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Sample records for model reporter protein

  1. Modeling complexes of modeled proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anishchenko, Ivan; Kundrotas, Petras J; Vakser, Ilya A

    2017-03-01

    Structural characterization of proteins is essential for understanding life processes at the molecular level. However, only a fraction of known proteins have experimentally determined structures. This fraction is even smaller for protein-protein complexes. Thus, structural modeling of protein-protein interactions (docking) primarily has to rely on modeled structures of the individual proteins, which typically are less accurate than the experimentally determined ones. Such "double" modeling is the Grand Challenge of structural reconstruction of the interactome. Yet it remains so far largely untested in a systematic way. We present a comprehensive validation of template-based and free docking on a set of 165 complexes, where each protein model has six levels of structural accuracy, from 1 to 6 Å C(α) RMSD. Many template-based docking predictions fall into acceptable quality category, according to the CAPRI criteria, even for highly inaccurate proteins (5-6 Å RMSD), although the number of such models (and, consequently, the docking success rate) drops significantly for models with RMSD > 4 Å. The results show that the existing docking methodologies can be successfully applied to protein models with a broad range of structural accuracy, and the template-based docking is much less sensitive to inaccuracies of protein models than the free docking. Proteins 2017; 85:470-478. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Protein Models Comparator

    CERN Document Server

    Widera, Paweł

    2011-01-01

    The process of comparison of computer generated protein structural models is an important element of protein structure prediction. It has many uses including model quality evaluation, selection of the final models from a large set of candidates or optimisation of parameters of energy functions used in template free modelling and refinement. Although many protein comparison methods are available online on numerous web servers, their ability to handle a large scale model comparison is often very limited. Most of the servers offer only a single pairwise structural comparison, and they usually do not provide a model-specific comparison with a fixed alignment between the models. To bridge the gap between the protein and model structure comparison we have developed the Protein Models Comparator (pm-cmp). To be able to deliver the scalability on demand and handle large comparison experiments the pm-cmp was implemented "in the cloud". Protein Models Comparator is a scalable web application for a fast distributed comp...

  3. Report on three Genomes to Life Workshops: Data Infrastructure, Modeling and Simulation, and Protein Structure Prediction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geist, GA

    2003-09-16

    On July 22, 23, 24, 2003, three one day workshops were held in Gaithersburg, Maryland. Each was attended by about 30 computational biologists, mathematicians, and computer scientists who were experts in the respective workshop areas The first workshop discussed the data infrastructure needs for the Genomes to Life (GTL) program with the objective to identify gaps in the present GTL data infrastructure and define the GTL data infrastructure required for the success of the proposed GTL facilities. The second workshop discussed the modeling and simulation needs for the next phase of the GTL program and defined how these relate to the experimental data generated by genomics, proteomics, and metabolomics. The third workshop identified emerging technical challenges in computational protein structure prediction for DOE missions and outlining specific goals for the next phase of GTL. The workshops were attended by representatives from both OBER and OASCR. The invited experts at each of the workshops made short presentations on what they perceived as the key needs in the GTL data infrastructure, modeling and simulation, and structure prediction respectively. Each presentation was followed by a lively discussion by all the workshop attendees. The following findings and recommendations were derived from the three workshops. A seamless integration of GTL data spanning the entire range of genomics, proteomics, and metabolomics will be extremely challenging but it has to be treated as the first-class component of the GTL program to assure GTL's chances for success. High-throughput GTL facilities and ultrascale computing will make it possible to address the ultimate goal of modern biology: to achieve a fundamental, comprehensive, and systematic understanding of life. But first the GTL community needs to address the problem of the massive quantities and increased complexity of biological data produced by experiments and computations. Genome-scale collection, analysis

  4. MODELS OF PROTEIN FOLDING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Unnati Ahluwalia

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available In an attempt to explore the understanding of protein folding mechanism, various models have been proposed in the literature. Advances in recent experimental and computational techniques rationalized our understanding on some of the fundamental features of the protein folding pathways. The goal of this review is to revisit the various models and outline the essential aspects of the folding reaction.

  5. Protein Model Database

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fidelis, K; Adzhubej, A; Kryshtafovych, A; Daniluk, P

    2005-02-23

    The phenomenal success of the genome sequencing projects reveals the power of completeness in revolutionizing biological science. Currently it is possible to sequence entire organisms at a time, allowing for a systemic rather than fractional view of their organization and the various genome-encoded functions. There is an international plan to move towards a similar goal in the area of protein structure. This will not be achieved by experiment alone, but rather by a combination of efforts in crystallography, NMR spectroscopy, and computational modeling. Only a small fraction of structures are expected to be identified experimentally, the remainder to be modeled. Presently there is no organized infrastructure to critically evaluate and present these data to the biological community. The goal of the Protein Model Database project is to create such infrastructure, including (1) public database of theoretically derived protein structures; (2) reliable annotation of protein model quality, (3) novel structure analysis tools, and (4) access to the highest quality modeling techniques available.

  6. Modeling Mercury in Proteins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, Jeremy C [ORNL; Parks, Jerry M [ORNL

    2016-01-01

    Mercury (Hg) is a naturally occurring element that is released into the biosphere both by natural processes and anthropogenic activities. Although its reduced, elemental form Hg(0) is relatively non-toxic, other forms such as Hg2+ and, in particular, its methylated form, methylmercury, are toxic, with deleterious effects on both ecosystems and humans. Microorganisms play important roles in the transformation of mercury in the environment. Inorganic Hg2+ can be methylated by certain bacteria and archaea to form methylmercury. Conversely, bacteria also demethylate methylmercury and reduce Hg2+ to relatively inert Hg(0). Transformations and toxicity occur as a result of mercury interacting with various proteins. Clearly, then, understanding the toxic effects of mercury and its cycling in the environment requires characterization of these interactions. Computational approaches are ideally suited to studies of mercury in proteins because they can provide a detailed picture and circumvent issues associated with toxicity. Here we describe computational methods for investigating and characterizing how mercury binds to proteins, how inter- and intra-protein transfer of mercury is orchestrated in biological systems, and how chemical reactions in proteins transform the metal. We describe quantum chemical analyses of aqueous Hg(II), which reveal critical factors that determine ligand binding propensities. We then provide a perspective on how we used chemical reasoning to discover how microorganisms methylate mercury. We also highlight our combined computational and experimental studies of the proteins and enzymes of the mer operon, a suite of genes that confers mercury resistance in many bacteria. Lastly, we place work on mercury in proteins in the context of what is needed for a comprehensive multi-scale model of environmental mercury cycling.

  7. Multiscale modeling of proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tozzini, Valentina

    2010-02-16

    The activity within a living cell is based on a complex network of interactions among biomolecules, exchanging information and energy through biochemical processes. These events occur on different scales, from the nano- to the macroscale, spanning about 10 orders of magnitude in the space domain and 15 orders of magnitude in the time domain. Consequently, many different modeling techniques, each proper for a particular time or space scale, are commonly used. In addition, a single process often spans more than a single time or space scale. Thus, the necessity arises for combining the modeling techniques in multiscale approaches. In this Account, I first review the different modeling methods for bio-systems, from quantum mechanics to the coarse-grained and continuum-like descriptions, passing through the atomistic force field simulations. Special attention is devoted to their combination in different possible multiscale approaches and to the questions and problems related to their coherent matching in the space and time domains. These aspects are often considered secondary, but in fact, they have primary relevance when the aim is the coherent and complete description of bioprocesses. Subsequently, applications are illustrated by means of two paradigmatic examples: (i) the green fluorescent protein (GFP) family and (ii) the proteins involved in the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) replication cycle. The GFPs are currently one of the most frequently used markers for monitoring protein trafficking within living cells; nanobiotechnology and cell biology strongly rely on their use in fluorescence microscopy techniques. A detailed knowledge of the actions of the virus-specific enzymes of HIV (specifically HIV protease and integrase) is necessary to study novel therapeutic strategies against this disease. Thus, the insight accumulated over years of intense study is an excellent framework for this Account. The foremost relevance of these two biomolecular systems was

  8. Modelling of proteins in membranes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sperotto, Maria Maddalena; May, S.; Baumgaertner, A.

    2006-01-01

    This review describes some recent theories and simulations of mesoscopic and microscopic models of lipid membranes with embedded or attached proteins. We summarize results supporting our understanding of phenomena for which the activities of proteins in membranes are expected to be significantly...... affected by the lipid environment. Theoretical predictions are pointed out, and compared to experimental findings, if available. Among others, the following phenomena are discussed: interactions of interfacially adsorbed peptides, pore-forming amphipathic peptides, adsorption of charged proteins onto...... oppositely charged lipid membranes, lipid-induced tilting of proteins embedded in lipid bilayers, protein-induced bilayer deformations, protein insertion and assembly, and lipid-controlled functioning of membrane proteins....

  9. Quantitative measurement of cell membrane receptor internalization by the nanoluciferase reporter: Using the G protein-coupled receptor RXFP3 as a model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yu; Song, Ge; Shao, Xiao-Xia; Liu, Ya-Li; Guo, Zhan-Yun

    2015-02-01

    Nanoluciferase (NanoLuc) is a newly developed small luciferase reporter with the brightest bioluminescence to date. In the present work, we developed NanoLuc as a sensitive bioluminescent reporter to measure quantitatively the internalization of cell membrane receptors, based on the pH dependence of the reporter activity. The G protein-coupled receptor RXFP3, the cognate receptor of relaxin-3/INSL7, was used as a model receptor. We first generated stable HEK293T cells that inducibly coexpressed a C-terminally NanoLuc-tagged human RXFP3 and a C-terminally enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP)-tagged human RXFP3. The C-terminal EGFP-tag and NanoLuc-tag had no detrimental effects on the ligand-binding potency and intracellular trafficking of RXFP3. Based on the fluorescence of the tagged EGFP reporter, the ligand-induced RXFP3 internalization was visualized directly under a fluorescence microscope. Based on the bioluminescence of the tagged NanoLuc reporter, the ligand-induced RXFP3 internalization was measured quantitatively by a convenient bioluminescent assay. Coexpression of an EGFP-tagged inactive [E141R]RXFP3 had no detrimental effect on the ligand-binding potency and ligand-induced internalization of the NanoLuc-tagged wild-type RXFP3, suggesting that the mutant RXFP3 and wild-type RXFP3 worked independently. The present bioluminescent internalization assay could be extended to other G protein-coupled receptors and other cell membrane receptors to study ligand-receptor and receptor-receptor interactions.

  10. Chemical reporters for exploring protein acylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thinon, Emmanuelle; Hang, Howard C

    2015-04-01

    Proteins are acylated by a variety of metabolites that regulates many important cellular pathways in all kingdoms of life. Acyl groups in cells can vary in structure from the smallest unit, acetate, to modified long-chain fatty acids, all of which can be activated and covalently attached to diverse amino acid side chains and consequently modulate protein function. For example, acetylation of Lys residues can alter the charge state of proteins and generate new recognition elements for protein-protein interactions. Alternatively, long-chain fatty-acylation targets proteins to membranes and enables spatial control of cell signalling. To facilitate the analysis of protein acylation in biology, acyl analogues bearing alkyne or azide tags have been developed that enable fluorescent imaging and proteomic profiling of modified proteins using bioorthogonal ligation methods. Herein, we summarize the currently available acylation chemical reporters and highlight their utility to discover and quantify the roles of protein acylation in biology.

  11. Comparative Protein Structure Modeling Using MODELLER.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webb, Benjamin; Sali, Andrej

    2016-06-20

    Comparative protein structure modeling predicts the three-dimensional structure of a given protein sequence (target) based primarily on its alignment to one or more proteins of known structure (templates). The prediction process consists of fold assignment, target-template alignment, model building, and model evaluation. This unit describes how to calculate comparative models using the program MODELLER and how to use the ModBase database of such models, and discusses all four steps of comparative modeling, frequently observed errors, and some applications. Modeling lactate dehydrogenase from Trichomonas vaginalis (TvLDH) is described as an example. The download and installation of the MODELLER software is also described. © 2016 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  12. Biosphere Model Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D.W. Wu; A.J. Smith

    2004-11-08

    The purpose of this report is to document the biosphere model, the Environmental Radiation Model for Yucca Mountain, Nevada (ERMYN), which describes radionuclide transport processes in the biosphere and associated human exposure that may arise as the result of radionuclide release from the geologic repository at Yucca Mountain. The biosphere model is one of the process models that support the Yucca Mountain Project (YMP) Total System Performance Assessment (TSPA) for the license application (LA), TSPA-LA. The ERMYN provides the capability of performing human radiation dose assessments. This report documents the biosphere model, which includes: (1) Describing the reference biosphere, human receptor, exposure scenarios, and primary radionuclides for each exposure scenario (Section 6.1); (2) Developing a biosphere conceptual model using site-specific features, events, and processes (FEPs) (Section 6.2), the reference biosphere (Section 6.1.1), the human receptor (Section 6.1.2), and approximations (Sections 6.3.1.4 and 6.3.2.4); (3) Building a mathematical model using the biosphere conceptual model (Section 6.3) and published biosphere models (Sections 6.4 and 6.5); (4) Summarizing input parameters for the mathematical model, including the uncertainty associated with input values (Section 6.6); (5) Identifying improvements in the ERMYN compared with the model used in previous biosphere modeling (Section 6.7); (6) Constructing an ERMYN implementation tool (model) based on the biosphere mathematical model using GoldSim stochastic simulation software (Sections 6.8 and 6.9); (7) Verifying the ERMYN by comparing output from the software with hand calculations to ensure that the GoldSim implementation is correct (Section 6.10); (8) Validating the ERMYN by corroborating it with published biosphere models; comparing conceptual models, mathematical models, and numerical results (Section 7).

  13. Modelling of proteins in membranes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sperotto, Maria Maddalena; May, S.; Baumgaertner, A.

    2006-01-01

    This review describes some recent theories and simulations of mesoscopic and microscopic models of lipid membranes with embedded or attached proteins. We summarize results supporting our understanding of phenomena for which the activities of proteins in membranes are expected to be significantly ...

  14. Biosphere Process Model Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J. Schmitt

    2000-05-25

    To evaluate the postclosure performance of a potential monitored geologic repository at Yucca Mountain, a Total System Performance Assessment (TSPA) will be conducted. Nine Process Model Reports (PMRs), including this document, are being developed to summarize the technical basis for each of the process models supporting the TSPA model. These reports cover the following areas: (1) Integrated Site Model; (2) Unsaturated Zone Flow and Transport; (3) Near Field Environment; (4) Engineered Barrier System Degradation, Flow, and Transport; (5) Waste Package Degradation; (6) Waste Form Degradation; (7) Saturated Zone Flow and Transport; (8) Biosphere; and (9) Disruptive Events. Analysis/Model Reports (AMRs) contain the more detailed technical information used to support TSPA and the PMRs. The AMRs consists of data, analyses, models, software, and supporting documentation that will be used to defend the applicability of each process model for evaluating the postclosure performance of the potential Yucca Mountain repository system. This documentation will ensure the traceability of information from its source through its ultimate use in the TSPA-Site Recommendation (SR) and in the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) analysis processes. The objective of the Biosphere PMR is to summarize (1) the development of the biosphere model, and (2) the Biosphere Dose Conversion Factors (BDCFs) developed for use in TSPA. The Biosphere PMR does not present or summarize estimates of potential radiation doses to human receptors. Dose calculations are performed as part of TSPA and will be presented in the TSPA documentation. The biosphere model is a component of the process to evaluate postclosure repository performance and regulatory compliance for a potential monitored geologic repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. The biosphere model describes those exposure pathways in the biosphere by which radionuclides released from a potential repository could reach a human receptor

  15. Coarse-grain modelling of protein-protein interactions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baaden, Marc; Marrink, Siewert J.

    2013-01-01

    Here, we review recent advances towards the modelling of protein-protein interactions (PPI) at the coarse-grained (CG) level, a technique that is now widely used to understand protein affinity, aggregation and self-assembly behaviour. PPI models of soluble proteins and membrane proteins are separate

  16. Modelling strategy report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, P.A. [SAM Switzerland GmbH (Switzerland); Brommundt, J.; Mayer, G. [AF-Consult Switzerland Ltd, Baden (Switzerland)] [and others

    2012-01-15

    This report presents a preliminary plan for the development and application of models for the probabilistic sensitivity analyses and the deterministic calculation cases that will be used to analyse scenarios in the 2012 safety case. The plan addresses both groundwater flow modelling and radionuclide transport modelling, primarily of the repository near field and of the geosphere. It also addresses the measures that will be applied during the implementation and documentation of the calculations that will contribute to the quality assurance of the safety case. It is expected that this plan will be refined and amended as experience is gained during the carrying out of the work. (orig.)

  17. Modeling protein synthesis from a physicist's perspective: a toy model

    CERN Document Server

    Basu, A; Basu, Aakash; Chowdhury, Debashish

    2007-01-01

    Proteins are polymers of amino acids. These macromolecules are synthesized by intracellular machines called {\\it ribosome}. Although, traditionally, the experimental investigation of protein synthesis has been an active area of research in molecular cell biology, important quantitative models of this phenomenon have been reported mostly in the research journals devoted to statistical physics and related interdisciplinary topics. From the perspective of a physicist, protein synthesis is a phenomenon of {\\it classical transport of interacting ribosomes on a messenger RNA (mRNA) template} that dictates the sequence of the amino acids on the protein. Here we bring this frontier area of contemporary research into the classroom by appropriate simplification of the models and methods. In particular, we develope a simple toy model and analyze it by some elementary techniques of non-equilibrium statistical mechanics to predict the average rate of protein synthesis and their spatial organization in the steady-state.

  18. Year 2 Report: Protein Function Prediction Platform

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, C E

    2012-04-27

    Upon completion of our second year of development in a 3-year development cycle, we have completed a prototype protein structure-function annotation and function prediction system: Protein Function Prediction (PFP) platform (v.0.5). We have met our milestones for Years 1 and 2 and are positioned to continue development in completion of our original statement of work, or a reasonable modification thereof, in service to DTRA Programs involved in diagnostics and medical countermeasures research and development. The PFP platform is a multi-scale computational modeling system for protein structure-function annotation and function prediction. As of this writing, PFP is the only existing fully automated, high-throughput, multi-scale modeling, whole-proteome annotation platform, and represents a significant advance in the field of genome annotation (Fig. 1). PFP modules perform protein functional annotations at the sequence, systems biology, protein structure, and atomistic levels of biological complexity (Fig. 2). Because these approaches provide orthogonal means of characterizing proteins and suggesting protein function, PFP processing maximizes the protein functional information that can currently be gained by computational means. Comprehensive annotation of pathogen genomes is essential for bio-defense applications in pathogen characterization, threat assessment, and medical countermeasure design and development in that it can short-cut the time and effort required to select and characterize protein biomarkers.

  19. Computational modeling of membrane proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koehler Leman, Julia; Ulmschneider, Martin B; Gray, Jeffrey J

    2015-01-01

    The determination of membrane protein (MP) structures has always trailed that of soluble proteins due to difficulties in their overexpression, reconstitution into membrane mimetics, and subsequent structure determination. The percentage of MP structures in the protein databank (PDB) has been at a constant 1-2% for the last decade. In contrast, over half of all drugs target MPs, only highlighting how little we understand about drug-specific effects in the human body. To reduce this gap, researchers have attempted to predict structural features of MPs even before the first structure was experimentally elucidated. In this review, we present current computational methods to predict MP structure, starting with secondary structure prediction, prediction of trans-membrane spans, and topology. Even though these methods generate reliable predictions, challenges such as predicting kinks or precise beginnings and ends of secondary structure elements are still waiting to be addressed. We describe recent developments in the prediction of 3D structures of both α-helical MPs as well as β-barrels using comparative modeling techniques, de novo methods, and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. The increase of MP structures has (1) facilitated comparative modeling due to availability of more and better templates, and (2) improved the statistics for knowledge-based scoring functions. Moreover, de novo methods have benefited from the use of correlated mutations as restraints. Finally, we outline current advances that will likely shape the field in the forthcoming decade.

  20. Linking microarray reporters with protein functions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gaj Stan

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The analysis of microarray experiments requires accurate and up-to-date functional annotation of the microarray reporters to optimize the interpretation of the biological processes involved. Pathway visualization tools are used to connect gene expression data with existing biological pathways by using specific database identifiers that link reporters with elements in the pathways. Results This paper proposes a novel method that aims to improve microarray reporter annotation by BLASTing the original reporter sequences against a species-specific EMBL subset, that was derived from and crosslinked back to the highly curated UniProt database. The resulting alignments were filtered using high quality alignment criteria and further compared with the outcome of a more traditional approach, where reporter sequences were BLASTed against EnsEMBL followed by locating the corresponding protein (UniProt entry for the high quality hits. Combining the results of both methods resulted in successful annotation of > 58% of all reporter sequences with UniProt IDs on two commercial array platforms, increasing the amount of Incyte reporters that could be coupled to Gene Ontology terms from 32.7% to 58.3% and to a local GenMAPP pathway from 9.6% to 16.7%. For Agilent, 35.3% of the total reporters are now linked towards GO nodes and 7.1% on local pathways. Conclusion Our methods increased the annotation quality of microarray reporter sequences and allowed us to visualize more reporters using pathway visualization tools. Even in cases where the original reporter annotation showed the correct description the new identifiers often allowed improved pathway and Gene Ontology linking. These methods are freely available at http://www.bigcat.unimaas.nl/public/publications/Gaj_Annotation/.

  1. Reporting guidelines for modelling studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bennett Carol

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Modelling studies are used widely to help inform decisions about health care and policy and their use is increasing. However, in order for modelling to gain strength as a tool for health policy, it is critical that key model factors are transparent so that users of models can have a clear understanding of the model and its limitations.Reporting guidelines are evidence-based tools that specify minimum criteria for authors to report their research such that readers can both critically appraise and interpret study findings. This study was conducted to determine whether there is an unmet need for population modelling reporting guidelines. Methods We conducted a review of the literature to identify: 1 guidance for reporting population modelling studies; and, 2 evidence on the quality of reporting of population modelling studies. Guidance for reporting was analysed using a thematic approach and the data was summarised as frequencies. Evidence on the quality of reporting was reviewed and summarized descriptively. Results There were no guidelines that specifically addressed the reporting of population modelling studies. We identified a number of reporting guidelines for economic evaluation studies, some of which had sections that were relevant population modelling studies. Amongst seven relevant records, we identified 69 quality criteria that have distinct reporting characteristics. We identified two papers that addressed reporting practices of modelling studies. Overall, with the exception of describing the data used for calibration, there was little consistency in reporting. Conclusions While numerous guidelines exist for developing and evaluating health technology assessment and economic evaluation models, which by extension could be applicable to population modelling studies, there is variation in their comprehensiveness and in the consistency of reporting these methods. Population modelling studies may be an area which would

  2. Strength Modeling Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badler, N. I.; Lee, P.; Wong, S.

    1985-01-01

    Strength modeling is a complex and multi-dimensional issue. There are numerous parameters to the problem of characterizing human strength, most notably: (1) position and orientation of body joints; (2) isometric versus dynamic strength; (3) effector force versus joint torque; (4) instantaneous versus steady force; (5) active force versus reactive force; (6) presence or absence of gravity; (7) body somatotype and composition; (8) body (segment) masses; (9) muscle group envolvement; (10) muscle size; (11) fatigue; and (12) practice (training) or familiarity. In surveying the available literature on strength measurement and modeling an attempt was made to examine as many of these parameters as possible. The conclusions reached at this point toward the feasibility of implementing computationally reasonable human strength models. The assessment of accuracy of any model against a specific individual, however, will probably not be possible on any realistic scale. Taken statistically, strength modeling may be an effective tool for general questions of task feasibility and strength requirements.

  3. VENTILATION MODEL REPORT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    V. Chipman

    2002-10-31

    The purpose of the Ventilation Model is to simulate the heat transfer processes in and around waste emplacement drifts during periods of forced ventilation. The model evaluates the effects of emplacement drift ventilation on the thermal conditions in the emplacement drifts and surrounding rock mass, and calculates the heat removal by ventilation as a measure of the viability of ventilation to delay the onset of peak repository temperature and reduce its magnitude. The heat removal by ventilation is temporally and spatially dependent, and is expressed as the fraction of heat carried away by the ventilation air compared to the fraction of heat produced by radionuclide decay. One minus the heat removal is called the wall heat fraction, or the remaining amount of heat that is transferred via conduction to the surrounding rock mass. Downstream models, such as the ''Multiscale Thermohydrologic Model'' (BSC 2001), use the wall heat fractions as outputted from the Ventilation Model to initialize their postclosure analyses.

  4. Model systems for understanding absorption tuning by opsin proteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Mogens Brøndsted

    2009-01-01

    This tutorial review reports on model systems that have been synthesised and investigated for elucidating how opsin proteins tune the absorption of the protonated retinal Schiff base chromophore. In particular, the importance of the counteranion is highlighted. In addition, the review advocates...... is avoided, and it becomes clear that opsin proteins induce blueshifts in the chromophore absorption rather than redshifts....

  5. Information-driven structural modelling of protein-protein interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, João P G L M; Karaca, Ezgi; Bonvin, Alexandre M J J

    2015-01-01

    Protein-protein docking aims at predicting the three-dimensional structure of a protein complex starting from the free forms of the individual partners. As assessed in the CAPRI community-wide experiment, the most successful docking algorithms combine pure laws of physics with information derived from various experimental or bioinformatics sources. Of these so-called "information-driven" approaches, HADDOCK stands out as one of the most successful representatives. In this chapter, we briefly summarize which experimental information can be used to drive the docking prediction in HADDOCK, and then focus on the docking protocol itself. We discuss and illustrate with a tutorial example a "classical" protein-protein docking prediction, as well as more recent developments for modelling multi-body systems and large conformational changes.

  6. Geologic Framework Model Analysis Model Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    R. Clayton

    2000-12-19

    The purpose of this report is to document the Geologic Framework Model (GFM), Version 3.1 (GFM3.1) with regard to data input, modeling methods, assumptions, uncertainties, limitations, and validation of the model results, qualification status of the model, and the differences between Version 3.1 and previous versions. The GFM represents a three-dimensional interpretation of the stratigraphy and structural features of the location of the potential Yucca Mountain radioactive waste repository. The GFM encompasses an area of 65 square miles (170 square kilometers) and a volume of 185 cubic miles (771 cubic kilometers). The boundaries of the GFM were chosen to encompass the most widely distributed set of exploratory boreholes (the Water Table or WT series) and to provide a geologic framework over the area of interest for hydrologic flow and radionuclide transport modeling through the unsaturated zone (UZ). The depth of the model is constrained by the inferred depth of the Tertiary-Paleozoic unconformity. The GFM was constructed from geologic map and borehole data. Additional information from measured stratigraphy sections, gravity profiles, and seismic profiles was also considered. This interim change notice (ICN) was prepared in accordance with the Technical Work Plan for the Integrated Site Model Process Model Report Revision 01 (CRWMS M&O 2000). The constraints, caveats, and limitations associated with this model are discussed in the appropriate text sections that follow. The GFM is one component of the Integrated Site Model (ISM) (Figure l), which has been developed to provide a consistent volumetric portrayal of the rock layers, rock properties, and mineralogy of the Yucca Mountain site. The ISM consists of three components: (1) Geologic Framework Model (GFM); (2) Rock Properties Model (RPM); and (3) Mineralogic Model (MM). The ISM merges the detailed project stratigraphy into model stratigraphic units that are most useful for the primary downstream models and the

  7. ROCK PROPERTIES MODEL ANALYSIS MODEL REPORT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clinton Lum

    2002-02-04

    The purpose of this Analysis and Model Report (AMR) is to document Rock Properties Model (RPM) 3.1 with regard to input data, model methods, assumptions, uncertainties and limitations of model results, and qualification status of the model. The report also documents the differences between the current and previous versions and validation of the model. The rock properties models are intended principally for use as input to numerical physical-process modeling, such as of ground-water flow and/or radionuclide transport. The constraints, caveats, and limitations associated with this model are discussed in the appropriate text sections that follow. This work was conducted in accordance with the following planning documents: WA-0344, ''3-D Rock Properties Modeling for FY 1998'' (SNL 1997, WA-0358), ''3-D Rock Properties Modeling for FY 1999'' (SNL 1999), and the technical development plan, Rock Properties Model Version 3.1, (CRWMS M&O 1999c). The Interim Change Notice (ICNs), ICN 02 and ICN 03, of this AMR were prepared as part of activities being conducted under the Technical Work Plan, TWP-NBS-GS-000003, ''Technical Work Plan for the Integrated Site Model, Process Model Report, Revision 01'' (CRWMS M&O 2000b). The purpose of ICN 03 is to record changes in data input status due to data qualification and verification activities. These work plans describe the scope, objectives, tasks, methodology, and implementing procedures for model construction. The constraints, caveats, and limitations associated with this model are discussed in the appropriate text sections that follow. The work scope for this activity consists of the following: (1) Conversion of the input data (laboratory measured porosity data, x-ray diffraction mineralogy, petrophysical calculations of bound water, and petrophysical calculations of porosity) for each borehole into stratigraphic coordinates; (2) Re-sampling and merging of data sets; (3

  8. Learning generative models for protein fold families.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balakrishnan, Sivaraman; Kamisetty, Hetunandan; Carbonell, Jaime G; Lee, Su-In; Langmead, Christopher James

    2011-04-01

    We introduce a new approach to learning statistical models from multiple sequence alignments (MSA) of proteins. Our method, called GREMLIN (Generative REgularized ModeLs of proteINs), learns an undirected probabilistic graphical model of the amino acid composition within the MSA. The resulting model encodes both the position-specific conservation statistics and the correlated mutation statistics between sequential and long-range pairs of residues. Existing techniques for learning graphical models from MSA either make strong, and often inappropriate assumptions about the conditional independencies within the MSA (e.g., Hidden Markov Models), or else use suboptimal algorithms to learn the parameters of the model. In contrast, GREMLIN makes no a priori assumptions about the conditional independencies within the MSA. We formulate and solve a convex optimization problem, thus guaranteeing that we find a globally optimal model at convergence. The resulting model is also generative, allowing for the design of new protein sequences that have the same statistical properties as those in the MSA. We perform a detailed analysis of covariation statistics on the extensively studied WW and PDZ domains and show that our method out-performs an existing algorithm for learning undirected probabilistic graphical models from MSA. We then apply our approach to 71 additional families from the PFAM database and demonstrate that the resulting models significantly out-perform Hidden Markov Models in terms of predictive accuracy.

  9. Neural network models of protein domain evolution

    OpenAIRE

    Sylvia Nagl

    2000-01-01

    Protein domains are complex adaptive systems, and here a novel procedure is presented that models the evolution of new functional sites within stable domain folds using neural networks. Neural networks, which were originally developed in cognitive science for the modeling of brain functions, can provide a fruitful methodology for the study of complex systems in general. Ethical implications of developing complex systems models of biomolecules are discussed, with particular reference to molecu...

  10. Molecular modeling of protein materials: case study of elastin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarakanova, Anna; Buehler, Markus J.

    2013-09-01

    Molecular modeling of protein materials is a quickly growing area of research that has produced numerous contributions in fields ranging from structural engineering to medicine and biology. We review here the history and methods commonly employed in molecular modeling of protein materials, emphasizing the advantages for using modeling as a complement to experimental work. We then consider a case study of the protein elastin, a critically important ‘mechanical protein’ to exemplify the approach in an area where molecular modeling has made a significant impact. We outline the progression of computational modeling studies that have considerably enhanced our understanding of this important protein which endows elasticity and recoil to the tissues it is found in, including the skin, lungs, arteries and the heart. A vast collection of literature has been directed at studying the structure and function of this protein for over half a century, the first molecular dynamics study of elastin being reported in the 1980s. We review the pivotal computational works that have considerably enhanced our fundamental understanding of elastin's atomistic structure and its extraordinary qualities—focusing on two in particular: elastin's superb elasticity and the inverse temperature transition—the remarkable ability of elastin to take on a more structured conformation at higher temperatures, suggesting its effectiveness as a biomolecular switch. Our hope is to showcase these methods as both complementary and enriching to experimental approaches that have thus far dominated the study of most protein-based materials.

  11. Modelling of DNA-protein recognition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rein, R.; Garduno, R.; Colombano, S.; Nir, S.; Haydock, K.; Macelroy, R. D.

    1980-01-01

    Computer model-building procedures using stereochemical principles together with theoretical energy calculations appear to be, at this stage, the most promising route toward the elucidation of DNA-protein binding schemes and recognition principles. A review of models and bonding principles is conducted and approaches to modeling are considered, taking into account possible di-hydrogen-bonding schemes between a peptide and a base (or a base pair) of a double-stranded nucleic acid in the major groove, aspects of computer graphic modeling, and a search for isogeometric helices. The energetics of recognition complexes is discussed and several models for peptide DNA recognition are presented.

  12. Whey protein concentrate market enhancement. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hudson, L.

    1982-09-01

    Whey protein concentrate (WPC) was studied to see whether or not there was sufficient depth in the marketplace to accommodate increased WPC production in the event more whey was converted into alcohol. It was concluded that the current market for WPC is still immature and ample room exists in the marketplace to produce and dispose of WPC. In addition, WPC literature was reviewed so as to evaluate the current state of the art producing WPC. Considerable evidence suggests that more product formulation work is needed to move WPC into the general marketplace. Concurrent to the market and ltierature study WPC was incorporated into select categories of foods where finished goods were enhanced by having WPC incorporated in their formulations. Formulations were produced to demonstrate the fact that products such as ice cream, breedings and batters for fish sticks, and orange juice can be enhanced by using WPC.

  13. Ventilation Model and Analysis Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    V. Chipman

    2003-07-18

    This model and analysis report develops, validates, and implements a conceptual model for heat transfer in and around a ventilated emplacement drift. This conceptual model includes thermal radiation between the waste package and the drift wall, convection from the waste package and drift wall surfaces into the flowing air, and conduction in the surrounding host rock. These heat transfer processes are coupled and vary both temporally and spatially, so numerical and analytical methods are used to implement the mathematical equations which describe the conceptual model. These numerical and analytical methods predict the transient response of the system, at the drift scale, in terms of spatially varying temperatures and ventilation efficiencies. The ventilation efficiency describes the effectiveness of the ventilation process in removing radionuclide decay heat from the drift environment. An alternative conceptual model is also developed which evaluates the influence of water and water vapor mass transport on the ventilation efficiency. These effects are described using analytical methods which bound the contribution of latent heat to the system, quantify the effects of varying degrees of host rock saturation (and hence host rock thermal conductivity) on the ventilation efficiency, and evaluate the effects of vapor and enhanced vapor diffusion on the host rock thermal conductivity.

  14. Bioorthogonal chemical reporters for analyzing protein lipidation and lipid trafficking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hang, Howard C; Wilson, John P; Charron, Guillaume

    2011-09-20

    Protein lipidation and lipid trafficking control many key biological functions in all kingdoms of life. The discovery of diverse lipid species and their covalent attachment to many proteins has revealed a complex and regulated network of membranes and lipidated proteins that are central to fundamental aspects of physiology and human disease. Given the complexity of lipid trafficking and the protein targeting mechanisms involved with membrane lipids, precise and sensitive methods are needed to monitor and identify these hydrophobic molecules in bacteria, yeast, and higher eukaryotes. Although many analytical methods have been developed for characterizing membrane lipids and covalently modified proteins, traditional reagents and approaches have limited sensitivity, do not faithfully report on the lipids of interest, or are not readily accessible. The invention of bioorthogonal ligation reactions, such as the Staudinger ligation and azide-alkyne cycloadditions, has provided new tools to address these limitations, and their use has begun to yield fresh insight into the biology of protein lipidation and lipid trafficking. In this Account, we discuss how these new bioorthogonal ligation reactions and lipid chemical reporters afford new opportunities for exploring the biology of lipid-modified proteins and lipid trafficking. Lipid chemical reporters from our laboratory and several other research groups have enabled improved detection and large-scale proteomic analysis of fatty-acylated and prenylated proteins. For example, fatty acid and isoprenoid chemical reporters in conjunction with bioorthogonal ligation methods have circumvented the limited sensitivity and hazards of radioactive analogues, allowing rapid and robust fluorescent detection of lipidated proteins in all organisms tested. These chemical tools have revealed alterations in protein lipidation in different cellular states and are beginning to provide unique insights in mechanisms of regulation. Notably, the

  15. Developing algorithms for predicting protein-protein interactions of homology modeled proteins.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martin, Shawn Bryan; Sale, Kenneth L.; Faulon, Jean-Loup Michel; Roe, Diana C.

    2006-01-01

    The goal of this project was to examine the protein-protein docking problem, especially as it relates to homology-based structures, identify the key bottlenecks in current software tools, and evaluate and prototype new algorithms that may be developed to improve these bottlenecks. This report describes the current challenges in the protein-protein docking problem: correctly predicting the binding site for the protein-protein interaction and correctly placing the sidechains. Two different and complementary approaches are taken that can help with the protein-protein docking problem. The first approach is to predict interaction sites prior to docking, and uses bioinformatics studies of protein-protein interactions to predict theses interaction site. The second approach is to improve validation of predicted complexes after docking, and uses an improved scoring function for evaluating proposed docked poses, incorporating a solvation term. This scoring function demonstrates significant improvement over current state-of-the art functions. Initial studies on both these approaches are promising, and argue for full development of these algorithms.

  16. Hydration dynamics near a model protein surface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Russo, Daniela; Hura, Greg; Head-Gordon, Teresa

    2003-09-01

    The evolution of water dynamics from dilute to very high concentration solutions of a prototypical hydrophobic amino acid with its polar backbone, N-acetyl-leucine-methylamide (NALMA), is studied by quasi-elastic neutron scattering and molecular dynamics simulation for both the completely deuterated and completely hydrogenated leucine monomer. We observe several unexpected features in the dynamics of these biological solutions under ambient conditions. The NALMA dynamics shows evidence of de Gennes narrowing, an indication of coherent long timescale structural relaxation dynamics. The translational water dynamics are analyzed in a first approximation with a jump diffusion model. At the highest solute concentrations, the hydration water dynamics is significantly suppressed and characterized by a long residential time and a slow diffusion coefficient. The analysis of the more dilute concentration solutions takes into account the results of the 2.0M solution as a model of the first hydration shell. Subtracting the first hydration layer based on the 2.0M spectra, the translational diffusion dynamics is still suppressed, although the rotational relaxation time and residential time are converged to bulk-water values. Molecular dynamics analysis shows spatially heterogeneous dynamics at high concentration that becomes homogeneous at more dilute concentrations. We discuss the hydration dynamics results of this model protein system in the context of glassy systems, protein function, and protein-protein interfaces.

  17. Predicting Protein Secondary Structure with Markov Models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fischer, Paul; Larsen, Simon; Thomsen, Claus

    2004-01-01

    we are considering here, is to predict the secondary structure from the primary one. To this end we train a Markov model on training data and then use it to classify parts of unknown protein sequences as sheets, helices or coils. We show how to exploit the directional information contained......The primary structure of a protein is the sequence of its amino acids. The secondary structure describes structural properties of the molecule such as which parts of it form sheets, helices or coils. Spacial and other properties are described by the higher order structures. The classification task...

  18. Model-building codes for membrane proteins.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shirley, David Noyes; Hunt, Thomas W.; Brown, W. Michael; Schoeniger, Joseph S. (Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA); Slepoy, Alexander; Sale, Kenneth L. (Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA); Young, Malin M. (Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA); Faulon, Jean-Loup Michel; Gray, Genetha Anne (Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA)

    2005-01-01

    We have developed a novel approach to modeling the transmembrane spanning helical bundles of integral membrane proteins using only a sparse set of distance constraints, such as those derived from MS3-D, dipolar-EPR and FRET experiments. Algorithms have been written for searching the conformational space of membrane protein folds matching the set of distance constraints, which provides initial structures for local conformational searches. Local conformation search is achieved by optimizing these candidates against a custom penalty function that incorporates both measures derived from statistical analysis of solved membrane protein structures and distance constraints obtained from experiments. This results in refined helical bundles to which the interhelical loops and amino acid side-chains are added. Using a set of only 27 distance constraints extracted from the literature, our methods successfully recover the structure of dark-adapted rhodopsin to within 3.2 {angstrom} of the crystal structure.

  19. Protein Folding: Search for Basic Physical Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivan Y. Torshin

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available How a unique three-dimensional structure is rapidly formed from the linear sequence of a polypeptide is one of the important questions in contemporary science. Apart from biological context of in vivo protein folding (which has been studied only for a few proteins, the roles of the fundamental physical forces in the in vitro folding remain largely unstudied. Despite a degree of success in using descriptions based on statistical and/or thermodynamic approaches, few of the current models explicitly include more basic physical forces (such as electrostatics and Van Der Waals forces. Moreover, the present-day models rarely take into account that the protein folding is, essentially, a rapid process that produces a highly specific architecture. This review considers several physical models that may provide more direct links between sequence and tertiary structure in terms of the physical forces. In particular, elaboration of such simple models is likely to produce extremely effective computational techniques with value for modern genomics.

  20. Modeling disordered regions in proteins using Rosetta.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ray Yu-Ruei Wang

    Full Text Available Protein structure prediction methods such as Rosetta search for the lowest energy conformation of the polypeptide chain. However, the experimentally observed native state is at a minimum of the free energy, rather than the energy. The neglect of the missing configurational entropy contribution to the free energy can be partially justified by the assumption that the entropies of alternative folded states, while very much less than unfolded states, are not too different from one another, and hence can be to a first approximation neglected when searching for the lowest free energy state. The shortcomings of current structure prediction methods may be due in part to the breakdown of this assumption. Particularly problematic are proteins with significant disordered regions which do not populate single low energy conformations even in the native state. We describe two approaches within the Rosetta structure modeling methodology for treating such regions. The first does not require advance knowledge of the regions likely to be disordered; instead these are identified by minimizing a simple free energy function used previously to model protein folding landscapes and transition states. In this model, residues can be either completely ordered or completely disordered; they are considered disordered if the gain in entropy outweighs the loss of favorable energetic interactions with the rest of the protein chain. The second approach requires identification in advance of the disordered regions either from sequence alone using for example the DISOPRED server or from experimental data such as NMR chemical shifts. During Rosetta structure prediction calculations the disordered regions make only unfavorable repulsive contributions to the total energy. We find that the second approach has greater practical utility and illustrate this with examples from de novo structure prediction, NMR structure calculation, and comparative modeling.

  1. Protein interaction reporter agents and methods for using same

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruce, James E.; Tang, Xiaoting; Munske,Gerhard

    2009-04-28

    Particular aspects provide novel protein interaction reporter (PIR) compounds (e.g., formulas I and II), comprising at least two protein reactive moieties (e.g., N-hydroxysuccinamide), each linked to a reporter moiety (e.g., mass reporter) by a covalent labile bond that is differentially cleavable with respect to peptide bonds (e.g., by a method such as collisional activation in a mass spectrometer, activation by electron capture dissociation (ECD), photoactivation, etc.), wherein the reporter moiety is operatively releasable from the PIR agent upon cleavage of the labile bonds, the released reporter moiety having a characteristic identifying property or label (e.g., m/z value). Particular PIRs comprise a mass reporter moiety, and further comprise an affinity group, (e.g., biotin), linked to the PIR (e.g., to the mass reporter moiety) by a selectively cleavable bone (e.g. photo-labile bond)). Additional aspects provide methods for characterizing intermolecular or intramolecular protein interactions using one or more inventive PIR compounds.

  2. Modelling heating effects in cryocooled protein crystals

    CERN Document Server

    Nicholson, J; Fayz, K; Fell, B; Garman, E

    2001-01-01

    With the application of intense X-ray beams from third generation synchrotron sources, damage to cryocooled macromolecular crystals is being observed more commonly . In order to fully utilize synchrotron facilities now available for studying biological crystals, it is essential to understand the processes involved in radiation damage and beam heating so that, if possible, action can be taken to slow the rate of damage. Finite Element Analysis (FEA) has been applied to model the heating effects of X-rays on cryocooled protein crystals, and to compare the relative cooling efficiencies of nitrogen and helium.

  3. Structural Model for the Spider Silk Protein Spidroin-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    dos Santos-Pinto, José Roberto Aparecido; Arcuri, Helen Andrade; Priewalder, Helga; Salles, Heliana Clara; Palma, Mario Sergio; Lubec, Gert

    2015-09-04

    Most reports about the 3-D structure of spidroin-1 have been proposed for the protein in solid state or for individual domains of these proteins. A gel-based mass spectrometry strategy using collision-induced dissociation (CID) and electron-transfer dissociation (ETD) fragmentation methods was used to completely sequence spidroins-1A and -1B and to assign a series of post-translational modifications (PTMs) on to the spidroin sequences. A total of 15 and 16 phosphorylation sites were detected on spidroin-1A and -1B, respectively. In this work, we present the nearly complete amino acid sequence of spidroin-1A and -1B, including the nonrepetitive N- and C-terminal domains and a highly repetitive central core. We also described a fatty acid layer surrounding the protein fibers and PTMs in the sequences of spidroin-1A and -1B, including phosphorylation. Thus, molecular models for phosphorylated spidroins were proposed in the presence of a mixture fatty acids/water (1:1) and submitted to molecular dynamics simulation. The resulting models presented high content of coils, a higher percentage of α-helix, and an almost neglected content of 310-helix than the previous models. Knowledge of the complete structure of spidroins-1A and -1B would help to explain the mechanical features of silk fibers. The results of the current investigation provide a foundation for biophysical studies of the mechanoelastic properties of web-silk proteins.

  4. Minimalist models for proteins: a comparative analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tozzini, Valentina

    2010-08-01

    The last decade has witnessed a renewed interest in the coarse-grained (CG) models for biopolymers, also stimulated by the needs of modern molecular biology, dealing with nano- to micro-sized bio-molecular systems and larger than microsecond timescale. This combination of size and timescale is, in fact, hard to access by atomic-based simulations. Coarse graining the system is a route to be followed to overcome these limits, but the ways of practically implementing it are many and different, making the landscape of CG models very vast and complex. In this paper, the CG models are reviewed and their features, applications and performances compared. This analysis, restricted to proteins, focuses on the minimalist models, namely those reducing at minimum the number of degrees of freedom without losing the possibility of explicitly describing the secondary structures. This class includes models using a single or a few interacting centers (beads) for each amino acid. From this analysis several issues emerge. The difficulty in building these models resides in the need for combining transferability/predictive power with the capability of accurately reproducing the structures. It is shown that these aspects could be optimized by accurately choosing the force field (FF) terms and functional forms, and combining different parameterization procedures. In addition, in spite of the variety of the minimalist models, regularities can be found in the parameters values and in FF terms. These are outlined and schematically presented with the aid of a generic phase diagram of the polypeptide in the parameter space and, hopefully, could serve as guidelines for the development of minimalist models incorporating the maximum possible level of predictive power and structural accuracy.

  5. Mining protein kinases regulation using graphical models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Qingfeng; Chen, Yi-Ping Phoebe

    2011-03-01

    Abnormal kinase activity is a frequent cause of diseases, which makes kinases a promising pharmacological target. Thus, it is critical to identify the characteristics of protein kinases regulation by studying the activation and inhibition of kinase subunits in response to varied stimuli. Bayesian network (BN) is a formalism for probabilistic reasoning that has been widely used for learning dependency models. However, for high-dimensional discrete random vectors the set of plausible models becomes large and a full comparison of all the posterior probabilities related to the competing models becomes infeasible. A solution to this problem is based on the Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) method. This paper proposes a BN-based framework to discover the dependency correlations of kinase regulation. Our approach is to apply the MCMC method to generate a sequence of samples from a probability distribution, by which to approximate the distribution. The frequent connections (edges) are identified from the obtained sampling graphical models. Our results point to a number of novel candidate regulation patterns that are interesting in biology and include inferred associations that were unknown.

  6. Evolution and physics in comparative protein structure modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiser, András; Feig, Michael; Brooks, Charles L; Sali, Andrej

    2002-06-01

    From a physical perspective, the native structure of a protein is a consequence of physical forces acting on the protein and solvent atoms during the folding process. From a biological perspective, the native structure of proteins is a result of evolution over millions of years. Correspondingly, there are two types of protein structure prediction methods, de novo prediction and comparative modeling. We review comparative protein structure modeling and discuss the incorporation of physical considerations into the modeling process. A good starting point for achieving this aim is provided by comparative modeling by satisfaction of spatial restraints. Incorporation of physical considerations is illustrated by an inclusion of solvation effects into the modeling of loops.

  7. Helical crystallization on lipid nanotubes: streptavidin as a model protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dang, Thanh X; Farah, Sammy J; Gast, Alice; Robertson, Channing; Carragher, Bridget; Egelman, Edward; Wilson-Kubalek, Elizabeth M

    2005-04-01

    In this study, we use streptavidin (SA) as a model system to study helical protein array formation on lipid nanotubes, an alternative to 2D studies on lipid monolayers. We demonstrate that wild-type and a mutant form of SA form helical arrays on biotinylated lipid nanotubes. 3D maps from helical arrays of wild-type and mutant SA were reconstructed using two different approaches: Fourier-Bessel methods and an iterative single particle algorithm. The maps show that wild-type and mutant streptavidin molecules order differently. The molecular packing arrangements of SA on the surface of the lipid nanotubes differ from previously reported lattice packing of SA on biotinylated monolayers. Helical crystallization on lipid nanotubes presents an alternative platform to explore fundamentals of protein ordering, intermolecular protein interaction and phase behavior. We demonstrate that lipid nanotubes offer a robust and reproducible substrate for forming helical protein arrays which present a means for studying protein structure and structure-function relationships.

  8. Simple micromechanical model of protein crystals for their mechanical characterizations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Na S.

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Proteins have been known to perform the excellent mechanical functions and exhibit the remarkable mechanical properties such as high fracture toughness in spider silk protein [1]. This indicates that the mechanical characterization of protein molecules and/or crystals is very essential to understand such remarkable mechanical function of protein molecules. In this study, for gaining insight into mechanical behavior of protein crystals, we developed the micromechanical model by using the empirical potential field prescribed to alpha carbon atoms of a protein crystal in a unit cell. We consider the simple protein crystals for their mechanical behavior under tensile loading to be compared with full atomic models

  9. Extreme Conditions Modeling Workshop Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coe, R. G.; Neary, V. S.; Lawson, M. J.; Yu, Y.; Weber, J.

    2014-07-01

    Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) and the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) hosted the Wave Energy Converter (WEC) Extreme Conditions Modeling (ECM) Workshop in Albuquerque, NM on May 13th-14th, 2014. The objective of the workshop was to review the current state of knowledge on how to model WECs in extreme conditions (e.g. hurricanes and other large storms) and to suggest how U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and national laboratory resources could be used to improve ECM methods for the benefit of the wave energy industry.

  10. Towards a model for protein production rates

    CERN Document Server

    Dong, J J; Zia, R K P

    2007-01-01

    In the process of translation, ribosomes read the genetic code on an mRNA and assemble the corresponding polypeptide chain. The ribosomes perform discrete directed motion which is well modeled by a totally asymmetric simple exclusion process (TASEP) with open boundaries. Using Monte Carlo simulations and a simple mean-field theory, we discuss the effect of one or two ``bottlenecks'' (i.e., slow codons) on the production rate of the final protein. Confirming and extending previous work by Chou and Lakatos, we find that the location and spacing of the slow codons can affect the production rate quite dramatically. In particular, we observe a novel ``edge'' effect, i.e., an interaction of a single slow codon with the system boundary. We focus in detail on ribosome density profiles and provide a simple explanation for the length scale which controls the range of these interactions.

  11. Towards a Model for Protein Production Rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, J. J.; Schmittmann, B.; Zia, R. K. P.

    2007-07-01

    In the process of translation, ribosomes read the genetic code on an mRNA and assemble the corresponding polypeptide chain. The ribosomes perform discrete directed motion which is well modeled by a totally asymmetric simple exclusion process (TASEP) with open boundaries. Using Monte Carlo simulations and a simple mean-field theory, we discuss the effect of one or two "bottlenecks" (i.e., slow codons) on the production rate of the final protein. Confirming and extending previous work by Chou and Lakatos, we find that the location and spacing of the slow codons can affect the production rate quite dramatically. In particular, we observe a novel "edge" effect, i.e., an interaction of a single slow codon with the system boundary. We focus in detail on ribosome density profiles and provide a simple explanation for the length scale which controls the range of these interactions.

  12. Extreme Conditions Modeling Workshop Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coe, Ryan Geoffrey [Sandia National Laboratories (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Neary, Vincent Sinclair [Sandia National Laboratories (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Lawon, Michael J. [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Yu, Yi-Hsiang [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Weber, Jochem [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2014-07-01

    Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) and the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) hosted the Wave Energy Converter (WEC) Extreme Conditions Modeling (ECM) Workshop in Albuquerque, New Mexico on May 13–14, 2014. The objective of the workshop was to review the current state of knowledge on how to numerically and experimentally model WECs in extreme conditions (e.g. large ocean storms) and to suggest how national laboratory resources could be used to improve ECM methods for the benefit of the wave energy industry. More than 30 U.S. and European WEC experts from industry, academia, and national research institutes attended the workshop, which consisted of presentations from W EC developers, invited keynote presentations from subject matter experts, breakout sessions, and a final plenary session .

  13. Theory, modeling, and simulation annual report, 1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-05-01

    This report briefly discusses research on the following topics: development of electronic structure methods; modeling molecular processes in clusters; modeling molecular processes in solution; modeling molecular processes in separations chemistry; modeling interfacial molecular processes; modeling molecular processes in the atmosphere; methods for periodic calculations on solids; chemistry and physics of minerals; graphical user interfaces for computational chemistry codes; visualization and analysis of molecular simulations; integrated computational chemistry environment; and benchmark computations.

  14. Self-reporting materials: protein-mediated visual indication of damage in a bulk polymer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruns, Nice; Clark, Douglas S

    2011-01-01

    Damage self-reporting materials are able to indicate the presence of microscopic damaged regions by easy to detect signals, such as fluorescence. Therefore, these smart materials can reduce the risk of catastrophic failure of load-bearing components, e.g., in aerospace and construction applications. We highlight here our proof-of-concept paper and we present some additional data, which shows that proteins can be used as mechanophores in solid polymeric materials. Macroscopic mechanical forces were transferred from the polymer to the embedded proteins. The biomolecules act as molecular strain sensor, giving the material the desired self-reporting property. Poly(ethylene glycol) and poly(acrylamide) (PAAm) networks were doped with small amounts of thermsosome (THS), a protein cage from the family of chaperonins, that encapsulated a pair of fluorescent proteins. THS acts as a scaffold which brings the two fluorescent proteins into distance suitable for fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET). Moreover, THS can be distorted by mechanic forces so that the distance between the fluorescent proteins changes, leading to a change in FRET efficiency. Using the brittle PAAm as a model system, we were able to visualize microcracks in the polymers by FRET microscopy and by fluorescence lifetime imaging. THS also stabilizes the encapsulated guest proteins against thermal denaturation, increasing their half-live at 70 degrees C by a factor of 2.3.

  15. A modified resonant recognition model to predict protein-protein interaction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Xiang; WANG Yifei

    2007-01-01

    Proteins are fundamental components of all living cells and the protein-protein interaction plays an important role in vital movement.This paper briefly introduced the original Resonant Recognition Model (RRM),and then modified it by using the wavelet transform to acquire the Modified Resonant Recognition Model (MRRM).The key characteristic of the new model is that it can predict directly the proteinprotein interaction from the primary sequence,and the MRRM is more suitable than the RRM for this prediction.The results of numerical experiments show that the MRRM is effective for predicting the protein-protein interaction.

  16. Tactile Teaching: Exploring Protein Structure/Function Using Physical Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herman, Tim; Morris, Jennifer; Colton, Shannon; Batiza, Ann; Patrick, Michael; Franzen, Margaret; Goodsell, David S.

    2006-01-01

    The technology now exists to construct physical models of proteins based on atomic coordinates of solved structures. We review here our recent experiences in using physical models to teach concepts of protein structure and function at both the high school and the undergraduate levels. At the high school level, physical models are used in a…

  17. A Novel Model for Protein Immobilization on Microspheres

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Di-qiang; LIU Bai-ling; LI He; HU Jie

    2004-01-01

    The immobilization of proteins, especially receptor proteins commonly used in high through-put screening of drugs (HTS), have received great attention in recent years. There are many successful isothermal models for describing the adsorption of protein onto solid surface, such as Langmuir model, Bi-Langmuir model, Fowler model, Freundlich model, Freundlich-Langmuir model and Tekmin model etc. In all these models, Langmuir model was the most favorable one model accepted by many researchers, but the experimental results showed that it was not entirely fit to all adsorption behaviors. So new models were required for describing protein adsorption onto microspheres in different conditions.In our research, a novel isothermal model, including Langmuir and other adsorbing behaviors was presented basing on the holding degree of surface active sites and the interaction styles of protein immobilization. In Langmuir model, the adsorbing amount of protein was described as [PS] =Km[P]/1 + K[P], where [PS] was the concentration of adsorbed protein, [P] was the concentration of freeprotein at equilibrium state, and Km and K was constant. According to the interactions of protein and ligands, there were three patterns in the interactions of protein and ligands. On the similar assumption that the interaction of protein and microspheres were three styles, and based on the definition of the holding degree of surface active sites (Y), three adsorption behaviors could be described as Y K[ P ]φ/ K[P]φ+1 or ln K + φ ln[P] =ln(Y/1-Y) in which [P] was the concentration of free protein at equilibrium state, and φ and K was constant. Different scale of φ presented different adsorption behaviors, especially when φ was 1, the adsorption behavior was Langmuir adsorbing model. Figure I indicated the different adsorbing results in different adsorption behaviors (φ>1, φ<1,and φ=1).

  18. Relative quantification of protein-protein interactions using a dual luciferase reporter pull-down assay system.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuaizheng Jia

    Full Text Available The identification and quantitative analysis of protein-protein interactions are essential to the functional characterization of proteins in the post-proteomics era. The methods currently available are generally time-consuming, technically complicated, insensitive and/or semi-quantitative. The lack of simple, sensitive approaches to precisely quantify protein-protein interactions still prevents our understanding of the functions of many proteins. Here, we develop a novel dual luciferase reporter pull-down assay by combining a biotinylated Firefly luciferase pull-down assay with a dual luciferase reporter assay. The biotinylated Firefly luciferase-tagged protein enables rapid and efficient isolation of a putative Renilla luciferase-tagged binding protein from a relatively small amount of sample. Both of these proteins can be quantitatively detected using the dual luciferase reporter assay system. Protein-protein interactions, including Fos-Jun located in the nucleus; MAVS-TRAF3 in cytoplasm; inducible IRF3 dimerization; viral protein-regulated interactions, such as MAVS-MAVS and MAVS-TRAF3; IRF3 dimerization; and protein interaction domain mapping, are studied using this novel assay system. Herein, we demonstrate that this dual luciferase reporter pull-down assay enables the quantification of the relative amounts of interacting proteins that bind to streptavidin-coupled beads for protein purification. This study provides a simple, rapid, sensitive, and efficient approach to identify and quantify relative protein-protein interactions. Importantly, the dual luciferase reporter pull-down method will facilitate the functional determination of proteins.

  19. Protein comparative sequence analysis and computer modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hambly, Brett D; Oakley, Cecily E; Fajer, Piotr G

    2008-01-01

    A problem frequently encountered by the biological scientist is the identification of a previously unknown gene or protein sequence, where there are few or no clues as to the biochemical function, ligand specificity, gene regulation, protein-protein interactions, tissue specificity, cellular localization, developmental phase of activity, or biological role. Through the process of bioinformatics there are now many approaches for predicting answers to at least some of these questions, often then allowing the design of more insightful experiments to characterize more definitively the new protein.

  20. Mechanical Modeling and Computer Simulation of Protein Folding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prigozhin, Maxim B.; Scott, Gregory E.; Denos, Sharlene

    2014-01-01

    In this activity, science education and modern technology are bridged to teach students at the high school and undergraduate levels about protein folding and to strengthen their model building skills. Students are guided from a textbook picture of a protein as a rigid crystal structure to a more realistic view: proteins are highly dynamic…

  1. Prediction of protein-protein interactions between viruses and human by an SVM model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cui Guangyu

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Several computational methods have been developed to predict protein-protein interactions from amino acid sequences, but most of those methods are intended for the interactions within a species rather than for interactions across different species. Methods for predicting interactions between homogeneous proteins are not appropriate for finding those between heterogeneous proteins since they do not distinguish the interactions between proteins of the same species from those of different species. Results We developed a new method for representing a protein sequence of variable length in a frequency vector of fixed length, which encodes the relative frequency of three consecutive amino acids of a sequence. We built a support vector machine (SVM model to predict human proteins that interact with virus proteins. In two types of viruses, human papillomaviruses (HPV and hepatitis C virus (HCV, our SVM model achieved an average accuracy above 80%, which is higher than that of another SVM model with a different representation scheme. Using the SVM model and Gene Ontology (GO annotations of proteins, we predicted new interactions between virus proteins and human proteins. Conclusions Encoding the relative frequency of amino acid triplets of a protein sequence is a simple yet powerful representation method for predicting protein-protein interactions across different species. The representation method has several advantages: (1 it enables a prediction model to achieve a better performance than other representations, (2 it generates feature vectors of fixed length regardless of the sequence length, and (3 the same representation is applicable to different types of proteins.

  2. Hydrodynamic multibead modeling: problems, pitfalls, and solutions. 2. Proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zipper, Peter; Durchschlag, Helmut

    2010-02-01

    Hydrodynamic models of proteins have been generated by recourse to crystallographic data and applying a filling model strategy in order to predict both hydrodynamic and scattering parameters. The design of accurate protein models retaining the majority of the molecule peculiarities requires usage of many beads and consideration of many serious problems. Applying the expertise obtained with ellipsoid models and pilot tests on proteins, we succeeded in constructing precise models for several anhydrous and hydrated proteins of different shape, size, and complexity. The models constructed consist of many beads (up to about 11,000) for the protein constituents (atoms, amino acid residues, groups) and preferentially bound water molecules. While in the case of small proteins, parameter predictions are straightforward, computations for giant proteins necessitate drastic reductions of the number of initially available beads. Among several auxiliary programs, our advanced hydration programs, HYDCRYST and HYDMODEL, and modified versions of García de la Torre's program HYDRO were successfully employed. This allowed the generation of realistic protein models by imaging details of their fine structure and enabled the prediction of reliable molecular parameters including intrinsic viscosities. The appearance of the models and the agreement of molecular properties and distance distribution functions p(r) of unreduced and reduced models can be used for a meticulous inspection of the data obtained.

  3. Theoretical model of the three-dimensional structure of a disease resistance gene homolog encoding resistance protein in Vigna mungo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basak, Jolly; Bahadur, Ranjit P

    2006-10-01

    Plant disease resistance (R) genes, the key players of innate immunity system in plants encode 'R' proteins. 'R' protein recognizes product of avirulance gene from the pathogen and activate downstream signaling responses leading to disease resistance. No three dimensional (3D) structural information of any 'R' proteins is available as yet. We have reported a 'R' gene homolog, the 'VMYR1', encoding 'R' protein in Vigna mungo. Here, we describe the homology modeling of the 'VMYR1' protein. The model was created by using the 3D structure of an ATP-binding cassette transporter protein from Vibrio cholerae as a template. The strategy for homology modeling was based on the high structural conservation in the superfamily of P-loop containing nucleoside triphosphate hydrolase in which target and template proteins belong. This is the first report of theoretical model structure of any 'R' proteins.

  4. Protein adsorption on nanoparticles: model development using computer simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, Qing; Hall, Carol K.

