WorldWideScience

Sample records for model scale pressure

  1. Ares I Scale Model Acoustic Test Instrumentation for Acoustic and Pressure Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vargas, Magda B.; Counter, Douglas

    2011-01-01

    Ares I Scale Model Acoustic Test (ASMAT) is a 5% scale model test of the Ares I vehicle, launch pad and support structures conducted at MSFC to verify acoustic and ignition environments and evaluate water suppression systems Test design considerations 5% measurements must be scaled to full scale requiring high frequency measurements Users had different frequencies of interest Acoustics: 200 - 2,000 Hz full scale equals 4,000 - 40,000 Hz model scale Ignition Transient: 0 - 100 Hz full scale equals 0 - 2,000 Hz model scale Environment exposure Weather exposure: heat, humidity, thunderstorms, rain, cold and snow Test environments: Plume impingement heat and pressure, and water deluge impingement Several types of sensors were used to measure the environments Different instrument mounts were used according to the location and exposure to the environment This presentation addresses the observed effects of the selected sensors and mount design on the acoustic and pressure measurements

  2. Ares I Scale Model Acoustic Tests Instrumentation for Acoustic and Pressure Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vargas, Magda B.; Counter, Douglas D.

    2011-01-01

    The Ares I Scale Model Acoustic Test (ASMAT) was a development test performed at the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) East Test Area (ETA) Test Stand 116. The test article included a 5% scale Ares I vehicle model and tower mounted on the Mobile Launcher. Acoustic and pressure data were measured by approximately 200 instruments located throughout the test article. There were four primary ASMAT instrument suites: ignition overpressure (IOP), lift-off acoustics (LOA), ground acoustics (GA), and spatial correlation (SC). Each instrumentation suite incorporated different sensor models which were selected based upon measurement requirements. These requirements included the type of measurement, exposure to the environment, instrumentation check-outs and data acquisition. The sensors were attached to the test article using different mounts and brackets dependent upon the location of the sensor. This presentation addresses the observed effect of the sensors and mounts on the acoustic and pressure measurements.

  3. Rotating Pressure and Temperature Measurements on Scale Model Fans Using Luminescent Paints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bencic, Timothy J.

    1998-01-01

    Pressure and temperature sensitive paint (PSP, TSP) technology is a rapidly developing measurement technique that is widely accepted in external aerodynamic wind tunnel measurements. Almost all quantitative full field measurements have been on stationary surfaces. Rotating pressure and temperature measurements were successfully acquired during scale-model fan tests in the NASA Lewis Research Center 9 foot by 15 foot low speed wind tunnel at speeds as high as 9500 RPM. The use of PSP and TSP on rotating surfaces presents additional challenges to data acquisition. This paper describes in detail the techniques used to acquire global rotating pressure and temperature measurements and overcome the problems associated with this type of measurement. These include illumination and detection problems associated with moving surfaces, temperature dependence of PSP and limited emitted light available from short duration illumination sources. Solutions to these problems as well as pressure and temperature results will be discussed.

  4. Mesos-scale modeling of irradiation in pressurized water reactor concrete biological shields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Le Pape, Yann [ORNL; Huang, Hai [Idaho National Laboratory (INL)

    2016-01-01

    Neutron irradiation exposure causes aggregate expansion, namely radiation-induced volumetric expansion (RIVE). The structural significance of RIVE on a portion of a prototypical pressurized water reactor (PWR) concrete biological shield (CBS) is investigated by using a meso- scale nonlinear concrete model with inputs from an irradiation transport code and a coupled moisture transport-heat transfer code. RIVE-induced severe cracking onset appears to be triggered by the ini- tial shrinkage-induced cracking and propagates to a depth of > 10 cm at extended operation of 80 years. Relaxation of the cement paste stresses results in delaying the crack propagation by about 10 years.

  5. Time-resolved transglottal pressure measurements in a scaled up vocal fold model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ringenberg, Hunter; Krane, Michael; Rogers, Dylan; Misfeldt, Mitchel; Wei, Timothy

    2016-11-01

    Experimental measurements of flow through a scaled up dynamic human vocal fold model are presented. The simplified 10x scale vocal fold model from Krane, et al. (2007) was used to examine fundamental features of vocal fold oscillatory motion. Of particular interest was the temporal variation of transglottal pressure multiplied by the volume flow rate through the glottis throughout an oscillation cycle. Experiments were dynamically scaled to examine a range of frequencies, 100 - 200 Hz, corresponding to the male and female voice. By using water as the working fluid, very high resolution, both spatial and temporal resolution, was achieved. Time resolved movies of flow through symmetrically oscillating vocal folds will be presented. Both individual realizations as well as phase-averaged data will be shown. Key features, such as randomness and development time of the Coanda effect, vortex shedding, and volume flow rate data have been presented in previous APS-DFD meetings. This talk will focus more on the relation between the flow and aeroacoustics associated with vocal fold oscillations. Supported by the NIH.

  6. Countercurrent Air-Water Flow in a Scale-Down Model of a Pressurizer Surge Line

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takashi Futatsugi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Steam generated in a reactor core and water condensed in a pressurizer form a countercurrent flow in a surge line between a hot leg and the pressurizer during reflux cooling. Characteristics of countercurrent flow limitation (CCFL in a 1/10-scale model of the surge line were measured using air and water at atmospheric pressure and room temperature. The experimental results show that CCFL takes place at three different locations, that is, at the upper junction, in the surge line, and at the lower junction, and its characteristics are governed by the most dominating flow limitation among the three. Effects of inclination angle and elbows of the surge line on CCFL characteristics were also investigated experimentally. The effects of inclination angle on CCFL depend on the flow direction, that is, the effect is large for the nearly horizontal flow and small for the vertical flow at the upper junction. The presence of elbows increases the flow limitation in the surge line, whereas the flow limitations at the upper and lower junctions do not depend on the presence of elbows.

  7. Water content dynamics at plot scale - comparison of time-lapse electrical resistivity tomography monitoring and pore pressure modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zieher, Thomas; Markart, Gerhard; Ottowitz, David; Römer, Alexander; Rutzinger, Martin; Meißl, Gertraud; Geitner, Clemens

    2017-01-01

    Physically-based dynamic modelling of shallow landslide susceptibility rests on several assumptions and simplifications. However, the applicability of physically-based models is only rarely tested in the field at the appropriate scale. This paper presents results of a spray irrigation experiment conducted on a plot of 100 m2 on an Alpine slope susceptible to shallow landsliding. Infiltrating precipitation applied at a constant rate (27.5 mm/h for 5.3 h) was monitored by means of 2D time-lapse electrical resistivity tomography, combined with time-domain reflectometry sensors installed at various depths. In addition, regolith characteristics were assessed by dynamic cone penetration tests using a light-weight cone penetrometer. The spray irrigation experiment resulted in a vertically progressing wetting front to a depth of 80-100 cm. Below that, the unconsolidated material was already saturated by rainfall in the previous days. The observed mean resistivity reduction attributed to infiltrating water during irrigation was scaled to pressure head. Mean variations in pore pressure were reproduced by a linear diffusion model also used in physically-based dynamic landslide susceptibility modelling. Sensitive parameters (hydraulic conductivity and specific storage) were tested over selected value ranges and calibrated. Calibrated parameter values are within published and experimentally derived ranges. The results of the comparison of observations and model results suggest that the model is capable of reproducing mean changes of pore pressure at a suitable scale for physically-based modelling of shallow landslide susceptibility. However, small-scale variations in pore pressure that may facilitate the triggering of shallow landslides are not captured by the model.

  8. Large scale modelling of salmon lice (Lepeophtheirus salmonis infection pressure based on lice monitoring data from Norwegian salmonid farms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anja B. Kristoffersen

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Infection by parasitic sea lice is a substantial problem in industrial scale salmon farming. To control the problem, Norwegian salmonid farms are not permitted to exceed a threshold level of infection on their fish, and farms are required to monitor and report lice levels on a weekly basis to ensure compliance with the regulation. In the present study, we combine the monitoring data with a deterministic model for salmon lice population dynamics to estimate farm production of infectious lice stages. Furthermore, we use an empirical estimate of the relative risk of salmon lice transmission between farms, that depend on inter-farm distances, to estimate the external infection pressure at a farm site, i.e. the infection pressure from infective salmon lice of neighbouring farm origin. Finally, we test whether our estimates of infection pressure from neighbouring farms as well as internal within farm infection pressure, predicts subsequent development of infection in cohorts of farmed salmonids in their initial phase of marine production. We find that estimated external infection pressure is a main predictor of salmon lice population dynamics in newly stocked cohorts of salmonids. Our results emphasize the importance of keeping the production of infectious lice stages at low levels within local networks of salmon farms. Our model can easily be implemented for real time estimation of infection pressure at the national scale, utilizing the masses of data generated through the compulsory lice monitoring in salmon farms. The implementation of such a system should give the salmon industry greater predictability with respect to salmon lice infection levels, and aid the decision making process when the development of new farm sites are planned.

  9. Construct Validity of the Braden Scale for Pressure Ulcer Assessment in Acute Care: A Structural Equation Modeling Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hong-Lin; Cao, Ying-Juan; Shen, Wang-Qin; Zhu, Bin

    2017-02-01

    The Braden Scale is the most widely used pressure ulcer risk assessment system in the world. To investigate its construct validity using structural equation modeling (SEM), a secondary analysis of retrospective data of patients admitted to an acute care facility was conducted using the records of 2588 patients who were at risk for pressure ulcers and admitted between January 2013 and December 2013. Data were extracted to an Excel sheet and analyzed, including demographic characteristics (ie, patients age, gender, weight, and disease spectrum), as well as total Braden scores and subscale scores. The SEM was set according to modification indices suggestion. The original Braden Scale model was supported by χ2(9) = 22.854, CFI = 0.902, GFI = 0.974, root mean square error of approximation (RMSEA) = 0.092, indicating inadequate model fit. After modification according to software indices, χ2(2) = 2.052, CFI = 0.999, GFI = 0.999, RMSEA = 0.020 indicated an acceptable fit of the model (final model). The factor loadings of 6 subscales were all significant (P <.001), with .147 for nutrition, .137 for activity, .167 for friction and shear, .825 for sensory perception, .626 for mobility, and .556 for moisture subscale. The nutrition, activity, and friction and shear subscales were corrected to examine their relationships with other Braden Scale subscales (nutrition with activity [φ -0.063], activity with friction/shear [φ 0.136], and nutrition (φ friction/shear [0.159]). The factor loadings ranged from -0.067 to 0.159. These findings suggest the original Braden Scale has inadequate construct validity for acute care patients and that new risk-predicting scales should be designed based on data mining. Second, according to the factor loadings in the SEM, the most important risk factor in the Braden Scale for this patient population is sensory perception, followed by mobility and moisture. This suggests practitioners should pay particular attention to pressure ulcer prevention

  10. Ruby fluorescence pressure scale: Revisited

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Lei; Bi, Yan; Xu, Ji-An

    2013-05-01

    Effect of non-hydrostatic stress on X-ray diffraction in a diamond anvil cell (DAC) is studied. The pressure gradient in the sample chamber leads to the broadening of the diffraction peaks, which increase with the hkl index of the crystal. It is found that the difference between the determined d-spacing compressive ratio d/d0 and the real d-spacing compressive ratio dr/d0 is determined by the yield stress of the pressure transmitting media (if used) and the shear modulus of the sample. On the basis of the corrected experiment data of Mao et al. (MXB86), which was used to calibrate the most widely used ruby fluorescence scale, a new relationship of ruby fluorescence pressure scale is corrected, i.e., P = (1904/9.827)[(1 + Δλ/λ0)9.827-1].

  11. A Preliminary Model Study of the Large-Scale Seasonal Cycle in Bottom Pressure Over the Global Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponte, Rui M.

    1998-01-01

    Output from the primitive equation model of Semtner and Chervin is used to examine the seasonal cycle in bottom pressure (Pb) over the global ocean. Effects of the volume-conserving formulation of the model on the calculation Of Pb are considered. The estimated seasonal, large-scale Pb signals have amplitudes ranging from less than 1 cm over most of the deep ocean to several centimeters over shallow, boundary regions. Variability generally increases toward the western sides of the basins, and is also larger in some Southern Ocean regions. An oscillation between subtropical and higher latitudes in the North Pacific is clear. Comparison with barotropic simulations indicates that, on basin scales, seasonal Pb variability is related to barotropic dynamics and the seasonal cycle in Ekman pumping, and results from a small, net residual in mass divergence from the balance between Ekman and Sverdrup flows.

  12. Development of a sub-scale dynamics model for pressure relaxation of multi-material cells in Lagrangian hydrodynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Canfield T.R.

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available We have extended the Sub-Scale Dynamics (SSD closure model for multi-fluid computational cells. Volume exchange between two materials is based on the interface area and a notional interface translation velocity, which is derived from a linearized Riemann solution. We have extended the model to cells with any number of materials, computing pressure-difference-driven volume and energy exchange as the algebraic sum of pairwise interactions. In multiple dimensions, we rely on interface reconstruction to provide interface areas and orientations, and centroids of material polygons. In order to prevent unphysically large or unmanageably small material volumes, we have used a flux-corrected transport (FCT approach to limit the pressure-driven part of the volume exchange. We describe the implementation of this model in two dimensions in the FLAG hydrodynamics code. We also report on Lagrangian test calculations, comparing them with others made using a mixed-zone closure model due to Tipton, and with corresponding calculations made with only single-material cells. We find that in some cases, the SSD model more accurately predicts the state of material in mixed cells. By comparing the algebraic forms of both models, we identify similar dependencies on state and dynamical variables, and propose explanations for the apparent higher fidelity of the SSD model.

  13. Fractional Scaling Analysis for IRIS pressurizer reduced scale experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bezerra da Silva, Mario Augusto, E-mail: mabs500@gmail.co [Departamento de Energia Nuclear - Centro de Tecnologia e Geociencias, Universidade Federal de Pernambuco, Av. Prof. Luiz Freire, 1000, 50740-540 Recife, PE (Brazil); Brayner de Oliveira Lira, Carlos Alberto, E-mail: cabol@ufpe.b [Departamento de Energia Nuclear - Centro de Tecnologia e Geociencias, Universidade Federal de Pernambuco, Av. Prof. Luiz Freire, 1000, 50740-540 Recife, PE (Brazil); Oliveira Barroso, Antonio Carlos de, E-mail: barroso@ipen.b [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares - Comissao Nacional de Energia Nuclear, Av. Prof. Lineu Prestes, 2242, 05508-900 Cidade Universitaria, Sao Paulo (Brazil)

    2010-10-15

    About twenty organizations joined in a consortium led by Westinghouse to develop an integral, modular and medium size pressurized water reactor (PWR), known as international reactor innovative and secure (IRIS), which is characterized by having most of its components inside the pressure vessel, eliminating or minimizing the probability of severe accidents. The pressurizer is responsible for pressure control in PWRs. A small continuous flow is maintained by the spray system in conventional pressurizers. This mini-flow allows a mixing between the reactor coolant and the pressurizer water, warranting acceptable limits for occasional differences in boron concentrations. There are neither surge lines nor spray in IRIS pressurizer, but surge and recirculation orifices that promote a circulation flow between primary system and pressurizer, avoiding power transients whether outsurges occur. The construction of models is a routine practice in engineering, being supported by similarity rules. A new method of scaling systems, Fractional Scaling Analysis, has been successfully used to analyze pressure variations, considering the most relevant agents of change. The aim of this analysis is to obtain the initial boron concentration ratio and the volumetric flows that ensure similar behavior for boron dispersion in a prototype and its model.

  14. Nearfield Unsteady Pressures at Cruise Mach Numbers for a Model Scale Counter-Rotation Open Rotor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephens, David B.

    2012-01-01

    An open rotor experiment was conducted at cruise Mach numbers and the unsteady pressure in the nearfield was measured. The system included extensive performance measurements, which can help provide insight into the noise generating mechanisms in the absence of flow measurements. A set of data acquired at a constant blade pitch angle but various rotor speeds was examined. The tone levels generated by the front and rear rotor were found to be nearly equal when the thrust was evenly balanced between rotors.

  15. Ultimate analysis of a 1/4-scale prestressed concrete containment vessel model subject to internal pressure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Young Jung; Choun, Young Sun; Lee, Sang Jin; Choi, In Kil; Kim, Hyun Ah [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejeon (Korea)

    2002-03-01

    The research on the investigation of ultimate capacity and integrity of the containment structures has been internationally performed since the late 1980's. However, it is almost impossible to predict the behavior and ultimate capacity of concrete structures with enough accuracy, because of the uncertainties in material properties of concrete. Especially it is a difficult task to predict the response of containment structures with numerical methods since the complex behaviors of concrete appear with crack formation. The objectives of this research are to establish and develop nonlinear analysis procedures for ultimate capacity of prestressed concrete containment structure subject to internal pressure. In this research 20 and 3D numerical analysis procedures are accomplished and fully evaluated by the test result of 1/4-scale model of a prestressed concrete containment that was tested by SNL. The computer program ABAQUS was used to analyze the 1/4-scale model. There is the limitation in the estimation of nonlinear response of containment with 2D analysis since it simple and doesn't consider penetrations although it has been widely used. Therefore in this research 3D FE analysis considering discontinuity was performed to estimate the response of containment together with 2D FE analysis. And the results of analysis were compared with the results of the pretest Round Robin Analysis of the PCCV model to examine the validity of analytical methods. 14 refs., 40 figs., 22 tabs. (Author)

  16. SAPHIR - a multi-scale, multi-resolution modeling environment targeting blood pressure regulation and fluid homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, S; Abdulhay, Enas; Baconnier, Pierre; Fontecave, Julie; Francoise, Jean-Pierre; Guillaud, Francois; Hannaert, Patrick; Hernandez, Alfredo; Le Rolle, Virginie; Maziere, Pierre; Tahi, Fariza; Zehraoui, Farida

    2007-01-01

    We present progress on a comprehensive, modular, interactive modeling environment centered on overall regulation of blood pressure and body fluid homeostasis. We call the project SAPHIR, for "a Systems Approach for PHysiological Integration of Renal, cardiac, and respiratory functions". The project uses state-of-the-art multi-scale simulation methods. The basic core model will give succinct input-output (reduced-dimension) descriptions of all relevant organ systems and regulatory processes, and it will be modular, multi-resolution, and extensible, in the sense that detailed submodules of any process(es) can be "plugged-in" to the basic model in order to explore, eg. system-level implications of local perturbations. The goal is to keep the basic core model compact enough to insure fast execution time (in view of eventual use in the clinic) and yet to allow elaborate detailed modules of target tissues or organs in order to focus on the problem area while maintaining the system-level regulatory compensations.

  17. Fuselage and nozzle pressure distributions of a 1/12-scale F-15 propulsion model at transonic speeds. Effect of fuselage modifications and nozzle variables

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pendergraft, O. C., Jr.; Carson, G. T., Jr.

    1984-01-01

    Static pressure coefficient distributions on the forebody, afterbody, and nozzles of a 1/12 scale F-15 propulsion model was determined in the 16 foot transonic tunnel for Mach numbers from 0.60 to 1.20, angles of attack from -2 deg to 7 deg and ratio of jet total pressure to free stream static pressure from 1 up to about 7, depending on Mach number. The effects of nozzle geometry and horizontal tail deflection on the pressure distributions were investigated. Boundary layer total pressure profiles were determined at two locations ahead of the nozzles on the top nacelle surface. Reynolds number varied from about 1.0 x 10 to the 7th power per meter, depending on Mach number.

  18. Shuttle model tailcone pressure distribution at low subsonic speeds of a 0.03614-scale model in the NASA/LaRC low-turbulence pressure tunnel (LA81), volume 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ball, J. W.; Lindahl, R. H.

    1976-01-01

    An investigation was conducted in the NASA/LaRC Low-Turbulence Pressure Tunnel on a 0.03614-scale orbiter model of a 089B configuration with a 139B configuration nose forward of F.S. 500. The tailcone was the TC sub 4 design and was instrumented with eighty-nine pressure orifices. Control surfaces were deflected and three wind tunnel mounting techniques were investigated over an angle-of-attack range from -2 deg to a maximum of 18 deg. In order to determine the sensitivity of the tailcone to changes in Reynolds number, most of the test was made at a Mach number of 0.20 over a Reynolds number range of 2.0 to 10 million per foot. A few runs were made at a Mach number of 0.30 at Reynolds numbers of 4.0, 6.0, and 8 million per foot.

  19. Multi Scale Modelling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huemmer, Matthias [AREVA NP GmbH, Paul-Gossen Strasse 100, Erlangen (Germany)

    2008-07-01

    The safety of the Reactor Pressure Vessels (RPV) must be assured and demonstrated by safety assessments against brittle fracture according to the codes and standards. In addition to these deterministic methods, researchers developed statistic methods, so called local approach (LA) models, to predict specimen or component failure. These models transfer the microscopic fracture events to the macro scale by means of Weibull stresses and therefore can describe the fracture behavior more accurate. This paper will propose a recently developed LA model. After the calibration of the model parameters the wide applicability of the model will be demonstrated. Therefore a large number of computations, based on 3D finite element simulations, have been conducted, containing different specimen types and materials in unirradiated and irradiated condition. Comparison of the experimental data with the predictions attained by means of the LA model shows that the fracture behavior can be well described. (authors)

  20. Luminescent Paints Used for Rotating Temperature and Pressure Measurements on Scale-Model High-Bypass-Ratio Fans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bencic, Timothy J.

    1998-01-01

    NASA Lewis Research Center is a leader in the application of temperature- and pressuresensitive paints (TSP and PSP) in rotating environments. Tests were recently completed on several scale model, high-bypass-ratio turbofans in Lewis' 9- by 15-Foot Low-Speed Wind Tunnel. Two of the test objectives were to determine the aerodynamic and acoustic performance of the fan designs. Using TSP and PSP, researchers successfully achieved fullfield aerodynamic loading profiles. The visualized loading profiles may help researchers identify factors contributing to the fans' performance and to the acoustic characteristics associated with the flow physics on the surface of the blades.

  1. Pressure distributions on a 0.04-scale model of the Space Shuttle Orbiter's forward fuselage in the Langley unitary plan wind tunnel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradley, P. F.; Siemers, P. M., III; Flanagan, P. F.; Henry, M. W.

    1983-01-01

    Pressure distribution tests on a 0.04-scale model of the forward fuselage of the Space Shuttle Orbiter are presented without analysis. The tests were completed in the Langley Unitary Plan Wind Tunnel (UPWT). The UPWT has two different test sections operating in the continuous mode. Each test section has its own Mach number range. The model was tested at angles of attack from -2.5 deg to 30 deg and angles of sideslip from -5 deg to 5 deg in both test sections. The test Reynolds number was 6.6 x 10 to the 6th power per meter. The tests were conducted in support of the development of the Shuttle Entry Air Data System (SEADS). In addition to modeling the 20 SEADS pressure orifices, the wind-tunnel model was also instrumented with orifices to match Development Flight Instrumentation (DFI) port locations currently existing on the Space Shuttle Orbiter Columbia (OV-102). This DFI simulation has provided a means for comparisons between reentry flight pressure data and wind-tunnel data.

  2. Gypsum scaling in pressure retarded osmosis: experiments, mechanisms and implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Minmin; Hou, Dianxun; She, Qianhong; Tang, Chuyang Y

    2014-01-01

    Pressure retarded osmosis (PRO) is an osmotically-driven membrane process that can be used to harvest salinity-gradient power. The PRO performance (both water flux and power density) can be severely limited by membrane fouling. The current study, for the first time, investigates PRO scaling in a bench-scale pressurized system using calcium sulfate dihydrate (gypsum) as a model scalant. In addition to the bulk feed solution (FS) saturation index (SI bulk), gypsum scaling was found to be strongly affected by the draw solution (DS) type and concentration, the applied hydraulic pressure, and the membrane orientation. The commonly recommended active layer facing draw solution (AL-DS) orientation was highly prone to internal scaling. In this orientation, severe internal concentration polarization (ICP) of scaling precursors induced gypsum clogging in membrane support layer even when the FS was undersaturated (e.g., SI bulk = 0.8). At higher SI bulk values, external gypsum crystal deposition occurred in addition to internal scaling. More severe scaling was observed when the DS contained scaling precursors such as Ca(2+) or SO4(2-), suggesting that the reverse diffusion of these precursors into the FS can significantly enhanced gypsum scaling. Increasing applied hydraulic pressure could enhance reverse solute diffusion and thus result in more severe gypsum scaling when the DS contained scaling precursors. A conceptual model, capturing the two important PRO scaling mechanisms (ICP of scaling precursors from FS and reverse diffusion of scaling precursors from the DS), is presented to rationalize the experimental results. Our results provide significant implications for PRO scaling control.

  3. 3He melting pressure temperature scale

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Halperin, W.P.; Archie, C.N.; Richardson, R.C.

    1976-01-01

    The latent heat for solidification of **3He has been measured along the **3He melting curve between 23 and 1 mK. A temperature scale is established which depends only on measurements of heat, pressure and volume, and on the condition that the entropy of solid **3He approaches R ln 2 at high...

  4. Understanding CO2 Plume Behavior and Basin-Scale Pressure Changes during Sequestration Projects through the use of Reservoir Fluid Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leetaru, H.E.; Frailey, S.M.; Damico, J.; Mehnert, E.; Birkholzer, J.; Zhou, Q.; Jordan, P.D.

    2009-01-01

    Large scale geologic sequestration tests are in the planning stages around the world. The liability and safety issues of the migration of CO2 away from the primary injection site and/or reservoir are of significant concerns for these sequestration tests. Reservoir models for simulating single or multi-phase fluid flow are used to understand the migration of CO2 in the subsurface. These models can also help evaluate concerns related to brine migration and basin-scale pressure increases that occur due to the injection of additional fluid volumes into the subsurface. The current paper presents different modeling examples addressing these issues, ranging from simple geometric models to more complex reservoir fluid models with single-site and basin-scale applications. Simple geometric models assuming a homogeneous geologic reservoir and piston-like displacement have been used for understanding pressure changes and fluid migration around each CO2 storage site. These geometric models are useful only as broad approximations because they do not account for the variation in porosity, permeability, asymmetry of the reservoir, and dip of the beds. In addition, these simple models are not capable of predicting the interference between different injection sites within the same reservoir. A more realistic model of CO2 plume behavior can be produced using reservoir fluid models. Reservoir simulation of natural gas storage reservoirs in the Illinois Basin Cambrian-age Mt. Simon Sandstone suggest that reservoir heterogeneity will be an important factor for evaluating storage capacity. The Mt. Simon Sandstone is a thick sandstone that underlies many significant coal fired power plants (emitting at least 1 million tonnes per year) in the midwestern United States including the states of Illinois, Indiana, Kentucky, Michigan, and Ohio. The initial commercial sequestration sites are expected to inject 1 to 2 million tonnes of CO2 per year. Depending on the geologic structure and

  5. Ag-PIE: a GIS-based screening model for assessing agricultural pressures and impacts on water quality on a European scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giupponi, Carlo; Vladimirova, Irena

    2006-04-15

    Diffuse pollution of water resources from agricultural sources is a major environmental issue in the European Union, and has been dealt with by specific legislation: the Nitrate Directive of 1991 and the Water Framework Directive of 2000. These attempts to provide a coordinated approach to solving environmental problems require methods and tools for spatial analysis and modelling on a continental scale, with river basins being used as spatial units. This paper presents a screening model (Ag-PIE), developed in a GIS environment, for the assessment of pressures from agricultural land use and the consequent impacts on surface and groundwater. Ag-PIE has been applied at the European scale (EU15), with focus on nitrogen pollution from chemical fertilisers and manure. The model adopts a multi-criteria evaluation procedure applied to spatial data layers which represent the variety of factors affecting the pollution process. The DPSIR (Driving forces, Pressures, State, Impact, Responses) approach is applied to provide the modelling approach with a conceptual framework and to further analyse and communicate results. Ag-PIE is ultimately aimed at providing a tool making use of state-of-the-art geographical databases to support policy-makers at the European level. The scale of reference adopted is the river basin, in particular those that extend across national boundaries. The quality of the results obtained has been assessed against existing related studies and monitoring reports and by means of sensitivity analysis. Conclusions are driven by considering the potential of Ag-PIE in devising policy support and its strengths and weaknesses in view of identifying future research needs.

  6. FRIEND PRESSURE SCALE: DEVELOPMENT, RELIABILITY AND VALIDITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Serkan Volkan SARI

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Human that has psycho-socio-cultural identity is invaded in an insensitive interaction with society in which he lives. The interaction continues from childhood to adolescence and adulthood. One of the main factors of the interaction is to have friends and to exist in social environment. The person constantly leagues together new friends, influences them, and is impressed by them during both childhood period and adolescence and adulthood period. However, the friend relationships that one have throughout his life, can create some problems from time to time. At this point, it is seen that the main parts of the national studies related to the subject have been commonly carried out so as to analyze the peer relations of the students at primary or secondary school. In this sense, the starting point of this study consists of the problems that students face in their university peer- groups. Therefore analyzing this problem necessitates developing a new data gathering tool that enables descriptive survey. By doing so, it is through that this scale will be used by researchers in order to put forward the factors related to the friend pressure levels of students and to determine the factors related to the friend pressure levels of the students. By developing a peer pressure scale for university students, the aim of the study is to show the usability of the scale within the scope of validity and reliability. The study was conducted on 450 university students training at the Faculty of Education in Rize University and Fatih Faculty of Education in Karadeniz Technical University. The study group consist of 188 men (42% and 262 girl (58%. In the scale development process, firstly, twelve students selected from different classes and departments on Fatih Faculty of Education in Karadeniz Technical University. Then, focus group discussions were interviewed. For using discussions, a semi-structured interview form was developed. Focused group is shared ideas

  7. Pressure distributions obtained on a 0.10-scale model of the Space Shuttle Orbiter's forebody in the Ames Unitary Plan Wind Tunnel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siemers, P. M., III; Henry, M. W.

    1986-01-01

    Pressure distribution test data obtained on a 0.10-scale model of the forward fuselage of the Space Shuttle Orbiter are presented without analysis. The tests were completed in the Ames Unitary Wind Tunnel (UPWT). The UPWT tests were conducted in two different test sections operating in the continuous mode, the 8 x 7 feet and 9 x 7 feet test sections. Each test section has its own Mach number range, 1.6 to 2.5 and 2.5 to 3.5 for the 9 x 7 feet and 8 x 7 feet test section, respectively. The test Reynolds number ranged from 1.6 to 2.5 x 10 to the 6th power ft and 0.6 to 2.0 x 10 to the 6th power ft, respectively. The tests were conducted in support of the development of the Shuttle Entry Air Data System (SEADS). In addition to modeling the 20 SEADS orifices, the wind-tunnel model was also instrumented with orifices to match Development Flight Instrumentation (DFI) port locations that existed on the Space Shuttle Columbia (OV-102) during the Orbiter Flight test program. This DFI simulation has provided a means for comparisons between reentry flight pressure data and wind-tunnel and computational data.

  8. Wave Pressures and Loads on a Small Scale Model of the Svåheia SSG Pilot Project

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buccino, Mariano; Vicinanza, Diego; Ciardulli, Francesco;

    2011-01-01

    The paper reports on 2D small scale experiments conducted to investigate wave loadings acting on a pilot project of device for the conversion of wave energy into electricity. The conversion concept is based on the overtopping principle and the structure is worldwide known with the acronym SSG. Th...

  9. Genome-Scale Models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bergdahl, Basti; Sonnenschein, Nikolaus; Machado, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    An introduction to genome-scale models, how to build and use them, will be given in this chapter. Genome-scale models have become an important part of systems biology and metabolic engineering, and are increasingly used in research, both in academica and in industry, both for modeling chemical pr...

  10. Acoustic testing of a 1.5 pressure ratio low tip speed fan with a serrated rotor (QEP fan B scale model). [reduction of engine noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazin, S. B.; Paas, J. E.; Minzner, W. R.

    1973-01-01

    A scale model of the bypass flow region of a 1.5 pressure ratio, single stage, low tip speed fan was tested with a serrated rotor leading edge to determine its effects on noise generation. The serrated rotor was produced by cutting teeth into the leading edge of the nominal rotor blades. The effects of speed and exhaust nozzle area on the scale models noise characteristics were investigated with both the nominal rotor and serrated rotor. Acoustic results indicate the serrations reduced front quadrant PNL's at takeoff power. In particular, the 200 foot (61.0 m) sideline noise was reduced from 3 to 4 PNdb at 40 deg for nominal and large nozzle operation. However, the rear quadrant maximum sideline PNL's were increased 1.5 to 3 PNdb at approach thust and up to 2 PNdb at takeoff thust with these serrated rotor blades. The configuration with the serrated rotor produced the lowest maximum 200 foot (61.0 m) sideline PNL for any given thust when the large nozzle (116% of design area) was employed.

  11. 3He melting pressure temperature scale

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Halperin, W.P.; Archie, C.N.; Richardson, R.C.;

    1976-01-01

    The latent heat for solidification of **3He has been measured along the **3He melting curve between 23 and 1 mK. A temperature scale is established which depends only on measurements of heat, pressure and volume, and on the condition that the entropy of solid **3He approaches R ln 2 at high...... temperatures. The A feature of the melting curve which suggests itself as a thermometric fixed point is found to be T//A equals 2. 75 plus or minus 0. 11 mK. The agreement between this value and independent measurements of T//A, based on nuclear or electronic paramagnetism, Johnson noise thermometry...

  12. SMALL SCALE MORPHODYNAMICAL MODELLING

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    D. Ditschke; O. Gothel; H. Weilbeer

    2001-01-01

    Long term morphological simulations using complete coupled models lead to very time consuming computations. Latteux (1995) presented modelling techniques developed for tidal current situations in order to reduce the computational effort. In this paper the applicability of such methods to small scale problems is investigated. It is pointed out that these methods can be transferred to small scale problems using the periodicity of the vortex shedding process.

  13. Length scales in cryogenic injection at supercritical pressure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Branam, R.; Mayer, W. [German Aerospace Center, DLR Lampoldshausen, 74239 Hardthausen (Germany)

    2002-09-01

    Length scales provide some understanding of the injection of cryogenic propellants in rocket chambers on mixing efficiency, which translates to burning efficiency and performance. This project uses supercritical cryogenic nitrogen to look at high-density core flows such as those of coaxial injectors used in rocket engines. The investigation considers test conditions from 4.0 to 6.0 MPa chamber pressure at two injection velocities and temperatures. Experimental data taken by using shadowgraph images provides a means of characterizing turbulent flow structures using a two-point correlation method to determine length scales and structure shapes. The experimental results are compared to computational models. (orig.)

  14. Generalizing Microdischarge Breakdown Scaling Laws for Pressure and Gas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loveless, Amanda; Garner, Allen

    2016-10-01

    Shrinking device dimensions for micro- and nanoelectromechanical systems necessitates accurate breakdown voltage predictions for reliable operation. Additionally, one must accurately predict breakdown voltage to optimize system geometry for applications in microplasmas and micropropulsion. Traditional approaches use Paschen's law (PL) to predict breakdown, but PL fails at small gap distances ( 15 μm) where field emission dominates. Subsequent work derived scaling laws and analytic expressions for breakdown voltage in argon at atmospheric pressure. Applications at high (e.g. combustion) and low (e.g. vacuum nanoelectronics) pressures for various gases motivate the generalization of these models for pressure and gas. This work addresses these concerns by deriving scaling laws generalized for gap distance, pressure, and gas, while also specifically incorporating and exploring the impact of field enhancement and work function. We compare these analytic scaling laws to experimental data and particle-in-cell simulations. Funded by a U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission Nuclear Education Program Faculty Development Grant Program at Purdue University.

  15. Scale analysis of turbulent channel flow with varying pressure gradient

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    邱翔; 罗剑平; 黄永祥; 卢志明; 刘宇陆

    2014-01-01

    In this paper orthogonal wavelet transformations are applied to decompose experimental velocity signals in fully develo-ped channel flows with varying pressure gradient into scales. We analyze the time series from turbulent data, to obtain the statistical characteristics, correlations between the adjacent scales and the principal scale of coherent structures in different scales by wavelet transformations. The results show that, in the counter gradient transport (CGT) region, skewness factors and flatness factors deviate strongly from the corresponding values of Gaussian distribution on certain scales. PDFs on each scale confirm this observation. Scale-scale correlations show further that the fluctuations on some certain special scales are more intermittent than nearby. Principal scale of coherent structure is coincident with the scales on which the statistical properties depart from Gaussian distribution. These features are the same for different families of wavelets, and it also shows some different features in the region between favorable pressure gradient and adverse pressure gradient.

  16. [Adaptation of a peer pressure scale in French and German: the Peer Pressure Inventory].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baggio, S; Studer, J; Daeppen, J-B; Gmel, G

    2013-06-01

    Peer pressure is regarded as an important determinant of substance use, sexual behavior and juvenile delinquency. However, few peer pressure scales are validated, especially in French or German. Little is known about the factor structure of such scales or the kind of scale needed: some scales takes into account both peer pressure to do and peer pressure not to do, while others consider only peer pressure to do. The aim of the present study was to adapt French and German versions of the Peer Pressure Inventory, which is one of the most widely used scales in this field. We considered its factor structure and concurrent validity. Five thousand eight hundred and sixty-seven young Swiss men filled in a questionnaire on peer pressure, substance use, and other variables (conformity, involvement) in a cohort study. We identified a four-factor structure, with the three factors of the initial Peer Pressure Inventory (involvement, conformity, misconduct) and adding a new one (relationship with girls). A non-valued scale (from no peer pressure to peer pressure to do only) showed stronger psychometric qualities than a valued scale (from peer pressure not to do to peer pressure to do). Concurrent validity was also good. Each behavior or attitude was significantly associated with peer pressure. Peer pressure seems to be a multidimensional concept. In this study, peer pressure to do showed the strongest influence on participants. Indeed, peer pressure not to do did not add anything useful. Only peer pressure to do affected young Swiss men's behaviors and attitudes and was reliable. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  17. Modelling ruptures of buried high-pressure dense-phase CO2 pipelines in carbon capture and storage applications - Part II. A full-scale rupture

    OpenAIRE

    Wareing, CJ; Fairweather, M.; Falle, SAEG; Woolley, RM

    2015-01-01

    Carbon capture and storage (CCS) presents a short-term option for significantly reducing the amount of carbon dioxide (CO2) released into the atmosphere. National Grid initiated the COOLTRANS research programme to consider the CCS pipeline transportation of high-pressure dense-phase CO2, including the development and application of a mathematical model for predicting the sonic near-field dispersion of pure CO2 following pipeline venting or failure. In Part I (Wareing et al., 2015a) validation...

  18. Asymmetric fluid criticality. I. Scaling with pressure mixing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Young C; Fisher, Michael E; Orkoulas, G

    2003-06-01

    The thermodynamic behavior of a fluid near a vapor-liquid and, hence, asymmetric critical point is discussed within a general "complete" scaling theory incorporating pressure mixing in the nonlinear scaling fields as well as corrections to scaling. This theory allows for a Yang-Yang anomaly in which mu(")(sigma)(T), the second temperature derivative of the chemical potential along the phase boundary, diverges like the specific heat when T-->T(c); it also generates a leading singular term, /t/(2beta), in the coexistence curve diameter, where t[triple bond](T-T(c))/T(c). The behavior of various special loci, such as the critical isochore, the critical isotherm, the k-inflection loci, on which chi((k))[triple bond]chi(rho,T)/rho(k) (with chi=rho(2)k(B)TK(T)) and C((k))(V)[triple bond]C(V)(rho,T)/rho(k) are maximal at fixed T, is carefully elucidated. These results are useful for analyzing simulations and experiments, since particular, nonuniversal values of k specify loci that approach the critical density most rapidly and reflect the pressure-mixing coefficient. Concrete illustrations are presented for the hard-core square-well fluid and for the restricted primitive model electrolyte. For comparison, a discussion of the classical (or Landau) theory is presented briefly and various interesting loci are determined explicitly and illustrated quantitatively for a van der Waals fluid.

  19. Risk assessment scales for pressure ulcer prevention: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pancorbo-Hidalgo, Pedro L; Garcia-Fernandez, Francisco Pedro; Lopez-Medina, Isabel Ma; Alvarez-Nieto, Carmen

    2006-04-01

    This paper reports a systematic review conducted to determine the effectiveness of the use of risk assessment scales for pressure ulcer prevention in clinical practice, degree of validation of risk assessment scales, and effectiveness of risk assessment scales as indicators of risk of developing a pressure ulcer. Pressure ulcers are an important health problem. The best strategy to avoid them is prevention. There are several risk assessment scales for pressure ulcer prevention which complement nurses' clinical judgement. However, some of these have not undergone proper validation. A systematic bibliographical review was conducted, based on a search of 14 databases in four languages using the keywords pressure ulcer or pressure sore or decubitus ulcer and risk assessment. Reports of clinical trials or prospective studies of validation were included in the review. Thirty-three studies were included in the review, three on clinical effectiveness and the rest on scale validation. There is no decrease in pressure ulcer incidence was found which might be attributed to use of an assessment scale. However, the use of scales increases the intensity and effectiveness of prevention interventions. The Braden Scale shows optimal validation and the best sensitivity/specificity balance (57.1%/67.5%, respectively); its score is a good pressure ulcer risk predictor (odds ratio = 4.08, CI 95% = 2.56-6.48). The Norton Scale has reasonable scores for sensitivity (46.8%), specificity (61.8%) and risk prediction (OR = 2.16, CI 95% = 1.03-4.54). The Waterlow Scale offers a high sensitivity score (82.4%), but low specificity (27.4%); with a good risk prediction score (OR = 2.05, CI 95% = 1.11-3.76). Nurses' clinical judgement (only considered in three studies) gives moderate scores for sensitivity (50.6%) and specificity (60.1%), but is not a good pressure ulcer risk predictor (OR = 1.69, CI 95% = 0.76-3.75). There is no evidence that the use of risk assessment scales decreases pressure

  20. Modelling of pressure loads in a pressure suppression pool

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Timperi, A.; Chauhan, M.; Paettikangas, T.; Niemi, J. [VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland (Finland)

    2013-06-15

    Rapid collapse of a large steam bubble is analyzed by using CFD and FEM calculations. In addition, a 1D code is written which takes into account the finite condensation rate. The 1D simulations are compared with the PPOOLEX experiment COL-01. By adjusting the condensation rate, the calculated pressure peak near the vent outlet could be made same as in the experiment. Scaling of the measured pressure loads to full-scale is studied by dimensional analyses and by review of the analysis of Sonin (1981). The structural response of containment during chugging is studied by using an FEM of containment with simplified geometry and loading which was created based on experimental data. The results are compared to the case in which desynchronization is absent, and chugging occurs simultaneously in every vent pipe. The desynchronized loading is created by giving random initiation times for chugs out of distribution corresponding to the desynchronization time presented by Kukita and Namatame (1985). CFD simulations of the PPOOLEX experiment MIX-03 were performed. In the experiment, clear chugging behavior was observed. In the simulation, the interphasial surface was much more stable and oscillation occurred at a higher frequency than in the experiment. The differences are likely caused by the turbulence model and too coarse numerical mesh, which causes numerical diffusion. (Author)

  1. SCALE EFFECT OF IMPINGING PRESSURE CAUSED BY SUBMERGED JET

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TIAN Zhong; XU Wei-lin; WANG Wei; LIU Shan-jun; DONG Jian-wei

    2005-01-01

    The characteristics of the impinging pressure at the jet equipment where the maximum jet velocity can reach 50m/s were studied. By comparing the impinging pressure with the one measured at the low velocity conditions, two conclusions of the scale effect are drawn: firstly, the velocity attenuation degree is smaller than that of low-velocity jet, and secondly, the relative impinging width is narrower than that of low-velocity jet. The reasons of the scale effect of the impinging pressure were elucidated through numerical simulation.

  2. Pressure anisotropy and small spatial scales induced by velocity shear

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Sarto, D.; Pegoraro, F.; Califano, F.

    2016-05-01

    By including the full pressure tensor dynamics in a fluid plasma model, we show that a sheared velocity field can provide an effective mechanism that makes the initial isotropic pressure nongyrotropic. This is distinct from the usual gyrotropic anisotropy related to the fluid compressibility and usually accounted for in double-adiabatic models. We determine the time evolution of the pressure agyrotropy and discuss how the propagation of "magnetoelastic perturbations" can affect the pressure tensor anisotropization and its spatial filamentation, which are due to the action of both the magnetic field and the flow strain tensor. We support this analysis with a numerical integration of the nonlinear equations describing the pressure tensor evolution.

  3. MicroScale - Atmospheric Pressure Plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sankaran, Mohan [Case Western Reserve University

    2012-01-25

    Low-temperature plasmas play an essential role in the manufacturing of integrated circuits which are ubiquitous in modern society. In recent years, these top-down approaches to materials processing have reached a physical limit. As a result, alternative approaches to materials processing are being developed that will allow the fabrication of nanoscale materials from the bottom up. The aim of our research is to develop a new class of plasmas, termed “microplasmas” for nanomaterials synthesis. Microplasmas are a special class of plasmas formed in geometries where at least one dimension is less than 1 mm. Plasma confinement leads to several unique properties including high-pressure stability and non-equilibrium that make microplasams suitable for nanomaterials synthesis. Vapor-phase precursors can be dissociated to homogeneously nucleate nanometer-sized metal and alloyed nanoparticles. Alternatively, metal salts dispersed in liquids or polymer films can be electrochemically reduced to form metal nanoparticles. In this talk, I will discuss these topics in detail, highlighting the advantages of microplasma-based systems for the synthesis of well-defined nanomaterials.

  4. Scaling of pressure spectrum in turbulent boundary layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patwardhan, Saurabh S.; Ramesh, O. N.

    2014-04-01

    Scaling of pressure spectrum in zero-pressure-gradient turbulent boundary layers is discussed. Spatial DNS data of boundary layer at one time instant (Reθ = 4500) are used for the analysis. It is observed that in the outer regions the pressure spectra tends towards the -7/3 law predicted by Kolmogorov's theory of small-scale turbulence. The slope in the pressure spectra varies from -1 close to the wall to a value close to -7/3 in the outer region. The streamwise velocity spectra also show a -5/3 trend in the outer region of the flow. The exercise carried out to study the amplitude modulation effect of the large scales on the smaller ones in the near-wall region reveals a strong modulation effect for the streamwise velocity, but not for the pressure fluctuations. The skewness of the pressure follows the same trend as the amplitude modulation coefficient, as is the case for the velocity. In the inner region, pressure spectra were seen to collapse better when normalized with the local Reynolds stress than when scaled with the local turbulent kinetic energy

  5. Drift Scale THM Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J. Rutqvist

    2004-10-07

    This model report documents the drift scale coupled thermal-hydrological-mechanical (THM) processes model development and presents simulations of the THM behavior in fractured rock close to emplacement drifts. The modeling and analyses are used to evaluate the impact of THM processes on permeability and flow in the near-field of the emplacement drifts. The results from this report are used to assess the importance of THM processes on seepage and support in the model reports ''Seepage Model for PA Including Drift Collapse'' and ''Abstraction of Drift Seepage'', and to support arguments for exclusion of features, events, and processes (FEPs) in the analysis reports ''Features, Events, and Processes in Unsaturated Zone Flow and Transport and Features, Events, and Processes: Disruptive Events''. The total system performance assessment (TSPA) calculations do not use any output from this report. Specifically, the coupled THM process model is applied to simulate the impact of THM processes on hydrologic properties (permeability and capillary strength) and flow in the near-field rock around a heat-releasing emplacement drift. The heat generated by the decay of radioactive waste results in elevated rock temperatures for thousands of years after waste emplacement. Depending on the thermal load, these temperatures are high enough to cause boiling conditions in the rock, resulting in water redistribution and altered flow paths. These temperatures will also cause thermal expansion of the rock, with the potential of opening or closing fractures and thus changing fracture permeability in the near-field. Understanding the THM coupled processes is important for the performance of the repository because the thermally induced permeability changes potentially effect the magnitude and spatial distribution of percolation flux in the vicinity of the drift, and hence the seepage of water into the drift. This is important because

  6. Do pressure ulcer risk assessment scales improve clinical practice?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Kottner

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Jan Kottner1, Katrin Balzer21Department of Nursing Science, Charité-Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Germany; 2Nursing Research Group, Institute for Social Medicine, Universitätsklinikum Schleswig-Holstein, Lübeck, GermanyAbstract: Standardized assessment instruments are deemed important for estimating pressure ulcer risk. Today, more than 40 so-called pressure ulcer risk assessment scales are available but still there is an ongoing debate about their usefulness. From a measurement point of view pressure ulcer (PU risk assessment scales have serious limitations. Empirical evidence supporting the validity of PU risk assessment scale scores is weak and obtained scores contain varying amounts of measurement error. The concept of pressure ulcer risk is strongly related to the general health status and severity of illness. A clinical impact due do the application of these scales could also not be demonstrated. It is questionable whether completion of standardized pressure ulcer risk scales in clinical practice is really needed.Keywords: Braden pressure ulcer, prevention, risk assessment, nursing assessment, predictive value, clinical effectiveness, review

  7. General Pressurization Model in Simscape

    Science.gov (United States)

    Servin, Mario; Garcia, Vicky

    2010-01-01

    System integration is an essential part of the engineering design process. The Ares I Upper Stage (US) is a complex system which is made up of thousands of components assembled into subsystems including a J2-X engine, liquid hydrogen (LH2) and liquid oxygen (LO2) tanks, avionics, thrust vector control, motors, etc. System integration is the task of connecting together all of the subsystems into one large system. To ensure that all the components will "fit together" as well as safety and, quality, integration analysis is required. Integration analysis verifies that, as an integrated system, the system will behave as designed. Models that represent the actual subsystems are built for more comprehensive analysis. Matlab has been an instrument widely use by engineers to construct mathematical models of systems. Simulink, one of the tools offered by Matlab, provides multi-domain graphical environment to simulate and design time-varying systems. Simulink is a powerful tool to analyze the dynamic behavior of systems over time. Furthermore, Simscape, a tool provided by Simulink, allows users to model physical (such as mechanical, thermal and hydraulic) systems using physical networks. Using Simscape, a model representing an inflow of gas to a pressurized tank was created where the temperature and pressure of the tank are measured over time to show the behavior of the gas. By further incorporation of Simscape into model building, the full potential of this software can be discovered and it hopefully can become a more utilized tool.

  8. Re-appraisal and extension of the Gratton-Vargas two-dimensional analytical snowplow model of plasma focus - III: Scaling theory for high pressure operation and its implications

    CERN Document Server

    Auluck, S K H

    2016-01-01

    Recent work on the revised Gratton-Vargas model has demonstrated that there are some aspects of Dense Plasma Focus (DPF) which are not sensitive to details of plasma dynamics and are well captured in an oversimplified model assumption which contains very little plasma physics. A hyperbolic conservation law formulation of DPF physics reveals the existence of a velocity threshold related to specific energy of dissociation and ionization, above which, the work done during shock propagation is adequate to ensure dissociation and ionization of the gas being ingested. These developments are utilized to formulate an algorithmic definition of DPF optimization that is valid in a wide range of applications, not limited to neutron emission. A universal scaling theory of DPF design optimization is proposed and illustrated for designing devices working at one or two orders higher pressure of deuterium than the current practice of designs optimized at pressures less than 10 mbar of deuterium. These examples show that the u...

  9. Measurement and Modelling of Scaling Minerals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Villafafila Garcia, Ada

    2005-01-01

    of scale formation found in many industrial processes, and especially in oilfield and geothermal operations. We want to contribute to the study of this problem by releasing a simple and accurate thermodynamic model capable of calculating the behaviour of scaling minerals, covering a wide range...... of temperature and pressure. Reliable experimental solubility measurements under conditions similar to those found in reality will help the development of strong and consistent models. Chapter 1 is a short introduction to the problem of scale formation, the model chosen to study it, and the experiments performed...... the thermodynamic model used in this Ph.D. project. A review of alternative activity coefficient models an earlier work on scale formation is provided. A guideline to the parameter estimation procedure and the number of parameters estimated in the present work are also described. The prediction of solid...

  10. PERFORM 60 - Prediction of the effects of radiation for reactor pressure vessel and in-core materials using multi-scale modelling - 60 years foreseen plant lifetime

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leclercq, Sylvain, E-mail: sylvain.leclercq@edf.f [EDF R and D, Materials and Mechanics of Components, Avenue des Renardieres - Ecuelles, 77818 Moret sur Loing Cedex (France); Lidbury, David [SERCO Assurance - Walton House, 404 Faraday Street, Birchwood Park, Warrington, Cheshire WA3 6GA (United Kingdom); Van Dyck, Steven [SCK-CEN, Nuclear Material Science, Boeretang 200, BE, 2400 Mol (Belgium); Moinereau, Dominique [EDF R and D, Materials and Mechanics of Components, Avenue des Renardieres - Ecuelles, 77818 Moret sur Loing Cedex (France); Alamo, Ana [CEA Saclay, DEN/DSOE, 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Mazouzi, Abdou Al [EDF R and D, Materials and Mechanics of Components, Avenue des Renardieres - Ecuelles, 77818 Moret sur Loing Cedex (France)

    2010-11-01

    In nuclear power plants, materials may undergo degradation due to severe irradiation conditions that may limit their operational life. Utilities that operate these reactors need to quantify the ageing and the potential degradations of some essential structures of the power plant to ensure safe and reliable plant operation. So far, the material databases needed to take account of these degradations in the design and safe operation of installations mainly rely on long-term irradiation programs in test reactors as well as on mechanical or corrosion testing in specialized hot cells. Continuous progress in the physical understanding of the phenomena involved in irradiation damage and continuous progress in computer sciences have now made possible the development of multi-scale numerical tools able to simulate the effects of irradiation on materials microstructure. A first step towards this goal has been successfully reached through the development of the RPV-2 and Toughness Module numerical tools by the scientific community created around the FP6 PERFECT project. These tools allow to simulate irradiation effects on the constitutive behaviour of the reactor pressure vessel low alloy steel, and also on its failure properties. Relying on the existing PERFECT Roadmap, the 4 years Collaborative Project PERFORM 60 has mainly for objective to develop multi-scale tools aimed at predicting the combined effects of irradiation and corrosion on internals (austenitic stainless steels) and also to improve existing ones on RPV (bainitic steels). PERFORM 60 is based on two technical sub-projects: (i) RPV and (ii) internals. In addition to these technical sub-projects, the Users' Group and Training sub-project shall allow representatives of constructors, utilities, research organizations... from Europe, USA and Japan to receive the information and training to get their own appraisal on limits and potentialities of the developed tools. An important effort will also be made to teach

  11. PERFORM 60 - Prediction of the effects of radiation for reactor pressure vessel and in-core materials using multi-scale modelling - 60 years foreseen plant lifetime

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leclercq, Sylvain; Lidbury, David; Van Dyck, Steven; Moinereau, Dominique; Alamo, Ana; Mazouzi, Abdou Al

    2010-11-01

    In nuclear power plants, materials may undergo degradation due to severe irradiation conditions that may limit their operational life. Utilities that operate these reactors need to quantify the ageing and the potential degradations of some essential structures of the power plant to ensure safe and reliable plant operation. So far, the material databases needed to take account of these degradations in the design and safe operation of installations mainly rely on long-term irradiation programs in test reactors as well as on mechanical or corrosion testing in specialized hot cells. Continuous progress in the physical understanding of the phenomena involved in irradiation damage and continuous progress in computer sciences have now made possible the development of multi-scale numerical tools able to simulate the effects of irradiation on materials microstructure. A first step towards this goal has been successfully reached through the development of the RPV-2 and Toughness Module numerical tools by the scientific community created around the FP6 PERFECT project. These tools allow to simulate irradiation effects on the constitutive behaviour of the reactor pressure vessel low alloy steel, and also on its failure properties. Relying on the existing PERFECT Roadmap, the 4 years Collaborative Project PERFORM 60 has mainly for objective to develop multi-scale tools aimed at predicting the combined effects of irradiation and corrosion on internals (austenitic stainless steels) and also to improve existing ones on RPV (bainitic steels). PERFORM 60 is based on two technical sub-projects: (i) RPV and (ii) internals. In addition to these technical sub-projects, the Users' Group and Training sub-project shall allow representatives of constructors, utilities, research organizations… from Europe, USA and Japan to receive the information and training to get their own appraisal on limits and potentialities of the developed tools. An important effort will also be made to teach young

  12. Do pressure ulcer risk assessment scales improve clinical practice?

    OpenAIRE

    Jan Kottner; Katrin Balzer

    2010-01-01

    Jan Kottner1, Katrin Balzer21Department of Nursing Science, Charité-Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Germany; 2Nursing Research Group, Institute for Social Medicine, Universitätsklinikum Schleswig-Holstein, Lübeck, GermanyAbstract: Standardized assessment instruments are deemed important for estimating pressure ulcer risk. Today, more than 40 so-called pressure ulcer risk assessment scales are available but still there is an ongoing debate about their usefulne...

  13. Simulating the Mineral Scale by High Pressure Thermal Vessel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Y. H.; Liu, H. L.; Chen, H. F.; Song, S. R.

    2014-12-01

    The generating capacity of Chingshui geothermal power plant decreased rapidly after it had operated three years. Chinese Petroleum Corporation (CPC) attributed the main reason was the depletion of reservoir. One reason was that the reservoir did not be recharged. And the other was the mineral scale in reservoir and pipes which caused flow rate decreased. There are abundant geothermal energy in Taiwan. But in Chingshui, the spring has amount content of carbonate. Most scaling are calcium carbonate and silica. These two materials have different solubility in various pH and physical conditions. Because the pressure reduced in the process of upwelling, the hot spring from the reservoir deposited calcium carbonate immediately by large carbon dioxide escape. This result caused the diameter of pipeline reduced. Besides, as the temperature decreased, the silica would scaling in the part of heat exchanger. To avoid the failure experience in Chingshui , how to prevent the mineral scaling is the key point that we need to solve. Our study will use hydrothermal experiments by High Pressure Thermal Vessel to simulate the process of spring water upwelling from reservoir to surface, to understand whether calcium carbonate and silica scaling or not in different temperature and pressure. This study choose the Hongchailin well as objects to simulate, and the target layers of drilling well were set as Szeleng sandstone and Lushan slate. We used pure water and saturated water pressure in our experiments. There were four vessels in High thermal vessel. The first vessel was used to simulate the condition of reservoir. The second and third vessel were simulated the conditions in the well when spring water upwelling to the surface. And the last vessel was simulated the conditions on surface surroundings. We hope to get the temperature and pressure when the scaling occurred, and verified with the computing result, thus we can inhibit the scaling.

  14. International Symposia on Scale Modeling

    CERN Document Server

    Ito, Akihiko; Nakamura, Yuji; Kuwana, Kazunori

    2015-01-01

    This volume thoroughly covers scale modeling and serves as the definitive source of information on scale modeling as a powerful simplifying and clarifying tool used by scientists and engineers across many disciplines. The book elucidates techniques used when it would be too expensive, or too difficult, to test a system of interest in the field. Topics addressed in the current edition include scale modeling to study weather systems, diffusion of pollution in air or water, chemical process in 3-D turbulent flow, multiphase combustion, flame propagation, biological systems, behavior of materials at nano- and micro-scales, and many more. This is an ideal book for students, both graduate and undergraduate, as well as engineers and scientists interested in the latest developments in scale modeling. This book also: Enables readers to evaluate essential and salient aspects of profoundly complex systems, mechanisms, and phenomena at scale Offers engineers and designers a new point of view, liberating creative and inno...

  15. Quantized pressure control in large-scale nonlinear hydraulic networks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Persis, Claudio De; Kallesøe, Carsten Skovmose; Jensen, Tom Nørgaard

    2010-01-01

    It was shown previously that semi-global practical pressure regulation at designated points of a large-scale nonlinear hydraulic network is guaranteed by distributed proportional controllers. For a correct implementation of the control laws, each controller, which is located at these designated poin

  16. VESPA: Very large-scale Evolutionary and Selective Pressure Analyses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew E. Webb

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Background Large-scale molecular evolutionary analyses of protein coding sequences requires a number of preparatory inter-related steps from finding gene families, to generating alignments and phylogenetic trees and assessing selective pressure variation. Each phase of these analyses can represent significant challenges, particularly when working with entire proteomes (all protein coding sequences in a genome from a large number of species. Methods We present VESPA, software capable of automating a selective pressure analysis using codeML in addition to the preparatory analyses and summary statistics. VESPA is written in python and Perl and is designed to run within a UNIX environment. Results We have benchmarked VESPA and our results show that the method is consistent, performs well on both large scale and smaller scale datasets, and produces results in line with previously published datasets. Discussion Large-scale gene family identification, sequence alignment, and phylogeny reconstruction are all important aspects of large-scale molecular evolutionary analyses. VESPA provides flexible software for simplifying these processes along with downstream selective pressure variation analyses. The software automatically interprets results from codeML and produces simplified summary files to assist the user in better understanding the results. VESPA may be found at the following website: http://www.mol-evol.org/VESPA.

  17. Concordance of Shape Risk Scale, a new pressure ulcer risk tool, with Braden Scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soppi, Esa T; Iivanainen, Ansa K; Korhonen, Pasi A

    2014-12-01

    The occurrence of pressure ulcers was examined in a cross-sectional study in 23 health care facilities and in home care involving 548 patients. The screening of pressure ulcer risk was assessed simultaneously using the Braden Scale and the new Shape Risk Scale (SRS), and the results were compared. The overall prevalence of pressure ulcers in the study population was 15·5% (85/548). The Braden Scale was performed as described in the literature. The direct concordance of the Braden and SRS scales was 46%. In more than 90% of cases, the SRS classified patients as well as or better than the Braden Scale. The SRS allocates patients significantly different from the Braden Scale into the risk categories, especially the difference is significant between the low and medium-risk categories. The greatest advantage of SRS to Braden Scale is that it correctly identifies patients with low risk of pressure ulcers. It is interesting that the two risk scores, taking into consideration the basically different pathophysiological factors, can still give rather similar results. The users considered that both scales are easy to use.

  18. Multi-scale modeling of composites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Azizi, Reza

    A general method to obtain the homogenized response of metal-matrix composites is developed. It is assumed that the microscopic scale is sufficiently small compared to the macroscopic scale such that the macro response does not affect the micromechanical model. Therefore, the microscopic scale......-Mandel’s energy principle is used to find macroscopic operators based on micro-mechanical analyses using the finite element method under generalized plane strain condition. A phenomenologically macroscopic model for metal matrix composites is developed based on constitutive operators describing the elastic...... behavior and the trapped free energy in the material, in addition to the plastic behavior in terms of the anisotropic development of the yield surface. It is shown that a generalization of Hill’s anisotropic yield criterion can be used to model the Bauschinger effect, in addition to the pressure and size...

  19. Pressure anisotropy and small spatial scales induced by velocity shear

    CERN Document Server

    Del Sarto, Daniele; Califano, Francesco

    2015-01-01

    Non-Maxwellian metaequilibria can exist in low-collisionality plasmas as evidenced by satellite and laboratory measurements. By including the full pressure tensor dynamics in a fluid plasma model, we show that a sheared velocity field can provide an effective mechanism that makes an initial isotropic state anisotropic and agyrotropic. We discuss how the propagation of magneto-elastic waves can affect the pressure tensor anisotropization and its spatial filamentation which are due to the action of both the magnetic field and flow strain tensor. We support this analysis by a numerical integration of the nonlinear equations describing the pressure tensor evolution.

  20. Foot Modeling and Smart Plantar Pressure Reconstruction from Three Sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghaida, Hussein Abou; Mottet, Serge; Goujon, Jean-Marc

    2014-01-01

    In order to monitor pressure under feet, this study presents a biomechanical model of the human foot. The main elements of the foot that induce the plantar pressure distribution are described. Then the link between the forces applied at the ankle and the distribution of the plantar pressure is established. Assumptions are made by defining the concepts of a 3D internal foot shape, which can be extracted from the plantar pressure measurements, and a uniform elastic medium, which describes the soft tissues behaviour. In a second part, we show that just 3 discrete pressure sensors per foot are enough to generate real time plantar pressure cartographies in the standing position or during walking. Finally, the generated cartographies are compared with pressure cartographies issued from the F-SCAN system. The results show 0.01 daN (2% of full scale) average error, in the standing position. PMID:25400713

  1. Functional Scaling of Musculoskeletal Models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, Morten Enemark; Andersen, Michael Skipper; de Zee, Mark;

    The validity of the predictions from musculoskeletal models depends largely on how well the morphology of the model matches that of the patient. To address this problem, we present a novel method to scale a cadaver-based musculoskeletal model to match both the segment lengths and joint parameters...... orientations are then used to morph/scale a cadaver based musculoskeletal model using a set of radial basis functions (RBFs). Using the functional joint axes to scale musculoskeletal models provides a better fit to the marker data, and allows for representation of patients with considerable difference in bone...... geometry, without the need for MR/CT scans. However, more validation activities are needed to better understand the effect of morphing musculoskeletal models based on functional joint parameters....

