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Sample records for model membranes mimicking

  1. Reconstituting ring-rafts in bud-mimicking topography of model membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryu, Yong-Sang; Lee, In-Ho; Suh, Jeng-Hun; Park, Seung Chul; Oh, Soojung; Jordan, Luke R.; Wittenberg, Nathan J.; Oh, Sang-Hyun; Jeon, Noo Li; Lee, Byoungho; Parikh, Atul N.; Lee, Sin-Doo

    2014-07-01

    During vesicular trafficking and release of enveloped viruses, the budding and fission processes dynamically remodel the donor cell membrane in a protein- or a lipid-mediated manner. In all cases, in addition to the generation or relief of the curvature stress, the buds recruit specific lipids and proteins from the donor membrane through restricted diffusion for the development of a ring-type raft domain of closed topology. Here, by reconstituting the bud topography in a model membrane, we demonstrate the preferential localization of cholesterol- and sphingomyelin-enriched microdomains in the collar band of the bud-neck interfaced with the donor membrane. The geometrical approach to the recapitulation of the dynamic membrane reorganization, resulting from the local radii of curvatures from nanometre-to-micrometre scales, offers important clues for understanding the active roles of the bud topography in the sorting and migration machinery of key signalling proteins involved in membrane budding.

  2. Preparation of artificial plasma membrane mimicking vesicles with lipid asymmetry.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qingqing Lin

    Full Text Available Lipid asymmetry, the difference in lipid distribution across the lipid bilayer, is one of the most important features of eukaryotic cellular membranes. However, commonly used model membrane vesicles cannot provide control of lipid distribution between inner and outer leaflets. We recently developed methods to prepare asymmetric model membrane vesicles, but facile incorporation of a highly controlled level of cholesterol was not possible. In this study, using hydroxypropyl-α-cyclodextrin based lipid exchange, a simple method was devised to prepare large unilamellar model membrane vesicles that closely resemble mammalian plasma membranes in terms of their lipid composition and asymmetry (sphingomyelin (SM and/or phosphatidylcholine (PC outside/phosphatidylethanolamine (PE and phosphatidylserine (PS inside, and in which cholesterol content can be readily varied between 0 and 50 mol%. We call these model membranes "artificial plasma membrane mimicking" ("PMm" vesicles. Asymmetry was confirmed by both chemical labeling and measurement of the amount of externally-exposed anionic lipid. These vesicles should be superior and more realistic model membranes for studies of lipid-lipid and lipid-protein interaction in a lipid environment that resembles that of mammalian plasma membranes.

  3. Preparation of artificial plasma membrane mimicking vesicles with lipid asymmetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Qingqing; London, Erwin

    2014-01-01

    Lipid asymmetry, the difference in lipid distribution across the lipid bilayer, is one of the most important features of eukaryotic cellular membranes. However, commonly used model membrane vesicles cannot provide control of lipid distribution between inner and outer leaflets. We recently developed methods to prepare asymmetric model membrane vesicles, but facile incorporation of a highly controlled level of cholesterol was not possible. In this study, using hydroxypropyl-α-cyclodextrin based lipid exchange, a simple method was devised to prepare large unilamellar model membrane vesicles that closely resemble mammalian plasma membranes in terms of their lipid composition and asymmetry (sphingomyelin (SM) and/or phosphatidylcholine (PC) outside/phosphatidylethanolamine (PE) and phosphatidylserine (PS) inside), and in which cholesterol content can be readily varied between 0 and 50 mol%. We call these model membranes "artificial plasma membrane mimicking" ("PMm") vesicles. Asymmetry was confirmed by both chemical labeling and measurement of the amount of externally-exposed anionic lipid. These vesicles should be superior and more realistic model membranes for studies of lipid-lipid and lipid-protein interaction in a lipid environment that resembles that of mammalian plasma membranes.

  4. Model molecules mimicking asphaltenes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sjöblom, Johan; Simon, Sébastien; Xu, Zhenghe

    2015-04-01

    Asphalthenes are typically defined as the fraction of petroleum insoluble in n-alkanes (typically heptane, but also hexane or pentane) but soluble in toluene. This fraction causes problems of emulsion formation and deposition/precipitation during crude oil production, processing and transport. From the definition it follows that asphaltenes are not a homogeneous fraction but is composed of molecules polydisperse in molecular weight, structure and functionalities. Their complexity makes the understanding of their properties difficult. Proper model molecules with well-defined structures which can resemble the properties of real asphaltenes can help to improve this understanding. Over the last ten years different research groups have proposed different asphaltene model molecules and studied them to determine how well they can mimic the properties of asphaltenes and determine the mechanisms behind the properties of asphaltenes. This article reviews the properties of the different classes of model compounds proposed and present their properties by comparison with fractionated asphaltenes. After presenting the interest of developing model asphaltenes, the composition and properties of asphaltenes are presented, followed by the presentation of approaches and accomplishments of different schools working on asphaltene model compounds. The presentation of bulk and interfacial properties of perylene-based model asphaltene compounds developed by Sjöblom et al. is the subject of the next part. Finally the emulsion-stabilization properties of fractionated asphaltenes and model asphaltene compounds is presented and discussed.

  5. Interaction of a peptide derived from C-terminus of human TRPA1 channel with model membranes mimicking the inner leaflet of the plasma membrane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witschas, Katja; Jobin, Marie-Lise; Korkut, Dursun Nizam; Vladan, Maria Magdalena; Salgado, Gilmar; Lecomte, Sophie; Vlachova, Viktorie; Alves, Isabel D

    2015-05-01

    The transient receptor potential ankyrin 1 channel (TRPA1) belongs to the TRP cation channel superfamily that responds to a panoply of stimuli such as changes in temperature, calcium levels, reactive oxygen and nitrogen species and lipid mediators among others. The TRP superfamily has been implicated in diverse pathological states including neurodegenerative disorders, kidney diseases, inflammation, pain and cancer. The intracellular C-terminus is an important regulator of TRP channel activity. Studies with this and other TRP superfamily members have shown that the C-terminus association with lipid bilayer alters channel sensitivity and activation, especially interactions occurring through basic residues. Nevertheless, it is not yet clear how this process takes place and which regions in the C-terminus would be responsible for such membrane recognition. With that in mind, herein the first putative membrane interacting region of the C-terminus of human TRPA1, (corresponding to a 29 residue peptide, IAEVQKHASLKRIAMQVELHTSLEKKLPL) named H1 due to its potential helical character was chosen for studies of membrane interaction. The affinity of H1 to lipid membranes, H1 structural changes occurring upon this interaction as well as effects of this interaction in lipid organization and integrity were investigated using a biophysical approach. Lipid models systems composed of zwitterionic and anionic lipids, namely those present in the lipid membrane inner leaflet, where H1 is prone to interact, where used. The study reveals a strong interaction and affinity of H1 as well as peptide structuration especially with membranes containing anionic lipids. Moreover, the interactions and peptide structure adoption are headgroup specific.

  6. Mimicking the LCDM model with stealths

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Campuzano, Cuauhtemoc [Universidad Veracruzana, Facultad de Fisica, Xalapa, Veracruz (Mexico); Cardenas, Victor H. [Universidad de Valparaiso, Facultad de Ciencias, Instituto de Fisica y Astronomia, Valparaiso (Chile); Herrera, Ramon [Pontificia Universidad Catolica de Valparaiso, Instituto de Fisica, Avenida Brasil 2950, Casilla 4059, Valparaiso (Chile)

    2016-12-15

    We present a new cosmological model that mimics the Lambda Cold Dark Matter by using a stealth field. This kind of field is characterized as not coupling directly to gravity; however, it is connected to the underlying matter content of the universe model. As is well known, stealth fields do not back-react on the space-time; however, their mimicry skills show how this field and its self-interaction potential determines the cosmic evolution. We show the study of the simplest model that can be developed with the stealth field. (orig.)

  7. Mimicking the LCDM model with Stealths

    CERN Document Server

    Campuzano, Cuauhtemoc; Herrera, Ramon

    2016-01-01

    We present a new cosmological model that mimics the Lambda Cold Dark Matter by using a stealth field. This kind of field is characterized as not coupling directly to gravity; however, it is connected to the underlying matter content of the universe model. As is known, stealth fields do not back-react on the space-time; however, their mimicry skills show how this field and its self-interaction potential determines the cosmic evolution. We show the study of the simplest model that can be developed with the stealth field.

  8. Mimicking the LCDM model with stealths

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campuzano, Cuauhtemoc; Cárdenas, Víctor H.; Herrera, Ramón

    2016-12-01

    We present a new cosmological model that mimics the Lambda Cold Dark Matter by using a stealth field. This kind of field is characterized as not coupling directly to gravity; however, it is connected to the underlying matter content of the universe model. As is well known, stealth fields do not back-react on the space-time; however, their mimicry skills show how this field and its self-interaction potential determines the cosmic evolution. We show the study of the simplest model that can be developed with the stealth field.

  9. Tooth Enamel Protein Amelogenin Binds to Ameloblast Cell Membrane-Mimicking Vesicles via its N-terminus

    Science.gov (United States)

    LOKAPPA, SOWMYA BEKSHE; CHANDRABABU, KARTHIK BALAKRISHNA; MORADIAN-OLDAK, JANET

    2015-01-01

    We have recently reported that the extracellular enamel protein amelogenin has affinity to interact with phospholipids and proposed that such interactions may play key roles in enamel biomineralization as well as reported amelogenin signaling activities. Here, in order to identify the liposome-interacting domains of amelogenin we designed four different amelogenin mutants containing only a single tryptophan at positions 25, 45, 112 and 161. Circular dichroism studies of the mutants confirmed that they are structurally similar to the wild-type amelogenin. Utilizing the intrinsic fluorescence of single tryptophan residues and fluorescence resonance energy transfer FRET, we analyzed the accessibility and strength of their binding with an ameloblast cell membrane-mimicking model membrane (ACML) and a negatively charged liposome used as a membrane model. We found that amelogenin has membrane-binding ability mainly via its N-terminal, close to residues W25 and W45. Significant blue shift was also observed in the fluorescence of a N-terminal peptide following addition of liposomes. We suggest that, among other mechanisms, enamel malformation in cases of Amelogenesis Imperfecta (AI) with mutations at the N-terminal may be the result of defective amelogenin-cell interactions. PMID:26188506

  10. Model cell membranes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Günther-Pomorski, Thomas; Nylander, Tommy; Cardenas Gomez, Marite

    2014-01-01

    The high complexity of biological membranes has motivated the development and application of a wide range of model membrane systems to study biochemical and biophysical aspects of membranes in situ under well defined conditions. The aim is to provide fundamental understanding of processes...... controlled by membrane structure, permeability and curvature as well as membrane proteins by using a wide range of biochemical, biophysical and microscopic techniques. This review gives an overview of some currently used model biomembrane systems. We will also discuss some key membrane protein properties...... that are relevant for protein-membrane interactions in terms of protein structure and how it is affected by membrane composition, phase behavior and curvature....

  11. Large enhancement in neurite outgrowth on a cell membrane-mimicking conducting polymer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Bo; Luo, Shyh-Chyang; Zhao, Haichao; Lin, Hsing-An; Sekine, Jun; Nakao, Aiko; Chen, Chi; Yamashita, Yoshiro; Yu, Hsiao-Hua

    2014-07-01

    Although electrically stimulated neurite outgrowth on bioelectronic devices is a promising means of nerve regeneration, immunogenic scar formation can insulate electrodes from targeted cells and tissues, thereby reducing the lifetime of the device. Ideally, an electrode material capable of electrically interfacing with neurons selectively and efficiently would be integrated without being recognized by the immune system and minimize its response. Here we develop a cell membrane-mimicking conducting polymer possessing several attractive features. This polymer displays high resistance towards nonspecific enzyme/cell binding and recognizes targeted cells specifically to allow intimate electrical communication over long periods of time. Its low electrical impedance relays electrical signals efficiently. This material is capable to integrate biochemical and electrical stimulation to promote neural cellular behaviour. Neurite outgrowth is enhanced greatly on this new conducting polymer; in addition, electrically stimulated secretion of proteins from primary Schwann cells can also occur on it.

