WorldWideScience

Sample records for model sheds light

  1. Lidar: shedding new light on habitat characterization and modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerri T. Vierling; Lee A. Vierling; William A. Gould; Sebastian Martinuzzi; Rick M. Clawges

    2008-01-01

    Ecologists need data on animal–habitat associations in terrestrial and aquatic environments to design and implement effective conservation strategies. Habitat characteristics used in models typically incorporate (1) field data of limited spatial extent and/or (2) remote sensing data that do not characterize the vertical habitat structure. Remote sensing tools that...

  2. Zebrafish models flex their muscles to shed light on muscular dystrophies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joachim Berger

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Muscular dystrophies are a group of genetic disorders that specifically affect skeletal muscle and are characterized by progressive muscle degeneration and weakening. To develop therapies and treatments for these diseases, a better understanding of the molecular basis of muscular dystrophies is required. Thus, identification of causative genes mutated in specific disorders and the study of relevant animal models are imperative. Zebrafish genetic models of human muscle disorders often closely resemble disease pathogenesis, and the optical clarity of zebrafish embryos and larvae enables visualization of dynamic molecular processes in vivo. As an adjunct tool, morpholino studies provide insight into the molecular function of genes and allow rapid assessment of candidate genes for human muscular dystrophies. This unique set of attributes makes the zebrafish model system particularly valuable for the study of muscle diseases. This review discusses how recent research using zebrafish has shed light on the pathological basis of muscular dystrophies, with particular focus on the muscle cell membrane and the linkage between the myofibre cytoskeleton and the extracellular matrix.

  3. Zebrafish models flex their muscles to shed light on muscular dystrophies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berger, Joachim; Currie, Peter D

    2012-11-01

    Muscular dystrophies are a group of genetic disorders that specifically affect skeletal muscle and are characterized by progressive muscle degeneration and weakening. To develop therapies and treatments for these diseases, a better understanding of the molecular basis of muscular dystrophies is required. Thus, identification of causative genes mutated in specific disorders and the study of relevant animal models are imperative. Zebrafish genetic models of human muscle disorders often closely resemble disease pathogenesis, and the optical clarity of zebrafish embryos and larvae enables visualization of dynamic molecular processes in vivo. As an adjunct tool, morpholino studies provide insight into the molecular function of genes and allow rapid assessment of candidate genes for human muscular dystrophies. This unique set of attributes makes the zebrafish model system particularly valuable for the study of muscle diseases. This review discusses how recent research using zebrafish has shed light on the pathological basis of muscular dystrophies, with particular focus on the muscle cell membrane and the linkage between the myofibre cytoskeleton and the extracellular matrix.

  4. Shedding Light on Fiber Optics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bunch, Robert M.

    1994-01-01

    Explains the principles of fiber optics as a medium for light-wave communication. Current uses of fiber systems on college campuses include voice, video, and local area network applications. A group of seven school districts in Minnesota are linked via fiber-optic cables. Other uses are discussed. (MLF)

  5. Shedding further light on late globalization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Turcan, Romeo V.

    2016-01-01

    In his opening essay on ‘What and/or Who is Late’, Nikhilesh Dholakia delineated inter alia “stage-setting contexts” or levels of analysis which could shed light on the phenomenon of late globalization, including its causes and effects. Indeed, these, especially the effects in contemporary contex...

  6. Process based model sheds light on climate sensitivity of Mediterranean tree-ring width

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Touchan

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available We use the process-based VS (Vaganov-Shashkin model to investigate whether a regional Pinus halepensis tree-ring chronology from Tunisia can be simulated as a function of climate alone by employing a biological model linking day length and daily temperature and precipitation (AD 1959–2004 from a climate station to ring-width variations. We check performance of the model on independent data by a validation exercise in which the model's parameters are tuned using data for 1982–2004 and the model is applied to generate tree-ring indices for 1959–1981. The validation exercise yields a highly significant positive correlation between the residual chronology and estimated growth curve (r=0.76 p<0.0001, n=23. The model shows that the average duration of the growing season is 191 days, with considerable variation from year to year. On average, soil moisture limits tree-ring growth for 128 days and temperature for 63 days. Model results depend on chosen values of parameters, in particular a parameter specifying a balance ratio between soil moisture and precipitation. Future work in the Mediterranean region should include multi-year natural experiments to verify patterns of cambial-growth variation suggested by the VS model.

  7. Process based model sheds light on climate sensitivity of Mediterranean tree-ring width

    Science.gov (United States)

    Touchan, R.; Shishov, V. V.; Meko, D. M.; Nouiri, I.; Grachev, A.

    2012-03-01

    We use the process-based VS (Vaganov-Shashkin) model to investigate whether a regional Pinus halepensis tree-ring chronology from Tunisia can be simulated as a function of climate alone by employing a biological model linking day length and daily temperature and precipitation (AD 1959-2004) from a climate station to ring-width variations. We check performance of the model on independent data by a validation exercise in which the model's parameters are tuned using data for 1982-2004 and the model is applied to generate tree-ring indices for 1959-1981. The validation exercise yields a highly significant positive correlation between the residual chronology and estimated growth curve (r=0.76 pseason is 191 days, with considerable variation from year to year. On average, soil moisture limits tree-ring growth for 128 days and temperature for 63 days. Model results depend on chosen values of parameters, in particular a parameter specifying a balance ratio between soil moisture and precipitation. Future work in the Mediterranean region should include multi-year natural experiments to verify patterns of cambial-growth variation suggested by the VS model.

  8. Process based model sheds light on climate signal of mediterranean tree rings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Touchan

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available We use the process-based VS (Vaganov-Shashkin model to investigate whether a regional Pinus halapensis tree-ring chronology from Tunisia can be simulated as a function of climate alone by employing a biological model linking day length and daily temperature and precipitation (AD 1959–2004 from a climate station to ring-width variations. We use two periods to calibrate (1982–2004 and verify (1959–1981 the model. We have obtained highly significant positive correlation between the residual chronology and estimated growth curve (r = 0.76 p < 0.001. The model shows that the average duration of the growing season is 191 days. On average, soil moisture limits tree-ring growth for 128 days and temperature for 63 days.

  9. Sex differences in animal models of schizophrenia shed light on the underlying pathophysiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Rachel Anne

    2016-08-01

    Sex differences in schizophrenia are apparent in almost all features of the illness, from incidence and mean age of onset to symptomatology, course of illness and response to pharmacological treatments. Understanding how men and women with schizophrenia differ provides significant clues into the pathophysiology of the disorder. Animal models are powerful tools when dissecting the molecular biology which underlies behavioural disturbances, and allow structured comparisons of biological sex differences without the social environmental gender influence that so often confounds human sex comparison studies. This review will provide a summary of sex differences described in developmental, genetic and drug-induced animal models of schizophrenia and will link sex-specific molecular and behavioural phenotypes of these models in an attempt to unravel the role that sex plays in the pathophysiology of schizophrenia. Both sex and stress hormones interact to shape the developing brain and behaviour and animal models of schizophrenia that include both sexes provide significant insight into the complexities of these interactions and can direct toward novel therapeutic strategies.

  10. Study Sheds Light on Safety of Driving with Epilepsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Study Sheds Light on Safety of Driving With Epilepsy Those who had longer seizures during driving tests ... SUNDAY, Dec. 4, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- People with epilepsy who experienced longer seizures during a simulated driving ...

  11. Relative values: shedding light on Einstein's theories

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    Prof. Paul Davies has analysed light from some of the most distant stellar objects in the sky. From these observations he has concluded that the speed of light was faster billions of years ago than it is today (1/2 page).

  12. A taxonomy-based approach to shed light on the babel of mathematical models for rice simulation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Confalonieri, Roberto; Bregaglio, Simone; Adam, Myriam; Ruget, Françoise; Li, Tao; Hasegawa, Toshihiro; Yin, Xinyou; Zhu, Yan; Boote, Kenneth; Buis, Samuel; Fumoto, Tamon; Gaydon, Donald; Lafarge, Tanguy; Marcaida, Manuel; Nakagawa, Hiroshi; Ruane, Alex C.; Singh, Balwinder; Singh, Upendra; Tang, Liang; Tao, Fulu; Fugice, Job; Yoshida, Hiroe; Zhang, Zhao; Wilson, Lloyd T.; Baker, Jeff; Yang, Yubin; Masutomi, Yuji; Wallach, Daniel; Acutis, Marco; Bouman, Bas

    2016-01-01

    For most biophysical domains, differences in model structures are seldom quantified. Here, we used a taxonomy-based approach to characterise thirteen rice models. Classification keys and binary attributes for each key were identified, and models were categorised into five clusters using a binary

  13. A Taxonomy-Based Approach to Shed Light on the Babel of Mathematical Models for Rice Simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Confalonieri, Roberto; Bregaglio, Simone; Adam, Myriam; Ruget, Francoise; Li, Tao; Hasegawa, Toshihiro; Yin, Xinyou; Zhu, Yan; Boote, Kenneth; Buis, Samuel; Ruane, Alex C.

    2016-01-01

    For most biophysical domains, differences in model structures are seldom quantified. Here, we used a taxonomy-based approach to characterise thirteen rice models. Classification keys and binary attributes for each key were identified, and models were categorised into five clusters using a binary similarity measure and the unweighted pair-group method with arithmetic mean. Principal component analysis was performed on model outputs at four sites. Results indicated that (i) differences in structure often resulted in similar predictions and (ii) similar structures can lead to large differences in model outputs. User subjectivity during calibration may have hidden expected relationships between model structure and behaviour. This explanation, if confirmed, highlights the need for shared protocols to reduce the degrees of freedom during calibration, and to limit, in turn, the risk that user subjectivity influences model performance.

  14. Circadian control sheds light on fungal bioluminescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Anderson G; Stevani, Cassius V; Waldenmaier, Hans E; Viviani, Vadim; Emerson, Jillian M; Loros, Jennifer J; Dunlap, Jay C

    2015-03-30

    Bioluminescence, the creation and emission of light by organisms, affords insight into the lives of organisms doing it. Luminous living things are widespread and access diverse mechanisms to generate and control luminescence [1-5]. Among the least studied bioluminescent organisms are phylogenetically rare fungi-only 71 species, all within the ∼ 9,000 fungi of the temperate and tropical Agaricales order-are reported from among ∼ 100,000 described fungal species [6, 7]. All require oxygen [8] and energy (NADH or NADPH) for bioluminescence and are reported to emit green light (λmax 530 nm) continuously, implying a metabolic function for bioluminescence, perhaps as a byproduct of oxidative metabolism in lignin degradation. Here, however, we report that bioluminescence from the mycelium of Neonothopanus gardneri is controlled by a temperature-compensated circadian clock, the result of cycles in content/activity of the luciferase, reductase, and luciferin that comprise the luminescent system. Because regulation implies an adaptive function for bioluminescence, a controversial question for more than two millennia [8-15], we examined interactions between luminescent fungi and insects [16]. Prosthetic acrylic resin "mushrooms," internally illuminated by a green LED emitting light similar to the bioluminescence, attract staphilinid rove beetles (coleopterans), as well as hemipterans (true bugs), dipterans (flies), and hymenopterans (wasps and ants), at numbers far greater than dark control traps. Thus, circadian control may optimize energy use for when bioluminescence is most visible, attracting insects that can in turn help in spore dispersal, thereby benefitting fungi growing under the forest canopy, where wind flow is greatly reduced.

  15. Shedding light on biology of bacterial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Johannes P; Basler, Marek

    2016-11-05

    To understand basic principles of living organisms one has to know many different properties of all cellular components, their mutual interactions but also their amounts and spatial organization. Live-cell imaging is one possible approach to obtain such data. To get multiple snapshots of a cellular process, the imaging approach has to be gentle enough to not disrupt basic functions of the cell but also have high temporal and spatial resolution to detect and describe the changes. Light microscopy has become a method of choice and since its early development over 300 years ago revolutionized our understanding of living organisms. As most cellular components are indistinguishable from the rest of the cellular contents, the second revolution came from a discovery of specific labelling techniques, such as fusions to fluorescent proteins that allowed specific tracking of a component of interest. Currently, several different tags can be tracked independently and this allows us to simultaneously monitor the dynamics of several cellular components and from the correlation of their dynamics to infer their respective functions. It is, therefore, not surprising that live-cell fluorescence microscopy significantly advanced our understanding of basic cellular processes. Current cameras are fast enough to detect changes with millisecond time resolution and are sensitive enough to detect even a few photons per pixel. Together with constant improvement of properties of fluorescent tags, it is now possible to track single molecules in living cells over an extended period of time with a great temporal resolution. The parallel development of new illumination and detection techniques allowed breaking the diffraction barrier and thus further pushed the resolution limit of light microscopy. In this review, we would like to cover recent advances in live-cell imaging technology relevant to bacterial cells and provide a few examples of research that has been possible due to imaging

  16. Shedding light on biology of bacterial cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    To understand basic principles of living organisms one has to know many different properties of all cellular components, their mutual interactions but also their amounts and spatial organization. Live-cell imaging is one possible approach to obtain such data. To get multiple snapshots of a cellular process, the imaging approach has to be gentle enough to not disrupt basic functions of the cell but also have high temporal and spatial resolution to detect and describe the changes. Light microscopy has become a method of choice and since its early development over 300 years ago revolutionized our understanding of living organisms. As most cellular components are indistinguishable from the rest of the cellular contents, the second revolution came from a discovery of specific labelling techniques, such as fusions to fluorescent proteins that allowed specific tracking of a component of interest. Currently, several different tags can be tracked independently and this allows us to simultaneously monitor the dynamics of several cellular components and from the correlation of their dynamics to infer their respective functions. It is, therefore, not surprising that live-cell fluorescence microscopy significantly advanced our understanding of basic cellular processes. Current cameras are fast enough to detect changes with millisecond time resolution and are sensitive enough to detect even a few photons per pixel. Together with constant improvement of properties of fluorescent tags, it is now possible to track single molecules in living cells over an extended period of time with a great temporal resolution. The parallel development of new illumination and detection techniques allowed breaking the diffraction barrier and thus further pushed the resolution limit of light microscopy. In this review, we would like to cover recent advances in live-cell imaging technology relevant to bacterial cells and provide a few examples of research that has been possible due to imaging. This

  17. Shedding Light on the Cosmic Skeleton

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-11-01

    Astronomers have tracked down a gigantic, previously unknown assembly of galaxies located almost seven billion light-years away from us. The discovery, made possible by combining two of the most powerful ground-based telescopes in the world, is the first observation of such a prominent galaxy structure in the distant Universe, providing further insight into the cosmic web and how it formed. "Matter is not distributed uniformly in the Universe," says Masayuki Tanaka from ESO, who led the new study. "In our cosmic vicinity, stars form in galaxies and galaxies usually form groups and clusters of galaxies. The most widely accepted cosmological theories predict that matter also clumps on a larger scale in the so-called 'cosmic web', in which galaxies, embedded in filaments stretching between voids, create a gigantic wispy structure." These filaments are millions of light years long and constitute the skeleton of the Universe: galaxies gather around them, and immense galaxy clusters form at their intersections, lurking like giant spiders waiting for more matter to digest. Scientists are struggling to determine how they swirl into existence. Although massive filamentary structures have been often observed at relatively small distances from us, solid proof of their existence in the more distant Universe has been lacking until now. The team led by Tanaka discovered a large structure around a distant cluster of galaxies in images they obtained earlier. They have now used two major ground-based telescopes to study this structure in greater detail, measuring the distances from Earth of over 150 galaxies, and, hence, obtaining a three-dimensional view of the structure. The spectroscopic observations were performed using the VIMOS instrument on ESO's Very Large Telescope and FOCAS on the Subaru Telescope, operated by the National Astronomical Observatory of Japan. Thanks to these and other observations, the astronomers were able to make a real demographic study of this structure

  18. Flashes Shed Light on Cosmic Clashes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-10-01

    An international team of astronomers led by Danish astronomer Jens Hjorth [1] has for the first time observed the visible light from a short gamma-ray burst (GRB). Using the 1.5m Danish telescope at La Silla (Chile), they showed that these short, intense bursts of gamma-ray emission most likely originate from the violent collision of two merging neutron stars. The same team has also used ESO's Very Large Telescope to constrain the birthplace of the first ever short burst whose position could be pinpointed with high precision, GRB 050509B. The results are being published in the October 6 issue of the journal Nature. Gamma-ray bursts, the most powerful type of explosion known in the Universe, have been a mystery for three decades. They come in two different flavours, long and short ones. Over the past few years, international efforts have convincingly shown that long gamma-ray bursts are linked with the ultimate explosion of massive stars (hypernovae; see e.g. ESO PR 16/03). "The breakthrough in our understanding of long-duration GRBs (those lasting more than about 2 seconds), which ultimately linked them with the energetic explosion of a massive star as it collapses into a black hole, came from the discovery of their long-lived X-ray and optical afterglows," says Jens Hjorth (Dark Cosmology Centre, Niels Bohr Institute, University of Copenhagen, Denmark). "Short duration GRBs have however evaded optical detection for more than 30 years," he adds. Things changed recently. In the night of July 9 to 10, 2005, the NASA HETE-2 satellite detected a burst of only 70-millisecond duration and, based on the detection of X-rays, was able to determine its position in the sky. Thirty-three hours after, Jens Hjorth and his team obtained images of this region of the sky using the Danish 1.5m telescope at ESO La Silla. The images showed the presence of a fading source, sitting on the edge of a galaxy. "We have thus discovered the first optical afterglow of a short gamma-ray burst

  19. Black Holes Shed Light on Galaxy Formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000-01-01

    This videotape is comprised of several segments of animations on black holes and galaxy formation, and several segments of an interview with Dr. John Kormendy. The animation segments are: (1) a super massive black hole, (2) Centarus A active black hole found in a collision, (3) galaxy NGC-4261 (active black hole and jet model), (4) galaxy M-32 (orbits of stars are effected by the gravity of the black hole), (5) galaxy M-37 (motion of stars increases as mass of black hole increases), (6) Birth of active galactic nuclei, (7) the collision of two galaxy leads to merger of the black holes, (8) Centarus A and simulation of the collision of 2 galaxies. There are also several segments of an interview with John Kormendy. In these segments he discusses the two most important aspects of his recent black hole work: (1) the correlations between galaxies speed and the mass of the black holes, and (2) the existence of black holes and galactic formation. He also discusses the importance of the Hubble Space Telescope and the Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph to the study of black holes. He also shows the methodology of processing images from the spectrograph in his office.

  20. LHCf sheds new light on cosmic rays

    CERN Multimedia

    Anaïs Schaeffer

    2011-01-01

    The energy spectrum of the single photon obtained using data from the LHCf experiment has turned out to be very different from that predicted by the theoretical models used until now to describe the interactions between very high-energy cosmic rays and the earth's atmosphere. The consequences of this discrepancy for cosmic ray studies could be significant.   Artistic impression of cosmic rays entering Earth's atmosphere. (Credit: Asimmetrie/Infn). It took physicists by surprise when analysis of the data collected by the two LHCf calorimeters in 2010 showed that high-energy cosmic rays don't interact with the atmosphere in the manner predicted by theory. The LHCf detectors, set up 140 metres either side of the ATLAS interaction point, are dedicated to the study of the secondary particles emitted at very small angles during proton-proton collisions in the LHC, with energies comparable to cosmic rays entering the earth's atmosphere at 2.5x1016 eV. The aim of the experiment is to r...

  1. Shedding light on restoring respiratory function after spinal cord injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Warren J Alilain

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Loss of respiratory function is one of the leading causes of death following spinal cord injury. Because of this, much work has been done in studying ways to restore respiratory function following SCI - including pharmacological and regeneration strategies. With the emergence of new and powerful tools from molecular neuroscience, new therapeutically relevant alternatives to these approaches have become available, including expression of light sensitive proteins called channelrhodopsins. In this article we briefly review the history of various attempts to restore breathing after C2 hemisection, and focus on our recent work using the activation of light sensitive channels to restore respiratory function after experimental spinal cord injury. We also discuss how such light induced activity can help shed light on the inner workings of the central nervous system respiratory circuitry that controls diaphragmatic function.

  2. CFTR Modulators: Shedding Light on Precision Medicine for Cystic Fibrosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopes-Pacheco, Miquéias

    2016-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is the most common life-threatening monogenic disease afflicting Caucasian people. It affects the respiratory, gastrointestinal, glandular and reproductive systems. The major cause of morbidity and mortality in CF is the respiratory disorder caused by a vicious cycle of obstruction of the airways, inflammation and infection that leads to epithelial damage, tissue remodeling and end-stage lung disease. Over the past decades, life expectancy of CF patients has increased due to early diagnosis and improved treatments; however, these patients still present limited quality of life. Many attempts have been made to rescue CF transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) expression, function and stability, thereby overcoming the molecular basis of CF. Gene and protein variances caused by CFTR mutants lead to different CF phenotypes, which then require different treatments to quell the patients’ debilitating symptoms. In order to seek better approaches to treat CF patients and maximize therapeutic effects, CFTR mutants have been stratified into six groups (although several of these mutations present pleiotropic defects). The research with CFTR modulators (read-through agents, correctors, potentiators, stabilizers and amplifiers) has achieved remarkable progress, and these drugs are translating into pharmaceuticals and personalized treatments for CF patients. This review summarizes the main molecular and clinical features of CF, emphasizes the latest clinical trials using CFTR modulators, sheds light on the molecular mechanisms underlying these new and emerging treatments, and discusses the major breakthroughs and challenges to treating all CF patients. PMID:27656143

  3. Structural biology sheds light on the puzzle of genomic ORFans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siew, Naomi; Fischer, Daniel

    2004-09-10

    Genomic ORFans are orphan open reading frames (ORFs) with no significant sequence similarity to other ORFs. ORFans comprise 20-30% of the ORFs of most completely sequenced genomes. Because nothing can be learnt about ORFans via sequence homology, the functions and evolutionary origins of ORFans remain a mystery. Furthermore, because relatively few ORFans have been experimentally characterized, it has been suggested that most ORFans are not likely to correspond to functional, expressed proteins, but rather to spurious ORFs, pseudo-genes or to rapidly evolving proteins with non-essential roles. As a snapshot view of current ORFan structural studies, we searched for ORFans among proteins whose three-dimensional structures have been recently determined. We find that functional and structural studies of ORFans are not as underemphasized as previously suggested. These recently determined structures correspond to ORFans from all Kingdoms of life, and include proteins that have previously been functionally characterized, as well as structural genomics targets of unknown function labeled as "hypothetical proteins". This suggests that many of the ORFans in the databases are likely to correspond to expressed, functional (and even essential) proteins. Furthermore, the recently determined structures include examples of the various types of ORFans, suggesting that the functions and evolutionary origins of ORFans are diverse. Although this survey sheds some light on the ORFan mystery, further experimental studies are required to gain a better understanding of the role and origins of the tens of thousands of ORFans awaiting characterization.

  4. Shedding light on bioluminescence regulation in Vibrio fischeri.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyashiro, Tim; Ruby, Edward G

    2012-06-01

    The bioluminescence emitted by the marine bacterium Vibrio fischeri is a particularly striking result of individual microbial cells co-ordinating a group behaviour. The genes responsible for light production are principally regulated by the LuxR-LuxI quorum-sensing system. In addition to LuxR-LuxI, numerous other genetic elements and environmental conditions control bioluminescence production. Efforts to mathematically model the LuxR-LuxI system are providing insight into the dynamics of this autoinduction behaviour. The Hawaiian squid Euprymna scolopes forms a natural symbiosis with V. fischeri, and utilizes the symbiont-derived bioluminescence for certain nocturnal behaviours, such as counterillumination. Recent work suggests that the tissue with which V. fischeri associates not only can detect bioluminescence but may also use this light to monitor the V. fischeri population. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  5. Shedding Light on Diatom Photonics by means of Digital Holography

    CERN Document Server

    Di Caprio, Giuseppe; De Stefano, L; De Stefano, M; Antonucci, A; Congestri, R; De Tommasi, E

    2012-01-01

    Diatoms are among the dominant phytoplankters in the worl's ocean, and their external silica investments, resembling artificial photonics crystal, are expected to play an active role in light manipulation. Digital holography allowed studying the interaction with light of Coscinodiscus wailesii cell wall reconstructing the light confinement inside the cell cytoplasm, condition that is hardly accessible via standard microscopy. The full characterization of the propagated beam, in terms of quantitative phase and intensity, removed a long-standing ambiguity about the origin of the light. The data were discussed in the light of living cell behavior in response to their environment.

  6. Perovskite solar cells: Shedding light on film crystallization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakr, Osman M.; Mohammed, Omar F.

    2017-06-01

    A study on the formation of methylammonium lead iodide perovskite films reveals that light illumination influences the crystallization kinetics, therefore affecting the final photovoltaic performance of these materials.

  7. Shedding Light on Neutrino Masses with Dark Forces

    CERN Document Server

    Batell, Brian; Shuve, Brian

    2016-01-01

    Heavy right-handed neutrinos (RHNs) provide the simplest explanation for the origin of light neutrino masses and mixings. If the RHN masses are at or below the weak scale, direct experimental discovery of these states is possible at accelerator experiments such as the LHC or new dedicated beam dump experiments; in such experiments, the RHN decays after traversing a macroscopic distance from the collision point. The experimental sensitivity to RHNs is significantly enhanced if there is a new "dark" gauge force connecting them to the Standard Model (SM), and detection of RHNs can be the primary discovery mode for the new dark force itself. We take the well-motivated example of a B-L gauge symmetry and analyze the sensitivity to displaced decays of the RHNs produced via the new gauge interaction in two experiments: the LHC and the proposed SHiP beam dump experiment. In the most favorable case in which the mediator can be produced on-shell and decays to RHNs, the sensitivity reach is controlled by the square of t...

  8. Gene trees, species trees and Earth history combine to shed light on the evolution of migration in a model avian system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voelker, Gary; Bowie, Rauri C K; Klicka, John

    2013-06-01

    The evolution of migration in birds has fascinated biologists for centuries. In this study, we performed phylogenetic-based analyses of Catharus thrushes, a model genus in the study of avian migration, and their close relatives. For these analyses, we used both mitochondrial and nuclear genes, and the resulting phylogenies were used to trace migratory traits and biogeographic patterns. Our results provide the first robust assessment of relationships within Catharus and relatives and indicate that both mitochondrial and autosomal genes contribute to overall support of the phylogeny. Measures of phylogenetic informativeness indicated that mitochondrial genes provided more signal within Catharus than did nuclear genes, whereas nuclear loci provided more signal for relationships between Catharus and close relatives than did mitochondrial genes. Insertion and deletion events also contributed important support across the phylogeny. Across all taxa included in the study, and for Catharus, possession of long-distance migration is reconstructed as the ancestral condition, and a North American (north of Mexico) ancestral area is inferred. Within Catharus, sedentary behaviour evolved after the first speciation event in the genus and is geographically and temporally correlated with Central American distributions and the final closure of the Central American Seaway. Migratory behaviour subsequently evolved twice in Catharus and is geographically and temporally correlated with a recolonization of North America in the late Pleistocene. By temporally linking speciation events with changes in migratory condition and events in Earth history, we are able to show support for several competing hypotheses relating to the geographic origin of migration. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Shedding light on ethylene metabolism in higher plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Aurineide Rodrigues

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Ethylene metabolism in higher plants is regulated by a wide array of endogenous and environmental factors. During most physiological processes, ethylene levels are mainly determined by a strict control of the rate-limiting biosynthetic steps responsible for the production of 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid (ACC and its subsequent conversion to ethylene. Responsible for these reactions, the key enzymes ACC synthase and ACC oxidase are encoded by multigene families formed by members that can be differentially regulated at the transcription and post-translational levels by specific developmental and environmental signals. Among the wide variety of environmental cues controlling plant ethylene production, light quality, duration and intensity have consistently been demonstrated to influence the metabolism of this plant hormone in diverse plant tissues, organs and species. Although still not completely elucidated, the mechanisms underlying the interaction between light signal transduction and ethylene evolution appears to involve a complex network that includes central transcription factors connecting multiple signaling pathways, which can be reciprocally modulated by ethylene itself, other phytohormones, and specific light wavelengths. Accumulating evidence has indicated particular photoreceptors as essential mediators in light-induced signaling cascades affecting ethylene levels. Therefore, this review specifically focuses on discussing the current knowledge of the potential molecular mechanisms implicated in the light-induced responses affecting ethylene metabolism during the regulation of developmental and metabolic plant responses. Besides presenting the state of the art in this research field, some overlooked mechanisms and future directions to elucidate the exact nature of the light-ethylene interplay in higher plants will also be compiled and discussed.

  10. Redox Proteomics Sheds Light on Photodynamic Treatment of Cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tsaytler, P.A.

    2009-01-01

    Cancer is the second most common cause of death among humans in the world, exceeded only by heart disease. One of the promising modalities for the treatment of cancer is photodynamic therapy (PDT). It is based on the concept that (1) certain light-sensitive compounds (photosensitizers) can be locali

  11. Redox Proteomics Sheds Light on Photodynamic Treatment of Cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tsaytler, P.A.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/304837679

    2009-01-01

    Cancer is the second most common cause of death among humans in the world, exceeded only by heart disease. One of the promising modalities for the treatment of cancer is photodynamic therapy (PDT). It is based on the concept that (1) certain light-sensitive compounds (photosensitizers) can be

  12. USEPA SHEDS MODEL: METHODOLOGY FOR EXPOSURE ASSESSMENT FOR WOOD PRESERVATIVES

    Science.gov (United States)

    A physically-based, Monte Carlo probabilistic model (SHEDS-Wood: Stochastic Human Exposure and Dose Simulation model for wood preservatives) has been applied to assess the exposure and dose of children to arsenic (As) and chromium (Cr) from contact with chromated copper arsenat...

  13. Shedding light on the black hole mass spectrum

    CERN Document Server

    Spera, Mario; Mapelli, Michela

    2016-01-01

    The mass spectrum of stellar black holes (BHs) is highly uncertain. Theoretical models of BH formation strongly depend on the efficiency of stellar winds of the progenitor star and on the supernova (SN) explosion mechanism. We discuss the BH mass spectrum we obtain using SEVN, a new public population-synthesis code that includes up-to-date stellar-wind prescriptions and several SN explosion models. Our models indicate a sub-solar metallicity environment for the progenitors of the gravitational wave source GW150914. We show that our models predict substantially larger BH masses (up to ~100 Msun) than other population synthesis codes, at low metallicity. In this proceeding, we also discuss the impact of pair-instability SNe on our previously published models.

  14. Shedding light on proteins, nucleic acids, cells, humans and fish

    Science.gov (United States)

    Setlow, Richard B.

    2002-01-01

    I was trained as a physicist in graduate school. Hence, when I decided to go into the field of biophysics, it was natural that I concentrated on the effects of light on relatively simple biological systems, such as proteins. The wavelengths absorbed by the amino acid subunits of proteins are in the ultraviolet (UV). The wavelengths that affect the biological activities, the action spectra, also are in the UV, but are not necessarily parallel to the absorption spectra. Understanding these differences led me to investigate the action spectra for affecting nucleic acids, and the effects of UV on viruses and cells. The latter studies led me to the discovery of the important molecular nature of the damages affecting DNA (cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers) and to the discovery of nucleotide excision repair. Individuals with the genetic disease xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) are extraordinarily sensitive to sunlight-induced skin cancer. The finding, by James Cleaver, that their skin cells were defective in DNA repair strongly suggested that DNA damage was a key step in carcinogenesis. Such information was important for estimating the wavelengths in sunlight responsible for human skin cancer and for predicting the effects of ozone depletion on the incidence of non-melanoma skin cancer. It took experiments with backcross hybrid fish to call attention to the probable role of the longer UV wavelengths not absorbed by DNA in the induction of melanoma. These reflections trace the biophysicist's path from molecules to melanoma.

  15. Shedding light on vampires: the phylogeny of vampyrellid amoebae revisited.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sebastian Hess

    Full Text Available With the advent of molecular phylogenetic techniques the polyphyly of naked filose amoebae has been proven. They are interspersed in several supergroups of eukaryotes and most of them already found their place within the tree of life. Although the 'vampire amoebae' have attracted interest since the middle of the 19th century, the phylogenetic position and even the monophyly of this traditional group are still uncertain. In this study clonal co-cultures of eight algivorous vampyrellid amoebae and the respective food algae were established. Culture material was characterized morphologically and a molecular phylogeny was inferred using SSU rDNA sequence comparisons. We found that the limnetic, algivorous vampyrellid amoebae investigated in this study belong to a major clade within the Endomyxa Cavalier-Smith, 2002 (Cercozoa, grouping together with a few soil-dwelling taxa. They split into two robust clades, one containing species of the genus Vampyrella Cienkowski, 1865, the other containing the genus Leptophrys Hertwig & Lesser, 1874, together with terrestrial members. Supported by morphological data these clades are designated as the two families Vampyrellidae Zopf, 1885, and Leptophryidae fam. nov. Furthermore the order Vampyrellida West, 1901 was revised and now corresponds to the major vampyrellid clade within the Endomyxa, comprising the Vampyrellidae and Leptophryidae as well as several environmental sequences. In the light of the presented phylogenetic analyses morphological and ecological aspects, the feeding strategy and nutritional specialization within the vampyrellid amoebae are discussed.

  16. Shedding light on fish otolith biomineralization using a bioenergetic approach

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fablet, R.; Pecquerie, L.; de Pontual, H.

    2011-01-01

    for ecosystem and fisheries monitoring. They however often lack validation and the poor understanding of biomineralization mechanisms has led to striking examples of misinterpretations and subsequent erroneous conclusions in fish ecology and fisheries management. Here we develop and validate a numerical model...... of otolith biomineralization. Based on a general bioenergetic theory, it disentangles the complex interplay between metabolic and temperature effects on biomineralization. This model resolves controversial issues and explains poorly understood observations of otolith formation. It represents a unique...... simulation tool to improve otolith interpretation and applications, and, beyond, to address the effects of both climate change and ocean acidification on other biomineralizing organisms such as corals and bivalves...

  17. Forest Carbon Offsets Revisited: Shedding Light on Darkwoods

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kooten, van G.C.; Bogle, T.; Vries, de F.P.

    2015-01-01

    This paper investigates the viability of carbon offset credits created through forest conservation and preservation. A detailed forest management model based on a case study of a forest estate in southeastern British Columbia, owned by The Nature Conservancy of Canada (NCC) is used to demonstrate th

  18. Shedding light on fish otolith biomineralization using a bioenergetic approach.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ronan Fablet

    Full Text Available Otoliths are biocalcified bodies connected to the sensory system in the inner ears of fish. Their layered, biorhythm-following formation provides individual records of the age, the individual history and the natural environment of extinct and living fish species. Such data are critical for ecosystem and fisheries monitoring. They however often lack validation and the poor understanding of biomineralization mechanisms has led to striking examples of misinterpretations and subsequent erroneous conclusions in fish ecology and fisheries management. Here we develop and validate a numerical model of otolith biomineralization. Based on a general bioenergetic theory, it disentangles the complex interplay between metabolic and temperature effects on biomineralization. This model resolves controversial issues and explains poorly understood observations of otolith formation. It represents a unique simulation tool to improve otolith interpretation and applications, and, beyond, to address the effects of both climate change and ocean acidification on other biomineralizing organisms such as corals and bivalves.

  19. Shedding light on fish otolith biomineralization using a bioenergetic approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fablet, Ronan; Pecquerie, Laure; de Pontual, Hélène; Høie, Hans; Millner, Richard; Mosegaard, Henrik; Kooijman, Sebastiaan A L M

    2011-01-01

    Otoliths are biocalcified bodies connected to the sensory system in the inner ears of fish. Their layered, biorhythm-following formation provides individual records of the age, the individual history and the natural environment of extinct and living fish species. Such data are critical for ecosystem and fisheries monitoring. They however often lack validation and the poor understanding of biomineralization mechanisms has led to striking examples of misinterpretations and subsequent erroneous conclusions in fish ecology and fisheries management. Here we develop and validate a numerical model of otolith biomineralization. Based on a general bioenergetic theory, it disentangles the complex interplay between metabolic and temperature effects on biomineralization. This model resolves controversial issues and explains poorly understood observations of otolith formation. It represents a unique simulation tool to improve otolith interpretation and applications, and, beyond, to address the effects of both climate change and ocean acidification on other biomineralizing organisms such as corals and bivalves.

  20. Shedding Light on Fish Otolith Biomineralization Using a Bioenergetic Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fablet, Ronan; Pecquerie, Laure; de Pontual, Hélène; Høie, Hans; Millner, Richard; Mosegaard, Henrik; Kooijman, Sebastiaan A. L. M.

    2011-01-01

    Otoliths are biocalcified bodies connected to the sensory system in the inner ears of fish. Their layered, biorhythm-following formation provides individual records of the age, the individual history and the natural environment of extinct and living fish species. Such data are critical for ecosystem and fisheries monitoring. They however often lack validation and the poor understanding of biomineralization mechanisms has led to striking examples of misinterpretations and subsequent erroneous conclusions in fish ecology and fisheries management. Here we develop and validate a numerical model of otolith biomineralization. Based on a general bioenergetic theory, it disentangles the complex interplay between metabolic and temperature effects on biomineralization. This model resolves controversial issues and explains poorly understood observations of otolith formation. It represents a unique simulation tool to improve otolith interpretation and applications, and, beyond, to address the effects of both climate change and ocean acidification on other biomineralizing organisms such as corals and bivalves. PMID:22110601

  1. Shedding light on ovothiol biosynthesis in marine metazoans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castellano, Immacolata; Migliaccio, Oriana; D’Aniello, Salvatore; Merlino, Antonello; Napolitano, Alessandra; Palumbo, Anna

    2016-02-01

    Ovothiol, isolated from marine invertebrate eggs, is considered one of the most powerful antioxidant with potential for drug development. However, its biological functions in marine organisms still represent a matter of debate. In sea urchins, the most accepted view is that ovothiol protects the eggs by the high oxidative burst at fertilization. In this work we address the role of ovothiol during sea urchin development to give new insights on ovothiol biosynthesis in metazoans. The gene involved in ovothiol biosynthesis OvoA was identified in Paracentrotus lividus genome (PlOvoA). PlOvoA embryo expression significantly increased at the pluteus stage and was up-regulated by metals at concentrations mimicking polluted sea-water and by cyclic toxic algal blooms, leading to ovothiol biosynthesis. In silico analyses of the PlOvoA upstream region revealed metal and stress responsive elements. Structural protein models highlighted conserved active site residues likely responsible for ovothiol biosynthesis. Phylogenetic analyses indicated that OvoA evolved in most marine metazoans and was lost in bony vertebrates during the transition from the aquatic to terrestrial environment. These results highlight the crucial role of OvoA in protecting embryos released in seawater from environmental cues, thus allowing the survival under different conditions.

  2. Non-linear optical microscopy sheds light on cardiovascular disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valentina Caorsi

    Full Text Available Many cardiac diseases have been associated with increased fibrosis and changes in the organization of fibrillar collagen. The degree of fibrosis is routinely analyzed with invasive histological and immunohistochemical methods, giving a limited and qualitative understanding of the tissue's morphological adaptation to disease. Our aim is to quantitatively evaluate the increase in fibrosis by three-dimensional imaging of the collagen network in the myocardium using the non-linear optical microscopy techniques Two-Photon Excitation microscopy (TPE and Second Harmonic signal Generation (SHG. No sample staining is needed because numerous endogenous fluorophores are excited by a two-photon mechanism and highly non-centrosymmetric structures such as collagen generate strong second harmonic signals. We propose for the first time a 3D quantitative analysis to carefully evaluate the increased fibrosis in tissue from a rat model of heart failure post myocardial infarction. We show how to measure changes in fibrosis from the backward SHG (B(SHG alone, as only backward-propagating SHG is accessible for true in vivo applications. A 5-fold increase in collagen I fibrosis is detected in the remote surviving myocardium measured 20 weeks after infarction. The spatial distribution is also shown to change markedly, providing insight into the morphology of disease progression.

  3. Non-Linear Optical Microscopy Sheds Light on Cardiovascular Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caorsi, Valentina; Toepfer, Christopher; Sikkel, Markus B.; Lyon, Alexander R.; MacLeod, Ken; Ferenczi, Mike A.

    2013-01-01

    Many cardiac diseases have been associated with increased fibrosis and changes in the organization of fibrillar collagen. The degree of fibrosis is routinely analyzed with invasive histological and immunohistochemical methods, giving a limited and qualitative understanding of the tissue's morphological adaptation to disease. Our aim is to quantitatively evaluate the increase in fibrosis by three-dimensional imaging of the collagen network in the myocardium using the non-linear optical microscopy techniques Two-Photon Excitation microscopy (TPE) and Second Harmonic signal Generation (SHG). No sample staining is needed because numerous endogenous fluorophores are excited by a two-photon mechanism and highly non-centrosymmetric structures such as collagen generate strong second harmonic signals. We propose for the first time a 3D quantitative analysis to carefully evaluate the increased fibrosis in tissue from a rat model of heart failure post myocardial infarction. We show how to measure changes in fibrosis from the backward SHG (BSHG) alone, as only backward-propagating SHG is accessible for true in vivo applications. A 5-fold increase in collagen I fibrosis is detected in the remote surviving myocardium measured 20 weeks after infarction. The spatial distribution is also shown to change markedly, providing insight into the morphology of disease progression. PMID:23409139

  4. Shedding Light on Structure-Property Relationships for Conjugated Microporous Polymers: The Importance of Rings and Strain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zwijnenburg, Martijn A; Cheng, Ge; McDonald, Tom O; Jelfs, Kim E; Jiang, Jia-Xing; Ren, Shijie; Hasell, Tom; Blanc, Frédéric; Cooper, Andrew I; Adams, Dave J

    2013-10-08

    The photophysical properties of insoluble porous pyrene networks, which are central to their function, differ strongly from those of analogous soluble linear and branched polymers and dendrimers. This can be rationalized by the presence of strained closed rings in the networks. A combined experimental and computational approach was used to obtain atomic scale insight into the structure of amorphous conjugated microporous polymers. The optical absorption and fluorescence spectra of a series of pyrene-based materials were compared with theoretical time-dependent density functional theory predictions for model clusters. Comparison of computation and experiment sheds light on the probable structural chromophores in the various materials.

  5. Shedding Light on Eco-Innovation in Tourism: A Critical Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria-del-Mar Alonso-Almeida

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The recent global increase in the competitiveness of tourism has made the implementation of eco-innovations a differentiating element among both the destinations and companies in the sector, with quality management and contribution to sustainable development being increasingly valued. However, the eco-innovations that have been developed and implemented in tourist industries have rarely been studied. In this study, the eco-innovations that have been developed and implemented by 57 tourism businesses worldwide are analysed. The identified eco-innovations are classified by using different qualitative methodologies. The obtained results shed light on the limited development of eco-innovations in the tourism industry and the industry focuses mainly on product eco-innovations. Several examples by the tourist sub-industry and types of eco-innovation are analysed. Furthermore, this study provides practical information about measures that both businesses and governmental organisations can adopt to promote eco-innovation in the sector.

  6. Clausius’ Disgregation: A Conceptual Relic that Sheds Light on the Second Law

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emilio Marco Pellegrino

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The present work analyzes the cognitive process that led Clausius towards the translation of the Second Law of Thermodynamics into mathematical expressions. We show that Clausius’ original formal expression of the Second Law was achieved by making extensive use of the concept of disgregation, a quantity which has subsequently disappeared from the thermodynamic language. Our analysis demonstrates that disgregation stands as a crucial logical step of such process and sheds light on the comprehension of such fundamental relation. The introduction of entropy—which occurred three years after the first formalization of the Second Law—was aimed at making the Second Law exploitable in practical contexts. The reasons for the disappearance of disgregation, as well as of other “pre-modern” quantities, from the thermodynamics language are discussed.

  7. Shedding light on the dark side of identity: Introduction to the special issue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crocetti, Elisabetta; Beyers, Wim; Çok, Figen

    2016-02-01

    The aim of this special issue is to shed light in the dark side of identity formation in adolescence and emerging adulthood, that is, to provide some understanding in what exactly can go wrong in identity development. After summarizing the recent developments in identity development literature, in this introduction the main findings of all thirteen empirical papers are summarized into three overarching themes: (1) lack of identity integration as a risk factor, (2) reconsideration of commitment as a sign of identity uncertainty, and (3) ruminative exploration as another risk factor undermining healthy identity development. Finally, given that all papers in this special issue are based on conference presentations at the 14th Biennial Conference of the European Association for Research on Adolescence (EARA), some more information on that conference is included in this introduction.

  8. Unusual modes of reproduction in social insects: shedding light on the evolutionary paradox of sex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wenseleers, Tom; Van Oystaeyen, Annette

    2011-12-01

    The study of alternative genetic systems and mixed modes of reproduction, whereby sexual and asexual reproduction is combined within the same lifecycle, is of fundamental importance as they may shed light on classical evolutionary issues, such as the paradox of sex. Recently, several such cases were discovered in social insects. A closer examination of these systems has revealed many amazing facts, including the mixed use of asexual and sexual reproduction for the production of new queens and workers, males that can clone themselves and the routine use of incest without deleterious genetic consequences. In addition, in several species, remarkable cases of asexually reproducing socially parasitic worker lineages have been discovered. The study of these unusual systems promises to provide insight into many basic evolutionary questions, including the maintenance of sex, the expression of sexual conflict and kin conflict and the evolution of cheating in asexual lineages.

  9. Hellbender genome sequences shed light on genomic expansion at the base of crown salamanders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Cheng; Mueller, Rachel Lockridge

    2014-07-01

    Among animals, genome sizes range from 20 Mb to 130 Gb, with 380-fold variation across vertebrates. Most of the largest vertebrate genomes are found in salamanders, an amphibian clade of 660 species. Thus, salamanders are an important system for studying causes and consequences of genomic gigantism. Previously, we showed that plethodontid salamander genomes accumulate higher levels of long terminal repeat (LTR) retrotransposons than do other vertebrates, although the evolutionary origins of such sequences remained unexplored. We also showed that some salamanders in the family Plethodontidae have relatively slow rates of DNA loss through small insertions and deletions. Here, we present new data from Cryptobranchus alleganiensis, the hellbender. Cryptobranchus and Plethodontidae span the basal phylogenetic split within salamanders; thus, analyses incorporating these taxa can shed light on the genome of the ancestral crown salamander lineage, which underwent expansion. We show that high levels of LTR retrotransposons likely characterize all crown salamanders, suggesting that disproportionate expansion of this transposable element (TE) class contributed to genomic expansion. Phylogenetic and age distribution analyses of salamander LTR retrotransposons indicate that salamanders' high TE levels reflect persistence and diversification of ancestral TEs rather than horizontal transfer events. Finally, we show that relatively slow DNA loss rates through small indels likely characterize all crown salamanders, suggesting that a decreased DNA loss rate contributed to genomic expansion at the clade's base. Our identification of shared genomic features across phylogenetically distant salamanders is a first step toward identifying the evolutionary processes underlying accumulation and persistence of high levels of repetitive sequence in salamander genomes.

  10. Genetic and Epigenetic Diversities Shed Light on Domestication of Cultivated Ginseng (Panax ginseng).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ming-Rui; Shi, Feng-Xue; Zhou, Yu-Xin; Li, Ya-Ling; Wang, Xin-Feng; Zhang, Cui; Wang, Xu-Tong; Liu, Bao; Xiao, Hong-Xing; Li, Lin-Feng

    2015-11-01

    Chinese ginseng (Panax ginseng) is a medically important herb within Panax and has crucial cultural values in East Asia. As the symbol of traditional Chinese medicine, Chinese ginseng has been used as a herbal remedy to restore stamina and capacity in East Asia for thousands of years. To address the evolutionary origin and domestication history of cultivated ginseng, we employed multiple molecular approaches to investigate the genetic structures of cultivated and wild ginseng across their distribution ranges in northeastern Asia. Phylogenetic and population genetic analyses revealed that the four cultivated ginseng landraces, COMMON, BIANTIAO, SHIZHU, and GAOLI (also known as Korean ginseng), were not domesticated independently and Fusong Town is likely one of the primary domestication centers. In addition, our results from population genetic and epigenetic analyses demonstrated that cultivated ginseng maintained high levels of genetic and epigenetic diversity, but showed distinct cytosine methylation patterns compared with wild ginseng. The patterns of genetic and epigenetic variation revealed by this study have shed light on the domestication history of cultivated ginseng, which may serve as a framework for future genetic improvements.

  11. Integrative analyses shed new light on human ribosomal protein gene regulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xin; Zheng, Yiyu; Hu, Haiyan; Li, Xiaoman

    2016-01-01

    Ribosomal protein genes (RPGs) are important house-keeping genes that are well-known for their coordinated expression. Previous studies on RPGs are largely limited to their promoter regions. Recent high-throughput studies provide an unprecedented opportunity to study how human RPGs are transcriptionally modulated and how such transcriptional regulation may contribute to the coordinate gene expression in various tissues and cell types. By analyzing the DNase I hypersensitive sites under 349 experimental conditions, we predicted 217 RPG regulatory regions in the human genome. More than 86.6% of these computationally predicted regulatory regions were partially corroborated by independent experimental measurements. Motif analyses on these predicted regulatory regions identified 31 DNA motifs, including 57.1% of experimentally validated motifs in literature that regulate RPGs. Interestingly, we observed that the majority of the predicted motifs were shared by the predicted distal and proximal regulatory regions of the same RPGs, a likely general mechanism for enhancer-promoter interactions. We also found that RPGs may be differently regulated in different cells, indicating that condition-specific RPG regulatory regions still need to be discovered and investigated. Our study advances the understanding of how RPGs are coordinately modulated, which sheds light to the general principles of gene transcriptional regulation in mammals. PMID:27346035

  12. Fossils from the Middle Jurassic of China shed light on morphology of Choristopsychidae (Insecta, Mecoptera)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiao, Xiao; Shih, Chung Kun; Petrulevičius, Julian F.; Dong, Ren

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Choristopsychidae, established by Martynov in 1937 with a single isolated forewing, is a little known extinct family in Mecoptera. Since then, no new members of this enigmatic family have been described. Based on 23 well-preserved specimens with complete body and wings from the Middle Jurassic of northeastern China, we report one new genus and three new species of Choristopsychidae, two new species of the genus Choristopsyche Martynov, 1937: Choristopsyche perfecta sp. n. and Choristopsyche asticta sp. n.; one new species of Paristopsyche gen. n.: Paristopsyche angelineae sp. n.; and re-describe Choristopsyche tenuinervis Martynov, 1937. In addition, we emend the diagnoses of Choristopsychidae and Choristopsyche. Analyzing the forewing length/width ratios of representative species in Mecoptera, we confirm that choristopsychids have the lowest ratio of forewing length/width, meaning broadest forewings. These findings, the first fossil choristopsychids with well-preserved body structure and the first record of Choristopsychidae in China, shed light on the morphology of these taxa and broaden their distribution from Tajikistan to China, while increasing the diversity of Mesozoic Mecoptera in China. PMID:23950679

  13. Ethical considerations in biobanks: how a public health ethics perspective sheds new light on old controversies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Virani, Alice Hawkins; Longstaff, Holly

    2015-06-01

    Biobanks, collections of biospecimens with or without linked medical data, have increased dramatically in number in the last two decades. Their potential power to identify the underlying mechanisms of both rare and common disease has catalyzed their proliferation in the academic, medical, and private sectors. Despite demonstrated public support of biobanks, some within the academic, governmental, and public realms have also expressed cautions associated with the ethical, legal, and social (ELSI) implications of biobanks. These issues include concerns related to the privacy and confidentiality of data; return of results and incidental findings to participants; data sharing and secondary use of samples; informed consent mechanisms; ownership of specimens; and benefit sharing (i.e., the distribution of financial or other assets that result from the research). Such apprehensions become amplified as more researchers seek to pursue national and cross-border collaborations between biobanks. This paper provides an overview of two of the most contentious topics in biobank literature - informed consent and return of individual research results or incidental findings - and explores how a public health ethics lens may help to shed new light on how these issues may be best approached and managed. Doing so also demonstrates the important role that genetic counselors can play in the ongoing discussion of ethically appropriate biobank recruitment and management strategies, as well as identifies important areas of ongoing empirical research on these unresolved topics.

  14. A previously undescribed organic residue sheds light on heat treatment in the Middle Stone Age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Patrick; Porraz, Guillaume; Bellot-Gurlet, Ludovic; February, Edmund; Ligouis, Bertrand; Paris, Céline; Texier, Pierre-Jean; Parkington, John E; Miller, Christopher E; Nickel, Klaus G; Conard, Nicholas J

    2015-08-01

    South Africa has in recent years gained increasing importance for our understanding of the evolution of 'modern human behaviour' during the Middle Stone Age (MSA). A key element in the suite of behaviours linked with modern humans is heat treatment of materials such as ochre for ritual purposes and stone prior to tool production. Until now, there has been no direct archaeological evidence for the exact procedure used in the heat treatment of silcrete. Through the analysis of heat-treated artefacts from the Howiesons Poort of Diepkloof Rock Shelter, we identified a hitherto unknown type of organic residue - a tempering-residue - that sheds light on the processes used for heat treatment in the MSA. This black film on the silcrete surface is an organic tar that contains microscopic fragments of charcoal and formed as a residue during the direct contact of the artefacts with hot embers of green wood. Our results suggest that heat treatment of silcrete was conducted directly using an open fire, similar to those likely used for cooking. These findings add to the discussion about the complexity of MSA behaviour and appear to contradict previous studies that had suggested that heat treatment of silcrete was a complex (i.e., requiring a large number of steps for its realization) and resource-consuming procedure.

  15. Navigating the gender minefield: An IPV prevention campaign sheds light on the gender gap.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keller, Sarah N; Honea, Joy C

    2016-01-01

    This article examines how differences in male and female views about intimate partner violence (IPV) contributed to divergent responses to a prevention campaign conducted in the western USA. The study examines focus groups (n = 22) and in-depth interview data (n = 13) collected during campaign development to shed light on quantitative results indicating that women (but not men) increased their perceived severity of domestic violence and awareness of services from pre-test to post-test, while male attitudes moved in the opposite direction. Results of the qualitative study provide the basis for the authors' conclusions about why reactions differed: (1) men's unwillingness to view abuse within a gender context limits men's ability to accept the inequity in statistically demonstrated male and female roles as perpetrators and victims; (2) male resentment of existing gender stereotypes contributed to a rejection of campaign messages that utilised gender prevalence statistics to depict images showing men as perpetrators and women as victims; and (3) victim blaming attitudes contributed to resistance to empathy for victims depicted in the campaign. The authors offer suggestions for future campaigns that foster agency among both perpetrators and survivors while confronting the structural barriers to enacting change.

  16. How counterfactuals of Red-Queen theory shed light on science and its historiography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dagg, Joachim L

    2017-08-01

    A historical episode of evolutionary theory, which has lead to the Red Queen theory of the evolutionary maintenance of sex, includes two striking contingencies. These are used to explore alternative what-if scenarios, in order to test some common opinions about such counterfactuals. This sheds new light on the nature of science and its historiography. One counterfactual leads to an unexpected convergence of its result to that of the actual science but, nevertheless, differs in its causal structure. The other diverges towards an incompatible alternative, but this requires further contingent choices that also diverge from actual science. The convergence in the first counterfactual is due to a horizontal transfer of knowledge. Similar transfers of knowledge are typical for innovations of actual science. This suggests that contingent choices can merge as well as fork research traditions both in actual research and counterfactual history. Neither the paths of the actual history of science nor those of its counterfactual alternatives will form a tree of exclusively diverging bifurcations, but a network instead. Convergencies in counterfactuals may, therefore, be due to the web-structure of science as much as to the aims of the historians in question. Furthermore, the difference in causal structure between the actual science and its convergent counterfactual might become diagnostic for external factors rather than internal aims forcing a historian towards convergence. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Fossils from the Middle Jurassic of China shed light on morphology of Choristopsychidae (Insecta, Mecoptera

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao Qiao

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Choristopsychidae, established by Martynov in 1937 with a single isolated forewing, is a little known extinct family in Mecoptera. Since then, no new members of this enigmatic family have been described. Based on 23 well-preserved specimens with complete body and wings from the Middle Jurassic of northeastern China, we report one new genus and three new species of Choristopsychidae, two new species of the genus Choristopsyche Martynov, 1937: C. perfecta sp. n. and C. asticta sp. n.; one new species of Paristopsyche gen. n.: P. angelineae sp. n.; and re-describe C. tenuinervis Martynov, 1937. In addition, we emend the diagnoses of Choristopsychidae and Choristopsyche. Analyzing the forewing length/width ratios of representative species in Mecoptera, we confirm that choristopsychids have the lowest ratio of forewing length/width, meaning broadest forewings. These findings, the first fossil choristopsychids with well-preserved body structure and the first record of Choristopsychidae in China, shed light on the morphology of these taxa and broaden their distribution from Tajikistan to China, while increasing the diversity of Mesozoic Mecoptera in China.

  18. Depression, Anxiety, and Stress Symptoms in Menopausal Arab Women: Shedding More Light on a Complex Relationship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bener, A; Saleh, N M; Bakir, A; Bhugra, D

    2016-01-01

    The association between depression, anxiety, and stress among Arab menopause and postmenopausal women have been explored in detailed. The objective of this study was to determine the correlation between depression, anxiety, and stress in menopausal and postmenopausal women and shedding more light on a complex relationship. A cross-sectional descriptive study was used to generate menopause symptoms experienced by Arabian women at the primary health care centers in Qatar. A representative sample of 1468 women aged 45-65 years were approached during July 2012 and May 2014 and 1101 women agreed to participate (75.0%) and responded to the study. Depression, anxiety, and stress were measured using the Depression Anxiety Stress Scales 21. Data on body mass index (BMI), clinical and other parameters were used. Univariate, multivariate, and matrix correlation analysis were performed for statistical analysis. A total of 1101 women agreed to participate after informed consent was obtained. The mean age and standard deviation (SD) of the menopausal age were 49.55 (3.12), the mean and SD of postmenopausal age was 58.08 (3.26) (P women. Furthermore, there were no differences between the groups regarding the frequency of certain levels of stress among menopause and postmenopause. The multivariate regression analyses revealed that age in years, diastolic BP, consanguinity, regular exercise were a predictor for depression. Meanwhile, diastolic BP, occupation, and physical activity considered the main risk factors for anxiety. Furthermore, age in years, occupation, and sheesha smoking habits were considered as the main risk factors associated with stress. A large number of factors were associated with experiencing menopausal and psycho-social problems and which had negative effects on the quality of life among Arabian women. Depression, anxiety, and stress should be considered as important risk factors for osteoporosis.

  19. Shedding light on fractals: exploration of the Sierpinski carpet optical antenna

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Ting Lee

    2015-01-01

    We describe experimental and theoretical investigations of the properties of a fractal optical antenna-the Sierpinski carpet optical antenna. Fractal optical antennas are inspired by fractal antennas designed in radio frequency (RF) region. Shrinking the size of fractal optical antennas from fractal antennas in RF regions by a factor of lE-5 arises challenges of fabrication, characterization and modelling their response to incident light. The comparison between optical antennas with the Sierp...

  20. Afterglow Observations Shed New Light on the Nature of X-ray Flashes

    CERN Document Server

    Granot, J; Perna, R; Granot, Jonathan; Ramirez-Ruiz, Enrico; Perna, Rosalba

    2005-01-01

    X-ray flashes (XRFs) and X-ray rich gamma-ray bursts (XRGRBs) share many observational characteristics with long duration GRBs, but the reason for which their prompt emission peaks at lower photon energies, $E_p$, is still under debate. Although many different models have been invoked in order to explain the lower $E_p$ values, their implications for the afterglow emission were not considered in most cases, mainly because observations of XRF afterglows have become available only recently. Here we examine the predictions of the various XRF models for the afterglow emission, and test them against the observations of XRF 030723 and XRGRB 041006, the events with the best monitored afterglow light curves in their respective class. We show that most existing XRF models are hard to reconcile with the observed afterglow light curves, which are very flat at early times. Such light curves are, however, naturally produced by a roughly uniform jet with relatively sharp edges that is viewed off-axis (i.e. from outside of ...