  2. Dispersion in deep polar firn driven by synoptic-scale surface pressure variability

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    Commonly, three mechanisms of firn air transport are distinguished: molecular diffusion, advection, and near-surface convective mixing. Here we identify and describe a fourth mechanism, namely dispersion driven by synoptic-scale surface pressure variability (or barometric pumping). We use published gas chromatography experiments on firn samples to derive the along-flow dispersivity of firn, and combine this dispersivity with a dynamical air pressure propagation model forced by surface air pre...

  3. Dispersion in deep polar firn driven by synoptic-scale surface pressure variability

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    Commonly, three mechanisms of firn air transport are distinguished: molecular diffusion, advection, and near-surface convective mixing. Here we identify and describe a fourth mechanism, namely dispersion driven by synoptic-scale surface pressure variability (or barometric pumping). We use published gas chromatography experiments on firn samples to derive the along-flow dispersivity of firn, and combine this dispersivity with a dynamical air pressure propagation model forced ...

  4. Re-appraisal and extension of the Gratton-Vargas two-dimensional analytical snowplow model of plasma focus. III. Scaling theory for high pressure operation and its implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Auluck, S. K. H.

    2016-12-01

    Recent work on the revised Gratton-Vargas model (Auluck, Phys. Plasmas 20, 112501 (2013); 22, 112509 (2015) and references therein) has demonstrated that there are some aspects of Dense Plasma Focus (DPF), which are not sensitive to details of plasma dynamics and are well captured in an oversimplified model assumption, which contains very little plasma physics. A hyperbolic conservation law formulation of DPF physics reveals the existence of a velocity threshold related to specific energy of dissociation and ionization, above which, the work done during shock propagation is adequate to ensure dissociation and ionization of the gas being ingested. These developments are utilized to formulate an algorithmic definition of DPF optimization that is valid in a wide range of applications, not limited to neutron emission. This involves determination of a set of DPF parameters, without performing iterative model calculations, that lead to transfer of all the energy from the capacitor bank to the plasma at the time of current derivative singularity and conversion of a preset fraction of this energy into magnetic energy, while ensuring that electromagnetic work done during propagation of the plasma remains adequate for dissociation and ionization of neutral gas being ingested. Such a universal optimization criterion is expected to facilitate progress in new areas of DPF research that include production of short lived radioisotopes of possible use in medical diagnostics, generation of fusion energy from aneutronic fuels, and applications in nanotechnology, radiation biology, and materials science. These phenomena are expected to be optimized for fill gases of different kinds and in different ranges of mass density compared to the devices constructed for neutron production using empirical thumb rules. A universal scaling theory of DPF design optimization is proposed and illustrated for designing devices working at one or two orders higher pressure of deuterium than the current

  5. Wind tunnel tests of an 0.019-scale space shuttle integrated vehicle -2A configuration (model 14-OTS) in the NASA Ames 8 X 7 foot unitary wind tunnel, volume 2. [cold jet gas plumes and pressure distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardin, R. B.; Burrows, R. R.

    1975-01-01

    The purpose of the test was to determine the effects of cold jet gas plumes on (1) the integrated vehicle longitudinal and lateral-directional force data, (2) exposed wing hinge moment, (3) wing pressure distributions, (4) orbiter MPS external pressure distributions, and (5) model base pressures. An investigation was undertaken to determine the similarity between solid and gaseous plumes; fluorescent oil flow visualization studies were also conducted. Plotted wing pressure data is tabulated.

  6. Large-scale volumetric pressure from tomographic PTV with HFSB tracers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneiders, Jan F. G.; Caridi, Giuseppe C. A.; Sciacchitano, Andrea; Scarano, Fulvio

    2016-11-01

    The instantaneous volumetric pressure in the near-wake of a truncated cylinder is measured by use of tomographic particle tracking velocimetry (PTV) using helium-filled soap bubbles (HFSB) as tracers. The measurement volume is several orders of magnitude larger than that reported in tomographic experiments dealing with pressure from particle image velocimetry (PIV). The near-wake of a truncated cylinder installed on a flat plate ( Re D = 3.5 × 104) features both wall-bounded turbulence and large-scale unsteady flow separation. The instantaneous pressure is calculated from the time-resolved 3D velocity distribution by invoking the momentum equation. The experiments are conducted simultaneously with surface pressure measurements intended for validation of the technique. The study shows that time-averaged pressure and root-mean-squared pressure fluctuations can be accurately measured both in the fluid domain and at the solid surface by large-scale tomographic PTV with HFSB as tracers, with significant reduction in manufacturing complexity for the wind-tunnel model and circumventing the need to install pressure taps or transducers. The measurement over a large volume eases the extension toward the free-stream regime, providing a reliable boundary condition for the solution of the Poisson equation for pressure. The work demonstrates, in the case of the flow past a truncated cylinder, the use of HFSB tracer particles for pressure measurement in air flows in a measurement volume that is two orders of magnitude larger than that of conventional tomographic PIV.

  7. The Braden Scale for Predicting Pressure Sore Risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergstrom, N; Braden, B J; Laguzza, A; Holman, V

    1987-01-01

    The Braden Scale for Predicting Pressure Sore Risk was developed to foster early identification of patients at risk for forming pressure sores. The scale is composed of six subscales that reflect sensory perception, skin moisture, activity, mobility, friction and shear, and nutritional status. Content and construct validity were established by expert opinion and empirical testing. Three studies of reliability are reported here, using raters who varied in level of educational preparation and geographic region. Two prospective studies of predictive validity were completed to determine the scale's sensitivity and specificity. Reliability ranged from r = .83 to r = .94 for nurses' aides and licensed practical nurses; when used by registered nurses, the reliability increased to r = .99. Predictive validity was calculated for each cut-off point of the scale. Using a cut-off point of 16, sensitivity was 100% in both studies. Specificity ranged from 64% to 90%. This instrument has highly satisfactory reliability when used by RNs, and greater sensitivity and specificity than instruments previously reported.

  8. Modeling flow in a pressure-sensitive, heterogeneous medium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vasco, Donald W.; Minkoff, Susan E.

    2009-06-01

    Using an asymptotic methodology, including an expansion in inverse powers of {radical}{omega}, where {omega} is the frequency, we derive a solution for flow in a medium with pressure dependent properties. The solution is valid for a heterogeneous medium with smoothly varying properties. That is, the scale length of the heterogeneity must be significantly larger then the scale length over which the pressure increases from it initial value to its peak value. The resulting asymptotic expression is similar in form to the solution for pressure in a medium in which the flow properties are not functions of pressure. Both the expression for pseudo-phase, which is related to the 'travel time' of the transient pressure disturbance, and the expression for pressure amplitude contain modifications due to the pressure dependence of the medium. We apply the method to synthetic and observed pressure variations in a deforming medium. In the synthetic test we model one-dimensional propagation in a pressure-dependent medium. Comparisons with both an analytic self-similar solution and the results of a numerical simulation indicate general agreement. Furthermore, we are able to match pressure variations observed during a pulse test at the Coaraze Laboratory site in France.

  9. Estimating large-scale fracture permeability of unsaturatedrockusing barometric pressure data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Yu-Shu; Zhang, Keni; Liu, Hui-Hai

    2005-05-17

    We present a three-dimensional modeling study of gas flow inthe unsaturated fractured rock of Yucca Mountain. Our objective is toestimate large-scale fracture permeability, using the changes insubsurface pneumatic pressure in response to barometric pressure changesat the land surface. We incorporate the field-measured pneumatic datainto a multiphase flow model for describing the coupled processes ofliquid and gas flow under ambient geothermal conditions. Comparison offield-measured pneumatic data with model-predicted gas pressures is foundto be a powerful technique for estimating the fracture permeability ofthe unsaturated fractured rock, which is otherwise extremely difficult todetermine on the large scales of interest. In addition, this studydemonstrates that the multi-dimensional-flow effect on estimatedpermeability values is significant and should be included whendetermining fracture permeability in heterogeneous fracturedmedia.

  10. Multi-scale peridynamic modeling of dynamic fracture in concrete

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lammi, Christopher J.; Zhou, Min

    2017-01-01

    Peridynamics simulations of the dynamic deformation and failure of high-performance concrete are performed at the meso-scale. A pressure-dependent, peridynamic plasticity model and failure criteria are used to capture pressure-sensitive granular flow and fracture. The meso-scale framework explicitly resolves reinforcing phases, pores, and intrinsic flaws. A novel scaling approach is formulated to inform the engineering-scale plasticity model parameters with meso-scale simulation results. The effects of composition, porosity, and fracture energy at the meso-scale on the engineering-scale impact resistance are assessed. The fracture process zone at the meso-scale is found to propagate along adjacent pores and reinforcing phases under tensile and shear loading conditions. The simulations show that tensile strength decreases and dissipation increases as the porosity in the concrete increases. The framework and modeling approach allow the delineation of trends that can be used to design more impact-resistant materials.

  11. Pressure-flow relationships for packed beds of compressible chromatography media at laboratory and production scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stickel, J J; Fotopoulos, A

    2001-01-01

    Pressure drop across chromatography beds employing soft or semirigid media can be a significant problem in the operation of large-scale preparative chromatography columns. The shape or aspect ratio (length/diameter) of a packed bed has a significant effect on column pressure drop due to wall effects, which can result in unexpectedly high pressures in manufacturing. Two types of agarose-based media were packed in chromatography columns at various column aspect ratios, during which pressure drop, bed height, and flow rate were carefully monitored. Compression of the packed beds with increasing flow velocities was observed. An empirical model was developed to correlate pressure drop with the aspect ratio of the packed beds and the superficial velocity. Modeling employed the Blake-Kozeny equation in which empirical relationships were used to predict bed porosity as a function of aspect ratio and flow velocity. Model predictions were in good agreement with observed pressure drops of industrial scale chromatography columns. A protocol was developed to predict compression in industrial chromatography applications by a few laboratory experiments. The protocol is shown to be useful in the development of chromatographic methods and sizing of preparative columns.

  12. Measurement and Modelling of Scaling Minerals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Villafafila Garcia, Ada

    2005-01-01

    of scale formation found in many industrial processes, and especially in oilfield and geothermal operations. We want to contribute to the study of this problem by releasing a simple and accurate thermodynamic model capable of calculating the behaviour of scaling minerals, covering a wide range......-liquid equilibrium of sulphate scaling minerals (SrSO4, BaSO4, CaSO4 and CaSO4•2H2O) at temperatures up to 300ºC and pressures up to 1000 bar is described in chapter 4. Results for the binary systems (M2+, )-H2O; the ternary systems (Na+, M2+, )-H2O, and (Na+, M2+, Cl-)-H2O; and the quaternary systems (Na+, M2+)(Cl...

  13. Fiber bundle model under fluid pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amitrano, David; Girard, Lucas

    2016-03-01

    Internal fluid pressure often plays an important role in the rupture of brittle materials. This is a major concern for many engineering applications and for natural hazards. More specifically, the mechanisms through which fluid pressure, applied at a microscale, can enhance the failure at a macroscale and accelerate damage dynamics leading to failure remains unclear. Here we revisit the fiber bundle model by accounting for the effect of fluid under pressure that contributes to the global load supported by the fiber bundle. Fluid pressure is applied on the broken fibers, following Biot's theory. The statistical properties of damage avalanches and their evolution toward macrofailure are analyzed for a wide range of fluid pressures. The macroscopic strength of the new model appears to be strongly controlled by the action of the fluid, particularly when the fluid pressure becomes comparable with the fiber strength. The behavior remains consistent with continuous transition, i.e., second order, including for large pressure. The main change concerns the damage acceleration toward the failure that is well modeled by the concept of sweeping of an instability. When pressure is increased, the exponent β characterizing the power-law distribution avalanche sizes significantly decreases and the exponent γ characterizing the cutoff divergence when failure is approached significantly increases. This proves that fluid pressure plays a key role in failure process acting as destabilization factor. This indicates that macrofailure occurs more readily under fluid pressure, with a behavior that becomes progressively unstable as fluid pressure increases. This may have considerable consequences on our ability to forecast failure when fluid pressure is acting.

  14. Mathematical Modelling of Silica Scaling Deposition in Geothermal Wells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nizami, M.; Sutopo

    2016-09-01

    Silica scaling is widely encountered in geothermal wells in which produce two-phase geothermal fluid. Silica scaling could be formed due to chemical reacting by mixing a geothermal fluid with other geothermal fluid in different compositions, or also can be caused by changes in fluid properties due to changes pressure and temperature. One of method to overcome silica scaling which is occurred around geothermal well is by workover operation. Modelling of silica deposition in porous medium has been modeled in previously. However, the growth of silica scaling deposition in geothermal wells has never been modeled. Modelling of silica deposition through geothermal is important aspects to determine depth of silica scaling growth and best placing for workover device to clean silica scaling. This study is attempted to develop mathematical models for predicting silica scaling through geothermal wells. The mathematical model is developed by integrating the solubility-temperature correlation and two-phase pressure drop coupled wellbore fluid temperature correlation in a production well. The coupled model of two-phase pressure drop and wellbore fluid temperature correlation which is used in this paper is Hasan-Kabir correlation. This modelling is divided into two categories: single and two phase fluid model. Modelling of silica deposition is constrained in temperature distribution effect through geothermal wells by solubility correlation for silica. The results of this study are visualizing the growth of silica scaling thickness through geothermal wells in each segment of depth. Sensitivity analysis is applied in several parameters, such as: bottom-hole pressure, temperature, and silica concentrations. Temperature is most impact factor for silica scaling through geothermal wellbore and depth of flash point. In flash point, silica scaling thickness has reached maximum because reducing of mole in liquid portion.

  15. Crystal Plasticity Model of Reactor Pressure Vessel Embrittlement in GRIZZLY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chakraborty, Pritam [Idaho National Laboratory (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Biner, Suleyman Bulent [Idaho National Laboratory (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Zhang, Yongfeng [Idaho National Laboratory (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Spencer, Benjamin Whiting [Idaho National Laboratory (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2015-07-01

    The integrity of reactor pressure vessels (RPVs) is of utmost importance to ensure safe operation of nuclear reactors under extended lifetime. Microstructure-scale models at various length and time scales, coupled concurrently or through homogenization methods, can play a crucial role in understanding and quantifying irradiation-induced defect production, growth and their influence on mechanical behavior of RPV steels. A multi-scale approach, involving atomistic, meso- and engineering-scale models, is currently being pursued within the GRIZZLY project to understand and quantify irradiation-induced embrittlement of RPV steels. Within this framework, a dislocation-density based crystal plasticity model has been developed in GRIZZLY that captures the effect of irradiation-induced defects on the flow stress behavior and is presented in this report. The present formulation accounts for the interaction between self-interstitial loops and matrix dislocations. The model predictions have been validated with experiments and dislocation dynamics simulation.

  16. Modeling of Pressure Effects in HVDC Cables

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Szabo, Peter; Hassager, Ole; Strøbech, Esben

    1999-01-01

    A model is developed for the prediction of pressure effects in HVDC mass impregnatedcables as a result of temperature changes.To test the model assumptions, experiments were performed in cable like geometries.It is concluded that the model may predict the formation of gas cavities....

  17. Reservoir pressure evolution model during exploration drilling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Korotaev B. A.

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Based on the analysis of laboratory studies and literature data the method for estimating reservoir pressure in exploratory drilling has been proposed, it allows identify zones of abnormal reservoir pressure in the presence of seismic data on reservoir location depths. This method of assessment is based on developed at the end of the XX century methods using d- and σ-exponentials taking into account the mechanical drilling speed, rotor speed, bit load and its diameter, lithological constant and degree of rocks' compaction, mud density and "regional density". It is known that in exploratory drilling pulsation of pressure at the wellhead is observed. Such pulsation is a consequence of transferring reservoir pressure through clay. In the paper the mechanism for transferring pressure to the bottomhole as well as the behaviour of the clay layer during transmission of excess pressure has been described. A laboratory installation has been built, it has been used for modelling pressure propagation to the bottomhole of the well through a layer of clay. The bulge of the clay layer is established for 215.9 mm bottomhole diameter. Functional correlation of pressure propagation through the layer of clay has been determined and a reaction of the top clay layer has been shown to have bulge with a height of 25 mm. A pressure distribution scheme (balance has been developed, which takes into account the distance from layers with abnormal pressure to the bottomhole. A balance equation for reservoir pressure evaluation has been derived including well depth, distance from bottomhole to the top of the formation with abnormal pressure and density of clay.

  18. Intraspecific scaling of arterial blood pressure in the Burmese python.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enok, Sanne; Slay, Christopher; Abe, Augusto S; Hicks, James W; Wang, Tobias

    2014-07-01

    Interspecific allometric analyses indicate that mean arterial blood pressure (MAP) increases with body mass of snakes and mammals. In snakes, MAP increases in proportion to the increased distance between the heart and the head, when the heart-head vertical distance is expressed as ρgh (where ρ is the density of blood, G: is acceleration due to gravity and h is the vertical distance above the heart), and the rise in MAP is associated with a larger heart to normalize wall stress in the ventricular wall. Based on measurements of MAP in Burmese pythons ranging from 0.9 to 3.7 m in length (0.20-27 kg), we demonstrate that although MAP increases with body mass, the rise in MAP is merely half of that predicted by heart-head distance. Scaling relationships within individual species, therefore, may not be accurately predicted by existing interspecific analyses.

  19. High pressure sheet metal forming of large scale body structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trompeter, M.; Krux, R.; Homberg, W.; Kleiner, M. [Dortmund Univ. (Germany). Inst. of Forming Technology and Lightweight Construction

    2005-07-01

    An important trend in the automotive industry is the weight reduction of car bodies by lightweight construction. One approach to realise lightweight structures is the use of load optimised sheet metal parts (e.g. tailored blanks), especially for crash relevant car body structures. To form such parts which are mostly complex and primarily made of high strength steels, the use of working media based forming processes is favorable. The paper presents the manufacturing of a large scale structural component made of tailor rolled blanks (TRB) by high pressure sheet metal forming (HBU). The paper focuses mainly on the tooling system, which is integrated into a specific 100 MN hydroform press at the IUL. The HBU tool basically consists of a multipoint blankholder, a specially designed flange draw-in sensor, which is necessary to determine the material flow, and a sealing system. Furthermore, the paper presents a strategy for an effective closed loop flange draw-in control. (orig.)

  20. Analytical model for non-thermal pressure in galaxy clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Xun; Komatsu, Eiichiro

    2014-07-01

    Non-thermal pressure in the intracluster gas has been found ubiquitously in numerical simulations, and observed indirectly. In this paper we develop an analytical model for intracluster non-thermal pressure in the virial region of relaxed clusters. We write down and solve a first-order differential equation describing the evolution of non-thermal velocity dispersion. This equation is based on insights gained from observations, numerical simulations, and theory of turbulence. The non-thermal energy is sourced, in a self-similar fashion, by the mass growth of clusters via mergers and accretion, and dissipates with a time-scale determined by the turnover time of the largest turbulence eddies. Our model predicts a radial profile of non-thermal pressure for relaxed clusters. The non-thermal fraction increases with radius, redshift, and cluster mass, in agreement with numerical simulations. The radial dependence is due to a rapid increase of the dissipation time-scale with radii, and the mass and redshift dependence comes from the mass growth history. Combing our model for the non-thermal fraction with the Komatsu-Seljak model for the total pressure, we obtain thermal pressure profiles, and compute the hydrostatic mass bias. We find typically 10 per cent bias for the hydrostatic mass enclosed within r500.

  1. Pump schedules optimisation with pressure aspects in complex large-scale water distribution systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Skworcow

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper considers optimisation of pump and valve schedules in complex large-scale water distribution networks (WDN, taking into account pressure aspects such as minimum service pressure and pressure-dependent leakage. An optimisation model is automatically generated in the GAMS language from a hydraulic model in the EPANET format and from additional files describing operational constraints, electricity tariffs and pump station configurations. The paper describes in details how each hydraulic component is modelled. To reduce the size of the optimisation problem the full hydraulic model is simplified using module reduction algorithm, while retaining the nonlinear characteristics of the model. Subsequently, a nonlinear programming solver CONOPT is used to solve the optimisation model, which is in the form of Nonlinear Programming with Discontinuous Derivatives (DNLP. The results produced by CONOPT are processed further by heuristic algorithms to generate integer solution. The proposed approached was tested on a large-scale WDN model provided in the EPANET format. The considered WDN included complex structures and interactions between pump stations. Solving of several scenarios considering different horizons, time steps, operational constraints, demand levels and topological changes demonstrated ability of the approach to automatically generate and solve optimisation problems for a variety of requirements.

  2. Pump schedules optimisation with pressure aspects in complex large-scale water distribution systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Skworcow

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available This paper considers optimisation of pump and valve schedules in complex large-scale water distribution networks (WDN, taking into account pressure aspects such as minimum service pressure and pressure-dependent leakage. An optimisation model is automatically generated in GAMS language from a hydraulic model in EPANET format and from additional files describing operational constraints, electricity tariffs and pump station configurations. The paper describes in details how each hydraulic component is modelled. To reduce the size of the optimisation problem the full hydraulic model is simplified using module reduction algorithm, while retaining the nonlinear characteristics of the model. Subsequently, a nonlinear programming solver CONOPT is used to solve the optimisation model, which is in the form of Nonlinear Programming with Discontinuous Derivatives (DNLP. The results produced by CONOPT are processed further by heuristic algorithms to generate integer solution. The proposed approached was tested on a large-scale WDN model provided in EPANET format. The considered WDN included complex structures and interactions between pump stations. Solving of several scenarios considering different horizons, time steps, operational constraints, demand levels and topological changes demonstrated ability of the approach to automatically generate and solve optimisation problems for variety of requirements.

  3. Pressure prediction model for compression garment design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leung, W Y; Yuen, D W; Ng, Sun Pui; Shi, S Q

    2010-01-01

    Based on the application of Laplace's law to compression garments, an equation for predicting garment pressure, incorporating the body circumference, the cross-sectional area of fabric, applied strain (as a function of reduction factor), and its corresponding Young's modulus, is developed. Design procedures are presented to predict garment pressure using the aforementioned parameters for clinical applications. Compression garments have been widely used in treating burning scars. Fabricating a compression garment with a required pressure is important in the healing process. A systematic and scientific design method can enable the occupational therapist and compression garments' manufacturer to custom-make a compression garment with a specific pressure. The objectives of this study are 1) to develop a pressure prediction model incorporating different design factors to estimate the pressure exerted by the compression garments before fabrication; and 2) to propose more design procedures in clinical applications. Three kinds of fabrics cut at different bias angles were tested under uniaxial tension, as were samples made in a double-layered structure. Sets of nonlinear force-extension data were obtained for calculating the predicted pressure. Using the value at 0° bias angle as reference, the Young's modulus can vary by as much as 29% for fabric type P11117, 43% for fabric type PN2170, and even 360% for fabric type AP85120 at a reduction factor of 20%. When comparing the predicted pressure calculated from the single-layered and double-layered fabrics, the double-layered construction provides a larger range of target pressure at a particular strain. The anisotropic and nonlinear behaviors of the fabrics have thus been determined. Compression garments can be methodically designed by the proposed analytical pressure prediction model.

  4. Base pressure and heat transfer tests of the 0.0225-scale space shuttle plume simulation model (19-OTS) in yawed flight conditions in the NASA-Lewis 10x10-foot supersonic wind tunnel (test IH83)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foust, J. W.

    1979-01-01

    Wind tunnel tests were performed to determine pressures, heat transfer rates, and gas recovery temperatures in the base region of a rocket firing model of the space shuttle integrated vehicle during simulated yawed flight conditions. First and second stage flight of the space shuttle were simulated by firing the main engines in conjunction with the SRB rocket motors or only the SSME's into the continuous tunnel airstream. For the correct rocket plume environment, the simulated altitude pressures were halved to maintain the rocket chamber/altitude pressure ratio. Tunnel freestream Mach numbers from 2.2 to 3.5 were simulated over an altitude range of 60 to 130 thousand feet with varying angle of attack, yaw angle, nozzle gimbal angle and SRB chamber pressure. Gas recovery temperature data derived from nine gas temperature probe runs are presented. The model configuration, instrumentation, test procedures, and data reduction are described.

  5. A pressure drop model for PWR grids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oh, Dong Seok; In, Wang Ki; Bang, Je Geon; Jung, Youn Ho; Chun, Tae Hyun [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1998-12-31

    A pressure drop model for the PWR grids with and without mixing device is proposed at single phase based on the fluid mechanistic approach. Total pressure loss is expressed in additive way for form and frictional losses. The general friction factor correlations and form drag coefficients available in the open literatures are used to the model. As the results, the model shows better predictions than the existing ones for the non-mixing grids, and reasonable agreements with the available experimental data for mixing grids. Therefore it is concluded that the proposed model for pressure drop can provide sufficiently good approximation for grid optimization and design calculation in advanced grid development. 7 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs. (Author)

  6. Modeling agreement on bounded scales.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanbelle, Sophie; Lesaffre, Emmanuel

    2017-01-01

    Agreement is an important concept in medical and behavioral sciences, in particular in clinical decision making where disagreements possibly imply a different patient management. The concordance correlation coefficient is an appropriate measure to quantify agreement between two scorers on a quantitative scale. However, this measure is based on the first two moments, which could poorly summarize the shape of the score distribution on bounded scales. Bounded outcome scores are common in medical and behavioral sciences. Typical examples are scores obtained on visual analog scales and scores derived as the number of positive items on a questionnaire. These kinds of scores often show a non-standard distribution, like a J- or U-shape, questioning the usefulness of the concordance correlation coefficient as agreement measure. The logit-normal distribution has shown to be successful in modeling bounded outcome scores of two types: (1) when the bounded score is a coarsened version of a latent score with a logit-normal distribution on the [0,1] interval and (2) when the bounded score is a proportion with the true probability having a logit-normal distribution. In the present work, a model-based approach, based on a bivariate generalization of the logit-normal distribution, is developed in a Bayesian framework to assess the agreement on bounded scales. This method permits to directly study the impact of predictors on the concordance correlation coefficient and can be simply implemented in standard Bayesian softwares, like JAGS and WinBUGS. The performances of the new method are compared to the classical approach using simulations. Finally, the methodology is used in two different medical domains: cardiology and rheumatology.

  7. Integrating Local Scale Drainage Measures in Meso Scale Catchment Modelling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra Hellmers

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This article presents a methodology to optimize the integration of local scale drainage measures in catchment modelling. The methodology enables to zoom into the processes (physically, spatially and temporally where detailed physical based computation is required and to zoom out where lumped conceptualized approaches are applied. It allows the definition of parameters and computation procedures on different spatial and temporal scales. Three methods are developed to integrate features of local scale drainage measures in catchment modelling: (1 different types of local drainage measures are spatially integrated in catchment modelling by a data mapping; (2 interlinked drainage features between data objects are enabled on the meso, local and micro scale; (3 a method for modelling multiple interlinked layers on the micro scale is developed. For the computation of flow routing on the meso scale, the results of the local scale measures are aggregated according to their contributing inlet in the network structure. The implementation of the methods is realized in a semi-distributed rainfall-runoff model. The implemented micro scale approach is validated with a laboratory physical model to confirm the credibility of the model. A study of a river catchment of 88 km2 illustrated the applicability of the model on the regional scale.

  8. Models of large scale structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frenk, C.S. (Physics Dept., Univ. of Durham (UK))

    1991-01-01

    The ingredients required to construct models of the cosmic large scale structure are discussed. Input from particle physics leads to a considerable simplification by offering concrete proposals for the geometry of the universe, the nature of the dark matter and the primordial fluctuations that seed the growth of structure. The remaining ingredient is the physical interaction that governs dynamical evolution. Empirical evidence provided by an analysis of a redshift survey of IRAS galaxies suggests that gravity is the main agent shaping the large-scale structure. In addition, this survey implies large values of the mean cosmic density, {Omega}> or approx.0.5, and is consistent with a flat geometry if IRAS galaxies are somewhat more clustered than the underlying mass. Together with current limits on the density of baryons from Big Bang nucleosynthesis, this lends support to the idea of a universe dominated by non-baryonic dark matter. Results from cosmological N-body simulations evolved from a variety of initial conditions are reviewed. In particular, neutrino dominated and cold dark matter dominated universes are discussed in detail. Finally, it is shown that apparent periodicities in the redshift distributions in pencil-beam surveys arise frequently from distributions which have no intrinsic periodicity but are clustered on small scales. (orig.).

  9. Large scale steam flow test: Pressure drop data and calculated pressure loss coefficients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meadows, J.B.; Spears, J.R.; Feder, A.R.; Moore, B.P.; Young, C.E. [Bettis Atomic Power Lab., Pittsburgh, PA (United States)

    1993-12-01

    This report presents the result of large scale steam flow testing, 3 million to 7 million lbs/hr., conducted at approximate steam qualities of 25, 45, 70 and 100 percent (dry, saturated). It is concluded from the test data that reasonable estimates of piping component pressure loss coefficients for single phase flow in complex piping geometries can be calculated using available engineering literature. This includes the effects of nearby upstream and downstream components, compressibility, and internal obstructions, such as splitters, and ladder rungs on individual piping components. Despite expected uncertainties in the data resulting from the complexity of the piping geometry and two-phase flow, the test data support the conclusion that the predicted dry steam K-factors are accurate and provide useful insight into the effect of entrained liquid on the flow resistance. The K-factors calculated from the wet steam test data were compared to two-phase K-factors based on the Martinelli-Nelson pressure drop correlations. This comparison supports the concept of a two-phase multiplier for estimating the resistance of piping with liquid entrained into the flow. The test data in general appears to be reasonably consistent with the shape of a curve based on the Martinelli-Nelson correlation over the tested range of steam quality.

  10. Non-Axisymmetric Inflatable Pressure Structure (NAIPS) Full-Scale Pressure Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Thomas C.; Doggett, William R.; Warren, Jerry E.; Watson, Judith J.; Shariff, Khadijah; Makino, Alberto; Yount, Bryan C.

    2017-01-01

    Inflatable space structures have the potential to significantly reduce the required launch volume for large pressure vessels required for exploration applications including habitats, airlocks and tankage. In addition, mass savings can be achieved via the use of high specific strength softgoods materials, and the reduced design penalty from launching the structure in a densely packaged state. Large inclusions however, such as hatches, induce a high mass penalty at the interfaces with the softgoods and in the added rigid structure while reducing the packaging efficiency. A novel, Non-Axisymmetric Inflatable Pressure Structure (NAIPS) was designed and recently tested at NASA Langley Research Center to demonstrate an elongated inflatable architecture that could provide areas of low stress along a principal axis in the surface. These low stress zones will allow the integration of a flexible linear seal that substantially reduces the added mass and volume of a heritage rigid hatch structure. This paper describes the test of the first full-scale engineering demonstration unit (EDU) of the NAIPS geometry and a comparison of the results to finite element analysis.

  11. Modeling steam pressure under martian lava flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dundas, Colin M.; Keszthelyi, Laszlo P.

    2013-01-01

    Rootless cones on Mars are a valuable indicator of past interactions between lava and water. However, the details of the lava–water interactions are not fully understood, limiting the ability to use these features to infer new information about past water on Mars. We have developed a model for the pressurization of a dry layer of porous regolith by melting and boiling ground ice in the shallow subsurface. This model builds on previous models of lava cooling and melting of subsurface ice. We find that for reasonable regolith properties and ice depths of decimeters, explosive pressures can be reached. However, the energy stored within such lags is insufficient to excavate thick flows unless they draw steam from a broader region than the local eruption site. These results indicate that lag pressurization can drive rootless cone formation under favorable circumstances, but in other instances molten fuel–coolant interactions are probably required. We use the model results to consider a range of scenarios for rootless cone formation in Athabasca Valles. Pressure buildup by melting and boiling ice under a desiccated lag is possible in some locations, consistent with the expected distribution of ice implanted from atmospheric water vapor. However, it is uncertain whether such ice has existed in the vicinity of Athabasca Valles in recent history. Plausible alternative sources include surface snow or an aqueous flood shortly before the emplacement of the lava flow.

  12. Brane World Models Need Low String Scale

    CERN Document Server

    Antoniadis, Ignatios; Calmet, Xavier

    2011-01-01

    Models with large extra dimensions offer the possibility of the Planck scale being of order the electroweak scale, thus alleviating the gauge hierarchy problem. We show that these models suffer from a breakdown of unitarity at around three quarters of the low effective Planck scale. An obvious candidate to fix the unitarity problem is string theory. We therefore argue that it is necessary for the string scale to appear below the effective Planck scale and that the first signature of such models would be string resonances. We further translate experimental bounds on the string scale into bounds on the effective Planck scale.

  13. Evaluation of burst pressure prediction models for line pipes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhu, Xian-Kui, E-mail: zhux@battelle.org [Battelle Memorial Institute, 505 King Avenue, Columbus, OH 43201 (United States); Leis, Brian N. [Battelle Memorial Institute, 505 King Avenue, Columbus, OH 43201 (United States)

    2012-01-15

    Accurate prediction of burst pressure plays a central role in engineering design and integrity assessment of oil and gas pipelines. Theoretical and empirical solutions for such prediction are evaluated in this paper relative to a burst pressure database comprising more than 100 tests covering a variety of pipeline steel grades and pipe sizes. Solutions considered include three based on plasticity theory for the end-capped, thin-walled, defect-free line pipe subjected to internal pressure in terms of the Tresca, von Mises, and ZL (or Zhu-Leis) criteria, one based on a cylindrical instability stress (CIS) concept, and a large group of analytical and empirical models previously evaluated by Law and Bowie (International Journal of Pressure Vessels and Piping, 84, 2007: 487-492). It is found that these models can be categorized into either a Tresca-family or a von Mises-family of solutions, except for those due to Margetson and Zhu-Leis models. The viability of predictions is measured via statistical analyses in terms of a mean error and its standard deviation. Consistent with an independent parallel evaluation using another large database, the Zhu-Leis solution is found best for predicting burst pressure, including consideration of strain hardening effects, while the Tresca strength solutions including Barlow, Maximum shear stress, Turner, and the ASME boiler code provide reasonably good predictions for the class of line-pipe steels with intermediate strain hardening response. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer This paper evaluates different burst pressure prediction models for line pipes. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The existing models are categorized into two major groups of Tresca and von Mises solutions. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Prediction quality of each model is assessed statistically using a large full-scale burst test database. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The Zhu-Leis solution is identified as the best predictive model.

  14. A Retrospective Analysis of Pressure Ulcer Incidence and Modified Braden Scale Score Risk Classifications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hong-Lin; Cao, Ying-Juan; Wang, Jing; Huai, Bao-Sha

    2015-09-01

    The Braden Scale is the most widely used pressure ulcer risk assessment in the world, but the currently used 5 risk classification groups do not accurately discriminate among their risk categories. To optimize risk classification based on Braden Scale scores, a retrospective analysis of all consecutively admitted patients in an acute care facility who were at risk for pressure ulcer development was performed between January 2013 and December 2013. Predicted pressure ulcer incidence first was calculated by logistic regression model based on original Braden score. Risk classification then was modified based on the predicted pressure ulcer incidence and compared between different risk categories in the modified (3-group) classification and the traditional (5-group) classification using chi-square test. Two thousand, six hundred, twenty-five (2,625) patients (mean age 59.8 ± 16.5, range 1 month to 98 years, 1,601 of whom were men) were included in the study; 81 patients (3.1%) developed a pressure ulcer. The predicted pressure ulcer incidence ranged from 0.1% to 49.7%. When the predicted pressure ulcer incidence was greater than 10.0% (high risk), the corresponding Braden scores were less than 11; when the predicted incidence ranged from 1.0% to 10.0% (moderate risk), the corresponding Braden scores ranged from 12 to 16; and when the predicted incidence was less than 1.0% (mild risk), the corresponding Braden scores were greater than 17. In the modified classification, observed pressure ulcer incidence was significantly different between each of the 3 risk categories (P less than 0.05). However, in the traditional classification, the observed incidence was not significantly different between the high-risk category and moderate-risk category (P less than 0.05) and between the mild-risk category and no-risk category (P less than 0.05). If future studies confirm the validity of these findings, pressure ulcer prevention protocols of care based on Braden Scale scores can

  15. Scaling Law for Cross-stream Diffusion in Microchannels under Combined Electroosmotic and Pressure Driven Flow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Hongjun; Wang, Yi; Pant, Kapil

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents an analytical study of the cross-stream diffusion of an analyte in a rectangular microchannel under combined electroosmotic flow (EOF) and pressure driven flow to investigate the heterogeneous transport behavior and spatially-dependent diffusion scaling law. An analytical model capable of accurately describing 3D steady-state convection-diffusion in microchannels with arbitrary aspect ratios is developed based on the assumption of the thin Electric Double Layer (EDL). The model is verified against high-fidelity numerical simulation in terms of flow velocity and analyte concentration profiles with excellent agreement (parametric analysis is then undertaken to interrogate the effect of the combined flow velocity field on the transport behavior in both the positive pressure gradient (PPG) and negative pressure gradient (NPG) cases. For the first time, the evolution from the spindle-shaped concentration profile in the PPG case, via the stripe-shaped profile (pure EOF), and finally to the butterfly-shaped profile in the PPG case is obtained using the analytical model along with a quantitative depiction of the spatially-dependent diffusion layer thickness and scaling law across a wide range of the parameter space.

  16. Engineering Model of High Pressure Moist Air

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyhlík Tomáš

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The article deals with the moist air equation of state. There are equations of state discussed in the article, i.e. the model of an ideal mixture of ideal gases, the model of an ideal mixture of real gases and the model based on the virial equation of state. The evaluation of sound speed based on the ideal mixture concept is mentioned. The sound speed calculated by the model of an ideal mixture of ideal gases is compared with the sound speed calculated by using the model based on the concept of an ideal mixture of real gases. The comparison of enthalpy end entropy based on the model of an ideal mixture of ideal gases and the model of an ideal mixture of real gases is performed. It is shown that the model of an ideal mixture of real gases deviates from the model of an ideal mixture of ideal gases only in the case of high pressure. An impossibility of the definition of partial pressure in the mixture of real gases is discussed, where the virial equation of state is used.

  17. Using the Braden Q Scale to Predict Pressure Ulcer Risk in pediatric patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noonan, Catherine; Quigley, Sandy; Curley, Martha A Q

    2011-12-01

    The Braden Q Scale for Predicting Pediatric Pressure Ulcer Risk (Braden Q Scale) is a widely used, valid, and reliable pediatric-specific pressure ulcer risk assessment tool. Since its original publication, requests for clarification on how best to use the tool across the wide spectrum of pediatric patients commonly cared for in health care systems have been received. Common clarifications focus on using the Braden Q Scale as originally designed; specifically, not using untested derivations of the tool, and not using the Braden Q Scale to predict medical device-related pressure damage. The purpose of this article is to provide practical information on how best to use the Braden Q Scale and how to score a pediatric patient's risk for pressure ulcers. Accurate assessment of patient risk for pressure ulcers is the first step in guiding appropriate nursing interventions that prevent pressure ulcers. Patient assessment, scoring, and common clinical scenarios are presented.

  18. Pressure-Balance Consistency in Magnetospheric Modelling

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    肖永登; 陈出新

    2003-01-01

    There have been many magnetic field models for geophysical and astrophysical bodies.These theoretical or empirical models represent the reality very well in some cases,but in other cases they may be far from reality.We argue that these models will become more reasonable if they are modified by some coordinate transformations.In order to demonstrate the transformation,we use this method to resolve the "pressure-balance inconsistency"problem that occurs when plasma transports from the outer plasma sheet of the Earth into the inner plasma sheet.

  19. Biomechanical modeling to prevent ischial pressure ulcers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luboz, Vincent; Petrizelli, Marion; Bucki, Marek; Diot, Bruno; Vuillerme, Nicolas; Payan, Yohan

    2014-07-18

    With 300,000 paraplegic persons only in France, ischial pressure ulcers represent a major public health issue. They result from the buttocks׳ soft tissues compression by the bony prominences. Unfortunately, the current clinical techniques, with - in the best case - embedded pressure sensor mats, are insufficient to prevent them because most are due to high internal strains which can occur even with low pressures at the skin surface. Therefore, improving prevention requires using a biomechanical model to estimate internal strains from skin surface pressures. However, the buttocks׳ soft tissues׳ stiffness is still unknown. This paper provides a stiffness sensitivity analysis using a finite element model. Different layers with distinct Neo Hookean materials simulate the skin, fat and muscles. With Young moduli in the range [100-500 kPa], [25-35 kPa], and [80-140 kPa] for the skin, fat, and muscles, respectively, maximum internal strains reach realistic 50 to 60% values. The fat and muscle stiffnesses have an important influence on the strain variations, while skin stiffness is less influent. Simulating different sitting postures and changing the muscle thickness also result in a variation in the internal strains. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Scaling of Core Material in Rubble Mound Breakwater Model Tests

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Burcharth, H. F.; Liu, Z.; Troch, P.

    1999-01-01

    correct scaling. The paper presents an empirical formula for the estimation of the wave induced pressure gradient in the core, based on measurements in models and a prototype. The formula, together with the Forchheimer equation can be used for the estimation of pore velocities in cores. The paper proposes...

  1. Choking under pressure: theoretical models and interventions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mesagno, Christopher; Beckmann, Juergen

    2017-08-01

    In sport, choking under pressure is a major concern for athletes, coaches and sport psychologists because athletes fail to meet self-imposed performance expectations in critical situations (when it counts the most), which is devastating and embarrassing. Researchers have debated choking under pressure definitions, identified personality characteristics that exacerbate choking outcomes, and examined models to determine mechanisms for choking. Based on these investigations, several interventions to prevent choking have been developed and tested. In this review, we specifically discuss current self-presentation and attention models and theory-driven interventions that help to alleviate choking in order to facilitate the understanding of this complex phenomenon by athletes, sport psychologists and researchers. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. MULTI-SCALE GAUSSIAN PROCESSES MODEL

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhou Yatong; Zhang Taiyi; Li Xiaohe

    2006-01-01

    A novel model named Multi-scale Gaussian Processes (MGP) is proposed. Motivated by the ideas of multi-scale representations in the wavelet theory, in the new model, a Gaussian process is represented at a scale by a linear basis that is composed of a scale function and its different translations. Finally the distribution of the targets of the given samples can be obtained at different scales. Compared with the standard Gaussian Processes (GP) model, the MGP model can control its complexity conveniently just by adjusting the scale parameter. So it can trade-off the generalization ability and the empirical risk rapidly. Experiments verify the feasibility of the MGP model, and exhibit that its performance is superior to the GP model if appropriate scales are chosen.

  3. [An assessment scale for the prevention of pressure sores in children].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chauvet, Corinne; Poirier, Marie-Renée; Sourisseau, Petronela Rachieru; Béduneau, Denis; Soulard, Anthony; Delacroix, Delphine

    2015-04-01

    Pressure sores in children are rare. However, when they do occur they can have significant consequences. Professionals in paediatric units realised the importance of assessing the risk of pressure sores and developed a pressure sore assessment scale specific to children. This project, carried out through a hospital-training school partnership, emphasises the importance of clinical reasoning in nursing practices.

  4. Pressure versus current scaling in a blocked bore rail gun

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrett, B. D.; Eubank, Eric; Nunnally, W. C.

    1993-07-01

    The paper presents experimental results from a blocked bore plasma armature rail gun. A piezoelectric transducer mounted in the bore blocking structure recorded time-resolved pressures over a range of input currents from 50 to 150 kA. The bore block is located at four positions where peak current occurs for the four respective charging voltages to power the system. Problems associated with obtaining these measurements and the solutions employed are discussed. Average distances from the block face to the armature current centroid are estimated assuming a pressure balance between the magnetic and neutral pressures. The averages of the measured pressures were found to be proportional to the input current raised to the power of 1.655.

  5. Cubic silicon carbide and boron nitride as possible primary pressure calibrants for high pressure and temperature scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhuravlev, K. K.; Goncharov, A. F.; Tkachev, S. N.; Prakapenka, V.

    2010-12-01

    K. K. Zhuravlev, A. F. Goncharov Geophysical Laboratory, Carnegie Institution of Washington, 5251 Broad Branch Road NW, Washington DC, 20015 V. Prakapenka, S. N. Tkachev CARS, the University of Chicago, Bldg. 434A, Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 S. Cass. Ave., Argonne, IL 60439 Abstract Since its introduction, ruby-based pressure scale (Mao et al., 1986) has been the most commonly used by the high-pressure scientific community. However, it has limited use at elevated temperatures, due to the weakening and broadening of the ruby fluorescence line. The recent developments in the field of high temperature, high pressure physics and geophysics require some alternative pressure scale, which will be capable of measuring pressures at temperatures up to 3000 K. Cubic boron nitride (cBN) was recently (Goncharov et al., 2005) proposed as the possible pressure calibrant. It has been suggested that the simultaneous use of x-ray diffraction to measure density and Brillouin spectroscopy to obtain elastic properties of the crystal can be used to construct the pressure scale independent of any other pressure standards, i.e. cBN can be a primary pressure calibrant. However, the acoustic velocities of cBN are very close to those of diamond and, therefore, are hard to resolve in experiment at high pressures in diamond-anvil cell. Another possible primary pressure calibrant is cubic silicon carbide (SiC-3C). Its density and elastic parameters are quite different from the diamond ones and it is stable over the broad range of temperatures and pressures (up to 1 Mbar). SiC-3C is transparent and allows the use of Brillouin spectroscopy. Additionally, SiC-3C has two strong Raman lines, which can be used for the optical in situ pressure measurements. We report our experimental data on both cBN and SiC-3C and show that they, indeed, can be used in constructing reliable and accurate high-pressure, high-temperature scale. We performed single crystal x-ray diffraction and Brillouin

  6. CFD modeling of the IRIS pressurizer dynamic

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanz, Ronny R.; Montesinos, Maria E.; Garcia, Carlos; Bueno, Elizabeth D.; Mazaira, Leorlen R., E-mail: rsanz@instec.cu, E-mail: mmontesi@instec.cu, E-mail: cgh@instec.cu, E-mail: leored1984@gmail.com [Instituto Superior de Tecnologias y Ciencias Aplicadas (InSTEC), La Habana (Cuba); Bezerra, Jair L.; Lira, Carlos A.B. Oliveira, E-mail: jair.lima@ufpe.br, E-mail: cabol@ufpe.br [Universida Federal de Pernambuco (UFPE), Recife, PE (Brazil). Dept. de Energia Nuclear

    2015-07-01

    Integral layout of nuclear reactor IRIS makes possible the elimination of the spray system, which is usually used to mitigate in-surge transient and also help to Boron homogenization. The study of transients with deficiencies in the Boron homogenization in this technology is very important, because they can cause disturbances in the reactor power and insert a strong reactivity in the core. The detailed knowledge of the behavior of multiphase multicomponent flows is challenging due to the complex phenomena and interactions at the interface. In this context, the CFD modeling is employed in the design of equipment in the nuclear industry as it allows predicting accidents or predicting their performance in dissimilar applications. The aim of the present research is to model the IRIS pressurizer's dynamic using the commercial CFD code CFX. A symmetric tri dimensional model equivalent to 1/8 of the total geometry was adopted to reduce mesh size and minimize processing time. The model considers the coexistence of four phases and also takes into account the heat losses. The relationships for interfacial mass, energy, and momentum transport are programmed and incorporated into CFX. Moreover, two subdomains and several additional variables are defined to monitoring the boron dilution sequences and condensation-evaporation rates in different control volumes. For transient states a non - equilibrium stratification in the pressurizer is considered. This paper discusses the model developed and the behavior of the system for representative transients sequences. The results of analyzed transients of IRIS can be applied to the design of pressurizer internal structures and components. (author)

  7. Operational design and pressure response of large-scale compressed air energy storage in porous formations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Bo; Bauer, Sebastian

    2017-04-01

    With the rapid growth of energy production from intermittent renewable sources like wind and solar power plants, large-scale energy storage options are required to compensate for fluctuating power generation on different time scales. Compressed air energy storage (CAES) in porous formations is seen as a promising option for balancing short-term diurnal fluctuations. CAES is a power-to-power energy storage, which converts electricity to mechanical energy, i.e. highly pressurized air, and stores it in the subsurface. This study aims at designing the storage setup and quantifying the pressure response of a large-scale CAES operation in a porous sandstone formation, thus assessing the feasibility of this storage option. For this, numerical modelling of a synthetic site and a synthetic operational cycle is applied. A hypothetic CAES scenario using a typical anticline structure in northern Germany was investigated. The top of the storage formation is at 700 m depth and the thickness is 20 m. The porosity and permeability were assumed to have a homogenous distribution with a value of 0.35 and 500 mD, respectively. According to the specifications of the Huntorf CAES power plant, a gas turbine producing 321 MW power with a minimum inlet pressure of 43 bars at an air mass flowrate of 417 kg/s was assumed. Pressure loss in the gas wells was accounted for using an analytical solution, which defines a minimum bottom hole pressure of 47 bars. Two daily extraction cycles of 6 hours each were set to the early morning and the late afternoon in order to bypass the massive solar energy production around noon. A two-year initial filling of the reservoir with air and ten years of daily cyclic operation were numerically simulated using the Eclipse E300 reservoir simulator. The simulation results show that using 12 wells the storage formation with a permeability of 500 mD can support the required 6-hour continuous power output of 321MW, which corresponds an energy output of 3852 MWh per

  8. Mark I Containment Program. Scaling analysis for modeling initial air clearing caused by reactor safety/relief valve discharge. [BWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schrum, R.W.

    1978-02-01

    A generalized method of similitude is introduced and applied to develop scaling relationships for a General Electric Mark I suppression pool. A scale model is proposed to model suppression pool wall loads due to air flow through a T-quencher discharge device. The scaling relationships developed provide the means for relating scale model parameters (i.e., pressure, velocity,) to full scale.

  9. High-temperature high-pressure calorimeter for studying gram-scale heterogeneous chemical reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacLeod, B. P.; Schauer, P. A.; Hu, K.; Lam, B.; Fork, D. K.; Berlinguette, C. P.

    2017-08-01

    We present an instrument for measuring pressure changes and heat flows of physical and chemical processes occurring in gram-scale solid samples under high pressures of reactive gases. Operation is demonstrated at 1232 °C under 33 bars of pure hydrogen. Calorimetric heat flow is inferred using a grey-box non-linear lumped-element heat transfer model of the instrument. Using an electrical calibration heater to deliver 900 J/1 W pulses at the sample position, we demonstrate a dynamic calorimetric power resolution of 50 mW when an 80-s moving average is applied to the signal. Integration of the power signal showed that the 900 J pulse energy could be measured with an average accuracy of 6.35% or better over the temperature range 150-1100 °C. This instrument is appropriate for the study of high-temperature metal hydride materials for thermochemical energy storage.

  10. THE SCALE-UP OF LARGE PRESSURIZED FLUIDIZED BEDS FOR ADVANCED COAL-FIRED POWER PROCESSES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leon R. Glicksman; Michael Louge; Hesham F. Younis; Richard Tan; Mathew Hyre; Mark Torpey

    2003-11-24

    This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor an agency thereof, nor any of the their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, A combined-cycle High Performance Power System (HIPPS) capable of overall cycle efficiencies approaching 50% has been proposed and designed by Foster Wheeler Development Corporation (FWDC). A pyrolyzer in the first stage of the HIPPS process converts a coal feedstock into fuel gas and char at an elevated pressure of 1.4 Map. (206 psia) and elevated temperature of 930 C (1700 F). The generated char serves as the feedstock for a Pulverized Coal (PC) boiler operating at atmospheric pressure, and the fuel gas is directly fired in a gas turbine. The hydrodynamic behavior of the pyrolyzer strongly influences the quality of both the fuel gas and the generated char, the energy split between the gas turbine and the steam turbine, and hence the overall efficiency of the system. By utilizing a simplified set of scaling parameters (Glicksman et al.,1993), a 4/7th labscale cold model of the pyrolyzer operating at ambient temperature and pressure was constructed and tested. The scaling parameters matched include solid to gas density ratio, Froude number, length to diameter ratio; dimensionless superficial gas velocity and solid recycle rate, particle sphericity and particle size distribution (PSD).

  11. Mirrored continuum and molecular scale simulations of the ignition of high-pressure phases of RDX

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kibaek; Joshi, Kaushik; Chaudhuri, Santanu; Stewart, D. Scott

    2016-05-01

    We present a mirrored atomistic and continuum framework that is used to describe the ignition of energetic materials, and a high-pressure phase of RDX in particular. The continuum formulation uses meaningful averages of thermodynamic properties obtained from the atomistic simulation and a simplification of enormously complex reaction kinetics. In particular, components are identified based on molecular weight bin averages and our methodology assumes that both the averaged atomistic and continuum simulations are represented on the same time and length scales. The atomistic simulations of thermally initiated ignition of RDX are performed using reactive molecular dynamics (RMD). The continuum model is based on multi-component thermodynamics and uses a kinetics scheme that describes observed chemical changes of the averaged atomistic simulations. Thus the mirrored continuum simulations mimic the rapid change in pressure, temperature, and average molecular weight of species in the reactive mixture. This mirroring enables a new technique to simplify the chemistry obtained from reactive MD simulations while retaining the observed features and spatial and temporal scales from both the RMD and continuum model. The primary benefit of this approach is a potentially powerful, but familiar way to interpret the atomistic simulations and understand the chemical events and reaction rates. The approach is quite general and thus can provide a way to model chemistry based on atomistic simulations and extend the reach of those simulations.

  12. Analytical model for non-thermal pressure in galaxy clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Shi, Xun

    2014-01-01

    Non-thermal pressure in the intracluster gas has been found ubiquitously in numerical simulations, and observed indirectly. In this paper we develop, for the first time, an analytical model for intracluster non-thermal pressure. We write down and solve a first-order differential equation describing the evolution of non-thermal velocity dispersion. This equation is based on insights gained from observations, numerical simulations, and theory of turbulence. The non-thermal energy is sourced, in a self-similar fashion, by the mass growth of clusters via mergers and accretion, and dissipates with a time scale determined by the turnover time of the largest turbulence eddies. Our model predicts a radial profile of non-thermal pressure for relaxed clusters. The non-thermal fraction increases with radius, redshift, and cluster mass, in agreement with numerical simulations. The radial dependence is due to a rapid increase of the dissipation time scale with radii, and the mass and redshift dependence comes from the mas...

  13. Subject-specific biomechanics of trunk: musculoskeletal scaling, internal loads and intradiscal pressure estimation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghezelbash, F; Shirazi-Adl, A; Arjmand, N; El-Ouaaid, Z; Plamondon, A

    2016-12-01

    Development of a subject-specific computational musculoskeletal trunk model (accounting for age, sex, body weight and body height), estimation of muscle forces and internal loads as well as subsequent validation by comparison with measured intradiscal pressure in various lifting tasks are novel, important and challenging. The objective of the present study is twofold. First, it aims to update and personalize the passive and active structures in an existing musculoskeletal kinematics-driven finite element model. The scaling scheme used an existing imaging database and biomechanical principles to adjust muscle geometries/cross-sectional-areas and passive joint geometry/properties in accordance with subjects' sex, age, body weight and body height. Second, using predictions of a detailed passive finite element model of the ligamentous lumbar spine, a novel nonlinear regression equation was proposed that relates the intradiscal pressure (IDP) at the L4-L5 disc to its compression force and intersegmental flexion rotation. Predicted IDPs and muscle activities of the personalized models under various tasks are found in good-to-excellent agreement with reported measurements. Results indicate the importance of personal parameters when computing muscle forces and spinal loads especially at larger trunk flexion angles as minor changes in individual parameters yielded up to 30 % differences in spinal forces. For more accurate subject-specific estimation of spinal loads and muscle activities, such a comprehensive trunk model should be used that accounts for subject's personalized features on active musculature and passive spinal structure.

  14. Tantalum strength model incorporating temperature, strain rate and pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Hojun; Battaile, Corbett; Brown, Justin; Lane, Matt

    Tantalum is a body-centered-cubic (BCC) refractory metal that is widely used in many applications in high temperature, strain rate and pressure environments. In this work, we propose a physically-based strength model for tantalum that incorporates effects of temperature, strain rate and pressure. A constitutive model for single crystal tantalum is developed based on dislocation kink-pair theory, and calibrated to measurements on single crystal specimens. The model is then used to predict deformations of single- and polycrystalline tantalum. In addition, the proposed strength model is implemented into Sandia's ALEGRA solid dynamics code to predict plastic deformations of tantalum in engineering-scale applications at extreme conditions, e.g. Taylor impact tests and Z machine's high pressure ramp compression tests, and the results are compared with available experimental data. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  15. Predictive capacity of risk assessment scales and clinical judgment for pressure ulcers: a meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Fernández, Francisco Pedro; Pancorbo-Hidalgo, Pedro L; Agreda, J Javier Soldevilla

    2014-01-01

    A systematic review with meta-analysis was completed to determine the capacity of risk assessment scales and nurses' clinical judgment to predict pressure ulcer (PU) development. Electronic databases were searched for prospective studies on the validity and predictive capacity of PUs risk assessment scales published between 1962 and 2010 in English, Spanish, Portuguese, Korean, German, and Greek. We excluded gray literature sources, integrative review articles, and retrospective or cross-sectional studies. The methodological quality of the studies was assessed according to the guidelines of the Critical Appraisal Skills Program. Predictive capacity was measured as relative risk (RR) with 95% confidence intervals. When 2 or more valid original studies were found, a meta-analysis was conducted using a random-effect model and sensitivity analysis. We identified 57 studies, including 31 that included a validation study. We also retrieved 4 studies that tested clinical judgment as a risk prediction factor. Meta-analysis produced the following pooled predictive capacity indicators: Braden (RR = 4.26); Norton (RR = 3.69); Waterlow (RR = 2.66); Cubbin-Jackson (RR = 8.63); EMINA (RR = 6.17); Pressure Sore Predictor Scale (RR = 21.4); and clinical judgment (RR = 1.89). Pooled analysis of 11 studies found adequate risk prediction capacity in various clinical settings; the Braden, Norton, EMINA (mEntal state, Mobility, Incontinence, Nutrition, Activity), Waterlow, and Cubbin-Jackson scales showed the highest predictive capacity. The clinical judgment of nurses was found to achieve inadequate predictive capacity when used alone, and should be used in combination with a validated scale.

  16. Modelling of rate effects at multiple scales

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, R.R.; Simone, A.; Sluys, L. J.

    2008-01-01

    At the macro- and meso-scales a rate dependent constitutive model is used in which visco-elasticity is coupled to visco-plasticity and damage. A viscous length scale effect is introduced to control the size of the fracture process zone. By comparison of the widths of the fracture process zone......, the length scale in the meso-model and the macro-model can be coupled. In this fashion, a bridging of length scales can be established. A computational analysis of  a Split Hopkinson bar test at medium and high impact load is carried out at macro-scale and meso-scale including information from  the micro-scale....

  17. Dispersion in deep polar firn driven by synoptic-scale surface pressure variability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buizert, Christo; Severinghaus, Jeffrey P.

    2016-09-01

    Commonly, three mechanisms of firn air transport are distinguished: molecular diffusion, advection, and near-surface convective mixing. Here we identify and describe a fourth mechanism, namely dispersion driven by synoptic-scale surface pressure variability (or barometric pumping). We use published gas chromatography experiments on firn samples to derive the along-flow dispersivity of firn, and combine this dispersivity with a dynamical air pressure propagation model forced by surface air pressure time series to estimate the magnitude of dispersive mixing in the firn. We show that dispersion dominates mixing within the firn lock-in zone. Trace gas concentrations measured in firn air samples from various polar sites confirm that dispersive mixing occurs. Including dispersive mixing in a firn air transport model suggests that our theoretical estimates have the correct order of magnitude, yet may overestimate the true dispersion. We further show that strong barometric pumping, such as at the Law Dome site, may reduce the gravitational enrichment of δ15N-N2 and other tracers below gravitational equilibrium, questioning the traditional definition of the lock-in depth as the depth where δ15N enrichment ceases. Last, we propose that 86Kr excess may act as a proxy for past synoptic activity (or paleo-storminess) at the site.

  18. On scale and magnitude of pressure build-up induced by large-scale geologic storage of CO2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, Q.; Birkholzer, J. T.

    2011-05-01

    The scale and magnitude of pressure perturbation and brine migration induced by geologic carbon sequestration is discussed assuming a full-scale deployment scenario in which enough CO{sub 2} is captured and stored to make relevant contributions to global climate change mitigation. In this scenario, the volumetric rates and cumulative volumes of CO{sub 2} injection would be comparable to or higher than those related to existing deep-subsurface injection and extraction activities, such as oil production. Large-scale pressure build-up in response to the injection may limit the dynamic storage capacity of suitable formations, because over-pressurization may fracture the caprock, may drive CO{sub 2}/brine leakage through localized pathways, and may cause induced seismicity. On the other hand, laterally extensive sedimentary basins may be less affected by such limitations because (i) local pressure effects are moderated by pressure propagation and brine displacement into regions far away from the CO{sub 2} storage domain; and (ii) diffuse and/or localized brine migration into overlying and underlying formations allows for pressure bleed-off in the vertical direction. A quick analytical estimate of the extent of pressure build-up induced by industrial-scale CO{sub 2} storage projects is presented. Also discussed are pressure perturbation and attenuation effects simulated for two representative sedimentary basins in the USA: the laterally extensive Illinois Basin and the partially compartmentalized southern San Joaquin Basin in California. These studies show that the limiting effect of pressure build-up on dynamic storage capacity is not as significant as suggested by Ehlig-Economides and Economides, who considered closed systems without any attenuation effects.

  19. Large Scale, High Resolution, Mantle Dynamics Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geenen, T.; Berg, A. V.; Spakman, W.

    2007-12-01

    To model the geodynamic evolution of plate convergence, subduction and collision and to allow for a connection to various types of observational data, geophysical, geodetical and geological, we developed a 4D (space-time) numerical mantle convection code. The model is based on a spherical 3D Eulerian fem model, with quadratic elements, on top of which we constructed a 3D Lagrangian particle in cell(PIC) method. We use the PIC method to transport material properties and to incorporate a viscoelastic rheology. Since capturing small scale processes associated with localization phenomena require a high resolution, we spend a considerable effort on implementing solvers suitable to solve for models with over 100 million degrees of freedom. We implemented Additive Schwartz type ILU based methods in combination with a Krylov solver, GMRES. However we found that for problems with over 500 thousend degrees of freedom the convergence of the solver degraded severely. This observation is known from the literature [Saad, 2003] and results from the local character of the ILU preconditioner resulting in a poor approximation of the inverse of A for large A. The size of A for which ILU is no longer usable depends on the condition of A and on the amount of fill in allowed for the ILU preconditioner. We found that for our problems with over 5×105 degrees of freedom convergence became to slow to solve the system within an acceptable amount of walltime, one minute, even when allowing for considerable amount of fill in. We also implemented MUMPS and found good scaling results for problems up to 107 degrees of freedom for up to 32 CPU¡¯s. For problems with over 100 million degrees of freedom we implemented Algebraic Multigrid type methods (AMG) from the ML library [Sala, 2006]. Since multigrid methods are most effective for single parameter problems, we rebuild our model to use the SIMPLE method in the Stokes solver [Patankar, 1980]. We present scaling results from these solvers for 3D

  20. The Importance of Pressure Sampling Frequency in Models for Determination of Critical Wave Loadings on Monolithic Structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Burcharth, Hans F.; Andersen, Thomas Lykke; Meinert, Palle

    2008-01-01

    Wave induced pressures on model scale monolithic structures like caissons and concrete superstructures on rubble mound breakwaters show very peaky variations, even in cases without impacts from slamming waves.......Wave induced pressures on model scale monolithic structures like caissons and concrete superstructures on rubble mound breakwaters show very peaky variations, even in cases without impacts from slamming waves....

  1. Large Scale Computations in Air Pollution Modelling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zlatev, Z.; Brandt, J.; Builtjes, P. J. H.

    Proceedings of the NATO Advanced Research Workshop on Large Scale Computations in Air Pollution Modelling, Sofia, Bulgaria, 6-10 July 1998......Proceedings of the NATO Advanced Research Workshop on Large Scale Computations in Air Pollution Modelling, Sofia, Bulgaria, 6-10 July 1998...

  2. Uncertainty Consideration in Watershed Scale Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watershed scale hydrologic and water quality models have been used with increasing frequency to devise alternative pollution control strategies. With recent reenactment of the 1972 Clean Water Act’s TMDL (total maximum daily load) component, some of the watershed scale models are being recommended ...

  3. Large Scale Computations in Air Pollution Modelling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zlatev, Z.; Brandt, J.; Builtjes, P. J. H.

    Proceedings of the NATO Advanced Research Workshop on Large Scale Computations in Air Pollution Modelling, Sofia, Bulgaria, 6-10 July 1998......Proceedings of the NATO Advanced Research Workshop on Large Scale Computations in Air Pollution Modelling, Sofia, Bulgaria, 6-10 July 1998...