  12. Heparin-mimicking multilayer coating on polymeric membrane via LbL assembly of cyclodextrin-based supramolecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Jie; Liu, Xinyue; Ma, Lang; Cheng, Chong; Shi, Wenbin; Nie, Chuanxiong; Zhao, Changsheng

    2014-12-10

    In this study, multifunctional and heparin-mimicking star-shaped supramolecules-deposited 3D porous multilayer films with improved biocompatibility were fabricated via a layer-by-layer (LbL) self-assembly method on polymeric membrane substrates. Star-shaped heparin-mimicking polyanions (including poly(styrenesulfonate-co-sodium acrylate; Star-PSS-AANa) and poly(styrenesulfonate-co-poly(ethylene glycol)methyl ether methacrylate; Star-PSS-EGMA)) and polycations (poly(methyl chloride-quaternized 2-(dimethylamino)ethyl methacrylate; Star-PMeDMA) were first synthesized by atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP) from β-cyclodextrin (β-CD) based cores. Then assembly of 3D porous multilayers onto polymeric membrane surfaces was carried out by alternating deposition of the polyanions and polycations via electrostatic interaction. The surface morphology and composition, water contact angle, blood activation, and thrombotic potential as well as cell viability for the coated heparin-mimicking films were systematically investigated. The results of surface ATR-FTIR spectra and XPS spectra verified successful deposition of the star-shaped supramolecules onto the biomedical membrane surfaces; scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM) observations revealed that the modified substrate had 3D porous surface morphology, which might have a great biological influence on the biointerface. Furthermore, systematic in vitro investigation of protein adsorption, platelet adhesion, human platelet factor 4 (PF4, indicates platelet activation), activate partial thromboplastin time (APTT), thrombin time (TT), coagulation activation (thrombin-antithrombin III complex (TAT, indicates blood coagulant)), and blood-related complement activation (C3a and C5a, indicates inflammation potential) confirmed that the heparin-mimicking multilayer coated membranes exhibited ultralow blood component activations and excellent hemocompatibility. Meanwhile, after surface coating

  13. Multi-Layer Electrospun Membrane Mimicking Tendon Sheath for Prevention of Tendon Adhesions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shichao Jiang

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Defect of the tendon sheath after tendon injury is a main reason for tendon adhesions, but it is a daunting challenge for the biomimetic substitute of the tendon sheath after injury due to its multi-layer membrane-like structure and complex biologic functions. In this study, a multi-layer membrane with celecoxib-loaded poly(l-lactic acid-polyethylene glycol (PELA electrospun fibrous membrane as the outer layer, hyaluronic acid (HA gel as middle layer, and PELA electrospun fibrous membrane as the inner layer was designed. The anti-adhesion efficacy of this multi-layer membrane was compared with a single-layer use in rabbit flexor digitorum profundus tendon model. The surface morphology showed that both PELA fibers and celecoxib-loaded PELA fibers in multi-layer membrane were uniform in size, randomly arrayed, very porous, and smooth without beads. Multi-layer membrane group had fewer peritendinous adhesions and better gliding than the PELA membrane group and control group in gross and histological observation. The similar mechanical characteristic and collagen expression of tendon repair site in the three groups indicated that the multi-layer membrane did not impair tendon healing. Taken together, our results demonstrated that such a biomimetic multi-layer sheath could be used as a potential strategy in clinics for promoting tendon gliding and preventing adhesion without poor tendon healing.

  14. From biological membranes to biomimetic model membranes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eeman, M.

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Biological membranes play an essential role in the cellular protection as well as in the control and the transport of nutrients. Many mechanisms such as molecular recognition, enzymatic catalysis, cellular adhesion and membrane fusion take place into the biological membranes. In 1972, Singer et al. provided a membrane model, called fluid mosaic model, in which each leaflet of the bilayer is formed by a homogeneous environment of lipids in a fluid state including globular assembling of proteins and glycoproteins. Since its conception in 1972, many developments were brought to this model in terms of composition and molecular organization. The main development of the fluid mosaic model was made by Simons et al. (1997 and Brown et al. (1997 who suggested that membrane lipids are organized into lateral microdomains (or lipid rafts with a specific composition and a molecular dynamic that are different to the composition and the dynamic of the surrounding liquid crystalline phase. The discovery of a phase separation in the plane of the membrane has induced an explosion in the research efforts related to the biology of cell membranes but also in the development of new technologies for the study of these biological systems. Due to the high complexity of biological membranes and in order to investigate the biological processes that occur on the membrane surface or within the membrane lipid bilayer, a large number of studies are performed using biomimicking model membranes. This paper aims at revisiting the fundamental properties of biological membranes in terms of membrane composition, membrane dynamic and molecular organization, as well as at describing the most common biomimicking models that are frequently used for investigating biological processes such as membrane fusion, membrane trafficking, pore formation as well as membrane interactions at a molecular level.

  15. Antimicrobial peptides at work: interaction of myxinidin and its mutant WMR with lipid bilayers mimicking the P. aeruginosa and E. coli membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lombardi, Lucia; Stellato, Marco Ignazio; Oliva, Rosario; Falanga, Annarita; Galdiero, Massimiliano; Petraccone, Luigi; D'Errico, Geradino; de Santis, Augusta; Galdiero, Stefania; Del Vecchio, Pompea

    2017-03-01

    Antimicrobial peptides are promising candidates as future therapeutics in order to face the problem of antibiotic resistance caused by pathogenic bacteria. Myxinidin is a peptide derived from the hagfish mucus displaying activity against a broad range of bacteria. We have focused our studies on the physico-chemical characterization of the interaction of myxinidin and its mutant WMR, which contains a tryptophan residue at the N-terminus and four additional positive charges, with two model biological membranes (DOPE/DOPG 80/20 and DOPE/DOPG/CL 65/23/12), mimicking respectively Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa membrane bilayers. All our results have coherently shown that, although both myxinidin and WMR interact with the two membranes, their effect on membrane microstructure and stability are different. We further have shown that the presence of cardiolipin plays a key role in the WMR-membrane interaction. Particularly, WMR drastically perturbs the DOPE/DOPG/CL membrane stability inducing a segregation of anionic lipids. On the contrary, myxinidin is not able to significantly perturb the DOPE/DOPG/CL bilayer whereas interacts better with the DOPE/DOPG bilayer causing a significant perturbing effect of the lipid acyl chains. These findings are fully consistent with the reported greater antimicrobial activity of WMR against P. aeruginosa compared with myxinidin.

  16. NMR characterization of the C-terminal tail of full-length RAGE in a membrane mimicking environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borsi, Valentina; Cerofolini, Linda; Fragai, Marco; Luchinat, Claudio, E-mail: luchinat@cerm.unifi.it [University of Florence, Magnetic Resonance Center (CERM) (Italy)

    2012-11-15

    Targeting the receptor for the advanced glycation endproducts (RAGE) signalling has a potential for the prevention and treatment of several pathologies. Extracellular activation of RAGE triggers the interactions of the RAGE cytoplasmic tail with intracellular protein partners. Here the cytoplasmic tail of RAGE has been investigated by NMR as part of the full-length protein, in the presence of a membrane-mimicking environment. The isolated cytoplasmic tail has also been studied for comparison. The NMR spectra of the whole receptor show that some but not all residues belonging to the C-terminal region of the cytoplasmic tail have a large flexibility, while the membrane proximal region seems to be rigidly connected to the trans-membrane domain and ectodomains. The analysis indicates that the behavior of the cytoplasmic tail is strongly affected by its being part of the whole receptor. These results provide new insight towards the understanding of signal transduction by RAGE.

  17. Mimicking the cell membrane: bio-inspired simultaneous functions with monovalent anion selectivity and antifouling properties of anion exchange membrane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yan; Liu, Huimin; Tang, Kaini; Jin, Yali; Pan, Jiefeng; der Bruggen, Bart Van; Shen, Jiangnan; Gao, Congjie

    2016-11-01

    A new bio-inspired method was applied in this study to simultaneously improve the monovalent anion selectivity and antifouling properties of anion exchange membranes (AEMs). Three-layer architecture was developed by deposition of polydopamine (PDA) and electro-deposition of N-O-sulfonic acid benzyl chitosan (NSBC). The innermost and outermost layers were PDA with different deposition time. The middle layer was prepared by NSBC. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy confirmed that PDA and NSBC were successfully modified on the surfaces of AEMs. The contact angle of the membranes indicated an improved hydrophilicity of the modified membranes. A series of electrodialysis experiments in which Cl‑/SO42‑ separation was studied, demonstrating the monovalent anion selectivity of the samples. The Cl‑/SO42‑ permselectivity of the modified membranes can reach up to 2.20, higher than that of the commercial membrane (only 0.78) during 90 minutes in electrodialysis (ED). The increase value of the resistance of the membranes was also measured to evaluate the antifouling properties. Sodium dodecyl benzene sulfonate (SDBS) was used as the fouling material in the ED process and the membrane area resistance of modified membrane increase value of was only 0.08 Ωcm2 30 minutes later.

  18. On "spinning" membrane models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bergshoeff, E.; Sezgin, E.; Townsend, P.K.

    1988-01-01

    Several alternative actions for a bosonic membrane have recently been proposed. We show that a linearly realized locally world-volume-supersymmetric (spinning membrane) extension of any of these actions implies an analogous extension of the standard Dirac membrane action. We further show that a

  19. Biomimetic carriers mimicking leukocyte plasma membrane to increase tumor vasculature permeability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palomba, R.; Parodi, A.; Evangelopoulos, M.; Acciardo, S.; Corbo, C.; De Rosa, E.; Yazdi, I. K.; Scaria, S.; Molinaro, R.; Furman, N. E. Toledano; You, J.; Ferrari, M.; Salvatore, F.; Tasciotti, E.

    2016-10-01

    Recent advances in the field of nanomedicine have demonstrated that biomimicry can further improve targeting properties of current nanotechnologies while simultaneously enable carriers with a biological identity to better interact with the biological environment. Immune cells for example employ membrane proteins to target inflamed vasculature, locally increase vascular permeability, and extravasate across inflamed endothelium. Inspired by the physiology of immune cells, we recently developed a procedure to transfer leukocyte membranes onto nanoporous silicon particles (NPS), yielding Leukolike Vectors (LLV). LLV are composed of a surface coating containing multiple receptors that are critical in the cross-talk with the endothelium, mediating cellular accumulation in the tumor microenvironment while decreasing vascular barrier function. We previously demonstrated that lymphocyte function-associated antigen (LFA-1) transferred onto LLV was able to trigger the clustering of intercellular adhesion molecule 1 (ICAM-1) on endothelial cells. Herein, we provide a more comprehensive analysis of the working mechanism of LLV in vitro in activating this pathway and in vivo in enhancing vascular permeability. Our results suggest the biological activity of the leukocyte membrane can be retained upon transplant onto NPS and is critical in providing the particles with complex biological functions towards tumor vasculature.

  20. Proteomic profiling of animal models mimicking skeletal muscle disorders

    OpenAIRE

    Doran, Philip; Gannon, Joan; O'Connell, Kathleen; Ohlendieck, Kay

    2007-01-01

    Over the last few decades of biomedical research, animal models of neuromuscular diseases have been widely used for determining pathological mechanisms and for testing new therapeutic strategies. With the emergence of high-throughput proteomics technology, the identification of novel protein factors involved in disease processes has been decisively improved. This review outlines the usefulness of the proteomic profiling of animal disease models for the discovery of new reliable biomarkers, fo...