  1. German physicians "on strike"--shedding light on the roots of physician dissatisfaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janus, Katharina; Amelung, Volker Eric; Gaitanides, Michael; Schwartz, Friedrich Wilhelm

    2007-08-01

    , continuous education and job security, administrative tasks and collegial relationships were highly significant, specialized technology and patient contact were significant and research and teaching and international exchange were not significant in contributing to physician job satisfaction. This study sheds light to the underlying factors that contribute to physician job satisfaction in Germany, and it provides insights into the reasons for physicians leaving medical practice. In order for a health system to recruit and retain physicians, it may be necessary for a system's physician strategy to shift from focusing primarily on hard, monetary and compensation-related factors to a broader focus that incorporates the soft, non-monetary factors. The implementation of policies and management practices that reduce the time burden on physicians, and enhance physicians' participation in the development of patient care management processes and in managerial decisions that affect patient care appears to be crucial. The result will be increased job satisfaction among physicians, which is important to the future recruitment and retention of doctors, as well as to the productivity and quality of the services provided by this essential component of our medical care systems.

  2. General relativistic considerations of the field shedding model of fast radio bursts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Punsly, Brian; Bini, Donato

    2016-06-01

    Popular models of fast radio bursts (FRBs) involve the gravitational collapse of neutron star progenitors to black holes. It has been proposed that the shedding of the strong neutron star magnetic field (B) during the collapse is the power source for the radio emission. Previously, these models have utilized the simplicity of the Schwarzschild metric which has the restriction that the magnetic flux is magnetic `hair' that must be shed before final collapse. But neutron stars have angular momentum and charge and a fully relativistic Kerr-Newman solution exists in which B has its source inside of the event horizon. In this Letter, we consider the magnetic flux to be shed as a consequence of the electric discharge of a metastable collapsed state of a Kerr-Newman black hole. It has also been argued that the shedding model will not operate due to pair creation. By considering the pulsar death line, we find that for a neutron star with B = 1011-1013 G and a long rotation period, >1s this is not a concern. We also discuss the observational evidence supporting the plausibility of magnetic flux shedding models of FRBs that are spawned from rapidly rotating progenitors.

  3. Shedding (far-red) light on phytochrome mechanisms and responses in land plants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Possart, A.; Fleck, C.; Hiltbrunner, A.

    2014-01-01

    In order to monitor ambient light conditions, plants rely on functionally diversified photoreceptors. Among these, phytochromes perceive red (R) and far-red (FR) light. FR light does not constitute a photosynthetic energy source; it however influences adaptive and developmental processes. In seed pl

  4. Shedding light on avian influenza H4N6 infection in mallards: modes of transmission and implications for surveillance.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaci K VanDalen

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Wild mallards (Anas platyrhychos are considered one of the primary reservoir species for avian influenza viruses (AIV. Because AIV circulating in wild birds pose an indirect threat to agriculture and human health, understanding the ecology of AIV and developing risk assessments and surveillance systems for prevention of disease is critical. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In this study, mallards were experimentally infected with an H4N6 subtype of AIV by oral inoculation or contact with an H4N6 contaminated water source. Cloacal swabs, oropharyngeal swabs, fecal samples, and water samples were collected daily and tested by real-time RT-PCR (RRT-PCR for estimation of viral shedding. Fecal samples had significantly higher virus concentrations than oropharyngeal or cloacal swabs and 6 month old ducks shed significantly more viral RNA than 3 month old ducks regardless of sample type. Use of a water source contaminated by AIV infected mallards, was sufficient to transmit virus to naïve mallards, which shed AIV at higher or similar levels as orally-inoculated ducks. CONCLUSIONS: Bodies of water could serve as a transmission pathway for AIV in waterfowl. For AIV surveillance purposes, water samples and fecal samples appear to be excellent alternatives or additions to cloacal and oropharyngeal swabbing. Furthermore, duck age (even within hatch-year birds may be important when interpreting viral shedding results from experimental infections or surveillance. Differential shedding among hatch-year mallards could affect prevalence estimates, modeling of AIV spread, and subsequent risk assessments.

  5. Variable Ly alpha sheds light on the environment surrounding GRB 090426

    CERN Document Server

    Thöne, C C; Lazzati, D; Postigo, A de Ugarte; Fynbo, J P U; Christensen, L; Levan, A J; Aloy, M A; Hjorth, J; Jakobsson, P; Levesque, E M; Malesani, D; Milvang-Jensen, B; Roming, P W A; Tanvir, N R; Wiersema, K; Gladders, M; Wuyts, E; Dahle, H

    2011-01-01

    Long duration gamma-ray bursts are commonly associated with the deaths of massive stars. Spectroscopic studies using the afterglow as a light source provide a unique opportunity to unveil the medium surrounding it, probing the densest region of their galaxies. This material is usually in a low ionisation state and at large distances from the burst site, hence representing the normal interstellar medium in the galaxy. Here we present the case of GRB 090426 at z=2.609, whose optical spectrum indicates an almost fully ionised medium together with a low column density of neutral hydrogen. For the first time, we also observe variations in the Ly alpha absorption line. Photoionisation modeling shows that we are probing material from the vicinity of the burst (~80 pc). The host galaxy is a complex of two luminous interacting galaxies, which might suggest that this burst could have occurred in an isolated star-forming region outside its host galaxy created in the interaction of the two galaxies.

  6. EPA's SHEDS-multimedia model: children's cumulative pyrethroid exposure estimates and evaluation against NHANES biomarker data

    Science.gov (United States)

    The U.S. EPA's SHEDS-Multimedia model was applied to enhance the understanding of children's exposures and doses to multiple pyrethroid pesticides, including major contributing chemicals and pathways. This paper presents combined dietary and residential exposure estimates and cum...

  7. Son Preference in India: Shedding Light on the North-South Gradient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela Klaus

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Dieser Beitrag liegt nur in englischer Sprache vor. Son preference is widespread in India and deep-rooted in its history. It is a matter of concern because it produces an imbalanced juvenile sex ratio. There are far fewer girls than boys. The figures vary greatly among the Indian states suggesting a major north-south gradient in son preference accompanied by a minor west-east gradient. The aim of this paper is to explain the regional pattern. We provide an application of the value of children-approach according to which the decision to have children is made on the calculus of benefits and costs related to children. In the light of the socioeconomic and sociocultural background in India, we propose that (potential parents’ expectations of benefits and costs are biased in favour of sons. This is suggested, therefore, as the key motivation for the preference for male offspring. However, region-specifics in the level of affluence, the educational level, the mode of production, the meaning and importance of religion, and the kinship regime are assumed to produce stronger son preference in north India compared to south India. This mediation-model is tested using the Indian sub-sample of the international Value of Children-study. Data were collected in Uttar Pradesh (north-central India and Puducherry (south-east India. Mothers aged 16 to 65 were interviewed in 2002 and 2010. Based on 1,173 respondents, a structural equation model was carried out to test the hypothesised composition effects related to the region and the mediating position of sex-specific benefits and costs. Initial findings confirm that the national son preference pattern is more likely to be found among north Indian mothers than south Indian mothers. As assumed, the sex-specific balance of benefits and costs contributes to the explanation of son preference. However, there is little evidence that the benefits and costs mediate between the region-specific socioeconomic and

  8. General Relativistic Considerations of the Field Shedding Model of Fast Radio Bursts

    CERN Document Server

    Punsly, Brian

    2016-01-01

    Popular models of fast radio bursts (FRBs) involve the gravitational collapse of neutron star progenitors to black holes. It has been proposed that the shedding of the strong neutron star magnetic field ($B$) during the collapse is the power source for the radio emission. Previously, these models have utilized the simplicity of the Schwarzschild metric which has the restriction that the magnetic flux is magnetic "hair" that must be shed before final collapse. But, neutron stars have angular momentum and charge and a fully relativistic Kerr Newman solution exists in which $B$ has its source inside of the event horizon. In this letter, we consider the magnetic flux to be shed as a consequence of the electric discharge of a metastable collapsed state of a Kerr Newman black hole. It has also been argued that the shedding model will not operate due to pair creation. By considering the pulsar death line, we find that for a neutron star with $B = 10^{11} - 10^{13}$ G and a long rotation period, $>1$ s this is not a ...

  9. Model-based control of vortex shedding at low Reynolds numbers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Illingworth, Simon J.

    2016-10-01

    Model-based feedback control of vortex shedding at low Reynolds numbers is considered. The feedback signal is provided by velocity measurements in the wake, and actuation is achieved using blowing and suction on the cylinder's surface. Using two-dimensional direct numerical simulations and reduced-order modelling techniques, linear models of the wake are formed at Reynolds numbers between 45 and 110. These models are used to design feedback controllers using {H}_∞ loop-shaping. Complete suppression of shedding is demonstrated up to Re = 110—both for a single-sensor arrangement and for a three-sensor arrangement. The robustness of the feedback controllers is also investigated by applying them over a range of off-design Reynolds numbers, and good robustness properties are seen. It is also observed that it becomes increasingly difficult to achieve acceptable control performance—measured in a suitable way—as Reynolds number increases.

  10. Shedding new light on viruses: super-resolution microscopy for studying human immunodeficiency virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Barbara; Heilemann, Mike

    2013-10-01

    For more than 70 years electron microscopy (EM) techniques have played an important role in investigating structures of enveloped viruses. By contrast, use of fluorescence microscopy (FM) methods for this purpose was limited by the fact that the size of virus particles is generally around or below the diffraction limit of light microscopy. Various super-resolution (SR) fluorescence imaging techniques developed over the past two decades bypass the diffraction limit of light microscopy, allowing visualization of subviral details and bridging the gap between conventional FM and EM methods. We summarize here findings on human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-1) obtained using SR-FM techniques. Although the number of published studies is currently limited and some of the pioneering analyses also covered methodological or descriptive aspects, recent publications clearly indicate the potential to approach open questions in HIV-1 replication from a new angle.

  11. Hippocampal formation: shedding light on the influence of sex and stress on the brain

    OpenAIRE

    2007-01-01

    The hippocampus is a malleable brain region that responds to external agents such as hormones and stressors. Investigations that began in our laboratories with the Golgi technique and an appreciation of hippocampal neuroanatomy at the light and electron microscopic levels have led us down a path that has uncovered unexpected structural plasticity in the adult brain along with unanticipated cellular and molecular mechanisms of this plasticity and of hormone mediation of these effects. This cha...

  12. Shedding (far-red) light on phytochrome mechanisms and responses in land plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Possart, Anja; Fleck, Christian; Hiltbrunner, Andreas

    2014-03-01

    In order to monitor ambient light conditions, plants rely on functionally diversified photoreceptors. Among these, phytochromes perceive red (R) and far-red (FR) light. FR light does not constitute a photosynthetic energy source; it however influences adaptive and developmental processes. In seed plants, phytochrome A (phyA) acts as FR receptor and mediates FR high irradiance responses (FR-HIRs). It exerts a dual role by promoting e.g. germination and seedling de-etiolation in canopy shade and by antagonising shade avoidance growth. Even though cryptogam plants such as mosses and ferns do not have phyA, they show FR-induced responses. In the present review we discuss the mechanistic basis of phyA-dependent FR-HIRs as well as their dual role in seed plants. We compare FR responses in seed plants and cryptogam plants and conclude on different potential concepts for the detection of canopy shade. Scenarios for the evolution of FR perception and responses are discussed.

  13. Cerebral malaria and the hemolysis/methemoglobin/heme hypothesis: shedding new light on an old disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pamplona, Ana; Hanscheid, Thomas; Epiphanio, Sabrina; Mota, Maria M; Vigário, Ana M

    2009-04-01

    Malaria causes more than 1 million deaths every year with cerebral malaria (CM) being a major cause of death in Sub-Saharan African children. The nature of the malaria-associated pathogenesis is complex and multi-factorial. A unified hypothesis involving sequestration of infected red blood cells, systemic host inflammatory response and hemostasis dysfunction has been proposed to explain the genesis of CM. In this review, we discuss the role of hemolysis, methemoglobin and free heme in CM, brought to light by our recent studies in mice as well as by other studies in humans.

  14. Evaluation of the Modeling of Exposure to Environmental Tobacco Smoke (ETS) in the SHEDS-PM Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Ye; Frey, H Christopher; Liu, Xiaozhen; Deshpande, Bela K

    2009-06-01

    Environmental tobacco smoke (ETS) is estimated to be a major contributor to indoor PM concentration and human exposures to fine particulate matter of 2.5 microns or smaller (PM2.5). The Stochastic Human Exposure and Dose Simulation for Particulate Matter (SHEDS-PM) model developed by the US Environmental Protection Agency estimates distributions of outdoor and indoor PM2.5 exposure for a specified population based on ambient concentrations and indoor emissions sources. Because indoor exposures to ETS can be high, especially in indoor residential microenvironments, a critical assessment was conducted of the methodology and data used in SHEDS-PM for estimation of indoor exposure to ETS. For the residential microenvironment, SHEDS uses a mass-balance approach which is comparable to best practices. The default inputs in SHEDS-PM were reviewed and more recent and extensive data sources were identified. Sensitivity analysis was used to determine which inputs should be prioritized for updating. Data regarding the cigarette emission rate was found to be the most important. SHEDS-PM does not currently account for in-vehicle ETS exposure; however, in-vehicle ETS-related PM2.5 levels can exceed those in residential microenvironments by a factor of 10 or more. Therefore, a mass-balance based methodology for estimating in-vehicle ETS PM2.5 concentration is evaluated. Recommendations are made regarding updating of input data and algorithms related to ETS exposure in the SHEDS-PM model.

  15. Modeling LED street lighting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno, Ivan; Avendaño-Alejo, Maximino; Saucedo-A, Tonatiuh; Bugarin, Alejandra

    2014-07-10

    LED luminaires may deliver precise illumination patterns to control light pollution, comfort, visibility, and light utilization efficiency. Here, we provide simple equations to determine how the light distributes in the streets. In particular, we model the illuminance spatial distribution as a function of Cartesian coordinates on a floor, road, or street. The equations show explicit dependence on the luminary position (pole height and arm length), luminary angle (fixture tilt), and the angular intensity profile (radiation pattern) of the LED luminary. To achieve this, we propose two mathematical representations to model the sophisticated intensity profiles of LED luminaries. Furthermore, we model the light utilization efficiency, illumination uniformity, and veiling luminance of glare due to one or several LED streetlamps.

  16. Can sea quark asymmetry shed light on the orbital angular momentum of the proton?

    CERN Document Server

    Nocera, Emanuele R

    2016-01-01

    A striking prediction of several extensions of the constituent quark model, including the unquenched quark model, the pion cloud model and the chiral quark model, is a proportionality relationship between the quark sea asymmetry and the orbital angular momentum of the proton. We investigate to which extent a relationship of this kind is corroborated by the experiment, through a systematic comparison between expectations based on models and predictions obtained from a global analysis of hard-scattering data in perturbative Quantum Chromodynamics. We find that the data allows the angular momentum of the proton to be proportional to its sea asymmetry, though with a rather large range of the optimal values of the proportionality coefficient. Typical values do not enable us to discriminate among expectations based on different models. In order to make our comparison conclusive, the extrapolation uncertainties on the proportionality coefficient should be reduced, hopefully by means of accurate measurements in the r...

  17. Shedding light on a new treatment for diabetic wound healing: a review on phototherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houreld, Nicolette N

    2014-01-01

    Impaired wound healing is a common complication associated with diabetes with complex pathophysiological underlying mechanisms and often necessitates amputation. With the advancement in laser technology, irradiation of these wounds with low-intensity laser irradiation (LILI) or phototherapy, has shown a vast improvement in wound healing. At the correct laser parameters, LILI has shown to increase migration, viability, and proliferation of diabetic cells in vitro; there is a stimulatory effect on the mitochondria with a resulting increase in adenosine triphosphate (ATP). In addition, LILI also has an anti-inflammatory and protective effect on these cells. In light of the ever present threat of diabetic foot ulcers, infection, and amputation, new improved therapies and the fortification of wound healing research deserves better prioritization. In this review we look at the complications associated with diabetic wound healing and the effect of laser irradiation both in vitro and in vivo in diabetic wound healing.

  18. Shedding Light on a New Treatment for Diabetic Wound Healing: A Review on Phototherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicolette N. Houreld

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Impaired wound healing is a common complication associated with diabetes with complex pathophysiological underlying mechanisms and often necessitates amputation. With the advancement in laser technology, irradiation of these wounds with low-intensity laser irradiation (LILI or phototherapy, has shown a vast improvement in wound healing. At the correct laser parameters, LILI has shown to increase migration, viability, and proliferation of diabetic cells in vitro; there is a stimulatory effect on the mitochondria with a resulting increase in adenosine triphosphate (ATP. In addition, LILI also has an anti-inflammatory and protective effect on these cells. In light of the ever present threat of diabetic foot ulcers, infection, and amputation, new improved therapies and the fortification of wound healing research deserves better prioritization. In this review we look at the complications associated with diabetic wound healing and the effect of laser irradiation both in vitro and in vivo in diabetic wound healing.

  19. Shedding Light on Increasing Trends of Phosphorus Concentration in Upper Austrian Rivers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthias Zessner

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Phosphorus (P impairment of surface waters still represents a major concern worldwide, despite decades of awareness and implementation of remedial measures. In view of this situation, it is all the more necessary to provide decision makers with reliable modelling tools, which can correctly estimate the effect of alternative management strategies. This work tests the performance of the semi-empirical model MONERIS (Modelling of Nutrient Emissions in River Systems in depicting and quantifying trends of instream total phosphorus (TP concentration in three catchments located in Upper Austria, a region affected by high agricultural nutrients emissions. The model correctly depicts both the existence of increasing trends (4–µ g TP L − 1 year − 1 and the lack thereof (<0.1 µ g TP L − 1 year − 1 in different sub-catchments within the period 2001–2014, although it systematically underestimates the trends magnitude. Furthermore, MONERIS together with an optimized data management system has allowed identifying the probable cause of such trends. The results suggest that, despite considerable improvements achieved through enhanced P removal from wastewater and through the implementation of an agri-environmental programme, changes in land use and in cultivated crop types have led to an offsetting increase of erosion-driven emissions. This methodology offers high potential to predict the effect of different management scenarios, but further model fine-tuning concerning erosion and retention processes is required to improve the model accuracy.

  20. Field warming experiments shed light on the wheat yield response to temperature in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Chuang; Piao, Shilong; Huang, Yao; Wang, Xuhui; Ciais, Philippe; Huang, Mengtian; Zeng, Zhenzhong; Peng, Shushi

    2016-11-01

    Wheat growth is sensitive to temperature, but the effect of future warming on yield is uncertain. Here, focusing on China, we compiled 46 observations of the sensitivity of wheat yield to temperature change (SY,T, yield change per °C) from field warming experiments and 102 SY,T estimates from local process-based and statistical models. The average SY,T from field warming experiments, local process-based models and statistical models is -0.7+/-7.8(+/-s.d.)% per °C, -5.7+/-6.5% per °C and 0.4+/-4.4% per °C, respectively. Moreover, SY,T is different across regions and warming experiments indicate positive SY,T values in regions where growing-season mean temperature is low, and water supply is not limiting, and negative values elsewhere. Gridded crop model simulations from the Inter-Sectoral Impact Model Intercomparison Project appear to capture the spatial pattern of SY,T deduced from warming observations. These results from local manipulative experiments could be used to improve crop models in the future.

  1. Evidence of Coat Color Variation Sheds New Light on Ancient Canids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ollivier, Morgane; Tresset, Anne; Hitte, Christophe; Petit, Coraline; Hughes, Sandrine; Gillet, Benjamin; Duffraisse, Marilyne; Pionnier-Capitan, Maud; Lagoutte, Laetitia; Arbogast, Rose-Marie; Balasescu, Adrian; Boroneant, Adina; Mashkour, Marjan; Vigne, Jean-Denis; Hänni, Catherine

    2013-01-01

    We have used a paleogenetics approach to investigate the genetic landscape of coat color variation in ancient Eurasian dog and wolf populations. We amplified DNA fragments of two genes controlling coat color, Mc1r (Melanocortin 1 Receptor) and CBD103 (canine-β-defensin), in respectively 15 and 19 ancient canids (dogs and wolf morphotypes) from 14 different archeological sites, throughout Asia and Europe spanning from ca. 12 000 B.P. (end of Upper Palaeolithic) to ca. 4000 B.P. (Bronze Age). We provide evidence of a new variant (R301C) of the Melanocortin 1 receptor (Mc1r) and highlight the presence of the beta-defensin melanistic mutation (CDB103-K locus) on ancient DNA from dog-and wolf-morphotype specimens. We show that the dominant KB allele (CBD103), which causes melanism, and R301C (Mc1r), the variant that may cause light hair color, are present as early as the beginning of the Holocene, over 10 000 years ago. These results underline the genetic diversity of prehistoric dogs. This diversity may have partly stemmed not only from the wolf gene pool captured by domestication but also from mutations very likely linked to the relaxation of natural selection pressure occurring in-line with this process. PMID:24098367

  2. Evidence of coat color variation sheds new light on ancient canids.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morgane Ollivier

    Full Text Available We have used a paleogenetics approach to investigate the genetic landscape of coat color variation in ancient Eurasian dog and wolf populations. We amplified DNA fragments of two genes controlling coat color, Mc1r (Melanocortin 1 Receptor and CBD103 (canine-β-defensin, in respectively 15 and 19 ancient canids (dogs and wolf morphotypes from 14 different archeological sites, throughout Asia and Europe spanning from ca. 12 000 B.P. (end of Upper Palaeolithic to ca. 4000 B.P. (Bronze Age. We provide evidence of a new variant (R301C of the Melanocortin 1 receptor (Mc1r and highlight the presence of the beta-defensin melanistic mutation (CDB103-K locus on ancient DNA from dog-and wolf-morphotype specimens. We show that the dominant K(B allele (CBD103, which causes melanism, and R301C (Mc1r, the variant that may cause light hair color, are present as early as the beginning of the Holocene, over 10,000 years ago. These results underline the genetic diversity of prehistoric dogs. This diversity may have partly stemmed not only from the wolf gene pool captured by domestication but also from mutations very likely linked to the relaxation of natural selection pressure occurring in-line with this process.

  3. Frequent Zika Virus Sexual Transmission and Prolonged Viral RNA Shedding in an Immunodeficient Mouse Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nisha K. Duggal

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Circulation of Zika virus (ZIKV was first identified in the Western hemisphere in late 2014. Primarily transmitted through mosquito bite, ZIKV can also be transmitted through sex and from mother to fetus, and maternal ZIKV infection has been associated with fetal malformations. We assessed immunodeficient AG129 mice for their capacity to shed ZIKV in semen and to infect female mice via sexual transmission. Infectious virus was detected in semen between 7 and 21 days post-inoculation, and ZIKV RNA was detected in semen through 58 days post-inoculation. During mating, 73% of infected males transmitted ZIKV to uninfected females, and 50% of females became infected, with evidence of fetal infection in resulting pregnancies. Semen from vasectomized mice contained significantly lower levels of infectious virus, though sexual transmission still occurred. This model provides a platform for studying the kinetics of ZIKV sexual transmission and prolonged RNA shedding also observed in human semen.

  4. Shedding light on the $b\\to s$ anomalies with a dark sector

    CERN Document Server

    Aristizabal Sierra, D.; Vicente, Avelino

    2015-01-01

    The LHCb collaboration has recently reported on some anomalies in $b\\to s$ transitions. In addition to discrepancies with the Standard Model (SM) predictions in some angular observables and branching ratios, an intriguing hint for lepton universality violation was found. Here we propose a simple model that extends the SM with a dark sector charged under an additional $U(1)$ gauge symmetry. The spontaneous breaking of this symmetry gives rise to a massive $Z^\\prime$ boson, which communicates the SM particles with a valid dark matter candidate, while solving the $b\\to s$ anomalies with contributions to the relevant observables.

  5. Individual Subject Meta-Analysis of Parameters for Giardia duodenalis Shedding in Animal Experimental Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. D. Adell

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Giardia duodenalis is a zoonotic protozoan parasite with public health importance worldwide. While articles about animal model infectivity have been published for G. duodenalis, the studies have used diverse protocols and parameters to evaluate the infectivity of this protozoan parasite. Hence, the objectives of this study were to (1 conduct a meta-analysis of published literature for cyst shedding and diarrhea outcomes in animal models and (2 develop recommendations to help standardize experimental dose response studies. Results showed that, for the outcome of cyst shedding in faeces, the covariates of infective stage (cyst versus trophozoite, Giardia dose, and the interactions between doses and infective stage, as well as dose and species of experimental host, were all significant (P value ≤ 0.05. This study suggests inoculation of the experimental host with cysts rather than trophozoites and administration of higher doses of Giardia will most likely result in cyst shedding. Based on the results of this meta-analysis, the infective stage (cyst versus trophozoite, parasite dose, and the interactions between dose and infective stage, as well as dose and species of experimental host, should be considered when designing experimental dose response studies that will assist in the study of zoonotic neglected tropical diseases globally.

  6. Molluscan neurons in culture: shedding light on synapse formation and plasticity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmold, Nichole; Syed, Naweed I

    2012-08-01

    From genes to behaviour, the simple model system approach has played many pivotal roles in deciphering nervous system function in both invertebrates and vertebrates. However, with the advent of sophisticated imaging and recording techniques enabling the direct investigation of single vertebrate neurons, the utility of simple invertebrate organisms as model systems has been put to question. To address this subject meaningfully and comprehensively, we first review the contributions made by invertebrates in the field of neuroscience over the years, paving the way for similar breakthroughs in higher animals. In particular, we focus on molluscan (Lymnaea, Aplysia, and Helisoma) and leech (Hirudo) models and the pivotal roles they have played in elucidating mechanisms of synapse formation and plasticity. While the ultimate goal in neuroscience is to understand the workings of the human brain in both its normal and diseased states, the sheer complexity of most vertebrate models still makes it difficult to define the underlying principles of nervous system function. Investigators have thus turned to invertebrate models, which are unique with respect to their simple nervous systems that are endowed with a finite number of large, individually identifiable neurons of known function. We start off by discussing in vivo and semi-intact preparations, regarding their amenability to simple circuit analysis. Despite the 'simplicity' of invertebrate nervous systems however, it is still difficult to study individual synaptic connections in detail. We therefore emphasize in the next section, the utility of studying identified invertebrate neurons in vitro, to directly examine the development, specificity, and plasticity of synaptic connections in a well-defined environment, at a resolution that it is still unapproachable in the intact brain. We conclude with a discussion of the future of invertebrates in neuroscience in elucidating mechanisms of neurological disease and developing

  7. Physicochemical Control of Adult Stem Cell Differentiation: Shedding Light on Potential Molecular Mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    skin [4], retina [5], pancreas [6], intestinal crypt [7], and liver [8] as well as in skeletal muscle [9]. Depending on the origin, these adult stem...and nuclear elements [126, 143]. This model has gained much attention due to the fact that it provides an architectural description of...Niemeyer, and H. J. Baker, “Isolation and characterization of multipotential mesenchymal stem cells from feline bone marrow,” Experi- mental

  8. Leaf optical properties shed light on foliar trait variability at individual to global scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiklomanov, A. N.; Serbin, S.; Dietze, M.

    2016-12-01

    Recent syntheses of large trait databases have contributed immensely to our understanding of drivers of plant function at the global scale. However, the global trade-offs revealed by such syntheses, such as the trade-off between leaf productivity and resilience (i.e. "leaf economics spectrum"), are often absent at smaller scales and fail to correlate with actual functional limitations. An improved understanding of how traits vary within communities, species, and individuals is critical to accurate representations of vegetation ecophysiology and ecological dynamics in ecosystem models. Spectral data from both field observations and remote sensing platforms present a potentially rich and widely available source of information on plant traits. In particular, the inversion of physically-based radiative transfer models (RTMs) is an effective and general method for estimating plant traits from spectral measurements. Here, we apply Bayesian inversion of the PROSPECT leaf RTM to a large database of field spectra and plant traits spanning tropical, temperate, and boreal forests, agricultural plots, arid shrublands, and tundra to identify dominant sources of variability and characterize trade-offs in plant functional traits. By leveraging such a large and diverse dataset, we re-calibrate the empirical absorption coefficients underlying the PROSPECT model and expand its scope to include additional leaf biochemical components, namely leaf nitrogen content. Our work provides a key methodological contribution as a physically-based retrieval of leaf nitrogen from remote sensing observations, and provides substantial insights about trait trade-offs related to plant acclimation, adaptation, and community assembly.

  9. Drug Elucidation: Invertebrate Genetics Sheds New Light on the Molecular Targets of CNS Drugs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Donard S. Dwyer

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Many important drugs approved to treat common human diseases were discovered by serendipity, without a firm understanding of their modes of action. As a result, the side effects and interactions of these medications are often unpredictable, and there is limited guidance for improving the design of next-generation drugs. Here, we review the innovative use of simple model organisms, especially Caenorhabditis elegans, to gain fresh insights into the complex biological effects of approved CNS medications. Whereas drug discovery involves the identification of new drug targets and lead compounds/biologics, and drug development spans preclinical testing to FDA approval, drug elucidation refers to the process of understanding the mechanisms of action of marketed drugs by studying their novel effects in model organisms. Drug elucidation studies have revealed new pathways affected by antipsychotic drugs, e.g., the insulin signaling pathway, a trace amine receptor and a nicotinic acetylcholine receptor. Similarly, novel targets of antidepressant drugs and lithium have been identified in C. elegans, including lipid-binding/transport proteins and the SGK-1 signaling pathway, respectively. Elucidation of the mode of action of anesthetic agents has shown that anesthesia can involve mitochondrial targets, leak currents and gap junctions. The general approach reviewed in this article has advanced our knowledge about important drugs for CNS disorders and can guide future drug discovery efforts.

  10. Cygnus X-1: shedding light on the spectral variability of a black hole

    CERN Document Server

    Grinberg, V; Wilms, J; Rodriguez, J; Pottschmidt, K; Nowak, M A; Böck, M; Bodaghee, A; Bel, M Cadolle; Fürst, F; Hanke, M; Kühnel, M; Laurent, P; Markoff, S B; Markowitz, A; Marcu, D M; Pooley, G G; Popp, A; Rothschild, R E; Tomsick, J A

    2013-01-01

    The knowledge of the spectral state of a black hole is essential for the interpretation of data from black holes in terms of their emission models. Based on pointed observations of Cyg X-1 with the Rossi X-ray timing Explorer (RXTE) that are used to classify simultaneous RXTE-ASM observations, we develop a scheme based on RXTE -ASM colors and count rates that can be used to classify all observations of this canonical black hole that were performed between 1996 and 2011. We show that a simple count rate criterion, as used previously, leads to a significantly higher fraction of misclassified observations. This scheme enables us to classify single INTEGRAL-IBIS science windows and to obtain summed spectra for the soft, intermediate and hard state with low contamination by other states.

  11. Shedding light on the nature of ESO 243-49 HLX-1

    CERN Document Server

    Mapelli, M; Zampieri, L

    2013-01-01

    The point-like X-ray source HLX-1, close to the S0 galaxy ESO 243-49, is one of the strongest intermediate-mass black hole candidates. We discuss the hypothesis that ESO 243-49 is undergoing a minor merger with a gas-rich disc galaxy. We propose that the counterpart of HLX-1 coincides with the nucleus of the secondary galaxy. We re-analyze the available photometric HST data, and we compare them with the results of N-body/smoothed particle hydrodynamics simulations. In particular, we derive synthetic surface brightness profiles for the simulated counterpart of HLX-1 in six HST filters, ranging from far ultraviolet (FUV) to infrared wavelengths. Such synthetic profiles include a contribution from the stellar population associated with the simulated disrupted satellite and a contribution from an irradiated disc model. These are in agreement with the observed surface brightness profiles of the HLX-1 counterpart, provided that the merger is at sufficiently late stage (>~2.5 Gyr since the first pericentre passage)....

  12. Cambrian cinctan echinoderms shed light on feeding in the ancestral deuterostome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, Imran A; Zamora, Samuel; Falkingham, Peter L; Phillips, Jeremy C

    2015-11-07

    Reconstructing the feeding mode of the latest common ancestor of deuterostomes is key to elucidating the early evolution of feeding in chordates and allied phyla; however, it is debated whether the ancestral deuterostome was a tentaculate feeder or a pharyngeal filter feeder. To address this, we evaluated the hydrodynamics of feeding in a group of fossil stem-group echinoderms (cinctans) using computational fluid dynamics. We simulated water flow past three-dimensional digital models of a Cambrian fossil cinctan in a range of possible life positions, adopting both passive tentacular feeding and active pharyngeal filter feeding. The results demonstrate that an orientation with the mouth facing downstream of the current was optimal for drag and lift reduction. Moreover, they show that there was almost no flow to the mouth and associated marginal groove under simulations of passive feeding, whereas considerable flow towards the animal was observed for active feeding, which would have enhanced the transport of suspended particles to the mouth. This strongly suggests that cinctans were active pharyngeal filter feeders, like modern enteropneust hemichordates and urochordates, indicating that the ancestral deuterostome employed a similar feeding strategy.

  13. Shedding Light on the Grey Zone of Speciation along a Continuum of Genomic Divergence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roux, Camille; Fraïsse, Christelle; Romiguier, Jonathan; Anciaux, Yoann; Galtier, Nicolas; Bierne, Nicolas

    2016-12-01

    Speciation results from the progressive accumulation of mutations that decrease the probability of mating between parental populations or reduce the fitness of hybrids-the so-called species barriers. The speciation genomic literature, however, is mainly a collection of case studies, each with its own approach and specificities, such that a global view of the gradual process of evolution from one to two species is currently lacking. Of primary importance is the prevalence of gene flow between diverging entities, which is central in most species concepts and has been widely discussed in recent years. Here, we explore the continuum of speciation thanks to a comparative analysis of genomic data from 61 pairs of populations/species of animals with variable levels of divergence. Gene flow between diverging gene pools is assessed under an approximate Bayesian computation (ABC) framework. We show that the intermediate "grey zone" of speciation, in which taxonomy is often controversial, spans from 0.5% to 2% of net synonymous divergence, irrespective of species life history traits or ecology. Thanks to appropriate modeling of among-locus variation in genetic drift and introgression rate, we clarify the status of the majority of ambiguous cases and uncover a number of cryptic species. Our analysis also reveals the high incidence in animals of semi-isolated species (when some but not all loci are affected by barriers to gene flow) and highlights the intrinsic difficulty, both statistical and conceptual, of delineating species in the grey zone of speciation.

  14. Concatenated analysis sheds light on early metazoan evolution and fuels a modern "urmetazoon" hypothesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bernd Schierwater

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available For more than a century, the origin of metazoan animals has been debated. One aspect of this debate has been centered on what the hypothetical "urmetazoon" bauplan might have been. The morphologically most simply organized metazoan animal, the placozoan Trichoplax adhaerens, resembles an intriguing model for one of several "urmetazoon" hypotheses: the placula hypothesis. Clear support for a basal position of Placozoa would aid in resolving several key issues of metazoan-specific inventions (including, for example, head-foot axis, symmetry, and coelom and would determine a root for unraveling their evolution. Unfortunately, the phylogenetic relationships at the base of Metazoa have been controversial because of conflicting phylogenetic scenarios generated while addressing the question. Here, we analyze the sum of morphological evidence, the secondary structure of mitochondrial ribosomal genes, and molecular sequence data from mitochondrial and nuclear genes that amass over 9,400 phylogenetically informative characters from 24 to 73 taxa. Together with mitochondrial DNA genome structure and sequence analyses and Hox-like gene expression patterns, these data (1 provide evidence that Placozoa are basal relative to all other diploblast phyla and (2 spark a modernized "urmetazoon" hypothesis.

  15. Marine viruses discovered via metagenomics shed light on viral strategies throughout the oceans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coutinho, Felipe H.; Silveira, Cynthia B.; Gregoracci, Gustavo B.; Thompson, Cristiane C.; Edwards, Robert A.; Brussaard, Corina P. D.; Dutilh, Bas E.; Thompson, Fabiano L.

    2017-07-01

    Marine viruses are key drivers of host diversity, population dynamics and biogeochemical cycling and contribute to the daily flux of billions of tons of organic matter. Despite recent advancements in metagenomics, much of their biodiversity remains uncharacterized. Here we report a data set of 27,346 marine virome contigs that includes 44 complete genomes. These outnumber all currently known phage genomes in marine habitats and include members of previously uncharacterized lineages. We designed a new method for host prediction based on co-occurrence associations that reveals these viruses infect dominant members of the marine microbiome such as Prochlorococcus and Pelagibacter. A negative association between host abundance and the virus-to-host ratio supports the recently proposed Piggyback-the-Winner model of reduced phage lysis at higher host densities. An analysis of the abundance patterns of viruses throughout the oceans revealed how marine viral communities adapt to various seasonal, temperature and photic regimes according to targeted hosts and the diversity of auxiliary metabolic genes.

  16. Seasonal bone growth and physiology in endotherms shed light on dinosaur physiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Köhler, Meike; Marín-Moratalla, Nekane; Jordana, Xavier; Aanes, Ronny

    2012-07-19

    Cyclical growth leaves marks in bone tissue that are in the forefront of discussions about physiologies of extinct vertebrates. Ectotherms show pronounced annual cycles of growth arrest that correlate with a decrease in body temperature and metabolic rate; endotherms are assumed to grow continuously until they attain maturity because of their constant high body temperature and sustained metabolic rate. This apparent dichotomy has driven the argument that zonal bone denotes ectotherm-like physiologies, thus fuelling the controversy on dinosaur thermophysiology and the evolution of endothermy in birds and mammal-like reptiles. Here we show, from a comprehensive global study of wild ruminants from tropical to polar environments, that cyclical growth is a universal trait of homoeothermic endotherms. Growth is arrested during the unfavourable season concurrently with decreases in body temperature, metabolic rate and bone-growth-mediating plasma insulin-like growth factor-1 levels, forming part of a plesiomorphic thermometabolic strategy for energy conservation. Conversely, bouts of intense tissue growth coincide with peak metabolic rates and correlated hormonal changes at the beginning of the favourable season, indicating an increased efficiency in acquiring and using seasonal resources. Our study supplies the strongest evidence so far that homeothermic endotherms arrest growth seasonally, which precludes the use of lines of arrested growth as an argument in support of ectothermy. However, high growth rates are a distinctive trait of mammals, suggesting the capacity for endogenous heat generation. The ruminant annual cycle provides an extant model on which to base inferences regarding the thermophysiology of dinosaurs and other extinct taxa.

  17. Shedding light on the Global Ocean microbiome with algorithms and data collection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lauro, F.; Ostrowski, M.; Chénard, C.; Acerbi, E.; Paulsen, I.; Jensen, R.

    2016-02-01

    In the Global Oceans, the marine microbiome plays a critical role in biogeochemical cycling of nutrients, but surveying marine microbial communities requires ship time for sample collection, economically constraining the number of samples collected. An integrative understanding of the microbiome's activity and performance requires the collection of high-density data, both temporally and spatially in a cost-effective way. We have overcome this bottleneck by crowdsourcing the data collection to vessels of opportunity, including bluewater sailing yachts. Sailors know the oceans, and experience first-hand the declines in ocean productivity and the effects of pollution and climate change. Moreover, simply the ability to sample a microbial community during anomalous or inclement weather conditions is a major advance in sampling strategy. Our approach inherently incorporates the benefit of outreach and participation of people in scientific research, gaining positive media attention for sailors, scientists and concerned citizens alike. We have tested the basic methods during a 2013 Indian Ocean Concept Cruise, from Cape Town to Singapore, performing experimental work and reaching sampling locations inaccessible to traditional Oceanographic Vessels. At the same time we developed a small, yacht-adapted automated sampling device that takes a variety of biological and chemical measurements. In 2015 our first beta-cruisers sampled the Pacific Ocean in the first ever citizen-oceanography transect at high and low latitudes in both hemispheres. The collected samples were characterized with next-gen sequencing technology and analysed with a combination of novel algorithmic approaches. With big data management, machine learning algorithms and agent-based models we show that it is possible to deconvolute the complexity of the Ocean Microbiome for the scientific management of fisheries, marine protected areas and preservation of the oceans and seas for generations to come.

  18. Resolving phenylalanine metabolism sheds light on natural synthesis of penicillin G in Penicillium chrysogenum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veiga, Tânia; Solis-Escalante, Daniel; Romagnoli, Gabriele; ten Pierick, Angela; Hanemaaijer, Mark; Deshmukh, Amit T; Deshmuhk, Amit; Wahl, Aljoscha; Pronk, Jack T; Daran, Jean-Marc

    2012-02-01

    The industrial production of penicillin G by Penicillium chrysogenum requires the supplementation of the growth medium with the side chain precursor phenylacetate. The growth of P. chrysogenum with phenylalanine as the sole nitrogen source resulted in the extracellular production of phenylacetate and penicillin G. To analyze this natural pathway for penicillin G production, chemostat cultures were switched to [U-(13)C]phenylalanine as the nitrogen source. The quantification and modeling of the dynamics of labeled metabolites indicated that phenylalanine was (i) incorporated in nascent protein, (ii) transaminated to phenylpyruvate and further converted by oxidation or by decarboxylation, and (iii) hydroxylated to tyrosine and subsequently metabolized via the homogentisate pathway. The involvement of the homogentisate pathway was supported by the comparative transcriptome analysis of P. chrysogenum cultures grown with phenylalanine and with (NH(4))(2)SO(4) as the nitrogen source. This transcriptome analysis also enabled the identification of two putative 2-oxo acid decarboxylase genes (Pc13g9300 and Pc18g01490). cDNAs of both genes were cloned and expressed in the 2-oxo-acid-decarboxylase-free Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain CEN.PK711-7C (pdc1 pdc5 pdc6Δ aro10Δ thi3Δ). The introduction of Pc13g09300 restored the growth of this S. cerevisiae mutant on glucose and phenylalanine, thereby demonstrating that Pc13g09300 encodes a dual-substrate pyruvate and phenylpyruvate decarboxylase, which plays a key role in an Ehrlich-type pathway for the production of phenylacetate in P. chrysogenum. These results provide a basis for the metabolic engineering of P. chrysogenum for the production of the penicillin G side chain precursor phenylacetate.

  19. EPA's SHEDS-multimedia model: children's cumulative pyrethroid exposure estimates and evaluation against NHANES biomarker data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Jianping; Zartarian, Valerie; Tornero-Velez, Rogelio; Tulve, Nicolle S

    2014-12-01

    The U.S. EPA's SHEDS-Multimedia model was applied to enhance the understanding of children's exposures and doses to multiple pyrethroid pesticides, including major contributing chemicals and pathways. This paper presents combined dietary and residential exposure estimates and cumulative doses for seven commonly used pyrethroids, and comparisons of model evaluation results with NHANES biomarker data for 3-PBA and DCCA metabolites. Model input distributions were fit to publicly available pesticide usage survey data, NHANES, and other studies, then SHEDS-Multimedia was applied to estimate total pyrethroid exposures and doses for 3-5 year olds for one year variability simulations. For dose estimations we used a pharmacokinetic model and two approaches for simulating dermal absorption. SHEDS-Multimedia predictions compared well to NHANES biomarker data: ratios of 3-PBA observed data to SHEDS-Multimedia modeled results were 0.88, 0.51, 0.54 and 1.02 for mean, median, 95th, and 99th percentiles, respectively; for DCCA, the ratios were 0.82, 0.53, 0.56, and 0.94. Modeled time-averaged cumulative absorbed dose of the seven pyrethroids was 3.1 nmol/day (versus 8.4 nmol/day for adults) in the general population (residential pyrethroid use and non-use homes) and 6.7 nmol/day (versus 10.5 nmol/day for adults) in the simulated residential pyrethroid use population. For the general population, contributions to modeled cumulative dose by chemical were permethrin (60%), cypermethrin (22%), and cyfluthrin (16%); for residential use homes, contributions were cypermethrin (49%), permethrin (29%), and cyfluthrin (17%). The primary exposure route for 3-5 year olds in the simulated residential use population was non-dietary ingestion exposure; whereas for the simulated general population, dietary exposure was the primary exposure route. Below the 95th percentile, the major exposure pathway was dietary for the general population; non-dietary ingestion was the major pathway starting below

  20. Shedding new light on the K-Pg extinction event: application of modern fire science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadden, Rory; Rein, Guillermo; Belcher, Claire

    2016-04-01

    The impact on fire on the earth system is a key component to understand the long term evolutionary history of our planet. However, in order to fully explore the role of fire, it is essential to draw on the significant existing literature and methods available to both palaeontologists and fire scientists if we are to better interpret the fossil record of life. A novel cross-disciplinary approach was developed to investigate the extent to which forest materials may have been ignited by the thermal radiation delivered by the collision of an extra-terrestrial body on the Yucatán Peninsula at the end of the Cretaceous period. A novel experimental approach was developed through close collaboration between earth scientists and fire safety engineers that drew on well established procedures for assessing material flammability. Through close working in both experimental design and interpretation, a new method to rapidly and effectively assess the expected ignition behaviour resulting from this event was developed. Prior modelling of the impact indicated that the impact resulted in a range of heat flux pulses, dependent on the angle of impact and melt spherule distribution and was shown to vary as a function of geographical location. These data were used as an input to a series of laboratory experiments undertaken at the Rushbrook Fire Laboratory at the University of Edinburgh. Building on existing material flammability assessment methods, modifications were made to the operation of the FM Global Fire Propagation Apparatus to allow these time-dependent heat flux pulses to be reproduced in the laboratory under controlled conditions of thermal input and burning environment. The results indicate that the ignition propensity of a particular biome is strongly dependent on both the fuel available and the heat pulse. It was observed that thin, dry fuels could be ignited easily under almost every condition but that live fuels could not. Live fuels could only be ignited by the less

  1. Shedding Light on Trust

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lesley Gill

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available New Zealand Human Resource Development practitioners interviewed in earlier research indicates that building “trust” is necessary if training efforts in the area of Emotional Intelligence are to be successful.  Yet, trust is often not defined clearly by those working in the field of HRD.  To establish a definition of trust that provides HRD practitioners with direction in the design of training programs, a large group conversation utilizing the “World Café” process was undertaken, after which EI training practitioners wrote reflections on the nature of trust.  Experienced EI Trainers tended to define trust in terms of the outcome produced in training, which was the readiness of participants to talk.  Defining trust in this way has the advantage of involving a low level of inference.  Trainers also identified actions within their control that could stimulate greater readiness amongst training participants about their experiences to trainers and other learners. The aim of the article is to provide a practice-based definition of trust that can inform HRD practitioners working in the field of Emotional Intelligence.

  2. A prediction model for the vortex shedding noise from the wake of an airfoil or axial flow fan blades

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, C.; Chung, M. K.; Kim, Y.-H.

    1993-06-01

    An analytical model is presented for predicting the vortex shedding noise generated from the wake of axial flow fan blades. The downstream wake of a fan blade is assumed to be dominated by the von Karman vortex street, and the strength and the shedding frequency of the wake vortex are determined from the wake structure model. The fluctuating pressure and lift on the blade surface, which are induced from the vortices in the wake, are analyzed by incorporating the wake model for the von Karman vortex street with thin airfoil theory. The predicted vortex shedding frequency and the overall sound pressure level compare favorably with the measured results for the vortex shedding noise from axial flow fans.

  3. ITS polymorphisms shed light on hybrid evolution in apomictic plants: a case study on the Ranunculus auricomus complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodač, Ladislav; Scheben, Armin Patrick; Hojsgaard, Diego; Paun, Ovidiu; Hörandl, Elvira

    2014-01-01

    The reconstruction of reticulate evolutionary histories in plants is still a major methodological challenge. Sequences of the ITS nrDNA are a popular marker to analyze hybrid relationships, but variation of this multicopy spacer region is affected by concerted evolution, high intraindividual polymorphism, and shifts in mode of reproduction. The relevance of changes in secondary structure is still under dispute. We aim to shed light on the extent of polymorphism within and between sexual species and their putative natural as well as synthetic hybrid derivatives in the Ranunculus auricomus complex to test morphology-based hypotheses of hybrid origin and parentage of taxa. We employed direct sequencing of ITS nrDNA from 68 individuals representing three sexuals, their synthetic hybrids and one sympatric natural apomict, as well as cloning of ITS copies in four representative individuals, RNA secondary structure analysis, and landmark geometric morphometric analysis on leaves. Phylogenetic network analyses indicate additivity of parental ITS variants in both synthetic and natural hybrids. The triploid synthetic hybrids are genetically much closer to their maternal progenitors, probably due to ploidy dosage effects, although exhibiting a paternal-like leaf morphology. The natural hybrids are genetically and morphologically closer to the putative paternal progenitor species. Secondary structures of ITS1-5.8S-ITS2 were rather conserved in all taxa. The observed similarities in ITS polymorphisms suggest that the natural apomict R. variabilis is an ancient hybrid of the diploid sexual species R. notabilis and the sexual species R. cassubicifolius. The additivity pattern shared by R. variabilis and the synthetic hybrids supports an evolutionary and biogeographical scenario that R. variabilis originated from ancient hybridization. Concerted evolution of ITS copies in R. variabilis is incomplete, probably due to a shift to asexual reproduction. Under the condition of

  4. ITS polymorphisms shed light on hybrid evolution in apomictic plants: a case study on the Ranunculus auricomus complex.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ladislav Hodač

    Full Text Available The reconstruction of reticulate evolutionary histories in plants is still a major methodological challenge. Sequences of the ITS nrDNA are a popular marker to analyze hybrid relationships, but variation of this multicopy spacer region is affected by concerted evolution, high intraindividual polymorphism, and shifts in mode of reproduction. The relevance of changes in secondary structure is still under dispute. We aim to shed light on the extent of polymorphism within and between sexual species and their putative natural as well as synthetic hybrid derivatives in the Ranunculus auricomus complex to test morphology-based hypotheses of hybrid origin and parentage of taxa. We employed direct sequencing of ITS nrDNA from 68 individuals representing three sexuals, their synthetic hybrids and one sympatric natural apomict, as well as cloning of ITS copies in four representative individuals, RNA secondary structure analysis, and landmark geometric morphometric analysis on leaves. Phylogenetic network analyses indicate additivity of parental ITS variants in both synthetic and natural hybrids. The triploid synthetic hybrids are genetically much closer to their maternal progenitors, probably due to ploidy dosage effects, although exhibiting a paternal-like leaf morphology. The natural hybrids are genetically and morphologically closer to the putative paternal progenitor species. Secondary structures of ITS1-5.8S-ITS2 were rather conserved in all taxa. The observed similarities in ITS polymorphisms suggest that the natural apomict R. variabilis is an ancient hybrid of the diploid sexual species R. notabilis and the sexual species R. cassubicifolius. The additivity pattern shared by R. variabilis and the synthetic hybrids supports an evolutionary and biogeographical scenario that R. variabilis originated from ancient hybridization. Concerted evolution of ITS copies in R. variabilis is incomplete, probably due to a shift to asexual reproduction. Under the

  5. Prediction models for 90Sr in shed deciduous teeth and infant bone

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aarkrog, Asker

    1971-01-01

    Shed deciduous teeth were collected in 1966-69 in Denmark, the Faroes and Greenland from children born in the period 1953-63. 235 samples of crowns were analysed for 90Sr. The 90Sr levels in deciduous tooth crowns were related to the fall-out rate and the accumulated fall-out. The tooth levels...... in children born in 1950-62 could be described with the same equation as the 90Sr bone levels in 1-yr-old infants born in 1962-68. The prediction models for 90Sr in teeth and bones showed that for given amount of fall-out the Faroese levels became nearly twice as high as the Danish. The maximum teeth and bone...... levels were found in children born in 1963, where the Faroese level was estimated from the prediction model to be 24 pCi 90Sr/g Ca....

  6. Light source modeling for automotive lighting devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zerhau-Dreihoefer, Harald; Haack, Uwe; Weber, Thomas; Wendt, Dierk

    2002-08-01

    Automotive lighting devices generally have to meet high standards. For example to avoid discomfort glare for the oncoming traffic, luminous intensities of a low beam headlight must decrease by more than one order of magnitude within a fraction of a degree along the horizontal cutoff-line. At the same time, a comfortable homogeneous illumination of the road requires slowly varying luminous intensities below the cutoff line. All this has to be realized taking into account both, the legal requirements and the customer's stylistic specifications. In order to be able to simulate and optimize devices with a good optical performance different light source models are required. In the early stage of e.g. reflector development simple unstructured models allow a very fast development of the reflectors shape. On the other hand the final simulation of a complex headlamp or signal light requires a sophisticated model of the spectral luminance. In addition to theoretical models based on the light source's geometry, measured luminance data can also be used in the simulation and optimization process.

  7. Trade-offs between light interception and leaf water shedding: a comparison of shade- and sun-adapted species in a subtropical rainforest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Fengqun; Cao, Rui; Yang, Dongmei; Niklas, Karl J; Sun, Shucun

    2014-01-01

    Species in high-rainfall regions have two major alternative approaches to quickly drain off water, i.e., increasing leaf inclination angles relative to the horizontal plane, or developing long leaf drip tips. We hypothesized that shade-adapted species will have more pronounced leaf drip tips but not greater inclination angles (which can reduce the ability to intercept light) compared to sun-adapted species and that length of leaf drip tips will be negatively correlated with photosynthetic capacity [characterized by light-saturated net photosynthetic rates (Amax), associated light compensation points (LCP), and light saturation points (LSP)]. We tested this hypothesis by measuring morphological and physiological traits that are associated with light-interception and water shedding for seven shade-adapted shrub species, ten sun-adapted understory shrub species, and 15 sun-adapted tree species in a subtropical Chinese rainforest, where mean annual precipitation is around 1,600 mm. Shade-adapted understory species had lower LMA, Amax, LSP, and LCP compared to understory or canopy sun-adapted species; their leaf and twig inclination angles were significantly smaller and leaf drip tips were significantly longer than those in sun-adapted species. This suggests that shade-adapted understory species tend to develop pronounced leaf drip tips but not large leaf inclination angles to shed water. The length of leaf drip tips was negatively correlated with leaf inclination angles and photosynthetic capacity. These relationships were consistent between ordinary regression and phylogenetic generalized least squares analyses. Our study illustrates the trade-offs between light interception and leaf water shedding and indicates that length of leaf drip tips can be used as an indicator of adaptation to shady conditions and overall photosynthetic performance of shrub species in subtropical rainforests.

  8. A mouse model of pathological small intestinal epithelial cell apoptosis and shedding induced by systemic administration of lipopolysaccharide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan M. Williams

    2013-11-01

    The gut barrier, composed of a single layer of intestinal epithelial cells (IECs held together by tight junctions, prevents the entrance of harmful microorganisms, antigens and toxins from the gut lumen into the blood. Small intestinal homeostasis is normally maintained by the rate of shedding of senescent enterocytes from the villus tip exactly matching the rate of generation of new cells in the crypt. However, in various localized and systemic inflammatory conditions, intestinal homeostasis can be disturbed as a result of increased IEC shedding. Such pathological IEC shedding can cause transient gaps to develop in the epithelial barrier and result in increased intestinal permeability. Although pathological IEC shedding has been implicated in the pathogenesis of conditions such as inflammatory bowel disease, our understanding of the underlying mechanisms remains limited. We have therefore developed a murine model to study this phenomenon, because IEC shedding in this species is morphologically analogous to humans. IEC shedding was induced by systemic lipopolysaccharide (LPS administration in wild-type C57BL/6 mice, and in mice deficient in TNF-receptor 1 (Tnfr1−/−, Tnfr2 (Tnfr2−/−, nuclear factor kappa B1 (Nfκb1−/− or Nfĸb2 (Nfĸb2−/−. Apoptosis and cell shedding was quantified using immunohistochemistry for active caspase-3, and gut-to-circulation permeability was assessed by measuring plasma fluorescence following fluorescein-isothiocyanate–dextran gavage. LPS, at doses ≥0.125 mg/kg body weight, induced rapid villus IEC apoptosis, with peak cell shedding occurring at 1.5 hours after treatment. This coincided with significant villus shortening, fluid exudation into the gut lumen and diarrhea. A significant increase in gut-to-circulation permeability was observed at 5 hours. TNFR1 was essential for LPS-induced IEC apoptosis and shedding, and the fate of the IECs was also dependent on NFκB, with signaling via NFκB1 favoring cell survival and

  9. Control of a coupled map lattice model for vortex shedding in the wake of a cylinder

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    G Balasubramanian; D J Olinger; M A Demetriou

    2002-07-01

    The flow behind a vibrating flexible cable at low Reynolds numbers can exhibit complex wake structures such as lace-like patterns, vortex dislocations and frequency cells. These structures have been observed in experiments and numerical simulations, and are predicted by a previously developed low-order coupled map lattice (CML). The discrete (in time and space) CML models consist of a series of diffusively coupled circle map oscillators along the cable span. Motivated by a desire to modify the complex wake patterns behind flexible vibrating cables, we have studied the addition of control terms into the highly efficient CML models and explored the resulting dynamics. Proportional, adaptive proportional and discontinuous non-linear (DNL) control methods were used to derive the control laws. The first method employed occasional proportional feedback. The adaptive method used spatio-temporal feedback control. The DNL method used a discontinuous feedback linearization procedure, and the controller was designed for the resulting linearized system using eigenvalue assignment. These techniques were applied to a modeled vortex dislocation structure in the wake of a vibrating cable in uniform freestream flow. Parallel shedding patterns were achieved for a range of forcing frequency-forcing amplitude combinations studied to validate the control theory. The adaptive proportional and DNL methods were found to be more effective than the proportional control method due to the incorporation of a spatially varying feedback gain across the cylinder span. The DNL method was found to be the most efficient controller of the low-order CML model. The required control level across the cable span was correlated to the 1/1 lock-on behavior of the temporal circle map.

  10. Information-Theoretic Approach May Shed a Light to a Better Understanding and Sustaining the Integrity of Ecological-Societal Systems under Changing Climate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, J.

    2016-12-01

    Considering high levels of uncertainty, epistemological conflicts over facts and values, and a sense of urgency, normal paradigm-driven science will be insufficient to mobilize people and nation toward sustainability. The conceptual framework to bridge the societal system dynamics with that of natural ecosystems in which humanity operates remains deficient. The key to understanding their coevolution is to understand `self-organization.' Information-theoretic approach may shed a light to provide a potential framework which enables not only to bridge human and nature but also to generate useful knowledge for understanding and sustaining the integrity of ecological-societal systems. How can information theory help understand the interface between ecological systems and social systems? How to delineate self-organizing processes and ensure them to fulfil sustainability? How to evaluate the flow of information from data through models to decision-makers? These are the core questions posed by sustainability science in which visioneering (i.e., the engineering of vision) is an essential framework. Yet, visioneering has neither quantitative measure nor information theoretic framework to work with and teach. This presentation is an attempt to accommodate the framework of self-organizing hierarchical open systems with visioneering into a common information-theoretic framework. A case study is presented with the UN/FAO's communal vision of climate-smart agriculture (CSA) which pursues a trilemma of efficiency, mitigation, and resilience. Challenges of delineating and facilitating self-organizing systems are discussed using transdisciplinary toold such as complex systems thinking, dynamic process network analysis and multi-agent systems modeling. Acknowledgments: This study was supported by the Korea Meteorological Administration Research and Development Program under Grant KMA-2012-0001-A (WISE project).

  11. Agriculture and future riverine nitrogen export to US coastal regions: Insights from the Nutrient Export from WaterSheds Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    We examine contemporary (2000) and future (2030) estimates of coastal N loads in the continental US by the Nutrient Export from WaterSheds (NEWS) model. Future estimates are based on Millennium Ecosystem Assessment (MEA) scenarios and two additional scenarios that reflect “...

  12. The High-Throughput Stochastic Human Exposure and Dose Simulation Model (SHEDS-HT) & The Chemical and Products Database (CPDat)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Stochastic Human Exposure and Dose Simulation Model – High-Throughput (SHEDS-HT) is a U.S. Environmental Protection Agency research tool for predicting screening-level (low-tier) exposures to chemicals in consumer products. This course will present an overview of this m...

