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Sample records for model oblate jellyfish

  1. Algebraic model of an oblate top

    CERN Document Server

    Bijker, R

    1996-01-01

    We consider an algebraic treatment of a three-body system. In particular, we develop the formalism for a system of three identical objects and discuss an application to nonstrange baryon resonances which are interpreted as vibrational and rotational excitations of an oblate symmetric top. We derive closed expressions for a set of elementary form factors that appear in the calculation of both electromagnetic, strong and weak couplings of baryons.

  2. Mass transfer inside oblate spheroidal solids: modelling and simulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. E. F. Carmo

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available A numerical solution of the unsteady diffusion equation describing mass transfer inside oblate spheroids, considering a constant diffusion coefficient and the convective boundary condition, is presented. The diffusion equation written in the oblate spheroidal coordinate system was used for a two-dimensional case. The finite-volume method was employed to discretize the basic equation. The linear equation set was solved iteratively using the Gauss-Seidel method. As applications, the effects of the Fourier number, the Biot number and the aspect ratio of the body on the drying rate and moisture content during the process are presented. To validate the methodology, results obtained in this work are compared with analytical results of the moisture content encountered in the literature and good agreement was obtained. The results show that the model is consistent and it may be used to solve cases such as those that include disks and spheres and/or those with variable properties with small modifications.

  3. A fluid mechanical model for current-generating-feeding jellyfish

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Jifeng; Dabiri, John

    2008-11-01

    Many jellyfish species, e.g. moon jellyfish Aurelia aurita, use body motion to generate fluid currents which carry their prey to the vicinity of their capture appendages. In this study, a model was developed to understand the fluid mechanics for this current-generating-feeding mode of jellyfish. The flow generated by free-swimming Aurelia aurita was measured using digital particle image velocimetry. The dynamics of prey (e.g., brine shrimp Artemia) in the flow field were described by a modified Maxey-Riley equation which takes into consideration the inertia of prey and the escape forces, which prey exert in the presence of predator. A Lagrangian analysis was used to identify the region of the flow in which prey can be captured by the jellyfish and the clearance rate was quantified. The study provides a new methodology to study biological current-generating-feeding and the transport and mixing of particles in fluid flow in general.

  4. Optimal stroke patterns for a model jellyfish swimmer with thin, flexible body

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Jifeng; Dabiri, John

    2007-11-01

    In this study, a numerical model is built to simulate swimming of oblate jellyfish (e.g. Aurelia aurita). The model swimmer is a thin, axisymmetric circular plate which is flexible and is able to deform, mimicking contraction and relaxation of a jellyfish. Using body deformation, the swimmer is able to swim by shedding vortices into fluid wake. A prescribed body motion extracted from a free-swimming Aurelia aurita is applied to the swimmer. The induced vortex wake is solved by a vortex sheet method and is compared with the wake of the free-swimming Aurelia aurita measured by PIV. The stoke pattern of the swimmer is optimized for minimal cost of locomotion. The body kinematics are parameterized and cost of locomotion is calculated from simulation using the vortex sheet method. A surrogate management framework is used as the optimization scheme. The vortex wake induced by the optimal stroke pattern is investigated to identify the characteristics of the wake which enhance swimming performance.

  5. Ephyra jellyfish as a new model for ecotoxicological bioassays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faimali, M; Garaventa, F; Piazza, V; Costa, E; Greco, G; Mazzola, V; Beltrandi, M; Bongiovanni, E; Lavorano, S; Gnone, G

    2014-02-01

    The aim of this study was a preliminary investigation on the possibility of using the ephyra of Scyphozoan jellyfish Aurelia aurita (Linnaeus, 1758), the common moon jellyfish, as an innovative model organism in marine ecotoxicology. A series of sequential experiments have been carried out in laboratory in order to investigate the influence of different culturing and methodological parameters (temperature, photoperiod, ephyrae density and age) on behavioural end-points (% of Frequency of Pulsations) and standardize a testing protocol. After that, the organisms have been exposed to two well known reference toxic compounds (Cadmium Nitrate and SDS) in order to analyse the acute and behavioural responses during static exposure. Results of this work indicate that the proposed behavioural end-point, frequency of pulsations (Fp), is an easily measurable one and can be used coupled with an acute one (immobilization) and that ephyrae of jellyfish are very promising model organisms for ecotoxicological investigation.

  6. Modeling jellyfish Pelagia noctiluca transport and stranding in the Ligurian Sea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berline, L; Zakardjian, B; Molcard, A; Ourmières, Y; Guihou, K

    2013-05-15

    Jellyfish blooms are generally attributed to a biological response to the environment, neglecting the role of transport patterns in redistributing existing populations. Here, we use high-resolution (1.25km) ocean modeling to examine the role of transport in the onshore arrival and abundance of the pelagic stinging jellyfish Pelagia noctiluca on the Ligurian Sea coast. Jellyfish are modeled as Lagrangian particles with a 0-300-m diel vertical migration typical of P. noctiluca. Over the course of a year, onshore arrivals are not restricted to the summer. Arrivals are concentrated at capes, but abundance can reach maxima in bays and in the lee of capes. Two factors impact jellyfish arrivals at the coast: the position of the Northern Current and the wind. A comparison of summer 2006 and available onshore jellyfish observations suggests a correct capture of the main stranding events by the model. These results have implications for understanding long-term fluctuations.

  7. Bifurcation Diagrams and Generalized Bifurcation Diagrams for a rotational model of an oblate satellite

    CERN Document Server

    Tarnopolski, Mariusz

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents bifurcation and generalized bifurcation diagrams for a rotational model of an oblate satellite. Special attention is paid to parameter values describing one of Saturn's moons, Hyperion. For various oblateness the largest Lyapunov Characteristic Exponent (LCE) is plotted. The largest LCE in the initial condition as well as in the mixed parameter-initial condition space exhibits a fractal structure, for which the fractal dimension was calculated. It results from the bifurcation diagrams of which most of the parameter values for preselected initial conditions lead to chaotic rotation. The First Recurrence Time (FRT) diagram provides an explanation of the birth of chaos and the existence of quasi-periodic windows occuring in the bifurcation diagrams.

  8. Observed changes in the Earth's dynamic oblateness from GRACE data and geophysical models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Y; Ditmar, P; Riva, R

    A new methodology is proposed to estimate changes in the Earth's dynamic oblateness ([Formula: see text] or equivalently, [Formula: see text]) on a monthly basis. The algorithm uses monthly Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) gravity solutions, an ocean bottom pressure model and a glacial isostatic adjustment (GIA) model. The resulting time series agree remarkably well with a solution based on satellite laser ranging (SLR) data. Seasonal variations of the obtained time series show little sensitivity to the choice of GRACE solutions. Reducing signal leakage in coastal areas when dealing with GRACE data and accounting for self-attraction and loading effects when dealing with water redistribution in the ocean is crucial in achieving close agreement with the SLR-based solution in terms of de-trended solutions. The obtained trend estimates, on the other hand, may be less accurate due to their dependence on the GIA models, which still carry large uncertainties.

  9. Protective effects of batimastat against hemorrhagic injuries in delayed jellyfish envenomation syndrome models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Beilei; Liu, Dan; Liu, Guoyan; Zhang, Xin; Wang, Qianqian; Zheng, Jiemin; Zhou, Yonghong; He, Qian; Zhang, Liming

    2015-12-15

    Previously, we established delayed jellyfish envenomation syndrome (DJES) models and proposed that the hemorrhagic toxins in jellyfish tentacle extracts (TE) play a significant role in the liver and kidney injuries of the experimental model. Further, we also demonstrated that metalloproteinases are the central toxic components of the jellyfish Cyanea capillata (C. capillata), which may be responsible for the hemorrhagic effects. Thus, metalloproteinase inhibitors appear to be a promising therapeutic alternative for the treatment of hemorrhagic injuries in DJES. In this study, we examined the metalloproteinase activity of TE from the jellyfish C. capillata using zymography analyses. Our results confirmed that TE possessed a metalloproteinase activity, which was also sensitive to heat. Then, we tested the effect of metalloproteinase inhibitor batimastat (BB-94) on TE-induced hemorrhagic injuries in DJES models. Firstly, using SR-based X-ray microangiography, we found that BB-94 significantly improved TE-induced hepatic and renal microvasculature alterations in DJES mouse model. Secondly, under synchrotron radiation micro-computed tomography (SR-μCT), we also confirmed that BB-94 reduced TE-induced hepatic and renal microvasculature changes in DJES rat model. In addition, being consistent with the imaging results, histopathological and terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated UTP end labeling (TUNEL)-like staining observations also clearly corroborated this hypothesis, as BB-94 was highly effective in neutralizing TE-induced extensive hemorrhage and necrosis in DJES rat model. Although it may require further clinical studies in the near future, the current study opens up the possibilities for the use of the metalloproteinase inhibitor, BB-94, in the treatment of multiple organ hemorrhagic injuries in DJES.

  10. Reynolds number limits for jet propulsion: a numerical study of simplified jellyfish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herschlag, Gregory; Miller, Laura

    2011-09-21

    The Scallop theorem states that reciprocal methods of locomotion, such as jet propulsion or paddling, will not work in Stokes flow (Reynolds number=0). In nature the effective limit of jet propulsion is still in the range where inertial forces are significant. It appears that almost all animals that use jet propulsion swim at Reynolds numbers (Re) of about 5 or more. Juvenile squid and octopods hatch from the egg already swimming in this inertial regime. Juvenile jellyfish, or ephyrae, break off from polyps swimming at Re greater than 5. Many other organisms, such as scallops, rarely swim at Re less than 100. The limitations of jet propulsion at intermediate Re is explored here using the immersed boundary method to solve the 2D Navier-Stokes equations coupled to the motion of a simplified jellyfish. The contraction and expansion kinematics are prescribed, but the forward and backward swimming motions of the idealized jellyfish are emergent properties determined by the resulting fluid dynamics. Simulations are performed for both an oblate bell shape using a paddling mode of swimming and a prolate bell shape using jet propulsion. Average forward velocities and work put into the system are calculated for Re between 1 and 320. The results show that forward velocities rapidly decay with decreasing Re for all bell shapes when Rejellyfish after two pulse cycles are comparable to those reported for Aurelia aurita, but discrepancies are observed in the vortex dynamics between when the 2D model oblate jellyfish and the organism. This discrepancy is likely due to a combination of the differences between the 3D reality of the jellyfish and the 2D simplification, as well as the rigidity of the time varying geometry imposed by the idealized model.

  11. Hematological parameters on the effect of the jellyfish venom Cassiopea andromeda in animal models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iraj Nabipour

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available For the first time, we previously recorded an enormous population of the Cassiopea andromeda jellyfish that had increased dramatically from Bushehr coasts of Iran. The sub-acute toxicity of the jellyfish venom in rat organs was correspondingly carried out. The data presented in this paper relate to the in vivo and in vitro hematological effects of this venomous species of jellyfish venom.

  12. A Simple Computational Model of a jellyfish-like flying machine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Fang; Ristroph, Leif; Shelley, Michael

    2013-11-01

    We explore theoretically the aerodynamics of a jellyfish-like flying machine recently fabricated at NYU. This experimental device achieves flight and hovering by opening and closing a set of flapping wings. It displays orientational flight stability without additional control surfaces or feedback control. Our model machine consists of two symmetric massless flapping wings connected to a body with mass and moment of inertia. A vortex sheet shedding and wake model is used for the flow simulation. Use of the Fast Multipole Method (FMM), and adaptive addition/deletion of vortices, allows us to simulate for long times and resolve complex wakes. We use our model to explore the physical parameters that maintain body hovering, its ascent and descent, and investigate the stability of these states.

  13. Revealing the network of periodic orbits in galaxy models with a prolate or an oblate dark matter halo component

    CERN Document Server

    Zotos, Euaggelos E

    2016-01-01

    Locating the position of periodic orbits in galaxies is undoubtedly an issue of paramount importance. We reveal the position and the stability of periodic orbits of stars moving in the meridional plane $(R,z)$ of an axially symmetric galactic model with a disk, a spherical nucleus, and a biaxial dark matter halo component. In particular, we study how all the involved parameters of the dynamical system influence the position and the stability of all resonant families. To locate the position and measure the stability of periodic orbits we use a highly sensitive numerical code which is able to identify resonant periodic orbits of the type $n:m$. Two cases are studied for every parameter: (i) the case where the dark matter halo component is prolate and (ii) the case where an oblate dark matter halo is present. Our numerical exploration reveals that all the dynamical quantities affect, more or less, the position and the stability of the periodic orbits. It is shown that the mass of the nucleus, the mass of the dis...

  14. Algebraic benchmark for prolate-oblate coexistence in nuclei

    CERN Document Server

    Leviatan, A

    2016-01-01

    We present a symmetry-based approach for prolate-oblate and spherical-prolate-oblate shape coexistence, in the framework of the interacting boson model of nuclei. The proposed Hamiltonian conserves the SU(3) and $\\overline{\\rm SU(3)}$ symmetry for the prolate and oblate ground bands and the U(5) symmetry for selected spherical states. Analytic expressions for quadrupole moments and $E2$ rates involving these states are derived and isomeric states are identified by means of selection rules.

  15. Impact assessment of non-indigenous jellyfish species on the estuarine community dynamic: A model of medusa phase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muha, Teja Petra; Teodósio, Maria Alexandra; Ben-Hamadou, Radhouan

    2017-03-01

    Non-indigenous jellyfish species (NIJS) Blackforida virginica have recently been introduced to the Guadiana Estuary. A modelling approach was used for the assessment of the species-specific impact on the native community, during the medusa phase. The novel interactions between NIJS and the native community are assessed through biomass variation including hydrodynamic and climatic variables. Sensitivity analysis shows that both native species, as well as NIJS highly depend on the water discharge regime, nutrient contribution and the amount of detritus production. Abiotic factors such as the Northern Atlantic Oscillation, water discharge, nutrient load and detritus production are the most influential factors for the dynamics of the estuarine ecosystem demonstrated by the model. Low water discharge and low nutrient retention rate appear to be the most favourable conditions for B. virginica. The species is a non-selective predator able to integrate into the system effectively and has caused a decrease in the biomass of other organisms in the estuarine ecosystem throughout the summer after dam removal. The B. virginica significant impact can be evaluated only when the jellyfish detritus food pathway is involved. The B. virginica predatory impact potential, as well as food preference, appears to be the most influential factors for the overall biomass variation. On the contrary, winter freshwater pulses reduce the survival rate of jellyfish polyps which results in a decrease of medusa during summer. The model presents a strong ecohydrology movement where the fluctuation of organism biomass strongly depends on the hydrological conditions including the amount of nutrient load.

  16. Magnetic cloud models with bent and oblate cross-section boundaries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Démoulin, P.; Dasso, S.

    2009-11-01

    Context: Magnetic clouds (MCs) are formed by magnetic flux ropes that are ejected from the Sun as coronal mass ejections. These structures generally have low plasma beta and travel through the interplanetary medium interacting with the surrounding solar wind. Thus, the dynamical evolution of the internal magnetic structure of a MC is a consequence of both the conditions of its environment and of its own dynamical laws, which are mainly dominated by magnetic forces. Aims: With in-situ observations the magnetic field is only measured along the trajectory of the spacecraft across the MC. Therefore, a magnetic model is needed to reconstruct the magnetic configuration of the encountered MC. The main aim of the present work is to extend the widely used cylindrical model to arbitrary cross-section shapes. Methods: The flux rope boundary is parametrized to account for a broad range of shapes. Then, the internal structure of the flux rope is computed by expressing the magnetic field as a series of modes of a linear force-free field. Results: We analyze the magnetic field profile along straight cuts through the flux rope, in order to simulate the spacecraft crossing through a MC. We find that the magnetic field orientation is only weakly affected by the shape of the MC boundary. Therefore, the MC axis can approximately be found by the typical methods previously used (e.g., minimum variance). The boundary shape affects the magnetic field strength most. The measurement of how much the field strength peaks along the crossing provides an estimation of the aspect ratio of the flux-rope cross-section. The asymmetry of the field strength between the front and the back of the MC, after correcting for the time evolution (i.e., its aging during the observation of the MC), provides an estimation of the cross-section global bending. A flat or/and bent cross-section requires a large anisotropy of the total pressure imposed at the MC boundary by the surrounding medium. Conclusions: The

  17. Recurrent jellyfish blooms are a consequence of global oscillations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Condon, Robert H; Duarte, Carlos M; Pitt, Kylie A; Robinson, Kelly L; Lucas, Cathy H; Sutherland, Kelly R; Mianzan, Hermes W; Bogeberg, Molly; Purcell, Jennifer E; Decker, Mary Beth; Uye, Shin-ichi; Madin, Laurence P; Brodeur, Richard D; Haddock, Steven H D; Malej, Alenka; Parry, Gregory D; Eriksen, Elena; Quiñones, Javier; Acha, Marcelo; Harvey, Michel; Arthur, James M; Graham, William M

    2013-01-15

    A perceived recent increase in global jellyfish abundance has been portrayed as a symptom of degraded oceans. This perception is based primarily on a few case studies and anecdotal evidence, but a formal analysis of global temporal trends in jellyfish populations has been missing. Here, we analyze all available long-term datasets on changes in jellyfish abundance across multiple coastal stations, using linear and logistic mixed models and effect-size analysis to show that there is no robust evidence for a global increase in jellyfish. Although there has been a small linear increase in jellyfish since the 1970s, this trend was unsubstantiated by effect-size analysis that showed no difference in the proportion of increasing vs. decreasing jellyfish populations over all time periods examined. Rather, the strongest nonrandom trend indicated jellyfish populations undergo larger, worldwide oscillations with an approximate 20-y periodicity, including a rising phase during the 1990s that contributed to the perception of a global increase in jellyfish abundance. Sustained monitoring is required over the next decade to elucidate with statistical confidence whether the weak increasing linear trend in jellyfish after 1970 is an actual shift in the baseline or part of an oscillation. Irrespective of the nature of increase, given the potential damage posed by jellyfish blooms to fisheries, tourism, and other human industries, our findings foretell recurrent phases of rise and fall in jellyfish populations that society should be prepared to face.

  18. Flow structure and transport characteristics of feeding and exchange currents generated by upside-down Cassiopea jellyfish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santhanakrishnan, Arvind; Dollinger, Makani; Hamlet, Christina L; Colin, Sean P; Miller, Laura A

    2012-07-15

    Quantifying the flows generated by the pulsations of jellyfish bells is crucial for understanding the mechanics and efficiency of their swimming and feeding. Recent experimental and theoretical work has focused on the dynamics of vortices in the wakes of swimming jellyfish with relatively simple oral arms and tentacles. The significance of bell pulsations for generating feeding currents through elaborate oral arms and the consequences for particle capture are not as well understood. To isolate the generation of feeding currents from swimming, the pulsing kinematics and fluid flow around the benthic jellyfish Cassiopea spp. were investigated using a combination of videography, digital particle image velocimetry and direct numerical simulation. During the rapid contraction phase of the bell, fluid is pulled into a starting vortex ring that translates through the oral arms with peak velocities that can be of the order of 10 cm s(-1). Strong shear flows are also generated across the top of the oral arms throughout the entire pulse cycle. A coherent train of vortex rings is not observed, unlike in the case of swimming oblate medusae such as Aurelia aurita. The phase-averaged flow generated by bell pulsations is similar to a vertical jet, with induced flow velocities averaged over the cycle of the order of 1-10 mm s(-1). This introduces a strong near-horizontal entrainment of the fluid along the substrate and towards the oral arms. Continual flow along the substrate towards the jellyfish is reproduced by numerical simulations that model the oral arms as a porous Brinkman layer of finite thickness. This two-dimensional numerical model does not, however, capture the far-field flow above the medusa, suggesting that either the three-dimensionality or the complex structure of the oral arms helps to direct flow towards the central axis and up and away from the animal.

  19. More on that jellyfish

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pataky, Lucky; edprochack

    2014-03-01

    This jellyfish-like flying machine (built by Leif Ristroph and Stephen Childress of New York University) can hover and stabilize itself in flight with no feedback control ("Flying 'jellyfish' is self-stabilizing", 16 January http://ow.ly/tl63X; see also p5).

  20. Mechanical and scaling considerations for efficient jellyfish swimming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoover, Alexander; Miller, Laura; Griffith, Boyce

    2015-11-01

    With a fossil record dating over half a billion years, jellyfish represent one of the earliest examples of how multicellular organisms first organized into moving systems. Lacking an agonist-antagonist muscle pairing, jellyfish swim via a process of elastic deformation and recoil. Jellyfish propulsion is generated via the coordinated contraction of its elastic bell by its coronal swimming muscles and a complementary re-expansion that is passively driven by stored elastic energy. Recent studies have found jellyfish to be one of the most efficient swimmers due to its low energy expenditure in their forward movement. Using an immersed boundary framework, we will further examine the efficiency of jellyfish swimming by incorporating material models that are informed by the musculature present in jellyfish into a model of the elastic jellyfish bell in three dimensions. The fully-coupled fluid structure interaction problem is solved using an adaptive and parallelized version of the immersed boundary method (IBAMR). This model is then used to explore how variability in the mechanical properties of the bell affect the work done by the bell as well as the cost of transport related to jellyfish locomotion. We then examine how the efficiency of this system is affected by the Reynolds number.

  1. Recurrent dermatitis from jellyfish envenomation.

    OpenAIRE

    Menahem, S; Shvartzman, P.

    1994-01-01

    Jellyfish envenomation can cause an immediate local skin reaction, which is usually a painful linear vesiculourticarial eruption. Persistent, delayed, or recurrent dermatitis is less common. Because jellyfish sting reactions and their management are unfamiliar to family physicians, we describe a case of recurrent local dermatitis after jellyfish envenomation and suggest appropriate treatment.

  2. Anticancer Effect of Nemopilema nomurai Jellyfish Venom on HepG2 Cells and a Tumor Xenograft Animal Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyunkyoung Lee

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Various kinds of animal venoms and their components have been widely studied for potential therapeutic applications. This study evaluated whether Nemopilema nomurai jellyfish venom (NnV has anticancer activity. NnV strongly induced cytotoxicity of HepG2 cells through apoptotic cell death, as demonstrated by alterations of chromatic morphology, activation of procaspase-3, and an increase in the Bax/Bcl-2 ratio. Furthermore, NnV inhibited the phosphorylation of PI3K, PDK1, Akt, mTOR, p70S6K, and 4EBP1, whereas it enhanced the expression of p-PTEN. Interestingly, NnV also inactivated the negative feedback loops associated with Akt activation, as demonstrated by downregulation of Akt at Ser473 and mTOR at Ser2481. The anticancer effect of NnV was significant in a HepG2 xenograft mouse model, with no obvious toxicity. HepG2 cell death by NnV was inhibited by tetracycline, metalloprotease inhibitor, suggesting that metalloprotease component in NnV is closely related to the anticancer effects. This study demonstrates, for the first time, that NnV exerts highly selective cytotoxicity in HepG2 cells via dual inhibition of the Akt and mTOR signaling pathways, but not in normal cells.

  3. Prolate and Oblate Shape Coexistence in 188Pt

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Yuan; A.Osa; Y.Hatsukawa; SUN Yang; ZHOU Xiao-Hong; ZHANG Yu-Hu; ZHENG-Yong; LIU Min-Liang; GUO Ying-Xiang; M.Oshima; Y.Toh; M.Koizumi

    2008-01-01

    A standard in-beam γ-spectroscopy experiment for 188Pt is performed via the 176Yb(18O,6n) reaction at beam energies of 88 and 95 Me V,and the level scheme for 188 Pt is established.Prolate and oblate shape coexistence has been demonstrated to occur in 188Pt by applying the projected shell model.The rotation alignment of i13/2neutrons drives the yrast sequence changing suddenly from prolate to oblate shape at angular momentum 10h,indicating likely a new type of shape phase transition along the yrast fine in 188Pt.

  4. The evection resonance: solar and oblateness perturbations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frouard, J.; Fouchard, M.; Vienne, A.

    2010-12-01

    Among resonances commonly influential to the dynamics of satellites, the evection resonance introduces an important correction to the precession frequency of the satellite, as it is well known for the Moon's problem. However, the dynamic of the resonance itself, which is important for satellites stability and capture topics, including its libration and circulation regions, and its elliptic and hyperbolic points, has not been extensively studied. Here we investigate its dynamic with an improved analytic model, making comparisons with previous works, and resort to numerical methods and integrations to study and localize the different features of the resonance. This resonance is found in the outer orbital region near the orbital stability limit. However we also study and localize an other libration region that can be found much more closer to the parent planet when its oblateness is taken into account in the model.

  5. Chaotic motion in axially symmetric potentials with oblate quadrupole deformation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Letelier, Patricio S. [Departamento de Matematica Aplicada, IMECC, Universidade Estadual de Campinas, 13083-859, Campinas, SP (Brazil); Ramos-Caro, Javier, E-mail: javier@ime.unicamp.br [Departamento de Matematica Aplicada, IMECC, Universidade Estadual de Campinas, 13083-859, Campinas, SP (Brazil); Lopez-Suspes, Framsol, E-mail: framsol@gmail.com [Facultad de Telecomunicaciones, Universidad Santo Tomas and Escuela de Fisica, Universidad Industrial de Santander, Bucaramanga (Colombia)

    2011-10-03

    By computing the Poincare's surfaces of section and Lyapunov exponents, we study the effect of introducing an oblate quadrupole in the dynamics associated with two generic spherical potentials of physical interest: the central monopole and the isotropic harmonic oscillator. In the former case we find saddle points in the effective potential, in contrast to the statements presented by Gueron and Letelier in [E. Gueron, P.S. Letelier, Phys. Rev. E 63 (2001) 035201]. The results we show in the second case have application in nuclear or atomic physics. In particular, we find values of oblate deformation leading to a disappearance of shell structure in the single-particle spectrum. -- Highlights: → We find chaotic motion around a monopole with oblate quadrupole deformation. → This corrects the statements introduced in [E. Gueron, P.S. Letelier, Phys. Rev. E 63 (2001) 035201]. → We present an alternative model for the potential due to an oblate deformed nuclei. → This leads to stochastic regions in the phase space of classical orbits. → It suggests that the shell structure of single-particle spectrum tends to disappear.

  6. Jellyfish: Networking Data Centers Randomly

    CERN Document Server

    Singla, Ankit; Popa, Lucian; Godfrey, P Brighten

    2011-01-01

    Industry experience indicates that the ability to incrementally expand data centers is essential. However, existing high-bandwidth network designs have rigid structure that interferes with incremental expansion. We present Jellyfish, a high-capacity network interconnect, which, by adopting a random graph topology, yields itself naturally to incremental expansion. Somewhat surprisingly, Jellyfish is more cost-efficient than a fat-tree: A Jellyfish interconnect built using the same equipment as a fat-tree, supports as many as 25% more servers at full capacity at the scale of a few thousand nodes, and this advantage improves with scale. Jellyfish also allows great flexibility in building networks with different degrees of oversubscription. However, Jellyfish's unstructured design brings new challenges in routing, physical layout, and wiring. We describe and evaluate approaches that resolve these challenges effectively, indicating that Jellyfish could be deployed in today's data centers.

  7. Not all jellyfish are equal: isotopic evidence for inter- and intraspecific variation in jellyfish trophic ecology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicholas E.C. Fleming

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Jellyfish are highly topical within studies of pelagic food-webs and there is a growing realisation that their role is more complex than once thought. Efforts being made to include jellyfish within fisheries and ecosystem models are an important step forward, but our present understanding of their underlying trophic ecology can lead to their oversimplification in these models. Gelatinous zooplankton represent a polyphyletic assemblage spanning >2,000 species that inhabit coastal seas to the deep-ocean and employ a wide variety of foraging strategies. Despite this diversity, many contemporary modelling approaches include jellyfish as a single functional group feeding at one or two trophic levels at most. Recent reviews have drawn attention to this issue and highlighted the need for improved communication between biologists and theoreticians if this problem is to be overcome. We used stable isotopes to investigate the trophic ecology of three co-occurring scyphozoan jellyfish species (Aurelia aurita, Cyanea lamarckii and C. capillata within a temperate, coastal food-web in the NE Atlantic. Using information on individual size, time of year and δ13C and δ15N stable isotope values, we examined: (1 whether all jellyfish could be considered as a single functional group, or showed distinct inter-specific differences in trophic ecology; (2 Were size-based shifts in trophic position, found previously in A. aurita, a common trait across species?; (3 When considered collectively, did the trophic position of three sympatric species remain constant over time? Differences in δ15N (trophic position were evident between all three species, with size-based and temporal shifts in δ15N apparent in A. aurita and C. capillata. The isotopic niche width for all species combined increased throughout the season, reflecting temporal shifts in trophic position and seasonal succession in these gelatinous species. Taken together, these findings support previous

  8. Muscular Control of Turning and Maneuvering in Jellyfish Bells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoover, Alexander; Miller, Laura; Griffith, Boyce

    2014-11-01

    Jellyfish represent one of the earliest and simplest examples of swimming by a macroscopic organism. Contractions of an elastic bell that expels water are driven by coronal swimming muscles. The re-expansion of the bell is passively driven by stored elastic energy. A current question in jellyfish propulsion is how the underlying neuromuscular organization of their bell allows for maneuvering. Using an immersed boundary framework, we will examine the mechanics of swimming by incorporating material models that are informed by the musculature present in jellyfish into a model of the elastic jellyfish bell in three dimensions. The fully-coupled fluid structure interaction problem is solved using an adaptive and parallelized version of the immersed boundary method (IBAMR). We then use this model to understand how variability in the muscular activation patterns allows for complicated swimming behavior, such as steering. We will compare the results of the simulations with the actual turning maneuvers of several species of jellyfish. Numerical flow fields will also be compared to those produced by actual jellyfish using particle image velocimetry (PIV).

  9. Constraining the Oblateness of Kepler Planets

    CERN Document Server

    Zhu, Wei; Zhou, George; Lin, D N C

    2014-01-01

    We use Kepler short cadence light curves to constrain the oblateness of planet candidates in the Kepler sample. The transits of rapidly rotating planets that are deformed in shape will lead to distortions in the ingress and egress of their light curves. We report the first tentative detection of an oblate planet outside of the solar system, measuring an oblateness of $0.22 \\pm 0.11$ for the 18 $M_J$ mass brown dwarf Kepler 39b (KOI-423.01). We also provide constraints on the oblateness of the planets (candidates) HAT-P-7b, KOI-686.01, and KOI-197.01 to be < 0.067, < 0.251, and < 0.186, respectively. Using the Q'-values from Jupiter and Saturn, we expect tidal synchronization for the spins of HAT-P-7b, KOI-686.01 and KOI-197.01, and for their rotational oblateness signatures to be undetectable in the current data. The potentially large oblateness of KOI-423.01 (Kepler 39b) suggests that the Q'-value of the brown dwarf needs to be two orders of magnitude larger than that of the solar system gas giants ...

  10. Constraining the oblateness of Kepler planets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhu, Wei [Department of Astronomy, The Ohio State University, 140 West 18th Avenue, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States); Huang, Chelsea X. [Department of Astrophysical Sciences, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08544 (United States); Zhou, George [Research School of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Australian National University, Cotter Road, Weston Creek, ACT 2611 (Australia); Lin, D. N. C., E-mail: weizhu@astronomy.ohio-state.edu [UCO/Lick Observatory, University of California, 1156 High Street, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States)

    2014-11-20

    We use Kepler short-cadence light curves to constrain the oblateness of planet candidates in the Kepler sample. The transits of rapidly rotating planets that are deformed in shape will lead to distortions in the ingress and egress of their light curves. We report the first tentative detection of an oblate planet outside the solar system, measuring an oblateness of 0.22{sub −0.11}{sup +0.11} for the 18 M{sub J} mass brown dwarf Kepler 39b (KOI 423.01). We also provide constraints on the oblateness of the planets (candidates) HAT-P-7b, KOI 686.01, and KOI 197.01 to be <0.067, <0.251, and <0.186, respectively. Using the Q' values from Jupiter and Saturn, we expect tidal synchronization for the spins of HAT-P-7b, KOI 686.01, and KOI 197.01, and for their rotational oblateness signatures to be undetectable in the current data. The potentially large oblateness of KOI 423.01 (Kepler 39b) suggests that the Q' value of the brown dwarf needs to be two orders of magnitude larger than that of the solar system gas giants to avoid being tidally spun down.

  11. Kinematics and Fluid Dynamics of Jellyfish Maneuvering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Laura; Hoover, Alex

    2014-11-01

    Jellyfish propel themselves through the water through periodic contractions of their elastic bells. Some jellyfish, such as the moon jellyfish Aurelia aurita and the upside down jellyfish Cassiopea xamachana, can perform turns via asymmetric contractions of the bell. The fluid dynamics of jellyfish forward propulsion and turning is explored here by analyzing the contraction kinematics of several species and using flow visualization to quantify the resulting flow fields. The asymmetric contraction and structure of the jellyfish generates asymmetries in the starting and stopping vortices. This creates a diagonal jet and a net torque acting on the jellyfish. Results are compared to immersed boundary simulations

  12. Localized neuropathy following jellyfish sting.

    OpenAIRE

    1990-01-01

    This report describes the case of an 18 year old female who sustained a jellyfish sting on her right wrist. She subsequently developed complete radial, ulnar and median nerve palsies distal to the site of the sting, which recovered fully over the next 10 months. We believe this to be due to a direct neurotoxic effect of the jellyfish venom.

  13. Environmental DNA reflects spatial and temporal jellyfish distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukuda, Miho; Katsuhara, Koki R.; Fujiwara, Ayaka; Hidaka, Shunsuke; Yamamoto, Satoshi; Takahashi, Kohji; Masuda, Reiji

    2017-01-01

    Recent development of environmental DNA (eDNA) analysis allows us to survey underwater macro-organisms easily and cost effectively; however, there have been no reports on eDNA detection or quantification for jellyfish. Here we present the first report on an eDNA analysis of marine jellyfish using Japanese sea nettle (Chrysaora pacifica) as a model species by combining a tank experiment with spatial and temporal distribution surveys. We performed a tank experiment monitoring eDNA concentrations over a range of time intervals after the introduction of jellyfish, and quantified the eDNA concentrations by quantitative real-time PCR. The eDNA concentrations peaked twice, at 1 and 8 h after the beginning of the experiment, and became stable within 48 h. The estimated release rates of the eDNA in jellyfish were higher than the rates previously reported in fishes. A spatial survey was conducted in June 2014 in Maizuru Bay, Kyoto, in which eDNA was collected from surface water and sea floor water samples at 47 sites while jellyfish near surface water were counted on board by eye. The distribution of eDNA in the bay corresponded with the distribution of jellyfish inferred by visual observation, and the eDNA concentration in the bay was ~13 times higher on the sea floor than on the surface. The temporal survey was conducted from March to November 2014, in which jellyfish were counted by eye every morning while eDNA was collected from surface and sea floor water at three sampling points along a pier once a month. The temporal fluctuation pattern of the eDNA concentrations and the numbers of observed individuals were well correlated. We conclude that an eDNA approach is applicable for jellyfish species in the ocean. PMID:28245277

  14. On the resonance analysis for compliant bionic jellyfishes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HSIEH; Wen-Hsiang; CHEN; Tsung-I

    2010-01-01

    A bionic jellyfish is a robot that can mimic the swimming of a real jellyfish. In practical application, the volume and the capacity of its carrying power are limited, hence its power consumption is a crucial factor for continuous swimming. The purpose of this paper is to propose an approach for the resonance analysis of bionic jellyfishes in order to investigate their energy efficiency in swimming. First, a suitable rigid-body bionic jellyfish was chosen from the previous study, and then its design approach was presented, Then, it was transformed into a compliant design, by the proposed method, in order to mimic the motion of a real jellyfish. Furthermore, its solid model was drawn, and the approach of modal analysis by using ANSYS software was addressed. After that, two terms, specific energy and energy ratio, were defined in order to evaluate its energy efficiency. Finally, a design example was given for illustration, and its motion simulations with and without resonance input were conducted by using ADAMS software. Additionally, their specific energies and energy ratios were found. The simulation results showed that the required input energy would be significantly reduced if a bionic jellyfish swims at its resonance frequency.

  15. MHD Stability Study of Oblate FRCs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cone, G. A.; Milroy, R. D.; Kim, C. C.

    2009-11-01

    The n=1 tilt, interchange, and shift modes of oblate FRC plasmas are simulated using the NIMROD code. The grid geometry approximates the shaped, close-fitting flux conserver used in the Swarthmore Spheromak eXperiment (SSX) oblate FRC studyfootnotetextM. J. Schaffer, M. Brown, C. Cothran, N. Murphy, An oblate FRC concept for SSX, ICC Workshop, College Park, MD, Feb 2007. The results validate the work by Belova et alfootnotetextE. V. Belova, S. C. Jardin, H. Ji, M. Yamada, R. Kulsrud, Numerical study of global stability of oblate field-reversed configurations, Phys. Plasmas, 8(4), 1267 (2001) which characterized important thresholds for these instabilities. The tilt mode changes from an internal mode to an external mode with decreasing FRC elongation, and in the oblate case it can be stabilized with a close-fitting conducting wall. By increasing the edge separatrix pressure for wall-supported FRCs, the growth rate of interchange mode decreases, and complete stabilization is achieved when the separatrix beta exceeds 30%. Simulations of the dynamics of FRC formation from two counter-helicity spheromaks are beginning, and preliminary results will be presented.

  16. Do resonating bells increase jellyfish swimming performance?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoover, Alexander; Miller, Laura

    2013-11-01

    A current question in swimming and flight is whether or not driving flexible appendages at their resonant frequency results in faster or more efficient locomotion. It has been suggested that jellyfish swim faster and/or more efficiently when the bell is driven at its resonant frequency. Previous work has modeled the jellyfish bell as a damped harmonic oscillator, and this simplified model suggests that work done by the bell is maximized when force is applied at the resonant frequency of the bell. We extend the idea of resonance phenomena of the jellyfish bell to a fluid structure interaction framework using the immersed boundary method. We first examine the effects of the bending stiffness of the bell on its resonant frequency. We then further our model with the inclusion of a ``muscular'' spring that connects the two sides of a 2D bell and drives it near its resonant frequency. We use this muscular spring to force the bell at varying frequencies and examine the work done by these springs and the resulting swimming speed. We finally augment our model with a flexible, passive bell margin to examine its role in propulsive efficiency.

  17. Coorbital Motion about an Oblate Primary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahoma, Walid; Ahmed, M. K.; Abd El-Salam, F. A.

    2009-05-01

    The problem of coorbital motion will be formulated in the Hamiltonian form in case when the primary is oblate. The problem considered will be assumed spatial and not circular. Different forms of the disturbing function will be outlined; the relevant form is developed in terms of Laplace coefficients. The Hamiltonian of the problem will be formed in Dalauny-like canonical elements. The ratio of the primary mass is considered as a small parameter of the first order while the leading oblateness term of the primary is considered of second order.

  18. New space value of the solar oblateness obtained with PICARD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Irbah, Abdanour; Meftah, Mustapha; Hauchecorne, Alain; Bocquier, Maxime; Cisse, E. Momar [Laboratoire Atmosphères, Milieux, Observations Spatiales (LATMOS), CNRS: UMR 8190-Université Paris VI-Pierre et Marie Curie-Université de Versailles Saint-Quentin-en-Yvelines-INSU, F-78280, Guyancourt (France); Djafer, Djelloul [Unité de Recherche Appliquée en Energies Renouvelables, URAER, Centre de Développement des Energies Renouvelables, CDER, 47133, Ghardaïa (Algeria); Corbard, Thierry, E-mail: Abdenour.Irbah@latmos.ipsl.fr [Laboratoire Lagrange, UMR7293, Université de Nice Sophia-Antipolis, CNRS, Observatoire de la Côte d' Azur, Bd. de l' Observatoire, F-06304 Nice (France)

    2014-04-20

    The PICARD spacecraft was launched on 2010 June 15 with the scientific objective of studying the geometry of the Sun. It is difficult to measure solar oblateness because images are affected by optical distortion. Rolling the satellite, as done in previous space missions, determines the contribution of the telescope by assuming that the geometry of the Sun is constant during the observations. The optical response of the telescope is considered to be time-invariant during the roll operations. This is not the case for PICARD because an orbital signature is clearly observed in the solar radius computed from its images. We take this effect into account and provide the new space value of solar oblateness from PICARD images recorded in the solar continuum at 535.7 nm on 2011 July 4-5. The equator-pole radius difference is 8.4 ± 0.5 mas, which corresponds to an absolute radius difference of 6.1 km. This coincides with the mean value of all solar oblateness measurements obtained during the last two decades from the ground, balloons, and space. It is also consistent with values determined from models using helioseismology data.

  19. Jellyfish movement data - Determining Movement Patterns of Jellyfish

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This project is to determine horizontal and vertical movement patterns of two jellyfish species in Hood Canal, in relation to environmental variables. It is being...

  20. Ensemble Trajectory Simulation of Large Jellyfish in the Yellow and Bohai Sea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wu Lingjuan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Combining Lagrange particle tracking method with the ensemble forecasting concept, one ensemble trajectory model is developed for large jellyfish with vertical movement of jellyfish taken into account in the Yellow and Bohai Sea. Besides, this ensemble model can give quick simulation of drifting trajectories and potential affected range. The comparison between observation and simulation of jellyfish trajectories in the coastal waters of Qingdao and Qinhuangdao as the typical place of the Yellow Sea and Bohai Sea has been made. And the results indicate that the ensemble trajectory model is more reliable than single one, and could provide more useful information for emergency response of jellyfish bloom, especially under the circumstance that autonomic (vertical movement of of jellyfish and its mechanism is not clear.

  1. Reynolds number limits for jet propulsion: A numerical study of simplified jellyfish

    CERN Document Server

    Herschlag, Gregory

    2010-01-01

    The Scallop Theorem states that reciprocal methods of locomotion, such as jet propulsion or paddling, will not work in Stokes flow (Reynolds number = 0). In nature the effective limit of jet propulsion is still in the range where inertial forces are significant. It appears that almost all animals that use jet propulsion swim at Reynolds numbers (Re) of about 5 or more. Juvenile squid and octopods hatch from the egg already swimming in this inertial regime. The limitations of jet propulsion at intermediate Re is explored here using the immersed boundary method to solve the two-dimensional Navier Stokes equations coupled to the motion of a simplified jellyfish. The contraction and expansion kinematics are prescribed, but the forward and backward swimming motions of the idealized jellyfish are emergent properties determined by the resulting fluid dynamics. Simulations are performed for both an oblate bell shape using a paddling mode of swimming and a prolate bell shape using jet propulsion. Average forward veloc...

  2. Studying large jellyfish swimming hydrodynamics using a biomimetic robot named Cyro 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, Colin; Krummel, Gregory; Villanueva, Alex; Marut, Kenneth; Priya, Shashank

    2015-11-01

    Some species of jellyfish can grow to great sizes, such as the lion's mane jellyfish (Cyanea capillata), which can span 2 m in diameter with tentacles 30 m long, roughly the same length as a blue whale. This is an impressive feat for an animal that begins its mobile life three orders of magnitude smaller. Such growth can require a large energy budget, suggesting that Cyanea may be a uniquely efficient swimmer, successful predator, or both. Either accolade would stem from a high level of hydrodynamic mastery as oblate jellyfish like Cyanea rely on the flow currents generated by bell pulsation for both propulsive thrust and prey encounter. However, further investigation has been hindered by the lack of reported quantitative flow measurements, perhaps due to the logistic challenges inherent to studying large specimen in vivo. Here, we used a 50 cm diameter biomimetic Cyanea robot named Cyro 2 as a proxy to study the hydrodynamics of large jellyfish. The effect of different trailing structure morphologies (e.g. oral arms and tentacles), swimming gaits, and kinematics on flow patterns were measured using PIV. Baseline swimming performance using biomimetic settings (but no trailing structures) was characterized by a cycle average velocity of 6.58 cm s-1, thrust of 1.9 N, and power input of 5.7 W, yielding a vehicle efficiency of 2.2% and a cost of transport of 15.4 J kg-1 m-1.

  3. Identification of genetically and oceanographically distinct blooms of jellyfish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Patricia L M; Dawson, Michael N; Neill, Simon P; Robins, Peter E; Houghton, Jonathan D R; Doyle, Thomas K; Hays, Graeme C

    2013-03-06

    Reports of nuisance jellyfish blooms have increased worldwide during the last half-century, but the possible causes remain unclear. A persistent difficulty lies in identifying whether blooms occur owing to local or regional processes. This issue can be resolved, in part, by establishing the geographical scales of connectivity among locations, which may be addressed using genetic analyses and oceanographic modelling. We used landscape genetics and Lagrangian modelling of oceanographic dispersal to explore patterns of connectivity in the scyphozoan jellyfish Rhizostoma octopus, which occurs en masse at locations in the Irish Sea and northeastern Atlantic. We found significant genetic structure distinguishing three populations, with both consistencies and inconsistencies with prevailing physical oceanographic patterns. Our analyses identify locations where blooms occur in apparently geographically isolated populations, locations where blooms may be the source or result of migrants, and a location where blooms do not occur consistently and jellyfish are mostly immigrant. Our interdisciplinary approach thus provides a means to ascertain the geographical origins of jellyfish in outbreaks, which may have wide utility as increased international efforts investigate jellyfish blooms.

  4. The elusive life cycle of scyphozoan jellyfish - metagenesis revisited

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ceh, Janja; Gonzalez, Jorge; Pacheco, Aldo S.; Riascos, José M.

    2015-07-01

    Massive proliferations of scyphozoan jellyfish considerably affect human industries and irreversibly change food webs. Efforts to understand the role of jellyfish in marine ecosystems are based on a life cycle model described 200 years ago. According to this paradigm the pelagic medusae is considered seasonal and alternates with the benthic polyp stage from which it derives. However, we provide evidence that a) the occurrence of several species of medusae is not restricted to a season in the year, they overwinter, b) polyp- and medusa generations are neither temporally nor spatially separated, and c) “metagenesis” which is defined as the alternation between sexual and asexual generations does not always occur. Hence we recommend additions to the current model and argue that the scyphozoan life cycle should be considered multi-modal, rather than metagenetic. The implications of these findings for jellyfish proliferations, including possible consequences and associated environmental drivers, are discussed.

  5. The elusive life cycle of scyphozoan jellyfish--metagenesis revisited.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ceh, Janja; Gonzalez, Jorge; Pacheco, Aldo S; Riascos, José M

    2015-07-08

    Massive proliferations of scyphozoan jellyfish considerably affect human industries and irreversibly change food webs. Efforts to understand the role of jellyfish in marine ecosystems are based on a life cycle model described 200 years ago. According to this paradigm the pelagic medusae is considered seasonal and alternates with the benthic polyp stage from which it derives. However, we provide evidence that a) the occurrence of several species of medusae is not restricted to a season in the year, they overwinter, b) polyp- and medusa generations are neither temporally nor spatially separated, and c) "metagenesis" which is defined as the alternation between sexual and asexual generations does not always occur. Hence we recommend additions to the current model and argue that the scyphozoan life cycle should be considered multi-modal, rather than metagenetic. The implications of these findings for jellyfish proliferations, including possible consequences and associated environmental drivers, are discussed.

  6. The Model of Rabbit Injuried Jellyfish Venom%水母毒素致伤家兔模型的建立

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    于春令; 张沂; 张智; 丁万强; 林龙; 焦雷

    2012-01-01

    Objective To establish an animal model to simulate jellyfish stings so as to study the efficacy of Compound Kuqin Ointment. Methods Rabbits were randomly divided into two groups: the control group that was injected with 0. 1 ml normal saline,and the experimental group that was injected with 0. 1 ml jellyfish toxin. Intrader-mal injection was used in both groups. The experimental area of skin irritation was observed in 1,2,3,4,5,6,12, 24,36,48,60 and 72 h respectively,followded by scoring. The blood of the rabbit ear vein was collected in 0, 12, 24, 36, 48, 60 and 72 h to determin blood and CRP. The damaged skin was taken for pathological analysis in 24, 48 and 72 h. Results The experimental rabbits developed significant skin irritation. The inflamed area became larger and radiated to neighboring regions until it reached the peak value at 24 h. White blood cells and CRP values changed in the experimental group. The control group remained constant. The results of pathology showed that the experimental group had severe inflammatory reaction, and that there was a large number of neutrophils around the injection site. Conclusion A rabbit model of jellyfish stings is established.%目的 建立动物模型模拟水母蜇伤,为进一步研究水母蜇伤防治药的药效学奠定基础.方法 将家兔随机分为两组,对照组注射0.1ml生理氯化钠溶液,实验组注射0.1ml水母毒素,均采用皮内注射.注射后分别在1、2、3、4、5、6、12、24、36、48、60、72 h观察实验区域皮肤红肿情况,并进行皮肤刺激评分.在0、12、24、36、48、60、72 h取家兔耳缘静脉血,用于血常规和C反应蛋白的测定.24、48、72 h时取损伤皮肤做病理切片.结果 实验组家兔出现明显的皮肤刺激症状,红肿区域较大并向邻近区域放射,24 h时红肿区域面积最大,皮肤刺激最明显.观察时间范围内,实验组中白细胞计数、C反应蛋白值有明显的变化趋势,在24 h时达最大值.对照组

  7. Close approach maneuvers around an oblate planet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, G. M. C.; Prado, A. F. B. A.; Sanchez, D. M.

    2015-10-01

    There are many applications of the close approach maneuvers in astronautics, and several missions used this technique in the last decades. In the present work, those close approach maneuvers are revisited, but now considering that the spacecraft passes around an oblate planet. This fact changes the distribution of mass of the planet, increasing the mass in the region of the equator, so increasing the gravitational forces in the equatorial plane. Since the present study is limited to planar trajectories, there is an increase in the variation of energy given by the maneuver. The planet Jupiter is used as the body for the close approach, but the value of J2 is varied in a large range to simulate situations of other celestial bodies that have larger oblateness, but the same mass ratio. This is particularly true in recent discovered exoplanets, and this first study can help the study of the dynamics around those bodies.

  8. Convection in Oblate Solar-Type Stars

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Junfeng; Liang, Chunlei

    2016-01-01

    We present the first global 3D simulations of thermal convection in the oblate envelopes of rapidly-rotating solar-type stars. This has been achieved by exploiting the capabilities of the new Compressible High-ORder Unstructured Spectral difference (CHORUS) code. We consider rotation rates up to 85\\% of the critical (breakup) rotation rate, which yields an equatorial radius that is up to 17\\% larger than the polar radius. This substantial oblateness enhances the disparity between polar and equatorial modes of convection. We find that the convection redistributes the heat flux emitted from the outer surface, leading to an enhancement of the heat flux in the polar and equatorial regions. This finding implies that lower-mass stars with convective envelopes may not have darker equators as predicted by classical gravity darkening arguments. The vigorous high-latitude convection also establishes elongated axisymmetric circulation cells and zonal jets in the polar regions. Though the overall amplitude of the surface...

  9. Jellyfish galaxies at low redshift

    CERN Document Server

    Poggianti, B M; Omizzolo, A; Gullieuszik, M; Bettoni, D; Moretti, A; Paccagnella, A; Jaffe', Y L; Vulcani, B; Fritz, J; Couch, W; D'Onofrio, M

    2015-01-01

    Jellyfish galaxies are galaxies that exhibit tentacles of debris material suggestive of gas stripping. We have conducted the first systematic search for jellyfish galaxies at low-z (z=0.04-0.07) in different environments. We have visually inspected B and V-band images and identified 241+153 candidates in 41+31 galaxy clusters of the OMEGAWINGS+WINGS sample and 99 candidates in groups and lower mass structures in the PM2GC sample. This large sample is well suited for follow-up studies of the gas and for a detailed analysis of the environments where such episodes of gas stripping occur. We present here the atlas of jellyfish candidates, a first analysis of their environment and their basic properties, such as morphologies, star formation rates and galaxy stellar masses. Jellyfish candidates are found in all clusters and at all clustercentric radii, and their number does not correlate with the cluster velocity dispersion or X-ray luminosity. Interestingly, convincing cases of jellyfish candidates are also found ...

  10. FROM THE SACRED TO THE PROFANE: THE OBLATION RITUALIZED

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reuben Ramas Cañete

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available The study approaches the historical construction of the narratives surrounding the statue titled Oblation, deemed as the symbol of the University of the Philippines (UP, from the theoretical perspective of Eric Hobsbawn’s notion of “invented traditions,” as well as Judith Butler’s theory of performativity. The study looks at the genesis of this narrative as informed by the anti-colonial struggle of the late-19th and early 20th century, but amplified and “sacralised” through the symbolic power of the UP Presidency, particularly under Jorge C. Bocobo (1935-1939 under whose auspices the Oblation was erected on November 30, 1935. The study also foregrounds the key term “Sacrificial Body” as a determinant of the Oblation’s narrational focus of itself as subject, and its function as idealized model or template to be “followed” by the UP community. The ambivalence of this narrative, however, is central to the production of contradicting discourses throughout its history, from the “sacred” Pre-War image akin to a secular Crucifixion upon which rituals supervised by a “priesthood” composed of the University’s officials were enacted; to the Post- War secular (and thus “profane” image of the Oblation as that “representing academic freedom” from the viewpoint of its progressive student body and faculty. The common assertion of a sacrificial representation of anti-colonial struggle, however, is intuited by the study as exemplifying the epistemic problematics of postcolonial nationalism.

  11. Social behaviour in mesopelagic jellyfish

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaartvedt, Stein; Ugland, Karl I.; Klevjer, Thor A.; Røstad, Anders; Titelman, Josefin; Solberg, Ingrid

    2015-06-01

    Gelatinous organisms apparently play a central role in deep pelagic ecosystems, but lack of observational methodologies has restricted information on their behaviour. We made acoustic records of diel migrating jellyfish Periphylla periphylla forming small, ephemeral groups at the upper fringe of an acoustic scattering layer consisting of krill. Groups of P. periphylla were also documented photographically using a remotely operated vehicle (ROV). Although the adaptive value of group formation remains speculative, we clearly demonstrate the ability of these jellyfishes to locate and team up with each other.

  12. Social behaviour in mesopelagic jellyfish

    KAUST Repository

    Kaartvedt, Stein

    2015-06-11

    Gelatinous organisms apparently play a central role in deep pelagic ecosystems, but lack of observational methodologies has restricted information on their behaviour. We made acoustic records of diel migrating jellyfish Periphylla periphylla forming small, ephemeral groups at the upper fringe of an acoustic scattering layer consisting of krill. Groups of P. periphylla were also documented photographically using a remotely operated vehicle (ROV). Although the adaptive value of group formation remains speculative, we clearly demonstrate the ability of these jellyfishes to locate and team up with each other.

  13. Influence of a second satellite on the rotational dynamics of an oblate moon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarnopolski, Mariusz

    2017-02-01

    The gravitational influence of a second satellite on the rotation of an oblate moon is numerically examined. A simplified model, assuming the axis of rotation perpendicular to the (Keplerian) orbit plane, is derived. The differences between the two models, i.e. in the absence and presence of the second satellite, are investigated via bifurcation diagrams and by evolving compact sets of initial conditions in the phase space. It turns out that the presence of another satellite causes some trajectories, that were regular in its absence, to become chaotic. Moreover, the highly structured picture revealed by the bifurcation diagrams in dependence on the eccentricity of the oblate body's orbit is destroyed when the gravitational influence is included, and the periodicities and critical curves are destroyed as well. For demonstrative purposes, focus is laid on parameters of the Saturn-Titan-Hyperion system, and on oblate satellites on low-eccentric orbits, i.e. e≈ 0.005.

  14. Influence of a second satellite on the rotational dynamics of an oblate moon

    CERN Document Server

    Tarnopolski, Mariusz

    2016-01-01

    The gravitational influence of a second satellite on the rotation of an oblate moon is numerically examined. A simplified model, assuming the axis of rotation perpendicular to the (Keplerian) orbit plane, is derived. The differences between the two models, i.e. in the absence and presence of the second satellite, are investigated via bifurcation diagrams and by evolving compact sets of initial conditions in the phase space. It turns out that the presence of another satellite causes some trajectories, that were regular in its absence, to become chaotic. Moreover, the highly structured picture revealed by the bifurcation diagrams in dependence on the eccentricity of the oblate body's orbit is destroyed when the gravitational influence is included, and the periodicities and critical curves are destroyed as well. For demonstrative purposes, focus is laid on parameters of the Saturn-Titan-Hyperion system, and on oblate satellites on low-eccentric orbits, i.e. $e\\approx 0.005$.

  15. Orbits in Homogeneous Oblate Spheroidal Gravitational Space-Time

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chifu E. N.

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available The generalized Lagrangian in general relativistic homogeneous oblate spheroidal gravitational fields is constructed and used to study orbits exterior to homogenous oblate spheroids. Expressions for the conservation of energy and angular momentum for this gravitational field are obtained. The planetary equation of motion and the equation of motion of a photon in the vicinity of an oblate spheroid are derived. These equations have additional terms not found in Schwarzschild's space time.

  16. Geostrophic wind induced by latitudinal variation in gravitational acceleration on oblate planets

    CERN Document Server

    Haqq-Misra, Jacob; Wolf, Eric T; Kopparapu, Ravi Kumar

    2016-01-01

    The population of known extrasolar planets includes giant and terrestrial planets that closely orbit their host star. Such planets experience significant tidal distortions that can force the planet into synchronous rotation. The combined effects of tidal deformation and centripetal acceleration induces significant asphericity in the shape of these planets, compared to the mild oblateness of Earth, with maximum gravitational acceleration at the poles. Here we show that this latitudinal variation in gravitational acceleration is relevant for modeling the climate of oblate planets including Jovian planets within the solar system, closely-orbiting hot Jupiters, and planets within the habitable zone of white dwarfs. We compare first- and third-order approximations for gravitational acceleration on an oblate spheroid and calculate the geostrophic wind that would result from this asphericity on a range of solar system planets and exoplanets. Third-order variations in gravitational acceleration are negligible for Ear...

  17. Solar Oblateness from Archimedes to Dicke

    CERN Document Server

    Sigismondi, C; Sigismondi, Costantino; Oliva, Pietro

    2005-01-01

    The non-spherical shape of the Sun has been invoked to explain the anomalous precession of Mercury. A brief history of some methods for measuring solar diameter is presented. Archimedes was the first to give upper and lower values for solar diameter in third century before Christ; we also show the method of total eclipses, used after Halley's observative campaign of 1715 eclipse; the variant of partial eclipses useful to measure different chords of the solar disk; the method of Dicke which correlates oblateness with luminous excess in the equatorial zone.

  18. Simulation of Motion of Satellite under the Effect of Oblateness of Earth and Atmospheric Drag

    CERN Document Server

    Sharma, Jaita; Pirzada, U M; Shah, Vishant

    2016-01-01

    The equations governing motion of the satellite under the effect of oblateness of Earth and atmospheric drag have been simulated, for a fixed initial position and three different initial velocities, till satellite collapses on Earth. Simulation of motion of artificial Earth satellite subject to the combined effects of oblate Earth and atmospheric drag is presented. The atmospheric model considered here takes in to account of exponential variation of the density with initial distance of Satellite from Earth's surface, scale height and radial distance. The minimum and maximum values of orbital elements and their variation over a time for different initial velocities have been reported.

  19. Simultaneous measurements of jellyfish bell kinematics and flow fields using PTV and PIV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Nicole; Dabiri, John

    2016-11-01

    A better understanding of jellyfish swimming can potentially improve the energy efficiency of aquatic vehicles or create biomimetic robots for ocean monitoring. Aurelia aurita is a simple oblate invertebrate composed of a flexible bell and coronal muscle, which contracts to eject water from the subumbrellar volume. Jellyfish locomotion can be studied by obtaining body kinematics or by examining the resulting fluid velocity fields using particle image velocimetry (PIV). Typically, swim kinematics are obtained by semi-manually tracking points of interest (POI) along the bell in video post-processing; simultaneous measurements of kinematics and flows involve using this semi-manual tracking method on PIV videos. However, we show that both the kinematics and flow fields can be directly visualized in 3D space by embedding phosphorescent particles in animals free-swimming in seeded environments. Particle tracking velocimetry (PTV) can then be used to calculate bell kinematics, such as pulse frequency, bell deformation, swim trajectories, and propulsive efficiency. By simultaneously tracking POI within the bell and collecting PIV data, we can further study the jellyfish's natural locomotive control mechanisms in conjunction with flow measurements. NSF GRFP.

  20. THE THREE-DIMENSIONAL FUNDAMENTAL SOLUTION TO STOKES FLOW IN THE OBLATE SPHEROIDAL COORDINATES WITH APPLICATIONS TO MULTIPLES SPHEROID PROBLEMS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    庄宏; 严宗毅; 吴望一

    2002-01-01

    A new three-dimensional fundamental solution to the Stokes flow was proposedby transforming the solid harmonic functions in Lamb' s solution into expressions in terms ofthe oblate spheroidal coordinates. These fundamental solutions are advantageous in treatingflows past an arbitrary number of arbitrarily positioned and oriented oblate spheroids. Theleast squares technique was adopted herein so that the convergence difficulties oftenencountered in solving three-dimensional problems were completely avoided. The examplesdemonstrate that present approach is highly accurate, consistently stable andcomputationally efficient.The oblate spheroid may be used to model a variety of particle shapes between acircular disk and a sphere. For the first time, the effect of various geometric factors on theforces and torques exerted on two oblate spheroids were systematically studied by using theproposed fundamental solutions. The generality of this approach was illustrated by twoproblems of three spheroids.

  1. Simulation of prolate swimming jellyfish with jet-based locomotion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Sung Goon; Kim, Boyoung; Lee, Jin; Huang, Wei-Xi; Sung, Hyung Jin

    2014-11-01

    The hydrodynamic patterns in the wake of swimming jellyfish are based on the bell morphology. Jellyfish with a prolate bell morphology form a clear jet structure in the wake. A three-dimensional computational model was used to analyze the hydrodynamic patterns. The Froude propulsion efficiency, defined by the ratio of the value of the energy required to deform the elastic bell to the value of the average center velocity multiplied by the thrust, was compared with different forms of the elastic bell deformation. The immersed boundary method was adopted to consider the interaction between the swimming jellyfish and surrounding fluid. Due to the effect of the momentum transferred to the surrounding fluid by the bell deformation, the rotational fluid mass was formed, called vortices. The vortex structures in the wake of prolate swimming jellyfish were elucidated in detail in both quantitative and qualitative ways. A dimensionless temporal parameter was employed to investigate the vortex formation process quantitatively. The starting/stopping vortex structures were generated during the contraction/relaxation phase. During the early stage of the contraction, the vortex structures were mainly generated by the stroke, then the ejected fluid was entrained into the vortex structures. This study was supported by the Creative Research Initiatives (No.2014-001493) program of the National Research Foundation of Korea (MSIP).

  2. Exploring the therapeutic potential of jellyfish venom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daly, Norelle L; Seymour, Jamie; Wilson, David

    2014-10-01

    The venom of certain jellyfish has long been known to be potentially fatal to humans, but it is only recently that details of the proteomes of these fascinating creatures are emerging. The molecular contents of the nematocysts from several jellyfish species have now been analyzed using proteomic MS approaches and include the analysis of Chironex fleckeri, one of the most venomous jellyfish known. These studies suggest that some species contain toxins related to peptides and proteins found in other venomous creatures. The detailed characterization of jellyfish venom is likely to provide insight into the diversification of toxins and might be a valuable resource in drug design.

  3. High gain durable anti-reflective coating with oblate voids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maghsoodi, Sina; Brophy, Brenor L.; Colson, Thomas E.; Gonsalves, Peter R.; Abrams, Ze' ev

    2016-06-28

    Disclosed herein are single layer transparent coatings with an anti-reflective property, a hydrophobic property, and that are highly abrasion resistant. The single layer transparent coatings contain a plurality of oblate voids. At least 1% of the oblate voids are open to a surface of the single layer transparent coatings.

  4. Biogeochemical implications of decomposing jellyfish blooms in a changing climate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chelsky, Ariella; Pitt, Kylie A.; Welsh, David T.

    2015-03-01

    Jellyfish often exhibit 'boom and bust' population dynamics whereby they proliferate rapidly and then die en masse and decompose. The few studies that have investigated post-bloom processes have not studied how changing ocean conditions will alter rates of decomposition. Climate change will result in warmer and more acidic waters, and studies therefore need to consider these factors in concert to determine their combined effect on decomposition processes. To quantify the effect, we measured oxygen consumption and nutrient regeneration rates during decomposition of Catostylus mosaicus in mesocosms at current average summer pH and temperature (pH 8.0 and 27 °C) as well as conditions projected for year 2100 (pH 7.8 and 30 °C) and compared these fluxes to control mesocosms without jellyfish over 12 days. We hypothesised that rates of jellyfish decomposition, as measured by oxygen demand and nutrient regeneration, would be accelerated in the end-of-century treatments, compared to present day treatments. Overall decomposition rates were only slightly elevated under end-of-century conditions, and the difference was only significant for ammonium fluxes from 19 h until 43 h after the experiment commenced. The difference between treatments was much smaller than would be expected due to the temperature increase, based on theoretical modelling of jellyfish decomposition which predicts a Q10 of 4.28, or a 1.5 fold increase in decomposition rates. This highlights the importance of investigating net effects on decomposition rates, as simultaneous shifts in temperature and pH may not follow patterns predicted due to one stressor alone. Ultimately, these results suggest that rates of oxygen consumption and nutrient regeneration resulting from collapsed jellyfish blooms may not change drastically over the next 100 years.

  5. Comprehensive analysis of the origin of giant jellyfish near Qinhuangdao in summer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Lingjuan; Wu, Xiaofen; Bai, Tao

    2016-09-01

    A massive bloom of the giant jellyfish Nemopilema nomurai occurred in waters off Qinhuangdao, a port city in Hebei Province, in July 2013. However, jellyfish larvae were not found in this location during the previous winter and spring. To determine the possible origin of the giant jellyfish medusa in the Bohai Sea, we developed a backward particle-tracking model and a series of numerical simulations were conducted by using the hydrodynamic, three-dimensional Regional Ocean Modeling System (ROMS) results. The simulated results showed that passive particles, representing jellyfish medusae, released in surface waters at diff erent dates during the summer had consistent trajectories. Particles released at the sea surface on August 1 and 15 could be traced back to the center of the Bohai Sea and to waters between Feiyan Shoal and the new Huanghe (Yellow) River estuary. Particles released on July 1 and 15 could also be traced back to the center of the Bohai Sea and to waters between Feiyan Shoal and only to Zhuangxi tide station. However, none of the particles released in the middle and bottom water layers could be traced back to those areas. Based on the results of the numerical simulations, the distribution characteristics of seafloor sediments, and observational data for giant jellyfish in the region, we suggest that waters between Feiyan Shoal and the new Huanghe River estuary are the likely origin of giant jellyfish observed near Qinhuangdao in summer.

  6. Immunological and toxinological responses to jellyfish stings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tibballs, James; Yanagihara, Angel A; Turner, Helen C; Winkel, Ken

    2011-10-01

    Just over a century ago, animal responses to injections of jellyfish extracts unveiled the phenomenon of anaphylaxis. Yet, until very recently, understanding of jellyfish sting toxicity has remained limited. Upon contact, jellyfish stinging cells discharge complex venoms, through thousands of barbed tubules, into the skin resulting in painful and, potentially, lethal envenomations. This review examines the immunological and toxinological responses to stings by prominent species of jellyfish including Physalia sp (Portuguese Man-o-War, Blue-bottle), Cubozoan jellyfish including Chironex fleckeri, several Carybdeids including Carybdea arborifera and Alatina moseri, Linuche unguiculta (Thimble jellyfish), a jellyfish responsible for Irukandji syndrome (Carukia barnesi) and Pelagia noctiluca. Jellyfish venoms are composed of potent proteinaceous porins (cellular membrane pore-forming toxins), neurotoxic peptides, bioactive lipids and other small molecules whilst the tubules contain ancient collagens and chitins. We postulate that immunologically, both tubular structural and functional biopolymers as well as venom components can initiate innate, adaptive, as well as immediate and delayed hypersensitivity reactions that may be amenable to topical anti-inflammatory-immunomodifier therapy. The current challenge for immunotoxinologists is to deconstruct the actions of venom components to target therapeutic modalities for sting treatment.

  7. High activity and Levy searches: jellyfish can search the water column like fish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hays, Graeme C; Bastian, Thomas; Doyle, Thomas K; Fossette, Sabrina; Gleiss, Adrian C; Gravenor, Michael B; Hobson, Victoria J; Humphries, Nicolas E; Lilley, Martin K S; Pade, Nicolas G; Sims, David W

    2012-02-07

    Over-fishing may lead to a decrease in fish abundance and a proliferation of jellyfish. Active movements and prey search might be thought to provide a competitive advantage for fish, but here we use data-loggers to show that the frequently occurring coastal jellyfish (Rhizostoma octopus) does not simply passively drift to encounter prey. Jellyfish (327 days of data from 25 jellyfish with depth collected every 1 min) showed very dynamic vertical movements, with their integrated vertical movement averaging 619.2 m d(-1), more than 60 times the water depth where they were tagged. The majority of movement patterns were best approximated by exponential models describing normal random walks. However, jellyfish also showed switching behaviour from exponential patterns to patterns best fitted by a truncated Lévy distribution with exponents (mean μ=1.96, range 1.2-2.9) close to the theoretical optimum for searching for sparse prey (μopt≈2.0). Complex movements in these 'simple' animals may help jellyfish to compete effectively with fish for plankton prey, which may enhance their ability to increase in dominance in perturbed ocean systems.

  8. The jellyfish buffet: jellyfish enhance seabird foraging opportunities by concentrating prey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Nobuhiko N; Kokubun, Nobuo; Yamamoto, Takashi; Watanuki, Yutaka; Kitaysky, Alexander S; Takahashi, Akinori

    2015-08-01

    High levels of jellyfish biomass have been reported in marine ecosystems around the world, but understanding of their ecological role remains in its infancy. Jellyfish are generally thought to have indirect negative impacts on higher trophic-level predators, through changes in lower trophic pathways. However, high densities of jellyfish in the water column may affect the foraging behaviour of marine predators more directly, and the effects may not always be negative. Here, we present novel observations of a diving seabird, the thick-billed murre, feeding on fish aggregating among the long tentacles of large jellyfish, by using small video loggers attached to the birds. We show that the birds encountered large jellyfish, Chrysaora melanaster, during most of their dives, commonly fed on fish associated with jellyfish, and appeared to specifically target jellyfish with a high number of fish aggregating in their tentacles, suggesting the use of jellyfish may provide significant energetic benefits to foraging murres. We conclude that jellyfish provide feeding opportunities for diving seabirds by concentrating forage fish, and that the impacts of jellyfish on marine ecosystems are more complex than previously anticipated and may be beneficial to seabirds.

  9. Jellyfish modulate bacterial dynamic and community structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tinta, Tinkara; Kogovšek, Tjaša; Malej, Alenka; Turk, Valentina

    2012-01-01

    Jellyfish blooms have increased in coastal areas around the world and the outbreaks have become longer and more frequent over the past few decades. The Mediterranean Sea is among the heavily affected regions and the common bloom-forming taxa are scyphozoans Aurelia aurita s.l., Pelagia noctiluca, and Rhizostoma pulmo. Jellyfish have few natural predators, therefore their carcasses at the termination of a bloom represent an organic-rich substrate that supports rapid bacterial growth, and may have a large impact on the surrounding environment. The focus of this study was to explore whether jellyfish substrate have an impact on bacterial community phylotype selection. We conducted in situ jellyfish-enrichment experiment with three different jellyfish species. Bacterial dynamic together with nutrients were monitored to assess decaying jellyfish-bacteria dynamics. Our results show that jellyfish biomass is characterized by protein rich organic matter, which is highly bioavailable to 'jellyfish-associated' and 'free-living' bacteria, and triggers rapid shifts in bacterial population dynamics and composition. Based on 16S rRNA clone libraries and denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) analysis, we observed a rapid shift in community composition from unculturable Alphaproteobacteria to culturable species of Gammaproteobacteria and Flavobacteria. The results of sequence analyses of bacterial isolates and of total bacterial community determined by culture independent genetic analysis showed the dominance of the Pseudoalteromonadaceae and the Vibrionaceae families. Elevated levels of dissolved proteins, dissolved organic and inorganic nutrient release, bacterial abundance and carbon production as well as ammonium concentrations characterized the degradation process. The biochemical composition of jellyfish species may influence changes in the amount of accumulated dissolved organic and inorganic nutrients. Our results can contribute insights into possible changes in

  10. Jellyfish modulate bacterial dynamic and community structure.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tinkara Tinta

    Full Text Available Jellyfish blooms have increased in coastal areas around the world and the outbreaks have become longer and more frequent over the past few decades. The Mediterranean Sea is among the heavily affected regions and the common bloom-forming taxa are scyphozoans Aurelia aurita s.l., Pelagia noctiluca, and Rhizostoma pulmo. Jellyfish have few natural predators, therefore their carcasses at the termination of a bloom represent an organic-rich substrate that supports rapid bacterial growth, and may have a large impact on the surrounding environment. The focus of this study was to explore whether jellyfish substrate have an impact on bacterial community phylotype selection. We conducted in situ jellyfish-enrichment experiment with three different jellyfish species. Bacterial dynamic together with nutrients were monitored to assess decaying jellyfish-bacteria dynamics. Our results show that jellyfish biomass is characterized by protein rich organic matter, which is highly bioavailable to 'jellyfish-associated' and 'free-living' bacteria, and triggers rapid shifts in bacterial population dynamics and composition. Based on 16S rRNA clone libraries and denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE analysis, we observed a rapid shift in community composition from unculturable Alphaproteobacteria to culturable species of Gammaproteobacteria and Flavobacteria. The results of sequence analyses of bacterial isolates and of total bacterial community determined by culture independent genetic analysis showed the dominance of the Pseudoalteromonadaceae and the Vibrionaceae families. Elevated levels of dissolved proteins, dissolved organic and inorganic nutrient release, bacterial abundance and carbon production as well as ammonium concentrations characterized the degradation process. The biochemical composition of jellyfish species may influence changes in the amount of accumulated dissolved organic and inorganic nutrients. Our results can contribute insights into

  11. Micro- and macrorheology of jellyfish extracellular matrix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gambini, Camille; Abou, Bérengère; Ponton, Alain; Cornelissen, Annemiek J M

    2012-01-04

    Mechanical properties of the extracellular matrix (ECM) play a key role in tissue organization and morphogenesis. Rheological properties of jellyfish ECM (mesoglea) were measured in vivo at the cellular scale by passive microrheology techniques: microbeads were injected in jellyfish ECM and their Brownian motion was recorded to determine the mechanical properties of the surrounding medium. Microrheology results were compared with macrorheological measurements performed with a shear rheometer on slices of jellyfish mesoglea. We found that the ECM behaved as a viscoelastic gel at the macroscopic scale and as a much softer and heterogeneous viscoelastic structure at the microscopic scale. The fibrous architecture of the mesoglea, as observed by differential interference contrast and scanning electron microscopy, was in accord with these scale-dependent mechanical properties. Furthermore, the evolution of the mechanical properties of the ECM during aging was investigated by measuring microrheological properties at different jellyfish sizes. We measured that the ECM in adult jellyfish was locally stiffer than in juvenile ones. We argue that this stiffening is a consequence of local aggregations of fibers occurring gradually during aging of the jellyfish mesoglea and is enhanced by repetitive muscular contractions of the jellyfish.