    2016-10-01

    The adsorption of proteins on nanoparticles results in the formation of the protein corona, the composition of which determines how nanoparticles influence their biological surroundings. We seek to better understand corona formation by developing models that describe protein adsorption on nanoparticles using computer simulation results as data. Using a coarse-grained protein model, discontinuous molecular dynamics simulations are conducted to investigate the adsorption of two small proteins (Trp-cage and WW domain) on a model nanoparticle of diameter 10.0 nm at protein concentrations ranging from 0.5 to 5 mM. The resulting adsorption isotherms are well described by the Langmuir, Freundlich, Temkin and Kiselev models, but not by the Elovich, Fowler-Guggenheim and Hill-de Boer models. We also try to develop a generalized model that can describe protein adsorption equilibrium on nanoparticles of different diameters in terms of dimensionless size parameters. The simulation results for three proteins (Trp-cage, WW domain, and GB3) on four nanoparticles (diameter  =  5.0, 10.0, 15.0, and 20.0 nm) illustrate both the promise and the challenge associated with developing generalized models of protein adsorption on nanoparticles.

  5. RNA and protein 3D structure modeling: similarities and differences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rother, Kristian; Rother, Magdalena; Boniecki, Michał; Puton, Tomasz; Bujnicki, Janusz M

    2011-09-01

    In analogy to proteins, the function of RNA depends on its structure and dynamics, which are encoded in the linear sequence. While there are numerous methods for computational prediction of protein 3D structure from sequence, there have been very few such methods for RNA. This review discusses template-based and template-free approaches for macromolecular structure prediction, with special emphasis on comparison between the already tried-and-tested methods for protein structure modeling and the very recently developed "protein-like" modeling methods for RNA. We highlight analogies between many successful methods for modeling of these two types of biological macromolecules and argue that RNA 3D structure can be modeled using "protein-like" methodology. We also highlight the areas where the differences between RNA and proteins require the development of RNA-specific solutions.

  6. Tracking membrane protein association in model membranes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Myriam Reffay

    Full Text Available Membrane proteins are essential in the exchange processes of cells. In spite of great breakthrough in soluble proteins studies, membrane proteins structures, functions and interactions are still a challenge because of the difficulties related to their hydrophobic properties. Most of the experiments are performed with detergent-solubilized membrane proteins. However widely used micellar systems are far from the biological two-dimensions membrane. The development of new biomimetic membrane systems is fundamental to tackle this issue.We present an original approach that combines the Fluorescence Recovery After fringe Pattern Photobleaching technique and the use of a versatile sponge phase that makes it possible to extract crucial informations about interactions between membrane proteins embedded in the bilayers of a sponge phase. The clear advantage lies in the ability to adjust at will the spacing between two adjacent bilayers. When the membranes are far apart, the only possible interactions occur laterally between proteins embedded within the same bilayer, whereas when membranes get closer to each other, interactions between proteins embedded in facing membranes may occur as well.After validating our approach on the streptavidin-biotinylated peptide complex, we study the interactions between two membrane proteins, MexA and OprM, from a Pseudomonas aeruginosa efflux pump. The mode of interaction, the size of the protein complex and its potential stoichiometry are determined. In particular, we demonstrate that: MexA is effectively embedded in the bilayer; MexA and OprM do not interact laterally but can form a complex if they are embedded in opposite bilayers; the population of bound proteins is at its maximum for bilayers separated by a distance of about 200 A, which is the periplasmic thickness of Pseudomonas aeruginosa. We also show that the MexA-OprM association is enhanced when the position and orientation of the protein is restricted by the

  7. From Genomes to Protein Models and Back

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tramontano, Anna; Giorgetti, Alejandro; Orsini, Massimiliano; Raimondo, Domenico

    2007-12-01

    The alternative splicing mechanism allows genes to generate more than one product. When the splicing events occur within protein coding regions they can modify the biological function of the protein. Alternative splicing has been suggested as one way for explaining the discrepancy between the number of human genes and functional complexity. We analysed the putative structure of the alternatively spliced gene products annotated in the ENCODE pilot project and discovered that many of the potential alternative gene products will be unlikely to produce stable functional proteins.

  8. Homology modelling and insilico analysis of neuraminidase protein in H1N1 Influenza A virus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abhilash Manohar

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available In this work, modelling of Neuraminidase protein of Influenza A virus (A/Himeji/1/2009(H1N1 neuraminidase (NA protein was done using Modeller 9V2. Modelled structure was submitted to protein model database and could be downloaded using accession number PM0075830. The modelled protein structure was subjected to In silco analysis using various bioinformatics tools. Two anti-influenza drugs currently being used to treat infected patients are oseltamivir (Tamiflu and zanamivir (Relenza, both of which target the neuraminidase enzyme of the virus. Reports of the emergence of drug resistance make the development of new anti-influenza molecules a priority. Hence the modelled structure of H1NI Neuraminidase could be very useful for in silico analysis of potential neuraminidase inhibitors.

  9. Chaos game representation walk model for the protein sequences

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Gao Jie; Jiang Li-Li; Xu Zhen-Yuan

    2009-01-01

    A new chaos game representation of protein sequences based on the detailed hydrophobic-hydrophilic(HP)model has been proposed by Yu et al(Physica A 337(2004)171). A CGR-walk model is proposed based on the new CGR coordinates for the protein sequences from complete genomes in the present paper. The new CGR coordinates based on the detailed HP model are converted into a time series, and a long-memory ARFIMA(p, d, q)model is introduced into the protein sequence analysis. This model is applied to simulating real CGR-walk sequence data of twelve protein sequences. Remarkably long-range correlations are uncovered in the data and the results obtained from these models are reasonably coneistent with those available from the ARFIMA(p, d, q)model.

  10. Final Project Report Load Modeling Transmission Research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lesieutre, Bernard [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Bravo, Richard [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Yinger, Robert [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Chassin, Dave [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Huang, Henry [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Lu, Ning [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Hiskens, Ian [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Venkataramanan, Giri [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2012-03-31

    The research presented in this report primarily focuses on improving power system load models to better represent their impact on system behavior. The previous standard load model fails to capture the delayed voltage recovery events that are observed in the Southwest and elsewhere. These events are attributed to stalled air conditioner units after a fault. To gain a better understanding of their role in these events and to guide modeling efforts, typical air conditioner units were testing in laboratories. Using data obtained from these extensive tests, new load models were developed to match air conditioner behavior. An air conditioner model is incorporated in the new WECC composite load model. These models are used in dynamic studies of the West and can impact power transfer limits for California. Unit-level and systemlevel solutions are proposed as potential solutions to the delayed voltage recovery problem.

  11. A binary logistic regression model for discriminating real protein-protein interface

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    The selection and study of descriptive variables of protein-protein complex interface is a major question that many biologists come across when the research of protein-protein recognition is concerned. Several variables have been proposed to understand the structural or energetic features of complex interfaces. Here a systematic study of some of these "traditional" variables, as well as a few new ones, is introduced. With the values of these variables extracted from 42 PDB samples with real or false complex interfaces, a binary logistic regression analysis is performed, which results in an effective empirical model for the evaluation of binding probabilities of protein-protein interfaces. The model is validated with 12 samples, and satisfactory results are obtained for both the training and validation sets. Meanwhile, three potential dimeric interfaces of staphylokinase have been investigated and one with the best suitability to our model is proposed.

  12. Predicting nucleic acid binding interfaces from structural models of proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dror, Iris; Shazman, Shula; Mukherjee, Srayanta; Zhang, Yang; Glaser, Fabian; Mandel-Gutfreund, Yael

    2012-02-01

    The function of DNA- and RNA-binding proteins can be inferred from the characterization and accurate prediction of their binding interfaces. However, the main pitfall of various structure-based methods for predicting nucleic acid binding function is that they are all limited to a relatively small number of proteins for which high-resolution three-dimensional structures are available. In this study, we developed a pipeline for extracting functional electrostatic patches from surfaces of protein structural models, obtained using the I-TASSER protein structure predictor. The largest positive patches are extracted from the protein surface using the patchfinder algorithm. We show that functional electrostatic patches extracted from an ensemble of structural models highly overlap the patches extracted from high-resolution structures. Furthermore, by testing our pipeline on a set of 55 known nucleic acid binding proteins for which I-TASSER produces high-quality models, we show that the method accurately identifies the nucleic acids binding interface on structural models of proteins. Employing a combined patch approach we show that patches extracted from an ensemble of models better predicts the real nucleic acid binding interfaces compared with patches extracted from independent models. Overall, these results suggest that combining information from a collection of low-resolution structural models could be a valuable approach for functional annotation. We suggest that our method will be further applicable for predicting other functional surfaces of proteins with unknown structure. Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Lessons from making the Structural Classification of Proteins (SCOP) and their implications for protein structure modelling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andreeva, Antonina

    2016-06-15

    The Structural Classification of Proteins (SCOP) database has facilitated the development of many tools and algorithms and it has been successfully used in protein structure prediction and large-scale genome annotations. During the development of SCOP, numerous exceptions were found to topological rules, along with complex evolutionary scenarios and peculiarities in proteins including the ability to fold into alternative structures. This article reviews cases of structural variations observed for individual proteins and among groups of homologues, knowledge of which is essential for protein structure modelling.

  14. Parmodel: a web server for automated comparative modeling of proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uchôa, Hugo Brandão; Jorge, Guilherme Eberhart; Freitas Da Silveira, Nelson José; Camera, João Carlos; Canduri, Fernanda; De Azevedo, Walter Filgueira

    2004-12-24

    Parmodel is a web server for automated comparative modeling and evaluation of protein structures. The aim of this tool is to help inexperienced users to perform modeling, assessment, visualization, and optimization of protein models as well as crystallographers to evaluate structures solved experimentally. It is subdivided in four modules: Parmodel Modeling, Parmodel Assessment, Parmodel Visualization, and Parmodel Optimization. The main module is the Parmodel Modeling that allows the building of several models for a same protein in a reduced time, through the distribution of modeling processes on a Beowulf cluster. Parmodel automates and integrates the main softwares used in comparative modeling as MODELLER, Whatcheck, Procheck, Raster3D, Molscript, and Gromacs. This web server is freely accessible at .

  15. Protein and gene model inference based on statistical modeling in k-partite graphs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerster, Sarah; Qeli, Ermir; Ahrens, Christian H; Bühlmann, Peter

    2010-07-06

    One of the major goals of proteomics is the comprehensive and accurate description of a proteome. Shotgun proteomics, the method of choice for the analysis of complex protein mixtures, requires that experimentally observed peptides are mapped back to the proteins they were derived from. This process is also known as protein inference. We present Markovian Inference of Proteins and Gene Models (MIPGEM), a statistical model based on clearly stated assumptions to address the problem of protein and gene model inference for shotgun proteomics data. In particular, we are dealing with dependencies among peptides and proteins using a Markovian assumption on k-partite graphs. We are also addressing the problems of shared peptides and ambiguous proteins by scoring the encoding gene models. Empirical results on two control datasets with synthetic mixtures of proteins and on complex protein samples of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Drosophila melanogaster, and Arabidopsis thaliana suggest that the results with MIPGEM are competitive with existing tools for protein inference.

  16. Clarification of Interaction Mechanism of Mouse Hepatitis Virus (MHV) N and nsp3 Protein with Homology Modeling and Protein-Protein Docking Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tatar, Gizem; Tok, Tugba Taskin

    2016-02-26

    The coronavirus nucleocapsid (N) plays an important role in the virus structure, the replication, and the transcription of CoV. This protein, which has a helix and flexible structure, and capable of binding on to the viral genomic RNA, is a non-structural protein (nsp3). Many studies suggest that the N protein interaction with nsp3 plays a critical role in the virus replication early in infection. Therefore, it is necessary to know the definition of the interaction mechanism of N and nsp3 protein in terms of the CoV replication transcription mechanism. We report on the homology modeling, molecular dynamics simulation, and docking studies to explain the structure-function relationship and the interaction mechanism. In addition, the prototype MHV is preferred in the wet experiment, so we also based our study on the MHV N and nsp3 proteins that belong to the experimental study. The amino acid sequences of MHV N and nsp3 proteins have similarity between human and severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus. Therefore, the 3D structure models of these proteins were built with using the crystal structure of the CoV family members as a template. By following these models, molecular dynamics simulations were applied to attain the most stable conformation. Finally, protein-protein docking was performed to prove accuracy of model structures of the MHV N and to clarify the interaction with nsp3. As a result, Lys 113, Arg 125, Tyr 127, Glu 173, Tyr 190 residues that play an important role in virus replication were determined.

  17. Computational protein structure modeling and analysis of UV-B stress protein in Synechocystis PCC 6803.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, Md Akhlaqur; Chaturvedi, Navaneet; Sinha, Sukrat; Pandey, Paras Nath; Gupta, Dwijendra Kumar; Sundaram, Shanthy; Tripathi, Ashutosh

    2013-01-01

    This study focuses on Ultra Violet stress (UVS) gene product which is a UV stress induced protein from cyanobacteria, Synechocystis PCC 6803. Three dimensional structural modeling of target UVS protein was carried out by homology modeling method. 3F2I pdb from Nostoc sp. PCC 7120 was selected as a suitable template protein structure. Ultimately, the detection of active binding regions was carried out for characterization of functional sites in modeled UV-B stress protein. The top five probable ligand binding sites were predicted and the common binding residues between target and template protein was analyzed. It has been validated for the first time that modeled UVS protein structure from Synechocystis PCC 6803 was structurally and functionally similar to well characterized UVS protein of another cyanobacterial species, Nostoc sp PCC 7120 because of having same structural motif and fold with similar protein topology and function. Investigations revealed that UVS protein from Synechocystis sp. might play significant role during ultraviolet resistance. Thus, it could be a potential biological source for remediation for UV induced stress.

  18. ANIMAL MODELS FOR PROTEIN RESPIRATORY SENSITIZERS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Protein induced respiratory hypersensitivity, particularly atopic disease in general, and allergic asthma in particular, has increased dramatically over the last several decades in the U.S. and other industrialized nations as a result of ill-defined changes in living conditions i...

  19. Corn Storage Protein - A Molecular Genetic Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Messing, Joachim [Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey

    2013-05-31

    Corn is the highest yielding crop on earth and probably the most valuable agricultural product of the United States. Because it converts sun energy through photosynthesis into starch and proteins, we addressed energy savings by focusing on protein quality. People and animals require essential amino acids derived from the digestion of proteins. If proteins are relatively low in certain essential amino acids, the crop becomes nutritionally defective and has to be supplemented. Such deficiency affects meat and fish production and countries where corn is a staple. Because corn seed proteins have relatively low levels of lysine and methionine, a diet has to be supplemented with soybeans for the missing lysine and with chemically synthesized methionine. We therefore have studied genes expressed during maize seed development and their chromosomal organization. A critical technical requirement for the understanding of the molecular structure of genes and their positional information was DNA sequencing. Because of the length of sequences, DNA sequencing methods themselves were insufficient for this type of analysis. We therefore developed the so-called “DNA shotgun sequencing” strategy, where overlapping DNA fragments were sequenced in parallel and used to reconstruct large DNA molecules via overlaps. Our publications became the most frequently cited ones during the decade of 1981-1990 and former Associate Director of Science for the Office of Basic Energy Sciences Patricia M. Dehmer presented our work as one of the great successes of this program. A major component of the sequencing strategy was the development of bacterial strains and vectors, which were also used to develop the first biotechnology crops. These crops possessed new traits thanks to the expression of foreign genes in plants. To enable such expression, chimeric genes had to be constructed using our materials and methods by the industry. Because we made our materials and methods freely available to

  20. Ising Model Reprogramming of a Repeat Protein's Equilibrium Unfolding Pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Millership, C; Phillips, J J; Main, E R G

    2016-05-08

    Repeat proteins are formed from units of 20-40 aa that stack together into quasi one-dimensional non-globular structures. This modular repetitive construction means that, unlike globular proteins, a repeat protein's equilibrium folding and thus thermodynamic stability can be analysed using linear Ising models. Typically, homozipper Ising models have been used. These treat the repeat protein as a series of identical interacting subunits (the repeated motifs) that couple together to form the folded protein. However, they cannot describe subunits of differing stabilities. Here we show that a more sophisticated heteropolymer Ising model can be constructed and fitted to two new helix deletion series of consensus tetratricopeptide repeat proteins (CTPRs). This analysis, showing an asymmetric spread of stability between helices within CTPR ensembles, coupled with the Ising model's predictive qualities was then used to guide reprogramming of the unfolding pathway of a variant CTPR protein. The designed behaviour was engineered by introducing destabilising mutations that increased the thermodynamic asymmetry within a CTPR ensemble. The asymmetry caused the terminal α-helix to thermodynamically uncouple from the rest of the protein and preferentially unfold. This produced a specific, highly populated stable intermediate with a putative dimerisation interface. As such it is the first step in designing repeat proteins with function regulated by a conformational switch. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  1. Building toy models of proteins using coevolutionary information

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Ryan; Raghunathan, Mohit; Onuchic, Jose

    2015-03-01

    Recent developments in global statistical methodologies have advanced the analysis of large collections of protein sequences for coevolutionary information. Coevolution between amino acids in a protein arises from compensatory mutations that are needed to maintain the stability or function of a protein over the course of evolution. This gives rise to quantifiable correlations between amino acid positions within the multiple sequence alignment of a protein family. Here, we use Direct Coupling Analysis (DCA) to infer a Potts model Hamiltonian governing the correlated mutations in a protein family to obtain the sequence-dependent interaction energies of a toy protein model. We demonstrate that this methodology predicts residue-residue interaction energies that are consistent with experimental mutational changes in protein stabilities as well as other computational methodologies. Furthermore, we demonstrate with several examples that DCA could be used to construct a structure-based model that quantitatively agrees with experimental data on folding mechanisms. This work serves as a potential framework for generating models of proteins that are enriched by evolutionary data that can potentially be used to engineer key functional motions and interactions in protein systems. This research has been supported by the NSF INSPIRE award MCB-1241332 and by the CTBP sponsored by the NSF (Grant PHY-1427654).

  2. 3D Modeling Engine Representation Summary Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steven Prescott; Ramprasad Sampath; Curtis Smith; Timothy Yang

    2014-09-01

    Computers have been used for 3D modeling and simulation, but only recently have computational resources been able to give realistic results in a reasonable time frame for large complex models. This summary report addressed the methods, techniques, and resources used to develop a 3D modeling engine to represent risk analysis simulation for advanced small modular reactor structures and components. The simulations done for this evaluation were focused on external events, specifically tsunami floods, for a hypothetical nuclear power facility on a coastline.

  3. Communicating and reporting on the business model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Christian; Lund, Morten

    2014-01-01

    The problem – as well as the prospect – with business models is that they are concerned with being different; as business in general thrives on some sort of unique selling point. So the bundle of indicators on value creation, business models, strategy, intellectual capital, and so on, which...... will be relevant to analyze or communicate about will differ from firm to firm. Therefore, this chapter focuses on the business model as the integrating concept for reporting and analysis of strategic types of information on e.g. management strategies, critical success factors, risk factors and value drivers....

  4. Hidden Markov models for prediction of protein features

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bystroff, Christopher; Krogh, Anders

    2008-01-01

    Hidden Markov Models (HMMs) are an extremely versatile statistical representation that can be used to model any set of one-dimensional discrete symbol data. HMMs can model protein sequences in many ways, depending on what features of the protein are represented by the Markov states. For protein...... structure prediction, states have been chosen to represent either homologous sequence positions, local or secondary structure types, or transmembrane locality. The resulting models can be used to predict common ancestry, secondary or local structure, or membrane topology by applying one of the two standard...... algorithms for comparing a sequence to a model. In this chapter, we review those algorithms and discuss how HMMs have been constructed and refined for the purpose of protein structure prediction....

  5. Proteins in growth regulation during early development. Comprehensive three year report, 1974--1977

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klein, N.W.

    1977-08-01

    Progress is reported on the following research projects: response of embryo regions to nutrition; synthesis of serum proteins by the yolk-sac; serum protein synthesis in relation to protein nutrition, protease secretion, teratogenic agents, genetic abnormalities, yolk-sac cell cultures, and cell free systems; and effects of serum proteins on rat embryos, chick embryos without yolk-sacs, and isolated brains. (HLW)

  6. Loopholes and missing links in protein modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossi, Karen A; Weigelt, Carolyn A; Nayeem, Akbar; Krystek, Stanley R

    2007-09-01

    This paper provides an unbiased comparison of four commercially available programs for loop sampling, Prime, Modeler, ICM, and Sybyl, each of which uses a different modeling protocol. The study assesses the quality of results and examines the relative strengths and weaknesses of each method. The set of loops to be modeled varied in length from 4-12 amino acids. The approaches used for loop modeling can be classified into two methodologies: ab initio loop generation (Modeler and Prime) and database searches (Sybyl and ICM). Comparison of the modeled loops to the native structures was used to determine the accuracy of each method. All of the protocols returned similar results for short loop lengths (four to six residues), but as loop length increased, the quality of the results varied among the programs. Prime generated loops with RMSDs modeled loops.

  7. Protein secondary structure analysis with a coarse-grained model

    OpenAIRE

    Kneller, Gerald R.; Hinsen, Konrad

    2014-01-01

    The paper presents a geometrical model for protein secondary structure analysis which uses only the positions of the $C_{\\alpha}$-atoms. We construct a space curve connecting these positions by piecewise polynomial interpolation and describe the folding of the protein backbone by a succession of screw motions linking the Frenet frames at consecutive $C_{\\alpha}$-positions. Using the ASTRAL subset of the SCOPe data base of protein structures, we derive thresholds for the screw parameters of se...

  8. Modeling protein network evolution under genome duplication and domain shuffling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isambert Hervé

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Successive whole genome duplications have recently been firmly established in all major eukaryote kingdoms. Such exponential evolutionary processes must have largely contributed to shape the topology of protein-protein interaction (PPI networks by outweighing, in particular, all time-linear network growths modeled so far. Results We propose and solve a mathematical model of PPI network evolution under successive genome duplications. This demonstrates, from first principles, that evolutionary conservation and scale-free topology are intrinsically linked properties of PPI networks and emerge from i prevailing exponential network dynamics under duplication and ii asymmetric divergence of gene duplicates. While required, we argue that this asymmetric divergence arises, in fact, spontaneously at the level of protein-binding sites. This supports a refined model of PPI network evolution in terms of protein domains under exponential and asymmetric duplication/divergence dynamics, with multidomain proteins underlying the combinatorial formation of protein complexes. Genome duplication then provides a powerful source of PPI network innovation by promoting local rearrangements of multidomain proteins on a genome wide scale. Yet, we show that the overall conservation and topology of PPI networks are robust to extensive domain shuffling of multidomain proteins as well as to finer details of protein interaction and evolution. Finally, large scale features of direct and indirect PPI networks of S. cerevisiae are well reproduced numerically with only two adjusted parameters of clear biological significance (i.e. network effective growth rate and average number of protein-binding domains per protein. Conclusion This study demonstrates the statistical consequences of genome duplication and domain shuffling on the conservation and topology of PPI networks over a broad evolutionary scale across eukaryote kingdoms. In particular, scale

  9. pH sensitivity of FRET reporters based on cyan and yellow fluorescent proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Betolngar, Dahdjim-Benoît; Erard, Marie; Pasquier, Hélène; Bousmah, Yasmina; Diop-Sy, Awa; Guiot, Elvire; Vincent, Pierre; Mérola, Fabienne

    2015-05-01

    It is generally acknowledged that the popular cyan and yellow fluorescent proteins carried by genetically encoded reporters suffer from strong pH sensitivities close to the physiological pH range. We studied the consequences of these pH responses on the intracellular signals of model Förster resonant energy transfer (FRET) tandems and FRET-based reporters of cAMP-dependent protein kinase activity (AKAR) expressed in the cytosol of living BHK cells, while changing the intracellular pH by means of the nigericin ionophore. Although the simultaneous pH sensitivities of the donor and the acceptor may mask each other in some cases, the magnitude of the perturbations can be very significant, as compared to the functional response of the AKAR biosensor. Replacing the CFP donor by the spectrally identical, but pH-insensitive Aquamarine variant (pK1/2 = 3.3) drastically modifies the biosensor pH response and gives access to the acid transition of the yellow acceptor. We developed a simple model of pH-dependent FRET and used it to describe the expected pH-induced changes in fluorescence lifetime and ratiometric signals. This model qualitatively accounts for most of the observations, but reveals a complex behavior of the cytosolic AKAR biosensor at acid pHs, associated to additional FRET contributions. This study underlines the major and complex impact of pH changes on the signal of FRET reporters in the living cell.

  10. An Integrated Framework Advancing Membrane Protein Modeling and Design.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rebecca F Alford

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Membrane proteins are critical functional molecules in the human body, constituting more than 30% of open reading frames in the human genome. Unfortunately, a myriad of difficulties in overexpression and reconstitution into membrane mimetics severely limit our ability to determine their structures. Computational tools are therefore instrumental to membrane protein structure prediction, consequently increasing our understanding of membrane protein function and their role in disease. Here, we describe a general framework facilitating membrane protein modeling and design that combines the scientific principles for membrane protein modeling with the flexible software architecture of Rosetta3. This new framework, called RosettaMP, provides a general membrane representation that interfaces with scoring, conformational sampling, and mutation routines that can be easily combined to create new protocols. To demonstrate the capabilities of this implementation, we developed four proof-of-concept applications for (1 prediction of free energy changes upon mutation; (2 high-resolution structural refinement; (3 protein-protein docking; and (4 assembly of symmetric protein complexes, all in the membrane environment. Preliminary data show that these algorithms can produce meaningful scores and structures. The data also suggest needed improvements to both sampling routines and score functions. Importantly, the applications collectively demonstrate the potential of combining the flexible nature of RosettaMP with the power of Rosetta algorithms to facilitate membrane protein modeling and design.

  11. A Bayesian model for classifying all differentially expressed proteins simultaneously in 2D PAGE gels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wu Steven H

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (2D PAGE is commonly used to identify differentially expressed proteins under two or more experimental or observational conditions. Wu et al (2009 developed a univariate probabilistic model which was used to identify differential expression between Case and Control groups, by applying a Likelihood Ratio Test (LRT to each protein on a 2D PAGE. In contrast to commonly used statistical approaches, this model takes into account the two possible causes of missing values in 2D PAGE: either (1 the non-expression of a protein; or (2 a level of expression that falls below the limit of detection. Results We develop a global Bayesian model which extends the previously described model. Unlike the univariate approach, the model reported here is able treat all differentially expressed proteins simultaneously. Whereas each protein is modelled by the univariate likelihood function previously described, several global distributions are used to model the underlying relationship between the parameters associated with individual proteins. These global distributions are able to combine information from each protein to give more accurate estimates of the true parameters. In our implementation of the procedure, all parameters are recovered by Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC integration. The 95% highest posterior density (HPD intervals for the marginal posterior distributions are used to determine whether differences in protein expression are due to differences in mean expression intensities, and/or differences in the probabilities of expression. Conclusions Simulation analyses showed that the global model is able to accurately recover the underlying global distributions, and identify more differentially expressed proteins than the simple application of a LRT. Additionally, simulations also indicate that the probability of incorrectly identifying a protein as differentially expressed (i.e., the False

  12. Physical modeling of geometrically confined disordered protein assemblies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ando, David

    2015-08-01

    The transport of cargo across the nuclear membrane is highly selective and accomplished by a poorly understood mechanism involving hundreds of nucleoporins lining the inside of the nuclear pore complex (NPC). Currently, there is no clear picture of the overall structure formed by this collection of proteins within the pore, primarily due to their disordered nature and uncertainty regarding the properties of individual nucleoporins. We first study the defining characteristics of the amino acid sequences of nucleoporins through bioinformatics techniques, although bioinformatics of disordered proteins is especially challenging given high mutation rates for homologous proteins and that functionality may not be strongly related to sequence. Here we have performed a novel bioinformatic analysis, based on the spatial clustering of physically relevant features such as binding motifs and charges within disordered proteins, on thousands of FG motif containing nucleoporins (FG nups). The biophysical mechanism by which the critical FG nups regulate nucleocytoplasmic transport has remained elusive, yet our analysis revealed a set of highly conserved spatial features in the sequence structure of individual FG nups, such as the separation, localization, and ordering of FG motifs and charged residues along the protein chain. These sequence features are likely conserved due to a common functionality between species regarding how FG nups functionally regulate traffic, therefore these results constrain current models and eliminate proposed biophysical mechanisms responsible for regulation of nucleocytoplasmic traffic in the NPC which would not result in such a conserved amino acid sequence structure. Additionally, this method allows us to identify potentially functionally analogous disordered proteins across distantly related species. To understand the physical implications of the sequence features on structure and dynamics of the nucleoporins, we performed coarse-grained simulations

  13. Geochemistry Model Validation Report: Material Degradation and Release Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    H. Stockman

    2001-09-28

    The purpose of this Analysis and Modeling Report (AMR) is to validate the Material Degradation and Release (MDR) model that predicts degradation and release of radionuclides from a degrading waste package (WP) in the potential monitored geologic repository at Yucca Mountain. This AMR is prepared according to ''Technical Work Plan for: Waste Package Design Description for LA'' (Ref. 17). The intended use of the MDR model is to estimate the long-term geochemical behavior of waste packages (WPs) containing U. S . Department of Energy (DOE) Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) codisposed with High Level Waste (HLW) glass, commercial SNF, and Immobilized Plutonium Ceramic (Pu-ceramic) codisposed with HLW glass. The model is intended to predict (1) the extent to which criticality control material, such as gadolinium (Gd), will remain in the WP after corrosion of the initial WP, (2) the extent to which fissile Pu and uranium (U) will be carried out of the degraded WP by infiltrating water, and (3) the chemical composition and amounts of minerals and other solids left in the WP. The results of the model are intended for use in criticality calculations. The scope of the model validation report is to (1) describe the MDR model, and (2) compare the modeling results with experimental studies. A test case based on a degrading Pu-ceramic WP is provided to help explain the model. This model does not directly feed the assessment of system performance. The output from this model is used by several other models, such as the configuration generator, criticality, and criticality consequence models, prior to the evaluation of system performance. This document has been prepared according to AP-3.10Q, ''Analyses and Models'' (Ref. 2), and prepared in accordance with the technical work plan (Ref. 17).

  14. A twist on folding: Predicting optimal sequences and optimal folds of simple protein models with the hidden-force algorithm

    CERN Document Server

    Kolossváry, István

    2012-01-01

    We propose a new way of looking at global optimization of off-lattice protein models. We present a dual optimization concept of predicting optimal sequences as well as optimal folds. We validate the utility of the recently introduced hidden-force Monte Carlo optimization algorithm by finding significantly lower energy folds for minimalist protein models than previously reported. Further, we also find the protein sequence that yields the lowest energy fold amongst all sequences for a given chain length and residue mixture. In particular, for protein models with a binary sequence, we show that the sequence-optimized folds form more compact cores than the lowest energy folds of the historically fixed, Fibonacci-series sequences of chain lengths of 13, 21, 34, 55, and 89. We emphasize that while the protein model we used is minimalist, the methodology is applicable to detailed protein models, and sequence optimization may yield novel folds and aid de novo protein design.

  15. Dynamical model of the kinesin protein motor

    CERN Document Server

    Nesterov, Alexander I; Ramírez, Mónica F

    2016-01-01

    We model and simulate the stepping dynamics of the kinesin motor including electric and mechanical forces, environmental noise, and the complicated potentials produced by tracking and neighboring protofilaments. Our dynamical model supports the hand-over-hand mechanism of the kinesin stepping. Our theoretical predictions and numerical simulations include the off-axis displacements of the kinesin heads while the steps are performed. The results obtained are in a good agreement with recent experiments on the kinesin dynamics.

  16. A coarse grain model for protein-surface interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Shuai; Knotts, Thomas A.

    2013-09-01

    The interaction of proteins with surfaces is important in numerous applications in many fields—such as biotechnology, proteomics, sensors, and medicine—but fundamental understanding of how protein stability and structure are affected by surfaces remains incomplete. Over the last several years, molecular simulation using coarse grain models has yielded significant insights, but the formalisms used to represent the surface interactions have been rudimentary. We present a new model for protein surface interactions that incorporates the chemical specificity of both the surface and the residues comprising the protein in the context of a one-bead-per-residue, coarse grain approach that maintains computational efficiency. The model is parameterized against experimental adsorption energies for multiple model peptides on different types of surfaces. The validity of the model is established by its ability to quantitatively and qualitatively predict the free energy of adsorption and structural changes for multiple biologically-relevant proteins on different surfaces. The validation, done with proteins not used in parameterization, shows that the model produces remarkable agreement between simulation and experiment.

  17. Comparative Study of Elastic Network Model and Protein Contact Network for Protein Complexes: The Hemoglobin Case

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guang Hu

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The overall topology and interfacial interactions play key roles in understanding structural and functional principles of protein complexes. Elastic Network Model (ENM and Protein Contact Network (PCN are two widely used methods for high throughput investigation of structures and interactions within protein complexes. In this work, the comparative analysis of ENM and PCN relative to hemoglobin (Hb was taken as case study. We examine four types of structural and dynamical paradigms, namely, conformational change between different states of Hbs, modular analysis, allosteric mechanisms studies, and interface characterization of an Hb. The comparative study shows that ENM has an advantage in studying dynamical properties and protein-protein interfaces, while PCN is better for describing protein structures quantitatively both from local and from global levels. We suggest that the integration of ENM and PCN would give a potential but powerful tool in structural systems biology.

  18. A least square method based model for identifying protein complexes in protein-protein interaction network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Qiguo; Guo, Maozu; Guo, Yingjie; Liu, Xiaoyan; Liu, Yang; Teng, Zhixia

    2014-01-01

    Protein complex formed by a group of physical interacting proteins plays a crucial role in cell activities. Great effort has been made to computationally identify protein complexes from protein-protein interaction (PPI) network. However, the accuracy of the prediction is still far from being satisfactory, because the topological structures of protein complexes in the PPI network are too complicated. This paper proposes a novel optimization framework to detect complexes from PPI network, named PLSMC. The method is on the basis of the fact that if two proteins are in a common complex, they are likely to be interacting. PLSMC employs this relation to determine complexes by a penalized least squares method. PLSMC is applied to several public yeast PPI networks, and compared with several state-of-the-art methods. The results indicate that PLSMC outperforms other methods. In particular, complexes predicted by PLSMC can match known complexes with a higher accuracy than other methods. Furthermore, the predicted complexes have high functional homogeneity.

  19. A Novel Reporter Rat Strain That Conditionally Expresses the Bright Red Fluorescent Protein tdTomato.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroyuki Igarashi

    Full Text Available Despite the strength of the Cre/loxP recombination system in animal models, its application in rats trails that in mice because of the lack of relevant reporter strains. Here, we generated a floxed STOP tdTomato rat that conditionally expresses a red fluorescent protein variant (tdTomato in the presence of exogenous Cre recombinase. The tdTomato signal vividly visualizes neurons including their projection fibers and spines without any histological enhancement. In addition, a transgenic rat line (FLAME that ubiquitously expresses tdTomato was successfully established by injecting intracytoplasmic Cre mRNA into fertilized ova. Our rat reporter system will facilitate connectome studies as well as the visualization of the fine structures of genetically identified cells for long periods both in vivo and ex vivo. Furthermore, FLAME is an ideal model for organ transplantation research owing to improved traceability of cells/tissues.

  20. fast_protein_cluster: parallel and optimized clustering of large-scale protein modeling data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, Ling-Hong; Samudrala, Ram

    2014-06-15

    fast_protein_cluster is a fast, parallel and memory efficient package used to cluster 60 000 sets of protein models (with up to 550 000 models per set) generated by the Nutritious Rice for the World project. fast_protein_cluster is an optimized and extensible toolkit that supports Root Mean Square Deviation after optimal superposition (RMSD) and Template Modeling score (TM-score) as metrics. RMSD calculations using a laptop CPU are 60× faster than qcprot and 3× faster than current graphics processing unit (GPU) implementations. New GPU code further increases the speed of RMSD and TM-score calculations. fast_protein_cluster provides novel k-means and hierarchical clustering methods that are up to 250× and 2000× faster, respectively, than Clusco, and identify significantly more accurate models than Spicker and Clusco. fast_protein_cluster is written in C++ using OpenMP for multi-threading support. Custom streaming Single Instruction Multiple Data (SIMD) extensions and advanced vector extension intrinsics code accelerate CPU calculations, and OpenCL kernels support AMD and Nvidia GPUs. fast_protein_cluster is available under the M.I.T. license. (http://software.compbio.washington.edu/fast_protein_cluster) © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press.

  1. Theory, Modeling and Simulation Annual Report 2000

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dixon, David A.; Garrett, Bruce C.; Straatsma, Tp; Jones, Donald R.; Studham, Ronald S.; Harrison, Robert J.; Nichols, Jeffrey A.

    2001-11-01

    This annual report describes the 2000 research accomplishments for the Theory, Modeling, and Simulation (TM&S) directorate, one of the six research organizations in the William R. Wiley Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory (EMSL) at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). EMSL is a U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) national scientific user facility and is the centerpiece of the DOE commitment to providing world-class experimental, theoretical, and computational capabilities for solving the nation's environmental problems.

  2. Theory, Modeling and Simulation Annual Report 2000

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dixon, David A; Garrett, Bruce C; Straatsma, TP; Jones, Donald R; Studham, Scott; Harrison, Robert J; Nichols, Jeffrey A

    2001-11-01

    This annual report describes the 2000 research accomplishments for the Theory, Modeling, and Simulation (TM and S) directorate, one of the six research organizations in the William R. Wiley Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory (EMSL) at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). EMSL is a U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) national scientific user facility and is the centerpiece of the DOE commitment to providing world-class experimental, theoretical, and computational capabilities for solving the nation's environmental problems.

  3. Phoenix Metropolitan Model Deployment Initiative Evaluation Report

    OpenAIRE

    Zimmerman, C; Marks, J.; Jenq, J.; Cluett, Chris; DeBlasio, Allan; Lappin, Jane; Rakha, Hesham A.; Wunderlich, K

    2000-01-01

    This report presents the evaluation results of the Phoenix, Arizona Metropolitan Model Deployment Initiative (MMDI). The MMDI was a three-year program of the Intelligent Transportation Systems (ITS) Joint Program Office of the U.S. Department of Transportation. It focused on aggressive deployment of ITS at four sites across the United States, including the metropolitan areas of San Antonio, Seattle, NY/NJ/Connecticut as well as Phoenix. The focus of the deployments was on integration of exist...

  4. PV performance modeling workshop summary report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stein, Joshua S.; Tasca, Coryne Adelle (SRA International, Inc., Fairfax, VA); Cameron, Christopher P.

    2011-05-01

    During the development of a solar photovoltaic (PV) energy project, predicting expected energy production from a system is a key part of understanding system value. System energy production is a function of the system design and location, the mounting configuration, the power conversion system, and the module technology, as well as the solar resource. Even if all other variables are held constant, annual energy yield (kWh/kWp) will vary among module technologies because of differences in response to low-light levels and temperature. A number of PV system performance models have been developed and are in use, but little has been published on validation of these models or the accuracy and uncertainty of their output. With support from the U.S. Department of Energy's Solar Energy Technologies Program, Sandia National Laboratories organized a PV Performance Modeling Workshop in Albuquerque, New Mexico, September 22-23, 2010. The workshop was intended to address the current state of PV system models, develop a path forward for establishing best practices on PV system performance modeling, and set the stage for standardization of testing and validation procedures for models and input parameters. This report summarizes discussions and presentations from the workshop, as well as examines opportunities for collaborative efforts to develop objective comparisons between models and across sites and applications.

  5. Modelling Protein Dynamics on the Microsecond Time Scale

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Siuda, Iwona Anna

    Recent years have shown an increase in coarse-grained (CG) molecular dynamics simulations, providing structural and dynamic details of large proteins and enabling studies of self-assembly of biological materials. It is not easy to acquire such data experimentally, and access is also still limited...... in atomistic simulations. During her PhD studies, Iwona Siuda used MARTINI CG models to study the dynamics of different globular and membrane proteins. In several cases, the MARTINI model was sufficient to study conformational changes of small, purely alpha-helical proteins. However, in studies of larger...... family....

  6. Modeling the Tensile Properties of Soybean Protein Yarns

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    石风俊; 崔世忠

    2003-01-01

    The tensile properties of a series of soybean protein yarns are tested in USTER THINKPAID Ⅲ.A nonlinear viscoelastic model has been proposed to describe the tensile behavior of soybean protein yarns.The model is composed of a Maxwell element,a linear spring and a nonlinear spring.The tensile properties of soybean protein yarn are analyzed.The stress-strain curves of the yarns are fitted.The average breaking tenacity and specific work of rupture are calculated using the average breaking strain.Comparisons indicate that theoretical predictions conform the experimental results very well.

  7. The unfolded protein response and translation attenuation: a modelling approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trusina, A; Tang, C

    2010-10-01

    Unfolded protein response (UPR) is a stress response to increased levels of unfolded proteins in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). To deal with this stress, all eukaryotic cells share a well-conserved strategy--the upregulation of chaperons and proteases to facilitate protein folding and to degrade the misfolded proteins. For metazoans, however, an additional and seemingly redundant strategy has been evolved--translation attenuation (TA) of proteins targeted to the ER via the protein kinase PERK pathway. PERK is essential in secretory cells, such as the pancreatic β-cells, but not in non-secretory cell types. We have recently developed a mathematical model of UPR, focusing on the interplay and synergy between the TA arm and the conserved Ire1 arm of the UPR. The model showed that the TA mechanism is beneficial in highly fluctuating environment, for example, in the case where the ER stress changes frequently. Under highly variable levels of ER stress, tight regulation of the ER load by TA avoids excess amount of chaperons and proteases being produced. The model also showed that TA is of greater importance when there is a large flux of proteins through the ER. In this study, we further expand our model to investigate different types of ER stress and different temporal profiles of the stress. We found that TA is more desirable in dealing with the translation stress, for example, prolonged stimulation of proinsulin biosynthesis, than the chemical stress.

  8. A resource for benchmarking the usefulness of protein structure models.

    KAUST Repository

    Carbajo, Daniel

    2012-08-02

    BACKGROUND: Increasingly, biologists and biochemists use computational tools to design experiments to probe the function of proteins and/or to engineer them for a variety of different purposes. The most effective strategies rely on the knowledge of the three-dimensional structure of the protein of interest. However it is often the case that an experimental structure is not available and that models of different quality are used instead. On the other hand, the relationship between the quality of a model and its appropriate use is not easy to derive in general, and so far it has been analyzed in detail only for specific application. RESULTS: This paper describes a database and related software tools that allow testing of a given structure based method on models of a protein representing different levels of accuracy. The comparison of the results of a computational experiment on the experimental structure and on a set of its decoy models will allow developers and users to assess which is the specific threshold of accuracy required to perform the task effectively. CONCLUSIONS: The ModelDB server automatically builds decoy models of different accuracy for a given protein of known structure and provides a set of useful tools for their analysis. Pre-computed data for a non-redundant set of deposited protein structures are available for analysis and download in the ModelDB database. IMPLEMENTATION, AVAILABILITY AND REQUIREMENTS: Project name: A resource for benchmarking the usefulness of protein structure models. Project home page: http://bl210.caspur.it/MODEL-DB/MODEL-DB_web/MODindex.php.Operating system(s): Platform independent. Programming language: Perl-BioPerl (program); mySQL, Perl DBI and DBD modules (database); php, JavaScript, Jmol scripting (web server). Other requirements: Java Runtime Environment v1.4 or later, Perl, BioPerl, CPAN modules, HHsearch, Modeller, LGA, NCBI Blast package, DSSP, Speedfill (Surfnet) and PSAIA. License: Free. Any restrictions to use by

  9. Homology Modeling: Generating Structural Models to Understand Protein Function and Mechanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramachandran, Srinivas; Dokholyan, Nikolay V.

    Geneticists and molecular and cell biologists routinely uncover new proteins important in specific biological processes/pathways. However, either the molecular functions or the functional mechanisms of many of these proteins are unclear due to a lack of knowledge of their atomic structures. Yet, determining experimental structures of many proteins presents technical challenges. The current methods for obtaining atomic-resolution structures of biomolecules (X-ray crystallography and NMR spectroscopy) require pure preparations of proteins at concentrations much higher than those at which the proteins exist in a physiological environment. Additionally, NMR has size limitations, with current technology limited to the determination of structures of proteins with masses of up to 15 kDa. Due to these reasons, atomic structures of many medically and biologically important proteins do not exist. However, the structures of these proteins are essential for several purposes, including in silico drug design [1], understanding the effects of disease mutations [2], and designing experiments to probe the functional mechanisms of proteins. Comparative modeling has gained importance as a tool for bridging the gap between sequence and structure space, allowing researchers to build structural models of proteins that are difficult to crystallize or for which structure determination by NMR spectroscopy is not tractable. Comparative modeling, or homology modeling, exploits the fact that two proteins whose sequences are evolutionarily connected display similar structural features [3]. Thus, the known structure of a protein (template) can be used to generate a molecular model of the protein (query) whose experimental structure is notknown.

  10. Protein buffering in model systems and in whole human saliva.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreas Lamanda

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to quantify the buffer attributes (value, power, range and optimum of two model systems for whole human resting saliva, the purified proteins from whole human resting saliva and single proteins. Two model systems, the first containing amyloglucosidase and lysozyme, and the second containing amyloglucosidase and alpha-amylase, were shown to provide, in combination with hydrogencarbonate and di-hydrogenphosphate, almost identical buffer attributes as whole human resting saliva. It was further demonstrated that changes in the protein concentration as small as 0.1% may change the buffer value of a buffer solution up to 15 times. Additionally, it was shown that there was a protein concentration change in the same range (0.16% between saliva samples collected at the time periods of 13:00 and others collected at 9:00 am and 17:00. The mode of the protein expression changed between these samples corresponded to the change in basic buffer power and the change of the buffer value at pH 6.7. Finally, SDS Page and Ruthenium II tris (bathophenantroline disulfonate staining unveiled a constant protein expression in all samples except for one 50 kDa protein band. As the change in the expression pattern of that 50 kDa protein band corresponded to the change in basic buffer power and the buffer value at pH 6.7, it was reasonable to conclude that this 50 kDa protein band may contain the protein(s belonging to the protein buffer system of human saliva.

  11. A 3D model of the membrane protein complex formed by the white spot syndrome virus structural proteins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yun-Shiang Chang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Outbreaks of white spot disease have had a large negative economic impact on cultured shrimp worldwide. However, the pathogenesis of the causative virus, WSSV (whit spot syndrome virus, is not yet well understood. WSSV is a large enveloped virus. The WSSV virion has three structural layers surrounding its core DNA: an outer envelope, a tegument and a nucleocapsid. In this study, we investigated the protein-protein interactions of the major WSSV structural proteins, including several envelope and tegument proteins that are known to be involved in the infection process. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In the present report, we used coimmunoprecipitation and yeast two-hybrid assays to elucidate and/or confirm all the interactions that occur among the WSSV structural (envelope and tegument proteins VP51A, VP19, VP24, VP26 and VP28. We found that VP51A interacted directly not only with VP26 but also with VP19 and VP24. VP51A, VP19 and VP24 were also shown to have an affinity for self-interaction. Chemical cross-linking assays showed that these three self-interacting proteins could occur as dimers. CONCLUSIONS: From our present results in conjunction with other previously established interactions we construct a 3D model in which VP24 acts as a core protein that directly associates with VP26, VP28, VP38A, VP51A and WSV010 to form a membrane-associated protein complex. VP19 and VP37 are attached to this complex via association with VP51A and VP28, respectively. Through the VP26-VP51C interaction this envelope complex is anchored to the nucleocapsid, which is made of layers of rings formed by VP664. A 3D model of the nucleocapsid and the surrounding outer membrane is presented.

  12. Finding low-energy conformations of lattice protein models by quantum annealing

    CERN Document Server

    Perdomo-Ortiz, Alejandro; Drew-Brook, Marshall; Rose, Geordie; Aspuru-Guzik, Alán

    2012-01-01

    Lattice protein folding models are a cornerstone of computational biophysics. Although these models are a coarse grained representation, they provide useful insight into the energy landscape of natural proteins. Finding low-energy three-dimensional structures is an intractable problem even in the simplest model, the Hydrophobic-Polar (HP) model. Exhaustive search of all possible global minima is limited to sequences in the tens of amino acids. Description of protein-like properties are more accurately described by generalized models, such as the one proposed by Miyazawa and Jernigan (MJ), which explicitly take into account the unique interactions among all 20 amino acids. There is theoretical and experimental evidence of the advantage of solving classical optimization problems using quantum annealing over its classical analogue (simulated annealing). In this report, we present a benchmark implementation of quantum annealing for a biophysical problem (six different experiments up to 81 superconducting quantum ...

  13. Mathematical modeling of salt-gradient ion-exchange simulated moving bed chromatography for protein separations

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    卢建刚

    2004-01-01

    The salt-gradient operation mode used in ion-exchange simulated moving bed chromatography (SMBC) can improve the efficiency of protein separations. A detailed model that takes into account any kind of adsorption/ion-exchange equilibrium, salt gradient, size exclusion, mass transfer resistance, and port periodic switching mechanism, was developed to simulate the complex dynamics. The model predictions were verified by the experimental data on upward and downward gradients for protein separations reported in the literature. All design and operating parameters (number, configuration, length and diameter of columns, particle size, switching period, flow rates of feed, raffinate, desorbent and extract, protein concentrations in feed, different salt concentrations in desorbent and feed) can be chosen correctly by numerical simulation. This model can facilitate the design, operation, optimization, control and scale-up of salt-gradient ion-exchange SMBC for protein separations.

  14. Adaptive Simulated Annealing Based Protein Loop Modeling of Neurotoxins

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈杰; 黄丽娜; 彭志红

    2003-01-01

    A loop modeling method, adaptive simulated annealing, for ab initio prediction of protein loop structures, as an optimization problem of searching the global minimum of a given energy function, is proposed. An interface-friendly toolbox-LoopModeller in Windows and Linux systems, VC++ and OpenGL environments is developed for analysis and visualization. Simulation results of three short-chain neurotoxins modeled by LoopModeller show that the method proposed is fast and efficient.

  15. Real-time quantification of protein expression at the single-cell level via dynamic protein synthesis translocation reporters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aymoz, Delphine; Wosika, Victoria; Durandau, Eric; Pelet, Serge

    2016-04-21

    Protein expression is a dynamic process, which can be rapidly induced by extracellular signals. It is widely appreciated that single cells can display large variations in the level of gene induction. However, the variability in the dynamics of this process in individual cells is difficult to quantify using standard fluorescent protein (FP) expression assays, due to the slow maturation of their fluorophore. Here we have developed expression reporters that accurately measure both the levels and dynamics of protein synthesis in live single cells with a temporal resolution under a minute. Our system relies on the quantification of the translocation of a constitutively expressed FP into the nucleus. As a proof of concept, we used these reporters to measure the transient protein synthesis arising from two promoters responding to the yeast hyper osmolarity glycerol mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway (pSTL1 and pGPD1). They display distinct expression dynamics giving rise to strikingly different instantaneous expression noise.

  16. A CONTINUUM HARD-SPHERE MODEL OF PROTEIN ADSORPTION.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finch, Craig; Clarke, Thomas; Hickman, James J

    2013-07-01

    Protein adsorption plays a significant role in biological phenomena such as cell-surface interactions and the coagulation of blood. Two-dimensional random sequential adsorption (RSA) models are widely used to model the adsorption of proteins on solid surfaces. Continuum equations have been developed so that the results of RSA simulations can be used to predict the kinetics of adsorption. Recently, Brownian dynamics simulations have become popular for modeling protein adsorption. In this work a continuum model was developed to allow the results from a Brownian dynamics simulation to be used as the boundary condition in a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulation. Brownian dynamics simulations were used to model the diffusive transport of hard-sphere particles in a liquid and the adsorption of the particles onto a solid surface. The configuration of the adsorbed particles was analyzed to quantify the chemical potential near the surface, which was found to be a function of the distance from the surface and the fractional surface coverage. The near-surface chemical potential was used to derive a continuum model of adsorption that incorporates the results from the Brownian dynamics simulations. The equations of the continuum model were discretized and coupled to a CFD simulation of diffusive transport to the surface. The kinetics of adsorption predicted by the continuum model closely matched the results from the Brownian dynamics simulation. This new model allows the results from mesoscale simulations to be incorporated into micro- or macro-scale CFD transport simulations of protein adsorption in practical devices.

  17. Protein Structure Classification and Loop Modeling Using Multiple Ramachandran Distributions

    KAUST Repository

    Najibi, Seyed Morteza

    2017-02-08

    Recently, the study of protein structures using angular representations has attracted much attention among structural biologists. The main challenge is how to efficiently model the continuous conformational space of the protein structures based on the differences and similarities between different Ramachandran plots. Despite the presence of statistical methods for modeling angular data of proteins, there is still a substantial need for more sophisticated and faster statistical tools to model the large-scale circular datasets. To address this need, we have developed a nonparametric method for collective estimation of multiple bivariate density functions for a collection of populations of protein backbone angles. The proposed method takes into account the circular nature of the angular data using trigonometric spline which is more efficient compared to existing methods. This collective density estimation approach is widely applicable when there is a need to estimate multiple density functions from different populations with common features. Moreover, the coefficients of adaptive basis expansion for the fitted densities provide a low-dimensional representation that is useful for visualization, clustering, and classification of the densities. The proposed method provides a novel and unique perspective to two important and challenging problems in protein structure research: structure-based protein classification and angular-sampling-based protein loop structure prediction.

  18. Random field model reveals structure of the protein recombinational landscape.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philip A Romero

    Full Text Available We are interested in how intragenic recombination contributes to the evolution of proteins and how this mechanism complements and enhances the diversity generated by random mutation. Experiments have revealed that proteins are highly tolerant to recombination with homologous sequences (mutation by recombination is conservative; more surprisingly, they have also shown that homologous sequence fragments make largely additive contributions to biophysical properties such as stability. Here, we develop a random field model to describe the statistical features of the subset of protein space accessible by recombination, which we refer to as the recombinational landscape. This model shows quantitative agreement with experimental results compiled from eight libraries of proteins that were generated by recombining gene fragments from homologous proteins. The model reveals a recombinational landscape that is highly enriched in functional sequences, with properties dominated by a large-scale additive structure. It also quantifies the relative contributions of parent sequence identity, crossover locations, and protein fold to the tolerance of proteins to recombination. Intragenic recombination explores a unique subset of sequence space that promotes rapid molecular diversification and functional adaptation.

  19. WATGEN: an algorithm for modeling water networks at protein-protein interfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bui, Huynh-Hoa; Schiewe, Alexandra J; Haworth, Ian S

    2007-11-15

    Water molecules at protein-protein interfaces contribute to the close packing of atoms and ensure complementarity between the protein surfaces, as well as mediating polar interactions. Therefore, modeling of interface water is of importance in understanding the structural basis of biomolecular association. We present an algorithm, WATGEN, which predicts locations for water molecules at a protein-protein or protein-peptide interface, given the atomic coordinates of the protein and peptide. A key element of the WATGEN algorithm is the prediction of water sites that can form multiple hydrogen bonds that bridge the binding interface. Trial calculations were performed on water networks predicted by WATGEN at 126 protein-peptide interfaces (X-ray resolutions algorithm predicts 72 and 88% of these sites within 1.5 and 2.0 A, respectively. The predicted number of water molecules at each interface was much higher than the number of water molecules identified experimentally. Therefore, random placement of the same number of water molecules as that predicted at each interface was performed as a control, and resulted in only 22 and 40% of water sites placed within 1.5 and 2.0 A of experimental sites, respectively. Based on these data, we conclude that WATGEN can accurately predict the location of water molecules at a protein-peptide interface, and this may be of value for understanding the energetics and specificity of biomolecular association. (c) 2007 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. A computational model of the LGI1 protein suggests a common binding site for ADAM proteins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emanuela Leonardi

    Full Text Available Mutations of human leucine-rich glioma inactivated (LGI1 gene encoding the epitempin protein cause autosomal dominant temporal lateral epilepsy (ADTLE, a rare familial partial epileptic syndrome. The LGI1 gene seems to have a role on the transmission of neuronal messages but the exact molecular mechanism remains unclear. In contrast to other genes involved in epileptic disorders, epitempin shows no homology with known ion channel genes but contains two domains, composed of repeated structural units, known to mediate protein-protein interactions.A three dimensional in silico model of the two epitempin domains was built to predict the structure-function relationship and propose a functional model integrating previous experimental findings. Conserved and electrostatic charged regions of the model surface suggest a possible arrangement between the two domains and identifies a possible ADAM protein binding site in the β-propeller domain and another protein binding site in the leucine-rich repeat domain. The functional model indicates that epitempin could mediate the interaction between proteins localized to different synaptic sides in a static way, by forming a dimer, or in a dynamic way, by binding proteins at different times.The model was also used to predict effects of known disease-causing missense mutations. Most of the variants are predicted to alter protein folding while several other map to functional surface regions. In agreement with experimental evidence, this suggests that non-secreted LGI1 mutants could be retained within the cell by quality control mechanisms or by altering interactions required for the secretion process.

  1. Markov dynamic models for long-timescale protein motion.

    KAUST Repository

    Chiang, Tsung-Han

    2010-06-01

    Molecular dynamics (MD) simulation is a well-established method for studying protein motion at the atomic scale. However, it is computationally intensive and generates massive amounts of data. One way of addressing the dual challenges of computation efficiency and data analysis is to construct simplified models of long-timescale protein motion from MD simulation data. In this direction, we propose to use Markov models with hidden states, in which the Markovian states represent potentially overlapping probabilistic distributions over protein conformations. We also propose a principled criterion for evaluating the quality of a model by its ability to predict long-timescale protein motions. Our method was tested on 2D synthetic energy landscapes and two extensively studied peptides, alanine dipeptide and the villin headpiece subdomain (HP-35 NleNle). One interesting finding is that although a widely accepted model of alanine dipeptide contains six states, a simpler model with only three states is equally good for predicting long-timescale motions. We also used the constructed Markov models to estimate important kinetic and dynamic quantities for protein folding, in particular, mean first-passage time. The results are consistent with available experimental measurements.

  2. Reduction of Protein Networks Models by Passivity Preserving Projection

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Luca Mesin; Flavio Canavero; Lamberto Rondoni

    2013-01-01

    Reduction of complex protein networks models is of great importance.The accuracy of a passivity preserving algorithm (PRIMA) for model order reduction (MOR) is here tested on protein networks,introducing innovative variations of the standard PRIMA method to fit the problem at hand.The reduction method does not require to solve the complete system,resulting in a promising tool for studying very large-scale models for which the full solution cannot be computed.The mathematical structure of the considered kinetic equations is preserved.Keeping constant the reduction factor,the approximation error is lower for larger systems.

  3. Dissipative electro-elastic network model of protein electrostatics

    CERN Document Server

    Martin, Daniel R; Matyushov, Dmitry V

    2011-01-01

    We propose a dissipative electro-elastic network model (DENM) to describe the dynamics and statistics of electrostatic fluctuations at active sites of proteins. The model combines the harmonic network of residue beads with overdamped dynamics of the normal modes of the network characterized by two friction coefficients. The electrostatic component is introduced to the model through atomic charges of the protein force field. The overall effect of the electrostatic fluctuations of the network is recorded through the frequency-dependent response functions of the electrostatic potential and electric field at the active site. We also consider the dynamics of displacements of individual residues in the network and the dynamics of distances between pairs of residues. The model is tested against loss spectra of residue displacements and the electrostatic potential and electric field at the heme's iron from all-atom molecular dynamics simulations of three hydrated globular proteins.

  4. Near-field/altered-zone models report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hardin, E. L., LLNL

    1998-03-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy is studying Yucca Mountain as the possible site for the first underground repository for permanent disposal of spent fuel from commercial nuclear reactors as well as for other types high-level nuclear waste. Emplacement of high-level radioactive waste, especially commercial spent nuclear fuel (CSNF), in Yucca Mountain will release a large amount of heat into the rock above and below the repository. The heating rate will decrease with time, creating a thermal pulse. Over a period of several thousand years, the rock temperature will rise initially, then drop when the production of decay heat falls below the rate at which heat escapes from the hot zone. Besides raising the rock temperature, much of this heat will vaporize water, which will then condense in cooler regions. The condensate is likely to form a gravity-driven heat pipe above the repository, creating the possibility that water may drain back onto the waste packages (WPs) or that it may ''shed'' through the pillars between emplacement drifts. The long-term importance of these effects has been investigated through the development, testing, and application of thermohydrologic (TH) models. Other effects, such coupled chemical and mechanical processes, may also influence the movement of water above, within, and below the emplacement drifts. A recent report on thermally driven coupled processes (Hardin and Chesnut, 1997) provides a qualitative assessment of the probable significance of these processes for the Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project (YMSCP) and is the phenomenological framework for the present report. This report describes the conceptual and numerical models that have been developed to predict the thermal, mechanical, hydrologic, and chemical responses to the cumulative heat production of the potential host rock at Yucca Mountain. As proposed, the repository horizon will be situated within the Topopah Spring tuff, in the adjacent middle

  5. Near-field/altered-zone models report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hardin, E. L., LLNL

    1998-03-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy is studying Yucca Mountain as the possible site for the first underground repository for permanent disposal of spent fuel from commercial nuclear reactors as well as for other types high-level nuclear waste. Emplacement of high-level radioactive waste, especially commercial spent nuclear fuel (CSNF), in Yucca Mountain will release a large amount of heat into the rock above and below the repository. The heating rate will decrease with time, creating a thermal pulse. Over a period of several thousand years, the rock temperature will rise initially, then drop when the production of decay heat falls below the rate at which heat escapes from the hot zone. Besides raising the rock temperature, much of this heat will vaporize water, which will then condense in cooler regions. The condensate is likely to form a gravity-driven heat pipe above the repository, creating the possibility that water may drain back onto the waste packages (WPs) or that it may ''shed'' through the pillars between emplacement drifts. The long-term importance of these effects has been investigated through the development, testing, and application of thermohydrologic (TH) models. Other effects, such coupled chemical and mechanical processes, may also influence the movement of water above, within, and below the emplacement drifts. A recent report on thermally driven coupled processes (Hardin and Chesnut, 1997) provides a qualitative assessment of the probable significance of these processes for the Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project (YMSCP) and is the phenomenological framework for the present report. This report describes the conceptual and numerical models that have been developed to predict the thermal, mechanical, hydrologic, and chemical responses to the cumulative heat production of the potential host rock at Yucca Mountain. As proposed, the repository horizon will be situated within the Topopah Spring tuff, in the adjacent middle

  6. BRIEF REPORT OF ACTIVE CONTROLLED AND OBSERVABLE PROTEIN CRYSTALLIZATION FACILITY

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    @@ There are two tendency of development on space protein crystal growth facility.Increase the number of samples, for commercial purpose, or observe and control the crystallization process, for study of crystallization process.

  7. System Advisor Model: Flat Plate Photovoltaic Performance Modeling Validation Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Freeman, J.; Whitmore, J.; Kaffine, L.; Blair, N.; Dobos, A. P.

    2013-12-01

    The System Advisor Model (SAM) is a free software tool that performs detailed analysis of both system performance and system financing for a variety of renewable energy technologies. This report provides detailed validation of the SAM flat plate photovoltaic performance model by comparing SAM-modeled PV system generation data to actual measured production data for nine PV systems ranging from 75 kW to greater than 25 MW in size. The results show strong agreement between SAM predictions and field data, with annualized prediction error below 3% for all fixed tilt cases and below 8% for all one axis tracked cases. The analysis concludes that snow cover and system outages are the primary sources of disagreement, and other deviations resulting from seasonal biases in the irradiation models and one axis tracking issues are discussed in detail.

