WorldWideScience

Sample records for model tests scale

  1. Vertimill™ pilot scale tests simulated by perfect mixing model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Douglas Batista Mazzinghy

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Minas-Rio Project, Anglo American property, located in Brazil, considers Vertimill™ to make the particle size distribution adequate to feed slurry pipeline. A pilot test campaign was carried out at Metso's pilot plant facility located in York city, Pennsylvania State, USA, to provide information to scale up the industrial grinding circuit. The perfect mixing model, normally used to simulate ball mills, was used to compare the direct and reverse circuit configurations. The simulations were based on the appearance function determined from the laboratory tests using a batch tube mill. The combined breakage rate/discharge rate function (r/d was determined from Vertimill™ feed and product particle size distributions obtained from pilot tests. The residence time was estimated considering the mill hold-up and solids flow rate. The simulation results show that there are no significant differences between direct and reverse circuits for the sample tested.

  2. Large-Scale Tests of the DGP Model

    CERN Document Server

    Song, Y S; Hu, W; Song, Yong-Seon; Sawicki, Ignacy; Hu, Wayne

    2006-01-01

    The self-accelerating braneworld model (DGP) can be tested from measurements of the expansion history of the universe and the formation of structure. Current constraints on the expansion history from supernova luminosity distances, the CMB, and the Hubble constant exclude the simplest flat DGP model at about 3sigma. The best-fit open DGP model is, however, only a marginally poorer fit to the data than flat LCDM. Its substantially different expansion history raises structure formation challenges for the model. A dark-energy model with the same expansion history would predict a highly significant discrepancy with the baryon oscillation measurement due the high Hubble constant required and a large enhancement of CMB anisotropies at the lowest multipoles due to the ISW effect. For the DGP model to satisfy these constraints new gravitational phenomena would have to appear at the non-linear and cross-over scales respectively. A prediction of the DGP expansion history in a region where the phenomenology is well unde...

  3. Meso-scale modeling of irradiated concrete in test reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Giorla, A. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, One Bethel Valley Road, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States); Vaitová, M. [Czech Technical University, Thakurova 7, 166 29 Praha 6 (Czech Republic); Le Pape, Y., E-mail: lepapeym@ornl.gov [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, One Bethel Valley Road, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States); Štemberk, P. [Czech Technical University, Thakurova 7, 166 29 Praha 6 (Czech Republic)

    2015-12-15

    Highlights: • A meso-scale finite element model for irradiated concrete is developed. • Neutron radiation-induced volumetric expansion is a predominant degradation mode. • Confrontation with expansion and damage obtained from experiments is successful. • Effects of paste shrinkage, creep and ductility are discussed. - Abstract: A numerical model accounting for the effects of neutron irradiation on concrete at the mesoscale is detailed in this paper. Irradiation experiments in test reactor (Elleuch et al., 1972), i.e., in accelerated conditions, are simulated. Concrete is considered as a two-phase material made of elastic inclusions (aggregate) subjected to thermal and irradiation-induced swelling and embedded in a cementitious matrix subjected to shrinkage and thermal expansion. The role of the hardened cement paste in the post-peak regime (brittle-ductile transition with decreasing loading rate), and creep effects are investigated. Radiation-induced volumetric expansion (RIVE) of the aggregate cause the development and propagation of damage around the aggregate which further develops in bridging cracks across the hardened cement paste between the individual aggregate particles. The development of damage is aggravated when shrinkage occurs simultaneously with RIVE during the irradiation experiment. The post-irradiation expansion derived from the simulation is well correlated with the experimental data and, the obtained damage levels are fully consistent with previous estimations based on a micromechanical interpretation of the experimental post-irradiation elastic properties (Le Pape et al., 2015). The proposed modeling opens new perspectives for the interpretation of test reactor experiments in regards to the actual operation of light water reactors.

  4. Scaling of Core Material in Rubble Mound Breakwater Model Tests

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Burcharth, H. F.; Liu, Z.; Troch, P.

    1999-01-01

    The permeability of the core material influences armour stability, wave run-up and wave overtopping. The main problem related to the scaling of core materials in models is that the hydraulic gradient and the pore velocity are varying in space and time. This makes it impossible to arrive at a fully...... correct scaling. The paper presents an empirical formula for the estimation of the wave induced pressure gradient in the core, based on measurements in models and a prototype. The formula, together with the Forchheimer equation can be used for the estimation of pore velocities in cores. The paper proposes...... that the diameter of the core material in models is chosen in such a way that the Froude scale law holds for a characteristic pore velocity. The characteristic pore velocity is chosen as the average velocity of a most critical area in the core with respect to porous flow. Finally the method is demonstrated...

  5. Scaling of Core Material in Rubble Mound Breakwater Model Tests

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Burcharth, H. F.; Liu, Z.; Troch, P.

    1999-01-01

    correct scaling. The paper presents an empirical formula for the estimation of the wave induced pressure gradient in the core, based on measurements in models and a prototype. The formula, together with the Forchheimer equation can be used for the estimation of pore velocities in cores. The paper proposes...

  6. Methods for Quantifying the Uncertainties of LSIT Test Parameters, Test Results, and Full-Scale Mixing Performance Using Models Developed from Scaled Test Data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Piepel, Gregory F. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Cooley, Scott K. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Kuhn, William L. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Rector, David R. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Heredia-Langner, Alejandro [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2015-05-01

    This report discusses the statistical methods for quantifying uncertainties in 1) test responses and other parameters in the Large Scale Integrated Testing (LSIT), and 2) estimates of coefficients and predictions of mixing performance from models that relate test responses to test parameters. Testing at a larger scale has been committed to by Bechtel National, Inc. and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) to “address uncertainties and increase confidence in the projected, full-scale mixing performance and operations” in the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP).

  7. Development of explosive event scale model testing capability at Sandia`s large scale centrifuge facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blanchat, T.K.; Davie, N.T.; Calderone, J.J. [and others

    1998-02-01

    Geotechnical structures such as underground bunkers, tunnels, and building foundations are subjected to stress fields produced by the gravity load on the structure and/or any overlying strata. These stress fields may be reproduced on a scaled model of the structure by proportionally increasing the gravity field through the use of a centrifuge. This technology can then be used to assess the vulnerability of various geotechnical structures to explosive loading. Applications of this technology include assessing the effectiveness of earth penetrating weapons, evaluating the vulnerability of various structures, counter-terrorism, and model validation. This document describes the development of expertise in scale model explosive testing on geotechnical structures using Sandia`s large scale centrifuge facility. This study focused on buried structures such as hardened storage bunkers or tunnels. Data from this study was used to evaluate the predictive capabilities of existing hydrocodes and structural dynamics codes developed at Sandia National Laboratories (such as Pronto/SPH, Pronto/CTH, and ALEGRA). 7 refs., 50 figs., 8 tabs.

  8. Small Scale Drop Tower Test for Practice Torpedo Impact Modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-01

    Table E3. Tensile test results for the aluminium 6061 -T6 model hull plates. 2 coupons were cut with their length parallel to the long side of the...and without stiffeners and aluminium plate without stiffeners. A qualitative comparison of the results for the three model hull forms shows that...stiffeners tend to limit the extent of the dent, that aluminium plate has a greater elastic response than that of both stiffened and unstiffened steel

  9. Model Wind Turbines Tested at Full-Scale Similarity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, M. A.; Kiefer, J.; Westergaard, C.; Hultmark, M.

    2016-09-01

    The enormous length scales associated with modern wind turbines complicate any efforts to predict their mechanical loads and performance. Both experiments and numerical simulations are constrained by the large Reynolds numbers governing the full- scale aerodynamics. The limited fundamental understanding of Reynolds number effects in combination with the lack of empirical data affects our ability to predict, model, and design improved turbines and wind farms. A new experimental approach is presented, which utilizes a highly pressurized wind tunnel (up to 220 bar). It allows exact matching of the Reynolds numbers (no matter how it is defined), tip speed ratios, and Mach numbers on a geometrically similar, small-scale model. The design of a measurement and instrumentation stack to control the turbine and measure the loads in the pressurized environment is discussed. Results are then presented in the form of power coefficients as a function of Reynolds number and Tip Speed Ratio. Due to gearbox power loss, a preliminary study has also been completed to find the gearbox efficiency and the resulting correction has been applied to the data set.

  10. Propeller aircraft interior noise model. II - Scale-model and flight-test comparisons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willis, C. M.; Mayes, W. H.

    1987-01-01

    A program for predicting the sound levels inside propeller driven aircraft arising from sidewall transmission of airborne exterior noise is validated through comparisons of predictions with both scale-model test results and measurements obtained in flight tests on a turboprop aircraft. The program produced unbiased predictions for the case of the scale-model tests, with a standard deviation of errors of about 4 dB. For the case of the flight tests, the predictions revealed a bias of 2.62-4.28 dB (depending upon whether or not the data for the fourth harmonic were included) and the standard deviation of the errors ranged between 2.43 and 4.12 dB. The analytical model is shown to be capable of taking changes in the flight environment into account.

  11. Ares I Scale Model Acoustic Test Instrumentation for Acoustic and Pressure Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vargas, Magda B.; Counter, Douglas

    2011-01-01

    Ares I Scale Model Acoustic Test (ASMAT) is a 5% scale model test of the Ares I vehicle, launch pad and support structures conducted at MSFC to verify acoustic and ignition environments and evaluate water suppression systems Test design considerations 5% measurements must be scaled to full scale requiring high frequency measurements Users had different frequencies of interest Acoustics: 200 - 2,000 Hz full scale equals 4,000 - 40,000 Hz model scale Ignition Transient: 0 - 100 Hz full scale equals 0 - 2,000 Hz model scale Environment exposure Weather exposure: heat, humidity, thunderstorms, rain, cold and snow Test environments: Plume impingement heat and pressure, and water deluge impingement Several types of sensors were used to measure the environments Different instrument mounts were used according to the location and exposure to the environment This presentation addresses the observed effects of the selected sensors and mount design on the acoustic and pressure measurements

  12. Ares I Scale Model Acoustic Test Above Deck Water Sound Suppression Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Counter, Douglas D.; Houston, Janice D.

    2011-01-01

    The Ares I Scale Model Acoustic Test (ASMAT) program test matrix was designed to determine the acoustic reduction for the Liftoff acoustics (LOA) environment with an above deck water sound suppression system. The scale model test can be used to quantify the effectiveness of the water suppression system as well as optimize the systems necessary for the LOA noise reduction. Several water flow rates were tested to determine which rate provides the greatest acoustic reductions. Preliminary results are presented.

  13. Photogrammetric analysis of rubble mound breakwaters scale model tests

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    João Rodrigues

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The main goal of this paper is to develop a photogrammetric method in order to obtain arobust tool for damage assessment and quantification of rubble-mound armour layers during physicalscale model tests. With the present work, an innovative approach based on a reduced number ofdigital photos is proposed to support the identification of affected areas. This work considers twosimple digital photographs recording the instants before and after the completion of the physicaltest. Mathematical techniques were considered in the development of the procedures, enabling thetracking of image differences between photos. The procedures were developed using an open-sourceapplication, Scilab, nevertheless they are not platform dependent. The procedures developed enablethe location and identity of eroded areas in the breakwater armour layer, as well as the possibilityof quantifying them. This ability is confirmed through the calculation of correlation coefficients ineach step of the search for the more damaged area. It is also possible to make an assessment of themovement of armour layer units.

  14. The use of model-test data for predicting full-scale ACV resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forstell, B. G.; Harry, C. W.

    The paper summarizes the analysis of test data obtained with a 1/12-scale model of the Amphibious Assault Landing Craft (AALC) JEFF(B). The analysis was conducted with the objective of improving the accuracy of drag predictions for a JEFF(B)-type air-cushion vehicle (ACV). Model test results, scaled to full-scale, are compared with full-scale drag obtained in various sea states during JEFF(B) trials. From the results of this comparison, it is found that the Froude-scale model rough-water drag data is consistently greater than full-scale derived drag, and is a function of both wave height and craft forward speed. Results are presented indicating that Froude scaling model data obtained in calm water also causes an over-prediction of calm-water drag at full-scale. An empirical correction that was developed for use on a JEFF(B)-type craft is discussed.

  15. Controlling Guessing Bias in the Dichotomous Rasch Model Applied to a Large-Scale, Vertically Scaled Testing Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrich, David; Marais, Ida; Humphry, Stephen Mark

    2016-01-01

    Recent research has shown how the statistical bias in Rasch model difficulty estimates induced by guessing in multiple-choice items can be eliminated. Using vertical scaling of a high-profile national reading test, it is shown that the dominant effect of removing such bias is a nonlinear change in the unit of scale across the continuum. The…

  16. Analysis, scale modeling, and full-scale test of a railcar and spent-nuclear-fuel shipping cask in a high-velocity impact against a rigid barrier

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huerta, M.

    1981-06-01

    This report describes the mathematical analysis, the physical scale modeling, and a full-scale crash test of a railcar spent-nuclear-fuel shipping system. The mathematical analysis utilized a lumped-parameter model to predict the structural response of the railcar and the shipping cask. The physical scale modeling analysis consisted of two crash tests that used 1/8-scale models to assess railcar and shipping cask damage. The full-scale crash test, conducted with retired railcar equipment, was carefully monitored with onboard instrumentation and high-speed photography. Results of the mathematical and scale modeling analyses are compared with the full-scale test. 29 figures.

  17. Ares I Scale Model Acoustic Tests Instrumentation for Acoustic and Pressure Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vargas, Magda B.; Counter, Douglas D.

    2011-01-01

    The Ares I Scale Model Acoustic Test (ASMAT) was a development test performed at the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) East Test Area (ETA) Test Stand 116. The test article included a 5% scale Ares I vehicle model and tower mounted on the Mobile Launcher. Acoustic and pressure data were measured by approximately 200 instruments located throughout the test article. There were four primary ASMAT instrument suites: ignition overpressure (IOP), lift-off acoustics (LOA), ground acoustics (GA), and spatial correlation (SC). Each instrumentation suite incorporated different sensor models which were selected based upon measurement requirements. These requirements included the type of measurement, exposure to the environment, instrumentation check-outs and data acquisition. The sensors were attached to the test article using different mounts and brackets dependent upon the location of the sensor. This presentation addresses the observed effect of the sensors and mounts on the acoustic and pressure measurements.

  18. Proposal of a Novel Approach to Developing Material Models for Micro-scale Composites Based on Testing and Modeling of Macro-scale Composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Siranosian, Antranik Antonio [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Schembri, Philip Edward [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Luscher, Darby Jon [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-04-20

    The Los Alamos National Laboratory's Weapon Systems Engineering division's Advanced Engineering Analysis group employs material constitutive models of composites for use in simulations of components and assemblies of interest. Experimental characterization, modeling and prediction of the macro-scale (i.e. continuum) behaviors of these composite materials is generally difficult because they exhibit nonlinear behaviors on the meso- (e.g. micro-) and macro-scales. Furthermore, it can be difficult to measure and model the mechanical responses of the individual constituents and constituent interactions in the composites of interest. Current efforts to model such composite materials rely on semi-empirical models in which meso-scale properties are inferred from continuum level testing and modeling. The proposed approach involves removing the difficulties of interrogating and characterizing micro-scale behaviors by scaling-up the problem to work with macro-scale composites, with the intention of developing testing and modeling capabilities that will be applicable to the mesoscale. This approach assumes that the physical mechanisms governing the responses of the composites on the meso-scale are reproducible on the macro-scale. Working on the macro-scale simplifies the quantification of composite constituents and constituent interactions so that efforts can be focused on developing material models and the testing techniques needed for calibration and validation. Other benefits to working with macro-scale composites include the ability to engineer and manufacture—potentially using additive manufacturing techniques—composites that will support the application of advanced measurement techniques such as digital volume correlation and three-dimensional computed tomography imaging, which would aid in observing and quantifying complex behaviors that are exhibited in the macro-scale composites of interest. Ultimately, the goal of this new approach is to develop a meso-scale

  19. Calibration of Airframe and Occupant Models for Two Full-Scale Rotorcraft Crash Tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Annett, Martin S.; Horta, Lucas G.; Polanco, Michael A.

    2012-01-01

    Two full-scale crash tests of an MD-500 helicopter were conducted in 2009 and 2010 at NASA Langley's Landing and Impact Research Facility in support of NASA s Subsonic Rotary Wing Crashworthiness Project. The first crash test was conducted to evaluate the performance of an externally mounted composite deployable energy absorber under combined impact conditions. In the second crash test, the energy absorber was removed to establish baseline loads that are regarded as severe but survivable. Accelerations and kinematic data collected from the crash tests were compared to a system integrated finite element model of the test article. Results from 19 accelerometers placed throughout the airframe were compared to finite element model responses. The model developed for the purposes of predicting acceleration responses from the first crash test was inadequate when evaluating more severe conditions seen in the second crash test. A newly developed model calibration approach that includes uncertainty estimation, parameter sensitivity, impact shape orthogonality, and numerical optimization was used to calibrate model results for the second full-scale crash test. This combination of heuristic and quantitative methods was used to identify modeling deficiencies, evaluate parameter importance, and propose required model changes. It is shown that the multi-dimensional calibration techniques presented here are particularly effective in identifying model adequacy. Acceleration results for the calibrated model were compared to test results and the original model results. There was a noticeable improvement in the pilot and co-pilot region, a slight improvement in the occupant model response, and an over-stiffening effect in the passenger region. This approach should be adopted early on, in combination with the building-block approaches that are customarily used, for model development and test planning guidance. Complete crash simulations with validated finite element models can be used

  20. AGU Chapman Conference Hydrogeologic Processes: Building and Testing Atomistic- to Basin-Scale Models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weaver, B. [American Geophysical Union, Washington, DC (United States)

    1994-12-31

    This report presents details of the Chapman Conference given on June 6--9, 1994 in Lincoln, New Hampshire. This conference covered the scale of processes involved in coupled hydrogeologic mass transport and a concept of modeling and testing from the atomistic- to the basin- scale. Other topics include; the testing of fundamental atomic level parameterizations in the laboratory and field studies of fluid flow and mass transport and the next generation of hydrogeologic models. Individual papers from this conference are processed separately for the database.

  1. Computational Fluid Dynamics Study on the Effects of RATO Timing on the Scale Model Acoustic Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielsen, Tanner; Williams, B.; West, Jeff

    2015-01-01

    The Scale Model Acoustic Test (SMAT) is a 5% scale test of the Space Launch System (SLS), which is currently being designed at Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC). The purpose of this test is to characterize and understand a variety of acoustic phenomena that occur during the early portions of lift off, one being the overpressure environment that develops shortly after booster ignition. The SLS lift off configuration consists of four RS-25 liquid thrusters on the core stage, with two solid boosters connected to each side. Past experience with scale model testing at MSFC (in ER42), has shown that there is a delay in the ignition of the Rocket Assisted Take Off (RATO) motor, which is used as the 5% scale analog of the solid boosters, after the signal to ignite is given. This delay can range from 0 to 16.5ms. While this small of a delay maybe insignificant in the case of the full scale SLS, it can significantly alter the data obtained during the SMAT due to the much smaller geometry. The speed of sound of the air and combustion gas constituents is not scaled, and therefore the SMAT pressure waves propagate at approximately the same speed as occurs during full scale. However, the SMAT geometry is much smaller allowing the pressure waves to move down the exhaust duct, through the trench, and impact the vehicle model much faster than occurs at full scale. To better understand the effect of the RATO timing simultaneity on the SMAT IOP test data, a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) analysis was performed using the Loci/CHEM CFD software program. Five different timing offsets, based on RATO ignition delay statistics, were simulated. A variety of results and comparisons will be given, assessing the overall effect of RATO timing simultaneity on the SMAT overpressure environment.

  2. Scale Effect Features During Simulation Tests of 3D Printer-Made Vane Pump Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. I. Petrov

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The article "Scale effect features during simulation tests of 3D printer-made vane pump models" discusses the influence of scale effect on translation of pump parameters from models, made with 3D-prototyping methods, to full-scale pumps. Widely spread now 3D-printer production of pump model parts or entire layouts can be considered to be the main direction of vane pumps modeling. This is due to the widespread development of pumps in different CAD-systems and the significant cost reduction in manufacturing such layouts, as compared to casting and other traditional methods.The phenomenon of scale effect in vane hydraulic machines, i.e. violation of similarity conditions when translating pump parameters from model to full-scale pumps is studied in detail in the theory of similarity. However, as the experience in the 3d-printer manufacturing of models and their testing gains it becomes clear that accounting large-scale effect for such models has a number of differences from the conventional techniques. The reason for this is the features of micro and macro geometry of parts made in different kinds of 3D-printers (extrusive, and powder sintering methods, ultraviolet light, etc..The article considers the converting features of external and internal mechanical losses, leakages, and hydraulic losses, as well as the specifics of the balance tests for such models. It also presents the basic conversion formulas describing the factors affecting the value of these losses. It shows photographs of part surfaces of models, manufactured by 3D-printer and subjected to subsequent machining. The paper shows results of translation from several pump models (layouts to the full-scale ones, using the techniques described, and it also shows that the error in translation efficiency does not exceed 1.15%. The conclusion emphasizes the importance of the balance tests of models to accumulate statistical data on the scale effect for pump layouts made by different 3D

  3. Characterization of the Scale Model Acoustic Test Overpressure Environment using Computational Fluid Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielsen, Tanner; West, Jeff

    2015-01-01

    The Scale Model Acoustic Test (SMAT) is a 5% scale test of the Space Launch System (SLS), which is currently being designed at Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC). The purpose of this test is to characterize and understand a variety of acoustic phenomena that occur during the early portions of lift off, one being the overpressure environment that develops shortly after booster ignition. The pressure waves that propagate from the mobile launcher (ML) exhaust hole are defined as the ignition overpressure (IOP), while the portion of the pressure waves that exit the duct or trench are the duct overpressure (DOP). Distinguishing the IOP and DOP in scale model test data has been difficult in past experiences and in early SMAT results, due to the effects of scaling the geometry. The speed of sound of the air and combustion gas constituents is not scaled, and therefore the SMAT pressure waves propagate at approximately the same speed as occurs in full scale. However, the SMAT geometry is twenty times smaller, allowing the pressure waves to move down the exhaust hole, through the trench and duct, and impact the vehicle model much faster than occurs at full scale. The DOP waves impact portions of the vehicle at the same time as the IOP waves, making it difficult to distinguish the different waves and fully understand the data. To better understand the SMAT data, a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) analysis was performed with a fictitious geometry that isolates the IOP and DOP. The upper and lower portions of the domain were segregated to accomplish the isolation in such a way that the flow physics were not significantly altered. The Loci/CHEM CFD software program was used to perform this analysis.

  4. Analysis and test for space shuttle propellant dynamics (1/10th scale model test results). Volume 1: Technical discussion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berry, R. L.; Tegart, J. R.; Demchak, L. J.

    1979-01-01

    Space shuttle propellant dynamics during ET/Orbiter separation in the RTLS (return to launch site) mission abort sequence were investigated in a test program conducted in the NASA KC-135 "Zero G" aircraft using a 1/10th-scale model of the ET LOX Tank. Low-g parabolas were flown from which thirty tests were selected for evaluation. Data on the nature of low-g propellant reorientation in the ET LOX tank, and measurements of the forces exerted on the tank by the moving propellent will provide a basis for correlation with an analytical model of the slosh phenomenon.

  5. Validation and Simulation of ARES I Scale Model Acoustic Test -1- Pathfinder Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Putnam, G. C.

    2011-01-01

    The Ares I Scale Model Acoustics Test (ASMAT) is a series of live-fire tests of scaled rocket motors meant to simulate the conditions of the Ares I launch configuration. These tests have provided a well documented set of high fidelity measurements useful for validation including data taken over a range of test conditions and containing phenomena like Ignition Over-Pressure and water suppression of acoustics. To take advantage of this data, a digital representation of the ASMAT test setup has been constructed and test firings of the motor have been simulated using the Loci/CHEM computational fluid dynamics software. Within this first of a series of papers, results from ASMAT simulations with the rocket in a held down configuration and without water suppression have then been compared to acoustic data collected from similar live-fire tests to assess the accuracy of the simulations. Detailed evaluations of the mesh features, mesh length scales relative to acoustic signals, Courant-Friedrichs-Lewy numbers, and spatial residual sources have been performed to support this assessment. Results of acoustic comparisons have shown good correlation with the amplitude and temporal shape of pressure features and reasonable spectral accuracy up to approximately 1000 Hz. Major plume and acoustic features have been well captured including the plume shock structure, the igniter pulse transient, and the ignition overpressure. Finally, acoustic propagation patterns illustrated a previously unconsidered issue of tower placement inline with the high intensity overpressure propagation path.

  6. A test for the transferability of regionalized model parameters across calibration scales and locations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, R.; Samaniego, L.

    2012-04-01

    Several recent studies have advocated on improving evaluation procedures for testing the reliability of distributed hydrologic models. The traditional approach of model evaluation in calibrated conditions against daily stream flow has proven to be inadequate in identifying a robust hydrologic model or a parametrization scheme among several competing ones, as noticed in several model inter-comparison studies (see e.g. DMIP-I & II; Reed et al. 2004, Smith et al., 2011). In this study, we propose a model evaluation procedure aiming at testing the reliability of a distributed hydrologic model for predictions beyond the calibrated conditions. Specifically, our goal was to assess the effectiveness of the transferability of model parameters to scales and locations other than those used during calibration. For this case study, we used a grid based distributed mesoscale hydrologic model (mHM, Samaniego et al. 2010, WRR) and show the effectiveness of two parameterization methods: one based on hydrological response units (HRU) and the other based on the multiscale parameter regionalization (MPR) technique. mHM with both parameterization methods was set-up in 45 southern German river basins covering a wide range of physiographical characteristics and drainage area (100 km2 to 12 700 km2). Model simulations were carried out at four spatial resolutions: (2, 4, 8, 16) km in the period from 1980 to 2008. At each scale, a set of free parameters of both methods were estimated using a dynamically dimensioned search algorithm (DDS). Both parametrization methods provided nearly similar acceptable performances for daily discharge simulations at all four modeling scales as long as their free parameters were calibrated at each scale. A significant deterioration (up to 40%) in performance of the HRU method was, however, noticed when its free parameters calibrated at a given modeling scale were shifted to another scale. The MPR method, on the contrary, exhibited a quasi scale

  7. Power Take-Off Simulation for Scale Model Testing of Wave Energy Converters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scott Beatty

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Small scale testing in controlled environments is a key stage in the development of potential wave energy conversion technology. Furthermore, it is well known that the physical design and operational quality of the power-take off (PTO used on the small scale model can have vast effects on the tank testing results. Passive mechanical elements such as friction brakes and air dampers or oil filled dashpots are fraught with nonlinear behaviors such as static friction, temperature dependency, and backlash, the effects of which propagate into the wave energy converter (WEC power production data, causing very high uncertainty in the extrapolation of the tank test results to the meaningful full ocean scale. The lack of quality in PTO simulators is an identified barrier to the development of WECs worldwide. A solution to this problem is to use actively controlled actuators for PTO simulation on small scale model wave energy converters. This can be done using force (or torque-controlled feedback systems with suitable instrumentation, enabling the PTO to exert any desired time and/or state dependent reaction force. In this paper, two working experimental PTO simulators on two different wave energy converters are described. The first implementation is on a 1:25 scale self-reacting point absorber wave energy converter with optimum reactive control. The real-time control system, described in detail, is implemented in LabVIEW. The second implementation is on a 1:20 scale single body point absorber under model-predictive control, implemented with a real-time controller in MATLAB/Simulink. Details on the physical hardware, software, and feedback control methods, as well as results, are described for each PTO. Lastly, both sets of real-time control code are to be web-hosted, free for download, modified and used by other researchers and WEC developers.

  8. Health Belief Model Scale for Human Papilloma Virus and its Vaccination: Adaptation and Psychometric Testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guvenc, Gulten; Seven, Memnun; Akyuz, Aygul

    2016-06-01

    To adapt and psychometrically test the Health Belief Model Scale for Human Papilloma Virus (HPV) and Its Vaccination (HBMS-HPVV) for use in a Turkish population and to assess the Human Papilloma Virus Knowledge score (HPV-KS) among female college students. Instrument adaptation and psychometric testing study. The sample consisted of 302 nursing students at a nursing school in Turkey between April and May 2013. Questionnaire-based data were collected from the participants. Information regarding HBMS-HPVV and HPV knowledge and descriptive characteristic of participants was collected using translated HBMS-HPVV and HPV-KS. Test-retest reliability was evaluated and Cronbach α was used to assess internal consistency reliability, and exploratory factor analysis was used to assess construct validity of the HBMS-HPVV. The scale consists of 4 subscales that measure 4 constructs of the Health Belief Model covering the perceived susceptibility and severity of HPV and the benefits and barriers. The final 14-item scale had satisfactory validity and internal consistency. Cronbach α values for the 4 subscales ranged from 0.71 to 0.78. Total HPV-KS ranged from 0 to 8 (scale range, 0-10; 3.80 ± 2.12). The HBMS-HPVV is a valid and reliable instrument for measuring young Turkish women's beliefs and attitudes about HPV and its vaccination. Copyright © 2015 North American Society for Pediatric and Adolescent Gynecology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Examining item-position effects in large-scale assessment using the Linear Logistic Test Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    CHRISTINE HOHENSINN

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available When administering large-scale assessments, item-position effects are of particular importance because the applied test designs very often contain several test booklets with the same items presented at different test positions. Establishing such position effects would be most critical; it would mean that the estimated item parameters do not depend exclusively on the items’ difficulties due to content but also on their presentation positions. As a consequence, item calibration would be biased. By means of the linear logistic test model (LLTM, item-position effects can be tested. In this paper, the results of a simulation study demonstrating how LLTM is indeed able to detect certain position effects in the framework of a large-scale assessment are presented first. Second, empirical item-position effects of a specific large-scale competence assessment in mathematics (4th grade students are analyzed using the LLTM. The results indicate that a small fatigue effect seems to take place. The most important consequence of the given paper is that it is advisable to try pertinent simulation studies before an analysis of empirical data takes place; the reason is, that for the given example, the suggested Likelihood-Ratio test neither holds the nominal type-I-risk, nor qualifies as “robust”, and furthermore occasionally shows very low power.

  10. Violent wave impacts on vertical and inclined walls: Large scale model tests

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Obhrai, C.; Bullock, G.; Wolters, G.

    2005-01-01

    New data is presented from large scale model tests where combined measurements of wave pressure and aeration have been made on the front of a vertical and an inclined wall. The shape of the breaking wave was found to have a significant effect on the distribution of the wave impact pressures...... on the wall. The characteristics of violent wave impacts are discussed and related to the impulse on the structure....

  11. 1:50 Scale Testing of Three Floating Wind Turbines at MARIN and Numerical Model Validation Against Test Data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dagher, Habib [Univ. of Maine, Orno, ME (United States); Viselli, Anthony [Univ. of Maine, Orno, ME (United States); Goupee, Andrew [Univ. of Maine, Orno, ME (United States); Allen, Christopher [Univ. of Maine, Orno, ME (United States)

    2017-08-15

    The primary goal of the basin model test program discussed herein is to properly scale and accurately capture physical data of the rigid body motions, accelerations and loads for different floating wind turbine platform technologies. The intended use for this data is for performing comparisons with predictions from various aero-hydro-servo-elastic floating wind turbine simulators for calibration and validation. Of particular interest is validating the floating offshore wind turbine simulation capabilities of NREL’s FAST open-source simulation tool. Once the validation process is complete, coupled simulators such as FAST can be used with a much greater degree of confidence in design processes for commercial development of floating offshore wind turbines. The test program subsequently described in this report was performed at MARIN (Maritime Research Institute Netherlands) in Wageningen, the Netherlands. The models considered consisted of the horizontal axis, NREL 5 MW Reference Wind Turbine (Jonkman et al., 2009) with a flexible tower affixed atop three distinct platforms: a tension leg platform (TLP), a spar-buoy modeled after the OC3 Hywind (Jonkman, 2010) and a semi-submersible. The three generic platform designs were intended to cover the spectrum of currently investigated concepts, each based on proven floating offshore structure technology. The models were tested under Froude scale wind and wave loads. The high-quality wind environments, unique to these tests, were realized in the offshore basin via a novel wind machine which exhibits negligible swirl and low turbulence intensity in the flow field. Recorded data from the floating wind turbine models included rotor torque and position, tower top and base forces and moments, mooring line tensions, six-axis platform motions and accelerations at key locations on the nacelle, tower, and platform. A large number of tests were performed ranging from simple free-decay tests to complex operating conditions with

  12. S-2 stage 1/25 scale model base region thermal environment test. Volume 1: Test results, comparison with theory and flight data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadunas, J. A.; French, E. P.; Sexton, H.

    1973-01-01

    A 1/25 scale model S-2 stage base region thermal environment test is presented. Analytical results are included which reflect the effect of engine operating conditions, model scale, turbo-pump exhaust gas injection on base region thermal environment. Comparisons are made between full scale flight data, model test data, and analytical results. The report is prepared in two volumes. The description of analytical predictions and comparisons with flight data are presented. Tabulation of the test data is provided.

  13. Method of Harmonic Balance in Full-Scale-Model Tests of Electrical Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorbatenko, N. I.; Lankin, A. M.; Lankin, M. V.

    2017-01-01

    Methods for determining the weber-ampere characteristics of electrical devices, one of which is based on solution of direct problem of harmonic balance and the other on solution of inverse problem of harmonic balance by the method of full-scale-model tests, are suggested. The mathematical model of the device is constructed using the describing function and simplex optimization methods. The presented results of experimental applications of the method show its efficiency. The advantage of the method is the possibility of application for nondestructive inspection of electrical devices in the processes of their production and operation.

  14. Rotor scale model tests for power conversion unit of GT-MHR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baxi, C.B., E-mail: baxicb1130@hotmail.com [General Atomics, P.O. Box 85608, San Diego, CA 92186-5608 (United States); Telengator, A.; Razvi, J. [General Atomics, P.O. Box 85608, San Diego, CA 92186-5608 (United States)

    2012-10-15

    The gas turbine modular helium reactor (GT-MHR) combines a modular high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) nuclear heat source with a closed Brayton gas-turbine cycle power conversion unit (PCU) for thermal to electric energy conversion. The PCU has a vertical orientation and is supported on electromagnetic bearings (EMB). The rotor scale model (RSM) tests are intended to directly model the control of EMB and rotor dynamic characteristics of the full-scale GT-MHR turbo-machine (TM). The objectives of the RSM tests are to: Bullet Confirm the EMB control system design for the GT-MHR turbo machine over the full-range of operation. Bullet Confirm the redundancy and on-line maintainability features that have been specified for the EMBs. Bullet Provide a benchmark for validation of analytical tools that will be used for independent analyses of the EMB subsystem design. Bullet Provide experience with the installation, operation and maintenance of EMBs supporting multiple rotors with flexible couplings. As with the full-scale TM, the RSM incorporates two rotors that are joined by a flexible coupling. Each of the rotors is supported on one axial and two radial EMBs. Additional devices, similar in concept to radial EMBs, are installed to simulate magnetic and/or mechanical forces representing those that would be seen by the exciter, generator, compressors and turbine. Overall, the lengths of the RSM rotor is about 1/3rd that of the full-scale TM, while the diameters are approximately 1/5th scale. The design and sizing of the rotor is such that the number and values of critical speeds in the RSM are the same as in the full-scale TM. The EMBs are designed such that their response to rotor dynamic forces is representative of the full-scale TM. The fabrication and assembly of the RSM was completed at the end of 2008. All start up adjustments were finished in December 2009. To-date the generator rotor has been supported in the EMBs and rotated up to 1800 rpm. Final tests are

  15. Attitude Scales an Congeneric Tests: A Re-Examination of an Attitude-Behavior Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alwin, Duane F.

    1976-01-01

    A structural equation model for attitude-behavior relationships is presented which conceptualizes attitude scales as congeneric measurements. The model represents a re-parameterization of an earlier one. (Author/RC)

  16. SCALE Modeling of Selected Neutronics Test Problems within the OECD UAM LWR’s Benchmark

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luigi Mercatali

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The OECD UAM Benchmark was launched in 2005 with the objective of determining the uncertainty in the simulation of Light Water Reactors (LWRs system calculations at all the stages of the coupled reactor physics—thermal hydraulics modeling. Within the framework of the “Neutronics Phase” of the Benchmark the solutions of some selected test cases at the cell physics and lattice physics levels are presented. The SCALE 6.1 code package has been used for the neutronics modeling of the selected exercises. Sensitivity and Uncertainty analysis (S/U based on the generalized perturbation theory has been performed in order to assess the uncertainty of the computation of some selected reactor integral parameters due to the uncertainty in the basic nuclear data. As a general trend, it has been found that the main sources of uncertainty are the 238U (n, and the 239Pu nubar for the UOX- and the MOX-fuelled test cases, respectively. Moreover, the reference solutions for the test cases obtained using Monte Carlo methodologies together with a comparison between deterministic and stochastic solutions are presented.

  17. Evaluation of Test Methods for Triaxially Braided Composites using a Meso-Scale Finite Element Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Chao

    2015-10-01

    The characterization of triaxially braided composite is complicate due to the nonuniformity of deformation within the unit cell as well as the possibility of the freeedge effect related to the large size of the unit cell. Extensive experimental investigation has been conducted to develop more accurate test approaches in characterizing the actual mechanical properties of the material we are studying. In this work, a meso-scale finite element model is utilized to simulate two complex specimens: notched tensile specimen and tube tensile specimen, which are designed to avoid the free-edge effect and free-edge effect induced premature edge damage. The full field strain data is predicted numerically and compared with experimental data obtained by Digit Image Correlation. The numerically predicted tensile strength values are compared with experimentally measured results. The discrepancy between numerically predicted and experimentally measured data, the capability of different test approaches are analyzed and discussed. The presented numerical model could serve as assistance to the evaluation of different test methods, and is especially useful in identifying potential local damage events.

  18. Plot-scale testing and sensitivity analysis of Be7 based soil erosion conversion models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Alex; Abdelli, Wahid; Barri, Bashar Al; Iurian, Andra; Gaspar, Leticia; Mabit, Lionel; Millward, Geoff; Ryken, Nick; Blake, Will

    2016-04-01

    Over the past 2 decades, a growing number of studies have recognised the potential for short-lived cosmogenic Be-7 (half-life 53 days) to be used as a tracer to evaluate soil erosion from short-term inter-rill erosion to hillslope sediment budgets. While conversion modelling approaches are now established for event-scale and extended-time-series applications, there is a lack of validation and sensitivity analysis to underpin confidence in their use across a full range of agro-climatic zones. This contribution aims to close this gap in the context of the maritime temperate climate of southwest UK. Two plots of 4 x 35 m were ploughed and tilled at the beginning of winter 2013/2014 in southwest UK to create (1) a bare, sloped soil surface and (2) a bare flat reference site. The bounded lower edge of the plot fed into a collection bin for overland flow and associated sediment. The tilled surface had a low bulk density and high permeability at the start of the experiment (ksat > 100 mm/hr). Hence, despite high rainfall in December (200 mm), notable overland flow was observed only after intense rain storms during late 2013 and early January 2014 when the soil profile was saturated i.e. driven by Saturation Overland Flow (SOF). At the time of SOF initiation, ca. 70% of the final Be-7 inventory had been delivered to the site. Subsequent to a series SOF events across a 1 month period, the plot soil surface was intensively sampled to quantify Be-7 inventory patterns and develop a tracer budget. Captured eroded sediment was dried, weighed and analysed for Be-7. All samples were analysed for particle size by laser granulometry. Be-7 inventory data were converted to soil erosion estimates using (1) standard profile distribution model, (2) the extended time series distribution model and (3) a new 'antecedent rainfall' extended time series model to account for lack of soil erosion prior to soil saturation. Results were scaled up to deliver a plot-scale sediment budget to include

  19. Allometric Scaling and Resource Limitations Model of Tree Heights: Part 3. Model Optimization and Testing over Continental China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiliang Ni

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The ultimate goal of our multi-article series is to demonstrate the Allometric Scaling and Resource Limitation (ASRL approach for mapping tree heights and biomass. This third article tests the feasibility of the optimized ASRL model over China at both site (14 meteorological stations and continental scales. Tree heights from the Geoscience Laser Altimeter System (GLAS waveform data are used for the model optimizations. Three selected ASRL parameters (area of single leaf, α; exponent for canopy radius, η; and root absorption efficiency, γ are iteratively adjusted to minimize differences between the references and predicted tree heights. Key climatic variables (e.g., temperature, precipitation, and solar radiation are needed for the model simulations. We also exploit the independent GLAS and in situ tree heights to examine the model performance. The predicted tree heights at the site scale are evaluated against the GLAS tree heights using a two-fold cross validation (RMSE = 1.72 m; R2 = 0.97 and bootstrapping (RMSE = 4.39 m; R2 = 0.81. The modeled tree heights at the continental scale (1 km spatial resolution are compared to both GLAS (RMSE = 6.63 m; R2 = 0.63 and in situ (RMSE = 6.70 m; R2 = 0.52 measurements. Further, inter-comparisons against the existing satellite-based forest height maps have resulted in a moderate degree of agreements. Our results show that the optimized ASRL model is capable of satisfactorily retrieving tree heights over continental China at both scales. Subsequent studies will focus on the estimation of woody biomass after alleviating the discussed limitations.

  20. Testing of Subgrid—Scale Stress Models by Using Results from Direct Numerical SImulations

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HongruiGONG

    1998-01-01

    The most commonly used dynamic subgrid models,Germano's model and dynamic kinetic energy model,and their base models-the Smagorinsky model and the kinetic energy model,were tested using results from direct numerical simulations of various turbulent flows.In germano's dynamic model,the model coefficient was treated as a constant within the test filter,This treatment is conceptually inconsistent.An iteration procedure was proposed to calculate the model coefficient and an improved correlation coefficient was found.

  1. Physical capability scale: psychometric testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Resnick, Barbara; Boltz, Marie; Galik, Elizabeth; Wells, Chris

    2013-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe the psychometric testing of the Basic Physical Capability Scale. The study was a secondary data analysis of combined data sets from three studies. Study participants included 93 older adults, recruited from 2 acute-care settings and 110 older adults living in long-term care facilities. Rasch analysis was used for the testing of the measurement model. There was some support for construct validity based on the fit of the items to the scale across both samples. In addition, there was support for hypothesis testing as physical function was significantly associated with physical capability. There was evidence for internal consistency (Alpha coefficients of .77-.83) and interrater reliability based on an intraclass correlation of .81. This study provided preliminary support for the reliability and validity of the Basic Physical Capability Scale, and guidance for scale revisions and continued use.

  2. Test models for estimating radiation balance in different scales for Jaboticabal, SP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valquíria de Alencar Beserra

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The net radiation (Rn in agroecosystems is the amount of energy that is available in the environment to heating processes of living organisms, air and soil; perspiration of animals and plants; photosynthesis and water evaporation. The Rn defines the type of climate and weather conditions prevailing in a region affecting the availability and thermal water, the fundamental understanding of genotype-environment, which ultimately determine the productivity of the agricultural system. Rn usually is used in models of weather and climate studies. The sustainability and economic viability of zootechnical activity is dependent on the positive interaction between animal and environment. Environmental factors such as water, shading, thermal exchanges sensible heat (conduction, convection and radiation skin and latent heat losses (evaporation and transpiration, conditioned by Rn, must be managed to provide the best results. The present study was conducted to develop and test models for accurate and precise radiation balance on the scales daily, monthly and seasonal ten-day for Jaboticabal - SP, due to the importance of estimates of net radiation for agricultural activities. We used daily meteorological data from weather station located in Jaboticabal, SP (coordinates: 21 ° 14'05 "South, 48 ° 17'09" West, 615m altitude at Universidade Estadual Paulista "Júlio Mesquita Filho" - FCAV/UNESP in a situation of default grass "Bahiagrass" during the period 20/08/2005 to 20/01/2012. The data used were the maximum temperature (Tmax, minimum (Tmin and mean (TMED; maximum relative humidity (URMáx, minimum (URMín and average (URMéd precipitation (mm, average velocity (m/s, Qo, solar radiation (MJ m-2, sunshine (hour meter (MJ m², soil temperature at two depths (Tsoil2CM, Tsoil5CM and class A pan evaporation (TCA (mm. The measures taken by the balance radiometer were taken as a reference to test other models. The models tested were those reported by NORMAN et al

  3. Testing gravity on Large Scales

    OpenAIRE

    Raccanelli Alvise

    2013-01-01

    We show how it is possible to test general relativity and different models of gravity via Redshift-Space Distortions using forthcoming cosmological galaxy surveys. However, the theoretical models currently used to interpret the data often rely on simplifications that make them not accurate enough for precise measurements. We will discuss improvements to the theoretical modeling at very large scales, including wide-angle and general relativistic corrections; we then show that for wide and deep...

  4. Mathematical modeling and full-scale shaking table tests for multi-curve buckling restrained braces

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    C. S. Tsai; Yungchang Lin; Wenshin Chen; H. C. Su

    2009-01-01

    Buckling restrained braces (BRBs) have been widely applied in seismic mitigation since they were introduced in the 1970s. However, traditional BRBs have several disadvantages caused by using a steel tube to envelope the mortar to prevent the core plate from buckling, such as: complex interfaces between the materials used, uncertain precision, and time consumption during the manufacturing processes. In this study, a new device called the multi-curve buckling restrained brace (MC-BRB) is proposed to overcome these disadvantages. The new device consists of a core plate with multiple neck portions assembled to form multiple energy dissipation segments, and the enlarged segment, lateral support elements and constraining elements to prevent the BRB from buckling. The enlarged segment located in the middle of the core plate can be welded to the lateral support and constraining elements to increase buckling resistance and to prevent them from sliding during earthquakes. Component tests and a series of shaking table tests on a full-scale steel structure equipped with MC-BRBs were carried out to investigate the behavior and capability of this new BRB design for seismic mitigation. The experimental results illustrate that the MC-BRB possesses a stable mechanical behavior under cyclic loadings and provides good protection to structures during earthquakes. Also, a mathematical model has been developed to simulate the mechanical characteristics of BRBs.

  5. The Continued Need for Modeling and Scaled Testing to Advance the Hanford Tank Waste Mission

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peurrung, Loni M.; Fort, James A.; Rector, David R.

    2013-09-03

    Hanford tank wastes are chemically complex slurries of liquids and solids that can exhibit changes in rheological behavior during retrieval and processing. The Hanford Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) recently abandoned its planned approach to use computational fluid dynamics (CFD) supported by testing at less than full scale to verify the design of vessels that process these wastes within the plant. The commercial CFD tool selected was deemed too difficult to validate to the degree necessary for use in the design of a nuclear facility. Alternative, but somewhat immature, CFD tools are available that can simulate multiphase flow of non-Newtonian fluids. Yet both CFD and scaled testing can play an important role in advancing the Hanford tank waste mission—in supporting the new verification approach, which is to conduct testing in actual plant vessels; in supporting waste feed delivery, where scaled testing is ongoing; as a fallback approach to design verification if the Full Scale Vessel Testing Program is deemed too costly and time-consuming; to troubleshoot problems during commissioning and operation of the plant; and to evaluate the effects of any proposed changes in operating conditions in the future to optimize plant performance.

  6. Ditching Tests of a 1/20-Scale Model of the Northrop B-35 Airplane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, Lloyd J.

    1948-01-01

    Tests of a 1/20-scale dynamically similar model of the Northrop B-35 airplane were made to study its ditching characteristics. The model was ditched in calm water at the Langley tank no. 2 monorail. Various landing attitudes, speeds,and conditions of damage were simulated during the investigation. The ditching characteristics were determined by visual observation and from motion-picture records and time-history acceleration records. Both longitudinal and lateral accelerations were measured. Results are given in tabular form and time-history acceleration curves and sequence photographs are presented. Conclusions based on the model investigation are as follows: 1. The best ditching of the B-35 airplane probably can be made by contacting the water in a near normal landing attitude of about 9 deg with the landing flaps full down so as to have a low horizontal speed. 2. The airplane usually will turn or yaw but the motion will not be violent. The maximum lateral acceleration will be about 2g. 3. If the airplane does not turn or yaw immediately after landing, it probably will trim up and then make a smooth run or porpoise slightly. The maximum longitudinal decelerations that will be encountered are about 6g or 7g. 4. Although the decelerations are not indicated to be especially large, the construction of the airplane is such that extensive damage is to be expected, and it probably will be difficult to find ditching stations where crew members can adequately brace themselves and be reasonably sure of avoiding a large inrush of water.

  7. Small-scale Rainfall Challenges Tested with Semi-distributed and Distributed Hydrological Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ichiba, Abdellah; Tchiguirinskaia, Ioulia; Gires, Auguste; Schertzer, Daniel; Bompard, Philippe

    2016-04-01

    Nowadays, there is a growing interest on small-scale rainfall information, provided by weather radars, to be used in urban water management and decision-making. Indeed, it helps to better understand the essential interactions between natural and man-made urban environments, both being complex systems. However the integration of this information in hydrological models remains a big challenge. In fact, urban water managers often rely on lumped or semi-distributed models with much coarser data resolution. The scope of this work is to investigate the sensitivity of two hydrological models to small-scale rainfall, and their potential improvements to integrate wholly the small-scale information. The case study selected to perform this study is a small urban catchment (245 ha), located at Val-de-Marne county (southeast of Paris, France). Investigations were conducted using either CANOE model, a semi-distributed conceptual model that is widely used in France for urban modeling, or a fully distributed and physically based model, Multi-Hydro, developed at Ecole des Ponts ParisTech (www hmco-dev.enpc.fr/Tools-Training/Tools/Multi-Hydro.php). Initially, in CANOE model the catchment was divided into 9 sub-catchments with size ranging from 1ha to 76ha. A refinement process was conduced in the framework of this investigation in order to improve the model resolution by considering higher number of smaller sub-catchments. The new configuration consists of 44 sub-catchments with size ranging from 1ha-14ha. The Multi-Hydro modeling approach consists on rasterizing the catchment information to a regular spatial grid of a resolution chosen by the user. Each pixel is then affected by specific information, e.g., a unique land type per pixel, for which hydrological and physical properties are set. First of all, both models were validated with respect to real flow measurements using three types of rainfall data: (1) point measurement data coming form the Sucy-en-Brie rain gauge; (2) Meteo

  8. An Analysis of Cross Racial Identity Scale Scores Using Classical Test Theory and Rasch Item Response Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sussman, Joshua; Beaujean, A. Alexander; Worrell, Frank C.; Watson, Stevie

    2013-01-01

    Item response models (IRMs) were used to analyze Cross Racial Identity Scale (CRIS) scores. Rasch analysis scores were compared with classical test theory (CTT) scores. The partial credit model demonstrated a high goodness of fit and correlations between Rasch and CTT scores ranged from 0.91 to 0.99. CRIS scores are supported by both methods.…

  9. Testing gravity on Large Scales

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raccanelli Alvise

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available We show how it is possible to test general relativity and different models of gravity via Redshift-Space Distortions using forthcoming cosmological galaxy surveys. However, the theoretical models currently used to interpret the data often rely on simplifications that make them not accurate enough for precise measurements. We will discuss improvements to the theoretical modeling at very large scales, including wide-angle and general relativistic corrections; we then show that for wide and deep surveys those corrections need to be taken into account if we want to measure the growth of structures at a few percent level, and so perform tests on gravity, without introducing systematic errors. Finally, we report the results of some recent cosmological model tests carried out using those precise models.

  10. Comparison of contact stresses of the test tyres used by the one third scale model mobile load simulator (MMLS3) and the full-scale test tyres of the Heavy Vehicle Simulator (HVS) - a summary

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    De Beer, Morris

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper summarises the results of a study in which the maximum vertical contact stressess of the one third scale test tyres of the Model Mobile Load Simulator (MMLS3) were compared with those measured for three types of full-scale test tyres...

  11. Ware Star - Scale 1:40 model test, test report 2; Wave Star - Skala 1:40 modelforsoeg, forsoegsrapport 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kramer, M.; Lykke Andersen, Thomas

    2005-01-01

    This report describes model tests with the wave energy converter Wave Star carried out at Aalborg University. This report succeeds to reports presenting numerical calculations. The objective of the tests presented in this report is to determine and optimize the Wave Star concept's power uptake for different physical configurations of the converter. (BA)

  12. Design Optimization for a Truncated Catenary Mooring System for Scale Model Test

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Climent Molins

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available One of the main aspects when testing floating offshore platforms is the scaled mooring system, particularly with the increased depths where such platforms are intended. The paper proposes the use of truncated mooring systems to emulate the real mooring system by solving an optimization problem. This approach could be an interesting option when the existing testing facilities do not have enough available space. As part of the development of a new spar platform made of concrete for Floating Offshore Wind Turbines (FOWTs, called Windcrete, a station keeping system with catenary shaped lines was selected. The test facility available for the planned experiments had an important width constraint. Then, an algorithm to optimize the design of the scaled truncated mooring system using different weights of lines was developed. The optimization process adjusts the quasi-static behavior of the scaled mooring system as much as possible to the real mooring system within its expected maximum displacement range, where the catenary line provides the restoring forces by its suspended line length.

  13. Modeling responses and response times in personality tests with rating scales

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jochen Ranger

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available In this article several latent trait models for the joint distribution of the responses and response times in rating scales are compared. Among these models are two generalizations of established models for binary items, namely a generalization of the approach of Ferrando and Lorenzo-Seva (2007a and a generalization of the approach of Ranger and Ortner (2011. Two new models and a variant of the hierarchical model of van der Linden (2007 are also considered. All these models combine the graded response model with a response time model based on the log-normal distribu-tion. The models differ in the assumed relationship between the expected log response time and the underlying latent traits. Although the proposed models have different interpretations and implications they can all be calibrated within the same general framework using marginal maximum likelihood estimation and an application of the ECM-algorithm. The models are used for the analysis of an empirical data set. According to the AIC index, the generalization of the model of Ranger and Ortner (2011 can represent the data best.

  14. Testing cosmological models with large-scale power modulation using microwave background polarization observations

    CERN Document Server

    Bunn, Emory F; Zheng, Haoxuan

    2016-01-01

    We examine the degree to which observations of large-scale cosmic microwave background (CMB) polarization can shed light on the puzzling large-scale power modulation in maps of CMB anisotropy. We consider a phenomenological model in which the observed anomaly is caused by modulation of large-scale primordial curvature perturbations, and calculate Fisher information and error forecasts for future polarization data, constrained by the existing CMB anisotropy data. Because a significant fraction of the available information is contained in correlations with the anomalous temperature data, it is essential to account for these constraints. We also present a systematic approach to finding a set of normal modes that maximize the available information, generalizing the well-known Karhunen-Loeve transformation to take account of the constraints from the temperature data. A polarization map covering at least $\\sim 60\\%$ of the sky should be able to provide a $3\\sigma$ detection of modulation at the level favored by the...

  15. Developing and testing a global-scale regression model to quantify mean annual streamflow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbarossa, Valerio; Huijbregts, Mark A. J.; Hendriks, A. Jan; Beusen, Arthur H. W.; Clavreul, Julie; King, Henry; Schipper, Aafke M.

    2017-01-01

    Quantifying mean annual flow of rivers (MAF) at ungauged sites is essential for assessments of global water supply, ecosystem integrity and water footprints. MAF can be quantified with spatially explicit process-based models, which might be overly time-consuming and data-intensive for this purpose, or with empirical regression models that predict MAF based on climate and catchment characteristics. Yet, regression models have mostly been developed at a regional scale and the extent to which they can be extrapolated to other regions is not known. In this study, we developed a global-scale regression model for MAF based on a dataset unprecedented in size, using observations of discharge and catchment characteristics from 1885 catchments worldwide, measuring between 2 and 106 km2. In addition, we compared the performance of the regression model with the predictive ability of the spatially explicit global hydrological model PCR-GLOBWB by comparing results from both models to independent measurements. We obtained a regression model explaining 89% of the variance in MAF based on catchment area and catchment averaged mean annual precipitation and air temperature, slope and elevation. The regression model performed better than PCR-GLOBWB for the prediction of MAF, as root-mean-square error (RMSE) values were lower (0.29-0.38 compared to 0.49-0.57) and the modified index of agreement (d) was higher (0.80-0.83 compared to 0.72-0.75). Our regression model can be applied globally to estimate MAF at any point of the river network, thus providing a feasible alternative to spatially explicit process-based global hydrological models.

  16. The restricted stochastic user equilibrium with threshold model: Large-scale application and parameter testing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Thomas Kjær; Nielsen, Otto Anker; Watling, David P.

    2017-01-01

    -pairs, and comparisons are performed with respect to a previously proposed RSUE model as well as an existing link-based mixed Multinomial Probit (MNP) SUE model. The results show that the RSUET has very attractive computation times for large-scale applications and demonstrate that the threshold addition to the RSUE...... highlight that the RSUET outperforms the MNP SUE in terms of convergence, calculation time and behavioural realism. The choice set composition is validated by using 16,618 observed route choices collected by GPS devices in the same network and observing their reproduction within the equilibrated choice sets...

  17. A novel Online-to-Offline (O2O model for pre-exposure prophylaxis and HIV testing scale up

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tarandeep Anand

    2017-01-01

    Conclusions: Adam’s Love O2O model is highly effective in linking online at-risk MSM and TG to PrEP and HIV testing services, and has high potential to be replicated and scaled up in other settings with high Internet penetration among key populations.

  18. Microfluidic very large scale integration (VLSI) modeling, simulation, testing, compilation and physical synthesis

    CERN Document Server

    Pop, Paul; Madsen, Jan

    2016-01-01

    This book presents the state-of-the-art techniques for the modeling, simulation, testing, compilation and physical synthesis of mVLSI biochips. The authors describe a top-down modeling and synthesis methodology for the mVLSI biochips, inspired by microelectronics VLSI methodologies. They introduce a modeling framework for the components and the biochip architecture, and a high-level microfluidic protocol language. Coverage includes a topology graph-based model for the biochip architecture, and a sequencing graph to model for biochemical application, showing how the application model can be obtained from the protocol language. The techniques described facilitate programmability and automation, enabling developers in the emerging, large biochip market. · Presents the current models used for the research on compilation and synthesis techniques of mVLSI biochips in a tutorial fashion; · Includes a set of "benchmarks", that are presented in great detail and includes the source code of several of the techniques p...

  19. a Numerical Test of Kpz Scaling:. Potts Models Coupled to Two-Dimensional Quantum Gravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baillie, C. F.; Johnston, D. A.

    We perform Monte-Carlo simulations using the Wolff cluster algorithm of the q=2 (Ising), 3, 4 and q=10 Potts models on dynamical phi-cubed graphs of spherical topology with up to 5000 nodes. We find that the measured critical exponents are in reasonable agreement with those from the exact solution of the Ising model and with those calculated from KPZ scaling for q=3, 4 where no exact solution is available. Using Binder’s cumulant we find that the q=10 Potts model displays a first order phase transition on a dynamical graph, as it does on a fixed lattice. We also examine the internal geometry of the graphs generated in the simulation, finding a linear relationship between ring length probabilities and the central charge of the Potts model.

  20. A Numerical Test of KPZ Scaling Potts Models Coupled to Two-Dimensional Quantum Gravity

    CERN Document Server

    Baillie, C F

    1992-01-01

    We perform Monte Carlo simulations using the Wolff cluster algorithm of the q=2 (Ising), 3, 4 and q=10 Potts models on dynamical phi-cubed graphs of spherical topology with up to 5000 nodes. We find that the measured critical exponents are in reasonable agreement with those from the exact solution of the Ising model and with those calculated from KPZ scaling for q=3,4 where no exact solution is available. Using Binder's cumulant we find that the q=10 Potts model displays a first order phase transition on a dynamical graph, as it does on a fixed lattice. We also examine the internal geometry of the graphs generated in the simulation, finding a linear relationship between ring length probabilities and the central charge of the Potts model

  1. Fermi Observations of Resolved Large-Scale Jets: Testing the IC/CMB Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breiding, Peter; Meyer, Eileen T.; Georganopoulos, Markos

    2017-01-01

    It has been observed with the Chandra X-ray Observatory since the early 2000s that many powerful quasar jets show X-ray emission on the kpc scale (Harris & Krawczynski, 2006). In many cases these X-rays cannot be explained by the extension of the radio-optical spectrum produced by synchrotron emitting electrons in the jet, since the observed X-ray flux is too high and the X-ray spectral index too hard. A widely accepted model for the X-ray emission first proposed by Celotti et al. 2001 and Tavecchio et al. 2000 posits that the X-rays are produced when relativistic electrons in the jet up-scatter ambient cosmic microwave background (CMB) photons via inverse Compton scattering from microwave to X-ray energies (the IC/CMB model). However, explaining the X-ray emission for these jets with the IC/CMB model requires high levels of IC/CMB γ-ray emission (Georganopoulos et al., 2006), which we are looking for using the FERMI/LAT γ-ray space telescope. Another viable model for the large scale jet X-ray emission favored by the results of Meyer et al. 2015 and Meyer & Georganopoulos 2014 is an alternate population of synchrotron emitting electrons. In contrast with the second synchrotron interpretation; the IC/CMB model requires jets with high kinetic powers which can exceed the Eddington luminsoity (Dermer & Atoyan 2004 and Atoyan & Dermer 2004) and be very fast on the kpc scale with a Γ~10 (Celotti et al. 2001 and Tavecchio et al. 2000). New results from data obtained with the Fermi/LAT will be shown for several quasars not in the Fermi/LAT 3FGL catalog whose large scale X-ray jets are attributed to IC/CMB. Additionally, recent work on the γ-ray bright blazar AP Librae will be shown which helps to constrain some models attempting to explain the high energy component of its SED, which extends from X-ray to TeV energies (e.g., Zacharias & Wagner 2016 & Petropoulou et al. 2016).