  13. Prioritization of pesticides based on daily dietary exposure potential as determined from the SHEDS model

    Science.gov (United States)

    A major pathway for exposure to many pesticides is through diet. The objectives were to rank pesticides by comparing their calculated daily dietary exposure as determined by EPA's Stochastic Human Exposure and Dose Simulation (SHEDS) to single pesticides for different age groups ...

  14. Prioritization of pesticides based on daily dietary exposure potential as determined from the SHEDS model

    Science.gov (United States)

    A major pathway for exposure to many pesticides is through diet. The objectives were to rank pesticides by comparing their calculated daily dietary exposure as determined by EPA's Stochastic Human Exposure and Dose Simulation (SHEDS) to single pesticides for different age groups ...

  15. Numerical 3D analysis of cloud cavitation shedding frequency on a circular leading edge hydrofoil with a barotropic cavitation model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blume, M.; Skoda, R.

    2015-12-01

    A compressible density-based time-explicit low Mach number consistent viscous flow solver is utilised in combination with a barotropic cavitation model for the analysis of cloud cavitation on a circular leading edge (CLE) hydrofoil. For 5° angle of attack, cloud structure and shedding frequency for different cavitation numbers are compared to experimental data. A strong grid sensitivity is found in particular for high cavitation numbers. On a fine grid, a very good agreement with validation data is achieved even without explicit turbulence model. The neglect of viscous effects as well as a two-dimensional set-up lead to a less realistic prediction of cloud structures and frequencies. Comparative simulations with the Sauer-Schnerr cavitation model and modified pre-factors of the mass transfer terms underestimate the measured shedding frequency.

  16. Prioritization of pesticides based on daily dietary exposure potential as determined from the SHEDS model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melnyk, Lisa Jo; Wang, Zhaohui; Li, Zhilin; Xue, Jianping

    2016-10-01

    A major pathway for exposure to many pesticides is through diet. The objectives were to rank pesticides by comparing their calculated daily dietary exposure as determined by EPA's Stochastic Human Exposure and Dose Simulation (SHEDS) to single pesticides for different age groups to acceptable daily intakes (ADI), characterize pesticide trends in exposures over different time periods, and determine commodities contributing to pesticide exposures. SHEDS was applied, using Pesticide Data Program (PDP) (1991-2011) and pesticide usage data on crops from USDA combined with NHANES dietary consumption data, to generate exposure estimates by age group. ADI data collected from EPA, WHO, and other sources were used to rank pesticides based on relativeness of the dietary exposure potential to ADI by age groups. Sensitivity analysis provided trends in pesticide exposures. Within SHEDS, commodities contributing the majority of pesticides with greatest exposure potential were determined. The results indicated that the highest ranking pesticides were methamidophos and diazinon which exceeded 100% of the ADI. Sensitivity analysis indicated that exposure to methamidophos, diazinon, malathion, ethion and formetanate hydrochloride had a marked decrease from 1991-1999 to 2000-2011. Contributions analysis indicated that apples, mushroom, carrots, and lettuce contributed to diazinon exposure. Beans and pepper contributed to methamidophos exposure. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  17. Can the genetics of type 1 and type 2 diabetes shed light on the genetics of latent autoimmune diabetes in adults?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grant, Struan F A; Hakonarson, Hakon; Schwartz, Stanley

    2010-04-01

    The pathophysiology of latent autoimmune diabetes in adults (LADA) is considered less understood than its much better characterized counterparts of type 1 and type 2 diabetes (T1D and T2D), where its clinical presentation exhibits some features of each of these two main diseases, earning it a reputation as being "type 1.5 diabetes". The etiology of LADA remains unknown, but a genetic component has been implicated from recent reports of T1D and T2D genes playing a role in its pathogenesis. One way to shed much needed light on the classification of LADA is to determine the discrete genetic factors conferring risk to the pathogenesis of this specific phenotype and to determine to what extent LADA shares genetic similarities with T1D and T2D. For instance, no conclusive support for a role of the T1D-associated INS gene has been reported in T2D; conversely, but similarly, no evidence has been found for the role of the T2D-associated genes IDE/HHEX, SLC30A8, CDKAL1, CDKN2A/B, IGF2BP2, FTO, and TCF7L2 in T1D. However, and somewhat at odds with current thinking, TCF7L2, the most strongly associated gene with T2D to date, is strongly associated with LADA, a disorder considered by the World Health Organization to be a slowly progressing form of T1D. In this review, we address recent advances in the genetics of T1D and T2D and how such discoveries have in turn shed some light on the genetics of LADA as being potentially at the "genetic intersection" of these two major diseases.

  18. A taxonomy-based approach to shed light on the babel of mathematical analogies for rice simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    For most biophysical domains, different models are available and the extent to which their structures differ with respect to differences in outputs was never quantified. We use a taxonomy-based approach to address the question with thirteen rice models. Classification keys and binary attributes for ...

  19. SHEDS-Multimedia Model Version 3 (a) Technical Manual; (b) User Guide; and (c) Executable File to Launch SAS Program and Install Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reliable models for assessing human exposures are important for understanding health risks from chemicals. The Stochastic Human Exposure and Dose Simulation model for multimedia, multi-route/pathway chemicals (SHEDS-Multimedia), developed by EPA’s Office of Research and Developm...

  20. Transcriptome comparisons shed light on the pre-condition and potential barrier for C4 photosynthesis evolution in eudicots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Yimin; Lyu, Ming-Ju Amy; Zhu, Xin-Guang

    2016-05-01

    C4 photosynthesis evolved independently from C3 photosynthesis in more than 60 lineages. Most of the C4 lineages are clustered together in the order Poales and the order Caryophyllales while many other angiosperm orders do not have C4 species, suggesting the existence of biological pre-conditions in the ancestral C3 species that facilitate the evolution of C4 photosynthesis in these lineages. To explore pre-adaptations for C4 photosynthesis evolution, we classified C4 lineages into the C4-poor and the C4-rich groups based on the percentage of C4 species in different genera and conducted a comprehensive comparison on the transcriptomic changes between the non-C4 species from the C4-poor and the C4-rich groups. Results show that species in the C4-rich group showed higher expression of genes related to oxidoreductase activity, light reaction components, terpene synthesis, secondary cell synthesis, C4 cycle related genes and genes related to nucleotide metabolism and senescence. In contrast, C4-poor group showed up-regulation of a PEP/Pi translocator, genes related to signaling pathway, stress response, defense response and plant hormone metabolism (ethylene and brassinosteroid). The implications of these transcriptomic differences between the C4-rich and C4-poor groups to C4 evolution are discussed.

  1. Shedding lights on the flexible-armed porphyrins: Human telomeric G4 DNA interaction and cell photocytotoxicity research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Xiang-Yu; Zhao, Ping; Jin, Shu-Fang; Liu, Min-Chao; Wang, Xia-Hong; Huang, Yu-Min; Cheng, Zhen-Feng; Yan, Si-Qi; Li, Yan-Yu; Chen, Ya-Qing; Zhong, Yan-Mei

    2017-08-01

    DNA polymorphism exerts a fascination on a large scientific community. Without crystallographic structural data, clarification of the binding modes between G-quadruplex (G4) and ligand (complex) is a challenging job. In the present work, three porphyrin compounds with different flexible carbon chains (arms) were designed, synthesized and characterized. Their binding, folding and stabilizing abilities to human telomeric G4 DNA structures were comparatively researched. Positive charges at the end of the flexible carbon chains seem to be favorable for the DNA-porphyrin interactions, which were evidenced by the spectral results and further confirmed by the molecular docking calculations. Biological function analysis demonstrated that these porphyrins show no substantial inhibition to Hela, A549 and BEL 7402 cancer cell lines under dark while exhibit broad inhibition under visible light. This significantly enhanced photocytotoxicity relative to the dark control is an essential property of photochemotherapeutic agents. The feature of the flexible arms emerges as critical influencing factors in the cell photocytotoxicity. Moreover, an ROS-mediated mitochondrial dysfunction pathway was suggested for the cell apoptosis induced by these flexible-armed porphyrins. It is found that the porphyrins with positive charges located at the end of the flexible arms represent an exciting opportunity for photochemotherapeutic anti-cancer drug design. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  2. Shedding light on cell compartmentation in the candidate phylum Poribacteria by high resolution visualisation and transcriptional profiling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jahn, Martin T; Markert, Sebastian M; Ryu, Taewoo; Ravasi, Timothy; Stigloher, Christian; Hentschel, Ute; Moitinho-Silva, Lucas

    2016-10-31

    Assigning functions to uncultivated environmental microorganisms continues to be a challenging endeavour. Here, we present a new microscopy protocol for fluorescence in situ hybridisation-correlative light and electron microscopy (FISH-CLEM) that enabled, to our knowledge for the first time, the identification of single cells within their complex microenvironment at electron microscopy resolution. Members of the candidate phylum Poribacteria, common and uncultivated symbionts of marine sponges, were used towards this goal. Cellular 3D reconstructions revealed bipolar, spherical granules of low electron density, which likely represent carbon reserves. Poribacterial activity profiles were retrieved from prokaryotic enriched sponge metatranscriptomes using simulation-based optimised mapping. We observed high transcriptional activity for proteins related to bacterial microcompartments (BMC) and we resolved their subcellular localisation by combining FISH-CLEM with immunohistochemistry (IHC) on ultra-thin sponge tissue sections. In terms of functional relevance, we propose that the BMC-A region may be involved in 1,2-propanediol degradation. The FISH-IHC-CLEM approach was proven an effective toolkit to combine -omics approaches with functional studies and it should be widely applicable in environmental microbiology.

  3. Shedding light on cell compartmentation in the candidate phylum Poribacteria by high resolution visualisation and transcriptional profiling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jahn, Martin T.; Markert, Sebastian M.; Ryu, Taewoo; Ravasi, Timothy; Stigloher, Christian; Hentschel, Ute; Moitinho-Silva, Lucas

    2016-10-01

    Assigning functions to uncultivated environmental microorganisms continues to be a challenging endeavour. Here, we present a new microscopy protocol for fluorescence in situ hybridisation-correlative light and electron microscopy (FISH-CLEM) that enabled, to our knowledge for the first time, the identification of single cells within their complex microenvironment at electron microscopy resolution. Members of the candidate phylum Poribacteria, common and uncultivated symbionts of marine sponges, were used towards this goal. Cellular 3D reconstructions revealed bipolar, spherical granules of low electron density, which likely represent carbon reserves. Poribacterial activity profiles were retrieved from prokaryotic enriched sponge metatranscriptomes using simulation-based optimised mapping. We observed high transcriptional activity for proteins related to bacterial microcompartments (BMC) and we resolved their subcellular localisation by combining FISH-CLEM with immunohistochemistry (IHC) on ultra-thin sponge tissue sections. In terms of functional relevance, we propose that the BMC-A region may be involved in 1,2-propanediol degradation. The FISH-IHC-CLEM approach was proven an effective toolkit to combine -omics approaches with functional studies and it should be widely applicable in environmental microbiology.

  4. Shedding light on cell compartmentation in the candidate phylum Poribacteria by high resolution visualisation and transcriptional profiling

    KAUST Repository

    Jahn, Martin T.

    2016-10-31

    Assigning functions to uncultivated environmental microorganisms continues to be a challenging endeavour. Here, we present a new microscopy protocol for fluorescence in situ hybridisation-correlative light and electron microscopy (FISH-CLEM) that enabled, to our knowledge for the first time, the identification of single cells within their complex microenvironment at electron microscopy resolution. Members of the candidate phylum Poribacteria, common and uncultivated symbionts of marine sponges, were used towards this goal. Cellular 3D reconstructions revealed bipolar, spherical granules of low electron density, which likely represent carbon reserves. Poribacterial activity profiles were retrieved from prokaryotic enriched sponge metatranscriptomes using simulation-based optimised mapping. We observed high transcriptional activity for proteins related to bacterial microcompartments (BMC) and we resolved their subcellular localisation by combining FISH-CLEM with immunohistochemistry (IHC) on ultra-thin sponge tissue sections. In terms of functional relevance, we propose that the BMC-A region may be involved in 1,2-propanediol degradation. The FISH-IHC-CLEM approach was proven an effective toolkit to combine -omics approaches with functional studies and it should be widely applicable in environmental microbiology.

  5. Shedding light on cell compartmentation in the candidate phylum Poribacteria by high resolution visualisation and transcriptional profiling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jahn, Martin T.; Markert, Sebastian M.; Ryu, Taewoo; Ravasi, Timothy; Stigloher, Christian; Hentschel, Ute; Moitinho-Silva, Lucas

    2016-01-01

    Assigning functions to uncultivated environmental microorganisms continues to be a challenging endeavour. Here, we present a new microscopy protocol for fluorescence in situ hybridisation-correlative light and electron microscopy (FISH-CLEM) that enabled, to our knowledge for the first time, the identification of single cells within their complex microenvironment at electron microscopy resolution. Members of the candidate phylum Poribacteria, common and uncultivated symbionts of marine sponges, were used towards this goal. Cellular 3D reconstructions revealed bipolar, spherical granules of low electron density, which likely represent carbon reserves. Poribacterial activity profiles were retrieved from prokaryotic enriched sponge metatranscriptomes using simulation-based optimised mapping. We observed high transcriptional activity for proteins related to bacterial microcompartments (BMC) and we resolved their subcellular localisation by combining FISH-CLEM with immunohistochemistry (IHC) on ultra-thin sponge tissue sections. In terms of functional relevance, we propose that the BMC-A region may be involved in 1,2-propanediol degradation. The FISH-IHC-CLEM approach was proven an effective toolkit to combine -omics approaches with functional studies and it should be widely applicable in environmental microbiology. PMID:27796326

  6. Recently evolved diversity and convergent radiations of rainforest mahoganies (Meliaceae) shed new light on the origins of rainforest hyperdiversity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koenen, E.J.M.; Clarkson, J.J.; Pennington, T.D.; Chatrou, L.W.

    2015-01-01

    •Tropical rainforest hyperdiversity is often suggested to have evolved over a long time-span (the ‘museum’ model), but there is also evidence for recent rainforest radiations. The mahoganies (Meliaceae) are a prominent plant group in lowland tropical rainforests world-wide but also occur in all othe

  7. Shedding new light on historical metal samples using micro-focused synchrotron X-ray fluorescence and spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grolimund, D.; Senn, M.; Trottmann, M.; Janousch, M.; Bonhoure, I.; Scheidegger, A. M.; Marcus, M.

    2004-10-01

    insights concerning the nature and origin of used raw materials as well as regarding employed processing techniques during historic iron fabrication and weapon manufacturing.The study demonstrates the potential of oxidation state and mineral phase mapping based on energy selective micro-XRF maps and spectroscopic phase identification. Such a spatially resolved recording of the chemical speciation is based on X-ray absorption spectroscopy. This analytical technique is exclusive to synchrotron light sources. However, the steadily increasing number of available synchrotron-based X-ray microprobes allows nowadays for more routine utilization of such micro-XAS techniques.

  8. Out-of-the-ecliptic reconstruction of solar irradiance sheds new light on the impact of orbital changes on climate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vieira, Luis Eduardo; Dudok de Wit, Thierry; Norton, Aimee; Kretzschmar, Matthieu; Schmidt, Gavin; Cheung, Mark

    2013-04-01

    The variability in solar irradiance, the main external energy source of the Earth's system, must be critically studied in order to place the effects of human-driven climate change into perspective and allow plausible predictions of the evolution of climate. Accurate measurements of total solar irradiance (TSI) variability by instruments onboard space platforms during the last three solar cycles indicate changes of approximately 0.1% over the sunspot cycle. Variations of orbital inclination in relation to the Sun's equator could potentially impact incoming solar irradiance as a result of the anisotropy of the distribution of active regions. Due to a lack of quantitative estimates, this effect has never been assessed. Here, we show that although observers with different orbital inclinations experience various levels of irradiance, modulations in TSI are not sufficient to drive observed 100 kyr climate variations. Based on our model we find that, due to orbital inclination alone, the maximum change in the average TSI over timescales of kyrs is 0.003 W/m2, much smaller than the 1.5 W/m2 annually integrated change related to orbital eccentricity variations, or the 1-8 W/m2 variability due to solar magnetic activity. Here, we stress that out-of-ecliptic measurements are needed in order to constrain models for the long-term evolution of TSI and its impact on climate.

  9. Human mitochondrial Hsp70 (mortalin): shedding light on ATPase activity, interaction with adenosine nucleotides, solution structure and domain organization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dores-Silva, Paulo R; Barbosa, Leandro R S; Ramos, Carlos H I; Borges, Júlio C

    2015-01-01

    The human mitochondrial Hsp70, also called mortalin, is of considerable importance for mitochondria biogenesis and the correct functioning of the cell machinery. In the mitochondrial matrix, mortalin acts in the importing and folding process of nucleus-encoded proteins. The in vivo deregulation of mortalin expression and/or function has been correlated with age-related diseases and certain cancers due to its interaction with the p53 protein. In spite of its critical biological roles, structural and functional studies on mortalin are limited by its insoluble recombinant production. This study provides the first report of the production of folded and soluble recombinant mortalin when co-expressed with the human Hsp70-escort protein 1, but it is still likely prone to self-association. The monomeric fraction of mortalin presented a slightly elongated shape and basal ATPase activity that is higher than that of its cytoplasmic counterpart Hsp70-1A, suggesting that it was obtained in the functional state. Through small angle X-ray scattering, we assessed the low-resolution structural model of monomeric mortalin that is characterized by an elongated shape. This model adequately accommodated high resolution structures of Hsp70 domains indicating its quality. We also observed that mortalin interacts with adenosine nucleotides with high affinity. Thermally induced unfolding experiments indicated that mortalin is formed by at least two domains and that the transition is sensitive to the presence of adenosine nucleotides and that this process is dependent on the presence of Mg2+ ions. Interestingly, the thermal-induced unfolding assays of mortalin suggested the presence of an aggregation/association event, which was not observed for human Hsp70-1A, and this finding may explain its natural tendency for in vivo aggregation. Our study may contribute to the structural understanding of mortalin as well as to contribute for its recombinant production for antitumor compound screenings.

  10. Human mitochondrial Hsp70 (mortalin: shedding light on ATPase activity, interaction with adenosine nucleotides, solution structure and domain organization.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulo R Dores-Silva

    Full Text Available The human mitochondrial Hsp70, also called mortalin, is of considerable importance for mitochondria biogenesis and the correct functioning of the cell machinery. In the mitochondrial matrix, mortalin acts in the importing and folding process of nucleus-encoded proteins. The in vivo deregulation of mortalin expression and/or function has been correlated with age-related diseases and certain cancers due to its interaction with the p53 protein. In spite of its critical biological roles, structural and functional studies on mortalin are limited by its insoluble recombinant production. This study provides the first report of the production of folded and soluble recombinant mortalin when co-expressed with the human Hsp70-escort protein 1, but it is still likely prone to self-association. The monomeric fraction of mortalin presented a slightly elongated shape and basal ATPase activity that is higher than that of its cytoplasmic counterpart Hsp70-1A, suggesting that it was obtained in the functional state. Through small angle X-ray scattering, we assessed the low-resolution structural model of monomeric mortalin that is characterized by an elongated shape. This model adequately accommodated high resolution structures of Hsp70 domains indicating its quality. We also observed that mortalin interacts with adenosine nucleotides with high affinity. Thermally induced unfolding experiments indicated that mortalin is formed by at least two domains and that the transition is sensitive to the presence of adenosine nucleotides and that this process is dependent on the presence of Mg2+ ions. Interestingly, the thermal-induced unfolding assays of mortalin suggested the presence of an aggregation/association event, which was not observed for human Hsp70-1A, and this finding may explain its natural tendency for in vivo aggregation. Our study may contribute to the structural understanding of mortalin as well as to contribute for its recombinant production for antitumor

  11. Shedding light on walking in the dark: the effects of reduced lighting on the gait of older adults with a higher-level gait disorder and controls

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gruendlinger Leor

    2005-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective To study the effects of reduced lighting on the gait of older adults with a high level gait disorder (HLGD and to compare their response to that of healthy elderly controls. Methods 22 patients with a HLGD and 20 age-matched healthy controls were studied under usual lighting conditions (1000 lumens and in near darkness (5 lumens. Gait speed and gait dynamics were measured under both conditions. Cognitive function, co-morbidities, depressive symptoms, and vision were also evaluated. Results Under usual lighting conditions, patients walked more slowly, with reduced swing times, and increased stride-to-stride variability, compared to controls. When walking under near darkness conditions, both groups slowed their gait. All other measures of gait were not affected by lighting in the controls. In contrast, patients further reduced their swing times and increased their stride-to-stride variability, both stride time variability and swing time variability. The unique response of the patients was not explained by vision, mental status, co-morbidities, or the values of walking under usual lighting conditions. Conclusion Walking with reduced lighting does not affect the gait of healthy elderly subjects, except for a reduction in speed. On the other hand, the gait of older adults with a HLGD becomes more variable and unsteady when they walk in near darkness, despite adapting a slow and cautious gait. Further work is needed to identify the causes of the maladaptive response among patients with a HLGD and the potential connection between this behavior and the increased fall risk observed in these patients.

  12. Spectroscopic and thermal characterization of alternative model biomembranes from shed skins of Bothrops jararaca and Spilotis pullatus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    André Rolim Baby

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Recently, there has been an interest in the use of shed snake skin as alternative model biomembrane for human stratum corneum. This research work presented as objective the qualitative characterization of alternative model biomembranes from Bothrops jararaca and Spilotis pullatus by FT-Raman, PAS-FTIR and DSC. The employed biophysical techniques permitted the characterization of the biomembranes from shed snake skin of B. jararaca and S. pullatus by the identification of vibrational frequencies and endothermic transitions that are similar to those of the human stratum corneum.Existe atualmente interesse no uso da muda de pele de cobra como modelos alternativos de biomembranas da pele humana. O presente trabalho apresentou como objetivo a caracterização qualitativa de modelos alternativos de biomembranas provenientes de mudas de pele de cobra da Bothrops jararaca e Spilotis pullatus por espectroscopia Raman (FT-Raman, espectroscopia fotoacústica no infravermelho (PAS-FTIR e calorimetria exploratória diferencial (DSC. As técnicas biofísicas FT-Raman, PAS-FTIR e DSC permitiram caracterizar qualitativamente os modelos alternativos de biomembranas provenientes das mudas de pele de cobra da B. jararaca e S. pullatus e identificar freqüências vibracionais e transições endotérmicas similares ao estrato córneo humano.

  13. Light fermions in composite models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khlebnikov, S. Yu.; Peccei, R. D.

    1993-07-01

    In preon models based on chiral gauge theories, we show that light composite fermions can ensue as a result of gauging a subset of preons in a vectorlike manner. After demonstrating how this mechanism works in a toy example, we construct a one-generation model of quarks which admits a hierarchy between the up and down quark masses as well as between these masses and the compositeness scale. In simple extensions of this model to more generations we discuss the challenges of obtaining any quark mixing. Some possible phenomenological implications of scenarios where quarks and leptons which are heavier are also less pointlike are also considered.

  14. Light fermions in composite models

    CERN Document Server

    Khlebnikov, S Yu

    1993-01-01

    In preon models based on chiral gauge theories, we show that light composite fermions can ensue as a result of gauging a subset of preons in a vector-like manner. After demonstrating how this mechanism works in a toy example, we construct a one generation model of quarks which admits a hierarchy between the up and down quark masses as well as between these masses and the compositeness scale. In simple extensions of this model to more generations we discuss the challenges of obtaining any quark mixing. Some possible phenomenological implications of scenarios where quarks and leptons which are heavier are also less pointlike are also considered.

  15. Historical profiling of maize duplicate genes sheds light on the evolution of C4 photosynthesis in grasses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Yao-Ming; Chang, Chia-Lin; Li, Wen-Hsiung; Shih, Arthur Chun-Chieh

    2013-02-01

    C4 plants evolved from C3 plants through a series of complex evolutionary steps. On the basis of the evolution of key C4 enzyme genes, the evolution of C4 photosynthesis has been considered a story of gene/genome duplications and subsequent modifications of gene function. If whole-genome duplication has contributed to the evolution of C4 photosynthesis, other genes should have been duplicated together with these C4 genes. However, which genes were co-duplicated with C4 genes and whether they have also played a role in C4 evolution are largely unknown. In this study, we developed a simple method to characterize the historical profile of the paralogs of a gene by tracing back to the most recent common ancestor (MRCA) of the gene and its paralog(s) and then counting the number of paralogs at each MRCA. We clustered the genes into clusters with similar duplication profiles and inferred their functional enrichments. Applying our method to maize, a familiar C4 plant, we identified many genes that show similar duplication profiles with those of the key C4 enzyme genes and found that the functional preferences of the C4 gene clusters are not only similar to those identified by an experimental approach in a recent study but also highly consistent with the functions required for the C4 photosynthesis evolutionary model proposed by S.F. Sage. Some of these genes might have co-evolved with the key C4 enzyme genes to increase the strength of C4 photosynthesis. Moreover, our results suggested that most key C4 enzyme genes had different origins and have undergone a long evolutionary process before the emergence of C4 grasses (Andropogoneae), consistent with the conclusion proposed by previous authors. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Transcriptomic data from panarthropods shed new light on the evolution of insulator binding proteins in insects : Insect insulator proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pauli, Thomas; Vedder, Lucia; Dowling, Daniel; Petersen, Malte; Meusemann, Karen; Donath, Alexander; Peters, Ralph S; Podsiadlowski, Lars; Mayer, Christoph; Liu, Shanlin; Zhou, Xin; Heger, Peter; Wiehe, Thomas; Hering, Lars; Mayer, Georg; Misof, Bernhard; Niehuis, Oliver

    2016-11-03

    Body plan development in multi-cellular organisms is largely determined by homeotic genes. Expression of homeotic genes, in turn, is partially regulated by insulator binding proteins (IBPs). While only a few enhancer blocking IBPs have been identified in vertebrates, the common fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster harbors at least twelve different enhancer blocking IBPs. We screened recently compiled insect transcriptomes from the 1KITE project and genomic and transcriptomic data from public databases, aiming to trace the origin of IBPs in insects and other arthropods. Our study shows that the last common ancestor of insects (Hexapoda) already possessed a substantial number of IBPs. Specifically, of the known twelve insect IBPs, at least three (i.e., CP190, Su(Hw), and CTCF) already existed prior to the evolution of insects. Furthermore we found GAF orthologs in early branching insect orders, including Zygentoma (silverfish and firebrats) and Diplura (two-pronged bristletails). Mod(mdg4) is most likely a derived feature of Neoptera, while Pita is likely an evolutionary novelty of holometabolous insects. Zw5 appears to be restricted to schizophoran flies, whereas BEAF-32, ZIPIC and the Elba complex, are probably unique to the genus Drosophila. Selection models indicate that insect IBPs evolved under neutral or purifying selection. Our results suggest that a substantial number of IBPs either pre-date the evolution of insects or evolved early during insect evolution. This suggests an evolutionary history of insulator binding proteins in insects different to that previously thought. Moreover, our study demonstrates the versatility of the 1KITE transcriptomic data for comparative analyses in insects and other arthropods.

  17. Shedding Light on Laser Welding

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aalderink, B.J.; Aalderink, Benno; Aarts, Ronald G.K.M.; Jonker, Jan B.; Meijer, J.

    2005-01-01

    Nd:YAG laser welding is often used in industry to obtain high quality joints. This however does not mean that monitoring or control of this process is common practice. A few commercial products are available but none of these systems can be used for monitoring the laser welding process of aluminium.

  18. Shedding Light on the Candela

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greene, Nathaniel R.

    2003-10-01

    Though the candela is one of the seven SI base units, it receives little attention from physics teachers. This paper will discuss the history of the candela, its measurement techniques (photometry), and its relation to the lumen. The luminous properties of incandescent and fluorescent lamps are compared. Of the SI base units, only the candela is linked to the peculiarities of human perception.

  19. Shedding Light on Night Learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horwood, Bert

    1986-01-01

    Shows how darkness and night provide a potentially excellent arena for experiential learning opportunities. Recommends learning must be gradual, beginning with appreciation and allaying fear of the dark. Suggests sensory activities, hikes, games, aquatic activities, ecological simulations, historical presentations, and writing or reciting poetry.…

  20. Shedding light on the past

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stampfl, A. P. J.; Friedman, E. S.; Wilkinson, T. J.; Alp, E. E.; Yener, K. A.

    2001-07-01

    The Amuq valley in southern Turkey is an important and interesting area in the Near East forming a space-time bridge for archaeologists and scientists to ancient and modern civilizations. The Lake of Antioch which evolved during the mid-late Holocene appears to have been located nearby some of the largest human settlements existing during this period. By documenting the conditions of the lake in time, using classical and modern approaches, the climate and geomorphology of the basin may be reconstructed. Synchrotron X-ray fluorescence measurements were performed on sections of a sedimentary core from the lake, representing an estimated 7500 yr of history. Analysis yielded the distribution of elemental masses spanning Ca to Mo as a function of depth from the surface. We find that the elemental concentrations measured follow a number of distinct patterns that may be related to local geomorphology, climate and human activities.

  1. Transparent alumina: A light scattering model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Apetz, R.; Van Bruggen, P.B.

    2003-01-01

    A model based on Rayleigh-Gans-Debye light scattering theory has been developed to describe the light transmission properties of fine-grained, fully dense polycrystalline ceramics consisting of birefringent crystals. This model extends light transmission models based on geometrical optics, which are

  2. A Crystallographic Study of the Role of Sequence Context in Thymine Glycol Bypass by a Replicative DNA Polymerase Serendipitously Sheds Light on the Exonuclease Complex

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aller, Pierre; Duclos, Stéphanie; Wallace, Susan S.; Doublié, Sylvie (Vermont)

    2012-06-27

    Thymine glycol (Tg) is the most common oxidation product of thymine and is known to be a strong block to replicative DNA polymerases. A previously solved structure of the bacteriophage RB69 DNA polymerase (RB69 gp43) in complex with Tg in the sequence context 5'-G-Tg-G shed light on how Tg blocks primer elongation: The protruding methyl group of the oxidized thymine displaces the adjacent 5'-G, which can no longer serve as a template for primer elongation [Aller, P., Rould, M. A., Hogg, M, Wallace, S. S. and Doublie S. (2007). A structural rationale for stalling of a replicative DNA polymerase at the most common oxidative thymine lesion, thymine glycol. Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA, 104, 814-818.]. Several studies showed that in the sequence context 5'-C-Tg-purine, Tg is more likely to be bypassed by Klenow fragment, an A-family DNA polymerase. We set out to investigate the role of sequence context in Tg bypass in a B-family polymerase and to solve the crystal structures of the bacteriophage RB69 DNA polymerase in complex with Tg-containing DNA in the three remaining sequence contexts: 5'-A-Tg-G, 5'-T-Tg-G, and 5'-C-Tg-G. A combination of several factors - including the associated exonuclease activity, the nature of the 3' and 5' bases surrounding Tg, and the cis-trans interconversion of Tg - influences Tg bypass. We also visualized for the first time the structure of a well-ordered exonuclease complex, allowing us to identify and confirm the role of key residues (Phe123, Met256, and Tyr257) in strand separation and in the stabilization of the primer strand in the exonuclease site.

  3. Studies of Human 2,4-Dienoyl CoA Reductase Shed New Light on Peroxisomal β-Oxidation of Unsaturated Fatty Acids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hua, Tian; Wu, Dong; Ding, Wei; Wang, Jiangyun; Shaw, Neil; Liu, Zhi-Jie [Nankai; (Chinese Aca. Sci.)

    2012-10-15

    Peroxisomes play an essential role in maintaining fatty acid homeostasis. Although mitochondria are also known to participate in the catabolism of fatty acids via β-oxidation, differences exist between the peroxisomal and mitochondrial β-oxidation. Only peroxisomes, but not mitochondrion, can shorten very long chain fatty acids. Here, we describe the crystal structure of a ternary complex of peroxisomal 2,4-dienoyl CoA reductases (pDCR) with hexadienoyl CoA and NADP, as a prototype for comparison with the mitochondrial 2,4-dienoyl CoA reductase (mDCR) to shed light on the differences between the enzymes from the two organelles at the molecular level. Unexpectedly, the structure of pDCR refined to 1.84 Å resolution reveals the absence of the tyrosine-serine pair seen in the active site of mDCR, which together with a lysine and an asparagine have been deemed a hallmark of the SDR family of enzymes. Instead, aspartate hydrogen-bonded to the Cα hydroxyl via a water molecule seems to perturb the water molecule for protonation of the substrate. Our studies provide the first structural evidence for participation of water in the DCR-catalyzed reactions. Biochemical studies and structural analysis suggest that pDCRs can catalyze the shortening of six-carbon-long substrates in vitro. However, the Km values of pDCR for short chain acyl CoAs are at least 6-fold higher than those for substrates with 10 or more aliphatic carbons. Unlike mDCR, hinge movements permit pDCR to process very long chain polyunsaturated fatty acids.

  4. Model membranes to shed light on the biochemical and physical properties of ezrin/radixin/moesin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Picart, Catherine

    2014-01-01

    Ezrin, radixin and moesin (ERM) proteins are now more and more recognized to play a key role in a large number of important physiological processes such as morphogenesis, cancer metastasis and virus infection. Several recent reviews extensively discuss their biological functions [1-4]. In this review, we will first remind the main features of this family of proteins, which are now known as linkers and regulators of the plasma membrane/cytoskeleton linkage. We will then briefly review their implication in pathological processes such as cancer and viral infection. In a second part, we will focus on biochemical and biophysical approaches to study ERM interaction with lipid membranes and conformational change in well-defined environments. In vitro studies using biomimetic lipid membranes, especially large unilamellar vesicles (LUVs), giant unilamellar vesicles (GUVs) and supported lipid bilayers (SLBs) and recombinant proteins help to understand the molecular mechanism of conformational activation of ERM proteins. These tools are aimed to decorticate the different steps of the interaction, to simplify the experiments performed in vivo in much more complex biological environments. PMID:23041444

  5. Optimal load shedding and restoration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Ding

    Load shedding is an emergency control action in power systems that can save systems from a wide-area blackout. Underfrequency load shedding, steady state load shedding, and voltage load shedding are widely used in power systems. These methods utilize either the steady state model or a simplified dynamic model to represent a power systems. In this dissertation, a general optimal load shedding method that considers both the dynamic process and load distribution is proposed. The unfavorable load shedding is then formulated as an optimization problem with the objective function of cost minimization. This objective function is subjected to system, security, and operation constraints. The entire problem becomes a question of optimization with differential and nonlinear equations as constraints. To solve this problem, discretization is used to change the differential equations into algebraic equations. The original problem is thus reformulated as an optimization problem and can be solved by a standard mathematical program. The general idea is then applied to traditional power systems, deregulated power systems, power systems with distributed generation, and load restoration. In the traditional power system, the method shows that governor action, generation dynamic, disturbance location, and economic factors can be taken into consideration. In the deregulated power system, two power market models are developed and incorporated into the load shedding scheme. In power systems with multiple distributed generations, the different cases of disturbances are analyzed and models of different distributed generation developed. The general idea is then applied. Finally, the load restoration problem is studied, and it is proposed that an optimization method be applied to it. This dissertation provides a comprehensive solution for load shedding problem in power systems. The models developed in this research can also be used to study other power system problems.

  6. GreenLight Model 960.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandes, Richard; Carey, Conn; Hynes, James; Papkovsky, Dmitri

    2013-01-01

    The importance of food safety has resulted in a demand for a more rapid, high-throughput method for total viable count (TVC). The industry standard for TVC determination (ISO 4833:2003) is widely used but presents users with some drawbacks. The method is materials- and labor-intensive, requiring multiple agar plates per sample. More importantly, the method is slow, with 72 h typically required for a definitive result. Luxcel Biosciences has developed the GreenLight Model 960, a microtiter plate-based assay providing a rapid high-throughput method of aerobic bacterial load assessment through analysis of microbial oxygen consumption. Results are generated in 1-12 h, depending on microbial load. The mix and measure procedure allows rapid detection of microbial oxygen consumption and equates oxygen consumption to microbial load (CFU/g), providing a simple, sensitive means of assessing the microbial contamination levels in foods (1). As bacteria in the test sample grow and respire, they deplete O2, which is detected as an increase in the GreenLight probe signal above the baseline level (2). The time required to reach this increase in signal can be used to calculate the CFU/g of the original sample, based on a predetermined calibration. The higher the initial microbial load, the earlier this threshold is reached (1).

  7. On the stability and extension of reduced-order Galerkin models in incompressible flows. A numerical study of vortex shedding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akhtar, Imran; Nayfeh, Ali H.; Ribbens, Calvin J.

    2009-07-01

    Proper orthogonal decomposition (POD) has been used to develop a reduced-order model of the hydrodynamic forces acting on a circular cylinder. Direct numerical simulations of the incompressible Navier-Stokes equations have been performed using a parallel computational fluid dynamics (CFD) code to simulate the flow past a circular cylinder. Snapshots of the velocity and pressure fields are used to calculate the divergence-free velocity and pressure modes, respectively. We use the dominant of these velocity POD modes (a small number of eigenfunctions or modes) in a Galerkin procedure to project the Navier-Stokes equations onto a low-dimensional space, thereby reducing the distributed-parameter problem into a finite-dimensional nonlinear dynamical system in time. The solution of the reduced dynamical system is a limit cycle corresponding to vortex shedding. We investigate the stability of the limit cycle by using long-time integration and propose to use a shooting technique to home on the system limit cycle. We obtain the pressure-Poisson equation by taking the divergence of the Navier-Stokes equation and then projecting it onto the pressure POD modes. The pressure is then decomposed into lift and drag components and compared with the CFD results.

  8. On the stability and extension of reduced-order Galerkin models in incompressible flows. A numerical study of vortex shedding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akhtar, Imran [Virginia Tech, Department of Engineering Science and Mechanics, MC 0219, Blacksburg, VA (United States); Virginia Tech, Interdisciplinary Center for Applied Mathematics, MC 0531, Blacksburg, VA (United States); Nayfeh, Ali H. [Virginia Tech, Department of Engineering Science and Mechanics, MC 0219, Blacksburg, VA (United States); Ribbens, Calvin J. [Virginia Tech, Department of Computer Science, Blacksburg, VA (United States)

    2009-07-15

    Proper orthogonal decomposition (POD) has been used to develop a reduced-order model of the hydrodynamic forces acting on a circular cylinder. Direct numerical simulations of the incompressible Navier-Stokes equations have been performed using a parallel computational fluid dynamics (CFD) code to simulate the flow past a circular cylinder. Snapshots of the velocity and pressure fields are used to calculate the divergence-free velocity and pressure modes, respectively. We use the dominant of these velocity POD modes (a small number of eigenfunctions or modes) in a Galerkin procedure to project the Navier-Stokes equations onto a low-dimensional space, thereby reducing the distributed-parameter problem into a finite-dimensional nonlinear dynamical system in time. The solution of the reduced dynamical system is a limit cycle corresponding to vortex shedding. We investigate the stability of the limit cycle by using long-time integration and propose to use a shooting technique to home on the system limit cycle. We obtain the pressure-Poisson equation by taking the divergence of the Navier-Stokes equation and then projecting it onto the pressure POD modes. The pressure is then decomposed into lift and drag components and compared with the CFD results. (orig.)

  9. Light Front Boson Model Propagation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jorge Henrique Sales; Alfredo Takashi Suzuki

    2011-01-01

    stract The scope and aim of this work is to describe the two-body interaction mediated by a particle (either the scalar or the gauge boson) within the light-front formulation. To do this, first of all we point out the importance of propagators and Green functions in Quantum Mechanics. Then we project the covariant quantum propagator onto the light front time to get the propagator for scalar particles in these coordinates. This operator propagates the wave function from x+ = 0 to x+ > O. It corresponds to the definition of the time ordering operation in the light front time x+. We calculate the light-front Green's function for 2 interacting bosons propagating forward in x+. We also show how to write down the light front Green's function from the Feynman propagator and finally make a generalization to N bosons.

  10. Risk assessment modelling of fecal shedding caused by extended-spectrum cephalosporin-resistant Escherichia coli transmitted through waste milk fed to dairy pre-weaned calves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Awosile, Babafela B; Smith, Ben A

    2017-10-04

    Waste milk feeding is a common practice in dairy operations. Regardless of the benefits of this practice to the dairy farmers, concerns from the potential dissemination of antimicrobial-resistant bacteria through the gut and subsequent shedding by calves into the environment are increasing. In this study, we employed Monte Carlo simulation to assess the risk of shedding extended-spectrum cephalosporin-resistant Escherichia coli (ESC-R E. coli) caused by waste milk feeding in pre-weaned calves using an exponential dose-response model fit to data for E. coli O157:H7 in cattle. Data from pertinent studies were included in our model to predict the risk of shedding. The median (5th and 95th percentiles) for the daily risk of shedding ESC-R E. coli by calves fed only contaminated waste milk was predicted to be 2.9 × 10(-3) (2.1 × 10(-3), 3.7 × 10(-3)), representing a median daily risk of 29 out of 10,000 calves shedding ESC-R E. coli due to exclusive feeding of waste milk containing ESC-R E. coli. This median value was reduced by 94% when accounting for the proportion of waste milk that does not contain ESC-R E. coli. The overall risk of shedding ESC-R E. coli through the pre-weaning period for farms that feed waste milk to calves was 5.7 × 10(-3) (2.4 × 10(-3), 1.1 × 10(-2)), representing 57 out of 10,000 calves. When accounting for the proportion of farms that do not feed waste milk, the pre-weaning period risk was reduced by 23%. By varying the prevalence of ESC-R E. coli in waste milk using values of 3, 1.5, and 1%, the daily risk of shedding decreased by factors of 50, 65, and 82%, respectively, which supports the reduction of contamination or discontinuation of feeding waste milk containing ESC-R E. coli as major mitigation measures to reduce the risk of shedding caused by ingestion of resistant bacteria. It is anticipated that the effects of antimicrobial residues in waste milk, which was not considered herein due to lack of data, would further increase

  11. Control of rod shedding in the frog retina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basinger, S F; Hollyfield, J G

    1980-01-01

    In all vertebrate species examined thus far, rod outer segment shedding follows a cyclic pattern in which the outer segment tips are shed shortly after the onset of light. Work in the rat retina suggests that rod shedding may follow a circadian rhythm which is controlled by one or more circadian oscillators. Our results in the frog retina are significantly different in that: rod shedding can be driven by the onset of light or other environmental cues; shedding does not persist in constant darkness; shedding is unaffected in frogs with chronic unilateral or bilateral optic nerve section; and shedding will rapidly phase shift to the time of light onset on a wide variety of diurnal cycles. Thus, rod shedding in the frog retina does not appear to be a classical circadian rhythm.

  12. Children's residential exposure to chlorpyrifos: Application of CPPAES field measurements of chlorpyrifos and TCPy within MENTOR/SHEDS-Pesticides model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hore, Paromita [Environmental and Occupational Health Sciences Institute (EOHSI), Rutgers University and the University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey (UMDNJ), Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, 170 Frelinghuysen Road, Piscataway, NJ 08855 (United States)]|[New York City Department of Health, 253 Broadway New York, New York 10007 (United States); Zartarian, Valerie; Xue Jianping; Ozkaynak, Haluk [National Exposure Research Laboratory, U.S. EPA, 109 TW Alexander Drive, Research Triangle Park, NC 27709 (United States); Wang, S.-W.; Yang, Y.-C.; Chu, P.-Ling; Robson, Mark; Georgopoulos, Panos [Environmental and Occupational Health Sciences Institute (EOHSI), Rutgers University and the University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey (UMDNJ), Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, 170 Frelinghuysen Road, Piscataway, NJ 08855 (United States); Sheldon, Linda [National Exposure Research Laboratory, U.S. EPA, 109 TW Alexander Drive, Research Triangle Park, NC 27709 (United States); Needham, Larry Barr, Dana [Contemporary Pesticide Laboratory, Centers for Disease Control, 4770 Buford Highway, Atlanta, GA 30341 (United States); Freeman, Natalie [Environmental and Occupational Health Sciences Institute (EOHSI), Rutgers University and the University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey (UMDNJ), Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, 170 Frelinghuysen Road, Piscataway, NJ 08855 (United States)]|[University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611 (United States); Lioy, Paul J. [Environmental and Occupational Health Sciences Institute (EOHSI), Rutgers University and the University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey (UMDNJ), Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, 170 Frelinghuysen Road, Piscataway, NJ 08855 (United States)]. E-mail: plioy@eohsi.rutgers.edu

    2006-08-01

    The comprehensive individual field-measurements on non-dietary exposure collected in the Children's-Post-Pesticide-Application-Exposure-Study (CPPAES) were used within MENTOR/SHEDS-Pesticides, a physically based stochastic human exposure and dose model. In this application, however, the model was run deterministically. The MENTOR/SHEDS-Pesticides employed the CPPAES as input variables to simulate the exposure and the dose profiles for seven children over a 2-week post-application period following a routine residential and professional indoor crack-and-crevice chlorpyrifos application. The input variables were obtained from a personal activity diary, microenvironmental measurements and personal biomonitoring data obtained from CPPAES samples collected from the individual children and in their homes. Simulation results were compared with CPPAES field measured values obtained from the children's homes to assess the utility of the different microenvironmental data collected in CPPAES, i.e. indicator toys and wipe samplers to estimate aggregate exposures that can be result from one or more exposure pathways and routes. The final analyses of the database involved comparisons of the actual data obtained from the individual biomarker samples of a urinary metabolite of chlorpyrifos (TCPy) and the values predicted by MENTOR/SHEDS-Pesticides using the CPPAES-derived variables. Because duplicate diet samples were not part of the CPPAES study design, SHEDs-Pesticides simulated dose profiles did not account for the dietary route. The research provided more confidence in the types of data that can be used in the inhalation and dermal contact modules of MENTOR/SHEDS-Pesticides to predict the pesticide dose received by a child. It was determined that we still need additional understanding about: (1) the types of activities and durations of activities that result in non-dietary ingestion of pesticides and (2) the influence of dietary exposures on the levels of TCPy found

  13. Light Front Fermion Model Propagation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jorge Henrique Sales; Alfredo Takashi Suzuki

    2013-01-01

    In this work we consider the propagation of two fermion fields interacting with each other by the exchange of intermediate scalar bosons in the light front.We obtain the corrections up to fourth order in the coupling constant using hierarchical equations in order to obtain the bound state equation (Bethe-Salpeter equation).

  14. Active Hexose Correlated Compound Activates Immune Function to Decrease Chlamydia trachomatis Shedding in a Murine Stress Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belay, Tesfaye; Fu, Chih-Lung; Woart, Anthony

    2015-01-01

    A cold-induced stress mouse model for investigating chlamydia genital infection and immune response analysis was established in our laboratory. Previous results showed that cold-induced stress results in suppression of the immune response and increased intensity of chlamydia genital infection in the mouse model. The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the potential therapeutic value of active hexose correlated compound (AHCC) against chlamydia genital infection in mice. AHCC is an extract of mushroom commonly used as a dietary supplement is known to boost the immune system. Mice were infected intravaginally with Chlamydia trachomatis after a 24-day cold-stress application. Oral administration of AHCC to stressed or non-stressed mice was carried out seven days before infection and during the course of infection along with cervicovaginal swabbing. Cytokine production by peritoneal and splenic T cells isolated from AHCC-fed stressed mice and non-stressed mice was measured ELISA. Splenic T cells from both animal groups were co-cultured with mouse monocyte J774.2 cell line or cultured by addition of supernatants of AHCC-treated J774.2 cell line for 24 hours. Infection studies showed that AHCC-feeding compared to phosphate buffered saline (PBS)-feeding to stressed mice resulted in reduced Chlamydia trachomatis shedding from the genital tract. Levels of tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) and interleukin 6 (IL-6) were significantly increased in stressed mice receiving AHCC compared to stressed mice receiving PBS. Production of interferon gamma (IFN-γ) and interleukin 2 (IL-2) in the AHCC group was significantly high compared to production in PBS-fed group. Splenic T cells from stressed and non-stressed cultured with supernatants of AHCC-treated J774.2 cell line resulted in significantly increased TNF-α or IFN-γ production. Results obtained in this study show that AHCC improves the function of immune cells as indicated by the restoration of levels of cytokines

  15. Inhibiting avian influenza virus shedding using a novel RNAi antiviral vector technology: proof of concept in an avian cell model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linke, Lyndsey M; Wilusz, Jeffrey; Pabilonia, Kristy L; Fruehauf, Johannes; Magnuson, Roberta; Olea-Popelka, Francisco; Triantis, Joni; Landolt, Gabriele; Salman, Mo

    2016-03-01

    Influenza A viruses pose significant health and economic threats to humans and animals. Outbreaks of avian influenza virus (AIV) are a liability to the poultry industry and increase the risk for transmission to humans. There are limitations to using the AIV vaccine in poultry, creating barriers to controlling outbreaks and a need for alternative effective control measures. Application of RNA interference (RNAi) techniques hold potential; however, the delivery of RNAi-mediating agents is a well-known obstacle to harnessing its clinical application. We introduce a novel antiviral approach using bacterial vectors that target avian mucosal epithelial cells and deliver (small interfering RNA) siRNAs against two AIV genes, nucleoprotein (NP) and polymerase acidic protein (PA). Using a red fluorescent reporter, we first demonstrated vector delivery and intracellular expression in avian epithelial cells. Subsequently, we demonstrated significant reductions in AIV shedding when applying these anti-AIV vectors prophylactically. These antiviral vectors provided up to a 10,000-fold reduction in viral titers shed, demonstrating in vitro proof-of-concept for using these novel anti-AIV vectors to inhibit AIV shedding. Our results indicate this siRNA vector technology could represent a scalable and clinically applicable antiviral technology for avian and human influenza and a prototype for RNAi-based vectors against other viruses.

  16. Measuring and modeling twilight's purple light

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Raymond L.; Hernández-Andrés, Javier

    2003-01-01

    During many clear twilights, much of the solar sky is dominated by pastel purples. This purple light's red component has long been ascribed to transmission through and scattering by stratospheric dust and other aerosols. Clearly the vivid purples of post-volcanic twilights are related to increased stratospheric aerosol loading. Yet our time-series measurements of purple-light spectra, combined with radiative transfer modeling and satellite soundings, indicate that background stratospheric aerosols by themselves do not redden sunlight enough to cause the purple light's reds. Furthermore, scattering and extinction in both the troposphere and the stratosphere are needed to explain most purple lights.

  17. Effect of valproic acid and injury on lesion size and endothelial glycocalyx shedding in a rodent model of isolated traumatic brain injury

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jepsen, Cecilie Heerdegen; deMoya, Marc A; Perner, Anders;

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In isolated traumatic brain injury (TBI), little is known about the endothelial response and the effects of endothelial glycocalyx shedding. We have previously shown that treatment with valproic acid (VPA) improves outcomes following TBI and hemorrhagic shock.In this model, we...... hypothesized that severe isolated TBI would cause shedding of the endothelial glycocalyx, as measured by serum syndecan-1 (sSDC-1) levels. We further hypothesized that VPA treatment would reduce this response and reduce lesion size volume. METHODS: Forty Sprague-Dawley rats were allocated to TBI + VPA (n = 8......), TBI + saline vehicle control infusion (n = 8), sham + saline vehicle control infusion (n = 6), or sham + VPA (n = 8). TBI animals were subjected to severe controlled cortical impact and killed 6 hours after injury. VPA 300 mg/kg was given as an intravenous bolus 30 minutes after injury. Serum samples...

  18. Kepler sheds new and unprecedented light on the variability of a blue supergiant: Gravity waves in the O9.5Iab star HD 188209

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aerts, C.; Símon-Díaz, S.; Bloemen, S.; Debosscher, J.; Pápics, P. I.; Bryson, S.; Still, M.; Moravveji, E.; Williamson, M. H.; Grundahl, F.; Fredslund Andersen, M.; Antoci, V.; Pallé, P. L.; Christensen-Dalsgaard, J.; Rogers, T. M.

    2017-06-01

    Stellar evolution models are most uncertain for evolved massive stars. Asteroseismology based on high-precision uninterrupted space photometry has become a new way to test the outcome of stellar evolution theory and was recently applied to a multitude of stars, but not yet to massive evolved supergiants.Our aim is to detect, analyse and interpret the photospheric and wind variability of the O9.5 Iab star HD 188209 from Kepler space photometry and long-term high-resolution spectroscopy. We used Kepler scattered-light photometry obtained by the nominal mission during 1460 d to deduce the photometric variability of this O-type supergiant. In addition, we assembled and analysed high-resolution high signal-to-noise spectroscopy taken with four spectrographs during some 1800 d to interpret the temporal spectroscopic variability of the star. The variability of this blue supergiant derived from the scattered-light space photometry is in full in agreement with the one found in the ground-based spectroscopy. We find significant low-frequency variability that is consistently detected in all spectral lines of HD 188209. The photospheric variability propagates into the wind, where it has similar frequencies but slightly higher amplitudes. The morphology of the frequency spectra derived from the long-term photometry and spectroscopy points towards a spectrum of travelling waves with frequency values in the range expected for an evolved O-type star. Convectively-driven internal gravity waves excited in the stellar interior offer the most plausible explanation of the detected variability. Based on photometric observations made with the NASA Kepler satellite and on spectroscopic observations made with four telescopes: the Nordic Optical Telescope operated by NOTSA and the Mercator Telescope operated by the Flemish Community, both at the Observatorio del Roque de los Muchachos (La Palma, Spain) of the Instituto de Astrofísica de Canarias, the T13 2.0 m Automatic Spectroscopic

  19. TLR2 signaling decreases transmission of Streptococcus pneumoniae by limiting bacterial shedding in an infant mouse Influenza A co-infection model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aimee L Richard

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available While the importance of transmission of pathogens is widely accepted, there is currently little mechanistic understanding of this process. Nasal carriage of Streptococcus pneumoniae (the pneumococcus is common in humans, especially in early childhood, and is a prerequisite for the development of disease and transmission among hosts. In this study, we adapted an infant mouse model to elucidate host determinants of transmission of S. pneumoniae from inoculated index mice to uninfected contact mice. In the context of co-infection with influenza A virus, the pneumococcus was transmitted among wildtype littermates, with approximately half of the contact mice acquiring colonization. Mice deficient for TLR2 were colonized to a similar density but transmitted S. pneumoniae more efficiently (100% transmission than wildtype animals and showed decreased expression of interferon α and higher viral titers. The greater viral burden in tlr2-/- mice correlated with heightened inflammation, and was responsible for an increase in bacterial shedding from the mouse nose. The role of TLR2 signaling was confirmed by intranasal treatment of wildtype mice with the agonist Pam3Cys, which decreased inflammation and reduced bacterial shedding and transmission. Taken together, these results suggest that the innate immune response to influenza virus promotes bacterial shedding, allowing the bacteria to transit from host to host. These findings provide insight into the role of host factors in the increased pneumococcal carriage rates seen during flu season and contribute to our overall understanding of pathogen transmission.

  20. Rainfall simulation experiments and Water Drop Penetration Time measurements shed light on the impact of water repellency on soils under organic farming management in Eastern Spain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerdà, Artemi; González, Óscar; León, Javier; Jordán, Antonio

    2015-04-01

    Water repellency is a well-know soil property since the research of professor Stefan Helmut Doerr recovered and powered the research developed by professor DeBano (Atanassova and Doerr, 2011; ; Jordán et al., 2011; Bodí et al., 2012; González Peñaloza et al., 2012 Bodí et al., 2013; García Moreno et al., 2013; Jordán et al., 2013; Badía-Villas et al., 2014; Jordán et al., 2013; Jiménez Morillo et al., 2015). However, little is known about the impact of water repellency in surface runoff generation, although usually is accepted that when more soil water repellent is a soil, higher will be the surface runoff discharge (Stoff et al., 2011; Madsen et al., 2011; León et al., 2013; Lozano et al., 2013; Mataix-Solera et al., 2013; Santos et al., 2015). And the impact of the water repellency and then the higher surface wash discharge can trigger high erosion rates (Kröpfl et al., 2013; Mandal and Sharda 2013; Zhao et al., 2013). However these relationships were not demonstrated as the most water repellent soils are the one with high organic contents, and those soils do not have soil losses, probably due to the high infiltration rates due to the macropore flow. Rainfall simulation experiments can shed light in the runoff generation mechanism as they can control the rainfall intensity (Bodí et al., 2012; Iserloh et al., 2012; Iserloh et al., 2013), and inform about the main mechanism of the soil erosion process Cerdà and Jurgensen, 2011; Daugherty et al., 2011; Podwojewski et al., 2011; Dunkerley, 2012; Garel et al., 2012; Jouquet et al., 2012; Kibet et al., 2013; Butzen et al., 2014; Ma et al., 2014; Martínez Murillo et al., 2013). To determine the relationship between surface runoff generated under simulated rainfall (Cerdà, 1988a; 1988b; Cerdà et al., 1998; Ziadat and Taimeh, 2013) with a small rainfall simulator (0.25 m2) and water repellency measurements with the Water Drop Penetration time methods were done (Bodí et al., 2012). The results show that

  1. Modeling and Fitting Exoplanet Transit Light Curves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Millholland, Sarah; Ruch, G. T.

    2013-01-01

    We present a numerical model along with an original fitting routine for the analysis of transiting extra-solar planet light curves. Our light curve model is unique in several ways from other available transit models, such as the analytic eclipse formulae of Mandel & Agol (2002) and Giménez (2006), the modified Eclipsing Binary Orbit Program (EBOP) model implemented in Southworth’s JKTEBOP code (Popper & Etzel 1981; Southworth et al. 2004), or the transit model developed as a part of the EXOFAST fitting suite (Eastman et al. in prep.). Our model employs Keplerian orbital dynamics about the system’s center of mass to properly account for stellar wobble and orbital eccentricity, uses a unique analytic solution derived from Kepler’s Second Law to calculate the projected distance between the centers of the star and planet, and calculates the effect of limb darkening using a simple technique that is different from the commonly used eclipse formulae. We have also devised a unique Monte Carlo style optimization routine for fitting the light curve model to observed transits. We demonstrate that, while the effect of stellar wobble on transit light curves is generally small, it becomes significant as the planet to stellar mass ratio increases and the semi-major axes of the orbits decrease. We also illustrate the appreciable effects of orbital ellipticity on the light curve and the necessity of accounting for its impacts for accurate modeling. We show that our simple limb darkening calculations are as accurate as the analytic equations of Mandel & Agol (2002). Although our Monte Carlo fitting algorithm is not as mathematically rigorous as the Markov Chain Monte Carlo based algorithms most often used to determine exoplanetary system parameters, we show that it is straightforward and returns reliable results. Finally, we show that analyses performed with our model and optimization routine compare favorably with exoplanet characterizations published by groups such as the

  2. Light element synthesis in baryon isocurvature models

    CERN Document Server

    Kumar, D L P

    2006-01-01

    The prejudice against baryon isocurvature models is primarily because of their inconsistency with early universe light element nucleosynthesis results. We propose that incipient low metallicity (Pop II) star forming regions can be expected to have environments conducive to Deuterium production by spallation, up to levels observed in the universe.

  3. A light knowledge model for linguistic applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baud, R H; Lovis, C; Ruch, P; Rassinoux, A M

    2001-01-01

    Content extraction from medical texts is achievable today by linguistic applications, in so far as sufficient domain knowledge is available. Such knowledge represents a model of the domain and is hard to collect with sufficient depth and good coverage, despite numerous attempts. To leverage this task is a priority in order to benefit from the awaited linguistic tools. The light model is designed with this goal in mind. Syntactic and lexical information are generally available with large lexicons. A domain model should add the necessary semantic information. The authors have designed a light knowledge model for the collection of semantic information on the basis of the recognized syntactical and lexical attributes. It has been tailored for the acquisition of enough semantic information in order to retrieve terms of a controlled vocabulary from free texts, as for example, to retrieve Mesh terms from patient records.

