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Sample records for model proteins remarkably

  1. Some Model Theoretic Remarks on Bass Modules

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    E. Momtahan

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available We study Bass modules, Bass rings, and related concepts from a model theoretic point of view. We observe that the class of Bass modules (over a fixed ring is not stable under elementary equivalence. We observe that under which conditions the class of Bass rings are stable under elementary equivalence.

  2. Remarks on the Curci-Ferrari model

    CERN Document Server

    Lavrov, Peter M

    2012-01-01

    Dependence of Green's functions for the Curci-Ferrari model on the parameter resembling the gauge parameter in massless Yang-Mills theories is investigated. It is shown that the generating functional of vertex functions (effective action) depends on this parameter on-shell.

  3. Remarks on ConstitutiveModeling of Nanofluids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Massoudi, Mehrdad; Tran X. Phuoc

    2012-01-01

    Nanofluids are made by adding nanoscale particles in low volumetric fractions to a fluid in order to enhance or improve their rheological, mechanical, optical, and thermal properties. The base fluid can be any liquid such as oil, water, ethylene glycol, or conventional fluid mixtures. Limited available studies on nanofluid viscosity have been reported [1-19]. In most of these studies, the behavior of the viscosity and the shear stress of nanofluids have been interpreted using the widely used empirical model developed by Casson [20].

  4. Some Remarks on the Model Theory of Epistemic Plausibility Models

    CERN Document Server

    Demey, Lorenz

    2010-01-01

    Classical logics of knowledge and belief are usually interpreted on Kripke models, for which a mathematically well-developed model theory is available. However, such models are inadequate to capture dynamic phenomena. Therefore, epistemic plausibility models have been introduced. Because these are much richer structures than Kripke models, they do not straightforwardly inherit the model-theoretical results of modal logic. Therefore, while epistemic plausibility structures are well-suited for modeling purposes, an extensive investigation of their model theory has been lacking so far. The aim of the present paper is to fill exactly this gap, by initiating a systematic exploration of the model theory of epistemic plausibility models. Like in 'ordinary' modal logic, the focus will be on the notion of bisimulation. We define various notions of bisimulations (parametrized by a language L) and show that L-bisimilarity implies L-equivalence. We prove a Hennesy-Milner type result, and also two undefinability results. ...

  5. The Concept of Model. What is Remarkable in Mathematical Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bezruchko, Boris P.; Smirnov, Dmitry A.

    Dictionaries tell us that the word "model" originates from the Latin word "modulus" which means "measure, template, norm". This term was used in proceedings on civil engineering several centuries BC. Currently, it relates to an enormously wide range of material objects, symbolic structures and ideal images ranging from models of clothes, small copies of ships and aeroplanes, different pictures and plots to mathematical equations and computational algorithms. Starting to define the concept of "model", we would like to remind about the difficulty to give strict definitions of basic concepts. Thus, when university professors define "oscillations" and "waves" in their lectures on this subject, it is common for many of them to repeat the joke of Russian academician L.I. Mandel'shtam, who illustrated the problem with the example of the term "heap": How many objects, and of which kind, deserve such a name? As well, he compared strict definitions at the beginning of studying any topic to "swaddling oneself with barbed wire". Among classical examples of impossibility to give exhaustive formulations, one can mention the terms "bald spot", "forest", etc. Therefore, we will not consider variety of existing definitions of "model" and "modelling" in detail. Any of them relates to the purposes and subjective preferences of an author and is valid in a certain sense. However, it is restricted since it ignores some objects or properties that deserve attention from other points of view.

  6. Annotation of Protein Domains Reveals Remarkable Conservation in the Functional Make up of Proteomes Across Superkingdoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nasir, Arshan; Naeem, Aisha; Khan, Muhammad Jawad; Lopez-Nicora, Horacio D.; Caetano-Anollés, Gustavo

    2011-01-01

    The functional repertoire of a cell is largely embodied in its proteome, the collection of proteins encoded in the genome of an organism. The molecular functions of proteins are the direct consequence of their structure and structure can be inferred from sequence using hidden Markov models of structural recognition. Here we analyze the functional annotation of protein domain structures in almost a thousand sequenced genomes, exploring the functional and structural diversity of proteomes. We find there is a remarkable conservation in the distribution of domains with respect to the molecular functions they perform in the three superkingdoms of life. In general, most of the protein repertoire is spent in functions related to metabolic processes but there are significant differences in the usage of domains for regulatory and extra-cellular processes both within and between superkingdoms. Our results support the hypotheses that the proteomes of superkingdom Eukarya evolved via genome expansion mechanisms that were directed towards innovating new domain architectures for regulatory and extra/intracellular process functions needed for example to maintain the integrity of multicellular structure or to interact with environmental biotic and abiotic factors (e.g., cell signaling and adhesion, immune responses, and toxin production). Proteomes of microbial superkingdoms Archaea and Bacteria retained fewer numbers of domains and maintained simple and smaller protein repertoires. Viruses appear to play an important role in the evolution of superkingdoms. We finally identify few genomic outliers that deviate significantly from the conserved functional design. These include Nanoarchaeum equitans, proteobacterial symbionts of insects with extremely reduced genomes, Tenericutes and Guillardia theta. These organisms spend most of their domains on information functions, including translation and transcription, rather than on metabolism and harbor a domain repertoire characteristic of

  7. Annotation of Protein Domains Reveals Remarkable Conservation in the Functional Make up of Proteomes Across Superkingdoms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gustavo Caetano-Anollés

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available The functional repertoire of a cell is largely embodied in its proteome, the collection of proteins encoded in the genome of an organism. The molecular functions of proteins are the direct consequence of their structure and structure can be inferred from sequence using hidden Markov models of structural recognition. Here we analyze the functional annotation of protein domain structures in almost a thousand sequenced genomes, exploring the functional and structural diversity of proteomes. We find there is a remarkable conservation in the distribution of domains with respect to the molecular functions they perform in the three superkingdoms of life. In general, most of the protein repertoire is spent in functions related to metabolic processes but there are significant differences in the usage of domains for regulatory and extra-cellular processes both within and between superkingdoms. Our results support the hypotheses that the proteomes of superkingdom Eukarya evolved via genome expansion mechanisms that were directed towards innovating new domain architectures for regulatory and extra/intracellular process functions needed for example to maintain the integrity of multicellular structure or to interact with environmental biotic and abiotic factors (e.g., cell signaling and adhesion, immune responses, and toxin production. Proteomes of microbial superkingdoms Archaea and Bacteria retained fewer numbers of domains and maintained simple and smaller protein repertoires. Viruses appear to play an important role in the evolution of superkingdoms. We finally identify few genomic outliers that deviate significantly from the conserved functional design. These include Nanoarchaeum equitans, proteobacterial symbionts of insects with extremely reduced genomes, Tenericutes and Guillardia theta. These organisms spend most of their domains on information functions, including translation and transcription, rather than on metabolism and harbor a domain

  8. Remarks on orthotropic elastic models applied to wood

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nilson Tadeu Mascia

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Wood is generally considered an anisotropic material. In terms of engineering elastic models, wood is usually treated as an orthotropic material. This paper presents an analysis of two principal anisotropic elastic models that are usually applied to wood. The first one, the linear orthotropic model, where the material axes L (Longitudinal, R( radial and T(tangential are coincident with the Cartesian axes (x, y, z, is more accepted as wood elastic model. The other one, the cylindrical orthotropic model is more adequate of the growth caracteristics of wood but more mathematically complex to be adopted in practical terms. Specifically due to its importance in wood elastic parameters, this paper deals with the fiber orientation influence in these models through adequate transformation of coordinates. As a final result, some examples of the linear model, which show the variation of elastic moduli, i.e., Young´s modulus and shear modulus, with fiber orientation are presented.

  9. Remarks on Khovanov Homology and the Potts Model

    CERN Document Server

    Kauffman, Louis H

    2009-01-01

    This paper is about Khovanov homology and its relationships with statistical mechanics models such as the Ising model and the Potts model. The paper gives a relatively self-contained introduction to Khovanov homology, and also to a reformulation of the Potts model in terms of a bracket state sum expansion on a knot diagram K(G) related to a planar graph G via the medial construction. We consider the original Khovanov homology and also the homology defined by Stosic via the dichromatic polynomial, and examine those values of the Potts model where the partition function can be expressed in terms of homological Euler characteristics. These points occur at imaginary temperature, and consequences of this phenomenon will be studied in subsequent work. This paper is dedicated to Oleg Viro on his 60-th birthday.

  10. Remark on: the neutron spherical optical-model absorption.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, A. B.; Nuclear Engineering Division

    2007-06-30

    The energy-dependent behavior of the absorption term of the spherical neutron optical potential for doubly magic {sup 208}Pb and the neighboring {sup 209}Bi is examined. These considerations suggest a phenomenological model that results in an intuitively attractive energy dependence of the imaginary potential that provides a good description of the observed neutron cross sections and that is qualitatively consistent with theoretical concepts. At the same time it provides an alternative to some of the arbitrary assumptions involved in many conventional optical-model interpretations reported in the literature and reduces the number of the parameters of the model.

  11. Topological switching between an alpha-beta parallel protein and a remarkably helical molten globule.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nabuurs, Sanne M; Westphal, Adrie H; aan den Toorn, Marije; Lindhoud, Simon; van Mierlo, Carlo P M

    2009-06-17

    Partially folded protein species transiently exist during folding of most proteins. Often these species are molten globules, which may be on- or off-pathway to native protein. Molten globules have a substantial amount of secondary structure but lack virtually all the tertiary side-chain packing characteristic of natively folded proteins. These ensembles of interconverting conformers are prone to aggregation and potentially play a role in numerous devastating pathologies, and thus attract considerable attention. The molten globule that is observed during folding of apoflavodoxin from Azotobacter vinelandii is off-pathway, as it has to unfold before native protein can be formed. Here we report that this species can be trapped under nativelike conditions by substituting amino acid residue F44 by Y44, allowing spectroscopic characterization of its conformation. Whereas native apoflavodoxin contains a parallel beta-sheet surrounded by alpha-helices (i.e., the flavodoxin-like or alpha-beta parallel topology), it is shown that the molten globule has a totally different topology: it is helical and contains no beta-sheet. The presence of this remarkably nonnative species shows that single polypeptide sequences can code for distinct folds that swap upon changing conditions. Topological switching between unrelated protein structures is likely a general phenomenon in the protein structure universe.

  12. Remarks on modeling the flexible seal ring housing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kundera, C.; Martsynkovskyy, V.; Zahorulko, A.

    2017-08-01

    When formulating models of dynamic face seals, two issues are of essential importance. The first concerns the determination of the forces formed in the medium film in the gap formed by the faces of two rings, while the second refers to the model of the flexible housing of one of the seal rings. The first issue includes the analysis of the medium flow through a narrow slit, taking thermal phenomena and deformations of slit-forming surfaces into account. The second issue concerns the modeling of properties of seal structural components, especially the modeling of elastic-damping properties of the flexible seal ring housing. This paper presents the results of simple relaxation tests of elastomeric rings and the procedure for analyzing these results and evaluating the elastic-damping properties of the rings tested. Finally, experimental results will be compared with theory.

  13. Some Remarks on CFD Drag Prediction of an Aircraft Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, S. H.; Eliasson, P.

    Observed in CFD drag predictions for the DLR-F6 aircraft model with various configurations, some issues are addressed. The emphasis is placed on the effect of turbulence modeling and grid resolution. With several different turbulence models, the predicted flow feature around the aircraft is highlighted. It is shown that the prediction of the separation bubble in the wing-body junction is closely related to the inherent modeling mechanism of turbulence production. For the configuration with an additional fairing, which has effectively removed the separation bubble, it is illustrated that the drag prediction may be altered even for attached turbulent boundary layer when different turbulence models are used. Grid sensitivity studies are performed with two groups of subsequently refined grids. It is observed that, in contrast to the lift, the drag prediction is rather sensitive to the grid refinement, as well as to the artificial diffusion added for solving the turbulence transport equation. It is demonstrated that an effective grid refinement should drive the predicted drag components monotonically and linearly converged to a finite value.

  14. Some remarks about non-minimally coupled scalar field models

    CERN Document Server

    Fadragas, Carlos R

    2014-01-01

    Are extended several results related to flat FRW models in the conformal (Einstein) frame of scalar-tensor gravity theories. Are considered scalar fields with arbitrary (positive) potentials and arbitrary coupling functions. Are straightforwardly introduced mild assumptions under such functions (differentiable class, number of singular points, asymptotes, etc.) in order to characterize the asymptotic structure on a phase-space. We pay special attention to the possible scaling solutions. Are presented several numerical evidences that confirm some of these results.

  15. Remarks on the Sachdev-Ye-Kitaev model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maldacena, Juan; Stanford, Douglas

    2016-11-01

    We study a quantum-mechanical model proposed by Sachdev, Ye and Kitaev. The model consists of N Majorana fermions with random interactions of a few fermions at a time. It it tractable in the large-N limit, where the classical variable is a bilocal fermion bilinear. The model becomes strongly interacting at low energies where it develops an emergent conformal symmetry. We study two- and four-point functions of the fundamental fermions. This provides the spectrum of physical excitations for the bilocal field. The emergent conformal symmetry is a reparametrization symmetry, which is spontaneously broken to S L (2 ,R ) , leading to zero modes. These zero modes are lifted by a small residual explicit breaking, which produces an enhanced contribution to the four-point function. This contribution displays a maximal Lyapunov exponent in the chaos region (out-of-time-ordered correlator). We expect these features to be universal properties of large-N quantum mechanics systems with emergent reparametrization symmetry. This article is largely based on talks given by Kitaev, which motivated us to work out the details of the ideas described there.

  16. Remarks on meson loop effects on quark models

    CERN Document Server

    Hammer, I K; Nefediev, A V

    2016-01-01

    We investigate the effect of meson loops on the spectrum of quark states. We demonstrate that in general quark states do not tend to get very broad if their coupling to the continuum increases, but instead they decouple from the latter in the large coupling limit. We ascribe this effect to the essentially nonperturbative unitarization procedure involved. In the meantime, some quark resonances behave very differently and demonstrate collectivity in the sense that their pole trajectories span a wide, as compared to the level spacing, region therefore acquiring contributions from multiple bare poles rather than from the closest neighbours. While the actual calculations are done within particular, very simplified models, it is argued that the findings might well be general.

  17. Remarks on meson loop effects on quark models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hammer, I.K.; Hanhart, C. [Institut fuer Kernphysik and Juelich Center for Hadron Physics, Forschungszentrum Juelich, Institute for Advanced Simulation, Juelich (Germany); Nefediev, A.V. [Institute for Theoretical and Experimental Physics, Moscow (Russian Federation); National Research Nuclear University MEPhI, Moscow (Russian Federation); Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology, Dolgoprudny, Moscow Region (Russian Federation)

    2016-11-15

    We investigate the effect of meson loops on the spectrum of quark states. We demonstrate that in general quark states do not tend to get very broad if their coupling to the continuum increases, but instead they decouple from the latter in the large coupling limit. We ascribe this effect to the essentially nonperturbative unitarization procedure involved. In the meantime, some quark resonances behave very differently and demonstrate collectivity in the sense that their pole trajectories span a wide, as compared to the level spacing, region therefore acquiring contributions from multiple bare poles rather than from the closest neighbors. While the actual calculations are done within particular, very simplified models, it is argued that the findings might well be general. (orig.)

  18. Pollution models and inverse distance weighting: Some critical remarks

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Mesnard, Louis

    2013-03-01

    When evaluating the impact of pollution, measurements from remote stations are often weighted by the inverse of distance raised to some nonnegative power (IDW). This is derived from Shepard's method of spatial interpolation (1968). The paper discusses the arbitrary character of the exponent of distance and the problem of monitoring stations that are close to the reference point. From elementary laws of physics, it is determined which exponent of distance should be chosen (or its upper bound) depending on the form of pollution encountered, such as radiant pollution (including radioactivity and sound), air pollution (plumes, puffs, and motionless clouds by using the classical Gaussian model), and polluted rivers. The case where a station is confused with the reference point (or zero distance) is also discussed: in real cases this station imposes its measurement on the whole area regardless of the measurements made by other stations. This is a serious flaw when evaluating the mean pollution of an area. However, it is shown that this is not so in the case of a continuum of monitoring stations, and the measurement at the reference point and for the whole area may differ, which is satisfactory.

  19. A database approach to information retrieval: The remarkable relationship between language models and region models

    CERN Document Server

    Hiemstra, Djoerd

    2010-01-01

    In this report, we unify two quite distinct approaches to information retrieval: region models and language models. Region models were developed for structured document retrieval. They provide a well-defined behaviour as well as a simple query language that allows application developers to rapidly develop applications. Language models are particularly useful to reason about the ranking of search results, and for developing new ranking approaches. The unified model allows application developers to define complex language modeling approaches as logical queries on a textual database. We show a remarkable one-to-one relationship between region queries and the language models they represent for a wide variety of applications: simple ad-hoc search, cross-language retrieval, video retrieval, and web search.

  20. Protecting the herd: the remarkable effectiveness of the bacterial meningitis polysaccharide-protein conjugate vaccines in altering transmission dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephens, David S

    2011-01-01

    Interrupting human-to-human transmission of the agents (Neisseria meningitidis, Haemophilus influenzae, and Streptococcus pneumoniae) of bacterial meningitis by new capsular polysaccharide-protein conjugate vaccines (PPCVs) has proven to be a remarkable (and unanticipated) contributor to vaccine effectiveness. Herd immunity accounts for ∼50% of the protection by meningococcal serogroup C PPCVs, pneumococcal PPCV7, and H. influenzae b PPCVs. Nasopharyngeal carriage can be reduced ≥75% for vaccine serotypes; the decrease in carriage is correlated with disease reduction in unvaccinated individuals, and the impact of herd immunity lasts for years. Based on these data, models for using herd immunity in vaccine-based prevention strategies are underway for control of meningitis in sub-Saharan Africa. Although the immunologic basis of herd immunity and impact on microbial biology need more study, protecting the unvaccinated by altering pathogen transmission dynamics is a powerful effect of PPCVs and increasingly important in vaccine introduction, implementation, and evaluation strategies.

  1. Some Remarks on the Riccati Equation Expansion Method for Variable Separation of Nonlinear Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yu-Peng; Dai, Chao-Qing

    2015-10-01

    Based on the Riccati equation expansion method, 11 kinds of variable separation solutions with different forms of (2+1)-dimensional modified Korteweg-de Vries equation are obtained. The following two remarks on the Riccati equation expansion method for variable separation are made: (i) a remark on the equivalence of different solutions constructed by the Riccati equation expansion method. From analysis, we find that these seemly independent solutions with different forms actually depend on each other, and they can transform from one to another via some relations. We should avoid arbitrarily asserting so-called "new" solutions; (ii) a remark on the construction of localised excitation based on variable separation solutions. For two or multi-component systems, we must be careful with excitation structures constructed by all components for the same model lest the appearance of some un-physical structures. We hope that these results are helpful to deeply study exact solutions of nonlinear models in physical, engineering and biophysical contexts.

  2. Novel VEGF decoy receptor fusion protein conbercept targeting multiple VEGF isoforms provide remarkable anti-angiogenesis effect in vivo.

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    Qin Wang

    Full Text Available VEGF family factors are known to be the principal stimulators of abnormal angiogenesis, which play a fundamental role in tumor and various ocular diseases. Inhibition of VEGF is widely applied in antiangiogenic therapy. Conbercept is a novel decoy receptor protein constructed by fusing VEGF receptor 1 and VEGF receptor 2 extracellular domains with the Fc region of human immunoglobulin. In this study, we systematically evaluated the binding affinity of conbercept with VEGF isoforms and PlGF by using anti-VEGF antibody (Avastin as reference. BIACORE and ELISA assay results indicated that conbercept could bind different VEGF-A isoforms with higher affinity than reference. Furthermore, conbercept could also bind VEGF-B and PlGF, whereas Avastin showed no binding. Oxygen-induced retinopathy model showed that conbercept could inhibit the formation of neovasularizations. In tumor-bearing nude mice, conbercept could also suppress tumor growth very effectively in vivo. Overall, our study have demonstrated that conbercept could bind with high affinity to multiple VEGF isoforms and consequently provide remarkable anti-angiogenic effect, suggesting the possibility to treat angiogenesis-related diseases such as cancer and wet AMD etc.

  3. Topological switching between an alpha-beta parallel protein and a remarkably helical molten globule.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nabuurs, S.M.; Westphal, A.H.; Toorn, M. aan den; Lindhoud, S.; Mierlo, C.P. van

    2009-01-01

    Partially folded protein species transiently exist during folding of most proteins. Often these species are molten globules, which may be on- or off-pathway to native protein. Molten globules have a substantial amount of secondary structure but lack virtually all the tertiary side-chain packing char

  4. Topological switching between an a-ß parallel protein and a remarkably helical molten globule.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nabuurs, S.M.; Westphal, A.H.; Toorn, aan den M.; Lindhoud, S.; Mierlo, van C.P.M.

    2009-01-01

    Partially folded protein species transiently exist during folding of most proteins. Often these species are molten globules, which may be on- or off-pathway to native protein. Molten globules have a substantial amount of secondary structure but lack virtually all the tertiary side-chain packing char

  5. Personal remarks on the future of protein crystallography and structural biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaskolski, Mariusz

    2010-01-01

    Protein crystallography, the main experimental method of structural biology, has undergone in the recent past three revolutionary changes leading to its unexpected renaissance. They were connected with (i) the introduction of synchrotron radiation sources for X-ray diffraction experiments, (ii) implementation of Se-Met multiwavelength anomalous diffraction (MAD) for phasing, and (iii) initiation of structural genomics (SG) programs. It can be foreseen that in the next 10-15 years protein crystallography will continue to be in this revolutionary phase. We can expect not only an avalanche of protein crystal structures from SG centers, but also attacking of more demanding projects, such as the structure of membrane proteins and of very large macromolecular complexes. On the technological front, the introduction of X-ray radiation from free-electron lasers will revolutionize the experimental possibilities, making feasible even the imaging of single molecules and of intact biological cells.

  6. Remarkable evolutionary relatedness among the enzymes and proteins from the α-amylase family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janeček, Štefan; Gabriško, Marek

    2016-07-01

    The α-amylase is a ubiquitous starch hydrolase catalyzing the cleavage of the α-1,4-glucosidic bonds in an endo-fashion. Various α-amylases originating from different taxonomic sources may differ from each other significantly in their exact substrate preference and product profile. Moreover, it also seems to be clear that at least two different amino acid sequences utilizing two different catalytic machineries have evolved to execute the same α-amylolytic specificity. The two have been classified in the Cabohydrate-Active enZyme database, the CAZy, in the glycoside hydrolase (GH) families GH13 and GH57. While the former and the larger α-amylase family GH13 evidently forms the clan GH-H with the families GH70 and GH77, the latter and the smaller α-amylase family GH57 has only been predicted to maybe define a future clan with the family GH119. Sequences and several tens of enzyme specificities found throughout all three kingdoms in many taxa provide an interesting material for evolutionarily oriented studies that have demonstrated remarkable observations. This review emphasizes just the three of them: (1) a close relatedness between the plant and archaeal α-amylases from the family GH13; (2) a common ancestry in the family GH13 of animal heavy chains of heteromeric amino acid transporter rBAT and 4F2 with the microbial α-glucosidases; and (3) the unique sequence features in the primary structures of amylomaltases from the genus Borrelia from the family GH77. Although the three examples cannot represent an exhaustive list of exceptional topics worth to be interested in, they may demonstrate the importance these enzymes possess in the overall scientific context.

  7. Recruitment of septin cytoskeletal proteins by botulinum toxin A protease determines its remarkable stability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vagin, Olga; Tokhtaeva, Elmira; Garay, Patton E; Souda, Puneet; Bassilian, Sara; Whitelegge, Julian P; Lewis, Ramilla; Sachs, George; Wheeler, Larry; Aoki, Roger; Fernandez-Salas, Ester

    2014-08-01

    Proteolytic cleavage of synaptosomal-associated protein 25 by the light chain of botulinum neurotoxin type A (LCA) results in a blockade of neurotransmitter release that persists for several months in motor neurons. The L428A/L429A mutation in LCA is known to significantly shorten both the proteolytic and neuroparalytic effects of the neurotoxin in mice. To elucidate the cellular mechanism for LCA longevity, we studied the effects of L428A/L429A mutation on the interactome, localization and stability of LCA expressed in cultured neuronal cells. Mass spectrometry analysis of the LCA interactome showed that the mutation prevented the interaction of LCA with septins. The wild-type LCA was concentrated in plasma-membrane-associated clusters, colocalizing with septins-2 and septin-7, which accumulated in these clusters only in the presence of LCA. The L428A/L429A mutation decreased co-clustering of LCA and septins and accelerated proteasomal and non-proteasomal degradation of LCA. Similarly, the impairment of septin oligomerization by forchlorfenuron or silencing of septin-2 prevented LCA interaction and clustering with septins and increased LCA degradation. Therefore, the dileucine-mediated LCA-septin co-clustering is crucial for the long-lasting stabilization of LCA-related proteolytic and presumably neuroparalytic activity. © 2014. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  8. Concluding remarks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Patrick, W.C.

    1996-04-01

    This section contains the concluding remarks of the workshop on rock mechanics issues in repository design and performance assessment. Technical issues such as spatial variability of rock properties, rock mass strength, measurement of loads, evaluation of long-term seal performance, and integration of data into design were discussed. Programmatic issues such as development of a coherent and consistent design methodology and implementation of that methodology were also reiterated.

  9. Modeling complexes of modeled proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anishchenko, Ivan; Kundrotas, Petras J; Vakser, Ilya A

    2017-03-01

    Structural characterization of proteins is essential for understanding life processes at the molecular level. However, only a fraction of known proteins have experimentally determined structures. This fraction is even smaller for protein-protein complexes. Thus, structural modeling of protein-protein interactions (docking) primarily has to rely on modeled structures of the individual proteins, which typically are less accurate than the experimentally determined ones. Such "double" modeling is the Grand Challenge of structural reconstruction of the interactome. Yet it remains so far largely untested in a systematic way. We present a comprehensive validation of template-based and free docking on a set of 165 complexes, where each protein model has six levels of structural accuracy, from 1 to 6 Å C(α) RMSD. Many template-based docking predictions fall into acceptable quality category, according to the CAPRI criteria, even for highly inaccurate proteins (5-6 Å RMSD), although the number of such models (and, consequently, the docking success rate) drops significantly for models with RMSD > 4 Å. The results show that the existing docking methodologies can be successfully applied to protein models with a broad range of structural accuracy, and the template-based docking is much less sensitive to inaccuracies of protein models than the free docking. Proteins 2017; 85:470-478. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Simple micromechanical model of protein crystals for their mechanical characterizations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Na S.

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Proteins have been known to perform the excellent mechanical functions and exhibit the remarkable mechanical properties such as high fracture toughness in spider silk protein [1]. This indicates that the mechanical characterization of protein molecules and/or crystals is very essential to understand such remarkable mechanical function of protein molecules. In this study, for gaining insight into mechanical behavior of protein crystals, we developed the micromechanical model by using the empirical potential field prescribed to alpha carbon atoms of a protein crystal in a unit cell. We consider the simple protein crystals for their mechanical behavior under tensile loading to be compared with full atomic models

  11. Protein Models Comparator

    CERN Document Server

    Widera, Paweł

    2011-01-01

    The process of comparison of computer generated protein structural models is an important element of protein structure prediction. It has many uses including model quality evaluation, selection of the final models from a large set of candidates or optimisation of parameters of energy functions used in template free modelling and refinement. Although many protein comparison methods are available online on numerous web servers, their ability to handle a large scale model comparison is often very limited. Most of the servers offer only a single pairwise structural comparison, and they usually do not provide a model-specific comparison with a fixed alignment between the models. To bridge the gap between the protein and model structure comparison we have developed the Protein Models Comparator (pm-cmp). To be able to deliver the scalability on demand and handle large comparison experiments the pm-cmp was implemented "in the cloud". Protein Models Comparator is a scalable web application for a fast distributed comp...

  12. MODELS OF PROTEIN FOLDING

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    Unnati Ahluwalia

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available In an attempt to explore the understanding of protein folding mechanism, various models have been proposed in the literature. Advances in recent experimental and computational techniques rationalized our understanding on some of the fundamental features of the protein folding pathways. The goal of this review is to revisit the various models and outline the essential aspects of the folding reaction.

  13. New porcine test-model reveals remarkable differences between algorithms for spectrophotometrical haemoglobin saturation measurements with VLS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gade, John; Greisen, Gorm

    2016-01-01

    The study created an 'ex vivo' model to test different algorithms for measurements of mucosal haemoglobin saturation with visible light spectrophotometry (VLS). The model allowed comparison between algorithms, but it also allowed comparison with co-oximetry using a 'gold standard' method. This has......  -32.8 to  +29.9 percentage points and from  -5.0 to  +9.2 percentage points, respectively. CONCLUSION: the algorithms showed remarkable in-between differences when tested on raw-spectra from an 'ex vivo' model. All algorithms had bias, more marked at high oxygenation than low oxygenation. Three...

  14. Protein Model Database

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fidelis, K; Adzhubej, A; Kryshtafovych, A; Daniluk, P

    2005-02-23

    The phenomenal success of the genome sequencing projects reveals the power of completeness in revolutionizing biological science. Currently it is possible to sequence entire organisms at a time, allowing for a systemic rather than fractional view of their organization and the various genome-encoded functions. There is an international plan to move towards a similar goal in the area of protein structure. This will not be achieved by experiment alone, but rather by a combination of efforts in crystallography, NMR spectroscopy, and computational modeling. Only a small fraction of structures are expected to be identified experimentally, the remainder to be modeled. Presently there is no organized infrastructure to critically evaluate and present these data to the biological community. The goal of the Protein Model Database project is to create such infrastructure, including (1) public database of theoretically derived protein structures; (2) reliable annotation of protein model quality, (3) novel structure analysis tools, and (4) access to the highest quality modeling techniques available.

  15. Concluding remarks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hafez, E S

    1980-07-01

    Focus in this discussion of IUDs is on types of IUD, fitting and insertion of IUDs, IUD management, physiology of IUDs, IUD pathology and management, and future development of IUDs. Several clinical trials are now underway in the effort to develop an IUD which will be able to lower the rate of pregnancies, expulsions, pain, bleeding, infections and other complications associated with IUD use. The use of proper techniques for insertion and placement of IUDs reduces the risk of uterine perforation, expulsion, pregnancy menstrual bleeding, pain and pelvic inflammatory disease. The device should be placed as high as possible in the endometrial cavity without perforating the uterine wall. In the absence of contraindications, IUDs can be used in adolescent females. The correct model should be selected and adapted individually to the sometimes underdeveloped uterine cavity. Side effects and complications of IUDs include uterine pain, dysfunctional uterine bleeding, expulsions, perforations, pelvic inflammatory disease, accidental intrauterine pregnancy and ectopic pregnancy. Novel approaches for future IUD improvement include medicated IUDs, medicated IUDs with compounds to reduce bleeding, IUDs designed to reduce expulsion after early postpartum and postabortion insertion, improved fit of IUD size and configuration to a given uterus, better insertion techniques and instrumentation, and application of biodegradables and polymeric delivery system.

  16. Some Remarks on the Calibration and Validation of Numerical Water Quality Models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Torben

    1997-01-01

    It is a general experience that complete deterministic water quality models for aquatic systems most often show surprisingly poor agreement when it comes to comparison between model estimates and measurement in the actual system. Often this discrepancy is misunderstood as a lack of complexity and....../or an incomplete formulation of the involved varied processes. But in this introduction to a debate it is argued that the explanation usually lies in the high complexity of the models in relation to the limited data available for the calibration of model constants. Two examples are given....

  17. PREFACE: Introductory remarks Introductory remarks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowler, D. R.; Alfe, D.

    2010-02-01

    This special issue contains papers related to the 2009 Thomas Young Centre Workshop at University College London 'Accessing large length and time scales with accurate quantum methods', in celebration of Professor Michael Gillan's 65th birthday. Mike Gillan won the 2006 Institute of Physics Dirac Medal and Prize, the citation reading: 'For his contributions to the development of atomic-scale computer simulations, which have greatly extended their power and effectiveness over an immense range of applications'. This rightly highlights Mike's seminal work on materials modelling, but misses out some of the many other areas he has enriched. After taking his PhD at the Department of Theoretical Physics, Oxford University, Mike went as a post-doc to Minneapolis. He then joined the Statistical Physics Group in the Theoretical Physics Division, Harwell, where he stayed for over 20 years, with a brief interlude in Saclay. In the late 1980s, Mike made a transition to become Professor of Physics at the University of Keele, where he stayed for a decade until University College London was fortunate in being able to tempt him to join the Condensed Matter and Material Physics Group, where there was already a significant materials modelling initiative. Over the years, Mike has made many important contributions, some with impact on other areas of science, others with significance in technology areas such as nuclear safety. Thus, he developed a form of quantum transition-state theory, generalizing Eyring's well-known classical transition-state theory to the case of quantum particles, such as hydrogen, diffusing in condensed matter. He pioneered quantum methods for calculating defect energetics in solids, and then molecular processes on surfaces. He synthesised these approaches into very general ways to calculate thermodynamic free energies of condensed matter from first principles, drawing on his early experience of statistical physics. These methods led to rapid advances in the study

  18. Some Remarks on the Calibration and Validation of Numerical Water Quality Models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Torben

    1997-01-01

    It is a general experience that complete deterministic water quality models for aquatic systems most often show surprisingly poor agreement when it comes to comparison between model estimates and measurement in the actual system. Often this discrepancy is misunderstood as a lack of complexity and...

  19. Some remarks on one-dimensional models of wave motion in elastic rods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paolo Podio-Guidugli

    1991-05-01

    Full Text Available An exact derivation from three-dimensional elasticity of a model equation for the longitudinal vibrations of a cylindrical elastic rod is presented, based on the results of [1]. Similarities and differences are discussed with the model of [2], whose study strongly motivated the work leading to [1] and opened the way to the present discussion. A difference is that the model of è2+ is not exact, being obtained through a line of reasoning that involves truncated expansions in the radius of the cross section; a similarity is that the resulting equations share the mathematically relevant properties, and describe the same physical phenomenology (in particular, they support traveling wave solutions of the solitary type.

  20. A remark on ground state of boundary Izergin-Korepin model

    CERN Document Server

    Kojima, Takeo

    2011-01-01

    We study the ground state of the boundary Izergin-Korepin model. The boundary Izergin-Korepin model is defined by so-called $R$-matrix and $K$-matrix for $U_q(A_2^{(2)})$ which satisfy Yang-Baxter equation and boundary Yang-Baxter equation respectively. The ground state associated with identity $K$-matrix $K(z)=id$ was constructed in earlier study [Yang and Zhang, Nucl.Phys.B596,495-(2001)]. We construct the free field realization of the ground state associated with nontrivial diagonal $K$-matrix.

  1. Remarks on disorder and aperiodicity in a model for interacting polymers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haddad, T. A. S.; Andrade, R. F. S.; Salinas, S. R.

    2004-12-01

    We present a comparative study of the effects of random and aperiodically distributed interactions on the critical behavior of a model for two interacting polymers on a diamond hierarchical lattice. The problem is formulated in terms of exact renormalization-group (RG) recursion relations. In the disordered case, it is possible to develop a perturbative treatment in order to obtain the fixed points of the moments associated with the random distribution of interactions. Fully uncorrelated disorder may become relevant, driving the system away from a homogeneous fixed point. Layered disorder may lead to a breakdown of the perturbative treatment. In the case of aperiodic interactions, we also show some examples of relevance and irrelevance of geometric fluctuations, and further investigate the models by resorting to an independent transfer-matrix (TM) analysis, which fully corroborates the scaling results.

  2. Remarks on the Standard Model predictions for R (D ) and R (D*)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, C. S.; Lopez-Castro, G.; Tostado, S. L.; Vicente, A.

    2017-01-01

    Semileptonic b →c transitions, and in particular the ratios R (D(*))=Γ/(B →D(*)τ ν ) Γ (B →D(*)ℓν ) , can be used to test the universality of the weak interactions. In light of the recent discrepancies between the experimental measurements of these observables by the BABAR, Belle, and LHCb collaborations and the Standard Model predicted values, we study the robustness of the latter. Our analysis reveals that R (D ) might be enhanced by lepton mass effects associated to the mostly unknown scalar form factor. In contrast, the Standard Model prediction for R (D*) is found to be more robust, because possible pollutions from B* contributions turn out to be negligibly small; this indicates that R (D*) is a promising observable for searches of new physics.

  3. On rapeseed meals. Part XXVI. Some remarks on the biological value of rapeseed meal proteins after silage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borowska, J; Cichon, R; Kozłowska, H; Rutkowski

    1978-01-01

    The influence of propionic bacteria on the biological value of potato-rapeseed meal protein ensilage was investigated. The inoculation of the ensilage with Propionibacterium Petersoni T 112 led to the reduction of the content of goitrogenous compounds (isothiocyanates and oxazolidinethiones) and to an increase of the nutritive value (NPU, PER) of the rapeseed protein. The increase of the protein value is greater by the application of propionic bacteria than by toasting of rapeseed meal.

  4. Remarks on Two-Dimensional Power Correction in Soft Wall Model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HUANG Tao; ZUO Fen

    2008-01-01

    We present a direct derivation of the two-point correlation function of the vector current in the soft wall model by using the AdS/CFT dictionary. The resulting correlator is exactly the same as the one previously obtained from dispersion relation with the same spectral function as in this model. The coeffcient C2 of the two-dimensional power correction is found to be C2 = -c/2 with c the slope of the Regge trajectory, rather than C2 = -c/3 derived from the strategy of the first quantized string theory. Taking the slope of the p trajectory c ≈ 0.9 CeV2 as input, we then obtain C2 ≈ -0.45 GeV2. The gluon condensate is found to be (αsG2) ≈ 0.064 GeV4, which is almost identical to the QCD sum rule estimation. By comparing these two equivalent derivation of the correlator of scalar glueball operator, we demonstrate that the two-dimensionai correction cannot be eliminated by including the non-leading solution in the bulk-to-boundary propagator, as carried out by Colangelo et al.[arXiv:0711.4747].In other words, the two-dimensional correction does exist in the scalar glueball case. Also it is manifest by using the dispersion relation that the minus sign of gluon condensate and violation of the low energy theorem are related to the subtraction scheme.

  5. Some general remarks on hyperplasticity modelling and its extension to partially saturated soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei, Xiaoqin; Wong, Henry; Fabbri, Antonin; Bui, Tuan Anh; Limam, Ali

    2016-06-01

    The essential ideas and equations of classic plasticity and hyperplasticity are successively recalled and compared, in order to highlight their differences and complementarities. The former is based on the mathematical framework proposed by Hill (The mathematical theory of plasticity. Oxford University Press, Oxford, 1950), whereas the latter is founded on the orthogonality hypothesis of Ziegler (An introduction to thermomechanics. Elsevier, North-Holland, 1983). The main drawback of classic plasticity is the possibility of violating the second principle of thermodynamics, while the relative ease to conjecture the yield function in order to approach experimental results is its main advantage. By opposition, the a priori satisfaction of thermodynamic principles constitutes the chief advantage of hyperplasticity theory. Noteworthy is also the fact that this latter approach allows a finer energy partition; in particular, the existence of frozen energy emerges as a natural consequence from its theoretical formulation. On the other hand, the relative difficulty to conjecture an efficient dissipation function to produce accurate predictions is its main drawback. The two theories are thus better viewed as two complementary approaches. Following this comparative study, a methodology to extend the hyperplasticity approach initially developed for dry or saturated materials to the case of partially saturated materials, accounting for interface energies and suction effects, is developed. A particular example based on the yield function of modified Cam-Clay model is then presented. It is shown that the approach developed leads to a model consistent with other existing works.

  6. Remarks on the static potential driven by vacuum nonlinearities in $D=3$ models

    CERN Document Server

    Gaete, Patricio

    2016-01-01

    Within the framework of the gauge-invariant, but path-dependent, variables formalism, we study the manifestations of vacuum electromagnetic nonlinearities in $D=3$ models. For this we consider both generalized Born-Infeld and Pagels-Tomboulis-like electrodynamics, as well as, an Euler-Heisenberg-like electrodynamics. We explicitly show that generalized Born-Infeld and Pagels-Tomboulis-like electrodynamics are equivalent, where the static potential profile contains a long-range (${\\raise0.5ex\\hbox{$\\scriptstyle 1$}\\kern-0.1em/\\kern-0.15em\\lower0.25ex\\hbox{$\\scriptstyle {{r^2}}$}}$-type) correction to the Coulomb potential. Interestingly enough, for an Euler-Heisenberg-like electrodynamics the interaction energy contains a linear potential, leading to the confinement of static charges.

  7. Remarks on Vortex-like Solutions in Topologically Massive Planar Abelian Gauge Models

    CERN Document Server

    Colatto, L P; Hott, M B; Moura-Melo, W A; Moura-Melo, Winder A.

    2003-01-01

    We study vortex-like configurations in planar Abelian gauge models that include a Chern-Simons term. In pure Chern-Simons Electrodynamics, for instance, such objects appear as point-like magnetic vortices. Then, although giving rise to finite flux, they yield divergent magnetic energy. As it is well-known, such a scenario is deeply changed whenever Higgs mechanism takes place and local symmetry is spontaneously broken down. Now, soliton-like configurations carry finite energy, as well. On the other hand, even in the simpler, say, Maxwell-Chern-Simons framework, the dynamical (Maxwell) term is shown to modify the point-like structure of the pure Chern-Simons vortices. Indeed, we have seen that the magnetic field naturally acquires a smooth behavior (quite similar to the Nielsen-Olensen solution in (3+1) dimensions), providing finite magnetic flux and energy for this sort of vortex. It is also identified a ``magnetic symmetry'' between a point-like charge and an azytmuthal-type current: namely, these configurat...

  8. Remarkable preservation of microbial mats in Neoproterozoic siliciclastic settings: Implications for Ediacaran taphonomic models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Callow, Richard H. T.; Brasier, Martin D.

    2009-10-01

    It is beyond doubt that the appearance of infaunal bioturbation and metazoan biomineralization across the Ediacaran-Cambrian transition irreversibly affected the nature of marine sediment architecture and biogeochemistry. Here we review those changes in relation to their likely effect upon the processes of fossil preservation, especially within siliciclastic sediments. Processes of soft-tissue preservation in siliciclastic settings from the Ediacaran Period, including microbes and microbial mats as well as Ediacaran macrofossils, are here reviewed within this context. Highlighted examples include the exceptional preservation of microbes found in association with wrinkle structures and Ediacaran macrofossils in England and Newfoundland (replicated by silicate minerals) and in the White Sea region of Russia (replicated by iron sulphide). These occurrences show that soft-tissue preservation in siliciclastic settings went well beyond that typical for Ediacaran macrofossils alone and also extended to similar modes of preservation in associated microbes. Using these new observations it can be argued that several existing explanations for Ediacaran fossil preservation can be united within a biogeochemical model that involves evolution of the sediment mixed layer across this transition.

  9. Modeling Mercury in Proteins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, Jeremy C [ORNL; Parks, Jerry M [ORNL

    2016-01-01

    Mercury (Hg) is a naturally occurring element that is released into the biosphere both by natural processes and anthropogenic activities. Although its reduced, elemental form Hg(0) is relatively non-toxic, other forms such as Hg2+ and, in particular, its methylated form, methylmercury, are toxic, with deleterious effects on both ecosystems and humans. Microorganisms play important roles in the transformation of mercury in the environment. Inorganic Hg2+ can be methylated by certain bacteria and archaea to form methylmercury. Conversely, bacteria also demethylate methylmercury and reduce Hg2+ to relatively inert Hg(0). Transformations and toxicity occur as a result of mercury interacting with various proteins. Clearly, then, understanding the toxic effects of mercury and its cycling in the environment requires characterization of these interactions. Computational approaches are ideally suited to studies of mercury in proteins because they can provide a detailed picture and circumvent issues associated with toxicity. Here we describe computational methods for investigating and characterizing how mercury binds to proteins, how inter- and intra-protein transfer of mercury is orchestrated in biological systems, and how chemical reactions in proteins transform the metal. We describe quantum chemical analyses of aqueous Hg(II), which reveal critical factors that determine ligand binding propensities. We then provide a perspective on how we used chemical reasoning to discover how microorganisms methylate mercury. We also highlight our combined computational and experimental studies of the proteins and enzymes of the mer operon, a suite of genes that confers mercury resistance in many bacteria. Lastly, we place work on mercury in proteins in the context of what is needed for a comprehensive multi-scale model of environmental mercury cycling.

  10. Multiscale modeling of proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tozzini, Valentina

    2010-02-16

    The activity within a living cell is based on a complex network of interactions among biomolecules, exchanging information and energy through biochemical processes. These events occur on different scales, from the nano- to the macroscale, spanning about 10 orders of magnitude in the space domain and 15 orders of magnitude in the time domain. Consequently, many different modeling techniques, each proper for a particular time or space scale, are commonly used. In addition, a single process often spans more than a single time or space scale. Thus, the necessity arises for combining the modeling techniques in multiscale approaches. In this Account, I first review the different modeling methods for bio-systems, from quantum mechanics to the coarse-grained and continuum-like descriptions, passing through the atomistic force field simulations. Special attention is devoted to their combination in different possible multiscale approaches and to the questions and problems related to their coherent matching in the space and time domains. These aspects are often considered secondary, but in fact, they have primary relevance when the aim is the coherent and complete description of bioprocesses. Subsequently, applications are illustrated by means of two paradigmatic examples: (i) the green fluorescent protein (GFP) family and (ii) the proteins involved in the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) replication cycle. The GFPs are currently one of the most frequently used markers for monitoring protein trafficking within living cells; nanobiotechnology and cell biology strongly rely on their use in fluorescence microscopy techniques. A detailed knowledge of the actions of the virus-specific enzymes of HIV (specifically HIV protease and integrase) is necessary to study novel therapeutic strategies against this disease. Thus, the insight accumulated over years of intense study is an excellent framework for this Account. The foremost relevance of these two biomolecular systems was

  11. The Autistic Phenotype Exhibits a Remarkably Localized Modification of Brain Protein by Products of Free Radical-Induced Lipid Oxidation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teresa A. Evans

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Oxidative damage has been documented in the peripheral tissues of autism patients. In this study, we sought evidence of oxidative injury in autistic brain. Carboxyethyl pyrrole (CEP and iso[4]levuglandin (iso[4]LGE2-protein adducts, that are uniquely generated through peroxidation of docosahexaenoate and arachidonate-containing lipids respectively, and heme oxygenase-1 were detected immunocytochemically in cortical brain tissues and by ELISA in blood plasma. Significant immunoreactivity toward all three of these markers of oxidative damage in the white matter and often extending well into the grey matter of axons was found in every case of autism examined. This striking threadlike pattern appears to be a hallmark of the autistic brain as it was not seen in any control brain, young or aged, used as controls for the oxidative assays. Western blot and immunoprecipitation analysis confirmed neurofilament heavy chain to be a major target of CEP-modification. In contrast, in plasma from 27 autism spectrum disorder patients and 11 age-matched healthy controls we found similar levels of plasma CEP (124.5 ± 57.9 versus 110.4 ± 30.3 pmol/mL, iso[4]LGE2 protein adducts (16.7 ± 5.8 versus 13.4 ± 3.4 nmol/mL, anti-CEP (1.2 ± 0.7 versus 1.2 ± 0.3 and anti-iso[4]LGE2 autoantibody titre (1.3 ± 1.6 versus 1.0 ± 0.9, and no differences between the ratio of NO2Tyr/Tyr (7.81 E-06 ± 3.29 E-06 versus 7.87 E-06 ± 1.62 E-06. These findings provide the first direct evidence of increased oxidative stress in the autistic brain. It seems likely that oxidative injury of proteins in the brain would be associated with neurological abnormalities and provide a cellular basis at the root of autism spectrum disorders.

  12. Ozonation of Human Blood Induces a Remarkable Upregulation of Heme Oxygenase-1 and Heat Stress Protein-70

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Velio Bocci

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Heme oxygenase-I (HO-1 has emerged as one of the most protective enzymes and its pleiotropic activities have been demonstrated in a variety of human pathologies. Unpublished observations have shown that HO-1 is induced after the infusion of ozonated blood into the respective donors, and many other experimental observations have demonstrated the efficacy of oxidizing agents. It appeared worthwhile to evaluate whether we could better define the activity of potential inducers such as hydrogen peroxide and ozonated human plasma. Human vascular endothelial cells at confluence were challenged with different concentrations of these inducers and the simultaneous production of nitric oxide (NO; and HO-1 was measured by either measuring nitrite, or bilirubin formation, or/and the immune reactivity of the protein by Western blot using a rabbit antihuman HO-1 and Hsp-70. The results show that production of both NO and HO-1 is fairly dose dependent but is particularly elevated using human plasma after transient exposure to a medium ozone concentration. At this concentration, there is also induction of Hsp-70. The results clarify another positive effect achievable by the use of ozone therapy.

  13. Co-stimulation with bone morphogenetic protein-9 and FK506 induces remarkable osteoblastic differentiation in rat dedifferentiated fat cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Toshiaki; Shinohara, Yukiya; Momozaki, Sawako; Yoshimoto, Takehiko; Noguchi, Kazuyuki

    2013-10-18

    Dedifferentiated fat (DFAT) cells, which are isolated from mature adipocytes using the ceiling culture method, exhibit similar characteristics to mesenchymal stem cells, and possess adipogenic, osteogenic, chondrogenic, and myogenic potentials. Bone morphogenetic protein (BMP)-2 and -9, members of the transforming growth factor-β superfamily, exhibit the most potent osteogenic activity of this growth factor family. However, the effects of BMP-2 and BMP-9 on the osteogenic differentiation of DFAT remain unknown. Here, we examined the effects of BMP-2 and BMP-9 on osteoblastic differentiation of rat DFAT (rDFAT) cells in the presence or absence of FK506, an immunosuppressive agent. Co-stimulation with BMP-9 and FK506 induced gene expression of runx2, osterix, and bone sialoprotein, and ALP activity compared with BMP-9 alone, BMP-2 alone and BMP-2+FK506 in rDFAT cells. Furthermore, it caused mineralization of cultures and phosphorylation of smad1/5/8, compared with BMP-9 alone. The ALP activity induced by BMP-9+FK506 was not influenced by addition of noggin, a BMP antagonist. Our data suggest that the combination of BMP-9 and FK506 potently induces osteoblastic differentiation of rDFAT cells.

  14. Oxytocin receptor gene sequences in owl monkeys and other primates show remarkable interspecific regulatory and protein coding variation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babb, Paul L; Fernandez-Duque, Eduardo; Schurr, Theodore G

    2015-10-01

    The oxytocin (OT) hormone pathway is involved in numerous physiological processes, and one of its receptor genes (OXTR) has been implicated in pair bonding behavior in mammalian lineages. This observation is important for understanding social monogamy in primates, which occurs in only a small subset of taxa, including Azara's owl monkey (Aotus azarae). To examine the potential relationship between social monogamy and OXTR variation, we sequenced its 5' regulatory (4936bp) and coding (1167bp) regions in 25 owl monkeys from the Argentinean Gran Chaco, and examined OXTR sequences from 1092 humans from the 1000 Genomes Project. We also assessed interspecific variation of OXTR in 25 primate and rodent species that represent a set of phylogenetically and behaviorally disparate taxa. Our analysis revealed substantial variation in the putative 5' regulatory region of OXTR, with marked structural differences across primate taxa, particularly for humans and chimpanzees, which exhibited unique patterns of large motifs of dinucleotide A+T repeats upstream of the OXTR 5' UTR. In addition, we observed a large number of amino acid substitutions in the OXTR CDS region among New World primate taxa that distinguish them from Old World primates. Furthermore, primate taxa traditionally defined as socially monogamous (e.g., gibbons, owl monkeys, titi monkeys, and saki monkeys) all exhibited different amino acid motifs for their respective OXTR protein coding sequences. These findings support the notion that monogamy has evolved independently in Old World and New World primates, and that it has done so through different molecular mechanisms, not exclusively through the oxytocin pathway.

  15. Graphite oxide/metal-organic framework (MIL-101): remarkable performance in the adsorptive denitrogenation of model fuels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Imteaz; Khan, Nazmul Abedin; Jhung, Sung Hwa

    2013-12-16

    A highly porous metal-organic framework (MOF), MIL-101 (Cr-benzenedicarboxylate), was synthesized in the presence of graphite oxide (GO) to produce GO/MIL-101 composites. The porosity of the composites increased remarkably in the presence of a small amount of GO (adsorptions. The adsorptive removal of nitrogen-containing compounds (NCCs) and sulfur-containing compounds (SCCs) from model fuels demonstrated the potential applications of the composites in adsorptions, and the adsorption capacity was dependent on the surface area and pore volume of the composites. Most importantly, the GO/MIL-101 composite has the highest adsorption capacity for NCCs among reported adsorbents so far, partly because of the increased porosity of the composite. Finally, the results suggest that GO could be used in the synthesis of highly porous MOF composites, and the obtained materials could be used in various adsorptions in both liquid and gas/vapor phase (such as H2, CH4, and CO2 storage) adsorptions, because of the high porosity and functional GO.

  16. Modelling of proteins in membranes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sperotto, Maria Maddalena; May, S.; Baumgaertner, A.

    2006-01-01

    This review describes some recent theories and simulations of mesoscopic and microscopic models of lipid membranes with embedded or attached proteins. We summarize results supporting our understanding of phenomena for which the activities of proteins in membranes are expected to be significantly...... affected by the lipid environment. Theoretical predictions are pointed out, and compared to experimental findings, if available. Among others, the following phenomena are discussed: interactions of interfacially adsorbed peptides, pore-forming amphipathic peptides, adsorption of charged proteins onto...... oppositely charged lipid membranes, lipid-induced tilting of proteins embedded in lipid bilayers, protein-induced bilayer deformations, protein insertion and assembly, and lipid-controlled functioning of membrane proteins....

  17. Chaos game representation walk model for the protein sequences

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Gao Jie; Jiang Li-Li; Xu Zhen-Yuan

    2009-01-01

    A new chaos game representation of protein sequences based on the detailed hydrophobic-hydrophilic(HP)model has been proposed by Yu et al(Physica A 337(2004)171). A CGR-walk model is proposed based on the new CGR coordinates for the protein sequences from complete genomes in the present paper. The new CGR coordinates based on the detailed HP model are converted into a time series, and a long-memory ARFIMA(p, d, q)model is introduced into the protein sequence analysis. This model is applied to simulating real CGR-walk sequence data of twelve protein sequences. Remarkably long-range correlations are uncovered in the data and the results obtained from these models are reasonably coneistent with those available from the ARFIMA(p, d, q)model.

  18. The remarkable similarity between the acid-base properties of ISFETs and proteins and the consequences for the design of ISFET biosensors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bergveld, Piet; van Hal, R.E.G.; van Hal, R.E.G.; Eijkel, Jan C.T.

    1995-01-01

    Studying the acid-base properties of protein molecules led us to reconsider the operational mechanism of ISFETs. Based on the site-dissociation model, applied to the amphoteric metal oxide gate materials used in ISFETs, the sensitivity of ISFETs is described in terms of the intrinsic buffer capacity

  19. Comparative Protein Structure Modeling Using MODELLER.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webb, Benjamin; Sali, Andrej

    2016-06-20

    Comparative protein structure modeling predicts the three-dimensional structure of a given protein sequence (target) based primarily on its alignment to one or more proteins of known structure (templates). The prediction process consists of fold assignment, target-template alignment, model building, and model evaluation. This unit describes how to calculate comparative models using the program MODELLER and how to use the ModBase database of such models, and discusses all four steps of comparative modeling, frequently observed errors, and some applications. Modeling lactate dehydrogenase from Trichomonas vaginalis (TvLDH) is described as an example. The download and installation of the MODELLER software is also described. © 2016 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  20. Modelling of proteins in membranes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sperotto, Maria Maddalena; May, S.; Baumgaertner, A.

    2006-01-01

    This review describes some recent theories and simulations of mesoscopic and microscopic models of lipid membranes with embedded or attached proteins. We summarize results supporting our understanding of phenomena for which the activities of proteins in membranes are expected to be significantly ...

  1. Coarse-grain modelling of protein-protein interactions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baaden, Marc; Marrink, Siewert J.

    2013-01-01

    Here, we review recent advances towards the modelling of protein-protein interactions (PPI) at the coarse-grained (CG) level, a technique that is now widely used to understand protein affinity, aggregation and self-assembly behaviour. PPI models of soluble proteins and membrane proteins are separate

  2. α-MHC MitoTimer mouse: In vivo mitochondrial turnover model reveals remarkable mitochondrial heterogeneity in the heart.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stotland, Aleksandr; Gottlieb, Roberta A

    2016-01-01

    In order to maintain an efficient, energy-producing network in the heart, dysfunctional mitochondria are cleared through the mechanism of autophagy, which is closely linked with mitochondrial biogenesis; these, together with fusion and fission comprise a crucial process known as mitochondrial turnover. Until recently, the lack of molecular tools and methods available to researchers has impeded in vivo investigations of turnover. To investigate the process at the level of a single mitochondrion, our laboratory has developed the MitoTimer protein. Timer is a mutant of DsRed fluorescent protein characterized by transition from green fluorescence to a more stable red conformation over 48 h, and its rate of maturation is stable under physiological conditions. We fused the Timer cDNA with the inner mitochondrial membrane signal sequence and placed it under the control of a cardiac-restricted promoter. This construct was used to create the alpha-MHC-MitoTimer mice. Surprisingly, initial analysis of the hearts from these mice demonstrated a high degree of heterogeneity in the ratio of red-to-green fluorescence of MitoTimer in cardiac tissue. Further, scattered solitary mitochondria within cardiomyocytes display a much higher red-to-green fluorescence (red-shifted) relative to other mitochondria in the cell, implying a block in import of newly synthesized MitoTimer likely due to lower membrane potential. These red-shifted mitochondria may represent older, senescent mitochondria. Concurrently, the cardiomyocytes also contain a subpopulation of mitochondria that display a lower red-to-green fluorescence (green-shifted) relative to other mitochondria, indicative of germinal mitochondria that are actively engaged in import of newly-synthesized mito-targeted proteins. These mitochondria can be isolated and sorted from the heart by flow cytometry for further analysis. Initial studies suggest that these mice represent an elegant tool for the investigation of mitochondrial turnover

  3. The remarkable Dr Robertson

    OpenAIRE

    Hammarton, Tansy C.

    2016-01-01

    Muriel Robertson (1883–1973) was a pioneering protozoologist who made a staggering number of important contributions to the fields of parasitology, bacteriology and immunology during her career, which spanned nearly 60 years. These contributions were all the more remarkable given the scientific and social times in which she worked. While Muriel is perhaps best known for her work on the life cycle and transmission of the African trypanosome, Trypanosoma brucei, which she carried out in Uganda ...

  4. Small and remarkable: The Micro-Tom model system as a tool to discover novel hormonal functions and interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campos, Marcelo Lattarulo; Carvalho, Rogério Falleiros; Benedito, Vagner Augusto; Peres, Lázaro Eustáquio Pereira

    2010-03-01

    Hormones are molecules involved in virtually every step of plant development and studies in this field have been shaping plant physiology for more than a century. The model plant Arabidopsis thaliana, long used as a tool to study plant hormones, lacks significant important developmental traits, such as fleshy climacteric fruit, compound leaf and multicellular trichomes, suggesting the necessity for alternative plant models. An attractive option often used is tomato, a species also of major economic importance, being ideal to bring together basic and applied plant sciences. The tomato Micro-Tom (MT) cultivar makes it possible to combine the direct benefits of studying a crop species with the fast life cycle and small size required for a suitable biological model. However, few obscure questions are constantly addressed to MT, creating a process herein called "MT mystification". In this work we present evidence clarifying these questions and show the potential of MT, aiming to demystify it. To corroborate our ideas we showed that, by making use of MT, our laboratory demonstrated straightforwardly new hormonal functions and also characterized a novel antagonistic hormonal interaction between jasmonates and brassinosteroids in the formation of anti-herbivory traits in tomato.

  5. A coarse grain model for protein-surface interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Shuai; Knotts, Thomas A.

    2013-09-01

    The interaction of proteins with surfaces is important in numerous applications in many fields—such as biotechnology, proteomics, sensors, and medicine—but fundamental understanding of how protein stability and structure are affected by surfaces remains incomplete. Over the last several years, molecular simulation using coarse grain models has yielded significant insights, but the formalisms used to represent the surface interactions have been rudimentary. We present a new model for protein surface interactions that incorporates the chemical specificity of both the surface and the residues comprising the protein in the context of a one-bead-per-residue, coarse grain approach that maintains computational efficiency. The model is parameterized against experimental adsorption energies for multiple model peptides on different types of surfaces. The validity of the model is established by its ability to quantitatively and qualitatively predict the free energy of adsorption and structural changes for multiple biologically-relevant proteins on different surfaces. The validation, done with proteins not used in parameterization, shows that the model produces remarkable agreement between simulation and experiment.

  6. Remarkable increase in 14C-acetate uptake in an epilepsy model rat brain induced by lithium-pilocarpine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosoi, Rie; Kitano, Daisuke; Momosaki, Sotaro; Kuse, Kenji; Gee, Antony; Inoue, Osamu

    2010-01-22

    The present study demonstrates changes in rat brain glial metabolism during the acute phase of epilepsy. Status epilepticus (SE) was induced using the lithium-pilocarpine model. Glial metabolism was measured with (14)C-acetate. Local cerebral blood flow and glucose metabolism were also measured using (14)C-N-isopropyl-p-iodoamphetamine (IMP) and (14)C-2-deoxyglucose (2DG), respectively. At the initiation of the seizure, (14)C-acetate uptake did not change significantly. However, a marked increase was observed 2 h after the pilocarpine injection in all brain regions studied. The increase of brain uptake was transient, and the maximum enhancement was seen at 2 h after the pilocarpine injection. The increase of (14)C-acetate uptake was almost to the same degree in all regions, whereas (14)C-IMP and (14)C-2DG uptakes showed a heterogeneous increase. In the case of (14)C-IMP, the highest increase was observed in the thalamus (280%), and a moderate increase (120 to 150%) was seen in the orbital cortex, cingulate cortex and pyriform cortex. (14)C-2DG uptake increased by 130 to 240% in most regions of the brain, however, an increase of only 40 and 20% was observed in the cerebellum and pons-medulla, respectively. These results demonstrated that glial energy metabolism was markedly enhanced during a prolonged seizure. To our knowledge, this study is the first observation showing large and widespread glial metabolic increases in the rat brain during status epilepticus.

  7. Seven remarkable days

    CERN Multimedia

    This has been a truly remarkable seven days for CERN. Things have moved so fast that it has sometimes been hard to separate fact from fiction – all the more so since facts have often seemed too good to be true. It’s been a week of many firsts. Monday was the first time we’ve had two captured beams in the LHC. It’s the first time the LHC has functioned as a particle accelerator, boosting particles to the highest beam energy so far achieved at CERN. And it’s been a week in which we’ve seen the highest energy proton-proton collisions ever produced at CERN: our last hadron collider, the SPS was a proton-antiproton collider, a technically simpler machine than the LHC. This week’s successes are all the more remarkable precisely because of the complexity of the LHC. Unlike the SPS collider, it is two accelerators not one, making the job of commissioning nearly twice as difficult. I’d like to express my heartfelt thanks and congra...

  8. Molecular modeling of protein materials: case study of elastin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarakanova, Anna; Buehler, Markus J.