  12. Current-oriented swimming by jellyfish and its role in bloom maintenance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fossette, Sabrina; Gleiss, Adrian Christopher; Chalumeau, Julien; Bastian, Thomas; Armstrong, Claire Denise; Vandenabeele, Sylvie; Karpytchev, Mikhail; Hays, Graeme Clive

    2015-02-02

    Cross-flows (winds or currents) affect animal movements [1-3]. Animals can temporarily be carried off course or permanently carried away from their preferred habitat by drift depending on their own traveling speed in relation to that of the flow [1]. Animals able to only weakly fly or swim will be the most impacted (e.g., [4]). To circumvent this problem, animals must be able to detect the effects of flow on their movements and respond to it [1, 2]. Here, we show that a weakly swimming organism, the jellyfish Rhizostoma octopus, can orientate its movements with respect to currents and that this behavior is key to the maintenance of blooms and essential to reduce the probability of stranding. We combined in situ observations with first-time deployment of accelerometers on free-ranging jellyfish and simulated the behavior observed in wild jellyfish within a high-resolution hydrodynamic model. Our results show that jellyfish can actively swim countercurrent in response to current drift, leading to significant life-history benefits, i.e., increased chance of survival and facilitated bloom formation. Current-oriented swimming may be achieved by jellyfish either directly detecting current shear across their body surface [5] or indirectly assessing drift direction using other cues (e.g., magnetic, infrasound). Our coupled behavioral-hydrodynamic model provides new evidence that current-oriented swimming contributes to jellyfish being able to form aggregations of hundreds to millions of individuals for up to several months, which may have substantial ecosystem and socioeconomic consequences [6, 7]. It also contributes to improve predictions of jellyfish blooms' magnitude and movements in coastal waters.

  13. Offshore marine constructions as propagators of moon jellyfish dispersal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vodopivec, Martin; Peliz, Álvaro J.; Malej, Alenka

    2017-08-01

    We have studied the influence of offshore marine constructions on the moon jellyfish population in the Adriatic sea, where the newly set up substrates enable the formation of a new population based in the formerly unpopulated open waters. Our five-year long computer simulation uses a high resolution coupled bio-physical individual-based model to track the dispersal of the offspring from subpopulations originating from offshore and shore-based sources. According to our study, the platforms enhance connectivity between subpopulations of jellyfish polyps, help sustain existing shore-based subpopulations, contribute to jellyfish blooms in some areas, and play an important role in establishing connection with the rest of the Mediterranean, in addition to representing substantial amounts of available substrate. This is an aspect that is usually overlooked when evaluating the ecological impact of existing and future wind farms, oil and gas platforms, etc. Our approach could serve as a role model in future studies of ecological impacts of planned offshore constructions.

  14. Giant jellyfish Nemopilema nomurai gathering in the Yellow Sea—a numerical study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Hao; Deng, Lijing; Wang, Yuheng; Zhao, Liang; Li, Xia; Zhang, Fang

    2015-04-01

    A particle tracking model, based on output from the Princeton Ocean Model (POM), is established to study the year-to-year variation of the gathering of giant jellyfish Nemopilema nomurai in early autumn in the Yellow Sea. Particles standing for scyphistoma adhered to the bottom are put initially along the coast from the Changjiang River estuary to Haizhou Bay. The triggering temperature for scyphistoma strobilation is set to 13 °C. The simulated N. nomurai distribution is in good agreement with observations in August 2009. Model results suggest that more jellyfish gathered near tidal front in August-September of 2008 than during the same period of 2009. Using a set of sensitivity experiments, the influences of temperature and circulation on N. nomurai gathering are discussed. Model results suggest the modeled difference in fall gathering of jellyfish between 2008 and 2009 can be attributed more to changes in circulation than the triggering of strobilation by spring bottom temperature.

  15. The Central Nervous System of Box Jellyfish

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Garm, Anders Lydik; Ekström, Peter

    2008-01-01

    Cubomedusae, or box jellyfish, are renowned for their immense stinging power, but another truly remarkable feature is their visual system. They have four sensory structures called rhopalia, and each of the rhopalia contains six eyes of four morphological types. These eyes support a range of behav......Cubomedusae, or box jellyfish, are renowned for their immense stinging power, but another truly remarkable feature is their visual system. They have four sensory structures called rhopalia, and each of the rhopalia contains six eyes of four morphological types. These eyes support a range...... of behaviors in the box jellyfish such as obstacle avoidance and navigation. The need to process the visual information and turn it into the appropriate behavior puts strong demands on the nervous system of box jellyfish, which appears more elaborate than in other cnidarians. Here, the central part...

  16. Optimal hash arrangement of tentacles in jellyfish

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okabe, Takuya; Yoshimura, Jin

    2016-06-01

    At first glance, the trailing tentacles of a jellyfish appear to be randomly arranged. However, close examination of medusae has revealed that the arrangement and developmental order of the tentacles obey a mathematical rule. Here, we show that medusa jellyfish adopt the best strategy to achieve the most uniform distribution of a variable number of tentacles. The observed order of tentacles is a real-world example of an optimal hashing algorithm known as Fibonacci hashing in computer science.

  17. Jellyfish stings on Langkawi Island, Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohd Suan, M A; Tan, W L; Soelar, S A; Cheng, H P; Osman, M

    2016-08-01

    Jellyfish stings are the most frequently reported marine animal envenomation worldwide. However, data on jellyfish sting from Malaysia remains obscure due to inadequate research. We investigated the epidemiology, clinical features and treatment of patients presenting at the emergency department of Langkawi Hospital between January 2012 and December 2014. Secondary data on the nature of the incident, patient demographics, clinical presentation, and treatment were retrieved from the patients' medical records. Descriptive statistics were presented for all patient variables. A total of 759 patients presented with jellyfish stings during the 3-year study period, with highest number of visits in July, October, November, and December. The mean patient age was 26.7 years (SD: 12.14), 59.4% were men, 68.1% were foreigners or international tourists, and 40.4% were stung between 12.00 p.m. and 6:59 p.m. At least 90 patients presented with mild Irukandji or Irukandji-like syndromes. Most of the jellyfish stings occurred at Chenang Beach (590 reported cases), followed by Tengah Beach and Kok Beach. Most patients were treated symptomatically, and no deaths following a jellyfish sting was reported during the study period. There is a need for public health interventions for both local and international tourists who visit Langkawi Island. Preventive steps and education on initial treatment at the incident site could elevate public awareness and decrease the adverse effects of jellyfish stings.

  18. Out-of-Plane Equilibrium Points in the Photogravitational CR3BP with Oblateness and P-R Drag

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Jagadish Singh; Tajudeen Oluwafemi Amuda

    2015-06-01

    This paper investigates the motion of a test particle around the out-of-plane equilibrium points in the circular photogravitational restricted three-body problem when the effect of radiation pressure from the smaller primary and its Poynting-Robertson (P-R) drag are taken into account, and the bigger primary is modeled as an oblate spheroid. These points lie in the -plane almost directly above and below the center of the oblate primary. The equilibrium points are sought, and we observe that, there are two coordinate points 6,7 which depend on the oblateness of the bigger primary, and the radiation pressure force and P-R drag of the smaller primary. The positions and linear stability of the problem are investigated both analytically and numerically for the binary system Cen X-4. The out-of-plane equilibrium points are found to be unstable in the sense of Lyapunov due to the presence of a positive real root.

  19. Drag reduction in turbulent channel flow laden with finite-size oblate spheroids

    CERN Document Server

    Ardekani, M Niazi; Breugem, W -P; Picano, F; Brandt, L

    2016-01-01

    We study suspensions of oblate rigid particles in a viscous fluid for different values of the particle volume fractions. Direct numerical simulations have been performed using a direct-forcing immersed boundary method to account for the dispersed phase, combined with a soft-sphere collision model and lubrication corrections for short-range particle-particle and particle-wall interactions. We show that the drag is reduced and the turbulent fluctuations attenuated in flows laden with oblate spheroids not only when compared to suspensions of perfect spheres but also to the single phase turbulent flow. In particular, the turbulence activity decreases to lower values than those obtained by only accounting for the effective suspension viscosity. To explain the observed drag reduction we consider the particle dynamics and the interactions of the particles with the turbulent velocity field. We report the lack of the particle layer at the wall observed for spherical particles, which was found to be responsible for inc...

  20. TOA Lightning Location Retrieval on Spherical and Oblate Spheroidal Earth Geometries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koshak, W. J.; Solakiewicz, R. J.; Arnold, James E. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    A simple linear algebraic solution is introduced for retrieving the location and time-of-occurrence of lightning ground strikes on a spherical Earth from a network of four or more time-of-arrival (TOA) sensors. Since the solution accounts for Earth curvature, it represents an extension to earlier planar model results described by Koshak et al. A test of the retrieval method is provided using computer-simulated data sets. The method is easy to comprehend and completely avoids reference to the mathematics of spherical hyperbolas such as discussed by Lewis. A quasi-analytic extension to the spherical Earth solution is provided for an oblate spheroidal Earth geometry, and the importance/relevance of oblate effects are discussed. Future application of these methods in support of the North American National Lightning Detection Network (NALDN) described by Cummins et al. is desirable, but additional theoretical investigations are required to incorporate magnetic bearing information into the present solution process.

  1. Length Is Associated with Pain: Jellyfish with Painful Sting Have Longer Nematocyst Tubules than Harmless Jellyfish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitatani, Ryuju; Yamada, Mayu; Kamio, Michiya; Nagai, Hiroshi

    2015-01-01

    A large number of humans are stung by jellyfish all over the world. The stings cause acute pain followed by persistent pain and local inflammation. Harmful jellyfish species typically cause strong pain, whereas harmless jellyfish cause subtle or no pain. Jellyfish sting humans by injecting a tubule, contained in the nematocyst, the stinging organ of jellyfish. The tubule penetrates into the skin leading to venom injection. The detailed morphology of the nematocyst tubule and molecular structure of the venom in the nematocyst has been reported; however, the mechanism responsible for the difference in pain that is caused by harmful and harmless jellyfish sting has not yet been explored or explained. Therefore, we hypothesized that differences in the length of the nematocyst tubule leads to different degrees of epithelial damage. The initial acute pain might be generated by penetration of the tubule, which stimulates pain receptor neurons, whilst persistent pain might be caused by injection of venom into the epithelium. To test this hypothesis we compared the lengths of discharged nematocyst tubules from harmful and harmless jellyfish species and evaluated their ability to penetrate human skin. The results showed that the harmful jellyfish species, Chrysaora pacifica, Carybdea brevipedalia, and Chironex yamaguchii, causing moderate to severe pain, have nematocyst tubules longer than 200 μm, compared with a jellyfish species that cause little or no pain, Aurelia aurita. The majority of the tubules of harmful jellyfishes, C. yamaguchii and C. brevipedalia, were sufficiently long to penetrate the human epidermis and physically stimulate the free nerve endings of Aδ pain receptor fibers around plexuses to cause acute pain and inject the venom into the human skin epithelium to cause persistent pain and inflammation.

  2. Jellyfish envenoming syndromes: unknown toxic mechanisms and unproven therapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey, Paul M; Little, Mark; Jelinek, George A; Wilce, Jacqueline A

    2003-01-06

    Interest in envenoming syndromes caused by Australian jellyfish has been intense since the deaths in early 2002 of two tourists in Queensland, attributed to the Irukandji syndrome. We review current knowledge of these envenoming syndromes, mechanisms of venom action and therapy, focusing on the deadly box jellyfish, Chironex fleckeri, and the array of jellyfish thought to cause the Irukandji syndrome. Current understanding of jellyfish venom activity is very limited, and many treatments are unproven and based on anecdote.

  3. Disk formation in oblate B[e] stars

    CERN Document Server

    Araya, I; Curé, M

    2016-01-01

    We investigate the possible role of line-driven winds in the circumstellar envelope in B[e] stars, mainly the role of the $\\Omega$-slow wind solution, which is characterized by a slower terminal velocity and higher mass-loss rate, in comparison with the standard (m-CAK) wind solution. In this work, we assume two scenarios: 1) a spherically symmetric star and 2) a scenario that considers the oblate shape, considering only the oblate correction factor. For certain values of the line force parameters (according to previous works), we obtain in both scenarios a density contrast $\\gtrsim10^{2}$ between equatorial and polar densities, characterized for a fast polar wind and a slow and denser wind when the $\\Omega$-slow wind solution is obtained. All this properties are enhanced when the oblate correction factor is included in our calculations.

  4. Feeding rates of the jellyfish Aurelia aurita on fish larvae

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Titelman, J.; Hansson, L.J.

    2006-01-01

    of prey captured by A. aurita during 2.5 h of feeding at extremely high prey concentration (> 200 prey l(-1)). Clearance rate in darkness scaled with jellyfish diameter to a power of similar to 1.7 for jellyfish 3.9-9.5 cm in diameter. The jellyfish did not alter their umbrella pulse frequency in response...

  5. Ocean acidification alters fish-jellyfish symbiosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagelkerken, Ivan; Pitt, Kylie A; Rutte, Melchior D; Geertsma, Robbert C

    2016-06-29

    Symbiotic relationships are common in nature, and are important for individual fitness and sustaining species populations. Global change is rapidly altering environmental conditions, but, with the exception of coral-microalgae interactions, we know little of how this will affect symbiotic relationships. We here test how the effects of ocean acidification, from rising anthropogenic CO2 emissions, may alter symbiotic interactions between juvenile fish and their jellyfish hosts. Fishes treated with elevated seawater CO2 concentrations, as forecast for the end of the century on a business-as-usual greenhouse gas emission scenario, were negatively affected in their behaviour. The total time that fish (yellowtail scad) spent close to their jellyfish host in a choice arena where they could see and smell their host was approximately three times shorter under future compared with ambient CO2 conditions. Likewise, the mean number of attempts to associate with jellyfish was almost three times lower in CO2-treated compared with control fish, while only 63% (high CO2) versus 86% (control) of all individuals tested initiated an association at all. By contrast, none of three fish species tested were attracted solely to jellyfish olfactory cues under present-day CO2 conditions, suggesting that the altered fish-jellyfish association is not driven by negative effects of ocean acidification on olfaction. Because shelter is not widely available in the open water column and larvae of many (and often commercially important) pelagic species associate with jellyfish for protection against predators, modification of the fish-jellyfish symbiosis might lead to higher mortality and alter species population dynamics, and potentially have flow-on effects for their fisheries.

  6. The toxinology of jellyfishes a systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Negar Taheri

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: Jellyfishes belong to the phylum Cnidarians with a wide range of size, from 22 centimeters to 2.5 meters. Jellyfishes have a worldwide distribution comprising over nine thousands species that approximately, 100 species are dangerous for humans. The venoms of these organisms contain biomolecules with extensive activities which could be used as a source of novel drugs in the future. Materials and Methods: The PubMed data bank was searched for the term “Jellyfish”. A total of 1677 papers were found. These papers were divided into three categories: medical, biomedical and biotechnological fields. The medical category was further divided into three subcategories comprising systemic manifestations, cutaneous manifestations and treatments for the stings of jellyfishes. The biomedical category was further subdivided into genomics, proteomics, and biology of venoms, mechanisms of actions and products of biomedical significance. In this part of systematic review, the biomedical and biotechnological and biotechnological fields were evaluated. Results: The genomics and proteomics of 24 species of jellyfishes had been studied in details. The mechanisms of actions of the venoms of 23 species were under investigations. The hematologic (hemolytic effects, cardiotoxic, neurotoxic, dermonecrotic, immunologic and cytotoxic presentations for the venoms were reported. Similar clinical presentations could be produced by different species of jellyfishes with a vast of molecular action mechanisms. Bioactive molecules with cytotoxic, anticancer, antibacterial and antioxidant effects were isolated from the venoms. Conclusion: The venoms of jellyfishes have bioactive molecules that produce a variety of complex intracellular interactions. Hence, the studies on the venomics of jellyfishes and the mechanisms of actions of their venoms could progress the therapeutic interventions and promise novel marine drugs.

  7. Drag reduction in turbulent channel laden with finite-size oblate spheroids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niazi Ardekani, Mehdi; Pedro Costa Collaboration; Wim-Paul Breugem Collaboration; Francesco Picano Collaboration; Luca Brandt Collaboration

    2016-11-01

    Suspensions of oblate rigid particles in a turbulent plane channel flow are investigated for different values of the particle volume fraction. We perform direct numerical simulations (DNS), using a direct-forcing immersed boundary method to account for the particle-fluid interactions, combined with a soft-sphere collision model and lubrication corrections for short-range particle-particle and particle-wall interactions. We show a clear drag reduction and turbulence attenuation in flows laden with oblate spheroids, both with respect to the single phase turbulent flow and to suspensions of rigid spheres. We explain the drag reduction by the lack of the particle layer at the wall, observed before for spherical particles. In addition, the special shape of the oblate particles creates a tendency to stay parallel to the wall in its vicinity, forming a shield of particles that prevents strong fluctuations in the outer layer to reach the wall and vice versa. Detailed statistics of the fluid and particle phase will be presented at the conference to explain the observed drag reduction. Supported by the European Research Council Grant No. ERC-2013-CoG-616186, TRITOS. The authors acknowledge computer time provided by SNIC (Swedish National Infrastructure for Computing) and the support from the COST Action MP1305: Flowing matter.

  8. Is the Presence of Jellyfish Problematic or Beneficial?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Udomsak DARUMAS

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Jellyfish are a diverse group of animals. The group consists of Chordata, Ctenophora and, mainly, Cnidaria. Jellyfish are often thought to be harmful, but few can cause fatality in humans. They are important throughout the trophic levels and consume a variety of prey. Jellyfish are used for food and have a high potential for pharmaceutical use. During a jellyfish bloom, energy flows are shunted through the trophic levels. Additionally, unusual increases in populations of jellyfish can cause problems for fisheries, aquaculture, power plants and the tourist industries.

  9. The global susceptibility of coastal forage fish to competition by large jellyfish

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schnedler-Meyer, Nicolas Azaña; Mariani, Patrizio; Kiørboe, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    , but the lack of both good quality data and a robust theoretical framework have prevented general global analyses. Here, we present a general mechanistic food web model that considers fundamental differences in feeding modes and predation pressure between fish and jellyfish. The model predicts forage fish...

  10. Feeding Currents Generated by Upside Down Jellyfish

    CERN Document Server

    Rodriguez, Terry; Gyoerkoe, Megan; Miller, Laura

    2010-01-01

    We present fluid dynamics videos of the pulsing dynamics and the resulting fluid flow generated by the upside down jellyfish, Cassiopea spp. Medusae of this genus are unusual in that they typically rest upside down on the ocean floor and pulse their bells to generate feeding currents, only swimming when significantly disturbed. The pulsing kinematics and fluid flow around these upside down jellyfish is investigated using a combination of videography, flow visualization, and numerical simulation. Significant mixing occurs around and directly above the oral arms and secondary mouths. Numerical simulations using the immersed boundary method with a porous layer representing the oral arms agree with the experimental results. The simulations also suggest that the presence of porous oral arms induce net horizontal flow towards the bell. Coherent vortex rings are not seen in the wake above the jellyfish, but starting and stopping vortices are observed before breaking up as they pass through the elaborate oral arms (i...

  11. protective effect of tetracycline against dermal toxicity induced by Jellyfish venom.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Changkeun Kang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Previously, we have reported that most, if not all, of the Scyphozoan jellyfish venoms contain multiple components of metalloproteinases, which apparently linked to the venom toxicity. Further, it is also well known that there is a positive correlation between the inflammatory reaction of dermal tissues and their tissue metalloproteinase activity. Based on these, the use of metalloproteinase inhibitors appears to be a promising therapeutic alternative for the treatment of jellyfish envenomation. METHODOLOGY AND PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Tetracycline (a metalloproteinase inhibitor has been examined for its activity to reduce or prevent the dermal toxicity induced by Nemopilema nomurai (Scyphozoa: Rhizostomeae jellyfish venom (NnV using in vitro and in vivo models. HaCaT (human keratinocyte and NIH3T3 (mouse fibroblast incubated with NnV showed decreases in cell viability, which is associated with the inductions of metalloproteinase-2 and -9. This result suggests that the use of metalloproteinase inhibitors, such as tetracycline, may prevent the jellyfish venom-mediated local tissue damage. In vivo experiments showed that comparing with NnV-alone treatment, tetracycline pre-mixed NnV demonstrated a significantly reduced progression of dermal toxicity upon the inoculation onto rabbit skin. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: It is believed that there has been no previous report on the therapeutic agent of synthetic chemical origin for the treatment of jellyfish venom-induced dermonecrosis based on understanding its mechanism of action except the use of antivenom treatment. Furthermore, the current study, for the first time, has proposed a novel mechanism-based therapeutic intervention for skin damages caused by jellyfish stings.

  12. Jellyfish body plans provide allometric advantages beyond low carbon content.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitt, Kylie A; Duarte, Carlos M; Lucas, Cathy H; Sutherland, Kelly R; Condon, Robert H; Mianzan, Hermes; Purcell, Jennifer E; Robinson, Kelly L; Uye, Shin-Ichi

    2013-01-01

    Jellyfish form spectacular blooms throughout the world's oceans. Jellyfish body plans are characterised by high water and low carbon contents which enables them to grow much larger than non-gelatinous animals of equivalent carbon content and to deviate from non-gelatinous pelagic animals when incorporated into allometric relationships. Jellyfish have, however, been argued to conform to allometric relationships when carbon content is used as the metric for comparison. Here we test the hypothesis that differences in allometric relationships for several key functional parameters remain for jellyfish even after their body sizes are scaled to their carbon content. Data on carbon and nitrogen contents, rates of respiration, excretion, growth, longevity and swimming velocity of jellyfish and other pelagic animals were assembled. Allometric relationships between each variable and the equivalent spherical diameters of jellyfish and other pelagic animals were compared before and after sizes of jellyfish were standardised for their carbon content. Before standardisation, the slopes of the allometric relationships for respiration, excretion and growth were the same for jellyfish and other pelagic taxa but the intercepts differed. After standardisation, slopes and intercepts for respiration were similar but excretion rates of jellyfish were 10× slower, and growth rates 2× faster than those of other pelagic animals. Longevity of jellyfish was independent of size. The slope of the allometric relationship of swimming velocity of jellyfish differed from that of other pelagic animals but because they are larger jellyfish operate at Reynolds numbers approximately 10× greater than those of other pelagic animals of comparable carbon content. We conclude that low carbon and high water contents alone do not explain the differences in the intercepts or slopes of the allometric relationships of jellyfish and other pelagic animals and that the evolutionary longevity of jellyfish and

  13. Jellyfish body plans provide allometric advantages beyond low carbon content.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kylie A Pitt

    Full Text Available Jellyfish form spectacular blooms throughout the world's oceans. Jellyfish body plans are characterised by high water and low carbon contents which enables them to grow much larger than non-gelatinous animals of equivalent carbon content and to deviate from non-gelatinous pelagic animals when incorporated into allometric relationships. Jellyfish have, however, been argued to conform to allometric relationships when carbon content is used as the metric for comparison. Here we test the hypothesis that differences in allometric relationships for several key functional parameters remain for jellyfish even after their body sizes are scaled to their carbon content. Data on carbon and nitrogen contents, rates of respiration, excretion, growth, longevity and swimming velocity of jellyfish and other pelagic animals were assembled. Allometric relationships between each variable and the equivalent spherical diameters of jellyfish and other pelagic animals were compared before and after sizes of jellyfish were standardised for their carbon content. Before standardisation, the slopes of the allometric relationships for respiration, excretion and growth were the same for jellyfish and other pelagic taxa but the intercepts differed. After standardisation, slopes and intercepts for respiration were similar but excretion rates of jellyfish were 10× slower, and growth rates 2× faster than those of other pelagic animals. Longevity of jellyfish was independent of size. The slope of the allometric relationship of swimming velocity of jellyfish differed from that of other pelagic animals but because they are larger jellyfish operate at Reynolds numbers approximately 10× greater than those of other pelagic animals of comparable carbon content. We conclude that low carbon and high water contents alone do not explain the differences in the intercepts or slopes of the allometric relationships of jellyfish and other pelagic animals and that the evolutionary longevity

  14. Stability of Triangular Equilibrium Points in the Photogravitational Restricted Three-Body Problem with Oblateness and Potential from a Belt

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Jagadish Singh; Joel John Taura

    2014-06-01

    We have examined the effects of oblateness up to 4 of the less massive primary and gravitational potential from a circum-binary belt on the linear stability of triangular equilibrium points in the circular restricted three-body problem, when the more massive primary emits electromagnetic radiation impinging on the other bodies of the system. Using analytical and numerical methods, we have found the triangular equilibrium points and examined their linear stability. The triangular equilibrium points move towards the line joining the primaries in the presence of any of these perturbations, except in the presence of oblateness up to 4 where the points move away from the line joining the primaries. It is observed that the triangular points are stable for 0 < < c and unstable for c ≤ ≤ $\\frac{1}{2}$, where c is the critical mass ratio affected by the oblateness up to 4 of the less massive primary, electromagnetic radiation of the more massive primary and potential from the belt, all of which have destabilizing tendencies, except the coefficient 4 and the potential from the belt. A practical application of this model could be the study of motion of a dust particle near a radiating star and an oblate body surrounded by a belt.

  15. Correction on Effect of Earth's Oblateness in Inversion of GPS Occultation Data

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU Xiaohua; LI Zhenghang; LUO Jia

    2005-01-01

    By using observed CHAMP orbit ephemeredes and MSISE-90 dry air model and regarding the earth as a sphere and an ellipsoid respectively, phase delays are simulated and the simulated data are retrieved under different schemes. The comparison between the inverted temperature profiles and the model temperature profiles shows that by inverting observed data, we will get temperature results with large errors if the effect of Earth's oblateness is omitted. The correction method is proved to be effective because the temperature errors decreased obviously with this method.

  16. Analyzing Beach Recreationists' Preferences for the Reduction of Jellyfish Blooms: Economic Results from a Stated-Choice Experiment in Catalonia, Spain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulo A L D Nunes

    Full Text Available Jellyfish outbreaks and their consequences appear to be on the increase around the world, and are becoming particularly relevant in the Mediterranean. No previous studies have quantified tourism losses caused by jellyfish outbreaks. We used a stated-choice questionnaire and a Random Utility Model to estimate the amount of time respondents would be willing to add to their journey, in terms of reported extra travel time, in order to reduce the risk of encountering jellyfish blooms in the Catalan coast. The estimation results indicated that the respondents were willing to spend on average an additional 23.8% of their travel time to enjoy beach recreation in areas with a lower risk of jellyfish blooms. Using as a reference the opportunity cost of time, we found that the subsample of individuals who made a trade-off between the disutility generated by travelling longer in order to lower the risk of jellyfish blooms, and the utility gained from reducing this risk, are willing to pay on average €3.20 per beach visit. This estimate, combined with the respondents' mean income, yielded annual economic gains associated with reduction of jellyfish blooms on the Catalan coast around €422.57 million, or about 11.95% of the tourism expenditures in 2012. From a policy-making perspective, this study confirms the importance of the economic impacts of jellyfish blooms and the need for mitigation strategies. In particular, providing daily information using social media applications or other technical devices may reduce these social costs. The current lack of knowledge about jellyfish suggests that providing this information to beach recreationists may be a substantially effective policy instrument for minimising the impact of jellyfish blooms.

  17. Analyzing Beach Recreationists' Preferences for the Reduction of Jellyfish Blooms: Economic Results from a Stated-Choice Experiment in Catalonia, Spain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nunes, Paulo A L D; Loureiro, Maria L; Piñol, Laia; Sastre, Sergio; Voltaire, Louinord; Canepa, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    Jellyfish outbreaks and their consequences appear to be on the increase around the world, and are becoming particularly relevant in the Mediterranean. No previous studies have quantified tourism losses caused by jellyfish outbreaks. We used a stated-choice questionnaire and a Random Utility Model to estimate the amount of time respondents would be willing to add to their journey, in terms of reported extra travel time, in order to reduce the risk of encountering jellyfish blooms in the Catalan coast. The estimation results indicated that the respondents were willing to spend on average an additional 23.8% of their travel time to enjoy beach recreation in areas with a lower risk of jellyfish blooms. Using as a reference the opportunity cost of time, we found that the subsample of individuals who made a trade-off between the disutility generated by travelling longer in order to lower the risk of jellyfish blooms, and the utility gained from reducing this risk, are willing to pay on average €3.20 per beach visit. This estimate, combined with the respondents' mean income, yielded annual economic gains associated with reduction of jellyfish blooms on the Catalan coast around €422.57 million, or about 11.95% of the tourism expenditures in 2012. From a policy-making perspective, this study confirms the importance of the economic impacts of jellyfish blooms and the need for mitigation strategies. In particular, providing daily information using social media applications or other technical devices may reduce these social costs. The current lack of knowledge about jellyfish suggests that providing this information to beach recreationists may be a substantially effective policy instrument for minimising the impact of jellyfish blooms.

  18. Observation of a Collective Oblate Band in 137Ce

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHU Sheng-Jiang; Jon Myang-Gil; WEN Shu-Xian; WU Xiao-Guang; LIU Xiang-An; ZHU Ling-Yan; LI Ming; GAN Cui-Yun; M. Sakhaee; YANG Li-Ming; ZHANG Zheng; JIANG Zhuo; LONG Gui-Lu

    2000-01-01

    High spin states in 137 Ce have been studied by using the heavy-ion induced reaction 124Sn(18 O, 5n) carried out at China Institute of Atomic Energy. Partial level scheme with spin up to (43/2-), including a high spin collective rotational band observed for the first time, has been established. The collective band shows the properties similar to those oblate bands with γ ~-60° in neighboring nuclei and probably originates from the five quasi-particle configuration νs1/2 [vh11/2]2 π97/2 πh11/2. The characteristics of this oblate band have been discussed.

  19. Proton emission from an oblate nucleus {sup 151}Lu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Procter, M.G., E-mail: mark.procter@postgrad.manchester.ac.uk [School of Physics and Astronomy, Schuster Laboratory, The University of Manchester, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom); Cullen, D.M.; Taylor, M.J.; Alharshan, G.A. [School of Physics and Astronomy, Schuster Laboratory, The University of Manchester, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom); Ferreira, L.S. [Centro de Física das Interacções Fundamentais, Departamento de Física, Instituto Superior Tecnico, Avenida Rovisco Pais, P1049-001 Lisbon (Portugal); Maglione, E. [Dipartimento di Fisica “G. Galilei”, Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Via Marzolo 8, I-3513, Padova (Italy); Auranen, K.; Grahn, T.; Greenlees, P.T.; Jakobsson, U.; Julin, R.; Herzáň, A.; Konki, J.; Leino, M. [Department of Physics, University of Jyväskylä, FIN-40014 Jyväskylä (Finland); Pakarinen, J. [Oliver Lodge Laboratory, University of Liverpool, Liverpool L69 7ZE (United Kingdom); Partanen, J. [Institut für Kernphysik, Universität zu Köln, D-50937, Köln (Germany); Peura, P.; Rahkila, P.; Ruotsalainen, P.; Sandzelius, M. [Department of Physics, University of Jyväskylä, FIN-40014 Jyväskylä (Finland); and others

    2013-08-09

    Excited states in the proton-unbound nucleus {sup 151}Lu have been established using γ-ray coincidence techniques. The lifetime of the first excited state above the proton-emitting ground state has been measured using the recoil-distance Doppler-shift method combined with recoil-decay tagging. The experimental level scheme and extracted lifetime have been compared with state-of-the-art theoretical calculations based upon a non-adiabatic deformed Woods–Saxon potential. This comparison suggests that the proton-emitting ground state in {sup 151}Lu is mildly oblate with a deformation β=−0.11{sub −0.05}{sup +0.02} and represents the best evidence to date for proton emission from an oblate nucleus.

  20. Learning from jellyfish: Fluid transport in muscular pumps at intermediate Reynolds numbers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nawroth, Janna; Dabiri, John

    2010-11-01

    Biologically inspired hydrodynamic propulsion and maneuvering strategies promise the advancement of medical implants and minimally invasive clinical tools. We have chosen juvenile jellyfish as a model system for investigating fluid dynamics and morphological properties underlying fluid transport by a muscular pump at intermediate Reynolds numbers. Recently we have described how natural variations in viscous forces are balanced by changes in jellyfish body shape (phenotypic plasticity), to the effect of facilitating efficient body-fluid interaction. Complementing these studies in our live model organisms, we are also engaged in engineering an artificial jellyfish, that is, a jellyfish-inspired construct of a flexible plastic sheet actuated by a monolayer of rat cardiomyocytes. The main challenges here are (1) to derive a body shape and deformation suitable for effective fluid transport under physiological conditions, (2) to understand the mechanical properties of the muscular film and derive a design capable of the desired deformation, (3) to master the proper alignment and timely contraction of the muscle component needed to achieve the desired deformation, and (4) to evaluate the performance of the design.

  1. [Causes of jellyfish blooms and their influence on marine environment].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qu, Chang-feng; Song, Jin-ming; Li, Ning

    2014-12-01

    Jellyfish blooms have damaged the normal composition and function of marine ecosystem and ecological environments, which have been one of the new marine ecological disasters. In this study, we summarized the possible inducements of jellyfish blooms, and the influences of jellyfish blooms on biogenic elements, dissolved oxygen, seawater acidity and biological community were discussed emphatically. The results showed that jellyfish blooms had a close contact with its physiological structure and life history, which had favorable characteristics including simple body struc- ture, rapid growth, thriving reproduction and short generation interval to tolerate harsh environment better. Jellyfish abundance increased rapidly when it encountered suitable conditions. The temperature variations of seawater might be the major inducing factor which could result in jellyfish blooms. Jellyfish blooms may benefit from warmer temperature that could increase the food availability of jellyfish and promote jellyfish reproduction, especially for warm temperate jellyfish species. Eutrophication, climate change, overfishing, alien invasions and habitat modification were all possible important contributory factors of jellyfish blooms. Jellyfish could significantly influence the form distribution and biogeochemical cycling of biogenic elements. Jellyfish excreted NH4+ and P04(3-) at a rate of 59.1-91.5 micromol N x kg(-1) x h(-1) and 1.1-1.8 micromol P x kg(-1) x h(-1), which could meet about 8%-10% and 21.6% of the phytoplankton primary production requirement of N and P, respectively. Live jellyfish released dissolved organic carbon (DOC) at a rate of 1.0 micromol C x g(-1) x d(-1). As jellyfish decomposing, the effluxes of total N and total P were 4000 micromol N x kg(-1) x d(-1) and 120 micromol P x kg(-1) x d(-1), respectively, while the efflux of DOC reached 30 micromol C x g(-1) x d(-1). Jellyfish decomposition could cause seawater acidification and lowered level of dissolved oxygen

  2. Isolation, Characterization and Evaluation of Collagen from Jellyfish Rhopilema esculentum Kishinouye for Use in Hemostatic Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Xiaochen; Liu, Chenguang

    2017-01-01

    Hemostat has been a crucial focus since human body is unable to control massive blood loss, and collagen proves to be an effective hemostat in previous studies. In this study, collagen was isolated from the mesoglea of jellyfish Rhopilema esculentum Kishinouye and its hemostatic property was studied. The yields of acid-soluble collagen (ASC) and pepsin-soluble (PSC) were 0.12% and 0.28% respectively. The SDS-PAGE patterns indicated that the collagen extracted from jellyfish mesoglea was type I collagen. The lyophilized jellyfish collagen sponges were cross-linked with EDC and interconnected networks in the sponges were revealed by scanning electron microscope (SEM). Collagen sponges exhibited higher water absorption rates than medical gauze and EDC/NHS cross-linking method could improve the stability of the collagen sponges. Compared with medical gauze groups, the blood clotting indexes (BCIs) of collagen sponges were significantly decreased (P < 0.05) and the concentration of collagen also had an influence on the hemostatic property (P < 0.05). Collagen sponges had an improved hemostatic ability compared to the gauze control in tail amputation rat models. Hemostatic mechanism studies showed that hemocytes and platelets could adhere and aggregate on the surface of collagen sponge. All properties make jellyfish collagen sponge to be a suitable candidate used as hemostatic material and for wound healing applications. PMID:28103327

  3. Detection of microvasculature alterations by synchrotron radiation in murine with delayed jellyfish envenomation syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Beilei; Zhang, Bo; Huo, Hua; Wang, Tao; Wang, Qianqian; Wu, Yuanlin; Xiao, Liang; Ren, Yuqi; Zhang, Liming

    2014-04-01

    Using the tentacle extract (TE) from the jellyfish Cyanea capillata, we have previously established a delayed jellyfish envenomation syndrome (DJES) model, which is meaningful for clinical interventions against jellyfish stings. However, the mechanism of DJES still remains unclear. Thus, this study aimed to explore its potential mechanism by detecting TE-induced microvasculature alterations in vivo and ex vivo. Using a third-generation synchrotron radiation facility, we, for the first time, directly observed the blood vessel alterations induced by jellyfish venom in vivo and ex vivo. Firstly, microvasculature imaging of whole-body mouse in vivo indicated that the small blood vessel branches in the liver and kidney in the TE-treated group, seemed much thinner than those in the control group. Secondly, 3D imaging of kidney ex vivo showed that the kidneys in the TE-treated group had incomplete vascular trees where distal vessel branches were partly missing and disorderly disturbed. Finally, histopathological analysis found that obvious morphological changes, especially hemorrhagic effects, were also present in the TE-treated kidney. Thus, TE-induced microvasculature changes might be one of the important mechanisms of multiple organ dysfunctions in DJES. In addition, the methods we employed here will probably facilitate further studies on developing effective intervention strategies against DJES.

  4. Hypertonic saline in the treatment of corneal jellyfish stings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu Yao, Hsin; Cho, Ta Hsiung; Lu, Ching Hsiang; Lin, Feng Chi; Horng, Chi Ting

    2016-02-01

    A 20-year-old male soldier was hit by the jellyfish. The ophthalmic examination revealed that epithelial keratitis and corneal oedema in the right eye. We prescribed 3% NaCl eyedrops and 0.3% Norfloxacin eyedrops in the treatment of the corneal jellyfish stings. Two weeks later, the cornea in the right eye healed. In this case report, 3% NaCl eyedrops was effective in the treatment of acute phase of jellyfish stings of the cornea.

  5. Actuation control of a PiezoMEMS biomimetic robotic jellyfish

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alejandre, Alvaro; Olszewski, Oskar; Jackson, Nathan

    2017-06-01

    Biomimetic micro-robots try to mimic the motion of a living system in the form of a synthetically developed microfabricated device. Dynamic motion of living systems have evolved through the years, but trying to mimic these motions is challenging. Micro-robotics are particular challenging as the fabrication of devices and controlling the motion in 3 dimensions is difficult. However, micro-scale robotics have potential to be used in a wide range of applications. MEMS based robots that can move and function in a liquid environment is of particular interest. This paper describes the development of a piezoMEMS based device that mimics the movement of a jellyfish. The paper focuses on the development of a finite element model that investigates a method of controlling the individual piezoelectric beams in order to create a jet propulsion motion, consisting of a quick excitation pulse followed by a slow recovery pulse in order to maximize thrust and velocity. By controlling the individual beams or legs of the jellyfish robot the authors can control the robot to move precisely in 3 dimensions.

  6. Study on the carry capacity of edible jellyfish fishery in Liaodong Bay

    Science.gov (United States)

    You, Kui; Bian, Yongning; Ma, Caihua; Chi, Xupeng; Liu, Zhiqiang; Zhang, Yuyu

    2016-06-01

    Jellyfish fishing is a special type of fishery that mainly exists in some countries of East and Southeast Asia. China has the largest jellyfish fishery yield in the world with an annual harvest of around 300 thousand tons. Liaodong Bay is the most important jellyfish fishery ground in China. However, due to the high benefits of jellyfish fishery, which leads to illegal and out-of-season jellyfish fishing occurring each year in Liaodong Bay. Illegal jellyfish fishery in Liaodong Bay is a typical example of the tragedy of the commons. The key problem is that fishermen seek to an illegally initiate jellyfish fishing as early as possible. In this paper, basing on the data of edible jellyfish's biology and ecology, we mainly analyzed the history of jellyfish fishery in China, especially in Liaodong bay, and then we calculated the carry capacity of edible jellyfish in Liaodong Bay which is about 300 thousand tons one year. This number is equal to the recent annual yield of edible jellyfish in China. Furthermore, basing on the carry capacity and reasonable quotas price analysis, we set up a Jellyfish fishing quotas and deficit quotas buyback system which could be a suitable and effective solution for jellyfish fishery management and development in Liaodong Bay at the underlying roots. Although China is the first country with edible jellyfish aquaculture, the annual yield of jellyfish aquaculture is only one fifth of jellyfish fishing. So, there is a very bright developing prospect about edible jellyfish aquaculture in China.

  7. Interpretation of Polarization Features in Ground-Based Microwave Observations as Caused by Horizontally Aligned Oblate Raindrops.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czekala, Harald; Crewell, Susanne; Simmer, Clemens; Thiele, Ariane; Hornbostel, Achim; Schroth, Arno

    2001-11-01

    Based on a comparison of ground-based radiometer measurements with microwave radiative transfer calculations, it is shown that raindrops with an oblate shape and a preferred horizontal orientation have a significant effect on microwave polarization signals when compared with spherical particle shape. Measurements with a dual-polarized 19-GHz radiometer reveal a polarization difference of as much as 18 K in the downwelling microwave radiation at 30° elevation angle. Averaging all rain observations within 19 months leads to a signal of 6 K. Model calculations covering roughly the same range of weather conditions as that inferred from the meteorological data recorded with the radiometer measurements were carried out with spherical raindrop shape and an oblate particle shape with a fixed horizontal alignment. From the model results, positive polarization difference is expected for spherical particles. This signal was never observed in the recorded data. For oblate drops, the averaged model results lead to a polarization difference of 8 K, which is in reasonable agreement with the long-term averaged observations. Case studies that compare isolated rain events usually lead to a better match of model and observations. However, there are some major discrepancies in some cases. Possible reasons for the remaining differences are the short-term variations in the cloud microphysics for which the model does not correctly account, such as variations in the melting layer, drop oscillations, or variations in the drop size distribution or angular distribution of the drop alignment. Three-dimensional effects are also important when observing small-scale heavy precipitation. Despite remaining small uncertainties, the comparison presents strong evidence that the oblate raindrop shape, with fixed horizontal alignment, is by far the better choice for accurate radiative transfer calculations than is the spherical shape. The omission of this shape effect can cause significant errors when

  8. Life-history stages of the jellyfish Aurelia aurita - towards a demographic understanding of jellyfish blooms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Goldstein, Josephine

    2017-01-01

    Jellyfish blooms are conspicuous demographic events that have received increasing attention by the public and the scientific community over the last decades due to their negative impact on fisheries, tourism and other human industries. Several aspects of the complex life cycles of the jellyfish...... species involved in mass occurrence have been covered in previous studies, providing important insight into diverse life stage-specific adaptation strategies to changing environmental conditions. Quantification of the demographic rates that characterize different life-history stages however has remained...... population dynamics and may inspire future research to sharpen an integrated view of jellyfish life histories in an ever changing environment. Such insight might be of particular importance beyond A. aurita in times of habitat eutrophication, climate warming and changes in species diversity....

  9. The Central Nervous System of Box Jellyfish

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Garm, Anders Lydik; Ekström, Peter

    2008-01-01

    of behaviors in the box jellyfish such as obstacle avoidance and navigation. The need to process the visual information and turn it into the appropriate behavior puts strong demands on the nervous system of box jellyfish, which appears more elaborate than in other cnidarians. Here, the central part...... of this nervous system is described. Each rhopalium holds a separate part of the CNS with 1,000 nerve cells and a large amount of neuropil. The rhopalial nervous system has several subsystems defined by the anatomy, location, and immunocytochemistry of the cells. Most of the subsystems connect to one or more...... of the eye types, and it is likely that the rhopalial nervous system accounts for most of the visual processing. The major part of the CNS is made up of a ring nerve encircling the bell shaped body. The ring nerve holds around 10,000 cells and is directly connected to all four rhopalial nervous systems...

  10. Jellyfish collagen scaffolds for cartilage tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoyer, Birgit; Bernhardt, Anne; Lode, Anja; Heinemann, Sascha; Sewing, Judith; Klinger, Matthias; Notbohm, Holger; Gelinsky, Michael

    2014-02-01

    Porous scaffolds were engineered from refibrillized collagen of the jellyfish Rhopilema esculentum for potential application in cartilage regeneration. The influence of collagen concentration, salinity and temperature on fibril formation was evaluated by turbidity measurements and quantification of fibrillized collagen. The formation of collagen fibrils with a typical banding pattern was confirmed by atomic force microscopy and transmission electron microscopy analysis. Porous scaffolds from jellyfish collagen, refibrillized under optimized conditions, were fabricated by freeze-drying and subsequent chemical cross-linking. Scaffolds possessed an open porosity of 98.2%. The samples were stable under cyclic compression and displayed an elastic behavior. Cytotoxicity tests with human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) did not reveal any cytotoxic effects of the material. Chondrogenic markers SOX9, collagen II and aggrecan were upregulated in direct cultures of hMSCs upon chondrogenic stimulation. The formation of typical extracellular matrix components was further confirmed by quantification of sulfated glycosaminoglycans.

  11. Jellyfish-associated bacterial communities and bacterioplankton in Indonesian Marine lakes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cleary, D.F.R.; Becking, L.E.; Polonia, A.; Freitas, B.M.; Gomes, N.

    2016-01-01

    In the present study, we compared communities of bacteria in two jellyfish species (the ‘golden’ jellyfish Mastigias cf. papua and the box jellyfish Tripedalia cf. cystophora) and water in three marine lakes located in the Berau region of northeastern Borneo, Indonesia. Jellyfish-associated bacteria

  12. Jellyfish-associated bacterial communities and bacterioplankton in Indonesian Marine lakes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cleary, D.F.R.; Becking, L.E.; Polonia, A.; Freitas, B.M.; Gomes, N.

    2016-01-01

    In the present study, we compared communities of bacteria in two jellyfish species (the ‘golden’ jellyfish Mastigias cf. papua and the box jellyfish Tripedalia cf. cystophora) and water in three marine lakes located in the Berau region of northeastern Borneo, Indonesia. Jellyfish-associated

  13. Long-term fluctuations in circalunar Beach aggregations of the box jellyfish Alatina moseri in Hawaii, with links to environmental variability.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciano M Chiaverano

    Full Text Available The box jellyfish Alatina moseri forms monthly aggregations at Waikiki Beach 8-12 days after each full moon, posing a recurrent hazard to swimmers due to painful stings. We present an analysis of long-term (14 years: Jan 1998- Dec 2011 changes in box jellyfish abundance at Waikiki Beach. We tested the relationship of beach counts to climate and biogeochemical variables over time in the North Pacific Sub-tropical Gyre (NPSG. Generalized Additive Models (GAM, Change-Point Analysis (CPA, and General Regression Models (GRM were used to characterize patterns in box jellyfish arrival at Waikiki Beach 8-12 days following 173 consecutive full moons. Variation in box jellyfish abundance lacked seasonality, but exhibited dramatic differences among months and among years, and followed an oscillating pattern with significant periods of increase (1998-2001; 2006-2011 and decrease (2001-2006. Of three climatic and 12 biogeochemical variables examined, box jellyfish showed a strong, positive relationship with primary production, >2 mm zooplankton biomass, and the North Pacific Gyre Oscillation (NPGO index. It is clear that that the moon cycle plays a key role in synchronizing timing of the arrival of Alatina moseri medusae to shore. We propose that bottom-up processes, likely initiated by inter-annual regional climatic fluctuations influence primary production, secondary production, and ultimately regulate food availability, and are therefore important in controlling the inter-annual changes in box jellyfish abundance observed at Waikiki Beach.

  14. Jellyfish Stings and Their Management: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giuseppe Mastrangelo

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Jellyfish (cnidarians have a worldwide distribution. Despite most being harmless, some species may cause local and also systemic reactions. Treatment of jellyfish envenomation is directed at: alleviating the local effects of venom, preventing further nematocyst discharges and controlling systemic reactions, including shock. In severe cases, the most important step is stabilizing and maintaining vital functions. With some differences between species, there seems to be evidence and consensus on oral/topical analgesics, hot water and ice packs as effective painkillers and on 30 s application of domestic vinegar (4%–6% acetic acid to prevent further discharge of unfired nematocysts remaining on the skin. Conversely, alcohol, methylated spirits and fresh water should be carefully avoided, since they could massively discharge nematocysts; pressure immobilization bandaging should also be avoided, as laboratory studies show that it stimulates additional venom discharge from nematocysts. Most treatment approaches are presently founded on relatively weak evidence; therefore, further research (especially randomized clinical trials is strongly recommended. Dissemination of appropriate treatment modalities should be deployed to better inform and educate those at risk. Adequate signage should be placed at beaches to notify tourists of the jellyfish risk. Swimmers in risky areas should wear protective equipment.

  15. Mediterranean Jellyfish Venoms: A Review on Scyphomedusae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gian Luigi Mariottini

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available The production of natural toxins is an interesting aspect, which characterizes the physiology and the ecology of a number of marine species that use them for defence/offence purposes. Cnidarians are of particular concern from this point of view; their venoms are contained in specialized structures–the nematocysts–which, after mechanical or chemical stimulation, inject the venom in the prey or in the attacker. Cnidarian stinging is a serious health problem for humans in the zones where extremely venomous jellyfish or anemones are common, such as in temperate and tropical oceanic waters and particularly along several Pacific coasts, and severe cases of envenomation, including also lethal cases mainly induced by cubomedusae, were reported. On the contrary, in the Mediterranean region the problem of jellyfish stings is quite modest, even though they can have anyhow an impact on public health and be of importance from the ecological and economic point of view owing to the implications on ecosystems and on some human activities such as tourism, bathing and fishing. This paper reviews the knowledge about the various aspects related to the occurrence and the stinging of the Mediterranean scyphozoan jellyfish as well as the activity of their venoms.

  16. Clearance rates of jellyfish and their potential predation impact on zooplankton and fish larvae in a neritic ecosystem (Limfjorden, Denmark)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansson, L. J.; Moeslund, O.; Kiørboe, Thomas

    2005-01-01

    comparatively low. These data were used to assess the impact of jellyfish predation upon zooplankton and fish larvae in Limfjorden, Denmark. Repeated sampling of zooplankton, fish larvae and medusae was undertaken during the first half of 2003. Nine taxa of hydromedusae and 4 taxa of scyphomedusae were...... identified. Abundance estimates were combined with estimated clearance rates of individual medusae to calculate potential jellyfish-induced mortality on prey in Limfjorden. Copepoda was used as a model prey group to estimate the collective predation impact by all medusae. Medusa species with unknown...... clearance potential were given assumed clearance rate values, but the collective predation potential by these species was evaluated to be small. Hydromedusae dominated numerically and had their highest potential clearance impact in spring, but overall jellyfish clearance potential on copepods was low during...

  17. Measurement of solar gravitational oblateness with gravity gradiometers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forward, R. L.

    1978-01-01

    A very high sensitivity rotating gravity gradiometer onboard the spacecraft is described for measuring the gravitational oblateness of the Sun during a solar probe mission. The proposed instrument would be a self-contained structure in a thermal-vacuum-magnetic shield in the shape of a cross, with a mass of 20 kg and arm length of 1.0 m and thickness of 0.1 m. The sensor inside would have a resonant frequency of 1/30 Hz, a mechanical Q of one million and would use gravitational radiation antenna technology to achieve a sensitivity of 6 x 10 to the minus 8th power Eotvos, which would provide a measurement of the solar oblateness to an accuracy of 1.5 to 6 x 10 to the minus 8th power. The gravity gradiometer will require a spinning spacecraft, so that it will not sense the spacecraft gravity fields, but the gradiometer does not need to be at the spacecraft center of mass, or even on the spacecraft spin axis. Major problem areas to be addressed are demonstration of the instrument sensitivity prior to flight and the measurement and compensation for any residual spacecraft angular rates.

  18. Libration points in the R3BP under combined effects of oblateness, radiation and power-law profile

    CERN Document Server

    Falaye, B J; Oyewumi, K J; Joshua, E S; Omojola, J; Abimbola, O J; Falaiye, O A; Ikhdair, S M; Kalu, O

    2015-01-01

    We study the effect of oblateness up to $J_4$ of the primaries and power-law density profile (PDP) on the linear stability of libration location of an infinitesimal mass within the framework of restricted three body problem (R3BP), by using a more realistic model in which a disc with PDP is rotating around the common center of the system mass with perturbed mean motion. The existence and stability of triangular equilibrium points have been explored. It has been shown that triangular equilibrium points are stable for $0<\\mu<\\mu_c$ and unstable for $\\mu_c\\leq\\mu\\leq1/2$, where $\\mu_c$ denotes the critical mass parameter. It has been found that, the oblateness up to $J_2$ of the primaries and the radiation reduces the stability range while the oblateness up to $J_4$ of the primaries will increase the size of stability both in the regime where PDP is considered and ignored. The PDP have effect of about $\\approx0.01$ reduction on the application of $\\mu_c$ to Earth-Moon and Jupiter-Moons systems. In the limi...

  19. Hovering of a jellyfish-like flying machine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ristroph, Leif; Childress, Stephen

    2013-11-01

    Ornithopters, or flapping-wing aircraft, offer an alternative to helicopters in achieving maneuverability at small scales, although stabilizing such aerial vehicles remains a key challenge. Here, we present a hovering machine that achieves self-righting flight using flapping wings alone, without relying on additional aerodynamic surfaces and without feedback control. We design, construct, and test-fly a prototype that opens and closes four wings, resembling the motions of swimming jellyfish more so than any insect or bird. Lift measurements and high-speed video of free-flight are used to inform an aerodynamic model that explains the stabilization mechanism. These results show the promise of flapping-flight strategies beyond those that directly mimic the wing motions of flying animals.

  20. Clinical manifestations and managements in jellyfish envenomation A systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Negar Taheri

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: The phylum Cnidarians have over nine thousand species that approximately, one hundred species are dangerous for humans. Annually, a large number of deaths were reported due to jellyfish stings. The manifestations depend on their species and kind of venoms, and include the local and systemic manifestations. A number of methods and compounds were used and under investigation for management of injuries with jellyfishes. Due to the lack of an integrated systematic review, the current study was done. Materials and Methods: The PubMed data bank was searched for the term “Jellyfish”. A total of 1677 papers were found. These papers were divided into three categories: medical, biomedical and biotechnological fields. The medical category was further divided into three subcategories comprising systemic manifestations, cutaneous manifestations and treatments for the stings of jellyfishes. The biomedical category was further subdivided into genomics, proteomics, and biology of venoms, mechanisms of actions and products of biomedical significance. In this part of systematic review, the medical aspects of injuries with jellyfishes were evaluated. Results: The clinical manifestations in jellyfish envenomation depend on their species and the nature of venoms. The most common clinical manifestations of jellyfish stings are cutaneous presentations like urticasia, erythema, swelling, vesicles and severe dermonectoric manifestations. Systemic manifestations were seen in the stings of box jellyfishes, Portuguese man-of-war and in Irukandji syndrome. The most common recommendations for jellyfish envenomation managements include decreasing the local effects of venom, prevention of the venomous nematocysts release, and Controlling of systemic reactions. Application of commercial vinegar (4 - 6% acetic acid, hot water immersion (HWI (42 ° C for 20 minutes, ice packs, sea water rinsing for inactivating nematocysts, administration of topical and parenteral

  1. Hydrogen-fuel-powered bell segments of biomimetic jellyfish

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tadesse, Yonas; Villanueva, Alex; Haines, Carter; Novitski, David; Baughman, Ray; Priya, Shashank

    2012-04-01

    Artificial muscles powered by a renewable energy source are desired for joint articulation in bio-inspired autonomous systems. In this study, a robotic underwater vehicle, inspired by jellyfish, was designed to be actuated by a chemical fuel source. The fuel-powered muscles presented in this work comprise nano-platinum catalyst-coated multi-wall carbon nanotube (MWCNT) sheets, wrapped on the surface of nickel-titanium (NiTi) shape memory alloy (SMA). As a mixture of oxygen and hydrogen gases makes contact with the platinum, the resulting exothermic reaction activates the nickel-titanium (NiTi)-based SMA. The MWCNT sheets serve as a support for the platinum particles and enhance the heat transfer due to the high thermal conductivity between the composite and the SMA. A hydrogen and oxygen fuel source could potentially provide higher power density than electrical sources. Several vehicle designs were considered and a peripheral SMA configuration under the robotic bell was chosen as the best arrangement. Constitutive equations combined with thermodynamic modeling were developed to understand the influence of system parameters that affect the overall actuation behavior of the fuel-powered SMA. The model is based on the changes in entropy of the hydrogen and oxygen fuel on the composite actuator within a channel. The specific heat capacity is the dominant factor controlling the width of the strain for various pulse widths of fuel delivery. Both theoretical and experimental strains for different diameter (100 and 150 µm) SMA/MWCNT/Pt fuel-powered muscles with dead weight attached at the end exhibited the highest magnitude under 450 ms of fuel delivery within 1.6 mm diameter conduit size. Fuel-powered bell deformation of 13.5% was found to be comparable to that of electrically powered (29%) and natural jellyfish (42%).

  2. Jellyfish prediction of occurrence from remote sensing data and a non-linear pattern recognition approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albajes-Eizagirre, Anton; Romero, Laia; Soria-Frisch, Aureli; Vanhellemont, Quinten

    2011-11-01

    Impact of jellyfish in human activities has been increasingly reported worldwide in recent years. Segments such as tourism, water sports and leisure, fisheries and aquaculture are commonly damaged when facing blooms of gelatinous zooplankton. Hence the prediction of the appearance and disappearance of jellyfish in our coasts, which is not fully understood from its biological point of view, has been approached as a pattern recognition problem in the paper presented herein, where a set of potential ecological cues was selected to test their usefulness for prediction. Remote sensing data was used to describe environmental conditions that could support the occurrence of jellyfish blooms with the aim of capturing physical-biological interactions: forcing, coastal morphology, food availability, and water mass characteristics are some of the variables that seem to exert an effect on jellyfish accumulation on the shoreline, under specific spatial and temporal windows. A data-driven model based on computational intelligence techniques has been designed and implemented to predict jellyfish events on the beach area as a function of environmental conditions. Data from 2009 over the NW Mediterranean continental shelf have been used to train and test this prediction protocol. Standard level 2 products are used from MODIS (NASA OceanColor) and MERIS (ESA - FRS data). The procedure for designing the analysis system can be described as following. The aforementioned satellite data has been used as feature set for the performance evaluation. Ground truth has been extracted from visual observations by human agents on different beach sites along the Catalan area. After collecting the evaluation data set, the performance between different computational intelligence approaches have been compared. The outperforming one in terms of its generalization capability has been selected for prediction recall. Different tests have been conducted in order to assess the prediction capability of the

  3. Jellyfish Patch Detecting Using Low Latitude Remote Sensing System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, J. S.; Jo, Y. H.

    2015-12-01

    Jellyfish can be asexual and sexual reproduction depending on the environment, and it has excellent environmental adaptability and reproduction than other sea creatures. If the marine environment become worse, jellyfish can take advantage in the competition for survival. Marine environmental changes caused by rapid climate change, dyke construction and land reclamation will increase the amount of jellyfish and as a result can lead to a various social and economic problems. In this study, jellyfish were observed in coastal area using a low-altitude Helikite remote sensing system for the first time. Helikite is a type of helium balloon plus a kite that can get the data with optical sensors for the desired spatial resolutions by adjusting the altitudes. In addition, it has an advantage that can monitor any objects for a long time at one place as long as the electric power and helium last. In this study, we observed the jellyfish patches using a digital camera in the Chesapeake Bay and estimate populations and size of jellyfish patches through image processing. Research results suggests that we can have long-term real-time observations for not only jellyfish, but also other harmful marine creatures.

  4. Streaming instability at the equator of an oblately deformed drop

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brosseau, Quentin; Vlahovska, Petia

    2016-11-01

    Electrohydrodynamic streaming and jet formation from the conical tips formed at the poles of a highly conducting drop in strong electric field is a well known phenomenon. Here we report a novel streaming-like instability occurring with drops less conducting than the suspending medium. In a uniform DC electric field, the drop deforms into a flattened oblate (pancake-like) shape with cusped rim around the equator. The rim emits concentric threads which subsequently break up into tiny droplets forming a Saturn-like rings of droplets around the mother drop. The rate of droplet production is much larger than the classical tip-streaming and suggest a potential new route for "electroemulsification".

  5. Jellyfish mucin may have potential disease-modifying effects on osteoarthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Urai Makoto

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We aimed to study the effects of intra-articular injection of jellyfish mucin (qniumucin on articular cartilage degeneration in a model of osteoarthritis (OA created in rabbit knees by resection of the anterior cruciate ligament. Qniumucin was extracted from Aurelia aurita (moon jellyfish and Stomolophus nomurai (Nomura's jellyfish and purified by ion exchange chromatography. The OA model used 36 knees in 18 Japanese white rabbits. Purified qniumucin extracts from S. nomurai or A. aurita were used at 1 mg/ml. Rabbits were divided into four groups: a control (C group injected with saline; a hyaluronic acid (HA-only group (H group; two qniumucin-only groups (M groups; and two qniumucin + HA groups (MH groups. One milligram of each solution was injected intra-articularly once a week for 5 consecutive weeks, starting from 4 weeks after surgery. Ten weeks after surgery, the articular cartilage was evaluated macroscopically and histologically. Results In the C and M groups, macroscopic cartilage defects extended to the subchondral bone medially and laterally. When the H and both MH groups were compared, only minor cartilage degeneration was observed in groups treated with qniumucin in contrast to the group without qniumucin. Histologically, densely safranin-O-stained cartilage layers were observed in the H and two MH groups, but cartilage was strongly maintained in both MH groups. Conclusion At the concentrations of qniumucin used in this study, injection together with HA inhibited articular cartilage degeneration in this model of OA.

  6. Fatal and severe box jellyfish stings, including Irukandji stings, in Malaysia, 2000-2010.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lippmann, John M; Fenner, Peter J; Winkel, Ken; Gershwin, Lisa-Ann

    2011-01-01

    Jellyfish are a common cause of injury throughout the world, with fatalities and severe systemic events not uncommon after tropical stings. The internet is a recent innovation to gain information on real-time health issues of travel destinations, including Southeast Asia. We applied the model of internet-based retrospective health data aggregation, through the Divers Alert Network Asia-Pacific (DAN AP), together with more conventional methods of literature and media searches, to document the health significance, and clinical spectrum, of box jellyfish stings in Malaysia for the period January 1, 2000 to July 30, 2010. Three fatalities, consistent with chirodropid envenomation, were identified for the period-all tourists to Malaysia. Non-fatal chirodropid stings were also documented. During 2010, seven cases consistent with moderately severe Irukandji syndrome were reported to DAN and two representative cases are discussed here. Photographs of chirodropid (multi-tentacled), carybdeid (four-tentacled) box jellyfish, and of severe sting lesions were also submitted to DAN during this period. This study suggests that the frequency and severity of jellyfish stings affecting tourists in Southeast Asia have been significantly underestimated. Severe and fatal cases of chirodropid-type stings occur in coastal waters off Peninsular Malaysia and Sabah, Borneo. Indeed, the first Malaysian cases consistent with Irukandji-like syndrome are reported here. Reports to DAN, a provider of emergency advice to divers, offer one method to address the historic lack of formalized reporting mechanisms for such events, for photo-documentation of the possible culprit species and treatment advice. The application of marine stinger prevention and treatment principles throughout the region may help reduce the incidence and severity of such stings. Meanwhile travelers and their medical advisors should be aware of the hazards of these stings throughout the Asia-Pacific. © 2011 International

  7. Environmental forcing on jellyfish communities in a small temperate estuary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Primo, Ana Lígia; Marques, Sónia C; Falcão, Joana; Crespo, Daniel; Pardal, Miguel A; Azeiteiro, Ulisses M

    2012-08-01

    The impact of biological, hydrodynamic and large scale climatic variables on the jellyfish community of Mondego estuary was evaluated from 2003 to 2010. Plankton samples were collected at the downstream part of the estuary. Siphonophora Muggiaea atlantica and Diphyes spp. were the main jellyfish species. Jellyfish density was generally higher in summer and since 2005 densities had increased. Summer community analysis pointed out Acartia clausi, estuarine temperature and salinity as the main driven forces for the assemblage's structure. Also, Chl a, estuarine salinity, runoff and SST were identified as the major environmental factors influencing the siphonophores summer interannual variability. Temperature influenced directly and indirectly the community and fluctuation of jellyfish blooms in the Mondego estuary. This study represents a contribution to a better knowledge of the gelatinous plankton communities in small temperate estuaries.

  8. Is global ocean sprawl a cause of jellyfish blooms?

    OpenAIRE

    Duarte, Carlos M.; Pitt, Kylie A.; Lucas, C.H.; Purcell, Jennifer E.; Uye, Shin-Ichi; Robinson, Kelly L.; Brotz, Lucas; Decker, MaryBeth; Kelly R Sutherland; Malej, Alenka; Madin, Laurence P.; Mianzan, Hermes; Gili, Josep-Maria; Fuentes, Veronica; Atienza, D.

    2013-01-01

    Jellyfish (Cnidaria, Scyphozoa) blooms appear to be increasing in both intensity and frequency in many coastal areas worldwide, due to multiple hypothesized anthropogenic stressors. Here, we propose that the proliferation of artificial structures – associated with (1) the exponential growth in shipping, aquaculture, and other coastal industries, and (2) coastal protection (collectively, “ocean sprawl”) – provides habitat for jellyfish polyps and may be an important driver of the global increa...

  9. Dose and time dependence of box jellyfish antivenom

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    Background The effectiveness of the currently available box jellyfish (Chironex fleckeri) antivenom has been subject of debate for many years. To assess whether the box jellyfish antivenom has the ability to attenuate venom-induced damage at cellular level, the present study analyzed the dose and time dependence of the antivenom in a cell-based assay. Methods Different doses of antivenom were added to venom and subsequently administered to cells and the cell index was measured using xCelligen...

  10. Taylor Series Trajectory Calculations Including Oblateness Effects and Variable Atmospheric Density

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, James R.

    2011-01-01

    Taylor series integration is implemented in NASA Glenn's Spacecraft N-body Analysis Program, and compared head-to-head with the code's existing 8th- order Runge-Kutta Fehlberg time integration scheme. This paper focuses on trajectory problems that include oblateness and/or variable atmospheric density. Taylor series is shown to be significantly faster and more accurate for oblateness problems up through a 4x4 field, with speedups ranging from a factor of 2 to 13. For problems with variable atmospheric density, speedups average 24 for atmospheric density alone, and average 1.6 to 8.2 when density and oblateness are combined.

  11. Solution of Axisymmetric Potential Problem in Oblate Spheroid Using the Exodus Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. D. Momoh

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the use of Exodus method for computing potential distribution within a conducting oblate spheroidal system. An explicit finite difference method for solving Laplace’s equation in oblate spheroidal coordinate systems for an axially symmetric geometry was developed. This was used to determine the transition probabilities for the Exodus method. A strategy was developed to overcome the singularity problems encountered in the oblate spheroid pole regions. The potential computation results obtained correlate with those obtained by exact solution and explicit finite difference methods.

  12. Scyphozoan jellyfish venom metalloproteinases and their role in the cytotoxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hyunkyoung; Jung, Eun-sun; Kang, Changkeun; Yoon, Won Duk; Kim, Jong-Shu; Kim, Euikyung

    2011-09-01

    The present study, for the first time, comparatively investigated the enzymatic activities (proteases and hyaluronidases) in the venoms of four Scyphozoan jellyfish species, including Nemopilema nomurai, Rhopilema esculenta, Cyanea nozakii, and Aurelia aurita. For this, various zymographic analyses were performed using assay specific substrates. Interestingly, all the four jellyfish venoms showed gelatinolytic, caseinolytic, and fibrinolytic activities, each of which contains a multitude of enzyme components with molecular weights between 17 and 130 kDa. These four jellyfish venoms demonstrated a huge variation in their proteolytic activities in quantitative and qualitative manner depending on the species. Most of these enzymatic activities were disappeared by the treatment of 1,10-phenanthroline, suggesting they might be belonged to metalloproteinases. Toxicological significance of these venom proteases was examined by comparing their proteolytic activity and the cytotoxicity in NIH 3T3 cells. The relative cytotoxic potency was C. nozakii > N. nomurai > A. aurita > R. esculenta. The cytotoxicity of jellyfish venom shows a positive correlation with its overall proteolytic activity. The metalloproteinases appear to play an important role in the induction of jellyfish venom toxicities. In conclusion, the present report proposes a novel finding of Scyphozoan jellyfish venom metalloproteinases and their potential role in the cytotoxicity.

  13. Geometry-induced Casimir suspension of oblate bodies in fluids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez, Alejandro W; Reid, M T Homer; Intravaia, Francesco; Woolf, Alexander; Dalvit, Diego A R; Capasso, Federico; Johnson, Steven G

    2013-11-01

    We predict that a low-permittivity oblate body (disk-shaped object) above a thin metal substrate (plate with a hole) immersed in a fluid of intermediate permittivity will experience a metastable equilibrium (restoring force) near the center of the hole. Stability is the result of a geometry-induced transition in the sign of the force, from repulsive to attractive, that occurs as the disk approaches the hole--in planar or nearly planar geometries, the same material combination yields a repulsive force at all separations, in accordance with the Dzyaloshinskiĭ-Lifshitz-Pitaevskiĭ condition of fluid-induced repulsion between planar bodies. We explore the stability of the system with respect to rotations and lateral translations of the disks and demonstrate interesting transitions (bifurcations) in the rotational stability of the disks as a function of their size. Finally, we consider the reciprocal situation in which the disk-plate materials are interchanged and find that in this case the system also exhibits metastability. The forces in the system are sufficiently large to be observed in experiments and should enable measurements based on the diffusion dynamics of the suspended bodies.

  14. Jellyfish Galaxy Candidates at Low Redshift

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poggianti, B. M.; Fasano, G.; Omizzolo, A.; Gullieuszik, M.; Bettoni, D.; Moretti, A.; Paccagnella, A.; Jaffé, Y. L.; Vulcani, B.; Fritz, J.; Couch, W.; D'Onofrio, M.

    2016-03-01

    Galaxies that are being stripped of their gas can sometimes be recognized from their optical appearance. Extreme examples of stripped galaxies are the so-called “jellyfish galaxies” that exhibit tentacles of debris material with a characteristic jellyfish morphology. We have conducted the first systematic search for galaxies that are being stripped of their gas at low-z (z = 0.04-0.07) in different environments, selecting galaxies with varying degrees of morphological evidence for stripping. We have visually inspected B- and V-band images and identified 344 candidates in 71 galaxy clusters of the OMEGAWINGS+WINGS sample and 75 candidates in groups and lower mass structures in the PM2GC sample. We present the atlas of stripping candidates and a first analysis of their environment and their basic properties, such as morphologies, star formation rates and galaxy stellar masses. Candidates are found in all clusters and at all clustercentric radii, and their number does not correlate with the cluster velocity dispersion σ or X-ray luminosity LX. Interestingly, convincing cases of candidates are also found in groups and lower mass halos (1011-1014M⊙), although the physical mechanism at work needs to be securely identified. All the candidates are disky, have stellar masses ranging from log M/M⊙ 11.5 and the majority of them form stars at a rate that is on average a factor of 2 higher (2.5σ) compared to non-stripped galaxies of similar mass. The few post-starburst and passive candidates have weak stripping evidence. We conclude that disturbed morphologies suggestive of stripping phenomena are ubiquitous in clusters and could be present even in groups and low mass halos. Further studies will reveal the physics of the gas stripping and clarify the mechanisms at work.

  15. Chironex fleckeri (Box Jellyfish) Venom Proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brinkman, Diane L.; Konstantakopoulos, Nicki; McInerney, Bernie V.; Mulvenna, Jason; Seymour, Jamie E.; Isbister, Geoffrey K.; Hodgson, Wayne C.

    2014-01-01

    The box jellyfish Chironex fleckeri produces extremely potent and rapid-acting venom that is harmful to humans and lethal to prey. Here, we describe the characterization of two C. fleckeri venom proteins, CfTX-A (∼40 kDa) and CfTX-B (∼42 kDa), which were isolated from C. fleckeri venom using size exclusion chromatography and cation exchange chromatography. Full-length cDNA sequences encoding CfTX-A and -B and a third putative toxin, CfTX-Bt, were subsequently retrieved from a C. fleckeri tentacle cDNA library. Bioinformatic analyses revealed that the new toxins belong to a small family of potent cnidarian pore-forming toxins that includes two other C. fleckeri toxins, CfTX-1 and CfTX-2. Phylogenetic inferences from amino acid sequences of the toxin family grouped CfTX-A, -B, and -Bt in a separate clade from CfTX-1 and -2, suggesting that the C. fleckeri toxins have diversified structurally and functionally during evolution. Comparative bioactivity assays revealed that CfTX-1/2 (25 μg kg−1) caused profound effects on the cardiovascular system of anesthetized rats, whereas CfTX-A/B elicited only minor effects at the same dose. Conversely, the hemolytic activity of CfTX-A/B (HU50 = 5 ng ml−1) was at least 30 times greater than that of CfTX-1/2. Structural homology between the cubozoan toxins and insecticidal three-domain Cry toxins (δ-endotoxins) suggests that the toxins have a similar pore-forming mechanism of action involving α-helices of the N-terminal domain, whereas structural diversification among toxin members may modulate target specificity. Expansion of the cnidarian toxin family therefore provides new insights into the evolutionary diversification of box jellyfish toxins from a structural and functional perspective. PMID:24403082

  16. JELLYFISH GALAXY CANDIDATES AT LOW REDSHIFT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poggianti, B. M.; Fasano, G.; Omizzolo, A.; Gullieuszik, M.; Bettoni, D.; Paccagnella, A. [INAF-Astronomical Observatory of Padova (Italy); Moretti, A.; D’Onofrio, M. [Physics and Astronomy Department, University of Padova (Italy); Jaffé, Y. L. [Department of Astronomy, Universidad de Concepción, Concepción (Chile); Vulcani, B. [Kavli Institute for the Physics and Mathematics of the universe (WPI), The University of Tokyo Institutes for Advanced Study (UTIAS), the University of Tokyo, Kashiwa, 277-8582 (Japan); Fritz, J. [Centro de Radioastronomía y Astrofísica, CRyA, UNAM, Michoacán (Mexico); Couch, W. [Australian Astronomical Observatory, North Ryde, NSW 1670 (Australia)

    2016-03-15

    Galaxies that are being stripped of their gas can sometimes be recognized from their optical appearance. Extreme examples of stripped galaxies are the so-called “jellyfish galaxies” that exhibit tentacles of debris material with a characteristic jellyfish morphology. We have conducted the first systematic search for galaxies that are being stripped of their gas at low-z (z = 0.04−0.07) in different environments, selecting galaxies with varying degrees of morphological evidence for stripping. We have visually inspected B- and V-band images and identified 344 candidates in 71 galaxy clusters of the OMEGAWINGS+WINGS sample and 75 candidates in groups and lower mass structures in the PM2GC sample. We present the atlas of stripping candidates and a first analysis of their environment and their basic properties, such as morphologies, star formation rates and galaxy stellar masses. Candidates are found in all clusters and at all clustercentric radii, and their number does not correlate with the cluster velocity dispersion σ or X-ray luminosity L{sub X}. Interestingly, convincing cases of candidates are also found in groups and lower mass halos (10{sup 11}−10{sup 14}M{sub ⊙}), although the physical mechanism at work needs to be securely identified. All the candidates are disky, have stellar masses ranging from log M/M{sub ⊙} < 9 to > 11.5 and the majority of them form stars at a rate that is on average a factor of 2 higher (2.5σ) compared to non-stripped galaxies of similar mass. The few post-starburst and passive candidates have weak stripping evidence. We conclude that disturbed morphologies suggestive of stripping phenomena are ubiquitous in clusters and could be present even in groups and low mass halos. Further studies will reveal the physics of the gas stripping and clarify the mechanisms at work.