  4. Shedding Light on the 2016 World Health Organization Classification of Tumors of the Central Nervous System in the Era of Radiomics and Radiogenomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colen, Rivka R; Hassan, Islam; Elshafeey, Nabil; Zinn, Pascal O

    2016-11-01

    The new World Health Organization classification of brain tumors depends on combining the histologic light microscopy features of central nervous system (CNS) tumors with canonical genetic alterations. This integrated diagnosis is redrawing the pedigree chart of brain tumors with rearrangement of tumor groups on the basis of geno-phenotypical behaviors into meaningful groups. Multiple radiogenomic studies provide a bridge between imaging features and tumor microenvironment. An overlap that can be integrated within the genophenotypical classification of CNS tumors for a better understanding of different clinically relevant entities.

  5. New Directions in Modeling the Lighting Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Fiala

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents information about new directions in the modelingof lighting systems, and an overview of methods for the modeling oflighting systems. The new R-FEM method is described, which is acombination of the Radiosity method and the Finite Elements Method. Thepaper contains modeling results and their verification by experimentalmeasurements and by the Matlab simulation for this R-FEM method.

  6. Modeling Light-Dependent Biofilm Morphology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kernan, Chase; Huang, Jean; Christianson, Rebecca

    2013-03-01

    Bacterial aggregates on submerged substrates can produce complex biofilm morphologies that are subject to environmental and metabolic factors. We develop a reductionistic cellular automata model of these structures with the intent of guiding experimentation and explaining prior results. We focus on reproducing the columnar and ``mushroom'' phases of aerobic R. palustris and light-sensitive anaerobic R. palustris, respectively. This light sensitivity requires the novel inclusion of a characteristic light penetration depth in addition to surface tension and media penetration parameters. We quantitatively divide this parameter space into roughly four morphological phases--columnar, mushroom, uniform, and irregular--by examining the resultant convexity defect distribution, horizontal correlation, and coverage as a function of height. Finally, we both validate experimental evidence of these phases and suggest new parameter regimes to investigate empirically.

  7. Model of light variations of Be stars

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stepinski, T. (Polska Akademia Nauk, Warsaw. Centrum Astronomiczne)

    1980-01-01

    The following model of Be star is proposed: a star rotating rigidly with a ''break up'' velocity is surrounded with a flat, geometrically thin, optically thick gaseous disk rotating with a Keplerian velocity. The disk absorbs and reemits stellar light. Viscous heat dissipation in the disk is neglected. The emerging spectrum of the system is calculated in black body approximation with temperature being a function of a position on the star and on the disk. Variation of the inner and outer disk radii may give rise to monochromatic light variations of the whole system in the range of 0.1-0.7 magnitudes. The light variations observed in Be stars are in the same range.

  8. PyTransit: Transit light curve modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parviainen, Hannu

    2015-05-01

    PyTransit implements optimized versions of the Giménez and Mandel & Agol transit models for exoplanet transit light-curves. The two models are implemented natively in Fortran with OpenMP parallelization, and are accessed by an object-oriented python interface. PyTransit facilitates the analysis of photometric time series of exoplanet transits consisting of hundreds of thousands of data points, and of multipassband transit light curves from spectrophotometric observations. It offers efficient model evaluation for multicolour observations and transmission spectroscopy, built-in supersampling to account for extended exposure times, and routines to calculate the projected planet-to-star distance for circular and eccentric orbits, transit durations, and more.

  9. Modeling Light Propagation in Luminescent Media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahin, Derya

    This study presents physical, computational and analytical modeling approaches for light propagation in luminescent random media. Two different approaches are used, namely (i) a statistical approach: Monte-Carlo simulations for photon transport and (ii) a deterministic approach: radiative transport theory. Both approaches account accurately for the multiple absorption and reemission of light at different wavelengths and for anisotropic luminescence. The deterministic approach is a generalization of radiative transport theory for solving inelastic scattering problems in random media. We use the radiative transport theory to study light propagation in luminescent media. Based on this theory, we also study the optically thick medium. Using perturbation methods, a corrected diffusion approximation with asymptotically accurate boundary conditions and a boundary layer solution are derived. The accuracy and the efficacy of this approach is verified for a plane-parallel slab problem. In particular, we apply these two approaches (MC and radiative transport theory) to model light propagation in semiconductor-based luminescent solar concentrators (LSCs). The computational results for both approaches are compared with each other and found to agree. The results of this dissertation present practical and reliable techniques to use for solving forward/inverse inelastic scattering problems arising in various research areas such as optics, biomedical engineering, nuclear engineering, solar science and material science.

  10. Development of a Rotavirus-Shedding Model in Rhesus Macaques, Using a Homologous Wild-Type Rotavirus of a New P Genotype

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNeal, Monica M.; Sestak, Karol; Choi, Anthony H.-C.; Basu, Mitali; Cole, Michael J.; Aye, Pyone P.; Bohm, Rudolf P.; Ward, Richard L.

    2005-01-01

    Although there are several reports on rotavirus inoculation of nonhuman primates, no reliable model exists. Therefore, this study was designed to develop a rhesus macaque model for rotavirus studies. The goals were to obtain a wild-type macaque rotavirus and evaluate it as a challenge virus for model studies. Once rotavirus was shown to be endemic within the macaque colony at the Tulane National Primate Research Center, stool specimens were collected from juvenile animals (2.6 to 5.9 months of age) without evidence of previous rotavirus infection and examined for rotavirus antigen. Six of 10 animals shed rotavirus during the 10-week collection period, and the electropherotypes of all isolates were identical to each other but distinct from those of prototype simian rotaviruses. These viruses were characterized as serotype G3 and subgroup 1, properties typical of many animal rotaviruses, including simian strains. Nucleotide sequence analysis of the VP4 gene was performed with a culture-grown isolate from the stool of one animal, designated the TUCH strain. Based on both genotypic and phylogenetic comparisons between TUCH VP4 and cognate proteins of representatives of the reported 22 P genotypes, the TUCH virus belongs to a new genotype, P[23]. A pool of wild-type TUCH was prepared and intragastrically administered to eight cesarean section-derived, specific-pathogen-free macaques 14 to 42 days of age. All animals were kept in a biocontainment level 2 facility. Although no diarrhea was observed and the animals remained clinically normal, all animals shed large quantities of rotavirus antigen in their feces after inoculation, which resolved by the end of the 14-day observation period. Therefore, TUCH infection of macaques provides a useful nonhuman primate model for studies on rotavirus protection. PMID:15613323

  11. Current challenges for pre-earthquake electromagnetic emissions: shedding light from micro-scale plastic flow, granular packings, phase transitions and self-affinity notion of fracture process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Eftaxias

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Are there credible electromagnetic (EM potential earthquake (EQ precursors? This a question debated in the scientific community and there may be legitimate reasons for the critical views. The negative view concerning the existence of EM potential precursors is enhanced by features that accompany their observation which are considered as paradox ones, namely, these signals: (i are not observed at the time of EQs occurrence and during the aftershock period, (ii are not accompanied by large precursory strain changes, (iii are not accompanied by simultaneous geodetic or seismological precursors and (iv their traceability is considered problematic. In this work, the detected candidate EM potential precursors are studied through a shift in thinking towards the basic science findings relative to granular packings, micron-scale plastic flow, interface depinning, fracture size effects, concepts drawn from phase transitions, self-affine notion of fracture and faulting process, universal features of fracture surfaces, recent high quality laboratory studies, theoretical models and numerical simulations. We try to contribute to the establishment of strict criteria for the definition of an emerged EM anomaly as a possibly EQ-related one, and to the explanation of potential precursory EM features which have been considered as paradoxes. A three-stage model for EQ generation by means of pre-EQ fracture-induced EM emissions is proposed. The claim that the observed EM potential precursors may permit a real-time and step-by-step monitoring of the EQ generation is tested.

  12. Novel Barite Chimneys at the Loki's Castle Vent Field Shed Light on Key Factors Shaping Microbial Communities and Functions in Hydrothermal Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steen, Ida H; Dahle, Håkon; Stokke, Runar; Roalkvam, Irene; Daae, Frida-Lise; Rapp, Hans Tore; Pedersen, Rolf B; Thorseth, Ingunn H

    2015-01-01

    In order to fully understand the cycling of elements in hydrothermal systems it is critical to understand intra-field variations in geochemical and microbiological processes in both focused, high-temperature and diffuse, low-temperature areas. To reveal important causes and effects of this variation, we performed an extensive chemical and microbiological characterization of a low-temperature venting area in the Loki's Castle Vent Field (LCVF). This area, located at the flank of the large sulfide mound, is characterized by numerous chimney-like barite (BaSO4) structures (≤ 1 m high) covered with white cotton-like microbial mats. Results from geochemical analyses, microscopy (FISH, SEM), 16S rRNA gene amplicon-sequencing and metatranscriptomics were compared to results from previous analyses of biofilms growing on black smoker chimneys at LCVF. Based on our results, we constructed a conceptual model involving the geochemistry and microbiology in the LCVF. The model suggests that CH4 and H2S are important electron donors for microorganisms in both high-temperature and low-temperature areas, whereas the utilization of H2 seems restricted to high-temperature areas. This further implies that sub-seafloor processes can affect energy-landscapes, elemental cycling, and the metabolic activity of primary producers on the seafloor. In the cotton-like microbial mats on top of the active barite chimneys, a unique network of single cells of Epsilonproteobacteria interconnected by threads of extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) was seen, differing significantly from the long filamentous Sulfurovum filaments observed in biofilms on the black smokers. This network also induced nucleation of barite crystals and is suggested to play an essential role in the formation of the microbial mats and the chimneys. Furthermore, it illustrates variations in how different genera of Epsilonproteobacteria colonize and position cells in different vent fluid mixing zones within a vent field

  13. Novel barite chimneys at the Loki´s Castle Vent Field shed light on key factors shaping microbial communities and functions in hydrothermal systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ida Helene eSteen

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In order to fully understand the cycling of elements in hydrothermal systems it is critical to understand intra-field variations in geochemical and microbiological processes in both focused, high-temperature and diffuse, low-temperature areas. To reveal important causes and effects of this variation, we performed an extensive chemical and microbiological characterization of a low-temperature venting area in the Loki’s Castle Vent Field (LCVF. This area, located at the flank of the large sulfide mound, is characterized by numerous chimney-like barite (BaSO4 structures (≤ 1m high covered with white cotton-like microbial mats. Results from geochemical analyses, microscopy (FISH, SEM, 16S rRNA gene amplicon-sequencing and metatranscriptomics were compared to results from previous analyses of biofilms growing on black smoker chimneys at LCVF. Based on our results, we constructed a conceptual model involving the geochemistry and microbiology in the LCVF. The model suggests that CH4 and H2S are important electron donors for microorganisms in both high-temperature and low-temperature areas, whereas the utilization of H2 seems restricted to high-temperature areas. This further implies that sub-seafloor processes can affect energy-landscapes, elemental cycling, and the metabolic activity of primary producers on the seafloor. In the cotton-like microbial mats on top of the active barite chimneys, a unique network of single cells of Epsilonproteobacteria interconnected by threads of extracellular polymeric substances (EPS was seen, differing significantly from the long filamentous Sulfurovum filaments observed in biofilms on the black smokers. This network also induced nucleation of barite crystals and is suggested to play an essential role in the formation of the microbial mats and the chimneys. Furthermore, it illustrates variations in how different genera of Epsilonproteobacteria colonize and position cells in different vent fluid mixing zones within

  14. Can alteration experiments on impact melts from El'gygytgyn and volcanic glasses shed new light on the formation of the Martian surface?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hellevang, Helge; Dypvik, Henning; Kalleson, Elin; Pittarello, Lidia; Koeberl, Christian

    2013-07-01

    This investigation involved three specimens: an altered felsic sample of impactite from the ICDP El'gygytgyn drill core D1c, and two reference volcanics from Iceland, namely a rhyolitic glass and a basaltic glass. The goal of this work was to better understand the alteration of impact melt and volcanic glass, and to apply the results to an investigation of alteration processes below the surface of Mars. Hydrothermal batch alteration experiments with the El'gygytgyn sample showed formation of various silica phases such as cristobalite, opal, and quartz. According to geochemical modeling, zeolites were also expected, but zeolite minerals already present in the impactite prior to the experiment may have masked possible experimental zeolite growth. Basaltic glass was altered to smectite, talc, and opal. The accompanying numerical modeling gave results that were similar or comparable to the laboratory experiments. Rhyolitic glass was kinetically more stable than basaltic glass, and showed only minor formation of calcite and feldspar during the 3-week experiment. The study showed that closed-system isochemical alteration of both siliceous and mafic glasses and melts results in the formation of smectites and zeolites. Therefore, to link alteration features on Mars to specific physical conditions, the exact identity of the mineral phases present in surface rocks must be known. Moreover, our simulations on closed-system isochemical alteration showed that the fraction of zeolites and silica formed relative to smectite depends on the source mineral altered. Therefore, fractions of these mineral groups present in the Martian soil may be used to better predict source rock characteristics.

  15. Colour dependence of zodiacal light models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giese, R. H.; Hanner, M. S.; Leinert, C.

    1973-01-01

    Colour models of the zodiacal light in the ecliptic have been calculated for both dielectric and metallic particles in the sub-micron and micron size range. Two colour ratios were computed, a blue ratio and a red ratio. The models with a size distribution proportional to s to the -2.5 power ds (where s is the particle radius) generally show a colour close to the solar colour and almost independent of elongation. Especially in the blue colour ratio there is generally no significant dependence on the lower cutoff size (0.1-1 micron). The main feature of absorbing particles is a reddening at small elongations. The models for size distributions proportional to s to the -4 power ds show larger departures from solar colour and more variation with model parameters. Colour measurements, including red and near infra-red, therefore are useful to distinguish between flat and steep size spectra and to verify the presence of slightly absorbing particles.

  16. Shedding Light on the Compton-thick Active Galactic Nucleus in the Ultraluminous Infrared Galaxy UGC 5101 with Broadband X-Ray Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oda, Saeko; Tanimoto, Atsushi; Ueda, Yoshihiro; Imanishi, Masatoshi; Terashima, Yuichi; Ricci, Claudio

    2017-02-01

    We report the broadband X-ray spectra of the ultraluminous infrared galaxy (ULIRG) UGC 5101 in the 0.25–100 keV band observed with the Swift/Burst Alert Telescope (BAT), Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array (NuSTAR), Suzaku, XMM-Newton, and Chandra. A Compton-thick active galactic nucleus (AGN) obscured with a hydrogen column density of ≈ 1.3× {10}24 cm‑2 is detected above 10 keV. A spectral fit with a numerical torus model favors a large half-opening angle of the torus, > 41°, suggesting that the covering fraction of material heavily obscuring the X-ray source is moderate. The intrinsic 2–10 keV luminosity is determined to be ≈ 1.4× {10}43 erg s‑1, which is ≈ 2.5 times larger than the previous estimate using only data below 10 keV with a simple spectral model. We find that UGC 5101 shows the ratio between the [O iv] 26 μm line and 2–10 keV luminosities similar to those of normal Seyfert galaxies, along with other ULIRGs observed with NuSTAR, indicating that a significant portion of local ULIRGs are not really “X-ray faint” with respect to the flux of forbidden lines originating from the narrow-line region. We propose a possible scenario that (1) the AGN in UGC 5101 is surrounded not only by Compton-thick matter located close to the equatorial plane but also by Compton-thin ({N}{{H}}∼ {10}21 cm‑2) matter in the torus-hole region and (2) it is accreting at a high Eddington rate with a steep UV to X-ray spectral energy distribution. Nevertheless, we argue that AGNs in many ULIRGs do not look extraordinary (i.e., extremely X-ray faint), as suggested by recent works, compared with normal Seyferts.

  17. Directional RNA deep sequencing sheds new light on the transcriptional response of Anabaena sp. strain PCC 7120 to combined-nitrogen deprivation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Head Steven R

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cyanobacteria are potential sources of renewable chemicals and biofuels and serve as model organisms for bacterial photosynthesis, nitrogen fixation, and responses to environmental changes. Anabaena (Nostoc sp. strain PCC 7120 (hereafter Anabaena is a multicellular filamentous cyanobacterium that can "fix" atmospheric nitrogen into ammonia when grown in the absence of a source of combined nitrogen. Because the nitrogenase enzyme is oxygen sensitive, Anabaena forms specialized cells called heterocysts that create a microoxic environment for nitrogen fixation. We have employed directional RNA-seq to map the Anabaena transcriptome during vegetative cell growth and in response to combined-nitrogen deprivation, which induces filaments to undergo heterocyst development. Our data provide an unprecedented view of transcriptional changes in Anabaena filaments during the induction of heterocyst development and transition to diazotrophic growth. Results Using the Illumina short read platform and a directional RNA-seq protocol, we obtained deep sequencing data for RNA extracted from filaments at 0, 6, 12, and 21 hours after the removal of combined nitrogen. The RNA-seq data provided information on transcript abundance and boundaries for the entire transcriptome. From these data, we detected novel antisense transcripts within the UTRs (untranslated regions and coding regions of key genes involved in heterocyst development, suggesting that antisense RNAs may be important regulators of the nitrogen response. In addition, many 5' UTRs were longer than anticipated, sometimes extending into upstream open reading frames (ORFs, and operons often showed complex structure and regulation. Finally, many genes that had not been previously identified as being involved in heterocyst development showed regulation, providing new candidates for future studies in this model organism. Conclusions Directional RNA-seq data were obtained that provide

  18. Fossil worm burrows reveal very early terrestrial animal activity and shed light on trophic resources after the end-cretaceous mass extinction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karen Chin

    Full Text Available The widespread mass extinctions at the end of the Cretaceous caused world-wide disruption of ecosystems, and faunal responses to the one-two punch of severe environmental perturbation and ecosystem collapse are still unclear. Here we report the discovery of in situ terrestrial fossil burrows from just above the impact-defined Cretaceous-Paleogene (K/Pg boundary in southwestern North Dakota. The crisscrossing networks of horizontal burrows occur at the interface of a lignitic coal and silty sandstone, and reveal intense faunal activity within centimeters of the boundary clay. Estimated rates of sedimentation and coal formation suggest that the burrows were made less than ten thousand years after the end-Cretaceous impact. The burrow characteristics are most consistent with burrows of extant earthworms. Moreover, the burrowing and detritivorous habits of these annelids fit models that predict the trophic and sheltering lifestyles of terrestrial animals that survived the K/Pg extinction event. In turn, such detritus-eaters would have played a critical role in supporting secondary consumers. Thus, some of the carnivorous vertebrates that radiated after the K/Pg extinction may owe their evolutionary success to thriving populations of earthworms.

  19. A gene-based map of the Nod factor-independent Aeschynomene evenia sheds new light on the evolution of nodulation and legume genomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaintreuil, Clémence; Rivallan, Ronan; Bertioli, David J; Klopp, Christophe; Gouzy, Jérôme; Courtois, Brigitte; Leleux, Philippe; Martin, Guillaume; Rami, Jean-François; Gully, Djamel; Parrinello, Hugues; Séverac, Dany; Patrel, Delphine; Fardoux, Joël; Ribière, William; Boursot, Marc; Cartieaux, Fabienne; Czernic, Pierre; Ratet, Pascal; Mournet, Pierre; Giraud, Eric; Arrighi, Jean-François

    2016-08-01

    Aeschynomene evenia has emerged as a new model legume for the deciphering of the molecular mechanisms of an alternative symbiotic process that is independent of the Nod factors. Whereas most of the research on nitrogen-fixing symbiosis, legume genetics and genomics has so far focused on Galegoid and Phaseolid legumes, A. evenia falls in the more basal and understudied Dalbergioid clade along with peanut (Arachis hypogaea). To provide insights into the symbiotic genes content and the structure of the A. evenia genome, we established a gene-based genetic map for this species. Firstly, an RNAseq analysis was performed on the two parental lines selected to generate a F2 mapping population. The transcriptomic data were used to develop molecular markers and they allowed the identification of most symbiotic genes. The resulting map comprised 364 markers arranged in 10 linkage groups (2n = 20). A comparative analysis with the sequenced genomes of Arachis duranensis and A. ipaensis, the diploid ancestors of peanut, indicated blocks of conserved macrosynteny. Altogether, these results provided important clues regarding the evolution of symbiotic genes in a Nod factor-independent context. They provide a basis for a genome sequencing project and pave the way for forward genetic analysis of symbiosis in A. evenia.

  20. Interaction between small GTPase Rab7 and PI3KC3 links autophagy and endocytosis: A new Rab7 effector protein sheds light on membrane trafficking pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Mary Grace; Zhong, Qing

    2011-03-01

    Endocytosis and autophagy are both membrane trafficking pathways vital for cell survival. Endocytosis, the primary means by which cells internalize material such as cell-surface receptors and their protein ligands, is essential for proper cell growth and communication. Autophagy is a catabolic process that degrades cargo ranging from organelles to protein aggregates to bacteria, and it is important for maintaining cellular homeostasis. Defects in both endosome and autophagosome maturation lead to an array of human diseases, including cancer; however, the molecular mechanisms underlying endosome and autophagosome maturation are not well characterized. In the case of endocytosis, small GTPases, key players in membrane organization, are required for endosome maturation. Specifically, activation of the small GTPase Rab7 is required for the initiation of the early-to-late endosome transition, although how this is regulated is largely unknown. Now recent findings from our laboratory show that Rubicon, a component of the PI3KC3 complex, inhibits endosome maturation by preventing activation of Rab7. Not only do our results clarify the molecular link between PI3KC3 and Rab7 function in endosome maturation, they lead us to propose new models for PI3KC3 involvement in membrane trafficking, particularly at the convergence between the endosome and autophagosome pathways.

  1. Fossil Worm Burrows Reveal Very Early Terrestrial Animal Activity and Shed Light on Trophic Resources after the End-Cretaceous Mass Extinction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chin, Karen; Pearson, Dean; Ekdale, A. A.

    2013-01-01

    The widespread mass extinctions at the end of the Cretaceous caused world-wide disruption of ecosystems, and faunal responses to the one-two punch of severe environmental perturbation and ecosystem collapse are still unclear. Here we report the discovery of in situ terrestrial fossil burrows from just above the impact-defined Cretaceous-Paleogene (K/Pg) boundary in southwestern North Dakota. The crisscrossing networks of horizontal burrows occur at the interface of a lignitic coal and silty sandstone, and reveal intense faunal activity within centimeters of the boundary clay. Estimated rates of sedimentation and coal formation suggest that the burrows were made less than ten thousand years after the end-Cretaceous impact. The burrow characteristics are most consistent with burrows of extant earthworms. Moreover, the burrowing and detritivorous habits of these annelids fit models that predict the trophic and sheltering lifestyles of terrestrial animals that survived the K/Pg extinction event. In turn, such detritus-eaters would have played a critical role in supporting secondary consumers. Thus, some of the carnivorous vertebrates that radiated after the K/Pg extinction may owe their evolutionary success to thriving populations of earthworms. PMID:23951041

  2. Active Hexose Correlated Compound Activates Immune Function to Decrease Chlamydia trachomatis Shedding in a Murine Stress Model

    OpenAIRE

    Belay, Tesfaye; Fu, Chih-Lung; Woart, Anthony

    2015-01-01

    A cold-induced stress mouse model for investigating chlamydia genital infection and immune response analysis was established in our laboratory. Previous results showed that cold-induced stress results in suppression of the immune response and increased intensity of chlamydia genital infection in the mouse model. The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the potential therapeutic value of active hexose correlated compound (AHCC) against chlamydia genital infection in mice. AHCC is an ex...

  3. BLAM (Benthic Light Availability Model): A Proposed Model of Hydrogeomorphic Controls on Light in Rivers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Julian, J. P.; Doyle, M. W.; Stanley, E. H.

    2006-12-01

    Light is vital to the dynamics of aquatic ecosystems. It drives photosynthesis and photochemical reactions, affects thermal structure, and influences behavior of aquatic biota. Despite the fundamental role of light to riverine ecosystems, light studies in rivers have been mostly neglected because i) boundary conditions (e.g., banks, riparian vegetation) make ambient light measurements difficult, and ii) the optical water quality of rivers is highly variable and difficult to characterize. We propose a benthic light availability model (BLAM) that predicts the percent of incoming photosynthetically active radiation (PAR) available at the river bed. BLAM was developed by quantifying light attenuation of the five hydrogeomorphic controls that dictate riverine light availability: topography, riparian vegetation, channel geometry, optical water quality, and water depth. BLAM was calibrated using hydrogeomorphic data and light measurements from two rivers: Deep River - a 5th-order, turbid river in central North Carolina, and Big Spring Creek - a 2nd-order, optically clear stream in central Wisconsin. We used a series of four PAR sensors to measure i) above-canopy PAR, ii) PAR above water surface, iii) PAR below water surface, and iv) PAR on stream bed. These measurements were used to develop empirical light attenuation coefficients, which were then used in combination with optical water quality measurements, shading analyses, channel surveys, and flow records to quantify the spatial and temporal variability in riverine light availability. Finally, we apply BLAM to the Baraboo River - a 6th-order, 120-mile, unimpounded river in central Wisconsin - in order to characterize light availability along the river continuum (from headwaters to mouth).

  4. Modeling repetitive motions using structured light.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Yi; Aliaga, Daniel G

    2010-01-01

    Obtaining models of dynamic 3D objects is an important part of content generation for computer graphics. Numerous methods have been extended from static scenarios to model dynamic scenes. If the states or poses of the dynamic object repeat often during a sequence (but not necessarily periodically), we call such a repetitive motion. There are many objects, such as toys, machines, and humans, undergoing repetitive motions. Our key observation is that when a motion-state repeats, we can sample the scene under the same motion state again but using a different set of parameters; thus, providing more information of each motion state. This enables robustly acquiring dense 3D information difficult for objects with repetitive motions using only simple hardware. After the motion sequence, we group temporally disjoint observations of the same motion state together and produce a smooth space-time reconstruction of the scene. Effectively, the dynamic scene modeling problem is converted to a series of static scene reconstructions, which are easier to tackle. The varying sampling parameters can be, for example, structured-light patterns, illumination directions, and viewpoints resulting in different modeling techniques. Based on this observation, we present an image-based motion-state framework and demonstrate our paradigm using either a synchronized or an unsynchronized structured-light acquisition method.

  5. The first multi-gene phylogeny of the Macrostomorpha sheds light on the evolution of sexual and asexual reproduction in basal Platyhelminthes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janssen, Toon; Vizoso, Dita B; Schulte, Gregor; Littlewood, D Timothy J; Waeschenbach, Andrea; Schärer, Lukas

    2015-11-01

    The Macrostomorpha-an early branching and species-rich clade of free-living flatworms-is attracting interest because it contains Macrostomum lignano, a versatile model organism increasingly used in evolutionary, developmental, and molecular biology. We elucidate the macrostomorphan molecular phylogeny inferred from both nuclear (18S and 28S rDNA) and mitochondrial (16S rDNA and COI) marker genes from 40 representatives. Although our phylogeny does not recover the Macrostomorpha as a statistically supported monophyletic grouping, it (i) confirms many taxa previously proposed based on morphological evidence, (ii) permits the first placement of many families and genera, and (iii) reveals a number of unexpected placements. Specifically, Myozona and Bradynectes are outside the three classic families (Macrostomidae, Microstomidae and Dolichomacrostomidae) and the asexually fissioning Myomacrostomum belongs to a new subfamily, the Myozonariinae nov. subfam. (Dolichomacrostomidae), rather than diverging early. While this represents the first evidence for asexuality among the Dolichomacrostomidae, we show that fissioning also occurs in another Myozonariinae, Myozonaria fissipara nov. sp. Together with the placement of the (also fissioning) Microstomidae, namely as the sister taxon of Dolichomacrostomidae, this suggests that fissioning is not basal within the Macrostomorpha, but rather restricted to the new taxon Dolichomicrostomida (Dolichomacrostomidae+Microstomidae). Furthermore, our phylogeny allows new insights into the evolution of the reproductive system, as ancestral state reconstructions reveal convergent evolution of gonads, and male and female genitalia. Finally, the convergent evolution of sperm storage organs in the female genitalia appears to be linked to the widespread occurrence of hypodermic insemination among the Macrostomorpha. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Balancing medicine prices and business sustainability: analyses of pharmacy costs, revenues and profit shed light on retail medicine mark-ups in rural Kyrgyzstan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maddix Jason

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Numerous not-for-profit pharmacies have been created to improve access to medicines for the poor, but many have failed due to insufficient financial planning and management. These pharmacies are not well described in health services literature despite strong demand from policy makers, implementers, and researchers. Surveys reporting unaffordable medicine prices and high mark-ups have spurred efforts to reduce medicine prices, but price reduction goals are arbitrary in the absence of information on pharmacy costs, revenues, and profit structures. Health services research is needed to develop sustainable and "reasonable" medicine price goals and strategic initiatives to reach them. Methods We utilized cost accounting methods on inventory and financial information obtained from a not-for-profit rural pharmacy network in mountainous Kyrgyzstan to quantify costs, revenues, profits and medicine mark-ups during establishment and maintenance periods (October 2004-December 2007. Results Twelve pharmacies and one warehouse were established in remote Kyrgyzstan with 100%, respectively. Annual mark-ups increased dramatically each year to cover increasing recurrent costs, and by 2007, only 19% and 46% of products revealed mark-ups of 100%. 2007 medicine mark-ups varied substantially across these products, ranging from 32% to 244%. Mark-ups needed to sustain private pharmacies would be even higher in the absence of government subsidies. Conclusion Pharmacy networks can be established in hard-to-reach regions with little funding using public-private partnership, resource-sharing models. Medicine prices and mark-ups must be interpreted with consideration for regional costs of business. Mark-ups vary dramatically across medicines. Some mark-ups appear "excessive" but are likely necessary for pharmacy viability. Pharmacy financial data is available in remote settings and can be used towards determination of "reasonable" medicine price goals

  7. Balancing medicine prices and business sustainability: analyses of pharmacy costs, revenues and profit shed light on retail medicine mark-ups in rural Kyrgyzstan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waning, Brenda; Maddix, Jason; Soucy, Lyne

    2010-07-13

    Numerous not-for-profit pharmacies have been created to improve access to medicines for the poor, but many have failed due to insufficient financial planning and management. These pharmacies are not well described in health services literature despite strong demand from policy makers, implementers, and researchers. Surveys reporting unaffordable medicine prices and high mark-ups have spurred efforts to reduce medicine prices, but price reduction goals are arbitrary in the absence of information on pharmacy costs, revenues, and profit structures. Health services research is needed to develop sustainable and "reasonable" medicine price goals and strategic initiatives to reach them. We utilized cost accounting methods on inventory and financial information obtained from a not-for-profit rural pharmacy network in mountainous Kyrgyzstan to quantify costs, revenues, profits and medicine mark-ups during establishment and maintenance periods (October 2004-December 2007). Twelve pharmacies and one warehouse were established in remote Kyrgyzstan with 100%, respectively. Annual mark-ups increased dramatically each year to cover increasing recurrent costs, and by 2007, only 19% and 46% of products revealed mark-ups of 100%. 2007 medicine mark-ups varied substantially across these products, ranging from 32% to 244%. Mark-ups needed to sustain private pharmacies would be even higher in the absence of government subsidies. Pharmacy networks can be established in hard-to-reach regions with little funding using public-private partnership, resource-sharing models. Medicine prices and mark-ups must be interpreted with consideration for regional costs of business. Mark-ups vary dramatically across medicines. Some mark-ups appear "excessive" but are likely necessary for pharmacy viability. Pharmacy financial data is available in remote settings and can be used towards determination of "reasonable" medicine price goals. Health systems researchers must document the positive and negative

  8. Model of Light Scattering in Cavitation Area

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. P. Skvortsov

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The offered work presents analysis of extinction mechanisms and justification of light scattering model in ultrasonic cavitation area to justify a control method of ultrasonic cavitation through its optical sounding by low-intensity laser radiation and through photo-detector record of last radiation.The analysis of the extinction mechanisms has shown that the most essential mechanism causing a change of the transmission coefficient with time is dispersion on pulsating cavitation bubbles. Other extinction mechanisms lead to the time-constant reduction of last radiation intensity and can be taken into consideration by normalizing a recorded transmission coefficient for a previously measured liquid transmission coefficient when there is no cavitation.The feature of light scattering on the cavitation bubbles is primary dispersion in a forward direction that is connected with great values of bubbles radius from units to hundreds of micrometers. In case of single bubbles, dispersion can be described by Mi's theory, and, as to the cavitation area, it is reasonable to use the theory of V. Tversky for multiple light scattering. Thus, dispersion section, according to the paradox of extinction, can be considered to be equal to doubled geometrical section of a bubble. With increasing bubble radius the transmission coefficient monotonically decreases. So, the law of bubble pulsations and the model of light scattering define the law of changing transmission coefficient.Therefore, the cavitation area with its optical sounding acts as a peculiar opto-acoustic modulator. Thus, the demodulated signal of a photo-detector comprises information on pulsations of bubbles.The paper examines the influence of cavitation area thickness and bubbles concentration on the transmission coefficient. It shows a type of transmission coefficient dependence on the radius of cavitation bubbles.The optical sounding method is attractive because it allows us to obtain data on the

  9. Ice shedding from overhead electrical lines by mechanical breaking : a ductile model for viscoplastic behaviour of atmospheric ice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eskandarian, M.

    2005-07-01

    The mechanical characteristics of power line components need improvement in order to avoid power failures during severe ice storms. Atmospheric icing of overhead power lines creates electrical and mechanical problems in the transmission network. The successful development of anti-icing and de-icing techniques requires good knowledge of the adherence and bulk strength characteristics of atmospheric ice. This study presented a model for viscoplastic behaviour of porous atmospheric ice in the ductile region. The model was then modified to consider the effects of cracking activities to predict the material behaviour in transition and brittle regions. The following general methodologies were followed in this research for describing the ductile behaviour of porous atmospheric ice: instantaneous elastic strain; delayed viscoelastic strain; and, permanent plastic strain. The scientific contributions of this study include a classification of atmospheric ice structure on power lines on the basis of its grain shape and c-axis orientation. This thesis also presented 3 computer codes in Maple Mathematical Program for determining the elastic moduli of various types of freshwater ice; a poroelastic model for modifying the elastic moduli of porous atmospheric ice; a cap-model plasticity for various types of porous atmospheric ice; new freshwater ice yield envelopes in ductile regions that take porosity into account by means of an elliptical moving cap; and a newly developed user-defined material subroutine for viscoplastic behaviour of atmospheric ice in ductile region including the poroelastic, viscoelastic, and cap-model plasticity.

  10. Host contact and shedding patterns clarify variation in pathogen exposure and transmission in threatened tortoise Gopherus agassizii: implications for disease modelling and management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aiello, Christina M; Nussear, Kenneth E; Esque, Todd C; Emblidge, Patrick G; Sah, Pratha; Bansal, Shweta; Hudson, Peter J

    2016-05-01

    Most directly transmitted infections require some form of close contact between infectious and susceptible hosts to spread. Often disease models assume contacts are equal and use mean field estimates of transmission probability for all interactions with infectious hosts. Such methods may inaccurately describe transmission when interactions differ substantially in their ability to cause infection. Understanding this variation in transmission risk may be critical to properly model and manage some infectious diseases. In this study, we investigate how varying exposure and transmission may be key to understanding disease dynamics in the threatened desert tortoise Gopherus agassizii. We created heterogeneity in Mycoplasma agassizii exposure (the putative bacterial agent of a respiratory disease) by varying the duration of interactions between naturally infected and uninfected captive desert tortoises. Using qPCR, we identified new infections and compared models of transmission probability as a function of contact duration and pathogen load. We then examined the contact patterns of a wild tortoise population using proximity loggers to identify heterogeneity in contact duration. The top-ranked model predicting M. agassizii transmission included a dose term defined as the product of the number of days in proximity to an infected host and the infection level of that host. Models predicted low transmission probability for short interactions, unless the infectious host had a high load of M. agassizii: such hosts were predicted to transmit infection at higher rates with any amount of contact. We observed predominantly short-lived interactions in a free-ranging tortoise population and thus, expect transmission patterns in this population to vary considerably with the frequency and duration of high infection levels. Mean field models may misrepresent natural transmission patterns in this and other populations depending on the distribution of high-risk contact and shedding

  11. A standardised challenge model with an enterotoxigenic F4+ Escherichia coli strain in piglets assessing clinical traits and faecal shedding of fae and est-II toxin genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spitzer, Franz; Vahjen, Wilfried; Pieper, Robert; Martinez-Vallespin, Beatriz; Zentek, Jürgen

    2014-12-01

    This study evaluated the effect of five feed additives on post weaning diarrhoea (PWD) in piglets challenged 3 d after weaning with an enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli strain (ETEC). In three experimental runs, a total of 84 piglets was weaned at 21 days of age and randomly assigned to seven treatments. As dietary treatment, piglets were fed a basal diet or diets with addition of bovine colostrum (0.2%), pineapple stem extract containing bromelain (0.2%), an autolysed yeast preparation (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) (0.1%), a combination of organic acids (0.7%) and a phytogenic product with thyme essential oil (0.015%). A porcine ETEC, serotype O149:K91:K88ac was given twice via oral infection on day 3 after weaning at 10(10) colony forming units/animal. One group of piglets was fed the basal diet without ETEC challenge. Traits included clinical sores, body temperature, faecal scoring and determination of faecal dry matter and the shedding of fae and est-II ETEC toxin genes. After weaning, non-challenged control piglets did not show signs of diarrhoea or impaired health, while the majority of infected piglets had a drop in body temperature, signs of diarrhoea and impaired general health. Mortality, the decrease of faecal dry matter and shedding of the toxin genes fae and est-II were not affected by the different additives. In conclusion, the ETEC challenge model induced distinct clinical signs of PWD in piglets, but the tested feed additives had no preventive effect under these conditions.

  12. Properties of analytic transit light curve models

    CERN Document Server

    Pál, András

    2008-01-01

    In this paper a set of analytic formulae are presented with which the partial derivatives of the flux obscuration function can be evaluated -- for planetary transits and eclipsing binaries -- under the assumption of quadratic limb darkening. The knowledge of these partial derivatives are crucial for many of the data modeling algorithms and estimates of the light curve variations directly from the changes in the orbital elements. These derivatives can also be utilized to speed up some of the fitting methods. A gain of 10 in computing time can be achieved in the implementation of the Levenberg-Marquardt algorithm, relative to using numerical derivatives.

  13. Modeling light trapping in nanostructured solar cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferry, Vivian E; Polman, Albert; Atwater, Harry A

    2011-12-27

    The integration of nanophotonic and plasmonic structures with solar cells offers the ability to control and confine light in nanoscale dimensions. These nanostructures can be used to couple incident sunlight into both localized and guided modes, enhancing absorption while reducing the quantity of material. Here we use electromagnetic modeling to study the resonances in a solar cell containing both plasmonic metal back contacts and nanostructured semiconductor top contacts, identify the local and guided modes contributing to enhanced absorption, and optimize the design. We then study the role of the different interfaces and show that Al is a viable plasmonic back contact material.

  14. Shedding light on canine pituitary dwarfism

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Voorbij, A.M.W.Y.

    2015-01-01

    Pituitary dwarfism, associated with growth hormone deficiency, is an autosomal, recessively inherited disorder in shepherd dogs. Due to the serious nature of pituitary dwarfism and lack of efficient treatment, it is preferable to prevent dwarfs from being born by applying a correct breeding policy.

  15. ATLAS helps shed light on the retina

    CERN Multimedia

    2007-01-01

    Technology developed for high-energy physics has led to the discovery of a retinal cell that eluded biologists for 40 years. The 512 electrode array, inspired by silicon microstrip detector technology in ATLAS, records the electrical activity of retinal neurones.ATLAS expertise have crossed over to biology enabling the discovery of a retinal cell type that may help humans see motion. The research, carried out by ATLAS collaborators at the University of California, Santa Cruz, and by neurobiologists at the Salk Institute in La Jolla, California, appeared in the 10 October issue of the Journal of Neuroscience and may help open biologists’ eyes to the uses of techniques developed in high-energy physics. At least 22 different types of primate retinal output cell are known from anatomical studies, but the functions of only a handful of these have been determined. The cells discovered have been ca...

  16. Snapshots to shed light on LHC performance

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    With the impressive size and unprecedented power of the LHC, it is all too easy to overlook the smaller devices that have the difficult task of monitoring the new accelerator. You don't have to stand too far back from the big picture to see examples of clever technology inside the LHC. One of the undulators installed in the LHC tunnel can be seen on the right of the photo. From right to left, back row: Lucio Rossi (group leader, MCS), Davide Tommasini (conceptual design, MCS), Thierry Tenaglia (integration design,TS-MME), Remo Maccaferri (project leader, MCS) and Hans Kummer (MCS/ME); front row: Gilles Trachez (MCS-ME) and Bruno Meunier (FSU-AT12). In contrast to the usual articles about the LHC's big number statistics, examples of clever problem-solving found in beam monitoring machinery show that smaller things can be beautiful too. The design of the LHC accelerator brought new challenges for monitoring the shape of the particle beam, known as the beam profile. The size of the beam shrinks as higher energi...

  17. Shedding light on some common dietetic misconceptions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Virag Ganesh Gokhale

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Certain misconceptions in dietetics are so deeply ingrained in the minds of people that it is difficult to convince them as to what the truth is. Busy family physicians often skip queries on such topics or give some casual replies that may further support the misunderstanding. Some of these misconceptions can even be harmful. A few such misconceptions like - that ghee is harmful or that beetroot is good for treating iron deficiency, that Sunflower oil is heart friendly, that a patient of hepatitis should avoid fatty food, or that vegetarian proteins are poor quality proteins are some such beliefs. That the truth is contrary to such beliefs is pointed out with scientific evidence.

  18. Clinical Trials Shed Light on Minority Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Tobacco Products Vaccines, Blood & Biologics Articulos en Espanol Alimentos y Bebidas Cosméticos Dispositivos Médicos Dispositivos que Emiten Radiación Fraude en la Salud Medicamentos Nutrición Productos Veterinarios Productos de Tabaco Salud ...

  19. Research progresses shed light on superconductivity mechanism

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    @@ The spring of 2008 saw substantial breakthroughs in superconductivity research. Four groups of physicists, one after another, achieved remarkable progresses in the study of iron-based materials after the breakthrough made by H. Hosono's group in Japan, providing renewed insights into the fundamental mechanism of high-temperature superconductivity (HTSC), a perplexing enigma on the frontier of condensed matter physics.

  20. Shedding light on disulfide bond formation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ostergaard, H; Henriksen, A; Hansen, F G

    2001-01-01

    To visualize the formation of disulfide bonds in living cells, a pair of redox-active cysteines was introduced into the yellow fluorescent variant of green fluorescent protein. Formation of a disulfide bond between the two cysteines was fully reversible and resulted in a >2-fold decrease in the i......To visualize the formation of disulfide bonds in living cells, a pair of redox-active cysteines was introduced into the yellow fluorescent variant of green fluorescent protein. Formation of a disulfide bond between the two cysteines was fully reversible and resulted in a >2-fold decrease...... in the intrinsic fluorescence. Inter conversion between the two redox states could thus be followed in vitro as well as in vivo by non-invasive fluorimetric measurements. The 1.5 A crystal structure of the oxidized protein revealed a disulfide bond-induced distortion of the beta-barrel, as well as a structural...

  1. Shedding light on canine pituitary dwarfism

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Voorbij, A.M.W.Y.

    2015-01-01

    Pituitary dwarfism, associated with growth hormone deficiency, is an autosomal, recessively inherited disorder in shepherd dogs. Due to the serious nature of pituitary dwarfism and lack of efficient treatment, it is preferable to prevent dwarfs from being born by applying a correct breeding policy.

  2. Research sheds light on treatment of inflammation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    @@ The latest research breakthrough on the molecular mechanism and treatment of inflammation, contributed by scientists from the Shanghai Institutes for Biological Sciences (SIBS) under the Chinese Academy of Sciences and their American collaborators, was reported online by Nature Immunology on July 16, 2007.

  3. Shedding a new light on hazardous waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reece, N.

    1991-02-01

    The sun's ability to detoxify waterborne chemicals has long been known; polluted streams, for example, become cleaner as they flow through sunlit areas. Solar detoxification harnesses this natural degradation process for beneficial ends, producing simple, nonhazardous substances from hazardous organic chemicals. Solar detoxification systems now being developed break down these chemicals without using the fossil fuels required by conventional technologies. Sunlight destroys hazardous waste because of the distinctive properties of photons, the packets of energy that make up sunlight. Low-energy photons add thermal energy that will heat toxic chemicals; high-energy photons add the energy needed to break the chemical bonds of these chemicals. The detoxification process discussed here takes advantage of this latter group of photons found in the ultraviolet portion of the solar spectrum. 4 figs.

  4. Researchers Shed More Light on Bird Flu

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    David; Brown; 于德江

    2006-01-01

    最近科学家们对禽流感有了进一步的认识。他们发现,普通流感病毒位于人类上呼吸道内,当人们咳嗽或者打喷嚏时,这些病毒会轻而易举地被喷出体外,使得其他人极易受到感染;而H5N1型禽流感病毒则大多位于人体的肺部细胞中,由于在人类呼吸道中聚集的位置太过靠下,所以很难在人们咳嗽或打喷嚏的过程中离开人体进入空气中,这就为H5N1难于人际传染找到了最新依据。尽管如此,我们不能排除这种病毒发生变异的可能性,所以应继续对其保持警惕,绝不能掉以轻心。

  5. Shedding light on pilot-wave phenomena

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brun, P.-T.; Harris, Daniel M.; Prost, Victor; Quintela, Julio; Bush, John W. M.

    2016-09-01

    This paper is associated with a video winner of a 2015 APS/DFD Gallery of Fluid Motion Award. The original video is available from the Gallery of Fluid Motion, http://dx.doi.org/10.1103/APS.DFD.2015.GFM.V0064

  6. Shedding light on antibacterial activities of cathelicidins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schneider, V.A.F.

    2016-01-01

    Antibiotic resistance is continuously increasing and has a tremendous impact on human and animal well-being. Attractive alternatives to conventional antibiotics are host defense peptides (HDP), such as chicken cathelicidin-2 (CATH-2) and porcine proline-rich PR-39. HDPs are small cationic molecules

  7. HYDRODYNAMICAL MODELS OF TYPE II-P SUPERNOVA LIGHT CURVES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. C. Bersten

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available We present progress in light curve models of type II-P supernovae (SNe II-P obtained using a newly devel- oped, one-dimensional hydrodynamic code. Using simple initial models (polytropes, we reproduced the global behavior of the observed light curves and we analyzed the sensitivity of the light curves to the variation of free parameters.

  8. Study on calculation model of road lighting visibility

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    Visibility is an evaluation index for road lighting, which comprehensively influences the vision reliability of drivers and is a key factor for road lighting safety and energy saving. This paper introduces the concept of road lighting visibility and its influencing factors. It also explains the small target visibility calculation model for road lighting design, and describes the significance of establishing urban road lighting visibility standards from a point of view of visual function and visual comfort of drivers.

  9. Phenomenological model for light-projectile breakup

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalbach, C.

    2017-01-01

    Background: Projectile breakup can make a large contribution to reactions induced by projectiles with mass numbers 2, 3, and 4, yet there is no global model for it and no clear agreement on the details of the reaction mechanism. Purpose: This project aims to develop a phenomenological model for light-projectile breakup that can guide the development of detailed theories and provide a useful tool for applied calculations. Method: An extensive database of double-differential cross sections for the breakup of deuterons, 3He ions, and α particles was assembled from the literature and analyzed in a consistent way. Results: Global systematics for the centroid energies, peak widths, and angular distributions of the breakup peaks have been extracted from the data. The dominant mechanism appears to be absorptive breakup, where the unobserved projectile fragment fuses with the target nucleus during the initial interaction. The global target-mass-number and incident-energy dependencies of the absorptive breakup cross section have also been determined, along with channel-specific normalization constants. Conclusions: Results from the model generally agree with the original data after subtraction of a reasonable underlying continuum. Absorptive breakup can account for as much as 50%-60% of the total reaction cross section.

  10. Shear driven droplet shedding and coalescence on a superhydrophobic surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moghtadernejad, S.; Tembely, M.; Jadidi, M.; Esmail, N.; Dolatabadi, A.

    2015-03-01

    The interest on shedding and coalescence of sessile droplets arises from the importance of these phenomena in various scientific problems and industrial applications such as ice formation on wind turbine blades, power lines, nacelles, and aircraft wings. It is shown recently that one of the ways to reduce the probability of ice accretion on industrial components is using superhydrophobic coatings due to their low adhesion to water droplets. In this study, a combined experimental and numerical approach is used to investigate droplet shedding and coalescence phenomena under the influence of air shear flow on a superhydrophobic surface. Droplets with a size of 2 mm are subjected to various air speeds ranging from 5 to 90 m/s. A numerical simulation based on the Volume of Fluid method coupled with the Large Eddy Simulation turbulent model is carried out in conjunction with the validating experiments to shed more light on the coalescence of droplets and detachment phenomena through a detailed analysis of the aerodynamics forces and velocity vectors on the droplet and the streamlines around it. The results indicate a contrast in the mechanism of two-droplet coalescence and subsequent detachment with those related to the case of a single droplet shedding. At lower speeds, the two droplets coalesce by attracting each other with successive rebounds of the merged droplet on the substrate, while at higher speeds, the detachment occurs almost instantly after coalescence, with a detachment time decreasing exponentially with the air speed. It is shown that coalescence phenomenon assists droplet detachment from the superhydrophobic substrate at lower air speeds.

  11. Analytical simulation of the far-field jet noise and the unsteady jet flow-field by a model of periodic shedding of vortex ring from the jet exit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, C. H.

    1975-01-01

    The construction of a theoretical flow field due to shedding of vortex rings, the identification of the controlling parameters, and the determination of whether the theoretical model successfully simulated the unsteady pressure field near jet (and consequently the far field noise) was studied. The basic parameters contained in the analytic solutions were the epoch at which a vortex ring was shed near the jet exit and the eddy viscosity coefficient. These parameters were identified from the experimental data for the real-time pressure and from the spread of the mixing layer of the jet. Results of the theoretical analysis show good qualitative agreement with the experimental data.

  12. Lighting Model of the Real World in Augmented Reality

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周雅; 闫达远; 赵虎

    2004-01-01

    Construction of a lighting model of the real world is one of the critical aims in an augmented reality (AR) system. The theory of lighting modeling used in computer graphics(CG) is applied in this study. The position of the real light-source is first conjectured from light and shade of the registration image element by element using a ray tracking algorithm. Then the virtual light-source and virtual fiducial are constructed in the CG environment, in which, the Phong model is used to draw the light effect. By comparing the CG scene with the real image, one can modify the pareters of the lighting model over and over again, until the lighting effect of the CG scene is close enough to that of the real image. It is proved that this method works well in the indoor AR system. The method can be used feasibly in most applications with some improvements.

  13. Light-light and heavy-light mesons in the model of QCD string with quarks at the ends

    CERN Document Server

    Nefediev, A V

    2002-01-01

    The variational einbein field method is applied to the model of the QCD string with quarks at the ends for the case of light-light and heavy-light mesons. Special attention is payed to the proper string dynamics. The correct string slope of the Regge trajectories is reproduced for light-light states which comes out from the picture of rotating string. Masses of several low-lying orbitally and radially excited states in the D, D_s, B, and B_s meson spectra are calculated and a good agreement with the experimental data as well as with recent lattice calculations is found. The role of the string correction to the interquark interaction is discussed at the example of the identification of D*'(2637) state recently claimed by DELPHI Collaboration. For the heavy-light mesons the standard constants used in Heavy Quark Effective Theory are extracted and compared to the results of other approaches.

  14. Light

    CERN Document Server

    Robertson, William C

    2003-01-01

    Why is left right and right left in the mirror? Baffled by the basics of reflection and refraction? Wondering just how the eye works? If you have trouble teaching concepts about light that you don t fully grasp yourself, get help from a book that s both scientifically accurate and entertaining with Light. By combining clear explanations, clever drawings, and activities that use easy-to-find materials, this book covers what science teachers and parents need to know to teach about light with confidence. It uses ray, wave, and particle models of light to explain the basics of reflection and refraction, optical instruments, polarization of light, and interference and diffraction. There s also an entire chapter on how the eye works. Each chapter ends with a Summary and Applications section that reinforces concepts with everyday examples. Whether you need a deeper understanding of how light bends or a good explanation of why the sky is blue, you ll find Light more illuminating and accessible than a college textbook...

  15. A Guess about light quantum model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yongquan, Han

    2016-03-01

    Photon is a ring, the diameter of the ring is the quantum fluctuated wave length. The linear movement of the ring, namely, the transmission of light, is reflected in the particle of light. A plurality of light quantum interactions or through a very narrow gap, the shape of quantum would temporarily be changed. The motion of photons to interference and diffraction phenomena occurs is determined by the structure of light quantum, the quantum ring radius and light quantum mass squared product is a constant. The smaller the light quantum ring radius is, the bigger the quality is, just consistent as the modern scientific experimental results, the energy of the purple is bigger than the red. This conclusion can be extrapolated to all of the electromagnetic wave. The shorter the photon wavelength is, the bigger the quality and density is , when the wavelength is less than 10-15 meters, it will convergence to atomic or subatomic composition material entity due to the gravity. In fact, the divergence and convergence of quantum is reversible, that is, the phenomenon of radiate ``light'' quantum occurs due to the energy exchange or other external energy. Author: hanyongquan TEL: 15611860790.

  16. Modeling of an Adjustable Beam Solid State Light Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Toni

    2015-01-01

    This proposal is for the development of a computational model of a prototype variable beam light source using optical modeling software, Zemax Optics Studio. The variable beam light source would be designed to generate flood, spot, and directional beam patterns, while maintaining the same average power usage. The optical model would demonstrate the possibility of such a light source and its ability to address several issues: commonality of design, human task variability, and light source design process improvements. An adaptive lighting solution that utilizes the same electronics footprint and power constraints while addressing variability of lighting needed for the range of exploration tasks can save costs and allow for the development of common avionics for lighting controls.

  17. Phthalate SHEDS-HT runs

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Inputs and outputs for SHEDS-HT runs of DiNP, DEHP, DBP. This dataset is associated with the following publication: Moreau, M., J. Leonard, K. Phillips, J. Campbell,...

  18. Improved light and temperature responses for light use efficiency based GPP models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. McCallum

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Gross primary production (GPP is the process by which carbon enters ecosystems. Diagnostic models, based on the theory of light use efficiency (LUE have emerged as one method to estimate ecosystem GPP. However, problems have been noted particularly when applying global results at regional levels. We hypothesize that accounting for non-linear light response and temperature acclimation of daily GPP in boreal regions will improve model performance. To test this hypothesis, we have chosen four diagnostic models for comparison, namely: an LUE model (linear in its light response both with and without temperature acclimation and an LUE model and a big leaf model both with temperature acclimation and non-linear in their light response. All models include environmental modifiers for temperature and vapour pressure deficit (VPD. Initially, all models were calibrated against four eddy covariance sites within Russia for the years 2002–2004, for a total of 10 site years. Model evaluation was performed via 10-out cross-validation. This study presents a methodology for comparing diagnostic modeling approaches. Cross validation clearly demonstrates the improvement in model performance that temperature acclimation makes in modeling GPP at strongly temperature controlled sites in Russia. Additionally, the inclusion of a non-linear light response function is shown to further improve performance. Furthermore we demonstrate the parameterization of the big leaf model, incorporating environmental modifiers for temperature and VPD.

  19. On Load Shedding in Complex Event Processing

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    Complex Event Processing (CEP) is a stream processing model that focuses on detecting event patterns in continuous event streams. While the CEP model has gained popularity in the research communities and commercial technologies, the problem of gracefully degrading performance under heavy load in the presence of resource constraints, or load shedding, has been largely overlooked. CEP is similar to "classical" stream data management, but addresses a substantially different class of queries. Thi...

  20. Phenomenological study of extended seesaw model for light sterile neutrino

    CERN Document Server

    Nath, Newton; Goswami, Srubabati; Gupta, Shivani

    2016-01-01

    We study the zero textures of the Yukawa matrices in the minimal extended type-I seesaw (MES) model which can give rise to $\\sim$ eV scale sterile neutrinos. In this model, three right handed neutrinos and one extra singlet $S$ are added to generate a light sterile neutrino. The light neutrino mass matrix for the active neutrinos, $ m_{\

  1. Modelling the effect of supplementary lighting on production and light utilisation efficiency of greenhouse crops.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koning, de J.C.M.

    1997-01-01

    The effect of supplementary lighting (SL) on dry matter production of greenhouse crops is predictable with ALSIM, a new crop growth model based on SUCROS87. The light utilization efficiency (LUE), defined as daily dry matter production divided by the daily photosynthetic photon flux is a parameter f

  2. Modelling of classical ghost images obtained using scattered light

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crosby, S.; Castelletto, S.; Aruldoss, C.; Scholten, R. E.; Roberts, A.

    2007-08-01

    The images obtained in ghost imaging with pseudo-thermal light sources are highly dependent on the spatial coherence properties of the incident light. Pseudo-thermal light is often created by reducing the coherence length of a coherent source by passing it through a turbid mixture of scattering spheres. We describe a model for simulating ghost images obtained with such partially coherent light, using a wave-transport model to calculate the influence of the scattering on initially coherent light. The model is able to predict important properties of the pseudo-thermal source, such as the coherence length and the amplitude of the residual unscattered component of the light which influence the resolution and visibility of the final ghost image. We show that the residual ballistic component introduces an additional background in the reconstructed image, and the spatial resolution obtainable depends on the size of the scattering spheres.

  3. Backscattering Light Model of Seawater for Modulated Lidar Based on the Stationarity of Light Field

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JI Hang; MA Yong; LIANG Kun; WANG Hong-yuan

    2007-01-01

    The backscattering signal, which arises from the pulsed laser traveling through water, has limited the lidar system sensitivity and underwater target contrast. The transmitted optical carrier is modulated to be ultrashort pulsed laser and i t is effective to suppress the backscattering to adopt the coherent detection technology by identifying the modulation envelope. A nonstationary light field is formed in seawater by the ultrashort pulsed laser. The inherent relationship between the nonstationary light field formed by modulated lidar and the stationary light field formed by conventional lidar was discussed and the backscattering light model of the stationary light field for the ultrashort pulsed laser was proposed. The backscattering signal in modulated lidar system was processed and analyzed in the frequency domain on the basis of the model.

  4. Improved light and temperature responses for light-use-efficiency-based GPP models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. McCallum

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Gross primary production (GPP is the process by which carbon enters ecosystems. Models based on the theory of light use efficiency (LUE have emerged as an efficient method to estimate ecosystem GPP. However, problems have been noted when applying global parameterizations to biome-level applications. In particular, model–data comparisons of GPP have shown that models (including LUE models have difficulty matching estimated GPP. This is significant as errors in simulated GPP may propagate through models (e.g. Earth system models. Clearly, unique biome-level characteristics must be accounted for if model accuracy is to be improved. We hypothesize that in boreal regions (which are strongly temperature controlled, accounting for temperature acclimation and non-linear light response of daily GPP will improve model performance. To test this hypothesis, we have chosen four diagnostic models for comparison, namely an LUE model (linear in its light response both with and without temperature acclimation and an LUE model and a big leaf model both with temperature acclimation and non-linear in their light response. All models include environmental modifiers for temperature and vapour pressure deficit (VPD. Initially, all models were calibrated against five eddy covariance (EC sites within Russia for the years 2002–2005, for a total of 17 site years. Model evaluation was performed via 10-out cross-validation. Cross-validation clearly demonstrates the improvement in model performance that temperature acclimation makes in modelling GPP at strongly temperature-controlled sites in Russia. These results would indicate that inclusion of temperature acclimation in models on sites experiencing cold temperatures is imperative. Additionally, the inclusion of a non-linear light response function is shown to further improve performance, particularly in less temperature-controlled sites.

