WorldWideScience

Sample records for model sheds light

  1. Economic versus belief-based models: Shedding light on the adoption of novel green technologies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Girod, Bastien; Mayer, Sebastian; Nägele, Florian

    2017-01-01

    Understanding the determinants for the adoption of novel green consumer technologies is important to effectively foster their diffusion. Energy and environmental science literature often takes an approach based on economic variables such as objectively measureable household and technology characteristics. Increasingly, also subjective variables based on personal belief are considered. On the basis of a survey about the intention to adopt an exemplary novel green consumer technology (intelligent thermostats), we contribute to the clarification of the explanatory power of these two approaches. We first compare the economic model to the belief-based model and second, investigate how beliefs about the green technology are influenced by personal environmental norms and innovativeness. Our evaluation shows that the belief-based model explains considerably higher variance in the intention to adopt. Thereby the perceived hedonic satisfaction, usefulness, habit and facilitating conditions reveal as key determinants. Moreover, environmental norms show lower impact than personal innovativeness. In the discussion we consolidate these findings and point to the risk of omitted variable bias when selectively including belief-based variables in adoption models. Our findings suggest that policies can effectively accelerate the early market diffusion of green consumer technologies by incentivizing retailers to introduce and market such technologies. - Highlights: • Adoption of a green consumer technology (energy-saving thermostats) is evaluated. • Subjective beliefs about the technology show higher impact than objective measures. • Key beliefs relate to pleasure, usefulness, habits and facilitating conditions. • Personal innovativeness is more relevant for adoption than environmental norms. • Isolated use of belief-based adoption determinants can lead to omitted variable bias.

  2. Relative values: shedding light on Einstein's theories

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    Prof. Paul Davies has analysed light from some of the most distant stellar objects in the sky. From these observations he has concluded that the speed of light was faster billions of years ago than it is today (1/2 page).

  3. Shedding Some Light on Fluorescent Bulbs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guilbert, Nicholas R.

    1996-01-01

    Explores some of the principles behind the working of fluorescent bulbs using a specially prepared fluorescent bulb with the white inner fluorescent coating applied along only half its length. Discusses the spectrum, the bulb plasma, and light production. (JRH)

  4. Shedding Light on the Cosmic Skeleton

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-11-01

    Astronomers have tracked down a gigantic, previously unknown assembly of galaxies located almost seven billion light-years away from us. The discovery, made possible by combining two of the most powerful ground-based telescopes in the world, is the first observation of such a prominent galaxy structure in the distant Universe, providing further insight into the cosmic web and how it formed. "Matter is not distributed uniformly in the Universe," says Masayuki Tanaka from ESO, who led the new study. "In our cosmic vicinity, stars form in galaxies and galaxies usually form groups and clusters of galaxies. The most widely accepted cosmological theories predict that matter also clumps on a larger scale in the so-called 'cosmic web', in which galaxies, embedded in filaments stretching between voids, create a gigantic wispy structure." These filaments are millions of light years long and constitute the skeleton of the Universe: galaxies gather around them, and immense galaxy clusters form at their intersections, lurking like giant spiders waiting for more matter to digest. Scientists are struggling to determine how they swirl into existence. Although massive filamentary structures have been often observed at relatively small distances from us, solid proof of their existence in the more distant Universe has been lacking until now. The team led by Tanaka discovered a large structure around a distant cluster of galaxies in images they obtained earlier. They have now used two major ground-based telescopes to study this structure in greater detail, measuring the distances from Earth of over 150 galaxies, and, hence, obtaining a three-dimensional view of the structure. The spectroscopic observations were performed using the VIMOS instrument on ESO's Very Large Telescope and FOCAS on the Subaru Telescope, operated by the National Astronomical Observatory of Japan. Thanks to these and other observations, the astronomers were able to make a real demographic study of this structure

  5. CMB photons shedding light on dark matter

    CERN Document Server

    Giesen, Gaelle; Audren, Benjamin; Ali-Haïmoud, Yacine

    2012-01-01

    The annihilation or decay of Dark Matter (DM) particles could affect the thermal history of the universe and leave an observable signature in Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) anisotropies. We update constraints on the annihilation rate of DM particles in the smooth cosmological background, using WMAP7 and recent small-scale CMB data. With a systematic analysis based on the Press-Schechter formalism, we also show that DM annihilation in halos at small redshift may explain entirely the reionization patterns observed in the CMB, under reasonable assumptions concerning the concentration and formation redshift of halos. We find that a mixed reionization model based on DM annihilation in halos as well as star formation at a redshift z~6.5 could simultaneously account for CMB observations and satisfy constraints inferred from the Gunn-Peterson effect. However, these models tend to reheat the inter-galactic medium (IGM) well above observational bounds: by including a realistic prior on the IGM temperature at low red...

  6. Black Holes Shed Light on Galaxy Formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000-01-01

    This videotape is comprised of several segments of animations on black holes and galaxy formation, and several segments of an interview with Dr. John Kormendy. The animation segments are: (1) a super massive black hole, (2) Centarus A active black hole found in a collision, (3) galaxy NGC-4261 (active black hole and jet model), (4) galaxy M-32 (orbits of stars are effected by the gravity of the black hole), (5) galaxy M-37 (motion of stars increases as mass of black hole increases), (6) Birth of active galactic nuclei, (7) the collision of two galaxy leads to merger of the black holes, (8) Centarus A and simulation of the collision of 2 galaxies. There are also several segments of an interview with John Kormendy. In these segments he discusses the two most important aspects of his recent black hole work: (1) the correlations between galaxies speed and the mass of the black holes, and (2) the existence of black holes and galactic formation. He also discusses the importance of the Hubble Space Telescope and the Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph to the study of black holes. He also shows the methodology of processing images from the spectrograph in his office.

  7. LHCf sheds new light on cosmic rays

    CERN Multimedia

    Anaïs Schaeffer

    2011-01-01

    The energy spectrum of the single photon obtained using data from the LHCf experiment has turned out to be very different from that predicted by the theoretical models used until now to describe the interactions between very high-energy cosmic rays and the earth's atmosphere. The consequences of this discrepancy for cosmic ray studies could be significant.   Artistic impression of cosmic rays entering Earth's atmosphere. (Credit: Asimmetrie/Infn). It took physicists by surprise when analysis of the data collected by the two LHCf calorimeters in 2010 showed that high-energy cosmic rays don't interact with the atmosphere in the manner predicted by theory. The LHCf detectors, set up 140 metres either side of the ATLAS interaction point, are dedicated to the study of the secondary particles emitted at very small angles during proton-proton collisions in the LHC, with energies comparable to cosmic rays entering the earth's atmosphere at 2.5x1016 eV. The aim of the experiment is to r...

  8. Shedding light on restoring respiratory function after spinal cord injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Warren J Alilain

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Loss of respiratory function is one of the leading causes of death following spinal cord injury. Because of this, much work has been done in studying ways to restore respiratory function following SCI - including pharmacological and regeneration strategies. With the emergence of new and powerful tools from molecular neuroscience, new therapeutically relevant alternatives to these approaches have become available, including expression of light sensitive proteins called channelrhodopsins. In this article we briefly review the history of various attempts to restore breathing after C2 hemisection, and focus on our recent work using the activation of light sensitive channels to restore respiratory function after experimental spinal cord injury. We also discuss how such light induced activity can help shed light on the inner workings of the central nervous system respiratory circuitry that controls diaphragmatic function.

  9. Shedding light on the cell biology of extracellular vesicles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Niel, Guillaume; D'Angelo, Gisela; Raposo, Graça

    2018-04-01

    Extracellular vesicles are a heterogeneous group of cell-derived membranous structures comprising exosomes and microvesicles, which originate from the endosomal system or which are shed from the plasma membrane, respectively. They are present in biological fluids and are involved in multiple physiological and pathological processes. Extracellular vesicles are now considered as an additional mechanism for intercellular communication, allowing cells to exchange proteins, lipids and genetic material. Knowledge of the cellular processes that govern extracellular vesicle biology is essential to shed light on the physiological and pathological functions of these vesicles as well as on clinical applications involving their use and/or analysis. However, in this expanding field, much remains unknown regarding the origin, biogenesis, secretion, targeting and fate of these vesicles.

  10. Shedding Light on Light Pollution: Reports from GLOBE at Night

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Constance E.; Pompea, S. M.; Isbell, D.

    2009-05-01

    The citizen-science program on light pollution, GLOBE at Night, has had rich responses during this year's campaign in March 2009. Reporting on some of the highlights, we will hear success stories and lessons learned from educators, students, science centers and astronomy clubs from around the world. Communities will be featured from several cities, such Norman, Oklahoma, Mishawaka, Indiana, Willimantic, Connecticut, and Waynesville, Ohio, which created mini-campaigns that combined local students with public advocates and representatives from local city and county governments. Connecticut kids collaborated with students in Wales, Canada and Romania on GLOBE at Night, and an extensive campaign was planned with the schools near the observatories of north-central Chile. Groups that have received special training in GLOBE at Night and related activities include the "Astronomy from the Ground Up” network of science and nature centers (fostered by the ASP and the NSF), 146 amateur astronomers who are part of the ASP-NASA Night-Sky Network, and the Association of Science-Technology Centers. Special training was given over forums, telecon-powerpoint presentations and blogs, to fit the needs of the communities. Among the more interesting media efforts for the general public, GLOBE at Night was the topic of the March 6 episode of the IYA2009 "Days of Astronomy" podcast. International organizing efforts for GLOBE at Night have been strong in countries like Argentina, Australia, Austria, Brazil, Canada, Chile, Costa Rica, the Czech Republic, Germany, Hungary, Ireland, Poland, Portugal, Romania, Spain and the United Kingdom, to name a few. We will also discuss how cities, such as Tucson, Arizona, combined efforts on GLOBE at Night with involvement in the World Wildlife Fund's Earth Hour event (www.earthhour.org). Earth Hour encouraged everyone to turn out their lights from 8:30-9:30 p.m. local time on Saturday, March 28, the final night of GLOBE at Night 2009.

  11. CFTR Modulators: Shedding Light on Precision Medicine for Cystic Fibrosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopes-Pacheco, Miquéias

    2016-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is the most common life-threatening monogenic disease afflicting Caucasian people. It affects the respiratory, gastrointestinal, glandular and reproductive systems. The major cause of morbidity and mortality in CF is the respiratory disorder caused by a vicious cycle of obstruction of the airways, inflammation and infection that leads to epithelial damage, tissue remodeling and end-stage lung disease. Over the past decades, life expectancy of CF patients has increased due to early diagnosis and improved treatments; however, these patients still present limited quality of life. Many attempts have been made to rescue CF transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) expression, function and stability, thereby overcoming the molecular basis of CF. Gene and protein variances caused by CFTR mutants lead to different CF phenotypes, which then require different treatments to quell the patients’ debilitating symptoms. In order to seek better approaches to treat CF patients and maximize therapeutic effects, CFTR mutants have been stratified into six groups (although several of these mutations present pleiotropic defects). The research with CFTR modulators (read-through agents, correctors, potentiators, stabilizers and amplifiers) has achieved remarkable progress, and these drugs are translating into pharmaceuticals and personalized treatments for CF patients. This review summarizes the main molecular and clinical features of CF, emphasizes the latest clinical trials using CFTR modulators, sheds light on the molecular mechanisms underlying these new and emerging treatments, and discusses the major breakthroughs and challenges to treating all CF patients. PMID:27656143

  12. Shedding light on diatom photonics by means of digital holography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Caprio, Giuseppe; Coppola, Giuseppe; De Stefano, Luca; De Stefano, Mario; Antonucci, Alessandra; Congestri, Roberta; De Tommasi, Edoardo

    2014-05-01

    Diatoms are among the dominant phytoplankters in the world's oceans, and their external silica investments, resembling artificial photonic crystals, are expected to play an active role in light manipulation. Digital holography allowed studying the interaction with light of Coscinodiscus wailesii cell wall reconstructing the light confinement inside the cell cytoplasm, condition that is hardly accessible via standard microscopy. The full characterization of the propagated beam, in terms of quantitative phase and intensity, removed a long-standing ambiguity about the origin of the light confinement. The data were discussed in the light of living cell behavior in response to their environment. Copyright © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  13. Gene trees, species trees and Earth history combine to shed light on the evolution of migration in a model avian system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voelker, Gary; Bowie, Rauri C K; Klicka, John

    2013-06-01

    The evolution of migration in birds has fascinated biologists for centuries. In this study, we performed phylogenetic-based analyses of Catharus thrushes, a model genus in the study of avian migration, and their close relatives. For these analyses, we used both mitochondrial and nuclear genes, and the resulting phylogenies were used to trace migratory traits and biogeographic patterns. Our results provide the first robust assessment of relationships within Catharus and relatives and indicate that both mitochondrial and autosomal genes contribute to overall support of the phylogeny. Measures of phylogenetic informativeness indicated that mitochondrial genes provided more signal within Catharus than did nuclear genes, whereas nuclear loci provided more signal for relationships between Catharus and close relatives than did mitochondrial genes. Insertion and deletion events also contributed important support across the phylogeny. Across all taxa included in the study, and for Catharus, possession of long-distance migration is reconstructed as the ancestral condition, and a North American (north of Mexico) ancestral area is inferred. Within Catharus, sedentary behaviour evolved after the first speciation event in the genus and is geographically and temporally correlated with Central American distributions and the final closure of the Central American Seaway. Migratory behaviour subsequently evolved twice in Catharus and is geographically and temporally correlated with a recolonization of North America in the late Pleistocene. By temporally linking speciation events with changes in migratory condition and events in Earth history, we are able to show support for several competing hypotheses relating to the geographic origin of migration. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. Shedding light on the optical properties of spider silk fiber

    OpenAIRE

    Chow, Desmond M.; Tow, Kenny Hey; Vollrath, Fritz; Dicaire, Isabelle; Gheysens, Tom; Thevenaz, Luc

    2015-01-01

    Optical characterisation of a Nephila edulis spider dragline silk is performed. The silk fiber transmits light up to 1400 nm with a propagation loss of ∼9 dB/cm and birefringence of 8×10−3 measured at 1302 nm.

  15. Shedding light on fish otolith biomineralization using a bioenergetic approach.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ronan Fablet

    Full Text Available Otoliths are biocalcified bodies connected to the sensory system in the inner ears of fish. Their layered, biorhythm-following formation provides individual records of the age, the individual history and the natural environment of extinct and living fish species. Such data are critical for ecosystem and fisheries monitoring. They however often lack validation and the poor understanding of biomineralization mechanisms has led to striking examples of misinterpretations and subsequent erroneous conclusions in fish ecology and fisheries management. Here we develop and validate a numerical model of otolith biomineralization. Based on a general bioenergetic theory, it disentangles the complex interplay between metabolic and temperature effects on biomineralization. This model resolves controversial issues and explains poorly understood observations of otolith formation. It represents a unique simulation tool to improve otolith interpretation and applications, and, beyond, to address the effects of both climate change and ocean acidification on other biomineralizing organisms such as corals and bivalves.

  16. Shedding Light on Fish Otolith Biomineralization Using a Bioenergetic Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fablet, Ronan; Pecquerie, Laure; de Pontual, Hélène; Høie, Hans; Millner, Richard; Mosegaard, Henrik; Kooijman, Sebastiaan A. L. M.

    2011-01-01

    Otoliths are biocalcified bodies connected to the sensory system in the inner ears of fish. Their layered, biorhythm-following formation provides individual records of the age, the individual history and the natural environment of extinct and living fish species. Such data are critical for ecosystem and fisheries monitoring. They however often lack validation and the poor understanding of biomineralization mechanisms has led to striking examples of misinterpretations and subsequent erroneous conclusions in fish ecology and fisheries management. Here we develop and validate a numerical model of otolith biomineralization. Based on a general bioenergetic theory, it disentangles the complex interplay between metabolic and temperature effects on biomineralization. This model resolves controversial issues and explains poorly understood observations of otolith formation. It represents a unique simulation tool to improve otolith interpretation and applications, and, beyond, to address the effects of both climate change and ocean acidification on other biomineralizing organisms such as corals and bivalves. PMID:22110601

  17. Composition of Jupiter irregular satellites sheds light on their origin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhatt, M.; Reddy, V.; Schindler, K.; Cloutis, E.; Bhardwaj, A.; Corre, L. L.; Mann, P.

    2017-12-01

    Context. Irregular satellites of Jupiter with their highly eccentric, inclined and distant orbits suggest that their capture took place after the giant planet migration. Aims: We aim to improve our understanding of the surface composition of irregular satellites of Jupiter to gain insight into a narrow time window when our solar system was forming. Methods: We observed three Jovian irregular satellites, Himalia (JVI), Elara (JVII), and Carme (JXI), using a medium-resolution 0.8-5.5 μm spectrograph, SpeX on the NASA Infrared Telescope Facility (IRTF). Using a linear spectral unmixing model we have constrained the major mineral phases on the surface of these three bodies. Results: Our results confirm that the surface of Himalia (JVI), Elara (JVII), and Carme (JXI) are dominated by opaque materials such as those seen in carbonaceous chondrite meteorites. Our spectral modeling of NIR spectra of Himalia and Elara confirm that their surface composition is the same and magnetite is the dominant mineral. A comparison of the spectral shape of Himalia with the two large main C-type asteroids, Themis (D 176 km) and Europa (D 352 km), suggests surface composition similar to Europa. The NIR spectrum of Carme exhibits blue slope up to 1.5 μm and is spectrally distinct from those of Himalia and Elara. Our model suggests that it is compositionally similar to amorphous carbon. Conclusions: Himalia and Elara are compositionally similar but differ significantly from Carme. These results support the hypotheses that the Jupiter's irregular satellites are captured bodies that were subject to further breakup events and clustered as families based on their similar physical and surface compositions.

  18. Shedding light on an extremophile lifestyle through transcriptomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dassanayake, M; Haas, J S; Bohnert, H J; Cheeseman, J M

    2009-08-01

    The tropical intertidal ecosystem is defined by trees - mangroves - which are adapted to an extreme and extremely variable environment. The genetic basis underlying these adaptations is, however, virtually unknown. Based on advances in pyrosequencing, we present here the first transcriptome analysis for plants for which no prior genomic information was available. We selected the mangroves Rhizophora mangle (Rhizophoraceae) and Heritiera littoralis (Malvaceae) as ecologically important extremophiles employing markedly different physiological and life-history strategies for survival and dominance in this extreme environment. For maximal representation of conditional transcripts, mRNA was obtained from a variety of developmental stages, tissues types, and habitats. For each species, a normalized cDNA library of pooled mRNAs was analysed using GSFLX pyrosequencing. A total of 537,635 sequences were assembled de novo and annotated as > 13,000 distinct gene models for each species. Gene ontology (GO) and Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) orthology annotations highlighted remarkable similarities in the mangrove transcriptome profiles, which differed substantially from the model plants Arabidopsis and Populus. Similarities in the two species suggest a unique mangrove lifestyle overarching the effects of transcriptome size, habitat, tissue type, developmental stage, and biogeographic and phylogenetic differences between them.

  19. Skipper genome sheds light on unique phenotypic traits and phylogeny.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cong, Qian; Borek, Dominika; Otwinowski, Zbyszek; Grishin, Nick V

    2015-08-27

    Butterflies and moths are emerging as model organisms in genetics and evolutionary studies. The family Hesperiidae (skippers) was traditionally viewed as a sister to other butterflies based on its moth-like morphology and darting flight habits with fast wing beats. However, DNA studies suggest that the family Papilionidae (swallowtails) may be the sister to other butterflies including skippers. The moth-like features and the controversial position of skippers in Lepidoptera phylogeny make them valuable targets for comparative genomics. We obtained the 310 Mb draft genome of the Clouded Skipper (Lerema accius) from a wild-caught specimen using a cost-effective strategy that overcomes the high (1.6 %) heterozygosity problem. Comparative analysis of Lerema accius and the highly heterozygous genome of Papilio glaucus revealed differences in patterns of SNP distribution, but similarities in functions of genes that are enriched in non-synonymous SNPs. Comparison of Lepidoptera genomes revealed possible molecular bases for unique traits of skippers: a duplication of electron transport chain components could result in efficient energy supply for their rapid flight; a diversified family of predicted cellulases might allow them to feed on cellulose-enriched grasses; an expansion of pheromone-binding proteins and enzymes for pheromone synthesis implies a more efficient mate-recognition system, which compensates for the lack of clear visual cues due to the similarities in wing colors and patterns of many species of skippers. Phylogenetic analysis of several Lepidoptera genomes suggested that the position of Hesperiidae remains uncertain as the tree topology varied depending on the evolutionary model. Completion of the first genome from the family Hesperiidae allowed comparative analyses with other Lepidoptera that revealed potential genetic bases for the unique phenotypic traits of skippers. This work lays the foundation for future experimental studies of skippers and

  20. Proteomics approaches shed new light on hibernation physiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grabek, Katharine R; Martin, Sandra L; Hindle, Allyson G

    2015-08-01

    The broad phylogenetic distribution and rapid phenotypic transitions of mammalian hibernators imply that hibernation is accomplished by differential expression of common genes. Traditional candidate gene approaches have thus far explained little of the molecular mechanisms underlying hibernation, likely due to (1) incomplete and imprecise sampling of a complex phenotype, and (2) the forming of hypotheses about which genes might be important based on studies of model organisms incapable of such dynamic physiology. Unbiased screening approaches, such as proteomics, offer an alternative means to discover the cellular underpinnings that permit successful hibernation and may reveal previously overlooked, important pathways. Here, we review the findings that have emerged from proteomics studies of hibernation. One striking feature is the stability of the proteome, especially across the extreme physiological shifts of torpor-arousal cycles during hibernation. This has led to subsequent investigations of the role of post-translational protein modifications in altering protein activity without energetically wasteful removal and rebuilding of protein pools. Another unexpected finding is the paucity of universal proteomic adjustments across organ systems in response to the extreme metabolic fluctuations despite the universality of their physiological challenges; rather each organ appears to respond in a unique, tissue-specific manner. Additional research is needed to extend and synthesize these results before it will be possible to address the whole body physiology of hibernation.

  1. PV working with industry, Second Quarter, 1999: Shedding light on the matter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moon, S.; Poole, L.

    1999-09-13

    NREL PV Working With Industry is a quarterly newsletter devoted to the research, development, and deployment performed by NREL staff in concert with their industry and university partners. The Second Quarter, 1999 issue, titled ''Shedding Light on the Matter,'' focuses on the PV-related research activities of NREL's Basic Sciences Center. The editorialist is Satyen Deb, in his role as Director of the Basic Sciences Center.

  2. Retail lighting: shedding light on people, products/brands and spaces

    OpenAIRE

    Quartier, Katelijn

    2013-01-01

    To understand where we are at, and to learn from the past, a brief history of retail lighting, with the focus on atmosphere will be given. Next, via the psychological aspects of lighting, its importance and the human-environment interaction will be explained. A study will be presented which shows the impact of lighting on the perception of atmosphere, the emotions and behaviour. retail lighting; research; atmosphere

  3. An inviscid model for vortex shedding from a deforming body

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shukla, Ratnesh K.; Eldredge, Jeff D. [University of California, Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering Department, Los Angeles, CA (United States)

    2007-09-15

    An inviscid vortex sheet model is developed in order to study the unsteady separated flow past a two-dimensional deforming body which moves with a prescribed motion in an otherwise quiescent fluid. Following Jones (J Fluid Mech 496, 405-441, 2003) the flow is assumed to comprise of a bound vortex sheet attached to the body and two separate vortex sheets originating at the edges. The complex conjugate velocity potential is expressed explicitly in terms of the bound vortex sheet strength and the edge circulations through a boundary integral representation. It is shown that Kelvin's circulation theorem, along with the conditions of continuity of the normal velocity across the body and the boundedness of the velocity field, yields a coupled system of equations for the unknown bound vortex sheet strength and the edge circulations. A general numerical treatment is developed for the singular principal value integrals arising in the solution procedure. The model is validated against the results of Jones (J Fluid Mech 496, 405-441, 2003) for computations involving a rigid flat plate and is subsequently applied to the flapping foil experiments of Heathcote et al. (AIAA J, 42, 2196-2204, 2004) in order to predict the thrust coefficient. The utility of the model in simulating aquatic locomotion is also demonstrated, with vortex shedding suppressed at the leading edge of the swimming body. (orig.)

  4. Unusual modes of reproduction in social insects: shedding light on the evolutionary paradox of sex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wenseleers, Tom; Van Oystaeyen, Annette

    2011-12-01

    The study of alternative genetic systems and mixed modes of reproduction, whereby sexual and asexual reproduction is combined within the same lifecycle, is of fundamental importance as they may shed light on classical evolutionary issues, such as the paradox of sex. Recently, several such cases were discovered in social insects. A closer examination of these systems has revealed many amazing facts, including the mixed use of asexual and sexual reproduction for the production of new queens and workers, males that can clone themselves and the routine use of incest without deleterious genetic consequences. In addition, in several species, remarkable cases of asexually reproducing socially parasitic worker lineages have been discovered. The study of these unusual systems promises to provide insight into many basic evolutionary questions, including the maintenance of sex, the expression of sexual conflict and kin conflict and the evolution of cheating in asexual lineages. Copyright © 2011 WILEY Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Shedding Light on Eco-Innovation in Tourism: A Critical Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria-del-Mar Alonso-Almeida

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The recent global increase in the competitiveness of tourism has made the implementation of eco-innovations a differentiating element among both the destinations and companies in the sector, with quality management and contribution to sustainable development being increasingly valued. However, the eco-innovations that have been developed and implemented in tourist industries have rarely been studied. In this study, the eco-innovations that have been developed and implemented by 57 tourism businesses worldwide are analysed. The identified eco-innovations are classified by using different qualitative methodologies. The obtained results shed light on the limited development of eco-innovations in the tourism industry and the industry focuses mainly on product eco-innovations. Several examples by the tourist sub-industry and types of eco-innovation are analysed. Furthermore, this study provides practical information about measures that both businesses and governmental organisations can adopt to promote eco-innovation in the sector.

  6. The International Globe at Night Citizen-Science Campaign: Shedding Light on Light Pollution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, C. E.; Pompea, S. M.

    2013-12-01

    For 8 years now, the Globe at Night campaign has invited citizen-scientists worldwide to measure and record the brightness of their night sky by hunting for the faintest stars in a particular constellation. Students for science projects and scientists for research use the data to monitor levels of brightness or 'light pollution' around the world. They also use the Globe at Night data to understand light pollution's effects on energy consumption, plants, wildlife and human health, as well as our ability to enjoy a starry night sky. The dates of the campaign for 2014 have been extended to every month during the year. Ten days each month (when the Moon is not up between 8pm and 10pm) are the recommended times to take measurements for the campaign. However, one can participate at other times and dates, as long as the Moon is not in the night sky and it is more than an hour after sunset or more than an hour before sunrise. New in 2014 will be an Android app that will allow you to input visual measurements anytime the Moon is not up. Also possibly included will be an iPhone app that will take sky brightness measurements. The campaign dates and the 5 easy steps to participating in the campaign are listed at www.globeatnight.org. You do not need to register. Once on the report page, you enter your location, date and time (automatic for a smart device). You find the constellation of the month in the night sky. (Help is on the website.) Then you choose which chart looks most like what you see toward the constellation. Choose the icon for how clear or cloudy it is and hit the submit button and you are done! The fifth step is returning later to the website to compare your observations on the world map to others from around the globe. Included on the Globe at Night website are many helpful resources and tools from finding the constellations used in the campaign, to understanding concepts like light pollution, to games that test your expertise in choosing 'limiting magnitudes

  7. Genetic and Epigenetic Diversities Shed Light on Domestication of Cultivated Ginseng (Panax ginseng).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ming-Rui; Shi, Feng-Xue; Zhou, Yu-Xin; Li, Ya-Ling; Wang, Xin-Feng; Zhang, Cui; Wang, Xu-Tong; Liu, Bao; Xiao, Hong-Xing; Li, Lin-Feng

    2015-11-02

    Chinese ginseng (Panax ginseng) is a medically important herb within Panax and has crucial cultural values in East Asia. As the symbol of traditional Chinese medicine, Chinese ginseng has been used as a herbal remedy to restore stamina and capacity in East Asia for thousands of years. To address the evolutionary origin and domestication history of cultivated ginseng, we employed multiple molecular approaches to investigate the genetic structures of cultivated and wild ginseng across their distribution ranges in northeastern Asia. Phylogenetic and population genetic analyses revealed that the four cultivated ginseng landraces, COMMON, BIANTIAO, SHIZHU, and GAOLI (also known as Korean ginseng), were not domesticated independently and Fusong Town is likely one of the primary domestication centers. In addition, our results from population genetic and epigenetic analyses demonstrated that cultivated ginseng maintained high levels of genetic and epigenetic diversity, but showed distinct cytosine methylation patterns compared with wild ginseng. The patterns of genetic and epigenetic variation revealed by this study have shed light on the domestication history of cultivated ginseng, which may serve as a framework for future genetic improvements. Copyright © 2015 The Author. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Navigating the gender minefield: An IPV prevention campaign sheds light on the gender gap.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keller, Sarah N; Honea, Joy C

    2016-01-01

    This article examines how differences in male and female views about intimate partner violence (IPV) contributed to divergent responses to a prevention campaign conducted in the western USA. The study examines focus groups (n = 22) and in-depth interview data (n = 13) collected during campaign development to shed light on quantitative results indicating that women (but not men) increased their perceived severity of domestic violence and awareness of services from pre-test to post-test, while male attitudes moved in the opposite direction. Results of the qualitative study provide the basis for the authors' conclusions about why reactions differed: (1) men's unwillingness to view abuse within a gender context limits men's ability to accept the inequity in statistically demonstrated male and female roles as perpetrators and victims; (2) male resentment of existing gender stereotypes contributed to a rejection of campaign messages that utilised gender prevalence statistics to depict images showing men as perpetrators and women as victims; and (3) victim blaming attitudes contributed to resistance to empathy for victims depicted in the campaign. The authors offer suggestions for future campaigns that foster agency among both perpetrators and survivors while confronting the structural barriers to enacting change.

  9. Integrative analyses shed new light on human ribosomal protein gene regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xin; Zheng, Yiyu; Hu, Haiyan; Li, Xiaoman

    2016-06-27

    Ribosomal protein genes (RPGs) are important house-keeping genes that are well-known for their coordinated expression. Previous studies on RPGs are largely limited to their promoter regions. Recent high-throughput studies provide an unprecedented opportunity to study how human RPGs are transcriptionally modulated and how such transcriptional regulation may contribute to the coordinate gene expression in various tissues and cell types. By analyzing the DNase I hypersensitive sites under 349 experimental conditions, we predicted 217 RPG regulatory regions in the human genome. More than 86.6% of these computationally predicted regulatory regions were partially corroborated by independent experimental measurements. Motif analyses on these predicted regulatory regions identified 31 DNA motifs, including 57.1% of experimentally validated motifs in literature that regulate RPGs. Interestingly, we observed that the majority of the predicted motifs were shared by the predicted distal and proximal regulatory regions of the same RPGs, a likely general mechanism for enhancer-promoter interactions. We also found that RPGs may be differently regulated in different cells, indicating that condition-specific RPG regulatory regions still need to be discovered and investigated. Our study advances the understanding of how RPGs are coordinately modulated, which sheds light to the general principles of gene transcriptional regulation in mammals.

  10. How counterfactuals of Red-Queen theory shed light on science and its historiography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dagg, Joachim L

    2017-08-01

    A historical episode of evolutionary theory, which has lead to the Red Queen theory of the evolutionary maintenance of sex, includes two striking contingencies. These are used to explore alternative what-if scenarios, in order to test some common opinions about such counterfactuals. This sheds new light on the nature of science and its historiography. One counterfactual leads to an unexpected convergence of its result to that of the actual science but, nevertheless, differs in its causal structure. The other diverges towards an incompatible alternative, but this requires further contingent choices that also diverge from actual science. The convergence in the first counterfactual is due to a horizontal transfer of knowledge. Similar transfers of knowledge are typical for innovations of actual science. This suggests that contingent choices can merge as well as fork research traditions both in actual research and counterfactual history. Neither the paths of the actual history of science nor those of its counterfactual alternatives will form a tree of exclusively diverging bifurcations, but a network instead. Convergencies in counterfactuals may, therefore, be due to the web-structure of science as much as to the aims of the historians in question. Furthermore, the difference in causal structure between the actual science and its convergent counterfactual might become diagnostic for external factors rather than internal aims forcing a historian towards convergence. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. How Hox genes can shed light on the place of echinoderms among the deuterostomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background The Hox gene cluster ranks among the greatest of biological discoveries of the past 30 years. Morphogenetic patterning genes are remarkable for the systems they regulate during major ontogenetic events, and for their expressions of molecular, temporal, and spatial colinearity. Recent descriptions of exceptions to these colinearities are suggesting deep phylogenetic signal that can be used to explore origins of entire deuterostome phyla. Among the most enigmatic of these deuterostomes in terms of unique body patterning are the echinoderms. However, there remains no overall synthesis of the correlation between this signal and the variations observable in the presence/absence and expression patterns of Hox genes. Results Recent data from Hox cluster analyses shed light on how the bizarre shift from bilateral larvae to radial adults during echinoderm ontogeny can be accomplished by equally radical modifications within the Hox cluster. In order to explore this more fully, a compilation of observations on the genetic patterns among deuterostomes is integrated with the body patterning trajectories seen across the deuterostome clade. Conclusions Synthesis of available data helps to explain morphogenesis along the anterior/posterior axis of echinoderms, delineating the origins and fate of that axis during ontogeny. From this, it is easy to distinguish between ‘seriality’ along echinoderm rays and true A/P axis phenomena such as colinearity within the somatocoels, and the ontogenetic outcomes of the unique translocation and inversion of the anterior Hox class found within the Echinodermata. An up-to-date summary and integration of the disparate lines of research so far produced on the relationship between Hox genes and pattern formation for all deuterostomes allows for development of a phylogeny and scenario for the evolution of deuterostomes in general, and the Echinodermata in particular. PMID:24959343

  12. Jet substructure shedding light on heavy Majorana neutrinos at the LHC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Arindam; Konar, Partha; Thalapillil, Arun

    2018-02-01

    The existence of tiny neutrino masses and flavor mixings can be explained naturally in various seesaw models, many of which typically having additional Majorana type SM gauge singlet right handed neutrinos ( N). If they are at around the electroweak scale and furnished with sizable mixings with light active neutrinos, they can be produced at high energy colliders, such as the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). A characteristic signature would be same sign lepton pairs, violating lepton number, together with light jets — pp → Nℓ ± , N → ℓ ± W ∓ , W ∓ → jj. We propose a new search strategy utilising jet substructure techniques, observing that for a heavy right handed neutrino mass M N much above M W ±, the two jets coming out of the boosted W ± may be interpreted as a single fat-jet ( J). Hence, the distinguishing signal topology will be ℓ ± ℓ ± J . Performing a comprehensive study of the different signal regions along with complete background analysis, in tandem with detector level simulations, we compute statistical significance limits. We find that heavy neutrinos can be explored effectively for mass ranges 300 GeV ≤ M N ≤ 800 GeV and different light-heavy neutrino mixing | V μN |2. At the 13 TeV LHC with 3000 fb-1 integrated luminosity one can competently explore mixing angles much below present LHC limits, and moreover exceed bounds from electroweak precision data.

  13. Afterglow Observations Shed New Light on the Nature of X-ray Flashes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Granot, J

    2005-02-17

    X-ray flashes (XRFs) and X-ray rich gamma-ray bursts (XRGRBs) share many observational characteristics with long duration ({approx}> 2 s) GRBs, but the reason for which the spectral energy distribution of their prompt emission peaks at lower photon energies, E{sub p}, is still a subject of debate. Although many different models have been invoked in order to explain the lower values of E{sub p}, their implications for the afterglow emission were not considered in most cases, mainly because observations of XRF afterglows have become available only recently. Here we examine the predictions of the various XRF models for the afterglow emission, and test them against the observations of XRF 030723 and XRGRB 041006, the events with the best monitored afterglow light curves in their respective class. We show that most existing XRF models are hard to reconcile with the observed afterglow light curves, which are very flat at early times. Such light curves are, however, naturally produced by a roughly uniform jet with relatively sharp edges that is viewed off-axis (i.e. from outside of the jet aperture). This type of model self consistently accommodates both the observed prompt emission and the afterglow light curves of XRGRB 041006 and XRF 030723, implying viewing angles {theta}{sub obs} from the jet axis of ({theta}{sub obs}-{theta}{sub 0}) {approx} 0.15 {theta}{sub 0} and ({theta}{sub obs}-{theta}{sub 0}) {approx} {theta}{sub 0}, respectively, where {theta}{sub 0} {approx} 3{sup o} is the half-opening angle of the jet. This suggests that GRBs, XRGRBs and XRFs are intrinsically similar relativistic jets viewed from different angles. It is then natural to identify GRBs with {gamma}({theta}{sub obs} - {theta}{sub 0}) {approx}< 1, XRGRBs with 1 {approx}< ({theta}{sub obs} - {theta}{sub 0}) {approx}< a few, and XRFs with {gamma}({theta}{sub obs} - {theta}{sub 0}) {approx}> a few, where {gamma} is the Lorentz factor of the outflow near the edge of the jet from which most of the

  14. Impact of shed blood products on stimulated cytokine release in an in vitro model of transfusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, S O; Biedler, A E; Behmenburg, F; Volk, T; Rensing, H

    2012-07-01

    Blood transfusion is reported to suppress the recipient's immune system. To avoid allogenic transfusion, post-operative shed blood retransfusion is a commonly used method. The aim of this study was to investigate the dose-related impact of post-operatively collected shed blood products on the stimulated cytokine release in an in vitro model of transfusion. Venous blood samples obtained from 20 patients undergoing hip arthroplasty were mixed with post-operatively collected unprocessed, processed, and irradiated shed blood as well as normal saline as a control. Shed blood was processed by centrifugation and separating the cellular fraction from the soluble fraction and washing the cellular fraction with phosphate buffered saline to eliminate any cell fragments and other substances. Mixing ratios were 1:3, 1:1, and 3:1. Endotoxin-stimulated release of Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha (TNF-α) was measured after 24 h of culture by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Unprocessed, irradiated shed blood and the soluble fraction caused a significant suppression of stimulated TNF-α release compared to control. The addition of the cellular shed blood fraction had no significant influence on the TNF-α release compared to control. Shed blood and its components caused a dose-independent immunomodulation as indicated by a suppressed stimulated TNF-α release. Leukocytes seem to play a minor role, as we observed a sustained suppression after transfusion of γ-irradiated shed blood. Only the elimination of soluble factors by centrifugation and followed by an additional washing step prevented the observed suppression of TNF-α. Thus, we assume that washing of shed blood can prevent potential detrimental effects. © 2012 The Authors. Acta Anaesthesiologica Scandinavica © 2012 The Acta Anaesthesiologica Scandinavica Foundation.

  15. Shedding light on avian influenza H4N6 infection in mallards: modes of transmission and implications for surveillance.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaci K VanDalen

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Wild mallards (Anas platyrhychos are considered one of the primary reservoir species for avian influenza viruses (AIV. Because AIV circulating in wild birds pose an indirect threat to agriculture and human health, understanding the ecology of AIV and developing risk assessments and surveillance systems for prevention of disease is critical. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In this study, mallards were experimentally infected with an H4N6 subtype of AIV by oral inoculation or contact with an H4N6 contaminated water source. Cloacal swabs, oropharyngeal swabs, fecal samples, and water samples were collected daily and tested by real-time RT-PCR (RRT-PCR for estimation of viral shedding. Fecal samples had significantly higher virus concentrations than oropharyngeal or cloacal swabs and 6 month old ducks shed significantly more viral RNA than 3 month old ducks regardless of sample type. Use of a water source contaminated by AIV infected mallards, was sufficient to transmit virus to naïve mallards, which shed AIV at higher or similar levels as orally-inoculated ducks. CONCLUSIONS: Bodies of water could serve as a transmission pathway for AIV in waterfowl. For AIV surveillance purposes, water samples and fecal samples appear to be excellent alternatives or additions to cloacal and oropharyngeal swabbing. Furthermore, duck age (even within hatch-year birds may be important when interpreting viral shedding results from experimental infections or surveillance. Differential shedding among hatch-year mallards could affect prevalence estimates, modeling of AIV spread, and subsequent risk assessments.

  16. Control of a coupled map lattice model for vortex shedding in the ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    These techniques were applied to a modeled vortex dislocation structure in the wake of a vibrating cable in uniform freestream flow. Parallel shedding patterns were achieved for a range of forcing frequency-forcing amplitude combinations studied to validate the control theory. The adaptive proportional and DNL methods ...

  17. Control of a coupled map lattice model for vortex shedding in the ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    the CML model have certain limitations. For example, at ... Specific to the present work, addition of control terms into the coupled map lattice con- .... value of Xk n equal to 0 corresponds to incipient vortex formation (the start of the vortex formation process), while a value of Xk n equal to 1 corresponds to the vortex shedding.

  18. EPA's SHEDS-multimedia model: children's cumulative pyrethroid exposure estimates and evaluation against NHANES biomarker data

    Science.gov (United States)

    The U.S. EPA's SHEDS-Multimedia model was applied to enhance the understanding of children's exposures and doses to multiple pyrethroid pesticides, including major contributing chemicals and pathways. This paper presents combined dietary and residential exposure estimates and cum...

  19. Through a Lattice Darkly: Shedding Light on Electron-Phonon Coupling in the High Tc Cuprates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. R. Garcia

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available With its central role in conventional BCS superconductivity, electron-phonon coupling appears to play a more subtle role in the phase diagram of the high-temperature superconducting cuprates. Their added complexity due to potentially numerous competing phases, including charge, spin, orbital, and lattice ordering, makes teasing out any unique phenomena challenging. In this review, we present our work using angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES exploring the role of the lattice on the valence band electronic structure of the cuprates. We introduce the ARPES technique and its unique ability to the probe the effect of bosonic renormalization (or “kink” on near-EF band structure. Our survey begins with the establishment of the ubiquitous nodal cuprate kink leading to how isotope substitution has shed a critical new perspective on the role and strength of electron-phonon coupling. We continue with recently published work connecting the phonon dispersion seen with inelastic X-ray scattering (IXS to the location of the kink observed by ARPES near the nodal point. Finally, we present very recent and ongoing ARPES work examining how induced strain through chemical pressure provides a potentially promising avenue for understanding the broader role of the lattice to the superconducting phase and larger cuprate phase diagram.

  20. Shedding light on DOC release by benthic primary producers and its consumption by bioeroding sponges

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Müller, Benjamin

    2015-01-01

    The effect of light on dissolved organic carbon (DOC) release of benthic primary producers (BPPs) was investigated on the coral reefs of Curaçao. Incubation experiments revealed a positive relation between the DOC release of four Caribbean reef algae (Cladophora sp., Dictyota menstrualis, Lobophora

  1. Shedding light on tree growth : ring analysis of juvenile tropical trees

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Soliz Gamboa, C.C.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/30484053X

    2010-01-01

    In the understory of tropical forests light is believed to be the main limiting growth factor for the newly established trees. Trees growing in shade of the understory may experience periods of slow radial growth. It is expected that gaps created by tree or branch fall will provoke tree growth

  2. Shedding light on the role of lipid flippases in the secretory pathway

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lopez Marques, Rosa Laura

    that these pumps serve important functions in vesicular traffic, their activities being required to support vesicle formation in the secretory and endocytic pathways. We are now aiming at determining the mechanism by which these ATPases function in vesicle biogenesis. For this purpose, we are using novel...... biophysical approaches based on giant vesicles and several advanced bioimaging methods. The limitations and future perspectives of these techniques for the characterization of lipid translocases will be discussed in the light of our recent results....

  3. Modeling von Karman vortex shedding in cylinder wake to examine energetic coherent motions on hydrokinetic turbines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neary, V. S.; Gunawan, B.; Chamorro, L. P.; Stekovic, S.; Hill, C.

    2012-12-01

    Numerous investigators have examined vortex-shedding in the wake of cylinders. This is a classical flow problem that has many engineering applications, including pronounced flow disturbance, turbulence generation, and sediment scour in the wakes of in stream structures, e.g. bridge piers and towers for marine and hydrokinetic (MHK) turbines. It is also important to understand the contribution of large coherent motions on the unsteady loading and performance of hydrokinetic turbines. Unsteady vortex shedding is caused by flow separation and detachment within the near-wall region along the cylinder surface. Our aim is to examine the unsteady flow field and von Karman vortex shedding resulting from unsteady turbulent flow around an emergent cylinder mounted perpendicular to a fixed surface by conducting physical and numerical modeling experiments. The numerical simulation emulates an open-channel flow experiment at the St. Anthony Falls Laboratory at the University of Minnesota, where instantaneous velocity was measured using three synchronized acoustic Doppler velocimeters (ADVs). The open-channel flume is 80 m long, and 2.75 m wide. The flow depth is 1.15 m. The cylinder diameter is 0.116 m. The flow is turbulent, with a cylinder Reynolds number equal to 5.44E4. We use the commercial CFD software, STAR-CCM+, to generate the computational mesh that models the flow geometry around the cylinder, and to numerically solve the unsteady Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes (URANS) equations. The generated mesh is fine enough (> 2 million elements) to resolve the coherent structures of vortex shedding. The Frost high-performance cluster (an ORNL supercomputer) is used to run the simulation. The results show how a validated CFD model can be used to design the layout and spacing of synchronized ADV point measurements to characterize essential features of the Karman shedding in the cylinder wake. A similar approach can be used to design field ADV arrays for measuring more complex

  4. Shedding Light on a New Treatment for Diabetic Wound Healing: A Review on Phototherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicolette N. Houreld

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Impaired wound healing is a common complication associated with diabetes with complex pathophysiological underlying mechanisms and often necessitates amputation. With the advancement in laser technology, irradiation of these wounds with low-intensity laser irradiation (LILI or phototherapy, has shown a vast improvement in wound healing. At the correct laser parameters, LILI has shown to increase migration, viability, and proliferation of diabetic cells in vitro; there is a stimulatory effect on the mitochondria with a resulting increase in adenosine triphosphate (ATP. In addition, LILI also has an anti-inflammatory and protective effect on these cells. In light of the ever present threat of diabetic foot ulcers, infection, and amputation, new improved therapies and the fortification of wound healing research deserves better prioritization. In this review we look at the complications associated with diabetic wound healing and the effect of laser irradiation both in vitro and in vivo in diabetic wound healing.

  5. Shedding light on axial stress effect on resonance frequencies of nanocantilevers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pini, Valerio; Tamayo, Javier; Gil-Santos, Eduardo; Ramos, Daniel; Kosaka, Priscila; Tong, Hien-Duy; van Rijn, Cees; Calleja, Montserrat

    2011-06-28

    The detection back-action phenomenon has received little attention in physical, chemical, and biological sensors based on nanomechanical systems. We show that this effect is very significant in ultrathin bimetallic cantilevers, in which the laser beam that probes the picometer scale vibration largely modifies the resonant frequencies of the system. The light back-action effect is nonlinear, and some resonant frequencies can even be reduced to a half with laser power intensities of 2 mW. We demonstrate that this effect arises from the stress and strain generated by the laser heating. The experiments are explained by two-dimensional nonlinear elasticity theory and supported by finite element simulations. The found phenomenology is intimately connected to the old unsolved problem about the effect of surface stress on the resonance frequency of singly clamped beams. The results indicate that to achieve the ultimate detection limits with nanomechanical resonators one must consider the uncertainty due to the detection back-action.

  6. Single-molecule fluorescence microscopy review: shedding new light on old problems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shashkova, Sviatlana; Leake, Mark C

    2017-08-31

    Fluorescence microscopy is an invaluable tool in the biosciences, a genuine workhorse technique offering exceptional contrast in conjunction with high specificity of labelling with relatively minimal perturbation to biological samples compared with many competing biophysical techniques. Improvements in detector and dye technologies coupled to advances in image analysis methods have fuelled recent development towards single-molecule fluorescence microscopy, which can utilize light microscopy tools to enable the faithful detection and analysis of single fluorescent molecules used as reporter tags in biological samples. For example, the discovery of GFP, initiating the so-called 'green revolution', has pushed experimental tools in the biosciences to a completely new level of functional imaging of living samples, culminating in single fluorescent protein molecule detection. Today, fluorescence microscopy is an indispensable tool in single-molecule investigations, providing a high signal-to-noise ratio for visualization while still retaining the key features in the physiological context of native biological systems. In this review, we discuss some of the recent discoveries in the life sciences which have been enabled using single-molecule fluorescence microscopy, paying particular attention to the so-called 'super-resolution' fluorescence microscopy techniques in live cells, which are at the cutting-edge of these methods. In particular, how these tools can reveal new insights into long-standing puzzles in biology: old problems, which have been impossible to tackle using other more traditional tools until the emergence of new single-molecule fluorescence microscopy techniques. © 2017 The Author(s).

  7. Evidence of coat color variation sheds new light on ancient canids.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morgane Ollivier

    Full Text Available We have used a paleogenetics approach to investigate the genetic landscape of coat color variation in ancient Eurasian dog and wolf populations. We amplified DNA fragments of two genes controlling coat color, Mc1r (Melanocortin 1 Receptor and CBD103 (canine-β-defensin, in respectively 15 and 19 ancient canids (dogs and wolf morphotypes from 14 different archeological sites, throughout Asia and Europe spanning from ca. 12 000 B.P. (end of Upper Palaeolithic to ca. 4000 B.P. (Bronze Age. We provide evidence of a new variant (R301C of the Melanocortin 1 receptor (Mc1r and highlight the presence of the beta-defensin melanistic mutation (CDB103-K locus on ancient DNA from dog-and wolf-morphotype specimens. We show that the dominant K(B allele (CBD103, which causes melanism, and R301C (Mc1r, the variant that may cause light hair color, are present as early as the beginning of the Holocene, over 10,000 years ago. These results underline the genetic diversity of prehistoric dogs. This diversity may have partly stemmed not only from the wolf gene pool captured by domestication but also from mutations very likely linked to the relaxation of natural selection pressure occurring in-line with this process.

  8. Evidence of Coat Color Variation Sheds New Light on Ancient Canids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ollivier, Morgane; Tresset, Anne; Hitte, Christophe; Petit, Coraline; Hughes, Sandrine; Gillet, Benjamin; Duffraisse, Marilyne; Pionnier-Capitan, Maud; Lagoutte, Laetitia; Arbogast, Rose-Marie; Balasescu, Adrian; Boroneant, Adina; Mashkour, Marjan; Vigne, Jean-Denis; Hänni, Catherine

    2013-01-01

    We have used a paleogenetics approach to investigate the genetic landscape of coat color variation in ancient Eurasian dog and wolf populations. We amplified DNA fragments of two genes controlling coat color, Mc1r (Melanocortin 1 Receptor) and CBD103 (canine-β-defensin), in respectively 15 and 19 ancient canids (dogs and wolf morphotypes) from 14 different archeological sites, throughout Asia and Europe spanning from ca. 12 000 B.P. (end of Upper Palaeolithic) to ca. 4000 B.P. (Bronze Age). We provide evidence of a new variant (R301C) of the Melanocortin 1 receptor (Mc1r) and highlight the presence of the beta-defensin melanistic mutation (CDB103-K locus) on ancient DNA from dog-and wolf-morphotype specimens. We show that the dominant KB allele (CBD103), which causes melanism, and R301C (Mc1r), the variant that may cause light hair color, are present as early as the beginning of the Holocene, over 10 000 years ago. These results underline the genetic diversity of prehistoric dogs. This diversity may have partly stemmed not only from the wolf gene pool captured by domestication but also from mutations very likely linked to the relaxation of natural selection pressure occurring in-line with this process. PMID:24098367

  9. The Santiago-Harvard-Edinburgh-Durham void comparison I: SHEDding light on chameleon gravity tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cautun, Marius; Paillas, Enrique; Cai, Yan-Chuan; Bose, Sownak; Armijo, Joaquin; Li, Baojiu; Padilla, Nelson

    2018-02-01

    We present a systematic comparison of several existing and new void finding algorithms, focusing on their potential power to test a particular class of modified gravity models - chameleon f(R) gravity. These models deviate from standard General Relativity (GR) more strongly in low-density regions and thus voids are a promising venue to test them. We use Halo Occupation Distribution (HOD) prescriptions to populate haloes with galaxies, and tune the HOD parameters such that the galaxy two-point correlation functions are the same in both f(R) and GR models. We identify both 3D voids as well as 2D underdensities in the plane-of-the-sky to find the same void abundance and void galaxy number density profiles across all models, which suggests that they do not contain much information beyond galaxy clustering. However, the underlying void dark matter density profiles are significantly different, with f(R) voids being more underdense than GR ones, which leads to f(R) voids having a larger tangential shear signal than their GR analogues. We investigate the potential of each void finder to test f(R) models with near-future lensing surveys such as EUCLID and LSST. The 2D voids have the largest power to probe f(R) gravity, with a LSST analysis of tunnel (which is a new type of 2D underdensity introduced here) lensing distinguishing at 80 and 11σ (statistical error) f(R) models with parameters, |fR0| = 10-5 and 10-6, from GR.

  10. The Santiago-Harvard-Edinburgh-Durham void comparison - I. SHEDding light on chameleon gravity tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cautun, Marius; Paillas, Enrique; Cai, Yan-Chuan; Bose, Sownak; Armijo, Joaquin; Li, Baojiu; Padilla, Nelson

    2018-05-01

    We present a systematic comparison of several existing and new void-finding algorithms, focusing on their potential power to test a particular class of modified gravity models - chameleon f(R) gravity. These models deviate from standard general relativity (GR) more strongly in low-density regions and thus voids are a promising venue to test them. We use halo occupation distribution (HOD) prescriptions to populate haloes with galaxies, and tune the HOD parameters such that the galaxy two-point correlation functions are the same in both f(R) and GR models. We identify both three-dimensional (3D) voids and two-dimensional (2D) underdensities in the plane of the sky to find the same void abundance and void galaxy number density profiles across all models, which suggests that they do not contain much information beyond galaxy clustering. However, the underlying void dark matter density profiles are significantly different, with f(R) voids being more underdense than GR ones, which leads to f(R) voids having a larger tangential shear signal than their GR analogues. We investigate the potential of each void finder to test f(R) models with near-future lensing surveys such as EUCLID and LSST. The 2D voids have the largest power to probe f(R) gravity, with an LSST analysis of tunnel (which is a new type of 2D underdensity introduced here) lensing distinguishing at 80 and 11σ (statistical error) f(R) models with parameters, |fR0| = 10-5 and 10-6, from GR.

  11. Shedding light on the $b\\to s$ anomalies with a dark sector

    CERN Document Server

    Aristizabal Sierra, D.; Vicente, Avelino

    2015-01-01

    The LHCb collaboration has recently reported on some anomalies in $b\\to s$ transitions. In addition to discrepancies with the Standard Model (SM) predictions in some angular observables and branching ratios, an intriguing hint for lepton universality violation was found. Here we propose a simple model that extends the SM with a dark sector charged under an additional $U(1)$ gauge symmetry. The spontaneous breaking of this symmetry gives rise to a massive $Z^\\prime$ boson, which communicates the SM particles with a valid dark matter candidate, while solving the $b\\to s$ anomalies with contributions to the relevant observables.

  12. Shedding Light on the Personality Profile of Professionals in the Outdoor Community

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friddle, Clay; Tochkov, Karin

    2018-01-01

    The outdoor community has long been used to study motivation and sensation seeking. While sensation seeking is related to the personality traits extraversion and openness there has been little research conducted on the whole personality profile of this community. This study used the Five Factor Model and the Big Five Inventory to measure the…

  13. Shedding light on the tt-macron asymmetry: the photon handle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aguilar-Saavedra, J.A. [Departamento de Física Teórica y del Cosmos, Universidad de Granada,E-18071 Granada (Spain); Álvarez, E. [CONICET, IFIBA Universidad de Buenos Aires,1428 Buenos Aires (Argentina); Juste, A. [Institució Catalana de Recerca i Estudis Avançats (ICREA),E-08010 Barcelona (Spain); Institut de Física d’Altes Energies (IFAE),E-08193 Bellaterra, Barcelona (Spain); Rubbo, F. [Institut de Física d’Altes Energies (IFAE),E-08193 Bellaterra, Barcelona (Spain)

    2014-04-30

    We investigate a charge asymmetry in tt-macronγ production at the LHC that provides complementary information to the measured asymmetries in tt-macron production. We estimate the experimental uncertainty in its measurement at the LHC with 8 TeV and 14 TeV. We argue that, for new physics models that simultaneously reproduce the asymmetry excess in tt-macron production at the Tevatron and the SM-like asymmetry at the LHC, the measurement in tt-macronγ production at the LHC is likely to deviate from the SM prediction. In two new physics models studied in detail we find that the deviations could be significant and observable at the 14 TeV run.

  14. Thermodynamic activity-based intrinsic enzyme kinetic sheds light on enzyme-solvent interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grosch, Jan-Hendrik; Wagner, David; Nistelkas, Vasilios; Spieß, Antje C

    2017-01-01

    The reaction medium has major impact on biocatalytic reaction systems and on their economic significance. To allow for tailored medium engineering, thermodynamic phenomena, intrinsic enzyme kinetics, and enzyme-solvent interactions have to be discriminated. To this end, enzyme reaction kinetic modeling was coupled with thermodynamic calculations based on investigations of the alcohol dehydrogenase from Lactobacillus brevis (LbADH) in monophasic water/methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE) mixtures as a model solvent. Substrate concentrations and substrate thermodynamic activities were varied separately to identify the individual thermodynamic and kinetic effects on the enzyme activity. Microkinetic parameters based on concentration and thermodynamic activity were derived to successfully identify a positive effect of MTBE on the availability of the substrate to the enzyme, but a negative effect on the enzyme performance. In conclusion, thermodynamic activity-based kinetic modeling might be a suitable tool to initially curtail the type of enzyme-solvent interactions and thus, a powerful first step to potentially understand the phenomena that occur in nonconventional media in more detail. © 2016 American Institute of Chemical Engineers Biotechnol. Prog., 33:96-103, 2017. © 2016 American Institute of Chemical Engineers.

  15. Alpine endemic spiders shed light on the origin and evolution of subterranean species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mammola, Stefano; Isaia, Marco; Arnedo, Miquel A

    2015-01-01

    We designed a comparative study to unravel the phylogeography of two Alpine endemic spiders characterized by a different degree of adaptation to subterranean life: Troglohyphantes vignai (Araneae, Linyphiidae) and Pimoa rupicola (Araneae, Pimoidae), the latter showing minor adaptation to hypogean life. We sampled populations of the model species in caves and other subterranean habitats across their known geographical range in the Western Alps. By combining phylogeographic inferences and Ecological Niche Modeling techniques, we inferred the biogeographic scenario that led to the present day population structure of the two species. According to our divergent time estimates and relative uncertainties, the isolation of T. vignai and P. rupicola from their northern sister groups was tracked back to Middle-Late Miocene. Furthermore, the fingerprint left by Pleistocene glaciations on the population structure revealed by the genetic data, led to the hypothesis that a progressive adaptation to subterranean habitats occurred in T. vignai, followed by strong population isolation. On the other hand, P. rupicola underwent a remarkable genetic bottleneck during the Pleistocene glaciations, that shaped its present population structure. It seems likely that such shallow population structure is both the result of the minor degree of specialization to hypogean life and the higher dispersal ability characterizing this species. The simultaneous study of overlapping spider species showing different levels of adaptation to hypogean life, disclosed a new way to clarify patterns of biological diversification and to understand the effects of past climatic shift on the subterranean biodiversity.

  16. Frequent Zika Virus Sexual Transmission and Prolonged Viral RNA Shedding in an Immunodeficient Mouse Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nisha K. Duggal

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Circulation of Zika virus (ZIKV was first identified in the Western hemisphere in late 2014. Primarily transmitted through mosquito bite, ZIKV can also be transmitted through sex and from mother to fetus, and maternal ZIKV infection has been associated with fetal malformations. We assessed immunodeficient AG129 mice for their capacity to shed ZIKV in semen and to infect female mice via sexual transmission. Infectious virus was detected in semen between 7 and 21 days post-inoculation, and ZIKV RNA was detected in semen through 58 days post-inoculation. During mating, 73% of infected males transmitted ZIKV to uninfected females, and 50% of females became infected, with evidence of fetal infection in resulting pregnancies. Semen from vasectomized mice contained significantly lower levels of infectious virus, though sexual transmission still occurred. This model provides a platform for studying the kinetics of ZIKV sexual transmission and prolonged RNA shedding also observed in human semen.

  17. IRMPD Spectroscopy Sheds New (Infrared) Light on the Sulfate Pattern of Carbohydrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schindler, B; Barnes, L; Gray, C J; Chambert, S; Flitsch, S L; Oomens, J; Daniel, R; Allouche, A R; Compagnon, I

    2017-03-16

    IR spectroscopy of gas-phase ions is proposed to resolve positional isomers of sulfated carbohydrates. Mass spectrometric fingerprints and gas-phase vibrational spectra in the near and mid-IR regions were obtained for sulfated monosaccharides, yielding unambiguous signatures of sulfated isomers. We report the first systematic exploration of the biologically relevant but notoriously challenging deprotonated state in the near IR region. Remarkably, anions displayed very atypical vibrational profiles, which challenge the well-established DFT (Density Functionnal Theory) modeling. The proposed approach was used to elucidate the sulfate patterns in glycosaminoglycans, a ubiquitous class of mammalian carbohydrates, which is regarded as a major challenge in carbohydrate structural analysis. Isomeric glycosaminoglycan disaccharides from heparin and chondroitin sources were resolved, highlighting the potential of infrared multiple photon dissociation spectroscopy as a novel structural tool for carbohydrates.

  18. Molecular bases of anorexia nervosa, bulimia nervosa and binge eating disorder: shedding light on the darkness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuesto, Germán; Everaerts, Claude; León, Leticia G; Acebes, Angel

    2017-12-01

    Eating-disorders (EDs) consequences to human health are devastating, involving social, mental, emotional, physical and life-threatening aspects, concluding on impairment and death in cases of extreme anorexia nervosa. It also implies that people suffering an ED need to find psychiatric and psychological help as soon as possible to achieve a fully physical and emotional recovery. Unfortunately, to date, there is a crucial lack of efficient clinical treatment to these disorders. In this review, we present an overview concerning the actual pharmacological and psychological treatments, the knowledge of cells, circuits, neuropeptides, neuromodulators and hormones in the human brain- and other organs- underlying these disorders, the studies in animal models and, finally, the genetic approaches devoted to face this challenge. We will also discuss the need for new perspectives, avenues and strategies to be developed in order to pave the way to novel and more efficient therapeutics.

  19. Marine viruses discovered via metagenomics shed light on viral strategies throughout the oceans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coutinho, Felipe H.; Silveira, Cynthia B.; Gregoracci, Gustavo B.; Thompson, Cristiane C.; Edwards, Robert A.; Brussaard, Corina P. D.; Dutilh, Bas E.; Thompson, Fabiano L.

    2017-07-01

    Marine viruses are key drivers of host diversity, population dynamics and biogeochemical cycling and contribute to the daily flux of billions of tons of organic matter. Despite recent advancements in metagenomics, much of their biodiversity remains uncharacterized. Here we report a data set of 27,346 marine virome contigs that includes 44 complete genomes. These outnumber all currently known phage genomes in marine habitats and include members of previously uncharacterized lineages. We designed a new method for host prediction based on co-occurrence associations that reveals these viruses infect dominant members of the marine microbiome such as Prochlorococcus and Pelagibacter. A negative association between host abundance and the virus-to-host ratio supports the recently proposed Piggyback-the-Winner model of reduced phage lysis at higher host densities. An analysis of the abundance patterns of viruses throughout the oceans revealed how marine viral communities adapt to various seasonal, temperature and photic regimes according to targeted hosts and the diversity of auxiliary metabolic genes.

  20. Shedding light on the elusive role of endothelial cells in cytomegalovirus dissemination.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Torsten Sacher

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Cytomegalovirus (CMV is frequently transmitted by solid organ transplantation and is associated with graft failure. By forming the boundary between circulation and organ parenchyma, endothelial cells (EC are suited for bidirectional virus spread from and to the transplant. We applied Cre/loxP-mediated green-fluorescence-tagging of EC-derived murine CMV (MCMV to quantify the role of infected EC in transplantation-associated CMV dissemination in the mouse model. Both EC- and non-EC-derived virus originating from infected Tie2-cre(+ heart and kidney transplants were readily transmitted to MCMV-naïve recipients by primary viremia. In contrast, when a Tie2-cre(+ transplant was infected by primary viremia in an infected recipient, the recombined EC-derived virus poorly spread to recipient tissues. Similarly, in reverse direction, EC-derived virus from infected Tie2-cre(+ recipient tissues poorly spread to the transplant. These data contradict any privileged role of EC in CMV dissemination and challenge an indiscriminate applicability of the primary and secondary viremia concept of virus dissemination.

  1. Concatenated analysis sheds light on early metazoan evolution and fuels a modern "urmetazoon" hypothesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bernd Schierwater

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available For more than a century, the origin of metazoan animals has been debated. One aspect of this debate has been centered on what the hypothetical "urmetazoon" bauplan might have been. The morphologically most simply organized metazoan animal, the placozoan Trichoplax adhaerens, resembles an intriguing model for one of several "urmetazoon" hypotheses: the placula hypothesis. Clear support for a basal position of Placozoa would aid in resolving several key issues of metazoan-specific inventions (including, for example, head-foot axis, symmetry, and coelom and would determine a root for unraveling their evolution. Unfortunately, the phylogenetic relationships at the base of Metazoa have been controversial because of conflicting phylogenetic scenarios generated while addressing the question. Here, we analyze the sum of morphological evidence, the secondary structure of mitochondrial ribosomal genes, and molecular sequence data from mitochondrial and nuclear genes that amass over 9,400 phylogenetically informative characters from 24 to 73 taxa. Together with mitochondrial DNA genome structure and sequence analyses and Hox-like gene expression patterns, these data (1 provide evidence that Placozoa are basal relative to all other diploblast phyla and (2 spark a modernized "urmetazoon" hypothesis.