  2. Large-scale groundwater modeling using global datasets: a test case for the Rhine-Meuse basin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. H. Sutanudjaja

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available The current generation of large-scale hydrological models does not include a groundwater flow component. Large-scale groundwater models, involving aquifers and basins of multiple countries, are still rare mainly due to a lack of hydro-geological data which are usually only available in developed countries. In this study, we propose a novel approach to construct large-scale groundwater models by using global datasets that are readily available. As the test-bed, we use the combined Rhine-Meuse basin that contains groundwater head data used to verify the model output. We start by building a distributed land surface model (30 arc-second resolution to estimate groundwater recharge and river discharge. Subsequently, a MODFLOW transient groundwater model is built and forced by the recharge and surface water levels calculated by the land surface model. Results are promising despite the fact that we still use an offline procedure to couple the land surface and MODFLOW groundwater models (i.e. the simulations of both models are separately performed. The simulated river discharges compare well to the observations. Moreover, based on our sensitivity analysis, in which we run several groundwater model scenarios with various hydro-geological parameter settings, we observe that the model can reasonably well reproduce the observed groundwater head time series. However, we note that there are still some limitations in the current approach, specifically because the offline-coupling technique simplifies the dynamic feedbacks between surface water levels and groundwater heads, and between soil moisture states and groundwater heads. Also the current sensitivity analysis ignores the uncertainty of the land surface model output. Despite these limitations, we argue that the results of the current model show a promise for large-scale groundwater modeling practices, including for data-poor environments and at the global scale.

  3. Lord-Wingersky Algorithm Version 2.0 for Hierarchical Item Factor Models with Applications in Test Scoring, Scale Alignment, and Model Fit Testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Li

    2015-06-01

    Lord and Wingersky's (Appl Psychol Meas 8:453-461, 1984) recursive algorithm for creating summed score based likelihoods and posteriors has a proven track record in unidimensional item response theory (IRT) applications. Extending the recursive algorithm to handle multidimensionality is relatively simple, especially with fixed quadrature because the recursions can be defined on a grid formed by direct products of quadrature points. However, the increase in computational burden remains exponential in the number of dimensions, making the implementation of the recursive algorithm cumbersome for truly high-dimensional models. In this paper, a dimension reduction method that is specific to the Lord-Wingersky recursions is developed. This method can take advantage of the restrictions implied by hierarchical item factor models, e.g., the bifactor model, the testlet model, or the two-tier model, such that a version of the Lord-Wingersky recursive algorithm can operate on a dramatically reduced set of quadrature points. For instance, in a bifactor model, the dimension of integration is always equal to 2, regardless of the number of factors. The new algorithm not only provides an effective mechanism to produce summed score to IRT scaled score translation tables properly adjusted for residual dependence, but leads to new applications in test scoring, linking, and model fit checking as well. Simulated and empirical examples are used to illustrate the new applications.

  4. Ice-Accretion Test Results for Three Large-Scale Swept-Wing Models in the NASA Icing Research Tunnel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broeren, Andy P.; Potapczuk, Mark G.; Lee, Sam; Malone, Adam M.; Paul, Benard P., Jr.; Woodard, Brian S.

    2016-01-01

    Icing simulation tools and computational fluid dynamics codes are reaching levels of maturity such that they are being proposed by manufacturers for use in certification of aircraft for flight in icing conditions with increasingly less reliance on natural-icing flight testing and icing-wind-tunnel testing. Sufficient high-quality data to evaluate the performance of these tools is not currently available. The objective of this work was to generate a database of ice-accretion geometry that can be used for development and validation of icing simulation tools as well as for aerodynamic testing. Three large-scale swept wing models were built and tested at the NASA Glenn Icing Research Tunnel (IRT). The models represented the Inboard (20% semispan), Midspan (64% semispan) and Outboard stations (83% semispan) of a wing based upon a 65% scale version of the Common Research Model (CRM). The IRT models utilized a hybrid design that maintained the full-scale leading-edge geometry with a truncated afterbody and flap. The models were instrumented with surface pressure taps in order to acquire sufficient aerodynamic data to verify the hybrid model design capability to simulate the full-scale wing section. A series of ice-accretion tests were conducted over a range of total temperatures from -23.8 deg C to -1.4 deg C with all other conditions held constant. The results showed the changing ice-accretion morphology from rime ice at the colder temperatures to highly 3-D scallop ice in the range of -11.2 deg C to -6.3 deg C. Warmer temperatures generated highly 3-D ice accretion with glaze ice characteristics. The results indicated that the general scallop ice morphology was similar for all three models. Icing results were documented for limited parametric variations in angle of attack, drop size and cloud liquid-water content (LWC). The effect of velocity on ice accretion was documented for the Midspan and Outboard models for a limited number of test cases. The data suggest that

  5. CO2 Absorption in a Lab-Scale Fixed Solid Bed Reactor: Modelling and Experimental Tests

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberto Gabbrielli

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available The CO2 absorption in a lab-scale fixed solid bed reactor filled with different solid sorbents has been studied under different operative conditions regarding temperature (20-200°C and input gas composition (N2, O2, CO2, H2O at 1bar pressure. The gas leaving the reactor has been analysed to measure the CO2 and O2 concentrations and, consequently, to evaluate the overall CO2 removal efficiency. In order to study the influence of solid sorbent type (i.e. CaO, coal bottom ash, limestone and blast furnace slag and of mass and heat transfer processes on CO2 removal efficiency, a one-dimensional time dependent mathematical model of the reactor, which may be considered a Plug Flow Reactor, has been developed. The quality of the model has been confirmed using the experimental results.

  6. Willingness to pay and size of health benefit: an integrated model to test for 'sensitivity to scale'.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeung, Raymond Y T; Smith, Richard D; McGhee, Sarah M

    2003-09-01

    A key theoretical prediction concerning willingness to pay is that it is positively correlated with benefit size and is assessed by testing the 'sensitivity to scale (scope)'. 'External' (between-sample) sensitivity tests are usually regarded as less powerful than 'internal' (within-subject) tests. However, the latter may suffer from 'anchoring' effects. This paper studies the statistical power of these tests by questioning the distributional assumption of empirical data. We present an integrated model to capture both internal and external variations, while controlling for sample heterogeneity, applied to data from a survey estimating the value of reducing symptom-days. Results indicate that once data is properly transformed, WTP becomes 'scale sensitive' and consistent with diminishing marginal utility theory.

  7. Modelling and operation strategies of DLR's large scale thermocline test facility (TESIS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Odenthal, Christian; Breidenbach, Nils; Bauer, Thomas

    2017-06-01

    In this work an overview of the TESIS:store thermocline test facility and its current construction status will be given. Based on this, the TESIS:store facility using sensible solid filler material is modelled with a fully transient model, implemented in MATLAB®. Results in terms of the impact of filler site and operation strategies will be presented. While low porosity and small particle diameters for the filler material are beneficial, operation strategy is one key element with potential for optimization. It is shown that plant operators have to ponder between utilization and exergetic efficiency. Different durations of the charging and discharging period enable further potential for optimizations.

  8. Modelling and Testing of Wave Dragon Wave Energy Converter Towards Full Scale Deployment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Parmeggiani, Stefano

    -commercial stage in which it has proven difficult to secure the necessary funding for the deployment of a full-scale demonstrator unit. The work presented aims at easing this process, by increasing public and scientific knowledge of the device, as well as by showing the latest progress in its development. Research....... This is mainly due to the development of an updated overtopping model specifically suited to Wave Dragon, which allows greater quality to predictions of the primary energy absorption of the device compared to previous versions. At the same time an equitable approach has been described and used in the performance......, the research has also provided a deeper insight into the physics of the overtopping process by individually assessing the influence of related device configuration and wave features, which goes beyond the present application and may be used for other overtopping WECs as well. Comprehensive analysis...

  9. The beliefs about paranoia scale: confirmatory factor analysis and tests of a metacognitive model of paranoia in a clinical sample

    OpenAIRE

    Murphy, Elizabeth K.; Tully, Sarah; Pyle, Melissa; Gumley, Andrew I.; Kingdon, David; Schwannauer, Matthias; Turkington, Douglas; Morrison, Anthony P.

    2017-01-01

    This study aimed to confirm the factor structure of the Beliefs about Paranoia Scale (BaPS), a self-report measure to assess metacognitive beliefs about paranoia, and to test hypotheses of a metacognitive model. We hypothesised that positive and negative beliefs about paranoia would be associated with severity of suspiciousness, and that the co-occurrence of positive and negative beliefs would be associated with increased suspiciousness. A total of 335 patients meeting criteria for a schizoph...

  10. The Acoustic Results of a United Technologies Scale Model Helicopter Rotor Tested at DNW

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-05-01

    Annual Forum of the Amer- Germany (Refs. 3,4). It was this ’ benchmark ’ test ican Helicopter Society, Washington, DC May 1990 which led to the...The au- 2. Schmitz, F.H., Boxwell , DA., Lewy, S., and Da- thors would like to offer sincere thanks to their friends han, C., "A Note on the Generel...W.R., Schultz, K.J., Schmitz, F.H., ing for their contributions made in acquiring the data and Boxwell ,D.A.,"Model Rotor High Speed Im- presented in

  11. Interacting dark energy models in Cosmology and large-scale structure observational tests

    CERN Document Server

    Marcondes, Rafael J F

    2016-01-01

    Modern Cosmology offers us a great understanding of the universe with striking precision, made possible by the modern technologies of the newest generations of telescopes. The standard cosmological model, however, is not absent of theoretical problems and open questions. One possibility that has been put forward is the existence of a coupling between dark sectors. The idea of an interaction between the dark components could help physicists understand why we live in an epoch of the universe where dark matter and dark energy are comparable in terms of energy density, which can be regarded as a coincidence given that their time evolutions are completely different. We introduce the interaction phenomenologically and proceed to test models of interaction with observations of redshift-space distortions. In a flat universe composed only of those two fluids, we consider separately two forms of interaction, through terms proportional to the densities of both dark energy and dark matter. An analytic expression for the ...

  12. The Large Scale Bias of Dark Matter Halos: Numerical Calibration and Model Tests

    CERN Document Server

    Tinker, Jeremy L; Kravtsov, Andrey V; Klypin, Anatoly; Warren, Michael S; Yepes, Gustavo; Gottlober, Stefan

    2010-01-01

    We measure the clustering of dark matter halos in a large set of collisionless cosmological simulations of the flat LCDM cosmology. Halos are identified using the spherical overdensity algorithm, which finds the mass around isolated peaks in the density field such that the mean density is Delta times the background. We calibrate fitting functions for the large scale bias that are adaptable to any value of Delta we examine. We find a ~6% scatter about our best fit bias relation. Our fitting functions couple to the halo mass functions of Tinker et. al. (2008) such that bias of all dark matter is normalized to unity. We demonstrate that the bias of massive, rare halos is higher than that predicted in the modified ellipsoidal collapse model of Sheth, Mo, & Tormen (2001), and approaches the predictions of the spherical collapse model for the rarest halos. Halo bias results based on friends-of-friends halos identified with linking length 0.2 are systematically lower than for halos with the canonical Delta=200 o...

  13. Crack propagation monitoring in a full-scale aircraft fatigue test based on guided wave-Gaussian mixture model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Lei; Yuan, Shenfang; Bao, Qiao; Mei, Hanfei; Ren, Yuanqiang

    2016-05-01

    For aerospace application of structural health monitoring (SHM) technology, the problem of reliable damage monitoring under time-varying conditions must be addressed and the SHM technology has to be fully validated on real aircraft structures under realistic load conditions on ground before it can reach the status of flight test. In this paper, the guided wave (GW) based SHM method is applied to a full-scale aircraft fatigue test which is one of the most similar test status to the flight test. To deal with the time-varying problem, a GW-Gaussian mixture model (GW-GMM) is proposed. The probability characteristic of GW features, which is introduced by time-varying conditions is modeled by GW-GMM. The weak cumulative variation trend of the crack propagation, which is mixed in time-varying influence can be tracked by the GW-GMM migration during on-line damage monitoring process. A best match based Kullback-Leibler divergence is proposed to measure the GW-GMM migration degree to reveal the crack propagation. The method is validated in the full-scale aircraft fatigue test. The validation results indicate that the reliable crack propagation monitoring of the left landing gear spar and the right wing panel under realistic load conditions are achieved.

  14. Earthquake simulator tests and associated study of an 1/6-scale nine-story RC model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sun Jingjiang; Wang Tao; Qi Hu

    2007-01-01

    Earthquake simulator tests of a 1/6-scale nine-story reinforced concrete frame-wall model are described in the paper. The test results and associated numerical simulation are summarized and discussed. Based on the test data,a relationship between maximum inter-story drift and damage state is established. Equations of variation of structural characteristics (natural frequency and equivalent stiffness) with overall drifts are derived by data fitting, which can be used to estimate structural damage state if structural characteristics can be measured. A comparison of the analytical and experimental results show that both the commonly used equivalent beam and fiber element models can simulate the nonlinear seismic response of structures very well. Finally, conclusions associated with seismic design and damage evaluation of RC structures are presented.

  15. Testing the Universality of the TIS Model on Cluster Scales from the X-ray Surface Brightness Profiles

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    The truncated isothermal sphere (TIS) model has been recently suggested as an alternative for virialized dark halos (Shapiro et al. 1999). Both its profound theoretical motivation and its successful explanations for the galactic rotation curves and the gravitational scaling laws of clusters indicate that the TIS model is a promising candidate among other prevailing models such as the NFW profile and the Burkert profile. This promotes us to re-examine the universality of the TIS model on cluster scales from a different angle. Using an ensemble of X-ray surface brightness profiles of 45 clusters, we test the goodness of fit of the TIS predicted gas distributions to the X-ray data under the assumption of isothermal, hydrostatic equilibrium. Unlike the conventional β model or the NFW/Burkert profile, for which about half of the clusters have the reduced x2v values smaller than 2,the TIS model fails in the fitting of the X-ray surface brightness profiles of clusters in the sense that 38 out of the 45 clusters show x2v > 2. This may constitute a challenge for the universality of the TIS model unless the present analysis is seriously contaminated by other uncertainties including the negligence of non-gravitational heating processes and the unconventional sampling of the X-ray data.

  16. Study on dynamic response of embedded long span corrugated steel culverts using scaled model shaking table tests and numerical analyses

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    A series of scaled-model shaking table tests and its simulation analyses using dynamic finite element method were performed to clarify the dynamic behaviors and the seismic stability of embedded corrugated steel culverts due to strong earthquakes like the 1995 Hyogoken-nanbu earthquake. The dynamic strains of the embedded culvert models and the seismic soil pressure acting on the models due to sinusoidal and random strong motions were investigated. This study verified that the corrugated culvert model was subjected to dynamic horizontal forces (lateral seismic soil pressure) from the surrounding ground,which caused the large bending strains on the structure; and that the structures do not exceed the allowable plastic deformation and do not collapse completely during strong earthquake like Hyogoken-nanbu earthquake. The results obtained are useful for design and construction of embedded long span corrugated steel culverts in seismic regions.

  17. Modeling the thermal-hydrologic processes in a large-scale underground heater test in partially saturated fractured tuff

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birkholzer, J. T.; Tsang, Y. W.

    2000-02-01

    The Drift Scale Test (DST) is being conducted in an underground facility at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, to probe the coupled thermal, hydrological, mechanical, and chemical processes likely to occur in the fractured rock mass around a potential high-level nuclear waste repository. Thermal-hydrological processes in the DST have been simulated using a three-dimensional numerical model. The model incorporates the realistic test configuration and all available site-specific measurements pertaining to the thermal and hydrological properties of the unsaturated fractured tuff of the test block. The modeled predictions were compared to the extensive set of measured data collected in the first year of this 8-year-long test. The mean error between the predictions and measurement at 12 months of heating for over 1600 temperature sensors is about 2°C. Heat-pipe signature in the temperature data, indicating two-phase regions of liquid-vapor counterflow, is seen in both the measurements and simulated results. The redistribution of moisture content in the rock mass (resulting from vaporization and condensation) was probed by periodic air-injection testing and geophysical measurements. Good agreement also occurred between the model predictions and these measurements. The general agreement between predictions from the numerical simulations and the measurements of the thermal test indicates that our fundamental understanding of the coupled thermal-hydrologic processes at Yucca Mountain is sound. However, effects of spatial heterogeneity from discrete fractures that are observed in the temperature data are not matched by simulations from the numerical model, which treat the densely spaced fractures as a continuum.

  18. Tests and Analyses of 1/4-Scale Upgraded Nine-Bay Reinforced Concrete Basement Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-05-01

    cylindrical steel bins, each having a 23-foot OD and a 22- "-." foot 10-inch ID, that contain the test media and test structures. A test chamber consists of...Figure 4.4 Punching shear at interior column. 78 Fiue45 Psts6iwo prdn oun in fat pate odel JigV Figue 46 Copresed edgs infla plae mdel est 2,:,..79 IA

  19. Large Scale Model Test Investigation on Wave Run-Up in Irregular Waves at Slender Piles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ramirez, Jorge Robert Rodriguez; Frigaard, Peter; Andersen, Thomas Lykke

    2013-01-01

    from high speed video recordings. Based on the measured run-up heights different types of prediction formulae for run-up in irregular waves were evaluated. In conclusion scale effects on run-up levels seems small except for differences in spray. However, run-up of individual waves is difficult...

  20. Performance test results of mock-up model test facility with a full-scale reaction tube for HTTR hydrogen production system. Contract research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Inagaki, Yoshiyuki; Hayashi, Koji; Kato, Michio [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Oarai, Ibaraki (Japan). Oarai Research Establishment] [and others

    2003-03-01

    Research on a hydrogen production system by steam reforming of methane, chemical reaction; CH{sub 4} + H{sub 2}O {yields} 3H{sub 2}O + CO, has been carried out to couple with the HTTR for establishment of high-temperature nuclear heat utilization technology and contribution to hydrogen energy society in future. The mock-up test facility with a full-scale reaction tube test facility, a model simulating one reaction tube of a steam reformer of the HTTR hydrogen production system in full scale, was fabricated to perform tests on controllability, hydrogen production performance etc. under the same pressure and temperature conditions as those of the HTTR hydrogen production system. The design and fabrication of the test facility started from 1997, and the all components were installed until September in 2001. In a performance test conducted from October in 2001 to February in 2002, performance of each component was examined and hydrogen of 120m{sup 3}{sub N}/h was successfully produced with high-temperature helium gas. This report describes the performance test results on components performance, hydrogen production characteristics etc., and main troubles and countermeasures. (author)

  1. Wind Tunnel Testing of a 120th Scale Large Civil Tilt-Rotor Model in Airplane and Helicopter Modes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theodore, Colin R.; Willink, Gina C.; Russell, Carl R.; Amy, Alexander R.; Pete, Ashley E.

    2014-01-01

    In April 2012 and October 2013, NASA and the U.S. Army jointly conducted a wind tunnel test program examining two notional large tilt rotor designs: NASA's Large Civil Tilt Rotor and the Army's High Efficiency Tilt Rotor. The approximately 6%-scale airframe models (unpowered) were tested without rotors in the U.S. Army 7- by 10-foot wind tunnel at NASA Ames Research Center. Measurements of all six forces and moments acting on the airframe were taken using the wind tunnel scale system. In addition to force and moment measurements, flow visualization using tufts, infrared thermography and oil flow were used to identify flow trajectories, boundary layer transition and areas of flow separation. The purpose of this test was to collect data for the validation of computational fluid dynamics tools, for the development of flight dynamics simulation models, and to validate performance predictions made during conceptual design. This paper focuses on the results for the Large Civil Tilt Rotor model in an airplane mode configuration up to 200 knots of wind tunnel speed. Results are presented with the full airframe model with various wing tip and nacelle configurations, and for a wing-only case also with various wing tip and nacelle configurations. Key results show that the addition of a wing extension outboard of the nacelles produces a significant increase in the lift-to-drag ratio, and interestingly decreases the drag compared to the case where the wing extension is not present. The drag decrease is likely due to complex aerodynamic interactions between the nacelle and wing extension that results in a significant drag benefit.

  2. Allometric Scaling and Resource Limitations Model of Tree Heights: Part 1. Model Optimization and Testing over Continental USA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramakrishna R. Nemani

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A methodology to generate spatially continuous fields of tree heights with an optimized Allometric Scaling and Resource Limitations (ASRL model is reported in this first of a multi-part series of articles. Model optimization is performed with the Geoscience Laser Altimeter System (GLAS waveform data. This methodology is demonstrated by mapping tree heights over forested lands in the continental USA (CONUS at 1 km spatial resolution. The study area is divided into 841 eco-climatic zones based on three forest types, annual total precipitation classes (30 mm intervals and annual average temperature classes (2 °C intervals. Three model parameters (area of single leaf, α, exponent for canopy radius, η, and root absorption efficiency, γ were selected for optimization, that is, to minimize the difference between actual and potential tree heights in each of the eco-climatic zones over the CONUS. Tree heights predicted by the optimized model were evaluated against GLAS heights using a two-fold cross validation approach (R2 = 0.59; RMSE = 3.31 m. Comparison at the pixel level between GLAS heights (mean = 30.6 m; standard deviation = 10.7 and model predictions (mean = 30.8 m; std. = 8.4 were also performed. Further, the model predictions were compared to existing satellite-based forest height maps. The optimized ASRL model satisfactorily reproduced the pattern of tree heights over the CONUS. Subsequent articles in this series will document further improvements with the ultimate goal of mapping tree heights and forest biomass globally.

  3. Mechanistic Model for Ash Deposit Formation in Biomass Suspension-Fired Boilers. Part 2: Model Verification by Use of Full Scale Tests

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Stine Broholm; Jensen, Peter Arendt; Jappe Frandsen, Flemming

    2017-01-01

    describes particle sticking or rebound by a combination of the description of (visco)elsatic particles impacting a solid surface and particle capture by a viscous surface. The model is used to predict deposit formation rates measured during tests conducted with probes in full-scale suspension-fired biomass...... of some physical parameters related to the description of surface capture are suggested. Based on these examinations of the model ability to describe observed deposit formation rates, the proposed model can be regarded as a promising tool for description of deposit formation in full-scale biomass......A model for deposit formation in suspension firing of biomass has been developed. The model describes deposit build-up by diffusion and subsequent condensation of vapors, thermoforesis of aerosols, convective diffusion of small particles, impaction of large particles and reaction. The model...

  4. Electrochromic Radiator Coupon Level Testing and Full Scale Thermal Math Modeling for Use on Altair Lunar Lander

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bannon, Erika T.; Bower, Chad E.; Sheth, Rubik; Stephan, Ryan

    2010-01-01

    In order to control system and component temperatures, many spacecraft thermal control systems use a radiator coupled with a pumped fluid loop to reject waste heat from the vehicle. Since heat loads and radiation environments can vary considerably according to mission phase, the thermal control system must be able to vary the heat rejection. The ability to "turn down" the heat rejected from the thermal control system is critically important when designing the system. Electrochromic technology as a radiator coating is being investigated to vary the amount of heat rejected by a radiator. Coupon level tests were performed to test the feasibility of this technology. Furthermore, thermal math models were developed to better understand the turndown ratios required by full scale radiator architectures to handle the various operation scenarios encountered during a mission profile for the Altair Lunar Lander. This paper summarizes results from coupon level tests as well as the thermal math models developed to investigate how electrochromics can be used to increase turn down ratios for a radiator. Data from the various design concepts of radiators and their architectures are outlined. Recommendations are made on which electrochromic radiator concept should be carried further for future thermal vacuum testing.

  5. Interacting dark energy models in Cosmology and large-scale structure observational tests

    OpenAIRE

    Rafael José França Marcondes

    2016-01-01

    Modern Cosmology offers us a great understanding of the universe with striking precision, made possible by the modern technologies of the newest generations of telescopes. The standard cosmological model, however, is not absent of theoretical problems and open questions. One possibility that has been put forward is the existence of a coupling between dark sectors. The idea of an interaction between the dark components could help physicists understand why we live in an epoch of the universe wh...

  6. The Infrared Nuclear Emission of Seyfert Galaxies on Parsec Scales: Testing the Clumpy Torus models

    CERN Document Server

    Almeida, Cristina Ramos; Espinosa, Jose Miguel Rodriguez; Herrero, Almudena Alonso; Ramos, Andres Asensio; Radomski, James T; Packham, Chris; Fisher, R Scott; Telesco, Charles M

    2009-01-01

    We present subarcsecond resolution mid-infrared (mid-IR) photometry in the wavelength range from 8 to 20 micron of eighteen Seyfert galaxies, reporting high spatial resolution nuclear fluxes for the entire sample. We construct spectral energy distributions (SEDs) that the AGN dominates adding near-IR measurements from the literature at similar angular resolution. The IR SEDs of intermediate-type Seyferts are flatter and present higher 10 to 18 micron ratios than those of Seyfert 2. We fit the individual SEDs with clumpy torus models using the in-house-developed BayesClumpy tool. The models reproduce the high spatial resolution measurements. Regardless of the Seyfert type, even with high spatial resolution data, near- to mid-IR SED fitting poorly constrains the radial extent of the torus. For the Seyfert 2, we find that edge-on geometries are more probable than face-on views, with a number of clouds along equatorial rays of N = 5-15. The 10 micron silicate feature is generally modeled in shallow absorption. Fo...

  7. Hierarchical Multiscale Framework for Materials Modeling: Advances in Scale-Bridging Applied to a Taylor Anvil Impact Test of RDX

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnes, Brian; Leiter, Kenneth; Becker, Richard; Knap, Jaroslaw; Brennan, John

    As part of a multiscale modeling effort, we present progress on a challenge in continuum-scale modeling: the direct incorporation of complex molecular-level processes in the constitutive evaluation. In this initial phase of the research we use a concurrent scale-bridging approach, with a hierarchical multiscale framework running in parallel to couple a particle-based model (the ''lower scale'') computing the equation of state (EOS) to the constitutive response in a finite-element multi-physics simulation (the ''upper scale''). The lower scale simulations of 1,3,5-trinitroperhydro-1,3,5-triazine (RDX) use a force-matched coarse-grain model and dissipative particle dynamics methods, and the upper scale simulation is of a Taylor anvil impact experiment. Results emphasize use of adaptive sampling (via dynamic kriging) that accelerates time to solution, and its comparison to fully ''on the fly'' runs. Work towards inclusion of a fully reactive EOS is also discussed.

  8. The Beliefs about Paranoia Scale: Confirmatory factor analysis and tests of a metacognitive model of paranoia in a clinical sample.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Elizabeth K; Tully, Sarah; Pyle, Melissa; Gumley, Andrew I; Kingdon, David; Schwannauer, Matthias; Turkington, Douglas; Morrison, Anthony P

    2017-02-01

    This study aimed to confirm the factor structure of the Beliefs about Paranoia Scale (BaPS), a self-report measure to assess metacognitive beliefs about paranoia, and to test hypotheses of a metacognitive model. We hypothesised that positive and negative beliefs about paranoia would be associated with severity of suspiciousness, and that the co-occurrence of positive and negative beliefs would be associated with increased suspiciousness. A total of 335 patients meeting criteria for a schizophrenia spectrum disorder completed the BaPS, the Positive and Negative Syndromes Scale (PANSS), and the Psychotic Symptom Rating Scales (PSYRATS). Confirmatory factor analysis verified that the three BaPS subscales (negative beliefs about paranoia, paranoia as a survival strategy, and normalizing beliefs) were an adequate fit of the data. Ordinal regression showed that positive beliefs about paranoia as a survival strategy and negative beliefs were both associated with severity of suspiciousness. This was the first study to show that the co-occurrence of positive and negative beliefs was associated with increased suspiciousness. All hypotheses were confirmed, suggesting that a metacognitive approach has utility for the conceptualization of paranoia. Clinical implications suggest a role for metacognitive therapy, including strategies such as detached mindfulness and worry postponement.

  9. Genome-Scale Models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bergdahl, Basti; Sonnenschein, Nikolaus; Machado, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    An introduction to genome-scale models, how to build and use them, will be given in this chapter. Genome-scale models have become an important part of systems biology and metabolic engineering, and are increasingly used in research, both in academica and in industry, both for modeling chemical pr...

  10. Ditching Tests of a 1/10-Scale Model of the North American XFJ-1 Airplane Ted No. NACA 314

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, Lloyd J.; McBride, Ellis E.

    1948-01-01

    Tests were made of a 1/10-scale dynamically similar model of the North American XFJ-1 airplane to study its behavior when ditched. The model was landed in calm water at the Langley tank no. 2 monorail. Various landing attitudes, speeds, and conditions of damage were simulated. The behavior of the model was determined from visual observations, by recording the accelerations, and by taking motion pictures of the ditchings. Data are presented in tabular form, sequence photographs, and time-history acceleration curves. From the results of the tests it was concluded that the airplane should be ditched at the near-stall, tail-down landing attitude of 12 deg. The flaps should be fully extended to obtain the lowest possible landing speed. The wing-tip tanks should be jettisoned if any appreciable load of fuel remains; if empty, they should be retained for additional buoyancy. In a calm-water ditching the airplane will probably run about 600 feet Maximum longitudinal decelerations of about 2.5g and maximum vertical acceleration of about 2g will be encountered. The nose-intake duct will be clear of the water until practically all forward motion has stopped.

  11. EXPERIMENTAL ESTIMATION OF A SCALING EXPONENT FOR TIP VORTEX CAVITATION VIA ITS INCEPTION TEST IN FULL-AND MODEL-SHIP

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LEE Jeung-Hoon; JUNG Jae-Kwon; LEE Kyung-Jun; HAN Jae-Moon; PARK Hyung-Gil; SEO Jong-Soo

    2012-01-01

    Tip vortex cavitation noise of marine propeller became primary concerns to reduce hazardous environmental impacts from commercial ship or to keep the underwater surveillance of naval ships.The investigations of the tip vortex and its induced noise are normally conducted through the model test in a water cavitation tunnel.However the Reynolds number of model-test is much smaller than that of the full-scale,which subsequently results in the difference of tip vortex cavitation inception.Hence,the scaling law between model- and full-scales needs to be identified prior to the prediction and assessment of propeller noise in full scale.From previous researches,it is generally known that the incipient caivtation number of tip vortex can be represented as a power of the Reynolds number.However,the power exponent for scaling,which is the main focus of this research,has not been clearly studied yet.This paper deals with the estimation of scaling exponent based on tip vortex cavitation inception test in both full- and model-scale ships.Acoustical measurements as well as several kind of signal processing technique for an inception criterion suggest the scaling exponent as 0.30.The scaling value proposed in this study shows slight difference to the one of most recent research.Besides,extrapolation of model-ship noise measurement using the proposed one predicts the full-scale noise measurement with an acceptable discrepancy.

  12. Full scale lightning test technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walko, L. C.; Schneider, J. G.

    1980-01-01

    A test technique was developed for applying a full scale mean value (30 kiloampere peak) simulated lightning return stroke current on a complete flight ready aircraft to assess the threat of lightning to aircraft electrical circuits. A computer-aided generator design was used to establish the parameters of the test system. Data from previous work done on development of low inductance current paths determined the basic system configuration.

  13. Validation and Simulation of Ares I Scale Model Acoustic Test - 3 - Modeling and Evaluating the Effect of Rainbird Water Deluge Inclusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strutzenberg, Louise L.; Putman, Gabriel C.

    2011-01-01

    The Ares I Scale Model Acoustics Test (ASMAT) is a series of live-fire tests of scaled rocket motors meant to simulate the conditions of the Ares I launch configuration. These tests have provided a well documented set of high fidelity measurements useful for validation including data taken over a range of test conditions and containing phenomena like Ignition Over-Pressure and water suppression of acoustics. Building on dry simulations of the ASMAT tests with the vehicle at 5 ft. elevation (100 ft. real vehicle elevation), wet simulations of the ASMAT test setup have been performed using the Loci/CHEM computational fluid dynamics software to explore the effect of rainbird water suppression inclusion on the launch platform deck. Two-phase water simulation has been performed using an energy and mass coupled lagrangian particle system module where liquid phase emissions are segregated into clouds of virtual particles and gas phase mass transfer is accomplished through simple Weber number controlled breakup and boiling models. Comparisons have been performed to the dry 5 ft. elevation cases, using configurations with and without launch mounts. These cases have been used to explore the interaction between rainbird spray patterns and launch mount geometry and evaluate the acoustic sound pressure level knockdown achieved through above-deck rainbird deluge inclusion. This comparison has been anchored with validation from live-fire test data which showed a reduction in rainbird effectiveness with the presence of a launch mount.

  14. International Symposia on Scale Modeling

    CERN Document Server

    Ito, Akihiko; Nakamura, Yuji; Kuwana, Kazunori

    2015-01-01

    This volume thoroughly covers scale modeling and serves as the definitive source of information on scale modeling as a powerful simplifying and clarifying tool used by scientists and engineers across many disciplines. The book elucidates techniques used when it would be too expensive, or too difficult, to test a system of interest in the field. Topics addressed in the current edition include scale modeling to study weather systems, diffusion of pollution in air or water, chemical process in 3-D turbulent flow, multiphase combustion, flame propagation, biological systems, behavior of materials at nano- and micro-scales, and many more. This is an ideal book for students, both graduate and undergraduate, as well as engineers and scientists interested in the latest developments in scale modeling. This book also: Enables readers to evaluate essential and salient aspects of profoundly complex systems, mechanisms, and phenomena at scale Offers engineers and designers a new point of view, liberating creative and inno...

  15. Revisiting the factorial validity of the Revised UCLA Loneliness Scale: a test of competing models in a sample of teachers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dussault, Marc; Fernet, Claude; Austin, Stéphanie; Leroux, Mathieu

    2009-12-01

    Over the years, various studies addressing different populations have consistently raised concerns about the unidimensionality of the Revised UCLA Loneliness Scale. In the present study, the factorial structure of the scale was examined by comparing it to alternative models. In a sample of 1,157 French Canadian teachers, results of confirmatory factor analysis support a three-factor model solution. Support for the invariance of this model across sexes and teaching levels (i.e., elementary and high school) was also obtained.

  16. Testing a Model of Planck-Scale Quantum Geometry With Broadband Correlation of Colocated 40m Interferometers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McCuller, Lee Patrick [Univ. of Chicago, IL (United States)

    2015-12-01

    The Holometer is designed to test for a Planck diffractive-scaling uncertainty in long-baseline position measurements due to an underlying noncommutative geometry normalized to relate Black hole entropy bounds of the Holographic principle to the now-finite number of position states. The experiment overlaps two independent 40 meter optical Michelson interferometers to detect the proposed uncertainty as a common broadband length fluctuation. 150 hours of instrument cross-correlation data are analyzed to test the prediction of a correlated noise magnitude of $7\\times10^{−21}$ m/$\\sqrt{\\rm Hz}$ with an effective bandwidth of 750kHz. The interferometers each have a quantum-limited sensitivity of $2.5\\times 10^{−18}$ m/$\\sqrt{\\rm Hz}$, but their correlation with a time-bandwidth product of $4\\times 10^{11}$ digs between the noise floors in search for the covarying geometric jitter. The data presents an exclusion of 5 standard deviations for the tested model. This exclusion is defended through analysis of the calibration methods for the instrument as well as further sub shot noise characterization of the optical systems to limit spurious background-correlations from undermining the signal.

  17. Ditching Tests of a 1/18-Scale Model of the Lockheed Constellation Airplane with Speedpak Attached

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, Lloyd J.; Thompson, William C.

    1949-01-01

    Results of previous model ditching tests of the Lockheed Constellation airplane are reported. Further model tests have been made to determine the probable ditching characteristics and the proper ditching technique for the airplane with the Speedpak attached. This paper presents the results of these tests. Design information was furnished by the Lockheed Aircraft Corporation. A three-vies drawing of the airplane with the Speedpak attached is shown. The tests were made in calm water at the Langley tank no.2 monorail.

  18. SMALL SCALE MORPHODYNAMICAL MODELLING

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    D. Ditschke; O. Gothel; H. Weilbeer

    2001-01-01

    Long term morphological simulations using complete coupled models lead to very time consuming computations. Latteux (1995) presented modelling techniques developed for tidal current situations in order to reduce the computational effort. In this paper the applicability of such methods to small scale problems is investigated. It is pointed out that these methods can be transferred to small scale problems using the periodicity of the vortex shedding process.

  19. DECOVALEX III PROJECT. Thermal-Chemical Modeling of the Yucca Mountain Project Drift Scale Test. Task 2D Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Datta, Robin N. [Bechtel SAlC Company, Las Vegas (US)] (comp.)

    2005-02-15

    Task 2D concerns numerical simulation of the coupled THC modeling of the DST test at Yucca mountain, with given results for geologic, thermal, hydrologic, mineralogic and petrologic characterization, as-built configuration of the test block of DST, including locations of various sensors and measuring instruments and the plans for heating and cooling, including expected heater powers at various times, and compared with geochemical measurements performed on gas, water, and mineral samples collected from the DST. Two teams of DOE/LBNL (USA) and JNC (Japan) participated the task with different approaches. The LBNL model represented the fractures and rock matrix by a dual-continuum concept, with the mineral-water-gas reactions treated by primarily kinetic and a few equilibrium reactions. The JNC model represented the fractures and matrix as a single effective continuum, with equilibrium mineral-water reactions controlling the chemical evolution (as well as considering aqueous species transport). The JNC team performed the coupled THC simulation of the Yucca Mountain Drift Scale Test by the coupled THM code 'THAMES', mass transport code 'Dtransu' and geochemical code 'PHREEQE' under coupling system code 'COUPLYS'. The LBNL team simulated the THC processes include coupling between heat, water, and vapor flow; aqueous and gaseous species transport; kinetic and equilibrium mineral-water reactions; and feedback of mineral precipitation/dissolution on porosity, permeability, and capillary pressure, with the FDM code TOUGHREACT V3.0. In general, both models capture the temperature evolution in the rock fairly well, although the JNC model yielded a closer match to the initial temperature rise in the rock, probably due to the better site-specific thermal data. Both models showed the contrasting solubility effects of increasing temperature on calcite and silica solubility; yet the dual continuum approach better represented the effects of

  20. Experimental Evaluation for the Microvibration Performance of a Segmented PC Method Based High Technology Industrial Facility Using 1/2 Scale Test Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sijun Kim

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The precast concrete (PC method used in the construction process of high technology industrial facilities is limited when applied to those with greater span lengths, due to the transport length restriction (maximum length of 15~16 m in Korea set by traffic laws. In order to resolve this, this study introduces a structural system with a segmented PC system, and a 1/2 scale model with a width of 9000 mm (hereafter Segmented Model is manufactured to evaluate vibration performance. Since a real vibrational environment cannot be reproduced for vibration testing using a scale model, a comparative analysis of their relative performances is conducted in this study. For this purpose, a 1/2 scale model with a width of 7200 mm (hereafter Nonsegmented Model of a high technology industrial facility is additionally prepared using the conventional PC method. By applying the same experiment method for both scale models and comparing the results, the relative vibration performance of the Segmented Model is observed. Through impact testing, the natural frequencies of the two scale models are compared. Also, in order to analyze the estimated response induced by the equipment, the vibration responses due to the exciter are compared. The experimental results show that the Segmented Model exhibits similar or superior performances when compared to the Nonsegmented Model.

  1. Modal analysis of measurements from a large-scale VIV model test of a riser in linearly sheared flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lie, H.; Kaasen, K. E.

    2006-05-01

    Large-scale model testing of a tensioned steel riser in well-defined sheared current was performed at Hanøytangen outside Bergen, Norway in 1997. The length of the model was 90 m and the diameter was 3 cm. The aim of the present work is to look into this information and try to improve the understanding of vortex-induced vibrations (VIV) for cases with very high order of responding modes, and in particular to study if and under which circumstances the riser motions would be single-mode or multi-mode. The measurement system consisted of 29 biaxial gauges for bending moment. The signals are processed to yield curvature and displacement and further to identify modes of vibration. A modal approach is used successfully employing a combination of signal filtering and least-squares fitting of precalculated mode-shapes. As a part of the modal analysis, it is demonstrated that the equally spaced instrumentation limited the maximum mode number to be extracted to be equal to the number of instrumentation locations. This imposed a constraint on the analysis of in-line (IL) vibration, which occurs at higher frequencies and involves higher modes than cross-flow (CF). The analysis has shown that in general the riser response was irregular (i.e. broad-banded) and that the degree of irregularity increases with the flow speed. In some tests distinct spectral peaks could be seen, corresponding to a dominating mode. No occurrences of single-mode (lock-in) were seen. The IL response is more broad-banded than the CF response and contains higher frequencies. The average value of the displacement r.m.s over the length of the riser is computed to indicate the magnitude of VIV motion during one test. In the CF direction the average displacement is typically 1/4 of the diameter, almost independent of the flow speed. For the IL direction the values are in the range 0.05 0.08 of the diameter. The peak frequency taken from the spectra of the CF displacement at riser midpoint show approximately

  2. Testing an astronomically-based decadal-scale empirical harmonic climate model versus the IPCC (2007) general circulation climate models

    CERN Document Server

    Scafetta, Nicola

    2012-01-01

    We compare the performance of a recently proposed empirical climate model based on astronomical harmonics against all available general circulation climate models (GCM) used by the IPCC (2007) to interpret the 20th century global surface temperature. The proposed model assumes that the climate is resonating with, or synchronized to a set of natural harmonics that have been associated to the solar system planetary motion, mostly determined by Jupiter and Saturn. We show that the GCMs fail to reproduce the major decadal and multidecadal oscillations found in the global surface temperature record from 1850 to 2011. On the contrary, the proposed harmonic model is found to well reconstruct the observed climate oscillations from 1850 to 2011, and it is able to forecast the climate oscillations from 1950 to 2011 using the data covering the period 1850-1950, and vice versa. The 9.1-year cycle is shown to be likely related to a decadal Soli/Lunar tidal oscillation, while the 10-10.5, 20-21 and 60-62 year cycles are sy...

  3. Aerodynamic and Acoustic Tests of a 1/15 Scale Model Dry Cooled Jet Aircraft Runup Noise Suppression System,

    Science.gov (United States)

    1975-10-01

    has. This required that the model utilize a fiberglass lin!ng (Owens Corning PF-105) having much finer fibers than the full-scale liner, so that the...shut downi in the exhaust room for nearly all runs and soinewhat lai er in the burner room for approximately every second ran. ’or all playback

  4. Impact of air traffic emissions on airport air quality. Multi-scale modeling, test bed and field measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramaroson, R.; Vuillot, F.; Durand, Y.; Courbet, B.; Janin, F.; Copalle, A.; Guin, C.; Paux, E.; Vannier, F.; Talbaut, M.; Weill, M.

    2004-12-01

    Air traffic emissions are playing a significant role in airport air quality. Engine emissions contribute to the ozone and PM formation. There is an emergence of a need to develop advanced numerical tools and airport emission databases for air pollution studies. Field monitoring at airports necessary to support model assessment is still limited in time and space. The French ONERA AIRPUR project has focused on three objectives: emission inventories; dispersion models; field measurements. Results are presented and discussed in this paper. The ground spatial distribution of LTO emissions using realistic aircraft trajectories, aircraft-engine classification by ICAO, fuel flow methodology and diurnal variations of fleet number, is presented and discussed. Exhaust species time evolution is simulated using a chemical-dispersion model. Results show high emissions of NOx during LTO, and a maximum of CO and Hydrocarbons during taxi. Depending on seasons, the NOx lifetime is varying differently; lower concentration is calculated far away from LTO emissions. Longer-lived pollutants such as ozone are formed downstream and require the use of advanced dispersion models. For this reason, two interactive models coupling the micro and the regional scales are developed and used in this work. A 3D CFD model (CEDRE) simulates the flow characteristics around buildings and the dispersion of emissions. CEDRE boundary conditions are provided by the 3D nested dispersion model MEDIUM/MM5, which includes a surface boundary layer chemistry and calculates the concentration of pollutants from the local to the airport vicinities. The CFD results show a tracer accumulation calculated downstream beside terminals, consistent with observations at some mega-airports. Sensibility studies are conducted to highlight the impact of emissions on ozone formation with MEDIUM. Results show that longer-lived species are produced downstream, their concentration depending on NOx, aromatics and VOC released by

  5. The latent structure of loneliness: testing competing factor models of the UCLA Loneliness Scale in a large adolescent sample.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shevlin, Mark; Murphy, Siobhan; Murphy, Jamie

    2015-04-01

    This study assessed the dimensional structure of the UCLA Loneliness Scale ([UCLA-LS], UCLA-3). Data from the Northern Ireland Young Life and Times Survey (2011), a survey of 1,434 16-year-olds, was used to examine the underlying factor structure of the scale. Confirmatory factor analysis was employed to compare alternative factor analytical models that can inform the scoring of the measure and determine the degree to which different factors provided unique predictive utility. Fit statistics indicated that the best fitting model comprised three correlated factors: Isolation, Related Connectedness, and Collective Connectedness. These findings were consistent with previous findings that identified the multidimensional nature of the UCLA-LS. The study also found evidence that the subscales were differentially associated with psychiatric morbidity as measured by the General Health Questionnaire (GHQ-12) and provides a more reliable and comprehensive framework to assess the clinical significance of loneliness.

  6. Scaled Rocket Testing in Hypersonic Flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dufrene, Aaron; MacLean, Matthew; Carr, Zakary; Parker, Ron; Holden, Michael; Mehta, Manish

    2015-01-01

    NASA's Space Launch System (SLS) uses four clustered liquid rocket engines along with two solid rocket boosters. The interaction between all six rocket exhaust plumes will produce a complex and severe thermal environment in the base of the vehicle. This work focuses on a recent 2% scale, hot-fire SLS base heating test. These base heating tests are short-duration tests executed with chamber pressures near the full-scale values with gaseous hydrogen/oxygen engines and RSRMV analogous solid propellant motors. The LENS II shock tunnel/Ludwieg tube tunnel was used at or near flight duplicated conditions up to Mach 5. Model development was strongly based on the Space Shuttle base heating tests with several improvements including doubling of the maximum chamber pressures and duplication of freestream conditions. Detailed base heating results are outside of the scope of the current work, rather test methodology and techniques are presented along with broader applicability toward scaled rocket testing in supersonic and hypersonic flow.

  7. Multi Scale Modelling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huemmer, Matthias [AREVA NP GmbH, Paul-Gossen Strasse 100, Erlangen (Germany)

    2008-07-01

    The safety of the Reactor Pressure Vessels (RPV) must be assured and demonstrated by safety assessments against brittle fracture according to the codes and standards. In addition to these deterministic methods, researchers developed statistic methods, so called local approach (LA) models, to predict specimen or component failure. These models transfer the microscopic fracture events to the macro scale by means of Weibull stresses and therefore can describe the fracture behavior more accurate. This paper will propose a recently developed LA model. After the calibration of the model parameters the wide applicability of the model will be demonstrated. Therefore a large number of computations, based on 3D finite element simulations, have been conducted, containing different specimen types and materials in unirradiated and irradiated condition. Comparison of the experimental data with the predictions attained by means of the LA model shows that the fracture behavior can be well described. (authors)

  8. Testing the νmax scaling relation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Coelho H. R.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Two key global seismic quantities are relevant to estimate the fundamental properties of a star: the frequency of maximum power (νmax and the large frequency separation (Δν. The focus of this work is to test the νmax scaling relation in order to ascertain it’s level of accuracy. Here we report our results using artificial data and real Kepler data, based on a grid-modelling approach.

  9. Missing Gamma-Rays from kpc-scale AGN Jets: A Test of the IC/CMB Model

    CERN Document Server

    Meyer, Eileen T; Sparks, William B; Godfrey, Leith; Perlman, Eric

    2015-01-01

    The physical origin of the X-ray emission in powerful quasar jets has been a long-standing mystery. Though these jets start out on the sub-pc scale as highly relativistic flows, we do not have any direct measurement of their speeds on the kpc scale, where the vast distances from the core necessitate in situ particle acceleration. If the jets remain highly relativistic on kpc scales, then the X-rays could be due to inverse-Compton upscattering of CMB photons. However, the IC/CMB explanation predicts a high level of gamma-ray emission, which should be detectible by the Fermi/LAT. We have searched for and ruled out this emission at a high level of significance for the well-known sources 3C 273 and PKS 0637-752, suggesting the X-rays are synchrotron, though of unknown origin. These recent results with Fermi also suggest that the kpc-scale jets in powerful quasars are significantly slower than have been presumed under the IC/CMB model. I will discuss the surprising implications of these findings for the energetics...

  10. 76 FR 3485 - Required Scale Tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-20

    ..., Packers and Stockyards Administration 9 CFR Part 201 RIN 0580-AB10 Required Scale Tests AGENCY: Grain... first of the two scale tests between January 1 and June 30 of the calendar year. The remaining scale test must be completed between July 1 and December 31 of the calendar year. In addition, a...

  11. 76 FR 50881 - Required Scale Tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-17

    ..., Packers and Stockyards Administration 9 CFR Part 201 RIN 0580-AB10 Required Scale Tests AGENCY: Grain... January 20, 2011, and on April 4, 2011, concerning required scale tests. Those documents defined ``limited...), concerning required scale tests. Those documents incorrectly defined limited seasonal basis in Sec....

  12. 76 FR 18348 - Required Scale Tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-04

    ... Tests AGENCY: Grain Inspection, Packers and Stockyards Administration. ACTION: Correcting amendments... Register on January 20, 2011 (76 FR 3485), defining required scale tests. That document incorrectly defined... packer using such scales may use the scales within a 6-month period following each test. * * * * * Alan...

  13. Evaluation of impact limiter performance during end-on and slapdown drop tests of a one-third scale model storage/transport cask system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoshimura, H.R.; Bronowski, D.R.; Uncapher, W.L.; Attaway, S.W.; Bateman, V.I.; Carne, T.G.; Gregory, D.L. (Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (USA)); Huerta, M. (Southwest Engineering Associates, El Paso, TX (USA))

    1990-12-01

    This report describes drop testing of a one-third scale model shipping cask system. Two casks were designed and fabricated by Transnuclear, Inc., to ship spent fuel from the former Nuclear Fuel Services West Valley reprocessing facility in New York to the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory for a long-term spent fuel dry storage demonstration project. As part of the NRC's regulatory certification process, one-third scale model tests were performed to obtain experimental data on impact limiter performance during impact testing. The objectives of the testing program were to (1) obtain deceleration and displacement information for the cask and impact limiter system, (2) obtain dynamic force-displacement data for the impact limiters, (3) verify the integrity of the impact limiter retention system, and (4) examine the crush behavior of the limiters. Two 30-ft (9-m) drop tests were conducted on a mass model of the cask body and scaled balsa and redwood-filled impact limiters. This report describes the results of both tests in terms of measured decelerations, posttest deformation measurements, and the general structural response of the system. 3 refs., 32 figs.

  14. Can uncertain landscape evolution models discriminate between landscape responses to stable and changing future climate? A millennial-scale test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Temme, A. J. A. M.; Baartman, J. E. M.; Schoorl, J. M.

    2009-10-01

    In the light of increasing societal interest in the effects of climate change, geomorphologists face the task of discriminating between natural landscape changes and landscape changes that result from human-induced climate change. Landscape Evolution Models (LEMs) are available for this purpose, but their application for prediction of future landscapes is problematic. Calibration of LEMs on a sufficiently long palaeo-record of landscape change solves some of these problems, but large uncertainties in input (e.g. climate) records and process descriptions remain. Using one of the few existing ka-scale LEM studies as starting point, this paper explores how uncertainty in the LEM LAPSUS (LandscApe ProcesS modelling at mUlti dimensions and scaleS, [Schoorl, J.M., Veldkamp, A. and Bouma, J., 2002. Modeling water and soil redistribution in a dynamic landscape context. Soil Science Society of America Journal, 66(5): 1610-1619]) affects its ability to discriminate future one-thousand year landscape change under stable climate from that under human-induced changed climate. Okhombe Valley in South Africa is used as a case study area. LEM uncertainty is characterized by different levels of parameter uncertainty. Results indicate that even under high levels of parameter uncertainty, LEM LAPSUS discriminates between responses to stable and changed climates for some zones in the landscape. Although confidence in model predictions remains limited, some explorative and relative conclusions about the effects of changed climate on future landscape evolution of Okhombe Valley are drawn. Finally, some possibilities and limitations of future studies on landscape evolution under changing climate are discussed.

  15. An integrated modelling framework of catchment-scale ecohydrological processes: 1. Model description and tests over an energy-limited watershed

    Science.gov (United States)

    The interactions between atmospheric, hydrological, and ecological processes at various spatial and temporal scales are not fully represented inmost ecohydrologicalmodels. This first of a two-part paper documents a fully integrated catchment-scale ecohydrological model consisting of a three-dimensio...

  16. Shaking table test and numerical analysis of a 1:12 scale model of a special concentrically braced steel frame with pinned connections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Haifeng; Zhang, Wenyuan; Zhang, Yaochun; Sun, Yusong

    2010-03-01

    This paper describes shaking table tests of a 1:12 scale model of a special concentrically braced steel frame with pinned connections, which was fabricated according to a one-bay braced frame selected from a typical main factory building of a large thermal power plant. In order to investigate the seismic performance of this type of structure, several ground motion accelerations with different levels for seismic intensity VIII, based on the Chinese Code for Seismic Design of Buildings, were selected to excite the model. The results show that the design methods of the members and the connections are adequate and that the structural system will perform well in regions of high seismicity. In addition to the tests, numerical simulations were also conducted and the results showed good agreement with the test results. Thus, the numerical model is shown to be accurate and the beam element can be used to model this structural system.

  17. ARKTOS full-scale evacuation tests

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seligman, B.; Hatfield, P. [ARKTOS Developments Ltd., Surrey, BC (Canada); Bercha, F. [Bercha Group, Calgary, AB (Canada)

    2008-09-15

    The ARKTOS amphibious vehicle can be used for evacuation operations in both open water and ice conditions. It is approved as an evacuation system by various regulators, such as the United States Coast Guard, and is operational in several marine cold regions as an escape, evacuation, and rescue (EER) system. An EER research project was performed in 2006 that provided a general reliability evaluation of the ARKTOS system. However, the project did not have the benefit of detailed full-scale tests in order to validate the associated computer model in drill or non-life threatening evacuation conditions. This paper described a follow-up set of full-scale evacuation tests designed to provide more detailed information and validation data for the reliability that the computer model described in the 2006 research project. A description and photographic illustrations of the ARKTOS system were presented. The tests and subsequent analyses were described. Specifically, the paper described the observations, and presented the statistical results from the data collected, and compared observed results with predicted results of a probabilistic EER simulation computer model. Conclusions and recommendations for reliability improvements were also provided. It was concluded that under the benign conditions, the drill performance was satisfactory in all aspects, both in the evacuation activities and the rescue or de-boarding activities. 3 refs., 1 tab., 17 figs.

  18. Evaluation of FRP Confinement Models for Substandard Rectangular RC Columns Based on Full-Scale Reversed Cyclic Lateral Loading Tests in Strong and Weak Directions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamid Farrokh Ghatte

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Although many theoretical and experimental studies are available on external confinement of columns using fiber-reinforced polymer (FRP jackets, as well as numerous models proposed for the axial stress-axial strain relation of concrete confined with FRP jackets, they have not been validated with a sufficient amount and variety of experimental data obtained through full-scale tests of reinforced concrete (RC columns with different geometrical and mechanical characteristics. Particularly, no systematical experimental data have been presented on full-scale rectangular substandard RC columns subjected to reversed cyclic lateral loads along either their strong or weak axes. In this study, firstly, test results of five full-scale rectangular substandard RC columns with a cross-sectional aspect ratio of two (300 mm × 600 mm are briefly summarized. The columns were tested under constant axial load and reversed cyclic lateral loads along their strong or weak axes before and after retrofitting with external FRP jackets. In the second stage, inelastic lateral force-displacement relationships of the columns are obtained analytically, making use of the plastic hinge assumption and different FRP confinement models available in the literature. Finally, the analytical findings are compared with the test results for both strong and weak directions of the columns. Comparisons showed that use of different models for the stress-strain relationship of FRP-confined concrete can yield significantly non-conservative or too conservative retrofit designs, particularly in terms of deformation capacity.

  19. Up-Scaling Field Observations to Ground Truth Seismic Interpretations and Test Dynamic Models of Deep Water Rifted Margins: What are the Challenges?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manatschal, G.; Nirrengarten, M.; Epin, M. E.

    2015-12-01

    Recent advances on the study of rifted margins resulted from the development of new, high-resolution seismic imaging methods and dynamic modelling that enable to image the crustal scale structure of rifted margins and experiment under what conditions they formed. However, both the used parameter space as well as the seismic interpretations and model results need to be ground truth by direct observations and data. In the case of deep-water rifted margins, the problem is that drill hole data is expensive, rare and only available from a handful of examples worldwide. In contrast, remnants preserving kilometre-scale outcrops of former deep-water rifted margins have been described from the Alps and the Pyrenees in Western Europe. These large-scale outcrops provide a direct access to mantle and crustal rocks and the associated sedimentary sequences and magmatic additions. The combination of world-class outcrops, classical, field-based mapping and analytical methods can provide the missing data that is necessary to calibrate and test dynamic models as well as to ground truth seismic interpretations. In my presentation I will use observations and data from key outcrops from the most distal fossil Alpine Tethys margins exposed in SE Switzerland with the aim to describe the deformation processes and conditions during final rifting and to test rift modes (semi-ductile flow vs. brittle poly-phase faulting). I will in particular focus on the way strain is distributed and the bulk rheology evolves during hyper-extension and mantle exhumation and compare the observations with model results and seismic interpretations. Up-and down scaling observations/data and bridging multiple spatial and temporal scales is a key to understand the large-scale extensional processes that are at the origin of the formation of hyper-extend and exhumed mantle domains. The major challenge is to understand how the learnings obtained from the well-documented examples in the Alps and Pyrenees can be used

  20. Testing new approaches to carbonate system simulation at the reef scale: the ReefSam model first results, application to a question in reef morphology and future challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrett, Samuel; Webster, Jody

    2016-04-01

    Numerical simulation of the stratigraphy and sedimentology of carbonate systems (carbonate forward stratigraphic modelling - CFSM) provides significant insight into the understanding of both the physical nature of these systems and the processes which control their development. It also provides the opportunity to quantitatively test conceptual models concerning stratigraphy, sedimentology or geomorphology, and allows us to extend our knowledge either spatially (e.g. between bore holes) or temporally (forwards or backwards in time). The later is especially important in determining the likely future development of carbonate systems, particularly regarding the effects of climate change. This application, by its nature, requires successful simulation of carbonate systems on short time scales and at high spatial resolutions. Previous modelling attempts have typically focused on the scales of kilometers and kilo-years or greater (the scale of entire carbonate platforms), rather than at the scale of centuries or decades, and tens to hundreds of meters (the scale of individual reefs). Previous work has identified limitations in common approaches to simulating important reef processes. We present a new CFSM, Reef Sedimentary Accretion Model (ReefSAM), which is designed to test new approaches to simulating reef-scale processes, with the aim of being able to better simulate the past and future development of coral reefs. Four major features have been tested: 1. A simulation of wave based hydrodynamic energy with multiple simultaneous directions and intensities including wave refraction, interaction, and lateral sheltering. 2. Sediment transport simulated as sediment being moved from cell to cell in an iterative fashion until complete deposition. 3. A coral growth model including consideration of local wave energy and composition of the basement substrate (as well as depth). 4. A highly quantitative model testing approach where dozens of output parameters describing the reef

  1. Validation and Simulation of Ares I Scale Model Acoustic Test - 2 - Simulations at 5 Foot Elevation for Evaluation of Launch Mount Effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strutzenberg, Louise L.; Putman, Gabriel C.

    2011-01-01

    The Ares I Scale Model Acoustics Test (ASMAT) is a series of live-fire tests of scaled rocket motors meant to simulate the conditions of the Ares I launch configuration. These tests have provided a well documented set of high fidelity measurements useful for validation including data taken over a range of test conditions and containing phenomena like Ignition Over-Pressure and water suppression of acoustics. Expanding from initial simulations of the ASMAT setup in a held down configuration, simulations have been performed using the Loci/CHEM computational fluid dynamics software for ASMAT tests of the vehicle at 5 ft. elevation (100 ft. real vehicle elevation) with worst case drift in the direction of the launch tower. These tests have been performed without water suppression and have compared the acoustic emissions for launch structures with and without launch mounts. In addition, simulation results have also been compared to acoustic and imagery data collected from similar live-fire tests to assess the accuracy of the simulations. Simulations have shown a marked change in the pattern of emissions after removal of the launch mount with a reduction in the overall acoustic environment experienced by the vehicle and the formation of highly directed acoustic waves moving across the platform deck. Comparisons of simulation results to live-fire test data showed good amplitude and temporal correlation and imagery comparisons over the visible and infrared wavelengths showed qualitative capture of all plume and pressure wave evolution features.

  2. DECOVALEX III PROJECT. Thermal-Hydrological Modeling of the Yucca Mountain Project Drift Scale Test. Task 2A Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Datta, Robin N. [Bechtel SAlC Company, Las Vegas (US)] (comp.)

