, irrespective of nodal status. Quantitatively, for tumor size between 3 and 50 mm, the increase of crude cumulative death rate (number of observed deaths divided by the number of patients at risk) increased with size from 10% to 25% for N0 and from 20% to 40% for N+. Conclusions: The functional relationship of tumor size with mortality is concordant with current knowledge of tumor growth. However, its qualitative and quantitative independence of nodal status is in contradiction with the prevailing concept of sequential disease progression from primary tumor to regional nodes. This argues against the perception that nodal metastases are caused by the primary tumor. PMID:15650642

  8. Tumor dormancy and frailty models: A novel approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rancoita, Paola M V; Valberg, Morten; Demicheli, Romano; Biganzoli, Elia; Di Serio, Clelia

    2017-03-01

    Frailty models are here proposed in the tumor dormancy framework, in order to account for possible unobservable dependence mechanisms in cancer studies where a non-negligible proportion of cancer patients relapses years or decades after surgical removal of the primary tumor. Relapses do not seem to follow a memory-less process, since their timing distribution leads to multimodal hazards. From a biomedical perspective, this behavior may be explained by tumor dormancy, i.e., for some patients microscopic tumor foci may remain asymptomatic for a prolonged time interval and, when they escape from dormancy, micrometastatic growth results in a clinical disease appearance. The activation of the growth phase at different metastatic states would explain the occurrence of metastatic recurrences and mortality at different times (multimodal hazard). We propose a new frailty model which includes in the risk function a random source of heterogeneity (frailty variable) affecting the components of the hazard function. Thus, the individual hazard rate results as the product of a random frailty variable and the sum of basic hazard rates. In tumor dormancy, the basic hazard rates correspond to micrometastatic developments starting from different initial states. The frailty variable represents the heterogeneity among patients with respect to relapse, which might be related to unknown mechanisms that regulate tumor dormancy. We use our model to estimate the overall survival in a large breast cancer dataset, showing how this improves the understanding of the underlying biological process. © 2016, The International Biometric Society.

  9. Rapamycin delays growth of Wnt-1 tumors in spite of suppression of host immunity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Svirshchevskaya, Elena V; Mariotti, Jacopo; Wright, Mollie H; Viskova, Natalia Y; Telford, William; Fowler, Daniel H; Varticovski, Lyuba

    2008-01-01

    Rapamycin, an inhibitor of mammalian target of Rapamycin (mTOR), is an immunosuppressive agent that has anti-proliferative effects on some tumors. However, the role of Rapamycin-induced immune suppression on tumor progression has not been examined. We developed a transplantation model for generation of mammary tumors in syngeneic recipients that can be used to address the role of the immune system on tumor progression. We examined the effect of Rapamycin on the immune system and growth of MMTV-driven Wnt-1 mammary tumors which were transplanted into irradiated and bone marrow-reconstituted, or naïve mice. Rapamycin induced severe immunosuppression and significantly delayed the growth of Wnt-1 tumors. T cell depletion in spleen and thymus and reduction in T cell cytokine secretion were evident within 7 days of therapy. By day 20, splenic but not thymic T cell counts, and cytokine secretion recovered. We determined whether adoptive T cell therapy enhances the anti-cancer effect using ex vivo generated Rapamycin-resistant T cells. However, T cell transfer during Rapamycin therapy did not improve the outcome relative to drug therapy alone. Thus, we could not confirm that suppression of T cell immunity contributes to tumor growth in this model. Consistent with suppression of the mTOR pathway, decreased 4E-BP1, p70 S6-kinase, and S6 protein phosphorylation correlated with a decrease in Wnt-1 tumor cell proliferation. Rapamycin has a direct anti-tumor effect on Wnt-1 breast cancer in vivo that involves inhibition of the mTOR pathway at doses that also suppress host immune responses

  10. Cancer Stem Cell Plasticity as Tumor Growth Promoter and Catalyst of Population Collapse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Poleszczuk

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available It is increasingly argued that cancer stem cells are not a cellular phenotype but rather a transient state that cells can acquire, either through intrinsic signaling cascades or in response to environmental cues. While cancer stem cell plasticity is generally associated with increased aggressiveness and treatment resistance, we set out to thoroughly investigate the impact of different rates of plasticity on early and late tumor growth dynamics and the response to therapy. We develop an agent-based model of cancer stem cell driven tumor growth, in which plasticity is defined as a spontaneous transition between stem and nonstem cancer cell states. Simulations of the model show that plasticity can substantially increase tumor growth rate and invasion. At high rates of plasticity, however, the cells get exhausted and the tumor will undergo spontaneous remission in the long term. In a series of in silico trials, we show that such remission can be facilitated through radiotherapy. The presented study suggests that stem cell plasticity has rather complex, nonintuitive implications on tumor growth and treatment response. Further theoretical, experimental, and integrated studies are needed to fully decipher cancer stem cell plasticity and how it can be harnessed for novel therapeutic approaches.

  11. Enhanced tumor growth in the NaS1 sulfate transporter null mouse

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dawson, Paul Anthony; Choyce, Allison; Chuang, Christine

    2010-01-01

    Sulfate plays an important role in maintaining normal structure and function of tissues, and its content is decreased in certain cancers including lung carcinoma. In this study, we investigated tumor growth in a mouse model of hyposulfatemia (Nas1(-/-)) and compared it to wild-type (Nas1(+/+)) mice...

  12. Linear ubiquitin chain induces apoptosis and inhibits tumor growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Zhoushuai; Jiang, Wandong; Wang, Guifen; Sun, Ying; Xiao, Wei

    2018-01-01

    Ubiquitination of proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) plays an important role in DNA damage response. Ectopic expression of PCNA fused at either terminus with ubiquitin (Ub) lacking two C-terminal glycine residues induces translesion DNA synthesis which resembles synthesis mediated by PCNA monoubiquitination. PCNA fused with Ub containing the C-terminal Gly residues at the C-terminus can be further polyubiquitinated in a Gly-dependent manner, which inhibits cell proliferation and induces ATR-dependent replication checkpoint. In this study, we surprisingly found that PCNA fused to a head-to-tail linear Ub chain induces apoptosis in a Ub chain length-dependent manner. Further investigation revealed that the apoptotic effect is actually induced by the linear Ub chain independently from PCNA, as the Ub chain fused to GFP or an epitope tag still efficiently induces apoptosis. It is revealed that the artificial linear Ub chain differs from endogenously encoded linear Ub chains in that its Ubs contain a Ub-G76S substitution, making the Ub chain resistant to cleavage by deubiquitination enzymes. We demonstrated in this study that ectopic expression of the artificial Ub chain alone in cultured human cancer cells is sufficient to inhibit tumor growth in a xenograft mouse model, making the linear Ub chain a putative anti-cancer agent.

  13. Predicting the Probability of Abnormal Stimulated Growth Hormone Response in Children After Radiotherapy for Brain Tumors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hua Chiaho, E-mail: Chia-Ho.Hua@stjude.org [Department of Radiological Sciences, St. Jude Children' s Research Hospital, Memphis, Tennessee (United States); Wu Shengjie [Department of Biostatistics, St. Jude Children' s Research Hospital, Memphis, Tennessee (United States); Chemaitilly, Wassim [Division of Endocrinology, Department of Pediatric Medicine, St. Jude Children' s Research Hospital, Memphis, Tennessee (United States); Lukose, Renin C.; Merchant, Thomas E. [Department of Radiological Sciences, St. Jude Children' s Research Hospital, Memphis, Tennessee (United States)

    2012-11-15

    Purpose: To develop a mathematical model utilizing more readily available measures than stimulation tests that identifies brain tumor survivors with high likelihood of abnormal growth hormone secretion after radiotherapy (RT), to avoid late recognition and a consequent delay in growth hormone replacement therapy. Methods and Materials: We analyzed 191 prospectively collected post-RT evaluations of peak growth hormone level (arginine tolerance/levodopa stimulation test), serum insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1), IGF-binding protein 3, height, weight, growth velocity, and body mass index in 106 children and adolescents treated for ependymoma (n = 72), low-grade glioma (n = 28) or craniopharyngioma (n = 6), who had normal growth hormone levels before RT. Normal level in this study was defined as the peak growth hormone response to the stimulation test {>=}7 ng/mL. Results: Independent predictor variables identified by multivariate logistic regression with high statistical significance (p < 0.0001) included IGF-1 z score, weight z score, and hypothalamic dose. The developed predictive model demonstrated a strong discriminatory power with an area under the receiver operating characteristic curve of 0.883. At a potential cutoff point of probability of 0.3 the sensitivity was 80% and specificity 78%. Conclusions: Without unpleasant and expensive frequent stimulation tests, our model provides a quantitative approach to closely follow the growth hormone secretory capacity of brain tumor survivors. It allows identification of high-risk children for subsequent confirmatory tests and in-depth workup for diagnosis of growth hormone deficiency.

  14. Predicting the Probability of Abnormal Stimulated Growth Hormone Response in Children After Radiotherapy for Brain Tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hua Chiaho; Wu Shengjie; Chemaitilly, Wassim; Lukose, Renin C.; Merchant, Thomas E.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To develop a mathematical model utilizing more readily available measures than stimulation tests that identifies brain tumor survivors with high likelihood of abnormal growth hormone secretion after radiotherapy (RT), to avoid late recognition and a consequent delay in growth hormone replacement therapy. Methods and Materials: We analyzed 191 prospectively collected post-RT evaluations of peak growth hormone level (arginine tolerance/levodopa stimulation test), serum insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1), IGF-binding protein 3, height, weight, growth velocity, and body mass index in 106 children and adolescents treated for ependymoma (n = 72), low-grade glioma (n = 28) or craniopharyngioma (n = 6), who had normal growth hormone levels before RT. Normal level in this study was defined as the peak growth hormone response to the stimulation test ≥7 ng/mL. Results: Independent predictor variables identified by multivariate logistic regression with high statistical significance (p < 0.0001) included IGF-1 z score, weight z score, and hypothalamic dose. The developed predictive model demonstrated a strong discriminatory power with an area under the receiver operating characteristic curve of 0.883. At a potential cutoff point of probability of 0.3 the sensitivity was 80% and specificity 78%. Conclusions: Without unpleasant and expensive frequent stimulation tests, our model provides a quantitative approach to closely follow the growth hormone secretory capacity of brain tumor survivors. It allows identification of high-risk children for subsequent confirmatory tests and in-depth workup for diagnosis of growth hormone deficiency.

  15. Computational Model for Tumor Oxygenation Applied to Clinical Data on Breast Tumor Hemoglobin Concentrations Suggests Vascular Dilatation and Compression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Welter

    Full Text Available We present a computational model for trans-vascular oxygen transport in synthetic tumor and host tissue blood vessel networks, aiming at qualitatively explaining published data of optical mammography, which were obtained from 87 breast cancer patients. The data generally show average hemoglobin concentration to be higher in tumors versus host tissue whereas average oxy-to total hemoglobin concentration (vascular segment RBC-volume-weighted blood oxygenation can be above or below normal. Starting from a synthetic arterio-venous initial network the tumor vasculature was generated by processes involving cooption, angiogenesis, and vessel regression. Calculations of spatially resolved blood flow, hematocrit, oxy- and total hemoglobin concentrations, blood and tissue oxygenation were carried out for ninety tumor and associated normal vessel networks starting from various assumed geometries of feeding arteries and draining veins. Spatial heterogeneity in the extra-vascular partial oxygen pressure distribution can be related to various tumor compartments characterized by varying capillary densities and blood flow characteristics. The reported higher average hemoglobin concentration of tumors is explained by growth and dilatation of tumor blood vessels. Even assuming sixfold metabolic rate of oxygen consumption in tumorous versus host tissue, the predicted oxygen hemoglobin concentrations are above normal. Such tumors are likely associated with high tumor blood flow caused by high-caliber blood vessels crossing the tumor volume and hence oxygen supply exceeding oxygen demand. Tumor oxy- to total hemoglobin concentration below normal could only be achieved by reducing tumor vessel radii during growth by a randomly selected factor, simulating compression caused by intra-tumoral solid stress due to proliferation of cells and extracellular matrix. Since compression of blood vessels will impede chemotherapy we conclude that tumors with oxy- to total

  16. Disrupting Hypoxia-Induced Bicarbonate Transport Acidifies Tumor Cells and Suppresses Tumor Growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McIntyre, Alan; Hulikova, Alzbeta; Ledaki, Ioanna; Snell, Cameron; Singleton, Dean; Steers, Graham; Seden, Peter; Jones, Dylan; Bridges, Esther; Wigfield, Simon; Li, Ji-Liang; Russell, Angela; Swietach, Pawel; Harris, Adrian L

    2016-07-01

    Tumor hypoxia is associated clinically with therapeutic resistance and poor patient outcomes. One feature of tumor hypoxia is activated expression of carbonic anhydrase IX (CA9), a regulator of pH and tumor growth. In this study, we investigated the hypothesis that impeding the reuptake of bicarbonate produced extracellularly by CA9 could exacerbate the intracellular acidity produced by hypoxic conditions, perhaps compromising cell growth and viability as a result. In 8 of 10 cancer cell lines, we found that hypoxia induced the expression of at least one bicarbonate transporter. The most robust and frequent inductions were of the sodium-driven bicarbonate transporters SLC4A4 and SLC4A9, which rely upon both HIF1α and HIF2α activity for their expression. In cancer cell spheroids, SLC4A4 or SLC4A9 disruption by either genetic or pharmaceutical approaches acidified intracellular pH and reduced cell growth. Furthermore, treatment of spheroids with S0859, a small-molecule inhibitor of sodium-driven bicarbonate transporters, increased apoptosis in the cell lines tested. Finally, RNAi-mediated attenuation of SLC4A9 increased apoptosis in MDA-MB-231 breast cancer spheroids and dramatically reduced growth of MDA-MB-231 breast tumors or U87 gliomas in murine xenografts. Our findings suggest that disrupting pH homeostasis by blocking bicarbonate import might broadly relieve the common resistance of hypoxic tumors to anticancer therapy. Cancer Res; 76(13); 3744-55. ©2016 AACR. ©2016 American Association for Cancer Research.

  17. Extract of Cordyceps militaris inhibits angiogenesis and suppresses tumor growth of human malignant melanoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruma, I Made Winarsa; Putranto, Endy Widya; Kondo, Eisaku; Watanabe, Risayo; Saito, Ken; Inoue, Yusuke; Yamamoto, Ken-Ichi; Nakata, Susumu; Kaihata, Masaji; Murata, Hitoshi; Sakaguchi, Masakiyo

    2014-07-01

    Angiogenesis is essential for tumor development and metastasis. Among several angiogenic factors, vascular endothelial growth factor receptor (VEGF) is important for tumor-derived angiogenesis and commonly overexpressed in solid tumors. Thus, many antitumor strategies targeting VEGF have been developed to inhibit cancer angiogenesis, offering insights into the successful treatment of solid cancers. However, there are a number of issues such as harmful effects on normal vascularity in clinical trials. Taking this into consideration, we employed Cordyceps militaris as an antitumor approach due to its biological safety in vivo. The herbal medicinal mushroom Cordyceps militaris has been reported to show potential anticancer properties including anti-angiogenic capacity; however, its concrete properties have yet to be fully demonstrated. In this study, we aimed to elucidate the biological role of Cordyceps militaris extract in tumor cells, especially in regulating angiogenesis and tumor growth of a human malignant melanoma cell line. We demonstrated that Cordyceps militaris extract remarkably suppressed tumor growth via induction of apoptotic cell death in culture that links to the abrogation of VEGF production in melanoma cells. This was followed by mitigation of Akt1 and GSK-3β activation, while p38α phosphorylation levels were increased. Extract treatment in mouse model xenografted with human melanoma cells resulted in a dramatic antitumor effect with down-regulation of VEGF expression. The results suggest that suppression of tumor growth by Cordyceps militaris extract is, at least, mediated by its anti-angiogenicity and apoptosis induction capacities. Cordyceps militaris extract may be a potent antitumor herbal drug for solid tumors.

  18. Transgenic Overexpression of the Proprotein Convertase Furin Enhances Skin Tumor Growth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian Fu

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Furin, one of the members of the family of proprotein convertases (PCs, ubiquitously expressed as a type I membrane-bound proteinase, activates several proteins that contribute to tumor progression. In vitro studies using cancer cell lines and clinical specimens demonstrated that furin processes important substrates such as insulin-like growth factor 1 receptor (IGF-1R and transforming growth factor β, leading to increased tumor growth and progression. Despite the numerous studies associating furin with tumor development, its effects in preclinical models has not been comprehensively studied. In this study, we sought to determine the protumorigenic role of furin in vivo after a two-stage chemical carcinogenesis protocol in transgenic mice in which furin expression was targeted to the epidermal basal layer. We found that processing of the PC substrate IGF-1R and the proliferation rate of mouse epidermis was enhanced in transgenic mice when compared with their WT counterparts. Histopathologic diagnoses of the tumors demonstrated that furin transgenic mice (line F47 developed twice as many squamous carcinomas as the control, WT mice (P < .002. Similarly, tumors cells from transgenic mice were able to process PC substrates more efficiently than tumor cells from WT mice. Furthermore, furin expression resulted in a higher SCC volume in transgenic mice as well as an increase in the percentage of high-grade SCC, including poorly differentiated and spindle cell carcinomas. In conclusion, expression of furin in the basal layer of the epidermis increased tumor development and enhanced tumor growth, supporting the consideration of furin as a potential target for cancer treatment.

  19. Growth hormone deficiency in children with brain tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shalet, S.M.; Beardwell, C.G.; Morris-Jones, P.; Bamford, F.N.; Ribeiro, G.G.; Pearson, D.

    1976-01-01

    Nine children with brain tumors are described who have received various combinations of treatment, including surgery, radiotherapy, and chemotherapy. Many of the children were noted to be of short stature. Endocrine assessment was carried out from 2 to 10 years after treatment. The combined results of insulin tolerance and Bovril stimulation tests show an impaired growth hormone response in six of the nine children. Bone age is retarded in all cases, and the present height is below the 10th percentile in five of the six. The cause of this growth hormone deficiency is obscure, but further studies are in progress

  20. Modeling evolutionary dynamics of epigenetic mutations in hierarchically organized tumors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Sottoriva

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available The cancer stem cell (CSC concept is a highly debated topic in cancer research. While experimental evidence in favor of the cancer stem cell theory is apparently abundant, the results are often criticized as being difficult to interpret. An important reason for this is that most experimental data that support this model rely on transplantation studies. In this study we use a novel cellular Potts model to elucidate the dynamics of established malignancies that are driven by a small subset of CSCs. Our results demonstrate that epigenetic mutations that occur during mitosis display highly altered dynamics in CSC-driven malignancies compared to a classical, non-hierarchical model of growth. In particular, the heterogeneity observed in CSC-driven tumors is considerably higher. We speculate that this feature could be used in combination with epigenetic (methylation sequencing studies of human malignancies to prove or refute the CSC hypothesis in established tumors without the need for transplantation. Moreover our tumor growth simulations indicate that CSC-driven tumors display evolutionary features that can be considered beneficial during tumor progression. Besides an increased heterogeneity they also exhibit properties that allow the escape of clones from local fitness peaks. This leads to more aggressive phenotypes in the long run and makes the neoplasm more adaptable to stringent selective forces such as cancer treatment. Indeed when therapy is applied the clone landscape of the regrown tumor is more aggressive with respect to the primary tumor, whereas the classical model demonstrated similar patterns before and after therapy. Understanding these often counter-intuitive fundamental properties of (non-hierarchically organized malignancies is a crucial step in validating the CSC concept as well as providing insight into the therapeutical consequences of this model.

  1. Experiment research of cisplatin implants inhibiting transplantation tumor growth and regulating the expression of KLK7 and E-cad of tumor-bearing mice with gastric cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhuang, Gui-Feng; Tan, Yan; Yang, Yuan-Zheng; Zhang, Jie-Wei; Tang, Jing

    2016-06-01

    To study the influence of cisplatin implants on transplantation tumor growth and the expression of tissue kallikrein-7 (KLK7) and E-cadherin (E-cad) in tumor-bearing mice with gastric cancer. BALB/c nude mice were collected as experimental animal and were randomly divided into model control group (Group A), tail intravenous injection of cisplatin group (Group B), intratumor injection of cisplatin group (Group C) and cisplatin implants treatment group (Group D). After the drugs intervening, the weight and volume of transplantation tumors were measured on Day 20, Day 30 and Day 40 and serum and KLK7 and E-cad contents in transplanted tumor tissue were examined. On Day 20, Day 30 and Day 40 after treatment, the weight and volume of transplantation tumors of tumor-bearing mice in four groups were different (Group A > Group B > Group C > Group D). The contents of KLK-7 and E-cad in tumor tissue and serum of tumor-bearing mice in four groups were different (Group A > Group B > Group C > Group D in KLK-7) and (Group A Cisplatin implants can inhibit the growth of transplanted tumor tissue and down-regulated KLK7 expression and up-regulated E-cad expression of tumor-bearing mice with gastric cancer. Copyright © 2016 Hainan Medical College. Production and hosting by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Inverse geometric approach for the simulation of close-to-circular growth. The case of multicellular tumor spheroids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brutovsky, B.; Horvath, D.; Lisy, V.

    2008-02-01

    We demonstrate the power of genetic algorithms to construct a cellular automata model simulating the growth of 2D close-to-circular clusters, revealing the desired properties, such as the growth rate and, at the same time, the fractal behavior of their contours. The possible application of the approach in the field of tumor modeling is outlined.

  3. Serum platelet-derived growth factor and fibroblast growth factor in patients with benign and malignant ovarian tumors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Christine Vestergaard; Steffensen, Karina Dahl; Olsen, Dorte Aalund

    2012-01-01

    New biological markers with predictive or prognostic value are highly warranted in the treatment of ovarian cancer. The platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) system and fibroblast growth factor (FGF) system are important components in tumor growth and angiogenesis.......New biological markers with predictive or prognostic value are highly warranted in the treatment of ovarian cancer. The platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) system and fibroblast growth factor (FGF) system are important components in tumor growth and angiogenesis....

  4. IL4-induced gene 1 promotes tumor growth by shaping the immune microenvironment in melanoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bod, Lloyd; Lengagne, Renée; Wrobel, Ludovic; Ramspott, Jan Philipp; Kato, Masashi; Avril, Marie-Françoise; Castellano, Flavia; Molinier-Frenkel, Valérie; Prévost-Blondel, Armelle

    2017-01-01

    Amino acid catabolizing enzymes emerged as a crucial mechanism used by tumors to dampen immune responses. The L-phenylalanine oxidase IL-4 induced gene 1 (IL4I1) is expressed by tumor-associated myeloid cells of most solid tumors, including melanoma. We previously provided the only evidence that IL4I1 accelerates tumor growth by limiting the CD8 + T cell mediated immune response, in a mouse model of melanoma cell transplantation. Here, we explored the role of IL4I1 in Ret mice, a spontaneous model of melanoma. We found that IL4I1 was expressed by CD11b + myeloid cells and that its activity correlated with disease aggressiveness. IL4I1 did not enhance tumor cell proliferation or angiogenesis, but orchestrated the remodeling of the immune compartment within the primary tumor. Indeed, the inactivation of IL4I1 limited the recruitment of polymorphonuclear myeloid-derived suppressor cells and enhanced the infiltration by Th1 and cytotoxic T cells, thus delaying tumor development and metastatic dissemination. Accordingly, human primary melanomas that were poorly infiltrated by IL4I1 + cells exhibited a higher density of CD8 + T cells. Collectively, our findings strengthen the rationale for therapeutic targeting of IL4I1 as one of the key immune regulators.

  5. Tumor growth increases neuroinflammation, fatigue and depressive-like behavior prior to alterations in muscle function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norden, Diana M; Bicer, Sabahattin; Clark, Yvonne; Jing, Runfeng; Henry, Christopher J; Wold, Loren E; Reiser, Peter J; Godbout, Jonathan P; McCarthy, Donna O

    2015-01-01

    Cancer patients frequently suffer from fatigue, a complex syndrome associated with loss of muscle mass, weakness, and depressed mood. Cancer-related fatigue (CRF) can be present at the time of diagnosis, during treatment, and persists for years after treatment. CRF negatively influences quality of life, limits functional independence, and is associated with decreased survival in patients with incurable disease. Currently there are no effective treatments to reduce CRF. The aim of this study was to use a mouse model of tumor growth and discriminate between two main components of fatigue: loss of muscle mass/function and altered mood/motivation. Here we show that tumor growth increased fatigue- and depressive-like behaviors, and reduced body and muscle mass. Decreased voluntary wheel running activity (VWRA) and increased depressive-like behavior in the forced swim and sucrose preference tests were evident in tumor-bearing mice within the first two weeks of tumor growth and preceded the loss of body and muscle mass. At three weeks, tumor-bearing mice had reduced grip strength but this was not associated with altered expression of myosin isoforms or impaired contractile properties of muscles. These increases in fatigue and depressive-like behaviors were paralleled by increased expression of IL-1β mRNA in the cortex and hippocampus. Minocycline administration reduced tumor-induced expression of IL-1β in the brain, reduced depressive-like behavior, and improved grip strength without altering muscle mass. Taken together, these results indicate that neuroinflammation and depressed mood, rather than muscle wasting, contribute to decreased voluntary activity and precede major changes in muscle contractile properties with tumor growth. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Hemagglutinin protease secreted by V. cholerae induced apoptosis in breast cancer cells by ROS mediated intrinsic pathway and regresses tumor growth in mice model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ray, Tanusree; Chakrabarti, Monoj Kumar; Pal, Amit

    2016-02-01

    Conventional anticancer therapies are effective but have side effects, so alternative targets are being developed. Bacterial toxins that can kill cells or alter the cellular processes like proliferation, apoptosis and differentiation have been reported for cancer treatment. In this study we have shown antitumor activity of hemagglutinin protease (HAP) secreted by Vibrio cholerae. One µg of HAP showed potent antitumor activity when injected into Ehrlich ascites carcinoma (EAC) tumors in Swiss albino mice. Weekly administration of this dose is able to significantly diminish a large tumor volume within 3 weeks and increases the survival rates of cancerous mice. HAP showed apoptotic activity on EAC and other malignant cells. Increased level of pro-apoptotic p53 with increased ratio of pro-apoptotic Bax to anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 signify that HAP induced apoptogenic signals lead to death of the tumor cells. In vivo and ex vivo studies suggest that mitochondrial dependent intrinsic pathway is responsible for this apoptosis. The level of ROS in malignant cells is reported to be higher than the normal healthy cells. HAP induces oxidative stress and increases the level of ROS in malignant cells which is significantly higher than the normal healthy cells. As a result the malignant cells cross the threshold level of ROS for cell survival faster than normal healthy cells. This mechanism causes HAP mediated apoptosis in malignant cells, but normal cells remain unaltered in the same environment. Our study suggests that HAP may be used as a new candidate drug for cancer therapy.

  7. CARI III Inhibits Tumor Growth in a Melanoma-Bearing Mouse Model through Induction of G0/G1 Cell Cycle Arrest

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hye-Jin Park

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Mushroom-derived natural products have been used to prevent or treat cancer for millennia. In this study, we evaluated the anticancer effects of CARI (Cell Activation Research Institute III, which consists of a blend of mushroom mycelia from Phellinus linteus grown on germinated brown rice, Inonotus obliquus grown on germinated brown rice, Antrodia camphorata grown on germinated brown rice and Ganoderma lucidum. Here, we showed that CARI III exerted anti-cancer activity, which is comparable to Dox against melanoma in vivo. B16F10 cells were intraperitoneally injected into C57BL6 mice to develop solid intra-abdominal tumors. Three hundred milligrams of the CARI III/kg/day p.o. regimen reduced tumor weight, comparable to the doxorubicin (Dox-treated group. An increase in life span (ILS% = 50.88% was observed in the CARI III-administered group, compared to the tumor control group. CARI III demonstrates anti-proliferative activity against B16F10 melanoma cells through inducing G0/G1 cell cycle arrest. CARI III inhibits the expression of cyclin D1, CDK4 and CDK2 and induces p21. Therefore, CARI III could be a potential chemopreventive supplement to melanoma patients.

  8. Transcription factor Runx2 knockdown regulates colon cancer transplantation tumor growth in vitro: an experimental study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bin Xu1

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To study the effect of transcription factor Runx2 knockdown on colon cancer transplantation tumor growth in vitro. Methods: Colon cancer cell lines HT29 were cultured and transfected with negative control (NC - shRNA plasmids and Runx2-shRNA plasmids respectively, the colon cancer cells transfected with shRNA were subcutaneously injected into C57 nude mice, and they were included in NC group and Runx2 knockdown group respectively. 1 week, 2 weeks and 3 weeks after model establishment, serum was collected to determine the contents of tumor markers, and tumor lesions were collected to determine proliferation and apoptosis gene expression. Results: CCSA-2, CEA and CA19-9 levels in serum as well as Rac1, Wnt3a, PLD2 and FAM96B protein expression in transplantation tumor lesions of Runx2 knockdown group were significantly lower than those of NC group while MS4A12, ASPP2 and Fas protein expression in transplantation tumor lesions of Runx2 knockdown group were significantly higher than those of NC group. Conclusion: Transcription factor Runx2 knockdown could inhibit the colon cancer transplantation tumor growth in vitro.

  9. Targeting the epidermal growth factor receptor in solid tumor malignancies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nedergaard, Mette K; Hedegaard, Chris J; Poulsen, Hans S

    2012-01-01

    to the extracellular part of EGFR, blocking the binding sites for the EGFR ligands, and intracellular tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) that block the ATP binding site of the tyrosine kinase domain. Besides an EGFRvIII-targeted vaccine, conjugated anti-EGFR mAbs have been used in different settings to deliver lethal......The epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) is over-expressed, as well as mutated, in many types of cancers. In particular, the EGFR variant type III mutant (EGFRvIII) has attracted much attention as it is frequently and exclusively found on many tumor cells, and hence both EGFR and EGFRvIII have...... been proposed as valid targets in many cancer therapy settings. Different strategies have been developed in order to either inhibit EGFR/EGFRvIII activity or to ablate EGFR/EGFRvIII-positive tumor cells. Drugs that inhibit these receptors include monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) that bind...

  10. Granulocyte colony-stimulating factor enhances bone tumor growth in mice in an osteoclast-dependent manner

    OpenAIRE

    Hirbe, Angela C.; Uluçkan, Özge; Morgan, Elizabeth A.; Eagleton, Mark C.; Prior, Julie L.; Piwnica-Worms, David; Trinkaus, Kathryn; Apicelli, Anthony; Weilbaecher, Katherine

    2007-01-01

    Inhibition of osteoclast (OC) activity has been associated with decreased tumor growth in bone in animal models. Increased recognition of factors that promote osteoclastic bone resorption in cancer patients led us to investigate whether increased OC activation could enhance tumor growth in bone. Granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) is used to treat chemotherapy-induced neutropenia, but is also associated with increased markers of OC activity and decreased bone mineral density (BMD). ...

  11. Splenectomy inhibits non-small cell lung cancer growth by modulating anti-tumor adaptive and innate immune response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levy, Liran; Mishalian, Inbal; Bayuch, Rachel; Zolotarov, Lida; Michaeli, Janna; Fridlender, Zvi G

    2015-01-01

    It has been shown that inhibitors of the immune system reside in the spleen and inhibit the endogenous antitumor effects of the immune system. We hypothesized that splenectomy would inhibit the growth of relatively large non-small lung cancer (NSCLC) tumors by modulating the systemic inhibition of the immune system, and in particular Myeloid Derived Suppressor Cells (MDSC). The effect of splenectomy was evaluated in several murine lung cancer models. We found that splenectomy reduces tumor growth and the development of lung metastases, but only in advanced tumors. In immune-deficient NOD-SCID mice the effect of splenectomy on tumor growth and metastatic spread disappeared. Splenectomy significantly reduced the presence of MDSC, and especially monocytic-MDSC in the circulation and inside the tumor. Specific reduction of the CCR2+ subset of monocytic MDSC was demonstrated, and the importance of the CCL2-CCR2 axis was further shown by a marked reduction in CCL2 following splenectomy. These changes were followed by changes in the macrophages contents of the tumors to become more antitumorigenic, and by increased activation of CD8+ Cytotoxic T-cells (CTL). By MDSC depletion, and adoptive transfer of MDSCs, we demonstrated that the effect of splenectomy on tumor growth was substantially mediated by MDSC cells. We conclude that the spleen is an important contributor to tumor growth and metastases, and that splenectomy can blunt this effect by depletion of MDSC, changing the amount and characteristics of myeloid cells and enhancing activation of CTL. PMID:26137413

  12. Augmented reality in a tumor resection model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chauvet, Pauline; Collins, Toby; Debize, Clement; Novais-Gameiro, Lorraine; Pereira, Bruno; Bartoli, Adrien; Canis, Michel; Bourdel, Nicolas

    2018-03-01

    Augmented Reality (AR) guidance is a technology that allows a surgeon to see sub-surface structures, by overlaying pre-operative imaging data on a live laparoscopic video. Our objectives were to evaluate a state-of-the-art AR guidance system in a tumor surgical resection model, comparing the accuracy of the resection with and without the system. Our system has three phases. Phase 1: using the MRI images, the kidney's and pseudotumor's surfaces are segmented to construct a 3D model. Phase 2: the intra-operative 3D model of the kidney is computed. Phase 3: the pre-operative and intra-operative models are registered, and the laparoscopic view is augmented with the pre-operative data. We performed a prospective experimental study on ex vivo porcine kidneys. Alginate was injected into the parenchyma to create pseudotumors measuring 4-10 mm. The kidneys were then analyzed by MRI. Next, the kidneys were placed into pelvictrainers, and the pseudotumors were laparoscopically resected. The AR guidance system allows the surgeon to see tumors and margins using classical laparoscopic instruments, and a classical screen. The resection margins were measured microscopically to evaluate the accuracy of resection. Ninety tumors were segmented: 28 were used to optimize the AR software, and 62 were used to randomly compare surgical resection: 29 tumors were resected using AR and 33 without AR. The analysis of our pathological results showed 4 failures (tumor with positive margins) (13.8%) in the AR group, and 10 (30.3%) in the Non-AR group. There was no complete miss in the AR group, while there were 4 complete misses in the non-AR group. In total, 14 (42.4%) tumors were completely missed or had a positive margin in the non-AR group. Our AR system enhances the accuracy of surgical resection, particularly for small tumors. Crucial information such as resection margins and vascularization could also be displayed.