  2. Concatenated analysis sheds light on early metazoan evolution and fuels a modern "urmetazoon" hypothesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schierwater, Bernd; Eitel, Michael; Jakob, Wolfgang; Osigus, Hans-Jürgen; Hadrys, Heike; Dellaporta, Stephen L; Kolokotronis, Sergios-Orestis; Desalle, Rob

    2009-01-27

    For more than a century, the origin of metazoan animals has been debated. One aspect of this debate has been centered on what the hypothetical "urmetazoon" bauplan might have been. The morphologically most simply organized metazoan animal, the placozoan Trichoplax adhaerens, resembles an intriguing model for one of several "urmetazoon" hypotheses: the placula hypothesis. Clear support for a basal position of Placozoa would aid in resolving several key issues of metazoan-specific inventions (including, for example, head-foot axis, symmetry, and coelom) and would determine a root for unraveling their evolution. Unfortunately, the phylogenetic relationships at the base of Metazoa have been controversial because of conflicting phylogenetic scenarios generated while addressing the question. Here, we analyze the sum of morphological evidence, the secondary structure of mitochondrial ribosomal genes, and molecular sequence data from mitochondrial and nuclear genes that amass over 9,400 phylogenetically informative characters from 24 to 73 taxa. Together with mitochondrial DNA genome structure and sequence analyses and Hox-like gene expression patterns, these data (1) provide evidence that Placozoa are basal relative to all other diploblast phyla and (2) spark a modernized "urmetazoon" hypothesis.

  3. Shedding Light on the Grey Zone of Speciation along a Continuum of Genomic Divergence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roux, Camille; Fraïsse, Christelle; Romiguier, Jonathan; Anciaux, Yoann; Galtier, Nicolas; Bierne, Nicolas

    2016-12-01

    Speciation results from the progressive accumulation of mutations that decrease the probability of mating between parental populations or reduce the fitness of hybrids-the so-called species barriers. The speciation genomic literature, however, is mainly a collection of case studies, each with its own approach and specificities, such that a global view of the gradual process of evolution from one to two species is currently lacking. Of primary importance is the prevalence of gene flow between diverging entities, which is central in most species concepts and has been widely discussed in recent years. Here, we explore the continuum of speciation thanks to a comparative analysis of genomic data from 61 pairs of populations/species of animals with variable levels of divergence. Gene flow between diverging gene pools is assessed under an approximate Bayesian computation (ABC) framework. We show that the intermediate "grey zone" of speciation, in which taxonomy is often controversial, spans from 0.5% to 2% of net synonymous divergence, irrespective of species life history traits or ecology. Thanks to appropriate modeling of among-locus variation in genetic drift and introgression rate, we clarify the status of the majority of ambiguous cases and uncover a number of cryptic species. Our analysis also reveals the high incidence in animals of semi-isolated species (when some but not all loci are affected by barriers to gene flow) and highlights the intrinsic difficulty, both statistical and conceptual, of delineating species in the grey zone of speciation.

  4. Shedding light on the Global Ocean microbiome with algorithms and data collection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lauro, F.; Ostrowski, M.; Chénard, C.; Acerbi, E.; Paulsen, I.; Jensen, R.

    2016-02-01

    In the Global Oceans, the marine microbiome plays a critical role in biogeochemical cycling of nutrients, but surveying marine microbial communities requires ship time for sample collection, economically constraining the number of samples collected. An integrative understanding of the microbiome's activity and performance requires the collection of high-density data, both temporally and spatially in a cost-effective way. We have overcome this bottleneck by crowdsourcing the data collection to vessels of opportunity, including bluewater sailing yachts. Sailors know the oceans, and experience first-hand the declines in ocean productivity and the effects of pollution and climate change. Moreover, simply the ability to sample a microbial community during anomalous or inclement weather conditions is a major advance in sampling strategy. Our approach inherently incorporates the benefit of outreach and participation of people in scientific research, gaining positive media attention for sailors, scientists and concerned citizens alike. We have tested the basic methods during a 2013 Indian Ocean Concept Cruise, from Cape Town to Singapore, performing experimental work and reaching sampling locations inaccessible to traditional Oceanographic Vessels. At the same time we developed a small, yacht-adapted automated sampling device that takes a variety of biological and chemical measurements. In 2015 our first beta-cruisers sampled the Pacific Ocean in the first ever citizen-oceanography transect at high and low latitudes in both hemispheres. The collected samples were characterized with next-gen sequencing technology and analysed with a combination of novel algorithmic approaches. With big data management, machine learning algorithms and agent-based models we show that it is possible to deconvolute the complexity of the Ocean Microbiome for the scientific management of fisheries, marine protected areas and preservation of the oceans and seas for generations to come.

  5. Shedding light on solar technologies-A techno-economic assessment and its policy implications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peters, Michael; Schmidt, Tobias S.; Wiederkehr, David; Schneider, Malte

    2011-01-01

    Solar power technologies will have to become a major pillar in the world's future energy system to combat climate change and resource depletion. However, it is unclear which solar technology is and will prove most viable. Therefore, a comprehensive comparative assessment of solar technologies along the key quantitative and qualitative competitiveness criteria is needed. Based on a literature review and detailed techno-economic modeling for 2010 and 2020 in five locations, we provide such an assessment for the three currently leading large-scale solar technologies. We show that today these technologies cannot yet compete with conventional forms of power generation but approach competitiveness around 2020 in favorable locations. Furthermore, from a global perspective we find that none of the solar technologies emerges as a clear winner and that cost of storing energy differs by technology and can change the order of competitiveness in some instances. Importantly, the competitiveness of the different technologies varies considerably across locations due to differences in, e.g., solar resource and discount rates. Based on this analysis, we discuss policy implications with regard to fostering the diffusion of solar technologies while increasing the efficiency of policy support through an adequate geographical allocation of solar technologies. - Highlights: → We conduct a comprehensive comparative assessment of solar technologies (CSP/PV). → While solar technologies approach competitiveness in 2020, no clear winner emerges. → Solar resource and discount rate heavily impact competitiveness of solar technologies. → Adequate geographical allocation of solar technologies increases policy efficiency. → Focus on key cost down levers and strategic co-benefits of solar technologies needed.

  6. Expression patterns ofPassiflora edulis APETALA1/FRUITFULLhomologues shed light onto tendril and corona identities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scorza, Livia C T; Hernandes-Lopes, Jose; Melo-de-Pinna, Gladys F A; Dornelas, Marcelo C

    2017-01-01

    Passiflora (passionflowers) makes an excellent model for studying plant evolutionary development. They are mostly perennial climbers that display axillary tendrils, which are believed to be modifications of the inflorescence. Passionflowers are also recognized by their unique flower features, such as the extra whorls of floral organs composed of corona filaments and membranes enclosing the nectary. Although some work on Passiflora organ ontogeny has been done, the developmental identity of both Passiflora tendrils and the corona is still controversial. Here, we combined ultrastructural analysis and expression patterns of the flower meristem and floral organ identity genes of the MADS-box AP1 / FUL clade to reveal a possible role for these genes in the generation of evolutionary novelties in Passiflora . We followed the development of structures arising from the axillary meristem from juvenile to adult phase in P. edulis . We further assessed the expression pattern of P. edulis AP1 / FUL homologues ( PeAP1 and PeFUL ), by RT-qPCR and in situ hybridization in several tissues, correlating it with the developmental stages of P. edulis . PeAP1 is expressed only in the reproductive stage, and it is highly expressed in tendrils and in flower meristems from the onset of their development. PeAP1 is also expressed in sepals, petals and in corona filaments, suggesting a novel role for PeAP1 in floral organ diversification. PeFUL presented a broad expression pattern in both vegetative and reproductive tissues, and it is also expressed in fruits. Our results provide new molecular insights into the morphological diversity in the genus Passiflora . Here, we bring new evidence that tendrils are part of the Passiflora inflorescence. This points to the convergence of similar developmental processes involving the recruitment of genes related to flower identity in the origin of tendrils in different plant families. The data obtained also support the hypothesis that the corona

  7. Expression patterns of Passiflora edulis APETALA1/FRUITFULL homologues shed light onto tendril and corona identities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Livia C. T. Scorza

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Passiflora (passionflowers makes an excellent model for studying plant evolutionary development. They are mostly perennial climbers that display axillary tendrils, which are believed to be modifications of the inflorescence. Passionflowers are also recognized by their unique flower features, such as the extra whorls of floral organs composed of corona filaments and membranes enclosing the nectary. Although some work on Passiflora organ ontogeny has been done, the developmental identity of both Passiflora tendrils and the corona is still controversial. Here, we combined ultrastructural analysis and expression patterns of the flower meristem and floral organ identity genes of the MADS-box AP1/FUL clade to reveal a possible role for these genes in the generation of evolutionary novelties in Passiflora. Results We followed the development of structures arising from the axillary meristem from juvenile to adult phase in P. edulis. We further assessed the expression pattern of P. edulis AP1/FUL homologues (PeAP1 and PeFUL, by RT-qPCR and in situ hybridization in several tissues, correlating it with the developmental stages of P. edulis. PeAP1 is expressed only in the reproductive stage, and it is highly expressed in tendrils and in flower meristems from the onset of their development. PeAP1 is also expressed in sepals, petals and in corona filaments, suggesting a novel role for PeAP1 in floral organ diversification. PeFUL presented a broad expression pattern in both vegetative and reproductive tissues, and it is also expressed in fruits. Conclusions Our results provide new molecular insights into the morphological diversity in the genus Passiflora. Here, we bring new evidence that tendrils are part of the Passiflora inflorescence. This points to the convergence of similar developmental processes involving the recruitment of genes related to flower identity in the origin of tendrils in different plant families. The data obtained also

  8. Shedding new light on the K-Pg extinction event: application of modern fire science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadden, Rory; Rein, Guillermo; Belcher, Claire

    2016-04-01

    The impact on fire on the earth system is a key component to understand the long term evolutionary history of our planet. However, in order to fully explore the role of fire, it is essential to draw on the significant existing literature and methods available to both palaeontologists and fire scientists if we are to better interpret the fossil record of life. A novel cross-disciplinary approach was developed to investigate the extent to which forest materials may have been ignited by the thermal radiation delivered by the collision of an extra-terrestrial body on the Yucatán Peninsula at the end of the Cretaceous period. A novel experimental approach was developed through close collaboration between earth scientists and fire safety engineers that drew on well established procedures for assessing material flammability. Through close working in both experimental design and interpretation, a new method to rapidly and effectively assess the expected ignition behaviour resulting from this event was developed. Prior modelling of the impact indicated that the impact resulted in a range of heat flux pulses, dependent on the angle of impact and melt spherule distribution and was shown to vary as a function of geographical location. These data were used as an input to a series of laboratory experiments undertaken at the Rushbrook Fire Laboratory at the University of Edinburgh. Building on existing material flammability assessment methods, modifications were made to the operation of the FM Global Fire Propagation Apparatus to allow these time-dependent heat flux pulses to be reproduced in the laboratory under controlled conditions of thermal input and burning environment. The results indicate that the ignition propensity of a particular biome is strongly dependent on both the fuel available and the heat pulse. It was observed that thin, dry fuels could be ignited easily under almost every condition but that live fuels could not. Live fuels could only be ignited by the less

  9. Numerical investigation of vortex shedding and vortex-induced vibration for flexible riser models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zheng-Shou Chen

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available The numerical study about the vortex-induced vibration and vortex shedding in the wake has been presented. Prior to the numerical simulation of flexible riser systems concerning engineering conditions, efficiency validating of the proposed FSI solution method have been performed. The comparison between numerical simulation and published experimental data shows that the CFD method designed for FSI solution could give acceptable result for the VIV prediction of flexible riser/pipe system. As meaningful study on VIV and vortex shedding mode with the focus on flexible riser model systems, two kinds of typical simulation cases have been carried out. One was related to the simulation of vortex visualization in the wake for a riser model subject to forced oscillation, and another was related to the simulation of fluid-structure interaction between the pipes of coupled multi-assembled riser system. The result from forced oscillation simulation shows that the vortex-induced vibration with high response frequency but small instantaneous vibration amplitude contributes to vortex conformation as much as the forced oscillation with large normalized amplitude does, when the frequency of forced oscillation was relatively high. In the multi-assembled riser systems, it has been found that the external current velocity and the distance between two pipes are the critical factors to determine the vibration state and the steady vibration state emerging in quad-pipe system may be destroyed more easily than dual-pipe system.

  10. ITS Polymorphisms Shed Light on Hybrid Evolution in Apomictic Plants: A Case Study on the Ranunculus auricomus Complex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodač, Ladislav; Scheben, Armin Patrick; Hojsgaard, Diego; Paun, Ovidiu; Hörandl, Elvira

    2014-01-01

    The reconstruction of reticulate evolutionary histories in plants is still a major methodological challenge. Sequences of the ITS nrDNA are a popular marker to analyze hybrid relationships, but variation of this multicopy spacer region is affected by concerted evolution, high intraindividual polymorphism, and shifts in mode of reproduction. The relevance of changes in secondary structure is still under dispute. We aim to shed light on the extent of polymorphism within and between sexual species and their putative natural as well as synthetic hybrid derivatives in the Ranunculus auricomus complex to test morphology-based hypotheses of hybrid origin and parentage of taxa. We employed direct sequencing of ITS nrDNA from 68 individuals representing three sexuals, their synthetic hybrids and one sympatric natural apomict, as well as cloning of ITS copies in four representative individuals, RNA secondary structure analysis, and landmark geometric morphometric analysis on leaves. Phylogenetic network analyses indicate additivity of parental ITS variants in both synthetic and natural hybrids. The triploid synthetic hybrids are genetically much closer to their maternal progenitors, probably due to ploidy dosage effects, although exhibiting a paternal-like leaf morphology. The natural hybrids are genetically and morphologically closer to the putative paternal progenitor species. Secondary structures of ITS1-5.8S-ITS2 were rather conserved in all taxa. The observed similarities in ITS polymorphisms suggest that the natural apomict R. variabilis is an ancient hybrid of the diploid sexual species R. notabilis and the sexual species R. cassubicifolius. The additivity pattern shared by R. variabilis and the synthetic hybrids supports an evolutionary and biogeographical scenario that R. variabilis originated from ancient hybridization. Concerted evolution of ITS copies in R. variabilis is incomplete, probably due to a shift to asexual reproduction. Under the condition of

  11. Model Tests of Under Frequency Load Shedding (UFLS for Connected Systems of Continental Europe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marek Głaz

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The task force set up by working group System Protection and Dynamics within ENTSO-E model tests of Under Frequency Load Shedding (UFLS for connected systems of continental Europe were carried out. Over 360 simulation scenarios were performed including 16 strategies UFLS, 2 variants of load, 6 types of contingency, with and without considering the impact of dispersed generation. On the basis of calculation results conditions for improving the effectiveness of the UFLS were specified,, including recommended changes of UFLS settings, necessary to achieve this aim. The following report contains a summary description of the test method together with the presentation of selected results of summary calculations and conclusions of the study.

  12. Prediction models for 90Sr in shed deciduous teeth and infant bone

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aarkrog, Asker

    1971-01-01

    Shed deciduous teeth were collected in 1966-69 in Denmark, the Faroes and Greenland from children born in the period 1953-63. 235 samples of crowns were analysed for 90Sr. The 90Sr levels in deciduous tooth crowns were related to the fall-out rate and the accumulated fall-out. The tooth levels...... in children born in 1950-62 could be described with the same equation as the 90Sr bone levels in 1-yr-old infants born in 1962-68. The prediction models for 90Sr in teeth and bones showed that for given amount of fall-out the Faroese levels became nearly twice as high as the Danish. The maximum teeth and bone...

  13. Trade-offs between light interception and leaf water shedding: a comparison of shade- and sun-adapted species in a subtropical rainforest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Fengqun; Cao, Rui; Yang, Dongmei; Niklas, Karl J; Sun, Shucun

    2014-01-01

    Species in high-rainfall regions have two major alternative approaches to quickly drain off water, i.e., increasing leaf inclination angles relative to the horizontal plane, or developing long leaf drip tips. We hypothesized that shade-adapted species will have more pronounced leaf drip tips but not greater inclination angles (which can reduce the ability to intercept light) compared to sun-adapted species and that length of leaf drip tips will be negatively correlated with photosynthetic capacity [characterized by light-saturated net photosynthetic rates (Amax), associated light compensation points (LCP), and light saturation points (LSP)]. We tested this hypothesis by measuring morphological and physiological traits that are associated with light-interception and water shedding for seven shade-adapted shrub species, ten sun-adapted understory shrub species, and 15 sun-adapted tree species in a subtropical Chinese rainforest, where mean annual precipitation is around 1,600 mm. Shade-adapted understory species had lower LMA, Amax, LSP, and LCP compared to understory or canopy sun-adapted species; their leaf and twig inclination angles were significantly smaller and leaf drip tips were significantly longer than those in sun-adapted species. This suggests that shade-adapted understory species tend to develop pronounced leaf drip tips but not large leaf inclination angles to shed water. The length of leaf drip tips was negatively correlated with leaf inclination angles and photosynthetic capacity. These relationships were consistent between ordinary regression and phylogenetic generalized least squares analyses. Our study illustrates the trade-offs between light interception and leaf water shedding and indicates that length of leaf drip tips can be used as an indicator of adaptation to shady conditions and overall photosynthetic performance of shrub species in subtropical rainforests.

  14. A mouse model of pathological small intestinal epithelial cell apoptosis and shedding induced by systemic administration of lipopolysaccharide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan M. Williams

    2013-11-01

    The gut barrier, composed of a single layer of intestinal epithelial cells (IECs held together by tight junctions, prevents the entrance of harmful microorganisms, antigens and toxins from the gut lumen into the blood. Small intestinal homeostasis is normally maintained by the rate of shedding of senescent enterocytes from the villus tip exactly matching the rate of generation of new cells in the crypt. However, in various localized and systemic inflammatory conditions, intestinal homeostasis can be disturbed as a result of increased IEC shedding. Such pathological IEC shedding can cause transient gaps to develop in the epithelial barrier and result in increased intestinal permeability. Although pathological IEC shedding has been implicated in the pathogenesis of conditions such as inflammatory bowel disease, our understanding of the underlying mechanisms remains limited. We have therefore developed a murine model to study this phenomenon, because IEC shedding in this species is morphologically analogous to humans. IEC shedding was induced by systemic lipopolysaccharide (LPS administration in wild-type C57BL/6 mice, and in mice deficient in TNF-receptor 1 (Tnfr1−/−, Tnfr2 (Tnfr2−/−, nuclear factor kappa B1 (Nfκb1−/− or Nfĸb2 (Nfĸb2−/−. Apoptosis and cell shedding was quantified using immunohistochemistry for active caspase-3, and gut-to-circulation permeability was assessed by measuring plasma fluorescence following fluorescein-isothiocyanate–dextran gavage. LPS, at doses ≥0.125 mg/kg body weight, induced rapid villus IEC apoptosis, with peak cell shedding occurring at 1.5 hours after treatment. This coincided with significant villus shortening, fluid exudation into the gut lumen and diarrhea. A significant increase in gut-to-circulation permeability was observed at 5 hours. TNFR1 was essential for LPS-induced IEC apoptosis and shedding, and the fate of the IECs was also dependent on NFκB, with signaling via NFκB1 favoring cell survival and

  15. Information-Theoretic Approach May Shed a Light to a Better Understanding and Sustaining the Integrity of Ecological-Societal Systems under Changing Climate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, J.

    2016-12-01

    Considering high levels of uncertainty, epistemological conflicts over facts and values, and a sense of urgency, normal paradigm-driven science will be insufficient to mobilize people and nation toward sustainability. The conceptual framework to bridge the societal system dynamics with that of natural ecosystems in which humanity operates remains deficient. The key to understanding their coevolution is to understand `self-organization.' Information-theoretic approach may shed a light to provide a potential framework which enables not only to bridge human and nature but also to generate useful knowledge for understanding and sustaining the integrity of ecological-societal systems. How can information theory help understand the interface between ecological systems and social systems? How to delineate self-organizing processes and ensure them to fulfil sustainability? How to evaluate the flow of information from data through models to decision-makers? These are the core questions posed by sustainability science in which visioneering (i.e., the engineering of vision) is an essential framework. Yet, visioneering has neither quantitative measure nor information theoretic framework to work with and teach. This presentation is an attempt to accommodate the framework of self-organizing hierarchical open systems with visioneering into a common information-theoretic framework. A case study is presented with the UN/FAO's communal vision of climate-smart agriculture (CSA) which pursues a trilemma of efficiency, mitigation, and resilience. Challenges of delineating and facilitating self-organizing systems are discussed using transdisciplinary toold such as complex systems thinking, dynamic process network analysis and multi-agent systems modeling. Acknowledgments: This study was supported by the Korea Meteorological Administration Research and Development Program under Grant KMA-2012-0001-A (WISE project).

  16. The High-Throughput Stochastic Human Exposure and Dose Simulation Model (SHEDS-HT) & The Chemical and Products Database (CPDat)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Stochastic Human Exposure and Dose Simulation Model – High-Throughput (SHEDS-HT) is a U.S. Environmental Protection Agency research tool for predicting screening-level (low-tier) exposures to chemicals in consumer products. This course will present an overview of this m...

  17. Models of light nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harvey, M.; Khanna, F.C.

    1975-01-01

    The general problem of what constitutes a physical model and what is known about the free nucleon-nucleon interaction are considered. A time independent formulation of the basic equations is chosen. Construction of the average field in which particles move in a general independent particle model is developed, concentrating on problems of defining the average spherical single particle field for any given nucleus, and methods for construction of effective residual interactions and other physical operators. Deformed shell models and both spherical and deformed harmonic oscillator models are discussed in detail, and connections between spherical and deformed shell models are analyzed. A section on cluster models is included. 11 tables, 21 figures

  18. Shedding light on the expansion and diversification of the Cdc48 protein family during the rise of the eukaryotic cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kienle, Nickias; Kloepper, Tobias H; Fasshauer, Dirk

    2016-10-18

    A defining feature of eukaryotic cells is the presence of various distinct membrane-bound compartments with different metabolic roles. Material exchange between most compartments occurs via a sophisticated vesicle trafficking system. This intricate cellular architecture of eukaryotes appears to have emerged suddenly, about 2 billion years ago, from much less complex ancestors. How the eukaryotic cell acquired its internal complexity is poorly understood, partly because no prokaryotic precursors have been found for many key factors involved in compartmentalization. One exception is the Cdc48 protein family, which consists of several distinct classical ATPases associated with various cellular activities (AAA+) proteins with two consecutive AAA domains. Here, we have classified the Cdc48 family through iterative use of hidden Markov models and tree building. We found only one type, Cdc48, in prokaryotes, although a set of eight diverged members that function at distinct subcellular compartments were retrieved from eukaryotes and were probably present in the last eukaryotic common ancestor (LECA). Pronounced changes in sequence and domain structure during the radiation into the LECA set are delineated. Moreover, our analysis brings to light lineage-specific losses and duplications that often reflect important biological changes. Remarkably, we also found evidence for internal duplications within the LECA set that probably occurred during the rise of the eukaryotic cell. Our analysis corroborates the idea that the diversification of the Cdc48 family is closely intertwined with the development of the compartments of the eukaryotic cell.

  19. Control of a coupled map lattice model for vortex shedding in the ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    portional, adaptive proportional and discontinuous non-linear (DNL) control methods were used to derive the control ... Keywords. Non-linear dynamics; coupled map lattices; control of chaos; adaptive control; vortex shedding ..... After this optimization study, γ =0.9 was chosen as the input feedback gain parameter for all ...

  20. Children's residential exposure to chlorpyrifos: Application of CPPAES field measurements of chlorpyrifos and TCPy within MENTOR/SHEDS-Pesticides model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hore, Paromita; Zartarian, Valerie; Xue Jianping; Ozkaynak, Haluk; Wang, S.-W.; Yang, Y.-C.; Chu, P.-Ling; Sheldon, Linda; Robson, Mark; Needham, Larry; Barr, Dana; Freeman, Natalie; Georgopoulos, Panos; Lioy, Paul J.

    2006-01-01

    The comprehensive individual field-measurements on non-dietary exposure collected in the Children's-Post-Pesticide-Application-Exposure-Study (CPPAES) were used within MENTOR/SHEDS-Pesticides, a physically based stochastic human exposure and dose model. In this application, however, the model was run deterministically. The MENTOR/SHEDS-Pesticides employed the CPPAES as input variables to simulate the exposure and the dose profiles for seven children over a 2-week post-application period following a routine residential and professional indoor crack-and-crevice chlorpyrifos application. The input variables were obtained from a personal activity diary, microenvironmental measurements and personal biomonitoring data obtained from CPPAES samples collected from the individual children and in their homes. Simulation results were compared with CPPAES field measured values obtained from the children's homes to assess the utility of the different microenvironmental data collected in CPPAES, i.e. indicator toys and wipe samplers to estimate aggregate exposures that can be result from one or more exposure pathways and routes. The final analyses of the database involved comparisons of the actual data obtained from the individual biomarker samples of a urinary metabolite of chlorpyrifos (TCPy) and the values predicted by MENTOR/SHEDS-Pesticides using the CPPAES-derived variables. Because duplicate diet samples were not part of the CPPAES study design, SHEDs-Pesticides simulated dose profiles did not account for the dietary route. The research provided more confidence in the types of data that can be used in the inhalation and dermal contact modules of MENTOR/SHEDS-Pesticides to predict the pesticide dose received by a child. It was determined that we still need additional understanding about: (1) the types of activities and durations of activities that result in non-dietary ingestion of pesticides and (2) the influence of dietary exposures on the levels of TCPy found in the

  1. Numerical 3D analysis of cloud cavitation shedding frequency on a circular leading edge hydrofoil with a barotropic cavitation model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blume, M.; Skoda, R.

    2015-12-01

    A compressible density-based time-explicit low Mach number consistent viscous flow solver is utilised in combination with a barotropic cavitation model for the analysis of cloud cavitation on a circular leading edge (CLE) hydrofoil. For 5° angle of attack, cloud structure and shedding frequency for different cavitation numbers are compared to experimental data. A strong grid sensitivity is found in particular for high cavitation numbers. On a fine grid, a very good agreement with validation data is achieved even without explicit turbulence model. The neglect of viscous effects as well as a two-dimensional set-up lead to a less realistic prediction of cloud structures and frequencies. Comparative simulations with the Sauer-Schnerr cavitation model and modified pre-factors of the mass transfer terms underestimate the measured shedding frequency.

  2. Shedding New Light on Exploding Stars: Tera-Scale Simulation of Neutrino-Driven Supernovae and their Nucleosynthesis. Final Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fuller, George M.

    2006-01-01

    Goals: I took seriously the charge to SciDAC P.I.'s to go after outstanding and key physics problems with cutting-edge numerical science. I proposed solving a key problem in core collapse supernova physics: the evolution of neutrino flavors in the supernova environment. A great deal may be riding on the solution to this problem. First, laboratory physics outstripped the supernova theorists, providing us with neutrino mass-squared differences and two of the three vacuum mixing angles. This data had not been incorporated into core collapse supernova models before, but it clearly pointed to the possibility of major changes to our existing supernova neutrino paradigm. Second, knowing how the neutrino and antineutrino energy spectra and fluxes evolved through flavor inter-conversion could be crucial for determining and understanding the supernova neutrino signal, light p-process, and r-process nucleosynthesis, and possibly even the shock re-heating problem. Moreover, much about fundamental neutrino properties remains unresolved by terrestrial experiment (e.g., the neutrino mass hierarchy, θ 13 , etc.). Unraveling the supernova neutrino flavor evolution problem coupled with a future Galactic supernova signal could allow determination of these unknown neutrino properties. Results and Findings: We solved the problem of coherent neutrino flavor evolution (both 2 x 2 and 3 x 3) in the supernova environment, for the first time incorporating self-consistently the nonlinear geometric and quantum trajectory coupling outlined above. The results were unexpected and surprising. These results hold out the possibility that a future Galactic supernova neutrino signal could give us significant insights into both fundamental neutrino physics, otherwise inacces- sible in the lab (e.g., the neutrino mass hierarchy, θ 13 ), and key issues in supernova physics (e.g., distinguishing between Fe core collapse and O-Ne-Mg core collapse events). First, the numerical solution to this problem

  3. Shedding light on cell compartmentation in the candidate phylum Poribacteria by high resolution visualisation and transcriptional profiling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jahn, Martin T.; Markert, Sebastian M.; Ryu, Taewoo; Ravasi, Timothy; Stigloher, Christian; Hentschel, Ute; Moitinho-Silva, Lucas

    2016-10-01

    Assigning functions to uncultivated environmental microorganisms continues to be a challenging endeavour. Here, we present a new microscopy protocol for fluorescence in situ hybridisation-correlative light and electron microscopy (FISH-CLEM) that enabled, to our knowledge for the first time, the identification of single cells within their complex microenvironment at electron microscopy resolution. Members of the candidate phylum Poribacteria, common and uncultivated symbionts of marine sponges, were used towards this goal. Cellular 3D reconstructions revealed bipolar, spherical granules of low electron density, which likely represent carbon reserves. Poribacterial activity profiles were retrieved from prokaryotic enriched sponge metatranscriptomes using simulation-based optimised mapping. We observed high transcriptional activity for proteins related to bacterial microcompartments (BMC) and we resolved their subcellular localisation by combining FISH-CLEM with immunohistochemistry (IHC) on ultra-thin sponge tissue sections. In terms of functional relevance, we propose that the BMC-A region may be involved in 1,2-propanediol degradation. The FISH-IHC-CLEM approach was proven an effective toolkit to combine -omics approaches with functional studies and it should be widely applicable in environmental microbiology.

  4. Shedding lights on the flexible-armed porphyrins: Human telomeric G4 DNA interaction and cell photocytotoxicity research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Xiang-Yu; Zhao, Ping; Jin, Shu-Fang; Liu, Min-Chao; Wang, Xia-Hong; Huang, Yu-Min; Cheng, Zhen-Feng; Yan, Si-Qi; Li, Yan-Yu; Chen, Ya-Qing; Zhong, Yan-Mei

    2017-08-01

    DNA polymorphism exerts a fascination on a large scientific community. Without crystallographic structural data, clarification of the binding modes between G-quadruplex (G4) and ligand (complex) is a challenging job. In the present work, three porphyrin compounds with different flexible carbon chains (arms) were designed, synthesized and characterized. Their binding, folding and stabilizing abilities to human telomeric G4 DNA structures were comparatively researched. Positive charges at the end of the flexible carbon chains seem to be favorable for the DNA-porphyrin interactions, which were evidenced by the spectral results and further confirmed by the molecular docking calculations. Biological function analysis demonstrated that these porphyrins show no substantial inhibition to Hela, A549 and BEL 7402 cancer cell lines under dark while exhibit broad inhibition under visible light. This significantly enhanced photocytotoxicity relative to the dark control is an essential property of photochemotherapeutic agents. The feature of the flexible arms emerges as critical influencing factors in the cell photocytotoxicity. Moreover, an ROS-mediated mitochondrial dysfunction pathway was suggested for the cell apoptosis induced by these flexible-armed porphyrins. It is found that the porphyrins with positive charges located at the end of the flexible arms represent an exciting opportunity for photochemotherapeutic anti-cancer drug design. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  5. Shedding light on cell compartmentation in the candidate phylum Poribacteria by high resolution visualisation and transcriptional profiling

    KAUST Repository

    Jahn, Martin T.

    2016-10-31

    Assigning functions to uncultivated environmental microorganisms continues to be a challenging endeavour. Here, we present a new microscopy protocol for fluorescence in situ hybridisation-correlative light and electron microscopy (FISH-CLEM) that enabled, to our knowledge for the first time, the identification of single cells within their complex microenvironment at electron microscopy resolution. Members of the candidate phylum Poribacteria, common and uncultivated symbionts of marine sponges, were used towards this goal. Cellular 3D reconstructions revealed bipolar, spherical granules of low electron density, which likely represent carbon reserves. Poribacterial activity profiles were retrieved from prokaryotic enriched sponge metatranscriptomes using simulation-based optimised mapping. We observed high transcriptional activity for proteins related to bacterial microcompartments (BMC) and we resolved their subcellular localisation by combining FISH-CLEM with immunohistochemistry (IHC) on ultra-thin sponge tissue sections. In terms of functional relevance, we propose that the BMC-A region may be involved in 1,2-propanediol degradation. The FISH-IHC-CLEM approach was proven an effective toolkit to combine -omics approaches with functional studies and it should be widely applicable in environmental microbiology.

  6. MulensModel: Microlensing light curves modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poleski, Radoslaw; Yee, Jennifer

    2018-03-01

    MulensModel calculates light curves of microlensing events. Both single and binary lens events are modeled and various higher-order effects can be included: extended source (with limb-darkening), annual microlensing parallax, and satellite microlensing parallax. The code is object-oriented and written in Python3, and requires AstroPy (ascl:1304.002).

  7. Model for how an accretion disk drives astrophysical jets and sheds angular momentum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellan, Paul M.

    2018-01-01

    Clumps of ions and neutrals in the weakly ionized plasma in an accretion disk are shown to follow trajectories analogous to those of fictitious ‘metaparticles’ having a charge to mass ratio reduced from that of an ion by the ionization fraction. A certain class of meta-particles have zero-canonical angular momentum and so spiral in towards the star. Accumulation of these meta-particles establishes a radial electric field that drives the electric current that flows in bidirectional astrophysical jets lying along the disk axis and provides forces that drive the jets. The entire process converts gravitational potential energy into jet energy while absorbing angular momentum from accreting material and shedding this angular momentum at near infinite radius.

  8. SHEDS-Multimedia Model Version 3 (a) Technical Manual; (b) User Guide; and (c) Executable File to Launch SAS Program and Install Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reliable models for assessing human exposures are important for understanding health risks from chemicals. The Stochastic Human Exposure and Dose Simulation model for multimedia, multi-route/pathway chemicals (SHEDS-Multimedia), developed by EPA’s Office of Research and Developm...

  9. Endemic palm species shed light on habitat shifts and the assembly of the Cerrado and Restinga floras.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bacon, Christine D; Moraes R, Monica; Jaramillo, Carlos; Antonelli, Alexandre

    2017-05-01

    Species expansions into new habitats are often associated with physiological adaptations, for instance when rain forest lineages colonize dry habitats. Although such shifts have been documented for the Brazilian savanna (Cerrado), little is known about the biogeographic origin of species occupying an extreme South American habitat type, the coastal dunes (Restinga). We examined the formation of this poorly known, endangered habitat by reconstructing the evolutionary history of two endemic species. Due to the proposed recency and uniqueness of this habitat, we hypothesized that Restinga species of the palm genus Allagoptera to be recently evolved and to present derived morphological characters. To detect habit shifts in absolute time, we used one plastid and nine nuclear genes to reconstruct the phylogenetic and biogeographic history of Allagoptera. We used light microscopy and stable isotope analysis to explore whether morphological adaptations occurred concomitantly with habitat shifts. Phylogenetic relationships were well supported and we found ancestral lineages of Allagoptera to be widely distributed throughout habitats that are currently occupied by extant species. Over the last ca. 7Ma Allagoptera has shifted its preference to increasingly dry habitats. Coincident with the colonization of the Cerrado and Restinga, morphological adaptations also evolved, including subterranean stems that are fire-resistant and long underground stem and root systems that facilitate water access. We did not find differences in metabolic pathway or modifications to pollen morphology when compared to other palm lineages. Assuming that the evolutionary history of Allagoptera is indicative of the habitat in which it occurs, our results infer a recent origin for Cerrado species. Although little is known about the formation of the Restinga habitat, our results also suggest a longer history than currently proposed; with an origin of Restinga habitats dating back to the Late Pliocene

  10. Recently evolved diversity and convergent radiations of rainforest mahoganies (Meliaceae) shed new light on the origins of rainforest hyperdiversity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koenen, E.J.M.; Clarkson, J.J.; Pennington, T.D.; Chatrou, L.W.

    2015-01-01

    •Tropical rainforest hyperdiversity is often suggested to have evolved over a long time-span (the ‘museum’ model), but there is also evidence for recent rainforest radiations. The mahoganies (Meliaceae) are a prominent plant group in lowland tropical rainforests world-wide but also occur in all

  11. Shedding light on walking in the dark: the effects of reduced lighting on the gait of older adults with a higher-level gait disorder and controls

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gruendlinger Leor

    2005-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective To study the effects of reduced lighting on the gait of older adults with a high level gait disorder (HLGD and to compare their response to that of healthy elderly controls. Methods 22 patients with a HLGD and 20 age-matched healthy controls were studied under usual lighting conditions (1000 lumens and in near darkness (5 lumens. Gait speed and gait dynamics were measured under both conditions. Cognitive function, co-morbidities, depressive symptoms, and vision were also evaluated. Results Under usual lighting conditions, patients walked more slowly, with reduced swing times, and increased stride-to-stride variability, compared to controls. When walking under near darkness conditions, both groups slowed their gait. All other measures of gait were not affected by lighting in the controls. In contrast, patients further reduced their swing times and increased their stride-to-stride variability, both stride time variability and swing time variability. The unique response of the patients was not explained by vision, mental status, co-morbidities, or the values of walking under usual lighting conditions. Conclusion Walking with reduced lighting does not affect the gait of healthy elderly subjects, except for a reduction in speed. On the other hand, the gait of older adults with a HLGD becomes more variable and unsteady when they walk in near darkness, despite adapting a slow and cautious gait. Further work is needed to identify the causes of the maladaptive response among patients with a HLGD and the potential connection between this behavior and the increased fall risk observed in these patients.

  12. Human mitochondrial Hsp70 (mortalin): shedding light on ATPase activity, interaction with adenosine nucleotides, solution structure and domain organization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dores-Silva, Paulo R; Barbosa, Leandro R S; Ramos, Carlos H I; Borges, Júlio C

    2015-01-01

    The human mitochondrial Hsp70, also called mortalin, is of considerable importance for mitochondria biogenesis and the correct functioning of the cell machinery. In the mitochondrial matrix, mortalin acts in the importing and folding process of nucleus-encoded proteins. The in vivo deregulation of mortalin expression and/or function has been correlated with age-related diseases and certain cancers due to its interaction with the p53 protein. In spite of its critical biological roles, structural and functional studies on mortalin are limited by its insoluble recombinant production. This study provides the first report of the production of folded and soluble recombinant mortalin when co-expressed with the human Hsp70-escort protein 1, but it is still likely prone to self-association. The monomeric fraction of mortalin presented a slightly elongated shape and basal ATPase activity that is higher than that of its cytoplasmic counterpart Hsp70-1A, suggesting that it was obtained in the functional state. Through small angle X-ray scattering, we assessed the low-resolution structural model of monomeric mortalin that is characterized by an elongated shape. This model adequately accommodated high resolution structures of Hsp70 domains indicating its quality. We also observed that mortalin interacts with adenosine nucleotides with high affinity. Thermally induced unfolding experiments indicated that mortalin is formed by at least two domains and that the transition is sensitive to the presence of adenosine nucleotides and that this process is dependent on the presence of Mg2+ ions. Interestingly, the thermal-induced unfolding assays of mortalin suggested the presence of an aggregation/association event, which was not observed for human Hsp70-1A, and this finding may explain its natural tendency for in vivo aggregation. Our study may contribute to the structural understanding of mortalin as well as to contribute for its recombinant production for antitumor compound screenings.

  13. Pushed for time or saving on fuel: fine-scale energy budgets shed light on currencies in a diving bird.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shepard, Emily L C; Wilson, Rory P; Quintana, Flavio; Laich, Agustina Gómez; Forman, Dan W

    2009-09-07

    Animals may forage using different currencies depending on whether time minimization or energy maximization is more pertinent at the time. Assessment of net energy acquisition requires detailed information on instantaneous activity-specific power use, which varies according to animal performance, being influenced, for example, by speed and prey loading, and which has not been measured before in wild animals. We used a new proxy for instantaneous energy expenditure (overall dynamic body acceleration), to quantify foraging effort in a model species, the imperial shag Phalacrocorax atriceps, during diving. Power costs varied nonlinearly with depth exploited owing to depth-related buoyancy. Consequently, solutions for maximizing the gross rate of gain and energetic efficiency differed for dives to any given depth. Dive effort in free-ranging imperial shags measured during the breeding season was consistent with a strategy to maximize the gross rate of energy gain. We suggest that the divergence of time and energy costs with dive depth has implications for the measurement of dive efficiency across diverse diving taxa.

  14. Next Generation Sequencing of Chromosome-Specific Libraries Sheds Light on Genome Evolution in Paleotetraploid Sterlet (Acipenser ruthenus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andreyushkova, Daria A; Makunin, Alexey I; Beklemisheva, Violetta R; Romanenko, Svetlana A; Druzhkova, Anna S; Biltueva, Larisa B; Serdyukova, Natalya A; Graphodatsky, Alexander S; Trifonov, Vladimir A

    2017-11-10

    Several whole genome duplication (WGD) events followed by rediploidization took place in the evolutionary history of vertebrates. Acipenserids represent a convenient model group for investigation of the consequences of WGD as their representatives underwent additional WGD events in different lineages resulting in ploidy level variation between species, and these processes are still ongoing. Earlier, we obtained a set of sterlet (Acipenser ruthenus) chromosome-specific libraries by microdissection and revealed that they painted two or four pairs of whole sterlet chromosomes, as well as additional chromosomal regions, depending on rediploidization status and chromosomal rearrangements after genome duplication. In this study, we employed next generation sequencing to estimate the content of libraries derived from different paralogous chromosomes of sterlet. For this purpose, we aligned the obtained reads to the spotted gar (Lepisosteus oculatus) reference genome to reveal syntenic regions between these two species having diverged 360 Mya. We also showed that the approach is effective for synteny prediction at various evolutionary distances and allows one to clearly distinguish paralogous chromosomes in polyploid genomes. We postulated that after the acipenserid-specific WGD sterlet karyotype underwent multiple interchromosomal rearrangements, but different chromosomes were involved in this process unequally.

  15. Expression analysis in response to drought stress in soybean: Shedding light on the regulation of metabolic pathway genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guimarães-Dias, Fábia; Neves-Borges, Anna Cristina; Viana, Antonio Americo Barbosa; Mesquita, Rosilene Oliveira; Romano, Eduardo; de Fátima Grossi-de-Sá, Maria; Nepomuceno, Alexandre Lima; Loureiro, Marcelo Ehlers; Alves-Ferreira, Márcio

    2012-06-01

    Metabolomics analysis of wild type Arabidopsis thaliana plants, under control and drought stress conditions revealed several metabolic pathways that are induced under water deficit. The metabolic response to drought stress is also associated with ABA dependent and independent pathways, allowing a better understanding of the molecular mechanisms in this model plant. Through combining an in silico approach and gene expression analysis by quantitative real-time PCR, the present work aims at identifying genes of soybean metabolic pathways potentially associated with water deficit. Digital expression patterns of Arabidopsis genes, which were selected based on the basis of literature reports, were evaluated under drought stress condition by Genevestigator. Genes that showed strong induction under drought stress were selected and used as bait to identify orthologs in the soybean genome. This allowed us to select 354 genes of putative soybean orthologs of 79 Arabidopsis genes belonging to 38 distinct metabolic pathways. The expression pattern of the selected genes was verified in the subtractive libraries available in the GENOSOJA project. Subsequently, 13 genes from different metabolic pathways were selected for validation by qPCR experiments. The expression of six genes was validated in plants undergoing drought stress in both pot-based and hydroponic cultivation systems. The results suggest that the metabolic response to drought stress is conserved in Arabidopsis and soybean plants.

  16. Shedding light to sleep studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dieffenderfer, James; Krystal, Andrew; Bozkurt, Alper

    2017-08-01

    This paper presents our efforts in the development of a small wireless, flexible bandage sized near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) system for sleep analysis. The current size of the system is 2.8 cm × 1.7 cm × 0.6 cm. It is capable of performing NIRS with 660nm, 940nm and 850nm wavelengths for up to 11 hours continuously. The device is placed on the forehead to measure from the prefrontal cortex and the raw data is continuously streamed over Bluetooth to a nearby data aggregator such as a smartphone for post processing and cloud connection. In this study, we performed traditional polysomnography simultaneously with NIRS to evaluate agreement with traditional measures of sleep and to provide labelled data for future work involving learning algorithms. Ultimately, we expect a machine learning algorithm to be able to generate characterization of sleep states comparable to traditional methods based on this biophotonics data. The system also includes an inertial measurement unit and the features that can be extracted from the presented system include sleep posture, heart rate, respiratory rate, relative change in oxy and deoxy hemoglobin concentrations and tissue oxygenation and cerebral arterial oxygen extracted from these. Preliminary proof of concept results are promising and demonstrate the capability to measure heart rate, respiratory rate and slow-wave-sleep stages. This system serves as a prototype to evaluate the potential of a small bandage-size continuous-wave NIRS device to be a useful means of studying sleep.

  17. Shedding light on the past

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stampfl, A.P.J.; Friedman, E.S.; Wilkinson, T.J.; Alp, E.E.; Yener, K.A.

    2001-01-01

    The Amuq valley in southern Turkey is an important and interesting area in the Near East forming a space-time bridge for archaeologists and scientists to ancient and modern civilizations. The Lake of Antioch which evolved during the mid-late Holocene appears to have been located nearby some of the largest human settlements existing during this period. By documenting the conditions of the lake in time, using classical and modern approaches, the climate and geomorphology of the basin may be reconstructed. Synchrotron X-ray fluorescence measurements were performed on sections of a sedimentary core from the lake, representing an estimated 7500 yr of history. Analysis yielded the distribution of elemental masses spanning Ca to Mo as a function of depth from the surface. We find that the elemental concentrations measured follow a number of distinct patterns that may be related to local geomorphology, climate and human activities

  18. Supersymmetric models with light higgsinos

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bruemmer, F.

    2012-05-01

    In the Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model, the higgsinos can have masses around the electroweak scale, while the other supersymmetric particles have TeV-scale masses. This happens in models of gauge-mediated SUSY breaking with a high messenger scale, which are motivated from string theory. For particular choices of the messenger eld content, multi-TeV squark and gluino masses naturally lead to a much lower electroweak scale, somewhat similar to focus point supersymmetry. They also induce Higgs masses of 124-126 GeV, while making the discovery of supersymmetry at the LHC unlikely. The light higgsinos will be di cult to see at the LHC but may eventually be discovered at a linear collider.

  19. A functional zeaxanthin epoxidase from red algae shedding light on the evolution of light-harvesting carotenoids and the xanthophyll cycle in photosynthetic eukaryotes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dautermann, Oliver; Lohr, Martin

    2017-12-01

    The epoxy-xanthophylls antheraxanthin and violaxanthin are key precursors of light-harvesting carotenoids and participate in the photoprotective xanthophyll cycle. Thus, the invention of zeaxanthin epoxidase (ZEP) catalyzing their formation from zeaxanthin has been a fundamental step in the evolution of photosynthetic eukaryotes. ZEP genes have only been found in Viridiplantae and chromalveolate algae with secondary plastids of red algal ancestry, suggesting that ZEP evolved in the Viridiplantae and spread to chromalveolates by lateral gene transfer. By searching publicly available sequence data from 11 red algae covering all currently recognized red algal classes we identified ZEP candidates in three species. Phylogenetic analyses showed that the red algal ZEP is most closely related to ZEP proteins from photosynthetic chromalveolates possessing secondary plastids of red algal origin. Its enzymatic activity was assessed by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) analyses of red algal pigment extracts and by cloning and functional expression of the ZEP gene from Madagascaria erythrocladioides in leaves of the ZEP-deficient aba2 mutant of Nicotiana plumbaginifolia. Unlike other ZEP enzymes examined so far, the red algal ZEP introduces only a single epoxy group into zeaxanthin, yielding antheraxanthin instead of violaxanthin. The results indicate that ZEP evolved before the split of Rhodophyta and Viridiplantae and that chromalveolates acquired ZEP from the red algal endosymbiont and not by lateral gene transfer. Moreover, the red algal ZEP enables engineering of transgenic plants incorporating antheraxanthin instead of violaxanthin in their photosynthetic machinery. © 2017 The Authors The Plant Journal © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. Studies of Human 2,4-Dienoyl CoA Reductase Shed New Light on Peroxisomal β-Oxidation of Unsaturated Fatty Acids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hua, Tian; Wu, Dong; Ding, Wei; Wang, Jiangyun; Shaw, Neil; Liu, Zhi-Jie [Nankai; (Chinese Aca. Sci.)

    2012-10-15

    Peroxisomes play an essential role in maintaining fatty acid homeostasis. Although mitochondria are also known to participate in the catabolism of fatty acids via β-oxidation, differences exist between the peroxisomal and mitochondrial β-oxidation. Only peroxisomes, but not mitochondrion, can shorten very long chain fatty acids. Here, we describe the crystal structure of a ternary complex of peroxisomal 2,4-dienoyl CoA reductases (pDCR) with hexadienoyl CoA and NADP, as a prototype for comparison with the mitochondrial 2,4-dienoyl CoA reductase (mDCR) to shed light on the differences between the enzymes from the two organelles at the molecular level. Unexpectedly, the structure of pDCR refined to 1.84 Å resolution reveals the absence of the tyrosine-serine pair seen in the active site of mDCR, which together with a lysine and an asparagine have been deemed a hallmark of the SDR family of enzymes. Instead, aspartate hydrogen-bonded to the Cα hydroxyl via a water molecule seems to perturb the water molecule for protonation of the substrate. Our studies provide the first structural evidence for participation of water in the DCR-catalyzed reactions. Biochemical studies and structural analysis suggest that pDCRs can catalyze the shortening of six-carbon-long substrates in vitro. However, the Km values of pDCR for short chain acyl CoAs are at least 6-fold higher than those for substrates with 10 or more aliphatic carbons. Unlike mDCR, hinge movements permit pDCR to process very long chain polyunsaturated fatty acids.

  1. A Crystallographic Study of the Role of Sequence Context in Thymine Glycol Bypass by a Replicative DNA Polymerase Serendipitously Sheds Light on the Exonuclease Complex

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aller, Pierre; Duclos, Stéphanie; Wallace, Susan S.; Doublié, Sylvie (Vermont)

    2012-06-27

    Thymine glycol (Tg) is the most common oxidation product of thymine and is known to be a strong block to replicative DNA polymerases. A previously solved structure of the bacteriophage RB69 DNA polymerase (RB69 gp43) in complex with Tg in the sequence context 5'-G-Tg-G shed light on how Tg blocks primer elongation: The protruding methyl group of the oxidized thymine displaces the adjacent 5'-G, which can no longer serve as a template for primer elongation [Aller, P., Rould, M. A., Hogg, M, Wallace, S. S. and Doublie S. (2007). A structural rationale for stalling of a replicative DNA polymerase at the most common oxidative thymine lesion, thymine glycol. Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA, 104, 814-818.]. Several studies showed that in the sequence context 5'-C-Tg-purine, Tg is more likely to be bypassed by Klenow fragment, an A-family DNA polymerase. We set out to investigate the role of sequence context in Tg bypass in a B-family polymerase and to solve the crystal structures of the bacteriophage RB69 DNA polymerase in complex with Tg-containing DNA in the three remaining sequence contexts: 5'-A-Tg-G, 5'-T-Tg-G, and 5'-C-Tg-G. A combination of several factors - including the associated exonuclease activity, the nature of the 3' and 5' bases surrounding Tg, and the cis-trans interconversion of Tg - influences Tg bypass. We also visualized for the first time the structure of a well-ordered exonuclease complex, allowing us to identify and confirm the role of key residues (Phe123, Met256, and Tyr257) in strand separation and in the stabilization of the primer strand in the exonuclease site.

  2. Global Nutrient Export from WaterSheds 2 (NEWS 2): Model development and implementation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mayorga, E.; Seitzinger, S.P.; Harrison, J.A.; Dumont, E.L.; Beusen, A.H.W.; Bouwman, A.F.; Fekete, B.M.; Kroeze, C.; Drecht, van G.

    2010-01-01

    Global NEWS is a global, spatially explicit, multi-element and multi-form model of nutrient exports by rivers. Here we present NEWS 2, the new version of Global NEWS developed as part of a Millennium Ecosystem Assessment scenario implementation from hindcast (1970) to contemporary (2000) and future

  3. Predicted protein interactions of IFITMs may shed light on mechanisms of Zika virus-induced microcephaly and host invasion [version 2; referees: 2 approved, 1 approved with reservations, 1 not approved

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Madhavi K. Ganapathiraju

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available After the first reported case of Zika virus (ZIKV in Brazil, in 2015, a significant increase in the reported cases of microcephaly was observed. Microcephaly is a neurological condition in which the infant’s head is significantly smaller with complications in brain development. Recently, two small membrane-associated interferon-inducible transmembrane proteins (IFITM1 and IFITM3 have been shown to repress members of the flaviviridae family which includes ZIKV. However, the exact mechanisms leading to the inhibition of the virus are yet unknown. Here, we assembled an interactome of IFITM1 and IFITM3 with known protein-protein interactions (PPIs collected from publicly available databases and novel PPIs predicted using the High-confidence Protein-Protein Interaction Prediction (HiPPIP model. We analyzed the functional and pathway associations of the interacting proteins, and found that there are several immunity pathways (toll-like receptor signaling, cd28 signaling in T-helper cells, crosstalk between dendritic cells and natural killer cells, neuronal pathways (axonal guidance signaling, neural tube closure and actin cytoskeleton signaling and developmental pathways (neural tube closure, embryonic skeletal system development that are associated with these interactors. Our novel PPIs associate cilia dysfunction in ependymal cells to microcephaly, and may also shed light on potential targets of ZIKV for host invasion by immunosuppression and cytoskeletal rearrangements. These results could help direct future research in elucidating the mechanisms underlying host defense to ZIKV and other flaviviruses.

  4. Quantifying Children's Aggregate (Dietary and Residential) Exposure and Dose to Permethin: Application and Evaluation of EPA's Probabilistic SHED-Multimedia Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reliable, evaluated human exposure and dose models are important for understanding the health risks from chemicals. A case study focusing on permethrin was conducted because of this insecticide’s widespread use and potential health effects. SHEDS-Multimedia was applied to estimat...

  5. Risk assessment modelling of fecal shedding caused by extended-spectrum cephalosporin-resistant Escherichia coli transmitted through waste milk fed to dairy pre-weaned calves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Awosile, Babafela B; Smith, Ben A

    2017-12-01

    Waste milk feeding is a common practice in dairy operations. Regardless of the benefits of this practice to the dairy farmers, concerns from the potential dissemination of antimicrobial-resistant bacteria through the gut and subsequent shedding by calves into the environment are increasing. In this study, we employed Monte Carlo simulation to assess the risk of shedding extended-spectrum cephalosporin-resistant Escherichia coli (ESC-R E. coli) caused by waste milk feeding in pre-weaned calves using an exponential dose-response model fit to data for E. coli O157:H7 in cattle. Data from pertinent studies were included in our model to predict the risk of shedding. The median (5th and 95th percentiles) for the daily risk of shedding ESC-R E. coli by calves fed only contaminated waste milk was predicted to be 2.9 × 10 -3 (2.1 × 10 -3 , 3.7 × 10 -3 ), representing a median daily risk of 29 out of 10,000 calves shedding ESC-R E. coli due to exclusive feeding of waste milk containing ESC-R E. coli. This median value was reduced by 94% when accounting for the proportion of waste milk that does not contain ESC-R E. coli. The overall risk of shedding ESC-R E. coli through the pre-weaning period for farms that feed waste milk to calves was 5.7 × 10 -3 (2.4 × 10 -3 , 1.1 × 10 -2 ), representing 57 out of 10,000 calves. When accounting for the proportion of farms that do not feed waste milk, the pre-weaning period risk was reduced by 23%. By varying the prevalence of ESC-R E. coli in waste milk using values of 3, 1.5, and 1%, the daily risk of shedding decreased by factors of 50, 65, and 82%, respectively, which supports the reduction of contamination or discontinuation of feeding waste milk containing ESC-R E. coli as major mitigation measures to reduce the risk of shedding caused by ingestion of resistant bacteria. It is anticipated that the effects of antimicrobial residues in waste milk, which was not considered herein due to lack of data, would further increase risks

  6. Shedding of ash deposits

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zbogar, Ana; Frandsen, Flemming; Jensen, Peter Arendt

    2009-01-01

    . Deposit shedding can be defined as the process of deposit removal from the heat transfer surfaces. Mechanical and thermal shock devices for deposit removal can be implemented within into the boiler, which can be then referred to as artificial shedding. Sootblowing is one such process, where a pressurized...... on the ash characteristics and the boiler operation. Different deposit characteristics will govern the ash deposit behaviour, and thus the mechanism of deposit shedding. The deposit strength will influence the erosion and gravity shedding mechanisms. The ash viscosity and the melting behaviour will govern...

  7. Inhibiting avian influenza virus shedding using a novel RNAi antiviral vector technology: proof of concept in an avian cell model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linke, Lyndsey M; Wilusz, Jeffrey; Pabilonia, Kristy L; Fruehauf, Johannes; Magnuson, Roberta; Olea-Popelka, Francisco; Triantis, Joni; Landolt, Gabriele; Salman, Mo

    2016-03-01

    Influenza A viruses pose significant health and economic threats to humans and animals. Outbreaks of avian influenza virus (AIV) are a liability to the poultry industry and increase the risk for transmission to humans. There are limitations to using the AIV vaccine in poultry, creating barriers to controlling outbreaks and a need for alternative effective control measures. Application of RNA interference (RNAi) techniques hold potential; however, the delivery of RNAi-mediating agents is a well-known obstacle to harnessing its clinical application. We introduce a novel antiviral approach using bacterial vectors that target avian mucosal epithelial cells and deliver (small interfering RNA) siRNAs against two AIV genes, nucleoprotein (NP) and polymerase acidic protein (PA). Using a red fluorescent reporter, we first demonstrated vector delivery and intracellular expression in avian epithelial cells. Subsequently, we demonstrated significant reductions in AIV shedding when applying these anti-AIV vectors prophylactically. These antiviral vectors provided up to a 10,000-fold reduction in viral titers shed, demonstrating in vitro proof-of-concept for using these novel anti-AIV vectors to inhibit AIV shedding. Our results indicate this siRNA vector technology could represent a scalable and clinically applicable antiviral technology for avian and human influenza and a prototype for RNAi-based vectors against other viruses.

  8. Development of a Salmonella Typhimurium challenge model in weaned pigs to evaluate effects of water and feed interventions on fecal shedding and growth performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Wolf, P J; Wientjes, J G M; Heuvelink, A E; Veldhuis, A M B; van Hees, H M J; Roubos-van den Hil, P J

    2017-07-01

    The aim of this study was to develop a Typhimurium (ST) challenge model in weaned pigs suitable to evaluate effects of water and feed interventions on fecal shedding and growth performance. Two studies were performed. In Exp. 1 weaned pigs were fed either a standard diet (CON) or a diet with a high buffer capacity (HB) and challenged for either 3 or 7 consecutive days in a Latin square design with 4 × 8 individually housed pigs. In Exp. 2, the CON 7-d challenge method was chosen for further model development and validation. Thirty-two individually housed weaned pigs were divided over 4 treatments: a nonchallenged control group (NCON), a challenged positive control group (PCON), a challenged intervention group with acidified water (WATER), and a challenged intervention group with acidified feed (FEED). Pigs were orally challenged once daily on d 7 to 9 or d 7 to 13 after weaning (d 0) with 1 ×10 cfu ST. From d 0 to 28, rectal temperature and occurrence of diarrhea were recorded daily, and BW and feed intake were measured weekly. Fecal samples were collected on d 0, 2, 7, 9, 13, 16, 20, 23, and 27 in Exp. 1 and d 0, 2, 7, 8, 9, 13, 15, and 27 in Exp. 2 for quantification. The results of both experiments showed quantifiable fecal shedding (average peak shedding of approximately 3.5 log and 5.5 log cfu/g, respectively), accompanied by a transient 0.5°C increase in rectal temperature and an increase in occurrence of diarrhea. In Exp. 2 during the week of challenge (i.e., d 7 to 14), a reduction in growth performance (ADG: -157 to 200 g/d and G:F: -0.22 to 0.25 g/d; model may be suitable for evaluation of effects of water and feed interventions on peak fecal shedding and growth performance.

  9. Kepler sheds new and unprecedented light on the variability of a blue supergiant: Gravity waves in the O9.5Iab star HD 188209

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aerts, C.; Símon-Díaz, S.; Bloemen, S.; Debosscher, J.; Pápics, P. I.; Bryson, S.; Still, M.; Moravveji, E.; Williamson, M. H.; Grundahl, F.; Fredslund Andersen, M.; Antoci, V.; Pallé, P. L.; Christensen-Dalsgaard, J.; Rogers, T. M.

    2017-06-01

    Stellar evolution models are most uncertain for evolved massive stars. Asteroseismology based on high-precision uninterrupted space photometry has become a new way to test the outcome of stellar evolution theory and was recently applied to a multitude of stars, but not yet to massive evolved supergiants.Our aim is to detect, analyse and interpret the photospheric and wind variability of the O9.5 Iab star HD 188209 from Kepler space photometry and long-term high-resolution spectroscopy. We used Kepler scattered-light photometry obtained by the nominal mission during 1460 d to deduce the photometric variability of this O-type supergiant. In addition, we assembled and analysed high-resolution high signal-to-noise spectroscopy taken with four spectrographs during some 1800 d to interpret the temporal spectroscopic variability of the star. The variability of this blue supergiant derived from the scattered-light space photometry is in full in agreement with the one found in the ground-based spectroscopy. We find significant low-frequency variability that is consistently detected in all spectral lines of HD 188209. The photospheric variability propagates into the wind, where it has similar frequencies but slightly higher amplitudes. The morphology of the frequency spectra derived from the long-term photometry and spectroscopy points towards a spectrum of travelling waves with frequency values in the range expected for an evolved O-type star. Convectively-driven internal gravity waves excited in the stellar interior offer the most plausible explanation of the detected variability. Based on photometric observations made with the NASA Kepler satellite and on spectroscopic observations made with four telescopes: the Nordic Optical Telescope operated by NOTSA and the Mercator Telescope operated by the Flemish Community, both at the Observatorio del Roque de los Muchachos (La Palma, Spain) of the Instituto de Astrofísica de Canarias, the T13 2.0 m Automatic Spectroscopic

  10. Effect of valproic acid and injury on lesion size and endothelial glycocalyx shedding in a rodent model of isolated traumatic brain injury

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jepsen, Cecilie Heerdegen; deMoya, Marc A; Perner, Anders

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In isolated traumatic brain injury (TBI), little is known about the endothelial response and the effects of endothelial glycocalyx shedding. We have previously shown that treatment with valproic acid (VPA) improves outcomes following TBI and hemorrhagic shock.In this model, we...... hypothesized that severe isolated TBI would cause shedding of the endothelial glycocalyx, as measured by serum syndecan-1 (sSDC-1) levels. We further hypothesized that VPA treatment would reduce this response and reduce lesion size volume. METHODS: Forty Sprague-Dawley rats were allocated to TBI + VPA (n = 8...... were analyzed for sSDC-1, and lesion size was determined on Nissl-stained cryosections. RESULTS: sSDC-1 was significantly elevated in injured compared with uninjured animals at 3 hours (p = 0.0009) and 6 hours (p = 0.0007) after injury. This effect was significantly more pronounced in the animals...

  11. New perspectives to the enterotoxigenic E. coli F4 porcine infection model: Susceptibility genotypes in relation to performance, diarrhoea and bacterial shedding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roubos-van den Hil, Petra J; Litjens, Ralph; Oudshoorn, Anna-Katharina; Resink, Jan Willem; Smits, Coen H M

    2017-04-01

    Enterotoxigenic E. coli (ETEC), causing post-weaning diarrhoea, is a major problem in weaned piglets. Individual animal responses to ETEC infection show high variability in animal experiments. Two studies were designed to optimize the ETEC F4ac infection model in piglets by combining the genotype susceptibility with performance, diarrhoea incidence and bacterial shedding. The studies were performed with respectively 120 and 80 male piglets that were tested for susceptibility or resistance towards ETEC O149:F4ac by a DNA marker based test. Three different genotypes were observed; resistant (RR), susceptible heterozygote (RS) and susceptible homozygote (SS). Piglets, were orally infected with an inoculum suspension (containing 1.5E8 CFU/ml ETEC F4ac) at day 0, 1 and 2 of the study. Performance, diarrhoea incidence and bacterial shedding were followed for 21days. In the first week after challenge a difference in average daily gain was observed between resistant and susceptible piglets in both studies. For the complete study period no significant differences were observed. Diarrhoea incidence was significantly higher in susceptible pigs compared to the resistant pigs in the first week after challenge. Bacterial shedding was much higher in the susceptible pigs and ETEC excretion lasted longer. ETEC was hardly detected in the faecal material of the resistant pigs. In conclusion, susceptible pigs showed higher diarrhoea incidence and higher numbers of faecal ETEC shedding in the first week after challenge compared to resistant pigs. The DNA marker based test can be used to select pigs that are susceptible for ETEC for inclusion in ETEC infection model, resulting in less animals needed to perform infection studies. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Rainfall simulation experiments and Water Drop Penetration Time measurements shed light on the impact of water repellency on soils under organic farming management in Eastern Spain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerdà, Artemi; González, Óscar; León, Javier; Jordán, Antonio

    2015-04-01

    Water repellency is a well-know soil property since the research of professor Stefan Helmut Doerr recovered and powered the research developed by professor DeBano (Atanassova and Doerr, 2011; ; Jordán et al., 2011; Bodí et al., 2012; González Peñaloza et al., 2012 Bodí et al., 2013; García Moreno et al., 2013; Jordán et al., 2013; Badía-Villas et al., 2014; Jordán et al., 2013; Jiménez Morillo et al., 2015). However, little is known about the impact of water repellency in surface runoff generation, although usually is accepted that when more soil water repellent is a soil, higher will be the surface runoff discharge (Stoff et al., 2011; Madsen et al., 2011; León et al., 2013; Lozano et al., 2013; Mataix-Solera et al., 2013; Santos et al., 2015). And the impact of the water repellency and then the higher surface wash discharge can trigger high erosion rates (Kröpfl et al., 2013; Mandal and Sharda 2013; Zhao et al., 2013). However these relationships were not demonstrated as the most water repellent soils are the one with high organic contents, and those soils do not have soil losses, probably due to the high infiltration rates due to the macropore flow. Rainfall simulation experiments can shed light in the runoff generation mechanism as they can control the rainfall intensity (Bodí et al., 2012; Iserloh et al., 2012; Iserloh et al., 2013), and inform about the main mechanism of the soil erosion process Cerdà and Jurgensen, 2011; Daugherty et al., 2011; Podwojewski et al., 2011; Dunkerley, 2012; Garel et al., 2012; Jouquet et al., 2012; Kibet et al., 2013; Butzen et al., 2014; Ma et al., 2014; Martínez Murillo et al., 2013). To determine the relationship between surface runoff generated under simulated rainfall (Cerdà, 1988a; 1988b; Cerdà et al., 1998; Ziadat and Taimeh, 2013) with a small rainfall simulator (0.25 m2) and water repellency measurements with the Water Drop Penetration time methods were done (Bodí et al., 2012). The results show that

  13. A Shoot-Specific Hypoxic Response of Arabidopsis Sheds Light on the Role of the Phosphate-Responsive Transcription Factor PHOSPHATE STARVATION RESPONSE11[W

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klecker, Maria; Gasch, Philipp; Peisker, Helga; Dörmann, Peter; Schlicke, Hagen; Grimm, Bernhard; Mustroph, Angelika

    2014-01-01

    Plant responses to biotic and abiotic stresses are often very specific, but signal transduction pathways can partially or completely overlap. Here, we demonstrate that in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), the transcriptional responses to phosphate starvation and oxygen deficiency stress comprise a set of commonly induced genes. While the phosphate deficiency response is systemic, under oxygen deficiency, most of the commonly induced genes are found only in illuminated shoots. This jointly induced response to the two stresses is under control of the transcription factor PHOSPHATE STARVATION RESPONSE1 (PHR1), but not of the oxygen-sensing N-end rule pathway, and includes genes encoding proteins for the synthesis of galactolipids, which replace phospholipids in plant membranes under phosphate starvation. Despite the induction of galactolipid synthesis genes, total galactolipid content and plant survival are not severely affected by the up-regulation of galactolipid gene expression in illuminated leaves during hypoxia. However, changes in galactolipid molecular species composition point to an adaptation of lipid fluxes through the endoplasmic reticulum and chloroplast pathways during hypoxia. PHR1-mediated signaling of phosphate deprivation was also light dependent. Because a photoreceptor-mediated PHR1 activation was not detectable under hypoxia, our data suggest that a chloroplast-derived retrograde signal, potentially arising from metabolic changes, regulates PHR1 activity under both oxygen and phosphate deficiency. PMID:24753539

  14. Colour dependence of zodiacal light models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giese, R. H.; Hanner, M. S.; Leinert, C.