  8. Model of a DNA-protein complex of the architectural monomeric protein MC1 from Euryarchaea.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Françoise Paquet

    Full Text Available In Archaea the two major modes of DNA packaging are wrapping by histone proteins or bending by architectural non-histone proteins. To supplement our knowledge about the binding mode of the different DNA-bending proteins observed across the three domains of life, we present here the first model of a complex in which the monomeric Methanogen Chromosomal protein 1 (MC1 from Euryarchaea binds to the concave side of a strongly bent DNA. In laboratory growth conditions MC1 is the most abundant architectural protein present in Methanosarcina thermophila CHTI55. Like most proteins that strongly bend DNA, MC1 is known to bind in the minor groove. Interaction areas for MC1 and DNA were mapped by Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR data. The polarity of protein binding was determined using paramagnetic probes attached to the DNA. The first structural model of the DNA-MC1 complex we propose here was obtained by two complementary docking approaches and is in good agreement with the experimental data previously provided by electron microscopy and biochemistry. Residues essential to DNA-binding and -bending were highlighted and confirmed by site-directed mutagenesis. It was found that the Arg25 side-chain was essential to neutralize the negative charge of two phosphates that come very close in response to a dramatic curvature of the DNA.

  9. Differential digestion of human milk proteins in a simulated stomach model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qiang; Cundiff, Judy K; Maria, Sarah D; McMahon, Robert J; Wickham, Martin S J; Faulks, Richard M; van Tol, Eric A F

    2014-02-07

    A key element in understanding how human milk proteins support the health and development of the neonate is to understand how individual proteins are affected during digestion. In the present study, a dynamic gastric model was used to simulate infant gastric digestion of human milk, and a subsequent proteomic approach was applied to study the behavior of individual proteins. A total of 413 human milk proteins were quantified in this study. This approach demonstrated a high degree of variability in the susceptibility of human milk proteins to gastric digestion. Specifically this study reports that lipoproteins are among the class of slowly digested proteins during gastric processes. The levels of integral lysozyme C and partial lactadherin in milk whey increase over digestion. Mucins, ribonuclease 4, and macrophage mannose receptor 1 are also resistant to gastric digestion. The retention or enhancement in whey protein abundance can be ascribed to the digestive release of milk-fat-globule-membrane or immune-cell enclosed proteins that are not initially accessible in milk. Immunoglobulins are more resistant to digestion compared to total milk proteins, and within the immunoglobulin class IgA and IgM are more resistant to digestion compared to IgG. The gastric digestion of milk proteins becomes more apparent from this study.

  10. A simple probabilistic model of multibody interactions in proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johansson, Kristoffer Enøe; Hamelryck, Thomas

    2013-08-01

    Protein structure prediction methods typically use statistical potentials, which rely on statistics derived from a database of know protein structures. In the vast majority of cases, these potentials involve pairwise distances or contacts between amino acids or atoms. Although some potentials beyond pairwise interactions have been described, the formulation of a general multibody potential is seen as intractable due to the perceived limited amount of data. In this article, we show that it is possible to formulate a probabilistic model of higher order interactions in proteins, without arbitrarily limiting the number of contacts. The success of this approach is based on replacing a naive table-based approach with a simple hierarchical model involving suitable probability distributions and conditional independence assumptions. The model captures the joint probability distribution of an amino acid and its neighbors, local structure and solvent exposure. We show that this model can be used to approximate the conditional probability distribution of an amino acid sequence given a structure using a pseudo-likelihood approach. We verify the model by decoy recognition and site-specific amino acid predictions. Our coarse-grained model is compared to state-of-art methods that use full atomic detail. This article illustrates how the use of simple probabilistic models can lead to new opportunities in the treatment of nonlocal interactions in knowledge-based protein structure prediction and design. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc., a Wiley company.

  11. PARFUME Theory and Model basis Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Darrell L. Knudson; Gregory K Miller; G.K. Miller; D.A. Petti; J.T. Maki; D.L. Knudson

    2009-09-01

    The success of gas reactors depends upon the safety and quality of the coated particle fuel. The fuel performance modeling code PARFUME simulates the mechanical, thermal and physico-chemical behavior of fuel particles during irradiation. This report documents the theory and material properties behind vari¬ous capabilities of the code, which include: 1) various options for calculating CO production and fission product gas release, 2) an analytical solution for stresses in the coating layers that accounts for irradiation-induced creep and swelling of the pyrocarbon layers, 3) a thermal model that calculates a time-dependent temperature profile through a pebble bed sphere or a prismatic block core, as well as through the layers of each analyzed particle, 4) simulation of multi-dimensional particle behavior associated with cracking in the IPyC layer, partial debonding of the IPyC from the SiC, particle asphericity, and kernel migration (or amoeba effect), 5) two independent methods for determining particle failure probabilities, 6) a model for calculating release-to-birth (R/B) ratios of gaseous fission products that accounts for particle failures and uranium contamination in the fuel matrix, and 7) the evaluation of an accident condition, where a particle experiences a sudden change in temperature following a period of normal irradiation. The accident condi¬tion entails diffusion of fission products through the particle coating layers and through the fuel matrix to the coolant boundary. This document represents the initial version of the PARFUME Theory and Model Basis Report. More detailed descriptions will be provided in future revisions.

  12. Hepatitis C virus expressing reporter tagged NS5A protein

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2014-01-01

    Hepatitis C reporter viruses containing Core through NS2 of prototype isolates of all major HCV genotypes and the remaining genes of isolate JFH1, by insertion of reporter genes in domain III of HCV NS5A were developed. A deletion upstream of the inserted reporter gene sequence conferred favorable...

  13. Protein carbonylation, protein aggregation and neuronal cell death in a murine model of multiple sclerosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dasgupta, Anushka

    Many studies have suggested that oxidative stress plays an important role in the pathophysiology of both multiple sclerosis (MS) and its animal model experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE). Yet, the mechanism by which oxidative stress leads to tissue damage in these disorders is unclear. Recent work from our laboratory has revealed that protein carbonylation, a major oxidative modification caused by severe and/or chronic oxidative stress conditions, is elevated in MS and EAE. Furthermore, protein carbonylation has been shown to alter protein structure leading to misfolding/aggregation. These findings prompted me to hypothesize that carbonylated proteins, formed as a consequence of oxidative stress and/or decreased proteasomal activity, promote protein aggregation to mediate neuronal apoptosis in vitro and in EAE. To test this novel hypothesis, I first characterized protein carbonylation, protein aggregation and apoptosis along the spinal cord during the course of myelin-oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG)35-55 peptide-induced EAE in C57BL/6 mice [Chapter 2]. The results show that carbonylated proteins accumulate throughout the course of the disease, albeit by different mechanisms: increased oxidative stress in acute EAE and decreased proteasomal activity in chronic EAE. I discovered not only that there is a temporal correlation between protein carbonylation and apoptosis but also that carbonyl levels are significantly higher in apoptotic cells. A high number of juxta-nuclear and cytoplasmic protein aggregates containing the majority of the oxidized proteins are also present during the course of EAE, which seems to be due to reduced autophagy. In chapter 3, I show that when gluthathione levels are reduced to those in EAE spinal cord, both neuron-like PC12 (nPC12) cells and primary neuronal cultures accumulate carbonylated proteins and undergo cell death (both by necrosis and apoptosis). Immunocytochemical and biochemical studies also revealed a temporal

  14. Coarse-grained models of protein folding: toy models or predictive tools?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clementi, Cecilia

    2008-02-01

    Coarse-grained models are emerging as a practical alternative to all-atom simulations for the characterization of protein folding mechanisms over long time scales. While a decade ago minimalist toy models were mainly designed to test general hypotheses on the principles regulating protein folding, the latest coarse-grained models are increasingly realistic and can be used to characterize quantitatively the detailed folding mechanism of specific proteins. The ability of such models to reproduce the essential features of folding dynamics suggests that each single atomic degree of freedom is not by itself particularly relevant to folding and supports a statistical mechanical approach to characterize folding transitions. When combined with more refined models and with experimental studies, the systematic investigation of protein systems and complexes using coarse-grained models can advance our theoretical understanding of the actual organizing principles that emerge from the complex network of interactions among protein atomic constituents.

  15. Ab initio modeling of small proteins by iterative TASSER simulations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Yang

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Predicting 3-dimensional protein structures from amino-acid sequences is an important unsolved problem in computational structural biology. The problem becomes relatively easier if close homologous proteins have been solved, as high-resolution models can be built by aligning target sequences to the solved homologous structures. However, for sequences without similar folds in the Protein Data Bank (PDB library, the models have to be predicted from scratch. Progress in the ab initio structure modeling is slow. The aim of this study was to extend the TASSER (threading/assembly/refinement method for the ab initio modeling and examine systemically its ability to fold small single-domain proteins. Results We developed I-TASSER by iteratively implementing the TASSER method, which is used in the folding test of three benchmarks of small proteins. First, data on 16 small proteins (α-root mean square deviation (RMSD of 3.8Å, with 6 of them having a Cα-RMSD α-RMSD α-RMSD of the I-TASSER models was 3.9Å, whereas it was 5.9Å using TOUCHSTONE-II software. Finally, 20 non-homologous small proteins (α-RMSD of 3.9Å was obtained for the third benchmark, with seven cases having a Cα-RMSD Conclusion Our simulation results show that I-TASSER can consistently predict the correct folds and sometimes high-resolution models for small single-domain proteins. Compared with other ab initio modeling methods such as ROSETTA and TOUCHSTONE II, the average performance of I-TASSER is either much better or is similar within a lower computational time. These data, together with the significant performance of automated I-TASSER server (the Zhang-Server in the 'free modeling' section of the recent Critical Assessment of Structure Prediction (CASP7 experiment, demonstrate new progresses in automated ab initio model generation. The I-TASSER server is freely available for academic users http://zhang.bioinformatics.ku.edu/I-TASSER.

  16. Connecting Protein Structure to Intermolecular Interactions: A Computer Modeling Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abualia, Mohammed; Schroeder, Lianne; Garcia, Megan; Daubenmire, Patrick L.; Wink, Donald J.; Clark, Ginevra A.

    2016-01-01

    An understanding of protein folding relies on a solid foundation of a number of critical chemical concepts, such as molecular structure, intra-/intermolecular interactions, and relating structure to function. Recent reports show that students struggle on all levels to achieve these understandings and use them in meaningful ways. Further, several…

  17. Phase diagram of a model of the protein amelogenin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haaga, Jason; Pemberton, Elizabeth; Gunton, J. D.; Rickman, J. M.

    2016-08-01

    There has been considerable recent interest in the self-assembly and phase behavior of models of colloidal and protein particles with anisotropic interactions. One example of particular interest is amelogenin, an important protein involved in the formation of dental enamel. Amelogenin is primarily hydrophobic with a 25-residue charged C-terminus tail. This protein undergoes a hierarchical assembly process that is crucial to mineral deposition, and experimental work has demonstrated that the deletion of the C-terminus tail prevents this self-assembly. A simplified model of amelogenin has been proposed in which the protein is treated as a hydrophobic sphere, interacting via the Asakura-Oosawa (AO) potential, with a tethered point charge on its surface. In this paper, we examine the effect of the Coulomb interaction between the point charges in altering the phase diagram of the AO model. For the parameter case specific to amelogenin, we find that the previous in vitro experimental and model conditions correspond to the system being near the low-density edge of the metastable region of the phase diagram. Our study illustrates more generally the importance of understanding the phase diagram for proteins, in that the kinetic pathway for self-assembly and the resulting aggregate morphology depends on the location of the initial state in the phase diagram.

  18. The evolution of the protein synthesis system. I - A model of a primitive protein synthesis system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizutani, H.; Ponnamperuma, C.

    1977-01-01

    A model is developed to describe the evolution of the protein synthesis system. The model is comprised of two independent autocatalytic systems, one including one gene (A-gene) and two activated amino acid polymerases (O and A-polymerases), and the other including the addition of another gene (N-gene) and a nucleotide polymerase. Simulation results have suggested that even a small enzymic activity and polymerase specificity could lead the system to the most accurate protein synthesis, as far as permitted by transitions to systems with higher accuracy.

  19. Identifying recommended dietary allowances for protein and amino acids: a critique of the 2007 WHO/FAO/UNU report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Millward, D Joe

    2012-08-01

    The WHO/FAO/UNU (2007) report examines dietary protein and amino acid requirements for all age groups, protein requirements during pregnancy, lactation and catch-up growth in children, the implications of these requirements for developing countries and protein quality evaluation. Requirements were defined as the minimum dietary intake which satisfies the metabolic demand and achieves nitrogen equilibrium and maintenance of the body protein mass, plus the needs for growth in children and pregnancy and lactation in healthy women. Insufficient evidence was identified to enable recommendations for specific health outcomes. A meta analysis of nitrogen balance studies identifies protein requirements for adults 10 % higher than previous values with no influence of gender or age, consistent with a subsequently published comprehensive study. A new factorial model for infants and children, validated on the basis of the adequacy of breast milk protein intakes and involving a lower maintenance requirement value, no provision for saltatory growth and new estimates of protein deposition identifies lower protein requirements than in previous reports. Higher values for adult amino acid requirements, derived from a re-evaluation of nitrogen balance studies and new stable isotope studies, identify some cereal-based diets as being inadequate for lysine. The main outstanding issues relate to the biological implausibility of the very low efficiencies of protein utilisation used in the factorial models for protein requirements for all population groups especially pregnancy when requirements may be overestimated. Also considerable uncertainty remains about the design and interpretation of most of the studies used to identify amino acid requirement values.

  20. Bayesian Proteoform Modeling Improves Protein Quantification of Global Proteomic Measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Webb-Robertson, Bobbie-Jo M.; Matzke, Melissa M.; Datta, Susmita; Payne, Samuel H.; Kang, Jiyun; Bramer, Lisa M.; Nicora, Carrie D.; Shukla, Anil K.; Metz, Thomas O.; Rodland, Karin D.; Smith, Richard D.; Tardiff, Mark F.; McDermott, Jason E.; Pounds, Joel G.; Waters, Katrina M.

    2014-12-01

    As the capability of mass spectrometry-based proteomics has matured, tens of thousands of peptides can be measured simultaneously, which has the benefit of offering a systems view of protein expression. However, a major challenge is that with an increase in throughput, protein quantification estimation from the native measured peptides has become a computational task. A limitation to existing computationally-driven protein quantification methods is that most ignore protein variation, such as alternate splicing of the RNA transcript and post-translational modifications or other possible proteoforms, which will affect a significant fraction of the proteome. The consequence of this assumption is that statistical inference at the protein level, and consequently downstream analyses, such as network and pathway modeling, have only limited power for biomarker discovery. Here, we describe a Bayesian model (BP-Quant) that uses statistically derived peptides signatures to identify peptides that are outside the dominant pattern, or the existence of multiple over-expressed patterns to improve relative protein abundance estimates. It is a research-driven approach that utilizes the objectives of the experiment, defined in the context of a standard statistical hypothesis, to identify a set of peptides exhibiting similar statistical behavior relating to a protein. This approach infers that changes in relative protein abundance can be used as a surrogate for changes in function, without necessarily taking into account the effect of differential post-translational modifications, processing, or splicing in altering protein function. We verify the approach using a dilution study from mouse plasma samples and demonstrate that BP-Quant achieves similar accuracy as the current state-of-the-art methods at proteoform identification with significantly better specificity. BP-Quant is available as a MatLab ® and R packages at https://github.com/PNNL-Comp-Mass-Spec/BP-Quant.

  1. A polaron model for electron transfer in globular proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chuev, G N; Lakhno, V D

    1993-07-07

    Polaron models have been considered for the electron states in protein globules existing in a solvent. These models account for two fundamental effects, viz, polarization interaction of an electron with the conformational vibrations and the heterogeneity of the medium. Equations have been derived to determine the electron state in a protein globule. The parameters of this state show that it is an extended state with an energy of 2 eV. The electron transfer rate for cyt C self-exchange reaction has been calculated in the polaron model. Reorganization energy, tunneling matrix element and the rate constant have also been estimated. The results are compared with experimental data. The influence of model parameters on the significance of the data obtained has been studied. The potentialities of the model are discussed.

  2. A simple probabilistic model of multibody interactions in proteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansson, Kristoffer Enøe; Hamelryck, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    predictions. Our coarse-grained model is compared to state-of-art methods that use full atomic detail. This article illustrates how the use of simple probabilistic models can lead to new opportunities in the treatment of nonlocal interactions in knowledge-based protein structure prediction and design....... beyond pairwise interactions have been described, the formulation of a general multibody potential is seen as intractable due to the perceived limited amount of data. In this article, we show that it is possible to formulate a probabilistic model of higher order interactions in proteins, without...... arbitrarily limiting the number of contacts. The success of this approach is based on replacing a naive table-based approach with a simple hierarchical model involving suitable probability distributions and conditional independence assumptions. The model captures the joint probability distribution of an amino...

  3. Plant G-proteins come of age: Breaking the bond with animal models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jimmy R Botella

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available G-proteins are universal signal transducers mediating many cellular responses. Plant G-protein signaling has been modeled on the well-established animal paradigm but accumulated experimental evidence indicates that G-protein-dependent signaling in plants has taken a very different evolutionary path. Here we review the differences between plant and animal G-proteins reported over past two decades. Most importantly, while in animal systems the G-protein signaling cycle is activated by seven transmembrane-spanning G-protein coupled receptors, the existence of these type of receptors in plants is highly controversial. Instead plant G-proteins have been proven to be functionally associated with atypical receptors such as the Arabidopsis RGS1 and a number of receptor-like kinases. We propose that, instead of the GTP/GDP cycle used in animals, plant G-proteins are activated/de-activated by phosphorylation/de-phosphorylation. We discuss the need of a fresh new look at these signaling molecules and provide a hypothetical model that departs fromthe accepted animal paradigm.

  4. Plant G-proteins come of age: Breaking the bond with animal models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Botella, Jimmy; Trusov, Yuri

    2016-05-01

    G-proteins are universal signal transducers mediating many cellular responses. Plant G-protein signaling has been modeled on the well-established animal paradigm but accumulated experimental evidence indicates that G-protein-dependent signaling in plants has taken a very different evolutionary path. Here we review the differences between plant and animal G-proteins reported over past two decades. Most importantly, while in animal systems the G-protein signaling cycle is activated by seven transmembrane-spanning G-protein coupled receptors, the existence of these type of receptors in plants is highly controversial. Instead plant G-proteins have been proven to be functionally associated with atypical receptors such as the Arabidopsis RGS1 and a number of receptor-like kinases. We propose that, instead of the GTP/GDP cycle used in animals, plant G-proteins are activated/de-activated by phosphorylation/de-phosphorylation. We discuss the need of a fresh new look at these signaling molecules and provide a hypothetical model that departs fromthe accepted animal paradigm.

  5. Unifying model for two-state and downhill protein folding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mi, D.; Meng, W. Q.; Sun, Y. Q.

    2011-04-01

    A protein-folding model is proposed at the amino acid level, in which the folding process is divided into two successive stages: the rate-determining step, dominated by the “stochastic interactions”of solvent molecules, and the rapid phase, dominated by the “order interactions”among atoms in polypeptide. The master equation approach is used to investigate the folding kinetics, and an analytical treatment of the master equation yields a simple three-parameter expression for folding time. It is found that both two-state and downhill protein-folding kinetics can be described by a unifying model.

  6. A generative, probabilistic model of local protein structure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boomsma, Wouter; Mardia, Kanti V.; Taylor, Charles C.;

    2008-01-01

    Despite significant progress in recent years, protein structure prediction maintains its status as one of the prime unsolved problems in computational biology. One of the key remaining challenges is an efficient probabilistic exploration of the structural space that correctly reflects the relative...... conformational stabilities. Here, we present a fully probabilistic, continuous model of local protein structure in atomic detail. The generative model makes efficient conformational sampling possible and provides a framework for the rigorous analysis of local sequence-structure correlations in the native state...

  7. Protein-binding site prediction based on three-dimensional protein modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Mina; Joo, Keehyoung; Lee, Jooyoung

    2009-01-01

    Structural information of a protein can guide one to understand the function of the protein, and ligand binding is one of the major biochemical functions of proteins. We have applied a two-stage template-based ligand binding site prediction method to CASP8 targets and achieved high quality results with accuracy/coverage = 70/80 (LEE). First, templates are used for protein structure modeling and then for binding site prediction by structural clustering of ligand-containing templates to the predicted protein model. Remarkably, the results are only a few percent worse than those one can obtain from native structures, which were available only after the prediction. Prediction was performed without knowing identity of ligands, and consequently, in many cases the ligand molecules used for prediction were different from the actual ligands, and yet we find that the prediction was quite successful. The current approach can be easily combined with experiments to investigate protein activities in a systematic way. Copyright 2009 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  8. Near Field Environment Process Model Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    R.A. Wagner

    2000-11-14

    Waste emplacement and activities associated with construction of a repository system potentially will change environmental conditions within the repository system. These environmental changes principally result from heat generated by the decay of the radioactive waste, which elevates temperatures within the repository system. Elevated temperatures affect distribution of water, increase kinetic rates of geochemical processes, and cause stresses to change in magnitude and orientation from the stresses resulting from the overlying rock and from underground construction activities. The recognition of this evolving environment has been reflected in activities, studies and discussions generally associated with what has been termed the Near-Field Environment (NFE). The NFE interacts directly with waste packages and engineered barriers as well as potentially changing the fluid composition and flow conditions within the mountain. As such, the NFE defines the environment for assessing the performance of a potential Monitored Geologic Repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. The NFe evolves over time, and therefore is not amenable to direct characterization or measurement in the ambient system. Analysis or assessment of the NFE must rely upon projections based on tests and models that encompass the long-term processes of the evolution of this environment. This NFE Process Model Report (PMR) describes the analyses and modeling based on current understanding of the evolution of the near-field within the rock mass extending outward from the drift wall.

  9. Prion Protein Deficiency Causes Diverse Proteome Shifts in Cell Models That Escape Detection in Brain Tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehrabian, Mohadeseh; Brethour, Dylan; Williams, Declan; Wang, Hansen; Arnould, Hélène; Schneider, Benoit; Schmitt-Ulms, Gerold

    2016-01-01

    A popular method for studying the function of a given protein is to generate and characterize a suitable model deficient for its expression. For the prion protein (PrP), best known for its role in several invariably fatal neurodegenerative diseases, a natural choice, therefore, would be to undertake such studies with brain samples. We recently documented the surprising observation that PrP deficiency caused a loss or enhancement of NCAM1 polysialylation, dependent on the cell model used. To identify possible causes for this disparity, we set out to systematically investigate the consequence of PrP deficiency on the global proteome in brain tissue and in four distinct cell models. Here we report that PrP deficiency causes robust but surprisingly divergent changes to the global proteomes of cell models but has no discernible impact on the global brain proteome. Amongst >1,500 proteins whose levels were compared in wild-type and PrP-deficient models, members of the MARCKS protein family exhibited pronounced, yet cell model-dependent changes to their steady-state levels. Follow-up experiments revealed that PrP collaborates with members of the MARCKS protein family in its control of NCAM1 polysialylation. We conclude that the physiological function of PrP may be masked in analyses of complex brain samples but its cell-type specific influence on a lipid raft-based NCAM1-related cell biology comes to the fore in investigations of specific cell types.

  10. Homology modelling of protein-protein complexes: a simple method and its possibilities and limitations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simonson Thomas

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Structure-based computational methods are needed to help identify and characterize protein-protein complexes and their function. For individual proteins, the most successful technique is homology modelling. We investigate a simple extension of this technique to protein-protein complexes. We consider a large set of complexes of known structures, involving pairs of single-domain proteins. The complexes are compared with each other to establish their sequence and structural similarities and the relation between the two. Compared to earlier studies, a simpler dataset, a simpler structural alignment procedure, and an additional energy criterion are used. Next, we compare the Xray structures to models obtained by threading the native sequence onto other, homologous complexes. An elementary requirement for a successful energy function is to rank the native structure above any threaded structure. We use the DFIREβ energy function, whose quality and complexity are typical of the models used today. Finally, we compare near-native models to distinctly non-native models. Results If weakly stable complexes are excluded (defined by a binding energy cutoff, as well as a few unusual complexes, a simple homology principle holds: complexes that share more than 35% sequence identity share similar structures and interaction modes; this principle was less clearcut in earlier studies. The energy function was then tested for its ability to identify experimental structures among sets of decoys, produced by a simple threading procedure. On average, the experimental structure is ranked above 92% of the alternate structures. Thus, discrimination of the native structure is good but not perfect. The discrimination of near-native structures is fair. Typically, a single, alternate, non-native binding mode exists that has a native-like energy. Some of the associated failures may correspond to genuine, alternate binding modes and/or native complexes that

  11. Validation of protein models by a neural network approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fantucci Piercarlo

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The development and improvement of reliable computational methods designed to evaluate the quality of protein models is relevant in the context of protein structure refinement, which has been recently identified as one of the bottlenecks limiting the quality and usefulness of protein structure prediction. Results In this contribution, we present a computational method (Artificial Intelligence Decoys Evaluator: AIDE which is able to consistently discriminate between correct and incorrect protein models. In particular, the method is based on neural networks that use as input 15 structural parameters, which include energy, solvent accessible surface, hydrophobic contacts and secondary structure content. The results obtained with AIDE on a set of decoy structures were evaluated using statistical indicators such as Pearson correlation coefficients, Znat, fraction enrichment, as well as ROC plots. It turned out that AIDE performances are comparable and often complementary to available state-of-the-art learning-based methods. Conclusion In light of the results obtained with AIDE, as well as its comparison with available learning-based methods, it can be concluded that AIDE can be successfully used to evaluate the quality of protein structures. The use of AIDE in combination with other evaluation tools is expected to further enhance protein refinement efforts.

  12. Discrete and continuous models of protein sorting in the Golgi

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Haijun; Schwartz, Russell

    2009-03-01

    The Golgi apparatus plays an important role in processing and sorting proteins and lipids. Golgi compartments constantly exchange material with each other and with other cellular components, allowing them to maintain and reform distinct identities despite dramatic changes in structure and size during cell division, development and osmotic stress. We have developed two minimal models of membrane and protein exchange in the Golgi --- a discrete, stochastic model [1] and a continuous ordinary differential equation (ODE) model --- both based on two fundamental mechanisms: vesicle-coat-mediated selective concentration of soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor attachment protein receptor (SNARE) proteins during vesicle formation and SNARE-mediated selective fusion of vesicles. Both show similar ability to establish and maintain distinct identities over broad parameter ranges, but they diverge in extreme conditions where Golgi collapse and reassembly may be observed. By exploring where the models differ, we hope to better identify those features essential to minimal models of various Golgi behaviors. [1] H. Gong, D. Sengupta, A. D. Linstedt, R. Schwartz. Biophys J. 95: 1674-1688, 2008.

  13. A transgenic Xenopus laevis reporter model to study lymphangiogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annelii Ny

    2013-07-01

    The importance of the blood- and lymph vessels in the transport of essential fluids, gases, macromolecules and cells in vertebrates warrants optimal insight into the regulatory mechanisms underlying their development. Mouse and zebrafish models of lymphatic development are instrumental for gene discovery and gene characterization but are challenging for certain aspects, e.g. no direct accessibility of embryonic stages, or non-straightforward visualization of early lymphatic sprouting, respectively. We previously demonstrated that the Xenopus tadpole is a valuable model to study the processes of lymphatic development. However, a fluorescent Xenopus reporter directly visualizing the lymph vessels was lacking. Here, we created transgenic Tg(Flk1:eGFP Xenopus laevis reporter lines expressing green fluorescent protein (GFP in blood- and lymph vessels driven by the Flk1 (VEGFR-2 promoter. We also established a high-resolution fluorescent dye labeling technique selectively and persistently visualizing lymphatic endothelial cells, even in conditions of impaired lymph vessel formation or drainage function upon silencing of lymphangiogenic factors. Next, we applied the model to dynamically document blood and lymphatic sprouting and patterning of the initially avascular tadpole fin. Furthermore, quantifiable models of spontaneous or induced lymphatic sprouting into the tadpole fin were developed for dynamic analysis of loss-of-function and gain-of-function phenotypes using pharmacologic or genetic manipulation. Together with angiography and lymphangiography to assess functionality, Tg(Flk1:eGFP reporter tadpoles readily allowed detailed lymphatic phenotyping of live tadpoles by fluorescence microscopy. The Tg(Flk1:eGFP tadpoles represent a versatile model for functional lymph/angiogenomics and drug screening.

  14. Electronic transport on the spatial structure of the protein: Three-dimensional lattice model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sarmento, R.G. [Departamento de Ciências Biológicas, Universidade Federal do Piauí, 64800-000 Floriano, PI (Brazil); Frazão, N.F. [Centro de Educação e Saúde, Universidade Federal de Campina Grande, 581750-000 Cuité, PB (Brazil); Macedo-Filho, A., E-mail: amfilho@gmail.com [Campus Prof. Antonio Geovanne Alves de Sousa, Universidade Estadual do Piauí, 64260-000 Piripiri, PI (Brazil)

    2017-01-30

    Highlights: • The electronic transport on the structure of the three-dimensional lattice model of the protein is studied. • The signing of the current–voltage is directly affected by permutations of the weak bonds in the structure. • Semiconductor behave of the proteins suggest a potential application in the development of novel biosensors. - Abstract: We report a numerical analysis of the electronic transport in protein chain consisting of thirty-six standard amino acids. The protein chains studied have three-dimensional structure, which can present itself in three distinct conformations and the difference consist in the presence or absence of thirteen hydrogen-bondings. Our theoretical method uses an electronic tight-binding Hamiltonian model, appropriate to describe the protein segments modeled by the amino acid chain. We note that the presence and the permutations between weak bonds in the structure of proteins are directly related to the signing of the current–voltage. Furthermore, the electronic transport depends on the effect of temperature. In addition, we have found a semiconductor behave in the models investigated and it suggest a potential application in the development of novel biosensors for molecular diagnostics.

  15. A resource for benchmarking the usefulness of protein structure models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carbajo Daniel

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Increasingly, biologists and biochemists use computational tools to design experiments to probe the function of proteins and/or to engineer them for a variety of different purposes. The most effective strategies rely on the knowledge of the three-dimensional structure of the protein of interest. However it is often the case that an experimental structure is not available and that models of different quality are used instead. On the other hand, the relationship between the quality of a model and its appropriate use is not easy to derive in general, and so far it has been analyzed in detail only for specific application. Results This paper describes a database and related software tools that allow testing of a given structure based method on models of a protein representing different levels of accuracy. The comparison of the results of a computational experiment on the experimental structure and on a set of its decoy models will allow developers and users to assess which is the specific threshold of accuracy required to perform the task effectively. Conclusions The ModelDB server automatically builds decoy models of different accuracy for a given protein of known structure and provides a set of useful tools for their analysis. Pre-computed data for a non-redundant set of deposited protein structures are available for analysis and download in the ModelDB database. Implementation, availability and requirements Project name: A resource for benchmarking the usefulness of protein structure models. Project home page: http://bl210.caspur.it/MODEL-DB/MODEL-DB_web/MODindex.php. Operating system(s: Platform independent. Programming language: Perl-BioPerl (program; mySQL, Perl DBI and DBD modules (database; php, JavaScript, Jmol scripting (web server. Other requirements: Java Runtime Environment v1.4 or later, Perl, BioPerl, CPAN modules, HHsearch, Modeller, LGA, NCBI Blast package, DSSP, Speedfill (Surfnet and PSAIA. License: Free. Any

  16. Super-secondary structures and modeling of protein folds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Efimov, Alexander V

    2013-01-01

    A characteristic feature of the polypeptide chain is its ability to form a restricted set of commonly occurring folding units composed of two or more elements of secondary structure that are adjacent along the chain. Some of these super-secondary structures exhibit a unique handedness and a unique overall fold irrespective of whether they occur in homologous or nonhomologous proteins. Such super-secondary structures are of particular value since they can be used as starting structures in protein modeling. The larger protein folds can be obtained by stepwise addition of other secondary structural elements to the starting structures taking into account a set of simple rules inferred from known principles of protein structure.

  17. Extracting protein alignment models from the sequence database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neuwald, A F; Liu, J S; Lipman, D J; Lawrence, C E

    1997-05-01

    Biologists often gain structural and functional insights into a protein sequence by constructing a multiple alignment model of the family. Here a program called Probe fully automates this process of model construction starting from a single sequence. Central to this program is a powerful new method to locate and align only those, often subtly, conserved patterns essential to the family as a whole. When applied to randomly chosen proteins, Probe found on average about four times as many relationships as a pairwise search and yielded many new discoveries. These include: an obscure subfamily of globins in the roundworm Caenorhabditis elegans ; two new superfamilies of metallohydrolases; a lipoyl/biotin swinging arm domain in bacterial membrane fusion proteins; and a DH domain in the yeast Bud3 and Fus2 proteins. By identifying distant relationships and merging families into superfamilies in this way, this analysis further confirms the notion that proteins evolved from relatively few ancient sequences. Moreover, this method automatically generates models of these ancient conserved regions for rapid and sensitive screening of sequences.

  18. Computational Modeling for the Activation Cycle of G-proteins by G-protein-coupled Receptors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yifei Bao

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we survey five different computational modeling methods. For comparison, we use the activation cycle of G-proteins that regulate cellular signaling events downstream of G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs as a driving example. Starting from an existing Ordinary Differential Equations (ODEs model, we implement the G-protein cycle in the stochastic Pi-calculus using SPiM, as Petri-nets using Cell Illustrator, in the Kappa Language using Cellucidate, and in Bio-PEPA using the Bio-PEPA eclipse plug in. We also provide a high-level notation to abstract away from communication primitives that may be unfamiliar to the average biologist, and we show how to translate high-level programs into stochastic Pi-calculus processes and chemical reactions.

  19. Luciferase NanoLuc as a reporter for gene expression and protein levels in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masser, Anna E.; Kandasamy, Ganapathi; Kaimal, Jayasankar Mohanakrishnan

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Reporter proteins are essential tools in the study of biological processes and are employed to monitor changes in gene expression and protein levels. Luciferases are reporter proteins that enable rapid and highly sensitive detection with an outstanding dynamic range. Here we evaluated the usefulness of the 19 kDa luciferase NanoLuc (Nluc), derived from the deep sea shrimp Oplophorus gracilirostris, as a reporter protein in yeast. Cassettes with codon‐optimized genes expressing yeast Nluc (yNluc) or its destabilized derivative yNlucPEST have been assembled in the context of the dominant drug resistance marker kanMX. The reporter proteins do not impair the growth of yeast cells and exhibit half‐lives of 40 and 5 min, respectively. The commercial substrate Nano‐Glo® is compatible with detection of yNluc bioluminescence in bioluminescent signal and mRNA levels during both induction and decay. We demonstrated that the bioluminescence of yNluc fused to the C‐terminus of a temperature‐sensitive protein reports on its protein levels. In conclusion, yNluc and yNlucPEST are valuable new reporter proteins suitable for experiments with yeast using standard commercial substrate. © 2016 The Authors. Yeast published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd. PMID:26860732

  20. QSAR Models for the Prediction of Plasma Protein Binding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zeshan Amin

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The prediction of plasma protein binding (ppb is of paramount importance in the pharmacokinetics characterization of drugs, as it causes significant changes in volume of distribution, clearance and drug half life. This study utilized Quantitative Structure – Activity Relationships (QSAR for the prediction of plasma protein binding. Methods: Protein binding values for 794 compounds were collated from literature. The data was partitioned into a training set of 662 compounds and an external validation set of 132 compounds. Physicochemical and molecular descriptors were calculated for each compound using ACD labs/logD, MOE (Chemical Computing Group and Symyx QSAR software packages. Several data mining tools were employed for the construction of models. These included stepwise regression analysis, Classification and Regression Trees (CART, Boosted trees and Random Forest. Results: Several predictive models were identified; however, one model in particular produced significantly superior prediction accuracy for the external validation set as measured using mean absolute error and correlation coefficient. The selected model was a boosted regression tree model which had the mean absolute error for training set of 13.25 and for validation set of 14.96. Conclusion: Plasma protein binding can be modeled using simple regression trees or multiple linear regressions with reasonable model accuracies. These interpretable models were able to identify the governing molecular factors for a high ppb that included hydrophobicity, van der Waals surface area parameters, and aromaticity. On the other hand, the more complicated ensemble method of boosted regression trees produced the most accurate ppb estimations for the external validation set.

  1. Exploring HP protein models using Wang-Landau sampling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wuest, Thomas; Landau, David P.

    2008-03-01

    The hydrophobic-polar (HP) protein model has become a standard in assessing the efficiency of computational methods for protein structure prediction as well as for exploring the statistical physics of protein folding in general. Numerous methods have been proposed to address the challenges of finding minimal energy conformations within the rough energy landscape of this lattice heteropolymer model. However, only a few studies have been dedicated to the more revealing - but also more demanding - problem of estimating the density of states which allows access to thermodynamic properties of a system at any temperature. Here, we show that Wang-Landau sampling, in connection with a suitable move set (``pull moves''), provides a powerful route for the ground state search and the precise determination of the density of states for HP sequences (with up to 100 monomers) in both, two and three dimensions. Our procedure possesses an intrinsic simplicity and overcomes the inevitable limitations inherent in other more tailored approaches. The main advantage lies in its general applicability to a broad range of lattice protein models that go beyond the scope of the HP model.

  2. DEFICIENT PROTEIN C AND PROTEIN S INDUCED ACUTE VENOUS MESENTERIC ISCHEMIA: A CASE REPORT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Darwin Britto

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND A 35 year old lady presented with unresolved severe abdominal pain and vomiting. She was diagnosed to have superior mesenteric vein thrombosis with gangrenous small bowel and multiple splenic infarcts secondary to Protein C and Protein S deficiency. She underwent emergency explorative laparotomy and extensive small bowel resection and anastomosis and splenectomy. This is to stress the importance of keeping mesenteric ischemia as an important differential diagnosis in cases of acute abdomen

  3. SWISS-MODEL: modelling protein tertiary and quaternary structure using evolutionary information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biasini, Marco; Bienert, Stefan; Waterhouse, Andrew; Arnold, Konstantin; Studer, Gabriel; Schmidt, Tobias; Kiefer, Florian; Gallo Cassarino, Tiziano; Bertoni, Martino; Bordoli, Lorenza; Schwede, Torsten

    2014-07-01

    Protein structure homology modelling has become a routine technique to generate 3D models for proteins when experimental structures are not available. Fully automated servers such as SWISS-MODEL with user-friendly web interfaces generate reliable models without the need for complex software packages or downloading large databases. Here, we describe the latest version of the SWISS-MODEL expert system for protein structure modelling. The SWISS-MODEL template library provides annotation of quaternary structure and essential ligands and co-factors to allow for building of complete structural models, including their oligomeric structure. The improved SWISS-MODEL pipeline makes extensive use of model quality estimation for selection of the most suitable templates and provides estimates of the expected accuracy of the resulting models. The accuracy of the models generated by SWISS-MODEL is continuously evaluated by the CAMEO system. The new web site allows users to interactively search for templates, cluster them by sequence similarity, structurally compare alternative templates and select the ones to be used for model building. In cases where multiple alternative template structures are available for a protein of interest, a user-guided template selection step allows building models in different functional states. SWISS-MODEL is available at http://swissmodel.expasy.org/.

  4. Model documentation report: Transportation sector model of the National Energy Modeling System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-03-01

    This report documents the objectives, analytical approach and development of the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) Transportation Model (TRAN). The report catalogues and describes the model assumptions, computational methodology, parameter estimation techniques, model source code, and forecast results generated by the model. This document serves three purposes. First, it is a reference document providing a detailed description of TRAN for model analysts, users, and the public. Second, this report meets the legal requirements of the Energy Information Administration (EIA) to provide adequate documentation in support of its statistical and forecast reports (Public Law 93-275, 57(b)(1)). Third, it permits continuity in model development by providing documentation from which energy analysts can undertake model enhancements, data updates, and parameter refinements.

  5. Mannan-binding protein forms complexes with alpha-2-macroglobulin. A protein model for the interaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Storgaard, P; Holm Nielsen, E; Skriver, E;

    1995-01-01

    We report that alpha-2-macroglobulin (alpha 2M) can form complexes with a high molecular weight porcine mannan-binding protein (pMBP-28). The alpha 2M/pMBP-28 complexes was isolated by PEG-precipitation and affinity chromatography on mannan-Sepharose, protein A-Sepharose and anti-IgM Sepharose......-PAGE, which reacted with antibodies against alpha 2M and pMBP-28, respectively, in Western blotting. Furthermore, alpha 2M/pMBP-28 complexes were demonstrated by electron microscopy. Fractionation of pMBP-containing D-mannose eluate from mannan-Sepharose on Superose 6 showed two protein peaks which reacted...

  6. Combined approach to the inverse protein folding problem. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruben A. Abagyan

    2000-06-01

    The main scientific contribution of the project ''Combined approach to the inverse protein folding problem'' submitted in 1996 and funded by the Department of Energy in 1997 is the formulation and development of the idea of the multilink recognition method for identification of functional and structural homologues of newly discovered genes. This idea became very popular after they first announced it and used it in prediction of the threading targets for the CASP2 competition (Critical Assessment of Structure Prediction).

  7. ANTIGENICITY OF COW'S MILK PROTEINS IN TWO ANIMAL MODELS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T.R. Neyestani

    2000-08-01

    Full Text Available Antigenicity of proteins found in cow's milk is age dependent. This is primarily due to infants possessing a more permeable intestinal wall than that in adults. Thus infants may acquire cow's milk allergy during their first year of life. While milk antigen specific IgE may cause allergy in susceptible subjects, there is some evidence indicating that milk antigen specific IgG may play some role in chronic disease development. The puropose of this study was to determine the antigenicity of cow's milk proteins in two animal models and to recommend the more sensitivie one, as an evaluation tool, to assess the antigenicity of a poteintial hypoallergenic formula. A crude extract of cow's milk was injected either to young male rabbits or BALB/C mice in four doses. Pure standard proteins of cow's milk were also injected to separate groups of animals to use their anti sera in later stages. The polyclonal pooled serum was then used to evaluate the antigenicity of the extract by indirect enzyme-linked immunossorbeni assay (LEISA. and Western blotting. Both the rabbit and BALB/C murine mode! demonstrated strong ELISA titres against casein and BSA proteins. However, the rabbit model also had a high antibody response against beta-lactoglobulin (/Mg. The lowest antibody response was found against alpha-kictalbumin («-la in both animal models and no response against immunoglobulins (Igs in either model. In Western blotting, rabbit antiserum showed four bands («-la, /Mg, caseins and BSA compared to two bands (caseins and BSA for mouse antiserum. Considering the allergenicity of these proteins in genetically prone subjects, it may be wise to exclude food sources of caseins as well as major whey proteins (BSA, from the diet of infants with a family history of atopy during the first year of life. The rabbit hyperimmunization model was more sensitive than the murine mode! in detecting antibodies against milk proteins. Thus, the rabbii model should be employed when

  8. A Model of Substitution Trajectories in Sequence Space and Long-Term Protein Evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Usmanova, Dinara R.; Ferretti, Luca; Povolotskaya, Inna S.; Vlasov, Peter K.; Kondrashov, Fyodor A.

    2015-01-01

    The nature of factors governing the tempo and mode of protein evolution is a fundamental issue in evolutionary biology. Specifically, whether or not interactions between different sites, or epistasis, are important in directing the course of evolution became one of the central questions. Several recent reports have scrutinized patterns of long-term protein evolution claiming them to be compatible only with an epistatic fitness landscape. However, these claims have not yet been substantiated with a formal model of protein evolution. Here, we formulate a simple covarion-like model of protein evolution focusing on the rate at which the fitness impact of amino acids at a site changes with time. We then apply the model to the data on convergent and divergent protein evolution to test whether or not the incorporation of epistatic interactions is necessary to explain the data. We find that convergent evolution cannot be explained without the incorporation of epistasis and the rate at which an amino acid state switches from being acceptable at a site to being deleterious is faster than the rate of amino acid substitution. Specifically, for proteins that have persisted in modern prokaryotic organisms since the last universal common ancestor for one amino acid substitution approximately ten amino acid states switch from being accessible to being deleterious, or vice versa. Thus, molecular evolution can only be perceived in the context of rapid turnover of which amino acids are available for evolution. PMID:25415964

  9. Prediction of Local Quality of Protein Structure Models Considering Spatial Neighbors in Graphical Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Woong-Hee; Kang, Xuejiao; Zhang, Jian; Kihara, Daisuke

    2017-01-01

    Protein tertiary structure prediction methods have matured in recent years. However, some proteins defy accurate prediction due to factors such as inadequate template structures. While existing model quality assessment methods predict global model quality relatively well, there is substantial room for improvement in local quality assessment, i.e. assessment of the error at each residue position in a model. Local quality is a very important information for practical applications of structure models such as interpreting/designing site-directed mutagenesis of proteins. We have developed a novel local quality assessment method for protein tertiary structure models. The method, named Graph-based Model Quality assessment method (GMQ), explicitly considers the predicted quality of spatially neighboring residues using a graph representation of a query protein structure model. GMQ uses conditional random field as its core of the algorithm, and performs a binary prediction of the quality of each residue in a model, indicating if a residue position is likely to be within an error cutoff or not. The accuracy of GMQ was improved by considering larger graphs to include quality information of more surrounding residues. Moreover, we found that using different edge weights in graphs reflecting different secondary structures further improves the accuracy. GMQ showed competitive performance on a benchmark for quality assessment of structure models from the Critical Assessment of Techniques for Protein Structure Prediction (CASP). PMID:28074879

  10. Animal models of protein allergenicity: potential benefits, pitfalls and challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dearman, R J; Kimber, I

    2009-04-01

    Food allergy is an important health issue. With an increasing interest in novel foods derived from transgenic crop plants, there is a growing need for the development of approaches suitable for the characterization of the allergenic potential of proteins. There are methods available currently (such as homology searches and serological testing) that are very effective at identifying proteins that are likely to cross-react with known allergens. However, animal models may play a role in the identification of truly novel proteins, such as bacterial or fungal proteins, that have not been experienced previously in the diet. We consider here the potential benefits, pitfalls and challenges of the selection of various animal models, including the mouse, the rat, the dog and the neonatal swine. The advantages and disadvantages of various experimental end-points are discussed, including the measurement of specific IgE by ELISA, Western blotting or functional tests such as the passive cutaneous anaphylaxis assay, and the assessment of challenge-induced clinical symptoms in previously sensitized animals. The experimental variables of route of exposure to test proteins and the incorporation of adjuvant to increase the sensitivity of the responses are considered also. It is important to emphasize that currently none of these approaches has been validated for the purposes of hazard identification in the context of a safety assessment. However, the available evidence suggests that the judicious use of an accurate and robust animal model could provide important additional data that would contribute significantly to the assessment of the potential allergenicity of novel proteins.

  11. Protein-lipid interactions in bilayer membranes: a lattice model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pink, D A; Chapman, D

    1979-04-01

    A lattice model has been developed to study the effects of intrinsic membrane proteins upon the thermodynamic properties of a lipid bilayer membrane. We assume that only nearest-neighbor van der Waals and steric interactions are important and that the polar group interactions can be represented by effective pressure-area terms. Phase diagrams, the temperature T(0), which locates the gel-fluid melting, the transition enthalpy, and correlations were calculated by mean field and cluster approximations. Average lipid chain areas and chain areas when the lipid is in a given protein environment were obtained. Proteins that have a "smooth" homogeneous surface ("cholesterol-like") and those that have inhomogeneous surfaces or that bind lipids specifically were considered. We find that T(0) can vary depending upon the interactions and that another peak can appear upon the shoulder of the main peak which reflects the melting of a eutectic mixture. The transition enthalpy decreases generally, as was found before, but when a second peak appears departures from this behavior reflect aspects of the eutectic mixture. We find that proteins have significant nonzero probabilities for being adjacent to one another so that no unbroken "annulus" of lipid necessarily exists around a protein. If T(0) does not increase much, or decreases, with increasing c, then lipids adjacent to a protein cannot all be all-trans on the time scale (10(-7) sec) of our system. Around a protein the lipid correlation depth is about one lipid layer, and this increases with c. Possible consequences of ignoring changes in polar group interactions due to clustering of proteins are discussed.

  12. R26R-GR: a Cre-activable dual fluorescent protein reporter mouse.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    You-Tzung Chen

    Full Text Available Green fluorescent protein (GFP and its derivatives are the most widely used molecular reporters for live cell imagining. The development of organelle-specific fusion fluorescent proteins improves the labeling resolution to a higher level. Here we generate a R26 dual fluorescent protein reporter mouse, activated by Cre-mediated DNA recombination, labeling target cells with a chromatin-specific enhanced green fluorescence protein (EGFP and a plasma membrane-anchored monomeric cherry fluorescent protein (mCherry. This dual labeling allows the visualization of mitotic events, cell shapes and intracellular vesicle behaviors. We expect this reporter mouse to have a wide application in developmental biology studies, transplantation experiments as well as cancer/stem cell lineage tracing.

  13. Multiscale models and approximation algorithms for protein electrostatics

    CERN Document Server

    Bardhan, Jaydeep P

    2015-01-01

    Electrostatic forces play many important roles in molecular biology, but are hard to model due to the complicated interactions between biomolecules and the surrounding solvent, a fluid composed of water and dissolved ions. Continuum model have been surprisingly successful for simple biological questions, but fail for important problems such as understanding the effects of protein mutations. In this paper we highlight the advantages of boundary-integral methods for these problems, and our use of boundary integrals to design and test more accurate theories. Examples include a multiscale model based on nonlocal continuum theory, and a nonlinear boundary condition that captures atomic-scale effects at biomolecular surfaces.

  14. An Efficient Null Model for Conformational Fluctuations in Proteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harder, Tim Philipp; Borg, Mikael; Bottaro, Sandro

    2012-01-01

    limited to comparatively short timescales. TYPHON is a probabilistic method to explore the conformational space of proteins under the guidance of a sophisticated probabilistic model of local structure and a given set of restraints that represent nonlocal interactions, such as hydrogen bonds or disulfide...... bridges. The choice of the restraints themselves is heuristic, but the resulting probabilistic model is well-defined and rigorous. Conceptually, TYPHON constitutes a null model of conformational fluctuations under a given set of restraints. We demonstrate that TYPHON can provide information...

  15. Conscription of proteins for new functionality. Technical progress report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferrin, T.E.

    1997-06-24

    This report focuses on research in the following areas: development of function-based screening routines; generating methods for sorting output of database searches; developing strategies for determining chemically relevant three-dimensional scaffolds; and the integration of computational methodologies into user friendly tools.

  16. Chemical reporter for visualizing metabolic cross-talk between carbohydrate metabolism and protein modification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaro, Balyn W; Chuh, Kelly N; Pratt, Matthew R

    2014-09-19

    Metabolic chemical reporters have been largely used to study posttranslational modifications. Generally, it was assumed that these reporters entered one biosynthetic pathway, resulting in labeling of one type of modification. However, because they are metabolized by cells before their addition onto proteins, metabolic chemical reporters potentially provide a unique opportunity to read-out on both modifications of interest and cellular metabolism. We report here the development of a metabolic chemical reporter 1-deoxy-N-pentynyl glucosamine (1-deoxy-GlcNAlk). This small-molecule cannot be incorporated into glycans; however, treatment of mammalian cells results in labeling of a variety proteins and enables their visualization and identification. Competition of this labeling with sodium acetate and an acetyltransferase inhibitor suggests that 1-deoxy-GlcNAlk can enter the protein acetylation pathway. These results demonstrate that metabolic chemical reporters have the potential to isolate and potentially discover cross-talk between metabolic pathways in living cells.

  17. Prediction of nuclear proteins using SVM and HMM models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raghava Gajendra PS

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The nucleus, a highly organized organelle, plays important role in cellular homeostasis. The nuclear proteins are crucial for chromosomal maintenance/segregation, gene expression, RNA processing/export, and many other processes. Several methods have been developed for predicting the nuclear proteins in the past. The aim of the present study is to develop a new method for predicting nuclear proteins with higher accuracy. Results All modules were trained and tested on a non-redundant dataset and evaluated using five-fold cross-validation technique. Firstly, Support Vector Machines (SVM based modules have been developed using amino acid and dipeptide compositions and achieved a Mathews correlation coefficient (MCC of 0.59 and 0.61 respectively. Secondly, we have developed SVM modules using split amino acid compositions (SAAC and achieved the maximum MCC of 0.66. Thirdly, a hidden Markov model (HMM based module/profile was developed for searching exclusively nuclear and non-nuclear domains in a protein. Finally, a hybrid module was developed by combining SVM module and HMM profile and achieved a MCC of 0.87 with an accuracy of 94.61%. This method performs better than the existing methods when evaluated on blind/independent datasets. Our method estimated 31.51%, 21.89%, 26.31%, 25.72% and 24.95% of the proteins as nuclear proteins in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Caenorhabditis elegans, Drosophila melanogaster, mouse and human proteomes respectively. Based on the above modules, we have developed a web server NpPred for predicting nuclear proteins http://www.imtech.res.in/raghava/nppred/. Conclusion This study describes a highly accurate method for predicting nuclear proteins. SVM module has been developed for the first time using SAAC for predicting nuclear proteins, where amino acid composition of N-terminus and the remaining protein were computed separately. In addition, our study is a first documentation where exclusively nuclear

  18. A modeling strategy for G-protein coupled receptors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Kahler

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Cell responses can be triggered via G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs that interact with small molecules, peptides or proteins and transmit the signal over the membrane via structural changes to activate intracellular pathways. GPCRs are characterized by a rather low sequence similarity and exhibit structural differences even for functionally closely related GPCRs. An accurate structure prediction for GPCRs is therefore not straightforward. We propose a computational approach that relies on the generation of several independent models based on different template structures, which are subsequently refined by molecular dynamics simulations. A comparison of their conformational stability and the agreement with GPCR-typical structural features is then used to select a favorable model. This strategy was applied to predict the structure of the herpesviral chemokine receptor US28 by generating three independent models based on the known structures of the chemokine receptors CXCR1, CXCR4, and CCR5. Model refinement and evaluation suggested that the model based on CCR5 exhibits the most favorable structural properties. In particular, the GPCR-typical structural features, such as a conserved water cluster or conserved non-covalent contacts, are present to a larger extent in the model based on CCR5 compared to the other models. A final model validation based on the recently published US28 crystal structure confirms that the CCR5-based model is the most accurate and exhibits 80.8% correctly modeled residues within the transmembrane helices. The structural agreement between the selected model and the crystal structure suggests that our modeling strategy may also be more generally applicable to other GPCRs of unknown structure.

  19. An approach to creating a more realistic working model from a protein data bank entry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandon, Christopher J.; Martin, Benjamin P.; McGee, Kelly J.; Stewart, James J. P.; Braun-Sand, Sonja B.

    2015-01-01

    An accurate model of three-dimensional protein structure is important in a variety of fields such as structure-based drug design and mechanistic studies of enzymatic reactions. While the entries in the Protein Data Bank (http://www.pdb.org) provide valuable information about protein structures, a small fraction of the PDB structures were found to contain anomalies not reported in the PDB file. The semiempirical PM7 method in MOPAC2012 was used for identifying anomalously short hydrogen bonds, C–H···O/C–H···N interactions, non-bonding close contacts, and unrealistic covalent bond lengths in recently published Protein Data Bank files. It was also used to generate new structures with these faults removed. When the semiempirical models were compared to those of PDB_REDO (http://www.cmbi.ru.nl/pdb_redo/), the clashscores, as defined by MolProbity (http://molprobity.biochem.duke.edu/), were better in about 50 % of the structures. The semiempirical models also had a lower root-mean-square-deviation value in nearly all cases than those from PDB_REDO, indicative of a better conservation of the tertiary structure. Finally, the semiempirical models were found to have lower clashscores than the initial PDB file in all but one case. Because this approach maintains as much of the original tertiary structure as possible while improving anomalous interactions, it should be useful to theoreticians, experimentalists, and crystallographers investigating the structure and function of proteins. PMID:25605595

  20. Illustrating and homology modeling the proteins of the Zika virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekins, Sean; Liebler, John; Neves, Bruno J.; Lewis, Warren G.; Coffee, Megan; Bienstock, Rachelle; Southan, Christopher; Andrade, Carolina H.

    2016-01-01

    The Zika virus (ZIKV) is a flavivirus of the family Flaviviridae, which is similar to dengue virus, yellow fever and West Nile virus. Recent outbreaks in South America, Latin America, the Caribbean and in particular Brazil have led to concern for the spread of the disease and potential to cause Guillain-Barré syndrome and microcephaly. Although ZIKV has been known of for over 60 years there is very little in the way of knowledge of the virus with few publications and no crystal structures. No antivirals have been tested against it either in vitro or in vivo. ZIKV therefore epitomizes a neglected disease. Several suggested steps have been proposed which could be taken to initiate ZIKV antiviral drug discovery using both high throughput screens as well as structure-based design based on homology models for the key proteins. We now describe preliminary homology models created for NS5, FtsJ, NS4B, NS4A, HELICc, DEXDc, peptidase S7, NS2B, NS2A, NS1, E stem, glycoprotein M, propeptide, capsid and glycoprotein E using SWISS-MODEL. Eleven out of 15 models pass our model quality criteria for their further use. While a ZIKV glycoprotein E homology model was initially described in the immature conformation as a trimer, we now describe the mature dimer conformer which allowed the construction of an illustration of the complete virion. By comparing illustrations of ZIKV based on this new homology model and the dengue virus crystal structure we propose potential differences that could be exploited for antiviral and vaccine design. The prediction of sites for glycosylation on this protein may also be useful in this regard. While we await a cryo-EM structure of ZIKV and eventual crystal structures of the individual proteins, these homology models provide the community with a starting point for structure-based design of drugs and vaccines as well as a for computational virtual screening. PMID:27746901

  1. Illustrating and homology modeling the proteins of the Zika virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekins, Sean; Liebler, John; Neves, Bruno J; Lewis, Warren G; Coffee, Megan; Bienstock, Rachelle; Southan, Christopher; Andrade, Carolina H

    2016-01-01

    The Zika virus (ZIKV) is a flavivirus of the family Flaviviridae, which is similar to dengue virus, yellow fever and West Nile virus. Recent outbreaks in South America, Latin America, the Caribbean and in particular Brazil have led to concern for the spread of the disease and potential to cause Guillain-Barré syndrome and microcephaly. Although ZIKV has been known of for over 60 years there is very little in the way of knowledge of the virus with few publications and no crystal structures. No antivirals have been tested against it either in vitro or in vivo. ZIKV therefore epitomizes a neglected disease. Several suggested steps have been proposed which could be taken to initiate ZIKV antiviral drug discovery using both high throughput screens as well as structure-based design based on homology models for the key proteins. We now describe preliminary homology models created for NS5, FtsJ, NS4B, NS4A, HELICc, DEXDc, peptidase S7, NS2B, NS2A, NS1, E stem, glycoprotein M, propeptide, capsid and glycoprotein E using SWISS-MODEL. Eleven out of 15 models pass our model quality criteria for their further use. While a ZIKV glycoprotein E homology model was initially described in the immature conformation as a trimer, we now describe the mature dimer conformer which allowed the construction of an illustration of the complete virion. By comparing illustrations of ZIKV based on this new homology model and the dengue virus crystal structure we propose potential differences that could be exploited for antiviral and vaccine design. The prediction of sites for glycosylation on this protein may also be useful in this regard. While we await a cryo-EM structure of ZIKV and eventual crystal structures of the individual proteins, these homology models provide the community with a starting point for structure-based design of drugs and vaccines as well as a for computational virtual screening.

  2. Embryo culture in teratological surveillance and serum proteins in development. Progress report, 1979-1980

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klein, N.W.

    1980-07-01

    Research progress for the period 1979-1980 is reported. The feasibility of using rat embryo cultures to test the teratogenic activity of serum was studied. The mechanisms regulating the synthesis of serum proteins were investigated. (ACR)

  3. Modeling regionalized volumetric differences in protein-ligand binding cavities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Brian Y; Bandyopadhyay, Soutir

    2012-06-21

    Identifying elements of protein structures that create differences in protein-ligand binding specificity is an essential method for explaining the molecular mechanisms underlying preferential binding. In some cases, influential mechanisms can be visually identified by experts in structural biology, but subtler mechanisms, whose significance may only be apparent from the analysis of many structures, are harder to find. To assist this process, we present a geometric algorithm and two statistical models for identifying significant structural differences in protein-ligand binding cavities. We demonstrate these methods in an analysis of sequentially nonredundant structural representatives of the canonical serine proteases and the enolase superfamily. Here, we observed that statistically significant structural variations identified experimentally established determinants of specificity. We also observed that an analysis of individual regions inside cavities can reveal areas where small differences in shape can correspond to differences in specificity.

  4. Models of protein and amino acid requirements for cattle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis Orlindo Tedeschi

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Protein supply and requirements by ruminants have been studied for more than a century. These studies led to the accumulation of lots of scientific information about digestion and metabolism of protein by ruminants as well as the characterization of the dietary protein in order to maximize animal performance. During the 1980s and 1990s, when computers became more accessible and powerful, scientists began to conceptualize and develop mathematical nutrition models, and to program them into computers to assist with ration balancing and formulation for domesticated ruminants, specifically dairy and beef cattle. The most commonly known nutrition models developed during this period were the National Research Council (NRC in the United States, Agricultural Research Council (ARC in the United Kingdom, Institut National de la Recherche Agronomique (INRA in France, and the Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organization (CSIRO in Australia. Others were derivative works from these models with different degrees of modifications in the supply or requirement calculations, and the modeling nature (e.g., static or dynamic, mechanistic, or deterministic. Circa 1990s, most models adopted the metabolizable protein (MP system over the crude protein (CP and digestible CP systems to estimate supply of MP and the factorial system to calculate MP required by the animal. The MP system included two portions of protein (i.e., the rumen-undegraded dietary CP - RUP - and the contributions of microbial CP - MCP as the main sources of MP for the animal. Some models would explicitly account for the impact of dry matter intake (DMI on the MP required for maintenance (MPm; e.g., Cornell Net Carbohydrate and Protein System - CNCPS, the Dutch system - DVE/OEB, while others would simply account for scurf, urinary, metabolic fecal, and endogenous contributions independently of DMI. All models included milk yield and its components in estimating MP required for lactation

  5. Simulation modeling of pooling for combinatorial protein engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polizzi, Karen M; Spencer, Cody U; Dubey, Anshul; Matsumura, Ichiro; Lee, Jay H; Realff, Matthew J; Bommarius, Andreas S

    2005-12-01

    Pooling in directed-evolution experiments will greatly increase the throughput of screening systems, but important parameters such as the number of good mutants created and the activity level increase of the good mutants will depend highly on the protein being engineered. The authors developed and validated a Monte Carlo simulation model of pooling that allows the testing of various scenarios in silico before starting experimentation. Using a simplified test system of 2 enzymes, betagalactosidase (supermutant, or greatly improved enzyme) and beta-glucuronidase (dud, or enzyme with ancestral level of activity), the model accurately predicted the number of supermutants detected in experiments within a factor of 2. Additional simulations using more complex activity distributions show the versatility of the model. Pooling is most suited to cases such as the directed evolution of new function in a protein, where the background level of activity is minimized, making it easier to detect small increases in activity level. Pooling is most successful when a sensitive assay is employed. Using the model will increase the throughput of screening procedures for directed-evolution experiments and thus lead to speedier engineering of proteins.