  5. Modelling and simulation of electrical energy systems through a complex systems approach using agent-based models. Case study: Under-frequency load shedding for refrigerators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kremers, Enrique [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), Karlsruhe (Germany). European Inst. for Energy Research (EIFER); Gonzalez de Durana, Jose Maria; Barambones, Oscar [Universidad del Pais Vasco, Vitoria (Spain). Escuela Universitaria de Ingenieria de Vitoria-Gasteiz

    2013-09-01

    One of the ways of studying complex systems is through modelling and simulation, which are used as tools to represent these systems in a virtual environment. Current advances in computing performance (which has been a major constraint in this field for some time) allow for the simulation these kinds of systems within reasonable time horizons. One of the tools for simulating complex systems is agent-based modelling. This individual-centric approach is based on autonomous entities that can interact with each other, thus modelling the system in a disaggregated way. Agent-based models can be coupled with other modelling methods, such as continuous models and discrete events, which can be embedded or run in parallel to the multi-agent system. When representing the electrical energy system in a systemic and multi-layered way, it is treated as a true socio-technical system, in which not only technical models are taken into account, but also socio-behavioural ones. In this work, a number of different models for the parts of an electrical system are presented, related to production, demand and storage. The models are intended to be as simple as possible in order to be simulated in an integrated framework representing the system as a whole. Furthermore, the models allow the inclusion of social behaviour and other, not purely engineering-related aspects of the system, which have to be considered from a complex point of view. (orig.)

  6. Effects of Traffic Lights on CA Traffic Model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SuweiFENG; GuoqingGU

    1997-01-01

    Cellular automaton traffic models can include various factors in traffic system with simple regulations and the corresponding computations and simulations are rather convenient and effective.In this paper,the Biham-Middleton-Levine model(briefly saying the BML model)is improved by removing its limitation of synchronized change of traffic lights.In new model,the traffic light at each crossing could arbitrarily change its starting time and tempo of variation and hence the model could more realistically describe the influence of traffic lights on the performance of traffic systems.The cases of traffic light with unsynchronized starting time and different tempo of variation are simulated in this paper.

  7. Current-voltage model of LED light sources

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beczkowski, Szymon; Munk-Nielsen, Stig

    2012-01-01

    Amplitude modulation is rarely used for dimming light-emitting diodes in polychromatic luminaires due to big color shifts caused by varying magnitude of LED driving current and nonlinear relationship between intensity of a diode and driving current. Current-voltage empirical model of light...

  8. Cell Division in the Light of Modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellaïche, Yohanns

    2016-09-26

    Theoretical modeling is central to elucidating underlying principles of emergent properties of complex systems. In cell and developmental biology, the last 15 years have witnessed a convergence of empirical and modeling approaches for fresh perspectives. The role of cell division in coordinating size, shape, and fate in particular illustrates the ever-growing impact of modeling.

  9. Crab shedding-system designs

    OpenAIRE

    1997-01-01

    There are as many ways to build and arrange crab shedding setups as there are people who make them. The following drawings are suggestions based on the experiencesof successful shedders. You may find changes that suit your operation better. (8pp.)

  10. Anomaly and Condensate in the Light-Cone Schwinger Model

    OpenAIRE

    1996-01-01

    The axial anomaly and fermion condensate in the light cone Schwinger model are studied following path integral methods. This formalism allows for a simple and direct calculation for these and other vacuum dependent phenomena.

  11. The impact of plug-in vehicles on greenhouse gas and criteria pollutants emissions in an urban air shed using a spatially and temporally resolved dispatch model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Razeghi, Ghazal; Brown, Tim; Samuelsen, G. Scott

    With the introduction of plug-in vehicles (PEVs) into the light-duty vehicle fleet, the tail-pipe emissions of GHGs and criteria pollutants will be partly transferred to electricity generating units. To study the impact of PEVs on well-to-wheels emissions, the U.S. Western electrical grid serving the South Coast Air Basin (SoCAB) of California is modeled with both spatial and temporal resolution at the level of individual power plants. Electricity load is calculated and projected for future years, and the temporal electricity generation of each power plant within the SoCAB is modeled based on historical data and knowledge of electricity generation and dispatch. Due to the efficiency and pollutant controls governing the performance of the Western grid, the deployment of PEVs results in a daily reduction of greenhouse gases (GHGs) and tail-pipe emissions, especially in the critical morning and afternoon commute hours. The extent of improvement depends on charging scenarios, future grid mix, and the number and type of plug-in vehicles. In addition, charging PEVs using wind energy that would otherwise be curtailed can result in a substantial emissions reduction. Smart control will be required to manage PEV charging in order to mitigate renewable intermittencies and decrease emissions associated with peaking power production.

  12. Modeling Water Clarity and Light Quality in Oceans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed A. Abdelrhman

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Phytoplankton is a primary producer of organic compounds, and it forms the base of the food chain in ocean waters. The concentration of phytoplankton in the water column controls water clarity and the amount and quality of light that penetrates through it. The availability of adequate light intensity is a major factor in the health of algae and phytoplankton. There is a strong negative coupling between light intensity and phytoplankton concentration (e.g., through self-shading by the cells, which reduces available light and in return affects the growth rate of the cells. Proper modeling of this coupling is essential to understand primary productivity in the oceans. This paper provides the methodology to model light intensity in the water column, which can be included in relevant water quality models. The methodology implements relationships from bio-optical models, which use phytoplankton chlorophyll a (chl-a concentration as a surrogate for light attenuation, including absorption and scattering by other attenuators. The presented mathematical methodology estimates the reduction in light intensity due to absorption by pure seawater, chl-a pigment, non-algae particles (NAPs and colored dissolved organic matter (CDOM, as well as backscattering by pure seawater, phytoplankton particles and NAPs. The methods presented facilitate the prediction of the effects of various environmental and management scenarios (e.g., global warming, altered precipitation patterns, greenhouse gases on the wellbeing of phytoplankton communities in the oceans as temperature-driven chl-a changes take place.

  13. Modeling the dynamic modulation of light energy in photosynthetic algae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papadakis, Ioannis A; Kotzabasis, Kiriakos; Lika, Konstadia

    2012-05-01

    An integrated cell-based dynamic mathematical model that take into account the role of the photon absorbing process, the partition of excitation energy, and the photoinactivation and repair of photosynthetic units, under variable light and dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) availability is proposed. The modeling of the photon energy absorption and the energy dissipation is based on the photoadaptive changes of the underlying mechanisms. The partition of the excitation energy is based on the relative availability of light and DIC to the cell. The modeling of the photoinactivation process is based on the common aspect that it occurs under any light intensity and the modeling of the repair process is based on the evidence that it is controlled by chloroplast and nuclear-encoded enzymes. The present model links the absorption of photons and the partitioning of excitation energy to the linear electron flow and other quenchers with chlorophyll fluorescence emission parameters, and the number of the functional photosynthetic units with the photosynthetic oxygen production rate. The energy allocation to the LEF increases as DIC availability increases and/or light intensity decreases. The rate of rejected energy increases with light intensity and with DIC availability. The resulting rate coefficient of photoinactivation increases as light intensity and/or as DIC concentration increases. We test the model against chlorophyll fluorescence induction and photosynthetic oxygen production rate measurements, obtained from cultures of the unicellular green alga Scenedesmus obliquus, and find a very close quantitative and qualitative correspondence between predictions and data.

  14. Reaction times to weak test lights. [psychophysics biological model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wandell, B. A.; Ahumada, P.; Welsh, D.

    1984-01-01

    Maloney and Wandell (1984) describe a model of the response of a single visual channel to weak test lights. The initial channel response is a linearly filtered version of the stimulus. The filter output is randomly sampled over time. Each time a sample occurs there is some probability increasing with the magnitude of the sampled response - that a discrete detection event is generated. Maloney and Wandell derive the statistics of the detection events. In this paper a test is conducted of the hypothesis that the reaction time responses to the presence of a weak test light are initiated at the first detection event. This makes it possible to extend the application of the model to lights that are slightly above threshold, but still within the linear operating range of the visual system. A parameter-free prediction of the model proposed by Maloney and Wandell for lights detected by this statistic is tested. The data are in agreement with the prediction.

  15. Personalized nursing LIGHT model. Love, Intend, Give, Help, Touching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersen, M D; Smereck, G A

    1989-01-01

    The Personalized Nursing LIGHT model is a prescriptive model for nursing. It is a model for nursing practice derived from a synthesis of Aristotle's theory of ethics and Martha E. Rogers' science of unitary human beings. The LIGHT model provides a mechanism for nurses to assist clients to improve their sense of well-being. The authors believe that improving well-being is the focus of nursing. Using principles synthesized from Aristotle and Rogers, clients are encouraged to use their talents in the pursuit of well-being and happiness in an increasingly complex world.

  16. Characterization, Modeling, and Optimization of Light-Emitting Diode System

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thorseth, Anders

    . It is shown that the droop in quantum efficiency can be approximated by a simple parabolic function. The investigated models of the spectral power distributions (SPD) from LEDs are the strictly empirical single and double Gaussian functions, and a semi empirical model using quasi Fermi levels and other basic...... solid state principles. The models are fitted to measured SPDs, using the free parameters. The result show a high correlation between the measured LED SPD and the fitted models. When comparing the chromaticity of the measured SPD with fitted models, the deviation is found to be larger than the lower...... limit of human color perception. A method has been developed to optimize multicolored cluster LED systems with respect to light quality, using multi objective optimization. The results are simulated SPDs similar to traditional light sources, and with high light quality. As part of this work...

  17. Mathematical Models Light Up Plant Signaling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chew, Y.H.; Smith, R.W.; Jones, H.J.; Seaton, D.D.; Grima, R.; Halliday, K.J.

    2014-01-01

    Plants respond to changes in the environment by triggering a suite of regulatory networks that control and synchronize molecular signaling in different tissues, organs, and the whole plant. Molecular studies through genetic and environmental perturbations, particularly in the model plant Arabidopsis

  18. Mathematical Models Light Up Plant Signaling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chew, Y.H.; Smith, R.W.; Jones, H.J.; Seaton, D.D.; Grima, R.; Halliday, K.J.

    2014-01-01

    Plants respond to changes in the environment by triggering a suite of regulatory networks that control and synchronize molecular signaling in different tissues, organs, and the whole plant. Molecular studies through genetic and environmental perturbations, particularly in the model plant Arabidopsis

  19. A Monte Carlo Model of Light Propagation in Nontransparent Tissue

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    姚建铨; 朱水泉; 胡海峰; 王瑞康

    2004-01-01

    To sharpen the imaging of structures, it is vital to develop a convenient and efficient quantitative algorithm of the optical coherence tomography (OCT) sampling. In this paper a new Monte Carlo model is set up and how light propagates in bio-tissue is analyzed in virtue of mathematics and physics equations. The relations,in which light intensity of Class 1 and Class 2 light with different wavelengths changes with their permeation depth,and in which Class 1 light intensity (signal light intensity) changes with the probing depth, and in which angularly resolved diffuse reflectance and diffuse transmittance change with the exiting angle, are studied. The results show that Monte Carlo simulation results are consistent with the theory data.

  20. Spatial Reasoning Training Through Light Curves Of Model Asteroids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziffer, Julie; Nakroshis, Paul A.; Rudnick, Benjamin T.; Brautigam, Maxwell J.; Nelson, Tyler W.

    2015-11-01

    Recent research has demonstrated that spatial reasoning skills, long known to be crucial to math and science success, are teachable. Even short stints of training can improve spatial reasoning skills among students who lack them (Sorby et al., 2006). Teaching spatial reasoning is particularly valuable to women and minorities who, through societal pressure, often doubt their spatial reasoning skill (Hill et al., 2010). We have designed a hands on asteroid rotation lab that provides practice in spatial reasoning tasks while building the student’s understanding of photometry. For our tool, we mount a model asteroid, with any shape of our choosing, on a slowly rotating motor shaft, whose speed is controlled by the experimenter. To mimic an asteroid light curve, we place the model asteroid in a dark box, shine a movable light source upon our asteroid, and record the light reflected onto a moveable camera. Students may then observe changes in the light curve that result from varying a) the speed of rotation, b) the model asteroid’s orientation with respect to the motor axis, c) the model asteroid’s shape or albedo, and d) the phase angle. After practicing with our tool, students are asked to pair new objects to their corresponding light curves. To correctly pair objects to their light curves, students must imagine how light scattering off of a three dimensional rotating object is imaged on a ccd sensor plane, and then reduced to a series of points on a light curve plot. Through the use of our model asteroid, the student develops confidence in spatial reasoning skills.

  1. Lighting

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Lighting Systems Test Facilities aid research that improves the energy efficiency of lighting systems. • Gonio-Photometer: Measures illuminance from each portion of...

  2. Light scattering by neutrophils: model, simulation, and experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orlova, Darya Yu; Yurkin, Maxim A; Hoekstra, Alfons G; Maltsev, Valeri P

    2008-01-01

    We studied the elastic light-scattering properties of human blood neutrophils, both experimentally and theoretically. The experimental study was performed with a scanning flow cytometer measuring the light-scattering patterns (LSPs) of individual cells over an angular range of 5-60 deg. We determined the absolute differential light-scattering cross sections of neutrophils. We also proposed an optical model for a neutrophil as a sphere filled by small spheres and prolate spheroids that correspond to granules and segmented nucleus, respectively. This model was used in simulations of LSPs using the discrete dipole approximation and different compositions of internal organelles. A comparison of experimentally measured and simulated LSPs gives a good qualitative agreement in LSP shape and quantitative agreement in overall magnitude of the differential light-scattering cross section.

  3. Improved spring model-based collaborative indoor visible light positioning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Zhijie; Zhang, WeiNan; Zhou, GuoFu

    2016-06-01

    Gaining accuracy with indoor positioning of individuals is important as many location-based services rely on the user's current position to provide them with useful services. Many researchers have studied indoor positioning techniques based on WiFi and Bluetooth. However, they have disadvantages such as low accuracy or high cost. In this paper, we propose an indoor positioning system in which visible light radiated from light-emitting diodes is used to locate the position of receivers. Compared with existing methods using light-emitting diode light, we present a high-precision and simple implementation collaborative indoor visible light positioning system based on an improved spring model. We first estimate coordinate position information using the visible light positioning system, and then use the spring model to correct positioning errors. The system can be employed easily because it does not require additional sensors and the occlusion problem of visible light would be alleviated. We also describe simulation experiments, which confirm the feasibility of our proposed method.

  4. Naturally light neutrinos in Diracon model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonilla, Cesar; Valle, Jose W. F.

    2016-11-01

    We propose a simple model for Dirac neutrinos where the smallness of neutrino mass follows from a parameter κ whose absence enhances the symmetry of the theory. Symmetry breaking is performed in a two-doublet Higgs sector supplemented by a gauge singlet scalar, realizing an accidental global U(1) symmetry. Its spontaneous breaking at the few TeV scale leads to a physical Nambu-Goldstone boson - the Diracon, denoted D - which is restricted by astrophysics and induces invisible Higgs decays such as h → DD. The scheme provides a rich, yet very simple scenario for symmetry breaking studies at colliders such as the LHC.

  5. Modeling the galaxy/light-mass connection with cosmological simulations

    CERN Document Server

    Tasitsiomi, A

    2006-01-01

    I review some results on the galaxy/light-mass connection obtained by dissipationless simulations in combination with a simple, non-parametric model to connect halo circular velocity to the luminosity of the galaxy they would host. I focus on the galaxy-mass correlation and mass-to-light ratios obtained from galaxy up to cluster scales. The predictions of this simple scheme are shown to be in very good agreement with SDSS observations.

  6. Modeling nanostructure-enhanced light trapping in organic solar cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Adam, Jost

    A promising approach for improving the power conversion efficiencies of organic solar cells (OSCs) is by incorporating nanostructures in their thin film architecture to improve the light absorption in the device’s active polymer layers. Here, we present a modelling framework for the prediction....... Diffraction by fractal metallic supergratings. Optics Express, 15(24), 15628–15636 (2007) [3] Goszczak, A. J. et al. Nanoscale Aluminum dimples for light trapping in organic thin films (submitted)...

  7. A Degeneracy in DRW Modelling of AGN Light Curves

    CERN Document Server

    Kozlowski, Szymon

    2016-01-01

    Individual light curves of active galactic nuclei (AGNs) are nowadays successfully modelled with the damped random walk (DRW) stochastic process, characterized by the power exponential covariance matrix of the signal, with the power $\\beta=1$. By Monte Carlo simulation means, we generate mock AGN light curves described by non-DRW stochastic processes ($0.5\\leq\\beta\\leq 1.5$ and $\\beta\

  8. Light

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Prescott, N.B.; Kristensen, Helle Halkjær; Wathes, C.M.

    2004-01-01

    This chapter presents the effect of artificial light environments (light levels, colour, photoperiod and flicker) on the welfare of broilers in terms of vision, behaviour, lameness and mortality......This chapter presents the effect of artificial light environments (light levels, colour, photoperiod and flicker) on the welfare of broilers in terms of vision, behaviour, lameness and mortality...

  9. Modelling the light curves of Fermi LAT millisecond pulsars

    CERN Document Server

    Venter, C; Harding, AK; Grove, JE

    2014-01-01

    We modelled the radio and gamma-ray light curves of millisecond pulsars using outer gap, two-pole caustic, low-altitude slot gap, and pair-starved polar cap geometric models, combined with a semi-empirical conal radio model. We find that no model fits all cases, with the outer gap and two-pole caustic models providing best fits for comparable numbers of millisecond pulsar light curves. We find a broad distribution of best-fit inclination angles as well as a clustering at large observer angles. The outer gap model furthermore seems to require relatively larger inclination angles, while the two-pole caustic model hints at an inverse trend between inclination angle and pulsar spin-down luminosity.

  10. Naturally light neutrinos in $Diracon$ model

    CERN Document Server

    Bonilla, Cesar

    2016-01-01

    We propose a simple model for Dirac neutrinos where the smallness of neutrino mass follows from a parameter $\\kappa$ whose absence enhances the symmetry of the theory. The symmetry breaking is performed by a two-doublet Higgs sector supplemented by an extra gauge singlet scalar, realizing an accidental global $U(1)$ symmetry. Its spontaneous breaking at the few TeV scale leads to a physical Nambu-Goldstone boson - the $Diracon$, denoted $\\mathcal{D}$ - which is restricted by astrophysics and induces invisible Higgs decays $h\\to \\mathcal{D} \\mathcal {D}$. The scheme provides a rich, yet very simple reference scenario for symmetry breaking studies at colliders such as the LHC.

  11. 8-prenylnaringenin and tamoxifen inhibit the shedding of irradiated epithelial cells and increase the latency period of radiation-induced oral mucositis. Cell culture and murine model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ryck, Tine de; Impe, Annouchka van; Bracke, Marc E. [Ghent University, Laboratory of Experimental Cancer Research, Department Radiation Oncology and Experimental Cancer Research, Ghent (Belgium); Vanhoecke, Barbara W. [Ghent University, Laboratory of Experimental Cancer Research, Department Radiation Oncology and Experimental Cancer Research, Ghent (Belgium); Ghent University, Laboratory of Microbial Ecology and Technology (LabMET), Ghent (Belgium); Heyerick, Arne [Ghent University, Laboratory of Pharmacognosy and Phytochemistry, Ghent (Belgium); Vakaet, Luc; Neve, Wilfried de [Ghent University Hospital, Department of Radiation Oncology, Ghent (Belgium); Mueller, Doreen [Medical Faculty and University Hospital Carl Gustav Carus, Technische Universitaet Dresden, Department of Radiotherapy and Radiation Oncology, OncoRay-National Center for Radiation Research in Oncology, Dresden (Germany); Schmidt, Margret [Medical Faculty and University Hospital Carl Gustav Carus, Technische Universitaet Dresden, Department of Radiotherapy and Radiation Oncology, OncoRay-National Center for Radiation Research in Oncology, Dresden (Germany); German Cancer Consortium (DKTK) partner site Dresden and German Cancer Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg (Germany); Doerr, Wolfgang [Medical Faculty and University Hospital Carl Gustav Carus, Technische Universitaet Dresden, Department of Radiotherapy and Radiation Oncology, OncoRay-National Center for Radiation Research in Oncology, Dresden (Germany); Medical University, Department of Radiation Oncology, CCC, and CD-Laboratory RadOnc, Vienna (Austria)

    2015-05-01

    The major component in the pathogenesis of oral radiation-induced mucositis is progressive epithelial hypoplasia and eventual ulceration. Irradiation inhibits cell proliferation, while cell loss at the surface continues. We conceived to slow down this desquamation by increasing intercellular adhesion, regulated by the E-cadherin/catenin complex. We investigated if 8-prenylnaringenin (8-PN) or tamoxifen (TAM) decrease the shedding of irradiated human buccal epithelial cells in vitro and thus delay the ulcerative phase of radiation-induced mucositis in vivo. In vitro, aggregates of buccal epithelial cells were irradiated and cultured in suspension for 11 days. 8-PN or TAM were investigated regarding their effect on cell shedding. In vivo, the lower tongue surface of mice was irradiated with graded single doses of 25 kV X-rays. The incidence, latency, and duration of the resulting mucosal ulcerations were analyzed after topical treatment with 8-PN, TAM or solvent. 8-PN or TAM prevented the volume reduction of the irradiated cell aggregates during the incubation period. This was the result of a higher residual cell number in the treated versus the untreated irradiated aggregates. In vivo, topical treatment with 8-PN or TAM significantly increased the latency of mucositis from 10.9 to 12.1 and 12.4 days respectively, while the ulcer incidence was unchanged. 8-PN and TAM prevent volume reduction of irradiated cell aggregates in suspension culture. In the tongues of mice, these compounds increase the latency period. This suggests a role for these compounds for the amelioration of radiation-induced mucositis in the treatment of head and neck tumors. (orig.) [German] Die wesentliche Komponente in der Pathogenese der radiogenen Mukositis ist eine progressive epitheliale Hypoplasie und letztendlich Ulzeration. Die Bestrahlung hemmt die Zellproliferation, waehrend der Zellverlust an der Oberflaeche fortbesteht. Wir versuchten, diese Desquamation durch eine Stimulation der

  12. Light-Front Spin-1 Model: Parameters Dependence

    CERN Document Server

    Mello, Clayton S; de Melo, J P B C; Frederico, T

    2015-01-01

    We study the structure of the $\\rho$-meson within a light-front model with constituent quark degrees of freedom. We calculate electroweak static observables: magnetic and quadrupole moments, decay constant and charge radius. The prescription used to compute the electroweak quantities is free of zero modes, which makes the calculation implicitly covariant. We compare the results of our model with other ones found in the literature. Our model parameters give a decay constant close to the experimental one.

  13. Pion electromagnetic current in a light-front model

    CERN Document Server

    Pacheco-Bicudo-Cabral de Melo, J; Frederico, T

    1999-01-01

    The electromagnetic form factor of the pion is calculated in a pseudoscalar field theoretical model which constituent quarks. We extract the form factor using the "+" component of the electromagnetic current in the light-cone formalism. For comparison, we also compute the form factor in the covariant framework and we obtain perfect agreement. It is shown that the pair terms do not contribute in this pseudoscalar model. This explains why a naive light-cone calculation, i.e., omitting pair terms from the onset, also yields the same results.

  14. Shedding of immature germ cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ariagno, J; Curi, S; Mendeluk, G; Grinspon, D; Repetto, H; Chenlo, P; Pugliese, N; Sardi, M; Blanco, A M

    2002-01-01

    The immature germ cells (IGC) constitute the highest percentage (90%) of nonsperm cells (NSpC) in ejaculates from fertile or infertile men. The objective of this study was to evaluate IGC concentration and the IGC/(IGC + Sp) ratio, in normozoospermia and dispermia. Normozoospermia from men with proven fertility (NPF). nonproven fertility (NNPF). dispermia (D) and semen samples with excessive shedding of immature germ cells (GI 1.7 x 10(6) to 5 x 10(6) IGC/mL and GII > 5.0 x 10(6) IGC/mL) were used in this study. The mean value +2 SD for the NNPF (1.7 x 10(6)/mL) and the value proposed by WHO (5 x 10(6)/mL) were employed to define GI and GII groups. IGC concentration is statistically different in the studied groups. The IGC/Sp ratio showed a significant difference only between the NNPF and the D. When comparing semen parameters (Sp/ejaculate. grade (a) motility and morphology) there was a highly significant difference between NNPF and GI and GII: no difference was found between GI and GII. While studying 200 cases of dispermias 83% showed a high shedding of immature germ cells. The cytological study of nonsperm cells and the count and identification of the immature germ cells could be used to evaluate the dispermic disorders.

  15. A light front quark-diquark model for the nucleons

    CERN Document Server

    Maji, Tanmay

    2016-01-01

    We present a quark-diquark model for the nucleons where the light front wave functions are constructed from the soft-wall AdS/QCD prediction. The model is consistent with quark counting rule and Drell-Yan-West relation. The model reproduces the scale evolution of unpolarized PDF of proton for a wide range of energy scale. Helicity and transversity distributions for the proton predicted in this model agree with phenomenological fits. The axial and tensor charges are also shown to agree with the experimental data. The model can be used to evaluate distributions like GPDS, TMDs etc. and their scale evolutions.

  16. Light dependence of carboxylation capacity for C3 photosynthesis models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Photosynthesis at high light is often modelled by assuming limitation by the maximum capacity of Rubisco carboxylation at low carbon dioxide concentrations, by electron transport capacity at higher concentrations, and sometimes by triose-phosphate utilization rate at the highest concentrations. Pho...

  17. Type II Supernovae: Model Light Curves and Standard Candle Relationships

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasen, Daniel; Woosley, S. E.

    2009-10-01

    A survey of Type II supernovae explosion models has been carried out to determine how their light curves and spectra vary with their mass, metallicity, and explosion energy. The presupernova models are taken from a recent survey of massive stellar evolution at solar metallicity supplemented by new calculations at subsolar metallicity. Explosions are simulated by the motion of a piston near the edge of the iron core and the resulting light curves and spectra are calculated using full multi-wavelength radiation transport. Formulae are developed that describe approximately how the model observables (light curve luminosity and duration) scale with the progenitor mass, explosion energy, and radioactive nucleosynthesis. Comparison with observational data shows that the explosion energy of typical supernovae (as measured by kinetic energy at infinity) varies by nearly an order of magnitude—from 0.5 to 4.0 × 1051 ergs, with a typical value of ~0.9 × 1051 ergs. Despite the large variation, the models exhibit a tight relationship between luminosity and expansion velocity, similar to that previously employed empirically to make SNe IIP standardized candles. This relation is explained by the simple behavior of hydrogen recombination in the supernova envelope, but we find a sensitivity to progenitor metallicity and mass that could lead to systematic errors. Additional correlations between light curve luminosity, duration, and color might enable the use of SNe IIP to obtain distances accurate to ~20% using only photometric data.

  18. 3D Modelling with Structured Light GAMMA Calibration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eser Sert

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Structured light method is one of the non-contact measurement methods used for high resolution and high sensitive 3D modeling. In this method, a projector, camera and computer are used. Projector projects patterns that are generated with specific coding strategies onto the object that will be 3D modeled. Camera receives these patterns. By processing the images received by the camera, object is 3D modeled. Light intensity that is emitted from the projector generally not a linear function of the signal input. This causes brightness problems in the patterns projected. Thus, images received from the camera needs to the gamma corrected. In this study, gamma calibration method is proposed to overcome this problem. Test results show that proposed calibration system improves the accuracy and quality of the 3D modeling.

  19. Light-limited growth and competition for light in well-mixed aquatic environments : An elementary model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huisman, Jef; Weissing, F.J.

    1994-01-01

    Light is never distributed homogeneously since it forms a gradient over biomass. As a consequence, the common theories on nutrient competition are not applicable to competition for light. In this paper, we investigate a model for light-limited growth and competition among phytoplankton species in a

  20. Light-limited growth and competition for light in well-mixed aquatic environments : An elementary model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huisman, Jef; Weissing, F.J.

    1994-01-01

    Light is never distributed homogeneously since it forms a gradient over biomass. As a consequence, the common theories on nutrient competition are not applicable to competition for light. In this paper, we investigate a model for light-limited growth and competition among phytoplankton species in a

  1. Model independent control of lightly damped noise/vibration systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Jing

    2008-07-01

    Feedforward control is a popular strategy of active noise/vibration control. In well-damped noise/vibration systems, path transfer functions from actuators to sensors can be modeled by finite impulse response (FIR) filters with negligible errors. It is possible to implement noninvasive model independent feedforward control by a recently proposed method called orthogonal adaptation. In lightly damped noise/vibration systems, however, path transfer functions have infinite impulse responses (IIRs) that cause difficulties in design and implementation of broadband feedforward controllers. A major source of difficulties is model error if IIR path transfer functions are approximated by FIR filters. In general, active control performance deteriorates as model error increases. In this study, a new method is proposed to design and implement model independent feedforward controllers for broadband in lightly damped noise/vibration systems. It is shown analytically that the proposed method is able to drive the convergence of a noninvasive model independent feedforward controller to improve broadband control in lightly damped noise/vibration systems. The controller is optimized in the minimum H2 norm sense. Experiment results are presented to verify the analytical results.

  2. On light dilaton extensions of the Standard Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Megías, Eugenio; Pujolàs, Oriol; Quirós, Mariano

    2016-11-01

    We discuss the presence of a light dilaton in Conformal Field Theories deformed by a single scalar operator, in the holographic realization consisting of confining Renormalization Group flows. Then, we apply this formalism to study the extension of the Standard Model with a light dilaton in a 5D warped model. We study the spectrum of scalar and vector perturbations, compare the model predictions with Electroweak Precision Tests and find the corresponding bounds for the lightest modes. Finally, we analyze the possibility that the Higgs resonance found at the LHC be a dilaton. Presented by E. Megías at the 4th International Conference on New Frontiers in Physics (ICNFP 2015), 23-30 August 2015, Kolymbari, Crete, Greece.

  3. Characterization, Modeling, and Optimization of Light-Emitting Diode Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thorseth, Anders

    This thesis explores, characterization, modeling, and optimization of light-emitting diodes (LED) for general illumination. An automated setup has been developed for spectral radiometric characterization of LED components with precise control of the settings of forward current and operating...... comparing the chromaticity of the measured SPD with tted models, the deviation is found to be larger than the lower limit of human color perception. A method has been developed to optimize multicolored cluster LED systems with respect to light quality, using multi objective optimization. The results...... temperature. The automated setup has been used to characterize commercial LED components with respect to multiple settings. It is shown that the droop in quantum efficiency can be approximated by a simple parabolic function. The investigated models of the spectral power distributions (SPD) from LEDs...

  4. Numerical simulation of icing, deicing, and shedding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, W. B.; Dewitt, K. J.; Keith, T. G., Jr.

    1991-01-01

    An algorithm has been developed to numerically model the concurrent phenomena of two-dimensional transient heat transfer, ice accretion, ice shedding and ice trajectory which arise from the use of electrothermal pad. The Alternating Direction Implicit method is used to simultaneously solve the heat transfer and accretion equations occurring in the multilayered body covered with ice. In order to model the phase change between ice and water, a technique was used which assumes a phase for each node. This allows the equations to be linearized such that a direct solution is possible. This technique requires an iterative procedure to find the correct phase at each node. The computer program developed to find this solution has been integrated with the NASA-Lewis flow/trajectory code LEWICE.

  5. Modelling light and photosynthesis in the marine environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bogdan Woźniak

    2003-06-01

    Full Text Available The overriding and far-reaching aim of our work has been to achieve a good understanding of the processes of light interaction with phytoplankton in the sea and to develop an innovative physical model of photosynthesis in the marine environment, suitable for the remote sensin gof marine primary production. Unlike previous models, the present one takesgreater account of the complexity of the physiological processes in phytoplankton. We have focused in particular on photophysiological processes, which are governed directly or indirectly by light energy, or in which light, besides the nutrient content in and the temperature of seawater, is one of the principal limiting factors.    To achieve this aim we have carried out comprehensive statistical analyses of the natural variability of the main photophysiological properties of phytoplankton and their links with the principal abiotic factors in the sea. These analyses have made use of extensive empirical data gathered in a wide diversity of seas and oceans by Polish and Russian teams as well as by joint Polish-Russian expeditions. Data sets available on the Internet have also been applied. As a result, a set of more or less complex, semi-empirical models of light-stimulated processes occurring in marine phytoplankton cells has been developed. The trophic type of sea, photo-acclimation and the production of photoprotecting carotenoids, chromatic acclimation and the production of various forms of chlorophyll-antennas and photosynthetic carotenoids, cell adaptation by the package effect, light absorption, photosynthesis, photoinhibition, the fluorescence effect, and the activation of PS2 centres are all considered in the models. These take into account not only the influence of light, but also, indirectly, that of the vertical mixing of water; in the case of photosynthesis, the quantum yield has been also formulated as being dependent on the nutrient concentrations and the temperature of seawater

  6. Pion in the Medium with a Light-Front Model

    CERN Document Server

    de Melo, J P B C; Frederico, Tobias

    2015-01-01

    The pion properties in symmetric nuclear matter are investigated with the Quark-Meson Coupling (QMC) Model plus the light-front constituent quark model~(LFCQM). The LFCQM has been quite successful in describing the properties of pseudoscalar mesons in vacuum, such as the electromagnetic elastic form factors, electromagnetic radii, and decay constants. We study the pion properties in symmetric nuclear matter with the in-medium input recalculated through the QMC model, which provides the in-medium modification of the LFCQM.

  7. An Analog Model for Light Propagation in Semiclassical Gravity

    CERN Document Server

    Bessa, C H G; Ford, L H

    2014-01-01

    We treat a model based upon nonlinear optics for the semiclassical gravitational effects of quantum fields upon light propagation. Our model uses a nonlinear material with a nonzero third order polarizability. Here a probe light pulse satisfies a wave equation containing the expectation value of the squared electric field. This expectation value depends upon the presence of lower frequency quanta, the background field, and modifies the effective index of refraction, and hence the speed of the probe pulse. If the mean squared electric field is positive, then the pulse is slowed, which is analogous to the gravitational effects of ordinary matter. Such matter satisfies the null energy condition and produce gravitational lensing and time delay. If the mean squared field is negative, then the pulse has a higher speed than in the absence of the background field. This is analogous to the gravitational effects of exotic matter, such as stress tensor expectation values with locally negative energy densities, which lea...

  8. Modeling of light absorption in tissue during infrared neural stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Alexander C; Wade, Scott A; Brown, William G A; Stoddart, Paul R

    2012-07-01

    A Monte Carlo model has been developed to simulate light transport and absorption in neural tissue during infrared neural stimulation (INS). A range of fiber core sizes and numerical apertures are compared illustrating the advantages of using simulations when designing a light delivery system. A range of wavelengths, commonly used for INS, are also compared for stimulation of nerves in the cochlea, in terms of both the energy absorbed and the change in temperature due to a laser pulse. Modeling suggests that a fiber with core diameter of 200 μm and NA=0.22 is optimal for optical stimulation in the geometry used and that temperature rises in the spiral ganglion neurons are as low as 0.1°C. The results show a need for more careful experimentation to allow different proposed mechanisms of INS to be distinguished.

  9. High Temperature Chemical Kinetic Combustion Modeling of Lightly Methylated Alkanes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sarathy, S M; Westbrook, C K; Pitz, W J; Mehl, M

    2011-03-01

    Conventional petroleum jet and diesel fuels, as well as alternative Fischer-Tropsch (FT) fuels and hydrotreated renewable jet (HRJ) fuels, contain high molecular weight lightly branched alkanes (i.e., methylalkanes) and straight chain alkanes (n-alkanes). Improving the combustion of these fuels in practical applications requires a fundamental understanding of large hydrocarbon combustion chemistry. This research project presents a detailed high temperature chemical kinetic mechanism for n-octane and three lightly branched isomers octane (i.e., 2-methylheptane, 3-methylheptane, and 2,5-dimethylhexane). The model is validated against experimental data from a variety of fundamental combustion devices. This new model is used to show how the location and number of methyl branches affects fuel reactivity including laminar flame speed and species formation.

  10. Modeling a bus through a sequence of traffic lights.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villalobos, Jorge; Muñoz, Víctor; Rogan, José; Zarama, Roberto; Penagos, Juan Felipe; Toledo, Benjamín; Valdivia, Juan Alejandro

    2015-07-01

    We propose a model of a bus traveling through a sequence of traffic lights, which is required to stop between the traffic signals to pick up passengers. A two dimensional model, of velocity and traveled time at each traffic light, is constructed, which shows non-trivial and chaotic behaviors for realistic city traffic parameters. We restrict the parameter values where these non-trivial and chaotic behaviors occur, by following analytically and numerically the fixed points and period 2 orbits. We define conditions where chaos may arise by determining regions in parameter space where the maximum Lyapunov exponent is positive. Chaos seems to occur as long as the ratio of the braking and accelerating capacities are greater than about ∼3.

  11. Explosion models, light curves, spectra and H$_{0}$

    CERN Document Server

    Höflich, P; Wheeler, J C; Nomoto, K; Thielemann, F K

    1996-01-01

    From the spectra and light curves it is clear that SNIa are thermonuclear explosions of white dwarfs. However, details of the explosion are highly under debate. Here, we present detailed models which are consistent with respect to the explosion mechanism, the optical and infrared light curves (LC), and the spectral evolution. This leaves the description of the burning front and the structure of the white dwarf as the only free parameters. The explosions are calculated using one-dimensional Lagrangian codes including nuclear networks. Subsequently, optical and IR-LCs are constructed. Detailed NLTE-spectra are computed for several instants of time using the density, chemical and luminosity structure resulting from the LCs. The general methods and critical tests are presented (sect. 2). Different models for the thermonuclear explosion are discussed including detonations deflagrations, delayed detonations, pulsating delayed detonations (PDD) and helium detonations (sect.3). Comparisons between theoretical and obs...

  12. Resonant cavity light-emitting diodes: modeling, design, and optimization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dumitrescu, Mihail M.; Sipila, Pekko; Vilokkinen, Ville; Toikkanen, L.; Melanen, Petri; Saarinen, Mika J.; Orsila, Seppo; Savolainen, Pekka; Toivonen, Mika; Pessa, Markus

    2000-02-01

    Monolithic top emitting resonant cavity light-emitting diodes operating in the 650 and 880 nm ranges have been prepared using solid-source molecular beam epitaxy growth. Transfer matrix based modeling together with a self- consistent model have been sued to optimize the devices' performances. The design of the layer structure and doping profile was assisted by computer simulations that enabled many device improvements. Among the most significant ones intermediate-composition barrier-reduction layers were introduced in the DBR mirrors for improving the I-V characteristics and the cavity and mirrors were detuned aiming at maximum extraction efficiency. The fabricated devices showed line widths below 15 nm, CW light power output of 8 and 22.5 mW, and external quantum efficiencies of 3 percent and 14.1 percent in the 650 nm and 880 nm ranges, respectively - while the simulations indicate significant performance improvement possibilities.

  13. Modelamiento del Ambiente Térmico y Aéreo de un Galpón de Presión Negativa Tipo Túnel para Pollitos / Modeling of the Thermal Environments in Shed Negative Pressure Tunnel Type of Chicks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robinson Osorio Hernández

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available La optimización de los procesos productivos tiene granimportancia en el mundo actual debido al continuo desarrollo y avance. Con la finalidad de evaluar el desempeño productivo en el sector avícola, se hace necesaria la adecuación del ambiente interno de las instalaciones avícolas con técnicas que atiendan las exigencias de confort térmico con mayor eficiencia energética. En este trabajo, se evaluó el ambiente térmico interno de un galpón de presión negativa tipo túnel durante la primera fase de crecimiento de pollos de engorde. La evaluación de comportamiento térmico en este período fue realizada utilizando la dinámica de fluidos computacionales (CFD. El modelo computacional demostró ser una herramienta eficaz para el entendimiento y mejora de diseños bioclimáticos de ambientes internos de galpones avícolas. / The optimization of production processes hasgreat importance in the world due to the development andadvancement. In order to evaluate the productive performance in poultry production, it becomes necessary the indoor environmental adequacy of the poultry buildings by technologies that attend the requirements of thermal comfort with major energy efficiency. This study evaluated the thermal environment of a domestic shed of negative pressure tunnel type, during the first growth phase of broilers. The evaluation of the thermal behavior model during this period was made using the computational fluid dynamics (CFD. The computational model proved to be an effective tool forunderstanding and improving of bioclimatic designs of indoorenvironments to create this kind of sheds.

  14. Light-by-Light Hadronic Corrections to the Muon G-2 Problem Within the Nonlocal Chiral Quark Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorokhov, A. E.; Radzhabov, A. E.; Zhevlakov, A. S.

    2017-03-01

    Results of calculation of the light-by-light contribution from the lightest neutral pseudoscalar and scalar mesons and the dynamical quark loop to the muon anomalous magnetic moment are discussed in the framework of the nonlocal SU(3) × SU(3) chiral quark model. The model is based on four-quark interaction of the Nambu-Jona-Lasinio type and Kobayashi-Maskawa-`t Hooft six-quark interaction. The full kinematic dependence of vertices with off-shell mesons and photons in intermediate states in the light-by-light scattering amplitude is taken into account. All calculations are elaborated in explicitly gauge-invariant manner. These results complete calculations of all hadronic light-by-light scattering contributions to aμ in the leading order in the 1/Nc expansion. The final result does not allow the discrepancy between the experiment and the Standard Model to be explained.

  15. Host contact and shedding patterns clarify variation in pathogen exposure and transmission in threatened tortoise Gopherus agassizii: implications for disease modelling and management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aiello, Christina M.; Nussear, Kenneth E.; Esque, Todd C.; Emblidge, Patrick G.; Sah, Pratha; Bansal, Shweta; Hudson, Peter J.

    2016-01-01

    Summary Most directly transmitted infections require some form of close contact between infectious and susceptible hosts to spread. Often disease models assume contacts are equal and use mean field estimates of transmission probability for all interactions with infectious hosts.

  16. Light-Cone Quantization of the Liouville Model

    CERN Document Server

    Bienkowska, J R

    1993-01-01

    We present the quantization of the Liouville model defined in light-cone coordinates in (1,1) signature space. We take advantage of the representation of the Liouville field by the free field of the Backl\\"{u}nd transformation and adapt the approch by Braaten, Curtright and Thorn. Quantum operators of the Liouville field $\\partial_{+}\\phi$, $\\partial_{-}\\phi$, $e^{g\\phi}$, $e^{2g\\phi}$ are constructed consistently in terms of the free field. The Liouville model field theory space is found to be restricted to the sector with field momentum $P_{+}=-P_{-}$, $P_{+}> 0$ , which is a closed subspace for the Liouville theory operator algebra.

  17. Heavy-light mesons in a relativistic model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jing-Bin; Yang, Mao-Zhi

    2016-07-01

    We study the heavy-light mesons in a relativistic model, which is derived from the Bethe-Salpeter equation by applying the Foldy-Wouthuysen transformation to the heavy quark. The kernel we choose is based on scalar confinement and vector Coulomb potentials. The transverse interaction of the gluon exchange is also taken into account in this model. The spectra and wave functions of D, Ds, B, Bs meson states are obtained. The spectra are calculated up to the order of 1/m Q, and wave functions are treated to leading order. Supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (11375088, 10975077, 10735080, 11125525)

  18. Gluon Sivers function in a light-cone spectator model

    CERN Document Server

    Lu, Zhun

    2016-01-01

    We calculate the gluon Sivers function of the proton in the valence-$x$ region using a light-cone spectator model with the presence of the gluon degree of freedom. We obtain the values of the parameters by fitting the model resulting gluon density distribution to the known parametrization. We find that our results agree with the recent phenomenological extraction of the gluon Sivers function after considering the evolution effect. We also estimate the mean transverse momentum of the gluon in a transversely polarized proton and find that it is within the range implied by the Burkardt sum rule.

  19. Numerical model of multilayer organic light-emitting devices

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hu Yue; Rao Hai-Bo

    2009-01-01

    A numerical model of multilayer organic light-emitting devices is presented in this article.This model is based on the drift-diffusion equations which include charge injection,transport,space charge effects,trapping,heterojunction interface and recombination process.The device structure in the simulation is ITO/CuPc(20 nm)/NPD(40 nm)/Alq3(60 nm)/LiF/Al.There are two heterojunctions which should be dealt with in the simulation.The Ⅰ-Ⅴ characteristics,carrier distribution and recombination rate of a device are calculated.The simulation results and measured data are in good agreement.

  20. Mathematical model for light scanning system based on circular laser

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Peiquan Xu; Shun Yao; Fenggui Lu; Xinhua Tang; Wei Zhang

    2005-01-01

    A novel light scanning system based on circular laser trajectory for welding robot is developed. With the help of image processing technique, intelligent laser welding could be realized. According to laser triangulation algorithm and Scheimpflug condition, mathematical model for circular laser vision is built.This scanning system projects circular laser onto welded seams and recovers the depth of the welded seams,escapes from shortcomings of less information, explains ambiguity and single tracking direction inherent in "spot" or "line" type laser trajectory. Three-dimensional (3D) model for welded seams could be recognized after depth recovery. The imaging error is investigated also.

  1. Dependence on supernovae light-curve processing in void models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bengochea, Gabriel R., E-mail: gabriel@iafe.uba.ar [Instituto de Astronomía y Física del Espacio (IAFE), UBA-CONICET, CC 67, Suc. 28, 1428 Buenos Aires (Argentina); De Rossi, Maria E., E-mail: derossi@iafe.uba.ar [Instituto de Astronomía y Física del Espacio (IAFE), UBA-CONICET, CC 67, Suc. 28, 1428 Buenos Aires (Argentina); Departamento de Física, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales, Universidad de Buenos Aires (Argentina)

    2014-06-02

    In this work, we show that when supernova Ia (SN Ia) data sets are used to put constraints on the free parameters of inhomogeneous models, certain extra information regarding the light-curve fitter used in the supernovae Ia luminosity fluxes processing should be taken into account. We found that the size of the void as well as other parameters of these models might be suffering extra degenerations or additional systematic errors due to the fitter. A recent proposal to relieve the tension between the results from Planck satellite and SNe Ia is re-analyzed in the framework of these subjects.

  2. White light-emitting diodes (LEDs) at domestic lighting levels and retinal injury in a rat model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shang, Yu-Man; Wang, Gen-Shuh; Sliney, David; Yang, Chang-Hao; Lee, Li-Ling

    2014-03-01

    Light-emitting diodes (LEDs) deliver higher levels of blue light to the retina than do conventional domestic light sources. Chronic exposure to high-intensity light (2,000-10,000 lux) has previously been found to result in light-induced retinal injury, but chronic exposure to relatively low-intensity (750 lux) light has not been previously assessed with LEDs in a rodent model. We examined LED-induced retinal neuronal cell damage in the Sprague-Dawley rat using functional, histological, and biochemical measurements. We used blue LEDs (460 nm) and full-spectrum white LEDs, coupled with matching compact fluorescent lights, for exposures. Pathological examinations included electroretinogram, hematoxylin and eosin (H&E) staining, immunohistochemistry (IHC), and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). We also measured free radical production in the retina to determine the oxidative stress level. H&E staining and TEM revealed apoptosis and necrosis of photoreceptors, which indicated blue-light induced photochemical injury of the retina. Free radical production in the retina was increased in LED-exposed groups. IHC staining demonstrated that oxidative stress was associated with retinal injury. Although we found serious retinal light injury in LED groups, the compact fluorescent lamp (CFL) groups showed moderate to mild injury. Our results raise questions about adverse effects on the retina from chronic exposure to LED light compared with other light sources that have less blue light. Thus, we suggest a precautionary approach with regard to the use of blue-rich "white" LEDs for general lighting. Shang YM, Wang GS, Sliney D, Yang CH, Lee LL. 2014. White light-emitting diodes (LEDs) at domestic lighting levels and retinal injury in a rat model. Environ Health Perspect 122:269-276; http://dx.doi.org/10.1289/ehp.1307294.

  3. Modelling merchantable volumes for uneven aged maritime pine (Pinus pinaster Aiton stands establi-shed by natural regeneration in the central Portugal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristina Alegria

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Uneven aged maritime pine stands established by natural regeneration have a great expression in Portugal. These stands being overstocked, as opposed to those established from plantations, provide straight and cylindrical tree boles and logs with less knots that makes them very suitable for certain industrial purposes. Therefore, the aim of this study was to fit a set of equations to predict total volume and merchantable volumes to any merchantable limit for uneven aged maritime pine stands established by natural regeneration in the central inland region of Portugal. Data were collected in 30 circular sampling plots of 500 m2 of area, on 1426 trees and 314 sample trees for volume assessment, corresponding to 2353 diameter/height mea-surements. A total height equation, a total volume equation, a volume ratio equation to any top height limit and a taper equation, over bark, were fitted. To select among the best models, several statistics were computed during model fitting and the independent validation procedure to evaluate model fitting, collinearity and prediction performances. A ranking index was used to support the final decision. The models selected were then fitted again using robust regression and weighted regression techniques, because studentized residuals distribution normality and homogeneity assumptions were not observed. This research showed that the models selected for these stands were not the same as those selected in previous studies for the species in this region, suggesting that these results may be due to the influence of stand density conditions on diameter and total height growth, and consequently, on stem form and volume. This set of equations will also be included as components in a single tree growth and yield model developed for these stands. 

  4. Spectra of heavy-light mesons in a relativistic model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Jing-Bin; Lue, Cai-Dian [Institute of High Energy Physics, Beijing (China)

    2017-05-15

    The spectra and wave functions of heavy-light mesons are calculated within a relativistic quark model which is based on a heavy-quark expansion of the instantaneous Bethe-Salpeter equation by applying the Foldy-Wouthuysen transformation. The kernel we choose is the standard combination of linear scalar and Coulombic vector. The effective Hamiltonian for heavy-light quark-antiquark system is calculated up to order 1/m{sub Q}{sup 2}. Our results are in good agreement with available experimental data except for the anomalous D{sub s0}{sup *}(2317) and D{sub s1}(2460) states. The newly observed heavy-light meson states can be accommodated successfully in the relativistic quark model with their assignments presented. The D{sub sJ}{sup *}(2860) can be interpreted as the vertical stroke 1{sup 3/2}D{sub 1} right angle and vertical stroke 1{sup 5/2}D{sub 3} right angle states being members of the 1D family with J{sup P} = 1{sup -} and 3{sup -}. (orig.)

  5. Light front quark-diquark model for the nucleons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maji, Tanmay; Chakrabarti, Dipankar

    2016-11-01

    We present a quark-diquark model for the nucleons where the light front wave functions are constructed from the soft-wall AdS/QCD prediction. The model is consistent with the quark counting rule and Drell-Yan-West relation. The scale evolution of unpolarized parton distribution functions (PDFs) of protons is simulated by making the parameters in the PDF scale dependent. The evolution of the PDFs are reproduced for a wide range of evolution scale. Helicity and transversity distributions for the proton predicted in this model agree with phenomenological fits. The axial and tensor charges are also shown to agree with the experimental data. The model can be used to evaluate distributions like generalized parton distributions, transverse momentum dependent distributions, etc., and their scale evolutions.

  6. Analysis and Prediction of Ice Shedding for a Full-Scale Heated Tail Rotor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kreeger, Richard E.; Work, Andrew; Douglass, Rebekah; Gazella, Matthew; Koster, Zakery; Turk, Jodi

    2016-01-01

    When helicopters are to fly in icing conditions, it is necessary to consider the possibility of ice shed from the rotor blades. In 2013, a series of tests were conducted on a heated tail rotor at NASA Glenn's Icing Research Tunnel (IRT). The tests produced several shed events that were captured on camera. Three of these shed events were captured at a sufficiently high frame rate to obtain multiple images of the shed ice in flight that had a sufficiently long section of shed ice for analysis. Analysis of these shed events is presented and compared to an analytical Shedding Trajectory Model (STM). The STM is developed and assumes that the ice breaks off instantly as it reaches the end of the blade, while frictional and viscous forces are used as parameters to fit the STM. The trajectory of each shed is compared to that predicted by the STM, where the STM provides information of the shed group of ice as a whole. The limitations of the model's underlying assumptions are discussed in comparison to experimental shed events.

  7. Nucleon parton distributions in a light-front quark model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gutsche, Thomas [Universitaet Tuebingen, Institut fuer Theoretische Physik, Kepler Center for Astro and Particle Physics, Tuebingen (Germany); Lyubovitskij, Valery E. [Universitaet Tuebingen, Institut fuer Theoretische Physik, Kepler Center for Astro and Particle Physics, Tuebingen (Germany); Tomsk State University, Department of Physics, Tomsk (Russian Federation); Tomsk Polytechnic University, Laboratory of Particle Physics, Mathematical Physics Department, Tomsk (Russian Federation); Universidad Tecnica Federico Santa Maria, Departamento de Fisica y Centro Cientifico Tecnologico de Valparaiso (CCTVal), Valparaiso (Chile); Schmidt, Ivan [Universidad Tecnica Federico Santa Maria, Departamento de Fisica y Centro Cientifico Tecnologico de Valparaiso (CCTVal), Valparaiso (Chile)

    2017-02-15

    Continuing our analysis of parton distributions in the nucleon, we extend our light-front quark model in order to obtain both the helicity-independent and the helicity-dependent parton distributions, analytically matching the results of global fits at the initial scale μ∝ 1 GeV; they also contain the correct Dokshitzer-Gribov-Lipatov-Altarelli-Parisi evolution. We also calculate the transverse parton, Wigner and Husimi distributions from a unified point of view, using our light-front wave functions and expressing them in terms of the parton distributions q{sub v}(x) and δq{sub v}(x). Our results are very relevant for the current and future program of the COMPASS experiment at SPS (CERN). (orig.)

  8. Nucleon parton distributions in a light-front quark model

    CERN Document Server

    Gutsche, Thomas; Schmidt, Ivan

    2016-01-01

    Continuing with our analysis of parton distributions in the nucleon, we extend our light-front quark model in order to obtain both the helicity independent and helicity dependent parton distributions, analytically matching the results of global fits at the initial scale $\\mu \\sim 1$ GeV, and which also contain the correct Dokshitzer-Gribov-Lipatov-Altarelli-Parisi evolution. We also calculate the transverse parton, Wigner and Husimi distributions from a unified point of view, using our light-front wave functions and expressing them in terms of the parton distributions $q_v(x)$ and $\\delta q_v(x)$. Our results are very relevant for the current and future program of the COMPASS experiment at SPS (CERN).

  9. Observation and modeling of polarized light from scarab beetles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowrey, Sam; de Silva, Lakshman; Hodgkinson, Ian; Leader, John

    2007-08-01

    The light reflected from scarab beetles illuminated with unpolarized white light is analyzed ellipsometrically and displayed as the sum of an elliptically polarized spectrum Ip and an unpolarized spectrum Iu. A chirped stack of chiral resonators, each with a characteristic Bragg wavelength and partial realignment of birefringent material to a fixed axis, is proposed as a model for simulation of both reflection and polarization spectra. Possible mechanisms that effectively eliminate impedance mismatch at the air-elytron interface and allow some beetles to exhibit nearly perfect circularly polarized reflections are discussed. Results are presented for three representative beetles, Ischiosopha bifasciata, which is shown to be a narrowband left-circular polarizer; Chrysophora chrysochlora, a broadband left-circular polarizer; and Chrysina woodi, an elliptical polarizer. The methods that are developed are applicable to the more general problem of synthesis of reflectors with prescribed reflection and polarization spectra.

  10. Light self-focusing in the atmosphere: thin window model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaseva, Irina A.; Fedoruk, Mikhail P.; Rubenchik, Alexander M.; Turitsyn, Sergei K.

    2016-08-01

    Ultra-high power (exceeding the self-focusing threshold by more than three orders of magnitude) light beams from ground-based laser systems may find applications in space-debris cleaning. The propagation of such powerful laser beams through the atmosphere reveals many novel interesting features compared to traditional light self-focusing. It is demonstrated here that for the relevant laser parameters, when the thickness of the atmosphere is much shorter than the focusing length (that is, of the orbit scale), the beam transit through the atmosphere in lowest order produces phase distortion only. This means that by using adaptive optics it may be possible to eliminate the impact of self-focusing in the atmosphere on the laser beam. The area of applicability of the proposed “thin window” model is broader than the specific physical problem considered here. For instance, it might find applications in femtosecond laser material processing.

  11. Methyl mercury exposure from fish consumption in vulnerable racial/ethnic populations: probabilistic SHEDS-Dietary model analyses using 1999-2006 NHANES and 1990-2002 TDS data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Jianping; Zartarian, Valerie G; Liu, Shi V; Geller, Andrew M

    2012-01-01

    NHANES subjects self-identified as "Asian, Pacific Islander, Native American, or multiracial" (A/P/N/M) have higher levels of blood organic mercury than other racial/ethnic groups; however, the reasons for this have been unclear. This research uses exposure modeling to determine the reasons for elevated blood methylmercury (MeHg) levels, and also extends previous analyses of observed NHANES blood levels. The probabilistic SHEDS-Dietary model was applied, using MeHg fish residue data from FDA's Total Diet Study (1990-2002) combined with NHANES/WWEIA (1999-2006) fish consumption data, to generate exposure estimates by race/ethnicity, age group, and fish type. Statistical analyses of blood methylmercury levels in the (6 times larger) 1999-2006 NHANES data were compared against previous published results for 1999-2002 data. The A/P/N/M group has higher fish intake, modeled MeHg exposures, and blood levels than the general population and other racial/ethnic groups. Tuna, other saltwater fish, and other freshwater fish are key food types driving dietary MeHg exposure. The 1-consumption is an important route for methylmercury intake by the general population, and especially for racial/ethnic groups with higher fish consumption. These probabilistic dietary modeling approaches could be applied for local populations (e.g., tribes) and other chemicals and foods, if data are available.

  12. Ud af hjemløshed?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pico Geerdsen, Lars; Koch-Nielsen, Inger; Vinther, Henrik

    Hjemløshed er ofte forbundet med en række problemer som misbrug, psykisk sygdom, vold i parforholdet, ringe arbejdsmarkedstilknytning og levevilkår, kriminalitet, gæld og manglende sociale netværk. Det er alle problemer, der kan udløse hjemløshed og potentielt fastholde personer i en hjemløshedst...

  13. ADOPT: A Historically Validated Light Duty Vehicle Consumer Choice Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brooker, A.; Gonder, J.; Lopp, S.; Ward, J.

    2015-05-04

    The Automotive Deployment Option Projection Tool (ADOPT) is a light-duty vehicle consumer choice and stock model supported by the U.S. Department of Energy’s Vehicle Technologies Office. It estimates technology improvement impacts on U.S. light-duty vehicles sales, petroleum use, and greenhouse gas emissions. ADOPT uses techniques from the multinomial logit method and the mixed logit method estimate sales. Specifically, it estimates sales based on the weighted value of key attributes including vehicle price, fuel cost, acceleration, range and usable volume. The average importance of several attributes changes nonlinearly across its range and changes with income. For several attributes, a distribution of importance around the average value is used to represent consumer heterogeneity. The majority of existing vehicle makes, models, and trims are included to fully represent the market. The Corporate Average Fuel Economy regulations are enforced. The sales feed into the ADOPT stock model. It captures key aspects for summing petroleum use and greenhouse gas emissions This includes capturing the change in vehicle miles traveled by vehicle age, the creation of new model options based on the success of existing vehicles, new vehicle option introduction rate limits, and survival rates by vehicle age. ADOPT has been extensively validated with historical sales data. It matches in key dimensions including sales by fuel economy, acceleration, price, vehicle size class, and powertrain across multiple years. A graphical user interface provides easy and efficient use. It manages the inputs, simulation, and results.

  14. The white-light flare of 1982 June 15 - Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mauas, Pablo J. D.; Avrett, Eugene H.; Machado, Marcos E.

    1990-01-01

    Models are presented for the two continuum-emitting kernels observed in the white-light flare (WLF) of June 15, 1982. They are the first semiempirical models of a WLF which are consistent not only with observations of the continuum emission level but also with a set of spectral lines having heights of formation which span the chromosphere and upper photosphere. It is shown that the models are not compatible with the hypothesis that the continuum emission is caused by enhanced Balmer and Paschen hydrogen continua, and they present strong evidence instead that the emission is of photospheric origin and that its source is due to H(-). The observation and the models derived from them show that white-light emission can occur in areas of the active region where there is no chromospheric emission and in particular no H-alpha emission. This fact seems to rule out the viability of downward transport mechanisms as the source of the energy required for the WLF.