  4. Turbulent Spot Pressure Fluctuation Wave Packet Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dechant, Lawrence J. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2017-05-01

    Wave packet analysis provides a connection between linear small disturbance theory and subsequent nonlinear turbulent spot flow behavior. The traditional association between linear stability analysis and nonlinear wave form is developed via the method of stationary phase whereby asymptotic (simplified) mean flow solutions are used to estimate dispersion behavior and stationary phase approximation are used to invert the associated Fourier transform. The resulting process typically requires nonlinear algebraic equations inversions that can be best performed numerically, which partially mitigates the value of the approximation as compared to a more complete, e.g. DNS or linear/nonlinear adjoint methods. To obtain a simpler, closed-form analytical result, the complete packet solution is modeled via approximate amplitude (linear convected kinematic wave initial value problem) and local sinusoidal (wave equation) expressions. Significantly, the initial value for the kinematic wave transport expression follows from a separable variable coefficient approximation to the linearized pressure fluctuation Poisson expression. The resulting amplitude solution, while approximate in nature, nonetheless, appears to mimic many of the global features, e.g. transitional flow intermittency and pressure fluctuation magnitude behavior. A low wave number wave packet models also recover meaningful auto-correlation and low frequency spectral behaviors.

  5. A Review of Large-Scale Fracture Experiments Relevant to Pressure Vessel Integrity Under Pressurized Thermal Shock Conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pugh, C.E.

    2001-01-29

    Numerous large-scale fracture experiments have been performed over the past thirty years to advance fracture mechanics methodologies applicable to thick-wall pressure vessels. This report first identifies major factors important to nuclear reactor pressure vessel (RPV) integrity under pressurized thermal shock (PTS) conditions. It then covers 20 key experiments that have contributed to identifying fracture behavior of RPVs and to validating applicable assessment methodologies. The experiments are categorized according to four types of specimens: (1) cylindrical specimens, (2) pressurized vessels, (3) large plate specimens, and (4) thick beam specimens. These experiments were performed in laboratories in six different countries. This report serves as a summary of those experiments, and provides a guide to references for detailed information.

  6. Pretest Round Robin Analysis of 1:4-Scale Prestressed Concrete Containment Vessel Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    HESSHEIMER,MICHAEL F.; LUK,VINCENT K.; KLAMERUS,ERIC W.; SHIBATA,S.; MITSUGI,S.; COSTELLO,J.F.

    2000-12-18

    The purpose of the program is to investigate the response of representative scale models of nuclear containment to pressure loading beyond the design basis accident and to compare analytical predictions to measured behavior. This objective is accomplished by conducting static, pneumatic overpressurization tests of scale models at ambient temperature. This research program consists of testing two scale models: a steel containment vessel (SCV) model (tested in 1996) and a prestressed concrete containment vessel (PCCV) model, which is the subject of this paper.

  7. Scaling limits of a model for selection at two scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Shishi; Mattingly, Jonathan C.

    2017-04-01

    The dynamics of a population undergoing selection is a central topic in evolutionary biology. This question is particularly intriguing in the case where selective forces act in opposing directions at two population scales. For example, a fast-replicating virus strain outcompetes slower-replicating strains at the within-host scale. However, if the fast-replicating strain causes host morbidity and is less frequently transmitted, it can be outcompeted by slower-replicating strains at the between-host scale. Here we consider a stochastic ball-and-urn process which models this type of phenomenon. We prove the weak convergence of this process under two natural scalings. The first scaling leads to a deterministic nonlinear integro-partial differential equation on the interval [0,1] with dependence on a single parameter, λ. We show that the fixed points of this differential equation are Beta distributions and that their stability depends on λ and the behavior of the initial data around 1. The second scaling leads to a measure-valued Fleming–Viot process, an infinite dimensional stochastic process that is frequently associated with a population genetics.

  8. Modeling and simulation with operator scaling

    CERN Document Server

    Cohen, Serge; Rosinski, Jan

    2009-01-01

    Self-similar processes are useful in modeling diverse phenomena that exhibit scaling properties. Operator scaling allows a different scale factor in each coordinate. This paper develops practical methods for modeling and simulating stochastic processes with operator scaling. A simulation method for operator stable Levy processes is developed, based on a series representation, along with a Gaussian approximation of the small jumps. Several examples are given to illustrate practical applications. A classification of operator stable Levy processes in two dimensions is provided according to their exponents and symmetry groups. We conclude with some remarks and extensions to general operator self-similar processes.

  9. Modeling plasma pressure anisotropy's effect on Saturn's global magnetospheric dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tilley, M.; Harnett, E. M.; Winglee, R.

    2014-12-01

    A 3D multi-fluid, multi-scale plasma model with a complete treatment of plasma pressure anisotropy is employed to study global magnetospheric dynamics at Saturn. Cassini has observed anisotropies in the Saturnian magnetosphere, and analyses have showed correlations between anisotropy and plasma convection, ring current structure and intensity, confinement of plasma to the equatorial plane, as well as mass transport to the outer magnetosphere. The energization and transport of plasma within Saturn's magnetosphere is impactful upon the induced magnetic environments and atmospheres of potentially habitable satellites such as Enceladus and Titan. Recent efforts to couple pressure anisotropy with 3D multi-fluid plasma modeling have shown a significant move towards matching observations for simulations of Earth's magnetosphere. Our approach is used to study the effects of plasma pressure anisotropy on global processes of the Saturnian magnetosphere such as identifying the effect of pressure anisotropy on the centrifugal interchange instability. Previous simulation results have not completely replicated all aspects of the structure and formation of the interchange 'fingers' measured by Cassini at Saturn. The related effects of anisotropy, in addition to those mentioned above, include contribution to formation of MHD waves (e.g. reduction of Alfvén wave speed) and formation of firehose and mirror instabilities. An accurate understanding of processes such as the interchange instability is required if a complete picture of mass and energy transport at Saturn is to be realized. The results presented here will detail how the inclusion of a full treatment of pressure anisotropy for idealized solar wind conditions modifies the interchange structure and shape of the tail current sheet. Simulation results are compared to observations made by Cassini.

  10. The equation of state of Bi and cross-checking of Au and Pt scales to megabar pressure

    CERN Document Server

    Akahama, Y; Singh, A K

    2002-01-01

    By means of x-ray diffraction experiments using a synchrotron radiation source, the equation of state (EOS) of body-centred cubic Bi has been investigated over a range of multimegabar pressure up to 222 GPa on the basis of the Pt pressure scale and it is proposed as an internal pressure standard over a range of megabar pressures. Pressure scales of the EOS of Au and Pt were cross-checked and the accuracy of the scales is discussed.

  11. Assessing Predictive Validity of Pressure Ulcer Risk Scales- A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    Background: The purpose of this study was to present a scientific reason for pressure ulcer risk scales: Cubbin& Jackson modified Braden, Norton, and Waterlow, as a nursing diagnosis tool by utilizing predictive validity of pressure sores. Methods: Articles published between 1966 and 2013 from periodicals indexed in the Ovid Medline, Embase, CINAHL, KoreaMed, NDSL, and other databases were selected using the key word “pressure ulcer”. QUADAS-II was applied for assessment for internal validity...

  12. Low-Speed Pressure Distribution Measurements Over the Aft-Fuselage, Fins and Stabilators of a 1/9th Scale F/A-18 Wind-Tunnel Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-10-01

    the peak pressure oscillations did not go outside the range of the transducers. Between calibrations, small drifts in the pressure mea- surements... Fene Off .. . ......0 - .......... -.: .......... _ .......... 0.0 ---... ---- . .. . . .. .-5 .......... -.: ......... ........... L

  13. Managing multiple diffuse pressures on water quality and ecological habitat: Spatially targeting effective mitigation actions at the landscape scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joyce, Hannah; Reaney, Sim

    2015-04-01

    Catchment systems provide multiple benefits for society, including: land for agriculture, climate regulation and recreational space. Yet, these systems also have undesirable externalities, such as flooding, and the benefits they create can be compromised through societal use. For example, agriculture, forestry and urban land use practices can increase the export of fine sediment and faecal indicator organisms (FIO) delivered to river systems. These diffuse landscape pressures are coupled with pressures on the in stream temperature environment from projected climate change. Such pressures can have detrimental impacts on water quality and ecological habitat and consequently the benefits they provide for society. These diffuse and in-stream pressures can be reduced through actions at the landscape scale but are commonly tackled individually. Any intervention may have benefits for other pressures and hence the challenge is to consider all of the different pressures simultaneously to find solutions with high levels of cross-pressure benefits. This research presents (1) a simple but spatially distributed model to predict the pattern of multiple pressures at the landscape scale, and (2) a method for spatially targeting the optimum location for riparian woodland planting as mitigation action against these pressures. The model follows a minimal information requirement approach along the lines of SCIMAP (www.scimap.org.uk). This approach defines the critical source areas of fine sediment diffuse pollution, rapid overland flow and FIOs, based on the analysis of the pattern of the pressure in the landscape and the connectivity from source areas to rivers. River temperature was modeled using a simple energy balance equation; focusing on temperature of inflowing and outflowing water across a catchment. The model has been calibrated using a long term observed temperature record. The modelling outcomes enabled the identification of the severity of each pressure in relative rather

  14. Prediction of Mineral Scale Formation in Geothermal and Oilfield Operations using the Extended UNIQUAC Model. Part I: Sulphate Scaling Minerals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Garcia, Ada V.; Thomsen, Kaj; Stenby, Erling Halfdan

    2005-01-01

    Pressure parameters are added to the Extended UNIQUAC model presented by Thomsen and Rasmussen (1999). The improved model has been used for correlation and prediction of solid-liquid equilibrium (SLE) of scaling minerals (CaSO4, CaSO4·2H2O, BaSO4 and SrSO4) at temperatures up to 300°C and pressures...

  15. A modelling framework to assess the effect of pressures on river abiotic habitat conditions and biota

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kail, Jochem; Guse, Björn; Radinger, Johannes; Schröder, Maria; Kiesel, Jens; Kleinhans, Maarten; Schuurman, Filip; Fohrer, Nicola; Hering, Daniel; Wolter, Christian

    2015-01-01

    River biota are affected by global reach-scale pressures, but most approaches for predicting biota of rivers focus on river reach or segment scale processes and habitats. Moreover, these approaches do not consider long-term morphological changes that affect habitat conditions. In this study, a model

  16. Grain-scale pressure variations recorded in orthopyroxene from the diamond grade ultra-high pressure Svartberget peridotite body, Western Gneiss Region, Norway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vrijmoed, Johannes C.

    2014-05-01

    to recent findings of plagioclase rims around kyanite (Tajčmanová et al., 2014). Plagioclase formed as rims around kyanite during decompression at high temperature (>800 ° C). Conventional phase diagrams for this chemical system predict increasing albite content at higher pressure. However, the anorthite endmember is the high density phase compared to albite. Observed anorthite content in the plagioclase rim is highest next to the kyanite and decreases toward the low pressure matrix. This is consistent with a mechanically feasible model proposed by Tajčmanová et al. (2014). It is proposed here that low-pressure Al-cores of orthopyroxene are preserved remnants of the original low-pressure spinel-peridotite body. In veins, cracks, and along rims of orthopyroxene, an injected overpressured metasomatic agent infiltrated the rocks conform the previously published model of Vrijmoed et al. (2009). This result is also consistent with the large scale observation that crosscutting pyroxenite veins in the Svartberget body contain the highest pressure (micro-diamond) and highest density assemblages (garnetite veins). References: Tajčmanová, L., Podladchikov, Y., Powell, R., Moulas, E., Vrijmoed, J. C. & Connolly, J. A. D. (2014). Grain scale pressure variations and chemical equilibrium in high-grade metamorphic rocks. Journal of Metamorphic Geology, (in press). Vrijmoed, J. C., Podladchikov, Y. Y., Andersen, T. B. & Hartz, E. H. (2009). An alternative model for ultra-high pressure in the Svartberget Fe-Ti garnet-peridotite, Western Gneiss Region, Norway. European Journal of Mineralogy 21, 1119-1133

  17. Scaling of Core Material in Rubble Mound Breakwater Model Tests

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Burcharth, H. F.; Liu, Z.; Troch, P.

    1999-01-01

    The permeability of the core material influences armour stability, wave run-up and wave overtopping. The main problem related to the scaling of core materials in models is that the hydraulic gradient and the pore velocity are varying in space and time. This makes it impossible to arrive at a fully...... correct scaling. The paper presents an empirical formula for the estimation of the wave induced pressure gradient in the core, based on measurements in models and a prototype. The formula, together with the Forchheimer equation can be used for the estimation of pore velocities in cores. The paper proposes...... that the diameter of the core material in models is chosen in such a way that the Froude scale law holds for a characteristic pore velocity. The characteristic pore velocity is chosen as the average velocity of a most critical area in the core with respect to porous flow. Finally the method is demonstrated...

  18. Modeling of Propagation of Interacting Cracks Under Hydraulic Pressure Gradient

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Hai [Idaho National Laboratory; Mattson, Earl Douglas [Idaho National Laboratory; Podgorney, Robert Karl [Idaho National Laboratory

    2015-04-01

    A robust and reliable numerical model for fracture initiation and propagation, which includes the interactions among propagating fractures and the coupling between deformation, fracturing and fluid flow in fracture apertures and in the permeable rock matrix, would be an important tool for developing a better understanding of fracturing behaviors of crystalline brittle rocks driven by thermal and (or) hydraulic pressure gradients. In this paper, we present a physics-based hydraulic fracturing simulator based on coupling a quasi-static discrete element model (DEM) for deformation and fracturing with conjugate lattice network flow model for fluid flow in both fractures and porous matrix. Fracturing is represented explicitly by removing broken bonds from the network to represent microcracks. Initiation of new microfractures and growth and coalescence of the microcracks leads to the formation of macroscopic fractures when external and/or internal loads are applied. The coupled DEM-network flow model reproduces realistic growth pattern of hydraulic fractures. In particular, simulation results of perforated horizontal wellbore clearly demonstrate that elastic interactions among multiple propagating fractures, fluid viscosity, strong coupling between fluid pressure fluctuations within fractures and fracturing, and lower length scale heterogeneities, collectively lead to complicated fracturing patterns.

  19. Pore-scale Modelling of Capillarity in Swelling Granular Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassanizadeh, S. M.; Sweijen, T.; Nikooee, E.; Chareyre, B.

    2015-12-01

    Capillarity in granular porous media is a common and important phenomenon in earth materials and industrial products, and therefore has been studied extensively. To model capillarity in granular porous media, one needs to go beyond current models which simulate either two-phase flow in porous media or mechanical behaviour in granular media. Current pore-scale models for two-phase flow such as pore-network models are tailored for rigid pore-skeletons, even though in many applications, namely hydro-mechanical coupling in soils, printing, and hygienic products, the porous structure does change during two-phase flow. On the other hand, models such as Discrete Element Method (DEM), which simulate the deformable porous media, have mostly been employed for dry or saturated granular media. Here, the effects of porosity change and swelling on the retention properties was studied, for swelling granular materials. A pore-unit model that was capable to construct the capillary pressure - saturation curve was coupled to DEM. Such that the capillary pressure - saturation curve could be constructed for varying porosities and amounts of absorbed water. The study material was super absorbent polymer particles, which are capable to absorb water 10's to 200 times their initial weight. We have simulated quasi-static primary imbibition for different porosities and amounts of absorbed water. The results reveal a 3 dimensional surface between capillary pressure, saturation, and porosity, which can be normalized by means of the entry pressure and the effective water saturation to a unique curve.

  20. Modeling basin- and plume-scale processes of CO2 storage for full-scale deployment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, Q.; Birkholzer, J.T.; Mehnert, E.; Lin, Y.-F.; Zhang, K.

    2009-08-15

    Integrated modeling of basin- and plume-scale processes induced by full-scale deployment of CO{sub 2} storage was applied to the Mt. Simon Aquifer in the Illinois Basin. A three-dimensional mesh was generated with local refinement around 20 injection sites, with approximately 30 km spacing. A total annual injection rate of 100 Mt CO{sub 2} over 50 years was used. The CO{sub 2}-brine flow at the plume scale and the single-phase flow at the basin scale were simulated. Simulation results show the overall shape of a CO{sub 2} plume consisting of a typical gravity-override subplume in the bottom injection zone of high injectivity and a pyramid-shaped subplume in the overlying multilayered Mt. Simon, indicating the important role of a secondary seal with relatively low-permeability and high-entry capillary pressure. The secondary-seal effect is manifested by retarded upward CO{sub 2} migration as a result of multiple secondary seals, coupled with lateral preferential CO{sub 2} viscous fingering through high-permeability layers. The plume width varies from 9.0 to 13.5 km at 200 years, indicating the slow CO{sub 2} migration and no plume interference between storage sites. On the basin scale, pressure perturbations propagate quickly away from injection centers, interfere after less than 1 year, and eventually reach basin margins. The simulated pressure buildup of 35 bar in the injection area is not expected to affect caprock geomechanical integrity. Moderate pressure buildup is observed in Mt. Simon in northern Illinois. However, its impact on groundwater resources is less than the hydraulic drawdown induced by long-term extensive pumping from overlying freshwater aquifers.

  1. Review of pressurized thermal shock studies of large scale reactor pressure vessels in Hungary

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tamás Fekete

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available In Hungary, four nuclear power units were constructed more than 30 years ago; they are operating to this day. In every unit, VVER-440 V213-type light-water cooled, light-water moderated, ressurized water reactors are in operation. Since the mid-1980s, numerous researches in the field of Pressurized Thermal Shock (PTS analyses of Reactor Pressure Vessels (RPVs have been conducted in Hungary; in all of them, the concept of structural integrity was the basis of research and development. During this time, four large PTS studies with industrial relevance have been completed in Hungary. Each used different objectives and guides, and the analysis methodology was also changing. This paper gives a comparative review of the methodologies used in these large PTS Structural Integrity Analysis projects, presenting the latest results as well

  2. Predicting Pressure Ulcer Risk with the Braden Q Scale in Chinese Pediatric Patients in ICU

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ye-Feng Lu; Yan Yang; Yan Wang; Lei-Qing Gao; Qing Qiu; Chen Li; Jing Jin

    2015-01-01

    Objective:The purpose of this study was to:(1) observe the value of the score of Braden Q scale in predicting pressure ulcers in pediatric Intensive Care Unit(ICU) patients in China,(2)determine the critical cutoff point for classifying patient risk,and(3) describe the pressure ulcer incidence.Methods:A prospective cohort descriptive study with a convenience sample of 198 patients bedridden for at least 24 hours without pre-existing pressure ulcers enrolled from a pediatric intensive care unit(PICU).The Braden Q score and skin assessment were independently rated,and data collectors were blinded to the other measures.Patients were observed for up to 3 times per week for 2 weeks and once a week thereafter until PICU discharge.Results:Fourteen patients(7.1%) developed pressure ulcers;12(85.7%) were Stage Ⅰ pressure ulcers,2(14.3%) were Stage Ⅱ,and there were no Stage Ⅲ or Ⅳ pressure ulcers.Most pressure ulcers(64.3%) were present at the first observation.The Braden Q Scale has an overall cumulative variance contribution rate of 69.599%.Using Stage Ⅰ+ pressure ulcer data obtained during the first observation,a Receiver Operator Characteristic(ROC) curve for each possible score of the Braden Q Scale was constructed.The area under the curve(AUC) was 0.57,and the95%confidence interval was 0.50-0.62.At a cutoff score of 19,the sensitivity was 0.71,and the specificity was 0.53.The AUC of each item of the Braden Q Scale was 0.543-0.612.Conclusions:PICU patients are susceptible to pressure ulcers.The value of the Braden Q Scale in the studied pediatric population was relatively poor,and it should be optimized before it is used in Chinese pediatric patients.

  3. Predicting Pressure Ulcer Risk with the Braden Q Scale in Chinese Pediatric Patients in ICU

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ye-Feng Lu; Yan Yang; Yan Wang; Lei-Qing Gao; Qing Qiu; Chen Li; Jing Jin

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of this study was to: ( 1 ) observe the value of the score of Braden Q scale in predicting pressure ulcers in pediatric Intensive Care Unit ( ICU) patients in China, ( 2) determine the critical cutoff point for classifying patient risk, and ( 3) describe the pressure ulcer incidence. Methods: A prospective cohort descriptive study with a convenience sample of 198 patients bed-ridden for at least 24 hours without pre-existing pressure ulcers enrolled from a pediatric intensive care unit ( PICU) . The Braden Q score and skin assessment were independently rated, and data collectors were blinded to the other measures. Patients were observed for up to 3 times per week for 2 weeks and once a week thereafter until PICU discharge. Results: Fourteen patients ( 7. 1%) developed pressure ulcers; 12 ( 85. 7%) were Stage I pres-sure ulcers, 2 ( 14. 3%) were Stage II, and there were no Stage III or IV pressure ulcers. Most pressure ulcers ( 64. 3%) were present at the first observation. The Braden Q Scale has an overall cumulative variance contribution rate of 69. 599%. Using Stage I+ pressure ulcer data obtained during the first observation, a Receiver Operator Characteristic ( ROC) curve for each possible score of the Braden Q Scale was constructed. The area under the curve ( AUC) was 0. 57, and the 95% confidence interval was 0. 50-0. 62. At a cutoff score of 19, the sensitivity was 0. 71, and the specificity was 0. 53. The AUC of each item of the Braden Q Scale was 0. 543-0. 612. Conclusions: PICU patients are susceptible to pressure ulcers. The value of the Braden Q Scale in the studied pediatric population was relatively poor, and it should be optimized before it is used in Chinese pediatric patients.

  4. Small-Scale Metal Tanks for High Pressure Storage of Fluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    London, Adam (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    Small scale metal tanks for high-pressure storage of fluids having tank factors of more than 5000 meters and volumes of ten cubic inches or less featuring arrays of interconnected internal chambers having at least inner walls thinner than gage limitations allow. The chambers may be arranged as multiple internal independent vessels. Walls of chambers that are also portions of external tank walls may be arcuate on the internal and/or external surfaces, including domed. The tanks may be shaped adaptively and/or conformally to an application, including, for example, having one or more flat outer walls and/or having an annular shape. The tanks may have dual-purpose inlet/outlet conduits of may have separate inlet and outlet conduits. The tanks are made by fusion bonding etched metal foil layers patterned from slices of a CAD model of the tank. The fusion bonded foil stack may be further machined.

  5. Oscillations in the proximal intratubular pressure: a mathematical model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holstein-Rathlou, N H; Leyssac, P P

    1987-01-01

    This study presents a dynamic continuous time model of the regulation of the renal proximal intratubular pressure in the rat. The model integrates a functional model of the glomerulus, a tubular model, a feedback model, and an afferent arteriolar model. The model has one equilibrium solution...... oscillations in proximal pressure are present. For sustained oscillations to appear, it is necessary for the system's operating point to be located on a sufficiently steep portion of the tubuloglomerular feedback curve. The model analyses are compared with various experimental recordings of the proximal...... intratubular pressure. The model simulations show both spontaneous and induced oscillations in the proximal pressure in close agreement with the experimental results; but the steady-state mean pressure regulation is found to be less efficient in the model than that apparent from the experimental recordings...

  6. Nondissipative Velocity and Pressure Regularizations for the ICON Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Restelli, M.; Giorgetta, M.; Hundertmark, T.; Korn, P.; Reich, S.

    2009-04-01

    A challenging aspect in the numerical simulation of atmospheric and oceanic flows is the multiscale character of the problem both in space and time. The small spacial scales are generated by the turbulent energy and enstrophy cascades, and are usually dealt with by means of turbulence parametrizations, while the small temporal scales are governed by the propagation of acoustic and gravity waves, which are of little importance for the large scale dynamics and are often eliminated by means of a semi-implicit time discretization. We propose to treat both phenomena of subgrid turbulence and temporal scale separation in a unified way by means of nondissipative regularizations of the underlying model equations. More precisely, we discuss the use of two regularized equation sets: the velocity regularization, also know as Lagrangian averaged Navier-Stokes system, and the pressure regularization. Both regularizations are nondissipative since they do not enhance the dissipation of energy and enstrophy of the flow. The velocity regularization models the effects of the subgrid velocity fluctuations on the mean flow, it has thus been proposed as a turbulence parametrization and it has been found to yield promising results in ocean modeling [HHPW08]. In particular, the velocity regularization results in a higher variability of the numerical solution. The pressure regularization, discussed in [RWS07], modifies the propagation of acoustic and gravity waves so that the resulting system can be discretized explicitly in time with time steps analogous to those allowed by a semi-implicit method. Compared to semi-implicit time integrators, however, the pressure regularization takes fully into account the geostrophic balance of the flow. We discuss here the implementation of the velocity and pressure regularizations within the numerical framework of the ICON general circulation model (GCM) [BR05] for the case of the rotating shallow water system, showing how the original numerical

  7. Computer-based testing of the Braden Scale for Predicting Pressure Sore Risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maklebust, JoAnn; Sieggreen, Mary Y; Sidor, Deborah; Gerlach, Mary A; Bauer, Carole; Anderson, Carol

    2005-04-01

    The Detroit Medical Center nursing documentation system requires all staff nurses to complete the Braden Scale for Predicting Pressure Sore Risk on an Acute Care Flow Record or Critical Care Flow Sheet on every patient, every day. An audit of these records raised concern as to whether staff nurses accurately used the Braden Scale to calculate pressure sore risk. Advanced Practice and ET Nurses noted that staff nurses were rating patients at lower levels of pressure sore risk than was warranted by the patient condition. In response, a computer-based learning module with case study examples was developed and tested to teach nursing staff to accurately evaluate pressure ulcer risk by using the Braden Scale and its subscales and to identify preventive interventions based on the patient's Braden subscale scores. Following revisions of those case study example narratives that were found to be problematic, the learning/assessment module was instituted in 2002. More than 2,500 nurses at the facility were tested regarding their knowledge of pressure ulcer risk assessment and prevention using this program. On average, nurses correctly rated the Braden Scale level of risk 75.6% of the time. The percentage of correct responses was highest for very high (92%) and very low (78%) levels of risk. This finding is consistent with the observation that most nosocomial pressure ulcers in this facility occur in patients who are rated in the "mild risk" level on the Braden scale. Subscales with the lowest percentage of correct answers were moisture and sensory perception. Correct clinical identification of a Stage I pressure ulcer as it was described in writing occurred only 53% of the time. These results indicate that training and practice are needed to use an assessment scale accurately. The Detroit Medical Center plans to include the Braden Scale in annual nursing education and competency testing.

  8. Weyl's Scale Invariance And The Standard Model

    CERN Document Server

    Gold, B S

    2005-01-01

    This paper is an extension of the work by Dr. Subhash Rajpoot, Ph.D. and Dr. Hitoshi Nishino, Ph.D. I introduce Weyl's scale invariance as an additional local symmetry in the standard model of electroweak interactions. An inevitable consequence is the introduction of general relativity coupled to scalar fields a la Dirac and an additional vector particle called the Weylon. This paper shows that once Weyl's scale invariance is broken, the phenomenon (a) generates Newton's gravitational constant GN and (b) triggers spontaneous symmetry breaking in the normal manner resulting in masses for the conventional fermions and bosons. The scale at which Weyl's sclale symmetry breaks is of order Planck mass. If right-handed neutrinos are also introduced, their absence at present energy scales is attributed to their mass which is tied to the scale where scale invariance breaks.

  9. New primary pressure calibrants for high pressure and temperature scale: SiC-3C and cBN are possible candidates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhuravlev, Kirill; Goncharov, Alexander; Prakapenka, Vitali

    2011-03-01

    Since the invention of a diamond-anvil cell, various high-pressure scales for in situ pressure measurements have been realized. Ruby-based pressure scale (Mao et al., 1986) is the best known and high-pressure scientific community has been using it for over two decades. However, it has limited use at elevated temperatures, due to the weakening and broadening of the ruby fluorescence line. The recent developments in the field of high temperature, high pressure physics and geophysics require some alternative pressure scale, capable of measuring pressures at temperatures up to 3000 K. Cubic boron nitride (cBN) was recently proposed as the possible pressure calibrant. It has been suggested that the simultaneous use of x-ray diffraction to measure density and Brillouin spectroscopy to obtain elastic properties of the crystal can be used to construct the pressure scale independent of any other pressure standards. However, the acoustic velocities of cBN are very close to those of diamond and, therefore, are hard to resolve in experiment in diamond-anvil cell. Another possible primary pressure calibrant is cubic silicon carbide (SiC-3C). We performed single crystal x-ray diffraction and Brillouin spectroscopy up to 1 Mbar in pressure at room temperature in the diamond-anvil cell and show that cBN and SiC-3C, indeed, can be used in constructing reliable and accurate high-pressure, high-temperature scale.

  10. Intraglottal velocity and pressure measurements in a hemilarynx model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oren, Liran; Gutmark, Ephraim; Khosla, Sid

    2015-02-01

    Determining the mechanisms of self-sustained oscillation of the vocal folds requires characterization of the pressures produced by intraglottal aerodynamics. Because most of the intraglottal aerodynamic forces cannot be measured in a tissue model of the larynx, current understanding of vocal fold vibration mechanism is derived from mechanical, analytical, and computational models. Previous studies have computed intraglottal pressures from measured intraglottal velocity fields and intraglottal geometry; however, this technique for determining pressures is not yet validated. In this study, intraglottal pressure measurements taken in a hemilarynx model are compared with pressure values that are computed from simultaneous velocity measurements. The results showed that significant negative pressure formed near the superior aspect of the folds during closing, which agrees with previous measurements in other hemilarynx models. Intraglottal velocity measurements show that the flow near the superior aspect separates from the glottal wall during closing and may develop into a vortex, which further augments the magnitude of negative pressure. Intraglottal pressure distributions, computed by solving the pressure Poisson equation, showed good agreement with pressure measurements. The match between the pressure computations and its measurements validates the current technique, which was previously used to estimate intraglottal pressure distribution in a full larynx model.

  11. Extracting scaling laws from numerical dynamo models

    CERN Document Server

    Stelzer, Z

    2013-01-01

    Earth's magnetic field is generated by processes in the electrically conducting, liquid outer core, subsumed under the term `geodynamo'. In the last decades, great effort has been put into the numerical simulation of core dynamics following from the magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) equations. However, the numerical simulations are far from Earth's core in terms of several control parameters. Different scaling analyses found simple scaling laws for quantities like heat transport, flow velocity, magnetic field strength and magnetic dissipation time. We use an extensive dataset of 116 numerical dynamo models compiled by Christensen and co-workers to analyse these scalings from a rigorous model selection point of view. Our method of choice is leave-one-out cross-validation which rates models according to their predictive abilities. In contrast to earlier results, we find that diffusive processes are not negligible for the flow velocity and magnetic field strength in the numerical dynamos. Also the scaling of the magneti...

  12. Combustion Characteristics of Lignite Char in a Laboratory-scale Pressurized Fluidized Bed Combustor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murakami, Takahiro; Suzuki, Yoshizo

    In a dual fluidized bed gasifier, the residual char after steam gasification is burnt in riser. The objectives of this work are to clarify the effect of parameters (temperature, pressure, and particle size of lignite char) of char combustion using a laboratory-scale pressurized fluidized bed combustor (PFBC). As a result, the burnout time of lignite char can be improved with increasing operating pressure, and temperature. In addition, the decrease in the particle size of char enhanced the effect on burnout time. The initial combustion rate of the char can be increased with increasing operating pressure. The effect was decreased with increasing operating temperature. However, the effect of operating pressure was slightly changed in small particle size, such as 0.5-1.0 mm. It takes about 20 sec to burn 50% of char in the operating pressure of 0.5 MPa and the particle size of 0.5-1.0 mm.

  13. Physical Modeling of Scaled Water Distribution System Networks.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O' Hern, Timothy J.; Hammond, Glenn Edward; Orear, Leslie ,; van Bloemen Waanders, Bart G.; Paul Molina; Ross Johnson

    2005-10-01

    Threats to water distribution systems include release of contaminants and Denial of Service (DoS) attacks. A better understanding, and validated computational models, of the flow in water distribution systems would enable determination of sensor placement in real water distribution networks, allow source identification, and guide mitigation/minimization efforts. Validation data are needed to evaluate numerical models of network operations. Some data can be acquired in real-world tests, but these are limited by 1) unknown demand, 2) lack of repeatability, 3) too many sources of uncertainty (demand, friction factors, etc.), and 4) expense. In addition, real-world tests have limited numbers of network access points. A scale-model water distribution system was fabricated, and validation data were acquired over a range of flow (demand) conditions. Standard operating variables included system layout, demand at various nodes in the system, and pressure drop across various pipe sections. In addition, the location of contaminant (salt or dye) introduction was varied. Measurements of pressure, flowrate, and concentration at a large number of points, and overall visualization of dye transport through the flow network were completed. Scale-up issues that that were incorporated in the experiment design include Reynolds number, pressure drop across nodes, and pipe friction and roughness. The scale was chosen to be 20:1, so the 10 inch main was modeled with a 0.5 inch pipe in the physical model. Controlled validation tracer tests were run to provide validation to flow and transport models, especially of the degree of mixing at pipe junctions. Results of the pipe mixing experiments showed large deviations from predicted behavior and these have a large impact on standard network operations models.3

  14. Modeling, Parameters Identification, and Control of High Pressure Fuel Cell Back-Pressure Valve

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fengxiang Chen

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The reactant pressure is crucial to the efficiency and lifespan of a high pressure PEMFC engine. This paper analyses a regulated back-pressure valve (BPV for the cathode outlet flow in a high pressure PEMFC engine, which can achieve precisely pressure control. The modeling, parameters identification, and nonlinear controller design of a BPV system are considered. The identified parameters are used in designing active disturbance rejection controller (ADRC. Simulations and extensive experiments are conducted with the xPC Target and show that the proposed controller can not only achieve good dynamic and static performance but also have strong robustness against parameters’ disturbance and external disturbance.

  15. Transport coefficients and entropy-scaling law in liquid iron up to Earth-core pressures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Qi-Long; Wang, Pan-Pan; Huang, Duo-Hui; Yang, Jun-Sheng; Wan, Ming-Jie; Wang, Fan-Hou

    2014-03-21

    Molecular dynamics simulations were applied to study the structural and transport properties, including the pair distribution function, the structure factor, the pair correlation entropy, self-diffusion coefficient, and viscosity, of liquid iron under high temperature and high pressure conditions. Our calculated results reproduced experimentally determined structure factors of liquid iron, and the calculated self-diffusion coefficients and viscosity agree well with previous simulation results. We show that there is a moderate increase of self-diffusion coefficients and viscosity along the melting curve up to the Earth-core pressure. Furthermore, the temperature dependencies of the pair correlation entropy, self-diffusion, and viscosity under high pressure condition have been investigated. Our results suggest that the temperature dependence of the pair correlation entropy is well described by T(-1) scaling, while the Arrhenius law well describes the temperature dependencies of self-diffusion coefficients and viscosity under high pressure. In particular, we find that the entropy-scaling laws, proposed by Rosenfeld [Phys. Rev. A 15, 2545 (1977)] and Dzugutov [Nature (London) 381, 137 (1996)] for self-diffusion coefficients and viscosity in liquid metals under ambient pressure, still hold well for liquid iron under high temperature and high pressure conditions. Using the entropy-scaling laws, we can obtain transport properties from structural properties under high pressure and high temperature conditions. The results provide a useful ingredient in understanding transport properties of planet's cores.

  16. Predictive models for pressure ulcers from intensive care unit electronic health records using Bayesian networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaewprag, Pacharmon; Newton, Cheryl; Vermillion, Brenda; Hyun, Sookyung; Huang, Kun; Machiraju, Raghu

    2017-07-05

    We develop predictive models enabling clinicians to better understand and explore patient clinical data along with risk factors for pressure ulcers in intensive care unit patients from electronic health record data. Identifying accurate risk factors of pressure ulcers is essential to determining appropriate prevention strategies; in this work we examine medication, diagnosis, and traditional Braden pressure ulcer assessment scale measurements as patient features. In order to predict pressure ulcer incidence and better understand the structure of related risk factors, we construct Bayesian networks from patient features. Bayesian network nodes (features) and edges (conditional dependencies) are simplified with statistical network techniques. Upon reviewing a network visualization of our model, our clinician collaborators were able to identify strong relationships between risk factors widely recognized as associated with pressure ulcers. We present a three-stage framework for predictive analysis of patient clinical data: 1) Developing electronic health record feature extraction functions with assistance of clinicians, 2) simplifying features, and 3) building Bayesian network predictive models. We evaluate all combinations of Bayesian network models from different search algorithms, scoring functions, prior structure initializations, and sets of features. From the EHRs of 7,717 ICU patients, we construct Bayesian network predictive models from 86 medication, diagnosis, and Braden scale features. Our model not only identifies known and suspected high PU risk factors, but also substantially increases sensitivity of the prediction - nearly three times higher comparing to logistical regression models - without sacrificing the overall accuracy. We visualize a representative model with which our clinician collaborators identify strong relationships between risk factors widely recognized as associated with pressure ulcers. Given the strong adverse effect of pressure ulcers

  17. Seamless cross-scale modeling with SCHISM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yinglong J.; Ye, Fei; Stanev, Emil V.; Grashorn, Sebastian

    2016-06-01

    We present a new 3D unstructured-grid model (SCHISM) which is an upgrade from an existing model (SELFE). The new advection scheme for the momentum equation includes an iterative smoother to reduce excess mass produced by higher-order kriging method, and a new viscosity formulation is shown to work robustly for generic unstructured grids and effectively filter out spurious modes without introducing excessive dissipation. A new higher-order implicit advection scheme for transport (TVD2) is proposed to effectively handle a wide range of Courant numbers as commonly found in typical cross-scale applications. The addition of quadrangular elements into the model, together with a recently proposed, highly flexible vertical grid system (Zhang et al., A new vertical coordinate system for a 3D unstructured-grid model. Ocean Model. 85, 2015), leads to model polymorphism that unifies 1D/2DH/2DV/3D cells in a single model grid. Results from several test cases demonstrate the model's good performance in the eddying regime, which presents greater challenges for unstructured-grid models and represents the last missing link for our cross-scale model. The model can thus be used to simulate cross-scale processes in a seamless fashion (i.e. from deep ocean into shallow depths).

  18. Site-Scale Saturated Zone Flow Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    G. Zyvoloski

    2003-12-17

    The purpose of this model report is to document the components of the site-scale saturated-zone flow model at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, in accordance with administrative procedure (AP)-SIII.lOQ, ''Models''. This report provides validation and confidence in the flow model that was developed for site recommendation (SR) and will be used to provide flow fields in support of the Total Systems Performance Assessment (TSPA) for the License Application. The output from this report provides the flow model used in the ''Site-Scale Saturated Zone Transport'', MDL-NBS-HS-000010 Rev 01 (BSC 2003 [162419]). The Site-Scale Saturated Zone Transport model then provides output to the SZ Transport Abstraction Model (BSC 2003 [164870]). In particular, the output from the SZ site-scale flow model is used to simulate the groundwater flow pathways and radionuclide transport to the accessible environment for use in the TSPA calculations. Since the development and calibration of the saturated-zone flow model, more data have been gathered for use in model validation and confidence building, including new water-level data from Nye County wells, single- and multiple-well hydraulic testing data, and new hydrochemistry data. In addition, a new hydrogeologic framework model (HFM), which incorporates Nye County wells lithology, also provides geologic data for corroboration and confidence in the flow model. The intended use of this work is to provide a flow model that generates flow fields to simulate radionuclide transport in saturated porous rock and alluvium under natural or forced gradient flow conditions. The flow model simulations are completed using the three-dimensional (3-D), finite-element, flow, heat, and transport computer code, FEHM Version (V) 2.20 (software tracking number (STN): 10086-2.20-00; LANL 2003 [161725]). Concurrently, process-level transport model and methodology for calculating radionuclide transport in the saturated zone at Yucca

  19. Calculating osmotic pressure according to nonelectrolyte Wilson nonrandom factor model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hui; Zhan, Tingting; Zhan, Xiancheng; Wang, Xiaolan; Tan, Xiaoying; Guo, Yiping; Li, Chengrong

    2014-08-01

    Abstract The osmotic pressure of NaCl solutions was determined by the air humidity in equilibrium (AHE) method. The relationship between the osmotic pressure and the concentration was explored theoretically, and the osmotic pressure was calculated according to the nonelectrolyte Wilson nonrandom factor (N-Wilson-NRF) model from the concentration. The results indicate that the calculated osmotic pressure is comparable to the measured one.

  20. Diffusion through thin membranes: Modeling across scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aho, Vesa; Mattila, Keijo; Kühn, Thomas; Kekäläinen, Pekka; Pulkkinen, Otto; Minussi, Roberta Brondani; Vihinen-Ranta, Maija; Timonen, Jussi

    2016-04-01

    From macroscopic to microscopic scales it is demonstrated that diffusion through membranes can be modeled using specific boundary conditions across them. The membranes are here considered thin in comparison to the overall size of the system. In a macroscopic scale the membrane is introduced as a transmission boundary condition, which enables an effective modeling of systems that involve multiple scales. In a mesoscopic scale, a numerical lattice-Boltzmann scheme with a partial-bounceback condition at the membrane is proposed and analyzed. It is shown that this mesoscopic approach provides a consistent approximation of the transmission boundary condition. Furthermore, analysis of the mesoscopic scheme gives rise to an expression for the permeability of a thin membrane as a function of a mesoscopic transmission parameter. In a microscopic model, the mean waiting time for a passage of a particle through the membrane is in accordance with this permeability. Numerical results computed with the mesoscopic scheme are then compared successfully with analytical solutions derived in a macroscopic scale, and the membrane model introduced here is used to simulate diffusive transport between the cell nucleus and cytoplasm through the nuclear envelope in a realistic cell model based on fluorescence microscopy data. By comparing the simulated fluorophore transport to the experimental one, we determine the permeability of the nuclear envelope of HeLa cells to enhanced yellow fluorescent protein.

  1. Modelling the scaling properties of human mobility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Chaoming; Koren, Tal; Wang, Pu; Barabási, Albert-László

    2010-10-01

    Individual human trajectories are characterized by fat-tailed distributions of jump sizes and waiting times, suggesting the relevance of continuous-time random-walk (CTRW) models for human mobility. However, human traces are barely random. Given the importance of human mobility, from epidemic modelling to traffic prediction and urban planning, we need quantitative models that can account for the statistical characteristics of individual human trajectories. Here we use empirical data on human mobility, captured by mobile-phone traces, to show that the predictions of the CTRW models are in systematic conflict with the empirical results. We introduce two principles that govern human trajectories, allowing us to build a statistically self-consistent microscopic model for individual human mobility. The model accounts for the empirically observed scaling laws, but also allows us to analytically predict most of the pertinent scaling exponents.

  2. Allometry and Scaling of the Intraocular Pressure and Aqueous Humour Flow Rate in Vertebrate Eyes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zouache, Moussa A.; Eames, Ian; Samsudin, Amir

    2016-01-01

    In vertebrates, intraocular pressure (IOP) is required to maintain the eye into a shape allowing it to function as an optical instrument. It is sustained by the balance between the production of aqueous humour by the ciliary body and the resistance to its outflow from the eye. Dysregulation of the IOP is often pathological to vision. High IOP may lead to glaucoma, which is in man the second most prevalent cause of blindness. Here, we examine the importance of the IOP and rate of formation of aqueous humour in the development of vertebrate eyes by performing allometric and scaling analyses of the forces acting on the eye during head movement and the energy demands of the cornea, and testing the predictions of the models against a list of measurements in vertebrates collated through a systematic review. We show that the IOP has a weak dependence on body mass, and that in order to maintain the focal length of the eye, it needs to be an order of magnitude greater than the pressure drop across the eye resulting from gravity or head movement. This constitutes an evolutionary constraint that is common to all vertebrates. In animals with cornea-based optics, this constraint also represents a condition to maintain visual acuity. Estimated IOPs were found to increase with the evolution of terrestrial animals. The rate of formation of aqueous humour was found to be adjusted to the metabolic requirements of the cornea, scaling as Vac0.67, where Vac is the volume of the anterior chamber. The present work highlights an interdependence between IOP and aqueous flow rate crucial to ocular function that must be considered to understand the evolution of the dioptric apparatus. It should also be taken into consideration in the prevention and treatment of glaucoma. PMID:26990431

  3. Sub-Grid Scale Plume Modeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Greg Yarwood

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Multi-pollutant chemical transport models (CTMs are being routinely used to predict the impacts of emission controls on the concentrations and deposition of primary and secondary pollutants. While these models have a fairly comprehensive treatment of the governing atmospheric processes, they are unable to correctly represent processes that occur at very fine scales, such as the near-source transport and chemistry of emissions from elevated point sources, because of their relatively coarse horizontal resolution. Several different approaches have been used to address this limitation, such as using fine grids, adaptive grids, hybrid modeling, or an embedded sub-grid scale plume model, i.e., plume-in-grid (PinG modeling. In this paper, we first discuss the relative merits of these various approaches used to resolve sub-grid scale effects in grid models, and then focus on PinG modeling which has been very effective in addressing the problems listed above. We start with a history and review of PinG modeling from its initial applications for ozone modeling in the Urban Airshed Model (UAM in the early 1980s using a relatively simple plume model, to more sophisticated and state-of-the-science plume models, that include a full treatment of gas-phase, aerosol, and cloud chemistry, embedded in contemporary models such as CMAQ, CAMx, and WRF-Chem. We present examples of some typical results from PinG modeling for a variety of applications, discuss the implications of PinG on model predictions of source attribution, and discuss possible future developments and applications for PinG modeling.

  4. From Large to Small Scales: Global Models of the ISM

    CERN Document Server

    D'Avillez, M A

    2004-01-01

    We review large scale modelling of the ISM with emphasis on the importance to include the disk-halo-disk duty cycle and to use a dynamical refinement of the grid (in regions where steep variations of density and pressure occur) for a realistic modelling of the ISM. We also discuss the necessity of convergence of the simulation results by comparing 0.625, 1.25 and 2.5 pc resolution simulations and show that a minimum grid resolution of 1.25 pc is required for quantitatively reliable results, as there is a rapid convergence for $\\Delta x \\leq 1.1$ pc.

  5. Evaluation of the pressure ulcers risk scales with critically ill patients: a prospective cohort study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andressa Tomazini Borghardt

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available AIMS: to evaluate the accuracy of the Braden and Waterlow risk assessment scales in critically ill inpatients.METHOD: this prospective cohort study, with 55 patients in intensive care units, was performed through evaluation of sociodemographic and clinical variables, through the application of the scales (Braden and Waterlow upon admission and every 48 hours; and through the evaluation and classification of the ulcers into categories.RESULTS: the pressure ulcer incidence was 30.9%, with the Braden and Waterlow scales presenting high sensitivity (41% and 71% and low specificity (21% and 47% respectively in the three evaluations. The cut off scores found in the first, second and third evaluations were 12, 12 and 11 in the Braden scale, and 16, 15 and 14 in the Waterlow scale.CONCLUSION: the Braden scale was shown to be a good screening instrument, and the Waterlow scale proved to have better predictive power.

  6. Spatial Variation of Pressure in the Lyophilization Product Chamber Part 1: Computational Modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganguly, Arnab; Varma, Nikhil; Sane, Pooja; Bogner, Robin; Pikal, Michael; Alexeenko, Alina

    2017-04-01

    The flow physics in the product chamber of a freeze dryer involves coupled heat and mass transfer at different length and time scales. The low-pressure environment and the relatively small flow velocities make it difficult to quantify the flow structure experimentally. The current work presents the three-dimensional computational fluid dynamics (CFD) modeling for vapor flow in a laboratory scale freeze dryer validated with experimental data and theory. The model accounts for the presence of a non-condensable gas such as nitrogen or air using a continuum multi-species model. The flow structure at different sublimation rates, chamber pressures, and shelf-gaps are systematically investigated. Emphasis has been placed on accurately predicting the pressure variation across the subliming front. At a chamber set pressure of 115 mtorr and a sublimation rate of 1.3 kg/h/m(2), the pressure variation reaches about 9 mtorr. The pressure variation increased linearly with sublimation rate in the range of 0.5 to 1.3 kg/h/m(2). The dependence of pressure variation on the shelf-gap was also studied both computationally and experimentally. The CFD modeling results are found to agree within 10% with the experimental measurements. The computational model was also compared to analytical solution valid for small shelf-gaps. Thus, the current work presents validation study motivating broader use of CFD in optimizing freeze-drying process and equipment design.

  7. Pressure Sensitive Paint Applied to Flexible Models Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schairer, Edward T.; Kushner, Laura Kathryn

    2014-01-01

    One gap in current pressure-measurement technology is a high-spatial-resolution method for accurately measuring pressures on spatially and temporally varying wind-tunnel models such as Inflatable Aerodynamic Decelerators (IADs), parachutes, and sails. Conventional pressure taps only provide sparse measurements at discrete points and are difficult to integrate with the model structure without altering structural properties. Pressure Sensitive Paint (PSP) provides pressure measurements with high spatial resolution, but its use has been limited to rigid or semi-rigid models. Extending the use of PSP from rigid surfaces to flexible surfaces would allow direct, high-spatial-resolution measurements of the unsteady surface pressure distribution. Once developed, this new capability will be combined with existing stereo photogrammetry methods to simultaneously measure the shape of a dynamically deforming model in a wind tunnel. Presented here are the results and methodology for using PSP on flexible surfaces.

  8. Mass modeling of galaxy clusters: quantifying hydrostatic bias and contribution from non-thermal pressure

    CERN Document Server

    Martizzi, Davide

    2016-01-01

    Galaxy cluster mass determinations achieved using X-ray and Sunyaev-Zeldovich data combined with the assumption of hydrostatic equilibrium are generally biased. The bias exists for two main reasons: non-thermal pressure forces are expected to contribute to the overall pressure balance and deviations from spherical symmetry and hydrostatic equilibrium can be present. In this paper, we use a sample of zoom-in hydrodynamical simulations of galaxy clusters to measure the magnitude of hydrostatic bias and the contribution from turbulence to the total pressure. We propose a new empirical model for turbulent pressure based on our simulations that can be applied to observations. We show that our model can be successfully applied to remove most of the bias related to neglection of turbulent pressure, which is usually not included in hydrostatic cluster mass profile reconstructions. The use of this model may significantly improve the calibration of cluster scaling relations that are a key tool for cluster cosmology.

  9. Assessing cumulative pressures and impacts in a regional scale: HELCOM Baltic Sea Impact Index

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Korpinen, S.; Meski, L.; Andersen, Jesper;

    of identifying hot spots needs to be replaced by spatial high-resolution maps associated with estimated impacts on key ecosystem components. The Baltic Sea Marine Environment Protection Commission (HELCOM) took a first step towards an initial regional assessment of anthropogenic pressures in the Initial Holistic...... of macrozoobenthic communities in some Baltic sub-basins and the results have suggested that more specific selection of pressures is needed in order to assess anthropogenic impacts on benthic habitats. Such an adaptation of the tool has already been tested to assess the sea-floor integrity under the MSFD qualitative...... Assessment of the Baltic Sea by producing the Baltic Sea Pressure Index (BSPI) and the Baltic Sea Impact Index (BSII). The BSPI visualizes cumulative anthropogenic pressures in the Baltic Sea scale, whereas the BSII consists of potential impacts of anthropogenic pressures on key ecosystem components...

  10. Ruby pressure scale in a low-temperature diamond anvil cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamaoka, Hitoshi; Zekko, Yumiko; Jarrige, Ignace; Lin, Jung-Fu; Hiraoka, Nozomu; Ishii, Hirofumi; Tsuei, Ku-Ding; Mizuki, Jun'ichiro

    2012-12-01

    Laser-excited N and R fluorescence lines of heavily doped ruby have been studied up to 26 GPa at low temperatures. While the intensity of the R lines at ambient pressure significantly decreases with decreasing temperature, the intensity of N lines originating from exchange-coupled Cr ion pairs is enhanced at low temperatures. The pressure induced wavelength shift of the N lines at 19 K is well fitted with an empirical formula similar to the equation for the R1 line, showing that the intense N line could be used as an alternative pressure scale at low temperatures. We also observe continuous increase in non-hydrostaticity with increasing pressure at low temperatures when silicone oil and 4:1 mixture of methanol and ethanol are used as pressure media.

  11. Advanced high-pressure bench-scale reactor for testing with hot corrosive gases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abbasian, J.; Bachta, R.P.; Wangerow, J.R. (Inst. of Gas Technology, Chicago, IL (United States)); Mojtahedi, W.; Salo, K. (Enviropower Inc., Espoo (Finland))

    1994-01-01

    A bench-scale, high-pressure/high-temperature fluidized-bed reactor (HPTR) system is described that is capable of operating at a maximum temperature and pressure of 1,000 C and 30 bar in a corrosive atmosphere. The design of the unit is based on a double-shell balanced-pressure system. All the hot parts of the reactor that are wetted by the corrosive (and/or reactive) gases and the entire sampling line are constructed of inert material to prevent corrosion and loss of the reactant gases. The unit has been used for over 200 high-pressure hot coal gas desulfurization tests at 20 bars and up to 750 C without any experimental problem and with excellent sulfur balance, indicating that this reactor system is ideal for testing with reactive and corrosive gases at elevated pressures and temperatures.

  12. [Laser therapy in pressure ulcers: evaluation by the Pressure Ulcer Scale for Healing and Nursing Outcomes Classification].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palagi, Sofia; Severo, Isis Marques; Menegon, Dóris Baratz; Lucena, Amália de Fátima

    2015-10-01

    To describe the pressure ulcer healing process in critically ill patients treated with conventional dressing therapy plus low-intensity laser therapy evaluated by the Pressure Ulcer Scale for Healing (PUSH) and the result of Wound Healing: Secondary Intention, according to the Nursing Outcomes Classification (NOC). Case report study according to nursing process conducted with an Intensive Care Unit patient. Data were collected with an instrument containing the PUSH and the result of the NOC. In the analysis we used descriptive statistics, considering the scores obtained on the instrument. A reduction in the size of lesions of 7cm to 1.5cm of length and 6cm to 1.1cm width, in addition to the increase of epithelial tissue and granulation, decreased secretion and odor. There was improvement in the healing process of the lesion treated with adjuvant therapy and the use of NOC allowed a more detailed and accurate assessment than the PUSH.

  13. Large scale topic modeling made practical

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wahlgreen, Bjarne Ørum; Hansen, Lars Kai

    2011-01-01

    Topic models are of broad interest. They can be used for query expansion and result structuring in information retrieval and as an important component in services such as recommender systems and user adaptive advertising. In large scale applications both the size of the database (number of docume......Topic models are of broad interest. They can be used for query expansion and result structuring in information retrieval and as an important component in services such as recommender systems and user adaptive advertising. In large scale applications both the size of the database (number...... topics at par with a much larger case specific vocabulary....

  14. Braden Scale cumulative score versus subscale scores: are we missing opportunities for pressure ulcer prevention?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gadd, Molly M

    2014-01-01

    Hospital-acquired pressure ulcer incidence rates continue to rise in the United States in the acute care setting despite efforts to extinguish them, and pressure ulcers are a nursing-sensitive quality indicator. The Braden Scale for Predicting Pressure Sore Risk instrument has been shown to be a valid and reliable instrument for assessing pressure ulcer risk. This case study represented 1 patient out of a chart audit that reviewed 20 patients with confirmed hospital-acquired pressure ulcers. The goal of the audit was to determine whether these ulcers might be avoided if preventive interventions based on Braden subscale scores versus the cumulative score were implemented. This case study describes a patient who, deemed at low risk for pressure ulcer development based on cumulative Braden Scale, may have benefited from interventions based on the subscale scores of sensory perception, activity, and mobility. Further research is needed to determine whether interventions based on subscales may be effective for preventing pressure ulcers when compared to a protocol based exclusively on the cumulative score.

  15. Experimental research on characteristic of start-up pressure wave propagation in gelled crude oil by large-scale flow loop

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    崔秀国; 艾慕阳; 姜保良; 霍连风; 张立新

    2008-01-01

    In order to research start-up pressure wave propagation mechanism and determine pressure wave speed in gelled crude oil pipelines accurately,experiment of Large-scale flow loop was carried out.In the experiment,start-up pressure wave speeds under various operation conditions were measured,and effects of correlative factors on pressure wave were analyzed.The experimental and theoretical analysis shows that thermal shrinkage and structural properties of gelled crude oils are key factors influencing on start-up pressure wave propagation.The quantitative analysis for these effects can be done by using volume expansion coefficient and structural property parameter of gelled crude oil.A new calculation model of pressure wave speed was developed on the basis of Large-scale flow loop experiment and theoretical analysis.

  16. Pressure in an exactly solvable model of active fluid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marini Bettolo Marconi, Umberto; Maggi, Claudio; Paoluzzi, Matteo

    2017-07-01

    We consider the pressure in the steady-state regime of three stochastic models characterized by self-propulsion and persistent motion and widely employed to describe the behavior of active particles, namely, the Active Brownian particle (ABP) model, the Gaussian colored noise (GCN) model, and the unified colored noise approximation (UCNA) model. Whereas in the limit of short but finite persistence time, the pressure in the UCNA model can be obtained by different methods which have an analog in equilibrium systems, in the remaining two models only the virial route is, in general, possible. According to this method, notwithstanding each model obeys its own specific microscopic law of evolution, the pressure displays a certain universal behavior. For generic interparticle and confining potentials, we derive a formula which establishes a correspondence between the GCN and the UCNA pressures. In order to provide explicit formulas and examples, we specialize the discussion to the case of an assembly of elastic dumbbells confined to a parabolic well. By employing the UCNA we find that, for this model, the pressure determined by the thermodynamic method coincides with the pressures obtained by the virial and mechanical methods. The three methods when applied to the GCN give a pressure identical to that obtained via the UCNA. Finally, we find that the ABP virial pressure exactly agrees with the UCNA and GCN results.

  17. Design and modeling of small scale multiple fracturing experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cuderman, J F

    1981-12-01

    Recent experiments at the Nevada Test Site (NTS) have demonstrated the existence of three distinct fracture regimes. Depending on the pressure rise time in a borehole, one can obtain hydraulic, multiple, or explosive fracturing behavior. The use of propellants rather than explosives in tamped boreholes permits tailoring of the pressure risetime over a wide range since propellants having a wide range of burn rates are available. This technique of using the combustion gases from a full bore propellant charge to produce controlled borehole pressurization is termed High Energy Gas Fracturing (HEGF). Several series of HEGF, in 0.15 m and 0.2 m diameter boreholes at 12 m depths, have been completed in a tunnel complex at NTS where mineback permitted direct observation of fracturing obtained. Because such large experiments are costly and time consuming, smaller scale experiments are desirable, provided results from small experiments can be used to predict fracture behavior in larger boreholes. In order to design small scale gas fracture experiments, the available data from previous HEGF experiments were carefully reviewed, analytical elastic wave modeling was initiated, and semi-empirical modeling was conducted which combined predictions for statically pressurized boreholes with experimental data. The results of these efforts include (1) the definition of what constitutes small scale experiments for emplacement in a tunnel complex at the Nevada Test Site, (2) prediction of average crack radius, in ash fall tuff, as a function of borehole size and energy input per unit length, (3) definition of multiple-hydraulic and multiple-explosive fracture boundaries as a function of boreholes size and surface wave velocity, (4) semi-empirical criteria for estimating stress and acceleration, and (5) a proposal that multiple fracture orientations may be governed by in situ stresses.

  18. A Prediction Model of the Capillary Pressure J-Function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, W. S.; Luo, P. Y.; Sun, L.; Lin, N.

    2016-01-01

    The capillary pressure J-function is a dimensionless measure of the capillary pressure of a fluid in a porous medium. The function was derived based on a capillary bundle model. However, the dependence of the J-function on the saturation Sw is not well understood. A prediction model for it is presented based on capillary pressure model, and the J-function prediction model is a power function instead of an exponential or polynomial function. Relative permeability is calculated with the J-function prediction model, resulting in an easier calculation and results that are more representative. PMID:27603701

  19. Spatial Variation of Pressure in the Lyophilization Product Chamber Part 2: Experimental Measurements and Implications for Scale-up and Batch Uniformity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sane, Pooja; Varma, Nikhil; Ganguly, Arnab; Pikal, Michael; Alexeenko, Alina; Bogner, Robin H

    2017-02-01

    Product temperature during the primary drying step of freeze-drying is controlled by a set point chamber pressure and shelf temperature. However, recent computational modeling suggests a possible variation in local chamber pressure. The current work presents an experimental verification of the local chamber pressure gradients in a lab-scale freeze-dryer. Pressure differences between the center and the edges of a lab-scale freeze-dryer shelf were measured as a function of sublimation flux and clearance between the sublimation front and the shelf above. A modest 3-mTorr difference in pressure was observed as the sublimation flux was doubled from 0.5 to 1.0 kg·h(-1)·m(-2) at a clearance of 2.6 cm. Further, at a constant sublimation flux of 1.0 kg·h(-1)·m(-2), an 8-fold increase in the pressure drop was observed across the shelf as the clearance was decreased from 4 to 1.6 cm. Scale-up of the pressure variation from lab- to a manufacturing-scale freeze-dryer predicted an increased uniformity in drying rates across the batch for two frequently used pharmaceutical excipients (mannitol and sucrose at 5% w/w). However, at an atypical condition of shelf temperature of +10°C and chamber pressure of 50 mTorr, the product temperature in the center vials was calculated to be a degree higher than the edge vial for a low resistance product, thus reversing the typical edge and center vial behavior. Thus, the effect of local pressure variation is more significant at the manufacturing-scale than at a lab-scale and accounting for the contribution of variations in the local chamber pressures can improve success in scale-up.

  20. Cross-Cultural Validation of the High Blood Pressure Health Literacy Scale in a Chinese Community.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qinghua Zhang

    Full Text Available Considering the importance of health literacy (HL for the maximum yield from the hypertension control programs, development of a reliable and valid instrument of hypertension-related HL is critical. This study aimed to translate and validate the High Blood Pressure-Health Literacy Scale (HBP-HLS into Chinese (C-HBP-HLS and evaluate its psychometric properties in Chinese context.Between June 2013 and January 2014, a cross-sectional study was conducted among recruited hypertensive patients belonging to the Han and Kazakh-Chinese communities in Urumqi, Xinjiang, China.A pilot sample (n = 242 was selected for the exploratory factor analysis of the translated and modified instrument. Another sample (n = 308 was recruited for the confirmatory factor analysis. C-HBP-HLS consisted of five dimensions (Print Health Literacy, Medication Label, Understanding Ability, Newest Vital Sign Test, and Avoiding Food Allergy containing 15 items, accounting for 77.7% of the total variance. The 5-factor model demonstrated a good overall fit. The scale-level content validity index was 0.85. Cronbach's alpha of the overall scale was 0.78 and test-retest reliability was 0.96. Education level had a strong positive correlation with the scores for items Q1, Q2, and Q3(r = 0.481, 0.492, 0.475, respectively. Health Literacy scores among Kazakh patients were significantly lower than Han (7.13±7.90 vs. 30.10±13.42, Z = -14.573, P<0.001.C-HBP-HLS demonstrated suitable factor structure and robust psychometric properties for measuring health literacy level among hypertensive patients in China.

  1. Thermodynamic models for bounding pressurant mass requirements of cryogenic tanks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandresar, Neil T.; Haberbusch, Mark S.

    1994-01-01

    Thermodynamic models have been formulated to predict lower and upper bounds for the mass of pressurant gas required to pressurize a cryogenic tank and then expel liquid from the tank. Limiting conditions are based on either thermal equilibrium or zero energy exchange between the pressurant gas and initial tank contents. The models are independent of gravity level and allow specification of autogenous or non-condensible pressurants. Partial liquid fill levels may be specified for initial and final conditions. Model predictions are shown to successfully bound results from limited normal-gravity tests with condensable and non-condensable pressurant gases. Representative maximum collapse factor maps are presented for liquid hydrogen to show the effects of initial and final fill level on the range of pressurant gas requirements. Maximum collapse factors occur for partial expulsions with large final liquid fill fractions.

  2. Aerodynamic noise characterization of a full-scale wind turbine through high-frequency surface pressure measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bertagnolio, Franck; Aagaard Madsen, Helge; Bak, Christian;

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this work is to investigate and characterize the high-frequency surface pressure fluctuations on a full-scale wind turbine blade and in particular the influence of the atmospheric turbulence. As these fluctuations are highly correlated to the sources of both turbulent inflow noise...... wind turbine with a 80 m diameter rotor as well as measurements of an airfoil section tested in a wind tunnel. The turbine was extensively equipped in order to monitor the local inflow onto the rotating blades. Further a section of the 38 m long blade was instrumented with 50 microphones flush......-mounted relative to the blade surface. The measurements of surface pressure spectra are compared with the results of two engineering models for trailing edge noise and for turbulent inflow noise. The measured pressure fluctuations are related to the local inflow angle and are also compared to measurements...

  3. Scaling model for symmetric star polymers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramachandran, Ram; Rai, Durgesh K.; Beaucage, Gregory

    2010-03-01

    Neutron scattering data from symmetric star polymers with six poly (urethane-ether) arms, chemically bonded to a C-60 molecule are fitted using a new scaling model and scattering function. The new scaling function can describe both good solvent and theta solvent conditions as well as resolve deviations in chain conformation due to steric interactions between star arms. The scaling model quantifies the distinction between invariant topological features for this star polymer and chain tortuosity which changes with goodness of solvent and steric interaction. Beaucage G, Phys. Rev. E 70 031401 (2004).; Ramachandran R, et al. Macromolecules 41 9802-9806 (2008).; Ramachandran R, et al. Macromolecules, 42 4746-4750 (2009); Rai DK et al. Europhys. Lett., (Submitted 10/2009).