    2005-02-15

    Task 2A concerns coupled TH modeling of the DST test at Yucca mountain, with given results for geologic, thermal, mechanical, hydrologic, and mineralogic and petrologic characterization, as-built configuration of the test block of DST, including locations of various sensors and measuring instruments and the plans for heating and cooling, including expected heater powers at various times, and requiring predictions for distributions and evolutions of the temperature and saturation fields. Three teams of ENRESA (Spain), DOE (USA), and NRC (USA) teams participated the task with different approaches, using FEM code Bright with a double porosity structure (ENRESA), a FDM code MULTIFLO with a dual continuum approach and an active fracture model (NRC) and a FDM code TOUGH 2 with a dual permeability approach (DOE), respectively. Based on the results of the temperature and moisture distributions and temperature histories, it can be concluded that in general, the three models capture the TH response of the DST fairly well, although there are some differences between the teams' results. Conduction is the dominant heat-transfer mechanism in the fractured unsaturated rock in the DST, especially in the sub-boiling regime. However, the pore water plays an important role near the boiling point as it goes through cycles of vaporization and condensation causing the so called heat-pipe effect. A characteristic signature of heatpipes - a short lull in the rise of temperature - was captured by all three teams. The 2D modeling of the DST carried out by the ENRESA team initially was characterized by very little diffusion of vapor because the tortuosity factor was set at a low value of 0.05 and is referred to as the ND (No Diffusion) case. The recent 3D model with a tortuosity factor set at 1 and a vapor diffusion enhancement coefficient allows maximum vapor diffusion and is referred to as the MD (maximum diffusion) case. Comparative analyses of the modeling results for ND and MD

  3. Multicultural counseling self-efficacy scale-racial diversity form: factor structure and test of a social cognitive model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheu, Hung-Bin; Rigali-Oiler, Marybeth; Lent, Robert W

    2012-01-01

    This study was conducted to gather evidence on the factor structure and concurrent criterion validity of the multicultural counseling self-efficacy scale-racial diversity form (MCSE-RD; Sheu & Lent, 2007). The MCSE-RD was designed to assess therapists' perceived capabilities in performing culturally relevant in-session behaviors in cross-racial counseling. Participants were 209 students in counseling-related graduate programs in the USA. Confirmatory factor analyses identified a bifactor structure in which responses to MCSE-RD items could be explained by one generic and three multicultural-specific counseling self-efficacy factors. Support was also found for a social cognitive model in which self-efficacy and interests in multicultural counseling mediated the effects of prior cross-racial client contacts and perceptions of multicultural training environments on intent to perform multicultural counseling in the future. Additionally, outcome expectations were predictive of multicultural counseling interests and choice goals. Implications for multicultural training and directions for future research are highlighted.

  4. Drift Scale THM Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J. Rutqvist

    2004-10-07

    This model report documents the drift scale coupled thermal-hydrological-mechanical (THM) processes model development and presents simulations of the THM behavior in fractured rock close to emplacement drifts. The modeling and analyses are used to evaluate the impact of THM processes on permeability and flow in the near-field of the emplacement drifts. The results from this report are used to assess the importance of THM processes on seepage and support in the model reports ''Seepage Model for PA Including Drift Collapse'' and ''Abstraction of Drift Seepage'', and to support arguments for exclusion of features, events, and processes (FEPs) in the analysis reports ''Features, Events, and Processes in Unsaturated Zone Flow and Transport and Features, Events, and Processes: Disruptive Events''. The total system performance assessment (TSPA) calculations do not use any output from this report. Specifically, the coupled THM process model is applied to simulate the impact of THM processes on hydrologic properties (permeability and capillary strength) and flow in the near-field rock around a heat-releasing emplacement drift. The heat generated by the decay of radioactive waste results in elevated rock temperatures for thousands of years after waste emplacement. Depending on the thermal load, these temperatures are high enough to cause boiling conditions in the rock, resulting in water redistribution and altered flow paths. These temperatures will also cause thermal expansion of the rock, with the potential of opening or closing fractures and thus changing fracture permeability in the near-field. Understanding the THM coupled processes is important for the performance of the repository because the thermally induced permeability changes potentially effect the magnitude and spatial distribution of percolation flux in the vicinity of the drift, and hence the seepage of water into the drift. This is important because

  5. Experiments to investigate direct containment heating phenomena with scaled models of the Zion Nuclear Power Plant in the Surtsey Test Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allen, M.D.; Pilch, M.M.; Blanchat, T.K.; Griffith, R.O. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Nichols, R.T. [Ktech Corp., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1994-05-01

    The Surtsey Facility at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) is used to perform scaled experiments that simulate hypothetical high-pressure melt ejection (HPME) accidents in a nuclear power plant (NPP). These experiments are designed to investigate the effect of specific phenomena associated with direct containment heating (DCH) on the containment load, such as the effect of physical scale, prototypic subcompartment structures, water in the cavity, and hydrogen generation and combustion. In the Integral Effects Test (IET) series, 1:10 linear scale models of the Zion NPP structures were constructed in the Surtsey vessel. The RPV was modeled with a steel pressure vessel that had a hemispherical bottom head, which had a 4-cm hole in the bottom head that simulated the final ablated hole that would be formed by ejection of an instrument guide tube in a severe NPP accident. Iron/alumina/chromium thermite was used to simulate molten corium that would accumulate on the bottom head of an actual RPV. The chemically reactive melt simulant was ejected by high-pressure steam from the RPV model into the scaled reactor cavity. Debris was then entrained through the instrument tunnel into the subcompartment structures and the upper dome of the simulated reactor containment building. The results of the IET experiments are given in this report.

  6. Ditching Tests of a 1/24-Scale Model of the Lockheed XR60-1 Airplane, TED No. NACA 235

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, Lloyd J.; Cederborg, Gibson A.

    1948-01-01

    The ditching characteristics of the Lockheed XR60-1 airplane were determined by tests of a 1/24-scale dynamic model in calm water at the Langley tank no. 2 monorail. Various landing attitudes, flap settings, speeds, and conditions of damager were investigated. The ditching behavior was evaluated from recordings of decelerations, length of runs, and motions of the model. Scale-strength bottoms and simulated crumpled bottoms were used to reproduce probable damage to the fuselage. It was concluded that the airplane should be ditched at a landing attitude of about 5 deg with flaps full down. At this attitude, the maximum longitudinal deceleration should not exceed 2g and the landing run will be bout three fuselage lengths. Damage to the fuselage will not be excessive and will be greatest near the point of initial contact with the water.

  7. Development of a Technique and Method of Testing Aircraft Models with Turboprop Engine Simulators in a Small-scale Wind Tunnel - Results of Tests

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. V. Petrov

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available This report presents the results of experimental investigations into the interaction between the propellers (Ps and the airframe of a twin-engine, twin-boom light transport aircraft with a Π-shaped tail. An analysis was performed of the forces and moments acting on the aircraft with rotating Ps. The main features of the methodology for windtunnel testing of an aircraft model with running Ps in TsAGI’s T-102 wind tunnel are outlined.The effect of 6-blade Ps slipstreams on the longitudinal and lateral aerodynamic characteristics as well as the effectiveness of the control surfaces was studied on the aircraft model in cruise and takeoff/landing configurations. The tests were conducted at flow velocities of V∞ = 20 to 50 m/s in the ranges of angles of attack α =  -6 to 20 deg, sideslip angles of β = -16 to 16 deg and blade loading coefficient of B 0 to 2.8. For the aircraft of unusual layout studied, an increase in blowing intensity is shown to result in decreasing longitudinal static stability and significant asymmetry of the directional stability characteristics associated with the interaction between the Ps slipstreams of the same (left-hand rotation and the empennage.

  8. Large-Scale Spacecraft Fire Safety Tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urban, David; Ruff, Gary A.; Ferkul, Paul V.; Olson, Sandra; Fernandez-Pello, A. Carlos; T'ien, James S.; Torero, Jose L.; Cowlard, Adam J.; Rouvreau, Sebastien; Minster, Olivier; Toth, Balazs; Legros, Guillaume; Eigenbrod, Christian; Smirnov, Nickolay; Fujita, Osamu; Jomaas, Grunde

    2014-01-01

    An international collaborative program is underway to address open issues in spacecraft fire safety. Because of limited access to long-term low-gravity conditions and the small volume generally allotted for these experiments, there have been relatively few experiments that directly study spacecraft fire safety under low-gravity conditions. Furthermore, none of these experiments have studied sample sizes and environment conditions typical of those expected in a spacecraft fire. The major constraint has been the size of the sample, with prior experiments limited to samples of the order of 10 cm in length and width or smaller. This lack of experimental data forces spacecraft designers to base their designs and safety precautions on 1-g understanding of flame spread, fire detection, and suppression. However, low-gravity combustion research has demonstrated substantial differences in flame behavior in low-gravity. This, combined with the differences caused by the confined spacecraft environment, necessitates practical scale spacecraft fire safety research to mitigate risks for future space missions. To address this issue, a large-scale spacecraft fire experiment is under development by NASA and an international team of investigators. This poster presents the objectives, status, and concept of this collaborative international project (Saffire). The project plan is to conduct fire safety experiments on three sequential flights of an unmanned ISS re-supply spacecraft (the Orbital Cygnus vehicle) after they have completed their delivery of cargo to the ISS and have begun their return journeys to earth. On two flights (Saffire-1 and Saffire-3), the experiment will consist of a flame spread test involving a meter-scale sample ignited in the pressurized volume of the spacecraft and allowed to burn to completion while measurements are made. On one of the flights (Saffire-2), 9 smaller (5 x 30 cm) samples will be tested to evaluate NASAs material flammability screening tests

  9. Proposed heat transfer model for the gas-liquid heat transfer effects observed in the Stanford Research Institute scaled tests. [LMFBR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Corradini, M; Sonin, A A; Todreas, N

    1976-12-01

    In 1971-72, the Stanford Research Institute conducted a series of scaled experiments which simulated a sodium-vapor expansion in a hypothetical core disruptive accident (HCDA) for the Fast Flux Test Facility. A non-condensible explosive source was used to model the pressure-volume expansion characteristics of sodium vapor as predicted by computer code calculations. Rigid piston-cylinder experiments (/sup 1///sub 10/ and /sup 1///sub 30/ scale) were undertaken to determine these expansion characteristics. The results showed that the pressure-volume characteristics depend significantly on the presence of water in the cylinder reducing the work output by about 50 percent when a sufficient water depth was present. The study presented proposes that the mechanism of heat transfer between the water and high temperature gas was due to area enhancement by Taylor instabilities at the gas-liquid interface. A simple heat transfer model is proposed which describes this energy transport process and agrees well with the experimental data from both scaled experiments. The consequences of this analysis suggest that an estimate of the heat transfer to the cold slug during a full-scale HCDA due to sodium vapor expansion and the accompanying reduction in mechanical work energy warrants further investigation. The implication of this analysis is that for either sodium or fuel vapor expansion in an HCDA, there is an inherent heat transfer mechanism which significantly reduces the work output of the expanding bubble.

  10. A Hydrostratigraphic System for Modeling Groundwater Flow and Radionuclide Migration at the Corrective Action Unit Scale, Nevada Test Site and Surrounding Areas, Clark, Lincoln, and Nye Counties, Nevada

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prothro, Lance; Drellack Jr., Sigmund; Mercadante, Jennifer

    2009-01-31

    Underground Test Area (UGTA) corrective action unit (CAU) groundwater flow and contaminant transport models of the Nevada Test Site (NTS) and vicinity are built upon hydrostratigraphic framework models (HFMs) that utilize the hydrostratigraphic unit (HSU) as the fundamental modeling component. The delineation and three-dimensional (3-D) modeling of HSUs within the highly complex geologic terrain that is the NTS requires a hydrostratigraphic system that is internally consistent, yet flexible enough to account for overlapping model areas, varied geologic terrain, and the development of multiple alternative HFMs. The UGTA CAU-scale hydrostratigraphic system builds on more than 50 years of geologic and hydrologic work in the NTS region. It includes 76 HSUs developed from nearly 300 stratigraphic units that span more than 570 million years of geologic time, and includes rock units as diverse as marine carbonate and siliciclastic rocks, granitic intrusives, rhyolitic lavas and ash-flow tuffs, and alluvial valley-fill deposits. The UGTA CAU-scale hydrostratigraphic system uses a geology-based approach and two-level classification scheme. The first, or lowest, level of the hydrostratigraphic system is the hydrogeologic unit (HGU). Rocks in a model area are first classified as one of ten HGUs based on the rock’s ability to transmit groundwater (i.e., nature of their porosity and permeability), which at the NTS is mainly a function of the rock’s primary lithology, type and degree of postdepositional alteration, and propensity to fracture. The second, or highest, level within the UGTA CAU-scale hydrostratigraphic system is the HSU, which is the fundamental mapping/modeling unit within UGTA CAU-scale HFMs. HSUs are 3-D bodies that are represented in the finite element mesh for the UGTA groundwater modeling process. HSUs are defined systematically by stratigraphically organizing HGUs of similar character into larger HSUs designations. The careful integration of

  11. Model testing of Wave Dragon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2001-07-01

    Previous to this project a scale model 1:50 of the wave energy converter (WEC) Wave Dragon was built by the Danish Maritime Institute and tested in a wave tank at Aalborg University (AAU). The test programs investigated the movements of the floating structure, mooring forces and forces in the reflectors. The first test was followed by test establishing the efficiency in different sea states. The scale model has also been extensively tested in the EU Joule Craft project JOR-CT98-7027 (Low-Pressure Turbine and Control Equipment for Wave Energy Converters /Wave Dragon) at University College Cork, Hydraulics and Maritime Research Centre, Ireland. The results of the previous model tests have formed the basis for a redesign of the WEC. In this project a reconstruction of the scale 1:50 model and sequential tests of changes to the model geometry and mass distribution parameters will be performed. AAU will make the modifications to the model based on the revised Loewenmark design and perform the tests in their wave tank. Grid connection requirements have been established. A hydro turbine with no movable parts besides the rotor has been developed and a scale model 1:3.5 tested, with a high efficiency over the whole head range. The turbine itself has possibilities for being used in river systems with low head and variable flow, an area of interest for many countries around the world. Finally, a regulation strategy for the turbines has been developed, which is essential for the future deployment of Wave Dragon.The video includes the following: 1. Title, 2. Introduction of the Wave Dragon, 3. Model test series H, Hs = 3 m, Rc = 3 m, 4. Model test series H, Hs = 5 m, Rc = 4 m, 5. Model test series I, Hs = 7 m, Rc = 1.25 m, 6. Model test series I, Hs = 7 m, Rc = 4 m, 7. Rolling title. On this VCD additional versions of the video can be found in the directory 'addvideo' for playing the video on PC's. These versions are: Model testing of Wave Dragon, DVD version

  12. Large Scale Flame Spread Environmental Characterization Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clayman, Lauren K.; Olson, Sandra L.; Gokoghi, Suleyman A.; Brooker, John E.; Ferkul, Paul V.; Kacher, Henry F.

    2013-01-01

    Under the Advanced Exploration Systems (AES) Spacecraft Fire Safety Demonstration Project (SFSDP), as a risk mitigation activity in support of the development of a large-scale fire demonstration experiment in microgravity, flame-spread tests were conducted in normal gravity on thin, cellulose-based fuels in a sealed chamber. The primary objective of the tests was to measure pressure rise in a chamber as sample material, burning direction (upward/downward), total heat release, heat release rate, and heat loss mechanisms were varied between tests. A Design of Experiments (DOE) method was imposed to produce an array of tests from a fixed set of constraints and a coupled response model was developed. Supplementary tests were run without experimental design to additionally vary select parameters such as initial chamber pressure. The starting chamber pressure for each test was set below atmospheric to prevent chamber overpressure. Bottom ignition, or upward propagating burns, produced rapid acceleratory turbulent flame spread. Pressure rise in the chamber increases as the amount of fuel burned increases mainly because of the larger amount of heat generation and, to a much smaller extent, due to the increase in gaseous number of moles. Top ignition, or downward propagating burns, produced a steady flame spread with a very small flat flame across the burning edge. Steady-state pressure is achieved during downward flame spread as the pressure rises and plateaus. This indicates that the heat generation by the flame matches the heat loss to surroundings during the longer, slower downward burns. One heat loss mechanism included mounting a heat exchanger directly above the burning sample in the path of the plume to act as a heat sink and more efficiently dissipate the heat due to the combustion event. This proved an effective means for chamber overpressure mitigation for those tests producing the most total heat release and thusly was determined to be a feasible mitigation

  13. Results of heat transfer tests of a 0.0175-scale space shuttle vehicle 5 model (60-OTS) in the NASA-Ames Research Center 3.5-foot hypersonic wind tunnel (test IH48)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dye, W. H.; Lockman, W. K.

    1976-01-01

    Heat transfer data are presented for a .0175-scale model of the Rockwell International Space Shuttle Vehicle 5. The primary purpose of these tests was to obtain aerodynamic interference heating data on the external tank in the tank alone, second-, and first-stage configurations. Data were also obtained on the Orbiter and solid rocket boosters. Nominal Mach Nos. of 5.2 and 5.3 at nominal freestream unit Reynolds numbers of 1.5 and 5.0 million per foot, respectively, were investigated. Photographs of the tested configurations and test equipment are shown.

  14. Dynamic FE simulation of four-story steel frame modeled by solid elements and its validation using results of full-scale shake-table test

    OpenAIRE

    Miyamura, Tomoshi; Yamashita, Takuzo; AKIBA,HIROSHI; Ohsaki, Makoto

    2015-01-01

    Dynamic finite element analyses of a four-story steel building frame modeled as a fine mesh of solid elements are performed using E-Simulator, which is a parallel finite element analysis software package for precisely simulating collapse behaviors of civil and building structures. E-Simulator is under development at the National Research Institute for Earth Science and Disaster Prevention (NIED), Japan. A full-scale shake-table test for a four-story frame was conducted using E-Defense at NIED...

  15. Report on Tier-0 Scaling Tests

    CERN Multimedia

    M. Branco; L. Goossens; A. Nairz

    To get prepared for handling the enormous data rates and volumes during LHC operation, ATLAS is currently running so-called Tier-0 Scaling Tests, which were started beginning of November and will last until Christmas. These tests are carried out in the context of LCG (LHC Computing Grid) Service Challenge 3 (SC3), a joint exercise of CERN IT and the LHC experiments to test the infrastructure of computing, network, and data management, in particular for its architecture, scalabilty and readiness for LHC data taking. ATLAS has adopted a multi-Tier hierarchical model to organise the workflow, with dedicated tasks to be performed at the individual levels in the Tier hierarchy. The Tier-0 centre located at CERN will be responsible for performing a first-pass reconstruction of the data arriving from the Event Filter farm, thus producing Event Summary Data (ESDs), Analysis Object Data (AODs) and event Tags, for processing calibration and alignment information, for archiving both raw and reconstructed data, and for ...

  16. Scaling Relationships Based on Scaled Tank Mixing and Transfer Test Results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Piepel, Gregory F.; Holmes, Aimee E.; Heredia-Langner, Alejandro

    2013-09-18

    This report documents the statistical analyses performed (by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory for Washington River Protection Solutions) on data from 26 tests conducted using two scaled tanks (43 and 120 inches) in the Small Scale Mixing Demonstration platform. The 26 tests varied several test parameters, including mixer-jet nozzle velocity, base simulant, supernatant viscosity, and capture velocity. For each test, samples were taken pre-transfer and during five batch transfers. The samples were analyzed for the concentrations (lbs/gal slurry) of four primary components in the base simulants (gibbsite, stainless steel, sand, and ZrO2). The statistical analyses including modeling the component concentrations as functions of test parameters using stepwise regression with two different model forms. The resulting models were used in an equivalent performance approach to calculate values of scaling exponents (for a simple geometric scaling relationship) as functions of the parameters in the component concentration models. The resulting models and scaling exponents are displayed in tables and graphically. The sensitivities of component concentrations and scaling exponents to the test parameters are presented graphically. These results will serve as inputs to subsequent work by other researchers to develop scaling relationships that are applicable to full-scale tanks.

  17. Scaling Relationships Based on Scaled Tank Mixing and Transfer Test Results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Piepel, Gregory F. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Holmes, Aimee E. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Heredia-Langner, Alejandro [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Lee, Kearn P. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Kelly, Steven E. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2014-01-01

    This report documents the statistical analyses performed (by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory for Washington River Protection Solutions) on data from 26 tests conducted using two scaled tanks (43 and 120 inches) in the Small Scale Mixing Demonstration platform. The 26 tests varied several test parameters, including mixer-jet nozzle velocity, base simulant, supernatant viscosity, and capture velocity. For each test, samples were taken pre-transfer and during five batch transfers. The samples were analyzed for the concentrations (lbs/gal slurry) of four primary components in the base simulants (gibbsite, stainless steel, sand, and ZrO2). The statistical analyses including modeling the component concentrations as functions of test parameters using stepwise regression with two different model forms. The resulting models were used in an equivalent performance approach to calculate values of scaling exponents (for a simple geometric scaling relationship) as functions of the parameters in the component concentration models. The resulting models and scaling exponents are displayed in tables and graphically. The sensitivities of component concentrations and scaling exponents to the test parameters are presented graphically. These results will serve as inputs to subsequent work by other researchers to develop scaling relationships that are applicable to full-scale tanks.

  18. Modelling of rate effects at multiple scales

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, R.R.; Simone, A.; Sluys, L. J.

    2008-01-01

    At the macro- and meso-scales a rate dependent constitutive model is used in which visco-elasticity is coupled to visco-plasticity and damage. A viscous length scale effect is introduced to control the size of the fracture process zone. By comparison of the widths of the fracture process zone......, the length scale in the meso-model and the macro-model can be coupled. In this fashion, a bridging of length scales can be established. A computational analysis of  a Split Hopkinson bar test at medium and high impact load is carried out at macro-scale and meso-scale including information from  the micro-scale....

  19. Wind-tunnel tests of a 1/4 scale model of the Bell XS-1 transonic airplane. 1: Longitudinal stability and control characteristics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donlan, C. J.; Kemp, W. B., Jr.; Polhamus, E. C.

    1976-01-01

    A 1/4 scale model of the Bell XS-1 transonic aircraft was tested in the Langley 300 mile-per-hour 7 by 10 foot tunnel to determine its low speed longitudinal stability and control characteristics. Pertinent longitudinal flying qualities expected of the XS-1 research airplane were estimated from the results of these tests including the effects of compressibility likely to be encountered at speeds below the force break. It appears that the static longitudinal stability and elevator control power will be adequate, but that the elevator control force gradient in steady flight will be undesirably low for all configurations. It is suggested that a centering spring be incorporated in the elevator control system of the airplane in order to increase the control force gradient in steady flight and in maneuvers.

  20. Operational modelling to guide implementation and scale-up of diagnostic tests within the health system: exploring opportunities for parasitic disease diagnostics based on example application for tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langley, Ivor; Adams, Emily; Doulla, Basra; Squire, S Bertel

    2014-12-01

    Research and innovation in the diagnosis of infectious and parasitic diseases has led to the development of several promising diagnostic tools, for example in malaria there is extensive literature concerning the use of rapid diagnostic tests. This means policymakers in many low and middle income countries need to make difficult decisions about which of the recommended tools and approaches to implement and scale-up. The test characteristics (e.g. sensitivity and specificity) of the tools alone are not a sufficient basis on which to make these decisions as policymakers need to also consider the best combination of tools, whether the new tools should complement or replace existing diagnostics and who should be tested. Diagnostic strategies need dovetailing to different epidemiology and structural resource constraints (e.g. existing diagnostic pathways, human resources and laboratory capacity). We propose operational modelling to assist with these complex decisions. Projections of patient, health system and cost impacts are essential and operational modelling of the relevant elements of the health system could provide these projections and support rational decisions. We demonstrate how the technique of operational modelling applied in the developing world to support decisions on diagnostics for tuberculosis, could in a parallel way, provide useful insights to support implementation of appropriate diagnostic innovations for parasitic diseases.

  1. [Mokken scaling of the Cognitive Screening Test].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diesfeldt, H F A

    2009-10-01

    The Cognitive Screening Test (CST) is a twenty-item orientation questionnaire in Dutch, that is commonly used to evaluate cognitive impairment. This study applied Mokken Scale Analysis, a non-parametric set of techniques derived from item response theory (IRT), to CST-data of 466 consecutive participants in psychogeriatric day care. The full item set and the standard short version of fourteen items both met the assumptions of the monotone homogeneity model, with scalability coefficient H = 0.39, which is considered weak. In order to select items that would fulfil the assumption of invariant item ordering or the double monotonicity model, the subjects were randomly partitioned into a training set (50% of the sample) and a test set (the remaining half). By means of an automated item selection eleven items were found to measure one latent trait, with H = 0.67 and item H coefficients larger than 0.51. Cross-validation of the item analysis in the remaining half of the subjects gave comparable values (H = 0.66; item H coefficients larger than 0.56). The selected items involve year, place of residence, birth date, the monarch's and prime minister's names, and their predecessors. Applying optimal discriminant analysis (ODA) it was found that the full set of twenty CST items performed best in distinguishing two predefined groups of patients of lower or higher cognitive ability, as established by an independent criterion derived from the Amsterdam Dementia Screening Test. The chance corrected predictive value or prognostic utility was 47.5% for the full item set, 45.2% for the fourteen items of the standard short version of the CST, and 46.1% for the homogeneous, unidimensional set of selected eleven items. The results of the item analysis support the application of the CST in cognitive assessment, and revealed a more reliable 'short' version of the CST than the standard short version (CST14).

  2. Unraveling the dynamics that scale cross-shore headland relief on rocky coastlines: 2. Model predictions and initial tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Limber, Patrick W.; Murray, A. Brad

    2014-04-01

    We explore the behavior of a theoretical model of cross-shore headland relief caused by alongshore differences in lithology and rock strength on rocky coastlines. Results address the question of why some rocky coasts exhibit frequent headland and embayment sequences while others evolve to a flat, smooth, and sandy configuration. Main model predictions are that cross-shore headland amplitude is inversely proportional to beach sediment supply and the strength of wave energy convergence and divergence along the headland and bay, and proportional to the alongshore embayment length (or distance between headlands) and the difference between headland and bay rock strength. The coastline's initial physical properties (sea cliff height, composition, etc.) largely determine whether headlands will be persistent or transient landscape features. Model timescales over which the headland and bay reach steady state amplitude, or disappear to a flat coastline, range from 120 to 175,000 years depending on how close the initial amplitude is to steady state. In many cases, the coastline must evolve over several sea level highstands in order to reach equilibrium. A characteristic timescale (independent of initial conditions) shows that the coastline evolves most rapidly when: wave focusing is stronger; sea cliff rock is weaker or retreats faster in a given wave climate; the sea cliff retreat rate decreases rapidly as a function of beach width (i.e., the beach is very effective at dampening wave energy); and the coastline is sediment rich. Comparisons to nature suggest that our model is qualitatively capturing general rocky coastline dynamics and that modeled headland amplitudes are consistent with observed amplitudes.

  3. Similar Materials in Large-scale Shaking Table Model Test%大型振动台试验相似材料研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    邹威; 许强; 刘汉香

    2012-01-01

    On the basis of analyzing and summarizing the research status of similar materials of rock which were u-sually used in physical simulation experiments of geological engineering in recent years, using the similar materials of shaking table model tests compounded by barite powder, quartz sand , gypsum and glycerol, through mechanical test of different proportion of materials, and considering the water content of similar materials, the contents of all kinds of materials and the regularity of the influence of the water content changing on the physical and mechanical properties of similar materials were studies and analyzed. It was found that water content had great influence on the compressive strength, cohesion, elastic modulus and friction angle of materials. According to the result, the proportion of similar material in shaking table model test was fixed finally. It was proved by the test that the mechanical index of this kind of material was stale, could meet the needs of the choice requirements of similar materials, convenient for pouring relatively large-scale model specimen once only. It applies to physical simulation experiments like large-scale shaking table model test.%在分析总结近几年岩土工程物理模拟试验中常用的岩质相似材料研究现状的基础上,采用重晶石粉、石英砂、石膏、甘油配制振动台模型试验相似材料,通过不同配比的材料力学试验,考虑相似材料的含水率,分析研究了各种材料含量以及含水率变化对相似材料物理力学性质的影响规律,发现含水率对材料的抗压强度、粘聚力、弹性模量、摩擦角有较大影响,根据试验结果最终确定了振动台试验相似材料配比.试验结果证明,该相似材料力学指标稳定,能很好地满足相似材料的选材要求,便于一次性浇注较大尺寸规模的模型试件,适用于大型振动台等物理模拟试验.

  4. Data Analysis, Pre-Ignition Assessment, and Post-Ignition Modeling of the Large-Scale Annular Cookoff Tests

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    G. Terrones; F.J. Souto; R.F. Shea; M.W.Burkett; E.S. Idar

    2005-09-30

    In order to understand the implications that cookoff of plastic-bonded explosive-9501 could have on safety assessments, we analyzed the available data from the large-scale annular cookoff (LSAC) assembly series of experiments. In addition, we examined recent data regarding hypotheses about pre-ignition that may be relevant to post-ignition behavior. Based on the post-ignition data from Shot 6, which had the most complete set of data, we developed an approximate equation of state (EOS) for the gaseous products of deflagration. Implementation of this EOS into the multimaterial hydrodynamics computer program PAGOSA yielded good agreement with the inner-liner collapse sequence for Shot 6 and with other data, such as velocity interferometer system for any reflector and resistance wires. A metric to establish the degree of symmetry based on the concept of time of arrival to pin locations was used to compare numerical simulations with experimental data. Several simulations were performed to elucidate the mode of ignition in the LSAC and to determine the possible compression levels that the metal assembly could have been subjected to during post-ignition.

  5. Testing Asteroseismic Scaling Relations with Interferometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    White T. R.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The asteroseismic scaling relations for the frequency of maximum oscillation power, vmax, and the large frequency separation, Δν, provide an easy way to directly determine the masses and radii of stars with detected solar-like oscillations. With the vast amount of data available from the CoRoT and Kepler missions, the convenience of the scaling relations has resulted in their wide-spread use. But how valid are the scaling relations when applied to red giants, which have a substantially different structure than the Sun? Verifying the scaling relations empirically requires independent measurements. We report on the current state and future prospects of interferometric tests of the scaling relations.

  6. Ditching Tests of a 1/8-Scale Model of the Chance Vought XF6U-1 Airplane, TED No. NACA DE319

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, Lloyd J., Jr.; McBride, Ellis E.

    1953-01-01

    Tests were made with a 1/8-scale dynamically similar model of the Chance Vought XF6U-1 airplane to study its behavior when ditched. The model was ditched in calm water at the Langley tank no. 2 monorail. Various landing attitudes, speeds, and conditions of damage were simulated. The behavior of the model was determined from visual observations, by recording time histories of the accelerations, and by taking motion pictures of the ditchings. From the results of the tests it was concluded that the airplane should be ditched at the near-stall, tail-down attitude (12 deg). The flaps should be fully extended to obtain the lowest possible landing speed. The wing-tip tanks should be jettisoned. The underside of the fuselage will be critically damaged in a ditching and the airplane will dive violently after a run of about three fuselage lengths. Maximum longitudinal decelerations up to about 7g and maximum vertical accelerations up to about 5g will be encountered.

  7. Modeling and full-scale tests of vortex plasma-fuel systems for igniting high-ash power plant coal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Messerle, V. E.; Ustimenko, A. B.; Karpenko, Yu. E.; Chernetskiy, M. Yu.; Dekterev, A. A.; Filimonov, S. A.

    2015-06-01

    The processes of supplying pulverized-coal fuel into a boiler equipped with plasma-fuel systems and its combustion in the furnace of this boiler are investigated. The results obtained from 3D modeling of conventional coal combustion processes and its firing with plasma-assisted activation of combustion in the furnace space are presented. The plasma-fuel system with air mixture supplied through a scroll is numerically investigated. The dependence of the swirled air mixture flow trajectory in the vortex plasma-fuel system on the scroll rotation angle is revealed, and the optimal rotation angle at which stable plasma-assisted ignition of pulverized coal flame is achieved is determined.

  8. Acoustic testing of a 1.5 pressure ratio low tip speed fan with a serrated rotor (QEP fan B scale model). [reduction of engine noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazin, S. B.; Paas, J. E.; Minzner, W. R.

    1973-01-01

    A scale model of the bypass flow region of a 1.5 pressure ratio, single stage, low tip speed fan was tested with a serrated rotor leading edge to determine its effects on noise generation. The serrated rotor was produced by cutting teeth into the leading edge of the nominal rotor blades. The effects of speed and exhaust nozzle area on the scale models noise characteristics were investigated with both the nominal rotor and serrated rotor. Acoustic results indicate the serrations reduced front quadrant PNL's at takeoff power. In particular, the 200 foot (61.0 m) sideline noise was reduced from 3 to 4 PNdb at 40 deg for nominal and large nozzle operation. However, the rear quadrant maximum sideline PNL's were increased 1.5 to 3 PNdb at approach thust and up to 2 PNdb at takeoff thust with these serrated rotor blades. The configuration with the serrated rotor produced the lowest maximum 200 foot (61.0 m) sideline PNL for any given thust when the large nozzle (116% of design area) was employed.

  9. Assessment of analytical and experimental techniques utilized in conducting plume technology tests 575 and 593. [exhaust flow simulation (wind tunnel tests) of scale model Space Shuttle Orbiter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, L. R.; Sulyma, P. R.; Tevepaugh, J. A.; Penny, M. M.

    1976-01-01

    Since exhaust plumes affect vehicle base environment (pressure and heat loads) and the orbiter vehicle aerodynamic control surface effectiveness, an intensive program involving detailed analytical and experimental investigations of the exhaust plume/vehicle interaction was undertaken as a pertinent part of the overall space shuttle development program. The program, called the Plume Technology program, has as its objective the determination of the criteria for simulating rocket engine (in particular, space shuttle propulsion system) plume-induced aerodynamic effects in a wind tunnel environment. The comprehensive experimental program was conducted using test facilities at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center and Ames Research Center. A post-test examination of some of the experimental results obtained from NASA-MSFC's 14 x 14-inch trisonic wind tunnel is presented. A description is given of the test facility, simulant gas supply system, nozzle hardware, test procedure and test matrix. Analysis of exhaust plume flow fields and comparison of analytical and experimental exhaust plume data are presented.

  10. Hovering and Transition Flight Tests of a 1/5-Scale Model of a Jet-Powered Vertical-Attitude VTOL Research Airplane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Charles C., Jr.

    1961-01-01

    An experimental investigation has been made to determine the dynamic stability and control characteristics of a 1/5-scale flying model of a jet-powered vertical-attitude VTOL research airplane in hovering and transition flight. The model was powered with either a hydrogen peroxide rocket motor or a compressed-air jet exhausting through an ejector tube to simulate the turbojet engine of the airplane. The gyroscopic effects of the engine were simulated by a flywheel driven by compressed-air jets. In hovering flight the model was controlled by jet-reaction controls which consisted of a swiveling nozzle on the main jet and a movable nozzle on each wing tip; and in forward flight the model was controlled by elevons and a rudder. If the gyroscopic effects of the jet engine were not represented, the model could be flown satisfactorily in hovering flight without any automatic stabilization devices. When the gyroscopic effects of the jet engine were represented, however, the model could not be controlled without the aid of artificial stabilizing devices because of the gyroscopic coupling of the yawing and pitching motions. The use of pitch and yaw dampers made these motions completely stable and the model could then be controlled very easily. In the transition flight tests, which were performed only with the automatic pitch and yaw dampers operating, it was found that the transition was very easy to perform either with or without the engine gyroscopic effects simulated, although the model had a tendency to fly in a rolled and sideslipped attitude at angles of attack between approximately 25 deg and 45 deg because of static directional instability in this range.

  11. Scale Model Test and Transient Analysis of Steam Injector Driven Passive Core Injection System for Innovative-Simplified Nuclear Power Plant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohmori, Shuichi; Narabayashi, Tadashi; Mori, Michitsugu

    A steam injector (SI) is a simple, compact and passive pump and also acts as a high-performance direct-contact compact heater. This provides SI with capability to serve also as a direct-contact feed-water heater that heats up feed-water by using extracted steam from turbine. Our technology development aims to significantly simplify equipment and reduce physical quantities by applying "high-efficiency SI", which are applicable to a wide range of operation regimes beyond the performance and applicable range of existing SIs and enables unprecedented multistage and parallel operation, to the low-pressure feed-water heaters and emergency core cooling system of nuclear power plants, as well as achieve high inherent safety to prevent severe accidents by keeping the core covered with water (a severe accident-free concept). This paper describes the results of the scale model test, and the transient analysis of SI-driven passive core injection system (PCIS).

  12. YMP Engineered Barrier Systems Scaled Ventilation Testing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    S.D. Dunn; B. Lowry; B. Walsh; J.D. Mar; C. Howard; R. Johnston; T. Williams

    2002-11-22

    Yucca Mountain, approximately 100 miles northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada, has been selected as the site for the nation's first geologic repository for high level nuclear waste. The Yucca Mountain Project (YMP) is currently developing the design for the underground facilities. Ventilation is a key component of the design as a way to maintain the desired thermal conditions in the emplacement drifts prior to closure. As a means of determining the effects of continuous ventilation on heat removal from the emplacement drifts two series of scaled ventilation tests have been performed. Both test series were performed in the DOE/North Las Vegas Atlas facility. The tests provided scaled (nominally 25% of the full scale emplacement drift design) thermal and flow process data that will be used to validate YMP heat and mass transport codes. The Phase I Ventilation Test series evaluated the ability of ambient ventilation air to remove energy under varying flow and input power conditions. The Phase II Ventilation Test series evaluated the ability of pre-conditioned ventilation air to remove energy under varying flow, input temperature and moisture content, and simulated waste package input power conditions. Twenty-two distinct ventilation tests were run.

  13. Scale testing of a partially confined blast chamber

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Grundling, W

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available on Partially Confining the Blast Chamber ?Emily?, CSIR report GLBL-0BSY2-10-008 Rev 1, February 2011. De Koker, P. Test Instruction: Testing of scaled model Semily and pendulum structure at DBEL, CSIR report GLBL-0BSY2-10-009 Rev 1, February 2011. SolidWorks...

  14. Functional Scaling of Musculoskeletal Models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, Morten Enemark; Andersen, Michael Skipper; de Zee, Mark;

    The validity of the predictions from musculoskeletal models depends largely on how well the morphology of the model matches that of the patient. To address this problem, we present a novel method to scale a cadaver-based musculoskeletal model to match both the segment lengths and joint parameters...... orientations are then used to morph/scale a cadaver based musculoskeletal model using a set of radial basis functions (RBFs). Using the functional joint axes to scale musculoskeletal models provides a better fit to the marker data, and allows for representation of patients with considerable difference in bone...... geometry, without the need for MR/CT scans. However, more validation activities are needed to better understand the effect of morphing musculoskeletal models based on functional joint parameters....

  15. Thermal scale modeling of radiation-conduction-convection systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shannon, R. L.

    1972-01-01

    Investigation of thermal scale modeling applied to radiation-conduction-convection systems with particular emphasis on the spacecraft cabin atmosphere/cabin wall thermal interface. The 'modified material preservation,' 'temperature preservation,' 'scaling compromises,' and 'Nusselt number preservation' scale modeling techniques and their inherent limitations and problem areas are described. The compromised scaling techniques of mass flux preservation and heat transfer coefficient preservation show promise of giving adequate thermal similitude while preserving both gas and temperature in the scale model. The use of these compromised scaling techniques was experimentally demonstrated in tests of full scale and 1/4 scale models. Correlation of test results for free and forced convection under various test conditions shows the effectiveness of these scaling techniques. It is concluded that either mass flux or heat transfer coefficient preservation may result in adequate thermal similitude depending on the system to be modeled. Heat transfer coefficient preservation should give good thermal similitude for manned spacecraft scale modeling applications.

  16. Port Adriano, 2D-Model Tests

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Burcharth, Hans F.; Andersen, Thomas Lykke; Jensen, Palle Meinert

    This report present the results of 2D physical model tests (length scale 1:50) carried out in a waveflume at Dept. of Civil Engineering, Aalborg University (AAU).......This report present the results of 2D physical model tests (length scale 1:50) carried out in a waveflume at Dept. of Civil Engineering, Aalborg University (AAU)....

  17. Large-Scale Aquifer Test at the Bemidji, Minnesota, Oil-Spill Site: Implications for Modeling Multiphase Flow, Natural Attenuation, and LNAPL Remediation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herkelrath, W. N.; Delin, G. N.

    2005-12-01

    A large-scale aquifer test was carried out at a crude oil spill site near Bemidji, Minnesota. The spill occurred in 1979 when a pipeline ruptured, spreading oil over a large area and creating three subsurface "pools" of high oil saturation near the water table. USGS scientists, in cooperation with researchers from several universities, have investigated the fate and transport of separate phase oil and hydrocarbons dissolved in ground water at this site since 1983. The primary goal of the aquifer test was to estimate parameters used in modeling processes such as subsurface flow of oil and water as well as natural attenuation of dissolved hydrocarbons in the plume. A secondary goal was to evaluate the effects of the oil on the parameters. Our aquifer test was carried out in July 2005 beneath the "north" oil pool, which occupies a 20x100 meter footprint. Prior to the test, the water table was about 6 meters below land surface, and the oil thickness in wells at the center of the pool was about 0.4 meters. A pumping well was installed near the center of the oil pool and screened 4-10 meters below the floating oil. During the test, water was pumped out at about 240 liters/min for 48 hours. Water levels were monitored in 21 wells that were screened below the water table and did not contain oil. Data loggers and pressure transducers were used to monitor 17 of these wells, and 4 wells were measured by hand using a tape. In 20 other wells that were screened at the water table and contained oil, depths to the oil-air and oil-water interfaces were monitored by hand using an oil-interface meter. Preliminary results indicate that oil thickness in wells within about 5 meters of the pumped well increased rapidly during the test to more than a meter. Oil also entered the top of the pumped well screen and filled the well bore to a thickness of about 3 meters. Preliminary analysis of water table drawdown vs. time data implies that the horizontal hydraulic conductivity is about 60 m

  18. Goethite Bench-scale and Large-scale Preparation Tests

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Josephson, Gary B.; Westsik, Joseph H.

    2011-10-23

    The Hanford Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) is the keystone for cleanup of high-level radioactive waste from our nation's nuclear defense program. The WTP will process high-level waste from the Hanford tanks and produce immobilized high-level waste glass for disposal at a national repository, low activity waste (LAW) glass, and liquid effluent from the vitrification off-gas scrubbers. The liquid effluent will be stabilized into a secondary waste form (e.g. grout-like material) and disposed on the Hanford site in the Integrated Disposal Facility (IDF) along with the low-activity waste glass. The major long-term environmental impact at Hanford results from technetium that volatilizes from the WTP melters and finally resides in the secondary waste. Laboratory studies have indicated that pertechnetate ({sup 99}TcO{sub 4}{sup -}) can be reduced and captured into a solid solution of {alpha}-FeOOH, goethite (Um 2010). Goethite is a stable mineral and can significantly retard the release of technetium to the environment from the IDF. The laboratory studies were conducted using reaction times of many days, which is typical of environmental subsurface reactions that were the genesis of this new process. This study was the first step in considering adaptation of the slow laboratory steps to a larger-scale and faster process that could be conducted either within the WTP or within the effluent treatment facility (ETF). Two levels of scale-up tests were conducted (25x and 400x). The largest scale-up produced slurries of Fe-rich precipitates that contained rhenium as a nonradioactive surrogate for {sup 99}Tc. The slurries were used in melter tests at Vitreous State Laboratory (VSL) to determine whether captured rhenium was less volatile in the vitrification process than rhenium in an unmodified feed. A critical step in the technetium immobilization process is to chemically reduce Tc(VII) in the pertechnetate (TcO{sub 4}{sup -}) to Tc(Iv)by reaction with the

  19. Aerodynamic results of a separation test (CA20) conducted at the Boeing transonic wind tunnel using 0.030-scale models of the configuration 140A/B (modified) SSV orbiter (model no. 45-0) and the Boeing 747 carrier (model no. AX 1319 I-1), volume 1. [wind tunnel tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dziubala, T.; Esparza, V.; Gillins, R. L.; Petrozzi, M.

    1975-01-01

    A Rockwell built 0.030-scale 45-0 modified Space Shuttle Orbiter Configuration 14?A/B model and a Boeing built 0.030-scale 747 carrier model were tested to provide six component force and moment data for each vehicle in proximity to the other at a matrix of relative positions, attitudes and test conditions (angles of attack and sideslip were varied). Orbiter model support system tare effects were determined for corrections to obtain support-free aerodynamics. In addition to the balance force data, pressures were measured. Pressure orifices were located at the base of the Orbiter, on either side of the vertical blade strut, and at the mid-root chord on either side of the vertical tail. Strain gages were installed on the Boeing 747 vertical tail to indicate buffet onset. Photographs of aerodynamic configurations tested are shown.

  20. Test Plan: WIPP bin-scale CH TRU waste tests

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Molecke, M.A.

    1990-08-01

    This WIPP Bin-Scale CH TRU Waste Test program described herein will provide relevant composition and kinetic rate data on gas generation and consumption resulting from TRU waste degradation, as impacted by synergistic interactions due to multiple degradation modes, waste form preparation, long-term repository environmental effects, engineered barrier materials, and, possibly, engineered modifications to be developed. Similar data on waste-brine leachate compositions and potentially hazardous volatile organic compounds released by the wastes will also be provided. The quantitative data output from these tests and associated technical expertise are required by the WIPP Performance Assessment (PA) program studies, and for the scientific benefit of the overall WIPP project. This Test Plan describes the necessary scientific and technical aspects, justifications, and rational for successfully initiating and conducting the WIPP Bin-Scale CH TRU Waste Test program. This Test Plan is the controlling scientific design definition and overall requirements document for this WIPP in situ test, as defined by Sandia National Laboratories (SNL), scientific advisor to the US Department of Energy, WIPP Project Office (DOE/WPO). 55 refs., 16 figs., 19 tabs.

  1. Testing agile requirements models

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    BOTASCHANJAN Jewgenij; PISTER Markus; RUMPE Bernhard

    2004-01-01

    This paper discusses a model-based approach to validate software requirements in agile development processes by simulation and in particular automated testing. The use of models as central development artifact needs to be added to the portfolio of software engineering techniques, to further increase efficiency and flexibility of the development beginning already early in the requirements definition phase. Testing requirements are some of the most important techniques to give feedback and to increase the quality of the result. Therefore testing of artifacts should be introduced as early as possible, even in the requirements definition phase.

  2. Comparison Between Overtopping Discharge in Small and Large Scale Models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Helgason, Einar; Burcharth, Hans F.

    2006-01-01

    small and large scale model tests show no clear evidence of scale effects for overtopping above a threshold value. In the large scale model no overtopping was measured for waveheights below Hs = 0.5m as the water sunk into the voids between the stones on the crest. For low overtopping scale effects...... are presented as the small-scale model underpredicts the overtopping discharge....

  3. Preliminary Scaling Estimate for Select Small Scale Mixing Demonstration Tests

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wells, Beric E.; Fort, James A.; Gauglitz, Phillip A.; Rector, David R.; Schonewill, Philip P.

    2013-09-12

    The Hanford Site double-shell tank (DST) system provides the staging location for waste that will be transferred to the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP). Specific WTP acceptance criteria for waste feed delivery describe the physical and chemical characteristics of the waste that must be met before the waste is transferred from the DSTs to the WTP. One of the more challenging requirements relates to the sampling and characterization of the undissolved solids (UDS) in a waste feed DST because the waste contains solid particles that settle and their concentration and relative proportion can change during the transfer of the waste in individual batches. A key uncertainty in the waste feed delivery system is the potential variation in UDS transferred in individual batches in comparison to an initial sample used for evaluating the acceptance criteria. To address this uncertainty, a number of small-scale mixing tests have been conducted as part of Washington River Protection Solutions’ Small Scale Mixing Demonstration (SSMD) project to determine the performance of the DST mixing and sampling systems.

  4. Testing the low scale seesaw and leptogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drewes, Marco; Garbrecht, Björn; Gueter, Dario; Klarić, Juraj

    2017-08-01

    Heavy neutrinos with masses below the electroweak scale can simultaneously generate the light neutrino masses via the seesaw mechanism and the baryon asymmetry of the universe via leptogenesis. The requirement to explain these phenomena imposes constraints on the mass spectrum of the heavy neutrinos, their flavour mixing pattern and their CP properties. We first combine bounds from different experiments in the past to map the viable parameter regions in which the minimal low scale seesaw model can explain the observed neutrino oscillations, while being consistent with the negative results of past searches for physics beyond the Standard Model. We then study which additional predictions for the properties of the heavy neutrinos can be made based on the requirement to explain the observed baryon asymmetry of the universe. Finally, we comment on the perspectives to find traces of heavy neutrinos in future experimental searches at the LHC, NA62, BELLE II, T2K, SHiP or a future high energy collider, such as ILC, CEPC or FCC-ee. If any heavy neutral leptons are discovered in the future, our results can be used to assess whether these particles are indeed the common origin of the light neutrino masses and the baryon asymmetry of the universe. If the magnitude of their couplings to all Standard Model flavours can be measured individually, and if the Dirac phase in the lepton mixing matrix is determined in neutrino oscillation experiments, then all model parameters can in principle be determined from this data. This makes the low scale seesaw a fully testable model of neutrino masses and baryogenesis.

  5. Hydraulic Model Tests on Modified Wave Dragon

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hald, Tue; Lynggaard, Jakob

    A floating model of the Wave Dragon (WD) was built in autumn 1998 by the Danish Maritime Institute in scale 1:50, see Sørensen and Friis-Madsen (1999) for reference. This model was subjected to a series of model tests and subsequent modifications at Aalborg University and in the following...... are found in Hald and Lynggaard (2001). Model tests and reconstruction are carried out during the phase 3 project: ”Wave Dragon. Reconstruction of an existing model in scale 1:50 and sequentiel tests of changes to the model geometry and mass distribution parameters” sponsored by the Danish Energy Agency...

  6. Comparison of Test and Finite Element Analysis for Two Full-Scale Helicopter Crash Tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Annett, Martin S.; Horta,Lucas G.

    2011-01-01

    Finite element analyses have been performed for two full-scale crash tests of an MD-500 helicopter. The first crash test was conducted to evaluate the performance of a composite deployable energy absorber under combined flight loads. In the second crash test, the energy absorber was removed to establish the baseline loads. The use of an energy absorbing device reduced the impact acceleration levels by a factor of three. Accelerations and kinematic data collected from the crash tests were compared to analytical results. Details of the full-scale crash tests and development of the system-integrated finite element model are briefly described along with direct comparisons of acceleration magnitudes and durations for the first full-scale crash test. Because load levels were significantly different between tests, models developed for the purposes of predicting the overall system response with external energy absorbers were not adequate under more severe conditions seen in the second crash test. Relative error comparisons were inadequate to guide model calibration. A newly developed model calibration approach that includes uncertainty estimation, parameter sensitivity, impact shape orthogonality, and numerical optimization was used for the second full-scale crash test. The calibrated parameter set reduced 2-norm prediction error by 51% but did not improve impact shape orthogonality.

  7. Yucca Mountain drift scale test progress report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Apps, J.; Birkholzer, J.T.; Peterson,J.E.; Sonnenthal, E.; Spycher, N.; Tsang, Y.W.; Williams, K.H.

    1999-01-01

    The Drift Scale Test (DST) is part of the Exploratory Studies Facility (ESF) Thermal Test being conducted underground at the potential high-level nuclear waste repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. The purpose of the ESF Thermal Test is to acquire a more in-depth understanding of the coupled thermal, mechanical, hydrological, and chemical processes likely to be encountered in the rock mass surrounding the potential geological repository at Yucca Mountain. These processes are monitored by a multitude of sensors to measure the temperature, humidity, gas pressure, and mechanical displacement, of the rock formation in response to the heat generated by the heaters. In addition to collecting passive monitoring data, active hydrological and geophysical testing is also being carried out periodically in the DST. These active tests are intended to monitor changes in the moisture redistribution in the rock mass, to collect water and gas samples for chemical and isotopic analysis, and to detect microfiacturing due to heating. On December 3, 1998, the heaters in the DST were activated. The planned heating phase of the DST is 4 years, and the cooling phase following the power shutoff will be of similar duration. The present report summarizes interpretation and analysis of thermal, hydrological, chemical, and geophysical data for the first 6 months; it is the first of many progress reports to be prepared during the DST.

  8. Evaluation of Landing Characteristics Achieved by Simulations and Flight Tests on a Small-scaled Model Related to Magnetically Levitated Advanced Take-off and Landing Operations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rohacs, D.; Voskuijl, M.; Siepenkotter, N.

    2014-01-01

    The goal of this paper is to simulate and measure on a small-scaled model the landing characteristics related to take-off and landing (TOL) operations supported by a magnetic levitation (MAGLEV) system as ground-based power supply. The technical feasibility and the potential benefits of using ground

  9. Evaluation of Landing Characteristics Achieved by Simulations and Flight Tests on a Small-scaled Model Related to Magnetically Levitated Advanced Take-off and Landing Operations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rohacs, D.; Voskuijl, M.; Siepenkotter, N.

    2014-01-01

    The goal of this paper is to simulate and measure on a small-scaled model the landing characteristics related to take-off and landing (TOL) operations supported by a magnetic levitation (MAGLEV) system as ground-based power supply. The technical feasibility and the potential benefits of using ground

  10. Seamless cross-scale modeling with SCHISM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yinglong J.; Ye, Fei; Stanev, Emil V.; Grashorn, Sebastian

    2016-06-01

    We present a new 3D unstructured-grid model (SCHISM) which is an upgrade from an existing model (SELFE). The new advection scheme for the momentum equation includes an iterative smoother to reduce excess mass produced by higher-order kriging method, and a new viscosity formulation is shown to work robustly for generic unstructured grids and effectively filter out spurious modes without introducing excessive dissipation. A new higher-order implicit advection scheme for transport (TVD2) is proposed to effectively handle a wide range of Courant numbers as commonly found in typical cross-scale applications. The addition of quadrangular elements into the model, together with a recently proposed, highly flexible vertical grid system (Zhang et al., A new vertical coordinate system for a 3D unstructured-grid model. Ocean Model. 85, 2015), leads to model polymorphism that unifies 1D/2DH/2DV/3D cells in a single model grid. Results from several test cases demonstrate the model's good performance in the eddying regime, which presents greater challenges for unstructured-grid models and represents the last missing link for our cross-scale model. The model can thus be used to simulate cross-scale processes in a seamless fashion (i.e. from deep ocean into shallow depths).

  11. Wave Reflection Model Tests

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Burcharth, H. F.; Larsen, Brian Juul

    The investigation concerns the design of a new internal breakwater in the main port of Ibiza. The objective of the model tests was in the first hand to optimize the cross section to make the wave reflection low enough to ensure that unacceptable wave agitation will not occur in the port. Secondly...

  12. Full Scale Explosive Tests in Woomera, Australia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GUPTA A; MENDIS P; LUMANTARNA R; NGO T

    2006-01-01

    Two large explosion trials (5 000 kg TNT and 500 kg ANFO) were conducted in Woomera,Australia in April/May 2006.Advance Protective Technologies for Engineering Structures (APTES) group tested 2 large single-storey concrete modules with individual components such as doors,windows and tiled panels.A description of the trial and details of various modules tested in these trials are presented in the paper.Numerical modelling and simulations are performed using computer programs,CONWEP,AIR3D and AUTODYN.A comparison of the pressure time histories obtained using these codes is made along with the concluding remarks.

  13. SDG and qualitative trend based model multiple scale validation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Dong; Xu, Xin; Yin, Jianjin; Zhang, Hongyu; Zhang, Beike

    2017-09-01

    Verification, Validation and Accreditation (VV&A) is key technology of simulation and modelling. For the traditional model validation methods, the completeness is weak; it is carried out in one scale; it depends on human experience. The SDG (Signed Directed Graph) and qualitative trend based multiple scale validation is proposed. First the SDG model is built and qualitative trends are added to the model. And then complete testing scenarios are produced by positive inference. The multiple scale validation is carried out by comparing the testing scenarios with outputs of simulation model in different scales. Finally, the effectiveness is proved by carrying out validation for a reactor model.

  14. A large-scale solar greenhouse dryer using polycarbonate cover: Modeling and testing in a tropical environment of Lao People's Democratic Republic

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Janjai, Serm; Intawee, Poolsak; Kaewkiew, Jinda; Sritus, Chanoke [Solar Energy Research Laboratory, Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Silpakorn University, Nakhon Pathom 73000 (Thailand); Khamvongsa, Vathsana [Department of Physics, Faculty of Natural Science, National University of Laos, P O Box 7322, Vientiane (Lao People' s Democratic Republic)

    2011-03-15

    A large-scale solar greenhouse dryer with a loading capacity of 1000 kg of fruits or vegetables has been developed and tested at field levels. The dryer has a parabolic shape and the dryer is covered with polycarbonate sheets. The base of the dryer is a black concrete floor with an area of 7.5 x 20.0 m{sup 2}. Nine DC fans powered by three 50-W solar cell modules are used to ventilate the dryer. The dryer was installed at Champasak (15.13 N, 105.79 E) in Lao People's Democratic Republic (Lao PDR). It is routinely used to dry chilli, banana and coffee. To assess the experimental performances of the dryer, air temperature, air relative humidity and product moisture contents were measured. One thousand kilograms of banana with the initial moisture content of 68% (wb) was dried within 5 days, compared to 7 days required for natural sun drying with the same weather conditions. Also three hundred kilograms of chilli with the initial moisture content of 75% (wb) was dried within 3 days while the natural sun drying needed 5 days. Two hundred kilograms of coffee with the initial moisture content of 52% (wb) was dried within 2 days as compared to 4 days required for natural sun drying. The chilli, coffee and banana dried in this dryer were completely protected from insects, animals and rain. Furthermore, good quality of dried products was obtained. The payback period of the dryer is estimated to be 2.5 years. A system of partial differential equations describing heat and moisture transfer during drying of chilli, coffee and banana in the greenhouse dryer was developed. These equations were solved by using the finite different method. The simulated results agree well with the experimental data. This model can be used to provide the design data for this type of dryer in other locations. (author)

  15. Utilisation of real-scale renewable energy test facility for validation of generic wind turbine and wind power plant controller models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zeni, Lorenzo; Hesselbæk, Bo; Bech, John; Sørensen, Poul Ejnar; Gevorgian, Vahan; Wallen, Robb

    2016-09-01

    This article presents an example of application of a modern test facility conceived for experiments regarding the integration of renewable energy in the power system. The capabilities of the test facility are used to validate dynamic simulation models of wind power plants and their controllers. The models are based on standard and generic blocks. The successful validation of events related to the control of active power (control phenomena in <10 Hz range, including frequency control and power oscillation damping) is described, demonstrating the capabilities of the test facility and drawing the track for future work and improvements.

  16. 直升机迫降着水缩比模型试验方法的研究%Helicopter Ditching Scale Model Test Methods

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李涛; 李名琦; 吴建华

    2015-01-01

    论文参考了船舶等行业水上试验方法,对直升机模型着水试验方法进行了研究,对着水试验模型、试验原理、试验设备设施、试验方法等进行了分析,初步制定了直升机模型着水试验的要求和数据分析方法,为直升机着水试验的应用提供参考。%With reference to the ship industry test on water ,research on the helicopter model ditching test methods is conducted ,and an analysis is made on the ditching test model ,test principles ,test installations ,test methods ,then the re‐quirements and data analysis methods for the helicopter model ditching test are formulated to provide reference for application of the helicopter ditching test .

  17. Research-scale melter test report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cooper, M.F.; Elliott, M.L.; Eyler, L.L.; Freeman, C.J.; Higginson, J.J.; Mahoney, L.A.; Powell, M.R.

    1994-05-01

    The Melter Performance Assessment (MPA) activity in the Pacific Northwest Laboratory`s (PNL) Hanford Waste Vitrification Plant (HWVP) Technology Development (PHTD) effort is intended to determine the impact of noble metals on the operational life of the reference HWVP melter. As a part of this activity, a parametric melter test was completed using a Research-Scale Melter (RSM). The RSM is a small, approximately 1/100-scale melter, 6-in.-diameter, that allows rapid changing of process conditions and subsequent re-establishment of a steady-state condition. The test matrix contained nine different segments that varied the melter operating parameters (glass and plenum temperatures) and feed properties (oxide concentration, redox potential, and noble metal concentrations) so that the effects of these parameters on noble metal agglomeration on the melter floor could be evaluated. The RSM operated for 48 days and consumed 1,300 L of feed, equating to 153 tank turnovers. The run produced 531 kg of glass. During the latter portion of the run, the resistance between the electrodes decreased. Upon destructive examination of the melter, a layer of noble metals was found on the bottom. This was surprising because the glass residence time in the RSM is only 10% of the HWVP plant melter. The noble metals layer impacted the melter significantly. Approximately 1/3 of one paddle electrode was melted or corroded off. The cause is assumed to be localized heating from short circuiting of the electrode to the noble metal layer. The metal layer also removed approximately 1/2 in. of the refractory on the bottom of the melter. The mechanism for this damage is not presently known.