  6. Large-Scale Protein-Protein Interactions Detection by Integrating Big Biosensing Data with Computational Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhu-Hong You

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Protein-protein interactions are the basis of biological functions, and studying these interactions on a molecular level is of crucial importance for understanding the functionality of a living cell. During the past decade, biosensors have emerged as an important tool for the high-throughput identification of proteins and their interactions. However, the high-throughput experimental methods for identifying PPIs are both time-consuming and expensive. On the other hand, high-throughput PPI data are often associated with high false-positive and high false-negative rates. Targeting at these problems, we propose a method for PPI detection by integrating biosensor-based PPI data with a novel computational model. This method was developed based on the algorithm of extreme learning machine combined with a novel representation of protein sequence descriptor. When performed on the large-scale human protein interaction dataset, the proposed method achieved 84.8% prediction accuracy with 84.08% sensitivity at the specificity of 85.53%. We conducted more extensive experiments to compare the proposed method with the state-of-the-art techniques, support vector machine. The achieved results demonstrate that our approach is very promising for detecting new PPIs, and it can be a helpful supplement for biosensor-based PPI data detection.

  7. Smart Grid Cybersecurity: Job Performance Model Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O' Neil, Lori Ross; Assante, Michael; Tobey, David

    2012-08-01

    This is the project report to DOE OE-30 for the completion of Phase 1 of a 3 phase report. This report outlines the work done to develop a smart grid cybersecurity certification. This work is being done with the subcontractor NBISE.

  8. A generalized free-solvent model for the osmotic pressure of multi-component solutions containing protein-protein interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McBride, Devin W; Rodgers, V G J

    2014-07-01

    The free-solvent model has been shown to have excellent predictability of the osmotic pressure for single and binary non-interactive proteins in aqueous solutions. Here the free-solvent model is extended to be more generalized by including the contributions of intra- and inter-protein interactions to the osmotic pressure of a solution in the form of homo- and hetero-multimers. The solute-solvent interactions are considered to be unique for each homo- and hetero-multimer in solution. The effect of the various generalized free-solvent model parameters on the osmotic pressure are examined for a single protein solution with a homo-dimer, a binary protein solution with no protein-protein interactions, and a binary protein solution with a hetero-dimer. Finally, the limitations associated with the generalized free-solvent model are discussed.

  9. Movable scour protection. Model test report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lorenz, R.

    2002-07-01

    This report presents the results of a series of model tests with scour protection of marine structures. The objective of the model tests is to investigate the integrity of the scour protection during a general lowering of the surrounding seabed, for instance in connection with movement of a sand bank or with general subsidence. The scour protection in the tests is made out of stone material. Two different fractions have been used: 4 mm and 40 mm. Tests with current, with waves and with combined current and waves were carried out. The scour protection material was placed after an initial scour hole has evolved in the seabed around the structure. This design philosophy has been selected because the situation often is that the scour hole starts to generate immediately after the structure has been placed. It is therefore difficult to establish a scour protection at the undisturbed seabed if the scour material is placed after the main structure. Further, placing the scour material in the scour hole increases the stability of the material. Two types of structure have been used for the test, a Monopile and a Tripod foundation. Test with protection mats around the Monopile model was also carried out. The following main conclusions have emerged form the model tests with flat bed (i.e. no general seabed lowering): 1. The maximum scour depth found in steady current on sand bed was 1.6 times the cylinder diameter, 2. The minimum horizontal extension of the scour hole (upstream direction) was 2.8 times the cylinder diameter, corresponding to a slope of 30 degrees, 3. Concrete protection mats do not meet the criteria for a strongly erodible seabed. In the present test virtually no reduction in the scour depth was obtained. The main problem is the interface to the cylinder. If there is a void between the mats and the cylinder, scour will develop. Even with the protection mats that are tightly connected to the cylinder, scour is expected to develop as long as the mats allow for

  10. Model-Based Enterprise Summit Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-02-01

    Models Become Much More Efficient and Effective When Coupled With Knowledge Design Advisors CAD Fit Machine Motion KanBan Trigger Models Tolerance...Based Enterprise Geometry Kinematics Design Advisors Control Physics Planning System Models CAD Fit Machine Motion KanBan Trigger Models Tolerance

  11. Folding pathways of a helix-turn-helix model protein

    CERN Document Server

    Hoffmann, D

    1997-01-01

    A small model polypeptide represented in atomic detail is folded using Monte Carlo dynamics. The polypeptide is designed to have a native conformation similar to the central part of the helix-turn-helix protein ROP. Starting from a beta-strand conformation or two different loop conformations of the protein glutamine synthetase, six trajectories are generated using the so-called window move in dihedral angle space. This move changes conformations locally and leads to realistic, quasi-continuously evolving trajectories. Four of the six trajectories end in stable native-like conformations. Their folding pathways show a fast initial development of a helix-bend-helix motif, followed by a dynamic behaviour predicted by the diffusion-collision model of Karplus and Weaver. The phenomenology of the pathways is consistent with experimental results.

  12. MODBASE: a database of annotated comparative protein structure models and associated resources

    OpenAIRE

    Pieper, Ursula; Eswar, Narayanan; Davis, Fred P.; Braberg, Hannes; Madhusudhan, M. S.; Rossi, Andrea; Marti-Renom, Marc; Karchin, Rachel; Webb, Ben M.; Eramian, David; Shen, Min-Yi; Kelly, Libusha; Melo, Francisco; Sali, Andrej

    2005-01-01

    MODBASE () is a database of annotated comparative protein structure models for all available protein sequences that can be matched to at least one known protein structure. The models are calculated by MODPIPE, an automated modeling pipeline that relies on MODELLER for fold assignment, sequence–structure alignment, model building and model assessment (). MODBASE is updated regularly to reflect the growth in protein sequence and structure databases, and improvements in the software for calculat...

  13. Epstein - Barr virus latent membrane protein 1 suppresses reporter activity through modulation of promyelocytic leukemia protein-nuclear bodies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flemington Erik K

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The Epstein-Barr virus (EBV encoded Latent Membrane Protein 1 (LMP1 has been shown to increase the expression of promyelocytic leukemia protein (PML and the immunofluorescent intensity of promyelocytic leukemia nuclear bodies (PML NBs. PML NBs have been implicated in the modulation of transcription and the association of reporter plasmids with PML NBs has been implicated in repression of reporter activity. Additionally, repression of various reporters in the presence of LMP1 has been noted. This study demonstrates that LMP1 suppresses expression of reporter activity in a dose responsive manner and corresponds with the LMP1 induced increase in PML NB intensity. Disruption of PML NBs with arsenic trioxide or a PML siRNA restores reporter activity. These data offer an explanation for previously conflicting data on LMP1 signaling and calls attention to the possibility of false-positives and false-negatives when using reporter assays as a research tool in cells expressing LMP1.

  14. Conservation, variability and the modeling of active protein kinases.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James D R Knight

    Full Text Available The human proteome is rich with protein kinases, and this richness has made the kinase of crucial importance in initiating and maintaining cell behavior. Elucidating cell signaling networks and manipulating their components to understand and alter behavior require well designed inhibitors. These inhibitors are needed in culture to cause and study network perturbations, and the same compounds can be used as drugs to treat disease. Understanding the structural biology of protein kinases in detail, including their commonalities, differences and modes of substrate interaction, is necessary for designing high quality inhibitors that will be of true use for cell biology and disease therapy. To this end, we here report on a structural analysis of all available active-conformation protein kinases, discussing residue conservation, the novel features of such conservation, unique properties of atypical kinases and variability in the context of substrate binding. We also demonstrate how this information can be used for structure prediction. Our findings will be of use not only in understanding protein kinase function and evolution, but they highlight the flaws inherent in kinase drug design as commonly practiced and dictate an appropriate strategy for the sophisticated design of specific inhibitors for use in the laboratory and disease therapy.

  15. Influence of surface modification on protein retention in ion-exchange chromatography. Evaluation using different retention models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruch, Thomas; Graalfs, Heiner; Jacob, Lothar; Frech, Christian

    2009-02-06

    A large number of different stationary phases for ion-exchange chromatography (IEC) from different manufacturers are available, which vary significantly in a number of chemical and physical properties. As a consequence, binding mechanisms may be different as well. In the work reported here, the retention data of model proteins (alpha-lactalbumin, beta-lactoglobulin A, bovine serum albumin and alcohol dehydrogenase) were determined for three anion-exchange adsorbents based on synthetic copolymer beads with differences in the functional group chemistry. Fractogel EMD DEAE and Fractoprep DEAE consist of functional groups bound to the surface via "tentacles", ToyopearlDEAE by a short linker. Three models which describe chromatographic retention were used to analyse the characteristic parameters of the protein/stationary-phase interactions. The number of electrostatic interaction between the stationary phase and the model proteins, the protein specific surface charge densities and the interacting surface of the proteins with the adsorptive layer of the chromatographic media depend on the surface modification as well as on the molecular mass of the model proteins. In general, protein retention of the model proteins on the weak anion exchangers was found to be greater if the stationary phase carries tentacles and protein mass is above 60 kDa.

  16. The role of protein content on the steady and oscillatory shear rheology of model synovial fluids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Z; Barman, S; Christopher, G F

    2014-08-28

    Recent studies have debated the role of protein content on the bulk rheology of synovial fluid; in particular, it has been questioned if proteins aggregate or interact with hyaluronic acid in synovial fluid to enhance bulk rheology, or if observed effects were due to systematic measurement error caused by interfacial rheology, stemming from protein adsorption to the interface. Utilizing several techniques to ensure results reflect only bulk rheology, an examination of the role of bovine serum albumin and γ-globulin on model synovial fluid rheology has been undertaken. When interfacial rheology caused by protein adsorption to the interface is abrogated, the bulk rheology of a model synovial fluid composed of bovine serum albumin, γ-globulin, and hyaluronic acid is found to be dominated solely by the hyaluronic acid over a wide range of shear rates, strains and frequencies. These results show that the previously reported enhanced rheological properties of model synovial fluids are solely due to interfacial rheology and not from any type of protein aggregation/interaction in bulk solution.

  17. Classification of lung cancer tumors based on structural and physicochemical properties of proteins by bioinformatics models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosseinzadeh, Faezeh; Ebrahimi, Mansour; Goliaei, Bahram; Shamabadi, Narges

    2012-01-01

    Rapid distinction between small cell lung cancer (SCLC) and non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) tumors is very important in diagnosis of this disease. Furthermore sequence-derived structural and physicochemical descriptors are very useful for machine learning prediction of protein structural and functional classes, classifying proteins and the prediction performance. Herein, in this study is the classification of lung tumors based on 1497 attributes derived from structural and physicochemical properties of protein sequences (based on genes defined by microarray analysis) investigated through a combination of attribute weighting, supervised and unsupervised clustering algorithms. Eighty percent of the weighting methods selected features such as autocorrelation, dipeptide composition and distribution of hydrophobicity as the most important protein attributes in classification of SCLC, NSCLC and COMMON classes of lung tumors. The same results were observed by most tree induction algorithms while descriptors of hydrophobicity distribution were high in protein sequences COMMON in both groups and distribution of charge in these proteins was very low; showing COMMON proteins were very hydrophobic. Furthermore, compositions of polar dipeptide in SCLC proteins were higher than NSCLC proteins. Some clustering models (alone or in combination with attribute weighting algorithms) were able to nearly classify SCLC and NSCLC proteins. Random Forest tree induction algorithm, calculated on leaves one-out and 10-fold cross validation) shows more than 86% accuracy in clustering and predicting three different lung cancer tumors. Here for the first time the application of data mining tools to effectively classify three classes of lung cancer tumors regarding the importance of dipeptide composition, autocorrelation and distribution descriptor has been reported.

  18. Classification of lung cancer tumors based on structural and physicochemical properties of proteins by bioinformatics models.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Faezeh Hosseinzadeh

    Full Text Available Rapid distinction between small cell lung cancer (SCLC and non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC tumors is very important in diagnosis of this disease. Furthermore sequence-derived structural and physicochemical descriptors are very useful for machine learning prediction of protein structural and functional classes, classifying proteins and the prediction performance. Herein, in this study is the classification of lung tumors based on 1497 attributes derived from structural and physicochemical properties of protein sequences (based on genes defined by microarray analysis investigated through a combination of attribute weighting, supervised and unsupervised clustering algorithms. Eighty percent of the weighting methods selected features such as autocorrelation, dipeptide composition and distribution of hydrophobicity as the most important protein attributes in classification of SCLC, NSCLC and COMMON classes of lung tumors. The same results were observed by most tree induction algorithms while descriptors of hydrophobicity distribution were high in protein sequences COMMON in both groups and distribution of charge in these proteins was very low; showing COMMON proteins were very hydrophobic. Furthermore, compositions of polar dipeptide in SCLC proteins were higher than NSCLC proteins. Some clustering models (alone or in combination with attribute weighting algorithms were able to nearly classify SCLC and NSCLC proteins. Random Forest tree induction algorithm, calculated on leaves one-out and 10-fold cross validation shows more than 86% accuracy in clustering and predicting three different lung cancer tumors. Here for the first time the application of data mining tools to effectively classify three classes of lung cancer tumors regarding the importance of dipeptide composition, autocorrelation and distribution descriptor has been reported.

  19. World Magnetic Model 2015 Technical Report

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The World Magnetic Model is the standard model used by the U.S. Department of Defense, the U.K. Ministry of Defence, the North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO)...

  20. A simple quantitative model of macromolecular crowding effects on protein folding: Application to the murine prion protein(121-231)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergasa-Caceres, Fernando; Rabitz, Herschel A.

    2013-06-01

    A model of protein folding kinetics is applied to study the effects of macromolecular crowding on protein folding rate and stability. Macromolecular crowding is found to promote a decrease of the entropic cost of folding of proteins that produces an increase of both the stability and the folding rate. The acceleration of the folding rate due to macromolecular crowding is shown to be a topology-dependent effect. The model is applied to the folding dynamics of the murine prion protein (121-231). The differential effect of macromolecular crowding as a function of protein topology suffices to make non-native configurations relatively more accessible.

  1. Transgenic rabbits as therapeutic protein bioreactors and human disease models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Jianglin; Watanabe, Teruo

    2003-09-01

    Genetically modified laboratory animals provide a powerful approach for studying gene expression and regulation and allow one to directly examine structure-function and cause-and-effect relationships in pathophysiological processes. Today, transgenic mice are available as a research tool in almost every research institution. On the other hand, the development of a relatively large mammalian transgenic model, transgenic rabbits, has provided unprecedented opportunities for investigators to study the mechanisms of human diseases and has also provided an alternative way to produce therapeutic proteins to treat human diseases. Transgenic rabbits expressing human genes have been used as a model for cardiovascular disease, AIDS, and cancer research. The recombinant proteins can be produced from the milk of transgenic rabbits not only at lower cost but also on a relatively large scale. One of the most promising and attractive recombinant proteins derived from transgenic rabbit milk, human alpha-glucosidase, has been successfully used to treat the patients who are genetically deficient in this enzyme. Although the pronuclear microinjection is still the major and most popular method for the creation of transgenic rabbits, recent progress in gene targeting and animal cloning has opened new avenues that should make it possible to produce transgenic rabbits by somatic cell nuclear transfer in the future. Based on a computer-assisted search of the studies of transgenic rabbits published in the English literature here, we introduce to the reader the achievements made thus far with transgenic rabbits, with emphasis on the application of these rabbits as human disease models and live bioreactors for producing human therapeutic proteins and on the recent progress in cloned rabbits.

  2. Regional forecasting with global atmospheric models; Fourth year report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crowley, T.J.; North, G.R.; Smith, N.R. [Applied Research Corp., College Station, TX (United States)

    1994-05-01

    The scope of the report is to present the results of the fourth year`s work on the atmospheric modeling part of the global climate studies task. The development testing of computer models and initial results are discussed. The appendices contain studies that provide supporting information and guidance to the modeling work and further details on computer model development. Complete documentation of the models, including user information, will be prepared under separate reports and manuals.

  3. Models to predict intestinal absorption of therapeutic peptides and proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antunes, Filipa; Andrade, Fernanda; Ferreira, Domingos; Nielsen, Hanne Morck; Sarmento, Bruno

    2013-01-01

    Prediction of human intestinal absorption is a major goal in the design, optimization, and selection of drugs intended for oral delivery, in particular proteins, which possess intrinsic poor transport across intestinal epithelium. There are various techniques currently employed to evaluate the extension of protein absorption in the different phases of drug discovery and development. Screening protocols to evaluate protein absorption include a range of preclinical methodologies like in silico, in vitro, in situ, ex vivo and in vivo. It is the careful and critical use of these techniques that can help to identify drug candidates, which most probably will be well absorbed from the human intestinal tract. It is well recognized that the human intestinal permeability cannot be accurately predicted based on a single preclinical method. However, the present social and scientific concerns about the animal well care as well as the pharmaceutical industries need for rapid, cheap and reliable models predicting bioavailability give reasons for using methods providing an appropriate correlation between results of in vivo and in vitro drug absorption. The aim of this review is to describe and compare in silico, in vitro, in situ, ex vivo and in vivo methods used to predict human intestinal absorption, giving a special attention to the intestinal absorption of therapeutic peptides and proteins.

  4. Insights on protein-DNA recognition by coarse grain modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poulain, Pierre; Saladin, Adrien; Hartmann, Brigitte; Prévost, Chantal

    2008-01-01

    Coarse grain modelling of macromolecules is a new approach potentially well adapted to answer numerous issues, ranging from physics to biology. We propose here an original DNA coarse grain model specifically dedicated to protein–DNA docking, a crucial, but still largely unresolved, question in molecular biology. Using a representative set of protein–DNA complexes, we first show that our model is able to predict the interaction surface between the macromolecular partners taken in their bound form. In a second part, the impact of the DNA sequence and electrostatics, together with the DNA and protein conformations on docking is investigated. Our results strongly suggest that the overall DNA structure mainly contributes in discriminating the interaction site on cognate proteins. Direct electrostatic interactions between phosphate groups and amino acids side chains strengthen the binding. Overall, this work demonstrates that coarse grain modelling can reveal itself a precious auxiliary for a general and complete description and understanding of protein–DNA association mechanisms. PMID:18478582

  5. Multiscale modeling and simulation of microtubule–motor-protein assemblies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Tong; Blackwell, Robert; Glaser, Matthew A.; Betterton, M. D.; Shelley, Michael J.

    2016-01-01

    Microtubules and motor proteins self-organize into biologically important assemblies including the mitotic spindle and the centrosomal microtubule array. Outside of cells, microtubule-motor mixtures can form novel active liquid-crystalline materials driven out of equilibrium by adenosine triphosphate–consuming motor proteins. Microscopic motor activity causes polarity-dependent interactions between motor proteins and microtubules, but how these interactions yield larger-scale dynamical behavior such as complex flows and defect dynamics is not well understood. We develop a multiscale theory for microtubule-motor systems in which Brownian dynamics simulations of polar microtubules driven by motors are used to study microscopic organization and stresses created by motor-mediated microtubule interactions. We identify polarity-sorting and crosslink tether relaxation as two polar-specific sources of active destabilizing stress. We then develop a continuum Doi-Onsager model that captures polarity sorting and the hydrodynamic flows generated by these polar-specific active stresses. In simulations of active nematic flows on immersed surfaces, the active stresses drive turbulent flow dynamics and continuous generation and annihilation of disclination defects. The dynamics follow from two instabilities, and accounting for the immersed nature of the experiment yields unambiguous characteristic length and time scales. When turning off the hydrodynamics in the Doi-Onsager model, we capture formation of polar lanes as observed in the Brownian dynamics simulation. PMID:26764729

  6. Relative Binding Free Energy Calculations Applied to Protein Homology Models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cappel, Daniel; Hall, Michelle Lynn; Lenselink, Eelke B; Beuming, Thijs; Qi, Jun; Bradner, James; Sherman, Woody

    2016-12-27

    A significant challenge and potential high-value application of computer-aided drug design is the accurate prediction of protein-ligand binding affinities. Free energy perturbation (FEP) using molecular dynamics (MD) sampling is among the most suitable approaches to achieve accurate binding free energy predictions, due to the rigorous statistical framework of the methodology, correct representation of the energetics, and thorough treatment of the important degrees of freedom in the system (including explicit waters). Recent advances in sampling methods and force fields coupled with vast increases in computational resources have made FEP a viable technology to drive hit-to-lead and lead optimization, allowing for more efficient cycles of medicinal chemistry and the possibility to explore much larger chemical spaces. However, previous FEP applications have focused on systems with high-resolution crystal structures of the target as starting points-something that is not always available in drug discovery projects. As such, the ability to apply FEP on homology models would greatly expand the domain of applicability of FEP in drug discovery. In this work we apply a particular implementation of FEP, called FEP+, on congeneric ligand series binding to four diverse targets: a kinase (Tyk2), an epigenetic bromodomain (BRD4), a transmembrane GPCR (A2A), and a protein-protein interaction interface (BCL-2 family protein MCL-1). We apply FEP+ using both crystal structures and homology models as starting points and find that the performance using homology models is generally on a par with the results when using crystal structures. The robustness of the calculations to structural variations in the input models can likely be attributed to the conformational sampling in the molecular dynamics simulations, which allows the modeled receptor to adapt to the "real" conformation for each ligand in the series. This work exemplifies the advantages of using all-atom simulation methods with

  7. Benchmarking consensus model quality assessment for protein fold recognition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    McGuffin Liam J

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Selecting the highest quality 3D model of a protein structure from a number of alternatives remains an important challenge in the field of structural bioinformatics. Many Model Quality Assessment Programs (MQAPs have been developed which adopt various strategies in order to tackle this problem, ranging from the so called "true" MQAPs capable of producing a single energy score based on a single model, to methods which rely on structural comparisons of multiple models or additional information from meta-servers. However, it is clear that no current method can separate the highest accuracy models from the lowest consistently. In this paper, a number of the top performing MQAP methods are benchmarked in the context of the potential value that they add to protein fold recognition. Two novel methods are also described: ModSSEA, which based on the alignment of predicted secondary structure elements and ModFOLD which combines several true MQAP methods using an artificial neural network. Results The ModSSEA method is found to be an effective model quality assessment program for ranking multiple models from many servers, however further accuracy can be gained by using the consensus approach of ModFOLD. The ModFOLD method is shown to significantly outperform the true MQAPs tested and is competitive with methods which make use of clustering or additional information from multiple servers. Several of the true MQAPs are also shown to add value to most individual fold recognition servers by improving model selection, when applied as a post filter in order to re-rank models. Conclusion MQAPs should be benchmarked appropriately for the practical context in which they are intended to be used. Clustering based methods are the top performing MQAPs where many models are available from many servers; however, they often do not add value to individual fold recognition servers when limited models are available. Conversely, the true MQAP methods

  8. MASCOT HTML and XML parser: an implementation of a novel object model for protein identification data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Chunguang G; Granite, Stephen J; Van Eyk, Jennifer E; Winslow, Raimond L

    2006-11-01

    Protein identification using MS is an important technique in proteomics as well as a major generator of proteomics data. We have designed the protein identification data object model (PDOM) and developed a parser based on this model to facilitate the analysis and storage of these data. The parser works with HTML or XML files saved or exported from MASCOT MS/MS ions search in peptide summary report or MASCOT PMF search in protein summary report. The program creates PDOM objects, eliminates redundancy in the input file, and has the capability to output any PDOM object to a relational database. This program facilitates additional analysis of MASCOT search results and aids the storage of protein identification information. The implementation is extensible and can serve as a template to develop parsers for other search engines. The parser can be used as a stand-alone application or can be driven by other Java programs. It is currently being used as the front end for a system that loads HTML and XML result files of MASCOT searches into a relational database. The source code is freely available at http://www.ccbm.jhu.edu and the program uses only free and open-source Java libraries.

  9. Prion Protein Deficiency Causes Diverse Proteome Shifts in Cell Models That Escape Detection in Brain Tissue.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohadeseh Mehrabian

    Full Text Available A popular method for studying the function of a given protein is to generate and characterize a suitable model deficient for its expression. For the prion protein (PrP, best known for its role in several invariably fatal neurodegenerative diseases, a natural choice, therefore, would be to undertake such studies with brain samples. We recently documented the surprising observation that PrP deficiency caused a loss or enhancement of NCAM1 polysialylation, dependent on the cell model used. To identify possible causes for this disparity, we set out to systematically investigate the consequence of PrP deficiency on the global proteome in brain tissue and in four distinct cell models. Here we report that PrP deficiency causes robust but surprisingly divergent changes to the global proteomes of cell models but has no discernible impact on the global brain proteome. Amongst >1,500 proteins whose levels were compared in wild-type and PrP-deficient models, members of the MARCKS protein family exhibited pronounced, yet cell model-dependent changes to their steady-state levels. Follow-up experiments revealed that PrP collaborates with members of the MARCKS protein family in its control of NCAM1 polysialylation. We conclude that the physiological function of PrP may be masked in analyses of complex brain samples but its cell-type specific influence on a lipid raft-based NCAM1-related cell biology comes to the fore in investigations of specific cell types.

  10. Modelling proteins' hidden conformations to predict antibiotic resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hart, Kathryn M.; Ho, Chris M. W.; Dutta, Supratik; Gross, Michael L.; Bowman, Gregory R.

    2016-10-01

    TEM β-lactamase confers bacteria with resistance to many antibiotics and rapidly evolves activity against new drugs. However, functional changes are not easily explained by differences in crystal structures. We employ Markov state models to identify hidden conformations and explore their role in determining TEM's specificity. We integrate these models with existing drug-design tools to create a new technique, called Boltzmann docking, which better predicts TEM specificity by accounting for conformational heterogeneity. Using our MSMs, we identify hidden states whose populations correlate with activity against cefotaxime. To experimentally detect our predicted hidden states, we use rapid mass spectrometric footprinting and confirm our models' prediction that increased cefotaxime activity correlates with reduced Ω-loop flexibility. Finally, we design novel variants to stabilize the hidden cefotaximase states, and find their populations predict activity against cefotaxime in vitro and in vivo. Therefore, we expect this framework to have numerous applications in drug and protein design.

  11. Tritiation of protein hormones. Progress report. [Stability of tritium-labelled protein hormones

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1977-01-01

    A non-catalytic tritium exchange system using a microwave discharge technique was bult and calibrated in order to optomize the labelling of small organic molecules such as benzoic acid. Analytical and preparative chromatographic procedures, including ion exchange and molecular sieve chromatography and polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, were standardized for use in the publication of tritium and labelled bovine ACTH. Results are reported from extensive studies of the control of chemical and biologic stability of labelled and unlabelled ACTH were carried out.

  12. Tritiation of protein hormones. Progress report. [Stability of tritium-labelled protein hormones

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1977-01-01

    A non-catalytic tritium exchange system using a microwave discharge technique was bult and calibrated in order to optomize the labelling of small organic molecules such as benzoic acid. Analytical and preparative chromatographic procedures, including ion exchange and molecular sieve chromatography and polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, were standardized for use in the publication of tritium and labelled bovine ACTH. Results are reported from extensive studies of the control of chemical and biologic stability of labelled and unlabelled ACTH were carried out.

  13. Photovoltaic performance models - A report card

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, J. H.; Reiter, L. R.

    1985-01-01

    Models for the analysis of photovoltaic (PV) systems' designs, implementation policies, and economic performance, have proliferated while keeping pace with rapid changes in basic PV technology and extensive empirical data compiled for such systems' performance. Attention is presently given to the results of a comparative assessment of ten well documented and widely used models, which range in complexity from first-order approximations of PV system performance to in-depth, circuit-level characterizations. The comparisons were made on the basis of the performance of their subsystem, as well as system, elements. The models fall into three categories in light of their degree of aggregation into subsystems: (1) simplified models for first-order calculation of system performance, with easily met input requirements but limited capability to address more than a small variety of design considerations; (2) models simulating PV systems in greater detail, encompassing types primarily intended for either concentrator-incorporating or flat plate collector PV systems; and (3) models not specifically designed for PV system performance modeling, but applicable to aspects of electrical system design. Models ignoring subsystem failure or degradation are noted to exclude operating and maintenance characteristics as well.

  14. Molecular cloning, sequence analysis and homology modeling of the first caudata amphibian antifreeze-like protein in axolotl (Ambystoma mexicanum).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Songyan; Gao, Jiuxiang; Lu, Yiling; Cai, Shasha; Qiao, Xue; Wang, Yipeng; Yu, Haining

    2013-08-01

    Antifreeze proteins (AFPs) refer to a class of polypeptides that are produced by certain vertebrates, plants, fungi, and bacteria and which permit their survival in subzero environments. In this study, we report the molecular cloning, sequence analysis and three-dimensional structure of the axolotl antifreeze-like protein (AFLP) by homology modeling of the first caudate amphibian AFLP. We constructed a full-length spleen cDNA library of axolotl (Ambystoma mexicanum). An EST having highest similarity (∼42%) with freeze-responsive liver protein Li16 from Rana sylvatica was identified, and the full-length cDNA was subsequently obtained by RACE-PCR. The axolotl antifreeze-like protein sequence represents an open reading frame for a putative signal peptide and the mature protein composed of 93 amino acids. The calculated molecular mass and the theoretical isoelectric point (pl) of this mature protein were 10128.6 Da and 8.97, respectively. The molecular characterization of this gene and its deduced protein were further performed by detailed bioinformatics analysis. The three-dimensional structure of current AFLP was predicted by homology modeling, and the conserved residues required for functionality were identified. The homology model constructed could be of use for effective drug design. This is the first report of an antifreeze-like protein identified from a caudate amphibian.

  15. PETRA. The Forecast Model. Synthesis report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-09-01

    The aim of the PETRA project was to develop a model that could recreate the main aspects involved in the demand for travel. The attainment of this objective requires that the model system should retain a high degree of detail and be based on disaggregate models. This was both to ensure an accurate representation of the underlying behavioural intentions, and allow analysis of the underlying travel demand and related aspects across a number of dimensions. This has been achieved in all main respects. The model system is capable of close reproduction of the observed behaviour and generally responds as expected to changes, exhibiting consistent and plausible reactions. The dis-aggregation of the forecast population, according to the various criteria, allows the model to clearly illustrates the behavioural differences between different population segments. Thus, it seems reasonable to conclude that PETRA is capable of detailed analyses of the distributional and behavioural effects of policy changes. (au) EFP-94. 20 refs.

  16. SEISMIC MODELING ENGINES PHASE 1 FINAL REPORT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    BRUCE P. MARION

    2006-02-09

    Seismic modeling is a core component of petroleum exploration and production today. Potential applications include modeling the influence of dip on anisotropic migration; source/receiver placement in deviated-well three-dimensional surveys for vertical seismic profiling (VSP); and the generation of realistic data sets for testing contractor-supplied migration algorithms or for interpreting AVO (amplitude variation with offset) responses. This project was designed to extend the use of a finite-difference modeling package, developed at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratories, to the advanced applications needed by industry. The approach included a realistic, easy-to-use 2-D modeling package for the desktop of the practicing geophysicist. The feasibility of providing a wide-ranging set of seismic modeling engines was fully demonstrated in Phase I. The technical focus was on adding variable gridding in both the horizontal and vertical directions, incorporating attenuation, improving absorbing boundary conditions and adding the optional coefficient finite difference methods.

  17. Zebrafish as a model system to study the physiological function of telomeric protein TPP1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yiying Xie

    Full Text Available Telomeres are specialized chromatin structures at the end of chromosomes. Telomere dysfunction can lead to chromosomal abnormalities, DNA damage responses, and even cancer. In mammalian cells, a six-protein complex (telosome/shelterin is assembled on the telomeres through the interactions between various domain structures of the six telomere proteins (POT1, TPP1, TIN2, TRF1, TRF2 and RAP1, and functions in telomere maintenance and protection. Within the telosome, TPP1 interacts directly with POT1 and TIN2 and help to mediate telosome assembly. Mechanisms of telomere regulation have been extensively studied in a variety of model organisms. For example, the physiological roles of telomere-targeted proteins have been assessed in mice through homozygous inactivation. In these cases, early embryonic lethality has prevented further studies of these proteins in embryogenesis and development. As a model system, zebrafish offers unique advantages such as genetic similarities with human, rapid developmental cycles, and ease of manipulation of its embryos. In this report, we detailed the identification of zebrafish homologues of TPP1, POT1, and TIN2, and showed that the domain structures and interactions of these telosome components appeared intact in zebrafish. Importantly, knocking down TPP1 led to multiple abnormalities in zebrafish embryogenesis, including neural death, heart malformation, and caudal defect. And these embryos displayed extensive apoptosis. These results underline the importance of TPP1 in zebrafish embryogenesis, and highlight the feasibility and advantages of investigating the signaling pathways and physiological function of telomere proteins in zebrafish.

  18. Design verification and cold-flow modeling test report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-07-01

    This report presents a compilation of the following three test reports prepared by TRW for Alaska Industrial Development and Export Authority (AIDEA) as part of the Healy Clean Coal Project, Phase 1 Design of the TRW Combustor and Auxiliary Systems, which is co-sponsored by the Department of Energy under the Clean Coal Technology 3 Program: (1) Design Verification Test Report, dated April 1993, (2) Combustor Cold Flow Model Report, dated August 28, 1992, (3) Coal Feed System Cold Flow Model Report, October 28, 1992. In this compilation, these three reports are included in one volume consisting of three parts, and TRW proprietary information has been excluded.

  19. Interferon-induced antiviral resistance. A mathematical model of regulation of Mx1 protein induction and action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bazhan, S I; Belova, O E

    1999-06-07

    Influenza A virus and various single-stranded RNA viruses have been reported to be blocked by IFN-stimulated Mx protein. Here we present a mathematical model of regulation of mouse Mx1 protein induction and action under influenza infection. Parameter estimates are derived from published experimental data. Numerical solutions of the model equations completely correspond to experimental data. The model is used to analyse the role of virus- and interferon-mediated expression of Mx1 in maintenance of antiviral state. The study suggests that virus- and IFN-induced Mx1 proteins act on different stages of intracellular ontogenesis of influenza virus and these actions result in different efficacy of cell protection. The model demonstrates that the synergistic action of inteferon and virus in regulation of Mx1 gene expression is the important factor of antiviral resistance. The results of simulation permit to assume that the active form of Mx1 protein is trimer.

  20. Factors influencing protein tyrosine nitration--structure-based predictive models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayden, Alexander S; Yakovlev, Vasily A; Graves, Paul R; Mikkelsen, Ross B; Kellogg, Glen E

    2011-03-15

    Models for exploring tyrosine nitration in proteins have been created based on 3D structural features of 20 proteins for which high-resolution X-ray crystallographic or NMR data are available and for which nitration of 35 total tyrosines has been experimentally proven under oxidative stress. Factors suggested in previous work to enhance nitration were examined with quantitative structural descriptors. The role of neighboring acidic and basic residues is complex: for the majority of tyrosines that are nitrated the distance to the heteroatom of the closest charged side chain corresponds to the distance needed for suspected nitrating species to form hydrogen bond bridges between the tyrosine and that charged amino acid. This suggests that such bridges play a very important role in tyrosine nitration. Nitration is generally hindered for tyrosines that are buried and for those tyrosines for which there is insufficient space for the nitro group. For in vitro nitration, closed environments with nearby heteroatoms or unsaturated centers that can stabilize radicals are somewhat favored. Four quantitative structure-based models, depending on the conditions of nitration, have been developed for predicting site-specific tyrosine nitration. The best model, relevant for both in vitro and in vivo cases, predicts 30 of 35 tyrosine nitrations (positive predictive value) and has a sensitivity of 60/71 (11 false positives). Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Enzymatic hydrolysis of protein:mechanism and kinetic model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qi Wei; He Zhimin

    2006-01-01

    The bioreaction mechanism and kinetic behavior of protein enzymatic hydrolysis for preparing active peptides were investigated to model and characterize the enzymatic hydrolysis curves.Taking into account single-substrate hydrolysis,enzyme inactivation and substrate or product inhibition,the reaction mechanism could be deduced from a series of experimental results carried out in a stirred tank reactor at different substrate concentrations,enzyme concentrations and temperatures based on M-M equation.An exponential equation dh/dt = aexp(-bh) was also established,where parameters a and b have different expressions according to different reaction mechanisms,and different values for different reaction systems.For BSA-trypsin model system,the regressive results agree with the experimental data,i.e.the average relative error was only 4.73%,and the reaction constants were determined as Km = 0.0748 g/L,Ks = 7.961 g/L,kd = 9.358/min,k2 =38.439/min,Ea= 64.826 kJ/mol,Ed= 80.031 kJ/mol in accordance with the proposed kinetic mode.The whole set of exponential kinetic equations can be used to model the bioreaction process of protein enzymatic hydrolysis,to calculate the thermodynamic and kinetic constants,and to optimize the operating parameters for bioreactor design.

  2. Mechanism test bed. Flexible body model report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Compton, Jimmy

    1991-01-01

    The Space Station Mechanism Test Bed is a six degree-of-freedom motion simulation facility used to evaluate docking and berthing hardware mechanisms. A generalized rigid body math model was developed which allowed the computation of vehicle relative motion in six DOF due to forces and moments from mechanism contact, attitude control systems, and gravity. No vehicle size limitations were imposed in the model. The equations of motion were based on Hill's equations for translational motion with respect to a nominal circular earth orbit and Newton-Euler equations for rotational motion. This rigid body model and supporting software were being refined.

  3. Protein-protein interaction networks identify targets which rescue the MPP+ cellular model of Parkinson’s disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keane, Harriet; Ryan, Brent J.; Jackson, Brendan; Whitmore, Alan; Wade-Martins, Richard

    2015-11-01

    Neurodegenerative diseases are complex multifactorial disorders characterised by the interplay of many dysregulated physiological processes. As an exemplar, Parkinson’s disease (PD) involves multiple perturbed cellular functions, including mitochondrial dysfunction and autophagic dysregulation in preferentially-sensitive dopamine neurons, a selective pathophysiology recapitulated in vitro using the neurotoxin MPP+. Here we explore a network science approach for the selection of therapeutic protein targets in the cellular MPP+ model. We hypothesised that analysis of protein-protein interaction networks modelling MPP+ toxicity could identify proteins critical for mediating MPP+ toxicity. Analysis of protein-protein interaction networks constructed to model the interplay of mitochondrial dysfunction and autophagic dysregulation (key aspects of MPP+ toxicity) enabled us to identify four proteins predicted to be key for MPP+ toxicity (P62, GABARAP, GBRL1 and GBRL2). Combined, but not individual, knockdown of these proteins increased cellular susceptibility to MPP+ toxicity. Conversely, combined, but not individual, over-expression of the network targets provided rescue of MPP+ toxicity associated with the formation of autophagosome-like structures. We also found that modulation of two distinct proteins in the protein-protein interaction network was necessary and sufficient to mitigate neurotoxicity. Together, these findings validate our network science approach to multi-target identification in complex neurological diseases.

  4. Elastic-contractile model proteins: Physical chemistry, protein function and drug design and delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urry, Dan W; Urry, Kelley D; Szaflarski, Witold; Nowicki, Michal

    2010-12-30

    This review presents the structure and physico-chemical properties of ECMPs, elastic-contractile model proteins using sparse design modifications of elastic (GVGVP)(n); it describes the capacity of ECMP to perform the energy conversions that sustain living organisms; it arrives at the hydration thermodynamics of ECMP in terms of the change in Gibbs free energy of hydrophobic association, ΔG(HA), and the apolar-polar repulsive free energy of hydration, ΔG(ap); it applies ΔG(HA), ΔG(ap), and the nature of elasticity to describe the function of basic diverse proteins, namely - the F₁-motor of ATP synthase, Complex III of mitochondria, the KscA potassium-channel, and the molecular chaperonin, GroEL/ES; it applies ΔG(HA) and ΔG(ap) to describe the function of ABC exporter proteins that confer multi-drug resistance (MDR) on micro-organisms and human carcinomas and suggests drug modifications with which to overcome MDR. Using ECMP, means are demonstrated, for quantifying drug hydrophobicity with which to combat MDR and for preparing ECMP drug delivery nanoparticles, ECMPddnp, decorated with synthetic antigen-binding fragments, Fab1 and Fab2, with which to target specific up-regulated receptors, characteristic of human carcinoma cells, for binding and localized drug release. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Pharmacophore modeling for protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bharatham, Kavitha; Bharatham, Nagakumar; Lee, Keun Woo

    2007-05-01

    A three dimensional chemical feature based pharmacophore model was developed for the inhibitors of protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B (PTP1B) using the CATALYST software, which would provide useful knowledge for performing virtual screening to identify new inhibitors targeted toward type II diabetes and obesity. A dataset of 27 inhibitors, with diverse structural properties, and activities ranging from 0.026 to 600 microM, was selected as a training set. Hypol, the most reliable quantitative four featured pharmacophore hypothesis, was generated from a training set composed of compounds with two H-bond acceptors, one hydrophobic aromatic and one ring aromatic features. It has a correlation coefficient, RMSD and cost difference (null cost-total cost) of 0.946, 0.840 and 65.731, respectively. The best hypothesis (Hypol) was validated using four different methods. Firstly, a cross validation was performed by randomizing the data using the Cat-Scramble technique. The results confirmed that the pharmacophore models generated from the training set were valid. Secondly, a test set of 281 molecules was scored, with a correlation of 0.882 obtained between the experimental and predicted activities. Hypol performed well in correctly discriminating the active and inactive molecules. Thirdly, the model was investigated by mapping on two PTP1B inhibitors identified by different pharmaceutical companies. The Hypol model correctly predicted these compounds as being highly active. Finally, docking simulations were performed on few compounds to substantiate the role of the pharmacophore features at the binding site of the protein by analyzing their binding conformations. These multiple validation approaches provided confidence in the utility of this pharmacophore model as a 3D query for virtual screening to retrieve new chemical entities showing potential as potent PTP1B inhibitors.

  6. A rapid and quantitative coat protein complex II vesicle formation assay using luciferase reporters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fromme, J Chris; Kim, Jinoh

    2012-02-15

    The majority of protein export from the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) is facilitated by coat protein complex II (COPII). The COPII proteins deform the ER membrane into vesicles at the ER exit sites. During the vesicle formation step, the COPII proteins load cargo molecules into the vesicles. Formation of COPII vesicles has been reconstituted in vitro in yeast and in mammalian systems. These in vitro COPII vesicle formation assays involve incubation of microsomal membranes and purified COPII proteins with nucleotides. COPII vesicles are separated from the microsomes by differential centrifugation. Interestingly, the efficiency of the COPII vesicle formation with purified recombinant mammalian COPII proteins is lower than that with cytosol, suggesting that an additional cytosolic factor(s) is involved in this process. Indeed, other studies have also implicated additional factors. To facilitate biochemical identification of such regulators, a rapid and quantitative COPII vesicle formation assay is necessary because the current assay is lengthy. To expedite this assay, we generated luciferase reporter constructs. The reporter proteins were packaged into COPII vesicles and yielded quantifiable luminescent signals, resulting in a rapid and quantitative COPII vesicle formation assay.

  7. Express your LOV: an engineered flavoprotein as a reporter for protein expression and purification.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jayde A Gawthorne

    Full Text Available In this work, we describe the utility of Light, Oxygen, or Voltage-sensing (LOV flavoprotein domains from plant phototropins as a reporter for protein expression and function. Specifically, we used iLOV, an enhanced and more photostable variant of LOV. A pET-based plasmid for protein expression was constructed, encoding a C terminal iLOV-octahistidine (His8-tag and a HRV 3C protease cleavage recognition site. Ten different proteins, with various sub-cellular locations, were cloned into the plasmid, creating iLOV-His8 tag fusions. To test protein expression and how iLOV could be used as a reporter, the proteins were expressed in three different cell lines, in four different culture media, at two different temperatures. To establish whether the presence of the iLOV tag could have an impact on the functionality, one of the proteins, EspG, was over-expressed and purified. EspG is an "effector" protein normally produced by enterohemorrhagic E. coli strains and "injected" into host cells via the T3SS. We tested functionality of EspG-iLOV fusion by performing functional studies of EspG in mammalian host cells. When EspG-iLOV was microinjected into the host cell, the Golgi apparatus was completely disrupted as had previously been observed for EspG.

  8. Analysis and Ranking of Protein-Protein Docking Models Using Inter-Residue Contacts and Inter-Molecular Contact Maps

    KAUST Repository

    Oliva, Romina

    2015-07-01

    In view of the increasing interest both in inhibitors of protein-protein interactions and in protein drugs themselves, analysis of the three-dimensional structure of protein-protein complexes is assuming greater relevance in drug design. In the many cases where an experimental structure is not available, protein-protein docking becomes the method of choice for predicting the arrangement of the complex. However, reliably scoring protein-protein docking poses is still an unsolved problem. As a consequence, the screening of many docking models is usually required in the analysis step, to possibly single out the correct ones. Here, making use of exemplary cases, we review our recently introduced methods for the analysis of protein complex structures and for the scoring of protein docking poses, based on the use of inter-residue contacts and their visualization in inter-molecular contact maps. We also show that the ensemble of tools we developed can be used in the context of rational drug design targeting protein-protein interactions.

  9. Facility Modeling Capability Demonstration Summary Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Key, Brian P. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Sadasivan, Pratap [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Fallgren, Andrew James [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Demuth, Scott Francis [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Aleman, Sebastian E. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); de Almeida, Valmor F. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Chiswell, Steven R. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Hamm, Larry [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Tingey, Joel M. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2017-02-01

    A joint effort has been initiated by Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), Savanah River National Laboratory (SRNL), Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), sponsored by the National Nuclear Security Administration’s (NNSA’s) office of Proliferation Detection, to develop and validate a flexible framework for simulating effluents and emissions from spent fuel reprocessing facilities. These effluents and emissions can be measured by various on-site and/or off-site means, and then the inverse problem can ideally be solved through modeling and simulation to estimate characteristics of facility operation such as the nuclear material production rate. The flexible framework called Facility Modeling Toolkit focused on the forward modeling of PUREX reprocessing facility operating conditions from fuel storage and chopping to effluent and emission measurements.

  10. Protein folding: the optically induced electronic excitations model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeknic-Dugic, J [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Nis (Serbia)], E-mail: jjeknic@pmf.ni.ac.yu

    2009-07-15

    The large-molecules conformational transitions problem (the 'protein folding problem') is an open issue of vivid current science research work of fundamental importance for a number of modern science disciplines as well as for nanotechnology. Here, we elaborate the recently proposed quantum-decoherence-based approach to the issue. First, we emphasize a need for detecting the elementary quantum mechanical processes (whose combinations may give a proper description of the realistic experimental situations) and then we design such a model. As distinct from the standard approach that deals with the conformation system, we investigate the optically induced transitions in the molecule electrons system that, in effect, may give rise to a conformation change in the molecule. Our conclusion is that such a model may describe the comparatively slow conformational transitions.

  11. The electronic excited states of green fluorescent protein chromophore models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olsen, Seth Carlton

    We explore the properties of quantum chemical approximations to the excited states of model chromophores of the green fluorescent protein of A. victoria. We calculate several low-lying states by several methods of quantum chemical calculation, including state-averaged complete active space SCF (CASSCF) methods, time dependent density functional theory (TDDFT), equation-of motion coupled cluster (EOM-CCSD) and multireference perturbation theory (MRPT). Amongst the low-lying states we identify the optically bright pipi* state of the molecules and examine its properties. We demonstrate that the state is dominated by a single configuration function. We calculate zero-time approximations to the resonance Raman spectrum of GFP chromophore models, and assign published spectra based upon these.

  12. 40 CFR 600.512-12 - Model year report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... economy standard or the “required fuel economy level” pursuant to 49 CFR part 533, as applicable. Model year reports for light trucks meeting required fuel economy levels pursuant to 49 CFR 533.5(g) and (h... requirements. (9) For 2011 and later model year reports, the “required fuel economy level” pursuant to 49...

  13. 40 CFR 600.512-08 - Model year report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ...” pursuant to 49 CFR part 533, as applicable. Model year reports for light trucks meeting required fuel economy levels pursuant to 49 CFR 533.5(g) and (h) shall include information in sufficient detail to... reports, the “required fuel economy level” pursuant to 49 CFR parts 531 or 533, as applicable. Model...

  14. Enhanced Stability of the Model Mini-protein in Amino Acid Ionic Liquids and Their Aqueous Solutions

    CERN Document Server

    Chevrot, Guillaume; Chaban, Vitaly V

    2015-01-01

    Using molecular dynamics simulations, the structure of model mini-protein was thoroughly characterized in the imidazolium-based amino acid ionic liquids and their aqueous solutions. We report that the mini-protein is more stable when AAIL is added as a cosolvent. Complete substitution of water by organic cations and anions further results in hindered conformational flexibility of the mini-protein. This observation suggests that AAILs are able to defend proteins from thermally induced denaturation. We show by means of radial distributions that the mini-protein is efficiently solvated by both solvents due to agood mutual miscibility. However, amino acid based anions prevail in the first coordination sphere of the mini-protein.

  15. A Co-infection Model System and the Use of Chimeric Proteins to Study Chlamydia Inclusion Proteins Interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Ying; Derré, Isabelle

    2017-01-01

    Chlamydia trachomatis is an obligate intracellular bacterium associated with trachoma and sexually transmitted diseases. During its intracellular developmental cycle, Chlamydia resides in a membrane bound compartment called the inclusion. A subset of Type III secreted effectors, the inclusion membrane proteins (Inc), are inserted into the inclusion membrane. Inc proteins are strategically positioned to promote inclusion interaction with host factors and organelles, a process required for bacterial replication, but little is known about Inc proteins function or host interacting partners. Moreover, it is unclear whether each Inc protein has a distinct function or if a subset of Inc proteins interacts with one another to perform their function. Here, we used IncD as a model to investigate Inc/Inc interaction in the context of Inc protein expression in C. trachomatis. We developed a co-infection model system to display different tagged Inc proteins on the surface of the same inclusion. We also designed chimeric Inc proteins to delineate domains important for interaction. We showed that IncD can self-interact and that the full-length protein is required for dimerization and/or oligomerization. Altogether our approach can be generalized to any Inc protein and will help to characterize the molecular mechanisms by which Chlamydia Inc proteins interact with themselves and/or host factors, eventually leading to a better understanding of C. trachomatis interaction with the mammalian host. PMID:28352612

  16. Theory, modeling and simulation: Annual report 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dunning, T.H. Jr.; Garrett, B.C.

    1994-07-01

    Developing the knowledge base needed to address the environmental restoration issues of the US Department of Energy requires a fundamental understanding of molecules and their interactions in insolation and in liquids, on surfaces, and at interfaces. To meet these needs, the PNL has established the Environmental and Molecular Sciences Laboratory (EMSL) and will soon begin construction of a new, collaborative research facility devoted to advancing the understanding of environmental molecular science. Research in the Theory, Modeling, and Simulation program (TMS), which is one of seven research directorates in the EMSL, will play a critical role in understanding molecular processes important in restoring DOE`s research, development and production sites, including understanding the migration and reactions of contaminants in soils and groundwater, the development of separation process for isolation of pollutants, the development of improved materials for waste storage, understanding the enzymatic reactions involved in the biodegradation of contaminants, and understanding the interaction of hazardous chemicals with living organisms. The research objectives of the TMS program are to apply available techniques to study fundamental molecular processes involved in natural and contaminated systems; to extend current techniques to treat molecular systems of future importance and to develop techniques for addressing problems that are computationally intractable at present; to apply molecular modeling techniques to simulate molecular processes occurring in the multispecies, multiphase systems characteristic of natural and polluted environments; and to extend current molecular modeling techniques to treat complex molecular systems and to improve the reliability and accuracy of such simulations. The program contains three research activities: Molecular Theory/Modeling, Solid State Theory, and Biomolecular Modeling/Simulation. Extended abstracts are presented for 89 studies.

  17. Multi-Component Protein - Protein Docking Based Protocol with External Scoring for Modeling Dimers of G Protein-Coupled Receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaczor, Agnieszka A; Guixà-González, Ramon; Carrió, Pau; Poso, Antti; Dove, Stefan; Pastor, Manuel; Selent, Jana

    2015-04-01

    In order to apply structure-based drug design techniques to GPCR complexes, it is essential to model their 3D structure. For this purpose, a multi-component protocol was derived based on protein-protein docking which generates populations of dimers compatible with membrane integration, considering all reasonable interfaces. At the next stage, we applied a scoring procedure based on up to eleven different parameters including shape or electrostatics complementarity. Two methods of consensus scoring were performed: (i) average scores of 100 best scored dimers with respect to each interface, and (ii) frequencies of interfaces among 100 best scored dimers. In general, our multi-component protocol gives correct indications for dimer interfaces that have been observed in X-ray crystal structures of GPCR dimers (opsin dimer, chemokine CXCR4 and CCR5 dimers, κ opioid receptor dimer, β1 adrenergic receptor dimer and smoothened receptor dimer) but also suggests alternative dimerization interfaces. Interestingly, at times these alternative interfaces are scored higher than the experimentally observed ones suggesting them to be also relevant in the life cycle of studied GPCR dimers. Further results indicate that GPCR dimer and higher-order oligomer formation may involve transmembrane helices (TMs) TM1-TM2-TM7, TM3-TM4-TM5 or TM4-TM5-TM6 but not TM1-TM2-TM3 or TM2-TM3-TM4 which is in general agreement with available experimental and computational data.

  18. Protein

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Food Service Resources Additional Resources About FAQ Contact Protein Protein is found throughout the body—in muscle, ... the heart and respiratory system, and death. All Protein Isn’t Alike Protein is built from building ...

  19. Phylogenetic Gaussian process model for the inference of functionally important regions in protein tertiary structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yi-Fei; Golding, G Brian

    2014-01-01

    A critical question in biology is the identification of functionally important amino acid sites in proteins. Because functionally important sites are under stronger purifying selection, site-specific substitution rates tend to be lower than usual at these sites. A large number of phylogenetic models have been developed to estimate site-specific substitution rates in proteins and the extraordinarily low substitution rates have been used as evidence of function. Most of the existing tools, e.g. Rate4Site, assume that site-specific substitution rates are independent across sites. However, site-specific substitution rates may be strongly correlated in the protein tertiary structure, since functionally important sites tend to be clustered together to form functional patches. We have developed a new model, GP4Rate, which incorporates the Gaussian process model with the standard phylogenetic model to identify slowly evolved regions in protein tertiary structures. GP4Rate uses the Gaussian process to define a nonparametric prior distribution of site-specific substitution rates, which naturally captures the spatial correlation of substitution rates. Simulations suggest that GP4Rate can potentially estimate site-specific substitution rates with a much higher accuracy than Rate4Site and tends to report slowly evolved regions rather than individual sites. In addition, GP4Rate can estimate the strength of the spatial correlation of substitution rates from the data. By applying GP4Rate to a set of mammalian B7-1 genes, we found a highly conserved region which coincides with experimental evidence. GP4Rate may be a useful tool for the in silico prediction of functionally important regions in the proteins with known structures.

  20. Model documentation report: Industrial sector demand module of the national energy modeling system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-01-01

    This report documents the objectives, analytical approach, and development of the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) Industrial Demand Model. The report catalogues and describes model assumptions, computational methodology, parameter estimation techniques, and model source code. This document serves three purposes. First, it is a reference document providing a detailed description of the NEMS Industrial Model for model analysts, users, and the public. Second, this report meets the legal requirements of the Energy Information Administration (EIA) to provide adequate documentation in support of its model. Third, it facilitates continuity in model development by providing documentation from which energy analysts can undertake model enhancements, data updates, and parameter refinements as future projects.

  1. Biopolymer stochastic moments. I. Modeling human rhinovirus cellular recognition with protein surface electrostatic moments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Díaz, Humberto; Uriarte, Eugenio

    2005-04-05

    Stochastic moments may be applied as molecular descriptors in quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) studies for small molecules (H. González-Dìaz et al., Journal of Molecular Modeling, 2002, Vol. 8, pp. 237-245; 2003, Vol. 9, pp. 395-407). However, applications in the field of biopolymers are less known. Recently, the MARCH-INSIDE approach has been generalized to encode structural features of proteins and other biopolymers (H. González-Dáaz et al., Bioinformatics, 2003, Vol. 19, pp. 2079-2087; Bioorganic & Medicinal Chemistry Letters, 2004, Vol. 14, pp. 4691-4695; Polymers, 2004, Vol. 45, pp. 3845-3853; Bioorganic & Medicinal Chemistry, 2005, Vol. 13, pp. 323-331). The present article attempts to extend this research by introducing for the first time stochastic moments for a surface road map of viral proteins. These moments are afterward used to seek a model that predicts the cellular receptor for human rhinoviruses. The model correctly classified 100% of 10 viruses binding to low-density lipoprotein receptor (LDLR) and 88.9% of 9 viruses binding to the intracellular adhesion molecule (ICAM) receptors in training. The same results have been obtained in four cross-validation experiments using a resubstitution technique. The present model favorably compares, in terms of complexity, with other previously reported based on entropy considerations, and offers a quantitative basis for the visual rule previously reported by Vlasak et al.

  2. Compare local pocket and global protein structure models by small structure patterns

    KAUST Repository

    Cui, Xuefeng

    2015-09-09

    Researchers proposed several criteria to assess the quality of predicted protein structures because it is one of the essential tasks in the Critical Assessment of Techniques for Protein Structure Prediction (CASP) competitions. Popular criteria include root mean squared deviation (RMSD), MaxSub score, TM-score, GDT-TS and GDT-HA scores. All these criteria require calculation of rigid transformations to superimpose the the predicted protein structure to the native protein structure. Yet, how to obtain the rigid transformations is unknown or with high time complexity, and, hence, heuristic algorithms were proposed. In this work, we carefully design various small structure patterns, including the ones specifically tuned for local pockets. Such structure patterns are biologically meaningful, and address the issue of relying on a sufficient number of backbone residue fragments for existing methods. We sample the rigid transformations from these small structure patterns; and the optimal superpositions yield by these small structures are refined and reported. As a result, among 11; 669 pairs of predicted and native local protein pocket models from the CASP10 dataset, the GDT-TS scores calculated by our method are significantly higher than those calculated by LGA. Moreover, our program is computationally much more efficient. Source codes and executables are publicly available at http://www.cbrc.kaust.edu.sa/prosta/

  3. Lithium Decreases Glial Fibrillary Acidic Protein in a Mouse Model of Alexander Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LaPash Daniels, Christine M; Paffenroth, Elizabeth; Austin, Elizabeth V; Glebov, Konstantin; Lewis, Diana; Walter, Jochen; Messing, Albee

    2015-01-01

    Alexander disease is a fatal neurodegenerative disease caused by mutations in the astrocyte intermediate filament glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP). The disease is characterized by elevated levels of GFAP and the formation of protein aggregates, known as Rosenthal fibers, within astrocytes. Lithium has previously been shown to decrease protein aggregates by increasing the autophagy pathway for protein degradation. In addition, lithium has also been reported to decrease activation of the transcription factor STAT3, which is a regulator of GFAP transcription and astrogliogenesis. Here we tested whether lithium treatment would decrease levels of GFAP in a mouse model of Alexander disease. Mice with the Gfap-R236H point mutation were fed lithium food pellets for 4 to 8 weeks. Four weeks of treatment with LiCl at 0.5% in food pellets decreased GFAP protein and transcripts in several brain regions, although with mild side effects and some mortality. Extending the duration of treatment to 8 weeks resulted in higher mortality, and again with a decrease in GFAP in the surviving animals. Indicators of autophagy, such as LC3, were not increased, suggesting that lithium may decrease levels of GFAP through other pathways. Lithium reduced the levels of phosphorylated STAT3, suggesting this as one pathway mediating the effects on GFAP. In conclusion, lithium has the potential to decrease GFAP levels in Alexander disease, but with a narrow therapeutic window separating efficacy and toxicity.

  4. Beyond the Standard Model: Working group report

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Gautam Bhattacharyya; Amitava Raychaudhuri

    2000-07-01

    This report summarises the work done in the ‘Beyond the Standard Model’ working group of the Sixth Workshop on High Energy Physics Phenomenology (WHEPP-6) held at the Institute of Mathematical Sciences, Chennai, Jan 3–15, 2000. The participants in this working group were: R Adhikari, B Ananthanarayan, K P S Balaji, Gour Bhattacharya, Gautam Bhattacharyya, Chao-Hsi Chang (Zhang), D Choudhury, Amitava Datta, Anindya Datta, Asesh K Datta, A Dighe, N Gaur, D Ghosh, A Goyal, K Kar, S F King, Anirban Kundu, U Mahanta, R N Mohapatra, B Mukhopadhyaya, S Pakvasa, P N Pandita, M K Parida, P Poulose, G Raffelt, G Rajasekaran, S Rakshit, Asim K Ray, A Raychaudhuri, S Raychaudhuri, D P Roy, P Roy, S Roy, K Sridhar and S Vempati.

  5. Modelling of Charles Darwin's tsunami reports

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galiev, Shamil

    2010-05-01

    Darwin landed at Valdivia and Concepcion, Chile, just before, during, and after a great 1835 earthquake. He described his impressions and results of the earthquake-induced natural catastrophe in The Voyage of the Beagle. His description of the tsunami could easily be read as a report from Indonesia or Sri Lanka, after the catastrophic tsunami of 26 December 2004. In particular, Darwin emphasised the dependence of earthquake-induced waves on a form of the coast and the coastal depth: ‘… Talcuhano and Callao are situated at the head of great shoaling bays, and they have always suffered from this phenomenon; whereas, the town of Valparaiso, which is seated close on the border of a profound ocean... has never been overwhelmed by one of these terrific deluges…' . He reports also, that ‘… the whole body of the sea retires from the coast, and then returns in great waves of overwhelming force ...' (we cite the Darwin's sentences following researchspace. auckland. ac. nz/handle/2292/4474). The coastal evolution of a tsunami was analytically studied in many publications (see, for example, Synolakis, C.E., Bernard, E.N., 2006. Philos. Trans. R. Soc., Ser. A, 364, 2231-2265; Tinti, S., Tonini, R. 205. J.Fluid Mech., 535, 11-21). However, the Darwin's reports and the influence of the coastal depth on the formation and the evolution of the steep front and the profile of tsunami did not practically discuss. Recently, a mathematical theory of these phenomena was presented in researchspace. auckland. ac. nz/handle/2292/4474. The theory describes the waves which are excited due to nonlinear effects within a shallow coastal zone. The tsunami elevation is described by two components: . Here is the linear (prime) component. It describes the wave coming from the deep ocean. is the nonlinear component. This component may become very important near the coastal line. After that the theory of the shallow waves is used. This theory yields the linear equation for and the weakly

  6. Phosphate sensing by fluorecent reporter proteins embedded in poly-acrylamide nanoparticles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sun, Honghao; Scharff-Poulsen, Anne Marie; Gu, Hong;

    2008-01-01

    by soluble proteases to some extent. This nanoparticle embedding method provides a novel promising tool for in vivo metabolite studies. It also demonstrates a universal method for embedding different fragile bioactive elements, such as antibodies, genes, enzymes, and other functional proteins......Phosphate sensors were developed by embedding fluorescent reporter proteins (FLIPPi) in polyacrylamide nanoparticles; with diameters from 40 to 120 nm. The sensor activity and protein loading efficiency varied according to nanoparticle composition, that is, the total monomer content (% T......) and the cross-linker content (% C). Nanoparticles with 28% T and 20% C were considered optimal as a result of relatively high loading efficiency (50.6%) as well as high protein activity (50%). The experimental results prove that the cross-linked polyacrylamide matrix could protect FLIPPi from degradation...