  13. In ovo method for evaluating the effect of nutritional therapies on tumor development, growth and vascularization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yves M. Dupertuis

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available In the state of the art evaluation of nutritional therapy on tumor development, growth and vascularization requires tedious and expensive in vivo assays in which a significant number of animals undergo invasive treatments. Therefore, new alternative methods to avoid animal suffering and sacrifice are welcome. This review presents a rapid and low-cost method of experimental radio/chemotherapy in tumor xenografted chicken chorioallantoic membrane (CAM, which may contribute to implement the 3R principle (Reduce, Refine, Replace. Advantages and limitations of the CAM as an experimental model in cancer research are discussed. Improving the CAM model by using tumor spheroid grafting and positron emission and computed tomography imaging would help to overcome the drawbacks of poor tumor grafting efficiency and restrained 2-D tumor growth measurement to the CAM surface. Such a simple, reliable, reproducible and quantitative method for obtaining dose–response analysis and estimating treatment schedule (i.e. type, route, dose and timing would provide an alternative to the time-consuming and expensive evaluation step in animals before initiating clinical trials.

  14. Influence of Cell-Cell Interactions on the Population Growth Rate in a Tumor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yong

    2017-12-01

    The understanding of the macroscopic phenomenological models of the population growth at a microscopic level is important to predict the population behaviors emerged from the interactions between the individuals. In this work, we consider the influence of the population growth rate R on the cell-cell interaction in a tumor system and show that, in most cases especially small proliferative probabilities, the regulative role of the interaction will be strengthened with the decline of the intrinsic proliferative probabilities. For the high replication rates of an individual and the cooperative interactions, the proliferative probability almost has no effect. We compute the dependences of R on the interactions between the cells under the approximation of the nearest neighbor in the rim of an avascular tumor. Our results are helpful to qualitatively understand the influence of the interactions between the individuals on the growth rate in population systems. Supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China under Grant Nos. 11675008 and 21434001

  15. Rapamycin Suppresses Tumor Growth and Alters the Metabolic Phenotype in T-Cell Lymphoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kittipongdaja, Wasakorn; Wu, Xuesong; Garner, Justine; Liu, Xiping; Komas, Steven M; Hwang, Sam T; Schieke, Stefan M

    2015-09-01

    The mTOR pathway is a master regulator of cellular growth and metabolism. The biosynthetic and energetic demand of rapidly proliferating cells such as cancer cells is met by metabolic adaptations such as an increased glycolytic rate known as the Warburg effect. Herein, we characterize the anti-tumor effect of rapamycin in a mouse model of T-cell lymphoma and examine the metabolic effects in vitro. The murine T-cell lymphoma line, MBL2, and human cutaneous T-cell lymphoma (CTCL) lines, HH and Hut78, were used in syngeneic or standard NSG mouse models to demonstrate a marked suppression of tumor growth by rapamycin accompanied by inhibition of mTORC1/2. Analysis of the metabolic phenotype showed a substantial reduction in the glycolytic rate and glucose utilization in rapamycin-treated lymphoma cells. This was associated with reduced expression of glucose transporters and glycolytic enzymes in cultured cells and xenograft tumors. As a result of the decrease in glycolytic state, rapamycin-treated cells displayed reduced sensitivity to low-glucose conditions but continued to rely on mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) with sensitivity to inhibition of OXPHOS. Taken together, we demonstrate that rapamycin suppresses growth of T-cell lymphoma tumors and leads to a reduction in aerobic glycolysis counteracting the Warburg effect of cancer cells.

  16. Attenuation of NK cells facilitates mammary tumor growth in streptozotocin-induced diabetes in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gajovic, Nevena; Jurisevic, Milena; Pantic, Jelena; Radosavljevic, Gordana; Arsenijevic, Nebojsa; Lukic, Miodrag L; Jovanovic, Ivan

    2018-04-01

    Diabetic patients have higher incidence and mortality of cancer. Recent study revealed that hyperglycemia-induced oxidative stress is involved in the acceleration of tumor metastasis. We used model of high-dose streptozotocin-induced diabetes to investigate its effect on tumor growth and modulation of antitumor immune response of 4T1 murine breast cancer in BALB/c mice. Diabetes accelerated tumor appearance, growth and weight, which was associated with decreased NK cells cytotoxicity against 4T1 tumor cells in vitro Diabetes reduced frequencies of systemic NKG2D + , perforin + , granzyme + , IFN-γ + and IL-17 + NK cells, while increased level of PD-1 expression and production of IL-10 in NK cells. Diabetes decreased percentage of NKG2D + NK cells and increased percentage of PD-1 + NK cells also in primary tumor. Diabetes increased accumulation of IL-10 + Tregs and TGF-β + myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) in spleen and tumor. Diabetic sera in vitro significantly increased the percentage of KLRG-1 + and PD-1 + NK cells, decreased the percentage of IFN-γ + NK cells, expression of NKp46 and production of perforin, granzyme, CD107a and IL-17 per NK cell in comparison to glucose-added mouse sera and control sera. Significantly increased percentages of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO) producing MDSCs and dendritic cells (DC) were found in the spleens of diabetic mice prior to tumor induction. 1- methyl -DL- tryptophan , specific IDO inhibitor, almost completely restored phenotype of NK cells cultivated in diabetic sera. These findings indicate that diabetes promotes breast cancer growth at least in part through increased accumulation of immunosuppressive cells and IDO-mediated attenuation of NK cells. © 2018 Society for Endocrinology.

  17. Blocking Blood Flow to Solid Tumors by Destabilizing Tubulin: An Approach to Targeting Tumor Growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Pérez, María-Jesús; Priego, Eva-María; Bueno, Oskía; Martins, Maria Solange; Canela, María-Dolores; Liekens, Sandra

    2016-10-13

    The unique characteristics of the tumor vasculature offer the possibility to selectively target tumor growth and vascularization using tubulin-destabilizing agents. Evidence accumulated with combretastatin A-4 (CA-4) and its prodrug CA-4P support the therapeutic value of compounds sharing this mechanism of action. However, the chemical instability and poor solubility of CA-4 demand alternative compounds that are able to surmount these limitations. This Perspective illustrates the different classes of compounds that behave similar to CA-4, analyzes their binding mode to αβ-tubulin according to recently available structural complexes, and includes described approaches to improve their delivery. In addition, dissecting the mechanism of action of CA-4 and analogues allows a closer insight into the advantages and drawbacks associated with these tubulin-destabilizing agents that behave as vascular disrupting agents (VDAs).

  18. Modeling the Dichotomy of the Immune Response to Cancer: Cytotoxic Effects and Tumor-Promoting Inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkie, Kathleen P; Hahnfeldt, Philip

    2017-06-01

    Although the immune response is often regarded as acting to suppress tumor growth, it is now clear that it can be both stimulatory and inhibitory. The interplay between these competing influences has complex implications for tumor development, cancer dormancy, and immunotherapies. In fact, early immunotherapy failures were partly due to a lack in understanding of the nonlinear growth dynamics these competing immune actions may cause. To study this biological phenomenon theoretically, we construct a minimally parameterized framework that incorporates all aspects of the immune response. We combine the effects of all immune cell types, general principles of self-limited logistic growth, and the physical process of inflammation into one quantitative setting. Simulations suggest that while there are pro-tumor or antitumor immunogenic responses characterized by larger or smaller final tumor volumes, respectively, each response involves an initial period where tumor growth is stimulated beyond that of growth without an immune response. The mathematical description is non-identifiable which allows an ensemble of parameter sets to capture inherent biological variability in tumor growth that can significantly alter tumor-immune dynamics and thus treatment success rates. The ability of this model to predict non-intuitive yet clinically observed patterns of immunomodulated tumor growth suggests that it may provide a means to help classify patient response dynamics to aid identification of appropriate treatments exploiting immune response to improve tumor suppression, including the potential attainment of an immune-induced dormant state.

  19. Phase transitions in tumor growth: IV relationship between metabolic rate and fractal dimension of human tumor cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Betancourt-Mar, J. A.; Llanos-Pérez, J. A.; Cocho, G.; Mansilla, R.; Martin, R. R.; Montero, S.; Nieto-Villar, J. M.

    2017-05-01

    By the use of thermodynamics formalism of irreversible processes, complex systems theory and systems biology, it is derived a relationship between the production of entropy per unit time, the fractal dimension and the tumor growth rate for human tumors cells. The thermodynamics framework developed demonstrates that, the dissipation function is a Landau potential and also the Lyapunov function of the dynamical behavior of tumor growth, which indicate the directional character, stability and robustness of the phenomenon. The entropy production rate may be used as a quantitative index of the metastatic potential of tumors. The current theoretical framework will hopefully provide a better understanding of cancer and contribute to improvements in cancer treatment.

  20. Antitumor action of 3-bromopyruvate implicates reorganized tumor growth regulatory components of tumor milieu, cell cycle arrest and induction of mitochondria-dependent tumor cell death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yadav, Saveg; Kujur, Praveen Kumar; Pandey, Shrish Kumar; Goel, Yugal; Maurya, Babu Nandan; Verma, Ashish; Kumar, Ajay; Singh, Rana Pratap; Singh, Sukh Mahendra

    2018-01-15

    Evidences demonstrate that metabolic inhibitor 3-bromopyruvate (3-BP) exerts a potent antitumor action against a wide range of malignancies. However, the effect of 3-BP on progression of the tumors of thymic origin remains unexplored. Although, constituents of tumor microenvironment (TME) plays a pivotal role in regulation of tumor progression, it remains unclear if 3-BP can alter the composition of the crucial tumor growth regulatory components of the external surrounding of tumor cells. Thus, the present investigation attempts to understand the effect of 3-BP administration to a host bearing a progressively growing tumor of thymic origin on tumor growth regulatory soluble, cellular and biophysical components of tumor milieu vis-à-vis understanding its association with tumor progression, accompanying cell cycle events and mode of cell death. Further, the expression of cell survival regulatory molecules and hemodynamic characteristics of the tumor milieu were analysed to decipher mechanisms underlying the antitumor action of 3-BP. Administration of 3-BP to tumor-bearing hosts retarded tumor progression accompanied by induction of tumor cell death, cell cycle arrest, declined metabolism, inhibited mitochondrial membrane potential, elevated release of cytochrome c and altered hemodynamics. Moreover, 3-BP reconstituted the external milieu, in concurrence with deregulated glucose and pH homeostasis and increased tumor infiltration by NK cells, macrophages, and T lymphocytes. Further, 3-BP administration altered the expression of key regulatory molecules involved in glucose uptake, intracellular pH and tumor cell survival. The outcomes of this study will help in optimizing the therapeutic application of 3-BP by targeting crucial tumor growth regulatory components of tumor milieu. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Modeling tumor-associated edema in gliomas during anti-angiogenic therapy and its impact on imageable tumor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea eHawkins-Daarud

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Glioblastoma, the most aggressive form of primary brain tumor is predominantly assessed with gadolinium-enhanced T1-weighted (T1Gd and T2-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (MRI. Pixel intensity enhancement on the T1Gd image is understood to correspond to the gadolinium contrast agent leaking from the tumor-induced neovasculature, while hyperintensity on the T2/FLAIR images corresponds with edema and infiltrated tumor cells. None of these modalities directly show tumor cells; rather, they capture abnormalities in the microenvironment caused by the presence of tumor cells. Thus, assessing disease response after treatments impacting the microenvironment remains challenging through the obscuring lens of MR imaging. Anti-angiogenic therapies have been used in the treatment of gliomas with spurious results ranging from no apparent response to significant imaging improvement with the potential for extremely diffuse patterns of tumor recurrence on imaging and autopsy. Anti-angiogenic treatment normalizes the vasculature, effectively decreasing vessel permeability and thus reducing tumor-induced edema, drastically altering T2-weighted MRI. We extend a previously developed mathematical model of glioma growth to explicitly incorporate edema formation allowing us to directly characterize and potentially predict the effects of anti-angiogenics on imageable tumor growth. A comparison of simulated glioma growth and imaging enhancement with and without bevacizumab supports the current understanding that anti-angiogenic treatment can serve as a surrogate for steroids and the clinically-driven hypothesis that anti-angiogenic treatment may not have any significant effect on the growth dynamics of the overall tumor-cell populations. However, the simulations do illustrate a potentially large impact on the level of edematous extracellular fluid, and thus on what would be imageable on T2/FLAIR MR for tumors with lower proliferation rates.

  2. Phosphoinositide 3-kinase accelerates postoperative tumor growth by inhibiting apoptosis and enhancing resistance to chemotherapy-induced apoptosis. Novel role for an old enemy.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Coffey, J Calvin

    2012-02-03

    Tumor removal remains the principal treatment modality in the management of solid tumors. The process of tumor removal may potentiate the resurgent growth of residual neoplastic tissue. Herein, we describe a novel murine model in which flank tumor cytoreduction is followed by accelerated local tumor recurrence. This model held for primary and recurrent tumors generated using a panel of human and murine (LS174T, DU145, SW480, SW640, and 3LL) cell lines and replicated accelerated tumor growth following excisional surgery. In investigating this further, epithelial cells were purified from LS174T primary and corresponding recurrent tumors for comparison. Baseline as well as tumor necrosis factor apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL)-induced apoptosis were significantly reduced in recurrent tumor epithelia. Primary and recurrent tumor gene expression profiles were then compared. This identified an increase and reduction in the expression of p110gamma and p85alpha class Ia phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) subunits in recurrent tumor epithelia. These changes were further confirmed at the protein level. The targeting of PI3K ex vivo, using LY294002, restored sensitivity to TRAIL in recurrent tumor epithelia. In vivo, adjuvant LY294002 prolonged survival and significantly attenuated recurrent tumor growth by greatly enhancing apoptosis levels. Hence, PI3K plays a role in generating the antiapoptotic and chemoresistant phenotype associated with accelerated local tumor recurrence.

  3. Fragmented sleep accelerates tumor growth and progression through recruitment of tumor-associated macrophages and TLR4 signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hakim, Fahed; Wang, Yang; Zhang, Shelley X L; Zheng, Jiamao; Yolcu, Esma S; Carreras, Alba; Khalyfa, Abdelnaby; Shirwan, Haval; Almendros, Isaac; Gozal, David

    2014-03-01

    Sleep fragmentation (SF) is a highly prevalent condition and a hallmark of sleep apnea, a condition that has been associated with increased cancer incidence and mortality. In this study, we examined the hypothesis that sleep fragmentation promotes tumor growth and progression through proinflammatory TLR4 signaling. In the design, we compared mice that were exposed to sleep fragmentation one week before engraftment of syngeneic TC1 or LL3 tumor cells and tumor analysis four weeks later. We also compared host contributions through the use of mice genetically deficient in TLR4 or its effector molecules MYD88 or TRIF. We found that sleep fragmentation enhanced tumor size and weight compared with control mice. Increased invasiveness was apparent in sleep fragmentation tumors, which penetrated the tumor capsule into surrounding tissues, including adjacent muscle. Tumor-associated macrophages (TAM) were more numerous in sleep fragmentation tumors, where they were distributed in a relatively closer proximity to the tumor capsule compared with control mice. Although tumors were generally smaller in both MYD88(-/-) and TRIF(-/-) hosts, the more aggressive features produced by sleep fragmentation persisted. In contrast, these more aggressive features produced by sleep fragmentation were abolished completely in TLR4(-/-) mice. Our findings offer mechanistic insights into how sleep perturbations can accelerate tumor growth and invasiveness through TAM recruitment and TLR4 signaling pathways. ©2014 AACR

  4. Effect of Depleting Tumor-Associated Macrophages on Breast Cancer Growth and Response to Chemotherapy

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Tsan, Min-Fu

    2004-01-01

    Tumor-associated macrophages (TAM) may comprise up to 50% of the tumor mass in breast cancer and are capable of producing estrogen and angiogenic cytokines that regulate the growth and angiogenesis of breast cancer...

  5. Effect of Depleting Tumor-Associated Macrophages on Breast Cancer Growth and Response to Chemotherapy

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Tsan, Min-Fu; Gao, Baochong

    2005-01-01

    Tumor-associated macrophages may comprise up to 50% of the tumor mass in breast cancer and are capable of producing estrogen and angiogenic cytokines that regulate the growth and angiogenesis of breast cancer...

  6. Tumor-specific RNA interference targeting Pokemon suppresses tumor growth and induces apoptosis in prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yining; Xu, Shuxiong; Wang, Xiangwei; Shi, Hua; Sun, Zhaolin; Yang, Zhao

    2013-02-01

    To explore the exact mechanism of Pokemon in prostate cancer. Pokemon is a member of the POK family of transcriptional repressors. Its main function is suppression of the p14ARF (alternate reading frame) tumor suppressor gene. Although Pokemon expression has been found to be increased in various types of lymphoma, the exact mechanism of the gene in prostate cancer is not clear. In the present study, prostate cancer cells were transfected with the specific short hairpin ribonucleic acid (RNA) expression vector targeting Pokemon. The expression of Pokemon messenger RNA and its protein was detected by semiquantitative reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction and Western blotting, respectively. The cell growth and cell apoptosis were also examined using the methyl thiazolyl tetrazolium assay and flow cytometry. The results demonstrated that specific RNA interference (RNAi) could decrease the expression levels of Pokemon gene messenger RNA and protein in prostate cancer cells. In addition, that specific RNAi significantly inhibited the cell proliferation and increased the apoptotic rate. In vivo experiments showed that specific RNAi inhibited the tumorigenicity of prostate cancer cells and significantly suppressed tumor growth. Therefore, an RNAi-targeted Pokemon gene strategy could be a potential approach to prostate cancer therapy. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Noninvasive Assessment of Tumor Cell Proliferation in Animal Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthias Edinger

    1999-10-01

    Full Text Available Revealing the mechanisms of neoplastic disease and enhancing our ability to intervene in these processes requires an increased understanding of cellular and molecular changes as they occur in intact living animal models. We have begun to address these needs by developing a method of labeling tumor cells through constitutive expression of an optical reporter gene, noninvasively monitoring cellular proliferation in vivo using a sensitive photon detection system. A stable line of HeLa cells that expressed a modified firefly luciferase gene was generated, proliferation of these cells in irradiated severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID mice was monitored. Tumor cells were introduced into animals via subcutaneous, intraperitoneal and intravenous inoculation and whole body images, that revealed tumor location and growth kinetics, were obtained. The number of photons that were emitted from the labeled tumor cells and transmitted through murine tissues was sufficient to detect 1×103 cells in the peritoneal cavity, 1×104 cells at subcutaneous sites and 1×106 circulating cells immediately following injection. The kinetics of cell proliferation, as measured by photon emission, was exponential in the peritoneal cavity and at subcutaneous sites. Intravenous inoculation resulted in detectable colonies of tumor cells in animals receiving more than 1×103 cells. Our demonstrated ability to detect small numbers of tumor cells in living animals noninvasively suggests that therapies designed to treat minimal disease states, as occur early in the disease course and after elimination of the tumor mass, may be monitored using this approach. Moreover, it may be possible to monitor micrometastases and evaluate the molecular steps in the metastatic process. Spatiotemporal analyses of neoplasia will improve the predictability of animal models of human disease as study groups can be followed over time, this method will accelerate development of novel therapeutic

  8. Oxygen consumption can regulate the growth of tumors, a new perspective on the Warburg effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yijun; Cairns, Rob; Papandreou, Ioanna; Koong, Albert; Denko, Nicholas C

    2009-09-15

    The unique metabolism of tumors was described many years ago by Otto Warburg, who identified tumor cells with increased glycolysis and decreased mitochondrial activity. However, "aerobic glycolysis" generates fewer ATP per glucose molecule than mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation, so in terms of energy production, it is unclear how increasing a less efficient process provides tumors with a growth advantage. We carried out a screen for loss of genetic elements in pancreatic tumor cells that accelerated their growth as tumors, and identified mitochondrial ribosomal protein L28 (MRPL28). Knockdown of MRPL28 in these cells decreased mitochondrial activity, and increased glycolysis, but paradoxically, decreased cellular growth in vitro. Following Warburg's observations, this mutation causes decreased mitochondrial function, compensatory increase in glycolysis and accelerated growth in vivo. Likewise, knockdown of either mitochondrial ribosomal protein L12 (MRPL12) or cytochrome oxidase had a similar effect. Conversely, expression of the mitochondrial uncoupling protein 1 (UCP1) increased oxygen consumption and decreased tumor growth. Finally, treatment of tumor bearing animals with dichloroacetate (DCA) increased pyruvate consumption in the mitochondria, increased total oxygen consumption, increased tumor hypoxia and slowed tumor growth. We interpret these findings to show that non-oncogenic genetic changes that alter mitochondrial metabolism can regulate tumor growth through modulation of the consumption of oxygen, which appears to be a rate limiting substrate for tumor proliferation.

  9. Oxygen consumption can regulate the growth of tumors, a new perspective on the Warburg effect.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yijun Chen

    Full Text Available The unique metabolism of tumors was described many years ago by Otto Warburg, who identified tumor cells with increased glycolysis and decreased mitochondrial activity. However, "aerobic glycolysis" generates fewer ATP per glucose molecule than mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation, so in terms of energy production, it is unclear how increasing a less efficient process provides tumors with a growth advantage.We carried out a screen for loss of genetic elements in pancreatic tumor cells that accelerated their growth as tumors, and identified mitochondrial ribosomal protein L28 (MRPL28. Knockdown of MRPL28 in these cells decreased mitochondrial activity, and increased glycolysis, but paradoxically, decreased cellular growth in vitro. Following Warburg's observations, this mutation causes decreased mitochondrial function, compensatory increase in glycolysis and accelerated growth in vivo. Likewise, knockdown of either mitochondrial ribosomal protein L12 (MRPL12 or cytochrome oxidase had a similar effect. Conversely, expression of the mitochondrial uncoupling protein 1 (UCP1 increased oxygen consumption and decreased tumor growth. Finally, treatment of tumor bearing animals with dichloroacetate (DCA increased pyruvate consumption in the mitochondria, increased total oxygen consumption, increased tumor hypoxia and slowed tumor growth.We interpret these findings to show that non-oncogenic genetic changes that alter mitochondrial metabolism can regulate tumor growth through modulation of the consumption of oxygen, which appears to be a rate limiting substrate for tumor proliferation.

  10. Datamining approaches for modeling tumor control probability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naqa, Issam El; Deasy, Joseph O; Mu, Yi; Huang, Ellen; Hope, Andrew J; Lindsay, Patricia E; Apte, Aditya; Alaly, James; Bradley, Jeffrey D

    2010-11-01

    Tumor control probability (TCP) to radiotherapy is determined by complex interactions between tumor biology, tumor microenvironment, radiation dosimetry, and patient-related variables. The complexity of these heterogeneous variable interactions constitutes a challenge for building predictive models for routine clinical practice. We describe a datamining framework that can unravel the higher order relationships among dosimetric dose-volume prognostic variables, interrogate various radiobiological processes, and generalize to unseen data before when applied prospectively. Several datamining approaches are discussed that include dose-volume metrics, equivalent uniform dose, mechanistic Poisson model, and model building methods using statistical regression and machine learning techniques. Institutional datasets of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients are used to demonstrate these methods. The performance of the different methods was evaluated using bivariate Spearman rank correlations (rs). Over-fitting was controlled via resampling methods. Using a dataset of 56 patients with primary NCSLC tumors and 23 candidate variables, we estimated GTV volume and V75 to be the best model parameters for predicting TCP using statistical resampling and a logistic model. Using these variables, the support vector machine (SVM) kernel method provided superior performance for TCP prediction with an rs=0.68 on leave-one-out testing compared to logistic regression (rs=0.4), Poisson-based TCP (rs=0.33), and cell kill equivalent uniform dose model (rs=0.17). The prediction of treatment response can be improved by utilizing datamining approaches, which are able to unravel important non-linear complex interactions among model variables and have the capacity to predict on unseen data for prospective clinical applications.

  11. Up-regulation of hepatoma-derived growth factor facilitates tumor progression in malignant melanoma [corrected].

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Han-En Tsai

    Full Text Available Cutaneous malignant melanoma is the fastest increasing malignancy in humans. Hepatoma-derived growth factor (HDGF is a novel growth factor identified from human hepatoma cell line. HDGF overexpression is correlated with poor prognosis in various types of cancer including melanoma. However, the underlying mechanism of HDGF overexpression in developing melanoma remains unclear. In this study, human melanoma cell lines (A375, A2058, MEL-RM and MM200 showed higher levels of HDGF gene expression, whereas human epidermal melanocytes (HEMn expressed less. Exogenous application of HDGF stimulated colony formation and invasion of human melanoma cells. Moreover, HDGF overexpression stimulated the degree of invasion and colony formation of B16-F10 melanoma cells whereas HDGF knockdown exerted opposite effects in vitro. To evaluate the effects of HDGF on tumour growth and metastasis in vivo, syngeneic mouse melanoma and metastatic melanoma models were performed by manipulating the gene expression of HDGF in melanoma cells. It was found that mice injected with HDGF-overexpressing melanoma cells had greater tumour growth and higher metastatic capability. In contrast, mice implanted with HDGF-depleted melanoma cells exhibited reduced tumor burden and lung metastasis. Histological analysis of excised tumors revealed higher degree of cell proliferation and neovascularization in HDGF-overexpressing melanoma. The present study provides evidence that HDGF promotes tumor progression of melanoma and targeting HDGF may constitute a novel strategy for the treatment of melanoma.

  12. Up-Regulation of Hepatoma-Derived Growth Factor Facilities Tumor Progression in Malignant Melanoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kung, Mei-Lang; Liu, Li-Feng; Kuo, Lai-Hsin; Kuo, Hsiao-Mei; Chen, San-Cher; Chan, Elsa C.; Wu, Chieh-Shan; Tai, Ming-Hong; Liu, Guei-Sheung

    2013-01-01

    Cutaneous malignant melanoma is the fastest increasing malignancy in humans. Hepatoma-derived growth factor (HDGF) is a novel growth factor identified from human hepatoma cell line. HDGF overexpression is correlated with poor prognosis in various types of cancer including melanoma. However, the underlying mechanism of HDGF overexpression in developing melanoma remains unclear. In this study, human melanoma cell lines (A375, A2058, MEL-RM and MM200) showed higher levels of HDGF gene expression, whereas human epidermal melanocytes (HEMn) expressed less. Exogenous application of HDGF stimulated colony formation and invasion of human melanoma cells. Moreover, HDGF overexpression stimulated the degree of invasion and colony formation of B16–F10 melanoma cells whereas HDGF knockdown exerted opposite effects in vitro. To evaluate the effects of HDGF on tumour growth and metastasis in vivo, syngeneic mouse melanoma and metastatic melanoma models were performed by manipulating the gene expression of HDGF in melanoma cells. It was found that mice injected with HDGF-overexpressing melanoma cells had greater tumour growth and higher metastatic capability. In contrast, mice implanted with HDGF-depleted melanoma cells exhibited reduced tumor burden and lung metastasis. Histological analysis of excised tumors revealed higher degree of cell proliferation and neovascularization in HDGF-overexpressing melanoma. The present study provides evidence that HDGF promotes tumor progression of melanoma and targeting HDGF may constitute a novel strategy for the treatment of melanoma. PMID:23536873

  13. Evaluation of Tumor Angiogenesis with a Second-Generation US Contrast Medium in a Rat Breast Tumor Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ko, Eun Young [Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Sang Hoon; Kim, Hak Hee; Kim, Sung Moon; Shin, Myung Jin; Kim, Nam Kug; Gong, Gyung Yub [Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2008-06-15

    Tumor angiogenesis is an important factor for tumor growth, treatment response and prognosis. Noninvasive imaging methods for the evaluation of tumor angiogenesis have been studied, but a method for the quantification of tumor angiogenesis has not been established. This study was designed to evaluate tumor angiogenesis in a rat breast tumor model by the use of a contrast enhanced ultrasound (US) examination with a second-generation US contrast agent. The alkylating agent 19N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea (ENU) was injected into the intraperitoneal cavity of 30-day-old female Sprague-Dawley rats. Three to four months later, breast tumors were detected along the mammary lines of the rats. A total of 17 breast tumors larger than 1 cm in nine rats were evaluated by gray-scale US, color Doppler US and contrast-enhanced US using SonoVue. The results were recorded as digital video images; time-intensity curves and hemodynamic parameters were analyzed. Pathological breast tumor specimens were obtained just after the US examinations. The tumor specimens were stained with hematoxylin and eosin (H and E) and the expression of CD31, an endothelial cell marker, was determined by immunohistochemical staining. We also evaluated the pathological diagnosis of the tumors and the microvessel density (MVD). Spearman's correlation and the Kruskal-Wallis test were used for the analysis. The pathological diagnoses were 11 invasive ductal carcinomas and six benign intraductal epithelial proliferations. The MVD did not correlate with the pathological diagnosis. However, blood volume (BV) showed a statistically significant correlation with MVD (Spearman's correlation, p < 0.05). Contrast-enhanced US using a second-generation US contrast material was useful for the evaluation of tumor angiogenesis of breast tumors in the rat.

  14. Modeling measurement error in tumor characterization studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marjoram Paul

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Etiologic studies of cancer increasingly use molecular features such as gene expression, DNA methylation and sequence mutation to subclassify the cancer type. In large population-based studies, the tumor tissues available for study are archival specimens that provide variable amounts of amplifiable DNA for molecular analysis. As molecular features measured from small amounts of tumor DNA are inherently noisy, we propose a novel approach to improve statistical efficiency when comparing groups of samples. We illustrate the phenomenon using the MethyLight technology, applying our proposed analysis to compare MLH1 DNA methylation levels in males and females studied in the Colon Cancer Family Registry. Results We introduce two methods for computing empirical weights to model heteroscedasticity that is caused by sampling variable quantities of DNA for molecular analysis. In a simulation study, we show that using these weights in a linear regression model is more powerful for identifying differentially methylated loci than standard regression analysis. The increase in power depends on the underlying relationship between variation in outcome measure and input DNA quantity in the study samples. Conclusions Tumor characteristics measured from small amounts of tumor DNA are inherently noisy. We propose a statistical analysis that accounts for the measurement error due to sampling variation of the molecular feature and show how it can improve the power to detect differential characteristics between patient groups.

  15. EXPRESSION OF GROWTH-FACTORS AND GROWTH-FACTOR RECEPTORS IN NORMAL AND TUMOROUS HUMAN THYROID TISSUES

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Laan, B.F.A.M.; FREEMAN, JL; ASA, SL

    A number of growth factors have been implicated as stimuli of thyroid cell proliferation; overexpression of these growth factors and/or their receptors may play a role in the growth of thyroid tumors. To determine if immunohistochemical detection of growth factors and/or their receptors correlates

  16. The miR-24-Bim pathway promotes tumor growth and angiogenesis in pancreatic carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Rui; Zhang, Haiyang; Wang, Xia; Zhou, Likun; Li, Hongli; Deng, Ting; Qu, Yanjun; Duan, Jingjing; Bai, Ming; Ge, Shaohua; Ning, Tao; Zhang, Le; Huang, Dingzhi; Ba, Yi

    2015-12-22

    miRNAs are a group of small RNAs that have been reported to play a key role at each stage of tumorigenesis and are believed to have future practical value. We now demonstrate that Bim, which stimulates cell apoptosis, is obviously down-regulated in pancreatic cancer (PaC) tissues and cell lines. And Bim-related miR-24 is significantly up-regulated in PaC. The repressed expression of Bim is proved to be a result of miR-24, thus promoting cell growth of both cancer and vascular cells, and accelerating vascular ring formation. By using mouse tumor model, we clearly showed that miR-24 promotes tumor growth and angiogenesis by suppressing Bim expression in vivo. Therefore, a new pathway comprising miR-24 and Bim can be used in the exploration of drug-target therapy of PaC.