  18. Site-Scale Saturated Zone Flow Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    G. Zyvoloski

    2003-12-17

    The purpose of this model report is to document the components of the site-scale saturated-zone flow model at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, in accordance with administrative procedure (AP)-SIII.lOQ, ''Models''. This report provides validation and confidence in the flow model that was developed for site recommendation (SR) and will be used to provide flow fields in support of the Total Systems Performance Assessment (TSPA) for the License Application. The output from this report provides the flow model used in the ''Site-Scale Saturated Zone Transport'', MDL-NBS-HS-000010 Rev 01 (BSC 2003 [162419]). The Site-Scale Saturated Zone Transport model then provides output to the SZ Transport Abstraction Model (BSC 2003 [164870]). In particular, the output from the SZ site-scale flow model is used to simulate the groundwater flow pathways and radionuclide transport to the accessible environment for use in the TSPA calculations. Since the development and calibration of the saturated-zone flow model, more data have been gathered for use in model validation and confidence building, including new water-level data from Nye County wells, single- and multiple-well hydraulic testing data, and new hydrochemistry data. In addition, a new hydrogeologic framework model (HFM), which incorporates Nye County wells lithology, also provides geologic data for corroboration and confidence in the flow model. The intended use of this work is to provide a flow model that generates flow fields to simulate radionuclide transport in saturated porous rock and alluvium under natural or forced gradient flow conditions. The flow model simulations are completed using the three-dimensional (3-D), finite-element, flow, heat, and transport computer code, FEHM Version (V) 2.20 (software tracking number (STN): 10086-2.20-00; LANL 2003 [161725]). Concurrently, process-level transport model and methodology for calculating radionuclide transport in the saturated zone at Yucca

  19. Bench Scale Saltcake Dissolution Test Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    BECHTOLD, D.B.; PACQUET, E.A.

    2000-12-06

    A potential scenario for retrieving saltcake from single shell tanks is the ''Rainbird{reg_sign} sprinkler'' method. Water is distributed evenly across the surface of the saltcake and allowed to percolate by gravity through the waste. The salt dissolves in the water, forming a saturated solution. The saturated liquid is removed by a saltwell pump situated near the bottom of the tank. By this method, there is never a large inventory of liquid in the tank that could pose a threat of leakage. There are many variables or factors that can influence the hydrodynamics of this retrieval process. They include saltcake porosity; saltwell pumping rate; salt dissolution chemistry; factors that could promote flow channeling (e.g. tank walls, dry wells, inclusions or discontinuities in the saltcake); method of water distribution; plug formation due to crystal formations or accumulation of insoluble solids. A brief literature search indicates that very little experimental data exist on these aspects of saltcake dissolution (Wiersma 1996, 1997). The tests reported here were planned (Herting, 2000) to provide preliminary data and information for planning future, scaled-up tests of the sprinkler method.

  20. Modeling agreement on bounded scales.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanbelle, Sophie; Lesaffre, Emmanuel

    2017-01-01

    Agreement is an important concept in medical and behavioral sciences, in particular in clinical decision making where disagreements possibly imply a different patient management. The concordance correlation coefficient is an appropriate measure to quantify agreement between two scorers on a quantitative scale. However, this measure is based on the first two moments, which could poorly summarize the shape of the score distribution on bounded scales. Bounded outcome scores are common in medical and behavioral sciences. Typical examples are scores obtained on visual analog scales and scores derived as the number of positive items on a questionnaire. These kinds of scores often show a non-standard distribution, like a J- or U-shape, questioning the usefulness of the concordance correlation coefficient as agreement measure. The logit-normal distribution has shown to be successful in modeling bounded outcome scores of two types: (1) when the bounded score is a coarsened version of a latent score with a logit-normal distribution on the [0,1] interval and (2) when the bounded score is a proportion with the true probability having a logit-normal distribution. In the present work, a model-based approach, based on a bivariate generalization of the logit-normal distribution, is developed in a Bayesian framework to assess the agreement on bounded scales. This method permits to directly study the impact of predictors on the concordance correlation coefficient and can be simply implemented in standard Bayesian softwares, like JAGS and WinBUGS. The performances of the new method are compared to the classical approach using simulations. Finally, the methodology is used in two different medical domains: cardiology and rheumatology.

  1. Rocket Plume Scaling for Orion Wind Tunnel Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brauckmann, Gregory J.; Greathouse, James S.; White, Molly E.

    2011-01-01

    A wind tunnel test program was undertaken to assess the jet interaction effects caused by the various solid rocket motors used on the Orion Launch Abort Vehicle (LAV). These interactions of the external flowfield and the various rocket plumes can cause localized aerodynamic disturbances yielding significant and highly non-linear control amplifications and attenuations. This paper discusses the scaling methodologies used to model the flight plumes in the wind tunnel using cold air as the simulant gas. Comparisons of predicted flight, predicted wind tunnel, and measured wind tunnel forces-and-moments and plume flowfields are made to assess the effectiveness of the selected scaling methodologies.

  2. Integrating Local Scale Drainage Measures in Meso Scale Catchment Modelling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra Hellmers

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This article presents a methodology to optimize the integration of local scale drainage measures in catchment modelling. The methodology enables to zoom into the processes (physically, spatially and temporally where detailed physical based computation is required and to zoom out where lumped conceptualized approaches are applied. It allows the definition of parameters and computation procedures on different spatial and temporal scales. Three methods are developed to integrate features of local scale drainage measures in catchment modelling: (1 different types of local drainage measures are spatially integrated in catchment modelling by a data mapping; (2 interlinked drainage features between data objects are enabled on the meso, local and micro scale; (3 a method for modelling multiple interlinked layers on the micro scale is developed. For the computation of flow routing on the meso scale, the results of the local scale measures are aggregated according to their contributing inlet in the network structure. The implementation of the methods is realized in a semi-distributed rainfall-runoff model. The implemented micro scale approach is validated with a laboratory physical model to confirm the credibility of the model. A study of a river catchment of 88 km2 illustrated the applicability of the model on the regional scale.

  3. Models of large scale structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frenk, C.S. (Physics Dept., Univ. of Durham (UK))

    1991-01-01

    The ingredients required to construct models of the cosmic large scale structure are discussed. Input from particle physics leads to a considerable simplification by offering concrete proposals for the geometry of the universe, the nature of the dark matter and the primordial fluctuations that seed the growth of structure. The remaining ingredient is the physical interaction that governs dynamical evolution. Empirical evidence provided by an analysis of a redshift survey of IRAS galaxies suggests that gravity is the main agent shaping the large-scale structure. In addition, this survey implies large values of the mean cosmic density, {Omega}> or approx.0.5, and is consistent with a flat geometry if IRAS galaxies are somewhat more clustered than the underlying mass. Together with current limits on the density of baryons from Big Bang nucleosynthesis, this lends support to the idea of a universe dominated by non-baryonic dark matter. Results from cosmological N-body simulations evolved from a variety of initial conditions are reviewed. In particular, neutrino dominated and cold dark matter dominated universes are discussed in detail. Finally, it is shown that apparent periodicities in the redshift distributions in pencil-beam surveys arise frequently from distributions which have no intrinsic periodicity but are clustered on small scales. (orig.).

  4. Test equating, scaling, and linking methods and practices

    CERN Document Server

    Kolen, Michael J

    2014-01-01

    This book provides an introduction to test equating, scaling, and linking, including those concepts and practical issues that are critical for developers and all other testing professionals.  In addition to statistical procedures, successful equating, scaling, and linking involves many aspects of testing, including procedures to develop tests, to administer and score tests, and to interpret scores earned on tests. Test equating methods are used with many standardized tests in education and psychology to ensure that scores from multiple test forms can be used interchangeably.  Test scaling is the process of developing score scales that are used when scores on standardized tests are reported. In test linking, scores from two or more tests are related to one another. Linking has received much recent attention, due largely to investigations of linking similarly named tests from different test publishers or tests constructed for different purposes. In recent years, researchers from the education, psychology, and...

  5. 钢筋砼框架结构1/10模型的三维振动台试验研究%Three-Dimensional Shaking Table Test of 1/10 Scale Model of Reinforced Concrete Frame Structure

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘涛; 张志海; 谢利民

    2001-01-01

    A 1/10 scale model of reinforced conorete (R.C.) frame structure was tested on the 15t-shaking table of State Key Laboratory, Tongji University. The structural prototype was a 10-storey office building that was damaged in the 1985 Mexico major earthquake[1]. The original acceleration records in the earthquake were applied as the input waves In the test. The dynamical test model was designed according to the general law of similarity, and the effect of the shortage of artificial quality was considered. The model was carefully made of fine gravel concrete and galvanized iron wire. The damage of test model is in good agreement with that of archetypal building in the experiment.

  6. 钢筋砼框架结构1/10模型的三维振动台试验研究%Three-Dimensional Shaking Table Test of 1/10 Scale Model of Reinforced Concrete Frame Structure

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘涛; 张志海; 谢利民

    2000-01-01

    A 1/10 scale model of reinforced conorete (R.C.) frame structure was tested on the 15t-shaking table of State Key Laboratory, Tongji University. The structural prototype was a 10-storey office building that was damaged in the 1985 Mexico major earthquake[1]. The original acceleration records in the earthquake were applied as the input waves In the test. The dynamical test model was designed according to the general law of similarity, and the effect of the shortage of artificial quality was considered. The model was carefully made of fine gravel concrete and galvanized iron wire. The damage of test model is in good agreement with that of archetypal building in the experiment.

  7. DECOVALEX III PROJECT. Thermal-Mechanical Modeling of the Yucca Mountain Project Drift Scale Test. Task 2B/2C Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Datta, Robin N. [Bechtel SAlC Company, Las Vegas (US)] (comp.)

    2005-02-15

    Tasks 2B and 2C deal with the mechanical process in the DST during the heating and cooling phases of the test. To model mechanical processes in the test it is necessary to have the time-evolution of temperature distributions in the test block which are inputs in the calculation of the mechanical effects. The difference between task 2B and 2C is that in 2B the mechanical effects are simulated using modeled temperature distributions as inputs, while in 2C the mechanical effects are calculated using measured temperature distributions as inputs. The given data include the results of geologic, thermal, mechanical, hydrologic, and mineralogic/petrologic characterization of the test block of the DST, the as-built configuration of the test block, including locations of various sensors and measuring instruments and the plans of heating and cooling, including expected heater powers at various times, respectively. The teams were required to predict the time-evolution of the displacements in the test block measured in the MPBX holes and the changes in the (fracture) permeability of the rock due to thermal mechanical processes, to be compared at certain time intervals. The research teams of ENRESA/UPC (Spain), DOE/LBNL (USA), CEA (France) and NRC/CNWRA (USA) participated the task 2B/2C with different numerical approaches and their reports are enclosed in the Attachments A-D, respectively. The DOE and ENRESA teams performed coupled THM analyses that included modeling of two-phase fluid flow (air and water), heat transfer (conduction and convection), and mechanical stress and strain, with dual-permeability and equivalent continuum approaches, respectively. CEA and NRC teams performed TM analyses in which the measured temperature field was imported to the numerical models. For simulation of rock-mechanical behavior, the DOE and ENRESA teams used elastic models, whereas CEA and NRC teams applied various elasto-plastic models. TM-induced permeability changes were modeled by DOE

  8. Recent tests of realistic models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brida, Giorgio; Degiovanni, Ivo Pietro; Genovese, Marco; Gramegna, Marco; Piacentini, Fabrizio; Schettini, Valentina; Traina, Paolo, E-mail: m.genovese@inrim.i [Istituto Nazionale di Ricerca Metrologica, Strada delle Cacce 91, 10135 Torino (Italy)

    2009-06-01

    In this article we present recent activity of our laboratories on testing specific hidden variable models and in particular we discuss the realizations of Alicki - van Ryn test and tests of SED and of Santos' models.

  9. Flutter tests (IS4) of the 0.0125-scale shuttle reflection plane model 30-OTS in the Langley Research Center 26-inch transonic blowdown tunnel test no. 547

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotch, M. A.

    1974-01-01

    A series of slab wing flutter models with rigid orbiter fuselage, external tank, and SRB models of the space shuttle were tested, in a reflection plane arrangement, in the NASA Langley Research Center's 26-inch Transonic Blowdown Tunnel. Model flutter boundaries were obtained for both a wing-alone configuration and a wing-with-orbiter, tank and SRB configuration. Additional test points were taken of the wing-with-orbiter configuration, as a correlation with the wing-alone condition. A description of the wind tunnel models and test procedures utilized in the experiment are provided.

  10. Planck Scale Gravity Test with Accelerators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gharibyan, V.

    2015-01-01

    Quantum or torsion gravity models predict unusual properties of space-time at very short distances. In particular, near the Planck length, around 10-35m, empty space may behave as a crystal, singly or doubly refractive. However, this hypothesis remains uncheckable for any direct measurement since the smallest distance accessible in experiment is about 10-19m at the LHC. Here I propose a laboratory test to measure the space refractivity and birefringence induced by gravity. A sensitivity from 10-31m down to the Planck length could be reached at existent GeV and future TeV energy lepton accelerators using laser Compton scattering. There are already experimental hints for gravity signature at distances approaching the Planck length by 5-7 orders of magnitude, derived from SLC and HERA data.

  11. Testing Planck-Scale Gravity with Accelerators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gharibyan, Vahagn

    2012-10-01

    Quantum or torsion gravity models predict unusual properties of space-time at very short distances. In particular, near the Planck length, around 10-35m, empty space may behave as a crystal, singly or doubly refractive. However, this hypothesis remains uncheckable for any direct measurement, since the smallest distance accessible in experiment is about 10-19m at the LHC. Here I propose a laboratory test to measure the space refractivity and birefringence induced by gravity. A sensitivity from 10-31m down to the Planck length could be reached at existent GeV and future TeV energy lepton accelerators using laser Compton scattering. There are already experimental hints for gravity signature at distances approaching the Planck length by 5-7 orders of magnitude, derived from SLC and HERA data.

  12. Full-Scale Dynamic Testing of Dolosse to Destruction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Burcharth, Hans F.

    1981-01-01

    It is well known that the relative dynamic strength of unreinforced slender concrete units decreases as the size increases. Big units can resist relatively smaller movements than small units. When model tests of cover layer stability are performed the determination of the damage criterion...... that should be adopted must therefore be based on knowledge of the dynamic strength of the corresponding prototype units. With the purpose of establishing a relationship between the size and the dynamic strength of unreinforced units, some full-scale tests to destruction of 1.5 and 5.4 t units were performed...

  13. Propfan test assessment testbed aircraft flutter model test report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenness, C. M. J.

    1987-01-01

    The PropFan Test Assessment (PTA) program includes flight tests of a propfan power plant mounted on the left wind of a modified Gulfstream II testbed aircraft. A static balance boom is mounted on the right wing tip for lateral balance. Flutter analyses indicate that these installations reduce the wing flutter stabilizing speed and that torsional stiffening and the installation of a flutter stabilizing tip boom are required on the left wing for adequate flutter safety margins. Wind tunnel tests of a 1/9th scale high speed flutter model of the testbed aircraft were conducted. The test program included the design, fabrication, and testing of the flutter model and the correlation of the flutter test data with analysis results. Excellent correlations with the test data were achieved in posttest flutter analysis using actual model properties. It was concluded that the flutter analysis method used was capable of accurate flutter predictions for both the (symmetric) twin propfan configuration and the (unsymmetric) single propfan configuration. The flutter analysis also revealed that the differences between the tested model configurations and the current aircraft design caused the (scaled) model flutter speed to be significantly higher than that of the aircraft, at least for the single propfan configuration without a flutter boom. Verification of the aircraft final design should, therefore, be based on flutter predictions made with the test validated analysis methods.

  14. Nurse Competence Scale--psychometric testing in a Norwegian context.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wangensteen, Sigrid; Johansson, Inger S; Nordström, Gun

    2015-01-01

    The aim was to test the construct validity of the Nurse Competence Scale. The Nurse Competence Scale has been used in hospital settings for various purposes in several countries. Despite this, confirmatory factor analyses are scarcely reported. The present study is based on re-analyses of data from 2007 (i.e. psychometric testing) and 593 newly graduated nurses working in various contexts were included. Confirmatory as well as exploratory factor analyses (Principal Component Analysis) were carried out. The original 7-factor model of the Nurse Competence Scale (73 items) was not confirmed. The exploratory factor analyses resulted in a Norwegian Nurse Competence Scale consisting of 46 items in the following competence categories: Planning and delivery of care, Teaching functions, Professional leadership, Research utilization and nursing values and Professional awareness. The results underline the needs for psychometric testing of an instrument after translation processes. The instrument is suitable for describing and comparing nurse competence for various reasons. It may also be helpful in creating competence development programs at an individual as well as at an organizational level. Further studies with a broader sample are recommended.

  15. Brane World Models Need Low String Scale

    CERN Document Server

    Antoniadis, Ignatios; Calmet, Xavier

    2011-01-01

    Models with large extra dimensions offer the possibility of the Planck scale being of order the electroweak scale, thus alleviating the gauge hierarchy problem. We show that these models suffer from a breakdown of unitarity at around three quarters of the low effective Planck scale. An obvious candidate to fix the unitarity problem is string theory. We therefore argue that it is necessary for the string scale to appear below the effective Planck scale and that the first signature of such models would be string resonances. We further translate experimental bounds on the string scale into bounds on the effective Planck scale.

  16. Test Scaling and Value-Added Measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballou, Dale

    2009-01-01

    Conventional value-added assessment requires that achievement be reported on an interval scale. While many metrics do not have this property, application of item response theory (IRT) is said to produce interval scales. However, it is difficult to confirm that the requisite conditions are met. Even when they are, the properties of the data that…

  17. PEP Support: Laboratory Scale Leaching and Permeate Stability Tests

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Russell, Renee L.; Peterson, Reid A.; Rinehart, Donald E.; Buchmiller, William C.

    2010-05-21

    This report documents results from a variety of activities requested by the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP). The activities related to caustic leaching, oxidative leaching, permeate precipitation behavior of waste as well as chromium (Cr) leaching are: • Model Input Boehmite Leaching Tests • Pretreatment Engineering Platform (PEP) Support Leaching Tests • PEP Parallel Leaching Tests • Precipitation Study Results • Cr Caustic and Oxidative Leaching Tests. Leaching test activities using the PEP simulant provided input to a boehmite dissolution model and determined the effect of temperature on mass loss during caustic leaching, the reaction rate constant for the boehmite dissolution, and the effect of aeration in enhancing the chromium dissolution during caustic leaching. Other tests were performed in parallel with the PEP tests to support the development of scaling factors for caustic and oxidative leaching. Another study determined if precipitate formed in the wash solution after the caustic leach in the PEP. Finally, the leaching characteristics of different chromium compounds under different conditions were examined to determine the best one to use in further testing.

  18. DEBATES SCALING UP HIV TESTING IN RESOURCE ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    annaline

    undergo a diagnostic test.5 The requirements for valid consent ... settings, where the need for knowledge of HIV status for both prevention and care is critical. ... in Africa, access to HIV testing and to voluntary counselling and testing (VCT) has been very limited, .... testing, in which health care workers make a point of offering.

  19. Scale-Scale Correlation as Discriminant Among the Biased Galaxy Formation Models

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FENG Long-Long; XIANG Shou-Ping

    2001-01-01

    Using the mock galaxy catalogues created from the N-body simulations, various biasing prescriptions for modelling the relative distribution between the galaxies and the underlying dark matter are statistically tested by using scale-scale correlation. We found that the scale-scale correlation is capable of breaking the model degeneracy indicated by the low-order clustering statistics, and could be taken as an effective discriminant among a variety of biasing models. Particularly, comparing with the APM bright galaxy catalogue, we infer that the two parameter Lagrangian biasing model gives the best fit to the observed clustering features.

  20. Static Aeroelastic Scaling and Analysis of a Sub-Scale Flexible Wing Wind Tunnel Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ting, Eric; Lebofsky, Sonia; Nguyen, Nhan; Trinh, Khanh

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents an approach to the development of a scaled wind tunnel model for static aeroelastic similarity with a full-scale wing model. The full-scale aircraft model is based on the NASA Generic Transport Model (GTM) with flexible wing structures referred to as the Elastically Shaped Aircraft Concept (ESAC). The baseline stiffness of the ESAC wing represents a conventionally stiff wing model. Static aeroelastic scaling is conducted on the stiff wing configuration to develop the wind tunnel model, but additional tailoring is also conducted such that the wind tunnel model achieves a 10% wing tip deflection at the wind tunnel test condition. An aeroelastic scaling procedure and analysis is conducted, and a sub-scale flexible wind tunnel model based on the full-scale's undeformed jig-shape is developed. Optimization of the flexible wind tunnel model's undeflected twist along the span, or pre-twist or wash-out, is then conducted for the design test condition. The resulting wind tunnel model is an aeroelastic model designed for the wind tunnel test condition.

  1. Small-Scale Testing of Laterally Loaded Monopiles in Sand

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomassen, Kristina; Roesen, Hanne Ravn; Ibsen, Lars Bo

    2011-01-01

    of small-scale laboratory tests. Six quasi-static tests are conducted on piles with diameters of 40mm and 100mm and a slenderness ratio, L/D, of 5. To minimise scale effects, the tests are carried out in a pressure tank at various stress levels. From the obtained load-deflection relationships...... shows that small-scale tests applied with overburden pressure are preferable....

  2. How do OSS projects change in number and size? A large-scale analysis to test a model of project growth

    CERN Document Server

    Schweitzer, Frank; Tessone, Claudio J; Xia, Xi

    2015-01-01

    Established Open Source Software (OSS) projects can grow in size if new developers join, but also the number of OSS projects can grow if developers choose to found new projects. We discuss to what extent an established model for firm growth can be applied to the dynamics of OSS projects. Our analysis is based on a large-scale data set from SourceForge (SF) consisting of monthly data for 10 years, for up to 360'000 OSS projects and up to 340'000 developers. Over this time period, we find an exponential growth both in the number of projects and developers, with a remarkable increase of single-developer projects after 2009. We analyze the monthly entry and exit rates for both projects and developers, the growth rate of established projects and the monthly project size distribution. To derive a prediction for the latter, we use modeling assumptions of how newly entering developers choose to either found a new project or to join existing ones. Our model applies only to collaborative projects that are deemed to gro...

  3. MULTI-SCALE GAUSSIAN PROCESSES MODEL

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhou Yatong; Zhang Taiyi; Li Xiaohe

    2006-01-01

    A novel model named Multi-scale Gaussian Processes (MGP) is proposed. Motivated by the ideas of multi-scale representations in the wavelet theory, in the new model, a Gaussian process is represented at a scale by a linear basis that is composed of a scale function and its different translations. Finally the distribution of the targets of the given samples can be obtained at different scales. Compared with the standard Gaussian Processes (GP) model, the MGP model can control its complexity conveniently just by adjusting the scale parameter. So it can trade-off the generalization ability and the empirical risk rapidly. Experiments verify the feasibility of the MGP model, and exhibit that its performance is superior to the GP model if appropriate scales are chosen.

  4. Scaling Flight Tests of Unmanned Air Vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-09-01

    historical perspective, the concept of scaling goes back to 1638, when Galileo first introduced “scaling” and “physics” in his treatise Disclosures...Vertical Field of View,VFOV (degrees):5.16897 103 Bibliography 1. G. Galilei , Disclosure and Mathematic Demonstrations Concerning Two Sciences

  5. Test Review: Anger Regulation and Expression Scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavlazoglu, Baki; Erdogan, Niyazi; Paine, Taylor; Jones, Meredith

    2013-01-01

    This review focuses on the Anger Regulation and Expression Scale (ARES) which was developed by DiGiuseppe and Tafrate (2011) and published by Multi-Health Systems Inc. The ARES was designed to be a self-report measure of anger expression and regulation in youth aged 10 to 17 years and was intended to be used in screening, individual assessment,…

  6. Testing gravity at large scales with H I intensity mapping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pourtsidou, Alkistis

    2016-09-01

    We investigate the possibility of testing Einstein's general theory of relativity (GR) and the standard cosmological model via the EG statistic using neutral hydrogen (H I) intensity mapping. We generalize the Fourier space estimator for EG to include H I as a biased tracer of matter and forecast statistical errors using H I clustering and lensing surveys that can be performed in the near future, in combination with ongoing and forthcoming optical galaxy and cosmic microwave background (CMB) surveys. We find that fractional errors <1 per cent in the EG measurement can be achieved in a number of cases and compare the ability of various survey combinations to differentiate between GR and specific modified gravity models. Measuring EG with intensity mapping and the Square Kilometre Array can provide exquisite tests of gravity at cosmological scales.

  7. Full-scale and bench-scale testing of a coal-fueled gas turbine system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roberts, P.B.; LeCren, R.T.; Cowell, L.H.; Galica, M.A.; Stephenson, M.D.; Wen, C.S.

    1992-01-01

    Components for a coal-fueled industrial gas turbine were developed and tested at both benchscale and full-scale. The components included a two stage slagging combustor, a particulate rejection impact separator (PRIS), and a secondary particulate filter. The Integrated Bench Scale Test Facility (IBSTF) was used for the filter tests ana some of the PRIS testing. Full-scale combustor testing has been carried-out both with and without the PRIS. Bench-scale testing has included evaluating the feasibility of on-site CWM preparation, developing a water-cooled impactor and an extended run with new secondary candle filters.

  8. Full-scale and bench-scale testing of a coal-fueled gas turbine system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roberts, P.B.; LeCren, R.T.; Cowell, L.H.; Galica, M.A.; Stephenson, M.D.; Wen, C.S.

    1992-12-31

    Components for a coal-fueled industrial gas turbine were developed and tested at both benchscale and full-scale. The components included a two stage slagging combustor, a particulate rejection impact separator (PRIS), and a secondary particulate filter. The Integrated Bench Scale Test Facility (IBSTF) was used for the filter tests ana some of the PRIS testing. Full-scale combustor testing has been carried-out both with and without the PRIS. Bench-scale testing has included evaluating the feasibility of on-site CWM preparation, developing a water-cooled impactor and an extended run with new secondary candle filters.

  9. Drift-Scale THC Seepage Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    C.R. Bryan

    2005-02-17

    The purpose of this report (REV04) is to document the thermal-hydrologic-chemical (THC) seepage model, which simulates the composition of waters that could potentially seep into emplacement drifts, and the composition of the gas phase. The THC seepage model is processed and abstracted for use in the total system performance assessment (TSPA) for the license application (LA). This report has been developed in accordance with ''Technical Work Plan for: Near-Field Environment and Transport: Coupled Processes (Mountain-Scale TH/THC/THM, Drift-Scale THC Seepage, and Post-Processing Analysis for THC Seepage) Report Integration'' (BSC 2005 [DIRS 172761]). The technical work plan (TWP) describes planning information pertaining to the technical scope, content, and management of this report. The plan for validation of the models documented in this report is given in Section 2.2.2, ''Model Validation for the DS THC Seepage Model,'' of the TWP. The TWP (Section 3.2.2) identifies Acceptance Criteria 1 to 4 for ''Quantity and Chemistry of Water Contacting Engineered Barriers and Waste Forms'' (NRC 2003 [DIRS 163274]) as being applicable to this report; however, in variance to the TWP, Acceptance Criterion 5 has also been determined to be applicable, and is addressed, along with the other Acceptance Criteria, in Section 4.2 of this report. Also, three FEPS not listed in the TWP (2.2.10.01.0A, 2.2.10.06.0A, and 2.2.11.02.0A) are partially addressed in this report, and have been added to the list of excluded FEPS in Table 6.1-2. This report has been developed in accordance with LP-SIII.10Q-BSC, ''Models''. This report documents the THC seepage model and a derivative used for validation, the Drift Scale Test (DST) THC submodel. The THC seepage model is a drift-scale process model for predicting the composition of gas and water that could enter waste emplacement drifts and the effects of mineral

  10. Ambiguous Tests of General Relativity on Cosmological Scales

    CERN Document Server

    Zuntz, Joe; Ferreira, Pedro; Skordis, Constantinos

    2011-01-01

    There are a number of approaches to testing General Relativity (GR) on linear scales using Parameterized Post-Friedmann (PPF) methods. It is generally assumed that the details of any given parameterization are unimportant if one uses it as a diagnostic for deviations from GR. In this brief report we show that this is not so by taking two particular parameterizations and analyzing a subset of the current cosmological data. We argue that any PPF approach should always be accompanied by a characterization of the class of modified gravity models it is seeking to approximate.

  11. Model-Based Security Testing

    CERN Document Server

    Schieferdecker, Ina; Schneider, Martin; 10.4204/EPTCS.80.1

    2012-01-01

    Security testing aims at validating software system requirements related to security properties like confidentiality, integrity, authentication, authorization, availability, and non-repudiation. Although security testing techniques are available for many years, there has been little approaches that allow for specification of test cases at a higher level of abstraction, for enabling guidance on test identification and specification as well as for automated test generation. Model-based security testing (MBST) is a relatively new field and especially dedicated to the systematic and efficient specification and documentation of security test objectives, security test cases and test suites, as well as to their automated or semi-automated generation. In particular, the combination of security modelling and test generation approaches is still a challenge in research and of high interest for industrial applications. MBST includes e.g. security functional testing, model-based fuzzing, risk- and threat-oriented testing,...

  12. Testing the low scale seesaw and leptogenesis

    CERN Document Server

    Drewes, Marco; Gueter, Dario; Klaric, Juraj

    2016-01-01

    Heavy neutrinos with masses below the electroweak scale could simultaneously generate the light neutrino masses via the seesaw mechanism and the baryon asymmetry of the universe via leptogenesis. The requirement to explain both imposes constraints on the mass spectrum of the heavy neutrinos, their flavour mixing pattern and CP properties. If any heavy neutral leptons are discovered in the future, it will be possible to use a combination of different observables in order to assess whether these are indeed the common origin of the light neutrino masses and the baryon asymmetry of the universe.

  13. Replication of Non-Trivial Directional Motion in Multi-Scales Observed by the Runs Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yura, Yoshihiro; Ohnishi, Takaaki; Yamada, Kenta; Takayasu, Hideki; Takayasu, Misako

    Non-trivial autocorrelation in up-down statistics in financial market price fluctuation is revealed by a multi-scale runs test(Wald-Wolfowitz test). We apply two models, a stochastic price model and dealer model to understand this property. In both approaches we successfully reproduce the non-stationary directional price motions consistent with the runs test by tuning parameters in the models. We find that two types of dealers exist in the markets, a short-time-scale trend-follower and an extended-time-scale contrarian who are active in different time periods.

  14. Development and testing of a novel lab-scale direct steam-injection apparatus to hydrolyse model and saline crop slurries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santi, Guglielmo; Guglielmo, Santi; D'Annibale, Alessandro; Alessandro, D'Annibale; Petruccioli, Maurizio; Maurizio, Petruccioli; Crognale, Silvia; Silvia, Crognale; Ruzzi, Maurizio; Maurizio, Ruzzi; Valentini, Riccardo; Riccardo, Valentini; Moresi, Mauro; Moresi, Mauro

    2012-02-20

    In this work, a novel laboratory-scale direct steam-injection apparatus (DSIA) was developed to overcome the main drawback of the conventional batch-driven lab rigs, namely the long time needed to heat fiber slurry from room to reaction temperatures greater than 150 °C. The novel apparatus mainly consisted of three units: (i) a mechanically-stirred bioreactor where saturated steam at 5-30 bar can be injected; (ii) an automatic on-off valve to flash suddenly the reaction medium after a prefixed reaction time; (iii) a cyclone separator to recover the reacted slurry. This system was tested using 0.75 dm³ of an aqueous solution of H₂SO₄ (0.5%, v/v) enriched with 50 kg m⁻³ of either commercial particles of Avicel® and Larch xylan or 0.5 mm sieved particles of Tamarix jordanis. Each slurry was heated to about 200 °C by injecting steam at 28 bar for 90 s. The process efficiency was assessed by comparing the dissolution degree of suspended solid (Y(S)), as well as xylose (Y(X)), glucose (Y(G)), and furfural (Y(F)) yields, with those obtained in a conventional steam autoclave at 130 °C for 30 or 60 min. Treatment of T. jordanis particles in DSIA resulted in Y(S) and Y(G) values quite similar to those obtained in the steam autoclave at 130 °C for 60 min, but in a less efficient hemicellulose solubilization. A limited occurrence of pentose degradation products was observed in both equipments, suggesting that hydrolysis predominated over degradation reactions. The susceptibility of the residual solid fractions from DSIA treatment to a conventional 120 h long cellulolytic treatment using an enzyme loading of 5.4 FPU g⁻¹ was markedly higher than that of samples hydrolysed in the steam autoclave, their corresponding glucose yields being equal to 0.94 and 0.22 g per gram of initial cellulose, respectively. Thus, T. jordanis resulted to be a valuable source of sugars for bioethanol production as proved by preliminary tests in the novel lab rig developed here.

  15. Ship Model Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-15

    analyzer, dual fuel, material tester, universal tester, laser scanner and 3D printer 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: a. REPORT b. ABSTRACT c...New Additions • New material testing machine with environmental chamber • New dual -fuel test bed for Haeberle Laboratory • Upgrade existing...of purchasing more data acquisition equipment (ie. FARO laser scanner, data telemetry , and velocity profiler). Table 1: Spending vs. budget

  16. Testing and validating environmental models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirchner, J.W.; Hooper, R.P.; Kendall, C.; Neal, C.; Leavesley, G.

    1996-01-01

    Generally accepted standards for testing and validating ecosystem models would benefit both modellers and model users. Universally applicable test procedures are difficult to prescribe, given the diversity of modelling approaches and the many uses for models. However, the generally accepted scientific principles of documentation and disclosure provide a useful framework for devising general standards for model evaluation. Adequately documenting model tests requires explicit performance criteria, and explicit benchmarks against which model performance is compared. A model's validity, reliability, and accuracy can be most meaningfully judged by explicit comparison against the available alternatives. In contrast, current practice is often characterized by vague, subjective claims that model predictions show 'acceptable' agreement with data; such claims provide little basis for choosing among alternative models. Strict model tests (those that invalid models are unlikely to pass) are the only ones capable of convincing rational skeptics that a model is probably valid. However, 'false positive' rates as low as 10% can substantially erode the power of validation tests, making them insufficiently strict to convince rational skeptics. Validation tests are often undermined by excessive parameter calibration and overuse of ad hoc model features. Tests are often also divorced from the conditions under which a model will be used, particularly when it is designed to forecast beyond the range of historical experience. In such situations, data from laboratory and field manipulation experiments can provide particularly effective tests, because one can create experimental conditions quite different from historical data, and because experimental data can provide a more precisely defined 'target' for the model to hit. We present a simple demonstration showing that the two most common methods for comparing model predictions to environmental time series (plotting model time series

  17. Sequential Tests for Large Scale Learning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Korattikara, A.; Chen, Y.; Welling, M.

    2016-01-01

    We argue that when faced with big data sets, learning and inference algorithms should compute updates using only subsets of data items. We introduce algorithms that use sequential hypothesis tests to adaptively select such a subset of data points. The statistical properties of this subsampling proce

  18. Full-Scale Tunnel (FST) model

    Science.gov (United States)

    1929-01-01

    Model of Full-Scale Tunnel (FST) under construction. On June 26, 1929, Elton W. Miller wrote to George W. Lewis proposing the construction of a model of the full-scale tunnel . 'The excellent energy ratio obtained in the new wind tunnel of the California Institute of Technology suggests that before proceeding with our full scale tunnel design, we ought to investigate the effect on energy ratio of such factors as: 1. Small included angle for the exit cone; 2. Carefully designed return passages of circular section as far as possible, without sudden changes in cross sections; 3. Tightness of walls. It is believed that much useful information can be obtained by building a model of about 1/16 scale, that is, having a closed throat of 2 ft. by 4 ft. The outside dimensions would be about 12 ft. by 25 ft. in plan and the height 4 ft. Two propellers will be required about 28 in. in diameter, each to be driven by direct current motor at a maximum speed of 4500 R.P.M. Provision can be made for altering the length of certain portions, particularly the exit cone, and possibly for the application of boundary layer control in order to effect satisfactory air flow. This model can be constructed in a comparatively short time, using 2 by 4 framing with matched sheathing inside, and where circular sections are desired they can be obtained by nailing sheet metal to wooden ribs, which can be cut on the band saw. It is estimated that three months will be required for the construction and testing of such a model and that the cost will be approximately three thousand dollars, one thousand dollars of which will be for the motors. No suitable location appears to exist in any of our present buildings, and it may be necessary to build it outside and cover it with a roof.' George Lewis responded immediately (June 27) granting the authority to proceed. He urged Langley to expedite construction and to employ extra carpenters if necessary. Funds for the model came from the FST project. In a 1979

  19. Comparison of New Large and Small Scale Overtopping Tests for Rubble Mound Breakwaters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Thomas Lykke; Burcharth, Hans F.; Gironella, X.

    2011-01-01

    in corresponding prototypes. The present study examines this scale effect by comparing overtopping discharges in small scale and large scale tests. The length scale ratio between the models was 5.7. The reason for using a large scale model instead of a prototype is the difficulties in accurate reproduction...... of prototype conditions for waves and structure in the model, as prototype conditions are not known in sufficient details. The model was designed to avoid as many model effects as possible. Despite this some differences in wave kinematics were detected, most probably due to differences in wave generation...... hardware and software. This demonstrates that, even under controlled conditions, it is very difficult to reproduce similar conditions. From the present test results it is concluded, despite the model effect, that a significant scale effect on small overtopping discharges exists also when wind effects...

  20. Testing general relativity: from local to cosmological scales.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uzan, Jean-Philippe

    2011-12-28

    I summarize various tests of general relativity on astrophysical scales, based on the large-scale structure of the universe but also on other systems, in particular the constants of physics. I emphasize the importance of hypotheses on the geometric structures of our universe while performing such tests and discuss their complementarity as well as their possible extensions.

  1. 30 CFR 75.211 - Roof testing and scaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Roof testing and scaling. 75.211 Section 75.211 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR COAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH MANDATORY SAFETY STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Roof Support § 75.211 Roof testing and scaling. (a)...

  2. Genome scale metabolic modeling of cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nilsson, Avlant; Nielsen, Jens

    2016-01-01

    been used as scaffolds for analysis of high throughput data to allow mechanistic interpretation of changes in expression. Finally, GEMs allow quantitative flux predictions using flux balance analysis (FBA). Here we critically review the requirements for successful FBA simulations of cancer cells......Cancer cells reprogram metabolism to support rapid proliferation and survival. Energy metabolism is particularly important for growth and genes encoding enzymes involved in energy metabolism are frequently altered in cancer cells. A genome scale metabolic model (GEM) is a mathematical formalization...... of metabolism which allows simulation and hypotheses testing of metabolic strategies. It has successfully been applied to many microorganisms and is now used to study cancer metabolism. Generic models of human metabolism have been reconstructed based on the existence of metabolic genes in the human genome...

  3. Scaling effects in direct shear tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orlando, A.D.; Hanes, D.M.; Shen, H.H.

    2009-01-01

    Laboratory experiments of the direct shear test were performed on spherical particles of different materials and diameters. Results of the bulk friction vs. non-dimensional shear displacement are presented as a function of the non-dimensional particle diameter. Simulations of the direct shear test were performed using the Discrete Element Method (DEM). The simulation results show Considerable differences with the physical experiments. Particle level material properties, such as the coefficients of static friction, restitution and rolling friction need to be known a priori in order to guarantee that the simulation results are an accurate representation of the physical phenomenon. Furthermore, laboratory results show a clear size dependency on the results, with smaller particles having a higher bulk friction than larger ones. ?? 2009 American Institute of Physics.

  4. Laboratory-scale integrated ARP filter test

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poirier, M. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Burket, P. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2016-03-01

    The Savannah River Site (SRS) is currently treating radioactive liquid waste with the Actinide Removal Process (ARP) and the Modular Caustic Side Solvent Extraction Unit (MCU). Recently, the low filter flux through the ARP of approximately 5 gallons per minute has limited the rate at which radioactive liquid waste can be treated. Salt Batch 6 had a lower processing rate and required frequent filter cleaning. There is a desire to understand the causes of the low filter flux and to increase ARP/MCU throughput. This task attempted to simulate the entire ARP process, including multiple batches (5), washing, chemical cleaning, and blending the feed with heels and recycle streams. The objective of the tests was to determine whether one of these processes is causing excessive fouling of the crossflow or secondary filter. The authors conducted the tests with feed solutions containing 6.6 M sodium Salt Batch 6 simulant supernate with no MST.

  5. Testing the mapping between redshift and cosmic scale factor

    CERN Document Server

    Wojtak, Radosław

    2016-01-01

    The canonical redshift-scale factor relation, 1/a=1+z, is a key element in the standard LambdaCDM model of the Big Bang cosmology. Despite its fundamental role, this relation has not yet undergone any observational tests since Lemaitre and Hubble established the expansion of the Universe. It is strictly based on the assumption of the Friedmann-Lemaitre-Robertson-Walker metric describing a locally homogeneous and isotropic universe and that photons move on null geodesics of the metric. Thus any violation of this assumption, within general relativity or modified gravity, can yield a different mapping between the model redshift z=1/a-1 and the actually observed redshift z_obs, i.e. z_obs neq z. Here we perform a simple test of consistency for the standard redshift-scale factor relation by determining simultaneous observational constraints on the concordance LambdaCDM cosmological parameters and a generalized redshift mapping z=f(z_obs). Using current baryon acoustic oscillations (BAO) and Type Ia supernova (SN) ...

  6. Effects of aerodynamic fairing on full scale blade fatigue test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Zujin; Wu, Jianzhong; Sun, Yuanrong; Jian, Liu

    2017-06-01

    The reliability of large blades should be verified by means of full scale fatigue test. In order to solve the problem of lack of exciting force during fatigue test in the flap wise direction, the program that aerodynamic fairing is installed in the tip of blade to reduce the air resistance is proposed. The numerical model of blade vibration and damping ratio calculation is established. The relationship between damping ratio, exciting force and amplitude is constructed by finite element method respectively. The difference of the exciting bending moment of blade and the damping ratio before and after the installation of aerodynamic fairing is compared respectively. The results show that damping ratio decreased by 27.9%. When the vibration of the blade reaches the target bending moment, the exciting force of the equipment decreases by 45.4%. It is an effective way to reduce the exciting force.

  7. Seismic Vibration Control of Elevated Water Tank by TLD and Validation of Full-Scale TLD Model through Real-Time-Hybrid-Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, A.; Staino, A.; (D Ghosh, A.; Basu, B.; Chatterjee, S.

    2016-09-01

    Elevated water tanks (EWTs), being top-heavy structures, are highly vulnerable to earthquake forces, and several have experienced damage/failure in past seismic events. However, as these are critical facilities whose continued performance in the post-earthquake scenario is of vital concern, it is significant to investigate their seismic vibration control using reliable and cost-effective passive dampers such as the Tuned Liquid Damper (TLD). Here, this aspect is studied for flexible EWT structures, such as those with annular shaft supports. The criterion of tuning the sloshing frequency of the TLD to the structural frequency necessitates dimensions of the TLD larger than those hitherto examined in literature. Hence the nonlinear model of the TLD based on established shallow water wave theory is verified for large container size by employing Real-Time-Hybrid-Testing (RTHT). Simulation studies are further carried out on a realistic example of a flexible EWT structure with TLDs. Results indicate that the TLD can be applied very effectively for the seismic vibration mitigation of EWTs.

  8. 高烈度地震区公路填方路基大型振动台模型试验%Large-scale Shaking Table Model Test for Fill Subgrade of Highway in High-intensity Earthquake Area

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李金贝; 张鸿儒; 李志强

    2011-01-01

    In order to study the seismic safety of highway fill subgrade, according to the test requirement, a large-scale shaking table model test scheme was designed for fill subgrade. First, the vibration system, the design of model box and the data acquisition system were introduced, the similar relation between treatment of the model boundary condition and fill subgrade model was analyzed, and the similarity constants are determined combining the test characteristics. The model material was determined by using the equivalent substitution method to deal with the similar gradation. Meanwhile, the arrangement of sensors was selected based on the numerical analysis of dynamic response characteristics. Finally, the loading scheme of the model test was prepared according to its purpose. The test result shows that the design of large-scale shaking table model test is feasible, and the purpose of the shaking table test was achieved.%为了深入研究公路填方路基的抗震安全,根据试验要求对填方路基进行了大型振动台模型试验方案设计.方案设计中首先介绍了振动台台阵体系、模型箱的设计和数据采集系统等试验装置;然后分析了填方路基振动台模型边界条件的处理和填方路基模型的相似关系,并在已有研究成果基础上结合本次试验特性确定了模型的相似常数,通过采用等量代替法来处理模型材料的相似级配,最终确定了模拟模型路基的试验材料.同时,在对填方路基数值分析的基础上,根据路基数值模型的动力反应特性确定了振动台试验测点的布置方案.最后,根据模型试验目的,编制了模型试验的加载制度.试验结果表明,填方路基的大型振动台模型试验设计方案可行,达到了振动台试验的目的.

  9. Cinlar Subgrid Scale Model for Large Eddy Simulation

    CERN Document Server

    Kara, Rukiye

    2016-01-01

    We construct a new subgrid scale (SGS) stress model for representing the small scale effects in large eddy simulation (LES) of incompressible flows. We use the covariance tensor for representing the Reynolds stress and include Clark's model for the cross stress. The Reynolds stress is obtained analytically from Cinlar random velocity field, which is based on vortex structures observed in the ocean at the subgrid scale. The validity of the model is tested with turbulent channel flow computed in OpenFOAM. It is compared with the most frequently used Smagorinsky and one-equation eddy SGS models through DNS data.

  10. Sand Impact Tests of a Half-Scale Crew Module Boilerplate Test Article

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vassilakos, Gregory J.; Hardy, Robin C.

    2012-01-01

    Although the Orion Multi-Purpose Crew Vehicle (MPCV) is being designed primarily for water landings, a further investigation of launch abort scenarios reveals the possibility of an onshore landing at Kennedy Space Center (KSC). To gather data for correlation against simulations of beach landing impacts, a series of sand impact tests were conducted at NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC). Both vertical drop tests and swing tests with combined vertical and horizontal velocity were performed onto beds of common construction-grade sand using a geometrically scaled crew module boilerplate test article. The tests were simulated using the explicit, nonlinear, transient dynamic finite element code LS-DYNA. The material models for the sand utilized in the simulations were based on tests of sand specimens. Although the LSDYNA models provided reasonable predictions for peak accelerations, they were not always able to track the response through the duration of the impact. Further improvements to the material model used for the sand were identified based on results from the sand specimen tests.

  11. Large Scale Computations in Air Pollution Modelling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zlatev, Z.; Brandt, J.; Builtjes, P. J. H.

    Proceedings of the NATO Advanced Research Workshop on Large Scale Computations in Air Pollution Modelling, Sofia, Bulgaria, 6-10 July 1998......Proceedings of the NATO Advanced Research Workshop on Large Scale Computations in Air Pollution Modelling, Sofia, Bulgaria, 6-10 July 1998...

  12. Uncertainty Consideration in Watershed Scale Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watershed scale hydrologic and water quality models have been used with increasing frequency to devise alternative pollution control strategies. With recent reenactment of the 1972 Clean Water Act’s TMDL (total maximum daily load) component, some of the watershed scale models are being recommended ...

  13. Large Scale Computations in Air Pollution Modelling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zlatev, Z.; Brandt, J.; Builtjes, P. J. H.

    Proceedings of the NATO Advanced Research Workshop on Large Scale Computations in Air Pollution Modelling, Sofia, Bulgaria, 6-10 July 1998......Proceedings of the NATO Advanced Research Workshop on Large Scale Computations in Air Pollution Modelling, Sofia, Bulgaria, 6-10 July 1998...

  14. Base pressure and heat transfer tests of the 0.0225-scale space shuttle plume simulation model (19-OTS) in yawed flight conditions in the NASA-Lewis 10x10-foot supersonic wind tunnel (test IH83)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foust, J. W.

    1979-01-01

    Wind tunnel tests were performed to determine pressures, heat transfer rates, and gas recovery temperatures in the base region of a rocket firing model of the space shuttle integrated vehicle during simulated yawed flight conditions. First and second stage flight of the space shuttle were simulated by firing the main engines in conjunction with the SRB rocket motors or only the SSME's into the continuous tunnel airstream. For the correct rocket plume environment, the simulated altitude pressures were halved to maintain the rocket chamber/altitude pressure ratio. Tunnel freestream Mach numbers from 2.2 to 3.5 were simulated over an altitude range of 60 to 130 thousand feet with varying angle of attack, yaw angle, nozzle gimbal angle and SRB chamber pressure. Gas recovery temperature data derived from nine gas temperature probe runs are presented. The model configuration, instrumentation, test procedures, and data reduction are described.

  15. Model-Based Security Testing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ina Schieferdecker

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Security testing aims at validating software system requirements related to security properties like confidentiality, integrity, authentication, authorization, availability, and non-repudiation. Although security testing techniques are available for many years, there has been little approaches that allow for specification of test cases at a higher level of abstraction, for enabling guidance on test identification and specification as well as for automated test generation. Model-based security testing (MBST is a relatively new field and especially dedicated to the systematic and efficient specification and documentation of security test objectives, security test cases and test suites, as well as to their automated or semi-automated generation. In particular, the combination of security modelling and test generation approaches is still a challenge in research and of high interest for industrial applications. MBST includes e.g. security functional testing, model-based fuzzing, risk- and threat-oriented testing, and the usage of security test patterns. This paper provides a survey on MBST techniques and the related models as well as samples of new methods and tools that are under development in the European ITEA2-project DIAMONDS.

  16. Full Scale Test of a SSP 34m boxgirder 2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Find Mølholt; Branner, Kim; Nielsen, Per Hørlyk

    This report presents the setup and result from three static full-scale tests of the reinforced glass fiber/epoxy box girder used in a 34m wind turbine blade. One test was without reinforcement one with cap reinforcement and the final test was with rib reinforcement. The cap reinforcement test...... of the following tests: 1) Flapwise bending with no reinforcement 2) Flapwise bending with wire reinforcements 3) Flapwise bending with rib reinforcements...

  17. Scaling limits of a model for selection at two scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Shishi; Mattingly, Jonathan C.

    2017-04-01

    The dynamics of a population undergoing selection is a central topic in evolutionary biology. This question is particularly intriguing in the case where selective forces act in opposing directions at two population scales. For example, a fast-replicating virus strain outcompetes slower-replicating strains at the within-host scale. However, if the fast-replicating strain causes host morbidity and is less frequently transmitted, it can be outcompeted by slower-replicating strains at the between-host scale. Here we consider a stochastic ball-and-urn process which models this type of phenomenon. We prove the weak convergence of this process under two natural scalings. The first scaling leads to a deterministic nonlinear integro-partial differential equation on the interval [0,1] with dependence on a single parameter, λ. We show that the fixed points of this differential equation are Beta distributions and that their stability depends on λ and the behavior of the initial data around 1. The second scaling leads to a measure-valued Fleming–Viot process, an infinite dimensional stochastic process that is frequently associated with a population genetics.

  18. Modeling and simulation with operator scaling

    CERN Document Server

    Cohen, Serge; Rosinski, Jan

    2009-01-01

    Self-similar processes are useful in modeling diverse phenomena that exhibit scaling properties. Operator scaling allows a different scale factor in each coordinate. This paper develops practical methods for modeling and simulating stochastic processes with operator scaling. A simulation method for operator stable Levy processes is developed, based on a series representation, along with a Gaussian approximation of the small jumps. Several examples are given to illustrate practical applications. A classification of operator stable Levy processes in two dimensions is provided according to their exponents and symmetry groups. We conclude with some remarks and extensions to general operator self-similar processes.

  19. Ditching Tests with a 1/12-Scale Model of the Army A-26 Airplane in Langley Tank No. 2 and on an Outdoor Catapult

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarvis, George A.; Hoffman, Edward L.

    1947-01-01

    Tests were conducted in calm water in Langley tank no. 2 and in calm and rough water at an outdoor catapult in order to determine the best way to make a forced landing of an Army A-26 airplane and to determine its probable ditching behavior. These tests were requested by the Air Materiel Command, Army Air Forces, in their letter of March 26, 1943, WEL:AW:50.

  20. Measurement and Modelling of Scaling Minerals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Villafafila Garcia, Ada

    2005-01-01

    of scale formation found in many industrial processes, and especially in oilfield and geothermal operations. We want to contribute to the study of this problem by releasing a simple and accurate thermodynamic model capable of calculating the behaviour of scaling minerals, covering a wide range...... of temperature and pressure. Reliable experimental solubility measurements under conditions similar to those found in reality will help the development of strong and consistent models. Chapter 1 is a short introduction to the problem of scale formation, the model chosen to study it, and the experiments performed...... the thermodynamic model used in this Ph.D. project. A review of alternative activity coefficient models an earlier work on scale formation is provided. A guideline to the parameter estimation procedure and the number of parameters estimated in the present work are also described. The prediction of solid...

  1. A review of micro-scale abrasion testing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gant, A J; Gee, M G [Electronics and Modelling Group, Division of Industry and Innovation, Module 9, Space G9-A5, Queens Road, Teddington, Middlesex, TW11 0LW (United Kingdom)

    2011-02-23

    Micro-scale abrasion (commonly referred to as 'ball cratering') is a small-scale tribological test method which can be operated on a desktop. It offers the possibility of providing a quick, cheap, localized abrasion test that can be used with small samples. In principle its operation is simple, but in practice there are issues with wear scar measurement, wear mode and its applicability to a wide variety of monolithic materials and coatings. (topical review)

  2. Testing the model for testing competency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keating, Sarah B; Rutledge, Dana N; Sargent, Arlene; Walker, Polly

    2003-05-01

    The pilot study to demonstrate the utility of the CBRDM in the practice setting was successful. Using a matrix evaluation tool based on the model's competencies, evaluators were able to observe specific performance behaviors of senior nursing students and new graduates at either the novice or competent levels. The study faced the usual perils of pilot studies, including small sample size, a limited number of items from the total CBRDM, restricted financial resources, inexperienced researchers, unexpected barriers, and untested evaluation tools. It was understood from the beginning of the study that the research would be based on a program evaluation model, analyzing both processes and outcomes. However, the meager data findings led to the desire to continue to study use of the model for practice setting job expectations, career planning for nurses, and curriculum development for educators. Although the California Strategic Planning Committee for Nursing no longer has funding, we hope that others interested in role differentiation issues will take the results of this study and test the model in other practice settings. Its ability to measure higher levels of competency as well as novice and competent should be studied, i.e., proficient, expert, and advanced practice. The CBRDM may be useful in evaluating student and nurse performance, defining role expectations, and identifying the preparation necessary for the roles. The initial findings related to the two functions as leader and teacher in the care provider and care coordinator roles led to much discussion about helping students and nurses develop competence. Additional discussion focused on the roles as they apply to settings such as critical care or primary health care. The model is useful for all of nursing as it continues to define its levels of practice and their relationship to on-the-job performance, curriculum development, and career planning.

  3. Small-Scale Testing of Laterally Loaded Bucket Foundations in Dense Sand

    OpenAIRE

    Ibsen, Lars Bo; Foglia, Aligi

    2011-01-01

    Monopod bucket foundations promise to become a reliable and cost-effective concept for offshore wind turbine. Physical models are essential to understand the behavior of soil-structure systems. When conducting small-scale experiments on soil, scale effects can considerably affect the tests outcome. In a bid for overcoming this issue, a novel testing system based on the application of suction between the soil surface and a membrane is employed. The comparison between the tests conducted at str...

  4. Development and psychometric testing of a barriers to HIV testing scale among individuals with HIV infection in Sweden; The Barriers to HIV testing scale-Karolinska version

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    © 2015 Wiklander et al. Background: Barriers to HIV testing experienced by individuals at risk for HIV can result in treatment delay and further transmission of the disease. Instruments to systematically measure barriers are scarce, but could contribute to improved strategies for HIV testing. Aims of this study were to develop and test a barriers to HIV testing scale in a Swedish context. Methods: An 18-item scale was developed, based on an existing scale with addition of six new it...

  5. Pretest Round Robin Analysis of 1:4-Scale Prestressed Concrete Containment Vessel Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    HESSHEIMER,MICHAEL F.; LUK,VINCENT K.; KLAMERUS,ERIC W.; SHIBATA,S.; MITSUGI,S.; COSTELLO,J.F.

    2000-12-18

    The purpose of the program is to investigate the response of representative scale models of nuclear containment to pressure loading beyond the design basis accident and to compare analytical predictions to measured behavior. This objective is accomplished by conducting static, pneumatic overpressurization tests of scale models at ambient temperature. This research program consists of testing two scale models: a steel containment vessel (SCV) model (tested in 1996) and a prestressed concrete containment vessel (PCCV) model, which is the subject of this paper.

  6. Unique Testing Capabilities of the NASA Langley Transonic Dynamics Tunnel, an Exercise in Aeroelastic Scaling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanco, Thomas G.

    2013-01-01

    NASA Langley Research Center's Transonic Dynamics Tunnel (TDT) is the world's most capable aeroelastic test facility. Its large size, transonic speed range, variable pressure capability, and use of either air or R-134a heavy gas as a test medium enable unparalleled manipulation of flow-dependent scaling quantities. Matching these scaling quantities enables dynamic similitude of a full-scale vehicle with a sub-scale model, a requirement for proper characterization of any dynamic phenomenon, and many static elastic phenomena. Select scaling parameters are presented in order to quantify the scaling advantages of TDT and the consequence of testing in other facilities. In addition to dynamic testing, the TDT is uniquely well-suited for high risk testing or for those tests that require unusual model mount or support systems. Examples of recently conducted dynamic tests requiring unusual model support are presented. In addition to its unique dynamic test capabilities, the TDT is also evaluated in its capability to conduct aerodynamic performance tests as a result of its flow quality. Results of flow quality studies and a comparison to a many other transonic facilities are presented. Finally, the ability of the TDT to support future NASA research thrusts and likely vehicle designs is discussed.

  7. [Unfolding item response model using best-worst scaling].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikehara, Kazuya

    2015-02-01

    In attitude measurement and sensory tests, the unfolding model is typically used. In this model, response probability is formulated by the distance between the person and the stimulus. In this study, we proposed an unfolding item response model using best-worst scaling (BWU model), in which a person chooses the best and worst stimulus among repeatedly presented subsets of stimuli. We also formulated an unfolding model using best scaling (BU model), and compared the accuracy of estimates between the BU and BWU models. A simulation experiment showed that the BWU modell performed much better than the BU model in terms of bias and root mean square errors of estimates. With reference to Usami (2011), the proposed models were apllied to actual data to measure attitudes toward tardiness. Results indicated high similarity between stimuli estimates generated with the proposed models and those of Usami (2011).

  8. Calibrating a large-scale groundwater model using spaceborne remote sensing products: A test-case for the Rhine-Meuse basin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sutanudjaja, E.H.; Beek, L.P.H. van; Jong, S.M. de; Geer, F.C. van; Bierkens, M.F.P.

    2012-01-01

    The European Remote Sensing Soil Water Index (ERS SWI) fields, providing spatio-temporal soil moisture expressions, should be able to infer groundwater dynamics. In this study, we explore the possibility of using them to calibrate a coupled groundwater-land surface model. We apply a brute force

  9. Weyl's Scale Invariance And The Standard Model

    CERN Document Server

    Gold, B S

    2005-01-01

    This paper is an extension of the work by Dr. Subhash Rajpoot, Ph.D. and Dr. Hitoshi Nishino, Ph.D. I introduce Weyl's scale invariance as an additional local symmetry in the standard model of electroweak interactions. An inevitable consequence is the introduction of general relativity coupled to scalar fields a la Dirac and an additional vector particle called the Weylon. This paper shows that once Weyl's scale invariance is broken, the phenomenon (a) generates Newton's gravitational constant GN and (b) triggers spontaneous symmetry breaking in the normal manner resulting in masses for the conventional fermions and bosons. The scale at which Weyl's sclale symmetry breaks is of order Planck mass. If right-handed neutrinos are also introduced, their absence at present energy scales is attributed to their mass which is tied to the scale where scale invariance breaks.

  10. Methods for testing of geometrical down-scaled rotor blades

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Branner, Kim; Berring, Peter

    as requirements for experimental facilities are very demanding and furthermore the time for performing the experimental test campaign and the cost are not well suitable for most research projects. This report deals with the advantages, disadvantages and open questions of using down-scaled testing on wind turbine...

  11. Silo model tests with sand

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Munch-Andersen, Jørgen

    Tests have been carried out in a large silo model with Leighton Buzzard Sand. Normal pressures and shear stresses have been measured during tests carried out with inlet and outlet geometry. The filling method is a very important parameter for the strength of the mass and thereby the pressures...

  12. Large-Scale Shaking Table Test and Finite Element Model for Tianjin Library%大比例缩尺模型振动台试验及有限元分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    姜忻良; 邓振丹; 韩阳; 韩宁

    2013-01-01

    The shaking table test of a 1/20 scale model with steel frame-bracing system is performed to study the seismic behavior of complex structure in this paper.In the shaking table test,the seismic responses and dynamic characteristics of the structure are measured.Furthermore,the structural finite element analysis model is established with ANSYS software,and then the elasto-plastic time-history analysis of the shaking table test model is carried out.The analytical results of structure periods,displacement response and strain response are in good agreement with the test results,which verifies the reliability of finite element model.%为研究复杂结构的抗震性能,进行了一幢钢框架-支撑结构体系1/20缩尺模型的地震振动台试验,试验测试了模型结构的动力性能和结构地震反应.同时,利用ANSYS软件建立了有限元分析模型,并对试验模型结构进行了动力弹塑性时程分析,就模型的频率、位移反应和应变反应进行了对比,计算结果和试验结果吻合较好,验证了有限元模型的可靠性.