  1. Epithelial membrane protein 2 (EMP2) deficiency alters placental angiogenesis, mimicking features of human placental insufficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Carmen J; Chu, Alison; Jefferson, Wendy N; Casero, David; Sudhakar, Deepthi; Khurana, Nevil; Hogue, Claire P; Aryasomayajula, Chinmayi; Patel, Priya; Sullivan, Peggy; Padilla-Banks, Elizabeth; Mohandessi, Shabnam; Janzen, Carla; Wadehra, Madhuri

    2017-03-14

    Epithelial membrane protein-2 (EMP2) is a tetraspan protein predicted to regulate placental development. Highly expressed in secretory endometrium and trophectoderm cells, previous studies suggest that it may regulate implantation by orchestrating the surface expression of integrins and other membrane proteins. In order to test the role of EMP2 in pregnancy, mice lacking EMP2 (Emp2(-/-) ) were generated. Emp2(-/-) females are fertile but have reduced litter sizes when carrying Emp2(-/-) but not Emp2(+/-) fetuses. Placentas of Emp2(-/-) fetuses exhibit dysregulation in pathways related to neoangiogenesis, coagulation, and oxidative stress, and have increased fibrin deposition and altered vasculature. Given that these findings often occur due to placental insufficiency resulting in an oxygen-poor environment, the expression of hypoxia-inducible factor-1 alpha (HIF-1α) was examined. Placentas from Emp2(-/-) fetuses had increased total HIF-1α expression in large part through an increase in uterine NK (uNK) cells, demonstrating a unique interplay between uNK cells and trophoblasts modulated through EMP2. To determine if these results translated to human pregnancy, placentas from normal, term deliveries or those complicated by placental insufficiency resulting in intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR) were stained for EMP2. EMP2 was significantly reduced in both villous and extravillous trophoblast populations in IUGR placentas. Experiments in vitro using human trophoblast cells lines indicate that EMP2 modulates angiogenesis by altering HIF-1α expression. Our results reveal a novel role for EMP2 in regulating trophoblast function and vascular development in mice and humans and suggest it may be a new biomarker for placental insufficiency.

  2. Modelling of proteins in membranes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sperotto, Maria Maddalena; May, S.; Baumgaertner, A.

    2006-01-01

    This review describes some recent theories and simulations of mesoscopic and microscopic models of lipid membranes with embedded or attached proteins. We summarize results supporting our understanding of phenomena for which the activities of proteins in membranes are expected to be significantly...... affected by the lipid environment. Theoretical predictions are pointed out, and compared to experimental findings, if available. Among others, the following phenomena are discussed: interactions of interfacially adsorbed peptides, pore-forming amphipathic peptides, adsorption of charged proteins onto...... oppositely charged lipid membranes, lipid-induced tilting of proteins embedded in lipid bilayers, protein-induced bilayer deformations, protein insertion and assembly, and lipid-controlled functioning of membrane proteins....

  3. Modelling of proteins in membranes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sperotto, Maria Maddalena; May, S.; Baumgaertner, A.

    2006-01-01

    This review describes some recent theories and simulations of mesoscopic and microscopic models of lipid membranes with embedded or attached proteins. We summarize results supporting our understanding of phenomena for which the activities of proteins in membranes are expected to be significantly ...

  4. Deriving a blood-mimicking fluid for particle image velocimetry in Sylgard-184 vascular models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yousif, Majid Y; Holdsworth, David W; Poepping, Tamie L

    2009-01-01

    A new blood-mimicking fluid (BMF) has been developed for particle image velocimetry (PIV), which enables flow studies in vascular models (phantoms). A major difficulty in PIV that affects measurement accuracy is the refraction and distortion of light passing through the interface between the model and the fluid, due to the difference in refractive index (n) between the two materials. The problem can be eliminated by using a fluid with a refractive index matching that of the model. Such fluids are not commonly available, especially for vascular research where the fluid should also have a viscosity similar to human blood. In this work, a blood-mimicking fluid, composed of water (47.38% by weight), glycerol (36.94% by weight) and sodium iodide salt (15.68% by weight), was developed for compatibility with our silicone (Sylgard 184; n = 1.414) phantoms. The fluid exhibits a dynamic viscosity of 4.31+/-0.03 cP which lies within the range of human blood viscosity (4.4+/-0.6 cP). Both refractive index and viscosity were attained at 22.2+/-0.2 degrees C, which is a feasible room temperature, thus eliminating the need for a temperature-control system. The fluid will be used to study hemodynamics in vascular flow models fabricated from Sylgard 184.

  5. Mathematical modelling of membrane separation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vinther, Frank

    This thesis concerns mathematical modelling of membrane separation. The thesis consists of introductory theory on membrane separation, equations of motion, and properties of dextran, which will be the solute species throughout the thesis. Furthermore, the thesis consist of three separate mathemat......This thesis concerns mathematical modelling of membrane separation. The thesis consists of introductory theory on membrane separation, equations of motion, and properties of dextran, which will be the solute species throughout the thesis. Furthermore, the thesis consist of three separate....... It is found that the probability of entering the pore is highest when the largest of the radii in the ellipse is equal to half the radius of the pore, in case of molecules with circular radius less than the pore radius. The results are directly related to the macroscopic distribution coefficient...

  6. Ex Vivo Aneurysm models mimicking real cases for the preoperative training of the clipping technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin D.

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Training in a specialty like cerebrovascular neurosurgery becomes more and more difficult as the access to training is limited by the increasing number of neurosurgical departments and the lack of expert centers for specific pathology. This is why an increased investment in experimental training is encountered in many centers worldwide. The best models for training the clipping technique are ex Vivo on cadaveric heads aneurysm models, animal models or augmented reality models. We present a few ex Vivo models of aneurysms mimicking ACOA, ACM bifurcation and basil are tip aneurysms using a pulsed continuous perfusion system. Clipping training on aneurysm models is an invaluable tool both for the residents and for the specialists with a special interest in cerebrovascular surgery.

  7. Tracking membrane protein association in model membranes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Myriam Reffay

    Full Text Available Membrane proteins are essential in the exchange processes of cells. In spite of great breakthrough in soluble proteins studies, membrane proteins structures, functions and interactions are still a challenge because of the difficulties related to their hydrophobic properties. Most of the experiments are performed with detergent-solubilized membrane proteins. However widely used micellar systems are far from the biological two-dimensions membrane. The development of new biomimetic membrane systems is fundamental to tackle this issue.We present an original approach that combines the Fluorescence Recovery After fringe Pattern Photobleaching technique and the use of a versatile sponge phase that makes it possible to extract crucial informations about interactions between membrane proteins embedded in the bilayers of a sponge phase. The clear advantage lies in the ability to adjust at will the spacing between two adjacent bilayers. When the membranes are far apart, the only possible interactions occur laterally between proteins embedded within the same bilayer, whereas when membranes get closer to each other, interactions between proteins embedded in facing membranes may occur as well.After validating our approach on the streptavidin-biotinylated peptide complex, we study the interactions between two membrane proteins, MexA and OprM, from a Pseudomonas aeruginosa efflux pump. The mode of interaction, the size of the protein complex and its potential stoichiometry are determined. In particular, we demonstrate that: MexA is effectively embedded in the bilayer; MexA and OprM do not interact laterally but can form a complex if they are embedded in opposite bilayers; the population of bound proteins is at its maximum for bilayers separated by a distance of about 200 A, which is the periplasmic thickness of Pseudomonas aeruginosa. We also show that the MexA-OprM association is enhanced when the position and orientation of the protein is restricted by the

  8. Geometry of Membrane Sigma Models

    CERN Document Server

    Vysoky, Jan

    2015-01-01

    String theory still remains one of the promising candidates for a unification of the theory of gravity and quantum field theory. One of its essential parts is relativistic description of moving multi-dimensional objects called membranes (or p-branes) in a curved spacetime. On the classical field theory level, they are described by an action functional extremalising the volume of a manifold swept by a propagating membrane. This and related field theories are collectively called membrane sigma models. Differential geometry is an important mathematical tool in the study of string theory. It turns out that string and membrane backgrounds can be conveniently described using objects defined on a direct sum of tangent and cotangent bundles of the spacetime manifold. Mathematical field studying such object is called generalized geometry. Its integral part is the theory of Leibniz algebroids, vector bundles with a Leibniz algebra bracket on its module of smooth sections. Special cases of Leibniz algebroids are better ...

  9. Modeling electrically active viscoelastic membranes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sitikantha Roy

    Full Text Available The membrane protein prestin is native to the cochlear outer hair cell that is crucial to the ear's amplification and frequency selectivity throughout the whole acoustic frequency range. The outer hair cell exhibits interrelated dimensional changes, force generation, and electric charge transfer. Cells transfected with prestin acquire unique active properties similar to those in the native cell that have also been useful in understanding the process. Here we propose a model describing the major electromechanical features of such active membranes. The model derived from thermodynamic principles is in the form of integral relationships between the history of voltage and membrane resultants as independent variables and the charge density and strains as dependent variables. The proposed model is applied to the analysis of an active force produced by the outer hair cell in response to a harmonic electric field. Our analysis reveals the mechanism of the outer hair cell active (isometric force having an almost constant amplitude and phase up to 80 kHz. We found that the frequency-invariance of the force is a result of interplay between the electrical filtering associated with prestin and power law viscoelasticity of the surrounding membrane. Paradoxically, the membrane viscoelasticity boosts the force balancing the electrical filtering effect. We also consider various modes of electromechanical coupling in membrane with prestin associated with mechanical perturbations in the cell. We consider pressure or strains applied step-wise or at a constant rate and compute the time course of the resulting electric charge. The results obtained here are important for the analysis of electromechanical properties of membranes, cells, and biological materials as well as for a better understanding of the mechanism of hearing and the role of the protein prestin in this mechanism.

  10. Giant plasma membrane vesicles: models for understanding membrane organization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levental, Kandice R; Levental, Ilya

    2015-01-01

    The organization of eukaryotic membranes into functional domains continues to fascinate and puzzle cell biologists and biophysicists. The lipid raft hypothesis proposes that collective lipid interactions compartmentalize the membrane into coexisting liquid domains that are central to membrane physiology. This hypothesis has proven controversial because such structures cannot be directly visualized in live cells by light microscopy. The recent observations of liquid-liquid phase separation in biological membranes are an important validation of the raft hypothesis and enable application of the experimental toolbox of membrane physics to a biologically complex phase-separated membrane. This review addresses the role of giant plasma membrane vesicles (GPMVs) in refining the raft hypothesis and expands on the application of GPMVs as an experimental model to answer some of key outstanding problems in membrane biology. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Computational modeling of membrane proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koehler Leman, Julia; Ulmschneider, Martin B; Gray, Jeffrey J

    2015-01-01

    The determination of membrane protein (MP) structures has always trailed that of soluble proteins due to difficulties in their overexpression, reconstitution into membrane mimetics, and subsequent structure determination. The percentage of MP structures in the protein databank (PDB) has been at a constant 1-2% for the last decade. In contrast, over half of all drugs target MPs, only highlighting how little we understand about drug-specific effects in the human body. To reduce this gap, researchers have attempted to predict structural features of MPs even before the first structure was experimentally elucidated. In this review, we present current computational methods to predict MP structure, starting with secondary structure prediction, prediction of trans-membrane spans, and topology. Even though these methods generate reliable predictions, challenges such as predicting kinks or precise beginnings and ends of secondary structure elements are still waiting to be addressed. We describe recent developments in the prediction of 3D structures of both α-helical MPs as well as β-barrels using comparative modeling techniques, de novo methods, and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. The increase of MP structures has (1) facilitated comparative modeling due to availability of more and better templates, and (2) improved the statistics for knowledge-based scoring functions. Moreover, de novo methods have benefited from the use of correlated mutations as restraints. Finally, we outline current advances that will likely shape the field in the forthcoming decade.

  12. Lupus mimickers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calixto, Omar-Javier; Franco, Juan-Sebastian; Anaya, Juan-Manuel

    2014-08-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is an autoimmune disease characterized by multisystem organ involvement, heterogeneity of clinical features, and variety in degree of severity. The differential diagnosis is a crucial aspect in SLE as many other autoimmune diseases portray clinical similarities and autoantibody positivity. Lupus mimickers refer to a group of conditions that exhibit both clinical features and laboratory characteristics, including autoantibody profiles that resemble those present in patients with SLE, and prompt a diagnostic challenge in everyday clinical practice. Thus, lupus mimickers may present as a lupus-like condition (i.e., 2 or 3 criteria) or as one meeting the classification criteria for SLE. Herein we review and classify the current literature on lupus mimickers based on diverse etiologies which include infections, malign and benign neoplasms, medications, and vaccine-related reactions.