  7. Illuminating the origins of spectral properties of green fluorescent proteins via proteochemometric and molecular modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nantasenamat, Chanin; Simeon, Saw; Owasirikul, Wiwat; Songtawee, Napat; Lapins, Maris; Prachayasittikul, Virapong; Wikberg, Jarl E S

    2014-10-15

    Green fluorescent protein (GFP) has immense utility in biomedical imaging owing to its autofluorescent nature. In efforts to broaden the spectral diversity of GFP, there have been several reports of engineered mutants via rational design and random mutagenesis. Understanding the origins of spectral properties of GFP could be achieved by means of investigating its structure-activity relationship. The first quantitative structure-property relationship study for modeling the spectral properties, particularly the excitation and emission maximas, of GFP was previously proposed by us some years ago in which quantum chemical descriptors were used for model development. However, such simplified model does not consider possible effects that neighboring amino acids have on the conjugated π-system of GFP chromophore. This study describes the development of a unified proteochemometric model in which the GFP chromophore and amino acids in its vicinity are both considered in the same model. The predictive performance of the model was verified by internal and external validation as well as Y-scrambling. Our strategy provides a general solution for elucidating the contribution that specific ligand and protein descriptors have on the investigated spectral property, which may be useful in engineering novel GFP variants with desired characteristics.

  8. Contact prediction in protein modeling: Scoring, folding and refinement of coarse-grained models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kolinski Andrzej

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Several different methods for contact prediction succeeded within the Sixth Critical Assessment of Techniques for Protein Structure Prediction (CASP6. The most relevant were non-local contact predictions for targets from the most difficult categories: fold recognition-analogy and new fold. Such contacts could provide valuable structural information in case a template structure cannot be found in the PDB. Results We described comprehensive tests of the effectiveness of contact data in various aspects of de novo modeling with CABS, an algorithm which was used successfully in CASP6 by the Kolinski-Bujnicki group. We used the predicted contacts in a simple scoring function for the post-simulation ranking of protein models and as a soft bias in the folding simulations and in the fold-refinement procedure. The latter approach turned out to be the most successful. The CABS force field used in the Replica Exchange Monte Carlo simulations cooperated with the true contacts and discriminated the false ones, which resulted in an improvement of the majority of Kolinski-Bujnicki's protein models. In the modeling we tested different sets of predicted contact data submitted to the CASP6 server. According to our results, the best performing were the contacts with the accuracy balanced with the coverage, obtained either from the best two predictors only or by a consensus from as many predictors as possible. Conclusion Our tests have shown that theoretically predicted contacts can be very beneficial for protein structure prediction. Depending on the protein modeling method, a contact data set applied should be prepared with differently balanced coverage and accuracy of predicted contacts. Namely, high coverage of contact data is important for the model ranking and high accuracy for the folding simulations.

  9. An Introductory Classroom Exercise on Protein Molecular Model Visualization and Detailed Analysis of Protein-Ligand Binding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poeylaut-Palena, Andres, A.; de los Angeles Laborde, Maria

    2013-01-01

    A learning module for molecular level analysis of protein structure and ligand/drug interaction through the visualization of X-ray diffraction is presented. Using DeepView as molecular model visualization software, students learn about the general concepts of protein structure. This Biochemistry classroom exercise is designed to be carried out by…

  10. Update to Core reporting practices in structural equation modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schreiber, James B

    2016-07-21

    This paper is a technical update to "Core Reporting Practices in Structural Equation Modeling."(1) As such, the content covered in this paper includes, sample size, missing data, specification and identification of models, estimation method choices, fit and residual concerns, nested, alternative, and equivalent models, and unique issues within the SEM family of techniques.

  11. Model to predict inhomogeneous protein-sugar distribution in powders prepared by spray drying

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Grasmeijer, Niels; Frijlink, Henderik W.; Hinrichs, Wouter L. J.

    2016-01-01

    A protein can be stabilized by spray drying an aqueous solution of the protein and a sugar, thereby incorporating the protein into a glassy sugar matrix. For optimal stability, the protein should be homogeneously distributed inside the sugar matrix. The aim of this study was to develop a model that

  12. Plasticized protein for 3D printing by fused deposition modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaunier, Laurent; Leroy, Eric; Della Valle, Guy; Lourdin, Denis

    2016-10-01

    The developments of Additive Manufacturing (AM) by Fused Deposition Modeling (FDM) now target new 3D printable materials, leading to novel properties like those given by biopolymers such as proteins: degradability, biocompatibility and edibility. Plasticized materials from zein, a storage protein issued from corn, present interesting thermomechanical and rheological properties, possibly matching with AM-FDM specifications. Thus commercial zein plasticized with 20% glycerol has a glass transition temperature (Tg) at about 42°C, after storage at intermediate relative humidity (RH=59%). Its principal mechanical relaxation at Tα ≈ 50°C leads to a drop of the elastic modulus from about 1.1 GPa, at ambient temperature, to 0.6 MPa at Tα+100°C. These values are in the same range as values obtained in the case of standard polymers for AM-FDM processing, as PLA and ABS, although relaxation mechanisms are likely different in these materials. Such results lead to the setting up of zein-based compositions printable by AM-FDM and allow processing bioresorbable printed parts, with designed 3D geometry and structure.

  13. Modeling associated protein-DNA pattern discovery with unified scores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Tak-Ming; Lo, Leung-Yau; Sze-To, Ho-Yin; Leung, Kwong-Sak; Xiao, Xinshu; Wong, Man-Hon

    2013-01-01

    Understanding protein-DNA interactions, specifically transcription factor (TF) and transcription factor binding site (TFBS) bindings, is crucial in deciphering gene regulation. The recent associated TF-TFBS pattern discovery combines one-sided motif discovery on both the TF and the TFBS sides. Using sequences only, it identifies the short protein-DNA binding cores available only in high-resolution 3D structures. The discovered patterns lead to promising subtype and disease analysis applications. While the related studies use either association rule mining or existing TFBS annotations, none has proposed any formal unified (both-sided) model to prioritize the top verifiable associated patterns. We propose the unified scores and develop an effective pipeline for associated TF-TFBS pattern discovery. Our stringent instance-level evaluations show that the patterns with the top unified scores match with the binding cores in 3D structures considerably better than the previous works, where up to 90 percent of the top 20 scored patterns are verified. We also introduce extended verification from literature surveys, where the high unified scores correspond to even higher verification percentage. The top scored patterns are confirmed to match the known WRKY binding cores with no available 3D structures and agree well with the top binding affinities of in vivo experiments.

  14. Induction of complement proteins in a mouse model for cerebral microvascular Aβ deposition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    DeFilippis Kelly

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The deposition of amyloid β-protein (Aβ in cerebral vasculature, known as cerebral amyloid angiopathy (CAA, is a common pathological feature of Alzheimer's disease and related disorders. In familial forms of CAA single mutations in the Aβ peptide have been linked to the increase of vascular Aβ deposits accompanied by a strong localized activation of glial cells and elevated expression of neuroinflammatory mediators including complement proteins. We have developed human amyloid-β precursor protein transgenic mice harboring two CAA Aβ mutations (Dutch E693Q and Iowa D694N that mimic the prevalent cerebral microvascular Aβ deposition observed in those patients, and the Swedish mutations (K670N/M671L to increase Aβ production. In these Tg-SwDI mice, we have reported predominant fibrillar Aβ along microvessels in the thalamic region and diffuse plaques in cortical region. Concurrently, activated microglia and reactive astrocytes have been detected primarily in association with fibrillar cerebral microvascular Aβ in this model. Here we show that three native complement components in classical and alternative complement pathways, C1q, C3, and C4, are elevated in Tg-SwDI mice in regions rich in fibrillar microvascular Aβ. Immunohistochemical staining of all three proteins was increased in thalamus, hippocampus, and subiculum, but not frontal cortex. Western blot analysis showed significant increases of all three proteins in the thalamic region (with hippocampus as well as the cortical region, except C3 that was below detection level in cortex. Also, in the thalamic region (with hippocampus, C1q and C3 mRNAs were significantly up-regulated. These complement proteins appeared to be expressed largely by activated microglial cells associated with the fibrillar microvascular Aβ deposits. Our findings demonstrate that Tg-SwDI mice exhibit elevated complement protein expression in response to fibrillar vascular Aβ deposition that is

  15. Induction of complement proteins in a mouse model for cerebral microvascular A beta deposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Rong; DeFilippis, Kelly; Van Nostrand, William E

    2007-09-18

    The deposition of amyloid beta-protein (A beta) in cerebral vasculature, known as cerebral amyloid angiopathy (CAA), is a common pathological feature of Alzheimer's disease and related disorders. In familial forms of CAA single mutations in the A beta peptide have been linked to the increase of vascular A beta deposits accompanied by a strong localized activation of glial cells and elevated expression of neuroinflammatory mediators including complement proteins. We have developed human amyloid-beta precursor protein transgenic mice harboring two CAA A beta mutations (Dutch E693Q and Iowa D694N) that mimic the prevalent cerebral microvascular A beta deposition observed in those patients, and the Swedish mutations (K670N/M671L) to increase A beta production. In these Tg-SwDI mice, we have reported predominant fibrillar A beta along microvessels in the thalamic region and diffuse plaques in cortical region. Concurrently, activated microglia and reactive astrocytes have been detected primarily in association with fibrillar cerebral microvascular A beta in this model. Here we show that three native complement components in classical and alternative complement pathways, C1q, C3, and C4, are elevated in Tg-SwDI mice in regions rich in fibrillar microvascular A beta. Immunohistochemical staining of all three proteins was increased in thalamus, hippocampus, and subiculum, but not frontal cortex. Western blot analysis showed significant increases of all three proteins in the thalamic region (with hippocampus) as well as the cortical region, except C3 that was below detection level in cortex. Also, in the thalamic region (with hippocampus), C1q and C3 mRNAs were significantly up-regulated. These complement proteins appeared to be expressed largely by activated microglial cells associated with the fibrillar microvascular A beta deposits. Our findings demonstrate that Tg-SwDI mice exhibit elevated complement protein expression in response to fibrillar vascular A beta deposition

  16. Loss of neprilysin alters protein expression in the brain of Alzheimer's disease model mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nilsson, Per; Loganathan, Krishnapriya; Sekiguchi, Misaki; Winblad, Bengt; Iwata, Nobuhisa; Saido, Takaomi C; Tjernberg, Lars O

    2015-10-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a neurodegenerative disease displaying extracellular plaques formed by the neurotoxic amyloid β-peptide (Aβ), and intracellular neurofibrillary tangles consisting of protein tau. However, how these pathologies relate to the massive neuronal death that occurs in AD brains remain elusive. Neprilysin is the major Aβ-degrading enzyme and a lack thereof increases Aβ levels in the brain twofold. To identify altered protein expression levels induced by increased Aβ levels, we performed a proteomic analysis of the brain of the AD mouse model APPsw and compared it to that of APPsw mice lacking neprilysin. To this end we established an LC-MS/MS method to analyze brain homogenate, using an (18) O-labeled internal standard to accurately quantify the protein levels. To distinguish between alterations in protein levels caused by increased Aβ levels and those induced by neprilysin deficiency independently of Aβ, the brain proteome of neprilysin deficient APPsw mice was also compared to that of neprilysin deficient mice. By this approach we identified approximately 600 proteins and the levels of 300 of these were quantified. Pathway analysis showed that many of the proteins with altered expression were involved in neurological disorders, and that tau, presenilin and APP were key regulators in the identified networks. The data have been deposited to the ProteomeXchange Consortium with identifiers PXD000968 and PXD001786 (http://proteomecentral.proteomexchange.org/dataset/PXD000968 and (http://proteomecentral.proteomexchange.org/dataset/PXD001786). Interestingly, the levels of several proteins, including some not previously reported to be linked to AD, were associated with increased Aβ levels. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  17. Amphiphilic poly-N-vinylpyrrolidone nanocarriers with incorporated model proteins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuskov, A N [Department of Polymers, D I Mendeleyev University of Chemical Technology, 9 Miusskaya Square, Moscow 125047 (Russian Federation); Villemson, A L [Department of Chemistry, M V Lomonosov Moscow State University, 119992 Moscow (Russian Federation); Shtilman, M I [Department of Polymers, D I Mendeleyev University of Chemical Technology, 9 Miusskaya Square, Moscow 125047 (Russian Federation); Larionova, N I [Department of Chemistry, M V Lomonosov Moscow State University, 119992 Moscow (Russian Federation); Tsatsakis, A M [Medical School, University of Crete, Voutes, 71409 Heraklion, Crete (Greece); Tsikalas, I [Department of Chemistry and Foundation for Research and Technology-Hellas (FORTH), University of Crete, PO Box 2208, Heraklion 71003, Crete (Greece); Rizos, A K [Department of Chemistry and Foundation for Research and Technology-Hellas (FORTH), University of Crete, PO Box 2208, Heraklion 71003, Crete (Greece)

    2007-05-23

    New nanoscaled polymeric carriers have been prepared on the basis of different amphiphilic water-soluble derivatives of poly-N-vinylpyrrolidone (PVP). The polymer self-assembly and interaction with model proteins (Bowman-Birk soybean proteinase inhibitor (BBI) and its hydrophobized derivatives) were studied in aqueous media. The possibility of inclusion of both BBI and hydrophobized oleic acid derivatives of BBI in amphiphilic PVP aggregates was investigated. It was ascertained that polymeric particles of size 50-80 nm were formed in certain concentrations of amphiphilic PVP and poorly soluble dioleic acid derivatives of BBI. Such polymeric aggregates are capable of solubilization of dioleoyl BBI with a concomitant prevention of its inactivation at low pH values.

  18. Amphiphilic poly-N-vinylpyrrolidone nanocarriers with incorporated model proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuskov, A. N.; Villemson, A. L.; Shtilman, M. I.; Larionova, N. I.; Tsatsakis, A. M.; Tsikalas, I.; Rizos, A. K.

    2007-05-01

    New nanoscaled polymeric carriers have been prepared on the basis of different amphiphilic water-soluble derivatives of poly-N-vinylpyrrolidone (PVP). The polymer self-assembly and interaction with model proteins (Bowman-Birk soybean proteinase inhibitor (BBI) and its hydrophobized derivatives) were studied in aqueous media. The possibility of inclusion of both BBI and hydrophobized oleic acid derivatives of BBI in amphiphilic PVP aggregates was investigated. It was ascertained that polymeric particles of size 50-80 nm were formed in certain concentrations of amphiphilic PVP and poorly soluble dioleic acid derivatives of BBI. Such polymeric aggregates are capable of solubilization of dioleoyl BBI with a concomitant prevention of its inactivation at low pH values.

  19. Insight into the intermolecular recognition mechanism between Keap1 and IKKβ combining homology modelling, protein-protein docking, molecular dynamics simulations and virtual alanine mutation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zheng-Yu Jiang

    Full Text Available Degradation of certain proteins through the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway is a common strategy taken by the key modulators responsible for stress responses. Kelch-like ECH-associated protein-1(Keap1, a substrate adaptor component of the Cullin3 (Cul3-based ubiquitin E3 ligase complex, mediates the ubiquitination of two key modulators, NF-E2-related factor 2 (Nrf2 and IκB kinase β (IKKβ, which are involved in the redox control of gene transcription. However, compared to the Keap1-Nrf2 protein-protein interaction (PPI, the intermolecular recognition mechanism of Keap1 and IKKβ has been poorly investigated. In order to explore the binding pattern between Keap1 and IKKβ, the PPI model of Keap1 and IKKβ was investigated. The structure of human IKKβ was constructed by means of the homology modeling method and using reported crystal structure of Xenopus laevis IKKβ as the template. A protein-protein docking method was applied to develop the Keap1-IKKβ complex model. After the refinement and visual analysis of docked proteins, the chosen pose was further optimized through molecular dynamics simulations. The resulting structure was utilized to conduct the virtual alanine mutation for the exploration of hot-spots significant for the intermolecular interaction. Overall, our results provided structural insights into the PPI model of Keap1-IKKβ and suggest that the substrate specificity of Keap1 depend on the interaction with the key tyrosines, namely Tyr525, Tyr574 and Tyr334. The study presented in the current project may be useful to design molecules that selectively modulate Keap1. The selective recognition mechanism of Keap1 with IKKβ or Nrf2 will be helpful to further know the crosstalk between NF-κB and Nrf2 signaling.

  20. Insight into the intermolecular recognition mechanism between Keap1 and IKKβ combining homology modelling, protein-protein docking, molecular dynamics simulations and virtual alanine mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Zheng-Yu; Chu, Hong-Xi; Xi, Mei-Yang; Yang, Ting-Ting; Jia, Jian-Min; Huang, Jing-Jie; Guo, Xiao-Ke; Zhang, Xiao-Jin; You, Qi-Dong; Sun, Hao-Peng

    2013-01-01

    Degradation of certain proteins through the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway is a common strategy taken by the key modulators responsible for stress responses. Kelch-like ECH-associated protein-1(Keap1), a substrate adaptor component of the Cullin3 (Cul3)-based ubiquitin E3 ligase complex, mediates the ubiquitination of two key modulators, NF-E2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) and IκB kinase β (IKKβ), which are involved in the redox control of gene transcription. However, compared to the Keap1-Nrf2 protein-protein interaction (PPI), the intermolecular recognition mechanism of Keap1 and IKKβ has been poorly investigated. In order to explore the binding pattern between Keap1 and IKKβ, the PPI model of Keap1 and IKKβ was investigated. The structure of human IKKβ was constructed by means of the homology modeling method and using reported crystal structure of Xenopus laevis IKKβ as the template. A protein-protein docking method was applied to develop the Keap1-IKKβ complex model. After the refinement and visual analysis of docked proteins, the chosen pose was further optimized through molecular dynamics simulations. The resulting structure was utilized to conduct the virtual alanine mutation for the exploration of hot-spots significant for the intermolecular interaction. Overall, our results provided structural insights into the PPI model of Keap1-IKKβ and suggest that the substrate specificity of Keap1 depend on the interaction with the key tyrosines, namely Tyr525, Tyr574 and Tyr334. The study presented in the current project may be useful to design molecules that selectively modulate Keap1. The selective recognition mechanism of Keap1 with IKKβ or Nrf2 will be helpful to further know the crosstalk between NF-κB and Nrf2 signaling.

  1. Function of the hemochromatosis protein HFE: Lessons from animal models

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Kostas Pantopoulos

    2008-01-01

    Hereditary hemochromatosis (HH) is caused by chronic hyperabsorption of dietary iron. Progressive accumulation of excess iron within tissue parenchymal cells may lead to severe organ damage. The most prevalent type of HH is linked to mutations in the HFE gene, encoding an atypical major histocompatibility complex class Ⅰ molecule. Shortly after its discovery in 1996, the hemochromatosis protein HFE was shown to physically interact with transferrin receptor 1 (TfR1)and impair the uptake of transferrin-bound iron in cells. However, these findings provided no clue why /-/FE mutations associate with systemic iron overload.It was later established that all forms of HH result from misregulation of hepcidin expression. This liverderived circulating peptide hormone controls iron efflux from duodenal enterocytes and reticuloendothelial macrophages by promoting the degradation of the iron exporter ferroportin. Recent studies with animal models of HH uncover a crucial role of HFE as a hepatocyte iron sensor and upstream regulator of helpcidin. Thus,hepatocyte HFE is indispensable for signaling to hepcidin, presumably as a constituent of a larger ironsensing complex. A working model postulates that the signaling activity of HFE is silenced when the protein is bound to TfR1. An increase in the iron saturation of plasma transferrin leads to displacement of TfR1 from HFE and assembly of the putative iron-sensing complex.In this way, iron uptake by the hepatocyte is translated into upregulation of hepcidin, reinforcing the concept that the liver is the major regulatory site for systemic iron homeostasis, and not merely an iron storage depot.

  2. Dynamical modeling of microRNA action on the protein translation process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barillot Emmanuel

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Protein translation is a multistep process which can be represented as a cascade of biochemical reactions (initiation, ribosome assembly, elongation, etc., the rate of which can be regulated by small non-coding microRNAs through multiple mechanisms. It remains unclear what mechanisms of microRNA action are the most dominant: moreover, many experimental reports deliver controversial messages on what is the concrete mechanism actually observed in the experiment. Nissan and Parker have recently demonstrated that it might be impossible to distinguish alternative biological hypotheses using the steady state data on the rate of protein synthesis. For their analysis they used two simple kinetic models of protein translation. Results In contrary to the study by Nissan and Parker, we show that dynamical data allow discriminating some of the mechanisms of microRNA action. We demonstrate this using the same models as developed by Nissan and Parker for the sake of comparison but the methods developed (asymptotology of biochemical networks can be used for other models. We formulate a hypothesis that the effect of microRNA action is measurable and observable only if it affects the dominant system (generalization of the limiting step notion for complex networks of the protein translation machinery. The dominant system can vary in different experimental conditions that can partially explain the existing controversy of some of the experimental data. Conclusions Our analysis of the transient protein translation dynamics shows that it gives enough information to verify or reject a hypothesis about a particular molecular mechanism of microRNA action on protein translation. For multiscale systems only that action of microRNA is distinguishable which affects the parameters of dominant system (critical parameters, or changes the dominant system itself. Dominant systems generalize and further develop the old and very popular idea of limiting step

  3. Organic acid modeling and model validation: Workshop summary. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sullivan, T.J.; Eilers, J.M.

    1992-08-14

    A workshop was held in Corvallis, Oregon on April 9--10, 1992 at the offices of E&S Environmental Chemistry, Inc. The purpose of this workshop was to initiate research efforts on the entitled ``Incorporation of an organic acid representation into MAGIC (Model of Acidification of Groundwater in Catchments) and testing of the revised model using Independent data sources.`` The workshop was attended by a team of internationally-recognized experts in the fields of surface water acid-bass chemistry, organic acids, and watershed modeling. The rationale for the proposed research is based on the recent comparison between MAGIC model hindcasts and paleolimnological inferences of historical acidification for a set of 33 statistically-selected Adirondack lakes. Agreement between diatom-inferred and MAGIC-hindcast lakewater chemistry in the earlier research had been less than satisfactory. Based on preliminary analyses, it was concluded that incorporation of a reasonable organic acid representation into the version of MAGIC used for hindcasting was the logical next step toward improving model agreement.

  4. Monte Carlo simulations of the HP model (the "Ising model" of protein folding)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ying Wai; Wüst, Thomas; Landau, David P.

    2011-09-01

    Using Wang-Landau sampling with suitable Monte Carlo trial moves (pull moves and bond-rebridging moves combined) we have determined the density of states and thermodynamic properties for a short sequence of the HP protein model. For free chains these proteins are known to first undergo a collapse "transition" to a globule state followed by a second "transition" into a native state. When placed in the proximity of an attractive surface, there is a competition between surface adsorption and folding that leads to an intriguing sequence of "transitions". These transitions depend upon the relative interaction strengths and are largely inaccessible to "standard" Monte Carlo methods.

  5. Fleet Compliance Annual Report: Model Year 2015, Fiscal Year 2016

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2016-12-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) regulates covered state government and alternative fuel provider fleets, pursuant to the Energy Policy Act of 1992 (EPAct), as amended. This report details compliance for model year 2015, fiscal year 2016.

  6. Multiple abdominal veins thrombosis secondary to protein s deficiency - a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kodali, Venkata Umakant; Borra, Seshulakshmi; Mandarapu, Surendra Babu; Sanda, Mallikarjuna Rao; Bolla, Srinivasa Rao

    2014-06-01

    Abdominal venous thrombosis may present either as Budd-Chiari syndrome (BCS) caused by hepatic vein or proximal inferior vena cava (IVC) obstruction or as an extra hepatic portal obstruction (EHPVO) caused by Portal vein thrombosis or mesenteric vein thrombosis, but a mixed involvement is uncommon. Multiple abdominal venous obstructions presenting with thrombosis of hepatic vein, IVC, portal vein and renal vein are very rarely seen . We are reporting a rare case with thrombosis of IVC, hepatic vein, portal vein and renal vein, with protein S and protein C deficiencies, which was managed by giving anticoagulant therapy.

  7. Thrombophilia and dental surgery: a report of dental extraction in a patient with protein S deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crean, S J; Sivarajasingam, V; Muhammed, J; Sharma, V; Fardy, M

    2000-01-01

    Most patients with thrombophilia are asymptomatic. A case is presented here of a young woman with protein S deficiency, one of the thrombophilias, who required dental extraction. Protein S deficiency predisposes a very small number of those affected to life-threatening thromboses and emboli, for which they are required to take lifelong prophylactic anticoagulation. This report emphasizes the need to liaise closely with haematology departments when deciding whether heparinization is required for patients already taking warfarin. The role of low-molecular-weight heparins is highlighted, a brief review of thrombophilia is given and the management of patients who are taking warfarin and need dental surgery is discussed.

  8. A Working Model of Protein Synthesis Using Lego(TM) Building Blocks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Templin, Mark A.; Fetters, Marcia K.

    2002-01-01

    Uses Lego building blocks to improve the effectiveness of teaching about protein synthesis. Provides diagrams and pictures for a 2-3 day student activity. Discusses mRNA, transfer RNA, and a protein synthesis model. (MVL)

  9. Membrane Compartmentalization Reducing the Mobility of Lipids and Proteins within a Model Plasma Membrane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koldsø, Heidi; Reddy, Tyler; Fowler, Philip W; Duncan, Anna L; Sansom, Mark S P

    2016-09-01

    The cytoskeleton underlying cell membranes may influence the dynamic organization of proteins and lipids within the bilayer by immobilizing certain transmembrane (TM) proteins and forming corrals within the membrane. Here, we present coarse-grained resolution simulations of a biologically realistic membrane model of asymmetrically organized lipids and TM proteins. We determine the effects of a model of cytoskeletal immobilization of selected membrane proteins using long time scale coarse-grained molecular dynamics simulations. By introducing compartments with varying degrees of restraints within the membrane models, we are able to reveal how compartmentalization caused by cytoskeletal immobilization leads to reduced and anomalous diffusional mobility of both proteins and lipids. This in turn results in a reduced rate of protein dimerization within the membrane and of hopping of membrane proteins between compartments. These simulations provide a molecular realization of hierarchical models often invoked to explain single-molecule imaging studies of membrane proteins.

  10. A Practical Teaching Course in Directed Protein Evolution Using the Green Fluorescent Protein as a Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruller, Roberto; Silva-Rocha, Rafael; Silva, Artur; Schneider, Maria Paula Cruz; Ward, Richard John

    2011-01-01

    Protein engineering is a powerful tool, which correlates protein structure with specific functions, both in applied biotechnology and in basic research. Here, we present a practical teaching course for engineering the green fluorescent protein (GFP) from "Aequorea victoria" by a random mutagenesis strategy using error-prone polymerase…

  11. Simulation studies of protein-induced bilayer deformations, and lipid-induced protein tilting, on a mesoscopic model for lipid bilayers with embedded proteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Venturoli, M.; Smit, B.; Sperotto, Maria Maddalena

    2005-01-01

    for positive values of mismatch; a dependence on the protein size appears as well. In the case of large model proteins experiencing extreme mismatch conditions, in the region next to the so-called lipid annulus, there appears an undershooting ( or overshooting) region where the bilayer hydrophobic thickness...... a small size, the main mechanism to compensate for a large hydrophobic mismatch is the tilt, whereas large proteins react to negative mismatch by causing an increase of the hydrophobic thickness of the nearby bilayer. Furthermore, for the case of small, peptidelike proteins, we found the same type...

  12. Fluid of fused spheres as a model for protein solution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Kastelic

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available In this work we examine thermodynamics of fluid with "molecules" represented by two fused hard spheres, decorated by the attractive square-well sites. Interactions between these sites are of short-range and cause association between the fused-sphere particles. The model can be used to study the non-spherical (or dimerized proteins in solution. Thermodynamic quantities of the system are calculated using a modification of Wertheim's thermodynamic perturbation theory and the results compared with new Monte Carlo simulations under isobaric-isothermal conditions. In particular, we are interested in the liquid-liquid phase separation in such systems. The model fluid serves to evaluate the effect of the shape of the molecules, changing from spherical to more elongated (two fused spheres ones. The results indicate that the effect of the non-spherical shape is to reduce the critical density and temperature. This finding is consistent with experimental observations for the antibodies of non-spherical shape.

  13. Complete protein-protein association kinetics in atomic detail revealed by molecular dynamics simulations and Markov modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plattner, Nuria; Doerr, Stefan; de Fabritiis, Gianni; Noé, Frank

    2017-10-01

    Protein-protein association is fundamental to many life processes. However, a microscopic model describing the structures and kinetics during association and dissociation is lacking on account of the long lifetimes of associated states, which have prevented efficient sampling by direct molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. Here we demonstrate protein-protein association and dissociation in atomistic resolution for the ribonuclease barnase and its inhibitor barstar by combining adaptive high-throughput MD simulations and hidden Markov modelling. The model reveals experimentally consistent intermediate structures, energetics and kinetics on timescales from microseconds to hours. A variety of flexibly attached intermediates and misbound states funnel down to a transition state and a native basin consisting of the loosely bound near-native state and the tightly bound crystallographic state. These results offer a deeper level of insight into macromolecular recognition and our approach opens the door for understanding and manipulating a wide range of macromolecular association processes.

  14. Reduced atomic pair-interaction design (RAPID) model for simulations of proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ni, Boris; Baumketner, Andrij

    2013-02-14

    Increasingly, theoretical studies of proteins focus on large systems. This trend demands the development of computational models that are fast, to overcome the growing complexity, and accurate, to capture the physically relevant features. To address this demand, we introduce a protein model that uses all-atom architecture to ensure the highest level of chemical detail while employing effective pair potentials to represent the effect of solvent to achieve the maximum speed. The effective potentials are derived for amino acid residues based on the condition that the solvent-free model matches the relevant pair-distribution functions observed in explicit solvent simulations. As a test, the model is applied to alanine polypeptides. For the chain with 10 amino acid residues, the model is found to reproduce properly the native state and its population. Small discrepancies are observed for other folding properties and can be attributed to the approximations inherent in the model. The transferability of the generated effective potentials is investigated in simulations of a longer peptide with 25 residues. A minimal set of potentials is identified that leads to qualitatively correct results in comparison with the explicit solvent simulations. Further tests, conducted for multiple peptide chains, show that the transferable model correctly reproduces the experimentally observed tendency of polyalanines to aggregate into β-sheets more strongly with the growing length of the peptide chain. Taken together, the reported results suggest that the proposed model could be used to succesfully simulate folding and aggregation of small peptides in atomic detail. Further tests are needed to assess the strengths and limitations of the model more thoroughly.

  15. A finite element model for protein transport in vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Montas Hubert J

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Biological mass transport processes determine the behavior and function of cells, regulate interactions between synthetic agents and recipient targets, and are key elements in the design and use of biosensors. Accurately predicting the outcomes of such processes is crucial to both enhancing our understanding of how these systems function, enabling the design of effective strategies to control their function, and verifying that engineered solutions perform according to plan. Methods A Galerkin-based finite element model was developed and implemented to solve a system of two coupled partial differential equations governing biomolecule transport and reaction in live cells. The simulator was coupled, in the framework of an inverse modeling strategy, with an optimization algorithm and an experimental time series, obtained by the Fluorescence Recovery after Photobleaching (FRAP technique, to estimate biomolecule mass transport and reaction rate parameters. In the inverse algorithm, an adaptive method was implemented to calculate sensitivity matrix. A multi-criteria termination rule was developed to stop the inverse code at the solution. The applicability of the model was illustrated by simulating the mobility and binding of GFP-tagged glucocorticoid receptor in the nucleoplasm of mouse adenocarcinoma. Results The numerical simulator shows excellent agreement with the analytic solutions and experimental FRAP data. Detailed residual analysis indicates that residuals have zero mean and constant variance and are normally distributed and uncorrelated. Therefore, the necessary and sufficient criteria for least square parameter optimization, which was used in this study, were met. Conclusion The developed strategy is an efficient approach to extract as much physiochemical information from the FRAP protocol as possible. Well-posedness analysis of the inverse problem, however, indicates that the FRAP protocol provides insufficient

  16. Modeling and analysis of Schistosoma Argonaute protein molecular spatial conformation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianhua Zhang

    2011-08-01

    Conclusions: The information relationship between the structure and function of the Argonaute protein can be initially established with bioinformatics tools and the internet server, and this provides the theoretical basis for further clarifying the function of Schistosoma Argonaute protein.

  17. Efforts - Final technical report on task 4. Physical modelling calidation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andreasen, Jan Lasson; Olsson, David Dam; Christensen, T. W.

    The present report is documentation for the work carried out in Task 4 at DTU Physical modelling-validation on the Brite/Euram project No. BE96-3340, contract No. BRPR-CT97-0398, with the title Enhanced Framework for forging design using reliable three-dimensional simulation (EFFORTS). The report...

  18. Model documentation report: Transportation sector model of the National Energy Modeling System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-02-01

    Over the past year, several modifications have been made to the NEMS Transportation Model, incorporating greater levels of detail and analysis in modules previously represented in the aggregate or under a profusion of simplifying assumptions. This document is intended to amend those sections of the Model Documentation Report (MDR) which describe these superseded modules. Significant changes have been implemented in the LDV Fuel Economy Model, the Alternative Fuel Vehicle Model, the LDV Fleet Module, and the Highway Freight Model. The relevant sections of the MDR have been extracted from the original document, amended, and are presented in the following pages. A brief summary of the modifications follows: In the Fuel Economy Model, modifications have been made which permit the user to employ more optimistic assumptions about the commercial viability and impact of selected technological improvements. This model also explicitly calculates the fuel economy of an array of alternative fuel vehicles (AFV`s) which are subsequently used in the estimation of vehicle sales. In the Alternative Fuel Vehicle Model, the results of the Fuel Economy Model have been incorporated, and the program flows have been modified to reflect that fact. In the Light Duty Vehicle Fleet Module, the sales of vehicles to fleets of various size are endogenously calculated in order to provide a more detailed estimate of the impacts of EPACT legislation on the sales of AFV`s to fleets. In the Highway Freight Model, the previous aggregate estimation has been replaced by a detailed Freight Truck Stock Model, where travel patterns, efficiencies, and energy intensities are estimated by industrial grouping. Several appendices are provided at the end of this document, containing data tables and supplementary descriptions of the model development process which are not integral to an understanding of the overall model structure.

  19. Regional forecasting with global atmospheric models; Third year report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crowley, T.J.; North, G.R.; Smith, N.R. [Applied Research Corp., College Station, TX (United States)

    1994-05-01

    This report was prepared by the Applied Research Corporation (ARC), College Station, Texas, under subcontract to Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) as part of a global climate studies task. The task supports site characterization work required for the selection of a potential high-level nuclear waste repository and is part of the Performance Assessment Scientific Support (PASS) Program at PNL. The work is under the overall direction of the Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM), US Department of Energy Headquarters, Washington, DC. The scope of the report is to present the results of the third year`s work on the atmospheric modeling part of the global climate studies task. The development testing of computer models and initial results are discussed. The appendices contain several studies that provide supporting information and guidance to the modeling work and further details on computer model development. Complete documentation of the models, including user information, will be prepared under separate reports and manuals.

  20. TimerQuant: a modelling approach to tandem fluorescent timer design and data interpretation for measuring protein turnover in embryos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barry, Joseph D; Donà, Erika; Gilmour, Darren; Huber, Wolfgang

    2016-01-01

    Studies on signalling dynamics in living embryos have been limited by a scarcity of in vivo reporters. Tandem fluorescent protein timers provide a generic method for detecting changes in protein population age and thus provide readouts for signalling events that lead to changes in protein stability or location. When imaged with quantitative dual-colour fluorescence microscopy, tandem timers offer detailed 'snapshot' readouts of signalling activity from subcellular to organismal scales, and therefore have the potential to revolutionise studies in developing embryos. Here we use computer modelling and embryo experiments to explore the behaviour of tandem timers in developing systems. We present a mathematical model of timer kinetics and provide software tools that will allow experimentalists to select the most appropriate timer designs for their biological question, and guide interpretation of the obtained readouts. Through the generation of a series of novel zebrafish reporter lines, we confirm experimentally that our quantitative model can accurately predict different timer responses in developing embryos and explain some less expected findings. For example, increasing the FRET efficiency of a tandem timer actually increases the ability of the timer to detect differences in protein half-life. Finally, while previous studies have used timers to monitor changes in protein turnover, our model shows that timers can also be used to facilitate the monitoring of gene expression kinetics in vivo. © 2016. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  1. A Cell Model for Conditional Profiling of Androgen-Receptor-Interacting Proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. A. Mooslehner

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Partial androgen insensitivity syndrome (PAIS is associated with impaired male genital development and can be transmitted through mutations in the androgen receptor (AR. The aim of this study is to develop a cell model suitable for studying the impact AR mutations might have on AR interacting proteins. For this purpose, male genital development relevant mouse cell lines were genetically modified to express a tagged version of wild-type AR, allowing copurification of multiprotein complexes under native conditions followed by mass spectrometry. We report 57 known wild-type AR-interacting proteins identified in cells grown under proliferating and 65 under nonproliferating conditions. Of those, 47 were common to both samples suggesting different AR protein complex components in proliferating and proliferation-inhibited cells from the mouse proximal caput epididymus. These preliminary results now allow future studies to focus on replacing wild-type AR with mutant AR to uncover differences in protein interactions caused by AR mutations involved in PAIS.

  2. M-X Environmental Technical Report. Public Finance Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-12-22

    7AD-A095 802 HENNINGSON DURHAM AND RICHARDSON SANTA 1BAR1BARA CA - UF/A 16/1 MA -x E VIRONMENT L fECHN AL REPORT. PUBLIC FINANCE MODEL. U) DEC A0...CATALOG NUMBER 4. TITLE (and Subtitle) 5. PERIOD COVERED-........... . Final1 M-X Environmental Technical Report, Public Finance Model , 6. PERFORMING ORG...KEY WORDS (Continue on reverse side If necessary and Identify by block number) Public Finance Texas iting Analysis Nevada New Mexico viromnental Report

  3. Folding 19 proteins to their native state and stability of large proteins from a coarse-grained model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapoor, Abhijeet; Travesset, Alex

    2014-03-01

    We develop an intermediate resolution model, where the backbone is modeled with atomic resolution but the side chain with a single bead, by extending our previous model (Proteins (2013) DOI: 10.1002/prot.24269) to properly include proline, preproline residues and backbone rigidity. Starting from random configurations, the model properly folds 19 proteins (including a mutant 2A3D sequence) into native states containing β sheet, α helix, and mixed α/β. As a further test, the stability of H-RAS (a 169 residue protein, critical in many signaling pathways) is investigated: The protein is stable, with excellent agreement with experimental B-factors. Despite that proteins containing only α helices fold to their native state at lower backbone rigidity, and other limitations, which we discuss thoroughly, the model provides a reliable description of the dynamics as compared with all atom simulations, but does not constrain secondary structures as it is typically the case in more coarse-grained models. Further implications are described. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. 40 CFR 600.512-86 - Model year report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 29 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Model year report. 600.512-86 Section 600.512-86 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) ENERGY POLICY FUEL ECONOMY AND CARBON-RELATED EXHAUST EMISSIONS OF MOTOR VEHICLES Fuel Economy Regulations for Model Year 1978 Passenger Automobiles and for 1979...

  5. Reporting Monte Carlo Studies in Structural Equation Modeling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boomsma, Anne

    2013-01-01

    In structural equation modeling, Monte Carlo simulations have been used increasingly over the last two decades, as an inventory from the journal Structural Equation Modeling illustrates. Reaching out to a broad audience, this article provides guidelines for reporting Monte Carlo studies in that fiel

  6. Working group report: Flavor physics and model building

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    M K Parida; Nita Sinha; B Adhikary; B Allanach; A Alok; K S Babu; B Brahmachari; D Choudhury; E J Chun; P K Das; A Ghosal; D Hitlin; W S Hou; S Kumar; H N Li; E Ma; S K Majee; G Majumdar; B Mishra; G Mohanty; S Nandi; H Pas; M K Parida; S D Rindani; J P Saha; N Sahu; Y Sakai; S Sen; C Sharma; C D Sharma; S Shalgar; N N Singh; S Uma Sankar; N Sinha; R Sinha; F Simonetto; R Srikanth; R Vaidya

    2006-11-01

    This is the report of flavor physics and model building working group at WHEPP-9. While activities in flavor physics have been mainly focused on -physics, those in model building have been primarily devoted to neutrino physics. We present summary of working group discussions carried out during the workshop in the above fields, and also briefly review the progress made in some projects subsequently

  7. An all-atom structure-based potential for proteins: bridging minimal models with all-atom empirical forcefields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitford, Paul C; Noel, Jeffrey K; Gosavi, Shachi; Schug, Alexander; Sanbonmatsu, Kevin Y; Onuchic, José N

    2009-05-01

    Protein dynamics take place on many time and length scales. Coarse-grained structure-based (Go) models utilize the funneled energy landscape theory of protein folding to provide an understanding of both long time and long length scale dynamics. All-atom empirical forcefields with explicit solvent can elucidate our understanding of short time dynamics with high energetic and structural resolution. Thus, structure-based models with atomic details included can be used to bridge our understanding between these two approaches. We report on the robustness of folding mechanisms in one such all-atom model. Results for the B domain of Protein A, the SH3 domain of C-Src Kinase, and Chymotrypsin Inhibitor 2 are reported. The interplay between side chain packing and backbone folding is explored. We also compare this model to a C(alpha) structure-based model and an all-atom empirical forcefield. Key findings include: (1) backbone collapse is accompanied by partial side chain packing in a cooperative transition and residual side chain packing occurs gradually with decreasing temperature, (2) folding mechanisms are robust to variations of the energetic parameters, (3) protein folding free-energy barriers can be manipulated through parametric modifications, (4) the global folding mechanisms in a C(alpha) model and the all-atom model agree, although differences can be attributed to energetic heterogeneity in the all-atom model, and (5) proline residues have significant effects on folding mechanisms, independent of isomerization effects. Because this structure-based model has atomic resolution, this work lays the foundation for future studies to probe the contributions of specific energetic factors on protein folding and function.

  8. Storage stability of hen egg white powders in three protein/water dough model systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Qinchun; Rocca-Smith, Jeancarlo R; Labuza, Theodore P

    2013-06-01

    In recent years, due to the specific health benefits associated with bioactive peptides and the reduction of protein allergenicity by enzymatic hydrolysis, the utilisation of protein hydrolysates in the intermediate-moisture food (IMF) market, such as high protein nutrition bars (HPNB), has significantly increased. Currently, no reported study is related to the storage stability of dried hen egg white (DEW) and its hydrolysates (HEW) in an IMF matrix. Therefore, three DEW/HEW dough model systems (100%HEW+0%DEW, 75%HEW+25%DEW and 50%HEW+50%DEW) were established using two commercial spray-dried egg white powders to study the effect of temperature and fraction of HEW on these IMF models (water activity (a(w)): ∼0.8). During storage at three different temperatures (23, 35 and 45°C) for 70 days, the selected physicochemical properties of the dough systems were compared. Overall, kinetic analysis showed an apparent zero-order model fit for the change in the colour (L(∗)), fluorescence intensity (FI) and hardness, as a function of time, for different dough model systems. As expected, the L(∗), FI and hardness increased as a function of time mainly due to the Maillard reaction. The amount of free amino groups decreased, with an increase in rate of loss, as temperature increased in the 100%HEW+0%DEW model. When DEW was substituted for some HEW, the regeneration of the free amino groups after loss was observed as a function of time. Furthermore, when the percentage of HEW was decreased, the incidence of mouldy samples occurred sooner, which indicates that HEW has some antimicrobial ability, especially in the 100%HEW+0%DEW system where mould growth did not occur. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Toward a rigorous network of protein-protein interactions of the model sulfate reducer Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chhabra, S.R.; Joachimiak, M.P.; Petzold, C.J.; Zane, G.M.; Price, M.N.; Gaucher, S.; Reveco, S.A.; Fok, V.; Johanson, A.R.; Batth, T.S.; Singer, M.; Chandonia, J.M.; Joyner, D.; Hazen, T.C.; Arkin, A.P.; Wall, J.D.; Singh, A.K.; Keasling, J.D.

    2011-05-01

    Protein–protein interactions offer an insight into cellular processes beyond what may be obtained by the quantitative functional genomics tools of proteomics and transcriptomics. The aforementioned tools have been extensively applied to study E. coli and other aerobes and more recently to study the stress response behavior of Desulfovibrio 5 vulgaris Hildenborough, a model anaerobe and sulfate reducer. In this paper we present the first attempt to identify protein-protein interactions in an obligate anaerobic bacterium. We used suicide vector-assisted chromosomal modification of 12 open reading frames encoded by this sulfate reducer to append an eight amino acid affinity tag to the carboxy-terminus of the chosen proteins. Three biological replicates of the 10 ‘pulled-down’ proteins were separated and analyzed using liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry. Replicate agreement ranged between 35% and 69%. An interaction network among 12 bait and 90 prey proteins was reconstructed based on 134 bait-prey interactions computationally identified to be of high confidence. We discuss the biological significance of several unique metabolic features of D. vulgaris revealed by this protein-protein interaction data 15 and protein modifications that were observed. These include the distinct role of the putative carbon monoxide-induced hydrogenase, unique electron transfer routes associated with different oxidoreductases, and the possible role of methylation in regulating sulfate reduction.

  10. Calculation of extreme wind atlases using mesoscale modeling. Final report

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsén, Xiaoli Guo; Badger, Jake

    This is the final report of the project PSO-10240 "Calculation of extreme wind atlases using mesoscale modeling". The overall objective is to improve the estimation of extreme winds by developing and applying new methodologies to confront the many weaknesses in the current methodologies...... as explained in Section 2. The focus has been put on developing a number of new methodologies through numerical modeling and statistical modeling....

  11. A comparative study of the reported performance of ab initio protein structure prediction algorithms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helles, Glennie

    2008-04-01

    Protein structure prediction is one of the major challenges in bioinformatics today. Throughout the past five decades, many different algorithmic approaches have been attempted, and although progress has been made the problem remains unsolvable even for many small proteins. While the general objective is to predict the three-dimensional structure from primary sequence, our current knowledge and computational power are simply insufficient to solve a problem of such high complexity. Some prediction algorithms do, however, appear to perform better than others, although it is not always obvious which ones they are and it is perhaps even less obvious why that is. In this review, the reported performance results from 18 different recently published prediction algorithms are compared. Furthermore, the general algorithmic settings most likely responsible for the difference in the reported performance are identified, and the specific settings of each of the 18 prediction algorithms are also compared. The average normalized r.m.s.d. scores reported range from 11.17 to 3.48. With a performance measure including both r.m.s.d. scores and CPU time, the currently best-performing prediction algorithm is identified to be the I-TASSER algorithm. Two of the algorithmic settings--protein representation and fragment assembly--were found to have definite positive influence on the running time and the predicted structures, respectively. There thus appears to be a clear benefit from incorporating this knowledge in the design of new prediction algorithms.

  12. Genome-scale metabolic model of Pichia pastoris with native and humanized glycosylation of recombinant proteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Irani, Zahra Azimzadeh; Kerkhoven, Eduard J.; Shojaosadati, Seyed Abbas;

    2016-01-01

    Pichia pastoris is used for commercial production of human therapeutic proteins, and genome-scale models of P. pastoris metabolism have been generated in the past to study the metabolism and associated protein production by this yeast. A major challenge with clinical usage of recombinant proteins...... produced by P. pastoris is the difference in N-glycosylation of proteins produced by humans and this yeast. However, through metabolic engineering, a P. pastoris strain capable of producing humanized N-glycosylated proteins was constructed. The current genome-scale models of P. pastoris do not address...... native nor humanized N-glycosylation, and we therefore developed ihGlycopastoris, an extension to the iLC915 model with both native and humanized N-glycosylation for recombinant protein production, but also an estimation of N-glycosylation of P. pastoris native proteins. This new model gives a better...

  13. A comparative analysis of green fluorescent protein and -glucuronidase protein-encoding genes as a reporter system for studying the temporal expression profiles of promoters

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    P Kavita; Pradeep Kumar Burma

    2008-09-01

    The assessment of activity of promoters has been greatly facilitated by the use of reporter genes. However, the activity as assessed by reporter gene is a reflection of not only promoter strength, but also that of the stability of the mRNA and the protein encoded by the reporter gene. While a stable reporter gene product is an advantage in analysing activities of weak promoters, it becomes a major limitation for understanding temporal expression patterns of a promoter, as the reporter product persists even after the activity of the promoter ceases. In the present study we undertook a comparative analysis of two reporter genes, -glucuronidase (gus) and green fluorescent protein (sgfp), for studying the temporal expression pattern of tapetum-specific promoters A9 (Arabidopsis thaliana) and TA29 (Nicotiana tabacum). The activity of A9 and TA29 promoters as assessed by transcript profiles of the reporter genes (gus or sgfp) remained the same irrespective of the reporter gene used. However, while the deduced promoter activity using gus was extended temporally beyond the actual activity of the promoter, sgfp as recorded through its fluorescence correlated better with the transcription profile. Our results thus demonstrate that sgfp is a better reporter gene compared to gus for assessment of temporal activity of promoters. Although several earlier reports have commented on the possible errors in deducing temporal activities of promoters using GUS as a reporter protein, we experimentally demonstrate the advantage of using reporter genes such as gfp for analysis of temporal expression patterns.

  14. Final Report. The Role of RUB (related to ubiquitin) Family of Proteins in the Hormone Response

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Callis, Judy [Univ. of California, Davis, CA (United States)

    2013-03-22

    The Rub pathway is a conserved protein modification pathway. RUB (called Rubp1 in budding yeast, Nedd8 in animals and RUB in plants) is a ubiquitin-like 76-amino acid protein. It covalently attaches to protein using an enzymatic machinery analogous to the enzymes that attach ubiquitin to its substrate proteins. However, the nature of the complement of Rub-modified proteins in organisms was not clear. From bioinformatics analyses, one can identify a Rub activating enzymes and Rub conjugating enzymes. However, in many cases, their biochemical properties were not described. In DOE-funded work, we made major advances in our understanding of the Rub pathway in yeast and plants, work that is applicable to other organisms as well. There is a multi-subunit enzyme called SCF in all eukaryotes. The SCF consists of several subunits that serve as a scaffold (the cullin, SKP and RBX subunits) and one subunit that interacts with the substrate. This cullin protein (called Cdc53p in yeast and CULLIN 1 in plants and animals) was a known Rub target. In this work, we identified additional Rub targets in yeast as the other cullin-like proteins Cul3p and Rtt101p. Additionally we described the conservation of the Rub pathway because plant RUB1 can conjugated to yeast Cdc53p- in yeast. In the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana, we characterized the Rub activating enzymes and showed that they are not biochemically equivalent. We also showed that the Rub pathway is essential in plants and characterized plants with reduced levels of rub proteins. These plants are affected in multiple developmental processes. We discovered that they over-produce ethylene as dark-grown seedlings. We characterized a mutant allele of CULLIN1 in Arabidopsis with impaired interaction with RBX and showed that it is unstable in vivo. We used our knowledge of monitoring protein degradation to map the degradation determinants in a plant transcription factor. Finally, we took a mass spectrometric approach to identify

  15. Fast and accurate multivariate Gaussian modeling of protein families: predicting residue contacts and protein-interaction partners.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlo Baldassi

    Full Text Available In the course of evolution, proteins show a remarkable conservation of their three-dimensional structure and their biological function, leading to strong evolutionary constraints on the sequence variability between homologous proteins. Our method aims at extracting such constraints from rapidly accumulating sequence data, and thereby at inferring protein structure and function from sequence information alone. Recently, global statistical inference methods (e.g. direct-coupling analysis, sparse inverse covariance estimation have achieved a breakthrough towards this aim, and their predictions have been successfully implemented into tertiary and quaternary protein structure prediction methods. However, due to the discrete nature of the underlying variable (amino-acids, exact inference requires exponential time in the protein length, and efficient approximations are needed for practical applicability. Here we propose a very efficient multivariate Gaussian modeling approach as a variant of direct-coupling analysis: the discrete amino-acid variables are replaced by continuous Gaussian random variables. The resulting statistical inference problem is efficiently and exactly solvable. We show that the quality of inference is comparable or superior to the one achieved by mean-field approximations to inference with discrete variables, as done by direct-coupling analysis. This is true for (i the prediction of residue-residue contacts in proteins, and (ii the identification of protein-protein interaction partner in bacterial signal transduction. An implementation of our multivariate Gaussian approach is available at the website http://areeweb.polito.it/ricerca/cmp/code.

  16. Model documentation report: Commercial Sector Demand Module of the National Energy Modeling System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-02-01

    This report documents the objectives, analytical approach and development of the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) Commercial Sector Demand Module. The report catalogues and describes the model assumptions, computational methodology, parameter estimation techniques, model source code, and forecast results generated through the synthesis and scenario development based on these components. This report serves three purposes. First, it is a reference document providing a detailed description for model analysts, users, and the public. Second, this report meets the legal requirement of the Energy Information Administration (EIA) to provide adequate documentation in support of its statistical and forecast reports (Public Law 93-275, section 57(b)(1)). Third, it facilitates continuity in model development by providing documentation from which energy analysts can undertake model enhancements, data updates, and parameter refinements as future projects.

  17. Mathematics, Thermodynamics, and Modeling to Address Ten Common Misconceptions about Protein Structure, Folding, and Stability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robic, Srebrenka

    2010-01-01

    To fully understand the roles proteins play in cellular processes, students need to grasp complex ideas about protein structure, folding, and stability. Our current understanding of these topics is based on mathematical models and experimental data. However, protein structure, folding, and stability are often introduced as descriptive, qualitative…

  18. Predicting important residues and interaction pathways in proteins using Gaussian Network Model: binding and stability of HLA proteins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Turkan Haliloglu

    Full Text Available A statistical thermodynamics approach is proposed to determine structurally and functionally important residues in native proteins that are involved in energy exchange with a ligand and other residues along an interaction pathway. The structure-function relationships, ligand binding and allosteric activities of ten structures of HLA Class I proteins of the immune system are studied by the Gaussian Network Model. Five of these models are associated with inflammatory rheumatic disease and the remaining five are properly functioning. In the Gaussian Network Model, the protein structures are modeled as an elastic network where the inter-residue interactions are harmonic. Important residues and the interaction pathways in the proteins are identified by focusing on the largest eigenvalue of the residue interaction matrix. Predicted important residues match those known from previous experimental and clinical work. Graph perturbation is used to determine the response of the important residues along the interaction pathway. Differences in response patterns of the two sets of proteins are identified and their relations to disease are discussed.

  19. Photovoltaic subsystem marketing and distribution model: programming manual. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1982-07-01

    Complete documentation of the marketing and distribution (M and D) computer model is provided. The purpose is to estimate the costs of selling and transporting photovoltaic solar energy products from the manufacturer to the final customer. The model adjusts for the inflation and regional differences in marketing and distribution costs. The model consists of three major components: the marketing submodel, the distribution submodel, and the financial submodel. The computer program is explained including the input requirements, output reports, subprograms and operating environment. The program specifications discuss maintaining the validity of the data and potential improvements. An example for a photovoltaic concentrator collector demonstrates the application of the model.

  20. Photovoltaic subsystem marketing and distribution model: programming manual. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1982-07-01

    Complete documentation of the marketing and distribution (M and D) computer model is provided. The purpose is to estimate the costs of selling and transporting photovoltaic solar energy products from the manufacturer to the final customer. The model adjusts for the inflation and regional differences in marketing and distribution costs. The model consists of three major components: the marketing submodel, the distribution submodel, and the financial submodel. The computer program is explained including the input requirements, output reports, subprograms and operating environment. The program specifications discuss maintaining the validity of the data and potential improvements. An example for a photovoltaic concentrator collector demonstrates the application of the model.

  1. Citrullination of synovial proteins in murine models of rheumatoid arthritis.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vossenaar, E.R.; Nijenhuis, S.; Helsen, M.M.A.; Heijden, A.G. van der; Senshu, T.; Berg, W.B. van den; Venrooij, W.J.W. van; Joosten, L.A.B.

    2003-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Antibodies directed to citrulline-containing proteins are highly specific for rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and can be detected in up to 80% of patients with RA. Citrulline is a nonstandard amino acid that can be incorporated into proteins only by posttranslational modification of arginine by

  2. Fungal protein from corn waste effluents : a model study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schellart, J.A.

    1975-01-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to study the microbiological aspects of the production of microbial protein ('single cell protein'; SCP) from corn waste effluents with simultaneous reduction of the COD of these effluents.For practical reasons the corn waste water itself was not used in the exp

  3. Modeling and analysis of Schistosoma Argonaute protein molecular spatial conformation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jianhua Zhang; Zhigang Shang; Xiaohui Zhang; Yuntao Zhang

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To analyze the amino acid sequence composition, secondary structure, the spatial conformation of its domain and other characteristics of Argonaute protein. Methods:Bioinformatics tools and the internet server were used. Firstly, the amino acid sequence composition features of the Argonaute protein were analyzed, and the phylogenetic tree was constructed. Secondly, Argonaute protein’s distribution of secondary structure and its physicochemical properties were predicted. Lastly, the protein functional expression form of the domain group was established through the Phyre-based analysis on the spatial conformation of Argonaute protein domains. Results: 593 amino acids were encoded by Argonaute protein, the phylogenetic tree was constructed, and Argonaute protein’s distribution of secondary structure and its physicochemical properties were obtained through analysis. In addition, the functional expression form which comprised the N-terminal PAZ domain and C-terminal Piwi domain for the Argonaute protein was obtained with Phyre. Conclusions: The information relationship between the structure and function of the Argonaute protein can be initially established with bioinformatics tools and the internet server, and this provides the theoretical basis for further clarifying the function of Schistosoma Argonaute protein.

  4. Fungal protein from corn waste effluents : a model study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schellart, J.A.

    1975-01-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to study the microbiological aspects of the production of microbial protein ('single cell protein'; SCP) from corn waste effluents with simultaneous reduction of the COD of these effluents.

    For practical reasons the corn waste water itself was

  5. Short-Termed Integrated Forecasting System: 1993 Model documentation report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-05-01

    The purpose of this report is to define the Short-Term Integrated Forecasting System (STIFS) and describe its basic properties. The Energy Information Administration (EIA) of the US Energy Department (DOE) developed the STIFS model to generate short-term (up to 8 quarters), monthly forecasts of US supplies, demands, imports exports, stocks, and prices of various forms of energy. The models that constitute STIFS generate forecasts for a wide range of possible scenarios, including the following ones done routinely on a quarterly basis: A base (mid) world oil price and medium economic growth. A low world oil price and high economic growth. A high world oil price and low economic growth. This report is written for persons who want to know how short-term energy markets forecasts are produced by EIA. The report is intended as a reference document for model analysts, users, and the public.

  6. Short-Termed Integrated Forecasting System: 1993 Model documentation report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-05-01

    The purpose of this report is to define the Short-Term Integrated Forecasting System (STIFS) and describe its basic properties. The Energy Information Administration (EIA) of the US Energy Department (DOE) developed the STIFS model to generate short-term (up to 8 quarters), monthly forecasts of US supplies, demands, imports exports, stocks, and prices of various forms of energy. The models that constitute STIFS generate forecasts for a wide range of possible scenarios, including the following ones done routinely on a quarterly basis: A base (mid) world oil price and medium economic growth. A low world oil price and high economic growth. A high world oil price and low economic growth. This report is written for persons who want to know how short-term energy markets forecasts are produced by EIA. The report is intended as a reference document for model analysts, users, and the public.

  7. Alpha-1 antitrypsin protein and gene therapies decrease autoimmunity and delay arthritis development in mouse model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atkinson Mark A

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Alpha-1 antitrypsin (AAT is a multi-functional protein that has anti-inflammatory and tissue protective properties. We previously reported that human AAT (hAAT gene therapy prevented autoimmune diabetes in non-obese diabetic (NOD mice and suppressed arthritis development in combination with doxycycline in mice. In the present study we investigated the feasibility of hAAT monotherapy for the treatment of chronic arthritis in collagen-induced arthritis (CIA, a mouse model of rheumatoid arthritis (RA. Methods DBA/1 mice were immunized with bovine type II collagen (bCII to induce arthritis. These mice were pretreated either with hAAT protein or with recombinant adeno-associated virus vector expressing hAAT (rAAV-hAAT. Control groups received saline injections. Arthritis development was evaluated by prevalence of arthritis and arthritic index. Serum levels of B-cell activating factor of the TNF-α family (BAFF, antibodies against both bovine (bCII and mouse collagen II (mCII were tested by ELISA. Results Human AAT protein therapy as well as recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV8-mediated hAAT gene therapy significantly delayed onset and ameliorated disease development of arthritis in CIA mouse model. Importantly, hAAT therapies significantly reduced serum levels of BAFF and autoantibodies against bCII and mCII, suggesting that the effects are mediated via B-cells, at least partially. Conclusion These results present a new drug for arthritis therapy. Human AAT protein and gene therapies are able to ameliorate and delay arthritis development and reduce autoimmunity, indicating promising potential of these therapies as a new treatment strategy for RA.

  8. Rubber particle proteins, HbREF and HbSRPP, show different interactions with model membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berthelot, Karine; Lecomte, Sophie; Estevez, Yannick; Zhendre, Vanessa; Henry, Sarah; Thévenot, Julie; Dufourc, Erick J; Alves, Isabel D; Peruch, Frédéric

    2014-01-01

    The biomembrane surrounding rubber particles from the hevea latex is well known for its content of numerous allergen proteins. HbREF (Hevb1) and HbSRPP (Hevb3) are major components, linked on rubber particles, and they have been shown to be involved in rubber synthesis or quality (mass regulation), but their exact function is still to be determined. In this study we highlighted the different modes of interactions of both recombinant proteins with various membrane models (lipid monolayers, liposomes or supported bilayers, and multilamellar vesicles) to mimic the latex particle membrane. We combined various biophysical methods (polarization-modulation-infrared reflection-adsorption spectroscopy (PM-IRRAS)/ellipsometry, attenuated-total reflectance Fourier-transform infrared (ATR-FTIR), solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), plasmon waveguide resonance (PWR), fluorescence spectroscopy) to elucidate their interactions. Small rubber particle protein (SRPP) shows less affinity than rubber elongation factor (REF) for the membranes but displays a kind of "covering" effect on the lipid headgroups without disturbing the membrane integrity. Its structure is conserved in the presence of lipids. Contrarily, REF demonstrates higher membrane affinity with changes in its aggregation properties, the amyloid nature of REF, which we previously reported, is not favored in the presence of lipids. REF binds and inserts into membranes. The membrane integrity is highly perturbed, and we suspect that REF is even able to remove lipids from the membrane leading to the formation of mixed micelles. These two homologous proteins show affinity to all membrane models tested but neatly differ in their interacting features. This could imply differential roles on the surface of rubber particles.