  17. Pinging down the food web: multi-frequency acoustic discrimination of jellyfish and fish

    OpenAIRE

    Christopher P Lynam; Brierley, Andrew S.; Axelsen, Bjørn Erik

    2004-01-01

    Jellyfish are gaining increasing prominence in many pelagic marine ecosystems worldwide. It has been argued that jellyfish-dominated communities will be the end-point in ecosystems perturbed by high fishing effort, and that increases in jellyfish abundance could be indicative of, and consequences of, climate-induced changes and/or regime shifts in pelagic ecosystems. Jellyfish are difficult to sample using conventional netting techniques, and data on changes in distribution and abundance are ...

  18. Stable hovering of a jellyfish-like flying machine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ristroph, Leif; Childress, Stephen

    2014-01-01

    Ornithopters, or flapping-wing aircraft, offer an alternative to helicopters in achieving manoeuvrability at small scales, although stabilizing such aerial vehicles remains a key challenge. Here, we present a hovering machine that achieves self-righting flight using flapping wings alone, without relying on additional aerodynamic surfaces and without feedback control. We design, construct and test-fly a prototype that opens and closes four wings, resembling the motions of swimming jellyfish more so than any insect or bird. Measurements of lift show the benefits of wing flexing and the importance of selecting a wing size appropriate to the motor. Furthermore, we use high-speed video and motion tracking to show that the body orientation is stable during ascending, forward and hovering flight modes. Our experimental measurements are used to inform an aerodynamic model of stability that reveals the importance of centre-of-mass location and the coupling of body translation and rotation. These results show the promise of flapping-flight strategies beyond those that directly mimic the wing motions of flying animals. PMID:24430122

  19. Pore Water Pumping by Upside-Down Jellyfish

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaddam, Manikantam; Santhanakrishnan, Arvind

    2016-11-01

    Patchy aggregations of Cassiopea medusae, commonly called upside-down jellyfish, are found in sheltered marine environments with low-speed ambient flows. These medusae exhibit a sessile, non-swimming lifestyle, and are oriented such that their bells are attached to the substrate and oral arms point towards sunlight. Pulsations of their bells are used to generate currents for suspension feeding. Their pulsations have also been proposed to generate forces that can release sediment locked nutrients into the surrounding water. The goal of this study is to examine pore water pumping by Cassiopea individuals in laboratory aquaria, as a model for understanding pore water pumping in unsteady flows. Planar laser-induced fluorescence (PLIF) measurements were conducted to visualize the release of pore water via bell motion, using fluorescent dye introduced underneath the substrate. 2D particle image velocimetry (PIV) measurements were conducted on the same individuals to correlate PLIF-based concentration profiles with the jets generated by pulsing of medusae. The effects of varying bell diameter on pore water release and pumping currents will be discussed.

  20. Immunohistochemical evidence for multiple photosystems in box jellyfish

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ekström, Peter; Garm, Anders Lydik; Pålsson, Jonas

    2008-01-01

    data demonstrate that the lens eyes of box jellyfish utilize a single opsin and are thus color-blind, and that there is probably a different photopigment in the pigment cup eyes. The results support our hypothesis that the lens eyes and the pigment cup eyes of box jellyfish are involved in different......Cubomedusae (box jellyfish) possess a remarkable visual system with 24 eyes distributed in four sensory structures termed rhopalia. Each rhopalium is equipped with six eyes: two pairs of pigment cup eyes and two unpaired lens eyes. Each eye type probably captures specific features of the visual...... environment. To investigate whether multiple types of photoreceptor cells are present in the rhopalium, and whether the different eye types possess different types of photoreceptors, we have used immunohistochemistry with a range of vertebrate opsin antibodies to label the photoreceptors...

  1. Visual pigments of the box jellyfish species Chiropsella bronzie

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    O*Connor, Megan; Garm, Anders Lydik; Marshall, Justin;

    2010-01-01

    Box jellyfish (Cubomedusae) possess a unique visual system comprising 24 eyes of four morphological types. Moreover, box jellyfish display several visually guided behaviours, including obstacle avoidance and light-shaft attractance. It is largely unknown what kind of visual information box......, electrophysiological and immunohistochemical methods. However, the results from these studies are to some degree conflicting and inconclusive. Here, we present results from an investigation into the visual system of the box jellyfish Chiropsella bronzie, using microspectrophotometry and immunohistochemistry. Our...... results strongly indicate that only one type of visual pigment is present in the upper and lower lens eyes with a peak absorbance of approximately 510 nm. Additionally, the visual pigment appears to undergo bleaching, similar to that of vertebrate visual pigments....

  2. The ontogenetic scaling of hydrodynamics and swimming performance in jellyfish (Aurelia aurita).

    Science.gov (United States)

    McHenry, Matthew J; Jed, Jason

    2003-11-01

    It is not well understood how ontogenetic changes in the motion and morphology of aquatic animals influence the performance of swimming. The goals of the present study were to understand how changes in size, shape and behavior affect the hydrodynamics of jet propulsion in the jellyfish Aurelia aurita and to explore how such changes affect the ontogenetic scaling of swimming speed and cost of transport. We measured the kinematics of jellyfish swimming from video recordings and simulated the hydrodynamics of swimming with two computational models that calculated thrust generation by paddle and jet mechanisms. Our results suggest that thrust is generated primarily by jetting and that there is negligible thrust generation by paddling. We examined how fluid forces scaled with body mass using the jet model. Despite an ontogenetic increase in the range of motion by the bell diameter and a decrease in the height-to-diameter ratio, we found that thrust and acceleration reaction scaled with body mass as predicted by kinematic similarity. However, jellyfish decreased their pulse frequency with growth, and speed consequently scaled at a lower exponential rate than predicted by kinematic similarity. Model simulations suggest that the allometric growth in Aurelia results in swimming that is slower, but more energetically economical, than isometric growth with a prolate bell shape. The decrease in pulse frequency over ontogeny allows large Aurelia medusae to avoid a high cost of transport but generates slower swimming than if they maintained a high pulse frequency. Our findings suggest that ontogenetic change in the height-to-diameter ratio and pulse frequency of Aurelia results in swimming that is relatively moderate in speed but is energetically economical.

  3. Transcriptome and venom proteome of the box jellyfish Chironex fleckeri

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    Background The box jellyfish, Chironex fleckeri, is the largest and most dangerous cubozoan jellyfish to humans. It produces potent and rapid-acting venom and its sting causes severe localized and systemic effects that are potentially life-threatening. In this study, a combined transcriptomic and proteomic approach was used to identify C. fleckeri proteins that elicit toxic effects in envenoming. Results More than 40,000,000 Illumina reads were used to de novo assemble ∼ 34,000 contiguous cDN...

  4. Box jellyfish use terrestrial visual cues for navigation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Garm, Anders; Oskarsson, Magnus; Nilsson, Dan-Eric

    2011-01-01

    Box jellyfish have an impressive set of 24 eyes of four different types, including eyes structurally similar to those of vertebrates and cephalopods [1, 2]. However, the known visual responses are restricted to simple phototaxis, shadow responses, and object avoidance responses [3-8], and it has...... been a puzzle why they need such a complex set of eyes. Here we report that medusae of the box jellyfish Tripedalia cystophora are capable of visually guided navigation in mangrove swamps using terrestrial structures seen through the water surface. They detect the mangrove canopy by an eye type...

  5. Unique structure and optics of the lesser eyes of the box jellyfish Tripedalia cystophora

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Garm, A; Andersson, F; Nilsson, Dan-E

    2008-01-01

    The visual system of box jellyfish comprises a total of 24 eyes. These are of four types and each probably has a special function. To investigate this hypothesis the morphology and optics of the lesser eyes, the pit and slit eyes, were examined. The pit eyes hold one cell type only and are probably...... mere light meters. The slit eyes, comprising four cell types, are complex and highly asymmetric. They also hold a lens-like structure, but its optical power is minute. Optical modeling suggests spatial resolution, but only in one plane. These unique and intriguing traits support strong peripheral...

  6. In vivo analysis of effects of venom from the jellyfish Chrysaora sp. in zebrafish (Danio rerio).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becerra-Amezcua, Mayra P; Guerrero-Legarreta, Isabel; González-Márquez, Humberto; Guzmán-García, Xochitl

    2016-04-01

    The jellyfishes of the genus Chrysaora are present in all of the world's oceans, but the toxicity of their venoms has not yet been thoroughly characterized. The zebrafish as a toxicology model can be used for general toxicity testing of drugs and the investigation of toxicological mechanisms. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of crude venom from jellyfish Chrysaora sp., a species of jellyfish observed in the tropical lagoons of the Gulf of Mexico, on the zebrafish Danio rerio. Juvenile zebrafish were injected with different concentrations of venom from Chrysaora sp. via intraperitoneal and subcutaneous injections. The effects of the venom were determined by histopathological analysis and through the measurement of hemolytic and phospholipase A2 activities. The crude venom was examined by SDS-PAGE. The effect of sublethal concentrations of crude venom from Chrysaora sp. on D. rerio was hemorrhaging in the eyes, while the histopathological analysis demonstrated that the primary organs targeted were the pseudobranch, which displayed hyperemia, and the gill, which displayed hyperplasia and hypertrophy. The blood analysis exhibited hemolysis, nuclear abnormalities, and echinocytes by the action of phospholipase A2, which was determined to have 596 units of activity/mg of protein in the venom. The crude venom has proteins with molecular weights ranging from 250 to 6 kDa, with more density in the bands corresponding to 70, 20 and 15 kDa. The venom of Chysaora sp. caused disturbances in circulation associated with vascular dilation due to the localized release of inflammatory mediators. The hemolysis of erythrocytes was caused by the action of phospholipase A2. These findings not only provide an excellent study model but also have a great pharmacological potential for designing new drugs and for the elucidation of the mechanisms of action of and treatment against stings.

  7. Jellyfish: Observational Properties of Extreme Ram-Pressure Stripping Events in Massive Galaxy Clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conor, McPartland; Ebeling, Harald; Roediger, Elke

    2015-08-01

    We investigate the physical origin and observational signatures of extreme ram-pressure stripping (RPS) in 63 massive galaxy clusters at z=0.3-0.7, based on data in the F606W passband obtained with the Advanced Camera for Surveys aboard the Hubble Space Telescope. Using a training set of a dozen ``jellyfish" galaxies identified earlier in the same imaging data, we define quantitative morphological criteria to select candidate galaxies which are similar to known cases of RPS. Considering a sample of 16 ``jellyfish" galaxies (10 of which we present for the first time), we visually derive estimates of the projected direction of motion based on dynamical features such as apparent compression shocks and debris trails. Our findings suggest that the observed events occur primarily at large distances from the cluster core and involve infall trajectories featuring high impact parameters. Simple models of cluster growth show that such trajectories are consistent with two scenarios: 1) galaxy infall along filaments; and 2) infall at high velocities (≥1000 km/s) characteristic of cluster mergers. The observed distribution of events is best described by timescales of ˜few Myr in agreement with recent numerical simulations of RPS. The broader areal coverage of the Hubble Frontier Fields should provide an even larger sample of RPS events to determine the relative contributions of infall and cluster mergers. Prompted by the discovery of several jellyfish galaxies whose brightness in the F606W passband rivals or exceeds that of the respective brightest cluster galaxy, we attempt to constrain the luminosity function of galaxies undergoing RPS. The observed significant excess at the bright end compared to the luminosity functions of blue cluster members strongly suggests enhanced star formation, thus challenging theoretical and numerical studies according to which RPS merely displaces existing star-forming regions. In-depth studies of individual objects will help test our

  8. Firing the Sting: Chemically Induced Discharge of Cnidae Reveals Novel Proteins and Peptides from Box Jellyfish (Chironex fleckeri) Venom

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    Cnidarian venom research has lagged behind other toxinological fields due to technical difficulties in recovery of the complex venom from the microscopic nematocysts. Here we report a newly developed rapid, repeatable and cost effective technique of venom preparation, using ethanol to induce nematocyst discharge and to recover venom contents in one step. Our model species was the Australian box jellyfish (Chironex fleckeri), which has a notable impact on public health. By utilizing scanning e...

  9. First-order analytic propagation of satellites in the exponential atmosphere of an oblate planet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinusi, Vladimir; Dell'Elce, Lamberto; Kerschen, Gaëtan

    2017-04-01

    The paper offers the fully analytic solution to the motion of a satellite orbiting under the influence of the two major perturbations, due to the oblateness and the atmospheric drag. The solution is presented in a time-explicit form, and takes into account an exponential distribution of the atmospheric density, an assumption that is reasonably close to reality. The approach involves two essential steps. The first one concerns a new approximate mathematical model that admits a closed-form solution with respect to a set of new variables. The second step is the determination of an infinitesimal contact transformation that allows to navigate between the new and the original variables. This contact transformation is obtained in exact form, and afterwards a Taylor series approximation is proposed in order to make all the computations explicit. The aforementioned transformation accommodates both perturbations, improving the accuracy of the orbit predictions by one order of magnitude with respect to the case when the atmospheric drag is absent from the transformation. Numerical simulations are performed for a low Earth orbit starting at an altitude of 350 km, and they show that the incorporation of drag terms into the contact transformation generates an error reduction by a factor of 7 in the position vector. The proposed method aims at improving the accuracy of analytic orbit propagation and transforming it into a viable alternative to the computationally intensive numerical methods.

  10. Attitude Dynamics and Tracking Control of Spacecraft in the Presence of Gravity Oblateness Perturbations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Achim IONITA

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The orbital docking represents a problem of great importance in aerospace engineering. The paper aims to perform an analysis of docking maneuvers between a chaser vehicle and a target vehicle in permanent LEO (low earth orbit. The work begins with a study of the attitude dynamics modeling intended to define the strategy that facilitates the chaser movement toward a docking part of the target. An LQR (linear quadratic regulator approach presents an optimal control design that provides linearized closed-loop error dynamics for tracking a desired quaternion. The control law formulation is combined with the control architecture based on SDRE (State Dependent Riccati equation technique for rotational maneuvers, including the Earth oblateness perturbation. The chaser body-fixed frame must coincide with the target body-fixed frame at the docking moment. Then the implementation of the control architecture based on LQR technique using the computational tool MATLAB is carried out. In simulation of the docking strategy V-R bar operations are analyzed and the minimum accelerations needs the control of chaser vehicle. The simulation analysis of those maneuvers considered for a chaser vehicle and a target vehicle in LEO orbit is validated in a case study.

  11. Isomers and oblate collectivity at high spin in neutron-rich Pt isotopes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tandel S.K.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Isomers and high-spin structures with rotation-aligned oblate configurations have been studied in several Pt isotopes. The 12+ states in the even Pt isotopes from 192–198Pt are found to be metastable, and have (i13/22 neutron character. The progression of E2 transition probabilities from the 12+ to 10+ states across the Pt isotopic chain implies reduction in collectivity, followed by an abrupt decrease at N=120 (198Pt. This behavior is quite distinct from the gradual decrease of B(E2 values near the respective ground states. A large contribution from aligned angular momentum, to the rotational sequences built on the 12+ states, is visible. This is due to the relatively small crossing frequencies for nucleons in low-Ω orbitals at oblate deformation in comparison to higher values for prolate shapes. As a result, oblate rotation is found to be increasingly favored for higher neutron numbers.

  12. The low-frequency dielectric response of charged oblate spheroidal particles immersed in an electrolyte

    CERN Document Server

    Hou, Chang-Yu; Sen, Pabitra N

    2016-01-01

    We study the low-frequency polarization response of a surface-charged oblate spheroidal particle immersed in an electrolyte solution. Because the charged spheroid attracts counter-ions which form the electric double layer around the particle, using usual boundary conditions at the interface between the particle and electrolyte can be quite complicated and challenging. Hence, we generalize Fixman's boundary conditions, originally derived for spherical particles, to the case of the charged oblate spheroid. Given two different counter-ion distributions in the thin electric double layer limit, we obtain analytic expressions for the polarization coefficients to the first non-trivial order in frequency. We find that the polarization response normal to the symmetry axis depends on the total amount of charge carried by the oblate spheroid while that parallel to the symmetry axis is suppressed when there is less charge on the edge of the spheroid. We further study the overall dielectric response for a dilute suspensio...

  13. Measuring the rates of spontaneous vortex formation in highly oblate Bose-Einstein condensates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neely, Tyler; Samson, Edward; Bradley, Ashton; Davis, Matthew; Anderson, Brian

    2009-05-01

    By studying the dynamics of the Bose-Einstein condensation transition in highly oblate (˜11:1 aspect ratio) traps, we have measured the dependence of spontaneous vortex formation on BEC growth rate, extending our previous experimental and numerical observations of spontaneous vortex formation in weakly oblate (˜2:1 aspect ratio) traps [1]. Our condensation procedure in these highly oblate traps allows us to create BECs over a large range of growth times, from approximately 200 ms to over 2 s. By characterizing vortex formation vs. BEC growth rate, and comparing experimental and numerical results, the Kibble-Zurek mechanism for topological defect formation may be quantitatively studied in our system. [1] C.N. Weiler, T.W. Neely, D.R. Scherer, A.S. Bradley, M.J. Davis, and B.P. Anderson., Nature 455, 948 (2008).

  14. Ecosystem relevance of variable jellyfish biomass in the Irish Sea between years, regions and water types

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bastian, Thomas; Lilley, Martin K. S.; Beggs, Steven E.; Hays, Graeme C.; Doyle, Thomas K.

    2014-08-01

    Monitoring the abundance and distribution of taxa is essential to assess their contribution to ecosystem processes. For marine taxa that are difficult to study or have long been perceived of little ecological importance, quantitative information is often lacking. This is the case for jellyfish (medusae and other gelatinous plankton). In the present work, 4 years of scyphomedusae by-catch data from the 2007-2010 Irish Sea juvenile gadoid fish survey were analysed with three main objectives: (1) to provide quantitative and spatially-explicit species-specific biomass data, for a region known to have an increasing trend in jellyfish abundance; (2) to investigate whether year-to-year changes in catch-biomass are due to changes in the numbers or in the size of medusa (assessed as the mean mass per individual), and (3) to determine whether inter-annual variation patterns are consistent between species and water masses. Scyphomedusae were present in 97% of samples (N = 306). Their overall annual median catch-biomass ranged from 0.19 to 0.92 g m-3 (or 8.6 to 42.4 g m-2). Aurelia aurita and Cyanea spp. (Cyanea lamarckii and Cyanea capillata) made up 77.7% and 21.5% of the total catch-biomass respectively, but species contributions varied greatly between sub-regions and years. No consistent pattern was detected between the distribution and inter-annual variations of the two genera, and contrasting inter-annual patterns emerged when considering abundance either as biomass or as density. Significantly, A. aurita medusae were heavier in stratified than in mixed waters, which we hypothesize may be linked to differences in timing and yield of primary and secondary productions between water masses. These results show the vulnerability of time-series from bycatch datasets to phenological changes and highlight the importance of taking species- and population-specific distribution patterns into account when integrating jellyfish into ecosystem models.

  15. Z(5): critical point symmetry for the prolate to oblate nuclear shape phase transition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bonatsos, Dennis; Lenis, D.; Petrellis, D.; Terziev, P.A

    2004-05-27

    A critical point symmetry for the prolate to oblate shape phase transition is introduced, starting from the Bohr Hamiltonian and approximately separating variables for {gamma}=30 deg. Parameter-free (up to overall scale factors) predictions for spectra and B(E2) transition rates are found to be in good agreement with experimental data for {sup 194}Pt, which is supposed to be located very close to the prolate to oblate critical point, as well as for its neighbours ({sup 192}Pt, {sup 196}Pt)

  16. Z(5): Critical point symmetry for the prolate to oblate nuclear shape phase transition

    CERN Document Server

    Bonatsos, D; Petrellis, D; Terziev, P A; Bonatsos, Dennis

    2004-01-01

    A critical point symmetry for the prolate to oblate shape phase transition is introduced, starting from the Bohr Hamiltonian and approximately separating variables for $\\gamma=30^{\\rm o}$. Parameter-free (up to overall scale factors) predictions for spectra and B(E2) transition rates are found to be in good agreement with experimental data for 194-Pt, which is supposed to be located very close to the prolate to oblate critical point, as well as for its neighbours (192-Pt, 196-Pt).

  17. Dielectric Behavior of Oblate Spheroidal Particles:Application to Erythrocytes Suspensions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HUANG Ji-Ping; YU Kin-Wah

    2003-01-01

    We have investigated the pressure effect on the eletrorotation (ER) spectrum of living cell suspensions byconsidering the particle shape effect. In particular, we consider coated oblate spheroidal particles and present a theoreticalstudy of ER based on the spectral representation theory. Analytic expressions for the characteristic frequency as wellas the dispersion strength can be obtained, thus simplifying the fitting of experimental data on oblate spheroidal cellsthat abound in the literature. From the theoretical analysis, we find that the cellshape, coating as well as materialparameters can change the ER spectrum. We demonstrate a good agreement between our theoretical predictions andexperimental data on human erthrocytes suspensions.

  18. Neuromuscular transmission in the jellyfish Aglantha digitale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerfoot, P A; Mackie, G O; Meech, R W; Roberts, A; Singla, C L

    1985-05-01

    In the jellyfish Aglantha digitale escape swimming is mediated by the nearly synchronous activity of eight giant motor axons which make direct synaptic contact with contractile myoepithelial cells on the under-surface of the body wall. The delay in transmission at these synapses was 0.7 +/- 0.1 ms (+/- S.D.;N = 6) at 12 degrees C as measured from intracellular records. Transmission depended on the presence of Ca2+ in the bathing medium. It was not blocked by increasing the level of Mg2+ to 127 mmol l-1. The myoepithelium is a thin sheet of electrically coupled cells and injection of current at one point was found to depolarize the surrounding cells. The potential change declined with distance from the current source as expected for two-dimensional current spread. The two-dimensional space constant (lambda) was 770 micron for current flow in the circular direction and 177 micron for radial flow. The internal resistance of the epithelium (178-201 omega cm) and the membrane time constant (5-10 ms) were direction independent. No propagated epithelial action potentials were observed. Spontaneous miniature synaptic potentials of similar amplitude and rise-time were recorded intracellularly at distances of up to 1 mm from the motor giant axon. Ultrastructural evidence confirms that neuro-myoepithelial synapses also occur away from the giant axons. It is likely that synaptic sites are widespread in the myoepithelium, probably associated with the lateral motor neurones as well as the giant axons. Local stimulation of lateral motor neurones generally produced contraction in distinct fields. We suppose that stimulation of a single motor giant axon excites a whole population of lateral motor neurones and hence a broad area of the myoepithelium.

  19. Skin and Systemic Manifestations of Jellyfish Stings in Iraqi Fishermen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K Al-Rubiay

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Jellyfish stings are common worldwide with an estimated 150 million cases annually,and their stings cause a wide range of clinical manifestations from skin inflammation to cardiovascularand respiratory collapse. No studies on jellyfish stings have been carried out in Basra, Iraq.Objectives: To describe the immediate and delayed skin reactions to White Jellyfish (Rhizostomasp. stings and the types of local treatment used by fishermen. Methods and Materials: 150fishermen were enrolled at three Marine stations in Basra, Iraq. Demographic data, types of skinreactions, systemic manifestations and kinds of treatments were collected. Results: Overall, 79% offishermen in all three Marine stations gave a history of having been stung. The common sites of singswere the hands and arms followed by the legs. Most fishermen claimed that stings led to skinreactions within 5 minutes. The presenting complaints were itching, burning sensation, anderythematic wheals. A few days after the sting, new groups of painless and itchy erythematousmonomorphic papular rashes developed at the site of the sting in 62% of cases as a delayed type ofskin reaction that resolved spontaneously. The local remedies commonly used by the fishermen wereseawater, tap water and ice. A few fishermen considered stings as insignificant and did not think therewas a need to seek medical help. Conclusions: We conclude that jellyfish causes many stingsamong fishermen in the Basra region. Their stings lead to immediate and delayed skin reactions. Selftreatmentby topical remedies is common.

  20. Current-driven Flow across a Stationary Jellyfish

    CERN Document Server

    Hamlet, Christina; Fan, Roger; Dollinger, Makani; Harenber, Steve

    2011-01-01

    We present several dye visualization and numerical simulation fluid dynamics videos of a sessile jellyfish subjected to channel flow. The low resolution video and the high resolution video display the vortex patterns in different channel flows. This description accompanies the video submission V038 to the 2011 APS DFD Gallery of Fluid Motion.

  1. Jellyfish Bioactive Compounds: Methods for Wet-Lab Work.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frazão, Bárbara; Antunes, Agostinho

    2016-04-12

    The study of bioactive compounds from marine animals has provided, over time, an endless source of interesting molecules. Jellyfish are commonly targets of study due to their toxic proteins. However, there is a gap in reviewing successful wet-lab methods employed in these animals, which compromises the fast progress in the detection of related biomolecules. Here, we provide a compilation of the most effective wet-lab methodologies for jellyfish venom extraction prior to proteomic analysis-separation, identification and toxicity assays. This includes SDS-PAGE, 2DE, gel chromatography, HPLC, DEAE, LC-MS, MALDI, Western blot, hemolytic assay, antimicrobial assay and protease activity assay. For a more comprehensive approach, jellyfish toxicity studies should further consider transcriptome sequencing. We reviewed such methodologies and other genomic techniques used prior to the deep sequencing of transcripts, including RNA extraction, construction of cDNA libraries and RACE. Overall, we provide an overview of the most promising methods and their successful implementation for optimizing time and effort when studying jellyfish.

  2. Jellyfish Bioactive Compounds: Methods for Wet-Lab Work

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bárbara Frazão

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The study of bioactive compounds from marine animals has provided, over time, an endless source of interesting molecules. Jellyfish are commonly targets of study due to their toxic proteins. However, there is a gap in reviewing successful wet-lab methods employed in these animals, which compromises the fast progress in the detection of related biomolecules. Here, we provide a compilation of the most effective wet-lab methodologies for jellyfish venom extraction prior to proteomic analysis—separation, identification and toxicity assays. This includes SDS-PAGE, 2DE, gel chromatography, HPLC, DEAE, LC-MS, MALDI, Western blot, hemolytic assay, antimicrobial assay and protease activity assay. For a more comprehensive approach, jellyfish toxicity studies should further consider transcriptome sequencing. We reviewed such methodologies and other genomic techniques used prior to the deep sequencing of transcripts, including RNA extraction, construction of cDNA libraries and RACE. Overall, we provide an overview of the most promising methods and their successful implementation for optimizing time and effort when studying jellyfish.

  3. Diversity, phylogeny and expression patterns of Pou and Six homeodomain transcription factors in hydrozoan jellyfish Craspedacusta sowerbyi.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miluse Hroudova

    Full Text Available Formation of all metazoan bodies is controlled by a group of selector genes including homeobox genes, highly conserved across the entire animal kingdom. The homeobox genes from Pou and Six classes are key members of the regulation cascades determining development of sensory organs, nervous system, gonads and muscles. Besides using common bilaterian models, more attention has recently been targeted at the identification and characterization of these genes within the basal metazoan phyla. Cnidaria as a diploblastic sister group to bilateria with simple and yet specialized organs are suitable models for studies on the sensory organ origin and the associated role of homeobox genes. In this work, Pou and Six homeobox genes, together with a broad range of other sensory-specific transcription factors, were identified in the transcriptome of hydrozoan jellyfish Craspedacusta sowerbyi. Phylogenetic analyses of Pou and Six proteins revealed cnidarian-specific sequence motifs and contributed to the classification of individual factors. The majority of the Craspedacusta sowerbyi Pou and Six homeobox genes are predominantly expressed in statocysts, manubrium and nerve ring, the tissues with sensory and nervous activities. The described diversity and expression patterns of Pou and Six factors in hydrozoan jellyfish highlight their evolutionarily conserved functions. This study extends the knowledge of the cnidarian genome complexity and shows that the transcriptome of hydrozoan jellyfish is generally rich in homeodomain transcription factors employed in the regulation of sensory and nervous functions.

  4. Firing the sting: chemically induced discharge of cnidae reveals novel proteins and peptides from box jellyfish (Chironex fleckeri) venom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jouiaei, Mahdokht; Casewell, Nicholas R; Yanagihara, Angel A; Nouwens, Amanda; Cribb, Bronwen W; Whitehead, Darryl; Jackson, Timothy N W; Ali, Syed A; Wagstaff, Simon C; Koludarov, Ivan; Alewood, Paul; Hansen, Jay; Fry, Bryan G

    2015-03-18

    Cnidarian venom research has lagged behind other toxinological fields due to technical difficulties in recovery of the complex venom from the microscopic nematocysts. Here we report a newly developed rapid, repeatable and cost effective technique of venom preparation, using ethanol to induce nematocyst discharge and to recover venom contents in one step. Our model species was the Australian box jellyfish (Chironex fleckeri), which has a notable impact on public health. By utilizing scanning electron microscopy and light microscopy, we examined nematocyst external morphology before and after ethanol treatment and verified nematocyst discharge. Further, to investigate nematocyst content or "venom" recovery, we utilized both top-down and bottom-up transcriptomics-proteomics approaches and compared the proteome profile of this new ethanol recovery based method to a previously reported high activity and recovery protocol, based upon density purified intact cnidae and pressure induced disruption. In addition to recovering previously characterized box jellyfish toxins, including CfTX-A/B and CfTX-1, we recovered putative metalloproteases and novel expression of a small serine protease inhibitor. This study not only reveals a much more complex toxin profile of Australian box jellyfish venom but also suggests that ethanol extraction method could augment future cnidarian venom proteomics research efforts.

  5. Firing the Sting: Chemically Induced Discharge of Cnidae Reveals Novel Proteins and Peptides from Box Jellyfish (Chironex fleckeri Venom

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahdokht Jouiaei

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Cnidarian venom research has lagged behind other toxinological fields due to technical difficulties in recovery of the complex venom from the microscopic nematocysts. Here we report a newly developed rapid, repeatable and cost effective technique of venom preparation, using ethanol to induce nematocyst discharge and to recover venom contents in one step. Our model species was the Australian box jellyfish (Chironex fleckeri, which has a notable impact on public health. By utilizing scanning electron microscopy and light microscopy, we examined nematocyst external morphology before and after ethanol treatment and verified nematocyst discharge. Further, to investigate nematocyst content or “venom” recovery, we utilized both top-down and bottom-up transcriptomics–proteomics approaches and compared the proteome profile of this new ethanol recovery based method to a previously reported high activity and recovery protocol, based upon density purified intact cnidae and pressure induced disruption. In addition to recovering previously characterized box jellyfish toxins, including CfTX-A/B and CfTX-1, we recovered putative metalloproteases and novel expression of a small serine protease inhibitor. This study not only reveals a much more complex toxin profile of Australian box jellyfish venom but also suggests that ethanol extraction method could augment future cnidarian venom proteomics research efforts.

  6. On the dynamics of jellyfish locomotion via 3D particle tracking velocimetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piper, Matthew; Kim, Jin-Tae; Chamorro, Leonardo P.

    2016-11-01

    The dynamics of jellyfish (Aurelia aurita) locomotion is experimentally studied via 3D particle tracking velocimetry. 3D locations of the bell tip are tracked over 1.5 cycles to describe the jellyfish path. Multiple positions of the jellyfish bell margin are initially tracked in 2D from four independent planes and individually projected in 3D based on the jellyfish path and geometrical properties of the setup. A cubic spline interpolation and the exponentially weighted moving average are used to estimate derived quantities, including velocity and acceleration of the jellyfish locomotion. We will discuss distinctive features of the jellyfish 3D motion at various swimming phases, and will provide insight on the 3D contraction and relaxation in terms of the locomotion, the steadiness of the bell margin eccentricity, and local Reynolds number based on the instantaneous mean diameter of the bell.

  7. Jellyfish (Cyanea nozakii) decomposition and its potential influence on marine environments studied via simulation experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qu, Chang-Feng; Song, Jin-Ming; Li, Ning; Li, Xue-Gang; Yuan, Hua-Mao; Duan, Li-Qin; Ma, Qing-Xia

    2015-08-15

    A growing body of evidence suggests that the jellyfish population in Chinese seas is increasing, and decomposition of jellyfish strongly influences the marine ecosystem. This study investigated the change in water quality during Cyanea nozakii decomposition using simulation experiments. The results demonstrated that the amount of dissolved nutrients released by jellyfish was greater than the amount of particulate nutrients. NH4(+) was predominant in the dissolved matter, whereas the particulate matter was dominated by organic nitrogen and inorganic phosphorus. The high N/P ratios demonstrated that jellyfish decomposition may result in high nitrogen loads. The inorganic nutrients released by C. nozakii decomposition were important for primary production. Jellyfish decomposition caused decreases in the pH and oxygen consumption associated with acidification and hypoxia or anoxia; however, sediments partially mitigated the changes in the pH and oxygen. These results imply that jellyfish decomposition can result in potentially detrimental effects on marine environments.

  8. A jellyfish-inspired jet propulsion robot actuated by an iris mechanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marut, Kenneth; Stewart, Colin; Michael, Tyler; Villanueva, Alex; Priya, Shashank

    2013-09-01

    A jellyfish-inspired jet propulsion robot (JetPRo) is designed, fabricated, and characterized with the objective of creating a fast-swimming uncrewed undersea vehicle. JetPRo measures 7.9 cm in height, 5.7 cm in diameter and is designed to mimic the proficient jetting propulsion mechanism used by the hydromedusa Sarsia tubulosa, which measures approximately 1 cm in diameter. In order to achieve the uniform-bell contraction used by S. tubulosa, we develop a novel circumferential actuation technique based on a mechanical iris diaphragm. When triggered, this mechanism induces a volumetric change of a deformable silicone cavity to expel a jet of fluid and produces positive thrust. A theoretical jetting model is used to optimize JetPRo’s gait for maximum steady-state swimming velocity, a result achieved by minimizing the timing between the contraction and relaxation phases. We validate this finding empirically and quantify the swimming performance of the robot using video tracking and time resolved digital particle image velocimetry. JetPRo was able to produce discrete vortex rings shed before pinch off and swim upwards with a maximum steady-state velocity of 11.6 cm s-1, outperforming current state-of-the-art robotic jellyfish in velocity as well as diameter-normalized velocity.

  9. Optical pulling force and torques on Rayleigh semiconductor prolate and oblate spheroids in Bessel tractor beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitri, F. G.

    2017-07-01

    Optical tractor Bessel beams are gaining increased interest where a negative attractive force acting in opposite direction of wave propagation is harnessed for particle manipulation in opto-fluidics, the manufacturing of periodic composite metamaterials and other related applications. Previous works considered the spherical geometry, however, it is of some importance to develop improved models to investigate objects of more complex shapes and study the tractor beam effect on them. The aim of this work is therefore directed toward this goal, where the dipole approximation method is used to compute the optical force, spin and orbital torques on a subwavelength semiconductor spheroid illuminated by a zeroth-order Bessel vector beam. Numerical computations for the Cartesian components of the optical radiation force on prolate and oblate spheroids with arbitrary orientation are performed, with emphasis on the emergence of a negative pulling force and its dependence on the half-cone angle of the beam, the aspect ratio of the spheroid, and its orientation in space. Moreover, the Cartesian components of the spin radiation torque are computed where a negative spin torque can arise, which causes a rotational twisting effect of the spheroid around its center of mass in either the counterclockwise or the clockwise (negative) direction of spinning. In addition, the axial component of the orbital radiation torque is computed which also shows sign reversal. The results of this analysis provide a priori information for the design and development of novel optical tweezers devices and tractor beams, with potential applications in the manipulation and handling of elongated particles.

  10. Interplay between Dark Matter and Galactic Structure in Disk and Oblate Elliptical Galaxies

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Euaggelos E. Zotos; Nicolaos D. Caranicolas

    2014-12-01

    Understanding the regular or chaotic nature of orbits in galaxies is undoubtedly an issue of great importance. We determine the character of orbits of stars moving in the meridional plane (, ) of an axially symmetric time-independent galactic model with a spherical central nucleus, and a flat biaxial oblate dark matter halo component. In particular, we try to reveal the influence of the fractional portion of dark matter on the structure and also on the different families of orbits of the galaxy, by monitoring how the percentage of chaotic orbits, as well as the percentages of orbits of the main regular resonant families evolve when the ratio of dark matter to luminous mass varies. The smaller alignment index (SALI) was computed by numerically integrating the equations of motion as well as the variational equations to extensive samples of orbits in order to distinguish between ordered and chaotic motion. In addition, a method based on the concept of spectral dynamics that utilizes the Fourier transform of the time series of each coordinate is used to identify the various families of regular orbits and also to recognize the secondary resonances that bifurcate from them. The investigation is carried out both in the physical (, ) and the phase (, $\\dot{R}$) space for a better understanding of the orbital properties of the system. The numerical computations reveal that in both cases, the fractional portion of dark matter influences more or less, the overall orbital structure of the system. It was observed however, that the evolution of the percentages of all types of orbits as a function of the fractional portion of dark matter strongly depends on the particular type of space (physical or phase) in which the initial conditions of orbits are launched. The results are compared with the similar earlier work.

  11. Anticoagulant activity of Moon jellyfish (Aurelia aurita) tentacle extract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rastogi, Akriti; Biswas, Sumit; Sarkar, Angshuman; Chakrabarty, Dibakar

    2012-10-01

    Moon jellyfish (Aurelia aurita) tentacle extract was studied for its anticoagulant activity in vitro. The Jellyfish Tentacle Extract (JFTE) showed very strong fibrinogenolytic activity by cleaving Aα and Bβ chain of fibrinogen molecule. The fibrinogenolytic activity was found to be stronger than some snake venom derived anticoagulants. JFTE also completely liquefied fibrin clots in 24 h. JFTE was found to contain both high and low molecular weight proteins/peptides. The fibrinogenolysis appears to be caused by high molecular weight fractions of the extract. It has been also noted that PMSF significantly reduced fibrinogenolytic activity and heating totally abolished it. Autolytic degradation of the high molecular weight protein was also noted. Autolysis slowed down, but did not abolish the fibrinogenolytic activity of the extract. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Regulation of polyp-to-jellyfish transition in Aurelia aurita.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuchs, Björn; Wang, Wei; Graspeuntner, Simon; Li, Yizhu; Insua, Santiago; Herbst, Eva-Maria; Dirksen, Philipp; Böhm, Anna-Marei; Hemmrich, Georg; Sommer, Felix; Domazet-Lošo, Tomislav; Klostermeier, Ulrich C; Anton-Erxleben, Friederike; Rosenstiel, Philip; Bosch, Thomas C G; Khalturin, Konstantin

    2014-02-03

    The life cycle of scyphozoan cnidarians alternates between sessile asexual polyps and pelagic medusa. Transition from one life form to another is triggered by environmental signals, but the molecular cascades involved in the drastic morphological and physiological changes remain unknown. We show in the moon jelly Aurelia aurita that the molecular machinery controlling transition of the sessile polyp into a free-swimming jellyfish consists of two parts. One is conserved and relies on retinoic acid signaling. The second, novel part is based on secreted proteins that are strongly upregulated prior to metamorphosis in response to the seasonal temperature changes. One of these proteins functions as a temperature-sensitive "timer" and encodes the precursor of the strobilation hormone of Aurelia. Our findings uncover the molecule framework controlling the polyp-to-jellyfish transition in a basal metazoan and provide insights into the evolution of complex life cycles in the animal kingdom. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Disarming the box-jellyfish: nematocyst inhibition in Chironex fleckeri.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartwick, R; Callanan, V; Williamson, J

    1980-01-12

    Laboratory tests indicate that methylated spirits, widely espoused as a first-aid treatment for jellyfish stings, causes massive discharge of nematocysts in living tentacles of the box-jellyfish, Chironex fleckeri. This action, together with demonstrated hazards of flammability and intoxication, casts doubt on this substance as a treatment for Chironex stings. In an attempt to find a substitute which will be effective in inactivating unfired nematocysts in the tentacles adhering to sting victims, a number of substances were tested in the laboratory. Weak solutions of acetic acid, as well as commerical vinegar, were found to inactivate the penetrating nematocysts of Chironex rapidly and completely. Most other substances tested proved less effective, and some actually stimulated the firing of nematocysts.

  14. Visual control of steering in the box jellyfish Tripedalia cystophora

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petie, Ronald; Garm, Anders; Nilsson, Dan-Eric

    2011-01-01

    Box jellyfish carry an elaborate visual system consisting of 24 eyes, which they use for driving a number of behaviours. However, it is not known how visual input controls the swimming behaviour. In this study we exposed the Caribbean box jellyfish Tripedalia cystophora to simple visual stimuli...... their bell in such a way that, if not tethered, they would turn and swim away from the dark area. We conclude that the visual system of T. cystophora has a predictable effect on swimming behaviour....... to the darkening of one quadrant of the equatorial visual world by (1) increasing pulse frequency, (2) creating an asymmetry in the structure that constricts the outflow opening of the bell, the velarium, and (3) delaying contraction at one of the four sides of the bell. This causes the animals to orient...

  15. Cytochalasin derivatives from a jellyfish-derived fungus Phoma sp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Eun La; Wang, Haibo; Park, Ju Hee; Hong, Jongki; Choi, Jae Sue; Im, Dong Soon; Chung, Hae Young; Jung, Jee H

    2015-01-01

    Four new cytochalasin derivatives (1-4), together with proxiphomin (5), were isolated from a jellyfish-derived fungus Phoma sp. The planar structures and relative stereochemistry were established by analysis of 1D and 2D NMR data. The absolute configuration was defined by the modified Mosher's method. The compounds showed moderate cytotoxicity against a small panel of human solid tumor cell lines (A549, KB, and HCT116).

  16. Venom Proteome of the Box Jellyfish Chironex fleckeri

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    The nematocyst is a complex intracellular structure unique to Cnidaria. When triggered to discharge, the nematocyst explosively releases a long spiny, tubule that delivers an often highly venomous mixture of components. The box jellyfish, Chironex fleckeri, produces exceptionally potent and rapid-acting venom and its stings to humans cause severe localized and systemic effects that are potentially life-threatening. In an effort to identify toxins that could be responsible for the serious heal...

  17. From fish to jellyfish in the eutrophicated Limfjorden (Denmark)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Riisgård, Hans Ulrik; Andersen, Per; Hoffmann, Erik

    2012-01-01

    The heavily eutrophicated Limfjorden (Denmark) provides a good illustration of the value of long-term monitoring, especially if this is combined with an experimental, interdisciplinary research approach. Here, we first give a short overview of the environmental status of Limfjorden, including the...... a substantial part of the zooplankton biomass. Marine environmental management programmes should be aware of the increasing importance of both indigenous and new invasive jellyfish species that may show mass occurrence in especially eutrophicated and overfished areas...

  18. MICROBIOLOGICAL SURVEY ON JELLYFISH FOOD PRODUCTS: PRELIMINARY RESULTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Guidi

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available A microbiological survey was performed on ten brined jellyfish products, sampled in Italy from Chinese food markets. In general, the microbiological conditions were good and respected the standards contemplated in the regulations CE 2073/2005 e 1441/2007. The presence of inhibiting substances and the absence of aerobic mesophilic bacteria in two samples suggest a treatment to preserve the product.

  19. What's on the mind of a jellyfish? A review of behavioural observations on Aurelia sp. jellyfish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albert, David J

    2011-01-01

    Aurelia sp. (scyphozoa; Moon Jellies) are one of the most common and widely distributed species of jellyfish. Their behaviours include swimming up in response to somatosensory stimulation, swimming down in response to low salinity, diving in response to turbulence, avoiding rock walls, forming aggregations, and horizontal directional swimming. These are not simple reflexes. They are species typical behaviours involving sequences of movements that are adjusted in response to the requirements of the situation and that require sensory feedback during their execution. They require the existence of specialized sensory receptors. The central nervous system of Aurelia sp. coordinates motor responses with sensory feedback, maintains a response long after the eliciting stimulus has disappeared, changes behaviour in response to sensory input from specialized receptors or from patterns of sensory input, organizes somatosensory input in a way that allows stimulus input from many parts of the body to elicit a similar response, and coordinates responding when stimuli are tending to elicit more than one response. While entirely different from that of most animals, the nervous system of Aurelia sp. includes a brain that creates numerous adaptive behaviours that are critical to the survival of these phylogenetically ancient species. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Jellyfish monitoring on coastlines using remote piloted aircraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrado, C.; Fuentes, J. A.; Salamí, E.; Royo, P.; Olariaga, A. D.; López, J.; Fuentes, V. L.; Gili, J. M.; Pastor, E.

    2014-03-01

    In the last 10 years the number of jellyfish shoals that reach the swimming area of the Mediterranean Sea are increasing constantly. The term "Jellyfish" refers to animals from different taxonomic groups but the Scyphomedusae are within the most significant one. Four species of Scyphomedusae are the most conspicuous ones inhabiting the studied area, the Barcelona metropolitan area. Jellyfish are usually found at the surface waters, forming big swarms. This feature makes possible to detect them remotely, using a visual camera and image processing algorithms. In this paper we present the characteristics of a remote piloted aircraft capable to perform monitoring flights during the whole summer season. The requirements of the aircraft are to be easy to operate, to be able to flight at low altitude (100 m) following the buoy line (200 m from the beach line) and to be save for other users of the seaside. The remote piloted aircraft will carry a vision system and a processing board able to obtain useful information on real-time.

  1. Australian venomous jellyfish, envenomation syndromes, toxins and therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tibballs, James

    2006-12-01

    The seas and oceans around Australia harbour numerous venomous jellyfish. Chironex fleckeri, the box jellyfish, is the most lethal causing rapid cardiorespiratory depression and although its venom has been characterised, its toxins remain to be identified. A moderately effective antivenom exists which is also partially effective against another chirodropid, Chiropsalmus sp. Numerous carybdeids, some unidentified, cause less severe illness, including Carybdea rastoni whose toxins CrTX-A and CrTX-B are large proteins. Carukia barnesi, another small carybdeid is one cause of the 'Irukandji' syndrome which includes delayed pain from severe muscle cramping, vomiting, anxiety, restlessness, sweating and prostration, and occasionally severe hypertension and acute cardiac failure. The syndrome is in part caused by release of catecholamines but the cause of heart failure is undefined. The venom contains a sodium channel modulator. Two species of Physalia are present and although one is potentially lethal, has not caused death in Australian waters. Other significant genera of jellyfish include Tamoya, Pelagia, Cyanea, Aurelia and Chyrosaora.

  2. Venom proteome of the box jellyfish Chironex fleckeri.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diane L Brinkman

    Full Text Available The nematocyst is a complex intracellular structure unique to Cnidaria. When triggered to discharge, the nematocyst explosively releases a long spiny, tubule that delivers an often highly venomous mixture of components. The box jellyfish, Chironex fleckeri, produces exceptionally potent and rapid-acting venom and its stings to humans cause severe localized and systemic effects that are potentially life-threatening. In an effort to identify toxins that could be responsible for the serious health effects caused by C. fleckeri and related species, we used a proteomic approach to profile the protein components of C. fleckeri venom. Collectively, 61 proteins were identified, including toxins and proteins important for nematocyte development and nematocyst formation (nematogenesis. The most abundant toxins identified were isoforms of a taxonomically restricted family of potent cnidarian proteins. These toxins are associated with cytolytic, nociceptive, inflammatory, dermonecrotic and lethal properties and expansion of this important protein family goes some way to explaining the destructive and potentially fatal effects of C. fleckeri venom. Venom proteins and their post-translational modifications (PTMs were further characterized using toxin-specific antibodies and phosphoprotein/glycoprotein-specific stains. Results indicated that glycosylation is a common PTM of the toxin family while a lack of cross-reactivity by toxin-specific antibodies infers there is significant divergence in structure and possibly function among family members. This study provides insight into the depth and diversity of protein toxins produced by harmful box jellyfish and represents the first description of a cubozoan jellyfish venom proteome.

  3. Venom proteome of the box jellyfish Chironex fleckeri.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brinkman, Diane L; Aziz, Ammar; Loukas, Alex; Potriquet, Jeremy; Seymour, Jamie; Mulvenna, Jason

    2012-01-01

    The nematocyst is a complex intracellular structure unique to Cnidaria. When triggered to discharge, the nematocyst explosively releases a long spiny, tubule that delivers an often highly venomous mixture of components. The box jellyfish, Chironex fleckeri, produces exceptionally potent and rapid-acting venom and its stings to humans cause severe localized and systemic effects that are potentially life-threatening. In an effort to identify toxins that could be responsible for the serious health effects caused by C. fleckeri and related species, we used a proteomic approach to profile the protein components of C. fleckeri venom. Collectively, 61 proteins were identified, including toxins and proteins important for nematocyte development and nematocyst formation (nematogenesis). The most abundant toxins identified were isoforms of a taxonomically restricted family of potent cnidarian proteins. These toxins are associated with cytolytic, nociceptive, inflammatory, dermonecrotic and lethal properties and expansion of this important protein family goes some way to explaining the destructive and potentially fatal effects of C. fleckeri venom. Venom proteins and their post-translational modifications (PTMs) were further characterized using toxin-specific antibodies and phosphoprotein/glycoprotein-specific stains. Results indicated that glycosylation is a common PTM of the toxin family while a lack of cross-reactivity by toxin-specific antibodies infers there is significant divergence in structure and possibly function among family members. This study provides insight into the depth and diversity of protein toxins produced by harmful box jellyfish and represents the first description of a cubozoan jellyfish venom proteome.

  4. Biogeography of jellyfish in the North Atlantic, by traditional and genomic methods

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Licandro, P.; Blackett, M.; Fischer, A.; Hosia, A.; Kennedy, J.; Kirby, R.R.; Raab, K.; Stern, R.; Tranter, P.

    2015-01-01

    Scientific debate on whether or not the recent increase in reports of jellyfish outbreaks represents a true rise in their abundance has outlined a lack of reliable records of Cnidaria and Ctenophora. Here we describe different jellyfish data sets produced within the EU programme EURO-BASIN. These

  5. Jellyfish as vectors of bacterial disease for farmed salmon (Salmo salar).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferguson, Hugh W; Delannoy, Christian M J; Hay, Stephen; Nicolson, James; Sutherland, David; Crumlish, Margaret

    2010-05-01

    Swarms or blooms of jellyfish are increasingly problematic and can result in high mortality rates of farmed fish. Small species of jellyfish, such as Phialella quadrata (13 mm in diameter), are capable of passing through the mesh of sea cages and being sucked into the mouth of fish during respiration. Results of the current study show that the initial damage to gills of farmed Atlantic salmon, likely produced by nematocyst-derived toxins from the jellyfish, was compounded by secondary bacterial infection with Tenacibaculum maritimum. Results also demonstrate that these filamentous bacteria were present on the mouth of the jellyfish and that their DNA sequences were almost identical to those of bacteria present on the salmon gills. This suggests that the bacterial lesions were not the result of an opportunistic infection of damaged tissue, as previously thought. Instead, P. quadrata is probably acting as a vector for this particular bacterial pathogen, and it is the first time that evidence to support such a link has been presented. No prior literature describing the presence of bacteria associated with jellyfish, except studies about their decay, could be found. It is not known if all jellyfish of this and other species carry similar bacteria or the relationship to each other. Their source, the role they play under other circumstances, and indeed whether the jellyfish were themselves diseased are also not known. The high proteolytic capabilities of T. maritimum mean that partially digested gill tissues were readily available to the jellyfish, which rely heavily on intracellular digestion for their nutrition.

  6. The Bright Side of Gelatinous Blooms: Nutraceutical Value and Antioxidant Properties of Three Mediterranean Jellyfish (Scyphozoa).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leone, Antonella; Lecci, Raffaella Marina; Durante, Miriana; Meli, Federica; Piraino, Stefano

    2015-07-29

    Jellyfish are recorded with increasing frequency and magnitude in many coastal areas and several species display biological features comparable to the most popular Asiatic edible jellyfish. The biochemical and antioxidant properties of wild gelatinous biomasses, in terms of nutritional and nutraceutical values, are still largely unexplored. In this paper, three of the most abundant and commonly recorded jellyfish species (Aurelia sp.1, Cotylorhiza tuberculata and Rhizostoma pulmo) in the Mediterranean Sea were subject to investigation. A sequential enzymatic hydrolysis of jellyfish proteins was set up by pepsin and collagenase treatments of jellyfish samples after aqueous or hydroalcoholic protein extraction. The content and composition of proteins, amino acids, phenolics, and fatty acids of the three species were recorded and compared. Protein content (mainly represented by collagen) up to 40% of jellyfish dry weight were found in two of the three jellyfish species (C. tuberculata and R. pulmo), whereas the presence of ω-3 and ω-6 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) was significantly higher in the zooxanthellate jellyfish C. tuberculata only. Remarkable antioxidant ability was also recorded from both proteinaceous and non proteinaceous extracts and the hydrolyzed protein fractions in all the three species. The abundance of collagen, peptides and other bioactive molecules make these Mediterranean gelatinous biomasses a largely untapped source of natural compounds of nutraceutical, cosmeceutical and pharmacological interest.

  7. The Bright Side of Gelatinous Blooms: Nutraceutical Value and Antioxidant Properties of Three Mediterranean Jellyfish (Scyphozoa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonella Leone

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Jellyfish are recorded with increasing frequency and magnitude in many coastal areas and several species display biological features comparable to the most popular Asiatic edible jellyfish. The biochemical and antioxidant properties of wild gelatinous biomasses, in terms of nutritional and nutraceutical values, are still largely unexplored. In this paper, three of the most abundant and commonly recorded jellyfish species (Aurelia sp.1, Cotylorhiza tuberculata and Rhizostoma pulmo in the Mediterranean Sea were subject to investigation. A sequential enzymatic hydrolysis of jellyfish proteins was set up by pepsin and collagenase treatments of jellyfish samples after aqueous or hydroalcoholic protein extraction. The content and composition of proteins, amino acids, phenolics, and fatty acids of the three species were recorded and compared. Protein content (mainly represented by collagen up to 40% of jellyfish dry weight were found in two of the three jellyfish species (C. tuberculata and R. pulmo, whereas the presence of ω-3 and ω-6 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs was significantly higher in the zooxanthellate jellyfish C. tuberculata only. Remarkable antioxidant ability was also recorded from both proteinaceous and non proteinaceous extracts and the hydrolyzed protein fractions in all the three species. The abundance of collagen, peptides and other bioactive molecules make these Mediterranean gelatinous biomasses a largely untapped source of natural compounds of nutraceutical, cosmeceutical and pharmacological interest.

  8. Biogeography of jellyfish in the North Atlantic, by traditional and genomic methods

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Licandro, P.; Blackett, M.; Fischer, A.; Hosia, A.; Kennedy, J.; Kirby, R.R.; Raab, K.; Stern, R.; Tranter, P.

    2015-01-01

    Scientific debate on whether or not the recent increase in reports of jellyfish outbreaks represents a true rise in their abundance has outlined a lack of reliable records of Cnidaria and Ctenophora. Here we describe different jellyfish data sets produced within the EU programme EURO-BASIN. These

  9. Dynamics of a rotating flat ellipsoid with a stochastic oblateness

    CERN Document Server

    Behar, Etienne; Pierret, Frédéric

    2014-01-01

    We derive a model for the motion of a rotating flat ellispoid with a stochastic flattening based on an invariance theorem for stochastic differential equations. A numerical study of a toy-model is performed leading to an intriguing coincidence with observational data.

  10. 3D simulations of self-propelled, reconstructed jellyfish using vortex methods

    CERN Document Server

    Rasmussen, J T; Storti, F; Koumoutsakos, P; Walther, J H

    2009-01-01

    We present simulations of the vortex dynamics associated with the self-propelled motion of jellyfish. The geometry is obtained from image segmentation of video recordings from live jellyfish. The numerical simulations are performed using three-dimensional viscous, vortex particle methods with Brinkman penalization to impose the kinematics of the jellyfish motion. We study two types of strokes recorded in the experiment1. The first type (stroke A) produces two vortex rings during the stroke: one outside the bell during the power stroke and one inside the bell during the recovery stroke. The second type (stroke B) produces three vortex rings: one ring during the power stroke and two vortex rings during the recovery stroke. Both strokes propel the jellyfish, with stroke B producing the highest velocity. The speed of the jellyfish scales with the square root of the Reynolds number. The simulations are visualized in a fluid dynamics video.

  11. On HMI solar oblateness during solar cycle 24 and impact of the space environment on results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meftah, M.; Hauchecorne, A.; Bush, R. I.; Irbah, A.

    2016-10-01

    Solar oblateness is a fundamental parameter of the Sun, which provides indirect information on the inner rotation profile and on the distribution of matter. It also puts constraints on General Relativity. But this quantity is difficult to measure due to its very small value where the solar equator-to-pole radius difference is less than 10 milli-arcsecond (mas). Indeed, the measurements can be affected by magnetic activity and by instrumental effects linked to the space environment. The Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (HMI) instrument onboard the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) has produced accurate determinations of the solar oblateness from 2010 to 2015. The HMI measurements of the solar shape are obtained during special roll maneuvers of the spacecraft by 11.25 degrees steps around the spacecraft to the Sun line. HMI roll maneuver has been repeated ten times after the commissioning phase from October 2010 to July 2015. From HMI data, we observed a slight anti-correlation between solar oblateness and solar activity. From a new correction method, we found a mean solar equator-to-pole radius difference of 8.36 ± 0.49 mas (i.e. 6.06 ± 0.35 km at one σ) at 617.3 nm during the period 2010-2015.

  12. Determining Neutron Star Properties by Fitting Oblate Schwarzschild Waveforms To X-ray Burst Oscillations

    CERN Document Server

    Miller, M Coleman

    2014-01-01

    We have developed sophisticated new Bayesian analysis methods that enable us to estimate quickly the masses and radii of rapidly rotating, oblate neutron stars using the energy-resolved waveforms of their X-ray burst oscillations and to determine the uncertainties in these mass and radius estimates. We demonstrate these methods by generating and analyzing the energy-resolved burst oscillation waveforms that would be produced by a hot spot on various rapidly rotating, oblate stars, using the analytic implementation of the oblate-star Schwarzschild-spacetime (OS) approximation introduced by Morsink et al. 2007. In generating these synthetic data, we assume that 10$^6$ counts have been collected from the hot spot and that the background is $9\\times10^6$ counts. This produces a realistic modulation amplitude and a total number of counts comparable to the number that could be obtained by future space missions, by combining data from many bursts from a given star. We compute the joint posterior distribution of the ...

  13. Does the association of young fishes with jellyfishes protect from predation?A report on a failure case due to damage to the jellyfish

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberta Martini Bonaldo

    Full Text Available The fish-jellyfish association is regarded as a temporary symbiosis believed to protect the fishes from predators. Here we report on juvenile scads (Trachurus lathami associated with the jellyfish Chrysaora lactea, opportunistically preyed on by the grouper Mycteroperca acutirostris while the medusa was being damaged. The predation instances occurred when a couple of the filefish Stephanolepis hispidus approached the jellyfish to nibble on its umbrella. The feeding of the filefish caused a momentary disturbance of the defensive association, perceived and capitalised on by the watchful grouper, an opportunistic and versatile hunter. Before and after the disturbance, the protection offered to the young fish by the jellyfish showed to be effective, which strengthens the hypothesis of defensive function of this association.

  14. Biomass of scyphozoan jellyfish, and its spatial association with 0-group fish in the Barents Sea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eriksen, Elena; Prozorkevich, Dmitry; Trofimov, Aleksandr; Howell, Daniel

    2012-01-01

    An 0-group fish survey is conducted annually in the Barents Sea in order to estimate fish population abundance. Data on jellyfish by-catch have been recorded since 1980, although this dataset has never been analysed. In recent years, however, the ecological importance of jellyfish medusae has become widely recognized. In this paper the biomass of jellyfish (medusae) in 0-60 m depths is calculated for the period 1980-2010. During this period the climate changed from cold to warm, and changes in zooplankton and fish distribution and abundance were observed. This paper discusses the less well known ecosystem component; jellyfish medusae within the Phylum Cnidaria, and their spatial and temporal variation. The long term average was ca. 9×10⁸ kg, with some years showing biomasses in excess of 5×10⁹ kg. The biomasses were low during 1980s, increased during 1990s, and were highest in early 2000s with a subsequent decline. The bulk of the jellyfish were observed in the central parts of the Barents Sea, which is a core area for most 0-group fishes. Jellyfish were associated with haddock in the western area, with haddock and herring in the central and coastal area, and with capelin in the northern area of the Barents Sea. The jellyfish were present in the temperature interval 1°Cjellyfish occurring between 4.0-7.0°C. It seems that the ongoing warming trend may be favourable for Barents Sea jellyfish medusae; however their biomass has showed a recent moderate decline during years with record high temperatures in the Barents Sea. Jellyfish are undoubtedly an important component of the Barents Sea ecosystem, and the data presented here represent the best summary of jellyfish biomass and distribution yet published for the region.

  15. Jellyfish: The origin and distribution of extreme ram-pressure stripping events in massive galaxy clusters

    CERN Document Server

    McPartland, Conor; Roediger, Elke; Blumenthal, Kelly

    2015-01-01

    We investigate the observational signatures and physical origin of ram-pressure stripping (RPS) in 63 massive galaxy clusters at $z=0.3-0.7$, based on images obtained with the Hubble Space Telescope. Using a training set of a dozen "jellyfish" galaxies identified earlier in the same imaging data, we define morphological criteria to select 211 additional, less obvious cases of RPS. Spectroscopic follow-up observations of 124 candidates so far confirmed 53 as cluster members. For the brightest and most favourably aligned systems we visually derive estimates of the projected direction of motion based on the orientation of apparent compression shocks and debris trails. Our findings suggest that the onset of these events occurs primarily at large distances from the cluster core ($>400$ kpc), and that the trajectories of the affected galaxies feature high impact parameters. Simple models show that such trajectories are highly improbable for galaxy infall along filaments but common for infall at high velocities, eve...

  16. A numerical study of the effects of bell pulsation dynamics and oral arms on the exchange currents generated by the upside-down jellyfish Cassiopea spp

    CERN Document Server

    Hamlet, Christina; Miller, Laura A

    2010-01-01

    Mathematical and experimental studies of the flows generated by jellyfish have focused primarily on mechanisms of swimming. More recent work has also considered the fluid dynamics of feeding from currents generated during swimming. Here the benthic lifestyle of the upside down jellyfish (Cassiopea spp.) is capitalized upon to explore the fluids dynamics of feeding uncoupled from swimming. A mathematical model is developed to capture the fundamental characteristics of the motion of the unique concave bell shape. Given the prominence of the oral arms, this structure is included and modeled as a porous layer that perturbs the flow generated by bell contractions. The immersed boundary method is used to solve the fluid-structure interaction problem. Velocity fields obtained from live organisms using digital particle image velocimetry were used to validate the numerical simulations. Parameter sweeps were used to numerically explore the effects of changes in pulse dynamics and the properties of the oral arms indepen...

  17. Impact of stinging jellyfish proliferations along south Italian coasts: human health hazards, treatment and social costs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Donno, Antonella; Idolo, Adele; Bagordo, Francesco; Grassi, Tiziana; Leomanni, Alessandro; Serio, Francesca; Guido, Marcello; Canitano, Mariarita; Zampardi, Serena; Boero, Ferdinando; Piraino, Stefano

    2014-02-27

    Stinging jellyfish outbreaks represent a health hazard, causing contact dermatitis and systemic reactions. This study investigated the epidemiology, severity, and treatment protocols of jellyfish stings in a coastal area with high tourist development and frequent stinging jellyfish outbreaks of the central Mediterranean (Salento, Southern Italy), and the associated costs for the Italian National Health Service. In 2007-2011, 1,733 bathers (mostly children and females) sought medical assistance following jellyfish stings, the main cause of human pathologies due to contact with marine organisms. The majority of events were reported in the years 2007-2009, whereas the occurrence of cnidarian jellyfish outbreaks has been increasingly reported in the same area since summer 2010. Most symptoms were limited to local and cutaneous reactions; conversely, 8.7% of cases evoked complications, mainly due to allergic reactions. The main drugs used were corticosteroids, locally applied and systemic (46% and 43%, respectively), and with ammonia (74%) as the main non-pharmacological treatment. The estimated cost of jellyfish-related first-aid services along the Salento coastline over the 5-year period was approximately 400,000 Euros. Therefore the management of jellyfish outbreak phenomena need coordinated research efforts towards a better understanding of underlying ecological mechanisms, together with the adoption of effective prevention policy, mitigation strategies, and appropriate planning of health services at tourist hot spots.

  18. Impact of Stinging Jellyfish Proliferations along South Italian Coasts: Human Health Hazards, Treatment and Social Costs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonella De Donno

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Stinging jellyfish outbreaks represent a health hazard, causing contact dermatitis and systemic reactions. This study investigated the epidemiology, severity, and treatment protocols of jellyfish stings in a coastal area with high tourist development and frequent stinging jellyfish outbreaks of the central Mediterranean (Salento, Southern Italy, and the associated costs for the Italian National Health Service. In 2007–2011, 1,733 bathers (mostly children and females sought medical assistance following jellyfish stings, the main cause of human pathologies due to contact with marine organisms. The majority of events were reported in the years 2007–2009, whereas the occurrence of cnidarian jellyfish outbreaks has been increasingly reported in the same area since summer 2010. Most symptoms were limited to local and cutaneous reactions; conversely, 8.7% of cases evoked complications, mainly due to allergic reactions. The main drugs used were corticosteroids, locally applied and systemic (46% and 43%, respectively, and with ammonia (74% as the main non-pharmacological treatment. The estimated cost of jellyfish-related first-aid services along the Salento coastline over the 5-year period was approximately 400,000 Euros. Therefore the management of jellyfish outbreak phenomena need coordinated research efforts towards a better understanding of underlying ecological mechanisms, together with the adoption of effective prevention policy, mitigation strategies, and appropriate planning of health services at tourist hot spots.

  19. Deterministic Factors Overwhelm Stochastic Environmental Fluctuations as Drivers of Jellyfish Outbreaks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benedetti-Cecchi, Lisandro; Canepa, Antonio; Fuentes, Veronica; Tamburello, Laura; Purcell, Jennifer E; Piraino, Stefano; Roberts, Jason; Boero, Ferdinando; Halpin, Patrick

    2015-01-01

    Jellyfish outbreaks are increasingly viewed as a deterministic response to escalating levels of environmental degradation and climate extremes. However, a comprehensive understanding of the influence of deterministic drivers and stochastic environmental variations favouring population renewal processes has remained elusive. This study quantifies the deterministic and stochastic components of environmental change that lead to outbreaks of the jellyfish Pelagia noctiluca in the Mediterranen Sea. Using data of jellyfish abundance collected at 241 sites along the Catalan coast from 2007 to 2010 we: (1) tested hypotheses about the influence of time-varying and spatial predictors of jellyfish outbreaks; (2) evaluated the relative importance of stochastic vs. deterministic forcing of outbreaks through the environmental bootstrap method; and (3) quantified return times of extreme events. Outbreaks were common in May and June and less likely in other summer months, which resulted in a negative relationship between outbreaks and SST. Cross- and along-shore advection by geostrophic flow were important concentrating forces of jellyfish, but most outbreaks occurred in the proximity of two canyons in the northern part of the study area. This result supported the recent hypothesis that canyons can funnel P. noctiluca blooms towards shore during upwelling. This can be a general, yet unappreciated mechanism leading to outbreaks of holoplanktonic jellyfish species. The environmental bootstrap indicated that stochastic environmental fluctuations have negligible effects on return times of outbreaks. Our analysis emphasized the importance of deterministic processes leading to jellyfish outbreaks compared to the stochastic component of environmental variation. A better understanding of how environmental drivers affect demographic and population processes in jellyfish species will increase the ability to anticipate jellyfish outbreaks in the future.

  20. Jellyfish: the origin and distribution of extreme ram-pressure stripping events in massive galaxy clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    McPartland, Conor; Ebeling, Harald; Roediger, Elke; Blumenthal, Kelly

    2016-01-01

    We investigate the observational signatures and physical origin of ram-pressure stripping (RPS) in 63 massive galaxy clusters at z = 0.3-0.7, based on images obtained with the Hubble Space Telescope. Using a training set of a dozen `jellyfish' galaxies identified earlier in the same imaging data, we define morphological criteria to select 211 additional, less obvious cases of RPS. Spectroscopic follow-up observations of 124 candidates so far confirmed 53 as cluster members. For the brightest and most favourably aligned systems, we visually derive estimates of the projected direction of motion based on the orientation of apparent compression shocks and debris trails. Our findings suggest that the onset of these events occurs primarily at large distances from the cluster core (>400 kpc), and that the trajectories of the affected galaxies feature high-impact parameters. Simple models show that such trajectories are highly improbable for galaxy infall along filaments but common for infall at high velocities, even after observational biases are accounted for, provided the duration of the resulting RPS events is ≲500 Myr. We thus tentatively conclude that extreme RPS events are preferentially triggered by cluster mergers, an interpretation that is supported by the disturbed dynamical state of many of the host clusters. This hypothesis implies that extreme RPS might occur also near the cores of merging poor clusters or even merging groups of galaxies. Finally, we present nine additional `jellyfish" galaxies at z > 0.3 discovered by us, thereby doubling the number of such systems known at intermediate redshift.

  1. GRACE era variability in the Earth's oblateness: a comparison of estimates from six different sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyrath, Thierry; Rebischung, Paul; van Dam, Tonie

    2017-02-01

    We study fluctuations in the degree-2 zonal spherical harmonic coefficient of the Earth's gravity potential, C20, over the period 2003-2015. This coefficient is related to the Earth's oblateness and studying its temporal variations, ΔC20, can be used to monitor large-scale mass movements between high and low latitude regions. We examine ΔC20 inferred from six different sources, including satellite laser ranging (SLR), GRACE and global geophysical fluids models. We further include estimates that we derive from measured variations in the length-of-day (LOD), from the inversion of global crustal displacements as measured by GPS, as well as from the combination of GRACE and the output of an ocean model as described by Sun et al. We apply a sequence of trend and seasonal moving average filters to the different time-series in order to decompose them into an interannual, a seasonal and an intraseasonal component. We then perform a comparison analysis for each component, and we further estimate the noise level contained in the different series using an extended version of the three-cornered-hat method. For the seasonal component, we generally obtain a very good agreement between the different sources, and except for the LOD-derived series, we find that over 90 per cent of the variance in the seasonal components can be explained by the sum of an annual and semiannual oscillation of constant amplitudes and phases, indicating that the seasonal pattern is stable over the considered time period. High consistency between the different estimates is also observed for the intraseasonal component, except for the solution from GRACE, which is known to be affected by a strong tide-like alias with a period of about 161 d. Estimated interannual components from the different sources are generally in agreement with each other, although estimates from GRACE and LOD present some discrepancies. Slight deviations are further observed for the estimate from the geophysical models, likely to

  2. Null tests for oblate spheroids. [aspheric surfaces in reflecting optical system designs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodgers, J. M.; Parks, R. E.

    1984-01-01

    In most real cases requiring simple null optics, the optical path difference cannot be reduced to zero but can be kept at a fractional wavelength level so that interferometric data reduction can be used to account for the residual error. In other cases, computer-generated holograms may be used to obtain apparently straight fringes when the desired surface is obtained. Two examples, one involving an f/2.5 concave oblate spheroid and the other a Paul-Baker secondary, are examined. It is shown that although the null tests are not generally perfect, the residual error is small and the tests are simple.

  3. Jellyfish support high energy intake of leatherback sea turtles (Dermochelys coriacea: video evidence from animal-borne cameras.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susan G Heaslip

    Full Text Available The endangered leatherback turtle is a large, highly migratory marine predator that inexplicably relies upon a diet of low-energy gelatinous zooplankton. The location of these prey may be predictable at large oceanographic scales, given that leatherback turtles perform long distance migrations (1000s of km from nesting beaches to high latitude foraging grounds. However, little is known about the profitability of this migration and foraging strategy. We used GPS location data and video from animal-borne cameras to examine how prey characteristics (i.e., prey size, prey type, prey encounter rate correlate with the daytime foraging behavior of leatherbacks (n = 19 in shelf waters off Cape Breton Island, NS, Canada, during August and September. Video was recorded continuously, averaged 1:53 h per turtle (range 0:08-3:38 h, and documented a total of 601 prey captures. Lion's mane jellyfish (Cyanea capillata was the dominant prey (83-100%, but moon jellyfish (Aurelia aurita were also consumed. Turtles approached and attacked most jellyfish within the camera's field of view and appeared to consume prey completely. There was no significant relationship between encounter rate and dive duration (p = 0.74, linear mixed-effects models. Handling time increased with prey size regardless of prey species (p = 0.0001. Estimates of energy intake averaged 66,018 kJ • d(-1 but were as high as 167,797 kJ • d(-1 corresponding to turtles consuming an average of 330 kg wet mass • d(-1 (up to 840 kg • d(-1 or approximately 261 (up to 664 jellyfish • d(-1. Assuming our turtles averaged 455 kg body mass, they consumed an average of 73% of their body mass • d(-1 equating to an average energy intake of 3-7 times their daily metabolic requirements, depending on estimates used. This study provides evidence that feeding tactics used by leatherbacks in Atlantic Canadian waters are highly profitable and our results are consistent with estimates of mass gain prior to

  4. Dynamic Model for Life History of Scyphozoa.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Congbo Xie

    Full Text Available A two-state life history model governed by ODEs is formulated to elucidate the population dynamics of jellyfish and to illuminate the triggering mechanism of its blooms. The polyp-medusa model admits trichotomous global dynamic scenarios: extinction, polyps survival only, and both survival. The population dynamics sensitively depend on several biotic and abiotic limiting factors such as substrate, temperature, and predation. The combination of temperature increase, substrate expansion, and predator diminishment acts synergistically to create a habitat that is more favorable for jellyfishes. Reducing artificial marine constructions, aiding predator populations, and directly controlling the jellyfish population would help to manage the jellyfish blooms. The theoretical analyses and numerical experiments yield several insights into the nature underlying the model and shed some new light on the general control strategy for jellyfish.

  5. A new record of the freshwater jellyfish Craspedacusta sowerbii Lankester, 1880 (Hydrozoa) in Southeastern Anatolia (Turkey)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bekleyen, Aysel; Varol, Memet; Gokot, Bulent

    2011-03-01

    We report the first record of the invasive freshwater jellyfish Craspedacusta sowerbii Lankester in Kralkizi Dam Lake, Southeastern Anatolia, Turkey. The medusa was found only in August, 2008 when average surface water temperatures were 26.9°C.

  6. A new record of the freshwater jellyfish Craspedacusta sowerbii Lankester, 1880 (Hydrozoa) in Southeastern Anatolia (Turkey)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Aysel BEKLEYEN; Memet VAROL; Bulent GOKOT

    2011-01-01

    We report the first record of the invasive freshwater jellyfish Craspedacusta sowerbii Lankester in Kralkizi Dam Lake, Southeastern Anatolia, Turkey. The medusa was found only in August, 2008 when average surface water temperatures were 26.9℃.

  7. Collapse and Fragmentation of Magnetic Molecular Cloud Cores with the Enzo AMR MHD Code. II. Prolate and Oblate Cores

    CERN Document Server

    Boss, A P

    2014-01-01

    We present the results of a large suite of three-dimensional (3D) models of the collapse of magnetic molecular cloud cores using the adaptive mesh refinement (AMR) code Enzo2.2 in the ideal magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) approximation. The cloud cores are initially either prolate or oblate, centrally condensed clouds with masses of 1.73 or 2.73 $M_\\odot$, respectively. The radial density profiles are Gaussian, with central densities 20 times higher than boundary densities. A barotropic equation of state is used to represent the transition from low density, isothermal phases, to high density, optically thick phases. The initial magnetic field strength ranges from 6.3 to 100 $\\mu$G, corresponding to clouds that are strongly to marginally supercritical, respectively, in terms of the mass to magnetic flux ratio. The magnetic field is initially uniform and aligned with the clouds' rotation axes, with initial ratios of rotational to gravitational energy ranging from $10^{-4}$ to 0.1. Two significantly different outcome...