  13. A rabbit model of fatal hypothyroidism mimicking "myxedema coma" established by microscopic total thyroidectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ono, Yosuke; Fujita, Masanori; Ono, Sachiko; Ogata, Sho; Tachibana, Shoichi; Tanaka, Yuji

    2016-06-30

    Myxedema coma (MC) is a life-threatening endocrine crisis caused by severe hypothyroidism. However, validated diagnostic criteria and treatment guidelines for MC have not been established owing to its rarity. Therefore, a valid animal model is required to investigate the pathologic and therapeutic aspects of MC. The aim of the present study was to establish an animal model of MC induced by total thyroidectomy. We utilized 14 male New Zealand White rabbits anesthetized via intramuscular ketamine and xylazine administration. A total of 7 rabbits were completely thyroidectomized under a surgical microscope (thyroidectomized group) and the remainder underwent sham operations (control group). The animals in both groups were monitored without thyroid hormone replacement for 15 weeks. Pulse rate, blood pressure, body temperature, and electrocardiograms (ECG) were recorded and blood samples were taken from the jugular vein immediately prior to the thyroidectomy and 2 and 4 weeks after surgery. The thyroidectomized rabbits showed a marked reduction of serum thyroxine levels at 4 weeks after the surgical procedure vs. controls (0.50±0.10 vs. 3.32±0.68 μg/dL, pcontrols. Of the 7 rabbits with severe hypothyroidism, 6 died from 4 to 14 weeks after the thyroidectomy possibly owing to heart failure, because histopathologic examinations revealed a myxedema heart. In summary, we have established a rabbit model of fatal hypothyroidism mimicking MC, which may facilitate pathophysiological and molecular investigations of MC and evaluations of new therapeutic interventions.

  14. Interaction of tea tree oil with model and cellular membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giordani, Cristiano; Molinari, Agnese; Toccacieli, Laura; Calcabrini, Annarica; Stringaro, Annarita; Chistolini, Pietro; Arancia, Giuseppe; Diociaiuti, Marco

    2006-07-27

    Tea tree oil (TTO) is the essential oil steam-distilled from Melaleuca alternifolia, a species of northern New South Wales, Australia. It exhibits a broad-spectrum antimicrobial activity and an antifungal activity. Only recently has TTO been shown to inhibit the in vitro growth of multidrug resistant (MDR) human melanoma cells. It has been suggested that the effect of TTO on tumor cells could be mediated by its interaction with the plasma membrane, most likely by inducing a reorganization of lipid architecture. In this paper we report biophysical and structural results obtained using simplified planar model membranes (Langmuir films) mimicking lipid "rafts". We also used flow cytometry analysis (FCA) and freeze-fracturing transmission electron microscopy to investigate the effects of TTO on actual MDR melanoma cell membranes. Thermodynamic (compression isotherms and adsorption kinetics) and structural (Brewster angle microscopy) investigation of the lipid monolayers clearly indicates that TTO interacts preferentially with the less ordered DPPC "sea" and that it does not alter the more ordered lipid "rafts". Structural observations, performed by freeze fracturing, confirm that TTO interacts with the MDR melanoma cell plasma membrane. Moreover, experiments performed by FCA demonstrate that TTO does not interfere with the function of the MDR drug transporter P-gp. We therefore propose that the effect exerted on MDR melanoma cells is mediated by the interaction with the fluid DPPC phase, rather than with the more organized "rafts" and that this interaction preferentially influences the ATP-independent antiapoptotic activity of P-gp likely localized outside "rafts".

  15. Mesoscopic models of biological membranes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Venturoli, M.; Sperotto, Maria Maddalena; Kranenburg, M.;

    2006-01-01

    , as model systems to understand the fundamental properties of biomembranes. The properties of lipid bilayers can be studied at different time and length scales. For some properties it is sufficient to envision a membrane as an elastic sheet, while for others it is important to take into account the details...... of the individual atoms. In this review, we focus on an intermediate level, where groups of atoms are lumped into pseudo-particles to arrive at a coarse-grained, or mesoscopic, description of a bilayer, which is subsequently studied using molecular simulation. The aim of this review is to compare various strategies...

  16. Immunogenic multistage recombinant protein vaccine confers partial protection against experimental toxoplasmosis mimicking natural infection in murine model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yaprak Gedik

    2016-01-01

    To generate a protective vaccine against toxoplasmosis, multistage vaccines and usage of challenging models mimicking natural route of infection are critical cornerstones. In this study, we generated a BAG1 and GRA1 multistage vaccine that induced strong immune response in which the protection was not at anticipated level. In addition, the murine model was orally challenged with tissue cysts to mimic natural route of infection.

  17. Modeling and simulation of membrane process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staszak, Maciej

    2017-06-01

    The article presents the different approaches to polymer membrane mathematical modeling. Traditional models based on experimental physicochemical correlations and balance models are presented in the first part. Quantum and molecular mechanics models are presented as they are more popular for polymer membranes in fuel cells. The initial part is enclosed by neural network models which found their use for different types of processes in polymer membranes. The second part is devoted to models of fluid dynamics. The computational fluid dynamics technique can be divided into solving of Navier-Stokes equations and into Boltzmann lattice models. Both approaches are presented focusing on membrane processes.

  18. A blood-mimicking fluid for particle image velocimetry with silicone vascular models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yousif, Majid Y.; Holdsworth, David W.; Poepping, Tamie L.

    2011-03-01

    For accurate particle image velocimetry measurements in hemodynamics studies, it is important to use a fluid with a refractive index ( n) matching that of the vascular models (phantoms) and ideally a dynamic viscosity matching human blood. In this work, a blood-mimicking fluid (BMF) composed of water, glycerol, and sodium iodide was formulated for a range of refractive indices to match most common silicone elastomers ( n = 1.40-1.43) and with corresponding dynamic viscosity within the average cited range of healthy human blood (4.4 ± 0.5 cP). Both refractive index and viscosity were attained at room temperature (22.2 ± 0.2°C), which eliminates the need for a temperature-control system. An optimally matched BMF, suitable for use in a vascular phantom ( n = 1.4140 ± 0.0008, Sylgard 184), was demonstrated with composition (by weight) of 47.38% water, 36.94% glycerol (44:56 glycerol-water ratio), and 15.68% sodium iodide salt, resulting in a dynamic viscosity of 4 .31 ± 0 .03 cP.

  19. Modeling branching pore structures in membrane filters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanaei, Pejman; Cummings, Linda J.

    2016-11-01

    Membrane filters are in widespread industrial use, and mathematical models to predict their efficacy are potentially very useful, as such models can suggest design modifications to improve filter performance and lifetime. Many models have been proposed to describe particle capture by membrane filters and the associated fluid dynamics, but most such models are based on a very simple structure in which the pores of the membrane are assumed to be simple circularly-cylindrical tubes spanning the depth of the membrane. Real membranes used in applications usually have much more complex geometry, with interconnected pores which may branch and bifurcate. Pores are also typically larger on the upstream side of the membrane than on the downstream side. We present an idealized mathematical model, in which a membrane consists of a series of bifurcating pores, which decrease in size as the membrane is traversed. Feed solution is forced through the membrane by applied pressure, and particles are removed from the feed either by sieving, or by particle adsorption within pores (which shrinks them). Thus the membrane's permeability decreases as the filtration progresses, ultimately falling to zero. We discuss how filtration efficiency depends on the characteristics of the branching structure. Partial support from NSF DMS 1261596 is gratefully acknowledged.

  20. Interaction of Defensins with Model Cell Membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanders, Lori K.; Schmidt, Nathan W.; Yang, Lihua; Mishra, Abhijit; Gordon, Vernita D.; Selsted, Michael E.; Wong, Gerard C. L.

    2009-03-01

    Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) comprise a key component of innate immunity for a wide range of multicellular organisms. For many AMPs, activity comes from their ability to selectively disrupt and lyse bacterial cell membranes. There are a number of proposed models for this action, but the detailed molecular mechanism of selective membrane permeation remains unclear. Theta defensins are circularized peptides with a high degree of selectivity. We investigate the interaction of model bacterial and eukaryotic cell membranes with theta defensins RTD-1, BTD-7, and compare them to protegrin PG-1, a prototypical AMP, using synchrotron small angle x-ray scattering (SAXS). The relationship between membrane composition and peptide induced changes in membrane curvature and topology is examined. By comparing the membrane phase behavior induced by these different peptides we will discuss the importance of amino acid composition and placement on membrane rearrangement.

  1. Modular toxin from the lynx spider Oxyopes takobius: Structure of spiderine domains in solution and membrane-mimicking environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nadezhdin, Kirill D; Romanovskaia, Daria D; Sachkova, Maria Y; Oparin, Peter B; Kovalchuk, Sergey I; Grishin, Eugene V; Arseniev, Alexander S; Vassilevski, Alexander A

    2017-03-01

    We have recently demonstrated that a common phenomenon in evolution of spider venom composition is the emergence of so-called modular toxins consisting of two domains, each corresponding to a "usual" single-domain toxin. In this article, we describe the structure of two domains that build up a modular toxin named spiderine or OtTx1a from the venom of Oxyopes takobius. Both domains were investigated by solution NMR in water and detergent micelles used to mimic membrane environment. The N-terminal spiderine domain OtTx1a-AMP (41 amino acid residues) contains no cysteines. It is disordered in aqueous solution but in micelles, it assumes a stable amphiphilic structure consisting of two α-helices separated by a flexible linker. On the contrary, the C-terminal domain OtTx1a-ICK (59 residues) is a disulfide-rich polypeptide reticulated by five S-S bridges. It presents a stable structure in water and its core is the inhibitor cystine knot (ICK) or knottin motif that is common among single-domain neurotoxins. OtTx1a-ICK structure is the first knottin with five disulfide bridges and it represents a good reference for the whole oxytoxin family. The affinity of both domains to membranes was measured with NMR using titration by liposome suspensions. In agreement with biological tests, OtTx1a-AMP was found to show high membrane affinity explaining its potent antimicrobial properties. © 2016 The Protein Society.

  2. Macroscopic Modeling of Polymer-Electrolyte Membranes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weber, A.Z.; Newman, J.

    2007-04-01

    In this chapter, the various approaches for the macroscopic modeling of transport phenomena in polymer-electrolyte membranes are discussed. This includes general background and modeling methodologies, as well as exploration of the governing equations and some membrane-related topic of interest.

  3. Tethered bimolecular lipid membranes - A novel model membrane platform

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knoll, Wolfgang; Koeper, Ingo; Naumann, Renate; Sinner, Eva-Kathrin [Max Planck Institute for Polymer Research, Ackermannweg 10, 55128 Mainz (Germany)

    2008-10-01

    stabilization of lipid bilayers, i.e., the protein-tethered membrane. Our efforts in experimentally characterizing the resulting membrane functions and correlating the data with the structural details of the bilayer architectures are complemented by theoretical studies modeling the electrical and electrochemical response of functional tethered lipid bilayer membranes by extended SPICE simulations. (author)

  4. Modelling and simulation of affinity membrane adsorption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boi, Cristiana; Dimartino, Simone; Sarti, Giulio C

    2007-08-24

    A mathematical model for the adsorption of biomolecules on affinity membranes is presented. The model considers convection, diffusion and adsorption kinetics on the membrane module as well as the influence of dead end volumes and lag times; an analysis of flow distribution on the whole system is also included. The parameters used in the simulations were obtained from equilibrium and dynamic experimental data measured for the adsorption of human IgG on A2P-Sartoepoxy affinity membranes. The identification of a bi-Langmuir kinetic mechanisms for the experimental system investigated was paramount for a correct process description and the simulated breakthrough curves were in good agreement with the experimental data. The proposed model provides a new insight into the phenomena involved in the adsorption on affinity membranes and it is a valuable tool to assess the use of membrane adsorbers in large scale processes.