  13. Dynamically Scaled Model Experiment of a Mooring Cable

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lars Bergdahl

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The dynamic response of mooring cables for marine structures is scale-dependent, and perfect dynamic similitude between full-scale prototypes and small-scale physical model tests is difficult to achieve. The best possible scaling is here sought by means of a specific set of dimensionless parameters, and the model accuracy is also evaluated by two alternative sets of dimensionless parameters. A special feature of the presented experiment is that a chain was scaled to have correct propagation celerity for longitudinal elastic waves, thus providing perfect geometrical and dynamic scaling in vacuum, which is unique. The scaling error due to incorrect Reynolds number seemed to be of minor importance. The 33 m experimental chain could then be considered a scaled 76 mm stud chain with the length 1240 m, i.e., at the length scale of 1:37.6. Due to the correct elastic scale, the physical model was able to reproduce the effect of snatch loads giving rise to tensional shock waves propagating along the cable. The results from the experiment were used to validate the newly developed cable-dynamics code, MooDy, which utilises a discontinuous Galerkin FEM formulation. The validation of MooDy proved to be successful for the presented experiments. The experimental data is made available here for validation of other numerical codes by publishing digitised time series of two of the experiments.

  14. Systems for animal exposure in full-scale fire tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilado, C. J.; Cumming, H. J.; Kourtides, D. A.; Parker, J. A.

    1977-01-01

    Two systems for exposing animals in full-scale fire tests are described. Both systems involve the simultaneous exposure of two animal species, mice and rats, in modular units; determination of mortality, morbidity, and behavioral response; and analysis of the blood for carboxyhemoglobin. The systems described represent two of many possible options for obtaining bioassay data from full-scale fire tests. In situations where the temperatures to which the test animals are exposed can not be controlled, analytical techniques may be more appropriate than bioassay techniques.

  15. Extracting scaling laws from numerical dynamo models

    CERN Document Server

    Stelzer, Z

    2013-01-01

    Earth's magnetic field is generated by processes in the electrically conducting, liquid outer core, subsumed under the term `geodynamo'. In the last decades, great effort has been put into the numerical simulation of core dynamics following from the magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) equations. However, the numerical simulations are far from Earth's core in terms of several control parameters. Different scaling analyses found simple scaling laws for quantities like heat transport, flow velocity, magnetic field strength and magnetic dissipation time. We use an extensive dataset of 116 numerical dynamo models compiled by Christensen and co-workers to analyse these scalings from a rigorous model selection point of view. Our method of choice is leave-one-out cross-validation which rates models according to their predictive abilities. In contrast to earlier results, we find that diffusive processes are not negligible for the flow velocity and magnetic field strength in the numerical dynamos. Also the scaling of the magneti...

  16. Confirmatory tests of full-scale condensers for SBWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Masoni, P. [ENEA, Bologna (Italy); Botti, S. [SIET SpA, Piacenza (Italy); Fitzsimmons, G.W.

    1993-12-31

    A full-scale isolation condenser and a full-scale passive containment cooling condenser for the Simplified Boiling Water Reactor (SBWR) will be tested to confirm the thermal-hydraulic and structural design characteristics of these components. The condensers provide vital roles in removing heat from the reactor vessel and the containment during certain design basis events. This paper describes the condensers and the test facilities which are under construction and summarizes the test objectives, the planned instrumentation, and the conditions to be tested. The results of some pre-test performance predictions, calculated with the TRACG code are presented. The results of the testing program are expected to demonstrate that the condenser designs will provide the required heat removal capacity and will survive the design basis temperature/pressure cycles without structural damage.

  17. Time invariant scaling in discrete fragmentation models

    CERN Document Server

    Giraud, B G; Giraud, B G; Peschanski, R

    1994-01-01

    Linear rate equations are used to describe the cascading decay of an initial heavy cluster into fragments. We consider moments of arbitrary orders of the mass multiplicity spectrum and derive scaling properties pertaining to their time evolution. We suggest that the mass weighted multiplicity is a suitable observable for the discovery of scaling. Numerical tests validate such properties, even for moderate values of the initial mass (nuclei, percolation clusters, jets of particles etc.). Finite size effects can be simply parametrized.

  18. Small-Scale Testing of Laterally Loaded Bucket Foundations in Dense Sand

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ibsen, Lars Bo; Foglia, Aligi

    Monopod bucket foundations promise to become a reliable and cost-effective concept for offshore wind turbine. Physical models are essential to understand the behavior of soil-structure systems. When conducting small-scale experiments on soil, scale effects can considerably affect the tests outcom...

  19. Large-Scale Multiobjective Static Test Generation for Web-Based Testing with Integer Programming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, M. L.; Hui, Siu Cheung; Fong, A. C. M.

    2013-01-01

    Web-based testing has become a ubiquitous self-assessment method for online learning. One useful feature that is missing from today's web-based testing systems is the reliable capability to fulfill different assessment requirements of students based on a large-scale question data set. A promising approach for supporting large-scale web-based…

  20. Evaluation of Icing Scaling on Swept NACA 0012 Airfoil Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsao, Jen-Ching; Lee, Sam

    2012-01-01

    Icing scaling tests in the NASA Glenn Icing Research Tunnel (IRT) were performed on swept wing models using existing recommended scaling methods that were originally developed for straight wing. Some needed modifications on the stagnation-point local collection efficiency (i.e., beta(sub 0) calculation and the corresponding convective heat transfer coefficient for swept NACA 0012 airfoil models have been studied and reported in 2009, and the correlations will be used in the current study. The reference tests used a 91.4-cm chord, 152.4-cm span, adjustable sweep airfoil model of NACA 0012 profile at velocities of 100 and 150 knot and MVD of 44 and 93 mm. Scale-to-reference model size ratio was 1:2.4. All tests were conducted at 0deg angle of attack (AoA) and 45deg sweep angle. Ice shape comparison results were presented for stagnation-point freezing fractions in the range of 0.4 to 1.0. Preliminary results showed that good scaling was achieved for the conditions test by using the modified scaling methods developed for swept wing icing.

  1. Hydraulic model tests on modified Wave Dragon. Phase 3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hald, T.; Lynggaard, J.

    2002-11-01

    The purpose of this report is to describe the model tests conducted with a new designed 2. generation WD model as well as obtained model test results. Tests are conducted as sequential reconstruction followed by physical model tests. All details concerning the reconstruction are found in Hald and Lynggaard (2001). Model tests and reconstruction are carried out during the phase 3 project: 'Wave Dragon. Reconstruction of an existing model in scale 1:50 and sequential tests of changes to the model geometry and mass distribution parameters' sponsored by the Danish Energy Agency (DEA) wave energy programme. The tests will establish a well documented basis for the development of a 1:4.5 scale prototype planned for testing Nissum Bredning, a sea inlet on the Danish West Coast. (au)

  2. Rotor blade full-scale fatigue testing technology and research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Per Hørlyk; Berring, Peter; Pavese, Christian

    Full scale fatigue test is an important part of the development and design of wind turbine blades. Testing is also needed for the approval of the blades in order for them to be used on large wind turbines. However, usually only one prototype blade is tested. Fatigue test of wind turbine blades...... was started in the beginning of the 1980´s and has been further developed since then. Structures in composite materials are generally difficult and time consuming to test for fatigue resistance. Therefore, several methods for testing of blades have been developed and exist today. These methods...... will be presented in this report giving the blade test facility operator a guide to choose the method that best fit the needs and economic constraints. The state of the art method is currently dual axis mass resonance, where the purpose of the test is to emulate the loads the blades encounter in operation....

  3. Diffusion through thin membranes: Modeling across scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aho, Vesa; Mattila, Keijo; Kühn, Thomas; Kekäläinen, Pekka; Pulkkinen, Otto; Minussi, Roberta Brondani; Vihinen-Ranta, Maija; Timonen, Jussi

    2016-04-01

    From macroscopic to microscopic scales it is demonstrated that diffusion through membranes can be modeled using specific boundary conditions across them. The membranes are here considered thin in comparison to the overall size of the system. In a macroscopic scale the membrane is introduced as a transmission boundary condition, which enables an effective modeling of systems that involve multiple scales. In a mesoscopic scale, a numerical lattice-Boltzmann scheme with a partial-bounceback condition at the membrane is proposed and analyzed. It is shown that this mesoscopic approach provides a consistent approximation of the transmission boundary condition. Furthermore, analysis of the mesoscopic scheme gives rise to an expression for the permeability of a thin membrane as a function of a mesoscopic transmission parameter. In a microscopic model, the mean waiting time for a passage of a particle through the membrane is in accordance with this permeability. Numerical results computed with the mesoscopic scheme are then compared successfully with analytical solutions derived in a macroscopic scale, and the membrane model introduced here is used to simulate diffusive transport between the cell nucleus and cytoplasm through the nuclear envelope in a realistic cell model based on fluorescence microscopy data. By comparing the simulated fluorophore transport to the experimental one, we determine the permeability of the nuclear envelope of HeLa cells to enhanced yellow fluorescent protein.

  4. Testing Models for Structure Formation

    CERN Document Server

    Kaiser, N

    1993-01-01

    I review a number of tests of theories for structure formation. Large-scale flows and IRAS galaxies indicate a high density parameter $\\Omega \\simeq 1$, in accord with inflationary predictions, but it is not clear how this meshes with the uniformly low values obtained from virial analysis on scales $\\sim$ 1Mpc. Gravitational distortion of faint galaxies behind clusters allows one to construct maps of the mass surface density, and this should shed some light on the large vs small-scale $\\Omega$ discrepancy. Power spectrum analysis reveals too red a spectrum (compared to standard CDM) on scales $\\lambda \\sim 10-100$ $h^{-1}$Mpc, but the gaussian fluctuation hypothesis appears to be in good shape. These results suggest that the problem for CDM lies not in the very early universe --- the inflationary predictions of $\\Omega = 1$ and gaussianity both seem to be OK; furthermore, the COBE result severely restricts modifications such as tilting the primordial spectrum --- but in the assumed matter content. The power s...

  5. Scale Effects Related to Small Physical Modelling of Overtopping of Rubble Mound Breakwaters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Burcharth, Hans F.; Andersen, Thomas Lykke

    2009-01-01

    in the paper and it is explained why it is impossible quantitatively to identify model and scale effects by comparison of the performance of prototype and small scale models. For such identification are needed special dedicated tests. The paper presents such a test which identify the scale effect in the rubble...

  6. Modelling the scaling properties of human mobility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Chaoming; Koren, Tal; Wang, Pu; Barabási, Albert-László

    2010-10-01

    Individual human trajectories are characterized by fat-tailed distributions of jump sizes and waiting times, suggesting the relevance of continuous-time random-walk (CTRW) models for human mobility. However, human traces are barely random. Given the importance of human mobility, from epidemic modelling to traffic prediction and urban planning, we need quantitative models that can account for the statistical characteristics of individual human trajectories. Here we use empirical data on human mobility, captured by mobile-phone traces, to show that the predictions of the CTRW models are in systematic conflict with the empirical results. We introduce two principles that govern human trajectories, allowing us to build a statistically self-consistent microscopic model for individual human mobility. The model accounts for the empirically observed scaling laws, but also allows us to analytically predict most of the pertinent scaling exponents.

  7. Sub-Grid Scale Plume Modeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Greg Yarwood

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Multi-pollutant chemical transport models (CTMs are being routinely used to predict the impacts of emission controls on the concentrations and deposition of primary and secondary pollutants. While these models have a fairly comprehensive treatment of the governing atmospheric processes, they are unable to correctly represent processes that occur at very fine scales, such as the near-source transport and chemistry of emissions from elevated point sources, because of their relatively coarse horizontal resolution. Several different approaches have been used to address this limitation, such as using fine grids, adaptive grids, hybrid modeling, or an embedded sub-grid scale plume model, i.e., plume-in-grid (PinG modeling. In this paper, we first discuss the relative merits of these various approaches used to resolve sub-grid scale effects in grid models, and then focus on PinG modeling which has been very effective in addressing the problems listed above. We start with a history and review of PinG modeling from its initial applications for ozone modeling in the Urban Airshed Model (UAM in the early 1980s using a relatively simple plume model, to more sophisticated and state-of-the-science plume models, that include a full treatment of gas-phase, aerosol, and cloud chemistry, embedded in contemporary models such as CMAQ, CAMx, and WRF-Chem. We present examples of some typical results from PinG modeling for a variety of applications, discuss the implications of PinG on model predictions of source attribution, and discuss possible future developments and applications for PinG modeling.

  8. 2-D Model Test Study of the Suape Breakwater, Brazil

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Thomas Lykke; Burcharth, Hans F.; Sopavicius, A.;

    This report deals with a two-dimensional model test study of the extension of the breakwater in Suape, Brazil. One cross-section was tested for stability and overtopping in various sea conditions. The length scale used for the model tests was 1:35. Unless otherwise specified all values given...

  9. Implications of the Baltimore Rail Tunnel Fire for Full-Scale Testing of Shipping Casks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Halstead, R. J.; Dilger, F.

    2003-02-25

    The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) does not currently require full-scale physical testing of shipping casks as part of its certification process. Stakeholders have long urged NRC to require full-scale testing as part of certification. NRC is currently preparing a full-scale casktesting proposal as part of the Package Performance Study (PPS) that grew out of the NRC reexamination of the Modal Study. The State of Nevada and Clark County remain committed to the position that demonstration testing would not be an acceptable substitute for a combination of full-scale testing, scale-model tests, and computer simulation of each new cask design prior to certification. Based on previous analyses of cask testing issues, and on preliminary findings regarding the July 2001 Baltimore rail tunnel fire, the authors recommend that NRC prioritize extra-regulatory thermal testing of a large rail cask and the GA-4 truck cask under the PPS. The specific fire conditions and other aspects of the full-scale extra-regulatory tests recommended for the PPS are yet to be determined. NRC, in consultation with stakeholders, must consider past real-world accidents and computer simulations to establish temperature failure thresholds for cask containment and fuel cladding. The cost of extra-regulatory thermal testing is yet to be determined. The minimum cost for regulatory thermal testing of a legal-weight truck cask would likely be $3.3-3.8 million.

  10. Propfan test assessment testbed aircraft stability and control/performance 1/9-scale wind tunnel tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Little, B. H., Jr.; Tomlin, K. H.; Aljabri, A. S.; Mason, C. A.

    1988-01-01

    One-ninth scale wind tunnel model tests of the Propfan Test Assessment (PTA) aircraft were performed in three different NASA facilities. Wing and propfan nacelle static pressures, model forces and moments, and flow field at the propfan plane were measured in these tests. Tests started in June 1985 and were completed in January 1987. These data were needed to assure PTA safety of flight, predict PTA performance, and validate analytical codes that will be used to predict flow fields in which the propfan will operate.

  11. Silo model tests with sand

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Munch-Andersen, Jørgen

    Tests have been carried out in a large silo model with Leighton Buzzard Sand. Normal pressures and shear stresses have been measured during tests carried out with inlet and outlet geometry. The filling method is a very important parameter for the strength of the mass and thereby the pressures...... as well as the flow pattern during discharge of the silo. During discharge a mixed flow pattern has been identified...

  12. Multi-scale modeling of composites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Azizi, Reza

    A general method to obtain the homogenized response of metal-matrix composites is developed. It is assumed that the microscopic scale is sufficiently small compared to the macroscopic scale such that the macro response does not affect the micromechanical model. Therefore, the microscopic scale......-Mandel’s energy principle is used to find macroscopic operators based on micro-mechanical analyses using the finite element method under generalized plane strain condition. A phenomenologically macroscopic model for metal matrix composites is developed based on constitutive operators describing the elastic...... behavior and the trapped free energy in the material, in addition to the plastic behavior in terms of the anisotropic development of the yield surface. It is shown that a generalization of Hill’s anisotropic yield criterion can be used to model the Bauschinger effect, in addition to the pressure and size...

  13. Computational Modeling of Simulation Tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-06-01

    Mexico , March 1979. 14. Kinney, G. F.,.::. IeiN, .hoce 1h Ir, McMillan, p. 57, 1962. 15. Courant and Friedrichs, ,U: r. on moca an.: Jho...AD 79 275 NEW MEXICO UNIV ALBUGUERGUE ERIC H WANG CIVIL ENGINE-ETC F/6 18/3 COMPUTATIONAL MODELING OF SIMULATION TESTS.(U) JUN 80 6 LEIGH, W CHOWN, B...COMPUTATIONAL MODELING OF SIMULATION TESTS00 0G. Leigh W. Chown B. Harrison Eric H. Wang Civil Engineering Research Facility University of New Mexico

  14. LLNL Small-Scale Friction sensitivity (BAM) Test

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simpson, L.R.; Foltz, M.F.

    1996-06-01

    Small-scale safety testing of explosives, propellants and other energetic materials, is done to determine their sensitivity to various stimuli including friction, static spark, and impact. Testing is done to discover potential handling problems for either newly synthesized materials of unknown behavior, or materials that have been stored for long periods of time. This report describes the existing {open_quotes}BAM{close_quotes} Small-Scale Friction Test, and the methods used to determine the friction sensitivity pertinent to handling energetic materials. The accumulated data for the materials tested is not listed here - that information is in a database. Included is, however, a short list of (1) materials that had an unusual response, and (2), a few {open_quotes}standard{close_quotes} materials representing the range of typical responses usually seen.

  15. Large scale topic modeling made practical

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wahlgreen, Bjarne Ørum; Hansen, Lars Kai

    2011-01-01

    Topic models are of broad interest. They can be used for query expansion and result structuring in information retrieval and as an important component in services such as recommender systems and user adaptive advertising. In large scale applications both the size of the database (number of docume......Topic models are of broad interest. They can be used for query expansion and result structuring in information retrieval and as an important component in services such as recommender systems and user adaptive advertising. In large scale applications both the size of the database (number...... topics at par with a much larger case specific vocabulary....

  16. Final report of the TRUE Block Scale project. 2. Tracer tests in the block scale

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andersson, Peter; Byegaard, Johan [Geosigma AB, Uppsala (Sweden); Winberg, Anders [Conterra AB, Partille (Sweden)

    2002-05-01

    The tracer test programme of the TRUE Block Scale Project involved 14 tracer tests campaigns, including performance of 32 tracer injections in 16 different combinations of source and sink sections (flow paths) varying in length between 10 to 130 metres, and involving one or more structures. Average, travel times varied between 1.5 and >2000 hours. Tracer dilution tests performed in conjunction with cross-hole hydraulic pumping tests were found to be a very important part of the pre-tests, where the results were used to identify and screen among possible injection points, and to verify the hydrostructural model valid at a given time. The main problem faced in the block scale tests was to select a test geometry, which gave a sufficiently high mass recovery, and at the same time enabled performance of cross-hole sorbing tracer tests within reasonable time frames. Three different injection methods were applied during the test programme; decaying pulse, finite pulse and forced pulse (unequal dipole). During the later phases of the tracer test programme it was identified that forced injection had to be employed in order to enable detection of tracer at the sink due to strong dilution, and also to avoid problems with artificially induced tailing in the injection signal. Sorbing (reactive) tracers were selected among the radioactive isotopes of the alkali and alkaline earth metals previously used in the TRUE- 1 experiments. It was decided that at least one slightly sorbing tracer and one strongly sorbing tracer should be used in each injection. Non-sorbing tracers were used for conservative reference, e.g., {sup 82}Br{sup -}, {sup 186}ReO{sub 4}, HTO (tritiated water) and {sup 131}I{sup -}. In two of the injections the radioactive non-sorbing tracers were rather short-lived and Uranine and Naphthionate were used as complementary conservative tracers. Surface distribution coefficients, K{sub a}, were evaluated from TRUE-1 and TRUE Block Scale data, making use of the

  17. Drag coefficients of lattice masts from full-scale wind-tunnel tests

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Georgakis, Christos; Støttrup-Andersen, Ulrik; Johnsen, Marie;

    2009-01-01

    :5 scale section model tests performed at the National Physics Laboratory and the National Maritime Institute in the UK in the 1970´s. ESDU provides velocity-dependent drag coefficients equivalent to those obtained from the same series of tests. In all cases, the mast legs and diagonals are comprised......In this paper, the drag coefficients obtained from a series of full-scale section model wind-tunnel tests of several lattice mast configurations are presented and compared to those provided in Eurocode 3 and ESDU. The drag coefficients provided in Eurocode are conservative interpretations of 1...

  18. Body shape shifting during growth permits tests that distinguish between competing geometric theories of metabolic scaling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hirst, Andrew G.; Glazier, Douglas S.; Atkinson, David

    2014-01-01

    the size dependence of metabolism is derived from material transport across external surfaces, or through internal resource-transport networks. We show that when body shape changes during growth, these models make opposing predictions. These models are tested using pelagic invertebrates, because...... these animals exhibit highly variable intraspecific scaling relationships for metabolic rate and body shape. Metabolic scaling slopes of diverse integument-breathing species were significantly positively correlated with degree of body flattening or elongation during ontogeny, as expected from surface area...

  19. Application of scale test modules for model the electrothermal performance in buildings for the efficient use of energy; Aplicacion de modulos de prueba a escala para modelar el funcionamiento electrotermico de edificios para el uso eficiente de la energia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Acoltzi Acoltzi, Higinio

    2000-10-01

    Due to the amount of materials and parameters that are included in the calculations of cooling spaces in buildings in real scale are very costly, the scale test modules coupled to air conditioner systems are used to obtain their electrothermal behavior. The test modules quantify the electrical energy consumption of each module considering test materials. A transitory theoretical thermal model is analyzed. It describes the thermal behavior of the scale test modules varying the materials of the roofs and glazing of windows, this results allow uns to establish a criteria of what materials can be used in buildings. Additionally a steady state theoretical electrothermal model is presented. This model calculates the electrical energy consumption to maintain the conditions of comfort at the interior of the test modules, that consider the variation of the mentioned materials. The experimentation is developed exposing the scale test modules coupled to air conditioners to the direct solar radiation, recording: the consumption of electric power of air conditioners, the solar radiation incident on test roofs and test windows, the interior temperatures of the modules, the interior and exterior temperature of the test roofs, the ambient temperature, and the speed of the wind. The results obtained comparing the electrical power consumption of the measured and the electrical power consumption calculated present a difference of 16%. The electrical energy savings observed with the theoretical electrothermal model are: 1) Changing only clear glass by sun filter glass it can be achieved savings up to 14.5% for the small beam and small vault pottery and 12.4% for the monolithic pottery; and 2) Changing only clear glass by sun reflector glass it can be obtained savings up to 28.1% for the small beam and small vault pottery and up to 16.8% for the monolithic pottery. The greater detected electrical energy saving was for substitution monolithic pottery with clear glass by the small beam

  20. Identification Report: Earthquake Test on 2-Bay, 6-Story Scale 1:5 RC-Frames

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kirkegaard, Poul Henning; Skjærbæk, P. S.; Nielsen, Søren R. K.

    The aim of the present report is to supply the identification results from the tests performed with a laboratory model of a plane 6-storey, 2-bay scale 1:5 RC-frame at Aalborg University, Denmark during the autumn 1996. The tests were performed as a part of a Ph.D study considering evaluation of ...

  1. China First Full-scale Comprehensive Drilling Test Unit

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhang Ailin

    1997-01-01

    @@ The full-scale comprehensive drilling test unit built in Daqing Oilfields is the first one in China which can simulate the bottom-hole environments and the working conditions of drilling string with well depth up to 6 000 m.

  2. Segmentation by Large Scale Hypothesis Testing - Segmentation as Outlier Detection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Darkner, Sune; Dahl, Anders Lindbjerg; Larsen, Rasmus

    2010-01-01

    locally. We propose a method based on large scale hypothesis testing with a consistent method for selecting an appropriate threshold for the given data. By estimating the background distribution we characterize the segment of interest as a set of outliers with a certain probability based on the estimated...

  3. Development and Testing of the Nurse Manager EBP Competency Scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shuman, Clayton J; Ploutz-Snyder, Robert J; Titler, Marita G

    2017-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop and evaluate the validity and reliability of an instrument to measure nurse manager competencies regarding evidence-based practice (EBP). The Nurse Manager EBP Competency Scale consists of 16 items for respondents to indicate their perceived level of competency on a 0 to 3 Likert-type scale. Content validity was demonstrated through expert panel review and pilot testing. Principal axis factoring and Cronbach's alpha evaluated construct validity and internal consistency reliability, respectively. Eighty-three nurse managers completed the scale. Exploratory factor analysis resulted in a 16-item scale with two subscales, EBP Knowledge ( n = 6 items, α = .90) and EBP Activity ( n = 10 items, α = .94). Cronbach's alpha for the entire scale was .95. The Nurse Manager EBP Competency Scale is a brief measure of nurse manager EBP competency with evidence of validity and reliability. The scale can enhance our understanding in future studies regarding how nurse manager EBP competency affects implementation.

  4. Development and psychometric testing of the Ascent to Competence Scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCoy, Michelle A; Levett-Jones, Tracy; Pitt, Victoria

    2013-01-01

    This paper reports the development and psychometric testing of the Ascent to Competence Scale, an instrument designed to measure nursing students' perceptions of the quality of their clinical placement experience. The key purpose of clinical placements is to facilitate students' learning and progress toward the attainment of competence. The attainment of competence requires personal commitment and active involvement of students; support and guidance of clinical and academic staff; and clinical environments that are welcoming and inclusive of students. The items for the Ascent to Competence Scale were identified following a critical review of the literature. Content and face validity were established by an expert panel. During 2010 the instrument was tested with third year nursing students (n=88) from one Australian university. Exploratory factor analysis with promax oblique rotation was used to determine construct validity and Cronbach's coefficient alpha determined the scale's internal consistency reliability. The final scale demonstrated satisfactory internal consistency (alpha 0.98). Exploratory factor analysis yielded a three-component structure termed "Being welcomed"; "Belongingness" and "Learning and competence". Each subscale demonstrated high internal consistency: 0.89; 0.96; and 0.95 respectively. The Ascent to Competence Scale provides a fresh perspective on clinical placements as it allows for the relationship between belongingness, learning and competence to be explored. The scale was reliable and valid for this cohort. Further research in different contexts would be valuable in extending upon this work. The Ascent to Competence Scale profiled in this paper will be of benefit to both educational and healthcare institutions. The use of a quantified yardstick, such as the Ascent to Competence Scale, is important in evaluating the efficacy of programs, placements and partnerships between higher education and health services. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd

  5. Scaling model for symmetric star polymers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramachandran, Ram; Rai, Durgesh K.; Beaucage, Gregory

    2010-03-01

    Neutron scattering data from symmetric star polymers with six poly (urethane-ether) arms, chemically bonded to a C-60 molecule are fitted using a new scaling model and scattering function. The new scaling function can describe both good solvent and theta solvent conditions as well as resolve deviations in chain conformation due to steric interactions between star arms. The scaling model quantifies the distinction between invariant topological features for this star polymer and chain tortuosity which changes with goodness of solvent and steric interaction. Beaucage G, Phys. Rev. E 70 031401 (2004).; Ramachandran R, et al. Macromolecules 41 9802-9806 (2008).; Ramachandran R, et al. Macromolecules, 42 4746-4750 (2009); Rai DK et al. Europhys. Lett., (Submitted 10/2009).

  6. Scaling the sandbox: New insights from detailed mechanical testing and quantitative comparison to nature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ritter, Malte C.; Leever, Karen; Rosenau, Matthias; Oncken, Onno

    2016-04-01

    Analogue sandbox experiments are an important tool to understand tectonic deformation. In combination with modern imaging techniques they provide a spatio-temporal resolution no other method can achieve. The downside is that information on stress distribution within the sandbox model is not readily available, which is the reason for most experiments to date being interpreted kinematically only. However, with the advent of reliable force sensors with a suitable dynamic range the dynamic evolution of sandbox models becomes available for analysis, offering new insights into the transient evolution of tectonic systems. The interpretation of sandbox dynamics and its transfer to natural systems requires a much stricter scaling approach than usually considered. In particular it requires that not only the strength of the model material, but also its transient strength evolution, i.e. its weakening, be properly scaled to that of the natural prototype. No such scaling of transient strength exists up to now. Furthermore, published mechanical test data have mostly been obtained under normal load conditions not representative for analogue experiments. To derive a scaling of transient strength we therefore measured and analysed two standard analogue model materials (quartz sand and glass microbeads) using ring-shear tests at low normal loads similar to common analogue experiments. We find that strain weakening under these conditions ( 1 kPa) only. We show that this basically restricts proper scaling of transient strength of the tested materials to crustal scale models, with a length scaling factor of (nature/model) = 106. For this scale range we quantitatively compare the model materials' transient strength evolution both laboratory measurements of natural rocks and to estimates for the earth' crust. Accounting for lithostatic and hydrostatic conditions, respectively, we find that proper dynamic scaling - also of transient properties - is achieved in either case.

  7. 100 Area soil washing bench-scale test procedures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Freeman, H.D.; Gerber, M.A.; Mattigod, S.V.; Serne, R.J.

    1993-03-01

    This document describes methodologies and procedures for conducting soil washing treatability tests in accordance with the 100 Area Soil Washing Treatability Test Plan (DOE-RL 1992, Draft A). The objective of this treatability study is to evaluate the use of physical separation systems and chemical extraction methods as a means of separating chemically and radioactively contaminated soil fractions from uncontaminated soil fractions. These data will be primarily used for determining feasibility of the individual unit operations and defining the requirements for a system, or systems, for pilot-scale testing.

  8. Full scale tests of all-steel buckling restrained braces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Ning; Wu, Bin; Li, Hui; Ou, Jinping; Yang, Weibiao

    2009-03-01

    Buckling-restrained braces (BRBs) are widely used seismic response-controlling members with excellent energy dissipation capacity without buckling at design deformation. However, the property of all-steel BRBs with cruciform cross section encased in a square steel tube remains insufficiently studied. In this paper, the properties of this kind of BRBs, which were used in two office buildings in Beijing, were examined by full-scale test. First, initial design was done according to the client's requirement. Then, two full-scale specimens were tested under uniaxial quasi-static cyclic loading. The test results indicate that there should be no welding in yielding portion of the core. Finally, the full-scale subassemblage test was done with an improved BRB and gusset plates installed in a frame. The result shows that the brace exhibited high energy dissipation capacity and stable hysteretic characteristic. According to the results from above tests, some important issues are summarized to provide advices for practical applications.

  9. Concepts for Small-Scale Testing of Used Nuclear Fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marschman, Steven Craig [Idaho National Laboratory; Winston, Philip Lon [Idaho National Laboratory

    2015-09-01

    This report documents a concept for a small-scale test involving between one and three Boiling Water Rector (BWR) high burnup (HBU) fuel assemblies. This test would be similar to the DOE funded High Burn-Up (HBU) Confirmatory Data Project to confirm the behavior of used high burn-up fuel under prototypic conditions, only on a smaller scale. The test concept proposed would collect data from fuel stored under prototypic dry storage conditions to mimic, as closely as possible, the conditions HBU UNF experiences during all stages of dry storage: loading, cask drying, inert gas backfilling, and transfer to an Independent Spent Fuel Storage Installation (ISFSI) for multi-year storage.

  10. Field Testing of a 1/100th Scale Starshade

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casement, L. S.; Glassman, T. M.; Lo, A.; Warwick, S.; Armagan, O.

    2013-01-01

    The external starshade is a prospective method for the direct detection and spectral characterization of terrestrial planets around other stars, a key goal identified in ASTRO2010. Validation of this approach has been challenging at ~1/1000th scale in the lab (Samuele et al., 2010). Recently we have successfully fabricated 60 cm 1/100th scale) starshades and have begun a series of ground test experiments with them. Our first experiment, limited by city lights and a short (300 m) baseline between the telescope and the starshade, showed excellent light suppression of >106. We enhanced our experimental setup to provide longer baselines and reduced aperture size to provide a closer match to the Fresnel number expected for the flight system. We took our test equipment into the field for a test in November 2012, the results of which are presented here.

  11. PROPERTIES IMPORTANT TO MIXING FOR WTP LARGE SCALE INTEGRATED TESTING

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koopman, D.; Martino, C.; Poirier, M.

    2012-04-26

    Large Scale Integrated Testing (LSIT) is being planned by Bechtel National, Inc. to address uncertainties in the full scale mixing performance of the Hanford Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP). Testing will use simulated waste rather than actual Hanford waste. Therefore, the use of suitable simulants is critical to achieving the goals of the test program. External review boards have raised questions regarding the overall representativeness of simulants used in previous mixing tests. Accordingly, WTP requested the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) to assist with development of simulants for use in LSIT. Among the first tasks assigned to SRNL was to develop a list of waste properties that matter to pulse-jet mixer (PJM) mixing of WTP tanks. This report satisfies Commitment 5.2.3.1 of the Department of Energy Implementation Plan for Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board Recommendation 2010-2: physical properties important to mixing and scaling. In support of waste simulant development, the following two objectives are the focus of this report: (1) Assess physical and chemical properties important to the testing and development of mixing scaling relationships; (2) Identify the governing properties and associated ranges for LSIT to achieve the Newtonian and non-Newtonian test objectives. This includes the properties to support testing of sampling and heel management systems. The test objectives for LSIT relate to transfer and pump out of solid particles, prototypic integrated operations, sparger operation, PJM controllability, vessel level/density measurement accuracy, sampling, heel management, PJM restart, design and safety margin, Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) Verification and Validation (V and V) and comparison, performance testing and scaling, and high temperature operation. The slurry properties that are most important to Performance Testing and Scaling depend on the test objective and rheological classification of the slurry (i

  12. Testing for Factorial Invariance of the Modified Leadership Scale for Sports: Using a Japanese Version

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Hyungil Harry; Pyun, Do Young; Han, Siwan; Ogasawara, Etsuko

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this study was to provide empirical evidence to support psychometric properties of a modified four-dimensional model of the Leadership Scale for Sports (LSS). The study tested invariance of all parameters (i.e., factor loadings, error variances, and factor variances-covariances) in the four-dimensional measurement model between…

  13. Model-independent tests of cosmic gravity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linder, Eric V

    2011-12-28

    Gravitation governs the expansion and fate of the universe, and the growth of large-scale structure within it, but has not been tested in detail on these cosmic scales. The observed acceleration of the expansion may provide signs of gravitational laws beyond general relativity (GR). Since the form of any such extension is not clear, from either theory or data, we adopt a model-independent approach to parametrizing deviations to the Einstein framework. We explore the phase space dynamics of two key post-GR functions and derive a classification scheme, and an absolute criterion on accuracy necessary for distinguishing classes of gravity models. Future surveys will be able to constrain the post-GR functions' amplitudes and forms to the required precision, and hence reveal new aspects of gravitation.

  14. An improved test for detecting multiplicative homeostatic synaptic scaling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jimok Kim

    Full Text Available Homeostatic scaling of synaptic strengths is essential for maintenance of network "gain", but also poses a risk of losing the distinctions among relative synaptic weights, which are possibly cellular correlates of memory storage. Multiplicative scaling of all synapses has been proposed as a mechanism that would preserve the relative weights among them, because they would all be proportionately adjusted. It is crucial for this hypothesis that all synapses be affected identically, but whether or not this actually occurs is difficult to determine directly. Mathematical tests for multiplicative synaptic scaling are presently carried out on distributions of miniature synaptic current amplitudes, but the accuracy of the test procedure has not been fully validated. We now show that the existence of an amplitude threshold for empirical detection of miniature synaptic currents limits the use of the most common method for detecting multiplicative changes. Our new method circumvents the problem by discarding the potentially distorting subthreshold values after computational scaling. This new method should be useful in assessing the underlying neurophysiological nature of a homeostatic synaptic scaling transformation, and therefore in evaluating its functional significance.

  15. Large-scale direct shear testing of geocell reinforced soil

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    The tests on the shear property of geocell reinforced soils were carried out by using large-scale direct shear equipment with shear-box-dimensions of 500 mm×500 mm×400 mm (length×width×height).Three types of specimens,silty gravel soil,geoceli reinforced silty gravel soil and geoceli reinforood cement stabilizing silty gravel soil were used to investigate the shear stress-displacement behavior,the shear strength and the strengthening mechanism of geocell reinforced soils.The comparisons of large-scale shear test with triaxial compression test for the same type of soil were conducted to evaluate the influences of testing method on the shear strength as well.The test results show that the unreinforced soil and geocell reinforced soil give similar nonlinear features on the behavior of shear stress and displacement.The geocell reinforced cement stabilizing soil has a quasi-elastic characteristic in the case of normal stress coming up to 1.0 GPa.The tests with the reinforcement of geocell result in an increase of 244% in cohesion,and the tests with the geocell and the cement stabilization result in an increase of 10 times in cohesion compared with the unreinforced soil.The friction angle does not change markedly.The geocell reinforcement develops a large amount of cohesion on the shear strength of soils.

  16. Hypothesis testing on the fractal structure of behavioral sequences: the Bayesian assessment of scaling methodology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moscoso del Prado Martín, Fermín

    2013-12-01

    I introduce the Bayesian assessment of scaling (BAS), a simple but powerful Bayesian hypothesis contrast methodology that can be used to test hypotheses on the scaling regime exhibited by a sequence of behavioral data. Rather than comparing parametric models, as typically done in previous approaches, the BAS offers a direct, nonparametric way to test whether a time series exhibits fractal scaling. The BAS provides a simpler and faster test than do previous methods, and the code for making the required computations is provided. The method also enables testing of finely specified hypotheses on the scaling indices, something that was not possible with the previously available methods. I then present 4 simulation studies showing that the BAS methodology outperforms the other methods used in the psychological literature. I conclude with a discussion of methodological issues on fractal analyses in experimental psychology.

  17. Experience with scale effects in non-airplane wind tunnel testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, J. C.; Olson, M. E.

    1990-01-01

    The aerodynamics results of two tests performed in the 80- by 120-Foot Wind Tunnel at NASA Ames Research Center are discussed with particular emphasis on the effects of model scale. The tests are unusual for this facility in that they were performed on non-airplane configurations: a full-scale tractor/trailer and large ramair inflated wings. For the truck drag measurements, comparisons with 1/8th-scale drag data taken at the Low Speed Wind Tunnel at Texas A&M indicate that small scale measurements can provide adequate accuracy if care is taken to test at high enough Reynolds numbers and if large regions of separated flow and reattachment are avoided. Some of the important aerodynamic and structural aspects of parafoil testing are also discussed. These include the effects of Reynolds number and aeroelastic effects such as fabric and support line stretch.

  18. Large-Scale Spray Releases: Additional Aerosol Test Results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daniel, Richard C.; Gauglitz, Phillip A.; Burns, Carolyn A.; Fountain, Matthew S.; Shimskey, Rick W.; Billing, Justin M.; Bontha, Jagannadha R.; Kurath, Dean E.; Jenks, Jeromy WJ; MacFarlan, Paul J.; Mahoney, Lenna A.

    2013-08-01

    One of the events postulated in the hazard analysis for the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) and other U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) nuclear facilities is a breach in process piping that produces aerosols with droplet sizes in the respirable range. The current approach for predicting the size and concentration of aerosols produced in a spray leak event involves extrapolating from correlations reported in the literature. These correlations are based on results obtained from small engineered spray nozzles using pure liquids that behave as a Newtonian fluid. The narrow ranges of physical properties on which the correlations are based do not cover the wide range of slurries and viscous materials that will be processed in the WTP and in processing facilities across the DOE complex. To expand the data set upon which the WTP accident and safety analyses were based, an aerosol spray leak testing program was conducted by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). PNNL’s test program addressed two key technical areas to improve the WTP methodology (Larson and Allen 2010). The first technical area was to quantify the role of slurry particles in small breaches where slurry particles may plug the hole and prevent high-pressure sprays. The results from an effort to address this first technical area can be found in Mahoney et al. (2012a). The second technical area was to determine aerosol droplet size distribution and total droplet volume from prototypic breaches and fluids, including sprays from larger breaches and sprays of slurries for which literature data are mostly absent. To address the second technical area, the testing program collected aerosol generation data at two scales, commonly referred to as small-scale and large-scale testing. The small-scale testing and resultant data are described in Mahoney et al. (2012b), and the large-scale testing and resultant data are presented in Schonewill et al. (2012). In tests at both scales, simulants were used

  19. Mechanistically-Based Field-Scale Models of Uranium Biogeochemistry from Upscaling Pore-Scale Experiments and Models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tim Scheibe; Alexandre Tartakovsky; Brian Wood; Joe Seymour

    2007-04-19

    generally not be applicable to other broad classes of problems, we believe that this approach (if applied over time to many types of problems) offers greater potential for long-term progress than attempts to discover a universal solution or theory. We are developing and testing this approach using porous media and model reaction systems that can be both experimentally measured and quantitatively simulated at the pore scale, specifically biofilm development and metal reduction in granular porous media. The general approach we are using in this research follows the following steps: (1) Perform pore-scale characterization of pore geometry and biofilm development in selected porous media systems. (2) Simulate selected reactive transport processes at the pore scale in experimentally measured pore geometries. (3) Validate pore-scale models against laboratory-scale experiments. (4) Perform upscaling to derive continuum-scale (local darcy scale) process descriptions and effective parameters. (5) Use upscaled models and parameters to simulate reactive transport at the continuum scale in a macroscopically heterogeneous medium.

  20. Description of Model Tests Carried Out by Aalborg University

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frigaard, Peter; Schlütter, F.; Andersen, H.

    1996-01-01

    As associated partner, Aalborg University (AU) have participated in different aspects of "the Zeebrugge project". AU has carried out an extensive number of small-scale model tests (1:65) with the Zeebrugge breakwater with the aim of investigating scale-effects.......As associated partner, Aalborg University (AU) have participated in different aspects of "the Zeebrugge project". AU has carried out an extensive number of small-scale model tests (1:65) with the Zeebrugge breakwater with the aim of investigating scale-effects....

  1. Twodimensional model testing of the Zeebrugge NW Breakwater

    OpenAIRE

    Wens, F.; De Rouck, J.; P. A. Troch; Eelen, B.

    1996-01-01

    Breakwater design at this moment is based on physical scale modelling combined with the use of experimental design formulae. These formulae are all derived from scale model tests together with simplifying the theoretical assumptions. Several breakwaters failures in the past indicate that the state of the art on this subject suffers from a significant lack of full scale data which could give rise to safer design standards. Within the MAST II framework of the EU (Marine Science and Technology),...

  2. Field Testing of a Wet FGD Additive for Enhanced Mercury Control - Pilot-Scale Test Results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gary M. Blythe

    2006-03-01

    This Topical Report summarizes progress on Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-04NT42309, ''Field Testing of a Wet FGD Additive.'' The objective of the project is to demonstrate the use of a flue gas desulfurization (FGD) additive, Degussa Corporation's TMT-15, to prevent the reemissions of elemental mercury (Hg{sup 0}) in flue gas exiting wet FGD systems on coal-fired boilers. Furthermore, the project intends to demonstrate that the additive can be used to precipitate most of the mercury (Hg) removed in the wet FGD system as a fine TMT salt that can be separated from the FGD liquor and bulk solid byproducts for separate disposal. The project will conduct pilot and full-scale tests of the TMT-15 additive in wet FGD absorbers. The tests are intended to determine required additive dosage requirements to prevent Hg{sup 0} reemissions and to separate mercury from the normal FGD byproducts for three coal types: Texas lignite/Power River Basin (PRB) coal blend, high-sulfur Eastern bituminous coal, and low-sulfur Eastern bituminous coal. The project team consists of URS Group, Inc., EPRI, TXU Generation Company LP, Southern Company, and Degussa Corporation. TXU Generation has provided the Texas lignite/PRB co-fired test site for pilot FGD tests, Monticello Steam Electric Station Unit 3. Southern Company is providing the low-sulfur Eastern bituminous coal host site for wet scrubbing tests, as well as the pilot and full-scale jet bubbling reactor (JBR) FGD systems to be tested. A third utility, to be named later, will provide the high-sulfur Eastern bituminous coal full-scale FGD test site. Degussa Corporation is providing the TMT-15 additive and technical support to the test program. The project is being conducted in six tasks. Of the six project tasks, Task 1 involves project planning and Task 6 involves management and reporting. The other four tasks involve field testing on FGD systems, either at pilot or full scale. The four tasks include: Task 2

  3. At-sea test system point design for a one-third scale cold water pipe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sutherland, W.H. (ed.)

    1979-12-01

    One step in the development of the technology for Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) Cold Water Pipes (CWP) is the at-sea testing of a fiberglass reinforced plastic nominal 10-foot diameter pipe. A design procedure and criteria for developing test hardware by scaling down a 30-foot diameter OTEC 10/40 MW Pilot Plant CWP design are presented. An example point design for the pipe, instrumentation to be used during the at-sea tests, and methods for selecting the support platform and mooring are described. The design considered starts with a scale model of a larger prototype, and then is modified to address the problems of fabrication and of survivability and handling during the 1/3rd scale model tests.

  4. Small-Scale Spray Releases: Additional Aerosol Test Results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schonewill, Philip P.; Gauglitz, Phillip A.; Kimura, Marcia L.; Brown, G. N.; Mahoney, Lenna A.; Tran, Diana N.; Burns, Carolyn A.; Kurath, Dean E.

    2013-08-01

    One of the events postulated in the hazard analysis at the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) and other U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) nuclear facilities is a breach in process piping that produces aerosols with droplet sizes in the respirable range. The current approach for predicting the size and concentration of aerosols produced in a spray leak involves extrapolating from correlations reported in the literature. These correlations are based on results obtained from small engineered spray nozzles using pure liquids with Newtonian fluid behavior. The narrow ranges of physical properties on which the correlations are based do not cover the wide range of slurries and viscous materials that will be processed in the WTP and across processing facilities in the DOE complex. To expand the data set upon which the WTP accident and safety analyses were based, an aerosol spray leak testing program was conducted by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). PNNL’s test program addressed two key technical areas to improve the WTP methodology (Larson and Allen 2010). The first technical area was to quantify the role of slurry particles in small breaches where slurry particles may plug the hole and prevent high-pressure sprays. The results from an effort to address this first technical area can be found in Mahoney et al. (2012a). The second technical area was to determine aerosol droplet size distribution and total droplet volume from prototypic breaches and fluids, including sprays from larger breaches and sprays of slurries for which literature data are largely absent. To address the second technical area, the testing program collected aerosol generation data at two scales, commonly referred to as small-scale and large-scale. The small-scale testing and resultant data are described in Mahoney et al. (2012b) and the large-scale testing and resultant data are presented in Schonewill et al. (2012). In tests at both scales, simulants were used to mimic the

  5. Modeling DNA beacons at the mesoscopic scale

    CERN Document Server

    Errami, Jalal; Theodorakopoulos, Nikos

    2007-01-01

    We report model calculations on DNA single strands which describe the equilibrium dynamics and kinetics of hairpin formation and melting. Modeling is at the level of single bases. Strand rigidity is described in terms of simple polymer models; alternative calculations performed using the freely rotating chain and the discrete Kratky-Porod models are reported. Stem formation is modeled according to the Peyrard-Bishop-Dauxois Hamiltonian. The kinetics of opening and closing is described in terms of a diffusion-controlled motion in an effective free energy landscape. Melting profiles, dependence of melting temperature on loop length, and kinetic time scales are in semiquantitative agreement with experimental data obtained from fluorescent DNA beacons forming poly(T) loops. Variation in strand rigidity is not sufficient to account for the large activation enthalpy of closing and the strong loop length dependence observed in hairpins forming poly(A) loops. Implications for modeling single strands of DNA or RNA are...

  6. Laboratory Tests of Chameleon Models

    CERN Document Server

    Brax, Philippe; Davis, Anne-Christine; Shaw, Douglas

    2009-01-01

    We present a cursory overview of chameleon models of dark energy and their laboratory tests with an emphasis on optical and Casimir experiments. Optical experiments measuring the ellipticity of an initially polarised laser beam are sensitive to the coupling of chameleons to photons. The next generation of Casimir experiments may be able to unravel the nature of the scalar force mediated by the chameleon between parallel plates.

  7. On the hydroelastic response of box-shaped floating structure with shallow draft. Tank test with large scale model; Senkitsusui hakogata futai no harochu dansei oto ni tsuite. Ogata mokei ni yoru suiso shiken

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yago, K.; Endo, H. [Ship Research Inst., Tokyo (Japan)

    1996-12-31

    The hydroelastic response test was carried out in waves using an approximately 10m long large model, and the numerical analysis was done by the direct method, for a commercial-size (300m long) box-shaped floating structure with shallow draft. The scale ratio of the model is 1/30.8, and the minimum wave cycle is around 0.7s from wave-making capacity of the tank, which corresponds to 4 to 14s with the commercial-size structure. Elastic displacement and bending strain were measured. The calculated results by the direct method are in good agreement with the observed results. The fluid dynamic mutual interference effects between elements are weak in added mass but strong in damping force, indicating that the range of mutual interference is strongly related to rolling cycle in the range of mutual interference. Wave pressure on the floating structure bottom is high at the upper side of the wave, greatly damping towards the downside of the wave. However, response amplitude of elastic displacement tends to increase at the ends, both in upside and downside of the wave. For the floating structure studied, the 0 to 4th mode components are predominant in longitudinal waves, and the 6th or higher mode components are negligibly low. 21 refs., 15 figs., 2 tabs.

  8. On the hydroelastic response of box-shaped floating structure with shallow draft. Tank test with large scale model; Senkitsusui hakogata futai no harochu dansei oto ni tsuite. Ogata mokei ni yoru suiso shiken

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yago, K.; Endo, H. [Ship Research Inst., Tokyo (Japan)

    1996-12-31

    The hydroelastic response test was carried out in waves using an approximately 10m long large model, and the numerical analysis was done by the direct method, for a commercial-size (300m long) box-shaped floating structure with shallow draft. The scale ratio of the model is 1/30.8, and the minimum wave cycle is around 0.7s from wave-making capacity of the tank, which corresponds to 4 to 14s with the commercial-size structure. Elastic displacement and bending strain were measured. The calculated results by the direct method are in good agreement with the observed results. The fluid dynamic mutual interference effects between elements are weak in added mass but strong in damping force, indicating that the range of mutual interference is strongly related to rolling cycle in the range of mutual interference. Wave pressure on the floating structure bottom is high at the upper side of the wave, greatly damping towards the downside of the wave. However, response amplitude of elastic displacement tends to increase at the ends, both in upside and downside of the wave. For the floating structure studied, the 0 to 4th mode components are predominant in longitudinal waves, and the 6th or higher mode components are negligibly low. 21 refs., 15 figs., 2 tabs.

  9. Probabilistic, meso-scale flood loss modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kreibich, Heidi; Botto, Anna; Schröter, Kai; Merz, Bruno

    2016-04-01

    Flood risk analyses are an important basis for decisions on flood risk management and adaptation. However, such analyses are associated with significant uncertainty, even more if changes in risk due to global change are expected. Although uncertainty analysis and probabilistic approaches have received increased attention during the last years, they are still not standard practice for flood risk assessments and even more for flood loss modelling. State of the art in flood loss modelling is still the use of simple, deterministic approaches like stage-damage functions. Novel probabilistic, multi-variate flood loss models have been developed and validated on the micro-scale using a data-mining approach, namely bagging decision trees (Merz et al. 2013). In this presentation we demonstrate and evaluate the upscaling of the approach to the meso-scale, namely on the basis of land-use units. The model is applied in 19 municipalities which were affected during the 2002 flood by the River Mulde in Saxony, Germany (Botto et al. submitted). The application of bagging decision tree based loss models provide a probability distribution of estimated loss per municipality. Validation is undertaken on the one hand via a comparison with eight deterministic loss models including stage-damage functions as well as multi-variate models. On the other hand the results are compared with official loss data provided by the Saxon Relief Bank (SAB). The results show, that uncertainties of loss estimation remain high. Thus, the significant advantage of this probabilistic flood loss estimation approach is that it inherently provides quantitative information about the uncertainty of the prediction. References: Merz, B.; Kreibich, H.; Lall, U. (2013): Multi-variate flood damage assessment: a tree-based data-mining approach. NHESS, 13(1), 53-64. Botto A, Kreibich H, Merz B, Schröter K (submitted) Probabilistic, multi-variable flood loss modelling on the meso-scale with BT-FLEMO. Risk Analysis.

  10. Measurement and Modelling of Scaling Minerals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Villafafila Garcia, Ada

    2005-01-01

    of scale formation found in many industrial processes, and especially in oilfield and geothermal operations. We want to contribute to the study of this problem by releasing a simple and accurate thermodynamic model capable of calculating the behaviour of scaling minerals, covering a wide range......-liquid equilibrium of sulphate scaling minerals (SrSO4, BaSO4, CaSO4 and CaSO4•2H2O) at temperatures up to 300ºC and pressures up to 1000 bar is described in chapter 4. Results for the binary systems (M2+, )-H2O; the ternary systems (Na+, M2+, )-H2O, and (Na+, M2+, Cl-)-H2O; and the quaternary systems (Na+, M2+)(Cl...

  11. Gait in children with cerebral palsy - Observer reliability of Physician Rating Scale and Edinburgh Visual Gait Analysis Interval Testing Scale

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maathuis, KGB; van der Schans, CP; van Iperen, A; Rietman, HS; Geertzen, JHB

    2005-01-01

    The aim of this study was to test the inter- and intra-observer reliability of the Physician Rating Scale (PRS) and the Edinburgh Visual Gait Analysis Interval Testing (GAIT) scale for use in children with cerebral palsy (CP). Both assessment scales are quantitative observational scales, evaluating

  12. Gait in children with cerebral palsy : observer reliability of Physician Rating Scale and Edinburgh Visual Gait Analysis Interval Testing scale

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maathuis, KGB; van der Schans, CP; van Iperen, A; Rietman, HS; Geertzen, JHB

    2005-01-01

    The aim of this study was to test the inter- and intra-observer reliability of the Physician Rating Scale (PRS) and the Edinburgh Visual Gait Analysis Interval Testing (GAIT) scale for use in children with cerebral palsy (CP). Both assessment scales are quantitative observational scales, evaluating

  13. Megawatt Scale Hardware-in-the-Loop Testing of a High Speed Generator

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-01

    designed for 1.2 MW continuous and 2.5 MW intermittent power. The generator is a two-stage machine composed of a brushless DC exciter and main...operators with the case interface. A simulation model of the entire PHIL test setup (dynamometer, gearbox, generator , rectifier, VVS, etc.), including...Hardware-in-the-Loop Testing of a High Speed Generator ABSTRACT A megawatt scale test bed for power hardware- in-the-loop experimentation with high

  14. Pilot-scale tests of HEME and HEPA dissolution process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qureshi, Z.H.; Strege, D.K.

    1994-06-01

    A series of pilot-scale demonstration tests for the dissolution of High Efficiency Mist Eliminators (HEME`s) and High Efficiency Particulate Airfilters (HEPA) were performed on a 1/5th linear scale. These fiberglass filters are to be used in the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) to decontaminate the effluents from the off-gases generated during the feed preparation process and vitrification. When removed, these filters will be dissolved in the Decontamination Waste Treatment Tank (DWTT) using 5 wt% NaOH solution. The contaminated fiberglass is converted to an aqueous stream which will be transferred to the waste tanks. The filter metal structure will be rinsed with process water before its disposal as low-level solid waste. The pilot-scale study reported here successfully demonstrated a simple one step process using 5 wt% NaOH solution. The proposed process requires the installation of a new water spray ring with 30 nozzles. In addition to the reduced waste generated, the total process time is reduced to 48 hours only (66% saving in time). The pilot-scale tests clearly demonstrated that the dissolution process of HEMEs has two stages - chemical digestion of the filter and mechanical erosion of the digested filter. The digestion is achieved by a boiling 5 wt% caustic solutions, whereas the mechanical break down of the digested filter is successfully achieved by spraying process water on the digested filter. An alternate method of breaking down the digested filter by increased air sparging of the solution was found to be marginally successful are best. The pilot-scale tests also demonstrated that the products of dissolution are easily pumpable by a centrifugal pump.

  15. Tacit knowledge: A refinement and empirical test of the Academic Tacit Knowledge Scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Insch, Gary S; McIntyre, Nancy; Dawley, David

    2008-11-01

    Researchers have linked tacit knowledge to improved organizational performance, but research on how to measure tacit knowledge is scarce. In the present study, the authors proposed and empirically tested a model of tacit knowledge and an accompanying measurement scale of academic tacit knowledge. They present 6 hypotheses that support the proposed tacit knowledge model regarding the role of cognitive (self-motivation, self-organization); technical (individual task, institutional task); and social (task-related, general) skills. The authors tested these hypotheses with 542 responses to the Academic Tacit Knowledge Scale, which included the respondents' grade point average-the performance variable. All 6 hypotheses were supported.

  16. LLNL small-scale drop-hammer impact sensitivity test

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simpson, L.R.; Foltz, M.F.

    1995-01-01

    Small-scale safety testing of explosives and other energetic materials is done to determine their sensitivity to various stimuli including friction, static spark, and impact. This testing is typically done to discover potential handling problems for either newly synthesized materials of unknown behavior or materials that have been stored for long periods of time. This report describes the existing ``ERL Type 12 Drop Weight Impact Sensitivity Apparatus``, or ``Drop Hammer Machine``, and the methods used to determine the impact sensitivity of energetic materials, Also discussed are changes made to both the machine and methods since the inception of impact sensitivity testing at LLNL in 1956. The accumulated data for the materials tested in not listed here, the exception being the discussion of those specific materials (primary calibrants: PETN, RDX, Comp-B3,and TNT; secondary calibrants: K-6, RX-26-AF, and TATB) used to calibrate the machine.

  17. Power Performance Test on a Full-Scale Wind Turbine

    OpenAIRE

    Wangsness, Erik Brevik

    2014-01-01

    There is a standard made by the International Electrotechnical Commission (IEC) for how a power performance test on a full-scale wind turbine should be performed. By using this standard as a guideline, I have performed a power performance test on the 3 MW wind turbine at Valsneset. This was done by measuring the incoming wind towards the wind turbine rotor area with a lidar in conjunction with a cup anemometer at a 33 m high meteorological mast (met-mast). The lidar and cup anemometer measure...

  18. Model Testing - Bringing the Ocean into the Laboratory

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aage, Christian

    2000-01-01

    Hydrodynamic model testing, the principle of bringing the ocean into the laboratory to study the behaviour of the ocean itself and the response of man-made structures in the ocean in reduced scale, has been known for centuries. Due to an insufficient understanding of the physics involved, however......, the early model tests often gave incomplete or directly misleading results.This keynote lecture deals with some of the possibilities and problems within the field of hydrodynamic and hydraulic model testing....

  19. When a Scale Measures More Than Its Name Denotes: The Case of the Test Anxiety Scale for Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicholls, John G.

    1976-01-01

    The Test Anxiety Scale for Children was rewritten to form separate comparative self-evaluation and anxiety scales. Correlations with variables that had been found to be related to the original scale and assumed to be affected by anxiety were generally higher for the self-evaluation scale than the anxiety scales. (Author)

  20. Large Scale and Performance tests of the ATLAS Online Software

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Alexandrov; H.Wolters; 等

    2001-01-01

    One of the sub-systems of the Trigger/DAQ system of the future ATLAS experiment is the Online Software system.It encompasses the functionality needed to configure,control and monitor the DAQ.Its architecture is based on a component structure described in the ATLAS Trigger/DAQ technical proposal.Resular integration tests ensure its smooth operation in test beam setups during its evolutionary development towards the final ATLAS online system.Feedback is received and returned into the development process.Studies of the system.behavior have been performed on a set of up to 111 PCs on a configuration which is getting closer to the final size,Large scale and performance tests of the integrated system were performed on this setup with emphasis on investigating the aspects of the inter-dependence of the components and the performance of the communication software.Of particular interest were the run control state transitions in various configurations of the run control hierarchy.For the purpose of the tests,the software from other Trigger/DAQ sub-systems has been emulated.This paper presents a brief overview of the online system structure,its components and the large scale integration tests and their results.

  1. Scaling analysis of the thermal-hydraulic test facility for the large break LOCA of KNGR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yun, Byong Jo; Kwon, Tae Soon; Song, Chul Hwa; Euh, Dong Jin; Chu, In Cheol; Cho, Hyoung Kyu; Park, Jong Kyun

    2001-03-01

    Korea Next Generation Reactor(KNGR) adopts a Direct Vessel Injection (DVI) system instead of conventional Cold Leg Injection (CLI) system. In this report, a scaling analysis for the steam-water test facility of KNGR with DVI under reflood phase of Loss of Coolant Accident(LBLOCA) is carried out. The major objectives of the test facility are to clarify the thermal hydraulics phenomena in the upper downcomer region and to provide experimental data for evaluating or validating relevant thermal hydraulic models and correlations of the best estimate codes. The test facility should be designed based on the appropriate scaling law so that the same thermal hydraulics phenomena is happened as in the case of prototype. For these, the investigations of previous scaling laws are carried out. And, in the present study, a new scaling approach, named the modified linear scaling, is developed for the design of a scaled-down experimental facility. Its velocity is scaled by a Wallis-type parameter and an aspect ratio of experimental facility is preserved with that of a prototype. The test facility is designed primarily by a volume scaling law and the area ratio of test facility is set to be 1/24.3. However, additional DVI nozzles are also installed at the elevation which is determined by the modified linear scaling law. It is for the scaling analysis of ECC bypass fraction. The cold leg, hot leg and DVI nozzles are additionally attached in the upper annulus downcomer region so that the UPTF counterpart test is possible.

  2. LS-DYNA Analysis of a Full-Scale Helicopter Crash Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Annett, Martin S.