  4. AN IMPROVED DYNAMIC SUBGRID-SCALE STRESS MODEL

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TANG Xue-ling; QIAN Zhong-dong; WU Yu-lin; LIU Shu-hong; YANG Fan

    2004-01-01

    According to modeling principle that a model must be more accurate if including more flow information, and based on the Cauchy-Helmholtz theorem and the Smagorinsky model, a second-order dynamic model with double dynamic coefficients was proposed by applying dimension analyses. The Subgrid-Scale (SGS) stress is a function of both strain-rate tensor and rotation-rate tensor. The SIMPLEC algorithm and staggering grid system was applied to give the solution of the discretized governing equations, and for the turbulent flow through a 90° bend, the distributions of velocity and pressure were achieved. The comparison between experimental data and simulation results at a Reynolds number 40000 shows a good agreement and implies that this model is practicable and credible.

  5. Asymptotic Modeling of the Thin Film Flow with a Pressure-Dependent Viscosity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduard Marušić-Paloka

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We study the lubrication process with incompressible fluid taking into account the dependence of the viscosity on the pressure. Assuming that the viscosity-pressure relation is given by the well-known Barus law, we derive an effective model using asymptotic analysis with respect to the film thickness. The key idea is to conveniently transform the governing system and then apply two-scale expansion technique.

  6. Risks assessment of water pollution by pesticides at local scale (PESTEAUX project): study of polluting pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noel, Stéphanie; Billo Bah, Boubacar

    2009-01-01

    Pollution of water resources (surface waters and ground waters) by pesticide uses is one of the key point of the European policy with the implementation of the Water Frame Work Directive (2000/60/EC) and the thematic Strategy on the Sustainable use of pesticides. According to this legislation, the Member States must initiate measures to limit environmental and toxicological effects caused by pesticide uses. The Agricultural Research Centre of Wallonia (CRA-W) emphasized the need of a tool for spatial risk analysis and develOPs it within the framework of PESTEAUX project. The originality of the approach proposed by the CRA-W is to generate maps to identify the risk of pollution at locale scale (agricultural parcel). The risk will be assessed according to the study of different factors, grouped under 3 data's layers: polluting pressure, vulnerability of the physical environment (soil) and meteorological data. This approach is directly based on the risk's definition which takes into account the polluting pressure, linked to the human activities, and the vulnerability of the soil, defined by factors of physical environment which characterize the water flow in the parcel. Moreover, meteorological data influence the intensity and likelihood flow of water, and indirectly pesticide by leaching or runoff. The PESTEAUX's approach to study the pollution is based on the model "source-vector-target". The source is the polluting pressure, in other words, the pesticides which could reach the targets. The main vector is the water which vehicles the pesticide on and trough the soil until the target which are the surface waters or ground waters. In this paper we introduce the factors contributing to the polluting pressure. These factors are linking to the human activities and more precisely, to the pesticide uses. The factors considered have an influence on pesticide's transport by water (in its solid state or in dissolved state by leaching, run-off, or erosion) but also on a set of

  7. Electron-scale reduced fluid models with gyroviscous effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Passot, T.; Sulem, P. L.; Tassi, E.

    2017-08-01

    Reduced fluid models for collisionless plasmas including electron inertia and finite Larmor radius corrections are derived for scales ranging from the ion to the electron gyroradii. Based either on pressure balance or on the incompressibility of the electron fluid, they respectively capture kinetic Alfvén waves (KAWs) or whistler waves (WWs), and can provide suitable tools for reconnection and turbulence studies. Both isothermal regimes and Landau fluid closures permitting anisotropic pressure fluctuations are considered. For small values of the electron beta parameter e$ , a perturbative computation of the gyroviscous force valid at scales comparable to the electron inertial length is performed at order e)$ , which requires second-order contributions in a scale expansion. Comparisons with kinetic theory are performed in the linear regime. The spectrum of transverse magnetic fluctuations for strong and weak turbulence energy cascades is also phenomenologically predicted for both types of waves. In the case of moderate ion to electron temperature ratio, a new regime of KAW turbulence at scales smaller than the electron inertial length is obtained, where the magnetic energy spectrum decays like \\bot -13/3$ , thus faster than the \\bot -11/3$ spectrum of WW turbulence.

  8. Mechanical Modeling of a WIPP Drum Under Pressure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, Jeffrey A. [Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2014-11-25

    Mechanical modeling was undertaken to support the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) technical assessment team (TAT) investigating the February 14th 2014 event where there was a radiological release at the WIPP. The initial goal of the modeling was to examine if a mechanical model could inform the team about the event. The intention was to have a model that could test scenarios with respect to the rate of pressurization. It was expected that the deformation and failure (inability of the drum to contain any pressure) would vary according to the pressurization rate. As the work progressed there was also interest in using the mechanical analysis of the drum to investigate what would happen if a drum pressurized when it was located under a standard waste package. Specifically, would the deformation be detectable from camera views within the room. A finite element model of a WIPP 55-gallon drum was developed that used all hex elements. Analyses were conducted using the explicit transient dynamics module of Sierra/SM to explore potential pressurization scenarios of the drum. Theses analysis show similar deformation patterns to documented pressurization tests of drums in the literature. The calculated failure pressures from previous tests documented in the literature vary from as little as 16 psi to 320 psi. In addition, previous testing documented in the literature shows drums bulging but not failing at pressures ranging from 69 to 138 psi. The analyses performed for this study found the drums failing at pressures ranging from 35 psi to 75 psi. When the drums are pressurized quickly (in 0.01 seconds) there is significant deformation to the lid. At lower pressurization rates the deformation of the lid is considerably less, yet the lids will still open from the pressure. The analyses demonstrate the influence of pressurization rate on deformation and opening pressure of the drums. Analyses conducted with a substantial mass on top of the closed drum demonstrate that the

  9. Consistent first-principles pressure scales for diffraction experiments under extreme conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otero-de-La-Roza, Alberto; Cabal, Victor Lua Na

    2012-02-01

    Diamond anvil cell (DAC) diffraction experiments are fundamental in geophysics and materials science to explore the behavior of solids under very high pressures and temperatures. A factor limiting the accuracy of DAC experiments is the lack of an accurate pressure scale for the calibration materials that extends to the ever-increasing pressure and temperature limits of the technique. In this communication, we address this problem by applying a newly developed technique that allows the calculation of accurate thermodynamic properties from first-principles calculations [Phys. Rev. B 84 (2011) 024109, 84 (2011) 184103]. Three elements are key in this method: i) the quasiharmonic approximation (QHA) and the static energies and phonon frequencies obtained from an electronic structure calculation ii) the appropriate representation of the equation of state by using averages of strain polynomials and iii) the correction of the systematic errors caused by the exchange-correlation functional approximation. As a result, we propose accurate equations of scale for typical pressure calibrants that can be used in the whole experimental range of pressures and temperatures. The internal consistency and the agreement with the ruby scale based on experimental data is examined.

  10. Construct validity of the moisture subscale of the Braden Scale for Predicting Pressure Sore Risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omolayo, Tolulope; Brown, Kilty; Rapp, Mary Pat; Li, Jing; Barrett, Ryan; Horn, Susan; Bergstrom, Nancy

    2013-03-01

    In this study, the construct validity of the moisture subscale of the Braden Scale for Predicting Pressure Sore Risk is partially supported by the significant inverse relationships between moisture subscale scores, the number of wet observations and soiled observations, brief changes, and differences among the moisture subscale score groups.

  11. Model Wind Turbines Tested at Full-Scale Similarity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, M. A.; Kiefer, J.; Westergaard, C.; Hultmark, M.

    2016-09-01

    The enormous length scales associated with modern wind turbines complicate any efforts to predict their mechanical loads and performance. Both experiments and numerical simulations are constrained by the large Reynolds numbers governing the full- scale aerodynamics. The limited fundamental understanding of Reynolds number effects in combination with the lack of empirical data affects our ability to predict, model, and design improved turbines and wind farms. A new experimental approach is presented, which utilizes a highly pressurized wind tunnel (up to 220 bar). It allows exact matching of the Reynolds numbers (no matter how it is defined), tip speed ratios, and Mach numbers on a geometrically similar, small-scale model. The design of a measurement and instrumentation stack to control the turbine and measure the loads in the pressurized environment is discussed. Results are then presented in the form of power coefficients as a function of Reynolds number and Tip Speed Ratio. Due to gearbox power loss, a preliminary study has also been completed to find the gearbox efficiency and the resulting correction has been applied to the data set.

  12. Velocity and pressure characteristics of a model SSME high pressure fuel turbopump

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tse, D. G-N.; Sabnis, J. S.; Mcdonald, H.

    1991-01-01

    Under the present effort an experiment rig has been constructed, an instrumentation package developed and a series of mean and rms velocity and pressure measurements made in a turbopump which modelled the first stage of the Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) High Pressure Fuel Turbopump. The rig was designed so as to allow initial experiments with a single configuration consisting of a bell-mouth inlet, a flight impeller, a vaneless diffuser and a volute. Allowance was made for components such as inlet guide vanes, exit guide vanes, downstream pumps, etc. to be added in future experiments. This flexibility will provide a clear baseline set of experiments and allow evaluation in later experiments of the effect of adding specific components upon the pump performance properties. The rotational speed of the impeller was varied between 4260 and 7680 rpm which covered the range of scaled SSME rotation speeds when due allowance is made for the differing stagnation temperature, model to full scale. The results at the inlet obtained with rotational speeds of 4260, 6084 and 7680 rpm showed that the axial velocity at the bell-mouth inlet remained roughly constant at 2.2 of the bulk velocity at the exit of the turbopump near the center of the inlet, but it decreased rapidly with increasing radius at all three speeds. Reverse flow occurred at a radius greater than 0.9 R for all three speeds and the maximum negative velocity reduced from 1.3 of the bulk velocity at the exit of the turbopump at 4260 rpm to 0.35 at 7680 rpm, suggesting that operating at a speed closer to the design condition of 8700 rpm improved the inlet characteristics. The reverse flow caused positive prerotation at the impeller inlet which was negligibly small near the center but reached 0.7 of the impeller speed at the outer annulus. The results in the diffuser and the volute obtained at 7680 rpm show that the hub and shroud walls of the diffuser were characterized by regions of transient reverse flow with

  13. Modeling subsurface contaminant reactions and transport at the watershed scale

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gwo, J.P.; Jardine, P.M.; D`Azevedo, E.F. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Wilson, G.V. [Desert Research Inst., Las Vegas, NV (United States). Water Resources Center

    1997-12-01

    The objectives of this research are: (1) to numerically examine the multiscale effects of physical and chemical mass transfer processes on watershed scale, variably saturated subsurface contaminant transport, and (2) to conduct numerical simulations on watershed scale reactive solute transport and evaluate their implications to uncertainty characterization and cost benefit analysis. Concurrent physical and chemical nonequilibrium caused by inter aggregate gradients of pressure head and solute concentration and intra-aggregate geochemical and microbiological processes, respectively, may arise at various scales and flowpaths. To this date, experimental investigations of these complex processes at watershed scale remain a challenge and numerical studies are often needed for guidance of water resources management and decision making. This research integrates the knowledge bases developed during previous experimental and numerical investigations at a proposed waste disposal site at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory to study the concurrent effects of physical and chemical nonequilibrium. Comparison of numerical results with field data indicates that: (1) multiregion, preferential flow and solute transport exist under partially saturated condition and can be confirmed theoretically, and that (2) mass transfer between pore regions is an important process influencing contaminant movement in the subsurface. Simulations of watershed scale, multi species reactive solute transport suggest that dominance of geochemistry and hydrodynamics may occur simultaneously at different locales and influence the movement of one species relative to another. Execution times on the simulations of the reactive solute transport model also indicate that the model is ready to assist the selection of important parameters for site characterization.

  14. Modeling subsurface contaminant reactions and transport at the watershed scale

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gwo, J.P.; Jardine, P.M.; D`Azevedo, E.F. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Wilson, G.V. [Desert Research Inst., Las Vegas, NV (United States). Water Resources Center

    1997-12-01

    The objectives of this research are: (1) to numerically examine the multiscale effects of physical and chemical mass transfer processes on watershed scale, variably saturated subsurface contaminant transport, and (2) to conduct numerical simulations on watershed scale reactive solute transport and evaluate their implications to uncertainty characterization and cost benefit analysis. Concurrent physical and chemical nonequilibrium caused by inter aggregate gradients of pressure head and solute concentration and intra-aggregate geochemical and microbiological processes, respectively, may arise at various scales and flowpaths. To this date, experimental investigations of these complex processes at watershed scale remain a challenge and numerical studies are often needed for guidance of water resources management and decision making. This research integrates the knowledge bases developed during previous experimental and numerical investigations at a proposed waste disposal site at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory to study the concurrent effects of physical and chemical nonequilibrium. Comparison of numerical results with field data indicates that: (1) multiregion, preferential flow and solute transport exist under partially saturated condition and can be confirmed theoretically, and that (2) mass transfer between pore regions is an important process influencing contaminant movement in the subsurface. Simulations of watershed scale, multi species reactive solute transport suggest that dominance of geochemistry and hydrodynamics may occur simultaneously at different locales and influence the movement of one species relative to another. Execution times on the simulations of the reactive solute transport model also indicate that the model is ready to assist the selection of important parameters for site characterization.

  15. Modeling DNA beacons at the mesoscopic scale

    CERN Document Server

    Errami, Jalal; Theodorakopoulos, Nikos

    2007-01-01

    We report model calculations on DNA single strands which describe the equilibrium dynamics and kinetics of hairpin formation and melting. Modeling is at the level of single bases. Strand rigidity is described in terms of simple polymer models; alternative calculations performed using the freely rotating chain and the discrete Kratky-Porod models are reported. Stem formation is modeled according to the Peyrard-Bishop-Dauxois Hamiltonian. The kinetics of opening and closing is described in terms of a diffusion-controlled motion in an effective free energy landscape. Melting profiles, dependence of melting temperature on loop length, and kinetic time scales are in semiquantitative agreement with experimental data obtained from fluorescent DNA beacons forming poly(T) loops. Variation in strand rigidity is not sufficient to account for the large activation enthalpy of closing and the strong loop length dependence observed in hairpins forming poly(A) loops. Implications for modeling single strands of DNA or RNA are...

  16. Modeling High Pressure Micro Hollow Cathode Discharges

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-11-02

    cathode discharge excimer lamps , Phys. Plasmas 7, 286 (2000). [3] RH Stark and KH Schoenbach, Direct high pressure glow discharges, J. Appl. Phys...temperature profiles in argon glow discharges, J. Appl. Phys. 88, 2234 (2000) [8] M. Moselhy, W. Shi, R. Stark, A flat glow discharge excimer radiation...MHCD acts as a plasma cathode for a third electrode (anode). Some experimental results in this geometry are available for argon and for air from the

  17. Single crystal elasticity of gold up to ˜20 GPa: Bulk modulus anomaly and implication for a primary pressure scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoneda, Akira; Fukui, Hiroshi; Gomi, Hitoshi; Kamada, Seiji; Xie, Longjian; Hirao, Naohisa; Uchiyama, Hiroshi; Tsutsui, Satoshi; Baron, Alfred Q. R.

    2017-09-01

    We measured the elasticity of single crystal gold (Au) and its lattice parameters under high pressure using inelastic X-ray scattering (IXS). The elastic moduli were obtained at five pressure points between 0 and 20 GPa. The pressure variation of the bulk modulus displays anomalous behavior, being nearly constant up to ˜5 GPa, and then steeply increasing at higher pressure. A similar anomaly is observed in first-principles calculations. An absolute pressure scale was derived by direct numerical integration of the bulk modulus over volume change. This yields a scale that gives slightly lower pressure values than those of previous work, about 5-10% lower at ˜20 GPa.

  18. Probabilistic Modeling of Intracranial Pressure Effects on Optic Nerve Biomechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ethier, C. R.; Feola, Andrew J.; Raykin, Julia; Myers, Jerry G.; Nelson, Emily S.; Samuels, Brian C.

    2016-01-01

    Altered intracranial pressure (ICP) is involved/implicated in several ocular conditions: papilledema, glaucoma and Visual Impairment and Intracranial Pressure (VIIP) syndrome. The biomechanical effects of altered ICP on optic nerve head (ONH) tissues in these conditions are uncertain but likely important. We have quantified ICP-induced deformations of ONH tissues, using finite element (FE) and probabilistic modeling (Latin Hypercube Simulations (LHS)) to consider a range of tissue properties and relevant pressures.

  19. Probabilistic, meso-scale flood loss modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kreibich, Heidi; Botto, Anna; Schröter, Kai; Merz, Bruno

    2016-04-01

    Flood risk analyses are an important basis for decisions on flood risk management and adaptation. However, such analyses are associated with significant uncertainty, even more if changes in risk due to global change are expected. Although uncertainty analysis and probabilistic approaches have received increased attention during the last years, they are still not standard practice for flood risk assessments and even more for flood loss modelling. State of the art in flood loss modelling is still the use of simple, deterministic approaches like stage-damage functions. Novel probabilistic, multi-variate flood loss models have been developed and validated on the micro-scale using a data-mining approach, namely bagging decision trees (Merz et al. 2013). In this presentation we demonstrate and evaluate the upscaling of the approach to the meso-scale, namely on the basis of land-use units. The model is applied in 19 municipalities which were affected during the 2002 flood by the River Mulde in Saxony, Germany (Botto et al. submitted). The application of bagging decision tree based loss models provide a probability distribution of estimated loss per municipality. Validation is undertaken on the one hand via a comparison with eight deterministic loss models including stage-damage functions as well as multi-variate models. On the other hand the results are compared with official loss data provided by the Saxon Relief Bank (SAB). The results show, that uncertainties of loss estimation remain high. Thus, the significant advantage of this probabilistic flood loss estimation approach is that it inherently provides quantitative information about the uncertainty of the prediction. References: Merz, B.; Kreibich, H.; Lall, U. (2013): Multi-variate flood damage assessment: a tree-based data-mining approach. NHESS, 13(1), 53-64. Botto A, Kreibich H, Merz B, Schröter K (submitted) Probabilistic, multi-variable flood loss modelling on the meso-scale with BT-FLEMO. Risk Analysis.

  20. A novel scaling approach for sooting laminar coflow flames at elevated pressures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdelgadir, Ahmed; Steinmetz, Scott A.; Attili, Antonio; Bisetti, Fabrizio; Roberts, William L.

    2016-11-01

    Laminar coflow diffusion flames are often used to study soot formation at elevated pressures due to their well-characterized configuration. In these expriments, these flames are operated at constant mass flow rate (constant Reynolds number) at increasing pressures. Due to the effect of gravity, the flame shape changes and as a results, the mixing field changes, which in return has a great effect on soot formation. In this study, a novel scaling approach of the flame at different pressures is proposed. In this approach, both the Reynolds and Grashof's numbers are kept constant so that the effect of gravity is the same at all pressures. In order to keep the Grashof number constant, the diameter of the nozzle is modified as pressure varies. We report both numerical and experimental data proving that this approach guarantees the same nondimensional flow fields over a broad range of pressures. In the range of conditions studied, the Damkoehler number, which varies when both Reynolds and Grashof numbers are kept constant, is shown to play a minor role. Hence, a set of suitable flames for investigating soot formation at pressure is identified. This research made use of the resources of IT Research Computing at King Abdullah University of Science & Technology (KAUST), Saudi Arabia.

  1. Drift-Scale THC Seepage Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    C.R. Bryan

    2005-02-17

    The purpose of this report (REV04) is to document the thermal-hydrologic-chemical (THC) seepage model, which simulates the composition of waters that could potentially seep into emplacement drifts, and the composition of the gas phase. The THC seepage model is processed and abstracted for use in the total system performance assessment (TSPA) for the license application (LA). This report has been developed in accordance with ''Technical Work Plan for: Near-Field Environment and Transport: Coupled Processes (Mountain-Scale TH/THC/THM, Drift-Scale THC Seepage, and Post-Processing Analysis for THC Seepage) Report Integration'' (BSC 2005 [DIRS 172761]). The technical work plan (TWP) describes planning information pertaining to the technical scope, content, and management of this report. The plan for validation of the models documented in this report is given in Section 2.2.2, ''Model Validation for the DS THC Seepage Model,'' of the TWP. The TWP (Section 3.2.2) identifies Acceptance Criteria 1 to 4 for ''Quantity and Chemistry of Water Contacting Engineered Barriers and Waste Forms'' (NRC 2003 [DIRS 163274]) as being applicable to this report; however, in variance to the TWP, Acceptance Criterion 5 has also been determined to be applicable, and is addressed, along with the other Acceptance Criteria, in Section 4.2 of this report. Also, three FEPS not listed in the TWP (2.2.10.01.0A, 2.2.10.06.0A, and 2.2.11.02.0A) are partially addressed in this report, and have been added to the list of excluded FEPS in Table 6.1-2. This report has been developed in accordance with LP-SIII.10Q-BSC, ''Models''. This report documents the THC seepage model and a derivative used for validation, the Drift Scale Test (DST) THC submodel. The THC seepage model is a drift-scale process model for predicting the composition of gas and water that could enter waste emplacement drifts and the effects of mineral

  2. Simulating the gas hydrate production test at Mallik using the pilot scale pressure reservoir LARS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heeschen, Katja; Spangenberg, Erik; Schicks, Judith M.; Priegnitz, Mike; Giese, Ronny; Luzi-Helbing, Manja

    2014-05-01

    LARS, the LArge Reservoir Simulator, allows for one of the few pilot scale simulations of gas hydrate formation and dissociation under controlled conditions with a high resolution sensor network to enable the detection of spatial variations. It was designed and built within the German project SUGAR (submarine gas hydrate reservoirs) for sediment samples with a diameter of 0.45 m and a length of 1.3 m. During the project, LARS already served for a number of experiments simulating the production of gas from hydrate-bearing sediments using thermal stimulation and/or depressurization. The latest test simulated the methane production test from gas hydrate-bearing sediments at the Mallik test site, Canada, in 2008 (Uddin et al., 2011). Thus, the starting conditions of 11.5 MPa and 11°C and environmental parameters were set to fit the Mallik test site. The experimental gas hydrate saturation of 90% of the total pore volume (70 l) was slightly higher than volumes found in gas hydrate-bearing formations in the field (70 - 80%). However, the resulting permeability of a few millidarcy was comparable. The depressurization driven gas production at Mallik was conducted in three steps at 7.0 MPa - 5.0 MPa - 4.2 MPa all of which were used in the laboratory experiments. In the lab the pressure was controlled using a back pressure regulator while the confining pressure was stable. All but one of the 12 temperature sensors showed a rapid decrease in temperature throughout the sediment sample, which accompanied the pressure changes as a result of gas hydrate dissociation. During step 1 and 2 they continued up to the point where gas hydrate stability was regained. The pressure decreases and gas hydrate dissociation led to highly variable two phase fluid flow throughout the duration of the simulated production test. The flow rates were measured continuously (gas) and discontinuously (liquid), respectively. Next to being discussed here, both rates were used to verify a model of gas

  3. Numerical Simulation on Hydromechanical Coupling in Porous Media Adopting Three-Dimensional Pore-Scale Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jianjun; Song, Rui; Cui, Mengmeng

    2014-01-01

    A novel approach of simulating hydromechanical coupling in pore-scale models of porous media is presented in this paper. Parameters of the sandstone samples, such as the stress-strain curve, Poisson's ratio, and permeability under different pore pressure and confining pressure, are tested in laboratory scale. The micro-CT scanner is employed to scan the samples for three-dimensional images, as input to construct the model. Accordingly, four physical models possessing the same pore and rock matrix characteristics as the natural sandstones are developed. Based on the micro-CT images, the three-dimensional finite element models of both rock matrix and pore space are established by MIMICS and ICEM software platform. Navier-Stokes equation and elastic constitutive equation are used as the mathematical model for simulation. A hydromechanical coupling analysis in pore-scale finite element model of porous media is simulated by ANSYS and CFX software. Hereby, permeability of sandstone samples under different pore pressure and confining pressure has been predicted. The simulation results agree well with the benchmark data. Through reproducing its stress state underground, the prediction accuracy of the porous rock permeability in pore-scale simulation is promoted. Consequently, the effects of pore pressure and confining pressure on permeability are revealed from the microscopic view. PMID:24955384

  4. An interrater reliability study of the assessment of pressure ulcer risk using the Braden scale and the classification of pressure ulcers in a home care setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kottner, Jan; Halfens, Ruud; Dassen, Theo

    2009-10-01

    Measurement error can seriously affect the validity of pressure ulcer risk assessment and of pressure ulcer classification. Determination of interrater reliability and agreement of pressure ulcer risk and pressure ulcers using the Braden scale and the EPUAP system. Duplicate assessments by trained nurses during two nationwide pressure ulcer prevalence surveys in the years 2007 and 2008 in The Netherlands in the home care setting. Home care clients which participated in 2007 (n=352) and 2008 (n=339) in the pressure ulcer prevalence surveys. The Braden scale was used to assess pressure ulcer risk. Skin examination was conducted to detect pressure related tissue damages and to classify them according to the EPUAP. In 2007 and 2008, Intraclass Correlation Coefficients for Braden scale sum scores were 0.90 (95% CI: 0.88-0.92) and 0.88 (95% CI: 0.85-0.91) respectively, and corresponding Standard Errors of Measurement were 1.00 and 0.98. 95% limits of agreement were -2.8 to 2.8 and -2.7 to 2.7 respectively. The items "moisture", "sensory perception" and "nutrition" contained largest amounts of measurement error. Proportions of agreement for the classification of pressure ulcers were 96% and interrater reliability was 0.81 and 0.79. Most disagreements were observed for the classification of grade 1 pressure ulcers. The standardized study procedure applied in the annual nationwide pressure ulcer prevalence surveys leads to reliable and reproducible results regarding pressure ulcer risk and pressure ulcer prevalence in the home care setting. Researchers and practitioners should be careful when drawing inferences from single pressure ulcer risk factors included in the Braden scale. Descriptions of the items "moisture", "sensory perception" and "nutrition" should be made more clearly and unambiguous.

  5. Scaling laws of impact induced shock pressure and particle velocity in planetary mantle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monteux, J.; Arkani-Hamed, J.

    2016-01-01

    While major impacting bodies during accretion of a Mars type planet have very low velocities (propagation and, hence, the derived scaling laws are poorly known for these low velocity impacts. Here, we use iSALE-2D hydrocode simulations to calculate shock pressure and particle velocity in a Mars type body for impact velocities ranging from 4 to 10 km/s. Large impactors of 100-400 km in diameter, comparable to those impacted on Mars and created giant impact basins, are examined. To better represent the power law distribution of shock pressure and particle velocity as functions of distance from the impact site at the surface, we propose three distinct regions in the mantle: a near field regime, which extends to 1-3 times the projectile radius into the target, where the peak shock pressure and particle velocity decay very slowly with increasing distance, a mid field region, which extends to ∼4.5 times the impactor radius, where the pressure and particle velocity decay exponentially but moderately, and a more distant far field region where the pressure and particle velocity decay strongly with distance. These scaling laws are useful to determine impact heating of a growing proto-planet by numerous accreting bodies.

  6. Equation of state in the generalized density scaling regime studied from ambient to ultra-high pressure conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grzybowski, A.; Koperwas, K.; Paluch, M.

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, based on the effective intermolecular potential with well separated density and configuration contributions and the definition of the isothermal bulk modulus, we derive two similar equations of state dedicated to describe volumetric data of supercooled liquids studied in the extremely wide pressure range related to the density range, which is extremely wide in comparison with the experimental range reached so far in pressure-volume-temperature measurements of glass-forming liquids. Both the equations comply with the generalized density scaling law of molecular dynamics versus h(ρ)/T at different densities ρ and temperatures T, where the scaling exponent can be in general only a density function γ(ρ) = d ln h/d ln ρ as recently argued by the theory of isomorphs. We successfully verify these equations of state by using data obtained from molecular dynamics simulations of the Kob-Andersen binary Lennard-Jones liquid. As a very important result, we find that the one-parameter density function h(ρ) analytically formulated in the case of this prototypical model of supercooled liquid, which implies the one-parameter density function γ(ρ), is able to scale the structural relaxation times with the value of this function parameter determined by fitting the volumetric simulation data to the equations of state. We also show that these equations of state properly describe the pressure dependences of the isothermal bulk modulus and the configurational isothermal bulk modulus in the extremely wide pressure range investigated by the computer simulations. Moreover, we discuss the possible forms of the density functions h(ρ) and γ(ρ) for real glass formers, which are suggested to be different from those valid for the model of supercooled liquid based on the Lennard-Jones intermolecular potential.

  7. On determining characteristic length scales in pressure-gradient turbulent boundary layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinuesa, R.; Bobke, A.; Örlü, R.; Schlatter, P.

    2016-05-01

    In the present work, we analyze three commonly used methods to determine the edge of pressure gradient turbulent boundary layers: two based on composite profiles, the one by Chauhan et al. ["Criteria for assessing experiments in zero pressure gradient boundary layers," Fluid Dyn. Res. 41, 021404 (2009)] and the one by Nickels ["Inner scaling for wall-bounded flows subject to large pressure gradients," J. Fluid Mech. 521, 217-239 (2004)], and the other one based on the condition of vanishing mean velocity gradient. Additionally, a new method is introduced based on the diagnostic plot concept by Alfredsson et al. ["A new scaling for the streamwise turbulence intensity in wall-bounded turbulent flows and what it tells us about the `outer' peak," Phys. Fluids 23, 041702 (2011)]. The boundary layers developing over the suction and pressure sides of a NACA4412 wing section, extracted from a direct numerical simulation at chord Reynolds number Rec = 400 000, are used as the test case, besides other numerical and experimental data from favorable, zero, and adverse pressure-gradient flat-plate turbulent boundary layers. We find that all the methods produce robust results with mild or moderate pressure gradients, although the composite-profile techniques require data preparation, including initial estimations of fitting parameters and data truncation. Stronger pressure gradients (with a Rotta-Clauser pressure-gradient parameter β larger than around 7) lead to inconsistent results in all the techniques except the diagnostic plot. This method also has the advantage of providing an objective way of defining the point where the mean streamwise velocity is 99% of the edge velocity and shows consistent results in a wide range of pressure gradient conditions, as well as flow histories. Collapse of intermittency factors obtained from a wide range of pressure-gradient and Re conditions on the wing further highlights the robustness of the diagnostic plot method to determine the

  8. Theory of azimuthally small-scale hydromagnetic waves in the axisymmetric magnetosphere with finite plasma pressure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Y. Klimushkin

    Full Text Available The structure of monochromatic MHD-waves with large azimuthal wave number m≫1 in a two-dimensional model of the magnetosphere has been investigated. A joint action of the field line curvature, finite plasma pressure, and transversal equilibrium current leads to the phenomenon that waves, standing along the field lines, are travelling across the magnetic shells. The wave propagation region, the transparency region, is bounded by the poloidal magnetic surface on one side and by the resonance surface on the other. In their meaning these surfaces correspond to the usual and singular turning points in the WKB-approximation, respectively. The wave is excited near the poloidal surface and propagates toward the resonance surface where it is totally absorbed due to the ionospheric dissipation. There are two transparency regions in a finite-beta magnetosphere, one of them corresponds to the Alfvén mode and the other to the slow magnetosound mode.

    Key words. Magnetosphere · Azimuthally small-scale waves · MHD waves

  9. Dual-scale multimedia dynamic synchronization model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李乃祥

    2009-01-01

    Multimedia synchronization is the key technology in application of distributed multimedia.Solution of synchronization conflicts insides and among streams as well as that of user interaction,synchronization granularity refinement and synchronization precision improvement remain great challenges although great efforts have been invested by the academic circle.The construction method of a dual-scale dynamic synchronous model of multimedia presented in this article realizes multimedia synchronization on two sca...

  10. Engineering Model of High Pressure Moist Air

    OpenAIRE

    Hyhlík Tomáš

    2017-01-01

    The article deals with the moist air equation of state. There are equations of state discussed in the article, i.e. the model of an ideal mixture of ideal gases, the model of an ideal mixture of real gases and the model based on the virial equation of state. The evaluation of sound speed based on the ideal mixture concept is mentioned. The sound speed calculated by the model of an ideal mixture of ideal gases is compared with the sound speed calculated by using the model based on the concept ...

  11. Small-Scale Testing of Laterally Loaded Non-Slender Piles in a Pressure Tank

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Søren Peder Hyldal; Ibsen, Lars Bo

    2012-01-01

    stresses in the soil. A new and innovative test setup for small-scale tests is presented. Tests were successfully carried out in a pressure tank enabling the possibility of ho¬mogeneously increasing the effective stresses. The test setup is described in detail in the paper. A total of 29 quasi-static tests...... were conducted on six piles with diameters between 40 and 100 mm and length to diameter ratios of 3-6 m. The effect of applying an overburden pressure is eval¬uated for the load-displacement relationships and the variation of pile deflection with depth....

  12. Performance of a pilot-scale, steam-blown, pressurized fluidized bed biomass gasifier

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sweeney, Daniel Joseph

    With the discovery of vast fossil resources, and the subsequent development of the fossil fuel and petrochemical industry, the role of biomass-based products has declined. However, concerns about the finite and decreasing amount of fossil and mineral resources, in addition to health and climate impacts of fossil resource use, have elevated interest in innovative methods for converting renewable biomass resources into products that fit our modern lifestyle. Thermal conversion through gasification is an appealing method for utilizing biomass due to its operability using a wide variety of feedstocks at a wide range of scales, the product has a variety of uses (e.g., transportation fuel production, electricity production, chemicals synthesis), and in many cases, results in significantly lower greenhouse gas emissions. In spite of the advantages of gasification, several technical hurdles have hindered its commercial development. A number of studies have focused on laboratory-scale and atmospheric biomass gasification. However, few studies have reported on pilot-scale, woody biomass gasification under pressurized conditions. The purpose of this research is an assessment of the performance of a pilot-scale, steam-blown, pressurized fluidized bed biomass gasifier. The 200 kWth fluidized bed gasifier is capable of operation using solid feedstocks at feedrates up to 65 lb/hr, bed temperatures up to 1600°F, and pressures up to 8 atm. Gasifier performance was assessed under various temperatures, pressure, and feedstock (untreated woody biomass, dark and medium torrefied biomass) conditions by measuring product gas yield and composition, residue (e.g., tar and char) production, and mass and energy conversion efficiencies. Elevated temperature and pressure, and feedstock pretreatment were shown to have a significant influence on gasifier operability, tar production, carbon conversion, and process efficiency. High-pressure and temperature gasification of dark torrefied biomass

  13. Multivariate Modeling of Body Mass Index, Pulse Pressure, Systolic and Diastolic Blood Pressure in Chinese Twins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wu, Yili; Zhang, Dongfeng; Pang, Zengchang;

    2015-01-01

    Systolic and diastolic blood pressure, pulse pressure (PP), and body mass index (BMI) are heritable traits in human metabolic health but their common genetic and environmental backgrounds are not well investigated. The aim of this article was to explore the phenotypic and genetic associations among...... PP, systolic blood pressure (SBP), diastolic blood pressure (DBP), and BMI. The studied sample contained 615 twin pairs (17-84 years) collected in the Qingdao municipality. Univariate and multivariate structural equation models were fitted for assessing the genetic and environmental contributions...... model estimated (1) high genetic correlations for DBP with SBP (0.87), PP with SBP (0.75); (2) low-moderate genetic correlations between PP and DBP (0.32), each BP component and BMI (0.24-0.37); (3) moderate unique environmental correlation for PP with SBP (0.68) and SBP with DBP (0.63); (4...

  14. Scale Factor Self-Dual Cosmological Models

    CERN Document Server

    dS, U Camara; Sotkov, G M

    2015-01-01

    We implement a conformal time scale factor duality for Friedmann-Robertson-Walker cosmological models, which is consistent with the weak energy condition. The requirement for self-duality determines the equations of state for a broad class of barotropic fluids. We study the example of a universe filled with two interacting fluids, presenting an accelerated and a decelerated period, with manifest UV/IR duality. The associated self-dual scalar field interaction turns out to coincide with the "radiation-like" modified Chaplygin gas models. We present an equivalent realization of them as gauged K\\"ahler sigma models (minimally coupled to gravity) with very specific and interrelated K\\"ahler- and super-potentials. Their applications in the description of hilltop inflation and also as quintessence models for the late universe are discussed.

  15. Full-Scale Tunnel (FST) model

    Science.gov (United States)

    1929-01-01

    Model of Full-Scale Tunnel (FST) under construction. On June 26, 1929, Elton W. Miller wrote to George W. Lewis proposing the construction of a model of the full-scale tunnel . 'The excellent energy ratio obtained in the new wind tunnel of the California Institute of Technology suggests that before proceeding with our full scale tunnel design, we ought to investigate the effect on energy ratio of such factors as: 1. Small included angle for the exit cone; 2. Carefully designed return passages of circular section as far as possible, without sudden changes in cross sections; 3. Tightness of walls. It is believed that much useful information can be obtained by building a model of about 1/16 scale, that is, having a closed throat of 2 ft. by 4 ft. The outside dimensions would be about 12 ft. by 25 ft. in plan and the height 4 ft. Two propellers will be required about 28 in. in diameter, each to be driven by direct current motor at a maximum speed of 4500 R.P.M. Provision can be made for altering the length of certain portions, particularly the exit cone, and possibly for the application of boundary layer control in order to effect satisfactory air flow. This model can be constructed in a comparatively short time, using 2 by 4 framing with matched sheathing inside, and where circular sections are desired they can be obtained by nailing sheet metal to wooden ribs, which can be cut on the band saw. It is estimated that three months will be required for the construction and testing of such a model and that the cost will be approximately three thousand dollars, one thousand dollars of which will be for the motors. No suitable location appears to exist in any of our present buildings, and it may be necessary to build it outside and cover it with a roof.' George Lewis responded immediately (June 27) granting the authority to proceed. He urged Langley to expedite construction and to employ extra carpenters if necessary. Funds for the model came from the FST project. In a 1979

  16. Laser therapy in pressure ulcers: evaluation by the Pressure Ulcer Scale for Healing and Nursing Outcomes Classification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sofia Palagi

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available AbstractOBJECTIVETo describe the pressure ulcer healing process in critically ill patients treated with conventional dressing therapy plus low-intensity laser therapy evaluated by the Pressure Ulcer Scale for Healing (PUSH and the result of Wound Healing: Secondary Intention, according to the Nursing Outcomes Classification (NOC.METHODCase report study according to nursing process conducted with an Intensive Care Unit patient. Data were collected with an instrument containing the PUSH and the result of the NOC. In the analysis we used descriptive statistics, considering the scores obtained on the instrument.RESULTSA reduction in the size of lesions of 7cm to 1.5cm of length and 6cm to 1.1cm width, in addition to the increase of epithelial tissue and granulation, decreased secretion and odor.CONCLUSIONThere was improvement in the healing process of the lesion treated with adjuvant therapy and the use of NOC allowed a more detailed and accurate assessment than the PUSH.

  17. Large-scale multimedia modeling applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Droppo, J.G. Jr.; Buck, J.W.; Whelan, G.; Strenge, D.L.; Castleton, K.J.; Gelston, G.M.

    1995-08-01

    Over the past decade, the US Department of Energy (DOE) and other agencies have faced increasing scrutiny for a wide range of environmental issues related to past and current practices. A number of large-scale applications have been undertaken that required analysis of large numbers of potential environmental issues over a wide range of environmental conditions and contaminants. Several of these applications, referred to here as large-scale applications, have addressed long-term public health risks using a holistic approach for assessing impacts from potential waterborne and airborne transport pathways. Multimedia models such as the Multimedia Environmental Pollutant Assessment System (MEPAS) were designed for use in such applications. MEPAS integrates radioactive and hazardous contaminants impact computations for major exposure routes via air, surface water, ground water, and overland flow transport. A number of large-scale applications of MEPAS have been conducted to assess various endpoints for environmental and human health impacts. These applications are described in terms of lessons learned in the development of an effective approach for large-scale applications.

  18. A semi-empirical airfoil stall noise model based on surface pressure measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertagnolio, Franck; Madsen, Helge Aa.; Fischer, Andreas; Bak, Christian

    2017-01-01

    This work is concerned with the experimental study of airfoil stall and the modelling of stall noise. Using pressure taps and high-frequency surface pressure microphones flush-mounted on airfoils measured in wind tunnels and on an operating wind turbine blade, the characteristics of stall are analyzed. This study shows that the main quantities of interest, namely convection velocity, spatial correlation and surface pressure spectra, can be scaled highlighting the universal nature of stall independently of airfoil shapes and flow conditions, although within a certain range of experimental conditions. Two main regimes for the scaling of the correlation lengths and the surface pressure spectra, depending on the Reynolds number of the flow, can be distinguished. These results are used to develop a model for the surface pressure spectra within the detached flow region valid for Reynolds numbers ranging from 1 ×106 to 6 ×106. Subsequently, this model is used to derive a model for stall noise. Modelled noise spectra are compared with experimental data measured in anechoic wind tunnels with reasonably satisfactory agreement.

  19. Inter- and intrarater reliability of the Waterlow pressure sore risk scale: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kottner, Jan; Dassen, Theo; Tannen, Antje

    2009-03-01

    The Waterlow scale is one of the pressure ulcer risk assessment scales which are frequently criticised for their low reliability. It is widely used in the United Kingdom, Europe and all over the world. The study objectives were to systematically review and evaluate inter- and intrarater reliability and/or agreement of the whole Waterlow scale and its single items. The overall aim was to find out if the Waterlow scale is applicable to daily clinical practice. Systematic review. MEDLINE (1985-June 2008), EMBASE (1985-June 2008), CINAHL (1985-June 2008) and World Wide Web. Selections of relevant studies, data extractions, recalculations of reliability and agreement coefficients, and study quality assessments were independently conducted by two researchers. Designs, methods and results of relevant studies were systematically described, compared and interpreted. Eight research reports were identified containing the results of nine inter- and intrarater reliability and agreement studies. Only three studies were considered as high quality studies. The Waterlow scale in clinical practice was examined in four studies. Interrater agreement for the total score varied between 0% and 57%. Taking into account any differences of up to two points the total score agreement increased to up to 86%. Median ranges of differences among raters scoring single items were high for 'poor nutrition', 'skin type', and 'mobility'. Recalculated intrarater reliability for one researcher was ICC(2,1)=0.97 (95% C.I. 0.94-0.98). Empirical evidence is rare regarding reliability and agreement among nurses when using the Waterlow scale in clinical practice. Interrater agreement for the total score is comparable to other pressure ulcer risk assessment scales. The interrater reliability has never been examined. Therefore, evaluation of reliability and agreement and evaluation of the applicability of the Waterlow scale to clinical practice are limited. It is very likely that the items 'poor nutrition

  20. Modeling the pressure inactivation dynamics of Escherichia coli

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yamamoto K.

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Escherichia coli, as a model microorganism, was treated in phosphate-buffered saline under high hydrostatic pressure between 100 and 300 MPa, and the inactivation dynamics was investigated from the viewpoint of predictive microbiology. Inactivation data were curve fitted by typical predictive models: logistic, Gompertz and Weibull functions. Weibull function described the inactivation curve the best. Two parameters of Weibull function were calculated for each holding pressure and their dependence on holding pressure was obtained by interpolation. With the interpolated parameters, inactivation curves were simulated and compared with the experimental data sets.

  1. Multi-scale and multi-fractal analysis of pressure fluctuation in slurry bubble column bed reactor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    The Daubechies second order wavelet was applied to decompose pressure fluctuation signals with the gas flux varying from 0.18 to 0.90 m3/h and the solid mass fraction from 0 to 20% and scales 1-9 detail signals and the 9th scale approximation signals. The pressure signals were studied by multi-scale and R/S analysis method. Hurst analysis method was applied to analyze multi-fractal characteristics of different scale signals. The results show that the characteristics of mono-fractal under scale 1 and scale 2, and bi-fractal under scale 3-9 are effective in deducing the hydrodynamics in slurry bubbling flow system. The measured pressure signals are decomposed to micro-scale signals, meso-scale signals and macro-scale signals. Micro-scale and macro-scale signals are of mono-fractal characteristics, and meso-scale signals are of bi-fractal characteristics. By analyzing energy distribution of different scale signals, it is shown that pressure fluctuations mainly reflects meso-scale interaction between the particles and the bubble.

  2. Nonisothermal turbulent boundary-layer adverse pressure gradient large scale thermal structure measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagheri, Nader; White, Bruce R.; Lei, Ting-Kwo

    1994-01-01

    Hot-wire anemometry measurements in an incompressible turbulent boundary-layer flow over a heated flat plate under equilibrium adverse-pressure-gradient conditions (beta = 1.8) were made for two different temperature difference cases (10 and 15 C) between the wall and the freestream. Space-time correlations of temperature fluctuations (T') were obtained with a pair of subminiature temperature fluctuation probes. The mean convection velocities, the mean inclination angles, and coherence characteristics of the T' large-scale structure were determined. The present temperature structures measurements for a nonisothermal boundary layer are compared to the zero-pressure-gradient case with identical temperature differences previously reported, in which the mean convection velocity of the T' structure was a function of position y(sup +) and independent of the limited temperature-difference cases tested. The three major findings of the present study, as compared to the zero-pressure-gradient case, are (1) the mean convection speed of the T' structure under beta = 1.8 pressure-gradient conditions was found to be substantially lower in the logarithmic core region than the zero-pressure-gradient case. Additionally, the mean convection speed is felt by the authors to be a function of pressure-gradient parameter beta; (2) the mean inclination angle of the T' structure to the wall under the adverse-pressure-gradient flow was 32 deg, which compares favorably to the 30-deg value of the zero-pressure-gradient case; and (3) the limited data suggests that the mean convection velocity of the T' structure is a function of y(sup +) and independent of the limited temperature-difference cases tested.

  3. Multi-scale atmospheric environment modelling for urban areas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. A. Baklanov

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Modern supercomputers allow realising multi-scale systems for assessment and forecasting of urban meteorology, air pollution and emergency preparedness and considering nesting with obstacle-resolved models. A multi-scale modelling system with downscaling from regional to city-scale with the Environment – HIgh Resolution Limited Area Model (Enviro-HIRLAM and to micro-scale with the obstacle-resolved Micro-scale Model for Urban Environment (M2UE is suggested and demonstrated. The M2UE validation results versus the Mock Urban Setting Trial (MUST experiment indicate satisfactory quality of the model. Necessary conditions for the choice of nested models, building descriptions, areas and resolutions of nested models are analysed. Two-way nesting (up- and down-scaling, when scale effects both directions (from the meso-scale on the micro-scale and from the micro-scale on the meso-scale, is also discussed.

  4. Mark I 1/5-scale boiling water reactor pressure suppression experiment facility report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Altes, R.G.; Pitts, J.H.; Ingraham, R.F.; Collins, E.K.; McCauley, E.W.

    1977-10-11

    An accurate Mark I /sup 1///sub 5/-scale, boiling water reactor (BWR), pressure suppression facility was designed and constructed at Lawrence Livermore Laboratory (LLL) in 11 months. Twenty-seven air tests using the facility are described. Cost was minimized by utilizing equipment borrowed from other LLL programs. The total value of borrowed equipment exceeded the program's budget of $2,020,000. Substantial flexibility in the facility was used to permit independent variation in the drywell pressure-time history, initial pressure in the drywell and toroidal wetwells, initial toroidal wetwell water level and downcomer length, vent line flow resistance, and vent line flow asymmetry. The two- and three-dimensional sectors of the toroidal wetwell provided significant data.

  5. Improved Solar-Radiation-Pressure Models for GPS Satellites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bar-Sever, Yoaz; Kuang, Da

    2006-01-01

    A report describes a series of computational models conceived as an improvement over prior models for determining effects of solar-radiation pressure on orbits of Global Positioning System (GPS) satellites. These models are based on fitting coefficients of Fourier functions of Sun-spacecraft- Earth angles to observed spacecraft orbital motions.

  6. Pressure pulsations in reciprocating pump piping systems Part 1: Modelling

    CERN Document Server

    Shu, Jian-Jun; Edge, Kevin A

    2014-01-01

    A distributed parameter model of pipeline transmission line behaviour is presented, based on a Galerkin method incorporating frequency-dependent friction. This is readily interfaced to an existing model of the pumping dynamics of a plunger pump to allow time-domain simulations of pipeline pressure pulsations in both suction and delivery lines. A new model for the pump inlet manifold is also proposed.

  7. An asperity-deformation model for effective pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gangi, Anthony F.; Carlson, Richard L.

    1996-05-01

    Variations of the mechanical and transport properties of cracked and/or porous rocks under isotropic stress depend on both the confining pressure ( Pc) and the pore-fluid pressure ( Pp). To a first approximation, these rock properties are functions of the differential pressure, Pd = Pc - Pp; at least for low differential pressures. However, at higher differential pressures, the properties depend in a more complicated way upon the two pressures. The concept of effective pressure, Pe, is used to denote this variation and it is defined as Pe( Pc, Pp) = Pc - n( Pc, Pp) Pp. If n = 1 (and therefore, is independent of Pc and Pp), the effective pressure is just the differential pressure. We have used an asperity-deformation model and a force-balance equation to derive expressions for the effective pressure. We equate the total external force (in one direction), Fc, to the total force on the asperities, Fa, and the force of the fluid, Fp, acting in that same direction. The fluid force, Fp, acts only on the parts of the crack (or pore-volume) faces which are not in contact. Then, the asperity pressure, Pa, is the average force per unit area acting on the crack (or grain) contacts P a = {F a}/{A} = {F c}/{A} - {F p}/{A} = P c - (1 - {A c}/{A})P p, where A is the total area over which Fc acts and Ac is the area of contact of the crack asperities or the grains. Thus, the asperity pressure, Pa, is greater than the differential pressure, Pd, because Pp acts on a smaller area, A- Ac, than the total area, A. For elastic asperities, the area of contact Ac and the strain (e.g., crack and pore openings) remain the same, to a high degree of approximation, at constant asperity pressure. Therefore, transport properties such as permeability, resistivity, thermal conductivity, etc. are constant, to the same degree of approximation, at constant asperity pressure. For these properties, the asperity pressure is, very accurately, the effective pressure, Pc. Using this model, we find that the

  8. Natural frequencies and buckling of pressurized nanotubes using shear deformable nonlocal shell model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Firouz-Abadi, R. D.; Fotouhi, M. M.; Permoon, M. R.; Haddadpour, H. [Sharif University of Technology, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2012-02-15

    The small-scale effect on the natural frequencies and buckling of pressurized nanotubes is investigated in this study. Based on the firstorder shear deformable shell theory, the nonlocal theory of elasticity is used to account for the small-scale effect and the governing equations of motion are obtained. Applying modal analysis technique and based on Galerkin's method a procedure is proposed to obtain natural frequencies of vibrations. For the case of nanotubes with simply supported boundary conditions, explicit expressions are obtained which establish the dependency of the natural frequencies and buckling loads of the nanotube on the small-scale parameter and natural frequencies obtained by local continuum mechanics. The obtained solutions generalize the results of nano-bar and -beam models and are verified by the literature. Based on several numerical studies some conclusions are drawn about the small-scale effect on the natural frequencies and buckling pressure of the nanotubes.

  9. Using the braden and glasgow scales to predict pressure ulcer risk in patients hospitalized at intensive care units

    OpenAIRE

    Luciana Magnani Fernandes; Maria Helena Larcher Caliri

    2008-01-01

    Pressure ulcers remain a major health issue for critical patients. The purpose of this descriptive and exploratory study was to analyze the risk factors for the development of pressure ulcers in patients hospitalized at an intensive care unit of a university hospital. Patients were assessed through the Braden scale to determine the risk for the development of pressure ulcers and to identify individual risks, and the Glasgow scale was used to assess their consciousness. It was found that the r...

  10. Pressure and velocity profiles in a static mechanical hemilarynx model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alipour, Fariborz; Scherer, Ronald C

    2002-12-01

    This study examined pressure and velocity profiles in a hemilarynx mechanical model of phonation. The glottal section had parallel walls and was fabricated from hard plastic. Twelve pressure taps were created in the vocal fold surface and connected to a differential pressure transducer through a pressure switch. The glottal gap was measured with feeler gauges and the uniform glottal duct was verified by use of a laser system. Eight pressure transducers were placed in the flat wall opposite the vocal fold. Hot-wire anemometry was used to obtain velocity profiles upstream and downstream of the glottis. The results indicate that the pressure distribution on the vocal fold surface was consistent with pressure change along a parallel duct, whereas the pressures on the opposite flat wall typically were lower (by 8%-40% of the transglottal pressure just past mid-glottis). The upstream velocity profiles were symmetric regardless of the constriction shape and size. The jet flow downstream of the glottis was turbulent even for laminar upstream conditions. The front of the jet was consistently approximately 1.5 mm from the flat wall for glottal gaps of 0.4, 0.8 and 1.2 mm. The turbulence intensity also remained approximately at the same location of about 4 mm from the flat wall for the two larger gaps.

  11. Multisite Web-based training in using the Braden Scale to predict pressure sore risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magnan, Morris A; Maklebust, JoAnn

    2008-03-01

    To evaluate the effect of a Web-based Braden Scale training module on nurses' knowledge of pressure-ulcer risk assessment and prevention. Pre-experimental, posttest-only design. Web-based learning environment. Registered nurses (N=1391) working at 3 medical centers in the Midwest. Primary outcomes of interest were reliability and competence associated with using the Braden Scale for pressure-ulcer risk assessment. Secondary outcomes of interest focused on program evaluation, specifically nurses' perceptions of program adequacy and ease of use. After training, nurses correctly rated Braden Scale level of risk 82.6% of the time. Numeric ratings for Braden subscales were generally more reliable when case-study data indicated extreme risk levels (generally not at-risk level, high-risk level, and very high level) than when data indicated midlevels of risk (mild-risk level and moderate-risk level). Nurses' knowledge of appropriate risk-based preventive interventions was high, but correlated poorly with the ability to correctly assign numeric ratings to Braden subscales. Web-based training alone may not ensure reliable, competent estimates of pressure-ulcer risk for patients at all risk levels. Other strategies, such as clinical practice with expert supervision, should be considered. Further research is needed to clarify the links between scoring Braden subscales correctly and selecting appropriate risk-based preventive interventions.

  12. Multiple-Scale Geomechanical Models for Thermal Spallation Drilling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lomov, I.; Walsh, S. D.; Roberts, J. J.

    2011-12-01

    Widespread adoption of geothermal energy will require access to deeply buried geothermal sources in granitic basement rocks at high temperatures and pressures. Exploiting these resources necessitates novel methods for drilling, stimulation, and maintenance, under operating conditions difficult or impossible to test in laboratory settings. Physically rigorous numerical modeling tools are vital to highlight potential risks, guide process optimization and reduce the uncertainties involved in these developing technologies. In this presentation, we discuss a numerical modeling effort investigating the multiscale mechanics of thermal spallation drilling (TSD) - a technique in which rock is fragmented into small flakes by a high temperature fluid jet. This process encompasses interconnected phenomena on several length and time scales: from system-scale fluid dynamics to grain-scale thermomechanics of spallation. Here we describe how these disperate scales are simulated using GEODYN, a parallel Eulerian compressible solid and fluid dynamics code with adaptive mesh refinement (AMR) capabilities. GEODYN is able to simulate materials under extremely large deformations, resolve details of wave propagation within grains, and uses a continuum damage mechanics approach to represent fracture. We will present results from both system- and grain-scale simulations describing the transfer of heat from the high temperature jet to the rock face, and the effect of grain-scale properties such as incipient flaw distribution, grain size and grain size distribution, heat flux, applied temperature and material heterogeneity on the onset of spallation. Detailed computer modeling helps to address several of the uncertainties surrounding TSD: 1) What rock compositions are drillable with TSD? 2) How do grain size and grain size distribution affect TSD and drilling rates? 3) What combination of macroscopic (Poisson ratio, heat capacity and thermal conductivity) and microscopic (flaw distribution

  13. Modelling and Analysis of High Pressure Peaking Switch

    Science.gov (United States)

    S, Bindu; Parekh, Mrunal; Mangalvedekar, H. A.; Sharma, Archana; Chakravarthy, D. P.

    2012-07-01

    This paper presents modelling and analysis of peaking switch used in Marx generator, such that the rise time of the pulse produced by the Marx generator is reduced substantially. Towards this FEMM (Finite Element Methods Magnetics) software is used for the field modelling of the switch and MATLAB for circuit modelling to observe the rise time. The switch has to produce pulse with sub-nanosecond rise time, hence the electrode distance has to be minimum. This switch can withstand high voltage only under high pressure. A mathematical model is simulated in MATLAB to see the performance under high pressure.

  14. European Continental Scale Hydrological Model, Limitations and Challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rouholahnejad, E.; Abbaspour, K.

    2014-12-01

    The pressures on water resources due to increasing levels of societal demand, increasing conflict of interest and uncertainties with regard to freshwater availability create challenges for water managers and policymakers in many parts of Europe. At the same time, climate change adds a new level of pressure and uncertainty with regard to freshwater supplies. On the other hand, the small-scale sectoral structure of water management is now reaching its limits. The integrated management of water in basins requires a new level of consideration where water bodies are to be viewed in the context of the whole river system and managed as a unit within their basins. In this research we present the limitations and challenges of modelling the hydrology of the continent Europe. The challenges include: data availability at continental scale and the use of globally available data, streamgauge data quality and their misleading impacts on model calibration, calibration of large-scale distributed model, uncertainty quantification, and computation time. We describe how to avoid over parameterization in calibration process and introduce a parallel processing scheme to overcome high computation time. We used Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT) program as an integrated hydrology and crop growth simulator to model water resources of the Europe continent. Different components of water resources are simulated and crop yield and water quality are considered at the Hydrological Response Unit (HRU) level. The water resources are quantified at subbasin level with monthly time intervals for the period of 1970-2006. The use of a large-scale, high-resolution water resources models enables consistent and comprehensive examination of integrated system behavior through physically-based, data-driven simulation and provides the overall picture of water resources temporal and spatial distribution across the continent. The calibrated model and results provide information support to the European Water

  15. Pressure transient modeling of a fractured geothermal reservior

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robinson, B.A.

    1990-01-01

    A fracture network model has been developed to simulate transient fluid flow behavior in a fractured rock mass. Included is a pressure-dependent aperture submodel to simulate behavior often seen in fractured systems. The model is used to simulate data from the Fenton Hill Hot Dry Rock (HDR) geothermal reservoir. Both low-pressure/low-flow-rate and high-pressure/high-flow-rate transient data are adequately simulated. The model parameters obtained suggest ways in which the model can be refined to achieve even more realistic fits to the data. The model is then used to demonstrate more efficient operating modes than the two-well circulating mode usually proposed for HDR reservoirs. 11 refs., 9 figs., 1 tab.

  16. Basin-scale Modeling of Geological Carbon Sequestration: Model Complexity, Injection Scenario and Sensitivity Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, X.; Bandilla, K.; Celia, M. A.; Bachu, S.

    2013-12-01

    Geological carbon sequestration can significantly contribute to climate-change mitigation only if it is deployed at a very large scale. This means that injection scenarios must occur, and be analyzed, at the basin scale. Various mathematical models of different complexity may be used to assess the fate of injected CO2 and/or resident brine. These models span the range from multi-dimensional, multi-phase numerical simulators to simple single-phase analytical solutions. In this study, we consider a range of models, all based on vertically-integrated governing equations, to predict the basin-scale pressure response to specific injection scenarios. The Canadian section of the Basal Aquifer is used as a test site to compare the different modeling approaches. The model domain covers an area of approximately 811,000 km2, and the total injection rate is 63 Mt/yr, corresponding to 9 locations where large point sources have been identified. Predicted areas of critical pressure exceedance are used as a comparison metric among the different modeling approaches. Comparison of the results shows that single-phase numerical models may be good enough to predict the pressure response over a large aquifer; however, a simple superposition of semi-analytical or analytical solutions is not sufficiently accurate because spatial variability of formation properties plays an important role in the problem, and these variations are not captured properly with simple superposition. We consider two different injection scenarios: injection at the source locations and injection at locations with more suitable aquifer properties. Results indicate that in formations with significant spatial variability of properties, strong variations in injectivity among the different source locations can be expected, leading to the need to transport the captured CO2 to suitable injection locations, thereby necessitating development of a pipeline network. We also consider the sensitivity of porosity and

  17. Model-based setting of inspiratory pressure and respiratory rate in pressure-controlled ventilation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schranz, C; Becher, T; Schädler, D; Weiler, N; Möller, K

    2014-03-01

    Mechanical ventilation carries the risk of ventilator-induced-lung-injury (VILI). To minimize the risk of VILI, ventilator settings should be adapted to the individual patient properties. Mathematical models of respiratory mechanics are able to capture the individual physiological condition and can be used to derive personalized ventilator settings. This paper presents model-based calculations of inspiration pressure (pI), inspiration and expiration time (tI, tE) in pressure-controlled ventilation (PCV) and a retrospective evaluation of its results in a group of mechanically ventilated patients. Incorporating the identified first order model of respiratory mechanics in the basic equation of alveolar ventilation yielded a nonlinear relation between ventilation parameters during PCV. Given this patient-specific relation, optimized settings in terms of minimal pI and adequate tE can be obtained. We then retrospectively analyzed data from 16 ICU patients with mixed pathologies, whose ventilation had been previously optimized by ICU physicians with the goal of minimization of inspiration pressure, and compared the algorithm's 'optimized' settings to the settings that had been chosen by the physicians. The presented algorithm visualizes the patient-specific relations between inspiration pressure and inspiration time. The algorithm's calculated results highly correlate to the physician's ventilation settings with r = 0.975 for the inspiration pressure, and r = 0.902 for the inspiration time. The nonlinear patient-specific relations of ventilation parameters become transparent and support the determination of individualized ventilator settings according to therapeutic goals. Thus, the algorithm is feasible for a variety of ventilated ICU patients and has the potential of improving lung-protective ventilation by minimizing inspiratory pressures and by helping to avoid the build-up of clinically significant intrinsic positive end-expiratory pressure.

  18. CFD Modeling of Helium Pressurant Effects on Cryogenic Tank Pressure Rise Rates in Normal Gravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grayson, Gary; Lopez, Alfredo; Chandler, Frank; Hastings, Leon; Hedayat, Ali; Brethour, James

    2007-01-01

    A recently developed computational fluid dynamics modeling capability for cryogenic tanks is used to simulate both self-pressurization from external heating and also depressurization from thermodynamic vent operation. Axisymmetric models using a modified version of the commercially available FLOW-3D software are used to simulate actual physical tests. The models assume an incompressible liquid phase with density that is a function of temperature only. A fully compressible formulation is used for the ullage gas mixture that contains both condensable vapor and a noncondensable gas component. The tests, conducted at the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center, include both liquid hydrogen and nitrogen in tanks with ullage gas mixtures of each liquid's vapor and helium. Pressure and temperature predictions from the model are compared to sensor measurements from the tests and a good agreement is achieved. This further establishes the accuracy of the developed FLOW-3D based modeling approach for cryogenic systems.

  19. A Modelling Framework to Assess the Effect of Pressures on River Abiotic Habitat Conditions and Biota.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jochem Kail

    Full Text Available River biota are affected by global reach-scale pressures, but most approaches for predicting biota of rivers focus on river reach or segment scale processes and habitats. Moreover, these approaches do not consider long-term morphological changes that affect habitat conditions. In this study, a modelling framework was further developed and tested to assess the effect of pressures at different spatial scales on reach-scale habitat conditions and biota. Ecohydrological and 1D hydrodynamic models were used to predict discharge and water quality at the catchment scale and the resulting water level at the downstream end of a study reach. Long-term reach morphology was modelled using empirical regime equations, meander migration and 2D morphodynamic models. The respective flow and substrate conditions in the study reach were predicted using a 2D hydrodynamic model, and the suitability of these habitats was assessed with novel habitat models. In addition, dispersal models for fish and macroinvertebrates were developed to assess the re-colonization potential and to finally compare habitat suitability and the availability/ability of species to colonize these habitats. Applicability was tested and model performance was assessed by comparing observed and predicted conditions in the lowland Treene River in northern Germany. Technically, it was possible to link the different models, but future applications would benefit from the development of open source software for all modelling steps to enable fully automated model runs. Future research needs concern the physical modelling of long-term morphodynamics, feedback of biota (e.g., macrophytes on abiotic habitat conditions, species interactions, and empirical data on the hydraulic habitat suitability and dispersal abilities of macroinvertebrates. The modelling framework is flexible and allows for including additional models and investigating different research and management questions, e.g., in climate impact

  20. Pressure pulsation in roller pumps: a validated lumped parameter model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moscato, Francesco; Colacino, Francesco M; Arabia, Maurizio; Danieli, Guido A

    2008-11-01

    During open-heart surgery roller pumps are often used to keep the circulation of blood through the patient body. They present numerous key features, but they suffer from several limitations: (a) they normally deliver uncontrolled pulsatile inlet and outlet pressure; (b) blood damage appears to be more than that encountered with centrifugal pumps. A lumped parameter mathematical model of a roller pump (Sarns 7000, Terumo CVS, Ann Arbor, MI, USA) was developed to dynamically simulate pressures at the pump inlet and outlet in order to clarify the uncontrolled pulsation mechanism. Inlet and outlet pressures obtained by the mathematical model have been compared with those measured in various operating conditions: different rollers' rotating speed, different tube occlusion rates, and different clamping degree at the pump inlet and outlet. Model results agree with measured pressure waveforms, whose oscillations are generated by the tube compression/release mechanism during the rollers' engaging and disengaging phases. Average Euclidean Error (AEE) was 20mmHg and 33mmHg for inlet and outlet pressure estimates, respectively. The normalized AEE never exceeded 0.16. The developed model can be exploited for designing roller pumps with improved performances aimed at reducing the undesired pressure pulsation.