  17. Increased expression of CYP4Z1 promotes tumor angiogenesis and growth in human breast cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, Wei [Department of Pharmacology, School of Medicine, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430071 (China); Chai, Hongyan [Center for Gene Diagnosis, Zhongnan Hospital, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430071 (China); Li, Ying; Zhao, Haixia; Xie, Xianfei; Zheng, Hao; Wang, Chenlong; Wang, Xue [Department of Pharmacology, School of Medicine, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430071 (China); Yang, Guifang [Department of Pathology, Zhongnan Hospital, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430071 (China); Cai, Xiaojun [Department of Ophthalmology, Zhongnan Hospital, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430071 (China); Falck, John R. [Department of Biochemistry, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX 75390 (United States); Yang, Jing, E-mail: yangjingliu@yahoo.com.cn [Department of Pharmacology, School of Medicine, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430071 (China); Research Center of Food and Drug Evaluation, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430071 (China)

    2012-10-01

    Cytochrome P450 (CYP) 4Z1, a novel CYP4 family member, is over-expressed in human mammary carcinoma and associated with high-grade tumors and poor prognosis. However, the precise role of CYP4Z1 in tumor progression is unknown. Here, we demonstrate that CYP4Z1 overexpression promotes tumor angiogenesis and growth in breast cancer. Stable expression of CYP4Z1 in T47D and BT-474 human breast cancer cells significantly increased mRNA expression and production of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)-A, and decreased mRNA levels and secretion of tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase-2 (TIMP-2), without affecting cell proliferation and anchorage-independent cell growth in vitro. Notably, the conditioned medium from CYP4Z1-expressing cells enhanced proliferation, migration and tube formation of human umbilical vein endothelial cells, and promoted angiogenesis in the zebrafish embryo and chorioallantoic membrane of the chick embryo. In addition, there were lower levels of myristic acid and lauric acid, and higher contents of 20-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid (20-HETE) in CYP4Z1-expressing T47D cells compared with vector control. CYP4Z1 overexpression significantly increased tumor weight and microvessel density by 2.6-fold and 1.9-fold in human tumor xenograft models, respectively. Moreover, CYP4Z1 transfection increased the phosphorylation of ERK1/2 and PI3K/Akt, while PI3K or ERK inhibitors and siRNA silencing reversed CYP4Z1-mediated changes in VEGF-A and TIMP-2 expression. Conversely, HET0016, an inhibitor of the CYP4 family, potently inhibited the tumor-induced angiogenesis with associated changes in the intracellular levels of myristic acid, lauric acid and 20-HETE. Collectively, these data suggest that increased CYP4Z1 expression promotes tumor angiogenesis and growth in breast cancer partly via PI3K/Akt and ERK1/2 activation. -- Highlights: ► CYP4Z1 overexpression promotes human breast cancer growth and angiogenesis. ► The pro-angiogenic effects of CYP4Z1 have

  18. FOXD3 suppresses tumor growth and angiogenesis in non-small cell lung cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yan, Jun-Hai; Zhao, Chun-Liu [Department of Respiratory Medicine, Luwan Branch of Ruijin Hospital, Shanghai Jiaotong University School of Medicine, Shanghai 20020 (China); Ding, Lan-Bao [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Shanghai 10th People' s Hospital, Tongji University School of Medicine, Shanghai 200072 (China); Zhou, Xi, E-mail: modelmap@139.com [Department of Respiratory Medicine, Luwan Branch of Ruijin Hospital, Shanghai Jiaotong University School of Medicine, Shanghai 20020 (China)

    2015-10-09

    The transcription factor forkhead box D3 (FOXD3), widely studied as a transcriptional repressor in embryogenesis, participates in the carcinogenesis of many cancers. However, the expression pattern and role of FOXD3 in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) have not been well characterized. We report that FOXD3 is significantly downregulated in NSCLC cell lines and clinical tissues. FOXD3 overexpression significantly inhibits cell growth and results in G1 cell cycle arrest in NSCLC A549 and H1299 cells. In a xenograft tumor model, FOXD3 overexpression inhibits tumor growth and angiogenesis. Remarkably, expression of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) was reduced in FOXD3 overexpression models both in vitro and in vivo. These findings suggest that FOXD3 plays a potential tumor suppressor role in NSCLC progression and represents a promising clinical prognostic marker and therapeutic target for this disease. - Highlights: • FOXD3 is downregulated in NSCLC cell lines and tissues. • FOXD3 overexpression inhibited cell proliferation in NSCLC cells. • FOXD3 overexpression led to decreased angiogenesis in NSCLC cells in vitro and in vivo.

  19. FOXD3 suppresses tumor growth and angiogenesis in non-small cell lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yan, Jun-Hai; Zhao, Chun-Liu; Ding, Lan-Bao; Zhou, Xi

    2015-01-01

    The transcription factor forkhead box D3 (FOXD3), widely studied as a transcriptional repressor in embryogenesis, participates in the carcinogenesis of many cancers. However, the expression pattern and role of FOXD3 in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) have not been well characterized. We report that FOXD3 is significantly downregulated in NSCLC cell lines and clinical tissues. FOXD3 overexpression significantly inhibits cell growth and results in G1 cell cycle arrest in NSCLC A549 and H1299 cells. In a xenograft tumor model, FOXD3 overexpression inhibits tumor growth and angiogenesis. Remarkably, expression of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) was reduced in FOXD3 overexpression models both in vitro and in vivo. These findings suggest that FOXD3 plays a potential tumor suppressor role in NSCLC progression and represents a promising clinical prognostic marker and therapeutic target for this disease. - Highlights: • FOXD3 is downregulated in NSCLC cell lines and tissues. • FOXD3 overexpression inhibited cell proliferation in NSCLC cells. • FOXD3 overexpression led to decreased angiogenesis in NSCLC cells in vitro and in vivo.

  20. Lack of MHC class II molecules favors CD8+T-cell infiltration into tumors associated with an increased control of tumor growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaoul, Nada; Tang, Alexandre; Desrues, Belinda; Oberkampf, Marine; Fayolle, Catherine; Ladant, Daniel; Sainz-Perez, Alexander; Leclerc, Claude

    2018-01-01

    Regulatory T-cells (Tregs) are crucial for the maintenance of immune tolerance and homeostasis as well as for preventing autoimmune diseases, but their impact on the survival of cancer patients remains controversial. In the TC-1 mouse model of human papillomavirus (HPV)-related carcinoma, we have previously demonstrated that the therapeutic efficacy of the CyaA-E7-vaccine, targeting the HPV-E7 antigen, progressively declines with tumor growth, in correlation with increased intratumoral recruitment of Tregs. In the present study, we demonstrated that these TC-1 tumor-infiltrating Tregs were highly activated, with increased expression of immunosuppressive molecules. Both intratumoral effector CD4 + T-cells (Teffs) and Tregs expressed high levels of PD-1, but anti-PD-1 antibody treatment did not impact the growth of the TC-1 tumor nor restore the therapeutic effect of the CyaA-E7 vaccine. To analyze the mechanisms by which Tregs are recruited to the tumor site, we used MHC-II KO mice with drastically reduced numbers of CD4 + effector T-cells. We demonstrated that these mice still had significant numbers of Tregs in their lymphoid organs which were recruited to the tumor. In MHC-II KO mice, the growth of the TC-1 tumor was delayed in correlation with a strong increase in the intratumoral recruitment of CD8 + T-cells. In addition, in mice that spontaneously rejected their tumors, the infiltration of E7-specific CD8 + T-cells was significantly higher than in MHC-II KO mice with a growing tumor. These results demonstrate that tumor-specific CD8 + T-cells can be efficiently activated and recruited in the absence of MHC class II molecules and of CD4 + T-cell help.

  1. Mathematical models of tumor heterogeneity and drug resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greene, James

    In this dissertation we develop mathematical models of tumor heterogeneity and drug resistance in cancer chemotherapy. Resistance to chemotherapy is one of the major causes of the failure of cancer treatment. Furthermore, recent experimental evidence suggests that drug resistance is a complex biological phenomena, with many influences that interact nonlinearly. Here we study the influence of such heterogeneity on treatment outcomes, both in general frameworks and under specific mechanisms. We begin by developing a mathematical framework for describing multi-drug resistance to cancer. Heterogeneity is reflected by a continuous parameter, which can either describe a single resistance mechanism (such as the expression of P-gp in the cellular membrane) or can account for the cumulative effect of several mechanisms and factors. The model is written as a system of integro-differential equations, structured by the continuous "trait," and includes density effects as well as mutations. We study the limiting behavior of the model, both analytically and numerically, and apply it to study treatment protocols. We next study a specific mechanism of tumor heterogeneity and its influence on cell growth: the cell-cycle. We derive two novel mathematical models, a stochastic agent-based model and an integro-differential equation model, each of which describes the growth of cancer cells as a dynamic transition between proliferative and quiescent states. By examining the role all parameters play in the evolution of intrinsic tumor heterogeneity, and the sensitivity of the population growth to parameter values, we show that the cell-cycle length has the most significant effect on the growth dynamics. In addition, we demonstrate that the agent-based model can be approximated well by the more computationally efficient integro-differential equations, when the number of cells is large. The model is closely tied to experimental data of cell growth, and includes a novel implementation of

  2. A voxel-based multiscale model to simulate the radiation response of hypoxic tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espinoza, I; Peschke, P; Karger, C P

    2015-01-01

    In radiotherapy, it is important to predict the response of tumors to irradiation prior to the treatment. This is especially important for hypoxic tumors, which are known to be highly radioresistant. Mathematical modeling based on the dose distribution, biological parameters, and medical images may help to improve this prediction and to optimize the treatment plan. A voxel-based multiscale tumor response model for simulating the radiation response of hypoxic tumors was developed. It considers viable and dead tumor cells, capillary and normal cells, as well as the most relevant biological processes such as (i) proliferation of tumor cells, (ii) hypoxia-induced angiogenesis, (iii) spatial exchange of cells leading to tumor growth, (iv) oxygen-dependent cell survival after irradiation, (v) resorption of dead cells, and (vi) spatial exchange of cells leading to tumor shrinkage. Oxygenation is described on a microscopic scale using a previously published tumor oxygenation model, which calculates the oxygen distribution for each voxel using the vascular fraction as the most important input parameter. To demonstrate the capabilities of the model, the dependence of the oxygen distribution on tumor growth and radiation-induced shrinkage is investigated. In addition, the impact of three different reoxygenation processes is compared and tumor control probability (TCP) curves for a squamous cells carcinoma of the head and neck (HNSSC) are simulated under normoxic and hypoxic conditions. The model describes the spatiotemporal behavior of the tumor on three different scales: (i) on the macroscopic scale, it describes tumor growth and shrinkage during radiation treatment, (ii) on a mesoscopic scale, it provides the cell density and vascular fraction for each voxel, and (iii) on the microscopic scale, the oxygen distribution may be obtained in terms of oxygen histograms. With increasing tumor size, the simulated tumors develop a hypoxic core. Within the model, tumor shrinkage was

  3. Modeling microbial growth and dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esser, Daniel S; Leveau, Johan H J; Meyer, Katrin M

    2015-11-01

    Modeling has become an important tool for widening our understanding of microbial growth in the context of applied microbiology and related to such processes as safe food production, wastewater treatment, bioremediation, or microbe-mediated mining. Various modeling techniques, such as primary, secondary and tertiary mathematical models, phenomenological models, mechanistic or kinetic models, reactive transport models, Bayesian network models, artificial neural networks, as well as agent-, individual-, and particle-based models have been applied to model microbial growth and activity in many applied fields. In this mini-review, we summarize the basic concepts of these models using examples and applications from food safety and wastewater treatment systems. We further review recent developments in other applied fields focusing on models that explicitly include spatial relationships. Using these examples, we point out the conceptual similarities across fields of application and encourage the combined use of different modeling techniques in hybrid models as well as their cross-disciplinary exchange. For instance, pattern-oriented modeling has its origin in ecology but may be employed to parameterize microbial growth models when experimental data are scarce. Models could also be used as virtual laboratories to optimize experimental design analogous to the virtual ecologist approach. Future microbial growth models will likely become more complex to benefit from the rich toolbox that is now available to microbial growth modelers.

  4. Plasticity of tumor cell invasion: governance by growth factors and cytokines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Odenthal, Julia; Takes, Robert; Friedl, Peter

    2016-12-01

    Tumor cell migration, the basis for metastatic dissemination, is an adaptive process which depends upon coordinated cell interaction with the environment, influencing cell-matrix and cell-cell adhesion, cytoskeletal dynamics and extracellular matrix remodeling. Growth factors and cytokines, released within the reactive tumor microenvironment and their intracellular effector signals strongly impact mechanocoupling functions in tumor cells and thereby control the mode and extent of tumor invasion, including collective and single-cell migration and their interconversions. Besides their role in controlling tumor cell growth and survival, cytokines and growth factors thus provide complex orchestration of the metastatic cascade and tumor cell adaptation to environmental challenge. We here review the mechanisms by which growth factors and cytokines control the reciprocal interactions between tumor cells and their microenvironment, and the consequences for the efficacy and plasticity of invasion programs and metastasis. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  5. Modeling Urban Fire Growth,

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nuclear explosion damage, *Explosion effects, *Fires, *Flame propagation, Growth (General), Area coverage, Ignition, Combustion, Casualties...Computerized simulation, Predictions, Countermeasures, Fire suppression, Damage assessment, Urban areas, Vulnerability, Data acquisition, Methodology, Symposia

  6. Genetically engineered endostatin-lidamycin fusion proteins effectively inhibit tumor growth and metastasis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jiang, Wen-guo; Zhen, Yong-su; Lu, Xin-an; Shang, Bo-yang; Fu, Yan; Zhang, Sheng-hua; Zhou, Daifu; Li, Liang; Li, Yi; Luo, Yongzhang

    2013-01-01

    Endostatin (ES) inhibits endothelial cell proliferation, migration, invasion, and tube formation. It also shows antiangiogenesis and antitumor activities in several animal models. Endostatin specifically targets tumor vasculature to block tumor growth. Lidamycin (LDM), which consists of an active enediyne chromophore (AE) and a non-covalently bound apo-protein (LDP), is a member of chromoprotein family of antitumor antibiotics with extremely potent cytotoxicity to cancer cells. Therefore, we reasoned that endostatin-lidamycin (ES-LDM) fusion proteins upon energizing with enediyne chromophore may obtain the combined capability targeting tumor vasculature and tumor cell by respective ES and LDM moiety. In this study, we designed and obtained two new endostatin-based fusion proteins, endostatin-LDP (ES-LDP) and LDP-endostatin (LDP-ES). In vitro, the antiangiogenic effect of fusion proteins was determined by the wound healing assay and tube formation assay and the cytotoxicity of their enediyne-energized analogs was evaluated by CCK-8 assay. Tissue microarray was used to analyze the binding affinity of LDP, ES or ES-LDP with specimens of human lung tissue and lung tumor. The in vivo efficacy of the fusion proteins was evaluated with human lung carcinoma PG-BE1 xenograft and the experimental metastasis model of 4T1-luc breast cancer. ES-LDP and LDP-ES disrupted the formation of endothelial tube structures and inhibited endothelial cell migration. Evidently, ES-LDP accumulated in the tumor and suppressed tumor growth and metastasis. ES-LDP and ES show higher binding capability than LDP to lung carcinoma; in addition, ES-LDP and ES share similar binding capability. Furthermore, the enediyne-energized fusion protein ES-LDP-AE demonstrated significant efficacy against lung carcinoma xenograft in athymic mice. The ES-based fusion protein therapy provides some fundamental information for further drug development. Targeting both tumor vasculature and tumor cells by endostatin

  7. Effects of the proteasome inhibitor PS-341 on tumor growth in HTLV-1 Tax transgenic mice and Tax tumor transplants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitra-Kaushik, Shibani; Harding, John C; Hess, Jay L; Ratner, Lee

    2004-08-01

    Recent studies have shown that the transcription factor nuclear factor kappaB (NF-kappaB) regulates critical survival pathways in a variety of cancers, including human T-cell leukemia/lymphotrophic virus 1 (HTLV-1)-transformed CD4 T cells. The activation of NF-kappaB is controlled by proteasome-mediated degradation of the inhibitor of nuclear factor kappaBalpha (IkappaBalpha). We investigated the effects of PS-341, a peptide boronate inhibitor of the proteasome in HTLV-1 Tax transgenic tumors in vitro and in vivo. In Tax transgenic mice, PS-341 administered thrice weekly inhibited tumor-associated NF-kappaB activity. Quantitation of proliferation, apoptosis, and interleukin 6 (IL-6) and IL-10 secretion by tumor cells in culture revealed that the effects of PS-341 on cell growth largely correlated with inhibition of pathways mediated by NF-kappaB. However, the effect of PS-341 on the growth of tumors in Tax transgenic mice revealed heterogeneity in drug responsiveness. The tumor tissues treated with PS-341 show no consistent inhibition of NFkappaB activation in vivo. Annexin V staining indicated that PS-341 response in vivo correlated with sensitivity to apoptosis induced by gamma irradiation. On the other hand, transplanted Tax tumors in Rag-1 mice showed consistent inhibition of tumor growth and prolonged survival in response to the same drug regimen. TUNEL staining indicated that PS-341 treatment sensitizes Tax tumors to DNA fragmentation.

  8. Human Organotypic Lung Tumor Models: Suitable For Preclinical 18F-FDG PET-Imaging.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Fecher

    Full Text Available Development of predictable in vitro tumor models is a challenging task due to the enormous complexity of tumors in vivo. The closer the resemblance of these models to human tumor characteristics, the more suitable they are for drug-development and -testing. In the present study, we generated a complex 3D lung tumor test system based on acellular rat lungs. A decellularization protocol was established preserving the architecture, important ECM components and the basement membrane of the lung. Human lung tumor cells cultured on the scaffold formed cluster and exhibited an up-regulation of the carcinoma-associated marker mucin1 as well as a reduced proliferation rate compared to respective 2D culture. Additionally, employing functional imaging with 2-deoxy-2-[18F]fluoro-D-glucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET these tumor cell cluster could be detected and tracked over time. This approach allowed monitoring of a targeted tyrosine kinase inhibitor treatment in the in vitro lung tumor model non-destructively. Surprisingly, FDG-PET assessment of single tumor cell cluster on the same scaffold exhibited differences in their response to therapy, indicating heterogeneity in the lung tumor model. In conclusion, our complex lung tumor test system features important characteristics of tumors and its microenvironment and allows monitoring of tumor growth and -metabolism in combination with functional imaging. In longitudinal studies, new therapeutic approaches and their long-term effects can be evaluated to adapt treatment regimes in future.

  9. Arctigenin inhibits prostate tumor cell growth in vitro and in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Piwen; Solorzano, Walter; Diaz, Tanya; Magyar, Clara E; Henning, Susanne M; Vadgama, Jaydutt V

    2017-06-01

    The low bioavailability of most phytochemicals limits their translation to humans. We investigated whether arctigenin, a novel anti-inflammatory lignan from the seeds of Arctium lappa , has favorable bioavailability/potency against prostate cancer. The anticarcinogenic activity of arctigenin was investigated both in vitro using the androgen-sensitive LNCaP and LAPC-4 human prostate cancer cells and pre-malignant WPE1-NA22 cells, and in vivo using xenograft mouse models. Arctigenin at lower doses (arctigenin at 50mg/kg (LD) or 100mg/kg (HD) b.w. daily or vehicle control by oral gavage. After 6 weeks, tumor growth was inhibited by 50% (LD) and 70% (HD) compared to control. A stronger tumor inhibitory effect was observed in a second experiment where arctigenin intervention started two weeks prior to tumor implantation. Arc was detectable in blood and tumors in Arc groups, with a mean value up to 2.0 μM in blood, and 8.3 nmol/g tissue in tumors. Tumor levels of proliferation marker Ki67, total and nuclear androgen receptor, and growth factors including VEGF, EGF, and FGF-β were significantly decreased by Arc, along with an increase in apoptosis marker of Bax/Bcl-2 ratio. Genes responsive to arctigenin were identified including TIMP3 and ZNF185, and microRNAs including miR-126-5p, and miR-21-5p. This study provides the first in vivo evidence of the strong anticancer activity of arctigenin in prostate cancer. The effective dose of arctigenin in vitro is physiologically achievable in vivo , which provides a high promise in its translation to human application.

  10. Oridonin inhibits tumor growth and metastasis through anti-angiogenesis by blocking the Notch signaling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanmin Dong

    Full Text Available While significant progress has been made in understanding the anti-inflammatory and anti-proliferative effects of the natural diterpenoid component Oridonin on tumor cells, little is known about its effect on tumor angiogenesis or metastasis and on the underlying molecular mechanisms. In this study, Oridonin significantly suppressed human umbilical vascular endothelial cells (HUVECs proliferation, migration, and apillary-like structure formation in vitro. Using aortic ring assay and mouse corneal angiogenesis model, we found that Oridonin inhibited angiogenesis ex vivo and in vivo. In our animal experiments, Oridonin impeded tumor growth and metastasis. Immunohistochemistry analysis further revealed that the expression of CD31 and vWF protein in xenografts was remarkably decreased by the Oridonin. Furthermore, Oridonin reinforced endothelial cell-cell junction and impaired breast cancer cell transendothelial migration. Mechanistically, Oridonin not only down-regulated Jagged2 expression and Notch1 activity but also decreased the expression of their target genes. In conclusion, our results demonstrated an original role of Oridonin in inhibiting tumor angiogenesis and propose a mechanism. This study also provides new evidence supporting the central role of Notch in tumor angiogenesis and suggests that Oridonin could be a potential drug candidate for angiogenesis related diseases.

  11. Optimal design for informative protocols in xenograft tumor growth inhibition experiments in mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lestini, Giulia; Mentré, France; Magni, Paolo

    2016-01-01

    Tumor growth inhibition (TGI) models are increasingly used during preclinical drug development in oncology for the in vivo evaluation of antitumor effect. Tumor sizes are measured in xenografted mice, often only during and shortly after treatment, thus preventing correct identification of some TGI model parameters. Our aims were i) to evaluate the importance of including measurements during tumor regrowth; ii) to investigate the proportions of mice included in each arm. For these purposes, optimal design theory based on the Fisher information matrix implemented in PFIM4.0 was applied. Published xenograft experiments, involving different drugs, schedules and cell lines, were used to help optimize experimental settings and parameters using the Simeoni TGI model. For each experiment, a two-arm design, i.e. control vs treatment, was optimized with or without the constraint of not sampling during tumor regrowth, i.e. “short” and “long” studies, respectively. In long studies, measurements could be taken up to 6 grams of tumor weight, whereas in short studies the experiment was stopped three days after the end of treatment. Predicted relative standard errors were smaller in long studies than in corresponding short studies. Some optimal measurement times were located in the regrowth phase, highlighting the importance of continuing the experiment after the end of treatment. In the four-arm designs, the results showed that the proportions of control and treated mice can differ. To conclude, making measurements during tumor regrowth should become a general rule for informative preclinical studies in oncology, especially when a delayed drug effect is suspected. PMID:27306546

  12. Dynamic Urban Growth Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    1979-12-01

    In the report the concept of 'order by fluctuation,' that has appeared recently in physico-chemical and biological systems, is applied to the description of urban growth. It is shown that fluctuations play a vital role in the evolutionary process of ...

  13. The HMGB1/RAGE inflammatory pathway promotes pancreatic tumor growth by regulating mitochondrial bioenergetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, R; Tang, D; Schapiro, NE; Loux, T; Livesey, KM; Billiar, TR; Wang, H; Van Houten, B; Lotze, MT; Zeh, HJ

    2013-01-01

    Tumor cells require increased adenosine triphosphate (ATP) to support anabolism and proliferation. The precise mechanisms regulating this process in tumor cells are unknown. Here, we show that the receptor for advanced glycation endproducts (RAGE) and one of its primary ligands, high-mobility group box 1 (HMGB1), are required for optimal mitochondrial function within tumors. We found that RAGE is present in the mitochondria of cultured tumor cells as well as primary tumors. RAGE and HMGB1 coordinately enhanced tumor cell mitochondrial complex I activity, ATP production, tumor cell proliferation and migration. Lack of RAGE or inhibition of HMGB1 release diminished ATP production and slowed tumor growth in vitro and in vivo. These findings link, for the first time, the HMGB1–RAGE pathway with changes in bioenergetics. Moreover, our observations provide a novel mechanism within the tumor microenvironment by which necrosis and inflammation promote tumor progression. PMID:23318458

  14. Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma mice lacking mucin 1 have a profound defect in tumor growth and metastasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Besmer, Dahlia M; Curry, Jennifer M; Roy, Lopamudra D; Tinder, Teresa L; Sahraei, Mahnaz; Schettini, Jorge; Hwang, Sun-Il; Lee, Yong Y; Gendler, Sandra J; Mukherjee, Pinku

    2011-07-01

    MUC1 is overexpressed and aberrantly glycosylated in more than 60% of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinomas. The functional role of MUC1 in pancreatic cancer has yet to be fully elucidated due to a dearth of appropriate models. In this study, we have generated mouse models that spontaneously develop pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (KC), which are either Muc1-null (KCKO) or express human MUC1 (KCM). We show that KCKO mice have significantly slower tumor progression and rates of secondary metastasis, compared with both KC and KCM. Cell lines derived from KCKO tumors have significantly less tumorigenic capacity compared with cells from KCM tumors. Therefore, mice with KCKO tumors had a significant survival benefit compared with mice with KCM tumors. In vitro, KCKO cells have reduced proliferation and invasion and failed to respond to epidermal growth factor, platelet-derived growth factor, or matrix metalloproteinase 9. Further, significantly less KCKO cells entered the G(2)-M phase of the cell cycle compared with the KCM cells. Proteomics and Western blotting analysis revealed a complete loss of cdc-25c expression, phosphorylation of mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK), as well as a significant decrease in nestin and tubulin-α2 chain expression in KCKO cells. Treatment with a MEK1/2 inhibitor, U0126, abrogated the enhanced proliferation of the KCM cells but had minimal effect on KCKO cells, suggesting that MUC1 is necessary for MAPK activity and oncogenic signaling. This is the first study to utilize a Muc1-null PDA mouse to fully elucidate the oncogenic role of MUC1, both in vivo and in vitro. ©2011 AACR

  15. Radiation-induced nitric oxide mitigates tumor hypoxia and radioresistance in a murine SCCVII tumor model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nagane, Masaki, E-mail: nagane@vetmed.hokudai.ac.jp [Laboratory of Radiation Biology, Department of Environmental Veterinary Sciences, Graduate School of Veterinary Medicine, Hokkaido University, Sapporo (Japan); Yasui, Hironobu, E-mail: yassan@vetmed.hokudai.ac.jp [Laboratory of Radiation Biology, Department of Environmental Veterinary Sciences, Graduate School of Veterinary Medicine, Hokkaido University, Sapporo (Japan); Yamamori, Tohru, E-mail: yamamorit@vetmed.hokudai.ac.jp [Laboratory of Radiation Biology, Department of Environmental Veterinary Sciences, Graduate School of Veterinary Medicine, Hokkaido University, Sapporo (Japan); Zhao, Songji, E-mail: zsi@med.hokudai.ac.jp [Department of Tracer Kinetics and Bioanalysis, Graduate School of Medicine, Hokkaido University, Sapporo (Japan); Kuge, Yuji, E-mail: kuge@med.hokudai.ac.jp [Central Institute of Isotope Science, Hokkaido University, Sapporo (Japan); Tamaki, Nagara, E-mail: natamaki@med.hokudai.ac.jp [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Graduate School of Medicine, Hokkaido University, Sapporo (Japan); Kameya, Hiromi, E-mail: kameya@affrc.go.jp [Food Safety Division, National Food Research Institute, Tsukuba (Japan); Nakamura, Hideo, E-mail: naka@science-edu.org [Department of Chemistry, Hokkaido University of Education, Hakodate (Japan); Fujii, Hirotada, E-mail: hgfujii@sapmed.ac.jp [Center for Medical Education, Sapporo Medical University, Sapporo (Japan); Inanami, Osamu, E-mail: inanami@vetmed.hokudai.ac.jp [Laboratory of Radiation Biology, Department of Environmental Veterinary Sciences, Graduate School of Veterinary Medicine, Hokkaido University, Sapporo (Japan)

    2013-08-02

    Highlights: •IR-induced NO increased tissue perfusion and pO{sub 2}. •IR increased NO production in tumors without changes in the mRNA and protein levels of NOS isoforms. •NOS activity assay showed that IR upregulated eNOS activity in tumors. •IR-induced NO decreased tumor hypoxia and altered tumor radiosensitivity. -- Abstract: Tumor hypoxia, which occurs mainly as a result of inadequate tissue perfusion in solid tumors, is a well-known challenge for successful radiotherapy. Recent evidence suggests that ionizing radiation (IR) upregulates nitric oxide (NO) production and that IR-induced NO has the potential to increase intratumoral circulation. However, the kinetics of NO production and the responsible isoforms for NO synthase in tumors exposed to IR remain unclear. In this study, we aimed to elucidate the mechanism by which IR stimulates NO production in tumors and the effect of IR-induced NO on tumor radiosensitivity. Hoechst33342 perfusion assay and electron spin resonance oxymetry showed that IR increased tissue perfusion and pO{sub 2} in tumor tissue. Immunohistochemical analysis using two different hypoxic probes showed that IR decreased hypoxic regions in tumors; treatment with a nitric oxide synthase (NOS) inhibitor, L-NAME, abrogated the effects of IR. Moreover, IR increased endothelial NOS (eNOS) activity without affecting its mRNA or protein expression levels in SCCVII-transplanted tumors. Tumor growth delay assay showed that L-NAME decreased the anti-tumor effect of fractionated radiation (10 Gy × 2). These results suggested that IR increased eNOS activity and subsequent tissue perfusion in tumors. Increases in intratumoral circulation simultaneously decreased tumor hypoxia. As a result, IR-induced NO increased tumor radiosensitivity. Our study provides a new insight into the NO-dependent mechanism for efficient fractionated radiotherapy.

  16. Expression of the insulin-like growth factor (IGF) system and steroidgenic enzymes in canine testis tumors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Peters, M.A.J.; Mol, J.A.; Wolferen, van M.E.; Oosterlaken-Dijksterhuis, M.A.; Teerds, K.J.; Sluijs, van F.J.

    2003-01-01

    Testis tumors occur frequently in dogs. The main types of tumors are Sertoli cell tumors, seminomas, and Leydig cell tumors. Mixed tumors and bilateral occurrence of tumors may be encountered frequently. To elucidate the possible relationship between the insulin-like growth factor (IGF) system and

  17. Abalone visceral extract inhibit tumor growth and metastasis by modulating Cox-2 levels and CD8+ T cell activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    II Kim Jae

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Abalone has long been used as a valuable food source in East Asian countries. Although the nutritional importance of abalone has been reported through in vitro and in vivo studies, there is little evidence about the potential anti-tumor effects of abalone visceral extract. The aim of the present study is to examine anti-tumor efficacy of abalone visceral extract and to elucidate its working mechanism. Methods In the present study, we used breast cancer model using BALB/c mouse-derived 4T1 mammary carcinoma and investigated the effect of abalone visceral extract on tumor development. Inhibitory effect against tumor metastasis was assessed by histopathology of lungs. Cox-2 productions by primary and secondary tumor were measured by real-time RT-PCR and immunoblotting (IB. Proliferation assay based on [3H]-thymidine incorporation and measurement of cytokines and effector molecules by RT-PCR were used to confirm tumor suppression efficacy of abalone visceral extract by modulating cytolytic CD8+ T cells. The cytotoxicity of CD8+ T cell was compared by JAM test. Results Oral administration of abalone visceral extract reduced tumor growth (tumor volume and weight and showed reduced metastasis as confirmed by decreased level of splenomegaly (spleen size and weight and histological analysis of the lung metastasis (gross analysis and histological staining. Reduced expression of Cox-2 (mRNA and protein from primary tumor and metastasized lung was also detected. In addition, treatment of abalone visceral extract increased anti-tumor activities of CD8+ T cells by increasing the proliferation capacity and their cytolytic activity. Conclusions Our results suggest that abalone visceral extract has anti-tumor effects by suppressing tumor growth and lung metastasis through decreasing Cox-2 expression level as well as promoting proliferation and cytolytic function of CD8+ T cells.