  5. Modeling anisotropic elasticity of fluid membranes

    CERN Document Server

    Ramakrishnan, N; Ipsen, John H; 10.1002/mats.201100002

    2011-01-01

    The biological membrane, which compartmentalizes the cell and its organelles, exhibit wide variety of macroscopic shapes of varying morphology and topology. A systematic understanding of the relation of membrane shapes to composition, external field, environmental conditions etc. have important biological relevance. Here we review the triangulated surface model, used in the macroscopic simulation of membranes and the associated Monte Carlo (DTMC) methods. New techniques to calculate surface quantifiers, that will facilitate the study of additional in-plane orientational degrees of freedom, has been introduced. The mere presence of a polar and nematic fields in the ordered phase drives the ground state conformations of the membrane to a cylinder and tetrahedron respectively.

  6. Novel experimental Pseudomonas aeruginosa lung infection model mimicking long-term host-pathogen interactions in cystic fibrosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moser, Claus; van Gennip, Maria; Bjarnsholt, Thomas;

    2009-01-01

    Moser C, van Gennip M, Bjarnsholt T, Jensen PO, Lee B, Hougen HP, Calum H, Ciofu O, Givskov M, Molin S, Hoiby N. Novel experimental Pseudomonas aeruginosa lung infection model mimicking long-term host-pathogen interactions in cystic fibrosis. APMIS 2009; 117: 95-107. The dominant cause of premature...... death in patients suffering from cystic fibrosis (CF) is chronic lung infection with Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The chronic lung infection often lasts for decades with just one clone. However, as a result of inflammation, antibiotic treatment and different niches in the lungs, the clone undergoes...

  7. Diffusion through thin membranes: Modeling across scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aho, Vesa; Mattila, Keijo; Kühn, Thomas; Kekäläinen, Pekka; Pulkkinen, Otto; Minussi, Roberta Brondani; Vihinen-Ranta, Maija; Timonen, Jussi

    2016-04-01

    From macroscopic to microscopic scales it is demonstrated that diffusion through membranes can be modeled using specific boundary conditions across them. The membranes are here considered thin in comparison to the overall size of the system. In a macroscopic scale the membrane is introduced as a transmission boundary condition, which enables an effective modeling of systems that involve multiple scales. In a mesoscopic scale, a numerical lattice-Boltzmann scheme with a partial-bounceback condition at the membrane is proposed and analyzed. It is shown that this mesoscopic approach provides a consistent approximation of the transmission boundary condition. Furthermore, analysis of the mesoscopic scheme gives rise to an expression for the permeability of a thin membrane as a function of a mesoscopic transmission parameter. In a microscopic model, the mean waiting time for a passage of a particle through the membrane is in accordance with this permeability. Numerical results computed with the mesoscopic scheme are then compared successfully with analytical solutions derived in a macroscopic scale, and the membrane model introduced here is used to simulate diffusive transport between the cell nucleus and cytoplasm through the nuclear envelope in a realistic cell model based on fluorescence microscopy data. By comparing the simulated fluorophore transport to the experimental one, we determine the permeability of the nuclear envelope of HeLa cells to enhanced yellow fluorescent protein.

  8. A Model for Membrane Fusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ngatchou, Annita

    2010-01-01

    Pheochromocytoma is a tumor of the adrenal gland which originates from chromaffin cells and is characterized by the secretion of excessive amounts of neurotransmitter which lead to high blood pressure and palpitations. Pheochromocytoma contain membrane bound granules that store neurotransmitter. The release of these stored molecules into the extracellular space occurs by fusion of the granule membrane with the cell plasma membrane, a process called exocytosis. The molecular mechanism of this membrane fusion is not well understood. It is proposed that the so called SNARE proteins [1] are the pillar of vesicle fusion as their cleavage by clostridial toxin notably, Botulinum neurotoxin and Tetanus toxin abrogate the secretion of neurotransmitter [2]. Here, I describe how physical principles are applied to a biological cell to explore the role of the vesicle SNARE protein synaptobrevin-2 in easing granule fusion. The data presented here suggest a paradigm according to which the movement of the C-terminal of synaptobrevin-2 disrupts the lipid bilayer to form a fusion pore through which molecules can exit.

  9. Antimicrobial mechanism of flavonoids against Escherichia coli ATCC 25922 by model membrane study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    He, Mengying; Wu, Ting; Pan, Siyi; Xu, Xiaoyun, E-mail: xiaoyunxu88@gmail.com

    2014-06-01

    Antimicrobial mechanism of four flavonoids (kaempferol, hesperitin, (+)-catechin hydrate, biochanin A) against Escherichia coli ATCC 25922 was investigated through cell membranes and a liposome model. The release of bacterial protein and images from transmission electron microscopy demonstrated damage to the E. coli ATCC 25922 membrane. A liposome model with dipalmitoylphosphatidylethanolamine (DPPE) (0.6 molar ratio) and dipalmitoylphosphatidylglycerol (DPPG) (0.4 molar ratio), representative of the phospholipid membrane of E. coli ATCC 25922, was used to specify the mode of action of four selected flavonoids through Raman spectroscopy and differential scanning calorimetry. It is suggested that for flavonoids, to be effective antimicrobials, interaction with the polar head-group of the model membrane followed by penetration into the hydrophobic regions must occur. The antimicrobial efficacies of the flavonoids were consistent with liposome interaction activities, kaempferol > hesperitin > (+)-catechin hydrate > biochanin A. This study provides a liposome model capable of mimicking the cell membrane of E. coli ATCC 25922. The findings are important in understanding the antibacterial mechanism on cell membranes.

  10. Specificity and mechanism of action of alpha-helical membrane-active peptides interacting with model and biological membranes by single-molecule force spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Shiyu; Zhao, Guangxu; Huang, Yibing; Cai, Mingjun; Shan, Yuping; Wang, Hongda; Chen, Yuxin

    2016-07-01

    In this study, to systematically investigate the targeting specificity of membrane-active peptides on different types of cell membranes, we evaluated the effects of peptides on different large unilamellar vesicles mimicking prokaryotic, normal eukaryotic, and cancer cell membranes by single-molecule force spectroscopy and spectrum technology. We revealed that cationic membrane-active peptides can exclusively target negatively charged prokaryotic and cancer cell model membranes rather than normal eukaryotic cell model membranes. Using Acholeplasma laidlawii, 3T3-L1, and HeLa cells to represent prokaryotic cells, normal eukaryotic cells, and cancer cells in atomic force microscopy experiments, respectively, we further studied that the single-molecule targeting interaction between peptides and biological membranes. Antimicrobial and anticancer activities of peptides exhibited strong correlations with the interaction probability determined by single-molecule force spectroscopy, which illustrates strong correlations of peptide biological activities and peptide hydrophobicity and charge. Peptide specificity significantly depends on the lipid compositions of different cell membranes, which validates the de novo design of peptide therapeutics against bacteria and cancers.

  11. Understanding transport in model water desalination membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Edwin

    Polyamide based thin film composites represent the the state-of-the-art nanofiltration and reverse osmosis membranes used in water desalination. The performance of these membranes is enabled by the ultrathin (~100 nm) crosslinked polyamide film in facilitating the selective transport of water over salt ions. While these materials have been refined over the last several decades, understanding the relationships between polyamide structure and membrane performance remains a challenge because of the complex and heterogeneous nature of the polyamide film. In this contribution, we present our approach to addressing this challenge by studying the transport properties of model polyamide membranes synthesized via molecular layer-by-layer (mLbL) assembly. First, we demonstrate that mLbL can successfully construct polyamide membranes with well-defined nanoscale thickness and roughness using a variety of monomer formulations. Next, we present measurement tools for characterizing the network structure and transport of these model polyamide membranes. Specifically, we used X-ray and neutron scattering techniques to characterize their structure as well as a recently-developed indentation based poromechanics approach to extrapolate their water diffusion coefficient. Finally, we illustrate how these measurements can provide insight into the original problem by linking the key polyamide network properties, i.e. water-polyamide interaction parameter and characteristic network mesh size, to the membrane performance.

  12. Antibacterial metabolites secreted under glucose-limited environment of the mimicked proximal colon model by lactobacilli abundant in infant feces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanjan, Pochanart; Hongpattarakere, Tipparat

    2016-09-01

    The most abundance of anti-Salmonella lactic acid bacteria (LAB) was found in feces of naturally born, exclusively breastfed Thai infants. Six strains of Lactobacillus plantarum and one strain of Lactobacillus paracasei were selected and identified. In the co-cultivation assay, L. plantarum subsp. plantarum I62 showed the strongest and broadest antibacterial activity against Escherichia coli, Shigella sonnei, Salmonella Paratyphi A, and Salmonella Typhimurium SA 2093 under the mimicked proximal colon condition, in which glucose and other nutrients were limited. According to GC-MS analysis, the major antibacterial contribution of organic acids secreted by L. plantarum I62 grown in the presence of glucose was dramatically reduced from 95.8 to 41.9 % under glucose-limited niche. The production of low-pK a acids, such as lactic, 1,2-benzenedicarboxylic, and 3-phenyllactic acids, was remarkably dropped. Surprisingly, higher-pK a acids such as 5-chlorobenzimidazole-2-carboxylic, pyroglutamic, palmitic, and oleic acids were enhanced. Moreover, cyclic dipeptides, ketones, alkanes, alcohols, and miscellaneous compounds, which were pH-independent antibacterial metabolites, became dominant. The electron microscopy strongly supported the synergistic attacks of the multiple antibacterial components targeting outer and cytoplasmic membranes leading to severe leakage and cell disruption of Salmonella Typhimurium. This strain poses to be a potential probiotic candidate for effectively controlling and treating human foodborne bacterial infection.

  13. Modeling of ion conductivity in Nafion membranes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Zhen; PENG Xiaofeng; WANG Buxuan; LEE Duujong; DUAN Yuanyuan

    2007-01-01

    A theoretical investigation was conducted to describe the ion transport behavior in a Nafion Membrane of proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFC).By analyzing the surface energy configuration of the ionic clusters in a Nafion membrane,an equivalent field intensity,Ee,was introduced to facilitate the analysis of surface resistance against ion conduction in the central region of clusters.An expression was derived for ionic conductivity incorporating the influence of surface resistance.A face-centered cubic (FCC)lattice model for a spatial cluster distribution was used to modify the effect of water content on ionic conductivity in the polymeric matrix,i.e.,the regions between clusters.Compared with the available empirical correlations,the new expression showed much better agreement with the available experimental results,which indicates the rationality to consider the structural influence on ion conduction in water-swollen Nation membranes.

  14. Simulation Model of Membrane Gas Separator Using Aspen Custom Modeler

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, Dong-keun [Korea Institute of Machinery and Materials, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Shin, Gahui; Yun, Jinwon; Yu, Sangseok [Chungnam Nat’l Univ., Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-12-15

    Membranes are used to separate pure gas from gas mixtures. In this study, three different types of mass transport through a membrane were developed in order to investigate the gas separation capabilities of a membrane. The three different models typically used are a lumped model, a multi-cell model, and a discretization model. Despite the multi-cell model producing similar results to a discretization model, the discretization model was selected for this investigation, due to the cell number dependence of a multi-cell model. The mass transport model was then used to investigate the effects of pressure difference, flow rate, total exposed area, and permeability. The results showed that the pressure difference increased with the stage cut, but the selectivity was a trade-off for the increasing pressure difference. Additionally, even though permeability is an important parameter, the selectivity and stage cut of the membrane converged as permeability increased.