  1. Personalized modeling for real-time pressure ulcer prevention in sitting posture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luboz, Vincent; Bailet, Mathieu; Boichon Grivot, Christelle; Rochette, Michel; Diot, Bruno; Bucki, Marek; Payan, Yohan

    2017-06-15

    Ischial pressure ulcer is an important risk for every paraplegic person and a major public health issue. Pressure ulcers appear following excessive compression of buttock's soft tissues by bony structures, and particularly in ischial and sacral bones. Current prevention techniques are mainly based on daily skin inspection to spot red patches or injuries. Nevertheless, most pressure ulcers occur internally and are difficult to detect early. Estimating internal strains within soft tissues could help to evaluate the risk of pressure ulcer. A subject-specific biomechanical model could be used to assess internal strains from measured skin surface pressures. However, a realistic 3D non-linear Finite Element buttock model, with different layers of tissue materials for skin, fat and muscles, requires somewhere between minutes and hours to compute, therefore forbidding its use in a real-time daily prevention context. In this article, we propose to optimize these computations by using a reduced order modeling technique (ROM) based on proper orthogonal decompositions of the pressure and strain fields coupled with a machine learning method. ROM allows strains to be evaluated inside the model interactively (i.e. in less than a second) for any pressure field measured below the buttocks. In our case, with only 19 modes of variation of pressure patterns, an error divergence of one percent is observed compared to the full scale simulation for evaluating the strain field. This reduced model could therefore be the first step towards interactive pressure ulcer prevention in a daily set-up. Copyright © 2017 Tissue Viability Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Improvements of model-test method for cavitation-induced pressure fluctuation in marine propeller

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LEE Jeung-Hoon; HAN Jae-Moon; PARK Hyung-Gil; SEO Jong-Soo

    2013-01-01

    Although the prediction of propeller cavitation-induced pressure fluctuation strongly depends on the model-scalemeasurement in a cavitation tunnel,there is still a lack of correlation with full-scale data.This paper deals with the enhancement of such a correlation deficiency by improving the conventional model-test technique,two majors of which are in the following.One is to take into account the boundary layer effect of wooden fairing plate at the ceiling of water cavitation tunnel.The other is to avoid the resonance frequency range of model-ship via adjusting the revolution speed of model propeller.Through a case study,for which both model and full-scale test data are available,the improved method in this study shows its validness,and furthermore a close correlation with full scale measurement.

  3. Dynamical process upscaling for deriving catchment scale state variables and constitutive relations for meso-scale process models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Zehe

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study we propose an uspcaling approach to derive time series of (a REW scale state variables, and (b effective REW scale soil hydraulic functions to test and parameterise models based on the REW approach. To this end we employed a physically based hydrological model, that represents the typical patterns and structures in the study catchment, and has previously been shown to reproduce observed runoff response and state dynamics well. This landscape- and process-compatible model is used to simulate numerical drainage and wetting experiments. The effective soil water retention curve and soil hydraulic conductivity curve are derived using the spatially averaged saturation and capillary pressure as well as averaged fluxes. When driven with observed boundary conditions during a one year simulation the model is used to estimate how the spatial pattern of soil moisture evolved during this period in the catchment. The time series of the volume integrated soil moisture is deemed as best estimate for the average catchment scale soil moisture. The approach is applied to the extensively monitored Weiherbach catchment in Germany. A sensitivity analysis showed that catchment scale model structures different from the landscape- and process compatible one yielded different times series of average catchment scale soil moisture and where not able to reproduce the observed rainfall runoff response. Hence, subscale typical heterogeneity leaves a clear fingerprint in the time series of average catchment scale saturation. In case of the Weiherbach catchment local scale heterogeneity of ks could be neglected and a simple representation of the typical hillslope scale patterns of soil types and macroporosity was sufficient for obtaining effective REW scale soil hydraulic functions. Both the effective soil hydraulic functions and time series of catchment scale saturation turned out to be useful to parameterise and test the CREW model, which is based on the REW

  4. Evolution of a typical ion-scale magnetic flux rope caused by thermal pressure enhancement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teh, W.-L.; Nakamura, T. K. M.; Nakamura, R.; Baumjohann, W.; Russell, C. T.; Pollock, C.; Lindqvist, P.-A.; Ergun, R. E.; Burch, J. L.; Torbert, R. B.; Giles, B. L.

    2017-02-01

    With high time-resolution field and plasma measurements by the Magnetospheric Multiscale spacecraft, interior fine structures of two ion-scale magnetic flux ropes ( 5 and 11 ion inertial length radius) separated by 14 s are resolved. These two ion-scale flux ropes (FR1 and FR2) show non-frozen-in ion behavior and consist of a strong axial magnetic field at the reversal of the negative-then-positive bipolar field component. The negative bipolar field component of the FR2 is found to be depressed, where magnetic pressure and total pressure decrease, but ion and electron thermal pressures increase, a feature akin to a crater-like flux rope. The pressure enhancement is due to the magnetosheath plasma feeding into the flux rope along the field lines. Magnetic field draping and energetic electrons are also observed in the trailing part of the FR2. The ratio of perpendicular and parallel currents indicates that the FR1 appears force-free but the FR2 seems not. Moreover, the FR2 is time-dependent as a result of a low correlation coefficient (CC = 0.75) for the derivation of the deHoffmann-Teller frame using the direct measured electric fields, while the FR1 is in quasi-steady conditions (CC = 0.94). It is concluded that the crater formation within the FR2 can be interpreted by the analytical flux rope simulation as the evolution of typical flux rope to crater-like one due to the thermal pressure enhancement, which could be induced by the depression of transverse magnetic fields of the flux rope.

  5. The scale-invariant scotogenic model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahriche, Amine [Department of Physics, University of Jijel,PB 98 Ouled Aissa, DZ-18000 Jijel (Algeria); The Abdus Salam International Centre for Theoretical Physics,Strada Costiera 11, I-34014, Trieste (Italy); McDonald, Kristian L. [ARC Centre of Excellence for Particle Physics at the Terascale,School of Physics, The University of Sydney,NSW 2006 (Australia); Nasri, Salah [Physics Department, UAE University,POB 17551, Al Ain (United Arab Emirates)

    2016-06-30

    We investigate a minimal scale-invariant implementation of the scotogenic model and show that viable electroweak symmetry breaking can occur while simultaneously generating one-loop neutrino masses and the dark matter relic abundance. The model predicts the existence of a singlet scalar (dilaton) that plays the dual roles of triggering electroweak symmetry breaking and sourcing lepton number violation. Important constraints are studied, including those from lepton flavor violating effects and dark matter direct-detection experiments. The latter turn out to be somewhat severe, already excluding large regions of parameter space. None the less, viable regions of parameter space are found, corresponding to dark matter masses below (roughly) 10 GeV and above 200 GeV.

  6. Genome scale metabolic modeling of cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nilsson, Avlant; Nielsen, Jens

    2016-01-01

    been used as scaffolds for analysis of high throughput data to allow mechanistic interpretation of changes in expression. Finally, GEMs allow quantitative flux predictions using flux balance analysis (FBA). Here we critically review the requirements for successful FBA simulations of cancer cells......Cancer cells reprogram metabolism to support rapid proliferation and survival. Energy metabolism is particularly important for growth and genes encoding enzymes involved in energy metabolism are frequently altered in cancer cells. A genome scale metabolic model (GEM) is a mathematical formalization...... of metabolism which allows simulation and hypotheses testing of metabolic strategies. It has successfully been applied to many microorganisms and is now used to study cancer metabolism. Generic models of human metabolism have been reconstructed based on the existence of metabolic genes in the human genome...

  7. Pressure Control in Distillation Columns: A Model-Based Analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mauricio Iglesias, Miguel; Bisgaard, Thomas; Kristensen, Henrik

    2014-01-01

    A comprehensive assessment of pressure control in distillation columns is presented, including the consequences for composition control and energy consumption. Two types of representative control structures are modeled, analyzed, and benchmarked. A detailed simulation test, based on a real...... industrial distillation column, is used to assess the differences between the two control structures and to demonstrate the benefits of pressure control in the operation. In the second part of the article, a thermodynamic analysis is carried out to establish the influence of pressure on relative volatility...

  8. Thermal scale modeling of radiation-conduction-convection systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shannon, R. L.

    1972-01-01

    Investigation of thermal scale modeling applied to radiation-conduction-convection systems with particular emphasis on the spacecraft cabin atmosphere/cabin wall thermal interface. The 'modified material preservation,' 'temperature preservation,' 'scaling compromises,' and 'Nusselt number preservation' scale modeling techniques and their inherent limitations and problem areas are described. The compromised scaling techniques of mass flux preservation and heat transfer coefficient preservation show promise of giving adequate thermal similitude while preserving both gas and temperature in the scale model. The use of these compromised scaling techniques was experimentally demonstrated in tests of full scale and 1/4 scale models. Correlation of test results for free and forced convection under various test conditions shows the effectiveness of these scaling techniques. It is concluded that either mass flux or heat transfer coefficient preservation may result in adequate thermal similitude depending on the system to be modeled. Heat transfer coefficient preservation should give good thermal similitude for manned spacecraft scale modeling applications.

  9. Predicting pressure ulcer risk with the modified Braden, Braden, and Norton scales in acute care hospitals in Mainland China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwong, Enid; Pang, Samantha; Wong, Thomas; Ho, Jacqueline; Shao-ling, Xue; Li-jun, Tao

    2005-05-01

    The aim of this study was to develop a modified Braden scale, to evaluate its predictive validity, and to identify a more valid pressure ulcer risk calculator for application in acute care hospitals in Mainland China among the modified Braden, Braden, and Norton scales. The initial modified Braden scale, with the addition of skin type and body build for height, was proposed in this study. Four hundred twenty-nine subjects who were admitted to two acute care hospitals in Mainland China within 24 hr and free of pressure ulcers upon admission were assessed with the initial modified Braden, Braden, and Norton scales by three nurse assessors. This was followed by a daily skin assessment to note any pressure ulcer by a nurse assessor. Nine subjects had pressure ulcers detected at Stages I (89%) and II (11%) after an average stay of 11 days. The descriptive analysis of each subscale scoring item in the initial modified Braden scale indicated that skin type and body build for height were the most distinct predictive factors whereas nutrition was the least distinct factor for predicting pressure ulcer development. Based on these findings, the modified Braden scale was further developed with the addition of skin type and body build for height and by exclusion of nutrition. The predictive validity test reported that the modified Braden scale demonstrated a better balance of sensitivity (89%) and specificity (75%) at a cutoff score of 16, with a higher positive predictive value (7%), than the Braden and Norton scales. This finding revealed that for this sample, the modified Braden scale is more effective in pressure ulcer risk prediction than the other two scales. Because the modified Braden scale is not 100% sensitive and specific, to increase clinical efficacy in the prevention of pressure ulcer, it is recommended that it be adopted combined with nursing judgment to predict pressure ulcer development in acute care settings in Mainland China.

  10. Scale-Bridging Model Development for Coal Particle Devolatilization

    CERN Document Server

    Schroeder, Benjamin B; Smith, Philip J; Fletcher, Thomas H; Packard, Andrew; Frenklach, Michael; Hegde, Arun; Li, Wenyu; Oreluk, James

    2016-01-01

    When performing large-scale, high-performance computations of multi-physics applications, it is common to limit the complexity of physics sub-models comprising the simulation. For a hierarchical system of coal boiler simulations a scale-bridging model is constructed to capture characteristics appropriate for the application-scale from a detailed coal devolatilization model. Such scale-bridging allows full descriptions of scale-applicable physics, while functioning at reasonable computational costs. This study presents a variation on multi-fidelity modeling with a detailed physics model, the chemical percolation devolatilization model, being used to calibrate a scale-briding model for the application of interest. The application space provides essential context for designing the scale-bridging model by defining scales, determining requirements and weighting desired characteristics. A single kinetic reaction equation with functional yield model and distributed activation energy is implemented to act as the scal...

  11. Modeling of interaction of multiple vent pipes in a pressure suppression pool

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Timperi, A.; Chauhan, M.; Paettikangas, T.; Niemi, J. (VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland (Finland))

    2012-04-15

    Calculations of direct-contact condensation in the pressure suppression pool have been performed. Partial pressure model for the condensation of pure vapor is used for the condensation, which makes possible modeling of the condensation of pure vapor. The heat and mass transfer during condensation is studied in detail for experiment PAR-10 in the PPOOLEX facility. The rapid collapse of a steam bubble in PPOOLEX experiment COL-01 has been analyzed with the new Eulerian model of Abaqus. By observing the collapse behavior, the pressure variation inside the bubble was fitted with the experiment. The effect of system size on the pressure peak was also examined; these results can be used for studying more thoroughly the scaling of the experimental results to full-scale in future. The desynchronization of chugging events in the two vent experiment PAR-10 was studied. The statistical distribution of desynchronization was determined from the measured pressure data and compared to results obtained in a seven vent pipe experiment found from literature. The response of BWR containment during desynchronized chugging events and with varying speeds of sound was numerically computed using direct time integration and modal dynamics procedure available in Abaqus. (Author)

  12. Comparison Between Overtopping Discharge in Small and Large Scale Models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Helgason, Einar; Burcharth, Hans F.

    2006-01-01

    small and large scale model tests show no clear evidence of scale effects for overtopping above a threshold value. In the large scale model no overtopping was measured for waveheights below Hs = 0.5m as the water sunk into the voids between the stones on the crest. For low overtopping scale effects...... are presented as the small-scale model underpredicts the overtopping discharge....

  13. Dynamic Modeling and Validation of a Biomass Hydrothermal Pretreatment Process - A Demonstration Scale Study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Prunescu, Remus Mihail; Blanke, Mogens; Jakobsen, Jon Geest

    2015-01-01

    Hydrothermal pretreatment of lignocellulosic biomass is a cost effective technology for second generation biorefineries. The process occurs in large horizontal and pressurized thermal reactors where the biomatrix is opened under the action of steam pressure and temperature to expose cellulose...... for the enzymatic hydrolysis process. Several by-products are also formed, which disturb and act as inhibitors downstream. The objective of this study is to formulate and validate a large scale hydrothermal pretreatment dynamic model based on mass and energy balances, together with a complex conversion mechanism...... of the process, outlining the value of the model for simulation, control design, and optimization for full-scale applications....

  14. Methodological developments in the field of structural integrity analyses of large scale reactor pressure vessels in Hungary

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tamás Fekete

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Buildings, structures and systems of large scale and high value (e.g. conventional and nuclear power plants, etc. are designed for a certain, limited service lifetime. If the standards and guidelines of the time are taken into account during the design process, the resulting structures will operate safely in most cases. However, in the course of technical history there were examples of unusual, catastrophic failures of structures, even resulting in human casualties. Although the concept of Structural Integrity first appeared in industrial applications only two-three decades ago, its pertinence has been growing higher ever since. Four nuclear power generation units have been constructed in Hungary, more than 30 years ago. In every unit, VVER-440 V213 type light-water cooled, light-water moderated, pressurized water reactors are in operation. Since the mid-1980s, Pressurized Thermal Shock (PTS analyses of Reactor Pressure Vessels (RPV have been conducted in Hungary, where the concept of structural integrity was the basis of research and development. In the first part of the paper, a short historic overview is given, where the origins of the Structural Integrity concept are presented, and the beginnings of Structural Integrity in Hungary are summarized. In the second part, a new conceptual model of Structural Integrity is introduced. In the third part, a brief description of the VVER-440 V213 type RPV and its surrounding primary system is presented. In the fourth part, a conceptual model developed for PTS Structural Integrity Analyses is explained.

  15. Weight scaling model for high-power DPAL system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mani, Siva; Rigdon, Douglas; Hewett, Kevin B.; Hostutler, David

    2010-04-01

    Since Krupke et.al. proposed and demonstrated pumping alkali atoms using diode lasers in 2003, there has been lot of interest in the diode pumped alkali laser (DPAL) systems. Several researchers have been able to scale the DPAL system to powers in the tens of watts. We have conducted a systems-level, weight-scaling study of a notional medium power, CW DPAL system. Three different modes of operation are considered: (i) very high pressure operation (over 25 atmospheres of He) in which the absorption and emission lines of the alkali atoms are broadened sufficiently to allow for efficient pumping with off-the-shelf diodes that have line width of 2 to 3 nm, (ii) intermediate pressure regime (~ 5 atmospheres) that requires diodes that are line narrowed to ~0.4 nm, and (iii) low pressure operation (~ 1 atmosphere) that requires diodes that are line narrowed to < 0.1 nm for efficient pumping of pump radiation into the alkali vapor. In the latter two cases some amount of methane, ethane, or some other gas would be needed to mix the two upper states rapidly; while in the first case, helium is used to broaden the transition and to mix the upper states. We have considered closed-cycle transverse flowing systems with the transverse length limited by medium inhomogeneity caused by heat deposition into the gas. Weight models have been developed for each of the following sub-systems: Pump Diodes, Fluid Flow System, Thermal Management System, Optics and Diagnostics System, Instrumentation & Control System, and Electrical Power system. The results of our weight estimates for a notional 100 kW DPAL system are presented.

  16. Low-pressure hydrogen plasmas explored using a global model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samuell, Cameron M.; Corr, Cormac S.

    2016-02-01

    Low-pressure hydrogen plasmas have found applications in a variety of technology areas including fusion, neutral beam injection and material processing applications. To better understand these discharges, a global model is developed to predict the behaviour of electrons, ground-state atomic and molecular hydrogen, three positive ion species (H+, \\text{H}2+ , and \\text{H}3+ ), a single negative ion species (H-), and fourteen vibrationally excited states of molecular hydrogen ({{\\text{H}}2}≤ft(\\upsilon =1\\right. -14)). The model is validated by comparison with experimental results from a planar inductively coupled GEC reference cell and subsequently applied to the MAGPIE linear helicon reactor. The MAGPIE reactor is investigated for a range of pressures from 1 to 100 mTorr and powers up to 5 kW. With increasing power between 50 W and 5 kW at 10 mTorr the density of all charged species increases as well as the dissociative fraction while the electron temperature remains almost constant at around 3 eV. For gas pressures from 1-100 mTorr at an input power of 1 kW, the electron density remains almost constant, the electron temperature and dissociative fraction decreases, while \\text{H}3+ density increases in density and also dominates amongst ion species. Across these power and pressure scans, electronegativity remains approximately constant at around 2.5%. The power and pressure determines the dominant ion species in the plasma with \\text{H}3+ observed to dominate at high pressures and low powers whereas H+ tends to be dominant at low pressures and high powers. A sensitivity analysis is used to demonstrate how experimental parameters (power, pressure, reactor wall material, geometry etc) influence individual species’ density as well as the electron temperature. Physical reactor changes including the length, radius and wall recombination coefficient are found to have the largest influence on outputs obtained from the model.

  17. Modeling conductive heat transfer during high-pressure thawing processes: determination of latent heat as a function of pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denys, S; Van Loey, A M; Hendrickx, M E

    2000-01-01

    A numerical heat transfer model for predicting product temperature profiles during high-pressure thawing processes was recently proposed by the authors. In the present work, the predictive capacity of the model was considerably improved by taking into account the pressure dependence of the latent heat of the product that was used (Tylose). The effect of pressure on the latent heat of Tylose was experimentally determined by a series of freezing experiments conducted at different pressure levels. By combining a numerical heat transfer model for freezing processes with a least sum of squares optimization procedure, the corresponding latent heat at each pressure level was estimated, and the obtained pressure relation was incorporated in the original high-pressure thawing model. Excellent agreement with the experimental temperature profiles for both high-pressure freezing and thawing was observed.

  18. Multi-Scale Modeling of Plasma Thrusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batishchev, Oleg

    2004-11-01

    Plasma thrusters are characterized with multiple spatial and temporal scales, which are due to the intrinsic physical processes such as gas ionization, wall effects and plasma acceleration. Characteristic times for hot plasma and cold gas are differing by 6-7 orders of magnitude. The typical collisional mean-free-paths vary by 3-5 orders along the devices. These make questionable a true self-consistent modeling of the thrusters. The latter is vital to the understanding of complex physics, non-linear dynamics and optimization of the performance. To overcome this problem we propose the following approach. All processes are divided into two groups: fast and slow. The slow ones include gas evolution with known sources and ionization sink. The ionization rate, transport coefficients, energy sources are defined during "fast step". Both processes are linked through external iterations. Multiple spatial scales are handled using moving adaptive mesh. Development and application of this method to the VASIMR helicon plasma source and other thrusters will be discussed. Supported by NASA.

  19. Tyre pressure monitoring using a dynamical model-based estimator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reina, Giulio; Gentile, Angelo; Messina, Arcangelo

    2015-04-01

    In the last few years, various control systems have been investigated in the automotive field with the aim of increasing the level of safety and stability, avoid roll-over, and customise handling characteristics. One critical issue connected with their integration is the lack of state and parameter information. As an example, vehicle handling depends to a large extent on tyre inflation pressure. When inflation pressure drops, handling and comfort performance generally deteriorate. In addition, it results in an increase in fuel consumption and in a decrease in lifetime. Therefore, it is important to keep tyres within the normal inflation pressure range. This paper introduces a model-based approach to estimate online tyre inflation pressure. First, basic vertical dynamic modelling of the vehicle is discussed. Then, a parameter estimation framework for dynamic analysis is presented. Several important vehicle parameters including tyre inflation pressure can be estimated using the estimated states. This method aims to work during normal driving using information from standard sensors only. On the one hand, the driver is informed about the inflation pressure and he is warned for sudden changes. On the other hand, accurate estimation of the vehicle states is available as possible input to onboard control systems.

  20. Multi-scale Modelling of Segmentation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hartmann, Martin; Lartillot, Olivier; Toiviainen, Petri

    2016-01-01

    While listening to music, people often unwittingly break down musical pieces into constituent chunks such as verses and choruses. Music segmentation studies have suggested that some consensus regarding boundary perception exists, despite individual differences. However, neither the effects...... of experimental task (i.e., real-time vs. annotated segmentation), nor of musicianship on boundary perception are clear. Our study assesses musicianship effects and differences between segmentation tasks. We conducted a real-time experiment to collect segmentations by musicians and nonmusicians from nine musical...... pieces. In a second experiment on non-real-time segmentation, musicians indicated boundaries and their strength for six examples. Kernel density estimation was used to develop multi-scale segmentation models. Contrary to previous research, no relationship was found between boundary strength and boundary...

  1. A model for pressurized hydrogen induced thin film blisters

    OpenAIRE

    Bos, R. A. J. M. van den; Reshetniak, V.; Lee, C. J.; Benschop1, J; Bijkerk, F

    2016-01-01

    We introduce a model for hydrogen induced blister formation in nanometer thick thin films. The model assumes that molecular hydrogen gets trapped under a circular blister cap causing it to deflect elastically outward until a stable blister is formed. In the first part, the energy balance required for a stable blister is calculated. From this model, the adhesion energy of the blister cap, the internal pressure and the critical H-dose for blister formation can be calculated. In the second part,...

  2. Nonlinear model predictive control of managed pressure drilling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nandan, Anirudh; Imtiaz, Syed

    2017-07-01

    A new design of nonlinear model predictive controller (NMPC) is proposed for managed pressure drilling (MPD) system. The NMPC is based on output feedback control architecture and employs offset-free formulation proposed in [1]. NMPC uses active set method for computing control inputs. The controller implements an automatic switching from constant bottom hole pressure (CBHP) regulation to flow control mode in the event of a reservoir kick. In the flow control mode the controller automatically raises the bottom hole pressure setpoint, and thereby keeps the reservoir fluid flow to the surface within a tunable threshold. This is achieved by exploiting constraint handling capability of NMPC. In addition to kick mitigation the controller demonstrated good performance in containing the bottom hole pressure (BHP) during the pipe connection sequence. The controller also delivered satisfactory performance in the presence of measurement noise and uncertainty in the system. Copyright © 2017 ISA. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Dynamic Modeling and Validation of a Biomass Hydrothermal Pretreatment Process - A Demonstration Scale Study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Prunescu, Remus Mihail; Blanke, Mogens; Jakobsen, Jon Geest;

    2015-01-01

    Hydrothermal pretreatment of lignocellulosic biomass is a cost effective technology for second generation biorefineries. The process occurs in large horizontal and pressurized thermal reactors where the biomatrix is opened under the action of steam pressure and temperature to expose cellulose for...... of the process, outlining the value of the model for simulation, control design, and optimization for full-scale applications. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved....

  4. Violent wave impacts on vertical and inclined walls: Large scale model tests

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Obhrai, C.; Bullock, G.; Wolters, G.

    2005-01-01

    New data is presented from large scale model tests where combined measurements of wave pressure and aeration have been made on the front of a vertical and an inclined wall. The shape of the breaking wave was found to have a significant effect on the distribution of the wave impact pressures...... on the wall. The characteristics of violent wave impacts are discussed and related to the impulse on the structure....

  5. Density and solidiifcation feeding model of vacuum counter-pressure cast aluminum alloy under grade-pressuring conditions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qing-song Yan; Huan Yu; Gang Lu; Bo-wen Xiong; Suai Xu

    2016-01-01

    The density of vacuum counter-pressure cast aluminum alloy samples under grade-pressuring condition was studied. The effect of grade pressure difference and time on the density of aluminum aloys was discussed, and the solidiifcation feeding model under grade-pressuring condition was established. The results indicate the grade-pressured solidiifcation feeding ability of vacuum counter-pressure casting mainly depends on grade pressure difference and time. With the increase of grade pressure difference, the density of al the aluminum aloy samples increases, and the trend of change in density from the pouring gate to the top location is first decreasing gradually and then increasing. In addition, in obtaining the maximum density, the optimal grade-pressuring time is different for samples with different wal thicknesses, and the solidiifcation time when the solid volume fraction of aluminum aloy reaches about 0.65 appears to be the optimal beginning time for grade-pressuring.

  6. Simultaneous nested modeling from the synoptic scale to the LES scale for wind energy applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Yubao; Warner, Tom; Liu, Yuewei

    2011-01-01

    This paper describes an advanced multi-scale weather modeling system, WRF–RTFDDA–LES, designed to simulate synoptic scale (~2000 km) to small- and micro-scale (~100 m) circulations of real weather in wind farms on simultaneous nested grids. This modeling system is built upon the National Center f...

  7. Nonlinear Pressure Wave Analysis by Concentrated Mass Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishikawa, Satoshi; Kondou, Takahiro; Matsuzaki, Kenichiro

    A pressure wave propagating in a tube often changes to a shock wave because of the nonlinear effect of fluid. Analyzing this phenomenon by the finite difference method requires high computational cost. To lessen the computational cost, a concentrated mass model is proposed. This model consists of masses, connecting nonlinear springs, connecting dampers, and base support dampers. The characteristic of a connecting nonlinear spring is derived from the adiabatic change of fluid, and the equivalent mass and equivalent damping coefficient of the base support damper are derived from the equation of motion of fluid in a cylindrical tube. Pressure waves generated in a hydraulic oil tube, a sound tube and a plane-wave tube are analyzed numerically by the proposed model to confirm the validity of the model. All numerical computational results agree very well with the experimental results carried out by Okamura, Saenger and Kamakura. Especially, the numerical analysis reproduces the phenomena that a pressure wave with large amplitude propagating in a sound tube or in a plane tube changes to a shock wave. Therefore, it is concluded that the proposed model is valid for the numerical analysis of nonlinear pressure wave problem.

  8. Scaling of viscosity with rate, pressure, and temperature: Linking simulations to experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jadhao, Vikram; Robbins, Mark

    Elastohydrodynamic lubrication (EHL) is important in many practical devices and produces extreme pressures (> 1 GPa) and shear rates (105 -107 s-1). This makes EHL fluids ideal candidates for bridging the gap between experimental and simulation studies of viscosity. There is an ongoing debate about whether the high-rate response of simple molecules like squalane follows a power-law Carreau model or a thermal activation based Eyring model. We use molecular dynamics simulations to investigate the rheological response of squalane for a wide range of rates (105 -1010 s-1), pressures (0.1 MPa to 3 GPa), and temperatures (100 - 313 K). We find that experimental and theoretical results can be collapsed onto a master curve consistent with Eyring theory over more than 20 orders of magnitude in rate. Extrapolating Eyring fits to simulations at 107 s-1 and above yields Newtonian viscosities η0 that are consistent with available low-rate experiments, and allows predictions to much higher pressures and lower temperatures. There is no indication of a diverging viscosity at finite stress, since log η0 rises sublinearly with pressure up to 6 GPa and η0 >1012 Pa-s. Correlations between chain conformations and Eyring parameters are also presented. This research was performed within the Center for Materials in Extreme Dynamic Environments (CMEDE) under the Hopkins Extreme Materials Institute at Johns Hopkins University. Financial support was provided by Grant W911NF-12-2-0022.

  9. Multi-scale modelling of infection pressure from Phytophthora infestans

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Skelsey, P.; Werf, van der W.; Kessel, G.J.T.; Rossing, W.A.H.; Holtslag, A.A.M.

    2007-01-01

    Management of potato late blight could benefit from prediction of the risk posed to potato fields from external inoculum sources of Phytophthora infestans. Influx of inoculum depends on a complex interplay of population biological, atmospheric and spore survival processes, and is difficult to predic

  10. Pressure wave model for action potential propagation in excitable cells

    CERN Document Server

    Rvachev, M M

    2003-01-01

    Speed of propagation of small-amplitude pressure waves through the cytoplasmic interior of myelinated and unmyelinated axons of different diameters is theoretically estimated and is found to generally agree with the action potential (AP) conduction velocities. This remarkable coincidence allows to surmise a model in which AP spread along axon is propelled not by straggling ionic currents as in the widely accepted local circuit theory, but by mechanoactivation of the membrane ion channels by a traveling pressure pulse. Hydraulic pulses propagating in the viscous axoplasm are calculated to decay over ~1 mm distances, and it is further hypothesized that it is the role of influxing during the AP calcium ions to activate membrane skeletal protein network attached to the membrane cytoplasmic side for a brief radial contraction amplifying the pressure pulse and preventing its decay. The model correctly predicts that the AP conduction velocity should vary as the one-half power of axon diameter for large unmyelinated ...

  11. Axion Models with High Scale Inflation

    CERN Document Server

    Moroi, Takeo; Nakayama, Kazunori; Takimoto, Masahiro

    2014-01-01

    We revisit the cosmological aspects of axion models. In the high-scale inflation scenario, the Peccei-Quinn (PQ) symmetry is likely to be restored during/after inflation. If the curvature of the PQ scalar potential at the origin is smaller than its vacuum expectation value; for instance in a class of SUSY axion models, thermal inflation happens before the radial component of the PQ scalar (saxion) relaxes into the global minimum of the potential and the decay of saxion coherent oscillation would produce too much axion dark radiation. In this paper, we study how to avoid the overproduction of axion dark radiation with some concrete examples. We show that, by taking account of the finite-temperature dissipation effect appropriately, the overproduction constraint can be relaxed since the PQ scalar can take part in the thermal plasma again even after the PQ phase transition. We also show that it can be further relaxed owing to the late time decay of another heavy CP-odd scalar, if it is present.

  12. Scaling properties of the mean wall-normal velocity in zero-pressure-gradient boundary layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Tie; Klewicki, Joseph

    2016-12-01

    The scaling properties of the mean wall-normal velocity V (x ,y ) in zero-pressure-gradient laminar and turbulent boundary-layer flows are investigated using numerical simulation data, physical experiment data, and integral analyses of the governing equations. The maximum mean wall-normal velocity V∞ and the boundary-layer thickness δ are evidenced to be the proper scaling for V over most if not all of the boundary layer. This is different from the behavior of the mean streamwise velocity U or the turbulent shear stress T =-ρ , which depend on different characteristic length scales in the regions near and away from the surface, respectively. The reason for this apparent difference in scaling behaviors is described physically relative to the downstream development of the U velocity profile and the mechanisms of boundary-layer growth. Insights pertaining to this are further surmised from an analytical relationship for the ratio of the displacement to momentum thickness, i.e., shape factor H . Integral analyses using the continuity and mean momentum equation show that U∞V∞/uτ2=H , where uτ is the friction velocity. Both the laminar similarity solution and direct numerical simulation data in post-transitional flows convincingly support this relation. Over the transitional regime, data of sufficiently high quality are lacking to check if this relation remains valid.

  13. Islands Climatology at Local Scale. Downscaling with CIELO model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azevedo, Eduardo; Reis, Francisco; Tomé, Ricardo; Rodrigues, Conceição

    2016-04-01

    Islands with horizontal scales of the order of tens of km, as is the case of the Atlantic Islands of Macaronesia, are subscale orographic features for Global Climate Models (GCMs) since the horizontal scales of these models are too coarse to give a detailed representation of the islands' topography. Even the Regional Climate Models (RCMs) reveals limitations when they are forced to reproduce the climate of small islands mainly by the way they flat and lowers the elevation of the islands, reducing the capacity of the model to reproduce important local mechanisms that lead to a very deep local climate differentiation. Important local thermodynamics mechanisms like Foehn effect, or the influence of topography on radiation balance, have a prominent role in the climatic spatial differentiation. Advective transport of air - and the consequent induced adiabatic cooling due to orography - lead to transformations of the state parameters of the air that leads to the spatial configuration of the fields of pressure, temperature and humidity. The same mechanism is in the origin of the orographic clouds cover that, besides the direct role as water source by the reinforcement of precipitation, act like a filter to direct solar radiation and as a source of long-wave radiation that affect the local balance of energy. Also, the saturation (or near saturation) conditions that they provide constitute a barrier to water vapour diffusion in the mechanisms of evapotranspiration. Topographic factors like slope, aspect and orographic mask have also significant importance in the local energy balance. Therefore, the simulation of the local scale climate (past, present and future) in these archipelagos requires the use of downscaling techniques to adjust locally outputs obtained at upper scales. This presentation will discuss and analyse the evolution of the CIELO model (acronym for Clima Insular à Escala LOcal) a statistical/dynamical technique developed at the University of the Azores

  14. A novel model of human skin pressure ulcers in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrés A Maldonado

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Pressure ulcers are a prevalent health problem in today's society. The shortage of suitable animal models limits our understanding and our ability to develop new therapies. This study aims to report on the development of a novel and reproducible human skin pressure ulcer model in mice. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Male non-obese, diabetic, severe combined immunodeficiency mice (n = 22 were engrafted with human skin. A full-thickness skin graft was placed onto 4×3 cm wounds created on the dorsal skin of the mice. Two groups with permanent grafts were studied after 60 days. The control group (n = 6 was focused on the process of engraftment. Evaluations were conducted with photographic assessment, histological analysis and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH techniques. The pressure ulcer group (n = 12 was created using a compression device. A pressure of 150 mmHg for 8 h, with a total of three cycles of compression-release was exerted. Evaluations were conducted with photographic assessment and histological analysis. RESULTS: Skin grafts in the control group took successfully, as shown by visual assessment, FISH techniques and histological analysis. Pressure ulcers in the second group showed full-thickness skin loss with damage and necrosis of all the epidermal and dermal layers (ulcer stage III in all cases. Complete repair occurred after 40 days. CONCLUSIONS: An inexpensive, reproducible human skin pressure ulcer model has been developed. This novel model will facilitate the development of new clinically relevant therapeutic strategies that can be tested directly on human skin.

  15. Global-scale modeling of groundwater recharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Döll, P.; Fiedler, K.

    2008-05-01

    Long-term average groundwater recharge, which is equivalent to renewable groundwater resources, is the major limiting factor for the sustainable use of groundwater. Compared to surface water resources, groundwater resources are more protected from pollution, and their use is less restricted by seasonal and inter-annual flow variations. To support water management in a globalized world, it is necessary to estimate groundwater recharge at the global scale. Here, we present a best estimate of global-scale long-term average diffuse groundwater recharge (i.e. renewable groundwater resources) that has been calculated by the most recent version of the WaterGAP Global Hydrology Model WGHM (spatial resolution of 0.5° by 0.5°, daily time steps). The estimate was obtained using two state-of-the-art global data sets of gridded observed precipitation that we corrected for measurement errors, which also allowed to quantify the uncertainty due to these equally uncertain data sets. The standard WGHM groundwater recharge algorithm was modified for semi-arid and arid regions, based on independent estimates of diffuse groundwater recharge, which lead to an unbiased estimation of groundwater recharge in these regions. WGHM was tuned against observed long-term average river discharge at 1235 gauging stations by adjusting, individually for each basin, the partitioning of precipitation into evapotranspiration and total runoff. We estimate that global groundwater recharge was 12 666 km3/yr for the climate normal 1961-1990, i.e. 32% of total renewable water resources. In semi-arid and arid regions, mountainous regions, permafrost regions and in the Asian Monsoon region, groundwater recharge accounts for a lower fraction of total runoff, which makes these regions particularly vulnerable to seasonal and inter-annual precipitation variability and water pollution. Average per-capita renewable groundwater resources of countries vary between 8 m3/(capita yr) for Egypt to more than 1 million m3

  16. Braden Scale risk assessments and pressure ulcer prevention planning: what's the connection?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magnan, Morris A; Maklebust, Joann

    2009-01-01

    To investigate the relationship between risk assessment scores on Braden subscales and nurses' selection of 10 commonly used best-practice pressure ulcer (PU) preventive interventions. Exploratory secondary data analysis, using a descriptive correlational design. A total of 377 Braden Scale PU risk assessments were made on 102 patients at different levels of risk. Assessments were made by RNs working at 3 different acute care hospitals. RNs making risk assessments also used an intervention checklist to select from 10 commonly used preventive interventions that should be implemented based on patient level of risk on each Braden subscale. The Braden Scale for Predicting Pressure Sore Risk was used to guide risk assessments. The Registered Nurses Intervention Checklist was used to identify PU preventive interventions that should be implemented. Braden subscale ratings influenced nurses' endorsement of preventive interventions in 2 distinct ways. First, endorsement of most (9 out of 10) preventive interventions was influenced by risk information embedded in unique combinations of Braden subscale assessments. Second, there appears to be a predictable pattern of increase in the likelihood of endorsing an intervention as Braden subscale scores decreased and the level of risk increased. Variability in Braden subscale ratings differentially predicts nurses' endorsements of selected PU-prevention interventions. Also, there is a predictable pattern of increase in the likelihood of endorsing a preventive intervention as PU risk levels increase, a pattern that may be related to the timing of risk assessment and PU-prevention planning activities.

  17. Computational modeling of high pressure combustion mechanism in scram accelerator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, J.Y. [Pusan Nat. Univ. (Korea); Lee, B.J. [Pusan Nat. Univ. (Korea); Agency for Defense Development, Taejon (Korea); Jeung, I.S. [Pusan Nat. Univ. (Korea); Seoul National Univ. (Korea). Dept. of Aerospace Engineering

    2000-11-01

    A computational study was carried out to analyze a high-pressure combustion in scram accelerator. Fluid dynamic modeling was based on RANS equations for reactive flows, which were solved in a fully coupled manner using a fully implicit-upwind TVD scheme. For the accurate simulation of high-pressure combustion in ram accelerator, 9-species, 25-step fully detailed reaction mechanism was incorporated with the existing CFD code previously used for the ram accelerator studies. The mechanism is based on GRI-Mech. 2.11 that includes pressure-dependent reaction rate formulations indispensable for the correct prediction of induction time in high-pressure environment. A real gas equation of state was also included to account for molecular interactions and real gas effects of high-pressure gases. The present combustion modeling is compared with previous 8-step and 19-step mechanisms with ideal gas assumption. The result shows that mixture ignition characteristics are very sensitive to the combustion mechanisms, and different mechanism results in different reactive flow-field characteristics that have a significant relevance to the operation mode and the performance of scram accelerator. (orig.)

  18. CODE's new solar radiation pressure model for GNSS orbit determination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnold, D.; Meindl, M.; Beutler, G.; Dach, R.; Schaer, S.; Lutz, S.; Prange, L.; Sośnica, K.; Mervart, L.; Jäggi, A.

    2015-08-01

    The Empirical CODE Orbit Model (ECOM) of the Center for Orbit Determination in Europe (CODE), which was developed in the early 1990s, is widely used in the International GNSS Service (IGS) community. For a rather long time, spurious spectral lines are known to exist in geophysical parameters, in particular in the Earth Rotation Parameters (ERPs) and in the estimated geocenter coordinates, which could recently be attributed to the ECOM. These effects grew creepingly with the increasing influence of the GLONASS system in recent years in the CODE analysis, which is based on a rigorous combination of GPS and GLONASS since May 2003. In a first step we show that the problems associated with the ECOM are to the largest extent caused by the GLONASS, which was reaching full deployment by the end of 2011. GPS-only, GLONASS-only, and combined GPS/GLONASS solutions using the observations in the years 2009-2011 of a global network of 92 combined GPS/GLONASS receivers were analyzed for this purpose. In a second step we review direct solar radiation pressure (SRP) models for GNSS satellites. We demonstrate that only even-order short-period harmonic perturbations acting along the direction Sun-satellite occur for GPS and GLONASS satellites, and only odd-order perturbations acting along the direction perpendicular to both, the vector Sun-satellite and the spacecraft's solar panel axis. Based on this insight we assess in the third step the performance of four candidate orbit models for the future ECOM. The geocenter coordinates, the ERP differences w. r. t. the IERS 08 C04 series of ERPs, the misclosures for the midnight epochs of the daily orbital arcs, and scale parameters of Helmert transformations for station coordinates serve as quality criteria. The old and updated ECOM are validated in addition with satellite laser ranging (SLR) observations and by comparing the orbits to those of the IGS and other analysis centers. Based on all tests, we present a new extended ECOM which

  19. Scale effects and scaling-up by geometric-optical model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李小文; 王锦地; A.H.Strahler

    2000-01-01

    This is a follow-up paper to our "Scale effect of Planck’s law over nonisothermal blackbody surface". More examples are used to describe the scale effect in detail, and the scaling-up of Planck law over blackbody surface is further extended to three-dimension nonisothermal surface. This scaling-up results in a conceptual model for the directionality and spectral signature of thermal radiation at the scale of remote sensing pixels. This new model is also an improvement of Li-Strahler-Friedl conceptual model in a sense that the new model needs only statistic parameters at the pixel scale, without request of sub-pixel scale parameters as the LSF model does.

  20. Scale effects and scaling-up by geometric-optical model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    This is a follow-up paper to our "Scale effect of Planck's law over nonisothermal blackbody surface".More examples are used to describe the scale effect in detail,and the scaling-up of Planck law over blackbody surface is further extended to three-dimension nonisothermal surface.This scaling-up results in a conceptual model for the directionality and spectral signature of thermal radiation at the scale of remote sensing pixels.This new model is also an improvement of Li-Strahler-Friedl conceptual model in a sense that the new model needs only statistic parameters at the pixel scale,without request of sub-pixel scale parameters as the LSF model does.

  1. Application of Scaling-Law and CFD Modeling to Hydrodynamics of Circulating Biomass Fluidized Bed Gasifier

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mazda Biglari

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Two modeling approaches, the scaling-law and CFD (Computational Fluid Dynamics approaches, are presented in this paper. To save on experimental cost of the pilot plant, the scaling-law approach as a low-computational-cost method was adopted and a small scale column operating under ambient temperature and pressure was built. A series of laboratory tests and computer simulations were carried out to evaluate the hydrodynamic characteristics of a pilot fluidized-bed biomass gasifier. In the small scale column solids were fluidized. The pressure and other hydrodynamic properties were monitored for the validation of the scaling-law application. In addition to the scaling-law modeling method, the CFD approach was presented to simulate the gas-particle system in the small column. 2D CFD models were developed to simulate the hydrodynamic regime. The simulation results were validated with the experimental data from the small column. It was proved that the CFD model was able to accurately predict the hydrodynamics of the small column. The outcomes of this research present both the scaling law with the lower computational cost and the CFD modeling as a more robust method to suit various needs for the design of fluidized-bed gasifiers.

  2. A new pressure-parametrization unified dark fluid model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Deng [Nankai University, Theoretical Physics Division, Chern Institute of Mathematics, Tianjin (China); Yan, Yang-Jie; Meng, Xin-He [Nankai University, Department of Physics, Tianjin (China)

    2017-04-15

    We propose a new pressure-parametrization model to explain the accelerated expansion of the late-time Universe by considering the baryon matter and dark contents (dark matter and dark energy) as a unified dark fluid. To realize this model more physically, we reconstruct it with the quintessence and phantom scalar fields, respectively. We use the recent cosmological data to constrain this model, distinguish it from the standard cosmological model and find that the value of the Hubble constant H{sub 0} = 68.34{sup +0.53}{sub -0.92} supports the global measurement by the Planck satellite at the 1σ confidence level. (orig.)

  3. Explicit Pore Pressure Material Model in Carbon-Cloth Phenolic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutierrez-Lemini, Danton; Ehle, Curt

    2003-01-01

    An explicit material model that uses predicted pressure in the pores of a carbon-cloth phenolic (CCP) composite has been developed. This model is intended to be used within a finite-element model to predict phenomena specific to CCP components of solid-fuel-rocket nozzles subjected to high operating temperatures and to mechanical stresses that can be great enough to cause structural failures. Phenomena that can be predicted with the help of this model include failures of specimens in restrained-thermal-growth (RTG) tests, pocketing erosion, and ply lifting

  4. Interpolating a consumption variable for scaling and generalizing potential population pressure on urbanizing natural areas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varanka, Dalia; Jiang, Bin; Yao, Xiaobai

    2010-01-01

    Measures of population pressure, referring in general to the stress upon the environment by human consumption of resources, are imperative for environmental sustainability studies and management. Development based on resource consumption is the predominant factor of population pressure. This paper presents a spatial model of population pressure by linking consumption associated with regional urbanism and ecosystem services. Maps representing relative geographic degree and extent of natural resource consumption and degree and extent of impacts on surrounding areas are new, and this research represents the theoretical research toward this goal. With development, such maps offer a visualization tool for planners of various services, amenities for people, and conservation planning for ecologist. Urbanization is commonly generalized by census numbers or impervious surface area. The potential geographical extent of urbanism encompasses the environmental resources of the surrounding region that sustain cities. This extent is interpolated using kriging of a variable based on population wealth data from the U.S. Census Bureau. When overlayed with land-use/land-cover data, the results indicate that the greatest estimates of population pressure fall within mixed forest areas. Mixed forest areas result from the spread of cedar woods in previously disturbed areas where further disturbance is then suppressed. Low density areas, such as suburbanization and abandoned farmland are characteristic of mixed forest areas.

  5. Scale-4 Analysis of Pressurized Water Reactor Critical Configurations: Volume 3-Surry Unit 1 Cycle 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bowman, S.M.

    1995-01-01

    The requirements of ANSI/ANS 8.1 specify that calculational methods for away-from-reactor criticality safety analyses be validated against experimental measurements. If credit for the negative reactivity of the depleted (or spent) fuel isotopics is desired, it is necessary to benchmark computational methods against spent fuel critical configurations. This report summarizes a portion of the ongoing effort to benchmark away-from-reactor criticality analysis methods using selected critical configurations from commercial pressurized-water reactors. The analysis methodology selected for all the calculations in this report is based on the codes and data provided in the SCALE-4 code system. The isotopic densities for the spent fuel assemblies in the critical configurations were calculated using the SAS2H analytical sequence of the SCALE-4 system. The sources of data and the procedures for deriving SAS2H input parameters are described in detail. The SNIKR code module was used to extract the necessary isotopic densities from the SAS2H results and to provide the data in the format required by the SCALE criticality analysis modules. The CSASN analytical sequence in SCALE-4 was used to perform resonance processing of the cross sections. The KENO V.a module of SCALE-4 was used to calculate the effective multiplication factor (k{sub eff}) of each case. The SCALE-4 27-group burnup library containing ENDF/B-IV (actinides) and ENDF/B-V (fission products) data was used for all the calculations. This volume of the report documents the SCALE system analysis of two reactor critical configurations for Surry Unit 1 Cycle 2. This unit and cycle were chosen for a previous analysis using a different methodology because detailed isotopics from multidimensional reactor calculations were available from the Virginia Power Company. These data permitted a direct comparison of criticality calculations using the utility-calculated isotopics with those using the isotopics generated by the SCALE-4

  6. SDG and qualitative trend based model multiple scale validation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Dong; Xu, Xin; Yin, Jianjin; Zhang, Hongyu; Zhang, Beike

    2017-09-01

    Verification, Validation and Accreditation (VV&A) is key technology of simulation and modelling. For the traditional model validation methods, the completeness is weak; it is carried out in one scale; it depends on human experience. The SDG (Signed Directed Graph) and qualitative trend based multiple scale validation is proposed. First the SDG model is built and qualitative trends are added to the model. And then complete testing scenarios are produced by positive inference. The multiple scale validation is carried out by comparing the testing scenarios with outputs of simulation model in different scales. Finally, the effectiveness is proved by carrying out validation for a reactor model.

  7. Model Robust Calibration: Method and Application to Electronically-Scanned Pressure Transducers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Eric L.; Starnes, B. Alden; Birch, Jeffery B.; Mays, James E.

    2010-01-01

    This article presents the application of a recently developed statistical regression method to the controlled instrument calibration problem. The statistical method of Model Robust Regression (MRR), developed by Mays, Birch, and Starnes, is shown to improve instrument calibration by reducing the reliance of the calibration on a predetermined parametric (e.g. polynomial, exponential, logarithmic) model. This is accomplished by allowing fits from the predetermined parametric model to be augmented by a certain portion of a fit to the residuals from the initial regression using a nonparametric (locally parametric) regression technique. The method is demonstrated for the absolute scale calibration of silicon-based pressure transducers.

  8. Warm-Intermediate Inflationary Universe Model with Viscous Pressure in High Dissipative Regime

    CERN Document Server

    Setare, M R

    2014-01-01

    Warm inflation model with bulk viscous pressure in the context of "intermediate inflation" where the cosmological scale factor expands as $a(t)=a_0\\exp(At^f)$, is studied. The characteristics of this model in slow-roll approximation and in high dissipative regime are presented in two cases: 1- Dissipative parameter $\\Gamma$ as a function of scalar field $\\phi$ and bulk viscous coefficient $\\zeta$ as a function of energy density $\\rho$. 2- $\\Gamma$ and $\\zeta$ are constant parameters. Scalar, tensor perturbations and spectral indices for this scenario are obtained. The cosmological parameters appearing in the present model are constrained by recent observational data (WMAP7).

  9. Modeling of micro-scale thermoacoustics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Offner, Avshalom; Ramon, Guy Z.

    2016-05-01

    Thermoacoustic phenomena, that is, onset of self-sustained oscillations or time-averaged fluxes in a sound wave, may be harnessed as efficient and robust heat transfer devices. Specifically, miniaturization of such devices holds great promise for cooling of electronics. At the required small dimensions, it is expected that non-negligible slip effects exist at the solid surface of the "stack"-a porous matrix, which is used for maintaining the correct temporal phasing of the heat transfer between the solid and oscillating gas. Here, we develop theoretical models for thermoacoustic engines and heat pumps that account for slip, within the standing-wave approximation. Stability curves for engines with both no-slip and slip boundary conditions were calculated; the slip boundary condition curve exhibits a lower temperature difference compared with the no slip curve for resonance frequencies that characterize micro-scale devices. Maximum achievable temperature differences across the stack of a heat pump were also calculated. For this case, slip conditions are detrimental and such a heat pump would maintain a lower temperature difference compared to larger devices, where slip effects are negligible.

  10. Modeling of micro-scale thermoacoustics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Offner, Avshalom [The Nancy and Stephen Grand Technion Energy Program, Technion-Israel Institute of Technology, Haifa 32000 (Israel); Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Technion-Israel Institute of Technology, Haifa 32000 (Israel); Ramon, Guy Z., E-mail: ramong@technion.ac.il [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Technion-Israel Institute of Technology, Haifa 32000 (Israel)

    2016-05-02

    Thermoacoustic phenomena, that is, onset of self-sustained oscillations or time-averaged fluxes in a sound wave, may be harnessed as efficient and robust heat transfer devices. Specifically, miniaturization of such devices holds great promise for cooling of electronics. At the required small dimensions, it is expected that non-negligible slip effects exist at the solid surface of the “stack”-a porous matrix, which is used for maintaining the correct temporal phasing of the heat transfer between the solid and oscillating gas. Here, we develop theoretical models for thermoacoustic engines and heat pumps that account for slip, within the standing-wave approximation. Stability curves for engines with both no-slip and slip boundary conditions were calculated; the slip boundary condition curve exhibits a lower temperature difference compared with the no slip curve for resonance frequencies that characterize micro-scale devices. Maximum achievable temperature differences across the stack of a heat pump were also calculated. For this case, slip conditions are detrimental and such a heat pump would maintain a lower temperature difference compared to larger devices, where slip effects are negligible.

  11. Modeling cancer metabolism on a genome scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yizhak, Keren; Chaneton, Barbara; Gottlieb, Eyal; Ruppin, Eytan

    2015-01-01

    Cancer cells have fundamentally altered cellular metabolism that is associated with their tumorigenicity and malignancy. In addition to the widely studied Warburg effect, several new key metabolic alterations in cancer have been established over the last decade, leading to the recognition that altered tumor metabolism is one of the hallmarks of cancer. Deciphering the full scope and functional implications of the dysregulated metabolism in cancer requires both the advancement of a variety of omics measurements and the advancement of computational approaches for the analysis and contextualization of the accumulated data. Encouragingly, while the metabolic network is highly interconnected and complex, it is at the same time probably the best characterized cellular network. Following, this review discusses the challenges that genome-scale modeling of cancer metabolism has been facing. We survey several recent studies demonstrating the first strides that have been done, testifying to the value of this approach in portraying a network-level view of the cancer metabolism and in identifying novel drug targets and biomarkers. Finally, we outline a few new steps that may further advance this field. PMID:26130389

  12. Lower Length Scale Model Development for Embrittlement of Reactor Presure Vessel Steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Yongfeng [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Schwen, Daniel [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Chakraborty, Pritam [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Bai, Xianming [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2016-09-01

    This report summarizes the lower-length-scale effort during FY 2016 in developing mesoscale capabilities for microstructure evolution, plasticity and fracture in reactor pressure vessel steels. During operation, reactor pressure vessels are subject to hardening and embrittlement caused by irradiation induced defect accumulation and irradiation enhanced solute precipitation. Both defect production and solute precipitation start from the atomic scale, and manifest their eventual effects as degradation in engineering scale properties. To predict the property degradation, multiscale modeling and simulation are needed to deal with the microstructure evolution, and to link the microstructure feature to material properties. In this report, the development of mesoscale capabilities for defect accumulation and solute precipitation are summarized. A crystal plasticity model to capture defect-dislocation interaction and a damage model for cleavage micro-crack propagation is also provided.

  13. Statistical parametric mapping of the regional distribution and ontogenetic scaling of foot pressures during walking in Asian elephants (Elephas maximus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panagiotopoulou, Olga; Pataky, Todd C; Hill, Zoe; Hutchinson, John R

    2012-05-01

    Foot pressure distributions during locomotion have causal links with the anatomical and structural configurations of the foot tissues and the mechanics of locomotion. Elephant feet have five toes bound in a flexible pad of fibrous tissue (digital cushion). Does this specialized foot design control peak foot pressures in such giant animals? And how does body size, such as during ontogenetic growth, influence foot pressures? We addressed these questions by studying foot pressure distributions in elephant feet and their correlation with body mass and centre of pressure trajectories, using statistical parametric mapping (SPM), a neuro-imaging technology. Our results show a positive correlation between body mass and peak pressures, with the highest pressures dominated by the distal ends of the lateral toes (digits 3, 4 and 5). We also demonstrate that pressure reduction in the elephant digital cushion is a complex interaction of its viscoelastic tissue structure and its centre of pressure trajectories, because there is a tendency to avoid rear 'heel' contact as an elephant grows. Using SPM, we present a complete map of pressure distributions in elephant feet during ontogeny by performing statistical analysis at the pixel level across the entire plantar/palmar surface. We hope that our study will build confidence in the potential clinical and scaling applications of mammalian foot pressures, given our findings in support of a link between regional peak pressures and pathogenesis in elephant feet.

  14. Validation of a Finite Element Humeroradial Joint Model of Contact Pressure Using Fuji Pressure Sensitive Film.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sunghwan; Carl Miller, Mark

    2016-01-01

    A finite element (FE) elbow model was developed to predict the contact stress and contact area of the native humeroradial joint. The model was validated using Fuji pressure sensitive film with cadaveric elbows for which axial loads of 50, 100, and 200 N were applied through the radial head. Maximum contact stresses ranged from 1.7 to 4.32 MPa by FE predictions and from 1.34 to 3.84 MPa by pressure sensitive film measurement while contact areas extended from 39.33 to 77.86 mm2 and 29.73 to 83.34 mm2 by FE prediction and experimental measurement, respectively. Measurements from cadaveric testing and FE predictions showed the same patterns in both the maximum contact stress and contact area, as another demonstration of agreement. While measured contact pressures and contact areas validated the FE predictions, computed maximum stresses and contact area tended to overestimate the maximum contact stress and contact area.

  15. OXYGEN PRESSURE REGULATOR DESIGN AND ANALYSIS THROUGH FINITE ELEMENT MODELING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asterios KOSMARAS

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Oxygen production centers produce oxygen in high pressure that needs to be defused. A regulator is designed and analyzed in the current paper for medical use in oxygen production centers. This study aims to design a new oxygen pressure regulator and perform an analysis using Finite Element Modeling in order to evaluate its working principle. In the design procedure,the main elements and the operating principles of a pressure regulator are taking into account. The regulator is designed and simulations take place in order to assessthe proposed design. Stress analysis results are presented for the main body of the regulator, as well as, flow analysis to determine some important flow characteristics in the inlet and outlet of the regulator.

  16. Simple mixing model for pressurized thermal shock applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chexal, B.; Chao, J.; Nickell, R.; Griesbach, T. (Electric Power Research Inst., Palo Alto, CA (USA))

    1983-02-01

    The phenomenon of fluid/thermal mixing in the cold leg and downcomer of a Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) has been a critical issue related to the concern of pressurized thermal shock. The question of imperfect mixing arises when the possibility of cold emergency core cooling water contacting the vessel wall during an overcooling transient could produce thermal stresses large enough to initiate a flaw in a radiation embrittled vessel wall. The temperature of the fluid in contact with the vessel wall is crucial to a determination of vessel integrity since temperature affects both the stresses and the material toughness of the vessel material. A simple mixing model is described which was developed as part of the EPRI pressurized thermal shock program for evaluation of reactor vessel integrity.

  17. Numerical Modeling of Pressurization of a Propellant Tank

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majumdar, Alok; Steadman, Todd

    1999-01-01

    An unsteady finite volume procedure has been developed to predict the history o pressure, temperature and mass flow rate of the pressurant and propellant during the expulsion of the propellant from a tan. The time dependent mass, momentum and energy conservation equations are solved at the ullage space. The model accounts for the change in the ullage volume due to expulsion of the propellant. It also accounts for the heat transfer from the tank wall and propellant to the ullage gas. The procedure was incorporated in the Generalized Fluid System Simulation Program (GFSSP). The results of several test cases were then compared with a published correlation of pressurant requirements for a given displacement of propellant. The agreement between the predictions and the correlation was found to be satisfactory.

  18. Jet fire consequence modeling for high-pressure gas pipelines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coccorullo, Ivano; Russo, Paola

    2016-12-01

    A simple and reliable approach for sizing the hazard area potentially affected by a jet fire as consequence of the failure of high-pressure pipeline is proposed. A release rate model, taking pipeline operation properties and source release properties into account, is coupled with SLAB dispersion model and point source radiation model to calculate the hazard distance. The hazard distance is set beyond the distance at which a low chance of fatality can occur to people exposed and a wooden structure is not expected to burn due to radiation heat of jet fire. The comparison between three gases with different physico-chemical properties (i.e. natural gas, hydrogen, ethylene) is shown. The influence of pipeline operating parameters, such as: pressure, pipeline diameter and length, hole size, on the hazard area for the three gases is evaluated. Finally, a simple correlation is proposed for calculating the hazard distance as function of these parameters.

  19. A Simplified Model for Detonation Based Pressure-Gain Combustors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paxson, Daniel E.

    2010-01-01

    A time-dependent model is presented which simulates the essential physics of a detonative or otherwise constant volume, pressure-gain combustor for gas turbine applications. The model utilizes simple, global thermodynamic relations to determine an assumed instantaneous and uniform post-combustion state in one of many envisioned tubes comprising the device. A simple, second order, non-upwinding computational fluid dynamic algorithm is then used to compute the (continuous) flowfield properties during the blowdown and refill stages of the periodic cycle which each tube undergoes. The exhausted flow is averaged to provide mixed total pressure and enthalpy which may be used as a cycle performance metric for benefits analysis. The simplicity of the model allows for nearly instantaneous results when implemented on a personal computer. The results compare favorably with higher resolution numerical codes which are more difficult to configure, and more time consuming to operate.

  20. Scale-Scale Correlation as Discriminant Among the Biased Galaxy Formation Models

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FENG Long-Long; XIANG Shou-Ping

    2001-01-01

    Using the mock galaxy catalogues created from the N-body simulations, various biasing prescriptions for modelling the relative distribution between the galaxies and the underlying dark matter are statistically tested by using scale-scale correlation. We found that the scale-scale correlation is capable of breaking the model degeneracy indicated by the low-order clustering statistics, and could be taken as an effective discriminant among a variety of biasing models. Particularly, comparing with the APM bright galaxy catalogue, we infer that the two parameter Lagrangian biasing model gives the best fit to the observed clustering features.

  1. The Harris-Todaro model and economies of scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panagariya, A; Succar, P

    1986-04-01

    The authors attempt to reanalyze the Harris-Todaro migration model in the presence of economies of scale in the manufacturing sector, focusing on economies of scale that are external to a given firm but internal to the industry.

  2. Scale-4 Analysis of Pressurized Water Reactor Critical Configurations: Volume 2-Sequoyah Unit 2 Cycle 3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bowman, S.M.

    1995-01-01

    The requirements of ANSI/ANS 8.1 specify that calculational methods for away-from-reactor criticality safety analyses be validated against experimental measurements. If credit for the negative reactivity of the depleted (or spent) fuel isotopics is desired, it is necessary to benchmark computational methods against spent fuel critical configurations. This report summarizes a portion of the ongoing effort to benchmark away-from-reactor criticality analysis methods using critical configurations from commercial pressurized-water reactors. The analysis methodology selected for all the calculations reported herein is based on the codes and data provided in the SCALE-4 code system. The isotopic densities for the spent fuel assemblies in the critical configurations were calculated using the SAS2H analytical sequence of the SCALE-4 system. The sources of data and the procedures for deriving SAS2H input parameters are described in detail. The SNIKR code module was used to extract the necessary isotopic densities from the SAS2H results and provide the data in the format required by the SCALE criticality analysis modules. The CSASN analytical sequence in SCALE-4 was used to perform resonance processing of the cross sections. The KENO V.a module of SCALE-4 was used to calculate the effective multiplication factor (k{sub eff}) of each case. The SCALE-4 27-group burnup library containing ENDF/B-IV (actinides) and ENDF/B-V (fission products) data was used for all the calculations. This volume of the report documents the SCALE system analysis of three reactor critical configurations for the Sequoyah Unit 2 Cycle 3. This unit and cycle were chosen because of the relevance in spent fuel benchmark applications: (1) the unit had a significantly long downtime of 2.7 years during the middle of cycle (MOC) 3, and (2) the core consisted entirely of burned fuel at the MOC restart. The first benchmark critical calculation was the MOC restart at hot, full-power (HFP) critical conditions. The

  3. Multi-scale modeling of softening materials

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lloberas Valls, O.; Simone, A.; Sluys, L.J.

    2008-01-01

    This paper presents an assessment of a two-scale framework for the study of softening materials. The procedure is based on a hierarchical Finite Element (FE) scheme in which computations are performed both at macro and mesoscopic scale levels. The methodology is chosen specifically to remain valid

  4. Upscaling a catchment-scale ecohydrology model for regional-scale earth system modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adam, J. C.; Tague, C.; Liu, M.; Garcia, E.; Choate, J.; Mullis, T.; Hull, R.; Vaughan, J. K.; Kalyanaraman, A.; Nguyen, T.