  18. Malignant cells fuel tumor growth by educating infiltrating leukocytes to produce the mitogen Gas6

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Loges, Sonja; Schmidt, Thomas; Tjwa, Marc; van Geyte, Katie; Lievens, Dirk; Lutgens, Esther; Vanhoutte, Davy; Borgel, Delphine; Plaisance, Stephane; Hoylaerts, Marc; Luttun, Aernout; Dewerchin, Mieke; Jonckx, Bart; Carmeliet, Peter

    2010-01-01

    The transforming and tumor growth-promoting properties of Axl, a member of the Tyro3, Axl, and Mer (TAM) family of receptor tyrosine kinases (TAMRs), are well recognized. In contrast, little is known about the role of the TAMR ligand growth arrest-specific gene 6 (Gas6) in tumor biology. By using

  19. Phosphoinositide 3-Kinase Gamma Inhibition Protects from Anthracycline Cardiotoxicity and Reduces Tumor Growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Mingchuan; Sala, Valentina; De Santis, Maria Chiara; Cimino, James; Cappello, Paola; Pianca, Nicola; Di Bona, Anna; Margaria, Jean Piero; Martini, Miriam; Lazzarini, Edoardo; Pirozzi, Flora; Rossi, Luca; Franco, Irene; Bornbaum, Julia; Heger, Jacqueline; Rohrbach, Susanne; Perino, Alessia; Tocchetti, Carlo G; Lima, Braulio H F; Teixeira, Mauro M; Porporato, Paolo E; Schulz, Rainer; Angelini, Annalisa; Sandri, Marco; Ameri, Pietro; Sciarretta, Sebastiano; Lima-Júnior, Roberto César P; Mongillo, Marco; Zaglia, Tania; Morello, Fulvio; Novelli, Francesco; Hirsch, Emilio; Ghigo, Alessandra

    2018-01-18

    Background -Anthracyclines, such as doxorubicin (DOX), are potent anti-cancer agents for the treatment of solid tumors and hematological malignancies. However, their clinical use is hampered by cardiotoxicity. This study sought to investigate the role of PI3Kγ in DOX-induced cardiotoxicity and the potential cardio-protective and anti-cancer effects of PI3Kγ inhibition. Methods -Mice expressing a kinase-inactive PI3Kγ or receiving PI3Kγ selective inhibitors were subjected to chronic DOX treatment. Cardiac function was analyzed by echocardiography and DOX-mediated signaling was assessed in whole hearts or in isolated cardiomyocytes. The dual cardio-protective and anti-tumor action of PI3Kγinhibition was assessed in mouse mammary tumor models. Results -PI3Kγ KD mice showed preserved cardiac function after chronic low-dose DOX treatment, and were protected against DOX-induced cardiotoxicity. The beneficial effects of PI3Kγ inhibition were causally linked to enhanced autophagic disposal of DOX-damaged mitochondria. Consistently, either pharmacological or genetic blockade of autophagy in vivo abrogated the resistance of PI3Kγ KD mice to DOX cardiotoxicity. Mechanistically, PI3Kγ was triggered in DOX-treated hearts, downstream of TLR9, by the mitochondrial DNA released by injured organelles, and contained in autolysosomes. This autolysosomal PI3Kγ/Akt/mTOR/Ulk1 signaling provided maladaptive feedback inhibition of autophagy. Finally, PI3Kγ blockade in models of mammary gland tumors prevented DOX-induced cardiac dysfunction, and concomitantly synergized with the anti-tumor action of DOX, by unleashing anticancer immunity. Conclusions -Blockade of PI3Kγ may provide a dual therapeutic advantage in cancer therapy, by simultaneously preventing anthracyclines cardiotoxicity and reducing tumor growth.

  20. Mathematical modeling of tumor-associated macrophage interactions with the cancer microenvironment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahlbacher, Grace; Curtis, Louis T; Lowengrub, John; Frieboes, Hermann B

    2018-01-30

    Immuno-oncotherapy has emerged as a promising means to target cancer. In particular, therapeutic manipulation of tumor-associated macrophages holds promise due to their various and sometimes opposing roles in tumor progression. It is established that M1-type macrophages suppress tumor progression while M2-types support it. Recently, Tie2-expressing macrophages (TEM) have been identified as a distinct sub-population influencing tumor angiogenesis and vascular remodeling as well as monocyte differentiation. This study develops a modeling framework to evaluate macrophage interactions with the tumor microenvironment, enabling assessment of how these interactions may affect tumor progression. M1, M2, and Tie2 expressing variants are integrated into a model of tumor growth representing a metastatic lesion in a highly vascularized organ, such as the liver. Behaviors simulated include M1 release of nitric oxide (NO), M2 release of growth-promoting factors, and TEM facilitation of angiogenesis via Angiopoietin-2 and promotion of monocyte differentiation into M2 via IL-10. The results show that M2 presence leads to larger tumor growth regardless of TEM effects, implying that immunotherapeutic strategies that lead to TEM ablation may fail to restrain growth when the M2 represents a sizeable population. As TEM pro-tumor effects are less pronounced and on a longer time scale than M1-driven tumor inhibition, a more nuanced approach to influence monocyte differentiation taking into account the tumor state (e.g., under chemotherapy) may be desirable. The results highlight the dynamic interaction of macrophages within a growing tumor, and, further, establish the initial feasibility of a mathematical framework that could longer term help to optimize cancer immunotherapy.

  1. Brain Tumor Segmentation Using a Generative Model with an RBM Prior on Tumor Shape

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Agn, Mikael; Puonti, Oula; Rosenschöld, Per Munck af

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we present a fully automated generative method for brain tumor segmentation in multi-modal magnetic resonance images. The method is based on the type of generative model often used for segmenting healthy brain tissues, where tissues are modeled by Gaussian mixture models combined...... with a spatial atlas-based tissue prior. We extend this basic model with a tumor prior, which uses convolutional restricted Boltzmann machines (cRBMs) to model the shape of both tumor core and complete tumor, which includes edema and core. The cRBMs are trained on expert segmentations of training images, without...

  2. Tumorer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Prause, J.U.; Heegaard, S.

    2005-01-01

    oftalmologi, øjenlågstumorer, conjunctivale tumorer, malignt melanom, retinoblastom, orbitale tumorer......oftalmologi, øjenlågstumorer, conjunctivale tumorer, malignt melanom, retinoblastom, orbitale tumorer...

  3. Monitoring of tumor growth and metastasis potential in MDA-MB-435s/tk-luc human breast cancer xenografts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, Y.-F.; Lin, Y.-Y.; Wang, H.-E.; Liu, R.-S.; Pang Fei; Hwang, J.-J.

    2007-01-01

    Molecular imaging of reporter gene expression provides a rapid, sensitive and non-invasive monitoring of tumor behaviors. In this study, we reported the establishment of a novel animal model for longitudinal examination of tumor growth kinetics and metastatic spreading in vivo. The highly metastatic human breast carcinoma MDA-MB-435s cell line was engineered to stably express herpes simplex virus type 1 thymidine kinase (HSV-1-tk) and luciferase (luc). Both 131 I-FIAU and D-luciferin were used as reporter probes. For orthotopic tumor formation, MDA-MB-435s/tk-luc cells were implanted into the first nipple of 6-week-old female NOD/SCID mice. For metastatic study, cells were injected via the lateral tail vein. Mice-bearing MDA-MB-435s/tk-luc tumors were scanned for tumor growth and metastatsis using Xenogen IVIS50 system. Gamma scintigraphy and whole-body autoradiography were also applied to confirm the tumor localization. The results of bioluminescence imaging as well as histopathological finding showed that tumors could be detected in femur, spine, ovary, lungs, kidney, adrenal gland, lymph nodes and muscle at 16 weeks post i.v. injection, and correlated photons could be quantified. This MDA-MB-435s/tk-luc human breast carcinoma-bearing mouse model combined with multimodalities of molecular imaging may facilitate studies on the molecular mechanisms of cancer invasion and metastasis

  4. Usp9x Promotes Survival in Human Pancreatic Cancer and Its Inhibition Suppresses Pancreatic Ductal Adenocarcinoma In Vivo Tumor Growth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anupama Pal

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Usp9x has emerged as a potential therapeutic target in some hematologic malignancies and a broad range of solid tumors including brain, breast, and prostate. To examine Usp9x tumorigenicity and consequence of Usp9x inhibition in human pancreatic tumor models, we carried out gain- and loss-of-function studies using established human pancreatic tumor cell lines (PANC1 and MIAPACA2 and four spontaneously immortalized human pancreatic patient-derived tumor (PDX cell lines. The effect of Usp9x activity inhibition by small molecule deubiquitinase inhibitor G9 was assessed in 2D and 3D culture, and its efficacy was tested in human tumor xenografts. Overexpression of Usp9x increased 3D growth and invasion in PANC1 cells and up-regulated the expression of known Usp9x substrates Mcl-1 and ITCH. Usp9x inhibition by shRNA-knockdown or by G9 treatment reduced 3D colony formation in PANC1 and PDX cell lines, induced rapid apoptosis in MIAPACA2 cells, and associated with reduced Mcl-1 and ITCH protein levels. Although G9 treatment reduced human MIAPACA2 tumor burden in vivo, in mouse pancreatic cancer cell lines established from constitutive (8041 and doxycycline-inducible (4668 KrasG12D/Tp53R172H mouse pancreatic tumors, Usp9x inhibition increased and sustained the 3D colony growth and showed no significant effect on tumor growth in 8041-xenografts. Thus, Usp9x inhibition may be therapeutically active in human PDAC, but this activity was not predicted from studies of genetically engineered mouse pancreatic tumor models.

  5. Dual IGF-I/II-neutralizing antibody MEDI-573 potently inhibits IGF signaling and tumor growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Jin; Chesebrough, Jon W; Cartlidge, Susan A; Ricketts, Sally-Ann; Incognito, Leonard; Veldman-Jones, Margaret; Blakey, David C; Tabrizi, Mohammad; Jallal, Bahija; Trail, Pamela A; Coats, Steven; Bosslet, Klaus; Chang, Yong S

    2011-02-01

    Insulin-like growth factors (IGF), IGF-I and IGF-II, are small polypeptides involved in regulating cell proliferation, survival, differentiation, and transformation. IGF activities are mediated through binding and activation of IGF-1R or insulin receptor isoform A (IR-A). The role of the IGF-1R pathway in promoting tumor growth and survival is well documented. Overexpression of IGF-II and IR-A is reported in multiple types of cancer and is proposed as a potential mechanism for cancer cells to develop resistance to IGF-1R-targeting therapy. MEDI-573 is a fully human antibody that neutralizes both IGF-I and IGF-II and inhibits IGF signaling through both the IGF-1R and IR-A pathways. Here, we show that MEDI-573 blocks the binding of IGF-I and IGF-II to IGF-1R or IR-A, leading to the inhibition of IGF-induced signaling pathways and cell proliferation. MEDI-573 significantly inhibited the in vivo growth of IGF-I- or IGF-II-driven tumors. Pharmacodynamic analysis demonstrated inhibition of IGF-1R phosphorylation in tumors in mice dosed with MEDI-573, indicating that the antitumor activity is mediated via inhibition of IGF-1R signaling pathways. Finally, MEDI-573 significantly decreased (18)F-fluorodeoxyglucose ((18)F-FDG) uptake in IGF-driven tumor models, highlighting the potential utility of (18)F-FDG-PET as a noninvasive pharmacodynamic readout for evaluating the use of MEDI-573 in the clinic. Taken together, these results demonstrate that the inhibition of IGF-I and IGF-II ligands by MEDI-573 results in potent antitumor activity and offers an effective approach to selectively target both the IGF-1R and IR-A signaling pathways.

  6. Complex microcirculation patterns detected by confocal indocyanine green angiography predict time to growth of small choroidal melanocytic tumors: MuSIC Report II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mueller, Arthur J; Freeman, William R; Schaller, Ulrich C; Kampik, Anselm; Folberg, Robert

    2002-12-01

    .001), and networks (P < 0.001). Of these, the angiographic documentation of any of the complex MCPs (parallel with cross-linking, arcs with branching, loops, networks, or a combination thereof) showed the strongest association with the time to tumor growth in a Cox proportional hazard model. The characteristics of our patient cohort are comparable by clinical and echographic parameters with cohorts for predicting tumor growth, described previously in the literature. In addition, we detected a novel clinical predictor of tumor growth: the confocal ICG angiographic detection of complex MCPs.

  7. Fibroblast growth factor receptor 4 regulates tumor invasion by coupling fibroblast growth factor signaling to extracellular matrix degradation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sugiyama, Nami; Varjosalo, Markku; Meller, Pipsa

    2010-01-01

    Aberrant expression and polymorphism of fibroblast growth factor receptor 4 (FGFR4) has been linked to tumor progression and anticancer drug resistance. We describe here a novel mechanism of tumor progression by matrix degradation involving epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition in response...

  8. Effect of magnetic field on oxygen pressure, radiosensitivity and growth of some experimental tumors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lyu, B.N.; Kauashev, S.K.

    The effect of variation of partial oxygen pressure in liquid media and directly in living tumors was investigated to determine the effect of a permanent magnetic field on these changes. Partial oxygen pressure increases significantly in Pliss lymphosarcoma and RS-1 tumors when exposed to a magnetic field and decreases after the magnetic field is removed. The variation of partial oxygen pressure is similar in Walker carcinosarcoma, but is different for living and killed rats. The growth rate of tumors decreases appreciably after each session of combination magnetic and radiation effects with an increase of partial oxygen pressure in magnetized tumors. Periodic one-hour magnetic exposure preceding irradiation causes a marked zigzag growth of tumors, while 5- and 30- minute exposure to a permanent magnetic field has essentially no effect on tumor growth.

  9. Effectivity of pazopanib treatment in orthotopic models of human testicular germ cell tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Juliachs, Mercè; Viñals, Francesc; Vidal, August; Muro, Xavier Garcia del; Piulats, Josep M; Condom, Enric; Casanovas, Oriol; Graupera, Mariona; Germà, Jose R; Villanueva, Alberto

    2013-01-01

    Cisplatin (CDDP) resistance in testicular germ cell tumors (GCTs) is still a clinical challenge, and one associated with poor prognosis. The purpose of this work was to test pazopanib, an anti-tumoral and anti-angiogenic multikinase inhibitor, and its combination with lapatinib (an anti-ErbB inhibitor) in mouse orthotopic models of human testicular GCTs. We used two different models of human testicular GCTs orthotopically grown in nude mice; a CDDP-sensitive choriocarcinoma (TGT38) and a new orthotopic model generated from a metastatic GCT refractory to first-line CDDP chemotherapy (TGT44). Nude mice implanted with these orthotopic tumors were treated with the inhibitors and the effect on tumoral growth and angiogenesis was evaluated. TGT44 refractory tumor had an immunohistochemical profile similar to the original metastasis, with characteristics of yolk sac tumor. TGT44 did not respond when treated with cisplatin. In contrast, pazopanib had an anti-angiogenic effect and anti-tumor efficacy in this model. Pazopanib in combination with lapatinib in TGT38, an orthotopic model of choriocarcinoma had an additive effect blocking tumor growth. We present pazopanib as a possible agent for the alternative treatment of CDDP-sensitive and CDDP-refractory GCT patients, alone or in combination with anti-ErbB therapies

  10. Interaction between CXCR4 and CCL20 pathways regulates tumor growth.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katia Beider

    Full Text Available The chemokine receptor CXCR4 and its ligand CXCL12 is overexpressed in the majority of tumors and is critically involved in the development and metastasis of these tumors. CXCR4 is expressed in malignant tumor cells whereas its ligand SDF-1 (CXCL12 is expressed mainly by cancer associated fibroblasts (CAF. Similarly to CXCR4, the chemokine CCL20 is overexpressed in variety of tumors; however its role and regulation in tumors is not fully clear. Here, we show that the chemokine receptor CXCR4 stimulates the production of the chemokine CCL20 and that CCL20 stimulates the proliferation and adhesion to collagen of various tumor cells. Furthermore, overexpression of CCL20 in tumor cells promotes growth and adhesion in vitro and increased tumor growth and invasiveness in vivo. Moreover, neutralizing antibodies to CCL20 inhibit the in vivo growth of tumors that either overexpress CXCR4 or CCL20 or naturally express CCL20. These results reveal a role for CCL20 in CXCR4-dependent and -independent tumor growth and suggest a therapeutic potential for CCL20 and CCR6 antagonists in the treatment of CXCR4- and CCL20-dependent malignancies.

  11. Methylthioadenosine (MTA inhibits melanoma cell proliferation and in vivo tumor growth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cortés Javier

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Melanoma is the most deadly form of skin cancer without effective treatment. Methylthioadenosine (MTA is a naturally occurring nucleoside with differential effects on normal and transformed cells. MTA has been widely demonstrated to promote anti-proliferative and pro-apoptotic responses in different cell types. In this study we have assessed the therapeutic potential of MTA in melanoma treatment. Methods To investigate the therapeutic potential of MTA we performed in vitro proliferation and viability assays using six different mouse and human melanoma cell lines wild type for RAS and BRAF or harboring different mutations in RAS pathway. We also have tested its therapeutic capabilities in vivo in a xenograft mouse melanoma model and using variety of molecular techniques and tissue culture we investigated its anti-proliferative and pro-apoptotic properties. Results In vitro experiments showed that MTA treatment inhibited melanoma cell proliferation and viability in a dose dependent manner, where BRAF mutant melanoma cell lines appear to be more sensitive. Importantly, MTA was effective inhibiting in vivo tumor growth. The molecular analysis of tumor samples and in vitro experiments indicated that MTA induces cytostatic rather than pro-apoptotic effects inhibiting the phosphorylation of Akt and S6 ribosomal protein and inducing the down-regulation of cyclin D1. Conclusions MTA inhibits melanoma cell proliferation and in vivo tumor growth particularly in BRAF mutant melanoma cells. These data reveal a naturally occurring drug potentially useful for melanoma treatment.

  12. Microencapsulated tumor assay: Evaluation of the nude mouse model of pancreatic cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Ming-Zhe; Cheng, Dong-Feng; Ye, Jin-Hua; Zhou, Yong; Wang, Jia-Xiang; Shi, Min-Min; Han, Bao-San; Peng, Cheng-Hong

    2012-01-01

    AIM: To establish a more stable and accurate nude mouse model of pancreatic cancer using cancer cell microencapsulation. METHODS: The assay is based on microencapsulation technology, wherein human tumor cells are encapsulated in small microcapsules (approximately 420 μm in diameter) constructed of semipermeable membranes. We implemented two kinds of subcutaneous implantation models in nude mice using the injection of single tumor cells and encapsulated pancreatic tumor cells. The size of subcutaneously implanted tumors was observed on a weekly basis using two methods, and growth curves were generated from these data. The growth and metastasis of orthotopically injected single tumor cells and encapsulated pancreatic tumor cells were evaluated at four and eight weeks postimplantation by positron emission tomography-computed tomography scan and necropsy. The pancreatic tumor samples obtained from each method were then sent for pathological examination. We evaluated differences in the rates of tumor incidence and the presence of metastasis and variations in tumor volume and tumor weight in the cancer microcapsules vs single-cell suspensions. RESULTS: Sequential in vitro observations of the microcapsules showed that the cancer cells in microcapsules proliferated well and formed spheroids at days 4 to 6. Further in vitro culture resulted in bursting of the membrane of the microcapsules and cells deviated outward and continued to grow in flasks. The optimum injection time was found to be 5 d after tumor encapsulation. In the subcutaneous implantation model, there were no significant differences in terms of tumor volume between the encapsulated pancreatic tumor cells and cells alone and rate of tumor incidence. There was a significant difference in the rate of successful implantation between the cancer cell microencapsulation group and the single tumor-cell suspension group (100% vs 71.43%, respectively, P = 0.0489) in the orthotropic implantation model. The former method

  13. Delay equations modeling the effects of phase-specific drugs and immunotherapy on proliferating tumor cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbarossa, Maria Vittoria; Kuttler, Christina; Zinsl, Jonathan

    2012-04-01

    In this work we present a mathematical model for tumor growth based on the biology of the cell cycle. For an appropriate description of the effects of phase-specific drugs, it is necessary to look at the cell cycle and its phases. Our model reproduces the dynamics of three different tumor cell populations: quiescent cells, cells during the interphase and mitotic cells. Starting from a partial differential equations (PDEs) setting, a delay differential equations (DDE) model is derived for an easier and more realistic approach. Our equations also include interactions of tumor cells with immune system effectors. We investigate the model both from the analytical and the numerical point of view, give conditions for positivity of solutions and focus on the stability of the cancer-free equilibrium. Different immunotherapeutic strategies and their effects on the tumor growth are considered, as well.

  14. Cellular and Tumor Radiosensitivity is Correlated to Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor Protein Expression Level in Tumors Without EGFR Amplification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kasten-Pisula, Ulla; Saker, Jarob; Eicheler, Wolfgang; Krause, Mechthild; Yaromina, Ala; Meyer-Staeckling, Soenke; Scherkl, Benjamin; Kriegs, Malte; Brandt, Burkhard; Grenman, Reidar; Petersen, Cordula; Baumann, Michael; Dikomey, Ekkehard

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: There is conflicting evidence for whether the expression of epidermal growth factor receptor in human tumors can be used as a marker of radioresponse. Therefore, this association was studied in a systematic manner using squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) cell lines grown as cell cultures and xenografts. Methods and Materials: The study was performed with 24 tumor cell lines of different tumor types, including 10 SCC lines, which were also investigated as xenografts on nude mice. Egfr gene dose and the length of CA-repeats in intron 1 were determined by polymerase chain reaction, protein expression in vitro by Western blot and in vivo by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, and radiosensitivity in vitro by colony formation. Data were correlated with previously published tumor control dose 50% data after fractionated irradiation of xenografts of the 10 SCC. Results: EGFR protein expression varies considerably, with most tumor cell lines showing moderate and only few showing pronounced upregulation. EGFR upregulation could only be attributed to massive gene amplification in the latter. In the case of little or no amplification, in vitro EGFR expression correlated with both cellular and tumor radioresponse. In vivo EGFR expression did not show this correlation. Conclusions: Local tumor control after the fractionated irradiation of tumors with little or no gene amplification seems to be dependent on in vitro EGFR via its effect on cellular radiosensitivity.

  15. Rac2 controls tumor growth, metastasis and M1-M2 macrophage differentiation in vivo.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shweta Joshi

    Full Text Available Although it is well-established that the macrophage M1 to M2 transition plays a role in tumor progression, the molecular basis for this process remains incompletely understood. Herein, we demonstrate that the small GTPase, Rac2 controls macrophage M1 to M2 differentiation and the metastatic phenotype in vivo. Using a genetic approach, combined with syngeneic and orthotopic tumor models we demonstrate that Rac2-/- mice display a marked defect in tumor growth, angiogenesis and metastasis. Microarray, RT-PCR and metabolomic analysis on bone marrow derived macrophages isolated from the Rac2-/- mice identify an important role for Rac2 in M2 macrophage differentiation. Furthermore, we define a novel molecular mechanism by which signals transmitted from the extracellular matrix via the α4β1 integrin and MCSF receptor lead to the activation of Rac2 and potentially regulate macrophage M2 differentiation. Collectively, our findings demonstrate a macrophage autonomous process by which the Rac2 GTPase is activated downstream of the α4β1 integrin and the MCSF receptor to control tumor growth, metastasis and macrophage differentiation into the M2 phenotype. Finally, using gene expression and metabolomic data from our Rac2-/- model, and information related to M1-M2 macrophage differentiation curated from the literature we executed a systems biologic analysis of hierarchical protein-protein interaction networks in an effort to develop an iterative interactome map which will predict additional mechanisms by which Rac2 may coordinately control macrophage M1 to M2 differentiation and metastasis.

  16. Magnetite nanoparticles inhibit tumor growth and upregulate the expression of p53/p16 in Ehrlich solid carcinoma bearing mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heba Bassiony

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Magnetite nanoparticles (MNPs have been widely used as contrast agents and have promising approaches in cancer treatment. In the present study we used Ehrlich solid carcinoma (ESC bearing mice as a model to investigate MNPs antitumor activity, their effect on expression of p53 and p16 genes as an indicator for apoptotic induction in tumor tissues. METHOD: MNPs coated with ascorbic acid (size: 25.0±5.0 nm were synthesized by co-precipitation method and characterized. Ehrlich mice model were treated with MNPs using 60 mg/Kg day by day for 14 injections; intratumorally (IT or intraperitoneally (IP. Tumor size, pathological changes and iron content in tumor and normal muscle tissues were assessed. We also assessed changes in expression levels of p53 and p16 genes in addition to p53 protein level by immunohistochemistry. RESULTS: Our results revealed that tumor growth was significantly reduced by IT and IP MNPs injection compared to untreated tumor. A significant increase in p53 and p16 mRNA expression was detected in Ehrlich solid tumors of IT and IP treated groups compared to untreated Ehrlich solid tumor. This increase was accompanied with increase in p53 protein expression. It is worth mentioning that no significant difference in expression of p53 and p16 could be detected between IT ESC and control group. CONCLUSION: MNPs might be more effective in breast cancer treatment if injected intratumorally to be directed to the tumor tissues.

  17. STAT5b as Molecular Target in Pancreatic Cancer—Inhibition of Tumor Growth, Angiogenesis, and Metastases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Moser

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available The prognosis of patients suffering from pancreatic cancer is still poor and novel therapeutic options are urgently needed. Recently, the transcription factor signal transducer and activator of transcription 5b (STAT5b was associated with tumor progression in human solid cancer. Hence, we assessed whether STAT5b might serve as an anticancer target in ductal pancreatic adenocarcinoma (DPAC. We found that nuclear expression of STAT5b can be detected in approximately 50% of DPAC. Blockade of STAT5b by stable shRNA-mediated knockdown showed no effects on tumor cell growth in vitro. However, inhibition of tumor cell motility was found even in response to stimulation with epidermal growth factor or interleukin-6. These findings were paralleled by a reduction of prometastatic and proangiogenic factors in vitro. Subsequent in vivo experiments revealed a strong growth inhibition on STAT5b blockade in subcutaneous and orthotopic models. These findings were paralleled by impaired tumor angiogenesis in vivo. In contrast to the subcutaneous model, the orthotopic model revealed a strong reduction of tumor cell proliferation that emphasizes the meaning of assessing targets in an appropriate microenvironment. Taken together, our results suggest that STAT5b might be a potential novel target for human DPAC.

  18. Dosimetry study of PHOTOFRIN-mediated photodynamic therapy in a mouse tumor model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Haixia; Kim, Michele M.; Penjweini, Rozhin; Zhu, Timothy C.

    2016-03-01

    It is well known in photodynamic therapy (PDT) that there is a large variability between PDT light dose and therapeutic outcomes. An explicit dosimetry model using apparent reacted 1O2 concentration [1O2]rx has been developed as a PDT dosimetric quantity to improve the accuracy of the predicted ability of therapeutic efficacy. In this study, this explicit macroscopic singlet oxygen model was adopted to establish the correlation between calculated reacted [1O2]rx and the tumor growth using Photofrin-mediated PDT in a mouse tumor model. Mice with radiation-induced fibrosarcoma (RIF) tumors were injected with Photofrin at a dose of 5 mg/kg. PDT was performed 24h later with different fluence rates (50, 75 and 150 mW/cm2) and different fluences (50 and 135 J/cm2) using a collimated light applicator coupled to a 630nm laser. The tumor volume was monitored daily after PDT and correlated with the total light fluence and [1O2]rx. Photophysical parameters as well as the singlet oxygen threshold dose for this sensitizer and the RIF tumor model were determined previously. The result showed that tumor growth rate varied greatly with light fluence for different fluence rates while [1O2]rx had a good correlation with the PDT-induced tumor growth rate. This preliminary study indicated that [1O2]rx could serve as a better dosimetric predictor for predicting PDT outcome than PDT light dose.

  19. Regorafenib inhibits colorectal tumor growth through PUMA-mediated apoptosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Dongshi; Wei, Liang; Yu, Jian; Zhang, Lin

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Regorafenib, a multi-kinase inhibitor targeting the Ras/Raf/MEK/ERK pathway, has recently been approved for the treatment of metastatic colorectal cancer (CRC). However, the mechanisms of action of regorafenib in CRC cells have been unclear. We investigated how regorafenib suppresses CRC cell growth and potentiates effects of other chemotherapeutic drugs. Experimental Design We determined whether and how regorafenib induces the expression of PUMA, a p53 target and a critical mediator of apoptosis in CRC cells. We also investigated whether PUMA is necessary for the killing and chemosensitization effects of regorafenib in CRC cells. Furthermore, xenograft tumors were used to test if PUMA mediates the in vivo antitumor, antiangiogenic and chemosensitization effects of regorafenib. Results We found that regorafenib treatment induces PUMA in CRC cells irrespective of p53 status through the NF-κB pathway following ERK inhibition and glycogen synthase kinase 3β (GSK3β) activation. Upregulation of PUMA is correlated with apoptosis induction in different CRC cell lines. PUMA is necessary for regorafenib-induced apoptosis in CRC cells. Chemosensitization by regorafenib is mediated by enhanced PUMA induction through different pathways. Furthermore, deficiency in PUMA abrogates the in vivo antitumor, antiangiogenic and chemosensitization effects of regorafenib. Conclusions Our results demonstrate a key role of PUMA in mediating the anticancer effects of regorafenib in CRC cells. They suggest that PUMA induction can be used as an indicator of regorafenib sensitivity, and also provide a rationale for manipulating the apoptotic machinery to improve the therapeutic efficacy of regorafenib and other targeted drugs. PMID:24763611

  20. Ovarian Tumor-Stroma Interactions in an In Vivo Orthotopic Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-01

    dog brain [31]; Ugt8a, transfers galactose to ceramide [32]; Zc4h2, mental retardation [33]; Kctd12b, GABA(B) receptor subunit [34]; Lrrk2...chamber model is to make possible the visualization of tumors that are normally buried and inaccessi- ble, such as pancreatic , prostate or lung tu...angiogenesis and pancreatic tumor growth [78]. Finally, this model is widely used to demonstrate the vascular effects of new anti-angiogenic

  1. Arctigenin inhibits prostate tumor cell growth in vitro and in vivo

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    Piwen Wang

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The low bioavailability of most phytochemicals limits their translation to humans. We investigated whether arctigenin, a novel anti-inflammatory lignan from the seeds of Arctium lappa, has favorable bioavailability/potency against prostate cancer. The anticarcinogenic activity of arctigenin was investigated both in vitro using the androgen-sensitive LNCaP and LAPC-4 human prostate cancer cells and pre-malignant WPE1-NA22 cells, and in vivo using xenograft mouse models. Arctigenin at lower doses (<2 μM significantly inhibited the proliferation of LNCaP and LAPC-4 cells by 30–50% at 48 h compared to control, and inhibited WPE1-NA22 cells by 75%, while did not affect normal prostate epithelial cells. Male severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID mice were implanted subcutaneously with LAPC-4 cells for in vivo studies. In one experiment, the intervention started one week after tumor implantation. Mice received arctigenin at 50 mg/kg (LD or 100 mg/kg (HD b.w. daily or vehicle control by oral gavage. After 6 weeks, tumor growth was inhibited by 50% (LD and 70% (HD compared to control. A stronger tumor inhibitory effect was observed in a second experiment where arctigenin intervention started two weeks prior to tumor implantation. Arc was detectable in blood and tumors in Arc groups, with a mean value up to 2.0 μM in blood, and 8.3 nmol/g tissue in tumors. Tumor levels of proliferation marker Ki67, total and nuclear androgen receptor, and growth factors including VEGF, EGF, and FGF-β were significantly decreased by Arc, along with an increase in apoptosis marker of Bax/Bcl-2 ratio. Genes responsive to arctigenin were identified including TIMP3 and ZNF185, and microRNAs including miR-126-5p, and miR-21-5p. This study provides the first in vivo evidence of the strong anticancer activity of arctigenin in prostate cancer. The effective dose of arctigenin in vitro is physiologically achievable in vivo, which provides a high promise in its

  2. Intermittent hypoxia increases kidney tumor vascularization in a murine model of sleep apnea.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antoni Vilaseca

    Full Text Available We investigate the effects of intermittent hypoxia (IH, a characteristic feature of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA, on renal cancer progression in an animal and cell model. An in vivo mouse model (Balb/c, n = 50 of kidney cancer was used to assess the effect of IH on tumor growth, metastatic capacity, angiogenesis and tumor immune response. An in vitro model tested the effect of IH on RENCA cells, macrophages and endothelial cells. Tumor growth, metastatic capacity, circulating vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF and content of endothelial cells, tumor associated macrophages and their phenotype were assessed in the tumor. In vitro, VEGF cell expression was quantified.Although IH did not boost tumor growth, it significantly increased endothelial cells (p = 0.001 and circulating VEGF (p<0.001 in the in vivo model. Macrophages exposed to IH in vitro increased VEGF expression, whereas RENCA cells and endothelial cells did not. These findings are in keeping with previous clinical data suggesting that OSA has no effect on kidney cancer size and that the association observed between OSA and higher Fuhrman grade of renal cell carcinoma may be mediated though a proangiogenic process, with a key role of macrophages.

  3. Intermittent hypoxia increases kidney tumor vascularization in a murine model of sleep apnea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vilaseca, Antoni; Campillo, Noelia; Torres, Marta; Musquera, Mireia; Gozal, David; Montserrat, Josep M; Alcaraz, Antonio; Touijer, Karim A; Farré, Ramon; Almendros, Isaac

    2017-01-01

    We investigate the effects of intermittent hypoxia (IH), a characteristic feature of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA), on renal cancer progression in an animal and cell model. An in vivo mouse model (Balb/c, n = 50) of kidney cancer was used to assess the effect of IH on tumor growth, metastatic capacity, angiogenesis and tumor immune response. An in vitro model tested the effect of IH on RENCA cells, macrophages and endothelial cells. Tumor growth, metastatic capacity, circulating vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and content of endothelial cells, tumor associated macrophages and their phenotype were assessed in the tumor. In vitro, VEGF cell expression was quantified.Although IH did not boost tumor growth, it significantly increased endothelial cells (p = 0.001) and circulating VEGF (p<0.001) in the in vivo model. Macrophages exposed to IH in vitro increased VEGF expression, whereas RENCA cells and endothelial cells did not. These findings are in keeping with previous clinical data suggesting that OSA has no effect on kidney cancer size and that the association observed between OSA and higher Fuhrman grade of renal cell carcinoma may be mediated though a proangiogenic process, with a key role of macrophages.