    2013-09-01

    Molecular modeling of protein materials is a quickly growing area of research that has produced numerous contributions in fields ranging from structural engineering to medicine and biology. We review here the history and methods commonly employed in molecular modeling of protein materials, emphasizing the advantages for using modeling as a complement to experimental work. We then consider a case study of the protein elastin, a critically important ‘mechanical protein’ to exemplify the approach in an area where molecular modeling has made a significant impact. We outline the progression of computational modeling studies that have considerably enhanced our understanding of this important protein which endows elasticity and recoil to the tissues it is found in, including the skin, lungs, arteries and the heart. A vast collection of literature has been directed at studying the structure and function of this protein for over half a century, the first molecular dynamics study of elastin being reported in the 1980s. We review the pivotal computational works that have considerably enhanced our fundamental understanding of elastin's atomistic structure and its extraordinary qualities—focusing on two in particular: elastin's superb elasticity and the inverse temperature transition—the remarkable ability of elastin to take on a more structured conformation at higher temperatures, suggesting its effectiveness as a biomolecular switch. Our hope is to showcase these methods as both complementary and enriching to experimental approaches that have thus far dominated the study of most protein-based materials.

  9. Computational modeling of membrane proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koehler Leman, Julia; Ulmschneider, Martin B; Gray, Jeffrey J

    2015-01-01

    The determination of membrane protein (MP) structures has always trailed that of soluble proteins due to difficulties in their overexpression, reconstitution into membrane mimetics, and subsequent structure determination. The percentage of MP structures in the protein databank (PDB) has been at a constant 1-2% for the last decade. In contrast, over half of all drugs target MPs, only highlighting how little we understand about drug-specific effects in the human body. To reduce this gap, researchers have attempted to predict structural features of MPs even before the first structure was experimentally elucidated. In this review, we present current computational methods to predict MP structure, starting with secondary structure prediction, prediction of trans-membrane spans, and topology. Even though these methods generate reliable predictions, challenges such as predicting kinks or precise beginnings and ends of secondary structure elements are still waiting to be addressed. We describe recent developments in the prediction of 3D structures of both α-helical MPs as well as β-barrels using comparative modeling techniques, de novo methods, and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. The increase of MP structures has (1) facilitated comparative modeling due to availability of more and better templates, and (2) improved the statistics for knowledge-based scoring functions. Moreover, de novo methods have benefited from the use of correlated mutations as restraints. Finally, we outline current advances that will likely shape the field in the forthcoming decade.

  10. Remarks on Higgs Inflation

    CERN Document Server

    Atkins, Michael

    2010-01-01

    We discuss models where the Higgs boson of the electroweak standard model plays the role of the inflaton. We focus on the question of the violation of perturbative unitarity due to the coupling of the Higgs boson either to the Ricci scalar or to the Einstein tensor and discuss the background dependence of the unitarity bounds. Our conclusion is that the simplest model which restricts itself to the standard model Higgs boson without introducing further degrees of freedom has a serious problem. However, in the asymptotically safe gravity scenario, the Higgs boson of the standard model could be the inflaton and no physics beyond the standard model is required to explain both inflation and the spontaneous breaking of the electroweak symmetry of the standard model.

  11. Protein-binding site prediction based on three-dimensional protein modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Mina; Joo, Keehyoung; Lee, Jooyoung

    2009-01-01

    Structural information of a protein can guide one to understand the function of the protein, and ligand binding is one of the major biochemical functions of proteins. We have applied a two-stage template-based ligand binding site prediction method to CASP8 targets and achieved high quality results with accuracy/coverage = 70/80 (LEE). First, templates are used for protein structure modeling and then for binding site prediction by structural clustering of ligand-containing templates to the predicted protein model. Remarkably, the results are only a few percent worse than those one can obtain from native structures, which were available only after the prediction. Prediction was performed without knowing identity of ligands, and consequently, in many cases the ligand molecules used for prediction were different from the actual ligands, and yet we find that the prediction was quite successful. The current approach can be easily combined with experiments to investigate protein activities in a systematic way. Copyright 2009 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  12. A remarkable age-related increase in SIRT1 protein expression against oxidative stress in elderly: SIRT1 gene variants and longevity in human.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ulkan Kilic

    Full Text Available Aging is defined as the accumulation of progressive organ dysfunction. Controlling the rate of aging by clarifying the complex pathways has a significant clinical importance. Nowadays, sirtuins have become famous molecules for slowing aging and decreasing age-related disorders. In the present study, we analyzed the SIRT1 gene polymorphisms (rs7895833 A>G, rs7069102 C>G and rs2273773 C>T and its relation with levels of SIRT1, eNOS, PON-1, cholesterol, TAS, TOS, and OSI to demonstrate the association between genetic variation in SIRT1 and phenotype at different ages in humans. We observed a significant increase in the SIRT1 level in older people and found a significant positive correlation between SIRT1 level and age in the overall studied population. The oldest people carrying AG genotypes for rs7895833 have the highest SIRT1 level suggesting an association between rs7895833 SNP and lifespan longevity. Older people have lower PON-1 levels than those of adults and children which may explain the high levels of SIRT1 protein as a compensatory mechanism for oxidative stress in the elderly. The eNOS protein level was significantly decreased in older people as compared to adults. There was no significant difference in the eNOS level between older people and children. The current study is the first to demonstrate age-related changes in SIRT1 levels in humans and it is important for a much better molecular understanding of the role of the longevity gene SIRT1 and its protein product in aging. It is also the first study presenting the association between SIRT1 expression in older people and rs7895833 in SIRT1 gene.

  13. A Remarkable Age-Related Increase in SIRT1 Protein Expression against Oxidative Stress in Elderly: SIRT1 Gene Variants and Longevity in Human

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilic, Ulkan; Gok, Ozlem; Erenberk, Ufuk; Dundaroz, Mehmet Rusen; Torun, Emel; Kucukardali, Yasar; Elibol-Can, Birsen; Uysal, Omer; Dundar, Tolga

    2015-01-01

    Aging is defined as the accumulation of progressive organ dysfunction. Controlling the rate of aging by clarifying the complex pathways has a significant clinical importance. Nowadays, sirtuins have become famous molecules for slowing aging and decreasing age-related disorders. In the present study, we analyzed the SIRT1 gene polymorphisms (rs7895833 A>G, rs7069102 C>G and rs2273773 C>T) and its relation with levels of SIRT1, eNOS, PON-1, cholesterol, TAS, TOS, and OSI to demonstrate the association between genetic variation in SIRT1 and phenotype at different ages in humans. We observed a significant increase in the SIRT1 level in older people and found a significant positive correlation between SIRT1 level and age in the overall studied population. The oldest people carrying AG genotypes for rs7895833 have the highest SIRT1 level suggesting an association between rs7895833 SNP and lifespan longevity. Older people have lower PON-1 levels than those of adults and children which may explain the high levels of SIRT1 protein as a compensatory mechanism for oxidative stress in the elderly. The eNOS protein level was significantly decreased in older people as compared to adults. There was no significant difference in the eNOS level between older people and children. The current study is the first to demonstrate age-related changes in SIRT1 levels in humans and it is important for a much better molecular understanding of the role of the longevity gene SIRT1 and its protein product in aging. It is also the first study presenting the association between SIRT1 expression in older people and rs7895833 in SIRT1 gene. PMID:25785999

  14. Fragment library screening reveals remarkable similarities between the G protein-coupled receptor histamine H₄ and the ion channel serotonin 5-HT₃A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verheij, Mark H P; de Graaf, Chris; de Kloe, Gerdien E; Nijmeijer, Saskia; Vischer, Henry F; Smits, Rogier A; Zuiderveld, Obbe P; Hulscher, Saskia; Silvestri, Linda; Thompson, Andrew J; van Muijlwijk-Koezen, Jacqueline E; Lummis, Sarah C R; Leurs, Rob; de Esch, Iwan J P

    2011-09-15

    A fragment library was screened against the G protein-coupled histamine H(4) receptor (H(4)R) and the ligand-gated ion channel serotonin 5-HT(3A) (5-HT(3A)R). Interestingly, significant overlap was found between H(4)R and 5-HT(3A)R hit sets. The data indicates that dual active H(4)R and 5 HT(3A)R fragments have a higher complexity than the selective compounds which has important implications for chemical genomics approaches. The results of our fragment-based library screening study illustrate similarities in ligand recognition between H(4)R and 5-HT(3A)R and have important consequences for selectivity profiling in ongoing drug discovery efforts on H(4)R and 5-HT(3A)R. The affinity profiles of our fragment screening studies furthermore match the chemical properties of the H(4)R and 5-HT(3A)R binding sites and can be used to define molecular interaction fingerprints to guide the in silico prediction of protein-ligand interactions and structure.

  15. One remarkable molecule: filaggrin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Sara J; McLean, W H Irwin

    2012-03-01

    The discovery, in 2006, that loss-of-function mutations in the filaggrin (FLG) gene are the cause of ichthyosis vulgaris-the most common disorder of keratinization-and also a strong genetic risk factor for atopic eczema, marked a significant breakthrough in the understanding of eczema pathogenesis. Subsequent investigations of the role of FLG-null mutations have identified a series of significant associations with atopic disease phenotypes, including atopic asthma, allergic rhinitis, and peanut allergy. However, many questions remain to be answered in relation to the precise mechanisms by which deficiency of an intracellular protein expressed primarily in the differentiating epidermis may contribute to the development of cutaneous and systemic pathology. This review aims to highlight the key milestones in filaggrin research over the past 25 years, to discuss the mechanistic, clinical, and therapeutic implications, and to consider possible future directions for ongoing investigation.

  16. Remarkable evolutionary conservation of SOX14 orthologues

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Jelena Popovic; Milena Stevanovic

    2009-04-01

    SOX proteins constitute a large family of diverse, well-conserved transcription factors present in vertebrates and invertebrates, and also implicated in control of many developmental processes. Our objectives have been to identify Sox14 gene of goat (Capra hircus), cow (Bos taurus) and rat (Rattus norvegicus), and to perform comparative analyses and mapping of SOX14 orthologues from numerous vertebrate species. PCR based approach was used to identify Sox14 of goat, cow and rat, while nucleotide and amino acid sequence alignments and mapping were performed using information currently available in public database. Comparative sequence analysis revealed remarkable identity among Sox14 orthologues and helped us to identify highly conserved motifs that represent molecular signatures of SOX14 protein that might have structural or functional significance. Further, we determined chromosomal locations of numerous predicted group B Sox genes and their neighbouring genes using currently available genome database. In conclusion, our study has not only supported the proposed model of group B Sox genes evolution in chicken and mammals, but has also revealed that additional evolutionary events split Sox B genes into different chromosomes in some mammals. Mapping data presented in this study could help in refining the understanding of the evolution of group B Sox genes in vertebrates.

  17. ER reorganization is remarkably induced in COS-7 cells accumulating transmembrane protein receptors not competent for export from the endoplasmic reticulum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Agostino, Massimo; Crespi, Arianna; Polishchuk, Elena; Generoso, Serena; Martire, Gianluca; Colombo, Sara Francesca; Bonatti, Stefano

    2014-11-01

    The newly synthesized mutant L501fsX533 Frizzled-4 form and the alpha3beta4 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor expressed in the absence of nicotine accumulate in the endoplasmic reticulum of COS-7 cells and induce the formation of large areas of smooth and highly convoluted cisternae. This results in a generalized block of the transport to the Golgi complex of newly synthesized proteins. Intriguingly, both effects happen peculiarly in COS-7 cells; HeLa, Huh-7, and HEK293 cells expressing the two receptors at similar level than COS-7 cells show normal ER and normal transport toward the plasma membrane. These results question the conclusion that a dominant-negative mechanism would explain the dominance of the mutant L501fsX533 Fz4 allele in the transmission of a form of Familial exudative vitreoretinopathy. Moreover, they indicate that the coordination of endoplasmic reticulum homeostasis in COS-7 cells is particularly error prone. This finding suggests that COS-7 cells may be extremely useful to study the molecular mechanisms regulating endoplasmic reticulum size and architecture.

  18. Information-driven structural modelling of protein-protein interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, João P G L M; Karaca, Ezgi; Bonvin, Alexandre M J J

    2015-01-01

    Protein-protein docking aims at predicting the three-dimensional structure of a protein complex starting from the free forms of the individual partners. As assessed in the CAPRI community-wide experiment, the most successful docking algorithms combine pure laws of physics with information derived from various experimental or bioinformatics sources. Of these so-called "information-driven" approaches, HADDOCK stands out as one of the most successful representatives. In this chapter, we briefly summarize which experimental information can be used to drive the docking prediction in HADDOCK, and then focus on the docking protocol itself. We discuss and illustrate with a tutorial example a "classical" protein-protein docking prediction, as well as more recent developments for modelling multi-body systems and large conformational changes.

  19. Learning generative models for protein fold families.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balakrishnan, Sivaraman; Kamisetty, Hetunandan; Carbonell, Jaime G; Lee, Su-In; Langmead, Christopher James

    2011-04-01

    We introduce a new approach to learning statistical models from multiple sequence alignments (MSA) of proteins. Our method, called GREMLIN (Generative REgularized ModeLs of proteINs), learns an undirected probabilistic graphical model of the amino acid composition within the MSA. The resulting model encodes both the position-specific conservation statistics and the correlated mutation statistics between sequential and long-range pairs of residues. Existing techniques for learning graphical models from MSA either make strong, and often inappropriate assumptions about the conditional independencies within the MSA (e.g., Hidden Markov Models), or else use suboptimal algorithms to learn the parameters of the model. In contrast, GREMLIN makes no a priori assumptions about the conditional independencies within the MSA. We formulate and solve a convex optimization problem, thus guaranteeing that we find a globally optimal model at convergence. The resulting model is also generative, allowing for the design of new protein sequences that have the same statistical properties as those in the MSA. We perform a detailed analysis of covariation statistics on the extensively studied WW and PDZ domains and show that our method out-performs an existing algorithm for learning undirected probabilistic graphical models from MSA. We then apply our approach to 71 additional families from the PFAM database and demonstrate that the resulting models significantly out-perform Hidden Markov Models in terms of predictive accuracy.

  20. Neural network models of protein domain evolution

    OpenAIRE

    Sylvia Nagl

    2000-01-01

    Protein domains are complex adaptive systems, and here a novel procedure is presented that models the evolution of new functional sites within stable domain folds using neural networks. Neural networks, which were originally developed in cognitive science for the modeling of brain functions, can provide a fruitful methodology for the study of complex systems in general. Ethical implications of developing complex systems models of biomolecules are discussed, with particular reference to molecu...

  1. Modeling protein synthesis from a physicist's perspective: a toy model

    CERN Document Server

    Basu, A; Basu, Aakash; Chowdhury, Debashish

    2007-01-01

    Proteins are polymers of amino acids. These macromolecules are synthesized by intracellular machines called {\\it ribosome}. Although, traditionally, the experimental investigation of protein synthesis has been an active area of research in molecular cell biology, important quantitative models of this phenomenon have been reported mostly in the research journals devoted to statistical physics and related interdisciplinary topics. From the perspective of a physicist, protein synthesis is a phenomenon of {\\it classical transport of interacting ribosomes on a messenger RNA (mRNA) template} that dictates the sequence of the amino acids on the protein. Here we bring this frontier area of contemporary research into the classroom by appropriate simplification of the models and methods. In particular, we develope a simple toy model and analyze it by some elementary techniques of non-equilibrium statistical mechanics to predict the average rate of protein synthesis and their spatial organization in the steady-state.

  2. Fast and accurate multivariate Gaussian modeling of protein families: predicting residue contacts and protein-interaction partners.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlo Baldassi

    Full Text Available In the course of evolution, proteins show a remarkable conservation of their three-dimensional structure and their biological function, leading to strong evolutionary constraints on the sequence variability between homologous proteins. Our method aims at extracting such constraints from rapidly accumulating sequence data, and thereby at inferring protein structure and function from sequence information alone. Recently, global statistical inference methods (e.g. direct-coupling analysis, sparse inverse covariance estimation have achieved a breakthrough towards this aim, and their predictions have been successfully implemented into tertiary and quaternary protein structure prediction methods. However, due to the discrete nature of the underlying variable (amino-acids, exact inference requires exponential time in the protein length, and efficient approximations are needed for practical applicability. Here we propose a very efficient multivariate Gaussian modeling approach as a variant of direct-coupling analysis: the discrete amino-acid variables are replaced by continuous Gaussian random variables. The resulting statistical inference problem is efficiently and exactly solvable. We show that the quality of inference is comparable or superior to the one achieved by mean-field approximations to inference with discrete variables, as done by direct-coupling analysis. This is true for (i the prediction of residue-residue contacts in proteins, and (ii the identification of protein-protein interaction partner in bacterial signal transduction. An implementation of our multivariate Gaussian approach is available at the website http://areeweb.polito.it/ricerca/cmp/code.

  3. Modelling of DNA-protein recognition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rein, R.; Garduno, R.; Colombano, S.; Nir, S.; Haydock, K.; Macelroy, R. D.

    1980-01-01

    Computer model-building procedures using stereochemical principles together with theoretical energy calculations appear to be, at this stage, the most promising route toward the elucidation of DNA-protein binding schemes and recognition principles. A review of models and bonding principles is conducted and approaches to modeling are considered, taking into account possible di-hydrogen-bonding schemes between a peptide and a base (or a base pair) of a double-stranded nucleic acid in the major groove, aspects of computer graphic modeling, and a search for isogeometric helices. The energetics of recognition complexes is discussed and several models for peptide DNA recognition are presented.

  4. Remarks on the clump theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krommes, J.A.

    1986-07-01

    Further details are provided of a soon-to-be published dialog (Phys. Fluids 29 (July, 1986)) which discussed the role of the small scales in fluid clump theory. It is argued that the approximation of the clump lifetime which is compatible with exponentially rapid separation of adjacent orbits is inappropriate for the description of the dynamically important large scales. Various other remarks are made relating to the analytic treatment of strong drift-wave-like turbulence.

  5. Hydration dynamics near a model protein surface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Russo, Daniela; Hura, Greg; Head-Gordon, Teresa

    2003-09-01

    The evolution of water dynamics from dilute to very high concentration solutions of a prototypical hydrophobic amino acid with its polar backbone, N-acetyl-leucine-methylamide (NALMA), is studied by quasi-elastic neutron scattering and molecular dynamics simulation for both the completely deuterated and completely hydrogenated leucine monomer. We observe several unexpected features in the dynamics of these biological solutions under ambient conditions. The NALMA dynamics shows evidence of de Gennes narrowing, an indication of coherent long timescale structural relaxation dynamics. The translational water dynamics are analyzed in a first approximation with a jump diffusion model. At the highest solute concentrations, the hydration water dynamics is significantly suppressed and characterized by a long residential time and a slow diffusion coefficient. The analysis of the more dilute concentration solutions takes into account the results of the 2.0M solution as a model of the first hydration shell. Subtracting the first hydration layer based on the 2.0M spectra, the translational diffusion dynamics is still suppressed, although the rotational relaxation time and residential time are converged to bulk-water values. Molecular dynamics analysis shows spatially heterogeneous dynamics at high concentration that becomes homogeneous at more dilute concentrations. We discuss the hydration dynamics results of this model protein system in the context of glassy systems, protein function, and protein-protein interfaces.

  6. Predicting Protein Secondary Structure with Markov Models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fischer, Paul; Larsen, Simon; Thomsen, Claus

    2004-01-01

    we are considering here, is to predict the secondary structure from the primary one. To this end we train a Markov model on training data and then use it to classify parts of unknown protein sequences as sheets, helices or coils. We show how to exploit the directional information contained......The primary structure of a protein is the sequence of its amino acids. The secondary structure describes structural properties of the molecule such as which parts of it form sheets, helices or coils. Spacial and other properties are described by the higher order structures. The classification task...

  7. Model-building codes for membrane proteins.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shirley, David Noyes; Hunt, Thomas W.; Brown, W. Michael; Schoeniger, Joseph S. (Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA); Slepoy, Alexander; Sale, Kenneth L. (Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA); Young, Malin M. (Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA); Faulon, Jean-Loup Michel; Gray, Genetha Anne (Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA)

    2005-01-01

    We have developed a novel approach to modeling the transmembrane spanning helical bundles of integral membrane proteins using only a sparse set of distance constraints, such as those derived from MS3-D, dipolar-EPR and FRET experiments. Algorithms have been written for searching the conformational space of membrane protein folds matching the set of distance constraints, which provides initial structures for local conformational searches. Local conformation search is achieved by optimizing these candidates against a custom penalty function that incorporates both measures derived from statistical analysis of solved membrane protein structures and distance constraints obtained from experiments. This results in refined helical bundles to which the interhelical loops and amino acid side-chains are added. Using a set of only 27 distance constraints extracted from the literature, our methods successfully recover the structure of dark-adapted rhodopsin to within 3.2 {angstrom} of the crystal structure.

  8. Protein Folding: Search for Basic Physical Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivan Y. Torshin

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available How a unique three-dimensional structure is rapidly formed from the linear sequence of a polypeptide is one of the important questions in contemporary science. Apart from biological context of in vivo protein folding (which has been studied only for a few proteins, the roles of the fundamental physical forces in the in vitro folding remain largely unstudied. Despite a degree of success in using descriptions based on statistical and/or thermodynamic approaches, few of the current models explicitly include more basic physical forces (such as electrostatics and Van Der Waals forces. Moreover, the present-day models rarely take into account that the protein folding is, essentially, a rapid process that produces a highly specific architecture. This review considers several physical models that may provide more direct links between sequence and tertiary structure in terms of the physical forces. In particular, elaboration of such simple models is likely to produce extremely effective computational techniques with value for modern genomics.

  9. A model for the condensation of the bacterial chromosome by the partitioning protein ParB

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broedersz, Chase; Wingreen, Ned

    2013-03-01

    The molecular machinery responsible for faithful segregation of the chromosome in bacteria such as Caulobacter crescentus and Bacillus subtilis includes the ParABS a.k.a. Spo0J/Soj partitioning system. In Caulobacter, prior to division, hundreds of ParB proteins bind to the DNA near the origin of replication, and localize to one pole of the cell. Subsequently, the ParB-DNA complex is translocated to the far pole by the binding and retraction of the ParA spindle-like apparatus. Remarkably, the localization of ParB proteins to specific regions of the chromosome appears to be controlled by only a few centromeric parS binding sites. Although lateral interactions between DNA-bound ParB are likely to be important for their localization, the long-range order of ParB domains on the chromosome appears to be inconsistent with a picture in which protein-protein interactions are limited to neighboring DNA-bound proteins. We developed a coarse-grained Brownian dynamics model that allows for lateral and 3D protein-protein interactions among bound ParB proteins. Our model shows how such interactions can condense and organize the DNA spatially, and can control the localization and the long-range order of the DNA-bound proteins.

  10. Modeling disordered regions in proteins using Rosetta.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ray Yu-Ruei Wang

    Full Text Available Protein structure prediction methods such as Rosetta search for the lowest energy conformation of the polypeptide chain. However, the experimentally observed native state is at a minimum of the free energy, rather than the energy. The neglect of the missing configurational entropy contribution to the free energy can be partially justified by the assumption that the entropies of alternative folded states, while very much less than unfolded states, are not too different from one another, and hence can be to a first approximation neglected when searching for the lowest free energy state. The shortcomings of current structure prediction methods may be due in part to the breakdown of this assumption. Particularly problematic are proteins with significant disordered regions which do not populate single low energy conformations even in the native state. We describe two approaches within the Rosetta structure modeling methodology for treating such regions. The first does not require advance knowledge of the regions likely to be disordered; instead these are identified by minimizing a simple free energy function used previously to model protein folding landscapes and transition states. In this model, residues can be either completely ordered or completely disordered; they are considered disordered if the gain in entropy outweighs the loss of favorable energetic interactions with the rest of the protein chain. The second approach requires identification in advance of the disordered regions either from sequence alone using for example the DISOPRED server or from experimental data such as NMR chemical shifts. During Rosetta structure prediction calculations the disordered regions make only unfavorable repulsive contributions to the total energy. We find that the second approach has greater practical utility and illustrate this with examples from de novo structure prediction, NMR structure calculation, and comparative modeling.

  11. Modelling heating effects in cryocooled protein crystals

    CERN Document Server

    Nicholson, J; Fayz, K; Fell, B; Garman, E

    2001-01-01

    With the application of intense X-ray beams from third generation synchrotron sources, damage to cryocooled macromolecular crystals is being observed more commonly . In order to fully utilize synchrotron facilities now available for studying biological crystals, it is essential to understand the processes involved in radiation damage and beam heating so that, if possible, action can be taken to slow the rate of damage. Finite Element Analysis (FEA) has been applied to model the heating effects of X-rays on cryocooled protein crystals, and to compare the relative cooling efficiencies of nitrogen and helium.

  12. Benchmarking Inverse Statistical Approaches for Protein Structure and Design with Exactly Solvable Models.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hugo Jacquin

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Inverse statistical approaches to determine protein structure and function from Multiple Sequence Alignments (MSA are emerging as powerful tools in computational biology. However the underlying assumptions of the relationship between the inferred effective Potts Hamiltonian and real protein structure and energetics remain untested so far. Here we use lattice protein model (LP to benchmark those inverse statistical approaches. We build MSA of highly stable sequences in target LP structures, and infer the effective pairwise Potts Hamiltonians from those MSA. We find that inferred Potts Hamiltonians reproduce many important aspects of 'true' LP structures and energetics. Careful analysis reveals that effective pairwise couplings in inferred Potts Hamiltonians depend not only on the energetics of the native structure but also on competing folds; in particular, the coupling values reflect both positive design (stabilization of native conformation and negative design (destabilization of competing folds. In addition to providing detailed structural information, the inferred Potts models used as protein Hamiltonian for design of new sequences are able to generate with high probability completely new sequences with the desired folds, which is not possible using independent-site models. Those are remarkable results as the effective LP Hamiltonians used to generate MSA are not simple pairwise models due to the competition between the folds. Our findings elucidate the reasons for the success of inverse approaches to the modelling of proteins from sequence data, and their limitations.

  13. Minimalist models for proteins: a comparative analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tozzini, Valentina

    2010-08-01

    The last decade has witnessed a renewed interest in the coarse-grained (CG) models for biopolymers, also stimulated by the needs of modern molecular biology, dealing with nano- to micro-sized bio-molecular systems and larger than microsecond timescale. This combination of size and timescale is, in fact, hard to access by atomic-based simulations. Coarse graining the system is a route to be followed to overcome these limits, but the ways of practically implementing it are many and different, making the landscape of CG models very vast and complex. In this paper, the CG models are reviewed and their features, applications and performances compared. This analysis, restricted to proteins, focuses on the minimalist models, namely those reducing at minimum the number of degrees of freedom without losing the possibility of explicitly describing the secondary structures. This class includes models using a single or a few interacting centers (beads) for each amino acid. From this analysis several issues emerge. The difficulty in building these models resides in the need for combining transferability/predictive power with the capability of accurately reproducing the structures. It is shown that these aspects could be optimized by accurately choosing the force field (FF) terms and functional forms, and combining different parameterization procedures. In addition, in spite of the variety of the minimalist models, regularities can be found in the parameters values and in FF terms. These are outlined and schematically presented with the aid of a generic phase diagram of the polypeptide in the parameter space and, hopefully, could serve as guidelines for the development of minimalist models incorporating the maximum possible level of predictive power and structural accuracy.

  14. Remarkable induction of UV-signature mutations at the 3'-cytosine of dipyrimidine sites except at 5'-TCG-3' in the UVB-exposed skin epidermis of xeroderma pigmentosum variant model mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikehata, Hironobu; Chang, Yumin; Yokoi, Masayuki; Yamamoto, Masayuki; Hanaoka, Fumio

    2014-10-01

    The human POLH gene is responsible for the variant form of xeroderma pigmentosum (XP-V), a genetic disease highly susceptible to cancer on sun-exposed skin areas, and encodes DNA polymerase η (polη), which is specialized for translesion DNA synthesis (TLS) of UV-induced DNA photolesions. We constructed polη-deficient mice transgenic with lacZ mutational reporter genes to study the effect of Polh null mutation (Polh(-/-)) on mutagenesis in the skin after UVB irradiation. UVB induced lacZ mutations with remarkably higher frequency in the Polh(-/-) epidermis and dermis than in the wild-type (Polh(+/+)) and heterozygote. DNA sequences of a hundred lacZ mutants isolated from the epidermis of four UVB-exposed Polh(-/-) mice were determined and compared with mutant sequences from irradiated Polh(+)(/)(+) mice. The spectra of the mutations in the two genotypes were both highly UV-specific and dominated by C→T transitions at dipyrimidines, namely UV-signature mutations. However, sequence preferences of the occurrence of UV-signature mutations were quite different between the two genotypes: the mutations occurred at a higher frequency preferentially at the 5'-TCG-3' sequence context than at the other dipyrimidine contexts in the Polh(+/+) epidermis, whereas the mutations were induced remarkably and exclusively at the 3'-cytosine of almost all dipyrimidine contexts with no preference for 5'-TCG-3' in the Polh(-/-) epidermis. In addition, in Polh(-/-) mice, a small but remarkable fraction of G→T transversions was also observed exclusively at the 3'-cytosine of dipyrimidine sites, strongly suggesting that these transversions resulted not from oxidative damage but from UV photolesions. These results would reflect the characteristics of the error-prone TLS functioning in the bypass of UV photolesions in the absence of polη, which would be mediated by mechanisms based on the two-step model of TLS. On the other hand, the deamination model would explain well the mutation

  15. Mining protein kinases regulation using graphical models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Qingfeng; Chen, Yi-Ping Phoebe

    2011-03-01

    Abnormal kinase activity is a frequent cause of diseases, which makes kinases a promising pharmacological target. Thus, it is critical to identify the characteristics of protein kinases regulation by studying the activation and inhibition of kinase subunits in response to varied stimuli. Bayesian network (BN) is a formalism for probabilistic reasoning that has been widely used for learning dependency models. However, for high-dimensional discrete random vectors the set of plausible models becomes large and a full comparison of all the posterior probabilities related to the competing models becomes infeasible. A solution to this problem is based on the Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) method. This paper proposes a BN-based framework to discover the dependency correlations of kinase regulation. Our approach is to apply the MCMC method to generate a sequence of samples from a probability distribution, by which to approximate the distribution. The frequent connections (edges) are identified from the obtained sampling graphical models. Our results point to a number of novel candidate regulation patterns that are interesting in biology and include inferred associations that were unknown.

  16. Evolution and physics in comparative protein structure modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiser, András; Feig, Michael; Brooks, Charles L; Sali, Andrej

    2002-06-01

    From a physical perspective, the native structure of a protein is a consequence of physical forces acting on the protein and solvent atoms during the folding process. From a biological perspective, the native structure of proteins is a result of evolution over millions of years. Correspondingly, there are two types of protein structure prediction methods, de novo prediction and comparative modeling. We review comparative protein structure modeling and discuss the incorporation of physical considerations into the modeling process. A good starting point for achieving this aim is provided by comparative modeling by satisfaction of spatial restraints. Incorporation of physical considerations is illustrated by an inclusion of solvation effects into the modeling of loops.

  17. Contact-assisted protein structure modeling by global optimization in CASP11.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joo, Keehyoung; Joung, InSuk; Cheng, Qianyi; Lee, Sung Jong; Lee, Jooyoung

    2016-09-01

    We have applied the conformational space annealing method to the contact-assisted protein structure modeling in CASP11. For Tp targets, where predicted residue-residue contact information was provided, the contact energy term in the form of the Lorentzian function was implemented together with the physical energy terms used in our template-free modeling of proteins. Although we observed some structural improvement of Tp models over the models predicted without the Tp information, the improvement was not substantial on average. This is partly due to the inaccuracy of the provided contact information, where only about 18% of it was correct. For Ts targets, where the information of ambiguous NOE (Nuclear Overhauser Effect) restraints was provided, we formulated the modeling in terms of the two-tier optimization problem, which covers: (1) the assignment of NOE peaks and (2) the three-dimensional (3D) model generation based on the assigned NOEs. Although solving the problem in a direct manner appears to be intractable at first glance, we demonstrate through CASP11 that remarkably accurate protein 3D modeling is possible by brute force optimization of a relevant energy function. For 19 Ts targets of the average size of 224 residues, generated protein models were of about 3.6 Å Cα atom accuracy. Even greater structural improvement was observed when additional Tc contact information was provided. For 20 out of the total 24 Tc targets, we were able to generate protein structures which were better than the best model from the rest of the CASP11 groups in terms of GDT-TS. Proteins 2016; 84(Suppl 1):189-199. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Towards a model for protein production rates

    CERN Document Server

    Dong, J J; Zia, R K P

    2007-01-01

    In the process of translation, ribosomes read the genetic code on an mRNA and assemble the corresponding polypeptide chain. The ribosomes perform discrete directed motion which is well modeled by a totally asymmetric simple exclusion process (TASEP) with open boundaries. Using Monte Carlo simulations and a simple mean-field theory, we discuss the effect of one or two ``bottlenecks'' (i.e., slow codons) on the production rate of the final protein. Confirming and extending previous work by Chou and Lakatos, we find that the location and spacing of the slow codons can affect the production rate quite dramatically. In particular, we observe a novel ``edge'' effect, i.e., an interaction of a single slow codon with the system boundary. We focus in detail on ribosome density profiles and provide a simple explanation for the length scale which controls the range of these interactions.

  19. Towards a Model for Protein Production Rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, J. J.; Schmittmann, B.; Zia, R. K. P.

    2007-07-01

    In the process of translation, ribosomes read the genetic code on an mRNA and assemble the corresponding polypeptide chain. The ribosomes perform discrete directed motion which is well modeled by a totally asymmetric simple exclusion process (TASEP) with open boundaries. Using Monte Carlo simulations and a simple mean-field theory, we discuss the effect of one or two "bottlenecks" (i.e., slow codons) on the production rate of the final protein. Confirming and extending previous work by Chou and Lakatos, we find that the location and spacing of the slow codons can affect the production rate quite dramatically. In particular, we observe a novel "edge" effect, i.e., an interaction of a single slow codon with the system boundary. We focus in detail on ribosome density profiles and provide a simple explanation for the length scale which controls the range of these interactions.

  20. A modified resonant recognition model to predict protein-protein interaction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Xiang; WANG Yifei

    2007-01-01

    Proteins are fundamental components of all living cells and the protein-protein interaction plays an important role in vital movement.This paper briefly introduced the original Resonant Recognition Model (RRM),and then modified it by using the wavelet transform to acquire the Modified Resonant Recognition Model (MRRM).The key characteristic of the new model is that it can predict directly the proteinprotein interaction from the primary sequence,and the MRRM is more suitable than the RRM for this prediction.The results of numerical experiments show that the MRRM is effective for predicting the protein-protein interaction.

  1. Introductive remarks on causal inference

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvana A. Romio

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available One of the more challenging issues in epidemiological research is being able to provide an unbiased estimate of the causal exposure-disease effect, to assess the possible etiological mechanisms and the implication for public health. A major source of bias is confounding, which can spuriously create or mask the causal relationship. In the last ten years, methodological research has been developed to better de_ne the concept of causation in epidemiology and some important achievements have resulted in new statistical models. In this review, we aim to show how a technique the well known by statisticians, i.e. standardization, can be seen as a method to estimate causal e_ects, equivalent under certain conditions to the inverse probability treatment weight procedure.

  2. Remarkable phylogenetic resolution of the most complex clade of Cyprinidae (Teleostei: Cypriniformes): a proof of concept of homology assessment and partitioning sequence data integrated with mixed model Bayesian analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Wenjing; Mayden, Richard L; He, Shunping

    2013-03-01

    Despite many efforts to resolve evolutionary relationships among major clades of Cyprinidae, some nodes have been especially problematic and remain unresolved. In this study, we employ four nuclear gene fragments (3.3kb) to infer interrelationships of the Cyprinidae. A reconstruction of the phylogenetic relationships within the family using maximum parsimony, maximum likelihood, and Bayesian analyses is presented. Among the taxa within the monophyletic Cyprinidae, Rasborinae is the basal-most lineage; Cyprinine is sister to Leuciscine. The monophyly for the subfamilies Gobioninae, Leuciscinae and Acheilognathinae were resolved with high nodal support. Although our results do not completely resolve relationships within Cyprinidae, this study presents novel and significant findings having major implications for a highly diverse and enigmatic clade of East-Asian cyprinids. Within this monophyletic group five closely-related subgroups are identified. Tinca tinca, one of the most phylogenetically enigmatic genera in the family, is strongly supported as having evolutionary affinities with this East-Asian clade; an established yet remarkable association because of the natural variation in phenotypes and generalized ecological niches occupied by these taxa. Our results clearly argue that the choice of partitioning strategies has significant impacts on the phylogenetic reconstructions, especially when multiple genes are being considered. The most highly partitioned model (partitioned by codon positions within genes) extracts the strongest phylogenetic signals and performs better than any other partitioning schemes supported by the strongest 2Δln Bayes factor. Future studies should include higher levels of taxon sampling and partitioned, model-based analyses.

  3. Tactile Teaching: Exploring Protein Structure/Function Using Physical Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herman, Tim; Morris, Jennifer; Colton, Shannon; Batiza, Ann; Patrick, Michael; Franzen, Margaret; Goodsell, David S.

    2006-01-01

    The technology now exists to construct physical models of proteins based on atomic coordinates of solved structures. We review here our recent experiences in using physical models to teach concepts of protein structure and function at both the high school and the undergraduate levels. At the high school level, physical models are used in a…

  4. A Novel Model for Protein Immobilization on Microspheres

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Di-qiang; LIU Bai-ling; LI He; HU Jie

    2004-01-01

    The immobilization of proteins, especially receptor proteins commonly used in high through-put screening of drugs (HTS), have received great attention in recent years. There are many successful isothermal models for describing the adsorption of protein onto solid surface, such as Langmuir model, Bi-Langmuir model, Fowler model, Freundlich model, Freundlich-Langmuir model and Tekmin model etc. In all these models, Langmuir model was the most favorable one model accepted by many researchers, but the experimental results showed that it was not entirely fit to all adsorption behaviors. So new models were required for describing protein adsorption onto microspheres in different conditions.In our research, a novel isothermal model, including Langmuir and other adsorbing behaviors was presented basing on the holding degree of surface active sites and the interaction styles of protein immobilization. In Langmuir model, the adsorbing amount of protein was described as [PS] =Km[P]/1 + K[P], where [PS] was the concentration of adsorbed protein, [P] was the concentration of freeprotein at equilibrium state, and Km and K was constant. According to the interactions of protein and ligands, there were three patterns in the interactions of protein and ligands. On the similar assumption that the interaction of protein and microspheres were three styles, and based on the definition of the holding degree of surface active sites (Y), three adsorption behaviors could be described as Y K[ P ]φ/ K[P]φ+1 or ln K + φ ln[P] =ln(Y/1-Y) in which [P] was the concentration of free protein at equilibrium state, and φ and K was constant. Different scale of φ presented different adsorption behaviors, especially when φ was 1, the adsorption behavior was Langmuir adsorbing model. Figure I indicated the different adsorbing results in different adsorption behaviors (φ>1, φ<1,and φ=1).

  5. Protein comparative sequence analysis and computer modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hambly, Brett D; Oakley, Cecily E; Fajer, Piotr G

    2008-01-01

    A problem frequently encountered by the biological scientist is the identification of a previously unknown gene or protein sequence, where there are few or no clues as to the biochemical function, ligand specificity, gene regulation, protein-protein interactions, tissue specificity, cellular localization, developmental phase of activity, or biological role. Through the process of bioinformatics there are now many approaches for predicting answers to at least some of these questions, often then allowing the design of more insightful experiments to characterize more definitively the new protein.

  6. Mechanical Modeling and Computer Simulation of Protein Folding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prigozhin, Maxim B.; Scott, Gregory E.; Denos, Sharlene

    2014-01-01

    In this activity, science education and modern technology are bridged to teach students at the high school and undergraduate levels about protein folding and to strengthen their model building skills. Students are guided from a textbook picture of a protein as a rigid crystal structure to a more realistic view: proteins are highly dynamic…

  7. Remarkable adsorptive removal of nitrogen-containing compounds from a model fuel by a graphene oxide/MIL-101 composite through a combined effect of improved porosity and hydrogen bonding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Imteaz; Jhung, Sung Hwa

    2016-08-15

    A composite was prepared by combining a highly porous metal-organic framework (MOF), MIL-101 (Cr-benzenedicarboxylate), and graphene oxide (GnO). The porosity of the composite increased appreciably by the addition of GnO up to a specific amount in the MOF, though further increases in the quantity of GnO was detrimental to porosity. The improved porosity of the GnO/MIL-101 composite was utilized for adsorptive denitrogenation (ADN) of a model fuel where indole (IND) and quinoline (QUI) were used as nitrogen-containing compounds (NCCs). It was found that both IND and QUI showed improved adsorption on the composite compared with pristine MIL-101 or GnO due to the improved porosity of the composite. Interestingly, the improvement in adsorption of IND was much higher than the quantity estimated for the porosity. Importantly, GnO/MIL-101 showed the highest adsorption capacities for NCCs. Irrespective of the studied solvents and co-presence of IND and QUI, the composite adsorbent performed ADN most effectively. This remarkable improvement is explained by the additional mechanism of hydrogen bonding between the surface functional groups of GnO and the hydrogen attached to the nitrogen atom of IND. This hydrogen bonding mechanism is also supported by the results of the adsorption of pyrrole and methylpyrrole. On the other hand, QUI does not show hydrogen-bonding capability, and therefore, its enhanced adsorption originates from only the increased porosity of the adsorbents.

  8. Prediction of protein-protein interactions between viruses and human by an SVM model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cui Guangyu

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Several computational methods have been developed to predict protein-protein interactions from amino acid sequences, but most of those methods are intended for the interactions within a species rather than for interactions across different species. Methods for predicting interactions between homogeneous proteins are not appropriate for finding those between heterogeneous proteins since they do not distinguish the interactions between proteins of the same species from those of different species. Results We developed a new method for representing a protein sequence of variable length in a frequency vector of fixed length, which encodes the relative frequency of three consecutive amino acids of a sequence. We built a support vector machine (SVM model to predict human proteins that interact with virus proteins. In two types of viruses, human papillomaviruses (HPV and hepatitis C virus (HCV, our SVM model achieved an average accuracy above 80%, which is higher than that of another SVM model with a different representation scheme. Using the SVM model and Gene Ontology (GO annotations of proteins, we predicted new interactions between virus proteins and human proteins. Conclusions Encoding the relative frequency of amino acid triplets of a protein sequence is a simple yet powerful representation method for predicting protein-protein interactions across different species. The representation method has several advantages: (1 it enables a prediction model to achieve a better performance than other representations, (2 it generates feature vectors of fixed length regardless of the sequence length, and (3 the same representation is applicable to different types of proteins.

  9. Hydrodynamic multibead modeling: problems, pitfalls, and solutions. 2. Proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zipper, Peter; Durchschlag, Helmut

    2010-02-01

    Hydrodynamic models of proteins have been generated by recourse to crystallographic data and applying a filling model strategy in order to predict both hydrodynamic and scattering parameters. The design of accurate protein models retaining the majority of the molecule peculiarities requires usage of many beads and consideration of many serious problems. Applying the expertise obtained with ellipsoid models and pilot tests on proteins, we succeeded in constructing precise models for several anhydrous and hydrated proteins of different shape, size, and complexity. The models constructed consist of many beads (up to about 11,000) for the protein constituents (atoms, amino acid residues, groups) and preferentially bound water molecules. While in the case of small proteins, parameter predictions are straightforward, computations for giant proteins necessitate drastic reductions of the number of initially available beads. Among several auxiliary programs, our advanced hydration programs, HYDCRYST and HYDMODEL, and modified versions of García de la Torre's program HYDRO were successfully employed. This allowed the generation of realistic protein models by imaging details of their fine structure and enabled the prediction of reliable molecular parameters including intrinsic viscosities. The appearance of the models and the agreement of molecular properties and distance distribution functions p(r) of unreduced and reduced models can be used for a meticulous inspection of the data obtained.

  10. Protein adsorption on nanoparticles: model development using computer simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, Qing; Hall, Carol K.

    2016-10-01

    The adsorption of proteins on nanoparticles results in the formation of the protein corona, the composition of which determines how nanoparticles influence their biological surroundings. We seek to better understand corona formation by developing models that describe protein adsorption on nanoparticles using computer simulation results as data. Using a coarse-grained protein model, discontinuous molecular dynamics simulations are conducted to investigate the adsorption of two small proteins (Trp-cage and WW domain) on a model nanoparticle of diameter 10.0 nm at protein concentrations ranging from 0.5 to 5 mM. The resulting adsorption isotherms are well described by the Langmuir, Freundlich, Temkin and Kiselev models, but not by the Elovich, Fowler-Guggenheim and Hill-de Boer models. We also try to develop a generalized model that can describe protein adsorption equilibrium on nanoparticles of different diameters in terms of dimensionless size parameters. The simulation results for three proteins (Trp-cage, WW domain, and GB3) on four nanoparticles (diameter  =  5.0, 10.0, 15.0, and 20.0 nm) illustrate both the promise and the challenge associated with developing generalized models of protein adsorption on nanoparticles.

  11. RNA and protein 3D structure modeling: similarities and differences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rother, Kristian; Rother, Magdalena; Boniecki, Michał; Puton, Tomasz; Bujnicki, Janusz M

    2011-09-01

    In analogy to proteins, the function of RNA depends on its structure and dynamics, which are encoded in the linear sequence. While there are numerous methods for computational prediction of protein 3D structure from sequence, there have been very few such methods for RNA. This review discusses template-based and template-free approaches for macromolecular structure prediction, with special emphasis on comparison between the already tried-and-tested methods for protein structure modeling and the very recently developed "protein-like" modeling methods for RNA. We highlight analogies between many successful methods for modeling of these two types of biological macromolecules and argue that RNA 3D structure can be modeled using "protein-like" methodology. We also highlight the areas where the differences between RNA and proteins require the development of RNA-specific solutions.

  12. Tracking membrane protein association in model membranes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Myriam Reffay

    Full Text Available Membrane proteins are essential in the exchange processes of cells. In spite of great breakthrough in soluble proteins studies, membrane proteins structures, functions and interactions are still a challenge because of the difficulties related to their hydrophobic properties. Most of the experiments are performed with detergent-solubilized membrane proteins. However widely used micellar systems are far from the biological two-dimensions membrane. The development of new biomimetic membrane systems is fundamental to tackle this issue.We present an original approach that combines the Fluorescence Recovery After fringe Pattern Photobleaching technique and the use of a versatile sponge phase that makes it possible to extract crucial informations about interactions between membrane proteins embedded in the bilayers of a sponge phase. The clear advantage lies in the ability to adjust at will the spacing between two adjacent bilayers. When the membranes are far apart, the only possible interactions occur laterally between proteins embedded within the same bilayer, whereas when membranes get closer to each other, interactions between proteins embedded in facing membranes may occur as well.After validating our approach on the streptavidin-biotinylated peptide complex, we study the interactions between two membrane proteins, MexA and OprM, from a Pseudomonas aeruginosa efflux pump. The mode of interaction, the size of the protein complex and its potential stoichiometry are determined. In particular, we demonstrate that: MexA is effectively embedded in the bilayer; MexA and OprM do not interact laterally but can form a complex if they are embedded in opposite bilayers; the population of bound proteins is at its maximum for bilayers separated by a distance of about 200 A, which is the periplasmic thickness of Pseudomonas aeruginosa. We also show that the MexA-OprM association is enhanced when the position and orientation of the protein is restricted by the

  13. From Genomes to Protein Models and Back

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tramontano, Anna; Giorgetti, Alejandro; Orsini, Massimiliano; Raimondo, Domenico

    2007-12-01

    The alternative splicing mechanism allows genes to generate more than one product. When the splicing events occur within protein coding regions they can modify the biological function of the protein. Alternative splicing has been suggested as one way for explaining the discrepancy between the number of human genes and functional complexity. We analysed the putative structure of the alternatively spliced gene products annotated in the ENCODE pilot project and discovered that many of the potential alternative gene products will be unlikely to produce stable functional proteins.

  14. Introductory Remarks to the "Edward Teller Lectures"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hora, Heinrich; Miley, George H.

    2016-10-01

    The following sections are included: * Overview * Big Laser Solution * Physics of the Fast Igniter * Fast Igniter for Electron Beam Fusion * Block Igniter for Producing Ion Beam Ignition * Concluding Remarks * References

  15. The end of a remarkable era

    CERN Multimedia

    2011-01-01

    An important era in particle physics is coming to an end: the US Department of Energy announced on Monday that it will not fund an extension to Tevatron running beyond 2011. It is a poignant moment for particle physics as we prepare to bid farewell to a machine that has changed our view of the Universe, and played a significant role in paving the way for the new era that is opening up with the LHC.   The Tevatron has been at the high-energy frontier of particle physics for over a quarter of a century. That’s a remarkable achievement by any account, and the physics results are there to prove it. As well as bringing us the discovery of the top quark in 1995, the Tevatron’s experiments have provided vitally important precision measurements covering the full spectrum of Standard Model physics, not to mention hints of what may lie beyond. With several months of running still to come, it would be a foolish gambler who bet against further new physics emerging before the Teva...

  16. Research use of patented inventions: opening remarks

    OpenAIRE

    Fernández de Labastida, José M.

    2006-01-01

    Opening remarks for the 2006 conference in Madrid on the research use of patented inventions. The conference, which was held at CSIC on 18-19 May 2006, was jointly organised by the Spanish National Research Council (CSIC), the Spanish Patent and Trademark Office (OEPM) and the OECD, with support from the European Patent Office (EPO) through its European Patent Academy. The conference brochure is also included as an attachment to the Opening remarks file.

  17. A binary logistic regression model for discriminating real protein-protein interface

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    The selection and study of descriptive variables of protein-protein complex interface is a major question that many biologists come across when the research of protein-protein recognition is concerned. Several variables have been proposed to understand the structural or energetic features of complex interfaces. Here a systematic study of some of these "traditional" variables, as well as a few new ones, is introduced. With the values of these variables extracted from 42 PDB samples with real or false complex interfaces, a binary logistic regression analysis is performed, which results in an effective empirical model for the evaluation of binding probabilities of protein-protein interfaces. The model is validated with 12 samples, and satisfactory results are obtained for both the training and validation sets. Meanwhile, three potential dimeric interfaces of staphylokinase have been investigated and one with the best suitability to our model is proposed.

  18. Predicting nucleic acid binding interfaces from structural models of proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dror, Iris; Shazman, Shula; Mukherjee, Srayanta; Zhang, Yang; Glaser, Fabian; Mandel-Gutfreund, Yael

    2012-02-01

    The function of DNA- and RNA-binding proteins can be inferred from the characterization and accurate prediction of their binding interfaces. However, the main pitfall of various structure-based methods for predicting nucleic acid binding function is that they are all limited to a relatively small number of proteins for which high-resolution three-dimensional structures are available. In this study, we developed a pipeline for extracting functional electrostatic patches from surfaces of protein structural models, obtained using the I-TASSER protein structure predictor. The largest positive patches are extracted from the protein surface using the patchfinder algorithm. We show that functional electrostatic patches extracted from an ensemble of structural models highly overlap the patches extracted from high-resolution structures. Furthermore, by testing our pipeline on a set of 55 known nucleic acid binding proteins for which I-TASSER produces high-quality models, we show that the method accurately identifies the nucleic acids binding interface on structural models of proteins. Employing a combined patch approach we show that patches extracted from an ensemble of models better predicts the real nucleic acid binding interfaces compared with patches extracted from independent models. Overall, these results suggest that combining information from a collection of low-resolution structural models could be a valuable approach for functional annotation. We suggest that our method will be further applicable for predicting other functional surfaces of proteins with unknown structure. Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Lessons from making the Structural Classification of Proteins (SCOP) and their implications for protein structure modelling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andreeva, Antonina

    2016-06-15

    The Structural Classification of Proteins (SCOP) database has facilitated the development of many tools and algorithms and it has been successfully used in protein structure prediction and large-scale genome annotations. During the development of SCOP, numerous exceptions were found to topological rules, along with complex evolutionary scenarios and peculiarities in proteins including the ability to fold into alternative structures. This article reviews cases of structural variations observed for individual proteins and among groups of homologues, knowledge of which is essential for protein structure modelling.

  20. Parmodel: a web server for automated comparative modeling of proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uchôa, Hugo Brandão; Jorge, Guilherme Eberhart; Freitas Da Silveira, Nelson José; Camera, João Carlos; Canduri, Fernanda; De Azevedo, Walter Filgueira

    2004-12-24

    Parmodel is a web server for automated comparative modeling and evaluation of protein structures. The aim of this tool is to help inexperienced users to perform modeling, assessment, visualization, and optimization of protein models as well as crystallographers to evaluate structures solved experimentally. It is subdivided in four modules: Parmodel Modeling, Parmodel Assessment, Parmodel Visualization, and Parmodel Optimization. The main module is the Parmodel Modeling that allows the building of several models for a same protein in a reduced time, through the distribution of modeling processes on a Beowulf cluster. Parmodel automates and integrates the main softwares used in comparative modeling as MODELLER, Whatcheck, Procheck, Raster3D, Molscript, and Gromacs. This web server is freely accessible at .

  1. Protein and gene model inference based on statistical modeling in k-partite graphs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerster, Sarah; Qeli, Ermir; Ahrens, Christian H; Bühlmann, Peter

    2010-07-06

    One of the major goals of proteomics is the comprehensive and accurate description of a proteome. Shotgun proteomics, the method of choice for the analysis of complex protein mixtures, requires that experimentally observed peptides are mapped back to the proteins they were derived from. This process is also known as protein inference. We present Markovian Inference of Proteins and Gene Models (MIPGEM), a statistical model based on clearly stated assumptions to address the problem of protein and gene model inference for shotgun proteomics data. In particular, we are dealing with dependencies among peptides and proteins using a Markovian assumption on k-partite graphs. We are also addressing the problems of shared peptides and ambiguous proteins by scoring the encoding gene models. Empirical results on two control datasets with synthetic mixtures of proteins and on complex protein samples of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Drosophila melanogaster, and Arabidopsis thaliana suggest that the results with MIPGEM are competitive with existing tools for protein inference.

  2. Remarkable adsorptive removal of nitrogen-containing compounds from a model fuel by a graphene oxide/MIL-101 composite through a combined effect of improved porosity and hydrogen bonding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahmed, Imteaz; Jhung, Sung Hwa, E-mail: sung@knu.ac.kr

    2016-08-15

    Highlights: • Metal-organic frameworks (MIL-101) were composed with graphene oxide (GnO). • GnO/MIL-101 showed the highest adsorption capacity for indole and quinoline. • Adsorption mechanism was clearly shown based on adsorption results and FTIR. • GnO/MIL-101 might be applied commercially considering capacity and reusability. - Abstract: A composite was prepared by combining a highly porous metal-organic framework (MOF), MIL-101 (Cr-benzenedicarboxylate), and graphene oxide (GnO). The porosity of the composite increased appreciably by the addition of GnO up to a specific amount in the MOF, though further increases in the quantity of GnO was detrimental to porosity. The improved porosity of the GnO/MIL-101 composite was utilized for adsorptive denitrogenation (ADN) of a model fuel where indole (IND) and quinoline (QUI) were used as nitrogen-containing compounds (NCCs). It was found that both IND and QUI showed improved adsorption on the composite compared with pristine MIL-101 or GnO due to the improved porosity of the composite. Interestingly, the improvement in adsorption of IND was much higher than the quantity estimated for the porosity. Importantly, GnO/MIL-101 showed the highest adsorption capacities for NCCs. Irrespective of the studied solvents and co-presence of IND and QUI, the composite adsorbent performed ADN most effectively. This remarkable improvement is explained by the additional mechanism of hydrogen bonding between the surface functional groups of GnO and the hydrogen attached to the nitrogen atom of IND. This hydrogen bonding mechanism is also supported by the results of the adsorption of pyrrole and methylpyrrole. On the other hand, QUI does not show hydrogen-bonding capability, and therefore, its enhanced adsorption originates from only the increased porosity of the adsorbents.

  3. Computational protein structure modeling and analysis of UV-B stress protein in Synechocystis PCC 6803.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, Md Akhlaqur; Chaturvedi, Navaneet; Sinha, Sukrat; Pandey, Paras Nath; Gupta, Dwijendra Kumar; Sundaram, Shanthy; Tripathi, Ashutosh

    2013-01-01

    This study focuses on Ultra Violet stress (UVS) gene product which is a UV stress induced protein from cyanobacteria, Synechocystis PCC 6803. Three dimensional structural modeling of target UVS protein was carried out by homology modeling method. 3F2I pdb from Nostoc sp. PCC 7120 was selected as a suitable template protein structure. Ultimately, the detection of active binding regions was carried out for characterization of functional sites in modeled UV-B stress protein. The top five probable ligand binding sites were predicted and the common binding residues between target and template protein was analyzed. It has been validated for the first time that modeled UVS protein structure from Synechocystis PCC 6803 was structurally and functionally similar to well characterized UVS protein of another cyanobacterial species, Nostoc sp PCC 7120 because of having same structural motif and fold with similar protein topology and function. Investigations revealed that UVS protein from Synechocystis sp. might play significant role during ultraviolet resistance. Thus, it could be a potential biological source for remediation for UV induced stress.

  4. ANIMAL MODELS FOR PROTEIN RESPIRATORY SENSITIZERS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Protein induced respiratory hypersensitivity, particularly atopic disease in general, and allergic asthma in particular, has increased dramatically over the last several decades in the U.S. and other industrialized nations as a result of ill-defined changes in living conditions i...

  5. Corn Storage Protein - A Molecular Genetic Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Messing, Joachim [Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey

    2013-05-31

    Corn is the highest yielding crop on earth and probably the most valuable agricultural product of the United States. Because it converts sun energy through photosynthesis into starch and proteins, we addressed energy savings by focusing on protein quality. People and animals require essential amino acids derived from the digestion of proteins. If proteins are relatively low in certain essential amino acids, the crop becomes nutritionally defective and has to be supplemented. Such deficiency affects meat and fish production and countries where corn is a staple. Because corn seed proteins have relatively low levels of lysine and methionine, a diet has to be supplemented with soybeans for the missing lysine and with chemically synthesized methionine. We therefore have studied genes expressed during maize seed development and their chromosomal organization. A critical technical requirement for the understanding of the molecular structure of genes and their positional information was DNA sequencing. Because of the length of sequences, DNA sequencing methods themselves were insufficient for this type of analysis. We therefore developed the so-called “DNA shotgun sequencing” strategy, where overlapping DNA fragments were sequenced in parallel and used to reconstruct large DNA molecules via overlaps. Our publications became the most frequently cited ones during the decade of 1981-1990 and former Associate Director of Science for the Office of Basic Energy Sciences Patricia M. Dehmer presented our work as one of the great successes of this program. A major component of the sequencing strategy was the development of bacterial strains and vectors, which were also used to develop the first biotechnology crops. These crops possessed new traits thanks to the expression of foreign genes in plants. To enable such expression, chimeric genes had to be constructed using our materials and methods by the industry. Because we made our materials and methods freely available to

  6. Ising Model Reprogramming of a Repeat Protein's Equilibrium Unfolding Pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Millership, C; Phillips, J J; Main, E R G

    2016-05-08

    Repeat proteins are formed from units of 20-40 aa that stack together into quasi one-dimensional non-globular structures. This modular repetitive construction means that, unlike globular proteins, a repeat protein's equilibrium folding and thus thermodynamic stability can be analysed using linear Ising models. Typically, homozipper Ising models have been used. These treat the repeat protein as a series of identical interacting subunits (the repeated motifs) that couple together to form the folded protein. However, they cannot describe subunits of differing stabilities. Here we show that a more sophisticated heteropolymer Ising model can be constructed and fitted to two new helix deletion series of consensus tetratricopeptide repeat proteins (CTPRs). This analysis, showing an asymmetric spread of stability between helices within CTPR ensembles, coupled with the Ising model's predictive qualities was then used to guide reprogramming of the unfolding pathway of a variant CTPR protein. The designed behaviour was engineered by introducing destabilising mutations that increased the thermodynamic asymmetry within a CTPR ensemble. The asymmetry caused the terminal α-helix to thermodynamically uncouple from the rest of the protein and preferentially unfold. This produced a specific, highly populated stable intermediate with a putative dimerisation interface. As such it is the first step in designing repeat proteins with function regulated by a conformational switch. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  7. Building toy models of proteins using coevolutionary information

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Ryan; Raghunathan, Mohit; Onuchic, Jose

    2015-03-01

    Recent developments in global statistical methodologies have advanced the analysis of large collections of protein sequences for coevolutionary information. Coevolution between amino acids in a protein arises from compensatory mutations that are needed to maintain the stability or function of a protein over the course of evolution. This gives rise to quantifiable correlations between amino acid positions within the multiple sequence alignment of a protein family. Here, we use Direct Coupling Analysis (DCA) to infer a Potts model Hamiltonian governing the correlated mutations in a protein family to obtain the sequence-dependent interaction energies of a toy protein model. We demonstrate that this methodology predicts residue-residue interaction energies that are consistent with experimental mutational changes in protein stabilities as well as other computational methodologies. Furthermore, we demonstrate with several examples that DCA could be used to construct a structure-based model that quantitatively agrees with experimental data on folding mechanisms. This work serves as a potential framework for generating models of proteins that are enriched by evolutionary data that can potentially be used to engineer key functional motions and interactions in protein systems. This research has been supported by the NSF INSPIRE award MCB-1241332 and by the CTBP sponsored by the NSF (Grant PHY-1427654).

  8. A self-organizing algorithm for modeling protein loops.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pu Liu

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Protein loops, the flexible short segments connecting two stable secondary structural units in proteins, play a critical role in protein structure and function. Constructing chemically sensible conformations of protein loops that seamlessly bridge the gap between the anchor points without introducing any steric collisions remains an open challenge. A variety of algorithms have been developed to tackle the loop closure problem, ranging from inverse kinematics to knowledge-based approaches that utilize pre-existing fragments extracted from known protein structures. However, many of these approaches focus on the generation of conformations that mainly satisfy the fixed end point condition, leaving the steric constraints to be resolved in subsequent post-processing steps. In the present work, we describe a simple solution that simultaneously satisfies not only the end point and steric conditions, but also chirality and planarity constraints. Starting from random initial atomic coordinates, each individual conformation is generated independently by using a simple alternating scheme of pairwise distance adjustments of randomly chosen atoms, followed by fast geometric matching of the conformationally rigid components of the constituent amino acids. The method is conceptually simple, numerically stable and computationally efficient. Very importantly, additional constraints, such as those derived from NMR experiments, hydrogen bonds or salt bridges, can be incorporated into the algorithm in a straightforward and inexpensive way, making the method ideal for solving more complex multi-loop problems. The remarkable performance and robustness of the algorithm are demonstrated on a set of protein loops of length 4, 8, and 12 that have been used in previous studies.

  9. Developing algorithms for predicting protein-protein interactions of homology modeled proteins.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martin, Shawn Bryan; Sale, Kenneth L.; Faulon, Jean-Loup Michel; Roe, Diana C.

    2006-01-01

    The goal of this project was to examine the protein-protein docking problem, especially as it relates to homology-based structures, identify the key bottlenecks in current software tools, and evaluate and prototype new algorithms that may be developed to improve these bottlenecks. This report describes the current challenges in the protein-protein docking problem: correctly predicting the binding site for the protein-protein interaction and correctly placing the sidechains. Two different and complementary approaches are taken that can help with the protein-protein docking problem. The first approach is to predict interaction sites prior to docking, and uses bioinformatics studies of protein-protein interactions to predict theses interaction site. The second approach is to improve validation of predicted complexes after docking, and uses an improved scoring function for evaluating proposed docked poses, incorporating a solvation term. This scoring function demonstrates significant improvement over current state-of-the art functions. Initial studies on both these approaches are promising, and argue for full development of these algorithms.

  10. Hidden Markov models for prediction of protein features

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bystroff, Christopher; Krogh, Anders

    2008-01-01

    Hidden Markov Models (HMMs) are an extremely versatile statistical representation that can be used to model any set of one-dimensional discrete symbol data. HMMs can model protein sequences in many ways, depending on what features of the protein are represented by the Markov states. For protein...... structure prediction, states have been chosen to represent either homologous sequence positions, local or secondary structure types, or transmembrane locality. The resulting models can be used to predict common ancestry, secondary or local structure, or membrane topology by applying one of the two standard...... algorithms for comparing a sequence to a model. In this chapter, we review those algorithms and discuss how HMMs have been constructed and refined for the purpose of protein structure prediction....