  15. The white-light flare of 1982 June 15 - Models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mauas, P.J.D.; Avrett, E.H.; Machado, M.E. (Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, Cambridge, MA (USA) Comision Nacional de Investigaciones Espaciales, San Miguel (Argentina))

    1990-09-01

    Models are presented for the two continuum-emitting kernels observed in the white-light flare (WLF) of June 15, 1982. They are the first semiempirical models of a WLF which are consistent not only with observations of the continuum emission level but also with a set of spectral lines having heights of formation which span the chromosphere and upper photosphere. It is shown that the models are not compatible with the hypothesis that the continuum emission is caused by enhanced Balmer and Paschen hydrogen continua, and they present strong evidence instead that the emission is of photospheric origin and that its source is due to H(-). The observation and the models derived from them show that white-light emission can occur in areas of the active region where there is no chromospheric emission and in particular no H-alpha emission. This fact seems to rule out the viability of downward transport mechanisms as the source of the energy required for the WLF. 31 refs.

  16. Modeling of lighting behaviour of a hybrid lighting system in inner spaces of Building of Electrical Engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amado, L.; Osma, G.; Villamizar, R.

    2016-07-01

    This paper presents the modelling of lighting behaviour of a hybrid lighting system - HLS in inner spaces for tropical climate. HLS aims to mitigate the problem of high electricity consumption used by artificial lighting in buildings. These systems integrate intelligently the daylight and artificial light through control strategies. However, selection of these strategies usually depends on expertise of designer and of available budget. In order to improve the selection process of the control strategies, this paper analyses the Electrical Engineering Building (EEB) case, initially modelling of lighting behaviour is established for the HLS of a classroom and an office. This allows estimating the illuminance level of the mixed lighting in the space, and energy consumption by artificial light according to different lighting control techniques, a control strategy based on occupancy and a combination of them. The model considers the concept of Daylight Factor (DF) for the estimating of daylight illuminance on the work plane for tropical climatic conditions. The validation of the model was carried out by comparing the measured and model-estimated indoor illuminances.

  17. Shedding of cell membrane-bound proteoglycans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nam, Eon Jeong; Park, Pyong Woo

    2012-01-01

    Membrane-bound proteoglycans function primarily as coreceptors for many glycosaminoglycan (GAG)-binding ligands at the cell surface. The majority of membrane-bound proteoglycans can also function as soluble autocrine or paracrine effectors as their extracellular domains, replete with all GAG chains, are enzymatically cleaved and released from the cell surface by ectodomain shedding. In particular, the ectodomain shedding of syndecans, a major family of cell surface heparan sulfate proteoglycans, is an important posttranslational mechanism that modulates diverse pathophysiological processes. Syndecan shedding is a tightly controlled process that regulates the onset, progression, and resolution of various infectious and noninfectious inflammatory diseases. This review describes methods to induce and measure the shedding of cell membrane-bound proteoglycans, focusing on syndecan shedding as a prototypic example.

  18. Light

    CERN Document Server

    Ditchburn, R W

    2011-01-01

    This classic study, available for the first time in paperback, clearly demonstrates how quantum theory is a natural development of wave theory, and how these two theories, once thought to be irreconcilable, together comprise a single valid theory of light. Aimed at students with an intermediate-level knowledge of physics, the book first offers a historical introduction to the subject, then covers topics such as wave theory, interference, diffraction, Huygens' Principle, Fermat's Principle, and the accuracy of optical measurements. Additional topics include the velocity of light, relativistic o

  19. Proteomic investigation of embryonic rat heart-derived H9c2 cell line sheds new light on the molecular phenotype of the popular cell model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenčo, Juraj; Lenčová-Popelová, Olga; Link, Marek; Jirkovská, Anna; Tambor, Vojtěch; Potůčková, Eliška; Stulík, Jiří; Šimůnek, Tomáš; Štěrba, Martin

    2015-12-10

    Due to their cardiac origin, H9c2 cells rank among the most popular cell lines in current cardiovascular research, yet molecular phenotype remains elusive. Hence, in this study we used proteomic approach to describe molecular phenotype of H9c2 cells in their undifferentiated (i.e., most frequently used) state, and its functional response to cardiotoxic drug doxorubicin. Of 1671 proteins identified by iTRAQ IEF/LC-MSMS analysis, only 12 proteins were characteristic for striated muscle cells and none was cardiac phenotype-specific. Targeted LC-SRM and western blot analyses confirmed that undifferentiated H9c2 cells are phenotypically considerably different to both primary neonatal cardiomyocytes and adult myocardium. These cells lack proteins essential for formation of striated muscle myofibrils or they express only minor amounts thereof. They also fail to express many proteins important for metabolism of muscle cells. The challenge with clinically relevant concentrations of doxorubicin did not induce a proteomic signature that has been previously noted in primary cardiomyocytes or adult hearts. Instead, several alterations previously described in other cells of mesodermal origin, such as fibroblasts, were observed (e.g., severe down-regulation of collagen synthesis pathway). In conclusion, the molecular phenotype of H9c2 cells resembles very immature myogenic cells with skeletal muscle commitment upon differentiation and thus, translatability of findings obtained in these cells deserves caution.

  20. Semi-dileptonic decays of the light vector mesons in Light Front Quark Model

    CERN Document Server

    Geng, Chao-Qiang

    2014-01-01

    We study the transition form factors of the light vector to pseudoscalar mesons as functions of the momentum transfer $q^2$ within the light-front quark model. With these form factors, we calculate the decay branching ratios of all possible modes for $V\\to P\\ell^+\\ell^-$ ($V=\\omega$ and $\\phi$, $P=\\pi^0$, $\\eta$ and $\\eta^{\\prime}$ and $\\ell=e$ and $\\mu$). We find that our numerical results fit with the data, such as those of $\\omega \\to \\pi^0 \\ell^+\\ell^-$ and $\\phi\\to \\pi^0 e^+e^-$ by NA60 and $\\phi \\to\\eta e^+e^-$ by SND. We also predict that the branching ratios of $\\phi \\to \\pi^0 \\mu^+\\mu^-$, $\\omega\\to \\eta e^+e^-$, $\\omega\\to \\eta \\mu^+\\mu^-$, $\\phi\\to \\eta \\mu^+\\mu^-$ and $\\phi\\to \\eta^{\\prime} e^+e^-$ to be aroud $3.48\\times 10^{-6}$, $3.22\\times 10^{-6}$, $1.81\\times 10^{-9}$, $6.86\\times 10^{-6}$ $2.97\\times 10^{-7}$, respectively.

  1. Double parton distributions in Light-Front constituent quark models

    CERN Document Server

    Rinaldi, Matteo; Traini, Marco; Vento, Vicente

    2014-01-01

    Double parton distribution functions (dPDF), accessible in high energy proton-proton and proton nucleus collisions, encode information on how partons inside a proton are correlated among each other and could represent a tool to explore the 3D proton structure. In recent papers, double parton correlations have been studied in the valence quark region, by means of constituent quark models. This framework allows to understand clearly the dynamical origin of the correlations and to establish which, among the features of the results, are model independent. Recent relevant results, obtained in a relativistic light-front scheme, able to overcome some drawbacks of previous calculations, such as the poor support, will be presented. Peculiar transverse momentum correlations, generated by the correct treatment of the boosts, are obtained. The role of spin correlations will be also shown. In this covariant approach, the symmetries of the dPDFs are unambiguously reproduced. The study of the QCD evolution of the model resu...

  2. Modeling diffuse reflectance measurements of light scattered by layered tissues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rohde, Shelley B.

    In this dissertation, we first present a model for the diffuse reflectance due to a continuous beam incident normally on a half space composed of a uniform scattering and absorbing medium. This model is the result of an asymptotic analysis of the radiative transport equation for strong scattering, weak absorption and a defined beam width. Through comparison with the diffuse reflectance computed using the numerical solution of the radiative transport equation, we show that this diffuse reflectance model gives results that are accurate for small source-detector separation distances. We then present an explicit model for the diffuse reflectance due to a collimated beam of light incident normally on layered tissues. This model is derived using the corrected diffusion approximation applied to a layered medium, and it takes the form of a convolution with an explicit kernel and the incident beam profile. This model corrects the standard diffusion approximation over all source-detector separation distances provided the beam is sufficiently wide compared to the scattering mean-free path. We validate this model through comparison with Monte Carlo simulations. Then we use this model to estimate the optical properties of an epithelial layer from Monte Carlo simulation data. Using measurements at small source-detector separations and this model, we are able to estimate the absorption coefficient, scattering coefficient and anisotropy factor of epithelial tissues efficiently with reasonable accuracy. Finally, we present an extension of the corrected diffusion approximation for an obliquely incident beam. This model is formed through a Fourier Series representation in the azimuthal angle which allows us to exhibit the break in axisymmetry when combined with the previous analysis. We validate this model with Monte Carlo simulations. This model can also be written in the form of a convolution of an explicit kernel with the incident beam profile. Additionally, it can be used to

  3. Design and modeling of a light powered biomimicry micropump

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sze, Tsun-kay Jackie; Liu, Jin; Dutta, Prashanta

    2015-06-01

    The design of compact micropumps to provide steady flow has been an on-going challenge in the field of microfluidics. In this work, a novel micropump concept is introduced utilizing bacteriorhodopsin and sugar transporter proteins. The micropump utilizes light energy to activate the transporter proteins, which create an osmotic pressure gradient and drive the fluid flow. The capability of the bio inspired micropump is demonstrated using a quasi 1D numerical model, where the contributions of bacteriorhodopsin and sugar transporter proteins are taken care of by appropriate flux boundary conditions in the flow channel. Proton flux created by the bacteriorhodopsin proteins is compared with experimental results to obtain the appropriate working conditions of the proteins. To identify the pumping capability, we also investigate the influences of several key parameters, such as the membrane fraction of transporter proteins, membrane proton permeability and the presence of light. Our results show that there is a wide bacteriorhodopsin membrane fraction range (from 0.2 to 10%) at which fluid flow stays nearly at its maximum value. Numerical results also indicate that lipid membranes with low proton permeability can effectively control the light source as a method to turn on/off fluid flow. This capability allows the micropump to be activated and shut off remotely without bulky support equipment. In comparison with existing micropumps, this pump generates higher pressures than mechanical pumps. It can produce peak fluid flow and shutoff head comparable to other non-mechanical pumps.

  4. Spectra of heavy-light mesons in a relativistic model

    CERN Document Server

    Liu, Jing-Bin

    2016-01-01

    The spectra and wave functions of heavy-light mesons are calculated within a relativistic quark model, which is derived from the instantaneous Bethe-Salpeter equation by applying the Foldy-Wouthuysen transformation on the heavy quark. The kernel we choose is based on scalar confining and vector Coulomb potentials. The Hamiltonian for heavy-light quark-antiquark system is calculated up to order $1/m_Q^2$. The results are in good agreement with available experimental data except for the masses of the anomalous $D_{s0}^*(2317)$ and $D_{s1}(2460)$ states. The newly observed charmed meson states can be accommodated successfully in the relativistic model and their assignments are presented, the $D_{sJ}^*(2860)$ can be interpreted as the $|1^{3/2}D_1\\rangle$ and $|1^{5/2}D_3\\rangle$ states being the $J^P=1^-$ and $3^-$ members of the 1D family in our model.

  5. Human tissue optical properties measurements and light propagation modelling

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Dam, JS

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available measurements and light propagation modelling J. S. Dam , A. Singh , and A. E. Karsten Biophotonics Group, National Laser Centre, CSIR, Pretoria. www.csir.co.za/biophotonics SAIP 2006 Slide 2 © CSIR 2006 www... and µ’s S a m p l e S a m p l e S a m p l e Integrating Sphere measurements “Measurements of the total transmittance and reflectance of a thin slab-shaped multiple scattering sample can yield the absorption- and the reduced...

  6. Generalized Semi-Analytical Models of Supernova Light Curves

    CERN Document Server

    Chatzopoulos, Emmanouil; Vinko, Jozsef

    2011-01-01

    We present generalized supernova (SN) light curve (LC) models for a variety of power inputs. We provide an expression for the power input that is produced by self-similar forward and reverse shocks in SN ejecta - circumstellar matter (CSM) interaction. We find that this ejecta-CSM interaction luminosity is in agreement with results from multi-dimensional radiation hydrodynamics simulations in the optically-thin case. We develop a model for the case of an optically-thick CSM by invoking an approximation for the effects of radiative diffusion. In the context of this model, we provide predictions for the time of forward shock break-out from the optically-thick part of the CSM envelope. We also introduce a hybrid LC model that incorporates ejecta-CSM interaction plus Ni-56 and Co-56 radioactive decay input. We fit this hybrid model to the LC of the Super-Luminous Supernova (SLSN) 2006gy. We find that this model provides a better fit to the LC of this event than previously presented models. We also address the rel...

  7. Tritium distribution modeling in a Light Water New Production Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jaeckle, J.W.

    1989-05-01

    The tritium distribution and tritium release pathways in a new light water production reactor were examined. A computer model was developed to track the tritium as it makes its way through the various plant systems and ends up either as a release to the atmosphere, the cooling tower blowdown or to the solid waste system. The model was designed to predict the integrated yearly tritium releases and provide estimated airborne tritium concentrations in various locations within the plant. WNP-1 was used as a representative model for a Light Water New Production Reactor (LWNPR). The Tritium Distribution Model solves for the time dependent tritium concentration in a system of nodes. These nodes are connected to one another via a set of internodal flow paths and to various sources and sinks. For example, plant systems such as the primary system are the nodes, piping and leaks are the internodal flow paths, make-up water is a source, and release to the atmosphere is a sink. The expected water mass of each node; the flow rates between nodes, sources, and sinks; and tritium source rates are provided as input. The code will solve for the time dependent tritium concentration in each node and the amount of tritium ''released'' to the sinks. Preliminary calculations have been performed using WNP-1 plant specific information obtained primarily from the WNP-1 FSAR. Further work is currently in progress to refine the model and provide a more realistic set of input values which will better represent an operating LWNPR. 1 ref., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  8. A comparison of osteoclast-rich and osteoclast-poor osteopetrosis in adult mice sheds light on the role of the osteoclast in coupling bone resorption and bone formation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thudium, Christian S; Moscatelli, Ilana; Flores, Carmen

    2014-01-01

    that osteoclasts are important for regulating osteoblast activity. To illuminate the role of the osteoclast in controlling bone remodeling, we transplanted irradiated skeletally mature 3-month old wild-type mice with hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) to generate either an osteoclast-rich or osteoclast-poor adult...... osteopetrosis model. We used fetal liver HSCs from (1) oc/oc mice, (2) RANK KO mice, and (3) compared these to wt control cells. TRAP5b activity, a marker of osteoclast number and size, was increased in the oc/oc recipients, while a significant reduction was seen in the RANK KO recipients. In contrast, the bone...

  9. Dynamic Optimization for Vortex Shedding Suppression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bonis Ioannis

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Flows around structures exhibiting vortex shedding induce vibrations that can potentially damage the structure. A way to avoid it is to suppress vortex shedding by controlling the wake. Wake control of laminar flow behind a rotating cylinder is formulated herein as a dynamic optimization problem. Angular cylinder speed is the manipulated variable that is adjusted to suppress vortex shedding by minimizing lift coefficient variation. The optimal angular speed is assumed to be periodic like wake formation. The control problem is solved for different time horizons tH. The impact of tH to control is evaluated and the need for feedback is assessed.

  10. The Instanton-Dyon Liquid Model V: Twisted Light Quarks

    CERN Document Server

    Liu, Yizhuang; Zahed, Ismail

    2016-01-01

    We discuss an extension of the instanton-dyon liquid model that includes twisted light quarks in the fundamental representation with explicit $Z_{N_c}$ symmetry for the case with equal number of colors $N_c$ and flavors $N_f$. We map the model on a 3-dimensional quantum effective theory, and analyze it in the mean-field approximation. The effective potential and the vacuum chiral condensates are made explicit for $N_f=N_c=2, 3$. The low temperature phase is center symmetric but breaks spontaneously flavor symmetry with $N_f-1$ massless pions. The high temperature phase breaks center symmetry but supports finite and unequal quark condensates.

  11. Supersymmetry and Light Quark Masses in a Realistic Superstring Model

    CERN Document Server

    Halyo, E

    1994-01-01

    We examine the light quark masses in a standard--like superstring model in the four dimensional free fermionic formulation. We find that the supersymmetry constraints in the observable and hidden sectors eliminate all large contributions to $m_u$ and $m_d$ and force them to be much smaller than the other quark masses. The requirement for an acceptable Higgs doublet spectrum results in $m_u<models a realistic $m_d$ can always be obtained whereas $m_u$ is at most $10^{-5}~MeV$. For particular choices of flat directions or vacua $m_u$ can be as small as $10^{-7}~MeV$ but cannot vanish.

  12. A light Z′ heterotic-string derived model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alon E. Faraggi

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The existence of an extra Z′ inspired from heterotic-string theory at accessible energy scales attracted considerable interest in the particle physics literature. Surprisingly, however, the construction of heterotic-string derived models that allow for an extra Z′ to remain unbroken down to low scales has proven to be very difficult. The main reason being that the U(1 symmetries that are typically discussed in the literature are either anomalous or have to be broken at a high scale to generate light neutrino masses. In this paper we use for that purpose the self-duality property under the spinor vector duality, which was discovered in free fermionic heterotic string models. The chiral massless states in the self-dual models fill complete 27 representations of E6. The anomaly free gauge symmetry in the effective low energy field theory of our string model is SU(4C×SU(2L×SU(2R×U(1ζ, where U(1ζ is the family universal U(1 symmetry that descends from E6, and is typically anomalous in other free fermionic heterotic-string models. Our model therefore allows for the existence of a low scale Z′, which is a combination of B−L, U(1ζ and T3R. The string model is free of exotic fractionally charged states in the massless spectrum. It contains exotic SO(10 singlet states that carry fractional, non-E6 charge, with respect to U(1ζ. These non-E6 string states arise in the model due to the breaking of the E6 symmetry by discrete Wilson lines. They represent a distinct signature of the string vacua. They may provide viable dark matter candidates.

  13. Vortex Shedding From a Flexible Hydrofoil

    OpenAIRE

    Dreyer, Matthieu; Farhat, Mohamed

    2011-01-01

    Video of vortex shedding in the wake of a Naca0009 hydrofoil made of polyoxymethylene type C (POM C). This video was submitted as part of the Gallery of Fluid Motion 2011 which is showcase of fluid dynamics videos.

  14. Adaptive load shedding and regional protection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ford, J.J.; Ledwich, G. [School of Engineering Systems, Queensland University of Technology, Brisbane, Qld 4001 (Australia); Bevrani, H. [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Kurdistan Sanandaj, Kurdistan (Iran)

    2009-11-15

    The requirement for improved efficiency whilst maintaining system security necessitates the development of improved system analysis approaches and the development of advanced emergency control technologies. Load shedding is a type of emergency control that is designed to ensure system stability by curtailing system load to match generation supply. This paper presents a new adaptive load shedding scheme that provides emergency protection against excess frequency decline, whilst minimizing the risk of line overloading. The proposed load shedding scheme uses the local frequency rate information to adapt the load shedding behaviour to suit the size and location of the experienced disturbance. The proposed scheme is tested in simulation on a 3-region, 10-generator sample system and shows good performance. (author)

  15. Vortex shedding by a Savonius rotor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Botrini, M.; Beguier, C.; Chauvin, A.; Brun, R.

    1984-05-01

    A series of flow visualizations was performed to characterize the wake vortices of a Savonius rotor. The trials were undertaken in an attempt to account for discrepancies between theoretical and experimentally-derived power coefficients. The Savonius examined was two-bladed with a center offset. All tests were made in a water tunnel. Dye injection provided the visualization, and average velocities and velocity fluctuations were measured using a laser Doppler anemometer. A system of three vortices was found to be periodically shed by the rotor. Flow velocity fluctuation intensity peaked as a vortex was shed. The vortex shedding alternated from blade to blade, so that one was shed from a blade moving upstream.

  16. Caenorhabditis elegans as a model to study the impact of exposure to light emitting diode (LED) domestic lighting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdel-Rahman, Fawzia; Okeremgbo, Bethel; Alhamadah, Fatimah; Jamadar, Sakha; Anthony, Kevin; Saleh, Mahmoud A

    2017-04-16

    This study aimed to investigate the biological impact of exposure on domestic light emitting diodes (LED) lighting using the free-living nematode Caenorhabditis elegans as a model. Nematodes were separately exposed to white LED light covering the range of 380-750 nm, blue light at 450 nm and black light at 380-420 nm for one life cycle (egg to adult) with dark exposure as the control. Each light range induced stress to the nematode C. elegans such as reducing the number of the hatched eggs and/or delayed the maturation of the hatched eggs to the adult stage. In addition, it lowered or prevented the ability of adults to lay eggs and impaired the locomotion in the exposed worms. The observed type of biological stress was also associated with the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) as compared to nematodes grown in the dark. It is concluded that the blue light component of white LED light may cause health problems, and further investigation is required to test commercial brands of white LEDs that emit different amounts of blue light.

  17. Modeling self-organizing traffic lights with elementary cellular automata

    CERN Document Server

    Gershenson, Carlos

    2009-01-01

    There have been several highway traffic models proposed based on cellular automata. The simplest one is elementary cellular automaton rule 184. We extend this model to city traffic with cellular automata coupled at intersections using only rules 184, 252, and 136. The simplicity of the model offers a clear understanding of the main properties of city traffic and its phase transitions. We use the proposed model to compare two methods for coordinating traffic lights: a green-wave method that tries to optimize phases according to expected flows and a self-organizing method that adapts to the current traffic conditions. The self-organizing method delivers considerable improvements over the green-wave method. For low densities, the self-organizing method promotes the formation and coordination of platoons that flow freely in four directions, i.e. with a maximum velocity and no stops. For medium densities, the method allows a constant usage of the intersections, exploiting their maximum flux capacity. For high dens...

  18. Modeling Global Urbanization Supported by Nighttime Light Remote Sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Y.

    2015-12-01

    Urbanization, a major driver of global change, profoundly impacts our physical and social world, for example, altering carbon cycling and climate. Understanding these consequences for better scientific insights and effective decision-making unarguably requires accurate information on urban extent and its spatial distributions. In this study, we developed a cluster-based method to estimate the optimal thresholds and map urban extents from the nighttime light remote sensing data, extended this method to the global domain by developing a computational method (parameterization) to estimate the key parameters in the cluster-based method, and built a consistent 20-year global urban map series to evaluate the time-reactive nature of global urbanization (e.g. 2000 in Fig. 1). Supported by urban maps derived from nightlights remote sensing data and socio-economic drivers, we developed an integrated modeling framework to project future urban expansion by integrating a top-down macro-scale statistical model with a bottom-up urban growth model. With the models calibrated and validated using historical data, we explored urban growth at the grid level (1-km) over the next two decades under a number of socio-economic scenarios. The derived spatiotemporal information of historical and potential future urbanization will be of great value with practical implications for developing adaptation and risk management measures for urban infrastructure, transportation, energy, and water systems when considered together with other factors such as climate variability and change, and high impact weather events.

  19. Modeling nanostructure-enhanced light trapping in organic solar cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Adam, Jost

    A promising approach for improving the power conversion efficiencies of organic solar cells (OSCs) is by incorporating nanostructures in their thin film architecture to improve the light absorption in the device’s active polymer layers. Here, we present a modelling framework for the prediction...... of optical and plasmonic field enhancement by nanostructures in (or close to) the active layers and electrodes in OSCs. We incorporate finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) calculations alongside semi- analytical approaches, as the rigorous coupled-wave analysis (RCWA) and mode-coupling theory. Our simulation......-compatible method for non-periodic electrode structuring by pores of controlled dimensions, formed through anodic oxidation of sputter-deposited high-purity aluminium films [3]. [1] Kluge, C., et al. Multi-periodic nanostructures for photon control. Optics Express, 22 (S5), A1363. (2014) [2] Skigin, D., et al...

  20. Model for Triplet State Engineering in Organic Light Emitting Diodes

    CERN Document Server

    Prodhan, Suryoday; Ramasesha, S

    2014-01-01

    Engineering the position of the lowest triplet state (T1) relative to the first excited singlet state (S1) is of great importance in improving the efficiencies of organic light emitting diodes and organic photovoltaic cells. We have carried out model exact calculations of substituted polyene chains to understand the factors that affect the energy gap between S1 and T1. The factors studied are backbone dimerisation, different donor-acceptor substitutions and twisted geometry. The largest system studied is an eighteen carbon polyene which spans a Hilbert space of about 991 million. We show that for reverse intersystem crossing (RISC) process, the best system involves substituting all carbon sites on one half of the polyene with donors and the other half with acceptors.

  1. A Robust Load Shedding Strategy for Microgrid Islanding Transition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Guodong [ORNL; Xiao, Bailu [ORNL; Starke, Michael R [ORNL; Ceylan, Oguzhan [ORNL; Tomsovic, Kevin [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK)

    2016-01-01

    A microgrid is a group of interconnected loads and distributed energy resources. It can operate in either gridconnected mode to exchange energy with the main grid or run autonomously as an island in emergency mode. However, the transition of microgrid from grid-connected mode to islanded mode is usually associated with excessive load (or generation), which should be shed (or spilled). Under this condition, this paper proposes an robust load shedding strategy for microgrid islanding transition, which takes into account the uncertainties of renewable generation in the microgrid and guarantees the balance between load and generation after islanding. A robust optimization model is formulated to minimize the total operation cost, including fuel cost and penalty for load shedding. The proposed robust load shedding strategy works as a backup plan and updates at a prescribed interval. It assures a feasible operating point after islanding given the uncertainty of renewable generation. The proposed algorithm is demonstrated on a simulated microgrid consisting of a wind turbine, a PV panel, a battery, two distributed generators (DGs), a critical load and a interruptible load. Numerical simulation results validate the proposed algorithm.

  2. Double parton correlations in Light-Front constituent quark models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rinaldi Matteo

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Double parton distribution functions (dPDF represent a tool to explore the 3D proton structure. They can be measured in high energy proton-proton and proton nucleus collisions and encode information on how partons inside a proton are correlated among each other. dPFDs are studied here in the valence quark region, by means of a constituent quark model, where two particle correlations are present without any additional prescription. This framework allows to understand the dynamical origin of the correlations and to clarify which, among the features of the results, are model independent. Use will be made of a relativistic light-front scheme, able to overcome some drawbacks of the previous calculation. Transverse momentum correlations, due to the exact treatment of the boosts, are predicted and analyzed. The role of spin correlations is also shown. Due to the covariance of the approach, some symmetries of the dPDFs are seen unambigously. For the valence sector, also the study of the QCD evolution of the model results, which can be performed safely thanks to the property of good support, has been also completed.

  3. Retinal endoilluminator toxicity of xenon and light-emitting diode (LED) light source: rabbit model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aydin, Bahri; Dinç, Erdem; Yilmaz, S Necat; Altiparmak, U Emrah; Yülek, Fatma; Ertekin, Sevda; Yilmaz, Mustafa; Yakın, Mehmet

    2014-09-01

    This study evaluates retinal toxicity due to endoillumination with the light-emitting diode (LED) light source in comparison to endoillumination with xenon light source. Twenty-five eyes of 14 New Zealand pigmented rabbits were used in the study. The LED light (Omesis Medical Systems, Turkey) group was composed of 7 right eyes, while the other 7 right eyes constituted the xenon group (420 nm filter, 357mW/cm(2)) (Bright Star; DORC, Zuidland, Netherlands). Eleven untreated left eyes composed the control group. Twenty gauge pars plana incision 1.5 mm behind the limbus was performed in the right eyes. Twenty gauge bullet type fiberoptic endoilluminator was inserted into the eye from the incision without any pars plana vitrectomy. Fiberoptic endoilluminator was placed in such a way that it was directed toward visual streak of the rabbit retina with a 5 mm distance to retinal surface. Endoillumination was then applied for 20 min with a maximum light intensity for LED and xenon light. In left control eyes, no surgical procedure and no endoillumination were performed. One week after the endoillumination procedure, both eyes of the rabbits were enucleated following electroretinography. Sections stained with hematoxylin and eosin to evaluate morphologic changes. Retina tissues were assessed by active caspase-3 staining. There was no difference in the shape of the waveforms recorded in the eyes endoilluminated with LED light and xenon light sources compared to control eyes both before and after endoillumination application (p > 0.05). Microscopic evaluation of the retinas with hematoxylin and eosin staining demonstrated that all study groups have normal histologic properties similar to control group. No apoptosis positive cells were found within all sections in all groups. When the LED light source is used with maximum power and limited duration for endoillumination in rabbit eyes it does not produce phototoxic effects that may be detectable by electrophysiology

  4. Novel technique sheds new light on protein colocalization patterns

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    @@ The potential of MELC, a brand-new and highly efficient technique for studying the temporal and spatial distribution of proteins in living tissue,has been explored jointly over the last years by Walter Schubert, its inventor from the Molecular Pattern-Recognition Research Group at the Institute of Medical Neurobiology, Otto-von-Guericke University (Magdeburg, Germany),and his collaborators including Andreas Dress from the CAS-MPG Partner Institute for Computational Biology (PICB), the Shanghai Institutes for Biological Sciences (SIBS).

  5. Finding Florence: Shedding Light on Nurse Practitioners' Professional Responsibility

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.J. ter Maten-Speksnijder (Ada)

    2016-01-01

    markdownabstractThe new professional role ‘nurse practitioner’ (in Dutch: verpleegkundig specialist) challenges nurses to distuinguish themselves from nurses educated at the Bacher level by the criteria: independency, expertise, and an active attitude to role development. A crucial aspect of their r

  6. Chemical communication: a jewel sheds light on signal evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lassance, Jean-Marc; Löfstedt, Christer

    2013-05-06

    When others show sexy tails or sing elaborate songs, many animals use the language of chemistry to attract potential mates. A study provides insights into the evolutionary conundrum of how new chemical signals can evolve in an established communication system.

  7. Shedding light on the growth of gold nanoshells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sauerbeck, Christian; Haderlein, Michael; Schürer, Benedikt; Braunschweig, Björn; Peukert, Wolfgang; Klupp Taylor, Robin N

    2014-03-25

    Nanostructured particles containing noble metals can have highly tunable localized surface plasmon resonances and are therefore of particular interest for numerous applications. Nanoshells comprising a dielectric core and gold or silver shell are a widely researched systems because of the strong dependence of their optical properties on the ratio of core diameter to shell thickness. Although seeded-growth procedures have been developed to produce these particles, the many reported studies show significant variation in the nanoshell morphologies and hence optical properties. In order to establish processes that reproducibly synthesize nanoshells with high optical quality, it is necessary to develop techniques that monitor changes at the core particle surface during shell growth. For that purpose, we have carried out in situ nonlinear second-harmonic scattering (SHS) and linear vis-NIR extinction spectroscopy simultaneously during the seeded growth of gold nanoshells on silica core particles. Our SHS measurements show a striking variation in the nonlinear optical properties of the growing gold nanoshells. In comparison with linear optical measurements and with scanning electron microscopy (SEM) images made of gold nanoshells produced with varying shell completenesses, the SHS signal was observed to reach a peak intensity at a stage prior to shell closure. We attribute this high sensitivity of the SHS signal to the incomplete nanoshell surface morphology to the generation and subsequent degeneration of regions of electric field enhancement at gaps between isolated gold islands, which grow and coalesce. This conclusion is corroborated by finite-difference time-domain simulations of incomplete nanoshells. We suggest that the in situ analytical approach demonstrated here offers significant promise for future activities regarding the in-process optimization of the morphology and optical properties of metal nanoshells and other nanostructured plasmonic particles.

  8. Trace elements in quartz shed light on sediment provenance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ackerson, Michael R.; Tailby, Nicholas D.; Watson, E. Bruce

    2015-06-01

    Quartz is one of the most common minerals on the surface of the earth, and is a primary rock-forming mineral across the rock cycle. These two factors make quartz an obvious target for sediment provenance studies. Observations from experimental and natural samples demonstrate that the trace element content of quartz often reflects the conditions of quartz formation. When quartz is weathered from its primary crystallization setting (i.e., quartz from a granitoid) it can retain many chemical signatures of formation throughout the sedimentation processes. These geochemical signatures can be used to understand the primary source of individual quartz grains within a sediment. Here we present a case study from the Bega River catchment to demonstrate that quartz grains in sediments at the mouth of the Bega River are sourced from granitoids within the drainage basin. Data presented here also indicate that a portion of the beach sediment is also derived from either (i) sedimentary rocks within the basin or; (ii) mixing with sediments at the mouth of the river. The Bega River catchment was selected for this study because it is both small and has a well-constrained bedrock lithology, making it an ideal location to test the utility of this provenance technique. However, quartz trace element provenance has broad applications to modern and ancient sediments and can be used in lieu of, or in conjunction with, other provenance techniques to elucidate sediment transport through time.

  9. Supernova sheds light on gamma-ray bursts

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    On 29 March the HETE-II satellite detected the most violent explosion in the universe to date - an enormous burst of gamma rays. Observers across the world recorded and studied the event. It appears to prove that gamma ray bursts originate in supernovae (1 page)

  10. Photons shedding light on electron capture by highly charged ions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoekstra, Romke Anne

    1990-01-01

    In this thesis charge transfer is studied in collisions of highly charged ions (Aq+) with neutral particles (B). Because the electron is captured resonantly (i.e. without its binding energy) by the ion, a limited number of highly excited states (characterized by the quantum numbers nlm) is preferent

  11. Common peptides shed light on evolution of Olfactory Receptors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lancet Doron

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Olfactory Receptors (ORs form the largest multigene family in vertebrates. Their evolution and their expansion in the vertebrate genomes was the subject of many studies. In this paper we apply a motif-based approach to this problem in order to uncover evolutionary characteristics. Results We extract deterministic motifs from ORs belonging to ten species using the MEX (Motif Extraction algorithm, thus defining Common Peptides (CPs characteristic to ORs. We identify species-specific CPs and show that their relative abundance is high only in fish and frog, suggesting relevance to water-soluble odorants. We estimate the origins of CPs according to the tree of life and track the gains and losses of CPs through evolution. We identify major CP gain in tetrapods and major losses in reptiles. Although the number of human ORs is less than half of the number of ORs in other mammals, the fraction of lost CPs is only 11%. By examining the positions of CPs along the OR sequence, we find two regions that expanded only in tetrapods. Using CPs we are able to establish remote homology relations between ORs and non-OR GPCRs. Selecting CPs according to their evolutionary age, we bicluster ORs and CPs for each species. Clean biclustering emerges when using relatively novel CPs. Evolutionary age is used to track the history of CP acquisition in the collection of mammalian OR families within HORDE (Human Olfactory Receptor Data Explorer. Conclusion The CP method provides a novel perspective that reveals interesting traits in the evolution of olfactory receptors. It is consistent with previous knowledge, and provides finer details. Using available phylogenetic trees, evolution can be rephrased in terms of CP origins. Supplementary information is also available at http://adios.tau.ac.il/ORPS

  12. Shedding light on filovirus infection with high-content imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pegoraro, Gianluca; Bavari, Sina; Panchal, Rekha G

    2012-08-01

    Microscopy has been instrumental in the discovery and characterization of microorganisms. Major advances in high-throughput fluorescence microscopy and automated, high-content image analysis tools are paving the way to the systematic and quantitative study of the molecular properties of cellular systems, both at the population and at the single-cell level. High-Content Imaging (HCI) has been used to characterize host-virus interactions in genome-wide reverse genetic screens and to identify novel cellular factors implicated in the binding, entry, replication and egress of several pathogenic viruses. Here we present an overview of the most significant applications of HCI in the context of the cell biology of filovirus infection. HCI assays have been recently implemented to quantitatively study filoviruses in cell culture, employing either infectious viruses in a BSL-4 environment or surrogate genetic systems in a BSL-2 environment. These assays are becoming instrumental for small molecule and siRNA screens aimed at the discovery of both cellular therapeutic targets and of compounds with anti-viral properties. We discuss the current practical constraints limiting the implementation of high-throughput biology in a BSL-4 environment, and propose possible solutions to safely perform high-content, high-throughput filovirus infection assays. Finally, we discuss possible novel applications of HCI in the context of filovirus research with particular emphasis on the identification of possible cellular biomarkers of virus infection.

  13. The last diadectomorph sheds light on Late Palaeozoic tetrapod biogeography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jun; Bever, G S

    2015-05-01

    Diadectomorpha is a clade of Late Palaeozoic vertebrates widely recognized as the sister group of crown-group Amniota and the first tetrapod lineage to evolve high-fibre herbivory. Despite their evolutionary importance, diadectomorphs are restricted stratigraphically and geographically, with all records being from the Upper Carboniferous and Lower Permian of North America and Germany. We describe a new diadectomorph, Alveusdectes fenestralis, based on a partial skull from the Upper Permian of China. The new species exhibits the derived mechanism for herbivory and is recovered phylogenetically as a deeply nested diadectid. Approximately 16 Myr younger than any other diadectomorph, Alveusdectes is the product of at least a 46 Myr ghost lineage. How much of this time was probably spent in Russia and/or central Asia will remain unclear until a specimen is described that subdivides this cryptic history, but the lineage assuredly crossed this region before entering the relatively isolated continent of North China. The discovery of Alveusdectes raises important questions regarding diadectomorph extinction dynamics including what, if any, ecological factors limited the diversity of this group in eastern Pangea. It also suggests that increased sampling in Asia will likely significantly affect our views of clade and faunal insularity leading up to the Permo-Triassic extinction.

  14. Proteomics Approaches Shed New Light on Traditional Iranian Medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Movahhed, Mina; Poursaleh, Zohreh

    2016-01-01

    Background: Until now, Iranian traditional medicine (ITM) had been extensively based on Iranian philosophy in theoretical approach in diagnosis and treatment, with doubts on academic medicine. Nevertheless, the diagnosis of temperaments, herbal standardization, and quality control had been with the obscurity of functional molecules and their action mechanisms. Proteomics is a potent board to the mechanistic investigation of ITM and has been comprehensively applied profile drug-regulated proteins. In this review, we assessed the application of this modern molecular biological method in the identification of temperaments and drug targets of ITM. Methods: All available studies related to proteomics in traditional medicine, alternative and complementary medicine, including books, journals, and other references were studied and assessed. Results: The present review showed the phenotypes of the various temperaments in healthy individuals, that is to say, same proteins with different dynamic properties. Therefore, the usefulness of proteomics seems authoritative to understand the means by which the molecular pathways protected in ITM. This might be also the key clinical viewpoint on this new approach for enabling the integration of Iranian traditional medicine and modern biological science and technology, as well for upholding the internationalization of ITM. Conclusion: Proteomics, as a powerful tool for systems biology, is an essential research methodology for understanding the mechanisms of traditional medicine. Further investigation on the applications of advanced proteomics in temperaments, herbal standardization, and quality control in ITM is recommended. PMID:27516684

  15. Shedding Light on the Nature of Seminal Round Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gianpiero D Palermo

    Full Text Available In this investigation we assess the incidence of round cells (RCs in semen samples in our infertile patient population and their significance on intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI cycle outcomes. We also evaluate the usefulness of RCs as indicators of bacterial infection and highlight the origin of this cell-type, as well as its role in the human ejaculate.In a prospective fashion, a total of 4,810 ejaculated samples were included in the study during a period of 24 months. RCs were characterized for white blood cell (WBC components versus exfoliated germ cells by testing for multiple markers of ploidy as well as protamine assays. Cases displaying ≥ 2 x 106/ml RCs were screened for bacteria. Raw specimens containing RC were processed by peroxidase and other leukocyte assays, specific stains for protamines were used to identify spermiogenic stage, aneuploidy (FISH assessment was carried out, and the presence of various Sertoli-cell cytoplasmic remnants was analyzed to identify and characterize immature germ cells. The effect of RC on clinical outcome was assessed in specimens used for ICSI.The average age of the men involved was 39.2 ± 7 years. Semen samples had a mean concentration of 40.7 ± 31 x 106/ml, motility of 42.6 ± 35%, and morphology of 2.3 ± 2%. RCs were identified in 261 specimens, representing a proportion of 5.4%. Men with RCs had comparable age but lower sperm concentration and morphology than the control group (P<0.001. The aneuploidy rate of 4.3% in RCs group was remarkably higher than the control group (2.3%; P<0.001. Sperm aneuploidy rate positively correlated with the number of RCs (P<0.001. Of 44 men, 17 of them in 18 cycles had up to 1.9 x 106/ml RCs without affecting fertilization and clinical pregnancy rates when compared to controls (n = 365 cycles. In 27 men undergoing 33 ICSI cycles with ≥ 2 x 106/ml RCs, the fertilization rate trended lower and the miscarriage rate was significantly increased (P = 0.05. There was lack of correlation between RC and bacteriological growth. Specific markers indicated that seminal RCs are mostly immature germ cells encased in the remnants of Sertoli cell cytoplasm. Moreover, their modest protamine content and their haploid status confirm that they are post-meiotic. Sequential observation in the same man showed that RC episodes were followed by an amelioration of semen parameters, and interestingly, the episodic occurrence of RCs often coincides with flu season peaks.Seminal RCs are not a marker of infectiousness but rather a transient indicator of spermatogenic insult that possibly occurs in most men following a mild and transient ailment such as the flu.

  16. Studies Shed Light on How Cheating Impedes Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sparks, Sarah D.

    2011-01-01

    This article reports on new research which shows that, when students succeed at cheating on tests, they get duped into thinking they're smarter than they really are. In four experiments detailed in the March "Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences", researchers from the Harvard Business School and Duke University found that cheaters pay…

  17. Innovative Visualizations Shed Light on Avian Nocturnal Migration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Shamoun-Baranes, J.; Farnsworth, A.; Aelterman, B.; Alves, J.A.; Azijn, K.; Bernstein, G.; Branco, S.; Desmet, P.; Dokter, A.M.; Horton, K.; Kelling, S.; Kelly, J.F.; Leijnse, H.; Rong, J.; Sheldon, D.; van den Broeck, W.; Van Den Meersche, J.K.; Van Doren, B.M.; van Gasteren, H.

    2016-01-01

    Globally, billions of flying animals undergo seasonal migrations, many of which occur at night. The temporal and spatial scales at which migrations occur and our inability to directly observe these nocturnal movements makes monitoring and characterizing this critical period in migratory animals’ lif

  18. Study Sheds Light on Effects of Hate Crimes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Megan, N.; Harper, Shaun R.; Hildebrand, Emily S.; Burns, Shannon L.

    2000-01-01

    Discussion of effects of hate crime on college campuses reports findings of a survey taken three months after a fatal hate crime. The study found that students in the targeted group, especially females and organizational leaders, had increased extracurricular involvement in campus organizations. Also provides statistics on racist acts on campus…

  19. Experiments shed new light on nickel-fluorine reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, J.; Gunther, W.; Jarry, R. L.

    1967-01-01

    Isotopic tracer experiments and scale-impingement experiments show fluorine to be the migrating species through the nickel fluoride scale formed during the fluorination of nickel. This is in contrast to nickel oxide scales, where nickel is the migrating species.

  20. Laminar Soot Processes Experiment Shedding Light on Flame Radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urban, David L.

    1998-01-01

    The Laminar Soot Processes (LSP) experiment investigated soot processes in nonturbulent, round gas jet diffusion flames in still air. The soot processes within these flames are relevant to practical combustion in aircraft propulsion systems, diesel engines, and furnaces. However, for the LSP experiment, the flames were slowed and spread out to allow measurements that are not tractable for practical, Earth-bound flames.

  1. Mutation directional selection sheds light on prion pathogenesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shen, Liang [Shandong Provincial Research Center for Bioinformatic Engineering and Technique, Shandong University of Technology, Zibo 255049 (China); Ji, Hong-Fang, E-mail: jhf@sdut.edu.cn [Shandong Provincial Research Center for Bioinformatic Engineering and Technique, Shandong University of Technology, Zibo 255049 (China)

    2011-07-01

    Highlights: {yields} Most pathogenic mutations possess strong directional selection, i.e., enhancing hydrophobicity or decreasing negative and increasing positive charge. {yields} Mutation-induced changes may strengthen the interactions between PrP and facilitating factors. {yields} The findings also have significant implications for exploring potential regions involved in the conformational transition from PrP{sup C} to PrP{sup Sc}. -- Abstract: As mutations in the PRNP gene account for human hereditary prion diseases (PrDs), it is crucial to elucidating how these mutations affect the central pathogenic conformational transition of normal cellular prion protein (PrP{sup C}) to abnormal scrapie isoform (PrP{sup Sc}). Many studies proposed that these pathogenic mutations may make PrP more susceptible to conformational change through altering its structure stability. By evaluating the most recent observations regarding pathogenic mutations, it was found that the pathogenic mutations do not exert a uniform effect on the thermodynamic stability of the human PrP's structure. Through analyzing the reported PrDs-related mutations, we found that 25 out of 27 mutations possess strong directional selection, i.e., enhancing hydrophobicity or decreasing negative and increasing positive charge. Based on the triggering role reported by previous studies of facilitating factors in PrP{sup C} conversion, e.g., lipid and polyanion, we proposed that the mutation-induced changes may strengthen the interaction between PrP and facilitating factors, which will accelerate PrP conversion and cause PrDs.

  2. FDA: Cutting-Edge Technology Sheds Light on Antibiotic Resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Radiation-Emitting Products Tobacco Products Vaccines, Blood & Biologics Articulos en Espanol Alimentos y Bebidas Cosméticos Dispositivos Médicos Dispositivos que Emiten Radiación Fraude en la Salud Medicamentos Nutrición Productos Veterinarios Productos de Tabaco Salud ...

  3. Shedding light on surface-assembled photosynthetic systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Magis, Johan Gerhard

    2012-01-01

    The interfacing of biomolecules to nanostructures, electrode surfaces and/or optical components constitutes the new discipline of bioelectronics. It is based on electron transfer between a protein and an electrode, and can be monitored by amperometric techniques. The integration of biomolecules with

  4. Absorbent Mind Update: Research Sheds New Light on Montessori Theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haines, Annette M.

    1993-01-01

    Explores Maria Montessori's notion that a young child's brain is significantly different from an adult's and that young children develop according to a series of predictable "sensitive periods." Cites numerous empirical studies that support these and other ideas Montessori postulated without the advantage of sophisticated scientific…

  5. Chlamydial genes shed light on the evolution of photoautotrophic eukaryotes

    OpenAIRE

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Background Chlamydiae are obligate intracellular bacteria of protists, invertebrates and vertebrates, but have not been found to date in photosynthetic eukaryotes (algae and embryophytes). Genes of putative chlamydial origin, however, are present in significant numbers in sequenced genomes of photosynthetic eukaryotes. It has been suggested that such genes were acquired by an ancient horizontal gene transfer from Chlamydiae to the ancestor of photosynthetic eukaryotes. To further tes...

  6. Chlamydial genes shed light on the evolution of photoautotrophic eukaryotes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melkonian Michael

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chlamydiae are obligate intracellular bacteria of protists, invertebrates and vertebrates, but have not been found to date in photosynthetic eukaryotes (algae and embryophytes. Genes of putative chlamydial origin, however, are present in significant numbers in sequenced genomes of photosynthetic eukaryotes. It has been suggested that such genes were acquired by an ancient horizontal gene transfer from Chlamydiae to the ancestor of photosynthetic eukaryotes. To further test this hypothesis, an extensive search for proteins of chlamydial origin was performed using several recently sequenced algal genomes and EST databases, and the proteins subjected to phylogenetic analyses. Results A total of 39 proteins of chlamydial origin were retrieved from the photosynthetic eukaryotes analyzed and their identity verified through phylogenetic analyses. The distribution of the chlamydial proteins among four groups of photosynthetic eukaryotes (Viridiplantae, Rhodoplantae, Glaucoplantae, Bacillariophyta was complex suggesting multiple acquisitions and losses. Evidence is presented that all except one of the chlamydial genes originated from an ancient endosymbiosis of a chlamydial bacterium into the ancestor of the Plantae before their divergence into Viridiplantae, Rhodoplantae and Glaucoplantae, i.e. more than 1.1 BYA. The chlamydial proteins subsequently spread through secondary plastid endosymbioses to other eukaryotes. Of 20 chlamydial proteins recovered from the genomes of two Bacillariophyta, 10 were of rhodoplant, and 10 of viridiplant origin suggesting that they were acquired by two different secondary endosymbioses. Phylogenetic analyses of concatenated sequences demonstrated that the viridiplant secondary endosymbiosis likely occurred before the divergence of Chlorophyta and Streptophyta. Conclusion We identified 39 proteins of chlamydial origin in photosynthetic eukaryotes signaling an ancient invasion of the ancestor of the Plantae by a chlamydial bacterium accompanied by horizontal gene transfer. Subsequently, chlamydial proteins spread through secondary endosymbioses to other eukaryotes. We conclude that intracellular chlamydiae likely persisted throughout the early history of the Plantae donating genes to their hosts that replaced their cyanobacterial/plastid homologs thus shaping early algal/plant evolution before they eventually vanished.

  7. Subsurface Images Shed Light on Past Tsunamis in India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nair, Rajesh R.; Buynevich, Ilya; Goble, Ronald J.; Srinivasan, P.; Murthy, S. G. N.; Kandpal, S. C.; Lakshmi, C. S. Vijaya; Trivedi, D.

    2010-12-01

    The 2004 Indian Ocean tsunami caused massive devastation and left a lasting impact along many of the major coastal regions in South Asia, including the coast of Tamil Nadu, a state in the southeastern tip of India. Following the event, sand deposits draped the low-lying areas and buried the muddy sediments of the coastal plain [Babu et al., 2007; Srinivasalu et al., 2007]. In addition, erosional features related to the tsunami, such as channels and scarps, have been observed along many parts of the coast (Figure 1a). This tsunami, along with a recorded history of intense monsoons, has highlighted the need for focused research on the role of extreme events in shaping the geological character of India's coastal plains.

  8. Research Sheds New Light on the Peopling of South Asia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    @@ Human mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA), a circular molecule with 16,569 base pair length, encodes 13 proteins, 22tRNAs, and 2 rRNAs. In the past few years, complete sequencing mtDNA genome has become a powerful tool to determine the matrilineal components and their evolutionary relationships (viz. phylogeny) and thus to gain some detailed insights into the past of modern humans.

  9. Principles of Food Science Class Sheds Light on Chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, Janet

    2004-01-01

    Many students are curious about the steps in food preparation. As a result of such experiences, the author of this article began to incorporate science demonstrations into food preparation classes. She conducted research, developed resources, and piloted the "Principles of Food Science" class over the next 6 years. "Principles of Food Science"…

  10. Studies Shed Light on Origin of New Genes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2004-01-01

    @@ Although scientists are certain that genomes of various organisms differ greatly in terms of numbers of genes contained, until recently they know little about process of origin of new genes. So gene genesis mechanism has become a major issue puzzling researchers in the field of evolutionary biology.

  11. Research Sheds Light on Mechanism of Alzheimer's Disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    @@ Scientists from the Shanghai Institute of Materia Medica (SIMM) under the CAS Shanghai Institutes for Biological Sciences have made significant progress in suggesting a possible mechanism for the accumulation of amyloid β-peptides (Aβs), which are believed to cause Alzheimer's disease. Aβs are fragments of a protein that is snipped from another protein called amyloid precursor protein (APP). In a healthy brain, these protein fragments would be broken down and eliminated. In Alzheimer's disease, unfortunately, the fragments accumulate to form hard, insoluble plaques, which are the characteristic lesions found in Alzheimer's patients and could dramatically inhibit several genes critical to memory and learning.

  12. Shedding Light on Lithium Evolution: The Globular Cluster Perspective

    CERN Document Server

    Korn, A J

    2012-01-01

    I shall review what has been learnt during 20 years of lithium observations in stars belonging to metal-poor globular clusters. The focus will be on little evolved main-sequence, turnoff-point (TOP) and subgiant-branch (SGB) stars expected to display Spite-plateau lithium abundances like those found in the majority of field stars of similar metallicities. But is the Spite plateau of globular clusters the same as those of field stars? What effect does, e.g., cluster-internal pollution have on lithium abundances in the now dominant second generation of stars? It will be shown that it is primarily our incomplete knowledge of the temperature scale of Population II stars which currently limits the diagnostic power of globular clusters as regards the stellar-surface evolution of lithium.

  13. Seronegative celiac disease: Shedding light on an obscure clinical entity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volta, Umberto; Caio, Giacomo; Boschetti, Elisa; Giancola, Fiorella; Rhoden, Kerry J; Ruggeri, Eugenio; Paterini, Paola; De Giorgio, Roberto

    2016-09-01

    Although serological tests are useful for identifying celiac disease, it is well established that a minority of celiacs are seronegative. To define the prevalence and features of seronegative compared to seropositive celiac disease, and to establish whether celiac disease is a common cause of seronegative villous atrophy. Starting from 810 celiac disease diagnoses, seronegative patients were retrospectively characterized for clinical, histological and laboratory findings. Of the 810 patients, fourteen fulfilled the diagnostic criteria for seronegative celiac disease based on antibody negativity, villous atrophy, HLA-DQ2/-DQ8 positivity and clinical/histological improvement after gluten free diet. Compared to seropositive, seronegative celiac disease showed a significantly higher median age at diagnosis and a higher prevalence of classical phenotype (i.e., malabsorption), autoimmune disorders and severe villous atrophy. The most frequent diagnosis in the 31 cases with seronegative flat mucosa was celiac disease (45%), whereas other diagnoses were Giardiasis (20%), common variable immunodeficiency (16%) and autoimmune enteropathy (10%). Although rare seronegative celiac disease can be regarded as the most frequent cause of seronegative villous atrophy being characterized by a high median age at diagnosis; a close association with malabsorption and flat mucosa; and a high prevalence of autoimmune disorders. Copyright © 2016 Editrice Gastroenterologica Italiana S.r.l. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Photons shedding light on electron capture by highly charged ions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoekstra, Romke Anne

    1990-01-01

    In this thesis charge transfer is studied in collisions of highly charged ions (Aq+) with neutral particles (B). Because the electron is captured resonantly (i.e. without its binding energy) by the ion, a limited number of highly excited states (characterized by the quantum numbers nlm) is

  15. Principles of Food Science Class Sheds Light on Chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, Janet

    2004-01-01

    Many students are curious about the steps in food preparation. As a result of such experiences, the author of this article began to incorporate science demonstrations into food preparation classes. She conducted research, developed resources, and piloted the "Principles of Food Science" class over the next 6 years. "Principles of Food Science"…

  16. Finding Florence: Shedding Light on Nurse Practitioners' Professional Responsibility

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.J. ter Maten-Speksnijder (Ada)

    2016-01-01

    markdownabstractThe new professional role ‘nurse practitioner’ (in Dutch: verpleegkundig specialist) challenges nurses to distuinguish themselves from nurses educated at the Bacher level by the criteria: independency, expertise, and an active attitude to role development. A crucial aspect of their r

  17. Shedding Light on Filovirus Infection with High-Content Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rekha G. Panchal

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Microscopy has been instrumental in the discovery and characterization of microorganisms. Major advances in high-throughput fluorescence microscopy and automated, high-content image analysis tools are paving the way to the systematic and quantitative study of the molecular properties of cellular systems, both at the population and at the single-cell level. High-Content Imaging (HCI has been used to characterize host-virus interactions in genome-wide reverse genetic screens and to identify novel cellular factors implicated in the binding, entry, replication and egress of several pathogenic viruses. Here we present an overview of the most significant applications of HCI in the context of the cell biology of filovirus infection. HCI assays have been recently implemented to quantitatively study filoviruses in cell culture, employing either infectious viruses in a BSL-4 environment or surrogate genetic systems in a BSL-2 environment. These assays are becoming instrumental for small molecule and siRNA screens aimed at the discovery of both cellular therapeutic targets and of compounds with anti-viral properties. We discuss the current practical constraints limiting the implementation of high-throughput biology in a BSL-4 environment, and propose possible solutions to safely perform high-content, high-throughput filovirus infection assays. Finally, we discuss possible novel applications of HCI in the context of filovirus research with particular emphasis on the identification of possible cellular biomarkers of virus infection.

  18. Innovative Visualizations Shed Light on Avian Nocturnal Migration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farnsworth, Andrew; Aelterman, Bart; Alves, Jose A.; Azijn, Kevin; Bernstein, Garrett; Branco, Sérgio; Desmet, Peter; Dokter, Adriaan M.; Horton, Kyle; Kelling, Steve; Kelly, Jeffrey F.; Leijnse, Hidde; Rong, Jingjing; Sheldon, Daniel; Van den Broeck, Wouter; Van Den Meersche, Jan Klaas; Van Doren, Benjamin Mark; van Gasteren, Hans

    2016-01-01

    Globally, billions of flying animals undergo seasonal migrations, many of which occur at night. The temporal and spatial scales at which migrations occur and our inability to directly observe these nocturnal movements makes monitoring and characterizing this critical period in migratory animals’ life cycles difficult. Remote sensing, therefore, has played an important role in our understanding of large-scale nocturnal bird migrations. Weather surveillance radar networks in Europe and North America have great potential for long-term low-cost monitoring of bird migration at scales that have previously been impossible to achieve. Such long-term monitoring, however, poses a number of challenges for the ornithological and ecological communities: how does one take advantage of this vast data resource, integrate information across multiple sensors and large spatial and temporal scales, and visually represent the data for interpretation and dissemination, considering the dynamic nature of migration? We assembled an interdisciplinary team of ecologists, meteorologists, computer scientists, and graphic designers to develop two different flow visualizations, which are interactive and open source, in order to create novel representations of broad-front nocturnal bird migration to address a primary impediment to long-term, large-scale nocturnal migration monitoring. We have applied these visualization techniques to mass bird migration events recorded by two different weather surveillance radar networks covering regions in Europe and North America. These applications show the flexibility and portability of such an approach. The visualizations provide an intuitive representation of the scale and dynamics of these complex systems, are easily accessible for a broad interest group, and are biologically insightful. Additionally, they facilitate fundamental ecological research, conservation, mitigation of human–wildlife conflicts, improvement of meteorological products, and public outreach, education, and engagement. PMID:27557096

  19. [Mid-gastrointestinal bleeding - endoscopy sheds light in the darkness].

    Science.gov (United States)

    May, A

    2014-08-01

    Mid-gastrointestinal bleeding is defined as a bleeding of the small bowel and is the most common indication for small bowel endoscopy. Intraoperative enteroscopy has been regarded as gold standard for a long time. With the introduction of different endoscopy techniques, they play now the central role, whereas intraoperative enteroscopy has become a reserve method for selected patients. Actually, there are, beside capsule endoscopy, five non-surgical, flexible enteroscopy techniques available. In Germany and Europe balloon-assisted enteroscopy (double balloon and single balloon enteroscopy) is mainly used. Double balloon enteroscopy (DBE) is the "oldest" flexible enteroscopy technique and has become established throughout the world for diagnostic and therapeutic examinations of the small bowel. The majority of the studies have been performed with DBE and it provides the highest rate of complete enteroscopy. Nevertheless, technical improvements to make enteroscopy easier and faster are still required. In patients with chronic MGI or problematic situations capsule endoscopy is an ideal screening option. In case of acute MGI the flexible enteroscopy techniques should be preferred because of the high diagnostic yield combined with the possibility of endoscopic therapeutic interventions. In difficult cases with unsuccessful enteroscopy, CT angiography and conventional angiography with the option of embolisation had proved their value.