    2010-01-01

    A full-scale crash test of an MD-500 helicopter was conducted in December 2009 at NASA Langley's Landing and Impact Research facility (LandIR). The MD-500 helicopter was fitted with a composite honeycomb Deployable Energy Absorber (DEA) and tested under vertical and horizontal impact velocities of 26 ft/sec and 40 ft/sec, respectively. The objectives of the test were to evaluate the performance of the DEA concept under realistic crash conditions and to generate test data for validation of a system integrated LS-DYNA finite element model. In preparation for the full-scale crash test, a series of sub-scale and MD-500 mass simulator tests was conducted to evaluate the impact performances of various components, including a new crush tube and the DEA blocks. Parameters defined within the system integrated finite element model were determined from these tests. The objective of this paper is to summarize the finite element models developed and analyses performed, beginning with pre-test and continuing through post test validation.

  3. Dual-scale multimedia dynamic synchronization model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李乃祥

    2009-01-01

    Multimedia synchronization is the key technology in application of distributed multimedia.Solution of synchronization conflicts insides and among streams as well as that of user interaction,synchronization granularity refinement and synchronization precision improvement remain great challenges although great efforts have been invested by the academic circle.The construction method of a dual-scale dynamic synchronous model of multimedia presented in this article realizes multimedia synchronization on two sca...

  4. A heterogeneity test for fine-scale genetic structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smouse, Peter E; Peakall, Rod; Gonzales, Eva

    2008-07-01

    For organisms with limited vagility and/or occupying patchy habitats, we often encounter nonrandom patterns of genetic affinity over relatively small spatial scales, labelled fine-scale genetic structure. Both the extent and decay rate of that pattern can be expected to depend on numerous interesting demographic, ecological, historical, and mating system factors, and it would be useful to be able to compare different situations. There is, however, no heterogeneity test currently available for fine-scale genetic structure that would provide us with any guidance on whether the differences we encounter are statistically credible. Here, we develop a general nonparametric heterogeneity test, elaborating on standard autocorrelation methods for pairs of individuals. We first develop a 'pooled within-population' correlogram, where the distance classes (lags) can be defined as functions of distance. Using that pooled correlogram as our null-hypothesis reference frame, we then develop a heterogeneity test of the autocorrelations among different populations, lag-by-lag. From these single-lag tests, we construct an analogous test of heterogeneity for multilag correlograms. We illustrate with a pair of biological examples, one involving the Australian bush rat, the other involving toadshade trillium. The Australian bush rat has limited vagility, and sometimes occupies patchy habitat. We show that the autocorrelation pattern diverges somewhat between continuous and patchy habitat types. For toadshade trillium, clonal replication in Piedmont populations substantially increases autocorrelation for short lags, but clonal replication is less pronounced in mountain populations. Removal of clonal replicates reduces the autocorrelation for short lags and reverses the sign of the difference between mountain and Piedmont correlograms.

  5. SPE5 Sub-Scale Test Series Summary Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vandersall, Kevin S. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Reeves, Robert V. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); DeHaven, Martin R. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Strickland, Shawn L. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2016-01-14

    A series of 2 SPE5 sub-scale tests were performed to experimentally confirm that a booster system designed and evaluated in prior tests would properly initiate the PBXN-110 case charge fill. To conduct the experiments, a canister was designed to contain the nominally 50 mm diameter booster tube with an outer fill of approximately 150 mm diameter by 150 mm in length. The canisters were filled with PBXN-110 at NAWS-China Lake and shipped back to LLNL for testing in the High Explosives Applications Facility (HEAF). Piezoelectric crystal pins were placed on the outside of the booster tube before filling, and a series of piezoelectric crystal pins along with Photonic Doppler Velocimetry (PDV) probes were placed on the outer surface of the canister to measure the relative timing and magnitude of the detonation. The 2 piezoelectric crystal pins integral to the booster design were also utilized along with a series of either piezoelectric crystal pins or piezoelectric polymer pads on the top of the canister or outside case that utilized direct contact, gaps, or different thicknesses of RTV cushions to obtain time of arrival data to evaluate the response in preparation for the large-scale SPE5 test. To further quantify the margin of the booster operation, the 1st test (SPE5SS1) was functioned with both detonators and the 2nd test (SPE5SS2) was functioned with only 1 detonator. A full detonation of the material was observed in both experiments as observed by the pin timing and PDV signals. The piezoelectric pads were found to provide a greater measured signal magnitude during the testing with an RTV layer present, and the improved response is due to the larger measurement surface area of the pad. This report will detail the experiment design, canister assembly for filling, final assembly, experiment firing, presentation of the diagnostic results, and a discussion of the results.

  6. Small-Scale Spray Releases: Orifice Plugging Test Results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mahoney, Lenna A.; Gauglitz, Phillip A.; Blanchard, Jeremy; Kimura, Marcia L.; Kurath, Dean E.

    2012-09-01

    One of the events postulated in the hazard analysis at the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) and other U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) nuclear facilities, is a breach in process piping that produces aerosols with droplet sizes in the respirable range. The current approach for predicting the size and concentration of aerosols produced in a spray leak involves extrapolating from correlations published in the literature. These correlations are based on results obtained from small engineered spray nozzles using pure liquids with Newtonian fluid behavior. The narrow ranges of physical properties on which the correlations are based do not cover the wide range of slurries and viscous materials present in the WTP and across processing facilities in the DOE complex. Two key technical areas were identified where testing results were needed to improve the technical basis by reducing the uncertainty introduced by extrapolating existing literature results. The first technical need was to quantify the role of slurry particles in small breaches in which the slurry particles may plug and result in substantially reduced, or even negligible, respirable fraction formed by high pressure sprays. The second technical need was to determine the aerosol droplet size distribution and volume from prototypic breaches and fluids, specifically including sprays from larger breaches with slurries where data from the literature are largely absent. To address these technical areas, small- and large-scale test stands were constructed and operated with simulants to determine the aerosol release fractions and aerosol generation rates from a range of breach sizes and geometries. The properties of the simulants represented the range of properties expected in the WTP process streams and included water, sodium salt solutions, slurries containing boehmite or gibbsite, and a hazardous chemical simulant. The effect of anti-foam agents (AFA) was assessed with most of the simulants. Orifices

  7. Proceedings Tenth Workshop on Model Based Testing

    OpenAIRE

    Pakulin, Nikolay; Petrenko, Alexander K.; Schlingloff, Bernd-Holger

    2015-01-01

    The workshop is devoted to model-based testing of both software and hardware. Model-based testing uses models describing the required behavior of the system under consideration to guide such efforts as test selection and test results evaluation. Testing validates the real system behavior against models and checks that the implementation conforms to them, but is capable also to find errors in the models themselves. The intent of this workshop is to bring together researchers and users of model...

  8. Remote control missile model test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Jerry M.; Shaw, David S.; Sawyer, Wallace C.

    1989-01-01

    An extremely large, systematic, axisymmetric body/tail fin data base was gathered through tests of an innovative missile model design which is described herein. These data were originally obtained for incorporation into a missile aerodynamics code based on engineering methods (Program MISSILE3), but can also be used as diagnostic test cases for developing computational methods because of the individual-fin data included in the data base. Detailed analysis of four sample cases from these data are presented to illustrate interesting individual-fin force and moment trends. These samples quantitatively show how bow shock, fin orientation, fin deflection, and body vortices can produce strong, unusual, and computationally challenging effects on individual fin loads. Comparisons between these data and calculations from the SWINT Euler code are also presented.

  9. Scale invariant for one-sided multivariate likelihood ratio tests

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samruam Chongcharoen

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Suppose 1 2 , ,..., n X X X is a random sample from Np ( ,V distribution. Consider 0 1 2 : ... 0 p H      and1 : 0 for 1, 2,..., i H   i  p , let 1 0 H  H denote the hypothesis that 1 H holds but 0 H does not, and let ~ 0 H denote thehypothesis that 0 H does not hold. Because the likelihood ratio test (LRT of 0 H versus 1 0 H  H is complicated, severalad hoc tests have been proposed. Tang, Gnecco and Geller (1989 proposed an approximate LRT, Follmann (1996 suggestedrejecting 0 H if the usual test of 0 H versus ~ 0 H rejects 0 H with significance level 2 and a weighted sum of the samplemeans is positive, and Chongcharoen, Singh and Wright (2002 modified Follmann’s test to include information about thecorrelation structure in the sum of the sample means. Chongcharoen and Wright (2007, 2006 give versions of the Tang-Gnecco-Geller tests and Follmann-type tests, respectively, with invariance properties. With LRT’s scale invariant desiredproperty, we investigate its powers by using Monte Carlo techniques and compare them with the tests which we recommendin Chongcharoen and Wright (2007, 2006.

  10. Scale Factor Self-Dual Cosmological Models

    CERN Document Server

    dS, U Camara; Sotkov, G M

    2015-01-01

    We implement a conformal time scale factor duality for Friedmann-Robertson-Walker cosmological models, which is consistent with the weak energy condition. The requirement for self-duality determines the equations of state for a broad class of barotropic fluids. We study the example of a universe filled with two interacting fluids, presenting an accelerated and a decelerated period, with manifest UV/IR duality. The associated self-dual scalar field interaction turns out to coincide with the "radiation-like" modified Chaplygin gas models. We present an equivalent realization of them as gauged K\\"ahler sigma models (minimally coupled to gravity) with very specific and interrelated K\\"ahler- and super-potentials. Their applications in the description of hilltop inflation and also as quintessence models for the late universe are discussed.

  11. Small-Scale Spray Releases: Initial Aerosol Test Results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mahoney, Lenna A.; Gauglitz, Phillip A.; Kimura, Marcia L.; Brown, Garrett N.; Kurath, Dean E.; Buchmiller, William C.; Smith, Dennese M.; Blanchard, Jeremy; Song, Chen; Daniel, Richard C.; Wells, Beric E.; Tran, Diana N.; Burns, Carolyn A.

    2013-05-29

    One of the events postulated in the hazard analysis at the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) and other U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) nuclear facilities is a breach in process piping that produces aerosols with droplet sizes in the respirable range. The current approach for predicting the size and concentration of aerosols produced in a spray leak involves extrapolating from correlations reported in the literature. These correlations are based on results obtained from small engineered spray nozzles using pure liquids with Newtonian fluid behavior. The narrow ranges of physical properties on which the correlations are based do not cover the wide range of slurries and viscous materials that will be processed in the WTP and across processing facilities in the DOE complex. Two key technical areas were identified where testing results were needed to improve the technical basis by reducing the uncertainty due to extrapolating existing literature results. The first technical need was to quantify the role of slurry particles in small breaches where the slurry particles may plug and result in substantially reduced, or even negligible, respirable fraction formed by high-pressure sprays. The second technical need was to determine the aerosol droplet size distribution and volume from prototypic breaches and fluids, specifically including sprays from larger breaches with slurries where data from the literature are scarce. To address these technical areas, small- and large-scale test stands were constructed and operated with simulants to determine aerosol release fractions and net generation rates from a range of breach sizes and geometries. The properties of the simulants represented the range of properties expected in the WTP process streams and included water, sodium salt solutions, slurries containing boehmite or gibbsite, and a hazardous chemical simulant. The effect of antifoam agents was assessed with most of the simulants. Orifices included round holes and

  12. Justification for using scale models for impact response evaluation of the SST Transportation System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berry, R.E.

    1990-12-01

    The validity of scale model impact evaluation of the SST Transportation System is acceptable based on Dimensional Analysis (Buckingham Pi Theorem) and the work of numerous programs that have evaluated the agreement among dimensional analysis, several different reduced-size models and full-scale impact test data. Excellent accuracy has been demonstrated between scale models and full-scale impact data when collected in conformance with the Buckingham Pi Theorem. 20 refs., 4 figs.

  13. A first large-scale flood inundation forecasting model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schumann, Guy J-P; Neal, Jeffrey C.; Voisin, Nathalie; Andreadis, Konstantinos M.; Pappenberger, Florian; Phanthuwongpakdee, Kay; Hall, Amanda C.; Bates, Paul D.

    2013-11-04

    At present continental to global scale flood forecasting focusses on predicting at a point discharge, with little attention to the detail and accuracy of local scale inundation predictions. Yet, inundation is actually the variable of interest and all flood impacts are inherently local in nature. This paper proposes a first large scale flood inundation ensemble forecasting model that uses best available data and modeling approaches in data scarce areas and at continental scales. The model was built for the Lower Zambezi River in southeast Africa to demonstrate current flood inundation forecasting capabilities in large data-scarce regions. The inundation model domain has a surface area of approximately 170k km2. ECMWF meteorological data were used to force the VIC (Variable Infiltration Capacity) macro-scale hydrological model which simulated and routed daily flows to the input boundary locations of the 2-D hydrodynamic model. Efficient hydrodynamic modeling over large areas still requires model grid resolutions that are typically larger than the width of many river channels that play a key a role in flood wave propagation. We therefore employed a novel sub-grid channel scheme to describe the river network in detail whilst at the same time representing the floodplain at an appropriate and efficient scale. The modeling system was first calibrated using water levels on the main channel from the ICESat (Ice, Cloud, and land Elevation Satellite) laser altimeter and then applied to predict the February 2007 Mozambique floods. Model evaluation showed that simulated flood edge cells were within a distance of about 1 km (one model resolution) compared to an observed flood edge of the event. Our study highlights that physically plausible parameter values and satisfactory performance can be achieved at spatial scales ranging from tens to several hundreds of thousands of km2 and at model grid resolutions up to several km2. However, initial model test runs in forecast mode

  14. Small-Scale Spray Releases: Initial Aerosol Test Results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mahoney, Lenna A.; Gauglitz, Phillip A.; Kimura, Marcia L.; Brown, Garrett N.; Kurath, Dean E.; Buchmiller, William C.; Smith, Dennese M.; Blanchard, Jeremy; Song, Chen; Daniel, Richard C.; Wells, Beric E.; Tran, Diana N.; Burns, Carolyn A.

    2012-11-01

    One of the events postulated in the hazard analysis at the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) and other U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) nuclear facilities is a breach in process piping that produces aerosols with droplet sizes in the respirable range. The current approach for predicting the size and concentration of aerosols produced in a spray leak involves extrapolating from correlations reported in the literature. These correlations are based on results obtained from small engineered spray nozzles using pure liquids with Newtonian fluid behavior. The narrow ranges of physical properties on which the correlations are based do not cover the wide range of slurries and viscous materials that will be processed in the WTP and across processing facilities in the DOE complex. Two key technical areas were identified where testing results were needed to improve the technical basis by reducing the uncertainty due to extrapolating existing literature results. The first technical need was to quantify the role of slurry particles in small breaches where the slurry particles may plug and result in substantially reduced, or even negligible, respirable fraction formed by high-pressure sprays. The second technical need was to determine the aerosol droplet size distribution and volume from prototypic breaches and fluids, specifically including sprays from larger breaches with slurries where data from the literature are scarce. To address these technical areas, small- and large-scale test stands were constructed and operated with simulants to determine aerosol release fractions and generation rates from a range of breach sizes and geometries. The properties of the simulants represented the range of properties expected in the WTP process streams and included water, sodium salt solutions, slurries containing boehmite or gibbsite, and a hazardous chemical simulant. The effect of anti-foam agents was assessed with most of the simulants. Orifices included round holes and

  15. Large-scale multimedia modeling applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Droppo, J.G. Jr.; Buck, J.W.; Whelan, G.; Strenge, D.L.; Castleton, K.J.; Gelston, G.M.

    1995-08-01

    Over the past decade, the US Department of Energy (DOE) and other agencies have faced increasing scrutiny for a wide range of environmental issues related to past and current practices. A number of large-scale applications have been undertaken that required analysis of large numbers of potential environmental issues over a wide range of environmental conditions and contaminants. Several of these applications, referred to here as large-scale applications, have addressed long-term public health risks using a holistic approach for assessing impacts from potential waterborne and airborne transport pathways. Multimedia models such as the Multimedia Environmental Pollutant Assessment System (MEPAS) were designed for use in such applications. MEPAS integrates radioactive and hazardous contaminants impact computations for major exposure routes via air, surface water, ground water, and overland flow transport. A number of large-scale applications of MEPAS have been conducted to assess various endpoints for environmental and human health impacts. These applications are described in terms of lessons learned in the development of an effective approach for large-scale applications.

  16. ROLE OF SCALE FACTOR DURING TENSILE TESTING OF SMALL SPECIMENS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gussev, Maxim N [ORNL; Busby, Jeremy T [ORNL; Field, Kevin G [ORNL; Sokolov, Mikhail A [ORNL; Gray, Mr. Sean [University of Michigan

    2014-01-01

    The influence of scale factor (tensile specimen geometry and dimensions) on mechanical test results was investigated for different widely used types of small specimens (SS-1, SS-2, SS-3, and SS-J3) and a set of materials. It was found that the effect of scale factor on the accurate determination of yield stress, ultimate tensile stress, and uniform elongation values was weak; however, clear systematic differences were observed and should be accounted for during interpretation of results. In contrast, total elongation values were strongly sensitive to variations in specimen geometry. Modern experimental methods like digital image correlation allow the impact of scale factor to be reduced. Using these techniques, it was shown that true stress true strain curves describing strain-hardening behavior were very close for different specimen types. The limits of miniaturization are discussed, and an ultra-miniature specimen concept was suggested and evaluated. This type of specimen, as expected, may be suitable for SEM and TEM in situ testing.

  17. A test of first order scaling in Nf=2 QCD

    CERN Document Server

    Cossu, G; Di Giacomo, A; Pica, C

    2007-01-01

    We complete our analysis of Nf=2 QCD based on the lattice staggered fermion formulation. Using a series of Monte Carlo simulations at fixed (amq*Ls^yh) one is able to test the universality class with given critical exponent yh. This strategy has been used to test the O(4) universality class and it has been presented at the previous Lattice conferences. No agreement was found with simulations in the mass range amq=[0.01335,0.15] using lattices with Ls=16 up to 32 and Lt=4. With the same strategy, we now investigate the possibility of a first order transition using a new set of Monte Carlo data corresponding to yh=3 in the same mass and volume range as the one used for O(4). A substantial agreement is observed both in the specific heat scaling and in the scaling of the chiral condensate, while the chiral susceptibilities still presents visible deviation from scaling in the mass range explored.

  18. Precision tests of quantum chromodynamics and the standard model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brodsky, S.J.; Lu, H.J.

    1995-06-01

    The authors discuss three topics relevant to testing the Standard Model to high precision: commensurate scale relations, which relate observables to each other in perturbation theory without renormalization scale or scheme ambiguity, the relationship of compositeness to anomalous moments, and new methods for measuring the anomalous magnetic and quadrupole moments of the W and Z.

  19. Multi-scale atmospheric environment modelling for urban areas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. A. Baklanov

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Modern supercomputers allow realising multi-scale systems for assessment and forecasting of urban meteorology, air pollution and emergency preparedness and considering nesting with obstacle-resolved models. A multi-scale modelling system with downscaling from regional to city-scale with the Environment – HIgh Resolution Limited Area Model (Enviro-HIRLAM and to micro-scale with the obstacle-resolved Micro-scale Model for Urban Environment (M2UE is suggested and demonstrated. The M2UE validation results versus the Mock Urban Setting Trial (MUST experiment indicate satisfactory quality of the model. Necessary conditions for the choice of nested models, building descriptions, areas and resolutions of nested models are analysed. Two-way nesting (up- and down-scaling, when scale effects both directions (from the meso-scale on the micro-scale and from the micro-scale on the meso-scale, is also discussed.

  20. Design and Modelling of Small Scale Low Temperature Power Cycles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wronski, Jorrit

    impact on the work output of the expander.The final part of this report deals with the performance of plate heat exchangers. Several plate heat exchanger correlations were reviewed focussing on their applicability to ORC systems. A framework for dynamic heat exchanger modelling was developed......he work presented in this report contributes to the state of the art within design and modelling of small scale low temperature power cycles. The study is divided into three main parts: (i) fluid property evaluation, (ii) expansion device investigations and (iii) heat exchanger performance...... times and below 10−7 away from the phase boundaries.Regarding expansion devices for small scale organic Rankine cycle (ORC) systems,this work focussed on reciprocating machines. A prototype of a reciprocating expander with a swept volume of 736 cm3 was tested and modelled. he model was written in object...

  1. Development of a Large Scale, High Speed Wheel Test Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kondoleon, Anthony; Seltzer, Donald; Thornton, Richard; Thompson, Marc

    1996-01-01

    Draper Laboratory, with its internal research and development budget, has for the past two years been funding a joint effort with the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) for the development of a large scale, high speed wheel test facility. This facility was developed to perform experiments and carry out evaluations on levitation and propulsion designs for MagLev systems currently under consideration. The facility was developed to rotate a large (2 meter) wheel which could operate with peripheral speeds of greater than 100 meters/second. The rim of the wheel was constructed of a non-magnetic, non-conductive composite material to avoid the generation of errors from spurious forces. A sensor package containing a multi-axis force and torque sensor mounted to the base of the station, provides a signal of the lift and drag forces on the package being tested. Position tables mounted on the station allow for the introduction of errors in real time. A computer controlled data acquisition system was developed around a Macintosh IIfx to record the test data and control the speed of the wheel. This paper describes the development of this test facility. A detailed description of the major components is presented. Recently completed tests carried out on a novel Electrodynamic (EDS) suspension system, developed by MIT as part of this joint effort are described and presented. Adaptation of this facility for linear motor and other propulsion and levitation testing is described.

  2. Drift-Scale Coupled Processes (DST and THC Seepage) Models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    P. Dixon

    2004-04-05

    The purpose of this Model Report (REV02) is to document the unsaturated zone (UZ) models used to evaluate the potential effects of coupled thermal-hydrological-chemical (THC) processes on UZ flow and transport. This Model Report has been developed in accordance with the ''Technical Work Plan for: Performance Assessment Unsaturated Zone'' (Bechtel SAIC Company, LLC (BSC) 2002 [160819]). The technical work plan (TWP) describes planning information pertaining to the technical scope, content, and management of this Model Report in Section 1.12, Work Package AUZM08, ''Coupled Effects on Flow and Seepage''. The plan for validation of the models documented in this Model Report is given in Attachment I, Model Validation Plans, Section I-3-4, of the TWP. Except for variations in acceptance criteria (Section 4.2), there were no deviations from this TWP. This report was developed in accordance with AP-SIII.10Q, ''Models''. This Model Report documents the THC Seepage Model and the Drift Scale Test (DST) THC Model. The THC Seepage Model is a drift-scale process model for predicting the composition of gas and water that could enter waste emplacement drifts and the effects of mineral alteration on flow in rocks surrounding drifts. The DST THC model is a drift-scale process model relying on the same conceptual model and much of the same input data (i.e., physical, hydrological, thermodynamic, and kinetic) as the THC Seepage Model. The DST THC Model is the primary method for validating the THC Seepage Model. The DST THC Model compares predicted water and gas compositions, as well as mineral alteration patterns, with observed data from the DST. These models provide the framework to evaluate THC coupled processes at the drift scale, predict flow and transport behavior for specified thermal-loading conditions, and predict the evolution of mineral alteration and fluid chemistry around potential waste emplacement drifts. The

  3. Simulating the Impact Response of Three Full-Scale Crash Tests of Cessna 172 Aircraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Karen E.; Fasanella, Edwin L.; Littell, Justin D.; Annett, Martin S.; Stimson, Chad M.

    2017-01-01

    During the summer of 2015, a series of three full-scale crash tests were performed at the Landing and Impact Research Facility located at NASA Langley Research Center of Cessna 172 aircraft. The first test (Test 1) represented a flare-to-stall emergency or hard landing onto a rigid surface. The second test (Test 2) represented a controlled-flight- into-terrain (CFIT) with a nose down pitch attitude of the aircraft, which impacted onto soft soil. The third test (Test 3) also represented a CFIT with a nose up pitch attitude of the aircraft, which resulted in a tail strike condition. Test 3 was also conducted onto soft soil. These crash tests were performed for the purpose of evaluating the performance of Emergency Locator Transmitters and to generate impact test data for model calibration. Finite element models were generated and impact analyses were conducted to simulate the three impact conditions using the commercial nonlinear, transient dynamic finite element code, LS-DYNA®. The objective of this paper is to summarize test-analysis results for the three full-scale crash tests.

  4. Commensurate scale relations: Precise tests of quantum chromodynamics without scale or scheme ambiguity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brodsky, S.J. [Stanford Linear Accelerator Center, Menlo Park, CA (United States); Lu, H.J. [Maryland Univ., College Park, MD (United States). Dept. of Physics

    1994-10-01

    We derive commensurate scale relations which relate perturbatively calculable QCD observables to each other, including the annihilation ratio R{sub e+}e{sup {minus}}, the heavy quark potential, {tau} decay, and radiative corrections to structure function sum rules. For each such observable one can define an effective charge, such as {alpha}{sub R}({radical}s)/{pi} {equivalent_to} R {sub e+}e{sup {minus}}({radical}s)/(3{Sigma}e{sub q}{sup 2}){minus}1. The commensurate scale relation connecting the effective charges for observables A and B has the form {alpha}{sub A}(Q{sub A}) {alpha}{sub B}(Q{sub B})(1 + r {sub A/B}{sub {pi}}/{sup {alpha}B} + {hor_ellipsis}), where the coefficient r{sub A/B} is independent of the number of flavors {integral} contributing to coupling renormalization, as in BLM scale-fixing. The ratio of scales Q{sub A}/Q{sub B} is unique at leading order and guarantees that the observables A and B pass through new quark thresholds at the same physical scale. In higher orders a different renormalization scale Q{sup n*} is assigned for each order n in the perturbative series such that the coefficients of the series are identical to that of a invariant theory. The commensurate scale relations and scales satisfy the renormalization group transitivity rule which ensures that predictions in PQCD are independent of the choice of an intermediate renormalization scheme C. In particular, scale-fixed predictions can be made without reference to theoretically constructed singular renormalization schemes such as MS. QCD can thus be tested in a new and precise way by checking that the effective charges of observables track both in their relative normalization and in their commensurate scale dependence. The commensurate scale relations which relate the radiative corrections to the annihilation ratio R{sub e{sup +}e{sup {minus}}} to the radiative corrections for the Bjorken and Gross-Llewellyn Smith sum rules are particularly elegant and interesting.

  5. Dynamic response of scale models subjected to impact loading

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hillsdon, Graham K.

    1997-05-01

    Presented with the problem of possible failure of large structures due to dynamic loading, and the cost of staging full scale tests. The Oxford University's Department of Engineering Science, supported by British Gas and Rolls Royce, has been scale modeling these events experimentally. The paper looks at two areas of research: (1) The structural integrity of a particular type of Liquified Natural Gas Storage Tank, and its vulnerability to blast loading. (2) The ability of Large Aero Engine Fan blades to withstand impacts associated with birds, stones, ice etc.

  6. BiGG Models: A platform for integrating, standardizing and sharing genome-scale models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2016-01-01

    Genome-scale metabolic models are mathematically-structured knowledge bases that can be used to predict metabolic pathway usage and growth phenotypes. Furthermore, they can generate and test hypotheses when integrated with experimental data. To maximize the value of these models, centralized...

  7. Experimental results from pressure testing a 1:6-scale nuclear power plant containment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Horschel, D.S. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1992-01-01

    This report discusses the testing of a 1:6-scale, reinforced-concrete containment building at Sandia National Laboratories, in Albuquerque, New Mexico. The scale-model, Light Water Reactor (LWR) containment building was designed and built to the American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) code by United Engineers and Constructors, Inc., and was instrumented with over 1200 transducers to prepare for the test. The containment model was tested to failure to determine its response to static internal overpressurization. As part of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission`s program on containment integrity, the test results will be used to assess the capability of analytical methods to predict the performance of containments under severe-accident loads. The scaled dimensions of the cylindrical wall and hemispherical dome were typical of a full-size containment. Other typical features included in the heavily reinforced model were equipment hatches, personnel air locks, several small piping penetrations, and a ihin steel liner that was attached to the concrete by headed studs. In addition to the transducers attached to the model, an acoustic detection system and several video and still cameras were used during testing to gather data and to aid in the conduct of the test. The model and its instrumentation are briefly discussed, and is followed by the testing procedures and measured response of the containment model. A summary discussion is included to aid in understanding the significance of the test as it applies to real world reinforced concrete containment structures. The data gathered during SIT and overpressure testing are included as an appendix.

  8. Integrated outburst detector sensor-model tests

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DZIURZY(N)SKI Wac(I)aw; WASILEWSKI Stanis(I)aw

    2011-01-01

    Outbursts of methane and rocks are,similarly to rock bursts,the biggest hazards in deep mines and are equally difficult to predict.The violent process of the outburst itself,along with the scale and range of hazards following the rapid discharge of gas and rocks,requires solutions which would enable quick and unambiguous detection of the hazard,immediate power supply cut-off and evacuation of personnel from potentially hazardous areas.For this purpose,an integrated outburst detector was developed.Assumed functions of the sensor which was equipped with three measuring and detection elements:a chamber for constant measurement of methane concentration,pressure sensor and microphone.Tests of the sensor model were carried out to estimate the parameters which characterize the dynamic properties of the sensor.Given the impossibility of carrying out the full scale experimental outburst,the sensor was tested during the methane and coal dust explosions in the testing gallery at KD Barbara.The obtained results proved that the applied solutions have been appropriate.

  9. Using Large Scale Test Results for Pedagogical Purposes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dolin, Jens

    2012-01-01

    The use and influence of large scale tests (LST), both national and international, has increased dramatically within the last decade. This process has revealed a tension between the legitimate need for information about the performance of the educational system and teachers to inform policy...... wash back effects known from other research but gave additionally some insight in teachers’ attitudes towards LSTs. To account for these findings results from another research project - the Validation of PISA – will be included. This project analyzed how PISA has influenced the Danish educational...

  10. Small-scale Testing of Bucket Foundations in Sand

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knudsen, Bjørn S.; Østergaard, Martin Underlin; Ibsen, Lars Bo

    For offshore foundation structures, the loads are of varying nature both in magnitude and duration. For the bucket foundation the dissipation of the pore pressure is highly relevant since it greatly affects the strength of the structure. The build up of pore pressures with varying loading rate...... skirt will provide valuable information of the quasi-static behaviour. For a number of small-scale tests performed in the laboratory at Aalborg University, a bucket foundation will be loaded with varying velocity to investigate the dissipation and general behaviour of bucket foundations used as offshore...

  11. Full-Scale Cookoff Model Validation Experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McClelland, M A; Rattanapote, M K; Heimdahl, E R; Erikson, W E; Curran, P O; Atwood, A I

    2003-11-25

    This paper presents the experimental results of the third and final phase of a cookoff model validation effort. In this phase of the work, two generic Heavy Wall Penetrators (HWP) were tested in two heating orientations. Temperature and strain gage data were collected over the entire test period. Predictions for time and temperature of reaction were made prior to release of the live data. Predictions were comparable to the measured values and were highly dependent on the established boundary conditions. Both HWP tests failed at a weld located near the aft closure of the device. More than 90 percent of unreacted explosive was recovered in the end heated experiment and less than 30 percent recovered in the side heated test.

  12. Finite Element Simulation of Three Full-Scale Crash Tests for Cessna 172 Aircraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mason, Brian H.; Warren, Jerry E., Jr.

    2017-01-01

    The NASA Emergency Locator Transmitter Survivability and Reliability (ELT-SAR) project was initiated in 2013 to assess the crash performance standards for the next generation of emergency locator transmitter (ELT) systems. Three Cessna 172 aircraft were acquired to perform crash testing at NASA Langley Research Center's Landing and Impact Research Facility. Full-scale crash tests were conducted in the summer of 2015 and each test article was subjected to severe, but survivable, impact conditions including a flare-to-stall during emergency landing, and two controlled-flight-into-terrain scenarios. Full-scale finite element analyses were performed using a commercial explicit solver, ABAQUS. The first test simulated impacting a concrete surface represented analytically by a rigid plane. Tests 2 and 3 simulated impacting a dirt surface represented analytically by an Eulerian grid of brick elements using a Mohr-Coulomb material model. The objective of this paper is to summarize the test and analysis results for the three full-scale crash tests. Simulation models of the airframe which correlate well with the tests are needed for future studies of alternate ELT mounting configurations.

  13. Large-Scale Spray Releases: Initial Aerosol Test Results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schonewill, Philip P.; Gauglitz, Phillip A.; Bontha, Jagannadha R.; Daniel, Richard C.; Kurath, Dean E.; Adkins, Harold E.; Billing, Justin M.; Burns, Carolyn A.; Davis, James M.; Enderlin, Carl W.; Fischer, Christopher M.; Jenks, Jeromy WJ; Lukins, Craig D.; MacFarlan, Paul J.; Shutthanandan, Janani I.; Smith, Dennese M.

    2012-12-01

    One of the events postulated in the hazard analysis at the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) and other U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) nuclear facilities is a breach in process piping that produces aerosols with droplet sizes in the respirable range. The current approach for predicting the size and concentration of aerosols produced in a spray leak involves extrapolating from correlations reported in the literature. These correlations are based on results obtained from small engineered spray nozzles using pure liquids with Newtonian fluid behavior. The narrow ranges of physical properties on which the correlations are based do not cover the wide range of slurries and viscous materials that will be processed in the WTP and across processing facilities in the DOE complex. Two key technical areas were identified where testing results were needed to improve the technical basis by reducing the uncertainty due to extrapolating existing literature results. The first technical need was to quantify the role of slurry particles in small breaches where the slurry particles may plug and result in substantially reduced, or even negligible, respirable fraction formed by high-pressure sprays. The second technical need was to determine the aerosol droplet size distribution and volume from prototypic breaches and fluids, specifically including sprays from larger breaches with slurries where data from the literature are scarce. To address these technical areas, small- and large-scale test stands were constructed and operated with simulants to determine aerosol release fractions and generation rates from a range of breach sizes and geometries. The properties of the simulants represented the range of properties expected in the WTP process streams and included water, sodium salt solutions, slurries containing boehmite or gibbsite, and a hazardous chemical simulant. The effect of anti-foam agents was assessed with most of the simulants. Orifices included round holes and

  14. Pilot Scale Tests Alden/Concepts NREC Turbine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomas C. Cook; George E.Hecker; Stephen Amaral; Philip Stacy; Fangbiao Lin; Edward Taft

    2003-09-30

    Alden Research Laboratory, Inc. has completed pilot scale testing of the new Alden/Concepts NREC turbine that was designed to minimize fish injury at hydropower projects. The test program was part of the U.S. Department of Energy's Advanced Hydropower Turbine Systems Program. The prototype turbine operating point was 1,000 cfs at 80ft head and 100 rpm. The turbine was design to: (1) limit peripheral runner speed; (2) have a high minimum pressure; (3) limit pressure change rates; (4) limit the maximum flow shear; (5) minimize the number and total length of leading blade edges; (6) maximize the distance between the runner inlet and the wicket gates and minimize clearances (i.e., gaps) between other components; and (7) maximize the size of flow passages.

  15. Tests of Gravitation at Solar System scales beyond the PPN formalism

    CERN Document Server

    Hees, A; Jacobson, R A; Park, R S; Lamine, B; Poncin-Lafitte, C Le; Wolf, P

    2014-01-01

    In this communication, the current tests of gravitation available at Solar System scales are recalled. These tests rely mainly on two frameworks: the PPN framework and the search for a fifth force. Some motivations are given to look for deviations from General Relativity in other frameworks than the two extensively considered. A recent analysis of Cassini data in a MOND framework is presented. Furthermore, possibilities to constrain Standard Model Extension parameters using Solar System data are developed.

  16. The development and performance testing of a biodegradable scale inhibitor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hardy, Julie; Fidoe, Steve; Jones, Chris

    2006-03-15

    The oil industry is currently facing severe restrictions concerning the discharge of oil field chemicals into the environment. Many commonly used materials in both topside and downhole applications are phased for substitution for use in the North Sea, and more will be identified. The development of biodegradable and low toxicity chemicals, which afford equal or improved efficacy, compared to conventional technology, available at a competitive price, is a current industry challenge. A range of biodegradable materials are increasingly available, however their limited performance can result in a restricted range of applications. This paper discusses the development and commercialization of a readily biodegradable scale inhibitor, ideal for use in topside applications. This material offers a broad spectrum of activity, notably efficiency against barium sulphate, calcium sulphate and calcium carbonate scales, in a range of water chemistries. A range of performance testing, compatibility, stability and OCNS dataset will be presented. Comparisons with commonly used chemicals have been made to identify the superior performance of this phosphate ester. This paper will discuss a scale inhibitor suitable for use in a variety of conditions which offers enhanced performance combined with a favourable biodegradation profile. This material is of great benefit to the industry, particularly in North Sea applications. (author) (tk)

  17. BiGG Models: A platform for integrating, standardizing and sharing genome-scale models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Zachary A; Lu, Justin; Dräger, Andreas; Miller, Philip; Federowicz, Stephen; Lerman, Joshua A; Ebrahim, Ali; Palsson, Bernhard O; Lewis, Nathan E

    2016-01-01

    Genome-scale metabolic models are mathematically-structured knowledge bases that can be used to predict metabolic pathway usage and growth phenotypes. Furthermore, they can generate and test hypotheses when integrated with experimental data. To maximize the value of these models, centralized repositories of high-quality models must be established, models must adhere to established standards and model components must be linked to relevant databases. Tools for model visualization further enhance their utility. To meet these needs, we present BiGG Models (http://bigg.ucsd.edu), a completely redesigned Biochemical, Genetic and Genomic knowledge base. BiGG Models contains more than 75 high-quality, manually-curated genome-scale metabolic models. On the website, users can browse, search and visualize models. BiGG Models connects genome-scale models to genome annotations and external databases. Reaction and metabolite identifiers have been standardized across models to conform to community standards and enable rapid comparison across models. Furthermore, BiGG Models provides a comprehensive application programming interface for accessing BiGG Models with modeling and analysis tools. As a resource for highly curated, standardized and accessible models of metabolism, BiGG Models will facilitate diverse systems biology studies and support knowledge-based analysis of diverse experimental data.

  18. Physical Modeling of Scaled Water Distribution System Networks.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O' Hern, Timothy J.; Hammond, Glenn Edward; Orear, Leslie ,; van Bloemen Waanders, Bart G.; Paul Molina; Ross Johnson

    2005-10-01

    Threats to water distribution systems include release of contaminants and Denial of Service (DoS) attacks. A better understanding, and validated computational models, of the flow in water distribution systems would enable determination of sensor placement in real water distribution networks, allow source identification, and guide mitigation/minimization efforts. Validation data are needed to evaluate numerical models of network operations. Some data can be acquired in real-world tests, but these are limited by 1) unknown demand, 2) lack of repeatability, 3) too many sources of uncertainty (demand, friction factors, etc.), and 4) expense. In addition, real-world tests have limited numbers of network access points. A scale-model water distribution system was fabricated, and validation data were acquired over a range of flow (demand) conditions. Standard operating variables included system layout, demand at various nodes in the system, and pressure drop across various pipe sections. In addition, the location of contaminant (salt or dye) introduction was varied. Measurements of pressure, flowrate, and concentration at a large number of points, and overall visualization of dye transport through the flow network were completed. Scale-up issues that that were incorporated in the experiment design include Reynolds number, pressure drop across nodes, and pipe friction and roughness. The scale was chosen to be 20:1, so the 10 inch main was modeled with a 0.5 inch pipe in the physical model. Controlled validation tracer tests were run to provide validation to flow and transport models, especially of the degree of mixing at pipe junctions. Results of the pipe mixing experiments showed large deviations from predicted behavior and these have a large impact on standard network operations models.3

  19. Pilot unit testing of scale inhibitors at geopressured energy well sites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mouche, R.J.; Matson, M.L.; Matson, J.V.; Bebout, D.G.; Bachman, A.L. (eds.)

    1981-01-01

    The skid-mounted pilot unit is a smaller version of the main surface equipment used at geothermal geopressured well sites. It will be used to monitor the effectiveness of scale and corrosion inhibitors for the preventing of scaling and corrosion in the main surface equipment. The pilot unit will model the main surface equipment with respect to pressure, flow velocities, and scale inhibitor injection. The pilot unit will also operate under other conditions for optimization determination. Scaling tendencies will be monitored by specially shaped mild steel coupons placed at critical locations throughout the pilot unit. The coupons will be checked at regular intervals, and analysis will include visual, weight and EDAX-SEM analysis. Various scale inhibitors will be tested over a large range of dosage levels in order to screen inhibitors and their effectiveness for water with particular quality parameters.

  20. The scale-invariant scotogenic model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahriche, Amine [Department of Physics, University of Jijel,PB 98 Ouled Aissa, DZ-18000 Jijel (Algeria); The Abdus Salam International Centre for Theoretical Physics,Strada Costiera 11, I-34014, Trieste (Italy); McDonald, Kristian L. [ARC Centre of Excellence for Particle Physics at the Terascale,School of Physics, The University of Sydney,NSW 2006 (Australia); Nasri, Salah [Physics Department, UAE University,POB 17551, Al Ain (United Arab Emirates)

    2016-06-30

    We investigate a minimal scale-invariant implementation of the scotogenic model and show that viable electroweak symmetry breaking can occur while simultaneously generating one-loop neutrino masses and the dark matter relic abundance. The model predicts the existence of a singlet scalar (dilaton) that plays the dual roles of triggering electroweak symmetry breaking and sourcing lepton number violation. Important constraints are studied, including those from lepton flavor violating effects and dark matter direct-detection experiments. The latter turn out to be somewhat severe, already excluding large regions of parameter space. None the less, viable regions of parameter space are found, corresponding to dark matter masses below (roughly) 10 GeV and above 200 GeV.

  1. Multilevel method for modeling large-scale networks.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Safro, I. M. (Mathematics and Computer Science)

    2012-02-24

    Understanding the behavior of real complex networks is of great theoretical and practical significance. It includes developing accurate artificial models whose topological properties are similar to the real networks, generating the artificial networks at different scales under special conditions, investigating a network dynamics, reconstructing missing data, predicting network response, detecting anomalies and other tasks. Network generation, reconstruction, and prediction of its future topology are central issues of this field. In this project, we address the questions related to the understanding of the network modeling, investigating its structure and properties, and generating artificial networks. Most of the modern network generation methods are based either on various random graph models (reinforced by a set of properties such as power law distribution of node degrees, graph diameter, and number of triangles) or on the principle of replicating an existing model with elements of randomization such as R-MAT generator and Kronecker product modeling. Hierarchical models operate at different levels of network hierarchy but with the same finest elements of the network. However, in many cases the methods that include randomization and replication elements on the finest relationships between network nodes and modeling that addresses the problem of preserving a set of simplified properties do not fit accurately enough the real networks. Among the unsatisfactory features are numerically inadequate results, non-stability of algorithms on real (artificial) data, that have been tested on artificial (real) data, and incorrect behavior at different scales. One reason is that randomization and replication of existing structures can create conflicts between fine and coarse scales of the real network geometry. Moreover, the randomization and satisfying of some attribute at the same time can abolish those topological attributes that have been undefined or hidden from

  2. Optogenetic stimulation of a meso-scale human cortical model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selvaraj, Prashanth; Szeri, Andrew; Sleigh, Jamie; Kirsch, Heidi

    2015-03-01

    Neurological phenomena like sleep and seizures depend not only on the activity of individual neurons, but on the dynamics of neuron populations as well. Meso-scale models of cortical activity provide a means to study neural dynamics at the level of neuron populations. Additionally, they offer a safe and economical way to test the effects and efficacy of stimulation techniques on the dynamics of the cortex. Here, we use a physiologically relevant meso-scale model of the cortex to study the hypersynchronous activity of neuron populations during epileptic seizures. The model consists of a set of stochastic, highly non-linear partial differential equations. Next, we use optogenetic stimulation to control seizures in a hyperexcited cortex, and to induce seizures in a normally functioning cortex. The high spatial and temporal resolution this method offers makes a strong case for the use of optogenetics in treating meso scale cortical disorders such as epileptic seizures. We use bifurcation analysis to investigate the effect of optogenetic stimulation in the meso scale model, and its efficacy in suppressing the non-linear dynamics of seizures.

  3. Large Scale, High Resolution, Mantle Dynamics Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geenen, T.; Berg, A. V.; Spakman, W.

    2007-12-01

    To model the geodynamic evolution of plate convergence, subduction and collision and to allow for a connection to various types of observational data, geophysical, geodetical and geological, we developed a 4D (space-time) numerical mantle convection code. The model is based on a spherical 3D Eulerian fem model, with quadratic elements, on top of which we constructed a 3D Lagrangian particle in cell(PIC) method. We use the PIC method to transport material properties and to incorporate a viscoelastic rheology. Since capturing small scale processes associated with localization phenomena require a high resolution, we spend a considerable effort on implementing solvers suitable to solve for models with over 100 million degrees of freedom. We implemented Additive Schwartz type ILU based methods in combination with a Krylov solver, GMRES. However we found that for problems with over 500 thousend degrees of freedom the convergence of the solver degraded severely. This observation is known from the literature [Saad, 2003] and results from the local character of the ILU preconditioner resulting in a poor approximation of the inverse of A for large A. The size of A for which ILU is no longer usable depends on the condition of A and on the amount of fill in allowed for the ILU preconditioner. We found that for our problems with over 5×105 degrees of freedom convergence became to slow to solve the system within an acceptable amount of walltime, one minute, even when allowing for considerable amount of fill in. We also implemented MUMPS and found good scaling results for problems up to 107 degrees of freedom for up to 32 CPU¡¯s. For problems with over 100 million degrees of freedom we implemented Algebraic Multigrid type methods (AMG) from the ML library [Sala, 2006]. Since multigrid methods are most effective for single parameter problems, we rebuild our model to use the SIMPLE method in the Stokes solver [Patankar, 1980]. We present scaling results from these solvers for 3D

  4. Drift-Scale Coupled Processes (DST and THC Seepage) Models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    E. Sonnenthale

    2001-04-16

    The purpose of this Analysis/Model Report (AMR) is to document the Near-Field Environment (NFE) and Unsaturated Zone (UZ) models used to evaluate the potential effects of coupled thermal-hydrologic-chemical (THC) processes on unsaturated zone flow and transport. This is in accordance with the ''Technical Work Plan (TWP) for Unsaturated Zone Flow and Transport Process Model Report'', Addendum D, Attachment D-4 (Civilian Radioactive Waste Management System (CRWMS) Management and Operating Contractor (M&O) 2000 [1534471]) and ''Technical Work Plan for Nearfield Environment Thermal Analyses and Testing'' (CRWMS M&O 2000 [153309]). These models include the Drift Scale Test (DST) THC Model and several THC seepage models. These models provide the framework to evaluate THC coupled processes at the drift scale, predict flow and transport behavior for specified thermal loading conditions, and predict the chemistry of waters and gases entering potential waste-emplacement drifts. The intended use of this AMR is to provide input for the following: Performance Assessment (PA); Near-Field Environment (NFE) PMR; Abstraction of Drift-Scale Coupled Processes AMR (ANL-NBS-HS-000029); and UZ Flow and Transport Process Model Report (PMR). The work scope for this activity is presented in the TWPs cited above, and summarized as follows: Continue development of the repository drift-scale THC seepage model used in support of the TSPA in-drift geochemical model; incorporate heterogeneous fracture property realizations; study sensitivity of results to changes in input data and mineral assemblage; validate the DST model by comparison with field data; perform simulations to predict mineral dissolution and precipitation and their effects on fracture properties and chemistry of water (but not flow rates) that may seep into drifts; submit modeling results to the TDMS and document the models. The model development, input data, sensitivity and validation

  5. Drift-Scale Coupled Processes (DST and THC Seepage) Models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    E. Gonnenthal; N. Spyoher

    2001-02-05

    The purpose of this Analysis/Model Report (AMR) is to document the Near-Field Environment (NFE) and Unsaturated Zone (UZ) models used to evaluate the potential effects of coupled thermal-hydrologic-chemical (THC) processes on unsaturated zone flow and transport. This is in accordance with the ''Technical Work Plan (TWP) for Unsaturated Zone Flow and Transport Process Model Report'', Addendum D, Attachment D-4 (Civilian Radioactive Waste Management System (CRWMS) Management and Operating Contractor (M and O) 2000 [153447]) and ''Technical Work Plan for Nearfield Environment Thermal Analyses and Testing'' (CRWMS M and O 2000 [153309]). These models include the Drift Scale Test (DST) THC Model and several THC seepage models. These models provide the framework to evaluate THC coupled processes at the drift scale, predict flow and transport behavior for specified thermal loading conditions, and predict the chemistry of waters and gases entering potential waste-emplacement drifts. The intended use of this AMR is to provide input for the following: (1) Performance Assessment (PA); (2) Abstraction of Drift-Scale Coupled Processes AMR (ANL-NBS-HS-000029); (3) UZ Flow and Transport Process Model Report (PMR); and (4) Near-Field Environment (NFE) PMR. The work scope for this activity is presented in the TWPs cited above, and summarized as follows: continue development of the repository drift-scale THC seepage model used in support of the TSPA in-drift geochemical model; incorporate heterogeneous fracture property realizations; study sensitivity of results to changes in input data and mineral assemblage; validate the DST model by comparison with field data; perform simulations to predict mineral dissolution and precipitation and their effects on fracture properties and chemistry of water (but not flow rates) that may seep into drifts; submit modeling results to the TDMS and document the models. The model development, input data

  6. Axial Waterjet (AxWJ) Model 5662: Hull Resistance and Model-Scale Powering with LDV Nozzle Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-09-01

    6 M odel-Scale Rotor Forces: Ship Propulsion Point As Tested ........................................ 6 M odel-Scale Rotor Forces: Over and Under...Propulsion ................................................. 7 Model-Scale Rotor Forces: Estimated At Corrected Ship Propulsion Point...hull. The largest increase was measured at 30 knots, where the LDV nozzles increased the PE by 4.9%. Model-Scale Rotor Forces: Ship Propulsion Point

  7. Worries of Pregnant Women: Testing the Farsi Cambridge Worry Scale

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Forough Mortazavi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Pregnancy adds many sources of concerns to women’s daily life worries. Excessive worry can affect maternal physiological and psychological state that influences the pregnancy outcomes. The aim of this study was to validate the Cambridge Worry Scale (CWS in a sample of Iranian pregnant women. After translation of the CWS, ten experts evaluated the items and added six items to the 17-item scale. In a descriptive cross-sectional study, 405 of pregnant women booked for prenatal care completed the Farsi CWS. We split the sample randomly. Exploratory factor analysis (EFA was conducted on the first half of the sample to disclose the factorial structure of the 23-item scale. The results of the EFA on the Farsi CWS indicated four factors altogether explained 51.5% of variances. Confirmatory factor analysis (CFA was done on the second half of the sample. The results of the CFA showed that the model fit our data (chi-square/df = 2.02, RMSEA = 0.071, SRMR = 0.071, CFI = 0.95, and NNFI = 0.94. Cronbach’s alpha coefficient for the Farsi CWS was 0.883. The Farsi CWS is a reliable and valid instrument for understanding common pregnancy worries in the third trimester of pregnancy in Iranian women.

  8. Using Large Scale Structure to test Multifield Inflation

    CERN Document Server

    Ferraro, Simone

    2014-01-01

    Primordial non-Gaussianity of local type is known to produce a scale-dependent contribution to the galaxy bias. Several classes of multi-field inflationary models predict non-Gaussian bias which is stochastic, in the sense that dark matter and halos don't trace each other perfectly on large scales. In this work, we forecast the ability of next-generation Large Scale Structure surveys to constrain common types of primordial non-Gaussianity like $f_{NL}$, $g_{NL}$ and $\\tau_{NL}$ using halo bias, including stochastic contributions. We provide fitting functions for statistical errors on these parameters which can be used for rapid forecasting or survey optimization. A next-generation survey with volume $V = 25 h^{-3}$Mpc$^3$, median redshift $z = 0.7$ and mean bias $b_g = 2.5$, can achieve $\\sigma(f_{NL}) = 6$, $\\sigma(g_{NL}) = 10^5$ and $\\sigma(\\tau_{NL}) = 10^3$ if no mass information is available. If halo masses are available, we show that optimally weighting the halo field in order to reduce sample variance...

  9. Worries of Pregnant Women: Testing the Farsi Cambridge Worry Scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mortazavi, Forough; Akaberi, Arash

    2016-01-01

    Pregnancy adds many sources of concerns to women's daily life worries. Excessive worry can affect maternal physiological and psychological state that influences the pregnancy outcomes. The aim of this study was to validate the Cambridge Worry Scale (CWS) in a sample of Iranian pregnant women. After translation of the CWS, ten experts evaluated the items and added six items to the 17-item scale. In a descriptive cross-sectional study, 405 of pregnant women booked for prenatal care completed the Farsi CWS. We split the sample randomly. Exploratory factor analysis (EFA) was conducted on the first half of the sample to disclose the factorial structure of the 23-item scale. The results of the EFA on the Farsi CWS indicated four factors altogether explained 51.5% of variances. Confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) was done on the second half of the sample. The results of the CFA showed that the model fit our data (chi-square/df = 2.02, RMSEA = 0.071, SRMR = 0.071, CFI = 0.95, and NNFI = 0.94). Cronbach's alpha coefficient for the Farsi CWS was 0.883. The Farsi CWS is a reliable and valid instrument for understanding common pregnancy worries in the third trimester of pregnancy in Iranian women.

  10. Scale-Bridging Model Development for Coal Particle Devolatilization

    CERN Document Server

    Schroeder, Benjamin B; Smith, Philip J; Fletcher, Thomas H; Packard, Andrew; Frenklach, Michael; Hegde, Arun; Li, Wenyu; Oreluk, James

    2016-01-01

    When performing large-scale, high-performance computations of multi-physics applications, it is common to limit the complexity of physics sub-models comprising the simulation. For a hierarchical system of coal boiler simulations a scale-bridging model is constructed to capture characteristics appropriate for the application-scale from a detailed coal devolatilization model. Such scale-bridging allows full descriptions of scale-applicable physics, while functioning at reasonable computational costs. This study presents a variation on multi-fidelity modeling with a detailed physics model, the chemical percolation devolatilization model, being used to calibrate a scale-briding model for the application of interest. The application space provides essential context for designing the scale-bridging model by defining scales, determining requirements and weighting desired characteristics. A single kinetic reaction equation with functional yield model and distributed activation energy is implemented to act as the scal...

  11. Testing Strategies for Model-Based Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heimdahl, Mats P. E.; Whalen, Mike; Rajan, Ajitha; Miller, Steven P.

    2006-01-01

    This report presents an approach for testing artifacts generated in a model-based development process. This approach divides the traditional testing process into two parts: requirements-based testing (validation testing) which determines whether the model implements the high-level requirements and model-based testing (conformance testing) which determines whether the code generated from a model is behaviorally equivalent to the model. The goals of the two processes differ significantly and this report explores suitable testing metrics and automation strategies for each. To support requirements-based testing, we define novel objective requirements coverage metrics similar to existing specification and code coverage metrics. For model-based testing, we briefly describe automation strategies and examine the fault-finding capability of different structural coverage metrics using tests automatically generated from the model.

  12. Preliminary Results of Testing of Flow Effects on Evaporator Scaling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hu, M.Z.

    2002-02-15

    This investigation has focused on the effects of fluid flow on solids deposition from solutions that simulate the feed to the 2H evaporator at the Savannah River Site. Literature studies indicate that the fluid flow (or shear) affects particle-particle and particle-surface interactions and thus the phenomena of particle aggregation in solution and particle deposition (i.e., scale formation) onto solid surfaces. Experimental tests were conducted with two configurations: (1) using a rheometer to provide controlled shear conditions and (2) using controlled flow of reactive solution through samples of stainless steel tubing. All tests were conducted at 80 C and at high silicon and aluminum concentrations, 0.133 M each, in solutions containing 4 M sodium hydroxide and 1 A4 each of sodium nitrate and sodium nitrite. Two findings from these experiments are important for consideration in developing approaches for reducing or eliminating evaporator scaling problems: (1) The rheometer tests suggested that for the conditions studied, maximum solids deposition occurs at a moderate shear rate, approximately 12 s{sup -1}. That value is expected to be on the order of shear rates that will occur in various parts of the evaporator system; for instance, a 6 gal/min single-phase liquid flow through the 2-in. lift or gravity drain lines would result in a shear rate of approximately 16 s{sup -1}. These results imply that engineering approaches aimed at reducing deposits through increased mixing would need to generate shear near all surfaces significantly greater than 12 s{sup -1}. However, further testing is needed to set a target value for shear that is applicable to evaporator operation. This is because the measured trend is not statistically significant at the 95% confidence interval due to variability in the results. In addition, testing at higher temperatures and lower concentrations of aluminum and silicon would more accurately represent conditions in the evaporator. Without

  13. Sensitivities in global scale modeling of isoprene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. von Kuhlmann

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available A sensitivity study of the treatment of isoprene and related parameters in 3D atmospheric models was conducted using the global model of tropospheric chemistry MATCH-MPIC. A total of twelve sensitivity scenarios which can be grouped into four thematic categories were performed. These four categories consist of simulations with different chemical mechanisms, different assumptions concerning the deposition characteristics of intermediate products, assumptions concerning the nitrates from the oxidation of isoprene and variations of the source strengths. The largest differences in ozone compared to the reference simulation occured when a different isoprene oxidation scheme was used (up to 30-60% or about 10 nmol/mol. The largest differences in the abundance of peroxyacetylnitrate (PAN were found when the isoprene emission strength was reduced by 50% and in tests with increased or decreased efficiency of the deposition of intermediates. The deposition assumptions were also found to have a significant effect on the upper tropospheric HOx production. Different implicit assumptions about the loss of intermediate products were identified as a major reason for the deviations among the tested isoprene oxidation schemes. The total tropospheric burden of O3 calculated in the sensitivity runs is increased compared to the background methane chemistry by 26±9  Tg( O3 from 273 to an average from the sensitivity runs of 299 Tg(O3. % revised Thus, there is a spread of ± 35% of the overall effect of isoprene in the model among the tested scenarios. This range of uncertainty and the much larger local deviations found in the test runs suggest that the treatment of isoprene in global models can only be seen as a first order estimate at present, and points towards specific processes in need of focused future work.

  14. Sensitivities in global scale modeling of isoprene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. von Kuhlmann

    2003-06-01

    Full Text Available A sensitivity study of the treatment of isoprene and related parameters in 3D atmospheric models was conducted using the global model of tropospheric chemistry MATCH-MPIC. A total of twelve sensitivity scenarios which can be grouped into four thematic categories were performed. These four categories consist of simulations with different chemical mechanisms, different assumptions concerning the deposition characteristics of intermediate products, assumptions concerning the nitrates from the oxidation of isoprene and variations of the source strengths. The largest differences in ozone compared to the reference simulation occured when a different isoprene oxidation scheme was used (up to 30–60% or about 10 nmol/mol. The largest differences in the abundance of peroxyacetylnitrate (PAN were found when the isoprene emission strength was reduced by 50% and in tests with increased or decreased efficiency of the deposition of intermediates. The deposition assumptions were also found to have a significant effect on the upper tropospheric HOx production. Different implicit assumptions about the loss of intermediate products were identified as a major reason for the deviations among the tested isoprene oxidation schemes. The total tropospheric burden of O3 calculated in the sensitivity runs is increased compared to the background methane chemistry by 26±9 Tg(O3 from 273 to 299 Tg(O(3. Thus, there is a spread of ±35% of the overall effect of isoprene in the model among the tested scenarios. This range of uncertainty and the much larger local deviations found in the test runs suggest that the treatment of isoprene in global models can only be seen as a first order estimate at present, and points towards specific processes in need of focused future work.

  15. Multi-scale Modeling of Plasticity in Tantalum.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lim, Hojun [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Battaile, Corbett Chandler. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Carroll, Jay [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Buchheit, Thomas E. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Boyce, Brad [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Weinberger, Christopher [Drexel Univ., Philadelphia, PA (United States)

    2015-12-01

    In this report, we present a multi-scale computational model to simulate plastic deformation of tantalum and validating experiments. In atomistic/ dislocation level, dislocation kink- pair theory is used to formulate temperature and strain rate dependent constitutive equations. The kink-pair theory is calibrated to available data from single crystal experiments to produce accurate and convenient constitutive laws. The model is then implemented into a BCC crystal plasticity finite element method (CP-FEM) model to predict temperature and strain rate dependent yield stresses of single and polycrystalline tantalum and compared with existing experimental data from the literature. Furthermore, classical continuum constitutive models describing temperature and strain rate dependent flow behaviors are fit to the yield stresses obtained from the CP-FEM polycrystal predictions. The model is then used to conduct hydro- dynamic simulations of Taylor cylinder impact test and compared with experiments. In order to validate the proposed tantalum CP-FEM model with experiments, we introduce a method for quantitative comparison of CP-FEM models with various experimental techniques. To mitigate the effects of unknown subsurface microstructure, tantalum tensile specimens with a pseudo-two-dimensional grain structure and grain sizes on the order of millimeters are used. A technique combining an electron back scatter diffraction (EBSD) and high resolution digital image correlation (HR-DIC) is used to measure the texture and sub-grain strain fields upon uniaxial tensile loading at various applied strains. Deformed specimens are also analyzed with optical profilometry measurements to obtain out-of- plane strain fields. These high resolution measurements are directly compared with large-scale CP-FEM predictions. This computational method directly links fundamental dislocation physics to plastic deformations in the grain-scale and to the engineering-scale applications. Furthermore, direct

  16. Full Scale Component Test Facility KOPRA - Qualification Test of EPR Control Rod Drive Mechanism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sykora, Alexander; Herr, Wolfgang [AREVA NP GmbH, P.O. Box 3220, 91050 Erlangen (Germany); Champomier, Francois [AREVA NP SAS, Tour AREVA - Cedex 16, 92084 Paris-La Defense (France)

    2008-07-01

    The test facility KOPRA is designed for full scale-tests on nuclear components under operational conditions. One part of it is the component test loop for developing and qualifying nuclear core components respecting temperature, pressure and mass flow of pressurized water reactor conditions. The KOPRA test facility and its measuring equipment is presented through qualification tests for the control rod drive mechanism and the control rod drive line of the new European Pressurized Water Reactor (EPR). The control rod drive mechanism qualification test program is split into three different test phases. At first, performance tests are conducted to verify the adequate performance of the new equipment, e.g. measurement of rod cluster control assembly drop time under different thermal hydraulic conditions, impact velocity of drive rod on CRDM latch tips and drive rod acceleration during stepping operation by means of strain gauges or through direct measurement. After these functional tests follow the stability tests to ensure that proper functioning is reliably achieved over an appreciable amount of time and the endurance tests to quantify the amount of time and/or the number of steps during which no appreciable wear, that could possibly alter the correct behaviour, is to be expected. (authors)

  17. Triple balance test of the PRR baseline space shuttle configuration on a .004 scale model of the MCR 0074 orbiter configuration in the MSFC 14 x 14 inch Trisonic Wind Tunnel (TWT 570) IA31F(B), volume 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramsey, P. E.; Davis, T. C.