  15. Triangle-hinge models for unoriented membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukuma, Masafumi; Sugishita, Sotaro; Umeda, Naoya

    2016-07-01

    Triangle-hinge models [M. Fukuma, S. Sugishita, and N. Umeda, J. High Energy Phys. 1507, 088 (2015)] are introduced to describe worldvolume dynamics of membranes. The Feynman diagrams consist of triangles glued together along hinges and can be restricted to tetrahedral decompositions in a large-N limit. In this paper, after clarifying that all the tetrahedra resulting in the original models are orientable, we define a version of triangle-hinge models that can describe the dynamics of unoriented membranes. By regarding each triangle as representing a propagation of an open membrane of disk topology, we introduce a local worldvolume parity transformation which inverts the orientation of a triangle, and define unoriented triangle-hinge models by gauging the transformation. Unlike two-dimensional cases, this local transformation generally relates a manifold to a nonmanifold, but still is a well-defined manipulation among tetrahedral decompositions. We further show that matter fields can be introduced in the same way as in the original oriented models. In particular, the models will describe unoriented membranes in a target spacetime by taking matter fields to be the target space coordinates.

  16. A Membrane Model from Implicit Elasticity Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freed, A. D.; Liao, J.; Einstein, D. R.

    2014-01-01

    A Fungean solid is derived for membranous materials as a body defined by isotropic response functions whose mathematical structure is that of a Hookean solid where the elastic constants are replaced by functions of state derived from an implicit, thermodynamic, internal-energy function. The theory utilizes Biot’s (1939) definitions for stress and strain that, in 1-dimension, are the stress/strain measures adopted by Fung (1967) when he postulated what is now known as Fung’s law. Our Fungean membrane model is parameterized against a biaxial data set acquired from a porcine pleural membrane subjected to three, sequential, proportional, planar extensions. These data support an isotropic/deviatoric split in the stress and strain-rate hypothesized by our theory. These data also demonstrate that the material response is highly non-linear but, otherwise, mechanically isotropic. These data are described reasonably well by our otherwise simple, four-parameter, material model. PMID:24282079

  17. Interaction of Mastoparan with Model Membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haloot, Justin

    2010-10-01

    The use of antimicrobial agents began during the 20th century to reduce the effects of infectious diseases. Since the 1990s, antimicrobial resistance has become an ever-increasing global problem. Our laboratory recently found that small antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) have potent antimicrobial activity against a wide range of Gram-negative and Gram-positive organisms including antibiotic resistant organisms. These AMPs are potential therapeutic agents against the growing problem of antimicrobial resistance. AMPs are small peptides produced by plants, insects and animals. Several hypotheses concede that these peptides cause some type of structural perturbations and increased membrane permeability in bacteria however, how AMPs kill bacteria remains unclear. The goal of this study was to design an assay that would allow us to evaluate and monitor the pore forming ability of an AMP, Mastoparan, on model membrane structures called liposomes. Development of this model will facilitate the study of how mastoparan and related AMPs interact with the bacterial membrane.

  18. Insulin-mimicking bioactivities of acylated inositol glycans in several mouse models of diabetes with or without obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Susumu; Suzuki, Chitose; Hinokio, Yoshinori; Ishigaki, Yasushi; Katagiri, Hideki; Kanzaki, Makoto; Azev, Viatcheslav N; Chakraborty, Nilanjana; d'Alarcao, Marc

    2014-01-01

    Insulin-mimetic species of low molecular weight are speculated to mediate some intracellular insulin actions. These inositol glycans, which are generated upon insulin stimulation from glycosylphosphatidylinositols, might control the activity of a multitude of insulin effector enzymes. Acylated inositol glycans (AIGs) are generated by cleavage of protein-free GPI precursors through the action of GPI-specific phospholipase C (GPI-PLC) and D (GPI-PLD). We synthesized AIGs (IG-1, IG-2, IG-13, IG-14, and IG-15) and then evaluated their insulin-mimicking bioactivities. IG-1 significantly stimulated glycogen synthesis and lipogenesis in 3T3-L1 adipocytes and rat isolated adipocytes dose-dependently. IG-2 significantly stimulated lipogenesis in rat isolated adipocytes dose-dependently. IG-15 also enhanced glycogen synthesis and lipogenesis in 3T3-L1 adipocytes. The administration of IG-1 decreased plasma glucose, increased glycogen content in liver and skeletal muscles and improved glucose tolerance in C57B6N mice with normal diets. The administration of IG-1 decreased plasma glucose in STZ-diabetic C57B6N mice. The treatment of IG-1 decreased plasma glucose, increased glycogen content in liver and skeletal muscles and improved glucose tolerance in C57B6N mice with high fat-diets and db/db mice. The long-term treatment of IG-1 decreased plasma glucose and reduced food intake and body weight in C57B6N mice with high fat-diets and ob/ob mice. Thus, IG-1 has insulin-mimicking bioactivities and improves glucose tolerance in mice models of diabetes with or without obesity.

  19. Evidence of proteolipid domain formation in an inner mitochondrial membrane mimicking model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cheniour, Mouhedine; Brewer, Jonathan R.; Bagatolli, Luis

    2017-01-01

    Background Mitochondrial creatine kinase (mtCK) is highly abundant in mitochondria; its quantity is equimolecular to the Adenylic Nucleotide Translocator and represents 1% of the mitochondrial proteins. It is a multitask protein localized in the mitochondria intermembrane space where it binds...

  20. Interaction of Artepillin C with model membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pazin, Wallance Moreira; Olivier, Danilo da Silva; Vilanova, Neus; Ramos, Ana Paula; Voets, Ilja Karina; Soares, Ademilson Espencer Egea; Ito, Amando Siuiti

    2017-05-01

    Green propolis, a mixture of beeswax and resinous compounds processed by Apis mellifera, displays several pharmacological properties. Artepillin C, the major compound in green propolis, consists of two prenylated groups bound to a phenyl group. Several studies have focused on the therapeutic effects of Artepillin C, but there is no evidence that it interacts with amphiphilic aggregates to mimic cell membranes. We have experimentally and computationally examined the interaction between Artepillin C and model membranes composed of dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine (DMPC) because phosphatidylcholine (PC) is one of the most abundant phospholipids in eukaryotic cell membranes. PC is located in both outer and inner leaflets and has been used as a simplified membrane model and a non-specific target to study the action of amphiphilic molecules with therapeutic effects. Experimental results indicated that Artepillin C adsorbed onto the DMPC monolayers. Its presence in the lipid suspension pointed to an increased tendency toward unilamellar vesicles and to decreased bilayer thickness. Artepillin C caused point defects in the lipid structure, which eliminated the ripple phase and the pre-transition in thermotropic chain melting. According to molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, (1) Artepillin C aggregated in the aqueous phase before it entered the bilayer; (2) Artepillin C was oriented along the direction normal to the surface; (3) the negatively charged group on Artepillin C was accommodated in the polar region of the membrane; and (4) thinner regions emerged around the Artepillin C molecules. These results help an understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying the biological action of propolis.

  1. Folded structure and insertion depth of the frog-skin antimicrobial Peptide esculentin-1b(1-18) in the presence of differently charged membrane-mimicking micelles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manzo, Giorgia; Casu, Mariano; Rinaldi, Andrea C; Montaldo, Nicola P; Luganini, Anna; Gribaudo, Giorgio; Scorciapino, Mariano A

    2014-11-26

    Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) are effectors of the innate immunity of most organisms. Their role in the defense against pathogen attack and their high selectivity for bacterial cells make them attractive for the development of a new class of antimicrobial drugs. The N-terminal fragment of the frog-skin peptide esculentin-1b (Esc(1-18)) has shown broad-spectrum antimicrobial activity. Similarly to most cationic AMPs, it is supposed to act by binding to and damaging the negatively charged plasma membrane of bacteria. Differently from many other AMPs, Esc(1-18) activity is preserved in biological fluids such as serum. In this work, a structural investigation was performed through NMR spectroscopy. The 3D structure was obtained in the presence of either zwitterionic or negatively charged micelles as membrane models for eukaryotic and prokaryotic membranes, respectively. Esc(1-18) showed a higher affinity for and deeper insertion into the latter and adopted an amphipathic helical structure characterized by a kink at the residue G8. These findings were confirmed by measuring penetration into lipid monolayers. The presence of negatively charged lipids in the bilayer appears to be necessary for Esc(1-18) to bind, to fold in the right three-dimensional structure, and, ultimately, to exert its biological role as an AMP.

  2. Model-building codes for membrane proteins.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shirley, David Noyes; Hunt, Thomas W.; Brown, W. Michael; Schoeniger, Joseph S. (Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA); Slepoy, Alexander; Sale, Kenneth L. (Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA); Young, Malin M. (Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA); Faulon, Jean-Loup Michel; Gray, Genetha Anne (Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA)

    2005-01-01

    We have developed a novel approach to modeling the transmembrane spanning helical bundles of integral membrane proteins using only a sparse set of distance constraints, such as those derived from MS3-D, dipolar-EPR and FRET experiments. Algorithms have been written for searching the conformational space of membrane protein folds matching the set of distance constraints, which provides initial structures for local conformational searches. Local conformation search is achieved by optimizing these candidates against a custom penalty function that incorporates both measures derived from statistical analysis of solved membrane protein structures and distance constraints obtained from experiments. This results in refined helical bundles to which the interhelical loops and amino acid side-chains are added. Using a set of only 27 distance constraints extracted from the literature, our methods successfully recover the structure of dark-adapted rhodopsin to within 3.2 {angstrom} of the crystal structure.

  3. Modelling Of Manufacturing Processes With Membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crăciunean, Daniel Cristian; Crăciunean, Vasile

    2015-07-01

    The current objectives to increase the standards of quality and efficiency in manufacturing processes can be achieved only through the best combination of inputs, independent of spatial distance between them. This paper proposes modelling production processes based on membrane structures introduced in [4]. Inspired from biochemistry, membrane computation [4] is based on the concept of membrane represented in its formalism by the mathematical concept of multiset. The manufacturing process is the evolution of a super cell system from its initial state according to the given actions of aggregation. In this paper we consider that the atomic production unit of the process is the action. The actions and the resources on which the actions are produced, are distributed in a virtual network of companies working together. The destination of the output resources is specified by corresponding output events.

  4. Cholesterol transport in model membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garg, Sumit; Porcar, Lionel; Butler, Paul; Perez-Salas, Ursula

    2010-03-01

    Physiological processes distribute cholesterol unevenly within the cell. The levels of cholesterol are maintained by intracellular transport and a disruption in the cell's ability to keep these normal levels will lead to disease. Exchange rates of cholesterol are generally studied in model systems using labeled lipid vesicles. Initially donor vesicles have all the cholesterol and acceptor vesicles are devoid of it. They are mixed and after some time the vesicles are separated and cholesterol is traced in each vesicle. The studies performed up to date have significant scatter indicating that the methodologies are not consistent. The present work shows in-situ Time-Resolved SANS studies of cholesterol exchange rates in unsaturated PC lipid vesicles. Molecular dynamics simulations were done to investigate the energetic and kinetic behavior of cholesterol in this system. This synergistic approach will provide insight into our efforts to understand cholesterol traffic.

  5. Constraints from growth-rate data on some coupled dark energy models mimicking a $\\Lambda CDM$ expansion

    CERN Document Server

    Fay, Stephane

    2016-01-01

    The $\\Lambda CDM$ expansion could be mimicked by a dark energy coupled to matter. Then, the equation of state $\\bar w$ and coupling $\\bar Q$ of this coupled dark energy could not be constrained by observations of the Hubble function alone. Also, in this paper, we determine the constraints on two such coupled dark energy models considering some current and forecast Euclid-like growth-rate data and assuming the prior on the $\\Lambda CDM$ dark matter density parameter today $\\Omega_{m0}=0.295\\pm 0.04$. The first model is defined by a constant equation of state. We find that at $2\\sigma$, $\\bar w=-1.02_{-0.22}^{+0.06}$ and the coupling function $\\bar Q_0$ today is $\\bar Q_0H_0^{-3}=0.057_{-0.148}^{+0.353}$ with $H_0$ the Hubble constant. The second model is defined by a varying equation of state $\\bar w=\\bar w_a-\\bar w_b\\ln(1+z)$, with $z$ the redshift and $(\\bar w_a,\\bar w_b)$, two constants. We find that at $2\\sigma$, $\\bar w_a=-0.99_{-0.90}^{+0.17}$, $\\bar w_b=-0.04_{-1.17}^{+0.31}$ and $\\bar Q_0H_0^{-3}=0.000...