    2014-12-01

    With a focus on the U.S. Pacific Northwest (PNW), BioEarth is an Earth System Model (EaSM) currently in development that explores the interactions between coupled C:N:H2O dynamics and resource management actions at the regional scale. Capturing coupled biogeochemical processes within EaSMs like BioEarth is important for exploring the response of the land surface to changes in climate and resource management actions; information that is important for shaping decisions that promote sustainable use of our natural resources. However, many EaSM frameworks do not adequately represent landscape-scale ( 10 km) are necessitated by computational limitations. Spatial heterogeneity in a landscape arises due to spatial differences in underlying soil and vegetation properties that control moisture, energy and nutrient fluxes; as well as differences that arise due to spatially-organized connections that may drive an ecohydrologic response by the land surface. While many land surface models used in EaSM frameworks capture the first type of heterogeneity, few account for the influence of lateral connectivity on land surface processes. This type of connectivity can be important when considering soil moisture and nutrient redistribution. The RHESSys model is utilized by BioEarth to enable a "bottom-up" approach that preserves fine spatial-scale sensitivities and lateral connectivity that may be important for coupled C:N:H2O dynamics over larger scales. RHESSys is a distributed eco-hydrologic model that was originally developed to run at relatively fine but computationally intensive spatial resolutions over small catchments. The objective of this presentation is to describe two developments to enable implementation of RHESSys over the PNW. 1) RHESSys is being adapted for BioEarth to allow for moderately coarser resolutions and the flexibility to capture both types of heterogeneity at biome-specific spatial scales. 2) A Kepler workflow is utilized to enable RHESSys implementation over

  5. Operational, regional-scale, chemical weather forecasting models in Europe

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kukkonen, J.; Balk, T.; Schultz, D.M.; Baklanov, A.; Klein, T.; Miranda, A.I.; Monteiro, A.; Hirtl, M.; Tarvainen, V.; Boy, M.; Peuch, V.H.; Poupkou, A.; Kioutsioukis, I.; Finardi, S.; Sofiev, M.; Sokhi, R.; Lehtinen, K.; Karatzas, K.; San José, R.; Astitha, M.; Kallos, G.; Schaap, M.; Reimer, E.; Jakobs, H.; Eben, K.

    2011-01-01

    Numerical models that combine weather forecasting and atmospheric chemistry are here referred to as chemical weather forecasting models. Eighteen operational chemical weather forecasting models on regional and continental scales in Europe are described and compared in this article. Topics discussed

  6. On anisotropy and internal pressure errors in numerical ocean models and processes near the shelf edge

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thiem, Oeyvind A.

    2004-12-01

    stratification. The barotropic simulation is compared with corresponding linear stability analysis and the results agree well. This study can be followed up by changing the topography, stratification, and the form and location of the inflow. These are all factors that can and will effect the generation of eddies in and along shelf flow. That deep water corals live and thrive in Norwegian waters is known. The corals in these waters are usually found along the continental shelf break, along ridges on the continental shelf, and on fjord sills. In this paper the focus was on why the Lophelia Pertusa was often found along the continental shelf break. The numerical results showed that close to the shelf break the particles had a tendency to penetrate the near sea bed bottom layer when the model was forced either by a long shelf jet or low pressures. To investigate why corals also live along ridges on the continental shelf, a model has to be set up on a smaller scale and this could be an interesting follow up work for this paper. Numerical models are often very sensitive to how they are forced and to the boundary conditions. Errors in the numerical result can therefore be due to artifacts inherited from the boundary conditions. In the third paper the along slope jet is forced trough a FRS zone while in the forth paper the forcing is performed with a body force. The magnitude and location of the jet are the same in both experiments, and the bathymetry is also identical. This means that the jet is instable in both experiments and eddies should evolve. The numerical results on the other hand show no instability when the model is forced with a body force even if the time scale parameter of the body force was adjusted so that the instabilities should be able to grow. This observation also deserves some attention and could probably result in a very interesting work. It is important to remember that numerical models have limitations. This can for instance be the resolution. Choices have to be

  7. Mathematical model for the gasification of coal under pressure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Biba, V.; Macak, J.; Kloss, E.; Malecha, J.

    1978-01-01

    A mathematical model for the the high-pressure gasification of solid fuels in the charged layer is presented which permits the quantitative description of the the static behavior of the generator. Deals with the parameters of reaction kinetics and of the transfer of matter and energy which are necessary for developing the model of a fixed-bed reactor. To obtain a practical model, simplifications are needed which concern the gasification, degasification, and drying processes. They are dealt with individually. For calculating the concentration and temperature profiles for the solid and gas phases along the gasification bed height, a system of differential equations was obtained which was supplemented by some algebraic equations.

  8. Testing of Full Scale Flight Qualified Kevlar Composite Overwrapped Pressure Vessels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greene, Nathanael; Saulsberry, Regor; Yoder, Tommy; Forsyth, Brad; Thesken, John; Phoenix, Leigh

    2007-01-01

    Many decades ago NASA identified a need for low-mass pressure vessels for carrying various fluids aboard rockets, spacecraft, and satellites. A pressure vessel design known as the composite overwrapped pressure vessel (COPV) was identified to provide a weight savings over traditional single-material pressure vessels typically made of metal and this technology has been in use for space flight applications since the 1970's. A typical vessel design consisted of a thin liner material, typically a metal, overwrapped with a continuous fiber yarn impregnated with epoxy. Most designs were such that the overwrapped fiber would carry a majority of load at normal operating pressures. The weight advantage for a COPV versus a traditional singlematerial pressure vessel contributed to widespread use of COPVs by NASA, the military, and industry. This technology is currently used for personal breathing supply storage, fuel storage for auto and mass transport vehicles and for various space flight and aircraft applications. The NASA Engineering and Safety Center (NESC) was recently asked to review the operation of Kevlar 2 and carbon COPVs to ensure they are safely operated on NASA space flight vehicles. A request was made to evaluate the life remaining on the Kevlar COPVs used on the Space Shuttle for helium and nitrogen storage. This paper provides a review of Kevlar COPV testing relevant to the NESC assessment. Also discussed are some key findings, observations, and recommendations that may be applicable to the COPV user community. Questions raised during the investigations have revealed the need for testing to better understand the stress rupture life and age life of COPVs. The focus of this paper is to describe burst testing of Kevlar COPVs that has been completed as a part of an the effort to evaluate the effects of ageing and shelf life on full scale COPVs. The test articles evaluated in this discussion had a diameter of 22 inches for S/N 014 and 40 inches for S/N 011. The

  9. Modeling thermophysical properties of food under high pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otero, L; Guignon, B; Aparicio, C; Sanz, P D

    2010-04-01

    A set of well-known generic models to predict the thermophysical properties of food from its composition at atmospheric conditions was adapted to work at any pressure. The suitability of the models was assessed using data from the literature for four different food products, namely tomato paste, potato, pork, and cod. When the composition of the product considered was not known, an alternative was proposed if some thermal data at atmospheric conditions were available. Since knowledge on the initial freezing point and ice content of food are essential for the correct prediction of its thermal properties, models for obtaining these properties under pressure were also included. Our results showed that good predictions under pressure, accurate enough for most engineering calculations can be made, either from composition data or using known thermal data of the food considered at atmospheric conditions. All the equations and coefficients needed to construct the models are given throughout the text, thus readers can compose their own routines. However, these routines can also be downloaded free at http://www.if.csic.es/programas/ifiform.htm as executable programs running in Windows.

  10. Mathematical Modeling of Fuel Pressure inside High Pressure Fuel Pipeline of Combination Electronic Unit Pump Fuel Injection System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qaisar Hayat

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available In order to completely understand the trend of pressure variations inside High Pressure (HP fuel pipeline of Combination Electronic Unit Pump (CEUP fuel injection system and study the impact of two major physical properties of fuel i.e., density and dynamic viscosity on pressure a 1D nonlinear dynamic mathematical model of fuel pressure inside pipeline using Wave Equation (WE has been developed in MATLAB using finite difference method. The developed model is based on the structural parameters of CEUP fuel injection system. The impact of two major physical properties of the fuel has been studied as a function of pressure at various operating conditions of diesel engine. Nearly 13.13 bars of increase in pressure is observed by increasing the density from 700 kg/m3 to 1000 kg/m3. Whereas an increase of viscosity from 2 kg/m.s to 6 kg/m.s results in decrease of pressures up to 44.16 bars. Pressure corrections in the mathematical model have been incorporated based on variations of these two fuel properties with the pressure. The resultant pressure profiles obtained from mathematical model at various distances along the pipeline are verified by correlating them with the profiles obtained from simulated AMESim numerical model of CEUP. The results show that MATLAB mathematical results are quite coherent with the AMESim simulated results and validate that the model is an effective tool for predicting pressure inside HP pipelines. The application of the this mathematical model with minute changes can therefore be extended to pressure modeling inside HP rail of Common Rail (CR fuel injection system.

  11. Integral bubble and jet models with pressure forces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vulfson, A. N.; Nikolaev, P. V.

    2017-07-01

    Modifications of integral bubble and jet models including the pressure force are proposed. Exact solutions are found for the modified model of a stationary convective jet from a point source of buoyancy and momentum. The exact solutions are compared against analytical solutions of the integral models for a stationary jet that are based on the approximation of the vertical boundary layer. It is found that the modified integral models of convective jets retain the power-law dependences on the altitude for the vertical velocity and buoyancy obtained in classical models. For a buoyant jet in a neutrally stratified atmosphere, the inclusion of the pressure force increases the amplitude of buoyancy and decreases the amplitude of vertical velocity. The total amplitude change is about 10%. It is shown that in this model there is a dynamic invariant expressing the law of a uniform distribution of the potential and kinetic energy along the jet axis. For a spontaneous jet rising in an unstably stratified atmosphere, the inclusion of the pressure force retains the amplitude of buoyancy and increases the amplitude of vertical velocity by about 15%. It is shown that in the model of a spontaneous jet there is a dynamic invariant expressing the law of a uniform distribution of the available potential and kinetic energy along the jet axis. The results are of interest for the problems of anthropogenic pollution diffusion in the air and water environments and the formulation of models for statistical and stochastic ensembles of thermals in a mass-flux parameterization of turbulent moments.

  12. Experimental investigation of a small-scale thermally driven pressurized adsorption chiller

    KAUST Repository

    Loh, Waisoong

    2015-01-01

    This paper describes the successful operation of an adsorption cycle in a miniaturized adsorption chiller (AD). The experiments show that the bench-scale pressurized adsorption chiller (PAC) has been successfully designed, commissioned, and tested. Experimental results at various heat fl uxes, half-cycle operation time intervals, and a cooling load of up to 24 W are also presented. A COP ranging from 0.05 to 0.15 is achieved depending on the parameters of the experimental conditions. Most importantly, the cooling performance of the PAC is achieved at a low encasement temperature that is below ambient. Besides having a high cooling density, the PAC has almost no major moving parts except for the fan of the condenser and it permits quiet operation as compared to other active coolers.

  13. Scaling up effects of Mg hydride in a temperature and pressure-controlled hydrogen storage device

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Verga, M.; Armanasco, F.; Guardamagna, C.; Valli, C. [CESI RICERCA S.p.A., Via Rubattino 54, 20134 Milano (Italy); Bianchin, A.; Lo Russo, S. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita di Padova, via Marzolo 8, 35131 Padova (Italy); Agresti, F.; Maddalena, A.; Principi, G. [Settore Materiali, Dipartimento di Ingegneria Meccanica, via Marzolo 9, 35131 Padova (Italy)

    2009-05-15

    A research program addressed to evaluate the magnesium hydride storage scaling up effects is being developed by CESI RICERCA, Milano, and the Hydrogen Group of Padova University. A storage device containing 500 g of magnesium hydride powder (manufactured by Venezia Tecnologie S.p.A. using high-energy ball milling) has been designed and tested in different operating conditions. A number of absorption and desorption cycles at different temperatures and pressures has been carried out in order to see if the results are comparable with laboratory data obtained on small amounts (fractions of grams) of powder samples. A sensible performance degradation that reduced the overall storage capacity of about 50% has been noticed after 20 cycles, presumably due to local powder heating, fragmentation and subsequent compaction. Further tests on a smaller tank equipped also with a porous baffle gave useful indications for the design of an improved large hydrogen reservoir. (author)

  14. Numerical investigation of pyrolysis of a Loy Yang coal in a lab-scale furnace at elevated pressures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hart, James; Al-Abbas, Audai Hussein; Naser, Jamal

    2013-12-01

    A computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model of the pyrolysis of a Loy Yang low-rank coal in a pressurised drop tube furnace (pdtf) was undertaken evaluating Arrhenius reaction rate constants. The paper also presents predictions of an isothermal flow through the drop tube furnace. In this study, a pdtf reactor operated at pressures up to 15 bar and at a temperature of 1,173 K with particle heating rates of approximately 105 K s-1 was used. The CFD model consists of two geometrical sections; flow straightner and injector. The single reaction and two competing reaction models were employed for this numerical investigation of the pyrolysis process. The results are validated against the available experimental data in terms of velocity profiles for the drop tube furnace and the particle mass loss versus particle residence times. The isothermal flow results showed reasonable agreement with the available experimental data at different locations from the injector tip. The predicted results of both the single reaction and competing reaction modes showed slightly different results. In addition, several reaction rate constants were tested and validated against the available experimental data. The most accurate results were being Badzioch and Hawksley (Ind Eng Chem Process Des Dev 9:521-530, 1970) with a single reaction model and Ubhayakar et al. (Symp (Int) Combust 16:427-436, 1977) for two competing reactions. These numerical results can provide useful information towards future modelling of the behaviour of Loy Yang coal in a full scale tangentially-fired furnace.

  15. Model of Electron Pressure Anisotropy in the Process of Magnetic Reconnection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Divin, A. V.; Lapenta, G.; Markidis, S.

    2009-12-01

    In our work we use particle-in-cell simulations of plasma for the study of magnetic reconection. Details of the diffusive process inside electron diffusion region (EDR) are explored. Reconnection is considered in two-dimensional antiparallel approach and pressure anisotropy is well-known to provide for collisionless dissipation in such configurations. We identify particles of different trajectories near X-point and their contribution to the pressure tensor anisotropy. Electrons are magnetized far from X-point (gyrotropic particle distribution) but gyrotropy is lost as the magnetic field vanishes near the X-point and electrons behave non-adiabaticly. The transition between inflow distribution and accelerated particles manifests itself as a tilt of distribution function, which creates pressure anisotropy and renders electron pressure divergency to be non-zero. Assuming stationarity of the reconnection process, next we apply test particle approach and trace particles back in time over characteristic meandering time. It allows for the separation between different populations of particles: those particles which meander in the vicinity of X-point are accelerating and trapped, whereas magnetized particles display drift motion and stay inside the inflow region. Model of electron pressure anisotropy is proposed, based on such bi-Maxwellian origin of the distribution function inside EDR. Equating reconnection electric field and divergency of pressure tensor at the X-point, we obtain scalings for the elecron flow velocity, width and total electron current within EDR.

  16. Pore-scale modeling of competitive adsorption in porous media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, Emily M; Tartakovsky, Alexandre M; Amon, Cristina

    2011-03-01

    In this paper we present a smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) pore-scale multicomponent reactive transport model with competitive adsorption. SPH is a Lagrangian, particle based modeling method which uses the particles as interpolation points to discretize and solve flow and transport equations. The theory and details of the SPH pore-scale model are presented along with a novel method for handling surface reactions, the continuum surface reaction (CSR) model. The numerical accuracy of the CSR model is validated with analytical and finite difference solutions, and the effects of spatial and temporal resolution on the accuracy of the model are also discussed. The pore-scale model is used to study competitive adsorption for different Damköhler and Peclet numbers in a binary system where a plume of species B is introduced into a system which initially contains species A. The pore-scale model results are compared with a Darcy-scale model to investigate the accuracy of a Darcy-scale reactive transport model for a wide range of Damköhler and Peclet numbers. The comparison shows that the Darcy model over estimates the mass fraction of aqueous and adsorbed species B and underestimates the mass fractions of species A. The Darcy-scale model also predicts faster transport of species A and B through the system than the pore-scale model. The overestimation of the advective velocity and the extent of reactions by the Darcy-scale model are due to incomplete pore-scale mixing. As the degree of the solute mixing decreases with increasing Peclet and Damköhler numbers, so does the accuracy of the Darcy-scale model. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Device Scale Modeling of Solvent Absorption using MFIX-TFM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carney, Janine E. [National Energy Technology Lab. (NETL), Albany, OR (United States); Finn, Justin R. [National Energy Technology Lab. (NETL), Albany, OR (United States); Oak Ridge Inst. for Science and Education (ORISE), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2016-10-01

    Recent climate change is largely attributed to greenhouse gases (e.g., carbon dioxide, methane) and fossil fuels account for a large majority of global CO2 emissions. That said, fossil fuels will continue to play a significant role in the generation of power for the foreseeable future. The extent to which CO2 is emitted needs to be reduced, however, carbon capture and sequestration are also necessary actions to tackle climate change. Different approaches exist for CO2 capture including both post-combustion and pre-combustion technologies, oxy-fuel combustion and/or chemical looping combustion. The focus of this effort is on post-combustion solvent-absorption technology. To apply CO2 technologies at commercial scale, the availability and maturity and the potential for scalability of that technology need to be considered. Solvent absorption is a proven technology but not at the scale needed by typical power plant. The scale up and down and design of laboratory and commercial packed bed reactors depends heavily on the specific knowledge of two-phase pressure drop, liquid holdup, the wetting efficiency and mass transfer efficiency as a function of operating conditions. Simple scaling rules often fail to provide proper design. Conventional reactor design modeling approaches will generally characterize complex non-ideal flow and mixing patterns using simplified and/or mechanistic flow assumptions. While there are varying levels of complexity used within these approaches, none of these models resolve the local velocity fields. Consequently, they are unable to account for important design factors such as flow maldistribution and channeling from a fundamental perspective. Ideally design would be aided by development of predictive models based on truer representation of the physical and chemical processes that occur at different scales. Computational fluid dynamic (CFD) models are based on multidimensional flow equations with first

  18. Imparting Barely Visible Impact Damage to a Stitched Composite Large-Scale Pressure Box

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lovejoy, Andrew E.; Przekop, Adam

    2016-01-01

    The Pultruded Rod Stitched Efficient Unitized Structure (PRSEUS) is a concept that was developed by The Boeing Company to address the complex structural design aspects associated with a pressurized hybrid wing body (HWB) aircraft configuration, which has been a focus of the NASA Environmentally Responsible Aviation Project. The NASA-Boeing structural development for the HWB aircraft culminated in testing of the multi-bay box, which is an 80%-scale representation of the pressurized center-body section. This structure was tested in the NASA Langley Research Center Combined Loads Test System facility. As part of this testing, barely visible impact damage was imparted to the interior and exterior of the test article to demonstrate compliance with a condition representative of the requirements for Category 1 damaged composite structure as defined by the Federal Aviation Regulations. Interior impacts were imparted using an existing spring-loaded impactor, while the exterior impacts were imparted using a newly designed, gravity-driven impactor. This paper describes the impacts to the test article, and the design of the gravitydriven guided-weight impactor. The guided-weight impactor proved to be a very reliable method to impart barely visible impact damage in locations which are not easily accessible for a traditional drop-weight impactor, while at the same time having the capability to be highly configurable for use on other aircraft structures.

  19. O absorption measurements in an engineering-scale high-pressure coal gasifier

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Kai; Sur, Ritobrata; Jeffries, Jay B.; Hanson, Ronald K.; Clark, Tommy; Anthony, Justin; Machovec, Scott; Northington, John

    2014-10-01

    A real-time, in situ water vapor (H2O) sensor using a tunable diode laser near 1,352 nm was developed to continuously monitor water vapor in the synthesis gas of an engineering-scale high-pressure coal gasifier. Wavelength-scanned wavelength-modulation spectroscopy with second harmonic detection (WMS-2 f) was used to determine the absorption magnitude. The 1 f-normalized, WMS-2 f signal (WMS-2 f/1 f) was insensitive to non-absorption transmission losses including beam steering and light scattering by the particulate in the synthesis gas. A fitting strategy was used to simultaneously determine the water vapor mole fraction and the collisional-broadening width of the transition from the scanned 1 f-normalized WMS-2 f waveform at pressures up to 15 atm, which can be used for large absorbance values. This strategy is analogous to the fitting strategy for wavelength-scanned direct absorption measurements. In a test campaign at the US National Carbon Capture Center, the sensor demonstrated a water vapor detection limit of ~800 ppm (25 Hz bandwidth) at conditions with more than 99.99 % non-absorption transmission losses. Successful unattended monitoring was demonstrated over a 435 h period. Strong correlations between the sensor measurements and transient gasifier operation conditions were observed, demonstrating the capability of laser absorption to monitor the gasification process.

  20. Testing of a Stitched Composite Large-Scale Multi-Bay Pressure Box

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jegley, Dawn; Rouse, Marshall; Przekop, Adam; Lovejoy, Andrew

    2016-01-01

    NASA has created the Environmentally Responsible Aviation (ERA) Project to develop technologies to reduce aviation's impact on the environment. A critical aspect of this pursuit is the development of a lighter, more robust airframe to enable the introduction of unconventional aircraft configurations. NASA and The Boeing Company have worked together to develop a structural concept that is lightweight and an advancement beyond state-of-the-art composite structures. The Pultruded Rod Stitched Efficient Unitized Structure (PRSEUS) is an integrally stiffened panel design where elements are stitched together. The PRSEUS concept is designed to maintain residual load carrying capabilities under a variety of damage scenarios. A series of building block tests were evaluated to explore the fundamental assumptions related to the capability and advantages of PRSEUS panels. The final step in the building block series is an 80%-scale pressure box representing a portion of the center section of a Hybrid Wing Body (HWB) transport aircraft. The testing of this article under maneuver load and internal pressure load conditions is the subject of this paper. The experimental evaluation of this article, along with the other building block tests and the accompanying analyses, has demonstrated the viability of a PRSEUS center body for the HWB vehicle. Additionally, much of the development effort is also applicable to traditional tube-and-wing aircraft, advanced aircraft configurations, and other structures where weight and through-the-thickness strength are design considerations.

  1. Modelling across bioreactor scales: methods, challenges and limitations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gernaey, Krist

    Scale-up and scale-down of bioreactors are very important in industrial biotechnology, especially with the currently available knowledge on the occurrence of gradients in industrial-scale bioreactors. Moreover, it becomes increasingly appealing to model such industrial scale systems, considering...... that it is challenging and expensive to acquire experimental data of good quality that can be used for characterizing gradients occurring inside a large industrial scale bioreactor. But which model building methods are available? And how can one ensure that the parameters in such a model are properly estimated? And what...... are the limitations of different types of mod - els? This paper will provide examples of models that have been published in the literature for use across bioreactor scales, including computational fluid dynamics (CFD) and population balance models. Furthermore, the importance of good modeling practice...

  2. Static Aeroelastic Scaling and Analysis of a Sub-Scale Flexible Wing Wind Tunnel Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ting, Eric; Lebofsky, Sonia; Nguyen, Nhan; Trinh, Khanh

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents an approach to the development of a scaled wind tunnel model for static aeroelastic similarity with a full-scale wing model. The full-scale aircraft model is based on the NASA Generic Transport Model (GTM) with flexible wing structures referred to as the Elastically Shaped Aircraft Concept (ESAC). The baseline stiffness of the ESAC wing represents a conventionally stiff wing model. Static aeroelastic scaling is conducted on the stiff wing configuration to develop the wind tunnel model, but additional tailoring is also conducted such that the wind tunnel model achieves a 10% wing tip deflection at the wind tunnel test condition. An aeroelastic scaling procedure and analysis is conducted, and a sub-scale flexible wind tunnel model based on the full-scale's undeformed jig-shape is developed. Optimization of the flexible wind tunnel model's undeflected twist along the span, or pre-twist or wash-out, is then conducted for the design test condition. The resulting wind tunnel model is an aeroelastic model designed for the wind tunnel test condition.

  3. Aeroacoustic Study of a High-Fidelity Aircraft Model. Part 2; Unsteady Surface Pressures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khorrami, Mehdi R.; Neuhart, Danny H.

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, we present unsteady surface pressure measurements for an 18%-scale, semi-span Gulfstream aircraft model. This high-fidelity model is being used to perform detailed studies of airframe noise associated with main landing gear, flap components, and gear-flap interaction noise, as well as to evaluate novel noise reduction concepts. The aerodynamic segment of the tests, conducted in the NASA Langley Research Center 14- by 22-Foot Subsonic Tunnel, was completed in November 2010. To discern the characteristics of the surface pressure fluctuations in the vicinity of the prominent noise sources, unsteady sensors were installed on the inboard and outboard flap edges, and on the main gear wheels, struts, and door. Various configurations were tested, including flap deflections of 0?, 20?, and 39?, with and without the main landing gear. The majority of unsteady surface pressure measurements were acquired for the nominal landing configuration where the main gear was deployed and the flap was deflected 39?. To assess the Mach number variation of the surface pressure amplitudes, measurements were obtained at Mach numbers of 0.16, 0.20, and 0.24. Comparison of the unsteady surface pressures with the main gear on and off shows significant interaction between the gear wake and the inboard flap edge, resulting in higher amplitude fluctuations when the gear is present.

  4. The effects of pressure on arthritic knees in a rat model of CFA-induced arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koo, Sung Tae; Lee, Chang-Hyung; Choi, Hyeunseok; Shin, Yong Il; Ha, Ki Tae; Ye, Hanna; Shim, Hyun Bo

    2013-01-01

    Pain is influenced by weather changes under certain circumstances, and inflammatory pain in animal models is ameliorated by pressure, but the underlying mechanism of atmospheric pressure has not been clearly elucidated. To examine the effect of pressure on pain in an arthritic animal model. Controlled animal study. Laboratory animal study. Following an injection of complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA) into one side of a knee joint, 32 rats were assigned randomly to 2 groups and either placed under 1 or 2.5 atmospheres absolute (ATA) in a hyperbaric chamber for 5 hours. The pain levels were assessed daily for up to 2 weeks post-injection to determine the changes in weight bearing (WB) of the affected limbs. In addition, the levels of gelatinase, MMP-2, and MMP-9 expression in the synovial fluids of the knees were analyzed. After arthritis induction, the rats in the 1 ATA group showed reduced WB of the affected limbs (CFA injection in the 1 ATA group. However, repetitive exposure to 2.5 ATA significantly reduced this ratio in the 2.5 ATA group. Although a sufficient number of samples were used to support the hypothesis that high atmospheric pressure improves a painful condition in this study, an additional larger-scale study will be needed to confirm these findings. Exposure to elevated pressures appears to relieve arthritic pain for extended periods by reducing the inflammatory process and should be considered as a possible alternative pain-reducing therapy.

  5. Time invariant scaling in discrete fragmentation models

    CERN Document Server

    Giraud, B G; Giraud, B G; Peschanski, R

    1994-01-01

    Linear rate equations are used to describe the cascading decay of an initial heavy cluster into fragments. We consider moments of arbitrary orders of the mass multiplicity spectrum and derive scaling properties pertaining to their time evolution. We suggest that the mass weighted multiplicity is a suitable observable for the discovery of scaling. Numerical tests validate such properties, even for moderate values of the initial mass (nuclei, percolation clusters, jets of particles etc.). Finite size effects can be simply parametrized.

  6. Modeling of low pressure plasma sources for microelectronics fabrication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agarwal, Ankur; Bera, Kallol; Kenney, Jason; Likhanskii, Alexandre; Rauf, Shahid

    2017-10-01

    Chemically reactive plasmas operating in the 1 mTorr–10 Torr pressure range are widely used for thin film processing in the semiconductor industry. Plasma modeling has come to play an important role in the design of these plasma processing systems. A number of 3-dimensional (3D) fluid and hybrid plasma modeling examples are used to illustrate the role of computational investigations in design of plasma processing hardware for applications such as ion implantation, deposition, and etching. A model for a rectangular inductively coupled plasma (ICP) source is described, which is employed as an ion source for ion implantation. It is shown that gas pressure strongly influences ion flux uniformity, which is determined by the balance between the location of plasma production and diffusion. The effect of chamber dimensions on plasma uniformity in a rectangular capacitively coupled plasma (CCP) is examined using an electromagnetic plasma model. Due to high pressure and small gap in this system, plasma uniformity is found to be primarily determined by the electric field profile in the sheath/pre-sheath region. A 3D model is utilized to investigate the confinement properties of a mesh in a cylindrical CCP. Results highlight the role of hole topology and size on the formation of localized hot-spots. A 3D electromagnetic plasma model for a cylindrical ICP is used to study inductive versus capacitive power coupling and how placement of ground return wires influences it. Finally, a 3D hybrid plasma model for an electron beam generated magnetized plasma is used to understand the role of reactor geometry on plasma uniformity in the presence of E  ×  B drift.

  7. Measurements and modeling of VLLE at elevated pressures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laursen, Torben

    and pure component calibration. Samples from the different liquid phases in the high-pressure cell is taken using a moveable needle. The systems investigated have been a combination of the components: CO2, N2, di-methyl ether (DME), water, methanol, ethanol and 1-propanol. 41 isotherms have been measured...... containing CO2, while the model has some problems with systems containing N2....

  8. Modeling Lactococcus lactis using a genome-scale flux model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nielsen Jens

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Genome-scale flux models are useful tools to represent and analyze microbial metabolism. In this work we reconstructed the metabolic network of the lactic acid bacteria Lactococcus lactis and developed a genome-scale flux model able to simulate and analyze network capabilities and whole-cell function under aerobic and anaerobic continuous cultures. Flux balance analysis (FBA and minimization of metabolic adjustment (MOMA were used as modeling frameworks. Results The metabolic network was reconstructed using the annotated genome sequence from L. lactis ssp. lactis IL1403 together with physiological and biochemical information. The established network comprised a total of 621 reactions and 509 metabolites, representing the overall metabolism of L. lactis. Experimental data reported in the literature was used to fit the model to phenotypic observations. Regulatory constraints had to be included to simulate certain metabolic features, such as the shift from homo to heterolactic fermentation. A minimal medium for in silico growth was identified, indicating the requirement of four amino acids in addition to a sugar. Remarkably, de novo biosynthesis of four other amino acids was observed even when all amino acids were supplied, which is in good agreement with experimental observations. Additionally, enhanced metabolic engineering strategies for improved diacetyl producing strains were designed. Conclusion The L. lactis metabolic network can now be used for a better understanding of lactococcal metabolic capabilities and potential, for the design of enhanced metabolic engineering strategies and for integration with other types of 'omic' data, to assist in finding new information on cellular organization and function.

  9. Staged, High-Pressure Oxy-Combustion Technology: Development and Scale-Up

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Axelbaum, Richard; Xia, Fei; Gopan, Akshay; Kumfer, Benjamin

    2014-09-30

    Washington University in St. Louis and its project partners are developing a unique pressurized oxy-combustion process that aims to improve efficiency and costs by reducing the recycling of flue gas to near zero. Normally, in the absence of recycled flue gas or another inert gas, combustion of fuel and oxygen results in a dramatic increase in temperature of the combustion products and radiant energy, as compared to combustion in air. High heat flux to the boiler tubes may result in a tube surface temperatures that exceed safe operating limits. In the Staged Pressurized Oxy-Combustion (SPOC) process, this problem is addressed by staging the delivery of fuel and by novel combustion design that allows control of heat flux. In addition, the main mode of heat transfer to the steam cycle is by radiation, as opposed to convection. Therefore, the requirement for recycling large amounts of flue gas, for temperature control or to improve convective heat transfer, is eliminated, resulting in a reduction in auxiliary loads. The following report contains a detailed summary of scientific findings and accomplishments for the period of Oct. 1, 2013 to Sept 30, 2014. Results of ASPEN process and CFD modelling activities aimed at improving the SPOC process and boiler design are presented. The effects of combustion pressure and fuel moisture on the plant efficiency are discussed. Combustor pressure is found to have only a minor impact beyond 16 bar. For fuels with moisture content greater than approx 30%, e.g. coal/water slurries, the amount of latent heat of condensation exceeds that which can be utilized in the steam cycle and plant efficiency is reduced significantly. An improved boiler design is presented that achieves a more uniform heat flux profile. In addition, a fundamental study of radiation in high-temperature, high-pressure, particle-laden flows is summarized which provides a more complete understanding of heat transfer in these unusual conditions and to allow for

  10. Comparison of model measured runner blade pressure fluctuations with unsteady flow analysis predictions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magnoli, M. V.

    2016-11-01

    An accurate prediction of pressure fluctuations in Francis turbines has become more and more important over the last years, due to the continuously increasing requirements of wide operating range capability. Depending on the machine operator, Francis turbines are operated at full load, part load, deep part load and speed-no-load. Each of these operating conditions is associated with different flow phenomena and pressure fluctuation levels. The better understanding of the pressure fluctuation phenomena and the more accurate prediction of their amplitude along the hydraulic surfaces can significantly contribute to improve the hydraulic and mechanical design of Francis turbines, their hydraulic stability and their reliability. With the objective to acquire a deeper knowledge about the pressure fluctuation characteristics in Francis turbines and to improve the accuracy of numerical simulation methods used for the prediction of the dynamic fluid flow through the turbine, pressure fluctuations were experimentally measured in a mid specific speed model machine. The turbine runner of a model machine with specific speed around nq,opt = 60 min-1, was instrumented with dynamic pressure transducers at the runner blades. The model machine shaft was equipped with a telemetry system able to transmit the measured pressure values to the data acquisition system. The transient pressure signal was measured at multiple locations on the blade and at several operating conditions. The stored time signal was also evaluated in terms of characteristic amplitude and dominating frequency. The dynamic fluid flow through the hydraulic turbine was numerically simulated with computational fluid dynamics (CFD) for selected operating points. Among others, operating points at full load, part load and deep part load were calculated. For the fluid flow numerical simulations more advanced turbulence models were used, such as the detached eddy simulation (DES) and scale adaptive simulation (SAS). At the

  11. Predictive power of the Braden scale for pressure sore risk in adult critical care patients: a comprehensive review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, Jill

    2012-01-01

    Critical care is designed for managing the sickest patients within our healthcare system. Multiple factors associated with an increased likelihood of pressure ulcer development have been investigated in the critical care population. Nevertheless, there is a lack of consensus regarding which of these factors poses the greatest risk for pressure ulceration. While the Braden scale for pressure sore risk is the most commonly used tool for measuring pressure ulcer risk in the United States, research focusing on the cumulative Braden Scale score and subscale scores is lacking in the critical care population. This author conducted a literature review on pressure ulcer risk assessment in the critical care population, to include the predictive value of both the total score and the subscale scores. In this review, the subscales sensory perception, mobility, moisture, and friction/shear were found to be associated with an increased likelihood of pressure ulcer development; in contrast, the Activity and Nutrition subscales were not found to predict pressure ulcer development in this population. In order to more precisely quantify risk in the critically ill population, modification of the Braden scale or development of a critical care specific risk assessment tool may be indicated.

  12. Fast Responding Pressure-Sensitive Paint for Large-Scale Wind Tunnel Testing Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The proposed work focuses on implementing fast-response pressure-sensitive paint for measurements of unsteady pressure in rotorcraft applications. Significant...

  13. A model for pressurized hydrogen induced thin film blisters

    Science.gov (United States)

    van den Bos, R. A. J. M.; Reshetniak, V.; Lee, C. J.; Benschop, J.; Bijkerk, F.

    2016-12-01

    We introduce a model for hydrogen induced blister formation in nanometer thick thin films. The model assumes that molecular hydrogen gets trapped under a circular blister cap causing it to deflect elastically outward until a stable blister is formed. In the first part, the energy balance required for a stable blister is calculated. From this model, the adhesion energy of the blister cap, the internal pressure, and the critical H-dose for blister formation can be calculated. In the second part, the flux balance required for a blister to grow to a stable size is calculated. The model is applied to blisters formed in a Mo/Si multilayer after being exposed to hydrogen ions. From the model, the adhesion energy of the Mo/Si blister cap was calculated to be around 1.05 J/m2 with internal pressures in the range of 175-280 MPa. Based on the model, a minimum ion dose for the onset of blister formation was calculated to be d = 4.2 × 1018 ions/cm2. From the flux balance equations, the diffusion constant for the Mo/Si blister cap was estimated to be DH2=(10 ±1 )×10-18 cm2/s .

  14. Characterization of the Scale Model Acoustic Test Overpressure Environment using Computational Fluid Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielsen, Tanner; West, Jeff

    2015-01-01

    The Scale Model Acoustic Test (SMAT) is a 5% scale test of the Space Launch System (SLS), which is currently being designed at Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC). The purpose of this test is to characterize and understand a variety of acoustic phenomena that occur during the early portions of lift off, one being the overpressure environment that develops shortly after booster ignition. The pressure waves that propagate from the mobile launcher (ML) exhaust hole are defined as the ignition overpressure (IOP), while the portion of the pressure waves that exit the duct or trench are the duct overpressure (DOP). Distinguishing the IOP and DOP in scale model test data has been difficult in past experiences and in early SMAT results, due to the effects of scaling the geometry. The speed of sound of the air and combustion gas constituents is not scaled, and therefore the SMAT pressure waves propagate at approximately the same speed as occurs in full scale. However, the SMAT geometry is twenty times smaller, allowing the pressure waves to move down the exhaust hole, through the trench and duct, and impact the vehicle model much faster than occurs at full scale. The DOP waves impact portions of the vehicle at the same time as the IOP waves, making it difficult to distinguish the different waves and fully understand the data. To better understand the SMAT data, a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) analysis was performed with a fictitious geometry that isolates the IOP and DOP. The upper and lower portions of the domain were segregated to accomplish the isolation in such a way that the flow physics were not significantly altered. The Loci/CHEM CFD software program was used to perform this analysis.

  15. Developing a pressure ulcer risk assessment scale for patients in long-term care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lepisto, Mervi; Eriksson, Elina; Hietanen, Helvi; Lepisto, Jyri; Lauri, Sirkka

    2006-02-01

    Previous pressure ulcer risk assessment scales appear to have relied on opinions about risk factors and are based on care setting rather than research evidence. Utilizing 21 existing risk assessment scales and relevant risk factor literature, an instrument was developed by Finnish researchers that takes into account individual patient risk factors, devices and methods applied in nursing care, and organizational characteristics. The instrument underwent two pilot tests to assess the relevance and clarity of the instrument: the first involved 43 nurses and six patients; the second involved 50 nurses with expertise in wound care. Changes to questionnaire items deemed necessary as a result of descriptive analysis and agreement percentages were completed. After pilot testing, the final instrument addressed the following issues: 1) patient risks: activity, mobility in bed, mental status, nutrition, urinary incontinence, fecal incontinence, sensory perception, and skin condition; 2) devices and methods used in patient care: technical devices, bed type, mattress, overlay, seat cushions, and care methods; and 3) staff number and structure, maximum number of beds, and beds in use (the last group of questions were included to ensure participants understood the items; results were not analyzed). The phases of the study provided an expeditious means of data collection and a suitable opportunity to assess how the instrument would function in practice. Instrument reliability and validity were improved as a result of the pilot testing and can be enhanced further with continued use and assessment.

  16. AGN feedback: galactic-scale outflows driven by radiation pressure on dust

    CERN Document Server

    Ishibashi, W

    2015-01-01

    Galaxy-scale outflows, which are thought to provide the link connecting the central black hole to its host galaxy, are now starting to be observed. However, the physical origin of the mechanism driving the observed outflows, whether due to energy-driving or radiation-driving, is still debated; and in some cases, it is not clear whether the central source is an active galactic nucleus (AGN) or a nuclear starburst. Here we study the role of radiation pressure on dust in driving galactic-scale AGN outflows, and analyse the dynamics of the outflowing shell as a function of the underlying physical parameters. We show that high-velocity outflows ($\\gtrsim$1000 km/s) with large momentum flux ($\\gtrsim 10 L/c$) can be obtained, by taking into account the effects of radiation trapping. In particular, the high observed values of the momentum boosts can be reproduced, provided that the shell is initially optically thick to the reprocessed infrared radiation. Alternatively, the inferred measurements of the momentum flux ...

  17. A model for turbulent dissipation rate in a constant pressure boundary layer

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    J DEY; P PHANI KUMAR

    2016-04-01

    Estimation of the turbulent dissipation rate in a boundary layer is a very involved process.Experimental determination of either the dissipation rate or the Taylor microscale, even in isotropic turbulence,which may occur in a portion of the turbulent boundary layer, is known to be a difficult task. For constant pressure boundary layers, a model for the turbulent dissipation rate is proposed here in terms of the local mean flow quantities. Comparable agreement between the estimated Taylor microscale and Kolmogorov length scale with other data in the logarithmic region suggests usefulness of this model in obtaining these quantitiesexperimentally

  18. Phenomenological and mathematical modeling of a high pressure steam driven jet injector. Part 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anand, G.

    1993-12-31

    An injector is a particular type of jet pump which uses condensable vapor to entrain a liquid and discharge against a pressure higher than either motive or suction pressures. The injector has no moving parts and requires no external power supply nor any complex control system. Thus, the injector is particularly suited for emergency core cooling operations. A detailed survey has indicated that various injector designs are available for operating pressures below 250 psig. However, the design of these injectors from the viewpoint of a basic understanding of heat and mass transfer processes has not been well developed. A critical review of the models showed serious discrepancies between the analytical models and the experimental observations. The discrepancies evolved from the neglect of non-equilibrium aspects of the flow. The origin of the non-equilibrium aspects can be traced to the extremely small time scales governing the flow in the injector. Thus, time scales of the order of 10{sup {minus}2} seconds are involved in the injector, accompanied by mass, momentum, and heat transfer rates of orders of magnitude higher than that observed in conventional two-phase flows. The present study focuses on the phenomenological and mathematical modeling of the processes in the injector from the viewpoint of its non-equilibrium nature.

  19. Experimental results from pressure testing a 1:6-scale nuclear power plant containment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Horschel, D.S. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1992-01-01

    This report discusses the testing of a 1:6-scale, reinforced-concrete containment building at Sandia National Laboratories, in Albuquerque, New Mexico. The scale-model, Light Water Reactor (LWR) containment building was designed and built to the American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) code by United Engineers and Constructors, Inc., and was instrumented with over 1200 transducers to prepare for the test. The containment model was tested to failure to determine its response to static internal overpressurization. As part of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission`s program on containment integrity, the test results will be used to assess the capability of analytical methods to predict the performance of containments under severe-accident loads. The scaled dimensions of the cylindrical wall and hemispherical dome were typical of a full-size containment. Other typical features included in the heavily reinforced model were equipment hatches, personnel air locks, several small piping penetrations, and a ihin steel liner that was attached to the concrete by headed studs. In addition to the transducers attached to the model, an acoustic detection system and several video and still cameras were used during testing to gather data and to aid in the conduct of the test. The model and its instrumentation are briefly discussed, and is followed by the testing procedures and measured response of the containment model. A summary discussion is included to aid in understanding the significance of the test as it applies to real world reinforced concrete containment structures. The data gathered during SIT and overpressure testing are included as an appendix.

  20. Scaling laws for gas-solid riser flow through two-fluid model simulation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    P.R. Naren; Vivek. V. Ranade

    2011-01-01

    Scale up of gas-solid circulating fluidized bed (CFB) risers poses many challenges to researchers. In this paper, CFD investigation of hydrodynamic scaling laws for gas-solid riser flow was attempted on the basis of two-fluid model simulations, in particular, the recently developed empirical scaling law of Qi, Zhu,and Huang (2008). A 3D computational model with periodic boundaries was used to perform numerical experiments and to study the effect of various system and operating parameters in hydrodynamic scaling of riser flow. The Qi scaling ratio was found to ensure similarity in global parameters like overall crosssectional average solid holdup or pressure drop gradient. However, similarity in local flow profiles was not observed for all the test cases. The present work also highlighted the significance of error bars in reporting experimental values.

  1. Multi-scale modelling and simulation in systems biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dada, Joseph O; Mendes, Pedro

    2011-02-01

    The aim of systems biology is to describe and understand biology at a global scale where biological functions are recognised as a result of complex mechanisms that happen at several scales, from the molecular to the ecosystem. Modelling and simulation are computational tools that are invaluable for description, prediction and understanding these mechanisms in a quantitative and integrative way. Therefore the study of biological functions is greatly aided by multi-scale methods that enable the coupling and simulation of models spanning several spatial and temporal scales. Various methods have been developed for solving multi-scale problems in many scientific disciplines, and are applicable to continuum based modelling techniques, in which the relationship between system properties is expressed with continuous mathematical equations or discrete modelling techniques that are based on individual units to model the heterogeneous microscopic elements such as individuals or cells. In this review, we survey these multi-scale methods and explore their application in systems biology.

  2. Gauge coupling unification in a classically scale invariant model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haba, Naoyuki; Ishida, Hiroyuki; Takahashi, Ryo; Yamaguchi, Yuya

    2016-02-01

    There are a lot of works within a class of classically scale invariant model, which is motivated by solving the gauge hierarchy problem. In this context, the Higgs mass vanishes at the UV scale due to the classically scale invariance, and is generated via the Coleman-Weinberg mechanism. Since the mass generation should occur not so far from the electroweak scale, we extend the standard model only around the TeV scale. We construct a model which can achieve the gauge coupling unification at the UV scale. In the same way, the model can realize the vacuum stability, smallness of active neutrino masses, baryon asymmetry of the universe, and dark matter relic abundance. The model predicts the existence vector-like fermions charged under SU(3) C with masses lower than 1 TeV, and the SM singlet Majorana dark matter with mass lower than 2.6 TeV.

  3. Gauge coupling unification in a classically scale invariant model

    CERN Document Server

    Haba, Naoyuki; Takahashi, Ryo; Yamaguchi, Yuya

    2015-01-01

    There are a lot of works within a class of classically scale invariant model, which is motivated by solving the gauge hierarchy problem. In this context, the Higgs mass vanishes at the UV scale due to the classically scale invariance, and is generated via the Coleman-Weinberg mechanism. Since the mass generation should occur not so far from the electroweak scale, we extend the standard model only around the TeV scale. We construct a model which can achieve the gauge coupling unification at the UV scale. In the same way, the model can realize the vacuum stability, smallness of active neutrino masses, baryon asymmetry of the universe, and dark matter relic abundance. The model predicts the existence vector-like fermions charged under $SU(3)_C$ with masses lower than $1\\,{\\rm TeV}$, and the SM singlet Majorana dark matter with mass lower than $2.6\\,{\\rm TeV}$.

  4. Adaptation en français et en allemand d'une échelle de pression des pairs pour jeunes adultes : le Peer Pressure Inventory [Adaptation of a peer pressure scale in French and German: the Peer Pressure Inventory].

    OpenAIRE

    Baggio, S.; Studer, J.; Daeppen, J.B.; Gmel, G.

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Peer pressure is regarded as an important determinant of substance use, sexual behavior and juvenile delinquency. However, few peer pressure scales are validated, especially in French or German. Little is known about the factor structure of such scales or the kind of scale needed: some scales takes into account both peer pressure to do and peer pressure not to do, while others consider only peer pressure to do. The aim of the present study was to adapt French and German versions o...

  5. The sense and non-sense of plot-scale, catchment-scale, continental-scale and global-scale hydrological modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bronstert, Axel; Heistermann, Maik; Francke, Till

    2017-04-01

    Hydrological models aim at quantifying the hydrological cycle and its constituent processes for particular conditions, sites or periods in time. Such models have been developed for a large range of spatial and temporal scales. One must be aware that the question which is the appropriate scale to be applied depends on the overall question under study. Therefore, it is not advisable to give a general applicable guideline on what is "the best" scale for a model. This statement is even more relevant for coupled hydrological, ecological and atmospheric models. Although a general statement about the most appropriate modelling scale is not recommendable, it is worth to have a look on what are the advantages and the shortcomings of micro-, meso- and macro-scale approaches. Such an appraisal is of increasing importance, since increasingly (very) large / global scale approaches and models are under operation and therefore the question arises how far and for what purposes such methods may yield scientifically sound results. It is important to understand that in most hydrological (and ecological, atmospheric and other) studies process scale, measurement scale, and modelling scale differ from each other. In some cases, the differences between theses scales can be of different orders of magnitude (example: runoff formation, measurement and modelling). These differences are a major source of uncertainty in description and modelling of hydrological, ecological and atmospheric processes. Let us now summarize our viewpoint of the strengths (+) and weaknesses (-) of hydrological models of different scales: Micro scale (e.g. extent of a plot, field or hillslope): (+) enables process research, based on controlled experiments (e.g. infiltration; root water uptake; chemical matter transport); (+) data of state conditions (e.g. soil parameter, vegetation properties) and boundary fluxes (e.g. rainfall or evapotranspiration) are directly measurable and reproducible; (+) equations based on

  6. Influences of Models on the Unsteady Pressure Characteristics of the NASA National Transonic Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Gregory; Balakrishna, Sundareswara; DeMoss, Joshua; Goodliff, Scott; Bailey, Matthew

    2015-01-01

    Pressure fluctuations have been measured over the course of several tests in the National Transonic Facility to study unsteady phenomenon both with and without the influence of a model. Broadband spectral analysis will be used to characterize the length scales of the tunnel. Special attention will be given to the large-scale, low frequency data that influences the Mach number and force and moment variability. This paper will also discuss the significance of the vorticity and sound fields that can be related to the Common Research Model and will also highlight the comparisons to an empty tunnel configuration. The effectiveness of vortex generators placed at the interface of the test section and wind tunnel diffuser showed promise in reducing the empty tunnel unsteadiness, however, the vortex generators were ineffective in the presence of a model.

  7. An Efficient Two-Scale Hybrid Embedded Fracture Model for Shale Gas Simulation

    KAUST Repository

    Amir, Sahar

    2016-12-27

    Natural and hydraulic fractures existence and state differs on a reservoir-by-reservoir or even on a well-by-well basis leading to the necessity of exploring the flow regimes variations with respect to the diverse fracture-network shapes forged. Conventional Dual-Porosity Dual-Permeability (DPDP) schemes are not adequate to model such complex fracture-network systems. To overcome this difficulty, in this paper, an iterative Hybrid Embedded multiscale (two-scale) Fracture model (HEF) is applied on a derived fit-for-purpose shale gas model. The HEF model involves splitting the fracture computations into two scales: 1) fine-scale solves for the flux exchange parameter within each grid cell; 2) coarse-scale solves for the pressure applied to the domain grid cells using the flux exchange parameter computed at each grid cell from the fine-scale. After that, the D dimensions matrix pressure and the (D-1) lower dimensional fracture pressure are solved as a system to apply the matrix-fracture coupling. HEF model combines the DPDP overlapping continua concept, the DFN lower dimensional fractures concept, the HFN hierarchical fracture concept, and the CCFD model simplicity. As for the fit-for-purpose shale gas model, various fit-for-purpose shale gas models can be derived using any set of selected properties plugged in one of the most popularly used proposed literature models as shown in the appendix. Also, this paper shows that shale extreme low permeability cause flow behavior to be dominated by the structure and magnitude of high permeability fractures.

  8. Limitations of mathematical modelling and numerical simulation of industrial and laboratory high-pressure processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rauh, Cornelia; Delgado, Antonio

    2011-03-01

    High pressures up to several hundreds of MPa are utilised in a wide range of applications in chemical engineering, bioengineering, and food engineering, aiming at selective control of (bio-)chemical reactions. Non-uniformity of process conditions may threaten the safety and quality of the resulting products as the process conditions such as pressure, temperature, and treatment history are crucial for the course of (bio-)chemical reactions. Therefore, thermofluid dynamical phenomena during the high-pressure process have to be examined, and tools to predict process uniformity and to optimise the processes have to be developed. Recently, mathematical models and numerical simulations of laboratory and industrial scale high-pressure processes have been set up and validated by experimental results. This contribution deals with the assumption of the modelling that relevant (bio-)chemical compounds are ideally dissolved or diluted particles in a continuum flow. By considering the definition of the continuum hypothesis regarding the minimum particle population in a distinct volume, limitations of this modelling and simulation are addressed.

  9. Numerical Investigation of Thermal Distribution and Pressurization Behavior in Helium Pressurized Cryogenic Tank by Introducing a Multi-component Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei, Wang; Yanzhong, Li; Zhan, Liu; Kang, Zhu

    An improved CFD model involving a multi-component gas mixturein the ullage is constructed to predict the pressurization behavior of a cryogenic tank considering the existence of pressurizing helium.A temperature difference between the local fluid and its saturation temperature corresponding to the vapor partial pressure is taken as the phase change driving force. As practical application of the model, hydrogen and oxygen tanks with helium pressurization arenumerically simulated by using themulti-component gas model. The results presentthat the improved model produce higher ullage temperature and pressure and lower wall temperaturethan those without multi-component consideration. The phase change has a slight influence on thepressurization performance due to the small quantities involved.

  10. Full scale measurements of pressure equalization on air permeable facade elements

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bentum, C.A. van; Geurts, C.P.W.

    2015-01-01

    Wind-induced pressure differences over rain screens are determined by the external pressures and the pressures inside the cavity. Minimizing this pressure difference decreases the risk of water leakage and also helps to minimize the local loads on the façade elements. Current rules to determine the

  11. Modeling wave-induced pore pressure and effective stress in a granular seabed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scholtès, Luc; Chareyre, Bruno; Michallet, Hervé; Catalano, Emanuele; Marzougui, Donia

    2015-01-01

    The response of a sandy seabed under wave loading is investigated on the basis of numerical modeling using a multi-scale approach. To that aim, the discrete element method is coupled to a finite volume method specially enhanced to describe compressible fluid flow. Both solid and fluid phase mechanics are upscaled from considerations established at the pore level. Model's predictions are validated against poroelasticity theory and discussed in comparison with experiments where a sediment analog is subjected to wave action in a flume. Special emphasis is put on the mechanisms leading the seabed to liquefy under wave-induced pressure variation on its surface. Liquefaction is observed in both dilative and compactive regimes. It is shown that the instability can be triggered for a well-identified range of hydraulic conditions. Particularly, the results confirm that the gas content, together with the permeability of the medium are key parameters affecting the transmission of pressure inside the soil.

  12. Development of a Numerical Model of Hypervelocity Impact into a Pressurized Composite Overwrapped Pressure Vessel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, M. A.; Davis, B. A.; Miller, J. E.

    2017-01-01

    . Also seen in the figure is the eroded projectile that had passed into the COPV vessel with the generated shock wave in the pressurant propagating just ahead of the material. In this paper, pertinent experimental details and the development of the material constitutive models necessary for this work along with the efforts to validate their use are dis-cussed. The simulation results are presented and compared with the NASA experimental observations. While work is on-going from this effort, early observations pertinent to the failure threshold are presented.

  13. Prevention of Pressure Oscillations in Modeling a Cavitating Acoustic Fluid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Klenow

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Cavitation effects play an important role in the UNDEX loading of a structure. For far-field UNDEX, the structural loading is affected by the formation of local and bulk cavitation regions, and the pressure pulses resulting from the closure of the cavitation regions. A common approach to numerically modeling cavitation in far-field underwater explosions is Cavitating Acoustic Finite Elements (CAFE and more recently Cavitating Acoustic Spectral Elements (CASE. Treatment of cavitation in this manner causes spurious pressure oscillations which must be treated by a numerical damping scheme. The focus of this paper is to investigate the severity of these oscillations on the structural response and a possible improvement to CAFE, based on the original Boris and Book Flux-Corrected Transport algorithm on structured meshes [6], to limit oscillations without the energy loss associated with the current damping schemes.

  14. Scrape-off Layer Flows With Pressure Gradient Scale Length ~ {rho}{sub p}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robert J. Goldston

    2013-03-08

    A heuristic model for the plasma scrape-off width balances magnetic drifts against parallel loss at c{sub s} /2, resulting in a SOL width ~ {rho}{sub p}. T{sub sep} is calculated from Spitzer–Härm parallel thermal conduction. This results in a prediction for the power scrape-off width in quantitative agreement both in magnitude and scaling with recent experimental data. To achieve the ~ c{sub s} /2 flow assumed in this model and measured experimentally sets requirements on the ratio of upstream to total SOL particle sources, relative to the square-root of the ratio of target to upstream temperature. The Pfisch-Schlüter model for equilibrium flows has been modified to allow near-sonic flows, appropriate for gradient scale lengths of order {rho}{sub p}, resulting in a new quadrupole radial flow pattern. The strong parallel flows and plasma charging implied by this model suggest a mechanism for H-mode transition, consistent with many observations

  15. Scrape-off layer flows with pressure gradient scale length ∼ρ{sub p}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goldston, Robert J., E-mail: rgoldston@pppl.gov [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, MS-41, Princeton, NJ 08543 (United States)

    2013-07-15

    A heuristic model for the plasma scrape-off width balances magnetic drifts against parallel loss at c{sub s}/2, resulting in a SOL width ∼ρ{sub p}. T{sub sep} is calculated from Spitzer–Härm parallel thermal conduction. This results in a prediction for the power scrape-off width in quantitative agreement both in magnitude and scaling with recent experimental data. To achieve the ∼c{sub s}/2 flow assumed in this model and measured experimentally sets requirements on the ratio of upstream to total SOL particle sources, relative to the square-root of the ratio of target to upstream temperature. The Pfisch–Schlüter model for equilibrium flows has been modified to allow near-sonic flows, appropriate for gradient scale lengths of order ρ{sub p}, resulting in a new quadrupole radial flow pattern. The strong parallel flows and plasma charging implied by this model suggest a mechanism for H-mode transition, consistent with many observations.

  16. Lattice Discrete Particle Model (LDPM) for pressure-dependent inelasticity in granular rocks

    CERN Document Server

    Ashari, Shiva Esna; Cusatis, Gianluca

    2016-01-01

    This paper deals with the formulation, calibration, and validation of a Lattice Discrete Particle Model (LDPM) for the simulation of the pressure-dependent inelastic response of granular rocks. LDPM is formulated in the framework of discrete mechanics and it simulates the heterogeneous deformation of cemented granular systems by means of discrete compatibility/equilibrium equations defined at the grain scale. A numerical strategy is proposed to generate a realistic microstructure based on the actual grain size distribution of a sandstone and the capabilities of the method are illustrated with reference to the particular case of Bleurswiller sandstone, i.e. a granular rock that has been extensively studied at the laboratory scale. LDPM micromechanical parameters are calibrated based on evidences from triaxial experiments, such as hydrostatic compression, brittle failure at low confinement and plastic behavior at high confinement. Results show that LDPM allows exploring the effect of fine-scale heterogeneity on...

  17. [Validation of EMINA and EVARUCI scales for assessing the risk of developing pressure ulcers in critical patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roca-Biosca, A; Garcia-Fernandez, F P; Chacon-Garcés, S; Rubio-Rico, L; Olona-Cabases, M; Anguera-Saperas, L; Garcia-Grau, N; Tuset-Garijo, G; de Molina-Fernández, I; Velasco-Guillen, M C

    2015-01-01

    To contribute to the validation of the EMINA and EVAUCI scales for assessing the risk of pressure ulcers in the critical patient and compare their predictive capacity in this same context. Prospective study from December 2012 until June 2013. Polyvalent intensive care unit of 14 beds in a reference hospital for two sanitary areas. patients of 18 years of age or older and without pressure ulcers were included. They were followed until development of a pressure ulcer of grade I or greater, medical discharge, death or 30 days. presence of ulcers, daily score of the risk of developing pressure ulcers through EMINA and EVARUCI evaluation. The validity of both scales was calculated using sensitivity, specificity, and positive and negative predictive value. The level of significance was P≤0.05. A total of 189 patients were evaluated. 67.2% were male with a mean age of 59.4 (DE: 16,8) years old, 53 (28%) developed pressure ulcers, being the incidence rate of 41 ulcers per 1000 admission days. The mean day of diagnosis was 7.7 days (DE: 4,4) and the most frequent area was the sacrum. The sensitivity and specificity for the mean of observations was 94.34 (IC95% 87.17-100) and 33.33 (IC95% 25.01-41.66) for the EMINA scale for a risk>10 and 92.45 (IC95% 84.40-100) and 42.96 (IC95% 34.24-51.68) for the EVARUCI scale for a risk of>11. No differences were found in predictive capacity of both scales. For sensitivities>90%the scales show to be insufficiently specific in the pressure ulcer risk detection in critical patients. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier España, S.L.U. y SEEIUC. All rights reserved.

  18. The Goddard multi-scale modeling system with unified physics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W.-K. Tao

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Recently, a multi-scale modeling system with unified physics was developed at NASA Goddard. It consists of (1 a cloud-resolving model (CRM, (2 a regional-scale model, the NASA unified Weather Research and Forecasting Model (WRF, and (3 a coupled CRM-GCM (general circulation model, known as the Goddard Multi-scale Modeling Framework or MMF. The same cloud-microphysical processes, long- and short-wave radiative transfer and land-surface processes are applied in all of the models to study explicit cloud-radiation and cloud-surface interactive processes in this multi-scale modeling system. This modeling system has been coupled with a multi-satellite simulator for comparison and validation with NASA high-resolution satellite data.

    This paper reviews the development and presents some applications of the multi-scale modeling system, including results from using the multi-scale modeling system to study the interactions between clouds, precipitation, and aerosols. In addition, use of the multi-satellite simulator to identify the strengths and weaknesses of the model-simulated precipitation processes will be discussed as well as future model developments and applications.

  19. Microphysics in Multi-scale Modeling System with Unified Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Wei-Kuo

    2012-01-01

    Recently, a multi-scale modeling system with unified physics was developed at NASA Goddard. It consists of (1) a cloud-resolving model (Goddard Cumulus Ensemble model, GCE model), (2) a regional scale model (a NASA unified weather research and forecast, WRF), (3) a coupled CRM and global model (Goddard Multi-scale Modeling Framework, MMF), and (4) a land modeling system. The same microphysical processes, long and short wave radiative transfer and land processes and the explicit cloud-radiation, and cloud-land surface interactive processes are applied in this multi-scale modeling system. This modeling system has been coupled with a multi-satellite simulator to use NASA high-resolution satellite data to identify the strengths and weaknesses of cloud and precipitation processes simulated by the model. In this talk, a review of developments and applications of the multi-scale modeling system will be presented. In particular, the microphysics development and its performance for the multi-scale modeling system will be presented.

  20. Long term evolution of the subglacial water pressure on Russell glacier, a modelling approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Fleurian, Basile; Mouginot, Jeremie; Nisancioglu, Kerim H.

    2017-04-01

    Basal sliding is the main control on land terminating outlet glaciers velocity. This sliding is mainly driven by the water pressure at the base of the glaciers. The ongoing increase in surface melt of the Greenland Ice Sheet warrants an examination of its impact on basal water pressure and in turn on basal sliding. Here, we examine the case of Russell glacier, West Greenland, where a remarkably extensive set of observations have been gathered. Our recently published study (de Fleurian et. al. 2016) is pointing to the fact that two different hydrological regimes exist under this glacier. Near the front of the glacier, the development of an efficient drainage system allows the water pressure to drop quickly at the end of summer and yields a stagnation of its annual-mean value. Conversely, further upglacier, the lack of an efficient drainage system leads to an increase of the mean annual water pressure throughout the years. This study left the question of the long term evolution of the subglacial hydrological system under a warmer climate. To answer this question we present here the results of longer simulations where runoff forcing is derived from a simple Positive Degree Day scheme scaled on the IPCC climatic scenarios. To get further insight from our subglacial hydrological model, we investigate the impact of the varying water pressure on modelled surface velocities. Reference: de Fleurian, B., M. Morlighem, H. Seroussi, E. Rignot, M. R. van den Broecke, P. Kuipers Munneke, J. Mouginot, C. J. P. P. Smeets, and A. J. Tedstone (2016), A modeling study of the effect of runoff variability on the effective pressure beneath Russell Glacier, West Greenland, J. Geophys. Res. Earth Surf., 121, 1834-1848, doi:10.1002/2016JF003842.

  1. Multi-scale observation and cross-scale mechanistic modeling on terrestrial ecosystem carbon cycle

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CAO; Mingkui; YU; Guirui; LIU; Jiyuan; LI; Kerang

    2005-01-01

    To predict global climate change and to implement the Kyoto Protocol for stabilizing atmospheric greenhouse gases concentrations require quantifying spatio-temporal variations in the terrestrial carbon sink accurately. During the past decade multi-scale ecological experiment and observation networks have been established using various new technologies (e.g. controlled environmental facilities, eddy covariance techniques and quantitative remote sensing), and have obtained a large amount of data about terrestrial ecosystem carbon cycle. However, uncertainties in the magnitude and spatio-temporal variations of the terrestrial carbon sink and in understanding the underlying mechanisms have not been reduced significantly. One of the major reasons is that the observations and experiments were conducted at individual scales independently, but it is the interactions of factors and processes at different scales that determine the dynamics of the terrestrial carbon sink. Since experiments and observations are always conducted at specific scales, to understand cross-scale interactions requires mechanistic analysis that is best to be achieved by mechanistic modeling. However, mechanistic ecosystem models are mainly based on data from single-scale experiments and observations and hence have no capacity to simulate mechanistic cross-scale interconnection and interactions of ecosystem processes. New-generation mechanistic ecosystem models based on new ecological theoretical framework are needed to quantify the mechanisms from micro-level fast eco-physiological responses to macro-level slow acclimation in the pattern and structure in disturbed ecosystems. Multi-scale data-model fusion is a recently emerging approach to assimilate multi-scale observational data into mechanistic, dynamic modeling, in which the structure and parameters of mechanistic models for simulating cross-scale interactions are optimized using multi-scale observational data. The models are validated and

  2. Surface Pressure Estimates for Pitching Aircraft Model at High Angles-of-attack (Short Communication)

    OpenAIRE

    A.A. Pashilkar

    2002-01-01

    The surface pressure on a pitching delta wing aircraft is estimated from the normal force and the pitching moment characteristics. The pressure model is based on parametrising the surface pressure distribution on a simple delta wing. This model is useful as a first approximation of the load distribution on the aircraft wing. Leeward surface pressure distributions computed by this method are presented.