    1973-01-01

    Colour models of the zodiacal light in the ecliptic have been calculated for both dielectric and metallic particles in the sub-micron and micron size range. Two colour ratios were computed, a blue ratio and a red ratio. The models with a size distribution proportional to s to the -2.5 power ds (where s is the particle radius) generally show a colour close to the solar colour and almost independent of elongation. Especially in the blue colour ratio there is generally no significant dependence on the lower cutoff size (0.1-1 micron). The main feature of absorbing particles is a reddening at small elongations. The models for size distributions proportional to s to the -4 power ds show larger departures from solar colour and more variation with model parameters. Colour measurements, including red and near infra-red, therefore are useful to distinguish between flat and steep size spectra and to verify the presence of slightly absorbing particles.

  15. CAF-like state in primary skin fibroblasts with constitutional BRCA1 epimutation sheds new light on tumor suppressor deficiency-related changes in healthy tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Etzold, Anna; Galetzka, Danuta; Weis, Eva; Bartsch, Oliver; Haaf, Thomas; Spix, Claudia; Itzel, Timo; Schweiger, Susann; Strand, Dennis; Strand, Susanne; Zechner, Ulrich

    2016-01-01

    Constitutive epimutations of tumor suppressor genes are increasingly considered as cancer predisposing factors equally to sequence mutations. In light of the emerging role of the microenvironment for cancer predisposition, initiation, and progression, we aimed to characterize the consequences of a BRCA1 epimutation in cells of mesenchymal origin. We performed a comprehensive molecular and cellular comparison of primary dermal fibroblasts taken from a monozygous twin pair discordant for recurrent cancers and BRCA1 epimutation, whose exceptional clinical case we previously reported in this journal. Comparative transcriptome analysis identified differential expression of extracellular matrix-related genes and pro-tumorigenic growth factors, such as collagens and CXC chemokines. Moreover, genes known to be key markers of so called cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAFs), such as ACTA2, FAP, PDPN, and TNC, were upregulated in fibroblasts of the affected twin (BRCA1(mosMe)) in comparison to those of the healthy twin (BRCA1(wt)). Further analyses detected CAF-typical cellular features, including an elevated growth rate, enhanced migration, altered actin architecture and increased production of ketone bodies in BRCA1(mosMe) fibroblasts compared to BRCA1(wt) fibroblasts. In addition, conditioned medium of BRCA1(mosMe) fibroblasts was more potent than conditioned medium of BRCA1(wt) fibroblasts to promote cell proliferation in an epithelial and a cancer cell line. Our data demonstrate, that a CAF-like state is not an exclusive feature of tumor-associated tissue but also exists in healthy tissue with tumor suppressor deficiency. The naturally occurring phenomenon of twin fibroblasts differing in their BRCA1 methylation status revealed to be a unique powerful tool for exploring tumor suppressor deficiency-related changes in healthy tissue, reinforcing their significance for cancer predisposition.

  16. Structure of HsdS Subunit from Thermoanaerobacter tengcongensis Sheds Lights on Mechanism of Dynamic Opening and Closing of Type I Methyltransferase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Pu; Tang, Qun; An, XiaoMin; Yan, XiaoXue; Liang, DongCai

    2011-01-01

    Type I DNA methyltransferases contain one specificity subunit (HsdS) and two modification subunits (HsdM). The electron microscopy model of M.EcoKI-M2S1 methyltransferase shows a reasonable closed state of this clamp-like enzyme, but the structure of the open state is still unclear. The 1.95 Å crystal structure of the specificity subunit from Thermoanaerobacter tengcongensis (TTE-HsdS) shows an unreported open form inter-domain orientation of this subunit. Based on the crystal structure of TTE-HsdS and the closed state model of M.EcoKI-M2S1, we constructed a potential open state model of type I methyltransferase. Mutational studies indicated that two α-helices (aa30-59 and aa466-495) of the TTE-HsdM subunit are important inter-subunit interaction sites in the TTE-M2S1 complex. DNA binding assays also highlighted the importance of the C-terminal region of TTE-HsdM for DNA binding by the TTE-M2S1 complex. On the basis of structural analysis, biochemical experiments and previous studies, we propose a dynamic opening and closing mechanism for type I methyltransferase. PMID:21399684

  17. Novel barite chimneys at the Loki´s Castle Vent Field shed light on key factors shaping microbial communities and functions in hydrothermal systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ida Helene eSteen

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In order to fully understand the cycling of elements in hydrothermal systems it is critical to understand intra-field variations in geochemical and microbiological processes in both focused, high-temperature and diffuse, low-temperature areas. To reveal important causes and effects of this variation, we performed an extensive chemical and microbiological characterization of a low-temperature venting area in the Loki’s Castle Vent Field (LCVF. This area, located at the flank of the large sulfide mound, is characterized by numerous chimney-like barite (BaSO4 structures (≤ 1m high covered with white cotton-like microbial mats. Results from geochemical analyses, microscopy (FISH, SEM, 16S rRNA gene amplicon-sequencing and metatranscriptomics were compared to results from previous analyses of biofilms growing on black smoker chimneys at LCVF. Based on our results, we constructed a conceptual model involving the geochemistry and microbiology in the LCVF. The model suggests that CH4 and H2S are important electron donors for microorganisms in both high-temperature and low-temperature areas, whereas the utilization of H2 seems restricted to high-temperature areas. This further implies that sub-seafloor processes can affect energy-landscapes, elemental cycling, and the metabolic activity of primary producers on the seafloor. In the cotton-like microbial mats on top of the active barite chimneys, a unique network of single cells of Epsilonproteobacteria interconnected by threads of extracellular polymeric substances (EPS was seen, differing significantly from the long filamentous Sulfurovum filaments observed in biofilms on the black smokers. This network also induced nucleation of barite crystals and is suggested to play an essential role in the formation of the microbial mats and the chimneys. Furthermore, it illustrates variations in how different genera of Epsilonproteobacteria colonize and position cells in different vent fluid mixing zones within

  18. Directional RNA deep sequencing sheds new light on the transcriptional response of Anabaena sp. strain PCC 7120 to combined-nitrogen deprivation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Head Steven R

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cyanobacteria are potential sources of renewable chemicals and biofuels and serve as model organisms for bacterial photosynthesis, nitrogen fixation, and responses to environmental changes. Anabaena (Nostoc sp. strain PCC 7120 (hereafter Anabaena is a multicellular filamentous cyanobacterium that can "fix" atmospheric nitrogen into ammonia when grown in the absence of a source of combined nitrogen. Because the nitrogenase enzyme is oxygen sensitive, Anabaena forms specialized cells called heterocysts that create a microoxic environment for nitrogen fixation. We have employed directional RNA-seq to map the Anabaena transcriptome during vegetative cell growth and in response to combined-nitrogen deprivation, which induces filaments to undergo heterocyst development. Our data provide an unprecedented view of transcriptional changes in Anabaena filaments during the induction of heterocyst development and transition to diazotrophic growth. Results Using the Illumina short read platform and a directional RNA-seq protocol, we obtained deep sequencing data for RNA extracted from filaments at 0, 6, 12, and 21 hours after the removal of combined nitrogen. The RNA-seq data provided information on transcript abundance and boundaries for the entire transcriptome. From these data, we detected novel antisense transcripts within the UTRs (untranslated regions and coding regions of key genes involved in heterocyst development, suggesting that antisense RNAs may be important regulators of the nitrogen response. In addition, many 5' UTRs were longer than anticipated, sometimes extending into upstream open reading frames (ORFs, and operons often showed complex structure and regulation. Finally, many genes that had not been previously identified as being involved in heterocyst development showed regulation, providing new candidates for future studies in this model organism. Conclusions Directional RNA-seq data were obtained that provide

  19. An analysis of synteny of Arachis with Lotus and Medicago sheds new light on the structure, stability and evolution of legume genomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nielsen Anna M

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Most agriculturally important legumes fall within two sub-clades of the Papilionoid legumes: the Phaseoloids and Galegoids, which diverged about 50 Mya. The Phaseoloids are mostly tropical and include crops such as common bean and soybean. The Galegoids are mostly temperate and include clover, fava bean and the model legumes Lotus and Medicago (both with substantially sequenced genomes. In contrast, peanut (Arachis hypogaea falls in the Dalbergioid clade which is more basal in its divergence within the Papilionoids. The aim of this work was to integrate the genetic map of Arachis with Lotus and Medicago and improve our understanding of the Arachis genome and legume genomes in general. To do this we placed on the Arachis map, comparative anchor markers defined using a previously described bioinformatics pipeline. Also we investigated the possible role of transposons in the patterns of synteny that were observed. Results The Arachis genetic map was substantially aligned with Lotus and Medicago with most synteny blocks presenting a single main affinity to each genome. This indicates that the last common whole genome duplication within the Papilionoid legumes predated the divergence of Arachis from the Galegoids and Phaseoloids sufficiently that the common ancestral genome was substantially diploidized. The Arachis and model legume genomes comparison made here, together with a previously published comparison of Lotus and Medicago allowed all possible Arachis-Lotus-Medicago species by species comparisons to be made and genome syntenies observed. Distinct conserved synteny blocks and non-conserved regions were present in all genome comparisons, implying that certain legume genomic regions are consistently more stable during evolution than others. We found that in Medicago and possibly also in Lotus, retrotransposons tend to be more frequent in the variable regions. Furthermore, while these variable regions generally have lower

  20. Shedding Light on the "Dark Side" of $B^0_d$--$\\bar{B^{0}_{d}}$ Mixing through $B_{d} \\to \\pi^{+}\\pi^{-}$, $K \\to \\pi\

    CERN Document Server

    Fleischer, Robert; Matias, J; Fleischer, Robert; Isidori, Gino; Matias, Joaquim

    2003-01-01

    In a wide class of NP models, which can be motivated through generic arguments and within SUSY, we obtain large contributions to $B^0_d$--$\\bar B^0_d$ mixing, but not to $\\Delta B=1$ processes. If we assume such a scenario, the solutions $\\phi_d\\sim 47^\\circ\\lor 133^\\circ$ for the $B^0_d$--$\\bar B^0_d$ mixing phase implied by $A_{CP}^{mix}(B_d\\to J/\\psi K_S)$ cannot be converted directly into a constraint in the $\\rho$--$\\eta$ plane. However, we may complement $\\phi_d$ with $|V_{ub}/V_{cb}|$ and the recently measured CP asymmetries in $B_d\\to\\pi^+ \\pi^-$ to determine the unitarity triangle, with its angles $\\alpha$, $\\beta$ and $\\gamma$. To this end, we have also to control penguin effects, which we do by means of the $B_d\\to\\pi^\\mp K^\\pm$ branching ratio. Interestingly, the present data show a perfectly consistent picture not only for the ``standard'' solution of $\\phi_d\\sim 47^\\circ$, but also for $\\phi_d\\sim 133^\\circ$. In the latter case, the preferred region for the apex of the unitarity triangle is in t...

  1. Fossil worm burrows reveal very early terrestrial animal activity and shed light on trophic resources after the end-cretaceous mass extinction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chin, Karen; Pearson, Dean; Ekdale, A A

    2013-01-01

    The widespread mass extinctions at the end of the Cretaceous caused world-wide disruption of ecosystems, and faunal responses to the one-two punch of severe environmental perturbation and ecosystem collapse are still unclear. Here we report the discovery of in situ terrestrial fossil burrows from just above the impact-defined Cretaceous-Paleogene (K/Pg) boundary in southwestern North Dakota. The crisscrossing networks of horizontal burrows occur at the interface of a lignitic coal and silty sandstone, and reveal intense faunal activity within centimeters of the boundary clay. Estimated rates of sedimentation and coal formation suggest that the burrows were made less than ten thousand years after the end-Cretaceous impact. The burrow characteristics are most consistent with burrows of extant earthworms. Moreover, the burrowing and detritivorous habits of these annelids fit models that predict the trophic and sheltering lifestyles of terrestrial animals that survived the K/Pg extinction event. In turn, such detritus-eaters would have played a critical role in supporting secondary consumers. Thus, some of the carnivorous vertebrates that radiated after the K/Pg extinction may owe their evolutionary success to thriving populations of earthworms.

  2. Shedding Light on the EOS-Gravity Degeneracy and Constraining the Nuclear Symmetry Energy from the Gravitational Binding Energy of Neutron Stars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    He Xiao-Tao

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A thorough understanding of properties of neutron stars requires both a reliable knowledge of the equation of state (EOS of super-dense nuclear matter and the strong-field gravity theories simultaneously. To provide information that may help break this EOS-gravity degeneracy, we investigate effects of nuclear symmetry energy on the gravitational binding energy of neutron stars within GR and the scalar-tensor subset of alternative gravity models. We focus on effects of the slope L of nuclear symmetry energy at saturation density and the high-density behavior of nuclear symmetry energy. We find that the variation of either the density slope L or the high-density behavior of nuclear symmetry energy leads to large changes in the binding energy of neutron stars. The difference in predictions using the GR and the scalar-tensor theory appears only for massive neutron stars, and even then is significantly smaller than the difference resulting from variations in the symmetry energy.

  3. Giant taro and its relatives: a phylogeny of the large genus Alocasia (Araceae) sheds light on Miocene floristic exchange in the Malesian region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nauheimer, Lars; Boyce, Peter C; Renner, Susanne S

    2012-04-01

    Alocasia comprises over 113 species of rainforest understorey plants in Southeast Asia, the Malesian region, and Australia. Several species, including giant taro, Alocasia macrorrhizos, and Chinese taro, Alocasia cucullata, are important food plants or ornamentals. We investigated the biogeography of this genus using plastid and nuclear DNA sequences (5200 nucleotides) from 78 accessions representing 71 species, plus 25 species representing 16 genera of the Pistia clade to which Alocasia belongs. Divergence times were inferred under strict and relaxed clock models, and ancestral areas with Bayesian and maximum likelihood approaches. Alocasia is monophyletic and sister to Colocasiagigantea from the SE Asian mainland, whereas the type species of Colocasia groups with Steudnera and Remusatia, requiring taxonomic realignments. Nuclear and plastid trees show topological conflict, with the nuclear tree reflecting morphological similarities, the plastid tree species' geographic proximity, suggesting chloroplast capture. The ancestor of Alocasia diverged from its mainland sister group c. 24 million years ago, and Borneo then played a central role in the expansion of Alocasia: 11-13 of 18-19 inferred dispersal events originated on Borneo. The Philippines were reached from Borneo 4-5 times in the Late Miocene and Early Pliocene, and the Asian mainland 6-7 times in the Pliocene. Domesticated giant taro originated on the Philippines, Chinese taro on the Asian mainland. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. The first multi-gene phylogeny of the Macrostomorpha sheds light on the evolution of sexual and asexual reproduction in basal Platyhelminthes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janssen, Toon; Vizoso, Dita B; Schulte, Gregor; Littlewood, D Timothy J; Waeschenbach, Andrea; Schärer, Lukas

    2015-11-01

    The Macrostomorpha-an early branching and species-rich clade of free-living flatworms-is attracting interest because it contains Macrostomum lignano, a versatile model organism increasingly used in evolutionary, developmental, and molecular biology. We elucidate the macrostomorphan molecular phylogeny inferred from both nuclear (18S and 28S rDNA) and mitochondrial (16S rDNA and COI) marker genes from 40 representatives. Although our phylogeny does not recover the Macrostomorpha as a statistically supported monophyletic grouping, it (i) confirms many taxa previously proposed based on morphological evidence, (ii) permits the first placement of many families and genera, and (iii) reveals a number of unexpected placements. Specifically, Myozona and Bradynectes are outside the three classic families (Macrostomidae, Microstomidae and Dolichomacrostomidae) and the asexually fissioning Myomacrostomum belongs to a new subfamily, the Myozonariinae nov. subfam. (Dolichomacrostomidae), rather than diverging early. While this represents the first evidence for asexuality among the Dolichomacrostomidae, we show that fissioning also occurs in another Myozonariinae, Myozonaria fissipara nov. sp. Together with the placement of the (also fissioning) Microstomidae, namely as the sister taxon of Dolichomacrostomidae, this suggests that fissioning is not basal within the Macrostomorpha, but rather restricted to the new taxon Dolichomicrostomida (Dolichomacrostomidae+Microstomidae). Furthermore, our phylogeny allows new insights into the evolution of the reproductive system, as ancestral state reconstructions reveal convergent evolution of gonads, and male and female genitalia. Finally, the convergent evolution of sperm storage organs in the female genitalia appears to be linked to the widespread occurrence of hypodermic insemination among the Macrostomorpha. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Fluorescence‐Lifetime Imaging and Super‐Resolution Microscopies Shed Light on the Directed‐ and Self‐Assembly of Functional Porphyrins onto Carbon Nanotubes and Flat Surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Boyang; Calatayud, David G.; Mirabello, Vincenzo; Kuganathan, Navaratnarajah; Ge, Haobo; Jacobs, Robert M. J.; Shepherd, Ashley M.; Ribeiro Martins, José A.; Bernardino De La Serna, Jorge; Hodges, Benjamin J.; Botchway, Stanley W.

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Functional porphyrins have attracted intense attention due to their remarkably high extinction coefficients in the visible region and potential for optical and energy‐related applications. Two new routes to functionalised SWNTs have been established using a bulky ZnII‐porphyrin featuring thiolate groups at the periphery. We probed the optical properties of this zinc(II)‐substituted, bulky aryl porphyrin and those of the corresponding new nano‐composites with single walled carbon nanotube (SWNTs) and coronene, as a model for graphene. We report hereby on: i) the supramolecular interactions between the pristine SWNTs and ZnII‐porphyrin by virtue of π–π stacking, and ii) a novel covalent binding strategy based on the Bingel reaction. The functional porphyrins used acted as dispersing agent for the SWNTs and the resulting nanohybrids showed improved dispersibility in common organic solvents. The synthesized hybrid materials were probed by various characterisation techniques, leading to the prediction that supramolecular polymerisation and host–guest functionalities control the fluorescence emission intensity and fluorescence lifetime properties. For the first time, XPS studies highlighted the differences in covalent versus non‐covalent attachments of functional metalloporphyrins to SWNTs. Gas‐phase DFT calculations indicated that the ZnII‐porphyrin interacts non‐covalently with SWNTs to form a donor–acceptor complex. The covalent attachment of the porphyrin chromophore to the surface of SWNTs affects the absorption and emission properties of the hybrid system to a greater extent than in the case of the supramolecular functionalisation of the SWNTs. This represents a synthetic challenge as well as an opportunity in the design of functional nanohybrids for future sensing and optoelectronic applications. PMID:28444700

  6. Balancing medicine prices and business sustainability: analyses of pharmacy costs, revenues and profit shed light on retail medicine mark-ups in rural Kyrgyzstan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waning, Brenda; Maddix, Jason; Soucy, Lyne

    2010-07-13

    Numerous not-for-profit pharmacies have been created to improve access to medicines for the poor, but many have failed due to insufficient financial planning and management. These pharmacies are not well described in health services literature despite strong demand from policy makers, implementers, and researchers. Surveys reporting unaffordable medicine prices and high mark-ups have spurred efforts to reduce medicine prices, but price reduction goals are arbitrary in the absence of information on pharmacy costs, revenues, and profit structures. Health services research is needed to develop sustainable and "reasonable" medicine price goals and strategic initiatives to reach them. We utilized cost accounting methods on inventory and financial information obtained from a not-for-profit rural pharmacy network in mountainous Kyrgyzstan to quantify costs, revenues, profits and medicine mark-ups during establishment and maintenance periods (October 2004-December 2007). Twelve pharmacies and one warehouse were established in remote Kyrgyzstan with ups. Medicine mark-ups needed for sustainability were greater than originally envisioned by network administration. In 2005, 55%, 35%, and 10% of the network's top 50 products revealed mark-ups of 100%, respectively. Annual mark-ups increased dramatically each year to cover increasing recurrent costs, and by 2007, only 19% and 46% of products revealed mark-ups of ups > 100%. 2007 medicine mark-ups varied substantially across these products, ranging from 32% to 244%. Mark-ups needed to sustain private pharmacies would be even higher in the absence of government subsidies. Pharmacy networks can be established in hard-to-reach regions with little funding using public-private partnership, resource-sharing models. Medicine prices and mark-ups must be interpreted with consideration for regional costs of business. Mark-ups vary dramatically across medicines. Some mark-ups appear "excessive" but are likely necessary for pharmacy

  7. SHEDS-HT: An Integrated Probabilistic Exposure Model for Prioritizing Exposures to Chemicals with Near-Field and Dietary Sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    United States Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) researchers are developing a strategy for highthroughput (HT) exposure-based prioritization of chemicals under the ExpoCast program. These novel modeling approaches for evaluating chemicals based on their potential for biologi...

  8. Educational complex of light-colored modeling of urban environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karpenko Vladimir E.

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Mechanisms, methodological tools and structure of a training complex of light-colored modeling of the urban environment are developed in this paper. The following results of the practical work of students are presented: light composition and installation, media facades, lighting of building facades, city streets and embankment. As a result of modeling, the structure of the light form is determined. Light-transmitting materials and causing characteristic optical illusions, light-visual and light-dynamic effects (video-dynamics and photostatics, basic compositional techniques of light form are revealed. The main elements of the light installation are studied, including a light projection, an electronic device, interactivity and relationality of the installation, and the mechanical device which becomes a part of the installation composition. The meaning of modern media facade technology is the transformation of external building structures and their facades into a changing information cover, into a media content translator using LED technology. Light tectonics and the light rhythm of the plastics of the architectural object are built up through point and local illumination, modeling of the urban ensemble assumes the structural interaction of several light building models with special light-composition techniques. When modeling the social and pedestrian environment, the lighting parameters depend on the scale of the chosen space and are adapted taking into account the visual perception of the pedestrian, and the atmospheric effects of comfort and safety of the environment are achieved with the help of special light compositional techniques. With the aim of realizing the tasks of light modeling, a methodology has been created, including the mechanisms of models, variability and complementarity. The perspectives of light modeling in the context of structural elements of the city, neuropsychology, wireless and bioluminescence technologies are proposed

  9. Comparison of Four Probabilistic Models (CARES, Calendex, ConsEspo, SHEDS) to Estimate Aggregate Residential Exposures to Pesticides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Two deterministic models (US EPA’s Office of Pesticide Programs Residential Standard Operating Procedures (OPP Residential SOPs) and Draft Protocol for Measuring Children’s Non-Occupational Exposure to Pesticides by all Relevant Pathways (Draft Protocol)) and four probabilistic mo...

  10. Host contact and shedding patterns clarify variation in pathogen exposure and transmission in threatened tortoise Gopherus agassizii: implications for disease modelling and management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aiello, Christina M; Nussear, Kenneth E; Esque, Todd C; Emblidge, Patrick G; Sah, Pratha; Bansal, Shweta; Hudson, Peter J

    2016-05-01

    Most directly transmitted infections require some form of close contact between infectious and susceptible hosts to spread. Often disease models assume contacts are equal and use mean field estimates of transmission probability for all interactions with infectious hosts. Such methods may inaccurately describe transmission when interactions differ substantially in their ability to cause infection. Understanding this variation in transmission risk may be critical to properly model and manage some infectious diseases. In this study, we investigate how varying exposure and transmission may be key to understanding disease dynamics in the threatened desert tortoise Gopherus agassizii. We created heterogeneity in Mycoplasma agassizii exposure (the putative bacterial agent of a respiratory disease) by varying the duration of interactions between naturally infected and uninfected captive desert tortoises. Using qPCR, we identified new infections and compared models of transmission probability as a function of contact duration and pathogen load. We then examined the contact patterns of a wild tortoise population using proximity loggers to identify heterogeneity in contact duration. The top-ranked model predicting M. agassizii transmission included a dose term defined as the product of the number of days in proximity to an infected host and the infection level of that host. Models predicted low transmission probability for short interactions, unless the infectious host had a high load of M. agassizii: such hosts were predicted to transmit infection at higher rates with any amount of contact. We observed predominantly short-lived interactions in a free-ranging tortoise population and thus, expect transmission patterns in this population to vary considerably with the frequency and duration of high infection levels. Mean field models may misrepresent natural transmission patterns in this and other populations depending on the distribution of high-risk contact and shedding

  11. Shedding light on baryonic dark matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silk, Joseph

    1991-01-01

    Halo dark matter, if it is baryonic, may plausibly consist of compact stellar remnants. Jeans mass clouds containing 10 to the 6th to 10 to the 8th solar masses could have efficiently formed stars in the early universe and could plausibly have generated, for a suitably top-heavy stellar initial mass function, a high abundance of neutron stars as well as a small admixture of long-lived low mass stars. Within the resulting clusters of dark remnants, which eventually are tidally disrupted when halos eventually form, captures of neutron stars by nondegenerate stars resulted in formation of close binaries. These evolve to produce, by the present epoch, an observable X-ray signal associated with dark matter aggregations in galaxy cluster cores.

  12. Clinical Trials Shed Light on Minority Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Minority Health HHS Office of Minority Health Related Consumer Updates The FDA Supports Research to Reduce Health Disparities FDA Broadens Its ... Events Training & Continuing Education Inspections & Compliance Federal, State & Local Officials ... Health Professionals Science & Research Industry Scroll back to ...

  13. Shedding a new light on hazardous waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reece, N.

    1991-02-01

    The sun's ability to detoxify waterborne chemicals has long been known; polluted streams, for example, become cleaner as they flow through sunlit areas. Solar detoxification harnesses this natural degradation process for beneficial ends, producing simple, nonhazardous substances from hazardous organic chemicals. Solar detoxification systems now being developed break down these chemicals without using the fossil fuels required by conventional technologies. Sunlight destroys hazardous waste because of the distinctive properties of photons, the packets of energy that make up sunlight. Low-energy photons add thermal energy that will heat toxic chemicals; high-energy photons add the energy needed to break the chemical bonds of these chemicals. The detoxification process discussed here takes advantage of this latter group of photons found in the ultraviolet portion of the solar spectrum. 4 figs.

  14. Shedding light on canine pituitary dwarfism

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Voorbij, A.M.W.Y.

    2015-01-01

    Pituitary dwarfism, associated with growth hormone deficiency, is an autosomal, recessively inherited disorder in shepherd dogs. Due to the serious nature of pituitary dwarfism and lack of efficient treatment, it is preferable to prevent dwarfs from being born by applying a correct breeding policy.

  15. ATLAS helps shed light on the retina

    CERN Multimedia

    2007-01-01

    Technology developed for high-energy physics has led to the discovery of a retinal cell that eluded biologists for 40 years. The 512 electrode array, inspired by silicon microstrip detector technology in ATLAS, records the electrical activity of retinal neurones.ATLAS expertise have crossed over to biology enabling the discovery of a retinal cell type that may help humans see motion. The research, carried out by ATLAS collaborators at the University of California, Santa Cruz, and by neurobiologists at the Salk Institute in La Jolla, California, appeared in the 10 October issue of the Journal of Neuroscience and may help open biologists’ eyes to the uses of techniques developed in high-energy physics. At least 22 different types of primate retinal output cell are known from anatomical studies, but the functions of only a handful of these have been determined. The cells discovered have been ca...

  16. Snapshots to shed light on LHC performance

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    With the impressive size and unprecedented power of the LHC, it is all too easy to overlook the smaller devices that have the difficult task of monitoring the new accelerator. You don't have to stand too far back from the big picture to see examples of clever technology inside the LHC. One of the undulators installed in the LHC tunnel can be seen on the right of the photo. From right to left, back row: Lucio Rossi (group leader, MCS), Davide Tommasini (conceptual design, MCS), Thierry Tenaglia (integration design,TS-MME), Remo Maccaferri (project leader, MCS) and Hans Kummer (MCS/ME); front row: Gilles Trachez (MCS-ME) and Bruno Meunier (FSU-AT12). In contrast to the usual articles about the LHC's big number statistics, examples of clever problem-solving found in beam monitoring machinery show that smaller things can be beautiful too. The design of the LHC accelerator brought new challenges for monitoring the shape of the particle beam, known as the beam profile. The size of the beam shrinks as higher energi...

  17. Shedding light on peptide controlled silica mineralization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lutz, H.

    2017-01-01

    Biominerals are fascinating composites of organic and inorganic matter that have evolved over hundreds of millions of years. With their intricate nano- to microscale architecture, biominerals display extraordinary properties in terms of toughness, strength and weight. These properties are found for

  18. Modeling of light scattering by icy bodies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolokolova, L.; Mackowski, D.; Pitman, K.; Verbiscer, A.; Buratti, B.; Momary, T.

    2014-07-01

    As a result of ground-based, space-based, and in-situ spacecraft mission observations, a great amount of photometric, polarimetric, and spectroscopic data of icy bodies (satellites of giant planets, Kuiper Belt objects, comet nuclei, and icy particles in cometary comae and rings) has been accumulated. These data have revealed fascinating light-scattering phenomena, such as the opposition surge resulting from coherent backscattering and shadow hiding and the negative polarization associated with them. Near-infrared (NIR) spectra of these bodies are especially informative as the depth, width, and shape of the absorption bands of ice are sensitive not only to the ice abundance but also to the size of icy grains. Numerous NIR spectra obtained by Cassini's Visual and Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (VIMS) have been used to map the microcharacteristics of the icy satellites [1] and rings of Saturn [2]. VIMS data have also permitted a study of the opposition surge for icy satellites of Saturn [3], showing that coherent backscattering affects not only brightness and polarization of icy bodies but also their spectra [4]. To study all of the light-scattering phenomena that affect the photopolarimetric and spectroscopic characteristics of icy bodies, including coherent backscattering, requires computer modeling that rigorously considers light scattering by a large number of densely packed small particles that form either layers (in the case of regolith) or big clusters (ring and comet particles) . Such opportunity has appeared recently with a development of a new version MSTM4 of the Multi-Sphere T-Matrix code [5]. Simulations of reflectance and absorbance spectra of a ''target'' (particle layer or cluster) require that the dimensions of the target be significantly larger than the wavelength, sphere radius, and layer thickness. For wavelength-sized spheres and packing fractions typical of regolith, targets can contain dozens of thousands of spheres that, with the original MSTM

  19. Application of a Process Based Hydrologic Model in a Snow Dominant WaterShed: Upper Feather River Basin in California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, F. I.; Kadir, T.; Galef, J.

    2008-12-01

    Milly et al. in a recent article (Science, Vol319, 1February, 2008, pp573-574) declared that "stationarity is dead." They went on stating, "Finding a suitable successor is crucial for human adaptation to changing climate." California's Department of Water Resources' (DWR's) search for a suitable successor led to the conclusion that a "temperature based approach" might be a good candidate to replace or supplement the traditional "precipitation based" hydrology. In this paper application of a physically based model that begins with ambient air temperature is presented. The projections of precipitation by various GCM's are wide spread and uncertainties on the wetness (or dryness) are abound whereas the future temperature projections, through also wide spread, are unanimous in directional sense-going up or getting warmer over time. Noting this robust nature of the future temperature projections and also noting that the cause of the future precipitation changes is due to the rising temperature, the authors take an approach that the temperature, rather than the precipitation, should be the commencing point in the development of the changing future hydrology. We claim that the main cause of the "death" of the stationarity in a snow dominant high elevation watershed is the warming temperature. Therefore, by commencing with the temperature in the hydrologic process, either the form of precipitation or the melting of the accumulated snow can be captured and the non-stationary future hydrology can be generated for water resources planning and management. The USGS under a contract to DWR completed development of the Precipitation-Runoff Modeling System (PRMS) application for simulating daily streamflow for the Upper Feather River Basin. PRMS simulates all the major snowmelt/precipitation related physical processes including snowpack accumulation/melting, sublimation, evapotranspiration, surface runoff, subsurface flow, and ground water flow. The model was calibrated for Water

  20. Light

    CERN Document Server

    Robertson, William C

    2003-01-01

    Why is left right and right left in the mirror? Baffled by the basics of reflection and refraction? Wondering just how the eye works? If you have trouble teaching concepts about light that you don t fully grasp yourself, get help from a book that s both scientifically accurate and entertaining with Light. By combining clear explanations, clever drawings, and activities that use easy-to-find materials, this book covers what science teachers and parents need to know to teach about light with confidence. It uses ray, wave, and particle models of light to explain the basics of reflection and refraction, optical instruments, polarization of light, and interference and diffraction. There s also an entire chapter on how the eye works. Each chapter ends with a Summary and Applications section that reinforces concepts with everyday examples. Whether you need a deeper understanding of how light bends or a good explanation of why the sky is blue, you ll find Light more illuminating and accessible than a college textbook...

  1. Modeling of an Adjustable Beam Solid State Light

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This proposal is for the development of a computational model of a prototype variable beam light source using optical modeling software, Zemax OpticStudio ®. The...

  2. Phthalate SHEDS-HT runs

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Inputs and outputs for SHEDS-HT runs of DiNP, DEHP, DBP. This dataset is associated with the following publication: Moreau, M., J. Leonard, K. Phillips, J. Campbell,...

  3. Diffusion model for ultrasound-modulated light.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hollmann, Joseph L; Horstmeyer, Roarke; Yang, Changhuei; DiMarzio, Charles A

    2014-03-01

    Researchers use ultrasound (US) to modulate diffusive light in a highly scattering medium like tissue. This paper analyzes the US-optical interaction in the scattering medium and derives an expression for the US-modulated optical radiance. The diffusion approximation to the radiative transport equation is employed to develop a Green's function for US-modulated light. The predicted modulated fluence and flux are verified using finite-difference time-domain simulations. The Green's function is then utilized to illustrate the modulated reflectance as the US-optical interaction increases in depth. The intent of this paper is to focus on high US frequencies necessary for high-resolution imaging because they are of interest for applications such as phase conjugation.

  4. Current-voltage model of LED light sources

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beczkowski, Szymon; Munk-Nielsen, Stig

    2012-01-01

    Amplitude modulation is rarely used for dimming light-emitting diodes in polychromatic luminaires due to big color shifts caused by varying magnitude of LED driving current and nonlinear relationship between intensity of a diode and driving current. Current-voltage empirical model of light...

  5. Light in Tropical Forest Models: What Detail Matters?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shenkin, A.; Bentley, L. P.; Asner, G. P.; Malhi, Y.

    2014-12-01

    Representations of light in models of tropical forests are typically unconstrained by field data and rife with assumptions, and for good reason: forest light environments are highly variable, difficult and onerous to predict, and the value of improved prediction is unclear. Still, the question remains: how detailed must our models be to be accurate enough, yet simple enough to be able to scale them from plots to landscapes? Here we use field data to constrain 1-D, 2-D, and 3-D light models and integrate them with simple forest models to predict net primary production (NPP) across an Andes-to-Amazon elevation transect in Peru. Field data consist of novel vertical light profile measurements coupled with airborne LiDAR (light detection and ranging) data from the Carnegie Airborne Observatory. Preliminary results indicate that while 1-D models may be "good-enough" and highly-scalable where forest structure is relatively homogenous, more complex models become important as forest structure becomes more heterogeneous. We discuss the implications our results hold for prediction of NPP under a changing climate, and suggest paths forward for useful proxies of light availability in forests to improve and scale up forest models.

  6. Modeling Water Clarity and Light Quality in Oceans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed A. Abdelrhman

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Phytoplankton is a primary producer of organic compounds, and it forms the base of the food chain in ocean waters. The concentration of phytoplankton in the water column controls water clarity and the amount and quality of light that penetrates through it. The availability of adequate light intensity is a major factor in the health of algae and phytoplankton. There is a strong negative coupling between light intensity and phytoplankton concentration (e.g., through self-shading by the cells, which reduces available light and in return affects the growth rate of the cells. Proper modeling of this coupling is essential to understand primary productivity in the oceans. This paper provides the methodology to model light intensity in the water column, which can be included in relevant water quality models. The methodology implements relationships from bio-optical models, which use phytoplankton chlorophyll a (chl-a concentration as a surrogate for light attenuation, including absorption and scattering by other attenuators. The presented mathematical methodology estimates the reduction in light intensity due to absorption by pure seawater, chl-a pigment, non-algae particles (NAPs and colored dissolved organic matter (CDOM, as well as backscattering by pure seawater, phytoplankton particles and NAPs. The methods presented facilitate the prediction of the effects of various environmental and management scenarios (e.g., global warming, altered precipitation patterns, greenhouse gases on the wellbeing of phytoplankton communities in the oceans as temperature-driven chl-a changes take place.

  7. Modelling and simulation of electrical energy systems through a complex systems approach using agent-based models. Case study: Under-frequency load shedding for refrigerators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kremers, Enrique [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), Karlsruhe (Germany). European Inst. for Energy Research (EIFER); Gonzalez de Durana, Jose Maria; Barambones, Oscar [Universidad del Pais Vasco, Vitoria (Spain). Escuela Universitaria de Ingenieria de Vitoria-Gasteiz

    2013-09-01

    One of the ways of studying complex systems is through modelling and simulation, which are used as tools to represent these systems in a virtual environment. Current advances in computing performance (which has been a major constraint in this field for some time) allow for the simulation these kinds of systems within reasonable time horizons. One of the tools for simulating complex systems is agent-based modelling. This individual-centric approach is based on autonomous entities that can interact with each other, thus modelling the system in a disaggregated way. Agent-based models can be coupled with other modelling methods, such as continuous models and discrete events, which can be embedded or run in parallel to the multi-agent system. When representing the electrical energy system in a systemic and multi-layered way, it is treated as a true socio-technical system, in which not only technical models are taken into account, but also socio-behavioural ones. In this work, a number of different models for the parts of an electrical system are presented, related to production, demand and storage. The models are intended to be as simple as possible in order to be simulated in an integrated framework representing the system as a whole. Furthermore, the models allow the inclusion of social behaviour and other, not purely engineering-related aspects of the system, which have to be considered from a complex point of view. (orig.)

  8. Light hadrons in the bag model with broken chiral symmetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Efrosinin, V.P.; Zaikin, D.A.

    1987-01-01

    A version of the bag model with broken chiral symmetry is proposed. A satisfactory description of the experimental data on light hadrons including the pion is obtained. The estimate of the pion-nucleon σ term is given in the framework of this model. The pion and kaon decay constants are calculated. The centre-of-mass motion problem in bag models is discussed

  9. A switchable light-input, light-output system modelled and constructed in yeast

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kozma-Bognar Laszlo

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Advances in synthetic biology will require spatio-temporal regulation of biological processes in heterologous host cells. We develop a light-switchable, two-hybrid interaction in yeast, based upon the Arabidopsis proteins PHYTOCHROME A and FAR-RED ELONGATED HYPOCOTYL 1-LIKE. Light input to this regulatory module allows dynamic control of a light-emitting LUCIFERASE reporter gene, which we detect by real-time imaging of yeast colonies on solid media. Results The reversible activation of the phytochrome by red light, and its inactivation by far-red light, is retained. We use this quantitative readout to construct a mathematical model that matches the system's behaviour and predicts the molecular targets for future manipulation. Conclusion Our model, methods and materials together constitute a novel system for a eukaryotic host with the potential to convert a dynamic pattern of light input into a predictable gene expression response. This system could be applied for the regulation of genetic networks - both known and synthetic.

  10. Affordable and personalized lighting using inverse modeling and virtual sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basu, Chandrayee; Chen, Benjamin; Richards, Jacob; Dhinakaran, Aparna; Agogino, Alice; Martin, Rodney

    2014-03-01

    Wireless sensor networks (WSN) have great potential to enable personalized intelligent lighting systems while reducing building energy use by 50%-70%. As a result WSN systems are being increasingly integrated in state-ofart intelligent lighting systems. In the future these systems will enable participation of lighting loads as ancillary services. However, such systems can be expensive to install and lack the plug-and-play quality necessary for user-friendly commissioning. In this paper we present an integrated system of wireless sensor platforms and modeling software to enable affordable and user-friendly intelligent lighting. It requires ⇠ 60% fewer sensor deployments compared to current commercial systems. Reduction in sensor deployments has been achieved by optimally replacing the actual photo-sensors with real-time discrete predictive inverse models. Spatially sparse and clustered sub-hourly photo-sensor data captured by the WSN platforms are used to develop and validate a piece-wise linear regression of indoor light distribution. This deterministic data-driven model accounts for sky conditions and solar position. The optimal placement of photo-sensors is performed iteratively to achieve the best predictability of the light field desired for indoor lighting control. Using two weeks of daylight and artificial light training data acquired at the Sustainability Base at NASA Ames, the model was able to predict the light level at seven monitored workstations with 80%-95% accuracy. We estimate that 10% adoption of this intelligent wireless sensor system in commercial buildings could save 0.2-0.25 quads BTU of energy nationwide.

  11. Lighting

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Lighting Systems Test Facilities aid research that improves the energy efficiency of lighting systems. • Gonio-Photometer: Measures illuminance from each portion of...

  12. Stochastic oscillations induced by vortex shedding in wind

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Claus

    1997-01-01

    for the vortex shedding load during lock-in are obtained and discussed. Due to the complexity of the problem, the models give an idealized phenomenological description of the "lock-in" phenomenon, but for engineering analysis, especially a fatigue analysis, such simple model may be sufficient. All the results...... to be rather uncertain. A stochastic model for the length and position of the lock-in interval and different load models for the vortex shedding load during lock-in are obtained and discussed. Due to the complexity of the problem, the models give an idealized phenomenological description of the "lock......As a fluid flows past a circular cylinder,vortices are shed alternately from each side at most values of the Reynolds number. Over a certain range of windspeeds, the periodicity in the wake is synchronized or captured by the mechanical system. The shedding abruptly deviates from the linear Strouhal...

  13. Finite difference time domain modeling of light matter interaction in light-propelled microtools

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bañas, Andrew Rafael; Palima, Darwin; Aabo, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Direct laser writing and other recent fabrication techniques offer a wide variety in the design of microdevices. Hence, modeling such devices requires analysis methods capable of handling arbitrary geometries. Recently, we have demonstrated the potential of microtools, optically actuated microstr......Direct laser writing and other recent fabrication techniques offer a wide variety in the design of microdevices. Hence, modeling such devices requires analysis methods capable of handling arbitrary geometries. Recently, we have demonstrated the potential of microtools, optically actuated...... microstructures with functionalities geared towards biophotonics applications. Compared to dynamic beam shaping alone, microtools allow more complex interactions between the shaped light and the biological samples at the receiving end. For example, strongly focused light coming from a tapered tip of a microtool...... demonstrate novel methods of optical micromanipulation which primarily result from the particle's geometry as opposed to the directly moving the light distributions as in conventional trapping....

  14. Improved spring model-based collaborative indoor visible light positioning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Zhijie; Zhang, WeiNan; Zhou, GuoFu

    2016-06-01

    Gaining accuracy with indoor positioning of individuals is important as many location-based services rely on the user's current position to provide them with useful services. Many researchers have studied indoor positioning techniques based on WiFi and Bluetooth. However, they have disadvantages such as low accuracy or high cost. In this paper, we propose an indoor positioning system in which visible light radiated from light-emitting diodes is used to locate the position of receivers. Compared with existing methods using light-emitting diode light, we present a high-precision and simple implementation collaborative indoor visible light positioning system based on an improved spring model. We first estimate coordinate position information using the visible light positioning system, and then use the spring model to correct positioning errors. The system can be employed easily because it does not require additional sensors and the occlusion problem of visible light would be alleviated. We also describe simulation experiments, which confirm the feasibility of our proposed method.

  15. The impact of plug-in vehicles on greenhouse gas and criteria pollutants emissions in an urban air shed using a spatially and temporally resolved dispatch model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Razeghi, Ghazal; Brown, Tim; Samuelsen, G. Scott

    With the introduction of plug-in vehicles (PEVs) into the light-duty vehicle fleet, the tail-pipe emissions of GHGs and criteria pollutants will be partly transferred to electricity generating units. To study the impact of PEVs on well-to-wheels emissions, the U.S. Western electrical grid serving the South Coast Air Basin (SoCAB) of California is modeled with both spatial and temporal resolution at the level of individual power plants. Electricity load is calculated and projected for future years, and the temporal electricity generation of each power plant within the SoCAB is modeled based on historical data and knowledge of electricity generation and dispatch. Due to the efficiency and pollutant controls governing the performance of the Western grid, the deployment of PEVs results in a daily reduction of greenhouse gases (GHGs) and tail-pipe emissions, especially in the critical morning and afternoon commute hours. The extent of improvement depends on charging scenarios, future grid mix, and the number and type of plug-in vehicles. In addition, charging PEVs using wind energy that would otherwise be curtailed can result in a substantial emissions reduction. Smart control will be required to manage PEV charging in order to mitigate renewable intermittencies and decrease emissions associated with peaking power production.

  16. Light

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Prescott, N.B.; Kristensen, Helle Halkjær; Wathes, C.M.

    2004-01-01

    This chapter presents the effect of artificial light environments (light levels, colour, photoperiod and flicker) on the welfare of broilers in terms of vision, behaviour, lameness and mortality......This chapter presents the effect of artificial light environments (light levels, colour, photoperiod and flicker) on the welfare of broilers in terms of vision, behaviour, lameness and mortality...

  17. Light Scatter in Optical Materials: Advanced Haze Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-03-31

    backside light from the bulb back toward the bowl. The center of the bowl has a clear aperture cut through it, allowing the eye an unobstructed...AFRL-RH-FS-TR-2017-0022 Light Scatter in Optical Materials: Advanced Haze Modeling Michael A. Guevara William R. Brockmeier Thomas K. Kuyk...other person or corporation; or convey any rights or permission to manufacture, use, or sell any patented invention that may relate to them. Qualified

  18. Modeling nanostructure-enhanced light trapping in organic solar cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Adam, Jost

    A promising approach for improving the power conversion efficiencies of organic solar cells (OSCs) is by incorporating nanostructures in their thin film architecture to improve the light absorption in the device’s active polymer layers. Here, we present a modelling framework for the prediction....... Diffraction by fractal metallic supergratings. Optics Express, 15(24), 15628–15636 (2007) [3] Goszczak, A. J. et al. Nanoscale Aluminum dimples for light trapping in organic thin films (submitted)...

  19. Modeling the dynamic modulation of light energy in photosynthetic algae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papadakis, Ioannis A; Kotzabasis, Kiriakos; Lika, Konstadia

    2012-05-07

    An integrated cell-based dynamic mathematical model that take into account the role of the photon absorbing process, the partition of excitation energy, and the photoinactivation and repair of photosynthetic units, under variable light and dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) availability is proposed. The modeling of the photon energy absorption and the energy dissipation is based on the photoadaptive changes of the underlying mechanisms. The partition of the excitation energy is based on the relative availability of light and DIC to the cell. The modeling of the photoinactivation process is based on the common aspect that it occurs under any light intensity and the modeling of the repair process is based on the evidence that it is controlled by chloroplast and nuclear-encoded enzymes. The present model links the absorption of photons and the partitioning of excitation energy to the linear electron flow and other quenchers with chlorophyll fluorescence emission parameters, and the number of the functional photosynthetic units with the photosynthetic oxygen production rate. The energy allocation to the LEF increases as DIC availability increases and/or light intensity decreases. The rate of rejected energy increases with light intensity and with DIC availability. The resulting rate coefficient of photoinactivation increases as light intensity and/or as DIC concentration increases. We test the model against chlorophyll fluorescence induction and photosynthetic oxygen production rate measurements, obtained from cultures of the unicellular green alga Scenedesmus obliquus, and find a very close quantitative and qualitative correspondence between predictions and data. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Brief History of Ultra-light Scalar Dark Matter Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lee Jae-Weon

    2018-01-01

    dark matter, BEC dark matter, wave dark matter, or ultra-light axion. In this model ultra-light scalar dark matter particles with mass m = O(10-22eV condense in a single Bose-Einstein condensate state and behave collectively like a classical wave. Galactic dark matter halos can be described as a self-gravitating coherent scalar field configuration called boson stars. At the scale larger than galaxies the dark matter acts like cold dark matter, while below the scale quantum pressure from the uncertainty principle suppresses the smaller structure formation so that it can resolve the small scale crisis of the conventional cold dark matter model.

  1. Demand side optimal strategy for voluntary load shedding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, J.; Xia, X.; Alexander, D. [Pretoria Univ. (South Africa). Dept. of Electrical, Electronic and Computer Engineering

    2008-07-01

    South African electricity suppliers are considering the use of voluntary load shedding as a means of solving the country's electricity shortage. In this study, an optimization model for demand side voluntary load shedding was used to simulate a scenario involving a water supply company. The aim of the study was to determine an optimal control model for the water pump equipment while ensuring that energy and cost reductions were achieved. The water supply company consisted of 21 pumps, 3 engine rooms, and 4 destination reservoirs. The water system was modelled as a mass balance model which stated that the mass that entered the system must leave the system or accumulate within the system. A time-of-use electricity tariff structure was used. The cost function was computed over a 24 hour period. The study demonstrated that water demand can be met when 50.5 per cent of peak time energy consumption was shed, and when 12.33 per cent of energy consumption during a weekday was shed. Approximately 17.76 per cent of the corresponding energy costs can be saved by adopting an optimal load shedding strategy. Further practical applications of the load shedding model are now being investigated. 15 refs., 5 tabs., 2 figs.

  2. Properties of light flavour baryons in hypercentral quark model

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The light flavour baryons are studied within the quark model using the hypercentral description of the three-body system. ... Department of Physics, Sardar Patel University, Vallabh Vidyanagar 388 120, India; Department of Physics, S.V. National Institute of Technology, Surat 395 007, India; Department of Physical Sciences, ...

  3. 8-prenylnaringenin and tamoxifen inhibit the shedding of irradiated epithelial cells and increase the latency period of radiation-induced oral mucositis. Cell culture and murine model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ryck, Tine de; Impe, Annouchka van; Bracke, Marc E. [Ghent University, Laboratory of Experimental Cancer Research, Department Radiation Oncology and Experimental Cancer Research, Ghent (Belgium); Vanhoecke, Barbara W. [Ghent University, Laboratory of Experimental Cancer Research, Department Radiation Oncology and Experimental Cancer Research, Ghent (Belgium); Ghent University, Laboratory of Microbial Ecology and Technology (LabMET), Ghent (Belgium); Heyerick, Arne [Ghent University, Laboratory of Pharmacognosy and Phytochemistry, Ghent (Belgium); Vakaet, Luc; Neve, Wilfried de [Ghent University Hospital, Department of Radiation Oncology, Ghent (Belgium); Mueller, Doreen [Medical Faculty and University Hospital Carl Gustav Carus, Technische Universitaet Dresden, Department of Radiotherapy and Radiation Oncology, OncoRay-National Center for Radiation Research in Oncology, Dresden (Germany); Schmidt, Margret [Medical Faculty and University Hospital Carl Gustav Carus, Technische Universitaet Dresden, Department of Radiotherapy and Radiation Oncology, OncoRay-National Center for Radiation Research in Oncology, Dresden (Germany); German Cancer Consortium (DKTK) partner site Dresden and German Cancer Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg (Germany); Doerr, Wolfgang [Medical Faculty and University Hospital Carl Gustav Carus, Technische Universitaet Dresden, Department of Radiotherapy and Radiation Oncology, OncoRay-National Center for Radiation Research in Oncology, Dresden (Germany); Medical University, Department of Radiation Oncology, CCC, and CD-Laboratory RadOnc, Vienna (Austria)

    2015-05-01

    The major component in the pathogenesis of oral radiation-induced mucositis is progressive epithelial hypoplasia and eventual ulceration. Irradiation inhibits cell proliferation, while cell loss at the surface continues. We conceived to slow down this desquamation by increasing intercellular adhesion, regulated by the E-cadherin/catenin complex. We investigated if 8-prenylnaringenin (8-PN) or tamoxifen (TAM) decrease the shedding of irradiated human buccal epithelial cells in vitro and thus delay the ulcerative phase of radiation-induced mucositis in vivo. In vitro, aggregates of buccal epithelial cells were irradiated and cultured in suspension for 11 days. 8-PN or TAM were investigated regarding their effect on cell shedding. In vivo, the lower tongue surface of mice was irradiated with graded single doses of 25 kV X-rays. The incidence, latency, and duration of the resulting mucosal ulcerations were analyzed after topical treatment with 8-PN, TAM or solvent. 8-PN or TAM prevented the volume reduction of the irradiated cell aggregates during the incubation period. This was the result of a higher residual cell number in the treated versus the untreated irradiated aggregates. In vivo, topical treatment with 8-PN or TAM significantly increased the latency of mucositis from 10.9 to 12.1 and 12.4 days respectively, while the ulcer incidence was unchanged. 8-PN and TAM prevent volume reduction of irradiated cell aggregates in suspension culture. In the tongues of mice, these compounds increase the latency period. This suggests a role for these compounds for the amelioration of radiation-induced mucositis in the treatment of head and neck tumors. (orig.) [German] Die wesentliche Komponente in der Pathogenese der radiogenen Mukositis ist eine progressive epitheliale Hypoplasie und letztendlich Ulzeration. Die Bestrahlung hemmt die Zellproliferation, waehrend der Zellverlust an der Oberflaeche fortbesteht. Wir versuchten, diese Desquamation durch eine Stimulation der

  4. Light-limited growth and competition for light in well-mixed aquatic environments : An elementary model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huisman, Jef; Weissing, F.J.

    Light is never distributed homogeneously since it forms a gradient over biomass. As a consequence, the common theories on nutrient competition are not applicable to competition for light. In this paper, we investigate a model for light-limited growth and competition among phytoplankton species in a

  5. Modeling of photoluminescence in laser-based lighting systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatzizyrli, Elisavet; Tinne, Nadine; Lachmayer, Roland; Neumann, Jörg; Kracht, Dietmar

    2017-12-01

    The development of laser-based lighting systems has been the latest step towards a revolution in illumination technology brought about by solid-state lighting. Laser-activated remote phosphor systems produce white light sources with significantly higher luminance than LEDs. The weak point of such systems is often considered to be the conversion element. The high-intensity exciting laser beam in combination with the limited thermal conductivity of ceramic phosphor materials leads to thermal quenching, the phenomenon in which the emission efficiency decreases as temperature rises. For this reason, the aim of the presented study is the modeling of remote phosphor systems in order to investigate their thermal limitations and to calculate the parameters for optimizing the efficiency of such systems. The common approach to simulate remote phosphor systems utilizes a combination of different tools such as ray tracing algorithms and wave optics tools for describing the incident and converted light, whereas the modeling of the conversion process itself, i.e. photoluminescence, in most cases is circumvented by using the absorption and emission spectra of the phosphor material. In this study, we describe the processes involved in luminescence quantum-mechanically using the single-configurational-coordinate diagram as well as the Franck-Condon principle and propose a simulation model that incorporates the temperature dependence of these processes. Following an increasing awareness of climate change and environmental issues, the development of ecologically friendly lighting systems featuring low power consumption and high luminous efficiency is imperative more than ever. The better understanding of laser-based lighting systems is an important step towards that aim as they may improve on LEDs in the near future.

  6. Model independent control of lightly damped noise/vibration systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Jing

    2008-07-01

    Feedforward control is a popular strategy of active noise/vibration control. In well-damped noise/vibration systems, path transfer functions from actuators to sensors can be modeled by finite impulse response (FIR) filters with negligible errors. It is possible to implement noninvasive model independent feedforward control by a recently proposed method called orthogonal adaptation. In lightly damped noise/vibration systems, however, path transfer functions have infinite impulse responses (IIRs) that cause difficulties in design and implementation of broadband feedforward controllers. A major source of difficulties is model error if IIR path transfer functions are approximated by FIR filters. In general, active control performance deteriorates as model error increases. In this study, a new method is proposed to design and implement model independent feedforward controllers for broadband in lightly damped noise/vibration systems. It is shown analytically that the proposed method is able to drive the convergence of a noninvasive model independent feedforward controller to improve broadband control in lightly damped noise/vibration systems. The controller is optimized in the minimum H2 norm sense. Experiment results are presented to verify the analytical results.

  7. SHEDS-Dietary Technical Manual Appendices

    Science.gov (United States)

    The appendices for the SHEDS-Dietary Technical Manual include a sample food diary, backgorund information on the water concentration data used in SHEDS-Dietary, a food list, food definitions and sample code.

  8. Characterization, Modeling, and Optimization of Light-Emitting Diode Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thorseth, Anders

    This thesis explores, characterization, modeling, and optimization of light-emitting diodes (LED) for general illumination. An automated setup has been developed for spectral radiometric characterization of LED components with precise control of the settings of forward current and operating...... temperature. The automated setup has been used to characterize commercial LED components with respect to multiple settings. It is shown that the droop in quantum efficiency can be approximated by a simple parabolic function. The investigated models of the spectral power distributions (SPD) from LEDs...... comparing the chromaticity of the measured SPD with tted models, the deviation is found to be larger than the lower limit of human color perception. A method has been developed to optimize multicolored cluster LED systems with respect to light quality, using multi objective optimization. The results...

  9. Modelling light and photosynthesis in the marine environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bogdan Woźniak

    2003-06-01

    Full Text Available The overriding and far-reaching aim of our work has been to achieve a good understanding of the processes of light interaction with phytoplankton in the sea and to develop an innovative physical model of photosynthesis in the marine environment, suitable for the remote sensin gof marine primary production. Unlike previous models, the present one takesgreater account of the complexity of the physiological processes in phytoplankton. We have focused in particular on photophysiological processes, which are governed directly or indirectly by light energy, or in which light, besides the nutrient content in and the temperature of seawater, is one of the principal limiting factors.    To achieve this aim we have carried out comprehensive statistical analyses of the natural variability of the main photophysiological properties of phytoplankton and their links with the principal abiotic factors in the sea. These analyses have made use of extensive empirical data gathered in a wide diversity of seas and oceans by Polish and Russian teams as well as by joint Polish-Russian expeditions. Data sets available on the Internet have also been applied. As a result, a set of more or less complex, semi-empirical models of light-stimulated processes occurring in marine phytoplankton cells has been developed. The trophic type of sea, photo-acclimation and the production of photoprotecting carotenoids, chromatic acclimation and the production of various forms of chlorophyll-antennas and photosynthetic carotenoids, cell adaptation by the package effect, light absorption, photosynthesis, photoinhibition, the fluorescence effect, and the activation of PS2 centres are all considered in the models. These take into account not only the influence of light, but also, indirectly, that of the vertical mixing of water; in the case of photosynthesis, the quantum yield has been also formulated as being dependent on the nutrient concentrations and the temperature of seawater

  10. Plant canopy light absorption model with application to wheat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chance, J. E.; Lemaster, E. W.

    1978-01-01

    A light absorption model (LAM) for vegetative plant canopies has been derived from the Suits reflectance model. From the LAM the absorption of light in the photosynthetically active region of the spectrum (400-700 nm) has been calculated for a Penjamo wheat crop for several situations including (a) the percent absorption of the incident radiation by a canopy of LAI 3.1 having a four-layer structure, (b) the percent absorption of light by the individual layers within a four-layer canopy and by the underlying soil, (c) the percent absorption of light by each vegetative canopy layer for variable sun angle, and (d) the cumulative solar energy absorbed by the developing wheat canopy as it progresses from a single layer through its growth stages to a three-layer canopy. This calculation is also presented as a function of the leaf area index and is shown to be in agreement with experimental data reported by Kanemasu on Plainsman V wheat.

  11. Early light curves for Type Ia supernova explosion models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noebauer, U. M.; Kromer, M.; Taubenberger, S.; Baklanov, P.; Blinnikov, S.; Sorokina, E.; Hillebrandt, W.

    2017-12-01

    Upcoming high-cadence transient survey programmes will produce a wealth of observational data for Type Ia supernovae. These data sets will contain numerous events detected very early in their evolution, shortly after explosion. Here, we present synthetic light curves, calculated with the radiation hydrodynamical approach STELLA for a number of different explosion models, specifically focusing on these first few days after explosion. We show that overall the early light curve evolution is similar for most of the investigated models. Characteristic imprints are induced by radioactive material located close to the surface. However, these are very similar to the signatures expected from ejecta-CSM or ejecta-companion interaction. Apart from the pure deflagration explosion models, none of our synthetic light curves exhibit the commonly assumed power-law rise. We demonstrate that this can lead to substantial errors in the determination of the time of explosion. In summary, we illustrate with our calculations that even with very early data an identification of specific explosion scenarios is challenging, if only photometric observations are available.

  12. Light

    CERN Document Server

    Rivera, Andrea

    2017-01-01

    Light is all around us. Learn how it is used in art, technology, and engineering. Five easy-to-read chapters explain the science behind light, as well as its real-world applications. Vibrant, full-color photos, bolded glossary words, and a key stats section let readers zoom in even deeper. Aligned to Common Core Standards and correlated to state standards. Abdo Zoom is a division of ABDO.

  13. White light-emitting diodes (LEDs) at domestic lighting levels and retinal injury in a rat model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shang, Yu-Man; Wang, Gen-Shuh; Sliney, David; Yang, Chang-Hao; Lee, Li-Ling

    2014-03-01

    Light-emitting diodes (LEDs) deliver higher levels of blue light to the retina than do conventional domestic light sources. Chronic exposure to high-intensity light (2,000-10,000 lux) has previously been found to result in light-induced retinal injury, but chronic exposure to relatively low-intensity (750 lux) light has not been previously assessed with LEDs in a rodent model. We examined LED-induced retinal neuronal cell damage in the Sprague-Dawley rat using functional, histological, and biochemical measurements. We used blue LEDs (460 nm) and full-spectrum white LEDs, coupled with matching compact fluorescent lights, for exposures. Pathological examinations included electroretinogram, hematoxylin and eosin (H&E) staining, immunohistochemistry (IHC), and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). We also measured free radical production in the retina to determine the oxidative stress level. H&E staining and TEM revealed apoptosis and necrosis of photoreceptors, which indicated blue-light induced photochemical injury of the retina. Free radical production in the retina was increased in LED-exposed groups. IHC staining demonstrated that oxidative stress was associated with retinal injury. Although we found serious retinal light injury in LED groups, the compact fluorescent lamp (CFL) groups showed moderate to mild injury. Our results raise questions about adverse effects on the retina from chronic exposure to LED light compared with other light sources that have less blue light. Thus, we suggest a precautionary approach with regard to the use of blue-rich "white" LEDs for general lighting. Shang YM, Wang GS, Sliney D, Yang CH, Lee LL. 2014. White light-emitting diodes (LEDs) at domestic lighting levels and retinal injury in a rat model. Environ Health Perspect 122:269-276; http://dx.doi.org/10.1289/ehp.1307294.

  14. General Model for Light Curves of Chromospherically Active Binary Stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jetsu, L.; Henry, G. W.; Lehtinen, J.

    2017-04-01

    The starspots on the surface of many chromospherically active binary stars concentrate on long-lived active longitudes separated by 180°. Shifts in activity between these two longitudes, the “flip-flop” events, have been observed in single stars like FK Comae and binary stars like σ Geminorum. Recently, interferometry has revealed that ellipticity may at least partly explain the flip-flop events in σ Geminorum. This idea was supported by the double-peaked shape of the long-term mean light curve of this star. Here we show that the long-term mean light curves of 14 chromospherically active binaries follow a general model that explains the connection between orbital motion, changes in starspot distribution, ellipticity, and flip-flop events. Surface differential rotation is probably weak in these stars, because the interference of two constant period waves may explain the observed light curve changes. These two constant periods are the active longitude period ({P}{act}) and the orbital period ({P}{orb}). We also show how to apply the same model to single stars, where only the value of P act is known. Finally, we present a tentative interference hypothesis about the origin of magnetic fields in all spectral types of stars. The CPS results are available electronically at the Vizier database.

  15. Spectra of heavy-light mesons in a relativistic model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jing-Bin; Lü, Cai-Dian

    2017-05-01

    The spectra and wave functions of heavy-light mesons are calculated within a relativistic quark model which is based on a heavy-quark expansion of the instantaneous Bethe-Salpeter equation by applying the Foldy-Wouthuysen transformation. The kernel we choose is the standard combination of linear scalar and Coulombic vector. The effective Hamiltonian for heavy-light quark-antiquark system is calculated up to order 1/m_Q^2. Our results are in good agreement with available experimental data except for the anomalous D_{s0}^*(2317) and D_{s1}(2460) states. The newly observed heavy-light meson states can be accommodated successfully in the relativistic quark model with their assignments presented. The D_{sJ}^*(2860) can be interpreted as the |1^{3/2}D_1\\rangle and |1^{5/2}D_3\\rangle states being members of the 1D family with J^P=1^- and 3^-.