  8. Evolution of galaxy shapes from prolate to oblate through compaction events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomassetti, Matteo; Dekel, Avishai; Mandelker, Nir; Ceverino, Daniel; Lapiner, Sharon; Faber, Sandra; Kneller, Omer; Primack, Joel; Sai, Tanmayi

    2016-06-01

    We study the evolution of global shapes of galaxies using cosmological simulations. The shapes refer to the components of dark matter (DM), stars and gas at the stellar half-mass radius. Most galaxies undergo a characteristic compaction event into a blue nugget at z ˜ 2-4, which marks the transition from a DM-dominated central body to a self-gravitating baryonic core. We find that in the high-z, DM-dominated phase, the stellar and DM systems tend to be triaxial, preferentially prolate and mutually aligned. The elongation is supported by an anisotropic velocity dispersion that originates from the assembly of the galaxy along a dominant large-scale filament. We estimate that torques by the dominant halo are capable of inducing the elongation of the stellar system and its alignment with the halo. Then, in association with the transition to self-gravity, small-pericentre orbits puff up and the DM and stellar systems evolve into a more spherical and oblate configuration, aligned with the gas disc and associated with rotation. This transition typically occurs when the stellar mass is ˜109 M⊙ and the escape velocity in the core is ˜100 km s-1, indicating that supernova feedback may be effective in keeping the core DM dominated and the system prolate. The early elongated phase itself may be responsible for the compaction event, and the transition to the oblate phase may be associated with the subsequent quenching in the core.

  9. Documenting the NASA Armstrong Flight Research Center Oblate Earth Simulation Equations of Motion and Integration Algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarke, R.; Lintereur, L.; Bahm, C.

    2016-01-01

    A desire for more complete documentation of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Armstrong Flight Research Center (AFRC), Edwards, California legacy code used in the core simulation has led to this e ort to fully document the oblate Earth six-degree-of-freedom equations of motion and integration algorithm. The authors of this report have taken much of the earlier work of the simulation engineering group and used it as a jumping-o point for this report. The largest addition this report makes is that each element of the equations of motion is traced back to first principles and at no point is the reader forced to take an equation on faith alone. There are no discoveries of previously unknown principles contained in this report; this report is a collection and presentation of textbook principles. The value of this report is that those textbook principles are herein documented in standard nomenclature that matches the form of the computer code DERIVC. Previous handwritten notes are much of the backbone of this work, however, in almost every area, derivations are explicitly shown to assure the reader that the equations which make up the oblate Earth version of the computer routine, DERIVC, are correct.

  10. Jellyfish blooms result in a major microbial respiratory sink of carbon in marine systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Condon, Robert H; Steinberg, Deborah K; del Giorgio, Paul A; Bouvier, Thierry C; Bronk, Deborah A; Graham, William M; Ducklow, Hugh W

    2011-06-21

    Jellyfish blooms occur in many estuarine and coastal regions and may be increasing in their magnitude and extent worldwide. Voracious jellyfish predation impacts food webs by converting large quantities of carbon (C), fixed by primary producers and consumed by secondary producers, into gelatinous biomass, which restricts C transfer to higher trophic levels because jellyfish are not readily consumed by other predators. In addition, jellyfish release colloidal and dissolved organic matter (jelly-DOM), and could further influence the functioning of coastal systems by altering microbial nutrient and DOM pathways, yet the links between jellyfish and bacterioplankton metabolism and community structure are unknown. Here we report that jellyfish released substantial quantities of extremely labile C-rich DOM, relative to nitrogen (25.6 ± 31.6 C:1N), which was quickly metabolized by bacterioplankton at uptake rates two to six times that of bulk DOM pools. When jelly-DOM was consumed it was shunted toward bacterial respiration rather than production, significantly reducing bacterial growth efficiencies by 10% to 15%. Jelly-DOM also favored the rapid growth and dominance of specific bacterial phylogenetic groups (primarily γ-proteobacteria) that were rare in ambient waters, implying that jelly-DOM was channeled through a small component of the in situ microbial assemblage and thus induced large changes in community composition. Our findings suggest major shifts in microbial structure and function associated with jellyfish blooms, and a large detour of C toward bacterial CO(2) production and away from higher trophic levels. These results further suggest fundamental transformations in the biogeochemical functioning and biological structure of food webs associated with jellyfish blooms.

  11. What's in a jellyfish? Proximate and elemental composition and biometric relationships for use in biogeochemical studies

    OpenAIRE

    Lucas, C.H.; Pitt, K. A.; Purcell, J.E.; Lebrato, Mario; R. H. Condon

    2011-01-01

    Many marine organisms have gelatinous bodies, but the trait is most common in the medusae (phylum Cnidaria), ctenophores (phylum Ctenophora), and the pelagic tunicates (phylum Chordata, class Thaliacea). Although there are taxonomic and trophic differences between the thaliaceans and the other two closely related phyla, the collective term "jellyfish" has been used within the framework of this article. Because of the apparent increase in bloom events, jellyfish are receiving greater attention...

  12. Jellyfish Envenomation Resulting In Vascular Insufficiency And Neurogenic Injury of Upper Limb

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Choong CYL

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Following a week after a jellyfish sting, a young man presented with regional cyanosis and threat of distal gangrene secondary to vascular spasm in the forearm. The patient also suffered from transient paresis and numbness of the affected upper limb. Contrasted imaging revealed unopacified vessels in the distal forearm and worsening swelling warranted emergency surgical fasciotomy for impending compartment syndrome. This case highlights the occurrence of jellyfish envenomation and the need for early treatment.

  13. Capacity Extension of Software Defined Data Center Networks With Jellyfish Topology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mehmeri, Victor; Vegas Olmos, Juan José; Tafur Monroy, Idelfonso

    We present a performance analysis of Jellyfish topology with Software-Defined commodity switches for Data Center networks. Our results show up to a 2-fold performance gain when compared to a Spanning Tree Protocol implementation.......We present a performance analysis of Jellyfish topology with Software-Defined commodity switches for Data Center networks. Our results show up to a 2-fold performance gain when compared to a Spanning Tree Protocol implementation....

  14. The effects of oblateness and solar radiation pressure on halo orbits in the photogravitational Sun-Earth system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, Vineet K.; Kumar, Jai; Kushvah, Badam Singh

    2016-12-01

    In this paper, we construct a third-order analytic approximate solution using the Lindstedt-Poincare method in the photogravitational circular restricted three body problem considering the Sun as a radiating source and the Earth as an oblate spheroid for computing halo orbits around the collinear Lagrangian points L1 and L2. Further, the well-known differential correction and continuation schemes are used to compute halo orbits and their families numerically. The effects of solar radiation pressure and oblateness on the orbit are studied around both Lagrangian points. From the study, it is noticed that time period of the halo orbit increases around L1 and L2 accounting oblateness of the Earth and solar radiation pressure of the Sun. It is also found that stability of halo orbits is a weak function of the out-of-plane amplitude and mass reduction factor.

  15. Extract from the zooxanthellate jellyfish Cotylorhiza tuberculata modulates gap junction intercellular communication in human cell cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leone, Antonella; Lecci, Raffaella Marina; Durante, Miriana; Piraino, Stefano

    2013-05-22

    On a global scale, jellyfish populations in coastal marine ecosystems exhibit increasing trends of abundance. High-density outbreaks may directly or indirectly affect human economical and recreational activities, as well as public health. As the interest in biology of marine jellyfish grows, a number of jellyfish metabolites with healthy potential, such as anticancer or antioxidant activities, is increasingly reported. In this study, the Mediterranean "fried egg jellyfish" Cotylorhiza tuberculata (Macri, 1778) has been targeted in the search forputative valuable bioactive compounds. A medusa extract was obtained, fractionated, characterized by HPLC, GC-MS and SDS-PAGE and assayed for its biological activity on breast cancer cells (MCF-7) and human epidermal keratinocytes (HEKa). The composition of the jellyfish extract included photosynthetic pigments, valuable ω-3 and ω-6 fatty acids, and polypeptides derived either from jellyfish tissues and their algal symbionts. Extract fractions showed antioxidant activity and the ability to affect cell viability and intercellular communication mediated by gap junctions (GJIC) differentially in MCF-7 and HEKa cells. A significantly higher cytotoxicity and GJIC enhancement in MCF-7 compared to HEKa cells was recorded. A putative action mechanism for the anticancer bioactivity through the modulation of GJIC has been hypothesized and its nutraceutical and pharmaceutical potential was discussed.

  16. Nutritional composition and total collagen content of three commercially important edible jellyfish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khong, Nicholas M H; Yusoff, Fatimah Md; Jamilah, B; Basri, Mahiran; Maznah, I; Chan, Kim Wei; Nishikawa, Jun

    2016-04-01

    The study aimed to evaluate nutraceutical potential of three commercially significant edible jellyfish species (Acromitus hardenbergi, Rhopilema hispidum and Rhopilema esculentum). The bell and oral arms of these jellyfishes were analyzed for their proximate composition, calorific value, collagen content, amino acid profile, chemical score and elemental constituent. In general, all jellyfish possessed low calorific values (1.0-4.9 kcal/g D.W.) and negligible fat contents (0.4-1.8 g/100 g D.W.), while protein (20.0-53.9 g/100 g D.W.) and minerals (15.9-57.2g/100g D.W.) were found to be the richest components. Total collagen content of edible jellyfish varied from 122.64 to 693.92 mg/g D.W., accounting for approximately half its total protein content. The dominant amino acids in both bell and oral arms of all jellyfish studied includes glycine, glutamate, threonine, proline, aspartate and arginine, while the major elements were sodium, potassium, chlorine, magnesium, sulfur, zinc and silicon. Among the jellyfish, A. hardenbergi exhibited significantly higher total amino acids, chemical scores and collagen content (pjellyfish is an appealing source of nutritive ingredients for the development of oral formulations, nutricosmetics and functional food.

  17. Characterization and neutralization of Nemopilema nomurai (Scyphozoa: Rhizostomeae) jellyfish venom using polyclonal antibody.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Changkeun; Han, Dae-Yong; Park, Kwang-Il; Pyo, Min-Jung; Heo, Yunwi; Lee, Hyunkyoung; Kim, Gon Sup; Kim, Euikyung

    2014-08-01

    Jellyfish stings have often caused serious health concerns for sea bathers especially in tropical waters. In the coastal areas of Korea, China and Japan, the blooming and stinging accidents of poisonous jellyfish species have recently increased, including Nemopilema nomurai. We have generated a polyclonal antibody against N. nomurai jellyfish venom (NnV) by the immunization of white rabbits with NnV antigen. In the present study, the antibody has been characterized for its neutralizing effect against NnV. At first, the presence of NnV polyclonal antibody has been confirmed from the immunized rabbit serum by Enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Then, the neutralizing activities of the polyclonal antibody have been investigated using cell-based toxicity test, hemolysis assay, and mice lethality test. When the polyclonal antibody was preincubated with NnV, it shows a high effectiveness in neutralizing the NnV toxicities in a concentration-dependent manner. Moreover, we explored proteomic analyses using 2-D SDS-PAGE and MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry to illustrate the molecular identities of the jellyfish venom. From this, 18 different protein families have been identified as jellyfish venom-derived proteins; the main findings of which are matrix metalloproteinase-14, astacin-like metalloprotease toxin 3 precursor. It is expected that the present results would have contributed to our understandings of the envenomation by N. nomurai, their treatment and some valuable knowledge on the pathological processes of the jellyfish stinging.

  18. Towards a miniature self-propelled jellyfish-like swimming robot

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junzhi Yu

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Jellyfish uses jet propulsion to achieve a diversity of propulsion modes in the water. In this article, a miniature jellyfish-inspired swimming robot is designed and built, which is capable of executing horizontal and vertical propulsion and maneuvers. In order to imitate the jellyfish in terms of morphology and kinematics, the robotic jellyfish is designed to be comprised of a streamlined head, a cavity shell, four separate drive units with bevel gears, and a soft outer skin encasing the drive units. A combination of four six-bar linkage mechanisms that are centrally symmetric is adopted as the driver to regulate the phases of contraction and relaxation of the bell-shaped body. Furthermore, a triangle wave generator is incorporated to generate rhythmic drive signals, which is implemented on the microcontroller. Through independent and coordinated control of the four drive units, the robotic jellyfish is able to replicate various propulsion modes similar to real jellyfish. Aquatic tests on the actual robot verify the effectiveness of the formed design scheme along with the proposed control methods.

  19. Decomposition of jellyfish carrion in situ: Short-term impacts on infauna, benthic nutrient fluxes and sediment redox conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chelsky, Ariella; Pitt, Kylie A; Ferguson, Angus J P; Bennett, William W; Teasdale, Peter R; Welsh, David T

    2016-10-01

    Jellyfish often form blooms that persist for weeks to months before they collapse en masse, resulting in the sudden release of large amounts of organic matter to the environment. This study investigated the biogeochemical and ecological effects of the decomposition of jellyfish in a shallow coastal lagoon in New South Wales, Australia. Catostylus mosaicus carrion was added to the surface of shallow sub-tidal sediments and biogeochemical parameters and macrofaunal abundance immediately below the jellyfish carrion were measured over three days. Sediment plots without jellyfish served as controls. Sediment oxygen demand and carbon and nitrogen efflux increased by up to 60-fold in the jellyfish plots, compared to control plots, and dissolved organic nutrient fluxes were more sustained than in previous studies due to the use of fresh rather than frozen biomass. The decomposing jellyfish progressively altered sediment redox conditions, indicated by an increase in porewater iron (II) and sulfide concentrations measured by high-resolution in situ diffusive samplers. Abundance of some macrofaunal taxa in the jellyfish plots decreased relative to controls, however, the abundance of a carnivorous gastropod, which was presumably feeding on the carrion, increased in the jellyfish plots. While jellyfish carrion may be a food source for some macrofauna, low oxygen conditions coupled with the accumulation of toxic dissolved sulfides in the near-surface sediments may explain the overall change in the macroinfaunal community.

  20. Irukandji jellyfish polyps exhibit tolerance to interacting climate change stressors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, Shannon G; Pitt, Kylie A; Rathjen, Kristen A; Seymour, Jamie E

    2014-01-01

    Increasing ocean temperatures and strengthening boundary currents have caused the poleward migration of many marine species. Cubozoan jellyfish known to cause Irukandji syndrome have historically been confined to tropical waters but may be expanding into subtropical regions. Here, we examine the interactive effects of warming and acidification on the population dynamics of polyps of an Irukandji jellyfish, Alatina nr mordens, and the formation of statoliths in newly metamorphosed medusae, to determine if this jellyfish could tolerate future conditions predicted for southeast Queensland (SEQ), Australia. Two experiments, examining the orthogonal factors of temperature and pH, were undertaken. Experiment 1 mimicked the current, ca. 2050 and ca. 2100 summer temperature and pH conditions predicted for SEQ using A1F1 scenarios (temperature: 25, 27, 29 °C; pH: 7.9, 7.8, 7.6) and Experiment 2 mimicked current and future winter conditions (18 and 22 °C, pH 7.9, 7.8, 7.6). All polyps in Experiment 1 survived and budded. Fewer polyps budded in the lower pH treatments; however, patterns varied slightly among temperature treatments. Statoliths at pH 7.6 were 24% narrower than those at pH 7.8 and 7.9. Most polyps survived the winter conditions mimicked by Experiment 2 but only polyps in the 22 °C, pH 7.9 treatment increased significantly. The current absence of A. nr mordens medusae in SEQ, despite the polyps' ability to tolerate the current temperature and pH conditions, suggests that ecological, rather than abiotic factors currently limit their distribution. Observations that budding was lower under low pH treatments suggest that rates of asexual reproduction will likely be much slower in the future. We consider that A. nr mordens polyps are likely to tolerate future conditions but are unlikely to thrive in the long term. However, if polyps can overcome potential ecological boundaries and acidification proceeds slowly A. nr mordens could expand polewards in the short

  1. Radioactivity in three species of eastern Mediterranean jellyfish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mamish, S; Al-Masri, M S; Durgham, H

    2015-11-01

    Activity concentrations of (137)Cs, (40)K, (210)Po, (210)Pb, (234)U and (238)U were determined in umbrella and oral arms of three widely distributed jellyfish species; namely Rhopilema nomadica Galil, 1990, Aurelia aurita Linne, 1758 and Aequorea forskalea Péron & Lesueur, 1810 collected from February 2011 to January 2012 in four sampling locations along the Syrian coast (Eastern Mediterranean Sea). The results have shown significant variations in radionuclides activity concentrations amongst the species. The average activity concentrations of (40)K, (210)Po, (210)Pb, (234)U and (238)U in the umbrella of R. nomadica species were higher than the average activity concentrations in the umbrella of A. aurita species by about 3.2, 1.4, 1.8, 3.2 and 3.2 folds, and A. forskalea species by about 45.5, 15.4, 19, 7.4 and 7.6 folds, respectively. The average activity concentrations of (40)K, (210)Po, (210)Pb, (234)U and (238)U in oral arms of R. nomadica species were higher than the average activity concentrations in oral arms of A. aurita species by about 3.8, 1.7, 1.9, 2.8 and 2.9 folds, respectively. (137)Cs activity concentrations were below the detection limit in all measured samples. In addition, activity concentrations of (137)Cs, (40)K, (210)Po, (210)Pb, (234)U and (238)U were also determined in 44 surface seawater samples and the activity concentrations ranged between 10.6 and 11.9 Bq l(-1) for (40)K, 1.1 and 1.4 mBq l(-1) for (210)Po, 0.5 and 0.7 mBq l(-1) for (210)Pb, 40.8 and 44.5 mBq l(-1) for (234)U, and 36.9 and 38.4 mBq l(-1) for (238)U, while (137)Cs activity concentrations were below the detection limit in all measured samples. Moreover, the umbrella and oral arms readily accumulated (40)K, (210)Po, (210)Pb, (234)U and (238)U above ambient seawater levels in the sequence of (210)Po > (210)Pb > (4) K > (234)U and (238)U. Concentration ratio (CR) values were relatively high for (210)Po and (210)Pb and reached 10(3) and 10(2), respectively for the jellyfish R

  2. Heavy Metals Affect Nematocysts Discharge Response and Biological Activity of Crude Venom in the Jellyfish Pelagia noctiluca (Cnidaria, Scyphozoa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rossana Morabito

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Pollution of marine ecosystems and, specifically, heavy metals contamination may compromise the physiology of marine animals with events occurring on a cellular and molecular level. The present study focuses on the effect of short-term exposure to heavy metals like Zinc, Cadmium, Cobalt and Lanthanum (2-10 mM on the homeostasis of Pelagia noctiluca (Cnidaria, Scyphozoa, a jellyfish abundant in the Mediterranean sea. This species possesses stinging organoids, termed nematocysts, whose discharge and concomitant delivery of venom underlie the survival of all Cnidaria. Methods: Nematocysts discharge response, elicited by combined chemico-physical stimulation, was verified on excised oral arms exposed to heavy metals for 20 min. In addition, the hemolytic activity of toxins, contained in the crude venom extracted from nematocysts isolated from oral arms, was tested on human erythrocytes, in the presence of heavy metals or their mixture. Results: Treatment with heavy metals significantly inhibited both nematocysts discharge response and hemolytic activity of crude venom, in a dose-dependent manner, not involving oxidative events, that was irreversible in the case of Lanthanum. Conclusion: Our findings show that the homeostasis of Pelagia noctiluca, in terms of nematocysts discharge capability and effectiveness of venom toxins, is dramatically and rapidly compromised by heavy metals and confirm that this jellyfish is eligible as a model for ecotoxicological investigations.

  3. Stokesian jellyfish: Viscous locomotion of bilayer vesicles

    CERN Document Server

    Evans, Arthur A; Lauga, Eric

    2010-01-01

    Motivated by recent advances in vesicle engineering, we consider theoretically the locomotion of shape-changing bilayer vesicles at low Reynolds number. By modulating their volume and membrane composition, the vesicles can be made to change shape quasi-statically in thermal equilibrium. When the control parameters are tuned appropriately to yield periodic shape changes which are not time-reversible, the result is a net swimming motion over one cycle of shape deformation. For two classical vesicle models (spontaneous curvature and bilayer coupling), we determine numerically the sequence of vesicle shapes through an enthalpy minimization, as well as the fluid-body interactions by solving a boundary integral formulation of the Stokes equations. For both models, net locomotion can be obtained either by continuously modulating fore-aft asymmetric vesicle shapes, or by crossing a continuous shape-transition region and alternating between fore-aft asymmetric and fore-aft symmetric shapes. The obtained hydrodynamic e...

  4. Evidence for multiple photosystems in jellyfish

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Garm, Anders Lydik; Ekström, Peter

    2010-01-01

    Cnidarians are often used as model animals in studies of eye and photopigment evolution. Most cnidarians display photosensitivity at some point in their lifecycle ranging from extraocular photoreception to image formation in camera-type eyes. The available information strongly suggests that some...... cnidarians even possess multiple photosystems. The evidence is strongest within Cubomedusae where all known species posses 24 eyes of four morphological types. Physiological experiments show that each cubomedusan eye type likely constitutes a separate photosystem controlling separate visually guided...... had evolved already in early eumetazoans and that their original level of organization was discrete sets of special-purpose eyes and/or photosensory cells...

  5. Complete mitochondrial genome of the jellyfish, Chrysaora quinquecirrha (Cnidaria, Scyphozoa).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Dae-Sik; Park, Eunji; Won, Yong-Jin; Lee, Woo-Jin; Shin, Kyoungsoon; Lee, Jae-Seong

    2014-02-01

    We sequenced 16,775 bp of the linear mitochondrial DNA of the jellyfish Chrysaora quinquecirrha and characterized them. C. quinquecirrha has 13 protein-coding genes (PCGs), 16S rRNA and 12S rRNA with 3 tRNAs (tRNA-Leu, tRNA-Ser(TGA), tRNA-Met) as shown in Aurelia sp. nov. Both have another two PCGs such as helicase and orf363 with telomeres at both ends. The PCGs of C. quinquecirrha shows anti-G bias on 2nd and 3rd positions of PCGs as well as anti-C bias on 1st and 3rd positions of PCGs.

  6. Techniques applicable for purifying Chironex fleckeri (box-jellyfish) venom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Othman, I; Burnett, J W

    1990-01-01

    A survey of several techniques to isolate a purified lethal factor from the tentacles of Chironex fleckeri was completed. Heterologous band patterns were obtained from specific eluates after gel filtration, ion exchange, immunoaffinity and hydrophobic chromatography. SDS-PAGE revealed a dense band at 24,000 mol. wt in many of these fractions. Isoelectric focusing of the crude venom resulted in considerable loss of activity but indicated significant purification in the fractions having a pI of 5.2-6.8. These fractions were also immunologically active against sera from a convalescing post-evenomation patient. The primary difficulties encountered in jellyfish venom purification are the lack of stability and the tendency of the active toxins to adhere to each other and to various support matrices.

  7. Lipid Profile in Different Parts of Edible Jellyfish Rhopilema esculentum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Si; Ye, Mengwei; Xu, Jilin; Guo, Chunyang; Zheng, Huakun; Hu, Jiabao; Chen, Juanjuan; Wang, Yajun; Xu, Shanliang; Yan, Xiaojun

    2015-09-23

    Jellyfish Rhopilema esculentum has been exploited commercially as a delicious food for a long time. Although the edible and medicinal values of R. esculentum have gained extensive attention, the effects of lipids on its nutritional value have rarely been reported. In the present of study, the lipid profile including lipid classes, fatty acyl compositions, and fatty acid (FA) positions in lipids from different parts (oral arms, umbrella, and mouth stalk) of R. esculentum was explored by ultraperformance liquid chromatography--electrospray ionization--quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry (UPLC-ESI-Q-TOF-MS). More than 87 species from 10 major lipid classes including phosphatidylcholine (PC), lysophosphatidylcholine (LPC), phosphatidylethanolamine (PE), lysophosphatidylethanolamine (LPE), phosphatidylinositol (PI), lysophosphatidylinositol (LPI), phosphatidylserine (PS), ceramide (Cer), ceramide 2-aminoethylphosphonate (CAEP), and triacylglycerol (TAG) were separated and characterized. Semiquantification of individual lipid species in different parts of R. esculentum was also conducted. Results showed that glycerophospholipids (GPLs) enriched in highly unsaturated fatty acids (HUFAs) were the major compenents in all parts of R. esculentum, which accounted for 54-63% of total lipids (TLs). Considering the high level of GPLs and the FA compositions in GPLs, jellyfish R. esculentum might have great potential as a health-promoting food for humans and as a growth-promoting diet for some commercial fish and crustaceans. Meanwhile, LPC, LPE, and LPI showed high levels in oral arms when compared with umbrella and mouth stalk, which may be due to the high proportion of phospholipase A2 (PLA2) in oral arms. Moreover, a high CAEP level was detected in oral arms, which may render cell membranes with resistance to chemical hydrolysis by PLA2. The relatively low TAG content could be associated with specific functions of oral arms.

  8. Lévy night flights by the jellyfish Periphylla periphylla

    KAUST Repository

    Ugland, KI

    2014-10-22

    Jellyfish blooms occur in marine environments around the world and have been linked to over-fishing, eutrophication and climatic change. In some coastal areas of Norway, the circumglobal Periphylla periphylla has increased to exceptionally high abundances and has replaced fish as the main planktivorous predator despite the ineffectiveness of its non-visual predation compared to visual fish predation. Using data from a bottom-mounted acoustic platform, we collected 12341 in situ measurements of individual vertical movements of large individuals of P. periphylla. These jellyfish are characterized by a stepwise vertical movement. The distribution of their vertical swimming distances was extremely left skewed; about 85% of the swimming distances were less than 3 m, and a few displacements were extremely long with a maximum of 85 m. Chi-square tests of goodness of fit to the tail and Akaike’s information criterion gave overwhelming evidence of the truncated power law. There was a clear diel pattern in the exponent with values significantly larger than 3 during the daytime and significantly lower than 3 at night. This pattern means that P. periphylla switches from relatively limited movements during the day to Lévy-like flights during the night. Since the abundance of zooplankton is large in the P. periphylla fjord, Brownian motion, rather than Lévy flight, is predicted by the optimal foraging hypothesis. It is therefore possible that the Lévy-like search pattern has evolved in the food-scarce oceanic environment, which is the main natural habitat of P. periphylla. Alternatively, the large individuals of the population addressed here may forage on scarcer prey sources than the main prevailing zooplankton in Lurefjorden.

  9. Biology and ecology of Irukandji jellyfish (Cnidaria: Cubozoa).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gershwin, Lisa-ann; Richardson, Anthony J; Winkel, Kenneth D; Fenner, Peter J; Lippmann, John; Hore, Russell; Avila-Soria, Griselda; Brewer, David; Kloser, Rudy J; Steven, Andy; Condie, Scott

    2013-01-01

    Irukandji stings are a leading occupational health and safety issue for marine industries in tropical Australia and an emerging problem elsewhere in the Indo-Pacific and Caribbean. Their mild initial sting frequently results in debilitating illness, involving signs of sympathetic excess including excruciating pain, sweating, nausea and vomiting, hypertension and a feeling of impending doom; some cases also experience acute heart failure and pulmonary oedema. These jellyfish are typically small and nearly invisible, and their infestations are generally mysterious, making them scary to the general public, irresistible to the media, and disastrous for tourism. Research into these fascinating species has been largely driven by the medical profession and focused on treatment. Biological and ecological information is surprisingly sparse, and is scattered through grey literature or buried in dispersed publications, hampering understanding. Given that long-term climate forecasts tend toward conditions favourable to jellyfish ecology, that long-term legal forecasts tend toward increasing duty-of-care obligations, and that bioprospecting opportunities exist in the powerful Irukandji toxins, there is a clear need for information to help inform global research and robust management solutions. We synthesise and contextualise available information on Irukandji taxonomy, phylogeny, reproduction, vision, behaviour, feeding, distribution, seasonality, toxins, and safety. Despite Australia dominating the research in this area, there are probably well over 25 species worldwide that cause the syndrome and it is an understudied problem in the developing world. Major gaps in knowledge are identified for future research: our lack of clarity on the socio-economic impacts, and our need for time series and spatial surveys of the species, make this field particularly enticing. © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. The effect of the Earth's oblateness on predicting the shadow conditions of a distant spacecraft: Application to a fictitious lunar explorer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Young-Joo; Kim, Bang-Yeop

    2016-01-01

    The effect of the Earth's oblateness on predicting the shadow events of a lunar spacecraft caused by the Earth's shadow is analyzed in this study. To ensure a reliable analysis, the proven 'line-of-intersection' method is modified and directly applied to predict the shadow conditions using a spheroidal model of the Earth and a conical shadow model. Two major lunar mission phases, namely, transfer and orbiting, are considered with corresponding fictitious initial conditions, and eclipse events are predicted and the results are compared using both spherical and spheroidal Earth models. For the lunar transfer phase, for which an Earth-bound highly elliptical orbit is assumed, not only the predicted entry and exit times of an event but also its duration are found to be more strongly shifted as the apogee altitude increases; for perigee and apogee altitudes of 1000 and 380,000 km, respectively, the maximum difference in predicted duration is found to be approximately 0.76 min for a penumbra event. For the lunar orbiting phase, for which a circular orbit around the Moon at an altitude of 100 km is assumed, a prediction difference of approximately half a minute on average and approximately one minute at maximum (e.g., 0.73 min for qumbra events, 1.03 min for penumbra events and 1.32 min for 'instantaneous' full sunlight events) can occur. The results of the present analysis highlight the importance of modeling the oblate shape of the Earth when predicting the shadow events of a distant spacecraft, and they are expected to provide numerous insights for any missions involving highly elliptical orbits around the Earth or travel to the Moon.

  11. Impact of Earth’s Oblateness Perturbations on Geosynchronous SAR Data Focusing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hu Wenlong

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available In this study, we focus on the ultra-long integration of orbital perturbations of geosynchronous Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR for imaging. By deriving mathematical expressions for the Doppler rate and quadratic phase from orbital elements perturbated by oblateness or the J2 term of the non-spherical gravitational force of the Earth, we analyze the impact on SAR data focusing. Based on our results, we conclude that the quadratic phase will exceed 45°, which is the defocusing threshold for imaging, after accumulation during a long integration time at the minute level. Because the potential for defocusing exists throughout nearly the entire satellite motion cycle, the SAR processor must carefully manage and compensate for the quadratic phase to avoid image degradations.

  12. Eclipse intervals for satellites in circular orbit under the effects of Earth’s oblateness and solar radiation pressure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.N. Ismail

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available In this work, the circumstances of eclipse for a circular satellites’ orbit are studied. The time of passage of the ingress and egress points is calculated. Finally, the eclipse intervals of satellites’ orbit are calculated. An application was done taken into account the effects of solar radiation pressure and Earth’s oblateness on the orbital elements of circular orbit satellite.

  13. Isolation, characterization and biological evaluation of jellyfish collagen for use in biomedical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Addad, Sourour; Exposito, Jean-Yves; Faye, Clément; Ricard-Blum, Sylvie; Lethias, Claire

    2011-01-01

    Fibrillar collagens are the more abundant extracellular proteins. They form a metazoan-specific family, and are highly conserved from sponge to human. Their structural and physiological properties have been successfully used in the food, cosmetic, and pharmaceutical industries. On the other hand, the increase of jellyfish has led us to consider this marine animal as a natural product for food and medicine. Here, we have tested different Mediterranean jellyfish species in order to investigate the economic potential of their collagens. We have studied different methods of collagen purification (tissues and experimental procedures). The best collagen yield was obtained using Rhizostoma pulmo oral arms and the pepsin extraction method (2-10 mg collagen/g of wet tissue). Although a significant yield was obtained with Cotylorhiza tuberculata (0.45 mg/g), R. pulmo was used for further experiments, this jellyfish being considered as harmless to humans and being an abundant source of material. Then, we compared the biological properties of R. pulmo collagen with mammalian fibrillar collagens in cell cytotoxicity assays and cell adhesion. There was no statistical difference in cytotoxicity (p > 0.05) between R. pulmo collagen and rat type I collagen. However, since heparin inhibits cell adhesion to jellyfish-native collagen by 55%, the main difference is that heparan sulfate proteoglycans could be preferentially involved in fibroblast and osteoblast adhesion to jellyfish collagens. Our data confirm the broad harmlessness of jellyfish collagens, and their biological effect on human cells that are similar to that of mammalian type I collagen. Given the bioavailability of jellyfish collagen and its biological properties, this marine material is thus a good candidate for replacing bovine or human collagens in selected biomedical applications.

  14. Isolation, Characterization and Biological Evaluation of Jellyfish Collagen for Use in Biomedical Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claire Lethias

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Fibrillar collagens are the more abundant extracellular proteins. They form a metazoan-specific family, and are highly conserved from sponge to human. Their structural and physiological properties have been successfully used in the food, cosmetic, and pharmaceutical industries. On the other hand, the increase of jellyfish has led us to consider this marine animal as a natural product for food and medicine. Here, we have tested different Mediterranean jellyfish species in order to investigate the economic potential of their collagens. We have studied different methods of collagen purification (tissues and experimental procedures. The best collagen yield was obtained using Rhizostoma pulmo oral arms and the pepsin extraction method (2–10 mg collagen/g of wet tissue. Although a significant yield was obtained with Cotylorhiza tuberculata (0.45 mg/g, R. pulmo was used for further experiments, this jellyfish being considered as harmless to humans and being an abundant source of material. Then, we compared the biological properties of R. pulmo collagen with mammalian fibrillar collagens in cell cytotoxicity assays and cell adhesion. There was no statistical difference in cytotoxicity (p > 0.05 between R. pulmo collagen and rat type I collagen. However, since heparin inhibits cell adhesion to jellyfish-native collagen by 55%, the main difference is that heparan sulfate proteoglycans could be preferentially involved in fibroblast and osteoblast adhesion to jellyfish collagens. Our data confirm the broad harmlessness of jellyfish collagens, and their biological effect on human cells that are similar to that of mammalian type I collagen. Given the bioavailability of jellyfish collagen and its biological properties, this marine material is thus a good candidate for replacing bovine or human collagens in selected biomedical applications.

  15. High occurrence of jellyfish predation by black-browed and Campbell albatross identified by DNA metabarcoding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McInnes, Julie C; Alderman, Rachael; Lea, Mary-Anne; Raymond, Ben; Deagle, Bruce E; Phillips, Richard A; Stanworth, Andrew; Thompson, David R; Catry, Paulo; Weimerskirch, Henri; Suazo, Cristián G; Gras, Michaël; Jarman, Simon N

    2017-07-22

    Gelatinous zooplankton are a large component of the animal biomass in all marine environments, but are considered to be uncommon in the diet of most marine top predators. However, the diets of key predator groups like seabirds have conventionally been assessed from stomach content analyses, which cannot detect most gelatinous prey. As marine top predators are used to identify changes in the overall species composition of marine ecosystems, such biases in dietary assessment may impact our detection of important ecosystem regime shifts. We investigated albatross diet using DNA metabarcoding of scats to assess the prevalence of gelatinous zooplankton consumption by two albatross species, one of which is used as an indicator species for ecosystem monitoring. Black-browed and Campbell albatross scats were collected from eight breeding colonies covering the circumpolar range of these birds over two consecutive breeding seasons. Fish was the main dietary item at most sites; however, cnidarian DNA, primarily from scyphozoan jellyfish, was present in 42% of samples overall and up to 80% of samples at some sites. Jellyfish was detected during all breeding stages and consumed by adults and chicks. Trawl fishery catches of jellyfish near the Falkland Islands indicate a similar frequency of jellyfish occurrence in albatross diets in years of high and low jellyfish availability, suggesting jellyfish consumption may be selective rather than opportunistic. Warmer oceans and overfishing of finfish are predicted to favour jellyfish population increases, and we demonstrate here that dietary DNA metabarcoding enables measurements of the contribution of gelatinous zooplankton to the diet of marine predators. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. Target organ identification of jellyfish envenomation using systemic and integrative analyses in anesthetized dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Changkeun; Kim, Young Ki; Lee, Hyunkyoung; Cha, Mijin; Sohn, Eun-Tae; Jung, Eun-Sun; Song, Chiyoun; Kim, Minkyung; Lee, Hee Chun; Kim, Jong-Shu; Hwang, Jin-Yong; Yoon, Won Duk; Kim, Euikyung

    2011-01-01

    Proper treatment of jellyfish envenomed patients can be successfully achieved only from an understanding of the overall functional changes and alterations in physiological parameters under its envenomation. The majority of previous investigations on jellyfish venoms have covered only a couple of parameters at a time. Unlike most other fragmentary jellyfish studies, we employed an integrative toxicological approach, including hemodynamics, clinical chemistry and hematology analyses, using N. nomurai jellyfish venom (NnV) in dogs. After the baseline measurements for mean arterial pressure (MAP), cardiac output (CO) and heart rate (HR), NnV was intravenously administered to the dogs at doses of 0.1 or 0.3mg/kg body weight. The dogs showed significant decreases in MAP (-27.4±3.7 and -48.1±9.9 mmHg), CO (-1.1±0.1 L/min and -1.0±0.2 L/min), and HR (-4.5±0.3 and -9.9±3.1 beats/min) comparing with the respective baseline controls. The onset of systemic hypotension and bradycardia occurred within 1 min of NnV injection and they lasted for 1-35 min, depending on the NnV doses. Interestingly, serum biochemical analyses of envenomed dogs exhibited dramatic increases of alkaline phosphatase (ALP), creatine phosphokinase (CPK), alanine aminotransferase (ALT) and aspartate aminotransferase (AST), indicating its possible target organs. In conclusion, we have demonstrated simultaneously, for the first time, the multiple organ toxicities (cardiotoxic, myotoxic and hepatotoxic) of a scyphozoan jellyfish venom. Based on these results, an integrative toxinological approach using dogs appears to be effective in predicting jellyfish venom toxicities and designing their therapeutic strategies. We expect this method can be applied to other jellyfish venom research as well.

  17. Jellyfish decomposition at the seafloor rapidly alters biogeochemical cycling and carbon flow through benthic food-webs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sweetman, A.K.; Chelsky, A.; Pitt, K.A.; Andrade, H.; Van Oevelen, D.; Renaud, P.E.

    2016-01-01

    Jellyfish blooms have increased in magnitude in several locations around the world, including in fjords.While the factors that promote jellyfish blooms and the impacts of live blooms on marine ecosystems areoften investigated, the post-bloom effects from the sinking and accumulation of dead

  18. Biogeography of jellyfish in the North Atlantic, by traditional and genomic methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Licandro, P.; Blackett, M.; Fischer, A.; Hosia, A.; Kennedy, J.; Kirby, R. R.; Raab, K.; Stern, R.; Tranter, P.

    2015-07-01

    Scientific debate on whether or not the recent increase in reports of jellyfish outbreaks represents a true rise in their abundance has outlined a lack of reliable records of Cnidaria and Ctenophora. Here we describe different jellyfish data sets produced within the EU programme EURO-BASIN. These data were assembled with the aim of creating an improved baseline and providing new data that can be used to evaluate the current diversity and standing stocks of jellyfish in the North Atlantic region. Using a net adapted to sample gelatinous zooplankton quantitatively, cnidarians and ctenophores were collected from the epipelagic layer during spring-summer 2010-2013, in inshore and offshore waters between lat 59 and 68° N and long 62° W and 5° E. Jellyfish were also identified and counted in samples opportunistically collected by other sampling equipment in the same region and at two coastal stations in the Bay of Biscay and in the Gulf of Cadiz. Continuous Plankton Recorder (CPR) samples collected in 2009-2012 were re-analysed with the aim of identifying the time and location of cnidarian blooms across the North Atlantic Basin. Overall the data show high variability in jellyfish abundance and diversity, mainly in relation to different water masses and bathymetry. Higher densities were generally recorded on the shelves, where the communities tend to be more diverse due to the presence of meropelagic medusae. Comparison of net records from the G.O. Sars transatlantic cruise shows that information on jellyfish diversity differs significantly depending on the sampling gear utilised. Indeed, the big trawls mostly collect relatively large scyphozoan and hydrozoan species, while small hydrozoans and early stages of Ctenophora are only caught by smaller nets. Based on CPR data from 2009 to 2012, blooms of cnidarians occurred in all seasons across the whole North Atlantic Basin. Molecular analysis revealed that, contrary to previous hypotheses, the CPR is able to detect

  19. Experiments and evidences:jellyfish (Nemopilema nomurai) decomposing and nutrients (nitrogen and phosphorus) released

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Xuegang; SONG Jinming; MA Qingxia; LI Ning; YUAN Huamao; DUAN Liqin; QU Baoxiao

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate nitrogen and phosphorus released in the process of the decomposition of giant jellyfish in the laboratory and found the evidence to verify the influence of nutrients released by the decomposition of jellyfish on the ecosystem in the field. The release of nitrogen and phosphorus from the decomposition ofNemopilema nomurai was examined in a series of experiments under different incubation conditions such as different pH values, salinity values, temperatures and nitrogen and phosphorus concentrations. The results showed that the complete decomposition ofNemopilema nomurai generally took about 4–8 d. The release of nitrogen and phosphorus from the decomposition ofNemopilema nomurai could be divided into two stages: the early stage and the later stage, although the efflux rate of nitrogen was one order more than phosphorus. In the early stage of the decomposition ofNemopilema nomurai, the concentrations of dissolved nitrogen, dissolved phosphorus, total nitrogen and total phosphorus in seawater increased rapidly, and the concentration of nitrogen could reach the highest level in the whole degradation process. In the later stage of the decomposition, the concentrations of dissolved nitrogen and total nitrogen declined slowly, while the concentration of phosphorus in water could reach a maximum in the degradation process. High pH, low salinity, high temperature and N/P will promote the release of nitrogen; low pH is unfavorable to the release of nitrogen but favorable to the release of phosphorus. In addition, we found the concentrations of ammonium and phosphate in the bottom water were higher than those in the surface water during the period of jellyfish bloom in the Jiaozhou Bay, proving that nutrients released by the decomposition of jellyfish have significant influence on nitrogen and phosphorus in the field. For the whole Yellow Sea, nutrients released by jellyfish carcasses may reach up to (2.63±2.98)×107 mol/d of

  20. Role of Thyroxine in Space-Developed Jellyfish

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spangenberg, Dorothy B.

    1997-01-01

    The Aurelia Metamorphosis Test System was previously used to determine the effects of the space environment on the development and behavior of tiny (1-2 mm) jellyfish ephyrae during the SLS-1 and IML-2 missions. Results from the SLS-1 experiment included the discovery that statolith numbers were significantly reduced in Earth-formed ephyrae flown for nine days in space as compared with ground-based controls. In addition, upon return to Earth, six times more ephyrae which had developed in space than those developed on Earth had pulsing abnormalities, indicating that either these animals did not form their neuromuscular structures normally while in space or they were unable to adapt to the Ig environment upon return to Earth. The metamorphosis process, which enables the formation of ephyrae from polyps is influenced by a hormone, Jf-T4 Oellyfish thyroxine) which is synthesized following iodine administration. Two groups of polyps in space, however, formed ephyrae without iodine administration indicating that Jf-T4 synthesis, utilization, or excretion was different in. the ephyrae. Increased synthesis or build-up in the media of the hormone may also be linked to the increased demineralization of statoliths found in space-exposed ephyrae. In previous experiments, we found that externally administered thyroxine causes increased demineralization of statoliths on Earth. Abnormal pulsina in ephyrae following return to Earth during the SLS-1 mission may also be traced to increased Jf-T4 levels. Thyroxine is known to be important to the normal development and function of the nervous system, heart, and skeletal muscles in higher animals. For this third Jellyfish-in-Space experiment, we proposed to quantitate the levels of Jf- T4 and of T4 receptors in space-developed ephyrae and media and to compare these levels with those of animals developing and at Ig in space and on Earth. We expected to be able to determine whether Jf-T4 synthesis and/or secretion is different in space

  1. Variation in lethality and effects of two Australian chirodropid jellyfish venoms in fish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kintner, Anna H; Seymour, Jamie E; Edwards, Susan L

    2005-11-01

    The North Queensland chirodropid box jellyfish Chironex fleckeri and Chiropsalmus sp. share similar nematocyst composition and the same prey of Acetes australis shrimps in their early medusa stages; however, as C. fleckeri individuals reach larger size, the animals add fish to their diet and their complement of nematocyst types changes, allowing larger doses of venom to be delivered to prey. This study demonstrated that the venoms of the two species differ as well: despite similar effects previously documented in crustacean prey models, the two had widely different cardiac and lethal effects in fish, with C. fleckeri being substantially more potent in its ability to cause death. Comparisons between the venom delivery abilities of the two species showed that the change in nematocysts of C. fleckeri cannot alone account for its ontogenetic shift to prey fish; instead, its prey ecology clearly necessitates it having venom capable of acting efficiently to cause death in fish. Although this venom is almost certainly produced at greater metabolic cost to the animal than the less-lethal venom of Chiropsalmus sp., owing to its greater molecular protein complexity, it confers the advantage of increased caloric intake from fish prey, facilitating larger size and potentially greater reproductive output of C. fleckeri over Chiropsalmus sp.

  2. The complete mitochondrial genome of the Antarctic stalked jellyfish, Haliclystus antarcticus Pfeffer, 1889 (Staurozoa: Stauromedusae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hsing-Hui Li

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available In present study, the complete mitogenome sequence of the Antarctic stalked jellyfish, Haliclystus antarcticus Pfeffer (Staurozoa: Stauromedusae has been sequenced by next-generation sequencing method. The assembled mitogenome comprises of 15,766 bp including 13 protein coding genes, 7 transfer RNAs, and 2 ribosomal RNA genes. The overall base of Antarctic stalked jellyfish constitutes of 26.5% for A, 19.6% for C, 19.8% for G, 34.1% for T and show 90% identity to Sessile Jelly, Haliclystus sanjuanensis, in the northeastern Pacific Ocean. The complete mitogenome of the Antarctic stalked jellyfish, contributes fundamental and significant DNA molecular data for further phylogeography and evolutionary analysis for seahorse phylogeny. The complete sequence was deposited in DBBJ/EMBL/GenBank under accession number KU947038.

  3. Serious envenomation by the Northern Australian box-jellyfish (Chironex fleckeri).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williamson, J A; Callanan, V I; Hartwick, R F

    1980-01-12

    Serious envenomation of an adult pregnant woman by a box-jellyfish (Chironex flecteri) in North Queensland is reported. Quick thinking and resuscitation by bystanders which was followed by early hospital treatment resulted in a successful outcome both for mother and for fetus. A brief review of the historic background of box-jellyfish envenomation is given, and some specific problems concerning the management and prevention of envenomation from this unique animal are described. On-the-spot resuscitation takes absolute priority, and the advent of specific antivenom is a major advance. Avoidance of fetal stings in the future is possible by simple preventive measures. The role of the Surf Life Saving Association of Australia in the prevention and treatment of such problems is highlighted, and, as a result of recent research, possible changes in the management of box-jellyfish envenomations are predicted.

  4. Investigation of Gelatin Polypeptides of Jellyfish (Rhopilema esculentum for Their Antioxidant Activity in vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yong-Liang Zhuang

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Jellyfish gelatin was hydrolyzed by different proteases to obtain antioxidative polypeptides. The gelatin hydrolysate obtained by progressive hydrolysis using trypsin and Properase E exhibited the highest hydrolysis degree and antioxidant activity. Three series of gelatin polypeptides (SCP1, SCP2 and SCP3 were obtained by ultrafiltrating the gelatin hydrolysate through molecular mass cut-off membranes of 10, 6 and 2 kDa, respectively. Amino acid composition analysis showed that SCP3 had the highest total hydrophobic amino acid content. The in vitro antioxidant tests demonstrated that SCP2 had the strongest hydroxyl radical and hydrogen peroxide scavenging activities and metal chelating ability, while SCP3 showed the highest reducing power, antioxidant activity in linoleic acid emulsion system and superoxide anion radical scavenging activity. The results support the feasibility of jellyfish gelatin as a natural antioxidant polypeptide provider, and enzymatic hydrolysis and ultrafiltration could be potent future processing technologies to utilize the abundant jellyfish resource.

  5. Changes in the small-jellyfish community in recent decades in Jiaozhou Bay, China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SUN Song; LI Yinghong; SUN Xiaoxia

    2012-01-01

    We used long term monitoring data to evaluate changes in abundance and species dominance of small-jellyfish (collected with zooplankton net whose bell diameter was less than 5 cm) between 1991 and 2009 in the Jiaozhou Bay,China.Zooplankton samples were vertically towed with conical plankton net from near-bottom to surface,identified microscopically,and mapped in time-space using Grapher 7.0 and Surfer 8.0.Results show that the abundance of small-jellyfish throughout the bay had been increasing during 2001-2009 on average of 15.2 ind./m3,almost 5 times higher than that between 1991 and 2000.The occurrence of peak abundance shifted from spring to summer after 2000,and two peaks appeared in spring and summer,respectively,after 2005.Both the abundance and the frequency of blooms of small-jellyfish increased after 2000 in the bay.In addition,the biodiversity of jellyfish has increased significantly in recent years with a change in dominant species.Several new dominant species appeared after 2000,including Rathkae octopunctata in winter,Phialidium hemisphaericum in spring,summer,and autumn,Phialucium carolinae in spring,and Pleurobrachia globosa in summer and autumn,while some previous dominant species throughout the 1990s (Eirene ceylonensis,Zanclea costata,Lovenella assimilis,and Muggiaea atlantica) were no longer dominant after 2000.The abundance of small-jellyfish was positively correlated with the density of dinoflagellates,and the abundance of zooplankton.We believe that the changes in smalljellyfish abundance and species composition were the result of eutrophication,aquaculture and coastal construction activities around the bay.Concurrently,seawater warming and salinity decrease in recent decades promoted the growth and reproduction of small-jellyfish in the bay.

  6. Jellyfish extract induces apoptotic cell death through the p38 pathway and cell cycle arrest in chronic myelogenous leukemia K562 cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwak, Choong-Hwan; Abekura, Fukushi; Park, Jun-Young; Park, Nam Gyu; Chang, Young-Chae; Lee, Young-Choon; Chung, Tae-Wook; Ha, Ki-Tae; Son, Jong-Keun

    2017-01-01

    Jellyfish species are widely distributed in the world’s oceans, and their population is rapidly increasing. Jellyfish extracts have several biological functions, such as cytotoxic, anti-microbial, and antioxidant activities in cells and organisms. However, the anti-cancer effect of Jellyfish extract has not yet been examined. We used chronic myelogenous leukemia K562 cells to evaluate the mechanisms of anti-cancer activity of hexane extracts from Nomura’s jellyfish in vitro. In this study, jellyfish are subjected to hexane extraction, and the extract is shown to have an anticancer effect on chronic myelogenous leukemia K562 cells. Interestingly, the present results show that jellyfish hexane extract (Jellyfish-HE) induces apoptosis in a dose- and time-dependent manner. To identify the mechanism(s) underlying Jellyfish-HE-induced apoptosis in K562 cells, we examined the effects of Jellyfish-HE on activation of caspase and mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs), which are responsible for cell cycle progression. Induction of apoptosis by Jellyfish-HE occurred through the activation of caspases-3,-8 and -9 and phosphorylation of p38. Jellyfish-HE-induced apoptosis was blocked by a caspase inhibitor, Z-VAD. Moreover, during apoptosis in K562 cells, p38 MAPK was inhibited by pretreatment with SB203580, an inhibitor of p38. SB203580 blocked jellyfish-HE-induced apoptosis. Additionally, Jellyfish-HE markedly arrests the cell cycle in the G0/G1 phase. Therefore, taken together, the results imply that the anti-cancer activity of Jellyfish-HE may be mediated apoptosis by induction of caspases and activation of MAPK, especially phosphorylation of p38, and cell cycle arrest at the Go/G1 phase in K562 cells. PMID:28133573

  7. Cell tracking supports secondary gastrulation in the moon jellyfish Aurelia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gold, David A; Nakanishi, Nagayasu; Hensley, Nicholai M; Hartenstein, Volker; Jacobs, David K

    2016-11-01

    The moon jellyfish Aurelia exhibits a dramatic reorganization of tissue during its metamorphosis from planula larva to polyp. There are currently two competing hypotheses regarding the fate of embryonic germ layers during this metamorphosis. In one scenario, the original endoderm undergoes apoptosis and is replaced by a secondary endoderm derived from ectodermal cells. In the second scenario, both ectoderm and endoderm remain intact through development. In this study, we performed a pulse-chase experiment to trace the fate of larval ectodermal cells. We observed that prior to metamorphosis, ectodermal cells that proliferated early in larval development concentrate at the future oral end of the polyp. During metamorphosis, these cells migrate into the endoderm, extending all the way to the aboral portion of the gut. We therefore reject the hypothesis that larval endoderm remains intact during metamorphosis and provide additional support for the "secondary gastrulation" hypothesis. Aurelia appears to offer the first and only described case where a cnidarian derives its endoderm twice during normal development, adding to a growing body of evidence that germ layers can be dramatically reorganized in cnidarian life cycles.

  8. Statolith Morphometrics Can Discriminate among Taxa of Cubozoan Jellyfishes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher J Mooney

    Full Text Available Identification of potentially harmful cubomedusae is difficult due to their gelatinous nature. The only hard structure of medusae, the statolith, has the potential to provide robust measurements for morphometric analysis. Traditional morphometric length to width ratios (L: W and modern morphometric Elliptical Fourier Analysis (EFA were applied to proximal, oral and lateral statolith faces of 12 cubozoan species. EFA outperformed L: W as L: W did not account for the curvature of the statolith. Best discrimination was achieved with Canonical Discriminant Analysis (CDA when analysing proximal + oral + lateral statolith faces in combination. Normalised Elliptical Fourier (NEF coefficients classified 98% of samples to their correct species and 94% to family group. Statolith shape agreed with currently accepted cubozoan taxonomy. This has potential to assist in identifying levels of risk and stock structure of populations in areas where box jellyfish envenomations are a concern as the severity of envenomation is family dependent. We have only studied 12 (27% of the 45 currently accepted cubomedusae, but analyses demonstrated that statolith shape is an effective taxonomic discriminator within the Class.

  9. Faking giants: the evolution of high prey clearance rates in jellyfishes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acuña, José Luis; López-Urrutia, Ángel; Colin, Sean

    2011-09-16

    Jellyfishes have functionally replaced several overexploited commercial stocks of planktivorous fishes. This is paradoxical, because they use a primitive prey capture mechanism requiring direct contact with the prey, whereas fishes use more efficient visual detection. We have compiled published data to show that, in spite of their primitive life-style, jellyfishes exhibit similar instantaneous prey clearance and respiration rates as their fish competitors and similar potential for growth and reproduction. To achieve this production, they have evolved large, water-laden bodies that increase prey contact rates. Although larger bodies are less efficient for swimming, optimization analysis reveals that large collectors are advantageous if they move through the water sufficiently slowly.

  10. Surfactant-laden drop jellyfish-breakup mode induced by the Marangoni effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Hui; Zhang, Wen-Bin; Xu, Jian-Liang; Li, Wei-Feng; Liu, Hai-Feng

    2017-03-01

    Drop breakup is a familiar event in both nature and technology. In this study, we find that the bag breakup mode can be replaced by a new breakup mode: jellyfish breakup, when the surfactant concentration of a surfactant-laden drop is high. This new breakup mode has a morphology resembling a jellyfish with many long tentacles. This is due to the inhomogeneous distribution of surfactant in the process of drop deformation and breakup. The thin film of liquid can remain stable as a result of the Marangoni effect. Finally, we propose that the dimensionless surfactant concentration can serve as a criterion for breakup mechanisms.

  11. Response of the box-jellyfish (Chironex fleckeri) cardiotoxin to intravenous administration of verapamil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burnett, J W; Calton, G J

    1983-08-20

    Verapamil, a calcium antagonist, has been shown to be effective in delaying death in mice after intravenous challenge with box-jellyfish (Chironex fleckeri) venom. Death from a challenge of up to three mouse-lethal doses of venom was significantly delayed after the prior intravenous administration of verapamil (P = 0.003). A smaller dose of verapamil could "rescue" mice previously envenomed with 1.25 mouse-lethal doses (P = 0.0001). These data suggest that verapamil injections should be added to the first-aid procedures performed on the beach for victims of box-jellyfish stings.

  12. Severe anaphylactic reaction to mediterranean jellyfish (Ropilhema nomadica envenomation: Case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nadav Friedel

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We present a 15-year-old female patient with an anaphylactic reaction to a jellyfish sting, sustained while surfing in the Mediterranean Sea. She experienced immediate difficulty in breathing, hoarseness and itching and was taken by ambulance to the emergency department, receiving intramuscular adrenaline on the way. She presented with periorbital swelling and facial edema and improved with systemic steroids and antihistamines. She was discharged 2 days later with allergy service follow up at our institution. This is the first case report documenting anaphylaxis due to Mediterranean jellyfish envenomation.

  13. Multiple photoreceptor systems control the swim pacemaker activity in box jellyfish

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Garm, Anders Lydik; Mori, S.

    2009-01-01

    Like all other cnidarian medusae, box jellyfish propel themselves through the water by contracting their bell-shaped body in discrete swim pulses. These pulses are controlled by a swim pacemaker system situated in their sensory structures, the rhopalia. Each medusa has four rhopalia each with a s......Like all other cnidarian medusae, box jellyfish propel themselves through the water by contracting their bell-shaped body in discrete swim pulses. These pulses are controlled by a swim pacemaker system situated in their sensory structures, the rhopalia. Each medusa has four rhopalia each...

  14. How does the oblateness coefficient influence the nature of orbits in the restricted three-body problem?

    CERN Document Server

    Zotos, Euaggelos E

    2015-01-01

    We numerically investigate the case of the planar circular restricted three-body problem where the more massive primary is an oblate spheroid. A thorough numerical analysis takes place in the configuration $(x,y)$ and the $(x,E)$ space in which we classify initial conditions of orbits into three categories: (i) bounded, (ii) escaping and (iii) collisional. Our results reveal that the oblateness coefficient has a huge impact on the character of orbits. Interpreting the collisional motion as leaking in the phase space we related our results to both chaotic scattering and the theory of leaking Hamiltonian systems. We successfully located the escape as well as the collisional basins and we managed to correlate them with the corresponding escape and collision times. We hope our contribution to be useful for a further understanding of the escape and collision properties of motion in this interesting version of the restricted three-body problem.

  15. Astrophysically Satisfactory Solutions to Einstein's R-33 Gravitational Field Equations Exterior/Interior to Static Homogeneous Oblate Spheroidal Masses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chifu E. N.

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available In this article, we formulate solutions to Einstein's geometrical field equations derived using our new approach. Our field equations exterior and interior to the mass distribution have only one unknown function determined by the mass or pressure distribution. Our obtained solutions yield the unknown function as generalizations of Newton's gravitational scalar potential. Thus, our solution puts Einstein's geometrical theory of gravity on same footing with Newton's dynamical theory; with the dependence of the field on one and only one unknown function comparable to Newton's gravitational scalar potential. Our results in this article are of much significance as the Sun and planets in the solar system are known to be more precisely oblate spheroidal in geometry. The oblate spheroidal geometries of these bodies have effects on their gravitational fields and the motions of test particles and photons in these fields.

  16. Evolution of Galaxy Shapes from Prolate to Oblate through Compaction Events

    CERN Document Server

    Tomassetti, Matteo; Mandelker, Nir; Ceverino, Daniel; Lapiner, Sharon; Faber, Sandra; Kneller, Omer; Primack, Joel; Sai, Tanmayi

    2015-01-01

    We study the evolution of global shapes of galaxies using cosmological simulations. The shapes refer to the components of dark matter (DM), stars and gas at the stellar half-mass radius. Most galaxies undergo a characteristic compaction event into a blue nugget at $z\\sim2-4$, which marks the transition from a DM-dominated central body to a self-gravitating baryonic core. We find that in the high-$z$, DM-dominated phase, the stellar and DM systems tend to be triaxial, preferentially prolate and mutually aligned. The elongation is supported by an anisotropic velocity dispersion that originates from the assembly of the galaxy along a dominant large-scale filament. We estimate that torques by the dominant halo are capable of inducing the elongation of the stellar system and its alignment with the halo. Then, in association with the transition to self-gravity, small-pericenter orbits puff up and the DM and stellar systems evolve into a more spherical and oblate configuration, aligned with the gas disc and associat...

  17. Rapid scavenging of jellyfish carcasses reveals the importance of gelatinous material to deep-sea food webs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sweetman, Andrew K; Smith, Craig R; Dale, Trine; Jones, Daniel O B

    2014-12-07

    Jellyfish blooms are common in many oceans, and anthropogenic changes appear to have increased their magnitude in some regions. Although mass falls of jellyfish carcasses have been observed recently at the deep seafloor, the dense necrophage aggregations and rapid consumption rates typical for vertebrate carrion have not been documented. This has led to a paradigm of limited energy transfer to higher trophic levels at jelly falls relative to vertebrate organic falls. We show from baited camera deployments in the Norwegian deep sea that dense aggregations of deep-sea scavengers (more than 1000 animals at peak densities) can rapidly form at jellyfish baits and consume entire jellyfish carcasses in 2.5 h. We also show that scavenging rates on jellyfish are not significantly different from fish carrion of similar mass, and reveal that scavenging communities typical for the NE Atlantic bathyal zone, including the Atlantic hagfish, galatheid crabs, decapod shrimp and lyssianasid amphipods, consume both types of carcasses. These rapid jellyfish carrion consumption rates suggest that the contribution of gelatinous material to organic fluxes may be seriously underestimated in some regions, because jelly falls may disappear much more rapidly than previously thought. Our results also demonstrate that the energy contained in gelatinous carrion can be efficiently incorporated into large numbers of deep-sea scavengers and food webs, lessening the expected impacts (e.g. smothering of the seafloor) of enhanced jellyfish production on deep-sea ecosystems and pelagic-benthic coupling.

  18. 浸泡对市售盐渍海蜇皮及海蜇头影响分析%Analysis of Soaking for Commercial Salted Jellyfish and Jellyfish Head

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈瑜; 朱敬萍; 金雷; 鲍静姣

    2016-01-01

    Based on the experimental study on the soaking time, the content of salt, water and alum of jellyfish and jellyfish head was got. The experimental results showed that the water in jellyfish came up to 96. 0% and 96. 6% after 16 h and 24 h, the salt of jellyfish was down to 1. 82% and 0. 19%, the alum of jellyfish was down to 0. 28% and 0. 11% in the same time. The water in jellyfish head came up to 95. 4% and 97. 8% after 16 h and 24 h, the salt of jellyfish was down to 2. 80% and 0. 28%, the alum of jellyfish was down to 0. 28% and 0. 10% in the same time. It turned out that fresh water soaking can reduce the amount of salt and alum in jellyfish and jellyfish head. The salt of jellyfish and jellyfish head can reduce to about 0. 2% ~0. 3% after 24 h, and the salty taste was almost impossible to tell. Alum content was lowered to 0. 1%, it was far lower than the state of aluminum daily limit value of 0. 004 g.%通过对浸泡时长的实验研究,以期得到对海蜇皮和海蜇头的盐分、水分及明矾含量影响的客观了解。实验结果显示,海蜇皮浸泡16 h和24 h后水分含量分别达到96.0%和96.6%,盐分降至1.82%和0.19%,明矾含量降至0.28%和0.11%;海蜇头浸泡16 h和24 h后水分含量达到95.4%和97.8%,盐分降至2.80%和0.28%,明矾含量降至0.28%和0.10%。结果表明,淡水浸泡能有效降低海蜇皮和海蜇头的盐分和明矾含量,且经过24 h海蜇皮和海蜇头的盐分可降至0.2%~0.3%左右,味觉几乎无法辨别到咸味,明矾含量也可降至0.1%左右,远低于国家对铝元素每日摄入限量值0.004 g。

  19. Fundamental solution of Laplace's equation in oblate spheroidal coordinates and Galerkin's matrix for Neumann's problem in Earth's gravity field studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holota, Petr; Nesvadba, Otakar

    2015-04-01

    In this paper the reciprocal distance is used for generating Galerkin's approximations in the weak solution of Neumann's problem that has an important role in Earth's gravity field studies. The reciprocal distance has a natural tie to the fundamental solution of Laplace's partial differential equation and in the paper it is represented by means of an expansion into a series of oblate spheroidal harmonics. Subsequently, the gradient vector of the reciprocal distance is constructed. In the computation of its components the expansion mentioned above is employed. The paper then focuses on the scalar product of reciprocal distance gradients in two different points and in particular on a series representation of a volume integral of the scalar product spread over an unbounded domain given by the exterior of an oblate spheroid (oblate ellipsoid of revolution). The integral yields the entries of Galerkin's matrix. The numerical interpretation of all the expansions used as well as the respective software implementation within the OpenCL framework is treated, which concerns also a numerical evaluation of Legendre functions of a real and an imaginary argument. In parallel an approximate closed formula expressing the entries of Galerkin's matrix (with an accuracy up to terms multiplied by the square of numerical eccentricity) is derived for convenience and comparison. The paper is added extensive numerical examples that illustrate the approach applied and demonstrate the accuracy of the derived formulas. Aspects related to practical applications are discussed.

  20. Gill damage to Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar caused by the common jellyfish (Aurelia aurita under experimental challenge.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emily J Baxter

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Over recent decades jellyfish have caused fish kill events and recurrent gill problems in marine-farmed salmonids. Common jellyfish (Aurelia spp. are among the most cosmopolitan jellyfish species in the oceans, with populations increasing in many coastal areas. The negative interaction between jellyfish and fish in aquaculture remains a poorly studied area of science. Thus, a recent fish mortality event in Ireland, involving Aurelia aurita, spurred an investigation into the effects of this jellyfish on marine-farmed salmon. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: To address the in vivo impact of the common jellyfish (A. aurita on salmonids, we exposed Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar smolts to macerated A. aurita for 10 hrs under experimental challenge. Gill tissues of control and experimental treatment groups were scored with a system that rated the damage between 0 and 21 using a range of primary and secondary parameters. Our results revealed that A. aurita rapidly and extensively damaged the gills of S. salar, with the pathogenesis of the disorder progressing even after the jellyfish were removed. After only 2 hrs of exposure, significant multi-focal damage to gill tissues was apparent. The nature and extent of the damage increased up to 48 hrs from the start of the challenge. Although the gills remained extensively damaged at 3 wks from the start of the challenge trial, shortening of the gill lamellae and organisation of the cells indicated an attempt to repair the damage suffered. CONCLUSIONS: Our findings clearly demonstrate that A. aurita can cause severe gill problems in marine-farmed fish. With aquaculture predicted to expand worldwide and evidence suggesting that jellyfish populations are increasing in some areas, this threat to aquaculture is of rising concern as significant losses due to jellyfish could be expected to increase in the future.

  1. Distribution of moon jellyfish Aurelia aurita in relation to summer hypoxia in Hiroshima Bay, Seto Inland Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shoji, Jun; Kudoh, Takaya; Takatsuji, Hideyuki; Kawaguchi, Osamu; Kasai, Akihide

    2010-02-01

    Biological and physical surveys were conducted in order to investigate the relationship between environmental conditions and the distribution of moon jellyfish Aurelia aurita in Hiroshima Bay, western Seto Inland Sea, Japan. Moon jellyfish and ichthyoplankton were collected at 13 stations in Hiroshima Bay during monthly surveys from July to September in 2006 and 2007. Surface temperature in 2006 was significantly lower during the August and September cruises and surface salinity was lower during all cruises than in 2007. Moon jellyfish was the most dominant gelatinous plankton collected, accounting for 89.7% in wet weight. Mean moon jellyfish abundance in 2006 was higher than that in 2007 from July through September, with significant inter-year differences for July and September. Variability in precipitation and nutritional input from the Ohta River, northernmost part of Hiroshima Bay, were suggested as possible factors affecting the inter-annual variability in moon jellyfish abundance in the coastal areas of northern Hiroshima Bay. Moon jellyfish were more abundant in the coastal areas of northern Hiroshima Bay, where the dissolved oxygen (DO) concentration was lower, while low in the central part of the bay. Japanese anchovy Engraulis japonicus eggs were most dominant (58.1% in number) among the ichthyoplankton and were abundant in the central area of Hiroshima Bay. Explanatory analysis was conducted to detect possible effects of environmental conditions on the abundance of moon jellyfish and Japanese anchovy eggs during the summer months in Hiroshima Bay. Of the environmental conditions tested (temperature, salinity and DO of surface and bottom layers at each sampling station), bottom DO had the most significant effect on the moon jellyfish abundance: there was a negative correlation between the bottom DO and the moon jellyfish abundance in Hiroshima Bay during summer.

  2. Gill damage to Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar) caused by the common jellyfish (Aurelia aurita) under experimental challenge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baxter, Emily J; Sturt, Michael M; Ruane, Neil M; Doyle, Thomas K; McAllen, Rob; Harman, Luke; Rodger, Hamish D

    2011-04-07

    Over recent decades jellyfish have caused fish kill events and recurrent gill problems in marine-farmed salmonids. Common jellyfish (Aurelia spp.) are among the most cosmopolitan jellyfish species in the oceans, with populations increasing in many coastal areas. The negative interaction between jellyfish and fish in aquaculture remains a poorly studied area of science. Thus, a recent fish mortality event in Ireland, involving Aurelia aurita, spurred an investigation into the effects of this jellyfish on marine-farmed salmon. To address the in vivo impact of the common jellyfish (A. aurita) on salmonids, we exposed Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar) smolts to macerated A. aurita for 10 hrs under experimental challenge. Gill tissues of control and experimental treatment groups were scored with a system that rated the damage between 0 and 21 using a range of primary and secondary parameters. Our results revealed that A. aurita rapidly and extensively damaged the gills of S. salar, with the pathogenesis of the disorder progressing even after the jellyfish were removed. After only 2 hrs of exposure, significant multi-focal damage to gill tissues was apparent. The nature and extent of the damage increased up to 48 hrs from the start of the challenge. Although the gills remained extensively damaged at 3 wks from the start of the challenge trial, shortening of the gill lamellae and organisation of the cells indicated an attempt to repair the damage suffered. Our findings clearly demonstrate that A. aurita can cause severe gill problems in marine-farmed fish. With aquaculture predicted to expand worldwide and evidence suggesting that jellyfish populations are increasing in some areas, this threat to aquaculture is of rising concern as significant losses due to jellyfish could be expected to increase in the future.

  3. [Effects of macro-jellyfish abundance dynamics on fishery resource structure in the Yangtze River estuary and its adjacent waters].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shan, Xiu-Juan; Zhuang, Zhi-Meng; Jin, Xian-Shi; Dai, Fang-Qun

    2011-12-01

    Based on the bottom trawl survey data in May 2007 and May and June 2008, this paper analyzed the effects of the abundance dynamics of macro-jellyfish on the species composition, distribution, and abundance of fishery resource in the Yangtze River estuary and its adjacent waters. From May 2007 to June 2008, the average catch per haul and the top catch per haul of macro-jellyfish increased, up to 222.2 kg x h(-1) and 1800 kg x h(-1) in June 2008, respectively. The macro-jellyfish were mainly distributed in the areas around 50 m isobath, and not beyond 100 m isobath where was the joint front of the coastal waters of East China Sea, Yangtze River runoff, and Taiwan Warm Current. The main distribution area of macro-jellyfish in June migrated northward, as compared with that in May, and the highest catches of macro-jellyfish in May 2007 and May 2008 were found in the same sampling station (122.5 degrees E, 28.5 degrees N). In the sampling stations with higher abundance of macro-jellyfish, the fishery abundance was low, and the fishery species also changed greatly, mainly composed by small-sized species (Trachurus japonicus, Harpadon nehereus, and Acropoma japonicum) and pelagic species (Psenopsis anomala, Octopus variabilis) and Trichiurus japonicus, and P. anomala accounted for 23.7% of the total catch in June 2008. Larimichthys polyactis also occupied higher proportion of the total catch in sampling stations with higher macro-jellyfish abundance, but the demersal species Lophius litulon was not found, and a few crustaceans were collected. This study showed that macro-jellyfish had definite negative effects on the fishery community structure and abundance in the Yangtze River estuary fishery ecosystem, and further, changed the energy flow patterns of the ecosystem through cascading trophic interactions. Therefore, macro-jellyfish was strongly suggested to be an independent ecological group when the corresponding fishery management measures were considered.

  4. ORIGIN OF THE GIANT JELLYFISH IN QINGDAO OFFSHORE IN SUMMER%青岛外海夏季水母路径溯源研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张海彦; 赵亮; 魏皓

    2012-01-01

    2011年夏季,青岛外海发现大量大型水母,如沙海蜇、海月水母和白色霞水母等,而在冬、春季未在当地海区发现其幼体。本文采用拉格朗日方法,以粒子代表水母,不考虑水母自身运动,进行反向追踪,追溯其运动路径及可能源地。不同追踪实验结果显示,在不同时间不同深度处释放的粒子路径不同。在海面处释放的粒子分别可以追溯到海州湾、江苏沿岸及长江口附近的海域,其中8月1日和8月15日在海面释放的粒子最远可以追溯至长江口外海域:2m层上释放的粒子最远也可到达长江口附近,而10m层以深释放的粒子基本分布在35°N以北。由于反向追踪只考虑海流的影响,追踪过程可逆,因此,从运动路径来看,青岛外海的部分水母可能来源于海州湾、江苏沿岸及长江口附近海域。从水母种类分布特征来看,海州湾、江苏沿岸及长江口附近海域在有粒子分布时期的水母种类与7、8月份青岛外海部分水母种类一致,为寻找青岛外海夏季水母的潜在的来源地提供了依据。%In the summer of 2011, massive giant jellyfish was observed in Qingdao offshore. These jellyfish, including Nemopilema nomurai, Cyanea nozakii and Aurelia aurita, were remote origin because their larvae were not found in Qingdao offshore in the past winter and spring. We conducted a series of backward Lagrangian particle-tracking experi- ments driven by the Princeton Ocean Model (POM) hydrodynamical results to identify possible source regions of the ob- served giant jellyfish. Passive particles representing the jellyfish were released in surface layer and at some other depths at different times in summer. The trajectories of the particles depended on both the depth and the date of release. Backward tracking from the summer to spring, the released particles in surface layer were mainly found in Haizhou Bay, Jiangsu coast area, and

  5. Introduction to the China Jellyfish Project——The Key Processes, Mechanism and Ecological Consequences of Jellyfish Bloom in China Coastal Waters

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SUN Xiaoxia; WANG Shiwei; SUN Song

    2011-01-01

    @@ As a National Basic Research Program (973 Program) of China, the Key Processes, Mechanism and Ecological Consequences of Jellyfish Bloom in China Coastal Waters led by Prof.SUN Song from Institute of Oceanology, Chinese Academy of Sciences (IOCAS) was endorsed by the Ministry of Science and Technology.Recently, the kick-off meeting of this five-year (2011-2015) program was held on January 15-16 in Qingdao,China.More than 120 participants attended the meeting.

  6. Systematics and biogeography of the jellyfish Aurelia labiata (Cnidaria: Scyphozoa).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gershwin, L A

    2001-08-01

    The hypothesis that the common eastern North Pacific Aurelia is A. aurita is falsified with morphological analysis. The name Aurelia labiata is resurrected, and the species is redescribed, to refer to medusae differing from A. aurita by a suite of characters related to a broad and elongated manubrium. Specifically, the oral arms are short, separated by and arising from the base of the fleshy manubrium, and the planulae are brooded upon the manubrium itself, rather than on the oral arms. Aurelia aurita possesses no corresponding enlarged structure. Furthermore, the number of radial canals is typically much greater in A. labiata, and thus the canals often appear more anastomosed than in A. aurita. Finally, most A. labiata medusae possess a 16-scalloped bell margin, whereas the margin is 8-scalloped in most A. aurita. Separation of the two forms has previously been noted on the basis of allozyme and isozyme analyses and on the histology of the neuromuscular system. Partial 18S rDNA sequencing corroborates these findings. Three distinct morphotypes of A. labiata, corresponding to separate marine bioprovinces, have been identified among 17 populations from San Diego, California, to Prince William Sound, Alaska. The long-undisputed species A. limbata may be simply a color morph of A. labiata, or a species within a yet-unelaborated A. labiata species complex. The first known introduction of Aurelia cf. aurita into southern California waters is documented. Although traditional jellyfish taxonomy tends to recognize many species as cosmopolitan or nearly so, these results indicate that coastal species, such as A. labiata, may experience rapid divergence among isolated populations, and that the taxonomy of such species should therefore be scrutinized with special care.