    1974-01-01

    A wind tunnel force and moment test of the space shuttle launch vehicle was conducted. The wind tunnel model utilized a triple balance such that component aerodynamics of the orbiter, external tank, and solid rocket booster was obtained. The test was conducted at an angle of attack range from -10 deg to 10 deg, and angle of sideslip range from -10 deg to 10 deg, and a Mach number range from 0.6 to 4.96. Simulation parameters to be used in future launch vehicle wind tunnel tests were investigated. The following were included: (1) effect of orbiter -ET attach hardware; (2) model attachment (spacer) effects; (3) effects of grit on model leading surfaces; and (4) model misalignment effects. The effects of external tank nose shape was studied by investigating five different nose configurations. Plotted and tabulated data is reported.

  18. 糯扎渡水电站大型蜗壳结构模型试验%Structural Model Test for the Large Scale Spiral Case of Nuozhadu Hydropower Station

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王溢波; 张宏战; 马震岳; 刘兴宁; 洪振伟

    2015-01-01

    Combined with the design research for the large spiral case structure of Nuozhadu hydropower station ,a simu-lation material model test with a geometric scale of 1∶10 was conducted .The test results indicate that ,under the maxi-mum design internal pressure of 2 .80 MPa ,the steel liner and outer reinforced concrete can meet the strength require-ments ,and the maximum crack width on the concrete is smaller than the limit value of the related specification .Under the internal pressure of 4 .20 MPa ,the stress of steel liner and steel bar does not exceed their respective yield strength , and the spiral case structure keeps good integrity .The intersection area of spiral case roof and generator pedestal of the import section is the weak part of the spiral case structure ,certain local reinforcement measures should be taken to control the extension of cracks .%结合糯扎渡水电站大型蜗壳结构的设计研究,开展了几何比尺为1∶10仿真材料模型试验。试验结果表明,在最大设计内水压力2.80 MPa下,混凝土裂缝最大宽度小于规范规定的限值,蜗壳钢衬及外围钢筋混凝土均满足强度要求;在4.20 MPa内水压力下,蜗壳钢衬和钢筋的应力也未超过材料的屈服强度,结构保持较好的整体性,具有较高的超载能力;蜗壳顶板混凝土较薄,特别是进口段与机墩的交角处开裂相对较重,属于结构薄弱部位,应采取一定的局部加强措施。

  19. Upscaling of U(VI) Desorption and Transport from Decimeter-Scale Heterogeneity to Plume-Scale Modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Curtis, Gary P. [U.S. Geological Survey, Menlo Park, CA (United States); Kohler, Matthias [U.S. Geological Survey, Menlo Park, CA (United States); Kannappan, Ramakrishnan [U.S. Geological Survey, Menlo Park, CA (United States); Briggs, Martin [U.S. Geological Survey, Menlo Park, CA (United States); Day-Lewis, Fred [U.S. Geological Survey, Menlo Park, CA (United States)

    2015-02-24

    Scientifically defensible predictions of field scale U(VI) transport in groundwater requires an understanding of key processes at multiple scales. These scales range from smaller than the sediment grain scale (less than 10 μm) to as large as the field scale which can extend over several kilometers. The key processes that need to be considered include both geochemical reactions in solution and at sediment surfaces as well as physical transport processes including advection, dispersion, and pore-scale diffusion. The research summarized in this report includes both experimental and modeling results in batch, column and tracer tests. The objectives of this research were to: (1) quantify the rates of U(VI) desorption from sediments acquired from a uranium contaminated aquifer in batch experiments;(2) quantify rates of U(VI) desorption in column experiments with variable chemical conditions, and(3) quantify nonreactive tracer and U(VI) transport in field tests.

  20. EVALUATION OF A NEW MEAN SCALED AND MOMENT ADJUSTED TEST STATISTIC FOR SEM.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong, Xiaoxiao; Bentler, Peter M

    2013-01-01

    Recently a new mean scaled and skewness adjusted test statistic was developed for evaluating structural equation models in small samples and with potentially nonnormal data, but this statistic has received only limited evaluation. The performance of this statistic is compared to normal theory maximum likelihood and two well-known robust test statistics. A modification to the Satorra-Bentler scaled statistic is developed for the condition that sample size is smaller than degrees of freedom. The behavior of the four test statistics is evaluated with a Monte Carlo confirmatory factor analysis study that varies seven sample sizes and three distributional conditions obtained using Headrick's fifth-order transformation to nonnormality. The new statistic performs badly in most conditions except under the normal distribution. The goodness-of-fit χ(2) test based on maximum-likelihood estimation performed well under normal distributions as well as under a condition of asymptotic robustness. The Satorra-Bentler scaled test statistic performed best overall, while the mean scaled and variance adjusted test statistic outperformed the others at small and moderate sample sizes under certain distributional conditions.

  1. A large scale test of the gaming-enhancement hypothesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew K. Przybylski

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available A growing research literature suggests that regular electronic game play and game-based training programs may confer practically significant benefits to cognitive functioning. Most evidence supporting this idea, the gaming-enhancement hypothesis, has been collected in small-scale studies of university students and older adults. This research investigated the hypothesis in a general way with a large sample of 1,847 school-aged children. Our aim was to examine the relations between young people’s gaming experiences and an objective test of reasoning performance. Using a Bayesian hypothesis testing approach, evidence for the gaming-enhancement and null hypotheses were compared. Results provided no substantive evidence supporting the idea that having preference for or regularly playing commercially available games was positively associated with reasoning ability. Evidence ranged from equivocal to very strong in support for the null hypothesis over what was predicted. The discussion focuses on the value of Bayesian hypothesis testing for investigating electronic gaming effects, the importance of open science practices, and pre-registered designs to improve the quality of future work.

  2. Multi-Scale Modeling of Plasma Thrusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batishchev, Oleg

    2004-11-01

    Plasma thrusters are characterized with multiple spatial and temporal scales, which are due to the intrinsic physical processes such as gas ionization, wall effects and plasma acceleration. Characteristic times for hot plasma and cold gas are differing by 6-7 orders of magnitude. The typical collisional mean-free-paths vary by 3-5 orders along the devices. These make questionable a true self-consistent modeling of the thrusters. The latter is vital to the understanding of complex physics, non-linear dynamics and optimization of the performance. To overcome this problem we propose the following approach. All processes are divided into two groups: fast and slow. The slow ones include gas evolution with known sources and ionization sink. The ionization rate, transport coefficients, energy sources are defined during "fast step". Both processes are linked through external iterations. Multiple spatial scales are handled using moving adaptive mesh. Development and application of this method to the VASIMR helicon plasma source and other thrusters will be discussed. Supported by NASA.

  3. Modelling Fine Scale Movement Corridors for the Tricarinate Hill Turtle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mondal, I.; Kumar, R. S.; Habib, B.; Talukdar, G.

    2016-06-01

    Habitat loss and the destruction of habitat connectivity can lead to species extinction by isolation of population. Identifying important habitat corridors to enhance habitat connectivity is imperative for species conservation by preserving dispersal pattern to maintain genetic diversity. Circuit theory is a novel tool to model habitat connectivity as it considers habitat as an electronic circuit board and species movement as a certain amount of current moving around through different resistors in the circuit. Most studies involving circuit theory have been carried out at small scales on large ranging animals like wolves or pumas, and more recently on tigers. This calls for a study that tests circuit theory at a large scale to model micro-scale habitat connectivity. The present study on a small South-Asian geoemydid, the Tricarinate Hill-turtle (Melanochelys tricarinata), focuses on habitat connectivity at a very fine scale. The Tricarinate has a small body size (carapace length: 127-175 mm) and home range (8000-15000 m2), with very specific habitat requirements and movement patterns. We used very high resolution Worldview satellite data and extensive field observations to derive a model of landscape permeability at 1 : 2,000 scale to suit the target species. Circuit theory was applied to model potential corridors between core habitat patches for the Tricarinate Hill-turtle. The modelled corridors were validated by extensive ground tracking data collected using thread spool technique and found to be functional. Therefore, circuit theory is a promising tool for accurately identifying corridors, to aid in habitat studies of small species.

  4. Multi-scale Modelling of Segmentation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hartmann, Martin; Lartillot, Olivier; Toiviainen, Petri

    2016-01-01

    While listening to music, people often unwittingly break down musical pieces into constituent chunks such as verses and choruses. Music segmentation studies have suggested that some consensus regarding boundary perception exists, despite individual differences. However, neither the effects...... of experimental task (i.e., real-time vs. annotated segmentation), nor of musicianship on boundary perception are clear. Our study assesses musicianship effects and differences between segmentation tasks. We conducted a real-time experiment to collect segmentations by musicians and nonmusicians from nine musical...... pieces. In a second experiment on non-real-time segmentation, musicians indicated boundaries and their strength for six examples. Kernel density estimation was used to develop multi-scale segmentation models. Contrary to previous research, no relationship was found between boundary strength and boundary...

  5. Linear Logistic Test Modeling with R

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Purya Baghaei

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The present paper gives a general introduction to the linear logistic test model (Fischer, 1973, an extension of the Rasch model with linear constraints on item parameters, along with eRm (an R package to estimate different types of Rasch models; Mair, Hatzinger, & Mair, 2014 functions to estimate the model and interpret its parameters. The applications of the model in test validation, hypothesis testing, cross-cultural studies of test bias, rule-based item generation, and investigating construct irrelevant factors which contribute to item difficulty are explained. The model is applied to an English as a foreign language reading comprehension test and the results are discussed.

  6. Testing Linear Models for Ability Parameters in Item Response Models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Glas, Cees A.W.; Hendrawan, Irene

    2005-01-01

    Methods for testing hypotheses concerning the regression parameters in linear models for the latent person parameters in item response models are presented. Three tests are outlined: A likelihood ratio test, a Lagrange multiplier test and a Wald test. The tests are derived in a marginal maximum like

  7. Development and psychometric testing of the Supportive Supervisory Scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGilton, Katherine S

    2010-06-01

    To describe the development and psychometric testing of the Supportive Supervisory Scale (SSS). The development of the items of the scale was based on Winnicott's relationship theory and on focus groups with 26 healthcare aides (HCAs) and 30 supervisors from six long-term care (LTC) facilities in Ontario, Canada. Content validity of the 15-item instrument was established by a panel of experts. Based on a secondary analysis of data collected from 222 HCAs in 10 LTC facilities in Ontario, Canada, the SSS was subjected to principal components analysis with oblique rotation. A two-factor solution was accepted, which is consistent with the theoretical conceptualization of the instrument. Factor I was labeled Respects Uniqueness and Factor II was labeled Being Reliable. Internal consistency of Factor I was .95, and that of Factor II was .91. Discriminant validity was also established. The focus groups revealed that "being available to staff" while "recognizing the HCA as an individual, and taking a moment to get to know them" was essential to feeling supported by their supervisor. The SSS is a reliable and valid measure of supervisory support of supervisors working in LTC facilities. At the core of supportive supervision is the supervisor's ability to develop and maintain positive relationships with each HCA. It is through respecting the uniqueness of each HCA and being reliable that supervisor-HCA relationships can flourish. Supportive leadership in LTC settings is a major contributor to HCAs' job satisfaction and retention and to quality of patient care. Therefore, a tool developed and tested to measure supervisors' supportive capacities in LTC is primal to evaluate the effectiveness of supervisors in these environments.

  8. Macro Scale Independently Homogenized Subcells for Modeling Braided Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blinzler, Brina J.; Goldberg, Robert K.; Binienda, Wieslaw K.

    2012-01-01

    An analytical method has been developed to analyze the impact response of triaxially braided carbon fiber composites, including the penetration velocity and impact damage patterns. In the analytical model, the triaxial braid architecture is simulated by using four parallel shell elements, each of which is modeled as a laminated composite. Currently, each shell element is considered to be a smeared homogeneous material. The commercial transient dynamic finite element code LS-DYNA is used to conduct the simulations, and a continuum damage mechanics model internal to LS-DYNA is used as the material constitutive model. To determine the stiffness and strength properties required for the constitutive model, a top-down approach for determining the strength properties is merged with a bottom-up approach for determining the stiffness properties. The top-down portion uses global strengths obtained from macro-scale coupon level testing to characterize the material strengths for each subcell. The bottom-up portion uses micro-scale fiber and matrix stiffness properties to characterize the material stiffness for each subcell. Simulations of quasi-static coupon level tests for several representative composites are conducted along with impact simulations.

  9. Experimental exploration of diffusion panel labyrinth in scale model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vance, Mandi M.

    Small rehearsal and performance venues often lack the rich reverberation found in larger spaces. Higini Arau-Puchades has designed and implemented a system of diffusion panels in the Orchestra Rehearsal Room at the Great Theatre Liceu and the Tonhalle St. Gallen that lengthen the reverberation time. These panels defy traditional room acoustics theory which holds that adding material to a room will shorten the reverberation time. This work explores several versions of Arau-Puchades' panels and room characteristics in scale model. Reverberation times are taken from room impulse response measurements in order to better understand the unusual phenomenon. Scale modeling enables many tests but has limitations in its accuracy due to the higher frequency range involved. Further investigations are necessary to establish how the sound energy interacts with the diffusion panels and confirm their validity in a range of applications.

  10. Modeling belief systems with scale-free networks

    CERN Document Server

    Antal, Miklos

    2008-01-01

    Evolution of belief systems has always been in focus of cognitive research. In this paper we delineate a new model describing belief systems as a network of statements considered true. Testing the model a small number of parameters enabled us to reproduce a variety of well-known mechanisms ranging from opinion changes to development of psychological problems. The self-organizing opinion structure showed a scale-free degree distribution. The novelty of our work lies in applying a convenient set of definitions allowing us to depict opinion network dynamics in a highly favorable way, which resulted in a scale-free belief network. As an additional benefit, we listed several conjectural consequences in a number of areas related to thinking and reasoning.

  11. Testing linearity against nonlinear moving average models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Gooijer, J.G.; Brännäs, K.; Teräsvirta, T.

    1998-01-01

    Lagrange multiplier (LM) test statistics are derived for testing a linear moving average model against an additive smooth transition moving average model. The latter model is introduced in the paper. The small sample performance of the proposed tests are evaluated in a Monte Carlo study and compared

  12. Software Testing Method Based on Model Comparison

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIE Xiao-dong; LU Yan-sheng; MAO Cheng-yin

    2008-01-01

    A model comparison based software testing method (MCST) is proposed. In this method, the requirements and programs of software under test are transformed into the ones in the same form, and described by the same model describe language (MDL).Then, the requirements are transformed into a specification model and the programs into an implementation model. Thus, the elements and structures of the two models are compared, and the differences between them are obtained. Based on the diffrences, a test suite is generated. Different MDLs can be chosen for the software under test. The usages of two classical MDLs in MCST, the equivalence classes model and the extended finite state machine (EFSM) model, are described with example applications. The results show that the test suites generated by MCST are more efficient and smaller than some other testing methods, such as the path-coverage testing method, the object state diagram testing method, etc.

  13. Full-Scale Accident Testing in Support of Used Nuclear Fuel Transportation.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Durbin, Samuel G.; Lindgren, Eric R.; Rechard, Rob P.; Sorenson, Ken B.

    2014-09-01

    The safe transport of spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste is an important aspect of the waste management system of the United States. The Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) currently certifies spent nuclear fuel rail cask designs based primarily on numerical modeling of hypothetical accident conditions augmented with some small scale testing. However, NRC initiated a Package Performance Study (PPS) in 2001 to examine the response of full-scale rail casks in extreme transportation accidents. The objectives of PPS were to demonstrate the safety of transportation casks and to provide high-fidelity data for validating the modeling. Although work on the PPS eventually stopped, the Blue Ribbon Commission on America’s Nuclear Future recommended in 2012 that the test plans be re-examined. This recommendation was in recognition of substantial public feedback calling for a full-scale severe accident test of a rail cask to verify evaluations by NRC, which find that risk from the transport of spent fuel in certified casks is extremely low. This report, which serves as the re-assessment, provides a summary of the history of the PPS planning, identifies the objectives and technical issues that drove the scope of the PPS, and presents a possible path for moving forward in planning to conduct a full-scale cask test. Because full-scale testing is expensive, the value of such testing on public perceptions and public acceptance is important. Consequently, the path forward starts with a public perception component followed by two additional components: accident simulation and first responder training. The proposed path forward presents a series of study options with several points where the package performance study could be redirected if warranted.

  14. Simultaneous nested modeling from the synoptic scale to the LES scale for wind energy applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Yubao; Warner, Tom; Liu, Yuewei

    2011-01-01

    This paper describes an advanced multi-scale weather modeling system, WRF–RTFDDA–LES, designed to simulate synoptic scale (~2000 km) to small- and micro-scale (~100 m) circulations of real weather in wind farms on simultaneous nested grids. This modeling system is built upon the National Center f...

  15. Baseline neutron logging measurements in the drift scale test

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, W.; Carlson, R.; Neubaurer, D.

    1998-01-01

    The Drift Scale Test (DST) is one of the thermal tests being conducted in the Exploratory Studies Facility (ESF). One of the objectives of the DST is to study the coupled thermal-mechanical- hydrological-chemical (TMHC) processes in the ESF at the repository horizon of the potential high-level nuclear waste repository in Yucca Mountain, Nevada. The objectives, the test design, and the test layouts of the DST are included in the test design report by CRWMS M&O Contractor LLNL. The configuration of the DST includes a declining Observation Drift driven mostly east and downward from main tunnel in the ESF, at about 2.827 km from the North portal. The downward slope of the Observation Drift (11.5 to 14.0 percent) ensures a minimum 10 m of middle nonlithophysal Topopah Spring Tuff as the overburden for the DST. The length of the Observation Drift is about 136 m. At the elevation of the DST crown (nominally 10 m below the upper extent of the middle nonlithophysal Topopah Spring Tuff) the Connecting Drift breaks out to the north from the Observation Drift, 136 m from the main tunnel of the ESF. The Connecting Drift extends approximately 40 m to the north from the Observation Drift. A Heater Drift breaks out westward from the Connecting Drift at about 30 m from the Observation Drift. The Heater Drift consists of an 11 m long entry, which includes a plate- loading niche, and a 47 m long heated drift. The nominal diameter of the drifts is 5 m. The detail configuration of the DST, including diagrams showing the drift and borehole layout, is included in the test design report by CRWMS M&O Contractor LLNL. Thermal neutron logging is a method used to determine moisture content in rocks and soils and will be used to monitor moisture content in boreholes ESF-HD-NEU-1 to ESF-HD-NEU-10 (Boreholes 47 to 51 and 64 to 68), ESF-HD-TEMP-1 (Borehole 79), and ESF-HD-TEMP-2 (Borehole 80) in the DST. The neutron probe contains a source of high energy neutrons and a detector for slow (thermal

  16. Dynamical process upscaling for deriving catchment scale state variables and constitutive relations for meso-scale process models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Zehe

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study we propose an uspcaling approach to derive time series of (a REW scale state variables, and (b effective REW scale soil hydraulic functions to test and parameterise models based on the REW approach. To this end we employed a physically based hydrological model, that represents the typical patterns and structures in the study catchment, and has previously been shown to reproduce observed runoff response and state dynamics well. This landscape- and process-compatible model is used to simulate numerical drainage and wetting experiments. The effective soil water retention curve and soil hydraulic conductivity curve are derived using the spatially averaged saturation and capillary pressure as well as averaged fluxes. When driven with observed boundary conditions during a one year simulation the model is used to estimate how the spatial pattern of soil moisture evolved during this period in the catchment. The time series of the volume integrated soil moisture is deemed as best estimate for the average catchment scale soil moisture. The approach is applied to the extensively monitored Weiherbach catchment in Germany. A sensitivity analysis showed that catchment scale model structures different from the landscape- and process compatible one yielded different times series of average catchment scale soil moisture and where not able to reproduce the observed rainfall runoff response. Hence, subscale typical heterogeneity leaves a clear fingerprint in the time series of average catchment scale saturation. In case of the Weiherbach catchment local scale heterogeneity of ks could be neglected and a simple representation of the typical hillslope scale patterns of soil types and macroporosity was sufficient for obtaining effective REW scale soil hydraulic functions. Both the effective soil hydraulic functions and time series of catchment scale saturation turned out to be useful to parameterise and test the CREW model, which is based on the REW

  17. Axion Models with High Scale Inflation

    CERN Document Server

    Moroi, Takeo; Nakayama, Kazunori; Takimoto, Masahiro

    2014-01-01

    We revisit the cosmological aspects of axion models. In the high-scale inflation scenario, the Peccei-Quinn (PQ) symmetry is likely to be restored during/after inflation. If the curvature of the PQ scalar potential at the origin is smaller than its vacuum expectation value; for instance in a class of SUSY axion models, thermal inflation happens before the radial component of the PQ scalar (saxion) relaxes into the global minimum of the potential and the decay of saxion coherent oscillation would produce too much axion dark radiation. In this paper, we study how to avoid the overproduction of axion dark radiation with some concrete examples. We show that, by taking account of the finite-temperature dissipation effect appropriately, the overproduction constraint can be relaxed since the PQ scalar can take part in the thermal plasma again even after the PQ phase transition. We also show that it can be further relaxed owing to the late time decay of another heavy CP-odd scalar, if it is present.

  18. Simulating the Response of a Composite Honeycomb Energy Absorber. Part 2; Full-Scale Impact Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fasanella, Edwin L.; Annett, Martin S.; Jackson, Karen E.; Polanco, Michael A.

    2012-01-01

    NASA has sponsored research to evaluate an externally deployable composite honeycomb designed to attenuate loads in the event of a helicopter crash. The concept, designated the Deployable Energy Absorber (DEA), is an expandable Kevlar(Registered TradeMark) honeycomb. The DEA has a flexible hinge that allows the honeycomb to be stowed collapsed until needed during an emergency. Evaluation of the DEA began with material characterization of the Kevlar(Registered TradeMark)-129 fabric/epoxy, and ended with a full-scale crash test of a retrofitted MD-500 helicopter. During each evaluation phase, finite element models of the test articles were developed and simulations were performed using the dynamic finite element code, LS-DYNA(Registered TradeMark). The paper will focus on simulations of two full-scale impact tests involving the DEA, a mass-simulator and a full-scale crash of an instrumented MD-500 helicopter. Isotropic (MAT24) and composite (MAT58) material models, which were assigned to DEA shell elements, were compared. Based on simulations results, the MAT58 model showed better agreement with test.

  19. Flavor Gauge Models Below the Fermi Scale

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Babu, K. S. [Oklahoma State U.; Friedland, A. [SLAC; Machado, P. A.N. [Madrid, IFT; Mocioiu, I. [Penn State U.

    2017-05-04

    The mass and weak interaction eigenstates for the quarks of the third generation are very well aligned, an empirical fact for which the Standard Model offers no explanation. We explore the possibility that this alignment is due to an additional gauge symmetry in the third generation. Specifically, we construct and analyze an explicit, renormalizable model with a gauge boson, $X$, corresponding to the $B-L$ symmetry of the third family. Having a relatively light (in the MeV to multi-GeV range), flavor-nonuniversal gauge boson results in a variety of constraints from different sources. By systematically analyzing 20 different constraints, we identify the most sensitive probes: kaon, $D^+$ and Upsilon decays, $D-\\bar{D}^0$ mixing, atomic parity violation, and neutrino scattering and oscillations. For the new gauge coupling $g_X$ in the range $(10^{-2} - 10^{-4})$ the model is shown to be consistent with the data. Possible ways of testing the model in $b$ physics, top and $Z$ decays, direct collider production and neutrino oscillation experiments, where one can observe nonstandard matter effects, are outlined. The choice of leptons to carry the new force is ambiguous, resulting in additional phenomenological implications, such as non-universality in semileptonic bottom decays. The proposed framework provides interesting connections between neutrino oscillations, flavor and collider physics.

  20. Current state of genome-scale modeling in filamentous fungi

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brandl, Julian; Andersen, Mikael Rørdam

    2015-01-01

    The group of filamentous fungi contains important species used in industrial biotechnology for acid, antibiotics and enzyme production. Their unique lifestyle turns these organisms into a valuable genetic reservoir of new natural products and biomass degrading enzymes that has not been used to full...... testing them in vivo. The increasing availability of high quality models and molecular biological tools for manipulating filamentous fungi renders the model-guided engineering of these fungal factories possible with comprehensive metabolic networks. A typical fungal model contains on average 1138 unique...... metabolic reactions and 1050 ORFs, making them a vast knowledge-base of fungal metabolism. In the present review we focus on the current state as well as potential future applications of genome-scale models in filamentous fungi....

  1. Vehicle rollover sensor test modeling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    McCoy, R.W.; Chou, C.C.; Velde, R. van de; Twisk, D.; Schie, C. van

    2007-01-01

    A computational model of a mid-size sport utility vehicle was developed using MADYMO. The model includes a detailed description of the suspension system and tire characteristics that incorporated the Delft-Tyre magic formula description. The model was correlated by simulating a vehicle suspension ki

  2. Global-scale modeling of groundwater recharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Döll, P.; Fiedler, K.

    2008-05-01

    Long-term average groundwater recharge, which is equivalent to renewable groundwater resources, is the major limiting factor for the sustainable use of groundwater. Compared to surface water resources, groundwater resources are more protected from pollution, and their use is less restricted by seasonal and inter-annual flow variations. To support water management in a globalized world, it is necessary to estimate groundwater recharge at the global scale. Here, we present a best estimate of global-scale long-term average diffuse groundwater recharge (i.e. renewable groundwater resources) that has been calculated by the most recent version of the WaterGAP Global Hydrology Model WGHM (spatial resolution of 0.5° by 0.5°, daily time steps). The estimate was obtained using two state-of-the-art global data sets of gridded observed precipitation that we corrected for measurement errors, which also allowed to quantify the uncertainty due to these equally uncertain data sets. The standard WGHM groundwater recharge algorithm was modified for semi-arid and arid regions, based on independent estimates of diffuse groundwater recharge, which lead to an unbiased estimation of groundwater recharge in these regions. WGHM was tuned against observed long-term average river discharge at 1235 gauging stations by adjusting, individually for each basin, the partitioning of precipitation into evapotranspiration and total runoff. We estimate that global groundwater recharge was 12 666 km3/yr for the climate normal 1961-1990, i.e. 32% of total renewable water resources. In semi-arid and arid regions, mountainous regions, permafrost regions and in the Asian Monsoon region, groundwater recharge accounts for a lower fraction of total runoff, which makes these regions particularly vulnerable to seasonal and inter-annual precipitation variability and water pollution. Average per-capita renewable groundwater resources of countries vary between 8 m3/(capita yr) for Egypt to more than 1 million m3

  3. Steel Containment Vessel Model Test: Results and Evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Costello, J.F.; Hashimote, T.; Hessheimer, M.F.; Luk, V.K.

    1999-03-01

    A high pressure test of the steel containment vessel (SCV) model was conducted on December 11-12, 1996 at Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM, USA. The test model is a mixed-scaled model (1:10 in geometry and 1:4 in shell thickness) of an improved Mark II boiling water reactor (BWR) containment. A concentric steel contact structure (CS), installed over the SCV model and separated at a nominally uniform distance from it, provided a simplified representation of a reactor shield building in the actual plant. The SCV model and contact structure were instrumented with strain gages and displacement transducers to record the deformation behavior of the SCV model during the high pressure test. This paper summarizes the conduct and the results of the high pressure test and discusses the posttest metallurgical evaluation results on specimens removed from the SCV model.

  4. Seepage Calibration Model and Seepage Testing Data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    P. Dixon

    2004-02-17

    The purpose of this Model Report is to document the Seepage Calibration Model (SCM). The SCM is developed (1) to establish the conceptual basis for the Seepage Model for Performance Assessment (SMPA), and (2) to derive seepage-relevant, model-related parameters and their distributions for use in the SMPA and seepage abstraction in support of the Total System Performance Assessment for License Application (TSPA-LA). The SCM is intended to be used only within this Model Report for the estimation of seepage-relevant parameters through calibration of the model against seepage-rate data from liquid-release tests performed in several niches along the Exploratory Studies Facility (ESF) Main Drift and in the Cross Drift. The SCM does not predict seepage into waste emplacement drifts under thermal or ambient conditions. Seepage predictions for waste emplacement drifts under ambient conditions will be performed with the SMPA (see upcoming REV 02 of CRWMS M&O 2000 [153314]), which inherits the conceptual basis and model-related parameters from the SCM. Seepage during the thermal period is examined separately in the Thermal Hydrologic (TH) Seepage Model (see BSC 2003 [161530]). The scope of this work is (1) to evaluate seepage rates measured during liquid-release experiments performed in several niches in the Exploratory Studies Facility (ESF) and in the Cross Drift, which was excavated for enhanced characterization of the repository block (ECRB); (2) to evaluate air-permeability data measured in boreholes above the niches and the Cross Drift to obtain the permeability structure for the seepage model; (3) to use inverse modeling to calibrate the SCM and to estimate seepage-relevant, model-related parameters on the drift scale; (4) to estimate the epistemic uncertainty of the derived parameters, based on the goodness-of-fit to the observed data and the sensitivity of calculated seepage with respect to the parameters of interest; (5) to characterize the aleatory uncertainty of

  5. Seepage Calibration Model and Seepage Testing Data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    S. Finsterle

    2004-09-02

    The purpose of this Model Report is to document the Seepage Calibration Model (SCM). The SCM was developed (1) to establish the conceptual basis for the Seepage Model for Performance Assessment (SMPA), and (2) to derive seepage-relevant, model-related parameters and their distributions for use in the SMPA and seepage abstraction in support of the Total System Performance Assessment for License Application (TSPA-LA). This Model Report has been revised in response to a comprehensive, regulatory-focused evaluation performed by the Regulatory Integration Team [''Technical Work Plan for: Regulatory Integration Evaluation of Analysis and Model Reports Supporting the TSPA-LA'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 169653])]. The SCM is intended to be used only within this Model Report for the estimation of seepage-relevant parameters through calibration of the model against seepage-rate data from liquid-release tests performed in several niches along the Exploratory Studies Facility (ESF) Main Drift and in the Cross-Drift. The SCM does not predict seepage into waste emplacement drifts under thermal or ambient conditions. Seepage predictions for waste emplacement drifts under ambient conditions will be performed with the SMPA [''Seepage Model for PA Including Drift Collapse'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 167652])], which inherits the conceptual basis and model-related parameters from the SCM. Seepage during the thermal period is examined separately in the Thermal Hydrologic (TH) Seepage Model [see ''Drift-Scale Coupled Processes (DST and TH Seepage) Models'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 170338])]. The scope of this work is (1) to evaluate seepage rates measured during liquid-release experiments performed in several niches in the Exploratory Studies Facility (ESF) and in the Cross-Drift, which was excavated for enhanced characterization of the repository block (ECRB); (2) to evaluate air-permeability data measured in boreholes above the niches and the Cross

  6. Full-scale validation of a model of algal productivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Béchet, Quentin; Shilton, Andy; Guieysse, Benoit

    2014-12-02

    While modeling algal productivity outdoors is crucial to assess the economic and environmental performance of full-scale cultivation, most of the models hitherto developed for this purpose have not been validated under fully relevant conditions, especially with regard to temperature variations. The objective of this study was to independently validate a model of algal biomass productivity accounting for both light and temperature and constructed using parameters experimentally derived using short-term indoor experiments. To do this, the accuracy of a model developed for Chlorella vulgaris was assessed against data collected from photobioreactors operated outdoor (New Zealand) over different seasons, years, and operating conditions (temperature-control/no temperature-control, batch, and fed-batch regimes). The model accurately predicted experimental productivities under all conditions tested, yielding an overall accuracy of ±8.4% over 148 days of cultivation. For the purpose of assessing the feasibility of full-scale algal cultivation, the use of the productivity model was therefore shown to markedly reduce uncertainty in cost of biofuel production while also eliminating uncertainties in water demand, a critical element of environmental impact assessments. Simulations at five climatic locations demonstrated that temperature-control in outdoor photobioreactors would require tremendous amounts of energy without considerable increase of algal biomass. Prior assessments neglecting the impact of temperature variations on algal productivity in photobioreactors may therefore be erroneous.

  7. Effects of subgrid-scale modeling on wind turbines flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciri, Umberto; Salvetti, Maria Vittoria; Leonardi, Stefano

    2015-11-01

    The increased demand for wind energy had led to a continuous increase in the size of wind turbines and, consequently, of wind farms. A potential drawback of such large clusters lies in the decrease in the efficiency due to the wake interference. Large-Eddy Simulations (LES) coupled with blade models have shown the capability of resolving the unsteady nature of wind turbine wakes. In LES, subgrid-scale (SGS) models are needed to introduce the effect of the turbulence small scales not resolved by the computational grid. Many LES of wind farms employ the classic Smagorinsky model, despite it suffers from some major drawbacks, e.g. (i) the presence of an input tuning parameter and (ii) the wrong behaviour near solid walls. In the present work an analysis of the effects of various SGS models is carried out for LES in which the turbine tower and nacelle are directly simulated with the Immersed Boundaries method. Particular attention is dedicated to the region of separated flow behind the tower where the impact of the SGS models is expected to be important. We focus herein on non-dynamic eddy-viscosity models, which have proven to have a correct behaviour near solid walls. A priori and a posteriori tests are performed for a configuration reproducing an experiment conducted at NTNU. The work is partially supported by the NSF PIRE Award IIA 1243482. TACC is acknowledged for providing computational time.

  8. The development and psychometric testing of the horizontal violence scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Longo, Joy; Newman, David

    2014-12-01

    Inappropriate behaviors of healthcare workers can threaten the delivery of safe, quality care. The purpose of this research was to develop a research instrument specific to the construct of horizontal violence and conduct foundational psychometric testing of the newly developed instrument. The overall findings on the fit indices suggest that this model does adequately measure the underlying construct of horizontal violence. The instrument can be used as a way to determine the existence and extent of horizontal violence in practice settings and used to augment the study of the work environment, particularly in relation to healthy work environments.

  9. Planck-scale gravity test at PETRA. Letter of intent

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gharibyan, V.; Balewski, K.

    2016-02-15

    Quantum or torsion gravity models predict unusual properties of space- time at very short distances. In particular, near the Planck length, around 10{sup -35} m, empty space may behave as a crystal, singly or doubly refractive. This hypothesis, however, remains uncheckable for any direct measurement since the smallest distance accessible in experiment is about 10{sup -19} m at the LHC. Here we propose a laboratory test to measure space birefringence or refractivity induced by gravity. A sensitivity 10{sup -31} m for doubly and 10{sup -28} m for singly refractive vacuum could be reached with PETRA 6 GeV beam exploring UV laser Compton scattering.

  10. Planck-scale gravity test at PETRA -- Letter of Intent

    CERN Document Server

    Gharibyan, Vahagn

    2016-01-01

    Quantum or torsion gravity models predict unusual properties of space-time at very short distances. In particular, near the Planck length, around $10^{-35}m$, empty space may behave as a crystal, singly or doubly refractive. This hypothesis, however, remains uncheckable for any direct measurement since the smallest distance accessible in experiment is about $10^{-19}m$ at the LHC. Here we propose a laboratory test to measure space birefringence or refractivity induced by gravity. A sensitivity $10^{-31}m$ for doubly and $10^{-28}m$ for singly refractive vacuum could be reached with PETRA 6 GeV beam exploring UV laser Compton scattering.

  11. Scale effects and scaling-up by geometric-optical model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李小文; 王锦地; A.H.Strahler

    2000-01-01

    This is a follow-up paper to our "Scale effect of Planck’s law over nonisothermal blackbody surface". More examples are used to describe the scale effect in detail, and the scaling-up of Planck law over blackbody surface is further extended to three-dimension nonisothermal surface. This scaling-up results in a conceptual model for the directionality and spectral signature of thermal radiation at the scale of remote sensing pixels. This new model is also an improvement of Li-Strahler-Friedl conceptual model in a sense that the new model needs only statistic parameters at the pixel scale, without request of sub-pixel scale parameters as the LSF model does.

  12. Scale effects and scaling-up by geometric-optical model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    This is a follow-up paper to our "Scale effect of Planck's law over nonisothermal blackbody surface".More examples are used to describe the scale effect in detail,and the scaling-up of Planck law over blackbody surface is further extended to three-dimension nonisothermal surface.This scaling-up results in a conceptual model for the directionality and spectral signature of thermal radiation at the scale of remote sensing pixels.This new model is also an improvement of Li-Strahler-Friedl conceptual model in a sense that the new model needs only statistic parameters at the pixel scale,without request of sub-pixel scale parameters as the LSF model does.

  13. Development and testing of the Attitude Scale for the Dietary Therapy of Hemodialysis Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onbe, Hiromi; Kanda, Kiyoko

    2017-05-04

    To develop an attitude scale regarding the dietary therapy of hemodialysis patients and to examine its reliability and validity. An initial item pool of 37 items was extracted from a conceptual model that had been developed in the authors' previous study and the literature was reviewed. An expert panel examined the content validity. A total of 381 Japanese hemodialysis patients then were recruited. Exploratory factor analyses and a confirmatory factor analysis were used to test the construct validity and an item analysis, internal consistency coefficients, and test-retest were used to verify the reliability. The expert panel judged the content validity index to be satisfactory. The data from the final 16 items consisted of three factors (propensity of behavior that is affected by cognition, propensity of behavior that is affected by the food culture, and negative affect that modifies the diet). Regarding the subscales, the Cronbach's coefficient alpha values were confirmed to be reliable, showing medium-to-high internal consistency. The test-retest method confirmed the stability of the scale. With the reliability and validity confirmed, it was established that the Attitude Scale for the Dietary Therapy of Hemodialysis Patients described herein is capable of determining the attitude of hemodialysis patients towards their dietary therapy. This scale makes it possible to quantitatively evaluate hemodialysis patients' attitudes toward dietary therapy. The accuracy of the scale needs to be improved by further examining its reliability and validity. © 2017 Japan Academy of Nursing Science.

  14. Testing coupled dark energy with large scale structure observation

    CERN Document Server

    yang, Weiqiang

    2014-01-01

    The coupling between the dark sectors provides a new approach to mitigate the coincidence problem of cosmological standard model. In this paper, dark energy is treated as a fluid with a constant equation of state, whose coupling with dark matter is proportional the Hubble parameter and dark energy density, that is, $Q=3H\\xi_x\\rho_x$. Via combining the background energy transfer and vanishing momentum transfer potential in the frame of either dark matter or dark energy, we derive the evolution equations for the density and velocity perturbations. Using jointing data sets which include cosmic microwave background radiation, baryon acoustic oscillation, type Ia supernovae, and redshift-space distortion, we perform a full Monte Carlo Markov Chain likelihood analysis for the coupled model. The results show that information provided by $f\\sigma_8(z)$ test significantly enhances the precision of the constraints on the cosmological parameters compared to the case where only geometric measurements are adopted. In part...

  15. Preparation for Scaling Studies of Ice-Crystal Icing at the NRC Research Altitude Test Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Struk, Peter M.; Bencic, Timothy J.; Tsao, Jen-Ching; Fuleki, Dan; Knezevici, Daniel C.

    2013-01-01

    This paper describes experiments conducted at the National Research Council (NRC) of Canadas Research Altitiude Test Facility between March 26 and April 11, 2012. The tests, conducted collaboratively between NASA and NRC, focus on three key aspects in preparation for later scaling work to be conducted with a NACA 0012 airfoil model in the NRC Cascade rig: (1) cloud characterization, (2) scaling model development, and (3) ice-shape profile measurements. Regarding cloud characterization, the experiments focus on particle spectra measurements using two shadowgraphy methods, cloud uniformity via particle scattering from a laser sheet, and characterization of the SEA Multi-Element probe. Overviews of each aspect as well as detailed information on the diagnostic method are presented. Select results from the measurements and interpretation are presented which will help guide future work.

  16. Testing of constitutive models in LAME.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hammerand, Daniel Carl; Scherzinger, William Mark

    2007-09-01

    Constitutive models for computational solid mechanics codes are in LAME--the Library of Advanced Materials for Engineering. These models describe complex material behavior and are used in our finite deformation solid mechanics codes. To ensure the correct implementation of these models, regression tests have been created for constitutive models in LAME. A selection of these tests is documented here. Constitutive models are an important part of any solid mechanics code. If an analysis code is meant to provide accurate results, the constitutive models that describe the material behavior need to be implemented correctly. Ensuring the correct implementation of constitutive models is the goal of a testing procedure that is used with the Library of Advanced Materials for Engineering (LAME) (see [1] and [2]). A test suite for constitutive models can serve three purposes. First, the test problems provide the constitutive model developer a means to test the model implementation. This is an activity that is always done by any responsible constitutive model developer. Retaining the test problem in a repository where the problem can be run periodically is an excellent means of ensuring that the model continues to behave correctly. A second purpose of a test suite for constitutive models is that it gives application code developers confidence that the constitutive models work correctly. This is extremely important since any analyst that uses an application code for an engineering analysis will associate a constitutive model in LAME with the application code, not LAME. Therefore, ensuring the correct implementation of constitutive models is essential for application code teams. A third purpose of a constitutive model test suite is that it provides analysts with example problems that they can look at to understand the behavior of a specific model. Since the choice of a constitutive model, and the properties that are used in that model, have an enormous effect on the results of an

  17. Testing the Big Bang: Light elements, neutrinos, dark matter and large-scale structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schramm, David N.

    1991-01-01

    Several experimental and observational tests of the standard cosmological model are examined. In particular, a detailed discussion is presented regarding: (1) nucleosynthesis, the light element abundances, and neutrino counting; (2) the dark matter problems; and (3) the formation of galaxies and large-scale structure. Comments are made on the possible implications of the recent solar neutrino experimental results for cosmology. An appendix briefly discusses the 17 keV thing and the cosmological and astrophysical constraints on it.

  18. A review of large-scale testing facilities in geotechnical earthquake engineering

    OpenAIRE

    Elgamal, A; Pitilakis, K.; Raptakis, D.; J. Garnier; GOPAL MADABHUSHI, SP; Pinto, A; Steidl, J.; STEWART, HE; STOKOE, KH; TAUCER, F; TOKIMATSU, K; WALLACE, JW

    2007-01-01

    In this new century, new large-scale testing facilities are being developed worldwide for earthquake engineering research. Concurrently, the advances in Information Technology (IT) are increasingly allowing unprecedented opportunities for : - remote access and tele-presence during extended remote off-site experimentation, - hybrid simulation of entire structural systems through a multi-site experimentation and computational overall model, and - near-real time data archival, processing and sha...

  19. Modeling of micro-scale thermoacoustics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Offner, Avshalom; Ramon, Guy Z.

    2016-05-01

    Thermoacoustic phenomena, that is, onset of self-sustained oscillations or time-averaged fluxes in a sound wave, may be harnessed as efficient and robust heat transfer devices. Specifically, miniaturization of such devices holds great promise for cooling of electronics. At the required small dimensions, it is expected that non-negligible slip effects exist at the solid surface of the "stack"-a porous matrix, which is used for maintaining the correct temporal phasing of the heat transfer between the solid and oscillating gas. Here, we develop theoretical models for thermoacoustic engines and heat pumps that account for slip, within the standing-wave approximation. Stability curves for engines with both no-slip and slip boundary conditions were calculated; the slip boundary condition curve exhibits a lower temperature difference compared with the no slip curve for resonance frequencies that characterize micro-scale devices. Maximum achievable temperature differences across the stack of a heat pump were also calculated. For this case, slip conditions are detrimental and such a heat pump would maintain a lower temperature difference compared to larger devices, where slip effects are negligible.

  20. Modeling of micro-scale thermoacoustics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Offner, Avshalom [The Nancy and Stephen Grand Technion Energy Program, Technion-Israel Institute of Technology, Haifa 32000 (Israel); Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Technion-Israel Institute of Technology, Haifa 32000 (Israel); Ramon, Guy Z., E-mail: ramong@technion.ac.il [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Technion-Israel Institute of Technology, Haifa 32000 (Israel)

    2016-05-02

    Thermoacoustic phenomena, that is, onset of self-sustained oscillations or time-averaged fluxes in a sound wave, may be harnessed as efficient and robust heat transfer devices. Specifically, miniaturization of such devices holds great promise for cooling of electronics. At the required small dimensions, it is expected that non-negligible slip effects exist at the solid surface of the “stack”-a porous matrix, which is used for maintaining the correct temporal phasing of the heat transfer between the solid and oscillating gas. Here, we develop theoretical models for thermoacoustic engines and heat pumps that account for slip, within the standing-wave approximation. Stability curves for engines with both no-slip and slip boundary conditions were calculated; the slip boundary condition curve exhibits a lower temperature difference compared with the no slip curve for resonance frequencies that characterize micro-scale devices. Maximum achievable temperature differences across the stack of a heat pump were also calculated. For this case, slip conditions are detrimental and such a heat pump would maintain a lower temperature difference compared to larger devices, where slip effects are negligible.

  1. Modeling cancer metabolism on a genome scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yizhak, Keren; Chaneton, Barbara; Gottlieb, Eyal; Ruppin, Eytan

    2015-01-01

    Cancer cells have fundamentally altered cellular metabolism that is associated with their tumorigenicity and malignancy. In addition to the widely studied Warburg effect, several new key metabolic alterations in cancer have been established over the last decade, leading to the recognition that altered tumor metabolism is one of the hallmarks of cancer. Deciphering the full scope and functional implications of the dysregulated metabolism in cancer requires both the advancement of a variety of omics measurements and the advancement of computational approaches for the analysis and contextualization of the accumulated data. Encouragingly, while the metabolic network is highly interconnected and complex, it is at the same time probably the best characterized cellular network. Following, this review discusses the challenges that genome-scale modeling of cancer metabolism has been facing. We survey several recent studies demonstrating the first strides that have been done, testifying to the value of this approach in portraying a network-level view of the cancer metabolism and in identifying novel drug targets and biomarkers. Finally, we outline a few new steps that may further advance this field. PMID:26130389

  2. Fabrication and testing of small scale mock-ups of ITER shielding blanket

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hatano, Toshihisa; Sato, Satoshi; Suzuki, Satoshi; Yokoyama, Kenji; Furuya, Kazuyuki; Kuroda, Toshimasa; Enoeda, Mikio; Takatsu, Hideyuki; Ohara, Yoshihiro [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Naka, Ibaraki (Japan). Naka Fusion Research Establishment

    1998-12-01

    Small scale mock-ups of the primary first wall, the baffle first wall, the shield block and a partial model for the edge of the primary first wall module were designed and fabricated incorporating most of the key design features of the ITER shielding blanket. All mock-ups featured the DSCu heat sink, the built-in SS coolant tubes within the heat sink and the SS shield block. CFC tiles was used as the protection armor for the baffle first wall mock-up. The small scale shield block mock-up, integrated with the first wall, was designed to have a poloidal curvature specified in the ITER design. Fabrication routes of mock-ups were decided based on the single step solid HIP of DSCu/DSCu, DSCu/SS and SS/SS reflecting the results of previous joining techniques development and testing. For attaching the CFC tiles onto DSCu heat sink in the fabrication of the baffle first wall mock-up, a two-step brazing was tried. All mock-ups and the partial model were successfully fabricated with a satisfactory dimensional accuracy. The small scale primary first wall mock-up was thermo-mechanically tested under high heat fluxes of 5-7 MW/m{sup 2} for 2500 cycles in total. Satisfactory heat removal performance and integrity of the mock-up against cyclic high heat flux loads were confirmed by measurement during the tests and destructive examination after the tests. Similar high heat flux tests were also performed with the small scale baffle first wall mock-up under 5-10 MW/m{sup 2} for 4500 cycles in total resulting in sufficient heat removal capability and integrity confirmed by measurements during the tests. (author)

  3. Current state of genome-scale modeling in filamentous fungi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandl, Julian; Andersen, Mikael R

    2015-06-01

    The group of filamentous fungi contains important species used in industrial biotechnology for acid, antibiotics and enzyme production. Their unique lifestyle turns these organisms into a valuable genetic reservoir of new natural products and biomass degrading enzymes that has not been used to full capacity. One of the major bottlenecks in the development of new strains into viable industrial hosts is the alteration of the metabolism towards optimal production. Genome-scale models promise a reduction in the time needed for metabolic engineering by predicting the most potent targets in silico before testing them in vivo. The increasing availability of high quality models and molecular biological tools for manipulating filamentous fungi renders the model-guided engineering of these fungal factories possible with comprehensive metabolic networks. A typical fungal model contains on average 1138 unique metabolic reactions and 1050 ORFs, making them a vast knowledge-base of fungal metabolism. In the present review we focus on the current state as well as potential future applications of genome-scale models in filamentous fungi.

  4. Wildland Fire Behaviour Case Studies and Fuel Models for Landscape-Scale Fire Modeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul-Antoine Santoni

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available This work presents the extension of a physical model for the spreading of surface fire at landscape scale. In previous work, the model was validated at laboratory scale for fire spreading across litters. The model was then modified to consider the structure of actual vegetation and was included in the wildland fire calculation system Forefire that allows converting the two-dimensional model of fire spread to three dimensions, taking into account spatial information. Two wildland fire behavior case studies were elaborated and used as a basis to test the simulator. Both fires were reconstructed, paying attention to the vegetation mapping, fire history, and meteorological data. The local calibration of the simulator required the development of appropriate fuel models for shrubland vegetation (maquis for use with the model of fire spread. This study showed the capabilities of the simulator during the typical drought season characterizing the Mediterranean climate when most wildfires occur.

  5. GEOCHEMICAL TESTING AND MODEL DEVELOPMENT - RESIDUAL TANK WASTE TEST PLAN

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    CANTRELL KJ; CONNELLY MP

    2010-03-09

    This Test Plan describes the testing and chemical analyses release rate studies on tank residual samples collected following the retrieval of waste from the tank. This work will provide the data required to develop a contaminant release model for the tank residuals from both sludge and salt cake single-shell tanks. The data are intended for use in the long-term performance assessment and conceptual model development.

  6. Ditching Tests of a 1/18-Scale Model of the Navy XP4M-1 Airplane in Langley Tank No. 2 and on an Outdoor Catapult, TED No. NACA 2362

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, Lloyd J.; Hoffman, Edward L.

    1947-01-01

    Tests with a dynamically similar model of the Navy XP4M-1 airplane were made to determine the best way to land the airplane in calm and rough water, to determine its probable ditching performance, and to determine practicable modifications which could be incorporated in the design of the airplane that would improve its ditching characteristics. The results were obtained by making visual observations, by recording longitudinal decelerations,a nd by taking motion pictures of the landings. A list of conclusions from the test results is included.

  7. The Harris-Todaro model and economies of scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panagariya, A; Succar, P

    1986-04-01

    The authors attempt to reanalyze the Harris-Todaro migration model in the presence of economies of scale in the manufacturing sector, focusing on economies of scale that are external to a given firm but internal to the industry.

  8. Uniqueness, scale, and resolution issues in groundwater model parameter identification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tian-chyi J. Yeh

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper first visits uniqueness, scale, and resolution issues in groundwater flow forward modeling problems. It then makes the point that non-unique solutions to groundwater flow inverse problems arise from a lack of information necessary to make the problems well defined. Subsequently, it presents the necessary conditions for a well-defined inverse problem. They are full specifications of (1 flux boundaries and sources/sinks, and (2 heads everywhere in the domain at at least three times (one of which is t = 0, with head change everywhere at those times must being nonzero for transient flow. Numerical experiments are presented to corroborate the fact that, once the necessary conditions are met, the inverse problem has a unique solution. We also demonstrate that measurement noise, instability, and sensitivity are issues related to solution techniques rather than the inverse problems themselves. In addition, we show that a mathematically well-defined inverse problem, based on an equivalent homogeneous or a layered conceptual model, may yield physically incorrect and scenario-dependent parameter values. These issues are attributed to inconsistency between the scale of the head observed and that implied by these models. Such issues can be reduced only if a sufficiently large number of observation wells are used in the equivalent homogeneous domain or each layer. With a large number of wells, we then show that increase in parameterization can lead to a higher-resolution depiction of heterogeneity if an appropriate inverse methodology is used. Furthermore, we illustrate that, using the same number of wells, a highly parameterized model in conjunction with hydraulic tomography can yield better characterization of the aquifer and minimize the scale and scenario-dependent problems. Lastly, benefits of the highly parameterized model and hydraulic tomography are tested according to their ability to improve predictions of aquifer responses induced by

  9. Structural subgrid-scale modeling for large-eddy simulation:A review

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hao Lu; Christopher J Rutland

    2016-01-01

    Accurately modeling nonlinear interactions in turbulence is one of the key challenges for large-eddy simu-lation (LES) of turbulence. In this article, we review recent studies on structural subgrid scale modeling, focusing on evaluating how well these models predict the effects of small scales. The article discusses a priori and a posteriori test results. Other nonlinear models are briefly discussed, and future prospects are noted.

  10. Multi-scale modeling of softening materials

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lloberas Valls, O.; Simone, A.; Sluys, L.J.

    2008-01-01

    This paper presents an assessment of a two-scale framework for the study of softening materials. The procedure is based on a hierarchical Finite Element (FE) scheme in which computations are performed both at macro and mesoscopic scale levels. The methodology is chosen specifically to remain valid

  11. Upscaling a catchment-scale ecohydrology model for regional-scale earth system modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adam, J. C.; Tague, C.; Liu, M.; Garcia, E.; Choate, J.; Mullis, T.; Hull, R.; Vaughan, J. K.; Kalyanaraman, A.; Nguyen, T.

    2014-12-01

    With a focus on the U.S. Pacific Northwest (PNW), BioEarth is an Earth System Model (EaSM) currently in development that explores the interactions between coupled C:N:H2O dynamics and resource management actions at the regional scale. Capturing coupled biogeochemical processes within EaSMs like BioEarth is important for exploring the response of the land surface to changes in climate and resource management actions; information that is important for shaping decisions that promote sustainable use of our natural resources. However, many EaSM frameworks do not adequately represent landscape-scale ( 10 km) are necessitated by computational limitations. Spatial heterogeneity in a landscape arises due to spatial differences in underlying soil and vegetation properties that control moisture, energy and nutrient fluxes; as well as differences that arise due to spatially-organized connections that may drive an ecohydrologic response by the land surface. While many land surface models used in EaSM frameworks capture the first type of heterogeneity, few account for the influence of lateral connectivity on land surface processes. This type of connectivity can be important when considering soil moisture and nutrient redistribution. The RHESSys model is utilized by BioEarth to enable a "bottom-up" approach that preserves fine spatial-scale sensitivities and lateral connectivity that may be important for coupled C:N:H2O dynamics over larger scales. RHESSys is a distributed eco-hydrologic model that was originally developed to run at relatively fine but computationally intensive spatial resolutions over small catchments. The objective of this presentation is to describe two developments to enable implementation of RHESSys over the PNW. 1) RHESSys is being adapted for BioEarth to allow for moderately coarser resolutions and the flexibility to capture both types of heterogeneity at biome-specific spatial scales. 2) A Kepler workflow is utilized to enable RHESSys implementation over

  12. Operational, regional-scale, chemical weather forecasting models in Europe

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kukkonen, J.; Balk, T.; Schultz, D.M.; Baklanov, A.; Klein, T.; Miranda, A.I.; Monteiro, A.; Hirtl, M.; Tarvainen, V.; Boy, M.; Peuch, V.H.; Poupkou, A.; Kioutsioukis, I.; Finardi, S.; Sofiev, M.; Sokhi, R.; Lehtinen, K.; Karatzas, K.; San José, R.; Astitha, M.; Kallos, G.; Schaap, M.; Reimer, E.; Jakobs, H.; Eben, K.

    2011-01-01

    Numerical models that combine weather forecasting and atmospheric chemistry are here referred to as chemical weather forecasting models. Eighteen operational chemical weather forecasting models on regional and continental scales in Europe are described and compared in this article. Topics discussed

  13. Traceability in Model-Based Testing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mathew George

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available The growing complexities of software and the demand for shorter time to market are two important challenges that face today’s IT industry. These challenges demand the increase of both productivity and quality of software. Model-based testing is a promising technique for meeting these challenges. Traceability modeling is a key issue and challenge in model-based testing. Relationships between the different models will help to navigate from one model to another, and trace back to the respective requirements and the design model when the test fails. In this paper, we present an approach for bridging the gaps between the different models in model-based testing. We propose relation definition markup language (RDML for defining the relationships between models.

  14. Fine water spray system: Extinguishing tests in medium and full-scale turbine hood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wighus, R.; Aune, P.; Drangsholt, G.; Stensaas, J. P.

    1994-12-01

    The report is based on the results from two test series, called Phase 1 and Phase 2 of the project 'Halon Replacement by Fine Water Spray Technology - Turbine Hood application'. Detailed results are presented in technical reports from Phase 1 and Phase 2. The tests were carried out in two different scales, one 30 cu m test enclosure formerly used to characterize different water spray nozzles, and a full scale 70 cu m model of a turbine hood. The scope of work in Phase 1 was to identify the extinguishing characteristics of various nozzles developed by BP Sunbury Research Center, UK, and to verify the efficiency of a total fire suppression system developed by Ginge-Kerr Offshore. The fire suppression system uses a twin-fluid nozzles using air and water at pressures about 5 bar. The nozzles produce a water spray with small droplets and high velocity. The scope of work of Phase 2 was to verify the efficiency of the Fine Water Spray nozzles fighting a variety of fire scenarios which may occur in a real turbine hood. A full scale test enclosure containing a mock-up of a turbine heated internally to simulate hot metal surfaces, with insulation mats and piping as in a real turbine hood was constructed in the large test hall of SINTEF NBL. The turbine hood model was built by elements of a Multipurpose Fire Test Rig. Realistic fires with Diesel pool- and spray fires, fires in insulation mats soaked with Diesel oil under different ventilation conditions were ignited in the turbine hood model. Number of Fine Water Spray nozzles, nozzle position and spraying sequences were varied. A base for design of a Fine Water Spray system for a turbine hood is developed, and several unique features of the performance of a Fine Water Spray fire suppression system have been documented.

  15. Wind tunnel tests of an 0.019-scale space shuttle integrated vehicle -2A configuration (model 14-OTS) in the NASA Ames 8 X 7 foot unitary wind tunnel, volume 2. [cold jet gas plumes and pressure distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardin, R. B.; Burrows, R. R.

    1975-01-01

    The purpose of the test was to determine the effects of cold jet gas plumes on (1) the integrated vehicle longitudinal and lateral-directional force data, (2) exposed wing hinge moment, (3) wing pressure distributions, (4) orbiter MPS external pressure distributions, and (5) model base pressures. An investigation was undertaken to determine the similarity between solid and gaseous plumes; fluorescent oil flow visualization studies were also conducted. Plotted wing pressure data is tabulated.

  16. Small-scale deflagration cylinder test with velocimetry wall-motion diagnostics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hooks, Daniel E [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Hill, Larry G [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Pierce, Timothy H [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2010-01-01

    Predicting the likelihood and effects of outcomes resultant from thermal initiation of explosives remains a significant challenge. For certain explosive formulations, the general outcome can be broadly predicted given knowledge of certain conditions. However, there remain unexplained violent events, and increased statistical understanding of outcomes as a function of many variables, or 'violence categorization,' is needed. Additionally, the development of an equation of state equivalent for deflagration would be very useful in predicting possible detailed event consequences using traditional hydrodynamic detonation moders. For violence categorization, it is desirable that testing be efficient, such that it is possible to statistically define outcomes reliant on the processes of initiation of deflagration, steady state deflagration, and deflagration to detonation transitions. If the test simultaneously acquires information to inform models of violent deflagration events, overall predictive capabilities for event likelihood and consequence might improve remarkably. In this paper we describe an economical scaled deflagration cylinder test. The cyclotetramethylene tetranitramine (HMX) based explosive formu1lation PBX 9501 was tested using different temperature profiles in a thick-walled copper cylindrical confiner. This test is a scaled version of a recently demonstrated deflagration cylinder test, and is similar to several other thermal explosion tests. The primary difference is the passive velocimetry diagnostic, which enables measurement of confinement vessel wall velocities at failure, regardless of the timing and location of ignition.