  11. Carbon Capture and Storage: concluding remarks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maitland, G C

    2016-10-20

    This paper aims to pull together the main points, messages and underlying themes to emerge from the Discussion. It sets these remarks in the context of where Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS) fits into the spectrum of carbon mitigation solutions required to meet the challenging greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions reduction targets set by the COP21 climate change conference. The Discussion focused almost entirely on carbon capture (21 out of 23 papers) and covered all the main technology contenders for this except biological processes. It included (chemical) scientists and engineers in equal measure and the Discussion was enriched by the broad content and perspectives this brought. The major underlying theme to emerge was the essential need for closer integration of materials and process design - the use of isolated materials performance criteria in the absence of holistic process modelling for design and optimisation can be misleading. Indeed, combining process and materials simulation for reverse materials molecular engineering to achieve the required process performance and cost constraints is now within reach and is beginning to make a significant impact on optimising CCS and CCU (CO2 utilisation) processes in particular, as it is on materials science and engineering generally. Examples from the Discussion papers are used to illustrate this potential. The take-home messages from a range of other underpinning research themes key to CCUS are also summarised: new capture materials, materials characterisation and screening, process innovation, membranes, industrial processes, net negative emissions processes, the effect of GHG impurities, data requirements, environment sustainability and resource management, and policy. Some key points to emerge concerning carbon transport, utilisation and storage are also included, together with some overarching conclusions on how to develop more energy- and cost-effective CCS processes through improved integration of approach across the

  12. Loopholes and missing links in protein modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossi, Karen A; Weigelt, Carolyn A; Nayeem, Akbar; Krystek, Stanley R

    2007-09-01

    This paper provides an unbiased comparison of four commercially available programs for loop sampling, Prime, Modeler, ICM, and Sybyl, each of which uses a different modeling protocol. The study assesses the quality of results and examines the relative strengths and weaknesses of each method. The set of loops to be modeled varied in length from 4-12 amino acids. The approaches used for loop modeling can be classified into two methodologies: ab initio loop generation (Modeler and Prime) and database searches (Sybyl and ICM). Comparison of the modeled loops to the native structures was used to determine the accuracy of each method. All of the protocols returned similar results for short loop lengths (four to six residues), but as loop length increased, the quality of the results varied among the programs. Prime generated loops with RMSDs modeled loops.

  13. Protein secondary structure analysis with a coarse-grained model

    OpenAIRE

    Kneller, Gerald R.; Hinsen, Konrad

    2014-01-01

    The paper presents a geometrical model for protein secondary structure analysis which uses only the positions of the $C_{\\alpha}$-atoms. We construct a space curve connecting these positions by piecewise polynomial interpolation and describe the folding of the protein backbone by a succession of screw motions linking the Frenet frames at consecutive $C_{\\alpha}$-positions. Using the ASTRAL subset of the SCOPe data base of protein structures, we derive thresholds for the screw parameters of se...

  14. Modeling protein network evolution under genome duplication and domain shuffling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isambert Hervé

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Successive whole genome duplications have recently been firmly established in all major eukaryote kingdoms. Such exponential evolutionary processes must have largely contributed to shape the topology of protein-protein interaction (PPI networks by outweighing, in particular, all time-linear network growths modeled so far. Results We propose and solve a mathematical model of PPI network evolution under successive genome duplications. This demonstrates, from first principles, that evolutionary conservation and scale-free topology are intrinsically linked properties of PPI networks and emerge from i prevailing exponential network dynamics under duplication and ii asymmetric divergence of gene duplicates. While required, we argue that this asymmetric divergence arises, in fact, spontaneously at the level of protein-binding sites. This supports a refined model of PPI network evolution in terms of protein domains under exponential and asymmetric duplication/divergence dynamics, with multidomain proteins underlying the combinatorial formation of protein complexes. Genome duplication then provides a powerful source of PPI network innovation by promoting local rearrangements of multidomain proteins on a genome wide scale. Yet, we show that the overall conservation and topology of PPI networks are robust to extensive domain shuffling of multidomain proteins as well as to finer details of protein interaction and evolution. Finally, large scale features of direct and indirect PPI networks of S. cerevisiae are well reproduced numerically with only two adjusted parameters of clear biological significance (i.e. network effective growth rate and average number of protein-binding domains per protein. Conclusion This study demonstrates the statistical consequences of genome duplication and domain shuffling on the conservation and topology of PPI networks over a broad evolutionary scale across eukaryote kingdoms. In particular, scale

  15. A tractable genotype-phenotype map modelling the self-assembly of protein quaternary structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenbury, Sam F; Johnston, Iain G; Louis, Ard A; Ahnert, Sebastian E

    2014-06-01

    The mapping between biological genotypes and phenotypes is central to the study of biological evolution. Here, we introduce a rich, intuitive and biologically realistic genotype-phenotype (GP) map that serves as a model of self-assembling biological structures, such as protein complexes, and remains computationally and analytically tractable. Our GP map arises naturally from the self-assembly of polyomino structures on a two-dimensional lattice and exhibits a number of properties: redundancy (genotypes vastly outnumber phenotypes), phenotype bias (genotypic redundancy varies greatly between phenotypes), genotype component disconnectivity (phenotypes consist of disconnected mutational networks) and shape space covering (most phenotypes can be reached in a small number of mutations). We also show that the mutational robustness of phenotypes scales very roughly logarithmically with phenotype redundancy and is positively correlated with phenotypic evolvability. Although our GP map describes the assembly of disconnected objects, it shares many properties with other popular GP maps for connected units, such as models for RNA secondary structure or the hydrophobic-polar (HP) lattice model for protein tertiary structure. The remarkable fact that these important properties similarly emerge from such different models suggests the possibility that universal features underlie a much wider class of biologically realistic GP maps.

  16. A tractable genotype–phenotype map modelling the self-assembly of protein quaternary structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenbury, Sam F.; Johnston, Iain G.; Louis, Ard A.; Ahnert, Sebastian E.

    2014-01-01

    The mapping between biological genotypes and phenotypes is central to the study of biological evolution. Here, we introduce a rich, intuitive and biologically realistic genotype–phenotype (GP) map that serves as a model of self-assembling biological structures, such as protein complexes, and remains computationally and analytically tractable. Our GP map arises naturally from the self-assembly of polyomino structures on a two-dimensional lattice and exhibits a number of properties: redundancy (genotypes vastly outnumber phenotypes), phenotype bias (genotypic redundancy varies greatly between phenotypes), genotype component disconnectivity (phenotypes consist of disconnected mutational networks) and shape space covering (most phenotypes can be reached in a small number of mutations). We also show that the mutational robustness of phenotypes scales very roughly logarithmically with phenotype redundancy and is positively correlated with phenotypic evolvability. Although our GP map describes the assembly of disconnected objects, it shares many properties with other popular GP maps for connected units, such as models for RNA secondary structure or the hydrophobic-polar (HP) lattice model for protein tertiary structure. The remarkable fact that these important properties similarly emerge from such different models suggests the possibility that universal features underlie a much wider class of biologically realistic GP maps. PMID:24718456

  17. Prediction of TF target sites based on atomistic models of protein-DNA complexes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Collado-Vides Julio

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The specific recognition of genomic cis-regulatory elements by transcription factors (TFs plays an essential role in the regulation of coordinated gene expression. Studying the mechanisms determining binding specificity in protein-DNA interactions is thus an important goal. Most current approaches for modeling TF specific recognition rely on the knowledge of large sets of cognate target sites and consider only the information contained in their primary sequence. Results Here we describe a structure-based methodology for predicting sequence motifs starting from the coordinates of a TF-DNA complex. Our algorithm combines information regarding the direct and indirect readout of DNA into an atomistic statistical model, which is used to estimate the interaction potential. We first measure the ability of our method to correctly estimate the binding specificities of eight prokaryotic and eukaryotic TFs that belong to different structural superfamilies. Secondly, the method is applied to two homology models, finding that sampling of interface side-chain rotamers remarkably improves the results. Thirdly, the algorithm is compared with a reference structural method based on contact counts, obtaining comparable predictions for the experimental complexes and more accurate sequence motifs for the homology models. Conclusion Our results demonstrate that atomic-detail structural information can be feasibly used to predict TF binding sites. The computational method presented here is universal and might be applied to other systems involving protein-DNA recognition.

  18. An Integrated Framework Advancing Membrane Protein Modeling and Design.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rebecca F Alford

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Membrane proteins are critical functional molecules in the human body, constituting more than 30% of open reading frames in the human genome. Unfortunately, a myriad of difficulties in overexpression and reconstitution into membrane mimetics severely limit our ability to determine their structures. Computational tools are therefore instrumental to membrane protein structure prediction, consequently increasing our understanding of membrane protein function and their role in disease. Here, we describe a general framework facilitating membrane protein modeling and design that combines the scientific principles for membrane protein modeling with the flexible software architecture of Rosetta3. This new framework, called RosettaMP, provides a general membrane representation that interfaces with scoring, conformational sampling, and mutation routines that can be easily combined to create new protocols. To demonstrate the capabilities of this implementation, we developed four proof-of-concept applications for (1 prediction of free energy changes upon mutation; (2 high-resolution structural refinement; (3 protein-protein docking; and (4 assembly of symmetric protein complexes, all in the membrane environment. Preliminary data show that these algorithms can produce meaningful scores and structures. The data also suggest needed improvements to both sampling routines and score functions. Importantly, the applications collectively demonstrate the potential of combining the flexible nature of RosettaMP with the power of Rosetta algorithms to facilitate membrane protein modeling and design.

  19. Model systems for understanding absorption tuning by opsin proteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Mogens Brøndsted

    2009-01-01

    This tutorial review reports on model systems that have been synthesised and investigated for elucidating how opsin proteins tune the absorption of the protonated retinal Schiff base chromophore. In particular, the importance of the counteranion is highlighted. In addition, the review advocates...... is avoided, and it becomes clear that opsin proteins induce blueshifts in the chromophore absorption rather than redshifts....

  20. Remarks on the system of the Spermatophytes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pulle, A.

    1938-01-01

    For the group of plants treated in the “Compendium” I have used the name Spermatophyta. WETTSTEIN in his “Handbuch” remarks that this name is incorrect because in botany the word “sperma” is used for spermatozoids, and from the name Spermatophyta it might be concluded that by it “plants with spermat

  1. Concluding remarks: from match to flamethrower.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poliakoff, Martyn

    2011-01-01

    These remarks give some impressions of Faraday Discussion 152 from the point of view of an outsider and suggest a number of actions which might help bind the Gold Catalysis Community more strongly and increase the long term impact of their science.

  2. Dynamical model of the kinesin protein motor

    CERN Document Server

    Nesterov, Alexander I; Ramírez, Mónica F

    2016-01-01

    We model and simulate the stepping dynamics of the kinesin motor including electric and mechanical forces, environmental noise, and the complicated potentials produced by tracking and neighboring protofilaments. Our dynamical model supports the hand-over-hand mechanism of the kinesin stepping. Our theoretical predictions and numerical simulations include the off-axis displacements of the kinesin heads while the steps are performed. The results obtained are in a good agreement with recent experiments on the kinesin dynamics.

  3. Comparative Study of Elastic Network Model and Protein Contact Network for Protein Complexes: The Hemoglobin Case

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guang Hu

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The overall topology and interfacial interactions play key roles in understanding structural and functional principles of protein complexes. Elastic Network Model (ENM and Protein Contact Network (PCN are two widely used methods for high throughput investigation of structures and interactions within protein complexes. In this work, the comparative analysis of ENM and PCN relative to hemoglobin (Hb was taken as case study. We examine four types of structural and dynamical paradigms, namely, conformational change between different states of Hbs, modular analysis, allosteric mechanisms studies, and interface characterization of an Hb. The comparative study shows that ENM has an advantage in studying dynamical properties and protein-protein interfaces, while PCN is better for describing protein structures quantitatively both from local and from global levels. We suggest that the integration of ENM and PCN would give a potential but powerful tool in structural systems biology.

  4. A least square method based model for identifying protein complexes in protein-protein interaction network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Qiguo; Guo, Maozu; Guo, Yingjie; Liu, Xiaoyan; Liu, Yang; Teng, Zhixia

    2014-01-01

    Protein complex formed by a group of physical interacting proteins plays a crucial role in cell activities. Great effort has been made to computationally identify protein complexes from protein-protein interaction (PPI) network. However, the accuracy of the prediction is still far from being satisfactory, because the topological structures of protein complexes in the PPI network are too complicated. This paper proposes a novel optimization framework to detect complexes from PPI network, named PLSMC. The method is on the basis of the fact that if two proteins are in a common complex, they are likely to be interacting. PLSMC employs this relation to determine complexes by a penalized least squares method. PLSMC is applied to several public yeast PPI networks, and compared with several state-of-the-art methods. The results indicate that PLSMC outperforms other methods. In particular, complexes predicted by PLSMC can match known complexes with a higher accuracy than other methods. Furthermore, the predicted complexes have high functional homogeneity.

  5. fast_protein_cluster: parallel and optimized clustering of large-scale protein modeling data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, Ling-Hong; Samudrala, Ram

    2014-06-15

    fast_protein_cluster is a fast, parallel and memory efficient package used to cluster 60 000 sets of protein models (with up to 550 000 models per set) generated by the Nutritious Rice for the World project. fast_protein_cluster is an optimized and extensible toolkit that supports Root Mean Square Deviation after optimal superposition (RMSD) and Template Modeling score (TM-score) as metrics. RMSD calculations using a laptop CPU are 60× faster than qcprot and 3× faster than current graphics processing unit (GPU) implementations. New GPU code further increases the speed of RMSD and TM-score calculations. fast_protein_cluster provides novel k-means and hierarchical clustering methods that are up to 250× and 2000× faster, respectively, than Clusco, and identify significantly more accurate models than Spicker and Clusco. fast_protein_cluster is written in C++ using OpenMP for multi-threading support. Custom streaming Single Instruction Multiple Data (SIMD) extensions and advanced vector extension intrinsics code accelerate CPU calculations, and OpenCL kernels support AMD and Nvidia GPUs. fast_protein_cluster is available under the M.I.T. license. (http://software.compbio.washington.edu/fast_protein_cluster) © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press.

  6. Modelling Protein Dynamics on the Microsecond Time Scale

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Siuda, Iwona Anna

    Recent years have shown an increase in coarse-grained (CG) molecular dynamics simulations, providing structural and dynamic details of large proteins and enabling studies of self-assembly of biological materials. It is not easy to acquire such data experimentally, and access is also still limited...... in atomistic simulations. During her PhD studies, Iwona Siuda used MARTINI CG models to study the dynamics of different globular and membrane proteins. In several cases, the MARTINI model was sufficient to study conformational changes of small, purely alpha-helical proteins. However, in studies of larger...... family....

  7. Modeling the Tensile Properties of Soybean Protein Yarns

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    石风俊; 崔世忠

    2003-01-01

    The tensile properties of a series of soybean protein yarns are tested in USTER THINKPAID Ⅲ.A nonlinear viscoelastic model has been proposed to describe the tensile behavior of soybean protein yarns.The model is composed of a Maxwell element,a linear spring and a nonlinear spring.The tensile properties of soybean protein yarn are analyzed.The stress-strain curves of the yarns are fitted.The average breaking tenacity and specific work of rupture are calculated using the average breaking strain.Comparisons indicate that theoretical predictions conform the experimental results very well.

  8. The unfolded protein response and translation attenuation: a modelling approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trusina, A; Tang, C

    2010-10-01

    Unfolded protein response (UPR) is a stress response to increased levels of unfolded proteins in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). To deal with this stress, all eukaryotic cells share a well-conserved strategy--the upregulation of chaperons and proteases to facilitate protein folding and to degrade the misfolded proteins. For metazoans, however, an additional and seemingly redundant strategy has been evolved--translation attenuation (TA) of proteins targeted to the ER via the protein kinase PERK pathway. PERK is essential in secretory cells, such as the pancreatic β-cells, but not in non-secretory cell types. We have recently developed a mathematical model of UPR, focusing on the interplay and synergy between the TA arm and the conserved Ire1 arm of the UPR. The model showed that the TA mechanism is beneficial in highly fluctuating environment, for example, in the case where the ER stress changes frequently. Under highly variable levels of ER stress, tight regulation of the ER load by TA avoids excess amount of chaperons and proteases being produced. The model also showed that TA is of greater importance when there is a large flux of proteins through the ER. In this study, we further expand our model to investigate different types of ER stress and different temporal profiles of the stress. We found that TA is more desirable in dealing with the translation stress, for example, prolonged stimulation of proinsulin biosynthesis, than the chemical stress.

  9. A resource for benchmarking the usefulness of protein structure models.

    KAUST Repository

    Carbajo, Daniel

    2012-08-02

    BACKGROUND: Increasingly, biologists and biochemists use computational tools to design experiments to probe the function of proteins and/or to engineer them for a variety of different purposes. The most effective strategies rely on the knowledge of the three-dimensional structure of the protein of interest. However it is often the case that an experimental structure is not available and that models of different quality are used instead. On the other hand, the relationship between the quality of a model and its appropriate use is not easy to derive in general, and so far it has been analyzed in detail only for specific application. RESULTS: This paper describes a database and related software tools that allow testing of a given structure based method on models of a protein representing different levels of accuracy. The comparison of the results of a computational experiment on the experimental structure and on a set of its decoy models will allow developers and users to assess which is the specific threshold of accuracy required to perform the task effectively. CONCLUSIONS: The ModelDB server automatically builds decoy models of different accuracy for a given protein of known structure and provides a set of useful tools for their analysis. Pre-computed data for a non-redundant set of deposited protein structures are available for analysis and download in the ModelDB database. IMPLEMENTATION, AVAILABILITY AND REQUIREMENTS: Project name: A resource for benchmarking the usefulness of protein structure models. Project home page: http://bl210.caspur.it/MODEL-DB/MODEL-DB_web/MODindex.php.Operating system(s): Platform independent. Programming language: Perl-BioPerl (program); mySQL, Perl DBI and DBD modules (database); php, JavaScript, Jmol scripting (web server). Other requirements: Java Runtime Environment v1.4 or later, Perl, BioPerl, CPAN modules, HHsearch, Modeller, LGA, NCBI Blast package, DSSP, Speedfill (Surfnet) and PSAIA. License: Free. Any restrictions to use by

  10. Homology Modeling: Generating Structural Models to Understand Protein Function and Mechanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramachandran, Srinivas; Dokholyan, Nikolay V.

    Geneticists and molecular and cell biologists routinely uncover new proteins important in specific biological processes/pathways. However, either the molecular functions or the functional mechanisms of many of these proteins are unclear due to a lack of knowledge of their atomic structures. Yet, determining experimental structures of many proteins presents technical challenges. The current methods for obtaining atomic-resolution structures of biomolecules (X-ray crystallography and NMR spectroscopy) require pure preparations of proteins at concentrations much higher than those at which the proteins exist in a physiological environment. Additionally, NMR has size limitations, with current technology limited to the determination of structures of proteins with masses of up to 15 kDa. Due to these reasons, atomic structures of many medically and biologically important proteins do not exist. However, the structures of these proteins are essential for several purposes, including in silico drug design [1], understanding the effects of disease mutations [2], and designing experiments to probe the functional mechanisms of proteins. Comparative modeling has gained importance as a tool for bridging the gap between sequence and structure space, allowing researchers to build structural models of proteins that are difficult to crystallize or for which structure determination by NMR spectroscopy is not tractable. Comparative modeling, or homology modeling, exploits the fact that two proteins whose sequences are evolutionarily connected display similar structural features [3]. Thus, the known structure of a protein (template) can be used to generate a molecular model of the protein (query) whose experimental structure is notknown.

  11. Protein buffering in model systems and in whole human saliva.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreas Lamanda

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to quantify the buffer attributes (value, power, range and optimum of two model systems for whole human resting saliva, the purified proteins from whole human resting saliva and single proteins. Two model systems, the first containing amyloglucosidase and lysozyme, and the second containing amyloglucosidase and alpha-amylase, were shown to provide, in combination with hydrogencarbonate and di-hydrogenphosphate, almost identical buffer attributes as whole human resting saliva. It was further demonstrated that changes in the protein concentration as small as 0.1% may change the buffer value of a buffer solution up to 15 times. Additionally, it was shown that there was a protein concentration change in the same range (0.16% between saliva samples collected at the time periods of 13:00 and others collected at 9:00 am and 17:00. The mode of the protein expression changed between these samples corresponded to the change in basic buffer power and the change of the buffer value at pH 6.7. Finally, SDS Page and Ruthenium II tris (bathophenantroline disulfonate staining unveiled a constant protein expression in all samples except for one 50 kDa protein band. As the change in the expression pattern of that 50 kDa protein band corresponded to the change in basic buffer power and the buffer value at pH 6.7, it was reasonable to conclude that this 50 kDa protein band may contain the protein(s belonging to the protein buffer system of human saliva.

  12. Adaptive Simulated Annealing Based Protein Loop Modeling of Neurotoxins

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈杰; 黄丽娜; 彭志红

    2003-01-01

    A loop modeling method, adaptive simulated annealing, for ab initio prediction of protein loop structures, as an optimization problem of searching the global minimum of a given energy function, is proposed. An interface-friendly toolbox-LoopModeller in Windows and Linux systems, VC++ and OpenGL environments is developed for analysis and visualization. Simulation results of three short-chain neurotoxins modeled by LoopModeller show that the method proposed is fast and efficient.

  13. A CONTINUUM HARD-SPHERE MODEL OF PROTEIN ADSORPTION.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finch, Craig; Clarke, Thomas; Hickman, James J

    2013-07-01

    Protein adsorption plays a significant role in biological phenomena such as cell-surface interactions and the coagulation of blood. Two-dimensional random sequential adsorption (RSA) models are widely used to model the adsorption of proteins on solid surfaces. Continuum equations have been developed so that the results of RSA simulations can be used to predict the kinetics of adsorption. Recently, Brownian dynamics simulations have become popular for modeling protein adsorption. In this work a continuum model was developed to allow the results from a Brownian dynamics simulation to be used as the boundary condition in a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulation. Brownian dynamics simulations were used to model the diffusive transport of hard-sphere particles in a liquid and the adsorption of the particles onto a solid surface. The configuration of the adsorbed particles was analyzed to quantify the chemical potential near the surface, which was found to be a function of the distance from the surface and the fractional surface coverage. The near-surface chemical potential was used to derive a continuum model of adsorption that incorporates the results from the Brownian dynamics simulations. The equations of the continuum model were discretized and coupled to a CFD simulation of diffusive transport to the surface. The kinetics of adsorption predicted by the continuum model closely matched the results from the Brownian dynamics simulation. This new model allows the results from mesoscale simulations to be incorporated into micro- or macro-scale CFD transport simulations of protein adsorption in practical devices.

  14. Protein Structure Classification and Loop Modeling Using Multiple Ramachandran Distributions

    KAUST Repository

    Najibi, Seyed Morteza

    2017-02-08

    Recently, the study of protein structures using angular representations has attracted much attention among structural biologists. The main challenge is how to efficiently model the continuous conformational space of the protein structures based on the differences and similarities between different Ramachandran plots. Despite the presence of statistical methods for modeling angular data of proteins, there is still a substantial need for more sophisticated and faster statistical tools to model the large-scale circular datasets. To address this need, we have developed a nonparametric method for collective estimation of multiple bivariate density functions for a collection of populations of protein backbone angles. The proposed method takes into account the circular nature of the angular data using trigonometric spline which is more efficient compared to existing methods. This collective density estimation approach is widely applicable when there is a need to estimate multiple density functions from different populations with common features. Moreover, the coefficients of adaptive basis expansion for the fitted densities provide a low-dimensional representation that is useful for visualization, clustering, and classification of the densities. The proposed method provides a novel and unique perspective to two important and challenging problems in protein structure research: structure-based protein classification and angular-sampling-based protein loop structure prediction.

  15. Random field model reveals structure of the protein recombinational landscape.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philip A Romero

    Full Text Available We are interested in how intragenic recombination contributes to the evolution of proteins and how this mechanism complements and enhances the diversity generated by random mutation. Experiments have revealed that proteins are highly tolerant to recombination with homologous sequences (mutation by recombination is conservative; more surprisingly, they have also shown that homologous sequence fragments make largely additive contributions to biophysical properties such as stability. Here, we develop a random field model to describe the statistical features of the subset of protein space accessible by recombination, which we refer to as the recombinational landscape. This model shows quantitative agreement with experimental results compiled from eight libraries of proteins that were generated by recombining gene fragments from homologous proteins. The model reveals a recombinational landscape that is highly enriched in functional sequences, with properties dominated by a large-scale additive structure. It also quantifies the relative contributions of parent sequence identity, crossover locations, and protein fold to the tolerance of proteins to recombination. Intragenic recombination explores a unique subset of sequence space that promotes rapid molecular diversification and functional adaptation.

  16. WATGEN: an algorithm for modeling water networks at protein-protein interfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bui, Huynh-Hoa; Schiewe, Alexandra J; Haworth, Ian S

    2007-11-15

    Water molecules at protein-protein interfaces contribute to the close packing of atoms and ensure complementarity between the protein surfaces, as well as mediating polar interactions. Therefore, modeling of interface water is of importance in understanding the structural basis of biomolecular association. We present an algorithm, WATGEN, which predicts locations for water molecules at a protein-protein or protein-peptide interface, given the atomic coordinates of the protein and peptide. A key element of the WATGEN algorithm is the prediction of water sites that can form multiple hydrogen bonds that bridge the binding interface. Trial calculations were performed on water networks predicted by WATGEN at 126 protein-peptide interfaces (X-ray resolutions algorithm predicts 72 and 88% of these sites within 1.5 and 2.0 A, respectively. The predicted number of water molecules at each interface was much higher than the number of water molecules identified experimentally. Therefore, random placement of the same number of water molecules as that predicted at each interface was performed as a control, and resulted in only 22 and 40% of water sites placed within 1.5 and 2.0 A of experimental sites, respectively. Based on these data, we conclude that WATGEN can accurately predict the location of water molecules at a protein-peptide interface, and this may be of value for understanding the energetics and specificity of biomolecular association. (c) 2007 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. A computational model of the LGI1 protein suggests a common binding site for ADAM proteins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emanuela Leonardi

    Full Text Available Mutations of human leucine-rich glioma inactivated (LGI1 gene encoding the epitempin protein cause autosomal dominant temporal lateral epilepsy (ADTLE, a rare familial partial epileptic syndrome. The LGI1 gene seems to have a role on the transmission of neuronal messages but the exact molecular mechanism remains unclear. In contrast to other genes involved in epileptic disorders, epitempin shows no homology with known ion channel genes but contains two domains, composed of repeated structural units, known to mediate protein-protein interactions.A three dimensional in silico model of the two epitempin domains was built to predict the structure-function relationship and propose a functional model integrating previous experimental findings. Conserved and electrostatic charged regions of the model surface suggest a possible arrangement between the two domains and identifies a possible ADAM protein binding site in the β-propeller domain and another protein binding site in the leucine-rich repeat domain. The functional model indicates that epitempin could mediate the interaction between proteins localized to different synaptic sides in a static way, by forming a dimer, or in a dynamic way, by binding proteins at different times.The model was also used to predict effects of known disease-causing missense mutations. Most of the variants are predicted to alter protein folding while several other map to functional surface regions. In agreement with experimental evidence, this suggests that non-secreted LGI1 mutants could be retained within the cell by quality control mechanisms or by altering interactions required for the secretion process.

  18. Markov dynamic models for long-timescale protein motion.

    KAUST Repository

    Chiang, Tsung-Han

    2010-06-01

    Molecular dynamics (MD) simulation is a well-established method for studying protein motion at the atomic scale. However, it is computationally intensive and generates massive amounts of data. One way of addressing the dual challenges of computation efficiency and data analysis is to construct simplified models of long-timescale protein motion from MD simulation data. In this direction, we propose to use Markov models with hidden states, in which the Markovian states represent potentially overlapping probabilistic distributions over protein conformations. We also propose a principled criterion for evaluating the quality of a model by its ability to predict long-timescale protein motions. Our method was tested on 2D synthetic energy landscapes and two extensively studied peptides, alanine dipeptide and the villin headpiece subdomain (HP-35 NleNle). One interesting finding is that although a widely accepted model of alanine dipeptide contains six states, a simpler model with only three states is equally good for predicting long-timescale motions. We also used the constructed Markov models to estimate important kinetic and dynamic quantities for protein folding, in particular, mean first-passage time. The results are consistent with available experimental measurements.

  19. Reduction of Protein Networks Models by Passivity Preserving Projection

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Luca Mesin; Flavio Canavero; Lamberto Rondoni

    2013-01-01

    Reduction of complex protein networks models is of great importance.The accuracy of a passivity preserving algorithm (PRIMA) for model order reduction (MOR) is here tested on protein networks,introducing innovative variations of the standard PRIMA method to fit the problem at hand.The reduction method does not require to solve the complete system,resulting in a promising tool for studying very large-scale models for which the full solution cannot be computed.The mathematical structure of the considered kinetic equations is preserved.Keeping constant the reduction factor,the approximation error is lower for larger systems.

  20. Dissipative electro-elastic network model of protein electrostatics

    CERN Document Server

    Martin, Daniel R; Matyushov, Dmitry V

    2011-01-01

    We propose a dissipative electro-elastic network model (DENM) to describe the dynamics and statistics of electrostatic fluctuations at active sites of proteins. The model combines the harmonic network of residue beads with overdamped dynamics of the normal modes of the network characterized by two friction coefficients. The electrostatic component is introduced to the model through atomic charges of the protein force field. The overall effect of the electrostatic fluctuations of the network is recorded through the frequency-dependent response functions of the electrostatic potential and electric field at the active site. We also consider the dynamics of displacements of individual residues in the network and the dynamics of distances between pairs of residues. The model is tested against loss spectra of residue displacements and the electrostatic potential and electric field at the heme's iron from all-atom molecular dynamics simulations of three hydrated globular proteins.

  1. The Remarkable Character of Porphobilinogen Synthase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaffe, Eileen K

    2016-11-15

    not use the allosteric Mg(2+), there is a spatially equivalent arginine-derived guanidium group. Deprotonation of this residue promotes formation of the hexamer and accounts for the basic arm of the bell-shaped pH vs activity profile of human PBGS. A human inborn error of metabolism known as ALAD porphyria is attributed to PBGS variants that favor the hexameric assembly. The existence of one such variant, F12L, which dramatically stabilizes the human PBGS hexamer, allowed crystal structure determination for the hexamer. Without this crystal structure and octameric PBGS structures containing the allosteric Mg(2+), it would have been difficult to decipher the structural basis for PBGS allostery. The requirement for multimer dissociation as an intermediate step in PBGS allostery was established by monitoring subunit disproportionation during the turnover-dependent transition of heteromeric PBGS (comprised of human wild type and F12L) from hexamer to octamer. One outcome of these studies was the definition of the dissociative morpheein model of protein allostery. The phylogenetically variable time scales for PBGS multimer interconversion result in atypical kinetic and biophysical behaviors. These behaviors can serve to identify other proteins that use the morpheein model of protein allostery.

  2. Model of a DNA-protein complex of the architectural monomeric protein MC1 from Euryarchaea.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Françoise Paquet

    Full Text Available In Archaea the two major modes of DNA packaging are wrapping by histone proteins or bending by architectural non-histone proteins. To supplement our knowledge about the binding mode of the different DNA-bending proteins observed across the three domains of life, we present here the first model of a complex in which the monomeric Methanogen Chromosomal protein 1 (MC1 from Euryarchaea binds to the concave side of a strongly bent DNA. In laboratory growth conditions MC1 is the most abundant architectural protein present in Methanosarcina thermophila CHTI55. Like most proteins that strongly bend DNA, MC1 is known to bind in the minor groove. Interaction areas for MC1 and DNA were mapped by Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR data. The polarity of protein binding was determined using paramagnetic probes attached to the DNA. The first structural model of the DNA-MC1 complex we propose here was obtained by two complementary docking approaches and is in good agreement with the experimental data previously provided by electron microscopy and biochemistry. Residues essential to DNA-binding and -bending were highlighted and confirmed by site-directed mutagenesis. It was found that the Arg25 side-chain was essential to neutralize the negative charge of two phosphates that come very close in response to a dramatic curvature of the DNA.

  3. A simple probabilistic model of multibody interactions in proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johansson, Kristoffer Enøe; Hamelryck, Thomas

    2013-08-01

    Protein structure prediction methods typically use statistical potentials, which rely on statistics derived from a database of know protein structures. In the vast majority of cases, these potentials involve pairwise distances or contacts between amino acids or atoms. Although some potentials beyond pairwise interactions have been described, the formulation of a general multibody potential is seen as intractable due to the perceived limited amount of data. In this article, we show that it is possible to formulate a probabilistic model of higher order interactions in proteins, without arbitrarily limiting the number of contacts. The success of this approach is based on replacing a naive table-based approach with a simple hierarchical model involving suitable probability distributions and conditional independence assumptions. The model captures the joint probability distribution of an amino acid and its neighbors, local structure and solvent exposure. We show that this model can be used to approximate the conditional probability distribution of an amino acid sequence given a structure using a pseudo-likelihood approach. We verify the model by decoy recognition and site-specific amino acid predictions. Our coarse-grained model is compared to state-of-art methods that use full atomic detail. This article illustrates how the use of simple probabilistic models can lead to new opportunities in the treatment of nonlocal interactions in knowledge-based protein structure prediction and design. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc., a Wiley company.

  4. Protein carbonylation, protein aggregation and neuronal cell death in a murine model of multiple sclerosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dasgupta, Anushka

    Many studies have suggested that oxidative stress plays an important role in the pathophysiology of both multiple sclerosis (MS) and its animal model experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE). Yet, the mechanism by which oxidative stress leads to tissue damage in these disorders is unclear. Recent work from our laboratory has revealed that protein carbonylation, a major oxidative modification caused by severe and/or chronic oxidative stress conditions, is elevated in MS and EAE. Furthermore, protein carbonylation has been shown to alter protein structure leading to misfolding/aggregation. These findings prompted me to hypothesize that carbonylated proteins, formed as a consequence of oxidative stress and/or decreased proteasomal activity, promote protein aggregation to mediate neuronal apoptosis in vitro and in EAE. To test this novel hypothesis, I first characterized protein carbonylation, protein aggregation and apoptosis along the spinal cord during the course of myelin-oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG)35-55 peptide-induced EAE in C57BL/6 mice [Chapter 2]. The results show that carbonylated proteins accumulate throughout the course of the disease, albeit by different mechanisms: increased oxidative stress in acute EAE and decreased proteasomal activity in chronic EAE. I discovered not only that there is a temporal correlation between protein carbonylation and apoptosis but also that carbonyl levels are significantly higher in apoptotic cells. A high number of juxta-nuclear and cytoplasmic protein aggregates containing the majority of the oxidized proteins are also present during the course of EAE, which seems to be due to reduced autophagy. In chapter 3, I show that when gluthathione levels are reduced to those in EAE spinal cord, both neuron-like PC12 (nPC12) cells and primary neuronal cultures accumulate carbonylated proteins and undergo cell death (both by necrosis and apoptosis). Immunocytochemical and biochemical studies also revealed a temporal

  5. Coarse-grained models of protein folding: toy models or predictive tools?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clementi, Cecilia

    2008-02-01

    Coarse-grained models are emerging as a practical alternative to all-atom simulations for the characterization of protein folding mechanisms over long time scales. While a decade ago minimalist toy models were mainly designed to test general hypotheses on the principles regulating protein folding, the latest coarse-grained models are increasingly realistic and can be used to characterize quantitatively the detailed folding mechanism of specific proteins. The ability of such models to reproduce the essential features of folding dynamics suggests that each single atomic degree of freedom is not by itself particularly relevant to folding and supports a statistical mechanical approach to characterize folding transitions. When combined with more refined models and with experimental studies, the systematic investigation of protein systems and complexes using coarse-grained models can advance our theoretical understanding of the actual organizing principles that emerge from the complex network of interactions among protein atomic constituents.

  6. Ab initio modeling of small proteins by iterative TASSER simulations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Yang

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Predicting 3-dimensional protein structures from amino-acid sequences is an important unsolved problem in computational structural biology. The problem becomes relatively easier if close homologous proteins have been solved, as high-resolution models can be built by aligning target sequences to the solved homologous structures. However, for sequences without similar folds in the Protein Data Bank (PDB library, the models have to be predicted from scratch. Progress in the ab initio structure modeling is slow. The aim of this study was to extend the TASSER (threading/assembly/refinement method for the ab initio modeling and examine systemically its ability to fold small single-domain proteins. Results We developed I-TASSER by iteratively implementing the TASSER method, which is used in the folding test of three benchmarks of small proteins. First, data on 16 small proteins (α-root mean square deviation (RMSD of 3.8Å, with 6 of them having a Cα-RMSD α-RMSD α-RMSD of the I-TASSER models was 3.9Å, whereas it was 5.9Å using TOUCHSTONE-II software. Finally, 20 non-homologous small proteins (α-RMSD of 3.9Å was obtained for the third benchmark, with seven cases having a Cα-RMSD Conclusion Our simulation results show that I-TASSER can consistently predict the correct folds and sometimes high-resolution models for small single-domain proteins. Compared with other ab initio modeling methods such as ROSETTA and TOUCHSTONE II, the average performance of I-TASSER is either much better or is similar within a lower computational time. These data, together with the significant performance of automated I-TASSER server (the Zhang-Server in the 'free modeling' section of the recent Critical Assessment of Structure Prediction (CASP7 experiment, demonstrate new progresses in automated ab initio model generation. The I-TASSER server is freely available for academic users http://zhang.bioinformatics.ku.edu/I-TASSER.

  7. SecA, a remarkable nanomachine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kusters, Ilja; Driessen, Arnold J. M.

    2011-01-01

    Biological cells harbor a variety of molecular machines that carry out mechanical work at the nanoscale. One of these nanomachines is the bacterial motor protein SecA which translocates secretory proteins through the protein-conducting membrane channel SecYEG. SecA converts chemically stored energy

  8. Phase diagram of a model of the protein amelogenin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haaga, Jason; Pemberton, Elizabeth; Gunton, J. D.; Rickman, J. M.

    2016-08-01

    There has been considerable recent interest in the self-assembly and phase behavior of models of colloidal and protein particles with anisotropic interactions. One example of particular interest is amelogenin, an important protein involved in the formation of dental enamel. Amelogenin is primarily hydrophobic with a 25-residue charged C-terminus tail. This protein undergoes a hierarchical assembly process that is crucial to mineral deposition, and experimental work has demonstrated that the deletion of the C-terminus tail prevents this self-assembly. A simplified model of amelogenin has been proposed in which the protein is treated as a hydrophobic sphere, interacting via the Asakura-Oosawa (AO) potential, with a tethered point charge on its surface. In this paper, we examine the effect of the Coulomb interaction between the point charges in altering the phase diagram of the AO model. For the parameter case specific to amelogenin, we find that the previous in vitro experimental and model conditions correspond to the system being near the low-density edge of the metastable region of the phase diagram. Our study illustrates more generally the importance of understanding the phase diagram for proteins, in that the kinetic pathway for self-assembly and the resulting aggregate morphology depends on the location of the initial state in the phase diagram.

  9. The evolution of the protein synthesis system. I - A model of a primitive protein synthesis system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizutani, H.; Ponnamperuma, C.

    1977-01-01

    A model is developed to describe the evolution of the protein synthesis system. The model is comprised of two independent autocatalytic systems, one including one gene (A-gene) and two activated amino acid polymerases (O and A-polymerases), and the other including the addition of another gene (N-gene) and a nucleotide polymerase. Simulation results have suggested that even a small enzymic activity and polymerase specificity could lead the system to the most accurate protein synthesis, as far as permitted by transitions to systems with higher accuracy.

  10. Bayesian Proteoform Modeling Improves Protein Quantification of Global Proteomic Measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Webb-Robertson, Bobbie-Jo M.; Matzke, Melissa M.; Datta, Susmita; Payne, Samuel H.; Kang, Jiyun; Bramer, Lisa M.; Nicora, Carrie D.; Shukla, Anil K.; Metz, Thomas O.; Rodland, Karin D.; Smith, Richard D.; Tardiff, Mark F.; McDermott, Jason E.; Pounds, Joel G.; Waters, Katrina M.

    2014-12-01

    As the capability of mass spectrometry-based proteomics has matured, tens of thousands of peptides can be measured simultaneously, which has the benefit of offering a systems view of protein expression. However, a major challenge is that with an increase in throughput, protein quantification estimation from the native measured peptides has become a computational task. A limitation to existing computationally-driven protein quantification methods is that most ignore protein variation, such as alternate splicing of the RNA transcript and post-translational modifications or other possible proteoforms, which will affect a significant fraction of the proteome. The consequence of this assumption is that statistical inference at the protein level, and consequently downstream analyses, such as network and pathway modeling, have only limited power for biomarker discovery. Here, we describe a Bayesian model (BP-Quant) that uses statistically derived peptides signatures to identify peptides that are outside the dominant pattern, or the existence of multiple over-expressed patterns to improve relative protein abundance estimates. It is a research-driven approach that utilizes the objectives of the experiment, defined in the context of a standard statistical hypothesis, to identify a set of peptides exhibiting similar statistical behavior relating to a protein. This approach infers that changes in relative protein abundance can be used as a surrogate for changes in function, without necessarily taking into account the effect of differential post-translational modifications, processing, or splicing in altering protein function. We verify the approach using a dilution study from mouse plasma samples and demonstrate that BP-Quant achieves similar accuracy as the current state-of-the-art methods at proteoform identification with significantly better specificity. BP-Quant is available as a MatLab ® and R packages at https://github.com/PNNL-Comp-Mass-Spec/BP-Quant.

  11. A polaron model for electron transfer in globular proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chuev, G N; Lakhno, V D

    1993-07-07

    Polaron models have been considered for the electron states in protein globules existing in a solvent. These models account for two fundamental effects, viz, polarization interaction of an electron with the conformational vibrations and the heterogeneity of the medium. Equations have been derived to determine the electron state in a protein globule. The parameters of this state show that it is an extended state with an energy of 2 eV. The electron transfer rate for cyt C self-exchange reaction has been calculated in the polaron model. Reorganization energy, tunneling matrix element and the rate constant have also been estimated. The results are compared with experimental data. The influence of model parameters on the significance of the data obtained has been studied. The potentialities of the model are discussed.

  12. A simple probabilistic model of multibody interactions in proteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansson, Kristoffer Enøe; Hamelryck, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    predictions. Our coarse-grained model is compared to state-of-art methods that use full atomic detail. This article illustrates how the use of simple probabilistic models can lead to new opportunities in the treatment of nonlocal interactions in knowledge-based protein structure prediction and design....... beyond pairwise interactions have been described, the formulation of a general multibody potential is seen as intractable due to the perceived limited amount of data. In this article, we show that it is possible to formulate a probabilistic model of higher order interactions in proteins, without...... arbitrarily limiting the number of contacts. The success of this approach is based on replacing a naive table-based approach with a simple hierarchical model involving suitable probability distributions and conditional independence assumptions. The model captures the joint probability distribution of an amino...

  13. Unifying model for two-state and downhill protein folding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mi, D.; Meng, W. Q.; Sun, Y. Q.

    2011-04-01

    A protein-folding model is proposed at the amino acid level, in which the folding process is divided into two successive stages: the rate-determining step, dominated by the “stochastic interactions”of solvent molecules, and the rapid phase, dominated by the “order interactions”among atoms in polypeptide. The master equation approach is used to investigate the folding kinetics, and an analytical treatment of the master equation yields a simple three-parameter expression for folding time. It is found that both two-state and downhill protein-folding kinetics can be described by a unifying model.

  14. A generative, probabilistic model of local protein structure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boomsma, Wouter; Mardia, Kanti V.; Taylor, Charles C.;

    2008-01-01

    Despite significant progress in recent years, protein structure prediction maintains its status as one of the prime unsolved problems in computational biology. One of the key remaining challenges is an efficient probabilistic exploration of the structural space that correctly reflects the relative...... conformational stabilities. Here, we present a fully probabilistic, continuous model of local protein structure in atomic detail. The generative model makes efficient conformational sampling possible and provides a framework for the rigorous analysis of local sequence-structure correlations in the native state...

  15. Some remarks on word formation in Danish

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Götzsche, Hans

    , there are some patterns for these Danish compounds concerning their internal semantics, in that the same lexical items may be used for different purposes depending on whether they are formed as a straightforward linear sequence (a word formation) or a reversed sequence (a phrase). The problem is (i) how the two......Abstract for the 25th Scandinavian Conference of Linguistics Some remarks on wordformation in Danish Some Danish word formation phenomena pose a problem for the linguist, being a predicament for analysis. In Danish a train leaves the station when it afgår ‘leaves’, while a minister may gå af...

  16. A remarkable representation of the Clifford group

    CERN Document Server

    Bengtsson, Ingemar

    2012-01-01

    The finite Heisenberg group knows when the dimension of Hilbert space is a square number. Remarkably, it then admits a representation such that the entire Clifford group --- the automorphism group of the Heisenberg group --- is represented by monomial phase-permutation matrices. This has a beneficial influence on the amount of calculation that must be done to find Symmetric Informationally Complete POVMs. I make some comments on the equations obeyed by the absolute values of the components of the SIC vectors, and on the fact that the representation partly suggests a preferred tensor product structure.

  17. Remarks on scale separation in flux vacua

    CERN Document Server

    Gautason, F F; Van Riet, T; Williams, M

    2015-01-01

    We argue that the Maldacena-Nunez no-go theorem excluding Minkowski and de Sitter vacua in flux compactifications can be extended to exclude anti-de Sitter (AdS) vacua for which the Kaluza-Klein scale is parametrically smaller than the AdS length scale. As a practical application of this observation we demonstrate that the mechanism to resolve O6 singularities in massive type IIA at the classical level is likely not to occur in AdS compactifications with scale separation. We furthermore remark that a compactification to four observable dimensions implies a large cosmological hierarchy.

  18. Homology modelling of protein-protein complexes: a simple method and its possibilities and limitations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simonson Thomas

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Structure-based computational methods are needed to help identify and characterize protein-protein complexes and their function. For individual proteins, the most successful technique is homology modelling. We investigate a simple extension of this technique to protein-protein complexes. We consider a large set of complexes of known structures, involving pairs of single-domain proteins. The complexes are compared with each other to establish their sequence and structural similarities and the relation between the two. Compared to earlier studies, a simpler dataset, a simpler structural alignment procedure, and an additional energy criterion are used. Next, we compare the Xray structures to models obtained by threading the native sequence onto other, homologous complexes. An elementary requirement for a successful energy function is to rank the native structure above any threaded structure. We use the DFIREβ energy function, whose quality and complexity are typical of the models used today. Finally, we compare near-native models to distinctly non-native models. Results If weakly stable complexes are excluded (defined by a binding energy cutoff, as well as a few unusual complexes, a simple homology principle holds: complexes that share more than 35% sequence identity share similar structures and interaction modes; this principle was less clearcut in earlier studies. The energy function was then tested for its ability to identify experimental structures among sets of decoys, produced by a simple threading procedure. On average, the experimental structure is ranked above 92% of the alternate structures. Thus, discrimination of the native structure is good but not perfect. The discrimination of near-native structures is fair. Typically, a single, alternate, non-native binding mode exists that has a native-like energy. Some of the associated failures may correspond to genuine, alternate binding modes and/or native complexes that

  19. Validation of protein models by a neural network approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fantucci Piercarlo

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The development and improvement of reliable computational methods designed to evaluate the quality of protein models is relevant in the context of protein structure refinement, which has been recently identified as one of the bottlenecks limiting the quality and usefulness of protein structure prediction. Results In this contribution, we present a computational method (Artificial Intelligence Decoys Evaluator: AIDE which is able to consistently discriminate between correct and incorrect protein models. In particular, the method is based on neural networks that use as input 15 structural parameters, which include energy, solvent accessible surface, hydrophobic contacts and secondary structure content. The results obtained with AIDE on a set of decoy structures were evaluated using statistical indicators such as Pearson correlation coefficients, Znat, fraction enrichment, as well as ROC plots. It turned out that AIDE performances are comparable and often complementary to available state-of-the-art learning-based methods. Conclusion In light of the results obtained with AIDE, as well as its comparison with available learning-based methods, it can be concluded that AIDE can be successfully used to evaluate the quality of protein structures. The use of AIDE in combination with other evaluation tools is expected to further enhance protein refinement efforts.

  20. Discrete and continuous models of protein sorting in the Golgi

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Haijun; Schwartz, Russell

    2009-03-01

    The Golgi apparatus plays an important role in processing and sorting proteins and lipids. Golgi compartments constantly exchange material with each other and with other cellular components, allowing them to maintain and reform distinct identities despite dramatic changes in structure and size during cell division, development and osmotic stress. We have developed two minimal models of membrane and protein exchange in the Golgi --- a discrete, stochastic model [1] and a continuous ordinary differential equation (ODE) model --- both based on two fundamental mechanisms: vesicle-coat-mediated selective concentration of soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor attachment protein receptor (SNARE) proteins during vesicle formation and SNARE-mediated selective fusion of vesicles. Both show similar ability to establish and maintain distinct identities over broad parameter ranges, but they diverge in extreme conditions where Golgi collapse and reassembly may be observed. By exploring where the models differ, we hope to better identify those features essential to minimal models of various Golgi behaviors. [1] H. Gong, D. Sengupta, A. D. Linstedt, R. Schwartz. Biophys J. 95: 1674-1688, 2008.

  1. A resource for benchmarking the usefulness of protein structure models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carbajo Daniel

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Increasingly, biologists and biochemists use computational tools to design experiments to probe the function of proteins and/or to engineer them for a variety of different purposes. The most effective strategies rely on the knowledge of the three-dimensional structure of the protein of interest. However it is often the case that an experimental structure is not available and that models of different quality are used instead. On the other hand, the relationship between the quality of a model and its appropriate use is not easy to derive in general, and so far it has been analyzed in detail only for specific application. Results This paper describes a database and related software tools that allow testing of a given structure based method on models of a protein representing different levels of accuracy. The comparison of the results of a computational experiment on the experimental structure and on a set of its decoy models will allow developers and users to assess which is the specific threshold of accuracy required to perform the task effectively. Conclusions The ModelDB server automatically builds decoy models of different accuracy for a given protein of known structure and provides a set of useful tools for their analysis. Pre-computed data for a non-redundant set of deposited protein structures are available for analysis and download in the ModelDB database. Implementation, availability and requirements Project name: A resource for benchmarking the usefulness of protein structure models. Project home page: http://bl210.caspur.it/MODEL-DB/MODEL-DB_web/MODindex.php. Operating system(s: Platform independent. Programming language: Perl-BioPerl (program; mySQL, Perl DBI and DBD modules (database; php, JavaScript, Jmol scripting (web server. Other requirements: Java Runtime Environment v1.4 or later, Perl, BioPerl, CPAN modules, HHsearch, Modeller, LGA, NCBI Blast package, DSSP, Speedfill (Surfnet and PSAIA. License: Free. Any

  2. Super-secondary structures and modeling of protein folds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Efimov, Alexander V

    2013-01-01

    A characteristic feature of the polypeptide chain is its ability to form a restricted set of commonly occurring folding units composed of two or more elements of secondary structure that are adjacent along the chain. Some of these super-secondary structures exhibit a unique handedness and a unique overall fold irrespective of whether they occur in homologous or nonhomologous proteins. Such super-secondary structures are of particular value since they can be used as starting structures in protein modeling. The larger protein folds can be obtained by stepwise addition of other secondary structural elements to the starting structures taking into account a set of simple rules inferred from known principles of protein structure.

  3. Extracting protein alignment models from the sequence database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neuwald, A F; Liu, J S; Lipman, D J; Lawrence, C E

    1997-05-01

    Biologists often gain structural and functional insights into a protein sequence by constructing a multiple alignment model of the family. Here a program called Probe fully automates this process of model construction starting from a single sequence. Central to this program is a powerful new method to locate and align only those, often subtly, conserved patterns essential to the family as a whole. When applied to randomly chosen proteins, Probe found on average about four times as many relationships as a pairwise search and yielded many new discoveries. These include: an obscure subfamily of globins in the roundworm Caenorhabditis elegans ; two new superfamilies of metallohydrolases; a lipoyl/biotin swinging arm domain in bacterial membrane fusion proteins; and a DH domain in the yeast Bud3 and Fus2 proteins. By identifying distant relationships and merging families into superfamilies in this way, this analysis further confirms the notion that proteins evolved from relatively few ancient sequences. Moreover, this method automatically generates models of these ancient conserved regions for rapid and sensitive screening of sequences.

  4. Computational Modeling for the Activation Cycle of G-proteins by G-protein-coupled Receptors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yifei Bao

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we survey five different computational modeling methods. For comparison, we use the activation cycle of G-proteins that regulate cellular signaling events downstream of G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs as a driving example. Starting from an existing Ordinary Differential Equations (ODEs model, we implement the G-protein cycle in the stochastic Pi-calculus using SPiM, as Petri-nets using Cell Illustrator, in the Kappa Language using Cellucidate, and in Bio-PEPA using the Bio-PEPA eclipse plug in. We also provide a high-level notation to abstract away from communication primitives that may be unfamiliar to the average biologist, and we show how to translate high-level programs into stochastic Pi-calculus processes and chemical reactions.

  5. Generation Strategies and Competitive Advantage in the Market for Off-Road Vehicles: Phenomenological Analysis of the Ford Model Release Ecosport In BrazilDOI:10.5585/remark.v10i1.2203l

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberto Bazanini

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available The central focus of this paper is to identify the innovations and entrepreneurship resulting from Ford Brazil main strategies, used in the Ford Ecosport launch in 2003. Using as a theoretical reference are the concepts of the RBV (Resource Based View complemented by Mintzberg el al schools, as follows: Entrepreneurship, Positioning and Environmental. The target was to identify resources generating competitive advantages using phenomenology method with qualitative research and pos-factum analysis through interviews with Off-Road specialists, Ford executives and car dealers. The research results showed the phenomenology methodology adequate, once it was able to identify the following resources being used by Ford: presence of an entrepreneur leader, targeted product positioning and production capacity accordingly to the environmental demand.DOI:10.5585/remark.v10i1.2203l

  6. QSAR Models for the Prediction of Plasma Protein Binding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zeshan Amin

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The prediction of plasma protein binding (ppb is of paramount importance in the pharmacokinetics characterization of drugs, as it causes significant changes in volume of distribution, clearance and drug half life. This study utilized Quantitative Structure – Activity Relationships (QSAR for the prediction of plasma protein binding. Methods: Protein binding values for 794 compounds were collated from literature. The data was partitioned into a training set of 662 compounds and an external validation set of 132 compounds. Physicochemical and molecular descriptors were calculated for each compound using ACD labs/logD, MOE (Chemical Computing Group and Symyx QSAR software packages. Several data mining tools were employed for the construction of models. These included stepwise regression analysis, Classification and Regression Trees (CART, Boosted trees and Random Forest. Results: Several predictive models were identified; however, one model in particular produced significantly superior prediction accuracy for the external validation set as measured using mean absolute error and correlation coefficient. The selected model was a boosted regression tree model which had the mean absolute error for training set of 13.25 and for validation set of 14.96. Conclusion: Plasma protein binding can be modeled using simple regression trees or multiple linear regressions with reasonable model accuracies. These interpretable models were able to identify the governing molecular factors for a high ppb that included hydrophobicity, van der Waals surface area parameters, and aromaticity. On the other hand, the more complicated ensemble method of boosted regression trees produced the most accurate ppb estimations for the external validation set.

  7. Exploring HP protein models using Wang-Landau sampling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wuest, Thomas; Landau, David P.

    2008-03-01

    The hydrophobic-polar (HP) protein model has become a standard in assessing the efficiency of computational methods for protein structure prediction as well as for exploring the statistical physics of protein folding in general. Numerous methods have been proposed to address the challenges of finding minimal energy conformations within the rough energy landscape of this lattice heteropolymer model. However, only a few studies have been dedicated to the more revealing - but also more demanding - problem of estimating the density of states which allows access to thermodynamic properties of a system at any temperature. Here, we show that Wang-Landau sampling, in connection with a suitable move set (``pull moves''), provides a powerful route for the ground state search and the precise determination of the density of states for HP sequences (with up to 100 monomers) in both, two and three dimensions. Our procedure possesses an intrinsic simplicity and overcomes the inevitable limitations inherent in other more tailored approaches. The main advantage lies in its general applicability to a broad range of lattice protein models that go beyond the scope of the HP model.

  8. SWISS-MODEL: modelling protein tertiary and quaternary structure using evolutionary information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biasini, Marco; Bienert, Stefan; Waterhouse, Andrew; Arnold, Konstantin; Studer, Gabriel; Schmidt, Tobias; Kiefer, Florian; Gallo Cassarino, Tiziano; Bertoni, Martino; Bordoli, Lorenza; Schwede, Torsten

    2014-07-01

    Protein structure homology modelling has become a routine technique to generate 3D models for proteins when experimental structures are not available. Fully automated servers such as SWISS-MODEL with user-friendly web interfaces generate reliable models without the need for complex software packages or downloading large databases. Here, we describe the latest version of the SWISS-MODEL expert system for protein structure modelling. The SWISS-MODEL template library provides annotation of quaternary structure and essential ligands and co-factors to allow for building of complete structural models, including their oligomeric structure. The improved SWISS-MODEL pipeline makes extensive use of model quality estimation for selection of the most suitable templates and provides estimates of the expected accuracy of the resulting models. The accuracy of the models generated by SWISS-MODEL is continuously evaluated by the CAMEO system. The new web site allows users to interactively search for templates, cluster them by sequence similarity, structurally compare alternative templates and select the ones to be used for model building. In cases where multiple alternative template structures are available for a protein of interest, a user-guided template selection step allows building models in different functional states. SWISS-MODEL is available at http://swissmodel.expasy.org/.

  9. Remarks on scale separation in flux vacua

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gautason, F. F.; Schillo, M.; Van Riet, T.; Williams, M.

    2016-03-01

    We argue that the Maldacena-Nuñez no-go theorem excluding Minkowski and de Sitter vacua in flux compactifications can be extended to anti-de Sitter (AdS) vacua for which the Kaluza-Klein scale is parametrically smaller than the AdS length scale. In the absence of negative tension sources, scale-separated AdS vacua are ruled out in 11-dimensional supergravity; in 10-dimensional supergravity, we show that such vacua can only arise in conjunction with large dilaton gradients. As a practical application of this observation we demonstrate that the mechanism to resolve O6 singularities in massive type IIA at the classical level is likely not to occur in AdS compactifications with scale separation. We furthermore remark that a compactification to four observable dimensions implies a large cosmological hierarchy.

  10. ANTIGENICITY OF COW'S MILK PROTEINS IN TWO ANIMAL MODELS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T.R. Neyestani

    2000-08-01

    Full Text Available Antigenicity of proteins found in cow's milk is age dependent. This is primarily due to infants possessing a more permeable intestinal wall than that in adults. Thus infants may acquire cow's milk allergy during their first year of life. While milk antigen specific IgE may cause allergy in susceptible subjects, there is some evidence indicating that milk antigen specific IgG may play some role in chronic disease development. The puropose of this study was to determine the antigenicity of cow's milk proteins in two animal models and to recommend the more sensitivie one, as an evaluation tool, to assess the antigenicity of a poteintial hypoallergenic formula. A crude extract of cow's milk was injected either to young male rabbits or BALB/C mice in four doses. Pure standard proteins of cow's milk were also injected to separate groups of animals to use their anti sera in later stages. The polyclonal pooled serum was then used to evaluate the antigenicity of the extract by indirect enzyme-linked immunossorbeni assay (LEISA. and Western blotting. Both the rabbit and BALB/C murine mode! demonstrated strong ELISA titres against casein and BSA proteins. However, the rabbit model also had a high antibody response against beta-lactoglobulin (/Mg. The lowest antibody response was found against alpha-kictalbumin («-la in both animal models and no response against immunoglobulins (Igs in either model. In Western blotting, rabbit antiserum showed four bands («-la, /Mg, caseins and BSA compared to two bands (caseins and BSA for mouse antiserum. Considering the allergenicity of these proteins in genetically prone subjects, it may be wise to exclude food sources of caseins as well as major whey proteins (BSA, from the diet of infants with a family history of atopy during the first year of life. The rabbit hyperimmunization model was more sensitive than the murine mode! in detecting antibodies against milk proteins. Thus, the rabbii model should be employed when

  11. Prediction of Local Quality of Protein Structure Models Considering Spatial Neighbors in Graphical Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Woong-Hee; Kang, Xuejiao; Zhang, Jian; Kihara, Daisuke

    2017-01-01

    Protein tertiary structure prediction methods have matured in recent years. However, some proteins defy accurate prediction due to factors such as inadequate template structures. While existing model quality assessment methods predict global model quality relatively well, there is substantial room for improvement in local quality assessment, i.e. assessment of the error at each residue position in a model. Local quality is a very important information for practical applications of structure models such as interpreting/designing site-directed mutagenesis of proteins. We have developed a novel local quality assessment method for protein tertiary structure models. The method, named Graph-based Model Quality assessment method (GMQ), explicitly considers the predicted quality of spatially neighboring residues using a graph representation of a query protein structure model. GMQ uses conditional random field as its core of the algorithm, and performs a binary prediction of the quality of each residue in a model, indicating if a residue position is likely to be within an error cutoff or not. The accuracy of GMQ was improved by considering larger graphs to include quality information of more surrounding residues. Moreover, we found that using different edge weights in graphs reflecting different secondary structures further improves the accuracy. GMQ showed competitive performance on a benchmark for quality assessment of structure models from the Critical Assessment of Techniques for Protein Structure Prediction (CASP). PMID:28074879

  12. Animal models of protein allergenicity: potential benefits, pitfalls and challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dearman, R J; Kimber, I

    2009-04-01

    Food allergy is an important health issue. With an increasing interest in novel foods derived from transgenic crop plants, there is a growing need for the development of approaches suitable for the characterization of the allergenic potential of proteins. There are methods available currently (such as homology searches and serological testing) that are very effective at identifying proteins that are likely to cross-react with known allergens. However, animal models may play a role in the identification of truly novel proteins, such as bacterial or fungal proteins, that have not been experienced previously in the diet. We consider here the potential benefits, pitfalls and challenges of the selection of various animal models, including the mouse, the rat, the dog and the neonatal swine. The advantages and disadvantages of various experimental end-points are discussed, including the measurement of specific IgE by ELISA, Western blotting or functional tests such as the passive cutaneous anaphylaxis assay, and the assessment of challenge-induced clinical symptoms in previously sensitized animals. The experimental variables of route of exposure to test proteins and the incorporation of adjuvant to increase the sensitivity of the responses are considered also. It is important to emphasize that currently none of these approaches has been validated for the purposes of hazard identification in the context of a safety assessment. However, the available evidence suggests that the judicious use of an accurate and robust animal model could provide important additional data that would contribute significantly to the assessment of the potential allergenicity of novel proteins.

  13. Protein-lipid interactions in bilayer membranes: a lattice model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pink, D A; Chapman, D

    1979-04-01

    A lattice model has been developed to study the effects of intrinsic membrane proteins upon the thermodynamic properties of a lipid bilayer membrane. We assume that only nearest-neighbor van der Waals and steric interactions are important and that the polar group interactions can be represented by effective pressure-area terms. Phase diagrams, the temperature T(0), which locates the gel-fluid melting, the transition enthalpy, and correlations were calculated by mean field and cluster approximations. Average lipid chain areas and chain areas when the lipid is in a given protein environment were obtained. Proteins that have a "smooth" homogeneous surface ("cholesterol-like") and those that have inhomogeneous surfaces or that bind lipids specifically were considered. We find that T(0) can vary depending upon the interactions and that another peak can appear upon the shoulder of the main peak which reflects the melting of a eutectic mixture. The transition enthalpy decreases generally, as was found before, but when a second peak appears departures from this behavior reflect aspects of the eutectic mixture. We find that proteins have significant nonzero probabilities for being adjacent to one another so that no unbroken "annulus" of lipid necessarily exists around a protein. If T(0) does not increase much, or decreases, with increasing c, then lipids adjacent to a protein cannot all be all-trans on the time scale (10(-7) sec) of our system. Around a protein the lipid correlation depth is about one lipid layer, and this increases with c. Possible consequences of ignoring changes in polar group interactions due to clustering of proteins are discussed.