  9. A Mouse Model of Anaphylaxis and Atopic Dermatitis to Salt-Soluble Wheat Protein Extract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Yining; Ebaugh, Sarah; Martens, Anna; Gao, Haoran; Olson, Eric; Ng, Perry K W; Gangur, Venu

    2017-09-27

    Wheat allergy and other immune-mediated disorders triggered by wheat proteins are growing at an alarming rate for reasons not well understood. A mouse model to study hypersensitivity responses to salt-soluble wheat protein (SSWP) extract is currently unavailable. Here we tested the hypothesis that SSWP extract from wheat will induce sensitization as well as allergic disease in mice. Female BALB/cJ mice were weaned onto a plant protein-free diet. The mice were injected a total of 4 times with an SSWP (0.01 mg/mouse) fraction extracted from durum wheat along with alum as an adjuvant. Blood was collected biweekly and SSWP-specific IgE (SIgE) and total IgE (TIgE) levels were measured using ELISA. Systemic anaphylaxis upon intraperitoneal injection with SSWP was quantified by hypothermia shock response (HSR). Mucosal mast cell degranulation was measured by the elevation of mMCP-1 in the blood. The mice were monitored for dermatitis. Skin tissues were used in histopathology and for measuring cytokine/chemokine/adhesion molecule levels using a protein microarray system. Injection with SSWP resulted in time-dependent SIgE antibody responses associated with the elevation of TIgE concentration. Challenge with SSWP elicited severe HSR that correlated with a significant elevation of plasma mMCP-1 levels. Sensitized mice developed facial dermatitis associated with mast cell degranulation. Lesions expressed significant elevation of Th2/Th17/Th1 cytokines and chemokines and E-selectin adhesion molecule. Here we report a mouse model of anaphylaxis and atopic dermatitis to SSWP extract that may be used for further basic and applied research on wheat allergy. © 2017 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  10. PRI-Modeler: extracting RNA structural elements from PDB files of protein-RNA complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Kyungsook; Nepal, Chirag

    2007-05-01

    A complete understanding of protein and RNA structures and their interactions is important for determining the binding sites in protein-RNA complexes. Computational approaches exist for identifying secondary structural elements in proteins from atomic coordinates. However, similar methods have not been developed for RNA, due in part to the very limited structural data so far available. We have developed a set of algorithms for extracting and visualizing secondary and tertiary structures of RNA and for analyzing protein-RNA complexes. These algorithms have been implemented in a web-based program called PRI-Modeler (protein-RNA interaction modeler). Given one or more protein data bank files of protein-RNA complexes, PRI-Modeler analyzes the conformation of the RNA, calculates the hydrogen bond (H bond) and van der Waals interactions between amino acids and nucleotides, extracts secondary and tertiary RNA structure elements, and identifies the patterns of interactions between the proteins and RNAs. This paper presents PRI-Modeler and its application to the hydrogen bond and van der Waals interactions in the most representative set of protein-RNA complexes. The analysis reveals several interesting interaction patterns at various levels. The information provided by PRI-Modeler should prove useful for determining the binding sites in protein-RNA complexes. PRI-Modeler is accessible at http://wilab.inha.ac.kr/primodeler/, and supplementary materials are available in the analysis results section at http://wilab.inha.ac.kr/primodeler/.

  11. Genome-scale modeling of the protein secretory machinery in yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feizi, Amir; Österlund, Tobias; Petranovic, Dina; Bordel, Sergio; Nielsen, Jens

    2013-01-01

    The protein secretory machinery in Eukarya is involved in post-translational modification (PTMs) and sorting of the secretory and many transmembrane proteins. While the secretory machinery has been well-studied using classic reductionist approaches, a holistic view of its complex nature is lacking. Here, we present the first genome-scale model for the yeast secretory machinery which captures the knowledge generated through more than 50 years of research. The model is based on the concept of a Protein Specific Information Matrix (PSIM: characterized by seven PTMs features). An algorithm was developed which mimics secretory machinery and assigns each secretory protein to a particular secretory class that determines the set of PTMs and transport steps specific to each protein. Protein abundances were integrated with the model in order to gain system level estimation of the metabolic demands associated with the processing of each specific protein as well as a quantitative estimation of the activity of each component of the secretory machinery.

  12. Blast Load Simulator Experiments for Computational Model Validation: Report 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-02-01

    O’Daniel, 2016. Blast load simulator experiments for computational model validation – Report 1. ERDC/GSL TR-16-27. Vicksburg, MS: U.S. Army Engineer ...ER D C/ G SL T R- 16 -2 7 Blast Load Simulator Experiments for Computational Model Validation Report 2 G eo te ch ni ca l a nd S tr uc...Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. The U.S. Army Engineer Research and Development Center (ERDC) solves the nation’s toughest

  13. Exploration of freely available web-interfaces for comparative homology modelling of microbial proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nema, Vijay; Pal, Sudhir Kumar

    2013-01-01

    This study was conducted to find the best suited freely available software for modelling of proteins by taking a few sample proteins. The proteins used were small to big in size with available crystal structures for the purpose of benchmarking. Key players like Phyre2, Swiss-Model, CPHmodels-3.0, Homer, (PS)2, (PS)(2)-V(2), Modweb were used for the comparison and model generation. Benchmarking process was done for four proteins, Icl, InhA, and KatG of Mycobacterium tuberculosis and RpoB of Thermus Thermophilus to get the most suited software. Parameters compared during analysis gave relatively better values for Phyre2 and Swiss-Model. This comparative study gave the information that Phyre2 and Swiss-Model make good models of small and large proteins as compared to other screened software. Other software was also good but is often not very efficient in providing full-length and properly folded structure.

  14. Bhageerath—Targeting the near impossible: Pushing the frontiers of atomic models for protein tertiary structure prediction

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    B Jayaram; Priyanka Dhingra; Bharat Lakhani; Shashank Shekhar

    2012-01-01

    Protein folding, considered to be the holy grail of molecular biology, remains intractable even after six decades since the report of the first crystal structure. Over 70,000 X-ray and NMR structures are now available in protein structural repositories and no physico-chemical solution is in sight. Molecular simulation methodologies have evolved to a stage to provide a computational solution to the tertiary structures of small proteins. Knowledge base driven methodologies are maturing in predicting the tertiary structures of query sequences which share high similarities with sequences of known structures in the databases. The void region thus seems to be medium (> 100 amino acid residues) to large proteins with no sequence homologs in the databases and hence which has become a fertile ground for the genesis of hybrid models which exploit local similarities together with ab initio models to arrive at reasonable predictions.We describe here the development of Bhageerath an ab initio model and Bhageerath-H a hybrid model and present a critique on the current status of prediction of protein tertiary structures.

  15. Label-free detection of protein molecules secreted from an organ-on-a-chip model for drug toxicity assays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morales, Andres W.; Zhang, Yu S.; Aleman, Julio; Alerasool, Parissa; Dokmeci, Mehmet R.; Khademhosseini, Ali; Ye, Jing Yong

    2016-03-01

    Clinical attrition is about 30% from failure of drug candidates due to toxic side effects, increasing the drug development costs significantly and slowing down the drug discovery process. This partly originates from the fact that the animal models do not accurately represent human physiology. Hence there is a clear unmet need for developing drug toxicity assays using human-based models that are complementary to traditional animal models before starting expensive clinical trials. Organ-on-a-chip techniques developed in recent years have generated a variety of human organ models mimicking different human physiological conditions. However, it is extremely challenging to monitor the transient and long-term response of the organ models to drug treatments during drug toxicity tests. First, when an organ-on-a-chip model interacts with drugs, a certain amount of protein molecules may be released into the medium due to certain drug effects, but the amount of the protein molecules is limited, since the organ tissue grown inside microfluidic bioreactors have minimum volume. Second, traditional fluorescence techniques cannot be utilized for real-time monitoring of the concentration of the protein molecules, because the protein molecules are continuously secreted from the tissue and it is practically impossible to achieve fluorescence labeling in the dynamically changing environment. Therefore, direct measurements of the secreted protein molecules with a label-free approach is strongly desired for organs-on-a-chip applications. In this paper, we report the development of a photonic crystal-based biosensor for label-free assays of secreted protein molecules from a liver-on-a-chip model. Ultrahigh detection sensitivity and specificity have been demonstrated.

  16. Application of model bread baking in the examination of arabinoxylan-protein complexes in rye bread.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buksa, Krzysztof

    2016-09-01

    The changes in molecular mass of arabinoxylan (AX) and protein caused by bread baking process were examined using a model rye bread. Instead of the normal flour, the dough contained starch, water-extractable AX and protein which were isolated from rye wholemeal. From the crumb of selected model breads, starch was removed releasing AX-protein complexes, which were further examined by size exclusion chromatography. On the basis of the research, it was concluded that optimum model mix can be composed of 3-6% AX and 3-6% rye protein isolate at 94-88% of rye starch meaning with the most similar properties to low extraction rye flour. Application of model rye bread allowed to examine the interactions between AX and proteins. Bread baked with a share of AX, rye protein and starch, from which the complexes of the highest molar mass were isolated, was characterized by the strongest structure of the bread crumb.

  17. Engineered Barrier System Degradation, Flow, and Transport Process Model Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    E.L. Hardin

    2000-07-17

    The Engineered Barrier System Degradation, Flow, and Transport Process Model Report (EBS PMR) is one of nine PMRs supporting the Total System Performance Assessment (TSPA) being developed by the Yucca Mountain Project for the Site Recommendation Report (SRR). The EBS PMR summarizes the development and abstraction of models for processes that govern the evolution of conditions within the emplacement drifts of a potential high-level nuclear waste repository at Yucca Mountain, Nye County, Nevada. Details of these individual models are documented in 23 supporting Analysis/Model Reports (AMRs). Nineteen of these AMRs are for process models, and the remaining 4 describe the abstraction of results for application in TSPA. The process models themselves cluster around four major topics: ''Water Distribution and Removal Model, Physical and Chemical Environment Model, Radionuclide Transport Model, and Multiscale Thermohydrologic Model''. One AMR (Engineered Barrier System-Features, Events, and Processes/Degradation Modes Analysis) summarizes the formal screening analysis used to select the Features, Events, and Processes (FEPs) included in TSPA and those excluded from further consideration. Performance of a potential Yucca Mountain high-level radioactive waste repository depends on both the natural barrier system (NBS) and the engineered barrier system (EBS) and on their interactions. Although the waste packages are generally considered as components of the EBS, the EBS as defined in the EBS PMR includes all engineered components outside the waste packages. The principal function of the EBS is to complement the geologic system in limiting the amount of water contacting nuclear waste. A number of alternatives were considered by the Project for different EBS designs that could provide better performance than the design analyzed for the Viability Assessment. The design concept selected was Enhanced Design Alternative II (EDA II).

  18. M-X Environmental Technical Report. Social Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-12-22

    Housing • Ccznaity Land Use and Infrastructure Ccmmanity Services and Facilities * Public Finance SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF THIS PAGE(’When Data Entered...Housing4 o Community Land Use and Infrastructure 0 Community Services and Facilities 0 Public Finance -I . . . . . _ . .. .. .. .,... .. .. ... ’up Ip II...use, and community services model groups, while economic/demographic and public finance models are discussed in separate technical reports. 1.2 THE

  19. Transcriptome and proteome exploration to model translation efficiency and protein stability in Lactococcus lactis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clémentine Dressaire

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available This genome-scale study analysed the various parameters influencing protein levels in cells. To achieve this goal, the model bacterium Lactococcus lactis was grown at steady state in continuous cultures at different growth rates, and proteomic and transcriptomic data were thoroughly compared. Ratios of mRNA to protein were highly variable among proteins but also, for a given gene, between the different growth conditions. The modeling of cellular processes combined with a data fitting modeling approach allowed both translation efficiencies and degradation rates to be estimated for each protein in each growth condition. Estimated translational efficiencies and degradation rates strongly differed between proteins and were tested for their biological significance through statistical correlations with relevant parameters such as codon or amino acid bias. These efficiencies and degradation rates were not constant in all growth conditions and were inversely proportional to the growth rate, indicating a more efficient translation at low growth rate but an antagonistic higher rate of protein degradation. Estimated protein median half-lives ranged from 23 to 224 min, underlying the importance of protein degradation notably at low growth rates. The regulation of intracellular protein level was analysed through regulatory coefficient calculations, revealing a complex control depending on protein and growth conditions. The modeling approach enabled translational efficiencies and protein degradation rates to be estimated, two biological parameters extremely difficult to determine experimentally and generally lacking in bacteria. This method is generic and can now be extended to other environments and/or other micro-organisms.

  20. Two studies of colloidal interactions: electric polarizability and protein crystallization. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fraden, Seth; Hu, Yue

    2001-08-06

    (I)Electric polarizability. During this grant period, the focus was on five topics concerning electric field effects on colloids. The first topic focuses on electric interactions between charged colloids in the absence of external fields, and the remaining four deal with colloids in the presence of external fields. The topics are (1) calculation of the effect of confinement on the pair-potential between like-charged colloids, (2) experimental determination of the interparticle potential under the conditions of dielectric polarization, (3) measurement of the evolution of structure of ER fluids, (4) synthesis of novel colloids designed for ER studies, and (5) computer modeling of polarization of surface charge. (II) Protein crystallization. Studies of the phase behavior of mixtures of proteins and polymers were initiated. The motivation was to test recent theories that suggested that optimal conditions for protein crystallization could be obtained using such mixtures. Combined light scattering measurements of the virial coefficients and determination of the phase diagram of protein/polymer mixtures revealed that the theoretical picture needs to be substantially modified.

  1. Testing the Coulomb/Accessible Surface Area solvent model for protein stability, ligand binding, and protein design

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bathelt Christine

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Protein structure prediction and computational protein design require efficient yet sufficiently accurate descriptions of aqueous solvent. We continue to evaluate the performance of the Coulomb/Accessible Surface Area (CASA implicit solvent model, in combination with the Charmm19 molecular mechanics force field. We test a set of model parameters optimized earlier, and we also carry out a new optimization in this work, using as a target a set of experimental stability changes for single point mutations of various proteins and peptides. The optimization procedure is general, and could be used with other force fields. The computation of stability changes requires a model for the unfolded state of the protein. In our approach, this state is represented by tripeptide structures of the sequence Ala-X-Ala for each amino acid type X. We followed an iterative optimization scheme which, at each cycle, optimizes the solvation parameters and a set of tripeptide structures for the unfolded state. This protocol uses a set of 140 experimental stability mutations and a large set of tripeptide conformations to find the best tripeptide structures and solvation parameters. Results Using the optimized parameters, we obtain a mean unsigned error of 2.28 kcal/mol for the stability mutations. The performance of the CASA model is assessed by two further applications: (i calculation of protein-ligand binding affinities and (ii computational protein design. For these two applications, the previous parameters and the ones optimized here give a similar performance. For ligand binding, we obtain reasonable agreement with a set of 55 experimental mutation data, with a mean unsigned error of 1.76 kcal/mol with the new parameters and 1.47 kcal/mol with the earlier ones. We show that the optimized CASA model is not inferior to the Generalized Born/Surface Area (GB/SA model for the prediction of these binding affinities. Likewise, the new parameters perform

  2. Modeling proteins using a super-secondary structure library and NMR chemical shift information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menon, Vilas; Vallat, Brinda K; Dybas, Joseph M; Fiser, Andras

    2013-06-04

    A remaining challenge in protein modeling is to predict structures for sequences with no sequence similarity to any experimentally solved structure. Based on earlier observations, the library of protein backbone supersecondary structure motifs (Smotifs) saturated about a decade ago. Therefore, it should be possible to build any structure from a combination of existing Smotifs with the help of limited experimental data that are sufficient to relate the backbone conformations of Smotifs between target proteins and known structures. Here, we present a hybrid modeling algorithm that relies on an exhaustive Smotif library and on nuclear magnetic resonance chemical shift patterns without any input of primary sequence information. In a test of 102 proteins, the algorithm delivered 90 homology-model-quality models, among them 24 high-quality ones, and a topologically correct solution for almost all cases. The current approach opens a venue to address the modeling of larger protein structures for which chemical shifts are available.

  3. Physical modelling in Geotechnical Earthquake Engineering – 2: Session Report

    OpenAIRE

    Madabhushi, Gopal

    2015-01-01

    This is the accepted manuscript. The final version is available at http://www.icevirtuallibrary.com/content/article/10.1680/ijpmg.14.00033. Geotechncial earthquake engineering continues to be an important area of research for physical modellers. There were 13 papers presented in this session. These papers and the direction of future research in this area are discussed in this session report.

  4. Statistical modelling of usual intake. Scientific report submitted to EFSA

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Voet, van der H.; Klaveren, van J.D.; Arcella, D.; Bakker, M.; Boeing, H.; Boon, P.E.; Crépét, A.; Dekkers, A.; Boer, de W.; Dodd, K.W.; Ferrari, P.; Goedhart, P.W.; Hart, A.; Heijden, van der G.W.A.M.; Kennedy, M.; Kipnis, V.; Knüppel, S.; Merten, C.; Ocké, M.; Slob, W.

    2010-01-01

    Within the EFSA Article 36 project “European Tool Usual Intake” (ETUI) a workshop was organised in May 2010 where the different available models to calculate usual intake were presented and discussed. This report integrates the workshop background document, the presentations given by experts, and th

  5. Structural Equation Modeling Reporting Practices for Language Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ockey, Gary J.; Choi, Ikkyu

    2015-01-01

    Studies that use structural equation modeling (SEM) techniques are increasingly encountered in the language assessment literature. This popularity has created the need for a set of guidelines that can indicate what should be included in a research report and make it possible for research consumers to judge the appropriateness of the…

  6. Computable general equilibrium model fiscal year 2014 capability development report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Edwards, Brian Keith [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Boero, Riccardo [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2016-05-11

    This report provides an overview of the development of the NISAC CGE economic modeling capability since 2012. This capability enhances NISAC's economic modeling and analysis capabilities to answer a broader set of questions than possible with previous economic analysis capability. In particular, CGE modeling captures how the different sectors of the economy, for example, households, businesses, government, etc., interact to allocate resources in an economy and this approach captures these interactions when it is used to estimate the economic impacts of the kinds of events NISAC often analyzes.

  7. Assessment of the allergic potential of food protein extracts and proteins on oral application using the Brown Norway rat model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Knippels, L.M.J.; Penninks, A.H.

    2003-01-01

    The need for widely accepted and validated animal models to test the potential allergenicity and potency of novel (biotechnology-derived) proteins has become an important issue for their safety evaluation.In this article, we summarize the results of the development of an oral sensitization protocol

  8. A method for the prediction of GPCRs coupling specificity to G-proteins using refined profile Hidden Markov Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Papasaikas Panagiotis K

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background G- Protein coupled receptors (GPCRs comprise the largest group of eukaryotic cell surface receptors with great pharmacological interest. A broad range of native ligands interact and activate GPCRs, leading to signal transduction within cells. Most of these responses are mediated through the interaction of GPCRs with heterotrimeric GTP-binding proteins (G-proteins. Due to the information explosion in biological sequence databases, the development of software algorithms that could predict properties of GPCRs is important. Experimental data reported in the literature suggest that heterotrimeric G-proteins interact with parts of the activated receptor at the transmembrane helix-intracellular loop interface. Utilizing this information and membrane topology information, we have developed an intensive exploratory approach to generate a refined library of statistical models (Hidden Markov Models that predict the coupling preference of GPCRs to heterotrimeric G-proteins. The method predicts the coupling preferences of GPCRs to Gs, Gi/o and Gq/11, but not G12/13 subfamilies. Results Using a dataset of 282 GPCR sequences of known coupling preference to G-proteins and adopting a five-fold cross-validation procedure, the method yielded an 89.7% correct classification rate. In a validation set comprised of all receptor sequences that are species homologues to GPCRs with known coupling preferences, excluding the sequences used to train the models, our method yields a correct classification rate of 91.0%. Furthermore, promiscuous coupling properties were correctly predicted for 6 of the 24 GPCRs that are known to interact with more than one subfamily of G-proteins. Conclusion Our method demonstrates high correct classification rate. Unlike previously published methods performing the same task, it does not require any transmembrane topology prediction in a preceding step. A web-server for the prediction of GPCRs coupling specificity to G-proteins

  9. A stochastic reaction-diffusion model for protein aggregation on DNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voulgarakis, Nikolaos K.

    Vital functions of DNA, such as transcription and packaging, depend on the proper clustering of proteins on the double strand. The present study investigates how the interplay between DNA allostery and electrostatic interactions affects protein clustering. The statistical analysis of a simple but transparent computational model reveals two major consequences of this interplay. First, depending on the protein and salt concentration, protein filaments exhibit a bimodal DNA stiffening and softening behavior. Second, within a certain domain of the control parameters, electrostatic interactions can cause energetic frustration that forces proteins to assemble in rigid spiral configurations. Such spiral filaments might trigger both positive and negative supercoiling, which can ultimately promote gene compaction and regulate the promoter. It has been experimentally shown that bacterial histone-like proteins assemble in similar spiral patterns and/or exhibit the same bimodal behavior. The proposed model can, thus, provide computational insights into the physical mechanisms used by proteins to control the mechanical properties of the DNA.

  10. Connecting protein and mRNA burst distributions for stochastic models of gene expression

    CERN Document Server

    Elgart, Vlad; Fenley, Andrew T; Kulkarni, Rahul V

    2011-01-01

    The intrinsic stochasticity of gene expression can lead to large variability in protein levels for genetically identical cells. Such variability in protein levels can arise from infrequent synthesis of mRNAs which in turn give rise to bursts of protein expression. Protein expression occurring in bursts has indeed been observed experimentally and recent studies have also found evidence for transcriptional bursting, i.e. production of mRNAs in bursts. Given that there are distinct experimental techniques for quantifying the noise at different stages of gene expression, it is of interest to derive analytical results connecting experimental observations at different levels. In this work, we consider stochastic models of gene expression for which mRNA and protein production occurs in independent bursts. For such models, we derive analytical expressions connecting protein and mRNA burst distributions which show how the functional form of the mRNA burst distribution can be inferred from the protein burst distributio...

  11. Mathematical Models for the Education Sector, A Survey. (Les Modeles Mathematiques du Sector Enseignement.) Technical Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development, Paris (France).

    The purposes of this volume are to report a survey of current practice in the construction and use of mathematical models for the education sector: to identify the most important technical and substantive problems confronting the model-building effort; and to bridge the gap between the advancing research pursuit of model-building and the lagging…

  12. Regional forecasting with global atmospheric models; Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crowley, T.J.; Smith, N.R. [Applied Research Corp., College Station, TX (United States)

    1994-05-01

    The purpose of the project was to conduct model simulations for past and future climate change with respect to the proposed Yucca Mtn. repository. The authors report on three main topics, one of which is boundary conditions for paleo-hindcast studies. These conditions are necessary for the conduction of three to four model simulations. The boundary conditions have been prepared for future runs. The second topic is (a) comparing the atmospheric general circulation model (GCM) with observations and other GCMs; and (b) development of a better precipitation data base for the Yucca Mtn. region for comparisons with models. These tasks have been completed. The third topic is preliminary assessments of future climate change. Energy balance model (EBM) simulations suggest that the greenhouse effect will likely dominate climate change at Yucca Mtn. for the next 10,000 years. The EBM study should improve rational choice of GCM CO{sub 2} scenarios for future climate change.

  13. Two-dimensional structure in a generic model of triangular proteins and protein trimers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camp, Philip J; Duncan, Peter D

    2006-04-01

    Motivated by the diversity and complexity of two-dimensional (2D) crystals formed by triangular proteins and protein trimers, we have investigated the structures and phase behavior of hard-disk trimers. In order to mimic specific binding interactions, each trimer possesses an "attractive" disk which can interact with similar disks on other trimers via an attractive square-well potential. At low density and low temperature, the fluid phase mainly consists of tetramers, pentamers, or hexamers. Hexamers provide the structural motif for a high-density, low-temperature periodic solid phase, but we also identify a metastable periodic structure based on a tetramer motif. At high density there is a transition between orientationally ordered and disordered solid phases. The connections between simulated structures and those of 2D protein crystals--as seen in electron microscopy--are briefly discussed.

  14. Ensemble models of proteins and protein domains based on distance distribution restraints.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeschke, Gunnar

    2016-04-01

    Conformational ensembles of intrinsically disordered peptide chains are not fully determined by experimental observations. Uncertainty due to lack of experimental restraints and due to intrinsic disorder can be distinguished if distance distributions restraints are available. Such restraints can be obtained from pulsed dipolar electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy applied to pairs of spin labels. Here, we introduce a Monte Carlo approach for generating conformational ensembles that are consistent with a set of distance distribution restraints, backbone dihedral angle statistics in known protein structures, and optionally, secondary structure propensities or membrane immersion depths. The approach is tested with simulated restraints for a terminal and an internal loop and for a protein with 69 residues by using sets of sparse restraints for underlying well-defined conformations and for published ensembles of a premolten globule-like and a coil-like intrinsically disordered protein.

  15. Influence of Monomer Types on the Designability of a Protein-Model Chain

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    梁好均; 王元元

    2002-01-01

    In a three-dimensional off-lattice model, the method of Shakhnovich and Gutin for minimizing the Hamiltonian is applied to the design of a protein-model chain. The effect of the number of hydrophobic and hydrophilic monomer types on the designability ora protein-model chain is investigated. The simulation results reveal that the number of hydrophobic monomer types is a much more important factor than that of the polar monomer types in the design of a protein-model chain.

  16. Protein Nano-Object Integrator (ProNOI for generating atomic style objects for molecular modeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Smith Nicholas

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background With the progress of nanotechnology, one frequently has to model biological macromolecules simultaneously with nano-objects. However, the atomic structures of the nano objects are typically not available or they are solid state entities. Because of that, the researchers have to investigate such nano systems by generating models of the nano objects in a manner that the existing software be able to carry the simulations. In addition, it should allow generating composite objects with complex shape by combining basic geometrical figures and embedding biological macromolecules within the system. Results Here we report the Protein Nano-Object Integrator (ProNOI which allows for generating atomic-style geometrical objects with user desired shape and dimensions. Unlimited number of objects can be created and combined with biological macromolecules in Protein Data Bank (PDB format file. Once the objects are generated, the users can use sliders to manipulate their shape, dimension and absolute position. In addition, the software offers the option to charge the objects with either specified surface or volumetric charge density and to model them with user-desired dielectric constants. According to the user preference, the biological macromolecule atoms can be assigned charges and radii according to four different force fields: Amber, Charmm, OPLS and PARSE. The biological macromolecules and the atomic-style objects are exported as a position, charge and radius (PQR file, or if a default dielectric constant distribution is not selected, it is exported as a position, charge, radius and epsilon (PQRE file. As illustration of the capabilities of the ProNOI, we created a composite object in a shape of a robot, aptly named the Clemson Robot, whose parts are charged with various volumetric charge densities and holds the barnase-barstar protein complex in its hand. Conclusions The Protein Nano-Object Integrator (ProNOI is a convenient tool for

  17. Protein Nano-Object Integrator (ProNOI) for generating atomic style objects for molecular modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Nicholas; Campbell, Brandon; Li, Lin; Li, Chuan; Alexov, Emil

    2012-12-05

    With the progress of nanotechnology, one frequently has to model biological macromolecules simultaneously with nano-objects. However, the atomic structures of the nano objects are typically not available or they are solid state entities. Because of that, the researchers have to investigate such nano systems by generating models of the nano objects in a manner that the existing software be able to carry the simulations. In addition, it should allow generating composite objects with complex shape by combining basic geometrical figures and embedding biological macromolecules within the system. Here we report the Protein Nano-Object Integrator (ProNOI) which allows for generating atomic-style geometrical objects with user desired shape and dimensions. Unlimited number of objects can be created and combined with biological macromolecules in Protein Data Bank (PDB) format file. Once the objects are generated, the users can use sliders to manipulate their shape, dimension and absolute position. In addition, the software offers the option to charge the objects with either specified surface or volumetric charge density and to model them with user-desired dielectric constants. According to the user preference, the biological macromolecule atoms can be assigned charges and radii according to four different force fields: Amber, Charmm, OPLS and PARSE. The biological macromolecules and the atomic-style objects are exported as a position, charge and radius (PQR) file, or if a default dielectric constant distribution is not selected, it is exported as a position, charge, radius and epsilon (PQRE) file. As illustration of the capabilities of the ProNOI, we created a composite object in a shape of a robot, aptly named the Clemson Robot, whose parts are charged with various volumetric charge densities and holds the barnase-barstar protein complex in its hand. The Protein Nano-Object Integrator (ProNOI) is a convenient tool for generating atomic-style nano shapes in conjunction with

  18. Effect of SNPs in protein kinase Czgene on gene expression in the reporter gene detection system

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhuo Liu; Hong-Xia Sun; Yong-Wei Zhang; Yun-Feng Li; Jin Zuo; Yan Meng; Fu-De Fang

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To investigated the effects of the SNPs (rs411021,rs436045, rs427811, rs385039 and rs809912) on gene expression and further identify the susceptibility genes of type 2 diabetes.METHODS: Ten allele fragments (49 bp each) were synthesized according to the 5 SNPs mentioned above.These fragments were cloned into luciferase reporter gene vector and then transfected into HepG2 cells. The activity of the luciferase was assayed. Effects of the SNPs on RNA splicing were analyzed by bioinformatics.RESULTS: rs427811T allele and rs809912G allele enhanced the activity of the reporter gene expression. None of the 5 SNPs affected RNA splicing.CONCLUSION: SNPs in protein kinase Cz (PKCZ) gene probably play a role in the susceptibility to type 2 diabetes by affecting the expression level of the relevant genes.

  19. Unusual phenotype of glucose transport protein type 1 deficiency syndrome: A case report and literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annio Posar

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The glucose transport protein type 1 (GLUT1 deficit causes a chronic brain energy failure. The classic phenotype of GLUT1 deficiency syndrome is characterized by: Mild to severe motor delay and mental retardation; infantile-onset epilepsy; head growth deceleration; movement disorders (ataxia, dystonia, spasticity; and non-epileptic paroxysmal events (intermittent ataxia, periodic confusion, recurrent headaches. During last years the classic phenotype of this syndrome, as originally reported, has expanded. We report the atypical phenotype of a boy with GLUT1 deficiency syndrome, characterized by mild mental retardation and drug-resistant absence seizures with onset at the age of 6 years, without movement disorders nor decrease of head circumference. A prompt diagnosis of this disorder is mandatory since the ketogenic diet might represent an effective treatment.

  20. Model documentation report: Industrial sector demand module of the National Energy Modeling System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-01-01

    This report documents the objectives, analytical approach, and development of the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) Industrial Demand Model. The report catalogues and describes model assumptions, computational methodology, parameter estimation techniques, and model source code. This document serves three purposes. First, it is a reference document providing a detailed description of the NEMS Industrial Model for model analysts, users, and the public. Second, this report meets the legal requirement of the Energy Information Administration (EIA) to provide adequate documentation in support of its models. Third, it facilitates continuity in model development by providing documentation from which energy analysts can undertake model enhancements, data updates, and parameter refinements as future projects. The NEMS Industrial Demand Model is a dynamic accounting model, bringing together the disparate industries and uses of energy in those industries, and putting them together in an understandable and cohesive framework. The Industrial Model generates mid-term (up to the year 2015) forecasts of industrial sector energy demand as a component of the NEMS integrated forecasting system. From the NEMS system, the Industrial Model receives fuel prices, employment data, and the value of industrial output. Based on the values of these variables, the Industrial Model passes back to the NEMS system estimates of consumption by fuel types.

  1. Model documentation report: Industrial sector demand module of the National Energy Modeling System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-01-01

    This report documents the objectives, analytical approach, and development of the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) Industrial Demand Model. The report catalogues and describes model assumptions, computational methodology, parameter estimation techniques, and model source code. This document serves three purposes. First, it is a reference document providing a detailed description of the NEMS Industrial Model for model analysts, users, and the public. Second, this report meets the legal requirement of the Energy Information Administration (EIA) to provide adequate documentation in support of its models. Third, it facilitates continuity in model development by providing documentation from which energy analysts can undertake model enhancements, data updates, and parameter refinements as future projects. The NEMS Industrial Demand Model is a dynamic accounting model, bringing together the disparate industries and uses of energy in those industries, and putting them together in an understandable and cohesive framework. The Industrial Model generates mid-term (up to the year 2015) forecasts of industrial sector energy demand as a component of the NEMS integrated forecasting system. From the NEMS system, the Industrial Model receives fuel prices, employment data, and the value of industrial output. Based on the values of these variables, the Industrial Model passes back to the NEMS system estimates of consumption by fuel types.

  2. Enlarging the toolbox for allergen epitope definition with an allergen-type model protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berkner, Hanna; Seutter von Loetzen, Christian; Hartl, Maximilian; Randow, Stefanie; Gubesch, Michaela; Vogel, Lothar; Husslik, Felix; Reuter, Andreas; Lidholm, Jonas; Ballmer-Weber, Barbara; Vieths, Stefan; Rösch, Paul; Schiller, Dirk

    2014-01-01

    Birch pollen-allergic subjects produce polyclonal cross-reactive IgE antibodies that mediate pollen-associated food allergies. The major allergen Bet v 1 and its homologs in plant foods bind IgE in their native protein conformation. Information on location, number and clinical relevance of IgE epitopes is limited. We addressed the use of an allergen-related protein model to identify amino acids critical for IgE binding of PR-10 allergens. Norcoclaurine synthase (NCS) from meadow rue is structurally homologous to Bet v 1 but does not bind Bet v 1-reactive IgE. NCS was used as the template for epitope grafting. NCS variants were tested with sera from 70 birch pollen allergic subjects and with monoclonal antibody BV16 reported to compete with IgE binding to Bet v 1. We generated an NCS variant (Δ29NCSN57/I58E/D60N/V63P/D68K) harboring an IgE epitope of Bet v 1. Bet v 1-type protein folding of the NCS variant was evaluated by 1H-15N-HSQC NMR spectroscopy. BV16 bound the NCS variant and 71% (50/70 sera) of our study population showed significant IgE binding. We observed IgE and BV16 cross-reactivity to the epitope presented by the NCS variant in a subgroup of Bet v 1-related allergens. Moreover BV16 blocked IgE binding to the NCS variant. Antibody cross-reactivity depended on a defined orientation of amino acids within the Bet v 1-type conformation. Our system allows the evaluation of patient-specific epitope profiles and will facilitate both the identification of clinically relevant epitopes as biomarkers and the monitoring of therapeutic outcomes to improve diagnosis, prognosis, and therapy of allergies caused by PR-10 proteins.

  3. Enlarging the toolbox for allergen epitope definition with an allergen-type model protein.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hanna Berkner

    Full Text Available Birch pollen-allergic subjects produce polyclonal cross-reactive IgE antibodies that mediate pollen-associated food allergies. The major allergen Bet v 1 and its homologs in plant foods bind IgE in their native protein conformation. Information on location, number and clinical relevance of IgE epitopes is limited. We addressed the use of an allergen-related protein model to identify amino acids critical for IgE binding of PR-10 allergens.Norcoclaurine synthase (NCS from meadow rue is structurally homologous to Bet v 1 but does not bind Bet v 1-reactive IgE. NCS was used as the template for epitope grafting. NCS variants were tested with sera from 70 birch pollen allergic subjects and with monoclonal antibody BV16 reported to compete with IgE binding to Bet v 1.We generated an NCS variant (Δ29NCSN57/I58E/D60N/V63P/D68K harboring an IgE epitope of Bet v 1. Bet v 1-type protein folding of the NCS variant was evaluated by 1H-15N-HSQC NMR spectroscopy. BV16 bound the NCS variant and 71% (50/70 sera of our study population showed significant IgE binding. We observed IgE and BV16 cross-reactivity to the epitope presented by the NCS variant in a subgroup of Bet v 1-related allergens. Moreover BV16 blocked IgE binding to the NCS variant. Antibody cross-reactivity depended on a defined orientation of amino acids within the Bet v 1-type conformation.Our system allows the evaluation of patient-specific epitope profiles and will facilitate both the identification of clinically relevant epitopes as biomarkers and the monitoring of therapeutic outcomes to improve diagnosis, prognosis, and therapy of allergies caused by PR-10 proteins.

  4. In silico modelling and validation of differential expressed proteins in lung cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhagavathi S

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The present study aims predict the three dimensional structure of three major proteins responsible for causing Lung cancer. Methods: These are the differentially expressed proteins in lung cancer dataset. Initially, the structural template for these proteins is identified from structural database using homology search and perform homology modelling approach to predict its native 3D structure. Three-dimensional model obtained was validated using Ramachandran plot analysis to find the reliability of the model. Results: Four proteins were differentially expressed and were significant proteins in causing lung cancer. Among the four proteins, Matrixmetallo proteinase (P39900 had a known 3D structure and hence was not considered for modelling. The remaining proteins Polo like kinase I Q58A51, Trophinin B1AKF1, Thrombomodulin P07204 were modelled and validated. Conclusions: The three dimensional structure of proteins provides insights about the functional aspect and regulatory aspect of the protein. Thus, this study will be a breakthrough for further lung cancer related studies.

  5. Coarse-grained lattice model simulations of sequence-structure fitness of a ribosome-inactivating protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olson, Mark A; Yeh, In-Chul; Lee, Michael S

    2008-02-01

    Many realistic protein-engineering design problems extend beyond the computational limits of what is considered practical when applying all-atom molecular-dynamics simulation methods. Lattice models provide computationally robust alternatives, yet most are regarded as too simplistic to accurately capture the details of complex designs. We revisit a coarse-grained lattice simulation model and demonstrate that a multiresolution modeling approach of reconstructing all-atom structures from lattice chains is of sufficient accuracy to resolve the comparability of sequence-structure modifications of the ricin A-chain (RTA) protein fold. For a modeled structure, the unfolding-folding transition temperature was calculated from the heat capacity using either the potential energy from the lattice model or the all-atom CHARMM19 force-field plus a generalized Born solvent approximation. We found, that despite the low-resolution modeling of conformational states, the potential energy functions were capable of detecting the relative change in the thermodynamic transition temperature that distinguishes between a protein design and the native RTA fold in excellent accord with reported experimental studies of thermal denaturation. A discussion is provided of different sequences fitted to the RTA fold and a possible unfolding model. (c) 2007 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Student Flow Model SFM-IA Reports. Technical Report 42. Preliminary Draft.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Western Interstate Commission for Higher Education, Boulder, CO. National Center for Higher Education Management Systems.

    Examples of the reports generated by the National Center for Higher Education Management Systems (NCHEMS) Student Flow Model (SFM) IA are presented. The SFM-IA is a tool for analyzing the historical movement of students between the various fields of study and student levels in an institution and for estimating the future enrollments in each field…

  7. RNA metabolism in the regulation of protein synthesis in plants. Progress report, 1975-1979

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Key, J L

    1979-01-01

    The major objectives of the research for the contract period covered by this report were (1) to gain an insight into the sequence organization of the DNA of soybean, emphasizing the arrangement of single copy or unique sequences and repetitive sequences of DNA throughout the genome, (2) to characterize soybean RNAs relative to nucleotide sequence complexity and kinetics of synthesis and turnover of poly A/sup +/ mRNA, and (3) to study ribosomal proteins directed to an analysis of possible changes in proteins which relate to the activation of 80S ribosomes and thus mRNA utilization and protein synthesis in response to environmental stimuli. Even with greatly reduced funding compared to that requested, objectives 1 and 2 were substantially accomplished. Because of reduced funding and the 20-month no cost extension, relatively little progress was made on objective 3. Accordingly objectives 1 and 2 will be summarized in some detail; a brief account of progress is presented on objective 3.

  8. Creating a specialist protein resource network: a meeting report for the protein bioinformatics and community resources retreat

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Babbitt, Patricia C.; Bagos, Pantelis G.; Bairoch, Amos

    2015-01-01

    During 11–12 August 2014, a Protein Bioinformatics and Community Resources Retreat was held at the Wellcome Trust Genome Campus in Hinxton, UK. This meeting brought together the principal investigators of several specialized protein resources (such as CAZy, TCDB and MEROPS) as well as those from ...

  9. Creating a specialist protein resource network: a meeting report for the protein bioinformatics and community resources retreat

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Babbitt, P.C.; Bagos, P.G.; Bairoch, A.; Bateman, A.; Chatonnet, A.; Chen, M.J.; Craik, D.J.; Finn, R.D.; Gloriam, D.; Haft, D.H.; Henrissat, B.; Holliday, G.L.; Isberg, V.; Kaas, Q.; Landsman, D.; Lenfant, N.; Manning, G.; Nagano, N.; Srinivasan, N.; O'Donovan, C.; Pruitt, K.D.; Sowdhamini, R.; Rawlings, N.D.; Saier, M.H., Jr.; Sharman, J.L.; Spedding, M.; Tsirigos, K.D.; Vastermark, A.; Vriend, G.

    2015-01-01

    During 11-12 August 2014, a Protein Bioinformatics and Community Resources Retreat was held at the Wellcome Trust Genome Campus in Hinxton, UK. This meeting brought together the principal investigators of several specialized protein resources (such as CAZy, TCDB and MEROPS) as well as those from pro

  10. A self-organizing algorithm for modeling protein loops.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pu Liu

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Protein loops, the flexible short segments connecting two stable secondary structural units in proteins, play a critical role in protein structure and function. Constructing chemically sensible conformations of protein loops that seamlessly bridge the gap between the anchor points without introducing any steric collisions remains an open challenge. A variety of algorithms have been developed to tackle the loop closure problem, ranging from inverse kinematics to knowledge-based approaches that utilize pre-existing fragments extracted from known protein structures. However, many of these approaches focus on the generation of conformations that mainly satisfy the fixed end point condition, leaving the steric constraints to be resolved in subsequent post-processing steps. In the present work, we describe a simple solution that simultaneously satisfies not only the end point and steric conditions, but also chirality and planarity constraints. Starting from random initial atomic coordinates, each individual conformation is generated independently by using a simple alternating scheme of pairwise distance adjustments of randomly chosen atoms, followed by fast geometric matching of the conformationally rigid components of the constituent amino acids. The method is conceptually simple, numerically stable and computationally efficient. Very importantly, additional constraints, such as those derived from NMR experiments, hydrogen bonds or salt bridges, can be incorporated into the algorithm in a straightforward and inexpensive way, making the method ideal for solving more complex multi-loop problems. The remarkable performance and robustness of the algorithm are demonstrated on a set of protein loops of length 4, 8, and 12 that have been used in previous studies.

  11. Mathematical model of zinc absorption: effects of dietary calcium, protein and iron on zinc absorption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Leland V; Krebs, Nancy F; Hambidge, K Michael

    2013-02-28

    A previously described mathematical model of Zn absorption as a function of total daily dietary Zn and phytate was fitted to data from studies in which dietary Ca, Fe and protein were also measured. An analysis of regression residuals indicated statistically significant positive relationships between the residuals and Ca, Fe and protein, suggesting that the presence of any of these dietary components enhances Zn absorption. Based on the hypotheses that (1) Ca and Fe both promote Zn absorption by binding with phytate and thereby making it unavailable for binding Zn and (2) protein enhances the availability of Zn for transporter binding, the model was modified to incorporate these effects. The new model of Zn absorption as a function of dietary Zn, phytate, Ca, Fe and protein was then fitted to the data. The proportion of variation in absorbed Zn explained by the new model was 0·88, an increase from 0·82 with the original model. A reduced version of the model without Fe produced an equally good fit to the data and an improved value for the model selection criterion, demonstrating that when dietary Ca and protein are controlled for, there is no evidence that dietary Fe influences Zn absorption. Regression residuals and testing with additional data supported the validity of the new model. It was concluded that dietary Ca and protein modestly enhanced Zn absorption and Fe had no statistically discernable effect. Furthermore, the model provides a meaningful foundation for efforts to model nutrient interactions in mineral absorption.

  12. Model documentation report: Commercial Sector Demand Module of the National Energy Modeling System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-01-01

    This report documents the objectives, analytical approach and development of the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) Commercial Sector Demand Module. The report catalogues and describes the model assumptions, computational methodology, parameter estimation techniques, model source code, and forecast results generated through the synthesis and scenario development based on these components. The NEMS Commercial Sector Demand Module is a simulation tool based upon economic and engineering relationships that models commercial sector energy demands at the nine Census Division level of detail for eleven distinct categories of commercial buildings. Commercial equipment selections are performed for the major fuels of electricity, natural gas, and distillate fuel, for the major services of space heating, space cooling, water heating, ventilation, cooking, refrigeration, and lighting. The algorithm also models demand for the minor fuels of residual oil, liquefied petroleum gas, steam coal, motor gasoline, and kerosene, the renewable fuel sources of wood and municipal solid waste, and the minor services of office equipment. Section 2 of this report discusses the purpose of the model, detailing its objectives, primary input and output quantities, and the relationship of the Commercial Module to the other modules of the NEMS system. Section 3 of the report describes the rationale behind the model design, providing insights into further assumptions utilized in the model development process to this point. Section 3 also reviews alternative commercial sector modeling methodologies drawn from existing literature, providing a comparison to the chosen approach. Section 4 details the model structure, using graphics and text to illustrate model flows and key computations.

  13. Creating a specialist protein resource network: a meeting report for the protein bioinformatics and community resources retreat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babbitt, Patricia C; Bagos, Pantelis G; Bairoch, Amos; Bateman, Alex; Chatonnet, Arnaud; Chen, Mark Jinan; Craik, David J; Finn, Robert D; Gloriam, David; Haft, Daniel H; Henrissat, Bernard; Holliday, Gemma L; Isberg, Vignir; Kaas, Quentin; Landsman, David; Lenfant, Nicolas; Manning, Gerard; Nagano, Nozomi; Srinivasan, Narayanaswamy; O'Donovan, Claire; Pruitt, Kim D; Sowdhamini, Ramanathan; Rawlings, Neil D; Saier, Milton H; Sharman, Joanna L; Spedding, Michael; Tsirigos, Konstantinos D; Vastermark, Ake; Vriend, Gerrit

    2015-01-01

    During 11-12 August 2014, a Protein Bioinformatics and Community Resources Retreat was held at the Wellcome Trust Genome Campus in Hinxton, UK. This meeting brought together the principal investigators of several specialized protein resources (such as CAZy, TCDB and MEROPS) as well as those from protein databases from the large Bioinformatics centres (including UniProt and RefSeq). The retreat was divided into five sessions: (1) key challenges, (2) the databases represented, (3) best practices for maintenance and curation, (4) information flow to and from large data centers and (5) communication and funding. An important outcome of this meeting was the creation of a Specialist Protein Resource Network that we believe will improve coordination of the activities of its member resources. We invite further protein database resources to join the network and continue the dialogue.

  14. Folding Behaviour for Proteins BBL and E3BD with Gō-like Models

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZUO Guang-Hong; ZHANG Jian; WANG Jun; WANG Wei

    2005-01-01

    @@ Folding behaviour of protein BBL and its homologue domain E3BD are studied by using an off-lattice Gō-like model. It is found that the folding behaviours of these two proteins are different. Protein BBL folds in a downhill manner, which is consistent with experiments. In contrast, protein E3BD folds cooperatively and has a bimodal distribution of the Q values (the similarity to the native state). By analysing the native structures of the two proteins, it is found that the difference in folding behaviours can be attributed to the different structural features described by the number of nonlocal contacts per residue.

  15. Computational model explains high activity and rapid cycling of Rho GTPases within protein complexes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew B Goryachev

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Formation of multiprotein complexes on cellular membranes is critically dependent on the cyclic activation of small GTPases. FRAP-based analyses demonstrate that within protein complexes, some small GTPases cycle nearly three orders of magnitude faster than they would spontaneously cycle in vitro. At the same time, experiments report concomitant excess of the activated, GTP-bound form of GTPases over their inactive form. Intuitively, high activity and rapid turnover are contradictory requirements. How the cells manage to maximize both remains poorly understood. Here, using GTPases of the Rab and Rho families as a prototype, we introduce a computational model of the GTPase cycle. We quantitatively investigate several plausible layouts of the cycling control module that consist of GEFs, GAPs, and GTPase effectors. We explain the existing experimental data and predict how the cycling of GTPases is controlled by the regulatory proteins in vivo. Our model explains distinct and separable roles that the activating GEFs and deactivating GAPs play in the GTPase cycling control. While the activity of GTPase is mainly defined by GEF, the turnover rate is a sole function of GAP. Maximization of the GTPase activity and turnover rate places conflicting requirements on the concentration of GAP. Therefore, to achieve a high activity and turnover rate at once, cells must carefully maintain concentrations of GEFs and GAPs within the optimal range. The values of these optimal concentrations indicate that efficient cycling can be achieved only within dense protein complexes typically assembled on the membrane surfaces. We show that the concentration requirement for GEF can be dramatically reduced by a GEF-activating GTPase effector that can also significantly boost the cycling efficiency. Interestingly, we find that the cycling regimes are only weakly dependent on the concentration of GTPase itself.

  16. Nonlinear Model of the Specificity of DNA-Protein Interactions and Its Stability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dwiputra, D.; Hidayat, W.; Khairani, R.; Zen, F. P.

    2016-08-01

    Specific DNA-protein interactions are fundamental processes of living cells. We propose a new model of DNA-protein interactions to explain the site specificity of the interactions. The hydrogen bonds between DNA base pairs and between DNA-protein peptide groups play a significant role in determination of the specific binding site. We adopt the Morse potential with coupling terms to construct the Hamiltonian of coupled oscillators representing the hydrogen bonds in which the depth of the potentials vary in the DNA chain. In this paper we investigate the stability of the model to determine the conditions satisfying the biological circumstances of the DNA-protein interactions.

  17. Protein aggregation in association with delayed neuronal death in rat model of brain ischemia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Pengfei GE; Tianfei LUG; Shuanglin FU; Wenchen LI; Chonghao WANG; Chuibing ZHOU; Yinan LUO

    2008-01-01

    To investigate the relationship between protein aggregation and delayed neuronal death, we adopted rat models of 20 min ischemia. Brain ischemia was produced using the 2-vessel occlusion (2VO) model in rats Light microscopy, transmission electronic microscopy and Western blot analysis were performed for morphological analysis of neurons, and protein detection. The results showed delayed neuronal death took place at 72 h after ischemia-reperfusion, protein aggregates formed at 4 h after reperfusion and reached the peak at 24 h after reper-fusion, and Western blot analysis was consistent with transmission electronic microscopy. We conclude that protein aggregation is one of the important factors leading to delayed neuronal death.

  18. Moisture-induced quality changes of hen egg white proteins in a protein/water model system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Qinchun; Rocca-Smith, Jeancarlo R; Labuza, Theodore P

    2012-10-24

    In recent years, the intermediate-moisture foods (IMF), such as nutrition and energy bars, are a rapidly growing segment of the global food market. However, due to moisture-induced protein aggregation, commercial high protein nutrition bars generally become harder over time, thus losing product acceptability. In this study, the objectives were to investigate the moisture-induced protein aggregation in a hen egg white proteins/water dough model system (water activity (a(w)): 0.95) and to evaluate its molecular mechanisms and controlling factors. During storage at three different temperatures (23, 35, and 45 °C) for 70 days, four selected physicochemical changes of the dough system were analyzed: the a(w), the color (L* value), the fluorescent Maillard compounds (fluorescence intensity (FI) value), and the remaining free amino groups. Overall, the physicochemical changes of egg white proteins in the dough system are closely related to the glass transition temperature (T(g)). The effect of moisture content on both the L* and FI values occurred as a function of storage time at 45 °C due to the Maillard reaction. The change of the remaining free amino groups at different temperatures was derived from the coaction of both the Maillard reaction and enzymatic hydrolysis from molds. Additionally, through analyzing the buffer-soluble egg white proteins using gel electrophoresis, our results showed that moisture-induced aggregates were produced by two chemical reactions during storage: the disulfide interaction and the Maillard reaction. Furthermore, the effect of two processes during manufacturing, desugarization and dry-heat pasteurization, on the physicochemical changes of the egg white proteins was elucidated. In order to prevent or reduce moisture-induced protein aggregation during product storage and distribution, two potential solutions were also discussed.

  19. Quality of Methods Reporting in Animal Models of Colitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bramhall, Michael; Flórez-Vargas, Oscar; Stevens, Robert; Brass, Andy

    2015-01-01

    Background: Current understanding of the onset of inflammatory bowel diseases relies heavily on data derived from animal models of colitis. However, the omission of information concerning the method used makes the interpretation of studies difficult or impossible. We assessed the current quality of methods reporting in 4 animal models of colitis that are used to inform clinical research into inflammatory bowel disease: dextran sulfate sodium, interleukin-10−/−, CD45RBhigh T cell transfer, and 2,4,6-trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid (TNBS). Methods: We performed a systematic review based on PRISMA guidelines, using a PubMed search (2000–2014) to obtain publications that used a microarray to describe gene expression in colitic tissue. Methods reporting quality was scored against a checklist of essential and desirable criteria. Results: Fifty-eight articles were identified and included in this review (29 dextran sulfate sodium, 15 interleukin-10−/−, 5 T cell transfer, and 16 TNBS; some articles use more than 1 colitis model). A mean of 81.7% (SD = ±7.038) of criteria were reported across all models. Only 1 of the 58 articles reported all essential criteria on our checklist. Animal age, gender, housing conditions, and mortality/morbidity were all poorly reported. Conclusions: Failure to include all essential criteria is a cause for concern; this failure can have large impact on the quality and replicability of published colitis experiments. We recommend adoption of our checklist as a requirement for publication to improve the quality, comparability, and standardization of colitis studies and will make interpretation and translation of data to human disease more reliable. PMID:25989337

  20. Using mathematical models to understand the effect of nanoscale roughness on protein adsorption for improving medical devices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ercan B

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Batur Ercan,1 Dongwoo Khang,2 Joseph Carpenter,3 Thomas J Webster1 1Department of Chemical Engineering, Northeastern University, Boston, MA, USA; 2School of Materials Science and Engineering and Center for PRC and RIGET, Gyeongsang National University, Jinju, South Korea; 3School of Medicine, Stanford University, Stanford, CA, USA Abstract: Surface roughness and energy significantly influence protein adsorption on to biomaterials, which, in turn, controls select cellular adhesion to determine the success and longevity of an implant. To understand these relationships at a fundamental level, a model was originally proposed by Khang et al to correlate nanoscale surface properties (specifically, nanoscale roughness and energy to protein adsorption, which explained the greater cellular responses on nanostructured surfaces commonly reported in the literature today. To test this model for different surfaces from what was previously used to develop that model, in this study we synthesized highly ordered poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid surfaces of identical chemistry but altered nanoscale surface roughness and energy using poly(dimethylsiloxane molds of polystyrene beads. Fibronectin and collagen type IV adsorption studies showed a linear adsorption behavior as the surface nanoroughness increased. This supported the general trends observed by Khang et al. However, when fitting such data to the mathematical model established by Khang et al, a strong correlation did not result. Thus, this study demonstrated that the equation proposed by Khang et al to predict protein adsorption should be modified to accommodate for additional nanoscale surface property contributions (ie, surface charge to make the model more accurate. In summary, results from this study provided an important step in developing future mathematical models that can correlate surface properties (such as nanoscale roughness and surface energy to initial protein adsorption events important to

  1. Metal ions induced heat shock protein response by elevating superoxide anion level in HeLa cells transformed by HSE-SEAP reporter gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Zhanjiang; Yang, Xiaoda; Wang, Kui

    2006-06-01

    The aim of this work is to define the relationship between heat shock protein (HSP) and reactive oxygen species (ROS) in the cells exposed to different concentrations of metal ions, and to evaluate a new method for tracing the dynamic levels of cellular reactive oxygen species using a HSE-SEAP reporter gene. The expression of heat shock protein was measured using a secreted alkaline phosphatase (SEAP) reporter gene transformed into HeLa cell strain, the levels of superoxide anion (O(2)(-)) and hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) were determined by NBT reduction assay and DCFH staining flow cytometry (FCM), respectively. The experimental results demonstrated that the expression of heat shock protein induced by metal ions was linearly related to the cellular superoxide anion level before cytotoxic effects were observed, but not related to the cellular hydrogen peroxide level. The experimental results suggested that metal ions might induce heat shock protein by elevating cellular superoxide anion level, and thus the expression of heat shock protein indicated by the HSE-SEAP reporter gene can be an effective model for monitoring the dynamic level of superoxide anion and early metal-induced oxidative stress/cytotoxicity.

  2. A Report on the Validation of Beryllium Strength Models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Armstrong, Derek Elswick [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-02-05

    This report discusses work on validating beryllium strength models with flyer plate and Taylor rod experimental data. Strength models are calibrated with Hopkinson bar and quasi-static data. The Hopkinson bar data for beryllium provides strain rates up to about 4000 per second. A limitation of the Hopkinson bar data for beryllium is that it only provides information on strain up to about 0.15. The lack of high strain data at high strain rates makes it difficult to distinguish between various strength model settings. The PTW model has been calibrated many different times over the last 12 years. The lack of high strain data for high strain rates has resulted in these calibrated PTW models for beryllium exhibiting significantly different behavior when extrapolated to high strain. For beryllium, the α parameter of PTW has recently been calibrated to high precision shear modulus data. In the past the α value for beryllium was set based on expert judgment. The new α value for beryllium was used in a calibration of the beryllium PTW model by Sky Sjue. The calibration by Sjue used EOS table information to model the temperature dependence of the heat capacity. Also, the calibration by Sjue used EOS table information to model the density changes of the beryllium sample during the Hopkinson bar and quasi-static experiments. In this paper, the calibrated PTW model by Sjue is compared against experimental data and other strength models. The other strength models being considered are a PTW model calibrated by Shuh- Rong Chen and a Steinberg-Guinan type model by John Pedicini. The three strength models are used in a comparison against flyer plate and Taylor rod data. The results show that the Chen PTW model provides better agreement to this data. The Chen PTW model settings have been previously adjusted to provide a better fit to flyer plate data, whereas the Sjue PTW model has not been changed based on flyer plate data. However, the Sjue model provides a reasonable fit to

  3. Effects of high hydrostatic pressure on emulsifying properties of sweet potato protein in model protein-hydrocolloids system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Nasir Mehmood; Mu, Tai-Hua; Ali, Farman; Arogundade, Lawrence A; Khan, Zia Ullah; Zhang, Maio; Ahmad, Shujaat; Sun, Hong-Nan

    2015-02-15

    The effects of high hydrostatic pressure (HHP) on emulsifying properties of sweet potato protein (SPP) in presence of 0.1%, 0.3% and 0.5% (w/v) of guar gum (GG) and glycerol monostearate (GMS) were investigated. Emulsifying stability index (ESI) of the SPP with GG revealed significant increase (Pmodel while such case was not observed for SPP-GMS model. The flow index for SPP-GG emulsion model was found to decrease with increase in HHP treatment and had non-Newtonian behaviour. The SPP-GMS emulsion models with HHP treatments showed comparatively lower viscosities but had more Newtonian flow character.

  4. Optimized Baxter model of protein solutions: electrostatics versus adhesion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Prinsen, P.; Odijk, T.

    2004-01-01

    A theory is set up of spherical proteins interacting by screened electrostatics and constant adhesion, in which the effective adhesion parameter is optimized by a variational principle for the free energy. An analytical approach to the second virial coefficient is first outlined by balancing the rep

  5. Diclofenac plasma protein binding: PK-PD modelling in cardiac patients submitted to cardiopulmonary bypass

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Auler Jr. J.O.

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available Twenty-four surgical patients of both sexes without cardiac, hepatic, renal or endocrine dysfunctions were divided into two groups: 10 cardiac surgical patients submitted to myocardial revascularization and cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB, 3 females and 7 males aged 65 ± 11 years, 74 ± 16 kg body weight, 166 ± 9 cm height and 1.80 ± 0.21 m2 body surface area (BSA, and control, 14 surgical patients not submitted to CPB, 11 female and 3 males aged 41 ± 14 years, 66 ± 14 kg body weight, 159 ± 9 cm height and 1.65 ± 0.16 m2 BSA (mean ± SD. Sodium diclofenac (1 mg/kg, im Voltaren 75® twice a day was administered to patients in the Recovery Unit 48 h after surgery. Venous blood samples were collected during a period of 0-12 h and analgesia was measured by the visual analogue scale (VAS during the same period. Plasma diclofenac levels were measured by high performance liquid chromatography. A two-compartment open model was applied to obtain the plasma decay curve and to estimate kinetic parameters. Plasma diclofenac protein binding decreased whereas free plasma diclofenac levels were increased five-fold in CPB patients. Data obtained for analgesia reported as the maximum effect (EMAX were: 25% VAS (CPB vs 10% VAS (control, P<0.05, median measured by the visual analogue scale where 100% is equivalent to the highest level of pain. To correlate the effect versus plasma diclofenac levels, the EMAX sigmoid model was applied. A prolongation of the mean residence time for maximum effect (MRTEMAX was observed without any change in lag-time in CPB in spite of the reduced analgesia reported for these patients, during the time-dose interval. In conclusion, the extent of plasma diclofenac protein binding was influenced by CPB with clinically relevant kinetic-dynamic consequences

  6. Inter-observer agreement in reporting HER 2 Neu protein over expression by immunohistochemistry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ibrahim Al Haddabi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: HER 2 Neu protein overexpression and its detection by immunohistochemistry (IHC has become quiet critical because of its relevance in regards to Herceptin treatment. This peer review was done at a tertiary care center, which aimed at determining the inter-observer variation among five pathologists and evaluating the degree of agreement between them. Aims: The aim of our study was to determine the reproducibility of HER 2 Neu system of reporting in breast cancer cases and determine inter-observer variability among five pathologists at a tertiary care center. To compare the results with similar studies done at other centers. Settings and Design: Retrospective descriptive study. Materials and Methods: Hematoxylin and Eosin (H and E and IHC stained slides of 104 cases of carcinoma breast, on which HER 2 Neu status had been reported were reviewed. The time period for selection was from January 2010 to December 2011 (2 year period. Five pathologists reviewed the H and E and IHC slides independently and scored the results on a specially designed work sheet. Kappa values for inter-observer variation and Cornbach′s alpha for internal consistency were calculated. Statistical Analysis Used: SPSS 20.0 (IBM. not known. Results: Complete agreement was seen between all five pathologists in 70 cases (70/104 = 67%. Agreement between four pathologists was seen in 78 cases (78/104 = 75%. Agreement between three pathologists was seen in 92 cases (92/104 = 88%. The global value for kappa co efficient for agreement between two pathologists was 0.706 and Cornbach alpha for internal consistency of reporting in the department was 0.987. Conclusion/Key Messages: Our departmental peer review indicated that there is good inter-observer concordance (agreement between two pathologists and there is strong overall internal consistency of reporting for HER 2 Neu reporting by IHC. Our results are comparable to International reported data of similar studies.

  7. Stable, high-level expression of reporter proteins from improved alphavirus expression vectors to track replication and dissemination during encephalitic and arthritogenic disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Chengqun; Gardner, Christina L; Watson, Alan M; Ryman, Kate D; Klimstra, William B

    2014-02-01

    Engineered alphavirus vectors expressing reporters of infection have been used for a number of years due to their relatively low costs for analysis of virus replication and the capacity to utilize imaging systems for longitudinal measurements of growth within single animals. In general, these vectors have been derived from Old World alphaviruses using a second viral subgenomic promoter to express the transgenes, placed either immediately after the nonstructural proteins or at the 3' end of the viral coding sequences. However, the relevance of these vectors to natural infections is questionable, as they have not been rigorously tested for virulence in vivo in comparison with parental viruses or for the retention of the reporter during replication. Here, we report construction of new expression vectors for two Old World arthritogenic alphaviruses (Sindbis and Chikungunya viruses) and two New World encephalitic alphaviruses (eastern and Venezuelan equine encephalitis viruses) based upon either fusion of the reporter protein in frame within nonstructural protein 3 (nsP3) or insertion of the reporter as a cleavable element between the capsid and PE2 structural proteins. We have compared these with a traditional 3' double subgenomic promoter virus expressing either a large, firefly luciferase (fLuc; 1,650 nucleotides), or small, NanoLuc (nLuc; 513 nucleotides), luminescent reporter protein. Results indicate that the nLuc is substantially more stable than fLuc during repeated rounds of infection regardless of the transgene location. However, the capsid-PE2 insertion and nsP3 fusion viruses exhibit the most authentic mimicking of parental virus infection regardless of expressed protein. IMPORTANCE As more antiviral therapeutics and vaccines are developed, rapid and accurate in vivo modeling of their efficacy will be required. However, current alphavirus vectors expressing reporters of infection have not been extensively tested for accurate mimicking of the infection

  8. Exploitation of parallelism in climate models. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baer, Ferdinand; Tribbia, Joseph J.; Williamson, David L.