  17. Canadian Triage and Acuity Scale: testing the mental health categories

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brown AM

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Anne-Marie Brown,1 Diana E Clarke,1 Julia Spence2 1College of Nursing, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, MB, Canada; 2St Michael's Hospital, Faculty of Medicine, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, Canada Purpose: The study tested the inter-rater reliability and accuracy of triage nurses' assignment of urgency ratings for mental health patient scenarios based on the 2008 Canadian Triage and Acuity Scale (CTAS guidelines, using a standardized triage tool. The influence of triage experience, educational preparation, and comfort level with mental health presentations on the accuracy of urgency ratings was also explored. Methods: Study participants assigned urgency ratings to 20 mental health patient scenarios in randomized order using the CTAS. The scenarios were developed using actual triage notes and were reviewed by an expert panel of emergency and mental health clinicians for face and content validity. Results: The overall Fleiss' kappa, the measure of inter-rater reliability for this sample of triage nurses (n=18, was 0.312, representing only fair albeit statistically significant (P<0.0001 agreement. Kendall's coefficient of concordance for the sample was calculated to be 0.680 (P<0.0001, which signifies moderate agreement. Although the sample reported high levels of education, comfort with mental health presentations, and experience, accuracy in urgency ratings measured by the percentage of correct responses ranged from 0.05% to 94% (mean: 54%. Greater accuracy in urgency ratings was recorded for triage nurses who used second-order modifiers and avoided the use of override. Conclusion: Specific focus on the use of second-order modifiers in orientation and ongoing education of triage nurses may improve the reliability and validity of the CTAS when used to assign urgency ratings to mental health presentations. Keywords: CTAS, mental health triage, inter-rater reliability 

  18. Bench-Scale Testing of the Micronized Magnetite Process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Edward R. Torak; Peter J. Suardini

    1997-11-01

    A recent emphasis of the Department of Energy's (DOE's), Coal Preparation Program has been the development of high-efficiency technologies that offer near-term, low-cost improvements in the ability of coal preparation plants to address problems associated with coal fines. In 1992, three cost-shared contracts were awarded to industry, under the first High-Efficiency Preparation (HEP I) solicitation. All three projects involved bench-scale testing of various emerging technologies, at the Federal Energy Technology Center*s (FETC*s), Process Research Facility (PRF). The first HEP I project, completed in mid-1993, was conducted by Process Technology, Inc., with the objective of developing a computerized, on-line system for monitoring and controlling the operation of a column flotation circuit. The second HEP I project, completed in mid-1994, was conducted by a team led by Virginia Polytechnic Institute to test the Mozely Multi-Gravity Separator in combination with the Microcel Flotation Column, for improved removal of mineral matter and pyritic sulfur from fine coal. The last HEP I project, of which the findings are contained in this report, was conducted by Custom Coals Corporation to evaluate and advance a micronized-magnetite-based, fine-coal cycloning technology. The micronized-magnetite coal cleaning technology, also know as the Micro-Mag process, is based on widely used conventional dense-medium cyclone applications, in that it utilizes a finely ground magnetite/water suspension as a separating medium for cleaning fine coal, by density, in a cyclone. However, the micronized-magnetite cleaning technology differs from conventional systems in several ways: ! It utilizes significantly finer magnetite (about 5 to 10 micron mean particle size), as compared to normal mean particle sizes of 20 microns. ! It can effectively beneficiate coal particles down to 500M in size, as compared to the most advanced, existing conventional systems that are limited to a

  19. A hybrid plume model for local-scale dispersion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nikmo, J.; Tuovinen, J.P.; Kukkonen, J.; Valkama, I.

    1997-12-31

    The report describes the contribution of the Finnish Meteorological Institute to the project `Dispersion from Strongly Buoyant Sources`, under the `Environment` programme of the European Union. The project addresses the atmospheric dispersion of gases and particles emitted from typical fires in warehouses and chemical stores. In the study only the `passive plume` regime, in which the influence of plume buoyancy is no longer important, is addressed. The mathematical model developed and its numerical testing is discussed. The model is based on atmospheric boundary-layer scaling theory. In the vicinity of the source, Gaussian equations are used in both the horizontal and vertical directions. After a specified transition distance, gradient transfer theory is applied in the vertical direction, while the horizontal dispersion is still assumed to be Gaussian. The dispersion parameters and eddy diffusivity are modelled in a form which facilitates the use of a meteorological pre-processor. Also a new model for the vertical eddy diffusivity (K{sub z}), which is a continuous function of height in the various atmospheric scaling regions is presented. The model includes a treatment of the dry deposition of gases and particulate matter, but wet deposition has been neglected. A numerical solver for the atmospheric diffusion equation (ADE) has been developed. The accuracy of the numerical model was analysed by comparing the model predictions with two analytical solutions of ADE. The numerical deviations of the model predictions from these analytic solutions were less than two per cent for the computational regime. The report gives numerical results for the vertical profiles of the eddy diffusivity and the dispersion parameters, and shows spatial concentration distributions in various atmospheric conditions 39 refs.

  20. Pore-scale modeling of competitive adsorption in porous media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, Emily M; Tartakovsky, Alexandre M; Amon, Cristina

    2011-03-01

    In this paper we present a smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) pore-scale multicomponent reactive transport model with competitive adsorption. SPH is a Lagrangian, particle based modeling method which uses the particles as interpolation points to discretize and solve flow and transport equations. The theory and details of the SPH pore-scale model are presented along with a novel method for handling surface reactions, the continuum surface reaction (CSR) model. The numerical accuracy of the CSR model is validated with analytical and finite difference solutions, and the effects of spatial and temporal resolution on the accuracy of the model are also discussed. The pore-scale model is used to study competitive adsorption for different Damköhler and Peclet numbers in a binary system where a plume of species B is introduced into a system which initially contains species A. The pore-scale model results are compared with a Darcy-scale model to investigate the accuracy of a Darcy-scale reactive transport model for a wide range of Damköhler and Peclet numbers. The comparison shows that the Darcy model over estimates the mass fraction of aqueous and adsorbed species B and underestimates the mass fractions of species A. The Darcy-scale model also predicts faster transport of species A and B through the system than the pore-scale model. The overestimation of the advective velocity and the extent of reactions by the Darcy-scale model are due to incomplete pore-scale mixing. As the degree of the solute mixing decreases with increasing Peclet and Damköhler numbers, so does the accuracy of the Darcy-scale model. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Modelling across bioreactor scales: methods, challenges and limitations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gernaey, Krist

    Scale-up and scale-down of bioreactors are very important in industrial biotechnology, especially with the currently available knowledge on the occurrence of gradients in industrial-scale bioreactors. Moreover, it becomes increasingly appealing to model such industrial scale systems, considering...... that it is challenging and expensive to acquire experimental data of good quality that can be used for characterizing gradients occurring inside a large industrial scale bioreactor. But which model building methods are available? And how can one ensure that the parameters in such a model are properly estimated? And what...... are the limitations of different types of mod - els? This paper will provide examples of models that have been published in the literature for use across bioreactor scales, including computational fluid dynamics (CFD) and population balance models. Furthermore, the importance of good modeling practice...

  2. Multi-scale peridynamic modeling of dynamic fracture in concrete

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lammi, Christopher J.; Zhou, Min

    2017-01-01

    Peridynamics simulations of the dynamic deformation and failure of high-performance concrete are performed at the meso-scale. A pressure-dependent, peridynamic plasticity model and failure criteria are used to capture pressure-sensitive granular flow and fracture. The meso-scale framework explicitly resolves reinforcing phases, pores, and intrinsic flaws. A novel scaling approach is formulated to inform the engineering-scale plasticity model parameters with meso-scale simulation results. The effects of composition, porosity, and fracture energy at the meso-scale on the engineering-scale impact resistance are assessed. The fracture process zone at the meso-scale is found to propagate along adjacent pores and reinforcing phases under tensile and shear loading conditions. The simulations show that tensile strength decreases and dissipation increases as the porosity in the concrete increases. The framework and modeling approach allow the delineation of trends that can be used to design more impact-resistant materials.

  3. Used Fuel Testing Transportation Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ross, Steven B. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Best, Ralph E. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Maheras, Steven J. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Jensen, Philip J. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); England, Jeffery L. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); LeDuc, Dan [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2014-09-25

    This report identifies shipping packages/casks that might be used by the Used Nuclear Fuel Disposition Campaign Program (UFDC) to ship fuel rods and pieces of fuel rods taken from high-burnup used nuclear fuel (UNF) assemblies to and between research facilities for purposes of evaluation and testing. Also identified are the actions that would need to be taken, if any, to obtain U.S. Nuclear Regulatory (NRC) or other regulatory authority approval to use each of the packages and/or shipping casks for this purpose.

  4. Used Fuel Testing Transportation Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ross, Steven B.; Best, Ralph E.; Maheras, Steven J.; Jensen, Philip J.; England, Jeffery L.; LeDuc, Dan

    2014-09-24

    This report identifies shipping packages/casks that might be used by the Used Nuclear Fuel Disposition Campaign Program (UFDC) to ship fuel rods and pieces of fuel rods taken from high-burnup used nuclear fuel (UNF) assemblies to and between research facilities for purposes of evaluation and testing. Also identified are the actions that would need to be taken, if any, to obtain U.S. Nuclear Regulatory (NRC) or other regulatory authority approval to use each of the packages and/or shipping casks for this purpose.

  5. Space Launch System Base Heating Test: Sub-Scale Rocket Engine/Motor Design, Development & Performance Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehta, Manish; Seaford, Mark; Kovarik, Brian; Dufrene, Aaron; Solly, Nathan

    2014-01-01

    ATA-002 Technical Team has successfully designed, developed, tested and assessed the SLS Pathfinder propulsion systems for the Main Base Heating Test Program. Major Outcomes of the Pathfinder Test Program: Reach 90% of full-scale chamber pressure Achieved all engine/motor design parameter requirements Reach steady plume flow behavior in less than 35 msec Steady chamber pressure for 60 to 100 msec during engine/motor operation Similar model engine/motor performance to full-scale SLS system Mitigated nozzle throat and combustor thermal erosion Test data shows good agreement with numerical prediction codes Next phase of the ATA-002 Test Program Design & development of the SLS OML for the Main Base Heating Test Tweak BSRM design to optimize performance Tweak CS-REM design to increase robustness MSFC Aerosciences and CUBRC have the capability to develop sub-scale propulsion systems to meet desired performance requirements for short-duration testing.

  6. Statistical Tests for Mixed Linear Models

    CERN Document Server

    Khuri, André I; Sinha, Bimal K

    2011-01-01

    An advanced discussion of linear models with mixed or random effects. In recent years a breakthrough has occurred in our ability to draw inferences from exact and optimum tests of variance component models, generating much research activity that relies on linear models with mixed and random effects. This volume covers the most important research of the past decade as well as the latest developments in hypothesis testing. It compiles all currently available results in the area of exact and optimum tests for variance component models and offers the only comprehensive treatment for these models a

  7. Colour Reconnection - Models and Tests

    CERN Document Server

    Christiansen, Jesper R

    2015-01-01

    Recent progress on colour reconnection within the Pythia framework is presented. A new model is introduced, based on the SU(3) structure of QCD and a minimization of the potential string energy. The inclusion of the epsilon structure of SU(3) gives a new baryon production mechanism and makes it possible simultaneously to describe hyperon production at both $e^+e^-$ and pp colliders. Finally, predictions for $e^+e^-$ colliders, both past and potential future ones, are presented.

  8. Design, construction, and evaluation of a 1:8 scale model binaural manikin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Philip; Xiang, Ning

    2013-03-01

    Many experiments in architectural acoustics require presenting listeners with simulations of different rooms to compare. Acoustic scale modeling is a feasible means to create accurate simulations of many rooms at reasonable cost. A critical component in a scale model room simulation is a receiver that properly emulates a human receiver. For this purpose, a scale model artificial head has been constructed and tested. This paper presents the design and construction methods used, proper equalization procedures, and measurements of its response. A headphone listening experiment examining sound externalization with various reflection conditions is presented that demonstrates its use for psycho-acoustic testing.

  9. Modeling Lactococcus lactis using a genome-scale flux model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nielsen Jens

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Genome-scale flux models are useful tools to represent and analyze microbial metabolism. In this work we reconstructed the metabolic network of the lactic acid bacteria Lactococcus lactis and developed a genome-scale flux model able to simulate and analyze network capabilities and whole-cell function under aerobic and anaerobic continuous cultures. Flux balance analysis (FBA and minimization of metabolic adjustment (MOMA were used as modeling frameworks. Results The metabolic network was reconstructed using the annotated genome sequence from L. lactis ssp. lactis IL1403 together with physiological and biochemical information. The established network comprised a total of 621 reactions and 509 metabolites, representing the overall metabolism of L. lactis. Experimental data reported in the literature was used to fit the model to phenotypic observations. Regulatory constraints had to be included to simulate certain metabolic features, such as the shift from homo to heterolactic fermentation. A minimal medium for in silico growth was identified, indicating the requirement of four amino acids in addition to a sugar. Remarkably, de novo biosynthesis of four other amino acids was observed even when all amino acids were supplied, which is in good agreement with experimental observations. Additionally, enhanced metabolic engineering strategies for improved diacetyl producing strains were designed. Conclusion The L. lactis metabolic network can now be used for a better understanding of lactococcal metabolic capabilities and potential, for the design of enhanced metabolic engineering strategies and for integration with other types of 'omic' data, to assist in finding new information on cellular organization and function.

  10. Model Based Testing for Agent Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhiyong; Thangarajah, John; Padgham, Lin

    Although agent technology is gaining world wide popularity, a hindrance to its uptake is the lack of proper testing mechanisms for agent based systems. While many traditional software testing methods can be generalized to agent systems, there are many aspects that are different and which require an understanding of the underlying agent paradigm. In this paper we present certain aspects of a testing framework that we have developed for agent based systems. The testing framework is a model based approach using the design models of the Prometheus agent development methodology. In this paper we focus on model based unit testing and identify the appropriate units, present mechanisms for generating suitable test cases and for determining the order in which the units are to be tested, present a brief overview of the unit testing process and an example. Although we use the design artefacts from Prometheus the approach is suitable for any plan and event based agent system.

  11. TESTING MONETARY EXCHANGE RATE MODELS WITH PANEL COINTEGRATION TESTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Szabo Andrea

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The monetary exchange rate models explain the long run behaviour of the nominal exchange rate. Their central assertion is that there is a long run equilibrium relationship between the nominal exchange rate and monetary macro-fundamentals. Although these models are essential tools of international macroeconomics, their empirical validity is ambiguous. Previously, time series testing was prevalent in the literature, but it did not bring convincing results. The power of the unit root and the cointegration tests are too low to reject the null hypothesis of no cointegration between the variables. This power can be enhanced by arranging our data in a panel data set, which allows us to analyse several time series simultaneously and enables us to increase the number of observations. We conducted a weak empirical test of the monetary exchange rate models by testing the existence of cointegration between the variables in three panels. We investigated 6, 10 and 15 OECD countries during the following periods: 1976Q1-2011Q4, 1985Q1-2011Q4 and 1996Q1-2011Q4. We tested the reduced form of the monetary exchange rate models in three specifications; we have two restricted models and an unrestricted model. Since cointegration can only be interpreted among non-stationary processes, we investigate the order of the integration of our variables with IPS, Fisher-ADF, Fisher-PP panel unit root tests and the Hadri panel stationary test. All the variables can be unit root processes; therefore we analyze the cointegration with the Pedroni and Kao panel cointegration test. The restricted models performed better than the unrestricted one and we obtained the best results with the 1985Q1-2011Q4 panel. The Kao test rejects the null hypotheses – there is no cointegration between the variables – in all the specifications and all the panels, but the Pedroni test does not show such a positive picture. Hence we found only moderate support for the monetary exchange rate models.

  12. Horns Rev II, 2D-Model Tests

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Thomas Lykke; Frigaard, Peter

    This report present the results of 2D physical model tests carried out in the shallow wave flume at Dept. of Civil Engineering, Aalborg University (AAU). The objective of the tests was: To investigate the combined influence of the pile diameter to water depth ratio and the wave height to water...... on the front side of the pile (0 to 90 degrees). These tests have been conducted at Aalborg University from 9. October, 2006 to 8. November, 2006. Unless otherwise mentioned, all values given in this report are in model scale....

  13. Testing cosmological models with the Integrated Sachs-Wolfe effect

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raccanelli, Alvise, E-mail: alvise.raccanelli@port.ac.uk [Institute of Cosmology and Gravitation, University of Portsmouth, Dennis Sciama Building, Portsmouth, PO1 3FX (United Kingdom)

    2011-02-01

    The cross correlation between the Cosmic Microwave Background and the Large Scale Structure of the Universe is a powerful probe to test our cosmological models. This correlation can be used to detect the Integrated Sachs-Wolfe effect, and it depends on both the geometry of the Universe and the properties of the clustering and evolution of structures; for this reason it can be used to test and constrain cosmological models and parameters as well as theories of gravity. In this proceeding we briefly introduce the ISW effect and present some of the recent cosmological tests done using it.

  14. Testing the suitability of geologic frameworks for extrapolating hydraulic properties across regional scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirus, Benjamin B.; Halford, Keith; Sweetkind, Don; Fenelon, Joe

    2016-08-01

    The suitability of geologic frameworks for extrapolating hydraulic conductivity ( K) to length scales commensurate with hydraulic data is difficult to assess. A novel method is presented for evaluating assumed relations between K and geologic interpretations for regional-scale groundwater modeling. The approach relies on simultaneous interpretation of multiple aquifer tests using alternative geologic frameworks of variable complexity, where each framework is incorporated as prior information that assumes homogeneous K within each model unit. This approach is tested at Pahute Mesa within the Nevada National Security Site (USA), where observed drawdowns from eight aquifer tests in complex, highly faulted volcanic rocks provide the necessary hydraulic constraints. The investigated volume encompasses 40 mi3 (167 km3) where drawdowns traversed major fault structures and were detected more than 2 mi (3.2 km) from pumping wells. Complexity of the five frameworks assessed ranges from an undifferentiated mass of rock with a single unit to 14 distinct geologic units. Results show that only four geologic units can be justified as hydraulically unique for this location. The approach qualitatively evaluates the consistency of hydraulic property estimates within extents of investigation and effects of geologic frameworks on extrapolation. Distributions of transmissivity are similar within the investigated extents irrespective of the geologic framework. In contrast, the extrapolation of hydraulic properties beyond the volume investigated with interfering aquifer tests is strongly affected by the complexity of a given framework. Testing at Pahute Mesa illustrates how this method can be employed to determine the appropriate level of geologic complexity for large-scale groundwater modeling.

  15. Testing the suitability of geologic frameworks for extrapolating hydraulic properties across regional scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirus, Benjamin B.; Halford, Keith J.; Sweetkind, Donald; Fenelon, Joseph M.

    2016-01-01

    The suitability of geologic frameworks for extrapolating hydraulic conductivity (K) to length scales commensurate with hydraulic data is difficult to assess. A novel method is presented for evaluating assumed relations between K and geologic interpretations for regional-scale groundwater modeling. The approach relies on simultaneous interpretation of multiple aquifer tests using alternative geologic frameworks of variable complexity, where each framework is incorporated as prior information that assumes homogeneous K within each model unit. This approach is tested at Pahute Mesa within the Nevada National Security Site (USA), where observed drawdowns from eight aquifer tests in complex, highly faulted volcanic rocks provide the necessary hydraulic constraints. The investigated volume encompasses 40 mi3 (167 km3) where drawdowns traversed major fault structures and were detected more than 2 mi (3.2 km) from pumping wells. Complexity of the five frameworks assessed ranges from an undifferentiated mass of rock with a single unit to 14 distinct geologic units. Results show that only four geologic units can be justified as hydraulically unique for this location. The approach qualitatively evaluates the consistency of hydraulic property estimates within extents of investigation and effects of geologic frameworks on extrapolation. Distributions of transmissivity are similar within the investigated extents irrespective of the geologic framework. In contrast, the extrapolation of hydraulic properties beyond the volume investigated with interfering aquifer tests is strongly affected by the complexity of a given framework. Testing at Pahute Mesa illustrates how this method can be employed to determine the appropriate level of geologic complexity for large-scale groundwater modeling.

  16. A Goddard Multi-Scale Modeling System with Unified Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Wei-Kuo

    2010-01-01

    A multi-scale modeling system with unified physics has been developed at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC). The system consists of an MMF, the coupled NASA Goddard finite-volume GCM (fvGCM) and Goddard Cumulus Ensemble model (GCE, a CRM); the state-of-the-art Weather Research and Forecasting model (WRF) and the stand alone GCE. These models can share the same microphysical schemes, radiation (including explicitly calculated cloud optical properties), and surface models that have been developed, improved and tested for different environments. In this talk, I will present: (1) A brief review on GCE model and its applications on the impact of the aerosol on deep precipitation processes, (2) The Goddard MMF and the major difference between two existing MMFs (CSU MMF and Goddard MMF), and preliminary results (the comparison with traditional GCMs), and (3) A discussion on the Goddard WRF version (its developments and applications). We are also performing the inline tracer calculation to comprehend the physical processes (i.e., boundary layer and each quadrant in the boundary layer) related to the development and structure of hurricanes and mesoscale convective systems. In addition, high - resolution (spatial. 2km, and temporal, I minute) visualization showing the model results will be presented.

  17. Linear Logistic Test Modeling with R

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baghaei, Purya; Kubinger, Klaus D.

    2015-01-01

    The present paper gives a general introduction to the linear logistic test model (Fischer, 1973), an extension of the Rasch model with linear constraints on item parameters, along with eRm (an R package to estimate different types of Rasch models; Mair, Hatzinger, & Mair, 2014) functions to estimate the model and interpret its parameters. The…

  18. Model of Full-Scale Tunnel (FST) under construction

    Science.gov (United States)

    1929-01-01

    Model of Full-Scale Tunnel (FST) under construction. On June 26, 1929, Elton W. Miller wrote to George W. Lewis proposing the construction of a model of the full-scale tunnel. 'The excellent energy ratio obtained in the new wind tunnel of the California Institute of Technology suggests that before proceeding with our full scale tunnel design, we ought to investigate the effect on energy ratio of such factors as: 1. small included angle for the exit cone; 2. carefully designed return passages of circular section as far as possible, without sudden changes in cross sections; 3. tightness of walls. It is believed that much useful information can be obtained by building a model of about 1/16 scale, that is, having a closed throat of 2 ft. by 4 ft. The outside dimensions would be about 12 ft. by 25 ft. in plan and the height 4 ft. Two propellers will be required about 28 in. in diameter, each to be driven by direct current motor at a maximum speed of 4500 R.P.M. Provision can be made for altering the length of certain portions, particularly the exit cone, and possibly for the application of boundary layer control in order to effect satisfactory air flow. This model can be constructed in a comparatively short time, using 2 by 4 framing with matched sheathing inside, and where circular sections are desired they can be obtained by nailing sheet metal to wooden ribs, which can be cut on the band saw. It is estimated that three months will be required for the construction and testing of such a model and that the cost will be approximately three thousand dollars, one thousand dollars of which will be for the motors. No suitable location appears to exist in any of our present buildings, and it may be necessary to build it outside and cover it with a roof.' George Lewis responded immediately (June 27) granting the authority to proceed. He urged Langley to expedite construction and to employ extra carpenters if necessary. Funds for the model came from the FST project. In a 1979

  19. Psychometric testing of the Jefferson Scale of Empathy Health Profession Students' version with Australian paramedic students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Brett; Brown, Ted; Boyle, Malcolm; Dousek, Simon

    2013-03-01

    Evidence now suggests that improved empathic behaviors can have a positive impact on healthcare outcomes. Therefore, having psychometrically-sound empathy scales is important for healthcare educators. In this study, the factor structure of the 20-item Jefferson Scale Empathy-Health Profession Students' version, when completed by a group of undergraduate paramedic students from a large Australian university, was investigated. Data from the Scale completed by 330 paramedic students were analyzed using principal components analysis followed by a maximum likelihood confirmatory factor analysis to test goodness of fit to the sample data. Two factors emerged from the principal components analysis, "compassionate care" and "perspective taking", accounting for 44.2% of the total variance. The 17-item two-factor model produced good model fit and good reliability estimates. Three of the original items did not fit the model. Results from the confirmatory factor analysis suggest that the 17-item Jefferson Scale Empathy-Health Profession Students' version is a valid and reliable measure for undergraduate paramedic students' empathy levels.

  20. Improved anomaly detection using multi-scale PLS and generalized likelihood ratio test

    KAUST Repository

    Madakyaru, Muddu

    2017-02-16

    Process monitoring has a central role in the process industry to enhance productivity, efficiency, and safety, and to avoid expensive maintenance. In this paper, a statistical approach that exploit the advantages of multiscale PLS models (MSPLS) and those of a generalized likelihood ratio (GLR) test to better detect anomalies is proposed. Specifically, to consider the multivariate and multi-scale nature of process dynamics, a MSPLS algorithm combining PLS and wavelet analysis is used as modeling framework. Then, GLR hypothesis testing is applied using the uncorrelated residuals obtained from MSPLS model to improve the anomaly detection abilities of these latent variable based fault detection methods even further. Applications to a simulated distillation column data are used to evaluate the proposed MSPLS-GLR algorithm.

  1. Multi-scale modelling and simulation in systems biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dada, Joseph O; Mendes, Pedro

    2011-02-01

    The aim of systems biology is to describe and understand biology at a global scale where biological functions are recognised as a result of complex mechanisms that happen at several scales, from the molecular to the ecosystem. Modelling and simulation are computational tools that are invaluable for description, prediction and understanding these mechanisms in a quantitative and integrative way. Therefore the study of biological functions is greatly aided by multi-scale methods that enable the coupling and simulation of models spanning several spatial and temporal scales. Various methods have been developed for solving multi-scale problems in many scientific disciplines, and are applicable to continuum based modelling techniques, in which the relationship between system properties is expressed with continuous mathematical equations or discrete modelling techniques that are based on individual units to model the heterogeneous microscopic elements such as individuals or cells. In this review, we survey these multi-scale methods and explore their application in systems biology.

  2. Gauge coupling unification in a classically scale invariant model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haba, Naoyuki; Ishida, Hiroyuki; Takahashi, Ryo; Yamaguchi, Yuya

    2016-02-01

    There are a lot of works within a class of classically scale invariant model, which is motivated by solving the gauge hierarchy problem. In this context, the Higgs mass vanishes at the UV scale due to the classically scale invariance, and is generated via the Coleman-Weinberg mechanism. Since the mass generation should occur not so far from the electroweak scale, we extend the standard model only around the TeV scale. We construct a model which can achieve the gauge coupling unification at the UV scale. In the same way, the model can realize the vacuum stability, smallness of active neutrino masses, baryon asymmetry of the universe, and dark matter relic abundance. The model predicts the existence vector-like fermions charged under SU(3) C with masses lower than 1 TeV, and the SM singlet Majorana dark matter with mass lower than 2.6 TeV.

  3. Gauge coupling unification in a classically scale invariant model

    CERN Document Server

    Haba, Naoyuki; Takahashi, Ryo; Yamaguchi, Yuya

    2015-01-01

    There are a lot of works within a class of classically scale invariant model, which is motivated by solving the gauge hierarchy problem. In this context, the Higgs mass vanishes at the UV scale due to the classically scale invariance, and is generated via the Coleman-Weinberg mechanism. Since the mass generation should occur not so far from the electroweak scale, we extend the standard model only around the TeV scale. We construct a model which can achieve the gauge coupling unification at the UV scale. In the same way, the model can realize the vacuum stability, smallness of active neutrino masses, baryon asymmetry of the universe, and dark matter relic abundance. The model predicts the existence vector-like fermions charged under $SU(3)_C$ with masses lower than $1\\,{\\rm TeV}$, and the SM singlet Majorana dark matter with mass lower than $2.6\\,{\\rm TeV}$.

  4. Cost Modeling for SOC Modules Testing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Balwinder Singh

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available The complexity of the system design is increasing very rapidly as the number of transistors on Integrated Circuits (IC doubles as per Moore’s law.There is big challenge of testing this complex VLSI circuit, in which whole system is integrated into a single chip called System on Chip (SOC. Cost of testing the SOC is also increasing with complexity. Cost modeling plays a vital role in reduction of test cost and time to market. This paper includes the cost modeling of the SOC Module testing which contains both analog and digital modules. The various test cost parameters and equations are considered from the previous work. The mathematical relations are developed for cost modeling to test the SOC further cost modeling equations are modeled in Graphical User Interface (GUI in MATLAB, which can be used as a cost estimation tool. A case study is done to calculate the cost of the SOC testing due to Logic Built in Self Test (LBIST and Memory Built in Self Test (MBIST. VLSI Test engineers can take the benefits of such cost estimation tools for test planning.

  5. The sense and non-sense of plot-scale, catchment-scale, continental-scale and global-scale hydrological modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bronstert, Axel; Heistermann, Maik; Francke, Till

    2017-04-01

    Hydrological models aim at quantifying the hydrological cycle and its constituent processes for particular conditions, sites or periods in time. Such models have been developed for a large range of spatial and temporal scales. One must be aware that the question which is the appropriate scale to be applied depends on the overall question under study. Therefore, it is not advisable to give a general applicable guideline on what is "the best" scale for a model. This statement is even more relevant for coupled hydrological, ecological and atmospheric models. Although a general statement about the most appropriate modelling scale is not recommendable, it is worth to have a look on what are the advantages and the shortcomings of micro-, meso- and macro-scale approaches. Such an appraisal is of increasing importance, since increasingly (very) large / global scale approaches and models are under operation and therefore the question arises how far and for what purposes such methods may yield scientifically sound results. It is important to understand that in most hydrological (and ecological, atmospheric and other) studies process scale, measurement scale, and modelling scale differ from each other. In some cases, the differences between theses scales can be of different orders of magnitude (example: runoff formation, measurement and modelling). These differences are a major source of uncertainty in description and modelling of hydrological, ecological and atmospheric processes. Let us now summarize our viewpoint of the strengths (+) and weaknesses (-) of hydrological models of different scales: Micro scale (e.g. extent of a plot, field or hillslope): (+) enables process research, based on controlled experiments (e.g. infiltration; root water uptake; chemical matter transport); (+) data of state conditions (e.g. soil parameter, vegetation properties) and boundary fluxes (e.g. rainfall or evapotranspiration) are directly measurable and reproducible; (+) equations based on

  6. Biglan Model Test Based on Institutional Diversity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roskens, Ronald W.; Creswell, John W.

    The Biglan model, a theoretical framework for empirically examining the differences among subject areas, classifies according to three dimensions: adherence to common set of paradigms (hard or soft), application orientation (pure or applied), and emphasis on living systems (life or nonlife). Tests of the model are reviewed, and a further test is…

  7. Graphical Models and Computerized Adaptive Testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mislevy, Robert J.; Almond, Russell G.

    This paper synthesizes ideas from the fields of graphical modeling and education testing, particularly item response theory (IRT) applied to computerized adaptive testing (CAT). Graphical modeling can offer IRT a language for describing multifaceted skills and knowledge, and disentangling evidence from complex performances. IRT-CAT can offer…

  8. Multivariate Model for Test Response Analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Krishnan, Shaji; Krishnan, Shaji; Kerkhoff, Hans G.

    2010-01-01

    A systematic approach to construct an effective multivariate test response model for capturing manufacturing defects in electronic products is described. The effectiveness of the model is demonstrated by its capability in reducing the number of test-points, while achieving the maximal coverage

  9. Test-driven modeling of embedded systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Munck, Allan; Madsen, Jan

    2015-01-01

    To benefit maximally from model-based systems engineering (MBSE) trustworthy high quality models are required. From the software disciplines it is known that test-driven development (TDD) can significantly increase the quality of the products. Using a test-driven approach with MBSE may have a sim...

  10. Multivariate model for test response analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Krishnan, S.; Kerkhoff, H.G.

    2010-01-01

    A systematic approach to construct an effective multivariate test response model for capturing manufacturing defects in electronic products is described. The effectiveness of the model is demonstrated by its capability in reducing the number of test-points, while achieving the maximal coverage attai

  11. Multivariate model for test response analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Krishnan, S.; Kerkhoff, H.G.

    2010-01-01

    A systematic approach to construct an effective multivariate test response model for capturing manufacturing defects in electronic products is described. The effectiveness of the model is demonstrated by its capability in reducing the number of test-points, while achieving the maximal coverage attai

  12. Multiple-Scale Geomechanical Models for Thermal Spallation Drilling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lomov, I.; Walsh, S. D.; Roberts, J. J.

    2011-12-01

    Widespread adoption of geothermal energy will require access to deeply buried geothermal sources in granitic basement rocks at high temperatures and pressures. Exploiting these resources necessitates novel methods for drilling, stimulation, and maintenance, under operating conditions difficult or impossible to test in laboratory settings. Physically rigorous numerical modeling tools are vital to highlight potential risks, guide process optimization and reduce the uncertainties involved in these developing technologies. In this presentation, we discuss a numerical modeling effort investigating the multiscale mechanics of thermal spallation drilling (TSD) - a technique in which rock is fragmented into small flakes by a high temperature fluid jet. This process encompasses interconnected phenomena on several length and time scales: from system-scale fluid dynamics to grain-scale thermomechanics of spallation. Here we describe how these disperate scales are simulated using GEODYN, a parallel Eulerian compressible solid and fluid dynamics code with adaptive mesh refinement (AMR) capabilities. GEODYN is able to simulate materials under extremely large deformations, resolve details of wave propagation within grains, and uses a continuum damage mechanics approach to represent fracture. We will present results from both system- and grain-scale simulations describing the transfer of heat from the high temperature jet to the rock face, and the effect of grain-scale properties such as incipient flaw distribution, grain size and grain size distribution, heat flux, applied temperature and material heterogeneity on the onset of spallation. Detailed computer modeling helps to address several of the uncertainties surrounding TSD: 1) What rock compositions are drillable with TSD? 2) How do grain size and grain size distribution affect TSD and drilling rates? 3) What combination of macroscopic (Poisson ratio, heat capacity and thermal conductivity) and microscopic (flaw distribution

  13. Small-Scale Testing of Laterally Loaded Non-Slender Monopiles in Sand

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomassen, Kristina; Roesen, Hanne Ravn; Ibsen, Lars Bo

    in sand subjected to lateral loading are analysed by means of small-scale laboratory tests. The six quasi-static tests are conducted on piles with diameters of 40 mm and 100 mm and a slenderness ratio, L/D, of 5. In order to minimise scale effects, the tests are carried out in a pressure tank at stress...... for different stress levels it is seen that small-scale tests with overburden pressure applied is preferable....

  14. Incremental Validity of the Subscales of the Emotional Regulation Related to Testing Scale for Predicting Test Anxiety

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feldt, Ronald; Lindley, Kyla; Louison, Rebecca; Roe, Allison; Timm, Megan; Utinkova, Nikola

    2015-01-01

    The Emotional Regulation Related to Testing Scale (ERT Scale) assesses strategies students use to regulate emotion related to academic testing. It has four dimensions: Cognitive Appraising Processes (CAP), Emotion-Focusing Processes (EFP), Task-Focusing Processes (TFP), and Regaining Task-Focusing Processes (RTFP). The study examined the factor…

  15. Preliminary results of steel containment vessel model test

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luk, V.K.; Hessheimer, M.F. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Matsumoto, T.; Komine, K.; Arai, S. [Nuclear Power Engineering Corp., Tokyo (Japan); Costello, J.F. [Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Washington, DC (United States)

    1998-04-01

    A high pressure test of a mixed-scaled model (1:10 in geometry and 1:4 in shell thickness) of a steel containment vessel (SCV), representing an improved boiling water reactor (BWR) Mark II containment, was conducted on December 11--12, 1996 at Sandia National Laboratories. This paper describes the preliminary results of the high pressure test. In addition, the preliminary post-test measurement data and the preliminary comparison of test data with pretest analysis predictions are also presented.

  16. Effects of input uncertainty on cross-scale crop modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waha, Katharina; Huth, Neil; Carberry, Peter

    2014-05-01

    The quality of data on climate, soils and agricultural management in the tropics is in general low or data is scarce leading to uncertainty in process-based modeling of cropping systems. Process-based crop models are common tools for simulating crop yields and crop production in climate change impact studies, studies on mitigation and adaptation options or food security studies. Crop modelers are concerned about input data accuracy as this, together with an adequate representation of plant physiology processes and choice of model parameters, are the key factors for a reliable simulation. For example, assuming an error in measurements of air temperature, radiation and precipitation of ± 0.2°C, ± 2 % and ± 3 % respectively, Fodor & Kovacs (2005) estimate that this translates into an uncertainty of 5-7 % in yield and biomass simulations. In our study we seek to answer the following questions: (1) are there important uncertainties in the spatial variability of simulated crop yields on the grid-cell level displayed on maps, (2) are there important uncertainties in the temporal variability of simulated crop yields on the aggregated, national level displayed in time-series, and (3) how does the accuracy of different soil, climate and management information influence the simulated crop yields in two crop models designed for use at different spatial scales? The study will help to determine whether more detailed information improves the simulations and to advise model users on the uncertainty related to input data. We analyse the performance of the point-scale crop model APSIM (Keating et al., 2003) and the global scale crop model LPJmL (Bondeau et al., 2007) with different climate information (monthly and daily) and soil conditions (global soil map and African soil map) under different agricultural management (uniform and variable sowing dates) for the low-input maize-growing areas in Burkina Faso/West Africa. We test the models' response to different levels of input

  17. Computer aided polymer design using multi-scale modelling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. C. Satyanarayana

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available The ability to predict the key physical and chemical properties of polymeric materials from their repeat-unit structure and chain-length architecture prior to synthesis is of great value for the design of polymer-based chemical products, with new functionalities and improved performance. Computer aided molecular design (CAMD methods can expedite the design process by establishing input-output relations between the type and number of functional groups in a polymer repeat unit and the desired macroscopic properties. A multi-scale model-based approach that combines a CAMD technique based on group contribution plus models for predicting polymer repeat unit properties with atomistic simulations for providing first-principles arrangements of the repeat units and for predictions of physical properties of the chosen candidate polymer structures, has been developed and tested for design of polymers with desired properties. A case study is used to highlight the main features of this multi-scale model-based approach for the design of a polymer-based product.

  18. Design and modeling of small scale multiple fracturing experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cuderman, J F

    1981-12-01

    Recent experiments at the Nevada Test Site (NTS) have demonstrated the existence of three distinct fracture regimes. Depending on the pressure rise time in a borehole, one can obtain hydraulic, multiple, or explosive fracturing behavior. The use of propellants rather than explosives in tamped boreholes permits tailoring of the pressure risetime over a wide range since propellants having a wide range of burn rates are available. This technique of using the combustion gases from a full bore propellant charge to produce controlled borehole pressurization is termed High Energy Gas Fracturing (HEGF). Several series of HEGF, in 0.15 m and 0.2 m diameter boreholes at 12 m depths, have been completed in a tunnel complex at NTS where mineback permitted direct observation of fracturing obtained. Because such large experiments are costly and time consuming, smaller scale experiments are desirable, provided results from small experiments can be used to predict fracture behavior in larger boreholes. In order to design small scale gas fracture experiments, the available data from previous HEGF experiments were carefully reviewed, analytical elastic wave modeling was initiated, and semi-empirical modeling was conducted which combined predictions for statically pressurized boreholes with experimental data. The results of these efforts include (1) the definition of what constitutes small scale experiments for emplacement in a tunnel complex at the Nevada Test Site, (2) prediction of average crack radius, in ash fall tuff, as a function of borehole size and energy input per unit length, (3) definition of multiple-hydraulic and multiple-explosive fracture boundaries as a function of boreholes size and surface wave velocity, (4) semi-empirical criteria for estimating stress and acceleration, and (5) a proposal that multiple fracture orientations may be governed by in situ stresses.

  19. Multi-scale modeling of composites subjected to high speed impact

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Minhyung; Cha, Myung S.; Kim, Nam H.

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, multi-scale modeling methodology has been applied to simulate the relatively thick composite panels subjected to high speed local impact loading. Instead of massive parallel processing, we propose to use surrogate modeling to bridge micro-scale and macro-scale. Multi-scale modeling of fracture phenomena of composite materials will consist of (1) micro-scale modeling of fiber-matrix structure using the unit-volume-element technique, which can incorporate the boundary effect, and the level set method for crack modeling, which can model the crack propagation independent of finite element mesh; (2) macro-scale simulation of composite panels under high strain-rate impact using material response calculated from micro-scale modeling; and (3) surrogate modeling to integrate the two scales. In order to validate the predictions, first we did the material level lab experiment such as tensile test. We also did the field test of bullet impact into composite panels made of 4 plies fiber. The impact velocity ranges from 300 ˜ 600 m/s.

  20. The Couplex test cases: models and lessons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bourgeat, A. [Lyon-1 Univ., MCS, 69 - Villeurbanne (France); Kern, M. [Institut National de Recherches Agronomiques (INRA), 78 - Le Chesnay (France); Schumacher, S.; Talandier, J. [Agence Nationale pour la Gestion des Dechets Radioactifs (ANDRA), 92 - Chatenay Malabry (France)

    2003-07-01

    The Couplex test cases are a set of numerical test models for nuclear waste deep geological disposal simulation. They are centered around the numerical issues arising in the near and far field transport simulation. They were used in an international contest, and are now becoming a reference in the field. We present the models used in these test cases, and show sample results from the award winning teams. (authors)

  1. Scale-up of counter-current chromatography: demonstration of predictable isocratic and quasi-continuous operating modes from the test tube to pilot/process scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutherland, Ian; Hewitson, Peter; Ignatova, Svetlana

    2009-12-11

    Predictable scale-up from test tube derived distribution ratios and analytical-scale sample loading optimisation is demonstrated using a model sample system of benzyl alcohol and p-cresol in a heptane:ethyl acetate:methanol:water phase system with the new 18 L Maxi counter-current chromatography centrifuge. The versatility of having a liquid stationary phase with its high loading capacity and flexible operating modes is demonstrated at two different scales by separating and concentrating target compounds using a mixture of caffeine, vanillin, naringenin and carvone using a quasi-continuous technique called intermittent counter-current extraction.

  2. Islands Climatology at Local Scale. Downscaling with CIELO model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azevedo, Eduardo; Reis, Francisco; Tomé, Ricardo; Rodrigues, Conceição

    2016-04-01

    Islands with horizontal scales of the order of tens of km, as is the case of the Atlantic Islands of Macaronesia, are subscale orographic features for Global Climate Models (GCMs) since the horizontal scales of these models are too coarse to give a detailed representation of the islands' topography. Even the Regional Climate Models (RCMs) reveals limitations when they are forced to reproduce the climate of small islands mainly by the way they flat and lowers the elevation of the islands, reducing the capacity of the model to reproduce important local mechanisms that lead to a very deep local climate differentiation. Important local thermodynamics mechanisms like Foehn effect, or the influence of topography on radiation balance, have a prominent role in the climatic spatial differentiation. Advective transport of air - and the consequent induced adiabatic cooling due to orography - lead to transformations of the state parameters of the air that leads to the spatial configuration of the fields of pressure, temperature and humidity. The same mechanism is in the origin of the orographic clouds cover that, besides the direct role as water source by the reinforcement of precipitation, act like a filter to direct solar radiation and as a source of long-wave radiation that affect the local balance of energy. Also, the saturation (or near saturation) conditions that they provide constitute a barrier to water vapour diffusion in the mechanisms of evapotranspiration. Topographic factors like slope, aspect and orographic mask have also significant importance in the local energy balance. Therefore, the simulation of the local scale climate (past, present and future) in these archipelagos requires the use of downscaling techniques to adjust locally outputs obtained at upper scales. This presentation will discuss and analyse the evolution of the CIELO model (acronym for Clima Insular à Escala LOcal) a statistical/dynamical technique developed at the University of the Azores

  3. Full-Scale Structural and NDI Validation Tests of Bonded Composite Doublers for Commercial Aircraft Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roach, D.; Walkington, P.

    1999-02-01

    Composite doublers, or repair patches, provide an innovative repair technique which can enhance the way aircraft are maintained. Instead of riveting multiple steel or aluminum plates to facilitate an aircraft repair, it is possible to bond a single Boron-Epoxy composite doubler to the damaged structure. Most of the concerns surrounding composite doubler technology pertain to long-term survivability, especially in the presence of non-optimum installations, and the validation of appropriate inspection procedures. This report focuses on a series of full-scale structural and nondestructive inspection (NDI) tests that were conducted to investigate the performance of Boron-Epoxy composite doublers. Full-scale tests were conducted on fuselage panels cut from retired aircraft. These full-scale tests studied stress reductions, crack mitigation, and load transfer capabilities of composite doublers using simulated flight conditions of cabin pressure and axial stress. Also, structures which modeled key aspects of aircraft structure repairs were subjected to extreme tension, shear and bending loads to examine the composite laminate's resistance to disbond and delamination flaws. Several of the structures were loaded to failure in order to determine doubler design margins. Nondestructive inspections were conducted throughout the test series in order to validate appropriate techniques on actual aircraft structure. The test results showed that a properly designed and installed composite doubler is able to enhance fatigue life, transfer load away from damaged structure, and avoid the introduction of new stress risers (i.e. eliminate global reduction in the fatigue life of the structure). Comparisons with test data obtained prior to the doubler installation revealed that stresses in the parent material can be reduced 30%--60% through the use of the composite doubler. Tests to failure demonstrated that the bondline is able to transfer plastic strains into the doubler and that

  4. Testing Students with Special Educational Needs in Large-Scale Assessments - Psychometric Properties of Test Scores and Associations with Test Taking Behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pohl, Steffi; Südkamp, Anna; Hardt, Katinka; Carstensen, Claus H; Weinert, Sabine

    2016-01-01

    Assessing competencies of students with special educational needs in learning (SEN-L) poses a challenge for large-scale assessments (LSAs). For students with SEN-L, the available competence tests may fail to yield test scores of high psychometric quality, which are-at the same time-measurement invariant to test scores of general education students. We investigated whether we can identify a subgroup of students with SEN-L, for which measurement invariant competence measures of adequate psychometric quality may be obtained with tests available in LSAs. We furthermore investigated whether differences in test-taking behavior may explain dissatisfying psychometric properties and measurement non-invariance of test scores within LSAs. We relied on person fit indices and mixture distribution models to identify students with SEN-L for whom test scores with satisfactory psychometric properties and measurement invariance may be obtained. We also captured differences in test-taking behavior related to guessing and missing responses. As a result we identified a subgroup of students with SEN-L for whom competence scores of adequate psychometric quality that are measurement invariant to those of general education students were obtained. Concerning test taking behavior, there was a small number of students who unsystematically picked response options. Removing these students from the sample slightly improved item fit. Furthermore, two different patterns of missing responses were identified that explain to some extent problems in the assessments of students with SEN-L.

  5. Generalized F test and generalized deviance test in two-way ANOVA models for randomized trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Juan; He, Xuming

    2014-01-01

    We consider the problem of detecting treatment effects in a randomized trial in the presence of an additional covariate. By reexpressing a two-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) model in a logistic regression framework, we derive generalized F tests and generalized deviance tests, which provide better power in detecting common location-scale changes of treatment outcomes than the classical F test. The null distributions of the test statistics are independent of the nuisance parameters in the models, so the critical values can be easily determined by Monte Carlo methods. We use simulation studies to demonstrate how the proposed tests perform compared with the classical F test. We also use data from a clinical study to illustrate possible savings in sample sizes.

  6. Prediction of vibration characteristics in beam structure using sub-scale modeling with experimental validation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zai, Behzad Ahmed; Sami, Saad; Khan, M. Amir; Ahmad, Furqan; Park, Myung Kyun

    2015-09-01

    Geometric or sub-scale modeling techniques are used for the evaluation of large and complex dynamic structures to ensure accurate reproduction of load path and thus leading to true dynamic characteristics of such structures. The sub-scale modeling technique is very effective in the prediction of vibration characteristics of original large structure when the experimental testing is not feasible due to the absence of a large testing facility. Previous researches were more focused on free and harmonic vibration case with little or no consideration for readily encountered random vibration. A sub-scale modeling technique is proposed for estimating the vibration characteristics of any large scale structure such as Launch vehicles, Mega structures, etc., under various vibration load cases by utilizing precise scaled-down model of that dynamic structure. In order to establish an analytical correlation between the original structure and its scaled models, different scale models of isotropic cantilever beam are selected and analyzed under various vibration conditions( i.e. free, harmonic and random) using finite element package ANSYS. The developed correlations are also validated through experimental testing. The prediction made from the vibratory response of the scaled-down beam through the established sets of correlation are found similar to the response measured from the testing of original beam structure. The established correlations are equally applicable in the prediction of dynamic characteristics of any complex structure through its scaled-down models. This paper presents modified sub-scale modeling technique that enables accurate prediction of vibration characteristics of large and complex structure under not only sinusoidal but also for random vibrations.

  7. A One-Dimensional Global-Scaling Erosive Burning Model Informed by Blowing Wall Turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kibbey, Timothy P.

    2014-01-01

    A derivation of turbulent flow parameters, combined with data from erosive burning test motors and blowing wall tests results in erosive burning model candidates useful in one-dimensional internal ballistics analysis capable of scaling across wide ranges of motor size. The real-time burn rate data comes from three test campaigns of subscale segmented solid rocket motors tested at two facilities. The flow theory admits the important effect of the blowing wall on the turbulent friction coefficient by using blowing wall data to determine the blowing wall friction coefficient. The erosive burning behavior of full-scale motors is now predicted more closely than with other recent models.

  8. FABASOFT BEST PRACTICES AND TEST METRICS MODEL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nadica Hrgarek

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Software companies have to face serious problems about how to measure the progress of test activities and quality of software products in order to estimate test completion criteria, and if the shipment milestone will be reached on time. Measurement is a key activity in testing life cycle and requires established, managed and well documented test process, defined software quality attributes, quantitative measures, and using of test management and bug tracking tools. Test metrics are a subset of software metrics (product metrics, process metrics and enable the measurement and quality improvement of test process and/or software product. The goal of this paper is to briefly present Fabasoft best practices and lessons learned during functional and system testing of big complex software products, and to describe a simple test metrics model applied to the software test process with the purpose to better control software projects, measure and increase software quality.

  9. The Goddard multi-scale modeling system with unified physics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W.-K. Tao

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Recently, a multi-scale modeling system with unified physics was developed at NASA Goddard. It consists of (1 a cloud-resolving model (CRM, (2 a regional-scale model, the NASA unified Weather Research and Forecasting Model (WRF, and (3 a coupled CRM-GCM (general circulation model, known as the Goddard Multi-scale Modeling Framework or MMF. The same cloud-microphysical processes, long- and short-wave radiative transfer and land-surface processes are applied in all of the models to study explicit cloud-radiation and cloud-surface interactive processes in this multi-scale modeling system. This modeling system has been coupled with a multi-satellite simulator for comparison and validation with NASA high-resolution satellite data.

    This paper reviews the development and presents some applications of the multi-scale modeling system, including results from using the multi-scale modeling system to study the interactions between clouds, precipitation, and aerosols. In addition, use of the multi-satellite simulator to identify the strengths and weaknesses of the model-simulated precipitation processes will be discussed as well as future model developments and applications.

  10. Microphysics in Multi-scale Modeling System with Unified Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Wei-Kuo

    2012-01-01

    Recently, a multi-scale modeling system with unified physics was developed at NASA Goddard. It consists of (1) a cloud-resolving model (Goddard Cumulus Ensemble model, GCE model), (2) a regional scale model (a NASA unified weather research and forecast, WRF), (3) a coupled CRM and global model (Goddard Multi-scale Modeling Framework, MMF), and (4) a land modeling system. The same microphysical processes, long and short wave radiative transfer and land processes and the explicit cloud-radiation, and cloud-land surface interactive processes are applied in this multi-scale modeling system. This modeling system has been coupled with a multi-satellite simulator to use NASA high-resolution satellite data to identify the strengths and weaknesses of cloud and precipitation processes simulated by the model. In this talk, a review of developments and applications of the multi-scale modeling system will be presented. In particular, the microphysics development and its performance for the multi-scale modeling system will be presented.

  11. Multi-scale observation and cross-scale mechanistic modeling on terrestrial ecosystem carbon cycle

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CAO; Mingkui; YU; Guirui; LIU; Jiyuan; LI; Kerang

    2005-01-01

    To predict global climate change and to implement the Kyoto Protocol for stabilizing atmospheric greenhouse gases concentrations require quantifying spatio-temporal variations in the terrestrial carbon sink accurately. During the past decade multi-scale ecological experiment and observation networks have been established using various new technologies (e.g. controlled environmental facilities, eddy covariance techniques and quantitative remote sensing), and have obtained a large amount of data about terrestrial ecosystem carbon cycle. However, uncertainties in the magnitude and spatio-temporal variations of the terrestrial carbon sink and in understanding the underlying mechanisms have not been reduced significantly. One of the major reasons is that the observations and experiments were conducted at individual scales independently, but it is the interactions of factors and processes at different scales that determine the dynamics of the terrestrial carbon sink. Since experiments and observations are always conducted at specific scales, to understand cross-scale interactions requires mechanistic analysis that is best to be achieved by mechanistic modeling. However, mechanistic ecosystem models are mainly based on data from single-scale experiments and observations and hence have no capacity to simulate mechanistic cross-scale interconnection and interactions of ecosystem processes. New-generation mechanistic ecosystem models based on new ecological theoretical framework are needed to quantify the mechanisms from micro-level fast eco-physiological responses to macro-level slow acclimation in the pattern and structure in disturbed ecosystems. Multi-scale data-model fusion is a recently emerging approach to assimilate multi-scale observational data into mechanistic, dynamic modeling, in which the structure and parameters of mechanistic models for simulating cross-scale interactions are optimized using multi-scale observational data. The models are validated and

  12. Generalization Technique for 2D+SCALE Dhe Data Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karim, Hairi; Rahman, Alias Abdul; Boguslawski, Pawel

    2016-10-01

    Different users or applications need different scale model especially in computer application such as game visualization and GIS modelling. Some issues has been raised on fulfilling GIS requirement of retaining the details while minimizing the redundancy of the scale datasets. Previous researchers suggested and attempted to add another dimension such as scale or/and time into a 3D model, but the implementation of scale dimension faces some problems due to the limitations and availability of data structures and data models. Nowadays, various data structures and data models have been proposed to support variety of applications and dimensionality but lack research works has been conducted in terms of supporting scale dimension. Generally, the Dual Half Edge (DHE) data structure was designed to work with any perfect 3D spatial object such as buildings. In this paper, we attempt to expand the capability of the DHE data structure toward integration with scale dimension. The description of the concept and implementation of generating 3D-scale (2D spatial + scale dimension) for the DHE data structure forms the major discussion of this paper. We strongly believed some advantages such as local modification and topological element (navigation, query and semantic information) in scale dimension could be used for the future 3D-scale applications.

  13. The development and psychometric testing of the geriatric health promotion scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jeng; Lee, Chia-Mou; Chang, Chong-Fang; Jane, Sui-Whi; Chen, Mei-Yen

    2015-03-01

    As life expectancy increases, being old is no longer synonymous with frailty, weakness, or poor health. Today, most people expect to maintain or promote their health by adopting healthy lifestyle habits. This study developed and tested the psychometric Geriatric Health Promotion (GHP) scale. The GHP scale is a multidimensional instrument that attempts to evaluate lifestyle patterns prevalent among senior citizens in Taiwan. Data used in this study were acquired from a large health-promotion study that targeted elderly residents of rural areas in Taiwan. All subjects were aged 65 years or older and resided in the four communities with the highest mean age ratios in the nation. Trained research assistants assisted the participants to answer the research instrument questions. A total of 520 participants over 65 years of age (mean = 75.02 ± 6.04) were enrolled in this study. The initial draft of the GHP scale included 33 items. After conducting the item analysis, correlation analysis, and factor analysis, the final draft of the GHP was reduced to 22 items. A six-factor solution with Varimax rotation offered the most parsimonious model, with health habits, community participation, health responsibilities, healthy diet, regular exercise, and oral health, explaining 68% of the total variance. The Cronbach's alpha for the developed model scored as high as .94, with a test-retest reliability of .72 (p adults. The GHP scale is easily administered in less than 10 minutes. We recommend that healthcare providers use the GHP scale to evaluate the effectiveness of health promotion programs targeting older adults.

  14. Qualification test of the EPR control rod drive mechanism in the full scale component test facility KOPRA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herr, Wolfgang; Sykora, Alexander; Kleideiter, Ansgar [AREVA NP GmbH, Erlangen (Germany); Champomier, Francois [AREVA NP SAS, Paris (France)

    2009-07-01

    The control rod drive mechanism (CRDM) and the mobile set consisting of rod cluster control assembly (RCC-A) of the evolutionary power reactor (EPR) had to pass a full scale qualification test in representative site conditions. The KOPRA core test section in Erlangen is precisely designed for full scale tests on nuclear core components in respect to coolant temperature and volume flow of PWR site conditions. In the test channel the complete geometry of the central core position of the reactor pressure vessel is simulated with 1:1 scale. The performance test program has led to an optimized test sequence through small adjustments in operating parameters of CRDM. The endurance test program has demonstrated that all tested components, i.e. the CRDN, the control rod driveline and the components of the drop channel are able to function properly and to meet the specification goals.

  15. The Vanishing Tetrad Test: Another Test of Model Misspecification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roos, J. Micah

    2014-01-01

    The Vanishing Tetrad Test (VTT) (Bollen, Lennox, & Dahly, 2009; Bollen & Ting, 2000; Hipp, Bauer, & Bollen, 2005) is an extension of the Confirmatory Tetrad Analysis (CTA) proposed by Bollen and Ting (Bollen & Ting, 1993). VTT is a powerful tool for detecting model misspecification and can be particularly useful in cases in which…

  16. The Vanishing Tetrad Test: Another Test of Model Misspecification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roos, J. Micah

    2014-01-01

    The Vanishing Tetrad Test (VTT) (Bollen, Lennox, & Dahly, 2009; Bollen & Ting, 2000; Hipp, Bauer, & Bollen, 2005) is an extension of the Confirmatory Tetrad Analysis (CTA) proposed by Bollen and Ting (Bollen & Ting, 1993). VTT is a powerful tool for detecting model misspecification and can be particularly useful in cases in which…

  17. Integrating coarse-scale uncertain soil moisture data into a fine-scale hydrological modelling scenario

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Vernieuwe

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available In a hydrological modelling scenario, often the modeller is confronted with external data, such as remotely-sensed soil moisture observations, that become available to update the model output. However, the scale triplet (spacing, extent and support of these data is often inconsistent with that of the model. Furthermore, the external data can be cursed with epistemic uncertainty. Hence, a method is needed that not only integrates the external data into the model, but that also takes into account the difference in scale and the uncertainty of the observations. In this paper, a synthetic hydrological modelling scenario is set up in which a high-resolution distributed hydrological model is run over an agricultural field. At regular time steps, coarse-scale field-averaged soil moisture data, described by means of possibility distributions (epistemic uncertainty, are retrieved by synthetic aperture radar and assimilated into the model. A method is presented that allows to integrate the coarse-scale possibility distribution of soil moisture content data with the fine-scale model-based soil moisture data. To this end, a scaling relationship between field-averaged soil moisture content data and its corresponding standard deviation is employed.

  18. Relevant Criteria for Testing the Quality of Turbulence Models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frandsen, Sten; Jørgensen, Hans E.; Sørensen, John Dalsgaard

    2007-01-01

    turbines when seeking wind characteristics that correspond to one blade and the entire rotor, respectively. For heights exceeding 50-60m the gust factor increases with wind speed. For heights larger the 60-80m, present assumptions on the value of the gust factor are significantly conservative, both for 3......Seeking relevant criteria for testing the quality of turbulence models, the scale of turbulence and the gust factor have been estimated from data and compared with predictions from first-order models of these two quantities. It is found that the mean of the measured length scales is approx. 10......% smaller than the IEC model, for wind turbine hub height levels. The mean is only marginally dependent on trends in time series. It is also found that the coefficient of variation of the measured length scales is about 50%. 3sec and 10sec pre-averaging of wind speed data are relevant for MW-size wind...

  19. Digital Image Correlation Techniques Applied to Large Scale Rocket Engine Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gradl, Paul R.

    2016-01-01

    Rocket engine hot-fire ground testing is necessary to understand component performance, reliability and engine system interactions during development. The J-2X upper stage engine completed a series of developmental hot-fire tests that derived performance of the engine and components, validated analytical models and provided the necessary data to identify where design changes, process improvements and technology development were needed. The J-2X development engines were heavily instrumented to provide the data necessary to support these activities which enabled the team to investigate any anomalies experienced during the test program. This paper describes the development of an optical digital image correlation technique to augment the data provided by traditional strain gauges which are prone to debonding at elevated temperatures and limited to localized measurements. The feasibility of this optical measurement system was demonstrated during full scale hot-fire testing of J-2X, during which a digital image correlation system, incorporating a pair of high speed cameras to measure three-dimensional, real-time displacements and strains was installed and operated under the extreme environments present on the test stand. The camera and facility setup, pre-test calibrations, data collection, hot-fire test data collection and post-test analysis and results are presented in this paper.

  20. Facilitating the Interpretation of English Language Proficiency Scores: Combining Scale Anchoring and Test Score Mapping Methodologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powers, Donald; Schedl, Mary; Papageorgiou, Spiros

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study was to develop, for the benefit of both test takers and test score users, enhanced "TOEFL ITP"® test score reports that go beyond the simple numerical scores that are currently reported. To do so, we applied traditional scale anchoring (proficiency scaling) to item difficulty data in order to develop performance…