  20. Shedding light on spectrophotometry: The SpecUP educational spectrophotometer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patricia B.C. Forbes

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Students often regard laboratory instruments as black boxes which generate results, without understanding their principles of operation. This lack of understanding is a concern because the correct interpretation of analytical results and the limitations thereof is invariably based on an understanding of the mechanism of measurement. Moreover, a number of tertiary institutions in Africa have very limited resources and access to laboratory equipment, including that related to the field of photonics, which prevents students from acquiring hands-on practical experience. We address both of these challenges by describing how students can assemble a novel, low-cost spectrophotometer, called the SpecUP, which can then be used in a range of experiments. The same kind of information can be generated as that obtained with costly commercial spectrophotometers (albeit of a lower quality. With the SpecUP, students also have the opportunity to vary instrumental parameters and to observe the effects these changes have on their experimental results, allowing for enquiry-based learning of spectroscopic principles. The results obtained for some chemistry-related spectrophotometric experiments are described for each of the two operational modes of the SpecUP, although the instrument can be applied in fields ranging from physics to biochemistry

  1. Shedding light on surface-assembled photosynthetic systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Magis, Johan Gerhard

    2012-01-01

    The interfacing of biomolecules to nanostructures, electrode surfaces and/or optical components constitutes the new discipline of bioelectronics. It is based on electron transfer between a protein and an electrode, and can be monitored by amperometric techniques. The integration of biomolecules with

  2. Finding Florence: Shedding Light on Nurse Practitioners' Professional Responsibility

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.J. ter Maten-Speksnijder (Ada)

    2016-01-01

    markdownabstractThe new professional role ‘nurse practitioner’ (in Dutch: verpleegkundig specialist) challenges nurses to distuinguish themselves from nurses educated at the Bacher level by the criteria: independency, expertise, and an active attitude to role development. A crucial aspect of their

  3. Modeling the Frequency of Cyclists’ Red-Light Running Behavior Using Bayesian PG Model and PLN Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yao Wu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Red-light running behaviors of bicycles at signalized intersection lead to a large number of traffic conflicts and high collision potentials. The primary objective of this study is to model the cyclists’ red-light running frequency within the framework of Bayesian statistics. Data was collected at twenty-five approaches at seventeen signalized intersections. The Poisson-gamma (PG and Poisson-lognormal (PLN model were developed and compared. The models were validated using Bayesian p values based on posterior predictive checking indicators. It was found that the two models have a good fit of the observed cyclists’ red-light running frequency. Furthermore, the PLN model outperformed the PG model. The model estimated results showed that the amount of cyclists’ red-light running is significantly influenced by bicycle flow, conflict traffic flow, pedestrian signal type, vehicle speed, and e-bike rate. The validation result demonstrated the reliability of the PLN model. The research results can help transportation professionals to predict the expected amount of the cyclists’ red-light running and develop effective guidelines or policies to reduce red-light running frequency of bicycles at signalized intersections.

  4. Light composite scalar boson from a see-saw mechanism in two-scale TC models

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Doff, A; Natale, A.A

    2015-01-01

    We consider the possibility of a light composite scalar boson arising from mass mixing between a relatively light and heavy scalar singlets in a see-saw mechanism expected to occur in two-scale Technicolor (TC) models...

  5. Computational Modeling to Limit the Impact Displays and Indicator Lights Have on Habitable Volume Operational Lighting Constraints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, T. A.; Brainard, G.; Salazar, G.; Johnston, S.; Schwing, B.; Litaker, H.; Kolomenski, A.; Venus, D.; Tran, K.; Hanifin, J.; Adolf, J.

    2017-01-01

    NASA has demonstrated an interest in improving astronaut health and performance through the installment of a new lighting countermeasure on the International Space Station. The Solid State Lighting Assembly (SSLA) system is designed to positively influence astronaut health by providing a daily change to light spectrum to improve circadian entrainment. Unfortunately, existing NASA standards and requirements define ambient light level requirements for crew sleep and other tasks, yet the number of light-emitting diode (LED) indicators and displays within a habitable volume is currently uncontrolled. Because each of these light sources has its own unique spectral properties, the additive lighting environment ends up becoming something different from what was planned or researched. Restricting the use of displays and indicators is not a solution because these systems provide beneficial feedback to the crew. The research team for this grant used computer-based computational modeling and real-world lighting mockups to document the impact that light sources other than the ambient lighting system contribute to the ambient spectral lighting environment. In particular, the team was focused on understanding the impacts of long-term tasks located in front of avionics or computer displays. The team also wanted to understand options for mitigating the changes to the ambient light spectrum in the interest of maintaining the performance of a lighting countermeasure. The project utilized a variety of physical and computer-based simulations to determine direct relationships between system implementation and light spectrum. Using real-world data, computer models were built in the commercially available optics analysis software Zemax Optics Studio(c). The team also built a mockup test facility that had the same volume and configuration as one of the Zemax models. The team collected over 1200 spectral irradiance measurements, each representing a different configuration of the mockup

  6. A hybrid method for optimal load shedding and improving voltage stability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Tamilselvan

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, a hybrid method is proposed for reducing the amount of load shedding and voltage collapse. The hybrid method is the combination of Genetic Algorithm (GA and Neural Network (NN. The GA is used by two stages, one is to frame the optimization model and other stage is to generate data set for developing the NN based intelligent load shedding model. The appropriate buses for load shedding are selected based on the sensitivity of minimum eigenvalue of load flow Jacobian with respect to the load shed. The proposed method is implemented in MATLAB working platform and the performance is tested with 6 bus and IEEE 14 bus bench mark system. The result of the proposed hybrid method is compared with the GA based optimization algorithm. The comparison shows that, the proposed method ensures voltage stability with minimum loading shedding.

  7. Control of Vortex Shedding at Moderate Reynolds Numbers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    邵传平; 鄂学全; 魏庆鼎; 朱凤荣

    2002-01-01

    The suppression method of vortex shedding from a circular cylinder has been studied experimentally in the Reynoldsnumber range from 300 to 1600. The test is performed in a water channel. The model cylinder is 1 cm in diameter and 38cm in length. A row of small rods of 0. 18 cm in diameter and 1.5 cm in length are perpendicularly connected to the surfaceof the model cylinder and distributed along the meridian. The distance between the neighboring rods and the angle of attackof the rods can be changed so that the suppression effect on vortex shedding can be adjusted. The results show that vortexshedding can be suppressed effectively if the distance between the neighboring rods is smaller than 3 times and the cylinderdiameter and the angle of attack is in the range of 30°≤β < 90°.

  8. Dynamical quark loop light-by-light contribution to muon g-2 within the nonlocal chiral quark model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dorokhov, A.E. [Bogoliubov Laboratory of Theoretical Physics, JINR, Dubna (Russian Federation); M.V. Lomonosov Moscow State University, N.N. Bogoliubov Institute of Theoretical Problems of Microworld, Moscow (Russian Federation); Radzhabov, A.E. [Institute for System Dynamics and Control Theory SB RAS, Irkutsk (Russian Federation); Zhevlakov, A.S. [Institute for System Dynamics and Control Theory SB RAS, Irkutsk (Russian Federation); Tomsk State University, Department of Physics, Tomsk (Russian Federation)

    2015-09-15

    The hadronic corrections to the muon anomalous magnetic moment a{sub μ}, due to the gauge-invariant set of diagrams with dynamical quark loop light-by-light scattering insertions, are calculated in the framework of the nonlocal chiral quark model. These results complete calculations of all hadronic light-by-light scattering contributions to a{sub μ} in the leading order in the 1/N{sub c} expansion. The result for the quark loop contribution is a{sub μ}{sup HLbL,Loop} = (11.0 ± 0.9) @ x 10{sup -10}, and the total result is a{sub μ}{sup HLbL,NχQM} = (16.8 ± 1.2) @ x 10{sup -10}. (orig.)

  9. Numerical simulation of terrain-induced vortex/wave shedding at the Hong Kong International Airport

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Lei

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The present study aims at simulating the shedding of vortex/wave from a mountain nearby the Hong Kong International Airport using a computational fluid dynamics model by employing high resolution terrain data without smoothing. The successful simulation of this shedding would have an important application in the short-term forecasting of the chance of occurrence of terrain-induced windshear at an operating airport. Two typical cases of vortex/wave shedding are considered, namely, in neutral atmosphere associated with the passage of a typhoon, and in stably stratified atmosphere in spring-time easterly flow with continental origin. The model is found to successfully capture the salient features of the shedding. The simulated radial velocity fields of weather radar/LIDAR compare well with actual observations. In particular, the creation and the propagation of the vortex/wave through shedding from a mountain nearby the airport are captured well in the model simulation. The shedding periods are also reproduced. From the limited number of cases studied in this paper, it appears that the model has the capability of forecasting the occurrence of vortex/wave shedding by coupling with a mesoscale meteorological model.

  10. Numerical simulation of terrain-induced vortex/wave shedding at the Hong Kong International Airport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Lei; Zhang, Li-Jie; Mao, Hui [Shenzhen National Climate Observatory, Meteorological Bureau of Shenzhen Municipality (China); Chan, P.W. [Hong Kong Observatory (China)

    2013-10-15

    The present study aims at simulating the shedding of vortex/wave from a mountain nearby the Hong Kong International Airport using a computational fluid dynamics model by employing high resolution terrain data without smoothing. The successful simulation of this shedding would have an important application in the short-term forecasting of the chance of occurrence of terrain-induced windshear at an operating airport. Two typical cases of vortex/wave shedding are considered, namely, in neutral atmosphere associated with the passage of a typhoon, and in stably stratified atmosphere in spring-time easterly flow with continental origin. The model is found to successfully capture the salient features of the shedding. The simulated radial velocity fields of weather radar/LIDAR compare well with actual observations. In particular, the creation and the propagation of the vortex/wave through shedding from a mountain nearby the airport are captured well in the model simulation. The shedding periods are also reproduced. From the limited number of cases studied in this paper, it appears that the model has the capability of forecasting the occurrence of vortex/wave shedding by coupling with a mesoscale meteorological model. (orig.)

  11. Light charged Higgs boson scenario in 3-Higgs doublet models

    CERN Document Server

    Akeroyd, A G; Yagyu, Kei; Yildirim, Emine

    2016-01-01

    The constraints from the measurements of the $B\\to X_s\\gamma$ decay rate on the parameter space of 3-Higgs Doublet Models (3HDMs), where all the doublets have non-zero vacuum expectation values, are studied at the next-to-leading order in QCD. In order to naturally avoid the presence of flavour changing neutral currents at the tree level, we impose two softly-broken discrete $Z_2$ symmetries. This gives rise to five independent types of 3HDMs that differ in their Yukawa couplings. We show that in all these 3HDMs (including the case of type-II-like Yukawa interactions) both masses of the two charged Higgs bosons $m_{H_1^\\pm}$ and $m_{H_2^\\pm}$ can be smaller than the top mass $m_t$ while complying with the constraints from $B\\to X_s\\gamma$. As an interesting phenomenological consequence, the branching ratios of the charged Higgs bosons decay into the $cb$ final states can be as large as $80\\%$ when their masses are taken to be below $m_t$ in two of the five 3HDMs (named as Type-Y and Type-Z). This light charge...

  12. Modeling chloride penetration into concrete with light-weight aggregates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maage, M.; Helland, S.; Carlsen, J. E. [SELMER ASA, Oslo (Norway)

    2000-07-01

    Results of a program of studies designed to provide input to a model for estimating the initiation period of reinforcement corrosion and to document chloride ingress into various practical concretes made with light-weight aggregates, depending on a number of variables in curing and exposure conditions, as well as concrete composition and materials, are discussed. Variables included curing time before exposure; curing temperature; exposure temperature and time; type of exposure; and type of binder. Results achieved correlate well with the initial hypothesis i.e. that the achieved chloride coefficient decreases with increasing exposure time and also with increasing curing time.Surface chloride content as the environmental load, was shown to increase with exposure time during the first years, and decrease with increased curing time and exposure temperature. The achieved diffusion coefficient was found to be independent of curing and exposure temperature, but decreased with longer exposure time and the addition of slag. Increasing the salt concentration in the exposure water and the introduction of slag increased the time dependency of the achieved diffusion coefficient. 11 refs., 2 tabs., 7 figs.

  13. Light scattering by neutrophils: Model, simulation, and experiment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Orlova, D.Y.; Yurkin, M.A.; Hoekstra, A.G.; Maltsev, V.P.

    2008-01-01

    We studied the elastic light-scattering properties of human blood neutrophils, both experimentally and theoretically. The experimental study was performed with a scanning flow cytometer measuring the light-scattering patterns (LSPs) of individual cells over an angular range of 5-60 deg. We determine

  14. A NEW MODEL OF AUTONOMOUS MOBILE ROBOTS WITH LIGHTS AND ITS COMPUTATIONAL POWER

    OpenAIRE

    寺井, 智史

    2016-01-01

    We study gathering problem for robots that move on a two dimensional plane. Robots are autonomous, anonymous, and have light that represents robot’s state. Gathering algorithm for n=2 robots is proposed in previous research. We propose a new model of robots with lights and athering algorithm. Key Words :distributed , mobile robots , light

  15. Modeling light adaptation in circadian clock: prediction of the response that stabilizes entrainment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kunichika Tsumoto

    Full Text Available Periods of biological clocks are close to but often different from the rotation period of the earth. Thus, the clocks of organisms must be adjusted to synchronize with day-night cycles. The primary signal that adjusts the clocks is light. In Neurospora, light transiently up-regulates the expression of specific clock genes. This molecular response to light is called light adaptation. Does light adaptation occur in other organisms? Using published experimental data, we first estimated the time course of the up-regulation rate of gene expression by light. Intriguingly, the estimated up-regulation rate was transient during light period in mice as well as Neurospora. Next, we constructed a computational model to consider how light adaptation had an effect on the entrainment of circadian oscillation to 24-h light-dark cycles. We found that cellular oscillations are more likely to be destabilized without light adaption especially when light intensity is very high. From the present results, we predict that the instability of circadian oscillations under 24-h light-dark cycles can be experimentally observed if light adaptation is altered. We conclude that the functional consequence of light adaptation is to increase the adjustability to 24-h light-dark cycles and then adapt to fluctuating environments in nature.

  16. Modeling light adaptation in circadian clock: prediction of the response that stabilizes entrainment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsumoto, Kunichika; Kurosawa, Gen; Yoshinaga, Tetsuya; Aihara, Kazuyuki

    2011-01-01

    Periods of biological clocks are close to but often different from the rotation period of the earth. Thus, the clocks of organisms must be adjusted to synchronize with day-night cycles. The primary signal that adjusts the clocks is light. In Neurospora, light transiently up-regulates the expression of specific clock genes. This molecular response to light is called light adaptation. Does light adaptation occur in other organisms? Using published experimental data, we first estimated the time course of the up-regulation rate of gene expression by light. Intriguingly, the estimated up-regulation rate was transient during light period in mice as well as Neurospora. Next, we constructed a computational model to consider how light adaptation had an effect on the entrainment of circadian oscillation to 24-h light-dark cycles. We found that cellular oscillations are more likely to be destabilized without light adaption especially when light intensity is very high. From the present results, we predict that the instability of circadian oscillations under 24-h light-dark cycles can be experimentally observed if light adaptation is altered. We conclude that the functional consequence of light adaptation is to increase the adjustability to 24-h light-dark cycles and then adapt to fluctuating environments in nature.

  17. Salmonella fecal shedding and immune responses are dose- and serotype- dependent in pigs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renata Ivanek

    Full Text Available Despite the public health importance of Salmonella infection in pigs, little is known about the associated dynamics of fecal shedding and immunity. In this study, we investigated the transitions of pigs through the states of Salmonella fecal shedding and immune response post-Salmonella inoculation as affected by the challenge dose and serotype. Continuous-time multistate Markov models were developed using published experimental data. The model for shedding had four transient states, of which two were shedding (continuous and intermittent shedding and two non-shedding (latency and intermittent non-shedding, and one absorbing state representing permanent cessation of shedding. The immune response model had two transient states representing responses below and above the seroconversion level. The effects of two doses [low (0.65×10(6 CFU/pig and high (0.65×10(9 CFU/pig] and four serotypes (Salmonella Yoruba, Salmonella Cubana, Salmonella Typhimurium, and Salmonella Derby on the models' transition intensities were evaluated using a proportional intensities model. Results indicated statistically significant effects of the challenge dose and serotype on the dynamics of shedding and immune response. The time spent in the specific states was also estimated. Continuous shedding was on average 10-26 days longer, while intermittent non-shedding was 2-4 days shorter, in pigs challenged with the high compared to low dose. Interestingly, among pigs challenged with the high dose, the continuous and intermittent shedding states were on average up to 10-17 and 3-4 days longer, respectively, in pigs infected with S. Cubana compared to the other three serotypes. Pigs challenged with the high dose of S. Typhimurium or S. Derby seroconverted on average up to 8-11 days faster compared to the low dose. These findings highlight that Salmonella fecal shedding and immune response following Salmonella challenge are dose- and serotype-dependent and that the detection of

  18. Itaalia maalikooli shedöövrid

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    1998-01-01

    I8. detsembrist Rüütelkonna hoones näitus "Itaalia maalikooli shedöövreid Eesti Kunstimuuseumi kogust" sarjast "Kadrioru lossi aarded", mis kajastab ka teoste restaureerimist ja uurimistööd. Maali "Püha Joosepi surm" ümberatribueerimisest XVII sajandi Veneetsia meistrile Giovanni Battista Piazzettale

  19. Ferns, mosses and liverworts as model systems for light-mediated chloroplast movements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suetsugu, Noriyuki; Higa, Takeshi; Wada, Masamitsu

    2016-11-17

    Light-induced chloroplast movement is found in most plant species, including algae and land plants. In land plants with multiple small chloroplasts, under weak light conditions, the chloroplasts move towards the light and accumulate on the periclinal cell walls to efficiently perceive light for photosynthesis (the accumulation response). Under strong light conditions, chloroplasts escape from light to avoid photodamage (the avoidance response). In most plant species, blue light induces chloroplast movement, and phototropin receptor kinases are the blue light receptors. Molecular mechanisms for photoreceptors, signal transduction and chloroplast motility systems are being studied using the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana. However, to further understand the molecular mechanisms and evolutionary history of chloroplast movement in green plants, analyses using other plant systems are required. Here, we review recent works on chloroplast movement in green algae, liverwort, mosses and ferns that provide new insights on chloroplast movement.

  20. Birds shed RNA-viruses according to the pareto principle.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark D Jankowski

    Full Text Available A major challenge in disease ecology is to understand the role of individual variation of infection load on disease transmission dynamics and how this influences the evolution of resistance or tolerance mechanisms. Such information will improve our capacity to understand, predict, and mitigate pathogen-associated disease in all organisms. In many host-pathogen systems, particularly macroparasites and sexually transmitted diseases, it has been found that approximately 20% of the population is responsible for approximately 80% of the transmission events. Although host contact rates can account for some of this pattern, pathogen transmission dynamics also depend upon host infectiousness, an area that has received relatively little attention. Therefore, we conducted a meta-analysis of pathogen shedding rates of 24 host (avian - pathogen (RNA-virus studies, including 17 bird species and five important zoonotic viruses. We determined that viral count data followed the Weibull distribution, the mean Gini coefficient (an index of inequality was 0.687 (0.036 SEM, and that 22.0% (0.90 SEM of the birds shed 80% of the virus across all studies, suggesting an adherence of viral shedding counts to the Pareto Principle. The relative position of a bird in a distribution of viral counts was affected by factors extrinsic to the host, such as exposure to corticosterone and to a lesser extent reduced food availability, but not to intrinsic host factors including age, sex, and migratory status. These data provide a quantitative view of heterogeneous virus shedding in birds that may be used to better parameterize epidemiological models and understand transmission dynamics.

  1. Birds shed RNA-viruses according to the pareto principle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jankowski, Mark D; Williams, Christopher J; Fair, Jeanne M; Owen, Jennifer C

    2013-01-01

    A major challenge in disease ecology is to understand the role of individual variation of infection load on disease transmission dynamics and how this influences the evolution of resistance or tolerance mechanisms. Such information will improve our capacity to understand, predict, and mitigate pathogen-associated disease in all organisms. In many host-pathogen systems, particularly macroparasites and sexually transmitted diseases, it has been found that approximately 20% of the population is responsible for approximately 80% of the transmission events. Although host contact rates can account for some of this pattern, pathogen transmission dynamics also depend upon host infectiousness, an area that has received relatively little attention. Therefore, we conducted a meta-analysis of pathogen shedding rates of 24 host (avian) - pathogen (RNA-virus) studies, including 17 bird species and five important zoonotic viruses. We determined that viral count data followed the Weibull distribution, the mean Gini coefficient (an index of inequality) was 0.687 (0.036 SEM), and that 22.0% (0.90 SEM) of the birds shed 80% of the virus across all studies, suggesting an adherence of viral shedding counts to the Pareto Principle. The relative position of a bird in a distribution of viral counts was affected by factors extrinsic to the host, such as exposure to corticosterone and to a lesser extent reduced food availability, but not to intrinsic host factors including age, sex, and migratory status. These data provide a quantitative view of heterogeneous virus shedding in birds that may be used to better parameterize epidemiological models and understand transmission dynamics.

  2. 76 FR 66220 - Automatic Underfrequency Load Shedding and Load Shedding Plans Reliability Standards

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-26

    ... differentiation in requirements based on entity size, though it provides the opportunity for planning coordinators... type of load shedding (i.e., automatic and manual) should not overlap. 49. There are no requirements in...

  3. A temporal model for early vision that explains detection thresholds for light pulses on flickering backgrounds

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Snippe, H.P.; Poot, L.; Hateren, J.H. van

    2000-01-01

    A model is presented for the early (retinal) stages of temporal processing of light inputs in the visual system. The model consists of a sequence of three adaptation processes, with two instantaneous nonlinearities in between. The three adaptation processes are, in order of processing of the light

  4. Superhydrophobic porous networks for enhanced droplet shedding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yahua; Wang, Zuankai

    2016-09-01

    Recent research has shown that the use of submillimeter-scale tapered post arrays could generate the so-called pancake bouncing, which is characterized by the fast shedding of impinging drops from the surface in a pancake shape without undergoing the retraction stage as observed on conventional superhydrophobic surfaces. Despite this exciting discovery, the fabrication of this unique superhydrophobic surface with tapered post arrays involves complex processes, hindering its wide applications in practical sectors. Here, we report on the facile strategy to prepare a new hierarchical multilayered superhydrophobic surface directly from commercially available porous matrix that allows for efficient drop shedding. Further study shows that the enhanced drop mobility observed on such a surface is attributed to the synergistic cooperation of hierarchical structures endowing an adequate energy storage and effective energy release. The facile fabrication of superhydrophobic surface with enhanced drop mobility may find many practical applications including anti-icing, dropwise condensation and self-cleaning.

  5. CAD Instructor Designs Eco-Friendly Shed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwendau, Mark

    2013-01-01

    Dissatisfied with the options offered by big box stores--and wanting to save some money and go as green as possible--the author puts his design and construction skills to good use. In this article, he shares how he designed and built an eco-friendly shed. He says he is very pleased with the results of working with his own design, reducing waste,…

  6. CAD Instructor Designs Eco-Friendly Shed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwendau, Mark

    2013-01-01

    Dissatisfied with the options offered by big box stores--and wanting to save some money and go as green as possible--the author puts his design and construction skills to good use. In this article, he shares how he designed and built an eco-friendly shed. He says he is very pleased with the results of working with his own design, reducing waste,…

  7. Canopy Light Absorption and Application of the Light-Use Efficiency Model of Photosynthesis in a Northern Great Plains Grassland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flanagan, L. B.; Sharp, E. J.; Gamon, J. A.

    2014-12-01

    The fraction of absorbed photosynthetically active radiation (fAPAR) is fundamentally important for model calculations of ecosystem productivity across large areas. The main objective of this study was to better understand factors influencing fAPAR, its relationship with seasonal variation in canopy greenness (Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI)), and the consequences of potential seasonal changes in the NDVI- fAPAR relationship for light-use efficiency model calculations of ecosystem photosynthesis in a semi-arid grassland. We used two approaches to determine fAPAR, (i) incoming and outgoing radiance measurements above and below the canopy, and (ii) an inversion approach based on incident photosynthetically active radiation and the light response curve of net ecosystem productivity (NEP) measured by eddy covariance at low light levels. The two approaches resulted in fAPAR values that were very strongly correlated during the initial development of the canopy until peak leaf area index (LAI) was reached. A strong linear relationship also occurred between fAPAR and NDVI, based on reflectance measurements made along a tram system above the grassland canopy during initial LAI development. After peak LAI, there was hysteresis in the NDVI- fAPAR relationship. Light-use efficiency model calculations of ecosystem photosynthesis made using fAPAR values were strongly correlated with chamber CO2 exchange measurements during the initial development of the canopy leaf area. After peak LAI, a relative stress function, based on either soil moisture or vapour pressure deficit (VPD) measurements, was necessary to reduce quantum yield and model calculations of ecosystem photosynthesis during periods of relatively low soil moisture and higher VPD later in the growing season. Both stress functions were similarly effective in improving the correlation between modeled and measured ecosystem photosynthesis values.

  8. Computer Modeling of Real-Time Dynamic Lighting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maida, James C.; Pace, J.; Novak, J.; Russo, Dane M. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Space Station tasks involve procedures that are very complex and highly dependent on the availability of visual information. In many situations, cameras are used as tools to help overcome the visual and physical restrictions associated with space flight. However, these cameras are effected by the dynamic lighting conditions of space. Training for these is conditions is necessary. The current project builds on the findings of an earlier NRA funded project, which revealed improved performance by humans when trained with computer graphics and lighting effects such as shadows and glare.

  9. Covariance of Light-Front Models Pair Current

    CERN Document Server

    Pacheco-Bicudo-Cabral de Melo, J; Naus, H W L; Sauer, P U

    1999-01-01

    We compute the "+" component of the electromagnetic current of a composite spin-one two-fermion system for vanishing momentum transfer component $q^+=q^0+q^3$. In particular, we extract the nonvanishing pair production amplitude on the light-front. It is a consequence of the longitudinal zero momentum mode, contributing to the light-front current in the Breit-frame. The covariance of the current is violated, if such pair terms are not included in its matrix elements. We illustrate our discussion with some numerical examples.

  10. Biology and biogenesis of shed microvesicles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tricarico, Christopher; Clancy, James; D'Souza-Schorey, Crislyn

    2016-08-05

    The ability of cells to transmit bioactive molecules to recipient cells and the extracellular environment is a fundamental requirement for both normal physiology and disease pathogenesis. It has traditionally been thought that soluble factors released from cells were responsible for this cellular signaling but recent research has revealed a fundamental role for microvesicles in this process. Microvesicles are heterogeneous membrane-bound sacs that are shed from the surface of cells into the extracellular environment in a highly regulated process. They are shed following the selective incorporation of a host of molecular cargo including multiple types of proteins and nucleic acids. In addition to providing new insight into the etiology of complex human diseases, microvesicles also show great promise as a tool for advanced diagnosis and therapy as we move forward into a new age of personalized medicine. Here we review current status of the rapidly evolving field of microvesicle biology, highlighting critical regulatory roles for several small GTPases in the biology and biogenesis of shed microvesicles.

  11. Modeling spectral sensitivity at low light levels based on mesopic visual performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meri Viikari

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Meri Viikari, Aleksanteri Ekrias, Marjukka Eloholma, Liisa HalonenLighting Laboratory, Helsinki University of Technology, FinlandAbstract: The spectral sensitivity of the eye at low light levels, ie, mesopic conditions, is determined by the rod and cone photoreceptors of the retina operating together in varying degree as adaptation luminance shifts between the scotopic and photopic. Thus mesopic spectral sensitivity is different from photopic, where only cones contribute to vision. There are definite needs for a practical system of mesopic photometry to be used in assessing light at low light levels, especially in road and other outdoor lighting applications. However, neither of the recently proposed systems of mesopic photometry, the MOVE-model or the X-model, is found satisfactory by common consent of the lighting community. The most active debate has considered the upper luminance limit of the mesopic region, which is regarded to be too high for the MOVE-model and too low for the X-model. The present paper proposes a new modified MOVE-model whose upper luminance limit is adjusted to meet the actual road and street lighting luminance values measured in different weather conditions. The paper compares the MOVE-model, X-model, and the proposed modified MOVE-model with three independent visual performance data sets provided by different European universities. Based on the comparison, recommendations are given for future actions towards internationally accepted practice for mesopic photometry.Keywords: spectral sensitivity, mesopic, visual performance, mesopic model, photometry, night-time driving

  12. Covariance of light-front models: pair current

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Melo, J.P.B.C. de; Frederico, T.; Naus, H.W.L.; Sauer, P.U.

    1999-01-01

    We compute the + component, i.e., j+ = j0 + j3, of the electromagnetic current of a composite spin-one two-fermion system for vanishing momentum transfer component q+ = q0 + q3. In particular, we extract the nonvanishing pair production amplitude on the light-front. It is a consequence of the longit

  13. Modeling Water Clarity and Light Quality in Oceans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phytoplankton is a primary producer of organic compounds, and it forms the base of the food chain in ocean waters. The concentration of phytoplankton in the water column controls water clarity and the amount and quality of light that penetrates through it. The availability of ade...

  14. Modeling of reflection-type laser-driven white lighting considering phosphor particles and surface topography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Dong-Ho; Joo, Jae-Young; Lee, Sun-Kyu

    2015-07-27

    This paper presents a model of blue laser diode (LD)-based white lighting coupled with a yellow YAG phosphor, for use in the proper design and fabrication of phosphor in automotive headlamps. First, the sample consisted of an LD, collecting lens, and phosphor was prepared that matches the model. The light distribution of the LD and the phosphor were modeled to investigate an effect of the surface topography and phosphor particle properties on the laser-driven white lighting systems by using the commercially available optical design software. Based on the proposed model, the integral spectrum distribution and the color coordinates were discussed.

  15. Correlation Models for Light Olefin Yields from Catalytic Pyrolysis of Petroleum Residue

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DongXiaoli; MengXianghai; GaoJinsen; XuChunming

    2005-01-01

    Correlation models for light olefin yields from residue catalytic pyrolysis are studied. Experiments are carried out in a confined fluidized bed reactor for Daqing (China) atmospheric residue catalytic pyrolysis over LCM-5 pyrolyzing catalyst. The influences of reaction temperature, residence time and the weight ratios of catalyst-to-oil and steam-to-oil on light olefin yields are researched. Correlation models for light olefin yields are established, and the model parameters obtained, with the least square method. Results for error analysis and the F-statistical test show that the correlation models have high calculation precision.

  16. Synechococcus sp. (PTCC 6021) cultivation under different light irradiances-Modeling of growth rate-light response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moosavi Zenooz, Alireza; Zokaee Ashtiani, Farzin; Ranjbar, Reza; Javadi, Najvan

    2016-08-17

    Synechococcus sp. (PTCC 6021), a cyanobacterium species, was cultivated in an internally illuminated photobioreactor. The reactor was designed to achieve a monoseptic cultivation of the species. The goal was to study the growth-irradiance behavior of Synechococcus sp. (PTCC 6021). To accomplish this, different initial light irradiances were implemented inside the photobioreactor and the growth of the cells was monitored. It was observed that cell growth increased with higher light intensity until the photoinhibition occurrence at light irradiance higher than 250 μE m(-2) s(-1). The maximum OD600, maximum growth rate, and biomass productivity increased, and hence the extinction coefficient decreased, with the increase in light irradiance before photoinhibition. The maximum optical density (OD600) of 5.91 was obtained with irradiance below 250 μE m(-2) s(-1) during a growth period of 80 days. The modified Monod function could model the growth-irradiance of cells with satisfactory agreement with the experimental data. The comparison of growth-irradiance of the studied species with other photosynthetic organisms showed the same trend as for cyanobacteria with photoinhibition.

  17. Modeling the role of mid-wavelength cones in circadian responses to light.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dkhissi-Benyahya, Ouria; Gronfier, Claude; De Vanssay, Wena; Flamant, Frederic; Cooper, Howard M

    2007-03-01

    Nonvisual responses to light, such as photic entrainment of the circadian clock, involve intrinsically light-sensitive melanopsin-expressing ganglion cells as well as rod and cone photoreceptors. However, previous studies have been unable to demonstrate a specific contribution of cones in the photic control of circadian responses to light. Using a mouse model that specifically lacks mid-wavelength (MW) cones we show that these photoreceptors play a significant role in light entrainment and in phase shifting of the circadian oscillator. The contribution of MW cones is mainly observed for light exposures of short duration and toward the longer wavelength region of the spectrum, consistent with the known properties of this opsin. Modeling the contributions of the various photoreceptors stresses the importance of considering the particular spectral, temporal, and irradiance response domains of the photopigments when assessing their role and contribution in circadian responses to light.

  18. Model for variable light sensitivity in imbibed dark-dormant seeds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duke, S O; Egley, G H; Reger, B J

    1977-02-01

    The level of light-induced germination of the seed of common purslane (Portulaca oleracea L.) and curly dock (Rumex crispus L.) changes with dark incubation time prior to brief, low energy, red light treatment. The rate at which phytochrome-far red-absorbing form (Pfr) acts in the light-induced population of seeds was measured by quantitating per cent reversals of the red light effect with saturating far red light exposures at successive times after the red light exposure. A linear positive correlation was found between this rate and the final germination level. These results are compatible with a model involving changing levels, during dark incubation, of a component with which Pfr interacts. In this model, germination is initiated after attainment of a certain level of interaction between Pfr and this component. These findings also support the view that the Pfr to Pr decay rate constant and total phytochrome level are stable during dark incubation.

  19. Simplified prediction model for lighting energy consumption in office building scheme design

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    余琼; 周潇儒; 林波荣; 朱颖心

    2009-01-01

    At the scheme design stage,the potential of daylighting is significant due to the saving for electric lighting use. There are few simple tools for architects to optimize the daylighting design. Therefore,it is useful to develop a design guideline related to the evaluation of lighting energy saving potential and sunlight design strategies. This paper analyzes the impacts of different artificial lighting control methods and design parameters on daylighting. A direct correlation between lighting energy consumption and parameters such as orientations,window to wall ratio (WWR) and perimeter depth is established. A simplified prediction model is proposed to estimate lighting energy consumption with the given perimeter depth,WWR,and window transparency. Validation of the model is carried out compared with detailed lighting simulation software for an office building. After the variation analysis for these parameters,design advises for the daylighting design at scheme design phase are summarized.

  20. Neural network modeling of the light profile in a novel photobioreactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salazar-Peña, R; Alcaraz-González, V; González-Álvarez, V; Snell-Castro, R; Méndez-Acosta, H O

    2014-06-01

    An artificial neural network (ANN) was implemented to model the light profile pattern inside a photobioreactor (PBR) that uses a toroidal light arrangement. The PBR uses Tequila vinasses as culture medium and purple non-sulfur bacteria Rhodopseudomonas palustris as biocatalyzer. The performance of the ANN was tested for a number of conditions and compared to those obtained by using deterministic models. Both ANN and deterministic models were validated experimentally. In all cases, at low biomass concentration, model predictions yielded determination coefficients greater than 0.9. Nevertheless, ANN yielded the more accurate predictions of the light pattern, at both low and high biomass concentration, when the bioreactor radius, the depth, the rotational speed of the stirrer and the biomass concentration were incorporated in the ANN structure. In comparison, most of the deterministic models failed to correlate the empirical data at high biomass concentration. These results show the usefulness of ANNs in the modeling of the light profile pattern in photobioreactors.

  1. Transcranial red and near infrared light transmission in a cadaveric model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jared R Jagdeo

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVE: Low level light therapy has garnered significant interest within the past decade. The exact molecular mechanisms of how red and near infrared light result in physiologic modulation are not fully understood. Heme moieties and copper within cells are red and near infrared light photoreceptors that induce the mitochondrial respiratory chain component cytochrome C oxidase, resulting in a cascade linked to cytoprotection and cellular metabolism. The copper centers in cytochrome C oxidase have a broad absorption range that peaks around 830 nm. Several in vitro and in vivo animal and human models exist that have demonstrated the benefits of red light and near infrared light for various conditions. Clinical applications for low level light therapy are varied. One study in particular demonstrated improved durable functional outcomes status post-stroke in patients treated with near infrared low level light therapy compared to sham treatment [1]. Despite previous data suggesting the beneficial effect in treating multiple conditions, including stroke, with low level light therapy, limited data exists that measures transmission in a human model. STUDY DESIGN/MATERIALS AND METHODS: To investigate this idea, we measured the transmission of near infrared light energy, using red light for purposes of comparison, through intact cadaver soft tissue, skull bones, and brain using a commercially available LED device at 830 nm and 633 nm. RESULTS: Our results demonstrate that near infrared measurably penetrates soft tissue, bone and brain parenchyma in the formalin preserved cadaveric model, in comparison to negligible red light transmission in the same conditions. CONCLUSION: These findings indicate that near infrared light can penetrate formalin fixed soft tissue, bone and brain and implicate that benefits observed in clinical studies are potentially related to direct action of near infrared light on neural tissue.

  2. The role of crown architecture for light harvesting and carbon gain in extreme light environments assessed with a structurally realistic 3-D model

    OpenAIRE

    2000-01-01

    Main results from different studies of crown architecture adaptation to extreme light environments are presented. Light capture and carbon gain by plants from low (forest understory) and high (open Mediterranean-type ecosystems) light environments were simulated with a 3-D model (YPLANT), which was developed specifically to analyse the structural features that determine light interception and photosynthesis at the whole plant level. Distantly related taxa with contrasting architectures exhibi...

  3. Using the Outcome-Driven Innovation Approach to Develop a Customer Value Model for Lighting

    OpenAIRE

    Dalton, Nonie

    2012-01-01

    LED technology is on the cusp of disrupting the entire lighting industry if the industry can develop new lighting products that customers will want to use and purchase. Understanding what customers value from their lighting products is an open question for the industry. To answer this question and to provide a deeper understanding of customer’s needs, I have applied the outcome driven innovation approach. Through this approach the customer value model was developed, which identifies customers...

  4. Intrinsic repair protects cells from pore-forming toxins by microvesicle shedding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romero, Matthew; Keyel, Michelle; Shi, Guilan; Bhattacharjee, Pushpak; Roth, Robyn; Heuser, John E; Keyel, Peter A

    2017-02-10

    Pore-forming toxins (PFTs) are used by both the immune system and by pathogens to disrupt cell membranes. Cells attempt to repair this disruption in various ways, but the exact mechanism(s) that cells use are not fully understood, nor agreed upon. Current models for membrane repair include (1) patch formation (e.g., fusion of internal vesicles with plasma membrane defects), (2) endocytosis of the pores, and (3) shedding of the pores by blebbing from the cell membrane. In this study, we sought to determine the specific mechanism(s) that cells use to resist three different cholesterol-dependent PFTs: Streptolysin O, Perfringolysin O, and Intermedilysin. We found that all three toxins were shed from cells by blebbing from the cell membrane on extracellular microvesicles (MVs). Unique among the cells studied, we found that macrophages were 10 times more resistant to the toxins, yet they shed significantly smaller vesicles than the other cells. To examine the mechanism of shedding, we tested whether toxins with engineered defects in pore formation or oligomerization were shed. We found that oligomerization was necessary and sufficient for membrane shedding, suggesting that calcium influx and patch formation were not required for shedding. However, pore formation enhanced shedding, suggesting that calcium influx and patch formation enhance repair. In contrast, monomeric toxins were endocytosed. These data indicate that cells use two interrelated mechanisms of membrane repair: lipid-dependent MV shedding, which we term 'intrinsic repair', and patch formation by intracellular organelles. Endocytosis may act after membrane repair is complete by removing inactivated and monomeric toxins from the cell surface.Cell Death and Differentiation advance online publication, 10 February 2017; doi:10.1038/cdd.2017.11.

  5. Modelling of salad plants growth and physiological status in vitamin space greenhouse during lighting regime optimization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konovalova, Irina; Berkovich, Yuliy A.; Smolyanina, Svetlana; Erokhin, Alexei; Yakovleva, Olga; Lapach, Sergij; Radchenko, Stanislav; Znamenskii, Artem; Tarakanov, Ivan

    2016-07-01

    The efficiency of the photoautotrophic element as part of bio-engineering life-support systems is determined substantially by lighting regime. The artificial light regime optimization complexity results from the wide range of plant physiological functions controlled by light: trophic, informative, biosynthetical, etc. An average photosynthetic photon flux density (PPFD), light spectral composition and pulsed light effects on the crop growth and plant physiological status were studied in the multivariate experiment, including 16 independent experiments in 3 replicates. Chinese cabbage plants (Brassica chinensis L.), cultivar Vesnianka, were grown during 24 days in a climatic chamber under white and red light-emitting diodes (LEDs): photoperiod 24 h, PPFD from 260 to 500 µM/(m ^{2}*s), red light share in the spectrum varying from 33% to 73%, pulsed (pulse period from 30 to 501 µs) and non-pulsed lighting. The regressions of plant photosynthetic and biochemical indexes as well as the crop specific productivity in response to the selected parameters of lighting regime were calculated. Developed models of crop net photosynthesis and dark respiration revealed the most intense gas exchange area corresponding to PPFD level 450 - 500 µM/(m ^{2}*s) with red light share in the spectrum about 60% and the pulse length 30 µs with a pulse period from 300 to 400 µs. Shoot dry weight increased monotonically in response to the increasing PPFD and changed depending on the pulse period under stabilized PPFD level. An increase in ascorbic acid content in the shoot biomass was revealed when increasing red light share in spectrum from 33% to 73%. The lighting regime optimization criterion (Q) was designed for the vitamin space greenhouse as the maximum of a crop yield square on its ascorbic acid concentration, divided by the light energy consumption. The regression model of optimization criterion was constructed based on the experimental data. The analysis of the model made it

  6. Modeling spatiotemporal patterns of understory light intensity using airborne laser scanner (LiDAR)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Shouzhang; Zhao, Chuanyan; Xu, Zhonglin

    2014-11-01

    This study described a spatiotemporally explicit 3D raytrace model to provide spatiotemporal patterns of understory light (light intensity in the forest floor and along the vertical gradient). The model was built based on voxels derived from LiDAR and field investigation data, geographical information (elevation and location), and solar position (azimuth and altitude angles). We calculated the distance (L, in meters) traveled by solar ray in the crowns based on the model, and then calibrated and verified the light attenuation function using L based on Beer's law. L and the ratio of below canopy light intensity to above canopy light intensity showed obviously exponential relationship, with R2 = 0.94 and P competition, soil evaporation, plant transpiration, and snowmelt in the forest.

  7. The pineal gland does not control rod outer segment shedding and phagocytosis in the rat retina and pigment epithelium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamai, M; Teirstein, P; Goldman, A; O'Brien, P; Chader, G

    1978-06-01

    Diurnal patterns of retinal outer segment shedding and phagocytosis by the pigment epithelium were examined in pinealectomized, superior-cervical-ganglionectomized, and sham-operated rats. Phagocytosis was quantitatively similar in all groups. Sharp increases in the number of large phagosomes were observed soon after lights were turned on in the tree sets of animals. Pinealectomized animals kept in constant darkness over a 24 hr period also exhibited normal shedding patterns. Our results suggest that the pineal does not exert a major influence on the daily rhythms of shedding and phagocytosis observed in the retina-pigment epithelium unit.

  8. Finite difference time domain modeling of light matter interaction in light-propelled microtools

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bañas, Andrew Rafael; Palima, Darwin; Aabo, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    may trigger highly localized non linear processes in the surface of a cell. Since these functionalities are strongly dependent on design, it is important to use models that can handle complexities and take in little simplifying assumptions about the system. Hence, we use the finite difference time...

  9. Design, Characterization and Modelling of High Efficient Solar Powered Lighting Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nymann, Peter; Svane, Frederik; Poulsen, Peter Behrensdorff;

    2016-01-01

    This paper discusses some of the major challenges in the development of L2L (Light-2-Light) products. It’s the lack of efficient converter electronics, modelling tools for dimensioning and furthermore, characterization facilities to support the successful development of the products. We report th...

  10. Hair shedding score may affect body temperature more than hair coat color during heat stress in weaned beef heifers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of hair shedding score and hair coat color on the vaginal temperature (VT) of calves during heat stress. Weaned Bos taurus beef heifers (n = 32; BW = 282 ± 6.4 kg) were assigned to a hair coat color class (BLACK; RED; or LIGHT, where LIGHT = yel...

  11. This pineal gland does not mediate phase shifts in the disc shedding rhythm of the rat retina

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goldman, A.I.

    1982-01-01

    Albino rats were subjected to pinealectomy, superior cervical ganglionectomy, or the appropriate sham preparation and were placed in lighting conditions so that light onset was advanced by 10 hr. After 6 days of this regimen, all animals exhibited a complete shift in their outer segment disc shedding rhythm, indicating that the pineal gland is not a factor in mediating such a shift.

  12. Light dilaton in the large N tricritical O (N ) model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omid, Hamid; Semenoff, Gordon W.; Wijewardhana, L. C. R.

    2016-12-01

    The leading order of the large N limit of the O (N ) symmetric phi-six theory in three dimensions has a phase which exhibits spontaneous breaking of scale symmetry accompanied by a massless dilaton which is a Goldstone boson. At the next-to-leading order in large N , the phi-six coupling has a beta function of order 1 /N and it is expected that the dilaton acquires a small mass, proportional to the beta function and the condensate. In this article, we show that this "light dilaton" is actually a tachyon. This indicates an instability of the phase of the theory with spontaneously broken approximate scale invariance.

  13. Modeling spectral sensitivity at low light levels based on mesopic visual performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viikari, Meri; Ekrias, Aleksanteri; Eloholma, Marjukka; Halonen, Liisa

    2008-03-01

    The spectral sensitivity of the eye at low light levels, ie, mesopic conditions, is determined by the rod and cone photoreceptors of the retina operating together in varying degree as adaptation luminance shifts between the scotopic and photopic. Thus mesopic spectral sensitivity is different from photopic, where only cones contribute to vision. There are definite needs for a practical system of mesopic photometry to be used in assessing light at low light levels, especially in road and other outdoor lighting applications. However, neither of the recently proposed systems of mesopic photometry, the MOVE-model or the X-model, is found satisfactory by common consent of the lighting community. The most active debate has considered the upper luminance limit of the mesopic region, which is regarded to be too high for the MOVE-model and too low for the X-model. The present paper proposes a new modified MOVE-model whose upper luminance limit is adjusted to meet the actual road and street lighting luminance values measured in different weather conditions. The paper compares the MOVE-model, X-model, and the proposed modified MOVE-model with three independent visual performance data sets provided by different European universities. Based on the comparison, recommendations are given for future actions towards internationally accepted practice for mesopic photometry.

  14. Effects of signal light on the fuel consumption and emissions under car-following model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Tie-Qiao; Yi, Zhi-Yan; Lin, Qing-Feng

    2017-03-01

    In this paper, a car-following model is utilized to study the effects of signal light on each vehicle's fuel consumption, CO, HC and NOX. The numerical results show that each vehicle's fuel consumption and emissions are influenced by the signal light and that the effects are related to the green split of the signal light and the vehicle's time headway at the origin, which can help drivers adjust their micro driving behavior on the road with a signal light to reduce their fuel consumption and emissions.

  15. Staying in the Light: Evaluating Sustainability Models for Brokering Software

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powers, L. A.; Benedict, K. K.; Best, M.; Fyfe, S.; Jacobs, C. A.; Michener, W. K.; Pearlman, J.; Turner, A.; Nativi, S.

    2015-12-01

    The Business Models Team of the Research Data Alliance Brokering Governance Working Group examined several support models proposed to promote the long-term sustainability of brokering middleware. The business model analysis includes examination of funding source, implementation frameworks and obstacles, and policy and legal considerations. The issue of sustainability is not unique to brokering software and these models may be relevant to many applications. Results of this comprehensive analysis highlight advantages and disadvantages of the various models in respect to the specific requirements for brokering services. We offer recommendations based on the outcomes of this analysis while recognizing that all software is part of an evolutionary process and has a lifespan.

  16. State-Based Models for Light Curve Classification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, A.

    I discuss here the application of continuous time autoregressive models to the characterization of astrophysical variability. These types of models are general enough to represent many classes of variability, and descriptive enough to provide features for lightcurve classification. Importantly, the features of these models may be interpreted in terms of the power spectrum of the lightcurve, enabling constraints on characteristic timescales and periodicity. These models may be extended to include vector-valued inputs, raising the prospect of a fully general modeling and classification environment that uses multi-passband inputs to create a single phenomenological model. These types of spectral-temporal models are an important extension of extant techniques, and necessary in the upcoming eras of Gaia and LSST.

  17. Modelling of a laser-pumped light source for endoscopic surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nadeau, Valerie J.; Elson, Daniel S.; Hanna, George B.; Neil, Mark A. A.

    2008-09-01

    A white light source, based on illumination of a yellow phosphor with a fibre-coupled blue-violet diode laser, has been designed and built for use in endoscopic surgery. This narrow light probe can be integrated into a standard laparoscope or inserted into the patient separately via a needle. We present a Monte Carlo model of light scattering and phosphorescence within the phosphor/silicone matrix at the probe tip, and measurements of the colour, intensity, and uniformity of the illumination. Images obtained under illumination with this light source are also presented, demonstrating the improvement in illumination quality over existing endoscopic light sources. This new approach to endoscopic lighting has the advantages of compact design, improved ergonomics, and more uniform illumination in comparison with current technologies.

  18. Modeling of coherent ultrafast magneto-optical experiments: Light-induced molecular mean-field model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hinschberger, Y. [Instituto de Física dos Materiais da Universidade do Porto, Departamento de Física et Astronomia, Rua do campo Alegre, 687, 4169-007 Porto (Portugal); Hervieux, P.-A. [Institut de Physique et Chimie des Matériaux de Strasbourg, Université de Strasbourg, CNRS UMR 7504 BP 43 - F-67034 Strasbourg Cedex 2 (France)

    2015-12-28

    We present calculations which aim to describe coherent ultrafast magneto-optical effects observed in time-resolved pump-probe experiments. Our approach is based on a nonlinear semi-classical Drude-Voigt model and is used to interpret experiments performed on nickel ferromagnetic thin film. Within this framework, a phenomenological light-induced coherent molecular mean-field depending on the polarizations of the pump and probe pulses is proposed whose microscopic origin is related to a spin-orbit coupling involving the electron spins of the material sample and the electric field of the laser pulses. Theoretical predictions are compared to available experimental data. The model successfully reproduces the observed experimental trends and gives meaningful insight into the understanding of magneto-optical rotation behavior in the ultrafast regime. Theoretical predictions for further experimental studies are also proposed.

  19. A Device Model for Polymer Light-Emitting Diodes with Mobile Ions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jong, M.J.M. de; Blom, P.W.M.

    1996-01-01

    A model is presented for the device operation of a polymer light-emitting diode (PLED) with mobile ions. It is calculated that the low efficiency of a PLED with a high injection barrier increases as the ions migrate.

  20. Kinetic modeling of the light-dependent photosynthetic activity of the green microalga Chlorella vulgaris.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yun, Yeoung-Sang; Park, Jong Moon

    2003-08-05

    Light-dependent photosynthesis of Chlorella vulgaris was investigated by using a novel photosynthesis measurement system that could cover wide ranges of incident light and cell density and reproduce accurate readings. Various photosynthesis models, which have been reported elsewhere, were classified and/or reformulated based upon the underlying hypotheses of the light dependence of the algal photosynthesis. Four types of models were derived, which contained distinct light-related variables such as the average or local photon flux density (APFD or LPFD) and the average or local photon absorption rate (APAR or LPAR). According to our experimental results, the LPFD and LPAR models could predict the experimental data more accurately although the APFD and APAR models have been widely used for the kinetic study of microalgal photosynthesis.

  1. Aromatization of light naphtha fractions on zeolites 1: Kinetic model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rovenskaja Svetlana A.

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available On the basis of analyzing kinetic experimental data performed in laboratory integral reactors a lumping kinetic model of the "Zeoforming" process was developed. A reaction scheme of the lumped components was proposed, that was adapted to the technological requirements. The reaction rate constants and activation energies were estimated, that are valid for certain feed compositions. The model is intended for further modeling and optimization of the process.

  2. The Time-Varying Characteristics of Overhead Electric Transmission Lines Considering the Induced-Ice-Shedding Effect

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kunpeng Ji

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available More ice deposits accreted on conductors or ground wires may be shed off when an overhead electric transmission line is responding to shocks initiated by natural ice shedding. Ice shedding causes the global mass, stiffness, and damping of the tower-line system to vary with time, and the successive shedding effect beyond a trigger event has not been taken into account in previous studies due to the lack of an adequate ice detachment model. In this paper, the ice shedding effect induced by initial shocks was considered in finite element (FE analysis. An ice detachment criterion, in the way of user-defined element rupture subroutine, was implemented into the main commercial nonlinear FE program ADINA, making it possible to consider the induced-ice-shedding effect numerically. The incremental FE form of the system’s governing equations of motion is presented where the variations in the mass and stiffness matrices of the system are taken into consideration. Taking a transmission line section following natural ice shedding as a case study, the results indicate that neglecting successive ice shedding underestimates the adverse influence of natural ice shedding. The proposed method can help to improve the design and evaluation of transmission lines in cold regions and to ensure their mechanical security.

  3. Investigations on the electrical current-voltage response in protein light receptors

    CERN Document Server

    Alfinito, E; Reggiani, L

    2014-01-01

    We report a theoretical/computational approach for modeling the current-voltage characteristics of sensing proteins. The modeling is applied to a couple of transmembrane proteins, bacteriorhodopsin and proteorhodopsin, sensitive to visible light and promising biomaterials for the development of a new generation of photo-transducers. The agreement between theory and experiments sheds new light on the microscopic interpretation of charge transfer in proteins and biological materials in general.

  4. HIGH LEVEL MODELLING OF REAL TIME TRAFFIC LIGHT CONTROLLER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ADITYA MANDLOI

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this paper is to design and implement traffic control system. The system developed is able to sense the presence of vehicles within certain range by setting the appropriate duration for the traffic signals to react accordingly. By employing logical functions to calculate the appropriate timing for the signals toilluminate, the system can help to solve the problem of traffic congestion. The use of FPGAs (Field Programmable Gate Arrays is an interesting new phenomenon in VLSI development. FPGAs offer all of thefeatures needed to implement most complex designs. Hardware simulation tests were successfully performed on the algorithm implemented into a FPGA (Field Programmable Gate Arrays. The main object of the paper is to design a Real Time Traffic Light Controller (RTTLC using VHDL and implement the RTTLC in XILINX SPARTAN - 3 FPGA.

  5. The Spectral Quark Model and Light Cone Phenomenology

    CERN Document Server

    Ruiz-Arriola, E; Broniowsk, Wojciech

    2003-01-01

    Chiral quark models offer a practical and simple tool to describe covariantly both low and high energy phenomenology in combination with QCD evolution. This can be done in full harmony with chiral symmetry and electromagnetic gauge invariance. We review the recently proposed spectral quark model where all these constraints are implemented.

  6. Comparison of three light doses in the photodynamic treatment of actinic keratosis using mathematical modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vignion-Dewalle, Anne-Sophie; Betrouni, Nacim; Tylcz, Jean-Baptiste; Vermandel, Maximilien; Mortier, Laurent; Mordon, Serge

    2015-05-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is an emerging treatment modality for various diseases, especially for cancer therapy. Although high efficacy is demonstrated for PDT using standardized protocols in nonhyperkeratotic actinic keratoses, alternative light doses expected to increase efficiency, to reduce adverse effects or to expand the use of PDT, are still being evaluated and refined. We propose a comparison of the three most common light doses in the treatment of actinic keratosis with 5-aminolevulinic acid PDT through mathematical modeling. The proposed model is based on an iterative procedure that involves determination of the local fluence rate, updating of the local optical properties, and estimation of the local damage induced by the therapy. This model was applied on a simplified skin sample model including an actinic keratosis lesion, with three different light doses (red light dose, 37 J∕cm2, 75 mW∕cm2, 500 s; blue light dose, 10 J∕cm2, 10 mW∕cm2, 1000 s; and daylight dose, 9000 s). Results analysis shows that the three studied light doses, although all efficient, lead to variable local damage. Defining reference damage enables the nonoptimal parameters for the current light doses to be refined and the treatment to be more suitable.

  7. Performance of Linear and Nonlinear Two-Leaf Light Use Efficiency Models at Different Temporal Scales

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wu, Xiaocui; Ju, Weimin; Zhou, Yanlian;

    2015-01-01

    two-leaf model (TL-LUE), and a big-leaf light use efficiency model (MOD17) to simulate GPP at half-hourly, daily and 8-day scales using GPP derived from 58 eddy-covariance flux sites in Asia, Europe and North America as benchmarks. Model evaluation showed that the overall performance of TL...

  8. A compact Ⅰ-Ⅴ model for lightly-doped-drain MOSFETs

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yu Chun-Li; Yang Lin-An; Hao Yue

    2004-01-01

    A novel model for lightly-doped-drain (LDD) MOSFETs is proposed, which utilizes the empirical hyperbolic tangent function to describe the Ⅰ-Ⅴcharacteristics. The model includes the strong inversion and subthreshold mechanism, and shows a good prediction for submicron LDD MOSFET. Moreover, the model requires low computation time consumption and is suitable for design of MOSFETs devices and circuits.

  9. A precise model of LED lighting and its application in uniform illumination system

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WU Feng-tie; HUANG Qi-lu

    2011-01-01

    Optical models directly effect the irradiance distribution of observed surface.Traditionally,approximate Lambertian models are widely used in designing the light-emitting diodes(LED) arrays in spite of their errors compared with the experimental data.But now a novel LED optical model for uniform illumination system has been proposed,in which the curvefitting technique is used to reduce the inherited errors and modify those previous models.The points from the curve of the LED light intensity are adopted,and a spline curve is designed for fitting,which obtains the revised mode.To verify its feasibility,we apply the new model in a 4 × 4 array design.The results show that compared with the approximate Lambertian,the light intensity distribution produced by the fitting model is more uniform and intense,as is expected.

  10. Light Models of Civilian Support in Blue-Red Operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-01

    Population 3 2 Civilian Support Social – Cognitive Constructs Perceptions Disposition Moral disengagement Personality Beliefs Grievance How is a...RELEASE Vulnerability Sacrifice Anger Commitment Model Civilian Support 4 3 Perceptions Disposition Moral disengagement Personality Beliefs Grievance • A

  11. Modelling of light pollution in suburban areas using remotely sensed imagery and GIS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chalkias, C; Petrakis, M; Psiloglou, B; Lianou, M

    2006-04-01

    This paper describes a methodology for modelling light pollution using geographical information systems (GIS) and remote sensing (RS) technology. The proposed approach attempts to address the issue of environmental assessment in sensitive suburban areas. The modern way of life in developing countries is conductive to environmental degradation in urban and suburban areas. One specific parameter for this degradation is light pollution due to intense artificial night lighting. This paper aims to assess this parameter for the Athens metropolitan area, using modern analytical and data capturing technologies. For this purpose, night-time satellite images and analogue maps have been used in order to create the spatial database of the GIS for the study area. Using GIS advanced analytical functionality, visibility analysis was implemented. The outputs for this analysis are a series of maps reflecting direct and indirect light pollution around the city of Athens. Direct light pollution corresponds to optical contact with artificial night light sources, while indirect light pollution corresponds to optical contact with the sky glow above the city. Additionally, the assessment of light pollution in different periods allows for dynamic evaluation of the phenomenon. The case study demonstrates high levels of light pollution in Athens suburban areas and its increase over the last decade.

  12. Modeling the Spatiotemporal Dynamics of Light and Heat Propagation for In Vivo Optogenetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stujenske, Joseph M; Spellman, Timothy; Gordon, Joshua A

    2015-07-21

    Despite the increasing use of optogenetics in vivo, the effects of direct light exposure to brain tissue are understudied. Of particular concern is the potential for heat induced by prolonged optical stimulation. We demonstrate that high-intensity light, delivered through an optical fiber, is capable of elevating firing rate locally, even in the absence of opsin expression. Predicting the severity and spatial extent of any temperature increase during optogenetic stimulation is therefore of considerable importance. Here, we describe a realistic model that simulates light and heat propagation during optogenetic experiments. We validated the model by comparing predicted and measured temperature changes in vivo. We further demonstrate the utility of this model by comparing predictions for various wavelengths of light and fiber sizes, as well as testing methods for reducing heat effects on neural targets in vivo.