  7. Sphingophosphonolipids, phospholipids, and fatty acids from Aegean jellyfish Aurelia aurita.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kariotoglou, D M; Mastronicolis, S K

    2001-11-01

    The goal of this study is to elucidate and identify several sphingophosphonolipids from Aurelia aurita, an abundant but harmless Aegean jellyfish, in which they have not previously been described. Total lipids of A. aurita were 0.031-0.036% of fresh tissue, and the lipid phosphorus content was 1.3-1.7% of total lipids. Phosphonolipids were 21.7% of phospholipids and consisted of a major ceramide aminoethylphosphonate (CAEP-I; 18.3%), as well as three minor CAEP (II, III, IV) methyl analogs at 1.3, 1.1, and 1.0%, respectively. The remaining phospholipid composition was: phosphatidylcholine, 44.5%, including 36.2% glycerylethers; phosphatidylethanolamine, 18.6%, including 4.5% glycerylethers; cardiolipin, 5.6%; phosphatidylinositol, 2.6%; and lysophosphatidylcholine, 5.0%. In CAEP-I, saturated fatty acids of 14-18 carbon chain length were 70.8% and were combined with 57.3% dihydroxy bases and 23.4% trihydroxy bases. The suite of the three minor CAEP methyl analogs were of the same lipid class based on the head group, but they separated into three different components because of their polarity as follows: CAEP-II and CAEP-III differentiation from the major CAEP-I was mainly due to the increased fatty acid unsaturation and not to a different long-chain base, but the CAEP-IV differentiation from CAEP-I, apart from fatty acid unsaturation, was due to the increased content of hydroxyl groups originated from both hydroxy fatty acids and trihydroxy long-chain bases. Saturated fatty acids were predominant in total (76.7%), polar (83.0%), and neutral lipids (67.6%) of A. aurita. The major phospholipid components of A. aurita were comparable to those previously found in a related organism (Pelagia noctiluca), which can injure humans.

  8. Setting the pace: new insights into central pattern generator interactions in box jellyfish swimming.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Lisa Stöckl

    Full Text Available Central Pattern Generators (CPGs produce rhythmic behaviour across all animal phyla. Cnidarians, which have a radially symmetric nervous system and pacemaker centres in multiples of four, provide an interesting comparison to bilaterian animals for studying the coordination between CPGs. The box jellyfish Tripedalia cystophora is remarkable among cnidarians due to its most elaborate visual system. Together with their ability to actively swim and steer, they use their visual system for multiple types of behaviour. The four swim CPGs are directly regulated by visual input. In this study, we addressed the question of how the four pacemaker centres of this radial symmetric cnidarian interact. We based our investigation on high speed camera observations of the timing of swim pulses of tethered animals (Tripedalia cystophora with one or four rhopalia, under different simple light regimes. Additionally, we developed a numerical model of pacemaker interactions based on the inter pulse interval distribution of animals with one rhopalium. We showed that the model with fully resetting coupling and hyperpolarization of the pacemaker potential below baseline fitted the experimental data best. Moreover, the model of four swim pacemakers alone underscored the proportion of long inter pulse intervals (IPIs considerably. Both in terms of the long IPIs as well as the overall swim pulse distribution, the simulation of two CPGs provided a better fit than that of four. We therefore suggest additional sources of pacemaker control than just visual input. We provide guidelines for future research on the physiological linkage of the cubozoan CPGs and show the insight from bilaterian CPG research, which show that pacemakers have to be studied in their bodily and nervous environment to capture all their functional features, are also manifest in cnidarians.

  9. Flawed citation practices facilitate the unsubstantiated perception of a global trend toward increased jellyfish blooms

    KAUST Repository

    Sanz-Martín, Marina

    2016-06-24

    Speculation over a global rise in jellyfish populations has become widespread in the scientific literature, but until recently the purported ‘global increase’ had not been tested. Here we present a citation analysis of peer-reviewed literature to track the evolution of the current perception of increases in jellyfish and identify key papers involved in its establishment. Trend statements and citation threads were reviewed and arranged in a citation network. Trend statements were assessed according their degree of affirmation and spatial scale, and the appropriateness of the citations used to support statements was assessed. Analyses showed that 48.9% of publications misinterpreted the conclusions of cited sources, with a bias towards claiming jellyfish populations are increasing, with a single review having the most influence on the network. Collectively, these disparities resulted in a network based on unsubstantiated statements and citation threads. As a community, we must ensure our statements about scientific findings in general are accurately substantiated and carefully communicated such that incorrect perceptions, as in the case of jellyfish blooms, do not develop in the absence of rigorous testing. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd

  10. Lichen planus-like eruption resulting from a jellyfish sting: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghosh Sudip Kumar

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Contact with a jellyfish can cause a wide variety of conditions, ranging from cutaneous eruption to fatal cardiovascular and respiratory collapse. Cutaneous features can be both acute and chronic. We report a case of persistent lichen planus-like eruption in a young boy after a jellyfish sting, a hitherto unreported occurrence. Case presentation A 15-year-old boy presented with multiple lichen planus-like violaceous papules over the lower part of his left thigh on the anterior aspect and also over the patellar region. He had a history of a jellyfish sting over his lower limbs incurred while bathing in the sea four weeks prior to presentation. Histopathology revealed a predominantly perivascular mononuclear cell infiltrate immediately beneath the dermoepidermal junction underneath the hyperplastic epidermis. The lesions significantly subsided with topical corticosteroid application. Conclusion This case report demonstrates a new variant of chronic cutaneous change following a jellyfish sting. We report it because of its uniqueness and we believe that physicians should be aware of the possibility of an aquatic animal-induced disease when dealing with lesions with lichen planus-like morphology.

  11. Vertical distribution of giant jellyfish, Nemopilema nomurai using acoustics and optics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Seonghun; Lee, Kyounghoon; Yoon, Won Duk; Lee, Hyungbeen; Hwang, Kangseok

    2016-03-01

    Nemopilema nomurai jellyfish, which are believed to complete their development in the East China Sea, have started migrating into the Yellow Sea in recent years. We obtained biomass estimates of this species in the Yellow Sea using bottom trawl fishing gear and sighting surveys over a 5-year period. These methods are effective for obtaining N. nomurai jellyfish density estimates and information about the community distribution near the bottom or surface of the sea. To verify the vertical distributions of giant jellyfish between, we used hydroacoustic equipment, including an optical stereo camera system attached to a towed sledge and an echo counting method with scientific echosounder system. Acoustic and optical data were collected while the vessel moved at 3 knots, from which the distribution and density of N. nomurai jellyfish were analyzed. Subsequently, the camera system was towed from a 7 m mean depth to sea level, with the detection range of the acoustic system extending from an 8 m depth to the bottom surface. The optical and acoustic methods indicated the presence of vertical distribution of 0.113 (inds/m3) and 0.064 (inds/m3), respectively. However, the vertical distribution indicated that around 93% of individuals occurred at a depth range of 10-40 m; thus, a 2.4-fold greater density was estimated by acoustic echo counting compared to the optical method.

  12. Passive energy recapture in jellyfish contributes to propulsive advantage over other metazoans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gemmell, Brad J; Costello, John H; Colin, Sean P; Stewart, Colin J; Dabiri, John O; Tafti, Danesh; Priya, Shashank

    2013-10-29

    Gelatinous zooplankton populations are well known for their ability to take over perturbed ecosystems. The ability of these animals to outcompete and functionally replace fish that exhibit an effective visual predatory mode is counterintuitive because jellyfish are described as inefficient swimmers that must rely on direct contact with prey to feed. We show that jellyfish exhibit a unique mechanism of passive energy recapture, which is exploited to allow them to travel 30% further each swimming cycle, thereby reducing metabolic energy demand by swimming muscles. By accounting for large interspecific differences in net metabolic rates, we demonstrate, contrary to prevailing views, that the jellyfish (Aurelia aurita) is one of the most energetically efficient propulsors on the planet, exhibiting a cost of transport (joules per kilogram per meter) lower than other metazoans. We estimate that reduced metabolic demand by passive energy recapture improves the cost of transport by 48%, allowing jellyfish to achieve the large sizes required for sufficient prey encounters. Pressure calculations, using both computational fluid dynamics and a newly developed method from empirical velocity field measurements, demonstrate that this extra thrust results from positive pressure created by a vortex ring underneath the bell during the refilling phase of swimming. These results demonstrate a physical basis for the ecological success of medusan swimmers despite their simple body plan. Results from this study also have implications for bioinspired design, where low-energy propulsion is required.

  13. Geographic patterns of fishes and jellyfish in Puget Sound surface waters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rice, Casimir A.; Duda, Jeffrey J.; Greene, Correigh M.; Karr, James R.

    2012-01-01

    We explored patterns of small pelagic fish assemblages and biomass of gelatinous zooplankton (jellyfish) in surface waters across four oceanographic subbasins of greater Puget Sound. Our study is the first to collect data documenting biomass of small pelagic fishes and jellyfish throughout Puget Sound; sampling was conducted opportunistically as part of a juvenile salmon survey of daytime monthly surface trawls at 52 sites during May–August 2003. Biomass composition differed spatially and temporally, but spatial differences were more distinct. Fish dominated in the two northern basins of Puget Sound, whereas jellyfish dominated in the two southern basins. Absolute and relative abundance of jellyfish, hatchery Chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha, and chum salmon O. keta decreased with increasing latitude, whereas the absolute and relative abundance of most fish species and the average fish species richness increased with latitude. The abiotic factors with the strongest relationship to biomass composition were latitude, water clarity, and sampling date. Further study is needed to understand the spatial and temporal heterogeneity in the taxonomic composition we observed in Puget Sound surface waters, especially as they relate to natural and anthropogenic influences.

  14. Identification, cloning and sequencing of two major venom proteins from the box jellyfish, Chironex fleckeri.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brinkman, Diane; Burnell, James

    2007-11-01

    Two of the most abundant proteins found in the nematocysts of the box jellyfish Chironex fleckeri have been identified as C. fleckeri toxin-1 (CfTX-1) and toxin-2 (CfTX-2). The molecular masses of CfTX-1 and CfTX-2, as determined by SDS-PAGE, are approximately 43 and 45 kDa, respectively, and both proteins are strongly antigenic to commercially available box jellyfish antivenom and rabbit polyclonal antibodies raised against C. fleckeri nematocyst extracts. The amino acid sequences of mature CfTX-1 and CfTX-2 (436 and 445 residues, respectively) share significant homology with three known proteins: CqTX-A from Chiropsalmus quadrigatus, CrTXs from Carybdea rastoni and CaTX-A from Carybdea alata, all of which are lethal, haemolytic box jellyfish toxins. Multiple sequence alignment of the five jellyfish proteins has identified several short, but highly conserved regions of amino acids that coincide with a predicted transmembrane spanning region, referred to as TSR1, which may be involved in a pore-forming mechanism of action. Furthermore, remote protein homology predictions for CfTX-2 and CaTX-A suggest weak structural similarities to pore-forming insecticidal delta-endotoxins Cry1Aa, Cry3Bb and Cry3A.

  15. The exotic jellyfish Blackfordia virginica introduced into the Netherlands (Cnidaria: Hydrozoa)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Faasse, M.A.; Melchers, M.

    2014-01-01

    In August 2014 the exotic jellyfish Blackfordia virginica was captured in the harbour of Amsterdam. This is the first confirmed record of this species in the Netherlands, although in October 2013 a possible specimen was filmed and released. This indicates that the species might be established in the

  16. Jellyfish Distribution and Habitat, Aquatic Invasive Species (AIS) animal distribution in Wisconsin - Freshwater jellyfish, Published in 2009, 1:24000 (1in=2000ft) scale, Wisconsin DNR Bureau of Watershed Management.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Jellyfish Distribution and Habitat dataset, published at 1:24000 (1in=2000ft) scale, was produced all or in part from Field Observation information as of 2009....

  17. Spatiotemporal distribution of protozooplankton and copepod nauplii in relation to the occurrence of giant jellyfish in the Yellow Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lu; Xu, Kuidong

    2013-11-01

    The occurrence of the giant jellyfish, Nemopilema nomurai, has been a frequent phenomenon in the Yellow Sea. However, the relationship between the giant jellyfish and protozoa, in particular ciliates, remains largely unknown. We investigated the distribution of nanoflagellates, ciliates, Noctiluca scintillans, and copepod nauplii along the transect 33°N in the Yellow Sea in June and August, 2012, during an occurrence of the giant jellyfish, and in October of that year when the jellyfish was absent. The organisms studied were mainly concentrated in the surface waters in summer, while in autumn they were evenly distributed in the water column. Nanoflagellate, ciliate, and copepod nauplii biomasses increased from early June to August along with jellyfish growth, the first two decreased in October, while N. scintillans biomass peaked in early June to 3 571 μg C/L and decreased in August and October. In summer, ciliate biomass greatly exceeded that of copepod nauplii (4.61-15.04 μg C/L vs. 0.34-0.89 μg C/L). Ciliate production was even more important than biomass, ranging from 6.59 to 34.19 μg C/(L·d) in summer. Our data suggest a tight and positive association among the nano-, micro-, and meso-zooplankton in the study area. Statistical analysis revealed that the abundance and total production of ciliate as well as loricate ciliate biomass were positively correlated with giant jellyfish biomass, indicating a possible predator-prey relationship between ciliates and giant jellyfish. This is in contrast to a previous study, which reported a significant reduction in ciliate standing crops due to the mass occurrence of N. nomurai in summer. Our study indicates that, with its high biomass and, in particular, high production ciliates might support the mass occurrence of giant jellyfish.

  18. Growth, Development and Temporal Variation in the Onset of Six Chironex fleckeri Medusae Seasons: A Contribution to Understanding Jellyfish Ecology

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    Despite the worldwide distribution, toxicity and commercial, industrial and medical impacts jellyfish present, many aspects of their ecology remain poorly understood. Quantified here are important ecological parameters of Chironex fleckeri medusae, contributing not only to the understanding of an understudied taxon, the cubozoa, but also to the broader understanding of jellyfish ecology. C. fleckeri medusae were collected across seven seasons (1999, 2000, 2003, 2005-07 and 2010), with growth ...

  19. Efficacy of Venom from Tentacle of Jellyfish Stomolophus meleagris (Nemopilema nomurai against the Cotton Bollworm Helicoverpa armigera

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huahua Yu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Efficacy of venom from tentacle of jellyfish Stomolophus meleagris against the cotton bollworm Helicoverpa armigera was determined. Venom from tentacle of jellyfish Stomolophus meleagris could inhibit the growth of Helicoverpa armigera and the weight inhibiting rate of sample NFr-2 was 60.53%. Of the six samples, only NFr-2 had high insecticidal activity against Helicoverpa armigera and the corrected mortality recorded at 7 d was 74.23%.

  20. Inductive Sustainment of Oblate FRCs with the Assistance of Magnetic Diffusion, Shaping and Finite-Lamor Radius Stabilization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gerhardt, S.; Belova, E. V.; Yamada, M.; Ji, H.; Inomoto, M.; Jacobson, C. M.; Maqueda, R.; McGeehan, B.; Y., Ren

    2008-07-31

    Oblate field-reversed configurations FRCs have been sustained for >300 µs, or >15 magnetic diffusion times, through the use of an inductive solenoid. These argon FRCs can have their poloidal flux sustained or increased, depending on the timing and strength of the induction. An inward pinch is observed during sustainment, leading to a peaking of the pressure profile and maintenance of the FRC equilibrium. The good stability observed in argon (and krypton) does not transfer to lighter gases, which develop terminal co-interchange instabilities. The stability in argon and krypton is attributed to a combination of external field shaping, magnetic diffusion, and finite-Larmor radius effects.

  1. Location and stability of L1 for the elliptic restricted three-body problem with oblate and triaxial primaries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masoud, Akram; Rahoma, Walid Ali; Abd El-Salam, Fawzy

    2016-07-01

    My subject of study is the point L1 with oblate and triaxial primaries in the elliptic restricted three-body problem (ERTBP). The study contains a mathematical determination of the location of this point in the form of a power series in the mass ratio and a discussion of its stability. The difference between the location of L1 in the perturbed ERTBP and in the classical circular restricted three-body problem (CRTBP) is graphically represented versus the mass ratio. To study the effect of a small displacement, a test particle is assumed to be subjected in the location of L1.

  2. Effects of Triaxiality, Oblateness and Gravitational Potential from a Belt on the Linear Stability of 4,5 in the Restricted Three-Body Problem

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Jagadish Singh; Joel John Taura

    2014-12-01

    In this paper we have considered the restricted three body problem (R3BP) in which the more massive primary is triaxial, the less massive primary and infinitesimal body are oblate spheroids, and are encompassed by a belt of homogenous material points. Analytically and numerically, we have studied the effects of triaxiality of the more massive primary, oblateness of both the less massive primary and infinitesimal body and the gravitational potential generated by the belt on the location of the triangular libration points 4,5 and their linear stability. 4,5 do not form equilateral triangles with the primaries in the presence of all or any of the aforementioned perturbations. Due to triaxiality of the more massive primary and oblateness of the infinitesimal body the triangular libration points are seen to move away from the line linking the primaries, whereas they shift closer to the line owing to the oblateness of the less massive primary and the potential from the belt. The range 0 < < c of stability of the triangular points is reduced in the presence of any of the perturbations, except when considering the potential from the belt the range increases, where c is the critical mass ratio. The oblateness of a test particle (of infinitesimal mass) shifts the location of its libration positions away from the primaries and reduces its range of stability.

  3. Fractal basins of attraction in the planar circular restricted three-body problem with oblateness and radiation pressure

    CERN Document Server

    Zotos, Euaggelos E

    2016-01-01

    In this paper we use the planar circular restricted three-body problem where one of the primary bodies is an oblate spheroid or an emitter of radiation in order to determine the basins of attraction associated with the equilibrium points. The evolution of the position of the five Lagrange points is monitored when the values of the mass ratio $\\mu$, the oblateness coefficient $A_1$, and the radiation pressure factor $q$ vary in predefined intervals. The regions on the configuration $(x,y)$ plane occupied by the basins of attraction are revealed using the multivariate version of the Newton-Raphson method. The correlations between the basins of convergence of the equilibrium points and the corresponding number of iterations needed in order to obtain the desired accuracy are also illustrated. We conduct a thorough and systematic numerical investigation demonstrating how the dynamical quantities $\\mu$, $A_1$, and $q$ influence the basins of attractions. Our results suggest that the mass ratio and the radiation pre...

  4. Comparative analysis of methods for concentrating venom from jellyfish Rhopilema esculentum Kishinouye

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Cuiping; Yu, Huahua; Feng, Jinhua; Chen, Xiaolin; Li, Pengcheng

    2009-02-01

    In this study, several methods were compared for the efficiency to concentrate venom from the tentacles of jellyfish Rhopilema esculentum Kishinouye. The results show that the methods using either freezing-dry or gel absorption to remove water to concentrate venom are not applicable due to the low concentration of the compounds dissolved. Although the recovery efficiency and the total venom obtained using the dialysis dehydration method are high, some proteins can be lost during the concentrating process. Comparing to the lyophilization method, ultrafiltration is a simple way to concentrate the compounds at high percentage but the hemolytic activities of the proteins obtained by ultrafiltration appear to be lower. Our results suggest that overall lyophilization is the best and recommended method to concentrate venom from the tentacles of jellyfish. It shows not only the high recovery efficiency for the venoms but high hemolytic activities as well.

  5. Comparative analysis of methods for concentrating venom from jellyfish Rhopilema esculentum Kishinouye

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YU Huahua; FENG Jinhua; CHEN Xiaolin; LI Pengcheng

    2009-01-01

    In this study, several methods were compared for the efficiency to concentrate venom from the tentacles of jellyfish Rhopilema esculentum Kishinouye. The results show that the methods using either freezing-dry or gel absorption to remove water to concentrate venom are not applicable due to the low concentration of the compounds dissolved. Although the recovery efficiency and the total venom obtained using the dialysis dehydration method are high, some proteins can be lost during the concentrating process. Comparing to the lyophilization method, ultrafiltration is a simple way to concentrate the compounds at high percentage but the hemolytic activities of the proteins obtained by ultrafiltration appear to be lower. Our results suggest that overall lyophilization is the best and recommended method to concentrate venom from the tentacles of jellyfish. It shows not only the high recovery efficiency for the venoms but high hemolytic activities as well.

  6. Optimization of antioxidant activity by response surface methodology in hydrolysates of jellyfish (Rhopilema esculentum) umbrella collagen

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yong-liang ZHUANG; Xue ZHAO; Ba-fang LI

    2009-01-01

    To optimize the hydrolysis conditions to prepare hydrolysates of jellyfish umbrella collagen with the highest hydroxyl radical scavenging activity, collagen extracted from jellyfish umbrella was hydrolyzed with trypsin, and response surface methodology (RSM) was applied. The optimum conditions obtained from experiments were pH 7.75, temperature (7) 48.77 ℃, and enzyme-to-substrate ratio ([E]/[S]) 3.50%. The analysis of variance in RSM showed that pH and [E]/[S] were important factors that significantly affected the process (P3000 Da, 1000 Da

  7. Molecular characterization of aspartylglucosaminidase, a lysosomal hydrolase upregulated during strobilation in the moon jellyfish, Aurelia aurita.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsujita, Natsumi; Kuwahara, Hiroyuki; Koyama, Hiroki; Yanaka, Noriyuki; Arakawa, Kenji; Kuniyoshi, Hisato

    2017-05-01

    The life cycle of the moon jellyfish, Aurelia aurita, alternates between a benthic asexual polyp stage and a planktonic sexual medusa (jellyfish) stage. Transition from polyp to medusa is called strobilation. To investigate the molecular mechanisms of strobilation, we screened for genes that are upregulated during strobilation using the differential display method and we identified aspartylglucosaminidase (AGA), which encodes a lysosomal hydrolase. Similar to AGAs from other species, Aurelia AGA possessed an N-terminal signal peptide and potential N-glycosylation sites. The genomic region of Aurelia AGA was approximately 9.8 kb in length and contained 12 exons and 11 introns. Quantitative RT-PCR analysis revealed that AGA expression increased during strobilation, and was then decreased in medusae. To inhibit AGA function, we administered the lysosomal acidification inhibitors, chloroquine or bafilomycin A1, to animals during strobilation. Both inhibitors disturbed medusa morphogenesis at the oral end, suggesting involvement of lysosomal hydrolases in strobilation.

  8. Symmetrization in jellyfish: reorganization to regain function, and not lost parts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abrams, Michael J; Goentoro, Lea

    2016-02-01

    We recently reported a previously unidentified strategy of self-repair in the moon jellyfish Aurelia aurita. Rather than regenerating lost parts, juvenile Aurelia reorganize remaining parts to regain essential body symmetry. This process that we called symmetrization is rapid and frequent, and is not driven by cell proliferation or cell death. Instead, the swimming machinery generates mechanical forces that drive symmetrization. We found evidence for symmetrization across three other species of jellyfish (Chrysaora pacifica, Mastigias sp., and Cotylorhiza tuberculata). We propose reorganization to regain function without recovery of initial morphology as a potentially broad class of self-repair strategy beyond radially symmetrical animals, and discuss the implications of this finding on the evolution of self-repair strategies in animals.

  9. Pentaplex PCR as screening assay for jellyfish species identification in food products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armani, Andrea; Giusti, Alice; Castigliego, Lorenzo; Rossi, Aurelio; Tinacci, Lara; Gianfaldoni, Daniela; Guidi, Alessandra

    2014-12-17

    Salted jellyfish, a traditional food in Asian Countries, is nowadays spreading on the Western markets. In this work, we developed a Pentaplex PCR for the identification of five edible species (Nemopilema nomurai, Rhopilema esculentum, Rhizostoma pulmo, Pelagia noctiluca, and Cotylorhiza tuberculata), which cannot be identified by a mere visual inspection in jellyfish products sold as food. A common degenerated forward primer and five specie-specific reverse primers were designed to amplify COI gene regions of different lengths. Another primer pair targeted the 28SrRNA gene and was intended as common positive reaction control. Considering the high level of degradation in the DNA extracted from acidified and salted products, the maximum length of the amplicons was set at 200 bp. The PCR was developed using 66 reference DNA samples. It gave successful amplifications in 85.4% of 48 ready to eat products (REs) and in 60% of 30 classical salted products (CPs) collected on the market.

  10. The effects of antivenom and verapamil on the haemodynamic actions of Chironex fleckeri (box jellyfish) venom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tibballs, J; Williams, D; Sutherland, S K

    1998-02-01

    The efficacy of antivenom and verapamil against Chironex fleckeri (box jellyfish) venom was investigated in monitored mechanically ventilated piglets. Chironex fleckeri tentacle extract alone, a mixture of tentacle extract with antivenom, and verapamil before tentacle extract were administered intravenously to groups of animals. Tentacle extract caused severe systemic hypotension, cardiac dysrrhythmias, pulmonary hypertension, haemolysis and hyperkalaemia. These effects were prevented by pre-incubation of tentacle extract with antivenom. Verapamil did not prevent any effect of venom, exacerbated cardiovascular collapse and increased mortality. We conclude that antivenom neutralizes the cardiovascular, haemolytic and hyperkalaemic effects of box jellyfish venom. Verapamil does not prevent any of these effects and is contra-indicated for treatment of envenomation.

  11. Jellyfish aggregations and leatherback turtle foraging patterns in a temperate coastal environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houghton, Jonathan D R; Doyle, Thomas K; Wilson, Mark W; Davenport, John; Hays, Graeme C

    2006-08-01

    Leatherback turtles (Dermochelys coriacea) are obligate predators of gelatinous zooplankton. However, the spatial relationship between predator and prey remains poorly understood beyond sporadic and localized reports. To examine how jellyfish (Phylum Cnidaria: Orders Semaeostomeae and Rhizostomeae) might drive the broad-scale distribution of this wide ranging species, we employed aerial surveys to map jellyfish throughout a temperate coastal shelf area bordering the northeast Atlantic. Previously unknown, consistent aggregations of Rhizostoma octopus extending over tens of square kilometers were identified in distinct coastal "hotspots" during consecutive years (2003-2005). Examination of retrospective sightings data (>50 yr) suggested that 22.5% of leatherback distribution could be explained by these hotspots, with the inference that these coastal features may be sufficiently consistent in space and time to drive long-term foraging associations.

  12. [Marine envenomation by box-jellyfish in a tourist in Cambodia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellaud, G; Epelboin, L; Henn, A; Perignon, A; Bricaire, F; Caumes, E

    2013-10-01

    We report a case of box-jellyfish related envenomation in a 40 year old tourist that occurred in Sihanoukville, Cambodia, in the Gulf of Thailand. Symptoms that appeared within a few minutes associated intense pain, hand edema and large edematous and erythematous flagellations in the stung skin areas. Antibiotics and corticosteroids were delivered. Inflammatory signs and skin lesions disappeared within 15 days followed by crusts then scars. Jellyfish at risk for humans are generally found in tropical seas and their geographic distribution seems to spread. As it is difficult to prevent this kind of accident, travelers should be aware of the first acts to perform, such as appropriate cleaning of the wound, the interest of vinegar usage, the administration of analgesics and corticosteroids in case of significant inflammatory signs.

  13. Acute management of serious envenomation by box-jellyfish (Chironex fleckeri).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williamson, J A; Le Ray, L E; Wohlfahrt, M; Fenner, P J

    Two cases of serious envenomation by the northern Australian box-jellyfish (Chironex fleckeri) are reported. The first-aid measures and the subsequent management and follow-up of patients are discussed. In addition to its known life-saving effects, the early administration of the specific antivenom appears to be the best treatment for the savage pain of the sting, and may also result in a reduction of subsequent skin scarring.

  14. A Novel Metric For Detection of Jellyfish Reorder Attack on Ad Hoc Network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. B. Jayasingh

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Ad Hoc networks are susceptible to many attacks due to its unique characteristics such as open network architecture, stringent resource constraints, shared wireless medium and highly dynamic topology. The attacks can be of different types out of which denial of service is one of the most difficult attacks to detect and defend. Jellyfish is a new denial of service attack that exploits the end to end congestion control mechanism of TCP (Transmission Control Protocol which has a very devastating effect on the throughput. The architecture for detection of such attack should be both distributed and cooperative to suit the needs of wireless ad-hoc networks that is every node in the wireless ad-hoc network should participate in the intrusion detection. We intend to develop an algorithm that detects the jellyfish attack at a single node and that can be effectively deployed at all other nodes in the ad hoc network. We propose the novel metric that detects the Jellyfish reorder attack based on the Reorder Density which is a basis for developing a metric. The comparison table shows the effectiveness of novel metric, it also helps protocol designers to develop the counter strategies for the attack.

  15. To Pee, or Not to Pee: A Review on Envenomation and Treatment in European Jellyfish Species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Louise Montgomery

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available There is a growing cause for concern on envenoming European species because of jellyfish blooms, climate change and globalization displacing species. Treatment of envenomation involves the prevention of further nematocyst release and relieving local and systemic symptoms. Many anecdotal treatments are available but species-specific first aid response is essential for effective treatment. However, species identification is difficult in most cases. There is evidence that oral analgesics, seawater, baking soda slurry and 42–45 °C hot water are effective against nematocyst inhibition and giving pain relief. The application of topical vinegar for 30 s is effective on stings of specific species. Treatments, which produce osmotic or pressure changes can exacerbate the initial sting and aggravate symptoms, common among many anecdotal treatments. Most available therapies are based on weak evidence and thus it is strongly recommended that randomized clinical trials are undertaken. We recommend a vital increase in directed research on the effect of environmental factors on envenoming mechanisms and to establish a species-specific treatment. Adequate signage on jellyfish stings and standardized first aid protocols with emphasis on protective equipment and avoidance of jellyfish to minimize cases should be implemented in areas at risk.

  16. To Pee, or Not to Pee: A Review on Envenomation and Treatment in European Jellyfish Species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montgomery, Louise; Seys, Jan; Mees, Jan

    2016-07-08

    There is a growing cause for concern on envenoming European species because of jellyfish blooms, climate change and globalization displacing species. Treatment of envenomation involves the prevention of further nematocyst release and relieving local and systemic symptoms. Many anecdotal treatments are available but species-specific first aid response is essential for effective treatment. However, species identification is difficult in most cases. There is evidence that oral analgesics, seawater, baking soda slurry and 42-45 °C hot water are effective against nematocyst inhibition and giving pain relief. The application of topical vinegar for 30 s is effective on stings of specific species. Treatments, which produce osmotic or pressure changes can exacerbate the initial sting and aggravate symptoms, common among many anecdotal treatments. Most available therapies are based on weak evidence and thus it is strongly recommended that randomized clinical trials are undertaken. We recommend a vital increase in directed research on the effect of environmental factors on envenoming mechanisms and to establish a species-specific treatment. Adequate signage on jellyfish stings and standardized first aid protocols with emphasis on protective equipment and avoidance of jellyfish to minimize cases should be implemented in areas at risk.

  17. A biomimetic robotic jellyfish (Robojelly) actuated by shape memory alloy composite actuators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villanueva, Alex; Smith, Colin; Priya, Shashank

    2011-09-01

    An analysis is conducted on the design, fabrication and performance of an underwater vehicle mimicking the propulsion mechanism and physical appearance of a medusa (jellyfish). The robotic jellyfish called Robojelly mimics the morphology and kinematics of the Aurelia aurita species. Robojelly actuates using bio-inspired shape memory alloy composite actuators. A systematic fabrication technique was developed to replicate the essential structural features of A. aurita. Robojelly's body was fabricated from RTV silicone having a total mass of 242 g and bell diameter of 164 mm. Robojelly was able to generate enough thrust in static water conditions to propel itself and achieve a proficiency of 0.19 s(-1) while the A. aurita achieves a proficiency of around 0.25 s(-1). A thrust analysis based on empirical measurements for a natural jellyfish was used to compare the performance of the different robotic configurations. The configuration with best performance was a Robojelly with segmented bell and a passive flap structure. Robojelly was found to consume an average power on the order of 17 W with the actuators not having fully reached a thermal steady state.

  18. Structural and physical properties of collagen extracted from moon jellyfish under neutral pH conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miki, Ayako; Inaba, Satomi; Baba, Takayuki; Kihira, Koji; Fukada, Harumi; Oda, Masayuki

    2015-01-01

    We extracted collagen from moon jellyfish under neutral pH conditions and analyzed its amino acid composition, secondary structure, and thermal stability. The content of hydroxyproline was 4.3%, which is lower than that of other collagens. Secondary structure analysis using circular dichroism (CD) showed a typical collagen helix. The thermal stability of this collagen at pH 3.0 was lower than those from fish scale and pig skin, which also correlates closely with jellyfish collagen having lower hydroxyproline content. Because the solubility of jellyfish collagen used in this study at neutral pH was quite high, it was possible to analyze its structural and physical properties under physiological conditions. Thermodynamic analysis using CD and differential scanning calorimetry showed that the thermal stability at pH 7.5 was higher than at pH 3.0, possibly due to electrostatic interactions. During the process of unfolding, fibrillation would occur only at neutral pH.

  19. The in vivo cardiovascular effects of an Australasian box jellyfish (Chiropsalmus sp.) venom in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramasamy, Sharmaine; Isbister, Geoffrey K; Seymour, Jamie E; Hodgson, Wayne C

    2005-03-01

    Using a new technique to extract venom from the nematocysts of jellyfish, the in vivo cardiovascular effects of Chiropsalmus sp. venom were investigated in anaesthetized rats. Chiropsalmus sp. venom (150 microg/kg, i.v.) produced a transient hypertensive response (44+/-4 mmHg; n=6) followed by hypotension and cardiovascular collapse. Concurrent artificial respiration or pretreatment with Chironex fleckeri antivenom (AV, 3000 U/kg, i.v.) did not have any effect on the venom-induced hypertensive response nor the subsequent cardiovascular collapse. The cardiovascular response of animals receiving venom after the infusion of MgSO4 (50-70 mM @ 0.25 ml/min, i.v.; n=5) alone, or in combination with AV (n=5), was not significantly different from rats receiving venom alone. Prior administration of prazosin (50 microg/kg, i.v.; n=4) or ketanserin (1 mg/kg, i.v.; n=4) did not significantly attenuate the hypertensive response nor prevent the cardiovascular collapse induced by venom (50 microg/kg, i.v.). In contrast to previous work examining C. fleckeri venom, administration of AV alone, or in combination with MgSO4, was not effective in preventing cardiovascular collapse following the administration of Chiropsalmus sp. venom. This indicates that the venom of the two related box jellyfish contain different lethal components and highlights the importance of species identification prior to initiating treatment regimes following jellyfish envenoming.

  20. Beyond the average: Diverse individual migration patterns in a population of mesopelagic jellyfish

    KAUST Repository

    Kaartvedt, Stein

    2011-11-01

    We examined the diel behavior among the jellyfish Periphylla periphylla in Lurefjorden, Norway in a sampling campaign and by a > 3-month continuous acoustic study. Jellyfish distribution and behavior were recorded by an upward-facing, bottom-mounted echo sounder at 280-m depth. The population was typically divided into four groups, each with different behavior. Individuals of behavioral Mode 1 undertook synchronous diel vertical migrations (DVM) within the upper 100 m. Individuals of behavioral Mode 2, stayed at ~ 160-200-m depth during the day, and also exhibited synchronized DVM, ascending at dusk and descending at dawn. The smaller individuals of behavioral Mode 3 swam continuously up and down throughout both day and night, yet occurred below Mode 2 individuals in daytime (~ 200 m-bottom), while their vertical range encompassed the entire water column during night. Mode 4 behavior was displayed by large jellyfish located between ~ 130 m and the bottom. These animals shifted between remaining motionless and relocating in rapid steps during both day and night. These four main behavioral patterns persisted throughout the registration period, although the synchronously migrating Mode 2 behavior became weaker in spring. This acoustic study has unveiled more diverse migration behaviors than previously derived from net sampling and remote-operated vehicles methods and emphasizes the importance of studying individuals. DVM is complex because individuals in a plankton population may simultaneously engage in a range of various contrasting behaviors.

  1. A biomimetic robotic jellyfish (Robojelly) actuated by shape memory alloy composite actuators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Villanueva, Alex; Smith, Colin; Priya, Shashank, E-mail: spriya@vt.edu [Center for Intelligent Material Systems and Structures (CIMSS), Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, VA 24061 (United States)

    2011-09-15

    An analysis is conducted on the design, fabrication and performance of an underwater vehicle mimicking the propulsion mechanism and physical appearance of a medusa (jellyfish). The robotic jellyfish called Robojelly mimics the morphology and kinematics of the Aurelia aurita species. Robojelly actuates using bio-inspired shape memory alloy composite actuators. A systematic fabrication technique was developed to replicate the essential structural features of A. aurita. Robojelly's body was fabricated from RTV silicone having a total mass of 242 g and bell diameter of 164 mm. Robojelly was able to generate enough thrust in static water conditions to propel itself and achieve a proficiency of 0.19 s{sup -1} while the A. aurita achieves a proficiency of around 0.25 s{sup -1}. A thrust analysis based on empirical measurements for a natural jellyfish was used to compare the performance of the different robotic configurations. The configuration with best performance was a Robojelly with segmented bell and a passive flap structure. Robojelly was found to consume an average power on the order of 17 W with the actuators not having fully reached a thermal steady state.

  2. Spatial distribution and dietary overlap between Japanese anchovy Engraulis japonicus and moon jellyfish Aurelia aurita in the Seto Inland Sea, Japan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun Shoji

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Biological and physical surveys were conducted in order to investigate the relationship between environmental conditions and the distribution of ichthyoplankton and jellyfish, and dietary overlap between the ichthyoplankton and jellyfish in the Seto Inland Sea (SIS, Japan. Ichthyoplankton, copepods, and jellyfish were collected during two cruises in July 2005 in the Sea of Hiuchi and in July 2006 in Hiroshima Bay within the SIS. Sea surface temperature (˚C, salinity, bottom-layer dissolved oxygen (mg l-1 and the abundance (no. m-2 of fish eggs and larvae were significantly higher in the Sea of Hiuchi. Japanese anchovy was most dominant (69.3% in number of eggs and 52.3% in number of larvae among the ichthyoplankton. Mean jellyfish biomass (g m-2 in Hiroshima Bay was significantly higher (50-folds than that in the Sea of Hiuchi. Moon jellyfish was the most dominant among the jellyfish collected, accounting for 85.6% in wet weight. Surface temperature had a significant effect on fish egg and larval distribution: abundance of fish eggs and larvae increased with increasing temperature. Jellyfish abundance was negatively correlated with the bottom-layer oxygen concentration. Stable isotope analysis indicated dietary overlap between the Japanese anchovy and the moon jellyfish in Hiroshima Bay.

  3. Where are the polyps? Molecular identification, distribution and population differentiation of Aurelia aurita jellyfish polyps in the southern North Sea area

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Walraven, van L.; Driessen, F.; Bleijswijk, van J.; Bol, A.; Luttikhuizen, P.; Coolen, J.W.P.; Bos, Oscar; Gittenberger, A.; Schrieken, N.; Langenberg, V.T.; Veer, van der H.W.

    2016-01-01

    For many species of metagenic jellyfish the location of the benthic polyps is unknown. To gain insight in the distribution, species composition and population structure of scyphozoan jellyfish polyps in the southern North Sea area, polyp samples were collected from natural and artificial substrates

  4. Signatures of active and passive optimized Lévy searching in jellyfish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynolds, Andy M

    2014-10-06

    Some of the strongest empirical support for Lévy search theory has come from telemetry data for the dive patterns of marine predators (sharks, bony fishes, sea turtles and penguins). The dive patterns of the unusually large jellyfish Rhizostoma octopus do, however, sit outside of current Lévy search theory which predicts that a single search strategy is optimal. When searching the water column, the movement patterns of these jellyfish change over time. Movement bouts can be approximated by a variety of Lévy and Brownian (exponential) walks. The adaptive value of this variation is not known. On some occasions movement pattern data are consistent with the jellyfish prospecting away from a preferred depth, not finding an improvement in conditions elsewhere and so returning to their original depth. This 'bounce' behaviour also sits outside of current Lévy walk search theory. Here, it is shown that the jellyfish movement patterns are consistent with their using optimized 'fast simulated annealing'--a novel kind of Lévy walk search pattern--to locate the maximum prey concentration in the water column and/or to locate the strongest of many olfactory trails emanating from more distant prey. Fast simulated annealing is a powerful stochastic search algorithm for locating a global maximum that is hidden among many poorer local maxima in a large search space. This new finding shows that the notion of active optimized Lévy walk searching is not limited to the search for randomly and sparsely distributed resources, as previously thought, but can be extended to embrace other scenarios, including that of the jellyfish R. octopus. In the presence of convective currents, it could become energetically favourable to search the water column by riding the convective currents. Here, it is shown that these passive movements can be represented accurately by Lévy walks of the type occasionally seen in R. octopus. This result vividly illustrates that Lévy walks are not necessarily

  5. 水母毒素研究与转化医学%Translational medicine underlying the studies on jellyfish toxins

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    肖良; 王倩倩; 王蓓蕾; 王涛; 张林; 张黎明

    2011-01-01

    Jellyfish stinging is the most common marine life injury, and is increasing corresponding to the explosive growth of jellyfish by the recent changes in the environment. Jellyfish toxins have a variety of toxicities such as cardiovascular, hemolytic, nervous and muscular toxicities. Neither the toxic mechanisms nor the prevention and therapy interventions are clear now. It will greatly raise the level of research on jellyfish toxins by strengthening the intercross between the clinical studies on jellyfish stinging and the basic studies on the action mechanism, purification and identification of toxic components.%水母蜇伤是最常见的海洋生物伤,其发生率随着近年来环境变化引起的水母爆发性增长在不断上升.水母毒素对心血管、血液、神经、肌肉等具有多种生物毒性,其作用机制不明确,水母蜇伤防治也以对症处理为主.注重水母蜇伤临床症状、救治措施与水母毒素纯化鉴定、作用机制之间的相互联系,将加速水母毒素研究的整体推进.

  6. Research and development of jellyfish compaction technology; Kurage gen'yoka shori gijutsu ni kansuru kaihatsu kenkyu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uemura, N. [Kansai Electric Power Co. Inc., Osaka (Japan)

    1999-12-10

    An on-site test is conducted of devices for reducing in a short time the volume of jellyfish that flow into power plants. There are three methods to reduce the volume of jellyfish by separating water from them, which are heating, pressing, and chemical. The chemical treatment is not an object of this test because it is expected that the volume reduction rate by this method will be too low. For the achievement of a reduction rate of 80%, the two methods, physical and crushing, are compared at the laboratory level. It is found that the crushing method is superior because it can dispose of jellyfish in a shorter time. Using this method, the crushed jellyfish is separated into drain and bubbles, the latter containing jellyfish fragments. An on-site test is conducted using a general-purpose crusher. The relationship between the filter diameter (1-5mm) and the separation rate is investigated, and it is found that separation proceeds more rapidly when the filter diameter is smaller. It is found that the addition of a certain chemical accelerates the separation. COD (chemical oxygen demand) is 300-490mg/l in the drain, and BOD (biological oxygen demand) 400-500mg/l, with COD having increased by approximately 20%. A study is scheduled to be conducted using an experimental apparatus. (NEDO)

  7. Jellyfish as prey: frequency of predation and selective foraging of Boops boops (Vertebrata, Actinopterygii on the mauve stinger Pelagia noctiluca (Cnidaria, Scyphozoa.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giacomo Milisenda

    Full Text Available In recent years, jellyfish blooms have attracted considerable scientific interest for their potential impacts on human activities and ecosystem functioning, with much attention paid to jellyfish as predators and to gelatinous biomass as a carbon sink. Other than qualitative data and observations, few studies have quantified direct predation of fish on jellyfish to clarify whether they may represent a seasonally abundant food source. Here we estimate predation frequency by the commercially valuable Mediterranean bogue, Boops boops on the mauve stinger jellyfish, Pelagia noctiluca, in the Strait of Messina (NE Sicily. A total of 1054 jellyfish were sampled throughout one year to quantify predation by B. boops from bite marks on partially eaten jellyfish and energy density of the jellyfish. Predation by B. boops in summer was almost twice that in winter, and they selectively fed according to medusa gender and body part. Calorimetric analysis and biochemical composition showed that female jellyfish gonads had significantly higher energy content than male gonads due to more lipids and that gonads had six-fold higher energy content than the somatic tissues due to higher lipid and protein concentrations. Energetically, jellyfish gonads represent a highly rewarding food source, largely available to B. boops throughout spring and summer. During the remainder of the year, when gonads were not very evident, fish predation switched towards less-selective foraging on the somatic gelatinous biomass. P. noctiluca, the most abundant jellyfish species in the Mediterranean Sea and a key planktonic predator, may represent not only a nuisance for human leisure activities and a source of mortality for fish eggs and larvae, but also an important resource for fish species of commercial value, such as B. boops.

  8. Jellyfish as Prey: Frequency of Predation and Selective Foraging of Boops boops (Vertebrata, Actinopterygii) on the Mauve Stinger Pelagia noctiluca (Cnidaria, Scyphozoa)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuentes, Veronica L.; Boero, Ferdinando; Guglielmo, Letterio; Purcell, Jennifer E.; Piraino, Stefano

    2014-01-01

    In recent years, jellyfish blooms have attracted considerable scientific interest for their potential impacts on human activities and ecosystem functioning, with much attention paid to jellyfish as predators and to gelatinous biomass as a carbon sink. Other than qualitative data and observations, few studies have quantified direct predation of fish on jellyfish to clarify whether they may represent a seasonally abundant food source. Here we estimate predation frequency by the commercially valuable Mediterranean bogue, Boops boops on the mauve stinger jellyfish, Pelagia noctiluca, in the Strait of Messina (NE Sicily). A total of 1054 jellyfish were sampled throughout one year to quantify predation by B. boops from bite marks on partially eaten jellyfish and energy density of the jellyfish. Predation by B. boops in summer was almost twice that in winter, and they selectively fed according to medusa gender and body part. Calorimetric analysis and biochemical composition showed that female jellyfish gonads had significantly higher energy content than male gonads due to more lipids and that gonads had six-fold higher energy content than the somatic tissues due to higher lipid and protein concentrations. Energetically, jellyfish gonads represent a highly rewarding food source, largely available to B. boops throughout spring and summer. During the remainder of the year, when gonads were not very evident, fish predation switched towards less-selective foraging on the somatic gelatinous biomass. P. noctiluca, the most abundant jellyfish species in the Mediterranean Sea and a key planktonic predator, may represent not only a nuisance for human leisure activities and a source of mortality for fish eggs and larvae, but also an important resource for fish species of commercial value, such as B. boops. PMID:24727977

  9. Jellyfish as prey: frequency of predation and selective foraging of Boops boops (Vertebrata, Actinopterygii) on the mauve stinger Pelagia noctiluca (Cnidaria, Scyphozoa).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milisenda, Giacomo; Rosa, Sara; Fuentes, Veronica L; Boero, Ferdinando; Guglielmo, Letterio; Purcell, Jennifer E; Piraino, Stefano

    2014-01-01

    In recent years, jellyfish blooms have attracted considerable scientific interest for their potential impacts on human activities and ecosystem functioning, with much attention paid to jellyfish as predators and to gelatinous biomass as a carbon sink. Other than qualitative data and observations, few studies have quantified direct predation of fish on jellyfish to clarify whether they may represent a seasonally abundant food source. Here we estimate predation frequency by the commercially valuable Mediterranean bogue, Boops boops on the mauve stinger jellyfish, Pelagia noctiluca, in the Strait of Messina (NE Sicily). A total of 1054 jellyfish were sampled throughout one year to quantify predation by B. boops from bite marks on partially eaten jellyfish and energy density of the jellyfish. Predation by B. boops in summer was almost twice that in winter, and they selectively fed according to medusa gender and body part. Calorimetric analysis and biochemical composition showed that female jellyfish gonads had significantly higher energy content than male gonads due to more lipids and that gonads had six-fold higher energy content than the somatic tissues due to higher lipid and protein concentrations. Energetically, jellyfish gonads represent a highly rewarding food source, largely available to B. boops throughout spring and summer. During the remainder of the year, when gonads were not very evident, fish predation switched towards less-selective foraging on the somatic gelatinous biomass. P. noctiluca, the most abundant jellyfish species in the Mediterranean Sea and a key planktonic predator, may represent not only a nuisance for human leisure activities and a source of mortality for fish eggs and larvae, but also an important resource for fish species of commercial value, such as B. boops.

  10. Low-lying level structure of the neutron-rich nucleus {sup 109}Nb: A possible oblate-shape isomer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Watanabe, H., E-mail: hiroshi@ribf.riken.j [RIKEN Nishina Center, 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Sumikama, T. [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science and Technology, Tokyo University of Science, 2641 Yamazaki, Noda, Chiba (Japan); Nishimura, S. [RIKEN Nishina Center, 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Yoshinaga, K. [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science and Technology, Tokyo University of Science, 2641 Yamazaki, Noda, Chiba (Japan); Li, Z. [RIKEN Nishina Center, 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Miyashita, Y. [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science and Technology, Tokyo University of Science, 2641 Yamazaki, Noda, Chiba (Japan); Yamaguchi, K. [Department of Physics, Osaka University, Machikaneyama-machi 1-1, Osaka 560-0043 Toyonaka (Japan); Baba, H. [RIKEN Nishina Center, 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Berryman, J.S. [Nuclear Science Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Blasi, N. [INFN, Sezione di Milano, via Celoria 16, I-20133 Milano (Italy); Bracco, A.; Camera, F. [INFN, Sezione di Milano, via Celoria 16, I-20133 Milano (Italy); Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita di Milano, via Celoria 16, I-20133 Milano (Italy); Chiba, J. [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science and Technology, Tokyo University of Science, 2641 Yamazaki, Noda, Chiba (Japan); Doornenbal, P. [RIKEN Nishina Center, 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Go, S.; Hashimoto, T.; Hayakawa, S. [Center for Nuclear Study, University of Tokyo, Hirosawa 2-1, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Hinke, C. [Physik Department, Technische Universitaet Muenchen, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Ideguchi, E. [Center for Nuclear Study, University of Tokyo, Hirosawa 2-1, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Isobe, T. [RIKEN Nishina Center, 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan)

    2011-01-31

    The neutron-rich nuclei {sup 109}Nb and {sup 109}Zr have been populated using in-flight fission of a {sup 238}U beam at 345 MeV/nucleon at the RIBF facility. A T{sub 1/2}=150(30) ns isomer at 313 keV has been identified in {sup 109}Nb for the first time. The low-lying levels in {sup 109}Nb have been also populated following the {beta}-decay of {sup 109}Zr. Based on the difference in feeding pattern between the isomeric and {beta} decays, the decay scheme from the isomeric state in {sup 109}Nb was established. The observed hindrances of the electromagnetic transitions deexciting the isomeric state are discussed in terms of possible shape coexistence. Potential energy surface calculations for single-proton configurations predict the presence of low-lying oblate-deformed states in {sup 109}Nb.

  11. Stability of oblate shapes in the vicinity of N= Z = 34 {sup 68}Se : bands in {sup 69}Se and {sup 67}As.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jenkins, D. G.; Balamuth, D. P.; Carpenter, M. P.; Lister, C. J.; Fischer, S. M.; Clark, R. M.; Macchiavelli, A. O.; Fallon, P.; Svensson, C. E.; Kelsall, N. S.; Wadsworth, R.; Physics; Univ. of Pennsylvania; De Paul Univ.; LBNL; Univ. of York

    2001-12-01

    The {gamma}-ray decay schemes of {sup 69}Se and {sup 67}As have been considerably extended using the {sup 40}Ca({sup 32}S,2pn){sup 69}Se and {sup 40}Ca({sup 32}S,{alpha}p){sup 67}As reactions at 100 MeV and {sup 40}Ca({sup 36}Ar,{alpha}2pn){sup 69}Se and {sup 40}Ca({sup 36}Ar,2{alpha}p){sup 67}As reactions at 145 MeV, with the aim of studying oblate bands arising from the strong coupling of a valence g9/2 particle (or hole) to the oblate deformed ground state band of {sup 68}Se. A new T{sub 1/2}=12{+-}2 ns J{sup {pi}}=9/2+ isomeric bandhead was identified in {sup 67}As. A transitional quadrupole moment of Q{sub 0}=-2.7(6) eb was deduced for the band built on the 9/2{sup +} isomer in {sup 69}Se, corresponding to a rigid oblate deformation of {beta}{sub 2}=-0.4(1), consistent with theoretical predictions. However, it appears that the relevant oblate configurations in {sup 69}Se and {sup 67}As are not nearly so favored as they are in {sup 68}Se, and are rapidly crossed by prolate configurations that form the high spin yrast lines.

  12. Effects of Collagen and Collagen Hydrolysate from Jellyfish Umbrella on Histological and Immunity Changes of Mice Photoaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yongliang Zhuang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Jellyfish collagen (JC was extracted from jellyfish umbrella and hydrolyzed to prepare jellyfish collagen hydrolysate (JCH. The effects of JC and JCH on UV-induced skin damage of mice were evaluated by the skin moisture, microscopic analyses of skin and immunity indexes. The skin moisture analyses showed that moisture retention ability of UV-induced mice skin was increased by JC and JCH. Further histological analysis showed that JC and JCH could repair the endogenous collagen and elastin protein fibers, and could maintain the natural ratio of type I to type III collagen. The immunity indexes showed that JC and JCH play a role in enhancing immunity of photoaging mice in vivo. JCH showed much higher protective ability than JC. These results suggest that JCH as a potential novel antiphotoaging agent from natural resources.

  13. Development studies of Aurelia (Jellyfish) ephyrae which developed during the SLS-1 mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spangenberg, D. B.; Jernigan, T.; McCombs, R.; Lowe, B. T.; Sampson, M.; Slusser, J.

    1994-08-01

    Aurelia polyps (scyphistomae) and ephyrae were exposed to microgravity for nine days aboard the space shuttle during the SLS-1 mission. During strobilation, polyps segment transversely and each segment develops into an ephyra. Polyps were induced to strobilate at 28°C, using iodine or thyroxine, at L(Launch)-48h, L-24h, and L+8h. Ephyrae developed in the groups tested in space and on Earth. The number of ephyrae formed per polyp was slightly higher in the L+8h groups as compared with those induced at L-24h and L-48h. On Earth, iodine is used by jellyfish to synthesize jellyfish-thyroxine (JfT 4), needed for ephyra production. Since iodine-treated polyps strobilated and formed ephyrae in space, it appears that jellyfish can synthesize Jf-T4 in space. Indeed, two groups of polyps not given inducer formed ephryae in space, presumably due to enhanced Jf-T4 synthesis, utilization or accumulation. Some ephyrae that formed in space were also fixed in space on Mission Day (MD) 8; others were fixed post-flight. Examination of living ephyrae with the light microscope and fixed ones with the Scanning and Transmission Electron Microscopes revealed that those which developed in space were morphologically very similar to those which developed on Earth. Quantitation of arm numbers determined that there were no significant differences between space and Earth-developed ephyrae. Pulsing abnormalities, however, were found in greater numbers (18.3%) in space-developed ephyrae than in Earth-developed controls (2.9%). These abnormalities suggest abnormal development of the graviceptors, the neuromuscular system, or a defect in the integration between these systems in apparently microgravity-sensitive animals.

  14. Jellyfish and Ctenophores in Limfjorden (Denmark—Mini-Review, with Recent New Observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hans Ulrik Riisgård

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Limfjorden is a major Danish water system that connects the North Sea via Thyborøn Kanal in the west and to the Kattegat in the east. Limfjorden is heavily eutrophicated and certain areas suffer from oxygen depletion each summer. Bottom-dwelling fish have disappeared as the number of jellyfish and ctenophores has increased. The abundance and predation impact of jellyfish and ctenophores in Limfjorden have been described in a number of studies conducted during the last decade, and a mini-review of this literature is given here in Section 2. The common jellyfish Aurelia aurita may, in a few years, be very abundant and exert a considerable predatory impact on zooplankton and fish larvae. Abundance, species composition, and population dynamics of A. aurita may, at irregular time intervals, be strongly influenced not only by the water brought into Limfjorden from the North Sea, but also by competition with the invasive ctenophore Mnemiopsis leidyi that occurred for the first time in extremely high numbers in 2007, brought into the fjord system with North Sea water. It has been suggested that Limfjorden may function as an incubator for M. leidyi with the potential to further seed M. leidyi into the Kattegat and adjacent Danish waters, and recent observations seem to support this hypothesis. In Section 3, we report on two bloom events of ctenophores, Pleurobrachia pileus and M. leidyi, along with their predators (Beroe spp. in Limfjorden in the autumns of 2012 and 2013, when the usually dominating A. aurita was absent. However, the present observation of B. ovata being M. leidyi’s native predator and a new species in Limfjorden may in the future reduce the abundance of M. leidyi.

  15. Jellyfish life histories: role of polyps in forming and maintaining scyphomedusa populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucas, Cathy H; Graham, William M; Widmer, Chad

    2012-01-01

    Large population fluctuations of jellyfish occur over a variety of temporal scales, from weekly to seasonal, inter-annual and even decadal, with some regions of the world reported to be experiencing persistent seasonal bloom events. Recent jellyfish research has focussed on understanding the causes and consequences of these population changes, with the vast majority of studies considering the effect of changing environmental variables only on the pelagic medusa. But many of the bloom-forming species are members of the Scyphozoa with complex metagenic life cycles consisting of a sexually reproducing pelagic medusa and asexually reproducing benthic polyp. Recruitment success during the juvenile (planula, polyp and ephyrae) stages of the life cycle can have a major effect on the abundance of the adult (medusa) population, but until very recently, little was known about the ecology of the polyp or scyphistoma phase of the scyphozoan life cycle. The aim of this review is to synthesise the current state of knowledge of polyp ecology by examining (1) the recruitment and metamorphosis of planulae larvae into polyps, (2) survival and longevity of polyps, (3) expansion of polyp populations via asexual propagation and (4) strobilation and recruitment of ephyrae (juvenile medusae). Where possible, comparisons are made with the life histories of other bentho-pelagic marine invertebrates so that further inferences can be made. Differences between tropical and temperate species are highlighted and related to climate change, and populations of the same species (in particular Aurelia aurita) inhabiting different habitats within its geographic range are compared. The roles that polyps play in ensuring the long-term survival of jellyfish populations as well as in the formation of bloom populations are considered, and recommendations for future research are presented.

  16. An in vivo examination of the stability of venom from the Australian box jellyfish Chironex fleckeri.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winter, K L; Isbister, G K; Seymour, J E; Hodgson, W C

    2007-05-01

    We have previously characterised the pharmacological activity of a number of jellyfish venoms with a particular emphasis on the profound cardiovascular effects. It has been suggested that jellyfish venoms are difficult to work with and are sensitive to pH, temperature and chemical changes. The current study aimed to examine the working parameters of the venom of the Australian box jellyfish Chironex fleckeri to enable fractionation and isolation of the toxins with cardiovascular activity. C. fleckeri venom was made up fresh each day and subjected to a number of different environments (i.e. a pH range of 5-9 and a temperature range of 4-30 degrees C). In addition, the effect of freeze drying and reconstituting the venom was investigated. Venom (50 microg/kg, i.v.) produced a transient hypertensive response followed by cardiovascular collapse in anaesthetised rats. This biphasic response was not significantly effected by preparation of the venom at a pH of 5, 7 or 9. Similarly, venom (50 microg/kg, i.v.) did not display a loss of activity when exposed to temperatures of 4, 20 or 30 degrees C for 1.5h. However, the cardiovascular activity was abolished by boiling the venom. Freeze drying, and then reconstituting, the venom did not significantly affect its cardiovascular activity. However, repeated freeze drying and reconstituting of extracted venom resulted in a significantly loss of activity. This study provides a more detailed knowledge of the parameters in which C. fleckeri venom can be used and, while supporting some previous studies, contradicts some of the perceived problems of working with the venom.

  17. Complete mitochondrial genome of the moon jellyfish, Aurelia sp. nov. (Cnidaria, Scyphozoa).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Dae-Sik; Park, Eunji; Won, Yong-Jin; Lee, Jae-Seong

    2014-02-01

    We sequenced 16,971 bp of the linear mitochondrial DNA of the moon jellyfish Aurelia sp. nov. and characterized it by comparing with Aurelia aurita. They had 13 protein-coding genes (PCGs), 16S rRNA and 12S rRNA with three tRNAs (tRNA-Leu, tRNA-Ser(TGA), tRNA-Met). Both have another two PCGs, orf969 and orf324 with telomeres at both ends. After comparison of Aurelia sp. nov. with Aurelia aurita, we found low-protein similarity of orf969 (59%) and orf324 (75%), respectively, while the other 13 PCGs showed 80% to 98% protein similarities.

  18. Nemopilema nomurai Jellyfish venom treatment leads to alterations in rat cardiomyocytes proteome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Indu Choudhary

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available This data article restrains data associated to the Choudhary et al. [1]. Nemopilema nomurai Jellyfish venom (NnV can lead to cardiac toxicity. Here we analyzed the effect of NnV on rat cardiomyocytes cell line H9c2 at the proteome level using two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF/MS. This analysis resulted in 34 proteins with differential expression. Here we provide the dataset for the proteins with amplified or reduced level as compare to control.

  19. Monoclonal antibodies neutralizing the haemolytic activity of box jellyfish (Chironex fleckeri) tentacle extracts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, S P; Comis, A; Marshall, M; Hartwick, R F; Howden, M E

    1993-09-01

    1. Three monoclonal antibodies have been produced which neutralize in vitro the haemolytic activity present in tentacle extracts of the box jellyfish (Chironex fleckeri). 2. Two of these monoclonal antibodies bound specifically to a component of relative molecular mass 50,000 in tentacle extract on Western blots. 3. This binding only occurred when the extracts were electrophoresed under non-reducing conditions. 4. The third monoclonal antibody did not display binding to Western blots of tentacle extract under any of our experimental conditions.

  20. Stabilization of lethal and hemolytic activities of box jellyfish (Chironex fleckeri) venom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Comis, A; Hartwick, R F; Howden, M E

    1989-01-01

    The stability of both the lethal and hemolytic activities of box jellyfish (Chironex fleckeri) tentacle extract was assessed after various extraction procedures. Both activities were higher when no buffers or water were used during the initial extraction. Also, when the extract was first filtered through a Sep-pak C18 cartridge, the residual lethal titre, after incubation for 24 hr at room temperature, was increased 16-fold and hemolysis was increased 2.6-fold. Evidence for proteolytic activity in the extract was also obtained and monitored by size exclusion HPLC.

  1. Jellyfish (Chrysaora lactea, Cnidaria, Semaeostomeae aggregations in southern Brazil and consequences of stings in humans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio C Marques

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The frequency of jellyfish blooms is generating a world-wide discussion about medusae population explosions, mainly those associated with stings. We report over 20,000 envenomations caused by Chrysaora lactea (Scyphozoa in the State of Paraná (southern Brazil during the austral summer of 2011 -2012. Envenomations were considered mild, but almost 600 cases were treated in emergency services, with either toxic and allergic reactions, some with systemic manifestations. We proposed non-exclusive hypotheses to explain this large number of cases.

  2. Indomethacin induction of metamorphosis from the asexual stage to sexual stage in the moon jellyfish, Aurelia aurita.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuniyoshi, Hisato; Okumura, Izumi; Kuroda, Rie; Tsujita, Natsumi; Arakawa, Kenji; Shoji, Jun; Saito, Tamio; Osada, Hiroyuki

    2012-01-01

    We found while screening a chemical library that indomethacin, an inhibitor of prostaglandin biosynthesis, induced strobilation (metamorphosis from the asexual to sexual stage) in the moon jellyfish, Aurelia aurita. Indomethacin initiated strobilation in a dose-dependent manner, but was not involved in the progression of strobilation. Pharmacological experiments suggested that indomethacin could induce strobilation independently of prostaglandin biosynthesis.

  3. Relationship between bacteria and phytoplankton during the giant jellyfish Nemopilema nomurai bloom in an oligotrophic temperate marine ecosystem

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZENG Yang; HUANG Xuguang; HUANG Bangqin; MI Tiezhu

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial abundance, phytoplankton community structure and environmental parameters were investigated to study the relationships between bacteria and phytoplankton during giant jellyfish Nemopilema nomurai blooms in the central Yellow Sea during 2013. N. nomurai appeared in June, increased in August, reached a peak and began to degrade in September 2013. Results showed that phosphate was possible a key nutrient for both phytoplankton and bacteria in June, but it changed to nitrate in August and September. Phytoplankton composition significantly changed that pico-phytoplankton relative biomass significantly increased, whereas other size phytoplankton significantly decreased during jellyfish bloom. In June, a significantly positive correlation was observed between chlorophyll a concentration and bacterial abundance (r=0.67, P0.05, n=25), but the relationship (r=0.71, P<0.001, n=31) was rebuilt with jellyfish degradation in September. In August, small size phytoplankton occupied the mixed layer in offshore stations, while bacteria almost distributed evenly in vertical. Chlorophyll a concentration significantly increased from (0.42±0.056) μg/L in June to (0.74±0.174) μg/L in August , while bacterial abundance just slightly increased. Additionally, the negative net community production indicated that community respiration was not entirely determined by the local primary productivity in August. These results indicated that jellyfish blooms potentially affect coupling of phytoplankton and bacteria in marine ecosystems.

  4. Isolation and in vitro partial characterization of hemolytic proteins from the nematocyst venom of the jellyfish Stomolophus meleagris.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Rongfeng; Yu, Huahua; Xing, Ronge; Liu, Song; Qing, Yukun; Li, Kecheng; Li, Bing; Meng, Xiangtao; Cui, Jinhui; Li, Pengcheng

    2013-09-01

    Jellyfish venom contains various toxins and can cause itching, edema, muscle aches, shortness of breath, blood pressure depression, shock or even death after being stung. Hemolytic protein is one of the most hazardous components in the venom. The present study investigated the hemolytic activity of the nematocyst venom from jellyfish Stomolophus meleagris. Anion exchange chromatography, DEAE Sepharose Fast Flow, and gel filtration chromatography, Superdex200 had been employed to isolate hemolytic proteins from the nematocyst venom of jellyfish S. meleagris. Hemolysis of chicken red blood cells was used to quantify hemolytic potency of crude nematocyst venom and chromatography fractions during the purification process. Native-PAGE profile displayed one protein band in the purified hemolytic protein (SmTX); however, two protein bands with apparent molecular weights of ≈ 45 kDa and 52 kDa were observed in the reducing SDS-PAGE analysis. Approximately 70 μg/mL of SmTX caused 50% hemolysis (HU50) of the erythrocyte suspension. The hemolytic activity of SmTX was shown to be temperature and pH dependent, with the optimum temperature and pH being 37°C and pH 5.0. The present study is the first report of isolation and partial characterization of hemolytic proteins from the nematocyst venom of the jellyfish S. meleagris. The mechanism of the hemolytic activity of SmTX is not clear and deserves further investigation.

  5. Is it possible to determine the economic impact of jellyfish outbreaks on fisheries? A Case Study – Slovenia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. NASTAV

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The interdependence between the economy and the environment is becoming a fact of increasing importance. Productive coastal areas have been recognised as one of the most valuable ecosystems from an ecological and socio-economic point of view. In this paper we focus on the massive presence of jellyfish in the northern Adriatic and their effect on the Slovenian economy. Our results indicate that high jellyfish abundance in 2004 resulted in a reduction of fish catch, value added, gross income, and employment in the fishing industry. Moreover, the government and the EU have acknowledged the impact of jellyfish on the fishing industry by allocating financial help to the fishermen involved. We attempted to assess other factors influencing the fishing industry but none were statistically significant. The input-output analysis has not revealed a significant impact on the entire Slovenian economy presumably due to the small contribution of the fishing industry to Slovenian GDP. Our work is a first attempt to relate ecological changes such as jellyfish outbreaks in the northern Adriatic to the wider economy and we suggest that such a methodology can be applied to other countries/regions and to other natural phenomena affecting the economy.

  6. Is it possible to determine the economic impact of jellyfish outbreaks on fisheries? A Case Study – Slovenia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. NASTAV

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The interdependence between the economy and the environment is becoming a fact of increasing importance. Productive coastal areas have been recognised as one of the most valuable ecosystems from an ecological and socio-economic point of view. In this paper we focus on the massive presence of jellyfish in the northern Adriatic and their effect on the Slovenian economy. Our results indicate that high jellyfish abundance in 2004 resulted in a reduction of fish catch, value added, gross income, and employment in the fishing industry. Moreover, the government and the EU have acknowledged the impact of jellyfish on the fishing industry by allocating financial help to the fishermen involved. We attempted to assess other factors influencing the fishing industry but none were statistically significant. The input-output analysis has not revealed a significant impact on the entire Slovenian economy presumably due to the small contribution of the fishing industry to Slovenian GDP. Our work is a first attempt to relate ecological changes such as jellyfish outbreaks in the northern Adriatic to the wider economy and we suggest that such a methodology can be applied to other countries/regions and to other natural phenomena affecting the economy.

  7. Structural and Developmental Disparity in the Tentacles of the Moon Jellyfish Aurelia sp.1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gold, David A; Nakanishi, Nagayasu; Hensley, Nicholai M; Cozzolino, Kira; Tabatabaee, Mariam; Martin, Michelle; Hartenstein, Volker; Jacobs, David K

    2015-01-01

    Tentacles armed with stinging cells (cnidocytes) are a defining trait of the cnidarians, a phylum that includes sea anemones, corals, jellyfish, and hydras. While cnidarian tentacles are generally characterized as structures evolved for feeding and defense, significant variation exists between the tentacles of different species, and within the same species across different life stages and/or body regions. Such diversity suggests cryptic distinctions exist in tentacle function. In this paper, we use confocal and transmission electron microscopy to contrast the structure and development of tentacles in the moon jellyfish, Aurelia species 1. We show that polyp oral tentacles and medusa marginal tentacles display markedly different cellular and muscular architecture, as well as distinct patterns of cellular proliferation during growth. Many structural differences between these tentacle types may reflect biomechanical solutions to different feeding strategies, although further work would be required for a precise mechanistic understanding. However, differences in cell proliferation dynamics suggests that the two tentacle forms lack a conserved mechanism of development, challenging the textbook-notion that cnidarian tentacles can be homologized into a conserved bauplan.

  8. Mesogleal cells of the jellyfish Aurelia aurita are involved in the formation of mesogleal fibres.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaposhnikova, Tatiana; Matveev, Ivan; Napara, Tatiana; Podgornaya, Olga

    2005-11-01

    The extracellular matrix of the jellyfish Aurelia aurita (Scyphozoa, Cnidaria), known as the mesoglea, is populated by numerous mesogleal cells (Mc). We determined the pattern of the Mc and the mesoglea, raised polyclonal antibodies (RA47) against the major mesogleal protein pA47 (47 kDa) and checked their specificity. In the mesoglea, RA47 stains pA47 itself. In immunoblots of Mc, RA47 stains bands of 120 kDa and 80 kDa; weaker staining is observed at pA47. The same staining pattern is seen on blots of jellyfish epidermal cells and of whole Hydra (Hydrozoa) or isolated mesoglea of Hydra. Our data indicate that pA47 is synthesized by Mc and epidermal cells as high molecular precursors. Using immunostaining techniques, we showed Mc to be involved in the formation of mesogleal non-collagenous (called "elastic" in classic morphological studies) fibres. The biochemical and morphological data suggest that Mc originate from the epidermis.

  9. NMR study on a novel mucin from jellyfish in natural abundance, Qniumucin from Aurelia aurita.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uzawa, Jun; Urai, Makoto; Baba, Takayuki; Seki, Hiroko; Taniguchi, Kayoko; Ushida, Kiminori

    2009-05-22

    A novel mucin (qniumucin), which we recently discovered in jellyfish, was investigated by several NMR techniques. Almost all the peaks in the (13)C and proton NMR spectra were satisfactorily assigned to the amino acids in the main chain and to the bridging GalNAc, the major sugar in the saccharide branches. The amino acid sequence in the tandem repeat part (-VVETTAAP-) was reconfirmed by the cross-peaks between alpha protons and carbonyl carbons in the HMBC spectrum. A connectivity analysis around the O-glycoside bond (GalNAc-Thr) was also performed, and detailed information on the local configuration was obtained by the DPFGSE-NOE-HSD technique. The strategy and the results described in this paper can be extended to the structural analysis of general O-glycan chains, which are more complex than the present mucin. NMR analyses reveal the simple structure of qniumucin extracted by the present protocol, and the homogeneity and purity of qniumucin are probably the result of it being extracted from jellyfish, a primitive animal.

  10. Morphology controlling method for amorphous silica nanoparticles and jellyfish-like nanowires and their luminescence properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Haitao; Huang, Zhaohui; Huang, Juntong; Xu, Song; Fang, Minghao; Liu, Yan-Gai; Wu, Xiaowen; Zhang, Shaowei

    2016-03-01

    Uniform silica nanoparticles and jellyfish-like nanowires were synthesized by a chemical vapour deposition method on Si substrates treated without and with Ni(NO3)2, using silicon powder as the source material. Composition and structural characterization using field emission scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy and fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy showed that the as-prepared products were silica nanoparticles and nanowires which have amorphous structures. The form of nanoparticles should be related to gas-phase nucleation procedure. The growth of the nanowires was in accordance with vapour-liquid-solid mechanism, followed by Ostwald ripening to form the jellyfish-like morphology. Photoluminescence and cathodoluminescence measurements showed that the silica products excited by different light sources show different luminescence properties. The emission spectra of both silica nanoparticles and nanowires are due to the neutral oxygen vacancies (≡Si-Si≡). The as-synthesized silica with controlled morphology can find potential applications in future nanodevices with tailorable photoelectric properties.

  11. Investigation into the hemolytic activity of tentacle venom from jellyfish Cyanea nozakii Kishinouye

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Cuiping; Yu, Huahua; Li, Rongfeng; Xing, Ronge; Liu, Song; Li, Pengcheng

    2016-03-01

    Cyanea nozakii Kishinouy e ( C. nozakii), a giant cnidarian of the class Scyphomedusae, order Semaeostomeae and family Cyaneidae, is widely distributed in the East China Sea, the Yellow Sea and the Bohai Sea, and is abundant from late summer to early autumn. Venom produced by C. nozakii during mass agglomerations can contaminate seawater resulting in death of the halobios and seriously damage commercial fisheries. Swimmers and fishermen commonly suff er painful stings from this jellyfish, resulting in local edema, tingling, breathing difficulties, depressed blood pressure and even death. Such effects arise from the complex mixture of biologically active molecules that make up jellyfish venom. In the present study, the hemolytic activity of venom from tentacles of C. nozakii and factors aff ecting its activity were assayed. The HU50 ( defined as the amount of protein required to lyse 50 % of erythrocytes) of the venom against dove and chicken erythrocytes was 34 and 59 μg/mL, respectively. Carboxylmethyl chitosan and glycerol could increase hemolytic activity at concentrations greater than 0.06% and 0.2 mol/L, respectively.