  16. Spectra of heavy-light mesons in a relativistic model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Jing-Bin; Lue, Cai-Dian [Institute of High Energy Physics, Beijing (China)

    2017-05-15

    The spectra and wave functions of heavy-light mesons are calculated within a relativistic quark model which is based on a heavy-quark expansion of the instantaneous Bethe-Salpeter equation by applying the Foldy-Wouthuysen transformation. The kernel we choose is the standard combination of linear scalar and Coulombic vector. The effective Hamiltonian for heavy-light quark-antiquark system is calculated up to order 1/m{sub Q}{sup 2}. Our results are in good agreement with available experimental data except for the anomalous D{sub s0}{sup *}(2317) and D{sub s1}(2460) states. The newly observed heavy-light meson states can be accommodated successfully in the relativistic quark model with their assignments presented. The D{sub sJ}{sup *}(2860) can be interpreted as the vertical stroke 1{sup 3/2}D{sub 1} right angle and vertical stroke 1{sup 5/2}D{sub 3} right angle states being members of the 1D family with J{sup P} = 1{sup -} and 3{sup -}. (orig.)

  17. Validation of ultraviolet, infrared, and narrow band light alternate light sources for detection of bruises in a pigskin model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olds, Kelly; Byard, Roger W; Winskog, Calle; Langlois, Neil E I

    2016-12-01

    Alternate light sources such as ultraviolet, narrow band, and infrared have been used in an attempt to reveal the presence of bruising that is not otherwise apparent (inapparent). The following study evaluates the ability of alternate light sources to enhance visibility of bruises by employing an objective assessment of digital photography images in conjunction with histology. A pigskin model was employed with bruises created by injection of blood to be not visible or barely visible (inapparent) under white light. The pigskin was photographed using alternate light source illumination. Images were assessed using the program Fiji ® to measure enhancement in terms of bruise length (cm). Photography results were compared with histology to confirm the presence of bruising. Violet and blue light sources produced the greatest enhancement, both with a p light sources in this study, indicating that light sources are not specific, and that their use to enhance the visibility of bruising should be undertaken with caution.

  18. Scaling properties in single collision model of light ion reflection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vukanic, J.; Simovic, R.

    2004-01-01

    Light ion reflection from solids in the keV energy region has been studied within the single collision model. Particle and energy reflection coefficients as functions of the scaled transport cross section have been calculated numerically by utilizing the exact scattering function for the Kr-C potential and analytically with an effective power approximation for the same potential. The obtained analytical formulae approximate very accurately to the numerical results. Comparison of the calculated reflection coefficients with the experimental data and computer simulations for different light ion-heavy target combinations shows that the scaled transport cross section remains a convenient scaling parameter in the single collision domain, as adopted previously in multiple collision theory

  19. Two-singlet model for light cold dark matter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abada, Abdessamad; Ghaffor, Djamal; Nasri, Salah

    2011-01-01

    We extend the standard model by adding two gauge-singlet Z 2 -symmetric scalar fields that interact with visible matter only through the Higgs particle. One is a stable dark matter WIMP, and the other one undergoes a spontaneous breaking of the symmetry that opens new channels for the dark matter annihilation, hence lowering the mass of the WIMP. We study the effects of the observed dark matter relic abundance on the WIMP annihilation cross section and find that in most regions of the parameters' space, light dark matter is viable. We also compare the elastic-scattering cross section of our dark matter candidate off a nucleus with existing (CDMSII and XENON100) and projected (SuperCDMS and XENON1T) experimental exclusion bounds. We find that most of the allowed mass range for light dark matter will be probed by the projected sensitivity of the XENON1T experiment.

  20. Nucleon parton distributions in a light-front quark model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gutsche, Thomas [Universitaet Tuebingen, Institut fuer Theoretische Physik, Kepler Center for Astro and Particle Physics, Tuebingen (Germany); Lyubovitskij, Valery E. [Universitaet Tuebingen, Institut fuer Theoretische Physik, Kepler Center for Astro and Particle Physics, Tuebingen (Germany); Tomsk State University, Department of Physics, Tomsk (Russian Federation); Tomsk Polytechnic University, Laboratory of Particle Physics, Mathematical Physics Department, Tomsk (Russian Federation); Universidad Tecnica Federico Santa Maria, Departamento de Fisica y Centro Cientifico Tecnologico de Valparaiso (CCTVal), Valparaiso (Chile); Schmidt, Ivan [Universidad Tecnica Federico Santa Maria, Departamento de Fisica y Centro Cientifico Tecnologico de Valparaiso (CCTVal), Valparaiso (Chile)

    2017-02-15

    Continuing our analysis of parton distributions in the nucleon, we extend our light-front quark model in order to obtain both the helicity-independent and the helicity-dependent parton distributions, analytically matching the results of global fits at the initial scale μ∝ 1 GeV; they also contain the correct Dokshitzer-Gribov-Lipatov-Altarelli-Parisi evolution. We also calculate the transverse parton, Wigner and Husimi distributions from a unified point of view, using our light-front wave functions and expressing them in terms of the parton distributions q{sub v}(x) and δq{sub v}(x). Our results are very relevant for the current and future program of the COMPASS experiment at SPS (CERN). (orig.)

  1. Phenomenological study of extended seesaw model for light sterile neutrino

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nath, Newton [Physical Research Laboratory,Navarangpura, Ahmedabad 380 009 (India); Indian Institute of Technology,Gandhinagar, Ahmedabad-382424 (India); Ghosh, Monojit [Department of Physics, Tokyo Metropolitan University,Hachioji, Tokyo 192-0397 (Japan); Goswami, Srubabati [Physical Research Laboratory,Navarangpura, Ahmedabad 380 009 (India); Gupta, Shivani [Center of Excellence for Particle Physics (CoEPP), University of Adelaide,Adelaide SA 5005 (Australia)

    2017-03-14

    We study the zero textures of the Yukawa matrices in the minimal extended type-I seesaw (MES) model which can give rise to ∼ eV scale sterile neutrinos. In this model, three right handed neutrinos and one extra singlet S are added to generate a light sterile neutrino. The light neutrino mass matrix for the active neutrinos, m{sub ν}, depends on the Dirac neutrino mass matrix (M{sub D}), Majorana neutrino mass matrix (M{sub R}) and the mass matrix (M{sub S}) coupling the right handed neutrinos and the singlet. The model predicts one of the light neutrino masses to vanish. We systematically investigate the zero textures in M{sub D} and observe that maximum five zeros in M{sub D} can lead to viable zero textures in m{sub ν}. For this study we consider four different forms for M{sub R} (one diagonal and three off diagonal) and two different forms of (M{sub S}) containing one zero. Remarkably we obtain only two allowed forms of m{sub ν} (m{sub eτ}=0 and m{sub ττ}=0) having inverted hierarchical mass spectrum. We re-analyze the phenomenological implications of these two allowed textures of m{sub ν} in the light of recent neutrino oscillation data. In the context of the MES model, we also express the low energy mass matrix, the mass of the sterile neutrino and the active-sterile mixing in terms of the parameters of the allowed Yukawa matrices. The MES model leads to some extra correlations which disallow some of the Yukawa textures obtained earlier, even though they give allowed one-zero forms of m{sub ν}. We show that the allowed textures in our study can be realized in a simple way in a model based on MES mechanism with a discrete Abelian flavor symmetry group Z{sub 8}×Z{sub 2}.

  2. Light

    CERN Document Server

    Ditchburn, R W

    1963-01-01

    This classic study, available for the first time in paperback, clearly demonstrates how quantum theory is a natural development of wave theory, and how these two theories, once thought to be irreconcilable, together comprise a single valid theory of light. Aimed at students with an intermediate-level knowledge of physics, the book first offers a historical introduction to the subject, then covers topics such as wave theory, interference, diffraction, Huygens' Principle, Fermat's Principle, and the accuracy of optical measurements. Additional topics include the velocity of light, relativistic o

  3. ADOPT: A Historically Validated Light Duty Vehicle Consumer Choice Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brooker, A.; Gonder, J.; Lopp, S.; Ward, J.

    2015-05-04

    The Automotive Deployment Option Projection Tool (ADOPT) is a light-duty vehicle consumer choice and stock model supported by the U.S. Department of Energy’s Vehicle Technologies Office. It estimates technology improvement impacts on U.S. light-duty vehicles sales, petroleum use, and greenhouse gas emissions. ADOPT uses techniques from the multinomial logit method and the mixed logit method estimate sales. Specifically, it estimates sales based on the weighted value of key attributes including vehicle price, fuel cost, acceleration, range and usable volume. The average importance of several attributes changes nonlinearly across its range and changes with income. For several attributes, a distribution of importance around the average value is used to represent consumer heterogeneity. The majority of existing vehicle makes, models, and trims are included to fully represent the market. The Corporate Average Fuel Economy regulations are enforced. The sales feed into the ADOPT stock model. It captures key aspects for summing petroleum use and greenhouse gas emissions This includes capturing the change in vehicle miles traveled by vehicle age, the creation of new model options based on the success of existing vehicles, new vehicle option introduction rate limits, and survival rates by vehicle age. ADOPT has been extensively validated with historical sales data. It matches in key dimensions including sales by fuel economy, acceleration, price, vehicle size class, and powertrain across multiple years. A graphical user interface provides easy and efficient use. It manages the inputs, simulation, and results.

  4. Modeling of lighting behaviour of a hybrid lighting system in inner spaces of Building of Electrical Engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amado, L.; Osma, G.; Villamizar, R.

    2016-07-01

    This paper presents the modelling of lighting behaviour of a hybrid lighting system - HLS in inner spaces for tropical climate. HLS aims to mitigate the problem of high electricity consumption used by artificial lighting in buildings. These systems integrate intelligently the daylight and artificial light through control strategies. However, selection of these strategies usually depends on expertise of designer and of available budget. In order to improve the selection process of the control strategies, this paper analyses the Electrical Engineering Building (EEB) case, initially modelling of lighting behaviour is established for the HLS of a classroom and an office. This allows estimating the illuminance level of the mixed lighting in the space, and energy consumption by artificial light according to different lighting control techniques, a control strategy based on occupancy and a combination of them. The model considers the concept of Daylight Factor (DF) for the estimating of daylight illuminance on the work plane for tropical climatic conditions. The validation of the model was carried out by comparing the measured and model-estimated indoor illuminances.

  5. Modelamiento del Ambiente Térmico y Aéreo de un Galpón de Presión Negativa Tipo Túnel para Pollitos / Modeling of the Thermal Environments in Shed Negative Pressure Tunnel Type of Chicks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robinson Osorio Hernández

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available La optimización de los procesos productivos tiene granimportancia en el mundo actual debido al continuo desarrollo y avance. Con la finalidad de evaluar el desempeño productivo en el sector avícola, se hace necesaria la adecuación del ambiente interno de las instalaciones avícolas con técnicas que atiendan las exigencias de confort térmico con mayor eficiencia energética. En este trabajo, se evaluó el ambiente térmico interno de un galpón de presión negativa tipo túnel durante la primera fase de crecimiento de pollos de engorde. La evaluación de comportamiento térmico en este período fue realizada utilizando la dinámica de fluidos computacionales (CFD. El modelo computacional demostró ser una herramienta eficaz para el entendimiento y mejora de diseños bioclimáticos de ambientes internos de galpones avícolas. / The optimization of production processes hasgreat importance in the world due to the development andadvancement. In order to evaluate the productive performance in poultry production, it becomes necessary the indoor environmental adequacy of the poultry buildings by technologies that attend the requirements of thermal comfort with major energy efficiency. This study evaluated the thermal environment of a domestic shed of negative pressure tunnel type, during the first growth phase of broilers. The evaluation of the thermal behavior model during this period was made using the computational fluid dynamics (CFD. The computational model proved to be an effective tool forunderstanding and improving of bioclimatic designs of indoorenvironments to create this kind of sheds.

  6. Light aircraft sound transmission studies - Noise reduction model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atwal, Mahabir S.; Heitman, Karen E.; Crocker, Malcolm J.

    1987-01-01

    Experimental tests conducted on the fuselage of a single-engine Piper Cherokee light aircraft suggest that the cabin interior noise can be reduced by increasing the transmission loss of the dominant sound transmission paths and/or by increasing the cabin interior sound absorption. The validity of using a simple room equation model to predict the cabin interior sound-pressure level for different fuselage and exterior sound field conditions is also presented. The room equation model is based on the sound power flow balance for the cabin space and utilizes the measured transmitted sound intensity data. The room equation model predictions were considered good enough to be used for preliminary acoustical design studies.

  7. Design and modeling of a light powered biomimicry micropump

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sze, Tsun-kay Jackie; Liu, Jin; Dutta, Prashanta

    2015-06-01

    The design of compact micropumps to provide steady flow has been an on-going challenge in the field of microfluidics. In this work, a novel micropump concept is introduced utilizing bacteriorhodopsin and sugar transporter proteins. The micropump utilizes light energy to activate the transporter proteins, which create an osmotic pressure gradient and drive the fluid flow. The capability of the bio inspired micropump is demonstrated using a quasi 1D numerical model, where the contributions of bacteriorhodopsin and sugar transporter proteins are taken care of by appropriate flux boundary conditions in the flow channel. Proton flux created by the bacteriorhodopsin proteins is compared with experimental results to obtain the appropriate working conditions of the proteins. To identify the pumping capability, we also investigate the influences of several key parameters, such as the membrane fraction of transporter proteins, membrane proton permeability and the presence of light. Our results show that there is a wide bacteriorhodopsin membrane fraction range (from 0.2 to 10%) at which fluid flow stays nearly at its maximum value. Numerical results also indicate that lipid membranes with low proton permeability can effectively control the light source as a method to turn on/off fluid flow. This capability allows the micropump to be activated and shut off remotely without bulky support equipment. In comparison with existing micropumps, this pump generates higher pressures than mechanical pumps. It can produce peak fluid flow and shutoff head comparable to other non-mechanical pumps.

  8. Very light Higgs bosons in extended models at the LHC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Belyaev, Alexander; Guedes, Renato; Santos, Rui; Moretti, Stefano

    2010-01-01

    The Large Electron-Positron (LEP) collider experiments have constrained the mass of the standard model (SM) Higgs boson to be above 114.4 GeV. This bound applies to all extensions of the SM where the coupling of a Higgs boson to the Z boson and also the Higgs decay profile do not differ much from the SM one. However, in scenarios with extended Higgs sectors, this coupling can be made very small by a suitable choice of the parameters of the model. In such cases, the lightest CP-even Higgs boson mass can in turn be made very small. Such a very light Higgs state, with a mass of the order of the Z boson one or even smaller, could have escaped detection at LEP. In this work we perform a detailed parton level study on the feasibility of the detection of such a very light Higgs particle at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) in the production process pp→hj→τ + τ - j, where j is a resolved jet. We conclude that there are several models where such a Higgs state could be detected at the LHC with early data.

  9. Improved Load Shedding Scheme considering Distributed Generation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Das, Kaushik; Nitsas, Antonios; Altin, Müfit

    2017-01-01

    . These schemes utilize directional relays, power flow through feeders, wind and PV measurements to optimally select the feeders to be disconnected during load shedding such that DG disconnection is minimized while disconnecting required amount of consumption. These different UFLS schemes are compared in terms......With high penetration of distributed generation (DG), the conventional under-frequency load shedding (UFLS) face many challenges and may not perform as expected. This article proposes new UFLS schemes, which are designed to overcome the shortcomings of traditional load shedding scheme...... of frequency response, amount of consumption and DG disconnected during load shedding....

  10. Clocks do not tick in unison: isolation of Clock and vrille shed new light on the clockwork model of the sand fly Lutzomyia longipalpis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gesto, João Silveira Moledo; Rivas, Gustavo Bueno da Silva; Pavan, Marcio Galvão; Meireles-Filho, Antonio Carlos Alves; Amoretty, Paulo Roberto de; Souza, Nataly Araújo de; Bruno, Rafaela Vieira; Peixoto, Alexandre Afranio

    2015-10-06

    Behavior rhythms of insect vectors directly interfere with the dynamics of pathogen transmission to humans. The sand fly Lutzomyia longipalpis is the main vector of visceral leishmaniasis in America and concentrates its activity around dusk. Despite the accumulation of behavioral data, very little is known about the molecular bases of the clock mechanism in this species. This study aims to characterize, within an evolutionary perspective, two important circadian clock genes, Clock and vrille. We have cloned and isolated the coding sequence of L. longipalpis' genes Clock and vrille. The former is structured in eight exons and encodes a protein of 696 amino acids, and the latter comprises three exons and translates to a protein of 469 amino acids. When compared to other insects' orthologues, L. longipalpis CLOCK shows a high degree of conservation in the functional domains bHLH and PAS, but a much shorter glutamine-rich (poly-Q) C-terminal region. As for L. longipalpis VRILLE, a high degree of conservation was found in the bZIP domain. To support these observations and provide an elegant view of the evolution of both genes in insects, phylogenetic analyses based on maximum-likelihood and Bayesian inferences were performed, corroborating the previously known insect systematics. The isolation and phylogenetic analyses of Clock and vrille orthologues in L. longipalpis bring novel and important data to characterize this species' circadian clock. Interestingly, the poly-Q shortening observed in CLOCK suggests that its transcription activity might be impaired and we speculate if this effect could be compensated by other clock factors such as CYCLE.

  11. Proteomic investigation of embryonic rat heart-derived H9c2 cell line sheds new light on the molecular phenotype of the popular cell model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenčo, Juraj; Lenčová-Popelová, Olga; Link, Marek; Jirkovská, Anna; Tambor, Vojtěch; Potůčková, Eliška; Stulík, Jiří; Šimůnek, Tomáš; Štěrba, Martin

    2015-12-10

    Due to their cardiac origin, H9c2 cells rank among the most popular cell lines in current cardiovascular research, yet molecular phenotype remains elusive. Hence, in this study we used proteomic approach to describe molecular phenotype of H9c2 cells in their undifferentiated (i.e., most frequently used) state, and its functional response to cardiotoxic drug doxorubicin. Of 1671 proteins identified by iTRAQ IEF/LC-MSMS analysis, only 12 proteins were characteristic for striated muscle cells and none was cardiac phenotype-specific. Targeted LC-SRM and western blot analyses confirmed that undifferentiated H9c2 cells are phenotypically considerably different to both primary neonatal cardiomyocytes and adult myocardium. These cells lack proteins essential for formation of striated muscle myofibrils or they express only minor amounts thereof. They also fail to express many proteins important for metabolism of muscle cells. The challenge with clinically relevant concentrations of doxorubicin did not induce a proteomic signature that has been previously noted in primary cardiomyocytes or adult hearts. Instead, several alterations previously described in other cells of mesodermal origin, such as fibroblasts, were observed (e.g., severe down-regulation of collagen synthesis pathway). In conclusion, the molecular phenotype of H9c2 cells resembles very immature myogenic cells with skeletal muscle commitment upon differentiation and thus, translatability of findings obtained in these cells deserves caution. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. A local model of light interaction with transparent crystalline media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Debelov, Victor A; Kozlov, Dmitry S

    2013-08-01

    The paper is devoted to the derivation of a bidirectional distribution function for crystals, which specifies all outgoing rays for a ray coming to the boundary of two transparent crystalline media with different optical properties, i.e., a particular mineral, directions of optical axes if they exist, and other features. A local model of interaction based on the notion of polarized light ray is introduced, which is specified by a geometric ray, its polarization state, light intensity, and so on. The computational algorithm that is suggested allows computing the directions and other properties of all (up to four) outgoing rays. In this paper, isotropic, uniaxial, and biaxial crystals are processed in a similar manner. The correctness of the model is validated by comparison of photos of real uniaxial crystals with corresponding computed images. The case of biaxial crystals is validated by testing the effect of conical refraction. Specifications of a series of tests devoted to rendering of optically different objects is presented also.

  13. Supersymmetry and light quark masses in a realistic superstring model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Halyo, Edi.

    1993-10-01

    We examine the light quark masses in a standard-like superstring model in the four dimensional free fermionic formulation. We find that the supersymmetry constraints in the observable and hidden sectors eliminate all large contributions to m u and m d and force them to be much smaller than the other quark masses. The requirement for an acceptable Higgs doublet spectrum results in m u d . In these models a realistic m d can always be obtained whereas m u is at most 10 -5 MeV. For particular choices on flat direction or vacua m u can be as small as 10 -7 MeV but cannot vanish. (author) 15 refs, 2 tabs

  14. Caenorhabditis elegans as a model to study the impact of exposure to light emitting diode (LED) domestic lighting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdel-Rahman, Fawzia; Okeremgbo, Bethel; Alhamadah, Fatimah; Jamadar, Sakha; Anthony, Kevin; Saleh, Mahmoud A

    2017-04-16

    This study aimed to investigate the biological impact of exposure on domestic light emitting diodes (LED) lighting using the free-living nematode Caenorhabditis elegans as a model. Nematodes were separately exposed to white LED light covering the range of 380-750 nm, blue light at 450 nm and black light at 380-420 nm for one life cycle (egg to adult) with dark exposure as the control. Each light range induced stress to the nematode C. elegans such as reducing the number of the hatched eggs and/or delayed the maturation of the hatched eggs to the adult stage. In addition, it lowered or prevented the ability of adults to lay eggs and impaired the locomotion in the exposed worms. The observed type of biological stress was also associated with the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) as compared to nematodes grown in the dark. It is concluded that the blue light component of white LED light may cause health problems, and further investigation is required to test commercial brands of white LEDs that emit different amounts of blue light.

  15. Modeling Global Urbanization Supported by Nighttime Light Remote Sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Y.

    2015-12-01

    Urbanization, a major driver of global change, profoundly impacts our physical and social world, for example, altering carbon cycling and climate. Understanding these consequences for better scientific insights and effective decision-making unarguably requires accurate information on urban extent and its spatial distributions. In this study, we developed a cluster-based method to estimate the optimal thresholds and map urban extents from the nighttime light remote sensing data, extended this method to the global domain by developing a computational method (parameterization) to estimate the key parameters in the cluster-based method, and built a consistent 20-year global urban map series to evaluate the time-reactive nature of global urbanization (e.g. 2000 in Fig. 1). Supported by urban maps derived from nightlights remote sensing data and socio-economic drivers, we developed an integrated modeling framework to project future urban expansion by integrating a top-down macro-scale statistical model with a bottom-up urban growth model. With the models calibrated and validated using historical data, we explored urban growth at the grid level (1-km) over the next two decades under a number of socio-economic scenarios. The derived spatiotemporal information of historical and potential future urbanization will be of great value with practical implications for developing adaptation and risk management measures for urban infrastructure, transportation, energy, and water systems when considered together with other factors such as climate variability and change, and high impact weather events.

  16. A comparison of osteoclast-rich and osteoclast-poor osteopetrosis in adult mice sheds light on the role of the osteoclast in coupling bone resorption and bone formation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thudium, Christian S; Moscatelli, Ilana; Flores, Carmen

    2014-01-01

    that osteoclasts are important for regulating osteoblast activity. To illuminate the role of the osteoclast in controlling bone remodeling, we transplanted irradiated skeletally mature 3-month old wild-type mice with hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) to generate either an osteoclast-rich or osteoclast-poor adult...... osteopetrosis model. We used fetal liver HSCs from (1) oc/oc mice, (2) RANK KO mice, and (3) compared these to wt control cells. TRAP5b activity, a marker of osteoclast number and size, was increased in the oc/oc recipients, while a significant reduction was seen in the RANK KO recipients. In contrast, the bone...

  17. Suppression of vortex shedding around a square cylinder using ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Also, Cohen (1991) through the use of scaling arguments put forward an analytical model for predicting Strouhal frequency in flow around porous circu- ... Kim et al (2003) carried out a parametric study in order to investigate the effect of base jet on vortex shedding both in laminar (Re = 200) and turbulent (Re = 8520) flow ...

  18. Models of light singlet fermion and neutrino phenomenology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chun, E.J.; Joshipura, A.S.; Smirnov, A.Yu.

    1995-05-01

    We suggest that a single fermion S exists beyond the standard see-saw structure. It mixes with light neutrinos via interactions with the right-handed neutrino components, so that ν e → S conversion solves the solar neutrino problem. Supersymmetry endowed with R-symmetry is shown to give a natural framework for existence, mass scale (∼ 3 · 10 -3 eV) and mixing (sin 2 2θ es ∼ (0.1 - 1.5) · 10 -2 ) of such a fermion. Models with an approximate horizontal symmetry are constructed, which embed the fermion S and explain simultaneously solar, atmospheric, hot dark matter problems as well as may predict the oscillation ν-bar μ → ν-bar e in the region of sensitivity of KARMEN and LSND experiments. (author). 24 refs

  19. Retinal endoilluminator toxicity of xenon and light-emitting diode (LED) light source: rabbit model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aydin, Bahri; Dinç, Erdem; Yilmaz, S Necat; Altiparmak, U Emrah; Yülek, Fatma; Ertekin, Sevda; Yilmaz, Mustafa; Yakın, Mehmet

    2014-09-01

    This study evaluates retinal toxicity due to endoillumination with the light-emitting diode (LED) light source in comparison to endoillumination with xenon light source. Twenty-five eyes of 14 New Zealand pigmented rabbits were used in the study. The LED light (Omesis Medical Systems, Turkey) group was composed of 7 right eyes, while the other 7 right eyes constituted the xenon group (420 nm filter, 357mW/cm(2)) (Bright Star; DORC, Zuidland, Netherlands). Eleven untreated left eyes composed the control group. Twenty gauge pars plana incision 1.5 mm behind the limbus was performed in the right eyes. Twenty gauge bullet type fiberoptic endoilluminator was inserted into the eye from the incision without any pars plana vitrectomy. Fiberoptic endoilluminator was placed in such a way that it was directed toward visual streak of the rabbit retina with a 5 mm distance to retinal surface. Endoillumination was then applied for 20 min with a maximum light intensity for LED and xenon light. In left control eyes, no surgical procedure and no endoillumination were performed. One week after the endoillumination procedure, both eyes of the rabbits were enucleated following electroretinography. Sections stained with hematoxylin and eosin to evaluate morphologic changes. Retina tissues were assessed by active caspase-3 staining. There was no difference in the shape of the waveforms recorded in the eyes endoilluminated with LED light and xenon light sources compared to control eyes both before and after endoillumination application (p > 0.05). Microscopic evaluation of the retinas with hematoxylin and eosin staining demonstrated that all study groups have normal histologic properties similar to control group. No apoptosis positive cells were found within all sections in all groups. When the LED light source is used with maximum power and limited duration for endoillumination in rabbit eyes it does not produce phototoxic effects that may be detectable by electrophysiology

  20. Enzyme-induced shedding of a poly(amino acid)-coating triggers contents release from dioleoyl phosphatidylethanolamine liposomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romberg, Birgit; Flesch, Frits M; Hennink, Wim E; Storm, Gert

    2008-05-01

    The enzymatically degradable poly(amino acid)-lipid conjugate poly(hydroxyethyl l-glutamine)-N-succinyl-dioctadecylamine (PHEG-DODASuc) has been shown to effectively prolong liposome circulation times. In this paper, we investigated whether PHEG-DODASuc can stabilize liposomes composed of the fusogenic, non-bilayer-forming lipid dioleoyl phosphatidylethanolamine (DOPE). Moreover, we evaluated the release of an entrapped compound after enzyme-induced shedding of the PHEG-coating, interbilayer contact and membrane destabilizing phase changes. Contents release was monitored using the fluorescent model compound calcein. Liposome destabilization and lipid mixing was studied by dynamic light scattering (DLS), fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) and cryogenic-temperature transmission electron microscopy (cryo-TEM). It was shown that PHEG-DODASuc is able to stabilize DOPE-based liposomes and that contents release can be triggered by shedding of the PHEG-coating.

  1. Characterization, Modeling, and Optimization of Light-Emitting Diode System

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thorseth, Anders

    limit of human color perception. A method has been developed to optimize multicolored cluster LED systems with respect to light quality, using multi objective optimization. The results are simulated SPDs similar to traditional light sources, and with high light quality. As part of this work...

  2. Double parton correlations in Light-Front constituent quark models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rinaldi Matteo

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Double parton distribution functions (dPDF represent a tool to explore the 3D proton structure. They can be measured in high energy proton-proton and proton nucleus collisions and encode information on how partons inside a proton are correlated among each other. dPFDs are studied here in the valence quark region, by means of a constituent quark model, where two particle correlations are present without any additional prescription. This framework allows to understand the dynamical origin of the correlations and to clarify which, among the features of the results, are model independent. Use will be made of a relativistic light-front scheme, able to overcome some drawbacks of the previous calculation. Transverse momentum correlations, due to the exact treatment of the boosts, are predicted and analyzed. The role of spin correlations is also shown. Due to the covariance of the approach, some symmetries of the dPDFs are seen unambigously. For the valence sector, also the study of the QCD evolution of the model results, which can be performed safely thanks to the property of good support, has been also completed.

  3. Modeling the Frequency of Cyclists’ Red-Light Running Behavior Using Bayesian PG Model and PLN Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yao Wu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Red-light running behaviors of bicycles at signalized intersection lead to a large number of traffic conflicts and high collision potentials. The primary objective of this study is to model the cyclists’ red-light running frequency within the framework of Bayesian statistics. Data was collected at twenty-five approaches at seventeen signalized intersections. The Poisson-gamma (PG and Poisson-lognormal (PLN model were developed and compared. The models were validated using Bayesian p values based on posterior predictive checking indicators. It was found that the two models have a good fit of the observed cyclists’ red-light running frequency. Furthermore, the PLN model outperformed the PG model. The model estimated results showed that the amount of cyclists’ red-light running is significantly influenced by bicycle flow, conflict traffic flow, pedestrian signal type, vehicle speed, and e-bike rate. The validation result demonstrated the reliability of the PLN model. The research results can help transportation professionals to predict the expected amount of the cyclists’ red-light running and develop effective guidelines or policies to reduce red-light running frequency of bicycles at signalized intersections.

  4. A 3D model of illumination, light distribution and crop photosynthesis to simulate lighting strategies in greenhouses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Visser, de P.H.B.; Buck-Sorlin, G.H.; Heijden, van der G.W.A.M.; Marcelis, L.F.M.

    2012-01-01

    A functional-structural model for a tomato crop, situated in a greenhouse, was developed to calculate the most efficient lamp (HPS, LED) positions and crop structure, with the objective to reduce energy consumption and improve light use efficiency. The model was built within the GroIMP platform and

  5. Nucleon-generalized parton distributions in the light-front quark model

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2016-01-12

    generalized parton distributions in the light-front quark model ... We calculate the generalized parton distributions (GPDs) for the up- and downquarks in nucleon using the effective light-front wavefunction. The results obtained for ...

  6. Computational Modeling to Limit the Impact Displays and Indicator Lights Have on Habitable Volume Operational Lighting Constraints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, T. A.; Brainard, G.; Salazar, G.; Johnston, S.; Schwing, B.; Litaker, H.; Kolomenski, A.; Venus, D.; Tran, K.; Hanifin, J.; hide

    2017-01-01

    NASA has demonstrated an interest in improving astronaut health and performance through the installment of a new lighting countermeasure on the International Space Station. The Solid State Lighting Assembly (SSLA) system is designed to positively influence astronaut health by providing a daily change to light spectrum to improve circadian entrainment. Unfortunately, existing NASA standards and requirements define ambient light level requirements for crew sleep and other tasks, yet the number of light-emitting diode (LED) indicators and displays within a habitable volume is currently uncontrolled. Because each of these light sources has its own unique spectral properties, the additive lighting environment ends up becoming something different from what was planned or researched. Restricting the use of displays and indicators is not a solution because these systems provide beneficial feedback to the crew. The research team for this grant used computer-based computational modeling and real-world lighting mockups to document the impact that light sources other than the ambient lighting system contribute to the ambient spectral lighting environment. In particular, the team was focused on understanding the impacts of long-term tasks located in front of avionics or computer displays. The team also wanted to understand options for mitigating the changes to the ambient light spectrum in the interest of maintaining the performance of a lighting countermeasure. The project utilized a variety of physical and computer-based simulations to determine direct relationships between system implementation and light spectrum. Using real-world data, computer models were built in the commercially available optics analysis software Zemax Optics Studio(c). The team also built a mockup test facility that had the same volume and configuration as one of the Zemax models. The team collected over 1200 spectral irradiance measurements, each representing a different configuration of the mockup

  7. Monte Carlo model of light transport in scintillating fibers and large scintillators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chakarova, R.

    1995-01-01

    A Monte Carlo model is developed which simulates the light transport in a scintillator surrounded by a transparent layer with different surface properties. The model is applied to analyse the light collection properties of scintillating fibers and a large scintillator wrapped in aluminium foil. The influence of the fiber interface characteristics on the light yield is investigated in detail. Light output results as well as time distributions are obtained for the large scintillator case. 15 refs, 16 figs

  8. Ultra light inspection robotic arm, design and modeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Voisembert, S.

    2012-01-01

    One of the major challenges in robotics is the improvement of inspections operations in confined and hazardous area using unmanned remote handling systems. Articulated arm are used in this case to carry some diagnostic tools for the inspection tasks. These long reach multi-link carriers should be characterized by a large workspace and reduced mass. Today, with about ten degrees of freedom and ten meters long they have reached their performance limit. Indeed, for long reach, the arm should have enough torque to carry its own weight plus the payload in cantilever mode and enough stiffness to minimize the deflection caused by the gravity. Despite the use of best materials and components, this kind of robot has reach its performance limit. Overcoming this limit needs a change in paradigm. Therefore a problem-solving, analysis and forecasting tool TRIZ (theory of inventive problem solving) is used. It leads naturally to identify the origin of the dilemma: the proper weight of the arm and so its mass under gravity. In particular, it proposes to postulate that a no-mass robot exists. An analysis of the properties of such a robot leads to the patented concept of an ultra light inflatable robot with unique and constant volume and constant diameter joints. This new object would benefit from advantages such as easy implementation, harmlessness toward its environment and so the ability to lean on it without damage. Therefore it could easily increase its range and its foreseen low-cost building would open a wide field of new applications. This thesis work, elaborates appropriate technical concepts and dimensioning methods for ultra light inflatable robots. The payload and length performances of an inflatable robot are analytically validated. Experimentations and a finite-element modeling are used for a pre-dimensioning of the joints and different modes of construction are prototyped in partnership with, specialized company in thigh-tech textile. The joints are also modeled with

  9. HER-2/neu Shedding and Oncogenesis

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Clinton, Gail

    2001-01-01

    The HER-2/neu extracellular domain (ECD) is shed from breast carcinoma cells in culture and is found at elevated levels in sera of patients with metastatic breast cancer where it may predict poor prognosis...

  10. Variability, Constraints, and Creativity: Shedding Light on Claude Monet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stokes, Patricia D.

    2001-01-01

    Discusses how creative individuals maintain high levels of variability, examining how Claude Monet's habitually high level of variability in painting was acquired during his childhood and early apprenticeship and maintained throughout his adult career by a continuous series of task constraints imposed by the artist on his own work. For Monet,…

  11. Variability, constraints, and creativity. Shedding light on Claude Monet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stokes, P D

    2001-04-01

    Recent experimental research suggests 2 things. The first is that along with learning how to do something, people also learn how variably or differently to continue doing it. The second is that high variability is maintained by constraining, precluding a currently successful, often repetitive solution to a problem. In this view, Claude Monet's habitually high level of variability in painting was acquired during his childhood and early apprenticeship and was maintained throughout his adult career by a continuous series of task constraints imposed by the artist on his own work. For Monet, variability was rewarded and rewarding.

  12. Shedding Light on Filovirus Infection with High-Content Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rekha G. Panchal

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Microscopy has been instrumental in the discovery and characterization of microorganisms. Major advances in high-throughput fluorescence microscopy and automated, high-content image analysis tools are paving the way to the systematic and quantitative study of the molecular properties of cellular systems, both at the population and at the single-cell level. High-Content Imaging (HCI has been used to characterize host-virus interactions in genome-wide reverse genetic screens and to identify novel cellular factors implicated in the binding, entry, replication and egress of several pathogenic viruses. Here we present an overview of the most significant applications of HCI in the context of the cell biology of filovirus infection. HCI assays have been recently implemented to quantitatively study filoviruses in cell culture, employing either infectious viruses in a BSL-4 environment or surrogate genetic systems in a BSL-2 environment. These assays are becoming instrumental for small molecule and siRNA screens aimed at the discovery of both cellular therapeutic targets and of compounds with anti-viral properties. We discuss the current practical constraints limiting the implementation of high-throughput biology in a BSL-4 environment, and propose possible solutions to safely perform high-content, high-throughput filovirus infection assays. Finally, we discuss possible novel applications of HCI in the context of filovirus research with particular emphasis on the identification of possible cellular biomarkers of virus infection.

  13. Shedding light on surface-assembled photosynthetic systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Magis, Johan Gerhard

    2012-01-01

    The interfacing of biomolecules to nanostructures, electrode surfaces and/or optical components constitutes the new discipline of bioelectronics. It is based on electron transfer between a protein and an electrode, and can be monitored by amperometric techniques. The integration of biomolecules with

  14. Principles of Food Science Class Sheds Light on Chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, Janet

    2004-01-01

    Many students are curious about the steps in food preparation. As a result of such experiences, the author of this article began to incorporate science demonstrations into food preparation classes. She conducted research, developed resources, and piloted the "Principles of Food Science" class over the next 6 years. "Principles of Food Science"…

  15. Modern vitiligo genetics sheds new light on an ancient disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    SPRITZ, Richard A.

    2013-01-01

    Vitiligo is a complex disorder in which autoimmune destruction of melanocytes results in white patches of skin and overlying hair. Over the past several years, extensive genetic studies have outlined a biological framework of vitiligo pathobiology that underscores its relationship to other autoimmune diseases. This biological framework offers insight into both vitiligo pathogenesis and perhaps avenues towards more effective approaches to treatment and even disease prevention. PMID:23668538

  16. Supernova sheds light on gamma-ray bursts

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    On 29 March the HETE-II satellite detected the most violent explosion in the universe to date - an enormous burst of gamma rays. Observers across the world recorded and studied the event. It appears to prove that gamma ray bursts originate in supernovae (1 page)

  17. The last diadectomorph sheds light on Late Palaeozoic tetrapod biogeography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jun; Bever, G. S.

    2015-01-01

    Diadectomorpha is a clade of Late Palaeozoic vertebrates widely recognized as the sister group of crown-group Amniota and the first tetrapod lineage to evolve high-fibre herbivory. Despite their evolutionary importance, diadectomorphs are restricted stratigraphically and geographically, with all records being from the Upper Carboniferous and Lower Permian of North America and Germany. We describe a new diadectomorph, Alveusdectes fenestralis, based on a partial skull from the Upper Permian of China. The new species exhibits the derived mechanism for herbivory and is recovered phylogenetically as a deeply nested diadectid. Approximately 16 Myr younger than any other diadectomorph, Alveusdectes is the product of at least a 46 Myr ghost lineage. How much of this time was probably spent in Russia and/or central Asia will remain unclear until a specimen is described that subdivides this cryptic history, but the lineage assuredly crossed this region before entering the relatively isolated continent of North China. The discovery of Alveusdectes raises important questions regarding diadectomorph extinction dynamics including what, if any, ecological factors limited the diversity of this group in eastern Pangea. It also suggests that increased sampling in Asia will likely significantly affect our views of clade and faunal insularity leading up to the Permo-Triassic extinction. PMID:25948572

  18. Studies Shed Light on How Cheating Impedes Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sparks, Sarah D.

    2011-01-01

    This article reports on new research which shows that, when students succeed at cheating on tests, they get duped into thinking they're smarter than they really are. In four experiments detailed in the March "Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences", researchers from the Harvard Business School and Duke University found that cheaters pay…

  19. Chlamydial genes shed light on the evolution of photoautotrophic eukaryotes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melkonian Michael

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chlamydiae are obligate intracellular bacteria of protists, invertebrates and vertebrates, but have not been found to date in photosynthetic eukaryotes (algae and embryophytes. Genes of putative chlamydial origin, however, are present in significant numbers in sequenced genomes of photosynthetic eukaryotes. It has been suggested that such genes were acquired by an ancient horizontal gene transfer from Chlamydiae to the ancestor of photosynthetic eukaryotes. To further test this hypothesis, an extensive search for proteins of chlamydial origin was performed using several recently sequenced algal genomes and EST databases, and the proteins subjected to phylogenetic analyses. Results A total of 39 proteins of chlamydial origin were retrieved from the photosynthetic eukaryotes analyzed and their identity verified through phylogenetic analyses. The distribution of the chlamydial proteins among four groups of photosynthetic eukaryotes (Viridiplantae, Rhodoplantae, Glaucoplantae, Bacillariophyta was complex suggesting multiple acquisitions and losses. Evidence is presented that all except one of the chlamydial genes originated from an ancient endosymbiosis of a chlamydial bacterium into the ancestor of the Plantae before their divergence into Viridiplantae, Rhodoplantae and Glaucoplantae, i.e. more than 1.1 BYA. The chlamydial proteins subsequently spread through secondary plastid endosymbioses to other eukaryotes. Of 20 chlamydial proteins recovered from the genomes of two Bacillariophyta, 10 were of rhodoplant, and 10 of viridiplant origin suggesting that they were acquired by two different secondary endosymbioses. Phylogenetic analyses of concatenated sequences demonstrated that the viridiplant secondary endosymbiosis likely occurred before the divergence of Chlorophyta and Streptophyta. Conclusion We identified 39 proteins of chlamydial origin in photosynthetic eukaryotes signaling an ancient invasion of the ancestor of the Plantae by a chlamydial bacterium accompanied by horizontal gene transfer. Subsequently, chlamydial proteins spread through secondary endosymbioses to other eukaryotes. We conclude that intracellular chlamydiae likely persisted throughout the early history of the Plantae donating genes to their hosts that replaced their cyanobacterial/plastid homologs thus shaping early algal/plant evolution before they eventually vanished.

  20. Embryo implantation: Shedding light on the roles of ovarian ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Implantation is a crucial step in mammalian reproduction, as it is a gateway to further embryonic development and successful pregnancy. Successful implantation requires coordinated interactions between the blastocyst and uterus. Uterine receptivity for embryo implantation is regulated by the ovarian hormones estrogen ...

  1. Shedding light on fish otolith biomineralization using a bioenergetic approach

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fablet, R.; Pecquerie, L.; de Pontual, H.

    2011-01-01

    Otoliths are biocalcified bodies connected to the sensory system in the inner ears of fish. Their layered, biorhythm-following formation provides individual records of the age, the individual history and the natural environment of extinct and living fish species. Such data are critical for ecosys...... simulation tool to improve otolith interpretation and applications, and, beyond, to address the effects of both climate change and ocean acidification on other biomineralizing organisms such as corals and bivalves...

  2. Berkeley Lab Sheds Light on Improving Solar Cell Efficiency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

    2007-01-01

    Typical manufacturing methods produce solar cells with an efficiency of 12-15%; and 14% efficiency is the bare minimum for achieving a profit. In work performed at the Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley, CA, 5 10-486-577 1)--a US Department of Energy national laboratory that conducts unclassified scientific research and is managed by the University of California--scientist Scott McHugo has obtained keen insights into the impaired performance of solar cells manufactured from polycrystalline silicon. The solar cell market is potentially vast, according to Berkeley Lab. Lightweight solar panels are highly beneficial for providing electrical power to remote locations in developing nations, since there is no need to build transmission lines or truck-in generator fuel. Moreover, industrial nations confronted with diminishing resources have active programs aimed at producing improved, less expensive solar cells. 'In a solar cell, there is a junction between p-type silicon and an n-type layer, such as diffused-in phosphorous', explained McHugo, who is now with Berkeley Lab's Accelerator and Fusion Research Division. 'When sunlight is absorbed, it frees electrons, which start migrating in a random-walk fashion toward that junction. If the electrons make it to the junction; they contribute to the cell's output of electric current. Often, however, before they reach the junction, they recombine at specific sites in the crystal' (and, therefore, cannot contribute to current output). McHugo scrutinized a map of a silicon wafer in which sites of high recombination appeared as dark regions. Previously, researchers had shown that such phenomena occurred not primarily at grain boundaries in the polycrystalline material, as might be expected, but more often at dislocations in the crystal. However, the dislocations themselves were not the problem. Using a unique heat treatment technique, McHugo performed electrical measurements to investigate the material at the dislocations. He was purportedly the first to show that they were 'decorated' with iron

  3. New Australian sauropods shed light on Cretaceous dinosaur palaeobiogeography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poropat, Stephen F.; Mannion, Philip D.; Upchurch, Paul; Hocknull, Scott A.; Kear, Benjamin P.; Kundrát, Martin; Tischler, Travis R.; Sloan, Trish; Sinapius, George H. K.; Elliott, Judy A.; Elliott, David A.

    2016-01-01

    Australian dinosaurs have played a rare but controversial role in the debate surrounding the effect of Gondwanan break-up on Cretaceous dinosaur distribution. Major spatiotemporal gaps in the Gondwanan Cretaceous fossil record, coupled with taxon incompleteness, have hindered research on this effect, especially in Australia. Here we report on two new sauropod specimens from the early Late Cretaceous of Queensland, Australia, that have important implications for Cretaceous dinosaur palaeobiogeography. Savannasaurus elliottorum gen. et sp. nov. comprises one of the most complete Cretaceous sauropod skeletons ever found in Australia, whereas a new specimen of Diamantinasaurus matildae includes the first ever cranial remains of an Australian sauropod. The results of a new phylogenetic analysis, in which both Savannasaurus and Diamantinasaurus are recovered within Titanosauria, were used as the basis for a quantitative palaeobiogeographical analysis of macronarian sauropods. Titanosaurs achieved a worldwide distribution by at least 125 million years ago, suggesting that mid-Cretaceous Australian sauropods represent remnants of clades which were widespread during the Early Cretaceous. These lineages would have entered Australasia via dispersal from South America, presumably across Antarctica. High latitude sauropod dispersal might have been facilitated by Albian–Turonian warming that lifted a palaeoclimatic dispersal barrier between Antarctica and South America. PMID:27763598

  4. Innovative Visualizations Shed Light on Avian Nocturnal Migration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Shamoun-Baranes, J.; Farnsworth, A.; Aelterman, B.; Alves, J.A.; Azijn, K.; Bernstein, G.; Branco, S.; Desmet, P.; Dokter, A.M.; Horton, K.; Kelling, S.; Kelly, J.F.; Leijnse, H.; Rong, J.; Sheldon, D.; Van den Broeck, W.; Van Den Meersche, J.K.; Van Doren, B.M.; van Gasteren, H.

    2016-01-01

    Globally, billions of flying animals undergo seasonal migrations, many of which occur at night. The temporal and spatial scales at which migrations occur and our inability to directly observe these nocturnal movements makes monitoring and characterizing this critical period in migratory animals’

  5. Innovative Visualizations Shed Light on Avian Nocturnal Migration.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Judy Shamoun-Baranes

    Full Text Available Globally, billions of flying animals undergo seasonal migrations, many of which occur at night. The temporal and spatial scales at which migrations occur and our inability to directly observe these nocturnal movements makes monitoring and characterizing this critical period in migratory animals' life cycles difficult. Remote sensing, therefore, has played an important role in our understanding of large-scale nocturnal bird migrations. Weather surveillance radar networks in Europe and North America have great potential for long-term low-cost monitoring of bird migration at scales that have previously been impossible to achieve. Such long-term monitoring, however, poses a number of challenges for the ornithological and ecological communities: how does one take advantage of this vast data resource, integrate information across multiple sensors and large spatial and temporal scales, and visually represent the data for interpretation and dissemination, considering the dynamic nature of migration? We assembled an interdisciplinary team of ecologists, meteorologists, computer scientists, and graphic designers to develop two different flow visualizations, which are interactive and open source, in order to create novel representations of broad-front nocturnal bird migration to address a primary impediment to long-term, large-scale nocturnal migration monitoring. We have applied these visualization techniques to mass bird migration events recorded by two different weather surveillance radar networks covering regions in Europe and North America. These applications show the flexibility and portability of such an approach. The visualizations provide an intuitive representation of the scale and dynamics of these complex systems, are easily accessible for a broad interest group, and are biologically insightful. Additionally, they facilitate fundamental ecological research, conservation, mitigation of human-wildlife conflicts, improvement of meteorological products, and public outreach, education, and engagement.

  6. Innovative Visualizations Shed Light on Avian Nocturnal Migration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farnsworth, Andrew; Aelterman, Bart; Alves, Jose A.; Azijn, Kevin; Bernstein, Garrett; Branco, Sérgio; Desmet, Peter; Dokter, Adriaan M.; Horton, Kyle; Kelling, Steve; Kelly, Jeffrey F.; Leijnse, Hidde; Rong, Jingjing; Sheldon, Daniel; Van den Broeck, Wouter; Van Den Meersche, Jan Klaas; Van Doren, Benjamin Mark; van Gasteren, Hans

    2016-01-01

    Globally, billions of flying animals undergo seasonal migrations, many of which occur at night. The temporal and spatial scales at which migrations occur and our inability to directly observe these nocturnal movements makes monitoring and characterizing this critical period in migratory animals’ life cycles difficult. Remote sensing, therefore, has played an important role in our understanding of large-scale nocturnal bird migrations. Weather surveillance radar networks in Europe and North America have great potential for long-term low-cost monitoring of bird migration at scales that have previously been impossible to achieve. Such long-term monitoring, however, poses a number of challenges for the ornithological and ecological communities: how does one take advantage of this vast data resource, integrate information across multiple sensors and large spatial and temporal scales, and visually represent the data for interpretation and dissemination, considering the dynamic nature of migration? We assembled an interdisciplinary team of ecologists, meteorologists, computer scientists, and graphic designers to develop two different flow visualizations, which are interactive and open source, in order to create novel representations of broad-front nocturnal bird migration to address a primary impediment to long-term, large-scale nocturnal migration monitoring. We have applied these visualization techniques to mass bird migration events recorded by two different weather surveillance radar networks covering regions in Europe and North America. These applications show the flexibility and portability of such an approach. The visualizations provide an intuitive representation of the scale and dynamics of these complex systems, are easily accessible for a broad interest group, and are biologically insightful. Additionally, they facilitate fundamental ecological research, conservation, mitigation of human–wildlife conflicts, improvement of meteorological products, and public outreach, education, and engagement. PMID:27557096

  7. Research sheds light on gender reparation in postwar Guatemala ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    2016-04-29

    Apr 29, 2016 ... "Conflict-related sexual violence has been one of history's greatest silences," declared the 2011 UN Action Against Sexual Violence in Conflict. The damage continues long after war has ended: victims continue to suffer in many ways, rarely receive compensation or an apology, and are often ostracized from ...

  8. Shedding light on fish otolith biomineralisation using a bioenergetic approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fablet, R.; Pecquerie, L; Pontual, H.D.; Hoie, H.; Millner, R.; Mosegaard, H.; Kooijman, S.A.L.M.

    2011-01-01

    Otoliths are biocalcified bodies connected to the sensory system in the inner ears of fish. Their layered, biorhythm-following formation provides individual records of the age, the individual history and the natural environment of extinct and living fish species. Such data are critical for ecosystem

  9. Shedding new light on the electric utility industry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Flavin, C.; Lenssen, N.

    1995-10-01

    This book presents an overview of two decades of change in the electric utility industry both in the USA and globally. Among the issues explored are the rise of independent (not-utility) power producers; the roles of energy efficiency and demand side management; and advances in fossil and renewable generation technologies.

  10. Report sheds light on demands for accountability, transparency for ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    2013-11-04

    Nov 4, 2013 ... In Africa, large-scale land deals can bring benefits such as jobs, market access, and infrastructure, but they can also dispossess people of land and other resources and spark conflict over economic benefits. Part of the problem is that land deals are rarely transparent, with limited accountability on the part of ...

  11. Device model investigation of bilayer organic light emitting diodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crone, B. K.; Davids, P. S.; Campbell, I. H.; Smith, D. L.

    2000-01-01

    Organic materials that have desirable luminescence properties, such as a favorable emission spectrum and high luminescence efficiency, are not necessarily suitable for single layer organic light-emitting diodes (LEDs) because the material may have unequal carrier mobilities or contact limited injection properties. As a result, single layer LEDs made from such organic materials are inefficient. In this article, we present device model calculations of single layer and bilayer organic LED characteristics that demonstrate the improvements in device performance that can occur in bilayer devices. We first consider an organic material where the mobilities of the electrons and holes are significantly different. The role of the bilayer structure in this case is to move the recombination away from the electrode that injects the low mobility carrier. We then consider an organic material with equal electron and hole mobilities but where it is not possible to make a good contact for one carrier type, say electrons. The role of a bilayer structure in this case is to prevent the holes from traversing the device without recombining. In both cases, single layer device limitations can be overcome by employing a two organic layer structure. The results are discussed using the calculated spatial variation of the carrier densities, electric field, and recombination rate density in the structures. (c) 2000 American Institute of Physics

  12. A NEW MODEL OF AUTONOMOUS MOBILE ROBOTS WITH LIGHTS AND ITS COMPUTATIONAL POWER

    OpenAIRE

    寺井, 智史

    2016-01-01

    We study gathering problem for robots that move on a two dimensional plane. Robots are autonomous, anonymous, and have light that represents robot’s state. Gathering algorithm for n=2 robots is proposed in previous research. We propose a new model of robots with lights and athering algorithm. Key Words :distributed , mobile robots , light

  13. Characterization, Modeling, and Optimization of Light-Emitting Diode System

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thorseth, Anders

    An automated setup has been developed for spectral radiometric characterization of LED components with precise control of the settings of forward current and operating temperature. The automated setup has been used to characterize commercial LED components with respect to multiple settings...... limit of human color perception. A method has been developed to optimize multicolored cluster LED systems with respect to light quality, using multi objective optimization. The results are simulated SPDs similar to traditional light sources, and with high light quality. As part of this work...

  14. Vortex Shedding Inside a Baffled Air Duct

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Philip; Kenny, R. Jeremy

    2010-01-01

    Common in the operation of both segmented and un-segmented large solid rocket motors is the occurrence of vortex shedding within the motor chamber. A portion of the energy within a shed vortex is converted to acoustic energy, potentially driving the longitudinal acoustic modes of the motor in a quasi-discrete fashion. This vortex shedding-acoustic mode excitation event occurs for every Reusable Solid Rocket Motor (RSRM) operation, giving rise to subsequent axial thrust oscillations. In order to better understand this vortex shedding/acoustic mode excitation phenomena, unsteady CFD simulations were run for both a test geometry and the full scale RSRM geometry. This paper covers the results from the subscale geometry runs, which were based on work focusing on the RSRM hydrodynamics. Unsteady CFD simulation parameters, including boundary conditions and post-processing returns, are reviewed. The results were further post-processed to identify active acoustic modes and vortex shedding characteristics. Probable locations for acoustic energy generation, and subsequent acoustic mode excitation, are discussed.

  15. A hybrid method for optimal load shedding and improving voltage stability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Tamilselvan

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, a hybrid method is proposed for reducing the amount of load shedding and voltage collapse. The hybrid method is the combination of Genetic Algorithm (GA and Neural Network (NN. The GA is used by two stages, one is to frame the optimization model and other stage is to generate data set for developing the NN based intelligent load shedding model. The appropriate buses for load shedding are selected based on the sensitivity of minimum eigenvalue of load flow Jacobian with respect to the load shed. The proposed method is implemented in MATLAB working platform and the performance is tested with 6 bus and IEEE 14 bus bench mark system. The result of the proposed hybrid method is compared with the GA based optimization algorithm. The comparison shows that, the proposed method ensures voltage stability with minimum loading shedding.

  16. Under-Frequency Load Shedding Technique Considering Event-Based for an Islanded Distribution Network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hasmaini Mohamad

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available One of the biggest challenge for an islanding operation is to sustain the frequency stability. A large power imbalance following islanding would cause under-frequency, hence an appropriate control is required to shed certain amount of load. The main objective of this research is to develop an adaptive under-frequency load shedding (UFLS technique for an islanding system. The technique is designed considering an event-based which includes the moment system is islanded and a tripping of any DG unit during islanding operation. A disturbance magnitude is calculated to determine the amount of load to be shed. The technique is modeled by using PSCAD simulation tool. A simulation studies on a distribution network with mini hydro generation is carried out to evaluate the UFLS model. It is performed under different load condition: peak and base load. Results show that the load shedding technique have successfully shed certain amount of load and stabilized the system frequency.

  17. Measuring and Modeling Twilight’s Purple Light

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-01-20

    since the Krakatoa volcano’s explosion in Au- gust 1883, major volcanic eruptions have been fol- lowed by reports worldwide of extraordinarily vivid...purple light. Naturally, volcanic purple lights occurred long before the Krakatoa eruption, and scattered ac- counts of these date from at least the...early 16th century.1 After the Krakatoa event, 19th-century scientists quite reasonably speculated that the eruption in- jected dust into the upper

  18. The Involvement of the Oxidative Stress in Murine Blue LED Light-Induced Retinal Damage Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Maho; Kuse, Yoshiki; Tsuruma, Kazuhiro; Shimazawa, Masamitsu; Hara, Hideaki

    2017-01-01

    The aim of study was to establish a mouse model of blue light emitting diode (LED) light-induced retinal damage and to evaluate the effects of the antioxidant N-acetylcysteine (NAC). Mice were exposed to 400 or 800 lx blue LED light for 2 h, and were evaluated for retinal damage 5 d later by electroretinogram amplitude and outer nuclear layer (ONL) thickness. Additionally, we investigated the effect of blue LED light exposure on shorts-wave-sensitive opsin (S-opsin), and rhodopsin expression by immunohistochemistry. Blue LED light induced light intensity dependent retinal damage and led to collapse of S-opsin and altered rhodopsin localization from inner and outer segments to ONL. Conversely, NAC administered at 100 or 250 mg/kg intraperitoneally twice a day, before dark adaptation and before light exposure. NAC protected the blue LED light-induced retinal damage in a dose-dependent manner. Further, blue LED light-induced decreasing of S-opsin levels and altered rhodopsin localization, which were suppressed by NAC. We established a mouse model of blue LED light-induced retinal damage and these findings indicated that oxidative stress was partially involved in blue LED light-induced retinal damage.

  19. Model for variable light sensitivity in imbibed dark-dormant seeds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duke, S O; Egley, G H; Reger, B J

    1977-02-01

    The level of light-induced germination of the seed of common purslane (Portulaca oleracea L.) and curly dock (Rumex crispus L.) changes with dark incubation time prior to brief, low energy, red light treatment. The rate at which phytochrome-far red-absorbing form (Pfr) acts in the light-induced population of seeds was measured by quantitating per cent reversals of the red light effect with saturating far red light exposures at successive times after the red light exposure. A linear positive correlation was found between this rate and the final germination level. These results are compatible with a model involving changing levels, during dark incubation, of a component with which Pfr interacts. In this model, germination is initiated after attainment of a certain level of interaction between Pfr and this component. These findings also support the view that the Pfr to Pr decay rate constant and total phytochrome level are stable during dark incubation.

  20. Transcranial red and near infrared light transmission in a cadaveric model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jared R Jagdeo

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVE: Low level light therapy has garnered significant interest within the past decade. The exact molecular mechanisms of how red and near infrared light result in physiologic modulation are not fully understood. Heme moieties and copper within cells are red and near infrared light photoreceptors that induce the mitochondrial respiratory chain component cytochrome C oxidase, resulting in a cascade linked to cytoprotection and cellular metabolism. The copper centers in cytochrome C oxidase have a broad absorption range that peaks around 830 nm. Several in vitro and in vivo animal and human models exist that have demonstrated the benefits of red light and near infrared light for various conditions. Clinical applications for low level light therapy are varied. One study in particular demonstrated improved durable functional outcomes status post-stroke in patients treated with near infrared low level light therapy compared to sham treatment [1]. Despite previous data suggesting the beneficial effect in treating multiple conditions, including stroke, with low level light therapy, limited data exists that measures transmission in a human model. STUDY DESIGN/MATERIALS AND METHODS: To investigate this idea, we measured the transmission of near infrared light energy, using red light for purposes of comparison, through intact cadaver soft tissue, skull bones, and brain using a commercially available LED device at 830 nm and 633 nm. RESULTS: Our results demonstrate that near infrared measurably penetrates soft tissue, bone and brain parenchyma in the formalin preserved cadaveric model, in comparison to negligible red light transmission in the same conditions. CONCLUSION: These findings indicate that near infrared light can penetrate formalin fixed soft tissue, bone and brain and implicate that benefits observed in clinical studies are potentially related to direct action of near infrared light on neural tissue.

  1. Phototherapy with blue and green mixed-light is as effective against unconjugated jaundice as blue light and reduces oxidative stress in the Gunn rat model.

    OpenAIRE

    Uchida, Yumiko; Morimoto, Yukihiro; Uchiike, Takao; Kamamoto, Tomoyuki :4/0000339; Hayashi, Tamaki; Arai, Ikuyo; Nishikubo, Toshiya; Takahashi, Yukihiro

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE:Phototherapy using blue light-emitting diodes (LED) is effective against neonatal jaundice. However, green light phototherapy also reduces unconjugated jaundice. We aimed to determine whether mixed blue and green light can relieve jaundice with minimal oxidative stress as effectively as either blue or green light alone in a rat model.METHODS:Gunn rats were exposed to phototherapy with blue (420-520 nm), filtered blue (FB; 440-520 nm without

  2. Modelling of salad plants growth and physiological status in vitamin space greenhouse during lighting regime optimization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konovalova, Irina; Berkovich, Yuliy A.; Smolyanina, Svetlana; Erokhin, Alexei; Yakovleva, Olga; Lapach, Sergij; Radchenko, Stanislav; Znamenskii, Artem; Tarakanov, Ivan

    2016-07-01

    The efficiency of the photoautotrophic element as part of bio-engineering life-support systems is determined substantially by lighting regime. The artificial light regime optimization complexity results from the wide range of plant physiological functions controlled by light: trophic, informative, biosynthetical, etc. An average photosynthetic photon flux density (PPFD), light spectral composition and pulsed light effects on the crop growth and plant physiological status were studied in the multivariate experiment, including 16 independent experiments in 3 replicates. Chinese cabbage plants (Brassica chinensis L.), cultivar Vesnianka, were grown during 24 days in a climatic chamber under white and red light-emitting diodes (LEDs): photoperiod 24 h, PPFD from 260 to 500 µM/(m ^{2}*s), red light share in the spectrum varying from 33% to 73%, pulsed (pulse period from 30 to 501 µs) and non-pulsed lighting. The regressions of plant photosynthetic and biochemical indexes as well as the crop specific productivity in response to the selected parameters of lighting regime were calculated. Developed models of crop net photosynthesis and dark respiration revealed the most intense gas exchange area corresponding to PPFD level 450 - 500 µM/(m ^{2}*s) with red light share in the spectrum about 60% and the pulse length 30 µs with a pulse period from 300 to 400 µs. Shoot dry weight increased monotonically in response to the increasing PPFD and changed depending on the pulse period under stabilized PPFD level. An increase in ascorbic acid content in the shoot biomass was revealed when increasing red light share in spectrum from 33% to 73%. The lighting regime optimization criterion (Q) was designed for the vitamin space greenhouse as the maximum of a crop yield square on its ascorbic acid concentration, divided by the light energy consumption. The regression model of optimization criterion was constructed based on the experimental data. The analysis of the model made it

  3. Birds shed RNA-viruses according to the pareto principle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jankowski, Mark D; Williams, Christopher J; Fair, Jeanne M; Owen, Jennifer C

    2013-01-01

    A major challenge in disease ecology is to understand the role of individual variation of infection load on disease transmission dynamics and how this influences the evolution of resistance or tolerance mechanisms. Such information will improve our capacity to understand, predict, and mitigate pathogen-associated disease in all organisms. In many host-pathogen systems, particularly macroparasites and sexually transmitted diseases, it has been found that approximately 20% of the population is responsible for approximately 80% of the transmission events. Although host contact rates can account for some of this pattern, pathogen transmission dynamics also depend upon host infectiousness, an area that has received relatively little attention. Therefore, we conducted a meta-analysis of pathogen shedding rates of 24 host (avian) - pathogen (RNA-virus) studies, including 17 bird species and five important zoonotic viruses. We determined that viral count data followed the Weibull distribution, the mean Gini coefficient (an index of inequality) was 0.687 (0.036 SEM), and that 22.0% (0.90 SEM) of the birds shed 80% of the virus across all studies, suggesting an adherence of viral shedding counts to the Pareto Principle. The relative position of a bird in a distribution of viral counts was affected by factors extrinsic to the host, such as exposure to corticosterone and to a lesser extent reduced food availability, but not to intrinsic host factors including age, sex, and migratory status. These data provide a quantitative view of heterogeneous virus shedding in birds that may be used to better parameterize epidemiological models and understand transmission dynamics.

  4. Birds shed RNA-viruses according to the pareto principle.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark D Jankowski

    Full Text Available A major challenge in disease ecology is to understand the role of individual variation of infection load on disease transmission dynamics and how this influences the evolution of resistance or tolerance mechanisms. Such information will improve our capacity to understand, predict, and mitigate pathogen-associated disease in all organisms. In many host-pathogen systems, particularly macroparasites and sexually transmitted diseases, it has been found that approximately 20% of the population is responsible for approximately 80% of the transmission events. Although host contact rates can account for some of this pattern, pathogen transmission dynamics also depend upon host infectiousness, an area that has received relatively little attention. Therefore, we conducted a meta-analysis of pathogen shedding rates of 24 host (avian - pathogen (RNA-virus studies, including 17 bird species and five important zoonotic viruses. We determined that viral count data followed the Weibull distribution, the mean Gini coefficient (an index of inequality was 0.687 (0.036 SEM, and that 22.0% (0.90 SEM of the birds shed 80% of the virus across all studies, suggesting an adherence of viral shedding counts to the Pareto Principle. The relative position of a bird in a distribution of viral counts was affected by factors extrinsic to the host, such as exposure to corticosterone and to a lesser extent reduced food availability, but not to intrinsic host factors including age, sex, and migratory status. These data provide a quantitative view of heterogeneous virus shedding in birds that may be used to better parameterize epidemiological models and understand transmission dynamics.