  6. Self-Segregation of Myelin Membrane Lipids in Model Membranes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yurlova, Larisa; Kahya, Nicoletta; Aggarwal, Shweta; Kaiser, Hermann-Josef; Chiantia, Salvatore; Bakhti, Mostafa; Pewzner-Jung, Yael; Ben-David, Oshrit; Futerman, Anthony H.; Bruegger, Britta; Simons, Mikael

    2011-01-01

    Rapid conduction of nerve impulses requires coating of axons by myelin sheaths, which are multilamellar, lipid-rich membranes produced by oligodendrocytes in the central nervous system. To act as an insulator, myelin has to form a stable and firm membrane structure. In this study, we have analyzed t

  7. Mimicking nitrogenase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dance, Ian

    2010-03-28

    In seeking to mimic the hydrogenation of N(2) to NH(3) as effected under mild conditions by the enzyme nitrogenase, three classes of known metal sulfide clusters that resemble the NFe(7)MoS(9) core of FeMo-co, the active site of nitrogenase, have been assessed theoretically. The assessment has been made in the context of the previously proposed mechanism for nitrogenase, in which protons are relayed to FeMo-co, where, as hydrogen atoms accumulated on Fe and S atoms, they transfer to bound N(2) and subsequent intermediates in a critical sequence of intramolecular hydrogenations, probably accelerated by H atom tunneling. The three model systems possess the X(c)Fe(4)S(4) face which is the key active site of FeMo-co (X is most probably N in FeMo-co, and is S in the models). The most promising functional models are based on clusters M1, {(tpb)Mo(mu(3)-S)(3)Fe(2)(Fe-L)S(c)(mu-S)(2)(Fe-L)Fe(2)(mu(3)-S)(3)Mo(tpb)} [tpb = tris(1-pyrazolyl)hydroborate], for which syntheses are well developed. The assessment is based on the ability of the models to mimic the intermediates in the FeMo-co mechanism, as determined by density functional simulations. The elaborations of M1 required to mimic the FeMo-co behaviour are described. These include modification of the tpb ligands to control the coordination at the Fe atoms, to provide for the proton relay functionality, and to prevent unwanted reactivity at other Fe and S atoms. Literature references with prescriptions for synthesis of the predicted homogeneous catalysts are provided. Further, in view of the similarities between the model systems and the P-cluster of nitrogenase, it is speculated that the P-cluster could be a relic catalytic site for N(2) reduction.

  8. The model of stress distribution in polymer electrolyte membrane

    CERN Document Server

    Atrazhev, Vadim V; Dmitriev, Dmitry V; Erikhman, Nikolay S; Sultanov, Vadim I; Patterson, Timothy; Burlatsky, Sergei F

    2014-01-01

    An analytical model of mechanical stress in a polymer electrolyte membrane (PEM) of a hydrogen/air fuel cell with porous Water Transfer Plates (WTP) is developed in this work. The model considers a mechanical stress in the membrane is a result of the cell load cycling under constant oxygen utilization. The load cycling causes the cycling of the inlet gas flow rate, which results in the membrane hydration/dehydration close to the gas inlet. Hydration/dehydration of the membrane leads to membrane swelling/shrinking, which causes mechanical stress in the constrained membrane. Mechanical stress results in through-plane crack formation. Thereby, the mechanical stress in the membrane causes mechanical failure of the membrane, limiting fuel cell lifetime. The model predicts the stress in the membrane as a function of the cell geometry, membrane material properties and operation conditions. The model was applied for stress calculation in GORE-SELECT.

  9. Membrane fusion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bendix, Pól Martin

    2015-01-01

    At Stanford University, Boxer lab, I worked on membrane fusion of small unilamellar lipid vesicles to flat membranes tethered to glass surfaces. This geometry closely resembles biological systems in which liposomes fuse to plasma membranes. The fusion mechanism was studied using DNA zippering...... between complementary strands linked to the two apposing membranes closely mimicking the zippering mechanism of SNARE fusion complexes....

  10. Membrane Compartmentalization Reducing the Mobility of Lipids and Proteins within a Model Plasma Membrane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koldsø, Heidi; Reddy, Tyler; Fowler, Philip W; Duncan, Anna L; Sansom, Mark S P

    2016-09-01

    The cytoskeleton underlying cell membranes may influence the dynamic organization of proteins and lipids within the bilayer by immobilizing certain transmembrane (TM) proteins and forming corrals within the membrane. Here, we present coarse-grained resolution simulations of a biologically realistic membrane model of asymmetrically organized lipids and TM proteins. We determine the effects of a model of cytoskeletal immobilization of selected membrane proteins using long time scale coarse-grained molecular dynamics simulations. By introducing compartments with varying degrees of restraints within the membrane models, we are able to reveal how compartmentalization caused by cytoskeletal immobilization leads to reduced and anomalous diffusional mobility of both proteins and lipids. This in turn results in a reduced rate of protein dimerization within the membrane and of hopping of membrane proteins between compartments. These simulations provide a molecular realization of hierarchical models often invoked to explain single-molecule imaging studies of membrane proteins.

  11. Stability of Model Membranes in Extreme Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Namani, Trishool; Deamer, David W.

    2008-08-01

    The first forms of cellular life required a source of amphiphilic compounds capable of assembling into stable boundary structures. Membranes composed of fatty acids have been proposed as model systems of primitive membranes, but their bilayer structure is stable only within a narrow pH range and low ionic strength. They are particularly sensitive to aggregating effects of divalent cations (Mg+2, Ca+2, Fe+2) that would be present in Archaean sea water. Here we report that mixtures of alkyl amines and fatty acids form vesicles at strongly basic and acidic pH ranges which are resistant to the effects of divalent cations up to 0.1 M. Vesicles formed by mixtures of decylamine and decanoic acid (1:1 mole ratio) are relatively permeable to pyranine, a fluorescent anionic dye, but permeability could be reduced by adding 2 mol% of a polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon such as pyrene. Permeability to the dye was also reduced by increasing the chain length of the amphiphiles. For instance, 1:1 mole ratio mixtures of dodecylamine and dodecanoic acid were able to retain pyranine dye during and following gel filtration. We conclude that primitive cell membranes were likely to be composed of mixtures of amphiphilic and hydrophobic molecules that manifested increased stability over pure fatty acid membranes.

  12. Validation of a sensitive DNA walking strategy to characterise unauthorised GMOs using model food matrices mimicking common rice products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fraiture, Marie-Alice; Herman, Philippe; Taverniers, Isabel; De Loose, Marc; Van Nieuwerburgh, Filip; Deforce, Dieter; Roosens, Nancy H

    2015-04-15

    To identify unauthorised GMOs in food and feed matrices, an integrated approach has recently been developed targeting pCAMBIA family vectors, highly present in transgenic plants. Their presence is first assessed by qPCR screening and is subsequently confirmed by characterising the transgene flanking regions, using DNA walking. Here, the DNA walking performance has been thoroughly tested for the first time, regarding the targeted DNA quality and quantity. Several assays, on model food matrices mimicking common rice products, have allowed to determine the limit of detection as well as the potential effects of food mixture and processing. This detection system allows the identification of transgenic insertions as low as 10 HGEs and was not affected by the presence of untargeted DNA. Moreover, despite the clear impact of food processing on DNA quality, this method was able to cope with degraded DNA. Given its specificity, sensitivity, reliability, applicability and practicability, the proposed approach is a key detection tool, easily implementable in enforcement laboratories. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  13. Mimicking human neuronal pathways in silico: an emergent model on the effective connectivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gürcan, Önder; Türker, Kemal S; Mano, Jean-Pierre; Bernon, Carole; Dikenelli, Oğuz; Glize, Pierre

    2014-04-01

    We present a novel computational model that detects temporal configurations of a given human neuronal pathway and constructs its artificial replication. This poses a great challenge since direct recordings from individual neurons are impossible in the human central nervous system and therefore the underlying neuronal pathway has to be considered as a black box. For tackling this challenge, we used a branch of complex systems modeling called artificial self-organization in which large sets of software entities interacting locally give rise to bottom-up collective behaviors. The result is an emergent model where each software entity represents an integrate-and-fire neuron. We then applied the model to the reflex responses of single motor units obtained from conscious human subjects. Experimental results show that the model recovers functionality of real human neuronal pathways by comparing it to appropriate surrogate data. What makes the model promising is the fact that, to the best of our knowledge, it is the first realistic model to self-wire an artificial neuronal network by efficiently combining neuroscience with artificial self-organization. Although there is no evidence yet of the model's connectivity mapping onto the human connectivity, we anticipate this model will help neuroscientists to learn much more about human neuronal networks, and could also be used for predicting hypotheses to lead future experiments.

  14. Micro-scale finite element modeling of ultrasound propagation in aluminum trabecular bone-mimicking phantoms: A comparison between numerical simulation and experimental results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vafaeian, B; Le, L H; Tran, T N H T; El-Rich, M; El-Bialy, T; Adeeb, S

    2016-05-01

    The present study investigated the accuracy of micro-scale finite element modeling for simulating broadband ultrasound propagation in water-saturated trabecular bone-mimicking phantoms. To this end, five commercially manufactured aluminum foam samples as trabecular bone-mimicking phantoms were utilized for ultrasonic immersion through-transmission experiments. Based on micro-computed tomography images of the same physical samples, three-dimensional high-resolution computational samples were generated to be implemented in the micro-scale finite element models. The finite element models employed the standard Galerkin finite element method (FEM) in time domain to simulate the ultrasonic experiments. The numerical simulations did not include energy dissipative mechanisms of ultrasonic attenuation; however, they expectedly simulated reflection, refraction, scattering, and wave mode conversion. The accuracy of the finite element simulations were evaluated by comparing the simulated ultrasonic attenuation and velocity with the experimental data. The maximum and the average relative errors between the experimental and simulated attenuation coefficients in the frequency range of 0.6-1.4 MHz were 17% and 6% respectively. Moreover, the simulations closely predicted the time-of-flight based velocities and the phase velocities of ultrasound with maximum relative errors of 20 m/s and 11 m/s respectively. The results of this study strongly suggest that micro-scale finite element modeling can effectively simulate broadband ultrasound propagation in water-saturated trabecular bone-mimicking structures.

  15. Toward restrictions on boson stars as black hole mimickers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guzman, F S, E-mail: guzman@ifm.umich.mx [Instituto de Fisica y Matematicas, Universidad Michoacana de San Nicolas de Hidalgo, Edificio C3, Cd. Universitaria, 58040 Morelia, Michoacan (Mexico)

    2011-09-22

    The status of boson stars as black hole mimickers is presented among other mimickers. We focus on the analysis of the emission spectrum of a simple accretion disk model. We describe the free parameters that allow a boson star to become a black hole mimicker and present an example of a particular astrophysical case.

  16. Novel Rat Model of Repetitive Portal Venous Embolization Mimicking Human Non-Cirrhotic Idiopathic Portal Hypertension

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klein, Sabine; Hinüber, Christian; Hittatiya, Kanishka

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Non-cirrhotic idiopathic portal hypertension (NCIPH) is characterized by splenomegaly, anemia and portal hypertension, while liver function is preserved. However, no animal models have been established yet. This study assessed a rat model of NCIPH and characterized the hemodynamics......, and compared it to human NCIPH. METHODS: Portal pressure (PP) was measured invasively and coloured microspheres were injected in the ileocecal vein in rats. This procedure was performed weekly for 3 weeks (weekly embolization). Rats without and with single embolization served as controls. After four weeks (one...... in the weekly embolization group. Fibrotic markers αSMA and Desmin were upregulated in weekly embolized rats. DISCUSSION: This study establishes a model using repetitive embolization via portal veins, comparable with human NCIPH and may serve to test new therapies....