  4. Pericyte–fibroblast transition promotes tumor growth and metastasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosaka, Kayoko; Yang, Yunlong; Seki, Takahiro; Fischer, Carina; Dubey, Olivier; Fredlund, Erik; Hartman, Johan; Religa, Piotr; Ishii, Yoko; Sasahara, Masakiyo; Larsson, Ola; Cossu, Giulio; Cao, Renhai; Lim, Sharon; Cao, Yihai

    2016-01-01

    Vascular pericytes, an important cellular component in the tumor microenvironment, are often associated with tumor vasculatures, and their functions in cancer invasion and metastasis are poorly understood. Here we show that PDGF-BB induces pericyte–fibroblast transition (PFT), which significantly contributes to tumor invasion and metastasis. Gain- and loss-of-function experiments demonstrate that PDGF-BB-PDGFRβ signaling promotes PFT both in vitro and in in vivo tumors. Genome-wide expression analysis indicates that PDGF-BB–activated pericytes acquire mesenchymal progenitor features. Pharmacological inhibition and genetic deletion of PDGFRβ ablate the PDGF-BB–induced PFT. Genetic tracing of pericytes with two independent mouse strains, TN-AP-CreERT2:R26R-tdTomato and NG2-CreERT2:R26R-tdTomato, shows that PFT cells gain stromal fibroblast and myofibroblast markers in tumors. Importantly, coimplantation of PFT cells with less-invasive tumor cells in mice markedly promotes tumor dissemination and invasion, leading to an increased number of circulating tumor cells and metastasis. Our findings reveal a mechanism of vascular pericytes in PDGF-BB–promoted cancer invasion and metastasis by inducing PFT, and thus targeting PFT may offer a new treatment option of cancer metastasis. PMID:27608497

  5. Deterministic Evolutionary Trajectories Influence Primary Tumor Growth: TRACERx Renal

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Turajlic, Samra; Xu, Hang; Litchfield, Kevin

    2018-01-01

    The evolutionary features of clear-cell renal cell carcinoma (ccRCC) have not been systematically studied to date. We analyzed 1,206 primary tumor regions from 101 patients recruited into the multi-center prospective study, TRACERx Renal. We observe up to 30 driver events per tumor and show that ...

  6. Ellagic Acid Inhibits Bladder Cancer Invasiveness and In Vivo Tumor Growth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia Ceci

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Ellagic acid (EA is a polyphenolic compound that can be found as a naturally occurring hydrolysis product of ellagitannins in pomegranates, berries, grapes, green tea and nuts. Previous studies have reported the antitumor properties of EA mainly using in vitro models. No data are available about EA influence on bladder cancer cell invasion of the extracellular matrix triggered by vascular endothelial growth factor-A (VEGF-A, an angiogenic factor associated with disease progression and recurrence, and tumor growth in vivo. In this study, we have investigated EA activity against four different human bladder cancer cell lines (i.e., T24, UM-UC-3, 5637 and HT-1376 by in vitro proliferation tests (measuring metabolic and foci forming activity, invasion and chemotactic assays in response to VEGF-A and in vivo preclinical models in nude mice. Results indicate that EA exerts anti-proliferative effects as a single agent and enhances the antitumor activity of mitomycin C, which is commonly used for the treatment of bladder cancer. EA also inhibits tumor invasion and chemotaxis, specifically induced by VEGF-A, and reduces VEGFR-2 expression. Moreover, EA down-regulates the expression of programmed cell death ligand 1 (PD-L1, an immune checkpoint involved in immune escape. EA in vitro activity was confirmed by the results of in vivo studies showing a significant reduction of the growth rate, infiltrative behavior and tumor-associated angiogenesis of human bladder cancer xenografts. In conclusion, these results suggest that EA may have a potential role as an adjunct therapy for bladder cancer.

  7. Extinction Effects of Multiplicative Non-Gaussian Lévy Noise in a Tumor Growth System with Immunization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hao Meng-Li; Xu Wei; Liu Di; Li Dong-Xi

    2014-01-01

    The extinction phenomenon induced by multiplicative non-Gaussian Lévy noise in a tumor growth model with immune response is discussed. Under the influence of the stochastic immune rate, the model is analyzed in terms of a stochastic differential equation with multiplicative noise. By means of the theory of the infinitesimal generator of Hunt processes, the escape probability, which is used to measure the noise-induced extinction probability of tumor cells, is explicitly expressed as a function of initial tumor cell density, stability index and noise intensity. Based on the numerical calculations, it is found that for different initial densities of tumor cells, noise parameters play opposite roles on the escape probability. The optimally selected values of the multiplicative noise intensity and the stability index are found to maximize the escape probability. (general)

  8. Model uncertainty in growth empirics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Prüfer, P.

    2008-01-01

    This thesis applies so-called Bayesian model averaging (BMA) to three different economic questions substantially exposed to model uncertainty. Chapter 2 addresses a major issue of modern development economics: the analysis of the determinants of pro-poor growth (PPG), which seeks to combine high

  9. Altered expression of platelet factor 4 and basic fibroblast growth factor correlates with the inhibition of tumor growth in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mabeta, Peace; Pepper, Michael S

    2015-02-01

    Herein, we describe the effects of Taxol on endothelioma cell growth and migration in vitro and on vascular tumor growth in vivo. The effects of Taxol on endothelioma cell growth were determined using the crystal violet assay, while cell migration was measured using the xCELLIgence Real-Time Cell Analysis system. To study the effects of Taxol on tumor growth, mice were inoculated with endothelioma cells to induce vascular tumor development and were treated with the drug. At termination, tissue samples from Taxol-treated and control mice were stained with hematoxylin and eosin for histological examination, while blood samples were collected for hematological analysis, as well as for the analysis of the expression of angiogenic markers. In vitro, Taxol inhibited cell growth and migration. The drug also inhibited vascular tumor growth in mice, and this correlated with a recovery of mice from thrombocytopenia. Array analysis of blood samples from mice revealed that there was an increase in the expression of platelet factor 4 and a suppression of the proangiogenic molecule basic fibroblast growth factor in Taxol-treated animals. Our findings suggest that Taxol may have potential in the treatment of vascular tumors. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  10. The Role of Neutrophil Myeloperoxidase in Models of Lung Tumor Development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rymaszewski, Amy L.; Tate, Everett; Yimbesalu, Joannes P.; Gelman, Andrew E.; Jarzembowski, Jason A.; Zhang, Hao; Pritchard, Kirkwood A. Jr.; Vikis, Haris G.

    2014-01-01

    Chronic inflammation plays a key tumor-promoting role in lung cancer. Our previous studies in mice demonstrated that neutrophils are critical mediators of tumor promotion in methylcholanthrene (MCA)-initiated, butylated hydroxytoluene (BHT)-promoted lung carcinogenesis. In the present study we investigated the role of neutrophil myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity in this inflammation promoted model. Increased levels of MPO protein and activity were present in the lungs of mice administered BHT. Treatment of mice with N-acetyl lysyltyrosylcysteine amide (KYC), a novel tripeptide inhibitor of MPO, during the inflammatory stage reduced tumor burden. In a separate tumor model, KYC treatment of a Lewis Lung Carcinoma (LLC) tumor graft in mice had no effect on tumor growth, however, mice genetically deficient in MPO had significantly reduced LLC tumor growth. Our observations suggest that MPO catalytic activity is critical during the early stages of tumor development. However, during the later stages of tumor progression, MPO expression independent of catalytic activity appears to be required. Our studies advocate for the use of MPO inhibitors in a lung cancer prevention setting

  11. The role of neutrophil myeloperoxidase in models of lung tumor development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rymaszewski, Amy L; Tate, Everett; Yimbesalu, Joannes P; Gelman, Andrew E; Jarzembowski, Jason A; Zhang, Hao; Pritchard, Kirkwood A; Vikis, Haris G

    2014-05-09

    Chronic inflammation plays a key tumor-promoting role in lung cancer. Our previous studies in mice demonstrated that neutrophils are critical mediators of tumor promotion in methylcholanthrene (MCA)-initiated, butylated hydroxytoluene (BHT)-promoted lung carcinogenesis. In the present study we investigated the role of neutrophil myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity in this inflammation promoted model. Increased levels of MPO protein and activity were present in the lungs of mice administered BHT. Treatment of mice with N-acetyl lysyltyrosylcysteine amide (KYC), a novel tripeptide inhibitor of MPO, during the inflammatory stage reduced tumor burden. In a separate tumor model, KYC treatment of a Lewis Lung Carcinoma (LLC) tumor graft in mice had no effect on tumor growth, however, mice genetically deficient in MPO had significantly reduced LLC tumor growth. Our observations suggest that MPO catalytic activity is critical during the early stages of tumor development. However, during the later stages of tumor progression, MPO expression independent of catalytic activity appears to be required. Our studies advocate for the use of MPO inhibitors in a lung cancer prevention setting.

  12. The Role of Neutrophil Myeloperoxidase in Models of Lung Tumor Development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rymaszewski, Amy L.; Tate, Everett; Yimbesalu, Joannes P. [Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology and MCW Cancer Center, Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, WI 53226 (United States); Gelman, Andrew E. [Department of Surgery, Washington University in St. Louis, St. Louis, MO 63130 (United States); Jarzembowski, Jason A. [Department of Pathology, Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, WI 53226 (United States); Zhang, Hao; Pritchard, Kirkwood A. Jr. [Department of Surgery and MCW Cancer Center, Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, WI 53226 (United States); Vikis, Haris G., E-mail: hvikis@mcw.edu [Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology and MCW Cancer Center, Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, WI 53226 (United States)

    2014-05-09

    Chronic inflammation plays a key tumor-promoting role in lung cancer. Our previous studies in mice demonstrated that neutrophils are critical mediators of tumor promotion in methylcholanthrene (MCA)-initiated, butylated hydroxytoluene (BHT)-promoted lung carcinogenesis. In the present study we investigated the role of neutrophil myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity in this inflammation promoted model. Increased levels of MPO protein and activity were present in the lungs of mice administered BHT. Treatment of mice with N-acetyl lysyltyrosylcysteine amide (KYC), a novel tripeptide inhibitor of MPO, during the inflammatory stage reduced tumor burden. In a separate tumor model, KYC treatment of a Lewis Lung Carcinoma (LLC) tumor graft in mice had no effect on tumor growth, however, mice genetically deficient in MPO had significantly reduced LLC tumor growth. Our observations suggest that MPO catalytic activity is critical during the early stages of tumor development. However, during the later stages of tumor progression, MPO expression independent of catalytic activity appears to be required. Our studies advocate for the use of MPO inhibitors in a lung cancer prevention setting.

  13. The Role of Neutrophil Myeloperoxidase in Models of Lung Tumor Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amy L. Rymaszewski

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Chronic inflammation plays a key tumor-promoting role in lung cancer. Our previous studies in mice demonstrated that neutrophils are critical mediators of tumor promotion in methylcholanthrene (MCA-initiated, butylated hydroxytoluene (BHT-promoted lung carcinogenesis. In the present study we investigated the role of neutrophil myeloperoxidase (MPO activity in this inflammation promoted model. Increased levels of MPO protein and activity were present in the lungs of mice administered BHT. Treatment of mice with N-acetyl lysyltyrosylcysteine amide (KYC, a novel tripeptide inhibitor of MPO, during the inflammatory stage reduced tumor burden. In a separate tumor model, KYC treatment of a Lewis Lung Carcinoma (LLC tumor graft in mice had no effect on tumor growth, however, mice genetically deficient in MPO had significantly reduced LLC tumor growth. Our observations suggest that MPO catalytic activity is critical during the early stages of tumor development. However, during the later stages of tumor progression, MPO expression independent of catalytic activity appears to be required. Our studies advocate for the use of MPO inhibitors in a lung cancer prevention setting.

  14. Inhibition of tumor metastasis by a growth factor receptor bound protein 2 Src homology 2 domain-binding antagonist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giubellino, Alessio; Gao, Yang; Lee, Sunmin; Lee, Min-Jung; Vasselli, James R; Medepalli, Sampath; Trepel, Jane B; Burke, Terrence R; Bottaro, Donald P

    2007-07-01

    Metastasis, the primary cause of death in most forms of cancer, is a multistep process whereby cells from the primary tumor spread systemically and colonize distant new sites. Blocking critical steps in this process could potentially inhibit tumor metastasis and dramatically improve cancer survival rates; however, our understanding of metastasis at the molecular level is still rudimentary. Growth factor receptor binding protein 2 (Grb2) is a widely expressed adapter protein with roles in epithelial cell growth and morphogenesis, as well as angiogenesis, making it a logical target for anticancer drug development. We have previously shown that a potent antagonist of Grb2 Src homology-2 domain-binding, C90, blocks growth factor-driven cell motility in vitro and angiogenesis in vivo. We now report that C90 inhibits metastasis in vivo in two aggressive tumor models, without affecting primary tumor growth rate. These results support the potential efficacy of this compound in reducing the metastatic spread of primary solid tumors and establish a critical role for Grb2 Src homology-2 domain-mediated interactions in this process.

  15. Increased Plasma Colloid Osmotic Pressure Facilitates the Uptake of Therapeutic Macromolecules in a Xenograft Tumor Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthias Hofmann

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Elevated tumor interstitial fluid pressure (TIFP is a characteristic of most solid tumors. Clinically, TIFP may hamper the uptake of chemotherapeutic drugs into the tumor tissue reducing their therapeutic efficacy. In this study, a means of modulating TIFP to increase the flux of macromolecules into tumor tissue is presented, which is based on the rationale that elevated plasma colloid osmotic pressure (COP pulls water from tumor interstitium lowering the TIFP. Concentrated human serum albumin: (20% HSA, used as an agent to enhance COP, reduced the TIFP time-dependently from 8 to 2 mm Hg in human tumor xenograft models bearing A431 epidermoid vulva carcinomas. To evaluate whether this reduction facilitates the uptake of macromolecules, the intratumoral distribution of fluorescently conjugated dextrans (2.5 mg/ml and cetuximab (2.0 mg/ml was probed using novel time domain nearinfrared fluorescence imaging. This method permitted discrimination and semiquantification of tumor-accumulated conjugate from background and unspecific probe fluorescence. The coadministration of 20% HSA together with either dextrans or cetuximab was found to lower the TIFP significantly and increase the concentration of the substances within the tumor tissue in comparison to control tumors. Furthermore, combined administration of 20%HSA plus cetuximab reduced the tumor growth significantly in comparison to standard cetuximab treatment. These data demonstrate that increased COP lowers the TIFP within hours and increases the uptake of therapeutic macromolecules into the tumor interstitium leading to reduced tumor growth. This model represents a novel approach to facilitate the delivery of therapeutics into tumor tissue, particularly monoclonal antibodies.

  16. Immunotherapy of tumor with vaccine based on basic fibroblast growth factor-activated fibroblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiuying; Wang, Yongsheng; Zhao, Yuwei; Yang, Hengxiu; Tong, Aiping; Zhao, Chengjian; Shi, Huashan; Li, Yang; Wang, Zhenlin; Wei, Yuquan

    2014-02-01

    Cancer-associated fibroblasts play a key role in tumor progression. It is conceivable that the breaking of immune tolerance of "self-antigens" associated with tumor cells and tumor stromal is an attractive approach for tumor immunotherapy. To test this concept, we used basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) to activate normal fibroblasts and used these activated fibroblasts as one vaccine against tumor. Normal fibroblasts were treated with bFGF; their expressions of a-SMA and FAP were assessed by Western blot. We immunized mice with bFGF-activated fibroblasts. Auto-antibodies were assessed by flow cytometric and Western blot analysis. The deposition of auto-antibodies within the tumor tissues was assessed. The inhibition of proliferation of tumor cells and fibroblasts by purified immunoglobulins was investigated. The anti-tumor effects of purified immunoglobulins and lymphocytes of immunized mice were assessed. The bFGF-activated fibroblasts were effective in affording protection from tumor onset, growth, and prolonging survival of tumor-bearing mice. The immunized sera exhibited positive staining for fibroblasts and tumor cells in FCAS and Western blot analysis. The purified immunoglobulins of immunized serum could inhibit the proliferation of tumor cells and fibroblasts in vitro and had the anti-tumor activity in vivo. There was the deposition of auto-antibodies within the tumor tissues. Adoptive transfer of lymphocytes of immunized mice revealed that cellular immune response is also involved. The anti-tumor activity could be abrogated by the depletion of CD4(+), CD8(+) T lymphocytes and NK cells. In summary, bFGF-activated fibroblasts could induce an autoimmune response which was simultaneously against both cancer-associated fibroblasts and tumor cells in a cross-reaction.

  17. Growth curves of three human malignant tumors transplanted to nude mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Spang-Thomsen, M; Nielsen, A; Visfeldt, J

    1980-01-01

    Experimental growth data for three human malignant tumors transplanted to nude mice of BALB/c origin are analyzed statistically in order to investigate whether they can be described according to the Gompertz function. The aim is to set up unequivocal standards for planned therapeutic experiments...... as a standard, e.g. in therapeutic experiments. The course of tumor growth is independent of the size of the transplant, and whether tumors are transplanted in the right or left or both flanks of the recipient mice. Furthermore, the growth does not vary in a systematic way with the number of passages in nude...

  18. The Effect of Electroacupuncture on Osteosarcoma Tumor Growth and Metastasis: Analysis of Different Treatment Regimens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Branden A. Smeester

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Osteosarcoma is the most common malignant bone tumor found in children and adolescents and is associated with many complications including cancer pain and metastasis. While cancer patients often seek complementary and alternative medicine (CAM approaches to treat cancer pain and fatigue or the side effects of chemotherapy and treatment, there is little known about the effect of acupuncture treatment on tumor growth and metastasis. Here we evaluate the effects of six different electroacupuncture (EA regimens on osteosarcoma tumor growth and metastasis in both male and female mice. The most significant positive effects were observed when EA was applied to the ST-36 acupoint twice weekly (EA-2X/3 beginning at postimplantation day 3 (PID 3. Twice weekly treatment produced robust reductions in tumor growth. Conversely, when EA was applied twice weekly (EA-2X/7, starting at PID 7, there was a significant increase in tumor growth. We further demonstrate that EA-2X/3 treatment elicits significant reductions in tumor lymphatics, vasculature, and innervation. Lastly, EA-2X/3 treatment produced a marked reduction in pulmonary metastasis, thus providing evidence for EA’s potential antimetastatic capabilities. Collectively, EA-2X/3 treatment was found to reduce both bone tumor growth and lung metastasis, which may be mediated in part through reductions in tumor-associated vasculature, lymphatics, and innervation.

  19. Gallium Maltolate Disrupts Tumor Iron Metabolism and Retards the Growth of Glioblastoma by Inhibiting Mitochondrial Function and Ribonucleotide Reductase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chitambar, Christopher R; Al-Gizawiy, Mona M; Alhajala, Hisham S; Pechman, Kimberly R; Wereley, Janine P; Wujek, Robert; Clark, Paul A; Kuo, John S; Antholine, William E; Schmainda, Kathleen M

    2018-03-28

    Gallium, a metal with antineoplastic activity, binds transferrin (Tf) and enters tumor cells via Tf receptor1 (TfR1); it disrupts iron homeostasis leading to cell death. We hypothesized that TfR1 on brain microvascular endothelial cells (BMECs) would facilitate Tf-Ga transport into the brain enabling it to target TfR-bearing glioblastoma. We show that U-87 MG and D54 glioblastoma cell lines and multiple glioblastoma stem cell (GSCs) lines express TfRs and that their growth is inhibited by gallium maltolate (GaM) in vitro. After 24-h of incubation with GaM, cells displayed a loss of mitochondrial reserve capacity followed by a dose-dependent decrease in oxygen consumption and a decrease in the activity of the iron-dependent M2 subunit of ribonucleotide reductase (RRM2). Immunohistochemical staining of rat and human tumor-bearing brains showed that glioblastoma, but not normal glial cells, expressed TfR1 and RRM2 and that glioblastoma expressed greater levels of H- and L-ferritin than normal brain. In an orthotopic U-87 MG glioblastoma xenograft rat model, GaM retarded the growth of brain tumors relative to untreated control (p=0.0159) and reduced tumor mitotic figures (p=0.045). Tumors in GaM-treated animals displayed an upregulation of TfR1 expression relative to control animals thus indicating that gallium produced tumor iron deprivation. GaM also inhibited iron uptake and upregulated TfR1 expression in U-87 MG and D54 cells in vitro. We conclude that GaM enters the brain via TfR1 on BMECs and targets iron metabolism in glioblastoma in vivo, thus inhibiting tumor growth. Further development of novel gallium compounds for brain tumor treatment is warranted. Copyright ©2018, American Association for Cancer Research.

  20. Cell Competition Drives the Formation of Metastatic Tumors in a Drosophila Model of Epithelial Tumor Formation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eichenlaub, Teresa; Cohen, Stephen M; Herranz, Héctor

    2016-01-01

    Cell competition is a homeostatic process in which proliferating cells compete for survival. Elimination of otherwise normal healthy cells through competition is important during development and has recently been shown to contribute to maintaining tissue health during organismal aging. The mechan......Cell competition is a homeostatic process in which proliferating cells compete for survival. Elimination of otherwise normal healthy cells through competition is important during development and has recently been shown to contribute to maintaining tissue health during organismal aging....... The mechanisms that allow for ongoing cell competition during adult life could, in principle, contribute to tumorigenesis. However, direct evidence supporting this hypothesis has been lacking. Here, we provide evidence that cell competition drives tumor formation in a Drosophila model of epithelial cancer. Cells...... of the Septin family protein Peanut. Cytokinesis failure due to downregulation of Peanut is required for tumorigenesis. This study provides evidence that the cellular mechanisms that drive cell competition during normal tissue growth can be co-opted to drive tumor formation and metastasis. Analogous mechanisms...

  1. CCR 20th anniversary commentary: a chimeric antibody, C225, inhibits EGFR activation and tumor growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendelsohn, John; Prewett, Marie; Rockwell, Patricia; Goldstein, Neil I

    2015-01-15

    Murine mAb 225 was effective against the EGFR tyrosine kinase and inhibited tumor growth in preclinical studies. A phase I trial showed safety, tumor localization, and satisfactory pharmacokinetics. Human:murine chimeric C225 retained biologic activity, which was essential for the conduct of subsequent combination therapy trials and eventual regulatory approval. ©2015 American Association for Cancer Research.

  2. Sensitivity of fibroblast growth factor 23 measurements in tumor-induced osteomalacia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Imel, Erik A; Peacock, Munro; Pitukcheewanont, Pisit

    2006-01-01

    Tumor-induced osteomalacia (TIO) is a paraneoplastic syndrome of hypophosphatemia, decreased renal phosphate reabsorption, normal or low serum 1,25-dihydryxyvitamin-D concentration, myopathy, and osteomalacia. Fibroblast growth factor 23 (FGF23) is a phosphaturic protein overexpressed in tumors...

  3. Platelets promote tumor growth and metastasis via direct interaction between Aggrus/podoplanin and CLEC-2.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satoshi Takagi

    Full Text Available The platelet aggregation-inducing factor Aggrus, also known as podoplanin, is frequently upregulated in several types of tumors and enhances hematogenous metastasis by interacting with and activating the platelet receptor CLEC-2. Thus, Aggrus-CLEC-2 binding could be a therapeutic molecular mechanism for cancer therapy. We generated a new anti-human Aggrus monoclonal antibody, MS-1, that suppressed Aggrus-CLEC-2 binding, Aggrus-induced platelet aggregation, and Aggrus-mediated tumor metastasis. Interestingly, the MS-1 monoclonal antibody attenuated the growth of Aggrus-positive tumors in vivo. Moreover, the humanized chimeric MS-1 antibody, ChMS-1, also exhibited strong antitumor activity against Aggrus-positive lung squamous cell carcinoma xenografted into NOD-SCID mice compromising antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxic and complement-dependent cytotoxic activities. Because Aggrus knockdown suppressed platelet-induced proliferation in vitro and tumor growth of the lung squamous cell carcinoma in vivo, Aggrus may be involved in not only tumor metastasis but also tumor growth by promoting platelet-tumor interaction, platelet activation, and secretion of platelet-derived factors in vivo. Our results indicate that molecular target drugs inhibiting specific platelet-tumor interactions can be developed as antitumor drugs that suppress both metastasis and proliferation of tumors such as lung squamous cell carcinoma.

  4. Targeting tumor multicellular aggregation through IGPR-1 inhibits colon cancer growth and improves chemotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woolf, N; Pearson, B E; Bondzie, P A; Meyer, R D; Lavaei, M; Belkina, A C; Chitalia, V; Rahimi, N

    2017-09-18

    Adhesion to extracellular matrix (ECM) is crucially important for survival of normal epithelial cells as detachment from ECM triggers specific apoptosis known as anoikis. As tumor cells lose the requirement for anchorage to ECM, they rely on cell-cell adhesion 'multicellular aggregation' for survival. Multicellular aggregation of tumor cells also significantly determines the sensitivity of tumor cells to the cytotoxic effects of chemotherapeutics. In this report, we demonstrate that expression of immunoglobulin containing and proline-rich receptor-1 (IGPR-1) is upregulated in human primary colon cancer. Our study demonstrates that IGPR-1 promotes tumor multicellular aggregation, and interfering with its adhesive function inhibits multicellular aggregation and, increases cell death. IGPR-1 supports colon carcinoma tumor xenograft growth in mouse, and inhibiting its activity by shRNA or blocking antibody inhibits tumor growth. More importantly, IGPR-1 regulates sensitivity of tumor cells to the chemotherapeutic agent, doxorubicin/adriamycin by a mechanism that involves doxorubicin-induced AKT activation and phosphorylation of IGPR-1 at Ser220. Our findings offer novel insight into IGPR-1's role in colorectal tumor growth, tumor chemosensitivity, and as a possible novel anti-cancer target.

  5. Predicting anti-tumor effect of deoxypodophyllotoxin in NCI-H460 tumor-bearing mice based on in vitro pharmacodynamics and physiologically based pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yang; Zhao, Kaijing; Liu, Fei; Li, Ying; Zhong, Zeyu; Hong, Shijin; Liu, Xiaodong; Liu, Li

    2018-04-04

    Anti-tumor evaluation in tumor-bearing mouse is time- and energy-consuming. We aimed to investigate whether in vivo anti-tumor efficacy could be predicted based on in vitro pharmacodynamics using deoxypodophyllotoxin (DPT), a developing anti-tumor candidate, as a model compound. Proliferation kinetics of monolayer cultivated NCI-H460 cells under various DPT concentrations was quantitatively investigated accompanied by calibration curves. Koch's two-phase natural growth model combined with sigmoid Emax model, i.e. dM/dt=2λ 0 λ 1 M/(λ 1 +2λ 0 M)-EmaxC γ /(EC 50 γ +C γ )·M, was introduced to describe cell proliferation (M) against time under DPT treatment (C). Estimated in vitro pharmacodynamic parameters were: EC 50 , 8.97 nM; Emax, 0.820 day -1 and γ, 7.13. A physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model including tumor compartment was introduced, which could predict DPT disposition in plasma, tumor tissue and main normal tissues of NCI-H460 tumor-bearing mice following single dose. In vivo pharmacodynamic model and parameters were assumed the same as in vitro ones, and linked with simulated tumor pharmacokinetic profiles by PBPK model, to build a physiologically based pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic (PBPK-PD) model. After estimating natural growth parameters (λ 0 and λ 1 ), we desirably predicted the tumor growth in NCI-H460 tumor-bearing mice during multi-dose DPT treatment, both in this study and literature, by the PBPK-PD model. The model was further successfully applied to predict tumor growth in SGC-7901 tumor-bearing mice. These data indicated that in vivo anti-tumor efficacy might be predicted based on in vitro cytotoxic assays via PBPK-PD model approach. The approach was demonstrated reasonable and applicable, which might facilitate and accelerate anti-cancer candidate screening and dose regimen design in drug discovery process. The American Society for Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics.

  6. An orthotopic bladder tumor model and the evaluation of intravesical saRNA treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Moo Rim; Yang, Glen; Charisse, Klaus; Epstein-Barash, Hila; Manoharan, Muthiah; Li, Long-Cheng

    2012-07-28

    We present a novel method for treating bladder cancer with intravesically delivered small activating RNA (saRNA) in an orthotopic xenograft mouse bladder tumor model. The mouse model is established by urethral catheterization under inhaled general anesthetic. Chemical burn is then introduced to the bladder mucosa using intravesical silver nitrate solution to disrupt the bladder glycosaminoglycan layer and allows cells to attach. Following several washes with sterile water, human bladder cancer KU-7-luc2-GFP cells are instilled through the catheter into the bladder to dwell for 2 hours. Subsequent growth of bladder tumors is confirmed and monitored by in vivo bladder ultrasound and bioluminescent imaging. The tumors are then treated intravesically with saRNA formulated in lipid nanoparticles (LNPs). Tumor growth is monitored with ultrasound and bioluminescence. All steps of this procedure are demonstrated in the accompanying video.

  7. Growth of peripheral and central nervous system tumors is supported by cytoplasmic c-Fos in humans and mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David C Silvestre

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: We have previously shown that the transcription factor c-Fos is also capable of associating to endoplasmic reticulum membranes (ER and activating phospholipid synthesis. Herein we examined phospholipid synthesis status in brain tumors from human patients and from NPcis mice, an animal model of the human disease Neurofibromatosis Type 1 (NF1. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In human samples, c-Fos expression was at the limit of detection in non-pathological specimens, but was abundantly expressed associated to ER membranes in tumor cells. This was also observed in CNS of adult tumor-bearing NPcis mice but not in NPcis fos(-/- KO mice. A glioblastoma multiforme and a malignant PNS tumor from a NF1 patient (MPNST showed a 2- and 4- fold c-Fos-dependent phospholipid synthesis activation, respectively. MPNST samples also showed increased cell proliferation rates and abundant c-Fos expression. CONCLUSIONS: Results highlight a role of cytoplasmic c-Fos as an activator of phospholipid synthesis in events demanding high rates of membrane biogenesis as occurs for the exacerbated growth of tumors cells. They also disclose this protein as a potential target for controlling tumor growth in the nervous system.

  8. Brachytherapy Using Elastin-Like Polypeptides with (131)I Inhibit Tumor Growth in Rabbits with VX2 Liver Tumor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xinpei; Shen, Yiming; Zhang, Xuqian; Lin, Rui; Jia, Qiang; Chang, Yixiang; Liu, Wenge; Liu, Wentian

    2016-10-01

    Brachytherapy is a targeted type of radiotherapy utilized in the treatment of cancers. Elastin-like polypeptides are a unique class of genetically engineered peptide polymers that have several attractive properties for brachytherapy. To explore the feasibility and application of brachytherapy for VX2 liver tumor using elastin-like polypeptides with (131)I so as to provide reliable experimental evidence for a new promising treatment of liver cancer. Elastin-like polypeptide as carrier was labeled with (131)I using the iodogen method. Ten eligible rabbits with VX2 liver tumor were randomly divided into the treatment group (n = 5) and control group (n = 5). The treatment group received brachytherapy using elastin-like polypeptide with (131)I, and in the control group, elastin-like polypeptide was injected into the VX2 liver tumor as a control. Periodic biochemical and imaging surveillances were required to assess treatment efficacy. The stability of elastin-like polypeptide with (131)I in vitro was maintained at over 96.8 % for 96 h. Biochemistry and imaging indicated brachytherapy using elastin-like polypeptide with (131)I for liver tumor can improve liver function and inhibit tumor growth (P polypeptide can be an ideal carrier of (131)I and have high labeling efficiency, radiochemical purity and stability. Brachytherapy using elastin-like polypeptide with (131)I for liver tumor is a useful therapy that possesses high antitumor efficacy advantages.

  9. Manic fringe inhibits tumor growth by suppressing Notch3 degradation in lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Fuming; Amarasinghe, Baru; Dang, Thao P

    2013-01-01

    Notch signaling plays an essential role in development as well as cancer. We have previously shown that Notch3 is important for lung cancer growth and survival. Notch receptors are activated through the interaction with their ligands, resulting in proteolytic cleavage of the receptors. This interaction is modulated by Fringe, a family of fucose-specific β1,3 N-acetylglucosaminyltransferases that modify the extracellular subunit of Notch receptors. Studies in developmental models showed that Fringe enhances Notch's response to Delta ligands at the expense of Jagged ligands. We observed that Manic Fringe expression is down-regulated in lung cancer. Since Jagged1, a known ligand for Notch3, is often over-expressed in lung cancer, we hypothesized that Fringe negatively regulates Notch3 activation. In this study, we show that re-expression of Manic Fringe down-regulates Notch3 target genes HES1 and HeyL and reduces tumor phenotype in vitro and in vivo. The mechanism for this phenomenon appears to be related to modulation of Notch3 protein stability. Proteasome inhibition reverses Manic Fringe-induced protein turnover. Taken together, our data provide the first evidence that Manic Fringe functions as a tumor suppressor in the lung and that the mechanism of its anti-tumor activity is mediated by inhibition of Notch3 activation.