  5. Cold light dark matter in extended seesaw models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boulebnane, Sami; Heeck, Julian; Nguyen, Anne; Teresi, Daniele

    2018-04-01

    We present a thorough discussion of light dark matter produced via freeze-in in two-body decays A→ B DM . If A and B are quasi-degenerate, the dark matter particle has a cold spectrum even for keV masses. We show this explicitly by calculating the transfer function that encodes the impact on structure formation. As examples for this setup we study extended seesaw mechanisms with a spontaneously broken global U(1) symmetry, such as the inverse seesaw. The keV-scale pseudo-Goldstone dark matter particle is then naturally produced cold by the decays of the quasi-degenerate right-handed neutrinos.

  6. Light-scattering models applied to circumstellar dust properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koehler, Melanie; Mann, Ingrid

    2004-01-01

    Radiation pressure force, Poynting-Robertson effect, and collisions are important to determine the size distribution of dust in circumstellar debris disks with the two former parameters depending on the light-scattering properties of grains. We here present Mie and discrete-dipole approximation (DDA) calculations to describe the optical properties of dust particles around β Pictoris, Vega, and Fomalhaut in order to study the influence of the radiation pressure force. We find that the differences between Mie and DDA calculations are lower than 30% for all porosities. Therefore, Mie calculations can be used to determine the cut-off limits which contribute to the size distribution for the different systems

  7. Design, characterization and modelling of high efficient solar powered lighting systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svane, Frederik; Nymann, Peter; Poulsen, Peter Behrensdorff

    2016-01-01

    This paper discusses some of the major challenges in the development of L2L (Light-2-Light) products. It’s the lack of efficient converter electronics, modelling tools for dimensioning and furthermore, characterization facilities to support the successful development of the products. We report th...

  8. Towards a 3D structural tomato model for calculating light interception

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sarlikioti, V.; Marcelis, L.F.M.; Visser, de P.H.B.

    2011-01-01

    A number of physiological tomato models have been proposed the last decades, their main challenge being the correct simulation of fruit yield. For this, an accurate simulation of light interception, and thus photosynthesis, is of primary importance. Light interception is highly dependent of the

  9. CAD Instructor Designs Eco-Friendly Shed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwendau, Mark

    2013-01-01

    Dissatisfied with the options offered by big box stores--and wanting to save some money and go as green as possible--the author puts his design and construction skills to good use. In this article, he shares how he designed and built an eco-friendly shed. He says he is very pleased with the results of working with his own design, reducing waste,…

  10. Technical and economic analysis of a Smart Public Lighting model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moretti F.

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available The study focuses on public lighting (PL and is based on data collected through the Lumière project (www.progettolumiere.enea.it (ENEA. We identified three intervention strategies that have been piloted in the town of Castelnuovo: 1 Line control 2 Remote point-to-point control 3 Smart (or Adaptive Lighting. The three solutions were compared according to their net present value (NPV and payback time (PBT and considering the energy saving and the security level. Overall, the third solution was found to be the best. The study was extended, given certain assumptions, to the municipalities in the Lumière Network and to Italy, and some very interesting results emerged. In conclusion, an adaptive control system would substantially increase Italy’s energy efficiency and would also significantly reduce municipalities’ expenditure. It would also represent a significant development in the field of PL as well as in transport, building management, security and the quality of services offered to citizens and tourists in general.

  11. Staying in the Light: Evaluating Sustainability Models for Brokering Software

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powers, L. A.; Benedict, K. K.; Best, M.; Fyfe, S.; Jacobs, C. A.; Michener, W. K.; Pearlman, J.; Turner, A.; Nativi, S.

    2015-12-01

    The Business Models Team of the Research Data Alliance Brokering Governance Working Group examined several support models proposed to promote the long-term sustainability of brokering middleware. The business model analysis includes examination of funding source, implementation frameworks and obstacles, and policy and legal considerations. The issue of sustainability is not unique to brokering software and these models may be relevant to many applications. Results of this comprehensive analysis highlight advantages and disadvantages of the various models in respect to the specific requirements for brokering services. We offer recommendations based on the outcomes of this analysis while recognizing that all software is part of an evolutionary process and has a lifespan.

  12. Modelling Elastic Scattering and Light Transport in 3D Collagen Gel Constructs

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Bixio, L

    2001-01-01

    A model of elastic scattering and light propagation is presented, which can be used to obtain the scattering coefficient, the index of refraction and the distribution of the collagen fibrils in a gel...

  13. A Numerical Method for Calculating Stellar Occultation Light Curves from an Arbitrary Atmospheric Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chamberlain, D. M.; Elliot, J. L.

    1997-01-01

    We present a method for speeding up numerical calculations of a light curve for a stellar occultation by a planetary atmosphere with an arbitrary atmospheric model that has spherical symmetry. This improved speed makes least-squares fitting for model parameters practical. Our method takes as input several sets of values for the first two radial derivatives of the refractivity at different values of model parameters, and interpolates to obtain the light curve at intermediate values of one or more model parameters. It was developed for small occulting bodies such as Pluto and Triton, but is applicable to planets of all sizes. We also present the results of a series of tests showing that our method calculates light curves that are correct to an accuracy of 10(exp -4) of the unocculted stellar flux. The test benchmarks are (i) an atmosphere with a l/r dependence of temperature, which yields an analytic solution for the light curve, (ii) an atmosphere that produces an exponential refraction angle, and (iii) a small-planet isothermal model. With our method, least-squares fits to noiseless data also converge to values of parameters with fractional errors of no more than 10(exp -4), with the largest errors occurring in small planets. These errors are well below the precision of the best stellar occultation data available. Fits to noisy data had formal errors consistent with the level of synthetic noise added to the light curve. We conclude: (i) one should interpolate refractivity derivatives and then form light curves from the interpolated values, rather than interpolating the light curves themselves; (ii) for the most accuracy, one must specify the atmospheric model for radii many scale heights above half light; and (iii) for atmospheres with smoothly varying refractivity with altitude, light curves can be sampled as coarsely as two points per scale height.

  14. Short-channel drain current model for asymmetric heavily / lightly ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    PRADIPTA DUTTA

    2017-07-29

    Jul 29, 2017 ... Abstract. The paper presents a drain current model for double gate metal oxide semiconductor field effect transistors (DG MOSFETs) based on a new velocity saturation model that accounts for short-channel velocity saturation effect independently in the front and the back gate controlled channels under ...

  15. Solar lighting system delivery models for rural areas in developing countries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koirala, Binod Prasad; Ortiz, Brisa [Freiburg Univ. (DE). Center for Renewable Energy (ZEE); Fraunhofer-Institut fuer Solare Energiesysteme (ISE), Freiburg im Breisgau (Germany); Modi, Anish [KTH Royal Inst. of Technology, Stockholm (Sweden); Mathur, Jyotirmay [Malaviya National Institute of Technology, Jaipur (India); Kafle, Nashib [Alternative Energy Promotion Center (AEPC), Kathmandu (Nepal)

    2011-07-01

    Many rural areas in developing countries will not have electricity access from the central grid for several years to come. Autonomous Solar Lighting Systems (SLS) are attractive and enviromentally friendly options for replacing kerosene lamps and providing basic lighting services to such areas. In order to highlight the benefits of these technologies, analysis of reduction in indoor air pollution due to replacement of kerosene lamp by SLS has been carried out. Use of SLS in place of kerosene lamps saves an equivalent of 1341 kg CO{sub 2} emissions per annum from each household. If a suitable mechanism is created, this amount of GHG emissions saving could alone be sufficient to finance solar lighting system for rural households. However, these technologies have not reached most of the poor population. In order to guarantee the access of solar lighting to the people at the Base of the Pyramid (BOP), strengths of different organizations working in the rural areas should be combined together to form successful business models. This paper will discuss business models to disseminate such services to needy people. A comparative study of SLS delivery models based on cash, credit, leasing, subsidy and service is performed. In addition, SWOT analysis for each model is employed. Further, Case studies of few projects to elaborate different models are also presented. If suitable business models for its delivery to rural people are considered, solar lighting systems are viable for providing basic lighting needs of rural areas in developing countries. (orig.)

  16. Demonstration of melanosome transfer by a shedding microvesicle mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Glynis

    2012-04-01

    The process of melanosome transfer has fascinated pigment cell biologists for decades. Whole-organelle transfer is a unique property of melanocytes, suggesting that the biologic underpinnings of the process reflect melanocyte- and keratinocyte-specific proteins and pathways. Although several mechanisms of melanosome transfer are likely to occur in the skin, Ando et al. focused on a new mechanism of melanosome transfer that involves release of melanosome-containing globules, similar to shedding vesicles into the extracellular space, followed by uptake by keratinocytes. This model adds further complexity to the process of melanosome transfer in the skin.

  17. Experience from insulators with RTV silicon rubber sheds and shed coatings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vlastos, A.E.; Sherif, E. (Chalmers Univ. of Technology, Hight Voltage Engineering, S-412 96 Gothenburg (SE))

    1990-10-01

    Long-rod composite insulators, with weather sheds made of room temperature vulcanizing silicon rubber compounds (RTV), were exposed for many years to HVAC and HVDC under realistic conditions and natural pollution. This paper reports that it was found that the shed material, quite in contrary to the experience gained from insulators with sheds of other organic materials e.g., EPDM rubber, undergoes a slow degradation which improves the already superior water repelling properties of the silicon rubber compounds. The improvement seems to be due to a low molecular layer which is produced on the surface of the insulator sheds. This layer improves the hydrophobicity of the surface, while protecting the surface from further degradation. Weather sheds of porcelain housing coated with a thin layer of RTV give similar results to those obtained with long-rod silicon rubber insulators. The RTV coating, although it led to increased salt deposit density, reduces the leak currents and the withstand of the insulator under the same pollution conditions.

  18. Light Exotic Mesons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eugenio, Paul

    2016-03-01

    tudies of meson spectra via strong decays provide insight regarding QCD at the confinement scale. These studies have led to phenomenological models for QCD such as the constituent quark model. However, QCD allows for a much richer spectrum of meson states which include extra states such as hybrids, exotics, multi-quarks, and glueballs. Within the past two decades a number of experiments have put forth tantalizing evidence for the existence of light quark exotic hybrid mesons in the mass range below 2 GeV . Recent Lattice QCD calculations of the light-quark meson spectrum indicate a constituent gluon-like excitation contributing an additional JPC =1+- and mass 1 - 1 . 5 GeV resulting in the lightest hybrid nonets with masses near 2 . 0 GeV . High statistical yields from recent experiments along with new advances in analysis techniques have shed a new light towards the understanding the latest experimental exotic candidates. Recent results from hadro-production and photo-production will be presented followed by an overview of ongoing and future efforts to search for light exotic mesons.

  19. Modelling of light pollution in suburban areas using remotely sensed imagery and GIS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chalkias, C; Petrakis, M; Psiloglou, B; Lianou, M

    2006-04-01

    This paper describes a methodology for modelling light pollution using geographical information systems (GIS) and remote sensing (RS) technology. The proposed approach attempts to address the issue of environmental assessment in sensitive suburban areas. The modern way of life in developing countries is conductive to environmental degradation in urban and suburban areas. One specific parameter for this degradation is light pollution due to intense artificial night lighting. This paper aims to assess this parameter for the Athens metropolitan area, using modern analytical and data capturing technologies. For this purpose, night-time satellite images and analogue maps have been used in order to create the spatial database of the GIS for the study area. Using GIS advanced analytical functionality, visibility analysis was implemented. The outputs for this analysis are a series of maps reflecting direct and indirect light pollution around the city of Athens. Direct light pollution corresponds to optical contact with artificial night light sources, while indirect light pollution corresponds to optical contact with the sky glow above the city. Additionally, the assessment of light pollution in different periods allows for dynamic evaluation of the phenomenon. The case study demonstrates high levels of light pollution in Athens suburban areas and its increase over the last decade.

  20. Fecal shedding of Salmonella spp among cattle admitted to a veterinary medical teaching hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cummings, Kevin J; Divers, Thomas J; McDonough, Patrick L; Warnick, Lorin D

    2009-06-15

    OBJECTIVE- To estimate the prevalence of fecal shedding of Salmonella spp among bovine patients at a veterinary teaching hospital, to identify risk factors for fecal shedding of Salmonella organisms, and to characterize the serotypes. DESIGN- Retrospective cohort study. SAMPLE POPULATION- 5,398 hospitalized cattle. PROCEDURES- Data were collected for all cattle admitted during an 11-year period. Fecal shedding of Salmonella spp was determined by means of standard bacteriologic culture. Multivariable logistic regression models were used to identify risk factors for shedding of Salmonella spp among patients. RESULTS- The prevalence of Salmonella shedding among clinical suspects was 6.5% (50/768), whereas that among nonsuspects tested through routine surveillance was 2.5% (50/2,020). Among clinical suspect calves, fecal shedding of Salmonella spp was more likely for those admitted in the fall (odds ratio [OR], 5.9), those with septicemia (OR, 3.3), or those with an umbilical hernia (OR, 8.6). Among clinical suspect adult cattle, those with enteritis (OR, 9.9) or metritis (OR, 5.2) were more likely to be shedding Salmonella spp. Among nonsuspect cattle, none of the variables were significant predictors of shedding status. Twenty-one serotypes were detected during the study period, with the most common being Salmonella enterica serotypes Typhimurium (33%), Newport (23%), and Agona (12%). CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE- Seasonal and disease risk factors for fecal shedding of Salmonella spp were evident among clinical suspect cattle admitted to a veterinary teaching hospital. In contrast, lack of significant associations among nonsuspect cattle would suggest that targeted screening within this population is not warranted.

  1. Hair shedding score may affect body temperature more than hair coat color during heat stress in weaned beef heifers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of hair shedding score and hair coat color on the vaginal temperature (VT) of calves during heat stress. Weaned Bos taurus beef heifers (n = 32; BW = 282 ± 6.4 kg) were assigned to a hair coat color class (BLACK; RED; or LIGHT, where LIGHT = yel...

  2. A New Light Trap Model as an Alternative for Controlling Pests in Eucalyptus Plantations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mafia, R G; Loureiro, E B; Silva, J B; Simões, J A C; Zarpelon, T G; Bezerra Junior, N S; Damacena, M B

    2017-07-18

    Eucalyptus plantations can be affected by species of defoliating caterpillars. The integrated management of this group primarily involves a monitoring system, natural enemies, and biological products. Alternative control methods, including the use of conventional light traps, have not been adopted, mostly because of their low efficiency. Therefore, a more efficient light trap model was developed. The new model allowed the capture of 3.6 times as many insects as the conventional model, with a 261% gain in control efficiency. The use of this new model represents another integrated management alternative for lepidopteran pests of eucalyptus plantations and other cultured plants.

  3. Short-channel drain current model for asymmetric heavily / lightly ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    PRADIPTA DUTTA

    2017-07-29

    Jul 29, 2017 ... drive current [1–6]. It also improves the performance of logic [7–9] as well as analog applications [10–12]. Previously, various types of drain current models of DG. MOSFETs have been demonstrated but they are ..... obtained from the electric field at the front and back gates. The smooth variation of the drain ...

  4. Independent-particle models for light negative atomic ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganas, P. S.; Talman, J. D.; Green, A. E. S.

    1980-01-01

    For the purposes of astrophysical, aeronomical, and laboratory application, a precise independent-particle model for electrons in negative atomic ions of the second and third period is discussed. The optimum-potential model (OPM) of Talman et al. (1979) is first used to generate numerical potentials for eight of these ions. Results for total energies and electron affinities are found to be very close to Hartree-Fock solutions. However, the OPM and HF electron affinities both depart significantly from experimental affinities. For this reason, two analytic potentials are developed whose inner energy levels are very close to the OPM and HF levels but whose last electron eigenvalues are adjusted precisely with the magnitudes of experimental affinities. These models are: (1) a four-parameter analytic characterization of the OPM potential and (2) a two-parameter potential model of the Green, Sellin, Zachor type. The system O(-) or e-O, which is important in upper atmospheric physics is examined in some detail.

  5. SIMPLIFIED BUILDING MODELS EXTRACTION FROM ULTRA-LIGHT UAV IMAGERY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. Küng

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Generating detailed simplified building models such as the ones present on Google Earth is often a difficult and lengthy manual task, requiring advanced CAD software and a combination of ground imagery, LIDAR data and blueprints. Nowadays, UAVs such as the AscTec Falcon 8 have reached the maturity to offer an affordable, fast and easy way to capture large amounts of oblique images covering all parts of a building. In this paper we present a state-of-the-art photogrammetry and visual reconstruction pipeline provided by Pix4D applied to medium resolution imagery acquired by such UAVs. The key element of simplified building models extraction is the seamless integration of the outputs of such a pipeline for a final manual refinement step in order to minimize the amount of manual work.

  6. A light neutralino in hybrid models of supersymmetry breaking

    CERN Document Server

    Dudas, Emilian; Parmentier, Jeanne; 10.1016

    2008-01-01

    We show that in gauge mediation models where heavy messenger masses are provided by the adjoint Higgs field of an underlying SU(5) theory, a generalized gauge mediation spectrum arises with the characteristic feature of having a neutralino much lighter than in the standard gauge or gravity mediation schemes. This naturally fits in a hybrid scenario where gravity mediation, while subdominant with respect to gauge mediation, provides mu and B mu parameters in the TeV range.

  7. Generalized Beer-Lambert model for near-infrared light propagation in thick biological tissues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhatt, Manish; Ayyalasomayajula, Kalyan R.; Yalavarthy, Phaneendra K.

    2016-07-01

    The attenuation of near-infrared (NIR) light intensity as it propagates in a turbid medium like biological tissue is described by modified the Beer-Lambert law (MBLL). The MBLL is generally used to quantify the changes in tissue chromophore concentrations for NIR spectroscopic data analysis. Even though MBLL is effective in terms of providing qualitative comparison, it suffers from its applicability across tissue types and tissue dimensions. In this work, we introduce Lambert-W function-based modeling for light propagation in biological tissues, which is a generalized version of the Beer-Lambert model. The proposed modeling provides parametrization of tissue properties, which includes two attenuation coefficients μ0 and η. We validated our model against the Monte Carlo simulation, which is the gold standard for modeling NIR light propagation in biological tissue. We included numerous human and animal tissues to validate the proposed empirical model, including an inhomogeneous adult human head model. The proposed model, which has a closed form (analytical), is first of its kind in providing accurate modeling of NIR light propagation in biological tissues.

  8. The ciliary corona: physical model and simulation of the fine needles radiating from point light sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van den Berg, Thomas J T P; Hagenouw, Michiel P J; Coppens, Joris E

    2005-07-01

    Most people see, around bright lights against dark backgrounds, a radiating pattern of numerous fine, slightly colored needles of light-the so called ciliary corona. The purpose of this study was to try to explain this phenomenon. Recently, it has been shown that light-scattering in the eye, measured psychophysically and on human donor lenses, can be explained assuming the presence of specific distributions of small particles in the eye. Light entering the eye is diffracted by these particles. Each such particle causes a circular diffraction pattern on the retina of tens of degrees, much like the well-known Airy pattern. The optics of combining many such diffraction patterns was modeled and the resultant pattern simulated graphically. The simulations were compared with observations on the ciliary corona, as seen by the natural eye. The diffraction discs originating from all the particles coherently superimposed on the retina. Because of phase differences this resulted in breaking the Airy-like discs into a fine spotted pattern when monochromatic light was used. For white (polychromatic) light, the spots line up to form the very fine-line pattern seen in the ciliary corona. Details such as the width and color of the needles follow from the theoretical treatment and were demonstrated by simulations. The details of the ciliary corona can be understood on the basis of polychromatic light-scattering by the particles predicted to be present in human eye lenses on the basis of light-scattering studies of donor lenses.

  9. Establishment of a blue light damage model of human retinal pigment epithelial cells in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, G; Cai, S J; Gong, X; Wang, L L; Li, H H; Wang, L M

    2016-06-24

    To establish a blue-light damage model of human retinal pigment epithelium (RPE). Fourth-generation human RPE cells were randomly divided into two groups. In group A, cells were exposed to blue light (2000 ± 500 lux) for 0 (control), 3, 6, 9, and 12 h, and cell culture was stopped after 12 h. In group B, cells were exposed to blue light at the same intensity and time periods, but cell culture was stopped after 24 h. TdT-mediated dUTP nick-end labeling (TUNEL) assay was performed to determine the most suitable illuminating time with apoptotic index. Flow cytometry was used to determine apoptotic ratio of RPEs. In group A, the apoptotic index of cells that received 6, 9 and 12 h of blue light was higher than that of control. The apoptotic index of cells receiving 9 and 12 h was higher than that of 6 h (P = 0.000). In group B, the apoptotic index and RPE cell apoptosis ratio of cells exposed to 6, 9 and 12 h of blue light were higher than that of 3 h (P = 0.000); and cells receiving 9 and 12 h had higher values than that of 6 h. This study demonstrated that the best conditions to establish a blue light damage model of human retinal pigment epithelial cells in vitro are 2000 ± 500 lux light intensity for 6 h, with 24 h of cell culture post-exposure.

  10. Implications of a Light Higgs in Composite Models

    CERN Document Server

    Redi, Michele

    2012-01-01

    We study the Higgs mass in composite Higgs models with partial compositeness, extending the results of Ref. [1] to different representations of the composite sector for SO(5)/SO(4) and to the coset SO(6)/SO(5). For a given tuning we find in general a strong correlation between the mass of the top partners and the Higgs mass, akin to the one in supersymmetry. If the theory is natural a Higgs mass of 125 GeV typically requires fermionic partners below TeV which might be within the reach of the present run of LHC. A discussion of CP properties of both cosets is also presented.

  11. Light radiation pressure upon a wrinkled membrane – parametrization of an optically orthotropic model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nerovny, N. A.; Zimin, V. N.

    2018-04-01

    In this paper, the problem of representing the light pressure force upon the surface of a thin wrinkled film is discussed. The common source of wrinkles is the shear deformation of the membrane sample. The optical model of such a membrane is assumed to be optically orthotropic and an analytic equation for infinitesimal light pressure force is written. A linear regression model in the case of wrinkle geometry, where a surface element can have different optical parameters, is constructed and the Bayesian approach is used to calculate the parameters of this model.

  12. (Non)supersymmetric SU(5) grand unified models with light coloured octets and electroweak triplets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krasnikov, N.V.

    1993-01-01

    It is shown that split 24 multiplets of SU(5) can cure the problems of (non)supersymmetric SU(5) grand unified models with light coloured octets and electroweak triplets, and predict the correct value of sin 2 (Θ ω ) and don't have the problems with the proton decay. The phenomenology of light coloured scalars is discussed briefly. (author) 17 refs.; 3 figs

  13. The regulatory network adjusting light-harvesting in the model green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii

    OpenAIRE

    Berger, Hanna

    2015-01-01

    In photosynthetic organisms, control of light-harvesting is a key component of acclimation mechanisms that optimize photon conversion efficiencies. In this thesis, the interrelation of short- and long-term regulation of light-harvesting at photosystem II (PSII) was analyzed in the green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. This model organism is able to gain carbon and energy through photosynthetic carbon dioxide fixation as well as heterotrophic feeding. A lowered inorganic or increased organic c...

  14. Rigorous modelling of light's intensity angular-profile in Abbe refractometers with absorbing homogeneous fluids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    García-Valenzuela, A; Contreras-Tello, H; Márquez-Islas, R; Sánchez-Pérez, C

    2013-01-01

    We derive an optical model for the light intensity distribution around the critical angle in a standard Abbe refractometer when used on absorbing homogenous fluids. The model is developed using rigorous electromagnetic optics. The obtained formula is very simple and can be used suitably in the analysis and design of optical sensors relying on Abbe type refractometry.

  15. Models based on multichannel R-matrix theory for evaluating light element reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dodder, D.C.; Hale, G.M.; Nisley, R.A.; Witte, K.; Young, P.G.

    1975-01-01

    Multichannel R-matrix theory has been used as a basis for models for analysis and evaluation of light nuclear systems. These models have the characteristic that data predictions can be made utilizing information derived from other reactions related to the one of primary interest. Several examples are given where such an approach is valid and appropriate. (auth.)

  16. Nucleon-generalized parton distributions in the light-front quark model

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2016-01-12

    Jan 12, 2016 ... The results obtained for GPDs in momentum and impact parameter space are comparable with phenomenological parametrization ... Recently, a phenomenological light-front quark model (LFQM) has been proposed by matching the soft-wall model of ... representation are defined as. F q. 1 (t) = ∫ dx d2k⊥.

  17. Unraveling models of CP violation through electric dipole moments of light nuclei

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dekens, W.; Vries, J. de; Bsaisou, J.; Bernreuther, W.; Hanhart, C.; Meißner, Ulf-G; Nogga, A.; Wirzba, A.

    2014-01-01

    We show that the proposed measurements of the electric dipole moments of light nuclei in storage rings would put strong constraints on models of flavor-diagonal CP violation. Our analysis is exemplified by a comparison of the Standard Model including the QCD theta term, the minimal left-right

  18. Modeling future scenarios of light attenuation and potential seagrass success in a eutrophic estuary

    Science.gov (United States)

    del Barrio, Pilar; Ganju, Neil K.; Aretxabaleta, Alfredo L.; Hayn, Melanie; García, Andrés; Howarth, Robert W.

    2014-01-01

    Estuarine eutrophication has led to numerous ecological changes, including loss of seagrass beds. One potential cause of these losses is a reduction in light availability due to increased attenuation by phytoplankton. Future sea level rise will also tend to reduce light penetration and modify seagrass habitat. In the present study, we integrate a spectral irradiance model into a biogeochemical model coupled to the Regional Ocean Model System (ROMS). It is linked to a bio-optical seagrass model to assess potential seagrass habitat in a eutrophic estuary under future nitrate loading and sea-level rise scenarios. The model was applied to West Falmouth Harbor, a shallow estuary located on Cape Cod (Massachusetts) where nitrate from groundwater has led to eutrophication and seagrass loss in landward portions of the estuary. Measurements of chlorophyll, turbidity, light attenuation, and seagrass coverage were used to assess the model accuracy. Mean chlorophyll based on uncalibrated in-situ fluorometry varied from 28 μg L−1 at the landward-most site to 6.5 μg L−1 at the seaward site, while light attenuation ranged from 0.86 to 0.45 m-1. The model reproduced the spatial variability in chlorophyll and light attenuation with RMS errors of 3.72 μg L−1 and 0.07 m-1 respectively. Scenarios of future nitrate reduction and sea-level rise suggest an improvement in light climate in the landward basin with a 75% reduction in nitrate loading. This coupled model may be useful to assess habitat availability changes due to eutrophication and sediment resuspension and fully considers spatial variability on the tidal timescale.

  19. Light moduli in almost no-scale models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buchmueller, Wilfried; Moeller, Jan; Schmidt, Jonas

    2009-09-01

    We discuss the stabilization of the compact dimension for a class of five-dimensional orbifold supergravity models. Supersymmetry is broken by the superpotential on a boundary. Classically, the size L of the fifth dimension is undetermined, with or without supersymmetry breaking, and the effective potential is of no-scale type. The size L is fixed by quantum corrections to the Kaehler potential, the Casimir energy and Fayet-Iliopoulos (FI) terms localized at the boundaries. For an FI scale of order M GUT , as in heterotic string compactifications with anomalous U(1) symmetries, one obtains L∝1/M GUT . A small mass is predicted for the scalar fluctuation associated with the fifth dimension, m ρ 3/2 /(L M). (orig.)

  20. Phototherapy with blue and green mixed-light is as effective against unconjugated jaundice as blue light and reduces oxidative stress in the Gunn rat model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uchida, Yumiko; Morimoto, Yukihiro; Uchiike, Takao; Kamamoto, Tomoyuki; Hayashi, Tamaki; Arai, Ikuyo; Nishikubo, Toshiya; Takahashi, Yukihiro

    2015-07-01

    Phototherapy using blue light-emitting diodes (LED) is effective against neonatal jaundice. However, green light phototherapy also reduces unconjugated jaundice. We aimed to determine whether mixed blue and green light can relieve jaundice with minimal oxidative stress as effectively as either blue or green light alone in a rat model. Gunn rats were exposed to phototherapy with blue (420-520 nm), filtered blue (FB; 440-520 nm without 1.00), respectively. Blue plus green phototherapy is as effective as blue phototherapy and it attenuates irradiation-induced oxidative stress. Combined blue and green spectra might be effective against neonatal hyperbilirubinemia. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Advanced network planning for bus rapid transit : the "Quickway" model as a modal alternative to "Light Rail Lite"

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-02-01

    Transit planning in the United States has tended toward viewing BRT as an analogue to light rail transit, with similar operating patterns. This model, referred to as Light Rail Lite, is compared to international best practices, which have often...

  2. Hjemløshed i Danmark 2015

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Benjaminsen, Lars; Lauritzen, Heidi Hesselberg

    Denne rapport indeholder resultaterne af den femte kortlægning af hjemløshed i Danmark i 2015. Kortlægningerne har været gennemført hvert andet år siden 2007. I denne kortlægning er antallet af hjemløse borgere opgjort til 6.138 personer i uge 6, 2015. Det er 318 personer flere end ved den forrige...... kortlægning i 2013, svarende til en stigning på 5 pct. Sammenholdt med 2009, hvor tallet var 4.998 personer, er der siden 2009 sket en stigning på 23 pct. Antallet af hjemløse er steget betydeligt i aldersgruppen mellem 25 og 29 år, hvor der i 2015 blev registreret 797 personer i denne aldersgruppe mod 616...

  3. Vortex Shedding Characteristics of the Wake of a Thin Flat Plate with a Circular Trailing Edge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rai, Man Mohan

    2018-01-01

    The near and very near wake of a thin flat plate with a circular trailing edge are investigated with direct numerical simulations (DNS). Data obtained for two different Reynolds numbers (based on plate thickness, D) are the main focus of this study. The separating boundary layers are turbulent in both cases. An earlier investigation of one of the cases (Case F) showed shed vortices in the wake that were about 1.0 D to 4.0 D in spanwise length. Considerable variation in both the strength and frequency of these shed vortices was observed. One objective of the present investigation is to determine the important contributors to this variability in strength and frequency of shed vortices and their finite spanwise extent. Analysis of the data shows that streamwise vortices in the separating boundary layer play an important role in strengthening/weakening of the shed vortices and that high/low-speed streaks in the boundary layer are important contributors to variability in shedding frequency. Both these features of the boundary layer contribute to the finite extent of the vortices in the spanwise direction. The second plate DNS (Case G, with 40 percent of the plate thickness of Case F) shows that while shedding intensity is weaker than obtained in Case F, many of the wake features are similar to that of Case F. This is important in understanding the path to the wake of the thin plate with a sharp trailing edge where shedding is absent. Here we also test the efficacy of a functional relationship between the shedding frequency and the Reynolds numbers based on the boundary layer momentum thickness (Re (sub theta) and D (Re (sub D)); data for developing this behavioral model is from Cases F & G and five earlier DNSs of the flat plate wake.

  4. A direct-imaging cryo-EM study of shedding extracellular vesicles from leukemic monocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koifman, Na'ama; Biran, Idan; Aharon, Anat; Brenner, Benjamin; Talmon, Yeshayahu

    2017-06-01

    The human leukemia monocytic cell line (THP-1) is known to shed extracellular vesicles (EVs) under various stimulations. We studied the effects of two types of common stimulation types, lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and starvation conditions by high resolution cryogenic electron microscopy, namely, cryo-SEM and cryo-TEM. Cryo-SEM data of cells undergoing EV blebbing and shedding is presented here for the first time. The high-resolution images show good agreement with models describing the membrane processes of shedding. Cells that underwent a 48-h starvation treatment exhibited differing morphological features, including shrunken nucleus and elongated membrane protrusions. LPS treated cells, however, showed extensive blebbing originating from the cell membrane, in good agreement with the sizes of EVs imaged by cryo-TEM. EVs isolated from both types of stimulations were measured by nanoparticle tracking analysis (NanoSight), by which LPS-EVs samples exhibited higher concentration and smaller mean diameter, as compared to starvation-EVs. Our results suggest a difference in the effects of the two stimulation types on the shedding process and possibly on the type of EVs shed. Our unique methodologies provide an important and innovative outlook of the shedding process and on its products, paving the way to further discoveries in this developing field of research, in which much is still unknown. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program Advanced Seismic Soil Structure Modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bolisetti, Chandrakanth [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Coleman, Justin Leigh [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2015-06-01

    of interest. The specific nonlinear soil behavior included in the NLSSI calculation presented in this report is gapping and sliding. Other NLSSI effects are not included in the calculation. The results presented in this report document initial model runs in the linear and nonlinear analysis process. Final comparisons between traditional and advanced SPRA will be presented in the September 30th deliverable.

  6. Biomechanical model produced from light-activated dental composite resins: a holographic analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pantelić, Dejan; Vasiljević, Darko; Blažić, Larisa; Savić-Šević, Svetlana; Murić, Branka; Nikolić, Marko

    2013-11-01

    Light-activated dental composites, commonly applied in dentistry, can be used as excellent material for producing biomechanical models. They can be cast in almost any shape in an appropriate silicone mold and quickly solidified by irradiation with light in the blue part of the spectrum. In that way, it is possible to obtain any number of nearly identical casts. The models can be used to study the behavior of arbitrary structure under mechanical loads. To test the technique, a simple mechanical model of the tooth with a mesio-occluso-distal cavity was manufactured. Composite resin restoration was placed inside the cavity and light cured. Real-time holographic interferometry was used to analyze the contraction of the composite resin and its effect on the surrounding material. The results obtained in the holographic experiment were in good agreement with those obtained using the finite element method.

  7. Towards a functional-structural plant model of cut-rose: simulation of light environment, light absorption, photosynthesis and interference with the plant structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buck-Sorlin, Gerhard; de Visser, Pieter H B; Henke, Michael; Sarlikioti, Vaia; van der Heijden, Gerie W A M; Marcelis, Leo F M; Vos, Jan

    2011-10-01

    The production system of cut-rose (Rosa × hybrida) involves a complex combination of plant material, management practice and environment. Plant structure is determined by bud break and shoot development while having an effect on local light climate. The aim of the present study is to cover selected aspects of the cut-rose system using functional-structural plant modelling (FSPM), in order to better understand processes contributing to produce quality and quantity. The model describes the production system in three dimensions, including a virtual greenhouse environment with the crop, light sources (diffuse and direct sun light and lamps) and photosynthetically active radiation (PAR) sensors. The crop model is designed as a multiscaled FSPM with plant organs (axillary buds, leaves, internodes, flowers) as basic units, and local light interception and photosynthesis within each leaf. A Monte-Carlo light model was used to compute the local light climate for leaf photosynthesis, the latter described using a biochemical rate model. The model was able to reproduce PAR measurements taken at different canopy positions, different times of the day and different light regimes. Simulated incident and absorbed PAR as well as net assimilation rate in upright and bent shoots showed characteristic spatial and diurnal dynamics for different common cultivation scenarios. The model of cut-rose presented allowed the creation of a range of initial structures thanks to interactive rules for pruning, cutting and bending. These static structures can be regarded as departure points for the dynamic simulation of production of flower canes. Furthermore, the model was able to predict local (per leaf) light absorption and photosynthesis. It can be used to investigate the physiology of ornamental plants, and provide support for the decisions of growers and consultants.

  8. Towards a functional–structural plant model of cut-rose: simulation of light environment, light absorption, photosynthesis and interference with the plant structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buck-Sorlin, Gerhard; de Visser, Pieter H. B.; Henke, Michael; Sarlikioti, Vaia; van der Heijden, Gerie W. A. M.; Marcelis, Leo F. M.; Vos, Jan

    2011-01-01

    Background and Aims The production system of cut-rose (Rosa × hybrida) involves a complex combination of plant material, management practice and environment. Plant structure is determined by bud break and shoot development while having an effect on local light climate. The aim of the present study is to cover selected aspects of the cut-rose system using functional–structural plant modelling (FSPM), in order to better understand processes contributing to produce quality and quantity. Methods The model describes the production system in three dimensions, including a virtual greenhouse environment with the crop, light sources (diffuse and direct sun light and lamps) and photosynthetically active radiation (PAR) sensors. The crop model is designed as a multiscaled FSPM with plant organs (axillary buds, leaves, internodes, flowers) as basic units, and local light interception and photosynthesis within each leaf. A Monte-Carlo light model was used to compute the local light climate for leaf photosynthesis, the latter described using a biochemical rate model. Key Results The model was able to reproduce PAR measurements taken at different canopy positions, different times of the day and different light regimes. Simulated incident and absorbed PAR as well as net assimilation rate in upright and bent shoots showed characteristic spatial and diurnal dynamics for different common cultivation scenarios. Conclusions The model of cut-rose presented allowed the creation of a range of initial structures thanks to interactive rules for pruning, cutting and bending. These static structures can be regarded as departure points for the dynamic simulation of production of flower canes. Furthermore, the model was able to predict local (per leaf) light absorption and photosynthesis. It can be used to investigate the physiology of ornamental plants, and provide support for the decisions of growers and consultants. PMID:21856634

  9. A mechanistic model for the light response of photosynthetic electron transport rate based on light harvesting properties of photosynthetic pigment molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Zi-Piao; Robakowski, Piotr; Suggett, David J

    2013-03-01

    Models describing the light response of photosynthetic electron transport rate (ETR) are routinely used to determine how light absorption influences energy, reducing power and yields of primary productivity; however, no single model is currently able to provide insight into the fundamental processes that implicitly govern the variability of light absorption. Here we present development and application of a new mechanistic model of ETR for photosystem II based on the light harvesting (absorption and transfer to the core 'reaction centres') characteristics of photosynthetic pigment molecules. Within this model a series of equations are used to describe novel biophysical and biochemical characteristics of photosynthetic pigment molecules and in turn light harvesting; specifically, the eigen-absorption cross-section and the minimum average lifetime of photosynthetic pigment molecules in the excited state, which describe the ability of light absorption of photosynthetic pigment molecules and retention time of excitons in the excited state but are difficult to be measured directly. We applied this model to a series of previously collected fluorescence data and demonstrated that our model described well the light response curves of ETR, regardless of whether dynamic down-regulation of PSII occurs, for a range of photosynthetic organisms (Abies alba, Picea abies, Pinus mugo and Emiliania huxleyi). Inherent estimated parameters (e.g. maximum ETR and the saturation irradiance) by our model are in very close agreement with the measured data. Overall, our mechanistic model potentially provides novel insights into the regulation of ETR by light harvesting properties as well as dynamical down-regulation of PSII.

  10. A Dynamic Model for Prediction of Psoriasis Management by Blue Light Irradiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Félix Garza, Zandra C; Liebmann, Joerg; Born, Matthias; Hilbers, Peter A J; van Riel, Natal A W

    2017-01-01

    Clinical investigations prove that blue light irradiation reduces the severity of psoriasis vulgaris. Nevertheless, the mechanisms involved in the management of this condition remain poorly defined. Despite the encouraging results of the clinical studies, no clear guidelines are specified in the literature for the irradiation scheme regime of blue light-based therapy for psoriasis. We investigated the underlying mechanism of blue light irradiation of psoriatic skin, and tested the hypothesis that regulation of proliferation is a key process. We implemented a mechanistic model of cellular epidermal dynamics to analyze whether a temporary decrease of keratinocytes hyper-proliferation can explain the outcome of phototherapy with blue light. Our results suggest that the main effect of blue light on keratinocytes impacts the proliferative cells. They show that the decrease in the keratinocytes proliferative capacity is sufficient to induce a transient decrease in the severity of psoriasis. To study the impact of the therapeutic regime on the efficacy of psoriasis treatment, we performed simulations for different combinations of the treatment parameters, i.e., length of treatment, fluence (also referred to as dose), and intensity. These simulations indicate that high efficacy is achieved by regimes with long duration and high fluence levels, regardless of the chosen intensity. Our modeling approach constitutes a framework for testing diverse hypotheses on the underlying mechanism of blue light-based phototherapy, and for designing effective strategies for the treatment of psoriasis.

  11. Interaction of hematoporphyrin derivative, light, and ionizing radiation in a rat glioma model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kostron, H.; Swartz, M.R.; Miller, D.C.; Martuza, R.L.

    1986-01-01

    The effects of hematoporphyrin derivative, light, and cobalt 60 ( 60 Co) irradiation were studied in a rat glioma model using an in vivo and an in vitro clonogenic assay. There was no effect on tumor growth by visible light or by a single dose of 60 Co irradiation at 4 Gy or 8 Gy, whereas 16 Gy inhibited tumor growth to 40% versus the control. Hematoporphyrin derivative alone slightly stimulated growth (P less than 0.1). Light in the presence of 10 mg hematoporphyrin derivative/kg inhibited tumor growth to 32%. 60 Co irradiation in the presence of hematoporphyrin derivative produced a significant tumor growth inhibition (P less than 0.02). This growth inhibition was directly related to the concentration of hematoporphyrin derivative. The addition of 60 Co to light in the presence of hematoporphyrin derivative produced a greater growth inhibition than light or 60 Co irradiation alone. This effect was most pronounced when light was applied 30 minutes before 60 Co irradiation. Our experiments in a subcutaneous rat glioma model suggest a radiosensitizing effect of hematoporphyrin derivative. Furthermore, the photodynamic inactivation is enhanced by the addition of 60 Co irradiation. These findings may be of importance in planning new treatment modalities in malignant brain tumors

  12. EDGE EFFECT MODELING AND STUDY FOR THREE-CHIP RGB LIGHT-EMITTING DIODES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. I. Podosinnikov

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Subject of study. The paper deals with light quality improvement of multi–chip RGB light-emitting diodes (LEDs and luminaries on their basis. In particular, we have studied the issues of the edge effect reducing, which is non–uniformity of color when observing the source of light under different angles as well as non-uniformity of color distribution on the illuminated surface. Methods. Experimental study of the edge effect has been performed, namely, the analysis of the halo at the periphery of the illuminated area and the non–uniformity of area at the surface of the screen illuminated with RGB LEDs with and without light concentrators. Modeling of illumination distribution at various distances from the source for the system containing four RGB LEDs with reflectors by ZEMAX software has been carried out. Assessment of the uniformity for light distribution via calculating the chromaticity coordinates has been performed. Main results. The possibility of modeling application at the stage of a luminary design is shown on the example of RGB LEDs for assessing the efficiency of light flux usage and colorimetric parameters. Suggested method simplifies significantly the design of luminaries and reduces associated costs. Practical relevance. The findings can be used in the design of luminaries based on RGB LEDs, including the ones with secondary optics elements.

  13. Measurement on the cavitating vortex shedding behind rectangular obstacles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hegedus, F; Hos, C; Pandula, Z; Kullmann, L

    2010-01-01

    Measurement results on the cavitating vortex shedding behind sharp-edged rectangular bodies are presented, intended to provide benchmark cases for the validation of unsteady cavitation models of CFD codes. Rectangular bodies of increasing aspect ratio (1, 2, 3 and 4) were used with a constant 25mm height (12.5% blockage ratio). The water velocity in the 0.2x0.05m test section of the channel was varied between 1 and 12 m/s resulting in a Reynolds number in the range of (0.4-3.5)x105. Pressure signals were measured at several locations, notably in the wake. Dominant frequencies and Strouhal numbers are reported from cavitation-free flow (classic von Karman vortex shedding) up to supercavitation as a function of the free-stream Reynolds number. The results are in good agreement with the literature in case of the square cylinder. We experienced a slight increase of the dominant Strouhal number with increasing aspect ratio. This result is somewhat inconsistent with the literature, in which a fall of the Strouhal number can be observed at side ratio 2. This may be the consequence of the different ranges of Reynolds numbers. It was also found that between the inception of cavitation and the formation of supercavitation the Strouhal number is not affected by cavitation.

  14. Interacting spiral waves in the Oregonator model of the light-sensitive Belousov-Zhabotinskii reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schebesch, I.; Engel, H.

    1999-12-01

    We study the interaction of meandering spiral waves within the framework of a modified Oregonator model for the light-sensitive Belousov-Zhabotinskii medium. In this medium the local excitation threshold can be controlled by varying the intensity of incident light. At low as well as sufficiently high light intensity we find stable axis-symmetric bound states consisting of two counterrotating spirals. At intensity values in between, spiral pairs undergo a symmetry-breaking instability, leading to one spiral suppressing and expelling the other. To avoid the instability, we consider a spiral wave interacting with its mirror image close to a plane boundary impermeable to diffusion. The drift velocity and the drift direction of those pseudobound states parallel to the boundary are strongly influenced by the light intensity.

  15. Prevalence and risk factors for shedding of Cryptosporidium spp. oocysts in dairy calves of Buenos Aires Province, Argentina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos J. Garro

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available In order to determine the prevalence and risk factors for shedding of Cryptosporidium spp. in dairy calves, a cross-sectional study was carried out in the northeastern region of Buenos Aires Province, Argentina. Fecal samples from a total of 552 calves from 27 dairy herds were collected, along with a questionnaire about management factors. Cryptosporidium spp. oocysts were detected by light microscopy using Kinyoun staining. Putative risk factors were tested for association using generalized linear mixed models (GLMMs. Oocyst shedding calves were found in 67% (CI95% = 49–84 of herds (corresponding to a true herd prevalence of 98% and 16% (CI95% = 13–19 of calves (corresponding to a true calve prevalence of 8%. Within-herd prevalence ranged from 0 to 60%, with a median of 8%. Cryptosporidium spp. excretion was not associated with the type of liquid diet, gender, time the calf stayed with the dam after birth, use of antibiotics, blood presence in feces, and calving season. However, important highly significant risk factors of oocyst shedding of calves was an age of less or equal than 20 days (OR = 7.4; 95% CI95% = 3–16; P < 0.0001 and occurrence of diarrhea (OR = 5.5; 95% CI95% = 2–11; P < 0.0001. The observed association with young age strongly suggests an early exposure of neonatal calves to Cryptosporidium spp. oocysts in maternity pens and/or an age-related susceptibility. Association with diarrhea suggests that Cryptosporidium spp. is an important enteropathogen primarily responsible for the cause of the observed diarrheal syndrome. Results demonstrate that Cryptosporidium spp. infection is widespread in the study region. Monitoring and control of this parasitic protozoan infection in dairy herds is recommended.

  16. Investigation of light baryons in a three-body quark model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aslanzadeh, M.; Rajabi, A. A.

    2017-02-01

    We present a three-body quark model based on hypercentral approach for investigating the internal structure of light baryons. The analytically obtained energy eigenvalues and eigenfunctions of the three-body problem have been used in the calculations of the mass spectrum of light baryons and electromagnetic elastic form factors of nucleon. The magnetic moments and charge radii of nucleon have also been calculated. We have compared the evaluated observables with experimental data and it has been shown that the present model provides a good description of the observed resonances.

  17. Adaptation to shift work: physiologically based modeling of the effects of lighting and shifts' start time.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Svetlana Postnova

    Full Text Available Shift work has become an integral part of our life with almost 20% of the population being involved in different shift schedules in developed countries. However, the atypical work times, especially the night shifts, are associated with reduced quality and quantity of sleep that leads to increase of sleepiness often culminating in accidents. It has been demonstrated that shift workers' sleepiness can be improved by a proper scheduling of light exposure and optimizing shifts timing. Here, an integrated physiologically-based model of sleep-wake cycles is used to predict adaptation to shift work in different light conditions and for different shift start times for a schedule of four consecutive days of work. The integrated model combines a model of the ascending arousal system in the brain that controls the sleep-wake switch and a human circadian pacemaker model. To validate the application of the integrated model and demonstrate its utility, its dynamics are adjusted to achieve a fit to published experimental results showing adaptation of night shift workers (n = 8 in conditions of either bright or regular lighting. Further, the model is used to predict the shift workers' adaptation to the same shift schedule, but for conditions not considered in the experiment. The model demonstrates that the intensity of shift light can be reduced fourfold from that used in the experiment and still produce good adaptation to night work. The model predicts that sleepiness of the workers during night shifts on a protocol with either bright or regular lighting can be significantly improved by starting the shift earlier in the night, e.g.; at 21:00 instead of 00:00. Finally, the study predicts that people of the same chronotype, i.e. with identical sleep times in normal conditions, can have drastically different responses to shift work depending on their intrinsic circadian and homeostatic parameters.

  18. Comparison of low cost 3D structured light scanners for face modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakirman, Tolga; Gumusay, Mustafa Umit; Reis, Hatice Catal; Selbesoglu, Mahmut Oguz; Yosmaoglu, Serra; Yaras, Mehmet Cem; Seker, Dursun Zafer; Bayram, Bulent

    2017-02-01

    This study aims to compare three different structured light scanner systems to generate accurate 3D human face models. Among these systems, the most dense and expensive one was denoted as the reference and the other two that were low cost and low resolution were compared according to the reference system. One female face and one male face were scanned with three light scanner systems. Point-cloud filtering, mesh generation, and hole-filling steps were carried out using a trial version of commercial software; moreover, the data evaluation process was realized using CloudCompare open-source software. Various filtering and mesh smoothing levels were applied on reference data to compare with other low-cost systems. Thus, the optimum reduction level of reference data was evaluated to continue further processes. The outcome of the presented study shows that low-cost structured light scanners have a great potential for 3D object modeling, including the human face. A considerable cheap structured light system has been used due to its capacity to obtain spatial and morphological information in the case study of 3D human face modeling. This study also discusses the benefits and accuracy of low-cost structured light systems.

  19. Hybrid diffusion and two-flux approximation for multilayered tissue light propagation modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yudovsky, Dmitry; Durkin, Anthony J

    2011-07-20

    Accurate and rapid estimation of fluence, reflectance, and absorbance in multilayered biological media has been essential in many biophotonics applications that aim to diagnose, cure, or model in vivo tissue. The radiative transfer equation (RTE) rigorously models light transfer in absorbing and scattering media. However, analytical solutions to the RTE are limited even in simple homogeneous or plane media. Monte Carlo simulation has been used extensively to solve the RTE. However, Monte Carlo simulation is computationally intensive and may not be practical for applications that demand real-time results. Instead, the diffusion approximation has been shown to provide accurate estimates of light transport in strongly scattering tissue. The diffusion approximation is a greatly simplified model and produces analytical solutions for the reflectance and absorbance in tissue. However, the diffusion approximation breaks down if tissue is strongly absorbing, which is common in the visible part of the spectrum or in applications that involve darkly pigmented skin and/or high local volumes of blood such as port-wine stain therapy or reconstructive flap monitoring. In these cases, a model of light transfer that can accommodate both strongly and weakly absorbing regimes is required. Here we present a model of light transfer through layered biological media that represents skin with two strongly scattering and one strongly absorbing layer. © 2011 Optical Society of America

  20. Beam-based model of broad-band impedance of the Diamond Light Source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smaluk, Victor; Martin, Ian; Fielder, Richard; Bartolini, Riccardo

    2015-06-01

    In an electron storage ring, the interaction between a single-bunch beam and a vacuum chamber impedance affects the beam parameters, which can be measured rather precisely. So we can develop beam-based numerical models of longitudinal and transverse impedances. At the Diamond Light Source (DLS) to get the model parameters, a set of measured data has been used including current-dependent shift of betatron tunes and synchronous phase, chromatic damping rates, and bunch lengthening. A matlab code for multiparticle tracking has been developed. The tracking results and analytical estimations are quite consistent with the measured data. Since Diamond has the shortest natural bunch length among all light sources in standard operation, the studies of collective effects with short bunches are relevant to many facilities including next generation of light sources.

  1. Beam-based model of broad-band impedance of the Diamond Light Source

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victor Smaluk

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available In an electron storage ring, the interaction between a single-bunch beam and a vacuum chamber impedance affects the beam parameters, which can be measured rather precisely. So we can develop beam-based numerical models of longitudinal and transverse impedances. At the Diamond Light Source (DLS to get the model parameters, a set of measured data has been used including current-dependent shift of betatron tunes and synchronous phase, chromatic damping rates, and bunch lengthening. A matlab code for multiparticle tracking has been developed. The tracking results and analytical estimations are quite consistent with the measured data. Since Diamond has the shortest natural bunch length among all light sources in standard operation, the studies of collective effects with short bunches are relevant to many facilities including next generation of light sources.

  2. Theoretical model of a polarization diffractive elements for the light beams conversion holographic formation in PDLCs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharangovich, Sergey N.; Semkin, Artem O.

    2017-12-01

    In this work a theoretical model of the holographic formation of the polarization diffractive optical elements for the transformation of Gaussian light beams into Bessel-like ones in polymer-dispersed liquid crystals (PDLC) is developed. The model is based on solving the equations of photo-induced Fredericks transition processes for polarization diffractive elements formation by orthogonally polarized light beams with inhomogeneous amplitude and phase profiles. The results of numerical simulation of the material's dielectric tensor changing due to the structure's formation process are presented for various recording beams' polarization states. Based on the results of numerical simulation, the ability to form the diffractive optical elements for light beams transformation by the polarization holography methods is shown.

  3. Design of a Stand-Alone Photovoltaic (PV Models for Home Lightings and Clean Environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vincent Anayochukwu Ani

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper gives a well-documented health risks of fuel-based lighting (kerosene lamps and fuel-powered generators and proposed a design of a stand-alone solar PV system for sustainable home lightings in rural Nigerian area. The design was done in three different patterns of electricity consumptions with energy efficient lightings (EELs using two different battery types (Rolls Surrette 6CS25PS and hoppecke 10 OpzS 1000 on; i judicious power consumption, ii normal power consumption, iii excess power consumption; and compared them with the incandescent light bulb consumption. The stand-alone photovoltaic energy systems were designed to match the rural Nigerian sunlight and weather conditions to meet the required lightings of the household. The objective function and constraints for the design models were formulated and optimization procedure were used to demonstrate the best solution (reliability at the lowest lifecycle cost. Initial capital costs as well as annualized costs over 5, 10, 15, 20, and 25 years were quantified and documented. The design identified the most cost-effective and reliable solar and battery array among the patterns of electricity consumption with energy efficient lighting options (judicious power consumption, normal power consumption, and excess power consumption.

  4. THE INFORMATION CONTENT IN ANALYTIC SPOT MODELS OF BROADBAND PRECISION LIGHT CURVES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walkowicz, Lucianne M. [Department of Astrophysical Sciences, Princeton University, Peyton Hall, 4 Ivy Lane, Princeton, NJ 08534 (United States); Basri, Gibor [Astronomy Department, University of California at Berkeley, Hearst Field Annex, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Valenti, Jeff A. [Space Telescope Science Institute, 3700 San Martin Dr., Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States)

    2013-04-01

    We present the results of numerical experiments to assess degeneracies in light curve models of starspots. Using synthetic light curves generated with the Cheetah starspot modeling code, we explore the extent to which photometric light curves constrain spot model parameters, including spot latitudes and stellar inclination. We also investigate the effects of spot parameters and differential rotation on one's ability to correctly recover rotation periods and differential rotation in the Kepler light curves. We confirm that in the absence of additional constraints on the stellar inclination, such as spectroscopic measurements of vsin i or occultations of starspots by planetary transits, the spot latitude and stellar inclination are difficult to determine uniquely from the photometry alone. We find that for models with no differential rotation, spots that appear on opposite hemispheres of the star may cause one to interpret the rotation period to be half of the true period. When differential rotation is included, the changing longitude separation between spots breaks the symmetry of the hemispheres and the correct rotation period is more likely to be found. The dominant period found via periodogram analysis is typically that of the largest spot. Even when multiple spots with periods representative of the star's differential rotation exist, if one spot dominates the light curve the signal of differential rotation may not be detectable from the periodogram alone. Starspot modeling is applicable to stars with a wider range of rotation rates than other surface imaging techniques (such as Doppler imaging), allows subtle signatures of differential rotation to be measured, and may provide valuable information on the distribution of stellar spots. However, given the inherent degeneracies and uncertainty present in starspot models, caution should be exercised in their interpretation.

  5. THE INFORMATION CONTENT IN ANALYTIC SPOT MODELS OF BROADBAND PRECISION LIGHT CURVES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walkowicz, Lucianne M.; Basri, Gibor; Valenti, Jeff A.

    2013-01-01

    We present the results of numerical experiments to assess degeneracies in light curve models of starspots. Using synthetic light curves generated with the Cheetah starspot modeling code, we explore the extent to which photometric light curves constrain spot model parameters, including spot latitudes and stellar inclination. We also investigate the effects of spot parameters and differential rotation on one's ability to correctly recover rotation periods and differential rotation in the Kepler light curves. We confirm that in the absence of additional constraints on the stellar inclination, such as spectroscopic measurements of vsin i or occultations of starspots by planetary transits, the spot latitude and stellar inclination are difficult to determine uniquely from the photometry alone. We find that for models with no differential rotation, spots that appear on opposite hemispheres of the star may cause one to interpret the rotation period to be half of the true period. When differential rotation is included, the changing longitude separation between spots breaks the symmetry of the hemispheres and the correct rotation period is more likely to be found. The dominant period found via periodogram analysis is typically that of the largest spot. Even when multiple spots with periods representative of the star's differential rotation exist, if one spot dominates the light curve the signal of differential rotation may not be detectable from the periodogram alone. Starspot modeling is applicable to stars with a wider range of rotation rates than other surface imaging techniques (such as Doppler imaging), allows subtle signatures of differential rotation to be measured, and may provide valuable information on the distribution of stellar spots. However, given the inherent degeneracies and uncertainty present in starspot models, caution should be exercised in their interpretation.

  6. White Light–Emitting Diodes (LEDs) at Domestic Lighting Levels and Retinal Injury in a Rat Model

    OpenAIRE

    Shang, Yu-Man; Wang, Gen-Shuh; Sliney, David; Yang, Chang-Hao; Lee, Li-Ling

    2013-01-01

    Background: Light-emitting diodes (LEDs) deliver higher levels of blue light to the retina than do conventional domestic light sources. Chronic exposure to high-intensity light (2,000–10,000 lux) has previously been found to result in light-induced retinal injury, but chronic exposure to relatively low-intensity (750 lux) light has not been previously assessed with LEDs in a rodent model. Objective: We examined LED-induced retinal neuronal cell damage in the Sprague-Dawley rat using functiona...

  7. Investigating Students' Mental Models about the Quantization of Light, Energy, and Angular Momentum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Didis, Nilüfer; Eryilmaz, Ali; Erkoç, Sakir

    2014-01-01

    This paper is the first part of a multiphase study examining students' mental models about the quantization of physical observables--light, energy, and angular momentum. Thirty-one second-year physics and physics education college students who were taking a modern physics course participated in the study. The qualitative analysis of data revealed…

  8. Statistical simulation of hadron-nucleus and light nucleus-nucleus interaction. Intranuclear cascade model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lobov, G.A.; Stepanov, N.V.; Sibirtsev, A.A.; Trebukhovskij, Yu.V.

    1983-01-01

    A new version of the program of statistical simulation of hadron-nucleus and light nucleus-nucleus interaction is elaborated. The cascade part of the program is described. The comparison of model predictions with the proton-nucleus interaction experiments is performed. A satisfactory calculations-experiment agreement is obtained

  9. Description of light charged particle multiplicities in the framework of dinuclear system model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonenko N.V.

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available In the framework of dinuclear system (DNS model we calculate the light charged particle (LCP multiplicities produced in fusion and quasifission reactions and their kinetic energy spectra. Calculations indicate that with increasing bombarding energy the ratio of LCP multiplicity from fragments MFF to corresponding LCP multiplicity from compound nucleus (CN MCN strongly increases.

  10. On the dynamic buckling of a lightly damped elastic cubic model ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... technique to determine the dynamic buckling load of a lightly and viscously damped elastic cubic model structure modulated by a sinusoidally slowly varying dynamic load. The imperfect elastic cubic (nonlinear) structure is itself a generalization of most elastic physical structures that have been investigated over the years.

  11. A simple model for 2D image upconversion of incoherent light

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dam, Jeppe Seidelin; Pedersen, Christian; Tidemand-Lichtenberg, Peter

    2011-01-01

    We present a simple theoretical model for 2 dimensional (2-D) image up-conversion of incoherent light. While image upconversion has been known for more than 40 years, the technology has been hindered by very low conversion quantum efficiency (~10-7). We show that our implementation compared...

  12. Veje ind og ud af hjemløshed

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Benjaminsen, Lars; Enemark, Morten Holm

    Hjemløsheden i Danmark har været stigende i de seneste år. Denne rapport beskriver forløbene op mod hjemløshed, vejene gennem hjemløshed og chancerne for at komme ud af hjemløshed igen. På baggrund af data fra hjemløsetællingerne og fra landets herberger (§ 110-boformer) i perioden 2009-2015 anal...

  13. Numerical evaluation of cavitation shedding structure around 3D Hydrofoil: Comparison of PANS, LES and RANS results with experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, B.; Peng, X. X.; Long, X. P.; Luo, X. W.; Wu, Y. L.

    2015-12-01

    Results of cavitating turbulent flow simulation around a twisted hydrofoil were presented in the paper using the Partially-Averaged Navier-Stokes (PANS) method (Ji et al. 2013a), Large-Eddy Simulation (LES) (Ji et al. 2013b) and Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS). The results are compared with available experimental data (Foeth 2008). The PANS and LES reasonably reproduce the cavitation shedding patterns around the twisted hydrofoil with primary and secondary shedding, while the RANS model fails to simulate the unsteady cavitation shedding phenomenon and yields an almost steady flow with a constant cavity shape and vapor volume. Besides, it is noted that the predicted shedding vapor cavity by PANS is more turbulent and the shedding vortex is stronger than that by LES, which is more consistent with experimental photos.

  14. Regional impacts of iron-light colimitation in a global biogeochemical model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. D. Galbraith

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Laboratory and field studies have revealed that iron has multiple roles in phytoplankton physiology, with particular importance for light-harvesting cellular machinery. However, although iron-limitation is explicitly included in numerous biogeochemical/ecosystem models, its implementation varies, and its effect on the efficiency of light harvesting is often ignored. Given the complexity of the ocean environment, it is difficult to predict the consequences of applying different iron limitation schemes. Here we explore the interaction of iron and nutrient cycles in an ocean general circulation model using a new, streamlined model of ocean biogeochemistry. Building on previously published parameterizations of photoadaptation and export production, the Biogeochemistry with Light Iron Nutrients and Gasses (BLING model is constructed with only four explicit tracers but including macronutrient and micronutrient limitation, light limitation, and an implicit treatment of community structure. The structural simplicity of this computationally-inexpensive model allows us to clearly isolate the global effect that iron availability has on maximum light-saturated photosynthesis rates vs. the effect iron has on photosynthetic efficiency. We find that the effect on light-saturated photosynthesis rates is dominant, negating the importance of photosynthetic efficiency in most regions, especially the cold waters of the Southern Ocean. The primary exceptions to this occur in iron-rich regions of the Northern Hemisphere, where high light-saturated photosynthesis rates allow photosynthetic efficiency to play a more important role. In other words, the ability to efficiently harvest photons has little effect in regions where light-saturated growth rates are low. Additionally, we speculate that the phytoplankton cells dominating iron-limited regions tend to have relatively high photosynthetic efficiency, due to reduced packaging effects. If this speculation is correct

  15. Modeling and predicting the growth boundary of Listeria monocytogenes in lightly preserved seafood

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mejlholm, Ole; Dalgaard, Paw

    2007-01-01

    in lightly preserved seafood. The developed growth boundary model accurately predicted growth and no-growth responses in 68 of 71 examined experiments from the present study as well as from literature data. Growth was predicted for three batches of naturally contaminated cold-smoked salmon when a no......-growth response was actually observed, indicating that the model is fail-safe. The developed model predicts both the growth boundary and growth rate of L. monocytogenes and seems useful for the risk management of lightly preserved seafood. Particularly, the model facilitates the identification of product...... characteristics required to prevent the growth of L. monocytogenes, thereby making it possible to identify critical control points, and is useful for compliance with the new European Union regulation on ready-to-eat foods (EC 2073/2005)....

  16. A Search for Beyond Standard Model Light Bosons Decaying into Muon Pairs

    CERN Document Server

    CMS Collaboration

    2016-01-01

    A dataset corresponding to $2.8~\\mathrm{fb}^{-1}$ of proton-proton collisions at $\\sqrt{s} = 13~\\mathrm{TeV}$ was recorded by the CMS experiment at the CERN LHC. These data are used to search for new light bosons with a mass in the range $0.25-8.5~\\mathrm{GeV}/c^2$ decaying into muon pairs. No excess is observed in the data, and a model-independent upper limit on the product of the cross section, branching fraction and acceptance is derived. The results are interpreted in the context of two benchmark models, namely, the next-to-minimal supersymmetric standard model, and dark SUSY models including those predicting a non-negligible light boson lifetime.

  17. Model Predictive Vibration Control Efficient Constrained MPC Vibration Control for Lightly Damped Mechanical Structures

    CERN Document Server

    Takács, Gergely

    2012-01-01

    Real-time model predictive controller (MPC) implementation in active vibration control (AVC) is often rendered difficult by fast sampling speeds and extensive actuator-deformation asymmetry. If the control of lightly damped mechanical structures is assumed, the region of attraction containing the set of allowable initial conditions requires a large prediction horizon, making the already computationally demanding on-line process even more complex. Model Predictive Vibration Control provides insight into the predictive control of lightly damped vibrating structures by exploring computationally efficient algorithms which are capable of low frequency vibration control with guaranteed stability and constraint feasibility. In addition to a theoretical primer on active vibration damping and model predictive control, Model Predictive Vibration Control provides a guide through the necessary steps in understanding the founding ideas of predictive control applied in AVC such as: ·         the implementation of ...

  18. Does leaf shedding protect stems from cavitation during seasonal droughts? A test of the hydraulic fuse hypothesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolfe, Brett T; Sperry, John S; Kursar, Thomas A

    2016-12-01

    During droughts, leaves are predicted to act as 'hydraulic fuses' by shedding when plants reach critically low water potential (Ψ plant ), thereby slowing water loss, stabilizing Ψ plant and protecting against cavitation-induced loss of stem hydraulic conductivity (K s ). We tested these predictions among trees in seasonally dry tropical forests, where leaf shedding is common, yet variable, among species. We tracked leaf phenology, Ψ plant and K s in saplings of six tree species distributed across two forests. Species differed in their timing and extent of leaf shedding, yet converged in shedding leaves as they approached the Ψ plant value associated with a 50% loss of K s and at which their model-estimated maximum sustainable transpiration rate approached zero. However, after shedding all leaves, the Ψ plant value of one species, Genipa americana, continued to decline, indicating that water loss continued after leaf shedding. K s was highly variable among saplings within species and seasons, suggesting a minimal influence of seasonal drought on K s . Hydraulic limits appear to drive diverse patterns of leaf shedding among tropical trees, supporting the hydraulic fuse hypothesis. However, leaf shedding is not universally effective at stabilizing Ψ plant , suggesting that the main function of drought deciduousness may vary among species. © 2016 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2016 New Phytologist Trust.