    2001-02-05

    This final report includes details on the research accomplished by the grant entitled 'Exploitation of Parallelism in Climate Models' to the University of Maryland. The purpose of the grant was to shed light on (a) how to reconfigure the atmospheric prediction equations such that the time iteration process could be compressed by use of MPP architecture; (b) how to develop local subgrid scale models which can provide time and space dependent parameterization for a state-of-the-art climate model to minimize the scale resolution necessary for a climate model, and to utilize MPP capability to simultaneously integrate those subgrid models and their statistics; and (c) how to capitalize on the MPP architecture to study the inherent ensemble nature of the climate problem. In the process of addressing these issues, we created parallel algorithms with spectral accuracy; we developed a process for concurrent climate simulations; we established suitable model reconstructions to speed up computation; we identified and tested optimum realization statistics; we undertook a number of parameterization studies to better understand model physics; and we studied the impact of subgrid scale motions and their parameterization in atmospheric models.

  9. Power Management and Distribution (PMAD) Model Development: Final Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metcalf, Kenneth J.

    2011-01-01

    Power management and distribution (PMAD) models were developed in the early 1990's to model candidate architectures for various Space Exploration Initiative (SEI) missions. They were used to generate "ballpark" component mass estimates to support conceptual PMAD system design studies. The initial set of models was provided to NASA Lewis Research Center (since renamed Glenn Research Center) in 1992. They were developed to estimate the characteristics of power conditioning components predicted to be available in the 2005 timeframe. Early 90's component and device designs and material technologies were projected forward to the 2005 timeframe, and algorithms reflecting those design and material improvements were incorporated into the models to generate mass, volume, and efficiency estimates for circa 2005 components. The models are about ten years old now and NASA GRC requested a review of them to determine if they should be updated to bring them into agreement with current performance projections or to incorporate unforeseen design or technology advances. This report documents the results of this review and the updated power conditioning models and new transmission line models generated to estimate post 2005 PMAD system masses and sizes. This effort continues the expansion and enhancement of a library of PMAD models developed to allow system designers to assess future power system architectures and distribution techniques quickly and consistently.

  10. Association of protein structure, protein and carbohydrate subfractions with bioenergy profiles and biodegradation functions in modeled forage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Cuiying; Zhang, Xuewei; Yu, Peiqiang

    2016-03-01

    The objectives of this study were to detect unique aspects and association of forage protein inherent structure, biological compounds, protein and carbohydrate subfractions, bioenergy profiles, and biodegradation features. In this study, common available alfalfa hay from two different sourced-origins (FSO vs. CSO) was used as a modeled forage for inherent structure profile, bioenergy, biodegradation and their association between their structure and bio-functions. The molecular spectral profiles were determined using non-invasive molecular spectroscopy. The parameters included: protein structure amide I group, amide II group and their ratios; protein subfractions (PA1, PA2, PB1, PB2, PC); carbohydrate fractions (CA1, CA2, CA3, CA4, CB1, CB2, CC); biodegradable and undegradable fractions of protein (RDPA2, RDPB1, RDPB2, RDP; RUPA2 RUPB1, RUPB2, RUPC, RUP); biodegradable and undegradable fractions of carbohydrate (RDCA4, RDCB1, RDCB2, RDCB3, RDCHO; RUCA4, RUCB1; RUCB2; RUCB3 RUCC, RUCHO) and bioenergy profiles (tdNDF, tdFA, tdCP, tdNFC, TDN1 ×, DE3 ×, ME3 ×, NEL3 ×; NEm, NEg). The results show differences in protein and carbohydrate (CHO) subfractions in the moderately degradable true protein fraction (PB1: 502 vs. 420 g/kg CP, P = 0.09), slowly degraded true protein fraction (PB2: 45 vs. 96 g/kg CP, P = 0.02), moderately degradable CHO fraction (CB2: 283 vs. 223 g/kg CHO, P = 0.06) and slowly degraded CHO fraction (CB3: 369 vs. 408 g/kg CHO) between the two sourced origins. As to biodegradable (RD) fractions of protein and CHO in rumen, there were differences in RD of PB1 (417 vs. 349 g/kg CP, P = 0.09), RD of PB2 (29 vs. 62 g/kg CP, P = 0.02), RD of CB2 (251 vs. 198 g/kg DM, P = 0.06), RD of CB3 (236 vs. 261 g/kg CHO, P = 0.08). As to bioenergy profile, there were differences in total digestible nutrient (TDN: 551 vs. 537 g/kg DM, P = 0.06), and metabolic bioenergy (P = 0.095). As to protein molecular structure, there were differences in protein structure 1st

  11. Association of protein structure, protein and carbohydrate subfractions with bioenergy profiles and biodegradation functions in modeled forage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Cuiying; Zhang, Xuewei; Yu, Peiqiang

    2016-03-15

    The objectives of this study were to detect unique aspects and association of forage protein inherent structure, biological compounds, protein and carbohydrate subfractions, bioenergy profiles, and biodegradation features. In this study, common available alfalfa hay from two different sourced-origins (FSO vs. CSO) was used as a modeled forage for inherent structure profile, bioenergy, biodegradation and their association between their structure and bio-functions. The molecular spectral profiles were determined using non-invasive molecular spectroscopy. The parameters included: protein structure amide I group, amide II group and their ratios; protein subfractions (PA1, PA2, PB1, PB2, PC); carbohydrate fractions (CA1, CA2, CA3, CA4, CB1, CB2, CC); biodegradable and undegradable fractions of protein (RDPA2, RDPB1, RDPB2, RDP; RUPA2 RUPB1, RUPB2, RUPC, RUP); biodegradable and undegradable fractions of carbohydrate (RDCA4, RDCB1, RDCB2, RDCB3, RDCHO; RUCA4, RUCB1; RUCB2; RUCB3 RUCC, RUCHO) and bioenergy profiles (tdNDF, tdFA, tdCP, tdNFC, TDN1×, DE3×, ME3×, NEL3×; NEm, NEg). The results show differences in protein and carbohydrate (CHO) subfractions in the moderately degradable true protein fraction (PB1: 502 vs. 420 g/kg CP, P=0.09), slowly degraded true protein fraction (PB2: 45 vs. 96 g/kg CP, P=0.02), moderately degradable CHO fraction (CB2: 283 vs. 223 g/kg CHO, P=0.06) and slowly degraded CHO fraction (CB3: 369 vs. 408 g/kg CHO) between the two sourced origins. As to biodegradable (RD) fractions of protein and CHO in rumen, there were differences in RD of PB1 (417 vs. 349 g/kg CP, P=0.09), RD of PB2 (29 vs. 62 g/kg CP, P=0.02), RD of CB2 (251 vs. 198 g/kg DM, P=0.06), RD of CB3 (236 vs. 261 g/kg CHO, P=0.08). As to bioenergy profile, there were differences in total digestible nutrient (TDN: 551 vs. 537 g/kg DM, P=0.06), and metabolic bioenergy (P=0.095). As to protein molecular structure, there were differences in protein structure 1st and 2nd amide groups (P0

  12. Evolution of sparsity and modularity in a model of protein allostery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hemery, Mathieu; Rivoire, Olivier

    2015-04-01

    The sequence of a protein is not only constrained by its physical and biochemical properties under current selection, but also by features of its past evolutionary history. Understanding the extent and the form that these evolutionary constraints may take is important to interpret the information in protein sequences. To study this problem, we introduce a simple but physical model of protein evolution where selection targets allostery, the functional coupling of distal sites on protein surfaces. This model shows how the geometrical organization of couplings between amino acids within a protein structure can depend crucially on its evolutionary history. In particular, two scenarios are found to generate a spatial concentration of functional constraints: high mutation rates and fluctuating selective pressures. This second scenario offers a plausible explanation for the high tolerance of natural proteins to mutations and for the spatial organization of their least tolerant amino acids, as revealed by sequence analysis and mutagenesis experiments. It also implies a faculty to adapt to new selective pressures that is consistent with observations. The model illustrates how several independent functional modules may emerge within the same protein structure, depending on the nature of past environmental fluctuations. Our model thus relates the evolutionary history of proteins to the geometry of their functional constraints, with implications for decoding and engineering protein sequences.

  13. Investigation and prediction of protein precipitation by polyethylene glycol using quantitative structure-activity relationship models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hämmerling, Frank; Ladd Effio, Christopher; Andris, Sebastian; Kittelmann, Jörg; Hubbuch, Jürgen

    2017-01-10

    Precipitation of proteins is considered to be an effective purification method for proteins and has proven its potential to replace costly chromatography processes. Besides salts and polyelectrolytes, polymers, such as polyethylene glycol (PEG), are commonly used for precipitation applications under mild conditions. Process development, however, for protein precipitation steps still is based mainly on heuristic approaches and high-throughput experimentation due to a lack of understanding of the underlying mechanisms. In this work we apply quantitative structure-activity relationships (QSARs) to model two parameters, the discontinuity point m* and the β-value, that describe the complete precipitation curve of a protein under defined conditions. The generated QSAR models are sensitive to the protein type, pH, and ionic strength. It was found that the discontinuity point m* is mainly dependent on protein molecular structure properties and electrostatic surface properties, whereas the β-value is influenced by the variance in electrostatics and hydrophobicity on the protein surface. The models for m* and the β-value exhibit a good correlation between observed and predicted data with a coefficient of determination of R(2)≥0.90 and, hence, are able to accurately predict precipitation curves for proteins. The predictive capabilities were demonstrated for a set of combinations of protein type, pH, and ionic strength not included in the generation of the models and good agreement between predicted and experimental data was achieved.

  14. Model based document and report generation for systems engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delp, C.; Lam, D.; Fosse, E.; Lee, Cin-Young

    As Model Based Systems Engineering (MBSE) practices gain adoption, various approaches have been developed in order to simplify and automate the process of generating documents from models. Essentially, all of these techniques can be unified around the concept of producing different views of the model according to the needs of the intended audience. In this paper, we will describe a technique developed at JPL of applying SysML Viewpoints and Views to generate documents and reports. An architecture of model-based view and document generation will be presented, and the necessary extensions to SysML with associated rationale will be explained. A survey of examples will highlight a variety of views that can be generated, and will provide some insight into how collaboration and integration is enabled. We will also describe the basic architecture for the enterprise applications that support this approach.

  15. Model summary report for the safety assessment SR-Site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vahlund, Fredrik; Zetterstroem Evins, Lena (Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management Co., Stockholm (Sweden)); Lindgren, Maria (Kemakta Konsult AB, Stockholm (Sweden))

    2010-12-15

    This document is the model summary report for the safety assessment SR-Site. In the report, the quality assurance (QA) measures conducted for assessment codes are presented together with the chosen QA methodology. In the safety assessment project SR-Site, a large number of numerical models are used to analyse the system and to show compliance. In order to better understand how the different models interact and how information are transferred between the different models Assessment Model Flowcharts, AMFs, are used. From these, different modelling tasks can be identify and the computer codes used. As a large number of computer codes are used in the assessment the complexity of these differs to a large extent, some of the codes are commercial while others are developed especially for the assessment at hand. QA requirements must on the one hand take this diversity into account and on the other hand be well defined. In the methodology section of the report the following requirements are defined for all codes: - It must be demonstrated that the code is suitable for its purpose. - It must be demonstrated that the code has been properly used. - It must be demonstrated that the code development process has followed appropriate procedures and that the code produces accurate results. - It must be described how data are transferred between the different computational tasks. Although the requirements are identical for all codes in the assessment, the measures used to show that the requirements are fulfilled will be different for different types of codes (for instance due to the fact that for some software the source-code is not available for review). Subsequent to the methodology section, each assessment code is presented together with a discussion on how the requirements are met

  16. Model documentation report: Residential sector demand module of the National Energy Modeling System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-01-01

    This report documents the objectives, analytical approach, and development of the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) Residential Sector Demand Module. The report catalogues and describes the model assumptions, computational methodology, parameter estimation techniques, and FORTRAN source code. This document serves three purposes. First, it is a reference document that provides a detailed description for energy analysts, other users, and the public. Second, this report meets the legal requirement of the Energy Information Administration (EIA) to provide adequate documentation in support of its statistical and forecast reports according to Public Law 93-275, section 57(b)(1). Third, it facilitates continuity in model development by providing documentation from which energy analysts can undertake model enhancements, data updates, and parameter refinements.

  17. Model documentation report: Residential sector demand module of the National Energy Modeling System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-03-01

    This report documents the objectives, analytical approach, and development of the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) Residential Sector Demand Module. The report catalogues and describes the model assumptions, computational methodology, parameter estimation techniques, and FORTRAN source code. This document serves three purposes. First, it is a reference document providing a detailed description for energy analysts, other users, and the public. Second, this report meets the legal requirement of the Energy Information Administration (EIA) to provide adequate documentation in support of its statistical and forecast reports according to Public Law 93-275, section 57(b)(1). Third, it facilitates continuity in model development by providing documentation from which energy analysts can undertake model enhancements, data updates, and parameter refinements.

  18. Optimization and modeling of cellulase protein from Trichoderma ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    AJB SERVER

    2007-01-04

    Jan 4, 2007 ... Logistic kinetic model was the best model for the mixed substrates. A conceptual Artificial Neural. Network (ANN) model was well incorporated in the fermentative production of cellulase. ... RSM to evaluate the effects of the medium parameters ... Experiments were performed along the steepest ascent.

  19. Report of the 2014 Programming Models and Environments Summit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heroux, Michael [US Dept. of Energy, Washington, DC (United States); Lethin, Richard [US Dept. of Energy, Washington, DC (United States)

    2016-09-19

    Programming models and environments play the essential roles in high performance computing of enabling the conception, design, implementation and execution of science and engineering application codes. Programmer productivity is strongly influenced by the effectiveness of our programming models and environments, as is software sustainability since our codes have lifespans measured in decades, so the advent of new computing architectures, increased concurrency, concerns for resilience, and the increasing demands for high-fidelity, multi-physics, multi-scale and data-intensive computations mean that we have new challenges to address as part of our fundamental R&D requirements. Fortunately, we also have new tools and environments that make design, prototyping and delivery of new programming models easier than ever. The combination of new and challenging requirements and new, powerful toolsets enables significant synergies for the next generation of programming models and environments R&D. This report presents the topics discussed and results from the 2014 DOE Office of Science Advanced Scientific Computing Research (ASCR) Programming Models & Environments Summit, and subsequent discussions among the summit participants and contributors to topics in this report.

  20. Multistep modeling of protein structure: application to bungarotoxin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srinivasan, S.; Shibata, M.; Rein, R.

    1986-01-01

    Modelling of bungarotoxin in atomic details is presented in this article. The model-building procedure utilizes the low-resolution crystal coordinates of the c-alpha atoms of bungarotoxin, sequence homology within the neurotoxin family, as well as high-resolution x-ray diffraction data of cobratoxin and erabutoxin. Our model-building procedure involves: (a) principles of comparative modelling, (b) embedding procedures of distance geometry, and (c) use of molecular mechanics for optimizing packing. The model is not only consistent with the c-alpha coordinates of crystal structure, but also agrees with solution conformational features of the triple-stranded beta sheet as observed by NOE measurements.

  1. Workshop on algorithms for macromolecular modeling. Final project report, June 1, 1994--May 31, 1995

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leimkuhler, B.; Hermans, J.; Skeel, R.D.

    1995-07-01

    A workshop was held on algorithms and parallel implementations for macromolecular dynamics, protein folding, and structural refinement. This document contains abstracts and brief reports from that workshop.

  2. Statistical-mechanical lattice models for protein-DNA binding in chromatin

    CERN Document Server

    Teif, Vladimir B

    2010-01-01

    Statistical-mechanical lattice models for protein-DNA binding are well established as a method to describe complex ligand binding equilibriums measured in vitro with purified DNA and protein components. Recently, a new field of applications has opened up for this approach since it has become possible to experimentally quantify genome-wide protein occupancies in relation to the DNA sequence. In particular, the organization of the eukaryotic genome by histone proteins into a nucleoprotein complex termed chromatin has been recognized as a key parameter that controls the access of transcription factors to the DNA sequence. New approaches have to be developed to derive statistical mechanical lattice descriptions of chromatin-associated protein-DNA interactions. Here, we present the theoretical framework for lattice models of histone-DNA interactions in chromatin and investigate the (competitive) DNA binding of other chromosomal proteins and transcription factors. The results have a number of applications for quant...

  3. Protein Alpha Shape (PAS) Dock: A new gaussian-based score function suitable for docking in homology modelled protein structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tøndel, Kristin; Anderssen, Endre; Drabløs, Finn

    2006-03-01

    Protein Alpha Shape (PAS) Dock is a new empirical score function suitable for virtual library screening using homology modelled protein structures. Here, the score function is used in combination with the geometry search method Tabu search. A description of the protein binding site is generated using gaussian property fields like in Protein Alpha Shape Similarity Analysis (PASSA). Gaussian property fields are also used to describe the ligand properties. The overlap between the receptor and ligand hydrophilicity and lipophilicity fields is maximised, while minimising steric clashes. Gaussian functions introduce a smoothing of the property fields. This makes the score function robust against small structural variations, and therefore suitable for use with homology models. This also makes it less critical to include protein flexibility in the docking calculations. We use a fast and simplified version of the score function in the geometry search, while a more detailed version is used for the final prediction of the binding free energies. This use of a two-level scoring makes PAS-Dock computationally efficient, and well suited for virtual screening. The PAS-Dock score function is trained on 218 X-ray structures of protein- ligand complexes with experimental binding affinities. The performance of PAS-Dock is compared to two other docking methods, AutoDock and MOE-Dock, with respect to both accuracy and computational efficiency. According to this study, PAS-Dock is more computationally efficient than both AutoDock and MOE-Dock, and gives a better prediction of the free energies of binding. PAS-Dock is also more robust against structural variations than AutoDock.

  4. Report on financing the new model of family medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spann, Stephen J

    2004-12-02

    To foster redesigning the work and workplaces of family physicians, this Future of Family Medicine task force was created to formulate and recommend a financial model that sustains and promotes a thriving New Model of care by focusing on practice reimbursement and health care finances. The goals of the task force were to develop a financial model that assesses the impact of the New Model on practice finances, and to recommend health care financial policies that, if implemented, would be expected to promote the New Model and the primary medical care function in the United States for the next few decades. The members of the task force reflected a wide range of professional backgrounds and expertise. The group met in person on 2 occasions and communicated by e-mail and conference calls to achieve consensus. A marketing study was carried out using focus groups to test the concept of the New Model with consumers. External consultants with expertise in health economics, health care finance, health policy, and practice management were engaged to assist the task force with developing the microeconomic (practice level) and macroeconomic (societal level) financial models necessary to achieve its goals. Model assumptions were derived from the published medical literature, existing practice management databases, and discussions with experienced physicians and other content experts. The results of the financial modeling exercise are included in this report. The initial draft report of the findings and recommendations was shared with a reactor panel representing a broad spectrum of constituencies. Feedback from these individuals was reviewed and incorporated, as appropriate, into the final report. The practice-level financial model suggests that full implementation of the New Model of care within the current fee-for-service system of reimbursement would result in a 26% increase in compensation (from 167,457 dollars to 210,288 dollars total annual compensation) for prototypical

  5. Nonequilibrium dynamics of an exactly solvable Ising-like model and protein translocation

    CERN Document Server

    Pelizzola, A

    2013-01-01

    Using an Ising-like model of protein mechanical unfolding, we introduce a diffusive dynamics on its exactly known free energy profile, reducing the nonequilibrium dynamics of the model to a biased random walk. As an illustration, the model is then applied to the protein translocation phenomenon, taking inspiration from a recent experiment on the green fluorescent protein pulled by a molecular motor. The average translocation time is evaluated exactly, and the analysis of single trajectories shows that translocation proceeds through an intermediate state, similar to that observed in the experiment.

  6. PKreport: report generation for checking population pharmacokinetic model assumptions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Jun

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Graphics play an important and unique role in population pharmacokinetic (PopPK model building by exploring hidden structure among data before modeling, evaluating model fit, and validating results after modeling. Results The work described in this paper is about a new R package called PKreport, which is able to generate a collection of plots and statistics for testing model assumptions, visualizing data and diagnosing models. The metric system is utilized as the currency for communicating between data sets and the package to generate special-purpose plots. It provides ways to match output from diverse software such as NONMEM, Monolix, R nlme package, etc. The package is implemented with S4 class hierarchy, and offers an efficient way to access the output from NONMEM 7. The final reports take advantage of the web browser as user interface to manage and visualize plots. Conclusions PKreport provides 1 a flexible and efficient R class to store and retrieve NONMEM 7 output, 2 automate plots for users to visualize data and models, 3 automatically generated R scripts that are used to create the plots; 4 an archive-oriented management tool for users to store, retrieve and modify figures, 5 high-quality graphs based on the R packages, lattice and ggplot2. The general architecture, running environment and statistical methods can be readily extended with R class hierarchy. PKreport is free to download at http://cran.r-project.org/web/packages/PKreport/index.html.

  7. Model documentation report: Macroeconomic Activity Module (MAM) of the National Energy Modeling System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-02-07

    This report documents the objectives, analytical approach, and development of the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) Macroeconomic Activity Module (MAM) used to develop the Annual Energy Outlook for 1994 (AEO94). The report catalogues and describes the module assumptions, computations, methodology, parameter estimation techniques, and mainframe source code. This document serves three purposes. First, it is a reference document providing a detailed description of the NEMS MAM used for the AEO 1994 production runs for model analysts, users, and the public. Second, this report meets the legal requirement of the Energy Information Administration (EIA) to provide adequate documentation in support of its models (Public Law 94-385, section 57.b.2). Third, it facilitates continuity in model development by providing documentation from which energy analysts can undertake model enhancements, data updates, and parameter refinements as future projects.

  8. Model summary report for the safety assessment SR-Can

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vahlund, Fredrik

    2006-10-15

    This document is the model summary report for the safety assessment SR-Can. In the report, the quality assurance measures conducted for the assessment codes are presented together with the chosen methodology. In the safety assessment SR-Can, a number of different computer codes are used. In order to better understand how these codes are related Assessment Model Flowcharts, AMFs, have been produced within the project. From these, it is possible to identify the different modelling tasks and consequently also the different computer codes used. A large number of different computer codes are used in the assessment of which some are commercial while others are developed especially for the current assessment project. QA requirements must on the one hand take this diversity into account and on the other hand be well defined. In the methodology section of the report the following requirements are defined: It must be demonstrated that the code is suitable for its purpose; It must be demonstrated that the code has been properly used; and, It must be demonstrated that the code development process has followed appropriate procedures and that the code produces accurate results. Although the requirements are identical for all codes, the measures used to show that the requirements are fulfilled will be different for different codes (for instance due to the fact that for some software the source-code is not available for review). Subsequent to the methodology section, each assessment code is presented and it is shown how the requirements are met.

  9. Competitive inhibition reaction mechanisms for the two-step model of protein aggregation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whidden, Mark; Ho, Allison; Ivanova, Magdalena I; Schnell, Santiago

    2014-01-01

    We propose three new reaction mechanisms for competitive inhibition of protein aggregation for the two-step model of protein aggregation. The first mechanism is characterized by the inhibition of native protein, the second is characterized by the inhibition of aggregation-prone protein and the third mechanism is characterized by the mixed inhibition of native and aggregation-prone proteins. Rate equations are derived for these mechanisms, and a method is described for plotting kinetic results to distinguish these three types of inhibitors. The derived rate equations provide a simple way of estimating the inhibition constant of native or aggregation-prone protein inhibitors in protein aggregation. The new approach is used to estimate the inhibition constants of different peptide inhibitors of insulin aggregation.

  10. Energetics of hydrogen bonding in proteins: a model compound study.

    OpenAIRE

    1996-01-01

    Differences in the energetics of amide-amide and amide-hydroxyl hydrogen bonds in proteins have been explored from the effect of hydroxyl groups on the structure and dissolution energetics of a series of crystalline cyclic dipeptides. The calorimetrically determined energetics are interpreted in light of the crystal structures of the studied compounds. Our results indicate that the amide-amide and amide-hydroxyl hydrogen bonds both provide considerable enthalpic stability, but that the amide-...

  11. An exponential modeling algorithm for protein structure completion by X-ray crystallography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shneerson, V L; Wild, D L; Saldin, D K

    2001-03-01

    An exponential modeling algorithm is developed for protein structure completion by X-ray crystallography and tested on experimental data from a 59-residue protein. An initial noisy difference Fourier map of missing residues of up to half of the protein is transformed by the algorithm into one that allows easy identification of the continuous tube of electron density associated with that polypeptide chain. The method incorporates the paradigm of phase hypothesis generation and cross validation within an automated scheme.

  12. Lovastatin Corrects Excess Protein Synthesis and Prevents Epileptogenesis in a Mouse Model of Fragile X Syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Chuang, Shih-Chieh; Chubykin, Alexander A.; Sidorov, Michael; Bianchi, Riccardo; Wong, Robert K.S.; Osterweil, Emily; Bear, Mark; Chubykin, Alexander A.

    2013-01-01

    Many neuropsychiatric symptoms of fragile X syndrome (FXS) are believed to be a consequence of altered regulation of protein synthesis at synapses. We discovered that lovastatin, a drug that is widely prescribed for the treatment of high cholesterol, can correct excess hippocampal protein synthesis in the mouse model of FXS and can prevent one of the robust functional consequences of increased protein synthesis in FXS, epileptogenesis. These data suggest that lovastatin is potentially disease...

  13. Lovastatin corrects excess protein synthesis and prevents epileptogenesis in a mouse model of fragile X syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Osterweil, Emily K.; Chuang, Shih-Chieh; Chubykin, Alexander A.; Sidorov, Michael; Bianchi, Riccardo; Wong, Robert K. S.; Bear, Mark F.

    2013-01-01

    Many neuropsychiatric symptoms of fragile X syndrome (FXS) are believed to be a consequence of altered regulation of protein synthesis at synapses. We discovered that lovastatin, a drug that is widely prescribed for treatment of high cholesterol, can correct excess hippocampal protein synthesis in themouse model of FXS and can prevent one of the robust functional consequences of increased protein synthesis in FXS, epileptogenesis. These data suggest that lovastatin is potentially disease modi...

  14. A two level hierarchical model of protein retention in ion exchange chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salvalaglio, Matteo; Paloni, Matteo; Guelat, Bertrand; Morbidelli, Massimo; Cavallotti, Carlo

    2015-09-11

    Predicting protein retention in ion exchange chromatography (IEX) from first principles is a fascinating perspective. In this work a two level hierarchical modeling strategy is proposed in order to calculate protein retention factors. Model predictions are tested against experimental data measured for Lysozyme and Chymotrypsinogen A in IEX columns as a function of ionic strength and pH. At the highest level of accuracy Molecular Dynamics (MD) simulations in explicit water are used to determine the interaction free energy between each of the two proteins and the IEX stationary phase for a reference pH and ionic strength. At a lower level of accuracy a linear response model based on an implicit treatment of solvation and adopting a static protein structure is used to calculate interaction free energies for the full range of pHs and ionic strengths considered. A scaling coefficient, determined comparing MD and implicit solvent simulations, is then introduced in order to correct the linear response model for errors induced by the adoption of a static protein structure. The calculated free energies are then used to compute protein retention factors, which can be directly compared with experimental data. The possibility to introduce a third level of accuracy is explored testing the predictions of a semiempirical model. A quantitative agreement between the predicted and measured protein retention factors is obtained using the coupled MD-linear response models, supporting the reliability of the proposed approach. The model allows quantifying the electrostatic, van der Waals, and conformational contributions to the interaction free energies. A good agreement between experiments and model is obtained also using the semiempirical model that, although requiring parameterization over higher level models or experimental data, proves to be useful in order to rapidly determine protein retention factors across wide pH and ionic strength ranges as it is computationally inexpensive.

  15. An expanded binding model for Cys2His2 zinc finger protein-DNA interfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Persikov, Anton V.; Singh, Mona

    2011-06-01

    Cys2His2 zinc finger (C2H2-ZF) proteins comprise the largest class of eukaryotic transcription factors. The 'canonical model' for C2H2-ZF protein-DNA interaction consists of only four amino acid-nucleotide contacts per zinc finger domain, and this model has been the basis for several efforts for computationally predicting and experimentally designing protein-DNA interfaces. Here, we perform a systematic analysis of structural and experimental binding data and find that, in addition to the canonical contacts, several other amino acid and base pair combinations frequently play a role in C2H2-ZF protein-DNA binding. We suggest an expansion of the canonical C2H2-ZF model to include one to three additional contacts, and show that computational approaches including these additional contacts improve predictions of DNA targets of zinc finger proteins.

  16. The unfolded protein response has a protective role in yeast models of classic galactosemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evandro A. De-Souza

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Classic galactosemia is a human autosomal recessive disorder caused by mutations in the GALT gene (GAL7 in yeast, which encodes the enzyme galactose-1-phosphate uridyltransferase. Here we show that the unfolded protein response pathway is triggered by galactose in two yeast models of galactosemia: lithium-treated cells and the gal7Δ mutant. The synthesis of galactose-1-phosphate is essential to trigger the unfolded protein response under these conditions because the deletion of the galactokinase-encoding gene GAL1 completely abolishes unfolded protein response activation and galactose toxicity. Impairment of the unfolded protein response in both yeast models makes cells even more sensitive to galactose, unmasking its cytotoxic effect. These results indicate that endoplasmic reticulum stress is induced under galactosemic conditions and underscores the importance of the unfolded protein response pathway to cellular adaptation in these models of classic galactosemia.

  17. The unfolded protein response has a protective role in yeast models of classic galactosemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De-Souza, Evandro A; Pimentel, Felipe S A; Machado, Caio M; Martins, Larissa S; da-Silva, Wagner S; Montero-Lomelí, Mónica; Masuda, Claudio A

    2014-01-01

    Classic galactosemia is a human autosomal recessive disorder caused by mutations in the GALT gene (GAL7 in yeast), which encodes the enzyme galactose-1-phosphate uridyltransferase. Here we show that the unfolded protein response pathway is triggered by galactose in two yeast models of galactosemia: lithium-treated cells and the gal7Δ mutant. The synthesis of galactose-1-phosphate is essential to trigger the unfolded protein response under these conditions because the deletion of the galactokinase-encoding gene GAL1 completely abolishes unfolded protein response activation and galactose toxicity. Impairment of the unfolded protein response in both yeast models makes cells even more sensitive to galactose, unmasking its cytotoxic effect. These results indicate that endoplasmic reticulum stress is induced under galactosemic conditions and underscores the importance of the unfolded protein response pathway to cellular adaptation in these models of classic galactosemia.

  18. Protein structure modelling and evaluation based on a 4-distance description of side-chain interactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Inbar Yuval

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Accurate evaluation and modelling of residue-residue interactions within and between proteins is a key aspect of computational structure prediction including homology modelling, protein-protein docking, refinement of low-resolution structures, and computational protein design. Results Here we introduce a method for accurate protein structure modelling and evaluation based on a novel 4-distance description of residue-residue interaction geometry. Statistical 4-distance preferences were extracted from high-resolution protein structures and were used as a basis for a knowledge-based potential, called Hunter. We demonstrate that 4-distance description of side chain interactions can be used reliably to discriminate the native structure from a set of decoys. Hunter ranked the native structure as the top one in 217 out of 220 high-resolution decoy sets, in 25 out of 28 "Decoys 'R' Us" decoy sets and in 24 out of 27 high-resolution CASP7/8 decoy sets. The same concept was applied to side chain modelling in protein structures. On a set of very high-resolution protein structures the average RMSD was 1.47 Å for all residues and 0.73 Å for buried residues, which is in the range of attainable accuracy for a model. Finally, we show that Hunter performs as good or better than other top methods in homology modelling based on results from the CASP7 experiment. The supporting web site http://bioinfo.weizmann.ac.il/hunter/ was developed to enable the use of Hunter and for visualization and interactive exploration of 4-distance distributions. Conclusions Our results suggest that Hunter can be used as a tool for evaluation and for accurate modelling of residue-residue interactions in protein structures. The same methodology is applicable to other areas involving high-resolution modelling of biomolecules.

  19. Early cirrhosis in a young female with protein C deficiency: An extremely unusual case report with review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nalini Bansal

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Protein C deficiency is a well recognized risk factor for development of venous thromboembolism but has never been reported to be associated with development of liver cirrhosis .We report a case of a 26 years old female who presented with multiple thrombosis involving superior mesenteric vein ,main portal vein and multiple cerebral veins. Liver biopsy done was reported as cirrhosis possibly due to Wilson's disease. However no improvement was seen with D penicillamine and patient's condition detiorated. Further, work up of patient revealed absence of Protein C levels in the plasma. So finally the case was diagnosed as Cirrhosis liver with Protein C deficiency as the likely etiology. We conclude that Protein C deficiency should be investigated in patients with cirrhosis with thrombotic lesions of unknown etiology.

  20. Ab initio structural modeling of and experimental validation for Chlamydia trachomatis protein CT296 reveal structural similarity to Fe(II) 2-oxoglutarate-dependent enzymes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kemege, Kyle E.; Hickey, John M.; Lovell, Scott; Battaile, Kevin P.; Zhang, Yang; Hefty, P. Scott (Michigan); (Kansas); (HWMRI)

    2012-02-13

    Chlamydia trachomatis is a medically important pathogen that encodes a relatively high percentage of proteins with unknown function. The three-dimensional structure of a protein can be very informative regarding the protein's functional characteristics; however, determining protein structures experimentally can be very challenging. Computational methods that model protein structures with sufficient accuracy to facilitate functional studies have had notable successes. To evaluate the accuracy and potential impact of computational protein structure modeling of hypothetical proteins encoded by Chlamydia, a successful computational method termed I-TASSER was utilized to model the three-dimensional structure of a hypothetical protein encoded by open reading frame (ORF) CT296. CT296 has been reported to exhibit functional properties of a divalent cation transcription repressor (DcrA), with similarity to the Escherichia coli iron-responsive transcriptional repressor, Fur. Unexpectedly, the I-TASSER model of CT296 exhibited no structural similarity to any DNA-interacting proteins or motifs. To validate the I-TASSER-generated model, the structure of CT296 was solved experimentally using X-ray crystallography. Impressively, the ab initio I-TASSER-generated model closely matched (2.72-{angstrom} C{alpha} root mean square deviation [RMSD]) the high-resolution (1.8-{angstrom}) crystal structure of CT296. Modeled and experimentally determined structures of CT296 share structural characteristics of non-heme Fe(II) 2-oxoglutarate-dependent enzymes, although key enzymatic residues are not conserved, suggesting a unique biochemical process is likely associated with CT296 function. Additionally, functional analyses did not support prior reports that CT296 has properties shared with divalent cation repressors such as Fur.

  1. Use of secondary structural information and C-C distance restraints to model protein structures with MODELLER

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Boojala V B Reddy; Yiannis N Kaznessis

    2007-08-01

    Protein secondary structure predictions and amino acid long range contact map predictions from primary sequence of proteins have been explored to aid in modelling protein tertiary structures. In order to evaluate the usefulness of secondary structure and 3D-residue contact prediction methods to model protein structures we have used the known Q3 (alpha-helix, beta-strands and irregular turns/loops) secondary structure information, along with residue-residue contact information as restraints for MODELLER. We present here results of our modelling studies on 30 best resolved single domain protein structures of varied lengths. The results shows that it is very difficult to obtain useful models even with 100% accurate secondary structure predictions and accurate residue contact predictions for up to 30% of residues in a sequence. The best models that we obtained for proteins of lengths 37, 70, 118, 136 and 193 amino acid residues are of RMSDs 4.17, 5.27, 9.12, 7.89 and 9.69, respectively. The results show that one can obtain better models for the proteins which have high percent of alpha-helix content. This analysis further shows that MODELLER restrain optimization program can be useful only if we have truly homologous structure(s) as a template where it derives numerous restraints, almost identical to the templates used. This analysis also clearly indicates that even if we satisfy several true residue-residue contact distances, up to 30% of their sequence length with fully known secondary structural information, we end up predicting model structures much distant from their corresponding native structures.

  2. Structural propensities of kinase family proteins from a Potts model of residue co-variation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haldane, Allan; Flynn, William F; He, Peng; Vijayan, R S K; Levy, Ronald M

    2016-08-01

    Understanding the conformational propensities of proteins is key to solving many problems in structural biology and biophysics. The co-variation of pairs of mutations contained in multiple sequence alignments of protein families can be used to build a Potts Hamiltonian model of the sequence patterns which accurately predicts structural contacts. This observation paves the way to develop deeper connections between evolutionary fitness landscapes of entire protein families and the corresponding free energy landscapes which determine the conformational propensities of individual proteins. Using statistical energies determined from the Potts model and an alignment of 2896 PDB structures, we predict the propensity for particular kinase family proteins to assume a "DFG-out" conformation implicated in the susceptibility of some kinases to type-II inhibitors, and validate the predictions by comparison with the observed structural propensities of the corresponding proteins and experimental binding affinity data. We decompose the statistical energies to investigate which interactions contribute the most to the conformational preference for particular sequences and the corresponding proteins. We find that interactions involving the activation loop and the C-helix and HRD motif are primarily responsible for stabilizing the DFG-in state. This work illustrates how structural free energy landscapes and fitness landscapes of proteins can be used in an integrated way, and in the context of kinase family proteins, can potentially impact therapeutic design strategies. © 2016 The Protein Society.

  3. Salivary protein levels as a predictor of perceived astringency in model systems and solid foods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleming, Erin E; Ziegler, Gregory R; Hayes, John E

    2016-09-01

    Salivary protein difference value (SP D-value) is a quantitative measure of salivary protein replenishment, which reportedly relates to individual differences in perceived astringency. This in vitro measure is calculated as the difference in total salivary protein before (S1) and after (S2) stimulation with tannic acid, with a greater absolute value (S2-S1) indicating less protein replenishment. Others report that this measure predicts perceived astringency and liking of liquid model systems and beverages containing added polyphenols. Whether this relationship generalizes to astringent compounds other than polyphenols, or to solid foods is unknown. Here, the associations between SP D-values and perceived astringency and overall liking/disliking for alum and tannic acid (experiment 1) as well as solid chocolate-flavored compound coating with added tannic acid or grape seed extract (GSE) (experiment 2) were examined. In both experiments, participants (n=84 and 81, respectively) indicated perceived intensity of astringency, bitterness, sweetness, and sourness, and degree of liking of either aqueous solutions, or solid chocolate-flavored compound coating with added astringents. Data were analyzed via linear regression, and as discrete groups for comparison to prior work. Three discrete groups were formed based on first and third quartile splits of the SP D-value distribution: low (LR), medium (MR), and high responding (HR) individuals. In experiment 1, significantly higher mean astringency ratings were observed for the HR as compared to the LR/MR groups for alum and tannic acid, confirming and extending prior work. In experiment 2, significantly higher mean astringency ratings were also observed for HR as compared to LR groups in solid chocolate-flavored compound containing added tannic acid or GSE. Significant differences in liking were found between HR and LR groups for alum and tannic acid in water, but no significant differences in liking were observed for

  4. A new mixed-mode model for interpreting and predicting protein elution during isoelectric chromatofocusing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choy, Derek Y C; Creagh, A Louise; von Lieres, Eric; Haynes, Charles

    2014-05-01

    Experimental data are combined with classic theories describing electrolytes in solution and at surfaces to define the primary mechanisms influencing protein retention and elution during isoelectric chromatofocusing (ICF) of proteins and protein mixtures. Those fundamental findings are used to derive a new model to understand and predict elution times of proteins during ICF. The model uses a modified form of the steric mass action (SMA) isotherm to account for both ion exchange and isoelectric focusing contributions to protein partitioning. The dependence of partitioning on pH is accounted for through the characteristic charge parameter m of the SMA isotherm and the application of Gouy-Chapman theory to define the dependence of the equilibrium binding constant Kbi on both m and ionic strength. Finally, the effects of changes in matrix surface pH on protein retention are quantified through a Donnan equilibrium type model. By accounting for isoelectric focusing, ion binding and exchange, and surface pH contributions to protein retention and elution, the model is shown to accurately capture the dependence of protein elution times on column operating conditions. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Unbiased quantitative models of protein translation derived from ribosome profiling data

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gritsenko, A.A.; Hulsman, M.; Reinders, M.J.T.; Ridder, de D.

    2015-01-01

    Translation of RNA to protein is a core process for any living organism. While for some steps of this process the effect on protein production is understood, a holistic understanding of translation still remains elusive. In silico modelling is a promising approach for elucidating the process of prot

  6. Unbiased Quantitative Models of Protein Translation Derived from Ribosome Profiling Data

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gritsenko, A.A.; Hulsman, M.; Reinders, M.J.T.; De Ridder, D.

    2015-01-01

    Translation of RNA to protein is a core process for any living organism. While for some steps of this process the effect on protein production is understood, a holistic understanding of translation still remains elusive. In silico modelling is a promising approach for elucidating the process of prot

  7. Incorporating Protein Biosynthesis into the Saccharomyces cerevisiae Genome-scale Metabolic Model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olivares Hernandez, Roberto

    by a rapidly growing cell. To extend the model including protein synthesis, from the survey of the available literature was possible to identify a few enzymatic reactions and gene functions in the early steps of gene expression for proteins: mRNA transcription, mRNA processing, mRNA export out of the nucleus...

  8. HyPEP FY06 Report: Models and Methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DOE report

    2006-09-01

    The Department of Energy envisions the next generation very high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (VHTR) as a single-purpose or dual-purpose facility that produces hydrogen and electricity. The Ministry of Science and Technology (MOST) of the Republic of Korea also selected VHTR for the Nuclear Hydrogen Development and Demonstration (NHDD) Project. This research project aims at developing a user-friendly program for evaluating and optimizing cycle efficiencies of producing hydrogen and electricity in a Very-High-Temperature Reactor (VHTR). Systems for producing electricity and hydrogen are complex and the calculations associated with optimizing these systems are intensive, involving a large number of operating parameter variations and many different system configurations. This research project will produce the HyPEP computer model, which is specifically designed to be an easy-to-use and fast running tool for evaluating nuclear hydrogen and electricity production facilities. The model accommodates flexible system layouts and its cost models will enable HyPEP to be well-suited for system optimization. Specific activities of this research are designed to develop the HyPEP model into a working tool, including (a) identifying major systems and components for modeling, (b) establishing system operating parameters and calculation scope, (c) establishing the overall calculation scheme, (d) developing component models, (e) developing cost and optimization models, and (f) verifying and validating the program. Once the HyPEP model is fully developed and validated, it will be used to execute calculations on candidate system configurations. FY-06 report includes a description of reference designs, methods used in this study, models and computational strategies developed for the first year effort. Results from computer codes such as HYSYS and GASS/PASS-H used by Idaho National Laboratory and Argonne National Laboratory, respectively will be benchmarked with HyPEP results in the

  9. Binding of Solvent Molecules to a Protein Surface in Binary Mixtures Follows a Competitive Langmuir Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulschewski, Tobias; Pleiss, Jürgen

    2016-09-06

    The binding of solvent molecules to a protein surface was modeled by molecular dynamics simulations of of Candida antarctica (C. antarctica) lipase B in binary mixtures of water, methanol, and toluene. Two models were analyzed: a competitive Langmuir model which assumes identical solvent binding sites with a different affinity toward water (KWat), methanol (KMet), and toluene (KTol) and a competitive Langmuir model with an additional interaction between free water and already bound water (KWatWat). The numbers of protein-bound molecules of both components of a binary mixture were determined for different compositions as a function of their thermodynamic activities in the bulk phase, and the binding constants were simultaneously fitted to the six binding curves (two components of three different mixtures). For both Langmuir models, the values of KWat, KMet, and KTol were highly correlated. The highest binding affinity was found for methanol, which was almost 4-fold higher than the binding affinities of water and toluene (KMet ≫ KWat ≈ KTol). Binding of water was dominated by the water-water interaction (KWatWat). Even for the three protein surface patches of highest water affinity, the binding affinity of methanol was 2-fold higher than water and 8-fold higher than toluene (KMet > KWat > KTol). The Langmuir model provides insights into the protein destabilizing mechanism of methanol which has a high binding affinity toward the protein surface. Thus, destabilizing solvents compete with intraprotein interactions and disrupt the tertiary structure. In contrast, benign solvents such as water or toluene have a low affinity toward the protein surface. Water is a special solvent: only few water molecules bind directly to the protein; most water molecules bind to already bound water molecules thus forming water patches. A quantitative mechanistic model of protein-solvent interactions that includes competition and miscibility of the components contributes a robust basis

  10. Management of swine manure for the recovery of protein and biogas. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boersma, L.; Gasper, E.; Miner, J.; Oldfield, J.; Phinney, H.

    1978-05-01

    Major findings of an investigation into the concept of nutrient and energy recovery from a swine waste management system are reported. Algae and bacteria were used to convert swine manure into methane-rich fuel gas and supplemental protein for animal feed. Waste heat from electricity generating plants was simulated to test its value in enhancing the biological recovery of nutrients and energy. The experimental facility was built adjacent to the Swine Research Center at Oregon State University and consisted of animal quarters with solid concrete floor and gutter to house 50 pigs, an anaerobic digester with a volume of 14 cu m, and 12 outdoor algae basins with a combined surface area of 24 sq m and a combined volume of 6,000 l. Manure was removed from the animal quarters by a gutter flushing system. The solids were separated from the liquids by gravity settling and then pumped into the digester for solubilization and recovery of biogas. The liquid phase of the diluted manure was pumped into the outdoor basins to serve as nutrient substrate for the growth of the high temperature strain 211/8K of Chlorella vulgaris as the predominant algal species. The algal biomass was concentrated by centrifugation and freeze dried. Its nutritional value as a protein source was determined by feeding trials with Long-Evans rats.

  11. Variability of Protein Structure Models from Electron Microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monroe, Lyman; Terashi, Genki; Kihara, Daisuke

    2017-03-02

    An increasing number of biomolecular structures are solved by electron microscopy (EM). However, the quality of structure models determined from EM maps vary substantially. To understand to what extent structure models are supported by information embedded in EM maps, we used two computational structure refinement methods to examine how much structures can be refined using a dataset of 49 maps with accompanying structure models. The extent of structure modification as well as the disagreement between refinement models produced by the two computational methods scaled inversely with the global and the local map resolutions. A general quantitative estimation of deviations of structures for particular map resolutions are provided. Our results indicate that the observed discrepancy between the deposited map and the refined models is due to the lack of structural information present in EM maps and thus these annotations must be used with caution for further applications.

  12. Formulation of probabilistic models of protein structure in atomic detail using the reference ratio method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valentin, Jan B; Andreetta, Christian; Boomsma, Wouter; Bottaro, Sandro; Ferkinghoff-Borg, Jesper; Frellsen, Jes; Mardia, Kanti V; Tian, Pengfei; Hamelryck, Thomas

    2014-02-01

    We propose a method to formulate probabilistic models of protein structure in atomic detail, for a given amino acid sequence, based on Bayesian principles, while retaining a close link to physics. We start from two previously developed probabilistic models of protein structure on a local length scale, which concern the dihedral angles in main chain and side chains, respectively. Conceptually, this constitutes a probabilistic and continuous alternative to the use of discrete fragment and rotamer libraries. The local model is combined with a nonlocal model that involves a small number of energy terms according to a physical force field, and some information on the overall secondary structure content. In this initial study we focus on the formulation of the joint model and the evaluation of the use of an energy vector as a descriptor of a protein's nonlocal structure; hence, we derive the parameters of the nonlocal model from the native structure without loss of generality. The local and nonlocal models are combined using the reference ratio method, which is a well-justified probabilistic construction. For evaluation, we use the resulting joint models to predict the structure of four proteins. The results indicate that the proposed method and the probabilistic models show considerable promise for probabilistic protein structure prediction and related applications.

  13. Thermodynamic characterization of the biocompatible ionic liquid effects on protein model compounds and their functional groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Attri, Pankaj; Venkatesu, Pannuru

    2011-04-14

    The stability of proteins under co-solvent conditions is dependant on the nature of the co-solvent; the co-solvent can alter a protein's properties and structural effects through bimolecular interactions between its functional groups and co-solvent particles. Ionic liquids (ILs) represent a rather diverse class of co-solvents that are combinations of different ions, which are liquids at or close to room temperature. To quantify the bimolecular interactions of protein functional groups with biocompatible ILs, we report the systematic and quantitative apparent transfer free energies (ΔG'(tr)) of a homologous series of cyclic dipeptides (CDs) from water to aqueous solutions of ILs through solubility measurements, as a function of IL concentration at 25 °C under atmospheric pressure. The materials investigated in the present work included the CDs of cyclo(Gly-Gly), cyclo(Ala-Gly), cyclo(Ala-Ala), cyclo(Leu-Ala), and cyclo(Val-Val). The ILs used such as diethylammonium acetate ([Et(2)NH][CH(3)COO], DEAA), triethylammonium acetate ([Et(3)NH][CH(3)COO], TEAA), diethylammonium dihydogen phosphate ([Et(3)NH][H(2)PO(4)], DEAP), triethylammonium dihydogen phosphate ([Et(3)NH][H(2)PO(4)], TEAP), diethylammonium sulfate ([Et(3)NH][HSO(4)], DEAS) and triethylammonium sulfate ([Et(3)NH][HSO(4)], TEAS). We observed positive values of ΔG'(tr) for CDs from water to ILs, indicating that interactions between ILs and CDs are unfavourable, which leads to stabilization of the native structure of CDs. The experimental results were further used for estimating the transfer free energies (Δg'(tr)) of the peptide bond (-CONH-), the peptide backbone unit (-CH(2)C=ONH-), and various functional groups from water to IL solutions. Our results explicitly elucidate that a series of all ammonium ILs act as stabilizers for tested model compounds through the exclusion of ILs from CDs surface.

  14. Protein structure prediction: combining de novo modeling with sparse experimental data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latek, Dorota; Ekonomiuk, Dariusz; Kolinski, Andrzej

    2007-07-30

    Routine structure prediction of new folds is still a challenging task for computational biology. The challenge is not only in the proper determination of overall fold but also in building models of acceptable resolution, useful for modeling the drug interactions and protein-protein complexes. In this work we propose and test a comprehensive approach to protein structure modeling supported by sparse, and relatively easy to obtain, experimental data. We focus on chemical shift-based restraints from NMR, although other sparse restraints could be easily included. In particular, we demonstrate that combining the typical NMR software with artificial intelligence-based prediction of secondary structure enhances significantly the accuracy of the restraints for molecular modeling. The computational procedure is based on the reduced representation approach implemented in the CABS modeling software, which proved to be a versatile tool for protein structure prediction during the CASP (CASP stands for critical assessment of techniques for protein structure prediction) experiments (see http://predictioncenter/CASP6/org). The method is successfully tested on a small set of representative globular proteins of different size and topology, including the two CASP6 targets, for which the required NMR data already exist. The method is implemented in a semi-automated pipeline applicable to a large scale structural annotation of genomic data. Here, we limit the computations to relatively small set. This enabled, without a loss of generality, a detailed discussion of various factors determining accuracy of the proposed approach to the protein structure prediction.

  15. Structural propensities of kinase family proteins from a Potts model of residue co‐variation

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Haldane, Allan; Flynn, William F; He, Peng; Vijayan, R.S.K; Levy, Ronald M

    2016-01-01

    ...‐variation of pairs of mutations contained in multiple sequence alignments of protein families can be used to build a Potts Hamiltonian model of the sequence patterns which accurately predicts structural contacts...

  16. Atomic-level description of protein-lipid interactions using an accelerated membrane model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baylon, Javier L; Vermaas, Josh V; Muller, Melanie P; Arcario, Mark J; Pogorelov, Taras V; Tajkhorshid, Emad

    2016-07-01

    Peripheral membrane proteins are structurally diverse proteins that are involved in fundamental cellular processes. Their activity of these proteins is frequently modulated through their interaction with cellular membranes, and as a result techniques to study the interfacial interaction between peripheral proteins and the membrane are in high demand. Due to the fluid nature of the membrane and the reversibility of protein-membrane interactions, the experimental study of these systems remains a challenging task. Molecular dynamics simulations offer a suitable approach to study protein-lipid interactions; however, the slow dynamics of the lipids often prevents sufficient sampling of specific membrane-protein interactions in atomistic simulations. To increase lipid dynamics while preserving the atomistic detail of protein-lipid interactions, in the highly mobile membrane-mimetic (HMMM) model the membrane core is replaced by an organic solvent, while short-tailed lipids provide a nearly complete representation of natural lipids at the organic solvent/water interface. Here, we present a brief introduction and a summary of recent applications of the HMMM to study different membrane proteins, complementing the experimental characterization of the presented systems, and we offer a perspective of future applications of the HMMM to study other classes of membrane proteins. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Membrane proteins edited by J.C. Gumbart and Sergei Noskov.

  17. Molecular Dynamics Simulations of a Powder Model of the Intrinsically Disordered Protein Tau.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fichou, Yann; Heyden, Matthias; Zaccai, Giuseppe; Weik, Martin; Tobias, Douglas J

    2015-10-01

    The tau protein, whose aggregates are involved in Alzheimer's disease, is an intrinsically disordered protein (IDP) that regulates microtubule activity in neurons. An IDP lacks a single, well-defined structure and, rather, constantly exchanges among multiple conformations. In order to study IDP dynamics, the combination of experimental techniques, such as neutron scattering, and computational techniques, such as molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, is a powerful approach. Amorphous hydrated powder samples have been very useful for studying protein internal dynamics experimentally, e.g., using neutron scattering. Thus, there is demand for realistic in silico models of hydrated protein powders. Here we present an MD simulation analysis of a powder hydrated at 0.4 g water/g protein of the IDP tau in the temperature range 20-300 K. By comparing with neutron scattering data, we identify the protein-water interface as the predominant feature determining IDP dynamics. The so-called protein dynamical transition is shown to be attenuated, but not suppressed, in the parts of the protein that are not exposed to the solvent. In addition, we find similarities in the mean-squared displacements of the core of a globular protein and "dry" clusters formed by the IDP in hydrated powders. Thus, the ps to ns dynamics of proteins in hydrated powders originate mainly from those residues in contact with solvent. We propose that by measuring the dynamics of protein assemblies, such as aggregates, one might assess qualitatively their state of hydration.

  18. On the application of the MARTINI coarse-grained model to immersion of a protein in a phospholipid bilayer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mustafa, Ghulam, E-mail: Ghulam.Mustafa@h-its.org, E-mail: rebecca.wade@h-its.org; Nandekar, Prajwal P.; Yu, Xiaofeng [Molecular and Cellular Modeling Group, Heidelberg Institute for Theoretical Studies (HITS), Schloß-Wolfsbrunnenweg 35, 69118 Heidelberg (Germany); Wade, Rebecca C., E-mail: Ghulam.Mustafa@h-its.org, E-mail: rebecca.wade@h-its.org [Molecular and Cellular Modeling Group, Heidelberg Institute for Theoretical Studies (HITS), Schloß-Wolfsbrunnenweg 35, 69118 Heidelberg (Germany); Zentrum für Molekulare Biologie der Universität Heidelberg, DKFZ-ZMBH Alliance, INF 282, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Interdisciplinary Center for Scientific Computing (IWR), Heidelberg University, INF 368, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany)

    2015-12-28

    An important step in the simulation of a membrane protein in a phospholipid bilayer is the correct immersion of the protein in the bilayer. Crystal structures are determined without the bilayer. Particularly for proteins with monotopic domains, it can be unclear how deeply and in which orientation the protein is being inserted in the membrane. We have previously developed a procedure combining coarse-grain (CG) with all-atom (AA) molecular dynamics (MD) simulations to insert and simulate a cytochrome P450 (CYP) possessing an N-terminal transmembrane helix connected by a flexible linker region to a globular domain that dips into the membrane. The CG simulations provide a computationally efficient means to explore different orientations and conformations of the CYP in the membrane. Converged configurations obtained in the CG simulations are then refined in AA simulations. Here, we tested different variants of the MARTINI CG model, differing in the water model, the treatment of long-range non-bonded interactions, and the implementation (GROMACS 4.5.5 vs 5.0.4), for this purpose. We examined the behavior of the models for simulating a 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (POPC) bilayer in water and for the immersion of CYP3A4 in a POPC bilayer, and compared the CG-MD results with the previously reported experimental and simulation results. We also tested the methodology on a set of four other CYPs. Finally, we propose an optimized protocol for modeling such protein-membrane systems that provides the most plausible configurations and is computationally efficient; this incorporates the standard non-polar water model and the GROMACS 5.0.4 implementation with a reaction field treatment of long-range interactions.

  19. Sepsis as a cause of acquired Protein C and Protein S deficiency- A case report and literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arun Kannan

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Warfarin Induced Skin Necrosis is a well-known complication in patients being started on warfarin without adequate bridging . The mechanism is thought to be due to protein C deficiency . We present a rather unusual cause of protein C deficiency due to sepsis resulting in warfarin induced skin necrosis. 43 year old lady who has been on chronic warfarin therapy secondary to anti phospholipid syndrome was admitted to the hospital for acute ischemic cerebellar stroke. Warfarin was held due to acute thrombocytopenia. She was discharged after restarting the warfarin. She presented back with septic shock due to pneumonia. She was found to have multiple necrotic areas consistent with skin necrosis. Unfortunately, patient died due to multi organ failure despite goal directed therapy. This case demonstrates the importance of recognizing the sepsis as an acquired cause of protein C deficiency.

  20. Cell-free synthesis of membrane proteins: tailored cell models out of microsomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fenz, Susanne F; Sachse, Rita; Schmidt, Thomas; Kubick, Stefan

    2014-05-01

    Incorporation of proteins in biomimetic giant unilamellar vesicles (GUVs) is one of the hallmarks towards cell models in which we strive to obtain a better mechanistic understanding of the manifold cellular processes. The reconstruction of transmembrane proteins, like receptors or channels, into GUVs is a special challenge. This procedure is essential to make these proteins accessible to further functional investigation. Here we describe a strategy combining two approaches: cell-free eukaryotic protein expression for protein integration and GUV formation to prepare biomimetic cell models. The cell-free protein expression system in this study is based on insect lysates, which provide endoplasmic reticulum derived vesicles named microsomes. It enables signal-induced translocation and posttranslational modification of de novo synthesized membrane proteins. Combining these microsomes with synthetic lipids within the electroswelling process allowed for the rapid generation of giant proteo-liposomes of up to 50 μm in diameter. We incorporated various fluorescent protein-labeled membrane proteins into GUVs (the prenylated membrane anchor CAAX, the heparin-binding epithelial growth factor like factor Hb-EGF, the endothelin receptor ETB, the chemokine receptor CXCR4) and thus presented insect microsomes as functional modules for proteo-GUV formation. Single-molecule fluorescence microscopy was applied to detect and further characterize the proteins in the GUV membrane. To extend the options in the tailoring cell models toolbox, we synthesized two different membrane proteins sequentially in the same microsome. Additionally, we introduced biotinylated lipids to specifically immobilize proteo-GUVs on streptavidin-coated surfaces. We envision this achievement as an important first step toward systematic protein studies on technical surfaces.

  1. Reservoir architecture modeling: Nonstationary models for quantitative geological characterization. Final report, April 30, 1998

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kerr, D.; Epili, D.; Kelkar, M.; Redner, R.; Reynolds, A.

    1998-12-01

    The study was comprised of four investigations: facies architecture; seismic modeling and interpretation; Markov random field and Boolean models for geologic modeling of facies distribution; and estimation of geological architecture using the Bayesian/maximum entropy approach. This report discusses results from all four investigations. Investigations were performed using data from the E and F units of the Middle Frio Formation, Stratton Field, one of the major reservoir intervals in the Gulf Coast Basin.

  2. Cowichan Valley energy mapping and modelling. Report 6 - Findings and recommendations. Final report. [Vancouver Island, Canada

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2012-06-15

    This report is the final report in a series of six reports detailing the findings from the Cowichan Valley Energy Mapping and Modelling project that was carried out from April of 2011 to March of 2012 by Ea Energy Analyses in conjunction with Geographic Resource Analysis and Science (GRAS). The driving force behind the Integrated Energy Mapping and Analysis project was the identification and analysis of a suite of pathways that the Cowichan Valley Regional District (CVRD) can utilise to increase its energy resilience, as well as reduce energy consumption and GHG emissions, with a primary focus on the residential sector. Mapping and analysis undertaken will support provincial energy and GHG reduction targets, and the suite of pathways outlined will address a CVRD internal target that calls for 75% of the region's energy within the residential sector to come from locally sourced renewables by 2050. The target has been developed as a mechanism to meet resilience and climate action target. The maps and findings produced are to be integrated as part of a regional policy framework currently under development. The present report is the final report and presents a summary of the findings of project tasks 1-5 and provides a set of recommendations to the CVRD based on the work done and with an eye towards the next steps in the energy planning process of the CVRD. (LN)

  3. Rapid degradation of dominant-negative Rab27 proteins in vivo precludes their use in transgenic mouse models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huxley Clare

    2002-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Transgenic mice have proven to be a powerful system to study normal and pathological gene functions. Here we describe an attempt to generate a transgenic mouse model for choroideremia (CHM, a slow-onset X-linked retinal degeneration caused by mutations in the Rab Escort Protein-1 (REP1 gene. REP1 is part of the Rab geranylgeranylation machinery, a modification that is essential for Rab function in membrane traffic. The loss of REP1 in CHM patients may trigger retinal degeneration through its effects on Rab proteins. We have previously reported that Rab27a is the Rab most affected in CHM lymphoblasts and hypothesised that the selective dysfunction of Rab27a (and possibly a few other Rab GTPases plays an essential role in the retinal degenerative process. Results To investigate this hypothesis, we generated several lines of dominant-negative, constitutively-active and wild-type Rab27a (and Rab27b transgenic mice whose expression was driven either by the pigment cell-specific tyrosinase promoter or the ubiquitous β-actin promoter. High levels of mRNA and protein were observed in transgenic lines expressing wild-type or constitutively active Rab27a and Rab27b. However, only modest levels of transgenic protein were expressed. Pulse-chase experiments suggest that the dominant-negative proteins, but not the constitutively-active or wild type proteins, are rapidly degraded. Consistently, no significant phenotype was observed in our transgenic lines. Coat-colour was normal, indicating normal Rab27a activity. Retinal function as determined by fundoscopy, angiography, electroretinography and histology was also normal. Conclusions We suggest that the instability of the dominant-negative mutant Rab27 proteins in vivo precludes the use of this approach to generate mouse models of disease caused by Rab27 GTPases.