  10. Combination therapy targeting the tumor microenvironment is effective in a model of human ocular melanoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schafer Peter H

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Ocular melanoma is the leading intraocular malignancy. There is no effective treatment for metastatic ocular melanoma. We sought a treatment targeting the tumor microenvironment as well as the tumor cells. Methods Migration of HUVEC cells, the ability of HUVEC cells to form tubes, and proliferative capacity of a human ocular melanoma cell line were tested in the presence of lenalidomide and sorafenib alone and in combination. The compounds were also tested in a rat aortic ring assay and were tested in a highly aggressive human ocular melanoma xenograft model. Results Lenalidomide and Sorafenib inhibit HUVEC ability to migrate and form tubes and when used in combination the inhibition is increased. The agents alone and in combination inhibit outgrowth in the rat aortic ring model. The combination of the agents improved the inhibition over either single agent. In a xenograft model, combination therapy inhibited tumor growth over inhibition by single agent alone in a significant fashion (p Conclusion Lenalidomide and sorafenib are effective at targeting endothelial cells, inhibiting growth of ocular melanoma cells and can inhibit growth of tumors in a xenograft model as well as inhibit development of metastases. Combining these agents works in an additive to synergistic way to inhibit the growth of tumors and development of metastases.

  11. Use of the vasodilator sodium nitroprusside during local hyperthermia: effects on tumor temperature and tumor response in a rat tumor model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krossnes, Baard Kronen; Mella, Olav; Dahl, Olav

    1996-01-01

    Purpose: The effect of a decrease in the mean arterial blood pressure (MAP) induced by sodium nitroprusside (SNP) on the tumor temperature during hyperthermia (HT), and on the cytotoxic effect of HT, was studied in the BT 4 An tumor transplanted to the hind limb of BD IX rats. Experiments with two different anesthetics, pentobarbital and the midazolam/fentanyl/fluanisone combination (MFF), were performed to secure reliable conclusions. Methods and Materials: In the tumor response experiments local waterbath HT at 44.0 deg. C was given for 60 min. Sodium nitroprusside was administered as a continuous intravenous infusion to lower the MAP to 60 or 80 mmHg during HT. In two other experiments the temperature at the base of the tumor during HT was measured before and during SNP infusion. In animals without tumor the temperature was measured subcutaneously on the foot during HT with or without SNP-induced hypotension. Results: When SNP was given to lower the MAP to 60 mmHg during HT in MFF anesthetized animals, the median tumor growth time (TGT) was 70 days, compared to 14.5 days in the HT alone group. The corresponding figures were 127 and 12.1 days with pentobarbital anesthesia. In the HT + SNP group, more than 40% cure was observed in both experiments. No cures were seen in any of the other groups. Hyperthermia alone prolonged the TGT slightly, whereas SNP given alone had no effect, compared to controls. When the MAP was lowered to 80 mmHg by SNP infusion during HT (MFF anesthesia), the median TGT was 19.9 days, which was significantly longer than that in the HT alone group (10.9 days). In the MAP range from 60 to 120 mmHg, a nearly linear relationship between the MAP and the tumor temperature was found during HT in MFF anesthetized animals. With both anesthetics, the median temperature at the base of the tumor was about 0.8 deg. C higher during HT when the MAP was lowered to 60 mmHg by SNP. In animals without tumors, the temperature subcutaneously on the foot was 0

  12. Gamma knife radiosurgery for vestibular schwannomas: identification of predictors for continued tumor growth and the influence of documented tumor growth preceding radiation treatment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Timmer, F.C.A.; Mulder, J.J.S.; Hanssens, P.E.; Overbeeke, J.J. van; Donders, R.; Cremers, C.W.R.J.; Graamans, K.

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVES/HYPOTHESIS: Gamma knife radiosurgery (GKRS) has become an important treatment modality for vestibular schwannomas. The primary aim of this study was to investigate whether tumor growth at the moment of GKRS has any correlation with the outcome. The secondary aim was to identify clinical

  13. Computational modeling of brain tumors: discrete, continuum or hybrid?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhihui; Deisboeck, Thomas S.

    In spite of all efforts, patients diagnosed with highly malignant brain tumors (gliomas), continue to face a grim prognosis. Achieving significant therapeutic advances will also require a more detailed quantitative understanding of the dynamic interactions among tumor cells, and between these cells and their biological microenvironment. Data-driven computational brain tumor models have the potential to provide experimental tumor biologists with such quantitative and cost-efficient tools to generate and test hypotheses on tumor progression, and to infer fundamental operating principles governing bidirectional signal propagation in multicellular cancer systems. This review highlights the modeling objectives of and challenges with developing such in silico brain tumor models by outlining two distinct computational approaches: discrete and continuum, each with representative examples. Future directions of this integrative computational neuro-oncology field, such as hybrid multiscale multiresolution modeling are discussed.

  14. Tumor microenvironmental changes induced by the sulfamate carbonic anhydrase IX inhibitor S4 in a laryngeal tumor model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tineke W H Meijer

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Carbonic anhydrase IX (CAIX plays a pivotal role in pH homeostasis, which is essential for tumor cell survival. We examined the effect of the CAIX inhibitor 4-(3'(3",5"-dimethylphenyl-ureidophenyl sulfamate (S4 on the tumor microenvironment in a laryngeal tumor model by analyzing proliferation, apoptosis, necrosis, hypoxia, metabolism and CAIX ectodomain shedding. METHODS: SCCNij202 tumor bearing-mice were treated with S4 for 1, 3 or 5 days. CAIX ectodomain shedding was measured in the serum after therapy. Effects on tumor cell proliferation, apoptosis, necrosis, hypoxia (pimonidazole and CAIX were investigated with quantitative immunohistochemistry. Metabolic transporters and enzymes were quantified with qPCR. RESULTS: CAIX ectodomain shedding decreased after treatment with S4 (p<0.01. S4 therapy did neither influence tumor cell proliferation nor the amount of apoptosis and necrosis. Hypoxia (pimonidazole and CAIX expression were also not affected by S4. CHOP and MMP9 mRNA as a reference of intracellular pH did not change upon treatment with S4. Compensatory mechanisms of pH homeostasis at the mRNA level were not observed. CONCLUSION: As the clinical and biological meaning of the decrease in CAIX ectodomain shedding after S4 therapy is not clear, studies are required to elucidate whether the CAIX ectodomain has a paracrine or autocrine signaling function in cancer biology. S4 did not influence the amount of proliferation, apoptosis, necrosis and hypoxia. Therefore, it is unlikely that S4 can be used as single agent to influence tumor cell kill and proliferation, and to target primary tumor growth.

  15. Kaempferol suppresses bladder cancer tumor growth by inhibiting cell proliferation and inducing apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dang, Qiang; Song, Wenbin; Xu, Defeng; Ma, Yanmin; Li, Feng; Zeng, Jin; Zhu, Guodong; Wang, Xinyang; Chang, Luke S; He, Dalin; Li, Lei

    2015-09-01

    The effects of the flavonoid compound, kaempferol, which is an inhibitor of cancer cell proliferation and an inducer of cell apoptosis have been shown in various cancers, including lung, pancreatic, and ovarian, but its effect has never been studied in bladder cancer. Here, we investigated the effects of kaempferol on bladder cancer using multiple in vitro cell lines and in vivo mice studies. The MTT assay results on various bladder cancer cell lines showed that kaempferol enhanced bladder cancer cell cytotoxicity. In contrast, when analyzed by the flow cytometric analysis, DNA ladder experiment, and TUNEL assay, kaempferol significantly was shown to induce apoptosis and cell cycle arrest. These in vitro results were confirmed in in vivo mice studies using subcutaneous xenografted mouse models. Consistent with the in vitro results, we found that treating mice with kaempferol significant suppression in tumor growth compared to the control group mice. Tumor tissue staining results showed decreased expressions of the growth related markers, yet increased expressions in apoptosis markers in the kaempferol treated group mice tissues compared to the control group mice. In addition, our in vitro and in vivo data showed kaempferol can also inhibit bladder cancer invasion and metastasis. Further mechanism dissection studies showed that significant down-regulation of the c-Met/p38 signaling pathway is responsible for the kaempferol mediated cell proliferation inhibition. All these findings suggest kaempferol might be an effective and novel chemotherapeutic drug to apply for the future therapeutic agent to combat bladder cancer. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Pu-erh Tea Inhibits Tumor Cell Growth by Down-Regulating Mutant p53

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Lanjun; Jia, Shuting; Tang, Wenru; Sheng, Jun; Luo, Ying

    2011-01-01

    Pu-erh tea is a kind of fermented tea with the incorporation of microorganisms’ metabolites. Unlike green tea, the chemical characteristics and bioactivities of Pu-erh tea are still not well understood. Using water extracts of Pu-erh tea, we analyzed the tumor cell growth inhibition activities on several genetically engineered mouse tumor cell lines. We found that at the concentration that did not affect wild type mouse embryo fibroblasts (MEFs) growth, Pu-erh tea extracts could inhibit tumor cell growth by down-regulated S phase and cause G1 or G2 arrest. Further study showed that Pu-erh tea extracts down-regulated the expression of mutant p53 in tumor cells at the protein level as well as mRNA level. The same concentration of Pu-erh tea solution did not cause p53 stabilization or activation of its downstream pathways in wild type cells. We also found that Pu-erh tea treatment could slightly down-regulate both HSP70 and HSP90 protein levels in tumor cells. These data revealed the action of Pu-erh tea on tumor cells and provided the possible mechanism for Pu-erh tea action, which explained its selectivity in inhibiting tumor cells without affecting wild type cells. Our data sheds light on the application of Pu-erh tea as an anti-tumor agent with low side effects. PMID:22174618

  17. EGFR overexpressing cells and tumors are dependent on autophagy for growth and survival

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jutten, Barry; Keulers, Tom G.; Schaaf, Marco B.E.; Savelkouls, Kim; Theys, Jan; Span, Paul N.; Vooijs, Marc A.; Bussink, Johan; Rouschop, Kasper M.A.

    2013-01-01

    Background and purpose: The epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) is overexpressed, amplified or mutated in various human epithelial tumors, and is associated with tumor aggressiveness and therapy resistance. Autophagy activation provides a survival advantage for cells in the tumor microenvironment. In the current study, we assessed the potential of autophagy inhibition (using chloroquine (CQ)) in treatment of EGFR expressing tumors. Material and methods: Quantitative PCR, immunohistochemistry, clonogenic survival, proliferation assays and in vivo tumor growth were used to assess this potential. Results: We show that EGFR overexpressing xenografts are sensitive to CQ treatment and are sensitized to irradiation by autophagy inhibition. In HNSSC xenografts, a correlation between EGFR and expression of the autophagy marker LC3b is observed, suggesting a role for autophagy in EGFR expressing tumors. This observation was substantiated in cell lines, showing high EGFR expressing cells to be more sensitive to CQ addition as reflected by decreased proliferation and survival. Surprisingly high EGFR expressing cells display a lower autophagic flux. Conclusions: The EGFR high expressing cells and tumors investigated in this study are highly dependent on autophagy for growth and survival. Inhibition of autophagy may therefore provide a novel treatment opportunity for EGFR overexpressing tumors

  18. Tumor growth in patients with tuberous sclerosis complex on the ketogenic diet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu-Shore, Catherine J; Thiele, Elizabeth A

    2010-04-01

    New evidence is emerging that the availability of nutrients plays a key role in regulating the mammalian target of rapamycin complex-1 (mTORC1) signaling pathway in human cancers. Tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC) is a genetic disorder which results in the growth of hamartomatous lesions in multiple organs due to insufficient suppression of the mTORC1 pathway. A minority of patients with TSC who develop epilepsy which is intractable to standard anticonvulsant medical and/or surgical treatments are treated with the ketogenic diet. To provide insight into the effects of nutrient manipulation on tumor growth in this condition, we describe our experience in a unique group of patients with known tuberous sclerosis complex who are on the ketogenic diet for seizure control. A retrospective chart review was performed of patients with TSC treated with the ketogenic diet between January 2002 and May 2007 at Massachusetts General Hospital. Five patients with definite TSC underwent serial imaging for tumor growth while on the ketogenic diet or had unchanged imaging prior to the onset of the diet and after termination. Three out of five patients, all children, had progression of a known tumor or tumors or the development of a new tumor while on the ketogenic diet. In this limited case series of five TSC patients, the ketogenic diet did not induce tumor regression or suppress the growth of TSC-related tumors. Copyright (c) 2009 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Effect of inhibition of vascular endothelial growth factor signaling on distribution of extravasated antibodies in tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakahara, Tsutomu; Norberg, Scott M; Shalinsky, David R; Hu-Lowe, Dana D; McDonald, Donald M

    2006-02-01

    Antibodies and other macromolecular therapeutics can gain access to tumor cells via leaky tumor vessels. Inhibition of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) signaling can reduce the vascularity of tumors and leakiness of surviving vessels, but little is known about how these changes affect the distribution of antibodies within tumors. We addressed this issue by examining the distribution of extravasated antibodies in islet cell tumors of RIP-Tag2 transgenic mice and implanted Lewis lung carcinomas using fluorescence and confocal microscopic imaging. Extravasated nonspecific immunoglobulin G (IgG) and antibodies to fibrin or E-cadherin accumulated in irregular patchy regions of stroma. Fibrin also accumulated in these regions. Anti-E-cadherin antibody, which targets epitopes on tumor cells of RIP-Tag2 adenomas, was the only antibody to achieve detectable levels within tumor cell clusters at 6 hours after i.v. injection. Treatment for 7 days with AG-013736, a potent inhibitor of VEGF signaling, reduced the tumor vascularity by 86%. The overall area density of extravasated IgG/antibodies decreased after treatment but the change was less than the reduction in vascularity and actually increased when expressed per surviving tumor vessel. Accumulation of anti-E-cadherin antibody in tumor cell clusters was similarly affected. The patchy pattern of antibodies in stroma after treatment qualitatively resembled untreated tumors and surprisingly coincided with sleeves of basement membrane left behind after pruning of tumor vessels. Together, the findings suggest that antibody transport increases from surviving tumor vessels after normalization by inhibition of VEGF signaling. Basement membrane sleeves may facilitate this transport. Antibodies preferentially distribute to tumor stroma but also accumulate on tumor cells if binding sites are accessible.

  20. Metformin enhances tamoxifen-mediated tumor growth inhibition in ER-positive breast carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ma, Ji; Zhang, Jian; Liu, Wenchao; Guo, Yan; Chen, Suning; Zhong, Cuiping; Xue, Yan; Zhang, Yuan; Lai, Xiaofeng; Wei, Yifang; Yu, Shentong

    2014-01-01

    Tamoxifen, an endocrine therapy drug used to treat breast cancer, is designed to interrupt estrogen signaling by blocking the estrogen receptor (ER). However, many ER-positive patients are low reactive or resistant to tamoxifen. Metformin is a widely used anti-diabetic drug with noteworthy anti-cancer effects. We investigated whether metformin has the additive effects with tamoxifen in ER-positive breast cancer therapy. The efficacy of metformin alone and in combination with tamoxifen against ER-positive breast cancer was analyzed by cell survival, DNA replication activity, plate colony formation, soft-agar, flow cytometry, immunohistochemistry, and nude mice model assays. The involved signaling pathways were detected by western blot assay. When metformin was combined with tamoxifen, the concentration of tamoxifen required for growth inhibition was substantially reduced. Moreover, metformin enhanced tamoxifen-mediated inhibition of proliferation, DNA replication activity, colony formation, soft-agar colony formation, and induction of apoptosis in ER-positive breast cancer cells. In addition, these tamoxifen-induced effects that were enhanced by metformin may be involved in the bax/bcl-2 apoptotic pathway and the AMPK/mTOR/p70S6 growth pathway. Finally, two-drug combination therapy significantly inhibited tumor growth in vivo. The present work shows that metformin and tamoxifen additively inhibited the growth and augmented the apoptosis of ER-positive breast cancer cells. It provides leads for future research on this drug combination for the treatment of ER-positive breast cancer

  1. Growth differentiation factor-15 suppresses maturation and function of dendritic cells and inhibits tumor-specific immune response.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhizhong Zhou

    Full Text Available Dendritic cells (DCs play a key role in the initiation stage of an antigen-specific immune response. A variety of tumor-derived factors (TDFs can suppress DC maturation and function, resulting in defects in the tumor-specific immune response. To identify unknown TDFs that may suppress DCs maturation and function, we established a high-throughput screening technology based on a human liver tumor T7 phage cDNA library and screened all of the proteins derived from hepatoma cells that potentially interact with immature DCs. Growth/differentiation factor-15 (GDF-15 was detected and chosen for further study. By incubation of DCs cultures with GDF-15, we demonstrate that GDF-15 can inhibit surface protrusion formation during DC maturation; suppress the membrane expression of CD83, CD86 and HLA-DR on DCs; enhance phagocytosis by DCs; reduce IL-12 and elevate TGF-β1 secretion by DCs; inhibit T cell stimulation and cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL activation by DCs. By building tumor-bearing mouse models, we demonstrate that GDF-15 can inhibit the ability of DCs to stimulate a tumor-specific immune response in vivo. These results indicate that GDF-15 may be one of the critical molecules that inhibit DC maturation and function and are involved in tumor immune escape. Thus, GDF-15 may be a novel target in tumor immunotherapy.

  2. Mesenchymal stem cells support growth and organization of host-liver colorectal-tumor organoids and possibly resistance to chemotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devarasetty, Mahesh; Wang, Edina; Soker, Shay; Skardal, Aleksander

    2017-06-07

    Despite having yielded extensive breakthroughs in cancer research, traditional 2D cell cultures have limitations in studying cancer progression and metastasis and screening therapeutic candidates. 3D systems can allow cells to grow, migrate, and interact with each other and the surrounding matrix, resulting in more realistic constructs. Furthermore, interactions between host tissue and developing tumors influence the susceptibility of tumors to drug treatments. Host-liver colorectal-tumor spheroids composed of primary human hepatocytes, mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) and colon carcinoma HCT116 cells were created in simulated microgravity rotating wall vessel (RWV) bioreactors. The cells were seeded on hyaluronic acid-based microcarriers, loaded with liver-specific growth factors and ECM components. Only in the presence of MSC, large tumor foci rapidly formed inside the spheroids and increased in size steadily over time, while not greatly impacting albumin secretion from hepatocytes. The presence of MSC appeared to drive self-organization and formation of a stroma-like tissue surrounding the tumor foci and hepatocytes. Exposure to a commonly used chemotherapeutic 5-FU showed a dose-dependent cytotoxicity. However, if tumor organoids were allowed to mature in the RWV, they were less sensitive to the drug treatment. These data demonstrate the potential utility of liver tumor organoids for cancer progression and drug response modeling.

  3. Methylated DNA for monitoring tumor growth and regression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristiansen, Søren; Nielsen, Dorte; Söletormos, Georg

    2014-01-01

    of gene promoters. Because tumor cells naturally secrete DNA and upon cell death leak DNA, modified methylated DNA can be detected in blood, urine, sputum and other body fluids. At present international guidelines do not include recommendations for monitoring modified methylated DNA. The low level...

  4. The selection of patients for accelerated radiotherapy on the basis of tumor growth kinetics and intrinsic radiosensitivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tucker, S.L.; Kang-Sow Chan

    1990-01-01

    Mathematical modelling was used to reach qualitative conclusions concerning the relative rate of local tumor control that might be achieved by using accelerated fractionation to treat only the patients with the most rapidly growing rumors, compared with the control rated that could be expected from either conventional or accelerated radiotherapy alone. The results suggest that concomitant boost therapy is equally or more effective than conventional dose fractionation for all tumors, regardless of their growth kinetics. For tumors with very short clonogen doubling times, CHART (continuous hyperfractionated accelerated radiotherapy) may be even more effective than concomitant boost treatment, but CHART is less effective than conventional or concomitant boost therapy for tumors with longer clonogen doubling times. Thus, there is a rationale for using a predictive assay of tumor clonogen doubling times to identify the patients who should be treated with CHART. However, improvements in local tumor control resulting from concomitant boost treatment or the selective use of CHART are not likely to be apparent in the population as a whole, because the overall control rated are largely determined by refractory tumors having little chance of control with any of the treatments and by higher responsive tumors that are likely to be controlled regardless of the treatment choice. Differences in control rated with different treatment strategies are most apparent in the stochastic fraction of the population, which excludes those patients for whom there is either very little change (e.g. 99%) of achieving local control with both treatments. The stochastic fraction can be approximated by excluding those patients with the most radioresistant and the most radiosensitive tumors, since intrinsic tumor radiosensitivity appears to be the single most important factor determining treatment outcome. (author). 32 refs.; 4 figs.; 5 tabs

  5. A tumor cord model for Doxorubicin delivery and dose optimization in solid tumors

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    Eikenberry Steffen

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Doxorubicin is a common anticancer agent used in the treatment of a number of neoplasms, with the lifetime dose limited due to the potential for cardiotoxocity. This has motivated efforts to develop optimal dosage regimes that maximize anti-tumor activity while minimizing cardiac toxicity, which is correlated with peak plasma concentration. Doxorubicin is characterized by poor penetration from tumoral vessels into the tumor mass, due to the highly irregular tumor vasculature. I model the delivery of a soluble drug from the vasculature to a solid tumor using a tumor cord model and examine the penetration of doxorubicin under different dosage regimes and tumor microenvironments. Methods A coupled ODE-PDE model is employed where drug is transported from the vasculature into a tumor cord domain according to the principle of solute transport. Within the tumor cord, extracellular drug diffuses and saturable pharmacokinetics govern uptake and efflux by cancer cells. Cancer cell death is also determined as a function of peak intracellular drug concentration. Results The model predicts that transport to the tumor cord from the vasculature is dominated by diffusive transport of free drug during the initial plasma drug distribution phase. I characterize the effect of all parameters describing the tumor microenvironment on drug delivery, and large intercapillary distance is predicted to be a major barrier to drug delivery. Comparing continuous drug infusion with bolus injection shows that the optimum infusion time depends upon the drug dose, with bolus injection best for low-dose therapy but short infusions better for high doses. Simulations of multiple treatments suggest that additional treatments have similar efficacy in terms of cell mortality, but drug penetration is limited. Moreover, fractionating a single large dose into several smaller doses slightly improves anti-tumor efficacy. Conclusion Drug infusion time has a significant

  6. Mechanisms of Glioma Formation: Iterative Perivascular Glioma Growth and Invasion Leads to Tumor Progression, VEGF-Independent Vascularization, and Resistance to Antiangiogenic Therapy

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    Gregory J. Baker

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available As glioma cells infiltrate the brain they become associated with various microanatomic brain structures such as blood vessels, white matter tracts, and brain parenchyma. How these distinct invasion patterns coordinate tumor growth and influence clinical outcomes remain poorly understood. We have investigated how perivascular growth affects glioma growth patterning and response to antiangiogenic therapy within the highly vascularized brain. Orthotopically implanted rodent and human glioma cells are shown to commonly invade and proliferate within brain perivascular space. This form of brain tumor growth and invasion is also shown to characterize de novo generated endogenous mouse brain tumors, biopsies of primary human glioblastoma (GBM, and peripheral cancer metastasis to the human brain. Perivascularly invading brain tumors become vascularized by normal brain microvessels as individual glioma cells use perivascular space as a conduit for tumor invasion. Agent-based computational modeling recapitulated biological perivascular glioma growth without the need for neoangiogenesis. We tested the requirement for neoangiogenesis in perivascular glioma by treating animals with angiogenesis inhibitors bevacizumab and DC101. These inhibitors induced the expected vessel normalization, yet failed to reduce tumor growth or improve survival of mice bearing orthotopic or endogenous gliomas while exacerbating brain tumor invasion. Our results provide compelling experimental evidence in support of the recently described failure of clinically used antiangiogenics to extend the overall survival of human GBM patients.

  7. Therapeutic targeting of tumor growth and angiogenesis with a novel anti-S100A4 monoclonal antibody.

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    Jose Luis Hernández

    Full Text Available S100A4, a member of the S100 calcium-binding protein family secreted by tumor and stromal cells, supports tumorigenesis by stimulating angiogenesis. We demonstrated that S100A4 synergizes with vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF, via the RAGE receptor, in promoting endothelial cell migration by increasing KDR expression and MMP-9 activity. In vivo overexpression of S100A4 led to a significant increase in tumor growth and vascularization in a human melanoma xenograft M21 model. Conversely, when silencing S100A4 by shRNA technology, a dramatic decrease in tumor development of the pancreatic MiaPACA-2 cell line was observed. Based on these results we developed 5C3, a neutralizing monoclonal antibody against S100A4. This antibody abolished endothelial cell migration, tumor growth and angiogenesis in immunodeficient mouse xenograft models of MiaPACA-2 and M21-S100A4 cells. It is concluded that extracellular S100A4 inhibition is an attractive approach for the treatment of human cancer.

  8. Dietary administration of scallion extract effectively inhibits colorectal tumor growth: cellular and molecular mechanisms in mice.

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    Palanisamy Arulselvan

    Full Text Available Colorectal cancer is a common malignancy and a leading cause of cancer death worldwide. Diet is known to play an important role in the etiology of colon cancer and dietary chemoprevention is receiving increasing attention for prevention and/or alternative treatment of colon cancers. Allium fistulosum L., commonly known as scallion, is popularly used as a spice or vegetable worldwide, and as a traditional medicine in Asian cultures for treating a variety of diseases. In this study we evaluated the possible beneficial effects of dietary scallion on chemoprevention of colon cancer using a mouse model of colon carcinoma (CT-26 cells subcutaneously inoculated into BALB/c mice. Tumor lysates were subjected to western blotting for analysis of key inflammatory markers, ELISA for analysis of cytokines, and immunohistochemistry for analysis of inflammatory markers. Metabolite profiles of scallion extracts were analyzed by LC-MS/MS. Scallion extracts, particularly hot-water extract, orally fed to mice at 50 mg (dry weight/kg body weight resulted in significant suppression of tumor growth and enhanced the survival rate of test mice. At the molecular level, scallion extracts inhibited the key inflammatory markers COX-2 and iNOS, and suppressed the expression of various cellular markers known to be involved in tumor apoptosis (apoptosis index, proliferation (cyclin D1 and c-Myc, angiogenesis (VEGF and HIF-1α, and tumor invasion (MMP-9 and ICAM-1 when compared with vehicle control-treated mice. Our findings may warrant further investigation of the use of common scallion as a chemopreventive dietary agent to lower the risk of colon cancer.

  9. The Use of Porous Scaffold as a Tumor Model

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    Mei Zhang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Human cancer is a three-dimensional (3D structure consisting of neighboring cells, extracellular matrix, and blood vessels. It is therefore critical to mimic the cancer cells and their surrounding environment during in vitro study. Our aim was to establish a 3D cancer model using a synthetic composite scaffold. Methods. High-density low-volume seeding was used to promote attachment of a non-small-cell lung cancer cell line (NCI-H460 to scaffolds. Growth patterns in 3D culture were compared with those of monolayers. Immunohistochemistry was conducted to compare the expression of Ki67, CD44, and carbonic anhydrase IX. Results. NCI-H460 readily attached to the scaffold without surface pretreatment at a rate of 35% from a load of 1.5 × 106 cells. Most cells grew vertically to form clumps along the surface of the scaffold, and cell morphology resembled tissue origin; 2D cultures exhibited characteristics of adherent epithelial cancer cell lines. Expression patterns of Ki67, CD44, and CA IX varied markedly between 3D and monolayer cultures. Conclusions. The behavior of cancer cells in our 3D model is similar to tumor growth in vivo. This model will provide the basis for future study using 3D cancer culture.

  10. Referent 3D tumor model at cellular level in radionuclide therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spaic, R.; Ilic, R.D.; Petrovic, B.J.

    2002-01-01

    Aim Conventional internal dosimetry has a lot of limitations because of tumor dose nonuniformity. The best approach for absorbed dose at cellular level for different tumors in radionuclide therapy calculation is Monte Carlo method. The purpose of this study is to introduce referent tumor 3D model at cellular level for Monte Carlo simulation study in radionuclide therapy. Material and Methods The moment when tumor is detectable and when same therapy can start is time period in which referent 3D tumor model at cellular level was defined. In accordance with tumor growth rate at that moment he was a sphere with same radius (10 000 μm). In that tumor there are cells or cluster of cells, which are randomly distributed spheres. Distribution of cells/cluster of cells can be calculated from histology data but it was assumed that this distribution is normal with the same mean value and standard deviation (100±50 mm). Second parameter, which was selected to define referent tumor, is volume density of cells (30%). In this referent tumor there are no necroses. Stroma is defined as space between spheres with same concentration of materials as in spheres. Results: Referent tumor defined on this way have about 2,2 10 5 cells or cluster of cells random distributed. Using this referent 3D tumor model and for same concentration of radionuclides (1:100) and energy of beta emitters (1000 keV) which are homogeneously distributed in labeled cells absorbed dose for all cells was calculated. Simulations are done using FOTELP Monte Carlo code, which is modified for this purposes. Results of absorbed dose in cells are given in numerical values (1D distribution) and as the images (2D or 3D distributions). Conclusion Geometrical module for Monte Carlo simulation study can be standardized by introducing referent 3D tumor model at cellular level. This referent 3D tumor model gives most realistic presentation of different tumors at the moment of their detectability. Referent 3D tumor model at

  11. Modelling Nanoparticle Diffusion into Cancer Tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Podduturi, Vishwa Priya; Derosa, Pedro

    2011-03-01

    Cancer is one of the major, potentially deadly diseases and has been for years. Non-specific delivery of the drug can damage healthy tissue seriously affecting in many cases the patient's living condition. Nanoparticles are being used for a targeted drug delivery thereby reducing the dose. In addition, metallic nanoparticles are being used in thermal treatment of cancer cells where nanoparticles help concentrate heat in the tumor and away from living tissue. We proposed a model that combines random walk with diffusion principles. The particle drift velocity is taken from the Hagen-Poiseuille equation and the velocity profile of the particle at the pores in the capillary wall is obtained using the Coventorware software. Pressure gradient and concentration gradient through the capillary wall are considered. Simulations are performed in Matlab using the Monte Carlo technique. Number of particles leaving the blood vessel through a pore is obtained as a function of blood pressure, the osmotic pressure, temperature, particle concentration, blood vessel radius, and pore size, and the relative effect of each of the parameters is discussed.

  12. Loss of glycogen debranching enzyme AGL drives bladder tumor growth via induction of hyaluronic acid synthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guin, Sunny; Ru, Yuanbin; Agarwal, Neeraj; Lew, Carolyn R.; Owens, Charles; Comi, Giacomo P.; Theodorescu, Dan

    2015-01-01

    Purpose We demonstrated that Amylo-alpha-1-6-glucosidase-4-alpha-glucanotransferase (AGL) is a tumor growth suppressor and prognostic marker in human bladder cancer. Here we determine how AGL loss enhances tumor growth, hoping to find therapeutically tractable targets/pathways that could be used in patients with low AGL expressing tumors. Experimental Design We transcriptionally profiled bladder cell lines with different AGL expression. By focusing on transcripts overexpressed as a function of low AGL and associated with adverse clinicopathologic variables in human bladder tumors, we sought to increase the chances of discovering novel therapeutic opportunities. Results One such transcript was hyaluronic acid synthase 2 (HAS2), an enzyme responsible for hyaluronic acid (HA) synthesis. HAS2 expression was inversely proportional to that of AGL in bladder cancer cells and immortalized and normal urothelium. HAS2 driven HA synthesis was enhanced in bladder cancer cells with low AGL and this drove anchorage dependent and independent growth. siRNA mediated depletion of HAS2 or inhibition of HA synthesis by 4-Methylumbelliferone (4MU) abrogated in vitro and xenograft growth of bladder cancer cells with low AGL. AGL and HAS2 mRNA expression in human tumors was inversely correlated in patient datasets. Patients with high HAS2 and low AGL tumor mRNA expression had poor survival lending clinical support to xenograft findings that HAS2 drives growth of tumors with low AGL. Conclusion Our study establishes HAS2 mediated HA synthesis as a driver of growth of bladder cancer with low AGL and provides preclinical rationale for personalized targeting of HAS2/HA signaling in patients with low AGL expressing tumors. PMID:26490312

  13. CD44v6 regulates growth of brain tumor stem cells partially through the AKT-mediated pathway.

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    Mayumi Jijiwa

    Full Text Available Identification of stem cell-like brain tumor cells (brain tumor stem-like cells; BTSC has gained substantial attention by scientists and physicians. However, the mechanism of tumor initiation and proliferation is still poorly understood. CD44 is a cell surface protein linked to tumorigenesis in various cancers. In particular, one of its variant isoforms, CD44v6, is associated with several cancer types. To date its expression and function in BTSC is yet to be identified. Here, we demonstrate the presence and function of the variant form 6 of CD44 (CD44v6 in BTSC of a subset of glioblastoma multiforme (GBM. Patients with CD44(high GBM exhibited significantly poorer prognoses. Among various variant forms, CD44v6 was the only isoform that was detected in BTSC and its knockdown inhibited in vitro growth of BTSC from CD44(high GBM but not from CD44(low GBM. In contrast, this siRNA-mediated growth inhibition was not apparent in the matched GBM sample that does not possess stem-like properties. Stimulation with a CD44v6 ligand, osteopontin (OPN, increased expression of phosphorylated AKT in CD44(high GBM, but not in CD44(low GBM. Lastly, in a mouse spontaneous intracranial tumor model, CD44v6 was abundantly expressed by tumor precursors, in contrast to no detectable CD44v6 expression in normal neural precursors. Furthermore, overexpression of mouse CD44v6 or OPN, but not its dominant negative form, resulted in enhanced growth of the mouse tumor stem-like cells in vitro. Collectively, these data indicate that a subset of GBM expresses high CD44 in BTSC, and its growth may depend on CD44v6/AKT pathway.