  19. In-medium pion valence distributions in a light-front model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Melo, J.P.B.C. de; Tsushima, K.; Ahmed, I.

    2017-01-01

    Pion valence distributions in nuclear medium and vacuum are studied in a light-front constituent quark model. The in-medium input for studying the pion properties is calculated by the quark-meson coupling model. We find that the in-medium pion valence distribution, as well as the in-medium pion valence wave function, are substantially modified at normal nuclear matter density, due to the reduction in the pion decay constant.

  20. New model for counter-current flow during reflood in light water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carbajo, J.J.

    1984-01-01

    Counter-current flow (CCF) of steam and water may occur at the upper core plate of a light water reactor (LWR) under reflood conditions. This paper describes a new model for CCF and flooding at the upper core plate of a LWR. The model assumes separate paths for the water draining through some open area of the upper core plate and the steam rising up through the remaining open area. Condensation of steam is not considered

  1. Leading-edge vortex shedding from rotating wings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kolomenskiy, Dmitry [Centre de Recherches Mathématiques (CRM), Department of Mathematics and Statistics, McGill University, 805 Sherbrooke W., Montreal, QC H3A 0B9 (Canada); Elimelech, Yossef [Faculty of Aerospace Engineering, Technion-Israel Institute of Technology, Haifa 32000 (Israel); Schneider, Kai, E-mail: dkolom@gmail.com [M2P2–CNRS, Université d' Aix-Marseille, 39, rue Frédéric Joliot-Curie, F-13453 Marseille Cedex 13 (France)

    2014-06-01

    This paper presents a numerical investigation of the leading-edge vortices generated by rotating triangular wings at Reynolds number Re = 250. A series of three-dimensional numerical simulations have been carried out using a Fourier pseudo-spectral method with volume penalization. The transition from stable attachment of the leading-edge vortex to periodic vortex shedding is explored, as a function of the wing aspect ratio and the angle of attack. It is found that, in a stable configuration, the spanwise flow in the recirculation bubble past the wing is due to the centrifugal force, incompressibility and viscous stresses. For the flow outside of the bubble, an inviscid model of spanwise flow is presented. (papers)

  2. Modeling light use efficiency in a subtropical mangrove forest equipped with CO2 eddy covariance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. G. Barr

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Despite the importance of mangrove ecosystems in the global carbon budget, the relationships between environmental drivers and carbon dynamics in these forests remain poorly understood. This limited understanding is partly a result of the challenges associated with in situ flux studies. Tower-based CO2 eddy covariance (EC systems are installed in only a few mangrove forests worldwide, and the longest EC record from the Florida Everglades contains less than 9 years of observations. A primary goal of the present study was to develop a methodology to estimate canopy-scale photosynthetic light use efficiency in this forest. These tower-based observations represent a basis for associating CO2 fluxes with canopy light use properties, and thus provide the means for utilizing satellite-based reflectance data for larger scale investigations. We present a model for mangrove canopy light use efficiency utilizing the enhanced green vegetation index (EVI derived from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS that is capable of predicting changes in mangrove forest CO2 fluxes caused by a hurricane disturbance and changes in regional environmental conditions, including temperature and salinity. Model parameters are solved for in a Bayesian framework. The model structure requires estimates of ecosystem respiration (RE, and we present the first ever tower-based estimates of mangrove forest RE derived from nighttime CO2 fluxes. Our investigation is also the first to show the effects of salinity on mangrove forest CO2 uptake, which declines 5% per each 10 parts per thousand (ppt increase in salinity. Light use efficiency in this forest declines with increasing daily photosynthetic active radiation, which is an important departure from the assumption of constant light use efficiency typically applied in satellite-driven models. The model developed here provides a framework for estimating CO2 uptake by these forests from reflectance data and

  3. Modeling light use efficiency in a subtropical mangrove forest equipped with CO2 eddy covariance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barr, J.G.; Engel, V.; Fuentes, J.D.; Fuller, D.O.; Kwon, H.

    2013-01-01

    Despite the importance of mangrove ecosystems in the global carbon budget, the relationships between environmental drivers and carbon dynamics in these forests remain poorly understood. This limited understanding is partly a result of the challenges associated with in situ flux studies. Tower-based CO2 eddy covariance (EC) systems are installed in only a few mangrove forests worldwide, and the longest EC record from the Florida Everglades contains less than 9 years of observations. A primary goal of the present study was to develop a methodology to estimate canopy-scale photosynthetic light use efficiency in this forest. These tower-based observations represent a basis for associating CO2 fluxes with canopy light use properties, and thus provide the means for utilizing satellite-based reflectance data for larger scale investigations. We present a model for mangrove canopy light use efficiency utilizing the enhanced green vegetation index (EVI) derived from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) that is capable of predicting changes in mangrove forest CO2 fluxes caused by a hurricane disturbance and changes in regional environmental conditions, including temperature and salinity. Model parameters are solved for in a Bayesian framework. The model structure requires estimates of ecosystem respiration (RE), and we present the first ever tower-based estimates of mangrove forest RE derived from nighttime CO2 fluxes. Our investigation is also the first to show the effects of salinity on mangrove forest CO2 uptake, which declines 5% per each 10 parts per thousand (ppt) increase in salinity. Light use efficiency in this forest declines with increasing daily photosynthetic active radiation, which is an important departure from the assumption of constant light use efficiency typically applied in satellite-driven models. The model developed here provides a framework for estimating CO2 uptake by these forests from reflectance data and information about

  4. Re-evaluation of model-based light-scattering spectroscopy for tissue spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lau, Condon; Šćepanović, Obrad; Mirkovic, Jelena; McGee, Sasha; Yu, Chung-Chieh; Fulghum, Stephen; Wallace, Michael; Tunnell, James; Bechtel, Kate; Feld, Michael

    2009-01-01

    Model-based light scattering spectroscopy (LSS) seemed a promising technique for in-vivo diagnosis of dysplasia in multiple organs. In the studies, the residual spectrum, the difference between the observed and modeled diffuse reflectance spectra, was attributed to single elastic light scattering from epithelial nuclei, and diagnostic information due to nuclear changes was extracted from it. We show that this picture is incorrect. The actual single scattering signal arising from epithelial nuclei is much smaller than the previously computed residual spectrum, and does not have the wavelength dependence characteristic of Mie scattering. Rather, the residual spectrum largely arises from assuming a uniform hemoglobin distribution. In fact, hemoglobin is packaged in blood vessels, which alters the reflectance. When we include vessel packaging, which accounts for an inhomogeneous hemoglobin distribution, in the diffuse reflectance model, the reflectance is modeled more accurately, greatly reducing the amplitude of the residual spectrum. These findings are verified via numerical estimates based on light propagation and Mie theory, tissue phantom experiments, and analysis of published data measured from Barrett’s esophagus. In future studies, vessel packaging should be included in the model of diffuse reflectance and use of model-based LSS should be discontinued. PMID:19405760

  5. Spatial extrapolation of light use efficiency model parameters to predict gross primary production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karsten Schulz

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available To capture the spatial and temporal variability of the gross primary production as a key component of the global carbon cycle, the light use efficiency modeling approach in combination with remote sensing data has shown to be well suited. Typically, the model parameters, such as the maximum light use efficiency, are either set to a universal constant or to land class dependent values stored in look-up tables. In this study, we employ the machine learning technique support vector regression to explicitly relate the model parameters of a light use efficiency model calibrated at several FLUXNET sites to site-specific characteristics obtained by meteorological measurements, ecological estimations and remote sensing data. A feature selection algorithm extracts the relevant site characteristics in a cross-validation, and leads to an individual set of characteristic attributes for each parameter. With this set of attributes, the model parameters can be estimated at sites where a parameter calibration is not possible due to the absence of eddy covariance flux measurement data. This will finally allow a spatially continuous model application. The performance of the spatial extrapolation scheme is evaluated with a cross-validation approach, which shows the methodology to be well suited to recapture the variability of gross primary production across the study sites.

  6. Observed light yield of scintillation pixels: Extending the two-ray model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kantorski, Igor; Jurkowski, Jacek; Drozdowski, Winicjusz

    2016-09-01

    In this paper we propose an extended, two dimensional model describing the propagation of scintillation photons inside a cuboid crystal until they reach a PMT window. In the simplest approach the model considers two main reasons for light losses: standard absorption obeying the classical Lambert-Beer law and non-ideal reflectivity of the "mummy" covering formed by several layers of Teflon tape wrapping the sample. Results of the model calculations are juxtaposed with experimental data as well as with predictions of an earlier, one dimensional model.

  7. {theta}-vacua in the light-front quantized Schwinger model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Srivastava, Prem P. [Universidade do Estado, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Inst. de Fisica]|[Centro Brasileiro de Pesquisas Fisicas (CBPF), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    1996-09-01

    The light-front quantization of the bosonized Schwinger model is discussed in the continuum formulation. The proposal, successfully used earlier for describing the spontaneous symmetry breaking on the light-front, of separating first the scalar field into the dynamical condensate and the fluctuation fields before employing the standard Dirac method works here as well. Some topics on the front form theory are summarized in the Appendices and attention is drawn to the fact that the theory quantized, at x{sup +} seems already to carry information on equal x{sup -} commutators as well. (author). 21 refs.

  8. Analytical design and performance studies of nuclear furnace tests of small nuclear light bulb models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latham, T. S.; Rodgers, R. J.

    1972-01-01

    Analytical studies were continued to identify the design and performance characteristics of a small-scale model of a nuclear light bulb unit cell suitable for testing in a nuclear furnace reactor. Emphasis was placed on calculating performance characteristics based on detailed radiant heat transfer analyses, on designing the test assembly for ease of insertion, connection, and withdrawal at the reactor test cell, and on determining instrumentation and test effluent handling requirements. In addition, a review of candidate test reactors for future nuclear light bulb in-reactor tests was conducted.

  9. Mathematical modelling of light-induced electric reaction of Cucurbita pepo L. leaves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Stolarek

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The bioelectRIc reactions of 14-16 day old plants of pumpkin (Cucurbita pepo L. and internodal cells of Nitellopsis obtusa to the action of visible and ultraviolet light (UV-C were studied. The possibility of analyzing the bioelectric reaction of pumpkin plants induced by visible light by means of mathematical modelling using a linear differential equation of the second order was considered. The solution of this equation (positive and negative functions can, in a sufficient way, reflect the participation of H+ and CI- ions in the generation of the photoelectric response in green plant cells.

  10. Analysis of LEP Constraints on Supersymmetric Models with a Light Gravitino

    CERN Document Server

    Ellis, John R.; Nanopoulos, Dimitri V.

    1997-01-01

    We propose an analysis of LEP constraints on radiative neutralino decays into a light gravitino, based on the plane of the Higgs mixing parameter mu and the SU(2) gaugino mass M_2. The preliminary LEP 2W constraints in the (mu, M_2) plane are considerably stronger than for supersymmetric models in which the lightest neutralino is stable. A significant portion of the parameter space in which chargino or selectron decay into a final state containing a light gravitino could provide an interpretation of the CDF ee gamma gamma + E_T,miss event can now excluded by the preliminary LEP 2W data.

  11. θ-vacua in the light-front quantized Schwinger model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Srivastava, Prem P.

    1996-09-01

    The light-front quantization of the bosonized Schwinger model is discussed in the continuum formulation. The proposal, successfully used earlier for describing the spontaneous symmetry breaking on the light-front, of separating first the scalar field into the dynamical condensate and the fluctuation fields before employing the standard Dirac method works here as well. Some topics on the front form theory are summarized in the Appendices and attention is drawn to the fact that the theory quantized, at x + seems already to carry information on equal x - commutators as well. (author). 21 refs

  12. Life-long shedding of Puumala hantavirus in wild bank voles (Myodes glareolus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voutilainen, Liina; Sironen, Tarja; Tonteri, Elina; Bäck, Anne Tuiskunen; Razzauti, Maria; Karlsson, Malin; Wahlström, Maria; Niemimaa, Jukka; Henttonen, Heikki; Lundkvist, Åke

    2015-06-01

    The knowledge of viral shedding patterns and viraemia in the reservoir host species is a key factor in assessing the human risk of zoonotic viruses. The shedding of hantaviruses (family Bunyaviridae) by their host rodents has widely been studied experimentally, but rarely in natural settings. Here we present the dynamics of Puumala hantavirus (PUUV) shedding and viraemia in naturally infected wild bank voles (Myodes glareolus). In a monthly capture-mark-recapture study, we analysed 18 bank voles for the presence and relative quantity of PUUV RNA in the excreta and blood from 2 months before up to 8 months after seroconversion. The proportion of animals shedding PUUV RNA in saliva, urine and faeces peaked during the first month after seroconversion, but continued throughout the study period with only a slight decline. The quantity of shed PUUV in reverse transcription quantitative PCR (RT-qPCR) positive excreta was constant over time. In blood, PUUV RNA was present for up to 7 months but both the probability of viraemia and the virus load declined with time. Our findings contradict the current view of a decline in virus shedding after the acute phase and a short viraemic period in hantavirus infection - an assumption widely adopted in current epidemiological models. We suggest the life-long shedding as a means of hantaviruses to survive over host population bottlenecks, and to disperse in fragmented habitats where local host and/or virus populations face temporary extinctions. Our results indicate that the kinetics of pathogens in wild hosts may differ considerably from those observed in laboratory settings. © 2015 The Authors.

  13. Solar lanterns for domestic lighting in India: Viability of central charging station model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chaurey, A.; Kandpal, T.C.

    2009-01-01

    About 68 million households in India rely on kerosene as a fuel for domestic lighting. Kerosene-based lighting devices, not only for poor quality of light, but also for the risks of indoor air pollution and fire hazards, etc. are not a desired option for domestic lighting purposes. Solar lantern is a better alternative in terms of its quality of illumination, durability and versatility of use. The dissemination model for solar lantern in India has so far been based on cash sales with or without the incentive of capital subsidy. This paper analyses several dissemination models including rental and fee-for-service based on centralized solar charging station concept for CFL- and LED-based designs of solar lanterns available in India. The basis of comparison is the acceptable daily costs or rental to the user as well as to the owner of the charging station. Further, the paper studies the impact of likely escalation in kerosene price on the acceptable daily rental and estimates the amount of subsidy required to make the charging station model viable for disseminating solar lanterns among rural households.

  14. Modeling light entangled in polarization and frequency: case study in quantum cryptography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myers, John M.

    2005-08-01

    With the recognition of a logical gap between experiments and equations of quantum mechanics comes: (1) a chance to clarify such purely mathematical entities as probabilities, density operators, and partial traces-separated out from the choices and judgments necessary to apply them to describing experiments with devices, and (2) an added freedom to invent equations by which to model devices, stemming from the corresponding freedom in interpreting how these equations connect to experiments. Here I apply a few of these clarifications and freedoms to model polarization-entangled light pulses called for in quantum key distribution (QKD). Available light pulses are entangled not only in polarization but also in frequency. Although absent from the simplified models that initiated QKD, the degree of frequency entanglement of polarization-entangled light pulses is shown to affect the amount of key that can be distilled from raw light signals, in one case by a factor of 4/3. Open questions remain, because QKD brings concepts of quantum decision theory, such as measures of distinguishability, mostly worked out in the context of finite-dimensional vector spaces, into contact with infinite-dimensional Hilbert spaces needed to give expression to optical frequency spectra.

  15. Two electric field Monte Carlo models of coherent backscattering of polarized light.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doronin, Alexander; Radosevich, Andrew J; Backman, Vadim; Meglinski, Igor

    2014-11-01

    Modeling of coherent polarized light propagation in turbid scattering medium by the Monte Carlo method provides an ultimate understanding of coherent effects of multiple scattering, such as enhancement of coherent backscattering and peculiarities of laser speckle formation in dynamic light scattering (DLS) and optical coherence tomography (OCT) diagnostic modalities. In this report, we consider two major ways of modeling the coherent polarized light propagation in scattering tissue-like turbid media. The first approach is based on tracking transformations of the electric field along the ray propagation. The second one is developed in analogy to the iterative procedure of the solution of the Bethe-Salpeter equation. To achieve a higher accuracy in the results and to speed up the modeling, both codes utilize the implementation of parallel computing on NVIDIA Graphics Processing Units (GPUs) with Compute Unified Device Architecture (CUDA). We compare these two approaches through simulations of the enhancement of coherent backscattering of polarized light and evaluate the accuracy of each technique with the results of a known analytical solution. The advantages and disadvantages of each computational approach and their further developments are discussed. Both codes are available online and are ready for immediate use or download.

  16. Hydrogen Bubbles as a Visualization Tool for Cylinder Shedding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sigurdson, Lorenz; Gilbert, Stuart

    2004-11-01

    We examine the behavior of hydrogen bubbles formed by electrolysis of water on a 2.54 mm cylindrical electrode in a water tunnel. The Reynolds Number based on cylinder diameter varies from 400 to 1100, and tunnel velocities range from 17 to 50 cm/s. At the lowest velocity buoyancy is a strong effect which inhibits accurate flow tracking by the bubbles. This effect largely disappears by 25 cm/s. As the tunnel velocity increases, bubble size decreases, reflected light for photography is reduced, and bubbles begin to track the von Karman vortex street vortex cores near the cylinder. The vortex cores have a sufficiently low pressure to capture the bubbles. Vortex street wavelength is seen to discretely increase as vortices proceed downstream. The location of this scale-change becomes nearer the cylinder as Re increases. Voids of bubbles occur in continuous linear downstream segments originating near the cylinder. They seem to be due to vortex modification in the wake similar to what other cylinder shedding researchers have found.

  17. Light-induced depigmentation in planarians models the pathophysiology of acute porphyrias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stubenhaus, Bradford M; Dustin, John P; Neverett, Emily R; Beaudry, Megan S; Nadeau, Leanna E; Burk-McCoy, Ethan; He, Xinwen; Pearson, Bret J; Pellettieri, Jason

    2016-05-31

    Porphyrias are disorders of heme metabolism frequently characterized by extreme photosensitivity. This symptom results from accumulation of porphyrins, tetrapyrrole intermediates in heme biosynthesis that generate reactive oxygen species when exposed to light, in the skin of affected individuals. Here we report that in addition to producing an ommochrome body pigment, the planarian flatworm Schmidtea mediterranea generates porphyrins in its subepithelial pigment cells under physiological conditions, and that this leads to pigment cell loss when animals are exposed to intense visible light. Remarkably, porphyrin biosynthesis and light-induced depigmentation are enhanced by starvation, recapitulating a common feature of some porphyrias - decreased nutrient intake precipitates an acute manifestation of the disease. Our results establish planarians as an experimentally tractable animal model for research into the pathophysiology of acute porphyrias, and potentially for the identification of novel pharmacological interventions capable of alleviating porphyrin-mediated photosensitivity or decoupling dieting and fasting from disease pathogenesis.

  18. Research on the Collinear Equation Model of Visual Positioning Based on Visible Light Communication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Yuqi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A positioning method based on visible light communication is proposed, which receiving visible light information by low-resolution photodiode array and receiving visual information by the front camera of mobile phone. The terminal position is determined by matching spot information provided by photodiode array with visual information and position information provided by visible light communication. A collinear equation model is derived which based on mobile phone front camera. A hardware-in-loop simulation has been conducted to verify the collinear equation. The three-dimensional positioning error is on the level of decimeter. Moreover, the main factors which affect the positioning accuracy are analyzed in order to further improve the positioning accuracy.

  19. Reactivation of latent herpes simplex virus infection by ultraviolet light: a human model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perna, J.J.; Mannix, M.L.; Rooney, J.F.; Notkins, A.L.; Straus, S.E.

    1987-01-01

    Infection with herpes simplex virus often results in a latent infection of local sensory ganglia and a disease characterized by periodic viral reactivation and mucocutaneous lesions. The factors that trigger reactivation in humans are still poorly defined. In our study, five patients with documented histories of recurrent herpes simplex virus infection on the buttocks or sacrum were exposed to three times their minimal erythema dose of ultraviolet light. Site-specific cutaneous herpes simplex virus infection occurred at 4.4 +/- 0.4 days after exposure to ultraviolet light in 8 of 13 attempts at reactivation. We conclude that ultraviolet light can reactivate herpes simplex virus under experimentally defined conditions. This model in humans should prove useful in evaluating the pathophysiology and prevention of viral reactivation

  20. An analytical model of nonproportional scintillator light yield in terms of recombination rates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bizarri, G.; Moses, W. W.; Singh, J.; Vasil'ev, A. N.; Williams, R. T.

    2009-01-01

    Analytical expressions for the local light yield as a function of the local deposited energy (-dE/dx) and total scintillation yield integrated over the track of an electron of initial energy E are derived from radiative and/or nonradiative rates of first through third order in density of electronic excitations. The model is formulated in terms of rate constants, some of which can be determined independently from time-resolved spectroscopy and others estimated from measured light yield efficiency as a constraint assumed to apply in each kinetic order. The rates and parameters are used in the theory to calculate scintillation yield versus primary electron energy for comparison to published experimental results on four scintillators. Influence of the track radius on the yield is also discussed. Results are found to be qualitatively consistent with the observed scintillation light yield. The theory can be applied to any scintillator if the rates of the radiative and nonradiative processes are known

  1. Sustainable Street Lighting Design Supported by Hypergraph-Based Computational Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam Sȩdziwy

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Street lighting systems are significant energy consumers in urban environments. The important step toward the reduction of this energy consumption and, thus, finding a balance between functional requirements and savings-related demands, was introducing LED-based light sources. There still exists, however, a margin for further savings, which is associated with well-tailored designs of road lighting installations. The critical impediment that has to be overcame beforehand is the computational complexity related to preparing such a well-suited design. To make this approach feasible, we propose using the formal graph-based model, enabling efficient heuristic computations. In this article, we demonstrate several real-life cases showing a coarse estimation of potential savings in terms of reduced CO2 emission. The presented results are expressed in kWh of saved energy, metric tones of CO2 , but also as a volume of combusted fuels, to make the assessment more tangible.

  2. Quasi-Monte Carlo methods: applications to modeling of light transport in tissue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schafer, Steven A.

    1996-05-01

    Monte Carlo modeling of light propagation can accurately predict the distribution of light in scattering materials. A drawback of Monte Carlo methods is that they converge inversely with the square root of the number of iterations. Theoretical considerations suggest that convergence which scales inversely with the first power of the number of iterations is possible. We have previously shown that one can obtain at least a portion of that improvement by using van der Corput sequences in place of a conventional pseudo-random number generator. Here, we present our further analysis, and show that quasi-Monte Carlo methods do have limited applicability to light scattering problems. We also discuss potential improvements which may increase the applicability.

  3. LED Lighting System Reliability Modeling and Inference via Random Effects Gamma Process and Copula Function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huibing Hao

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Light emitting diode (LED lamp has attracted increasing interest in the field of lighting systems due to its low energy and long lifetime. For different functions (i.e., illumination and color, it may have two or more performance characteristics. When the multiple performance characteristics are dependent, it creates a challenging problem to accurately analyze the system reliability. In this paper, we assume that the system has two performance characteristics, and each performance characteristic is governed by a random effects Gamma process where the random effects can capture the unit to unit differences. The dependency of performance characteristics is described by a Frank copula function. Via the copula function, the reliability assessment model is proposed. Considering the model is so complicated and analytically intractable, the Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC method is used to estimate the unknown parameters. A numerical example about actual LED lamps data is given to demonstrate the usefulness and validity of the proposed model and method.

  4. Radicals excess in the retina: A model for light flashes in space

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Narici, L.; De Martino, A.; Brunetti, V.; Rinaldi, A.; Sannita, W.G.; Paci, M.

    2009-01-01

    The risk due to cosmic radiation is a major issue in planning future missions to the Moon or Mars and would be critical if inadequately addressed. Functional risks must also be considered. The perception of light flashes reported by astronauts in space, and ascribed mostly to the action of ionizing radiation in the eye (retina), is an evidence for radiation functional interaction. No detailed model of the ion/retina interaction is yet available. Here we present the first model for a generation mechanism compatible with light flashes in space, and the results of in vitro tests supporting it. The model can be a common end point for the interactions between ionizing radiation and visual system in space. It would also support the assessment of functional radiation risks in space.

  5. Design of a Stand-Alone Photovoltaic Model for Home Lightings and Clean Environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ani, Vincent Anayochukwu

    2016-01-01

    This paper gives a well-documented health risk of fuel-based lighting (kerosene lamps and fuel-powered generators) and proposed a design of a stand-alone solar PV system for sustainable home lightings in rural Nigerian area. The design was done in three different patterns of electricity consumptions with energy efficient lightings (EELs) using two different battery types (Rolls Surrette 6CS25PS and Hoppecke 10 OpzS 1000) on; (i) judicious power consumption, (ii) normal power consumption, and (iii) excess power consumption; and compared them with the incandescent light bulb consumption. The stand-alone photovoltaic energy systems were designed to match the rural Nigerian sunlight and weather conditions to meet the required lightings of the household. The objective function and constraints for the design models were formulated and optimization procedures were used to demonstrate the best solution (reliability at the lowest lifecycle cost). Initial capital costs as well as annualized costs over 5, 10, 15, 20, and 25 years were quantified and documented. The design identified the most cost-effective and reliable solar and battery array among the patterns of electricity consumption with EEL options (judicious power consumption, normal power consumption, and excess power consumption).

  6. Furcocercous cercariae shed by the freshwater snails Pila ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    During July 2009 and 2010 surveys of snail-borne larval trematodes of the Okavango Delta floodplains and lagoons were undertaken. Cercaria mohemboense were shed by Pila occidentalis (Mousson, 1887) and Cercaria dubaensis and Cercaria indistinctus were shed by Biomphalaria pfeifferi (Krauss, 1848), respectively.

  7. Light pollution: measuring and modelling skyglow. An application in two Portuguese reserves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lima, Raul Cerveira Pinto Sousa

    Outdoors human-made lighting at night causes sky glow, one of the effects of light pollution. Sky glow is rising with the growth of world population. Urban inhabitants are increasingly deprived from a starry sky. However, since light propagates to regions far from where it is produced, light pollution spreads to places where few or none artificial light at night existed, disturbing the quality of the night sky. In this work we assess for the first time the sky brightness of two regions in Portugal, the Peneda-Geres National Park, and the recently created Starlight Reserve Dark Sky® Alqueva. We used a portable unit, a Unihedron Sky Quality Meter-L (SQM-L), to measure the luminance of the night sky. We also tested the SQM-L in a laboratory to a more thorough analysis of the device, and to check the effect of polarization on the unit, suggested by our observations and other users. Our results suggest that the SQM-L is not affected by any measurable effect of polarization, but some guidelines to use the SQM-L in the field are provided based on our work. The data from the field measurement was used to compare to one light pollution propagation model (Kocifaj, 2007), using VIIRS DNB satellite upwards radiance as input to the model. The results obtained from the model are favourably compared to the field measurements. We proceeded to a set of tests with the model to find the best fit. Our best results were achieved by analysing the data by night rather than the global set of data. Our first results were used to apply to the classification of the region of Alqueva to a Starlight Tourism Destination. That classification was attained during the course of this work (December 2011). A guideline on the Peneda-Geres National Park was also implemented after our first results were provided. We believe we have achieved a set of results in a set of parallel issues all related to light pollution that we hope may contribute to the current knowledge on this area of research.

  8. Dispersion of light and heavy pollutants in urban scale models: CO(2) laser photoacoustic studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zelinger, Z; Strizík, M; Kubát, P; Civis, S; Grigorová, E; Janecková, R; Zavila, O; Nevrlý, V; Herecová, L; Bailleux, S; Horká, V; Ferus, M; Skrínský, J; Kozubková, M; Drábková, S; Janour, Z

    2009-04-01

    The distribution of pollutants in two urban scale models (point emission source and street canyon with extensive transport) was investigated by means of CO(2) laser photoacoustic spectroscopy in the region of the atmospheric window (9-10 mum). The experimental results of physical modeling are in a good agreement with the numerical calculations performed in the frame of computational fluid dynamic (CFD) modeling. Methanol, ethanol, and ozone (examples of light pollutants), as well as sulfur hexafluoride and 1,2 dichlorethane (examples of heavy pollutants), were selected on the basis of their high resolution spectra acquired by Fourier transform and laser diode spectroscopy.

  9. Multiagent-Based Distributed Load Shedding for Islanded Microgrids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xi Wu

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper addresses a multiagent-based distributed load shedding scheme to restore frequency for the microgrids during islanded operation. The objective of the proposed scheme is to realize a distributed load shedding considering its associated cost and the capacity of the flexible loads. There are two advantages of the proposed scheme: (1 it is a distributed scheme using average-consensus theorem, which can discover the global information when only communications between immediate neighboring agents are used, moreover it can meet the requirements of plug-and-play operations more easily than a centralized scheme; (2 it is a new adaptive load shedding through the comprehensive weights which take into accounts the cost of load shedding and the capacity of flexible loads, these comprehensive weights are evaluated locally by making use of the adaptability and intelligence characteristics of agents. Simulation results in power systems computer aided design (PSCAD illustrate the validity and adaptability of the proposed load shedding scheme.

  10. Electromagnetic properties of light and heavy baryons in the relativistic quark model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nicmorus Marinescu, Diana

    2007-06-14

    One of the main challenges of nowadays low-energy physics remains the description of the internal structure of hadrons, strongly connected to the electromagnetic properties of matter. In this vein, the success of the relativistic quark model in the analysis of the hadron structure constitutes a solid motivation for the study carried out throughout this work. The relativistic quark model is extended to the investigation of static electromagnetic properties of both heavy and light baryons. The bare contributions to the magnetic moments of the single-, double- and triple-heavy baryons are calculated. Moreover, the relativistic quark model allows the study of the electromagnetic properties of the light baryon octet incorporating meson cloud contributions in a perturbative manner. The long disputed values of the multipole ratios E2/M1 and C2/M1 and the electromagnetic form factors of the N{yields}{delta}{gamma} transition are successfully reproduced. The relativistic quark model can be viewed as a quantum field theory approach based on a phenomenological Lagrangian coupling light and heavy baryons to their constituent quarks. In our approach the baryon is a composite object of three constituent quarks, at least in leading order. The effective interaction Lagrangian is written in terms of baryon and constituent quark fields. The effective action preserves Lorentz covariance and gauge invariance. The main ingredients of the model are already introduced at the level of the interaction Lagrangian: the three-quark baryon currents, the Gaussian distribution of the constituent quarks inside the baryon and the compositeness condition which sets an upper limit for the baryon-quark vertex. The S-matrix elements are expressed by a set of Feynman quark-diagrams. The model contains only few parameters, namely, the cut-off parameter of the Gaussian quark distribution and the free quark propagator, which are unambiguously determined from the best fit to the data. The heavy quark limit

  11. Electromagnetic properties of light and heavy baryons in the relativistic quark model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nicmorus Marinescu, Diana

    2007-01-01

    One of the main challenges of nowadays low-energy physics remains the description of the internal structure of hadrons, strongly connected to the electromagnetic properties of matter. In this vein, the success of the relativistic quark model in the analysis of the hadron structure constitutes a solid motivation for the study carried out throughout this work. The relativistic quark model is extended to the investigation of static electromagnetic properties of both heavy and light baryons. The bare contributions to the magnetic moments of the single-, double- and triple-heavy baryons are calculated. Moreover, the relativistic quark model allows the study of the electromagnetic properties of the light baryon octet incorporating meson cloud contributions in a perturbative manner. The long disputed values of the multipole ratios E2/M1 and C2/M1 and the electromagnetic form factors of the N→Δγ transition are successfully reproduced. The relativistic quark model can be viewed as a quantum field theory approach based on a phenomenological Lagrangian coupling light and heavy baryons to their constituent quarks. In our approach the baryon is a composite object of three constituent quarks, at least in leading order. The effective interaction Lagrangian is written in terms of baryon and constituent quark fields. The effective action preserves Lorentz covariance and gauge invariance. The main ingredients of the model are already introduced at the level of the interaction Lagrangian: the three-quark baryon currents, the Gaussian distribution of the constituent quarks inside the baryon and the compositeness condition which sets an upper limit for the baryon-quark vertex. The S-matrix elements are expressed by a set of Feynman quark-diagrams. The model contains only few parameters, namely, the cut-off parameter of the Gaussian quark distribution and the free quark propagator, which are unambiguously determined from the best fit to the data. The heavy quark limit within this

  12. 76 FR 76932 - Public Hearings for 2017 and Later Model Year Light-Duty Vehicle Greenhouse Gas Emissions and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-09

    .../otaq/climate/regulations.htm or by searching the public dockets (NHTSA-2010-0131 (for the proposed rule... emissions from and improve fuel economy for light-duty vehicles for model years 2017-2025. The proposal... Program to reduce greenhouse gas emissions of light-duty vehicles for model years 2017-2025. The proposal...

  13. Modeling the drain current and its equation parameters for lightly doped symmetrical double-gate MOSFETs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhartia, Mini; Chatterjee, Arun Kumar

    2015-01-01

    A 2D model for the potential distribution in silicon film is derived for a symmetrical double gate MOSFET in weak inversion. This 2D potential distribution model is used to analytically derive an expression for the subthreshold slope and threshold voltage. A drain current model for lightly doped symmetrical DG MOSFETs is then presented by considering weak and strong inversion regions including short channel effects, series source to drain resistance and channel length modulation parameters. These derived models are compared with the simulation results of the SILVACO (Atlas) tool for different channel lengths and silicon film thicknesses. Lastly, the effect of the fixed oxide charge on the drain current model has been studied through simulation. It is observed that the obtained analytical models of symmetrical double gate MOSFETs are in good agreement with the simulated results for a channel length to silicon film thickness ratio greater than or equal to 2. (paper)

  14. Modeling the drain current and its equation parameters for lightly doped symmetrical double-gate MOSFETs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhartia, Mini; Chatterjee, Arun Kumar

    2015-04-01

    A 2D model for the potential distribution in silicon film is derived for a symmetrical double gate MOSFET in weak inversion. This 2D potential distribution model is used to analytically derive an expression for the subthreshold slope and threshold voltage. A drain current model for lightly doped symmetrical DG MOSFETs is then presented by considering weak and strong inversion regions including short channel effects, series source to drain resistance and channel length modulation parameters. These derived models are compared with the simulation results of the SILVACO (Atlas) tool for different channel lengths and silicon film thicknesses. Lastly, the effect of the fixed oxide charge on the drain current model has been studied through simulation. It is observed that the obtained analytical models of symmetrical double gate MOSFETs are in good agreement with the simulated results for a channel length to silicon film thickness ratio greater than or equal to 2.

  15. Study of system dynamics model and control of a high-power LED lighting luminaire

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang, B.-J.; Hsu, P.-C.; Wu, M.-S.; Tang, C.-W.

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of the present study is to design a current control system which is robust to the system dynamics uncertainty and the disturbance of ambient temperature to assure a stable optical output property of LED. The system dynamics model of the LED lighting system was first derived. A 96 W high-power LED luminaire was designed and built in the present study. The linearly perturbed system dynamics model for the LED luminaire is derived experimentally. The dynamics model of LED lighting system is of a multiple-input-multiple-output (MIMO) system with two inputs (applied voltage and ambient temperature) and two outputs (forward current and heat conducting body temperature). A step response test method was employed to the 96 W LED luminaire to identify the system dynamics model. It is found that the current model is just a constant gain (resistance) and the disturbance model is of first order, both changing with operating conditions (voltage and ambient temperature). A feedback control system using PI algorithm was designed using the results of the system dynamics model. The control system was implemented on a PIC microprocessor. Experimental results show that the control system can stably and accurately control the LED current to a constant value at the variation of ambient temperature up to 40 o C. The control system is shown to have a robust property with respect to the plant uncertainty and the ambient temperature disturbance

  16. A customized light sheet microscope to measure spatio-temporal protein dynamics in small model organisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rieckher, Matthias; Kyparissidis-Kokkinidis, Ilias; Zacharopoulos, Athanasios; Kourmoulakis, Georgios; Tavernarakis, Nektarios; Ripoll, Jorge; Zacharakis, Giannis

    2015-01-01

    We describe a customizable and cost-effective light sheet microscopy (LSM) platform for rapid three-dimensional imaging of protein dynamics in small model organisms. The system is designed for high acquisition speeds and enables extended time-lapse in vivo experiments when using fluorescently labeled specimens. We demonstrate the capability of the setup to monitor gene expression and protein localization during ageing and upon starvation stress in longitudinal studies in individual or small groups of adult Caenorhabditis elegans nematodes. The system is equipped to readily perform fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP), which allows monitoring protein recovery and distribution under low photobleaching conditions. Our imaging platform is designed to easily switch between light sheet microscopy and optical projection tomography (OPT) modalities. The setup permits monitoring of spatio-temporal expression and localization of ageing biomarkers of subcellular size and can be conveniently adapted to image a wide range of small model organisms and tissue samples.

  17. A semi-analytical model of biological effectiveness for treatment planning in light ion radiotherapy

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kundrát, Pavel

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 34, č. 6 (2007), s. 2654-2654 ISSN 0094-2405. [AAPM Annual Meeting. Minneapolis, 22.07.2007-26.07.2007] R&D Projects: GA ČR GA202/05/2728 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100502 Keywords : treatment planning * light-ion therapy * radiobiological models Subject RIV: BF - Elementary Particles and High Energy Physics Impact factor: 3.198, year: 2007

  18. Postscript: Making Important Distinctions--Diagnostic Models, Theoretical Models, and the Mnemonic Model of PTSD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monroe, Scott M.; Mineka, Susan

    2008-01-01

    Our commentary was intended to stimulate discussion about what we perceive to be shortcomings of the mnemonic model and its research base, in the hope of shedding some light on key questions for understanding posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). In our view, Berntsen, Rubin, and Bohni have responded only to what they perceive to be shortcomings…

  19. Transmission line equivalent circuit model applied to a plasmonic grating nanosurface for light trapping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polemi, Alessia; Shuford, Kevin L

    2012-01-02

    In this paper, we show how light absorption in a plasmonic grating nanosurface can be calculated by means of a simple, analytical model based on a transmission line equivalent circuit. The nanosurface is a one-dimensional grating etched into a silver metal film covered by a silicon slab. The transmission line model is specified for both transverse electric and transverse magnetic polarizations of the incident light, and it incorporates the effect of the plasmonic modes diffracted by the ridges of the grating. Under the assumption that the adjacent ridges are weakly interacting in terms of diffracted waves, we show that the approximate, closed form expression for the reflection coefficient at the air-silicon interface can be used to evaluate light absorption of the solar cell. The weak-coupling assumption is valid if the grating structure is not closely packed and the excitation direction is close to normal incidence. Also, we show the utility of the circuit theory for understanding how the peaks in the absorption coefficient are related to the resonances of the equivalent transmission model and how this can help in designing more efficient structures.

  20. Modelling the light absorption coefficients of oceanic waters: Implications for underwater optical applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prabhakaran, Sai Shri; Sahu, Sanjay Kumar; Dev, Pravin Jeba; Shanmugam, Palanisamy

    2018-05-01

    Spectral absorption coefficients of particulate (algal and non-algal components) and dissolved substances are modelled and combined with the pure seawater component to determine the total light absorption coefficients of seawater in the Bay of Bengal. Two parameters namely chlorophyll-a (Chl) concentration and turbidity were measured using commercially available instruments with high sampling rates. For modelling the light absorption coefficients of oceanic waters, the measured data are classified into two broad groups - algal dominant and non-algal particle (NAP) dominant. With these criteria the individual absorption coefficients of phytoplankton and NAP were established based on their concentrations using an iterative method. To account for the spectral dependence of absorption by phytoplankton, the wavelength-dependent coefficients were introduced into the model. The CDOM absorption was determined by subtracting the individual absorption coefficients of phytoplankton and NAP from the measured total absorption data and then related to the Chl concentration. Validity of the model is assessed based on independent in-situ data from certain discrete locations in the Bay of Bengal. The total absorption coefficients estimated using the new model by considering the contributions of algal, non-algal and CDOM have good agreement with the measured total absorption data with the error range of 6.9 to 28.3%. Results obtained by the present model are important for predicting the propagation of the radiant energy within the ocean and interpreting remote sensing observation data.

  1. Cosmological Parameter Uncertainties from SALT-II Type Ia Supernova Light Curve Models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mosher, J. [Pennsylvania U.; Guy, J. [LBL, Berkeley; Kessler, R. [Chicago U., KICP; Astier, P. [Paris U., VI-VII; Marriner, J. [Fermilab; Betoule, M. [Paris U., VI-VII; Sako, M. [Pennsylvania U.; El-Hage, P. [Paris U., VI-VII; Biswas, R. [Argonne; Pain, R. [Paris U., VI-VII; Kuhlmann, S. [Argonne; Regnault, N. [Paris U., VI-VII; Frieman, J. A. [Fermilab; Schneider, D. P. [Penn State U.

    2014-08-29

    We use simulated type Ia supernova (SN Ia) samples, including both photometry and spectra, to perform the first direct validation of cosmology analysis using the SALT-II light curve model. This validation includes residuals from the light curve training process, systematic biases in SN Ia distance measurements, and a bias on the dark energy equation of state parameter w. Using the SN-analysis package SNANA, we simulate and analyze realistic samples corresponding to the data samples used in the SNLS3 analysis: ~120 low-redshift (z < 0.1) SNe Ia, ~255 Sloan Digital Sky Survey SNe Ia (z < 0.4), and ~290 SNLS SNe Ia (z ≤ 1). To probe systematic uncertainties in detail, we vary the input spectral model, the model of intrinsic scatter, and the smoothing (i.e., regularization) parameters used during the SALT-II model training. Using realistic intrinsic scatter models results in a slight bias in the ultraviolet portion of the trained SALT-II model, and w biases (w (input) – w (recovered)) ranging from –0.005 ± 0.012 to –0.024 ± 0.010. These biases are indistinguishable from each other within the uncertainty, the average bias on w is –0.014 ± 0.007.

  2. Large-Eddy Simulation of turbulent vortex shedding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Archambeau, F.

    1995-06-01

    This thesis documents the development and application of a computational algorithm for Large-Eddy Simulation. Unusually, the method adopts a fully collocated variable storage arrangement and is applicable to complex, non-rectilinear geometries. A Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes algorithm has formed the starting point of the development, but has been modified substantially: the spatial approximation of convection is effected by an energy-conserving central-differencing scheme; a second-order time-marching Adams-Bashforth scheme has been introduced; the pressure field is determined by solving the pressure-Poisson equation; this equation is solved either by use of preconditioned Conjugate-Gradient methods or with the Generalised Minimum Residual method; two types of sub-grid scale models have been introduced and examined. The algorithm has been validated by reference to a hierarchy of unsteady flows of increasing complexity starting with unsteady lid-driven cavity flows and ending with 3-D turbulent vortex shedding behind a square prism. In the latter case, for which extensive experimental data are available, special emphasis has been put on examining the dependence of the results on mesh density, near-wall treatment and the nature of the sub-grid-scale model, one of which is an advanced dynamic model. The LES scheme is shown to return time-average and phase-averaged results which agree well with experimental data and which support the view that LES is a promising approach for unsteady flows dominated by large periodic structures. (author)

  3. Modeling the electrochemistry of the primary circuits of light water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bertuch, A.; Macdonald, D.D.; Pang, J.; Kriksunov, L.; Arioka, K.

    1994-01-01

    To model the corrosion behaviors of the heat transport circuits of light water reactors, a mixed potential model (NTM) has been developed and applied to both boiling water reactors (BWRs) and pressurized water reactors (PWRs). Using the data generated by the GE/UKEA-Harwell radiolysis model, electrochemical potentials (ECPs) have been calculated for the heat transport circuits of eight BWRs operating under hydrogen water chemistry (HWC). By modeling the corrosion behaviors of these reactors, the effectiveness of HWC at limiting IGSCC and IASCC can be determined. For simulating PWR primary circuits, a chemical-radiolysis model (developed by the authors) was used to generate input parameters for the MPM. Corrosion potentials of Type 304 and 316 SSs in PWR primary environments were calculated using the NTM and were found to be in good agreement with the corrosion potentials measured in the laboratory for simulated PWR primary environments

  4. Comparison of Color Model in Cotton Image Under Conditions of Natural Light

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, J. H.; Kong, F. T.; Wu, J. Z.; Wang, S. W.; Liu, J. J.; Zhao, P.

    Although the color images contain a large amount of information reflecting the species characteristics, different color models also get different information. The selection of color models is the key to separating crops from background effectively and rapidly. Taking the cotton images collected under natural light as the object, we convert the color components of RGB color model, HSL color model and YIQ color model respectively. Then, we use subjective evaluation and objective evaluation methods, evaluating the 9 color components of conversion. It is concluded that the Q component of the soil, straw and plastic film region gray values remain the same without larger fluctuation when using subjective evaluation method. In the objective evaluation, we use the variance method, average gradient method, gray prediction objective evaluation error statistics method and information entropy method respectively to find the minimum numerical of Q color component suitable for background segmentation.

  5. Modelling and Simulation of SVPWM Based Vector Controlled HVDC Light Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ajay Kumar MOODADLA

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Recent upgrades in power electronics technology have lead to the improvements of insulated gate bipolar transistor (IGBT based Voltage source converter High voltage direct current (VSC HVDC transmission systems. These are also commercially known as HVDC Light systems, which are popular in renewable, micro grid, and electric power systems. Out of different pulse width modulation (PWM schemes, Space vector PWM (SVPWM control scheme finds growing importance in power system applications because of its better dc bus utilization. In this paper, modelling of the converter is described, and SVPWM scheme is utilized to control the HVDC Light system in order to achieve better DC bus utilization, harmonic reduction, and for reduced power fluctuations. The simulations are carried out in the MATLAB/SIMULINK environment and the results are provided for steady state and dynamic conditions. Finally, the performance of SVPWM based vector controlled HVDC Light transmission system is compared with sinusoidal pulse width modulation (SPWM based HVDC Light system in terms of output voltage and total harmonic distortion (THD.

  6. Modeling and Analysis of Entropy Generation in Light Heating of Nanoscaled Silicon and Germanium Thin Films

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Ernesto Nájera-Carpio

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available In this work, the irreversible processes in light heating of Silicon (Si and Germanium (Ge thin films are examined. Each film is exposed to light irradiation with radiative and convective boundary conditions. Heat, electron and hole transport and generation-recombination processes of electron-hole pairs are studied in terms of a phenomenological model obtained from basic principles of irreversible thermodynamics. We present an analysis of the contributions to the entropy production in the stationary state due to the dissipative effects associated with electron and hole transport, generation-recombination of electron-hole pairs as well as heat transport. The most significant contribution to the entropy production comes from the interaction of light with the medium in both Si and Ge. This interaction includes two processes, namely, the generation of electron-hole pairs and the transferring of energy from the absorbed light to the lattice. In Si the following contribution in magnitude comes from the heat transport. In Ge all the remaining contributions to entropy production have nearly the same order of magnitude. The results are compared and explained addressing the differences in the magnitude of the thermodynamic forces, Onsager’s coefficients and transport properties of Si and Ge.

  7. Modeling the interaction of light intensity, nutrient concentration and uranium toxicity in Lemna minor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zimmer, E.; Horemans, N.; Vandenhove, H. [Belgian Nuclear Research Centre SCK-CEN (Belgium); Cedergreen, N. [University of Copenhagen (Denmark); Jager, T. [Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2014-07-01

    Radioecology aims at assessing the effect of radionuclides and radiation on the environment. Since we cannot test every possible environmental situation in the laboratory, we need modeling approaches to extrapolate the results of toxicity assays to environmentally relevant scenarios. Therefore, it is of crucial importance to understand the effect of relevant environmental factors, such as nutrients, temperature and light on the toxicity of the test. Radionuclides are often found to induce the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS). In plants, an overload of ROS can lead to disturbances of the photosynthetic system. Since the light intensity determines the efficiency of the photo-systems in plants, it can be expected to interact with the effect of radionuclides. The nutrient concentration of the test medium determines the physiological state of the plant, affecting in turn the plant's capability of dealing with stress and hence influences the toxicity of the contaminant. To study the interaction of stressors with environmental conditions, mechanistic effect modeling is promoted widely in ecotoxicology. In principle, the modelling aims at a mechanistic understanding of the different processes causing the stress individually, and integrating them in one framework to study their joint effect and possible interaction. We here present a mechanistic effect model for Lemna minor (common duckweed), which is based on Dynamic Energy Budget (DEB) theory. Models based on DEB have been used widely to study the effects of compounds on animals. Due to its general applicability to all types of organisms, it holds potential to be used for comparison of species and compounds in a broad context. Energy uptake from the environment is modeled explicitly, and metabolic rates are set to depend on temperature in DEB models. Therefore, they can be used to extrapolate effects to a wide range of environmentally relevant scenarios. Until now, the DEB research in ecotoxicology has

  8. A stereovision model applied in bio-micromanipulation system based on stereo light microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yuezong

    2017-12-01

    A bio-micromanipulation system is designed for manipulating micro-objects with a length scale of tens or hundreds of microns based on stereo light microscope. The world coordinate reconstruction of points on the surface of micro-objects is an important goal for the micromanipulation. Traditional pinhole camera model is applied widely in macrocomputer vision. However, this model will output bad data with remarkable error if it is directly used to reconstruct three-dimensional world coordinates for stereo light microscope. Therefore, a novel and improved pinhole camera model applied in bio-micromanipulation system is proposed in this article. The new model is composed of binocular-pinhole model and error-correction model. The binocular-pinhole model is used to output the basic world coordinates. The error-correction model is used to correct the errors from the basic world coordinates and outputs the final high-precision world coordinates. The results show that the new model achieves a precision of 0.01 mm in the X direction, 0.01 mm in the Y direction, and 0.015 mm in the Z direction within a maximum reconstruction distance of 4.1 mm in the X direction, 2.9 mm in the Y direction, and 2.25 mm in the Z direction, and that traditional pinhole camera model achieves a lower and unsatisfactory precision of about 0.1 mm. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Investigating students’ mental models about the nature of light in different contexts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Özcan, Özgür

    2015-11-01

    In this study, we investigated pre-service physics teachers’ mental models of light in different contexts, such as blackbody radiation, the photoelectric effect and the Compton effect. The data collected through the paper-and-pencil questionnaire (PPQ) were analyzed both quantitatively and qualitatively. Sampling of this study consists of a total of 110 physics education students who were taking a modern physics course at two different state universities in Turkey. As a result, three mental models, which were called the beam ray model (BrM), hybrid model (HM) and particle model (PM), were being used by the students while explaining these phenomena. The most model fluctuation was seen in HM and BrM. In addition, some students were in a mixed-model state where they use multiple mental models in explaining a phenomenon and used these models inconsistently. On the other hand, most of the students who used the particle model can be said to be in a pure model state.

  10. Two-phase coolant pump model of pressurized light water nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santos, G.A. dos; Freitas, R.L.

    1990-01-01

    The two-phase coolant pump model of pressurized light water nuclear reactors is an important point for the loss of primary coolant accident analysis. The homologous curves set up the complete performance of the pump and are input for accidents analysis thermal-hydraulic codes. This work propose a mathematical model able to predict the two-phase homologous curves where it was incorporated geometric and operational pump condition. The results were compared with the experimental tests data from literature and it has showed a good agreement. (author)

  11. Light Path Model of Fiber Optic Liquid Level Sensor Considering Residual Liquid Film on the Wall

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhijun Zhang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The working principle of the refractive-type fiber optic liquid level sensor is analyzed in detail based on the light refraction principle. The optic path models are developed in consideration of common simplification and the residual liquid film on the glass tube wall. The calculating formulae for the model are derived, constraint conditions are obtained, influencing factors are discussed, and the scopes and skills of application are analyzed through instance simulations. The research results are useful in directing the correct usage of the fiber optic liquid level sensor, especially in special cases, such as those involving viscous liquid in the glass tube monitoring.

  12. Model predictive control in light naphtha distillation column of gasoline hydrogenation process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kornkrit Chiewchanchairat

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The main scope of this research is for designing and implementing of model predictive control (MPC on the light naphtha distillation column of gasoline hydrogenation process. This model is designed by using robust multivariable predictive control technology (RMPCT. The performance of MPC controller is better than PID controllers 32.1 % those are comparing by using as the same of objective function and also in the MPC controller can be used for steam optimization that is shown in this research, stream consumption is reduced 6.6 Kg/ m3 of fresh feed.

  13. Final Report: System Reliability Model for Solid-State Lighting (SSL) Luminaires

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davis, J. Lynn [RTI International, Research Triangle Park, NC (United States)

    2017-05-31

    The primary objectives of this project was to develop and validate reliability models and accelerated stress testing (AST) methodologies for predicting the lifetime of integrated SSL luminaires. This study examined the likely failure modes for SSL luminaires including abrupt failure, excessive lumen depreciation, unacceptable color shifts, and increased power consumption. Data on the relative distribution of these failure modes were acquired through extensive accelerated stress tests and combined with industry data and other source of information on LED lighting. This data was compiled and utilized to build models of the aging behavior of key luminaire optical and electrical components.

  14. High-Fidelity Modelling Methodology of Light-Limited Photosynthetic Production in Microalgae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Bernardi

    Full Text Available Reliable quantitative description of light-limited growth in microalgae is key to improving the design and operation of industrial production systems. This article shows how the capability to predict photosynthetic processes can benefit from a synergy between mathematical modelling and lab-scale experiments using systematic design of experiment techniques. A model of chlorophyll fluorescence developed by the authors [Nikolaou et al., J Biotechnol 194:91-99, 2015] is used as starting point, whereby the representation of non-photochemical-quenching (NPQ process is refined for biological consistency. This model spans multiple time scales ranging from milliseconds to hours, thus calling for a combination of various experimental techniques in order to arrive at a sufficiently rich data set and determine statistically meaningful estimates for the model parameters. The methodology is demonstrated for the microalga Nannochloropsis gaditana by combining pulse amplitude modulation (PAM fluorescence, photosynthesis rate and antenna size measurements. The results show that the calibrated model is capable of accurate quantitative predictions under a wide range of transient light conditions. Moreover, this work provides an experimental validation of the link between fluorescence and photosynthesis-irradiance (PI curves which had been theoricized.

  15. SETOR: hardware-lighted three-dimensional solid model representations of macromolecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, S V

    1993-06-01

    SETOR is designed to exploit the hardware lighting capabilities of the IRIS-4D series graphics workstations to render high-quality raster images of macromolecules that can undergo rotation and translation interactively. SETOR can render standard all-atom and backbone models of proteins or nucleic acids, but focuses on displaying protein molecules by highlighting elements of secondary structure. The program has a very friendly user interface that minimizes the number of input files by allowing the user to interactively edit parameters, such as colors, lighting coefficients, and descriptions of secondary structure via mouse activated dialogue boxes. The choice of polymer chain representation can be varied from standard vector models and van der Waal models, to a B-spline fit of polymer backbones that yields a smooth ribbon that approximates the polymer chain, to strict Cardinal splines that interpolate the smoothest curve possible that will precisely follow the polymer chain. The program provides a photograph mode, save/restore facilities, and efficient generation of symmetry-related molecules and packing diagrams. Additionally, SETOR is designed to accept commands and model coordinates from the standard input stream, and to control standard output. Ancillary programs provide a method to interactively edit hardcopy plots of all vector and many solid models generated by SETOR, and to produce standard HPGL or PostScript files. Examples of figures rendered by SETOR of a number of macromolecules of various classes are presented.

  16. Light ions radiobiological effects on human tumoral cells: measurements modelling and application to hadron-therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jalade, P.

    2005-11-01

    In classical radiotherapy, the characteristics of photons interactions undergo limits for the treatment of radioresistant and not well located tumours. Pioneering treatments of patients at the Lawrence Laboratory at Berkeley has demonstrated two advantages of hadrons beams: the Relative Biologic Effect (the RBE) and the ballistic of the beams. Since 1994, the clinical centre at Chiba, has demonstrated successfully the applicability of the method. A physics group, managed by G. Kraft, at Darmstadt in Germany, has underlined the advantages of carbon beams. An European pool, called ENGIGHT (European Network for LIGHt ion Therapy) has been created in which the French ETOILE project appeared. The purpose of the thesis concerns measurements and models of 'in vitro' human cells survival. In the first part, the nowadays situation in particles interactions, tracks and cells structures and radiobiology is presented here. The second is devoted to the models based on the beam tracks and localization of the physical dose. Discussion of sensitivity to various parameters of the model has been realized with the help of numerical simulations. Finally the predictions of the improved model has been compared to experimental irradiations of human cells with argon and carbon beams of the GANIL machine. Conclusion of such study shows the performance and limits of a local model for predicting the radiobiological efficiency of light ions in hadron-therapy. (author)

  17. Using Cross Entropy Optimization to Model Active Galactic Nuclei Light Curves from VLBA MOJAVE Images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vitoriano, R. P.; Botti, L. C. L.

    2018-02-01

    We present in this article a new method to derive the observed properties of outbursts in relativistic jets. We use the VLBI MOJAVE maps to obtain the light curves, based on the principle that the variability of extragalactic sources, in this case 3C 279 and 4C +29.45, should appear in high resolution observations since 1996 until 2016. The use of the cross entropy method (CE) can accurately determine the ranges of parameters for a sequence of outbursts based on the shock-wave model, where the decay/rise timescale ratio has a small spread and the use of a unique index 1.3 generates a good fit modeled by functions of outbursts and by the model of the three stages. By the CE method, one can automatically get the start epochs as well as the occurrence of rise and decline times of the outbursts in the light curves. The values found are in agreement with the power-law distribution of energy, which shows that the cooling of electrons is a predominant process during the initial phase of the shock model evolution. The results of the decomposition show that the outbursts match the VLBI components observed in jets in addition to showing strong evidence of the peaks in the frequencies of 15.3 GHz. With this, we can model the shock waves with reference to the distance at the core of AGN to obtain the Doppler factor and the Lorentz factor.

  18. White Light–Emitting Diodes (LEDs) at Domestic Lighting Levels and Retinal Injury in a Rat Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shang, Yu-Man; Wang, Gen-Shuh; Sliney, David; Lee, Li-Ling

    2013-01-01

    Background: Light-emitting diodes (LEDs) deliver higher levels of blue light to the retina than do conventional domestic light sources. Chronic exposure to high-intensity light (2,000–10,000 lux) has previously been found to result in light-induced retinal injury, but chronic exposure to relatively low-intensity (750 lux) light has not been previously assessed with LEDs in a rodent model. Objective: We examined LED-induced retinal neuronal cell damage in the Sprague-Dawley rat using functional, histological, and biochemical measurements. Methods: We used blue LEDs (460 nm) and full-spectrum white LEDs, coupled with matching compact fluorescent lights, for exposures. Pathological examinations included electroretinogram, hematoxylin and eosin (H&E) staining, immunohistochemistry (IHC), and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). We also measured free radical production in the retina to determine the oxidative stress level. Results: H&E staining and TEM revealed apoptosis and necrosis of photoreceptors, which indicated blue-light induced photochemical injury of the retina. Free radical production in the retina was increased in LED-exposed groups. IHC staining demonstrated that oxidative stress was associated with retinal injury. Although we found serious retinal light injury in LED groups, the compact fluorescent lamp (CFL) groups showed moderate to mild injury. Conclusion: Our results raise questions about adverse effects on the retina from chronic exposure to LED light compared with other light sources that have less blue light. Thus, we suggest a precautionary approach with regard to the use of blue-rich “white” LEDs for general lighting. Citation: Shang YM, Wang GS, Sliney D, Yang CH, Lee LL. 2014. White light–emitting diodes (LEDs) at domestic lighting levels and retinal injury in a rat model. Environ Health Perspect 122:269–276; http://dx.doi.org/10.1289/ehp.1307294 PMID:24362357

  19. Large Differences in Terrestrial Vegetation Production Derived from Satellite-Based Light Use Efficiency Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenwen Cai

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Terrestrial gross primary production (GPP is the largest global CO2 flux and determines other ecosystem carbon cycle variables. Light use efficiency (LUE models may have the most potential to adequately address the spatial and temporal dynamics of GPP, but recent studies have shown large model differences in GPP simulations. In this study, we investigated the GPP differences in the spatial and temporal patterns derived from seven widely used LUE models at the global scale. The result shows that the global annual GPP estimates over the period 2000–2010 varied from 95.10 to 139.71 Pg C∙yr−1 among models. The spatial and temporal variation of global GPP differs substantially between models, due to different model structures and dominant environmental drivers. In almost all models, water availability dominates the interannual variability of GPP over large vegetated areas. Solar radiation and air temperature are not the primary controlling factors for interannual variability of global GPP estimates for most models. The disagreement among the current LUE models highlights the need for further model improvement to quantify the global carbon cycle.

  20. The vacuole model: new terms in the second order deflection of light

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharya, Amrita; Garipova, Guzel M.; Laserra, Ettore; Bhadra, Arunava; Nandi, Kamal K.

    2011-02-01

    The present paper is an extension of a recent work (Bhattacharya et al. 2010) to the Einstein-Strauss vacuole model with a cosmological constant, where we work out the light deflection by considering perturbations up to order M3 and confirm the light bending obtained previously in their vacuole model by Ishak et al. (2008). We also obtain another local coupling term -5πM2Λ/8 related to Λ, in addition to the one obtained by Sereno (2008, 2009). We argue that the vacuole method for light deflection is exclusively suited to cases where the cosmological constant Λ disappears from the path equation. However, the original Rindler-Ishak method (2007) still applies even if a certain parameter γ of Weyl gravity does not disappear. Here, using an alternative prescription, we obtain the known term -γR/2, as well as another new local term 3πγM/2 between M and γ. Physical implications are compared, where we argue that the repulsive term -γR/2 can be masked by the Schwarzschild term 2M/R in the halo regime supporting attractive property of the dark matter.

  1. The vacuole model: new terms in the second order deflection of light

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhattacharya, Amrita; Nandi, Kamal K.; Garipova, Guzel M.; Laserra, Ettore; Bhadra, Arunava

    2011-01-01

    The present paper is an extension of a recent work (Bhattacharya et al. 2010) to the Einstein-Strauss vacuole model with a cosmological constant, where we work out the light deflection by considering perturbations up to order M 3 and confirm the light bending obtained previously in their vacuole model by Ishak et al. (2008). We also obtain another local coupling term −5πM 2 Λ/8 related to Λ, in addition to the one obtained by Sereno (2008, 2009). We argue that the vacuole method for light deflection is exclusively suited to cases where the cosmological constant Λ disappears from the path equation. However, the original Rindler-Ishak method (2007) still applies even if a certain parameter γ of Weyl gravity does not disappear. Here, using an alternative prescription, we obtain the known term −γR/2, as well as another new local term 3πγM/2 between M and γ. Physical implications are compared, where we argue that the repulsive term −γR/2 can be masked by the Schwarzschild term 2M/R in the halo regime supporting attractive property of the dark matter

  2. Radiative Decays of Scalar Mesons in Light-Front Quark Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dewitt, Martin; Choi, Ho-Meoyng; Ji, Chueng-Ryong

    2003-04-01

    It is currently thought that the difficulty in experimentally identifying the light scalar glueball results from the fact that it tends to mix with nearby conventional scalar mesons. Therefore, the glueball's presence can only be inferred from the behavior of the experimentally observed (mixed) scalar states. Here, we present relativistic light-front quark model calculations of absolute widths for the radiative decay processes Scalar[0^++] → γγ, Scalar[0^++]→γ Vector[1^-], and Vector[1^-]→γ Scalar[0^++] which incorporate the effects of glueball-q barq mixing. The mixed physical states are assumed to be the f_0(1370), the f_0(1500), and the f_0(1710). The n barn, s bars, and gg content of each of the physical states is taken from the mass mixing matrix calculations of other works. These flavor/glue wavefunctions are then used in conjunction with light-front spin-space wavefunctions to compute transition form factors for the decay processes mentioned above. In the q^2→ 0 limit the form factors are used to determine the corresponding decay widths. Our results are compared with available experimental data as well as the results of a recent non-relativistic model calculation of the process Scalar[0^++]→γ Vector[1^-].

  3. Light Kaluza Klein States in Randall-Sundrum Models with Custodial SU(2)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carena, Marcela; /Fermilab; Ponton, Eduardo; /Columbia U.; Santiago, Jose; /Fermilab; Wagner, Carlos E.M.; /Argonne /Chicago U., EFI /KICP, Chicago

    2006-07-01

    We consider Randall-Sundrum scenarios based on SU(2){sub L} x SU(2){sub R} and a discrete parity exchanging L with R. The custodial and parity symmetries can be used to make the tree level contribution to the T parameter and the anomalous couplings of the bottom quark to the Z very small. We show that the resulting quantum numbers typically induce a negative T parameter at one loop that, together with the positive value of the S parameter, restrict considerably these models. There are nevertheless regions of parameter space that successfully reproduce the fit to electroweak precision observables with light Kaluza-Klein excitations accessible at colliders. We consider models of gauge-Higgs unification that implement the custodial and parity symmetries and find that the electroweak data singles out a very well defined region in parameter space. In this region one typically finds light gauge boson Kaluza-Klein excitations as well as light SU(2){sub L} singlet, and sometimes also doublet, fermionic states, that mix with the top quark, and that may yield interesting signatures at future colliders.

  4. Ultraviolet Light Curves of Gaia16apd in Superluminous Supernova Models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tolstov, Alexey; Zhiglo, Andrey; Nomoto, Ken’ichi; Blinnikov, Sergei [Kavli Institute for the Physics and Mathematics of the Universe (WPI), The University of Tokyo Institutes for Advanced Study, The University of Tokyo, 5-1-5 Kashiwanoha, Kashiwa, Chiba 277-8583 (Japan); Sorokina, Elena [Sternberg Astronomical Institute, M.V.Lomonosov Moscow State University, 119234 Moscow (Russian Federation); Kozyreva, Alexandra, E-mail: alexey.tolstov@ipmu.jp [The Raymond and Beverly Sackler School of Physics and Astronomy, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv 69978 (Israel)

    2017-08-10

    Observations of Gaia16apd revealed extremely luminous ultraviolet emission among superluminous supernovae (SLSNe). Using radiation hydrodynamics simulations, we perform a comparison of UV light curves, color temperatures, and photospheric velocities between the most popular SLSN models: pair-instability supernova, magnetar, and interaction with circumstellar medium. We find that the interaction model is the most promising to explain the extreme UV luminosity of Gaia16apd. The differences in late-time UV emission and in color evolution found between the models can be used to link an observed SLSN event to the most appropriate model. Observations at UV wavelengths can be used to clarify the nature of SLSNe and more attention should be paid to them in future follow-up observations.