  14. Structural Model for the Spider Silk Protein Spidroin-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    dos Santos-Pinto, José Roberto Aparecido; Arcuri, Helen Andrade; Priewalder, Helga; Salles, Heliana Clara; Palma, Mario Sergio; Lubec, Gert

    2015-09-04

    Most reports about the 3-D structure of spidroin-1 have been proposed for the protein in solid state or for individual domains of these proteins. A gel-based mass spectrometry strategy using collision-induced dissociation (CID) and electron-transfer dissociation (ETD) fragmentation methods was used to completely sequence spidroins-1A and -1B and to assign a series of post-translational modifications (PTMs) on to the spidroin sequences. A total of 15 and 16 phosphorylation sites were detected on spidroin-1A and -1B, respectively. In this work, we present the nearly complete amino acid sequence of spidroin-1A and -1B, including the nonrepetitive N- and C-terminal domains and a highly repetitive central core. We also described a fatty acid layer surrounding the protein fibers and PTMs in the sequences of spidroin-1A and -1B, including phosphorylation. Thus, molecular models for phosphorylated spidroins were proposed in the presence of a mixture fatty acids/water (1:1) and submitted to molecular dynamics simulation. The resulting models presented high content of coils, a higher percentage of α-helix, and an almost neglected content of 310-helix than the previous models. Knowledge of the complete structure of spidroins-1A and -1B would help to explain the mechanical features of silk fibers. The results of the current investigation provide a foundation for biophysical studies of the mechanoelastic properties of web-silk proteins.

  15. Multiscale models and approximation algorithms for protein electrostatics

    CERN Document Server

    Bardhan, Jaydeep P

    2015-01-01

    Electrostatic forces play many important roles in molecular biology, but are hard to model due to the complicated interactions between biomolecules and the surrounding solvent, a fluid composed of water and dissolved ions. Continuum model have been surprisingly successful for simple biological questions, but fail for important problems such as understanding the effects of protein mutations. In this paper we highlight the advantages of boundary-integral methods for these problems, and our use of boundary integrals to design and test more accurate theories. Examples include a multiscale model based on nonlocal continuum theory, and a nonlinear boundary condition that captures atomic-scale effects at biomolecular surfaces.

  16. An Efficient Null Model for Conformational Fluctuations in Proteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harder, Tim Philipp; Borg, Mikael; Bottaro, Sandro

    2012-01-01

    limited to comparatively short timescales. TYPHON is a probabilistic method to explore the conformational space of proteins under the guidance of a sophisticated probabilistic model of local structure and a given set of restraints that represent nonlocal interactions, such as hydrogen bonds or disulfide...... bridges. The choice of the restraints themselves is heuristic, but the resulting probabilistic model is well-defined and rigorous. Conceptually, TYPHON constitutes a null model of conformational fluctuations under a given set of restraints. We demonstrate that TYPHON can provide information...

  17. Prediction of nuclear proteins using SVM and HMM models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raghava Gajendra PS

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The nucleus, a highly organized organelle, plays important role in cellular homeostasis. The nuclear proteins are crucial for chromosomal maintenance/segregation, gene expression, RNA processing/export, and many other processes. Several methods have been developed for predicting the nuclear proteins in the past. The aim of the present study is to develop a new method for predicting nuclear proteins with higher accuracy. Results All modules were trained and tested on a non-redundant dataset and evaluated using five-fold cross-validation technique. Firstly, Support Vector Machines (SVM based modules have been developed using amino acid and dipeptide compositions and achieved a Mathews correlation coefficient (MCC of 0.59 and 0.61 respectively. Secondly, we have developed SVM modules using split amino acid compositions (SAAC and achieved the maximum MCC of 0.66. Thirdly, a hidden Markov model (HMM based module/profile was developed for searching exclusively nuclear and non-nuclear domains in a protein. Finally, a hybrid module was developed by combining SVM module and HMM profile and achieved a MCC of 0.87 with an accuracy of 94.61%. This method performs better than the existing methods when evaluated on blind/independent datasets. Our method estimated 31.51%, 21.89%, 26.31%, 25.72% and 24.95% of the proteins as nuclear proteins in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Caenorhabditis elegans, Drosophila melanogaster, mouse and human proteomes respectively. Based on the above modules, we have developed a web server NpPred for predicting nuclear proteins http://www.imtech.res.in/raghava/nppred/. Conclusion This study describes a highly accurate method for predicting nuclear proteins. SVM module has been developed for the first time using SAAC for predicting nuclear proteins, where amino acid composition of N-terminus and the remaining protein were computed separately. In addition, our study is a first documentation where exclusively nuclear

  18. A modeling strategy for G-protein coupled receptors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Kahler

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Cell responses can be triggered via G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs that interact with small molecules, peptides or proteins and transmit the signal over the membrane via structural changes to activate intracellular pathways. GPCRs are characterized by a rather low sequence similarity and exhibit structural differences even for functionally closely related GPCRs. An accurate structure prediction for GPCRs is therefore not straightforward. We propose a computational approach that relies on the generation of several independent models based on different template structures, which are subsequently refined by molecular dynamics simulations. A comparison of their conformational stability and the agreement with GPCR-typical structural features is then used to select a favorable model. This strategy was applied to predict the structure of the herpesviral chemokine receptor US28 by generating three independent models based on the known structures of the chemokine receptors CXCR1, CXCR4, and CCR5. Model refinement and evaluation suggested that the model based on CCR5 exhibits the most favorable structural properties. In particular, the GPCR-typical structural features, such as a conserved water cluster or conserved non-covalent contacts, are present to a larger extent in the model based on CCR5 compared to the other models. A final model validation based on the recently published US28 crystal structure confirms that the CCR5-based model is the most accurate and exhibits 80.8% correctly modeled residues within the transmembrane helices. The structural agreement between the selected model and the crystal structure suggests that our modeling strategy may also be more generally applicable to other GPCRs of unknown structure.

  19. Illustrating and homology modeling the proteins of the Zika virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekins, Sean; Liebler, John; Neves, Bruno J.; Lewis, Warren G.; Coffee, Megan; Bienstock, Rachelle; Southan, Christopher; Andrade, Carolina H.

    2016-01-01

    The Zika virus (ZIKV) is a flavivirus of the family Flaviviridae, which is similar to dengue virus, yellow fever and West Nile virus. Recent outbreaks in South America, Latin America, the Caribbean and in particular Brazil have led to concern for the spread of the disease and potential to cause Guillain-Barré syndrome and microcephaly. Although ZIKV has been known of for over 60 years there is very little in the way of knowledge of the virus with few publications and no crystal structures. No antivirals have been tested against it either in vitro or in vivo. ZIKV therefore epitomizes a neglected disease. Several suggested steps have been proposed which could be taken to initiate ZIKV antiviral drug discovery using both high throughput screens as well as structure-based design based on homology models for the key proteins. We now describe preliminary homology models created for NS5, FtsJ, NS4B, NS4A, HELICc, DEXDc, peptidase S7, NS2B, NS2A, NS1, E stem, glycoprotein M, propeptide, capsid and glycoprotein E using SWISS-MODEL. Eleven out of 15 models pass our model quality criteria for their further use. While a ZIKV glycoprotein E homology model was initially described in the immature conformation as a trimer, we now describe the mature dimer conformer which allowed the construction of an illustration of the complete virion. By comparing illustrations of ZIKV based on this new homology model and the dengue virus crystal structure we propose potential differences that could be exploited for antiviral and vaccine design. The prediction of sites for glycosylation on this protein may also be useful in this regard. While we await a cryo-EM structure of ZIKV and eventual crystal structures of the individual proteins, these homology models provide the community with a starting point for structure-based design of drugs and vaccines as well as a for computational virtual screening. PMID:27746901

  20. Illustrating and homology modeling the proteins of the Zika virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekins, Sean; Liebler, John; Neves, Bruno J; Lewis, Warren G; Coffee, Megan; Bienstock, Rachelle; Southan, Christopher; Andrade, Carolina H

    2016-01-01

    The Zika virus (ZIKV) is a flavivirus of the family Flaviviridae, which is similar to dengue virus, yellow fever and West Nile virus. Recent outbreaks in South America, Latin America, the Caribbean and in particular Brazil have led to concern for the spread of the disease and potential to cause Guillain-Barré syndrome and microcephaly. Although ZIKV has been known of for over 60 years there is very little in the way of knowledge of the virus with few publications and no crystal structures. No antivirals have been tested against it either in vitro or in vivo. ZIKV therefore epitomizes a neglected disease. Several suggested steps have been proposed which could be taken to initiate ZIKV antiviral drug discovery using both high throughput screens as well as structure-based design based on homology models for the key proteins. We now describe preliminary homology models created for NS5, FtsJ, NS4B, NS4A, HELICc, DEXDc, peptidase S7, NS2B, NS2A, NS1, E stem, glycoprotein M, propeptide, capsid and glycoprotein E using SWISS-MODEL. Eleven out of 15 models pass our model quality criteria for their further use. While a ZIKV glycoprotein E homology model was initially described in the immature conformation as a trimer, we now describe the mature dimer conformer which allowed the construction of an illustration of the complete virion. By comparing illustrations of ZIKV based on this new homology model and the dengue virus crystal structure we propose potential differences that could be exploited for antiviral and vaccine design. The prediction of sites for glycosylation on this protein may also be useful in this regard. While we await a cryo-EM structure of ZIKV and eventual crystal structures of the individual proteins, these homology models provide the community with a starting point for structure-based design of drugs and vaccines as well as a for computational virtual screening.

  1. Transfer functions for protein signal transduction: application to a model of striatal neural plasticity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriele Scheler

    Full Text Available We present a novel formulation for biochemical reaction networks in the context of protein signal transduction. The model consists of input-output transfer functions, which are derived from differential equations, using stable equilibria. We select a set of "source" species, which are interpreted as input signals. Signals are transmitted to all other species in the system (the "target" species with a specific delay and with a specific transmission strength. The delay is computed as the maximal reaction time until a stable equilibrium for the target species is reached, in the context of all other reactions in the system. The transmission strength is the concentration change of the target species. The computed input-output transfer functions can be stored in a matrix, fitted with parameters, and even recalled to build dynamical models on the basis of state changes. By separating the temporal and the magnitudinal domain we can greatly simplify the computational model, circumventing typical problems of complex dynamical systems. The transfer function transformation of biochemical reaction systems can be applied to mass-action kinetic models of signal transduction. The paper shows that this approach yields significant novel insights while remaining a fully testable and executable dynamical model for signal transduction. In particular we can deconstruct the complex system into local transfer functions between individual species. As an example, we examine modularity and signal integration using a published model of striatal neural plasticity. The modularizations that emerge correspond to a known biological distinction between calcium-dependent and cAMP-dependent pathways. Remarkably, we found that overall interconnectedness depends on the magnitude of inputs, with higher connectivity at low input concentrations and significant modularization at moderate to high input concentrations. This general result, which directly follows from the properties of

  2. Transfer functions for protein signal transduction: application to a model of striatal neural plasticity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheler, Gabriele

    2013-01-01

    We present a novel formulation for biochemical reaction networks in the context of protein signal transduction. The model consists of input-output transfer functions, which are derived from differential equations, using stable equilibria. We select a set of "source" species, which are interpreted as input signals. Signals are transmitted to all other species in the system (the "target" species) with a specific delay and with a specific transmission strength. The delay is computed as the maximal reaction time until a stable equilibrium for the target species is reached, in the context of all other reactions in the system. The transmission strength is the concentration change of the target species. The computed input-output transfer functions can be stored in a matrix, fitted with parameters, and even recalled to build dynamical models on the basis of state changes. By separating the temporal and the magnitudinal domain we can greatly simplify the computational model, circumventing typical problems of complex dynamical systems. The transfer function transformation of biochemical reaction systems can be applied to mass-action kinetic models of signal transduction. The paper shows that this approach yields significant novel insights while remaining a fully testable and executable dynamical model for signal transduction. In particular we can deconstruct the complex system into local transfer functions between individual species. As an example, we examine modularity and signal integration using a published model of striatal neural plasticity. The modularizations that emerge correspond to a known biological distinction between calcium-dependent and cAMP-dependent pathways. Remarkably, we found that overall interconnectedness depends on the magnitude of inputs, with higher connectivity at low input concentrations and significant modularization at moderate to high input concentrations. This general result, which directly follows from the properties of individual transfer

  3. Modeling regionalized volumetric differences in protein-ligand binding cavities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Brian Y; Bandyopadhyay, Soutir

    2012-06-21

    Identifying elements of protein structures that create differences in protein-ligand binding specificity is an essential method for explaining the molecular mechanisms underlying preferential binding. In some cases, influential mechanisms can be visually identified by experts in structural biology, but subtler mechanisms, whose significance may only be apparent from the analysis of many structures, are harder to find. To assist this process, we present a geometric algorithm and two statistical models for identifying significant structural differences in protein-ligand binding cavities. We demonstrate these methods in an analysis of sequentially nonredundant structural representatives of the canonical serine proteases and the enolase superfamily. Here, we observed that statistically significant structural variations identified experimentally established determinants of specificity. We also observed that an analysis of individual regions inside cavities can reveal areas where small differences in shape can correspond to differences in specificity.

  4. Models of protein and amino acid requirements for cattle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis Orlindo Tedeschi

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Protein supply and requirements by ruminants have been studied for more than a century. These studies led to the accumulation of lots of scientific information about digestion and metabolism of protein by ruminants as well as the characterization of the dietary protein in order to maximize animal performance. During the 1980s and 1990s, when computers became more accessible and powerful, scientists began to conceptualize and develop mathematical nutrition models, and to program them into computers to assist with ration balancing and formulation for domesticated ruminants, specifically dairy and beef cattle. The most commonly known nutrition models developed during this period were the National Research Council (NRC in the United States, Agricultural Research Council (ARC in the United Kingdom, Institut National de la Recherche Agronomique (INRA in France, and the Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organization (CSIRO in Australia. Others were derivative works from these models with different degrees of modifications in the supply or requirement calculations, and the modeling nature (e.g., static or dynamic, mechanistic, or deterministic. Circa 1990s, most models adopted the metabolizable protein (MP system over the crude protein (CP and digestible CP systems to estimate supply of MP and the factorial system to calculate MP required by the animal. The MP system included two portions of protein (i.e., the rumen-undegraded dietary CP - RUP - and the contributions of microbial CP - MCP as the main sources of MP for the animal. Some models would explicitly account for the impact of dry matter intake (DMI on the MP required for maintenance (MPm; e.g., Cornell Net Carbohydrate and Protein System - CNCPS, the Dutch system - DVE/OEB, while others would simply account for scurf, urinary, metabolic fecal, and endogenous contributions independently of DMI. All models included milk yield and its components in estimating MP required for lactation

  5. Simulation modeling of pooling for combinatorial protein engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polizzi, Karen M; Spencer, Cody U; Dubey, Anshul; Matsumura, Ichiro; Lee, Jay H; Realff, Matthew J; Bommarius, Andreas S

    2005-12-01

    Pooling in directed-evolution experiments will greatly increase the throughput of screening systems, but important parameters such as the number of good mutants created and the activity level increase of the good mutants will depend highly on the protein being engineered. The authors developed and validated a Monte Carlo simulation model of pooling that allows the testing of various scenarios in silico before starting experimentation. Using a simplified test system of 2 enzymes, betagalactosidase (supermutant, or greatly improved enzyme) and beta-glucuronidase (dud, or enzyme with ancestral level of activity), the model accurately predicted the number of supermutants detected in experiments within a factor of 2. Additional simulations using more complex activity distributions show the versatility of the model. Pooling is most suited to cases such as the directed evolution of new function in a protein, where the background level of activity is minimized, making it easier to detect small increases in activity level. Pooling is most successful when a sensitive assay is employed. Using the model will increase the throughput of screening procedures for directed-evolution experiments and thus lead to speedier engineering of proteins.

  6. Large-Scale Protein-Protein Interactions Detection by Integrating Big Biosensing Data with Computational Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhu-Hong You

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Protein-protein interactions are the basis of biological functions, and studying these interactions on a molecular level is of crucial importance for understanding the functionality of a living cell. During the past decade, biosensors have emerged as an important tool for the high-throughput identification of proteins and their interactions. However, the high-throughput experimental methods for identifying PPIs are both time-consuming and expensive. On the other hand, high-throughput PPI data are often associated with high false-positive and high false-negative rates. Targeting at these problems, we propose a method for PPI detection by integrating biosensor-based PPI data with a novel computational model. This method was developed based on the algorithm of extreme learning machine combined with a novel representation of protein sequence descriptor. When performed on the large-scale human protein interaction dataset, the proposed method achieved 84.8% prediction accuracy with 84.08% sensitivity at the specificity of 85.53%. We conducted more extensive experiments to compare the proposed method with the state-of-the-art techniques, support vector machine. The achieved results demonstrate that our approach is very promising for detecting new PPIs, and it can be a helpful supplement for biosensor-based PPI data detection.

  7. Helical crystallization on lipid nanotubes: streptavidin as a model protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dang, Thanh X; Farah, Sammy J; Gast, Alice; Robertson, Channing; Carragher, Bridget; Egelman, Edward; Wilson-Kubalek, Elizabeth M

    2005-04-01

    In this study, we use streptavidin (SA) as a model system to study helical protein array formation on lipid nanotubes, an alternative to 2D studies on lipid monolayers. We demonstrate that wild-type and a mutant form of SA form helical arrays on biotinylated lipid nanotubes. 3D maps from helical arrays of wild-type and mutant SA were reconstructed using two different approaches: Fourier-Bessel methods and an iterative single particle algorithm. The maps show that wild-type and mutant streptavidin molecules order differently. The molecular packing arrangements of SA on the surface of the lipid nanotubes differ from previously reported lattice packing of SA on biotinylated monolayers. Helical crystallization on lipid nanotubes presents an alternative platform to explore fundamentals of protein ordering, intermolecular protein interaction and phase behavior. We demonstrate that lipid nanotubes offer a robust and reproducible substrate for forming helical protein arrays which present a means for studying protein structure and structure-function relationships.

  8. A generalized free-solvent model for the osmotic pressure of multi-component solutions containing protein-protein interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McBride, Devin W; Rodgers, V G J

    2014-07-01

    The free-solvent model has been shown to have excellent predictability of the osmotic pressure for single and binary non-interactive proteins in aqueous solutions. Here the free-solvent model is extended to be more generalized by including the contributions of intra- and inter-protein interactions to the osmotic pressure of a solution in the form of homo- and hetero-multimers. The solute-solvent interactions are considered to be unique for each homo- and hetero-multimer in solution. The effect of the various generalized free-solvent model parameters on the osmotic pressure are examined for a single protein solution with a homo-dimer, a binary protein solution with no protein-protein interactions, and a binary protein solution with a hetero-dimer. Finally, the limitations associated with the generalized free-solvent model are discussed.

  9. Coevolutionary modeling of protein sequences: Predicting structure, function, and mutational landscapes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weigt, Martin

    Over the last years, biological research has been revolutionized by experimental high-throughput techniques, in particular by next-generation sequencing technology. Unprecedented amounts of data are accumulating, and there is a growing request for computational methods unveiling the information hidden in raw data, thereby increasing our understanding of complex biological systems. Statistical-physics models based on the maximum-entropy principle have, in the last few years, played an important role in this context. To give a specific example, proteins and many non-coding RNA show a remarkable degree of structural and functional conservation in the course of evolution, despite a large variability in amino acid sequences. We have developed a statistical-mechanics inspired inference approach - called Direct-Coupling Analysis - to link this sequence variability (easy to observe in sequence alignments, which are available in public sequence databases) to bio-molecular structure and function. In my presentation I will show, how this methodology can be used (i) to infer contacts between residues and thus to guide tertiary and quaternary protein structure prediction and RNA structure prediction, (ii) to discriminate interacting from non-interacting protein families, and thus to infer conserved protein-protein interaction networks, and (iii) to reconstruct mutational landscapes and thus to predict the phenotypic effect of mutations. References [1] M. Figliuzzi, H. Jacquier, A. Schug, O. Tenaillon and M. Weigt ''Coevolutionary landscape inference and the context-dependence of mutations in beta-lactamase TEM-1'', Mol. Biol. Evol. (2015), doi: 10.1093/molbev/msv211 [2] E. De Leonardis, B. Lutz, S. Ratz, S. Cocco, R. Monasson, A. Schug, M. Weigt ''Direct-Coupling Analysis of nucleotide coevolution facilitates RNA secondary and tertiary structure prediction'', Nucleic Acids Research (2015), doi: 10.1093/nar/gkv932 [3] F. Morcos, A. Pagnani, B. Lunt, A. Bertolino, D. Marks, C

  10. Folding pathways of a helix-turn-helix model protein

    CERN Document Server

    Hoffmann, D

    1997-01-01

    A small model polypeptide represented in atomic detail is folded using Monte Carlo dynamics. The polypeptide is designed to have a native conformation similar to the central part of the helix-turn-helix protein ROP. Starting from a beta-strand conformation or two different loop conformations of the protein glutamine synthetase, six trajectories are generated using the so-called window move in dihedral angle space. This move changes conformations locally and leads to realistic, quasi-continuously evolving trajectories. Four of the six trajectories end in stable native-like conformations. Their folding pathways show a fast initial development of a helix-bend-helix motif, followed by a dynamic behaviour predicted by the diffusion-collision model of Karplus and Weaver. The phenomenology of the pathways is consistent with experimental results.

  11. MODBASE: a database of annotated comparative protein structure models and associated resources

    OpenAIRE

    Pieper, Ursula; Eswar, Narayanan; Davis, Fred P.; Braberg, Hannes; Madhusudhan, M. S.; Rossi, Andrea; Marti-Renom, Marc; Karchin, Rachel; Webb, Ben M.; Eramian, David; Shen, Min-Yi; Kelly, Libusha; Melo, Francisco; Sali, Andrej

    2005-01-01

    MODBASE () is a database of annotated comparative protein structure models for all available protein sequences that can be matched to at least one known protein structure. The models are calculated by MODPIPE, an automated modeling pipeline that relies on MODELLER for fold assignment, sequence–structure alignment, model building and model assessment (). MODBASE is updated regularly to reflect the growth in protein sequence and structure databases, and improvements in the software for calculat...

  12. Remarkable selective constraints on exonic dinucleotide repeats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haasl, Ryan J; Payseur, Bret A

    2014-09-01

    Long dinucleotide repeats found in exons present a substantial mutational hazard: mutations at these loci occur often and generate frameshifts. Here, we provide clear and compelling evidence that exonic dinucleotides experience strong selective constraint. In humans, only 18 exonic dinucleotides have repeat lengths greater than six, which contrasts sharply with the genome-wide distribution of dinucleotides. We genotyped each of these dinucleotides in 200 humans from eight 1000 Genomes Project populations and found a near-absence of polymorphism. More remarkably, divergence data demonstrate that repeat lengths have been conserved across the primate phylogeny in spite of what is likely considerable mutational pressure. Coalescent simulations show that even a very low mutation rate at these loci fails to explain the anomalous patterns of polymorphism and divergence. Our data support two related selective constraints on the evolution of exonic dinucleotides: a short-term intolerance for any change to repeat length and a long-term prevention of increases to repeat length. In general, our results implicate purifying selection as the force that eliminates new, deleterious mutants at exonic dinucleotides. We briefly discuss the evolution of the longest exonic dinucleotide in the human genome--a 10 x CA repeat in fibroblast growth factor receptor-like 1 (FGFRL1)--that should possess a considerably greater mutation rate than any other exonic dinucleotide and therefore generate a large number of deleterious variants. © 2014 The Author(s). Evolution © 2014 The Society for the Study of Evolution.

  13. A simple quantitative model of macromolecular crowding effects on protein folding: Application to the murine prion protein(121-231)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergasa-Caceres, Fernando; Rabitz, Herschel A.

    2013-06-01

    A model of protein folding kinetics is applied to study the effects of macromolecular crowding on protein folding rate and stability. Macromolecular crowding is found to promote a decrease of the entropic cost of folding of proteins that produces an increase of both the stability and the folding rate. The acceleration of the folding rate due to macromolecular crowding is shown to be a topology-dependent effect. The model is applied to the folding dynamics of the murine prion protein (121-231). The differential effect of macromolecular crowding as a function of protein topology suffices to make non-native configurations relatively more accessible.

  14. Transgenic rabbits as therapeutic protein bioreactors and human disease models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Jianglin; Watanabe, Teruo

    2003-09-01

    Genetically modified laboratory animals provide a powerful approach for studying gene expression and regulation and allow one to directly examine structure-function and cause-and-effect relationships in pathophysiological processes. Today, transgenic mice are available as a research tool in almost every research institution. On the other hand, the development of a relatively large mammalian transgenic model, transgenic rabbits, has provided unprecedented opportunities for investigators to study the mechanisms of human diseases and has also provided an alternative way to produce therapeutic proteins to treat human diseases. Transgenic rabbits expressing human genes have been used as a model for cardiovascular disease, AIDS, and cancer research. The recombinant proteins can be produced from the milk of transgenic rabbits not only at lower cost but also on a relatively large scale. One of the most promising and attractive recombinant proteins derived from transgenic rabbit milk, human alpha-glucosidase, has been successfully used to treat the patients who are genetically deficient in this enzyme. Although the pronuclear microinjection is still the major and most popular method for the creation of transgenic rabbits, recent progress in gene targeting and animal cloning has opened new avenues that should make it possible to produce transgenic rabbits by somatic cell nuclear transfer in the future. Based on a computer-assisted search of the studies of transgenic rabbits published in the English literature here, we introduce to the reader the achievements made thus far with transgenic rabbits, with emphasis on the application of these rabbits as human disease models and live bioreactors for producing human therapeutic proteins and on the recent progress in cloned rabbits.

  15. Models to predict intestinal absorption of therapeutic peptides and proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antunes, Filipa; Andrade, Fernanda; Ferreira, Domingos; Nielsen, Hanne Morck; Sarmento, Bruno

    2013-01-01

    Prediction of human intestinal absorption is a major goal in the design, optimization, and selection of drugs intended for oral delivery, in particular proteins, which possess intrinsic poor transport across intestinal epithelium. There are various techniques currently employed to evaluate the extension of protein absorption in the different phases of drug discovery and development. Screening protocols to evaluate protein absorption include a range of preclinical methodologies like in silico, in vitro, in situ, ex vivo and in vivo. It is the careful and critical use of these techniques that can help to identify drug candidates, which most probably will be well absorbed from the human intestinal tract. It is well recognized that the human intestinal permeability cannot be accurately predicted based on a single preclinical method. However, the present social and scientific concerns about the animal well care as well as the pharmaceutical industries need for rapid, cheap and reliable models predicting bioavailability give reasons for using methods providing an appropriate correlation between results of in vivo and in vitro drug absorption. The aim of this review is to describe and compare in silico, in vitro, in situ, ex vivo and in vivo methods used to predict human intestinal absorption, giving a special attention to the intestinal absorption of therapeutic peptides and proteins.

  16. Insights on protein-DNA recognition by coarse grain modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poulain, Pierre; Saladin, Adrien; Hartmann, Brigitte; Prévost, Chantal

    2008-01-01

    Coarse grain modelling of macromolecules is a new approach potentially well adapted to answer numerous issues, ranging from physics to biology. We propose here an original DNA coarse grain model specifically dedicated to protein–DNA docking, a crucial, but still largely unresolved, question in molecular biology. Using a representative set of protein–DNA complexes, we first show that our model is able to predict the interaction surface between the macromolecular partners taken in their bound form. In a second part, the impact of the DNA sequence and electrostatics, together with the DNA and protein conformations on docking is investigated. Our results strongly suggest that the overall DNA structure mainly contributes in discriminating the interaction site on cognate proteins. Direct electrostatic interactions between phosphate groups and amino acids side chains strengthen the binding. Overall, this work demonstrates that coarse grain modelling can reveal itself a precious auxiliary for a general and complete description and understanding of protein–DNA association mechanisms. PMID:18478582

  17. Multiscale modeling and simulation of microtubule–motor-protein assemblies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Tong; Blackwell, Robert; Glaser, Matthew A.; Betterton, M. D.; Shelley, Michael J.

    2016-01-01

    Microtubules and motor proteins self-organize into biologically important assemblies including the mitotic spindle and the centrosomal microtubule array. Outside of cells, microtubule-motor mixtures can form novel active liquid-crystalline materials driven out of equilibrium by adenosine triphosphate–consuming motor proteins. Microscopic motor activity causes polarity-dependent interactions between motor proteins and microtubules, but how these interactions yield larger-scale dynamical behavior such as complex flows and defect dynamics is not well understood. We develop a multiscale theory for microtubule-motor systems in which Brownian dynamics simulations of polar microtubules driven by motors are used to study microscopic organization and stresses created by motor-mediated microtubule interactions. We identify polarity-sorting and crosslink tether relaxation as two polar-specific sources of active destabilizing stress. We then develop a continuum Doi-Onsager model that captures polarity sorting and the hydrodynamic flows generated by these polar-specific active stresses. In simulations of active nematic flows on immersed surfaces, the active stresses drive turbulent flow dynamics and continuous generation and annihilation of disclination defects. The dynamics follow from two instabilities, and accounting for the immersed nature of the experiment yields unambiguous characteristic length and time scales. When turning off the hydrodynamics in the Doi-Onsager model, we capture formation of polar lanes as observed in the Brownian dynamics simulation. PMID:26764729

  18. Relative Binding Free Energy Calculations Applied to Protein Homology Models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cappel, Daniel; Hall, Michelle Lynn; Lenselink, Eelke B; Beuming, Thijs; Qi, Jun; Bradner, James; Sherman, Woody

    2016-12-27

    A significant challenge and potential high-value application of computer-aided drug design is the accurate prediction of protein-ligand binding affinities. Free energy perturbation (FEP) using molecular dynamics (MD) sampling is among the most suitable approaches to achieve accurate binding free energy predictions, due to the rigorous statistical framework of the methodology, correct representation of the energetics, and thorough treatment of the important degrees of freedom in the system (including explicit waters). Recent advances in sampling methods and force fields coupled with vast increases in computational resources have made FEP a viable technology to drive hit-to-lead and lead optimization, allowing for more efficient cycles of medicinal chemistry and the possibility to explore much larger chemical spaces. However, previous FEP applications have focused on systems with high-resolution crystal structures of the target as starting points-something that is not always available in drug discovery projects. As such, the ability to apply FEP on homology models would greatly expand the domain of applicability of FEP in drug discovery. In this work we apply a particular implementation of FEP, called FEP+, on congeneric ligand series binding to four diverse targets: a kinase (Tyk2), an epigenetic bromodomain (BRD4), a transmembrane GPCR (A2A), and a protein-protein interaction interface (BCL-2 family protein MCL-1). We apply FEP+ using both crystal structures and homology models as starting points and find that the performance using homology models is generally on a par with the results when using crystal structures. The robustness of the calculations to structural variations in the input models can likely be attributed to the conformational sampling in the molecular dynamics simulations, which allows the modeled receptor to adapt to the "real" conformation for each ligand in the series. This work exemplifies the advantages of using all-atom simulation methods with

  19. Benchmarking consensus model quality assessment for protein fold recognition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    McGuffin Liam J

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Selecting the highest quality 3D model of a protein structure from a number of alternatives remains an important challenge in the field of structural bioinformatics. Many Model Quality Assessment Programs (MQAPs have been developed which adopt various strategies in order to tackle this problem, ranging from the so called "true" MQAPs capable of producing a single energy score based on a single model, to methods which rely on structural comparisons of multiple models or additional information from meta-servers. However, it is clear that no current method can separate the highest accuracy models from the lowest consistently. In this paper, a number of the top performing MQAP methods are benchmarked in the context of the potential value that they add to protein fold recognition. Two novel methods are also described: ModSSEA, which based on the alignment of predicted secondary structure elements and ModFOLD which combines several true MQAP methods using an artificial neural network. Results The ModSSEA method is found to be an effective model quality assessment program for ranking multiple models from many servers, however further accuracy can be gained by using the consensus approach of ModFOLD. The ModFOLD method is shown to significantly outperform the true MQAPs tested and is competitive with methods which make use of clustering or additional information from multiple servers. Several of the true MQAPs are also shown to add value to most individual fold recognition servers by improving model selection, when applied as a post filter in order to re-rank models. Conclusion MQAPs should be benchmarked appropriately for the practical context in which they are intended to be used. Clustering based methods are the top performing MQAPs where many models are available from many servers; however, they often do not add value to individual fold recognition servers when limited models are available. Conversely, the true MQAP methods

  20. Modelling proteins' hidden conformations to predict antibiotic resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hart, Kathryn M.; Ho, Chris M. W.; Dutta, Supratik; Gross, Michael L.; Bowman, Gregory R.

    2016-10-01

    TEM β-lactamase confers bacteria with resistance to many antibiotics and rapidly evolves activity against new drugs. However, functional changes are not easily explained by differences in crystal structures. We employ Markov state models to identify hidden conformations and explore their role in determining TEM's specificity. We integrate these models with existing drug-design tools to create a new technique, called Boltzmann docking, which better predicts TEM specificity by accounting for conformational heterogeneity. Using our MSMs, we identify hidden states whose populations correlate with activity against cefotaxime. To experimentally detect our predicted hidden states, we use rapid mass spectrometric footprinting and confirm our models' prediction that increased cefotaxime activity correlates with reduced Ω-loop flexibility. Finally, we design novel variants to stabilize the hidden cefotaximase states, and find their populations predict activity against cefotaxime in vitro and in vivo. Therefore, we expect this framework to have numerous applications in drug and protein design.

  1. Remarks on rotating shallow-water magnetohydrodynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Zeitlin

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available We show how the rotating shallow-water MHD model, which was proposed in the solar tachocline context, may be systematically derived by vertical averaging of the full MHD equations for the rotating magneto fluid under the influence of gravity. The procedure highlights the main approximations and the domain of validity of the model, and allows for multi-layer generalizations and, hence, inclusion of the baroclinic effects. A quasi-geostrophic version of the model, both in barotropic and in baroclinic cases, is derived in the limit of strong rotation. The basic properties of the model(s are sketched, including the stabilizing role of magnetic fields in the baroclinic version.

  2. Factors influencing protein tyrosine nitration--structure-based predictive models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayden, Alexander S; Yakovlev, Vasily A; Graves, Paul R; Mikkelsen, Ross B; Kellogg, Glen E

    2011-03-15

    Models for exploring tyrosine nitration in proteins have been created based on 3D structural features of 20 proteins for which high-resolution X-ray crystallographic or NMR data are available and for which nitration of 35 total tyrosines has been experimentally proven under oxidative stress. Factors suggested in previous work to enhance nitration were examined with quantitative structural descriptors. The role of neighboring acidic and basic residues is complex: for the majority of tyrosines that are nitrated the distance to the heteroatom of the closest charged side chain corresponds to the distance needed for suspected nitrating species to form hydrogen bond bridges between the tyrosine and that charged amino acid. This suggests that such bridges play a very important role in tyrosine nitration. Nitration is generally hindered for tyrosines that are buried and for those tyrosines for which there is insufficient space for the nitro group. For in vitro nitration, closed environments with nearby heteroatoms or unsaturated centers that can stabilize radicals are somewhat favored. Four quantitative structure-based models, depending on the conditions of nitration, have been developed for predicting site-specific tyrosine nitration. The best model, relevant for both in vitro and in vivo cases, predicts 30 of 35 tyrosine nitrations (positive predictive value) and has a sensitivity of 60/71 (11 false positives). Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Enzymatic hydrolysis of protein:mechanism and kinetic model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qi Wei; He Zhimin

    2006-01-01

    The bioreaction mechanism and kinetic behavior of protein enzymatic hydrolysis for preparing active peptides were investigated to model and characterize the enzymatic hydrolysis curves.Taking into account single-substrate hydrolysis,enzyme inactivation and substrate or product inhibition,the reaction mechanism could be deduced from a series of experimental results carried out in a stirred tank reactor at different substrate concentrations,enzyme concentrations and temperatures based on M-M equation.An exponential equation dh/dt = aexp(-bh) was also established,where parameters a and b have different expressions according to different reaction mechanisms,and different values for different reaction systems.For BSA-trypsin model system,the regressive results agree with the experimental data,i.e.the average relative error was only 4.73%,and the reaction constants were determined as Km = 0.0748 g/L,Ks = 7.961 g/L,kd = 9.358/min,k2 =38.439/min,Ea= 64.826 kJ/mol,Ed= 80.031 kJ/mol in accordance with the proposed kinetic mode.The whole set of exponential kinetic equations can be used to model the bioreaction process of protein enzymatic hydrolysis,to calculate the thermodynamic and kinetic constants,and to optimize the operating parameters for bioreactor design.

  4. Protein-protein interaction networks identify targets which rescue the MPP+ cellular model of Parkinson’s disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keane, Harriet; Ryan, Brent J.; Jackson, Brendan; Whitmore, Alan; Wade-Martins, Richard

    2015-11-01

    Neurodegenerative diseases are complex multifactorial disorders characterised by the interplay of many dysregulated physiological processes. As an exemplar, Parkinson’s disease (PD) involves multiple perturbed cellular functions, including mitochondrial dysfunction and autophagic dysregulation in preferentially-sensitive dopamine neurons, a selective pathophysiology recapitulated in vitro using the neurotoxin MPP+. Here we explore a network science approach for the selection of therapeutic protein targets in the cellular MPP+ model. We hypothesised that analysis of protein-protein interaction networks modelling MPP+ toxicity could identify proteins critical for mediating MPP+ toxicity. Analysis of protein-protein interaction networks constructed to model the interplay of mitochondrial dysfunction and autophagic dysregulation (key aspects of MPP+ toxicity) enabled us to identify four proteins predicted to be key for MPP+ toxicity (P62, GABARAP, GBRL1 and GBRL2). Combined, but not individual, knockdown of these proteins increased cellular susceptibility to MPP+ toxicity. Conversely, combined, but not individual, over-expression of the network targets provided rescue of MPP+ toxicity associated with the formation of autophagosome-like structures. We also found that modulation of two distinct proteins in the protein-protein interaction network was necessary and sufficient to mitigate neurotoxicity. Together, these findings validate our network science approach to multi-target identification in complex neurological diseases.

  5. Elastic-contractile model proteins: Physical chemistry, protein function and drug design and delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urry, Dan W; Urry, Kelley D; Szaflarski, Witold; Nowicki, Michal

    2010-12-30

    This review presents the structure and physico-chemical properties of ECMPs, elastic-contractile model proteins using sparse design modifications of elastic (GVGVP)(n); it describes the capacity of ECMP to perform the energy conversions that sustain living organisms; it arrives at the hydration thermodynamics of ECMP in terms of the change in Gibbs free energy of hydrophobic association, ΔG(HA), and the apolar-polar repulsive free energy of hydration, ΔG(ap); it applies ΔG(HA), ΔG(ap), and the nature of elasticity to describe the function of basic diverse proteins, namely - the F₁-motor of ATP synthase, Complex III of mitochondria, the KscA potassium-channel, and the molecular chaperonin, GroEL/ES; it applies ΔG(HA) and ΔG(ap) to describe the function of ABC exporter proteins that confer multi-drug resistance (MDR) on micro-organisms and human carcinomas and suggests drug modifications with which to overcome MDR. Using ECMP, means are demonstrated, for quantifying drug hydrophobicity with which to combat MDR and for preparing ECMP drug delivery nanoparticles, ECMPddnp, decorated with synthetic antigen-binding fragments, Fab1 and Fab2, with which to target specific up-regulated receptors, characteristic of human carcinoma cells, for binding and localized drug release. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Pharmacophore modeling for protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bharatham, Kavitha; Bharatham, Nagakumar; Lee, Keun Woo

    2007-05-01

    A three dimensional chemical feature based pharmacophore model was developed for the inhibitors of protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B (PTP1B) using the CATALYST software, which would provide useful knowledge for performing virtual screening to identify new inhibitors targeted toward type II diabetes and obesity. A dataset of 27 inhibitors, with diverse structural properties, and activities ranging from 0.026 to 600 microM, was selected as a training set. Hypol, the most reliable quantitative four featured pharmacophore hypothesis, was generated from a training set composed of compounds with two H-bond acceptors, one hydrophobic aromatic and one ring aromatic features. It has a correlation coefficient, RMSD and cost difference (null cost-total cost) of 0.946, 0.840 and 65.731, respectively. The best hypothesis (Hypol) was validated using four different methods. Firstly, a cross validation was performed by randomizing the data using the Cat-Scramble technique. The results confirmed that the pharmacophore models generated from the training set were valid. Secondly, a test set of 281 molecules was scored, with a correlation of 0.882 obtained between the experimental and predicted activities. Hypol performed well in correctly discriminating the active and inactive molecules. Thirdly, the model was investigated by mapping on two PTP1B inhibitors identified by different pharmaceutical companies. The Hypol model correctly predicted these compounds as being highly active. Finally, docking simulations were performed on few compounds to substantiate the role of the pharmacophore features at the binding site of the protein by analyzing their binding conformations. These multiple validation approaches provided confidence in the utility of this pharmacophore model as a 3D query for virtual screening to retrieve new chemical entities showing potential as potent PTP1B inhibitors.

  7. Remarks on Exactly Solvable Noncommutative Quantum Field

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Ning

    2007-01-01

    We study exactly the solvable noncommutative scalar quantum Geld models of (2n) or (2n + 1) dimensions. By writing out an equivalent action of the noncommutative field, it is shown that the special condition B·θ =±I in field theoretic context means the full restoration of the maximal U(∞) gauge symmetries broken due to kinetic term. It is further shown that the model can be obtained by dimensional reduction of a 2n- dimensional exactly solvable noncommutative φ4 quantum field model closely related to the 1+1- dimensional Moyal/ matrix-valued nonlinear Schr(o)dinger (MNLS) equation. The corresponding quantum fundamental commutation relation of the MNLS model is also given explicitly.

  8. Physical modeling of geometrically confined disordered protein assemblies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ando, David

    2015-08-01

    The transport of cargo across the nuclear membrane is highly selective and accomplished by a poorly understood mechanism involving hundreds of nucleoporins lining the inside of the nuclear pore complex (NPC). Currently, there is no clear picture of the overall structure formed by this collection of proteins within the pore, primarily due to their disordered nature and uncertainty regarding the properties of individual nucleoporins. We first study the defining characteristics of the amino acid sequences of nucleoporins through bioinformatics techniques, although bioinformatics of disordered proteins is especially challenging given high mutation rates for homologous proteins and that functionality may not be strongly related to sequence. Here we have performed a novel bioinformatic analysis, based on the spatial clustering of physically relevant features such as binding motifs and charges within disordered proteins, on thousands of FG motif containing nucleoporins (FG nups). The biophysical mechanism by which the critical FG nups regulate nucleocytoplasmic transport has remained elusive, yet our analysis revealed a set of highly conserved spatial features in the sequence structure of individual FG nups, such as the separation, localization, and ordering of FG motifs and charged residues along the protein chain. These sequence features are likely conserved due to a common functionality between species regarding how FG nups functionally regulate traffic, therefore these results constrain current models and eliminate proposed biophysical mechanisms responsible for regulation of nucleocytoplasmic traffic in the NPC which would not result in such a conserved amino acid sequence structure. Additionally, this method allows us to identify potentially functionally analogous disordered proteins across distantly related species. To understand the physical implications of the sequence features on structure and dynamics of the nucleoporins, we performed coarse-grained simulations

  9. [The model of the non-trivial machine or the semiotic alternative. Remarks to Th. v. Uexkülls and W. Weisiacks regarding the theoretical basis of human medicine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zepf, S; Hartmann, S

    2001-01-01

    The authors discuss the attempt by v. Uexküll and Wesiack to formulate the basics of human medicine within the framework of a sign theory. They criticize this attempt mainly in three points: 1. Central concepts of their model--i.e. "meaning", "sign" or "signcoupling"--are only used as general concepts and not in the differentiated manner they are conventionally used in semiotics. 2. Human behavior is reduced to conditioned reflex systems which are merely described in a different, semiotic way. 3. Problems evolving from the epistemology of a radical constructivism on which their model of a "bio-psycho-social medicine" is based, remain not only unsolved but also undiscussed.

  10. Analysis and Ranking of Protein-Protein Docking Models Using Inter-Residue Contacts and Inter-Molecular Contact Maps

    KAUST Repository

    Oliva, Romina

    2015-07-01

    In view of the increasing interest both in inhibitors of protein-protein interactions and in protein drugs themselves, analysis of the three-dimensional structure of protein-protein complexes is assuming greater relevance in drug design. In the many cases where an experimental structure is not available, protein-protein docking becomes the method of choice for predicting the arrangement of the complex. However, reliably scoring protein-protein docking poses is still an unsolved problem. As a consequence, the screening of many docking models is usually required in the analysis step, to possibly single out the correct ones. Here, making use of exemplary cases, we review our recently introduced methods for the analysis of protein complex structures and for the scoring of protein docking poses, based on the use of inter-residue contacts and their visualization in inter-molecular contact maps. We also show that the ensemble of tools we developed can be used in the context of rational drug design targeting protein-protein interactions.

  11. Protein folding: the optically induced electronic excitations model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeknic-Dugic, J [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Nis (Serbia)], E-mail: jjeknic@pmf.ni.ac.yu

    2009-07-15

    The large-molecules conformational transitions problem (the 'protein folding problem') is an open issue of vivid current science research work of fundamental importance for a number of modern science disciplines as well as for nanotechnology. Here, we elaborate the recently proposed quantum-decoherence-based approach to the issue. First, we emphasize a need for detecting the elementary quantum mechanical processes (whose combinations may give a proper description of the realistic experimental situations) and then we design such a model. As distinct from the standard approach that deals with the conformation system, we investigate the optically induced transitions in the molecule electrons system that, in effect, may give rise to a conformation change in the molecule. Our conclusion is that such a model may describe the comparatively slow conformational transitions.

  12. The electronic excited states of green fluorescent protein chromophore models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olsen, Seth Carlton

    We explore the properties of quantum chemical approximations to the excited states of model chromophores of the green fluorescent protein of A. victoria. We calculate several low-lying states by several methods of quantum chemical calculation, including state-averaged complete active space SCF (CASSCF) methods, time dependent density functional theory (TDDFT), equation-of motion coupled cluster (EOM-CCSD) and multireference perturbation theory (MRPT). Amongst the low-lying states we identify the optically bright pipi* state of the molecules and examine its properties. We demonstrate that the state is dominated by a single configuration function. We calculate zero-time approximations to the resonance Raman spectrum of GFP chromophore models, and assign published spectra based upon these.

  13. Remarkable NO oxidation on single supported platinum atoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narula, Chaitanya K; Allard, Lawrence F; Stocks, G M; Moses-DeBusk, Melanie

    2014-11-28

    Our first-principles density functional theoretical modeling suggests that NO oxidation is feasible on fully oxidized single θ-Al2O3 supported platinum atoms via a modified Langmuir-Hinshelwood pathway. This is in contrast to the known decrease in NO oxidation activity of supported platinum with decreasing Pt particle size believed to be due to increased platinum oxidation. In order to validate our theoretical study, we evaluated single θ-Al2O3 supported platinum atoms and found them to exhibit remarkable NO oxidation activity. A comparison of turnover frequencies (TOF) of single supported Pt atoms with those of platinum particles for NO oxidation shows that single supported Pt atoms are as active as fully formed platinum particles. Thus, the overall picture of NO oxidation on supported Pt is that NO oxidation activity decreases with decreasing Pt particle size but accelerates when Pt is present only as single atoms.

  14. A Co-infection Model System and the Use of Chimeric Proteins to Study Chlamydia Inclusion Proteins Interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Ying; Derré, Isabelle

    2017-01-01

    Chlamydia trachomatis is an obligate intracellular bacterium associated with trachoma and sexually transmitted diseases. During its intracellular developmental cycle, Chlamydia resides in a membrane bound compartment called the inclusion. A subset of Type III secreted effectors, the inclusion membrane proteins (Inc), are inserted into the inclusion membrane. Inc proteins are strategically positioned to promote inclusion interaction with host factors and organelles, a process required for bacterial replication, but little is known about Inc proteins function or host interacting partners. Moreover, it is unclear whether each Inc protein has a distinct function or if a subset of Inc proteins interacts with one another to perform their function. Here, we used IncD as a model to investigate Inc/Inc interaction in the context of Inc protein expression in C. trachomatis. We developed a co-infection model system to display different tagged Inc proteins on the surface of the same inclusion. We also designed chimeric Inc proteins to delineate domains important for interaction. We showed that IncD can self-interact and that the full-length protein is required for dimerization and/or oligomerization. Altogether our approach can be generalized to any Inc protein and will help to characterize the molecular mechanisms by which Chlamydia Inc proteins interact with themselves and/or host factors, eventually leading to a better understanding of C. trachomatis interaction with the mammalian host. PMID:28352612

  15. Multi-Component Protein - Protein Docking Based Protocol with External Scoring for Modeling Dimers of G Protein-Coupled Receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaczor, Agnieszka A; Guixà-González, Ramon; Carrió, Pau; Poso, Antti; Dove, Stefan; Pastor, Manuel; Selent, Jana

    2015-04-01

    In order to apply structure-based drug design techniques to GPCR complexes, it is essential to model their 3D structure. For this purpose, a multi-component protocol was derived based on protein-protein docking which generates populations of dimers compatible with membrane integration, considering all reasonable interfaces. At the next stage, we applied a scoring procedure based on up to eleven different parameters including shape or electrostatics complementarity. Two methods of consensus scoring were performed: (i) average scores of 100 best scored dimers with respect to each interface, and (ii) frequencies of interfaces among 100 best scored dimers. In general, our multi-component protocol gives correct indications for dimer interfaces that have been observed in X-ray crystal structures of GPCR dimers (opsin dimer, chemokine CXCR4 and CCR5 dimers, κ opioid receptor dimer, β1 adrenergic receptor dimer and smoothened receptor dimer) but also suggests alternative dimerization interfaces. Interestingly, at times these alternative interfaces are scored higher than the experimentally observed ones suggesting them to be also relevant in the life cycle of studied GPCR dimers. Further results indicate that GPCR dimer and higher-order oligomer formation may involve transmembrane helices (TMs) TM1-TM2-TM7, TM3-TM4-TM5 or TM4-TM5-TM6 but not TM1-TM2-TM3 or TM2-TM3-TM4 which is in general agreement with available experimental and computational data.

  16. Protein

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Food Service Resources Additional Resources About FAQ Contact Protein Protein is found throughout the body—in muscle, ... the heart and respiratory system, and death. All Protein Isn’t Alike Protein is built from building ...

  17. Remarks on Multi-Dimensional Conformal Mechanics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cestmír Burdík

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Recently, Galajinsky, Lechtenfeld and Polovnikov proposed an elegant group-theoretical transformation of the generic conformal-invariant mechanics to the free one. Considering the classical counterpart of this transformation, we relate this transformation with the Weil model of Lobachewsky space.

  18. Remarks on the Theory of Cosmological Perturbation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    林文斌

    2001-01-01

    It is shown that the power spectrum defined in the synchronous gauge cannot be directly used to calculate the predictions of cosmological models on the large-scale structure of the Universe, which should be calculated directly by a suitable gauge-invariant power spectrum or the power spectrum defined in the Newtonian gauge.

  19. Remarks on Global Anomalies in RCFT Orientifolds

    CERN Document Server

    Gato-Rivera, Beatriz

    2006-01-01

    We check the list of supersymmetric standard model orientifold spectra of Dijkstra, Huiszoon and Schellekens for the presence of global anomalies, using probe branes. Absence of global anomalies is found to impose strong constraints, but in nearly all cases they are automatically satisfied by the solutions to the tadpole cancellation conditions.

  20. Econophysics - related Remarks in Considering the Necessity of a Distribution Adjustment in the Eurozone Real Economy and Re-modeling its Financial System and Markets. Thermodynamics and Statistical Physics Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabin RIZESCU

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available The term “Econophysics” was used for the first time by Eugene Stanley (physicist in 1995 and represents the name of a rather new research domain that tries to apply the modeling standards in statistical physics to the more complicated world of economics and finance. This approach seems to be kind of appropriate and that because Economics is about people and refers to individuals. In this kind of respect we have to say that in a certain economic environment there are a lot of individuals existing, working and making commerce, so they may very much be assimilated with a system composed of a really big number of “particles” and obey to the same mathematical laws used to describe the time-behavior of such a system. In this article we use thermodinamics and statistical physics approach to describe some economic processes.

  1. Remarks on brane and antibrane dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Michel, Ben; Polchinski, Joseph; Puhm, Andrea; Saad, Philip

    2014-01-01

    We develop the point of view that brane actions should be understood in the context of effective field theory, and that this is the correct way to treat classical as well as loop divergences. We illustrate this idea in a simple model. We then consider the implications for the dynamics of antibranes in flux backgrounds, focusing on the simplest case of a single antibrane. We argue that there is no tachyonic instability at zero temperature, but there is a nonperturbative process in which an antibrane annihilates with its screening cloud. This is distinct from the NS5-brane instanton decay. Constraints on models of metastable supersymmetry breaking by antibranes may be tightened, but there is no problem of principle with this mechanism.

  2. Bioceramics and pharmaceuticals: A remarkable synergy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vallet-Regí, María; Balas, Francisco; Colilla, Montserrat; Manzano, Miguel

    2007-09-01

    The research on controlled drug delivery systems using bioceramics as host matrices presents two distinct sides; one route aims at embedding pharmaceuticals in biomaterials designed for the reconstruction or regeneration of living tissues, in order to counteract inflammatory responses, infections, bone carcinomas and so forth, while the other route deals with the more traditional drug introduction systems, i.e. oral administration. The incorporation of pharmaceuticals to bioceramic matrices could be very interesting in clinical practice. It is rather common in these days for an orthopedic surgeon working in bone reconstruction to use bioceramics. An added value to the production of these ceramics would be the optional addition of pharmaceuticals such as antibiotics, anti-inflammatories, anti-carcinogens, etc. In this sense, if we take into account the infections statistics at hip joint prostheses, the incidence varies between 2 and 4%, reaching up to a 45% in bolts used as external fixation. One of the main problems in these situations is the access to the infected area of the bone, in order to deliver the adequate antibiotic. If the pharmaceutical could be included within the implant itself, the added value would be straightforward. And if the bioceramic is bioactive, and therefore precursor of new bone tissue, the capability to introduce peptides, proteins or growth factors at its pores could accelerate the bone regeneration processes. We are facing a fine example of multidisciplinary research, where the so-called transversal supply of knowledge from and between the domains of materials science, biology and medicine will empower the know-how and applications that shall, undoubtedly, give rise to new advances in science and technology.

  3. Remarks on Urban Spatial Growth Management Research

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    "Urban spatial growth management(USGM)" is developed from "urban growth management(UGM)",and is more specific on urban space than UGM.An urban spatial plan can achieve its goals in virtue of USGM.This paper reviews the research on urban growth management both in China and abroad,and then puts forwards the development issue of USGM in China which requires further study in two main aspects:systemic research on the basic theories of USGM with Chinese characteristics,and the utilization of modern techniques to examine the effectiveness of USGM.In turn,the methods to develop the modeling and analysis techniques of USGM are discussed.

  4. Contact prediction in protein modeling: Scoring, folding and refinement of coarse-grained models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kolinski Andrzej

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Several different methods for contact prediction succeeded within the Sixth Critical Assessment of Techniques for Protein Structure Prediction (CASP6. The most relevant were non-local contact predictions for targets from the most difficult categories: fold recognition-analogy and new fold. Such contacts could provide valuable structural information in case a template structure cannot be found in the PDB. Results We described comprehensive tests of the effectiveness of contact data in various aspects of de novo modeling with CABS, an algorithm which was used successfully in CASP6 by the Kolinski-Bujnicki group. We used the predicted contacts in a simple scoring function for the post-simulation ranking of protein models and as a soft bias in the folding simulations and in the fold-refinement procedure. The latter approach turned out to be the most successful. The CABS force field used in the Replica Exchange Monte Carlo simulations cooperated with the true contacts and discriminated the false ones, which resulted in an improvement of the majority of Kolinski-Bujnicki's protein models. In the modeling we tested different sets of predicted contact data submitted to the CASP6 server. According to our results, the best performing were the contacts with the accuracy balanced with the coverage, obtained either from the best two predictors only or by a consensus from as many predictors as possible. Conclusion Our tests have shown that theoretically predicted contacts can be very beneficial for protein structure prediction. Depending on the protein modeling method, a contact data set applied should be prepared with differently balanced coverage and accuracy of predicted contacts. Namely, high coverage of contact data is important for the model ranking and high accuracy for the folding simulations.

  5. An Introductory Classroom Exercise on Protein Molecular Model Visualization and Detailed Analysis of Protein-Ligand Binding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poeylaut-Palena, Andres, A.; de los Angeles Laborde, Maria

    2013-01-01

    A learning module for molecular level analysis of protein structure and ligand/drug interaction through the visualization of X-ray diffraction is presented. Using DeepView as molecular model visualization software, students learn about the general concepts of protein structure. This Biochemistry classroom exercise is designed to be carried out by…

  6. A score of the ability of a three-dimensional protein model to retrieve its own sequence as a quantitative measure of its quality and appropriateness.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    León P Martínez-Castilla

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Despite the remarkable progress of bioinformatics, how the primary structure of a protein leads to a three-dimensional fold, and in turn determines its function remains an elusive question. Alignments of sequences with known function can be used to identify proteins with the same or similar function with high success. However, identification of function-related and structure-related amino acid positions is only possible after a detailed study of every protein. Folding pattern diversity seems to be much narrower than sequence diversity, and the amino acid sequences of natural proteins have evolved under a selective pressure comprising structural and functional requirements acting in parallel. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The approach described in this work begins by generating a large number of amino acid sequences using ROSETTA [Dantas G et al. (2003 J Mol Biol 332:449-460], a program with notable robustness in the assignment of amino acids to a known three-dimensional structure. The resulting sequence-sets showed no conservation of amino acids at active sites, or protein-protein interfaces. Hidden Markov models built from the resulting sequence sets were used to search sequence databases. Surprisingly, the models retrieved from the database sequences belonged to proteins with the same or a very similar function. Given an appropriate cutoff, the rate of false positives was zero. According to our results, this protocol, here referred to as Rd.HMM, detects fine structural details on the folding patterns, that seem to be tightly linked to the fitness of a structural framework for a specific biological function. CONCLUSION: Because the sequence of the native protein used to create the Rd.HMM model was always amongst the top hits, the procedure is a reliable tool to score, very accurately, the quality and appropriateness of computer-modeled 3D-structures, without the need for spectroscopy data. However, Rd.HMM is very sensitive to the

  7. Model to predict inhomogeneous protein-sugar distribution in powders prepared by spray drying

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Grasmeijer, Niels; Frijlink, Henderik W.; Hinrichs, Wouter L. J.

    2016-01-01

    A protein can be stabilized by spray drying an aqueous solution of the protein and a sugar, thereby incorporating the protein into a glassy sugar matrix. For optimal stability, the protein should be homogeneously distributed inside the sugar matrix. The aim of this study was to develop a model that

  8. Plasticized protein for 3D printing by fused deposition modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaunier, Laurent; Leroy, Eric; Della Valle, Guy; Lourdin, Denis

    2016-10-01

    The developments of Additive Manufacturing (AM) by Fused Deposition Modeling (FDM) now target new 3D printable materials, leading to novel properties like those given by biopolymers such as proteins: degradability, biocompatibility and edibility. Plasticized materials from zein, a storage protein issued from corn, present interesting thermomechanical and rheological properties, possibly matching with AM-FDM specifications. Thus commercial zein plasticized with 20% glycerol has a glass transition temperature (Tg) at about 42°C, after storage at intermediate relative humidity (RH=59%). Its principal mechanical relaxation at Tα ≈ 50°C leads to a drop of the elastic modulus from about 1.1 GPa, at ambient temperature, to 0.6 MPa at Tα+100°C. These values are in the same range as values obtained in the case of standard polymers for AM-FDM processing, as PLA and ABS, although relaxation mechanisms are likely different in these materials. Such results lead to the setting up of zein-based compositions printable by AM-FDM and allow processing bioresorbable printed parts, with designed 3D geometry and structure.

  9. Modeling associated protein-DNA pattern discovery with unified scores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Tak-Ming; Lo, Leung-Yau; Sze-To, Ho-Yin; Leung, Kwong-Sak; Xiao, Xinshu; Wong, Man-Hon

    2013-01-01

    Understanding protein-DNA interactions, specifically transcription factor (TF) and transcription factor binding site (TFBS) bindings, is crucial in deciphering gene regulation. The recent associated TF-TFBS pattern discovery combines one-sided motif discovery on both the TF and the TFBS sides. Using sequences only, it identifies the short protein-DNA binding cores available only in high-resolution 3D structures. The discovered patterns lead to promising subtype and disease analysis applications. While the related studies use either association rule mining or existing TFBS annotations, none has proposed any formal unified (both-sided) model to prioritize the top verifiable associated patterns. We propose the unified scores and develop an effective pipeline for associated TF-TFBS pattern discovery. Our stringent instance-level evaluations show that the patterns with the top unified scores match with the binding cores in 3D structures considerably better than the previous works, where up to 90 percent of the top 20 scored patterns are verified. We also introduce extended verification from literature surveys, where the high unified scores correspond to even higher verification percentage. The top scored patterns are confirmed to match the known WRKY binding cores with no available 3D structures and agree well with the top binding affinities of in vivo experiments.

  10. Remarks on the Woods-Saxon potential

    Science.gov (United States)

    Çapak, M.; Gönül, B.

    2016-06-01

    More recently, comprehensive applications of approximate analytical solutions of the Woods-Saxon (WS) potential in closed form for the five-dimensional Bohr Hamiltonian have appeared [M. Çapak, D. Petrellis, B. Gönül and D. Bonatsos, J. Phys. G 42, 95102 (2015)] and its comparison to the data for many different nuclei has clearly revealed the domains for the success and failure in case of using such potential forms to analyze the data related to the nuclear structure within the frame of the collective model. Gaining confidence from this work, the exact solvability of the WS type potentials in lower dimensions for the bound states having zero angular momentum is carefully reviewed to finalize an ongoing discussion in the related literature which clearly shows that such kind of potentials have no analytical solutions even for ℓ = 0 case.

  11. Remarkable Features of Decaying Hagedorn States

    CERN Document Server

    Beitel, M; Greiner, C

    2014-01-01

    Hagedorn states (HS) are a tool to model the hadronization process which occurs in the phase transition phase between the quark gluon plasma (QGP) and the hadron resonance gas (HRG). Their abundance is believed to appear near the Hagedorn temperature $T_H$ which in our understanding equals the critical temperature $T_c$. These hadron-like resonances are characterized by being very massive and by not being limited to quantum numbers of known hadrons. To generate a whole zoo of such new states we solve the covariantly formulated bootstrap equation by regarding energy conservation and conservation of the baryon number $B$, strangeness $S$ and electric charge $Q$. To investigate their decay properties decay chain calculations of HS were conducted. One single (heavy) HS with certain quantum numbers decays by various two-body decay channels subsequently into final stable hadrons. Multiplicities of these stable hadrons, their ratios and their energy distributions are presented. Strikingly the final energy spectra of...

  12. Remarks on the Woods-Saxon Potential

    CERN Document Server

    Capak, M

    2016-01-01

    More recently, comprehensive application results of approximate analytical solutions of the Woods-Saxon potential in closed form for the 5-dimensional Bohr Hamiltonian have been appeared [14] and its comparison to the data for many different nuclei has clearly revealed the domains for the sucsess and failure in case of using such potential forms to analyse the data concerning with the nuclear structure of deformed nuclei within the frame of the collective model. Gaining confidence from this work, exact solvability of the Woods-Saxon type potentials in lower dimensions for the bound states having zero angular momentum is carefully reviewed to finalize an ongoing discussion in the related literature and clearly shown that such kind of potentials have no analytical solutions even for l=0 case.