  13. A LIGHT-PKI FAST AUTHENTICATION MODEL%一种Light-PKI快速认证模型

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘红梅

    2012-01-01

    提出一种两层扁平结构的PKI认证模型,即light-PKI结构.在该结构中,终端安全存储有根CA的公钥信息并且维护了一个本地作废证书库.实体之间互相认证时,不需要第三方(认证机构)的实时参与,改善了PKI系统的认证速度,提高了认证的效率.%A two-tier flat structure PKI authentication model, i. e. the light-PKI structure, is proposed. In this structure, the terminal se-curity storage has the root CA public key and has maintained a local revoked certificate library. There is no need of the real participation by the third-party ( authentication body) when the authentications take place between the entities each other. So this model improves the authentication speed of PKI systems and raises the authentication efficiency.

  14. Modeling and experimental verification for a broad beam light transport in optical tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janunts, Edgar; Pöschinger, Thomas; Eisa, Fabian; Langenbucher, Achim

    2010-01-01

    This paper describes a general theoretical model for computing a broad beam excitation light transport in a 3D diffusion medium. The model is based on the diffusion approximation of the radiative transport equation. An analytical approach for the light propagation is presented by deriving a corresponding Green's function. A finite cylindrical domain with a rectangular cross section was considered as a 3D homogeneous phantom model. The results of the model are compared with corresponding experimental data. The measurements are done on solid and liquid phantoms replicating tissue-like optical properties.

  15. Spectral composition of light sources and insect phototaxis, with an evaluation of existing spectral response models. Journal of Insect Conservation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Grunsven, van R.H.A.; Donners, M.; Boekee, K.; Tichelaar, I.; Geffen, van K.G.; Groenendijk, D.; Berendse, F.; Veenendaal, E.M.

    2014-01-01

    Artificial illumination attracts insects, but to what extent light attracts insects, depends on the spectral composition of the light. Response models have been developed to predict the attractiveness of artificial light sources. In this study we compared attraction of insects by existing light sour

  16. Radiative neutrino models in light of diphoton signals

    CERN Document Server

    Antipin, Oleg; Kumericki, Kresimir; Picek, Ivica

    2016-01-01

    Viable explanations of a hinted 750 GeV scalar resonance may be sought within the extensions of the SM Higgs sector aimed at generating neutrino masses at the loop level. We confront a compatibility with the 750 GeV diphoton excess for two recent models which do not need to impose ad hoc symmetry to forbid the tree-level masses: a one-loop mass model providing the H(750) candidate within its real triplet scalar representation and a three-loop mass model providing it within its two Higgs doublets. Besides accounting for the 750 GeV resonance, we demonstrate that these complementary neutrino-mass scenarios have different testable predictions for the LHC which should show up soon as more data is accumulated during the ongoing 13 TeV run.

  17. Bloch-Redfield equations for modeling light-harvesting complexes

    CERN Document Server

    Jeske, Jan; Plenio, Martin B; Huelga, Susana F; Cole, Jared H

    2014-01-01

    We challenge the commonly held view that Bloch-Redfield equations are a less powerful tool than phenomenological Lindblad equations for modeling exciton transport in photosynthetic complexes. This view predominantly originates from the misuse of the secular approximation. We provide a detailed description of how to model both coherent oscillations and several types of noise, giving explicit examples. All issues with non-positivity are overcome by a consistent straightforward physical noise model. Herein also lies the strength of the Bloch-Redfield approach because it facilitates the analysis of noise-effects by linking them back to physical parameters of the noise environment. This includes temporal and spatial correlations and the strength and type of interaction between the noise and the system of interest. Finally we analyze a prototypical dimer system as well as a 7-site Fenna-Matthews-Olson (FMO) complex in regards to spatial correlation length of the noise, noise strength, temperature and their connecti...

  18. Quantitative modeling of Cerenkov light production efficiency from medical radionuclides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beattie, Bradley J; Thorek, Daniel L J; Schmidtlein, Charles R; Pentlow, Keith S; Humm, John L; Hielscher, Andreas H

    2012-01-01

    There has been recent and growing interest in applying Cerenkov radiation (CR) for biological applications. Knowledge of the production efficiency and other characteristics of the CR produced by various radionuclides would help in accessing the feasibility of proposed applications and guide the choice of radionuclides. To generate this information we developed models of CR production efficiency based on the Frank-Tamm equation and models of CR distribution based on Monte-Carlo simulations of photon and β particle transport. All models were validated against direct measurements using multiple radionuclides and then applied to a number of radionuclides commonly used in biomedical applications. We show that two radionuclides, Ac-225 and In-111, which have been reported to produce CR in water, do not in fact produce CR directly. We also propose a simple means of using this information to calibrate high sensitivity luminescence imaging systems and show evidence suggesting that this calibration may be more accurate than methods in routine current use.

  19. Temporal coherence length of light in semiclassical field theory models

    CERN Document Server

    Jagielski, Borys; Vistnes, Arnt Inge

    2010-01-01

    The following work is motivated by the conceptual problems associated with the wave-particle duality and the notion of the photon. Two simple classical models for radiation from individual emitters are compared, one based on sines with random phasejumps, another based on pulse trains. The sum signal is calculated for a varying number of emitters. The focus lies on the final signal's statistical features quantified by means of the temporal coherence function and the temporal coherence length. We show how these features might be used to experimentally differentiate between the models. We also point to ambiguities in the definition of the temporal coherence length.

  20. Light weakly coupled axial forces: models, constraints, and projections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahn, Yonatan; Krnjaic, Gordan; Mishra-Sharma, Siddharth; Tait, Tim M. P.

    2017-05-01

    We investigate the landscape of constraints on MeV-GeV scale, hidden U(1) forces with nonzero axial-vector couplings to Standard Model fermions. While the purely vector-coupled dark photon, which may arise from kinetic mixing, is a well-motivated scenario, several MeV-scale anomalies motivate a theory with axial couplings which can be UV-completed consistent with Standard Model gauge invariance. Moreover, existing constraints on dark photons depend on products of various combinations of axial and vector couplings, making it difficult to isolate the effects of axial couplings for particular flavors of SM fermions. We present a representative renormalizable, UV-complete model of a dark photon with adjustable axial and vector couplings, discuss its general features, and show how some UV constraints may be relaxed in a model with nonrenormalizable Yukawa couplings at the expense of fine-tuning. We survey the existing parameter space and the projected reach of planned experiments, briefly commenting on the relevance of the allowed parameter space to low-energy anomalies in π0 and 8Be∗ decay.

  1. Independent-particle models for light negative atomic ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganas, P. S.; Talman, J. D.; Green, A. E. S.

    1980-01-01

    For the purposes of astrophysical, aeronomical, and laboratory application, a precise independent-particle model for electrons in negative atomic ions of the second and third period is discussed. The optimum-potential model (OPM) of Talman et al. (1979) is first used to generate numerical potentials for eight of these ions. Results for total energies and electron affinities are found to be very close to Hartree-Fock solutions. However, the OPM and HF electron affinities both depart significantly from experimental affinities. For this reason, two analytic potentials are developed whose inner energy levels are very close to the OPM and HF levels but whose last electron eigenvalues are adjusted precisely with the magnitudes of experimental affinities. These models are: (1) a four-parameter analytic characterization of the OPM potential and (2) a two-parameter potential model of the Green, Sellin, Zachor type. The system O(-) or e-O, which is important in upper atmospheric physics is examined in some detail.

  2. Light Weakly Coupled Axial Forces: Models, Constraints, and Projections

    CERN Document Server

    Kahn, Yonatan; Mishra-Sharma, Siddharth; Tait, Tim M P

    2016-01-01

    We investigate the landscape of constraints on MeV-GeV scale, hidden U(1) forces with nonzero axial-vector couplings to Standard Model fermions. While the purely vector-coupled dark photon, which may arise from kinetic mixing, is a well-motivated scenario, several MeV-scale anomalies motivate a theory with axial couplings which can be UV-completed consistent with Standard Model gauge invariance. Moreover, existing constraints on dark photons depend on products of various combinations of axial and vector couplings, making it difficult to isolate the effects of axial couplings for particular flavors of SM fermions. We present a representative renormalizable, UV-complete model of a dark photon with adjustable axial and vector couplings, discuss its general features, and show how some UV constraints may be relaxed in a model with nonrenormalizable Yukawa couplings at the expense of fine-tuning. We survey the existing parameter space and the projected reach of planned experiments, briefly commenting on the relevan...

  3. Light Weakly Coupled Axial Forces: Models, Constraints, and Projections

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kahn, Yonatan [Princeton U.; Krnjaic, Gordan [Fermilab; Mishra-Sharma, Siddharth [Princeton U.; Tait, Tim P. [UC, Irvine

    2016-09-28

    We investigate the landscape of constraints on MeV-GeV scale, hidden U(1) forces with nonzero axial-vector couplings to Standard Model fermions. While the purely vector-coupled dark photon, which may arise from kinetic mixing, is a well-motivated scenario, several MeV-scale anomalies motivate a theory with axial couplings which can be UV-completed consistent with Standard Model gauge invariance. Moreover, existing constraints on dark photons depend on products of various combinations of axial and vector couplings, making it difficult to isolate the effects of axial couplings for particular flavors of SM fermions. We present a representative renormalizable, UV-complete model of a dark photon with adjustable axial and vector couplings, discuss its general features, and show how some UV constraints may be relaxed in a model with nonrenormalizable Yukawa couplings at the expense of fine-tuning. We survey the existing parameter space and the projected reach of planned experiments, briefly commenting on the relevance of the allowed parameter space to low-energy anomalies in pi^0 and 8-Be* decay.

  4. Light baryons in a constituent quark model with chiral dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Glozman, L Ya; Plessas, W

    1996-01-01

    It is shown from rigorous three-body Faddeev calculations that the masses of all 14 lowest states in the N and \\Delta spectra can be described within a constituent quark model with a Goldstone-boson-exch ange interaction plus linear confinement between the constituent quarks.

  5. Statistical-thermodynamic model for light scattering from eye lens protein mixtures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, Michael M.; Ross, David S.; Bautista, Maurino P.; Shahmohamad, Hossein; Langner, Andreas; Hamilton, John F.; Lahnovych, Carrie N.; Thurston, George M.

    2017-02-01

    We model light-scattering cross sections of concentrated aqueous mixtures of the bovine eye lens proteins γB- and α-crystallin by adapting a statistical-thermodynamic model of mixtures of spheres with short-range attractions. The model reproduces measured static light scattering cross sections, or Rayleigh ratios, of γB-α mixtures from dilute concentrations where light scattering intensity depends on molecular weights and virial coefficients, to realistically high concentration protein mixtures like those of the lens. The model relates γB-γB and γB-α attraction strengths and the γB-α size ratio to the free energy curvatures that set light scattering efficiency in tandem with protein refractive index increments. The model includes (i) hard-sphere α-α interactions, which create short-range order and transparency at high protein concentrations, (ii) short-range attractive plus hard-core γ-γ interactions, which produce intense light scattering and liquid-liquid phase separation in aqueous γ-crystallin solutions, and (iii) short-range attractive plus hard-core γ-α interactions, which strongly influence highly non-additive light scattering and phase separation in concentrated γ-α mixtures. The model reveals a new lens transparency mechanism, that prominent equilibrium composition fluctuations can be perpendicular to the refractive index gradient. The model reproduces the concave-up dependence of the Rayleigh ratio on α/γ composition at high concentrations, its concave-down nature at intermediate concentrations, non-monotonic dependence of light scattering on γ-α attraction strength, and more intricate, temperature-dependent features. We analytically compute the mixed virial series for light scattering efficiency through third order for the sticky-sphere mixture, and find that the full model represents the available light scattering data at concentrations several times those where the second and third mixed virial contributions fail. The model

  6. Mathematical modeling and through artificial neural networks of the Spirulina sp. growth in a photobioreactor with fluorescent light source and solid state lighting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Víctor Vásquez-Villalobos

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The Gompertz and logistic mathematical models in the Spirulina sp. growth kinetics were evaluated and were compared with a modeling through Backpropagation Artificial Neural Networks (BP- ANN. Spirulina was cultivated in a (3 L/min of 500 mL aerated laboratory photobioreactor with 40W fluorescent lighting and 1W lighting Solid State (LED-Light Emitting Diode obtaining 11.0 klx lighting with both systems. The LED lighting allowed to obtain a (ɑ 0.90 high biomass value compared with that one obtained with fluorescent lighting of 0.82, as well as a greater growth rate µ=0.63 h-1 preceded by a shorter latency time λ = 0.34 h. The BP-ANN showed a good accuracy with respect to the Gompertz I corrected model for both the Spirulina sp cultivation case with fluorescent lighting and with LED displaying correlation coefficients (R of the 0.993 and 0.994 order respectively, with regard to the experimental data. Spirulina modeling through the Gompertz I corrected model is advantageous because besides showing R 0.987 and 0.990 values in Spirulina sp. cultures with fluorescent lighting and with LED respectively, it allows to attain the growth parameters kinetics directly.

  7. Vortex shedding from slender cones at low Reynolds numbers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papangelou, A.

    1992-09-01

    Wind-tunnel experiments on the flows created by a number of slightly tapered models of circular cross-section have shown the presence of spanwise cells (regions of constant shedding frequency) at Reynolds numbers of the order of 100. The experiments have also shown a number of other interesting features of these flows: the cellular flow configuration is dependent on the base Reynolds number and independent of the tip Reynolds number, the frequency jump between adjacent cells is a function of flow speed, taper angle and kinematic viscosity, but is constant along a cone's span, and the unsteady hot-wire anemometer signal is both amplitude and phase modulated. A mathematical model is proposed based on the complex Landau-Stuart equation with a spanwise diffusive coupling term. Numerical solutions of this equation have shown many of the qualitative features observed in the experiments.

  8. A rigorous treatment of a follow-the-leader traffic model with traffic lights present

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Argall, Brenna; Cheleshkin, Eugene; Greenberg, J.M.; Hinde, Colin; Lin, Pei-Jen

    2003-07-16

    Traffic flow on a unidirectional roadway in the presence of traffic lights is modeled. Individual car responses to green, yellow, and red lights are postulated and these result in rules governing the acceleration and deceleration of individual cars. The essence of the model is that only specific cars are directly affected by the lights. The other cars behave according to simple follow-the-leader rules which limit their speed by the spacing between it and the car directly ahead. The model has a number of desirable properties; namely cars do not run red lights, cars do not smash into one another, and cars exhibit no velocity reversals. In a situation with multiple lights operating in-phase we get, after an initial startup period, a constant number of cars through each light during any green-yellow period. Moreover, this flux is less by one or two cars per period than the flux obtained in discretized versions of the idealized Lighthill, Whitham, Richards model which allows for infinite accelerations.

  9. SIMPLIFIED BUILDING MODELS EXTRACTION FROM ULTRA-LIGHT UAV IMAGERY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. Küng

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Generating detailed simplified building models such as the ones present on Google Earth is often a difficult and lengthy manual task, requiring advanced CAD software and a combination of ground imagery, LIDAR data and blueprints. Nowadays, UAVs such as the AscTec Falcon 8 have reached the maturity to offer an affordable, fast and easy way to capture large amounts of oblique images covering all parts of a building. In this paper we present a state-of-the-art photogrammetry and visual reconstruction pipeline provided by Pix4D applied to medium resolution imagery acquired by such UAVs. The key element of simplified building models extraction is the seamless integration of the outputs of such a pipeline for a final manual refinement step in order to minimize the amount of manual work.

  10. Optical model for light distribution during transscleral cyclophotocoagulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nemati, B.; Dunn, A.; Welch, A.J.; Rylander, H.G. III [Medical Optics Laboratory, Biomedical Engineering Program, ENS 610, University of Texas, Austin, Texas 78712 (United States)

    1998-02-01

    Transscleral cyclophotocoagulation (TSCPC) is currently performed clinically as an effective treatment for end-stage glaucoma. We develop a theoretical model for the analysis of optical attenuation phenomena during TSCPC as a basis for selection of an optimal wavelength. A multilayered Monte Carlo model was developed to calculate the fluence and the rate of heat generation in each tissue layer for the wavelengths of Nd:YAG, diode, ruby, krypton yellow, and argon lasers. Of the five wavelengths under study, our theoretical results suggest that the diode laser wavelength offers the best penetration through the conjunctiva, sclera, and ciliary muscle and highest absorption within the ciliary pigment epithelium. {copyright} 1998 Optical Society of America.

  11. A light neutralino in hybrid models of supersymmetry breaking

    CERN Document Server

    Dudas, Emilian; Parmentier, Jeanne; 10.1016

    2008-01-01

    We show that in gauge mediation models where heavy messenger masses are provided by the adjoint Higgs field of an underlying SU(5) theory, a generalized gauge mediation spectrum arises with the characteristic feature of having a neutralino much lighter than in the standard gauge or gravity mediation schemes. This naturally fits in a hybrid scenario where gravity mediation, while subdominant with respect to gauge mediation, provides mu and B mu parameters in the TeV range.

  12. Regularization of a Light-Front Qqq Model

    CERN Document Server

    Suisso, E F; Frederico, T; Frederico, Tobias

    2003-01-01

    We study the mass of the ground state of Qqq system using differents regularization schemes of the relativistic integral equation obtnaide with a flavor independente contact interaction in a QCD-inspired model. We calculated the masses of the spin 1/2 low-lying states of the $\\Lambda^0$, $\\Lambda^{+}_c$ and $\\Lambda_{b}^{0}$ for differentes values of the regularization cut-off parameter with a fixed nucleon mass. Our results are remarkable agreement with the experimental data.

  13. Bloch-Redfield equations for modeling light-harvesting complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeske, Jan; Ing, David J; Plenio, Martin B; Huelga, Susana F; Cole, Jared H

    2015-02-14

    We challenge the misconception that Bloch-Redfield equations are a less powerful tool than phenomenological Lindblad equations for modeling exciton transport in photosynthetic complexes. This view predominantly originates from an indiscriminate use of the secular approximation. We provide a detailed description of how to model both coherent oscillations and several types of noise, giving explicit examples. All issues with non-positivity are overcome by a consistent straightforward physical noise model. Herein also lies the strength of the Bloch-Redfield approach because it facilitates the analysis of noise-effects by linking them back to physical parameters of the noise environment. This includes temporal and spatial correlations and the strength and type of interaction between the noise and the system of interest. Finally, we analyze a prototypical dimer system as well as a 7-site Fenna-Matthews-Olson complex in regards to spatial correlation length of the noise, noise strength, temperature, and their connection to the transfer time and transfer probability.

  14. Quantitative modeling of Cerenkov light production efficiency from medical radionuclides.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bradley J Beattie

    Full Text Available There has been recent and growing interest in applying Cerenkov radiation (CR for biological applications. Knowledge of the production efficiency and other characteristics of the CR produced by various radionuclides would help in accessing the feasibility of proposed applications and guide the choice of radionuclides. To generate this information we developed models of CR production efficiency based on the Frank-Tamm equation and models of CR distribution based on Monte-Carlo simulations of photon and β particle transport. All models were validated against direct measurements using multiple radionuclides and then applied to a number of radionuclides commonly used in biomedical applications. We show that two radionuclides, Ac-225 and In-111, which have been reported to produce CR in water, do not in fact produce CR directly. We also propose a simple means of using this information to calibrate high sensitivity luminescence imaging systems and show evidence suggesting that this calibration may be more accurate than methods in routine current use.

  15. Generalized Beer-Lambert model for near-infrared light propagation in thick biological tissues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhatt, Manish; Ayyalasomayajula, Kalyan R.; Yalavarthy, Phaneendra K.

    2016-07-01

    The attenuation of near-infrared (NIR) light intensity as it propagates in a turbid medium like biological tissue is described by modified the Beer-Lambert law (MBLL). The MBLL is generally used to quantify the changes in tissue chromophore concentrations for NIR spectroscopic data analysis. Even though MBLL is effective in terms of providing qualitative comparison, it suffers from its applicability across tissue types and tissue dimensions. In this work, we introduce Lambert-W function-based modeling for light propagation in biological tissues, which is a generalized version of the Beer-Lambert model. The proposed modeling provides parametrization of tissue properties, which includes two attenuation coefficients μ0 and η. We validated our model against the Monte Carlo simulation, which is the gold standard for modeling NIR light propagation in biological tissue. We included numerous human and animal tissues to validate the proposed empirical model, including an inhomogeneous adult human head model. The proposed model, which has a closed form (analytical), is first of its kind in providing accurate modeling of NIR light propagation in biological tissues.

  16. Modeling Educational Usage of Facebook

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazman, Sacide Guzin; Usluel, Yasemin Kocak

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to design a structural model explaining how users could utilize Facebook for educational purposes. In order to shed light on the educational usage of Facebook, in constructing the model, the relationship between users' Facebook adoption processes and their educational use of Facebook were included indirectly while the…

  17. Modeling Educational Usage of Facebook

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazman, Sacide Guzin; Usluel, Yasemin Kocak

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to design a structural model explaining how users could utilize Facebook for educational purposes. In order to shed light on the educational usage of Facebook, in constructing the model, the relationship between users' Facebook adoption processes and their educational use of Facebook were included indirectly while the…

  18. Computational Modeling to Limit the Impact Displays and Indicator Lights Have on Habitable Volume Operational Lighting Constraints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, T. A.; Salazar, G. A.; Brainard, G. C.; Litaker, H. L.; Hanifin, J.; Schwing, B. M.

    2016-01-01

    Even with no ambient lighting system "on", the International Space Station glows at night. The glow is caused by indicator lamps and displays that are not included with the specification of the ambient lighting system. How does this impact efforts to improve the astronaut's lighting environment to promote more effective sleep patterns? Do the extra indicators and displays add enough light to change the spectrum of light the crew sees during the day as well? If spacecraft environments are specifically engineered to have an ambient lighting system that emits a spectrum promoting a healthy circadian response, is there a way control the impact? The goal of this project is to investigate how additional light sources, such as displays and indicators change the effective light spectrum of the architectural lighting system and how impacts can be mitigated.

  19. Estimating heritability of wool shedding in a cross-bred ewe population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vargas Jurado, N; Leymaster, K A; Kuehn, L A; Lewis, R M

    2016-10-01

    Low wool prices and high production costs in sheep systems have resulted in the introduction of genotypes that shed wool into flocks to reduce shearing costs. Wool shedding occurs naturally in a few breeds and can be incorporated by cross-breeding. The opportunity to enhance shedding through selection depends on the extent of genetic variability present. Genetic and environmental parameters for wool shedding for ewes from a three-breed composite population were estimated using Bayesian inference. Data on 2025 cross-bred ewes, including 3345 wool shedding scores (WS) and 1647 breeding weight (BW) records, were analysed using bivariate and, for WS, univariate animal repeatability models. Breeding weight was included to account for possible selection bias. Breeding weight was moderately heritable and highly repeatable with means of 0.317 and 0.724, respectively. Under both models, WS was found to be moderately heritable and repeatable with means of 0.256 and 0.399, respectively. Based on a cumulative link model and contingency table analysis, age and reproductive activity influenced the extent of WS (p < 0.05). Given that WS is moderately heritable, selective gain in WS can be achieved.

  20. A semi-analytical light curve model and its application to type IIP supernovae

    CERN Document Server

    Nagy, Andrea P; Vinko, Jozsef; Wheeler, J Craig

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this work is to present a semi-analytical light curve modeling code which can be used for estimating physical properties of core collapse supernovae (SNe) in a quick and efficient way. To verify our code we fit light curves of Type II SNe and compare our best parameter estimates to those from hydrodynamical calculations. For this analysis we use the quasi-bolometric light curves of five different Type IIP supernovae. In each case we get appropriate results for the initial pre-supernova parameters. We conclude that this semi-analytical light curve model is useful to get approximate physical properties of Type II SNe without using time-consuming numerical hydrodynamic simulations.

  1. Establishment of a blue light damage model of human retinal pigment epithelial cells in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, G; Cai, S J; Gong, X; Wang, L L; Li, H H; Wang, L M

    2016-06-24

    To establish a blue-light damage model of human retinal pigment epithelium (RPE). Fourth-generation human RPE cells were randomly divided into two groups. In group A, cells were exposed to blue light (2000 ± 500 lux) for 0 (control), 3, 6, 9, and 12 h, and cell culture was stopped after 12 h. In group B, cells were exposed to blue light at the same intensity and time periods, but cell culture was stopped after 24 h. TdT-mediated dUTP nick-end labeling (TUNEL) assay was performed to determine the most suitable illuminating time with apoptotic index. Flow cytometry was used to determine apoptotic ratio of RPEs. In group A, the apoptotic index of cells that received 6, 9 and 12 h of blue light was higher than that of control. The apoptotic index of cells receiving 9 and 12 h was higher than that of 6 h (P = 0.000). In group B, the apoptotic index and RPE cell apoptosis ratio of cells exposed to 6, 9 and 12 h of blue light were higher than that of 3 h (P = 0.000); and cells receiving 9 and 12 h had higher values than that of 6 h. This study demonstrated that the best conditions to establish a blue light damage model of human retinal pigment epithelial cells in vitro are 2000 ± 500 lux light intensity for 6 h, with 24 h of cell culture post-exposure.

  2. Modeling study of the light stimulation of a neuron cell with channelrhodopsin-2 mutants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grossman, Nir; Nikolic, Konstantin; Toumazou, Christofer; Degenaar, Patrick

    2011-06-01

    Channelrhodopsin-2 (ChR2) has become a widely used tool for stimulating neurons with light. Nevertheless, the underlying dynamics of the ChR2-evoked spikes are still not yet fully understood. Here, we develop a model that describes the response of ChR2-expressing neurons to light stimuli and use the model to explore the light-to-spike process. We show that an optimal stimulation yield is achieved when the optical energies are delivered in short pulses. The model allows us to theoretically examine the effects of using various types of ChR2 mutants. We show that while increasing the lifetime and shuttering speed of ChR2 have limited effect, reducing the threshold irradiance by increased conductance will eliminate adaptation and allow constant dynamic range. The model and the conclusion presented in this study can help to interpret experimental results, design illumination protocols, and seek improvement strategies in the nascent optogenetic field.

  3. Forward and Inverse Modelling Approaches for Prediction of Light Stimulus from Electrophysiological Response in Plants

    CERN Document Server

    Chatterjee, Shre Kumar; Das, Saptarshi; Manzella, Veronica; Vitaletti, Andrea; Masi, Elisa; Santopolo, Luisa; Mancuso, Stefano; Maharatna, Koushik

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, system identification approach has been adopted to develop a novel dynamical model for describing the relationship between light as an environmental stimulus and the electrical response as the measured output for a bay leaf (Laurus nobilis) plant. More specifically, the target is to predict the characteristics of the input light stimulus (in terms of on-off timing, duration and intensity) from the measured electrical response - leading to an inverse problem. We explored two major classes of system estimators to develop dynamical models - linear and nonlinear - and their several variants for establishing a forward and also an inverse relationship between the light stimulus and plant electrical response. The best class of models are given by the Nonlinear Hammerstein-Wiener (NLHW) estimator showing good data fitting results over other linear and nonlinear estimators in a statistical sense. Consequently, a few set of models using different functional variants of NLHW has been developed and their a...

  4. Modeling of III-nitride light-emitting diodes: progress, problems, and perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karpov, Sergey Yu.

    2011-02-01

    Recent progress in III-nitride LED modeling is reviewed with the focus on physical models that provide a better understanding of such hot issues, as factors limiting the internal quantum efficiency of light emission and high-current efficiency droop, polarization doping in graded-composition III-nitride alloys and its utilization in LEDs, current crowding in LED dice and its impact on the light extraction efficiency, and optimal light conversion in white LED lamps. Specific features of III-nitride materials, their impact on the LED operation, and models accounting for these features are considered. Insufficient understanding of transport mechanisms of non-equilibrium electrons and holes and their localization in InGaN inhomogeneous active regions are discussed along with other still unsolved problems. Influence of technological factors on LED heterostructures and their operation is argued in the context of further model developments.

  5. Implications of a Light Higgs in Composite Models

    CERN Document Server

    Redi, Michele

    2012-01-01

    We study the Higgs mass in composite Higgs models with partial compositeness, extending the results of Ref. [1] to different representations of the composite sector for SO(5)/SO(4) and to the coset SO(6)/SO(5). For a given tuning we find in general a strong correlation between the mass of the top partners and the Higgs mass, akin to the one in supersymmetry. If the theory is natural a Higgs mass of 125 GeV typically requires fermionic partners below TeV which might be within the reach of the present run of LHC. A discussion of CP properties of both cosets is also presented.

  6. Modelling the Radio Light Curve of Eta Carinae

    OpenAIRE

    Kashi, Amit; Soker, Noam

    2007-01-01

    We study the propagation of the ionizing radiation emitted by the secondary star in Eta Carinae. We find that a large fraction of this radiation is absorbed by the primary stellar wind, mainly after it encounters the secondary wind and passes through a shock wave. The amount of absorption depends on the compression factor of the primary wind in the shock wave. We build a model where the compression factor is limited by the magnetic pressure in the primary wind. We find that the variation of t...

  7. Precise optical modeling for LED lighting verified by cross correlation in the midfield region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Ching-Cherng; Lee, Tsung-Xian; Ma, Shih-Hsin; Lee, Ya-Luan; Huang, Shih-Ming

    2006-07-15

    A novel LED modeling algorithm for precise three-dimensional light pattern simulation is proposed and demonstrated. We propose to use normalized cross correlation to verify the validity of the simulation in one-dimensional intensity patterns as well as two-dimensional irradiance patterns in various midfield distances and to provide feedback to achieve a successful model. The model is demonstrated to obtain an average of 99% in normalized cross correlation between the simulation light pattern and experimental measurement for a truncated inverse pyramid LED.

  8. Chirally Invariant Avatar in a Model of Neutrinos with Light Cone Reflection Symmetry

    CERN Document Server

    Chodos, Alan

    2016-01-01

    In previous work we developed a model of neutrinos based on a new symmetry, Light Cone Reflection (LCR), that interchanges spacelike and timelike intervals. In this paper we start with the four-dimensional model, and construct a two-dimensional avatar that obeys the same equations of motion, and preserves both the light-cone reflection symmetry and the chiral symmetry of the original theory. The avatar also contains the interaction that rendered the four-dimensional model gauge invariant. In an addendum, we make some remarks about how to determine the scalar field that enters into the definition of the LCR-covariant derivative.

  9. Beyond the Standard Model Research at JLab - The DarkLight Experiment: Status

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boyce, James R. [JLAB

    2012-02-01

    Interest in experiments probing physics Beyond the Standard Model (BSM) has increased in recent years. At Jefferson Lab, the LIPSS experiments demonstrated that new, high intensity accelerators can be used to explore regions of dark matter parameter space heretofore inaccessible. The status of promising experiments will be discussed, with a focus on DarkLight, one of three efforts at Jefferson Lab searching for the gauge boson '. DarkLight will use a high current electron beam scattering off a gaseous hydrogen target.

  10. THEORETICAL-MODEL FOR THE SCATTERING OF LIGHT BY DENTIN AND COMPARISON WITH MEASUREMENTS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    ZIJP, [No Value; TENBOSCH, JJ

    1993-01-01

    A theoretical model of the scattering of light by dentin is presented. The model that results is a superposition of several scattering contributions, i.e., scattering by mineral crystals, collagen fibrils, and dentinal tubules. These tubules are oriented so that they cause an asymmetrical scattering

  11. Benchmark calculation of no-core Monte Carlo shell model in light nuclei

    CERN Document Server

    Abe, T; Otsuka, T; Shimizu, N; Utsuno, Y; Vary, J P; 10.1063/1.3584062

    2011-01-01

    The Monte Carlo shell model is firstly applied to the calculation of the no-core shell model in light nuclei. The results are compared with those of the full configuration interaction. The agreements between them are within a few % at most.

  12. Study of light scattering by a granulated coated sphere - a model of granulated blood cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.A. Yurkin; D. de Kanter; A.G. Hoekstra

    2008-01-01

    We performed extensive simulations of light scattering by granulated coated sphere model using the discrete dipole approximation and varying model parameters in the ranges of sizes and refractive indices of granulated blood cells. We compared these results with predictions of Maxwell-Garnett effecti

  13. The light curve in supernova modeled by a continuous radioactive decay of $^{56}$Ni

    CERN Document Server

    Zaninetti, L

    2014-01-01

    The UVOIR bolometric light curves are usually modeled by the radioactive decay. In order to model more precisely the absolute/apparent magnitude versus time relationship the continuous production of radioactive isotopes is introduced. A differential equation of the first order with separable variables is solved.

  14. Predictive model for the lightness of comminuted porcine lean meat during heating

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Palombo, R.; Wijngaards, G.

    1990-01-01

    A mathematical model for the prediction of lightness values (L*) of a comminuted porcine lean meat (PLM) system (about 2.5% fat) during heating was constructed using kinetic data collected from process temperatures of 50, 60, 80 and 100°C and heating times of up to 3 hr. The procedure of model

  15. Unraveling models of CP violation through electric dipole moments of light nuclei

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dekens, W.; Vries, J. de; Bsaisou, J.; Bernreuther, W.; Hanhart, C.; Meißner, Ulf-G; Nogga, A.; Wirzba, A.

    2014-01-01

    We show that the proposed measurements of the electric dipole moments of light nuclei in storage rings would put strong constraints on models of flavor-diagonal CP violation. Our analysis is exemplified by a comparison of the Standard Model including the QCD theta term, the minimal left-right symmet

  16. Theoretical Models of Light Scattering Applied in Sizing Particles in Coal Water Slurry

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王仁哲; 张荣曾; 徐志强

    2004-01-01

    Advantges and disadvantage of Mie scattering model and Fraunhofer diffraction model are discussed. The result shows that 1) the Fraunhofer diffraction model is simple in design and fast in operation, which is quite suitable for on-line control and 2) the intensity and energy distribution of diffracted light of both the Mie scattering model and the Fraunhofer theoretical model are compared and researched. Feasibility of using the Fraunhofer diffraction model to replace the Mie scattering model in measuring particles in coal water slurry is demonstrated.

  17. Numerical evaluation of cavitation shedding structure around 3D Hydrofoil: Comparison of PANS, LES and RANS results with experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, B.; Peng, X. X.; Long, X. P.; Luo, X. W.; Wu, Y. L.

    2015-12-01

    Results of cavitating turbulent flow simulation around a twisted hydrofoil were presented in the paper using the Partially-Averaged Navier-Stokes (PANS) method (Ji et al. 2013a), Large-Eddy Simulation (LES) (Ji et al. 2013b) and Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS). The results are compared with available experimental data (Foeth 2008). The PANS and LES reasonably reproduce the cavitation shedding patterns around the twisted hydrofoil with primary and secondary shedding, while the RANS model fails to simulate the unsteady cavitation shedding phenomenon and yields an almost steady flow with a constant cavity shape and vapor volume. Besides, it is noted that the predicted shedding vapor cavity by PANS is more turbulent and the shedding vortex is stronger than that by LES, which is more consistent with experimental photos.

  18. Modeling size-dependent photosynthesis: light absorption and the allometric rule.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finkel, Z V; Irwin, A J

    2000-06-07

    Microalgal photosynthesis can be predicted using empirical allometric or mechanistic bio-optic models. These two descriptions are usually considered independently. We compare the size scaling of photosynthesis predicted by these two models. Size scaling exponents for phytoplankton often deviate from the allometric 3/4 rule. This may be because the allometric model does not account for the size dependence of light absorption and its effect on the size scaling of photosynthesis. In contrast to the allometric model and experimental data, the bio-optic model predicts photosynthesis should be independent of cell size when intracellular pigment concentrations are low or inversely related to cell diameter. A composite of the allometric and bio-optic models is described and compared to laboratory data of light-limited nutrient-saturated diatom photosynthesis. The allo-bio-optic model provides a mechanistic explanation for the anomalous size scaling found in laboratory and field studies of microalgal photosynthesis and growth.

  19. Light moduli in almost no-scale models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buchmueller, Wilfried; Moeller, Jan; Schmidt, Jonas

    2009-09-15

    We discuss the stabilization of the compact dimension for a class of five-dimensional orbifold supergravity models. Supersymmetry is broken by the superpotential on a boundary. Classically, the size L of the fifth dimension is undetermined, with or without supersymmetry breaking, and the effective potential is of no-scale type. The size L is fixed by quantum corrections to the Kaehler potential, the Casimir energy and Fayet-Iliopoulos (FI) terms localized at the boundaries. For an FI scale of order M{sub GUT}, as in heterotic string compactifications with anomalous U(1) symmetries, one obtains L{proportional_to}1/M{sub GUT}. A small mass is predicted for the scalar fluctuation associated with the fifth dimension, m{sub {rho}}

  20. Modeling of optical spectra of the light-harvesting CP29 antenna complex of photosystem II--part II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Ximao; Kell, Adam; Pieper, Jörg; Jankowiak, Ryszard

    2013-06-01

    Until recently, it was believed that the CP29 protein from higher plant photosystem II (PSII) contains 8 chlorophylls (Chl's) per complex (Ahn et al. Science 2008, 320, 794-797; Bassi et al. Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 1999, 96, 10056-10061) in contrast to the 13 Chl's revealed by the recent X-ray structure (Pan et al. Nat. Struct. Mol. Biol. 2011, 18, 309-315). This disagreement presents a constraint on the interpretation of the underlying electronic structure of this complex. To shed more light on the interpretation of various experimental optical spectra discussed in the accompanying paper (part I, DOI 10.1021/jp4004328 ), we report here calculated low-temperature (5 K) absorption, fluorescence, hole-burned (HB), and 300 K circular dichroism (CD) spectra for CP29 complexes with a different number of pigments. We focus on excitonic structure and the nature of the low-energy state using modeling based on the X-ray structure of CP29 and Redfield theory. We show that the lowest energy state is mostly contributed to by a612, a611, and a615 Chl's. We suggest that in the previously studied CP29 complexes from spinach (Pieper et al. Photochem. Photobiol.2000, 71, 574-589) two Chl's could have been lost during the preparation/purification procedure, but it is unlikely that the spinach CP29 protein contains only eight Chl's, as suggested by the sequence homology-based study (Bassi et al. Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A.1999, 96, 10056-10061). The likely Chl's missing in wild-type (WT) CP29 complexes studied previously (Pieper et al. Photochem. Photobiol. 2000, 71, 574-589) include a615 and b607. This is why the nonresonant HB spectra shown in that reference were ~1 nm blue-shifted with the low-energy state mostly localized on about one Chl a (i.e., a612) molecule. Pigment composition of CP29 is discussed in the context of light-harvesting and excitation energy transfer.

  1. Full Bayesian hierarchical light curve modeling of core-collapse supernova populations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanders, Nathan; Betancourt, Michael; Soderberg, Alicia Margarita

    2016-06-01

    While wide field surveys have yielded remarkable quantities of photometry of transient objects, including supernovae, light curves reconstructed from this data suffer from several characteristic problems. Because most transients are discovered near the detection limit, signal to noise is generally poor; because coverage is limited to the observing season, light curves are often incomplete; and because temporal sampling can be uneven across filters, these problems can be exacerbated at any one wavelength. While the prevailing approach of modeling individual light curves independently is successful at recovering inferences for the objects with the highest quality observations, it typically neglects a substantial portion of the data and can introduce systematic biases. Joint modeling of the light curves of transient populations enables direct inference on population-level characteristics as well as superior measurements for individual objects. We present a new hierarchical Bayesian model for supernova light curves, where information inferred from observations of every individual light curve in a sample is partially pooled across objects to constrain population-level hyperparameters. Using an efficient Hamiltonian Monte Carlo sampling technique, the model posterior can be explored to enable marginalization over weakly-identified hyperparameters through full Bayesian inference. We demonstrate our technique on the Pan-STARRS1 (PS1) Type IIP supernova light curve sample published by Sanders et al. (2015), consisting of nearly 20,000 individual photometric observations of more than 70 supernovae in five photometric filters. We discuss the Stan probabilistic programming language used to implement the model, computational challenges, and prospects for future work including generalization to multiple supernova types. We also discuss scientific results from the PS1 dataset including a new relation between the peak magnitude and decline rate of SNe IIP, a new perspective on the

  2. Leading-edge vortex shedding from rotating wings

    CERN Document Server

    Kolomenskiy, Dmitry; Schneider, Kai

    2014-01-01

    The paper presents a numerical investigation of the leading-edge vortices generated by rotating triangular wings at Reynolds number $Re=250$. A series of three-dimensional numerical simulations have been carried out using a Fourier pseudo-spectral method with volume penalization. The transition from stable attachment of the leading-edge vortex to periodic vortex shedding is explored, as a function of the wing aspect ratio and the angle of attack. It is found that, in a stable configuration, the spanwise flow in the recirculation bubble past the wing is due to the centrifugal force, incompressibility and viscous stresses. For the flow outside of the bubble, an inviscid model of spanwise flow is presented.

  3. Biomechanical model produced from light-activated dental composite resins: a holographic analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pantelić, Dejan; Vasiljević, Darko; Blažić, Larisa; Savić-Šević, Svetlana; Murić, Branka; Nikolić, Marko

    2013-11-01

    Light-activated dental composites, commonly applied in dentistry, can be used as excellent material for producing biomechanical models. They can be cast in almost any shape in an appropriate silicone mold and quickly solidified by irradiation with light in the blue part of the spectrum. In that way, it is possible to obtain any number of nearly identical casts. The models can be used to study the behavior of arbitrary structure under mechanical loads. To test the technique, a simple mechanical model of the tooth with a mesio-occluso-distal cavity was manufactured. Composite resin restoration was placed inside the cavity and light cured. Real-time holographic interferometry was used to analyze the contraction of the composite resin and its effect on the surrounding material. The results obtained in the holographic experiment were in good agreement with those obtained using the finite element method.

  4. Physically-based in silico light sheet microscopy for visualizing fluorescent brain models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdellah, Marwan; Bilgili, Ahmet; Eilemann, Stefan; Markram, Henry; Schürmann, Felix

    2015-01-01

    We present a physically-based computational model of the light sheet fluorescence microscope (LSFM). Based on Monte Carlo ray tracing and geometric optics, our method simulates the operational aspects and image formation process of the LSFM. This simulated, in silico LSFM creates synthetic images of digital fluorescent specimens that can resemble those generated by a real LSFM, as opposed to established visualization methods producing visually-plausible images. We also propose an accurate fluorescence rendering model which takes into account the intrinsic characteristics of fluorescent dyes to simulate the light interaction with fluorescent biological specimen. We demonstrate first results of our visualization pipeline to a simplified brain tissue model reconstructed from the somatosensory cortex of a young rat. The modeling aspects of the LSFM units are qualitatively analysed, and the results of the fluorescence model were quantitatively validated against the fluorescence brightness equation and characteristic emission spectra of different fluorescent dyes. Modelling and simulation.

  5. The effect of blue light exposure in an ocular melanoma animal model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Odashiro Alexandre N

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Uveal melanoma (UM cell lines, when exposed to blue light in vitro, show a significant increase in proliferation. In order to determine if similar effects could be seen in vivo, we investigated the effect of blue light exposure in a xenograft animal model of UM. Methods Twenty New Zealand albino rabbits were injected with 1.0 × 106 human UM cells (92.1 in the suprachoroidal space of the right eye. Animals were equally divided into two groups; the experimental group was exposed to blue light, while the control group was protected from blue light exposure. The eyes were enucleated after sacrifice and the proliferation rates of the re-cultured tumor cells were assessed using a Sulforhodamine-B assay. Cells were re-cultured for 1 passage only in order to maintain any in vivo cellular changes. Furthermore, Proliferating Cell Nuclear Antigen (PCNA protein expression was used to ascertain differences in cellular proliferation between both groups in formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded eyes (FFPE. Results Blue light exposure led to a statistically significant increase in proliferation for cell lines derived from intraocular tumors (p Conclusion There is an increasing amount of data suggesting that blue light exposure may influence the progression of UM. Our results support this notion and warrant further studies to evaluate the ability of blue light filtering lenses to slow disease progression in UM patients.

  6. Life-long shedding of Puumala hantavirus in wild bank voles (Myodes glareolus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voutilainen, Liina; Sironen, Tarja; Tonteri, Elina; Bäck, Anne Tuiskunen; Razzauti, Maria; Karlsson, Malin; Wahlström, Maria; Niemimaa, Jukka; Henttonen, Heikki; Lundkvist, Åke

    2015-06-01

    The knowledge of viral shedding patterns and viraemia in the reservoir host species is a key factor in assessing the human risk of zoonotic viruses. The shedding of hantaviruses (family Bunyaviridae) by their host rodents has widely been studied experimentally, but rarely in natural settings. Here we present the dynamics of Puumala hantavirus (PUUV) shedding and viraemia in naturally infected wild bank voles (Myodes glareolus). In a monthly capture-mark-recapture study, we analysed 18 bank voles for the presence and relative quantity of PUUV RNA in the excreta and blood from 2 months before up to 8 months after seroconversion. The proportion of animals shedding PUUV RNA in saliva, urine and faeces peaked during the first month after seroconversion, but continued throughout the study period with only a slight decline. The quantity of shed PUUV in reverse transcription quantitative PCR (RT-qPCR) positive excreta was constant over time. In blood, PUUV RNA was present for up to 7 months but both the probability of viraemia and the virus load declined with time. Our findings contradict the current view of a decline in virus shedding after the acute phase and a short viraemic period in hantavirus infection - an assumption widely adopted in current epidemiological models. We suggest the life-long shedding as a means of hantaviruses to survive over host population bottlenecks, and to disperse in fragmented habitats where local host and/or virus populations face temporary extinctions. Our results indicate that the kinetics of pathogens in wild hosts may differ considerably from those observed in laboratory settings.

  7. Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program Advanced Seismic Soil Structure Modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bolisetti, Chandrakanth [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Coleman, Justin Leigh [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2015-06-01

    of interest. The specific nonlinear soil behavior included in the NLSSI calculation presented in this report is gapping and sliding. Other NLSSI effects are not included in the calculation. The results presented in this report document initial model runs in the linear and nonlinear analysis process. Final comparisons between traditional and advanced SPRA will be presented in the September 30th deliverable.

  8. A mechanistic model for the light response of photosynthetic electron transport rate based on light harvesting properties of photosynthetic pigment molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Zi-Piao; Robakowski, Piotr; Suggett, David J

    2013-03-01

    Models describing the light response of photosynthetic electron transport rate (ETR) are routinely used to determine how light absorption influences energy, reducing power and yields of primary productivity; however, no single model is currently able to provide insight into the fundamental processes that implicitly govern the variability of light absorption. Here we present development and application of a new mechanistic model of ETR for photosystem II based on the light harvesting (absorption and transfer to the core 'reaction centres') characteristics of photosynthetic pigment molecules. Within this model a series of equations are used to describe novel biophysical and biochemical characteristics of photosynthetic pigment molecules and in turn light harvesting; specifically, the eigen-absorption cross-section and the minimum average lifetime of photosynthetic pigment molecules in the excited state, which describe the ability of light absorption of photosynthetic pigment molecules and retention time of excitons in the excited state but are difficult to be measured directly. We applied this model to a series of previously collected fluorescence data and demonstrated that our model described well the light response curves of ETR, regardless of whether dynamic down-regulation of PSII occurs, for a range of photosynthetic organisms (Abies alba, Picea abies, Pinus mugo and Emiliania huxleyi). Inherent estimated parameters (e.g. maximum ETR and the saturation irradiance) by our model are in very close agreement with the measured data. Overall, our mechanistic model potentially provides novel insights into the regulation of ETR by light harvesting properties as well as dynamical down-regulation of PSII.

  9. Impact of Pilot Light Modeling on the Predicted Annual Performance of Residential Gas Water Heaters: Preprint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maguire, J.; Burch, J.

    2013-08-01

    Modeling residential water heaters with dynamic simulation models can provide accurate estimates of their annual energy consumption, if the units? characteristics and use conditions are known. Most gas storage water heaters (GSWHs) include a standing pilot light. It is generally assumed that the pilot light energy will help make up standby losses and have no impact on the predicted annual energy consumption. However, that is not always the case. The gas input rate and conversion efficiency of a pilot light for a GSWH were determined from laboratory data. The data were used in simulations of a typical GSWH with and without a pilot light, for two cases: 1) the GSWH is used alone; and 2) the GSWH is the second tank in a solar water heating (SWH) system. The sensitivity of wasted pilot light energy to annual hot water use, climate, and installation location was examined. The GSWH used alone in unconditioned space in a hot climate had a slight increase in energy consumption. The GSWH with a pilot light used as a backup to an SWH used up to 80% more auxiliary energy than one without in hot, sunny locations, from increased tank losses.

  10. A Dynamic Model for Prediction of Psoriasis Management by Blue Light Irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Félix Garza, Zandra C.; Liebmann, Joerg; Born, Matthias; Hilbers, Peter A. J.; van Riel, Natal A. W.

    2017-01-01

    Clinical investigations prove that blue light irradiation reduces the severity of psoriasis vulgaris. Nevertheless, the mechanisms involved in the management of this condition remain poorly defined. Despite the encouraging results of the clinical studies, no clear guidelines are specified in the literature for the irradiation scheme regime of blue light-based therapy for psoriasis. We investigated the underlying mechanism of blue light irradiation of psoriatic skin, and tested the hypothesis that regulation of proliferation is a key process. We implemented a mechanistic model of cellular epidermal dynamics to analyze whether a temporary decrease of keratinocytes hyper-proliferation can explain the outcome of phototherapy with blue light. Our results suggest that the main effect of blue light on keratinocytes impacts the proliferative cells. They show that the decrease in the keratinocytes proliferative capacity is sufficient to induce a transient decrease in the severity of psoriasis. To study the impact of the therapeutic regime on the efficacy of psoriasis treatment, we performed simulations for different combinations of the treatment parameters, i.e., length of treatment, fluence (also referred to as dose), and intensity. These simulations indicate that high efficacy is achieved by regimes with long duration and high fluence levels, regardless of the chosen intensity. Our modeling approach constitutes a framework for testing diverse hypotheses on the underlying mechanism of blue light-based phototherapy, and for designing effective strategies for the treatment of psoriasis. PMID:28184200

  11. EDGE EFFECT MODELING AND STUDY FOR THREE-CHIP RGB LIGHT-EMITTING DIODES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. I. Podosinnikov

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Subject of study. The paper deals with light quality improvement of multi–chip RGB light-emitting diodes (LEDs and luminaries on their basis. In particular, we have studied the issues of the edge effect reducing, which is non–uniformity of color when observing the source of light under different angles as well as non-uniformity of color distribution on the illuminated surface. Methods. Experimental study of the edge effect has been performed, namely, the analysis of the halo at the periphery of the illuminated area and the non–uniformity of area at the surface of the screen illuminated with RGB LEDs with and without light concentrators. Modeling of illumination distribution at various distances from the source for the system containing four RGB LEDs with reflectors by ZEMAX software has been carried out. Assessment of the uniformity for light distribution via calculating the chromaticity coordinates has been performed. Main results. The possibility of modeling application at the stage of a luminary design is shown on the example of RGB LEDs for assessing the efficiency of light flux usage and colorimetric parameters. Suggested method simplifies significantly the design of luminaries and reduces associated costs. Practical relevance. The findings can be used in the design of luminaries based on RGB LEDs, including the ones with secondary optics elements.

  12. Approach to Modeling and Virtual-reality-based Simulation for Plant Canopy Lighting

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAO Kai; SONG Fengbin; WANG Haopeng

    2008-01-01

    Over the past 20 years, significant progress has been made in virtual plant modeling corresponding to the rapid advances in information technology. Virtual plant research has broad applications in agronomy, forestry, ecol-ogy and remote sensing. As many biological processes are driven by light, it is the key for virtual plant to estimate the light absorbed by each organ. This paper presents the radiance equation suitable for calculating sun and sky light in-tercepted by plant organs based on the principles of the interaction between light and plant canopy firstly; analyzes the process principles of plant canopy primary lighting based on ray casting and projection secondly; describes the multiple scattering of plant lighting based on Monte Carlo ray tracing method and on the radiosity method thirdly; and confirms the research with 3D visualization based on Virtual Reality Modeling Language (VRML) finally. The research is the primary work of digital agriculture, and important for monitoring and estimating corn growth in Northeast China.

  13. Computational Modeling to Limit the Impact Displays and Indicator Lights Have on Habitable Volume Operational Lighting Constraints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, T. A.; Salazar, G. A.; Brainard, G. C.; Kolomenski, A.; Hanifin, J.; Schwin, B. M.

    2017-01-01

    NASA has demonstrated an interest in improving astronaut health and performance through the installment of a new lighting countermeasure on the International Space Station. The Solid State Lighting Assembly (SSLA) system is designed to positively influence astronaut health by providing a daily change to light spectrum to improve circadian entrainment. Unfortunately, existing NASA standards and requirements define ambient light level requirements for crew sleep and other tasks, yet the number of light-emitting diode (LED) indicators and displays within a habitable volume is currently uncontrolled. Because each of these light sources has its own unique spectral properties, the additive lighting environment ends up becoming something different from what was planned or researched. Restricting the use of displays and indicators is not a solution because these systems provide beneficial crew feedback.

  14. ELLC - a fast, flexible light curve model for detached eclipsing binary stars and transiting exoplanets

    CERN Document Server

    Maxted, P F L

    2016-01-01

    Very high quality light curves are now available for thousands of detached eclipsing binary stars and transiting exoplanet systems as a result of surveys for transiting exoplanets and other large-scale photometric surveys. I have developed a binary star model (ELLC) that can be used to analyse the light curves of detached eclipsing binary stars and transiting exoplanet systems that is fast and accurate, and that can include the effects of star spots, Doppler boosting and light-travel time within binaries with eccentric orbits. The model represents the stars as triaxial ellipsoids. The apparent flux from the binary is calculated using Gauss-Legendre integration over the ellipses that are the projection of these ellipsoids on the sky. The model can also be used to calculate the flux-weighted radial velocity of the stars during an eclipse (Rossiter-McLaughlin effect). The main features of the model have tested by comparison to observed data and other light curve models. The model is found to be accurate enough t...

  15. Exclusive Rare B ( s, c) Decays in Light-Front Quark Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Ho-Meoyng

    2013-03-01

    We investigate the exclusive rare {B_sto (K,η^{(')})(ν_{ell}bar{ν_{ell}}, ell^+ell^-)} and {B_cto D_{(s)}(ν_{ell}bar{ν_{ell}}, ell^+ell^-)} ( ℓ = e, μ, τ) decays within the standard model and the light-front quark model constrained by the variational principle for the QCD motivated effective Hamiltonian. The branching ratios and the longitudinal lepton polarization asymmetries are calculated and compared with other theoretical model predictions.

  16. Models of Polarized Light from Oceans and Atmospheres of Earth-like Extrasolar Planets

    CERN Document Server

    McCullough, P R

    2006-01-01

    Specularly reflected light, or glint, from an ocean surface may provide a useful observational tool for studying extrasolar terrestrial planets. Detection of sea-surface glints would differentiate ocean-bearing terrestrial planets, i.e. those similar to Earth, from other terrestrial extrasolar planets. The brightness and degree of polarization of both sea-surface glints and atmospheric Rayleigh scattering are strong functions of the phase angle of the extrasolar planet. We modify analytic expressions for the bi-directional reflectances previously validated by satellite imagery of the Earth to account for the fractional linear polarization of sea-surface reflections and of Rayleigh scattering in the atmosphere. We compare our models with Earth's total visual light and degree of linear polarization as observed in the ashen light of the Moon, or Earthshine. We predict the spatially-integrated reflected light and its degree of polarization as functions of the diurnal cycle and orbital phase of Earth and Earth-lik...

  17. Non-approximated numerical modeling of propagation of light in any state of spatial coherence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castañeda, Román; Garcia-Sucerquia, Jorge

    2011-12-01

    Due to analytical and numerical difficulties, the propagation of optical fields in any state of spatial coherence is traditionally computed under severe approximations. The paraxial approach in the Fresnel-Fraunhofer domain is one of the most widely used. These approximations provide a rough knowledge of the actual light behavior as it propagates, which is not enough for supporting applications, such as light propagation under a high numerical aperture (NA). In this paper, a non-approximated model for the propagation of optical fields in any state of spatial coherence is presented. The method is applicable in very practical cases, as high-NA propagations, because of its simplicity of implementation. This approach allows for studying unaware behaviors of light as it propagates. The light behavior close to the diffracting transmittances can also be analyzed with the aid of the proposed tool.

  18. Computer Modeling of Daylight-Integrated Photocontrol of Electric Lighting Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard Mistrick

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available This article presents a variety of different approaches to both model and assess the performance of daylight-integrated electric lighting control systems. In these systems, the output of a controlled lighting zone is based on a light sensor reading and a calibrated control algorithm. Computer simulations can consider the simulated illuminance data generated from both the electric lighting system and a daylight delivery system whose performance is addressed using typical meteorological year (TMY weather data. Photosensor signals and the operation of a control system’s dimming algorithms are also included. Methods and metrics for evaluating simulated performance for the purpose of making informed design decisions that lead to the best possible installed system performance are presented.

  19. Adaptation to shift work: physiologically based modeling of the effects of lighting and shifts' start time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Postnova, Svetlana; Robinson, Peter A; Postnov, Dmitry D

    2013-01-01

    Shift work has become an integral part of our life with almost 20% of the population being involved in different shift schedules in developed countries. However, the atypical work times, especially the night shifts, are associated with reduced quality and quantity of sleep that leads to increase of sleepiness often culminating in accidents. It has been demonstrated that shift workers' sleepiness can be improved by a proper scheduling of light exposure and optimizing shifts timing. Here, an integrated physiologically-based model of sleep-wake cycles is used to predict adaptation to shift work in different light conditions and for different shift start times for a schedule of four consecutive days of work. The integrated model combines a model of the ascending arousal system in the brain that controls the sleep-wake switch and a human circadian pacemaker model. To validate the application of the integrated model and demonstrate its utility, its dynamics are adjusted to achieve a fit to published experimental results showing adaptation of night shift workers (n = 8) in conditions of either bright or regular lighting. Further, the model is used to predict the shift workers' adaptation to the same shift schedule, but for conditions not considered in the experiment. The model demonstrates that the intensity of shift light can be reduced fourfold from that used in the experiment and still produce good adaptation to night work. The model predicts that sleepiness of the workers during night shifts on a protocol with either bright or regular lighting can be significantly improved by starting the shift earlier in the night, e.g.; at 21:00 instead of 00:00. Finally, the study predicts that people of the same chronotype, i.e. with identical sleep times in normal conditions, can have drastically different responses to shift work depending on their intrinsic circadian and homeostatic parameters.

  20. Adaptation to shift work: physiologically based modeling of the effects of lighting and shifts' start time.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Svetlana Postnova

    Full Text Available Shift work has become an integral part of our life with almost 20% of the population being involved in different shift schedules in developed countries. However, the atypical work times, especially the night shifts, are associated with reduced quality and quantity of sleep that leads to increase of sleepiness often culminating in accidents. It has been demonstrated that shift workers' sleepiness can be improved by a proper scheduling of light exposure and optimizing shifts timing. Here, an integrated physiologically-based model of sleep-wake cycles is used to predict adaptation to shift work in different light conditions and for different shift start times for a schedule of four consecutive days of work. The integrated model combines a model of the ascending arousal system in the brain that controls the sleep-wake switch and a human circadian pacemaker model. To validate the application of the integrated model and demonstrate its utility, its dynamics are adjusted to achieve a fit to published experimental results showing adaptation of night shift workers (n = 8 in conditions of either bright or regular lighting. Further, the model is used to predict the shift workers' adaptation to the same shift schedule, but for conditions not considered in the experiment. The model demonstrates that the intensity of shift light can be reduced fourfold from that used in the experiment and still produce good adaptation to night work. The model predicts that sleepiness of the workers during night shifts on a protocol with either bright or regular lighting can be significantly improved by starting the shift earlier in the night, e.g.; at 21:00 instead of 00:00. Finally, the study predicts that people of the same chronotype, i.e. with identical sleep times in normal conditions, can have drastically different responses to shift work depending on their intrinsic circadian and homeostatic parameters.