  5. Estimating crop yield using a satellite-based light use efficiency model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yuan, Wenping; Chen, Yang; Xia, Jiangzhou

    2016-01-01

    for simulating crops’ GPP. At both irrigated and rainfed sites, the EC-LUE model exhibits a similar level of performance. However, large errors are found when simulating yield based on crop harvest index. This analysis highlights the need to improve the representation of the harvest index and carbon allocation......Satellite-based techniques that provide temporally and spatially continuous information over vegetated surfaces have become increasingly important in monitoring the global agriculture yield. In this study, we examine the performance of a light use efficiency model (EC-LUE) for simulating the gross...... primary production (GPP) and yield of crops. The EC-LUE model can explain on average approximately 90% of the variability in GPP for 36 FLUXNET sites globally. The results indicate that a universal set of parameters, independent of crop species (except for C4 crops), can be adopted in the EC-LUE model...

  6. Experimental evaluation of models for predicting Cherenkov light intensities from short-cooled nuclear fuel assemblies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Branger, E.; Grape, S.; Jansson, P.; Jacobsson Svärd, S.

    2018-02-01

    The Digital Cherenkov Viewing Device (DCVD) is a tool used by nuclear safeguards inspectors to verify irradiated nuclear fuel assemblies in wet storage based on the recording of Cherenkov light produced by the assemblies. One type of verification involves comparing the measured light intensity from an assembly with a predicted intensity, based on assembly declarations. Crucial for such analyses is the performance of the prediction model used, and recently new modelling methods have been introduced to allow for enhanced prediction capabilities by taking the irradiation history into account, and by including the cross-talk radiation from neighbouring assemblies in the predictions. In this work, the performance of three models for Cherenkov-light intensity prediction is evaluated by applying them to a set of short-cooled PWR 17x17 assemblies for which experimental DCVD measurements and operator-declared irradiation data was available; (1) a two-parameter model, based on total burnup and cooling time, previously used by the safeguards inspectors, (2) a newly introduced gamma-spectrum-based model, which incorporates cycle-wise burnup histories, and (3) the latter gamma-spectrum-based model with the addition to account for contributions from neighbouring assemblies. The results show that the two gamma-spectrum-based models provide significantly higher precision for the measured inventory compared to the two-parameter model, lowering the standard deviation between relative measured and predicted intensities from 15.2 % to 8.1 % respectively 7.8 %. The results show some systematic differences between assemblies of different designs (produced by different manufacturers) in spite of their similar PWR 17x17 geometries, and possible ways are discussed to address such differences, which may allow for even higher prediction capabilities. Still, it is concluded that the gamma-spectrum-based models enable confident verification of the fuel assembly inventory at the currently used

  7. Modeling and simulations of light emission and propagation in open nanophotonic systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    de Lasson, Jakob Rosenkrantz

    for computing and normalizing quasi-normal modes in extended systems, and comparing to numerically exact calculations, the theory correctly predicts a slight asymmetry (one cavity) and a peak and a dip (two cavities) in the local density of states spectra. Next, the photonic crystal waveguide is interfaced......Light emission and propagation in photonic crystal membranes are studied theoretically, with an emphasis on waveguides, slow light effects, and coupled cavity-waveguide systems. A Bloch mode expansion formalism for optical modeling of photonic crystal membranes is presented, and perfectly matched...... layer boundary conditions are introduced to emulate the inherent openness of the photonic crystal membrane. The impact of the computational domain size and perfectly matched layer parameters on dipole emission in a photonic crystal membrane waveguide is investigated, and we find the associated...

  8. Elucidating the interaction between light competition and herbivore feeding patterns using functional-structural plant modelling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Vries, Jorad; Poelman, Erik H; Anten, Niels; Evers, Jochem B

    2018-01-24

    Plants usually compete with neighbouring plants for resources such as light as well as defend themselves against herbivorous insects. This requires investment of limiting resources, resulting in optimal resource distribution patterns and trade-offs between growth- and defence-related traits. A plant's competitive success is determined by the spatial distribution of its resources in the canopy. The spatial distribution of herbivory in the canopy in turn differs between herbivore species as the level of herbivore specialization determines their response to the distribution of resources and defences in the canopy. Here, we investigated to what extent competition for light affects plant susceptibility to herbivores with different feeding preferences. To quantify interactions between herbivory and competition, we developed and evaluated a 3-D spatially explicit functional-structural plant model for Brassica nigra that mechanistically simulates competition in a dynamic light environment, and also explicitly models leaf area removal by herbivores with different feeding preferences. With this novel approach, we can quantitatively explore the extent to which herbivore feeding location and light competition interact in their effect on plant performance. Our results indicate that there is indeed a strong interaction between levels of plant-plant competition and herbivore feeding preference. When plants did not compete, herbivory had relatively small effects irrespective of feeding preference. Conversely, when plants competed, herbivores with a preference for young leaves had a strong negative effect on the competitiveness and subsequent performance of the plant, whereas herbivores with a preference for old leaves did not. Our study predicts how plant susceptibility to herbivory depends on the composition of the herbivore community and the level of plant competition, and highlights the importance of considering the full range of dynamics in plant-plant-herbivore interactions

  9. Modeling light scattering in the shadow region behind thin cylinders for diameter analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blohm, Werner

    2018-03-01

    In this paper, the scattered light intensities resulting in the shadow region at an observation plane behind monochromatically illuminated circular cylinders are modeled by sinusoidal sequences having a squared dependence on spatial position in the observation plane. Whereas two sinusoidal components appear to be sufficient for modeling the light distribution behind intransparent cylinders, at least three sinusoidal components are necessary for transparent cylinders. Based on this model, a novel evaluation algorithm for a very fast retrieval of the diameter of thin cylindrical products like metallic wires and transparent fibers is presented. This algorithm was tested in a cylinder diameter range typical for these products (d ≈ 70 … 150 μm; n ≈ 1.5). Numerical examples are given to illustrate its application by using both synthetic and experimental scattering data. Diameter accuracies below 0.05 μm could be achieved for intransparent cylinders in the tested diameter range. However, scattering effects due to morphological-dependent resonances (MDRs) are problematical in the diameter analysis of transparent products. In order to incorporate these effects into the model, further investigations are needed.

  10. Reinfusion of Shed Blood Following Pediatric Orthopaedic Surgery

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Blevins, Field

    1991-01-01

    .... The use of a system for salvage and reinfusion of nonwashed shed blood postoperatively is recommended as a safe method to minimize the need for homologous transfusion, especially when there is...

  11. Light Penetration in Seawater Polluted by Dispersed Oil: Results of Radiative Transfer Modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haule, K.; Darecki, M.; Toczek, H.

    2015-11-01

    The downwelling light in seawater is shaped by natural seawater constituents as well as by some external substances which can occur locally and temporally. In this study we focused on dispersed oil droplets which can be found in seawater after an oil spill or in the consequence of intensive shipping, oil extraction and transportation. We applied our modified radiative transfer model based on Monte Carlo code to evaluate the magnitude of potential influence of dispersed oil droplets on the downwelling irradiance and the depth of the euphotic zone. Our model was validated on the basis of in situ measurements for natural (unpolluted) seawater in the Southern Baltic Sea, resulting in less than 5% uncertainty. The optical properties of dispersed Petrobaltic crude oil were calculated on the basis of Mie theory and involved into radiative transfer model. We found that the changes in downwelling light caused by dispersed oil depend on several factors such as oil droplet concentration, size distribution, and the penetration depth (i.e. vertical range of oil droplets occurrence below sea surface). Petrobaltic oil droplets of submicron sizes and penetration depth of 5 m showed a potentially detectable reduction in the depth of the euphotic zone of 5.5% at the concentration of only 10 ppb. Micrometer-sized droplets needed 10 times higher concentration to give a similar effect. Our radiative transfer model provided data to analyse and discuss the influence of each factor separately. This study contributes to the understanding of the change in visible light penetration in seawater affected by dispersed oil.

  12. A Global Model of The Light Curves and Expansion Velocities of Type II-plateau Supernovae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pejcha, Ondřej; Prieto, Jose L.

    2015-02-01

    We present a new self-consistent and versatile method that derives photospheric radius and temperature variations of Type II-Plateau supernovae based on their expansion velocities and photometric measurements. We apply the method to a sample of 26 well-observed, nearby supernovae with published light curves and velocities. We simultaneously fit ~230 velocity and ~6800 mag measurements distributed over 21 photometric passbands spanning wavelengths from 0.19 to 2.2 μm. The light-curve differences among the Type II-Plateau supernovae are well modeled by assuming different rates of photospheric radius expansion, which we explain as different density profiles of the ejecta, and we argue that steeper density profiles result in flatter plateaus, if everything else remains unchanged. The steep luminosity decline of Type II-Linear supernovae is due to fast evolution of the photospheric temperature, which we verify with a successful fit of SN 1980K. Eliminating the need for theoretical supernova atmosphere models, we obtain self-consistent relative distances, reddenings, and nickel masses fully accounting for all internal model uncertainties and covariances. We use our global fit to estimate the time evolution of any missing band tailored specifically for each supernova, and we construct spectral energy distributions and bolometric light curves. We produce bolometric corrections for all filter combinations in our sample. We compare our model to the theoretical dilution factors and find good agreement for the B and V filters. Our results differ from the theory when the I, J, H, or K bands are included. We investigate the reddening law toward our supernovae and find reasonable agreement with standard \\mathscr{R}_V˜ 3.1 reddening law in UBVRI bands. Results for other bands are inconclusive. We make our fitting code publicly available.

  13. A GLOBAL MODEL OF THE LIGHT CURVES AND EXPANSION VELOCITIES OF TYPE II-PLATEAU SUPERNOVAE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pejcha, Ondřej [Department of Astrophysical Sciences, Princeton University, 4 Ivy Lane, Princeton, NJ 08540 (United States); Prieto, Jose L., E-mail: pejcha@astro.princeton.edu [Núcleo de Astronomía de la Facultad de Ingeniería, Universidad Diego Portales, Av. Ejército 441 Santiago (Chile)

    2015-02-01

    We present a new self-consistent and versatile method that derives photospheric radius and temperature variations of Type II-Plateau supernovae based on their expansion velocities and photometric measurements. We apply the method to a sample of 26 well-observed, nearby supernovae with published light curves and velocities. We simultaneously fit ∼230 velocity and ∼6800 mag measurements distributed over 21 photometric passbands spanning wavelengths from 0.19 to 2.2 μm. The light-curve differences among the Type II-Plateau supernovae are well modeled by assuming different rates of photospheric radius expansion, which we explain as different density profiles of the ejecta, and we argue that steeper density profiles result in flatter plateaus, if everything else remains unchanged. The steep luminosity decline of Type II-Linear supernovae is due to fast evolution of the photospheric temperature, which we verify with a successful fit of SN 1980K. Eliminating the need for theoretical supernova atmosphere models, we obtain self-consistent relative distances, reddenings, and nickel masses fully accounting for all internal model uncertainties and covariances. We use our global fit to estimate the time evolution of any missing band tailored specifically for each supernova, and we construct spectral energy distributions and bolometric light curves. We produce bolometric corrections for all filter combinations in our sample. We compare our model to the theoretical dilution factors and find good agreement for the B and V filters. Our results differ from the theory when the I, J, H, or K bands are included. We investigate the reddening law toward our supernovae and find reasonable agreement with standard R{sub V}∼3.1 reddening law in UBVRI bands. Results for other bands are inconclusive. We make our fitting code publicly available.

  14. Light Competition and Carbon Partitioning-Allocation in an improved Forest Ecosystem Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collalti, Alessio; Santini, Monia; Valentini Valentini, Riccardo

    2010-05-01

    In Italy about 100.000 km2 are covered by forests. This surface is the 30% of the whole national land and this shows how the forests are important both for socio-economic and for environmental aspects. Forests changes affect a delicate balance that involve not only vegetation components but also bio-geochemical cycles and global climate. The knowledge of the amount of Carbon sequestered by forests represents a precious information for their sustainable management in the framework of climate changes. Primary studies in terms of model about this important issue, has been done through Forest Ecosystem Model (FEM), well known and validated as 3PG (Landsberg et Waring, 1997; Sands 2004). It is based on light use efficiency approach at the canopy level. The present study started from the original model 3PG, producing an improved version that uses many of explicit formulations of all relevant ecophysiological processes but makes it able to be applied for natural forests. The mutual interaction of forest growth and light conditions causes vertical and horizontal differentiation in the natural forest mosaic. Only ecophysiological parameters which can be either directly measured or estimates with reasonable certainty are used. The model has been written in C language and has been created considering a tri-dimensional cell structure with different vertical layers depending on the forest type that has to be simulated. This 3PG 'improved' version enable to work on multi-layer and multi-species forests type with cell resolution of one hectare for the typical Italian forest species. The multi-layer version is the result of the implementation and development of Lambert-Beer law for the estimation of intercepted, absorbed and transmitted light through different storeys of the forest. It is possible estimates, for each storey, a Par value (Photosynthetic Active Radiation) through Leaf Area Index (LAI), Light Extinction Coefficient and cell Canopy Cover using a "Big Leaf" approach

  15. Modelling hydrologic impacts of light absorbing aerosol deposition on snow at the catchment scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matt, Felix N.; Burkhart, John F.; Pietikäinen, Joni-Pekka

    2018-01-01

    Light absorbing impurities in snow and ice (LAISI) originating from atmospheric deposition enhance snowmelt by increasing the absorption of shortwave radiation. The consequences are a shortening of the snow duration due to increased snowmelt and, at the catchment scale, a temporal shift in the discharge generation during the spring melt season. In this study, we present a newly developed snow algorithm for application in hydrological models that allows for an additional class of input variable: the deposition mass flux of various species of light absorbing aerosols. To show the sensitivity of different model parameters, we first use the model as a 1-D point model forced with representative synthetic data and investigate the impact of parameters and variables specific to the algorithm determining the effect of LAISI. We then demonstrate the significance of the radiative forcing by simulating the effect of black carbon (BC) deposited on snow of a remote southern Norwegian catchment over a 6-year period, from September 2006 to August 2012. Our simulations suggest a significant impact of BC in snow on the hydrological cycle. Results show an average increase in discharge of 2.5, 9.9, and 21.4 %, depending on the applied model scenario, over a 2-month period during the spring melt season compared to simulations where radiative forcing from LAISI is not considered. The increase in discharge is followed by a decrease in discharge due to a faster decrease in the catchment's snow-covered fraction and a trend towards earlier melt in the scenarios where radiative forcing from LAISI is applied. Using a reasonable estimate of critical model parameters, the model simulates realistic BC mixing ratios in surface snow with a strong annual cycle, showing increasing surface BC mixing ratios during spring melt as a consequence of melt amplification. However, we further identify large uncertainties in the representation of the surface BC mixing ratio during snowmelt and the subsequent

  16. The Goodwin model: simulating the effect of light pulses on the circadian sporulation rhythm of Neurospora crassa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruoff, P; Vinsjevik, M; Monnerjahn, C; Rensing, L

    2001-03-07

    The Goodwin oscillator is a minimal model that describes the oscillatory negative feedback regulation of a translated protein which inhibits its own transcription. Now, over 30 years later this scheme provides a basic description of the central components in the circadian oscillators of Neurospora, Drosophila, and mammals. We showed previously that Neurospora's resetting behavior by pulses of temperature, cycloheximide or heat shock can be simulated by this model, in which degradation processes play an important role for determining the clock's period and its temperature-compensation. Another important environmental factor for the synchronization is light. In this work, we show that on the basis of a light-induced transcription of the frequency (frq) gene phase response curves of light pulses as well as the influence of the light pulse length on phase shifts can be described by the Goodwin oscillator. A relaxation variant of the model predicts that directly after a light pulse inhibition in frq -transcription occurs, even when the inhibiting factor Z (FRQ) has not reached inhibitory concentrations. This has so far not been experimentally investigated for frq transcription, but it complies with a current model of light-induced transcription of other genes by a phosphorylated white-collar complex. During long light pulses, the relaxational model predicts that the sporulation rhythm is arrested in a steady state of high frq -mRNA levels. However, experimental results indicate the possibility of oscillations around this steady state and more in favor of the results by the original Goodwin model. In order to explain the resetting behavior by two light pulses, a biphasic first-order kinetics recovery period of the blue light receptor or of the light signal transduction pathway has to be assumed. Copyright 2001 Academic Press.

  17. Modeling Phase-Aligned Gamma-Ray and Radio Millisecond Pulsar Light Curves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venter, C.; Johnson, T.; Harding, A.

    2012-01-01

    Since the discovery of the first eight gamma-ray millisecond pulsars (MSPs) by the Fermi Large Area Telescope, this population has been steadily expanding. Four of the more recent detections, PSR J00340534, PSR J1939+2134 (B1937+21; the first MSP ever discovered), PSR J1959+2048 (B1957+20; the first discovery of a black widow system), and PSR J2214+3000, exhibit a phenomenon not present in the original discoveries: nearly phase-aligned radio and gamma-ray light curves (LCs). To account for the phase alignment, we explore models where both the radio and gamma-ray emission originate either in the outer magnetosphere near the light cylinder or near the polar caps. Using a Markov Chain Monte Carlo technique to search for best-fit model parameters, we obtain reasonable LC fits for the first three of these MSPs in the context of altitude-limited outer gap (alOG) and two-pole caustic (alTPC) geometries (for both gamma-ray and radio emission). These models differ from the standard outer gap (OG)/two-pole caustic (TPC) models in two respects: the radio emission originates in caustics at relatively high altitudes compared to the usual conal radio beams, and we allow both the minimum and maximum altitudes of the gamma-ray and radio emission regions to vary within a limited range (excluding the minimum gamma-ray altitude of the alTPC model, which is kept constant at the stellar radius, and that of the alOG model, which is set to the position-dependent null charge surface altitude). Alternatively, phase-aligned solutions also exist for emission originating near the stellar surface in a slot gap scenario (low-altitude slot gap (laSG) models). We find that the alTPC models provide slightly better LC fits than the alOG models, and both of these give better fits than the laSG models (for the limited range of parameters considered in the case of the laSG models). Thus, our fits imply that the phase-aligned LCs are likely of caustic origin, produced in the outer magnetosphere, and

  18. MODELING PHASE-ALIGNED GAMMA-RAY AND RADIO MILLISECOND PULSAR LIGHT CURVES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Venter, C. [Centre for Space Research, North-West University, Potchefstroom Campus, Potchefstroom 2520 (South Africa); Johnson, T. J.; Harding, A. K. [Astrophysics Science Division, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Since the discovery of the first eight gamma-ray millisecond pulsars (MSPs) by the Fermi Large Area Telescope, this population has been steadily expanding. Four of the more recent detections, PSR J0034-0534, PSR J1939+2134 (B1937+21; the first MSP ever discovered), PSR J1959+2048 (B1957+20; the first discovery of a black widow system), and PSR J2214+3000, exhibit a phenomenon not present in the original discoveries: nearly phase-aligned radio and gamma-ray light curves (LCs). To account for the phase alignment, we explore models where both the radio and gamma-ray emission originate either in the outer magnetosphere near the light cylinder or near the polar caps. Using a Markov Chain Monte Carlo technique to search for best-fit model parameters, we obtain reasonable LC fits for the first three of these MSPs in the context of 'altitude-limited' outer gap (alOG) and two-pole caustic (alTPC) geometries (for both gamma-ray and radio emission). These models differ from the standard outer gap (OG)/two-pole caustic (TPC) models in two respects: the radio emission originates in caustics at relatively high altitudes compared to the usual conal radio beams, and we allow both the minimum and maximum altitudes of the gamma-ray and radio emission regions to vary within a limited range (excluding the minimum gamma-ray altitude of the alTPC model, which is kept constant at the stellar radius, and that of the alOG model, which is set to the position-dependent null charge surface altitude). Alternatively, phase-aligned solutions also exist for emission originating near the stellar surface in a slot gap scenario ('low-altitude slot gap' (laSG) models). We find that the alTPC models provide slightly better LC fits than the alOG models, and both of these give better fits than the laSG models (for the limited range of parameters considered in the case of the laSG models). Thus, our fits imply that the phase-aligned LCs are likely of caustic origin, produced in the

  19. Tumor-Shed Antigen Affects Antibody Tumor Targeting: Comparison of Two 89Zr-Labeled Antibodies Directed against Shed or Nonshed Antigens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jae-Ho Lee

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available We investigated the effect of shed antigen mesothelin on the tumor uptake of amatuximab, a therapeutic anti-mesothelin mAb clinically tested in mesothelioma patients. The B3 mAb targeting a nonshed antigen was also analyzed for comparison. The mouse model implanted with A431/H9 tumor, which expresses both shed mesothelin and nonshed Lewis-Y antigen, provided an ideal system to compare the biodistribution and PET imaging profiles of the two mAbs. Our study demonstrated that the tumor and organ uptakes of 89Zr-B3 were dose-independent when 3 doses, 2, 15, and 60 μg B3, were compared at 24 h after injection. In contrast, tumor and organ uptakes of 89Zr-amatuximab were dose-dependent, whereby a high dose (60 μg was needed to achieve tumor targeting comparable to the low dose (2 μg of 89Zr-B3, suggesting that shed mesothelin may affect amatuximab tumor targeting as well as serum half-life. The autoradiography analysis showed that the distribution of 89Zr-B3 was nonuniform with the radioactivity primarily localized at the tumor periphery independent of the B3 dose. However, the autoradiography analysis for 89Zr-amatuximab showed dose-dependent distribution profiles of the radiolabel; at 10 μg dose, the radiolabel penetrated toward the tumor core with its activity comparable to that at the tumor periphery, whereas at 60 μg dose, the distribution profile became similar to those of 89Zr-B3. These results suggest that shed antigen in blood may act as a decoy requiring higher doses of mAb to improve serum half-life as well as tumor targeting. Systemic mAb concentration should be at a severalfold molar excess to the shed Ag in blood to overcome the hepatic processing of mAb-Ag complexes. On the other hand, mAb concentration should remain lower than the shed Ag concentration in the tumor ECS to maximize tumor penetration by passing binding site barriers.

  20. Cold welding of organic light emitting diode: Interfacial and contact models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Asare

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the results of an analytical and computational study of the contacts and interfacial fracture associated with the cold welding of Organic Light Emitting diodes (OLEDs. The effects of impurities (within the possible interfaces are explored for contacts and interfacial fracture between layers that are relevant to model OLEDs. The models are used to study the effects of adhesion, pressure, thin film layer thickness and dust particle modulus (between the contacting surfaces on contact profiles around impurities between cold-welded thin films. The lift-off stage of thin films (during cold welding is then modeled as an interfacial fracture process. A combination of adhesion and interfacial fracture theories is used to provide new insights for the design of improved contact and interfacial separation during cold welding. The implications of the results are discussed for the design and fabrication of cold welded OLED structures.

  1. An update on single field models of inflation in light of WMAP7

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alabidi, Laila; Huston, Ian

    2010-01-01

    In this paper we summarise the status of single field models of inflation in light of the WMAP 7 data release. We find little has changed since the 5 year release, and results are consistent with previous findings. The increase in the upper bound on the running of the spectral index impacts on the status of the production of Primordial Black Holes from single field models. The lower bound on f equi NL is reduced and thus the bounds on the theoretical parameters of (UV) DBI single brane models are weakened. In the case of multiple coincident branes the bounds are also weakened and the two, three or four brane cases will produce a tensor-signal that could possibly be observed in the future

  2. Masses of the light hadrons in the chiral and cloudy bag models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saito, Koichi.

    1983-10-01

    The masses of the light hadrons except for the pion are calculated in the stable chiral and cloudy bag models with the massless or massive u, d quark and pion. Two difficulties in these models, i.e. the lack of stability and the divergence of the quark self-energy, are removed by taking account of a simple non-local quark-pion interaction. The effects of the finite size of the qq-bar pion and the behavior of the quark self-energy are discussed in detail. In our calculation the bag self-energy due to the pion has an important role in the origin of the N-Δ and the Σ-Λ mass differences. The baryon octet and decuplet masses are well reproduced by the present model. (author)

  3. Light propagation in disordered media: From Maxwell equations to a spherical p-spin model and light condensation effects

    KAUST Repository

    Toth, Laszlo Daniel

    2013-05-01

    The well-known phenomenon of the formation of a Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC), a striking consequence of the Bose-Einstein statistics, has been traditionally linked to an ensemble of ultra-cold gas molecules. However, classical systems can also exhibit condensation effects; in the field of photonics, for example, signatures of this condensation in the mode dynamics (\\'light condensation\\', LC) have been theoretically investigated and experimentally observed in various types of multimode lasers [1,2 and ref. therein]. © 2013 IEEE.

  4. Photokinetic Drug Delivery: Light-Enhanced Permeation in an In Vitro Eye Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godley, Bernard F; Kraft, Edward R; Giannos, Steven A; Zhao, Zhen-Yang; Haag, Anthony M; Wen, Julie W

    2015-12-01

    To investigate light-enhanced molecular movement as a potential technology for drug delivery. To do this, we developed an in vitro eye model while representing similar concentration gradient conditions and compositions found in the eye. The eye model unit was fabricated by inserting a cross-linked type I collagen membrane in a spectrophotometer cuvette with 1% hyaluronic acid as the drug recipient medium. Photokinetic delivery was studied by illuminating 1 mg/mL methotrexate (MTX) placed in the drug donor compartment on top of the membrane, with noncoherent 450 nm light at 8.2 mW from an LED source pulsed at 25 cycles per second, placed in contact with the solution. A modified UV-visual spectrophotometer was employed to rapidly determine the concentration of MTX, at progressive 1 mm distances away from the membrane, within the viscous recipient medium of the model eye after 1 h. A defined, progressive concentration gradient was observed within the nonagitated drug recipient media, diminishing with greater distances from the membrane. Transport of MTX through the membrane was significantly enhanced (ranging from 2 to 3 times, P < 0.05 to P ≤ 0.001) by photokinetic methods compared with control conditions by determining drug concentrations at 4 defined distances from the membrane. According to scanning electron microscopy images, no structural damage or shunts were created on the surface of the cross-linked gelatin membrane. The application of pulsed noncoherent visible light significantly enhances the permeation of MTX through a cross-linked collagen membrane and hyaluronic acid recipient medium without causing structural damage to the membrane.

  5. Modeling the light-travel-time effect on the far-infrared size of IRC +10216

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Edward L.; Baganoff, Frederick K.

    1995-01-01

    Models of the far-infrared emission from the large circumstellar dust envelope surrounding the carbon star IRC +10216 are used to assess the importance of the light-travel-time effect (LTTE) on the observed size of the source. The central star is a long-period variable with an average period of 644 +/- 17 days and a peak-to-peak amplitude of two magnituds, so a large light-travel-time effect is seen at 1 min radius. An attempt is made to use the LTTE to reconcile the discrepancy between the observations of Fazio et al. and Lester et al. regarding the far-infrared source size. This discrepancy is reviewed in light of recent, high-spatial-resolution observations at 11 microns by Danchi et al. We conclude that IRC +10216 has been resolved on the arcminute scale by Fazio et al. Convolution of the model intensity profile at 61 microns with the 60 sec x 90 sec Gaussian beam of Fazio et al. yields an observed source size full width at half maximum (FWHM) that ranges from approximately 67 sec to 75 sec depending on the phase of the star and the assumed distance to the source. Using a simple r(exp -2) dust distribution and the 106 deg phase of the Fazio et al. observations, the LTTE model reaches a peak size of 74.3 sec at a distance of 300 pc. This agrees favorably with the 78 sec x 6 sec size measured by Fazio et al. Finally, a method is outlined for using the LTTE as a distance indicator to IRC +10216 and other stars with extended mass outflows.

  6. Monitoring the trajectory of urban nighttime light hotspots using a Gaussian volume model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Qiming; Jiang, Ruowei; Wang, Ke; Huang, Lingyan; Ye, Ziran; Gan, Muye; Ji, Biyong

    2018-03-01

    Urban nighttime light hotspot is an ideal representation of the spatial heterogeneity of human activities within a city, which is sensitive to regional urban expansion pattern. However, most of previous studies related to nighttime light imageries focused on extracting urban extent, leaving the spatial variation of radiance intensity insufficiently explored. With the help of global radiance calibrated DMSP-OLS datasets (NTLgrc), we proposed an innovative framework to explore the spatio-temporal trajectory of polycentric urban nighttime light hotspots. Firstly, NTLgrc was inter-annually calibrated to improve the consistency. Secondly, multi-resolution segmentation and region-growing SVM classification were employed to remove blooming effect and to extract potential clusters. At last, the urban hotspots were identified by a Gaussian volume model, and the resulting parameters were used to quantitatively depict hotspot features (i.e., intensity, morphology and centroid dynamics). The result shows that our framework successfully captures hotspots in polycentric urban area, whose Ra2 are over 0.9. Meanwhile, the spatio-temporal dynamics of the hotspot features intuitively reveal the impact of the regional urban growth pattern and planning strategies on human activities. Compared to previous studies, our framework is more robust and offers an effective way to describe hotspot pattern. Also, it provides a more comprehensive and spatial-explicit understanding regarding the interaction between urbanization pattern and human activities. Our findings are expected to be beneficial to governors in term of sustainable urban planning and decision making.

  7. The diverse broad-band light-curves of Swift GRBs reproduced with the cannonball model

    CERN Document Server

    Dado, Shlomo; De Rújula, A

    2009-01-01

    Two radiation mechanisms, inverse Compton scattering (ICS) and synchrotron radiation (SR), suffice within the cannonball (CB) model of long gamma ray bursts (LGRBs) and X-ray flashes (XRFs) to provide a very simple and accurate description of their observed prompt emission and afterglows. Simple as they are, the two mechanisms and the burst environment generate the rich structure of the light curves at all frequencies and times. This is demonstrated for 33 selected Swift LGRBs and XRFs, which are well sampled from early time until late time and well represent the entire diversity of the broad band light curves of Swift LGRBs and XRFs. Their prompt gamma-ray and X-ray emission is dominated by ICS of glory light. During their fast decline phase, ICS is taken over by SR which dominates their broad band afterglow. The pulse shape and spectral evolution of the gamma-ray peaks and the early-time X-ray flares, and even the delayed optical `humps' in XRFs, are correctly predicted. The canonical and non-canonical X-ra...

  8. Light element abundances in a matter-antimatter model of the universe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aly, J.J.

    1978-01-01

    This paper is devoted to the problem of light element synthesis in a baryon symmetric Big-Bang cosmology, in which the universe is constituted at the end of the leptonic era by a nucleon-antinucleon emulsion. If the initial typical size of the matter or antimatter regions is sufficiently high to avoid significant neutron annihilation, nucleosynthesis can proceed in this kind of model in the same way as in the conventional Big-Bang. But the abundances of the created light elements can be modified at a later time by interaction of the nuclei with the high energy particles and photons resulting from annihilation. In this article, we consider two specific mechanisms able to change the abundances: a 4 He 'nucleodisruption' process (proposed by Combes et al., 1975), which leads to deuterium production, and 4 He photodisintegration by annihilation γ-rays, which leads to an increase of the 3 He and D production. General relations are established which allow one to compute the abundances of the so created elements when the size l of the matter or antimatter regions and the annihilation rate are given as function of time. These relations are applied to the Omnes model, in which the size l grows by a coalescence mechanism. It is shown that in this model the D and 3 He abundances are much greater than the limits on primordial abundances deduced from the present observations. (orig.) [de

  9. Mathematical modeling of photoinitiated coating degradation: Effects of coating glass transition temperature and light stabilizers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kiil, Søren; G.de With, R.A.T.M.Van Benthem

    2013-01-01

    A mathematical model, describing coating degradation mechanisms of thermoset coatings exposed to ultraviolet radiation and humidity at constant temperature, was extended to simulate the behavior of a coating with a low glass transition temperature. The effects of adding light stabilizers (a UV......, and simulates the transient development of an oxidation zone. Simulations are in good agreement with experimental data for a fast degrading epoxy-amine coating with a glass transition temperature of −50°C. It was found that the degradation rate of the non-stabilized coating was influenced significantly...

  10. A vortex-shedding flowmeter based on IPMCs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pasquale, Giovanna Di; Pollicino, Antonino; Graziani, Salvatore; Strazzeri, Salvatore

    2016-01-01

    Ionic polymer–metal composites (IPMCs) are electroactive polymers that can be used both as sensors and actuators. They have been demonstrated for many potential applications, in wet and underwater environments. Applications in fields such as biomimetics, robotics, and aerospace, just to mention a few, have been proposed. In this paper, the sensing nature of IPMCs is used to develop a flowmeter based on the vortex shedding phenomenon. The system is described, and a model is proposed and verified. A setup has been realized, and data have been acquired for many working conditions. The performance of the sensing system has been investigated by using acquired experimental data. Water flux velocities in the range [0.38, 2.83] m s −1 have been investigated. This working range is comparable with ranges claimed for established technologies. Results show the suitability of the proposed system to work as a flowmeter. The proposed transducer is suitable for envisaged post-silicon applications, where the use of IPMCs gives the opportunity to realize a new generating polymeric flowmeter. This has potential applications in fields where properties of IPMCs such as low cost, usability, and disposability are relevant. (paper)

  11. Vortex Shedding in the Wake Induced by a Real Elephant Seal Whisker

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turk, Jodi; Omilion, Alexis; Zhang, Wei; Kim, Jeong-Jae; Kim, Jeong-Ju; Choi, Woo-Rak; Lee, Sang-Joon

    2017-11-01

    Biomimicry has been adopted to create innovative solutions in a vast range of applications. One such application is the design of seal-whisker-inspired flow sensors for autonomous underwater vehicles (AUVs). In dark, cramped, and unstable terrain AUVs are not able to maneuver using visual and sonar-based navigation. Hence, it is critical to use underwater flow sensors to accurately detect minute disturbances in the surroundings. Certain seal whiskers exhibit a unique undulating three-dimensional morphology that can reduce vortex induced vibrations (VIVs) if the major axis of the whisker cross-section is aligned to the inflow. This allows the seal to precisely track prey fish upstream using solely their whiskers. The current study aims to understand the effect of a real seal whisker's morphology on the vortex shedding behavior. Despite extensive studies of wake induced by scaled whisker-like models, the vortex shedding in the wake of a real seal whisker is not well understood. A series of experiments are conducted with a high-speed Particle Imaging Velocimetry (PIV) system in a water channel to examine the vortex shedding downstream from a smooth whisker and an undulating whisker at a Reynolds number of a few hundred. Results of the vortex shedding induced by real seal whiskers can provide insights on developing high-sensitivity underwater flow sensors for AUVs and other whisker-inspired structures.

  12. The role of crown architecture for light harvesting and carbon gain in extreme light environments assessed with a structurally realistic 3-D model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valladares, Fernando

    2000-06-01

    Full Text Available Main results from different studies of crown architecture adaptation to extreme light environments are presented. Light capture and carbon gain by plants from low (forest understory and high (open Mediterranean-type ecosystems light environments were simulated with a 3-D model (YPLANT, which was developed specifically to analyse the structural features that determine light interception and photosynthesis at the whole plant level. Distantly related taxa with contrasting architectures exhibited similar efficiencies of light interception (functional convergence. Between habitats large differences in architecture existed depending on whether light capture must be maximised or whether excess photon flux density must be avoided. These differences are realised both at the species level and within a species because of plastic adjustments of crown architecture to the external light environment. Realistic, 3-D architectural models are indispensable tools in this kind of comparative studies due to the intrinsic complexity of plant architecture. Their efficient development requires a fluid exchange of ideas between botanists, ecologists and plant modellers.Se presentan los resultados principales de varios estudios sobre las adaptaciones del follaje a ambientes lumínicos extremos. Plantas de ambientes oscuros (sotobosques de bosques templados y tropicales y de ambientes muy luminosos (ecosistemas abiertos de tipo Mediterráneo han sido estudiadas mediante un modelo (YPLANT que permite la reconstrucción tridimensional de la parte aérea de las plantas e identificar los rasgos estructurales que determinan la interceptación de luz y la fotosíntesis y transpiraci6n potencial a nivel de toda la copa. Taxones no relacionados y con arquitecturas muy diferentes mostraron una eficiencia en la interceptaci6n de luz similar (convergencia funcional. La comparación entre hábitat revelo grandes diferencias arquitecturales dependiendo de si la absorción de luz deb

  13. Large-Eddy Simulation of turbulent vortex shedding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Archambeau, F

    1995-06-01

    This thesis documents the development and application of a computational algorithm for Large-Eddy Simulation. Unusually, the method adopts a fully collocated variable storage arrangement and is applicable to complex, non-rectilinear geometries. A Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes algorithm has formed the starting point of the development, but has been modified substantially: the spatial approximation of convection is effected by an energy-conserving central-differencing scheme; a second-order time-marching Adams-Bashforth scheme has been introduced; the pressure field is determined by solving the pressure-Poisson equation; this equation is solved either by use of preconditioned Conjugate-Gradient methods or with the Generalised Minimum Residual method; two types of sub-grid scale models have been introduced and examined. The algorithm has been validated by reference to a hierarchy of unsteady flows of increasing complexity starting with unsteady lid-driven cavity flows and ending with 3-D turbulent vortex shedding behind a square prism. In the latter case, for which extensive experimental data are available, special emphasis has been put on examining the dependence of the results on mesh density, near-wall treatment and the nature of the sub-grid-scale model, one of which is an advanced dynamic model. The LES scheme is shown to return time-average and phase-averaged results which agree well with experimental data and which support the view that LES is a promising approach for unsteady flows dominated by large periodic structures. (author) 87 refs.

  14. Modelling the cosmic spectral energy distribution and extragalactic background light over all time

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrews, S. K.; Driver, S. P.; Davies, L. J. M.; Lagos, C. d. P.; Robotham, A. S. G.

    2018-02-01

    We present a phenomological model of the cosmic spectral energy distribution (CSED) and the integrated galactic light (IGL) over all cosmic time. This model, based on an earlier model by Driver et al., attributes the cosmic star formation history (CSFH) to two processes - first, chaotic clump accretion and major mergers, resulting in the early-time formation of bulges and secondly, cold gas accretion, resulting in late-time disc formation. Under the assumption of a Universal Chabrier initial mass function, we combine the Bruzual & Charlot stellar libraries, the Charlot & Fall dust attenuation prescription and template spectra for emission by dust and active galactic nuclei to predict the CSED - pre- and post-dust attenuation - and the IGL throughout cosmic time. The phenomological model, as constructed, adopts a number of basic axioms and empirical results and has minimal free parameters. We compare the model output, as well as predictions from the semi-analytic model GALFORM to recent estimates of the CSED out to z = 1. By construction, our empirical model reproduces the full energy output of the Universe from the ultraviolet to the far-infrared extremely well. We use the model to derive predictions of the stellar and dust mass densities, again finding good agreement. We find that GALFORM predicts the CSED for z < 0.3 in good agreement with the observations. This agreement becomes increasingly poor towards z = 1, when the model CSED is ˜50 per cent fainter. The latter is consistent with the model underpredicting the CSFH. As a consequence, GALFORM predicts a ˜30 per cent fainter IGL.

  15. Swelling in light water reactor internal components: Insights from computational modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stoller, Roger E. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Barashev, Alexander V. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States); Golubov, Stanislav I. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2015-08-01

    A modern cluster dynamics model has been used to investigate the materials and irradiation parameters that control microstructural evolution under the relatively low-temperature exposure conditions that are representative of the operating environment for in-core light water reactor components. The focus is on components fabricated from austenitic stainless steel. The model accounts for the synergistic interaction between radiation-produced vacancies and the helium that is produced by nuclear transmutation reactions. Cavity nucleation rates are shown to be relatively high in this temperature regime (275 to 325°C), but are sensitive to assumptions about the fine scale microstructure produced under low-temperature irradiation. The cavity nucleation rates observed run counter to the expectation that void swelling would not occur under these conditions. This expectation was based on previous research on void swelling in austenitic steels in fast reactors. This misleading impression arose primarily from an absence of relevant data. The results of the computational modeling are generally consistent with recent data obtained by examining ex-service components. However, it has been shown that the sensitivity of the model s predictions of low-temperature swelling behavior to assumptions about the primary damage source term and specification of the mean-field sink strengths is somewhat greater that that observed at higher temperatures. Further assessment of the mathematical model is underway to meet the long-term objective of this research, which is to provide a predictive model of void swelling at relevant lifetime exposures to support extended reactor operations.

  16. Optical fluence modelling for ultraviolet light emitting diode-based water treatment systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simons, R; Gabbai, U E; Moram, M A

    2014-12-01

    This work presents a validated optical fluence rate model optimised for ultraviolet light-emitting diodes (UV-LEDs), which allow a very wide range of emission wavelengths and source geometries to be used in water treatment units. The model is based on a Monte Carlo approach, in which an incremental ray-tracing algorithm is used to calculate the local volumetric rate of energy absorption and subsequently convert it to the local fluence rate distribution for an UV-LED water treatment chamber of arbitrary design. The model includes contributions from optical reflections and scattering by treatment chamber walls and from scattering due to particulates and/or microorganisms. The model successfully predicts optical fluence rates in point-of-use water treatment units, as verified using biodosimetry with MS-2 bacteriophage at a UV-LED emission wavelength of 254 nm. The effects of chamber geometry are also modelled effectively and are consistent with the inactivation data for E. coli at 254 nm. The data indicate that this model is suitable for application in the design and optimisation of UV-LED-based water treatment systems. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Relationship Between Vehicle Size and Fatality Risk in Model Year 1985-93 Passenger Cars and Light Trucks

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997-01-01

    Fatality rates per million exposure years are computed by make, model and model year, : based on the crash experience of model year 1985-93 passenger cars and light trucks (pickups) vans : and sport utility vehicles) in the United States during calen...

  18. Modeling Electronic-Nuclear Interactions for Excitation Energy Transfer Processes in Light-Harvesting Complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Mi Kyung; Coker, David F

    2016-08-18

    An accurate approach for computing intermolecular and intrachromophore contributions to spectral densities to describe the electronic-nuclear interactions relevant for modeling excitation energy transfer processes in light harvesting systems is presented. The approach is based on molecular dynamics (MD) calculations of classical correlation functions of long-range contributions to excitation energy fluctuations and a separate harmonic analysis and single-point gradient quantum calculations for electron-intrachromophore vibrational couplings. A simple model is also presented that enables detailed analysis of the shortcomings of standard MD-based excitation energy fluctuation correlation function approaches. The method introduced here avoids these problems, and its reliability is demonstrated in accurate predictions for bacteriochlorophyll molecules in the Fenna-Matthews-Olson pigment-protein complex, where excellent agreement with experimental spectral densities is found. This efficient approach can provide instantaneous spectral densities for treating the influence of fluctuations in environmental dissipation on fast electronic relaxation.

  19. Relativistic three-body quark model of light baryons based on hypercentral approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aslanzadeh, M.; Rajabi, A. A.

    2015-05-01

    In this paper, we have treated the light baryons as a relativistic three-body bound system. Inspired by lattice QCD calculations, we treated baryons as a spin-independent three-quark system within a relativistic three-quark model based on the three-particle Klein-Gordon equation. We presented the analytical solution of three-body Klein-Gordon equation with employing the constituent quark model based on a hypercentral approach through which two- and three-body forces are taken into account. Herewith the average energy values of the up, down and strange quarks containing multiplets are reproduced. To describe the hyperfine structure of the baryon, the splittings within the SU(6)-multiplets are produced by the generalized Gürsey Radicati mass formula. The considered SU(6)-invariant potential is popular "Coulomb-plus-linear" potential and the strange and non-strange baryons spectra are in general well reproduced.

  20. Fenton Process Coupled to Ultrasound and UV Light Irradiation for the Oxidation of a Model Pollutant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karen E. Barrera-Salgado

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The Fenton process coupled to photosonolysis (UV light and Us, using Fe2O3 catalyst supported on Al2O3, was used to oxidize a model pollutant like acid green 50 textile dye (AG50. Dye degradation was followed by AG50 concentration decay analyses. It was observed that parameters like iron content on a fixed amount of catalyst supporting material, catalyst annealing temperature, initial dye concentration, and the solution pH influence the overall treatment efficiency. High removal efficiencies of the model pollutant are achieved. The stability and reusability tests of the Fe2O3 catalyst show that the catalyst can be used up to three cycles achieving high discoloration. Thus, this catalyst is highly efficient for the degradation of AG50 in the Fenton process.

  1. TYPE Ia SUPERNOVA LIGHT CURVE INFERENCE: HIERARCHICAL MODELS IN THE OPTICAL AND NEAR-INFRARED

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mandel, Kaisey S.; Narayan, Gautham; Kirshner, Robert P.

    2011-01-01

    We have constructed a comprehensive statistical model for Type Ia supernova (SN Ia) light curves spanning optical through near-infrared (NIR) data. A hierarchical framework coherently models multiple random and uncertain effects, including intrinsic supernova (SN) light curve covariances, dust extinction and reddening, and distances. An improved BAYESN Markov Chain Monte Carlo code computes probabilistic inferences for the hierarchical model by sampling the global probability density of parameters describing individual SNe and the population. We have applied this hierarchical model to optical and NIR data of 127 SNe Ia from PAIRITEL, CfA3, Carnegie Supernova Project, and the literature. We find an apparent population correlation between the host galaxy extinction A V and the ratio of total-to-selective dust absorption R V . For SNe with low dust extinction, A V ∼ V ∼ 2.5-2.9, while at high extinctions, A V ∼> 1, low values of R V < 2 are favored. The NIR luminosities are excellent standard candles and are less sensitive to dust extinction. They exhibit low correlation with optical peak luminosities, and thus provide independent information on distances. The combination of NIR and optical data constrains the dust extinction and improves the predictive precision of individual SN Ia distances by about 60%. Using cross-validation, we estimate an rms distance modulus prediction error of 0.11 mag for SNe with optical and NIR data versus 0.15 mag for SNe with optical data alone. Continued study of SNe Ia in the NIR is important for improving their utility as precise and accurate cosmological distance indicators.

  2. Coiled Coils Ensure the Physiological Ectodomain Shedding of Collagen XVII*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishie, Wataru; Jackow, Joanna; Hofmann, Silke C.; Franzke, Claus-Werner; Bruckner-Tuderman, Leena

    2012-01-01

    α-Helical coiled coils, frequent protein oligomerization motifs, are commonly observed in vital proteins. Here, using collagen XVII as an example, we provide evidence for a novel function of coiled coils in the regulation of ectodomain shedding. Transmembrane collagen XVII, an epithelial cell surface receptor, mediates dermal-epidermal adhesion in the skin, and its dysfunction is linked to human skin blistering diseases. The ectodomain of this collagen is constitutively shed from the cell surface by proteinases of a disintegrin and metalloprotease family; however, the mechanisms regulating shedding remain elusive. Here, we used site-specific mutagenesis to target the coiled-coil heptad repeats within the juxtamembranous, extracellular noncollagenous 16th A (NC16A) domain of collagen XVII. This resulted in a substantial increase of ectodomain shedding, which was not mediated by disintegrin and metalloproteases. Instead, conformational changes induced by the mutation(s) unmasked a furin recognition sequence that was used for cleavage. This study shows that apart from their functions in protein oligomerization, coiled coils can also act as regulators of ectodomain shedding depending on the biological context. PMID:22761443

  3. Phototherapy with LED light modulates healing processes in an in vitro scratch-wound model using 3 different cell types.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teuschl, Andreas; Balmayor, Elizabeth Rosado; Redl, Heinz; van Griensven, Martijn; Dungel, Peter

    2015-02-01

    An effective way of modulating wound healing processes, including proliferation and apoptosis, is low-level light therapy. Because of several disadvantages of lasers, light-emitting diodes (LEDs) could be more feasible light sources. To evaluate and compare the effects of blue and red light from LEDs on different cell types in an in vitro scratch-wound model. Monolayers of C2C12 myoblasts, NIH/3T3 fibroblasts, and BICR10 keratinocytes were injured by mechanical scraping. Cells were illuminated on 5 consecutive days for 10 minutes by LED at 470 or 630 nm. Effects of light on in vitro wound healing were evaluated by analyzing time to closure, proliferation, apoptosis, and necrosis rates. Illumination substantially affected cell viability and cell growth. Blue light strongly decreased proliferation and augmented apoptosis in all 3 cell types and increased necrosis rates in C2C12 and NIH/3T3 cells. In contrast, red light did not alter apoptosis in either cell type but promoted proliferation in all 3 cell types with significant effects in C2C12 and NIH/3T3 cells and shortened time to closure in all 3 cell types. Light-emitting diode light illumination could be a therapeutic option and positively affect wound healing processes. By choosing appropriate wavelengths, variable effects can be achieved.

  4. Adjoint sensitivity studies of loop current and eddy shedding in the Gulf of Mexico

    KAUST Repository

    Gopalakrishnan, Ganesh

    2013-07-01

    Adjoint model sensitivity analyses were applied for the loop current (LC) and its eddy shedding in the Gulf of Mexico (GoM) using the MIT general circulation model (MITgcm). The circulation in the GoM is mainly driven by the energetic LC and subsequent LC eddy separation. In order to understand which ocean regions and features control the evolution of the LC, including anticyclonic warm-core eddy shedding in the GoM, forward and adjoint sensitivities with respect to previous model state and atmospheric forcing were computed using the MITgcm and its adjoint. Since the validity of the adjoint model sensitivities depends on the capability of the forward model to simulate the real LC system and the eddy shedding processes, a 5 year (2004–2008) forward model simulation was performed for the GoM using realistic atmospheric forcing, initial, and boundary conditions. This forward model simulation was compared to satellite measurements of sea-surface height (SSH) and sea-surface temperature (SST), and observed transport variability. Despite realistic mean state, standard deviations, and LC eddy shedding period, the simulated LC extension shows less variability and more regularity than the observations. However, the model is suitable for studying the LC system and can be utilized for examining the ocean influences leading to a simple, and hopefully generic LC eddy separation in the GoM. The adjoint sensitivities of the LC show influences from the Yucatan Channel (YC) flow and Loop Current Frontal Eddy (LCFE) on both LC extension and eddy separation, as suggested by earlier work. Some of the processes that control LC extension after eddy separation differ from those controlling eddy shedding, but include YC through-flow. The sensitivity remains stable for more than 30 days and moves generally upstream, entering the Caribbean Sea. The sensitivities of the LC for SST generally remain closer to the surface and move at speeds consistent with advection by the high-speed core of

  5. Experimental constraints on light scalar field models in cosmology and particle physics (SNLS and CMS experiments)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neveu, Jeremy

    2014-01-01

    The nature of dark energy and dark matter is still unknown today. Light scalar field models have been proposed to explain the late-time accelerated expansion of the Universe and the apparent abundance of non-baryonic matter. In the first part of this thesis, the Galileon theory, a well-posed modified gravity theory preserving the local gravitation thanks to the Vainshtein screening effect, is accurately tested against recent cosmological data. Observational constraints are derived on the model parameters using cosmological distance and growth rate of structure measurements. A good agreement is observed between data and theory predictions. The Galileon theory appears therefore as a promising alternative to the cosmological constant scenario. In the second part, the dark matter question is explored through an extra-dimension theory containing massive and stable scalar fields called Branons. Branon production is searched for in the proton-proton collisions that were collected by the Compact Muon Solenoid experiment in 2012 at the Large Hadron Collider. Events with a single photon and transverse missing energy are selected in this data set and compared to the Standard Model and instrumental background estimates. No signature of new physics is observed, so experimental limits on the Branon model parameters are derived. This thesis concludes with some ideas to reach an unified description of both models in the frame of extra-dimension theories. (author) [fr

  6. Model-unrestricted scattering potentials for light ions and their interpretation in the folding model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ermer, M.; Clement, H.; Frank, G.; Grabmayr, P.; Heberle, N.; Wagner, G.J.

    1989-01-01

    High-quality data for elastic proton, deuteron and α-particle scattering on 40 Ca and 208 Pb at 26-30 MeV/N have been analyzed in terms of the model-unrestricted Fourier-Bessel concept. While extracted scattering potentials show substantial deviations from Woods-Saxon shapes, their real central parts are well described by folding calculations using a common effective nucleon-nucleon interaction with a weak density dependence. (orig.)

  7. Modeling investigation of light-absorbing aerosols in the Amazon Basin during the wet season

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Q. Wang

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available We use a global chemical transport model (GEOS-Chem to interpret observed light-absorbing aerosols in Amazonia during the wet season. Observed aerosol properties, including black carbon (BC concentration and light absorption, at the Amazon Tall Tower Observatory (ATTO site in the central Amazon have relatively low background levels but frequently show high peaks during the study period of January–April 2014. With daily temporal resolution for open fire emissions and modified aerosol optical properties, our model successfully captures the observed variation in fine/coarse aerosol and BC concentrations as well as aerosol light absorption and its wavelength dependence over the Amazon Basin. The source attribution in the model indicates the important influence of open fire on the observed variances of aerosol concentrations and absorption, mainly from regional sources (northern South America and from northern Africa. The contribution of open fires from these two regions is comparable, with the latter becoming more important in the late wet season. The analysis of correlation and enhancement ratios of BC versus CO suggests transport times of < 3 days for regional fires and  ∼  11 days for African plumes arriving at ATTO during the wet season. The model performance of long-range transport of African plumes is also evaluated with observations from AERONET, MODIS, and CALIOP. Simulated absorption aerosol optical depth (AAOD averaged over the wet season is lower than 0.0015 over the central Amazon, including the ATTO site. We find that more than 50 % of total absorption at 550 nm is from BC, except for the northeastern Amazon and the Guianas, where the influence of dust becomes significant (up to 35 %. The brown carbon contribution is generally between 20 and 30 %. The distribution of absorption Ångström exponents (AAE suggests more influence from fossil fuel combustion in the southern part of the basin (AAE  ∼  1 but more

  8. A Ball Lightning Model as a Possible Explanation of Recently Reported Cavity Lights

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fryberger, David; /SLAC

    2009-08-04

    The salient features of cavity lights, in particular, mobile luminous objects (MLO's), as have been experimentally observed in superconducting accelerator cavities, are summarized. A model based upon standard electromagnetic interactions between a small particle and the 1.5 GHz cavity excitation field is described. This model can explain some features of these data, in particular, the existence of particle orbits without wall contact. While this result is an important success for the model, it is detailed why the model as it stands is incomplete. It is argued that no avenues for a suitable extension of the model through established physics appear evident, which motivates an investigation of a model based upon a more exotic object, ball lightning. As discussed, further motivation derives from the fact that there are significant similarities in many of the qualitative features of ball lightning and MLO's, even though they appear in quite different circumstances and differ in scale by orders of magnitude. The ball lightning model, which incorporates electromagnetic charges and currents, is based on a symmetrized set of Maxwell's equations in which the electromagnetic sources and fields are characterized by a process called dyality rotation. It is shown that a consistent mathematical description of dyality rotation as a physical process can be achieved by adding suitable (phenomenological) current terms to supplement the usual current terms in the symmetrized Maxwell's equations. These currents, which enable the conservation of electric and magnetic charge, are called vacuum currents. It is shown that the proposed ball lightning model offers a good qualitative explanation of the perplexing aspects of the MLO data. Avenues for further study are indicated.

  9. A statistical light use efficiency model explains 85% variations in global GPP

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, C.; Ryu, Y.

    2016-12-01

    Photosynthesis is a complicated process whose modeling requires different levels of assumptions, simplification, and parameterization. Among models, light use efficiency (LUE) model is highly compact but powerful in monitoring gross primary production (GPP) from satellite data. Most of LUE models adopt a multiplicative from of maximum LUE, absorbed photosynthetically active radiation (APAR), and temperature and water stress functions. However, maximum LUE is a fitting parameter with large spatial variations, but most studies only use several biome dependent constants. In addition, stress functions are empirical and arbitrary in literatures. Moreover, meteorological data used are usually coarse-resolution, e.g., 1°, which could cause large errors. Finally, sunlit and shade canopy have completely different light responses but little considered. Targeting these issues, we derived a new statistical LUE model from a process-based and satellite-driven model, the Breathing Earth System Simulator (BESS). We have already derived a set of global radiation (5-km resolution), carbon and water fluxes (1-km resolution) products from 2000 to 2015 from BESS. By exploring these datasets, we found strong correlation between APAR and GPP for sunlit (R2=0.84) and shade (R2=0.96) canopy, respectively. A simple model, only driven by sunlit and shade APAR, was thus built based on linear relationships. The slopes of the linear function act as effective LUE of global ecosystem, with values of 0.0232 and 0.0128 umol C/umol quanta for sunlit and shade canopy, respectively. When compared with MPI-BGC GPP products, a global proxy of FLUXNET data, BESS-LUE achieved an overall accuracy of R2 = 0.85, whereas original BESS was R2 = 0.83 and MODIS GPP product was R2 = 0.76. We investigated spatiotemporal variations of the effective LUE. Spatially, the ratio of sunlit to shade values ranged from 0.1 (wet tropic) to 4.5 (dry inland). By using maps of sunlit and shade effective LUE the accuracy of

  10. Fleet average NOx emission performance of 2004 model year light-duty vehicles, light-duty trucks and medium-duty passenger vehicles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2006-05-01

    The On-Road Vehicle and Engine Emission Regulations came into effect on January 1, 2004. The regulations introduced more stringent national emission standards for on-road vehicles and engines, and also required that companies submit reports containing information concerning the company's fleets. This report presented a summary of the regulatory requirements relating to nitric oxide (NO x ) fleet average emissions for light-duty vehicles, light-duty trucks, and medium-duty passenger vehicles under the new regulations. The effectiveness of the Canadian fleet average NO x emission program at achieving environmental performance objectives was also evaluated. A summary of the fleet average NO x emission performance of individual companies was presented, as well as the overall Canadian fleet average of the 2004 model year based on data submitted by companies in their end of model year reports. A total of 21 companies submitted reports covering 2004 model year vehicles in 10 test groups, comprising 1,350,719 vehicles of the 2004 model year manufactured or imported for the purpose of sale in Canada. The average NO x value for the entire Canadian LDV/LDT fleet was 0.2016463 grams per mile. The average NO x values for the entire Canadian HLDT/MDPV fleet was 0.321976 grams per mile. It was concluded that the NO x values for both fleets were consistent with the environmental performance objectives of the regulations for the 2004 model year. 9 tabs

  11. Multi-sources model and control algorithm of an energy management system for light electric vehicles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hannan, M.A.; Azidin, F.A.; Mohamed, A.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► An energy management system (EMS) is developed for a scooter under normal and heavy power load conditions. ► The battery, FC, SC, EMS, DC machine and vehicle dynamics are modeled and designed for the system. ► State-based logic control algorithms provide an efficient and feasible multi-source EMS for light electric vehicles. ► Vehicle’s speed and power are closely matched with the ECE-47 driving cycle under normal and heavy load conditions. ► Sources of energy changeover occurred at 50% of the battery state of charge level in heavy load conditions. - Abstract: This paper presents the multi-sources energy models and ruled based feedback control algorithm of an energy management system (EMS) for light electric vehicle (LEV), i.e., scooters. The multiple sources of energy, such as a battery, fuel cell (FC) and super-capacitor (SC), EMS and power controller, DC machine and vehicle dynamics are designed and modeled using MATLAB/SIMULINK. The developed control strategies continuously support the EMS of the multiple sources of energy for a scooter under normal and heavy power load conditions. The performance of the proposed system is analyzed and compared with that of the ECE-47 test drive cycle in terms of vehicle speed and load power. The results show that the designed vehicle’s speed and load power closely match those of the ECE-47 test driving cycle under normal and heavy load conditions. This study’s results suggest that the proposed control algorithm provides an efficient and feasible EMS for LEV.

  12. Delayed detonation models for normal and subluminous type Ia sueprnovae: Absolute brightness, light curves, and molecule formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoflich, P.; Khokhlov, A. M.; Wheeler, J. C.

    1995-01-01

    We compute optical and infrared light curves of the pulsating class of delayed detonation models for Type Ia supernovae (SN Ia's) using an elaborate treatment of the Local Thermodynamic Equilbrium (LTE) radiation transport, equation of state and ionization balance, expansion opacity including the cooling by CO, Co(+), and SiO, and a Monte Carlo gamma-ray deposition scheme. The models have an amount of Ni-56 in the range from approximately or equal to 0.1 solar mass up to 0.7 solar mass depending on the density at which the transition from a deflagration to a detonation occurs. Models with a large nickel production give light curves comparable to those of typical Type Ia supernovae. Subluminous supernovae can be explained by models with a low nickel production. Multiband light curves are presented in comparison with the normally bright event SN 1992bc and the subluminous events Sn 1991bg and SN 1992bo to establish the principle that the delayed detonation paradigm in Chandrasekhar mass models may give a common explosion mechanism accounting for both normal and subluminous SN Ia's. Secondary IR-maxima are formed in the models of normal SN Ia's as a photospheric effect if the photospheric radius continues to increase well after maximum light. Secondary maxima appear later and stronger in models with moderate expansion velocities and with radioactive material closer to the surface. Model light curves for subluminous SN Ia's tend to show only one 'late' IR-maximum. In some delayed detonation models shell-like envelopes form, which consist of unburned carbon and oxygen. The formation of molecules in these envelopes is addressed. If the model retains a C/O-envelope and is subluminous, strong vibration bands of CO may appear, typically several weeks past maximum light. CO should be very weak or absent in normal Sn Ia's.

  13. Modeling of a light elastic beam by a system of rigid bodies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Šalinić Slaviša

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper has shown that a light elastic beam, in the case of small elastic deformations, can be modeled by a kinematic chain without branching composed of rigid bodies which are connected by passive revolute or prismatic joints with corresponding springs in them. Elastic properties of the beam are modeled by the springs introduced. The potential energy of the elastic beam is expressed as a function of components of the vector of elastic displacement and the vector of elastic rotation calculated for the elastic centre of the beam, which results in the diagonal stiffness matrix of the beam. As the potential energy of the introduced system of bodies with springs is expressed in the function of relative joint displacements, the diagonal stiffness matrix is obtained. In addition, these two stiffness matrices are equal. The modeling process has been demonstrated on the example of an elastic beam rotating about a fixed vertical axis, with a rigid body whose mass is considerably larger than the beam mass fixed to its free end. Differential equations of motion have been formed for this mechanical system. The modeling technique described here aims at expanding of usage of well developed methods of dynamics of systems of rigid bodies to the analysis of systems with elastic bodies. .

  14. Modeling of light absorbing particles in atmosphere, snow and ice in the Arctic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobhani, N.; Kulkarni, S.; Carmichael, G. R.

    2015-12-01

    Long-range transport of atmospheric particles from mid-latitude sources to the Arctic is the main contributor to the Arctic aerosol loadings and deposition. Black Carbon (BC), Brown Carbon (BrC) and dust are considered of great climatic importance and are the main absorbers of sunlight in the atmosphere. Furthermore, wet and dry deposition of light absorbing particles (LAPs) on snow and ice cause reduction of snow and ice albedo. LAPs have significant radiative forcing and effect on snow albedo. There are high uncertainties in estimating radiative forcing of LAPs. We studied the potential effect of LAPs from different emission source regions and sectors on snow albedo in the Arctic. The transport pathway of LAPs to the Arctic is studies for different high pollution episodes. In this study a modeling framework including Weather Research and Forecasting Model (WRF) and the University of Iowa's Sulfur Transport and dEpostion model(STEM) is used to predict the transport of LAPs from different geographical sources and sectors (i.e. transportation, residential, industry, biomass burning and power) to the Arctic. For assessing the effect of LAP deposition on snow single-layer simulator of the SNow, Ice, and Aerosol Radiation (SNICAR-Online) model was used to derive snow albedo values for snow albedo reduction causes by BC deposition. To evaluate the simulated values we compared the BC concentration in snow with observed values from previous studies including Doherty et al. 2010.

  15. Modeling random telegraph signal noise in CMOS image sensor under low light based on binomial distribution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Yu; Wang Guangyi; Lu Xinmiao; Hu Yongcai; Xu Jiangtao

    2016-01-01

    The random telegraph signal noise in the pixel source follower MOSFET is the principle component of the noise in the CMOS image sensor under low light. In this paper, the physical and statistical model of the random telegraph signal noise in the pixel source follower based on the binomial distribution is set up. The number of electrons captured or released by the oxide traps in the unit time is described as the random variables which obey the binomial distribution. As a result, the output states and the corresponding probabilities of the first and the second samples of the correlated double sampling circuit are acquired. The standard deviation of the output states after the correlated double sampling circuit can be obtained accordingly. In the simulation section, one hundred thousand samples of the source follower MOSFET have been simulated, and the simulation results show that the proposed model has the similar statistical characteristics with the existing models under the effect of the channel length and the density of the oxide trap. Moreover, the noise histogram of the proposed model has been evaluated at different environmental temperatures. (paper)

  16. Modelling the potential distribution of Bemisia tabaci in Europe in light of the climate change scenario.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilioli, Gianni; Pasquali, Sara; Parisi, Simone; Winter, Stephan

    2014-10-01

    Bemisia tabaci is a serious pest of agricultural and horticultural crops in greenhouses and fields around the world. This paper deals with the distribution of the pest under field conditions. In Europe, the insect is currently found in coastal regions of Mediterranean countries where it is subject to quarantine regulations. To assess the risk presented by B. tabaci to Europe, the area of potential establishment of this insect, in light of the climate change scenario, was assessed by a temperature-dependent physiologically based demographic model (PBDM). The simulated potential distribution under current climate conditions has been successfully validated with the available field records of B. tabaci in Europe. Considering climate change scenarios of +1 and +2 °C, range expansion by B. tabaci is predicted, particularly in Spain, France, Italy, Greece and along the Adriatic coast of the Balkans. Nonetheless, even under the scenario of +2 °C, northern European countries are not likely to be at risk of B. tabaci establishment because of climatic limitations. Model validation with field observations and evaluation of uncertainties associated with model parameter variability support the reliability of model results. The PBDM developed here can be applied to other organisms and offers significant advantages for assessing the potential distribution of invasive species. © 2014 Society of Chemical Industry.