  13. Amphiphilic poly-N-vinylpyrrolidone nanocarriers with incorporated model proteins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuskov, A N [Department of Polymers, D I Mendeleyev University of Chemical Technology, 9 Miusskaya Square, Moscow 125047 (Russian Federation); Villemson, A L [Department of Chemistry, M V Lomonosov Moscow State University, 119992 Moscow (Russian Federation); Shtilman, M I [Department of Polymers, D I Mendeleyev University of Chemical Technology, 9 Miusskaya Square, Moscow 125047 (Russian Federation); Larionova, N I [Department of Chemistry, M V Lomonosov Moscow State University, 119992 Moscow (Russian Federation); Tsatsakis, A M [Medical School, University of Crete, Voutes, 71409 Heraklion, Crete (Greece); Tsikalas, I [Department of Chemistry and Foundation for Research and Technology-Hellas (FORTH), University of Crete, PO Box 2208, Heraklion 71003, Crete (Greece); Rizos, A K [Department of Chemistry and Foundation for Research and Technology-Hellas (FORTH), University of Crete, PO Box 2208, Heraklion 71003, Crete (Greece)

    2007-05-23

    New nanoscaled polymeric carriers have been prepared on the basis of different amphiphilic water-soluble derivatives of poly-N-vinylpyrrolidone (PVP). The polymer self-assembly and interaction with model proteins (Bowman-Birk soybean proteinase inhibitor (BBI) and its hydrophobized derivatives) were studied in aqueous media. The possibility of inclusion of both BBI and hydrophobized oleic acid derivatives of BBI in amphiphilic PVP aggregates was investigated. It was ascertained that polymeric particles of size 50-80 nm were formed in certain concentrations of amphiphilic PVP and poorly soluble dioleic acid derivatives of BBI. Such polymeric aggregates are capable of solubilization of dioleoyl BBI with a concomitant prevention of its inactivation at low pH values.

  14. Amphiphilic poly-N-vinylpyrrolidone nanocarriers with incorporated model proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuskov, A. N.; Villemson, A. L.; Shtilman, M. I.; Larionova, N. I.; Tsatsakis, A. M.; Tsikalas, I.; Rizos, A. K.

    2007-05-01

    New nanoscaled polymeric carriers have been prepared on the basis of different amphiphilic water-soluble derivatives of poly-N-vinylpyrrolidone (PVP). The polymer self-assembly and interaction with model proteins (Bowman-Birk soybean proteinase inhibitor (BBI) and its hydrophobized derivatives) were studied in aqueous media. The possibility of inclusion of both BBI and hydrophobized oleic acid derivatives of BBI in amphiphilic PVP aggregates was investigated. It was ascertained that polymeric particles of size 50-80 nm were formed in certain concentrations of amphiphilic PVP and poorly soluble dioleic acid derivatives of BBI. Such polymeric aggregates are capable of solubilization of dioleoyl BBI with a concomitant prevention of its inactivation at low pH values.

  15. Function of the hemochromatosis protein HFE: Lessons from animal models

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Kostas Pantopoulos

    2008-01-01

    Hereditary hemochromatosis (HH) is caused by chronic hyperabsorption of dietary iron. Progressive accumulation of excess iron within tissue parenchymal cells may lead to severe organ damage. The most prevalent type of HH is linked to mutations in the HFE gene, encoding an atypical major histocompatibility complex class Ⅰ molecule. Shortly after its discovery in 1996, the hemochromatosis protein HFE was shown to physically interact with transferrin receptor 1 (TfR1)and impair the uptake of transferrin-bound iron in cells. However, these findings provided no clue why /-/FE mutations associate with systemic iron overload.It was later established that all forms of HH result from misregulation of hepcidin expression. This liverderived circulating peptide hormone controls iron efflux from duodenal enterocytes and reticuloendothelial macrophages by promoting the degradation of the iron exporter ferroportin. Recent studies with animal models of HH uncover a crucial role of HFE as a hepatocyte iron sensor and upstream regulator of helpcidin. Thus,hepatocyte HFE is indispensable for signaling to hepcidin, presumably as a constituent of a larger ironsensing complex. A working model postulates that the signaling activity of HFE is silenced when the protein is bound to TfR1. An increase in the iron saturation of plasma transferrin leads to displacement of TfR1 from HFE and assembly of the putative iron-sensing complex.In this way, iron uptake by the hepatocyte is translated into upregulation of hepcidin, reinforcing the concept that the liver is the major regulatory site for systemic iron homeostasis, and not merely an iron storage depot.

  16. Methodological remarks on studying prehistoric Greek religion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petra Pakkanen

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a methodological approach to the study of Greek religion of the period which lacks written documents, i.e. prehistory. The assumptions and interpretations of religion of that time have to be based on archaeological material. How do we define religion and cultic activity on the basis of primary archaeological material from this period, and which are the methodological tools for this difficult task? By asking questions on the nature and definition of religion and culture scholars of religion have provided us with some methodological apparatus to approach religion of the past in general, but there are models developed by archaeologists as well. Critical combination of these methodological tools leads to the best possible result. Archaeology studies the material culture of the past. History of religion studies the spiritual culture of the past. In the background the two have important theoretical and even philosophical speculations since they both deal with meanings (of things or practices and with interpretation.

  17. Remarks on a monotone Markov chain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Todorovic

    1987-01-01

    Full Text Available In applications, considerations on stochastic models often involve a Markov chain {ζn}0∞ with state space in R+, and a transition probability Q. For each x  R+ the support of Q(x,. is [0,x]. This implies that ζ0≥ζ1≥…. Under certain regularity assumptions on Q we show that Qn(x,Bu→1 as n→∞ for all u>0 and that 1−Qn(x,Bu≤[1−Q(x,Bu]n where Bu=[0,u. Set τ0=max{k;ζk=ζ0}, τn=max{k;ζk=ζτn−1+1} and write Xn=ζτn−1+1, Tn=τn−τn−1. We investigate some properties of the imbedded Markov chain {Xn}0∞ and of {Tn}0∞. We determine all the marginal distributions of {Tn}0∞ and show that it is asymptotically stationary and that it possesses a monotonicity property. We also prove that under some mild regularity assumptions on β(x=1−Q(x,Bx, ∑1n(Ti−a/bn→dZ∼N(0,1.

  18. OPENING REMARKS: Scientific Discovery through Advanced Computing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strayer, Michael

    2006-01-01

    Good morning. Welcome to SciDAC 2006 and Denver. I share greetings from the new Undersecretary for Energy, Ray Orbach. Five years ago SciDAC was launched as an experiment in computational science. The goal was to form partnerships among science applications, computer scientists, and applied mathematicians to take advantage of the potential of emerging terascale computers. This experiment has been a resounding success. SciDAC has emerged as a powerful concept for addressing some of the biggest challenges facing our world. As significant as these successes were, I believe there is also significance in the teams that achieved them. In addition to their scientific aims these teams have advanced the overall field of computational science and set the stage for even larger accomplishments as we look ahead to SciDAC-2. I am sure that many of you are expecting to hear about the results of our current solicitation for SciDAC-2. I’m afraid we are not quite ready to make that announcement. Decisions are still being made and we will announce the results later this summer. Nearly 250 unique proposals were received and evaluated, involving literally thousands of researchers, postdocs, and students. These collectively requested more than five times our expected budget. This response is a testament to the success of SciDAC in the community. In SciDAC-2 our budget has been increased to about 70 million for FY 2007 and our partnerships have expanded to include the Environment and National Security missions of the Department. The National Science Foundation has also joined as a partner. These new partnerships are expected to expand the application space of SciDAC, and broaden the impact and visibility of the program. We have, with our recent solicitation, expanded to turbulence, computational biology, and groundwater reactive modeling and simulation. We are currently talking with the Department’s applied energy programs about risk assessment, optimization of complex systems - such

  19. Monte Carlo simulations of the HP model (the "Ising model" of protein folding)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ying Wai; Wüst, Thomas; Landau, David P.

    2011-09-01

    Using Wang-Landau sampling with suitable Monte Carlo trial moves (pull moves and bond-rebridging moves combined) we have determined the density of states and thermodynamic properties for a short sequence of the HP protein model. For free chains these proteins are known to first undergo a collapse "transition" to a globule state followed by a second "transition" into a native state. When placed in the proximity of an attractive surface, there is a competition between surface adsorption and folding that leads to an intriguing sequence of "transitions". These transitions depend upon the relative interaction strengths and are largely inaccessible to "standard" Monte Carlo methods.

  20. A Working Model of Protein Synthesis Using Lego(TM) Building Blocks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Templin, Mark A.; Fetters, Marcia K.

    2002-01-01

    Uses Lego building blocks to improve the effectiveness of teaching about protein synthesis. Provides diagrams and pictures for a 2-3 day student activity. Discusses mRNA, transfer RNA, and a protein synthesis model. (MVL)

  1. Membrane Compartmentalization Reducing the Mobility of Lipids and Proteins within a Model Plasma Membrane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koldsø, Heidi; Reddy, Tyler; Fowler, Philip W; Duncan, Anna L; Sansom, Mark S P

    2016-09-01

    The cytoskeleton underlying cell membranes may influence the dynamic organization of proteins and lipids within the bilayer by immobilizing certain transmembrane (TM) proteins and forming corrals within the membrane. Here, we present coarse-grained resolution simulations of a biologically realistic membrane model of asymmetrically organized lipids and TM proteins. We determine the effects of a model of cytoskeletal immobilization of selected membrane proteins using long time scale coarse-grained molecular dynamics simulations. By introducing compartments with varying degrees of restraints within the membrane models, we are able to reveal how compartmentalization caused by cytoskeletal immobilization leads to reduced and anomalous diffusional mobility of both proteins and lipids. This in turn results in a reduced rate of protein dimerization within the membrane and of hopping of membrane proteins between compartments. These simulations provide a molecular realization of hierarchical models often invoked to explain single-molecule imaging studies of membrane proteins.

  2. Preface: Introductory Remarks: Linear Scaling Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowler, D. R.; Fattebert, J.-L.; Gillan, M. J.; Haynes, P. D.; Skylaris, C.-K.

    2008-07-01

    implementation questions relating to parallelization (particularly with multi-core processors starting to dominate the market) and inherent scaling and basis sets (in both normal and linear scaling codes). For now, the answer seems to lie between 100-1,000 atoms, though this depends on the type of simulation used among other factors. Basis sets are still a problematic question in the area of electronic structure calculations. The linear scaling community has largely split into two camps: those using relatively small basis sets based on local atomic-like functions (where systematic convergence to the full basis set limit is hard to achieve); and those that use necessarily larger basis sets which allow convergence systematically and therefore are the localised equivalent of plane waves. Related to basis sets is the study of Wannier functions, on which some linear scaling methods are based and which give a good point of contact with traditional techniques; they are particularly interesting for modelling unoccupied states with linear scaling methods. There are, of course, as many approaches to linear scaling solution for the density matrix as there are groups in the area, though there are various broad areas: McWeeny-based methods, fragment-based methods, recursion methods, and combinations of these. While many ideas have been in development for several years, there are still improvements emerging, as shown by the rich variety of the talks below. Applications using O(N) DFT methods are now starting to emerge, though they are still clearly not trivial. Once systems to be simulated cross the 10,000 atom barrier, only linear scaling methods can be applied, even with the most efficient standard techniques. One of the most challenging problems remaining, now that ab initio methods can be applied to large systems, is the long timescale problem. Although much of the work presented was concerned with improving the performance of the codes, and applying them to scientificallyimportant

  3. A Practical Teaching Course in Directed Protein Evolution Using the Green Fluorescent Protein as a Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruller, Roberto; Silva-Rocha, Rafael; Silva, Artur; Schneider, Maria Paula Cruz; Ward, Richard John

    2011-01-01

    Protein engineering is a powerful tool, which correlates protein structure with specific functions, both in applied biotechnology and in basic research. Here, we present a practical teaching course for engineering the green fluorescent protein (GFP) from "Aequorea victoria" by a random mutagenesis strategy using error-prone polymerase…

  4. Simulation studies of protein-induced bilayer deformations, and lipid-induced protein tilting, on a mesoscopic model for lipid bilayers with embedded proteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Venturoli, M.; Smit, B.; Sperotto, Maria Maddalena

    2005-01-01

    for positive values of mismatch; a dependence on the protein size appears as well. In the case of large model proteins experiencing extreme mismatch conditions, in the region next to the so-called lipid annulus, there appears an undershooting ( or overshooting) region where the bilayer hydrophobic thickness...... a small size, the main mechanism to compensate for a large hydrophobic mismatch is the tilt, whereas large proteins react to negative mismatch by causing an increase of the hydrophobic thickness of the nearby bilayer. Furthermore, for the case of small, peptidelike proteins, we found the same type...

  5. Fluid of fused spheres as a model for protein solution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Kastelic

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available In this work we examine thermodynamics of fluid with "molecules" represented by two fused hard spheres, decorated by the attractive square-well sites. Interactions between these sites are of short-range and cause association between the fused-sphere particles. The model can be used to study the non-spherical (or dimerized proteins in solution. Thermodynamic quantities of the system are calculated using a modification of Wertheim's thermodynamic perturbation theory and the results compared with new Monte Carlo simulations under isobaric-isothermal conditions. In particular, we are interested in the liquid-liquid phase separation in such systems. The model fluid serves to evaluate the effect of the shape of the molecules, changing from spherical to more elongated (two fused spheres ones. The results indicate that the effect of the non-spherical shape is to reduce the critical density and temperature. This finding is consistent with experimental observations for the antibodies of non-spherical shape.

  6. Complete protein-protein association kinetics in atomic detail revealed by molecular dynamics simulations and Markov modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plattner, Nuria; Doerr, Stefan; de Fabritiis, Gianni; Noé, Frank

    2017-10-01

    Protein-protein association is fundamental to many life processes. However, a microscopic model describing the structures and kinetics during association and dissociation is lacking on account of the long lifetimes of associated states, which have prevented efficient sampling by direct molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. Here we demonstrate protein-protein association and dissociation in atomistic resolution for the ribonuclease barnase and its inhibitor barstar by combining adaptive high-throughput MD simulations and hidden Markov modelling. The model reveals experimentally consistent intermediate structures, energetics and kinetics on timescales from microseconds to hours. A variety of flexibly attached intermediates and misbound states funnel down to a transition state and a native basin consisting of the loosely bound near-native state and the tightly bound crystallographic state. These results offer a deeper level of insight into macromolecular recognition and our approach opens the door for understanding and manipulating a wide range of macromolecular association processes.

  7. A finite element model for protein transport in vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Montas Hubert J

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Biological mass transport processes determine the behavior and function of cells, regulate interactions between synthetic agents and recipient targets, and are key elements in the design and use of biosensors. Accurately predicting the outcomes of such processes is crucial to both enhancing our understanding of how these systems function, enabling the design of effective strategies to control their function, and verifying that engineered solutions perform according to plan. Methods A Galerkin-based finite element model was developed and implemented to solve a system of two coupled partial differential equations governing biomolecule transport and reaction in live cells. The simulator was coupled, in the framework of an inverse modeling strategy, with an optimization algorithm and an experimental time series, obtained by the Fluorescence Recovery after Photobleaching (FRAP technique, to estimate biomolecule mass transport and reaction rate parameters. In the inverse algorithm, an adaptive method was implemented to calculate sensitivity matrix. A multi-criteria termination rule was developed to stop the inverse code at the solution. The applicability of the model was illustrated by simulating the mobility and binding of GFP-tagged glucocorticoid receptor in the nucleoplasm of mouse adenocarcinoma. Results The numerical simulator shows excellent agreement with the analytic solutions and experimental FRAP data. Detailed residual analysis indicates that residuals have zero mean and constant variance and are normally distributed and uncorrelated. Therefore, the necessary and sufficient criteria for least square parameter optimization, which was used in this study, were met. Conclusion The developed strategy is an efficient approach to extract as much physiochemical information from the FRAP protocol as possible. Well-posedness analysis of the inverse problem, however, indicates that the FRAP protocol provides insufficient

  8. Modeling and analysis of Schistosoma Argonaute protein molecular spatial conformation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianhua Zhang

    2011-08-01

    Conclusions: The information relationship between the structure and function of the Argonaute protein can be initially established with bioinformatics tools and the internet server, and this provides the theoretical basis for further clarifying the function of Schistosoma Argonaute protein.

  9. Opening Remarks: SciDAC 2007

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strayer, Michael

    2007-09-01

    Good morning. Welcome to Boston, the home of the Red Sox, Celtics and Bruins, baked beans, tea parties, Robert Parker, and SciDAC 2007. A year ago I stood before you to share the legacy of the first SciDAC program and identify the challenges that we must address on the road to petascale computing—a road E E Cummins described as `. . . never traveled, gladly beyond any experience.' Today, I want to explore the preparations for the rapidly approaching extreme scale (X-scale) generation. These preparations are the first step propelling us along the road of burgeoning scientific discovery enabled by the application of X- scale computing. We look to petascale computing and beyond to open up a world of discovery that cuts across scientific fields and leads us to a greater understanding of not only our world, but our universe. As part of the President's America Competitiveness Initiative, the ASCR Office has been preparing a ten year vision for computing. As part of this planning the LBNL together with ORNL and ANL hosted three town hall meetings on Simulation and Modeling at the Exascale for Energy, Ecological Sustainability and Global Security (E3). The proposed E3 initiative is organized around four programmatic themes: Engaging our top scientists, engineers, computer scientists and applied mathematicians; investing in pioneering large-scale science; developing scalable analysis algorithms, and storage architectures to accelerate discovery; and accelerating the build-out and future development of the DOE open computing facilities. It is clear that we have only just started down the path to extreme scale computing. Plan to attend Thursday's session on the out-briefing and discussion of these meetings. The road to the petascale has been at best rocky. In FY07, the continuing resolution provided 12% less money for Advanced Scientific Computing than either the President, the Senate, or the House. As a consequence, many of you had to absorb a no cost extension for your

  10. Folding 19 proteins to their native state and stability of large proteins from a coarse-grained model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapoor, Abhijeet; Travesset, Alex

    2014-03-01

    We develop an intermediate resolution model, where the backbone is modeled with atomic resolution but the side chain with a single bead, by extending our previous model (Proteins (2013) DOI: 10.1002/prot.24269) to properly include proline, preproline residues and backbone rigidity. Starting from random configurations, the model properly folds 19 proteins (including a mutant 2A3D sequence) into native states containing β sheet, α helix, and mixed α/β. As a further test, the stability of H-RAS (a 169 residue protein, critical in many signaling pathways) is investigated: The protein is stable, with excellent agreement with experimental B-factors. Despite that proteins containing only α helices fold to their native state at lower backbone rigidity, and other limitations, which we discuss thoroughly, the model provides a reliable description of the dynamics as compared with all atom simulations, but does not constrain secondary structures as it is typically the case in more coarse-grained models. Further implications are described. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Toward a rigorous network of protein-protein interactions of the model sulfate reducer Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chhabra, S.R.; Joachimiak, M.P.; Petzold, C.J.; Zane, G.M.; Price, M.N.; Gaucher, S.; Reveco, S.A.; Fok, V.; Johanson, A.R.; Batth, T.S.; Singer, M.; Chandonia, J.M.; Joyner, D.; Hazen, T.C.; Arkin, A.P.; Wall, J.D.; Singh, A.K.; Keasling, J.D.

    2011-05-01

    Protein–protein interactions offer an insight into cellular processes beyond what may be obtained by the quantitative functional genomics tools of proteomics and transcriptomics. The aforementioned tools have been extensively applied to study E. coli and other aerobes and more recently to study the stress response behavior of Desulfovibrio 5 vulgaris Hildenborough, a model anaerobe and sulfate reducer. In this paper we present the first attempt to identify protein-protein interactions in an obligate anaerobic bacterium. We used suicide vector-assisted chromosomal modification of 12 open reading frames encoded by this sulfate reducer to append an eight amino acid affinity tag to the carboxy-terminus of the chosen proteins. Three biological replicates of the 10 ‘pulled-down’ proteins were separated and analyzed using liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry. Replicate agreement ranged between 35% and 69%. An interaction network among 12 bait and 90 prey proteins was reconstructed based on 134 bait-prey interactions computationally identified to be of high confidence. We discuss the biological significance of several unique metabolic features of D. vulgaris revealed by this protein-protein interaction data 15 and protein modifications that were observed. These include the distinct role of the putative carbon monoxide-induced hydrogenase, unique electron transfer routes associated with different oxidoreductases, and the possible role of methylation in regulating sulfate reduction.

  12. Genome-scale metabolic model of Pichia pastoris with native and humanized glycosylation of recombinant proteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Irani, Zahra Azimzadeh; Kerkhoven, Eduard J.; Shojaosadati, Seyed Abbas;

    2016-01-01

    Pichia pastoris is used for commercial production of human therapeutic proteins, and genome-scale models of P. pastoris metabolism have been generated in the past to study the metabolism and associated protein production by this yeast. A major challenge with clinical usage of recombinant proteins...... produced by P. pastoris is the difference in N-glycosylation of proteins produced by humans and this yeast. However, through metabolic engineering, a P. pastoris strain capable of producing humanized N-glycosylated proteins was constructed. The current genome-scale models of P. pastoris do not address...... native nor humanized N-glycosylation, and we therefore developed ihGlycopastoris, an extension to the iLC915 model with both native and humanized N-glycosylation for recombinant protein production, but also an estimation of N-glycosylation of P. pastoris native proteins. This new model gives a better...

  13. Clarification of Interaction Mechanism of Mouse Hepatitis Virus (MHV) N and nsp3 Protein with Homology Modeling and Protein-Protein Docking Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tatar, Gizem; Tok, Tugba Taskin

    2016-02-26

    The coronavirus nucleocapsid (N) plays an important role in the virus structure, the replication, and the transcription of CoV. This protein, which has a helix and flexible structure, and capable of binding on to the viral genomic RNA, is a non-structural protein (nsp3). Many studies suggest that the N protein interaction with nsp3 plays a critical role in the virus replication early in infection. Therefore, it is necessary to know the definition of the interaction mechanism of N and nsp3 protein in terms of the CoV replication transcription mechanism. We report on the homology modeling, molecular dynamics simulation, and docking studies to explain the structure-function relationship and the interaction mechanism. In addition, the prototype MHV is preferred in the wet experiment, so we also based our study on the MHV N and nsp3 proteins that belong to the experimental study. The amino acid sequences of MHV N and nsp3 proteins have similarity between human and severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus. Therefore, the 3D structure models of these proteins were built with using the crystal structure of the CoV family members as a template. By following these models, molecular dynamics simulations were applied to attain the most stable conformation. Finally, protein-protein docking was performed to prove accuracy of model structures of the MHV N and to clarify the interaction with nsp3. As a result, Lys 113, Arg 125, Tyr 127, Glu 173, Tyr 190 residues that play an important role in virus replication were determined.

  14. Mathematics, Thermodynamics, and Modeling to Address Ten Common Misconceptions about Protein Structure, Folding, and Stability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robic, Srebrenka

    2010-01-01

    To fully understand the roles proteins play in cellular processes, students need to grasp complex ideas about protein structure, folding, and stability. Our current understanding of these topics is based on mathematical models and experimental data. However, protein structure, folding, and stability are often introduced as descriptive, qualitative…

  15. Predicting important residues and interaction pathways in proteins using Gaussian Network Model: binding and stability of HLA proteins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Turkan Haliloglu

    Full Text Available A statistical thermodynamics approach is proposed to determine structurally and functionally important residues in native proteins that are involved in energy exchange with a ligand and other residues along an interaction pathway. The structure-function relationships, ligand binding and allosteric activities of ten structures of HLA Class I proteins of the immune system are studied by the Gaussian Network Model. Five of these models are associated with inflammatory rheumatic disease and the remaining five are properly functioning. In the Gaussian Network Model, the protein structures are modeled as an elastic network where the inter-residue interactions are harmonic. Important residues and the interaction pathways in the proteins are identified by focusing on the largest eigenvalue of the residue interaction matrix. Predicted important residues match those known from previous experimental and clinical work. Graph perturbation is used to determine the response of the important residues along the interaction pathway. Differences in response patterns of the two sets of proteins are identified and their relations to disease are discussed.

  16. Citrullination of synovial proteins in murine models of rheumatoid arthritis.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vossenaar, E.R.; Nijenhuis, S.; Helsen, M.M.A.; Heijden, A.G. van der; Senshu, T.; Berg, W.B. van den; Venrooij, W.J.W. van; Joosten, L.A.B.

    2003-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Antibodies directed to citrulline-containing proteins are highly specific for rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and can be detected in up to 80% of patients with RA. Citrulline is a nonstandard amino acid that can be incorporated into proteins only by posttranslational modification of arginine by

  17. Fungal protein from corn waste effluents : a model study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schellart, J.A.

    1975-01-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to study the microbiological aspects of the production of microbial protein ('single cell protein'; SCP) from corn waste effluents with simultaneous reduction of the COD of these effluents.For practical reasons the corn waste water itself was not used in the exp

  18. Modeling and analysis of Schistosoma Argonaute protein molecular spatial conformation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jianhua Zhang; Zhigang Shang; Xiaohui Zhang; Yuntao Zhang

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To analyze the amino acid sequence composition, secondary structure, the spatial conformation of its domain and other characteristics of Argonaute protein. Methods:Bioinformatics tools and the internet server were used. Firstly, the amino acid sequence composition features of the Argonaute protein were analyzed, and the phylogenetic tree was constructed. Secondly, Argonaute protein’s distribution of secondary structure and its physicochemical properties were predicted. Lastly, the protein functional expression form of the domain group was established through the Phyre-based analysis on the spatial conformation of Argonaute protein domains. Results: 593 amino acids were encoded by Argonaute protein, the phylogenetic tree was constructed, and Argonaute protein’s distribution of secondary structure and its physicochemical properties were obtained through analysis. In addition, the functional expression form which comprised the N-terminal PAZ domain and C-terminal Piwi domain for the Argonaute protein was obtained with Phyre. Conclusions: The information relationship between the structure and function of the Argonaute protein can be initially established with bioinformatics tools and the internet server, and this provides the theoretical basis for further clarifying the function of Schistosoma Argonaute protein.

  19. Fungal protein from corn waste effluents : a model study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schellart, J.A.

    1975-01-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to study the microbiological aspects of the production of microbial protein ('single cell protein'; SCP) from corn waste effluents with simultaneous reduction of the COD of these effluents.

    For practical reasons the corn waste water itself was

  20. PRI-Modeler: extracting RNA structural elements from PDB files of protein-RNA complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Kyungsook; Nepal, Chirag

    2007-05-01

    A complete understanding of protein and RNA structures and their interactions is important for determining the binding sites in protein-RNA complexes. Computational approaches exist for identifying secondary structural elements in proteins from atomic coordinates. However, similar methods have not been developed for RNA, due in part to the very limited structural data so far available. We have developed a set of algorithms for extracting and visualizing secondary and tertiary structures of RNA and for analyzing protein-RNA complexes. These algorithms have been implemented in a web-based program called PRI-Modeler (protein-RNA interaction modeler). Given one or more protein data bank files of protein-RNA complexes, PRI-Modeler analyzes the conformation of the RNA, calculates the hydrogen bond (H bond) and van der Waals interactions between amino acids and nucleotides, extracts secondary and tertiary RNA structure elements, and identifies the patterns of interactions between the proteins and RNAs. This paper presents PRI-Modeler and its application to the hydrogen bond and van der Waals interactions in the most representative set of protein-RNA complexes. The analysis reveals several interesting interaction patterns at various levels. The information provided by PRI-Modeler should prove useful for determining the binding sites in protein-RNA complexes. PRI-Modeler is accessible at http://wilab.inha.ac.kr/primodeler/, and supplementary materials are available in the analysis results section at http://wilab.inha.ac.kr/primodeler/.

  1. Genome-scale modeling of the protein secretory machinery in yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feizi, Amir; Österlund, Tobias; Petranovic, Dina; Bordel, Sergio; Nielsen, Jens

    2013-01-01

    The protein secretory machinery in Eukarya is involved in post-translational modification (PTMs) and sorting of the secretory and many transmembrane proteins. While the secretory machinery has been well-studied using classic reductionist approaches, a holistic view of its complex nature is lacking. Here, we present the first genome-scale model for the yeast secretory machinery which captures the knowledge generated through more than 50 years of research. The model is based on the concept of a Protein Specific Information Matrix (PSIM: characterized by seven PTMs features). An algorithm was developed which mimics secretory machinery and assigns each secretory protein to a particular secretory class that determines the set of PTMs and transport steps specific to each protein. Protein abundances were integrated with the model in order to gain system level estimation of the metabolic demands associated with the processing of each specific protein as well as a quantitative estimation of the activity of each component of the secretory machinery.

  2. Exploration of freely available web-interfaces for comparative homology modelling of microbial proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nema, Vijay; Pal, Sudhir Kumar

    2013-01-01

    This study was conducted to find the best suited freely available software for modelling of proteins by taking a few sample proteins. The proteins used were small to big in size with available crystal structures for the purpose of benchmarking. Key players like Phyre2, Swiss-Model, CPHmodels-3.0, Homer, (PS)2, (PS)(2)-V(2), Modweb were used for the comparison and model generation. Benchmarking process was done for four proteins, Icl, InhA, and KatG of Mycobacterium tuberculosis and RpoB of Thermus Thermophilus to get the most suited software. Parameters compared during analysis gave relatively better values for Phyre2 and Swiss-Model. This comparative study gave the information that Phyre2 and Swiss-Model make good models of small and large proteins as compared to other screened software. Other software was also good but is often not very efficient in providing full-length and properly folded structure.

  3. Depletion of the chromatin looping proteins CTCF and cohesin causes chromatin compaction: insight into chromatin folding by polymer modelling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariliis Tark-Dame

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Folding of the chromosomal fibre in interphase nuclei is an important element in the regulation of gene expression. For instance, physical contacts between promoters and enhancers are a key element in cell-type-specific transcription. We know remarkably little about the principles that control chromosome folding. Here we explore the view that intrachromosomal interactions, forming a complex pattern of loops, are a key element in chromosome folding. CTCF and cohesin are two abundant looping proteins of interphase chromosomes of higher eukaryotes. To investigate the role of looping in large-scale (supra Mb folding of human chromosomes, we knocked down the gene that codes for CTCF and the one coding for Rad21, an essential subunit of cohesin. We measured the effect on chromosome folding using systematic 3D fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH. Results show that chromatin becomes more compact after reducing the concentration of these two looping proteins. The molecular basis for this counter-intuitive behaviour is explored by polymer modelling usingy the Dynamic Loop model (Bohn M, Heermann DW (2010 Diffusion-driven looping provides a consistent framework for chromatin organization. PLoS ONE 5: e12218.. We show that compaction can be explained by selectively decreasing the number of short-range loops, leaving long-range looping unchanged. In support of this model prediction it has recently been shown by others that CTCF and cohesin indeed are responsible primarily for short-range looping. Our results suggest that the local and the overall changes in of chromosome structure are controlled by a delicate balance between short-range and long-range loops, allowing easy switching between, for instance, open and more compact chromatin states.

  4. Application of model bread baking in the examination of arabinoxylan-protein complexes in rye bread.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buksa, Krzysztof

    2016-09-01

    The changes in molecular mass of arabinoxylan (AX) and protein caused by bread baking process were examined using a model rye bread. Instead of the normal flour, the dough contained starch, water-extractable AX and protein which were isolated from rye wholemeal. From the crumb of selected model breads, starch was removed releasing AX-protein complexes, which were further examined by size exclusion chromatography. On the basis of the research, it was concluded that optimum model mix can be composed of 3-6% AX and 3-6% rye protein isolate at 94-88% of rye starch meaning with the most similar properties to low extraction rye flour. Application of model rye bread allowed to examine the interactions between AX and proteins. Bread baked with a share of AX, rye protein and starch, from which the complexes of the highest molar mass were isolated, was characterized by the strongest structure of the bread crumb.

  5. Transcriptome and proteome exploration to model translation efficiency and protein stability in Lactococcus lactis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clémentine Dressaire

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available This genome-scale study analysed the various parameters influencing protein levels in cells. To achieve this goal, the model bacterium Lactococcus lactis was grown at steady state in continuous cultures at different growth rates, and proteomic and transcriptomic data were thoroughly compared. Ratios of mRNA to protein were highly variable among proteins but also, for a given gene, between the different growth conditions. The modeling of cellular processes combined with a data fitting modeling approach allowed both translation efficiencies and degradation rates to be estimated for each protein in each growth condition. Estimated translational efficiencies and degradation rates strongly differed between proteins and were tested for their biological significance through statistical correlations with relevant parameters such as codon or amino acid bias. These efficiencies and degradation rates were not constant in all growth conditions and were inversely proportional to the growth rate, indicating a more efficient translation at low growth rate but an antagonistic higher rate of protein degradation. Estimated protein median half-lives ranged from 23 to 224 min, underlying the importance of protein degradation notably at low growth rates. The regulation of intracellular protein level was analysed through regulatory coefficient calculations, revealing a complex control depending on protein and growth conditions. The modeling approach enabled translational efficiencies and protein degradation rates to be estimated, two biological parameters extremely difficult to determine experimentally and generally lacking in bacteria. This method is generic and can now be extended to other environments and/or other micro-organisms.

  6. A 3D model of the membrane protein complex formed by the white spot syndrome virus structural proteins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yun-Shiang Chang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Outbreaks of white spot disease have had a large negative economic impact on cultured shrimp worldwide. However, the pathogenesis of the causative virus, WSSV (whit spot syndrome virus, is not yet well understood. WSSV is a large enveloped virus. The WSSV virion has three structural layers surrounding its core DNA: an outer envelope, a tegument and a nucleocapsid. In this study, we investigated the protein-protein interactions of the major WSSV structural proteins, including several envelope and tegument proteins that are known to be involved in the infection process. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In the present report, we used coimmunoprecipitation and yeast two-hybrid assays to elucidate and/or confirm all the interactions that occur among the WSSV structural (envelope and tegument proteins VP51A, VP19, VP24, VP26 and VP28. We found that VP51A interacted directly not only with VP26 but also with VP19 and VP24. VP51A, VP19 and VP24 were also shown to have an affinity for self-interaction. Chemical cross-linking assays showed that these three self-interacting proteins could occur as dimers. CONCLUSIONS: From our present results in conjunction with other previously established interactions we construct a 3D model in which VP24 acts as a core protein that directly associates with VP26, VP28, VP38A, VP51A and WSV010 to form a membrane-associated protein complex. VP19 and VP37 are attached to this complex via association with VP51A and VP28, respectively. Through the VP26-VP51C interaction this envelope complex is anchored to the nucleocapsid, which is made of layers of rings formed by VP664. A 3D model of the nucleocapsid and the surrounding outer membrane is presented.

  7. Testing the Coulomb/Accessible Surface Area solvent model for protein stability, ligand binding, and protein design

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bathelt Christine

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Protein structure prediction and computational protein design require efficient yet sufficiently accurate descriptions of aqueous solvent. We continue to evaluate the performance of the Coulomb/Accessible Surface Area (CASA implicit solvent model, in combination with the Charmm19 molecular mechanics force field. We test a set of model parameters optimized earlier, and we also carry out a new optimization in this work, using as a target a set of experimental stability changes for single point mutations of various proteins and peptides. The optimization procedure is general, and could be used with other force fields. The computation of stability changes requires a model for the unfolded state of the protein. In our approach, this state is represented by tripeptide structures of the sequence Ala-X-Ala for each amino acid type X. We followed an iterative optimization scheme which, at each cycle, optimizes the solvation parameters and a set of tripeptide structures for the unfolded state. This protocol uses a set of 140 experimental stability mutations and a large set of tripeptide conformations to find the best tripeptide structures and solvation parameters. Results Using the optimized parameters, we obtain a mean unsigned error of 2.28 kcal/mol for the stability mutations. The performance of the CASA model is assessed by two further applications: (i calculation of protein-ligand binding affinities and (ii computational protein design. For these two applications, the previous parameters and the ones optimized here give a similar performance. For ligand binding, we obtain reasonable agreement with a set of 55 experimental mutation data, with a mean unsigned error of 1.76 kcal/mol with the new parameters and 1.47 kcal/mol with the earlier ones. We show that the optimized CASA model is not inferior to the Generalized Born/Surface Area (GB/SA model for the prediction of these binding affinities. Likewise, the new parameters perform

  8. Modeling proteins using a super-secondary structure library and NMR chemical shift information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menon, Vilas; Vallat, Brinda K; Dybas, Joseph M; Fiser, Andras

    2013-06-04

    A remaining challenge in protein modeling is to predict structures for sequences with no sequence similarity to any experimentally solved structure. Based on earlier observations, the library of protein backbone supersecondary structure motifs (Smotifs) saturated about a decade ago. Therefore, it should be possible to build any structure from a combination of existing Smotifs with the help of limited experimental data that are sufficient to relate the backbone conformations of Smotifs between target proteins and known structures. Here, we present a hybrid modeling algorithm that relies on an exhaustive Smotif library and on nuclear magnetic resonance chemical shift patterns without any input of primary sequence information. In a test of 102 proteins, the algorithm delivered 90 homology-model-quality models, among them 24 high-quality ones, and a topologically correct solution for almost all cases. The current approach opens a venue to address the modeling of larger protein structures for which chemical shifts are available.

  9. Assessment of the allergic potential of food protein extracts and proteins on oral application using the Brown Norway rat model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Knippels, L.M.J.; Penninks, A.H.

    2003-01-01

    The need for widely accepted and validated animal models to test the potential allergenicity and potency of novel (biotechnology-derived) proteins has become an important issue for their safety evaluation.In this article, we summarize the results of the development of an oral sensitization protocol

  10. A stochastic reaction-diffusion model for protein aggregation on DNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voulgarakis, Nikolaos K.

    Vital functions of DNA, such as transcription and packaging, depend on the proper clustering of proteins on the double strand. The present study investigates how the interplay between DNA allostery and electrostatic interactions affects protein clustering. The statistical analysis of a simple but transparent computational model reveals two major consequences of this interplay. First, depending on the protein and salt concentration, protein filaments exhibit a bimodal DNA stiffening and softening behavior. Second, within a certain domain of the control parameters, electrostatic interactions can cause energetic frustration that forces proteins to assemble in rigid spiral configurations. Such spiral filaments might trigger both positive and negative supercoiling, which can ultimately promote gene compaction and regulate the promoter. It has been experimentally shown that bacterial histone-like proteins assemble in similar spiral patterns and/or exhibit the same bimodal behavior. The proposed model can, thus, provide computational insights into the physical mechanisms used by proteins to control the mechanical properties of the DNA.

  11. Connecting protein and mRNA burst distributions for stochastic models of gene expression

    CERN Document Server

    Elgart, Vlad; Fenley, Andrew T; Kulkarni, Rahul V

    2011-01-01

    The intrinsic stochasticity of gene expression can lead to large variability in protein levels for genetically identical cells. Such variability in protein levels can arise from infrequent synthesis of mRNAs which in turn give rise to bursts of protein expression. Protein expression occurring in bursts has indeed been observed experimentally and recent studies have also found evidence for transcriptional bursting, i.e. production of mRNAs in bursts. Given that there are distinct experimental techniques for quantifying the noise at different stages of gene expression, it is of interest to derive analytical results connecting experimental observations at different levels. In this work, we consider stochastic models of gene expression for which mRNA and protein production occurs in independent bursts. For such models, we derive analytical expressions connecting protein and mRNA burst distributions which show how the functional form of the mRNA burst distribution can be inferred from the protein burst distributio...

  12. Two-dimensional structure in a generic model of triangular proteins and protein trimers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camp, Philip J; Duncan, Peter D

    2006-04-01

    Motivated by the diversity and complexity of two-dimensional (2D) crystals formed by triangular proteins and protein trimers, we have investigated the structures and phase behavior of hard-disk trimers. In order to mimic specific binding interactions, each trimer possesses an "attractive" disk which can interact with similar disks on other trimers via an attractive square-well potential. At low density and low temperature, the fluid phase mainly consists of tetramers, pentamers, or hexamers. Hexamers provide the structural motif for a high-density, low-temperature periodic solid phase, but we also identify a metastable periodic structure based on a tetramer motif. At high density there is a transition between orientationally ordered and disordered solid phases. The connections between simulated structures and those of 2D protein crystals--as seen in electron microscopy--are briefly discussed.

  13. Ensemble models of proteins and protein domains based on distance distribution restraints.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeschke, Gunnar

    2016-04-01

    Conformational ensembles of intrinsically disordered peptide chains are not fully determined by experimental observations. Uncertainty due to lack of experimental restraints and due to intrinsic disorder can be distinguished if distance distributions restraints are available. Such restraints can be obtained from pulsed dipolar electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy applied to pairs of spin labels. Here, we introduce a Monte Carlo approach for generating conformational ensembles that are consistent with a set of distance distribution restraints, backbone dihedral angle statistics in known protein structures, and optionally, secondary structure propensities or membrane immersion depths. The approach is tested with simulated restraints for a terminal and an internal loop and for a protein with 69 residues by using sets of sparse restraints for underlying well-defined conformations and for published ensembles of a premolten globule-like and a coil-like intrinsically disordered protein.

  14. Mannan-binding protein forms complexes with alpha-2-macroglobulin. A protein model for the interaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Storgaard, P; Holm Nielsen, E; Skriver, E;

    1995-01-01

    We report that alpha-2-macroglobulin (alpha 2M) can form complexes with a high molecular weight porcine mannan-binding protein (pMBP-28). The alpha 2M/pMBP-28 complexes was isolated by PEG-precipitation and affinity chromatography on mannan-Sepharose, protein A-Sepharose and anti-IgM Sepharose......-PAGE, which reacted with antibodies against alpha 2M and pMBP-28, respectively, in Western blotting. Furthermore, alpha 2M/pMBP-28 complexes were demonstrated by electron microscopy. Fractionation of pMBP-containing D-mannose eluate from mannan-Sepharose on Superose 6 showed two protein peaks which reacted...

  15. Influence of Monomer Types on the Designability of a Protein-Model Chain

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    梁好均; 王元元

    2002-01-01

    In a three-dimensional off-lattice model, the method of Shakhnovich and Gutin for minimizing the Hamiltonian is applied to the design of a protein-model chain. The effect of the number of hydrophobic and hydrophilic monomer types on the designability ora protein-model chain is investigated. The simulation results reveal that the number of hydrophobic monomer types is a much more important factor than that of the polar monomer types in the design of a protein-model chain.

  16. In silico modelling and validation of differential expressed proteins in lung cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhagavathi S

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The present study aims predict the three dimensional structure of three major proteins responsible for causing Lung cancer. Methods: These are the differentially expressed proteins in lung cancer dataset. Initially, the structural template for these proteins is identified from structural database using homology search and perform homology modelling approach to predict its native 3D structure. Three-dimensional model obtained was validated using Ramachandran plot analysis to find the reliability of the model. Results: Four proteins were differentially expressed and were significant proteins in causing lung cancer. Among the four proteins, Matrixmetallo proteinase (P39900 had a known 3D structure and hence was not considered for modelling. The remaining proteins Polo like kinase I Q58A51, Trophinin B1AKF1, Thrombomodulin P07204 were modelled and validated. Conclusions: The three dimensional structure of proteins provides insights about the functional aspect and regulatory aspect of the protein. Thus, this study will be a breakthrough for further lung cancer related studies.

  17. Mathematical model of zinc absorption: effects of dietary calcium, protein and iron on zinc absorption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Leland V; Krebs, Nancy F; Hambidge, K Michael

    2013-02-28

    A previously described mathematical model of Zn absorption as a function of total daily dietary Zn and phytate was fitted to data from studies in which dietary Ca, Fe and protein were also measured. An analysis of regression residuals indicated statistically significant positive relationships between the residuals and Ca, Fe and protein, suggesting that the presence of any of these dietary components enhances Zn absorption. Based on the hypotheses that (1) Ca and Fe both promote Zn absorption by binding with phytate and thereby making it unavailable for binding Zn and (2) protein enhances the availability of Zn for transporter binding, the model was modified to incorporate these effects. The new model of Zn absorption as a function of dietary Zn, phytate, Ca, Fe and protein was then fitted to the data. The proportion of variation in absorbed Zn explained by the new model was 0·88, an increase from 0·82 with the original model. A reduced version of the model without Fe produced an equally good fit to the data and an improved value for the model selection criterion, demonstrating that when dietary Ca and protein are controlled for, there is no evidence that dietary Fe influences Zn absorption. Regression residuals and testing with additional data supported the validity of the new model. It was concluded that dietary Ca and protein modestly enhanced Zn absorption and Fe had no statistically discernable effect. Furthermore, the model provides a meaningful foundation for efforts to model nutrient interactions in mineral absorption.

  18. Folding Behaviour for Proteins BBL and E3BD with Gō-like Models

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZUO Guang-Hong; ZHANG Jian; WANG Jun; WANG Wei

    2005-01-01

    @@ Folding behaviour of protein BBL and its homologue domain E3BD are studied by using an off-lattice Gō-like model. It is found that the folding behaviours of these two proteins are different. Protein BBL folds in a downhill manner, which is consistent with experiments. In contrast, protein E3BD folds cooperatively and has a bimodal distribution of the Q values (the similarity to the native state). By analysing the native structures of the two proteins, it is found that the difference in folding behaviours can be attributed to the different structural features described by the number of nonlocal contacts per residue.

  19. Homology modelling and insilico analysis of neuraminidase protein in H1N1 Influenza A virus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abhilash Manohar

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available In this work, modelling of Neuraminidase protein of Influenza A virus (A/Himeji/1/2009(H1N1 neuraminidase (NA protein was done using Modeller 9V2. Modelled structure was submitted to protein model database and could be downloaded using accession number PM0075830. The modelled protein structure was subjected to In silco analysis using various bioinformatics tools. Two anti-influenza drugs currently being used to treat infected patients are oseltamivir (Tamiflu and zanamivir (Relenza, both of which target the neuraminidase enzyme of the virus. Reports of the emergence of drug resistance make the development of new anti-influenza molecules a priority. Hence the modelled structure of H1NI Neuraminidase could be very useful for in silico analysis of potential neuraminidase inhibitors.

  20. Nonlinear Model of the Specificity of DNA-Protein Interactions and Its Stability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dwiputra, D.; Hidayat, W.; Khairani, R.; Zen, F. P.

    2016-08-01

    Specific DNA-protein interactions are fundamental processes of living cells. We propose a new model of DNA-protein interactions to explain the site specificity of the interactions. The hydrogen bonds between DNA base pairs and between DNA-protein peptide groups play a significant role in determination of the specific binding site. We adopt the Morse potential with coupling terms to construct the Hamiltonian of coupled oscillators representing the hydrogen bonds in which the depth of the potentials vary in the DNA chain. In this paper we investigate the stability of the model to determine the conditions satisfying the biological circumstances of the DNA-protein interactions.

  1. Protein aggregation in association with delayed neuronal death in rat model of brain ischemia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Pengfei GE; Tianfei LUG; Shuanglin FU; Wenchen LI; Chonghao WANG; Chuibing ZHOU; Yinan LUO

    2008-01-01

    To investigate the relationship between protein aggregation and delayed neuronal death, we adopted rat models of 20 min ischemia. Brain ischemia was produced using the 2-vessel occlusion (2VO) model in rats Light microscopy, transmission electronic microscopy and Western blot analysis were performed for morphological analysis of neurons, and protein detection. The results showed delayed neuronal death took place at 72 h after ischemia-reperfusion, protein aggregates formed at 4 h after reperfusion and reached the peak at 24 h after reper-fusion, and Western blot analysis was consistent with transmission electronic microscopy. We conclude that protein aggregation is one of the important factors leading to delayed neuronal death.

  2. Moisture-induced quality changes of hen egg white proteins in a protein/water model system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Qinchun; Rocca-Smith, Jeancarlo R; Labuza, Theodore P

    2012-10-24

    In recent years, the intermediate-moisture foods (IMF), such as nutrition and energy bars, are a rapidly growing segment of the global food market. However, due to moisture-induced protein aggregation, commercial high protein nutrition bars generally become harder over time, thus losing product acceptability. In this study, the objectives were to investigate the moisture-induced protein aggregation in a hen egg white proteins/water dough model system (water activity (a(w)): 0.95) and to evaluate its molecular mechanisms and controlling factors. During storage at three different temperatures (23, 35, and 45 °C) for 70 days, four selected physicochemical changes of the dough system were analyzed: the a(w), the color (L* value), the fluorescent Maillard compounds (fluorescence intensity (FI) value), and the remaining free amino groups. Overall, the physicochemical changes of egg white proteins in the dough system are closely related to the glass transition temperature (T(g)). The effect of moisture content on both the L* and FI values occurred as a function of storage time at 45 °C due to the Maillard reaction. The change of the remaining free amino groups at different temperatures was derived from the coaction of both the Maillard reaction and enzymatic hydrolysis from molds. Additionally, through analyzing the buffer-soluble egg white proteins using gel electrophoresis, our results showed that moisture-induced aggregates were produced by two chemical reactions during storage: the disulfide interaction and the Maillard reaction. Furthermore, the effect of two processes during manufacturing, desugarization and dry-heat pasteurization, on the physicochemical changes of the egg white proteins was elucidated. In order to prevent or reduce moisture-induced protein aggregation during product storage and distribution, two potential solutions were also discussed.

  3. Effects of high hydrostatic pressure on emulsifying properties of sweet potato protein in model protein-hydrocolloids system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Nasir Mehmood; Mu, Tai-Hua; Ali, Farman; Arogundade, Lawrence A; Khan, Zia Ullah; Zhang, Maio; Ahmad, Shujaat; Sun, Hong-Nan

    2015-02-15

    The effects of high hydrostatic pressure (HHP) on emulsifying properties of sweet potato protein (SPP) in presence of 0.1%, 0.3% and 0.5% (w/v) of guar gum (GG) and glycerol monostearate (GMS) were investigated. Emulsifying stability index (ESI) of the SPP with GG revealed significant increase (Pmodel while such case was not observed for SPP-GMS model. The flow index for SPP-GG emulsion model was found to decrease with increase in HHP treatment and had non-Newtonian behaviour. The SPP-GMS emulsion models with HHP treatments showed comparatively lower viscosities but had more Newtonian flow character.

  4. A Bayesian model for classifying all differentially expressed proteins simultaneously in 2D PAGE gels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wu Steven H

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (2D PAGE is commonly used to identify differentially expressed proteins under two or more experimental or observational conditions. Wu et al (2009 developed a univariate probabilistic model which was used to identify differential expression between Case and Control groups, by applying a Likelihood Ratio Test (LRT to each protein on a 2D PAGE. In contrast to commonly used statistical approaches, this model takes into account the two possible causes of missing values in 2D PAGE: either (1 the non-expression of a protein; or (2 a level of expression that falls below the limit of detection. Results We develop a global Bayesian model which extends the previously described model. Unlike the univariate approach, the model reported here is able treat all differentially expressed proteins simultaneously. Whereas each protein is modelled by the univariate likelihood function previously described, several global distributions are used to model the underlying relationship between the parameters associated with individual proteins. These global distributions are able to combine information from each protein to give more accurate estimates of the true parameters. In our implementation of the procedure, all parameters are recovered by Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC integration. The 95% highest posterior density (HPD intervals for the marginal posterior distributions are used to determine whether differences in protein expression are due to differences in mean expression intensities, and/or differences in the probabilities of expression. Conclusions Simulation analyses showed that the global model is able to accurately recover the underlying global distributions, and identify more differentially expressed proteins than the simple application of a LRT. Additionally, simulations also indicate that the probability of incorrectly identifying a protein as differentially expressed (i.e., the False

  5. Connecting Protein Structure to Intermolecular Interactions: A Computer Modeling Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abualia, Mohammed; Schroeder, Lianne; Garcia, Megan; Daubenmire, Patrick L.; Wink, Donald J.; Clark, Ginevra A.

    2016-01-01

    An understanding of protein folding relies on a solid foundation of a number of critical chemical concepts, such as molecular structure, intra-/intermolecular interactions, and relating structure to function. Recent reports show that students struggle on all levels to achieve these understandings and use them in meaningful ways. Further, several…

  6. Optimized Baxter model of protein solutions: electrostatics versus adhesion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Prinsen, P.; Odijk, T.

    2004-01-01

    A theory is set up of spherical proteins interacting by screened electrostatics and constant adhesion, in which the effective adhesion parameter is optimized by a variational principle for the free energy. An analytical approach to the second virial coefficient is first outlined by balancing the rep

  7. Conservation, variability and the modeling of active protein kinases.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James D R Knight

    Full Text Available The human proteome is rich with protein kinases, and this richness has made the kinase of crucial importance in initiating and maintaining cell behavior. Elucidating cell signaling networks and manipulating their components to understand and alter behavior require well designed inhibitors. These inhibitors are needed in culture to cause and study network perturbations, and the same compounds can be used as drugs to treat disease. Understanding the structural biology of protein kinases in detail, including their commonalities, differences and modes of substrate interaction, is necessary for designing high quality inhibitors that will be of true use for cell biology and disease therapy. To this end, we here report on a structural analysis of all available active-conformation protein kinases, discussing residue conservation, the novel features of such conservation, unique properties of atypical kinases and variability in the context of substrate binding. We also demonstrate how this information can be used for structure prediction. Our findings will be of use not only in understanding protein kinase function and evolution, but they highlight the flaws inherent in kinase drug design as commonly practiced and dictate an appropriate strategy for the sophisticated design of specific inhibitors for use in the laboratory and disease therapy.

  8. Association of protein structure, protein and carbohydrate subfractions with bioenergy profiles and biodegradation functions in modeled forage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Cuiying; Zhang, Xuewei; Yu, Peiqiang

    2016-03-01

    The objectives of this study were to detect unique aspects and association of forage protein inherent structure, biological compounds, protein and carbohydrate subfractions, bioenergy profiles, and biodegradation features. In this study, common available alfalfa hay from two different sourced-origins (FSO vs. CSO) was used as a modeled forage for inherent structure profile, bioenergy, biodegradation and their association between their structure and bio-functions. The molecular spectral profiles were determined using non-invasive molecular spectroscopy. The parameters included: protein structure amide I group, amide II group and their ratios; protein subfractions (PA1, PA2, PB1, PB2, PC); carbohydrate fractions (CA1, CA2, CA3, CA4, CB1, CB2, CC); biodegradable and undegradable fractions of protein (RDPA2, RDPB1, RDPB2, RDP; RUPA2 RUPB1, RUPB2, RUPC, RUP); biodegradable and undegradable fractions of carbohydrate (RDCA4, RDCB1, RDCB2, RDCB3, RDCHO; RUCA4, RUCB1; RUCB2; RUCB3 RUCC, RUCHO) and bioenergy profiles (tdNDF, tdFA, tdCP, tdNFC, TDN1 ×, DE3 ×, ME3 ×, NEL3 ×; NEm, NEg). The results show differences in protein and carbohydrate (CHO) subfractions in the moderately degradable true protein fraction (PB1: 502 vs. 420 g/kg CP, P = 0.09), slowly degraded true protein fraction (PB2: 45 vs. 96 g/kg CP, P = 0.02), moderately degradable CHO fraction (CB2: 283 vs. 223 g/kg CHO, P = 0.06) and slowly degraded CHO fraction (CB3: 369 vs. 408 g/kg CHO) between the two sourced origins. As to biodegradable (RD) fractions of protein and CHO in rumen, there were differences in RD of PB1 (417 vs. 349 g/kg CP, P = 0.09), RD of PB2 (29 vs. 62 g/kg CP, P = 0.02), RD of CB2 (251 vs. 198 g/kg DM, P = 0.06), RD of CB3 (236 vs. 261 g/kg CHO, P = 0.08). As to bioenergy profile, there were differences in total digestible nutrient (TDN: 551 vs. 537 g/kg DM, P = 0.06), and metabolic bioenergy (P = 0.095). As to protein molecular structure, there were differences in protein structure 1st

  9. Association of protein structure, protein and carbohydrate subfractions with bioenergy profiles and biodegradation functions in modeled forage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Cuiying; Zhang, Xuewei; Yu, Peiqiang

    2016-03-15

    The objectives of this study were to detect unique aspects and association of forage protein inherent structure, biological compounds, protein and carbohydrate subfractions, bioenergy profiles, and biodegradation features. In this study, common available alfalfa hay from two different sourced-origins (FSO vs. CSO) was used as a modeled forage for inherent structure profile, bioenergy, biodegradation and their association between their structure and bio-functions. The molecular spectral profiles were determined using non-invasive molecular spectroscopy. The parameters included: protein structure amide I group, amide II group and their ratios; protein subfractions (PA1, PA2, PB1, PB2, PC); carbohydrate fractions (CA1, CA2, CA3, CA4, CB1, CB2, CC); biodegradable and undegradable fractions of protein (RDPA2, RDPB1, RDPB2, RDP; RUPA2 RUPB1, RUPB2, RUPC, RUP); biodegradable and undegradable fractions of carbohydrate (RDCA4, RDCB1, RDCB2, RDCB3, RDCHO; RUCA4, RUCB1; RUCB2; RUCB3 RUCC, RUCHO) and bioenergy profiles (tdNDF, tdFA, tdCP, tdNFC, TDN1×, DE3×, ME3×, NEL3×; NEm, NEg). The results show differences in protein and carbohydrate (CHO) subfractions in the moderately degradable true protein fraction (PB1: 502 vs. 420 g/kg CP, P=0.09), slowly degraded true protein fraction (PB2: 45 vs. 96 g/kg CP, P=0.02), moderately degradable CHO fraction (CB2: 283 vs. 223 g/kg CHO, P=0.06) and slowly degraded CHO fraction (CB3: 369 vs. 408 g/kg CHO) between the two sourced origins. As to biodegradable (RD) fractions of protein and CHO in rumen, there were differences in RD of PB1 (417 vs. 349 g/kg CP, P=0.09), RD of PB2 (29 vs. 62 g/kg CP, P=0.02), RD of CB2 (251 vs. 198 g/kg DM, P=0.06), RD of CB3 (236 vs. 261 g/kg CHO, P=0.08). As to bioenergy profile, there were differences in total digestible nutrient (TDN: 551 vs. 537 g/kg DM, P=0.06), and metabolic bioenergy (P=0.095). As to protein molecular structure, there were differences in protein structure 1st and 2nd amide groups (P0

  10. Evolution of sparsity and modularity in a model of protein allostery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hemery, Mathieu; Rivoire, Olivier

    2015-04-01

    The sequence of a protein is not only constrained by its physical and biochemical properties under current selection, but also by features of its past evolutionary history. Understanding the extent and the form that these evolutionary constraints may take is important to interpret the information in protein sequences. To study this problem, we introduce a simple but physical model of protein evolution where selection targets allostery, the functional coupling of distal sites on protein surfaces. This model shows how the geometrical organization of couplings between amino acids within a protein structure can depend crucially on its evolutionary history. In particular, two scenarios are found to generate a spatial concentration of functional constraints: high mutation rates and fluctuating selective pressures. This second scenario offers a plausible explanation for the high tolerance of natural proteins to mutations and for the spatial organization of their least tolerant amino acids, as revealed by sequence analysis and mutagenesis experiments. It also implies a faculty to adapt to new selective pressures that is consistent with observations. The model illustrates how several independent functional modules may emerge within the same protein structure, depending on the nature of past environmental fluctuations. Our model thus relates the evolutionary history of proteins to the geometry of their functional constraints, with implications for decoding and engineering protein sequences.

  11. Investigation and prediction of protein precipitation by polyethylene glycol using quantitative structure-activity relationship models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hämmerling, Frank; Ladd Effio, Christopher; Andris, Sebastian; Kittelmann, Jörg; Hubbuch, Jürgen

    2017-01-10

    Precipitation of proteins is considered to be an effective purification method for proteins and has proven its potential to replace costly chromatography processes. Besides salts and polyelectrolytes, polymers, such as polyethylene glycol (PEG), are commonly used for precipitation applications under mild conditions. Process development, however, for protein precipitation steps still is based mainly on heuristic approaches and high-throughput experimentation due to a lack of understanding of the underlying mechanisms. In this work we apply quantitative structure-activity relationships (QSARs) to model two parameters, the discontinuity point m* and the β-value, that describe the complete precipitation curve of a protein under defined conditions. The generated QSAR models are sensitive to the protein type, pH, and ionic strength. It was found that the discontinuity point m* is mainly dependent on protein molecular structure properties and electrostatic surface properties, whereas the β-value is influenced by the variance in electrostatics and hydrophobicity on the protein surface. The models for m* and the β-value exhibit a good correlation between observed and predicted data with a coefficient of determination of R(2)≥0.90 and, hence, are able to accurately predict precipitation curves for proteins. The predictive capabilities were demonstrated for a set of combinations of protein type, pH, and ionic strength not included in the generation of the models and good agreement between predicted and experimental data was achieved.

  12. Novel nanocomposites from spider silk–silica fusion (chimeric) proteins

    OpenAIRE

    Wong Po Foo, Cheryl; Patwardhan, Siddharth V.; Belton, David J.; Kitchel, Brandon; Anastasiades, Daphne; Huang, Jia; Naik, Rajesh R.; Perry, Carole C.; Kaplan, David L.

    2006-01-01

    Silica skeletal architectures in diatoms are characterized by remarkable morphological and nanostructural details. Silk proteins from spiders and silkworms form strong and intricate self-assembling fibrous biomaterials in nature. We combined the features of silk with biosilica through the design, synthesis, and characterization of a novel family of chimeric proteins for subsequent use in model materials forming reactions. The domains from the major ampullate spidroin 1 (MaSp1) protein of Neph...

  13. Some remarks on the two-electron atom

    CERN Document Server

    Apostol, M

    1996-01-01

    New, approximate, two-electron wavefunctions are introduced for the two-electron atoms (cations), which account remarkably well for the ground-state energies and the lowest-excxited states (where available). A new scheme of electronic configurations is also proposed for the multi-electron atoms.

  14. Steiner versus Wittgenstein: Remarks on Differing Views of Mathematical Truth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charles SAYWARD

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Mark Steiner criticizes some remarks Wittgenstein makes about Gödel. Steiner takes Wittgenstein to be disputing a mathematical result. The paper argues that Wittgenstein does no such thing. The contrast between the realist and the demonstrativist concerning mathematical truth is examined. Wittgenstein is held to side with neither camp. Rather, his point is that a realist argument is inconclusive.

  15. Remarks on Nephrops norvegicus (L.) and its variety Meridionalis zariquiey

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Holthuis, L.B.

    1945-01-01

    In 1935 R. Zariquiey Cenarro published a paper in the Spanish language, in which he separated the specimens of Nephrops norvegicus occurring in the Mediterranean and the southern Atlantic Ocean as a separate variety meridionalis from the typical form of the northern Atlantic. In this paper he remark

  16. Discussant Remarks on Session: Statistical Aspects of Measuring the Internet

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cottrell, Les

    1999-04-02

    These remarks will briefly summarize what we learn from the talks in this session, and add some more areas in Internet Measurement that may provide challenges for statisticians. It will also point out some reasons why statisticians may be interested in working in this area.

  17. A Remarkable Recent Transition in the Solar Dynamo

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Jager, C.; Akasofu, S.-I.; Duhau, S.; Livingston, W.C.; Nieuwenhuijzen, H.; Potgieter, M.S.

    2016-01-01

    We summarize the major aspects of the remarkable, fairly long lasting period(∼ 2005 to ∼ 2010) of low solar activity, that we will call the Transition. It is the transitionalstage between the Grand Maximum of the 20th century and a forthcoming (most probablyRegular) episode of solar activity. The va

  18. Initial remarks on Sur la genèse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. M. Goshgarian

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available G. M. Goshgarian describes historical and theoretical context in whichAlthusser’s note On Genesis has been written. Goshgarian indicated theoreticalsources of althusserian remarks in the theme of genesis. He invokes – next to Marx– such names as Montaigne or Spinoza.