  14. Model construction of nursing service satisfaction in hospitalized tumor patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yongyi; Liu, Jingshi; Xiao, Shuiyuan; Liu, Xiangyu; Tang, Xinhui; Zhou, Yujuan

    2014-01-01

    This study aims to construct a satisfaction model on nursing service in hospitalized tumor patients. Using questionnaires, data about hospitalized tumor patients' expectation, quality perception and satisfaction of hospital nursing service were obtained. A satisfaction model of nursing service in hospitalized tumor patients was established through empirical study and by structural equation method. This model was suitable for tumor specialized hospital, with reliability and validity. Patient satisfaction was significantly affected by quality perception and patient expectation. Patient satisfaction and patient loyalty was also affected by disease pressure. Hospital brand was positively correlated with patient satisfaction and patient loyalty, negatively correlated with patient complaint. Patient satisfaction was positively correlated with patient loyalty, patient complaints, and quality perception, and negatively correlated with disease pressure and patient expectation. The satisfaction model on nursing service in hospitalized tumor patients fits well. By this model, the quality of hospital nursing care may be improved.

  15. Extratumoral Heme Oxygenase-1 (HO-1 Expressing Macrophages Likely Promote Primary and Metastatic Prostate Tumor Growth.

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    Sofia Halin Bergström

    Full Text Available Aggressive tumors induce tumor-supporting changes in the benign parts of the prostate. One factor that has increased expression outside prostate tumors is hemoxygenase-1 (HO-1. To investigate HO-1 expression in more detail, we analyzed samples of tumor tissue and peritumoral normal prostate tissue from rats carrying cancers with different metastatic capacity, and human prostate cancer tissue samples from primary tumors and bone metastases. In rat prostate tumor samples, immunohistochemistry and quantitative RT-PCR showed that the main site of HO-1 synthesis was HO-1+ macrophages that accumulated in the tumor-bearing organ, and at the tumor-invasive front. Small metastatic tumors were considerably more effective in attracting HO-1+ macrophages than larger non-metastatic ones. In clinical samples, accumulation of HO-1+ macrophages was seen at the tumor invasive front, almost exclusively in high-grade tumors, and it correlated with the presence of bone metastases. HO-1+ macrophages, located at the tumor invasive front, were more abundant in bone metastases than in primary tumors. HO-1 expression in bone metastases was variable, and positively correlated with the expression of macrophage markers but negatively correlated with androgen receptor expression, suggesting that elevated HO-1 could be a marker for a subgroup of bone metastases. Together with another recent observation showing that selective knockout of HO-1 in macrophages reduced prostate tumor growth and metastatic capacity in animals, the results of this study suggest that extratumoral HO-1+ macrophages may have an important role in prostate cancer.

  16. A Multimodal Imaging Approach for Longitudinal Evaluation of Bladder Tumor Development in an Orthotopic Murine Model.

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    Chantal Scheepbouwer

    Full Text Available Bladder cancer is the fourth most common malignancy amongst men in Western industrialized countries with an initial response rate of 70% for the non-muscle invasive type, and improving therapy efficacy is highly needed. For this, an appropriate, reliable animal model is essential to gain insight into mechanisms of tumor growth for use in response monitoring of (new agents. Several animal models have been described in previous studies, but so far success has been hampered due to the absence of imaging methods to follow tumor growth non-invasively over time. Recent developments of multimodal imaging methods for use in animal research have substantially strengthened these options of in vivo visualization of tumor growth. In the present study, a multimodal imaging approach was addressed to investigate bladder tumor proliferation longitudinally. The complementary abilities of Bioluminescence, High Resolution Ultrasound and Photo-acoustic Imaging permit a better understanding of bladder tumor development. Hybrid imaging modalities allow the integration of individual strengths to enable sensitive and improved quantification and understanding of tumor biology, and ultimately, can aid in the discovery and development of new therapeutics.

  17. Effect of host age on the transplantation, growth, and radiation response of EMT6 tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rockwell, S.

    1981-01-01

    The characteristics of EMT6 tumors in young adult and aged BALB/c KaRw mice were compared. The number of tumor cells implanted s.c. necessary to cause tumors in 50% of the injection sites was lower in aging than in young adult mice. The latent period of intradermally implanted tumors was shorter in aging mice than in young animals; however, the growth curves of established tumors were similar. The number and appearance of lung colonies after injection of cells i.v. and the pattern of spontaneous metastases were similar in young and aged animals. Radiation dose-response curves for the cells of tumors in young and aging mice were different and suggested that the proportion of hypoxic cells was higher in tumors on aging animals. These findings suggest that both immunological and nonimmunological tumor-host interactions differ in young and aged animals and that such factors may influence the natural history of the tumor and the response of the tumor to treatment

  18. Single and 30 fraction tumor control doses correlate in xenografted tumor models: implications for predictive assays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gerweck, Leo E.; Dubois, Willum; Baumann, Michael; Suit, Herman D.

    1995-01-01

    , the rank-order correlation coefficient between the single dose hypoxic versus fractionated dose TCD50s under hypoxic or aerobic conditions was 1.0. For all 5 tumors examined, a trend for rank correlation was observed between the single dose and the fractionated dose TCD50s performed under normal or clamp hypoxic conditions (r=0.7, p=0.16 in both cases). The linear correlation coefficients were 0.83, p=0.08 and 0.72, p=0.17, respectively. Failure to attain a rank correlation of 1.0 was due to one tumor exhibiting an insignificant fractionation effect. The rank correlation between the TCD50s for fractionated treatments under normal versus the extrapolated TCD50s under clamp hypoxic conditions was 1.00; the linear correlation coefficient was 0.97 (p=0.01). Conclusions: In the tumor models examined, factors controlling the single fraction tumor control dose, also impact the response to fractionated treatments. These results suggest that laboratory estimates of intrinsic radiosensitivity and tumor clonogen number at the onset of treatment, will be of use in predicting radiocurability for fractionated treatments, as has been observed for single dose treatments

  19. Other paradigms: growth rate constants and tumor burden determined using computed tomography data correlate strongly with the overall survival of patients with renal cell carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stein, Wilfred D; Huang, Hui; Menefee, Michael; Edgerly, Maureen; Kotz, Herb; Dwyer, Andrew; Yang, James; Bates, Susan E

    2009-01-01

    In solid tumors, where curative therapies still elude oncologists, novel paradigms are needed to assess the efficacy of new therapies and those already approved. We used radiologic measurements obtained in patients with metastatic renal cell carcinoma enrolled in a phase II study of the epothilone B analog, ixabepilone (Ixempra), to address this issue. Using a novel 2-phase mathematical equation, we used the radiologic measurements to estimate the concomitant rates of tumor regression and growth (regression and growth rate constants). Eighty-one patients were enrolled on the ixabepilone trial at the time of this analysis. Growth rate constants were determined using computed tomography measurements obtained exclusively while a patient was enrolled on study. The growth rate constants of renal cell carcinomas treated with ixabepilone were significantly reduced compared with those of tumors in patients who received placebo in a previous trial. Furthermore, a correlation with overall survival was found for both the growth rate constant and the initial tumor burden; and this correlation was even stronger when both the growth rate constant and the initial tumor burden were combined. The readily amenable mathematical model described herein has potential applications to many tumor types that can be assessed with imaging modalities. Because the growth rate constant seems to be a surrogate for survival, assessment could aid in the evaluation of relative efficacies of different therapies and perhaps in assessing the potential individual benefit of an experimental therapy.

  20. Acetylsalicylic acid inhibits the growth of melanoma tumors via SOX2-dependent-PAF-R-independent signaling pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thyagarajan, Anita; Saylae, Jeremiah; Sahu, Ravi P

    2017-07-25

    Acquired resistance to standard therapies remains a serious challenge, requiring novel therapeutic approaches that incorporate potential factors involved in tumor resistance. As cancers including melanoma express inflammatory cyclooxygenases generating prostaglandins implicated in tumor growth, we investigated mechanism of anti-inflammatory drug, acetylsalicylic acid (ASA) which has been shown to inhibit various tumor types, however, its effects against highly aggressive melanoma model are unclear. Given our reports that an activation of platelet-activating factor-receptor (PAF-R) augments the growth and impede efficacies of therapeutic agents in experimental melanoma, we also sought to determine if PAF-R mediates anti-melanoma activity of ASA. The current studies using stably PAF-R-positive (B16-PAFR) and negative (B16-MSCV) murine melanoma cells and PAF-R-expressing and deficient mice, demonstrate that ASA inhibits the in-vitro and in-vivo growth of highly aggressive B16F10 melanoma via bypassing tumoral or stromal PAF-R signaling. Similar ASA-induced effects in-vitro were seen in human melanoma and nasopharyngeal carcinoma cells positive or negative in PAF-R. Mechanistically, the ASA-induced decrease in cell survival and increase in apoptosis were significantly blocked by prostaglandin F2 alpha (PGF2α) agonists. Importantly, PCR array and qRT-PCR analysis of B16-tumors revealed significant downregulation of sry-related high-mobility-box-2 (SOX2) oncogene by ASA treatment. Interestingly, modulation of SOX2 expression by PGF2α agonists and upregulation by fibroblast growth factor 1 (FGF-1) rescued melanoma cells from ASA-induced decreased survival and increased apoptosis. Moreover, PGF2α-receptor antagonist, AL8810 mimics ASA-induced decreased melanoma cells survival which was significantly blocked by PGF2α and FGF-1. These findings indicate that ASA inhibits the growth of aggressive melanoma via SOX2-dependent-PAF-R-indepedent pathway.

  1. Antitumor effect of Ganoderma lucidum : Cytotoxicity and Tumor Growth Delay(1)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kwon, Hyoung Cheol; Kim, Jung Soo; Choi, Dong Seong; Song, Chang Won

    1994-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate the effect of aqueous extract of Ganoderma lucidum(G.I.) on the survival of tumor cells in vitro and on the growth of tumors in vivo. Materials and Methods: Dried G.I. was made into powder, extracted with distilled water, filtered and diluted from a maximum concentration of 100 mg/ml in sequence. The cytotoxicity of G.O. in vitro was evaluated from its ability to reduce the clonogenicity of SCK tumor cells. For the tumor growth delay study, about 2x10 5 of SCK tumor cells were subcutaneously inoculated in the legs of A/J mice. The first experimental group of mice were injected i.p. with 0.2ml of 250 mg/kg of G/I. From the first day after tumor inoculation for 10 days. The second experimental group of mice were injected i.p. with 0.2ml of 250 mg/kg of G.I. either once a day for 10 days or twice a day for 5 days beginning from the 7th day after tumor inoculation. Results: 1. Cytotoxicity in vitro; survival fraction, as judged from the curve, at G.I. concentration of 0.5, 1,5,10,25,50 and 100 mg/ml were 1.0, 0.74±0.03, 0.18±0.03, 0.15±0.02, 0.006±0.002, 0.015 and 0.0015, respectively. 2. Tumor growth delay in vivo; a) the time required for the mean tumor volume to grow to 1,000mm 3 was 11 days in the control group and 14 days in the experimental group. b) the time required for tumor volume to increase 4 times was 11 days in the control group while it was 10.5 and 12 days in the groups injected with G.I. once a day and twice a day from the 7th day after tumor inoculation respectively. Conclusion: Aqueous extracts of G.I. showed a marked cytotoxicity on the SCK mammary cells in vitro. Tumor growth delay was statistically significant when G.I. injection was started soon after tumor inoculation, but it was not significant when injection was started after the tumors were firmly established

  2. Antitumor effect of Ganoderma lucidum : Cytotoxicity and Tumor Growth Delay(1)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kwon, Hyoung Cheol; Kim, Jung Soo [Chonbuk National University College of Medicine, Chonju (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Dong Seong [Chonju Woosuck Univ., Chonju (Korea, Republic of); Song, Chang Won [Univ. of Minnesota Medical School, Minneapolis (United States)

    1994-10-15

    Purpose: To investigate the effect of aqueous extract of Ganoderma lucidum(G.I.) on the survival of tumor cells in vitro and on the growth of tumors in vivo. Materials and Methods: Dried G.I. was made into powder, extracted with distilled water, filtered and diluted from a maximum concentration of 100 mg/ml in sequence. The cytotoxicity of G.O. in vitro was evaluated from its ability to reduce the clonogenicity of SCK tumor cells. For the tumor growth delay study, about 2x10{sup 5} of SCK tumor cells were subcutaneously inoculated in the legs of A/J mice. The first experimental group of mice were injected i.p. with 0.2ml of 250 mg/kg of G/I. From the first day after tumor inoculation for 10 days. The second experimental group of mice were injected i.p. with 0.2ml of 250 mg/kg of G.I. either once a day for 10 days or twice a day for 5 days beginning from the 7th day after tumor inoculation. Results: 1. Cytotoxicity in vitro; survival fraction, as judged from the curve, at G.I. concentration of 0.5, 1,5,10,25,50 and 100 mg/ml were 1.0, 0.74{+-}0.03, 0.18{+-}0.03, 0.15{+-}0.02, 0.006{+-}0.002, 0.015 and 0.0015, respectively. 2. Tumor growth delay in vivo; a) the time required for the mean tumor volume to grow to 1,000mm{sup 3} was 11 days in the control group and 14 days in the experimental group. b) the time required for tumor volume to increase 4 times was 11 days in the control group while it was 10.5 and 12 days in the groups injected with G.I. once a day and twice a day from the 7th day after tumor inoculation respectively. Conclusion: Aqueous extracts of G.I. showed a marked cytotoxicity on the SCK mammary cells in vitro. Tumor growth delay was statistically significant when G.I. injection was started soon after tumor inoculation, but it was not significant when injection was started after the tumors were firmly established.

  3. Andrographolide Suppress Tumor Growth by Inhibiting TLR4/NF-κB Signaling Activation in Insulinoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qian-Qian; Ding, Yi; Lei, Yan; Qi, Cui-Ling; He, Xiao-Dong; Lan, Tian; Li, Jiang-Chao; Gong, Ping; Yang, Xuesong; Geng, Jian-Guo; Wang, Li-Jing

    2014-01-01

    Insulinomas are rare tumors, and approximately 10% of insulinomas are malignant. Accumulating evidence has implicated that we still lack effective therapy to treat the patients who are diagnosed with rare malignant insulinoma. Previous studies have reported that Andrographolide (Andro) could inhibit cell cycle progression, reduce cell invasion and induce cell apoptosis in many common cancer cells. However, the effects of andro are cell type-dependent. So we emplored the β-TC-6 cells and the RIP1-Tag2 transgenic mouse model of endogenously growing insulinoma model to elucidate the possible anti-cancer effect of Andro on insulinoma, an uncommon type of malignant cancers in this study. Our experiments revealed that Andro significantly inhibited tumor growth at both the early-stage and the advanced-stage of insulinoma through targeting the TLR4/NF-κB signaling pathway. This work initially provides the evidence that the TLR4/NF-κB signaling pathway might be vital as a potential therapeutic target, and also indispensable in Andro-mediated anti-cancer effect in insulinoma. PMID:24719558

  4. Andrographolide suppress tumor growth by inhibiting TLR4/NF-κB signaling activation in insulinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qian-Qian; Ding, Yi; Lei, Yan; Qi, Cui-Ling; He, Xiao-Dong; Lan, Tian; Li, Jiang-Chao; Gong, Ping; Yang, Xuesong; Geng, Jian-Guo; Wang, Li-Jing

    2014-01-01

    Insulinomas are rare tumors, and approximately 10% of insulinomas are malignant. Accumulating evidence has implicated that we still lack effective therapy to treat the patients who are diagnosed with rare malignant insulinoma. Previous studies have reported that Andrographolide (Andro) could inhibit cell cycle progression, reduce cell invasion and induce cell apoptosis in many common cancer cells. However, the effects of andro are cell type-dependent. So we emplored the β-TC-6 cells and the RIP1-Tag2 transgenic mouse model of endogenously growing insulinoma model to elucidate the possible anti-cancer effect of Andro on insulinoma, an uncommon type of malignant cancers in this study. Our experiments revealed that Andro significantly inhibited tumor growth at both the early-stage and the advanced-stage of insulinoma through targeting the TLR4/NF-κB signaling pathway. This work initially provides the evidence that the TLR4/NF-κB signaling pathway might be vital as a potential therapeutic target, and also indispensable in Andro-mediated anti-cancer effect in insulinoma.

  5. Imatinib and Dasatinib Inhibit Hemangiosarcoma and Implicate PDGFR-β and Src in Tumor Growth12

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickerson, Erin B; Marley, Kevin; Edris, Wade; Tyner, Jeffrey W; Schalk, Vidya; MacDonald, Valerie; Loriaux, Marc; Druker, Brian J; Helfand, Stuart C

    2013-01-01

    Hemangiosarcoma, a natural model of human angiosarcoma, is an aggressive vascular tumor diagnosed commonly in dogs. The documented expression of several receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs) by these tumors makes them attractive targets for therapeutic intervention using tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs). However, we possess limited knowledge of the effects of TKIs on hemangiosarcoma as well as other soft tissue sarcomas. We report here on the use of the TKIs imatinib and dasatinib in canine hemangiosarcoma and their effects on platelet-derived growth factor receptor β (PDGFR-β) and Src inhibition. Both TKIs reduced cell viability, but dasatinib was markedly more potent in this regard, mediating cytotoxic effects orders of magnitude greater than imatinib. Dasatinib also inhibited the phosphorylation of the shared PDGFR-β target at a concentration approximately 1000 times less than that needed by imatinib and effectively blocked Src phosphorylation. Both inhibitors augmented the response to doxorubicin, suggesting that clinical responses likely will be improved using both drugs in combination; however, dasatinib was significantly (P hemangiosarcoma established that clinically achievable doses of dasatinib may be realized in dogs and provides a means to investigate the effect of TKIs on soft tissue sarcomas in a large animal model. PMID:23544168

  6. Effect of p27 gene combined with Pientzehuang ([characters: see text]) on tumor growth in osteosarcoma-bearing nude mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Shou-song; Yuan, Fang; Liu, Ying-hong; Zhou, Le-tian; Li, Jun

    2015-11-01

    To observe the effect of p27 gene recombinant adenovirus combined with Chinese medicine Pientzehuang ([characters: see text]) on the growth of xenografted human osteosarcoma in nude mice. Tissue transplantation was used to construct the orthotopic model of human osteosarcoma Saos-2 cell in nude mice. Thirty tumor-bearing nude mice were randomly divided into 5 groups with 6 mice in each group: blank control group (model of osteosarcoma), empty vector group (recombinant adeno-associated virus-multiple cloning site), Pientzehuang group, p27 gene group and combined treatment group (p27 gene combined with Pientzehuang). The effect of combined treatment on human osteosarcoma was analyzed through the tumor formation, tumor volume and inhibition rate of tumor growth. The expression of p27 was measured by immunohistochemical staining and Western blot. The orthotopic model of osteosarcoma in nude mice was successfully constructed. The general appearance of tumor-bearing nude mice in Pientzehuang and p27 gene groups was markedly improved compared with the blank control group; and in the combined treatment group it was significantly improved compared with the Pientzehuang and p27 gene groups. The tumor growth in the Pientzehuang and p27 gene groups was significantly inhibited compared with the blank control group P<0.05); while in the combined treatment group it was markedly inhibited compared with the Pientzehuang and p27 gene groups (P<0.05). The rates of tumor growth inhibition were 34.1%, 56.5% and 63.8% in the Pientzehuang, p27 gene and combined treatment groups, respectively. Meanwhile, the protein expression of p27 gene in the p27 gene group was significantly increased compared with the blank control group (P<0.05); and it was significantly increased in the combined treatment group compared with the p27 gene and Pientzehuang groups (P<0.05). p27 gene introduced by adenovirus combined with Pientzehuang can inhibit the growth of human osteosarcoma cell Saos-2 in nude mice.

  7. Contrast-enhancing tumor growth dynamics of preoperative, treatment-naive human glioblastoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellingson, Benjamin M; Nguyen, Huytram N; Lai, Albert; Nechifor, Ruben E; Zaw, Okkar; Pope, Whitney B; Yong, William H; Nghiemphu, Phioanh L; Liau, Linda M; Cloughesy, Timothy F

    2016-06-01

    Little is known about the natural growth characteristics of untreated glioblastoma before surgical or therapeutic intervention, because patients are rapidly treated after preliminary radiographic diagnosis. Understanding the growth characteristics of uninhibited human glioblastoma may be useful for characterizing changes in response to therapy. Thus, the objective of the current study was to explore tumor growth dynamics in a cohort of patients with untreated glioblastoma before surgical or therapeutic intervention. Ninety-five patients with glioblastoma who had measurable enhancing disease on >2 magnetic resonance imaging scans before surgery were identified. Tumor growth rates were quantified in 4 different ways (the percentage change per day, the absolute rate of change per day, the estimated volumetric doubling time, and the radial expansion rate) using 3 different approaches (bidirectional product, enhancing disease, and total lesion volume). The median volumetric doubling time was 21.1 days, the percentage change in tumor volume was 2.1% per day, and the rate of change in total lesion volume was 0.18 cc per day. The length of follow-up between magnetic resonance imaging examinations should be >28 days to detect progressive disease with high specificity. Small initial tumor sizes (variety of ways with similar results. The percentage changes in tumor size and volume depend on baseline tumor size and the time interval between scans. Cancer 2016;122:1718-27. © 2016 American Cancer Society. © 2016 American Cancer Society.

  8. Inhibition of Tumor Growth and Angiogenesis by Soluble EphB4

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Georg Martiny-Baron

    2004-05-01

    Full Text Available EphB receptors and their ephrinB ligands play a key role in the formation of a regular vascular system. Recent studies have also shown the involvement of Eph/ephrin interactions in malignant tumor progression and angiogenesis. We have generated soluble monomeric EphB4 (sEphB4-expressing A375 melanoma cells to study the effect of dominant negatively acting sEphB4 on tumor growth and angiogenesis. Soluble EphB4-expressing A375 tumors grown subcutaneously in nude mice show dramatically reduced tumor growth compared to control tumors. The proliferative capacity of sEphB4-expressing cells in monolayer culture is not altered. Yet, sEphB4-expressing A375 cells cannot establish proper cell-cell contacts in three-dimensional spheroids. However, sEphB4 transfectants have reduced proliferation and apoptosis rates when grown in three-dimensional culture in vitro or in subcutaneous tumors in vivo. Analysis of the vascular phenotype of the tumors revealed a reduction of intratumoral microvessel density in sEphB4-expressing tumors. Corresponding to these mouse experiments, a matched pair analysis of EphB4 and ephrinB2 expression in human colon carcinomas revealed significantly upregulated levels of EphB4 expression compared to adjacent normal tissue. Taken together, the data identify dual effects of sEphB4 on the tumor and the vascular compartment that collectively inhibit tumor growth.

  9. Heralding a new paradigm in 3D tumor modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fong, Eliza L S; Harrington, Daniel A; Farach-Carson, Mary C; Yu, Hanry

    2016-11-01

    Numerous studies to date have contributed to a paradigm shift in modeling cancer, moving from the traditional two-dimensional culture system to three-dimensional (3D) culture systems for cancer cell culture. This led to the inception of tumor engineering, which has undergone rapid advances over the years. In line with the recognition that tumors are not merely masses of proliferating cancer cells but rather, highly complex tissues consisting of a dynamic extracellular matrix together with stromal, immune and endothelial cells, significant efforts have been made to better recapitulate the tumor microenvironment in 3D. These approaches include the development of engineered matrices and co-cultures to replicate the complexity of tumor-stroma interactions in vitro. However, the tumor engineering and cancer biology fields have traditionally relied heavily on the use of cancer cell lines as a cell source in tumor modeling. While cancer cell lines have contributed to a wealth of knowledge in cancer biology, the use of this cell source is increasingly perceived as a major contributing factor to the dismal failure rate of oncology drugs in drug development. Backing this notion is the increasing evidence that tumors possess intrinsic heterogeneity, which predominantly homogeneous cancer cell lines poorly reflect. Tumor heterogeneity contributes to therapeutic resistance in patients. To overcome this limitation, cancer cell lines are beginning to be replaced by primary tumor cell sources, in the form of patient-derived xenografts and organoids cultures. Moving forward, we propose that further advances in tumor engineering would require that tumor heterogeneity (tumor variants) be taken into consideration together with tumor complexity (tumor-stroma interactions). In this review, we provide a comprehensive overview of what has been achieved in recapitulating tumor complexity, and discuss the importance of incorporating tumor heterogeneity into 3D in vitro tumor models. This

  10. In Vivo Measurements of Tumor Metabolism and Growth after Administration of Enzastaurin Using Small Animal FDG Positron Emission Tomography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karen E. Pollok

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. The use of 2-[18F]fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose ([18F]FDG may help to establish the antitumor activity of enzastaurin, a novel protein kinase C-beta II (PKC-II inhibitor, in mouse xenografts. Methods. The hematologic cell line RAJI and the solid tumor cell line U87MG were each implanted in NOD/SCID mice. Standard tumor growth measurements and [18F]FDG PET imaging were performed weekly for up to three weeks after tumor implantation and growth. Results. Concomitant with caliper measurements, [18F]FDG PET imaging was performed to monitor glucose metabolism. Heterogeneity of glucose uptake in various areas of the tumors was observed after vehicle or enzastaurin treatment. This heterogeneity may limit the use of [18F]FDG PET imaging to measure enzastaurin-associated changes in xenograft tumors. Conclusion. [18F]FDG PET imaging technique does not correlate with standard caliper assessments in xenografts to assess the antitumor activity of enzastaurin. Future studies are needed to determine the use of [18F]FDG PET imaging in preclinical models.

  11. Investigation of HIFU-induced anti-tumor immunity in a murine tumor model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lyerly H Kim

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background High intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU is an emerging non-invasive treatment modality for localized treatment of cancers. While current clinical strategies employ HIFU exclusively for thermal ablation of the target sites, biological responses associated with both thermal and mechanical damage from focused ultrasound have not been thoroughly investigated. In particular, endogenous danger signals from HIFU-damaged tumor cells may trigger the activation of dendritic cells. This response may play a critical role in a HIFU-elicited anti-tumor immune response which can be harnessed for more effective treatment. Methods Mice bearing MC-38 colon adenocarcinoma tumors were treated with thermal and mechanical HIFU exposure settings in order to independently observe HIFU-induced effects on the host's immunological response. In vivo dendritic cell activity was assessed along with the host's response to challenge tumor growth. Results Thermal and mechanical HIFU were found to increase CD11c+ cells 3.1-fold and 4-fold, respectively, as compared to 1.5-fold observed for DC injection alone. In addition, thermal and mechanical HIFU increased CFSE+ DC accumulation in draining lymph nodes 5-fold and 10-fold, respectively. Moreover, focused ultrasound treatments not only caused a reduction in the growth of primary tumors, with tumor volume decreasing by 85% for thermal HIFU and 43% for mechanical HIFU, but they also provided protection against subcutaneous tumor re-challenge. Further immunological assays confirmed an enhanced CTL activity and increased tumor-specific IFN-γ-secreting cells in the mice treated by focused ultrasound, with cytotoxicity induced by mechanical HIFU reaching as high as 27% at a 10:1 effector:target ratio. Conclusion These studies present initial encouraging results confirming that focused ultrasound treatment can elicit a systemic anti-tumor immune response, and they suggest that this immunity is closely related to

  12. Puberty and plexiform neurofibroma tumor growth in patients with neurofibromatosis type I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dagalakis, Urania; Lodish, Maya; Dombi, Eva; Sinaii, Ninet; Sabo, Jessica; Baldwin, Andrea; Steinberg, Seth M; Stratakis, Constantine A; Widemann, Brigitte C

    2014-03-01

    To assess the relationship between pubertal progression and change in plexiform neurofibroma (PN) burden over time in pediatric and young adult patients with neurofibromatosis type 1 and PNs. Analyses accounted for sex, age, race, and chemotherapy. Forty-one patients with neurofibromatosis type 1 (15 female and 26 male patients) were studied at the National Institutes of Health. Tanner stage, testosterone, progesterone, estradiol, insulin-like growth factor -1, luteinizing hormone, and follicle-stimulating hormone were assessed. Tumor volume was measured using magnetic resonance imaging and lesion detection software developed locally. Patients were divided into 2 groups based on whether they were actively progressing through puberty (n = 16) or were peripubertal (n = 25) and were followed for an average of 20 months. Tumor growth rates in the puberty and peripubertal group were analyzed for a subset of patients. There was no statistically significant difference in tumor burden change over time (cm(2)/kg per month) between the pubertal and peripubertal groups (-0.16 ± 0.34 vs 0.03 ± 1.8, P = .31) and in the PN growth rates before and during puberty (P = .90). Change in tumor volume/patient weight/time did not correlate with testosterone change/time in males or estradiol change/time in females. These findings support that hormonal changes of puberty do not accelerate PN growth. Additional long-term follow-up of patients is necessary to further characterize the interaction between puberty and tumor growth. Published by Mosby, Inc.

  13. Edema control by cediranib, a vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-targeted kinase inhibitor, prolongs survival despite persistent brain tumor growth in mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kamoun, Walid S; Ley, Carsten D; Farrar, Christian T

    2009-01-01

    anti-VEGF agents may decrease tumor contrast-enhancement, vascularity, and edema, the mechanisms leading to improved survival in patients remain incompletely understood. Our goal was to determine whether alleviation of edema by anti-VEGF agents alone could increase survival in mice. METHODS: We treated...... mice bearing three different orthotopic models of glioblastoma with a VEGF-targeted kinase inhibitor, cediranib. Using intravital microscopy, molecular techniques, and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), we measured survival, tumor growth, edema, vascular morphology and function, cancer cell apoptosis...... and proliferation, and circulating angiogenic biomarkers. RESULTS: We show by intravital microscopy that cediranib significantly decreased tumor vessel permeability and diameter. Moreover, cediranib treatment induced normalization of perivascular cell coverage and thinning of the basement membrane, as mirrored...

  14. Dioscin inhibits colon tumor growth and tumor angiogenesis through regulating VEGFR2 and AKT/MAPK signaling pathways

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tong, Qingyi [Regenerative Medicine Research Center, State Key Laboratory of Biotherapy and Cancer Center, West China Hospital, Sichuan University, Chengdu, Sichuan 610041 (China); Qing, Yong, E-mail: qingyongxy@yahoo.co.jp [Department of Pharmacology, West China School of Pharmacy, Sichuan University, Chengdu, Sichuan 610041 (China); Wu, Yang [State Key Laboratory of Biotherapy and Cancer Center, West China Hospital, Sichuan University, Chengdu, Sichuan 610041 (China); Hu, Xiaojuan; Jiang, Lei [Department of Pharmacology, West China School of Pharmacy, Sichuan University, Chengdu, Sichuan 610041 (China); Wu, Xiaohua, E-mail: wuxh@scu.edu.cn [Regenerative Medicine Research Center, State Key Laboratory of Biotherapy and Cancer Center, West China Hospital, Sichuan University, Chengdu, Sichuan 610041 (China)

    2014-12-01

    Dioscin has shown cytotoxicity against cancer cells, but its in vivo effects and the mechanisms have not elucidated yet. The purpose of the current study was to assess the antitumor effects and the molecular mechanisms of dioscin. We showed that dioscin could inhibit tumor growth in vivo and has no toxicity at the test condition. The growth suppression was accompanied by obvious blood vessel decrease within solid tumors. We also found dioscin treatment inhibited the proliferation of cancer and endothelial cell lines, and most sensitive to primary cultured human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs). What's more, analysis of HUVECs migration, invasion, and tube formation exhibited that dioscin has significantly inhibitive effects to these actions. Further analysis of blood vessel formation in the matrigel plugs indicated that dioscin could inhibit VEGF-induced blood vessel formation in vivo. We also identified that dioscin could suppress the downstream protein kinases of VEGFR2, including Src, FAK, AKT and Erk1/2, accompanied by the increase of phosphorylated P38MAPK. The results potently suggest that dioscin may be a potential anticancer drug, which efficiently inhibits angiogenesis induced by VEGFR2 signaling pathway as well as AKT/MAPK pathways. - Highlights: • Dioscin inhibits tumor growth in vivo and does not exhibit any toxicity. • Dioscin inhibits angiogenesis within solid tumors. • Dioscin inhibits the proliferation, migration, invasion, and tube formation of HUVECs. • Dioscin inhibits VEGF–induced blood vessel formation in vivo. • Dioscin inhibits VEGFR2 signaling pathway as well as AKT/MAPK pathway.