  17. Improving Color Constancy in an Ambient Light Environment Using the Phong Reflection Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woo, Sung-Min; Lee, Sang-Ho; Yoo, Jun-Sang; Kim, Jong-Ok

    2018-04-01

    We present a physics-based illumination estimation approach explicitly designed to handle natural images under ambient light. Existing physics-based color constancy methods are theoretically perfect but do not handle real-world images well because the majority of these methods assume a single illuminant. Therefore, specular pixels selected using existing methods produce estimated dichromatic lines that are thick or curvilinear in the presence of ambient light, thus generating significant errors. Based on the Phong reflection model, we show that a group of specular pixels on a uniformly colored object, although they are subject to intensity thresholding, produce a unique dichromatic line length depending on the geometry of each image path. Assuming that the longest dichromatic line is the most desirable when estimating the chromaticity of an illuminant, ambient-robust specular pixels are also found on the same path on which the longest dichromatic line segment is generated. Therefore, we propose a method to find the optimal image path in which the specular pixels produce the longest dichromatic line. Even though the number of collected specular pixels is reduced using the proposed method, they are proven to be more accurate when determining the illuminant chromaticity even in the existing methods. Experiments with an established benchmark data set and a self-produced image set find that the proposed method is better able to locate the illuminant chromaticity compared with the state-of-the-art color constancy methods.

  18. Model-based restoration using light vein for range-gated imaging systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Canjin; Sun, Tao; Wang, Tingfeng; Wang, Rui; Guo, Jin; Tian, Yuzhen

    2016-09-10

    The images captured by an airborne range-gated imaging system are degraded by many factors, such as light scattering, noise, defocus of the optical system, atmospheric disturbances, platform vibrations, and so on. The characteristics of low illumination, few details, and high noise make the state-of-the-art restoration method fail. In this paper, we present a restoration method especially for range-gated imaging systems. The degradation process is divided into two parts: the static part and the dynamic part. For the static part, we establish the physical model of the imaging system according to the laser transmission theory, and estimate the static point spread function (PSF). For the dynamic part, a so-called light vein feature extraction method is presented to estimate the fuzzy parameter of the atmospheric disturbance and platform movement, which make contributions to the dynamic PSF. Finally, combined with the static and dynamic PSF, an iterative updating framework is used to restore the image. Compared with the state-of-the-art methods, the proposed method can effectively suppress ringing artifacts and achieve better performance in a range-gated imaging system.

  19. Multi-messenger Light Curves from Gamma-Ray Bursts in the Internal Shock Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bustamante, Mauricio [Center for Cosmology and AstroParticle Physics (CCAPP), The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States); Heinze, Jonas; Winter, Walter [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Platanenallee 6, D-15738 Zeuthen (Germany); Murase, Kohta, E-mail: bustamanteramirez.1@osu.edu, E-mail: walter.winter@desy.de, E-mail: jonas.heinze@desy.de, E-mail: murase@psu.edu [Center for Particle and Gravitational Astrophysics, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA16802 (United States)

    2017-03-01

    Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are promising as sources of neutrinos and cosmic rays. In the internal shock scenario, blobs of plasma emitted from a central engine collide within a relativistic jet and form shocks, leading to particle acceleration and emission. Motivated by present experimental constraints and sensitivities, we improve the predictions of particle emission by investigating time-dependent effects from multiple shocks. We produce synthetic light curves with different variability timescales that stem from properties of the central engine. For individual GRBs, qualitative conclusions about model parameters, neutrino production efficiency, and delays in high-energy gamma-rays can be deduced from inspection of the gamma-ray light curves. GRBs with fast time variability without additional prominent pulse structure tend to be efficient neutrino emitters, whereas GRBs with fast variability modulated by a broad pulse structure can be inefficient neutrino emitters and produce delayed high-energy gamma-ray signals. Our results can be applied to quantitative tests of the GRB origin of ultra-high-energy cosmic rays, and have the potential to impact current and future multi-messenger searches.

  20. Multi-messenger light curves from gamma-ray bursts in the internal shock model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bustamante, Mauricio [Ohio State Univ., Columbus, OH (United States). Center for Cosmology and AstroParticle Physics (CCAPP); Ohio State Univ., Columbus, OH (United States). Dept. of Physics; Murase, Kohta [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States). Center for Particle and Gravitational Astrophysics; Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States). Dept. of Astronomy and Astrophysics; Winter, Walter [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Zeuthen (Germany)

    2016-06-15

    Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are promising as sources of neutrinos and cosmic rays. In the internal shock scenario, blobs of plasma emitted from a central engine collide within a relativistic jet and form shocks, leading to particle acceleration and emission. Motivated by present experimental constraints and sensitivities, we improve the predictions of particle emission by investigating time-dependent effects from multiple shocks. We produce synthetic light curves with different variability timescales that stem from properties of the central engine. For individual GRBs, qualitative conclusions about model parameters, neutrino production efficiency, and delays in high-energy gamma rays can be deduced from inspection of the gamma-ray light curves. GRBs with fast time variability without additional prominent pulse structure tend to be efficient neutrino emitters, whereas GRBs with fast variability modulated by a broad pulse structure tend to be inefficient neutrino emitters and produce delayed high-energy gamma-ray signals. Our results can be applied to quantitative tests of the GRB origin of ultra-high-energy cosmic rays, and have the potential to impact current and future multi-messenger searches.

  1. Herpes simplex virus-2 genital tract shedding is not predictable over months or years in infected persons.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Varsha Dhankani

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Herpes simplex virus-2 (HSV-2 is a chronic reactivating infection that leads to recurrent shedding episodes in the genital tract. A minority of episodes are prolonged, and associated with development of painful ulcers. However, currently, available tools poorly predict viral trajectories and timing of reactivations in infected individuals. We employed principal components analysis (PCA and singular value decomposition (SVD to interpret HSV-2 genital tract shedding time series data, as well as simulation output from a stochastic spatial mathematical model. Empirical and model-derived, time-series data gathered over >30 days consists of multiple complex episodes that could not be reduced to a manageable number of descriptive features with PCA and SVD. However, single HSV-2 shedding episodes, even those with prolonged duration and complex morphologies consisting of multiple erratic peaks, were consistently described using a maximum of four dominant features. Modeled and clinical episodes had equivalent distributions of dominant features, implying similar dynamics in real and simulated episodes. We applied linear discriminant analysis (LDA to simulation output and identified that local immune cell density at the viral reactivation site had a predictive effect on episode duration, though longer term shedding suggested chaotic dynamics and could not be predicted based on spatial patterns of immune cell density. These findings suggest that HSV-2 shedding patterns within an individual are impossible to predict over weeks or months, and that even highly complex single HSV-2 episodes can only be partially predicted based on spatial distribution of immune cell density.

  2. Blue-light filtering alters angiogenic signaling in human retinal pigmented epithelial cells culture model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vila, Natalia; Siblini, Aya; Esposito, Evangelina; Bravo-Filho, Vasco; Zoroquiain, Pablo; Aldrees, Sultan; Logan, Patrick; Arias, Lluis; Burnier, Miguel N

    2017-11-02

    Light exposure and more specifically the spectrum of blue light contribute to the oxidative stress in Age-related macular degeneration (AMD). The purpose of the study was to establish whether blue light filtering could modify proangiogenic signaling produced by retinal pigmented epithelial (RPE) cells under different conditions simulating risk factors for AMD. Three experiments were carried out in order to expose ARPE-19 cells to white light for 48 h with and without blue light-blocking filters (BLF) in different conditions. In each experiment one group was exposed to light with no BLF protection, a second group was exposed to light with BLF protection, and a control group was not exposed to light. The ARPE-19 cells used in each experiment prior to light exposure were cultured for 24 h as follows: Experiment 1) Normoxia, Experiment 2) Hypoxia, and Experiment 3) Lutein supplemented media in normoxia. The media of all groups was harvested after light exposure for sandwich ELISA-based assays to quantify 10 pro-angiogenic cytokines. A significant decrease in angiogenin secretion levels and a significant increase in bFGF were observed following light exposure, compared to dark conditions, in both normoxia and hypoxia conditions. With the addition of a blue light-blocking filter in normoxia, a significant increase in angiogenin levels was observed. Although statistical significance was not achieved, blue light filters reduce light-induced secretion of bFGF and VEGF to near normal levels. This trend is also observed when ARPE-19 cells are grown under hypoxic conditions and when pre-treated with lutein prior to exposure to experimental conditions. Following light exposure, there is a decrease in angiogenin secretion by ARPE-19 cells, which was abrogated with a blue light - blocking filter. Our findings support the position that blue light filtering affects the secretion of angiogenic factors by retinal pigmented epithelial cells under normoxic, hypoxic, and lutein

  3. Household light source for potent photo-dynamic antimicrobial effect and wound healing in an infective animal model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ullah, Azeem; Zhang, Yuxiang; Iqbal, Zafar; Zhang, Yaxin; Wang, Dong; Chen, Jincan; Hu, Ping; Chen, Zhuo; Huang, Mingdong

    2018-03-01

    Photodynamic antimicrobial chemotherapy (PACT) is considered a promising alternative to conventional antibiotic approach. We have previously developed a novel PS containing five lysine amino acids, pentalysine-β-carbonylphthalocyanine Zinc (ZnPc(Lys) 5 ), which in the presence of light, is highly toxic against a range of bacterial strains, including hospital isolated, drug resistant Acinetobacter baumannii. Here, we study the effect of light fluence of the two light sources on the PACT potency of ZnPc(Lys) 5 . We observed that an exposure of E.coli to a red LED light for only 2 seconds (light fluence of 0.15 J/cm 2 ) in the presence of ZnPc(Lys) 5 significantly eradicated 80% of the E.coli . We further demonstrated that a light fluence of 4.5 J/cm 2 from a household light source induced a noticeable photodynamic effect in vitro and in vivo animal model. This study points to a new research direction of reducing light illumination time by increasing potency of PS.

  4. Lighting up your product! : The influence of retail lighting on product perception

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Creusen, M.E.H.; Pont, S.C.; Schoormans, J.P.L.

    2017-01-01

    This research is one of the first attempts to shed light on the influence of different lighting characteristics on consumer product perception. Study 1 looked at the influence of light level (i.e., brightness) and color temperature on consumer perception of a sneaker and a toaster. Study 2 assessed

  5. Application of users’ light-switch stochastic models to dynamic energy simulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Camisassi, V.; Fabi, V.; Andersen, Rune Korsholm

    2015-01-01

    deterministic inputs, due to the uncertain nature of human behaviour. In this paper, new stochastic models of users’ interaction with artificial lighting systems are developed and implemented in the energy simulation software IDA ICE. They were developed from field measurements in an office building in Prague......The design of an innovative building should include building overall energy flows estimation. They are principally related to main six influencing factors (IEA-ECB Annex 53): climate, building envelope and equipment, operation and maintenance, occupant behaviour and indoor environment conditions....... Consequently, energy-related occupant behaviour should be taken into account by energy simulation software. Previous researches (Bourgeois et al. 2006, Buso 2012, Fabi 2012) already revealed the differences in terms of energy loads between considering occupants' behaviour as stochastic processes rather than...

  6. Imaging, microscopic analysis, and modeling of a CdTe module degraded by heat and light

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnston, Steve; Albin, David; Hacke, Peter; Harvey, Steven P.; Moutinho, Helio; Jiang, Chun-Sheng; Xiao, Chuanxiao; Parikh, Anuja; Nardone, Marco; Al-Jassim, Mowafak; Metzger, Wyatt K.

    2018-05-01

    Photoluminescence (PL), electroluminescence (EL), and dark lock-in thermography are collected during stressing of a CdTe module under one-Sun light at an elevated temperature of 100 degrees C. The PL imaging system is simple and economical. The PL images show differing degrees of degradation across the module and are less sensitive to effects of shunting and resistance that appear on the EL images. Regions of varying degradation are chosen based on avoiding pre-existing shunt defects. These regions are evaluated using time-of-flight secondary ion-mass spectrometry and Kelvin probe force microscopy. Reduced PL intensity correlates to increased Cu concentration at the front interface. Numerical modeling and measurements agree that the increased Cu concentration at the junction also correlates to a reduced space charge region.

  7. Quarkonia and heavy-light mesons in a covariant quark model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leitão Sofia

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Preliminary calculations using the Covariant Spectator Theory (CST employed a scalar linear confining interaction and an additional constant vector potential to compute the mesonic mass spectra. In this work we generalize the confining interaction to include more general structures, in particular a vector and also a pseudoscalar part, as suggested by a recent study [1]. A one-gluon-exchange kernel is also implemented to describe the short-range part of the interaction. We solve the simplest CST approximation to the complete Bethe-Salpeter equation, the one-channel spectator equation, using a numerical technique that eliminates all singularities from the kernel. The parameters of the model are determined through a fit to the experimental pseudoscalar meson spectra, with a good agreement for both quarkonia and heavy-light states.

  8. Roy Adaptation Model: integrative review of studies conducted in the light of the theory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lays Pinheiro de Medeiros

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to identify the scientific evidence about the components of the Roy Adaptation Model in the population studied in the light of this theory. Methods: this is an integrative literature review in databases of the Latin-American and Caribbean Center on Health Sciences Information, Medical Literature Analysis and Retrieval System Online, Spanish Bibliographic Index on Health Sciences, Nursing Database, PubMed Central, Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature, Web of Science, and SciVerse Scopus. The sample consists of 20 articles published between 2005 and 2013. Results: the three types of stimuli, 38 of 82 adaptive problems, the four adaptive modes, and the six steps of the nursing process were identified. Conclusion: there is need for further studies on this theory and that address the entire nursing process, culminating in the increase in specific nursing knowledge and affirmation of this science in health.

  9. Advanced modelling and testing of a 13 MWth waste wood-fired grate boiler with recycled flue gas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rajh, Boštjan; Yin, Chungen; Samec, Niko

    2016-01-01

    are also investigated. The temperature profiles at different ports in the furnace are measured to shed some light on the flow and combustion characteristics in the boiler and also to collect some in-flame data for modelling validation. The overall modelling strategy, the new sub-models and the use...

  10. Type II Supernova Energetics and Comparison of Light Curves to Shock-Cooling Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubin, Adam; Gal-Yam, Avishay; Cia, Annalisa De; Horesh, Assaf; Khazov, Danny; Ofek, Eran O.; Kulkarni, S. R.; Arcavi, Iair; Manulis, Ilan; Cenko, S. Bradley

    2016-01-01

    During the first few days after explosion, Type II supernovae (SNe) are dominated by relatively simple physics. Theoretical predictions regarding early-time SN light curves in the ultraviolet (UV) and optical bands are thus quite robust. We present, for the first time, a sample of 57 R-band SN II light curves that are well-monitored during their rise, with greater than 5 detections during the first 10 days after discovery, and a well-constrained time of explosion to within 13 days. We show that the energy per unit mass (E/M) can be deduced to roughly a factor of five by comparing early-time optical data to the 2011 model of Rabinak Waxman, while the progenitor radius cannot be determined based on R-band data alone. We find that SN II explosion energies span a range of EM = (0.2-20) x 10(exp 51) erg/(10 M stellar mass), and have a mean energy per unit mass of E/ M = 0.85 x 10(exp 51) erg(10 stellar mass), corrected for Malmquist bias. Assuming a small spread in progenitor masses, this indicates a large intrinsic diversity in explosion energy. Moreover, E/M is positively correlated with the amount of Ni-56 produced in the explosion, as predicted by some recent models of core-collapse SNe. We further present several empirical correlations. The peak magnitude is correlated with the decline rate (Delta m(sub15), the decline rate is weakly correlated with the rise time, and the rise time is not significantly correlated with the peak magnitude. Faster declining SNe are more luminous and have longer rise times. This limits the possible power sources for such events.

  11. Sivers and cos 2 ϕ asymmetries in semi-inclusive deep inelastic scattering in light-front holographic model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maji, Tanmay; Chakrabarti, Dipankar; Mukherjee, Asmita

    2018-01-01

    The spin asymmetries in SIDIS associated with T -odd TMDs are presented in a light-front quark-diquark model of a proton. To incorporate the effects of the final-state interaction, the light front wave functions are modified to have a phase factor which is essential to have Sivers or Boer-Mulders functions. The Sivers and Boer-Mulder asymmetries are compared with HERMES and COMPASS data.

  12. Analytical modeling of light transport in scattering materials with strong absorption

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meretska, M. L.; Uppu, R.; Vissenberg, Gilles; Lagendijk, A.; Ijzerman, W. L.; Vos, W. L.

    2017-01-01

    We have investigated the transport of light through slabs that both scatter and strongly absorb, a situation that occurs in diverse application fields ranging from biomedical optics, powder technology, to solid-state lighting. In particular, we study the transport of light in the visible wavelength

  13. Exploring the spatial distribution of light interception and photosynthesis of canopies by means of a functional-structural plant model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sarlikioti, V.; Visser, de P.H.B.; Marcelis, L.F.M.

    2011-01-01

    Background and Aims - At present most process-based models and the majority of three-dimensional models include simplifications of plant architecture that can compromise the accuracy of light interception simulations and, accordingly, canopy photosynthesis. The aim of this paper is to analyse canopy

  14. An indicator based 'traffic light' model to pro-actively assess the occurrence of mycotoxins in tree nuts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jeurissen, S.M.F.; Seyhan, F.; Kandhai, M.C.; Dekkers, S.; Booij, C.J.H.; Bos, P.M.J.; Fels, van der H.J.

    2011-01-01

    This paper proposes an indicator based 'traffic light' model as a tool to pro-actively assess the occurrence of mycotoxins in tree nuts. The model is built using a holistic approach and, consequently, uses indicators from inside and outside the tree nut production chain as the basic elements.

  15. Symmetries for Light-Front Quantization of Yukawa Model with Renormalization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Żochowski, Jan; Przeszowski, Jerzy A.

    2017-12-01

    In this work we discuss the Yukawa model with the extra term of self-interacting scalar field in D=1+3 dimensions. We present the method of derivation the light-front commutators and anti-commutators from the Heisenberg equations induced by the kinematical generating operator of the translation P+. Mentioned Heisenberg equations are the starting point for obtaining this algebra of the (anti-) commutators. Some discrepancies between existing and proposed method of quantization are revealed. The Lorentz and the CPT symmetry, together with some features of the quantum theory were applied to obtain the two-point Wightman function for the free fermions. Moreover, these Wightman functions were computed especially without referring to the Fock expansion. The Gaussian effective potential for the Yukawa model was found in the terms of the Wightman functions. It was regularized by the space-like point-splitting method. The coupling constants within the model were redefined. The optimum mass parameters remained regularization independent. Finally, the Gaussian effective potential was renormalized.

  16. Characterizing and modeling electrical response to light for metal-based EUV photoresists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pret, Alessandro V.; Kocsis, Mike; De Simone, Danilo; Vandenberghe, Geert; Stowers, Jason; Giglia, Angelo; de Schepper, Peter; Mani, Antonio; Biafore, John J.

    2016-03-01

    Metal-based photoresists are appealing for use in EUV lithography due to their improved etch resistance and absorption compared with organic resists, and due to their resolving power demonstrated with 13.53 nm exposures using synchrotron light. Recently imec has started a new project to study novel photoresists for EUV lithography, with particular attention to metal containing materials, in order to explore alternative approaches that may offer superior characteristics in photoresist imaging and etching performance compared with more mature chemically amplified resists. In order to model these novel resists it is mandatory to understand both the optical properties and the electronic response to photon absorption. As in previous experiments on organic materials, some of the optical properties can be determined by merging analysis from high-energy electron scattering models (e.g. CXRO website), X-ray absorption spectroscopy, and DUV spectroscopic ellipsometry. Dispersion curves can be used to calculate the electronic inelastic and elastic mean-free paths; convolved with the expected spectrum at wafer level it is possible to estimate the electron yield and the secondary electron blur of the photoresist. These material properties can be used to modify the physical models currently used to simulate organic photoresist performance in computational lithography software.

  17. Light Nuclei in the Framework of the Symplectic No-Core Shell Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Draayer, Jerry P.; Dytrych, Tomas; Sviratcheva, Kristina D.; Bahri, Chairul; /Louisiana State U.; Vary, James P.; /Iowa State U. /LLNL, Livermore /SLAC

    2007-04-02

    A symplectic no-core shell model (Sp-NCSM) is constructed with the goal of extending the ab-initio NCSM to include strongly deformed higher-oscillator-shell configurations and to reach heavier nuclei that cannot be studied currently because the spaces encountered are too large to handle, even with the best of modern-day computers. This goal is achieved by integrating two powerful concepts: the ab-initio NCSM with that of the Sp(3,R) {contains} SU(3) group-theoretical approach. The NCSM uses modern realistic nuclear interactions in model spaces that consists of many-body configurations up to a given number of {h_bar}{Upsilon} excitations together with modern high-performance parallel computing techniques. The symplectic theory extends this picture by recognizing that when deformed configurations dominate, which they often do, the model space can be better selected so less relevant low-lying {h_bar}{Upsilon} configurations yield to more relevant high-lying {h_bar}{Upsilon} configurations, ones that respect a near symplectic symmetry found in the Hamiltonian. Results from an application of the Sp-NCSM to light nuclei are compared with those for the NCSM and with experiment.

  18. Accession data for analysed Xestospongia testudinaria metatranscriptomes, supplement to: Jahn, Martin T; Markert, Sebastian M; Ryu, Taewoo; Ravasi, Timothy; Stigloher, Christian; Hentschel, Ute; Moitinho-Silva, Lucas (2016): Shedding light on cell compartmentation in the candidate phylum Poribacteria by high resolution visualisation and transcriptional profiling. Scientific Reports, 6, 35860

    KAUST Repository

    Jahn, Martin T

    2016-01-01

    Assigning functions to uncultivated environmental microorganisms continues to be a challenging endeavour. Here, we present a new microscopy protocol for fluorescence in situ hybridisation-correlative light and electron microscopy (FISH-CLEM) that enabled, to our knowledge for the first time, the identification of single cells within their complex microenvironment at electron microscopy resolution. Members of the candidate phylum Poribacteria, common and uncultivated symbionts of marine sponges, were used towards this goal. Cellular 3D reconstructions revealed bipolar, spherical granules of low electron density, which likely represent carbon reserves. Poribacterial activity profiles were retrieved from prokaryotic enriched sponge metatranscriptomes using simulation-based optimised mapping. We observed high transcriptional activity for proteins related to bacterial microcompartments (BMC) and we resolved their subcellular localisation by combining FISH-CLEM with immunohistochemistry (IHC) on ultra-thin sponge tissue sections. In terms of functional relevance, we propose that the BMC-A region may be involved in 1,2-propanediol degradation. The FISH-IHC-CLEM approach was proven an effective toolkit to combine -omics approaches with functional studies and it should be widely applicable in environmental microbiology.

  19. Suppression of vortex shedding around a square cylinder using ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Direct numerical simulation (DNS) of flow past a square cylinder at a Reynolds number of 100 has been carried out to explore the effect of blowing in the form of jet(s) on vortex shedding. Higher order spatial as well as temporal discretization has been employed for the discretization of governing equations. The varying ...

  20. Vortex Shedding and Depinning of Wind-Forced Liquid Drops

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, Roger; White, Edward

    2017-11-01

    Water drops adhere to solid substrates but can depin when wind forcing exceeds the adhesion force provided by surface tension. Schmucker and White (2012.DFD.M4.6) measured critical wind forcing limits for high-Reynolds-number airflow forcing and found a critical constant Weber number, Wecrit = 8.0 , for a range of drop Bond numbers. This work seeks to identify what behavior is associated with Wecrit = 8.0 and why wind-forced drops depin when they do. One hypothesis suggests that, at high Reynolds numbers, drops depin when their interface natural frequency matches the frequency of air vortex shedding in the separated drop wake. We investigate whether a resonance between vortex shedding and drop interface oscillations is involved with depinning. We measure the shedding frequencies behind solid protuberances of the same size as typical drops and, separately, water-drop interface frequencies. We compare our measured values under different flow conditions to establish whether shedding and interface resonance are related to depinning. 1Supported by the National Science Foundation through Grant CBET-1605947.

  1. Faecal Campylobacter shedding among dogs in animal shelters across Texas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leahy, A M; Cummings, K J; Rodriguez-Rivera, L D; Hamer, S A; Lawhon, S D

    2017-12-01

    Epidemiologic studies on faecal Campylobacter shedding among dogs in the United States have been limited, despite evidence that the incidence of human campylobacteriosis has increased over the last decade. Our objectives were to estimate the prevalence of faecal Campylobacter shedding among shelter dogs in Texas, to estimate the specific prevalence of Campylobacter jejuni and Campylobacter coli shedding, and to identify risk factors for Campylobacter-positive status. Using a cross-sectional study design, we collected faecal samples from dogs in six animal shelters across Texas between May and December, 2014. Quantitative PCR protocols were used to detect Campylobacter in samples and to specifically identify C. jejuni and C. coli. The prevalence of faecal Campylobacter shedding among sampled dogs was 75.7% (140/185). Prevalence varied significantly by shelter (p = .03), ranging from 57% to 93%. There was a marginal association (p = .06) between abnormal faecal consistency and positive Campylobacter status, after controlling for shelter as a random effect. However, approximately 70% of Campylobacter-positive dogs had grossly normal faeces. Campylobacter prevalence did not vary significantly by age group or sex. The prevalence of C. jejuni-positive samples was 5.4% (10/185), but C. coli was not detected in any samples. Dogs are a potential source of zoonotic Campylobacter transmission. © 2017 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  2. Suppression of vortex shedding around a square cylinder using ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. Direct numerical simulation (DNS) of flow past a square cylinder at a. Reynolds number of 100 has been carried out to explore the effect of blowing in the form of jet(s) on vortex shedding. Higher order spatial as well as temporal discretiza- tion has been employed for the discretization of governing equations.

  3. [Forest lighting fire forecasting for Daxing'anling Mountains based on MAXENT model].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yu; Shi, Ming-Chang; Peng, Huan; Zhu, Pei-Lin; Liu, Si-Lin; Wu, Shi-Lei; He, Cheng; Chen, Feng

    2014-04-01

    Daxing'anling Mountains is one of the areas with the highest occurrence of forest lighting fire in Heilongjiang Province, and developing a lightning fire forecast model to accurately predict the forest fires in this area is of importance. Based on the data of forest lightning fires and environment variables, the MAXENT model was used to predict the lightning fire in Daxing' anling region. Firstly, we studied the collinear diagnostic of each environment variable, evaluated the importance of the environmental variables using training gain and the Jackknife method, and then evaluated the prediction accuracy of the MAXENT model using the max Kappa value and the AUC value. The results showed that the variance inflation factor (VIF) values of lightning energy and neutralized charge were 5.012 and 6.230, respectively. They were collinear with the other variables, so the model could not be used for training. Daily rainfall, the number of cloud-to-ground lightning, and current intensity of cloud-to-ground lightning were the three most important factors affecting the lightning fires in the forest, while the daily average wind speed and the slope was of less importance. With the increase of the proportion of test data, the max Kappa and AUC values were increased. The max Kappa values were above 0.75 and the average value was 0.772, while all of the AUC values were above 0.5 and the average value was 0. 859. With a moderate level of prediction accuracy being achieved, the MAXENT model could be used to predict forest lightning fire in Daxing'anling Mountains.

  4. Further validation of the hybrid particle-mesh method for vortex shedding flow simulations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seung-Jae Lee

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available This is the continuation of a numerical study on vortex shedding from a blunt trailing-edge of a hydrofoil. In our previous work (Lee et al., 2015, numerical schemes for efficient computations were successfully implemented; i.e. multiple domains, the approximation of domain boundary conditions using cubic spline functions, and particle- based domain decomposition for better load balancing. In this study, numerical results through a hybrid particle-mesh method which adopts the Vortex-In-Cell (VIC method and the Brinkman penalization model are further rigorously validated through comparison to experimental data at the Reynolds number of 2 × 106. The effects of changes in numerical parameters are also explored herein. We find that the present numerical method enables us to reasonably simulate vortex shedding phenomenon, as well as turbulent wakes of a hydrofoil.

  5. On the origins of vortex shedding in two-dimensional incompressible flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boghosian, M. E.; Cassel, K. W.

    2016-12-01

    An exegesis of a novel mechanism leading to vortex splitting and subsequent shedding that is valid for two-dimensional incompressible, inviscid or viscous, and external or internal or wall-bounded flows, is detailed in this research. The mechanism, termed the vortex shedding mechanism (VSM) is simple and intuitive, requiring only two coincident conditions in the flow: (1) the existence of a location with zero momentum and (2) the presence of a net force having a positive divergence. Numerical solutions of several model problems illustrate causality of the VSM. Moreover, the VSM criteria is proved to be a necessary and sufficient condition for a vortex splitting event in any two-dimensional, incompressible flow. The VSM is shown to exist in several canonical problems including the external flow past a circular cylinder. Suppression of the von Kármán vortex street is demonstrated for Reynolds numbers of 100 and 400 by mitigating the VSM.

  6. Assessing agreement in measurements of orthodontic study models: Digital caliper on plaster models vs 3-dimensional software on models scanned by structured-light scanner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan Hassan, Wan Nurazreena; Othman, Siti Adibah; Chan, Chee Seng; Ahmad, Roshahida; Ali, Siti Nor'Ain; Abd Rohim, Anis

    2016-11-01

    In this study we aimed to compare measurements on plaster models using a digital caliper, and on 3-dimensional (3D) digital models, produced using a structured-light scanner, using 3D software. Fifty digital models were scanned from the same plaster models. Arch and tooth size measurements were made by 2 operators, twice. Calibration was done on 10 sets of models and checked using the Pearson correlation coefficient. Data were analyzed by error variances, repeatability coefficient, repeated-measures analysis of variance, and Bland-Altman plots. Error variances ranged between 0.001 and 0.044 mm for the digital caliper method, and between 0.002 and 0.054 mm for the 3D software method. Repeated-measures analysis of variance showed small but statistically significant differences (P <0.05) between the repeated measurements in the arch and buccolingual planes (0.011 and 0.008 mm, respectively). There were no statistically significant differences between methods and between operators. Bland-Altman plots showed that the mean biases were close to zero, and the 95% limits of agreement were within ±0.50 mm. Repeatability coefficients for all measurements were similar. Measurements made on models scanned by the 3D structured-light scanner were in good agreement with those made on conventional plaster models and were, therefore, clinically acceptable. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  7. Modeling Net Growth of Phaeocystis antarctica Based on Physiological and Optical Responses to Light and Temperature Co-limitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tiffany A. Moisan

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Temperature and light are fundamental environmental variables which regulate phytoplankton growth rates when nutrients are in excess. For polar coastal oceans that are undergoing changes in sea ice cover and warming, light, and temperature are particularly important for bloom dynamics. Using colonial Phaeocystis antarctica cultures grown at steady-state, we assessed the combined effect of these two environmental controls on net growth rate (μn, chlorophyll-specific absorption of light (aph* (λ, and quantum yields for growth (ϕμ. Specific net growth rates (μn varied from 0.04 to 0.34 day−1 within a matrix of light and temperature ranging from 14 to 542 μmol quanta m−2 s−1 and −1.5 to 4°C. Values of aph* (λ varied significantly with light but only slightly with temperature. Values of ϕμ ranged from 0.003 to 0.09 mol C (mol quanta absorbed−1 with highest values at low light and 4°C. For excess irradiances or low temperatures where growth rate is inhibited, quantum yields were low. The low ϕμ values are attributed both to increased absorption by photoprotective pigments compared to photosynthetic pigments and thermodynamic control of dark reaction enzymes. The systematic changes in photophysiological properties of P. antarctica in relation to temperature and light were used to develop a series of nested light- and temperature-dependent models for μn, aph* (λ, and ϕμ. A model for aph* (300–700 nm was developed that takes into account the systematic changes in aph* (λ due to pigment packaging effects and cellular concentrations of chlorophylls and photoprotective pigments. Also, a model for ϕμ was developed based on a cumulative one-hit Poisson probability function. These model parameterizations for absorption and quantum yield are combined into an overall model of net growth that can be applied easily to P. antarctica bloom dynamics using remote sensing data for temperature, light, and chlorophyll a. Furthermore

  8. A structure-based model of energy transfer reveals the principles of light harvesting in photosystem II supercomplexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, Doran I G; Amarnath, Kapil; Fleming, Graham R

    2013-06-19

    Photosystem II (PSII) initiates photosynthesis in plants through the absorption of light and subsequent conversion of excitation energy to chemical energy via charge separation. The pigment binding proteins associated with PSII assemble in the grana membrane into PSII supercomplexes and surrounding light harvesting complex II trimers. To understand the high efficiency of light harvesting in PSII requires quantitative insight into energy transfer and charge separation in PSII supercomplexes. We have constructed the first structure-based model of energy transfer in PSII supercomplexes. This model shows that the kinetics of light harvesting cannot be simplified to a single rate limiting step. Instead, substantial contributions arise from both excitation diffusion through the antenna pigments and transfer from the antenna to the reaction center (RC), where charge separation occurs. Because of the lack of a rate-limiting step, fitting kinetic models to fluorescence lifetime data cannot be used to derive mechanistic insight on light harvesting in PSII. This model will clarify the interpretation of chlorophyll fluorescence data from PSII supercomplexes, grana membranes, and leaves.

  9. Pàgines web de museus a Europa: tendències en estructures i models

    OpenAIRE

    Monistrol, Ricard

    2008-01-01

    Before planning the design of a web site of a museum, they have to be been itself shed light on which their purpose is: the diffusion cultural and the identity from the museum. Moreover, we examine proposals of models and structures of web site museum (Dr. Sara Monaci and Museum&Web) and we propose three conceptual museum models in the WWW.

  10. Neuroscience Meets Music Education: Exploring the Implications of Neural Processing Models on Music Education Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, Anita

    2013-01-01

    Over the past two decades, neuroscientists have been fascinated by the way the brain processes music. Using new technologies, neuroscientists offer us a better understanding of the human brain's structures and functions. They have further proposed explanatory models for how the brain processes music. While these models shed light on how the…

  11. Residuals and the Residual-Based Statistic for Testing Goodness of Fit of Structural Equation Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foldnes, Njal; Foss, Tron; Olsson, Ulf Henning

    2012-01-01

    The residuals obtained from fitting a structural equation model are crucial ingredients in obtaining chi-square goodness-of-fit statistics for the model. The authors present a didactic discussion of the residuals, obtaining a geometrical interpretation by recognizing the residuals as the result of oblique projections. This sheds light on the…

  12. Statistical Analysis of Coherent Ultrashort Light Pulse CDMA With Multiple Optical Amplifiers Using Additive Noise Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jamshidi, Kambiz; Salehi, Jawad A.

    2005-05-01

    This paper describes a study of the performance of various configurations for placing multiple optical amplifiers in a typical coherent ultrashort light pulse code-division multiple access (CULP-CDMA) communication system using the additive noise model. For this study, a comprehensive performance analysis was developed that takes into account multiple-access noise, noise due to optical amplifiers, and thermal noise using the saddle-point approximation technique. Prior to obtaining the overall system performance, the input/output statistical models for different elements of the system such as encoders/decoders,star coupler, and optical amplifiers were obtained. Performance comparisons between an ideal and lossless quantum-limited case and a typical CULP-CDMA with various losses exhibit more than 30 dB more power requirement to obtain the same bit-error rate (BER). Considering the saturation effect of optical amplifiers, this paper discusses an algorithm for amplifiers' gain setting in various stages of the network in order to overcome the nonlinear effects on signal modulation in optical amplifiers. Finally, using this algorithm,various configurations of multiple optical amplifiers in CULP-CDMA are discussed and the rules for the required optimum number of amplifiers are shown with their corresponding optimum locations to be implemented along the CULP-CDMA system.

  13. Explaining dark matter and neutrino mass in the light of TYPE-II seesaw model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biswas, Anirban; Shaw, Avirup

    2018-02-01

    With the motivation of simultaneously explaining dark matter and neutrino masses, mixing angles, we have invoked the Type-II seesaw model extended by an extra SU(2) doublet Φ. Moreover, we have imposed a Z2 parity on Φ which remains unbroken as the vacuum expectation value of Φ is zero. Consequently, the lightest neutral component of Φ becomes naturally stable and can be a viable dark matter candidate. On the other hand, light Majorana masses for neutrinos have been generated following usual Type-II seesaw mechanism. Further in this framework, for the first time we have derived the full set of vacuum stability and unitarity conditions, which must be satisfied to obtain a stable vacuum as well as to preserve the unitarity of the model respectively. Thereafter, we have performed extensive phenomenological studies of both dark matter and neutrino sectors considering all possible theoretical and current experimental constraints. Finally, we have also discussed a qualitative collider signatures of dark matter and associated odd particles at the 13 TeV Large Hadron Collider.

  14. Modeling and design of light powered biomimicry micropump utilizing transporter proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jin; Sze, Tsun-Kay Jackie; Dutta, Prashanta

    2014-11-01

    The creation of compact micropumps to provide steady flow has been an on-going challenge in the field of microfluidics. We present a mathematical model for a micropump utilizing Bacteriorhodopsin and sugar transporter proteins. This micropump utilizes transporter proteins as method to drive fluid flow by converting light energy into chemical potential. The fluid flow through a microchannel is simulated using the Nernst-Planck, Navier-Stokes, and continuity equations. Numerical results show that the micropump is capable of generating usable pressure. Designing parameters influencing the performance of the micropump are investigated including membrane fraction, lipid proton permeability, illumination, and channel height. The results show that there is a substantial membrane fraction region at which fluid flow is maximized. The use of lipids with low membrane proton permeability allows illumination to be used as a method to turn the pump on and off. This capability allows the micropump to be activated and shut off remotely without bulky support equipment. This modeling work provides new insights on mechanisms potentially useful for fluidic pumping in self-sustained bio-mimic microfluidic pumps. This work is supported in part by the National Science Fundation Grant CBET-1250107.

  15. Grain dormancy and light quality effects on germination in the model grass Brachypodium distachyon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrero, José M; Jacobsen, John V; Talbot, Mark J; White, Rosemary G; Swain, Stephen M; Garvin, David F; Gubler, Frank

    2012-01-01

    • Lack of grain dormancy in cereal crops such as barley and wheat is a common problem affecting farming areas around the world, causing losses in yield and quality because of preharvest sprouting. Control of seed or grain dormancy has been investigated extensively using various approaches in different species, including Arabidopsis and cereals. However, the use of a monocot model plant such as Brachypodium distachyon presents opportunities for the discovery of new genes related to grain dormancy that are not present in modern commercial crops. • In this work we present an anatomical description of the Brachypodium caryopsis, and we describe the dormancy behaviour of six common diploid Brachypodium inbred genotypes. We also study the effect of light quality (blue, red and far-red) on germination, and analyse changes in abscisic acid levels and gene expression between a dormant and a non-dormant Brachypodium genotype. • Our results indicate that different genotypes display high natural variability in grain dormancy and that the characteristics of dormancy and germination are similar to those found in other cereals. • We propose that Brachypodium is an ideal model for studies of grain dormancy in grasses and can be used to identify new strategies for increasing grain dormancy in crop species. © 2011 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2011 New Phytologist Trust.

  16. Oblique S and T constraints on electroweak strongly-coupled models with a light Higgs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pich, A. [Departament de Física Teòrica, IFIC, Universitat de València - CSIC,Apt. Correus 22085, E-46071 València (Spain); Rosell, I. [Departament de Física Teòrica, IFIC, Universitat de València - CSIC,Apt. Correus 22085, E-46071 València (Spain); Departamento de Ciencias Físicas, Matemáticas y de la Computación,Universidad CEU Cardenal Herrera,c/ Sant Bartomeu 55, E-46115 Alfara del Patriarca, València (Spain); Sanz-Ciller, J.J. [Departamento de Física Teórica, Instituto de Física Teórica,Universidad Autónoma de Madrid - CSIC,c/ Nicolás Cabrera 13-15, E-28049 Cantoblanco, Madrid (Spain)

    2014-01-28

    Using a general effective Lagrangian implementing the chiral symmetry breaking SU(2){sub L}⊗SU(2){sub R}→SU(2){sub L+R}, we present a one-loop calculation of the oblique S and T parameters within electroweak strongly-coupled models with a light scalar. Imposing a proper ultraviolet behaviour, we determine S and T at next-to-leading order in terms of a few resonance parameters. The constraints from the global fit to electroweak precision data force the massive vector and axial-vector states to be heavy, with masses above the TeV scale, and suggest that the W{sup +}W{sup −} and ZZ couplings of the Higgs-like scalar should be close to the Standard Model value. Our findings are generic, since they only rely on soft requirements on the short-distance properties of the underlying strongly-coupled theory, which are widely satisfied in more specific scenarios.

  17. Mucosal HSV-2 specific CD8+ T-cells represent containment of prior viral shedding rather than a correlate of future protection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joshua Tisdell Schiffer

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available It is largely unknown why certain infected hosts shed Herpes Simplex Virus-2 (HSV-2 more frequently and have more severe disease manifestations than others. One idea is that different density or functional capacity of tissue resident effector memory CD8+ T-cells between infected persons may explain phenotypic variability. To generate hypotheses for contrasting shedding patterns in different infected hosts, a spatial mathematical model was employed to evaluate the effects of variability in tissue resident effector memory CD8+ T-cell response, and HSV-2 replication and spread, on viral shedding rate. Model simulations suggest that high levels of CD8+ T-cells in the mucosa do not necessarily indicate a protective phenotype but rather an effective response to recent shedding. Moreover, higher CD8+ T-cell expansion rate and lower viral replication rate, which correlate with better short-term control, may have only a minor impact on long term shedding rates. Breakthrough shedding occurs under all sets of model parameter assumptions, because CD8+ T-cell levels only surpass a protective threshold in a minority of genital tract mucosal micro-regions. If CD8+ T-cell levels are artificially increased using an immunotherapeutic approach, better control of shedding is predicted to occur for at least a year. These results highlight the complex co-dependent relationship between HSV-2 and tissue resident CD8+ lymphocytes during the course of natural infection.

  18. Seagrass canopy photosynthetic response is a function of canopy density and light environment: a model for Amphibolis griffithii.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John D Hedley

    Full Text Available A three-dimensional computer model of canopies of the seagrass Amphibolis griffithii was used to investigate the consequences of variations in canopy structure and benthic light environment on leaf-level photosynthetic saturation state. The model was constructed using empirical data of plant morphometrics from a previously conducted shading experiment and validated well to in-situ data on light attenuation in canopies of different densities. Using published values of the leaf-level saturating irradiance for photosynthesis, results show that the interaction of canopy density and canopy-scale photosynthetic response is complex and non-linear, due to the combination of self-shading and the non-linearity of photosynthesis versus irradiance (P-I curves near saturating irradiance. Therefore studies of light limitation in seagrasses should consider variation in canopy structure and density. Based on empirical work, we propose a number of possible measures for canopy scale photosynthetic response that can be plotted to yield isoclines in the space of canopy density and light environment. These plots can be used to interpret the significance of canopy changes induced as a response to decreases in the benthic light environment: in some cases canopy thinning can lead to an equivalent leaf level light environment, in others physiological changes may also be required but these alone may be inadequate for canopy survival. By providing insight to these processes the methods developed here could be a valuable management tool for seagrass conservation during dredging or other coastal developments.

  19. Non-image-forming light driven functions are preserved in a mouse model of autosomal dominant optic atrophy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Georgia Perganta

    Full Text Available Autosomal dominant optic atrophy (ADOA is a slowly progressive optic neuropathy that has been associated with mutations of the OPA1 gene. In patients, the disease primarily affects the retinal ganglion cells (RGCs and causes optic nerve atrophy and visual loss. A subset of RGCs are intrinsically photosensitive, express the photopigment melanopsin and drive non-image-forming (NIF visual functions including light driven circadian and sleep behaviours and the pupil light reflex. Given the RGC pathology in ADOA, disruption of NIF functions might be predicted. Interestingly in ADOA patients the pupil light reflex was preserved, although NIF behavioural outputs were not examined. The B6; C3-Opa1(Q285STOP mouse model of ADOA displays optic nerve abnormalities, RGC dendropathy and functional visual disruption. We performed a comprehensive assessment of light driven NIF functions in this mouse model using wheel running activity monitoring, videotracking and pupillometry. Opa1 mutant mice entrained their activity rhythm to the external light/dark cycle, suppressed their activity in response to acute light exposure at night, generated circadian phase shift responses to 480 nm and 525 nm pulses, demonstrated immobility-defined sleep induction following exposure to a brief light pulse at night and exhibited an intensity dependent pupil light reflex. There were no significant differences in any parameter tested relative to wildtype littermate controls. Furthermore, there was no significant difference in the number of melanopsin-expressing RGCs, cell morphology or melanopsin transcript levels between genotypes. Taken together, these findings suggest the preservation of NIF functions in Opa1 mutants. The results provide support to growing evidence that the melanopsin-expressing RGCs are protected in mitochondrial optic neuropathies.

  20. An LED light source and novel fluorophore combinations improve fluorescence laparoscopic detection of metastatic pancreatic cancer in orthotopic mouse models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metildi, Cristina A; Kaushal, Sharmeela; Lee, Claudia; Hardamon, Chanae R; Snyder, Cynthia S; Luiken, George A; Talamini, Mark A; Hoffman, Robert M; Bouvet, Michael

    2012-06-01

    The aim of this study was to improve fluorescence laparoscopy of pancreatic cancer in an orthotopic mouse model with the use of a light-emitting diode (LED) light source and optimal fluorophore combinations. Human pancreatic cancer models were established with fluorescent FG-RFP, MiaPaca2-GFP, BxPC-3-RFP, and BxPC-3 cancer cells implanted in 6-week-old female athymic mice. Two weeks postimplantation, diagnostic laparoscopy was performed with a Stryker L9000 LED light source or a Stryker X8000 xenon light source 24 hours after tail-vein injection of CEA antibodies conjugated with Alexa 488 or Alexa 555. Cancer lesions were detected and localized under each light mode. Intravital images were also obtained with the OV-100 Olympus and Maestro CRI Small Animal Imaging Systems, serving as a positive control. Tumors were collected for histologic analysis. Fluorescence laparoscopy with a 495-nm emission filter and an LED light source enabled real-time visualization of the fluorescence-labeled tumor deposits in the peritoneal cavity. The simultaneous use of different fluorophores (Alexa 488 and Alexa 555), conjugated to antibodies, brightened the fluorescence signal, enhancing detection of submillimeter lesions without compromising background illumination. Adjustments to the LED light source permitted simultaneous detection of tumor lesions of different fluorescent colors and surrounding structures with minimal autofluorescence. Using an LED light source with adjustments to the red, blue, and green wavelengths, it is possible to simultaneously identify tumor metastases expressing fluorescent proteins of different wavelengths, which greatly enhanced the signal without compromising background illumination. Development of this fluorescence laparoscopy technology for clinical use can improve staging and resection of pancreatic cancer. Copyright © 2012 American College of Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Thermodynamic Modelling of Fe-Cr-Ni-Spinel Formation at the Light-Water Reactor Conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kurepin, V. A.; Kulik, D. A.; Hitpold, A.; Nicolet, M.

    2002-03-01

    In the light water reactors (LWR), the neutron activation and transport of corrosion products is of concern in the context of minimizing the radiation doses received by the personnel during maintenance works. A practically useful model for transport and deposition of the stainless steel corrosion products in LWR can only be based on an improved understanding of chemical processes, in particular, on the attainment of equilibrium in this hydrothermal system, which can be described by means of a thermodynamic solid-solution -aqueous-solution (SSAS) model. In this contribution, a new thermodynamic model for a Fe-Cr-Ni multi-component spinel solid solutions was developed that considers thermodynamic consequences of cation interactions in both spinel sub-Iattices. The obtained standard thermodynamic properties of two ferrite and two chromite end-members and their mixing parameters at 90 bar pressure and 290 *c temperature predict a large miscibility gap between (Fe,Ni) chromite and (Fe,Ni) ferrite phases. Together with the SUPCRT92-98 thermo- dynamic database for aqueous species, the 'spinel' thermodynamic dataset was applied to modeling oxidation of austenitic stainless steel in hydrothermal water at 290*C and 90 bar using the Gibbs energy minimization (GEM) algorithm, implemented in the GEMS-PSI code. Firstly, the equilibrium compositions of steel oxidation products were modelIed as function of oxygen fugacity .fO 2 by incremental additions of O 2 in H 2 O-free system Cr-Fe- Ni-O. Secondly, oxidation of corrosion products in the Fe-Cr-Ni-O-H aquatic system was modelIed at different initial solid/water ratios. It is demonstrated that in the transition region from hydrogen regime to oxygen regime, the most significant changes in composition of two spinel-oxide phases (chromite and ferrite) and hematite must take place. Under more reduced conditions, the Fe-rich ferrite (magnetite) and Ni-poor chromite phases co-exist at equilibrium with a metal Ni phase, maintaining

  2. Modeling and simulation challenges pursued by the Consortium for Advanced Simulation of Light Water Reactors (CASL)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turinsky, Paul J.; Kothe, Douglas B.

    2016-05-01

    The Consortium for the Advanced Simulation of Light Water Reactors (CASL), the first Energy Innovation Hub of the Department of Energy, was established in 2010 with the goal of providing modeling and simulation (M&S) capabilities that support and accelerate the improvement of nuclear energy's economic competitiveness and the reduction of spent nuclear fuel volume per unit energy, and all while assuring nuclear safety. To accomplish this requires advances in M&S capabilities in radiation transport, thermal-hydraulics, fuel performance and corrosion chemistry. To focus CASL's R&D, industry challenge problems have been defined, which equate with long standing issues of the nuclear power industry that M&S can assist in addressing. To date CASL has developed a multi-physics ;core simulator; based upon pin-resolved radiation transport and subchannel (within fuel assembly) thermal-hydraulics, capitalizing on the capabilities of high performance computing. CASL's fuel performance M&S capability can also be optionally integrated into the core simulator, yielding a coupled multi-physics capability with untapped predictive potential. Material models have been developed to enhance predictive capabilities of fuel clad creep and growth, along with deeper understanding of zirconium alloy clad oxidation and hydrogen pickup. Understanding of corrosion chemistry (e.g., CRUD formation) has evolved at all scales: micro, meso and macro. CFD R&D has focused on improvement in closure models for subcooled boiling and bubbly flow, and the formulation of robust numerical solution algorithms. For multiphysics integration, several iterative acceleration methods have been assessed, illuminating areas where further research is needed. Finally, uncertainty quantification and data assimilation techniques, based upon sampling approaches, have been made more feasible for practicing nuclear engineers via R&D on dimensional reduction and biased sampling. Industry adoption of CASL's evolving M

  3. Tree Size Inequality Reduces Forest Productivity: An Analysis Combining Inventory Data for Ten European Species and a Light Competition Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourdier, Thomas; Cordonnier, Thomas; Kunstler, Georges; Piedallu, Christian; Lagarrigues, Guillaume; Courbaud, Benoit

    2016-01-01

    Plant structural diversity is usually considered as beneficial for ecosystem functioning. For instance, numerous studies have reported positive species diversity-productivity relationships in plant communities. However, other aspects of structural diversity such as individual size inequality have been far less investigated. In forests, tree size inequality impacts directly tree growth and asymmetric competition, but consequences on forest productivity are still indeterminate. In addition, the effect of tree size inequality on productivity is likely to vary with species shade-tolerance, a key ecological characteristic controlling asymmetric competition and light resource acquisition. Using plot data from the French National Geographic Agency, we studied the response of stand productivity to size inequality for ten forest species differing in shade tolerance. We fitted a basal area stand production model that included abiotic factors, stand density, stand development stage and a tree size inequality index. Then, using a forest dynamics model we explored whether mechanisms of light interception and light use efficiency could explain the tree size inequality effect observed for three of the ten species studied. Size inequality negatively affected basal area increment for seven out of the ten species investigated. However, this effect was not related to the shade tolerance of these species. According to the model simulations, the negative tree size inequality effect could result both from reduced total stand light interception and reduced light use efficiency. Our results demonstrate that negative relationships between size inequality and productivity may be the rule in tree populations. The lack of effect of shade tolerance indicates compensatory mechanisms between effect on light availability and response to light availability. Such a pattern deserves further investigations for mixed forests where complementarity effects between species are involved. When studying the

  4. Laminar vortex shedding behind a cooled circular cylinder

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Trávníček, Zdeněk; Wang, A. B.; Tu, W.Y.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 55, č. 2 (2014), s. 1-12 ISSN 0723-4864 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA14-08888S Institutional support: RVO:61388998 Keywords : vortex shedding * cooled circular cylinder * thermal effect Subject RIV: JU - Aeronautics, Aerodynamics, Aircrafts Impact factor: 1.670, year: 2014 http://link.springer.com/journal/348/55/2/page/1

  5. Shed-blood-separation and cell-saver

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bauer, Adrian; Hausmann, Harald; Schaarschmidt, Jan

    2018-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The postoperative systemic inflammatory response after cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) is still an undesirable side-effect after cardiac surgery. It is most likely caused by blood contact with foreign surfaces and by the surgical trauma itself. However, the recirculation of activated shed...... of a cell-saver (TNF-α ng/l post-ECC 10 min: 9.5±3.5 vs. 19.7±14.5, p

  6. Syndecan-4 shedding impairs macrovascular angiogenesis in diabetes mellitus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Ran; Xie, Jun; Wu, Han; Li, Guannan; Chen, Jianzhou; Chen, Qinhua; Wang, Lian; Xu, Biao, E-mail: xubiao@medmail.com.cn

    2016-05-20

    Purpose: Syndecan-4 (synd4) is a ubiquitous heparan sulfate proteoglycan cell surface receptor that modulates cell proliferation, migration, mechanotransduction, and endocytosis. The extracellular domain of synd4 sheds heavily in acute inflammation, but the shedding of synd4 in chronic inflammation, such as diabetes mellitus (DM), is still undefined. We investigated the alterations of synd4 endothelial expression in DM and the influence of impaired synd4 signaling on angiogenesis in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs), diabetic rats, synd4 null mice, and db/db mice. Material and methods: HUVECs were incubated with advanced glycation end products (AGEs). Western blot analysis was used to determine synd4 protein expression and ELISA was used to detect soluble synd4 fragments. The concentration of synd4 in the aortic endothelia of diabetic rats was detected by immunohistochemical staining. Aortic ring assays were performed to study the process of angiogenesis in the diabetic rats and in synd4 null and db/db mice. Recombinant adenoviruses containing the synd4 gene or null were constructed to enhance synd4 aortic expression in db/db mice. Results: Western blot analysis showed decreased expression of the synd4 extracellular domain in HUVECs, and ELISA detected increased soluble fragments of synd4 in the media. Synd4 endothelial expression in the aortas of diabetic rats was decreased. Aortic ring assay indicated impaired angiogenesis in synd4 null and db/db mice, which was partially reversed by synd4 overexpression in db/db mice. Conclusion: Synd4 shedding from vascular endothelial cells played an important role in the diabetes-related impairment of angiogenesis. -- Highlights: •Synd4 shedding from endothelial cells is accelerated under the stimulation of AGEs. •Extracellular domain of synd4 is diminished in the endothelium of DM rats. •Aortic rings of synd4 null mice showed impaired angiogenesis. •Overexpression of synd4 partly rescues macrovascular

  7. Vortex Shedding from Tapered Cylinders at high Reynolds Numbers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansson, Jens; Andersen, Michael Styrk; Christensen, Silas Sverre

    2015-01-01

    percent for strakes of circular cross section. The present paper argues that this height can be reduced for structures where the critical wind velocity for vortex shedding is in the Supercritical Reynolds number regime. The present investigations are aimed for suppressing VIV on offshore wind turbine......^5 (Supercritical). Results indicate that circular strakes with a diameter corresponding to 3 percent of the structures mean diameter can be used to efficiently reduce VIV in the Supercritical Reynolds number regime....

  8. Neutronic and Thermal-hydraulic Modelling of High Performance Light Water Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seppaelae, Malla

    2008-01-01

    High Performance Light Water Reactor (HPLWR), which is studied in EU project 'HPLWR2', uses water at supercritical pressures as coolant and moderator to achieve higher core outlet temperature and thus higher efficiency compared to present reactors. At VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland, functionality of the thermal-hydraulics in the coupled reactor dynamics code TRAB3D/ SMABRE was extended to supercritical pressures for the analyses of HPLWR. Input models for neutronics and thermal-hydraulics were made for TRAB3D/ SMABRE according to the latest HPLWR design. A preliminary analysis was performed in which the capability of SMABRE in the transition from supercritical pressures to subcritical pressures was demonstrated. Parameterized two-group cross sections for TRAB3D neutronics were received from Hungarian Academy of Sciences KFKI Atomic Energy Research Institute together with a subroutine for handling them. PSG, a new Monte Carlo transport code developed at VTT, was also used to generate two-group constants for HPLWR and comparisons were made with the KFKI cross sections and MCNP calculations. (author)

  9. Neutronic and Thermal-hydraulic Modelling of High Performance Light Water Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seppaelae, Malla [VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland, P.O.Box 1000, FI02044 VTT (Finland)

    2008-07-01

    High Performance Light Water Reactor (HPLWR), which is studied in EU project 'HPLWR2', uses water at supercritical pressures as coolant and moderator to achieve higher core outlet temperature and thus higher efficiency compared to present reactors. At VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland, functionality of the thermal-hydraulics in the coupled reactor dynamics code TRAB3D/ SMABRE was extended to supercritical pressures for the analyses of HPLWR. Input models for neutronics and thermal-hydraulics were made for TRAB3D/ SMABRE according to the latest HPLWR design. A preliminary analysis was performed in which the capability of SMABRE in the transition from supercritical pressures to subcritical pressures was demonstrated. Parameterized two-group cross sections for TRAB3D neutronics were received from Hungarian Academy of Sciences KFKI Atomic Energy Research Institute together with a subroutine for handling them. PSG, a new Monte Carlo transport code developed at VTT, was also used to generate two-group constants for HPLWR and comparisons were made with the KFKI cross sections and MCNP calculations. (author)

  10. Light-absorbing Particles in Snow and Ice: Measurement and Modeling of Climatic and Hydrological Impact

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qian, Yun; Yasunari, Teppei J.; Doherty, Sarah J.; Flanner, M. G.; Lau, William K.; Ming, J.; Wang, Hailong; Wang, Mo; Warren, Stephen G.; Zhang, Rudong

    2015-01-01

    Light absorbing particles (LAP, e.g., black carbon, brown carbon, and dust) influence water and energy budgets of the atmosphere and snowpack in multiple ways. In addition to their effects associated with atmospheric heating by absorption of solar radiation and interactions with clouds, LAP in snow on land and ice can reduce the surface reflectance (a.k.a., surface darkening), which is likely to accelerate the snow aging process and further reduces snow albedo and increases the speed of snowpack melt. LAP in snow and ice (LAPSI) has been identified as one of major forcings affecting climate change, e.g. in the fourth and fifth assessment reports of IPCC. However, the uncertainty level in quantifying this effect remains very high. In this review paper, we document various technical methods of measuring LAPSI and review the progress made in measuring the LAPSI in Arctic, Tibetan Plateau and other mid-latitude regions. We also report the progress in modeling the mass concentrations, albedo reduction, radiative forcing, andclimatic and hydrological impact of LAPSI at global and regional scales. Finally we identify some research needs for reducing the uncertainties in the impact of LAPSI on global and regional climate and the hydrological cycle.

  11. NF-kB activation as a biomarker of light injury using a transgenic mouse model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pocock, Ginger M.; Boretsky, Adam; Wang, Heuy-Ching; Golden, Dallas; Gupta, Praveena; Vargas, Gracie; Oliver, Jeffrey W.; Motamedi, Massoud

    2012-03-01

    The spatial and temporal activation of NF-kB (p65) was monitored in the retina of a transgenic mouse model (cis-NFkB-EGFP) in vivo after receiving varying grades of laser induced thermal injury in one eye. Baseline images of the retinas from 26 mice were collected prior to injury and up to five months post-exposure using a Heidelberg Spectralis HRA confocal scanning laser ophthalmoscope (cSLO) with a spectral domain optical coherence tomographer (SDOCT). Injured and control eyes were enucleated at discrete time points following laser exposure for cryosectioning to determine localization of NF-kB dependent enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) reporter gene expression within the retina using fluorescence microscopy. In addition, EGFP basal expression in brain and retinal tissue from the cis-NFkB-EGFP was characterized using two-photon imaging. Regions of the retina exposed to threshold and supra-threshold laser damage evaluated using fluorescence cSLO showed increased EGFP fluorescence localized to the exposed region for a duration that was dependent upon the degree of injury. Fluorescence microscopy of threshold damage revealed EGFP localized to the outer nuclear region and retinal pigment epithelial layer. Basal expression of EGFP imaged using two-photon microscopy was heterogeneously distributed throughout brain tissue and confined to the inner retina. Results show cis-NF-kB-EGFP reporter mouse can be used for in vivo studies of light induced injury to the retina and possibly brain injury.

  12. Quantum phase transitions of light in a dissipative Dicke-Bose-Hubbard model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Ren-Cun; Tan, Lei; Zhang, Wen-Xuan; Liu, Wu-Ming

    2017-09-01

    The impact that the environment has on the quantum phase transition of light in the Dicke-Bose-Hubbard model is investigated. Based on the quasibosonic approach, mean-field theory, and perturbation theory, the formulation of the Hamiltonian, the eigenenergies, and the superfluid order parameter are obtained analytically. Compared with the ideal cases, the order parameter of the system evolves with time as the photons naturally decay in their environment. When the system starts with the superfluid state, the dissipation makes the photons more likely to localize, and a greater hopping energy of photons is required to restore the long-range phase coherence of the localized state of the system. Furthermore, the Mott lobes depend crucially on the numbers of atoms and photons (which disappear) of each site, and the system tends to be classical with the number of atoms increasing; however, the atomic number is far lower than that expected under ideal circumstances. As there is an inevitable interaction between the coupled-cavity array and its surrounding environment in the actual experiments, the system is intrinsically dissipative. The results obtained here provide a more realistic image for characterizing the dissipative nature of quantum phase transitions in lossy platforms, which will offer valuable insight into quantum simulation of a dissipative system and which are helpful in guiding experimentalists in open quantum systems.

  13. Modeling of quasi-guiding light within the lower refractive index core layer(s)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Uranus, H.P.; Hoekstra, Hugo; van Groesen, Embrecht W.C.

    2005-01-01

    It is well known that light can be guided within layer(s) having refractive index higher than that of the surroundings by means of the total internal reflection principles. However, using a proper structure, light can also be quasi-confined into layer(s) with refractive indices lower than the

  14. A Simple Electromagnetic Model for the Light Clock of Special Relativity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Glenn S.

    2011-01-01

    Thought experiments involving a light clock are common in introductory treatments of special relativity, because they provide a simple way of demonstrating the non-intuitive phenomenon of time dilation. The properties of the ray or pulse of light that is continuously reflected between the parallel mirrors of the clock are often stated vaguely and…

  15. Bonding bare die LEDs on PET foils for lighting applications: Thermal design modeling and bonding experiments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ende, D.A. van den; Kusters, R.H.L.; Cauwe, M.; Waal, A. van der; Brand, J. van den

    2012-01-01

    Integration of LEDs on flexible foil substrates is of interest for flexible lighting applications and flexible photonic devices. A matrix of LEDs on a foil combined with a diffuser can be a potential alternative for flexible OLED lighting devices. Preferably, these LEDs are integrated in an

  16. The modelled photosynthetic effects of different light colours on tomato crop growth and production

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Elings, A.; Meinen, E.; Dieleman, J.A.; Visser, de P.H.B.

    2017-01-01

    Photosynthesis characteristics of tomato plants grown under LED modules that produced blue, green, red, and white light were determined. Photosynthesis rates at low light intensity of plants grown and measured under the same colour related to each other as: white › red › green › blue. However, rates

  17. Electrical-thermal-luminous-chromatic model of phosphor-converted white light-emitting diodes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ye, H.; Koh, S.W.; Yuan, C.; Zeijl, H. van; Gielen, A.W.J.; Lee, S.W.R.; Zhang, G.

    2014-01-01

    The drive of increased electrical currents to achieve high luminous output for phosphor-converted white light-emitting diodes (PW-LED) has led to a series of thermal problems. The light performance of PW-LED is affected by the heat generated by the two major sources in a package/module: chip(s) and

  18. Aural-Nondetectability Model Predictions for Night-Vision Goggles across Ambient Lighting Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-12-01

    Ambient Lighting Conditions by Jeremy Gaston, Ashley Foots, Christopher Stachowiak , and Samantha Chambers Approved for...Lighting Conditions Jeremy Gaston, Ashley Foots, Christopher Stachowiak , and Samantha Chambers Human Research and Engineering Directorate, ARL...CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) Jeremy Gaston, Ashley Foots, Christopher Stachowiak , and Samantha

  19. Vortex shedding from two surface-mounted cubes in tandem

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martinuzzi, Robert J.; Havel, Brian

    2004-01-01

    Periodic vortex shedding from two surface-mounted cubes, of height H, in tandem arrangement placed in a thin boundary layer is investigated for a spacing 2H using phase-averaged Laser Doppler Velocimetry. Tests were conducted for a Reynolds number of 22,000, based on H and the freestream velocity, and an approximately 0.07H thick laminar boundary layer. For obstacle separations between 1.5H and 2.5H, the shedding frequency scales inversely with the obstacle spacing, S, such that the Strouhal number based on S is constant or geometrically locked. In this locked regime, periodic shedding is triggered by the interference between a vertical flow stream along the front face of the downstream obstacle and the vortex in the inter-obstacle cavity. This three-dimensional mechanism is not observed for two-dimensional geometries and helps explain why a locked regime cannot be observed for square cylinders in tandem arrangement. Furthermore, it is shown that the structure of the turbulent field in the cavity region differs significantly from that in the base region of a two-dimensional obstacle

  20. Genital HSV Shedding among Kenyan Women Initiating Antiretroviral Therapy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Griffins O Manguro

    Full Text Available Genital ulcer disease (GUD prevalence increases in the first month of antiretroviral treatment (ART, followed by a return to baseline prevalence by month 3. Since most GUD is caused by herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2, we hypothesized that genital HSV detection would follow a similar pattern after treatment initiation.We conducted a prospective cohort study of 122 HSV-2 and HIV-1 co-infected women with advanced HIV disease who initiated ART and were followed closely with collection of genital swab specimens for the first three months of treatment.At baseline, the HSV detection rate was 32%, without significant increase in genital HSV detection noted during the first month or the third month of ART. HIV-1 shedding declined during this period; no association was also noted between HSV and HIV-1 shedding during this period.Because other studies have reported increased HSV detection in women initiating ART and we have previously reported an increase in GUD during early ART, it may be prudent to counsel HIV-1 infected women initiating ART that HSV shedding in the genital tract may continue after ART initiation.