  4. PIN-G – A novel reporter for imaging and defining the effects of trafficking signals in membrane proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hu Weiwen

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The identification of protein trafficking signals, and their interacting mechanisms, is a fundamental objective of modern biology. Unfortunately, the analysis of trafficking signals is complicated by their topography, hierarchical nature and regulation. Powerful strategies to test candidate motifs include their ability to direct simpler reporter proteins, to which they are fused, to the appropriate cellular compartment. However, present reporters are limited by their endogenous expression, paucity of cloning sites, and difficult detection in live cells. Results Consequently, we have engineered a mammalian expression vector encoding a novel trafficking reporter – pIN-G – consisting of a simple, type I integral protein bearing permissive intra/extracellular cloning sites, green fluorescent protein (GFP, cMyc and HA epitope tags. Fluorescence imaging, flow cytometry and biochemical assays of transfected HEK293 cells, confirm the size, topology and surface expression of PIN-G. Moreover, a pIN-G fusion construct, containing a Trans-Golgi Network (TGN targeting determinant, internalises rapidly from the cell surface and localises to the TGN. Additionally, another PIN-G fusion protein and its mutants reveal trafficking determinants in the cytoplasmic carboxy terminus of Kv1.4 voltage-gated potassium channels. Conclusion Together, these data indicate that pIN-G is a versatile, powerful, new reporter for analysing signals controlling membrane protein trafficking, surface expression and dynamics.

  5. Final Report on Models, Periodic Progress, Report No D1.3, Globeman21, ESPRIT 26509

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Jens Dahl; Tølle, Martin; Vesterager, Johan

    1999-01-01

    This deliverable D1.3 is the third and final deliverable of WP1 - Global Manufacturing Concept of the European part of the Globeman21 project. The report essentially presents the final models on generic Extended Enterprise Management (EEM) and generic Product Life Cycle Management (PLCM...... accomplished during the GM21EU project. Especially the Extended Enterprise Framework should be accentuated as a key concept of WP1. Building on ISO/DIS 15704 GERAM, the framework constitutes a generic reference model for extended enterprises and hereunder for EEM and PLCM issues. The Extended Enterprise...... classification schema for work preparation in extended enterprises. The classification schema is applied as support for a mapping of the EEM and PLCM pilot projects onto the Extended Enterprise Framework. By mapping the industrial pilot work onto a common reference model experiences have been collected from GM21...

  6. Structure Based Thermostability Prediction Models for Protein Single Point Mutations with Machine Learning Tools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Lei; Yarlagadda, Ramya; Reed, Charles C

    2015-01-01

    Thermostability issue of protein point mutations is a common occurrence in protein engineering. An application which predicts the thermostability of mutants can be helpful for guiding decision making process in protein design via mutagenesis. An in silico point mutation scanning method is frequently used to find "hot spots" in proteins for focused mutagenesis. ProTherm (http://gibk26.bio.kyutech.ac.jp/jouhou/Protherm/protherm.html) is a public database that consists of thousands of protein mutants' experimentally measured thermostability. Two data sets based on two differently measured thermostability properties of protein single point mutations, namely the unfolding free energy change (ddG) and melting temperature change (dTm) were obtained from this database. Folding free energy change calculation from Rosetta, structural information of the point mutations as well as amino acid physical properties were obtained for building thermostability prediction models with informatics modeling tools. Five supervised machine learning methods (support vector machine, random forests, artificial neural network, naïve Bayes classifier, K nearest neighbor) and partial least squares regression are used for building the prediction models. Binary and ternary classifications as well as regression models were built and evaluated. Data set redundancy and balancing, the reverse mutations technique, feature selection, and comparison to other published methods were discussed. Rosetta calculated folding free energy change ranked as the most influential features in all prediction models. Other descriptors also made significant contributions to increasing the accuracy of the prediction models.

  7. Structure Based Thermostability Prediction Models for Protein Single Point Mutations with Machine Learning Tools.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lei Jia

    Full Text Available Thermostability issue of protein point mutations is a common occurrence in protein engineering. An application which predicts the thermostability of mutants can be helpful for guiding decision making process in protein design via mutagenesis. An in silico point mutation scanning method is frequently used to find "hot spots" in proteins for focused mutagenesis. ProTherm (http://gibk26.bio.kyutech.ac.jp/jouhou/Protherm/protherm.html is a public database that consists of thousands of protein mutants' experimentally measured thermostability. Two data sets based on two differently measured thermostability properties of protein single point mutations, namely the unfolding free energy change (ddG and melting temperature change (dTm were obtained from this database. Folding free energy change calculation from Rosetta, structural information of the point mutations as well as amino acid physical properties were obtained for building thermostability prediction models with informatics modeling tools. Five supervised machine learning methods (support vector machine, random forests, artificial neural network, naïve Bayes classifier, K nearest neighbor and partial least squares regression are used for building the prediction models. Binary and ternary classifications as well as regression models were built and evaluated. Data set redundancy and balancing, the reverse mutations technique, feature selection, and comparison to other published methods were discussed. Rosetta calculated folding free energy change ranked as the most influential features in all prediction models. Other descriptors also made significant contributions to increasing the accuracy of the prediction models.

  8. Hidden markov model for the prediction of transmembrane proteins using MATLAB.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaturvedi, Navaneet; Shanker, Sudhanshu; Singh, Vinay Kumar; Sinha, Dhiraj; Pandey, Paras Nath

    2011-01-01

    Since membranous proteins play a key role in drug targeting therefore transmembrane proteins prediction is active and challenging area of biological sciences. Location based prediction of transmembrane proteins are significant for functional annotation of protein sequences. Hidden markov model based method was widely applied for transmembrane topology prediction. Here we have presented a revised and a better understanding model than an existing one for transmembrane protein prediction. Scripting on MATLAB was built and compiled for parameter estimation of model and applied this model on amino acid sequence to know the transmembrane and its adjacent locations. Estimated model of transmembrane topology was based on TMHMM model architecture. Only 7 super states are defined in the given dataset, which were converted to 96 states on the basis of their length in sequence. Accuracy of the prediction of model was observed about 74 %, is a good enough in the area of transmembrane topology prediction. Therefore we have concluded the hidden markov model plays crucial role in transmembrane helices prediction on MATLAB platform and it could also be useful for drug discovery strategy. The database is available for free at bioinfonavneet@gmail.comvinaysingh@bhu.ac.in.

  9. Analysis of statistical thermodynamic model for binary protein adsorption equilibria on cation exchange adsorbent

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHOU Xiaopeng; SU Xueli; SUN Yan

    2007-01-01

    A study of nonlinear competitive adsorption equilibria of proteins is of fundamental importance in understanding the behavior of preparative chromatographic separation.This work describes the nonlinear binary protein adsorption equilibria on ion exchangers by the statistical thermodynamic (ST) model.The single-component and binary protein adsorption isotherms of bovine hemoglobin (Hb) and bovine serum albumin(BSA)on SP Sepharose FF were determined by batch adsorption experiments in 0.05 mol/L sodium acetate buffer at three pH values(4.5,5.0 and 5.5)and three NaCl concentrations(0.05,0.10 and 0.15 mol/L)at pH 5.0.The ST model was found to depict the effects of pH and ionic strength on the single-component equilibria well,with model parameters depending on the pH and ionic strength.Moreover,the ST model gave acceptable fitting to the binary adsorption data with the fltted singlecomponent model parameters,leading to the estimation of the binary ST model parameter.The effects of pH and ionic strength on the model parameters are reasonably interpreted by the electrostatic and thermodynamic theories.Results demonstrate the availability of the ST model for describing nonlinear competitive protein adsorption equilibria in the presence of two proteins.

  10. Computable general equilibrium model fiscal year 2013 capability development report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Edwards, Brian Keith [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Rivera, Michael Kelly [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Boero, Riccardo [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-05-17

    This report documents progress made on continued developments of the National Infrastructure Simulation and Analysis Center (NISAC) Computable General Equilibrium Model (NCGEM), developed in fiscal year 2012. In fiscal year 2013, NISAC the treatment of the labor market and tests performed with the model to examine the properties of the solutions computed by the model. To examine these, developers conducted a series of 20 simulations for 20 U.S. States. Each of these simulations compared an economic baseline simulation with an alternative simulation that assumed a 20-percent reduction in overall factor productivity in the manufacturing industries of each State. Differences in the simulation results between the baseline and alternative simulations capture the economic impact of the reduction in factor productivity. While not every State is affected in precisely the same way, the reduction in manufacturing industry productivity negatively affects the manufacturing industries in each State to an extent proportional to the reduction in overall factor productivity. Moreover, overall economic activity decreases when manufacturing sector productivity is reduced. Developers ran two additional simulations: (1) a version of the model for the State of Michigan, with manufacturing divided into two sub-industries (automobile and other vehicle manufacturing as one sub-industry and the rest of manufacturing as the other subindustry); and (2) a version of the model for the United States, divided into 30 industries. NISAC conducted these simulations to illustrate the flexibility of industry definitions in NCGEM and to examine the simulation properties of in more detail.

  11. Creating a specialist protein resource network: a meeting report for the protein bioinformatics and community resources retreat

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Babbitt, Patricia C.; Bagos, Pantelis G.; Bairoch, Amos;

    2015-01-01

    protein databases from the large Bioinformatics centres (including UniProt and RefSeq). The retreat was divided into five sessions: (1) key challenges, (2) the databases represented, (3) best practices for maintenance and curation, (4) information flow to and from large data centers and (5) communication...

  12. Effects of polyols on the stability of whey proteins in intermediate-moisture food model systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiaoming; Zhou, Peng; Tran, Amy; Labuza, Ted P

    2009-03-25

    The objective of this study was to investigate the influence of polyols on the stability of whey proteins in an intermediate-moisture food model system and to elucidate the effect of polyols on the hardening of whey protein-based bars during storage. Four major polyols, glycerol, propylene glycol, maltitol, and sorbitol, were evaluated in model systems, which contained whey protein isolate, polyols, and water. The results showed that glycerol was the most effective polyol in lowering water activity and provided the soft texture of intermediate-moisture foods, followed by sorbitol and maltitol. These three polyols stabilized the native structure of whey proteins, provided a desired texture, and slowed the hardening of the model systems. Propylene glycol should not be used in whey protein-based high-protein intermediate-moisture foods because it caused changes in protein conformation and stability as observed by differential scanning calorimeter and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and resulted in aggregation of whey proteins and hardening of the bar texture during storage, causing loss in product quality.

  13. A model for the condensation of the bacterial chromosome by the partitioning protein ParB

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broedersz, Chase; Wingreen, Ned

    2013-03-01

    The molecular machinery responsible for faithful segregation of the chromosome in bacteria such as Caulobacter crescentus and Bacillus subtilis includes the ParABS a.k.a. Spo0J/Soj partitioning system. In Caulobacter, prior to division, hundreds of ParB proteins bind to the DNA near the origin of replication, and localize to one pole of the cell. Subsequently, the ParB-DNA complex is translocated to the far pole by the binding and retraction of the ParA spindle-like apparatus. Remarkably, the localization of ParB proteins to specific regions of the chromosome appears to be controlled by only a few centromeric parS binding sites. Although lateral interactions between DNA-bound ParB are likely to be important for their localization, the long-range order of ParB domains on the chromosome appears to be inconsistent with a picture in which protein-protein interactions are limited to neighboring DNA-bound proteins. We developed a coarse-grained Brownian dynamics model that allows for lateral and 3D protein-protein interactions among bound ParB proteins. Our model shows how such interactions can condense and organize the DNA spatially, and can control the localization and the long-range order of the DNA-bound proteins.

  14. LDRD final report on imaging self-organization of proteins in membranes by photocatalytic nano-tagging.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zavadil, Kevin Robert; Shelnutt, John Allen; Sasaki, Darryl Yoshio; Song, Yujiang; Medforth, Craig J.

    2005-11-01

    We have developed a new nanotagging technology for detecting and imaging the self-organization of proteins and other components of membranes at nanometer resolution for the purpose of investigating cell signaling and other membrane-mediated biological processes. We used protein-, lipid-, or drug-bound porphyrin photocatalysts to grow in-situ nanometer-sized metal particles, which reveal the location of the porphyrin-labeled molecules by electron microscopy. We initially used photocatalytic nanotagging to image assembled multi-component proteins and to monitor the distribution of lipids and porphyrin labels in liposomes. For example, by exchanging the heme molecules in hemoproteins with a photocatalytic tin porphyrin, a nanoparticle was grown at each heme site of the protein. The result obtained from electron microscopy for a tagged multi-subunit protein such as hemoglobin is a symmetric constellation of a specific number of nanoparticle tags, four in the case of the hemoglobin tetramer. Methods for covalently linking photocatalytic porphyrin labels to lipids and proteins were also developed to detect and image the self-organization of lipids, protein-protein supercomplexes, and membrane-protein complexes. Procedures for making photocatalytic porphyrin-drug, porphyrin-lipid, and porphyrin-protein hybrids for non-porphyrin-binding proteins and membrane components were pursued and the first porphyrin-labeled lipids was investigated in liposomal membrane models. Our photocatalytic nanotagging technique may ultimately allow membrane self-organization and cell signaling processes to be imaged in living cells. Fluorescence and plasmonic spectra of the tagged proteins might also provide additional information about protein association and membrane organization. In addition, a porphyrin-aspirin or other NSAID hybrid may be used to grow metal nanotags for the pharmacologically important COX enzymes in membranes so that the distribution of the protein can be imaged at the

  15. Modeling how reproductive ecology can drive protein diversification and result in linkage disequilibrium between sperm and egg proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomaiuolo, Maurizio; Levitan, Don R

    2010-07-01

    Gamete-recognition proteins determine whether sperm and eggs are compatible at fertilization, and they often evolve rapidly. The source of selection driving the evolution of these proteins is still debated. It has been suggested that sexual conflict can result in proliferation of genetic variation and possibly linkage disequilibrium between sperm and egg proteins. Empirical evidence suggests that both male and female reproductive success can be predicted by their sperm ligand genotype, but why female success can be predicted by a protein expressed only in males is unknown. Here we use mathematical modeling to investigate the interaction between reproductive behavior and sperm availability on the evolution of sperm ligands and egg receptors. We consider haploid and diploid expression in gametes in two possible ecological scenarios, monogamous spawning and competitive spawning. Reproductive behavior plays an important role in determining possible outcomes resulting from sexual conflict. Sperm limitation selects for common genotypes regardless of mating behavior. Under conditions of sperm abundance, competitive spawning provides conditions for the persistence of allelic variation and gametic disequilibrium. With monogamous spawning, such conditions are more restrictive.

  16. Textural performance of crosslinked or reduced-calcium milk protein ingredients in model high-protein nutrition bars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banach, J C; Clark, S; Metzger, L E; Lamsal, B P

    2016-08-01

    Transglutaminase (Tgase) crosslinking and calcium reduction were investigated as ways to improve the texture and storage stability of high-protein nutrition (HPN) bars formulated with milk protein concentrate (MPC) and micellar casein concentrate (MCC). The MPC and MCC crosslinked at none, low, and high levels, and a reduced-calcium MPC (RCMPC) were each formulated into model HPN bars. Hardness, crumbliness, moisture content, pH, color, and water activity of the HPN bars were measured during accelerated storage. The HPN bars prepared with MPC were harder and more cohesive than those prepared with MCC. Higher levels of Tgase crosslinking improved HPN bar cohesiveness and decreased hardening during storage. The RCMPC produced softer, yet crumblier HPN bars. Small textural differences were observed for the HPN bars formulated with the transglutaminase crosslinked proteins or RCMPC when compared with their respective controls. However, modification only slightly improved protein ingredient ability to slow hardening while balancing cohesion and likely requires further improvement for increased applicability in soft-texture HPN bars.

  17. A maize spermine synthase 1 PEST sequence fused to the GUS reporter protein facilitates proteolytic degradation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maruri-López, Israel; Rodríguez-Kessler, Margarita; Rodríguez-Hernández, Aída Araceli; Becerra-Flora, Alicia; Olivares-Grajales, Juan Elías; Jiménez-Bremont, Juan Francisco

    2014-05-01

    Polyamines are low molecular weight aliphatic compounds involved in various biochemical, cellular and physiological processes in all organisms. In plants, genes involved in polyamine biosynthesis and catabolism are regulated at transcriptional, translational, and posttranslational level. In this research, we focused on the characterization of a PEST sequence (rich in proline, glutamic acid, serine, and threonine) of the maize spermine synthase 1 (ZmSPMS1). To this aim, 123 bp encoding 40 amino acids of the C-terminal region of the ZmSPMS1 enzyme containing the PEST sequence were fused to the GUS reporter gene. This fusion was evaluated in Arabidopsis thaliana transgenic lines and onion monolayers transient expression system. The ZmSPMS1 PEST sequence leads to specific degradation of the GUS reporter protein. It is suggested that the 26S proteasome may be involved in GUS::PEST fusion degradation in both onion and Arabidopsis. The PEST sequences appear to be present in plant spermine synthases, mainly in monocots.

  18. A kinetic model for the internal motions of proteins: diffusion between multiple harmonic wells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amadei, A; de Groot, B L; Ceruso, M A; Paci, M; Di Nola, A; Berendsen, H J

    1999-05-15

    The dynamics of collective protein motions derived from Molecular Dynamics simulations have been studied for two small model proteins: initiation factor I and the B1 domain of Protein G. First, we compared the structural fluctuations, obtained by local harmonic approximations in different energy minima, with the ones revealed by large scale molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. It was found that a limited set of harmonic wells can be used to approximate the configurational fluctuations of these proteins, although any single harmonic approximation cannot properly describe their dynamics. Subsequently, the kinetics of the main (essential) collective protein motions were characterized. A dual-diffusion behavior was observed in which a fast type of diffusion switches to a much slower type in a typical time of about 1-3 ps. From these results, the large backbone conformational fluctuations of a protein may be considered as "hopping" between multiple harmonic wells on a basically flat free energy surface.

  19. A network model to investigate structural and electrical properties of proteins

    CERN Document Server

    Alfinito, E; Reggiani, L

    2007-01-01

    One of the main trend in to date research and development is the miniaturization of electronic devices. In this perspective, integrated nanodevices based on proteins or biomolecules are attracting a major interest. In fact, it has been shown that proteins like bacteriorhodopsin and azurin, manifest electrical properties which are promising for the development of active components in the field of molecular electronics. Here we focus on two relevant kinds of proteins: The bovine rhodopsin, prototype of GPCR protein, and the enzyme acetylcholinesterase (AChE), whose inhibition is one of the most qualified treatments of Alzheimer disease. Both these proteins exert their functioning starting with a conformational change of their native structure. Our guess is that such a change should be accompanied with a detectable variation of their electrical properties. To investigate this conjecture, we present an impedance network model of proteins, able to estimate the different electrical response associated with the diff...

  20. Coarse-grained model of adsorption of blood plasma proteins onto nanoparticles

    CERN Document Server

    Lopez, Hender

    2016-01-01

    We present a coarse-grained model for evaluation of interactions of globular proteins with nanoparticles. The protein molecules are represented by one bead per aminoacid and the nanoparticle by a homogeneous sphere that interacts with the aminoacids via a central force that depends on the nanoparticle size. The proposed methodology is used to predict the adsorption energies for six common human blood plasma proteins on hydrophobic charged or neutral nanoparticles of different sizes as well as the preferred orientation of the molecules upon adsorption. Our approach allows one to rank the proteins by their binding affinity to the nanoparticle, which can be used for predicting the composition of the NP-protein corona. The predicted ranking is in good agreement with known experimental data for protein adsorption on surfaces.

  1. Adsorption of a model protein, the GroEL chaperonin, on surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leung, Carl; Palmer, Richard E [Nanoscale Physics Research Laboratory, School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Birmingham, Edgbaston, Birmingham B15 2TT (United Kingdom)], E-mail: carl.leung@kcl.ac.uk

    2008-09-03

    Understanding and controlling protein adsorption on surfaces is fundamental to many biological processes ranging from cell adhesion to the fabrication of protein biochips. In general, proteins need to retain their 3D conformation to perform their intended functions. However, when they are presented with a solid surface, complex interactions ranging from weak non-covalent binding to strong covalent bonding may occur, which can potentially induce conformational changes within the adsorbed protein. To investigate the surface adsorption process and its effects on a model protein, the chaperonin GroEL, we have applied contact mode atomic force microscopy, in buffer solution to probe the interactions between single proteins and surfaces in real space. We will discuss the adsorption of GroEL molecules on planar surfaces (mica, graphite and gold) and specifically tailored nanostructured surfaces, which present structural features on the size scale of individual biological molecules. (topical review)

  2. Molecular dynamics techniques for modeling G protein-coupled receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McRobb, Fiona M; Negri, Ana; Beuming, Thijs; Sherman, Woody

    2016-10-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) constitute a major class of drug targets and modulating their signaling can produce a wide range of pharmacological outcomes. With the growing number of high-resolution GPCR crystal structures, we have the unprecedented opportunity to leverage structure-based drug design techniques. Here, we discuss a number of advanced molecular dynamics (MD) techniques that have been applied to GPCRs, including long time scale simulations, enhanced sampling techniques, water network analyses, and free energy approaches to determine relative binding free energies. On the basis of the many success stories, including those highlighted here, we expect that MD techniques will be increasingly applied to aid in structure-based drug design and lead optimization for GPCRs.

  3. Scalable rule-based modelling of allosteric proteins and biochemical networks.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julien F Ollivier

    Full Text Available Much of the complexity of biochemical networks comes from the information-processing abilities of allosteric proteins, be they receptors, ion-channels, signalling molecules or transcription factors. An allosteric protein can be uniquely regulated by each combination of input molecules that it binds. This "regulatory complexity" causes a combinatorial increase in the number of parameters required to fit experimental data as the number of protein interactions increases. It therefore challenges the creation, updating, and re-use of biochemical models. Here, we propose a rule-based modelling framework that exploits the intrinsic modularity of protein structure to address regulatory complexity. Rather than treating proteins as "black boxes", we model their hierarchical structure and, as conformational changes, internal dynamics. By modelling the regulation of allosteric proteins through these conformational changes, we often decrease the number of parameters required to fit data, and so reduce over-fitting and improve the predictive power of a model. Our method is thermodynamically grounded, imposes detailed balance, and also includes molecular cross-talk and the background activity of enzymes. We use our Allosteric Network Compiler to examine how allostery can facilitate macromolecular assembly and how competitive ligands can change the observed cooperativity of an allosteric protein. We also develop a parsimonious model of G protein-coupled receptors that explains functional selectivity and can predict the rank order of potency of agonists acting through a receptor. Our methodology should provide a basis for scalable, modular and executable modelling of biochemical networks in systems and synthetic biology.

  4. Protein-protein interaction network construction for cancer using a new L1/2-penalized Net-SVM model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chai, H; Huang, H H; Jiang, H K; Liang, Y; Xia, L Y

    2016-07-25

    Identifying biomarker genes and characterizing interaction pathways with high-dimensional and low-sample size microarray data is a major challenge in computational biology. In this field, the construction of protein-protein interaction (PPI) networks using disease-related selected genes has garnered much attention. Support vector machines (SVMs) are commonly used to classify patients, and a number of useful tools such as lasso, elastic net, SCAD, or other regularization methods can be combined with SVM models to select genes that are related to a disease. In the current study, we propose a new Net-SVM model that is different from other SVM models as it is combined with L1/2-norm regularization, which has good performance with high-dimensional and low-sample size microarray data for cancer classification, gene selection, and PPI network construction. Both simulation studies and real data experiments demonstrated that our proposed method outperformed other regularization methods such as lasso, SCAD, and elastic net. In conclusion, our model may help to select fewer but more relevant genes, and can be used to construct simple and informative PPI networks that are highly relevant to cancer.

  5. Model Uracil-Rich RNAs and Membrane Protein mRNAs Interact Specifically with Cold Shock Proteins in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benhalevy, Daniel; Bochkareva, Elena S; Biran, Ido; Bibi, Eitan

    2015-01-01

    Are integral membrane protein-encoding mRNAs (MPRs) different from other mRNAs such as those encoding cytosolic mRNAs (CPRs)? This is implied from the emerging concept that MPRs are specifically recognized and delivered to membrane-bound ribosomes in a translation-independent manner. MPRs might be recognized through uracil-rich segments that encode hydrophobic transmembrane helices. To investigate this hypothesis, we designed DNA sequences encoding model untranslatable transcripts that mimic MPRs or CPRs. By utilizing in vitro-synthesized biotinylated RNAs mixed with Escherichia coli extracts, we identified a highly specific interaction that takes place between transcripts that mimic MPRs and the cold shock proteins CspE and CspC, which are normally expressed under physiological conditions. Co-purification studies with E. coli expressing 6His-tagged CspE or CspC confirmed that the specific interaction occurs in vivo not only with the model uracil-rich untranslatable transcripts but also with endogenous MPRs. Our results suggest that the evolutionarily conserved cold shock proteins may have a role, possibly as promiscuous chaperons, in the biogenesis of MPRs.

  6. Effect of single-point sequence alterations on the aggregationpropensity of a model protein

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bratko, Dusan; Cellmer, Troy; Prausnitz, John M.; Blanch, Harvey W.

    2005-10-07

    Sequences of contemporary proteins are believed to have evolved through process that optimized their overall fitness including their resistance to deleterious aggregation. Biotechnological processing may expose therapeutic proteins to conditions that are much more conducive to aggregation than those encountered in a cellular environment. An important task of protein engineering is to identify alternative sequences that would protect proteins when processed at high concentrations without altering their native structure associated with specific biological function. Our computational studies exploit parallel tempering simulations of coarse-grained model proteins to demonstrate that isolated amino-acid residue substitutions can result in significant changes in the aggregation resistance of the protein in a crowded environment while retaining protein structure in isolation. A thermodynamic analysis of protein clusters subject to competing processes of folding and association shows that moderate mutations can produce effects similar to those caused by changes in system conditions, including temperature, concentration, and solvent composition that affect the aggregation propensity. The range of conditions where a protein can resist aggregation can therefore be tuned by sequence alterations although the protein generally may retain its generic ability for aggregation.

  7. PCVMZM: Using the Probabilistic Classification Vector Machines Model Combined with a Zernike Moments Descriptor to Predict Protein-Protein Interactions from Protein Sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yanbin; You, Zhuhong; Li, Xiao; Chen, Xing; Jiang, Tonghai; Zhang, Jingting

    2017-05-11

    Protein-protein interactions (PPIs) are essential for most living organisms' process. Thus, detecting PPIs is extremely important to understand the molecular mechanisms of biological systems. Although many PPIs data have been generated by high-throughput technologies for a variety of organisms, the whole interatom is still far from complete. In addition, the high-throughput technologies for detecting PPIs has some unavoidable defects, including time consumption, high cost, and high error rate. In recent years, with the development of machine learning, computational methods have been broadly used to predict PPIs, and can achieve good prediction rate. In this paper, we present here PCVMZM, a computational method based on a Probabilistic Classification Vector Machines (PCVM) model and Zernike moments (ZM) descriptor for predicting the PPIs from protein amino acids sequences. Specifically, a Zernike moments (ZM) descriptor is used to extract protein evolutionary information from Position-Specific Scoring Matrix (PSSM) generated by Position-Specific Iterated Basic Local Alignment Search Tool (PSI-BLAST). Then, PCVM classifier is used to infer the interactions among protein. When performed on PPIs datasets of Yeast and H. Pylori, the proposed method can achieve the average prediction accuracy of 94.48% and 91.25%, respectively. In order to further evaluate the performance of the proposed method, the state-of-the-art support vector machines (SVM) classifier is used and compares with the PCVM model. Experimental results on the Yeast dataset show that the performance of PCVM classifier is better than that of SVM classifier. The experimental results indicate that our proposed method is robust, powerful and feasible, which can be used as a helpful tool for proteomics research.

  8. Mathematical modeling of the intracellular protein dynamics: the importance of active transport along microtubules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szymańska, Zuzanna; Parisot, Martin; Lachowicz, Mirosław

    2014-12-21

    In this paper we propose a mathematical model of protein and mRNA transport inside a cell. The spatio-temporal model takes into account the active transport along microtubules in the cytoplasm as well as diffusion and is able to reproduce the oscillatory changes in protein concentration observed in many experimental data. In the model the protein and the mRNA interact with each other that allows us to classify the model as a simple gene regulatory network. The proposed model is generic and may be adapted to specific signaling pathways. On the basis of numerical simulations, we formulate a new hypothesis that the oscillatory dynamics is allowed by the mRNA active transport along microtubules from the nucleus to distant locations.

  9. Formulation of probabilistic models of protein structure in atomic detail using the reference ratio method

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Valentin, Jan B.; Andreetta, Christian; Boomsma, Wouter

    2014-01-01

    We propose a method to formulate probabilistic models of protein structure in atomic detail, for a given amino acid sequence, based on Bayesian principles, while retaining a close link to physics. We start from two previously developed probabilistic models of protein structure on a local length...... scale, which concern the dihedral angles in main chain and side chains, respectively. Conceptually, this constitutes a probabilistic and continuous alternative to the use of discrete fragment and rotamer libraries. The local model is combined with a nonlocal model that involves a small number of energy...... terms according to a physical force field, and some information on the overall secondary structure content. In this initial study we focus on the formulation of the joint model and the evaluation of the use of an energy vector as a descriptor of a protein's nonlocal structure; hence, we derive...

  10. Evolution of off-lattice model proteins under ligand binding constraints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Erik D.; Grishin, Nick V.

    2016-08-01

    We investigate protein evolution using an off-lattice polymer model evolved to imitate the behavior of small enzymes. Model proteins evolve through mutations to nucleotide sequences (including insertions and deletions) and are selected to fold and maintain a specific binding site compatible with a model ligand. We show that this requirement is, in itself, sufficient to maintain an ordered folding domain, and we compare it to the requirement of folding an ordered (but otherwise unrestricted) domain. We measure rates of amino acid change as a function of local environment properties such as solvent exposure, packing density, and distance from the active site, as well as overall rates of sequence and structure change, both along and among model lineages in star phylogenies. The model recapitulates essentially all of the behavior found in protein phylogenetic analyses, and predicts that amino acid substitution rates vary linearly with distance from the binding site.

  11. Supermarket refrigeration modeling and field demonstration: Interim report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walker, D.H.; Deming, G.I.

    1989-03-01

    The Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) has undertaken a project to investigate supermarket refrigeration. The objectives of this project are (1) to develop an energy use and demand model of supermarket refrigeration systems and (2) to carry out an extensive field test of such systems in an operating supermarket. To accomplish these goals, a supermarket owned by Safeway Stores, Inc., and located in Menlo Park, CA, with an existing conventional refrigeration system utilizing single compressor units, was equipped with a state-of-the-art system with multiplexed parallel compressors. The store and both refrigeration systems were thoroughly instrumented and a test schedule was prepared and executed. Presented in this report are the preliminary results of this field test along with the initial validation of the energy use and demand model. 62 figs., 47 tabs.

  12. Final Report: Center for Programming Models for Scalable Parallel Computing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mellor-Crummey, John [William Marsh Rice University

    2011-09-13

    As part of the Center for Programming Models for Scalable Parallel Computing, Rice University collaborated with project partners in the design, development and deployment of language, compiler, and runtime support for parallel programming models to support application development for the “leadership-class” computer systems at DOE national laboratories. Work over the course of this project has focused on the design, implementation, and evaluation of a second-generation version of Coarray Fortran. Research and development efforts of the project have focused on the CAF 2.0 language, compiler, runtime system, and supporting infrastructure. This has involved working with the teams that provide infrastructure for CAF that we rely on, implementing new language and runtime features, producing an open source compiler that enabled us to evaluate our ideas, and evaluating our design and implementation through the use of benchmarks. The report details the research, development, findings, and conclusions from this work.

  13. Protein and amino acid bioavailability of extruded dog food with protein meals of different quality using growing mink (Neovison vison) as a model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tjernsbekk, M. T.; Tauson, Anne-Helene; Matthiesen, Connie Frank

    2016-01-01

    The present study evaluated growing mink (Neovison vison) as a model for dietary protein quality assessment of protein meals used in extruded dog foods. Three foods with similar CP content but of different protein quality were produced using different protein meals. The protein meals varied...... by the European Pet Food Industry Federation. It was concluded that growth studies with mink kits can provide valuable information in protein quality assessment of extruded dog foods. Furthermore, the study showed that to ensure nutritional adequacy of dog food and to be able to compare protein quality of dog...... of protein and AA bioavailability in growing mink. Standardized ileal digestibility (SID) was used to measure protein and AA bioavailability in adult dogs (Canis familiaris). The mink study (3 × 3 Latin square design) included 12 kits aged 8 to 11 wk. The dog study included 12 dogs divided in 3 groups...

  14. Volume-based solvation models out-perform area-based models in combined studies of wild-type and mutated protein-protein interfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Warwicker Jim

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Empirical binding models have previously been investigated for the energetics of protein complexation (ΔG models and for the influence of mutations on complexation (i.e. differences between wild-type and mutant complexes, ΔΔG models. We construct binding models to directly compare these processes, which have generally been studied separately. Results Although reasonable fit models were found for both ΔG and ΔΔG cases, they differ substantially. In a dataset curated for the absence of mainchain rearrangement upon binding, non-polar area burial is a major determinant of ΔG models. However this ΔG model does not fit well to the data for binding differences upon mutation. Burial of non-polar area is weighted down in fitting of ΔΔG models. These calculations were made with no repacking of sidechains upon complexation, and only minimal packing upon mutation. We investigated the consequences of more extensive packing changes with a modified mean-field packing scheme. Rather than emphasising solvent exposure with relatively extended sidechains, rotamers are selected that exhibit maximal packing with protein. This provides solvent accessible areas for proteins that are much closer to those of experimental structures than the more extended sidechain regime. The new packing scheme increases changes in non-polar burial for mutants compared to wild-type proteins, but does not substantially improve agreement between ΔG and ΔΔG binding models. Conclusion We conclude that solvent accessible area, based on modelled mutant structures, is a poor correlate for ΔΔG upon mutation. A simple volume-based, rather than solvent accessibility-based, model is constructed for ΔG and ΔΔG systems. This shows a more consistent behaviour. We discuss the efficacy of volume, as opposed to area, approaches to describe the energetic consequences of mutations at interfaces. This knowledge can be used to develop simple computational screens for

  15. A Basic Protein Comparative Three-Dimensional Modeling Methodological Workflow Theory and Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bitar, Mainá; Franco, Glória Regina

    2014-01-01

    When working with proteins and studying its properties, it is crucial to have access to the three-dimensional structure of the molecule. If experimentally solved structures are not available, comparative modeling techniques can be used to generate useful protein models to subsidize structure-based research projects. In recent years, with Bioinformatics becoming the basis for the study of protein structures, there is a crescent need for the exposure of details about the algorithms behind the softwares and servers, as well as a need for protocols to guide in silico predictive experiments. In this article, we explore different steps of the comparative modeling technique, such as template identification, sequence alignment, generation of candidate structures and quality assessment, its peculiarities and theoretical description. We then present a practical step-by-step workflow, to support the Biologist on the in silico generation of protein structures. Finally, we explore further steps on comparative modeling, presenting perspectives to the study of protein structures through Bioinformatics. We trust that this is a thorough guide for beginners that wish to work on the comparative modeling of proteins.

  16. New Wistar Kyoto and spontaneously hypertensive rat transgenic models with ubiquitous expression of green fluorescent protein

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Isabel Garcia Diaz

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The Wistar Kyoto (WKY rat and the spontaneously hypertensive (SHR rat inbred strains are well-established models for human crescentic glomerulonephritis (CRGN and metabolic syndrome, respectively. Novel transgenic (Tg strains add research opportunities and increase scientific value to well-established rat models. We have created two novel Tg strains using Sleeping Beauty transposon germline transgenesis, ubiquitously expressing green fluorescent protein (GFP under the rat elongation factor 1 alpha (EF1a promoter on the WKY and SHR genetic backgrounds. The Sleeping Beauty system functioned with high transgenesis efficiency; 75% of new rats born after embryo microinjections were transgene positive. By ligation-mediated PCR, we located the genome integration sites, confirming no exonic disruption and defining a single or low copy number of the transgenes in the new WKY-GFP and SHR-GFP Tg lines. We report GFP-bright expression in embryos, tissues and organs in both lines and show preliminary in vitro and in vivo imaging data that demonstrate the utility of the new GFP-expressing lines for adoptive transfer, transplantation and fate mapping studies of CRGN, metabolic syndrome and other traits for which these strains have been extensively studied over the past four decades.

  17. Final Report on Models, Periodic Progress, Report No D1.3, Globeman21, ESPRIT 26509

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Jens Dahl; Tølle, Martin; Vesterager, Johan

    1999-01-01

    This deliverable D1.3 is the third and final deliverable of WP1 - Global Manufacturing Concept of the European part of the Globeman21 project. The report essentially presents the final models on generic Extended Enterprise Management (EEM) and generic Product Life Cycle Management (PLCM), a colle......This deliverable D1.3 is the third and final deliverable of WP1 - Global Manufacturing Concept of the European part of the Globeman21 project. The report essentially presents the final models on generic Extended Enterprise Management (EEM) and generic Product Life Cycle Management (PLCM......), a collection of practical experiences, and requirements for enhanced methods and tools for modelling. First, the deliverable outlines the GM21 understanding regarding extended enterprises and virtual enterprises. This is done by extracting and synthesising the essence of key definitions and concepts...... enterprise context. Through the set of recommended activities for individual life cycle phases of respectively the network entity, the VE entity, and the product entity of the Extended Enterprise Framework, the methodology supports realisation of extended enterprises. The time sequenced planning...

  18. Model-based high-throughput design of ion exchange protein chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khalaf, Rushd; Heymann, Julia; LeSaout, Xavier; Monard, Florence; Costioli, Matteo; Morbidelli, Massimo

    2016-08-12

    This work describes the development of a model-based high-throughput design (MHD) tool for the operating space determination of a chromatographic cation-exchange protein purification process. Based on a previously developed thermodynamic mechanistic model, the MHD tool generates a large amount of system knowledge and thereby permits minimizing the required experimental workload. In particular, each new experiment is designed to generate information needed to help refine and improve the model. Unnecessary experiments that do not increase system knowledge are avoided. Instead of aspiring to a perfectly parameterized model, the goal of this design tool is to use early model parameter estimates to find interesting experimental spaces, and to refine the model parameter estimates with each new experiment until a satisfactory set of process parameters is found. The MHD tool is split into four sections: (1) prediction, high throughput experimentation using experiments in (2) diluted conditions and (3) robotic automated liquid handling workstations (robotic workstation), and (4) operating space determination and validation. (1) Protein and resin information, in conjunction with the thermodynamic model, is used to predict protein resin capacity. (2) The predicted model parameters are refined based on gradient experiments in diluted conditions. (3) Experiments on the robotic workstation are used to further refine the model parameters. (4) The refined model is used to determine operating parameter space that allows for satisfactory purification of the protein of interest on the HPLC scale. Each section of the MHD tool is used to define the adequate experimental procedures for the next section, thus avoiding any unnecessary experimental work. We used the MHD tool to design a polishing step for two proteins, a monoclonal antibody and a fusion protein, on two chromatographic resins, in order to demonstrate it has the ability to strongly accelerate the early phases of process

  19. DINAMO: a coupled sequence alignment editor/molecular graphics tool for interactive homology modeling of proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, M; Bentz, J; Baucom, A; Gregoret, L

    1998-01-01

    Gaining functional information about a novel protein is a universal problem in biomedical research. With the explosive growth of the protein sequence and structural databases, it is becoming increasingly common for researchers to attempt to build a three-dimensional model of their protein of interest in order to gain information about its structure and interactions with other molecules. The two most reliable methods for predicting the structure of a protein are homology modeling, in which the novel sequence is modeled on the known three-dimensional structure of a related protein, and fold recognition (threading), where the sequence is scored against a library of fold models, and the highest scoring model is selected. The sequence alignment to a known structure can be ambiguous, and human intervention is often required to optimize the model. We describe an interactive model building and assessment tool in which a sequence alignment editor is dynamically coupled to a molecular graphics display. By means of a set of assessment tools, the user may optimize his or her alignment to satisfy the known heuristics of protein structure. Adjustments to the sequence alignment made by the user are reflected in the displayed model by color and other visual cues. For instance, residues are colored by hydrophobicity in both the three-dimensional model and in the sequence alignment. This aids the user in identifying undesirable buried polar residues. Several different evaluation metrics may be selected including residue conservation, residue properties, and visualization of predicted secondary structure. These characteristics may be mapped to the model both singly and in combination. DINAMO is a Java-based tool that may be run either over the web or installed locally. Its modular architecture also allows Java-literate users to add plug-ins of their own design.

  20. The Beyond the Standard Model Working Group Summary Report

    CERN Document Server

    Azuelos, Georges; Hewett, J L; Landsberg, G L; Matchev, K; Paige, Frank E; Rizzo, T; Rurua, L; Abdullin, S; Albert, A; Allanach, Benjamin C; Blazek, T; Cavalli, D; Charles, F; Cheung, K; Dedes, A; Dimopoulos, Savas K; Dreiner, H; Ellwanger, Ulrich; Gorbunov, D S; Heinemeyer, S; Hinchliffe, Ian; Hugonie, C; Moretti, S; Polesello, G; Przysiezniak, H; Richardson, Peter; Vacavant, L; Weiglein, Georg

    2002-01-01

    Report of the "Beyond the Standard Model" working group for the Workshop `Physics at TeV Colliders', Les Houches, France, 21 May - 1 June 2001. It consists of 18 separate parts: 1. Preface; 2. Theoretical Discussion; 3. Numerical Calculation of the mSUGRA and Higgs Spectrum; 4. Theoretical Uncertainties in Sparticle Mass Predictions; 5. High Mass Supersymmetry with High Energy Hadron Colliders; 6. SUSY with Heavy Scalars at LHC; 7. Inclusive Study of MSSM in CMS; 8. Establishing a No-Lose Theorem for NMSSM Higgs Boson Discovery at the LHC; 9. Effects of Supersymmetric Phases on Higgs Production in Association with Squark Pairs in the Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model; 10. Study of the Lepton Flavour Violating Decays of Charged Fermions in SUSY GUTs; 11. Interactions of the Goldstino Supermultiplet with Standard Model Fields; 12. Attempts at Explaining the NuTeV Observation of Di-Muon Events; 13. Kaluza-Klein States of the Standard Model Gauge Bosons: Constraints From High Energy Experiments; 14. Kaluza-Kl...

  1. Introducing a Clustering Step in a Consensus Approach for the Scoring of Protein-Protein Docking Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lensink, Marc F.; Petta, Andrea; Serra, Luigi; Scarano, Vittorio; Cavallo, Luigi; Oliva, Romina

    2016-01-01

    Correctly scoring protein-protein docking models to single out native-like ones is an open challenge. It is also an object of assessment in CAPRI (Critical Assessment of PRedicted Interactions), the community-wide blind docking experiment. We introduced in the field the first pure consensus method, CONSRANK, which ranks models based on their ability to match the most conserved contacts in the ensemble they belong to. In CAPRI, scorers are asked to evaluate a set of available models and select the top ten ones, based on their own scoring approach. Scorers’ performance is ranked based on the number of targets/interfaces for which they could provide at least one correct solution. In such terms, blind testing in CAPRI Round 30 (a joint prediction round with CASP11) has shown that critical cases for CONSRANK are represented by targets showing multiple interfaces or for which only a very small number of correct solutions are available. To address these challenging cases, CONSRANK has now been modified to include a contact-based clustering of the models as a preliminary step of the scoring process. We used an agglomerative hierarchical clustering based on the number of common inter-residue contacts within the models. Two criteria, with different thresholds, were explored in the cluster generation, setting either the number of common contacts or of total clusters. For each clustering approach, after selecting the top (most populated) ten clusters, CONSRANK was run on these clusters and the top-ranked model for each cluster was selected, in the limit of 10 models per target. We have applied our modified scoring approach, Clust-CONSRANK, to SCORE_SET, a set of CAPRI scoring models made recently available by CAPRI assessors, and to the subset of homodimeric targets in CAPRI Round 30 for which CONSRANK failed to include a correct solution within the ten selected models. Results show that, for the challenging cases, the clustering step typically enriches the ten top ranked

  2. Introducing a Clustering Step in a Consensus Approach for the Scoring of Protein-Protein Docking Models

    KAUST Repository

    Chermak, Edrisse

    2016-11-15

    Correctly scoring protein-protein docking models to single out native-like ones is an open challenge. It is also an object of assessment in CAPRI (Critical Assessment of PRedicted Interactions), the community-wide blind docking experiment. We introduced in the field the first pure consensus method, CONSRANK, which ranks models based on their ability to match the most conserved contacts in the ensemble they belong to. In CAPRI, scorers are asked to evaluate a set of available models and select the top ten ones, based on their own scoring approach. Scorers\\' performance is ranked based on the number of targets/interfaces for which they could provide at least one correct solution. In such terms, blind testing in CAPRI Round 30 (a joint prediction round with CASP11) has shown that critical cases for CONSRANK are represented by targets showing multiple interfaces or for which only a very small number of correct solutions are available. To address these challenging cases, CONSRANK has now been modified to include a contact-based clustering of the models as a preliminary step of the scoring process. We used an agglomerative hierarchical clustering based on the number of common inter-residue contacts within the models. Two criteria, with different thresholds, were explored in the cluster generation, setting either the number of common contacts or of total clusters. For each clustering approach, after selecting the top (most populated) ten clusters, CONSRANK was run on these clusters and the top-ranked model for each cluster was selected, in the limit of 10 models per target. We have applied our modified scoring approach, Clust-CONSRANK, to SCORE_SET, a set of CAPRI scoring models made recently available by CAPRI assessors, and to the subset of homodimeric targets in CAPRI Round 30 for which CONSRANK failed to include a correct solution within the ten selected models. Results show that, for the challenging cases, the clustering step typically enriches the ten top ranked

  3. Environmental stress-mediated changes in transcriptional and translational regulation of protein synthesis in crop plants. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-12-31

    The research described in this final report focused on the influence of stress agents on protein synthesis in crop plants (primarily soybean). Investigations into the `heat shock` (HS) stress mediated changes in transcriptional and translocational regulation of protein synthesis coupled with studies on anaerobic water deficit and other stress mediated alterations in protein synthesis in plants provided the basis of the research. Understanding of the HS gene expression and function(s) of the HSPs may clarify regulatory mechanisms operative in development. Since the reproductive systems of plants if often very temperature sensitive, it may be that the system could be manipulated to provide greater thermotolerance.

  4. A Hidden Markov Model method, capable of predicting and discriminating β-barrel outer membrane proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamodrakas Stavros J

    2004-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Integral membrane proteins constitute about 20–30% of all proteins in the fully sequenced genomes. They come in two structural classes, the α-helical and the β-barrel membrane proteins, demonstrating different physicochemical characteristics, structure and localization. While transmembrane segment prediction for the α-helical integral membrane proteins appears to be an easy task nowadays, the same is much more difficult for the β-barrel membrane proteins. We developed a method, based on a Hidden Markov Model, capable of predicting the transmembrane β-strands of the outer membrane proteins of gram-negative bacteria, and discriminating those from water-soluble proteins in large datasets. The model is trained in a discriminative manner, aiming at maximizing the probability of correct predictions rather than the likelihood of the sequences. Results The training has been performed on a non-redundant database of 14 outer membrane proteins with structures known at atomic resolution; it has been tested with a jacknife procedure, yielding a per residue accuracy of 84.2% and a correlation coefficient of 0.72, whereas for the self-consistency test the per residue accuracy was 88.1% and the correlation coefficient 0.824. The total number of correctly predicted topologies is 10 out of 14 in the self-consistency test, and 9 out of 14 in the jacknife. Furthermore, the model is capable of discriminating outer membrane from water-soluble proteins in large-scale applications, with a success rate of 88.8% and 89.2% for the correct classification of outer membrane and water-soluble proteins respectively, the highest rates obtained in the literature. That test has been performed independently on a set of known outer membrane proteins with low sequence identity with each other and also with the proteins of the training set. Conclusion Based on the above, we developed a strategy, that enabled us to screen the entire proteome of E. coli for

  5. Mechanical strength of 17,134 model proteins and cysteine slipknots.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mateusz Sikora

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available A new theoretical survey of proteins' resistance to constant speed stretching is performed for a set of 17,134 proteins as described by a structure-based model. The proteins selected have no gaps in their structure determination and consist of no more than 250 amino acids. Our previous studies have dealt with 7510 proteins of no more than 150 amino acids. The proteins are ranked according to the strength of the resistance. Most of the predicted top-strength proteins have not yet been studied experimentally. Architectures and folds which are likely to yield large forces are identified. New types of potent force clamps are discovered. They involve disulphide bridges and, in particular, cysteine slipknots. An effective energy parameter of the model is estimated by comparing the theoretical data on characteristic forces to the corresponding experimental values combined with an extrapolation of the theoretical data to the experimental pulling speeds. These studies provide guidance for future experiments on single molecule manipulation and should lead to selection of proteins for applications. A new class of proteins, involving cysteine slipknots, is identified as one that is expected to lead to the strongest force clamps known. This class is characterized through molecular dynamics simulations.

  6. Protein-thiol substitution or protein dethiolation by thiol/disulfide exchange reactions: the albumin model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Summa, Domenico; Spiga, Ottavia; Bernini, Andrea; Venditti, Vincenzo; Priora, Raffaella; Frosali, Simona; Margaritis, Antonios; Di Giuseppe, Danila; Niccolai, Neri; Di Simplicio, Paolo

    2007-11-01

    Dethiolation experiments of thiolated albumin with thionitrobenzoic acid and thiols (glutathione, cysteine, homocysteine) were carried out to understand the role of albumin in plasma distribution of thiols and disulfide species by thiol/disulfide (SH/SS) exchange reactions. During these experiments we observed that thiolated albumin underwent thiol substitution (Alb-SS-X+RSHAlb-SS-R+XSH) or dethiolation (Alb-SS-X+XSHAlb-SH+XSSX), depending on the different pK(a) values of thiols involved in protein-thiol mixed disulfides (Alb-SS-X). It appeared in these reactions that the compound with lower pK(a) in mixed disulfide was a good leaving group and that the pK(a) differences dictated the kind of reaction (substitution or dethiolation). Thionitrobenzoic acid, bound to albumin by mixed disulfide (Alb-TNB), underwent rapid substitution after thiol addition, forming the corresponding Alb-SS-X (peaks at 0.25-1 min). In turn, Alb-SS-X were dethiolated by the excess nonprotein SH groups because of the lower pK(a) value in mixed disulfide with respect to that of other thiols. Dethiolation of Alb-SS-X was accompanied by formation of XSSX and Alb-SH up to equilibrium levels at 35 min, which were different for each thiol. Structures by molecular simulation of thiolated albumin, carried out for understanding the role of sulfur exposure in mixed disulfides in dethiolation process, evidenced that the sulfur exposure is important for the rate but not for determining the kind of reaction (substitution or dethiolation). Our data underline the contribution of SH/SS exchanges to determine levels of various thiols as reduced and oxidized species in human plasma.

  7. Enhanced hybrid search algorithm for protein structure prediction using the 3D-HP lattice model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Changjun; Hou, Caixia; Zhang, Qiang; Wei, Xiaopeng

    2013-09-01

    The problem of protein structure prediction in the hydrophobic-polar (HP) lattice model is the prediction of protein tertiary structure. This problem is usually referred to as the protein folding problem. This paper presents a method for the application of an enhanced hybrid search algorithm to the problem of protein folding prediction, using the three dimensional (3D) HP lattice model. The enhanced hybrid search algorithm is a combination of the particle swarm optimizer (PSO) and tabu search (TS) algorithms. Since the PSO algorithm entraps local minimum in later evolution extremely easily, we combined PSO with the TS algorithm, which has properties of global optimization. Since the technologies of crossover and mutation are applied many times to PSO and TS algorithms, so enhanced hybrid search algorithm is called the MCMPSO-TS (multiple crossover and mutation PSO-TS) algorithm. Experimental results show that the MCMPSO-TS algorithm can find the best solutions so far for the listed benchmarks, which will help comparison with any future paper approach. Moreover, real protein sequences and Fibonacci sequences are verified in the 3D HP lattice model for the first time. Compared with the previous evolutionary algorithms, the new hybrid search algorithm is novel, and can be used effectively to predict 3D protein folding structure. With continuous development and changes in amino acids sequences, the new algorithm will also make a contribution to the study of new protein sequences.

  8. Studies on BN rats model to determine the potential allergenicity of proteins from genetically modified foods

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xu-Dong Jia; Ning Li; Yong-Ning Wu; Xiao-Guang Yang

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To develop a Brown Norway (BN) rat model to determine the potential allergenicity of novel proteins in genetically modified food.METHODS: The allergenicity of different proteins were compared, including ovalbumin (OVA), a potent respiratory and food allergen, bovine serum albumin (BSA), a protein that is considered to have a lesser allergenic potential,and potato acid phosphatase (PAP), a non-allergenic protein when administered to BN rats via different routes of exposure (intraperitoneally or by gavage). IgG and IgE antibody responses were determined by ELISA and PCA,respectively. An immunoassay kit was used to determine the plasma histamine level. In addition, possible systemic effect of allergens was investigated by monitoring blood pressure.RESULTS: OVA provoked very vigorous protein-specific IgG and IgE responses, low grade protein-specific IgG and IgE responses were elicited by BSA, while by neither route did PAP elicit anything. In either routes of exposure,plasma histamine level in BN rats sensitized with OVA was higher than that of BSA or PAP. In addition, an oral challenge with BSA and PAP did not induce any effect on blood pressure, while a temporary drop in systolic blood pressure in few animals of each routes of exposure was found by an oral challenge with OVA.CONCLUSION: BN rat model might be a useful and predictive animal model to study the potential allergenicity of novel food proteins.

  9. Extension of the selection of protein chromatography and the rate model to affinity chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandoval, G; Shene, C; Andrews, B A; Asenjo, J A

    2010-01-01

    The rational selection of optimal protein purification sequences, as well as mathematical models that simulate and allow optimization of chromatographic protein purification processes have been developed for purification procedures such as ion-exchange, hydrophobic interaction and gel filtration chromatography. This paper investigates the extension of such analysis to affinity chromatography both in the selection of chromatographic processes and in the use of the rate model for mathematical modelling and simulation. Two affinity systems were used: Blue Sepharose and Protein A. The extension of the theory developed previously for ion-exchange and HIC chromatography to affinity separations is analyzed in this paper. For the selection of operations two algorithms are used. In the first, the value of η, which corresponds to the efficiency (resolution) of the actual chromatography and, Σ, which determines the amount of a particular contaminant eliminated after each separation step, which determines the purity, have to be determined. It was found that the value of both these parameters is not generic for affinity separations but will depend on the type of affinity system used and will have to be determined on a case by case basis. With Blue Sepharose a salt gradient was used and with Protein A, a pH gradient. Parameters were determined with individual proteins and simulations of the protein mixtures were done. This approach allows investigation of chromatographic protein purification in a holistic manner that includes ion-exchange, HIC, gel filtration and affinity separations for the first time.

  10. Using viromes to predict novel immune proteins in non-model organisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Yan Wei; Silva, Genivaldo Gueiros Z.; Nelson, Craig E.; Haas, Andreas F.; Kelly, Linda Wegley; Edwards, Robert A.; Rohwer, Forest L.

    2016-01-01

    Immunity is mostly studied in a few model organisms, leaving the majority of immune systems on the planet unexplored. To characterize the immune systems of non-model organisms alternative approaches are required. Viruses manipulate host cell biology through the expression of proteins that modulate the immune response. We hypothesized that metagenomic sequencing of viral communities would be useful to identify both known and unknown host immune proteins. To test this hypothesis, a mock human virome was generated and compared to the human proteome using tBLASTn, resulting in 36 proteins known to be involved in immunity. This same pipeline was then applied to reef-building coral, a non-model organism that currently lacks traditional molecular tools like transgenic animals, gene-editing capabilities, and in vitro cell cultures. Viromes isolated from corals and compared with the predicted coral proteome resulted in 2503 coral proteins, including many proteins involved with pathogen sensing and apoptosis. There were also 159 coral proteins predicted to be involved with coral immunity but currently lacking any functional annotation. The pipeline described here provides a novel method to rapidly predict host immune components that can be applied to virtually any system with the potential to discover novel immune proteins. PMID:27581878

  11. Elastic network model of allosteric regulation in protein kinase PDK1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Williams Gareth

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Structural switches upon binding of phosphorylated moieties underpin many signalling networks. The ligand activation is a form of allosteric modulation of the protein, where the binding site is remote from the structural change in the protein. Recently this structural switch has been elegantly demonstrated with the crystallisation of the activated form of 3-phosphoinositide-dependent protein kinase-1 (PDK1. The purpose of the present work is to determine whether the allosteric coupling in PDK1 emerges at the level of a simple coarse grained model of protein dynamics. Results It is shown here that the allosteric effects of the agonist binding to the small lobe upon the activation loop in the large lobe of PDK1 are explainable within a simple 'ball and spring' elastic network model (ENM of protein dynamics. In particular, the model shows that the bound phospho peptide mimetic fluctuations have a high degree of correlation with the activation loop of PDK1. Conclusions The ENM approach to small molecule activation of proteins may offer a first pass predictive methodology where affinity is encoded in residues remote from the active site, and aid in the design of specific protein agonists that enhance the allosteric coupling and antagonist that repress it.

  12. Electrostatics of cysteine residues in proteins: parameterization and validation of a simple model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salsbury, Freddie R; Poole, Leslie B; Fetrow, Jacquelyn S

    2012-11-01

    One of the most popular and simple models for the calculation of pK(a) s from a protein structure is the semi-macroscopic electrostatic model MEAD. This model requires empirical parameters for each residue to calculate pK(a) s. Analysis of current, widely used empirical parameters for cysteine residues showed that they did not reproduce expected cysteine pK(a) s; thus, we set out to identify parameters consistent with the CHARMM27 force field that capture both the behavior of typical cysteines in proteins and the behavior of cysteines which have perturbed pK(a) s. The new parameters were validated in three ways: (1) calculation across a large set of typical cysteines in proteins (where the calculations are expected to reproduce expected ensemble behavior); (2) calculation across a set of perturbed cysteines in proteins (where the calculations are expected to reproduce the shifted ensemble behavior); and (3) comparison to experimentally determined pK(a) values (where the calculation should reproduce the pK(a) within experimental error). Both the general behavior of cysteines in proteins and the perturbed pK(a) in some proteins can be predicted reasonably well using the newly determined empirical parameters within the MEAD model for protein electrostatics. This study provides the first general analysis of the electrostatics of cysteines in proteins, with specific attention paid to capturing both the behavior of typical cysteines in a protein and the behavior of cysteines whose pK(a) should be shifted, and validation of force field parameters for cysteine residues. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Contact-assisted protein structure modeling by global optimization in CASP11.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joo, Keehyoung; Joung, InSuk; Cheng, Qianyi; Lee, Sung Jong; Lee, Jooyoung

    2016-09-01

    We have applied the conformational space annealing method to the contact-assisted protein structure modeling in CASP11. For Tp targets, where predicted residue-residue contact information was provided, the contact energy term in the form of the Lorentzian function was implemented together with the physical energy terms used in our template-free modeling of proteins. Although we observed some structural improvement of Tp models over the models predicted without the Tp information, the improvement was not substantial on average. This is partly due to the inaccuracy of the provided contact information, where only about 18% of it was correct. For Ts targets, where the information of ambiguous NOE (Nuclear Overhauser Effect) restraints was provided, we formulated the modeling in terms of the two-tier optimization problem, which covers: (1) the assignment of NOE peaks and (2) the three-dimensional (3D) model generation based on the assigned NOEs. Although solving the problem in a direct manner appears to be intractable at first glance, we demonstrate through CASP11 that remarkably accurate protein 3D modeling is possible by brute force optimization of a relevant energy function. For 19 Ts targets of the average size of 224 residues, generated protein models were of about 3.6 Å Cα atom accuracy. Even greater structural improvement was observed when additional Tc contact information was provided. For 20 out of the total 24 Tc targets, we were able to generate protein structures which were better than the best model from the rest of the CASP11 groups in terms of GDT-TS. Proteins 2016; 84(Suppl 1):189-199. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Temperature-induced unfolding behavior of proteins studied by tensorial elastic network model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, Amit; Granek, Rony

    2016-12-01

    Motivated by single molecule experiments and recent molecular dynamics (MD) studies, we propose a simple and computationally efficient method based on a tensorial elastic network model to investigate the unfolding pathways of proteins under temperature variation. The tensorial elastic network model, which relies on the native state topology of a protein, combines the anisotropic network model, the bond bending elasticity, and the backbone twist elasticity to successfully predicts both the isotropic and anisotropic fluctuations in a manner similar to the Gaussian network model and anisotropic network model. The unfolding process is modeled by breaking the native contacts between residues one by one, and by assuming a threshold value for strain fluctuation. Using this method, we simulated the unfolding processes of four well-characterized proteins: chymotrypsin inhibitor, barnase, ubiquitein, and adenalyate kinase. We found that this step-wise process leads to two or more cooperative, first-order-like transitions between partial denaturation states. The sequence of unfolding events obtained using this method is consistent with experimental and MD studies. The results also imply that the native topology of proteins "encrypts" information regarding their unfolding process. Proteins 2016; 84:1767-1775. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. A Stochastic Point Cloud Sampling Method for Multi-Template Protein Comparative Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jilong; Cheng, Jianlin

    2016-01-01

    Generating tertiary structural models for a target protein from the known structure of its homologous template proteins and their pairwise sequence alignment is a key step in protein comparative modeling. Here, we developed a new stochastic point cloud sampling method, called MTMG, for multi-template protein model generation. The method first superposes the backbones of template structures, and the Cα atoms of the superposed templates form a point cloud for each position of a target protein, which are represented by a three-dimensional multivariate normal distribution. MTMG stochastically resamples the positions for Cα atoms of the residues whose positions are uncertain from the distribution, and accepts or rejects new position according to a simulated annealing protocol, which effectively removes atomic clashes commonly encountered in multi-template comparative modeling. We benchmarked MTMG on 1,033 sequence alignments generated for CASP9, CASP10 and CASP11 targets, respectively. Using multiple templates with MTMG improves the GDT-TS score and TM-score of structural models by 2.96–6.37% and 2.42–5.19% on the three datasets over using single templates. MTMG’s performance was comparable to Modeller in terms of GDT-TS score, TM-score, and GDT-HA score, while the average RMSD was improved by a new sampling approach. The MTMG software is freely available at: http://sysbio.rnet.missouri.edu/multicom_toolbox/mtmg.html. PMID:27161489

  16. Using maximum entropy model to predict protein secondary structure with single sequence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Yong-Sheng; Zhang, Tong-Liang; Gu, Quan; Zhao, Pei-Ying; Chou, Kuo-Chen

    2009-01-01

    Prediction of protein secondary structure is somewhat reminiscent of the efforts by many previous investigators but yet still worthy of revisiting it owing to its importance in protein science. Several studies indicate that the knowledge of protein structural classes can provide useful information towards the determination of protein secondary structure. Particularly, the performance of prediction algorithms developed recently have been improved rapidly by incorporating homologous multiple sequences alignment information. Unfortunately, this kind of information is not available for a significant amount of proteins. In view of this, it is necessary to develop the method based on the query protein sequence alone, the so-called single-sequence method. Here, we propose a novel single-sequence approach which is featured by that various kinds of contextual information are taken into account, and that a maximum entropy model classifier is used as the prediction engine. As a demonstration, cross-validation tests have been performed by the new method on datasets containing proteins from different structural classes, and the results thus obtained are quite promising, indicating that the new method may become an useful tool in protein science or at least play a complementary role to the existing protein secondary structure prediction methods.

  17. A New Hybrid Model of Amino Acid Substitution for Protein Functional Classification

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ke Long WANG; Zhi Ning WEN; Fu Sheng NIE; Meng Long LI

    2005-01-01

    In this paper, a new hybrid model of amino acid substitution is developed and compared with the others in previous works. The results show that the new hybrid model can characterize the protein sequences very well by calculating Fisher weights, which can denote how much the variants contribute to the classification.

  18. Homology modeling of the CheW coupling protein of the chemotaxis signaling complex.