  3. Investigation of pressure gradient aware wall modeling in LES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thiry, Olivier; Winckelmans, Gregoire; Duponcheel, Matthieu

    2015-11-01

    This work focuses on the investigation of various wall modeling strategies for the simulation of high Reynolds number wall-bounded turbulent flows with acceleration and/or deceleration. Our code is based on fourth order finite differences, is momentum conserving, and is energy conserving up to fourth order. We here use a ``channel flow'' set-up, with no slip and wall modeling at the bottom, with slip at the top, and with blowing and/or suction at the top in order to generate the desired acceleration-deceleration profile. Two strategies are investigated and compared. Pressure gradient corrected algebraic models are first considered, and we investigate various local averaging techniques so as to avoid imposing mean profile laws pointwise. RANS sub-layer models are then also considered, where the turbulent viscosity is corrected to account for pressure gradient effects and for resolved LES fluctuations effects. A wall-resolved LES was also performed to provide a reference solution. Research fellow (Ph.D. student) at the F.R.S. - FNRS (Belgium).

  4. Generalization Technique for 2D+SCALE Dhe Data Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karim, Hairi; Rahman, Alias Abdul; Boguslawski, Pawel

    2016-10-01

    Different users or applications need different scale model especially in computer application such as game visualization and GIS modelling. Some issues has been raised on fulfilling GIS requirement of retaining the details while minimizing the redundancy of the scale datasets. Previous researchers suggested and attempted to add another dimension such as scale or/and time into a 3D model, but the implementation of scale dimension faces some problems due to the limitations and availability of data structures and data models. Nowadays, various data structures and data models have been proposed to support variety of applications and dimensionality but lack research works has been conducted in terms of supporting scale dimension. Generally, the Dual Half Edge (DHE) data structure was designed to work with any perfect 3D spatial object such as buildings. In this paper, we attempt to expand the capability of the DHE data structure toward integration with scale dimension. The description of the concept and implementation of generating 3D-scale (2D spatial + scale dimension) for the DHE data structure forms the major discussion of this paper. We strongly believed some advantages such as local modification and topological element (navigation, query and semantic information) in scale dimension could be used for the future 3D-scale applications.

  5. The Behavior of a Stitched Composite Large-Scale Multi-Bay Pressure Box

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jegley, Dawn C.; Rouse, Marshall; Przekop, Adam; Lovejoy, Andrew E.

    2016-01-01

    NASA has created the Environmentally Responsible Aviation (ERA) Project to develop technologies to reduce impact of aviation on the environment. A critical aspect of this pursuit is the development of a lighter, more robust airframe to enable the introduction of unconventional aircraft configurations. NASA and The Boeing Company have worked together to develop a structural concept that is lightweight and an advancement beyond state-of-the-art composite structures. The Pultruded Rod Stitched Efficient Unitized Structure (PRSEUS) is an integrally stiffened panel design where elements are stitched together and designed to maintain residual load-carrying capabilities under a variety of damage scenarios. With the PRSEUS concept, through-the-thickness stitches are applied through dry fabric prior to resin infusion, and replace fasteners throughout each integral panel. Through-the-thickness reinforcement at discontinuities, such as along flange edges, has been shown to suppress delamination and turn cracks, which expands the design space and leads to lighter designs. The pultruded rod provides stiffening away from the more vulnerable skin surface and improves bending stiffness. A series of building block tests were evaluated to explore the fundamental assumptions related to the capability and advantages of PRSEUS panels. The final step in the building block series of tests is an 80%-scale pressure box representing a portion of the center section of a Hybrid Wing Body (HWB) transport aircraft. The testing of this test article under maneuver and internal pressure loading conditions is the subject of this paper. The experimental evaluation of this article, along with the other building block tests and the accompanying analyses, has demonstrated the viability of a PRSEUS center body for the HWB vehicle. Additionally, much of the development effort is also applicable to traditional tube-and-wing aircraft, advanced aircraft configurations, and other structures where weight and

  6. Magnetic reorientation induced by pressure solution: A potential mechanism for orogenic-scale remagnetizations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliva-Urcia, Belén; Pueyo, Emilio L.; Larrasoaña, Juan C.

    2008-01-01

    New paleomagnetic analyses of Triassic, Cretaceous and Eocene strata in the south-central Pyrenees show evidence for a widespread remagnetization, located along the southern border of the Axial Zone, the Internal Sierras, and the northern part of the Jaca-Pamplona basin. This remagnetization, always reversed in polarity, was acquired after an extensive period of Late Eocene-Early Oligocene folding and tilting in the area, and affects limestones, sandstones, marls and red beds. In addition, a characteristic prefolding component was identified in 30% of Upper Cretaceous and Triassic red beds. These results, together with a revaluation of previously published paleomagnetic data from the central Pyrenees, indicate that the spatial distribution of the postfolding remagnetization coincides with that of a domain of pressure solution cleavage. A relationship between the intensity of the remagnetization and the characteristic (prefolding component) with respect to the density of cleavage surfaces, leads us to propose a mechanism for the remagnetization related to the development of pressure solution cleavage that is framed within the tectonic evolution of the central Pyrenees. Partial dissolution of rock under tectonic compression leads to the liberation and subsequent accumulation of insoluble minerals in cleavage planes. Magnetic grains are part of the relatively insoluble residue, and they reorient in the presence of the ambient field after they are freed during dissolution of the rock matrix. Chemical reequilibrium (dissolution and/or neoformation of magnetic carriers) during this process cannot be excluded. The remagnetization mechanism we propose can help to explain widespread remagnetizations in low to moderately deformed rocks without the need of large-scale migration of orogenic fluids.

  7. Scale-4 Analysis of Pressurized Water Reactor Critical Configurations: Volume 1-Summary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DeHart, M.D.

    1995-01-01

    The requirements of ANSI/ANS 8.1 specify that calculational methods for away-from-reactor criticality safety analyses be validated against experimental measurements. If credit is to be taken for the reduced reactivity of burned or spent fuel relative to its original ''fresh'' composition, it is necessary to benchmark computational methods used in determining such reactivity worth against spent fuel reactivity measurements. This report summarizes a portion of the ongoing effort to benchmark away-from-reactor criticality analysis methods using critical configurations from commercial pressurized- water reactors (PWR). The analysis methodology utilized for all calculations in this report is based on the modules and data associated with the SCALE-4 code system. Isotopic densities for spent fuel assemblies in the core were calculated using the SAS2H analytical sequence in SCALE-4. The sources of data and the procedures for deriving SAS2H input parameters are described in detail. The SNIKR code sequence was used to extract the necessary isotopic densities from SAS2H results and to provide the data in the format required for SCALE-4 criticality analysis modules. The CSASN analytical sequence in SCALE-4 was used to perform resonance processing of cross sections. The KENO V.a module of SCALE-4 was used to calculate the effective multiplication factor (k{sub eff}) for the critical configuration. The SCALE-4 27-group burnup library containing ENDF/B-IV (actinides) and ENDF/B-V (fission products) data was used for analysis of each critical configuration. Each of the five volumes comprising this report provides an overview of the methodology applied. Subsequent volumes also describe in detail the approach taken in performing criticality calculations for these PWR configurations: Volume 2 describes criticality calculations for the Tennessee Valley Authority's Sequoyah Unit 2 reactor for Cycle 3; Volume 3 documents the analysis of Virginia Power

  8. Integrating coarse-scale uncertain soil moisture data into a fine-scale hydrological modelling scenario

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Vernieuwe

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available In a hydrological modelling scenario, often the modeller is confronted with external data, such as remotely-sensed soil moisture observations, that become available to update the model output. However, the scale triplet (spacing, extent and support of these data is often inconsistent with that of the model. Furthermore, the external data can be cursed with epistemic uncertainty. Hence, a method is needed that not only integrates the external data into the model, but that also takes into account the difference in scale and the uncertainty of the observations. In this paper, a synthetic hydrological modelling scenario is set up in which a high-resolution distributed hydrological model is run over an agricultural field. At regular time steps, coarse-scale field-averaged soil moisture data, described by means of possibility distributions (epistemic uncertainty, are retrieved by synthetic aperture radar and assimilated into the model. A method is presented that allows to integrate the coarse-scale possibility distribution of soil moisture content data with the fine-scale model-based soil moisture data. To this end, a scaling relationship between field-averaged soil moisture content data and its corresponding standard deviation is employed.

  9. The big squeeze: scaling of constriction pressure in two of the world's largest snakes, Python reticulatus and Python molurus bivittatus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penning, David A; Dartez, Schuyler F; Moon, Brad R

    2015-11-01

    Snakes are important predators that have radiated throughout many ecosystems, and constriction was important in their radiation. Constrictors immobilize and kill prey by using body loops to exert pressure on their prey. Despite its importance, little is known about constriction performance or its full effects on prey. We studied the scaling of constriction performance in two species of giant pythons (Python reticulatus and Python molurus bivittatus) and propose a new mechanism of prey death by constriction. In both species, peak constriction pressure increased significantly with snake diameter. These and other constrictors can exert pressures dramatically higher than their prey's blood pressure, suggesting that constriction can stop circulatory function and perhaps kill prey rapidly by over-pressurizing the brain and disrupting neural function. We propose the latter 'red-out effect' as another possible mechanism of prey death from constriction. These effects may be important to recognize and treat properly in rare cases when constrictors injure humans.

  10. Translation and testing of the Risk Assessment Pressure Ulcer Sore scale used among residents in Norwegian nursing homes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fossum, Mariann; Söderhamn, Olle; Cliffordson, Christina; Söderhamn, Ulrika

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to translate and test the psychometric properties of the Norwegian-language version of the Risk Assessment Pressure Sore (RAPS) scale. Risk assessment scales for pressure ulcer (PU) prevention have become an aspect of quality improvement in healthcare, but their effectiveness depends on the reliability and validity of the scale.  A convenience sample of 481 residents in 15 nursing homes in rural Norway was included between January and June 2007. The English-language version of the RAPS scale was translated into Norwegian, and this scale was used to collect the data, including a skin examination. The number of PUs and grades were documented. Reliability was assessed in a small group of 26 residents and construct validity in the total study group. Equivalence between two assessments regarding total scores of the RAPS scale was reflected in an intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) of 0.95. Construct validity was supported, and the RAPS scale could define groups with expected low and high scores. Further evidence of construct validity was shown in a confirmatory factor analysis. The Norwegian version of the RAPS scale has shown sufficient psychometric properties to be considered a reliable and valid scale for identifying risk of PUs among nursing home residents. However, further testing is needed.

  11. Scale-4 Analysis of Pressurized Water Reactor Critical Configurations: Volume 4-Three Mile Island Unit 1 Cycle 5

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DeHart, M.D.

    1995-01-01

    The requirements of ANSI/ANS-8.1 specify that calculational methods for away-from-reactor criticality safety analyses be validated against experimental measurements. If credit is to be taken for the reduced reactivity of burned or spent fuel relative to its original ''fresh'' composition, it is necessary to benchmark computational methods used in determining such reactivity worth against spent fuel reactivity measurements. This report summarizes a portion of the ongoing effort to benchmark away-from-reactor criticality analysis methods using relevant and well-documented critical configurations from commercial pressurized water reactors. The analysis methodology utilized for all calculations in this report is based on the modules and data associated with the SCALE-4 code system. Isotopic densities for spent fuel assemblies in the core were calculated using the SCALE-4 SAS2H analytical sequence. The sources of data and the procedures for deriving SAS2H input parameters are described in detail. The SNIKR code family was used to extract the necessary isotopic densities from SAS2H results and to provide the data in the format required for SCALE criticality analysis modules. The CSASN analytical sequence in SCALE-4 was used to perform resonance processing of cross sections. The KENO V.a module of SCALE-4 was used to calculate the effective multiplication factor (k{sub eff}) for the critical configuration. The SCALE-4 27-group burnup library containing ENDF/B-IV (actinides) and ENDF/B-V (fission products) data was used for all calculations. This volume of the report documents a reactor critical calculation for GPU Nuclear Corporation's Three Mile Island Unit 1 (TMI-1) during hot, zero-power startup testing for the beginning of cycle 5. This unit and cycle were selected because of their relevance in spent fuel benchmark applications: (1) cycle 5 startup occurred after an especially long downtime of 6.6 years; and (2) the core consisted primarily

  12. A Comparative Study of a 1/4-Scale Gulfstream G550 Aircraft Nose Gear Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khorrami, Mehdi R.; Neuhart, Dan H.; Zawodny, Nikolas S.; Liu, Fei; Yardibi, Tarik; Cattafesta, Louis; Van de Ven, Thomas

    2009-01-01

    A series of fluid dynamic and aeroacoustic wind tunnel experiments are performed at the University of Florida Aeroacoustic Flow Facility and the NASA-Langley Basic Aerodynamic Research Tunnel Facility on a high-fidelity -scale model of Gulfstream G550 aircraft nose gear. The primary objectives of this study are to obtain a comprehensive aeroacoustic dataset for a nose landing gear and to provide a clearer understanding of landing gear contributions to overall airframe noise of commercial aircraft during landing configurations. Data measurement and analysis consist of mean and fluctuating model surface pressure, noise source localization maps using a large-aperture microphone directional array, and the determination of far field noise level spectra using a linear array of free field microphones. A total of 24 test runs are performed, consisting of four model assembly configurations, each of which is subjected to three test section speeds, in two different test section orientations. The different model assembly configurations vary in complexity from a fully-dressed to a partially-dressed geometry. The two model orientations provide flyover and sideline views from the perspective of a phased acoustic array for noise source localization via beamforming. Results show that the torque arm section of the model exhibits the highest rms pressures for all model configurations, which is also evidenced in the sideline view noise source maps for the partially-dressed model geometries. Analysis of acoustic spectra data from the linear array microphones shows a slight decrease in sound pressure levels at mid to high frequencies for the partially-dressed cavity open model configuration. In addition, far field sound pressure level spectra scale approximately with the 6th power of velocity and do not exhibit traditional Strouhal number scaling behavior.

  13. Scaling of musculoskeletal models from static and dynamic trials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, Morten Enemark; Andersen, Michael Skipper; de Zee, Mark

    2015-01-01

    Subject-specific scaling of cadaver-based musculoskeletal models is important for accurate musculoskeletal analysis within multiple areas such as ergonomics, orthopaedics and occupational health. We present two procedures to scale ‘generic’ musculoskeletal models to match segment lengths and joint...... parameters to a specific subject and compare the results to a simpler approach based on linear, segment-wise scaling. By incorporating data from functional and standing reference trials, the new scaling approaches reduce the model sensitivity to assumed model marker positions. For validation, we applied all...... three scaling methods to an inverse dynamics-based musculoskeletal model and compared predicted knee joint contact forces to those measured with an instrumented prosthesis during gait. Additionally, a Monte Carlo study was used to investigate the sensitivity of the knee joint contact force to random...

  14. Modeling aerosol processes at the local scale

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lazaridis, M.; Isukapalli, S.S.; Georgopoulos, P.G. [Environmental and Occupational Health Sciences Inst., NJ (United States)

    1998-12-31

    This work presents an approach for modeling photochemical gaseous and aerosol phase processes in subgrid plumes from major localized (e.g. point) sources (plume-in-grid modeling), thus improving the ability to quantify the relationship between emission source activity and ambient air quality. This approach employs the Reactive Plume Model (RPM-AERO) which extends the regulatory model RPM-IV by incorporating aerosol processes and heterogeneous chemistry. The physics and chemistry of elemental carbon, organic carbon, sulfate, sodium, chloride and crustal material of aerosols are treated and attributed to the PM size distribution. A modified version of the Carbon Bond IV chemical mechanism is included to model the formation of organic aerosol, and the inorganic multicomponent atmospheric aerosol equilibrium model, SEQUILIB is used for calculating the amounts of inorganic species in particulate matter. Aerosol dynamics modeled include mechanisms of nucleation, condensation and gas/particle partitioning of organic matter. An integrated trajectory-in-grid modeling system, UAM/RPM-AERO, is under continuing development for extracting boundary and initial conditions from the mesoscale photochemical/aerosol model UAM-AERO. The RPM-AERO is applied here to case studies involving emissions from point sources to study sulfate particle formation in plumes. Model calculations show that homogeneous nucleation is an efficient process for new particle formation in plumes, in agreement with previous field studies and theoretical predictions.

  15. Re-scaling social preference data: implications for modelling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cleemput, Irina; Kind, Paul; Kesteloot, Katrien

    2004-12-01

    As applied in cost-utility analysis, generic health status indexes require that full health and dead are valued as 1 and 0, respectively. When social preference weights for health states are obtained using a visual analogue scale (VAS), their raw scores often lie on a scale with different endpoints (such as "best" and "worst" health). Re-scaling individual raw scores to a 0-1 scale leads to the exclusion of respondents who fail to value dead or full health. This study examined alternative approaches that do not impose such strict exclusion criteria. The impact of a different timing of re-scaling (before or after aggregation) and a different measure of central tendency (median or mean) is measured. Data from a postal valuation survey (n=722) conducted in Belgium are used. The following models are considered: (a) re-scaling values for EQ-5D health states on a within-respondent basis and using mean re-scaled values as proxies for social preference values, (b) using median re-scaled values as proxies for social preference values, (c) computing the median raw VAS values and then re-scale, and (e) re-scaling mean raw VAS values. Exclusion rates, health state rankings and valuations and incremental value differences between pairs of states are computed for each model. Models that use a different timing of re-scaling, are compared ceteris paribus to evaluate the importance of timing of re-scaling and models that use a different measure of central tendency are compared ceteris paribus to evaluate the importance of the measure of central tendency. The exclusion rates are above 20% in the models that re-scale valuations before aggregation and less than 5% in the models that re-scale after aggregation. Health state valuations are found to be different in all two by two comparisons. Although in some comparisons the incremental values are statistically significantly different between models, they are never clinically significantly different. Differences in health state rankings

  16. Atrial Remodeling Is Directly Related to End-Diastolic Left Ventricular Pressure in a Mouse Model of Ventricular Pressure Overload

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Jong, Anne Margreet; Van Gelder, Isabelle C.; Baudoin, Inge; Cannon, Megan V.; Van Gilst, Wiek H.; Maass, Alexander H.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Atrial fibrillation (AF) is often preceded by underlying cardiac diseases causing ventricular pressure overload. Objective: It was our aim to investigate the progression of atrial remodeling in a small animal model of ventricular pressure overload and its association with induction of

  17. ScaleNet: a literature-based model of scale insect biology and systematics

    OpenAIRE

    García Morales, Mayrolin; Denno, Barbara D.; Miller, Douglass R.; Miller, Gary L.; Ben-Dov, Yair; Hardy, Nate B.

    2016-01-01

    Scale insects (Hemiptera: Coccoidea) are small herbivorous insects found on all continents except Antarctica. They are extremely invasive, and many species are serious agricultural pests. They are also emerging models for studies of the evolution of genetic systems, endosymbiosis and plant-insect interactions. ScaleNet was launched in 1995 to provide insect identifiers, pest managers, insect systematists, evolutionary biologists and ecologists efficient access to information about scale insec...

  18. Strong scale dependent bispectrum in the Starobinsky model of inflation

    CERN Document Server

    Arroja, Frederico

    2012-01-01

    We compute analytically the dominant contribution to the tree-level bispectrum in the Starobinsky model of inflation. In this model, the potential is vacuum energy dominated but contains a subdominant linear term which changes the slope abruptly at a point. We show that on large scales compared with the transition scale $k_0$ and in the equilateral limit the analogue of the non-linearity parameter scales as $(k/k_0)^2$, that is its amplitude decays for larger and larger scales until it becomes subdominant with respect to the usual slow-roll suppressed corrections. On small scales we show that the non-linearity parameter oscillates with angular frequency given by $3/k_0$ and its amplitude grows linearly towards smaller scales and can be large depending on the model parameters. We also compare our results with previous results in the literature.

  19. Raster-Based Approach to Solar Pressure Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Theodore W. II

    2013-01-01

    An algorithm has been developed to take advantage of the graphics processing hardware in modern computers to efficiently compute high-fidelity solar pressure forces and torques on spacecraft, taking into account the possibility of self-shading due to the articulation of spacecraft components such as solar arrays. The process is easily extended to compute other results that depend on three-dimensional attitude analysis, such as solar array power generation or free molecular flow drag. The impact of photons upon a spacecraft introduces small forces and moments. The magnitude and direction of the forces depend on the material properties of the spacecraft components being illuminated. The parts of the components being lit depends on the orientation of the craft with respect to the Sun, as well as the gimbal angles for any significant moving external parts (solar arrays, typically). Some components may shield others from the Sun. The purpose of this innovation is to enable high-fidelity computation of solar pressure and power generation effects of illuminated portions of spacecraft, taking self-shading from spacecraft attitude and movable components into account. The key idea in this innovation is to compute results dependent upon complicated geometry by using an image to break the problem into thousands or millions of sub-problems with simple geometry, and then the results from the simpler problems are combined to give high-fidelity results for the full geometry. This process is performed by constructing a 3D model of a spacecraft using an appropriate computer language (OpenGL), and running that model on a modern computer's 3D accelerated video processor. This quickly and accurately generates a view of the model (as shown on a computer screen) that takes rotation and articulation of spacecraft components into account. When this view is interpreted as the spacecraft as seen by the Sun, then only the portions of the craft visible in the view are illuminated. The view as

  20. Cinlar Subgrid Scale Model for Large Eddy Simulation

    CERN Document Server

    Kara, Rukiye

    2016-01-01

    We construct a new subgrid scale (SGS) stress model for representing the small scale effects in large eddy simulation (LES) of incompressible flows. We use the covariance tensor for representing the Reynolds stress and include Clark's model for the cross stress. The Reynolds stress is obtained analytically from Cinlar random velocity field, which is based on vortex structures observed in the ocean at the subgrid scale. The validity of the model is tested with turbulent channel flow computed in OpenFOAM. It is compared with the most frequently used Smagorinsky and one-equation eddy SGS models through DNS data.

  1. A numerical model for dynamic crustal-scale fluid flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sachau, Till; Bons, Paul; Gomez-Rivas, Enrique; Koehn, Daniel

    2015-04-01

    Fluid flow in the crust is often envisaged and modeled as continuous, yet minimal flow, which occurs over large geological times. This is a suitable approximation for flow as long as it is solely controlled by the matrix permeability of rocks, which in turn is controlled by viscous compaction of the pore space. However, strong evidence (hydrothermal veins and ore deposits) exists that a significant part of fluid flow in the crust occurs strongly localized in both space and time, controlled by the opening and sealing of hydrofractures. We developed, tested and applied a novel computer code, which considers this dynamic behavior and couples it with steady, Darcian flow controlled by the matrix permeability. In this dual-porosity model, fractures open depending on the fluid pressure relative to the solid pressure. Fractures form when matrix permeability is insufficient to accommodate fluid flow resulting from compaction, decompression (Staude et al. 2009) or metamorphic dehydration reactions (Weisheit et al. 2013). Open fractures can close when the contained fluid either seeps into the matrix or escapes by fracture propagation: mobile hydrofractures (Bons, 2001). In the model, closing and sealing of fractures is controlled by a time-dependent viscous law, which is based on the effective stress and on either Newtonian or non-Newtonian viscosity. Our simulations indicate that the bulk of crustal fluid flow in the middle to lower upper crust is intermittent, highly self-organized, and occurs as mobile hydrofractures. This is due to the low matrix porosity and permeability, combined with a low matrix viscosity and, hence, fast sealing of fractures. Stable fracture networks, generated by fluid overpressure, are restricted to the uppermost crust. Semi-stable fracture networks can develop in an intermediate zone, if a critical overpressure is reached. Flow rates in mobile hydrofractures exceed those in the matrix porosity and fracture networks by orders of magnitude

  2. Scale invariant cosmology II: model equations and properties

    CERN Document Server

    Maeder, Andre

    2016-01-01

    We want to establish the basic properties of a scale invariant cosmology, that also accounts for the hypothesis of scale invariance of the empty space at large scales. We write the basic analytical properties of the scale invariant cosmological models. The hypothesis of scale invariance of the empty space at large scale brings interesting simplifications in the scale invariant equations for cosmology. There is one new term, depending on the scale factor of the scale invariant cosmology, that opposes to gravity and favours an accelerated expansion. We first consider a zero-density model and find an accelerated expansion, going like t square. In models with matter present, the displacements due to the new term make a significant contribution Omega_l to the energy-density of the Universe, satisfying an equation of the form Omega_m + Omega_k + Omega_l = 1. Unlike the Friedman's models, there is a whole family of flat models (k=0) with different density parameters Omega_m smaller than 1. We examine the basic relat...

  3. Multi-scale Modelling of the Ocean Beneath Ice Shelves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Candy, A. S.; Kimura, S.; Holland, P.; Kramer, S. C.; Piggott, M. D.; Jenkins, A.; Pain, C. C.

    2011-12-01

    Quantitative prediction of future sea-level is currently limited because we lack an understanding of how the mass balance of the Earth's great ice sheets respond to and influence the climate. Understanding the behaviour of the ocean beneath an ice shelf and its interaction with the sheet above presents a great scientific challenge. A solid ice cover, in many places kilometres thick, bars access to the water column, so that observational data can only be obtained by drilling holes through, or launching autonomous vehicles beneath, the ice. In the absence of a comprehensive observational database, numerical modelling can be a key tool to advancing our understanding of the sub-ice-shelf regime. While we have a reasonable understanding of the overall ocean circulation and basic sensitivities, there remain critical processes that are difficult or impossible to represent in current operational models. Resolving these features adequately within a domain that includes the entire ice shelf and continental shelf to the north can be difficult with a structured horizontal resolution. It is currently impossible to adequately represent the key grounding line region, where the water column thickness reduces to zero, with a structured vertical grid. In addition, fronts and pycnoclines, the ice front geometry, shelf basal irregularities and modelling surface pressure all prove difficult in current approaches. The Fluidity-ICOM model (Piggott et al. 2008, doi:10.1002/fld.1663) simulates non-hydrostatic dynamics on meshes that can be unstructured in all three dimensions and uses anisotropic adaptive resolution which optimises the mesh and calculation in response to evolving solution dynamics. These features give it the flexibility required to tackle the challenges outlined above and the opportunity to develop a model that can improve understanding of the physical processes occurring under ice shelves. The approaches taken to develop a multi-scale model of ice shelf ocean cavity

  4. Network modelling of wettability and pore geometry effects on electrical resistivity and capillary pressure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Man, H.N.; Jing, X.D. [Centre for Petroleum Studies, T.H. Huxley School, Imperial College of Science, Technology and Medicine, Prince Consort Road, London (United Kingdom)

    1999-12-01

    Recent research efforts have focused on using simple non-circular cross-sectional pore shapes to honour the physics observed at the pore scale. For example, there is evidence to suggest variations of wettability occur at this level. These pores can exhibit water-wet and oil-wet regions, depending on the physics of wetting films, and hence the porous medium maybe of mixed-wettability character. For low water saturations, electrical resistivity cannot be physically simulated at the pore scale using cylindrical tubes, even though wetting film thickness' and pore constrictions are taken into account. A three-dimensional network model that investigates the petrophysical characteristics, electrical resistivity and capillary pressure, is presented. The influence of saturation history is also modelled. Key pore geometrical attributes such as pore shape, aspect ratio, pore coordination number (pore connectivity) and pore size distribution are included in the model. In addition, pore constrictions are introduced which may result in phase trapping via snap-off within the tube itself. Analysis of our developing network model starting from representing the pore shape as circular is presented. Using a simple non-circular cross-sectional pore shape we show bulk water retained in the crevices give rise to predictions that are in close agreement with electrical resistivity and capillary pressure trends observed in experiments. Numerical results are presented and compared with experimental data.

  5. Modeling of patient's blood pressure variation during ambulance transportation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakatani, Kenji; Ono, Takahiko; Kobayasi, Yasuhide; Hikita, Shinichi; Saito, Mitsuyuki

    2007-12-01

    In an emergency transportation by ambulance, a patient is transported in a supine position. In this position, a patient's blood pressure (BP) variation depending on an inertial force which occurs when an ambulance accelerates or decelerates. This BP variation causes a critical damage for a patent with brain disorder. In order to keep a patient stable during transportation, it is required to maintain small BP variation. To analyze the BP variation during transportation, a model of the BP variation has so far been made. But, it can estimate the BP variation only in braking. The purpose of this paper is to make a dynamical model of the BP variation which can simulate it in both braking and accelerating. First, to obtain the data to construct the model, we used a tilting bed to measure a head-to-foot acceleration and BP of fingertip. Based on this data, we build a mathematical model whose input is the head-to-foot acceleration and output is the Mean BP variation. It is a switched model which switches two models depending on the jerk. We add baroreceptor reflex to the model as a offset value.

  6. Enhanced solar radiation pressure modeling for Galileo satellites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montenbruck, O.; Steigenberger, P.; Hugentobler, U.

    2015-03-01

    This paper introduces a new approach for modeling solar radiation pressure (SRP) effects on Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSSs). It focuses on the Galileo In-Orbit Validation (IOV) satellites, for which obvious SRP modeling deficits can be identified in presently available precise orbit products. To overcome these problems, the estimation of empirical accelerations in the Sun direction (D), solar panel axis (Y) and the orthogonal (B) axis is complemented by an a priori model accounting for the contribution of the rectangular spacecraft body. Other than the GPS satellites, which comprise an almost cubic body, the Galileo IOV satellites exhibit a notably rectangular shape with a ratio of about 2:1 for the main body axes. Use of the a priori box model allows to properly model the varying cross section exposed to the Sun during yaw-steering attitude mode and helps to remove systematic once-per-revolution orbit errors that have so far affected the Galileo orbit determination. Parameters of a simple a priori cuboid model suitable for the IOV satellites are established from the analysis of a long-term set of GNSS observations collected with the global network of the Multi-GNSS Experiment of the International GNSS Service. The model is finally demonstrated to reduce the peak magnitude of radial orbit errors from presently 20 cm down to 5 cm outside eclipse phases.

  7. Increasing pulse wave velocity in a realistic cardiovascular model does not increase pulse pressure with age

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohiuddin, Mohammad W.; Rihani, Ryan J.; Laine, Glen A.

    2012-01-01

    The mechanism of the well-documented increase in aortic pulse pressure (PP) with age is disputed. Investigators assuming a classical windkessel model believe that increases in PP arise from decreases in total arterial compliance (Ctot) and increases in total peripheral resistance (Rtot) with age. Investigators assuming a more sophisticated pulse transmission model believe PP rises because increases in pulse wave velocity (cph) make the reflected pressure wave arrive earlier, augmenting systolic pressure. It has recently been shown, however, that increases in cph do not have a commensurate effect on the timing of the reflected wave. We therefore used a validated, large-scale, human arterial system model that includes realistic pulse wave transmission to determine whether increases in cph cause increased PP with age. First, we made the realistic arterial system model age dependent by altering cardiac output (CO), Rtot, Ctot, and cph to mimic the reported changes in these parameters from age 30 to 70. Then, cph was theoretically maintained constant, while Ctot, Rtot, and CO were altered. The predicted increase in PP with age was similar to the observed increase in PP. In a complementary approach, Ctot, Rtot, and CO were theoretically maintained constant, and cph was increased. The predicted increase in PP was negligible. We found that increases in cph have a limited effect on the timing of the reflected wave but cause the system to degenerate into a windkessel. Changes in PP can therefore be attributed to a decrease in Ctot. PMID:22561301

  8. Numerical Investigation of Pressure Fluctuation in Centrifugal Pump Volute Based on SAS Model and Experimental Validation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiaorui Si

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents an investigation of pressure fluctuation of a single-suction volute-type centrifugal pump, particularly volute casing, by using numerical and experimental methods. A new type of hybrid Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes/Large Eddy Simulation, referred to as the shear stress transport-scale-adaptive simulation (SAS model, is employed to study the unsteady flow. Statistical analysis method is adopted to show the pressure fluctuation intensity distribution in the volute channel. A test rig for pressure pulsation measurement is built to validate the numerical simulation results using eight transient pressure sensors in the middle section of the volute wall. Results show that the SAS model can accurately predict the inner flow field of centrifugal pumps. Radial force acting on the impeller presents a star distribution related to the blade number. Pressure fluctuation intensity is strongest near the tongue and shows irregular distribution in the pump casing. Pressure fluctuation is distributed symmetrically at the cross-section of the volute casing because the volute can eliminate the rotational movement of the liquid discharged from the impeller. Blade passing frequency and its multiples indicate the dominant frequency of the monitoring points within the volute, and the low-frequency pulsation, particularly in the shaft component, increases when it operates at off-design condition, particularly with a small flow rate. The reason is that the vortex wave is enhanced at the off-design condition, which has an effect on the axle and is presented in the shaft component in the frequency domain.

  9. Analysis of linear trade models and relation to scale economies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomory, R E; Baumol, W J

    1997-09-01

    We discuss linear Ricardo models with a range of parameters. We show that the exact boundary of the region of equilibria of these models is obtained by solving a simple integer programming problem. We show that there is also an exact correspondence between many of the equilibria resulting from families of linear models and the multiple equilibria of economies of scale models.

  10. Plant growth simulation for landscape scale hydrologic modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landscape scale hydrologic models can be improved by incorporating realistic, process-oriented plant models for simulating crops, grasses, and woody species. The objective of this project was to present some approaches for plant modeling applicable to hydrologic models like SWAT that can affect the...

  11. Polymorphism of a polymer precursor: metastable glycolide polymorph recovered via large scale high-pressure experiments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hutchison, Ian B.; Delori, Amit; Wang, Xiao;

    2015-01-01

    Using a large volume high-pressure press a new polymorph of an important precursor for biomedical polymers was isolated in gram quantities and used to seed crystallisation experiments at ambient pressure.......Using a large volume high-pressure press a new polymorph of an important precursor for biomedical polymers was isolated in gram quantities and used to seed crystallisation experiments at ambient pressure....

  12. Stochastic modeling of unresolved scales in complex systems

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jinqiao DUAN

    2009-01-01

    Model uncertainties or simulation uncertainties occur in math-ematical modeling of multiscale complex systems, since some mechanisms or scales are not represented (i.e., 'unresolved') due to a lack in our understand-ing of these mechanisms or limitations in computational power. The impact of these unresolved scales on the resolved scales needs to be parameterized or taken into account. A stochastic scheme is devised to take the effects of unresolved scales into account, in the context of solving nonlinear partial differential equations. An example is presented to demonstrate this strategy.

  13. Scaling of far-field wake angle of nonaxisymmetric pressure disturbance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moisy, F.; Rabaud, M.

    2014-06-01

    It has been recently emphasized that the angle of maximum wave amplitude α in the wake of a disturbance of finite size can be significantly narrower than the maximum value αK=sin-1(1/3)≃19.47∘ predicted by the classical analysis of Kelvin. For axisymmetric disturbance, a simple argument based on the Cauchy-Poisson initial-value problem suggests that the wake angle decreases following a Mach-like law at large velocity, α ≃FrL-1, where FrL=U/√gL is the Froude number based on the disturbance velocity U, its size L, and gravity g. In this paper we extend this analysis to the case of nonaxisymmetric disturbances, relevant to real ships. We find that, for intermediate Froude numbers, the wake angle follows an intermediate scaling law α ≃FrL-2, in agreement with the recent prediction of Noblesse et al. [Eur. J. Mech. B/Fluids 46, 164 (2014), 10.1016/j.euromechflu.2014.03.012]. We show that beyond a critical Froude number, which scales as A1/2 (where A is the length-to-width aspect ratio of the disturbance), the asymptotic scaling α ≃FrB-1 holds, where now FrB=A1/2FrL is the Froude number based on the disturbance width. We propose a simple model for this transition, and provide a regime diagram of the scaling of the wake angle as a function of parameters (A,FrL).

  14. Modeling of a Large-Scale High Temperature Regenerative Sulfur Removal Process

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Konttinen, Jukka T.; Johnsson, Jan Erik

    1999-01-01

    -up. Steady-state kinetic reactor models are needed for reactor sizing, and dynamic models can be used for process control design and operator training. The regenerative sulfur removal process to be studied in this paper consists of two side-by-side fluidized bed reactors operating at temperatures of 400......-650°C and at elevated pressure. In this paper, hydrodynamic modeling equations for dense fluidized bed and freeboard are applied for the prediction of the performance of a large-scale regeneration reactor. These equations can partly explain the differences in modeling results observed with a simpler...

  15. Brillouin Scattering With Simultaneous X-Ray Diffraction at GSECARS, Advanced Photon Source: Toward Determination of Absolute Pressure Scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bass, J. D.; Sinogeikin, S. V.; Lakshtanov, D. L.; Prakapenka, V. B.; Shen, G.; Sanchez-Valle, C.; Perrillat, J.; Wang, J.; Chen, B.

    2006-12-01

    As one of the primary goals of the Elasticity Grand Challenge initiative and a COMPRES Infrastructure Development Project, a Brillouin spectrometer has been designed and installed at a synchrotron beam line (GSECARS, Sector 13 of the Advanced Photon Source). This facility allows one to simultaneously measure sound velocities (by Brillouin scattering) and density (by synchrotron X-ray diffraction measurements of the volume) on small single crystals at high pressure and/or temperature. One of the main motivations for this work was to perform measurements at high pressure on a variety of materials that would be useful as pressure standards for high-pressure research. It is now well known that through simultaneous velocity and density measurements at high pressure, one can solve for the pressure without resort to secondary standards such as the ruby pressure scale. Such measurements have thus far been carried out with several potential standards, such as NaCl and MgO. Single-crystal samples were loaded into diamond anvil cells along with ruby chips, and samples of standard metals such as Pt and Au. For NaCl and MgO, Brillouin spectra recording the longitudinal and transverse sound velocities, and simultaneous XRD were performed up to pressures of about 30 GPa. In addition, the velocities and density of polycrystalline B2 phase of NaCl were measured to >70 GPa. In this talk we describe this new facility and the measurements made thus far on NaCl and MgO. We further discuss the implications of our results on existing pressure scales.

  16. Dynamically Scaled Model Experiment of a Mooring Cable

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lars Bergdahl

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The dynamic response of mooring cables for marine structures is scale-dependent, and perfect dynamic similitude between full-scale prototypes and small-scale physical model tests is difficult to achieve. The best possible scaling is here sought by means of a specific set of dimensionless parameters, and the model accuracy is also evaluated by two alternative sets of dimensionless parameters. A special feature of the presented experiment is that a chain was scaled to have correct propagation celerity for longitudinal elastic waves, thus providing perfect geometrical and dynamic scaling in vacuum, which is unique. The scaling error due to incorrect Reynolds number seemed to be of minor importance. The 33 m experimental chain could then be considered a scaled 76 mm stud chain with the length 1240 m, i.e., at the length scale of 1:37.6. Due to the correct elastic scale, the physical model was able to reproduce the effect of snatch loads giving rise to tensional shock waves propagating along the cable. The results from the experiment were used to validate the newly developed cable-dynamics code, MooDy, which utilises a discontinuous Galerkin FEM formulation. The validation of MooDy proved to be successful for the presented experiments. The experimental data is made available here for validation of other numerical codes by publishing digitised time series of two of the experiments.

  17. Modelling of pressure-strain correlation in compressible turbulent flow

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Siyuan Huang; Song Fu

    2008-01-01

    Previous studies carried out in the early 1990s conjectured that the main compressible effects could be associated with the dilatational effects of velocity fluctuation.Later,it was shown that the main compressibility effect came from the reduced pressure-strain term due to reduced pressure fluctuations.Although better understanding of the compressible turbulence is generally achieved with the increased DNS and experimental research effort,there are still some discrepancies among these recent findings.Analysis of the DNS and experimental data suggests that some of the discrepancies are apparent if the compressible effect is related to the turbulent Mach number,Mt.From the comparison of two classes of compressible flow,homogenous shear flow and inhomogeneous shear flow(mixing layer),we found that the effect of compressibility on both classes of shear flow can be characterized in three categories corresponding to three regions of turbulent Mach numbers:the low-Mt,the moderate-Mt and high-Mt regions.In these three regions the effect of compressibility on the growth rate of the turbulent mixing layer thickness is rather different.A simple approach to the reduced pressure-strain effect may not necessarily reduce the mixing-layer growth rate,and may even cause an increase in the growth rate.The present work develops a new second-moment model for the compressible turbulence through the introduction of some blending functions of Mt to account for the compressibility effects on the flow.The model has been successfully applied to the compressible mixing layers.

  18. Behavior modification in primary care: the pressure system model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katz, D L

    2001-01-01

    The leading causes of death in the United States are predominantly attributable to modifiable behaviors. Patients with behavioral risk factors for premature death and disability, including dietary practices; sexual practices; level of physical activity; motor vehi cle use patterns; and tobacco, alcohol, and illicit sub stance use, are seen far more consistently by primary care providers than by mental health specialists. Yet models of behavior modification are reported, debated, and revised almost exclusively in the psychology literature. While the Stages of Change Model, or Transtheo retical Model, has won application in a broadening array of clinical settings, its application in the primary care setting is apparently quite limited despite evidence of its utility [Prochaska J, Velicer W. Am J Health Promot 1997;12:38-48]. The lack of a rigorous behavioral model developed for application in the primary care setting is an impediment to the accomplishment of public health goals specified in the Healthy People objectives and in the reports of the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force. The Pressure System Model reported here synthesizes elements of established behavior modification theories for specific application under the constraints of the primary care setting. Use of the model in both clinical and research settings, with outcome evaluation, is encouraged as part of an effort to advance public health.

  19. The Norton, Waterlow, Braden, and Care Dependency Scales: comparing their validity when identifying patients' pressure sore risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balzer, Katrin; Pohl, Claudia; Dassen, Theo; Halfens, Rudd

    2007-01-01

    We compared the sensitivity and specificity of the Norton, Waterlow, and Braden Scales in identifying patients at pressure sore risk. An additional goal was to determine whether or not the Care Dependency Scale (CDS) is able to detect patients at risk for pressure sore development. The investigation was part of a prevalence study involving 754 patients in 3 Berlin hospitals. A questionnaire was used containing the subscales of the 3 risk calculators (Norton, Waterlow, and Braden), and the CDS. On the specified day nurses filled in the questionnaire using data obtained from the patients' charts and direct visualization of the patients' skin. Thirty-four out of 754 patients had at least 1 pressure ulcer. Comparing the 3 risk assessment tools, the Waterlow scale demonstrated the highest sensitivity (0.86) and the Norton scale demonstrated the highest specificity (0.75). Individuals with pressure sores were more likely to be care dependent (t-test: P< .01); 27 of them had a CDS score lower than 55. Using the score of 55 as the cut-off point, the CDS demonstrated a sensitivity of 0.74 and a specificity of 0.83. This study demonstrated remarkable differences among the 3 commonly used risk assessment tools, in regards to sensitivity and specificity. Moreover, the CDS seems to have a diagnostic value similar to the 3 commonly used risk assessment calculators.

  20. Modeling the Ductile Brittle Fracture Transition in Reactor Pressure Vessel Steels using a Cohesive Zone Model based approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pritam Chakraborty; S. Bulent Biner

    2013-10-01

    Fracture properties of Reactor Pressure Vessel (RPV) steels show large variations with changes in temperature and irradiation levels. Brittle behavior is observed at lower temperatures and/or higher irradiation levels whereas ductile mode of failure is predominant at higher temperatures and/or lower irradiation levels. In addition to such temperature and radiation dependent fracture behavior, significant scatter in fracture toughness has also been observed. As a consequence of such variability in fracture behavior, accurate estimates of fracture properties of RPV steels are of utmost importance for safe and reliable operation of reactor pressure vessels. A cohesive zone based approach is being pursued in the present study where an attempt is made to obtain a unified law capturing both stable crack growth (ductile fracture) and unstable failure (cleavage fracture). The parameters of the constitutive model are dependent on both temperature and failure probability. The effect of irradiation has not been considered in the present study. The use of such a cohesive zone based approach would allow the modeling of explicit crack growth at both stable and unstable regimes of fracture. Also it would provide the possibility to incorporate more physical lower length scale models to predict DBT. Such a multi-scale approach would significantly improve the predictive capabilities of the model, which is still largely empirical.

  1. Analysis of chromosome aberration data by hybrid-scale models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Indrawati, Iwiq [Research and Development on Radiation and Nuclear Biomedical Center, National Nuclear Energy Agency (Indonesia); Kumazawa, Shigeru [Nuclear Technology and Education Center, Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute, Honkomagome, Tokyo (Japan)

    2000-02-01

    This paper presents a new methodology for analyzing data of chromosome aberrations, which is useful to understand the characteristics of dose-response relationships and to construct the calibration curves for the biological dosimetry. The hybrid scale of linear and logarithmic scales brings a particular plotting paper, where the normal section paper, two types of semi-log papers and the log-log paper are continuously connected. The hybrid-hybrid plotting paper may contain nine kinds of linear relationships, and these are conveniently called hybrid scale models. One can systematically select the best-fit model among the nine models by among the conditions for a straight line of data points. A biological interpretation is possible with some hybrid-scale models. In this report, the hybrid scale models were applied to separately reported data on chromosome aberrations in human lymphocytes as well as on chromosome breaks in Tradescantia. The results proved that the proposed models fit the data better than the linear-quadratic model, despite the demerit of the increased number of model parameters. We showed that the hybrid-hybrid model (both variables of dose and response using the hybrid scale) provides the best-fit straight lines to be used as the reliable and readable calibration curves of chromosome aberrations. (author)

  2. The dynamic scale display digital pressure gauge%动态刻度显示数字压力表

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王浩

    2014-01-01

    The dynamic scale display digital pressure gauge provides an intuitive dynamic pressure scale display, which not only uses the same digital pressure gauge and general digital display pressure values, and can be used LED string light off analog disc mechanical pressure gauge pointer indicates the instant value of the pressure, with the LED lights steady visual analog display measuring signal set upper limit, lower limit value.%针对现有数字压力表在显示方面的不足,开发设计了一种能够同时具有两种显示方式的动态刻度显示数字压力表。它不仅能够和一般数字压力表一样采用数码管显示压力值,而且可以用LED灯串模拟圆盘式机械压力表指针指示即时压力值,用常亮LED灯直观地模拟显示设定测量信号的上限值、下限值。

  3. Whole-body mathematical model for simulating intracranial pressure dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lakin, William D. (Inventor); Penar, Paul L. (Inventor); Stevens, Scott A. (Inventor); Tranmer, Bruce I. (Inventor)

    2007-01-01

    A whole-body mathematical model (10) for simulating intracranial pressure dynamics. In one embodiment, model (10) includes 17 interacting compartments, of which nine lie entirely outside of intracranial vault (14). Compartments (F) and (T) are defined to distinguish ventricular from extraventricular CSF. The vasculature of the intracranial system within cranial vault (14) is also subdivided into five compartments (A, C, P, V, and S, respectively) representing the intracranial arteries, capillaries, choroid plexus, veins, and venous sinus. The body's extracranial systemic vasculature is divided into six compartments (I, J, O, Z, D, and X, respectively) representing the arteries, capillaries, and veins of the central body and the lower body. Compartments (G) and (B) include tissue and the associated interstitial fluid in the intracranial and lower regions. Compartment (Y) is a composite involving the tissues, organs, and pulmonary circulation of the central body and compartment (M) represents the external environment.

  4. Network Scale Modeling of Lymph Transport and Its Effective Pumping Parameters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jamalian, Samira; Davis, Michael J; Zawieja, David C; Moore, James E

    2016-01-01

    The lymphatic system is an open-ended network of vessels that run in parallel to the blood circulation system. These vessels are present in almost all of the tissues of the body to remove excess fluid. Similar to blood vessels, lymphatic vessels are found in branched arrangements. Due to the complexity of experiments on lymphatic networks and the difficulty to control the important functional parameters in these setups, computational modeling becomes an effective and essential means of understanding lymphatic network pumping dynamics. Here we aimed to determine the effect of pumping coordination in branched network structures on the regulation of lymph flow. Lymphatic vessel networks were created by building upon our previous lumped-parameter model of lymphangions in series. In our network model, each vessel is itself divided into multiple lymphangions by lymphatic valves that help maintain forward flow. Vessel junctions are modeled by equating the pressures and balancing mass flows. Our results demonstrated that a 1.5 s rest-period between contractions optimizes the flow rate. A time delay between contractions of lymphangions at the junction of branches provided an advantage over synchronous pumping, but additional time delays within individual vessels only increased the flow rate for adverse pressure differences greater than 10.5 cmH2O. Additionally, we quantified the pumping capability of the system under increasing levels of steady transmural pressure and outflow pressure for different network sizes. We observed that peak flow rates normally occurred under transmural pressures between 2 to 4 cmH2O (for multiple pressure differences and network sizes). Networks with 10 lymphangions per vessel had the highest pumping capability under a wide range of adverse pressure differences. For favorable pressure differences, pumping was more efficient with fewer lymphangions. These findings are valuable for translating experimental measurements from the single lymphangion

  5. Network Scale Modeling of Lymph Transport and Its Effective Pumping Parameters.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samira Jamalian

    Full Text Available The lymphatic system is an open-ended network of vessels that run in parallel to the blood circulation system. These vessels are present in almost all of the tissues of the body to remove excess fluid. Similar to blood vessels, lymphatic vessels are found in branched arrangements. Due to the complexity of experiments on lymphatic networks and the difficulty to control the important functional parameters in these setups, computational modeling becomes an effective and essential means of understanding lymphatic network pumping dynamics. Here we aimed to determine the effect of pumping coordination in branched network structures on the regulation of lymph flow. Lymphatic vessel networks were created by building upon our previous lumped-parameter model of lymphangions in series. In our network model, each vessel is itself divided into multiple lymphangions by lymphatic valves that help maintain forward flow. Vessel junctions are modeled by equating the pressures and balancing mass flows. Our results demonstrated that a 1.5 s rest-period between contractions optimizes the flow rate. A time delay between contractions of lymphangions at the junction of branches provided an advantage over synchronous pumping, but additional time delays within individual vessels only increased the flow rate for adverse pressure differences greater than 10.5 cmH2O. Additionally, we quantified the pumping capability of the system under increasing levels of steady transmural pressure and outflow pressure for different network sizes. We observed that peak flow rates normally occurred under transmural pressures between 2 to 4 cmH2O (for multiple pressure differences and network sizes. Networks with 10 lymphangions per vessel had the highest pumping capability under a wide range of adverse pressure differences. For favorable pressure differences, pumping was more efficient with fewer lymphangions. These findings are valuable for translating experimental measurements from the

  6. Advances in large-scale crop modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scholze, Marko; Bondeau, Alberte; Ewert, Frank; Kucharik, Chris; Priess, Jörg; Smith, Pascalle

    Intensified human activity and a growing population have changed the climate and the land biosphere. One of the most widely recognized human perturbations is the emission of carbon dioxide (C02) by fossil fuel burning and land-use change. As the terrestrial biosphere is an active player in the global carbon cycle, changes in land use feed back to the climate of the Earth through regulation of the content of atmospheric CO2, the most important greenhouse gas,and changing albedo (e.g., energy partitioning).Recently, the climate modeling community has started to develop more complex Earthsystem models that include marine and terrestrial biogeochemical processes in addition to the representation of atmospheric and oceanic circulation. However, most terrestrial biosphere models simulate only natural, or so-called potential, vegetation and do not account for managed ecosystems such as croplands and pastures, which make up nearly one-third of the Earth's land surface.

  7. Pore-Scale Modeling of Navier-Stokes Flow in Distensible Networks and Porous Media

    CERN Document Server

    Sochi, Taha

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, a pore-scale network modeling method, based on the flow continuity residual in conjunction with a Newton-Raphson non-linear iterative solving technique, is proposed and used to obtain the pressure and flow fields in a network of interconnected distensible ducts representing, for instance, blood vasculature or deformable porous media. A previously derived analytical expression correlating boundary pressures to volumetric flow rate in compliant tubes for a pressure-area constitutive elastic relation has been used to represent the underlying flow model. Comparison to a preceding equivalent method, the one-dimensional Navier-Stokes finite element, was made and the results were analyzed. The advantages of the new method have been highlighted and practical computational issues, related mainly to the rate and speed of convergence, have been discussed.

  8. Improving pressure ulcer risk assessment and management using the Waterlow scale at a London teaching hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahalingam, S; Gao, L; Nageshwaran, S; Vickers, C; Bottomley, T; Grewal, P

    2014-12-01

    Pressure ulcers (PUs) cost the National Health Service (NHS) up to 4% of its health care expenditure. Arising from this are also clinical negligence claims, where inadequate risk assessment has been cited as one of the principal drawbacks in the prevention of PUs. This two-cycle audit aims to examine the consistency and accuracy of risk assessment of patients, and demonstrates how simple focused interventions can improve the quality of care provided. The Waterlow pressure ulcer risk assessment tool was employed to assess inpatients during a 6-month period at a London teaching hospital. Patients were risk assessed, and examined to detect PUs and to determine the type of mattress. We compared our findings with clinical (nursing and medical) documentation. Interventions were made through questionnaires given to staff, educational sessions, presentations and posters addressing where improvements could be made in risk stratifying patients. A repeat audit was carried out 24 months later and the results from both cycles were compared. Statistical analysis was carried out using Fisher's exact and the Student's T-test. In total 100 in-patients were assessed in each cycle with a mean age of 71.4 years in cycle 1 and 70.1 years in cycle 2. A nursing Waterlow score was recorded for 81% of patients in cycle 1 and 100% in cycle 2 (p<0.05). In cycle 1, the average nursing score was significantly lower than that from the study (mean 13.7 versus 17.1, median 14.0 versus 18.0; p<0.05), but after intervention this had reduced to a minimal difference (mean 8.5 versus 9.0, median 8.0 versus 9.0, p=0.08). Nursing scores recorded in the notes were lower than the study scores in cycle 1, primarily from a failure to appropriately assess certain categories of the Waterlow scale. These differences reduced after focused education of staff. Our results suggest that targeted interventions tailored towards nursing and medical staff can result in improvements in the risk assessment for prevention

  9. [Unfolding item response model using best-worst scaling].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikehara, Kazuya

    2015-02-01

    In attitude measurement and sensory tests, the unfolding model is typically used. In this model, response probability is formulated by the distance between the person and the stimulus. In this study, we proposed an unfolding item response model using best-worst scaling (BWU model), in which a person chooses the best and worst stimulus among repeatedly presented subsets of stimuli. We also formulated an unfolding model using best scaling (BU model), and compared the accuracy of estimates between the BU and BWU models. A simulation experiment showed that the BWU modell performed much better than the BU model in terms of bias and root mean square errors of estimates. With reference to Usami (2011), the proposed models were apllied to actual data to measure attitudes toward tardiness. Results indicated high similarity between stimuli estimates generated with the proposed models and those of Usami (2011).

  10. MOUNTAIN-SCALE COUPLED PROCESSES (TH/THC/THM)MODELS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Y.S. Wu

    2005-08-24

    This report documents the development and validation of the mountain-scale thermal-hydrologic (TH), thermal-hydrologic-chemical (THC), and thermal-hydrologic-mechanical (THM) models. These models provide technical support for screening of features, events, and processes (FEPs) related to the effects of coupled TH/THC/THM processes on mountain-scale unsaturated zone (UZ) and saturated zone (SZ) flow at Yucca Mountain, Nevada (BSC 2005 [DIRS 174842], Section 2.1.1.1). The purpose and validation criteria for these models are specified in ''Technical Work Plan for: Near-Field Environment and Transport: Coupled Processes (Mountain-Scale TH/THC/THM, Drift-Scale THC Seepage, and Drift-Scale Abstraction) Model Report Integration'' (BSC 2005 [DIRS 174842]). Model results are used to support exclusion of certain FEPs from the total system performance assessment for the license application (TSPA-LA) model on the basis of low consequence, consistent with the requirements of 10 CFR 63.342 [DIRS 173273]. Outputs from this report are not direct feeds to the TSPA-LA. All the FEPs related to the effects of coupled TH/THC/THM processes on mountain-scale UZ and SZ flow are discussed in Sections 6 and 7 of this report. The mountain-scale coupled TH/THC/THM processes models numerically simulate the impact of nuclear waste heat release on the natural hydrogeological system, including a representation of heat-driven processes occurring in the far field. The mountain-scale TH simulations provide predictions for thermally affected liquid saturation, gas- and liquid-phase fluxes, and water and rock temperature (together called the flow fields). The main focus of the TH model is to predict the changes in water flux driven by evaporation/condensation processes, and drainage between drifts. The TH model captures mountain-scale three-dimensional flow effects, including lateral diversion and mountain-scale flow patterns. The mountain-scale THC model evaluates TH effects on

  11. Linking Metabolism, Elemental Cycles, and Environmental Conditions in the Deep Biosphere: Growth of a Model Extremophile, Archaeoglobus fulgidus, Under High-Pressure Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliver, G. C. M.; Cario, A.; Rogers, K. L.

    2015-12-01

    A majority of Earth's biosphere is hosted in subsurface environments where global-scale biogeochemical and energy cycles are driven by diverse microbial communities that operate on and are influenced by micro-scale environmental variables. While the subsurface hosts a variety of geochemical and geothermal conditions, elevated pressures are common to all subsurface ecosystems. Understanding how microbes adapt to and thrive in high-pressure environments is essential to linking microbial subsurface processes with global-scale cycles. Here we are using a model extremophile, Archaeoglobus fulgidus, to determine how elevated pressures affect the growth, metabolism, and physiology of subsurface microorganisms. A. fulgidus cycles carbon and sulfur via heterotrophic and autotrophic sulfate reduction in various high temperature and high-pressure niches including shallow marine vents, deep-sea hydrothermal vents, and deep oil reservoirs. Here we report the results of A. fulgidus growth experiments at optimum temperature, 83°C, and pressures up to 600 bars. Exponential growth was observed over the entire pressure range, though growth rates were diminished at 500 and 600 bars compared to ambient pressure experimental controls. At pressures up to 400 bars, cell density yields and growth rates were at least as high as ambient pressure controls. Elevated pressures and extended incubation times stimulated cell flocculation, a common stress response in this strain, and cellular morphology was affected at pressures exceeding 400 bars. These results suggest that A. fulgidus continues carbon, sulfur and energy cycling unaffected by elevated pressures up to 400 bars, representing a variety of subsurface environments. The ability of subsurface organisms to drive biogeochemical cycles at elevated pressures is a critical link between the surface and subsurface biospheres and understanding how species-scale processes operate under these conditions is a vital part of global-scale

  12. Flavor Gauge Models Below the Fermi Scale

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Babu, K. S. [Oklahoma State U.; Friedland, A. [SLAC; Machado, P. A.N. [Madrid, IFT; Mocioiu, I. [Penn State U.

    2017-05-04

    The mass and weak interaction eigenstates for the quarks of the third generation are very well aligned, an empirical fact for which the Standard Model offers no explanation. We explore the possibility that this alignment is due to an additional gauge symmetry in the third generation. Specifically, we construct and analyze an explicit, renormalizable model with a gauge boson, $X$, corresponding to the $B-L$ symmetry of the third family. Having a relatively light (in the MeV to multi-GeV range), flavor-nonuniversal gauge boson results in a variety of constraints from different sources. By systematically analyzing 20 different constraints, we identify the most sensitive probes: kaon, $D^+$ and Upsilon decays, $D-\\bar{D}^0$ mixing, atomic parity violation, and neutrino scattering and oscillations. For the new gauge coupling $g_X$ in the range $(10^{-2} - 10^{-4})$ the model is shown to be consistent with the data. Possible ways of testing the model in $b$ physics, top and $Z$ decays, direct collider production and neutrino oscillation experiments, where one can observe nonstandard matter effects, are outlined. The choice of leptons to carry the new force is ambiguous, resulting in additional phenomenological implications, such as non-universality in semileptonic bottom decays. The proposed framework provides interesting connections between neutrino oscillations, flavor and collider physics.

  13. Anomalous scaling in an age-dependent branching model

    OpenAIRE

    Keller-Schmidt, Stephanie; Tugrul, Murat; Eguíluz, Víctor M; Hernández-García, Emilio; Klemm, Konstantin

    2015-01-01

    We introduce a one-parametric family of tree growth models, in which branching probabilities decrease with branch age $\\tau$ as $\\tau^{-\\alpha}$. Depending on the exponent $\\alpha$, the scaling of tree depth with tree size $n$ displays a transition between the logarithmic scaling of random trees and an algebraic growth. At the transition ($\\alpha=1$) tree depth grows as $(\\log n)^2$. This anomalous scaling is in good agreement with the trend observed in evolution of biological species, thus p...

  14. Scaling behavior of the Heisenberg model in three dimensions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordillo-Guerrero, A; Kenna, R; Ruiz-Lorenzo, J J

    2013-12-01

    We report on extensive numerical simulations of the three-dimensional Heisenberg model and its analysis through finite-size scaling of Lee-Yang zeros. Besides the critical regime, we also investigate scaling in the ferromagnetic phase. We show that, in this case of broken symmetry, the corrections to scaling contain information on the Goldstone modes. We present a comprehensive Lee-Yang analysis, including the density of zeros, and confirm recent numerical estimates for critical exponents.

  15. Anomalous scaling in an age-dependent branching model

    OpenAIRE

    Keller-Schmidt, Stephanie; Tugrul, Murat; Eguíluz, Víctor M.; Hernández-García, Emilio; Klemm, Konstantin

    2010-01-01

    We introduce a one-parametric family of tree growth models, in which branching probabilities decrease with branch age $\\tau$ as $\\tau^{-\\alpha}$. Depending on the exponent $\\alpha$, the scaling of tree depth with tree size $n$ displays a transition between the logarithmic scaling of random trees and an algebraic growth. At the transition ($\\alpha=1$) tree depth grows as $(\\log n)^2$. This anomalous scaling is in good agreement with the trend observed in evolution of biological species, thus p...

  16. RSRM Chamber Pressure Oscillations: Transit Time Models and Unsteady CFD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nesman, Tom; Stewart, Eric

    1996-01-01

    Space Shuttle solid rocket motor low frequency internal pressure oscillations have been observed since early testing. The same type of oscillations also are present in the redesigned solid rocket motor (RSRM). The oscillations, which occur during RSRM burn, are predominantly at the first three motor cavity longitudinal acoustic mode frequencies. Broadband flow and combustion noise provide the energy to excite these modes at low levels throughout motor burn, however, at certain times during burn the fluctuating pressure amplitude increases significantly. The increased fluctuations at these times suggests an additional excitation mechanism. The RSRM has inhibitors on the propellant forward facing surface of each motor segment. The inhibitors are in a slot at the segment field joints to prevent burning at that surface. The aft facing segment surface at a field joint slot burns and forms a cavity of time varying size. Initially the inhibitor is recessed in the field joint cavity. As propellant burns away the inhibitor begins to protrude into the bore flow. Two mechanisms (transit time models) that are considered potential pressure oscillation excitations are cavity-edge tones, and inhibitor hole-tones. Estimates of frequency variation with time of longitudinal acoustic modes, cavity edge-tones, and hole-tones compare favorably with frequencies measured during motor hot firing. It is believed that the highest oscillation amplitudes occur when vortex shedding frequencies coincide with motor longitudinal acoustic modes. A time accurate computational fluid dynamic (CFD) analysis was made to replicate the observations from motor firings and to observe the transit time mechanisms in detail. FDNS is the flow solver used to detail the time varying aspects of the flow. The fluid is approximated as a single-phase ideal gas. The CFD model was an axisymmetric representation of the RSRM at 80 seconds into burn.Deformation of the inhibitors by the internal flow was determined

  17. Large-scale self-assembly of uniform submicron silver sulfide material driven by precise pressure control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Juanjuan; Chen, Ke; Zhang, Shuhao; Yang, Yun; Guo, Lin; Yang, Shihe

    2017-03-01

    The controllable self-assembly of nanosized building blocks into larger specific structures can provide an efficient method of synthesizing novel materials with excellent properties. The self-assembly of nanocrystals by assisted means is becoming an extremely active area of research, because it provides a method of producing large-scale advanced functional materials with potential applications in the areas of energy, electronics, optics, and biologics. In this study, we applied an efficient strategy, namely, the use of ‘pressure control’ to the assembly of silver sulfide (Ag2S) nanospheres with a diameter of approximately 33 nm into large-scale, uniform Ag2S sub-microspheres with a size of about 0.33 μm. More importantly, this strategy realizes the online control of the overall reaction system, including the pressure, reaction time, and temperature, and could also be used to easily fabricate other functional materials on an industrial scale. Moreover, the thermodynamics and kinetics parameters for the thermal decomposition of silver diethyldithiocarbamate (Ag(DDTC)) are also investigated to explore the formation mechanism of the Ag2S nanosized building blocks which can be assembled into uniform sub-micron scale architecture. As a method of producing sub-micron Ag2S particles by means of the pressure-controlled self-assembly of nanoparticles, we foresee this strategy being an efficient and universally applicable option for constructing other new building blocks and assembling novel and large functional micromaterials on an industrial scale.