  19. Concluding remarks: Faraday Discussion on chemistry in the urban atmosphere.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jimenez, Jose L

    2016-07-18

    This article summarises the Concluding remarks from the Faraday Discussion on Chemistry in the Urban Atmosphere. The following themes are addressed: (a) new results that inform our understanding of the evolving sources and composition of the urban atmosphere ("News"); (b) results that identify gaps in our understanding that necessitate further work ("Gaps");

  20. Optimization and modeling of cellulase protein from Trichoderma ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    AJB SERVER

    2007-01-04

    Jan 4, 2007 ... Logistic kinetic model was the best model for the mixed substrates. A conceptual Artificial Neural. Network (ANN) model was well incorporated in the fermentative production of cellulase. ... RSM to evaluate the effects of the medium parameters ... Experiments were performed along the steepest ascent.

  1. Multistep modeling of protein structure: application to bungarotoxin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srinivasan, S.; Shibata, M.; Rein, R.

    1986-01-01

    Modelling of bungarotoxin in atomic details is presented in this article. The model-building procedure utilizes the low-resolution crystal coordinates of the c-alpha atoms of bungarotoxin, sequence homology within the neurotoxin family, as well as high-resolution x-ray diffraction data of cobratoxin and erabutoxin. Our model-building procedure involves: (a) principles of comparative modelling, (b) embedding procedures of distance geometry, and (c) use of molecular mechanics for optimizing packing. The model is not only consistent with the c-alpha coordinates of crystal structure, but also agrees with solution conformational features of the triple-stranded beta sheet as observed by NOE measurements.

  2. Statistical-mechanical lattice models for protein-DNA binding in chromatin

    CERN Document Server

    Teif, Vladimir B

    2010-01-01

    Statistical-mechanical lattice models for protein-DNA binding are well established as a method to describe complex ligand binding equilibriums measured in vitro with purified DNA and protein components. Recently, a new field of applications has opened up for this approach since it has become possible to experimentally quantify genome-wide protein occupancies in relation to the DNA sequence. In particular, the organization of the eukaryotic genome by histone proteins into a nucleoprotein complex termed chromatin has been recognized as a key parameter that controls the access of transcription factors to the DNA sequence. New approaches have to be developed to derive statistical mechanical lattice descriptions of chromatin-associated protein-DNA interactions. Here, we present the theoretical framework for lattice models of histone-DNA interactions in chromatin and investigate the (competitive) DNA binding of other chromosomal proteins and transcription factors. The results have a number of applications for quant...

  3. Protein Alpha Shape (PAS) Dock: A new gaussian-based score function suitable for docking in homology modelled protein structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tøndel, Kristin; Anderssen, Endre; Drabløs, Finn

    2006-03-01

    Protein Alpha Shape (PAS) Dock is a new empirical score function suitable for virtual library screening using homology modelled protein structures. Here, the score function is used in combination with the geometry search method Tabu search. A description of the protein binding site is generated using gaussian property fields like in Protein Alpha Shape Similarity Analysis (PASSA). Gaussian property fields are also used to describe the ligand properties. The overlap between the receptor and ligand hydrophilicity and lipophilicity fields is maximised, while minimising steric clashes. Gaussian functions introduce a smoothing of the property fields. This makes the score function robust against small structural variations, and therefore suitable for use with homology models. This also makes it less critical to include protein flexibility in the docking calculations. We use a fast and simplified version of the score function in the geometry search, while a more detailed version is used for the final prediction of the binding free energies. This use of a two-level scoring makes PAS-Dock computationally efficient, and well suited for virtual screening. The PAS-Dock score function is trained on 218 X-ray structures of protein- ligand complexes with experimental binding affinities. The performance of PAS-Dock is compared to two other docking methods, AutoDock and MOE-Dock, with respect to both accuracy and computational efficiency. According to this study, PAS-Dock is more computationally efficient than both AutoDock and MOE-Dock, and gives a better prediction of the free energies of binding. PAS-Dock is also more robust against structural variations than AutoDock.

  4. Nonequilibrium dynamics of an exactly solvable Ising-like model and protein translocation

    CERN Document Server

    Pelizzola, A

    2013-01-01

    Using an Ising-like model of protein mechanical unfolding, we introduce a diffusive dynamics on its exactly known free energy profile, reducing the nonequilibrium dynamics of the model to a biased random walk. As an illustration, the model is then applied to the protein translocation phenomenon, taking inspiration from a recent experiment on the green fluorescent protein pulled by a molecular motor. The average translocation time is evaluated exactly, and the analysis of single trajectories shows that translocation proceeds through an intermediate state, similar to that observed in the experiment.

  5. Competitive inhibition reaction mechanisms for the two-step model of protein aggregation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whidden, Mark; Ho, Allison; Ivanova, Magdalena I; Schnell, Santiago

    2014-01-01

    We propose three new reaction mechanisms for competitive inhibition of protein aggregation for the two-step model of protein aggregation. The first mechanism is characterized by the inhibition of native protein, the second is characterized by the inhibition of aggregation-prone protein and the third mechanism is characterized by the mixed inhibition of native and aggregation-prone proteins. Rate equations are derived for these mechanisms, and a method is described for plotting kinetic results to distinguish these three types of inhibitors. The derived rate equations provide a simple way of estimating the inhibition constant of native or aggregation-prone protein inhibitors in protein aggregation. The new approach is used to estimate the inhibition constants of different peptide inhibitors of insulin aggregation.

  6. Energetics of hydrogen bonding in proteins: a model compound study.

    OpenAIRE

    1996-01-01

    Differences in the energetics of amide-amide and amide-hydroxyl hydrogen bonds in proteins have been explored from the effect of hydroxyl groups on the structure and dissolution energetics of a series of crystalline cyclic dipeptides. The calorimetrically determined energetics are interpreted in light of the crystal structures of the studied compounds. Our results indicate that the amide-amide and amide-hydroxyl hydrogen bonds both provide considerable enthalpic stability, but that the amide-...

  7. An exponential modeling algorithm for protein structure completion by X-ray crystallography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shneerson, V L; Wild, D L; Saldin, D K

    2001-03-01

    An exponential modeling algorithm is developed for protein structure completion by X-ray crystallography and tested on experimental data from a 59-residue protein. An initial noisy difference Fourier map of missing residues of up to half of the protein is transformed by the algorithm into one that allows easy identification of the continuous tube of electron density associated with that polypeptide chain. The method incorporates the paradigm of phase hypothesis generation and cross validation within an automated scheme.

  8. Lovastatin Corrects Excess Protein Synthesis and Prevents Epileptogenesis in a Mouse Model of Fragile X Syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Chuang, Shih-Chieh; Chubykin, Alexander A.; Sidorov, Michael; Bianchi, Riccardo; Wong, Robert K.S.; Osterweil, Emily; Bear, Mark; Chubykin, Alexander A.

    2013-01-01

    Many neuropsychiatric symptoms of fragile X syndrome (FXS) are believed to be a consequence of altered regulation of protein synthesis at synapses. We discovered that lovastatin, a drug that is widely prescribed for the treatment of high cholesterol, can correct excess hippocampal protein synthesis in the mouse model of FXS and can prevent one of the robust functional consequences of increased protein synthesis in FXS, epileptogenesis. These data suggest that lovastatin is potentially disease...

  9. Lovastatin corrects excess protein synthesis and prevents epileptogenesis in a mouse model of fragile X syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Osterweil, Emily K.; Chuang, Shih-Chieh; Chubykin, Alexander A.; Sidorov, Michael; Bianchi, Riccardo; Wong, Robert K. S.; Bear, Mark F.

    2013-01-01

    Many neuropsychiatric symptoms of fragile X syndrome (FXS) are believed to be a consequence of altered regulation of protein synthesis at synapses. We discovered that lovastatin, a drug that is widely prescribed for treatment of high cholesterol, can correct excess hippocampal protein synthesis in themouse model of FXS and can prevent one of the robust functional consequences of increased protein synthesis in FXS, epileptogenesis. These data suggest that lovastatin is potentially disease modi...

  10. A two level hierarchical model of protein retention in ion exchange chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salvalaglio, Matteo; Paloni, Matteo; Guelat, Bertrand; Morbidelli, Massimo; Cavallotti, Carlo

    2015-09-11

    Predicting protein retention in ion exchange chromatography (IEX) from first principles is a fascinating perspective. In this work a two level hierarchical modeling strategy is proposed in order to calculate protein retention factors. Model predictions are tested against experimental data measured for Lysozyme and Chymotrypsinogen A in IEX columns as a function of ionic strength and pH. At the highest level of accuracy Molecular Dynamics (MD) simulations in explicit water are used to determine the interaction free energy between each of the two proteins and the IEX stationary phase for a reference pH and ionic strength. At a lower level of accuracy a linear response model based on an implicit treatment of solvation and adopting a static protein structure is used to calculate interaction free energies for the full range of pHs and ionic strengths considered. A scaling coefficient, determined comparing MD and implicit solvent simulations, is then introduced in order to correct the linear response model for errors induced by the adoption of a static protein structure. The calculated free energies are then used to compute protein retention factors, which can be directly compared with experimental data. The possibility to introduce a third level of accuracy is explored testing the predictions of a semiempirical model. A quantitative agreement between the predicted and measured protein retention factors is obtained using the coupled MD-linear response models, supporting the reliability of the proposed approach. The model allows quantifying the electrostatic, van der Waals, and conformational contributions to the interaction free energies. A good agreement between experiments and model is obtained also using the semiempirical model that, although requiring parameterization over higher level models or experimental data, proves to be useful in order to rapidly determine protein retention factors across wide pH and ionic strength ranges as it is computationally inexpensive.

  11. An expanded binding model for Cys2His2 zinc finger protein-DNA interfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Persikov, Anton V.; Singh, Mona

    2011-06-01

    Cys2His2 zinc finger (C2H2-ZF) proteins comprise the largest class of eukaryotic transcription factors. The 'canonical model' for C2H2-ZF protein-DNA interaction consists of only four amino acid-nucleotide contacts per zinc finger domain, and this model has been the basis for several efforts for computationally predicting and experimentally designing protein-DNA interfaces. Here, we perform a systematic analysis of structural and experimental binding data and find that, in addition to the canonical contacts, several other amino acid and base pair combinations frequently play a role in C2H2-ZF protein-DNA binding. We suggest an expansion of the canonical C2H2-ZF model to include one to three additional contacts, and show that computational approaches including these additional contacts improve predictions of DNA targets of zinc finger proteins.

  12. The unfolded protein response has a protective role in yeast models of classic galactosemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evandro A. De-Souza

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Classic galactosemia is a human autosomal recessive disorder caused by mutations in the GALT gene (GAL7 in yeast, which encodes the enzyme galactose-1-phosphate uridyltransferase. Here we show that the unfolded protein response pathway is triggered by galactose in two yeast models of galactosemia: lithium-treated cells and the gal7Δ mutant. The synthesis of galactose-1-phosphate is essential to trigger the unfolded protein response under these conditions because the deletion of the galactokinase-encoding gene GAL1 completely abolishes unfolded protein response activation and galactose toxicity. Impairment of the unfolded protein response in both yeast models makes cells even more sensitive to galactose, unmasking its cytotoxic effect. These results indicate that endoplasmic reticulum stress is induced under galactosemic conditions and underscores the importance of the unfolded protein response pathway to cellular adaptation in these models of classic galactosemia.

  13. The unfolded protein response has a protective role in yeast models of classic galactosemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De-Souza, Evandro A; Pimentel, Felipe S A; Machado, Caio M; Martins, Larissa S; da-Silva, Wagner S; Montero-Lomelí, Mónica; Masuda, Claudio A

    2014-01-01

    Classic galactosemia is a human autosomal recessive disorder caused by mutations in the GALT gene (GAL7 in yeast), which encodes the enzyme galactose-1-phosphate uridyltransferase. Here we show that the unfolded protein response pathway is triggered by galactose in two yeast models of galactosemia: lithium-treated cells and the gal7Δ mutant. The synthesis of galactose-1-phosphate is essential to trigger the unfolded protein response under these conditions because the deletion of the galactokinase-encoding gene GAL1 completely abolishes unfolded protein response activation and galactose toxicity. Impairment of the unfolded protein response in both yeast models makes cells even more sensitive to galactose, unmasking its cytotoxic effect. These results indicate that endoplasmic reticulum stress is induced under galactosemic conditions and underscores the importance of the unfolded protein response pathway to cellular adaptation in these models of classic galactosemia.

  14. Protein structure modelling and evaluation based on a 4-distance description of side-chain interactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Inbar Yuval

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Accurate evaluation and modelling of residue-residue interactions within and between proteins is a key aspect of computational structure prediction including homology modelling, protein-protein docking, refinement of low-resolution structures, and computational protein design. Results Here we introduce a method for accurate protein structure modelling and evaluation based on a novel 4-distance description of residue-residue interaction geometry. Statistical 4-distance preferences were extracted from high-resolution protein structures and were used as a basis for a knowledge-based potential, called Hunter. We demonstrate that 4-distance description of side chain interactions can be used reliably to discriminate the native structure from a set of decoys. Hunter ranked the native structure as the top one in 217 out of 220 high-resolution decoy sets, in 25 out of 28 "Decoys 'R' Us" decoy sets and in 24 out of 27 high-resolution CASP7/8 decoy sets. The same concept was applied to side chain modelling in protein structures. On a set of very high-resolution protein structures the average RMSD was 1.47 Å for all residues and 0.73 Å for buried residues, which is in the range of attainable accuracy for a model. Finally, we show that Hunter performs as good or better than other top methods in homology modelling based on results from the CASP7 experiment. The supporting web site http://bioinfo.weizmann.ac.il/hunter/ was developed to enable the use of Hunter and for visualization and interactive exploration of 4-distance distributions. Conclusions Our results suggest that Hunter can be used as a tool for evaluation and for accurate modelling of residue-residue interactions in protein structures. The same methodology is applicable to other areas involving high-resolution modelling of biomolecules.

  15. Use of secondary structural information and C-C distance restraints to model protein structures with MODELLER

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Boojala V B Reddy; Yiannis N Kaznessis

    2007-08-01

    Protein secondary structure predictions and amino acid long range contact map predictions from primary sequence of proteins have been explored to aid in modelling protein tertiary structures. In order to evaluate the usefulness of secondary structure and 3D-residue contact prediction methods to model protein structures we have used the known Q3 (alpha-helix, beta-strands and irregular turns/loops) secondary structure information, along with residue-residue contact information as restraints for MODELLER. We present here results of our modelling studies on 30 best resolved single domain protein structures of varied lengths. The results shows that it is very difficult to obtain useful models even with 100% accurate secondary structure predictions and accurate residue contact predictions for up to 30% of residues in a sequence. The best models that we obtained for proteins of lengths 37, 70, 118, 136 and 193 amino acid residues are of RMSDs 4.17, 5.27, 9.12, 7.89 and 9.69, respectively. The results show that one can obtain better models for the proteins which have high percent of alpha-helix content. This analysis further shows that MODELLER restrain optimization program can be useful only if we have truly homologous structure(s) as a template where it derives numerous restraints, almost identical to the templates used. This analysis also clearly indicates that even if we satisfy several true residue-residue contact distances, up to 30% of their sequence length with fully known secondary structural information, we end up predicting model structures much distant from their corresponding native structures.

  16. Structural propensities of kinase family proteins from a Potts model of residue co-variation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haldane, Allan; Flynn, William F; He, Peng; Vijayan, R S K; Levy, Ronald M

    2016-08-01

    Understanding the conformational propensities of proteins is key to solving many problems in structural biology and biophysics. The co-variation of pairs of mutations contained in multiple sequence alignments of protein families can be used to build a Potts Hamiltonian model of the sequence patterns which accurately predicts structural contacts. This observation paves the way to develop deeper connections between evolutionary fitness landscapes of entire protein families and the corresponding free energy landscapes which determine the conformational propensities of individual proteins. Using statistical energies determined from the Potts model and an alignment of 2896 PDB structures, we predict the propensity for particular kinase family proteins to assume a "DFG-out" conformation implicated in the susceptibility of some kinases to type-II inhibitors, and validate the predictions by comparison with the observed structural propensities of the corresponding proteins and experimental binding affinity data. We decompose the statistical energies to investigate which interactions contribute the most to the conformational preference for particular sequences and the corresponding proteins. We find that interactions involving the activation loop and the C-helix and HRD motif are primarily responsible for stabilizing the DFG-in state. This work illustrates how structural free energy landscapes and fitness landscapes of proteins can be used in an integrated way, and in the context of kinase family proteins, can potentially impact therapeutic design strategies. © 2016 The Protein Society.

  17. A new mixed-mode model for interpreting and predicting protein elution during isoelectric chromatofocusing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choy, Derek Y C; Creagh, A Louise; von Lieres, Eric; Haynes, Charles

    2014-05-01

    Experimental data are combined with classic theories describing electrolytes in solution and at surfaces to define the primary mechanisms influencing protein retention and elution during isoelectric chromatofocusing (ICF) of proteins and protein mixtures. Those fundamental findings are used to derive a new model to understand and predict elution times of proteins during ICF. The model uses a modified form of the steric mass action (SMA) isotherm to account for both ion exchange and isoelectric focusing contributions to protein partitioning. The dependence of partitioning on pH is accounted for through the characteristic charge parameter m of the SMA isotherm and the application of Gouy-Chapman theory to define the dependence of the equilibrium binding constant Kbi on both m and ionic strength. Finally, the effects of changes in matrix surface pH on protein retention are quantified through a Donnan equilibrium type model. By accounting for isoelectric focusing, ion binding and exchange, and surface pH contributions to protein retention and elution, the model is shown to accurately capture the dependence of protein elution times on column operating conditions. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Unbiased quantitative models of protein translation derived from ribosome profiling data

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gritsenko, A.A.; Hulsman, M.; Reinders, M.J.T.; Ridder, de D.

    2015-01-01

    Translation of RNA to protein is a core process for any living organism. While for some steps of this process the effect on protein production is understood, a holistic understanding of translation still remains elusive. In silico modelling is a promising approach for elucidating the process of prot

  19. Unbiased Quantitative Models of Protein Translation Derived from Ribosome Profiling Data

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gritsenko, A.A.; Hulsman, M.; Reinders, M.J.T.; De Ridder, D.

    2015-01-01

    Translation of RNA to protein is a core process for any living organism. While for some steps of this process the effect on protein production is understood, a holistic understanding of translation still remains elusive. In silico modelling is a promising approach for elucidating the process of prot

  20. Incorporating Protein Biosynthesis into the Saccharomyces cerevisiae Genome-scale Metabolic Model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olivares Hernandez, Roberto

    by a rapidly growing cell. To extend the model including protein synthesis, from the survey of the available literature was possible to identify a few enzymatic reactions and gene functions in the early steps of gene expression for proteins: mRNA transcription, mRNA processing, mRNA export out of the nucleus...

  1. Binding of Solvent Molecules to a Protein Surface in Binary Mixtures Follows a Competitive Langmuir Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulschewski, Tobias; Pleiss, Jürgen

    2016-09-06

    The binding of solvent molecules to a protein surface was modeled by molecular dynamics simulations of of Candida antarctica (C. antarctica) lipase B in binary mixtures of water, methanol, and toluene. Two models were analyzed: a competitive Langmuir model which assumes identical solvent binding sites with a different affinity toward water (KWat), methanol (KMet), and toluene (KTol) and a competitive Langmuir model with an additional interaction between free water and already bound water (KWatWat). The numbers of protein-bound molecules of both components of a binary mixture were determined for different compositions as a function of their thermodynamic activities in the bulk phase, and the binding constants were simultaneously fitted to the six binding curves (two components of three different mixtures). For both Langmuir models, the values of KWat, KMet, and KTol were highly correlated. The highest binding affinity was found for methanol, which was almost 4-fold higher than the binding affinities of water and toluene (KMet ≫ KWat ≈ KTol). Binding of water was dominated by the water-water interaction (KWatWat). Even for the three protein surface patches of highest water affinity, the binding affinity of methanol was 2-fold higher than water and 8-fold higher than toluene (KMet > KWat > KTol). The Langmuir model provides insights into the protein destabilizing mechanism of methanol which has a high binding affinity toward the protein surface. Thus, destabilizing solvents compete with intraprotein interactions and disrupt the tertiary structure. In contrast, benign solvents such as water or toluene have a low affinity toward the protein surface. Water is a special solvent: only few water molecules bind directly to the protein; most water molecules bind to already bound water molecules thus forming water patches. A quantitative mechanistic model of protein-solvent interactions that includes competition and miscibility of the components contributes a robust basis

  2. Variability of Protein Structure Models from Electron Microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monroe, Lyman; Terashi, Genki; Kihara, Daisuke

    2017-03-02

    An increasing number of biomolecular structures are solved by electron microscopy (EM). However, the quality of structure models determined from EM maps vary substantially. To understand to what extent structure models are supported by information embedded in EM maps, we used two computational structure refinement methods to examine how much structures can be refined using a dataset of 49 maps with accompanying structure models. The extent of structure modification as well as the disagreement between refinement models produced by the two computational methods scaled inversely with the global and the local map resolutions. A general quantitative estimation of deviations of structures for particular map resolutions are provided. Our results indicate that the observed discrepancy between the deposited map and the refined models is due to the lack of structural information present in EM maps and thus these annotations must be used with caution for further applications.

  3. Formulation of probabilistic models of protein structure in atomic detail using the reference ratio method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valentin, Jan B; Andreetta, Christian; Boomsma, Wouter; Bottaro, Sandro; Ferkinghoff-Borg, Jesper; Frellsen, Jes; Mardia, Kanti V; Tian, Pengfei; Hamelryck, Thomas

    2014-02-01

    We propose a method to formulate probabilistic models of protein structure in atomic detail, for a given amino acid sequence, based on Bayesian principles, while retaining a close link to physics. We start from two previously developed probabilistic models of protein structure on a local length scale, which concern the dihedral angles in main chain and side chains, respectively. Conceptually, this constitutes a probabilistic and continuous alternative to the use of discrete fragment and rotamer libraries. The local model is combined with a nonlocal model that involves a small number of energy terms according to a physical force field, and some information on the overall secondary structure content. In this initial study we focus on the formulation of the joint model and the evaluation of the use of an energy vector as a descriptor of a protein's nonlocal structure; hence, we derive the parameters of the nonlocal model from the native structure without loss of generality. The local and nonlocal models are combined using the reference ratio method, which is a well-justified probabilistic construction. For evaluation, we use the resulting joint models to predict the structure of four proteins. The results indicate that the proposed method and the probabilistic models show considerable promise for probabilistic protein structure prediction and related applications.

  4. Protein structure prediction: combining de novo modeling with sparse experimental data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latek, Dorota; Ekonomiuk, Dariusz; Kolinski, Andrzej

    2007-07-30

    Routine structure prediction of new folds is still a challenging task for computational biology. The challenge is not only in the proper determination of overall fold but also in building models of acceptable resolution, useful for modeling the drug interactions and protein-protein complexes. In this work we propose and test a comprehensive approach to protein structure modeling supported by sparse, and relatively easy to obtain, experimental data. We focus on chemical shift-based restraints from NMR, although other sparse restraints could be easily included. In particular, we demonstrate that combining the typical NMR software with artificial intelligence-based prediction of secondary structure enhances significantly the accuracy of the restraints for molecular modeling. The computational procedure is based on the reduced representation approach implemented in the CABS modeling software, which proved to be a versatile tool for protein structure prediction during the CASP (CASP stands for critical assessment of techniques for protein structure prediction) experiments (see http://predictioncenter/CASP6/org). The method is successfully tested on a small set of representative globular proteins of different size and topology, including the two CASP6 targets, for which the required NMR data already exist. The method is implemented in a semi-automated pipeline applicable to a large scale structural annotation of genomic data. Here, we limit the computations to relatively small set. This enabled, without a loss of generality, a detailed discussion of various factors determining accuracy of the proposed approach to the protein structure prediction.

  5. Structural propensities of kinase family proteins from a Potts model of residue co‐variation

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Haldane, Allan; Flynn, William F; He, Peng; Vijayan, R.S.K; Levy, Ronald M

    2016-01-01

    ...‐variation of pairs of mutations contained in multiple sequence alignments of protein families can be used to build a Potts Hamiltonian model of the sequence patterns which accurately predicts structural contacts...

  6. Atomic-level description of protein-lipid interactions using an accelerated membrane model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baylon, Javier L; Vermaas, Josh V; Muller, Melanie P; Arcario, Mark J; Pogorelov, Taras V; Tajkhorshid, Emad

    2016-07-01

    Peripheral membrane proteins are structurally diverse proteins that are involved in fundamental cellular processes. Their activity of these proteins is frequently modulated through their interaction with cellular membranes, and as a result techniques to study the interfacial interaction between peripheral proteins and the membrane are in high demand. Due to the fluid nature of the membrane and the reversibility of protein-membrane interactions, the experimental study of these systems remains a challenging task. Molecular dynamics simulations offer a suitable approach to study protein-lipid interactions; however, the slow dynamics of the lipids often prevents sufficient sampling of specific membrane-protein interactions in atomistic simulations. To increase lipid dynamics while preserving the atomistic detail of protein-lipid interactions, in the highly mobile membrane-mimetic (HMMM) model the membrane core is replaced by an organic solvent, while short-tailed lipids provide a nearly complete representation of natural lipids at the organic solvent/water interface. Here, we present a brief introduction and a summary of recent applications of the HMMM to study different membrane proteins, complementing the experimental characterization of the presented systems, and we offer a perspective of future applications of the HMMM to study other classes of membrane proteins. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Membrane proteins edited by J.C. Gumbart and Sergei Noskov.

  7. Molecular Dynamics Simulations of a Powder Model of the Intrinsically Disordered Protein Tau.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fichou, Yann; Heyden, Matthias; Zaccai, Giuseppe; Weik, Martin; Tobias, Douglas J

    2015-10-01

    The tau protein, whose aggregates are involved in Alzheimer's disease, is an intrinsically disordered protein (IDP) that regulates microtubule activity in neurons. An IDP lacks a single, well-defined structure and, rather, constantly exchanges among multiple conformations. In order to study IDP dynamics, the combination of experimental techniques, such as neutron scattering, and computational techniques, such as molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, is a powerful approach. Amorphous hydrated powder samples have been very useful for studying protein internal dynamics experimentally, e.g., using neutron scattering. Thus, there is demand for realistic in silico models of hydrated protein powders. Here we present an MD simulation analysis of a powder hydrated at 0.4 g water/g protein of the IDP tau in the temperature range 20-300 K. By comparing with neutron scattering data, we identify the protein-water interface as the predominant feature determining IDP dynamics. The so-called protein dynamical transition is shown to be attenuated, but not suppressed, in the parts of the protein that are not exposed to the solvent. In addition, we find similarities in the mean-squared displacements of the core of a globular protein and "dry" clusters formed by the IDP in hydrated powders. Thus, the ps to ns dynamics of proteins in hydrated powders originate mainly from those residues in contact with solvent. We propose that by measuring the dynamics of protein assemblies, such as aggregates, one might assess qualitatively their state of hydration.

  8. Cell-free synthesis of membrane proteins: tailored cell models out of microsomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fenz, Susanne F; Sachse, Rita; Schmidt, Thomas; Kubick, Stefan

    2014-05-01

    Incorporation of proteins in biomimetic giant unilamellar vesicles (GUVs) is one of the hallmarks towards cell models in which we strive to obtain a better mechanistic understanding of the manifold cellular processes. The reconstruction of transmembrane proteins, like receptors or channels, into GUVs is a special challenge. This procedure is essential to make these proteins accessible to further functional investigation. Here we describe a strategy combining two approaches: cell-free eukaryotic protein expression for protein integration and GUV formation to prepare biomimetic cell models. The cell-free protein expression system in this study is based on insect lysates, which provide endoplasmic reticulum derived vesicles named microsomes. It enables signal-induced translocation and posttranslational modification of de novo synthesized membrane proteins. Combining these microsomes with synthetic lipids within the electroswelling process allowed for the rapid generation of giant proteo-liposomes of up to 50 μm in diameter. We incorporated various fluorescent protein-labeled membrane proteins into GUVs (the prenylated membrane anchor CAAX, the heparin-binding epithelial growth factor like factor Hb-EGF, the endothelin receptor ETB, the chemokine receptor CXCR4) and thus presented insect microsomes as functional modules for proteo-GUV formation. Single-molecule fluorescence microscopy was applied to detect and further characterize the proteins in the GUV membrane. To extend the options in the tailoring cell models toolbox, we synthesized two different membrane proteins sequentially in the same microsome. Additionally, we introduced biotinylated lipids to specifically immobilize proteo-GUVs on streptavidin-coated surfaces. We envision this achievement as an important first step toward systematic protein studies on technical surfaces.

  9. Remarkable movements of an American crocodile (Crocodylus acutus) in Florida

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cherkiss, Michael S.; Mazzotti, Frank J.; Hord, Lindsey; Aldecoa, Mario

    2014-01-01

    Here we present the remarkable movements of an individual Crocodylus acutus (American Crocodile) over a 14-year period. The crocodile was originally marked in Homestead, FL as a young-of-the-year in 1999, and was later recaptured multiple times more than 388 km away along the southwest coast of Florida. After several relocations and numerous sightings, this individual who has become known as Yellow Number 1 was found back within the same canal system in which it was first captured.

  10. Remarks on a benchmark nonlinear constrained optimization problem

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Luo Yazhong; Lei Yongjun; Tang Guojin

    2006-01-01

    Remarks on a benchmark nonlinear constrained optimization problem are made. Due to a citation error, two absolutely different results for the benchmark problem are obtained by independent researchers. Parallel simulated annealing using simplex method is employed in our study to solve the benchmark nonlinear constrained problem with mistaken formula and the best-known solution is obtained, whose optimality is testified by the Kuhn-Tucker conditions.

  11. Average of Distribution and Remarks on Box-Splines

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Yue-sheng

    2001-01-01

    A class of generalized moving average operators is introduced, and the integral representations of an average function are provided. It has been shown that the average of Dirac δ-distribution is just the well known box-spline. Some remarks on box-splines, such as their smoothness and the corresponding partition of unity, are made. The factorization of average operators is derived. Then, the subdivision algorithm for efficient computing of box-splines and their linear combinations follows.

  12. Structure Based Thermostability Prediction Models for Protein Single Point Mutations with Machine Learning Tools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Lei; Yarlagadda, Ramya; Reed, Charles C

    2015-01-01

    Thermostability issue of protein point mutations is a common occurrence in protein engineering. An application which predicts the thermostability of mutants can be helpful for guiding decision making process in protein design via mutagenesis. An in silico point mutation scanning method is frequently used to find "hot spots" in proteins for focused mutagenesis. ProTherm (http://gibk26.bio.kyutech.ac.jp/jouhou/Protherm/protherm.html) is a public database that consists of thousands of protein mutants' experimentally measured thermostability. Two data sets based on two differently measured thermostability properties of protein single point mutations, namely the unfolding free energy change (ddG) and melting temperature change (dTm) were obtained from this database. Folding free energy change calculation from Rosetta, structural information of the point mutations as well as amino acid physical properties were obtained for building thermostability prediction models with informatics modeling tools. Five supervised machine learning methods (support vector machine, random forests, artificial neural network, naïve Bayes classifier, K nearest neighbor) and partial least squares regression are used for building the prediction models. Binary and ternary classifications as well as regression models were built and evaluated. Data set redundancy and balancing, the reverse mutations technique, feature selection, and comparison to other published methods were discussed. Rosetta calculated folding free energy change ranked as the most influential features in all prediction models. Other descriptors also made significant contributions to increasing the accuracy of the prediction models.

  13. Structure Based Thermostability Prediction Models for Protein Single Point Mutations with Machine Learning Tools.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lei Jia

    Full Text Available Thermostability issue of protein point mutations is a common occurrence in protein engineering. An application which predicts the thermostability of mutants can be helpful for guiding decision making process in protein design via mutagenesis. An in silico point mutation scanning method is frequently used to find "hot spots" in proteins for focused mutagenesis. ProTherm (http://gibk26.bio.kyutech.ac.jp/jouhou/Protherm/protherm.html is a public database that consists of thousands of protein mutants' experimentally measured thermostability. Two data sets based on two differently measured thermostability properties of protein single point mutations, namely the unfolding free energy change (ddG and melting temperature change (dTm were obtained from this database. Folding free energy change calculation from Rosetta, structural information of the point mutations as well as amino acid physical properties were obtained for building thermostability prediction models with informatics modeling tools. Five supervised machine learning methods (support vector machine, random forests, artificial neural network, naïve Bayes classifier, K nearest neighbor and partial least squares regression are used for building the prediction models. Binary and ternary classifications as well as regression models were built and evaluated. Data set redundancy and balancing, the reverse mutations technique, feature selection, and comparison to other published methods were discussed. Rosetta calculated folding free energy change ranked as the most influential features in all prediction models. Other descriptors also made significant contributions to increasing the accuracy of the prediction models.

  14. Hidden markov model for the prediction of transmembrane proteins using MATLAB.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaturvedi, Navaneet; Shanker, Sudhanshu; Singh, Vinay Kumar; Sinha, Dhiraj; Pandey, Paras Nath

    2011-01-01

    Since membranous proteins play a key role in drug targeting therefore transmembrane proteins prediction is active and challenging area of biological sciences. Location based prediction of transmembrane proteins are significant for functional annotation of protein sequences. Hidden markov model based method was widely applied for transmembrane topology prediction. Here we have presented a revised and a better understanding model than an existing one for transmembrane protein prediction. Scripting on MATLAB was built and compiled for parameter estimation of model and applied this model on amino acid sequence to know the transmembrane and its adjacent locations. Estimated model of transmembrane topology was based on TMHMM model architecture. Only 7 super states are defined in the given dataset, which were converted to 96 states on the basis of their length in sequence. Accuracy of the prediction of model was observed about 74 %, is a good enough in the area of transmembrane topology prediction. Therefore we have concluded the hidden markov model plays crucial role in transmembrane helices prediction on MATLAB platform and it could also be useful for drug discovery strategy. The database is available for free at bioinfonavneet@gmail.comvinaysingh@bhu.ac.in.

  15. Analysis of statistical thermodynamic model for binary protein adsorption equilibria on cation exchange adsorbent

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHOU Xiaopeng; SU Xueli; SUN Yan

    2007-01-01

    A study of nonlinear competitive adsorption equilibria of proteins is of fundamental importance in understanding the behavior of preparative chromatographic separation.This work describes the nonlinear binary protein adsorption equilibria on ion exchangers by the statistical thermodynamic (ST) model.The single-component and binary protein adsorption isotherms of bovine hemoglobin (Hb) and bovine serum albumin(BSA)on SP Sepharose FF were determined by batch adsorption experiments in 0.05 mol/L sodium acetate buffer at three pH values(4.5,5.0 and 5.5)and three NaCl concentrations(0.05,0.10 and 0.15 mol/L)at pH 5.0.The ST model was found to depict the effects of pH and ionic strength on the single-component equilibria well,with model parameters depending on the pH and ionic strength.Moreover,the ST model gave acceptable fitting to the binary adsorption data with the fltted singlecomponent model parameters,leading to the estimation of the binary ST model parameter.The effects of pH and ionic strength on the model parameters are reasonably interpreted by the electrostatic and thermodynamic theories.Results demonstrate the availability of the ST model for describing nonlinear competitive protein adsorption equilibria in the presence of two proteins.

  16. Effects of polyols on the stability of whey proteins in intermediate-moisture food model systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiaoming; Zhou, Peng; Tran, Amy; Labuza, Ted P

    2009-03-25

    The objective of this study was to investigate the influence of polyols on the stability of whey proteins in an intermediate-moisture food model system and to elucidate the effect of polyols on the hardening of whey protein-based bars during storage. Four major polyols, glycerol, propylene glycol, maltitol, and sorbitol, were evaluated in model systems, which contained whey protein isolate, polyols, and water. The results showed that glycerol was the most effective polyol in lowering water activity and provided the soft texture of intermediate-moisture foods, followed by sorbitol and maltitol. These three polyols stabilized the native structure of whey proteins, provided a desired texture, and slowed the hardening of the model systems. Propylene glycol should not be used in whey protein-based high-protein intermediate-moisture foods because it caused changes in protein conformation and stability as observed by differential scanning calorimeter and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and resulted in aggregation of whey proteins and hardening of the bar texture during storage, causing loss in product quality.

  17. Modeling how reproductive ecology can drive protein diversification and result in linkage disequilibrium between sperm and egg proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomaiuolo, Maurizio; Levitan, Don R

    2010-07-01

    Gamete-recognition proteins determine whether sperm and eggs are compatible at fertilization, and they often evolve rapidly. The source of selection driving the evolution of these proteins is still debated. It has been suggested that sexual conflict can result in proliferation of genetic variation and possibly linkage disequilibrium between sperm and egg proteins. Empirical evidence suggests that both male and female reproductive success can be predicted by their sperm ligand genotype, but why female success can be predicted by a protein expressed only in males is unknown. Here we use mathematical modeling to investigate the interaction between reproductive behavior and sperm availability on the evolution of sperm ligands and egg receptors. We consider haploid and diploid expression in gametes in two possible ecological scenarios, monogamous spawning and competitive spawning. Reproductive behavior plays an important role in determining possible outcomes resulting from sexual conflict. Sperm limitation selects for common genotypes regardless of mating behavior. Under conditions of sperm abundance, competitive spawning provides conditions for the persistence of allelic variation and gametic disequilibrium. With monogamous spawning, such conditions are more restrictive.

  18. Textural performance of crosslinked or reduced-calcium milk protein ingredients in model high-protein nutrition bars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banach, J C; Clark, S; Metzger, L E; Lamsal, B P

    2016-08-01

    Transglutaminase (Tgase) crosslinking and calcium reduction were investigated as ways to improve the texture and storage stability of high-protein nutrition (HPN) bars formulated with milk protein concentrate (MPC) and micellar casein concentrate (MCC). The MPC and MCC crosslinked at none, low, and high levels, and a reduced-calcium MPC (RCMPC) were each formulated into model HPN bars. Hardness, crumbliness, moisture content, pH, color, and water activity of the HPN bars were measured during accelerated storage. The HPN bars prepared with MPC were harder and more cohesive than those prepared with MCC. Higher levels of Tgase crosslinking improved HPN bar cohesiveness and decreased hardening during storage. The RCMPC produced softer, yet crumblier HPN bars. Small textural differences were observed for the HPN bars formulated with the transglutaminase crosslinked proteins or RCMPC when compared with their respective controls. However, modification only slightly improved protein ingredient ability to slow hardening while balancing cohesion and likely requires further improvement for increased applicability in soft-texture HPN bars.

  19. A kinetic model for the internal motions of proteins: diffusion between multiple harmonic wells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amadei, A; de Groot, B L; Ceruso, M A; Paci, M; Di Nola, A; Berendsen, H J

    1999-05-15

    The dynamics of collective protein motions derived from Molecular Dynamics simulations have been studied for two small model proteins: initiation factor I and the B1 domain of Protein G. First, we compared the structural fluctuations, obtained by local harmonic approximations in different energy minima, with the ones revealed by large scale molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. It was found that a limited set of harmonic wells can be used to approximate the configurational fluctuations of these proteins, although any single harmonic approximation cannot properly describe their dynamics. Subsequently, the kinetics of the main (essential) collective protein motions were characterized. A dual-diffusion behavior was observed in which a fast type of diffusion switches to a much slower type in a typical time of about 1-3 ps. From these results, the large backbone conformational fluctuations of a protein may be considered as "hopping" between multiple harmonic wells on a basically flat free energy surface.

  20. A network model to investigate structural and electrical properties of proteins

    CERN Document Server

    Alfinito, E; Reggiani, L

    2007-01-01

    One of the main trend in to date research and development is the miniaturization of electronic devices. In this perspective, integrated nanodevices based on proteins or biomolecules are attracting a major interest. In fact, it has been shown that proteins like bacteriorhodopsin and azurin, manifest electrical properties which are promising for the development of active components in the field of molecular electronics. Here we focus on two relevant kinds of proteins: The bovine rhodopsin, prototype of GPCR protein, and the enzyme acetylcholinesterase (AChE), whose inhibition is one of the most qualified treatments of Alzheimer disease. Both these proteins exert their functioning starting with a conformational change of their native structure. Our guess is that such a change should be accompanied with a detectable variation of their electrical properties. To investigate this conjecture, we present an impedance network model of proteins, able to estimate the different electrical response associated with the diff...

  1. Coarse-grained model of adsorption of blood plasma proteins onto nanoparticles

    CERN Document Server

    Lopez, Hender

    2016-01-01

    We present a coarse-grained model for evaluation of interactions of globular proteins with nanoparticles. The protein molecules are represented by one bead per aminoacid and the nanoparticle by a homogeneous sphere that interacts with the aminoacids via a central force that depends on the nanoparticle size. The proposed methodology is used to predict the adsorption energies for six common human blood plasma proteins on hydrophobic charged or neutral nanoparticles of different sizes as well as the preferred orientation of the molecules upon adsorption. Our approach allows one to rank the proteins by their binding affinity to the nanoparticle, which can be used for predicting the composition of the NP-protein corona. The predicted ranking is in good agreement with known experimental data for protein adsorption on surfaces.

  2. Adsorption of a model protein, the GroEL chaperonin, on surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leung, Carl; Palmer, Richard E [Nanoscale Physics Research Laboratory, School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Birmingham, Edgbaston, Birmingham B15 2TT (United Kingdom)], E-mail: carl.leung@kcl.ac.uk

    2008-09-03

    Understanding and controlling protein adsorption on surfaces is fundamental to many biological processes ranging from cell adhesion to the fabrication of protein biochips. In general, proteins need to retain their 3D conformation to perform their intended functions. However, when they are presented with a solid surface, complex interactions ranging from weak non-covalent binding to strong covalent bonding may occur, which can potentially induce conformational changes within the adsorbed protein. To investigate the surface adsorption process and its effects on a model protein, the chaperonin GroEL, we have applied contact mode atomic force microscopy, in buffer solution to probe the interactions between single proteins and surfaces in real space. We will discuss the adsorption of GroEL molecules on planar surfaces (mica, graphite and gold) and specifically tailored nanostructured surfaces, which present structural features on the size scale of individual biological molecules. (topical review)

  3. Molecular dynamics techniques for modeling G protein-coupled receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McRobb, Fiona M; Negri, Ana; Beuming, Thijs; Sherman, Woody

    2016-10-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) constitute a major class of drug targets and modulating their signaling can produce a wide range of pharmacological outcomes. With the growing number of high-resolution GPCR crystal structures, we have the unprecedented opportunity to leverage structure-based drug design techniques. Here, we discuss a number of advanced molecular dynamics (MD) techniques that have been applied to GPCRs, including long time scale simulations, enhanced sampling techniques, water network analyses, and free energy approaches to determine relative binding free energies. On the basis of the many success stories, including those highlighted here, we expect that MD techniques will be increasingly applied to aid in structure-based drug design and lead optimization for GPCRs.

  4. Scalable rule-based modelling of allosteric proteins and biochemical networks.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julien F Ollivier

    Full Text Available Much of the complexity of biochemical networks comes from the information-processing abilities of allosteric proteins, be they receptors, ion-channels, signalling molecules or transcription factors. An allosteric protein can be uniquely regulated by each combination of input molecules that it binds. This "regulatory complexity" causes a combinatorial increase in the number of parameters required to fit experimental data as the number of protein interactions increases. It therefore challenges the creation, updating, and re-use of biochemical models. Here, we propose a rule-based modelling framework that exploits the intrinsic modularity of protein structure to address regulatory complexity. Rather than treating proteins as "black boxes", we model their hierarchical structure and, as conformational changes, internal dynamics. By modelling the regulation of allosteric proteins through these conformational changes, we often decrease the number of parameters required to fit data, and so reduce over-fitting and improve the predictive power of a model. Our method is thermodynamically grounded, imposes detailed balance, and also includes molecular cross-talk and the background activity of enzymes. We use our Allosteric Network Compiler to examine how allostery can facilitate macromolecular assembly and how competitive ligands can change the observed cooperativity of an allosteric protein. We also develop a parsimonious model of G protein-coupled receptors that explains functional selectivity and can predict the rank order of potency of agonists acting through a receptor. Our methodology should provide a basis for scalable, modular and executable modelling of biochemical networks in systems and synthetic biology.

  5. Protein-protein interaction network construction for cancer using a new L1/2-penalized Net-SVM model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chai, H; Huang, H H; Jiang, H K; Liang, Y; Xia, L Y

    2016-07-25

    Identifying biomarker genes and characterizing interaction pathways with high-dimensional and low-sample size microarray data is a major challenge in computational biology. In this field, the construction of protein-protein interaction (PPI) networks using disease-related selected genes has garnered much attention. Support vector machines (SVMs) are commonly used to classify patients, and a number of useful tools such as lasso, elastic net, SCAD, or other regularization methods can be combined with SVM models to select genes that are related to a disease. In the current study, we propose a new Net-SVM model that is different from other SVM models as it is combined with L1/2-norm regularization, which has good performance with high-dimensional and low-sample size microarray data for cancer classification, gene selection, and PPI network construction. Both simulation studies and real data experiments demonstrated that our proposed method outperformed other regularization methods such as lasso, SCAD, and elastic net. In conclusion, our model may help to select fewer but more relevant genes, and can be used to construct simple and informative PPI networks that are highly relevant to cancer.

  6. Model Uracil-Rich RNAs and Membrane Protein mRNAs Interact Specifically with Cold Shock Proteins in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benhalevy, Daniel; Bochkareva, Elena S; Biran, Ido; Bibi, Eitan

    2015-01-01

    Are integral membrane protein-encoding mRNAs (MPRs) different from other mRNAs such as those encoding cytosolic mRNAs (CPRs)? This is implied from the emerging concept that MPRs are specifically recognized and delivered to membrane-bound ribosomes in a translation-independent manner. MPRs might be recognized through uracil-rich segments that encode hydrophobic transmembrane helices. To investigate this hypothesis, we designed DNA sequences encoding model untranslatable transcripts that mimic MPRs or CPRs. By utilizing in vitro-synthesized biotinylated RNAs mixed with Escherichia coli extracts, we identified a highly specific interaction that takes place between transcripts that mimic MPRs and the cold shock proteins CspE and CspC, which are normally expressed under physiological conditions. Co-purification studies with E. coli expressing 6His-tagged CspE or CspC confirmed that the specific interaction occurs in vivo not only with the model uracil-rich untranslatable transcripts but also with endogenous MPRs. Our results suggest that the evolutionarily conserved cold shock proteins may have a role, possibly as promiscuous chaperons, in the biogenesis of MPRs.

  7. Differential digestion of human milk proteins in a simulated stomach model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qiang; Cundiff, Judy K; Maria, Sarah D; McMahon, Robert J; Wickham, Martin S J; Faulks, Richard M; van Tol, Eric A F

    2014-02-07

    A key element in understanding how human milk proteins support the health and development of the neonate is to understand how individual proteins are affected during digestion. In the present study, a dynamic gastric model was used to simulate infant gastric digestion of human milk, and a subsequent proteomic approach was applied to study the behavior of individual proteins. A total of 413 human milk proteins were quantified in this study. This approach demonstrated a high degree of variability in the susceptibility of human milk proteins to gastric digestion. Specifically this study reports that lipoproteins are among the class of slowly digested proteins during gastric processes. The levels of integral lysozyme C and partial lactadherin in milk whey increase over digestion. Mucins, ribonuclease 4, and macrophage mannose receptor 1 are also resistant to gastric digestion. The retention or enhancement in whey protein abundance can be ascribed to the digestive release of milk-fat-globule-membrane or immune-cell enclosed proteins that are not initially accessible in milk. Immunoglobulins are more resistant to digestion compared to total milk proteins, and within the immunoglobulin class IgA and IgM are more resistant to digestion compared to IgG. The gastric digestion of milk proteins becomes more apparent from this study.

  8. Effect of single-point sequence alterations on the aggregationpropensity of a model protein

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bratko, Dusan; Cellmer, Troy; Prausnitz, John M.; Blanch, Harvey W.

    2005-10-07

    Sequences of contemporary proteins are believed to have evolved through process that optimized their overall fitness including their resistance to deleterious aggregation. Biotechnological processing may expose therapeutic proteins to conditions that are much more conducive to aggregation than those encountered in a cellular environment. An important task of protein engineering is to identify alternative sequences that would protect proteins when processed at high concentrations without altering their native structure associated with specific biological function. Our computational studies exploit parallel tempering simulations of coarse-grained model proteins to demonstrate that isolated amino-acid residue substitutions can result in significant changes in the aggregation resistance of the protein in a crowded environment while retaining protein structure in isolation. A thermodynamic analysis of protein clusters subject to competing processes of folding and association shows that moderate mutations can produce effects similar to those caused by changes in system conditions, including temperature, concentration, and solvent composition that affect the aggregation propensity. The range of conditions where a protein can resist aggregation can therefore be tuned by sequence alterations although the protein generally may retain its generic ability for aggregation.

  9. PCVMZM: Using the Probabilistic Classification Vector Machines Model Combined with a Zernike Moments Descriptor to Predict Protein-Protein Interactions from Protein Sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yanbin; You, Zhuhong; Li, Xiao; Chen, Xing; Jiang, Tonghai; Zhang, Jingting

    2017-05-11

    Protein-protein interactions (PPIs) are essential for most living organisms' process. Thus, detecting PPIs is extremely important to understand the molecular mechanisms of biological systems. Although many PPIs data have been generated by high-throughput technologies for a variety of organisms, the whole interatom is still far from complete. In addition, the high-throughput technologies for detecting PPIs has some unavoidable defects, including time consumption, high cost, and high error rate. In recent years, with the development of machine learning, computational methods have been broadly used to predict PPIs, and can achieve good prediction rate. In this paper, we present here PCVMZM, a computational method based on a Probabilistic Classification Vector Machines (PCVM) model and Zernike moments (ZM) descriptor for predicting the PPIs from protein amino acids sequences. Specifically, a Zernike moments (ZM) descriptor is used to extract protein evolutionary information from Position-Specific Scoring Matrix (PSSM) generated by Position-Specific Iterated Basic Local Alignment Search Tool (PSI-BLAST). Then, PCVM classifier is used to infer the interactions among protein. When performed on PPIs datasets of Yeast and H. Pylori, the proposed method can achieve the average prediction accuracy of 94.48% and 91.25%, respectively. In order to further evaluate the performance of the proposed method, the state-of-the-art support vector machines (SVM) classifier is used and compares with the PCVM model. Experimental results on the Yeast dataset show that the performance of PCVM classifier is better than that of SVM classifier. The experimental results indicate that our proposed method is robust, powerful and feasible, which can be used as a helpful tool for proteomics research.

  10. Mathematical modeling of the intracellular protein dynamics: the importance of active transport along microtubules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szymańska, Zuzanna; Parisot, Martin; Lachowicz, Mirosław

    2014-12-21

    In this paper we propose a mathematical model of protein and mRNA transport inside a cell. The spatio-temporal model takes into account the active transport along microtubules in the cytoplasm as well as diffusion and is able to reproduce the oscillatory changes in protein concentration observed in many experimental data. In the model the protein and the mRNA interact with each other that allows us to classify the model as a simple gene regulatory network. The proposed model is generic and may be adapted to specific signaling pathways. On the basis of numerical simulations, we formulate a new hypothesis that the oscillatory dynamics is allowed by the mRNA active transport along microtubules from the nucleus to distant locations.

  11. Formulation of probabilistic models of protein structure in atomic detail using the reference ratio method

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Valentin, Jan B.; Andreetta, Christian; Boomsma, Wouter

    2014-01-01

    We propose a method to formulate probabilistic models of protein structure in atomic detail, for a given amino acid sequence, based on Bayesian principles, while retaining a close link to physics. We start from two previously developed probabilistic models of protein structure on a local length...... scale, which concern the dihedral angles in main chain and side chains, respectively. Conceptually, this constitutes a probabilistic and continuous alternative to the use of discrete fragment and rotamer libraries. The local model is combined with a nonlocal model that involves a small number of energy...... terms according to a physical force field, and some information on the overall secondary structure content. In this initial study we focus on the formulation of the joint model and the evaluation of the use of an energy vector as a descriptor of a protein's nonlocal structure; hence, we derive...

  12. Finding low-energy conformations of lattice protein models by quantum annealing

    CERN Document Server

    Perdomo-Ortiz, Alejandro; Drew-Brook, Marshall; Rose, Geordie; Aspuru-Guzik, Alán

    2012-01-01

    Lattice protein folding models are a cornerstone of computational biophysics. Although these models are a coarse grained representation, they provide useful insight into the energy landscape of natural proteins. Finding low-energy three-dimensional structures is an intractable problem even in the simplest model, the Hydrophobic-Polar (HP) model. Exhaustive search of all possible global minima is limited to sequences in the tens of amino acids. Description of protein-like properties are more accurately described by generalized models, such as the one proposed by Miyazawa and Jernigan (MJ), which explicitly take into account the unique interactions among all 20 amino acids. There is theoretical and experimental evidence of the advantage of solving classical optimization problems using quantum annealing over its classical analogue (simulated annealing). In this report, we present a benchmark implementation of quantum annealing for a biophysical problem (six different experiments up to 81 superconducting quantum ...

  13. Evolution of off-lattice model proteins under ligand binding constraints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Erik D.; Grishin, Nick V.

    2016-08-01

    We investigate protein evolution using an off-lattice polymer model evolved to imitate the behavior of small enzymes. Model proteins evolve through mutations to nucleotide sequences (including insertions and deletions) and are selected to fold and maintain a specific binding site compatible with a model ligand. We show that this requirement is, in itself, sufficient to maintain an ordered folding domain, and we compare it to the requirement of folding an ordered (but otherwise unrestricted) domain. We measure rates of amino acid change as a function of local environment properties such as solvent exposure, packing density, and distance from the active site, as well as overall rates of sequence and structure change, both along and among model lineages in star phylogenies. The model recapitulates essentially all of the behavior found in protein phylogenetic analyses, and predicts that amino acid substitution rates vary linearly with distance from the binding site.

  14. Protein and amino acid bioavailability of extruded dog food with protein meals of different quality using growing mink (Neovison vison) as a model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tjernsbekk, M. T.; Tauson, Anne-Helene; Matthiesen, Connie Frank

    2016-01-01

    The present study evaluated growing mink (Neovison vison) as a model for dietary protein quality assessment of protein meals used in extruded dog foods. Three foods with similar CP content but of different protein quality were produced using different protein meals. The protein meals varied...... by the European Pet Food Industry Federation. It was concluded that growth studies with mink kits can provide valuable information in protein quality assessment of extruded dog foods. Furthermore, the study showed that to ensure nutritional adequacy of dog food and to be able to compare protein quality of dog...... of protein and AA bioavailability in growing mink. Standardized ileal digestibility (SID) was used to measure protein and AA bioavailability in adult dogs (Canis familiaris). The mink study (3 × 3 Latin square design) included 12 kits aged 8 to 11 wk. The dog study included 12 dogs divided in 3 groups...

  15. Mathematical modeling of salt-gradient ion-exchange simulated moving bed chromatography for protein separations

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    卢建刚

    2004-01-01

    The salt-gradient operation mode used in ion-exchange simulated moving bed chromatography (SMBC) can improve the efficiency of protein separations. A detailed model that takes into account any kind of adsorption/ion-exchange equilibrium, salt gradient, size exclusion, mass transfer resistance, and port periodic switching mechanism, was developed to simulate the complex dynamics. The model predictions were verified by the experimental data on upward and downward gradients for protein separations reported in the literature. All design and operating parameters (number, configuration, length and diameter of columns, particle size, switching period, flow rates of feed, raffinate, desorbent and extract, protein concentrations in feed, different salt concentrations in desorbent and feed) can be chosen correctly by numerical simulation. This model can facilitate the design, operation, optimization, control and scale-up of salt-gradient ion-exchange SMBC for protein separations.

  16. Volume-based solvation models out-perform area-based models in combined studies of wild-type and mutated protein-protein interfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Warwicker Jim

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Empirical binding models have previously been investigated for the energetics of protein complexation (ΔG models and for the influence of mutations on complexation (i.e. differences between wild-type and mutant complexes, ΔΔG models. We construct binding models to directly compare these processes, which have generally been studied separately. Results Although reasonable fit models were found for both ΔG and ΔΔG cases, they differ substantially. In a dataset curated for the absence of mainchain rearrangement upon binding, non-polar area burial is a major determinant of ΔG models. However this ΔG model does not fit well to the data for binding differences upon mutation. Burial of non-polar area is weighted down in fitting of ΔΔG models. These calculations were made with no repacking of sidechains upon complexation, and only minimal packing upon mutation. We investigated the consequences of more extensive packing changes with a modified mean-field packing scheme. Rather than emphasising solvent exposure with relatively extended sidechains, rotamers are selected that exhibit maximal packing with protein. This provides solvent accessible areas for proteins that are much closer to those of experimental structures than the more extended sidechain regime. The new packing scheme increases changes in non-polar burial for mutants compared to wild-type proteins, but does not substantially improve agreement between ΔG and ΔΔG binding models. Conclusion We conclude that solvent accessible area, based on modelled mutant structures, is a poor correlate for ΔΔG upon mutation. A simple volume-based, rather than solvent accessibility-based, model is constructed for ΔG and ΔΔG systems. This shows a more consistent behaviour. We discuss the efficacy of volume, as opposed to area, approaches to describe the energetic consequences of mutations at interfaces. This knowledge can be used to develop simple computational screens for

  17. A Basic Protein Comparative Three-Dimensional Modeling Methodological Workflow Theory and Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bitar, Mainá; Franco, Glória Regina

    2014-01-01

    When working with proteins and studying its properties, it is crucial to have access to the three-dimensional structure of the molecule. If experimentally solved structures are not available, comparative modeling techniques can be used to generate useful protein models to subsidize structure-based research projects. In recent years, with Bioinformatics becoming the basis for the study of protein structures, there is a crescent need for the exposure of details about the algorithms behind the softwares and servers, as well as a need for protocols to guide in silico predictive experiments. In this article, we explore different steps of the comparative modeling technique, such as template identification, sequence alignment, generation of candidate structures and quality assessment, its peculiarities and theoretical description. We then present a practical step-by-step workflow, to support the Biologist on the in silico generation of protein structures. Finally, we explore further steps on comparative modeling, presenting perspectives to the study of protein structures through Bioinformatics. We trust that this is a thorough guide for beginners that wish to work on the comparative modeling of proteins.

  18. Model-based high-throughput design of ion exchange protein chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khalaf, Rushd; Heymann, Julia; LeSaout, Xavier; Monard, Florence; Costioli, Matteo; Morbidelli, Massimo

    2016-08-12

    This work describes the development of a model-based high-throughput design (MHD) tool for the operating space determination of a chromatographic cation-exchange protein purification process. Based on a previously developed thermodynamic mechanistic model, the MHD tool generates a large amount of system knowledge and thereby permits minimizing the required experimental workload. In particular, each new experiment is designed to generate information needed to help refine and improve the model. Unnecessary experiments that do not increase system knowledge are avoided. Instead of aspiring to a perfectly parameterized model, the goal of this design tool is to use early model parameter estimates to find interesting experimental spaces, and to refine the model parameter estimates with each new experiment until a satisfactory set of process parameters is found. The MHD tool is split into four sections: (1) prediction, high throughput experimentation using experiments in (2) diluted conditions and (3) robotic automated liquid handling workstations (robotic workstation), and (4) operating space determination and validation. (1) Protein and resin information, in conjunction with the thermodynamic model, is used to predict protein resin capacity. (2) The predicted model parameters are refined based on gradient experiments in diluted conditions. (3) Experiments on the robotic workstation are used to further refine the model parameters. (4) The refined model is used to determine operating parameter space that allows for satisfactory purification of the protein of interest on the HPLC scale. Each section of the MHD tool is used to define the adequate experimental procedures for the next section, thus avoiding any unnecessary experimental work. We used the MHD tool to design a polishing step for two proteins, a monoclonal antibody and a fusion protein, on two chromatographic resins, in order to demonstrate it has the ability to strongly accelerate the early phases of process

  19. DINAMO: a coupled sequence alignment editor/molecular graphics tool for interactive homology modeling of proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, M; Bentz, J; Baucom, A; Gregoret, L

    1998-01-01

    Gaining functional information about a novel protein is a universal problem in biomedical research. With the explosive growth of the protein sequence and structural databases, it is becoming increasingly common for researchers to attempt to build a three-dimensional model of their protein of interest in order to gain information about its structure and interactions with other molecules. The two most reliable methods for predicting the structure of a protein are homology modeling, in which the novel sequence is modeled on the known three-dimensional structure of a related protein, and fold recognition (threading), where the sequence is scored against a library of fold models, and the highest scoring model is selected. The sequence alignment to a known structure can be ambiguous, and human intervention is often required to optimize the model. We describe an interactive model building and assessment tool in which a sequence alignment editor is dynamically coupled to a molecular graphics display. By means of a set of assessment tools, the user may optimize his or her alignment to satisfy the known heuristics of protein structure. Adjustments to the sequence alignment made by the user are reflected in the displayed model by color and other visual cues. For instance, residues are colored by hydrophobicity in both the three-dimensional model and in the sequence alignment. This aids the user in identifying undesirable buried polar residues. Several different evaluation metrics may be selected including residue conservation, residue properties, and visualization of predicted secondary structure. These characteristics may be mapped to the model both singly and in combination. DINAMO is a Java-based tool that may be run either over the web or installed locally. Its modular architecture also allows Java-literate users to add plug-ins of their own design.