  12. Partial purification of cytolytic venom proteins from the box jellyfish, Chironex fleckeri.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brinkman, Diane; Burnell, James

    2008-04-01

    Venom proteins from the nematocysts of Chironex fleckeri were fractionated by size-exclusion and cation-exchange chromatography. Using sheep erythrocyte haemolysis as an indicator of cytolytic activity, two major cytolysins, with native molecular masses of approximately 370 and 145kDa, and one minor cytolysin ( approximately 70kDa) were isolated. SDS-PAGE and western blot protein profiles revealed that the 370kDa haemolysin is composed of CfTX-1 and CfTX-2 subunits ( approximately 43 and 45kDa, respectively); the most abundant proteins found in C. fleckeri nematocyst extracts. The 145kDa haemolysin predominately contains two other major proteins ( approximately 39 and 41kDa), which are not antigenic towards commercially available box jellyfish antivenom or rabbit polyclonal antibodies raised against whole C. fleckeri nematocyst extracts or CfTX-1 and -2. The kinetics of CfTX-1 and -2 haemolytic activities are temperature dependent and characterised by a pre-lytic lag phase ( approximately 6-7min) prior to initiation of haemolysis. Significant amino acid sequence homology between the CfTX proteins and other box jellyfish toxins suggest that CfTX-1 and -2 may also be lethal and dermonecrotic. Therefore, further in vivo and in vitro studies are required to investigate the potential roles of CfTX-1 and -2 in the lethal effects of C. fleckeri venom.

  13. Feeding and asexual reproduction of the jellyfish Sarsia gemmifera in response to resource enrichment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stibor, Herwig; Tokle, Nils

    2003-04-01

    Jellyfish are ubiquitous predators in marine pelagic environments and can sometimes control their zooplankton prey populations. Recent considerations of the fertilization of entire food webs in coastal areas make it important to investigate the response of jellyfish to resource enrichment. We investigated feeding, assimilation and life history parameters in the hydromedusa species Sarsia gemmifera. S. gemmifera was able to ingest up to 3 micro g carbon per hour, which corresponds to a daily carbon ingestion that exceeds the individual's body weight (carbon). Conversion of ingested carbon into tissue was less than 30%. The assimilated carbon was allocated such that approximately 65% was used for growth and the remainder for asexual reproduction. Carbon from food was allocated to asexually produced offspring within hours. The numerical response of S. gemmifera reached saturation at prey levels of 100 or more copepods per liter. Propagule quality was influenced by maternal effects: higher net production of the mothers in higher food environments resulted in higher carbon content of individual propagules. Starvation resistance of propagules was therefore positively related to food density in the maternal environment. The food concentrations which S. gemmifera normally experiences in the field are much lower than the food levels at which this species had its maximum asexual reproductive output in the laboratory. Therefore, S. gemmifera may potentially benefit from food web perturbations which increase crustacean zooplankton densities.

  14. NMR diffusion-encoding with axial symmetry and variable anisotropy: Distinguishing between prolate and oblate microscopic diffusion tensors with unknown orientation distribution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eriksson, Stefanie; Lasič, Samo; Nilsson, Markus; Westin, Carl-Fredrik; Topgaard, Daniel

    2015-03-14

    We introduce a nuclear magnetic resonance method for quantifying the shape of axially symmetric microscopic diffusion tensors in terms of a new diffusion anisotropy metric, DΔ, which has unique values for oblate, spherical, and prolate tensor shapes. The pulse sequence includes a series of equal-amplitude magnetic field gradient pulse pairs, the directions of which are tailored to give an axially symmetric diffusion-encoding tensor b with variable anisotropy bΔ. Averaging of data acquired for a range of orientations of the symmetry axis of the tensor b renders the method insensitive to the orientation distribution function of the microscopic diffusion tensors. Proof-of-principle experiments are performed on water in polydomain lyotropic liquid crystals with geometries that give rise to microscopic diffusion tensors with oblate, spherical, and prolate shapes. The method could be useful for characterizing the geometry of fluid-filled compartments in porous solids, soft matter, and biological tissues.

  15. NMR diffusion-encoding with axial symmetry and variable anisotropy: Distinguishing between prolate and oblate microscopic diffusion tensors with unknown orientation distribution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eriksson, Stefanie; Topgaard, Daniel, E-mail: daniel.topgaard@fkem1.lu.se [Division of Physical Chemistry, Department of Chemistry, Lund University, Lund (Sweden); Lasič, Samo [CR Development AB, Lund (Sweden); Nilsson, Markus [Lund University Bioimaging Center, Lund University, Lund (Sweden); Westin, Carl-Fredrik [Department of Radiology, BWH, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts MA 02215 (United States); Department of Biomedical Engineering, Medical Informatics, Linköping University, Linköping (Sweden)

    2015-03-14

    We introduce a nuclear magnetic resonance method for quantifying the shape of axially symmetric microscopic diffusion tensors in terms of a new diffusion anisotropy metric, D{sub Δ}, which has unique values for oblate, spherical, and prolate tensor shapes. The pulse sequence includes a series of equal-amplitude magnetic field gradient pulse pairs, the directions of which are tailored to give an axially symmetric diffusion-encoding tensor b with variable anisotropy b{sub Δ}. Averaging of data acquired for a range of orientations of the symmetry axis of the tensor b renders the method insensitive to the orientation distribution function of the microscopic diffusion tensors. Proof-of-principle experiments are performed on water in polydomain lyotropic liquid crystals with geometries that give rise to microscopic diffusion tensors with oblate, spherical, and prolate shapes. The method could be useful for characterizing the geometry of fluid-filled compartments in porous solids, soft matter, and biological tissues.

  16. 海蜇制品中铝的研究进展%Research progress of aluminum in jellyfish products

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李颖畅; 包桂林; 吕艳芳

    2014-01-01

    海蜇制品中胶原蛋白等营养成分含量丰富,具有抗氧化、抗疲劳和增强免疫力等生理功能,同时海蜇制品具有特殊的口感,深受广大消费者的喜爱,但是铝元素在海蜇等食品中广泛存在,其并非人体所需元素,铝摄入量超标会对中枢系统、生殖系统、骨骼和造血系统有潜在的慢性毒性,危害人体健康。本文综述了铝对人体健康的危害、海蜇制品中铝的检测方法、铝的去除方法,并对海蜇制品中铝的研究进行了展望。%The content of nutrients in jellyfish products is rich such as collagen. Collagen has antioxidant and antifatigue, enhance immunity. Jellyfish products were favored by consumers because of its special taste. Aluminum widely exists in jellyfish products and other food, but it is not necessary for human. Aluminum will have the potential chronic toxicity of central nervous system, reproductive system, skeletal and hematopoietic system when aluminum content in body exceeds the standard content. Aluminum will cause great harm to hu-man health. The harm of aluminum on human health, detection method of aluminum, aluminum removal of jellyfish and the prospect of aluminum in the jellyfish products were discussed.

  17. Exploring the Antibacterial and Antifungal Potential of Jellyfish-Associated Marine Fungi by Cultivation-Dependent Approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yue, Yang; Yu, Huahua; Li, Rongfeng; Xing, Ronge; Liu, Song; Li, Pengcheng

    2015-01-01

    Fungi isolated from marine invertebrates are of considerable importance as new promising sources of unique secondary metabolites with significant biomedical potential. However, the cultivable fungal community harbored in jellyfish was less investigated. In this work, we seek to recover symbiotic fungi from different tissues of jellyfish Nemopilema nomurai. A total of seven morphotypes were isolated, which were assigned into four genera (Aspergillus, Cladosporium, Purpureocillium, and Tilletiopsis) from two phyla (Ascomycota and Basidiomycota) by comparing the rDNA-ITS sequences with the reference sequences in GenBank. The most fungi were found in the inner tissues of subumbrella. Two of the cultivation-independent procedures, changing media type and co-cultivation, were employed to maximize the complexity of metabolites. Thus, thirteen EtOAc gum were obtained and fingerprinted by High Performance Liquid Chromatography (HPLC) equipped with a photodiode array (PDA) detector. Antibacterial and antifungal activities of these complex mixtures were tested against a panel of bacterial and fungal pathogens. The antimicrobial results showed that all of the 13 EtOAc extracts displayed different levels of antibacterial activity, three of which exhibited strong to significant antibacterial activity to the bacterial pathogens Staphylococcus aureus and Salmonella entrica. Antifungal activity indicated that the EtOAc extracts from pure culture of Aspergillus versicolor and co-culture of A. versicolor and Tilletiopsis sp. in rice media were promising for searching new compounds, with the maximal mycelial growth inhibition of 82.32% ± 0.61% for Rhizoctonia solani and 48.41% ± 11.02% for Botrytis cinerea at 200 μg/ml, respectively. This study is the first report on the antibacterial and antifungal activity of jellyfish-associated fungi and allows the first sight into cultivable fungal community residing in jellyfish. Induced metabolites by cultivation-dependent approaches

  18. Exploring the Antibacterial and Antifungal Potential of Jellyfish-Associated Marine Fungi by Cultivation-Dependent Approaches.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Yue

    Full Text Available Fungi isolated from marine invertebrates are of considerable importance as new promising sources of unique secondary metabolites with significant biomedical potential. However, the cultivable fungal community harbored in jellyfish was less investigated. In this work, we seek to recover symbiotic fungi from different tissues of jellyfish Nemopilema nomurai. A total of seven morphotypes were isolated, which were assigned into four genera (Aspergillus, Cladosporium, Purpureocillium, and Tilletiopsis from two phyla (Ascomycota and Basidiomycota by comparing the rDNA-ITS sequences with the reference sequences in GenBank. The most fungi were found in the inner tissues of subumbrella. Two of the cultivation-independent procedures, changing media type and co-cultivation, were employed to maximize the complexity of metabolites. Thus, thirteen EtOAc gum were obtained and fingerprinted by High Performance Liquid Chromatography (HPLC equipped with a photodiode array (PDA detector. Antibacterial and antifungal activities of these complex mixtures were tested against a panel of bacterial and fungal pathogens. The antimicrobial results showed that all of the 13 EtOAc extracts displayed different levels of antibacterial activity, three of which exhibited strong to significant antibacterial activity to the bacterial pathogens Staphylococcus aureus and Salmonella entrica. Antifungal activity indicated that the EtOAc extracts from pure culture of Aspergillus versicolor and co-culture of A. versicolor and Tilletiopsis sp. in rice media were promising for searching new compounds, with the maximal mycelial growth inhibition of 82.32% ± 0.61% for Rhizoctonia solani and 48.41% ± 11.02% for Botrytis cinerea at 200 μg/ml, respectively. This study is the first report on the antibacterial and antifungal activity of jellyfish-associated fungi and allows the first sight into cultivable fungal community residing in jellyfish. Induced metabolites by cultivation

  19. Study of the determination of the coefficients beta and gamma of the generalized metric of Robertson and of the dynamical oblateness of the sun

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchal, C.

    1971-01-01

    Motion of a space probe about a spherical center of attraction is considered, applying the general theory of relativity. Motion of a probe under the influence of the sun's oblateness is also discussed. Estimates of beta, gamma, and J20 using solar probe motion are presented. It is concluded that such measurements are possible if the unknown long-period perturbing acceleration is of the order of 10 to the -11th or -12th power m/sec. sq.

  20. Deformation of giant vesicles in AC electric fields —Dependence of the prolate-to-oblate transition frequency on vesicle radius

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antonova, K.; Vitkova, V.; Mitov, M. D.

    2010-02-01

    The electrodeformation of giant vesicles is studied as a function of their radii and the frequency of the applied AC field. At low frequency the shape is prolate, at sufficiently high frequency it is oblate and at some frequency, fc, the shape changes from prolate to oblate. A linear dependence of the prolate-to-oblate transition inverse frequency, 1/fc, on the vesicle radius is found. The nature of this phenomenon does not change with the variation of both the solution conductivity, σ, and the type of the fluid enclosed by the lipid membrane (water, sucrose or glucose aqueous solution). When σ increases, the value of fc increases while the slope of the line 1/fc(r) decreases. For vesicles in symmetrical conditions (the same conductivity of the inner and the outer solution) a linear dependence between σ and the critical frequency, fc, is obtained for conductivities up to σ=114 μS/cm. For vesicles with sizes below a certain minimum radius, depending on the solution conductivity, no shape transition could be observed.

  1. Global Transcriptome Analysis of the Tentacle of the Jellyfish Cyanea capillata Using Deep Sequencing and Expressed Sequence Tags: Insight into the Toxin- and Degenerative Disease-Related Transcripts.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guoyan Liu

    Full Text Available Jellyfish contain diverse toxins and other bioactive components. However, large-scale identification of novel toxins and bioactive components from jellyfish has been hampered by the low efficiency of traditional isolation and purification methods.We performed de novo transcriptome sequencing of the tentacle tissue of the jellyfish Cyanea capillata. A total of 51,304,108 reads were obtained and assembled into 50,536 unigenes. Of these, 21,357 unigenes had homologues in public databases, but the remaining unigenes had no significant matches due to the limited sequence information available and species-specific novel sequences. Functional annotation of the unigenes also revealed general gene expression profile characteristics in the tentacle of C. capillata. A primary goal of this study was to identify putative toxin transcripts. As expected, we screened many transcripts encoding proteins similar to several well-known toxin families including phospholipases, metalloproteases, serine proteases and serine protease inhibitors. In addition, some transcripts also resembled molecules with potential toxic activities, including cnidarian CfTX-like toxins with hemolytic activity, plancitoxin-1, venom toxin-like peptide-6, histamine-releasing factor, neprilysin, dipeptidyl peptidase 4, vascular endothelial growth factor A, angiotensin-converting enzyme-like and endothelin-converting enzyme 1-like proteins. Most of these molecules have not been previously reported in jellyfish. Interestingly, we also characterized a number of transcripts with similarities to proteins relevant to several degenerative diseases, including Huntington's, Alzheimer's and Parkinson's diseases. This is the first description of degenerative disease-associated genes in jellyfish.We obtained a well-categorized and annotated transcriptome of C. capillata tentacle that will be an important and valuable resource for further understanding of jellyfish at the molecular level and information

  2. Is sleep's 'supreme mystery' unraveling? An evolutionary analysis of sleep encounters no mystery; nor does life's earliest sleep, recently discovered in jellyfish.

    OpenAIRE

    2006-01-01

    Biotelemetry has revealed daily 15-h behavioral sleep periods in a cubomedusan jellyfish, Chironex fleckeri. Its sleep is expected to be phylogenetically most primitive, since jellyfish possess only two germ layers. They belong to the phylum Cnidaria, the 'simplest' multicellular organisms with an organized nervous system. Cubomedusae have a complex visual system with 24 eyes of four different types, each type specialized for a different task. Input to these eyes during visually guided fast-s...

  3. Antioxidant activity of the giant jellyfish Nemopilema nomurai measured by the oxygen radical absorbance capacity and hydroxyl radical averting capacity methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harada, Kazuki; Maeda, Toshimichi; Hasegawa, Yoshiro; Tokunaga, Takushi; Ogawa, Shinya; Fukuda, Kyoko; Nagatsuka, Norie; Nagao, Keiko; Ueno, Shunshiro

    2011-01-01

    The giant jellyfish Nemopilema nomurai (reaching sizes of up to 2 m diameter and 150 kg), which forms dense blooms, has caused extensive damage to fisheries by overloading trawl nets, while its toxic nematocysts cause dermatological symptoms. Giant jellyfish are currently discarded on the grounds of pest control. However, the giant jellyfish is considered to be edible and is part of Chinese cuisine. Therefore, we investigated whether any benefits for human health may be derived from consumption of the jellyfish in order to formulate medicated diets. Antioxidant activity of Nemopilema nomurai was measured using the oxygen radical absorbance capacity (ORAC) and hydroxyl radical averting capacity (HORAC) methods. Based on the results, the ORAC value of the giant jellyfish freeze-dried sample was 541 µmol trolox equivalent (TE)/100 g and the HORAC value was 3,687 µmol gallic acid equivalent (GAE)/100 g. On the other hand, the IC50 value of hydroxyl radical scavenging activity measured by using the electron spin resonance method was 3.3%. In conclusion, the results suggest that the freeze-dried powder of the giant jellyfish Nemopilema nomurai is a potentially beneficial food for humans.

  4. Study of oblate nuclear shapes and shape coexistence in neutron-deficient rare earth isotopes

    CERN Multimedia

    Guttormsen, M S; Reiter, P; Larsen, A; Korten, W; Clement, E; Siem, S; Renstrom, T; Buerger, A; Jenkins, D G

    We propose to investigate nuclear shapes and shape coexistence in neutron-deficient rare earth nuclei below the N=82 shell closure at the ISOLDE facility by employing Coulomb excitation of Nd, Sm, Gd, and Dy beams from the REX accelerator and the Miniball experiment. Nuclear shapes are expected to change rapidly in this region of the nuclear chart. The measurement of electric quadrupole moments of excited states and the transition rates between them serves as a stringent test of theoretical models and effective nucleon-nucleon interactions.

  5. Star-disc interactions in a galactic centre and oblateness of the inner stellar cluster

    CERN Document Server

    Subr, L; Huré, J M

    2004-01-01

    Structure of a quasi-stationary stellar cluster is modelled assuming that it is embedded in the gravitational field of a super-massive black hole. Gradual orbital decay of stellar trajectories is caused by the dissipative interaction with an accretion disc. Gravitational field of the disc is constructed and its effect on the cluster structure is taken into account as an axially symmetric perturbation. Attention is focused on a circumnuclear region (r<10^4 gravitational radii) where the effects of the central black hole and the disc dominate over the influence of an outer galaxy. It is shown how the stellar system becomes gradually flattened towards the disc plane. For certain combinations of the model parameters, a toroidal structure is formed by a fraction of stars. Growing anisotropy of stellar velocities as well as their segregation occur. The mass function of the inner cluster is modified and it progressively departs from the asymptotic form assumed in the outer cluster. A new stationary distribution c...

  6. 水母暴发研究所面临的挑战%Challenges in the Jellyfish Bloom Research

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孙松

    2012-01-01

    在过去的10多年中,全球海洋中的水母数量都有所增加,在一些局部区域出现了水母种群暴发的现象,主要是在近海、特别是一些重要的渔场和高生产力区。水母暴发已经形成重要的生态灾害,对沿海工业、海洋渔业和滨海旅游业等造成严重危害。水母暴发的原因、生态危害、如何应对等是一个世界性难题,引起全球沿海国家的重视,也是国际海洋生态系统研究领域的焦点问题之一。由于水母特殊的生物学和生态学特性,水母暴发的研究面临众多的困难和挑战。水母的暴发与全球气候变化、海洋渔业活动、富营养化、海岸带工程等密切相关,水母暴发现象是海洋生态系统演变的一种具体体现,通过对水母暴发机理的研究,将会加深对在全球变化和人类活动共同作用下海洋生态系统演变机理和变化趋势的了解。%In the last 10 years, jellyfish bloom occurred in the ocean globally, especially in the coastal waters. Jellyfish bloom is one of the main ecological disasters in the ocean; it affects the coastal industries, fishery and tourism. It is one of the worldwide issues to understand the causes, mechanism and consequences of the jelly- fish bloom. The big challenges for the jellyfish bloom research include jellyfish bloom observation, absence of the long term data, complexity of the life cycle for many of the jellyfish. The jellyfish bloom is an indicator of the ma- rine ecosystem change; it is one of the ecosvstem responses to the global climate change and the human activities.

  7. Effect of fluid and particle inertia on the rotation of an oblate spheroidal particle suspended in linear shear flow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosén, T; Do-Quang, M; Aidun, C K; Lundell, F

    2015-05-01

    This work describes the inertial effects on the rotational behavior of an oblate spheroidal particle confined between two parallel opposite moving walls, which generate a linear shear flow. Numerical results are obtained using the lattice Boltzmann method with an external boundary force. The rotation of the particle depends on the particle Reynolds number, Re(p)=Gd(2)ν(-1) (G is the shear rate, d is the particle diameter, ν is the kinematic viscosity), and the Stokes number, St=αRe(p) (α is the solid-to-fluid density ratio), which are dimensionless quantities connected to fluid and particle inertia, respectively. The results show that two inertial effects give rise to different stable rotational states. For a neutrally buoyant particle (St=Re(p)) at low Re(p), particle inertia was found to dominate, eventually leading to a rotation about the particle's symmetry axis. The symmetry axis is in this case parallel to the vorticity direction; a rotational state called log-rolling. At high Re(p), fluid inertia will dominate and the particle will remain in a steady state, where the particle symmetry axis is perpendicular to the vorticity direction and has a constant angle ϕ(c) to the flow direction. The sequence of transitions between these dynamical states were found to be dependent on density ratio α, particle aspect ratio r(p), and domain size. More specifically, the present study reveals that an inclined rolling state (particle rotates around its symmetry axis, which is not aligned in the vorticity direction) appears through a pitchfork bifurcation due to the influence of periodic boundary conditions when simulated in a small domain. Furthermore, it is also found that a tumbling motion, where the particle symmetry axis rotates in the flow-gradient plane, can be a stable motion for particles with high r(p) and low α.

  8. Structure and optics of the eyes of the box jellyfish Chiropsella bronzie

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    O’Connor, Megan; Garm, Anders Lydik; Nilsson, Dan-E.

    2009-01-01

    Cubomedusae have a total of 24 eyes of four morphologically different types. Two of these eye types are camera-type eyes (upper and lower lens-eye), while the other two eye types are simpler pigment pit eyes (pit and slit eye). Here, we give a description of the visual system of the box jellyfish...... species Chiropsella bronzie and the optics of the lens eyes in this species. One aim of this study is to distinguish between general cubozoan features and species-specific features in the layout and optics of the eyes. We find that both types of lens eyes are more severely under-focused in C. bronzie than...... those in the previously investigated species Tripedalia cystophora. In the lower lens-eye of C. bronzie, blur circles subtend 20 and 52° for closed and open pupil, respectively, effectively removing all but the coarsest structures of the image. Histology reveals that the retina of the lower lens-eye...

  9. The spectral sensitivity of the lens eyes of a box jellyfish, Tripedalia cystophora (Conant)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Coates, Melissa M; Garm, Anders; Theobald, Jamie C

    2006-01-01

    Box jellyfish, or cubomedusae (class Cubozoa), are unique among the Cnidaria in possessing lens eyes similar in morphology to those of vertebrates and cephalopods. Although these eyes were described over 100 years ago, there has been no work done on their electrophysiological responses to light. We...... used an electroretinogram (ERG) technique to measure spectral sensitivity of the lens eyes of the Caribbean species Tripedalia cystophora. The cubomedusae have two kinds of lens eyes, the lower and upper lens eyes. We found that both lens eye types have similar spectral sensitivities, which likely...... result from the presence of a single receptor type containing a single opsin. The peak sensitivity is to blue-green light. Visual pigment template fits indicate a vitamin A-1 based opsin with peak sensitivity near 500 nm for both eye types....

  10. Visually guided obstacle avoidance in the box jellyfish Tripedalia cystophora and Chiropsella bronzie

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Garm, A; O'Connor, M; Parkefelt, L

    2007-01-01

    Box jellyfish, cubomedusae, possess an impressive total of 24 eyes of four morphologically different types. Two of these eye types, called the upper and lower lens eyes, are camera-type eyes with spherical fish-like lenses. Compared with other cnidarians, cubomedusae also have an elaborate...... behavioral repertoire, which seems to be predominantly visually guided. Still, positive phototaxis is the only behavior described so far that is likely to be correlated with the eyes. We have explored the obstacle avoidance response of the Caribbean species Tripedalia cystophora and the Australian species...... Chiropsella bronzie in a flow chamber. Our results show that obstacle avoidance is visually guided. Avoidance behavior is triggered when the obstacle takes up a certain angle in the visual field. The results do not allow conclusions on whether color vision is involved but the strength of the response had...

  11. Exploring vortex enhancement and manipulation mechanisms in jellyfish that contributes to energetically efficient propulsion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gemmell, Brad J; Costello, John H; Colin, Sean P

    2014-01-01

    The ability of animals to propel themselves efficiently through a fluid medium is ecologically advantageous. Flexible components that influence vortex interactions are widespread among animal propulsors. However the mechanisms by which vortices are enhanced and appropriately positioned for thrust generation are still poorly understood. Here, we describe how kinematic propulsor movements of a jellyfish can enhance and reposition a vortex ring that allows the recapture of wake energy for secondary thrust generation and efficient locomotion. We use high-speed video and digital particle image velocimetry (DPIV) to resolve kinematics simultaneously with fluid structures. These results provide new insight into how animals can manipulate fluid structures to reduce metabolic energy demands of swimming muscles and may have implications in bio-inspired design.

  12. Effect of Venom from the Jellyfish Nemopilema nomurai on the Silkworm Bombyx mori L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Huahua; Li, Rongfeng; Chen, Xiaolin; Yue, Yang; Xing, Ronge; Liu, Song; Li, Pengcheng

    2015-09-24

    The silkworm Bombyx mori L. (B. mori) has a significant impact on the economy by producing more than 80% of the globally produced raw silk. The exposure of silkworm to pesticides may cause adverse effects on B. mori, such as a reduction in the production and quality of silk. This study aims to assay the effect of venom from the jellyfish Nemopilema nomurai on growth, cuticle and acetylcholinesterase (AChE) activity of the silkworm B. mori by the leaf dipping method. The experimental results revealed that the four samples caused neither antifeeding nor a lethal effect on B. mori. The sample SFV inhibited B. mori growth after 6 days of treatment in a dose-dependent manner. The samples SFV, DSFV and Fr-1 inhibited the precipitation and synthesis of chitin in the cuticle after 12 and 14 days of treatment. In the case of the four samples, the AChE was significantly improved after 14 days of treatment.

  13. Structural analysis of O-glycans of mucin from jellyfish (Aurelia aurita) containing 2-aminoethylphosphonate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urai, Makoto; Nakamura, Takemichi; Uzawa, Jun; Baba, Takayuki; Taniguchi, Kayoko; Seki, Hiroko; Ushida, Kiminori

    2009-11-02

    The structure of O-glycan in qniumucin (Q-mucin), which is a novel mucin extracted from jellyfish, was analyzed by a combination of NMR and ESI-MS/MS. A previously unidentified monosaccharide involved in the glycan chains was determined to be N-acetylgalactosamine (GalNAc) substituted by 2-aminoethylphosphonate (AEP) at the C-6. The O-glycans in Q-mucin from Aurelia aurita were proved to be mainly composed of three monosaccharides: GalNAc, AEP-(O-->6)-GalNAc, and P-6-GalNAc. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first example of an O-glycan structure of glycoproteins containing AEP. This exceptionally simple structure of Q-mucin and its potential use in material science and technology are revealed.

  14. Occurrence of high levels of tetracosahexaenoic acid in the jellyfish Aurelia sp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nichols, Peter D; Danaher, Kathryn T; Koslow, J Anthony

    2003-11-01

    The FA composition of the pelagic jellyfish Aurelia sp. collected from off-shore Western Australia waters was determined by capillary GC and GC-MS, with confirmation of PUFA structure performed by analysis of 4,4-dimethyloxazoline derivatives. PUFA constituted 47.6% of the total FA, with the essential PUFA eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA), arachidonic acid, and DHA accounting for 34%. Of particular interest, the unusual very long chain PUFA 6,9,12,15,18,21-tetracosahexaenoic acid (THA, 24:6n-3) was present at 9.3%, and the rarely reported 6,9,12,15,18-tetracosapentaenoic acid (24:5n-6) also was detected at 0.8%. To our knowledge, this represents the first report of THA as a major PUFA in a pelagic marine organism.

  15. Freshwater jellyfish Craspedacusta sowerbyi Lankester, 1880 (Hydrozoa, Olindiidae: 50 years' observations in Serbia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jakovčev-Todorović Dunja

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Detailed and relevant limnological investigations of Serbian waters were initiated in 1958 and have continued to the present. During the period 1971-2008 we monitored biological elements as a part of working studies/projects, including the distribution of the freshwater jellyfish Craspedacusta sowerbyi Lankester, 1880. We observed over 500 sampling sites in running and standing waters. Specimens of this hydro-medusa were found in five of them. Throughout the period of investigation, only the medusae stages were observed. Our purpose in this paper was to provide data of the records and distribution of this limnomedusa during the period 1958-2008 in inland waters of Serbia. These observations should contribute to knowledge on the limnofauna not only of the Balkan Peninsula but Europe as a whole.

  16. Pelagia benovici sp. nov. (Cnidaria, Scyphozoa): a new jellyfish in the Mediterranean Sea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piraino, Stefano; Aglieri, Giorgio; Martell, Luis; Mazzoldi, Carlotta; Melli, Valentina; Milisenda, Giacomo; Scorrano, Simonetta; Boero, Ferdinando

    2014-05-07

    A bloom of an unknown semaestome jellyfish species was recorded in the North Adriatic Sea from September 2013 to early 2014. Morphological analysis of several specimens showed distinct differences from other known semaestome species in the Mediterranean Sea and unquestionably identified them as belonging to a new pelagiid species within genus Pelagia. The new species is morphologically distinct from P. noctiluca, currently the only recognized valid species in the genus, and from other doubtful Pelagia species recorded from other areas of the world. Molecular analyses of mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase subunit I (COI) and nuclear 28S ribosomal DNA genes corroborate its specific distinction from P. noctiluca and other pelagiid taxa, supporting the monophyly of Pelagiidae. Thus, we describe Pelagia benovici sp. nov. Piraino, Aglieri, Scorrano & Boero.

  17. Isolation and characterization of venom from nematocysts of jellyfish Rhopilema esculentum Kishinouye

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FENG Jinhua; YU Huahua; LI Cuiping; XING Ronge; LIU Song; WANG Lin; CAI Shengbao; LI Pengcheng

    2009-01-01

    The present work is the first report of the biochemical characterization of the venom from nematocysts of the jellyfish Rhopilema esculentum Kishinouye. The nematocysts were isolated by autolysis and centrifugation and separated by flow cytometry. Four types of nematocysts were identified: mastigophores, euryteles, and atrichous and holotrichous isorhiza. SDS-PAGE and amino acid analyses demonstrated that most of the proteins in the nematocyst extract were between 10 kDa and 40 kDa, and that glutamic acid was the main amino acid. A hemolytic activity assay showed that the activity of the nematocyst venom (RNV) was strongest in Tris-HCl buffer (50 mmol/L, pH 7.8, 5% glycerol, 0.5 mmol/L EDTA, 0.1 mol/L NaCl). The hemolytic activity was related to protein concentration and the HU_(50) against chicken erythrocytes was 0.91 μg/mL.

  18. Prokaryotic microbiota in the digestive cavity of the jellyfish Cotylorhiza tuberculata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cortés-Lara, Sara; Urdiain, Mercedes; Mora-Ruiz, Merit; Prieto, Laura; Rosselló-Móra, Ramon

    2015-10-01

    The microbiota associated to the gastric cavity of four exemplars of the jellyfish Cotylorhiza tuberculata has been studied by means of cultured-dependent and -independent methods. The pyrosequencing approach rendered a very reduced diversity of Bacteria with four major groups shared by the four exemplars that made up to 95% of the total diversity. The culturing approach recovered low abundant organisms and some of them also detected by the pyrosequencing approach. The major key organisms were related to the genera Spiroplasma, Thalassospira, Tenacibaculum (from the pyrosequencing data), and Vibrio (from the cultivable fraction). Altogether the results indicate that C. tuberculata harbors an associated microbiota of very reduced diversity. On the other hand, some of the major key players may be potential pathogens and the host may serve as dispersal mechanism.

  19. Evidence-based treatment of jellyfish stings in North America and Hawaii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, Nicholas T; Darracq, Michael A; Tomaszewski, Christian; Clark, Richard F

    2012-10-01

    We performed a systematic review of the evidence supporting various treatments for envenomation by jellyfish (cnidarian) and related organisms in North America and Hawaii. Our review produced 19 pertinent primary articles. Current research demonstrates variable response to treatment, often with conflicting results according to species studied, which contributes to considerable confusion about what treatment is warranted and efficacious. Our review suggests that vinegar causes pain exacerbation or nematocyst discharge in the majority of species. Hot water and topical lidocaine appear more widely beneficial in improving pain symptoms and are preferentially recommended. Unfortunately, they may be difficult to obtain at the site of envenomation, such as the beach or diving sites. In these instances, removing the nematocysts and washing the area with saltwater may be considered. If the envenomation is thought to be due to the bluebottle (Physalia), vinegar may be beneficial.

  20. Partial purification of box jellyfish (Chironex fleckeri) nematocyst venom isolated at the beachside.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bloom, D A; Burnett, J W; Alderslade, P

    1998-08-01

    Chironex fleckeri, the northern Australian box jellyfish produces one of, if not, the most potent animal venoms. Study of the venom has been hampered by the limits of the animals' range and the venom's thermolability. Using retained lethality and native polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (NPAGE), we show that lyophilization of autolysis isolated nematocysts is an effective method of transporting the venom. In addition, Sephadex G-200 chromatography, spin concentration, and NPAGE fail to demonstrate the presence of a 600 kDa protein to which the bulk of the lethal activity has been ascribed. Sodium dodecyl sulfate capillary electrophoresis of crude venom yields several protein bands with a molecular weight range of 30-200 kDa. Freeze-thaw studies show a loss of activity and NPAGE bands after two freeze thaw cycles.

  1. The Occurrence of Type S1A Serine Proteases in Sponge and Jellyfish

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rojas, Ana; Doolittle, Russell F.

    2003-01-01

    Although serine proteases are found in all kinds of cellular organisms and many viruses, the classic "chymotrypsin family" (Group S1A by th e 1998 Barrett nomenclature) has an unusual phylogenetic distribution , being especially common in animals, entirely absent from plants and protists, and rare among fungi. The distribution in Bacteria is larg ely restricted to the genus Streptomyces, although a few isolated occ urrences in other bacteria have been reported. The family may be enti rely absent from Archaea. Although more than a thousand sequences have been reported for enzymes of this type from animals, none of them ha ve been from early diverging phyla like Porifera or Cnidaria, We now report the existence of Group SlA serine proteases in a sponge (phylu m Porifera) and a jellyfish (phylum Cnidaria), making it safe to conc lude that all animal groups possess these enzymes.

  2. Local versus Generalized Phenotypes in Two Sympatric Aurelia Species: Understanding Jellyfish Ecology Using Genetics and Morphometrics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiaverano, Luciano M; Bayha, Keith W; Graham, William M

    2016-01-01

    For individuals living in environmentally heterogeneous environments, a key component for adaptation and persistence is the extent of phenotypic differentiation in response to local environmental conditions. In order to determine the extent of environmentally induced morphological variation in a natural population distributed along environmental gradients, it is necessary to account for potential genetic differences contributing to morphological differentiation. In this study, we set out to quantify geographic morphological variation in the moon jellyfish Aurelia exposed at the extremes of a latitudinal environmental gradient in the Gulf of Mexico (GoM). We used morphological data based on 28 characters, and genetic data taken from mitochondrial cytochrome oxidase I (COI) and nuclear internal transcribed spacer 1 (ITS-1). Molecular analyses revealed the presence of two genetically distinct species of Aurelia co-occurring in the GoM: Aurelia sp. 9 and Aurelia c.f. sp. 2, named for its divergence from (for COI) and similarity to (for ITS-1) Aurelia sp. 2 (Brazil). Neither species exhibited significant population genetic structure between the Northern and the Southeastern Gulf of Mexico; however, they differed greatly in the degree of geographic morphological variation. The morphology of Aurelia sp. 9 exhibited ecophenotypic plasticity and varied significantly between locations, while morphology of Aurelia c.f. sp. 2 was geographically invariant (i.e., canalized). The plastic, generalist medusae of Aurelia sp. 9 are likely able to produce environmentally-induced, "optimal" phenotypes that confer high relative fitness in different environments. In contrast, the non-plastic generalist individuals of Aurelia c.f. sp. 2 likely produce environmentally-independent phenotypes that provide the highest fitness across environments. These findings suggest the two Aurelia lineages co-occurring in the GoM were likely exposed to different past environmental conditions (i

  3. Local versus Generalized Phenotypes in Two Sympatric Aurelia Species: Understanding Jellyfish Ecology Using Genetics and Morphometrics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciano M Chiaverano

    Full Text Available For individuals living in environmentally heterogeneous environments, a key component for adaptation and persistence is the extent of phenotypic differentiation in response to local environmental conditions. In order to determine the extent of environmentally induced morphological variation in a natural population distributed along environmental gradients, it is necessary to account for potential genetic differences contributing to morphological differentiation. In this study, we set out to quantify geographic morphological variation in the moon jellyfish Aurelia exposed at the extremes of a latitudinal environmental gradient in the Gulf of Mexico (GoM. We used morphological data based on 28 characters, and genetic data taken from mitochondrial cytochrome oxidase I (COI and nuclear internal transcribed spacer 1 (ITS-1. Molecular analyses revealed the presence of two genetically distinct species of Aurelia co-occurring in the GoM: Aurelia sp. 9 and Aurelia c.f. sp. 2, named for its divergence from (for COI and similarity to (for ITS-1 Aurelia sp. 2 (Brazil. Neither species exhibited significant population genetic structure between the Northern and the Southeastern Gulf of Mexico; however, they differed greatly in the degree of geographic morphological variation. The morphology of Aurelia sp. 9 exhibited ecophenotypic plasticity and varied significantly between locations, while morphology of Aurelia c.f. sp. 2 was geographically invariant (i.e., canalized. The plastic, generalist medusae of Aurelia sp. 9 are likely able to produce environmentally-induced, "optimal" phenotypes that confer high relative fitness in different environments. In contrast, the non-plastic generalist individuals of Aurelia c.f. sp. 2 likely produce environmentally-independent phenotypes that provide the highest fitness across environments. These findings suggest the two Aurelia lineages co-occurring in the GoM were likely exposed to different past environmental conditions

  4. Cytotoxicity and hemolytic activity of jellyfish Nemopilema nomurai (Scyphozoa: Rhizostomeae) venom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Changkeun; Munawir, Al; Cha, Mijin; Sohn, Eun-Tae; Lee, Hyunkyoung; Kim, Jong-Shu; Yoon, Won Duk; Lim, Donghyun; Kim, Euikyung

    2009-07-01

    The recent bloom of a giant jellyfish Nemopilema nomurai has caused a danger to sea bathers and fishery damages in the waters of China, Korea, and Japan. The present study investigated the cytotoxic and hemolytic activities of crude venom extract of N. nomurai using a number of in vitro assays. The jellyfish venom showed a much higher cytotoxic activity in H9C2 heart myoblast than in C2C12 skeletal myoblast (LC(50)=2 microg/mL vs. 12 microg/mL, respectively), suggesting its possible in vivo selective toxicity on cardiac tissue. This result is consistent with our previous finding that cardiovascular function is a target of the venom. In order to determine the stability of N. nomurai venom, its cytotoxicity was examined under the various temperature and pH conditions. The activity was relatively well retained at low environmental temperature (or=60 degrees C). In pH stability test, the venom has abruptly lost its activity at low pH environment (pH

  5. Phospholipase A2 activity of the Persian Gulf upside-down jellyfish venom (Cassiopea andromeda

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gholamhossean Mohebbi

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: The venomous jellyfish Cassiopea andromeda can produce envenomation and different toxicological and biological effects by their nematocysts. The phospholipase A2 enzymes (PLA2 are toxic and induce various pharmacological effects including neurotoxicity, myotoxicity and anticoagulant activities. The main aim of the current project was to screen the in vitro PLA2 activity of the C. andromeda crude venom. To better understand the experimental result; a molecular docking study was also performed. Materials and methods: The live specimens were collected from Nayband lagoon, by a trawl net, and separation of their tentacles was done according to Bloom 's et al., method. The PLA2 activity of crude venom was performed according to the acidimetric method of Tan and Tan. The lyophilized venom was subjected to Gas Chromatography/ Mass Spectroscopy, and the obtained structures were used for docking study against PLA2. The indoxam was considered as standard control. Results: The PLA2 activity of the jellyfish crude venom was 413 ±0.08 µmol/min/mg. Analysis of the crude venom detected seven compounds (i-vii using GC-MS. Docking data was also confirmed the experimental results. According to the docking results, the highest affinity (-6.7 (kcal/mol was observed in the compound “Pregn-5-ene-3,11-dione, 17,20:20,21 bis [methylenebis(oxy]-, cyclic 3-(1,2-ethane diyl acetal”. Conclusions: A high PLA2 level was found in the venom of C. andromeda. There was a good correlation between in vitro and in silico studies.

  6. Aurelin, a novel antimicrobial peptide from jellyfish Aurelia aurita with structural features of defensins and channel-blocking toxins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ovchinnikova, Tatiana V; Balandin, Sergey V; Aleshina, Galina M; Tagaev, Andrey A; Leonova, Yulia F; Krasnodembsky, Eugeny D; Men'shenin, Alexander V; Kokryakov, Vladimir N

    2006-09-22

    A novel 40-residue antimicrobial peptide, aurelin, exhibiting activity against Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria, was purified from the mesoglea of a scyphoid jellyfish Aurelia aurita by preparative gel electrophoresis and RP-HPLC. Molecular mass (4296.95 Da) and complete amino acid sequence of aurelin (AACSDRAHGHICESFKSFCKDSGRNGVKLRANCKKTCGLC) were determined. Aurelin has six cysteines forming three disulfide bonds. The total RNA was isolated from the jellyfish mesoglea, RT-PCR and cloning were performed, and cDNA was sequenced. A 84-residue preproaurelin contains a putative signal peptide (22 amino acids) and a propiece of the same size (22 amino acids). Aurelin has no structural homology with any previously identified antimicrobial peptides but reveals partial similarity both with defensins and K+ channel-blocking toxins of sea anemones and belongs to ShKT domain family.

  7. Neritic Jellyfishes (Cnidaria: Cubozoa and Scyphozoa from the coast of Rio Grande do Norte state, northeast of Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthews-Cascon, H.

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available For the entire Brazilian coast, there are 22 published records of scyphozoans. On the other hand, only 35 species ofcubozoans were described worldwide, four of them reported for the Brazilian coast. However, little is known about thespecies of cubozoans and scyphozoans in the Northeastern states of Brazil. The aim of this study was to perform asurvey of the jellyfish (Cnidaria: Cubozoa and Scyphozoa on the coast of Rio Grande do Norte state, Northeast ofBrazil. Specimens were collected using trawl net on beaches in the counties of Natal (in 2003 and Tibaú (in 2004. Forthe Rio Grande do Norte coast there were few records of large jellyfish, and new records of the following cubozoan andscyphozoan species were verified: Chiropsalmus quadrumanus; Chrysaora lactea; Lychnorhiza lucerna andStomolophus meleagris. The studied species had their distributions expanded in the coast to the State of Rio Grande doNorte.

  8. [Spectral diversity among the members of the family of Green Fluorescent Protein in hydroid jellyfish (Cnidaria, Hydrozoa)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ianushevich, Iu G; Shagin, D A; Fradkov, A F; Shakhbazov, K S; Barsova, E V; Gurskaia, N G; Labas, Iu A; Matts, M V; Luk'ianov, k A; Lul'ianov, S A

    2005-01-01

    The cDNAs encoding the genes of new proteins homologous to the well-known Green Fluorescent Protein (GFP) from the hydroid jellyfish Aequorea victoria were cloned. Two green fluorescent proteins from one un-identified anthojellyfish, a yellow fluorescent protein from Phialidium sp., and a nonfluorescent chromoprotein from another unidentified anthojellyfish were characterized. Thus, a broad diversity of GFP-like proteins among the organisms of the class Hydrozoa in both spectral properties and primary structure was shown.

  9. [Lipid variation in oocytes of the jellyfish Stomolophus meleagris (Scyphozoa: Rhizostomeae) from Las Guasimas Lagoon, Mexico, during gonadal development].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvalho-Saucedo, Liliana; García-Domínguez, Federico; Rodríguez-Jaramillo, Carmen; López-Martínez, Juana

    2010-03-01

    The jellyfish Stomolophus meleagris has potential for commercial exploitation but there is little information on their reproductive biology. This paper seeks to evaluate some biochemical and demographic characteristics of the species. Samples were taken monthly during 2005 and 2006. Jellyfish collected in 2005 were used to describe the characteristics and quantity of oocyte triglycerides and phospholipids with the Sudan black technique, and to ascertain the degree of gonadal development and sex ratio by the hematoxylin-eosin technique. The 2006 jellyfish were used to determine the size at first maturity and protein and total lipids contents. Four stages of development in both sexes were determined, with a continuous gamete development. The highest percentage of mature organisms was recorded in April. The proportion of sexes was 0.7:1.3. We found higher concentrations of triglycerides than phospholipids in the cytoplasm. There was a positive correlation between triglycerides and the diameter of the oocyte. The size at first maturity for both sexes was 105 mm. The highest protein and lipids contents were obtained in April and March respectively.

  10. Screening of Extraction Methods for Glycoproteins from Jellyfish (Rhopilema esculentum) Oral-Arms by High Performance Liquid Chromatography

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    REN Guoyan; LI Bafang; ZHAO Xue; ZHUANG Yongliang; YAN Mingyan; HOU Hu; ZHANG Xiukun; CHEN Li

    2009-01-01

    In order to select an optimum extraction method for the target glycoprotein (TGP) from jellyfish (Rhopilema esculentum) oral-arms, a high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC)-assay for the determination of the TGP was developed. Purified target glycoprotein was taken as a standard glycoprotcin. The results showed that the calibration curves for peak area plotted against con-centration for TGP were linear (r=0.9984, y=4.5895x+47.601) over concentrations ranging from 50 to 400mgL-1. The mean extrac-tion recovery was 97.84% (CV2.60%). The fractions containing TGP were isolated from jellyfish (R. esculentum) oral-arms bv four extraction methods: 1) water extraction (WE), 2) phosphate buffer solution (PBS) extraction (PE), 3) ultrasound-assisted water ex-traction (UA-WE), 4) ultrasound-assisted PBS extraction (UA-PE). The lyophtlized extract was dissolved in Milli-Q water and ana-lyzed directly on a short TSK-GEL G4000PWXL (7.8mm×300mm) column. Our results indicated that the UA-PE method was the optimum extraction method selected by HPLC.Kay words HPLC; glycoprotein; jellyfish; extraction method

  11. Jellyfish stings

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... The World of Medusa and Her Sisters. 2016. Springer. Wilcox CL, Yanagihara AA. Heated debates: Hot-water ... medical conditions. Call 911 for all medical emergencies. Links to other sites are provided for information only -- ...

  12. Plastic Jellyfish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moseley, Christine

    2000-01-01

    Presents an environmental science activity designed to enhance students' awareness of the hazards of plastic waste for wildlife in aquatic environments. Discusses how students can take steps to reduce the effects of plastic waste. (WRM)

  13. Jellyfish collagen stimulates production of TNF-α and IL-6 by J774.1 cells through activation of NF-κB and JNK via TLR4 signaling pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Putra, Agus Budiawan Naro; Nishi, Kosuke; Shiraishi, Ryusuke; Doi, Mikiharu; Sugahara, Takuya

    2014-03-01

    We previously reported that jellyfish collagen stimulates both the acquired and innate immune responses. In the acquired immune response, jellyfish collagen enhanced immunoglobulin production by lymphocytes in vitro and in vivo. Meanwhile, in the innate immune response jellyfish collagen promoted cytokine production and phagocytotic activity of macrophages. The facts that jellyfish collagen plays several potential roles in stimulating cytokine production by macrophages have further attracted us to uncover its mechanisms. We herein describe that the cytokine production-stimulating activity of jellyfish collagen was canceled by a Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) inhibitor. Moreover, jellyfish collagen stimulated phosphorylation of inhibitor of κBα (IκBα), promoted the translocation of nucleus factor-κB (NF-κB), and activated c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK). A JNK inhibitor also abrogated the cytokine production-stimulating activity of jellyfish collagen. These results suggest that jellyfish collagen may facilitate cytokine production by macrophages through activation of NF-κB and JNK via the TLR4 signaling pathways.

  14. Studies on nucleoside constituents of Jellyfish Stomopholus meleagris%沙蜇Stomopholus meleagris核苷类成分研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    蔡杨鹏; 刘璐璐; 闫玉霞; 李平林; 李八方

    2011-01-01

    首次对沙蜇的核苷类成分进行比较全面的提取、分离和结构鉴定,为沙蜇的进一步综合开发利用提供理论依据.方法 新鲜沙蜇的甲醇提取物用石油醚、乙酸乙酯和正丁醇分级萃取;再用硅胶柱层析、Sephadex LH-20凝胶柱层析、薄层制备层析等分离技术得到单体化合物;通过GC-MS、ESIMS、NMR等分析方法,结合文献对照,对所得化合物进行结构鉴定.结果 从沙蜇的甲醇提取物中分离出6个单体:胸腺嘧啶(1)、2'-甲氧基尿嘧啶核苷(2)、尿嘧啶(3)、2’-脱氧胸腺嘧啶核苷(4)、2'-脱氧尿嘧啶核苷(5)、尿嘧啶核苷(6).结论 化合物1~6均为首次从沙蜇中分离得到.%Objective For further utilization and exploitation of jellyfish resource, nucleoside constituents from jellyfish Stomopholus meleagris were investigated. Methods Methanol extracts of fresh jellyfish was partitioned successively with petroleum ether, ethyl acetate, and n-butanol. Then silica gel chro-matography, Sephadex LH-20 gel filtration and PTLC were performed for the isolation and purification of the compounds, and GC-MS, ESIMS,NMR analyses as well as data comparison with reported literatures were applied for the structure elucidation. Results Six compounds were isolated and determined from jellyfish; thymine (1), 2'-O-methyluridine (2), uracil (3), 2-deoxythymidine (4), 2'-deoxyuridine (5), uridine (6). Conclusion All the compounds obtained were purified and identified from jellyfish Stomopholus meleagris for the first time.

  15. Acoustic Scattering from Sand Dollars (Dendraster excentricus): Modeling as High Aspect Ratio Oblate Objects and Comparison to Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-09-01

    naturally occurring dense collections. These benthic echinoderms can form concentrations of up to several hundred per square meter in the sandy, shallow...L. (1972). “A new approach to the shaded picture problem”, Proc ACM National Conf. Nichols, D. (1969). Echinoderms , 4th edition (Hutchinson & Co

  16. Classifying orbits in a new dynamical model describing motion in a prolate or an oblate elliptical galaxy

    CERN Document Server

    Zotos, Euaggelos E; Doni, Efthimia G

    2015-01-01

    The regular or chaotic character of orbits of stars moving in the meridional plane (R,z) of an axially symmetric elliptical galaxy with a dense, massive spherical nucleus and a dark matter halo component is under investigation. In particular, we explore how the flattening of an elliptical galaxy influences the overall orbital structure of the system, by computing in each case the percentage of chaotic orbits, as well as the percentages of orbits composing the main regular families. In an attempt to discriminate safely and with certainty between regular and chaotic motion, we use the Smaller ALingment Index (SALI) method to extensive samples of orbits obtained by integrating numerically the basic equations of motion as well as the variational equations. In addition, a technique which is based mainly on the field of spectral dynamics that utilizes the Fourier transform of the time series of each coordinate is used for classifying the regular orbits into different families and also to recognize the secondary res...

  17. 海蜇ACE抑制肽水解用酶的筛选%Screening of Proteases for Hydrolysis of Jellyfish ACE Inhibitory Peptides

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘新; 张绵松; 孟秀梅; 张永刚; 王萍; 刘昌衡

    2012-01-01

    Take several indexes into consideration, including peptides content, ACE inhibition rate and the rate ofpeptides, the proteases for hydrolysis of Jellyfish ACE Inhibitory Peptides were screened. The results showed that different protease had different effects on the hydrolysis of jellyfish. Papain and protamex were the good choices for hydrolysis of Jellyfish ACE Inhibitory Peptides.%采用肽含量、ACE抑制率和肽的比例等多个指标对六种蛋白酶的水解效果进行评价筛选海蜇ACE抑制肽的酶法制备用酶。试验结果表明,不同的蛋白酶对海蜇的水解效果不同,综合考虑三项指标,复合蛋白酶是海蜇ACE抑制肽酶法制备的理想用酶

  18. 海蜇胶原蛋白肽的降血脂及抗氧化作用的研究%The Hypolipidemic and Antioxidative Effects of Jellyfish Collagen Peptide

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    丁进锋; 苏秀榕; 李妍妍; 高翔; 岳福鹏; 蒋鑫

    2012-01-01

    The collagen peptide was prepared by enzymatic hydrolysis in this paper and the effects of jellyfish collagen peptide on blood lipid and antioxidantion were investigated. The hyperlipidemia model was established by feeding ICR mice with high fat feed. The changes of liver index and fat coefficient as well as the effects on serum lipids.antioxidant capacity of liver homogenate in mice were determined. Results showed jellyfish collagen peptide could decrease the liver index,fat coefficient, TC.LDL-C, and LDL-C/HDL-C in serum significantly,and increase HDL-C and HDL-C/TC. The activities of SOD and GSH-Px in liver homogenate were enhanced,while MDA contents were reduced significantly. Jellyfish collagen peptide has hypolipidemic and antioxidative effects.%本研究以海蜇胶原蛋白为原料,经酶解得到海蜇胶原蛋白肽,探讨海蜇胶原蛋白肽对小鼠血脂的影响及抗氧化作用.以高脂饲料喂养ICR小鼠,建立高脂血症模型,研究胶原蛋白肽对小鼠肝系数和脂肪系数的变化情况及小鼠血脂水平、肝组织抗氧化功能的影响.结果表明海蜇胶原蛋白肽能显著降低小鼠肝系数和脂肪系数,能显著降低高脂血症小鼠血清总胆固醇(TC)、低密度脂蛋白胆固醇(LDL-C)、动脉硬化指数( LDL-C/HDL-C)水平,升高高密度脂蛋白胆固醇(HDL-C)和抗动脉粥样硬化因子(HDL-C/TC);能提高肝组织超氧化物歧化酶(SOD)谷胱甘肽过氧化物酶(GSH-Px)的活力,并能减低丙二醛(MDA)的含量.海蜇胶原蛋白肽具有辅助减低血脂水平和增强抗氧化功能的作用.

  19. Changes in bacterial community metabolism and composition during the degradation of dissolved organic matter from the jellyfish Aurelia aurita in a Mediterranean coastal lagoon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanchet, Marine; Pringault, Olivier; Bouvy, Marc; Catala, Philippe; Oriol, Louise; Caparros, Jocelyne; Ortega-Retuerta, Eva; Intertaglia, Laurent; West, Nyree; Agis, Martin; Got, Patrice; Joux, Fabien

    2015-09-01

    Spatial increases and temporal shifts in outbreaks of gelatinous plankton have been observed over the past several decades in many estuarine and coastal ecosystems. The effects of these blooms on marine ecosystem functioning and particularly on the dynamics of the heterotrophic bacteria are still unclear. The response of the bacterial community from a Mediterranean coastal lagoon to the addition of dissolved organic matter (DOM) from the jellyfish Aurelia aurita, corresponding to an enrichment of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) by 1.4, was assessed for 22 days in microcosms (8 l). The high bioavailability of this material led to (i) a rapid mineralization of the DOC and dissolved organic nitrogen from the jellyfish and (ii) the accumulation of high concentrations of ammonium and orthophosphate in the water column. DOM from jellyfish greatly stimulated heterotrophic prokaryotic production and respiration rates during the first 2 days; then, these activities showed a continuous decay until reaching those measured in the control microcosms (lagoon water only) at the end of the experiment. Bacterial growth efficiency remained below 20%, indicating that most of the DOM was respired and a minor part was channeled to biomass production. Changes in bacterial diversity were assessed by tag pyrosequencing of partial bacterial 16S rRNA genes, DNA fingerprints, and a cultivation approach. While bacterial diversity in control microcosms showed little changes during the experiment, the addition of DOM from the jellyfish induced a rapid growth of Pseudoalteromonas and Vibrio species that were isolated. After 9 days, the bacterial community was dominated by Bacteroidetes, which appeared more adapted to metabolize high-molecular-weight DOM. At the end of the experiment, the bacterial community shifted toward a higher proportion of Alphaproteobacteria. Resilience of the bacterial community after the addition of DOM from the jellyfish was higher for metabolic functions than diversity

  20. A specific antimicrobial protein CAP-1 from Pseudomonas sp. isolated from the jellyfish Cyanea capillata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Manman; Liu, Dan; Xu, Feng; Xiao, Liang; Wang, Qianqian; Wang, Beilei; Chang, Yinlong; Zheng, Jiemin; Tao, Xia; Liu, Guoyan; Zhang, Liming

    2016-01-01

    A bacterium strain, designated as CMF-2, was isolated from the jellyfish Cyanea capillata and its culture supernatant exhibited a significant antimicrobial activity. The strain CMF-2 was identified as Pseudomonas sp. based on the morphological, biochemical and physiological characteristics as well as 16S rRNA sequence analysis. In this study, an antimicrobial protein, named as CAP-1, was isolated from the culture of CMF-2 through ammonium sulfate precipitation and gel filtration chromatography. According to the result of sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE), a major band indicated that the antimicrobial protein had a molecular mass of about 15 kDa, and it was identified as a hypothetical protein by MALDI-TOF-MS analysis and Mascot searching. CAP-1 displayed a broad antimicrobial spectrum against the indicator bacteria and fungus, including Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli, Bacillus subtilis and Candida albicans, especially some marine-derived microorganisms such as Vibrio vulnificus, Vibrio alginolyticus, Vibrio parahaemolyticus, Vibrio cholera, and Vibrio anguillarum, but showed little impact on tumor cells and normal human cells. The protein CAP-1 remained a stable antimicrobial activity in a wide range of temperature (20-80°C) and pH (2-10) conditions. These results suggested that CAP-1 might have a specific antimicrobial function not due to cytotoxicity.

  1. To flap or not to flap: a discussion between a fish and a jellyfish

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Nathan; Roh, Chris; Idrees, Suhail; Gharib, Morteza

    2016-11-01

    Fish and jellyfish are known to swim by flapping and by periodically contracting respectively, but which is the more effective propulsion mechanism? In an attempt to answer this question, an experimental comparison is made between simplified versions of these motions to determine which generates the greatest thrust for the least power. The flapping motion is approximated by pitching plates while periodic contractions are approximated by clapping plates. A machine is constructed to operate in either a flapping or a clapping mode between Reynolds numbers 1,880 and 11,260 based on the average plate tip velocity and span. The effect of the total sweep angle, total sweep time, plate flexibility, and duty cycle are investigated. The average thrust generated and power required per cycle are compared between the two modes when their total sweep angle and total sweep time are identical. In general, operating in the clapping mode required significantly more power to generate a similar thrust compared to the flapping mode. However, modifying the duty cycle for clapping caused the effectiveness to approach that of flapping with an unmodified duty cycle. These results suggest that flapping is the more effective propulsion mechanism within the range of Reynolds numbers tested. This work was supported by the Charyk Bio-inspired Laboratory at the California Institute of Technology, the National Science Foundation Graduate Research Fellowship under Grant No. DGE-1144469, and the Summer Undergraduate Research Fellowships program.

  2. Recombinant expression and solution structure of antimicrobial peptide aurelin from jellyfish Aurelia aurita.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shenkarev, Zakhar O; Panteleev, Pavel V; Balandin, Sergey V; Gizatullina, Albina K; Altukhov, Dmitry A; Finkina, Ekaterina I; Kokryakov, Vladimir N; Arseniev, Alexander S; Ovchinnikova, Tatiana V

    2012-12-07

    Aurelin is a 40-residue cationic antimicrobial peptide isolated from the mezoglea of a scyphoid jellyfish Aurelia aurita. Aurelin and its (15)N-labeled analogue were overexpressed in Escherichia coli and purified. Antimicrobial activity of the recombinant peptide was examined, and its spatial structure was studied by NMR spectroscopy. Aurelin represents a compact globule, enclosing one 3(10)-helix and two α-helical regions cross-linked by three disulfide bonds. The peptide binds to anionic lipid (POPC/DOPG, 3:1) vesicles even at physiological salt concentration, it does not interact with zwitterionic (POPC) vesicles and interacts with the DPC micelle surface with moderate affinity via two α-helical regions. Although aurelin shows structural homology to the BgK and ShK toxins of sea anemones, its surface does not possess the "functional dyad" required for the high-affinity interaction with the K(+)-channels. The obtained data permit to correlate the modest antibacterial properties and membrane activity of aurelin. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Effect of tea saponin on ephyrae and polyps of the moon jellyfish Aurelia sp.1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Zhijun; Sun, Tingting; Liang, Likun; Wang, Lei

    2017-01-01

    The moon jellyfish (Aurelia sp.1) is thought to be a nuisance for the sea cucumber aquaculture, which commonly occur in the sea cucumber (Apostichopus japonicus) culture ponds of the Yellow Sea, China. To develop an appropriate method to control Aurelia sp.1 blooms, the toxic effects of tea saponin on Aurelia sp.1 ephyrae and polyps were tested in laboratory experiments. Our results revealed that tea saponin caused significant morphological changes, behavioral abnormality and mortality in Aurelia sp.1 ephyrae and polyps in 24 h and 48 h exposure experiments. The 24 h and 48 h median lethal concentrations (LC50) values of tea saponin for Aurelia sp.1 ephyrae were 1.9 and 1.1 mg L-1 respectively, while the LC50 value for Aurelia sp.1 polyps was 0.4 mg L-1 after 24h and 48 h of exposure to tea saponin. Comparison with literature results of tea saponin on A. japonicus indicates that the resistance of A. japonicus to tea saponin is 12-18 times greater than that of Aurelia sp.1 ephyrae. Therefore, the appropriate tea saponin dosage for the control of Aurelia sp.1 should be paid enough attention in order to minimize possible damage for sea cucumber. We suggest that the recommended level of tea saponin to eradicate Aurelia sp.1 ephyrae and polyps in sea cucumber culture ponds be lower than 1.35 mg L-1.

  4. Construction of chitin/PVA composite hydrogels with jellyfish gel-like structure and their biocompatibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Meng; Wang, Zhenggang; Cao, Yan; Zhao, Yanteng; Duan, Bo; Chen, Yun; Xu, Min; Zhang, Lina

    2014-09-08

    High strength chitin/poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA) composite hydrogels (RCP) were constructed by adding PVA into chitin dissolved in a NaOH/urea aqueous solution, and then by cross-linking with epichlorohydrin (ECH) and freezing-thawing process. The RCP hydrogels were characterized by field emission scanning electron microscopy, FTIR, differential scanning calorimetry, solid-state (13)C NMR, wide-angle X-ray diffraction, and compressive test. The results revealed that the repeated freezing/thawing cycles induced the bicrosslinked networks consisted of chitin and PVA crystals in the composite gels. Interestingly, a jellyfish gel-like structure occurred in the RCP75 gel with 25 wt % PVA content in which the amorphous and crystalline PVA were immobilized tightly in the chitin matrix through hydrogen bonding interaction. The freezing/thawing cycles played an important role in the formation of the layered porous PVA networks and the tight combining of PVA with the pore wall of chitin. The mechanical properties of RCP75 were much higher than the other RCP gels, and the compressive strength was 20× higher than that of pure chitin gels, as a result of broadly dispersing stress caused by the orderly multilayered networks. Furthermore, the cell culture tests indicated that the chitin/PVA composite hydrogels exhibited excellent biocompatibility and safety, showing potential applications in the field of tissue engineering.

  5. Jellyfish: Special Tools for Biological Research on Earth and in Space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spangenberg, Dorothy B.

    1991-01-01

    The most intriguing nature of the jellyfish polyps is their ability to metamorphose, giving rise to tiny immature medusae called ephyrae which have a different form or shape from the polyps. The Aurelia Metamorphosis Test System was used to determine the subtle effects of hydrocarbons found in oil spills and the effects of X-irradiation on developing ephyrae. Currently, this test system is used to determine the effects of the gravity-less environment of outer space on the development and behavior of ephyrae. For this purpose, the effects of clinostat rotation on development of the ephyrae and their gravity receptor are being studied. The behavior of the ephyrae during 0 gravity achieved for short intervals of 30 seconds in parabolic flight is examined. The developing ephyrae and the mature ephyrae are exposed to gravity-less environment of outer space via a six or seven day shuttle experiment. If gravity receptors do form in outer space, they will be studied in detail using various types of microscopes, including the electron microscope, to determin whether they developed normally in space as compared with control on Earth.

  6. Jellyfish skin polysaccharides: extraction and inhibitory activity on macrophage-derived foam cell formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hai-Lin; Cui, Shao-Hua; Zha, Xue-Qiang; Bansal, Vibha; Xue, Lei; Li, Xiao-Long; Hao, Ran; Pan, Li-Hua; Luo, Jian-Ping

    2014-06-15

    In this work, response surface methodology was used to determine optimum conditions for extraction of polysaccharides from jellyfish skin (JSP). The optimum parameters were found to be raw material to water ratio 1:7.5 (w/v), extraction temperature 100°C and extraction time 4h. Under these conditions, the JSP yield reached 1.007 mg/g. Papain (15 U/mL) in combination with Sevag reagent was beneficial in removing proteins from JSP. After precipitation with ethanol at final concentration of 40%, 60% and 80% in turn, three polysaccharide fractions of JSP1, JSP2 and JSP3 were obtained from JSP, respectively. The three fractions exhibited different physicochemical properties with respect to molecular weight distribution, monosaccharide composition, infrared absorption spectra, and glycosyl bond composition. In addition, JSP3 showed strong inhibitory effects on oxidized low-density lipoprotein (oxLDL) induced conversion of macrophages into foam cells, which possibly attributed to the down-regulation of some atherogenesis-related gene expressions.

  7. Cloning and expression of aequorin genes from jellyfish Aequorea and characterization of aequorins activities

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    罗文新; 张军; 李少伟; 程通; 陈敏; 李少菁; 夏宁邵

    2002-01-01

    Two new aequorin genes, aeqxm and aeqxxm, were isolated from jellyfish Aequorea macrodactyla and Aequorea parva respectively, which are commonly found in the warmer waters on the coastal region of the East China Sea. The DNA sequences of the two genes have no introns and each one contains an ORF of 585 bp in full-length encoding a 195-aa protein. The two genes of aeqxm and aeqxxm share nuclcotide homologies of 80.7% and 85.1% with AEVAQ440X respectively, and the corresponding proteins share amino acid homologies of 84.7 % and 84.2 % with AEVAQ440X. High amino acid homology was found between apoaeqxm and apoaeqxxm. The two genes were cloned into expression vector pTO -T7 respectively, and the expression yields amounted to 40% of the total protein in E. coli BL21. The activities of the two photoproteins were reconstituted by incubating the expressed apoproteins with coelenterazine f. In the presence of Ca ion, both of the regenerated aeqxm and aeqxxm exhibited an emission peak at the wave length of 470 nm.

  8. The mechanism underlying the cardiotoxic effect of the toxin from the jellyfish Chironex fleckeri.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mustafa, M R; White, E; Hongo, K; Othman, I; Orchard, C H

    1995-08-01

    We have investigated the mechanisms underlying the cardiac effects of the toxin from the box jellyfish Chironex fleckeri. Papillary muscles isolated from the hearts of ferrets and ventricular myocytes isolated from the hearts of ferrets and rats were used. Force, intracellular [Ca2+], and membrane potential were monitored in the papillary muscles; contraction, intracellular [Ca2+], intracellular [Na+], and membrane currents were monitored in the isolated myocytes. Application of the toxin to these preparations resulted in a large increase in intracellular [Ca2+] and the adverse symptoms of Ca2+ overload (aftercontractions, spontaneous contractions, a decrease in developed force, and an increase in resting force). The response of papillary muscles to the toxin was not inhibited by blockers of Ca2+ or Na+ channels or by inhibitors of the sarcoplasmic reticulum, Na+/K+ ATPase, or Na+/H+ exchange. The response to the toxin was, however, blocked by prior exposure to a solution which contained no Na+ and by Ni2+. In the isolated myocytes, as well as an increase in intracellular [Ca2+], the toxin also caused an increase in intracellular [Na+] and the appearance of a current which was inward at negative potentials and reversed at about -10 mV. These data can be explained by the toxin increasing Na+ influx into the cell. The increase in intracellular [Na+] will then increase intracellular [Ca2+] via the Na+/Ca2+ exchange mechanism, thus producing the observed Ca2+ overload.

  9. Fatal envenomation by Chironex fleckeri, the north Australian box jellyfish: the continuing search for lethal mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lumley, J; Williamson, J A; Fenner, P J; Burnett, J W; Colquhoun, D M

    1988-05-16

    A child with severe envenomation by Chironex fleckeri presented in cardiac arrest at a hospital between 15 and 20 min after the sting was sustained. Resuscitation was not successful. Objective confirmation of C. fleckeri as the cause of death is described. Four metres of tentacle contact in this case represents the smallest-measured fatal C. fleckeri sting that has been recorded so far. The mechanism of this death was toxic and not allergic. The available clinical information suggests direct myocardial interference, but does not exclude a respiratory hypoxic element. A more widespread venom-induced functional disruption of the cell membrane is postulated, with a resultant dysfunction in several vital organ systems that were acting in concert. Early, vigorous and sustained resuscitation that is performed as a first-aid measure offers the best hope of prehospital survival after a massive C. fleckeri sting, which is the most explosive envenomation process that is presently known to humans. In-hospital resuscitation from unresponsive circulatory arrest should now involve intravenously-administered verapamil (or its equivalent) and additional box-jellyfish antivenom, while the patient is being monitored.

  10. The Jellyfish hunter--Jack Barnes: a pioneer medical toxinologist in Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearn, John; Fenner, Peter

    2006-12-01

    Dr Jack Handyside Barnes (1922-1985) was one of the small and elite group of Pacific marine toxinologists whose work was characterised by an uncompromising rugged persona, a focussed resolve to solve challenging problems of human clinical envenomation, and who conducted curiosity-driven research under conditions of scientific isolation. He was a pioneering advocate for the preservation of marine heritage, particularly that of the Great Barrier Reef. A former military commando who later became a general medical practitioner with extensive surgical and obstetric skills, in 1947 he was appointed the Medical Superintendent of Thursday Island in the Torres Strait. Later (from January 1953), he worked indefatigably as a general medical practitioner in Cairns, in tropical North Australia. For four decades (1945-1985), Jack Barnes undertook detailed laboratory, clinical and field research into invertebrate envenomation, particularly medusan toxinology. In 1960 he discovered the species responsible for the Irukandji syndrome, a small carybdeid named Carukia barnesi in his honour. He invented the research technique for the extraction of venom from the world's most venomous creature, the Pacific box Jellyfish, Chironex fleckeri. By 1960, he had published taxonomic details of nematocyst structure and clinical envenomation details consequent upon stings by Physalia, Cyanea, Chironex, Chiropsalmus and Carukia. This paper is a précis of the chronology of his life, contributions and influence.

  11. Effect of Venom from the Jellyfish Nemopilema nomurai on the Silkworm Bombyx mori L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huahua Yu

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The silkworm Bombyx mori L. (B. mori has a significant impact on the economy by producing more than 80% of the globally produced raw silk. The exposure of silkworm to pesticides may cause adverse effects on B. mori, such as a reduction in the production and quality of silk. This study aims to assay the effect of venom from the jellyfish Nemopilema nomurai on growth, cuticle and acetylcholinesterase (AChE activity of the silkworm B. mori by the leaf dipping method. The experimental results revealed that the four samples caused neither antifeeding nor a lethal effect on B. mori. The sample SFV inhibited B. mori growth after 6 days of treatment in a dose-dependent manner. The samples SFV, DSFV and Fr-1 inhibited the precipitation and synthesis of chitin in the cuticle after 12 and 14 days of treatment. In the case of the four samples, the AChE was significantly improved after 14 days of treatment.

  12. Clearance rates of ephyrae and small medusae of the common jellyfish Aurelia aurita offered different types of prey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riisgård, Hans Ulrik; Madsen, Caroline V.

    2011-01-01

    Prey selection and knowledge of the amounts of water processed by the early stages of the common jellyfish Aurelia aurita may at certain times of the year be crucial for understanding the plankton dynamics in marine ecosystems with mass occurrences of this jellyfish. In the present study we used two different methods ("clearance method" and "ingestion-rate method") to estimate the amount of water cleared per unit of time of different types and sizes of prey organisms offered to A. aurita ephyrae and small medusae. The mean clearance rates of medusae, estimated with Artemia sp. nauplii as prey by both methods, agreed well, namely 3.8 ± 1.4 l h - 1 by the clearance method and 3.2 ± 1.1 l h - 1 by the ingestion-rate method. Both methods showed that copepods (nauplii and adults) and mussel veligers are captured with considerably lower efficiency, 22 to 37% and 14 to 30%, respectively, than Artemia salina nauplii. By contrast, the water processing rates of ephyrae measured by the clearance method with A. salina nauplii as prey were 3 to 5 times lower than those measured by the ingestion-rate method. This indicates that the prerequisite of full mixing for using the clearance method may not have been fulfilled in the ephyrae experiments. The study demonstrates that the predation impact of the young stages of A. aurita is strongly dependent on its developmental stage (ephyra versus medusa), and the types and sizes of prey organisms. The estimated prey-digestion time of 1.3 h in a steady-state feeding experiment with constant prey concentration supports the reliability of the ingestion-rate method, which eliminates the negative "container effects" of the clearance method, and it seems to be useful in future jellyfish studies, especially on small species/younger stages in which both type and number of prey can be easily and precisely assessed.

  13. In depth analysis of the in vivo toxicity of venom from the jellyfish Stomolophus meleagris.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Rongfeng; Yu, Huahua; Yue, Yang; Liu, Song; Xing, Ronge; Chen, Xiaolin; Wang, Xueqin; Li, Pengcheng

    2014-12-15

    Jellyfish Stomolophus meleagris, a synonym of Nemopilema nomurai, which has often bloomed in the China Sea in recent years, is becoming an increasing threat to human health and life as a result of its strong toxicity. Each year, hundreds of thousands of people were stung, especially in the high season, and the victims suffered itch, edema, myalgia, dyspnea, hypotension, shock and even death. Here, we present the in-depth analysis of the in vivo toxicity of the venom from the jellyfish S. meleagris by using both an acute toxicological approach and pathological analyses. The venom showed an LD50 of approximately 2.92 μg/g body weight in mice following an intravenous injection and caused renal glomerular swelling, renal vesicle stricture, renal tubules dilatation, hepatic blood sinusoid dilatation, pulmonary edema and malignant pleural effusion. The pathological sections analysis showed that the kidney and liver were significantly damaged, but the heart, spleen and stomach had no observed changes. Additionally, the hemanalysis showed an increase of white blood cells (WBC), middle cells (Mid), alanine aminotransferase (ALT), blood urine nitrogen (BUN) and uric acid (UA) in the blood. Moreover, the mice also displayed convulsions, mouth bleeding, piloerection, dyspnea and death after the injection of the venom. In conclusion, this venom has a strong toxicity to the kidney of the mice and the acute renal failure might be one of the most important factors for the death after a severe sting. Hopefully, the present study will provide a significant reference for the treatment of stings by the jellyfish S. meleagris in the future.