  18. Large-scale self-assembly of uniform submicron silver sulfide material driven by precise pressure control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Juanjuan; Chen, Ke; Zhang, Shuhao; Yang, Yun; Guo, Lin; Yang, Shihe

    2017-03-10

    The controllable self-assembly of nanosized building blocks into larger specific structures can provide an efficient method of synthesizing novel materials with excellent properties. The self-assembly of nanocrystals by assisted means is becoming an extremely active area of research, because it provides a method of producing large-scale advanced functional materials with potential applications in the areas of energy, electronics, optics, and biologics. In this study, we applied an efficient strategy, namely, the use of 'pressure control' to the assembly of silver sulfide (Ag2S) nanospheres  with a diameter of approximately 33 nm into large-scale, uniform Ag2S sub-microspheres with a size of about 0.33 μm. More importantly, this strategy realizes the online control of the overall reaction system, including the pressure, reaction time, and temperature, and could also be used to easily fabricate other functional materials on an industrial scale. Moreover, the thermodynamics and kinetics parameters for the thermal decomposition of silver diethyldithiocarbamate (Ag(DDTC)) are also investigated to explore the formation mechanism of the Ag2S nanosized building blocks which can be assembled into uniform sub-micron scale architecture. As a method of producing sub-micron Ag2S particles by means of the pressure-controlled self-assembly of nanoparticles, we foresee this strategy being an efficient and universally applicable option for constructing other new building blocks and assembling novel and large functional micromaterials on an industrial scale.

  19. Multiscale modeling of soft matter: scaling of dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fritz, Dominik; Koschke, Konstantin; Harmandaris, Vagelis A; van der Vegt, Nico F A; Kremer, Kurt

    2011-06-14

    Many physical phenomena and properties of soft matter systems are characterized by an interplay of interactions and processes that span a wide range of length- and time scales. Computer simulation approaches require models, which cover these scales. These are typically multiscale models that combine and link different levels of resolution. In order to reach mesoscopic time- and length scales, necessary to access material properties, coarse-grained models are developed. They are based on microscopic, atomistic descriptions of systems and represent these systems on a coarser, mesoscopic level. While the connection between length scales can be established immediately, the link between the different time scales that takes into account the faster dynamics of the coarser system cannot be obtained directly. In this perspective paper we discuss methods that link the time scales in structure based multiscale models. Concepts which try to rigorously map dynamics of related models are limited to simple model systems, while the challenge in soft matter systems is the multitude of fluctuating energy barriers of comparable height. More pragmatic methods to match time scales are applied successfully to quantitatively understand and predict dynamics of one-component soft matter systems. However, there are still open questions. We point out that the link between the dynamics on different resolution levels can be affected by slight changes of the system, as for different tacticities. Furthermore, in two-component systems the dynamics of the host polymer and of additives are accelerated very differently.

  20. Atomic-scale modeling of cellulose nanocrystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Xiawa

    Cellulose nanocrystals (CNCs), the most abundant nanomaterials in nature, are recognized as one of the most promising candidates to meet the growing demand of green, bio-degradable and sustainable nanomaterials for future applications. CNCs draw significant interest due to their high axial elasticity and low density-elasticity ratio, both of which are extensively researched over the years. In spite of the great potential of CNCs as functional nanoparticles for nanocomposite materials, a fundamental understanding of CNC properties and their role in composite property enhancement is not available. In this work, CNCs are studied using molecular dynamics simulation method to predict their material' behaviors in the nanoscale. (a) Mechanical properties include tensile deformation in the elastic and plastic regions using molecular mechanics, molecular dynamics and nanoindentation methods. This allows comparisons between the methods and closer connectivity to experimental measurement techniques. The elastic moduli in the axial and transverse directions are obtained and the results are found to be in good agreement with previous research. The ultimate properties in plastic deformation are reported for the first time and failure mechanism are analyzed in details. (b) The thermal expansion of CNC crystals and films are studied. It is proposed that CNC film thermal expansion is due primarily to single crystal expansion and CNC-CNC interfacial motion. The relative contributions of inter- and intra-crystal responses to heating are explored. (c) Friction at cellulose-CNCs and diamond-CNCs interfaces is studied. The effects of sliding velocity, normal load, and relative angle between sliding surfaces are predicted. The Cellulose-CNC model is analyzed in terms of hydrogen bonding effect, and the diamond-CNC model compliments some of the discussion of the previous model. In summary, CNC's material properties and molecular models are both studied in this research, contributing to

  1. Sensitivities in global scale modeling of isoprene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. von Kuhlmann

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available A sensitivity study of the treatment of isoprene and related parameters in 3D atmospheric models was conducted using the global model of tropospheric chemistry MATCH-MPIC. A total of twelve sensitivity scenarios which can be grouped into four thematic categories were performed. These four categories consist of simulations with different chemical mechanisms, different assumptions concerning the deposition characteristics of intermediate products, assumptions concerning the nitrates from the oxidation of isoprene and variations of the source strengths. The largest differences in ozone compared to the reference simulation occured when a different isoprene oxidation scheme was used (up to 30-60% or about 10 nmol/mol. The largest differences in the abundance of peroxyacetylnitrate (PAN were found when the isoprene emission strength was reduced by 50% and in tests with increased or decreased efficiency of the deposition of intermediates. The deposition assumptions were also found to have a significant effect on the upper tropospheric HOx production. Different implicit assumptions about the loss of intermediate products were identified as a major reason for the deviations among the tested isoprene oxidation schemes. The total tropospheric burden of O3 calculated in the sensitivity runs is increased compared to the background methane chemistry by 26±9  Tg( O3 from 273 to an average from the sensitivity runs of 299 Tg(O3. % revised Thus, there is a spread of ± 35% of the overall effect of isoprene in the model among the tested scenarios. This range of uncertainty and the much larger local deviations found in the test runs suggest that the treatment of isoprene in global models can only be seen as a first order estimate at present, and points towards specific processes in need of focused future work.

  2. Sensitivities in global scale modeling of isoprene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. von Kuhlmann

    2003-06-01

    Full Text Available A sensitivity study of the treatment of isoprene and related parameters in 3D atmospheric models was conducted using the global model of tropospheric chemistry MATCH-MPIC. A total of twelve sensitivity scenarios which can be grouped into four thematic categories were performed. These four categories consist of simulations with different chemical mechanisms, different assumptions concerning the deposition characteristics of intermediate products, assumptions concerning the nitrates from the oxidation of isoprene and variations of the source strengths. The largest differences in ozone compared to the reference simulation occured when a different isoprene oxidation scheme was used (up to 30–60% or about 10 nmol/mol. The largest differences in the abundance of peroxyacetylnitrate (PAN were found when the isoprene emission strength was reduced by 50% and in tests with increased or decreased efficiency of the deposition of intermediates. The deposition assumptions were also found to have a significant effect on the upper tropospheric HOx production. Different implicit assumptions about the loss of intermediate products were identified as a major reason for the deviations among the tested isoprene oxidation schemes. The total tropospheric burden of O3 calculated in the sensitivity runs is increased compared to the background methane chemistry by 26±9 Tg(O3 from 273 to 299 Tg(O(3. Thus, there is a spread of ±35% of the overall effect of isoprene in the model among the tested scenarios. This range of uncertainty and the much larger local deviations found in the test runs suggest that the treatment of isoprene in global models can only be seen as a first order estimate at present, and points towards specific processes in need of focused future work.

  3. Fractal Modeling and Scaling in Natural Systems - Editorial

    Science.gov (United States)

    The special issue of Ecological complexity journal on Fractal Modeling and Scaling in Natural Systems contains representative examples of the status and evolution of data-driven research into fractals and scaling in complex natural systems. The editorial discusses contributions to understanding rela...

  4. On scaling properties of cluster distributions in Ising models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruge, C.; Wagner, F.

    1992-01-01

    Scaling relations of cluster distributions for the Wolff algorithm are derived. We found them to be well satisfied for the Ising model in d=3 dimensions. Using scaling and a parametrization of the cluster distribution, we determine the critical exponent β/ν=0.516(6) with moderate effort in computing time.

  5. Reference Priors for the General Location-Scale Model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fernández, C.; Steel, M.F.J.

    1997-01-01

    The reference prior algorithm (Berger and Bernardo 1992) is applied to multivariate location-scale models with any regular sampling density, where we establish the irrelevance of the usual assumption of Normal sampling if our interest is in either the location or the scale. This result immediately

  6. Scaling Properties of a Hybrid Fermi-Ulam-Bouncer Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diego F. M. Oliveira

    2009-01-01

    under the framework of scaling description. The model is described by using a two-dimensional nonlinear area preserving mapping. Our results show that the chaotic regime below the lowest energy invariant spanning curve is scaling invariant and the obtained critical exponents are used to find a universal plot for the second momenta of the average velocity.

  7. Modeling the fluid-dynamics and oxygen consumption in a porous scaffold stimulated by cyclic squeeze pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferroni, Marco; Giusti, Serena; Nascimento, Diana; Silva, Ana; Boschetti, Federica; Ahluwalia, Arti

    2016-08-01

    The architecture and dynamic physical environment of tissues can be recreated in-vitro by combining 3D porous scaffolds and bioreactors able to apply controlled mechanical stimuli on cells. In such systems, the entity of the stimuli and the distribution of nutrients within the engineered construct depend on the micro-structure of the scaffolds. In this work, we present a new approach for optimizing computational fluid-dynamics (CFD) models for the investigation of fluid-induced forces generated by cyclic squeeze pressure within a porous construct, coupled with oxygen consumption of cardiomyocytes. A 2D axial symmetric macro-scaled model of a squeeze pressure bioreactor chamber was used as starting point for generating time dependent pressure profiles. Subsequently the fluid movement generated by the pressure fields was coupled with a complete 3D micro-scaled model of a porous protein cryogel. Oxygen transport and consumption inside the scaffold was evaluated considering a homogeneous distribution of cardiomyocytes throughout the structure, as confirmed by preliminary cell culture experiments. The results show that a 3D description of the system, coupling a porous geometry and time dependent pressure driven flow with fluid-structure-interaction provides an accurate and meaningful description of the microenvironment in terms of shear stress and oxygen distribution than simple stationary 2D models.

  8. An application to model traffic intensity of agricultural machinery at field scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Augustin, Katja; Kuhwald, Michael; Duttmann, Rainer

    2017-04-01

    Several soil-pressure-models deal with the impact of agricultural machines on soils. In many cases, these models were used for single spots and consider a static machine configuration. Therefore, a statement about the spatial distribution of soil compaction risk for entire working processes is limited. The aim of the study is the development of an application for the spatial modelling of traffic lanes from agricultural vehicles including wheel load, ground pressure and wheel passages at the field scale. The application is based on Open Source software, application and data formats, using python programming language. Minimum input parameters are GPS-positions, vehicles and tires (producer and model) and the tire inflation pressure. Five working processes were distinguished: soil tillage, manuring, plant protection, sowing and harvest. Currently, two different models (Diserens 2009, Rücknagel et al. 2015) were implemented to calculate the soil pressure. The application was tested at a study site in Lower Saxony, Germany. Since 2015, field traffic were recorded by RTK-GPS and used machine set ups were noted. Using these input information the traffic lanes, wheel load and soil pressure were calculated for all working processes. For instance, the maize harvest in 2016 with a crop chopper and one transport vehicle crossed about 55 % of the total field area. At some places the machines rolled over up to 46 times. Approximately 35 % of the total area was affected by wheel loads over 7 tons and soil pressures between 163 and 193 kPa. With the information about the spatial distribution of wheel passages, wheel load and soil pressure it is possible to identify hot spots of intensive field traffic. Additionally, the use of the application enables the analysis of soil compaction risk induced by agricultural machines for long- and short-term periods.

  9. Power law cosmology model comparison with CMB scale information

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tutusaus, Isaac; Lamine, Brahim; Blanchard, Alain; Dupays, Arnaud; Zolnierowski, Yves; Cohen-Tanugi, Johann; Ealet, Anne; Escoffier, Stéphanie; Le Fèvre, Olivier; Ilić, Stéphane; Pisani, Alice; Plaszczynski, Stéphane; Sakr, Ziad; Salvatelli, Valentina; Schücker, Thomas; Tilquin, André; Virey, Jean-Marc

    2016-11-01

    Despite the ability of the cosmological concordance model (Λ CDM ) to describe the cosmological observations exceedingly well, power law expansion of the Universe scale radius, R (t )∝tn, has been proposed as an alternative framework. We examine here these models, analyzing their ability to fit cosmological data using robust model comparison criteria. Type Ia supernovae (SNIa), baryonic acoustic oscillations (BAO) and acoustic scale information from the cosmic microwave background (CMB) have been used. We find that SNIa data either alone or combined with BAO can be well reproduced by both Λ CDM and power law expansion models with n ˜1.5 , while the constant expansion rate model (n =1 ) is clearly disfavored. Allowing for some redshift evolution in the SNIa luminosity essentially removes any clear preference for a specific model. The CMB data are well known to provide the most stringent constraints on standard cosmological models, in particular, through the position of the first peak of the temperature angular power spectrum, corresponding to the sound horizon at recombination, a scale physically related to the BAO scale. Models with n ≥1 lead to a divergence of the sound horizon and do not naturally provide the relevant scales for the BAO and the CMB. We retain an empirical footing to overcome this issue: we let the data choose the preferred values for these scales, while we recompute the ionization history in power law models, to obtain the distance to the CMB. In doing so, we find that the scale coming from the BAO data is not consistent with the observed position of the first peak of the CMB temperature angular power spectrum for any power law cosmology. Therefore, we conclude that when the three standard probes (SNIa, BAO, and CMB) are combined, the Λ CDM model is very strongly favored over any of these alternative models, which are then essentially ruled out.

  10. Small-scale models of multiring basins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allemand, Pascal; Thomas, Pierre

    1999-07-01

    Small-scale sand-silicone simulations of multiring impact structures have been undertaken in order to understand the effects of the rheology of the lithosphere on the variability of natural multiring structures. For low sand-silicone thickness ratio (1:3), brittle strain is accommodated by spiral strike-slip faults. For higher sand-silicone ratios (1:1 or 2:1), an inner concentric ring affected by strike-slip faults is relayed by an external ring affected by concentric normal faults. The diameter of the inner ring decreases with the increase of the sand-silicone thickness ratio. It is suggested that the flexure of the brittle layer due to the silicone flow is responsible for the brittle strain field which is enhanced by the channel flow of the lower crust. The characteristic geometry of the intersection of conjugated strike-slip faults can be observed around large multiring basins on silicate crust such as Orientale on the Moon and on icy crust, such as Valhalla on Callisto and Gilgamesh on Ganymede. The strain field around these large craters is discussed in terms of mechanical properties of the lithospheres. On the Moon, large craters without relaxation faults, such as Imbrium are located on thin crust regions. The crust was too thin to have a ductile lower layer at the time of impact. Gilgamesh on Ganymede is surrounded mainly by strike-slip faults. Asgard on Callisto has the same diameter as Gilgamesh but is surrounded by concentric normal faults. The brittle-ductile thickness ratio is thus higher on Callisto than on Ganymede.

  11. The Faddeev Model and Scaling in Quantum Chromodynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Widom, A; Srivastava, Y N

    2016-01-01

    The Faddeev two body bound state model is discussed as an example of a QCD inspired model thought by some to exhibit dimensional transmutation. This simple model is solved exactly and the growth of a specified dimensional energy scale is shown to be an illusion.

  12. Atomic scale simulations for improved CRUD and fuel performance modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andersson, Anders David Ragnar [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Cooper, Michael William Donald [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-01-06

    A more mechanistic description of fuel performance codes can be achieved by deriving models and parameters from atomistic scale simulations rather than fitting models empirically to experimental data. The same argument applies to modeling deposition of corrosion products on fuel rods (CRUD). Here are some results from publications in 2016 carried out using the CASL allocation at LANL.

  13. Computational Fluid Dynamics Study on the Effects of RATO Timing on the Scale Model Acoustic Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielsen, Tanner; Williams, B.; West, Jeff

    2015-01-01

    The Scale Model Acoustic Test (SMAT) is a 5% scale test of the Space Launch System (SLS), which is currently being designed at Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC). The purpose of this test is to characterize and understand a variety of acoustic phenomena that occur during the early portions of lift off, one being the overpressure environment that develops shortly after booster ignition. The SLS lift off configuration consists of four RS-25 liquid thrusters on the core stage, with two solid boosters connected to each side. Past experience with scale model testing at MSFC (in ER42), has shown that there is a delay in the ignition of the Rocket Assisted Take Off (RATO) motor, which is used as the 5% scale analog of the solid boosters, after the signal to ignite is given. This delay can range from 0 to 16.5ms. While this small of a delay maybe insignificant in the case of the full scale SLS, it can significantly alter the data obtained during the SMAT due to the much smaller geometry. The speed of sound of the air and combustion gas constituents is not scaled, and therefore the SMAT pressure waves propagate at approximately the same speed as occurs during full scale. However, the SMAT geometry is much smaller allowing the pressure waves to move down the exhaust duct, through the trench, and impact the vehicle model much faster than occurs at full scale. To better understand the effect of the RATO timing simultaneity on the SMAT IOP test data, a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) analysis was performed using the Loci/CHEM CFD software program. Five different timing offsets, based on RATO ignition delay statistics, were simulated. A variety of results and comparisons will be given, assessing the overall effect of RATO timing simultaneity on the SMAT overpressure environment.

  14. Energetic benefits and adaptations in mammalian limbs: Scale effects and selective pressures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilbourne, Brandon M; Hoffman, Louwrens C

    2015-06-01

    Differences in limb size and shape are fundamental to mammalian morphological diversity; however, their relevance to locomotor costs has long been subject to debate. In particular, it remains unknown if scale effects in whole limb morphology could partially underlie decreasing mass-specific locomotor costs with increasing limb length. Whole fore- and hindlimb inertial properties reflecting limb size and shape-moment of inertia (MOI), mass, mass distribution, and natural frequency-were regressed against limb length for 44 species of quadrupedal mammals. Limb mass, MOI, and center of mass position are negatively allometric, having a strong potential for lowering mass-specific locomotor costs in large terrestrial mammals. Negative allometry of limb MOI results in a 40% reduction in MOI relative to isometry's prediction for our largest sampled taxa. However, fitting regression residuals to adaptive diversification models reveals that codiversification of limb mass, limb length, and body mass likely results from selection for differing locomotor modes of running, climbing, digging, and swimming. The observed allometric scaling does not result from selection for energetically beneficial whole limb morphology with increasing size. Instead, our data suggest that it is a consequence of differing morphological adaptations and body size distributions among quadrupedal mammals, highlighting the role of differing limb functions in mammalian evolution.

  15. ScaleNet: a literature-based model of scale insect biology and systematics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García Morales, Mayrolin; Denno, Barbara D; Miller, Douglass R; Miller, Gary L; Ben-Dov, Yair; Hardy, Nate B

    2016-01-01

    Scale insects (Hemiptera: Coccoidea) are small herbivorous insects found on all continents except Antarctica. They are extremely invasive, and many species are serious agricultural pests. They are also emerging models for studies of the evolution of genetic systems, endosymbiosis and plant-insect interactions. ScaleNet was launched in 1995 to provide insect identifiers, pest managers, insect systematists, evolutionary biologists and ecologists efficient access to information about scale insect biological diversity. It provides comprehensive information on scale insects taken directly from the primary literature. Currently, it draws from 23,477 articles and describes the systematics and biology of 8194 valid species. For 20 years, ScaleNet ran on the same software platform. That platform is no longer viable. Here, we present a new, open-source implementation of ScaleNet. We have normalized the data model, begun the process of correcting invalid data, upgraded the user interface, and added online administrative tools. These improvements make ScaleNet easier to use and maintain and make the ScaleNet data more accurate and extendable. Database URL: http://scalenet.info.

  16. Scale-based spatial data model for GIS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WEI Zu-kuan

    2004-01-01

    Being the primary media of geographical information and the elementary objects manipulated, almost all of maps adopt the layer-based model to represent geographic information in the existent GIS. However, it is difficult to extend the map represented in layer-based model. Furthermore, in Web-Based GIS, It is slow to transmit the spatial data for map viewing. In this paper, for solving the questions above, we have proposed a new method for representing the spatial data. That is scale-based model. In this model we represent maps in three levels: scale-view, block, and spatial object, and organize the maps in a set of map layers, named Scale-View, which associates some given scales.Lastly, a prototype Web-Based GIS using the proposed spatial data representation is described briefly.

  17. A retrospective study using the pressure ulcer scale for healing (PUSH) tool to examine factors affecting stage II pressure ulcer healing in a Korean acute care hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Kyung Hee

    2014-09-01

    Stage II pressure ulcers (PUs) should be managed promptly and appropriately in order to prevent complications. To identify the factors affecting Stage II PU healing and optimize care, the electronic medical records of patients with a Stage II PU in an acute care hospital were examined. Patient and ulcer characteristics as well as nutritional assessment variables were retrieved, and ulcer variables were used to calculate Pressure Ulcer Scale for Healing (PUSH) scores. The effect of all variables on healing status (healed versus nonhealed) and change in PUSH score for healing rate were compared. Records of 309 Stage II PUs from 155 patients (mean age 61.2 ± 15.2 [range 5-89] years, 182 [58.9%] male) were retrieved and analyzed. Of those, 221 healed and 88 were documented as not healed at the end of the study. The variables that were significantly different between patients with PUs that did and did not heal were: major diagnosis (P = 0.001), peripheral arterial disease (P = 0.007), smoking (P = 0.048), serum albumin ( PUSH score change -indicative of healing - when pressure-redistribution surfaces were used (P strategies for healing Stage II PUs in the acute care setting should include early recognition of lower-stage PUs, the provision of static pressure-redistribution surfaces and multivitamins, and maintaining higher MAP may facilitate healing and prevent deterioration. Further prospective research is warranted to verify the effect of these interventions.

  18. Evaluation of fracture models through pressurized-thermal-shock testing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pugh, C.E.; Bryan, R.H.; Bass, B.R.; Nanstad, R.K.

    1988-01-01

    Two multiple-transient pressurized-thermal-shock experiments (PTSEs) have been conducted under the NRC-sponsored Heavy-Section Steel Technology (HSST) program. The first test (PTSE-1) employed an SA-508 class 2 steel with high Charpy upper-shelf energy level and a relatively high brittle-to-ductile transition temperature. The second test (PTSE-2) used a 2 1/4 Cr-1 Mo steel (SA-387 grade 22) that had been given a special heat treatment to yield a low Charpy upper-shelf energy level and attendant low tearing resistance. Each experiment included two combined thermal and pressure transients that give rise to propagation and arrest of an initial long flaw that extended about 10% through the thick wall of the test cylinder. Both materials exhibited the ability to inhibit crack propagation by warm prestressing, high initiation toughness values and high crack-arrest toughness values. Cleavage initiation and arrest are modeled well by available fracture theories. However, calculations of ductile tearing based on resistance curves did not consistently predict the observed tearing.

  19. Localization of Shear in Saturated Granular Media: Insights from a Multi-Scaled Granular-Fluid Model

    CERN Document Server

    Aharonov, Einat; Sparks, David; Toussaint, Renaud

    2013-01-01

    The coupled mechanics of fluid-filled granular media controls the behavior of many natural systems such as saturated soils, fault gouge, and landslides. The grain motion and the fluid pressure influence each other: It is well established that when the fluid pressure rises, the shear resistance of fluid-filled granular systems decreases, and as a result catastrophic events such as soil liquefaction, earthquakes, and accelerating landslides may be triggered. Alternatively, when the pore pressure drops, the shear resistance of these systems increases. Despite the great importance of the coupled mechanics of grains-fluid systems, the basic physics that controls this coupling is far from understood. We developed a new multi-scaled model based on the discrete element method, coupled with a continuum model of fluid pressure, to explore this dynamical system. The model was shown recently to capture essential feedbacks between porosity changes arising from rearrangement of grains, and local pressure variations due to ...

  20. Thermal Correlators in Holographic Models with Lifshitz scaling

    CERN Document Server

    Keranen, Ville

    2012-01-01

    We study finite temperature effects in two distinct holographic models that exhibit Lifshitz scaling, looking to identify model independent features in the dual strong coupling physics. We consider the thermodynamics of black branes and find different low-temperature behavior of the specific heat. Deformation away from criticality leads to non-trivial temperature dependence of correlation functions and we study how the characteristic length scale in the two point function of scalar operators varies as a function of temperature and deformation parameters.

  1. Modeling of the HiPco process for carbon nanotube production. II. Reactor-scale analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gokcen, Tahir; Dateo, Christopher E.; Meyyappan, M.

    2002-01-01

    The high-pressure carbon monoxide (HiPco) process, developed at Rice University, has been reported to produce single-walled carbon nanotubes from gas-phase reactions of iron carbonyl in carbon monoxide at high pressures (10-100 atm). Computational modeling is used here to develop an understanding of the HiPco process. A detailed kinetic model of the HiPco process that includes of the precursor, decomposition metal cluster formation and growth, and carbon nanotube growth was developed in the previous article (Part I). Decomposition of precursor molecules is necessary to initiate metal cluster formation. The metal clusters serve as catalysts for carbon nanotube growth. The diameter of metal clusters and number of atoms in these clusters are some of the essential information for predicting carbon nanotube formation and growth, which is then modeled by the Boudouard reaction with metal catalysts. Based on the detailed model simulations, a reduced kinetic model was also developed in Part I for use in reactor-scale flowfield calculations. Here this reduced kinetic model is integrated with a two-dimensional axisymmetric reactor flow model to predict reactor performance. Carbon nanotube growth is examined with respect to several process variables (peripheral jet temperature, reactor pressure, and Fe(CO)5 concentration) with the use of the axisymmetric model, and the computed results are compared with existing experimental data. The model yields most of the qualitative trends observed in the experiments and helps to understanding the fundamental processes in HiPco carbon nanotube production.

  2. Mechanistically-Based Field-Scale Models of Uranium Biogeochemistry from Upscaling Pore-Scale Experiments and Models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tim Scheibe; Alexandre Tartakovsky; Brian Wood; Joe Seymour

    2007-04-19

    Effective environmental management of DOE sites requires reliable prediction of reactive transport phenomena. A central issue in prediction of subsurface reactive transport is the impact of multiscale physical, chemical, and biological heterogeneity. Heterogeneity manifests itself through incomplete mixing of reactants at scales below those at which concentrations are explicitly defined (i.e., the numerical grid scale). This results in a mismatch between simulated reaction processes (formulated in terms of average concentrations) and actual processes (controlled by local concentrations). At the field scale, this results in apparent scale-dependence of model parameters and inability to utilize laboratory parameters in field models. Accordingly, most field modeling efforts are restricted to empirical estimation of model parameters by fitting to field observations, which renders extrapolation of model predictions beyond fitted conditions unreliable. The objective of this project is to develop a theoretical and computational framework for (1) connecting models of coupled reactive transport from pore-scale processes to field-scale bioremediation through a hierarchy of models that maintain crucial information from the smaller scales at the larger scales; and (2) quantifying the uncertainty that is introduced by both the upscaling process and uncertainty in physical parameters. One of the challenges of addressing scale-dependent effects of coupled processes in heterogeneous porous media is the problem-specificity of solutions. Much effort has been aimed at developing generalized scaling laws or theories, but these require restrictive assumptions that render them ineffective in many real problems. We propose instead an approach that applies physical and numerical experiments at small scales (specifically the pore scale) to a selected model system in order to identify the scaling approach appropriate to that type of problem. Although the results of such studies will

  3. Large Scale Triboelectric Nanogenerator and Self-Powered Pressure Sensor Array Using Low Cost Roll-to-Roll UV Embossing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhakar, Lokesh; Gudla, Sudeep; Shan, Xuechuan; Wang, Zhiping; Tay, Francis Eng Hock; Heng, Chun-Huat; Lee, Chengkuo

    2016-02-01

    Triboelectric nanogenerators (TENGs) have emerged as a potential solution for mechanical energy harvesting over conventional mechanisms such as piezoelectric and electromagnetic, due to easy fabrication, high efficiency and wider choice of materials. Traditional fabrication techniques used to realize TENGs involve plasma etching, soft lithography and nanoparticle deposition for higher performance. But lack of truly scalable fabrication processes still remains a critical challenge and bottleneck in the path of bringing TENGs to commercial production. In this paper, we demonstrate fabrication of large scale triboelectric nanogenerator (LS-TENG) using roll-to-roll ultraviolet embossing to pattern polyethylene terephthalate sheets. These LS-TENGs can be used to harvest energy from human motion and vehicle motion from embedded devices in floors and roads, respectively. LS-TENG generated a power density of 62.5 mW m-2. Using roll-to-roll processing technique, we also demonstrate a large scale triboelectric pressure sensor array with pressure detection sensitivity of 1.33 V kPa-1. The large scale pressure sensor array has applications in self-powered motion tracking, posture monitoring and electronic skin applications. This work demonstrates scalable fabrication of TENGs and self-powered pressure sensor arrays, which will lead to extremely low cost and bring them closer to commercial production.

  4. Large Scale Triboelectric Nanogenerator and Self-Powered Pressure Sensor Array Using Low Cost Roll-to-Roll UV Embossing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhakar, Lokesh; Gudla, Sudeep; Shan, Xuechuan; Wang, Zhiping; Tay, Francis Eng Hock; Heng, Chun-Huat; Lee, Chengkuo

    2016-02-24

    Triboelectric nanogenerators (TENGs) have emerged as a potential solution for mechanical energy harvesting over conventional mechanisms such as piezoelectric and electromagnetic, due to easy fabrication, high efficiency and wider choice of materials. Traditional fabrication techniques used to realize TENGs involve plasma etching, soft lithography and nanoparticle deposition for higher performance. But lack of truly scalable fabrication processes still remains a critical challenge and bottleneck in the path of bringing TENGs to commercial production. In this paper, we demonstrate fabrication of large scale triboelectric nanogenerator (LS-TENG) using roll-to-roll ultraviolet embossing to pattern polyethylene terephthalate sheets. These LS-TENGs can be used to harvest energy from human motion and vehicle motion from embedded devices in floors and roads, respectively. LS-TENG generated a power density of 62.5 mW m(-2). Using roll-to-roll processing technique, we also demonstrate a large scale triboelectric pressure sensor array with pressure detection sensitivity of 1.33 V kPa(-1). The large scale pressure sensor array has applications in self-powered motion tracking, posture monitoring and electronic skin applications. This work demonstrates scalable fabrication of TENGs and self-powered pressure sensor arrays, which will lead to extremely low cost and bring them closer to commercial production.

  5. Oscillometric measurement of systolic and diastolic blood pressures validated in a physiologic mathematical model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Babbs Charles F

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The oscillometric method of measuring blood pressure with an automated cuff yields valid estimates of mean pressure but questionable estimates of systolic and diastolic pressures. Existing algorithms are sensitive to differences in pulse pressure and artery stiffness. Some are closely guarded trade secrets. Accurate extraction of systolic and diastolic pressures from the envelope of cuff pressure oscillations remains an open problem in biomedical engineering. Methods A new analysis of relevant anatomy, physiology and physics reveals the mechanisms underlying the production of cuff pressure oscillations as well as a way to extract systolic and diastolic pressures from the envelope of oscillations in any individual subject. Stiffness characteristics of the compressed artery segment can be extracted from the envelope shape to create an individualized mathematical model. The model is tested with a matrix of possible systolic and diastolic pressure values, and the minimum least squares difference between observed and predicted envelope functions indicates the best fit choices of systolic and diastolic pressure within the test matrix. Results The model reproduces realistic cuff pressure oscillations. The regression procedure extracts systolic and diastolic pressures accurately in the face of varying pulse pressure and arterial stiffness. The root mean squared error in extracted systolic and diastolic pressures over a range of challenging test scenarios is 0.3 mmHg. Conclusions A new algorithm based on physics and physiology allows accurate extraction of systolic and diastolic pressures from cuff pressure oscillations in a way that can be validated, criticized, and updated in the public domain.

  6. Development and validity of a new model for assessing pressure redistribution properties of support surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuo, Junko; Sugama, Junko; Sanada, Hiromi; Okuwa, Mayumi; Nakatani, Toshio; Konya, Chizuko; Sakamoto, Jirou

    2011-05-01

    Pressure ulcers are a common problem, especially in older patients. In Japan, most institutionalized older people are malnourished and show extreme bony prominence (EBP). EBP is a significant factor in the development of pressure ulcers due to increased interface pressure concentrated at the skin surface over the EBP. The use of support surfaces is recommended for the prophylaxis of pressure ulcers. However, the present equivocal criteria for evaluating the pressure redistribution of support surfaces are inadequate. Since pressure redistribution is influenced by physique and posture, evaluations using human subjects are limited. For this reason, models that can substitute for humans are necessary. We developed a new EBP model based on the anthropometric measurements, including pelvic inclination, of 100 bedridden elderly people. A comparison between the pressure distribution charts of our model and bedridden elderly subjects demonstrated that maximum contact pressure values, buttock contact pressure values, and bone prominence rates corresponded closely. This indicates that the model provides a good approximation of the features of elderly people with EBP. We subsequently examined the validity of the model through quantitative assessment of pressure redistribution functions consisting of immersion, envelopment, and contact area change. The model was able to detect differences in the hardness of urethane foam, differences in the internal pressure of an air mattress, and sequential changes during the pressure switching mode. These results demonstrate the validity of our new buttock model in evaluating pressure redistribution for a variety of surfaces.

  7. Full-Scale Cookoff Model Validation Experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McClelland, M A; Rattanapote, M K; Heimdahl, E R; Erikson, W E; Curran, P O; Atwood, A I

    2003-11-25

    This paper presents the experimental results of the third and final phase of a cookoff model validation effort. In this phase of the work, two generic Heavy Wall Penetrators (HWP) were tested in two heating orientations. Temperature and strain gage data were collected over the entire test period. Predictions for time and temperature of reaction were made prior to release of the live data. Predictions were comparable to the measured values and were highly dependent on the established boundary conditions. Both HWP tests failed at a weld located near the aft closure of the device. More than 90 percent of unreacted explosive was recovered in the end heated experiment and less than 30 percent recovered in the side heated test.

  8. Genome-scale modeling for metabolic engineering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simeonidis, E; Price, ND

    2015-01-13

    We focus on the application of constraint-based methodologies and, more specifically, flux balance analysis in the field of metabolic engineering, and enumerate recent developments and successes of the field. We also review computational frameworks that have been developed with the express purpose of automatically selecting optimal gene deletions for achieving improved production of a chemical of interest. The application of flux balance analysis methods in rational metabolic engineering requires a metabolic network reconstruction and a corresponding in silico metabolic model for the microorganism in question. For this reason, we additionally present a brief overview of automated reconstruction techniques. Finally, we emphasize the importance of integrating metabolic networks with regulatory information-an area which we expect will become increasingly important for metabolic engineering-and present recent developments in the field of metabolic and regulatory integration.

  9. Genome-scale modeling for metabolic engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simeonidis, Evangelos; Price, Nathan D

    2015-03-01

    We focus on the application of constraint-based methodologies and, more specifically, flux balance analysis in the field of metabolic engineering, and enumerate recent developments and successes of the field. We also review computational frameworks that have been developed with the express purpose of automatically selecting optimal gene deletions for achieving improved production of a chemical of interest. The application of flux balance analysis methods in rational metabolic engineering requires a metabolic network reconstruction and a corresponding in silico metabolic model for the microorganism in question. For this reason, we additionally present a brief overview of automated reconstruction techniques. Finally, we emphasize the importance of integrating metabolic networks with regulatory information-an area which we expect will become increasingly important for metabolic engineering-and present recent developments in the field of metabolic and regulatory integration.

  10. Scaling Theory and Modeling of DNA Evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buldyrev, Sergey V.

    1998-03-01

    We present evidence supporting the possibility that the nucleotide sequence in noncoding DNA is power-law correlated. We do not find such long-range correlation in the coding regions of the gene, so we build a ``coding sequence finder'' to locate the coding regions of an unknown DNA sequence. We also propose a different coding sequence finding algorithm, based on the concept of mutual information(I. Große, S. V. Buldyrev, H. Herzel, H. E. Stanley, (preprint).). We describe our recent work on quantification of DNA patchiness, using long-range correlation measures (G. M. Viswanathan, S. V. Buldyrev, S. Havlin, and H. E. Stanley, Biophysical Journal 72), 866-875 (1997).. We also present our recent study of the simple repeat length distributions. We find that the distributions of some simple repeats in noncoding DNA have long power-law tails, while in coding DNA all simple repeat distributions decay exponentially. (N. V. Dokholyan, S. V. Buldyrev, S. Havlin, and H. E. Stanley, Phys. Rev. Lett (in press).) We discuss several models based on insertion-deletion and mutation-duplication mechanisms that relate long-range correlations in non-coding DNA to DNA evolution. Specifically, we relate long-range correlations in non-coding DNA to simple repeat expansion, and propose an evolutionary model that reproduces the power law distribution of simple repeat lengths. We argue that the absence of long-range correlations in protein coding sequences is related to their highly conserved primary structure which is necessary to insure protein folding.

  11. Scaling laws of coronal loops compared to a 3D MHD model of an Active Region

    CERN Document Server

    Bourdin, Philippe-A; Peter, Hardi

    2016-01-01

    Context. The structure and heating of coronal loops are investigated since decades. Established scaling laws relate fundamental quantities like the loop apex temperature, pressure, length, and the coronal heating. Aims. We test such scaling laws against a large-scale 3D MHD model of the Solar corona, which became feasible with nowadays high-performance computing. Methods. We drive an active region simulation a with photospheric observations and found strong similarities to the observed coronal loops in X-rays and EUV wavelength. A 3D reconstruction of stereoscopic observations showed that our model loops have a realistic spatial structure. We compare scaling laws to our model data extracted along an ensemble of field lines. Finally, we fit a new scaling law that represents well hot loops and also cooler structures, which was not possible before only based on observations. Results. Our model data gives some support for scaling laws that were established for hot and EUV-emissive coronal loops. For the RTV scali...

  12. [Modeling continuous scaling of NDVI based on fractal theory].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luan, Hai-Jun; Tian, Qing-Jiu; Yu, Tao; Hu, Xin-Li; Huang, Yan; Du, Ling-Tong; Zhao, Li-Min; Wei, Xi; Han, Jie; Zhang, Zhou-Wei; Li, Shao-Peng

    2013-07-01

    Scale effect was one of the very important scientific problems of remote sensing. The scale effect of quantitative remote sensing can be used to study retrievals' relationship between different-resolution images, and its research became an effective way to confront the challenges, such as validation of quantitative remote sensing products et al. Traditional up-scaling methods cannot describe scale changing features of retrievals on entire series of scales; meanwhile, they are faced with serious parameters correction issues because of imaging parameters' variation of different sensors, such as geometrical correction, spectral correction, etc. Utilizing single sensor image, fractal methodology was utilized to solve these problems. Taking NDVI (computed by land surface radiance) as example and based on Enhanced Thematic Mapper Plus (ETM+) image, a scheme was proposed to model continuous scaling of retrievals. Then the experimental results indicated that: (a) For NDVI, scale effect existed, and it could be described by fractal model of continuous scaling; (2) The fractal method was suitable for validation of NDVI. All of these proved that fractal was an effective methodology of studying scaling of quantitative remote sensing.

  13. Modelling turbulent stellar convection zones: sub-grid scales effects

    CERN Document Server

    Strugarek, A; Brun, A S; Charbonneau, P; Mathis, S; Smolarkiewicz, P K

    2016-01-01

    The impressive development of global numerical simulations of turbulent stellar interiors unveiled a variety of possible differential rotation (solar or anti-solar), meridional circulation (single or multi-cellular), and dynamo states (stable large scale toroidal field or periodically reversing magnetic fields). Various numerical schemes, based on the so-called anelastic set of equations, were used to obtain these results. It appears today mandatory to assess their robustness with respect to the details of the numerics, and in particular to the treatment of turbulent sub-grid scales. We report on an ongoing comparison between two global models, the ASH and EULAG codes. In EULAG the sub-grid scales are treated implicitly by the numerical scheme, while in ASH their effect is generally modelled by using enhanced dissipation coefficients. We characterize the sub-grid scales effect in a turbulent convection simulation with EULAG. We assess their effect at each resolved scale with a detailed energy budget. We deriv...

  14. Capillary pressure and saturation relations for supercritical CO2 and brine in sand: High-pressure Pc(Sw) controller/meter measurements and capillary scaling predictions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tokunaga, Tetsu K.; Wan, Jiamin; Jung, Jong-Won; Kim, Tae Wook; Kim, Yongman; Dong, Wenming

    2013-08-01

    In geologic carbon sequestration, reliable predictions of CO2 storage require understanding the capillary behavior of supercritical (sc) CO2. Given the limited availability of measurements of the capillary pressure (Pc) dependence on water saturation (Sw) with scCO2 as the displacing fluid, simulations of CO2 sequestration commonly rely on modifying more familiar air/H2O and oil/H2O Pc(Sw) relations, adjusted to account for differences in interfacial tensions. In order to test such capillary scaling-based predictions, we developed a high-pressure Pc(Sw) controller/meter, allowing accurate Pc and Sw measurements. Drainage and imbibition processes were measured on quartz sand with scCO2-brine at pressures of 8.5 and 12.0 MPa (45°C), and air-brine at 21°C and 0.1 MPa. Drainage and rewetting at intermediate Sw levels shifted to Pc values that were from 30% to 90% lower than predicted based on interfacial tension changes. Augmenting interfacial tension-based predictions with differences in independently measured contact angles from different sources led to more similar scaled Pc(Sw) relations but still did not converge onto universal drainage and imbibition curves. Equilibrium capillary trapping of the nonwetting phases was determined for Pc = 0 during rewetting. The capillary-trapped volumes for scCO2 were significantly greater than for air. Given that the experiments were all conducted on a system with well-defined pore geometry (homogeneous sand), and that scCO2-brine interfacial tensions are fairly well constrained, we conclude that the observed deviations from scaling predictions resulted from scCO2-induced decreased wettability. Wettability alteration by scCO2 makes predicting hydraulic behavior more challenging than for less reactive fluids.

  15. Biventricular remodeling in murine models of right ventricular pressure overload.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Navin K Kapur

    Full Text Available Right ventricular (RV failure is a major cause of mortality in acute or chronic lung disease and left heart failure. The objective of this study was to demonstrate a percutaneous approach to study biventricular hemodynamics in murine models of primary and secondary RV pressure overload (RVPO and further explore biventricular expression of two key proteins that regulate cardiac remodeling: calcineurin and transforming growth factor beta 1 (TGFβ1.Adult, male mice underwent constriction of the pulmonary artery or thoracic aorta as models of primary and secondary RVPO, respectively. Conductance catheterization was performed followed by tissue analysis for changes in myocyte hypertrophy and fibrosis.Both primary and secondary RVPO decreased biventricular stroke work however RV instantaneous peak pressure (dP/dtmax and end-systolic elastance (Ees were preserved in both groups compared to controls. In contrast, left ventricular (LV dP/dtmax and LV-Ees were unchanged by primary, but reduced in the secondary RVPO group. The ratio of RV:LV ventriculo-arterial coupling was increased in primary and reduced in secondary RVPO. Primary and secondary RVPO increased RV mass, while LV mass decreased in primary and increased in the secondary RVPO groups. RV fibrosis and hypertrophy were increased in both groups, while LV fibrosis and hypertrophy were increased in secondary RVPO only. RV calcineurin expression was increased in both groups, while LV expression increased in secondary RVPO only. Biventricular TGFβ1 expression was increased in both groups.These data identify distinct effects of primary and secondary RVPO on biventricular structure, function, and expression of key remodeling pathways.

  16. Analysis of Frequency Response and Scale-Factor of Tuning Fork Micro-Gyroscope Operating at Atmospheric Pressure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xukai Ding

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a study of the frequency response and the scale-factor of a tuning fork micro-gyroscope operating at atmospheric pressure in the presence of an interference sense mode by utilizing the approximate transfer function. The optimal demodulation phase (ODP, which is always ignored in vacuum packaged micro-gyroscopes but quite important in gyroscopes operating at atmospheric pressure, is obtained through the transfer function of the sense mode, including the primary mode and the interference mode. The approximate transfer function of the micro-gyroscope is deduced in consideration of the interference mode and the ODP. Then, the equation describing the scale-factor of the gyroscope is also obtained. The impacts of the interference mode and Q-factor on the frequency response and the scale-factor of the gyroscope are analyzed through numerical simulations. The relationship between the scale-factor and the demodulation phase is also illustrated and gives an effective way to find out the ODP in practice. The simulation results predicted by the transfer functions are in close agreement with the results of the experiments. The analyses and simulations can provide constructive guidance on bandwidth and sensitivity designs of the micro-gyroscopes operating at atmospheric pressure.

  17. Human activity under high pressure: A case study on fluctuation scaling of air traffic controller's communication behaviors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yanjun; Zhang, Qiqian; Zhu, Chenping; Hu, Minghua; Duong, Vu

    2016-01-01

    Recent human dynamics research has unmasked astonishing statistical characteristics such as scaling behaviors in human daily activities. However, less is known about the general mechanism that governs the task-specific activities. In particular, whether scaling law exists in human activities under high pressure remains an open question. In air traffic management system, safety is the most important factor to be concerned by air traffic controllers who always work under high pressure, which provides a unique platform to study human activity. Here we extend fluctuation scaling method to study air traffic controller's communication activity by investigating two empirical communication datasets. Taken the number of controlled flights as the size-like parameter, we show that the relationships between the average communication activity and its standard deviation in both datasets can be well described by Taylor's power law, with scaling exponent α ≈ 0.77 ± 0.01 for the real operational data and α ≈ 0.54 ± 0.01 for the real-time training data. The difference between the exponents suggests that human dynamics under pressure is more likely dominated by the exogenous force. Our findings may lead to further understanding of human behavior.

  18. Analysis of frequency response and scale-factor of tuning fork micro-gyroscope operating at atmospheric pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Xukai; Li, Hongsheng; Ni, Yunfang; Sang, Pengcheng

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents a study of the frequency response and the scale-factor of a tuning fork micro-gyroscope operating at atmospheric pressure in the presence of an interference sense mode by utilizing the approximate transfer function. The optimal demodulation phase (ODP), which is always ignored in vacuum packaged micro-gyroscopes but quite important in gyroscopes operating at atmospheric pressure, is obtained through the transfer function of the sense mode, including the primary mode and the interference mode. The approximate transfer function of the micro-gyroscope is deduced in consideration of the interference mode and the ODP. Then, the equation describing the scale-factor of the gyroscope is also obtained. The impacts of the interference mode and Q-factor on the frequency response and the scale-factor of the gyroscope are analyzed through numerical simulations. The relationship between the scale-factor and the demodulation phase is also illustrated and gives an effective way to find out the ODP in practice. The simulation results predicted by the transfer functions are in close agreement with the results of the experiments. The analyses and simulations can provide constructive guidance on bandwidth and sensitivity designs of the micro-gyroscopes operating at atmospheric pressure.

  19. Models for Small-Scale Structure on Cosmic Strings: II. Scaling and its stability

    CERN Document Server

    Vieira, J P P; Shellard, E P S

    2016-01-01

    We make use of the formalism described in a previous paper [Martins {\\it et al.} Phys. Rev. D90 (2014) 043518] to address general features of wiggly cosmic string evolution. In particular, we highlight the important role played by poorly understood energy loss mechanisms and propose a simple ansatz which tackles this problem in the context of an extended velocity-dependent one-scale model. We find a general procedure to determine all the scaling solutions admitted by a specific string model and study their stability, enabling a detailed comparison with future numerical simulations. A simpler comparison with previous Goto-Nambu simulations supports earlier evidence that scaling is easier to achieve in the matter era than in the radiation era. In addition, we also find that the requirement that a scaling regime be stable seems to notably constrain the allowed range of energy loss parameters.

  20. FINAL REPORT: Mechanistically-Base Field Scale Models of Uranium Biogeochemistry from Upscaling Pore-Scale Experiments and Models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wood, Brian D.

    2013-11-04

    Biogeochemical reactive transport processes in the subsurface environment are important to many contemporary environmental issues of significance to DOE. Quantification of risks and impacts associated with environmental management options, and design of remediation systems where needed, require that we have at our disposal reliable predictive tools (usually in the form of numerical simulation models). However, it is well known that even the most sophisticated reactive transport models available today have poor predictive power, particularly when applied at the field scale. Although the lack of predictive ability is associated in part with our inability to characterize the subsurface and limitations in computational power, significant advances have been made in both of these areas in recent decades and can be expected to continue. In this research, we examined the upscaling (pore to Darcy and Darcy to field) the problem of bioremediation via biofilms in porous media. The principle idea was to start with a conceptual description of the bioremediation process at the pore scale, and apply upscaling methods to formally develop the appropriate upscaled model at the so-called Darcy scale. The purpose was to determine (1) what forms the upscaled models would take, and (2) how one might parameterize such upscaled models for applications to bioremediation in the field. We were able to effectively upscale the bioremediation process to explain how the pore-scale phenomena were linked to the field scale. The end product of this research was to produce a set of upscaled models that could be used to help predict field-scale bioremediation. These models were mechanistic, in the sense that they directly incorporated pore-scale information, but upscaled so that only the essential features of the process were needed to predict the effective parameters that appear in the model. In this way, a direct link between the microscale and the field scale was made, but the upscaling process

  1. Evaluation of a pilot scale high pressure plasma ozonizer for use in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    TUOYO

    2010-08-09

    Aug 9, 2010 ... Key words: Ozone, ozonizer, oxidizer, plasma, high pressure, plasma system. INTRODUCTION ... the electric field which can result in a voltage breakdown. .... electric current of 10 mA, discharge gap of 0.006 m, gas pressure ...

  2. A SUB-GRID VOLUME-OF-FLUIDS (VOF) MODEL FOR MIXING IN RESOLVED SCALE AND IN UNRESOLVED SCALE COMPUTATIONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    VOLD, ERIK L. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; SCANNAPIECO, TONY J. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2007-10-16

    A sub-grid mix model based on a volume-of-fluids (VOF) representation is described for computational simulations of the transient mixing between reactive fluids, in which the atomically mixed components enter into the reactivity. The multi-fluid model allows each fluid species to have independent values for density, energy, pressure and temperature, as well as independent velocities and volume fractions. Fluid volume fractions are further divided into mix components to represent their 'mixedness' for more accurate prediction of reactivity. Time dependent conversion from unmixed volume fractions (denoted cf) to atomically mixed (af) fluids by diffusive processes is represented in resolved scale simulations with the volume fractions (cf, af mix). In unresolved scale simulations, the transition to atomically mixed materials begins with a conversion from unmixed material to a sub-grid volume fraction (pf). This fraction represents the unresolved small scales in the fluids, heterogeneously mixed by turbulent or multi-phase mixing processes, and this fraction then proceeds in a second step to the atomically mixed fraction by diffusion (cf, pf, af mix). Species velocities are evaluated with a species drift flux, {rho}{sub i}u{sub di} = {rho}{sub i}(u{sub i}-u), used to describe the fluid mixing sources in several closure options. A simple example of mixing fluids during 'interfacial deceleration mixing with a small amount of diffusion illustrates the generation of atomically mixed fluids in two cases, for resolved scale simulations and for unresolved scale simulations. Application to reactive mixing, including Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF), is planned for future work.

  3. Pressure Adaptive Honeycomb: Mechanics, Modeling, and Experimental Investigation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vos, R.; Barrett, R.

    2010-01-01

    A new type of adaptive structure is presented that relies on a pressure derential to perform gross structural deformations. This structure relies on highly compliant honey-comb cells that can be pressurized externally or can rely on a pressure differential that exists at elevated altitudes. By

  4. Properties of Brownian Image Models in Scale-Space

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Kim Steenstrup

    2003-01-01

    In this paper it is argued that the Brownian image model is the least committed, scale invariant, statistical image model which describes the second order statistics of natural images. Various properties of three different types of Gaussian image models (white noise, Brownian and fractional...... Brownian images) will be discussed in relation to linear scale-space theory, and it will be shown empirically that the second order statistics of natural images mapped into jet space may, within some scale interval, be modeled by the Brownian image model. This is consistent with the 1/f 2 power spectrum...... law that apparently governs natural images. Furthermore, the distribution of Brownian images mapped into jet space is Gaussian and an analytical expression can be derived for the covariance matrix of Brownian images in jet space. This matrix is also a good approximation of the covariance matrix...

  5. Nucleon Electric Dipole Moments in High-Scale Supersymmetric Models

    CERN Document Server

    Hisano, Junji; Kuramoto, Wataru; Kuwahara, Takumi

    2015-01-01

    The electric dipole moments (EDMs) of electron and nucleons are the promising probe of the new physics. In the generic high-scale supersymmetric (SUSY) scenarios such as models based on mixture of the anomaly and gauge mediations, gluino has an additional contribution to the nucleon EDMs. In this paper, we estimated the effect of the CP-violating gluon Weinberg operator induced by the gluino chromoelectric dipole moment in the high-scale SUSY scenarios, and we evaluated the nucleon and electron EDMs in these scenarios. We found that in the generic high-scale SUSY models, the nucleon EDMs may receive the sizable contribution from the Weinberg operator. Thus, it is important to compare the nucleon EDMs with the electron EDM in order to discriminate among the high-scale SUSY models.

  6. Nucleon electric dipole moments in high-scale supersymmetric models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hisano, Junji; Kobayashi, Daiki; Kuramoto, Wataru; Kuwahara, Takumi

    2015-11-01

    The electric dipole moments (EDMs) of electron and nucleons are promising probes of the new physics. In generic high-scale supersymmetric (SUSY) scenarios such as models based on mixture of the anomaly and gauge mediations, gluino has an additional contribution to the nucleon EDMs. In this paper, we studied the effect of the CP -violating gluon Weinberg operator induced by the gluino chromoelectric dipole moment in the high-scale SUSY scenarios, and we evaluated the nucleon and electron EDMs in the scenarios. We found that in the generic high-scale SUSY models, the nucleon EDMs may receive the sizable contribution from the Weinberg operator. Thus, it is important to compare the nucleon EDMs with the electron one in order to discriminate among the high-scale SUSY models.

  7. Cancer systems biology and modeling: microscopic scale and multiscale approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masoudi-Nejad, Ali; Bidkhori, Gholamreza; Hosseini Ashtiani, Saman; Najafi, Ali; Bozorgmehr, Joseph H; Wang, Edwin

    2015-02-01

    Cancer has become known as a complex and systematic disease on macroscopic, mesoscopic and microscopic scales. Systems biology employs state-of-the-art computational theories and high-throughput experimental data to model and simulate complex biological procedures such as cancer, which involves genetic and epigenetic, in addition to intracellular and extracellular complex interaction networks. In this paper, different systems biology modeling techniques such as systems of differential equations, stochastic methods, Boolean networks, Petri nets, cellular automata methods and agent-based systems are concisely discussed. We have compared the mentioned formalisms and tried to address the span of applicability they can bear on emerging cancer modeling and simulation approaches. Different scales of cancer modeling, namely, microscopic, mesoscopic and macroscopic scales are explained followed by an illustration of angiogenesis in microscopic scale of the cancer modeling. Then, the modeling of cancer cell proliferation and survival are examined on a microscopic scale and the modeling of multiscale tumor growth is explained along with its advantages.

  8. Experimental investigation and calibration of surface pressure modeling for trailing edge noise

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bertagnolio, Franck

    2011-01-01

    The modeling of the surface pressure spectrum under a turbulent boundary layer is investigated in the presence of an adverse pressure gradient along the flow direction. It is shown that discrepancies between measurements and results from a well-known model increase as the pressure gradient...... increases. This model is modified by introducing anisotropy in the definition of the vertical velocity component spectrum across the boundary layer. The degree of anisotropy is directly related to the strength of the pressure gradient. It is shown that by appropriately normalizing the pressure gradient...... and by tuning the anisotropy factor, experimental results can be closely reproduced by the modified model....

  9. Diagnostic Modeling of PAMS VOC Observation on Regional Scale Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, S.; Liu, T.; Chen, T.; Ou Yang, C.; Wang, J.; Chang, J. S.

    2008-12-01

    While a number of gas-phase chemical mechanisms, such as CBM-Z, RADM2, SAPRC-07 had been successful in studying gas-phase atmospheric chemical processes they all used some lumped organic species to varying degrees. Photochemical Assessment Monitoring Stations (PAMS) has been in use for over ten years and yet it is not clear how the detailed organic species measured by PAMS compare to the lumped model species under regional-scale transport and chemistry interactions. By developing a detailed mechanism specifically for the PAMS organics and embedding this diagnostic model within a regional-scale transport and chemistry model we can then directly compare PAMS observation with regional-scale model simulations. We modify one regional-scale chemical transport model (Taiwan Air Quality Model, TAQM) by adding a submodel with chemical mechanism for interactions of the 56 species observed by PAMS. This submodel then calculates the time evolution of these 56 PAMS species within the environment established by TAQM. It is assumed that TAQM can simulate the overall regional-scale environment including impact of regional-scale transport and time evolution of oxidants and radicals. Therefore we can scale these influences to the PAMS organic species and study their time evolution with their species-specific source functions, meteorological transport, and chemical interactions. Model simulations of each species are compared with PAMS hourly surface measurements. A case study located in a metropolitan area in central Taiwan showed that with wind speeds lower than 3 m/s, when meteorological simulation is comparable with observation, the diurnal pattern of each species performs well with PAMS data. It is found that for many observations meteorological transport is an influence and that local emissions of specific species must be represented correctly. At this time there are still species that cannot be modeled properly. We suspect this is mostly due to lack of information on local

  10. Flowering to bloom of PeV scale supersymmetric left–right symmetric models

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Urjit A Yajnik; Anishnu Sarkar; Sasmita Mishra; Debasish Borah

    2016-02-01

    Unified models incorporating right-handed neutrino in a symmetric way generically possess parity symmetry. If this is broken spontaneously, it results in the formation of domain walls in the early Universe, whose persistence is unwanted. A generic mechanism for the destabilization of such walls is a small pressure difference signalled by difference in free energy across the walls. It is interesting to explore the possibility of such effects in conjunction with the effects that break supersymmetry in a phenomenologically acceptable way. This possibility when realized in the context of several scenarios of supersymmetry breaking, leads to an upper bound on the scale of spontaneous parity breaking, often much lower than the GUT scale. In the left–right symmetric models studied, the upper bound is no higher than 1011 GeV but a scale as low as 105 GeV is acceptable.

  11. Modeling heat dominated electric breakdown in air, with adaptivity to electron or ion time scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agnihotri, A.; Hundsdorfer, W.; Ebert, U.

    2017-09-01

    We model heat dominated electrical breakdown in air in a short planar gap. We couple the discharge dynamics in fluid approximation with the hydrodynamic motion of the air heated by the discharge. To be computationally efficient, we derive a reduced model on the ion time scale, and we switch between the full model on the electron time scale and the reduced model. We observe an ion pulse reaching the cathode, releasing electrons by secondary emission, and these electrons create another ion pulse. These cycles of ion pulses might lead to electrical breakdown. This breakdown is driven by Ohmic heating, thermal shocks and induced pressure waves, rather than by the streamer mechanism of local field enhancement at the streamer tip.

  12. Modeling solidification structure evolution and microsegregation under pressure condition

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qiang Li; Qiaoyi Guo; Rongde Li

    2006-01-01

    Solidification microstructure and microsegregation were simulated under a constant pressure condition using the cellular automaton method. First, a single dendrite evolution was simulated and compared under pressure condition and under normal condition,respectively. The solidification microstructure and microsegregation were then simulated. Through simulation, it may be concluded that if the growth direction of the dendrite is parallel to the pressure direction, dendrite growth will be hindered. On the other hand,pressure has no influence on the dendrite evolution. However, when two dendrites grow in close contact, solute enrichment occurs in the dendrites, which hinders the growth of the dendrites. In addition, the solute is preferentially enriched along the pressure direction.

  13. Use of large-scale acoustic monitoring to assess anthropogenic pressures on Orthoptera communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penone, Caterina; Le Viol, Isabelle; Pellissier, Vincent; Julien, Jean-François; Bas, Yves; Kerbiriou, Christian

    2013-10-01

    Biodiversity monitoring at large spatial and temporal scales is greatly needed in the context of global changes. Although insects are a species-rich group and are important for ecosystem functioning, they have been largely neglected in conservation studies and policies, mainly due to technical and methodological constraints. Sound detection, a nondestructive method, is easily applied within a citizen-science framework and could be an interesting solution for insect monitoring. However, it has not yet been tested at a large scale. We assessed the value of a citizen-science program in which Orthoptera species (Tettigoniidae) were monitored acoustically along roads. We used Bayesian model-averaging analyses to test whether we could detect widely known patterns of anthropogenic effects on insects, such as the negative effects of urbanization or intensive agriculture on Orthoptera populations and communities. We also examined site-abundance correlations between years and estimated the biases in species detection to evaluate and improve the protocol. Urbanization and intensive agricultural landscapes negatively affected Orthoptera species richness, diversity, and abundance. This finding is consistent with results of previous studies of Orthoptera, vertebrates, carabids, and butterflies. The average mass of communities decreased as urbanization increased. The dispersal ability of communities increased as the percentage of agricultural land and, to a lesser extent, urban area increased. Despite changes in abundances over time, we found significant correlations between yearly abundances. We identified biases linked to the protocol (e.g., car speed or temperature) that can be accounted for ease in analyses. We argue that acoustic monitoring of Orthoptera along roads offers several advantages for assessing Orthoptera biodiversity at large spatial and temporal extents, particularly in a citizen science framework. © 2013 Society for Conservation Biology.

  14. Intracochlear Pressure Changes due to Round Window Opening: A Model Experiment

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Mittmann, P; Ernst, A; Todt, I

    2014-01-01

    .... The experiments were performed in an artificial cochlea model. A round window was simulated with a polythene foil and a pressure sensor was placed in the helicotrema area to monitor intraluminal pressure changes...

  15. Intracochlear pressure changes due to round window opening: a model experiment

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Mittmann, P; Ernst, A; Todt, I

    2014-01-01

    .... The experiments were performed in an artificial cochlea model. A round window was simulated with a polythene foil and a pressure sensor was placed in the helicotrema area to monitor intraluminal pressure changes...

  16. Surface Pressure Estimates for Pitching Aircraft Model at High Angles-of-attack (Short Communication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. A. Pashilkar

    2002-10-01

    Full Text Available The surface pressure on a pitching delta wing aircraft is estimated from the normal force and the pitching moment characteristics. The pressure model is based on parametrising the surface pressure distribution on a simple delta wing. This model is useful as a first approximation of the load distribution on the aircraft wing. Leeward surface pressure distributions computed by this method are presented.

  17. Power law cosmology model comparison with CMB scale information

    CERN Document Server

    Tutusaus, Isaac; Blanchard, Alain; Dupays, Arnaud; Zolnierowski, Yves; Cohen-Tanugi, Johann; Ealet, Anne; Escoffier, Stéphanie; Fèvre, Olivier Le; Ilić, Stéphane; Piazza, Federico; Pisani, Alice; Plaszczynski, Stéphane; Sakr, Ziad; Salvatelli, Valentina; Schücker, Thomas; Tilquin, André; Virey, Jean-Marc

    2016-01-01

    Despite the ability of the cosmological concordance model ($\\Lambda$CDM) to describe the cosmological observations exceedingly well, power law expansion of the Universe scale radius has been proposed as an alternative framework. We examine here these models, analyzing their ability to fit cosmological data using robust model comparison criteria. Type Ia supernovae (SNIa), baryonic acoustic oscillations (BAO) and acoustic scale information from the cosmic microwave background (CMB) have been used. We find that SNIa data either alone or combined with BAO, can be well reproduced by both $\\Lambda$CDM and power law expansion models with $n \\sim 1.5$, while the constant expansion rate model ($n = 1$) is clearly disfavored. Allowing for some redshift evolution in the SNIa luminosity essentially removes any clear preference for a specific model. The CMB data is well known to provide the most stringent constraints on standard cosmological models, in particular through the position of the first peak of the temperature ...

  18. Description of Muzzle Blast by Modified Ideal Scaling Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kevin S. Fansler

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available Gun blast data from a large variety of weapons are scaled and presented for both the instantaneous energy release and the constant energy deposition rate models. For both ideal explosion models, similar amounts of data scatter occur for the peak overpressure but the instantaneous energy release model correlated the impulse data significantly better, particularly for the region in front of the gun. Two parameters that characterize gun blast are used in conjunction with the ideal scaling models to improve the data correlation. The gun-emptying parameter works particularly well with the instantaneous energy release model to improve data correlation. In particular, the impulse, especially in the forward direction of the gun, is correlated significantly better using the instantaneous energy release model coupled with the use of the gun-emptying parameter. The use of the Mach disc location parameter improves the correlation only marginally. A predictive model is obtained from the modified instantaneous energy release correlation.

  19. Transdisciplinary application of the cross-scale resilience model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sundstrom, Shana M.; Angeler, David G.; Garmestani, Ahjond S.; Garcia, Jorge H.; Allen, Craig R.

    2014-01-01

    The cross-scale resilience model was developed in ecology to explain the emergence of resilience from the distribution of ecological functions within and across scales, and as a tool to assess resil