  20. Introducing a Clustering Step in a Consensus Approach for the Scoring of Protein-Protein Docking Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lensink, Marc F.; Petta, Andrea; Serra, Luigi; Scarano, Vittorio; Cavallo, Luigi; Oliva, Romina

    2016-01-01

    Correctly scoring protein-protein docking models to single out native-like ones is an open challenge. It is also an object of assessment in CAPRI (Critical Assessment of PRedicted Interactions), the community-wide blind docking experiment. We introduced in the field the first pure consensus method, CONSRANK, which ranks models based on their ability to match the most conserved contacts in the ensemble they belong to. In CAPRI, scorers are asked to evaluate a set of available models and select the top ten ones, based on their own scoring approach. Scorers’ performance is ranked based on the number of targets/interfaces for which they could provide at least one correct solution. In such terms, blind testing in CAPRI Round 30 (a joint prediction round with CASP11) has shown that critical cases for CONSRANK are represented by targets showing multiple interfaces or for which only a very small number of correct solutions are available. To address these challenging cases, CONSRANK has now been modified to include a contact-based clustering of the models as a preliminary step of the scoring process. We used an agglomerative hierarchical clustering based on the number of common inter-residue contacts within the models. Two criteria, with different thresholds, were explored in the cluster generation, setting either the number of common contacts or of total clusters. For each clustering approach, after selecting the top (most populated) ten clusters, CONSRANK was run on these clusters and the top-ranked model for each cluster was selected, in the limit of 10 models per target. We have applied our modified scoring approach, Clust-CONSRANK, to SCORE_SET, a set of CAPRI scoring models made recently available by CAPRI assessors, and to the subset of homodimeric targets in CAPRI Round 30 for which CONSRANK failed to include a correct solution within the ten selected models. Results show that, for the challenging cases, the clustering step typically enriches the ten top ranked

  1. Introducing a Clustering Step in a Consensus Approach for the Scoring of Protein-Protein Docking Models

    KAUST Repository

    Chermak, Edrisse

    2016-11-15

    Correctly scoring protein-protein docking models to single out native-like ones is an open challenge. It is also an object of assessment in CAPRI (Critical Assessment of PRedicted Interactions), the community-wide blind docking experiment. We introduced in the field the first pure consensus method, CONSRANK, which ranks models based on their ability to match the most conserved contacts in the ensemble they belong to. In CAPRI, scorers are asked to evaluate a set of available models and select the top ten ones, based on their own scoring approach. Scorers\\' performance is ranked based on the number of targets/interfaces for which they could provide at least one correct solution. In such terms, blind testing in CAPRI Round 30 (a joint prediction round with CASP11) has shown that critical cases for CONSRANK are represented by targets showing multiple interfaces or for which only a very small number of correct solutions are available. To address these challenging cases, CONSRANK has now been modified to include a contact-based clustering of the models as a preliminary step of the scoring process. We used an agglomerative hierarchical clustering based on the number of common inter-residue contacts within the models. Two criteria, with different thresholds, were explored in the cluster generation, setting either the number of common contacts or of total clusters. For each clustering approach, after selecting the top (most populated) ten clusters, CONSRANK was run on these clusters and the top-ranked model for each cluster was selected, in the limit of 10 models per target. We have applied our modified scoring approach, Clust-CONSRANK, to SCORE_SET, a set of CAPRI scoring models made recently available by CAPRI assessors, and to the subset of homodimeric targets in CAPRI Round 30 for which CONSRANK failed to include a correct solution within the ten selected models. Results show that, for the challenging cases, the clustering step typically enriches the ten top ranked

  2. A Hidden Markov Model method, capable of predicting and discriminating β-barrel outer membrane proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamodrakas Stavros J

    2004-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Integral membrane proteins constitute about 20–30% of all proteins in the fully sequenced genomes. They come in two structural classes, the α-helical and the β-barrel membrane proteins, demonstrating different physicochemical characteristics, structure and localization. While transmembrane segment prediction for the α-helical integral membrane proteins appears to be an easy task nowadays, the same is much more difficult for the β-barrel membrane proteins. We developed a method, based on a Hidden Markov Model, capable of predicting the transmembrane β-strands of the outer membrane proteins of gram-negative bacteria, and discriminating those from water-soluble proteins in large datasets. The model is trained in a discriminative manner, aiming at maximizing the probability of correct predictions rather than the likelihood of the sequences. Results The training has been performed on a non-redundant database of 14 outer membrane proteins with structures known at atomic resolution; it has been tested with a jacknife procedure, yielding a per residue accuracy of 84.2% and a correlation coefficient of 0.72, whereas for the self-consistency test the per residue accuracy was 88.1% and the correlation coefficient 0.824. The total number of correctly predicted topologies is 10 out of 14 in the self-consistency test, and 9 out of 14 in the jacknife. Furthermore, the model is capable of discriminating outer membrane from water-soluble proteins in large-scale applications, with a success rate of 88.8% and 89.2% for the correct classification of outer membrane and water-soluble proteins respectively, the highest rates obtained in the literature. That test has been performed independently on a set of known outer membrane proteins with low sequence identity with each other and also with the proteins of the training set. Conclusion Based on the above, we developed a strategy, that enabled us to screen the entire proteome of E. coli for

  3. Plant G-proteins come of age: Breaking the bond with animal models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jimmy R Botella

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available G-proteins are universal signal transducers mediating many cellular responses. Plant G-protein signaling has been modeled on the well-established animal paradigm but accumulated experimental evidence indicates that G-protein-dependent signaling in plants has taken a very different evolutionary path. Here we review the differences between plant and animal G-proteins reported over past two decades. Most importantly, while in animal systems the G-protein signaling cycle is activated by seven transmembrane-spanning G-protein coupled receptors, the existence of these type of receptors in plants is highly controversial. Instead plant G-proteins have been proven to be functionally associated with atypical receptors such as the Arabidopsis RGS1 and a number of receptor-like kinases. We propose that, instead of the GTP/GDP cycle used in animals, plant G-proteins are activated/de-activated by phosphorylation/de-phosphorylation. We discuss the need of a fresh new look at these signaling molecules and provide a hypothetical model that departs fromthe accepted animal paradigm.

  4. Plant G-proteins come of age: Breaking the bond with animal models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Botella, Jimmy; Trusov, Yuri

    2016-05-01

    G-proteins are universal signal transducers mediating many cellular responses. Plant G-protein signaling has been modeled on the well-established animal paradigm but accumulated experimental evidence indicates that G-protein-dependent signaling in plants has taken a very different evolutionary path. Here we review the differences between plant and animal G-proteins reported over past two decades. Most importantly, while in animal systems the G-protein signaling cycle is activated by seven transmembrane-spanning G-protein coupled receptors, the existence of these type of receptors in plants is highly controversial. Instead plant G-proteins have been proven to be functionally associated with atypical receptors such as the Arabidopsis RGS1 and a number of receptor-like kinases. We propose that, instead of the GTP/GDP cycle used in animals, plant G-proteins are activated/de-activated by phosphorylation/de-phosphorylation. We discuss the need of a fresh new look at these signaling molecules and provide a hypothetical model that departs fromthe accepted animal paradigm.

  5. Mechanical strength of 17,134 model proteins and cysteine slipknots.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mateusz Sikora

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available A new theoretical survey of proteins' resistance to constant speed stretching is performed for a set of 17,134 proteins as described by a structure-based model. The proteins selected have no gaps in their structure determination and consist of no more than 250 amino acids. Our previous studies have dealt with 7510 proteins of no more than 150 amino acids. The proteins are ranked according to the strength of the resistance. Most of the predicted top-strength proteins have not yet been studied experimentally. Architectures and folds which are likely to yield large forces are identified. New types of potent force clamps are discovered. They involve disulphide bridges and, in particular, cysteine slipknots. An effective energy parameter of the model is estimated by comparing the theoretical data on characteristic forces to the corresponding experimental values combined with an extrapolation of the theoretical data to the experimental pulling speeds. These studies provide guidance for future experiments on single molecule manipulation and should lead to selection of proteins for applications. A new class of proteins, involving cysteine slipknots, is identified as one that is expected to lead to the strongest force clamps known. This class is characterized through molecular dynamics simulations.

  6. Protein-thiol substitution or protein dethiolation by thiol/disulfide exchange reactions: the albumin model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Summa, Domenico; Spiga, Ottavia; Bernini, Andrea; Venditti, Vincenzo; Priora, Raffaella; Frosali, Simona; Margaritis, Antonios; Di Giuseppe, Danila; Niccolai, Neri; Di Simplicio, Paolo

    2007-11-01

    Dethiolation experiments of thiolated albumin with thionitrobenzoic acid and thiols (glutathione, cysteine, homocysteine) were carried out to understand the role of albumin in plasma distribution of thiols and disulfide species by thiol/disulfide (SH/SS) exchange reactions. During these experiments we observed that thiolated albumin underwent thiol substitution (Alb-SS-X+RSHAlb-SS-R+XSH) or dethiolation (Alb-SS-X+XSHAlb-SH+XSSX), depending on the different pK(a) values of thiols involved in protein-thiol mixed disulfides (Alb-SS-X). It appeared in these reactions that the compound with lower pK(a) in mixed disulfide was a good leaving group and that the pK(a) differences dictated the kind of reaction (substitution or dethiolation). Thionitrobenzoic acid, bound to albumin by mixed disulfide (Alb-TNB), underwent rapid substitution after thiol addition, forming the corresponding Alb-SS-X (peaks at 0.25-1 min). In turn, Alb-SS-X were dethiolated by the excess nonprotein SH groups because of the lower pK(a) value in mixed disulfide with respect to that of other thiols. Dethiolation of Alb-SS-X was accompanied by formation of XSSX and Alb-SH up to equilibrium levels at 35 min, which were different for each thiol. Structures by molecular simulation of thiolated albumin, carried out for understanding the role of sulfur exposure in mixed disulfides in dethiolation process, evidenced that the sulfur exposure is important for the rate but not for determining the kind of reaction (substitution or dethiolation). Our data underline the contribution of SH/SS exchanges to determine levels of various thiols as reduced and oxidized species in human plasma.

  7. Enhanced hybrid search algorithm for protein structure prediction using the 3D-HP lattice model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Changjun; Hou, Caixia; Zhang, Qiang; Wei, Xiaopeng

    2013-09-01

    The problem of protein structure prediction in the hydrophobic-polar (HP) lattice model is the prediction of protein tertiary structure. This problem is usually referred to as the protein folding problem. This paper presents a method for the application of an enhanced hybrid search algorithm to the problem of protein folding prediction, using the three dimensional (3D) HP lattice model. The enhanced hybrid search algorithm is a combination of the particle swarm optimizer (PSO) and tabu search (TS) algorithms. Since the PSO algorithm entraps local minimum in later evolution extremely easily, we combined PSO with the TS algorithm, which has properties of global optimization. Since the technologies of crossover and mutation are applied many times to PSO and TS algorithms, so enhanced hybrid search algorithm is called the MCMPSO-TS (multiple crossover and mutation PSO-TS) algorithm. Experimental results show that the MCMPSO-TS algorithm can find the best solutions so far for the listed benchmarks, which will help comparison with any future paper approach. Moreover, real protein sequences and Fibonacci sequences are verified in the 3D HP lattice model for the first time. Compared with the previous evolutionary algorithms, the new hybrid search algorithm is novel, and can be used effectively to predict 3D protein folding structure. With continuous development and changes in amino acids sequences, the new algorithm will also make a contribution to the study of new protein sequences.

  8. Studies on BN rats model to determine the potential allergenicity of proteins from genetically modified foods

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xu-Dong Jia; Ning Li; Yong-Ning Wu; Xiao-Guang Yang

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To develop a Brown Norway (BN) rat model to determine the potential allergenicity of novel proteins in genetically modified food.METHODS: The allergenicity of different proteins were compared, including ovalbumin (OVA), a potent respiratory and food allergen, bovine serum albumin (BSA), a protein that is considered to have a lesser allergenic potential,and potato acid phosphatase (PAP), a non-allergenic protein when administered to BN rats via different routes of exposure (intraperitoneally or by gavage). IgG and IgE antibody responses were determined by ELISA and PCA,respectively. An immunoassay kit was used to determine the plasma histamine level. In addition, possible systemic effect of allergens was investigated by monitoring blood pressure.RESULTS: OVA provoked very vigorous protein-specific IgG and IgE responses, low grade protein-specific IgG and IgE responses were elicited by BSA, while by neither route did PAP elicit anything. In either routes of exposure,plasma histamine level in BN rats sensitized with OVA was higher than that of BSA or PAP. In addition, an oral challenge with BSA and PAP did not induce any effect on blood pressure, while a temporary drop in systolic blood pressure in few animals of each routes of exposure was found by an oral challenge with OVA.CONCLUSION: BN rat model might be a useful and predictive animal model to study the potential allergenicity of novel food proteins.

  9. Extension of the selection of protein chromatography and the rate model to affinity chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandoval, G; Shene, C; Andrews, B A; Asenjo, J A

    2010-01-01

    The rational selection of optimal protein purification sequences, as well as mathematical models that simulate and allow optimization of chromatographic protein purification processes have been developed for purification procedures such as ion-exchange, hydrophobic interaction and gel filtration chromatography. This paper investigates the extension of such analysis to affinity chromatography both in the selection of chromatographic processes and in the use of the rate model for mathematical modelling and simulation. Two affinity systems were used: Blue Sepharose and Protein A. The extension of the theory developed previously for ion-exchange and HIC chromatography to affinity separations is analyzed in this paper. For the selection of operations two algorithms are used. In the first, the value of η, which corresponds to the efficiency (resolution) of the actual chromatography and, Σ, which determines the amount of a particular contaminant eliminated after each separation step, which determines the purity, have to be determined. It was found that the value of both these parameters is not generic for affinity separations but will depend on the type of affinity system used and will have to be determined on a case by case basis. With Blue Sepharose a salt gradient was used and with Protein A, a pH gradient. Parameters were determined with individual proteins and simulations of the protein mixtures were done. This approach allows investigation of chromatographic protein purification in a holistic manner that includes ion-exchange, HIC, gel filtration and affinity separations for the first time.

  10. Using viromes to predict novel immune proteins in non-model organisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Yan Wei; Silva, Genivaldo Gueiros Z.; Nelson, Craig E.; Haas, Andreas F.; Kelly, Linda Wegley; Edwards, Robert A.; Rohwer, Forest L.

    2016-01-01

    Immunity is mostly studied in a few model organisms, leaving the majority of immune systems on the planet unexplored. To characterize the immune systems of non-model organisms alternative approaches are required. Viruses manipulate host cell biology through the expression of proteins that modulate the immune response. We hypothesized that metagenomic sequencing of viral communities would be useful to identify both known and unknown host immune proteins. To test this hypothesis, a mock human virome was generated and compared to the human proteome using tBLASTn, resulting in 36 proteins known to be involved in immunity. This same pipeline was then applied to reef-building coral, a non-model organism that currently lacks traditional molecular tools like transgenic animals, gene-editing capabilities, and in vitro cell cultures. Viromes isolated from corals and compared with the predicted coral proteome resulted in 2503 coral proteins, including many proteins involved with pathogen sensing and apoptosis. There were also 159 coral proteins predicted to be involved with coral immunity but currently lacking any functional annotation. The pipeline described here provides a novel method to rapidly predict host immune components that can be applied to virtually any system with the potential to discover novel immune proteins. PMID:27581878

  11. Elastic network model of allosteric regulation in protein kinase PDK1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Williams Gareth

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Structural switches upon binding of phosphorylated moieties underpin many signalling networks. The ligand activation is a form of allosteric modulation of the protein, where the binding site is remote from the structural change in the protein. Recently this structural switch has been elegantly demonstrated with the crystallisation of the activated form of 3-phosphoinositide-dependent protein kinase-1 (PDK1. The purpose of the present work is to determine whether the allosteric coupling in PDK1 emerges at the level of a simple coarse grained model of protein dynamics. Results It is shown here that the allosteric effects of the agonist binding to the small lobe upon the activation loop in the large lobe of PDK1 are explainable within a simple 'ball and spring' elastic network model (ENM of protein dynamics. In particular, the model shows that the bound phospho peptide mimetic fluctuations have a high degree of correlation with the activation loop of PDK1. Conclusions The ENM approach to small molecule activation of proteins may offer a first pass predictive methodology where affinity is encoded in residues remote from the active site, and aid in the design of specific protein agonists that enhance the allosteric coupling and antagonist that repress it.

  12. Electrostatics of cysteine residues in proteins: parameterization and validation of a simple model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salsbury, Freddie R; Poole, Leslie B; Fetrow, Jacquelyn S

    2012-11-01

    One of the most popular and simple models for the calculation of pK(a) s from a protein structure is the semi-macroscopic electrostatic model MEAD. This model requires empirical parameters for each residue to calculate pK(a) s. Analysis of current, widely used empirical parameters for cysteine residues showed that they did not reproduce expected cysteine pK(a) s; thus, we set out to identify parameters consistent with the CHARMM27 force field that capture both the behavior of typical cysteines in proteins and the behavior of cysteines which have perturbed pK(a) s. The new parameters were validated in three ways: (1) calculation across a large set of typical cysteines in proteins (where the calculations are expected to reproduce expected ensemble behavior); (2) calculation across a set of perturbed cysteines in proteins (where the calculations are expected to reproduce the shifted ensemble behavior); and (3) comparison to experimentally determined pK(a) values (where the calculation should reproduce the pK(a) within experimental error). Both the general behavior of cysteines in proteins and the perturbed pK(a) in some proteins can be predicted reasonably well using the newly determined empirical parameters within the MEAD model for protein electrostatics. This study provides the first general analysis of the electrostatics of cysteines in proteins, with specific attention paid to capturing both the behavior of typical cysteines in a protein and the behavior of cysteines whose pK(a) should be shifted, and validation of force field parameters for cysteine residues. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Temperature-induced unfolding behavior of proteins studied by tensorial elastic network model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, Amit; Granek, Rony

    2016-12-01

    Motivated by single molecule experiments and recent molecular dynamics (MD) studies, we propose a simple and computationally efficient method based on a tensorial elastic network model to investigate the unfolding pathways of proteins under temperature variation. The tensorial elastic network model, which relies on the native state topology of a protein, combines the anisotropic network model, the bond bending elasticity, and the backbone twist elasticity to successfully predicts both the isotropic and anisotropic fluctuations in a manner similar to the Gaussian network model and anisotropic network model. The unfolding process is modeled by breaking the native contacts between residues one by one, and by assuming a threshold value for strain fluctuation. Using this method, we simulated the unfolding processes of four well-characterized proteins: chymotrypsin inhibitor, barnase, ubiquitein, and adenalyate kinase. We found that this step-wise process leads to two or more cooperative, first-order-like transitions between partial denaturation states. The sequence of unfolding events obtained using this method is consistent with experimental and MD studies. The results also imply that the native topology of proteins "encrypts" information regarding their unfolding process. Proteins 2016; 84:1767-1775. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. A Stochastic Point Cloud Sampling Method for Multi-Template Protein Comparative Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jilong; Cheng, Jianlin

    2016-01-01

    Generating tertiary structural models for a target protein from the known structure of its homologous template proteins and their pairwise sequence alignment is a key step in protein comparative modeling. Here, we developed a new stochastic point cloud sampling method, called MTMG, for multi-template protein model generation. The method first superposes the backbones of template structures, and the Cα atoms of the superposed templates form a point cloud for each position of a target protein, which are represented by a three-dimensional multivariate normal distribution. MTMG stochastically resamples the positions for Cα atoms of the residues whose positions are uncertain from the distribution, and accepts or rejects new position according to a simulated annealing protocol, which effectively removes atomic clashes commonly encountered in multi-template comparative modeling. We benchmarked MTMG on 1,033 sequence alignments generated for CASP9, CASP10 and CASP11 targets, respectively. Using multiple templates with MTMG improves the GDT-TS score and TM-score of structural models by 2.96–6.37% and 2.42–5.19% on the three datasets over using single templates. MTMG’s performance was comparable to Modeller in terms of GDT-TS score, TM-score, and GDT-HA score, while the average RMSD was improved by a new sampling approach. The MTMG software is freely available at: http://sysbio.rnet.missouri.edu/multicom_toolbox/mtmg.html. PMID:27161489

  15. Prion Protein Deficiency Causes Diverse Proteome Shifts in Cell Models That Escape Detection in Brain Tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehrabian, Mohadeseh; Brethour, Dylan; Williams, Declan; Wang, Hansen; Arnould, Hélène; Schneider, Benoit; Schmitt-Ulms, Gerold

    2016-01-01

    A popular method for studying the function of a given protein is to generate and characterize a suitable model deficient for its expression. For the prion protein (PrP), best known for its role in several invariably fatal neurodegenerative diseases, a natural choice, therefore, would be to undertake such studies with brain samples. We recently documented the surprising observation that PrP deficiency caused a loss or enhancement of NCAM1 polysialylation, dependent on the cell model used. To identify possible causes for this disparity, we set out to systematically investigate the consequence of PrP deficiency on the global proteome in brain tissue and in four distinct cell models. Here we report that PrP deficiency causes robust but surprisingly divergent changes to the global proteomes of cell models but has no discernible impact on the global brain proteome. Amongst >1,500 proteins whose levels were compared in wild-type and PrP-deficient models, members of the MARCKS protein family exhibited pronounced, yet cell model-dependent changes to their steady-state levels. Follow-up experiments revealed that PrP collaborates with members of the MARCKS protein family in its control of NCAM1 polysialylation. We conclude that the physiological function of PrP may be masked in analyses of complex brain samples but its cell-type specific influence on a lipid raft-based NCAM1-related cell biology comes to the fore in investigations of specific cell types.

  16. Using maximum entropy model to predict protein secondary structure with single sequence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Yong-Sheng; Zhang, Tong-Liang; Gu, Quan; Zhao, Pei-Ying; Chou, Kuo-Chen

    2009-01-01

    Prediction of protein secondary structure is somewhat reminiscent of the efforts by many previous investigators but yet still worthy of revisiting it owing to its importance in protein science. Several studies indicate that the knowledge of protein structural classes can provide useful information towards the determination of protein secondary structure. Particularly, the performance of prediction algorithms developed recently have been improved rapidly by incorporating homologous multiple sequences alignment information. Unfortunately, this kind of information is not available for a significant amount of proteins. In view of this, it is necessary to develop the method based on the query protein sequence alone, the so-called single-sequence method. Here, we propose a novel single-sequence approach which is featured by that various kinds of contextual information are taken into account, and that a maximum entropy model classifier is used as the prediction engine. As a demonstration, cross-validation tests have been performed by the new method on datasets containing proteins from different structural classes, and the results thus obtained are quite promising, indicating that the new method may become an useful tool in protein science or at least play a complementary role to the existing protein secondary structure prediction methods.

  17. A New Hybrid Model of Amino Acid Substitution for Protein Functional Classification

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ke Long WANG; Zhi Ning WEN; Fu Sheng NIE; Meng Long LI

    2005-01-01

    In this paper, a new hybrid model of amino acid substitution is developed and compared with the others in previous works. The results show that the new hybrid model can characterize the protein sequences very well by calculating Fisher weights, which can denote how much the variants contribute to the classification.

  18. Homology modeling of the CheW coupling protein of the chemotaxis signaling complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cashman, Derek J; Ortega, Davi R; Zhulin, Igor B; Baudry, Jerome

    2013-01-01

    Homology models of the E. coli and T. maritima chemotaxis protein CheW were constructed to assess the quality of structural predictions and their applicability in chemotaxis research: i) a model of E. coli CheW was constructed using the T. maritima CheW NMR structure as a template, and ii) a model of T. maritima CheW was constructed using the E. coli CheW NMR structure as a template. The conformational space accessible to the homology models and to the NMR structures was investigated using molecular dynamics and Monte Carlo simulations. The results show that even though static homology models of CheW may be partially structurally different from their corresponding experimentally determined structures, the conformational space they can access through their dynamic variations can be similar, for specific regions of the protein, to that of the experimental NMR structures. When CheW homology models are allowed to explore their local accessible conformational space, modeling can provide a rational path to predicting CheW interactions with the MCP and CheA proteins of the chemotaxis complex. Homology models of CheW (and potentially, of other chemotaxis proteins) should be seen as snapshots of an otherwise larger ensemble of accessible conformational space.

  19. Progressive mitochondrial protein lysine acetylation and heart failure in a model of Friedreich's ataxia cardiomyopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stram, Amanda R; Wagner, Gregory R; Fogler, Brian D; Pride, P Melanie; Hirschey, Matthew D; Payne, R Mark

    2017-01-01

    The childhood heart disease of Friedreich's Ataxia (FRDA) is characterized by hypertrophy and failure. It is caused by loss of frataxin (FXN), a mitochondrial protein involved in energy homeostasis. FRDA model hearts have increased mitochondrial protein acetylation and impaired sirtuin 3 (SIRT3) deacetylase activity. Protein acetylation is an important regulator of cardiac metabolism and loss of SIRT3 increases susceptibility of the heart to stress-induced cardiac hypertrophy and ischemic injury. The underlying pathophysiology of heart failure in FRDA is unclear. The purpose of this study was to examine in detail the physiologic and acetylation changes of the heart that occur over time in a model of FRDA heart failure. We predicted that increased mitochondrial protein acetylation would be associated with a decrease in heart function in a model of FRDA. A conditional mouse model of FRDA cardiomyopathy with ablation of FXN (FXN KO) in the heart was compared to healthy controls at postnatal days 30, 45 and 65. We evaluated hearts using echocardiography, cardiac catheterization, histology, protein acetylation and expression. Acetylation was temporally progressive and paralleled evolution of heart failure in the FXN KO model. Increased acetylation preceded detectable abnormalities in cardiac function and progressed rapidly with age in the FXN KO mouse. Acetylation was also associated with cardiac fibrosis, mitochondrial damage, impaired fat metabolism, and diastolic and systolic dysfunction leading to heart failure. There was a strong inverse correlation between level of protein acetylation and heart function. These results demonstrate a close relationship between mitochondrial protein acetylation, physiologic dysfunction and metabolic disruption in FRDA hypertrophic cardiomyopathy and suggest that abnormal acetylation contributes to the pathophysiology of heart disease in FRDA. Mitochondrial protein acetylation may represent a therapeutic target for early intervention.

  20. Electronic transport on the spatial structure of the protein: Three-dimensional lattice model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sarmento, R.G. [Departamento de Ciências Biológicas, Universidade Federal do Piauí, 64800-000 Floriano, PI (Brazil); Frazão, N.F. [Centro de Educação e Saúde, Universidade Federal de Campina Grande, 581750-000 Cuité, PB (Brazil); Macedo-Filho, A., E-mail: amfilho@gmail.com [Campus Prof. Antonio Geovanne Alves de Sousa, Universidade Estadual do Piauí, 64260-000 Piripiri, PI (Brazil)

    2017-01-30

    Highlights: • The electronic transport on the structure of the three-dimensional lattice model of the protein is studied. • The signing of the current–voltage is directly affected by permutations of the weak bonds in the structure. • Semiconductor behave of the proteins suggest a potential application in the development of novel biosensors. - Abstract: We report a numerical analysis of the electronic transport in protein chain consisting of thirty-six standard amino acids. The protein chains studied have three-dimensional structure, which can present itself in three distinct conformations and the difference consist in the presence or absence of thirteen hydrogen-bondings. Our theoretical method uses an electronic tight-binding Hamiltonian model, appropriate to describe the protein segments modeled by the amino acid chain. We note that the presence and the permutations between weak bonds in the structure of proteins are directly related to the signing of the current–voltage. Furthermore, the electronic transport depends on the effect of temperature. In addition, we have found a semiconductor behave in the models investigated and it suggest a potential application in the development of novel biosensors for molecular diagnostics.

  1. The Phyre2 web portal for protein modelling, prediction and analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelley, Lawrence A; Mezulis, Stefans; Yates, Christopher M; Wass, Mark N; Sternberg, Michael JE

    2017-01-01

    Summary Phyre2 is a suite of tools available on the web to predict and analyse protein structure, function and mutations. The focus of Phyre2 is to provide biologists with a simple and intuitive interface to state-of-the-art protein bioinformatics tools. Phyre2 replaces Phyre, the original version of the server for which we previously published a protocol. In this updated protocol, we describe Phyre2, which uses advanced remote homology detection methods to build 3D models, predict ligand binding sites, and analyse the effect of amino-acid variants (e.g. nsSNPs) for a user’s protein sequence. Users are guided through results by a simple interface at a level of detail determined by them. This protocol will guide a user from submitting a protein sequence to interpreting the secondary and tertiary structure of their models, their domain composition and model quality. A range of additional available tools is described to find a protein structure in a genome, to submit large number of sequences at once and to automatically run weekly searches for proteins difficult to model. The server is available at http://www.sbg.bio.ic.ac.uk/phyre2. A typical structure prediction will be returned between 30mins and 2 hours after submission. PMID:25950237

  2. Murine models for evaluating the allergenicity of novel proteins and foods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aldemir, Hatice; Bars, Rémi; Herouet-Guicheney, Corinne

    2009-08-01

    Genetically modified crops convey many benefits to world population. However, a rigorous safety assessment procedure, including an evaluation of the allergenic potential, is fundamental before their release into the food chain. As an integral part of the safety assessment process, regulatory authorities worldwide strongly recommend the use of tests that can predict the allergenic potential of the novel proteins. All guidance documents are based on an array of tests that have been proposed in 2003 by the Codex Alimentarius. Although the animal model is not a requirement of the Codex Alimentarius weight of evidence approach, allergenic hazard of novel proteins could only be evaluated by an in vivo model that can potentially identify and distinguish commonly allergenic proteins from rarely allergenic proteins. Therefore, food allergy experts encourage its development. During the 2007 International Life Science Institute (ILSI) workshop (Nice, France), worldwide experts shared their latest research results on rodent models to evaluate the allergenic potential of proteins and foods. This review presents the most promising rodent models for assessing food protein allergenicity that were evaluated during this ILSI workshop.

  3. Proteomic Identification of Altered Cerebral Proteins in the Complex Regional Pain Syndrome Animal Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francis Sahngun Nahm

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS is a rare but debilitating pain disorder. Although the exact pathophysiology of CRPS is not fully understood, central and peripheral mechanisms might be involved in the development of this disorder. To reveal the central mechanism of CRPS, we conducted a proteomic analysis of rat cerebrum using the chronic postischemia pain (CPIP model, a novel experimental model of CRPS. Materials and Methods. After generating the CPIP animal model, we performed a proteomic analysis of the rat cerebrum using a multidimensional protein identification technology, and screened the proteins differentially expressed between the CPIP and control groups. Results. A total of 155 proteins were differentially expressed between the CPIP and control groups: 125 increased and 30 decreased; expressions of proteins related to cell signaling, synaptic plasticity, regulation of cell proliferation, and cytoskeletal formation were increased in the CPIP group. However, proenkephalin A, cereblon, and neuroserpin were decreased in CPIP group. Conclusion. Altered expression of cerebral proteins in the CPIP model indicates cerebral involvement in the pathogenesis of CRPS. Further study is required to elucidate the roles of these proteins in the development and maintenance of CRPS.

  4. Generic framework for mining cellular automata models on protein-folding simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diaz, N; Tischer, I

    2016-05-13

    Cellular automata model identification is an important way of building simplified simulation models. In this study, we describe a generic architectural framework to ease the development process of new metaheuristic-based algorithms for cellular automata model identification in protein-folding trajectories. Our framework was developed by a methodology based on design patterns that allow an improved experience for new algorithms development. The usefulness of the proposed framework is demonstrated by the implementation of four algorithms, able to obtain extremely precise cellular automata models of the protein-folding process with a protein contact map representation. Dynamic rules obtained by the proposed approach are discussed, and future use for the new tool is outlined.

  5. Modelling small-angle scattering data from complex protein-lipid systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kynde, Søren Andreas Røssell

    the techniques very well suited for the study of the nanodisc system. Chapter 3 explains two different modelling approaches that can be used in the analysis of small-angle scattering data from lipid-protein complexes. These are the continuous approach where the system of interest is modelled as a few regular...... geometric objects and the discrete approach were models are build from a large number of points. It is the basic hypothesis of this thesis, that analysis of smallangle scattering data can be approached in a way that combines the continuous and the discrete modelling methods, and that such an approach can......This thesis consists of two parts. The rst part is divided into five chapters. Chapter 1 gives a general introduction to the bio-molecular systems that have been studied. These are membrane proteins and their lipid environments in the form of phospholipid nanodiscs. Membrane proteins...

  6. Prediction of protein continuum secondary structure with probabilistic models based on NMR solved structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bailey Timothy L

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The structure of proteins may change as a result of the inherent flexibility of some protein regions. We develop and explore probabilistic machine learning methods for predicting a continuum secondary structure, i.e. assigning probabilities to the conformational states of a residue. We train our methods using data derived from high-quality NMR models. Results Several probabilistic models not only successfully estimate the continuum secondary structure, but also provide a categorical output on par with models directly trained on categorical data. Importantly, models trained on the continuum secondary structure are also better than their categorical counterparts at identifying the conformational state for structurally ambivalent residues. Conclusion Cascaded probabilistic neural networks trained on the continuum secondary structure exhibit better accuracy in structurally ambivalent regions of proteins, while sustaining an overall classification accuracy on par with standard, categorical prediction methods.

  7. REMARKS ON INTENSIFIERS AND INTENSIFICATION IN ENGLISH AND ROMANIAN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Constantin MANEA

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present paper is to briefly illustrate and assess the main uses of intensifiers and intensification in English and Romanian, trying to hint at the complexity of the phenomenon in the two languages, while sketchily suggesting ways to improve the teaching and learning activities in Romanian schools, as well as much of the activity of translators in this country. The authors’s illustrative treatment tackles the broader sphere of intensification, not only such intensifiers as very, terribly, awfully, really, definitely, kind of. The main subsections of the paper deal, respectively, with semantic aspects, word formation, syntactic aspects, stylistic issues, and a few remarks on usage.

  8. Remarkable Computing - the Challenge of Designing for the Home

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Marianne Graves

    2004-01-01

    The vision of ubiquitous computing is floating into the domain of the household, despite arguments that lessons from design of workplace artefacts cannot be blindly transferred into the domain of the household. This paper discusses why the ideal of unremarkable or ubiquitous computing is too narrow...... with respect to the household. It points out how understanding technology use, is a matter of looking into the process of use and on how the specific context of the home, in several ways, call for technology to be remarkable rather than unremarkable....

  9. Remarks on different reviews of Chinese character recognition

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TANG Yuanyan

    2007-01-01

    This paper gives an introduction and remarks on two review papers for Chinese character recognition.One review is made by Chinese authors,another is from American scientists.They investigate Chinese character from different language environments;they do the research from different points of view.Thus,a more comprehensive view on Chinese character recognition,which is an important branch of pattern recognition,can be provided to the readers.Meantime,one article pays attention to online process,and other paper deals with offiine recognition,which complement each other.

  10. Remarkable convergent evolution in specialized parasitic Thecostraca (Crustacea)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pérez-Losada, Marcos; Høeg, Jens Thorvald; Crandall, Keith A

    2009-01-01

    analyses indicate a convergent evolution of the very similar and highly reduced slug-shaped stages found during metamorphosis of both the Rhizocephala and the Facetotecta. This provides a remarkable case of convergent evolution and implies that the advanced endoparasitic mode of life known from...... the metamorphosis found in the Facetotecta and Rhizocephala suggests a common evolutionary origin, but until now no comprehensive study has looked at the basic evolution of these thecostracan groups. Results To this end, we collected DNA sequences from three nuclear genes [18S rRNA (2,305), 28S rRNA (2...

  11. Remark on non-Abelian classical kinetic theory

    CERN Document Server

    Laine, Mikko; Laine, Mikko; Manuel, Cristina

    2002-01-01

    It is known that non-Abelian classical kinetic theory reproduces the Hard Thermal/Dense Loop (HTL/HDL) effective action of QCD, obtained after integrating out the hardest momentum scales from the system, as well as the first higher dimensional operator beyond the HTL/HDL level. We discuss here its applicability at still higher orders, by comparing the exact classical effective action obtained in the static limit, with the 1-loop quantum effective potential. We remark that while correct types of operators arise, the classical colour algebra reproduces correctly the prefactor of the 4-point function $tr A_0^4$ only for matter in asymptotically high dimensional colour representations.

  12. A Few Remarks About Formal Development of Secure Systems

    CERN Document Server

    Jaeger, Eric; 10.1109/HASE.2008.49

    2009-01-01

    Formal methods provide remarkable tools allowing for high levels of confidence in the correctness of developments. Their use is therefore encouraged, when not required, for the development of systems in which safety or security is mandatory. But effectively specifying a secure system or deriving a secure implementation can be tricky. We propose a review of some classical `gotchas' and other possible sources of concerns with the objective to improve the confidence in formal developments, or at least to better assess the actual confidence level.

  13. Nationwide Genomic Study in Denmark Reveals Remarkable Population Homogeneity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Athanasiadis, Georgios; Cheng, Jade Y; Vilhjálmsson, Bjarni J;

    2016-01-01

    polygenic predictions of phenotypic traits in adolescents. We observed remarkable homogeneity across different geographic regions, although we could still detect weak signals of genetic structure reflecting the history of the country. Denmark presented genomic affinity with primarily neighboring countries...... with overall resemblance of decreasing weight from Britain, Sweden, Norway, Germany and France. A Polish admixture signal was detected in Zealand and Funen and our date estimates coincided with historical evidence of Wend settlements in the south of Denmark. We also observed considerably diverse demographic...

  14. Protein purification using chromatography: selection of type, modelling and optimization of operating conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asenjo, J A; Andrews, B A

    2009-01-01

    models. These models were the Plate Model and the more fundamentally based Rate Model. Simulated elution curves were compared with experimental data not used for parameter identification. Deviation between experimental data and the simulated curves using the Plate Model was less than 0.0189 (absorbance units); a slightly higher deviation [0.0252 (absorbance units)] was obtained when the Rate Model was used. In order to optimize operating conditions, a cost function was built that included the effect of the different production stages, namely fermentation, purification and concentration. This cost function was also successfully used for the determination of the fraction of product to be collected (peak cutting) in chromatography. It can be used for protein products with different characteristics and qualities, such as purity and yield, by choosing the appropriate parameters.

  15. A benchmark testing ground for integrating homology modeling and protein docking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohnuud, Tanggis; Luo, Lingqi; Wodak, Shoshana J; Bonvin, Alexandre M J J; Weng, Zhiping; Vajda, Sandor; Schueler-Furman, Ora; Kozakov, Dima

    2017-01-01

    Protein docking procedures carry out the task of predicting the structure of a protein-protein complex starting from the known structures of the individual protein components. More often than not, however, the structure of one or both components is not known, but can be derived by homology modeling on the basis of known structures of related proteins deposited in the Protein Data Bank (PDB). Thus, the problem is to develop methods that optimally integrate homology modeling and docking with the goal of predicting the structure of a complex directly from the amino acid sequences of its component proteins. One possibility is to use the best available homology modeling and docking methods. However, the models built for the individual subunits often differ to a significant degree from the bound conformation in the complex, often much more so than the differences observed between free and bound structures of the same protein, and therefore additional conformational adjustments, both at the backbone and side chain levels need to be modeled to achieve an accurate docking prediction. In particular, even homology models of overall good accuracy frequently include localized errors that unfavorably impact docking results. The predicted reliability of the different regions in the model can also serve as a useful input for the docking calculations. Here we present a benchmark dataset that should help to explore and solve combined modeling and docking problems. This dataset comprises a subset of the experimentally solved 'target' complexes from the widely used Docking Benchmark from the Weng Lab (excluding antibody-antigen complexes). This subset is extended to include the structures from the PDB related to those of the individual components of each complex, and hence represent potential templates for investigating and benchmarking integrated homology modeling and docking approaches. Template sets can be dynamically customized by specifying ranges in sequence similarity and in

  16. Soybean Hydrophobic Protein Response to External Electric Field: A Molecular Modeling Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vijaya Raghavan

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available The molecular dynamic (MD modeling approach was applied to evaluate the effect of an external electric field on soybean hydrophobic protein and surface properties. Nominal electric field strengths of 0.002 V/nm and 0.004 V/nm had no major effect on the structure and surface properties of the protein isolate but the higher electric field strength of 3 V/nm significantly affected the protein conformation and solvent accessible surface area. The response of protein isolate to various external field stresses demonstrated that it is necessary to gain insight into protein dynamics under electromagnetic fields in order to be able to develop the techniques utilizing them for food processing and other biological applications.

  17. Acute phase proteins in bovine milk in an experimental model of Staphylococcus aureus subclinical mastitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eckersall, P D; Young, F J; Nolan, A M

    2006-01-01

    The objectives were to establish the origin of 2 acute phase proteins in milk during subclinical bovine mastitis and to characterize the relationship between those proteins in milk and blood. Haptoglobin (Hp) and mammary-associated serum amyloid A (M-SAA3) appear in milk during mastitis, whereas Hp...... and serum amyloid A increase in serum during mastitis. The concentrations of these proteins were determined in an experimental model using a field strain of Staphylococcus aureus to induce subclinical mastitis in dairy cows. The expression of mRNA coding for these proteins was assessed and the presence of M......-SAA3 in mammary tissues was determined using immunocytochemistry. Increases of M-SAA3 and Hp in milk occurred within 12 h of Staphylococcus aureus infusion, with peak concentrations occurring 3 d after infusion of the bacteria. The increase of acute phase proteins in milk (15 h) preceded the increase...

  18. Combining Coarse-Grained Protein Models with Replica-Exchange All-Atom Molecular Dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Wabik, Jacek; Gront, Dominik; Kouza, Maksim; Kolinski, Andrzej

    2013-01-01

    We describe a combination of all-atom simulations with CABS, a well-established coarse-grained protein modeling tool, into a single multiscale protocol. The simulation method has been tested on the C-terminal beta hairpin of protein G, a model system of protein folding. After reconstructing atomistic details, conformations derived from the CABS simulation were subjected to replica-exchange molecular dynamics simulations with OPLS-AA and AMBER99sb force fields in explicit solvent. Such a combination accelerates system convergence several times in comparison with all-atom simulations starting from the extended chain conformation, demonstrated by the analysis of melting curves, the number of native-like conformations as a function of time and secondary structure propagation. The results strongly suggest that the proposed multiscale method could be an efficient and accurate tool for high-resolution studies of protein folding dynamics in larger systems.

  19. Combining Coarse-Grained Protein Models with Replica-Exchange All-Atom Molecular Dynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrzej Koliński

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available We describe a combination of all-atom simulations with CABS, a well-established coarse-grained protein modeling tool, into a single multiscale protocol. The simulation method has been tested on the C-terminal beta hairpin of protein G, a model system of protein folding. After reconstructing atomistic details, conformations derived from the CABS simulation were subjected to replica-exchange molecular dynamics simulations with OPLS-AA and AMBER99sb force fields in explicit solvent. Such a combination accelerates system convergence several times in comparison with all-atom simulations starting from the extended chain conformation, demonstrated by the analysis of melting curves, the number of native-like conformations as a function of time and secondary structure propagation. The results strongly suggest that the proposed multiscale method could be an efficient and accurate tool for high-resolution studies of protein folding dynamics in larger systems.

  20. Combining coarse-grained protein models with replica-exchange all-atom molecular dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wabik, Jacek; Kmiecik, Sebastian; Gront, Dominik; Kouza, Maksim; Koliński, Andrzej

    2013-05-10

    We describe a combination of all-atom simulations with CABS, a well-established coarse-grained protein modeling tool, into a single multiscale protocol. The simulation method has been tested on the C-terminal beta hairpin of protein G, a model system of protein folding. After reconstructing atomistic details, conformations derived from the CABS simulation were subjected to replica-exchange molecular dynamics simulations with OPLS-AA and AMBER99sb force fields in explicit solvent. Such a combination accelerates system convergence several times in comparison with all-atom simulations starting from the extended chain conformation, demonstrated by the analysis of melting curves, the number of native-like conformations as a function of time and secondary structure propagation. The results strongly suggest that the proposed multiscale method could be an efficient and accurate tool for high-resolution studies of protein folding dynamics in larger systems.

  1. In Pursuit of Fully Flexible Protein-Ligand Docking: Modeling the Bilateral Mechanism of Binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henzler, Angela M; Rarey, Matthias

    2010-03-15

    Modern structure-based drug design aims at accounting for the intrinsic flexibility of therapeutic relevant targets. Over the last few years a considerable amount of docking approaches that encounter this challenging problem has emerged. Here we provide the readership with an overview of established methods for fully flexible protein-ligand docking and current developments in the field. All methods are based on one of two fundamental models which describe the dynamic behavior of proteins upon ligand binding. Methods for ensemble docking (ED) model the protein conformational change before the ligand is placed, whereas induced-fit docking (IFD) optimizes the protein structure afterwards. A third category of docking approaches is formed by recent approaches that follow both concepts. This categorization allows to comprehensively discover strengths and weaknesses of the individual processes and to extract information for their applicability in real world docking scenarios.

  2. Replica-exchange Wang-Landau simulations of the H0P lattice protein model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Guangjie; Wüst, Thomas; Li, Ying Wai; Landau, David P.

    The hydrophobic-polar (HP) lattice protein model has been the subject of intensive investigation in an effort to aid our understanding of protein folding. However, the high ground state degeneracies caused by its simplification stands in contrast to the generally unique native states of natural proteins. Here we proposed a simple modification, by introducing a new type of ``neutral'' monomer, 0, i.e. neither hydrophobic nor polar, thus rendering the model more realistic without increasing the difficulties of sampling significantly. With the replica exchange Wang-Landau (REWL) scheme we investigated several widely studied HP proteins and their H0P counterparts. Dramatic differences in both ground state and thermodynamic properties have been found. For example, the H0P version of Crambin shows more clear two-step folding and 3 order of magnitudes less ground state degeneracy than its HP counterpart. Supported by NSF.

  3. A Random Forest Model for Predicting Allosteric and Functional Sites on Proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ava S-Y; Westwood, Nicholas J; Brear, Paul; Rogers, Graeme W; Mavridis, Lazaros; Mitchell, John B O

    2016-04-01

    We created a computational method to identify allosteric sites using a machine learning method trained and tested on protein structures containing bound ligand molecules. The Random Forest machine learning approach was adopted to build our three-way predictive model. Based on descriptors collated for each ligand and binding site, the classification model allows us to assign protein cavities as allosteric, regular or orthosteric, and hence to identify allosteric sites. 43 structural descriptors per complex were derived and were used to characterize individual protein-ligand binding sites belonging to the three classes, allosteric, regular and orthosteric. We carried out a separate validation on a further unseen set of protein structures containing the ligand 2-(N-cyclohexylamino) ethane sulfonic acid (CHES).

  4. Bayesian mixture modeling using a hybrid sampler with application to protein subfamily identification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fong, Youyi; Wakefield, Jon; Rice, Kenneth

    2010-01-01

    Predicting protein function is essential to advancing our knowledge of biological processes. This article is focused on discovering the functional diversification within a protein family. A Bayesian mixture approach is proposed to model a protein family as a mixture of profile hidden Markov models. For a given mixture size, a hybrid Markov chain Monte Carlo sampler comprising both Gibbs sampling steps and hierarchical clustering-based split/merge proposals is used to obtain posterior inference. Inference for mixture size concentrates on comparing the integrated likelihoods. The choice of priors is critical with respect to the performance of the procedure. Through simulation studies, we show that 2 priors that are based on independent data sets allow correct identification of the mixture size, both when the data are homogeneous and when the data are generated from a mixture. We illustrate our method using 2 sets of real protein sequences.

  5. Constrained solution scattering modelling of human antibodies and complement proteins reveals novel biological insights.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perkins, Stephen J; Okemefuna, Azubuike I; Nan, Ruodan; Li, Keying; Bonner, Alexandra

    2009-10-06

    X-ray and neutron-scattering techniques characterize proteins in solution and complement high-resolution structural studies. They are useful when either a large protein cannot be crystallized, in which case scattering yields a solution structure, or a crystal structure has been determined and requires validation in solution. These solution structures are determined by the application of constrained modelling methods based on known subunit structures. First, an appropriate starting model is generated. Next, its conformation is randomized to generate thousands of models for trial-and-error fits. Comparison with the experimental data identifies a small family of best-fit models. Finally, their significance for biological function is assessed. We illustrate this in application to structure determinations for secretory immunoglobulin A, the most prevalent antibody in the human body and a first line of defence in mucosal immunity. We also discuss the applications to the large multi-domain proteins of the complement system, most notably its major regulator factor H, which is important in age-related macular degeneration and renal diseases. We discuss the importance of complementary data from analytical ultracentrifugation, and structural studies of protein-protein complexes. We conclude that constrained scattering modelling makes useful contributions to our understanding of antibody and complement structure and function.

  6. Particle-based model of Min-protein oscillations in Escherichia coli

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berman, Adam; Huang, Kerwyn; Wingreen, Ned

    2007-03-01

    In Escherichia coli cells, the Min proteins, which are required for division site selection, oscillate from pole to pole via a Turing instability. During these oscillations, two of the Min proteins, MinD and MinE self-associate and co- associate on the bacterial inner membrane forming dynamic structures including a ring of MinE protein, compact polar zones of MinD, and zebra stripes in filamentous cells. Such rich behavior in a system with so few species has made the Min proteins a model system for applying computational methods to study intracellular dynamics in bacteria. Though mean-field computational models successfully reproduce the coarse-grained oscillatory dynamics in both rod-shaped and round E. coli cells and also predict that the Min-proteins actively detect cell shape, the mean-field models cannot address questions raised by the recent finding that MinD forms a small number of large polymers on the membrane. First, it is unclear how the intrinsic dynamics of polymer formation, namely polymer nucleation and growth, affect the pole-to-pole oscillations. Second, it is not understood how the oscillations influence the morphology of the MinD polymers. To study this coupling between MinD polymerization and pole-to-pole oscillation, we employ a particle-based computational model. In this talk, we will describe this model, which produces both large polymers and pole-to-pole oscillations.

  7. Curvature of the energy landscape and folding of model proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazzoni, Lorenzo N; Casetti, Lapo

    2006-11-24

    We study the geometric properties of the energy landscape of coarse-grained, off-lattice models of polymers by endowing the configuration space with a suitable metric, depending on the potential energy function, such that the dynamical trajectories are the geodesics of the metric. Using numerical simulations, we show that the fluctuations of the curvature clearly mark the folding transition, and that this quantity allows to distinguish between polymers having a proteinlike behavior (i.e., that fold to a unique configuration) and polymers which undergo a hydrophobic collapse but do not have a folding transition. These geometrical properties are defined by the potential energy without requiring any prior knowledge of the native configuration.

  8. Discrete, continuous, and stochastic models of protein sorting in the Golgi apparatus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Haijun; Guo, Yusong; Linstedt, Adam; Schwartz, Russell

    2010-01-01

    The Golgi apparatus plays a central role in processing and sorting proteins and lipids in eukaryotic cells. Golgi compartments constantly exchange material with each other and with other cellular components, allowing them to maintain and reform distinct identities despite dramatic changes in structure and size during cell division, development, and osmotic stress. We have developed three minimal models of membrane and protein exchange in the Golgi—a discrete, stochastic model, a continuous ordinary differential equation model, and a continuous stochastic differential equation model—each based on two fundamental mechanisms: vesicle-coat-mediated selective concentration of cargoes and soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor attachment protein receptor (SNARE) proteins during vesicle formation and SNARE-mediated selective fusion of vesicles. By exploring where the models differ, we hope to discover whether the discrete, stochastic nature of vesicle-mediated transport is likely to have appreciable functional consequences for the Golgi. All three models show similar ability to restore and maintain distinct identities over broad parameter ranges. They diverge, however, in conditions corresponding to collapse and reassembly of the Golgi. The results suggest that a continuum model provides a good description of Golgi maintenance but that considering the discrete nature of vesicle-based traffic is important to understanding assembly and disassembly of the Golgi. Experimental analysis validates a prediction of the models that altering guanine nucleotide exchange factor expression levels will modulate Golgi size.

  9. A Comparison Study for DNA Motif Modeling on Protein Binding Microarray.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Ka-Chun; Li, Yue; Peng, Chengbin; Wong, Hau-San

    2016-01-01

    Transcription factor binding sites (TFBSs) are relatively short (5-15 bp) and degenerate. Identifying them is a computationally challenging task. In particular, protein binding microarray (PBM) is a high-throughput platform that can measure the DNA binding preference of a protein in a comprehensive and unbiased manner; for instance, a typical PBM experiment can measure binding signal intensities of a protein to all possible DNA k-mers (k = 8∼10). Since proteins can often bind to DNA with different binding intensities, one of the major challenges is to build TFBS (also known as DNA motif) models which can fully capture the quantitative binding affinity data. To learn DNA motif models from the non-convex objective function landscape, several optimization methods are compared and applied to the PBM motif model building problem. In particular, representative methods from different optimization paradigms have been chosen for modeling performance comparison on hundreds of PBM datasets. The results suggest that the multimodal optimization methods are very effective for capturing the binding preference information from PBM data. In particular, we observe a general performance improvement if choosing di-nucleotide modeling over mono-nucleotide modeling. In addition, the models learned by the best-performing method are applied to two independent applications: PBM probe rotation testing and ChIP-Seq peak sequence prediction, demonstrating its biological applicability.

  10. A Comparison Study for DNA Motif Modeling on Protein Binding Microarray

    KAUST Repository

    Wong, Ka-Chun

    2015-06-11

    Transcription Factor Binding Sites (TFBSs) are relatively short (5-15 bp) and degenerate. Identifying them is a computationally challenging task. In particular, Protein Binding Microarray (PBM) is a high-throughput platform that can measure the DNA binding preference of a protein in a comprehensive and unbiased manner; for instance, a typical PBM experiment can measure binding signal intensities of a protein to all possible DNA k-mers (k=810). Since proteins can often bind to DNA with different binding intensities, one of the major challenges is to build motif models which can fully capture the quantitative binding affinity data. To learn DNA motif models from the non-convex objective function landscape, several optimization methods are compared and applied to the PBM motif model building problem. In particular, representative methods from different optimization paradigms have been chosen for modeling performance comparison on hundreds of PBM datasets. The results suggest that the multimodal optimization methods are very effective for capturing the binding preference information from PBM data. In particular, we observe a general performance improvement using di-nucleotide modeling over mono-nucleotide modeling. In addition, the models learned by the best-performing method are applied to two independent applications: PBM probe rotation testing and ChIP-Seq peak sequence prediction, demonstrating its biological applicability.

  11. Bayesian segmental models with multiple sequence alignment profiles for protein secondary structure and contact map prediction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Wei; Ghahramani, Zoubin; Podtelezhnikov, Alexei; Wild, David L

    2006-01-01

    In this paper, we develop a segmental semi-Markov model (SSMM) for protein secondary structure prediction which incorporates multiple sequence alignment profiles with the purpose of improving the predictive performance. The segmental model is a generalization of the hidden Markov model where a hidden state generates segments of various length and secondary structure type. A novel parameterized model is proposed for the likelihood function that explicitly represents multiple sequence alignment profiles to capture the segmental conformation. Numerical results on benchmark data sets show that incorporating the profiles results in substantial improvements and the generalization performance is promising. By incorporating the information from long range interactions in beta-sheets, this model is also capable of carrying out inference on contact maps. This is an important advantage of probabilistic generative models over the traditional discriminative approach to protein secondary structure prediction. The Web server of our algorithm and supplementary materials are available at http://public.kgi.edu/-wild/bsm.html.

  12. A model for non-obligate oligomer formation in protein aggregration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Healy, Eamonn F.

    2015-01-01

    Using solvent-exposed intramolecular backbone hydrogen bonds as physico-chemical descriptors for protein packing, a role for transient, non-obligate oligomers in the formation of aberrant protein aggregates is presented. Oligomeric models of the both wild type (wt) and select mutant variants of superoxide dismutase (SOD1) are proposed to provide a structural basis for investigating the etiology of Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS). PMID:26282203

  13. Escaping the flybottle: solipsism and method in Wittgenstein's Philosophical Remarks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jônadas Techio

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The paper supports a dialectical interpretation of Wittgenstein's method focusing on the analysis of the conditions of experience presented in his Philosophical Remarks. By means of a close reading of some key passages dealing with solipsism I will try to lay bare their self-subverting character: the fact that they amount to miniature dialectical exercises offering specific directions to pass from particular pieces of disguised nonsense to corresponding pieces of patent nonsense. Yet, in order to follow those directions one needs to allow oneself to become simultaneously tempted by and suspicious of their all-too-evident "metaphysical tone" - a tone which, as we shall see, is particularly manifest in those claims purporting to state what can or cannot be the case, and, still more particularly, those purporting to state what can or cannot be done in language or thought, thus leading to the view that there are some (determinate things which are ineffable or unthinkable. I conclude by suggesting that in writing those remarks Wittgenstein was still moved by an ethical project, which gets conspicuously displayed in these reiterations of his attempts to cure the readers (and himself from some of the temptations expressed by solipsism.

  14. Remarkable symmetries in the Milky Way disk's magnetic field

    CERN Document Server

    Kronberg, Philipp P

    2009-01-01

    We report new, remarkably coherent patterns of Faraday rotation (RM) at $b \\lesssim 15 \\deg$ in the inner Galactic plane, using an expanded extragalactic source RM compilation of unprecedented average accuracy. The patterns, relevant to RM pathlengths toward the inner Galactic disk, clearly indicate a global disk magnetic field structure, with remarkable reflection symmetry in RM. Sharply defined RM($l$) features replicate with the opposite sign on opposite sides of the Galactic center, confirming the bi-symmetric magnetic field pattern {\\it inward} of the Sagittarius-Carina arm originally found by Simard-Normandin and Kronberg (1979). The prevailing magnetic field points to $l = 79 \\pm 2\\deg$, very close to the general spiral arm direction. Additional sharp RM sign reversals in $b$, just below the Galactic plane, are consistent with an A0 galactic dynamo configuration. At all ``outer'' longitudes, there are no large scale RM sign reversals either {\\it at} the Galactic plane or near to it. The outer Galactic ...

  15. Practical remarks on the heart rate and saturation measurement methodology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kowal, M.; Kubal, S.; Piotrowski, P.; Staniec, K.

    2017-05-01

    A surface reflection-based method for measuring heart rate and saturation has been introduced as one having a significant advantage over legacy methods in that it lends itself for use in special applications such as those where a person’s mobility is of prime importance (e.g. during a miner’s work) and excluding the use of traditional clips. Then, a complete ATmega1281-based microcontroller platform has been described for performing computational tasks of signal processing and wireless transmission. In the next section remarks have been provided regarding the basic signal processing rules beginning with raw voltage samples of converted optical signals, their acquisition, storage and smoothing. This chapter ends with practical remarks demonstrating an exponential dependence between the minimum measurable heart rate and the readout resolution at different sampling frequencies for different cases of averaging depth (in bits). The following section is devoted strictly to the heart rate and hemoglobin oxygenation (saturation) measurement with the use of the presented platform, referenced to measurements obtained with a stationary certified pulsoxymeter.

  16. Modeling of 3D-structure for regular fragments of low similarity unknown structure proteins

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Peng Zhihong; Chen Jie; Lin Xiwen; Sang Yanchao

    2007-01-01

    Because it is hard to search similar structure for low similarity unknown structure proteins dimefly from the Protein Data Bank(PDB)database,3D-structure is modeled in this paper for secondary structure regular fragments(α-Helices,β-Strands)of such proteins by the protein secondary structure prediction software,the Basic Local Alignment Search Tool(BLAST)and the side chain construction software SCWRL3.First.the protein secondary structure prediction software is adopted to extract secondary structure fragments from the unknown structure proteins.Then.regular fragments are regulated by BLAST based on comparative modeling,providing main chain configurations.Finally,SCWRL3 is applied to assemble side chains for regular fragments,so that 3D-structure of regular fragments of low similarity un known structure protein is obtained.Regular fragments of several neurotoxins ale used for test.Simulation results show that the prediction errors are less than 0.06nm for regular fragments less than 10 amino acids,implying the simpleness and effectiveness of the proposed method.

  17. Protein loop modeling using a new hybrid energy function and its application to modeling in inaccurate structural environments.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hahnbeom Park

    Full Text Available Protein loop modeling is a tool for predicting protein local structures of particular interest, providing opportunities for applications involving protein structure prediction and de novo protein design. Until recently, the majority of loop modeling methods have been developed and tested by reconstructing loops in frameworks of experimentally resolved structures. In many practical applications, however, the protein loops to be modeled are located in inaccurate structural environments. These include loops in model structures, low-resolution experimental structures, or experimental structures of different functional forms. Accordingly, discrepancies in the accuracy of the structural environment assumed in development of the method and that in practical applications present additional challenges to modern loop modeling methods. This study demonstrates a new strategy for employing a hybrid energy function combining physics-based and knowledge-based components to help tackle this challenge. The hybrid energy function is designed to combine the strengths of each energy component, simultaneously maintaining accurate loop structure prediction in a high-resolution framework structure and tolerating minor environmental errors in low-resolution structures. A loop modeling method based on global optimization of this new energy function is tested on loop targets situated in different levels of environmental errors, ranging from experimental structures to structures perturbed in backbone as well as side chains and template-based model structures. The new method performs comparably to force field-based approaches in loop reconstruction in crystal structures and better in loop prediction in inaccurate framework structures. This result suggests that higher-accuracy predictions would be possible for a broader range of applications. The web server for this method is available at http://galaxy.seoklab.org/loop with the PS2 option for the scoring function.

  18. Isatin decreases Bax protein expression in the substantia nigra of a mouse model of Parkinson's disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jiguo Zhang; Fang Zhang; Yanlong Qiu; Wang Yue

    2011-01-01

    The present study observed the action of 1H-indole-2, 3-dione (isatin) on Bax protein expression in the substantia nigra of a Parkinson's disease animal model. Parkinson's disease-like behaviors were induced in C57BL/6J mice treated with 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1, 2, 3, 6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP). Bax protein expression was significantly reduced in isatin (100, 200 mg/kg)-pretreated mice. Results demonstrate that isatin plays a neuroprotective role in mice treated with MPTP by down-regulating Bax protein expression.

  19. Protein Folding under Mediation of Ordering Water: an Off-Lattice Gō-Like Model Study

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZUO Guang-Hong; HU Jun; FANG Hai-Ping

    2007-01-01

    @@ Water plays an important role in the structure and function of biomolecules. Water confined at the nanoscale usually exhibits phenomena not seen in bulk water, including the ice-like ordering structure on the surfaces of many substrates. We investigate the behaviour of protein folding in which the proteins are asssumed in an environment with ordering water by using of an off-lattice Gō-like model. It is found that in the physiological temperature, both the folding rate and the thermodynamic stability of the protein are greatly promoted by the existence of ordering of water.

  20. Downhill versus two-state protein folding in a statistical mechanical model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruscolini, Pierpaolo; Pelizzola, Alessandro; Zamparo, Marco

    2007-06-01

    The authors address the problem of downhill protein folding in the framework of a simple statistical mechanical model, which allows an exact solution for the equilibrium and a semianalytical treatment of the kinetics. Focusing on protein 1BBL, a candidate for downhill folding behavior, and comparing it to the WW domain of protein PIN1, a two-state folder of comparable size, the authors show that there are qualitative differences in both the equilibrium and kinetic properties of the two molecules. However, the barrierless scenario which would be expected if 1BBL were a true downhill folder is observed only at low enough temperature.

  1. Calculation of accurate small angle X-ray scattering curves from coarse-grained protein models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stovgaard, Kasper; Andreetta, Christian; Ferkinghoff-Borg, Jesper

    2010-01-01

    the computationally costly iteration over all atoms. We estimated the form factors using generated data from a set of high quality protein structures. No ad hoc scaling or correction factors are applied in the calculation of the curves. Two coarse-grained representations of protein structure were investigated; two...... CRYSOL, which requires full atomic detail. Our method was also comparable to CRYSOL in recognizing native structures among native-like decoys. As a proof-of-concept, we combined the coarse-grained Debye calculation with a previously described probabilistic model of protein structure, Torus...

  2. Ability of silybin and its derivatives to prevent protein oxidation in different model systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Purchartová, K.; Baron, C.P.; Křen, V.

    2013-01-01

    to prevent activation of hemoglobin (Hb) to highly reactive hypervalent heme protein species (ferrylHb and perferrylHb) was examined. Indeed, Hb cytotoxicity has been associated with the generation of protein radicals, which are formed when the ferric iron of Hb (Fe3+) is oxidised by H2O2 to (Fe4+) to form...... perferrylHb and ferrylHb, with the later also bearing a radical on its protein. The relationship between the structural properties of silybin and its derivatives and their ability to prevent oxidation of Hb was investigated in model system in the presence or the absence of lipids. The antioxidant activities...

  3. Thermodynamic modeling of protein retention in mixed-mode chromatography: An extended model for isocratic and dual gradient elution chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yi Feng; Graalfs, Heiner; Frech, Christian

    2016-09-16

    An extended model is developed to describe protein retention in mixed-mode chromatography based on thermodynamic principles. Special features are the incorporation of pH dependence of the ionic interaction on a mixed-mode resin and the addition of a water term into the model which enables one to describe the total number of water molecules released at the hydrophobic interfaces upon protein-ligand binding. Examples are presented on how to determine the model parameters using isocratic elution chromatography. Four mixed-mode anion-exchanger prototype resins with different surface chemistries and ligand densities were tested using isocratic elution of two monoclonal antibodies at different pH values (7-10) and encompassed a wide range of NaCl concentrations (0-5M). U-shape mixed-mode retention curves were observed for all four resins. By taking into account of the deprotonation and protonation of the weak cationic functional groups in these mixed-mode anion-exchanger prototype resins, conditions which favor protein-ligand binding via mixed-mode strong cationic ligands as well as conditions which favor protein-ligand binding via both mixed-mode strong cationic ligands and non-hydrophobic weak cationic ligands were identified. The changes in the retention curves with pH, salt, protein, and ligand can be described very well by the extended model using meaningful thermodynamic parameters like Gibbs energy, number of ionic and hydrophobic interactions, total number of released water molecules as well as modulator interaction constant. Furthermore, the fitted model parameters based on isocratic elution data can also be used to predict protein retention in dual salt-pH gradient elution chromatography. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Unraveling protein folding mechanism by analyzing the hierarchy of models with increasing level of detail

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayashi, Tomohiko; Yasuda, Satoshi; Škrbić, Tatjana; Giacometti, Achille; Kinoshita, Masahiro

    2017-09-01

    Taking protein G with 56 residues for a case study, we investigate the mechanism of protein folding. In addition to its native structure possessing α-helix and β-sheet contents of 27% and 39%, respectively, we construct a number of misfolded decoys with a wide variety of α-helix and β-sheet contents. We then consider a hierarchy of 8 different models with increasing level of detail in terms of the number of entropic and energetic physical factors incorporated. The polyatomic structure is always taken into account, but the side chains are removed in half of the models. The solvent is formed by either neutral hard spheres or water molecules. Protein intramolecular hydrogen bonds (H-bonds) and protein-solvent H-bonds (the latter is present only in water) are accounted for or not, depending on the model considered. We then apply a physics-based free-energy function (FEF) corresponding to each model and investigate which structures are most stabilized. This special approach taken on a step-by-step basis enables us to clarify the role of each physical factor in contributing to the structural stability and separately elucidate its effect. Depending on the model employed, significantly different structures such as very compact configurations with no secondary structures and configurations of associated α-helices are optimally stabilized. The native structure can be identified as that with lowest FEF only when the most detailed model is employed. This result is significant for at least the two reasons: The most detailed model considered here is able to capture the fundamental aspects of protein folding notwithstanding its simplicity; and it is shown that the native structure is stabilized by a complex interplay of minimal multiple factors that must be all included in the description. In the absence of even a single of these factors, the protein is likely to be driven towards a different, more stable state.