  14. A pharmacological investigation of the venom extract of the Australian box jellyfish, Chironex fleckeri, in cardiac and vascular tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, Richard J A; Angus, James A; Winkel, Kenneth D; Wright, Christine E

    2012-02-25

    The pharmacology of Australian box jellyfish, Chironex fleckeri, unpurified (crude) nematocyst venom extract (CVE) was investigated in rat isolated cardiac and vascular tissues and in anaesthetised rats. In small mesenteric arteries CVE (0.01-30 μg/ml) caused contractions (EC(50) 1.15±0.19 μg/ml) that were unaffected by prazosin (0.1 μM), bosentan (10 μM), CGRP(8-37) (1 μM) or tetrodotoxin (1 μM). Box jellyfish antivenom (5-92.6 units/ml) caused rightward shifts of the CVE concentration-response curve with no change in the maximum. In the presence of l-NAME (100 μM) the sensitivity and maximum response to CVE were increased, whilst MgSO(4) (6 mM) decreased both parameters. CVE (1-10 μg/ml) caused inhibition of the contractile response to electrical sympathetic nerve stimulation. Left atrial responses to CVE (0.001-30 μg/ml) were bi-phasic, composed of an initial positive inotropy followed by a marked negative inotropy and atrial standstill. CVE (0.3 μg/ml) elicited a marked decrease in right atrial rate followed by atrial standstill at 3 μg/ml. These responses were unaffected by 1 μM of propranolol, atropine or CGRP(8-37). Antivenom (54 and 73 units/ml) caused rightward shifts of the CVE concentration-response curve and prevented atrial standstill in left and right atria. The effects of CVE do not appear to involve autonomic nerves, post-synaptic α(1)- or β(1)-adrenoceptors, or muscarinic, endothelin or CGRP receptors, but may occur through direct effects on the cardiac and vascular muscle. Box jellyfish antivenom was effective in attenuating CVE-induced responses in isolated cardiac and vascular tissues.

  15. Use of an Inverse Method for Time Series to Estimate the Dynamics of and Management Strategies for the Box Jellyfish Carybdea marsupialis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cesar Bordehore

    Full Text Available Frequently, population ecology of marine organisms uses a descriptive approach in which their sizes and densities are plotted over time. This approach has limited usefulness for design strategies in management or modelling different scenarios. Population projection matrix models are among the most widely used tools in ecology. Unfortunately, for the majority of pelagic marine organisms, it is difficult to mark individuals and follow them over time to determine their vital rates and built a population projection matrix model. Nevertheless, it is possible to get time-series data to calculate size structure and densities of each size, in order to determine the matrix parameters. This approach is known as a "demographic inverse problem" and it is based on quadratic programming methods, but it has rarely been used on aquatic organisms. We used unpublished field data of a population of cubomedusae Carybdea marsupialis to construct a population projection matrix model and compare two different management strategies to lower population to values before year 2008 when there was no significant interaction with bathers. Those strategies were by direct removal of medusae and by reducing prey. Our results showed that removal of jellyfish from all size classes was more effective than removing only juveniles or adults. When reducing prey, the highest efficiency to lower the C. marsupialis population occurred when prey depletion affected prey of all medusae sizes. Our model fit well with the field data and may serve to design an efficient management strategy or build hypothetical scenarios such as removal of individuals or reducing prey. TThis This sdfsdshis method is applicable to other marine or terrestrial species, for which density and population structure over time are available.

  16. Vertical distribution of Aurelia labiata (Scyphozoa) jellyfish in Roscoe Bay is similar during flood and ebb tides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albert, David J.

    2010-10-01

    The vertical distribution of the jellyfish, Aurelia labiata, was assessed during flood and ebb tides in April, May, June, and August 2009 in Roscoe Bay (British Columbia, Canada). Assessments were made at locations along the entire length of the bay. The average tide change was 3.7 m. The vertical position of medusae (in 2 m intervals) did not differ significantly during ebb ( N = 17) and flood tides ( N = 18) in 6 and 8 m water columns. These results indicate that A. labiata do not use tidally synchronized vertical migration to maintain their location or presence in Roscoe Bay.

  17. Antihypertensive effect of long-term oral administration of jellyfish (Rhopilema esculentum) collagen peptides on renovascular hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhuang, Yongliang; Sun, Liping; Zhang, Yufeng; Liu, Gaoxiang

    2012-02-01

    Antihypertensive effect of long-term oral administration of jellyfish (Rhopilema esculentum) collagen peptides (JCP) on renovascular hypertension rats (RVHs) was evaluated. The systolic blood pressure and diastolic blood pressure of the RVHs were significantly reduced with administration of JCP (p oral treatment with high dose JCP (p > 0.05). Furthermore, effect of JCP on angiotensin II (Ang II) concentration of plasma had no significance (p > 0.05), but JCP significantly inhibited the Ang II concentration in RVHs' kidney (p < 0.05). The kidney should be the target site of JCP.

  18. Paecilonic acids A and B, bicyclic fatty acids from the jellyfish-derived fungus Paecilomyces variotii J08NF-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Haibo; Hong, Jongki; Yin, Jun; Liu, Juan; Liu, Yonghong; Choi, Jae Sue; Jung, Jee H

    2016-05-01

    Two new bicyclic fatty acids, paecilonic acids A and B (1 and 2), were isolated from the culture broth of the marine fungus Paecilomyces variotii derived from the jellyfish Nemopilema nomurai. Compounds 1 and 2 share the same molecular formula and possess a 6,8-dioxabicyclo[3.2.1]octane core skeleton. The planar structures of compounds 1 and 2 were established by spectroscopic analysis, which included NMR and ESI-MS/MS. Relative and absolute configurations were determined by analyzing coupling constants, NOESY correlations, and optical rotations.

  19. Microbacterium aureliae sp. nov., a novel actinobacterium isolated from Aurelia aurita, the moon jellyfish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaur, Gurwinder; Mual, Parveen; Kumar, Narender; Verma, Ashish; Kumar, Anand; Krishnamurthi, Srinivasan; Mayilraj, Shanmugam

    2016-11-01

    The taxonomic position of a lemon-yellow-pigmented actinobacterium, strain JF-6T, isolated from Aurelia aurita, the moon jellyfish, collected from the Bay of Bengal coast, Kanyakumari, India, was determined using a polyphasic approach. The strain had phenotypic and chemotaxonomic properties that were consistent with its classification in the genus Microbacterium. Alignment of the 16S rRNA gene sequence of strain JF-6T with sequences from Microbacterium arthrosphaerae CC-VM-YT, Microbacterium yannicii G72T, Microbacterium trichothecenolyticum IFO 15077T, Microbacterium flavescens DSM 20643T, Microbacterium insulae DS-66T, Microbacterium resistens DMMZ 1710T and Microbacterium thalassium IFO 16060T revealed similarities of 98.95, 98.76, 98.43, 98.41, 98.41, 98.26 and 98.22 %, respectively. However, the levels of DNA-DNA relatedness with its closest phylogenetic neighbours confirmed that it represents a novel species within the genus. The major polar lipids were phosphatidylglycerol, diphosphatidylglycerol and an unknown glycolipid. The major menaquinones detected for strain JF-6T were MK-13 and MK-12. The diamino acid in the cell-wall peptidoglycan was ornithine and the peptidoglycan was type B2β (Glu/Hyg-Gly-d-Orn). The DNA G+C content was 69.4 mol%. Based on these differences, strain JF-6T (=MTCC 11843T=JCM 30060T=KCTC 39828T) should be classified as the type strain of a novel species of Microbacterium, for which the name Microbacterium aureliae sp. nov. is proposed.

  20. Transcriptome profiling of the dynamic life cycle of the scypohozoan jellyfish Aurelia aurita.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brekhman, Vera; Malik, Assaf; Haas, Brian; Sher, Noa; Lotan, Tamar

    2015-02-14

    The moon jellyfish Aurelia aurita is a widespread scyphozoan species that forms large seasonal blooms. Here we provide the first comprehensive view of the entire complex life of the Aurelia Red Sea strain by employing transcriptomic profiling of each stage from planula to mature medusa. A de novo transcriptome was assembled from Illumina RNA-Seq data generated from six stages throughout the Aurelia life cycle. Transcript expression profiling yielded clusters of annotated transcripts with functions related to each specific life-cycle stage. Free-swimming planulae were found highly enriched for functions related to cilia and microtubules, and the drastic morphogenetic process undergone by the planula while establishing the future body of the polyp may be mediated by specifically expressed Wnt ligands. Specific transcripts related to sensory functions were found in the strobila and the ephyra, whereas extracellular matrix functions were enriched in the medusa due to high expression of transcripts such as collagen, fibrillin and laminin, presumably involved in mesoglea development. The CL390-like gene, suggested to act as a strobilation hormone, was also highly expressed in the advanced strobila of the Red Sea species, and in the medusa stage we identified betaine-homocysteine methyltransferase, an enzyme that may play an important part in maintaining equilibrium of the medusa's bell. Finally, we identified the transcription factors participating in the Aurelia life-cycle and found that 70% of these 487 identified transcription factors were expressed in a developmental-stage-specific manner. This study provides the first scyphozoan transcriptome covering the entire developmental trajectory of the life cycle of Aurelia. It highlights the importance of numerous stage-specific transcription factors in driving morphological and functional changes throughout this complex metamorphosis, and is expected to be a valuable resource to the community.

  1. Mitochondrial genome of the freshwater jellyfish Craspedacusta sowerbyi and phylogenetics of Medusozoa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Hong; Zhang, Jin; Li, Wenxiang; Wu, Shangong; Wang, Guitang

    2012-01-01

    The 17,922 base pairs (bp) nucleotide sequence of the linear mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) molecule of the freshwater jellyfish Craspedacusta sowerbyi (Hydrozoa, Trachylina, Limnomedusae) has been determined. This sequence exhibits surprisingly low A+T content (57.1%), containing genes for 13 energy pathway proteins, a small and a large subunit rRNAs, and methionine and tryptophan tRNAs. Mitochondrial ancestral medusozoan gene order (AMGO) was found in the C. sowerbyi, as those found in Cubaia aphrodite (Hydrozoa, Trachylina, Limnomedusae), discomedusan Scyphozoa and Staurozoa. The genes of C. sowerbyi mtDNA are arranged in two clusters with opposite transcriptional polarities, whereby transcription proceeds toward the ends of the DNA molecule. Identical inverted terminal repeats (ITRs) flank the ends of the mitochondrial DNA molecule, a characteristic typical of medusozoans. In addition, two open reading frames (ORFs) of 354 and 1611 bp in length were found downstream of the large subunit rRNA gene, similar to the two ORFs of ORF314 and polB discovered in the linear mtDNA of C. aphrodite, discomedusan Scyphozoa and Staurozoa. Phylogenetic analyses of C. sowerbyi and other cnidarians were carried out based on both nucleotide and inferred amino acid sequences of the 13 mitochondrial energy pathway genes. Our working hypothesis supports the monophyletic Medusozoa being a sister group to Octocorallia (Cnidaria, Anthozoa). Within Medusozoa, the phylogenetic analysis suggests that Staurozoa may be the earliest diverging class and the sister group of all other medusozoans. Cubozoa and coronate Scyphozoa form a clade that is the sister group of Hydrozoa plus discomedusan Scyphozoa. Hydrozoa is the sister group of discomedusan Scyphozoa. Semaeostomeae is a paraphyletic clade with Rhizostomeae, while Limnomedusae (Trachylina) is the sister group of hydroidolinans and may be the earliest diverging lineage among Hydrozoa.

  2. Jellyfish Lake, Palau: Regeneration of C, N, Si, and P in anoxic marine lake sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyons, W.B.; Lent, R.M.; Burnett, W.C.; Chin, P.; Landing, W.M.; Orem, W.H.; McArthur, J.M.

    1996-01-01

    Sediment cores from Jellyfish Lake were processed under an inert atmosphere and the pore waters extracted and analyzed for the following parameters: pH, titration alkalinity (TA), Cl-, H4SiO4, PO43-, NH4+, Ca2-, Mg2+, SO42-, and H2S. Additionally, in one set of pore-water samples (core 10), the ??13C of the ??CO2 was also determined. The TA, H4SiO4, PO43-, NH4+, and H2S increased with depth in the pore waters above anoxic bottom-water values. H2S values increased to 3.8 ??M. In one case, both H4SiO4 and PO43- concentrations increased to a maximum value and then decreased with depth, suggesting removal into solid phases. The H4SiO4 concentrations are equal to or greater than pore-water values observed in sediments underlying upwelling areas. PO43- concentrations are, in general, lower than pore-water values from terrigenous nearshore areas but higher than nearshore carbonate pore-water values from Florida Bay or Bermuda. The Ca2+, Cl-, and Mg2+: Cl- ratios show slight decreases in the top 15-20 cm, suggesting that authigenic carbonate may be forming. This suggestion is supported by the fact that the pore waters are saturated with respect to CaCO3 due to the very high TAs. The ??13C measurements of the pore-water ??CO2 are from a shorter core. These measurements reach their most negative concentration at 72 cm and then become slightly heavier. This change is accompanied by a decrease in TA, suggesting the onset of methanogenesis at this location in this core.

  3. Recombinant expression and solution structure of antimicrobial peptide aurelin from jellyfish Aurelia aurita

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shenkarev, Zakhar O.; Panteleev, Pavel V.; Balandin, Sergey V. [Shemyakin and Ovchinnikov Institute of Bioorganic Chemistry, Russian Academy of Sciences, Miklukho-Maklaya str., 16/10, 117997 Moscow (Russian Federation); Gizatullina, Albina K.; Altukhov, Dmitry A. [Shemyakin and Ovchinnikov Institute of Bioorganic Chemistry, Russian Academy of Sciences, Miklukho-Maklaya str., 16/10, 117997 Moscow (Russian Federation); Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology (State University), Department of Physicochemical Biology and Biotechnology, Institutskii per., 9, 141700 Dolgoprudny, Moscow Region (Russian Federation); Finkina, Ekaterina I. [Shemyakin and Ovchinnikov Institute of Bioorganic Chemistry, Russian Academy of Sciences, Miklukho-Maklaya str., 16/10, 117997 Moscow (Russian Federation); Kokryakov, Vladimir N. [Institute of Experimental Medicine, Russian Academy of Medical Sciences, Academica Pavlova str., 12, 197376 Saint-Petersburg (Russian Federation); Arseniev, Alexander S. [Shemyakin and Ovchinnikov Institute of Bioorganic Chemistry, Russian Academy of Sciences, Miklukho-Maklaya str., 16/10, 117997 Moscow (Russian Federation); Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology (State University), Department of Physicochemical Biology and Biotechnology, Institutskii per., 9, 141700 Dolgoprudny, Moscow Region (Russian Federation); Ovchinnikova, Tatiana V., E-mail: ovch@ibch.ru [Shemyakin and Ovchinnikov Institute of Bioorganic Chemistry, Russian Academy of Sciences, Miklukho-Maklaya str., 16/10, 117997 Moscow (Russian Federation); Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology (State University), Department of Physicochemical Biology and Biotechnology, Institutskii per., 9, 141700 Dolgoprudny, Moscow Region (Russian Federation)

    2012-12-07

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Aurelin was overexpressed in Escherichia coli, and its spatial structure was studied by NMR. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Aurelin compact structure encloses helical regions cross-linked by three disulfide bonds. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Aurelin shows structural homology to the BgK and ShK toxins of sea anemones. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Aurelin binds to the anionic lipid vesicles, but does not interact with zwitterionic ones. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Aurelin binds to DPC micelle surface with moderate affinity via two helical regions. -- Abstract: Aurelin is a 40-residue cationic antimicrobial peptide isolated from the mezoglea of a scyphoid jellyfish Aurelia aurita. Aurelin and its {sup 15}N-labeled analogue were overexpressed in Escherichia coli and purified. Antimicrobial activity of the recombinant peptide was examined, and its spatial structure was studied by NMR spectroscopy. Aurelin represents a compact globule, enclosing one 3{sub 10}-helix and two {alpha}-helical regions cross-linked by three disulfide bonds. The peptide binds to anionic lipid (POPC/DOPG, 3:1) vesicles even at physiological salt concentration, it does not interact with zwitterionic (POPC) vesicles and interacts with the DPC micelle surface with moderate affinity via two {alpha}-helical regions. Although aurelin shows structural homology to the BgK and ShK toxins of sea anemones, its surface does not possess the 'functional dyad' required for the high-affinity interaction with the K{sup +}-channels. The obtained data permit to correlate the modest antibacterial properties and membrane activity of aurelin.

  4. Mitochondrial genome of the freshwater jellyfish Craspedacusta sowerbyi and phylogenetics of Medusozoa.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong Zou

    Full Text Available The 17,922 base pairs (bp nucleotide sequence of the linear mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA molecule of the freshwater jellyfish Craspedacusta sowerbyi (Hydrozoa, Trachylina, Limnomedusae has been determined. This sequence exhibits surprisingly low A+T content (57.1%, containing genes for 13 energy pathway proteins, a small and a large subunit rRNAs, and methionine and tryptophan tRNAs. Mitochondrial ancestral medusozoan gene order (AMGO was found in the C. sowerbyi, as those found in Cubaia aphrodite (Hydrozoa, Trachylina, Limnomedusae, discomedusan Scyphozoa and Staurozoa. The genes of C. sowerbyi mtDNA are arranged in two clusters with opposite transcriptional polarities, whereby transcription proceeds toward the ends of the DNA molecule. Identical inverted terminal repeats (ITRs flank the ends of the mitochondrial DNA molecule, a characteristic typical of medusozoans. In addition, two open reading frames (ORFs of 354 and 1611 bp in length were found downstream of the large subunit rRNA gene, similar to the two ORFs of ORF314 and polB discovered in the linear mtDNA of C. aphrodite, discomedusan Scyphozoa and Staurozoa. Phylogenetic analyses of C. sowerbyi and other cnidarians were carried out based on both nucleotide and inferred amino acid sequences of the 13 mitochondrial energy pathway genes. Our working hypothesis supports the monophyletic Medusozoa being a sister group to Octocorallia (Cnidaria, Anthozoa. Within Medusozoa, the phylogenetic analysis suggests that Staurozoa may be the earliest diverging class and the sister group of all other medusozoans. Cubozoa and coronate Scyphozoa form a clade that is the sister group of Hydrozoa plus discomedusan Scyphozoa. Hydrozoa is the sister group of discomedusan Scyphozoa. Semaeostomeae is a paraphyletic clade with Rhizostomeae, while Limnomedusae (Trachylina is the sister group of hydroidolinans and may be the earliest diverging lineage among Hydrozoa.

  5. Preliminary assessment of the jellyfish bycatch captured off southern and southeastern Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafael Schroeder

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Macromedusoid forms of Hydrozoa, Scyphozoa and Cubozoa captured by different fishing gears active in south and southeast of Brazil were recorded on board by scientific observers. After each fishing operation, catch composition was quantified and precise information about the position of the catch was taken between 2008 and 2011. Macromedusae records have been systemized in order to analyze the spatial-temporal distribution, the areas of concentration of the identified species and their relationship with other components of the bycatch. Catch composition analyzed in 986 fishing tows, demonstrated that the participation of these organisms ranged from 6-16%, and the hydromedusae Rhacostoma atlanticum L. Agassiz, 1851 and Olindias sambaquiensis Müller, 1861 were the most abundant and widely distributed species. R. atlanticum was recorded between 20 and 140 m deep while O. sambaquiensis presented registers in shallower waters between 10 and 70 m. No other identified species has been recorded in depths greater than 60 m. Areas of high concentration included the north-central coast of Santa Catarina and Paraná, the northern part of São Paulo and the north-central portion of Rio Grande do Sul State. Although the participation of the macromedusae has been relatively low, in areas of elevated concentration, the relative importance was high, making its participation almost exclusive among other zoological groups. Those registers of abundance and the respective areas of high concentration of macromedusae, which were associated to high primary production sites, may serve as a theoretical reference of the abundance of these organisms for future studies that aim to evaluate possible changes in jellyfish populations.

  6. [Molecular identification and detection of moon jellyfish (Aurelia sp.) based on partial sequencing of mitochondrial 16S rDNA and COI].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jian-Yan; Zhen, Yu; Wang, Guo-shan; Mi, Tie-Zhu; Yu, Zhi-gang

    2013-03-01

    Taking the moon jellyfish Aurelia sp. commonly found in our coastal sea areas as test object, its genome DNA was extracted, the partial sequences of mt-16S rDNA (650 bp) and mt-COI (709 bp) were PCR-amplified, and, after purification, cloning, and sequencing, the sequences obtained were BLASTn-analyzed. The sequences of greater difference with those of the other jellyfish were chosen, and eight specific primers for the mt-16S rDNA and mt-COI of Aurelia sp. were designed, respectively. The specificity test indicated that the primer AS3 for the mt-16S rDNA and the primer AC3 for the mt-COI were excellent in rapidly detecting the target jellyfish from Rhopilema esculentum, Nemopilema nomurai, Cyanea nozakii, Acromitus sp., and Aurelia sp., and thus, the techniques for the molecular identification and detection of moon jellyfish were preliminarily established, which could get rid of the limitations in classical morphological identification of Aurelia sp. , being able to find the Aurelia sp. in the samples more quickly and accurately.

  7. Effects of large gut volume in gelatinous zooplankton: ingestion rate, bolus production and food patch utilization by the jellyfish Sarsia tubulosa

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansson, L.J.; Kiørboe, Thomas

    2006-01-01

    Many gelatinous zooplankton consume a large amount of prey and have stomach volumes much greater than the volume of individual prey. We suggest that jellyfish can use their voluminous stomach as a buffering food-accumulating organ that allows the organism to feed at maximum clearance rate in a wide...

  8. 新鲜海蜇不同部位总糖含量的测定%Determination of total sugar concentration in different parts of fresh jellyfish

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孙鑫; 刘希光; 李海; 薛松; 高玉荣; 李鹏程; 于华华

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, different parts of fresh jellyfish (Rhopilema esculentum) were lyophilized , and the total sugar contents were determined by improved differential phenol-sulfuric acid method. The hydrolysis conditions of the treated jellyfish samples were optimized by orthogonal test. The optimal hydrolysis conditions of lyophilized jellyfish were 1 mol/L H2SO4 at 90℃for two hours. The result showed that the total sugar content was 9.42%in the gonad tissue, 7.28%in the umbrella tissue and 7.58%in the oral arms tissue of dried jellyfish, respectively.%以新鲜海蜇(Rhopilema esculentum Kishinouye)为原料,将其冷冻干燥处理后,采用改良的差示苯酚-硫酸法测定了海蜇不同部位的总糖含量,并用正交实验优化了水解条件。实验结果表明,海蜇的最佳水解条件为:1 mol/L硫酸,90℃水解120 min,测得海蜇生殖腺、海蜇皮、海蜇头的总糖含量分别为9.42%,7.28%和7.58%。

  9. A method for in situ estimation of prey selectivity and predation rate in large plankton, exemplified with the jellyfish Aurelia aurita (L.)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansson, L.J.

    2006-01-01

    among individual jellyfish and among the various oral arms and gastric pouches within individuals. Clearance rates varied strongly with prey type. The medusae selected large crustacean prey (cladocerans and copepods/copepodites) over echinoderm larvae and copepod nauplii. Prey distribution within...

  10. Screening of extraction methods for glycoproteins from jellyfish ( Rhopilema esculentum) oral-arms by high performance liquid chromatography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Guoyan; Li, Bafang; Zhao, Xue; Zhuang, Yongliang; Yan, Mingyan; Hou, Hu; Zhang, Xiukun; Chen, Li

    2009-03-01

    In order to select an optimum extraction method for the target glycoprotein (TGP) from jellyfish ( Rhopilema esculentum) oral-arms, a high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC)-assay for the determination of the TGP was developed. Purified target glycoprotein was taken as a standard glycoprotein. The results showed that the calibration curves for peak area plotted against concentration for TGP were linear ( r = 0.9984, y = 4.5895 x+47.601) over concentrations ranging from 50 to 400 mgL-1. The mean extraction recovery was 97.84% (CV2.60%). The fractions containing TGP were isolated from jellyfish ( R. esculentum) oral-arms by four extraction methods: 1) water extraction (WE), 2) phosphate buffer solution (PBS) extraction (PE), 3) ultrasound-assisted water extraction (UA-WE), 4) ultrasound-assisted PBS extraction (UA-PE). The lyophilized extract was dissolved in Milli-Q water and analyzed directly on a short TSK-GEL G4000PWXL (7.8 mm×300 mm) column. Our results indicated that the UA-PE method was the optimum extraction method selected by HPLC.

  11. Cardiovascular effect is independent of hemolytic toxicity of tentacle-only extract from the jellyfish Cyanea capillata.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao Liang

    Full Text Available Our previous studies have confirmed that the crude tentacle-only extract (cTOE from the jellyfish Cyanea capillata (Cyaneidae exhibits hemolytic and cardiovascular toxicities simultaneously. So, it is quite difficult to discern the underlying active component responsible for heart injury caused by cTOE. The inactivation of the hemolytic toxicity from cTOE accompanied with a removal of plenty of precipitates would facilitate the separation of cardiovascular component and the investigation of its cardiovascular injury mechanism. In our research, after the treatment of one-step alkaline denaturation followed by twice dialysis, the protein concentration of the treated tentacle-only extract (tTOE was about 1/3 of cTOE, and SDS-PAGE showed smaller numbers and lower density of protein bands in tTOE. The hemolytic toxicity of tTOE was completely lost while its cardiovascular toxicity was well retained. The observations of cardiac function, histopathology and ultrastructural pathology all support tTOE with significant cardiovascular toxicity. Blood gas indexes and electrolytes changed far less by tTOE than those by cTOE, though still with significant difference from normal. In summary, the cardiovascular toxicity of cTOE can exist independently of the hemolytic toxicity and tTOE can be employed as a better venom sample for further purification and mechanism research on the jellyfish cardiovascular toxic proteins.

  12. Characterising the enzymatic profile of crude tentacle extracts from the South Atlantic jellyfish Olindias sambaquiensis (Cnidaria: Hydrozoa).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knittel, Paloma S; Long, Paul F; Brammall, Lucas; Marques, Antonio C; Almeida, Michelle T; Padilla, Gabriel; Moura-da-Silva, Ana M

    2016-09-01

    Jellyfish venoms are of medical and biotechnological importance, with toxins displaying antimicrobial, analgesic and anti-tumor activities. Although proteolytic enzymes have also been described, detailed characterisation of these proteins is scant in Olindias spp. High throughput mass spectrometry profiling of cnidarian venoms has become increasingly popular since the first description of the proteomic profile of putative toxins isolated from nematocysts of the hydrozoan jellyfish Olindias sambaquiensis describing the presence of orthologous enzymes as presented in venoms of advanced species as snakes. Rigorous bioinformatics analyses can aid functional annotation, but biochemical assays are prerequisite to unambiguously assign toxic function to a peptide or protein. Here we present results that experimentally confirm previously predicted proteomic analysis that crude venom extracts from tentacles of O. sambaquiensis are composed of polypeptides with metalloproteinase, serine proteinase and phospholipases A2 activities. Surprisingly, levels of serine proteinase and phospholipase A2 activities were comparable to those observed in venoms of Bothrops snakes which were used as positive controls in this study. Hence, these data offer new opportunities to explore serine proteinase and phospholipase A2 activities in the clinical sequelae following O. sambaquiensis envenomation, with future possible biopharmaceutical applications. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Nitrogen and Phosphorus Budget of a Polyculture System of Sea Cucumber (Apostichopus japonicus), Jellyfish (Rhopilema esculenta) and Shrimp (Fenneropenaeus chinensis)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Junwei; DONG Shuanglin; GAO Qinfeng; ZHU Changbo

    2014-01-01

    The nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) budget and the ecological efficiency of a polyculture system of sea cucumber (Apostichopus japonicus), jellyfish (Rhopilema esculenta) and shrimp (Fenneropenaeus chinensis) were studied in a cofferdam, 120.2 ha in size. The nutrients were supplied by spring tide inflow. In total, 139600 kg N yr-1 and 9730 kg P yr-1 input to the system;while 118900 kg N yr-1 and 2840 kg P yr-1 outflowed from the system concurrently, thus the outflow was 85.7%(N) and 29.2%(P) of inflow. The production of N and P was 889.5 kg yr-1 and 49.28 kg yr-1 (sea cucumber) and 204 kg yr-1 and 18.03 kg yr-1 (jellyfish and shrimp), respectively. The utilization rate of N and P by polycultured animals was 7.8‰and 6.9‰, respectively, 21.9%and 38%higher than that of monocultured sea cucumber. Our results indicated that the polyculture system was an efficient culture system of animals and a remediation system of coastal environment as well;it scavenged 14.3%and 70.8%of N and P, respectively. Such an ecological efficiency may be improved further by increasing either the stocking density or the size of sea cucumber or both.

  14. Macrobenthic community structure and species composition in the Yellow Sea and East China Sea in jellyfish bloom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Songyao; Li, Xinzheng; Wang, Hongfa; Zhang, Baolin

    2014-05-01

    To understand the characteristics of macrobenthic structures and the relationship between environment and benthic assemblages in jellyfish bloom, we studied the macrobenthos and related environmental factors in the coastal waters of the Yellow Sea and East China Sea. Data were collected during two seasonal cruises in April and August of 2011, and analyzed with multivariate statistical methods. Up to 306 macrobenthic species were registered from the research areas, including 115 species of Polychaeta, 78 of Crustacea, 61 of Mollusca, 30 of Echinodermata, and 22 of other groups. Nine polychaete species occurred at frequencies higher than 25% from the sampling stations: Lumbrineris longifolia, Notomastus latericeus, Ninöe palmata, Ophelina acuminata, Nephtys oligobranchia, Onuphis geophiliformis, Glycera chirori, Terebellides stroemii, and Aricidea fragilis. Both the average biomass and abundance of macrobenthos are higher in August (23.8 g/m2 and 237.7 ind./m2) than those in April (11.3 g/m2 and 128 ind./m2); the dissimilarity of macrobenthic structures among stations is as high as 70%. In terms of the dissimilarity values, we divided the stations into four clusters in spring and eight in summer. The ABC curve shows that the macrofauna communities in high jellyfish abundance were not changed. Canonical correspondence analysis showed that depth, temperature, median grain size, total organic carbon of sediment and total nitrogen in sediment were important factors affecting the macrozoobenthic community in the study area.

  15. Cloning a Chymotrypsin-Like 1 (CTRL-1 Protease cDNA from the Jellyfish Nemopilema nomurai

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yunwi Heo

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available An enzyme in a nematocyst extract of the Nemopilema nomurai jellyfish, caught off the coast of the Republic of Korea, catalyzed the cleavage of chymotrypsin substrate in an amidolytic kinetic assay, and this activity was inhibited by the serine protease inhibitor, phenylmethanesulfonyl fluoride. We isolated the full-length cDNA sequence of this enzyme, which contains 850 nucleotides, with an open reading frame of 801 encoding 266 amino acids. A blast analysis of the deduced amino acid sequence showed 41% identity with human chymotrypsin-like (CTRL and the CTRL-1 precursor. Therefore, we designated this enzyme N. nomurai CTRL-1. The primary structure of N. nomurai CTRL-1 includes a leader peptide and a highly conserved catalytic triad of His69, Asp117, and Ser216. The disulfide bonds of chymotrypsin and the substrate-binding sites are highly conserved compared with the CTRLs of other species, including mammalian species. Nemopilema nomurai CTRL-1 is evolutionarily more closely related to Actinopterygii than to Scyphozoan (Aurelia aurita or Hydrozoan (Hydra vulgaris. The N. nomurai CTRL1 was amplified from the genomic DNA with PCR using specific primers designed based on the full-length cDNA, and then sequenced. The N. nomurai CTRL1 gene contains 2434 nucleotides and four distinct exons. The 5′ donor splice (GT and 3′ acceptor splice sequences (AG are wholly conserved. This is the first report of the CTRL1 gene and cDNA structures in the jellyfish N. nomurai.

  16. Nitrogen and phosphorus budget of a polyculture system of sea cucumber ( Apostichopus japonicus), jellyfish ( Rhopilema esculenta) and shrimp ( Fenneropenaeus chinensis)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Junwei; Dong, Shuanglin; Gao, Qinfeng; Zhu, Changbo

    2014-06-01

    The nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) budget and the ecological efficiency of a polyculture system of sea cucumber ( Apostichopus japonicus), jellyfish ( Rhopilema esculenta) and shrimp ( Fenneropenaeus chinensis) were studied in a cofferdam, 120.2 ha in size. The nutrients were supplied by spring tide inflow. In total, 139600 kg N yr-1 and 9730 kg P yr-1 input to the system; while 118900 kg N yr-1 and 2840 kg P yr-1 outflowed from the system concurrently, thus the outflow was 85.7% (N) and 29.2% (P) of inflow. The production of N and P was 889.5 kg yr-1 and 49.28 kg yr-1 (sea cucumber) and 204 kg yr-1 and 18.03 kg yr-1 (jellyfish and shrimp), respectively. The utilization rate of N and P by polycultured animals was 7.8‰ and 6.9‰, respectively, 21.9% and 38% higher than that of monocultured sea cucumber. Our results indicated that the polyculture system was an efficient culture system of animals and a remediation system of coastal environment as well; it scavenged 14.3% and 70.8% of N and P, respectively. Such an ecological efficiency may be improved further by increasing either the stocking density or the size of sea cucumber or both.

  17. Growth, development and temporal variation in the onset of six Chironex fleckeri medusae seasons: a contribution to understanding jellyfish ecology.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew Gordon

    Full Text Available Despite the worldwide distribution, toxicity and commercial, industrial and medical impacts jellyfish present, many aspects of their ecology remain poorly understood. Quantified here are important ecological parameters of Chironex fleckeri medusae, contributing not only to the understanding of an understudied taxon, the cubozoa, but also to the broader understanding of jellyfish ecology. C. fleckeri medusae were collected across seven seasons (1999, 2000, 2003, 2005-07 and 2010, with growth rates, temporal variation in the medusae season onset and differences in population structure between estuarine and coastal habitats quantified. With a mean of 2 September ± 2 d (mean ± 95% confidence limits, the earliest date of metamorphosis was temporally constrained between seasons, varying by only 7 d (30 August to 5 September. Juvenile medusae appeared to be added over an extended period, suggesting polyp metamorphosis was an ongoing process once it commenced. At a maximum of 3 ± 0.2 mm d(-1 IPD, medusae growth to an asymptotic size of ~190 mm IPD was rapid, yet, with the oldest medusae estimated to be ~78 d in age, medusae did not appear to accumulate along the coastline. Furthermore, a greater proportion of juveniles were observed along the coastline, with estuarine populations typified by larger medusae. With key aspects of C. fleckeri's ecology now quantified, medusae season management protocols can be further developed.

  18. Growth, development and temporal variation in the onset of six Chironex fleckeri medusae seasons: a contribution to understanding jellyfish ecology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, Matthew; Seymour, Jamie

    2012-01-01

    Despite the worldwide distribution, toxicity and commercial, industrial and medical impacts jellyfish present, many aspects of their ecology remain poorly understood. Quantified here are important ecological parameters of Chironex fleckeri medusae, contributing not only to the understanding of an understudied taxon, the cubozoa, but also to the broader understanding of jellyfish ecology. C. fleckeri medusae were collected across seven seasons (1999, 2000, 2003, 2005-07 and 2010), with growth rates, temporal variation in the medusae season onset and differences in population structure between estuarine and coastal habitats quantified. With a mean of 2 September ± 2 d (mean ± 95% confidence limits), the earliest date of metamorphosis was temporally constrained between seasons, varying by only 7 d (30 August to 5 September). Juvenile medusae appeared to be added over an extended period, suggesting polyp metamorphosis was an ongoing process once it commenced. At a maximum of 3 ± 0.2 mm d(-1) IPD, medusae growth to an asymptotic size of ~190 mm IPD was rapid, yet, with the oldest medusae estimated to be ~78 d in age, medusae did not appear to accumulate along the coastline. Furthermore, a greater proportion of juveniles were observed along the coastline, with estuarine populations typified by larger medusae. With key aspects of C. fleckeri's ecology now quantified, medusae season management protocols can be further developed.

  19. Pharmacologically distinct cardiovascular effects of box jellyfish (Chironex fleckeri) venom and a tentacle-only extract in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramasamy, Sharmaine; Isbister, Geoffrey K; Seymour, Jamie E; Hodgson, Wayne C

    2005-02-15

    Using a recently developed technique to extract jellyfish venom from nematocysts, the present study investigated the in vivo cardiovascular effects of Chironex fleckeri venom and tentacle extract (devoid of nematocysts). In anaesthetised rats, venom (10 microg/kg, i.v.) produced a transient pressor response (23+/-4 mmHg) followed, in two of five animals, by cardiovascular collapse. Tentacle extract (100 microg/kg, i.v.) produced a more prolonged hypertensive effect (31+/-3 mmHg) without cardiovascular collapse. Prazosin (50 microg/kg, i.v.) did not have any significant effect on the cardiovascular effects produced by venom. However, prazosin significantly attenuated the pressor response produced by tentacle extract. Ketanserin (1 mg/kg, i.v.) did not have any significant effect on the cardiovascular response of the anaesthetised rat to venom (10 microg/kg, i.v.; 25+/-1 mmHg). Sodium dodecyl sulphate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) was performed to compare the two jellyfish samples used in the present study. In addition to ensuring reproducibility of future studies and allow comparison with previous research. We show, for the first time, that a pure venom sample extracted from C. fleckeri nematocysts and a tentacle extract have cardiovascular effects in the anaesthetised rat which are different and pharmacologically distinct.

  20. The Acute Toxicity and Hematological Characterization of the Effects of Tentacle-Only Extract from the Jellyfish Cyanea capillata

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liming Zhang

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available To investigate the hematologic changes and the activities of jellyfish venoms other than hemolytic and cardiovascular toxicities, the acute toxicity of tentacle-only extract (TOE from the jellyfish Cyanea capillata was observed in mice, and hematological indexes were examined in rats. The median lethal dose (LD50 of TOE was 4.25 mg/kg, and the acute toxicity involved both heart- and nervous system-related symptoms. Arterial blood gas indexes, including pH, PCO2, HCO3−, HCO3std, TCO2, BEecf and BE (B, decreased significantly. PO2 showed a slight increase, while SO2c (% had no change at any time. Na+ and Ca2+ decreased, but K+ increased. Biochemical indexes, including LDH, CK, CK-MB, ALT, AST and sCr, significantly increased. Other biochemical indexes, including BUN and hemodiastase, remained normal. Lactic acid significantly increased, while glucose, Hct% and THbc showed slight temporary increases and then returned to normal. These results on the acute toxicity and hematological changes should improve our understanding of the in vivo pathophysiological effects of TOE from C. capillata and indicate that it may also have neurotoxicity, liver toxicity and muscular toxicity in addition to hemolytic and cardiovascular toxicities, but no kidney or pancreatic toxicity.

  1. Algebraic model of baryon resonances

    CERN Document Server

    Bijker, R

    1997-01-01

    We discuss recent calculations of electromagnetic form factors and strong decay widths of nucleon and delta resonances. The calculations are done in a collective constituent model of the nucleon, in which the baryons are interpreted as rotations and vibrations of an oblate top.

  2. A Collective Model of Baryons

    CERN Document Server

    Bijker, R; Leviatan, A

    1993-01-01

    We propose an algebraic description of the geometric structure of baryons in terms of the algebra $U(7)$. We construct a mass operator that preserves the threefold permutational symmetry and discuss a collective model of baryons with the geometry of an oblate top.

  3. Simulate of the depletion of fishery and jellyfish in Liaodong Bay%辽东湾海蜇资源衰退仿真研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    苏艺; 金成浩; 孙康

    2015-01-01

    Based on Netlogo software ,this paper simulates the jellyfish resources of Liaodong Bay to explore the way of how to sustain the jellyfish resources .The results show that the fishing intensity and sea pollution are the key factors of system optimization ,which are effective ways to restore and sustain the jellyfish resources for decreasing fishing intensity and sea pollution .It is also a gradual process .T he result indicates that breeding massively babies of jellyfish may take the place of decrea‐sing fishing intensity and sea pollution .Therefore ,the government should adopt two steps .The first is breeding massively babies of jellyfish to replace decreasing fishing intensity and sea pollution .T he second is decreasing fishing intensity and sea pollution .%运用Netlogo仿真工具对辽东湾海蜇资源进行仿真实验,探讨海蜇资源可持续利用的途径。研究结论表明:大规模的海蜇增殖放流可以有效缓解短期内无法大幅度降低捕捞强度和海域污染的压力,但不能从根本上遏制海蜇资源的衰退。海域污染和捕捞强度是实现系统优化的关键,两者的降低是一个渐进过程,首先,可以采取增加海蜇资源初始量代替降低海域污染水平和捕捞强度的措施;其次,是以降低海域污染水平和捕捞强度为主的分阶段海蜇捕捞专项管理措施。

  4. Exactly solvable models of baryon structure

    CERN Document Server

    Bijker, R

    1998-01-01

    We present a qualitative analysis of the gross features of baryon spectroscopy (masses and form factors) in terms of various exactly solvable models. It is shown that a collective model, in which baryon resonances are interpreted as rotations and vibrations of an oblate symmetric top, provides a good starting point for a more detailed quantitative study.

  5. Exactly solvable models of baryon structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bijker, R. [Instituto de Ciencias Nucleares, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico. Apartado Postal 70-543, 04510 Mexico D.F. (Mexico); Leviatan, A. [Racah Institute of Physics, The Hebrew University. Jerusalem 91904, Israel (Israel)

    1998-12-31

    We present a qualitative analysis of the gross features of baryon spectroscopy (masses and form factors) in terms of various exactly solvable models. It is shown that a collective model, in which baryon resonances are interpreted as rotations and vibrations of an oblate symmetric top, provides a good starting point for a more detailed quantitative study. (Author)

  6. Search and analysis of superdeformed and oblate states in {sup 193}Pb nucleus with the EUROGAM II multidetector array; Recherche et analyse des etats superdeformes et aplatis dans le noyau {sup 193}Pb a l'aide du multidetecteur EUROGAM II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ducroux, L. [Lyon-1 Univ., 69 - Villeurbanne (France). Inst. de Physique Nucleaire]|[Universite Claude Bernard, 69 - Lyon (France)

    1997-01-09

    This work is devoted to the search and analysis of superdeformed and oblate states in {sup 193}Pb nucleus. High spin states of this isotope, populated via fusion-evaporation reaction {sup 168}Er ({sup 30}Si, 5n) {sup 193}Pb, have been studied with the EUROGAM II {gamma} multidetector array located near the VIVITRON accelerator in Strasbourg. New sorting and analysis programs have been developed in particular related to the background treatment. Angular distribution and linear polarisation analysis allowed us to assign the {gamma} transition multipolarities. Five dipole bands, corresponding to a weakly oblate-deformed shape of the nucleus, have been observed and connected to the low-lying states. The level scheme has been considerably extended up to a spin of 61/2 {Dirac_h} and an excitation energy of about 8 MeV. These structures have been interpreted as based on a high-K two-quasi-proton excitation coupled to rotation aligned quasi-neutrons. Six superdeformed bands, corresponding to a high prolate-deformed shape of the nucleus, have been observed. These six bands have been interpreted as three pairs of signature partners based on quasineutron excitations. The extraction of the g-factor of a K=9/2 neutron superdeformed orbital has been done for the first time in lead isotopes, giving access to the magnetic properties of the extreme nuclear matter. All these results have been discussed in terms of microscopic mean field self-consistent Hartree-Fock calculations using the microscopic 'rotor + particle(s)' model. (author)

  7. Bioinformatic Analysis on Jellyfish Hematoxin%水母溶血毒素的生物信息学分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    欧阳春磊; 高佳栋; 任玉坤; 肖良; 王倩倩; 郭玉峰; 蔡滨欣; 张黎明

    2009-01-01

    AIM: To illustrate the structure and function of five hematoxin sequences reported in four jellyfish and explore the possible mechanism of pathogenesis.METHODS: Bioinformatic methods were used to analyze the composition and sequence of amino acid residues, physico-chemical property, signal peptide, membrane spanning domain, hydrophobicity or hydrophilicity, secon- dary structure, conserved region and molecular phylogenetic evolution.RESULT and CONCLUSIONS: The results showed that the five jellyfish hematoxins were similar in composition and sequence of amino acid residues and physico-chemical property.The amino acid sequences of jellyfish hematoxins contained membrane spanning domain and hydrophobic regions; with a possible cleavage site in the signal peptide between the amino acid residues 20 and 21; α-helix and random coil were the major motifs of predicted secondary structure while β-tum and extended strand spread in the whole protein; There were four conserved amino acid sequences in three of the five hematoxins and similar phylogenetic trees were constructed by both NJ and MP methods.%目的与方法:为阐明已报道的5种水母溶血毒素的氨基酸组成和序列、信号肽、跨膜结构域、疏水性/亲水性、二级结构,保守区域、分子进化关系等,利用生物信息学方法对其进行了分析和预测.结果与结论:不同水母溶血毒素的氨基酸组成和理化性质相类似;水母溶血毒素存在跨膜结构域和疏水区域;在20~21位点最有可能存在信号肽切割位点:α螺旋、不规则卷曲是二级结构中最大量的结构元件,β折叠散布于整个蛋白质中;在其中3种水母毒素蛋白中存在4个保守区;以MP法和NJ法构建的系统发生树基本一致.

  8. 长期低温条件对海蜇横裂生殖的影响%Long-term Low Temperature Effect on Jellyfish Strobilation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    游奎; 王绍军; 马彩华; 高天翔; 王云中; 杨翠华

    2011-01-01

    采用实验生态学手段,研究了长期低温条件对海蜇螅状体保育存活率和横裂生殖效率的影响.结果表明:海蜇横裂生殖后的螅状体经过1a的长期低温保育后,其存活率约33%,显著高于不采用低温条件保育螅状体的成活率.横裂生殖后的螅状体经长期低温保育后仍具有横裂生殖能力,碟状幼体释放率仍然高达15%,其横裂生殖能力可与正常螅状幼体相比.采用长期低温环境条件,可以有效地提高海蜇螅状体的存活率,并可以恢复促进海蜇的横裂生殖效率,相关结果可以为海蜇苗种生产提供参考和指导.%By means of methods in experimental ecology, the survival rate of jellyfish scyphistomae bred under long-term low temperature conditions, and the effects of these conditions on the jellyfish strobilation are studied. It is shown in the study results that after scyphistomae reproduced from jellyfish strobilation has been bred under one-year long low temperature conditions, its survival rate is about 33 %, significantly higher than that of scyphistomae without low temperature breeding conditions. Although those survivors have been bred under low temperature conditions for a long time, they still have their strobilation ability,and the ephyrae release rate is as high as iS%. Those ephyrae lavae will have their strobilation ability comparable with the ability of scyphistomae lavae bred under normal conditions. Therefore the long-term low temperature conditions are favourable to effectively raise the survival rate of jellyfish scyphistomae larvae and to improve jellyfish strobilation efficiency. These relevand results might be used as reference and guidance for jellyfish lava production.

  9. Settlement of planulae of the Moon jellyfish Aurelia aurita onto hydrophilic polycarbonate plates modified by atmospheric plasma treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomaru, Akiko; Sasaki, Ryota; Miyahara, Hidekazu; Okino, Akitoshi; Ogawa, Nobuhiro; Hamasaki, Koji

    2014-01-01

    It has been reported that planula larvae of some jellyfish prefer artificial substrates for settlement. This research focused on the relationship between the settlement of planulae and the wettability of artificial substrate surfaces. We used atmospheric plasmas to change the wettability of the surfaces of polycarbonate (PC) plates because plasma treatment has no chemical side effects. The treatment made the surfaces hydrophilic, as evidenced by the decrease of contact angle from 85° to 35°. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy revealed that the change of wettability of the PC plates could be attributed to N2, which was probably ionized in the air above the plates. Scanning electron microscopy revealed no difference in the surface morphology of the plates before and after plasma treatment. Results of bioassays using treated PC plates showed that planulae tended to preferentially settle on hydrophobic surfaces.

  10. Noninvasive laser therapy in the treatment of keloid scar after injury caused by a jellyfish: a case report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kymplova, Jaroslava; Navratil, Leos; Skopek, Jiri

    2001-10-01

    Keloid scars trouble the patients particularly for aesthetical reasons. They also frequency result in various functional disturbances, they are painful and the patient suffers for dysesthesia on touch. Low level laser is able to provide three principal effects: biostimulating, analgesic and antiinflammatory. Particularly thanks to the first two effects we are able, when adhering to the proper therapeutic procedure, to moderate or even remove the above mentioned problems. We complement the low level laser treatment by applications of ointments, cremes or silicone strips. Our communication is aimed at a case report concerning the treatment of keloid scars resulting from an injury by a jellyfish with the aim to familiarize the reader with wide therapeutic possibilities of non-invasive laser, even in indications which are not frequently encountered in central Europe.

  11. Settlement of planulae of the Moon jellyfish Aurelia aurita onto hydrophilic polycarbonate plates modified by atmospheric plasma treatment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akiko Tomaru

    Full Text Available It has been reported that planula larvae of some jellyfish prefer artificial substrates for settlement. This research focused on the relationship between the settlement of planulae and the wettability of artificial substrate surfaces. We used atmospheric plasmas to change the wettability of the surfaces of polycarbonate (PC plates because plasma treatment has no chemical side effects. The treatment made the surfaces hydrophilic, as evidenced by the decrease of contact angle from 85° to 35°. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy revealed that the change of wettability of the PC plates could be attributed to N2, which was probably ionized in the air above the plates. Scanning electron microscopy revealed no difference in the surface morphology of the plates before and after plasma treatment. Results of bioassays using treated PC plates showed that planulae tended to preferentially settle on hydrophobic surfaces.

  12. Axial acoustic radiation force on rigid oblate and prolate spheroids in Bessel vortex beams of progressive, standing and quasi-standing waves

    CERN Document Server

    Mitri, F G

    2016-01-01

    The analysis using the partial-wave series expansion (PWSE) method in spherical coordinates is extended to evaluate the acoustic radiation force experienced by rigid oblate and prolate spheroids centered on the axis of wave propagation of high-order Bessel vortex beams composed of progressive, standing and quasi-standing waves, respectively. A coupled system of linear equations is derived after applying the Neumann boundary condition for an immovable surface in a non-viscous fluid, and solved numerically by matrix inversion after performing a single numerical integration procedure. The system of linear equations depends on the partial-wave index n and the order of the Bessel vortex beam m using truncated but converging PWSEs in the least-squares sense. Numerical results for the radiation force function, which is the radiation force per unit energy density and unit cross-sectional surface, are computed with particular emphasis on the amplitude ratio describing the transition from the progressive to the pure st...

  13. First evidence of inbreeding, relatedness and chaotic genetic patchiness in the holoplanktonic jellyfish Pelagia noctiluca (Scyphozoa, Cnidaria).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aglieri, Giorgio; Papetti, Chiara; Zane, Lorenzo; Milisenda, Giacomo; Boero, Ferdinando; Piraino, Stefano

    2014-01-01

    Genetic drift and non-random mating seldom influence species with large breeding populations and high dispersal potential, characterized by unstructured gene pool and panmixia at a scale lower than the minimum dispersal range of individuals. In the present study, a set of nine microsatellite markers was developed and used to investigate the spatio-temporal genetic patterns of the holoplanktonic jellyfish Pelagia noctiluca (Scyphozoa) in the Southern Tyrrhenian Sea. Homozygote excess was detected at eight loci, and individuals exhibited intra-population relatedness higher than expected by chance in at least three samples. This result was supported by the presence of siblings in at least 5 out 8 samples, 4 of which contained full-sib in addition to half-sib dyads. Having tested and ruled out alternative explanations as null alleles, our results suggest the influence of reproductive and behavioural features in shaping the genetic structure of P. noctiluca, as outcomes of population genetics analyses pointed out. Indeed, the genetic differentiation among populations was globally small but highlighted: a) a spatial genetic patchiness uncorrelated with distance between sampling locations, and b) a significant genetic heterogeneity between samples collected in the same locations in different years. Therefore, despite its extreme dispersal potential, P. noctiluca does not maintain a single homogenous population, but rather these jellyfish appear to have intra-bloom localized recruitment and/or individual cohesiveness, whereby siblings more likely swarm together as a single group and remain close after spawning events. These findings provide the first evidence of family structures and consequent genetic patchiness in a species with highly dispersive potential throughout its whole life cycle, contributing to understanding the patterns of dispersal and connectivity in marine environments.

  14. Chironex fleckeri (box jellyfish) venom proteins: expansion of a cnidarian toxin family that elicits variable cytolytic and cardiovascular effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brinkman, Diane L; Konstantakopoulos, Nicki; McInerney, Bernie V; Mulvenna, Jason; Seymour, Jamie E; Isbister, Geoffrey K; Hodgson, Wayne C

    2014-02-21

    The box jellyfish Chironex fleckeri produces extremely potent and rapid-acting venom that is harmful to humans and lethal to prey. Here, we describe the characterization of two C. fleckeri venom proteins, CfTX-A (∼40 kDa) and CfTX-B (∼42 kDa), which were isolated from C. fleckeri venom using size exclusion chromatography and cation exchange chromatography. Full-length cDNA sequences encoding CfTX-A and -B and a third putative toxin, CfTX-Bt, were subsequently retrieved from a C. fleckeri tentacle cDNA library. Bioinformatic analyses revealed that the new toxins belong to a small family of potent cnidarian pore-forming toxins that includes two other C. fleckeri toxins, CfTX-1 and CfTX-2. Phylogenetic inferences from amino acid sequences of the toxin family grouped CfTX-A, -B, and -Bt in a separate clade from CfTX-1 and -2, suggesting that the C. fleckeri toxins have diversified structurally and functionally during evolution. Comparative bioactivity assays revealed that CfTX-1/2 (25 μg kg(-1)) caused profound effects on the cardiovascular system of anesthetized rats, whereas CfTX-A/B elicited only minor effects at the same dose. Conversely, the hemolytic activity of CfTX-A/B (HU50 = 5 ng ml(-1)) was at least 30 times greater than that of CfTX-1/2. Structural homology between the cubozoan toxins and insecticidal three-domain Cry toxins (δ-endotoxins) suggests that the toxins have a similar pore-forming mechanism of action involving α-helices of the N-terminal domain, whereas structural diversification among toxin members may modulate target specificity. Expansion of the cnidarian toxin family therefore provides new insights into the evolutionary diversification of box jellyfish toxins from a structural and functional perspective.

  15. Rapid short term and gradual permanent cardiotoxic effects of vertebrate toxins from Chironex fleckeri (Australian box jellyfish) venom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaousis, Stephanie; Smout, Michael; Wilson, David; Loukas, Alex; Mulvenna, Jason; Seymour, Jamie

    2014-03-01

    The vertebrate cardiotoxic components of the venom produced by the Australian box jellyfish, Chironex fleckeri, have not previously been isolated. We have uncovered for the first time, three distinct cytotoxic crude fractions from within the vertebrate cardiotoxic peak of C. fleckeri venom by monitoring viability of human muscle cells with an impedance based assay (ACEA xCELLigence system) measuring cell detachment as cytotoxicity which was correlated with a reduction in cell metabolism using a cell proliferation (MTS) assay. When the effects of the venom components on human cardiomyocytes and human skeletal muscle cells were compared, two fractions were found to specifically affect cardiomyocytes with distinct temporal profiles (labelled Crude Toxic Fractions (CTF), α and β). A third fraction (CTF-γ) was toxic to both muscle cell types and therefore not cardio specific. The vertebrate, cardio specific CTF-α and CTF-β, presented distinct activities; CTF-α caused rapid but short term cell detachment and reduction in cell metabolism with enhanced activity at lower concentrations than CTF-β. This activity was not permanent, with cell reattachment and subsequent increased metabolism of heart muscle cells observed when exposed to all but the highest concentrations of CTF-α tested. The cytotoxic effect of CTF-β took twice as long to act on the cells compared to CTF-α, however, the activity was permanent. Furthermore, we showed that the two fractions combined have a synergistic effect causing a much stronger and faster cell detachment (death) when combined than the sum of the individual effects of each toxin. These data presented here improves the current understanding of the toxic mechanisms of the Australian box jellyfish, C. fleckeri, and provides a basis for in vivo research of these newly isolated toxic fractions.

  16. The in vitro effects of two chirodropid (Chironex fleckeri and Chiropsalmus sp.) venoms: efficacy of box jellyfish antivenom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramasamy, Sharmaine; Isbister, Geoff K; Seymour, Jamie E; Hodgson, Wayne C

    2003-05-01

    The pharmacological and biochemical isolation of cnidarian venoms has been hindered by difficulties with both extracting pure venom from nematocysts and venom stability. The development of a new technique to extract active, pure venom of Chironex fleckeri and Chiropsalmus sp. has enabled identify both neurotoxic and myotoxic activity in their venoms. These activities are similar, but not identical in each species. Venom (50 micro g/ml) from both species significantly inhibited indirect and direct twitches of the chick biventer nerve-muscle preparation. Pre-incubation with 1U/ml box jellyfish antivenom did not have any significant effect on venom-induced reductions of indirect twitches. However, this activity was markedly attenuated by prior addition of 5U/ml antivenom, albeit to a lesser degree for Chiropsalmus sp. In contrast, prior addition of 5U/ml box jellyfish antivenom did not neutralise the myotoxic activity of C. fleckeri venom (50 micro g/ml), although it did inhibit the myotoxicity produced by Chiropsalmus sp. venom (50 micro g/ml). Antivenom (5U/ml) added 1h after the addition of C. fleckeri venom (50 micro g/ml) had no effect on the indirect or direct twitches of the skeletal muscle preparation. However, it partially restored the reduction in indirect twitch height caused by Chiropsalmus sp. venom (50 micro g/ml). Myotoxicity was confirmed in muscle preparations stained with hematoxylin and eosin.Therefore, although antivenom was able to neutralize the neurotoxic effects of both species, and the myotoxic effects of Chiropsalmus sp., when added prior to venom, it was unable to reverse the effects after venom addition. This suggests that antivenom is unlikely to be useful in the treatment of neurotoxic or myotoxic effects in patients, although these effects are rarely seen clinically.

  17. Surviving but not thriving: inconsistent responses of zooxanthellate jellyfish polyps to ocean warming and future UV-B scenarios

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, Shannon G.; Pitt, Kylie A.; Carroll, Anthony R.

    2016-07-01

    Complex changes to UV radiation at the Earth’s surface are occurring concurrently with ocean warming. Despite few empirical tests, jellyfish are hypothesised to be increasing in some parts of the world because they are robust to environmental stressors. Here we examine the effects of UV-B and ocean warming projections on zooxanthellate jellyfish polyps. We exposed Cassiopea sp. polyps to three levels of UV-B (future-low (1.43 Wm2), current (1.60 Wm2), future-high (1.77 Wm2)) and two levels of temperature (current-day (25 °C) and future (28 °C)) over 6 weeks. The intensity of UV-B was varied throughout the day to mimic diel variation in UV-B irradiance. Polyp survival, asexual reproduction and YII were measured. In the current and future-high UV-B treatments, more polyps were produced in 25 °C than 28 °C. This pattern, however, was reversed under future-low UV-B conditions, where more polyps were produced at 28 °C. YII was highest under current summer conditions and future conditions of low UV-B and increased temperature. YII, however, was reduced under high UV-B conditions but was further reduced with warming. Our results suggest that although Cassiopea polyps may survive elevated UV-B and warming conditions, they are unlikely to thrive. If, however, UV-B radiation decreases then ocean warming may facilitate increases in Cassiopea populations.

  18. Occurrence of the freshwater jellyfish Craspedacusta sowerbii (Lankester, 1880) (Hydrozoa, Limnomedusae) in a calcareous lake in Mato Grosso do Sul, Brazil

    OpenAIRE

    Silva,William Marcos; Roche, Kennedy Francis

    2007-01-01

    The occurrence of the freshwater jellyfish Craspedacusta sowerbii (=sowerbyi) Lankester, 1880 was recorded in April 2006 in the Lagoa Misteriosa water body, a calcareous lake (doline) in Mato Grosso do Sul State, Brazil. Only Rotifera composed the zooplankton community was composed only of Rotifera and the environment was meso-eutrophic system. The nomenclature of C. sowerbii is discussed with regard to the use of the correct spelling and an alternative one. The distributions of C. sowerbii i...

  19. First report of a peroxiredoxin homologue in jellyfish: molecular cloning, expression and functional characterization of CcPrx4 from Cyanea capillata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruan, Zengliang; Liu, Guoyan; Wang, Beilei; Zhou, Yonghong; Lu, Jia; Wang, Qianqian; Zhao, Jie; Zhang, Liming

    2014-01-09

    We first identified and characterized a novel peroxiredoxin (Prx), designated as CcPrx4, from the cDNA library of the tentacle of the jellyfish Cyanea capillata. The full-length cDNA sequence of CcPrx4 consisted of 884 nucleotides with an open reading frame encoding a mature protein of 247 amino acids. It showed a significant homology to peroxiredoxin 4 (Prx4) with the highly conserved F-motif (93FTFVCPTEI101), hydrophobic region (217VCPAGW222), 140GGLG143 and 239YF240, indicating that it should be a new member of the Prx4 family. The deduced CcPrx4 protein had a calculated molecular mass of 27.2 kDa and an estimated isoelectric point of 6.3. Quantitative real-time PCR analysis showed that CcPrx4 mRNA could be detected in all the jellyfish tissues analyzed. CcPrx4 protein was cloned into the expression vector, pET-24a, and expressed in Escherichia coli Rosetta (DE3) pLysS. Recombinant CcPrx4 protein was purified by HisTrap High Performance chelating column chromatography and analyzed for its biological function. The results showed that the purified recombinant CcPrx4 protein manifested the ability to reduce hydrogen peroxide and protect supercoiled DNA from oxidative damage, suggesting that CcPrx4 protein may play an important role in protecting jellyfish from oxidative damage.

  20. First Report of a Peroxiredoxin Homologue in Jellyfish: Molecular Cloning, Expression and Functional Characterization of CcPrx4 from Cyanea capillata

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zengliang Ruan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We first identified and characterized a novel peroxiredoxin (Prx, designated as CcPrx4, from the cDNA library of the tentacle of the jellyfish Cyanea capillata. The full-length cDNA sequence of CcPrx4 consisted of 884 nucleotides with an open reading frame encoding a mature protein of 247 amino acids. It showed a significant homology to peroxiredoxin 4 (Prx4 with the highly conserved F-motif (93FTFVCPTEI101, hydrophobic region (217VCPAGW222, 140GGLG143 and 239YF240, indicating that it should be a new member of the Prx4 family. The deduced CcPrx4 protein had a calculated molecular mass of 27.2 kDa and an estimated isoelectric point of 6.3. Quantitative real-time PCR analysis showed that CcPrx4 mRNA could be detected in all the jellyfish tissues analyzed. CcPrx4 protein was cloned into the expression vector, pET-24a, and expressed in Escherichia coli Rosetta (DE3 pLysS. Recombinant CcPrx4 protein was purified by HisTrap High Performance chelating column chromatography and analyzed for its biological function. The results showed that the purified recombinant CcPrx4 protein manifested the ability to reduce hydrogen peroxide and protect supercoiled DNA from oxidative damage, suggesting that CcPrx4 protein may play an important role in protecting jellyfish from oxidative damage.

  1. Research of salted jellyfish products dealumination and safety guidelines%盐渍海蜇脱铝研究及安全食用建议

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵玉庭; 李佳蕙; 靳洋; 苏博; 何鑫; 张昀昌

    2015-01-01

    Objective To discuss the risk of aluminum exceeding content in jellyfish product and study the method to reduce aluminum content in salted jellyfish product.MethodsHighly purified water, hydrochloric acid, glacial acetic acid, citric acid and vinegar were used to soak salted jellyfish samples with different aluminum content in order to remove aluminum, then the aluminum content in the samples were determined and sensory changes after the experiment were observed.ResultsAluminum content in water soaked jellyfish was only slightly reduced. Although the effects of hydrochloric acid and citric acid soaking in aluminum content reduction were good, the toughness of those samples declined after soaking, which leaded to worse quality. Glacial acetic acid and vinegar solution had a better effect on dealumination and jellyfishs sample became shiny, soft and flexible after soaking. The optimal dealumination condition was soaking with 0.1 mol/L glacial acetic acid for 4 h with the vinegar/water concentration ratio of 1/9.ConclusionIt is recommended that the producers can add acetic acid soaking process in the process of jellyfish producing and consumers can soak salted jellyfish with acetic acid before eating.%目的:采用不同弱酸浸泡盐渍海蜇脱铝,探讨海蜇产品铝含量超标安全风险,研究降低海蜇产品铝含量的食用方法。方法采用高纯水、盐酸、冰醋酸、柠檬酸以及食用醋5种不同溶液分别浸泡不同铝含量的盐渍海蜇除去盐渍海蜇中的铝,分析实验前后铝含量及观察实验前后样品感官变化。结果水浸泡法对降低海蜇中残留铝的效果有限;盐酸与柠檬酸溶液有较好的脱铝效果,但脱铝后海蜇样品韧性变差,品质下降;冰醋酸与食用醋溶液有较好的脱铝效果,且脱铝后海蜇样品有光泽,柔软饱满、有弹性,冰醋酸浓度为0.1 mol/L浸泡4h时和食用醋浓度为体积比1/9浸泡4 h,是最佳的浸泡浓度及时间,脱铝后海

  2. Computational comparison of a calcium-dependent jellyfish protein (apoaequorin) and calmodulin-cholesterol in short-term memory maintenance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrill, Gene A; Kostellow, Adele B; Gupta, Raj K

    2017-03-06

    Memory reconsolidation and maintenance depend on calcium channels and on calcium/calmodulin-dependent kinases regulating protein turnover in the hippocampus. Ingestion of a jellyfish protein, apoaequorin, reportedly protects and/or improves verbal learning in adults and is currently widely advertised for use by the elderly. Apoaequorin is a member of the EF-hand calcium binding family of proteins that includes calmodulin. Calmodulin-1 (148 residues) differs from Apoaequorin (195 residues) in that it contains four rather than three Ca(2+)-binding sites and three rather than four cholesterol-binding (CRAC, CARC) domains. All three cholesterol-binding CARC domains in calmodulin have a high interaction affinity for cholesterol compared to only two high affinity CARC domains in apoaequorin. Both calmodulin and apoaequorin can form dimers with a potential of eight bound Ca(2+) ions and six high affinity-bound cholesterol molecules in calmodulin with six bound Ca(2+) ions and a mixed population of eight cholesterols bound to both CARC and CRAC domains in apoaqueorin. MEMSAT-SVM analysis indicates that both calmodulin and apoaqueorin have a pore-lining region. The Peptide-Cutter algorithm predicts that calmodulin-1 contains 11 trypsin-specific cleavage sites (compared to 21 in apoaqueorin), four of which are potentially blocked by cholesterol and three are within the Ca-binding domains and/or the pore-lining region. Three are clustered between the third and fourth Ca(2+)-binding sites. Only calmodulin pore-lining regions contain Ca(2+) binding sites and as dimers may insert into the plasma membrane of neural cells and act as Ca(2+) channels. In a dietary supplement, bound cholesterol may protect both apoaequorin and calmodulin from proteolysis in the gut as well as facilitate uptake across the blood-brain barrier. Our results suggest that a physiological calmodulin-cholesterol complex, not cholesterol-free jellyfish protein, may better serve as a dietary supplement to

  3. Axial acoustic radiation force on rigid oblate and prolate spheroids in Bessel vortex beams of progressive, standing and quasi-standing waves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitri, F G

    2017-02-01

    The analysis using the partial-wave series expansion (PWSE) method in spherical coordinates is extended to evaluate the acoustic radiation force experienced by rigid oblate and prolate spheroids centered on the axis of wave propagation of high-order Bessel vortex beams composed of progressive, standing and quasi-standing waves, respectively. A coupled system of linear equations is derived after applying the Neumann boundary condition for an immovable surface in a non-viscous fluid, and solved numerically by matrix inversion after performing a single numerical integration procedure. The system of linear equations depends on the partial-wave index n and the order of the Bessel vortex beam m using truncated but converging PWSEs in the least-squares sense. Numerical results for the radiation force function, which is the radiation force per unit energy density and unit cross-sectional surface, are computed with particular emphasis on the amplitude ratio describing the transition from the progressive to the pure standing waves cases, the aspect ratio (i.e., the ratio of the major axis over the minor axis of the spheroid), the half-cone angle and order of the Bessel vortex beam, as well as the dimensionless size parameter. A generalized expression for the radiation force function is derived for cases encompassing the progressive, standing and quasi-standing waves of Bessel vortex beams. This expression can be reduced to other types of beams/waves such as the zeroth-order Bessel non-vortex beam or the infinite plane wave case by appropriate selection of the beam parameters. The results for progressive waves reveal a tractor beam behavior, characterized by the emergence of an attractive pulling force acting in opposite direction of wave propagation. Moreover, the transition to the quasi-standing and pure standing wave cases shows the acoustical tweezers behavior in dual-beam Bessel vortex beams. Applications in acoustic levitation, particle manipulation and acousto

  4. Development of a rapid assay to detect the jellyfish Cyanea nozakii using a loop-mediated isothermal amplification method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhongyuan; Dong, Zhijun; Liu, Dongyan

    2016-07-01

    Blooms of the harmful jellyfish Cyanea nozakii, which are a severe nuisance to fisheries and tourisms, frequently occur in the northern East China Sea, Yellow Sea, and Bohai Sea. To provide early warning of this species, a simple and effective molecular method for identifying C. nozakii was developed using the loop-mediated isothermal amplification method (LAMP). The LAMP assay is highly specific and uses a set of four primers that target six different regions on the mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase subunit I (COI) gene of C. nozakii. The amplification conditions, including the dNTP and betaine concentrations, the inner primer to outer primer concentration ratio, reaction time and temperature, were optimized. The LAMP assay amplified DNA extracted from tissue samples of C. nozakii but did not amplify DNA from other common scyphozoans and hydrozoans collected in the same region. In addition, the LAMP assay was more sensitive than conventional PCR. Therefore, the established LAMP assay is a sensitive, specific, fast, and easily performed method for detection of C. nozakii at different stages in their life cycle.

  5. The Acaricidal Activity of Venom from the Jellyfish Nemopilema nomurai against the Carmine Spider Mite Tetranychus cinnabarinus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Huahua; Yue, Yang; Dong, Xiangli; Li, Rongfeng; Li, Pengcheng

    2016-01-01

    The carmine spider mite Tetranychus cinnabarinus (T. cinnabarinus) is a common polyphagous pest that attacks crops, vegetables, flowers, and so on. It is necessary to find lead compounds for developing novel, powerful, and environmentally-friendly acaricides as an alternative approach to controlling the carmine spider mite because of the serious resistance and residual agrochemicals in the environment. In addition, the study on the acaricidal activities of marine bioactive substances is comparatively deficient. In the present study, the acaricidal activity of venom (NnFV) from the jellyfish Nemopilema nomurai against the carmine spider mite T. cinnabarinus was determined for the first time. The venom had contact toxicity, and the 24-h LC50-value was 29.1 μg/mL. The mite body wall was affected by the venom, with the mite body having no luster and being seriously shrunken after 24 h. T. cinnabarinus was a potential target pest of NnFV, which had potential as a type of natural bioacaricide. The repellent activity and systemic toxicity of the venom against T. cinnabarinus were also studied. However, NnFV had no repellent activity and systemic toxicity against T. cinnabarinus. PMID:27294957

  6. Preliminary results of the in vivo and in vitro characterization of a tentacle venom fraction from the jellyfish Aurelia aurita.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponce, Dalia; López-Vera, Estuardo; Aguilar, Manuel B; Sánchez-Rodríguez, Judith

    2013-12-06

    The neurotoxic effects produced by a tentacle venom extract and a fraction were analyzed and correlated by in vivo and in vitro approaches. The tentacle venom extract exhibited a wide range of protein components (from 24 to >225 kDa) and produced tetanic reactions, flaccid paralysis, and death when injected into crabs. Two chromatography fractions also produced uncontrolled appendix movements and leg stretching. Further electrophysiological characterization demonstrated that one of these fractions potently inhibited ACh-elicited currents mediated by both vertebrate fetal and adult muscle nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChR) subtypes. Receptor inhibition was concentration-dependent and completely reversible. The calculated IC(50) values were 1.77 μg/μL for fetal and 2.28 μg/μL for adult muscle nAChRs. The bioactive fraction was composed of a major protein component at ~90 kDa and lacked phospholipase A activity. This work represents the first insight into the interaction of jellyfish venom components and muscle nicotinic receptors.

  7. Sea Water Acidification Affects Osmotic Swelling, Regulatory Volume Decrease and Discharge in Nematocytes of the Jellyfish Pelagia noctiluca

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rossana Morabito

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Increased acidification/PCO2 of sea water is a threat to the environment and affects the homeostasis of marine animals. In this study, the effect of sea water pH changes on the osmotic phase (OP, regulatory volume decrease (RVD and discharge of the jellyfish Pelagia noctiluca (Cnidaria, Scyphozoa nematocytes, collected from the Strait of Messina (Italy, was assessed. Methods: Isolated nematocytes, suspended in artificial sea water (ASW with pH 7.65, 6.5 and 4.5, were exposed to hyposmotic ASW of the same pH values and their osmotic response and RVD measured optically in a special flow through chamber. Nematocyte discharge was analyzed in situ in ASW at all three pH values. Results: At normal pH (7.65, nematocytes subjected to hyposmotic shock first expanded osmotically and then regulated their cell volume within 15 min. Exposure to hyposmotic ASW pH 6.5 and 4.5 compromised the OP and reduced or totally abrogated the ensuing RVD, respectively. Acidic pH also significantly reduced the nematocyte discharge response. Conclusion: Data indicate that the homeostasis and function of Cnidarians may be altered by environmental changes such as sea water acidification, thereby validating their use as novel bioindicators for the quality of the marine environment.

  8. Physiological and chemical analysis of neurotransmitter candidates at a fast excitatory synapse in the jellyfish Cyanea capillata (Cnidaria, Scyphozoa).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Peter A V; Trapido-Rosenthal, H G

    2009-12-01

    Motor nerve net (MNN) neurons in the jellyfish Cyanea capillata communicate with one another by way of fast, bidirectional excitatory chemical synapses. As is the case with almost all identified chemical synapses in cnidarians, the identity of the neurotransmitter at these synapses is unclear. MNN neurons are large enough for stable intracellular recordings. This, together with the fact that they can be exposed, providing unlimited access to them and to their synapses, prompted a study of the action of a variety of neurotransmitter candidates, including those typically associated with fast synapses in higher animals. Only the amino acids taurine and beta-alanine produced physiological responses consistent with those of the normal EPSP in these cells. Moreover, chemical analysis revealed that both taurine and beta-alanine are present in the neurons and released by depolarization. These various findings strongly suggest that either or both of these amino acids, or a closely related compound is the neurotransmitter at the fast chemical synapses between MNN neurons.

  9. Fine structure, histochemistry, and morphogenesis during excystment of the podocysts of the giant jellyfish Nemopilema nomurai (Scyphozoa, Rhizostomeae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikeda, Hideki; Ohtsu, Kohzoh; Uye, Shin-Ichi

    2011-12-01

    Production of podocysts is the exclusive form of asexual reproduction by polyps of the giant jellyfish Nemopilema nomurai, which has been recurrently blooming in the East Asian seas in the last decade. Podocycts consist of a dome-shaped chitinous capsule with laminated structure that encapsulates a mass of cyst cells filled with granules containing nutrient reserves such as proteins, carbohydrates, and lipids. Mitochondria, rough endoplasmic reticulum, and Golgi complexes are scarce in the cytoplasm of these cells, and the staining reaction for RNA is weak, indicating very low metabolic activity. Podocysts are capable of dormancy for at least 5 years without significant change of internal structure or nutrient reserves. Integrated information about spontaneous and artificially induced metamorphosis suggests that the following processes occur during excystment: (1) nematocyst formation in the internal cell mass, (2) stratification of the cell mass into endoderm and ectoderm, (3) extrusion of the cell mass through a gradual opening of the capsule, (4) formation of primordial polyp mouth and tentacles, and (5) metamorphosis to a polyp. We morphologically confirmed that N. nomurai podocysts have the capacity for long-term dormancy, an ability that should contribute to the periodic nature of the massive blooms of medusae of this species.