  15. Hyaluronan Tumor Cell Interactions in Prostate Cancer Growth and Survival

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-12-01

    used in the funded award. These studies have a direct bearing on changes in the original design of studies to use prostate cancer cell lines in these...ran-dependent mitotic spindle assembly. Cell. 127:539-52. Maxwell, C.A., J.J. Keats, M. Crainie, X. Sun , T. Yen, E. Shibuya, M. Hendzel, G. Chan...prognostic factor, loss of p21, identifies a subgroup of MMR-proficient tumors with a high incidence of microsatellite instability that has a particularly

  16. Germline genetic variation modulates tumor progression and metastasis in a mouse model of neuroendocrine prostate carcinoma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shashank J Patel

    Full Text Available Neuroendocrine (NE differentiation has gained increased attention as a prostate cancer (PC prognostic marker. The aim of this study is to determine whether host germline genetic variation influences tumor progression and metastasis in C57BL/6-Tg(TRAMP8247Ng/J (TRAMP mouse model of aggressive NEPC. TRAMP mice were crossed to the eight progenitor strains of the Collaborative Cross recombinant inbred panel to address this. Tumor growth and metastasis burden were quantified in heterozygous transgene positive F1 male mice at 30 weeks of age. Compared to wild-type C57BL/6J-Tg(TRAMP824Ng/J males, TRAMP x CAST/EiJ, TRAMP x NOD/ShiLtJ and TRAMP x NZO/HlLtJ F1 males displayed significant increases in tumor growth. Conversely, TRAMP x WSB/EiJ and TRAMP x PWK/PhJ F1 males displayed significant reductions in tumor growth. Interestingly, despite reduced tumor burden, TRAMP x WSB/EiJ males had an increased nodal metastasis burden. Patterns of distant pulmonary metastasis tended to follow the same patterns as that of local dissemination in each of the strains. All tumors and metastases displayed positive staining for NE markers, synaptophysin, and FOXA2. These experiments conclusively demonstrate that the introduction of germline variation by breeding modulates tumor growth, local metastasis burden, and distant metastasis frequency in this model of NEPC. These strains will be useful as model systems to facilitate the identification of germline modifier genes that promote the development of aggressive forms of PC.

  17. Aspirin Inhibits Colon Cancer Cell and Tumor Growth and Downregulates Specificity Protein (Sp) Transcription Factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pathi, Satya; Jutooru, Indira; Chadalapaka, Gayathri; Nair, Vijayalekshmi; Lee, Syng-Ook; Safe, Stephen

    2012-01-01

    Acetylsalicylic acid (aspirin) is highly effective for treating colon cancer patients postdiagnosis; however, the mechanisms of action of aspirin in colon cancer are not well defined. Aspirin and its major metabolite sodium salicylate induced apoptosis and decreased colon cancer cell growth and the sodium salt of aspirin also inhibited tumor growth in an athymic nude mouse xenograft model. Colon cancer cell growth inhibition was accompanied by downregulation of Sp1, Sp3 and Sp4 proteins and decreased expression of Sp-regulated gene products including bcl-2, survivin, VEGF, VEGFR1, cyclin D1, c-MET and p65 (NFκB). Moreover, we also showed by RNA interference that β-catenin, an important target of aspirin in some studies, is an Sp-regulated gene. Aspirin induced nuclear caspase-dependent cleavage of Sp1, Sp3 and Sp4 proteins and this response was related to sequestration of zinc ions since addition of zinc sulfate blocked aspirin-mediated apoptosis and repression of Sp proteins. The results demonstrate an important underlying mechanism of action of aspirin as an anticancer agent and, based on the rapid metabolism of aspirin to salicylate in humans and the high salicylate/aspirin ratios in serum, it is likely that the anticancer activity of aspirin is also due to the salicylate metabolite. PMID:23110215

  18. Celecoxib increases miR-222 while deterring aromatase-expressing breast tumor growth in mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wong, Tsz Yan; Li, Fengjuan; Lin, Shu-mei; Chan, Franky L; Chen, Shiuan; Leung, Lai K

    2014-01-01

    Breast cancer is one of the most deadly diseases in women. Inhibiting the synthesis of estrogen is effective in treating patients with estrogen-responsive breast cancer. Previous studies have demonstrated that use of cyclooxygenase (COX) inhibitors is associated with reduced breast cancer risk. In the present study, we employed an established mouse model for postmenopausal breast cancer to evaluate the potential mechanisms of the COX-2 inhibitor celecoxib. Aromatase-expressing MCF-7 cells were transplanted into ovariectomized athymic mice. The animals were given celecoxib at 1500 ppm or aspirin at 200 ppm by oral administration with androstenedione injection. Our results showed that both COX inhibitors could suppress the cancer xenograft growth without changing the plasma estrogen level. Protein expression of ERα, COX-2, Cyclin A, and Bcl-xL were reduced in celecoxib-treated tumor samples, whereas only Bcl-xL expression was suppressed in those treated with aspirin. Among the breast cancer-related miRNAs, miR-222 expression was elevated in samples treated with celecoxib. Further studies in culture cells verified that the increase in miR-222 expression might contribute to ERα downregulation but not the growth deterrence of cells. Overall, this study suggested that both celecoxib and aspirin could prevent breast cancer growth by regulating proteins in the cell cycle and apoptosis without blocking estrogen synthesis. Besides, celecoxib might affect miR expression in an undesirable fashion

  19. RAGE mediates S100A7-induced breast cancer growth and metastasis by modulating the tumor microenvironment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nasser, Mohd W.; Wani, Nissar Ahmad; Ahirwar, Dinesh K.; Powell, Catherine A.; Ravi, Janani; Elbaz, Mohamad; Zhao, Helong; Padilla, Laura; Zhang, Xiaoli; Shilo, Konstantin; Ostrowski, Michael; Shapiro, Charles; Carson, William E.; Ganju, Ramesh K.

    2015-01-01

    RAGE is a multi-functional receptor implicated in diverse processes including inflammation and cancer. In this study, we report that RAGE expression is upregulated widely in aggressive triple-negative breast cancer cells, both in primary tumors and lymph node metastases. In evaluating the functional contributions of RAGE in breast cancer, we found RAGE-deficient mice displayed a reduced propensity for breast tumor growth. In an established model of lung metastasis, systemic blockade by injection of a RAGE neutralizing antibody inhibited metastasis development. Mechanistic investigations revealed that RAGE bound to the pro-inflammatory ligand S100A7 and mediated its ability to activate ERK, NF-κB and cell migration. In an S100A7 transgenic mouse model of breast cancer (mS100a7a15 mice), administration of either RAGE neutralizing antibody or soluble RAGE was sufficient to inhibit tumor progression and metastasis. In this model, we found that RAGE/S100A7 conditioned the tumor microenvironment by driving the recruitment of MMP9-positive tumor-associated macrophages. Overall, our results highlight RAGE as a candidate biomarker for triple-negative breast cancers and they reveal a functional role for RAGE/S100A7 signaling in linking inflammation to aggressive breast cancer development. PMID:25572331

  20. Kinetic and biochemical studies on tumor growth. Comprehensive progress report, October 1, 1967--April 1, 1975

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dethlefsen, L.A.

    1975-01-01

    The growth kinetics of four lines of the C3H mammary tumor have been studied by standard autoradiographic procedures in combination with volumetric growth curve analysis. Thus, such parameters as volumetric doubling time, mean cell generation time, growth fraction, and cell loss have been measured. Two of these lines (Slow and S102F) are currently being used for studying hormone responsiveness both in vivo and in vitro and the perturbed kinetics following insults with therapeutic agents. The respective values for the above parameters are: Slow; 21.0 days, 34 hours, 0.20, 9 percent per day, and S102F; 2.5 days, 17 hours, 0.60, 27 percent per day. A direct method ( 125 I-IUdR Method) for measuring cell loss has also been developed. This method consists of injecting mice with 125 I-IUdR and then measuring the loss of 125 I-activity from the tumor. The antigenic status of these tumors has been studied as one possible factor underlying the different growth kinetics. The mouse's immunological system was either suppressed (thymectomy and whole-body x-irradiation) or stimulated (previous exposure to tumor cells) and the percent takes, latent period, and growth rates measured. There was no evidence for a strong antigenic factor in any of these tumors. Hydroxyurea is being used as a tool for studying the perturbed cellular kinetics of the duodenum and the Slow and S102F tumors. The methods used are autoradiography, volumetric growth curve analysis, and measurements of the rates of DNA synthesis. Hormone effects on growth have been studied. Insulin had no effect but large doses of corticosterone (20 μg/ml and greater) were inhibitory and prolactin appeared to partially reverse these effects in the Slow line. (U.S.)

  1. Loss of CSL Unlocks a Hypoxic Response and Enhanced Tumor Growth Potential in Breast Cancer Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eike-Benjamin Braune

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Notch signaling is an important regulator of stem cell differentiation. All canonical Notch signaling is transmitted through the DNA-binding protein CSL, and hyperactivated Notch signaling is associated with tumor development; thus it may be anticipated that CSL deficiency should reduce tumor growth. In contrast, we report that genetic removal of CSL in breast tumor cells caused accelerated growth of xenografted tumors. Loss of CSL unleashed a hypoxic response during normoxic conditions, manifested by stabilization of the HIF1α protein and acquisition of a polyploid giant-cell, cancer stem cell-like, phenotype. At the transcriptome level, loss of CSL upregulated more than 1,750 genes and less than 3% of those genes were part of the Notch transcriptional signature. Collectively, this suggests that CSL exerts functions beyond serving as the central node in the Notch signaling cascade and reveals a role for CSL in tumorigenesis and regulation of the cellular hypoxic response.

  2. Brain Tumor Tropism of Transplanted Human Neural Stem Cells Is Induced by Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nils Ole Schmidt

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available The transplantation of neural stem cells (NSCs offers a new potential therapeutic approach as a cell-based delivery system for gene therapy in brain tumors. This is based on the unique capacity of NSCs to migrate throughout the brain and to target invading tumor cells. However, the signals controlling the targeted migration of transplanted NSCs are poorly defined. We analyzed the in vitro and in vivo effects of angiogenic growth factors and protein extracts from surgical specimens of brain tumor patients on NSC migration. Here, we demonstrate that vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF is able to induce a long-range attraction of transplanted human NSCs from distant sites in the adult brain. Our results indicate that tumorupregulated VEGF and angiogenic-activated microvasculature are relevant guidance signals for NSC tropism toward brain tumors.

  3. Inhibition of neuroblastoma tumor growth by targeted delivery of microRNA-34a using anti-disialoganglioside GD2 coated nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tivnan, Amanda; Orr, Wayne Shannon; Gubala, Vladimir; Nooney, Robert; Williams, David E; McDonagh, Colette; Prenter, Suzanne; Harvey, Harry; Domingo-Fernández, Raquel; Bray, Isabella M; Piskareva, Olga; Ng, Catherine Y; Lode, Holger N; Davidoff, Andrew M; Stallings, Raymond L

    2012-01-01

    Neuroblastoma is one of the most challenging malignancies of childhood, being associated with the highest death rate in paediatric oncology, underlining the need for novel therapeutic approaches. Typically, patients with high risk disease undergo an initial remission in response to treatment, followed by disease recurrence that has become refractory to further treatment. Here, we demonstrate the first silica nanoparticle-based targeted delivery of a tumor suppressive, pro-apoptotic microRNA, miR-34a, to neuroblastoma tumors in a murine orthotopic xenograft model. These tumors express high levels of the cell surface antigen disialoganglioside GD2 (GD(2)), providing a target for tumor-specific delivery. Nanoparticles encapsulating miR-34a and conjugated to a GD(2) antibody facilitated tumor-specific delivery following systemic administration into tumor bearing mice, resulted in significantly decreased tumor growth, increased apoptosis and a reduction in vascularisation. We further demonstrate a novel, multi-step molecular mechanism by which miR-34a leads to increased levels of the tissue inhibitor metallopeptidase 2 precursor (TIMP2) protein, accounting for the highly reduced vascularisation noted in miR-34a-treated tumors. These novel findings highlight the potential of anti-GD(2)-nanoparticle-mediated targeted delivery of miR-34a for both the treatment of GD(2)-expressing tumors, and as a basic discovery tool for elucidating biological effects of novel miRNAs on tumor growth.

  4. Inhibition of neuroblastoma tumor growth by targeted delivery of microRNA-34a using anti-disialoganglioside GD2 coated nanoparticles.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amanda Tivnan

    Full Text Available Neuroblastoma is one of the most challenging malignancies of childhood, being associated with the highest death rate in paediatric oncology, underlining the need for novel therapeutic approaches. Typically, patients with high risk disease undergo an initial remission in response to treatment, followed by disease recurrence that has become refractory to further treatment. Here, we demonstrate the first silica nanoparticle-based targeted delivery of a tumor suppressive, pro-apoptotic microRNA, miR-34a, to neuroblastoma tumors in a murine orthotopic xenograft model. These tumors express high levels of the cell surface antigen disialoganglioside GD2 (GD(2, providing a target for tumor-specific delivery.Nanoparticles encapsulating miR-34a and conjugated to a GD(2 antibody facilitated tumor-specific delivery following systemic administration into tumor bearing mice, resulted in significantly decreased tumor growth, increased apoptosis and a reduction in vascularisation. We further demonstrate a novel, multi-step molecular mechanism by which miR-34a leads to increased levels of the tissue inhibitor metallopeptidase 2 precursor (TIMP2 protein, accounting for the highly reduced vascularisation noted in miR-34a-treated tumors.These novel findings highlight the potential of anti-GD(2-nanoparticle-mediated targeted delivery of miR-34a for both the treatment of GD(2-expressing tumors, and as a basic discovery tool for elucidating biological effects of novel miRNAs on tumor growth.

  5. Alerting the immune system via stromal cells is central to the prevention of tumor growth

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Navikas, Shohreh

    2013-01-01

    Anticancer immunotherapies are highly desired. Conversely, unwanted inflammatory or immune responses contribute to oncogenesis, tumor progression, and cancer-related death. For non-immunogenic therapies to inhibit tumor growth, they must promote, not prevent, the activation of anticancer immune...... responses. Here, the central immunoregulatory role of brain-specific stromal cells and neurons as well as their ability to maintain an immunological balance and prevent the development of glioblastoma is discussed....

  6. A novel xenograft model in zebrafish for high-resolution investigating dynamics of neovascularization in tumors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chengjian Zhao

    Full Text Available Tumor neovascularization is a highly complex process including multiple steps. Understanding this process, especially the initial stage, has been limited by the difficulties of real-time visualizing the neovascularization embedded in tumor tissues in living animal models. In the present study, we have established a xenograft model in zebrafish by implanting mammalian tumor cells into the perivitelline space of 48 hours old Tg(Flk1:EGFP transgenic zebrafish embryos. With this model, we dynamically visualized the process of tumor neovascularization, with unprecedented high-resolution, including new sprouts from the host vessels and the origination from VEGFR2(+ individual endothelial cells. Moreover, we quantified their contributions during the formation of vascular network in tumor. Real-time observations revealed that angiogenic sprouts in tumors preferred to connect each other to form endothelial loops, and more and more endothelial loops accumulated into the irregular and chaotic vascular network. The over-expression of VEGF165 in tumor cells significantly affected the vascularization in xenografts, not only the number and size of neo-vessels but the abnormalities of tumor vascular architecture. The specific inhibitor of VEGFR2, SU5416, significantly inhibited the vascularization and the growth of melanoma xenografts, but had little affects to normal vessels in zebrafish. Thus, this zebrafish/tumor xenograft model not only provides a unique window to investigate the earliest events of tumoral neoangiogenesis, but is sensitive to be used as an experimental platform to rapidly and visually evaluate functions of angiogenic-related genes. Finally, it also offers an efficient and cost-effective means for the rapid evaluation of anti-angiogenic chemicals.

  7. Effects of Ligustilide on Tumor Growth and Immune Function in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Results: LIG significantly increased thymus and spleen index, macrophage phagocytosis, serum hemolysin concentration, spleen lymphocyte proliferation and CTL and NK cell activities in normal ICR mice, but inhibited the growth of transplantable H22 hepatoma. The effect was dose-related but not in a linear fashion.

  8. Suppression of tumor growth in vivo by local and systemic 90K level increase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jallal, B; Powell, J; Zachwieja, J

    1995-01-01

    Expression levels of the immunostimulatory 90K antigen in mammary carcinoma, glioblastoma, and other tumor-derived cell lines inversely correlate with their tumorigenicity in athymic mice. Engineered enhancement of 90K expression results in significant (> 80%) tumor growth inhibition, not by dire...... signal for the body's cellular defense against pathogens, which in a subset of tumors is suppressed to allow cancer progression....... action on the tumor cell, but by stimulation of the residual cell-mediated immune defense of the nude mouse. Enhanced 90K level effects are both localized and systemic and involve induction of ICAM-1 and VCAM-1 in the tumor endothelium. The findings presented suggest a role for 90K as a molecular alarm...

  9. Clinical Predictors of Regression of Choroidal Melanomas after Brachytherapy: A Growth Curve Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rashid, Mamunur; Heikkonen, Jorma; Singh, Arun D; Kivelä, Tero T

    2018-02-27

    To build multivariate models to assess correctly and efficiently the contribution of tumor characteristics on the rate of regression of choroidal melanomas after brachytherapy in a way that adjusts for confounding and takes into account variation in tumor regression patterns. Modeling of longitudinal observational data. Ultrasound images from 330 of 388 consecutive choroidal melanomas (87%) irradiated from 2000 through 2008 at the Helsinki University Hospital, Helsinki, Finland, a national referral center. Images were obtained with a 10-MHz B-scan during 3 years of follow-up. Change in tumor thickness and cross-sectional area were modeled using a polynomial growth-curve function in a nested mixed linear regression model considering regression pattern and tumor levels. Initial tumor dimensions, tumor-node-metastasis (TNM) stage, shape, ciliary body involvement, pigmentation, isotope, plaque size, detached muscles, and radiation parameters were considered as covariates. Covariates that independently predict tumor regression. Initial tumor thickness, largest basal diameter, ciliary body involvement, TNM stage, tumor shape group, break in Bruch's membrane, having muscles detached, and radiation dose to tumor base predicted faster regression, whether considering all tumors or those that regressed in a pattern compatible with exponential decay. Dark brown pigmentation was associated with slower regression. In multivariate modeling, initial tumor thickness remained the predominant and robust predictor of tumor regression (P future analyses efficiently without matching. Copyright © 2018 American Academy of Ophthalmology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Numerical modeling of fluid flow in solid tumors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Soltani

    Full Text Available A mathematical model of interstitial fluid flow is developed, based on the application of the governing equations for fluid flow, i.e., the conservation laws for mass and momentum, to physiological systems containing solid tumors. The discretized form of the governing equations, with appropriate boundary conditions, is developed for a predefined tumor geometry. The interstitial fluid pressure and velocity are calculated using a numerical method, element based finite volume. Simulations of interstitial fluid transport in a homogeneous solid tumor demonstrate that, in a uniformly perfused tumor, i.e., one with no necrotic region, because of the interstitial pressure distribution, the distribution of drug particles is non-uniform. Pressure distribution for different values of necrotic radii is examined and two new parameters, the critical tumor radius and critical necrotic radius, are defined. Simulation results show that: 1 tumor radii have a critical size. Below this size, the maximum interstitial fluid pressure is less than what is generally considered to be effective pressure (a parameter determined by vascular pressure, plasma osmotic pressure, and interstitial osmotic pressure. Above this size, the maximum interstitial fluid pressure is equal to effective pressure. As a consequence, drugs transport to the center of smaller tumors is much easier than transport to the center of a tumor whose radius is greater than the critical tumor radius; 2 there is a critical necrotic radius, below which the interstitial fluid pressure at the tumor center is at its maximum value. If the tumor radius is greater than the critical tumor radius, this maximum pressure is equal to effective pressure. Above this critical necrotic radius, the interstitial fluid pressure at the tumor center is below effective pressure. In specific ranges of these critical sizes, drug amount and therefore therapeutic effects are higher because the opposing force, interstitial fluid

  11. Viscoelastic model of tungsten 'fuzz' growth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krasheninnikov, S I

    2011-01-01

    A viscoelastic model of fuzz growth is presented. The model describes the main features of tungsten fuzz observed in experiments. It gives estimates of fuzz growth rate and temperature range close to experimental ones.

  12. A novel peptide derived from human apolipoprotein E is an inhibitor of tumor growth and ocular angiogenesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Partha S Bhattacharjee

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Angiogenesis is a hallmark of tumor development and metastasis and now a validated target for cancer treatment. We previously reported that a novel dimer peptide (apoEdp derived from the receptor binding region of human apolipoprotein E (apoE inhibits virus-induced angiogenesis. However, its role in tumor anti-angiogenesis is unknown. This study demonstrates that apoEdp has anti-angiogenic property in vivo through reduction of tumor growth in a mouse model and ocular angiogenesis in a rabbit eye model. Our in vitro studies show that apoEdp inhibits human umbilical vein endothelial cell proliferation, migration, invasion and capillary tube formation. We document that apoEdp inhibits vascular endothelial growth factor-induced Flk-1 activation as well as downstream signaling pathways that involve c-Src, Akt, eNOS, FAK, and ERK1/2. These in vitro data suggest potential sites of the apoE dipeptide inhibition that could occur in vivo.This is the first evidence that a synthetic dimer peptide mimicking human apoE has anti-angiogenesis functions and could be an anti-tumor drug candidate.

  13. Andrographolide inhibits osteopontin expression and breast tumor growth through down regulation of PI3 kinase/Akt signaling pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, S; Patil, H S; Sharma, P; Kumar, D; Dasari, S; Puranik, V G; Thulasiram, H V; Kundu, G C

    2012-09-01

    Breast cancer is one of the most common cancers among women in India and around the world. Despite recent advancement in the treatment of breast cancer, the results of chemotherapy to date remain unsatisfactory, prompting a need to identify natural agents that could target cancer efficiently with least side effects. Andrographolide (Andro) is one such molecule which has been shown to possess inhibitory effect on cancer cell growth. In this study, Andro, a natural diterpenoid lactone isolated from Andrographis paniculata has been shown to inhibit breast cancer cell proliferation, migration and arrest cell cycle at G2/M phase and induces apoptosis through caspase independent pathway. Our experimental evidences suggest that Andro attenuates endothelial cell motility and tumor-endothelial cell interaction. Moreover, Andro suppresses breast tumor growth in orthotopic NOD/SCID mice model. The anti-tumor activity of Andro in both in vitro and in vivo model was correlated with down regulation of PI3 kinase/Akt activation and inhibition of pro-angiogenic molecules such as OPN and VEGF expressions. Collectively, these results demonstrate that Andro may act as an effective anti-tumor and anti-angiogenic agent for the treatment of breast cancer.

  14. Inhibition of metastasis, angiogenesis, and tumor growth by Chinese herbal cocktail Tien-Hsien Liquid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sun Andy

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Advanced cancer is a multifactorial disease that demands treatments targeting multiple cellular pathways. Chinese herbal cocktail which contains various phytochemicals may target multiple dys-regulated pathways in cancer cells and thus may provide an alternative/complementary way to treat cancers. Previously we reported that the Chinese herbal cocktail Tien-Hsien Liguid (THL can specifically induce apoptosis in various cancer cells and have immuno-modulating activity. In this study, we further evaluated the anti-metastatic, anti-angiogenic and anti-tumor activities of THL with a series of in vitro and in vivo experiments. Methods The migration and invasion of cancer cells and endothelial cells was determined by Boyden chamber transwell assays. The effect of THL on pulmonary metastasis was done by injecting CT-26 colon cancer cells intravenously to syngenic mice. The in vitro and in vivo microvessel formation was determined by the tube formation assay and the Matrigel plug assay, respectively. The in vivo anti-tumor effect of THL was determined by a human MDA-MB-231 breast cancer xenograft model. The expression of metalloproteinase (MMP-2, MMP-9, and urokinase plasminogen activator (uPA was measured by gelatin zymography. The expression of HIF-1α and the phosphorylation of ERK1/2 were determined by Western blot. Results THL inhibited the migration and invasion ability of various cancer cells in vitro, decreased the secretion of MMP-2, MMP-9, and uPA and the activity of ERK1/2 in cancer cells, and suppressed pulmonary metastasis of CT-26 cancer cells in syngenic mice. Moreover, THL inhibited the migration, invasion, and tube formation of endothelial cells in vitro, decreased the secretion of MMP-2 and uPA in endothelial cells, and suppressed neovascularization in Matrigel plugs in mice. Besides its inhibitory effect on endothelial cells, THL inhibited hypoxia-induced HIF-1α and vascular endothelial growth factor-A expression

  15. Inhibition of metastasis, angiogenesis, and tumor growth by Chinese herbal cocktail Tien-Hsien Liquid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chia, Jean-San; Du, Jia-Ling; Hsu, Wei-Bin; Sun, Andy; Chiang, Chun-Pin; Wang, Won-Bo

    2010-01-01

    Advanced cancer is a multifactorial disease that demands treatments targeting multiple cellular pathways. Chinese herbal cocktail which contains various phytochemicals may target multiple dys-regulated pathways in cancer cells and thus may provide an alternative/complementary way to treat cancers. Previously we reported that the Chinese herbal cocktail Tien-Hsien Liguid (THL) can specifically induce apoptosis in various cancer cells and have immuno-modulating activity. In this study, we further evaluated the anti-metastatic, anti-angiogenic and anti-tumor activities of THL with a series of in vitro and in vivo experiments. The migration and invasion of cancer cells and endothelial cells was determined by Boyden chamber transwell assays. The effect of THL on pulmonary metastasis was done by injecting CT-26 colon cancer cells intravenously to syngenic mice. The in vitro and in vivo microvessel formation was determined by the tube formation assay and the Matrigel plug assay, respectively. The in vivo anti-tumor effect of THL was determined by a human MDA-MB-231 breast cancer xenograft model. The expression of metalloproteinase (MMP)-2, MMP-9, and urokinase plasminogen activator (uPA) was measured by gelatin zymography. The expression of HIF-1α and the phosphorylation of ERK1/2 were determined by Western blot. THL inhibited the migration and invasion ability of various cancer cells in vitro, decreased the secretion of MMP-2, MMP-9, and uPA and the activity of ERK1/2 in cancer cells, and suppressed pulmonary metastasis of CT-26 cancer cells in syngenic mice. Moreover, THL inhibited the migration, invasion, and tube formation of endothelial cells in vitro, decreased the secretion of MMP-2 and uPA in endothelial cells, and suppressed neovascularization in Matrigel plugs in mice. Besides its inhibitory effect on endothelial cells, THL inhibited hypoxia-induced HIF-1α and vascular endothelial growth factor-A expression in cancer cells. Finally, our results show that THL

  16. Tumor growth in the space-time with temporal fractal dimension

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Molski, Marcin; Konarski, Jerzy

    2008-01-01

    An improvement of the Waliszewski and Konarski approach [Waliszewski P, Konarski J. The Gompertzian curve reveals fractal properties of tumor growth. Chaos, Solitons and Fractals 2003;16:665-74] to determination of the time-dependent temporal fractal dimension b t (t) and the scaling factor a t (t) for the tumor formation in the fractal space-time is presented. The analytical formulae describing the time-dependence of b t (t) and a t (t), which take into account appropriate boundary conditions for t → 0 and t → ∞, are derived. Their validity is tested on the experimental growth curve obtained by Laird for the Flexner-Jobling rat's tumor. A hypothesis is formulated that tumorigenesis has a lot in common with the neuronal differentiation and synapse formation. These processes are qualitatively described by the same Gompertz function of growth and take place in the fractal space-time whose mean temporal fractal dimension is lost during progression

  17. Hepatic Radiofrequency Ablation–induced Stimulation of Distant Tumor Growth Is Suppressed by c-Met Inhibition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Gaurav; Moussa, Marwan; Wang, Yuanguo; Rozenblum, Nir; Galun, Eithan; Goldberg, S. Nahum

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To elucidate how hepatic radiofrequency (RF) ablation affects distant extrahepatic tumor growth by means of two key molecular pathways. Materials and Methods Rats were used in this institutional animal care and use committee–approved study. First, the effect of hepatic RF ablation on distant subcutaneous in situ R3230 and MATBIII breast tumors was evaluated. Animals were randomly assigned to standardized RF ablation, sham procedure, or no treatment. Tumor growth rate was measured for 3½ to 7 days. Then, tissue was harvested for Ki-67 proliferative indexes and CD34 microvascular density. Second, hepatic RF ablation was performed for hepatocyte growth factor (HGF), vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), and c-Met receptor expression measurement in periablational rim, serum, and distant tumor 24 hours to 7 days after ablation. Third, hepatic RF ablation was combined with either a c-Met inhibitor (PHA-665752) or VEGF receptor inhibitor (semaxanib) and compared with sham or drug alone arms to assess distant tumor growth and growth factor levels. Finally, hepatic RF ablation was performed in rats with c-Met–negative R3230 tumors for comparison with the native c-Met–positive line. Tumor size and immunohistochemical quantification at day 0 and at sacrifice were compared with analysis of variance and the two-tailed Student t test. Tumor growth curves before and after treatment were analyzed with linear regression analysis to determine mean slopes of pre- and posttreatment growth curves on a per-tumor basis and were compared with analysis of variance and paired two-tailed t tests. Results After RF ablation of normal liver, distant R3230 tumors were substantially larger at 7 days compared with tumors treated with the sham procedure and untreated tumors, with higher growth rates and tumor cell proliferation. Similar findings were observed in MATBIII tumors. Hepatic RF ablation predominantly increased periablational and serum HGF and downstream distant tumor

  18. Baseline tumor growth and immune control in laboratory mice are significantly influenced by subthermoneutral housing temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kokolus, Kathleen M.; Capitano, Maegan L.; Lee, Chen-Ting; Eng, Jason W.-L.; Waight, Jeremy D.; Hylander, Bonnie L.; Sexton, Sandra; Hong, Chi-Chen; Gordon, Christopher J.; Abrams, Scott I.; Repasky, Elizabeth A.

    2013-01-01

    We show here that fundamental aspects of antitumor immunity in mice are significantly influenced by ambient housing temperature. Standard housing temperature for laboratory mice in research facilities is mandated to be between 20–26 °C; however, these subthermoneutral temperatures cause mild chronic cold stress, activating thermogenesis to maintain normal body temperature. When stress is alleviated by housing at thermoneutral ambient temperature (30–31 °C), we observe a striking reduction in tumor formation, growth rate and metastasis. This improved control of tumor growth is dependent upon the adaptive immune system. We observe significantly increased numbers of antigen-specific CD8+ T lymphocytes and CD8+ T cells with an activated phenotype in the tumor microenvironment at thermoneutrality. At the same time there is a significant reduction in numbers of immunosuppressive MDSCs and regulatory T lymphocytes. Notably, in temperature preference studies, tumor-bearing mice select a higher ambient temperature than non-tumor-bearing mice, suggesting that tumor-bearing mice experience a greater degree of cold-stress. Overall, our data raise the hypothesis that suppression of antitumor immunity is an outcome of cold stress-induced thermogenesis. Therefore, the common approach of studying immunity against tumors in mice housed only at standard room temperature may be limiting our understanding of the full potential of the antitumor immune response. PMID:24248371

  19. Parameterization des modeles tumoral bases sur des maillages des donnees experimentaux.

    OpenAIRE

    Jagiella , Nick

    2012-01-01

    In order to establish a predictive model for in-vivo tumor growth and therapy, a multiscale model has to be set-up and calibrated individually in a stepwise process to a targeted cell type and di erent environments (in-vitro and in-vivo). As a proof of principle we will present the process chain of model construction and parametrization from di erent data sources for the avascular growth of the EMT6/Ro and the SK-MES-1 cell line. In a rst step, a multiscale and individual-based model has been...

  20. Mammary tumors that become independent of the type I insulin-like growth factor receptor express elevated levels of platelet-derived growth factor receptors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Campbell Craig I

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Targeted therapies are becoming an essential part of breast cancer treatment and agents targeting the type I insulin-like growth factor receptor (IGF-IR are currently being investigated in clinical trials. One of the limitations of targeted therapies is the development of resistant variants and these variants typically present with unique gene expression patterns and characteristics compared to the original tumor. Results MTB-IGFIR transgenic mice, with inducible overexpression of the IGF-IR were used to model mammary tumors that develop resistance to IGF-IR targeting agents. IGF-IR independent mammary tumors, previously shown to possess characteristics associated with EMT, were found to express elevated levels of PDGFRα and PDGFRβ. Furthermore, these receptors were shown to be inversely expressed with the IGF-IR in this model. Using cell lines derived from IGF-IR-independent mammary tumors (from MTB-IGFIR mice, it was demonstrated that PDGFRα and to a lesser extent PDGFRβ was important for cell migration and invasion as RNAi knockdown of PDGFRα alone or PDGFRα and PDGFRβ in combination, significantly decreased tumor cell migration in Boyden chamber assays and suppressed cell migration in scratch wound assays. Somewhat surprisingly, concomitant knockdown of PDGFRα and PDGFRβ resulted in a modest increase in cell proliferation and a decrease in apoptosis. Conclusion During IGF-IR independence, PDGFRs are upregulated and function to enhance tumor cell motility. These results demonstrate a novel interaction between the IGF-IR and PDGFRs and highlight an important, therapeutically relevant pathway, for tumor cell migration and invasion.