  5. The potential of chitosan in enhancing peptide and protein absorption across the TR146 cell culture model-an in vitro model of the buccal epithelium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Portero, Ana; Remuñán-López, Carmen; Nielsen, Hanne Mørck

    2002-01-01

    To investigate the potential of chitosan (CS) to enhance buccal peptide and protein absorption, the TR146 cell culture model, a model of the buccal epithelium, was used.......To investigate the potential of chitosan (CS) to enhance buccal peptide and protein absorption, the TR146 cell culture model, a model of the buccal epithelium, was used....

  6. A Model of Substitution Trajectories in Sequence Space and Long-Term Protein Evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Usmanova, Dinara R.; Ferretti, Luca; Povolotskaya, Inna S.; Vlasov, Peter K.; Kondrashov, Fyodor A.

    2015-01-01

    The nature of factors governing the tempo and mode of protein evolution is a fundamental issue in evolutionary biology. Specifically, whether or not interactions between different sites, or epistasis, are important in directing the course of evolution became one of the central questions. Several recent reports have scrutinized patterns of long-term protein evolution claiming them to be compatible only with an epistatic fitness landscape. However, these claims have not yet been substantiated with a formal model of protein evolution. Here, we formulate a simple covarion-like model of protein evolution focusing on the rate at which the fitness impact of amino acids at a site changes with time. We then apply the model to the data on convergent and divergent protein evolution to test whether or not the incorporation of epistatic interactions is necessary to explain the data. We find that convergent evolution cannot be explained without the incorporation of epistasis and the rate at which an amino acid state switches from being acceptable at a site to being deleterious is faster than the rate of amino acid substitution. Specifically, for proteins that have persisted in modern prokaryotic organisms since the last universal common ancestor for one amino acid substitution approximately ten amino acid states switch from being accessible to being deleterious, or vice versa. Thus, molecular evolution can only be perceived in the context of rapid turnover of which amino acids are available for evolution. PMID:25415964

  7. Predictive response surface model for heat-induced rheological changes and aggregation of whey protein concentrate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarez, Pedro A; Emond, Charles; Gomaa, Ahmed; Remondetto, Gabriel E; Subirade, Muriel

    2015-02-01

    Whey proteins are now far more than a by-product of cheese processing. In the last 2 decades, food manufacturers have developed them as ingredients, with the dairy industry remaining as a major user. For many applications, whey proteins are modified (denatured) to alter their structure and functional properties. The objective of this research was to study the influence of 85 to 100 °C, with protein concentration of 8% to 12%, and treatment times of 5 to 30 min, while measuring rheological properties (storage modulus, loss modulus, and complex viscosity) and aggregation (intermolecular beta-sheet formation) in dispersions of whey protein concentrate (WPC). A Box-Behnken Response Surface Methodology modeled the heat denaturation of liquid sweet WPC at 3 variables and 3 levels. The model revealed a very significant fit for viscoelastic properties, and a lesser fit for protein aggregation, at temperatures not previously studied. An exponential increase of rheological parameters was governed by protein concentration and temperature, while a modest linear relationship of aggregation was governed by temperature. Models such as these can serve as valuable guides to the ingredient and dairy industries to develop target products, as whey is a major ingredient in many functional foods.

  8. Analysing the origin of long-range interactions in proteins using lattice models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Unger Ron

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Long-range communication is very common in proteins but the physical basis of this phenomenon remains unclear. In order to gain insight into this problem, we decided to explore whether long-range interactions exist in lattice models of proteins. Lattice models of proteins have proven to capture some of the basic properties of real proteins and, thus, can be used for elucidating general principles of protein stability and folding. Results Using a computational version of double-mutant cycle analysis, we show that long-range interactions emerge in lattice models even though they are not an input feature of them. The coupling energy of both short- and long-range pairwise interactions is found to become more positive (destabilizing in a linear fashion with increasing 'contact-frequency', an entropic term that corresponds to the fraction of states in the conformational ensemble of the sequence in which the pair of residues is in contact. A mathematical derivation of the linear dependence of the coupling energy on 'contact-frequency' is provided. Conclusion Our work shows how 'contact-frequency' should be taken into account in attempts to stabilize proteins by introducing (or stabilizing contacts in the native state and/or through 'negative design' of non-native contacts.

  9. Using Denatured Egg White as a Macroscopic Model for Teaching Protein Structure and Introducing Protein Synthesis for High School Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Correia, Paulo R. M.; Torres, Bayardo B.

    2007-12-01

    The success of teaching molecular and atomic phenomena depends on the didactical strategy and the media selection adopted, in consideration of the level of abstraction of the subject to be taught and the students' capability to deal with abstract operations. Dale's cone of experience was employed to plan three 50-minute classes to discuss protein denaturation from a chemical point of view. Only low abstraction level activities were selected: (i) two demonstrations showing the denaturation of albumin by heating and by changing the solvent, (ii) the assembly of a macroscopic model representing the protein molecule, and (iii) a role-play for simulating glucagon synthesis. A student-centered approach and collaborative learning were used throughout the classes. The use of macroscopic models is a powerful didactical strategy to represent molecular and atomic events. They can convert microscopic entities into touchable objects, reducing the abstraction level required to discuss chemistry with high school students. Thus, interesting topics involving molecules and their behavior can take place efficiently when mediated by concrete experiences.

  10. Characterizing the Microenvironment Surrounding Phosphorylated Protein Sites

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shi-Cai Fan; Xue-Gong Zhang

    2005-01-01

    Protein phosphorylation plays an important role in various cellular processes. Due to its high complexity, the mechanism needs to be further studied. In the last few years, many methods have been contributed to this field, but almost all of them investigated the mechanism based on protein sequences around protein sites. In this study, we implement an exploration by characterizing the microenvironment surrounding phosphorylated protein sites with a modified shell model, and obtain some significant properties by the rank-sum test, such as the lack of some classes of residues, atoms, and secondary structures. Furthermore, we find that the depletion of some properties affects protein phosphorylation remarkably. Our results suggest that it is a meaningful direction to explore the mechanism of protein phosphorylation from microenvironment and we expect further findings along with the increasing size of phosphorylation and protein structure data.

  11. Production of spider silk proteins in tobacco and potato.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheller, J; Gührs, K H; Grosse, F; Conrad, U

    2001-06-01

    Spider dragline silk is a proteinaceous fiber with remarkable mechanical properties that make it attractive for technical applications. Unfortunately, the material cannot be obtained in large quantities from spiders. We have therefore generated transgenic tobacco and potato plants that express remarkable amounts of recombinant Nephila clavipes dragline proteins. Using a gene synthesis approach, the recombinant proteins exhibit homologies of >90% compared to their native models. Here, we demonstrate the accumulation of recombinant silk proteins, which are encoded by synthetic genes of 420-3,600 base pairs, up to a level of at least 2% of total soluble protein in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) of tobacco and potato leaves and potato tubers, respectively. Using the present expression system, spider silk proteins up to 100 kDa could be detected in plant tissues. When produced in plants, the recombinant spidroins exhibit extreme heat stability-a property that is used to purify the spidroins by a simple and efficient procedure.

  12. Random forest-based protein model quality assessment (RFMQA) using structural features and potential energy terms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manavalan, Balachandran; Lee, Juyong; Lee, Jooyoung

    2014-01-01

    Recently, predicting proteins three-dimensional (3D) structure from its sequence information has made a significant progress due to the advances in computational techniques and the growth of experimental structures. However, selecting good models from a structural model pool is an important and challenging task in protein structure prediction. In this study, we present the first application of random forest based model quality assessment (RFMQA) to rank protein models using its structural features and knowledge-based potential energy terms. The method predicts a relative score of a model by using its secondary structure, solvent accessibility and knowledge-based potential energy terms. We trained and tested the RFMQA method on CASP8 and CASP9 targets using 5-fold cross-validation. The correlation coefficient between the TM-score of the model selected by RFMQA (TMRF) and the best server model (TMbest) is 0.945. We benchmarked our method on recent CASP10 targets by using CASP8 and 9 server models as a training set. The correlation coefficient and average difference between TMRF and TMbest over 95 CASP10 targets are 0.984 and 0.0385, respectively. The test results show that our method works better in selecting top models when compared with other top performing methods. RFMQA is available for download from http://lee.kias.re.kr/RFMQA/RFMQA_eval.tar.gz.

  13. Simulation of porosity decrease with protein adsorption using the distributed pore model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coquebert de Neuville, Bertrand; Thomas, Helen; Morbidelli, Massimo

    2013-11-01

    Chromatographic stationary phases such as Fractogel EMD SO3 (M) have a pore size distribution that is close to the size of proteins. The accessible porosity and the mass transfer inside the particles are therefore strongly affected by the pore to solute size ratio. This effect was simulated using the distributed pore model for three media: Base Fractogel SO3, Fractogel EMD SO3 (M) and (S). This model was extended so as to be able to account for the effect of pore shrinkage due to protein loading on the chromatographic behavior of other proteins. Pulse chromatographic experiments using dextrans of various sizes on column pre-loaded with antibodies have been conducted to test the model reliability.

  14. Hidden Markov Models Incorporating Fuzzy Measures and Integrals for Protein Sequence Identification and Alignment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Niranjan P.Bidargaddi; Madlhu Chetty; Joarder Kamruzzaman

    2008-01-01

    Profile hidden Markov models (HMMs) based on classical HMMs have been widely applied for protein sequence identification. The formulation of the forward and backward variables in profile HMMs is made under statistical independence assumption of the probability theory. We propose a fuzzy profile HMM to overcome the limitations of that assumption and to achieve an improved alignment for protein sequences belonging to a given family. The proposed model fuzzifies the forward and backward variables by incorporating Sugeno fuzzy measures and Choquet integrals, thus further extends the generalized HMM. Based on the fuzzified forwardand backward variables, we propose a fuzzy Baum-Welch parameter estimation al-gorithm for profiles. The strong correlations and the sequence preference involved in the protein structures make this fuzzy architecture based model as a suitable candidate for building profiles of a given family, since the fuzzy set can handle uncertainties better than classical methods.

  15. Folding and stability of helical bundle proteins from coarse-grained models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapoor, Abhijeet; Travesset, Alex

    2013-07-01

    We develop a coarse-grained model where solvent is considered implicitly, electrostatics are included as short-range interactions, and side-chains are coarse-grained to a single bead. The model depends on three main parameters: hydrophobic, electrostatic, and side-chain hydrogen bond strength. The parameters are determined by considering three level of approximations and characterizing the folding for three selected proteins (training set). Nine additional proteins (containing up to 126 residues) as well as mutated versions (test set) are folded with the given parameters. In all folding simulations, the initial state is a random coil configuration. Besides the native state, some proteins fold into an additional state differing in the topology (structure of the helical bundle). We discuss the stability of the native states, and compare the dynamics of our model to all atom molecular dynamics simulations as well as some general properties on the interactions governing folding dynamics.

  16. The utility of comparative models and the local model quality for protein crystal structure determination by Molecular Replacement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pawlowski Marcin

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Computational models of protein structures were proved to be useful as search models in Molecular Replacement (MR, a common method to solve the phase problem faced by macromolecular crystallography. The success of MR depends on the accuracy of a search model. Unfortunately, this parameter remains unknown until the final structure of the target protein is determined. During the last few years, several Model Quality Assessment Programs (MQAPs that predict the local accuracy of theoretical models have been developed. In this article, we analyze whether the application of MQAPs improves the utility of theoretical models in MR. Results For our dataset of 615 search models, the real local accuracy of a model increases the MR success ratio by 101% compared to corresponding polyalanine templates. On the contrary, when local model quality is not utilized in MR, the computational models solved only 4.5% more MR searches than polyalanine templates. For the same dataset of the 615 models, a workflow combining MR with predicted local accuracy of a model found 45% more correct solution than polyalanine templates. To predict such accuracy MetaMQAPclust, a “clustering MQAP” was used. Conclusions Using comparative models only marginally increases the MR success ratio in comparison to polyalanine structures of templates. However, the situation changes dramatically once comparative models are used together with their predicted local accuracy. A new functionality was added to the GeneSilico Fold Prediction Metaserver in order to build models that are more useful for MR searches. Additionally, we have developed a simple method, AmIgoMR (Am I good for MR?, to predict if an MR search with a template-based model for a given template is likely to find the correct solution.

  17. Theoretical model of the three-dimensional structure of a disease resistance gene homolog encoding resistance protein in Vigna mungo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basak, Jolly; Bahadur, Ranjit P

    2006-10-01

    Plant disease resistance (R) genes, the key players of innate immunity system in plants encode 'R' proteins. 'R' protein recognizes product of avirulance gene from the pathogen and activate downstream signaling responses leading to disease resistance. No three dimensional (3D) structural information of any 'R' proteins is available as yet. We have reported a 'R' gene homolog, the 'VMYR1', encoding 'R' protein in Vigna mungo. Here, we describe the homology modeling of the 'VMYR1' protein. The model was created by using the 3D structure of an ATP-binding cassette transporter protein from Vibrio cholerae as a template. The strategy for homology modeling was based on the high structural conservation in the superfamily of P-loop containing nucleoside triphosphate hydrolase in which target and template proteins belong. This is the first report of theoretical model structure of any 'R' proteins.

  18. PROXIMO--a new docking algorithm to model protein complexes using data from radical probe mass spectrometry (RP-MS)

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Gerega, Sebastien K; Downard, Kevin M

    2006-01-01

    The design and implementation of a new algorithm, known as PROXIMO for protein oxidation interface modeller, is described to predict the structure of protein complexes using data generated in radical...

  19. Exact protein distributions for stochastic models of gene expression using partitioning of Poisson processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pendar, Hodjat; Platini, Thierry; Kulkarni, Rahul V.

    2013-04-01

    Stochasticity in gene expression gives rise to fluctuations in protein levels across a population of genetically identical cells. Such fluctuations can lead to phenotypic variation in clonal populations; hence, there is considerable interest in quantifying noise in gene expression using stochastic models. However, obtaining exact analytical results for protein distributions has been an intractable task for all but the simplest models. Here, we invoke the partitioning property of Poisson processes to develop a mapping that significantly simplifies the analysis of stochastic models of gene expression. The mapping leads to exact protein distributions using results for mRNA distributions in models with promoter-based regulation. Using this approach, we derive exact analytical results for steady-state and time-dependent distributions for the basic two-stage model of gene expression. Furthermore, we show how the mapping leads to exact protein distributions for extensions of the basic model that include the effects of posttranscriptional and posttranslational regulation. The approach developed in this work is widely applicable and can contribute to a quantitative understanding of stochasticity in gene expression and its regulation.

  20. Computer construction and analysis of protein models of the mutant γD-crystallin gene

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YAO Ke; SUN Zhao-hui; SHENTU Xing-chao; WANG Kai-jun; TAN Jian

    2005-01-01

    Background γD-crystallin plays an important role in human cataract formation. Being highly stable, γD-crystallin proteins are composed of two domains. In this study we constructed and analyzed protein models of the mutant γD-crystallin gene, which caused a special fasciculiform congenital cataract affecting a large Chinese family. Methods γD-crystallin protein structure was predicted by Swiss-Model software using bovine γD-crystallin as a template and Prospect software using human βb2-crystallin as a template. The models were observed with a Swiss-Pdb viewer.Results The mutant γD-crystallin structure predicted by the Swiss-Model software showed that proline23 was an exposed surface residue and P23T change made a decreased hydrogen bond distance between threonine23 and asparagine49. The mutant γD-crystallin structure predicted by the Prospect software showed that the P23T change exerted a significant effect on the protein's tertiary structure and yielded hydrogen bonds with aspartic acid21, asparagine24, asparagine49 and serine74.Conclusion The mutant γD-crystallin gene has a significant effect on the protein's tertiary structure, supporting that alteration of γ-crystallin plays an important role in human cataract formation.

  1. An approach to creating a more realistic working model from a protein data bank entry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandon, Christopher J.; Martin, Benjamin P.; McGee, Kelly J.; Stewart, James J. P.; Braun-Sand, Sonja B.

    2015-01-01

    An accurate model of three-dimensional protein structure is important in a variety of fields such as structure-based drug design and mechanistic studies of enzymatic reactions. While the entries in the Protein Data Bank (http://www.pdb.org) provide valuable information about protein structures, a small fraction of the PDB structures were found to contain anomalies not reported in the PDB file. The semiempirical PM7 method in MOPAC2012 was used for identifying anomalously short hydrogen bonds, C–H···O/C–H···N interactions, non-bonding close contacts, and unrealistic covalent bond lengths in recently published Protein Data Bank files. It was also used to generate new structures with these faults removed. When the semiempirical models were compared to those of PDB_REDO (http://www.cmbi.ru.nl/pdb_redo/), the clashscores, as defined by MolProbity (http://molprobity.biochem.duke.edu/), were better in about 50 % of the structures. The semiempirical models also had a lower root-mean-square-deviation value in nearly all cases than those from PDB_REDO, indicative of a better conservation of the tertiary structure. Finally, the semiempirical models were found to have lower clashscores than the initial PDB file in all but one case. Because this approach maintains as much of the original tertiary structure as possible while improving anomalous interactions, it should be useful to theoreticians, experimentalists, and crystallographers investigating the structure and function of proteins. PMID:25605595

  2. Animal Models of Congenital Cardiomyopathies Associated With Mutations in Z-Line Proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bang, Marie-Louise

    2017-01-01

    The cardiac Z-line at the boundary between sarcomeres is a multiprotein complex connecting the contractile apparatus with the cytoskeleton and the extracellular matrix. The Z-line is important for efficient force generation and transmission as well as the maintenance of structural stability and integrity. Furthermore, it is a nodal point for intracellular signaling, in particular mechanosensing and mechanotransduction. Mutations in various genes encoding Z-line proteins have been associated with different cardiomyopathies, including dilated cardiomyopathy, hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy, restrictive cardiomyopathy, and left ventricular noncompaction, and mutations even within the same gene can cause widely different pathologies. Animal models have contributed to a great advancement in the understanding of the physiological function of Z-line proteins and the pathways leading from mutations in Z-line proteins to cardiomyopathy, although genotype-phenotype prediction remains a great challenge. This review presents an overview of the currently available animal models for Z-line and Z-line associated proteins involved in human cardiomyopathies with special emphasis on knock-in and transgenic mouse models recapitulating the clinical phenotypes of human cardiomyopathy patients carrying mutations in Z-line proteins. Pros and cons of mouse models will be discussed and a future outlook will be given. J. Cell. Physiol. 232: 38-52, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Calculation of accurate small angle X-ray scattering curves from coarse-grained protein models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stovgaard Kasper

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Genome sequencing projects have expanded the gap between the amount of known protein sequences and structures. The limitations of current high resolution structure determination methods make it unlikely that this gap will disappear in the near future. Small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS is an established low resolution method for routinely determining the structure of proteins in solution. The purpose of this study is to develop a method for the efficient calculation of accurate SAXS curves from coarse-grained protein models. Such a method can for example be used to construct a likelihood function, which is paramount for structure determination based on statistical inference. Results We present a method for the efficient calculation of accurate SAXS curves based on the Debye formula and a set of scattering form factors for dummy atom representations of amino acids. Such a method avoids the computationally costly iteration over all atoms. We estimated the form factors using generated data from a set of high quality protein structures. No ad hoc scaling or correction factors are applied in the calculation of the curves. Two coarse-grained representations of protein structure were investigated; two scattering bodies per amino acid led to significantly better results than a single scattering body. Conclusion We show that the obtained point estimates allow the calculation of accurate SAXS curves from coarse-grained protein models. The resulting curves are on par with the current state-of-the-art program CRYSOL, which requires full atomic detail. Our method was also comparable to CRYSOL in recognizing native structures among native-like decoys. As a proof-of-concept, we combined the coarse-grained Debye calculation with a previously described probabilistic model of protein structure, TorusDBN. This resulted in a significant improvement in the decoy recognition performance. In conclusion, the presented method shows great promise for

  4. Classification of Beta-lactamases and penicillin binding proteins using ligand-centric network models.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hakime Öztürk

    Full Text Available β-lactamase mediated antibiotic resistance is an important health issue and the discovery of new β-lactam type antibiotics or β-lactamase inhibitors is an area of intense research. Today, there are about a thousand β-lactamases due to the evolutionary pressure exerted by these ligands. While β-lactamases hydrolyse the β-lactam ring of antibiotics, rendering them ineffective, Penicillin-Binding Proteins (PBPs, which share high structural similarity with β-lactamases, also confer antibiotic resistance to their host organism by acquiring mutations that allow them to continue their participation in cell wall biosynthesis. In this paper, we propose a novel approach to include ligand sharing information for classifying and clustering β-lactamases and PBPs in an effort to elucidate the ligand induced evolution of these β-lactam binding proteins. We first present a detailed summary of the β-lactamase and PBP families in the Protein Data Bank, as well as the compounds they bind to. Then, we build two different types of networks in which the proteins are represented as nodes, and two proteins are connected by an edge with a weight that depends on the number of shared identical or similar ligands. These models are analyzed under three different edge weight settings, namely unweighted, weighted, and normalized weighted. A detailed comparison of these six networks showed that the use of ligand sharing information to cluster proteins resulted in modules comprising proteins with not only sequence similarity but also functional similarity. Consideration of ligand similarity highlighted some interactions that were not detected in the identical ligand network. Analysing the β-lactamases and PBPs using ligand-centric network models enabled the identification of novel relationships, suggesting that these models can be used to examine other protein families to obtain information on their ligand induced evolutionary paths.

  5. Learning protein-DNA interaction landscapes by integrating experimental data through computational models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Jianling; Wasson, Todd; Hartemink, Alexander J

    2014-10-15

    Transcriptional regulation is directly enacted by the interactions between DNA and many proteins, including transcription factors (TFs), nucleosomes and polymerases. A critical step in deciphering transcriptional regulation is to infer, and eventually predict, the precise locations of these interactions, along with their strength and frequency. While recent datasets yield great insight into these interactions, individual data sources often provide only partial information regarding one aspect of the complete interaction landscape. For example, chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) reveals the binding positions of a protein, but only for one protein at a time. In contrast, nucleases like MNase and DNase can be used to reveal binding positions for many different proteins at once, but cannot easily determine the identities of those proteins. Currently, few statistical frameworks jointly model these different data sources to reveal an accurate, holistic view of the in vivo protein-DNA interaction landscape. Here, we develop a novel statistical framework that integrates different sources of experimental information within a thermodynamic model of competitive binding to jointly learn a holistic view of the in vivo protein-DNA interaction landscape. We show that our framework learns an interaction landscape with increased accuracy, explaining multiple sets of data in accordance with thermodynamic principles of competitive DNA binding. The resulting model of genomic occupancy provides a precise mechanistic vantage point from which to explore the role of protein-DNA interactions in transcriptional regulation. The C source code for compete and Python source code for MCMC-based inference are available at http://www.cs.duke.edu/∼amink. amink@cs.duke.edu Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  6. Analyses of simulations of three-dimensional lattice proteins in comparison with a simplified statistical mechanical model of protein folding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abe, H; Wako, H

    2006-07-01

    Folding and unfolding simulations of three-dimensional lattice proteins were analyzed using a simplified statistical mechanical model in which their amino acid sequences and native conformations were incorporated explicitly. Using this statistical mechanical model, under the assumption that only interactions between amino acid residues within a local structure in a native state are considered, the partition function of the system can be calculated for a given native conformation without any adjustable parameter. The simulations were carried out for two different native conformations, for each of which two foldable amino acid sequences were considered. The native and non-native contacts between amino acid residues occurring in the simulations were examined in detail and compared with the results derived from the theoretical model. The equilibrium thermodynamic quantities (free energy, enthalpy, entropy, and the probability of each amino acid residue being in the native state) at various temperatures obtained from the simulations and the theoretical model were also examined in order to characterize the folding processes that depend on the native conformations and the amino acid sequences. Finally, the free energy landscapes were discussed based on these analyses.

  7. Modelling small-angle scattering data from complex protein-lipid systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kynde, Søren Andreas Røssell

    geometric objects and the discrete approach were models are build from a large number of points. It is the basic hypothesis of this thesis, that analysis of smallangle scattering data can be approached in a way that combines the continuous and the discrete modelling methods, and that such an approach can...... the techniques very well suited for the study of the nanodisc system. Chapter 3 explains two different modelling approaches that can be used in the analysis of small-angle scattering data from lipid-protein complexes. These are the continuous approach where the system of interest is modelled as a few regular...... of bacteriorhodopsin and a continuous model of the nanodisc. The position and orientation of the membrane protein relative to the nanodisc is determined as well as the structural changes of the nanodisc. Paper II describes the use of the same approach to determine the relative position of a nanodisc and the membrane...

  8. Assessment and Challenges of Ligand Docking into Comparative Models of G-Protein Coupled Receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nguyen, E.D.; Meiler, J.; Norn, C.;

    2013-01-01

    The rapidly increasing number of high-resolution X-ray structures of G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) creates a unique opportunity to employ comparative modeling and docking to provide valuable insight into the function and ligand binding determinants of novel receptors, to assist in virtual...... screening and to design and optimize drug candidates. However, low sequence identity between receptors, conformational flexibility, and chemical diversity of ligands present an enormous challenge to molecular modeling approaches. It is our hypothesis that rapid Monte-Carlo sampling of protein backbone...

  9. A twist on folding: Predicting optimal sequences and optimal folds of simple protein models with the hidden-force algorithm

    CERN Document Server

    Kolossváry, István

    2012-01-01

    We propose a new way of looking at global optimization of off-lattice protein models. We present a dual optimization concept of predicting optimal sequences as well as optimal folds. We validate the utility of the recently introduced hidden-force Monte Carlo optimization algorithm by finding significantly lower energy folds for minimalist protein models than previously reported. Further, we also find the protein sequence that yields the lowest energy fold amongst all sequences for a given chain length and residue mixture. In particular, for protein models with a binary sequence, we show that the sequence-optimized folds form more compact cores than the lowest energy folds of the historically fixed, Fibonacci-series sequences of chain lengths of 13, 21, 34, 55, and 89. We emphasize that while the protein model we used is minimalist, the methodology is applicable to detailed protein models, and sequence optimization may yield novel folds and aid de novo protein design.

  10. Accurate De Novo Prediction of Protein Contact Map by Ultra-Deep Learning Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Sheng; Sun, Siqi; Li, Zhen; Zhang, Renyu; Xu, Jinbo

    2017-01-01

    Protein contacts contain key information for the understanding of protein structure and function and thus, contact prediction from sequence is an important problem. Recently exciting progress has been made on this problem, but the predicted contacts for proteins without many sequence homologs is still of low quality and not very useful for de novo structure prediction. This paper presents a new deep learning method that predicts contacts by integrating both evolutionary coupling (EC) and sequence conservation information through an ultra-deep neural network formed by two deep residual neural networks. The first residual network conducts a series of 1-dimensional convolutional transformation of sequential features; the second residual network conducts a series of 2-dimensional convolutional transformation of pairwise information including output of the first residual network, EC information and pairwise potential. By using very deep residual networks, we can accurately model contact occurrence patterns and complex sequence-structure relationship and thus, obtain higher-quality contact prediction regardless of how many sequence homologs are available for proteins in question. Our method greatly outperforms existing methods and leads to much more accurate contact-assisted folding. Tested on 105 CASP11 targets, 76 past CAMEO hard targets, and 398 membrane proteins, the average top L long-range prediction accuracy obtained by our method, one representative EC method CCMpred and the CASP11 winner MetaPSICOV is 0.47, 0.21 and 0.30, respectively; the average top L/10 long-range accuracy of our method, CCMpred and MetaPSICOV is 0.77, 0.47 and 0.59, respectively. Ab initio folding using our predicted contacts as restraints but without any force fields can yield correct folds (i.e., TMscore>0.6) for 203 of the 579 test proteins, while that using MetaPSICOV- and CCMpred-predicted contacts can do so for only 79 and 62 of them, respectively. Our contact-assisted models also have

  11. Accurate De Novo Prediction of Protein Contact Map by Ultra-Deep Learning Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhen; Zhang, Renyu

    2017-01-01

    Motivation Protein contacts contain key information for the understanding of protein structure and function and thus, contact prediction from sequence is an important problem. Recently exciting progress has been made on this problem, but the predicted contacts for proteins without many sequence homologs is still of low quality and not very useful for de novo structure prediction. Method This paper presents a new deep learning method that predicts contacts by integrating both evolutionary coupling (EC) and sequence conservation information through an ultra-deep neural network formed by two deep residual neural networks. The first residual network conducts a series of 1-dimensional convolutional transformation of sequential features; the second residual network conducts a series of 2-dimensional convolutional transformation of pairwise information including output of the first residual network, EC information and pairwise potential. By using very deep residual networks, we can accurately model contact occurrence patterns and complex sequence-structure relationship and thus, obtain higher-quality contact prediction regardless of how many sequence homologs are available for proteins in question. Results Our method greatly outperforms existing methods and leads to much more accurate contact-assisted folding. Tested on 105 CASP11 targets, 76 past CAMEO hard targets, and 398 membrane proteins, the average top L long-range prediction accuracy obtained by our method, one representative EC method CCMpred and the CASP11 winner MetaPSICOV is 0.47, 0.21 and 0.30, respectively; the average top L/10 long-range accuracy of our method, CCMpred and MetaPSICOV is 0.77, 0.47 and 0.59, respectively. Ab initio folding using our predicted contacts as restraints but without any force fields can yield correct folds (i.e., TMscore>0.6) for 203 of the 579 test proteins, while that using MetaPSICOV- and CCMpred-predicted contacts can do so for only 79 and 62 of them, respectively. Our contact

  12. Evaluation of protein-protein docking model structures using all-atom molecular dynamics simulations combined with the solution theory in the energy representation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takemura, Kazuhiro; Guo, Hao; Sakuraba, Shun; Matubayasi, Nobuyuki; Kitao, Akio

    2012-12-07

    We propose a method to evaluate binding free energy differences among distinct protein-protein complex model structures through all-atom molecular dynamics simulations in explicit water using the solution theory in the energy representation. Complex model structures are generated from a pair of monomeric structures using the rigid-body docking program ZDOCK. After structure refinement by side chain optimization and all-atom molecular dynamics simulations in explicit water, complex models are evaluated based on the sum of their conformational and solvation free energies, the latter calculated from the energy distribution functions obtained from relatively short molecular dynamics simulations of the complex in water and of pure water based on the solution theory in the energy representation. We examined protein-protein complex model structures of two protein-protein complex systems, bovine trypsin/CMTI-1 squash inhibitor (PDB ID: 1PPE) and RNase SA/barstar (PDB ID: 1AY7), for which both complex and monomer structures were determined experimentally. For each system, we calculated the energies for the crystal complex structure and twelve generated model structures including the model most similar to the crystal structure and very different from it. In both systems, the sum of the conformational and solvation free energies tended to be lower for the structure similar to the crystal. We concluded that our energy calculation method is useful for selecting low energy complex models similar to the crystal structure from among a set of generated models.

  13. Downregulation of 14-3-3 Proteins in a Kainic Acid-Induced Neurotoxicity Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smani, Danyal; Sarkar, Sumit; Raymick, James; Kanungo, Jyotshna; Paule, Merle G; Gu, Qiang

    2017-08-24

    The 14-3-3 proteins are among the most abundant proteins expressed in the brain, comprising about 1% of the total amount of soluble brain proteins. Through phosphoserine- and phosphothreonine-binding motifs, 14-3-3 proteins regulate many signaling proteins and cellular processes including cell death. In the present study, we utilized a well-known kainic acid (KA)-induced excitotoxicity rat model and examined the expression of 14-3-3 and its isoforms in the frontal cortex of KA-treated and control animals. Among the different 14-3-3 isoforms, abundant levels of eta and tau were detected in the frontal cortex, followed by sigma, epsilon, and gamma, while the expression levels of alpha/beta and zeta/delta isoforms were low. Compared to the control animals, KA treatment induced a significant downregulation of the overall 14-3-3 protein level as well as the levels of the abundant isoforms eta, tau, epsilon, and gamma. We also investigated two 14-3-3-interacting proteins that are involved in the cell death process: Bcl-2-associated X (BAX) and extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK). Both BAX and phosphorylated ERK showed increased levels following KA treatment. Together, these findings demonstrate an abundance of several 14-3-3 isoforms in the frontal cortex and that KA treatment can cause a downregulation of 14-3-3 expression and an upregulation of 14-3-3-interacting proteins BAX and phospho-ERK. Thus, downregulation of 14-3-3 proteins could be one of the early molecular events associated with excitotoxicity. This could lead to subsequent upregulation of 14-3-3-binding proteins such as BAX and phospho-ERK that contribute to further downstream apoptosis processes, eventually leading to cell death. Maintaining sufficient levels of 14-3-3 expression and function may become a target of therapeutic intervention for excitotoxicity-induced neurodegeneration.

  14. Classification of lung cancer tumors based on structural and physicochemical properties of proteins by bioinformatics models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosseinzadeh, Faezeh; Ebrahimi, Mansour; Goliaei, Bahram; Shamabadi, Narges

    2012-01-01

    Rapid distinction between small cell lung cancer (SCLC) and non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) tumors is very important in diagnosis of this disease. Furthermore sequence-derived structural and physicochemical descriptors are very useful for machine learning prediction of protein structural and functional classes, classifying proteins and the prediction performance. Herein, in this study is the classification of lung tumors based on 1497 attributes derived from structural and physicochemical properties of protein sequences (based on genes defined by microarray analysis) investigated through a combination of attribute weighting, supervised and unsupervised clustering algorithms. Eighty percent of the weighting methods selected features such as autocorrelation, dipeptide composition and distribution of hydrophobicity as the most important protein attributes in classification of SCLC, NSCLC and COMMON classes of lung tumors. The same results were observed by most tree induction algorithms while descriptors of hydrophobicity distribution were high in protein sequences COMMON in both groups and distribution of charge in these proteins was very low; showing COMMON proteins were very hydrophobic. Furthermore, compositions of polar dipeptide in SCLC proteins were higher than NSCLC proteins. Some clustering models (alone or in combination with attribute weighting algorithms) were able to nearly classify SCLC and NSCLC proteins. Random Forest tree induction algorithm, calculated on leaves one-out and 10-fold cross validation) shows more than 86% accuracy in clustering and predicting three different lung cancer tumors. Here for the first time the application of data mining tools to effectively classify three classes of lung cancer tumors regarding the importance of dipeptide composition, autocorrelation and distribution descriptor has been reported.

  15. Classification of lung cancer tumors based on structural and physicochemical properties of proteins by bioinformatics models.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Faezeh Hosseinzadeh

    Full Text Available Rapid distinction between small cell lung cancer (SCLC and non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC tumors is very important in diagnosis of this disease. Furthermore sequence-derived structural and physicochemical descriptors are very useful for machine learning prediction of protein structural and functional classes, classifying proteins and the prediction performance. Herein, in this study is the classification of lung tumors based on 1497 attributes derived from structural and physicochemical properties of protein sequences (based on genes defined by microarray analysis investigated through a combination of attribute weighting, supervised and unsupervised clustering algorithms. Eighty percent of the weighting methods selected features such as autocorrelation, dipeptide composition and distribution of hydrophobicity as the most important protein attributes in classification of SCLC, NSCLC and COMMON classes of lung tumors. The same results were observed by most tree induction algorithms while descriptors of hydrophobicity distribution were high in protein sequences COMMON in both groups and distribution of charge in these proteins was very low; showing COMMON proteins were very hydrophobic. Furthermore, compositions of polar dipeptide in SCLC proteins were higher than NSCLC proteins. Some clustering models (alone or in combination with attribute weighting algorithms were able to nearly classify SCLC and NSCLC proteins. Random Forest tree induction algorithm, calculated on leaves one-out and 10-fold cross validation shows more than 86% accuracy in clustering and predicting three different lung cancer tumors. Here for the first time the application of data mining tools to effectively classify three classes of lung cancer tumors regarding the importance of dipeptide composition, autocorrelation and distribution descriptor has been reported.

  16. Dystropathology increases energy expenditure and protein turnover in the mdx mouse model of duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hannah G Radley-Crabb

    Full Text Available The skeletal muscles in Duchenne muscular dystrophy and the mdx mouse model lack functional dystrophin and undergo repeated bouts of necrosis, regeneration, and growth. These processes have a high metabolic cost. However, the consequences for whole body energy and protein metabolism, and on the dietary requirements for these macronutrients at different stages of the disease, are not well-understood. This study used juvenile (4- to 5- wk-old and adult (12- to 14-wk-old male dystrophic C57BL/10ScSn-mdx/J and age-matched C57BL/10ScSn/J control male mice to measure total and resting energy expenditure, food intake, spontaneous activity, body composition, whole body protein turnover, and muscle protein synthesis rates. In juvenile mdx mice that have extensive muscle damage, energy expenditure, muscle protein synthesis, and whole body protein turnover rates were higher than in age-matched controls. Adaptations in food intake and decreased activity were insufficient to meet the increased energy and protein needs of juvenile mdx mice and resulted in stunted growth. In (non-growing adult mdx mice with less severe dystropathology, energy expenditure, muscle protein synthesis, and whole body protein turnover rates were also higher than in age-matched controls. Food intake was sufficient to meet their protein and energy needs, but insufficient to result in fat deposition. These data show that dystropathology impacts the protein and energy needs of mdx mice and that tailored dietary interventions are necessary to redress this imbalance. If not met, the resultant imbalance blunts growth, and may limit the benefits of therapies designed to protect and repair dystrophic muscles.

  17. Dystropathology increases energy expenditure and protein turnover in the mdx mouse model of duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radley-Crabb, Hannah G; Marini, Juan C; Sosa, Horacio A; Castillo, Liliana I; Grounds, Miranda D; Fiorotto, Marta L

    2014-01-01

    The skeletal muscles in Duchenne muscular dystrophy and the mdx mouse model lack functional dystrophin and undergo repeated bouts of necrosis, regeneration, and growth. These processes have a high metabolic cost. However, the consequences for whole body energy and protein metabolism, and on the dietary requirements for these macronutrients at different stages of the disease, are not well-understood. This study used juvenile (4- to 5- wk-old) and adult (12- to 14-wk-old) male dystrophic C57BL/10ScSn-mdx/J and age-matched C57BL/10ScSn/J control male mice to measure total and resting energy expenditure, food intake, spontaneous activity, body composition, whole body protein turnover, and muscle protein synthesis rates. In juvenile mdx mice that have extensive muscle damage, energy expenditure, muscle protein synthesis, and whole body protein turnover rates were higher than in age-matched controls. Adaptations in food intake and decreased activity were insufficient to meet the increased energy and protein needs of juvenile mdx mice and resulted in stunted growth. In (non-growing) adult mdx mice with less severe dystropathology, energy expenditure, muscle protein synthesis, and whole body protein turnover rates were also higher than in age-matched controls. Food intake was sufficient to meet their protein and energy needs, but insufficient to result in fat deposition. These data show that dystropathology impacts the protein and energy needs of mdx mice and that tailored dietary interventions are necessary to redress this imbalance. If not met, the resultant imbalance blunts growth, and may limit the benefits of therapies designed to protect and repair dystrophic muscles.

  18. A Remark on Contact Hypersurfaces of a Complex Hyperbolic Space

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    许志才

    1993-01-01

    A differentiable manifold is said to be contact if it admits a linear functional f on the tangent bundle satisfying f∧ (df)n-1≠0.This remark obtain the following the classification:Let M be a complete connected contact hyper-surface of CH2(-4),then M is congruent to one of the following:(i) A tube of redius r>0 around a totally geodesic,totally real hyperbolic space form H2(-1);(ii)A tube of radius r>0 around a totally geodesic complex hyperbolic space form CH1(-4);(iii)A geodesic hypersphere of radius r>0,or(iv)A horosphere.

  19. Charles Hard Townes: Remarkable Scientist and Inspiring Teacher

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldsmith, P. F.

    2016-05-01

    Charles Townes is renowned for his work elucidating the structure of molecules through microwave spectroscopy and for his invention of the maser and the laser. He also had a lifelong interest in astronomy, and in the later portion of his remarkable and long career devoted himself to astronomical research, pioneering the study of molecules in interstellar space and the development of infrared spectroscopy, first from the ground and then from airborne facilities. His interest in high angular resolution, as well as high spectral resolution observations, led to development of the first infrared spatial interferometer employing coherent signal processing techniques. In this short review I will only touch on some of Townes' many scientific contributions, concentrating on astronomy, and will also give some personal thoughts about how he inspired students in their research, helping to make the "Townes Group" at the University of California, Berkeley, an ideal environment in which to start a career in research.

  20. Hippocampal expression of synaptic structural proteins and phosphorylated cAMP response element-binding protein in a rat model of vascular dementia induced by chronic cerebral hypoperfusion

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hui Zhao; Zhiyong Li; Yali Wang; Qiuxia Zhang

    2012-01-01

    The present study established a rat model of vascular dementia induced by chronic cerebral hy-poperfusion through permanent ligation of bilateral common carotid arteries. At 60 days after mod-eling, escape latency and swimming path length during hidden-platform acquisition training in Morris water maze significantly increased in the model group. In addition, the number of accurate crossings over the original platform significantly decreased, hippocampal CA1 synaptophysin and growth-associated protein 43 expression significantly decreased, cAMP response element-binding protein expression remained unchanged, and phosphorylated cAMP response element-binding protein expression significantly decreased. Results suggested that abnormal expression of hippo-campal synaptic structural protein and cAMP response element-binding protein phosphorylation played a role in cognitive impairment following chronic cerebral hypoperfusion.

  1. The Social Interplay of Disciplinarity and Interdisciplinarity. Some Introductory Remarks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reinhold Hedtke

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Social Science Education as a subject field in schools is an intrinsic pluridisciplinary feature, whatever disciplines are included, however it may be organised and wherever it may be institutionalised. Civic education, economic education, social education and historical education each comprise several academic disciplines even if they are thought to be completely independent subjects. From the start on, disciplinarity and interdisciplinarity are on the agenda for any subject related to social science education and are one of its main problems. For these introductory remarks interdisciplinarity can be simply defined as relating two or more academic disciplines or school subjects to each other if this is done in a purposeful, systematic, explicit and reflective way. The overarching goal is to improve education that is to enhance students' understandings of the worlds and their abilities to act within and towards them. A relationship between disciplines or subjects which misses one or more of the four characteristics can be called pluridisciplinary or multidisciplinary (cf. Audigier 2006. In the following I first want to discuss some aspects of disciplinarity and interdisciplinarity at schools and at universities and the weakness of interdisciplinarity. I sketch some social science based ideas on the interrelationship between the subject structure of the academic world and the world of schools (3. and of some tendency to commonalities or even unification of social sciences and related competencies (4.. I conclude with some remarks on different kinds of knowledge (5.. Last but not least, I'll give an overview on the papers in this issue of the Journal of Social Science Education (6..

  2. Critical analysis of the successes and failures of homology models of G protein-coupled receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharya, Supriyo; Lam, Alfonso Ramon; Li, Hubert; Balaraman, Gouthaman; Niesen, Michiel Jacobus Maria; Vaidehi, Nagarajan

    2013-05-01

    We present a critical assessment of the performance of our homology model refinement method for G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs), called LITICon that led to top ranking structures in a recent structure prediction assessment GPCRDOCK2010. GPCRs form the largest class of drug targets for which only a few crystal structures are currently available. Therefore, accurate homology models are essential for drug design in these receptors. We submitted five models each for human chemokine CXCR4 (bound to small molecule IT1t and peptide CVX15) and dopamine D3DR (bound to small molecule eticlopride) before the crystal structures were published. Our models in both CXCR4/IT1t and D3/eticlopride assessments were ranked first and second, respectively, by ligand RMSD to the crystal structures. For both receptors, we developed two types of protein models: homology models based on known GPCR crystal structures, and ab initio models based on the prediction method MembStruk. The homology-based models compared better to the crystal structures than the ab initio models. However, a robust refinement procedure for obtaining high accuracy structures is needed. We demonstrate that optimization of the helical tilt, rotation, and translation is vital for GPCR homology model refinement. As a proof of concept, our in-house refinement program LITiCon captured the distinct orientation of TM2 in CXCR4, which differs from that of adrenoreceptors. These findings would be critical for refining GPCR homology models in future. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. JiffyNet: a web-based instant protein network modeler for newly sequenced species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Eiru; Kim, Hanhae; Lee, Insuk

    2013-07-01

    Revolutionary DNA sequencing technology has enabled affordable genome sequencing for numerous species. Thousands of species already have completely decoded genomes, and tens of thousands more are in progress. Naturally, parallel expansion of the functional parts list library is anticipated, yet genome-level understanding of function also requires maps of functional relationships, such as functional protein networks. Such networks have been constructed for many sequenced species including common model organisms. Nevertheless, the majority of species with sequenced genomes still have no protein network models available. Moreover, biologists might want to obtain protein networks for their species of interest on completion of the genome projects. Therefore, there is high demand for accessible means to automatically construct genome-scale protein networks based on sequence information from genome projects only. Here, we present a public web server, JiffyNet, specifically designed to instantly construct genome-scale protein networks based on associalogs (functional associations transferred from a template network by orthology) for a query species with only protein sequences provided. Assessment of the networks by JiffyNet demonstrated generally high predictive ability for pathway annotations. Furthermore, JiffyNet provides network visualization and analysis pages for wide variety of molecular concepts to facilitate network-guided hypothesis generation. JiffyNet is freely accessible at http://www.jiffynet.org.

  4. Disulfide Connectivity Prediction Based on Modelled Protein 3D Structural Information and Random Forest Regression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Dong-Jun; Li, Yang; Hu, Jun; Yang, Xibei; Yang, Jing-Yu; Shen, Hong-Bin

    2015-01-01

    Disulfide connectivity is an important protein structural characteristic. Accurately predicting disulfide connectivity solely from protein sequence helps to improve the intrinsic understanding of protein structure and function, especially in the post-genome era where large volume of sequenced proteins without being functional annotated is quickly accumulated. In this study, a new feature extracted from the predicted protein 3D structural information is proposed and integrated with traditional features to form discriminative features. Based on the extracted features, a random forest regression model is performed to predict protein disulfide connectivity. We compare the proposed method with popular existing predictors by performing both cross-validation and independent validation tests on benchmark datasets. The experimental results demonstrate the superiority of the proposed method over existing predictors. We believe the superiority of the proposed method benefits from both the good discriminative capability of the newly developed features and the powerful modelling capability of the random forest. The web server implementation, called TargetDisulfide, and the benchmark datasets are freely available at: http://csbio.njust.edu.cn/bioinf/TargetDisulfide for academic use.

  5. Change detection in the dynamics of an intracellular protein synthesis model using nonlinear Kalman filtering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rigatos, Gerasimos G; Rigatou, Efthymia G; Djida, Jean Daniel

    2015-10-01

    A method for early diagnosis of parametric changes in intracellular protein synthesis models (e.g. the p53 protein - mdm2 inhibitor model) is developed with the use of a nonlinear Kalman Filtering approach (Derivative-free nonlinear Kalman Filter) and of statistical change detection methods. The intracellular protein synthesis dynamic model is described by a set of coupled nonlinear differential equations. It is shown that such a dynamical system satisfies differential flatness properties and this allows to transform it, through a change of variables (diffeomorphism), to the so-called linear canonical form. For the linearized equivalent of the dynamical system, state estimation can be performed using the Kalman Filter recursion. Moreover, by applying an inverse transformation based on the previous diffeomorphism it becomes also possible to obtain estimates of the state variables of the initial nonlinear model. By comparing the output of the Kalman Filter (which is assumed to correspond to the undistorted dynamical model) with measurements obtained from the monitored protein synthesis system, a sequence of differences (residuals) is obtained. The statistical processing of the residuals with the use of x2 change detection tests, can provide indication within specific confidence intervals about parametric changes in the considered biological system and consequently indications about the appearance of specific diseases (e.g. malignancies).

  6. Megalin and cubilin in proximal tubule protein reabsorption: from experimental models to human disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielsen, Rikke; Christensen, Erik Ilsø; Birn, Henrik

    2016-01-01

    Proximal tubule protein uptake is mediated by 2 receptors, megalin and cubilin. These receptors rescue a variety of filtered ligands, including biomarkers, essential vitamins, and hormones. Receptor gene knockout animal models have identified important functions of the receptors and have established their essential role in modulating urinary protein excretion. Rare genetic syndromes associated with dysfunction of these receptors have been identified and characterized, providing additional information on the importance of these receptors in humans. Using various disease models in combination with receptor gene knockout, the implications of receptor dysfunction in acute and chronic kidney injury have been explored and have pointed to potential new roles of these receptors. Based on data from animal models, this paper will review current knowledge on proximal tubule endocytic receptor function and regulation, and their role in renal development, protein reabsorption, albumin uptake, and normal renal physiology. These findings have implications for the pathophysiology and diagnosis of proteinuric renal diseases. We will examine the limitations of the different models and compare the findings to phenotypic observations in inherited human disorders associated with receptor dysfunction. Furthermore, evidence from receptor knockout mouse models as well as human observations suggesting a role of protein receptors for renal disease will be discussed in light of conditions such as chronic kidney disease, diabetes, and hypertension.

  7. Modeling grain protein formation in relation to nitrogen uptake and remobilization in rice plant

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHU Yan; LI Weiguo; JING Qi; CAO Weixing; Takeshi Horie

    2007-01-01

    Protein concentration of grain is an important quality index of rice,and formation of grain protein largely depends on pre-anthesis nitrogen assimilation and postanthesis nitrogen remobilization in the rice plant.The primary objective of this study was to develop a simplified process model for simulating nitrogen accumulation and remobilization in plant and protein formation in rice grains on the basis of an established rice growth model.Six field experiments,involving different years,eco-sites,varieties,nitrogen rates,and irrigation regimes,were conducted to obtain the necessary data for model building,genotypic parameter determination,and model validation.Using physiological development time(PDT)as general time scale of development progress and cultivar-specific grain protein concentration as genotypic parameter,the dynamic relationships of plant nitrogen accumulation and translocation to environmental and genetic factors were quantified and synthesized in the present model.The pre-anthesis nitrogen uptake rate by plant changed with the PDT in a negative exponential pattern,and post-anthesis nitrogen uptake rate changed with leaf area index(LA1)in an exponential equation.Post-antbesis nitrogen translocation rate depended on the plant nitrogen concentration and dry weight at anthesis as well as residue nitrogen concentration of plant at maturity.The nitrogen for protein synthesis in grains came from two sources:the nitrogen pre-stored in leaves,stem and sheath before anthesis and then remobilized after anthesis,and the nitrogen absorbed directly by plant after anthesis.Finally,the model was tested by using the data sets of different years,eco-sites,varieties,and N fertilization and irrigation conditions with the root mean square errors(RMSE)0.22%-0.26%,indicating the general and reliable features of the model.It is hoped that by properly integrating with the existing rice growth models,the present model can be used for predicting grain protein concentration and

  8. Interaction of S-layer proteins of Lactobacillus kefir with model membranes and cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hollmann, Axel; Delfederico, Lucrecia; Santos, Nuno Correia; Disalvo, E Anibal; Semorile, Liliana

    2017-01-12

    In previous works, it was shown that S-layer proteins from Lactobacillus kefir were able to recrystallize and stabilize liposomes, this feature reveling a great potential for developing liposomal-based carriers. Despite previous studies on this subject are important milestones, a number of questions remain unanswered; In this context, the feasibility of S-layer proteins as a biomaterial for drug delivery was evaluated in this work. First, S-layer proteins were fully characterized by Electron microscopy, 2D-electrophoresis, and HPAEC-PAD. Afterward, interactions of S-layer proteins with model lipid membranes were evaluated, showing that proteins adsorb to the lipid surface following a non-fickean or anomalous diffusion, when positively charged lipid were employed, suggesting that electrostatic interaction is a key factor in the recrystallization process on these proteins. Finally, the interaction of S-layer coated liposomes with CACO-2 cell line was assessed, First cytotoxicity of formulations was tested showing noncytotoxic effects in S-layer coated vesicles. Second, by flow cytometry, it was observed an increased ability to transfer cargo molecules into CACO-2 cells from S-layer coated liposomes in comparison to control ones. All data put together, supporting the idea that a combination of adhesive properties of S-layer proteins concomitant with higher stability of S-layer coated liposomes represents an exciting starting point in the development of new drug carriers.

  9. Unbiased Quantitative Models of Protein Translation Derived from Ribosome Profiling Data.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexey A Gritsenko

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Translation of RNA to protein is a core process for any living organism. While for some steps of this process the effect on protein production is understood, a holistic understanding of translation still remains elusive. In silico modelling is a promising approach for elucidating the process of protein synthesis. Although a number of computational models of the process have been proposed, their application is limited by the assumptions they make. Ribosome profiling (RP, a relatively new sequencing-based technique capable of recording snapshots of the locations of actively translating ribosomes, is a promising source of information for deriving unbiased data-driven translation models. However, quantitative analysis of RP data is challenging due to high measurement variance and the inability to discriminate between the number of ribosomes measured on a gene and their speed of translation. We propose a solution in the form of a novel multi-scale interpretation of RP data that allows for deriving models with translation dynamics extracted from the snapshots. We demonstrate the usefulness of this approach by simultaneously determining for the first time per-codon translation elongation and per-gene translation initiation rates of Saccharomyces cerevisiae from RP data for two versions of the Totally Asymmetric Exclusion Process (TASEP model of translation. We do this in an unbiased fashion, by fitting the models using only RP data with a novel optimization scheme based on Monte Carlo simulation to keep the problem tractable. The fitted models match the data significantly better than existing models and their predictions show better agreement with several independent protein abundance datasets than existing models. Results additionally indicate that the tRNA pool adaptation hypothesis is incomplete, with evidence suggesting that tRNA post-transcriptional modifications and codon context may play a role in determining codon elongation rates.

  10. Unbiased Quantitative Models of Protein Translation Derived from Ribosome Profiling Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gritsenko, Alexey A; Hulsman, Marc; Reinders, Marcel J T; de Ridder, Dick

    2015-08-01

    Translation of RNA to protein is a core process for any living organism. While for some steps of this process the effect on protein production is understood, a holistic understanding of translation still remains elusive. In silico modelling is a promising approach for elucidating the process of protein synthesis. Although a number of computational models of the process have been proposed, their application is limited by the assumptions they make. Ribosome profiling (RP), a relatively new sequencing-based technique capable of recording snapshots of the locations of actively translating ribosomes, is a promising source of information for deriving unbiased data-driven translation models. However, quantitative analysis of RP data is challenging due to high measurement variance and the inability to discriminate between the number of ribosomes measured on a gene and their speed of translation. We propose a solution in the form of a novel multi-scale interpretation of RP data that allows for deriving models with translation dynamics extracted from the snapshots. We demonstrate the usefulness of this approach by simultaneously determining for the first time per-codon translation elongation and per-gene translation initiation rates of Saccharomyces cerevisiae from RP data for two versions of the Totally Asymmetric Exclusion Process (TASEP) model of translation. We do this in an unbiased fashion, by fitting the models using only RP data with a novel optimization scheme based on Monte Carlo simulation to keep the problem tractable. The fitted models match the data significantly better than existing models and their predictions show better agreement with several independent protein abundance datasets than existing models. Results additionally indicate that the tRNA pool adaptation hypothesis is incomplete, with evidence suggesting that tRNA post-transcriptional modifications and codon context may play a role in determining codon elongation rates.

  11. Molecular modeling of the conformational dynamics of the cellular prion protein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Charles; Colling, Ian; Bartz, Jason; Soto, Patricia

    2014-03-01

    Prions are infectious agents responsible for transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSEs), a type of fatal neurodegenerative disease in mammals. Prions propagate biological information by conversion of the non-pathological version of the prion protein to the infectious conformation, PrPSc. A wealth of knowledge has shed light on the nature and mechanism of prion protein conversion. In spite of the significance of this problem, we are far from fully understanding the conformational dynamics of the cellular isoform. To remedy this situation we employ multiple biomolecular modeling techniques such as docking and molecular dynamics simulations to map the free energy landscape and determine what specific regions of the prion protein are most conductive to binding. The overall goal is to characterize the conformational dynamics of the cell form of the prion protein, PrPc, to gain insight into inhibition pathways against misfolding. NE EPSCoR FIRST Award to Patricia Soto.

  12. Folding of small knotted proteins: Insights from a mean field coarse-grained model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Najafi, Saeed; Potestio, Raffaello, E-mail: potestio@mpip-mainz.mpg.de [Max Planck Institute for Polymer Research, Ackermannweg 10, 55128 Mainz (Germany)

    2015-12-28

    A small but relevant number of proteins whose native structure is known features nontrivial topology, i.e., they are knotted. Understanding the process of folding from a swollen unknotted state to the biologically relevant native conformation is, for these proteins, particularly difficult, due to their rate-limiting topological entanglement. To shed some light into this conundrum, we introduced a structure-based coarse-grained model of the protein, where the information about the folded conformation is encoded in bonded angular interactions only, which do not favor the formation of native contacts. A stochastic search scheme in parameter space is employed to identify a set of interactions that maximizes the probability to attain the knotted state. The optimal knotting pathways of the two smallest knotted proteins, obtained through this approach, are consistent with the results derived by means of coarse-grained as well as full atomistic simulations.

  13. The role of protein content on the steady and oscillatory shear rheology of model synovial fluids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Z; Barman, S; Christopher, G F

    2014-08-28

    Recent studies have debated the role of protein content on the bulk rheology of synovial fluid; in particular, it has been questioned if proteins aggregate or interact with hyaluronic acid in synovial fluid to enhance bulk rheology, or if observed effects were due to systematic measurement error caused by interfacial rheology, stemming from protein adsorption to the interface. Utilizing several techniques to ensure results reflect only bulk rheology, an examination of the role of bovine serum albumin and γ-globulin on model synovial fluid rheology has been undertaken. When interfacial rheology caused by protein adsorption to the interface is abrogated, the bulk rheology of a model synovial fluid composed of bovine serum albumin, γ-globulin, and hyaluronic acid is found to be dominated solely by the hyaluronic acid over a wide range of shear rates, strains and frequencies. These results show that the previously reported enhanced rheological properties of model synovial fluids are solely due to interfacial rheology and not from any type of protein aggregation/interaction in bulk solution.

  14. Modeling of the structure of ribosomal protein L1 from the archaeon Haloarcula marismortui

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nevskaya, N. A.; Kljashtorny, V. G.; Vakhrusheva, A. V.; Garber, M. B.; Nikonov, S. V.

    2017-07-01

    The halophilic archaeon Haloarcula marismortui proliferates in the Dead Sea at extremely high salt concentrations (higher than 3 M). This is the only archaeon, for which the crystal structure of the ribosomal 50S subunit was determined. However, the structure of the functionally important side protuberance containing the abnormally negatively charged protein L1 (HmaL1) was not visualized. Attempts to crystallize HmaL1 in the isolated state or as its complex with RNA using normal salt concentrations (≤500 mM) failed. A theoretical model of HmaL1 was built based on the structural data for homologs of the protein L1 from other organisms, and this model was refined by molecular dynamics methods. Analysis of this model showed that the protein HmaL1 can undergo aggregation due to the presence of a cluster of positive charges unique for proteins L1. This cluster is located at the RNA-protein interface, which interferes with the crystallization of HmaL1 and the binding of the latter to RNA.

  15. Homology modeling of nematode Caenorhabditis elegans CED3 protein-inhibitor complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azim, M K; Grossmann, J G; Zaidi, Z H

    2001-02-16

    CED3 protein, the product of a gene necessary for programmed cell death in the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans, is related to a highly specific cysteine protease family i.e., caspases. A tertiary-structural model has been constructed of a complex of the CED3 protein with tetrapeptide-aldehyde inhibitor, Ac-DEVD-CHO. The conformation of CED3 protein active site and the general binding features of inhibitor residues are similar to those observed in other caspases. The loop segment (Phe380-Pro387) binds with the P4 Asp in a different fashion compared to caspase-3. The comparative modeling of active sites from caspase-3 and CED3 protein indicated that although these enzymes require Asp at the position P4, variation could occur in the binding of this residue at the S4 subsite. This model allowed the definition of substrate specificity of CED3 protein from the structural standpoint and provided insight in designing of mutants for structure-function studies of this classical caspase homologue.

  16. A comparison of different functions for predicted protein model quality assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Juan; Fang, Huisheng

    2016-07-01

    In protein structure prediction, a considerable number of models are usually produced by either the Template-Based Method (TBM) or the ab initio prediction. The purpose of this study is to find the critical parameter in assessing the quality of the predicted models. A non-redundant template library was developed and 138 target sequences were modeled. The target sequences were all distant from the proteins in the template library and were aligned with template library proteins on the basis of the transformation matrix. The quality of each model was first assessed with QMEAN and its six parameters, which are C_β interaction energy (C_beta), all-atom pairwise energy (PE), solvation energy (SE), torsion angle energy (TAE), secondary structure agreement (SSA), and solvent accessibility agreement (SAE). Finally, the alignment score (score) was also used to assess the quality of model. Hence, a total of eight parameters ( i.e., QMEAN, C_beta, PE, SE, TAE, SSA, SAE, score) were independently used to assess the quality of each model. The results indicate that SSA is the best parameter to estimate the quality of the model.

  17. Refinement of protein structure homology models via long, all-atom molecular dynamics simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raval, Alpan; Piana, Stefano; Eastwood, Michael P; Dror, Ron O; Shaw, David E

    2012-08-01

    Accurate computational prediction of protein structure represents a longstanding challenge in molecular biology and structure-based drug design. Although homology modeling techniques are widely used to produce low-resolution models, refining these models to high resolution has proven difficult. With long enough simulations and sufficiently accurate force fields, molecular dynamics (MD) simulations should in principle allow such refinement, but efforts to refine homology models using MD have for the most part yielded disappointing results. It has thus far been unclear whether MD-based refinement is limited primarily by accessible simulation timescales, force field accuracy, or both. Here, we examine MD as a technique for homology model refinement using all-atom simulations, each at least 100 μs long-more than 100 times longer than previous refinement simulations-and a physics-based force field that was recently shown to successfully fold a structurally diverse set of fast-folding proteins. In MD simulations of 24 proteins chosen from the refinement category of recent Critical Assessment of Structure Prediction (CASP) experiments, we find that in most cases, simulations initiated from homology models drift away from the native structure. Comparison with simulations initiated from the native structure suggests that force field accuracy is the primary factor limiting MD-based refinement. This problem can be mitigated to some extent by restricting sampling to the neighborhood of the initial model, leading to structural improvement that, while limited, is roughly comparable to the leading alternative methods.

  18. Mathematical model using non-uniform flow distribution for dynamic protein breakthrough with membrane adsorption media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneiderman, Steven; Varadaraju, Hemanthram; Zhang, Lifeng; Fong, Hao; Menkhaus, Todd J

    2011-12-23

    A mathematical model has been investigated to predict protein breakthrough during membrane adsorption/chromatography operations. The new model incorporates a non-uniform boundary condition at the column inlet to help describe the deviation from plug flow within real membrane adsorption devices. The model provides estimated breakthrough profiles of a binding protein while explicitly accounting for non-uniform flow at the inlet of the separation operation by modeling the flow distribution by a polynomial. We have explored experimental breakthrough curves produced using commercial membrane adsorption devices, as well as novel adsorption media of nanolayered nanofiber membranes, and compare