  10. The effectiveness of antivenom in countering the actions of box-jellyfish (Chironex fleckeri) nematocyst toxins in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Endean, R; Sizemore, D J

    1988-01-01

    The neutralizing ability of commercially available antivenom prepared against 'milked' box-jellyfish (Chironex fleckeri) venom was tested intravenously in mice against crude nematocyst venom obtained by crushing isolated nematocysts and against each of two lethal toxins (T1 and T2) present in this venom. The in vitro neutralizing ability of the antivenom against crude venom was reduced markedly compared with its reported neutralizing ability against 'milked' venom whilst the in vivo neutralizing ability of the antivenom tested in both prophylactic and rescue experiments involving crude nematocyst venom was reduced approximately threefold. When tested in vitro and prophylactically in vivo the neutralizing ability of the antivenom was much more pronounced against T2 than against T1. This finding was in accord with the view that T1 was absent from the 'milked' venom against which the antivenom was prepared. Doses of crude venom in excess of twice the lethal dose killed mice within 2-3 min emphasizing the need for speed in the administration of antivenom.

  11. Preliminary Results of the in Vivo and in Vitro Characterization of a Tentacle Venom Fraction from the Jellyfish Aurelia aurita

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponce, Dalia; López-Vera, Estuardo; Aguilar, Manuel B.; Sánchez-Rodríguez, Judith

    2013-01-01

    The neurotoxic effects produced by a tentacle venom extract and a fraction were analyzed and correlated by in vivo and in vitro approaches. The tentacle venom extract exhibited a wide range of protein components (from 24 to >225 kDa) and produced tetanic reactions, flaccid paralysis, and death when injected into crabs. Two chromatography fractions also produced uncontrolled appendix movements and leg stretching. Further electrophysiological characterization demonstrated that one of these fractions potently inhibited ACh-elicited currents mediated by both vertebrate fetal and adult muscle nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChR) subtypes. Receptor inhibition was concentration-dependent and completely reversible. The calculated IC50 values were 1.77 μg/μL for fetal and 2.28 μg/μL for adult muscle nAChRs. The bioactive fraction was composed of a major protein component at ~90 kDa and lacked phospholipase A activity. This work represents the first insight into the interaction of jellyfish venom components and muscle nicotinic receptors. PMID:24322597

  12. Preliminary Results of the in Vivo and in Vitro Characterization of a Tentacle Venom Fraction from the Jellyfish Aurelia aurita

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dalia Ponce

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The neurotoxic effects produced by a tentacle venom extract and a fraction were analyzed and correlated by in vivo and in vitro approaches. The tentacle venom extract exhibited a wide range of protein components (from 24 to >225 kDa and produced tetanic reactions, flaccid paralysis, and death when injected into crabs. Two chromatography fractions also produced uncontrolled appendix movements and leg stretching. Further electrophysiological characterization demonstrated that one of these fractions potently inhibited ACh-elicited currents mediated by both vertebrate fetal and adult muscle nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChR subtypes. Receptor inhibition was concentration-dependent and completely reversible. The calculated IC50 values were 1.77 μg/μL for fetal and 2.28 μg/μL for adult muscle nAChRs. The bioactive fraction was composed of a major protein component at ~90 kDa and lacked phospholipase A activity. This work represents the first insight into the interaction of jellyfish venom components and muscle nicotinic receptors.

  13. The Acaricidal Activity of Venom from the Jellyfish Nemopilema nomurai against the Carmine Spider Mite Tetranychus cinnabarinus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huahua Yu

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The carmine spider mite Tetranychus cinnabarinus (T. cinnabarinus is a common polyphagous pest that attacks crops, vegetables, flowers, and so on. It is necessary to find lead compounds for developing novel, powerful, and environmentally-friendly acaricides as an alternative approach to controlling the carmine spider mite because of the serious resistance and residual agrochemicals in the environment. In addition, the study on the acaricidal activities of marine bioactive substances is comparatively deficient. In the present study, the acaricidal activity of venom (NnFV from the jellyfish Nemopilema nomurai against the carmine spider mite T. cinnabarinus was determined for the first time. The venom had contact toxicity, and the 24-h LC50-value was 29.1 μg/mL. The mite body wall was affected by the venom, with the mite body having no luster and being seriously shrunken after 24 h. T. cinnabarinus was a potential target pest of NnFV, which had potential as a type of natural bioacaricide. The repellent activity and systemic toxicity of the venom against T. cinnabarinus were also studied. However, NnFV had no repellent activity and systemic toxicity against T. cinnabarinus.

  14. Spatiotemporal variation in community structure of marine benthic ciliates in the Yellow Sea during and after macroalgal and giant jellyfish blooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Bailing; Xu, Kuidong

    2016-07-01

    The annual bloom of the green macroalgal Ulva prolifera from May through July since 2008 and another of giant jellyfish Nemopilema nomurai from June through September have been frequent events in the Yellow Sea. However, the patterns of benthic ciliate communities during and after the blooms are still not known. In combination with analyses of benthic environmental factors, we investigated the distribution and community composition of benthic ciliates in the Yellow Sea in July and November 2011. In July, ciliates had high standing crops and diversity in the northern Yellow Sea, and in the inshore area off the southern Shandong Peninsula, where large numbers of green macroalgae accumulated. In November, the abundance, biomass and diversity of ciliates were high in the sea areas off the Shandong Peninsula and Changjiang estuary, where a large quantity of jellyfish occurred in August. Neither the abundance nor the biomass had significant difference between seasons, or between different compartments of the Yellow Sea. The species number, and both Margalef and Shannon-Wiener indices of ciliates were all significantly higher in November than in July. In both seasons, prostomateans and karyorelicteans consistently constituted the first and second most important ciliate groups in biomass; and carnivorous ciliates constituted the primary feeding type in terms of biomass as well as species richness, followed by bacterivores, algivores and omnivores. Compared with that in June 2007 when no macroalgae occurred, the percentage of small-sized bacterivores (e.g. Metacystis spp., Euplotes spp. and scuticociliates) increased in July 2011. The proportion of carnivorous ciliates increased in November, and this increased dominance of carnivorous ciliates may be a response to the increase in predominance of heterotrophic nanoflagellates, which might in turn be ascribed to an effect of green macroalgal and giant jellyfish blooms in the Yellow Sea.

  15. Antioxidant Activity of Enzymatic Gonad Hydrolysates from Jellyfish Rhopilema esculentum%海蜇生殖腺酶解物抗氧化活性的研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郑杰; 于笛; 陈冲; 袁成玉

    2014-01-01

    为提高海蜇的综合利用率,利用木瓜蛋白酶酶解技术制备海蜇生殖腺酶解物。分析酶解物的氨基酸组成,并通过体外化学模拟体系评价酶解物与F e2+螯合前后的抗氧化活性。试验结果表明,海蜇生殖腺酶解物含有17种氨基酸,具有一定的Fe2+螯合能力和DPPH ·清除能力,其螯合率和清除率达到50%时的质量浓度分别为1.73 mg/mL 和22.20 mg/mL。同时,具有一定的还原能力,其在700 nm处吸光值达到0.5时的质量浓度为17.61 mg/mL。海蜇生殖腺酶解物与Fe2+螯合后,抗氧化能力显著增强,DPPH ·清除率达到50%和在700 nm处吸光值达到0.5时的质量浓度分别为0.15 mg/mL和0.86 mg/mL。%The enzymatic hydrolysates of gonad in jellyfish Rhopilema esculentum were prepared by papain ,and the amino acid composition and the antioxidant activities of the hydrolysates were analyzed by Fe2+-chelating assay ,1 ,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH · ) assay and reducing power assay to make full use of the jellyfish .The results showed that the hydrolysates from jellyfish gonad were composed of 17 amino acids ,and possessed Fe2+ -chelatin ability ,DPPH radical scavenging capacity with IC50 values of 1 . 73 and 22 .20 mg/mL , respectively , and reducing power with AC0 .5 value of 17 .61 mg/mL .The antioxidant activities of enzymatic hydrolysates ,chelated with Fe2+ ,were obviously improved ,with the IC50 and AC0 .5 values of 0 .15 mg/mL in DPPH radical scavenging capacity and 0 .86 mg/mL in reducing power .The findings provide theoretical support for the further exploitation of jellyfish gonad .

  16. The "eyes absent" (eya) gene in the eye-bearing hydrozoan jellyfish Cladonema radiatum: conservation of the retinal determination network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graziussi, Daria Federica; Suga, Hiroshi; Schmid, Volker; Gehring, Walter Jakob

    2012-06-01

    Eyes absent (Eya) is a member of the Retinal Determination Gene Network (RDGN), a set of genes responsible for eye specification in Drosophila. Eya is a dual function protein, working as a transcription factor in the nucleus and as a tyrosine phosphatase in the cytoplasm. It had been shown that Pax and Six family genes, main components of the RDGN, are present in the hydrozoan Cladonema radiatum and that they are expressed in the eye. However, nothing had been known about the Eya family in hydrozoan jellyfish. Here we report the presence of an Eya homologue (CrEya) in Cladonema. Real-time PCR analysis and in situ hybridization showed that CrEya is expressed in the eye. Furthermore, the comprehensive survey of eukaryote genomes revealed that the acquisition of the N-terminal transactivation domain, including the EYA Domain 2 and its adjacent sequence shared by all eumetazoans, happened early in evolution, before the separation of Cnidaria and Bilateria. Our results uncover the evolution of the two domains and show a conservation of the expression pattern of the Eya gene between Cnidaria and Bilateria, which, together with previous data, supports the hypothesis of the monophyletic origin of metazoans eyes. We additionally show that CrEya is also expressed in the oocytes, where two other members of the RDGN, CrPaxB, and Six4/5-Cr, are known to be expressed. These data suggest that several members of the RDGN have begun to be localized also into the different context of egg development early in the course of metazoan evolution.

  17. Catostylus tagi: partial rDNA sequencing and characterisation of nematocyte structures using two improvements in jellyfish sample preparation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parracho, Tiago; Morais, Zilda

    2015-01-01

    More than 200 Scyphozoa species have been described, but few have been properly studied regarding their chemical and genetic characteristics. Catostylus tagi, an edible Scyphozoa and the sole European Catostylidae, occurs in summer at Tagus and Sado estuaries. Neither a systematic comparison between the two Catostylus communities nor a chemical approach on their nematocytes had been carried out yet. In order to achieve these purposes, optimisation of DNA extraction and of histochemical staining procedures were developed. Catostylus specimens from Tagus and Sado estuaries were compared by ribosomal 18S, 28S, and ITS1 partial sequencing. The morphochemistry of nematocytes was studied by optical and electronic microscopy. Macroscopic and molecular results indicated that both communities belong to the same species, C. tagi. The hematoxylin and eosin staining allowed the visualisation of nematocyst genesis and indicated a basic character for the macromolecules on the shaft of euryteles and on the tubule of isorhizae and birhopaloids. By Masson's trichrome procedure, the basic properties of the tubules were confirmed and a collagenous profile for the toxins was suggested. Results of the alcian blue staining showed that the outer membrane of nematocyte may consist of macromolecules with acidic polysaccharides, consistent with NOWA and nematogalectin glycoproteins detected in Hydra, but also with poly-gamma-glutamate complex, chitin-like polysaccharides and hyaluronic acids. Through the von Kossa assays, calcium was detected; its position suggested interactions with polysaccharides of the membrane, with proteins of the contractile system or with both. The optimisation of sample preparation for DNA extraction may facilitate further studies on little known jellyfish species. The improvement of the smear procedure simplified the use of stained reactions in zooplankton. Moreover, it was shown that good slide images might be acquired manually. The development of specific

  18. Mechanism of endothelial nitric oxide synthase phosphorylation and activation by tentacle extract from the jellyfish Cyanea capillata

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beilei Wang

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Our previous study demonstrated that tentacle extract (TE from the jellyfish Cyanea capillata (C. capillata could cause a weak relaxation response mediated by nitric oxide (NO using isolated aorta rings. However, the intracellular mechanisms of TE-induced vasodilation remain unclear. Thus, this study was conducted to examine the role of TE on Akt/eNOS/NO and Ca2+ signaling pathways in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs. Our results showed that TE induced dose- and time-dependent increases of eNOS activity and NO production. And TE also induced Akt and eNOS phosphorylation in HUVECs. However, treatment with specific PI3-kinase inhibitor (Wortmannin significantly inhibited the increases in NO production and Akt/eNOS phosphorylation. In addition, TE also stimulated an increase in the intracellular Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]i, which was significantly attenuated by either IP3 receptor blocker (Heparin or PKC inhibitor (PKC 412. In contrast, extracellular Ca2+-free, L-type calcium channel blocker (Nifedipine, or PKA inhibitor (H89 had no influence on the [Ca2+]i elevation. Since calcium ions also play a critical role in stimulating eNOS activity, we next explored the role of Ca2+ in TE-induced Akt/eNOS activation. In consistent with the attenuation of [Ca2+]i elevation, we found that Akt/eNOS phosphorylation was also dramatically decreased by Heparin or PKC 412, but not affected by Nifedipine or H89. However, the phosphorylation level could also be decreased by the removal of extracellular calcium. Taken together, our findings indicated that TE-induced eNOS phosphorylation and activation were mainly through PI3K/Akt-dependent, PKC/IP3R-sensitive and Ca2+-dependent pathways.

  19. Occurrence, inter-annual variability and zooplankton-predation impact of the invasive ctenophore Mnemiopsis leidyi and the native jellyfish Aurelia aurita in Limfjorden (Denmark) in 2010 and 2011

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Riisgaard, Hans Ulrik; Jaspers, Cornelia; Serre, Sandrine

    2012-01-01

    In 2007, the invasive ctenophore Mnemiopsis leidyi was observed for the first time in Limfjorden (Denmark) where it exhibited mass occurrence in late summer while the indigenous and usually dominating common jellyfish, Aurelia aurita, was nearly absent. Both species were further studied in 2008...

  20. First report of a thioredoxin homologue in jellyfish: molecular cloning, expression and antioxidant activity of CcTrx1 from Cyanea capillata.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zengliang Ruan

    Full Text Available Thioredoxins (Trx proteins are a family of small, highly-conserved and ubiquitous proteins that play significant roles in the resistance of oxidative damage. In this study, a homologue of Trx was identified from the cDNA library of tentacle of the jellyfish Cyanea capillata and named CcTrx1. The full-length cDNA of CcTrx1 was 479 bp with a 312 bp open reading frame encoding 104 amino acids. Bioinformatics analysis revealed that the putative CcTrx1 protein harbored the evolutionarily-conserved Trx active site 31CGPC34 and shared a high similarity with Trx1 proteins from other organisms analyzed, indicating that CcTrx1 is a new member of Trx1 sub-family. CcTrx1 mRNA was found to be constitutively expressed in tentacle, umbrella, oral arm and gonad, indicating a general role of CcTrx1 protein in various physiological processes. The recombinant CcTrx1 (rCcTrx1 protein was expressed in Escherichia coli BL21 (DE3, and then purified by affinity chromatography. The rCcTrx1 protein was demonstrated to possess the expected redox activity in enzymatic analysis and protection against oxidative damage of supercoiled DNA. These results indicate that CcTrx1 may function as an important antioxidant in C. capillata. To our knowledge, this is the first Trx protein characterized from jellyfish species.

  1. Where are the polyps? Molecular identification, distribution and population differentiation of Aurelia aurita jellyfish polyps in the southern North Sea area.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Walraven, Lodewijk; Driessen, Floor; van Bleijswijk, Judith; Bol, Anneke; Luttikhuizen, Pieternella C; Coolen, Joop W P; Bos, Oscar G; Gittenberger, Adriaan; Schrieken, Niels; Langenberg, Victor T; van der Veer, Henk W

    For many species of metagenic jellyfish the location of the benthic polyps is unknown. To gain insight in the distribution, species composition and population structure of scyphozoan jellyfish polyps in the southern North Sea area, polyp samples were collected from natural and artificial substrates (settling plates, marina floats and wrecks) at ten inshore locations in the Netherlands, seven offshore locations in the North Sea and in the Gullmar Fjord in Sweden. Polyps were identified to species level by sequencing both a fragment of 18S rDNA and a fragment of mitochondrial COI, and comparing these sequences to reference sequences available in GenBank and to newly obtained sequences from medusae collected in the area. All polyps sequenced did belong to Aurelia aurita. For this species, molecular diversity in mitochondrial COI was high, with 50 haplotypes among 183 polyps. Population differentiation was detected between the Dogger Bank and other-more coastal-locations, indicating extremely low connectivity. No significant differences were found between coastal samples. The location of polyps of Cyanea capillata, Cyanea lamarckii, Chrysaora hysoscella and Rhizostoma octopus in the study area remains unresolved.

  2. Mitochondrial diversity in Gonionemus (Trachylina:Hydrozoa) and its implications for understanding the origins of clinging jellyfish in the Northwest Atlantic Ocean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Govindarajan, Annette F; Carman, Mary R; Khaidarov, Marat R; Semenchenko, Alexander; Wares, John P

    2017-01-01

    Determining whether a population is introduced or native to a region can be challenging due to inadequate taxonomy, the presence of cryptic lineages, and poor historical documentation. For taxa with resting stages that bloom episodically, determining origin can be especially challenging as an environmentally-triggered abrupt appearance of the taxa may be confused with an anthropogenic introduction. Here, we assess diversity in mitochondrial cytochrome oxidase I sequences obtained from multiple Atlantic and Pacific locations, and discuss the implications of our findings for understanding the origin of clinging jellyfish Gonionemus in the Northwest Atlantic. Clinging jellyfish are known for clinging to seagrasses and seaweeds, and have complex life cycles that include resting stages. They are especially notorious as some, although not all, populations are associated with severe sting reactions. The worldwide distribution of Gonionemus has been aptly called a "zoogeographic puzzle" and our results refine rather than resolve the puzzle. We find a relatively deep divergence that may indicate cryptic speciation between Gonionemus from the Northeast Pacific and Northwest Pacific/Northwest Atlantic. Within the Northwest Pacific/Northwest Atlantic clade, we find haplotypes unique to each region. We also find one haplotype that is shared between highly toxic Vladivostok-area populations and some Northwest Atlantic populations. Our results are consistent with multiple scenarios that involve both native and anthropogenic processes. We evaluate each scenario and discuss critical directions for future research, including improving the resolution of population genetic structure, identifying possible lineage admixture, and better characterizing and quantifying the toxicity phenotype.

  3. First report of a thioredoxin homologue in jellyfish: molecular cloning, expression and antioxidant activity of CcTrx1 from Cyanea capillata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruan, Zengliang; Liu, Guoyan; Guo, Yufeng; Zhou, Yonghong; Wang, Qianqian; Chang, Yinlong; Wang, Beilei; Zheng, Jiemin; Zhang, Liming

    2014-01-01

    Thioredoxins (Trx proteins) are a family of small, highly-conserved and ubiquitous proteins that play significant roles in the resistance of oxidative damage. In this study, a homologue of Trx was identified from the cDNA library of tentacle of the jellyfish Cyanea capillata and named CcTrx1. The full-length cDNA of CcTrx1 was 479 bp with a 312 bp open reading frame encoding 104 amino acids. Bioinformatics analysis revealed that the putative CcTrx1 protein harbored the evolutionarily-conserved Trx active site 31CGPC34 and shared a high similarity with Trx1 proteins from other organisms analyzed, indicating that CcTrx1 is a new member of Trx1 sub-family. CcTrx1 mRNA was found to be constitutively expressed in tentacle, umbrella, oral arm and gonad, indicating a general role of CcTrx1 protein in various physiological processes. The recombinant CcTrx1 (rCcTrx1) protein was expressed in Escherichia coli BL21 (DE3), and then purified by affinity chromatography. The rCcTrx1 protein was demonstrated to possess the expected redox activity in enzymatic analysis and protection against oxidative damage of supercoiled DNA. These results indicate that CcTrx1 may function as an important antioxidant in C. capillata. To our knowledge, this is the first Trx protein characterized from jellyfish species.

  4. Mitochondrial dysfunction contributes to the cytotoxicity induced by tentacle extract from the jellyfish Cyanea capillata in rat renal tubular epithelial NRK-52E cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Tao; He, Qian; Xiao, Liang; Wang, Qianqian; Zhang, Bo; Wang, Beilei; Liu, Guoyan; Zheng, Jiemin; Yu, Bentong; Zhang, Liming

    2013-11-01

    Our previous studies have shown that tentacle extract (TE) from the jellyfish Cyanea capillata could induce a delayed jellyfish envenomation syndrome with severe multiple organ dysfunctions, among which renal injury with tubular necrosis seemed to be most serious. So, in this study, we aimed to explore the toxic effect of TE on rat renal tubular epithelial NRK-52E cells. Based on the previous findings that TE could cause oxidative damage in erythrocytes, the effects of TE on cell oxidative stress conditions, including ROS production and lipid peroxidation, and mitochondrial dysfunction associated with cell death were investigated in NRK-52E cells. The results showed that TE caused cell morphological change and decreased cell viability through induction of apoptosis and necrosis in NRK-52E cells. Meanwhile, ROS overproduction and mitochondrial membrane potential decrease were found before the cell death occurred. It was concluded that TE could induce cytotoxicity, especially apoptosis and necrosis, in NRK-52E cells, and mitochondrial dysfunction and ROS overproduction might play important roles in the process of cell injury and death.

  5. METHODS OF EXTRACTING VENOM FROM JELLYFISH CYANEA SP. NEMATOCYST USING MINI-BEADBEATER%组织研磨器细胞破碎法提取霞水母(Cyanea sp.)毒素的初步研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李荣锋; 于华华; 冯金华; 李鹏程

    2011-01-01

    Extraction of venom from jellyfish Cyanea sp. nematocysts using Mini-Beadbeater under different conditions was investigated. First, jellyfish nematocysts were prepared from tentacles, then concentration of nematocyst venom extracted in different disruption conditions, such as disruption time and power, were determined. Microscopy images of disrupted jellyfish nematocysts showed only taken 2--3min for Mini-Beadbeater to disrupt approximately 90% of the nematocysts, an improvement in yield in extracting venom in jellyfish. The protein profile showed no obvious difference from our SDS-PAGE results. Our extraction methodology is proven to be an effective way to extract the venom from jellyfish Cyanea sp.%采用Mini-Beadbeater组织研磨器破碎的方法进行了提取霞水母刺丝囊细胞毒素的研究。首先制备霞水母刺丝囊细胞,然后研究破碎频率、破碎时间对提取霞水母刺丝囊细胞毒素浓度的影响。结果表明,组织研磨器能够在2—3min内破碎约90%的霞水母刺丝囊细胞,从而提高水母毒素的提取效率。SDS-PAGE结果显示,提取的水母毒素蛋白条带没有发生明显差异,是一种有效提取霞水母毒素的方法。

  6. 包装方式及醋酸溶液处理对脱盐海蜇贮存性的影响%Effect of packaging and acetum treatment on the quality of desalted jellyfish in storage

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    单继航; 许学勤; 李凤舞

    2011-01-01

    Effect of different packaging on the water losing rate,acetum processing on the microorganism number and temperature on the texture of desalted jellyfish which was treated by acetum were studied.Results showed that pressure of the package resulted in loss of water from jellyfish and some water that put in the package with jellyfish can alleviate the loss.Immersing desalted jellyfish with 0.1% acetum for 5min before packaging could effectively reduce the number of microorganism.Desalted jellyfish which was processed in this way and stored up at the temperature less than or equal to 25℃ could maintain good quality during a long shelflife.%研究了包装方式对脱盐海蜇失水率影响,醋酸溶液浸泡处理对脱盐海蜇丝的抑菌效果,及温度对酸处理后海蜇的质构影响。结果发现,包装袋的机械挤压可使脱盐海蜇部分脱水,包装时同时加入一定量水可以缓和这种机械作用导致海蜇脱水的程度;脱盐海蜇经0.1%浓度的醋酸浸泡5min后,在25℃及以下温度储藏,可有效地抑制微生物生长,也可较好地保持脱盐海蜇的质地。

  7. Changes in Texture and Tissue Structure of Salted Jellyfish (Rhopilema esculentum Kishinouye) during Desalting%脱盐过程中盐渍海蜇质构及组织结构的变化

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    马璐璐; 李岩; 温成荣; 傅新鑫; 程沙沙; 董秀萍

    2016-01-01

    In China,salting is the common processing method for fresh jellyfish,and desalination becomes a necessary process for subsequent processing of salted jellyfish.However,some negative effects,such as tissue welled,texture softened,shape changed,and nutrients lost,would accompanied by the processing of desalination.In this study,with salted jellyfish umbrella as the research object,Paraffin section Masson staining combined with optical microscope and textural analyzer were used to investigate the microstructural and textural changes of jellyfish during water desalination.The salted jellyfish umbrella were cut into 1.5 cm×1.0 cm,then desalinated in deionized water with a solid-liquid ratio 1:10 at 4 ℃,25 ℃,50 ℃ for different treatment duration.The changes of salinity,quality,moisture,texture and organization structure were measured at each treatment.The results showed that the weight of jellyfish decreased during desalination at different temperatures (4 ℃,25 ℃ and 50 ℃),while the decrease rates increased as the desalination temperature increased.The salt contents of jellyfish after desalination 2 h at 4 ℃,25 ℃ and 50 ℃ were 8.25%,6.86% and 5.83%,respectively.During desalination,rehydration was dominant for 4 ℃,while dehydration was dominant for 25 ℃ and 50 ℃.The protein denaturation and structure was damaged as the temperature increased,in which led to water lost from jellyfish.For texture properties,there was no obvious change in hardness and elasticity of jellyfish during desalination at 4 ℃.During desalination at 25 ℃,jellyfish hardness showed a slightly decline,while the elasticity change was not obvious.For 50 ℃ desalination,jellyfish showed a tendency of rapid decline in hardness,from 5368/g down to 2983/g during 5 h,and presented a tendency of increase in elasticity,from 0.42 to 0.95.In terms of tissue structure,the results of Masson staining suggested the collagen fibers were swelled due to the rehydration jellyfish of

  8. Existence of Resonance Stability of Triangular Equilibrium Points in Circular Case of the Planar Elliptical Restricted Three-Body Problem under the Oblate and Radiating Primaries around the Binary System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Narayan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper analyzes the existence of resonance stability of the triangular equilibrium points of the planar elliptical restricted three-body problem when both the primaries are oblate spheroid as well as the source of radiation under the particular case, when e=0. We have derived Hamiltonian function describing the motion of infinitesimal mass in the neighborhood of the triangular equilibrium solutions taken as a convergent series. Hamiltonian function for the system has been derived and also expanded in powers of the generalized components of momenta. We have used canonical transformation to make the Hamiltonian function independent of true anomaly. The most interesting and distinguishable results of this study are establishing the relation for determining the range of stability at and near the resonance ω2=1/2 around the binary system.

  9. Spatiotemporal characteristics and mechanisms of intracellular Ca(2+) increases at fertilization in eggs of jellyfish (Phylum Cnidaria, Class Hydrozoa).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deguchi, Ryusaku; Kondoh, Eri; Itoh, Junko

    2005-03-15

    We have clarified, for the first time, the spatiotemporal patterns of intracellular Ca(2+) increases at fertilization and the Ca(2+)-mobilizing mechanisms in eggs of hydrozoan jellyfish, which belong to the evolutionarily old diploblastic phylum, Cnidaria. An initial Ca(2+) increase just after fertilization took the form of a Ca(2+) wave starting from one cortical region of the egg and propagating to its antipode in all of four hydrozoan species tested: Cytaeis uchidae, Cladonema pacificum, Clytia sp., and Gonionema vertens. The initiation site of the Ca(2+) wave was restricted to the animal pole, which is known to be the only area of sperm-egg fusion in hydrozoan eggs, and the wave propagating velocity was estimated to be 4.2-5.9 mum/s. After a Ca(2+) peak had been attained by the initial Ca(2+) wave, the elevated Ca(2+) gradually declined and returned nearly to the resting value at 7-10 min following fertilization. Injection of inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP(3)), an agonist of IP(3) receptors (IP(3)R), was highly effective in inducing a Ca(2+) increase in unfertilized eggs; IP(3) at a final intracellular concentration of 12-60 nM produced a fully propagating Ca(2+) wave equivalent to that observed at fertilization. In contrast, a higher concentration of cyclic ADP-ribose (cADPR), an agonist of ryanodine receptors (RyR), only generated a localized Ca(2+) increase that did not propagate in the egg. In addition, caffeine, another stimulator of RyR, was completely without effect. Sperm-induced Ca(2+) increases in Gonionema eggs were severely affected by preinjection of heparin, an inhibitor of Ca(2+) release from IP(3)R. These results strongly suggest that there is a well-developed IP(3)R-, but not RyR-mediated Ca(2+) release mechanism in hydrozoan eggs and that the former system primarily functions at fertilization. Our present data also demonstrate that the spatial characteristics and mechanisms of Ca(2+) increases at fertilization in hydrozoan eggs resemble

  10. PROGRESS IN THE JELLYFISH BLOOM RESEARCH IN THE YELLOW SEA AND EAST CHINA SEA%黄、东海水母暴发机理及其生态环境效应研究进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孙松; 于志刚; 李超伦; 黄邦钦; 庄志猛; 魏皓; 孙晓霞

    2012-01-01

    在全球变化和人类活动影响下海洋生态系统的结构与功能发生了很大的变化,海洋赤潮、绿潮、白潮(水母暴发)等生态灾害在多重压力下不断出现。对于以水母为代表的胶质类生物的数量增多,国际上有很多的解释和争论:水母的暴发是一种趋势性的还是周期性的现象,关键问题是对导致水母暴发原因的认识。针对这些问题,国家重点基础研究发展计划项目“中国近海水母暴发的关键过程、机理及生态环境效应”开展了综合性的研究,对前期的研究进展和结果进行系统整理发表在本专辑中,涉及水母生活史策略、环境因子对水母不同生活史阶段的生长和发育的影响、水母的暴发对环境的影响、以及对中国近海水母暴发的新认知等。%Under the pressure of global changes and human activities, the structure and function of marine ecosystem changed significantly. The ecological disasters including red tide, green tide and white tide (jellyfish blooms) occurred frequently. As representatives of the gelatinous plankton, the increasing of jellyfish abundance caused much controversy and interpretation internationally: the outbreak of jellyfish is a trend or a cyclical phenomenon. The key question is the understanding of the cause of jellyfish bloom. To solve these problems, a comprehensive investigation was carried out on the basis of Major State Basic Research Development Program entitled "Key processes, mechanism and ecological conse- quences of jellyfish bloom in China coastal waters". The research progress of the project will be published in this special issue. This progress is related to the jellyfish life history strategies, the impact of environmental factors on the growth and development of the different life history stages of jellyfish, the impact of jellyfish bloom on environment, as well as the new perception on the mechanism of jellyfish bloom in

  11. Study on the morphological and growth characteristics of Rhopilema esculenta: from ephyra to juvenile jellyfish%海蜇浮游幼体形态特征和生长规律的研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘顶海; 张继红; 陈四清; 方建光; 燕敬平; 刘春胜; 张明亮; 高亚平

    2011-01-01

    The morphological characteristics of Rhopilerna esculenta from ephyra to juvenile jellyfish were described, the healing process of residual access mouth of gastrovascular cavity was observed for the first time, and the development phases of jellyfish were redefined. At the water temperature of 20±1℃, salinity 28~29, and pH 7.8~8.2, cultured ephyra(diameter 2 ~3mm) could grow to juvenile jellyfish (15 ~ 20mm) with clubbed subsidiary organ after 20d.The food consumption and growth characteristics (diameter and weight) from newly released ephyra to juvenile jellyfish were analyzed. It was found that the daily growth equation of juvenile jellyfish' s diameter(2 ~ 20mm) is y= 2. 748 8e0. 101 8x. The relationship between weight and diameter, food consumption and diameter of juvenile jellyfish were y= 6 × 10-5 —0.5ar3.5475,y= 43. 537x1.775 respectively.%观察描述了海蜇Rhopilema esculenta从碟状体发育至幼蛰的形态变化特征,首次观察到了消化腔残留通道口的愈合过程,并重新对海蜇浮游幼体各个阶段进行了划分和定义.依据苗种培育与生产实际采样,在水温20±1℃,盐度28~29,pH为7.8~8.2条件下,初生碟状体(伞径2~3mm)经过20 d的培养,棒状附着器形成,发育成为幼蜇(15~20 mm).测定分析了人工培养的初生碟状体到幼蜇的摄食量和生长规律(伞径和体重),2~20 mm的海蜇幼体伞径日生长率呈指数增长,方程为y-2.748 8e0.1018x,体重与伞径的关系式为Y-6×10-5-0.5χ3.5475,摄食量与伞径呈指数增长,方程为y=43.537χ1.775.

  12. Monodisc strobilation in Japanese giant box jellyfish Morbakka virulenta (Kishinouye, 1910): a strong implication of phylogenetic similarity between Cubozoa and Scyphozoa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toshino, Sho; Miyake, Hiroshi; Ohtsuka, Susumu; Adachi, Aya; Kondo, Yusuke; Okada, Shoma; Hirabayashi, Takeshi; Hiratsuka, Tatsuya

    2015-01-01

    Both sexes of the Japanese giant box jellyfish Morbakka virulenta were collected from the Seto Inland Sea, western Japan in December 2011, in order to observe the developmental processes from polyps to medusae. The medusa production in M. virulenta is up to now a unique process in cubozoans in that it exhibits a form of monodisc strobilation where the polyp is regenerated before the medusa detaches. This mode of medusa production was previously thought to be exclusive to scyphozoans. The general shape of young medusae resembles that of other cubozoans such as Alatina moseri and Copula sivickisi, but is differentiated from these by the short capitate tentacles and the lack of gastric filaments in the stomach. The unique medusa production of M. virulenta highly implies a phylogenetic similarity between cubozoans and scyphozoans.

  13. Abundant box jellyfish, Chironex sp. (Cnidaria: Cubozoa: Chirodropidae), discovered at depths of over 50 m on western Australian coastal reefs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keesing, John K; Strzelecki, Joanna; Stowar, Marcus; Wakeford, Mary; Miller, Karen J; Gershwin, Lisa-Ann; Liu, Dongyan

    2016-02-29

    Box jellyfish cause human fatalities and have a life cycle and habit associated with shallow waters (Chironex sp. very near to the benthos (Chironex were not widespread, occurring only in 2 of 33 tow videos and 3 of 41 epibenthic sleds spread over 2000 km(2). All Chironex filmed or captured were on low to medium relief reefs with rich filter feeder communities. None were on soft sediment habitat despite these habitats comprising 49% of all sites. The importance of the reef habitat to Chironex remains unclear. Being associated with filter feeder communities might represent a hazard, and other studies have shown C. fleckeri avoid habitats which represent a risk of entanglement of their tentacles. Most of our observations were made during the period of lowest tidal current flow in the morning. This may represent a period favourable for active hunting for prey close to the seabed.

  14. Extraction and Isolation of Pepsin-solubilised Collagen from Jellyfish (Rhopilema esculentum )%海蜇胶原蛋白的提取及纯化

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘磊; 陈伟

    2011-01-01

    Pepsin-solubllised collagen (PSC) which was isolated from the mesogloea of jellyfish (Rhopilema esculentum) ,by limited pepsin digestion and isolated by selective precipitation with NaCl and cm-cellulose chromatography.The PSC exhibited a maximum absorbance at 235 nm.The results of SDS-PAGE and amino acid compositions suggested the purified collagen was type Ⅰ collagen.It was the same with those of the collagen from jellyfish umbrella and the acidsoluble collagen from its mesoglce, such as S.nomurai and Rhopilema asamushi.As a primitive animal, amino analysis of pac revealed the slight difference between invertebrate and vertebrate.%通过胃蛋白酶的限制性酶切、选择性盐析及阳离子交换柱的层析作用,低温从海蜇中胶层提取可得到胃蛋白酶促溶且去除端肽(telopeptide)的胶原蛋白(PSC).紫外-可见扫描测得PSC的最大吸收峰位于235nm.凝胶电泳及氨基酸分析显示这些都符合Ⅰ型胶原的特征,同水母S.nomurai和Rhopilema asamushi来源的胶原蛋白基本一致,作为一个低等动物,其氨基酸分析显示了脊椎动物和非脊椎动物的微小差异.

  15. Apoptosis-like cell death induced by nematocyst venom from Chrysaora helvola Brandt jellyfish and an in vitro evaluation of commonly used antidotes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qu, Xiaosheng; Xia, Xianghua; Lai, Zefeng; Zhong, Taozheng; Li, Gang; Fan, Lanlan; Shu, Wei

    2016-02-01

    The present work investigated the in vitro cytotoxicity of nematocyst venom (NV) from Chrysaora helvola Brandt (C. helvola) jellyfish against human MCF-7 and CNE-2 tumor cell lines. Potent cytotoxicity was quantified using the MTT assay (LC50=12.07±3.13 and 1.6±0.22μg/mL (n=4), respectively). Apoptosis-like cell death was further confirmed using the LDH release assay and Annexin V/PI double staining-based flow cytometry analysis. However, only activation of caspase-4 was observed. It is possible that some caspase-independent pathways were activated by the NV treatment. Since no reference or antivenom is available, the effects of several commonly used antidotes on the cytotoxicity of NV were examined on more sensitive CNE-2 cells to determine the appropriate emergency measures for envenomation by C. helvola. The phospholipase A2 (PLA2) inhibitor para-bromophenacyl bromide (pBPB) showed no protective effect, while Mg(2+) potentiated cytotoxicity. Voltage-gated L-type Ca(2+) channel blockers (verapamil, nifedipine and felodipine) and Na-Ca(2+) exchanger inhibitor KB-R7943 also showed no effect. Assays using Ca(2+)-free culture media or the intracellular Ca(2+) chelator BAPTA also could not inhibit the cytotoxicity. Taken together, these results suggest that PLA2 and Ca(2+) are not directly involved in the cytotoxicity of NV from C. helvola. Our work also suggests caution regarding the choice for first aid for envenomation by C. helvola jellyfish.

  16. An in vivo comparison of the efficacy of CSL box jellyfish antivenom with antibodies raised against nematocyst-derived Chironex fleckeri venom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winter, Kelly L; Isbister, Geoffrey K; Jacoby, Tamara; Seymour, Jamie E; Hodgson, Wayne C

    2009-06-01

    Although CSL box jellyfish antivenom (AV) remains the primary treatment for Chironex fleckeri envenoming, there has been considerable debate regarding its clinical effectiveness. Animal studies have shown that AV is largely ineffective in preventing C. fleckeri-induced cardiovascular collapse. This study examined the effectiveness of CSL box jellyfish AV (ovine IgG), raised against 'milked' venom, and polyclonal rabbit IgG antibodies (Ab) raised against nematocyst-derived venom. A venom dose of 30microg/kg, i.v., which causes an initial presser response (34+/-5mmHg; n=7) followed by cardiovascular collapse, was used in all experiments. A bolus dose of AV (3000U/kg, i.v.) or Ab (12mg; i.e. an equivalent protein 'load' to 3000U/kg AV), administered 15min prior to a bolus dose of venom, did not significantly attenuate the effects of venom. The venom response was also not significantly attenuated when AV (3000U/kg) was given as a bolus dose 10-60min prior to venom infusion. However, when the venom was incubated with either AV (3000U/kg) or Ab (12mg) for 3h prior to infusion, the effect of the venom was almost abolished. The results of this study demonstrate that antibodies raised against both 'milked' and nematocyst-derived venom are able to neutralise the cardiovascular collapse produced by the venom. However, large amounts of AV are required and must be preincubated with the venom to be protective. This indicates a very rapid action of the toxin(s) and that AV is unlikely to be clinically effective because it cannot be administered early enough.

  17. The pharmacology of Malo maxima jellyfish venom extract in isolated cardiovascular tissues: A probable cause of the Irukandji syndrome in Western Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ran; Wright, Christine E; Winkel, Kenneth D; Gershwin, Lisa-Ann; Angus, James A

    2011-03-25

    The in vitro cardiac and vascular pharmacology of Malo maxima, a newly described jellyfish suspected of causing Irukandji syndrome in the Broome region of Western Australia, was investigated in rat tissues. In left atria, M. maxima crude venom extract (CVE; 1-100μg/mL) caused concentration-dependent inotropic responses which were unaffected by atropine (1μM), but significantly attenuated by tetrodotoxin (TTX; 0.1μM), propranolol (1μM), Mg(2+) (6mM) or calcitonin gene-related peptide antagonist (CGRP(8-37); 1μM). CVE caused no change in right atrial rate until 100μg/mL, which elicited bradycardia. This was unaffected by atropine, TTX, propranolol or CGRP(8-37). In the presence of Mg(2+), CVE 30-100μg/mL caused tachycardia. In small mesenteric arteries CVE caused concentration-dependent contractions (pEC(50) 1.03±0.07μg/mL) that were unaffected by prazosin (0.3μM), ω-conotoxin GVIA (0.1μM) or Mg(2+) (6mM). There was a 2-fold increase in sensitivity in the presence of CGRP(8-37) (3μM). TTX (0.1μM), box jellyfish Chironex fleckeri antivenom (92.6U/mL) and benextramine (3μM) decreased sensitivity by 2.6, 1.9 and 2.1-fold, respectively. CVE-induced maximum contractions were attenuated by C. fleckeri antivenom (-22%) or benextramine (-49%). M. maxima CVE appears to activate the sympathetic, but not parasympathetic, nervous system and to stimulate sensory nerve CGRP release in left atria and resistance arteries. These effects are consistent with the catecholamine excess thought to cause Irukandji syndrome, with additional actions of CGRP release.

  18. Is sleep's 'supreme mystery' unraveling? An evolutionary analysis of sleep encounters no mystery; nor does life's earliest sleep, recently discovered in jellyfish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kavanau, J Lee

    2006-01-01

    Biotelemetry has revealed daily 15-h behavioral sleep periods in a cubomedusan jellyfish, Chironex fleckeri. Its sleep is expected to be phylogenetically most primitive, since jellyfish possess only two germ layers. They belong to the phylum Cnidaria, the 'simplest' multicellular organisms with an organized nervous system. Cubomedusae have a complex visual system with 24 eyes of four different types, each type specialized for a different task. Input to these eyes during visually guided fast-swimming predation requires enormous amounts of neural processing, possibly nearly saturating the capacity of their comparatively simple nervous system. These heavy neural demands may account for the need for fifteen hours of sleep. C. fleckeri is the only animal known for which sleep may be either present or absent, dependent on lifestyle. Limited knowledge of behavior of some other cubomedusae suggests that they also possess this faculty. The finding of sleep in C. fleckeri supports current proposals of sleep's origin and basic function. Evolutionary analyses link sleep to a conflict produced by excessive processing demands on multifunctional neural circuitry for detailed focal vision by complex lensed eyes. The conflict arises between the enormous demands of complex visual analysis and needs for split-second control of actions, on the one hand, and non-urgent processing of memories of ongoing and stored events, on the other. Conflict is resolved by deferring the non-urgent processing to periods of sleep. Without sleep, selection would favor the evolution of circuitry 'dedicated' to single or but few tasks, with corresponding lesser efficiency. Had complex lensed eyes of medusae originated as a consequence of selection for increased mating success of males pursuing females, it could have occurred before the evolution of fast-swimming bilateral (three-germ-layered) prey. But if it was a consequence of selection for increased prey-hunting success, the origin of such eyes

  19. The in vivo cardiovascular effects of box jellyfish Chironex fleckeri venom in rats: efficacy of pre-treatment with antivenom, verapamil and magnesium sulphate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramasamy, Sharmaine; Isbister, Geoffrey K; Seymour, Jamie E; Hodgson, Wayne C

    2004-05-01

    Using a new technique to extract venom from the nematocysts, the efficacy of CSL box jellyfish antivenom (AV) and adjunct therapies, verapamil and magnesium sulfate (MgSO(4)), were investigated against the in vivo cardiovascular effects of Chironex fleckeri venom in anaesthetised rats. C. fleckeri venom (30 microg/kg; i.v.) produced a transient hypertensive response followed by hypotension and cardiovascular collapse within 4 min of administration. Prophylactic treatment of anaesthetised rats with CSL box jellyfish AV (3000 U/kg; i.v.) did not have any effect on the venom-induced pressor response, but prevented cardiovascular collapse in four out of 10 animals. Administration of verapamil (20mM@0.25 ml/min; i.v.) either alone or in combination with AV, did not have any effect on the C. fleckeri venom-induced pressor response nor the consequent hypotension or cardiovascular collapse of animals. However, the administration of verapamil negated the partially protective effects of AV. Concurrent artificial respiration of animals with the above treatments did not attenuate the C. fleckeri venom-induced cardiovascular effects. MgSO(4) (0.05-0.07M@0.25 ml/min; i.v.) alone did not have any effect on the venom-induced pressor response nor the consequent cardiovascular collapse of animals. However, although combined AV and MgSO(4) administration could not inhibit the transient pressor effect following the administration of C. fleckeri venom, it prevented cardiovascular collapse in all animals. We show for the first time, the cardiovascular effects of a C. fleckeri venom sample free of tentacular contamination and the potential of MgSO(4) as an adjunct therapy for the treatment of potentially fatal C. fleckeri envenomings.

  20. Mitochondrial diversity in Gonionemus (Trachylina:Hydrozoa and its implications for understanding the origins of clinging jellyfish in the Northwest Atlantic Ocean

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annette F. Govindarajan

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Determining whether a population is introduced or native to a region can be challenging due to inadequate taxonomy, the presence of cryptic lineages, and poor historical documentation. For taxa with resting stages that bloom episodically, determining origin can be especially challenging as an environmentally-triggered abrupt appearance of the taxa may be confused with an anthropogenic introduction. Here, we assess diversity in mitochondrial cytochrome oxidase I sequences obtained from multiple Atlantic and Pacific locations, and discuss the implications of our findings for understanding the origin of clinging jellyfish Gonionemus in the Northwest Atlantic. Clinging jellyfish are known for clinging to seagrasses and seaweeds, and have complex life cycles that include resting stages. They are especially notorious as some, although not all, populations are associated with severe sting reactions. The worldwide distribution of Gonionemus has been aptly called a “zoogeographic puzzle” and our results refine rather than resolve the puzzle. We find a relatively deep divergence that may indicate cryptic speciation between Gonionemus from the Northeast Pacific and Northwest Pacific/Northwest Atlantic. Within the Northwest Pacific/Northwest Atlantic clade, we find haplotypes unique to each region. We also find one haplotype that is shared between highly toxic Vladivostok-area populations and some Northwest Atlantic populations. Our results are consistent with multiple scenarios that involve both native and anthropogenic processes. We evaluate each scenario and discuss critical directions for future research, including improving the resolution of population genetic structure, identifying possible lineage admixture, and better characterizing and quantifying the toxicity phenotype.

  1. Impairment of the cell-to-matrix adhesion and cytotoxicity induced by the Mediterranean jellyfish Pelagia noctiluca venom and its fractions in cultured glioblastoma cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayed Yosra

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The biodiversity of the marine environment and the associated chemical diversity constitute a practically unlimited source of new active substances in the field of the development of bioactive products. In our study, we have investigated the efficiency of the venom from the Mediterranean jellyfish, Pelagia noctiluca and its fractions for anti-proliferative and anti-cell adhesion to cell–extracellular matrix activities. Results Our experiments have indicated that the separation of the Mediterranean jellyfish Pelagia noctiluca crude venom extract by sephadex G-75 chromatography led to four fractions (F1, F2, F3, and F4. Among the four fractions F1 and F3 were cytotoxic against U87 cells with IC50 values of 125 and 179 μg/ml respectively. The venom, F1, F2 and F 3 showed significant anti-proliferative activity in time-dependent manner. Our results also suggest that these fractions and the venom are able to inhibit cell adhesion to fibrinogen in dose-dependent manner. This inhibition is reliant on its ability to interact with integrins. Conclusions To conclude, we have demonstrated for the first time that Pelagia noctiluca venom and its fractions especially (F1 and F2 display potent anti-tumoral properties. Separation by sephadex G-75 chromatography give rise to more active fractions than the crude venom extract. The purification and the determination of chemical structures of compounds of these active fractions are under investigation. Overall, Pelagia noctiluca venom may has the potential to serve as a template for future anticancer-drug development.

  2. Regulatory volume decrease in isolated nematocytes is affected by crude venom from the jellyfish Pelagia noctiluca

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rossana Morabito

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Crude venom from nematocysts of the Scyphozoan Pelagia noctiluca possesses hemolytic and cytotoxic power on cultured cells and elicits local and systemic inflammation reactions in vivo. The ability of regulating their volume after exposure to an anisosmotic solution is a fundamental feature common to cells from vertebrates and invertebrates, including Cnidarians. The aim of the present work i s to assay whether crude venom from Pelagia noctiluca may affect the regulatory volume decrease (RVD of nematocytes isolated from the Anthozoan Aiptasia mutabilis, here employed as a cell model. For this purpose, nematocytes were isolated by 605 mM NaSCN plus 0.01 mM Ca2+ application on acontia of Aiptasia mutabilis, while crude venom was obtained by sonication of a population of, respectively, 10, 25 and 50 nematocysts/µL (n/µL. Isolated nematocytes were pre-treated for 30 min with crude venom, submitted to hypotonic stress and their osmotic response and RVD were measured optically. Our results show that, after exposure to crude venom, nematocytes were morphologically intact, as shown by the Trypan blue exclusion test, but did not exhibit RVD. This effect was dose-dependent and reversed by the ionopho re gramicidin. The last observation suggests an inhibitory effect of venom on cell membrane ion transport mechanisms involved in RVD. Further studies are needed to verify this hypothesis and ascertain if a similar effect could be observed in human cells.

  3. 基于SCI-E、CPCI-S 的水母研究文献分析%Analysis of jellyfish literatures based on SCI-E and CPCI-S

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    彭海青; 刘秀娟

    2011-01-01

    By using bibliometric method, the research papers about jellyfish collected in SCI-E and CPCI-S(ISTP) published since 1899 were analyzed . The year distribution, subject distribution, top 10 countries and institutions of jellyfish literature were discussed, in order to understand the advances of the research field in different countries and provide scientific reference for professional researchers.%采用文献计量方法, 对1899 年以来SCI-E、CPCI-S(ISTP)收录的水母相关文献进行分析, 探讨了水母研究的年代分布、学科分布及排名前10 位的国家和机构, 以期了解世界各国在这一研究领域的进展情况, 并为专业研究人员提供科研参考。

  4. 海蜇中铝限量标准探讨及安全食用建议%Discussion of standard limit of aluminium for jellyfish products and safety guidelines

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    叶湖; 陈英; 赵晓峰; 陆俊; 纪丽君

    2013-01-01

    目的 探讨海蜇产品铝含量超标情况和安全风险,研究降低海蜇产品铝含量的食用方法.方法 依据SC/T 3210-2001和GB/T 23374-2009标准,分别检测51个批次海蜇产品中明矾含量和铝含量;采用水浸泡法和弱酸浸泡法除铝,通过正交试验进行条件优化.结果 由于标准的不同,检测结果显示明矾含量合格率100%,而铝含量合格率0%.正交试验结果显示,以500 ml l%醋酸溶液浸泡20 g海蜇的比例浸泡6h,可将铝残留量(湿基)降至57 mg/kg.结论 为保证食品安全,应加快标准修订,实现生产标准和卫生标准的无缝衔接;对于生产者,建议在即食海蜇生产中增加弱酸浸泡工序;对于消费者,建议食用非即食海蜇前将清水浸泡的传统方法改为食醋浸泡以降低铝的风险.%Objective To investigate the risk of excessive aluminum residue in jellyfish and research the way to deduce the content of aluminum in jellyfish products.Methods The content of alum and aluminum in 51 batches of jellyfish products were determined according to SC/T 3210-2001 and GB/T 23374-2009,respectively.The methods for aluminum reduction in jellyfish were studied by soaking the jellyfish in water or weak acid.The soaking conditions were optimized by orthogonal test consisting of three factors at three different levels.Results The results showed that the content of alum in all samples were qualified,while the unqualified rate of aluminum was 100%.The results of orthogonal test showed that the aluminum residues (wet weight) could be reduced to 57 mg/kg by soaking 20 g jellyfish products in 500 ml 1% acetic acid solution for 6 hours.Conclusion The standards should be revised to keep accordance to ensure food safety.Weak acid soaking was proposed for ready-to-eat jellyfish processing,while vinegar soaking was more effective to reduce the health risk of excessive aluminum for non-ready-to-eat jellyfish.

  5. 对黄、东海水母暴发机理的新认知%NEW PERCEPTION OF JELLYFISH BLOOM IN THE EAST CHINA SEA AND YELLOW SEA

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孙松

    2012-01-01

    The results of the experiments in laboratory and cruises in the Chinese coastal waters and continental shelf area showed that the jellyfish bloom occurred in the East China Sea and Yellow Sea was caused by bottom sea water tem- perature turbulence and the rich food supply. The hypothesis is that the jellyfish usually live on the sea bottom as the form of polyps as benthos, when the environment temperature under the turbulent condition, it will trigger the polyps asexual reproduction to the strobilation, producing ephyra. This process is the way for jellyfish to escape from the crisis environ- ment, wander in the sea water to settle in the new environment and find new opportunities for live by coincidence. The key factors for the jellyfish bloom are temperature stimulation and food supply. Climate change and eutrophication are the main causes of the jellyfish bloom in the Chinese coastal waters.%基于大量实验结果和大规模海上考察和综合分析,从基础生物学和生态学的角度,对中国近海水母暴发的机理提出一种新的理论模式:水母生活史中的大部分时间以水螅体的形式生活在海底;水母种群的暴发是水螅体对环境变异的一种应激反应,是为了逃避动荡环境、扩大分布范围、寻求新的生存空间,为种群繁衍需求更多的机会的一种生存策略。导致水母种群暴发的关键过程是海洋底层温度的变动和饵料数量的变化,全球气候变化和富营养化是中国近海水母暴发的最重要诱发因素。水母暴发是全球变化下海洋生态系统演变的一种综合体现。

  6. The influence of different diets on growth performance in moon jellyfish Aurelia aurita%不同饲料对海月水母生长性能的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王文龙; 冷向军; 刘晃

    2009-01-01

    研究了5种饲料对海月水母Aurelia aurita(伞体直径为2.50 cm±0.10 cm)生长性能的影响.实验共分5组,每组设3个平行,分别投喂卤虫无节幼体、冰冻卤虫、冷冻干燥卤虫、国产微粒饲料和国外微粒饲料,依照投喂饲料的不同,各组分别记为G_(鲜活)、G_(冰冻)、G_(干燥)、G_(国产)、G_(国外)组,实验共进行30 d.结果表明:饲养30 d后,5组海月水母伞体的平均直径依次为(5.01±0.10)、(4.78±0.20)、(4.62±0.11)、(4.23±0.05)、(4.42±0.06)cm,卤虫无节幼体组生长性能最好,水母伞体直径显著高于其他各组(P0.05),收缩频率平均为0.5~0.66 次/s;冰冻卤虫组的三态氮含量均显著高于其他各组(P<0.05),国内微粒饲料组的三态氮含量次之,也显著高于其他3组(P<0.05).本实验结果表明,卤虫无节幼体是海月水母较理想的饵料,冰冻卤虫和冷冻干燥卤虫次之.国产微粒饲料因为在营养组成、水中稳定性和悬浮性方面较差,饲养海月水母的效果也较差.%Moon jellyfish Amelia aurita with initial umbrella diameter of (2.50 ± 0.10)cm were fed nauplii of Ar-temia, frozen Atemia, freeze dried Atemia, Chinese microdiet and microdiet abroad for one month to evaluate the influence of the diets above on growth performance in the moon jellyfish. The moon jellyfish fed the Chinese micro-diet had survival rate of 95% , whereas the moon jellyfish fed the other diets had survival rate of 100%. The moon jellyfish fed the nauplii of Anemia showed the best growth performance, the umbrella diameter (5.01 cm ±0. 10 cm) being significant higher than the animals fed other diets(P <0.05) .followed by the moon jellyfish fed the fro-zen Atemia (4.78 cm ±0.20 cm in umbrella diameter) or freeze dried Atemia (4.62 cm ±0.11 cm in umbrella diameter). The least growth was observed in the moon jellyfish fed the Chinese microdiet (4.42 cm ±0.06 cm in umbrella diameter). The highest constraction frequency (1/second) was

  7. On the accuracy of the relativistic parameters beta, gamma, and the solar oblateness coefficient J2, as deduced from ranging data of a drag-free space probe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roth, E. A.

    1971-01-01

    Motion in the general gravity field is described mathematically. A covariance analysis, based on two simple models, is presented. Two drag-free space probes were considered, for which the orbital elements are given.

  8. Cardiovascular actions of the venom from the Irukandji (Carukia barnesi) jellyfish: effects in human, rat and guinea-pig tissues in vitro and in pigs in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winkel, Kenneth D; Tibballs, James; Molenaar, Peter; Lambert, Gavin; Coles, Peter; Ross-Smith, Mark; Wiltshire, Carolyn; Fenner, Peter J; Gershwin, Lisa-Ann; Hawdon, Gabrielle M; Wright, Christine E; Angus, James A

    2005-09-01

    1. We have investigated the cardiovascular pharmacology of the crude venom extract (CVE) from the potentially lethal, very small carybdeid jellyfish Carukia barnesi, in rat, guinea-pig and human isolated tissues and anaesthetized piglets. 2. In rat and guinea-pig isolated right atria, CVE (0.1-10 microg/mL) caused tachycardia in the presence of atropine (1 micromol/L), a response almost completely abolished by pretreatment with tetrodotoxin (TTX; 0.1 micromol/L). In paced left atria from guinea-pig or rat, CVE (0.1-3 microg/mL) caused a positive inotropic response in the presence of atropine (1 micromol/L). 3. In rat mesenteric small arteries, CVE (0.1-30 microg/mL) caused concentration-dependent contractions that were unaffected by 0.1 micromol/L TTX, 0.3 micromol/L prazosin or 0.1 micromol/L omega-conotoxin GVIA. 4. Neither the rat right atria tachycardic response nor the contraction of rat mesenteric arteries to CVE were affected by the presence of box jellyfish (Chironex fleckeri) antivenom (92.6 units/mL). 5. In human isolated driven right atrial trabeculae muscle strips, CVE (10 microg/mL) tended to cause an initial fall, followed by a more sustained increase, in contractile force. In the presence of atropine (1 micromol/L), CVE only caused a positive inotropic response. In separate experiments in the presence of propranolol (0.2 micromol/L), the negative inotropic effect of CVE was enhanced, whereas the positive inotropic response was markedly decreased. 6. In anaesthetized piglets, CVE (67 microg/kg, i.v.) caused sustained tachycardia and systemic and pulmonary hypertension. Venous blood samples demonstrated a marked elevation in circulating levels of noradrenaline and adrenaline. 7. We conclude that C. barnesi venom may contain a neural sodium channel activator (blocked by TTX) that, in isolated atrial tissue (and in vivo), causes the release of transmitter (and circulating) catecholamines. The venom may also contain a 'direct' vasoconstrictor component

  9. 我国海域常见有毒水母的分类检索%Taxonomy Key of the Venomous Jellyfishes in China Sea

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘萍; 张学雷; 宋洪军; 庞敏

    2013-01-01

    综合现有资料编制了我国海域常见的19种有毒水母种类的分类检索表.我国常见有毒水母分属于3纲8目14科17属,包括水螅水母类3种、管水母类2种、立方水母类2种、钵水母类12种,其中钵水母纲旗口水母目和根口水母目种类较多(各5种),其它目每目含1~2科且每科仅1属1种.对我国现有的水母分类体系中部分与国际通用体系不统一之处进行了厘正,如:火水母拉丁文种名应由Tamoya alata Uchida,1929厘正为Tamoya gargantua Haeckel,1880,建议将灯罩水母[Linuche draco (Haeckel,1880)]命名厘正为爪罩水母[Linuche unguiculata (Schwartz,1788)]等.%A taxonomy key for 19 species of common venomous jellyfishes in China sea was constructed based on the morphologic characteristics of different classes,orders,families,genera and species.There were 3 hydromedusa,2 siphonophore,2 cubomedusae and 12 scyphomedusae.More species belonged to the orders Semaeostomeae (5 species) and Rhizostomeae (5 species) of class Scyphozoa,and fewer (1 or 2 species) per the other orders.Some inconsistency of jellyfish taxonomy being used in China was detected and clarified,e.g.the abandoned name of Tamoya alata (Uchida,1829) should be replaced with Tamoya gargantua (Haeckel,1880),and the name of Linuchedraco (Haeckel,1880) was suggested to be replaced with the currently accepted name Linuche unguiculata (Schwartz,1788) following WoRMS (World Register of Marine Species).

  10. Modeling of Possible Conditions for Origin of First Organic Forms in hot Mineral Water

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ignat Ignatov

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The composition of water, its temperature and pH value was analyzed in experiments with modelling of primary hydrosphere and possible conditions for origin of first organic forms in hot mineral water. For this aim the authors performed experiments with hot mineral and seawater from Bulgaria by IR-spectrometry (DNES-method. As model systems were used cactus juice of Echinopsis pachanoi and Mediterranean jellyfish Cotylorhiza tuberculata. It was considered the reactions of condensation and dehydration in alkaline aqueous solutions with рН = 9–10, resulting in synthesis from separate molecules larger organic molecules as polymers and short polipeptides. It was shown that hot alkaline mineral water with temperature from +65 0C to +95 0C and pH value from 9 to 11 is more suitable for the origination of life and living matter than other analyzed water samples. The pH value of seawater on contrary is limited to the range of 7,5 to 8,4 units. Two common local maximums were observed in the IR-spectra of jellyfish and seawater, which were more pronouncedly expressed in IR-spectra of jellyfish.

  11. Improved methods for modeling pulse shapes of accreting millisecond pulsars

    CERN Document Server

    Leahy, D; Cadeau, C

    2006-01-01

    Raytracing computations for light emitted from the surface of a rapidly rotating neutron star are carried out in order to construct light curves for accreting millisecond pulsars. These calculations are for realistic models of rapidly rotating neutron stars which take into account both the correct exterior metric and the oblate shape of the star. We find that the most important effect, comparing the full raytracing computations with simpler approximations currently in use, arises from the oblate shape of the rotating star. Approximating a rotating neutron star as a sphere introduces serious errors in fitted values of the star's radius and mass if the rotation rate is very large. However, for lower rotation rates acceptable mass and radius values can be obtained using the spherical approximation.

  12. Aurelia labiata jellyfish in Roscoe Bay on the West Coast of Canada: Seasonal changes in adult bell diameter and mingling of juvenile and adult populations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albert, David J.; Walsh, Michael L.

    2014-01-01

    The bell diameter of adult Aurelia labiata in Roscoe Bay increased from spring (April) to early summer (May/June) and decreased over the rest of the year (2009/2010). The increase in bell diameter in the spring would have been supported by the increase in zooplankton that occurs in the northeast Pacific at this time. Over the summer, bell diameter may have decreased because the food available/medusa would have been decreased by the arrival of a large number of juveniles and may have decreased further over the fall and winter when zooplankton levels are known to be low. Adults and juveniles were intermingled during 2010, 2011, and 2012. Correlations between the number of adults and number of juveniles obtained in individual net lifts across the entire bay and in different parts of the bay were all positive and most were statistically significant. In 2012, salinity in the entire water column of the west side of the bay dropped below 20 ppt in July and most medusae migrated to higher salinity in the east side of the bay, a distance of about 0.5 km. The mingling of adults and juveniles supports other evidence that adult Aurelia sp. medusae do not prey upon juveniles. The ability to withstand months with insufficient food and to inhibit preying on juveniles would contribute greatly to the survival of Aurelia sp. jellyfish.

  13. The use of ephyrae of a scyphozoan jellyfish, Aurelia aurita, in the aquatic toxicological assessment of Macondo oils from the Deepwater Horizon incident.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Echols, B S; Smith, A J; Gardinali, P R; Rand, G M

    2016-02-01

    Ephyrae of the scyphozoan jellyfish, Aurelia aurita, were evaluated in 96-hr acute toxicity tests for lethal response to Macondo crude oils from the Deepwater Horizon (DWH) incident in the Gulf of Mexico (GOM), Corexit 9500, and oil-dispersant mixtures. Water accommodated fractions (WAFs) of weathered and unweathered Macondo crude oils were not acutely toxic to ephyrae (LC50s > 100% WAF). The total PAHs (TPAHs), measured as the sum of 46 PAHs, averaged 21.1and 152 µg TPAH/L for WAFs of weathered and unweathered oil, respectively. Mortality was significantly (p = <0.0001) higher in the three highest exposure concentrations (184-736 µg TPAH/L) of chemically dispersed WAFs (CEWAF) compared to controls. Dispersant only tests resulted in a mean LC50 of 32.3 µL/L, which is in the range of previously published LC50s for marine zooplankton. Changes in appearance and muscle contractions were observed in organisms exposed to CEWAF dilutions of 12.5 and 25%, as early as 24 h post-exposure. Based on the results of these tests, crude oil alone did not cause significant acute toxicity; however, the presence of chemical dispersant resulted in substantial mortality and physical and behavioral abnormalities either due to an increase in hydrocarbons or droplet exposure. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. 海蜇产品中铝含量3种测定方法的比较%Comparison of three methods of aluminum determination in jellyfish product

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴则业; 杨贤庆; 岑剑伟; 魏涯; 赵永强; 黄卉; 周婉君

    2015-01-01

    Aluminum content in jellyfish is high due to adding of aluminum in the processing to improve the products quality.An accurate method to detect aluminum content in jellyfish was studied by comparing of several existing methods such as:EDTA titration method,flame atomic absorption and inductively coupled plasma emission spectrometry (ICP-AES).The precision and recovery rates were carried on.Fifteen desalted jellyfish and fifteen salted jellyfish were tested respectively.After wet digestion,three different detection methods were applied.The results showed that there was no significant difference in the final results (P > 0.05).ALL three methods' relative standard deviations were less than 5%.The recovery of desalted jellyfish was 86.10% and 88.50% respectively determined by ED-TA titration method and flame atomic absorption.The recoveries of others were all higher.The detection limit was 7.4 mg/L and 3.5 mg/L of EDTA titration method and flame atomic absorption spectrometry.EDTA titration method and flame atomic absorption method can be used for determination of aluminum content in jellyfish by enterprises and inspection agencies.%海蜇中因加工过程添加大量的明矾而含有较高的铝含量,文中通过比较EDTA滴定法、火焰原子吸收法和电感耦合等离子体发射光谱法(ICP-AES)对海蜇中铝含量的测定结果,找出准确测定海蜇中铝含量的方法,同时做精密度和回收率实验.取即食海蜇和盐渍海蜇样品各15个,采用湿法消解完毕后,以3种检测方法进行测定.结果表明:3种检测方法的测定结果没有显著性差异(P>0.05),用3种检测方法测定即食海蜇和盐渍海蜇的相对标准偏差均小于5%;除了在即食海蜇铝含量的检测中,EDTA滴定法和火焰原子吸收法测定的回收率分别为86.10%、88.50%较低外,其他测定的结果都达到了较高的回收率.EDTA滴定法和火焰原子吸收法测定的检出限分别为7.4、3.5 mg/L.因

  15. Calculation of Energy Levels of Nucleus 127I in the Particle-Triaxial-Rotor Model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SONG Hui-Chao; LIU Yu-Xin; ZHANG Yu-Hu

    2004-01-01

    @@ Theoretical calculations have been performed for nucleus 127 I in the framework of the particle-triaxial-rotor model.The calculated results indicate that both the 5+2 and 7+2 bands are oblate deformed bands. Their configurations are associated with the πd5/2 [402] 52 and πg7/2[404] 72 orbitals and the strong mixing between them. Meanwhile a possible explanation of the strong mixing is given.

  16. GASP. II. A MUSE View of Extreme Ram-Pressure Stripping along the Line of Sight: Kinematics of the Jellyfish Galaxy JO201

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellhouse, C.; Jaffé, Y. L.; Hau, G. K. T.; McGee, S. L.; Poggianti, B. M.; Moretti, A.; Gullieuszik, M.; Bettoni, D.; Fasano, G.; D'Onofrio, M.; Fritz, J.; Omizzolo, A.; Sheen, Y.-K.; Vulcani, B.

    2017-07-01

    This paper presents a spatially resolved kinematic study of the jellyfish galaxy JO201, one of the most spectacular cases of ram-pressure stripping (RPS) in the GAs Stripping Phenomena in galaxies with MUSE (GASP) survey. By studying the environment of JO201, we find that it is moving through the dense intracluster medium of Abell 85 at supersonic speeds along our line of sight, and that it is likely accompanied by a small group of galaxies. Given the density of the intracluster medium and the galaxy’s mass, projected position, and velocity within the cluster, we estimate that JO201 must so far have lost ˜50% of its gas during infall via RPS. The MUSE data indeed reveal a smooth stellar disk accompanied by large projected tails of ionized ({{H}}α ) gas, composed of kinematically cold (velocity dispersion 100 km s-1) diffuse emission, that extend out to at least ˜ 50 {kpc} from the galaxy center. The ionized {{H}}α -emitting gas in the disk rotates with the stars out to ˜6 kpc but, in the disk outskirts, it becomes increasingly redshifted with respect to the (undisturbed) stellar disk. The observed disturbances are consistent with the presence of gas trailing behind the stellar component resulting from intense face-on RPS along the line of sight. Our kinematic analysis is consistent with the estimated fraction of lost gas and reveals that stripping of the disk happens outside-in, causing shock heating and gas compression in the stripped tails.

  17. Mitrocomin from the jellyfish Mitrocoma cellularia with deleted C-terminal tyrosine reveals a higher bioluminescence activity compared to wild type photoprotein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burakova, Ludmila P; Natashin, Pavel V; Markova, Svetlana V; Eremeeva, Elena V; Malikova, Natalia P; Cheng, Chongyun; Liu, Zhi-Jie; Vysotski, Eugene S

    2016-09-01

    The full-length cDNA genes encoding five new isoforms of Ca(2+)-regulated photoprotein mitrocomin from a small tissue sample of the outer bell margin containing photocytes of only one specimen of the luminous jellyfish Mitrocoma cellularia were cloned, sequenced, and characterized after their expression in Escherichia coli and subsequent purification. The analysis of cDNA nucleotide sequences encoding mitrocomin isoforms allowed suggestion that two isoforms might be the products of two allelic genes differing in one amino acid residue (64R/Q) whereas other isotypes appear as a result of transcriptional mutations. In addition, the crystal structure of mitrocomin was determined at 1.30Å resolution which expectedly revealed a high similarity with the structures of other hydromedusan photoproteins. Although mitrocomin isoforms reveal a high degree of identity of amino acid sequences, they vary in specific bioluminescence activities. At that, all isotypes displayed the identical bioluminescence spectra (473-474nm with no shoulder at 400nm). Fluorescence spectra of Ca(2+)-discharged mitrocomins were almost identical to their light emission spectra similar to the case of Ca(2+)-discharged aequorin, but different from Ca(2+)-discharged obelins and clytin which fluorescence is red-shifted by 25-30nm from bioluminescence spectra. The main distinction of mitrocomin from other hydromedusan photoproteins is an additional Tyr at the C-terminus. Using site-directed mutagenesis, we showed that this Tyr is not important for bioluminescence because its deletion even increases specific activity and efficiency of apo-mitrocomin conversion into active photoprotein, in contrast to C-terminal Pro of other photoproteins. Since genes in a population generally exist as different isoforms, it makes us anticipate the cloning of even more isoforms of mitrocomin and other hydromedusan photoproteins with different bioluminescence properties.

  18. Mitrocomin from the jellyfish Mitrocoma cellularia with deleted C-terminal tyrosine reveals a higher bioluminescence activity compared to wild type photoprotein

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burakova, Ludmila P.; Natashin, Pavel V.; Markova, Svetlana V.; Eremeeva, Elena V.; Malikova, Natalia P.; Cheng, Chongyun; Liu, Zhi-Jie; Vysotski, Eugene S.

    2016-09-01

    The full-length cDNA genes encoding five new isoforms of Ca2 +-regulated photoprotein mitrocomin from a small tissue sample of the outer bell margin containing photocytes of only one specimen of the luminous jellyfish Mitrocoma cellularia were cloned, sequenced, and characterized after their expression in Escherichia coli and subsequent purification. The analysis of cDNA nucleotide sequences encoding mitrocomin isoforms allowed suggestion that two isoforms might be the products of two allelic genes differing in one amino acid residue (64R/Q) whereas other isotypes appear as a result of transcriptional mutations. In addition, the crystal structure of mitrocomin was determined at 1.30 Å resolution which expectedly revealed a high similarity with the structures of other hydromedusan photoproteins. Although mitrocomin isoforms reveal a high degree of identity of amino acid sequences, they vary in specific bioluminescence activities. At that, all isotypes displayed the identical bioluminescence spectra (473–474 nm with no shoulder at 400 nm). Fluorescence spectra of Ca2 +-discharged mitrocomins were almost identical to their light emission spectra similar to the case of Ca2 +-discharged aequorin, but different from Ca2 +-discharged obelins and clytin which fluorescence is red-shifted by 25–30 nm from bioluminescence spectra. The main distinction of mitrocomin from other hydromedusan photoproteins is an additional Tyr at the C-terminus. Using site-directed mutagenesis, we showed that this Tyr is not important for bioluminescence because its deletion even increases specific activity and efficiency of apo-mitrocomin conversion into active photoprotein, in contrast to C-terminal Pro of other photoproteins. Since genes in a population generally exist as different isoforms, it makes us anticipate the cloning of even more isoforms of mitrocomin and other hydromedusan photoproteins with different bioluminescence properties.

  19. Precession Relaxation of Viscoelastic Oblate Rotators

    CERN Document Server

    Frouard, Julien

    2016-01-01

    Various perturbations (collisions, close encounters, YORP) destabilise the rotation of a small body, leaving it in a non-principal spin state. Then the body experiences alternating stresses generated by the inertial forces. The ensuing inelastic dissipation reduces the kinetic energy, without influencing the angular momentum. This yields nutation relaxation, i.e., evolution of the spin towards rotation about the maximal-inertia axis. Knowledge of the timescales needed to damp the nutation is crucial in studies of small bodies' dynamics. In the past, nutation relaxation has been described by an empirical quality factor introduced to parameterise the dissipation rate and to evade the discussion of the actual rheological parameters and their role in dissipation. This approach is unable to describe the dependence of the relaxation rate upon the nutation angle, because we do not know the quality factor's dependence on the frequency (which is a function of the nutation angle). This leaves open the question of relax...

  20. Preparation of Micro-pores Oblate Spherical Powder with Closed-pore Structure by Improvement of One Step Process%改进“一步法”制备闭孔结构微气孔球扁药

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郭长平; 殷继刚; 袁超; 李生有; 潘仁明

    2012-01-01

    A new process of fabricating micro-pores oblate spherical powder (MOSP) with closed-pore structure was put forward, which is based on the traditional ball propellant process and the way of making the micro-capsule. 7% sodium sulfate solution is used as a dispersion medium for making MOSP instead of water. This method can effectively avoid the hole connection structure between pore walls in MOSP caused by water which is dissolved in nitrocellulose solution. Both changing the dosage of inner water phase and chemical foaming are used to prepare MOSP with closed-pore structure. The results indicate that: MOSP with uniform pore and closed-pore structure can be prepared when the amount of the inner water phase is less than 30 Ml; MOSP with uniform pore,closed-pore structure and low bulk density can be prepared when 29% of solvent is evaporated.%以传统球扁药工艺和微胶囊技术制备球扁药方法为基础,采用质量浓度为7%的Na2SO4溶液替代纯水作为分散介质,避免溶解在硝化棉溶液中的水易导致的药粒内部孔壁之间通孔结构的形成,用添加不同量内水相和化学发泡法两种方法来控制球扁药中闭孔结构的形成.结果表明:采用内水相用量来控制孔结构方法时,内水相用量低于30 mL时能制备孔径分布均匀、具有闭孔结构的球扁药;采用化学发泡法时,驱溶量为总溶剂量的29%时发泡能制备孔径分布较均匀、低堆积密度、具有闭孔结构的球扁药.