  17. Scalar dark energy models mimicking {Lambda}CDM with arbitrary future evolution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Astashenok, Artyom V. [Baltic Federal University of I. Kant, Department of Theoretical Physics, 236041, 14, Nevsky st., Kaliningrad (Russian Federation); Nojiri, Shin' ichi, E-mail: nojiri@phys.nagoya-u.ac.jp [Department of Physics, Nagoya University, Nagoya 464-8602 (Japan); Kobayashi-Maskawa Institute for the Origin of Particles and the Universe, Nagoya University, Nagoya 464-8602 (Japan); Odintsov, Sergei D. [Institucio Catalana de Recerca i Estudis Avancats (ICREA), Barcelona (Spain); Institut de Ciencies de l' Espai (CSIC-IEEC), Campus UAB, Facultat de Ciencies, Torre C5-Par-2a pl, E-08193 Bellaterra, Barcelona (Spain); Scherrer, Robert J. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Vanderbilt University, Nashville TN 37235 (United States)

    2012-07-09

    Dark energy models with various scenarios of evolution are considered from the viewpoint of the formalism for the equation of state. It is shown that these models are compatible with current astronomical data. Some of the models presented here evolve arbitrarily close to {Lambda}CDM up to the present, but diverge in the future into a number of different possible asymptotic states, including asymptotic de Sitter (pseudo-rip) evolution, little rips with disintegration of bound structures, and various forms of finite-time future singularities. Therefore it is impossible from observational data to determine whether the universe will end in a future singularity or not. We demonstrate that the models under consideration are stable for a long period of time (billions of years) before entering a Little Rip/Pseudo-Rip induced dissolution of bound structures or before entering a soft finite-time future singularity. Finally, the physical consequences of Little Rip, Types II, III and Big Crush singularities are briefly compared.

  18. A general model for membrane-based separation processes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Soni, Vipasha; Abildskov, Jens; Jonsson, Gunnar Eigil;

    2009-01-01

    behaviour will play an important role. In this paper, modelling of membrane-based processes for separation of gas and liquid mixtures are considered. Two general models, one for membrane-based liquid separation processes (with phase change) and another for membrane-based gas separation are presented...

  19. Transgenic mouse model of IgM+ lymphoproliferative disease mimicking Waldenström macroglobulinemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tompkins, V S; Sompallae, R; Rosean, T R; Walsh, S; Acevedo, M; Kovalchuk, A L; Han, S-S; Jing, X; Holman, C; Rehg, J E; Herms, S; Sunderland, J S; Morse, H C; Janz, S

    2016-01-01

    Waldenström macroglobulinemia (WM) is a low-grade incurable immunoglobulin M+ (IgM+) lymphoplasmacytic lymphoma for which a genetically engineered mouse model of de novo tumor development is lacking. On the basis of evidence that the pro-inflammatory cytokine, interleukin 6 (IL6), and the survival-enhancing oncoprotein, B cell leukemia 2 (BCL2), have critical roles in the natural history of WM, we hypothesized that the enforced expression of IL6 and BCL2 in mice unable to perform immunoglobulin class switch recombination may result in a lymphoproliferative disease that mimics WM. To evaluate this possibility, we generated compound transgenic BALB/c mice that harbored the human BCL2 and IL6 transgenes, EμSV-BCL2-22 and H2-Ld-hIL6, on the genetic background of activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID) deficiency. We designated these mice BCL2+IL6+AID− and found that they developed—with full genetic penetrance (100% incidence) and suitably short latency (93 days median survival)—a severe IgM+ lymphoproliferative disorder that recapitulated important features of human WM. However, the BCL2+IL6+AID− model also exhibited shortcomings, such as low serum IgM levels and histopathological changes not seen in patients with WM, collectively indicating that further refinements of the model are required to achieve better correlations with disease characteristics of WM. PMID:27813533

  20. Conformational study of melectin and antapin antimicrobial peptides in model membrane environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kocourková, Lucie; Novotná, Pavlína; Čujová, Sabína; Čeřovský, Václav; Urbanová, Marie; Setnička, Vladimír

    2017-01-01

    Antimicrobial peptides have long been considered as promising compounds against drug-resistant pathogens. In this work, we studied the secondary structure of antimicrobial peptides melectin and antapin using electronic (ECD) and vibrational circular dichroism (VCD) spectroscopies that are sensitive to peptide secondary structures. The results from quantitative ECD spectral evaluation by Dichroweb and CDNN program and from the qualitative evaluation of the VCD spectra were compared. The antimicrobial activity of the selected peptides depends on their ability to adopt an amphipathic α-helical conformation on the surface of the bacterial membrane. Hence, solutions of different zwitterionic and negatively charged liposomes and micelles were used to mimic the eukaryotic and bacterial biological membranes. The results show a significant content of α-helical conformation in the solutions of negatively charged liposomes mimicking the bacterial membrane, thus correlating with the antimicrobial activity of the studied peptides. On the other hand in the solutions of zwitterionic liposomes used as models of the eukaryotic membranes, the fraction of α-helical conformation was lower, which corresponds with their moderate hemolytic activity.

  1. Modeling of membrane processes for air revitalization and water recovery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lange, Kevin E.; Foerg, Sandra L.; Dall-Bauman, Liese A.

    1992-01-01

    Gas-separation and reverse-osmosis membrane models are being developed in conjunction with membrane testing at NASA JSC. The completed gas-separation membrane model extracts effective component permeabilities from multicomponent test data, and predicts the effects of flow configuration, operating conditions, and membrane dimensions on module performance. Variable feed- and permeate-side pressures are considered. The model has been applied to test data for hollow-fiber membrane modules with simulated cabin-air feeds. Results are presented for a membrane designed for air drying applications. Extracted permeabilities are used to predict the effect of operating conditions on water enrichment in the permeate. A first-order reverse-osmosis model has been applied to test data for spiral wound membrane modules with a simulated hygiene water feed. The model estimates an effective local component rejection coefficient under pseudosteady-state conditions. Results are used to define requirements for a detailed reverse-osmosis model.

  2. Involvement of innate and adaptive immunity in a murine model of coronary arteritis mimicking Kawasaki disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulte, Danica J; Yilmaz, Atilla; Shimada, Kenichi; Fishbein, Michael C; Lowe, Emily L; Chen, Shuang; Wong, Michelle; Doherty, Terence M; Lehman, Thomas; Crother, Timothy R; Sorrentino, Rosalinda; Arditi, Moshe

    2009-10-15

    Kawasaki disease (KD) is the most common cause of acquired cardiac disease and acute vasculitis in children in the developed world. Injection of a cell wall extract isolated from Lactobacillus casei (LCCWE) into mice causes a focal coronary arteritis that histopathologically mimics the coronary lesions observed in KD patients. In this study we used this model to investigate the participation of T cells, B cells, and dendritic cells (DC) in the development of coronary arteritis. RAG1(-/-), B cell(null), and wild-type (WT) mice were injected with a single dose of LCCWE (500 microg/mouse i.p.). None of the RAG1(-/-) mice developed coronary arteritis, whereas 70% of WT and 100% of B cell(null) mice developed coronary lesions, indicating that T cells were required for lesion formation. When splenocytes isolated from LCCWE-treated mice were restimulated with LCCWE, we observed significant IFN-gamma secretion in WT but not in RAG1(-/-) mice. Immunohistochemical staining showed F4/80(+) macrophages, activated MIDC-8(+) myeloid DCs (mDC), plasmacytoid DCs, and colocalization of CD3(+) T cells with mDCs in coronary artery lesions, suggesting an Ag-driven process. T cells but not B cells are required for LCCWE-induced coronary arteritis. Similar to human lesions, the coronary lesions contain macrophages, activated mDCs, and plaslmacytoid DCs all in close proximity to T cells, further strengthening the relevance of this mouse model to the immunopathology of coronary disease in KD. These studies are consistent with the interpretation that macrophages and DCs may collaborate with T cells in the pathological mechanisms of coronary arteritis.

  3. Reprodaetion of an animal model of multiple intestinal injuries mimicking "lethal triad" caused by severe penetrating abdominal trauma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peng-fei WANG

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective To reproduce an animal model of multi-intestinal injuries with "lethal triad" characterized by low body temperature,acidosis and coagulopathy.Methods Six female domestic outbred pigs were anesthetized,and the carotid artery and jugular vein were cannulated for monitoring the blood pressure and heart rate and for infusion of fluid.The animals were shot with a gun to create a severe penetrating abdominal trauma.Immediately after the shooting,50% of total blood volume(35ml/kg hemorrhage was drawn from the carotid artery in 20min.After a 40min shock period,4h of pre-hospital phase was mimicked by normal saline(NS resuscitation to maintain systolic blood pressure(SBP > 80mmHg or mean arterial pressure(MAP > 60mmHg.When SBP > 80mmHg or MAP > 60mmHg,no fluid infusion or additional bleeding was given.Hemodynamic parameters were recorded,and pathology of myocardium,lung,small intestine and liver was observed.Results There were multiple intestinal perforations(8-10 site injuries/pig leading to intra-abdominal contamination,mesenteric injury(1-2 site injuries/pig resulted in partial intestinal ischemia and intra-abdominal hemorrhage,and no large colon and mesenteric vascular injury.One pig died before the completion of the model establishment(at the end of pre-hospital resuscitation.The typical symptoms of trauma-induced hemorrhagic shock were observed in survival animals.Low temperature(33.3±0.5℃,acidosis(pH=7.242±0.064,and coagulopathy(protrombin time and activated partial thromboplasting time prolonged were observed after pre-hospital resuscitation.Pathology showed that myocardium,lung,small intestine and liver were severely injured.Conclusions A new model,simulating three stages of "traumatic hemorrhagic shock,pre-hospital recovery and hospital treatment" and inducing the "lethal triad" accompanied with abdominal pollution,has been successfully established.This model has good stability and high reproducibility.The survival animals can be

  4. Characterization of lipid model membranes designed for studying impact of ceramide species on drug diffusion and penetration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ochalek, M; Heissler, S; Wohlrab, J; Neubert, R H H

    2012-05-01

    The stratum corneum (SC) intercellular lipid matrix plays a crucial role in the skin barrier function. In the present study, lipid model membranes mimicking its phase behavior were prepared and characterized using different analytical techniques (i.a. SAXD, HPTLC, ESEM, confocal Raman imaging, ATR-FTIR spectroscopy) in order to obtain well-standardized model membranes for diffusion and penetration studies. The lipid model membranes should be used in the future for studying the impact of each ceramide species on the diffusion and penetration of drugs. The SAXD study confirmed that the lipids within artificial lipid systems are arranged similarly to the lipids in the human SC. The polarization microscopic and ESEM images showed the homogenous deposition of lipids on the polycarbonate filter. Both the HPTLC and confocal Raman imaging studies proved the homogenous distribution of individual lipid classes within the lipid model membranes. First in vitro diffusion experiments (performed using an ATR-FTIR diffusion cell) of the hydrophilic compound, urea, revealed that the lipid model membrane represents even stronger diffusion barrier than the human SC. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Chromatic adaptation of photosynthetic membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheuring, Simon; Sturgis, James N

    2005-07-15

    Many biological membranes adapt in response to environmental conditions. We investigated how the composition and architecture of photosynthetic membranes of a bacterium change in response to light, using atomic force microscopy. Despite large modifications in the membrane composition, the local environment of core complexes remained unaltered, whereas specialized paracrystalline light-harvesting antenna domains grew under low-light conditions. Thus, the protein mixture in the membrane shows eutectic behavior and can be mimicked by a simple model. Such structural adaptation ensures efficient photon capture under low-light conditions and prevents photodamage under high-light conditions.

  6. Design and Investigation of PolyFermS In Vitro Continuous Fermentation Models Inoculated with Immobilized Fecal Microbiota Mimicking the Elderly Colon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fehlbaum, Sophie; Chassard, Christophe; Haug, Martina C; Fourmestraux, Candice; Derrien, Muriel; Lacroix, Christophe

    2015-01-01

    In vitro gut modeling is a useful approach to investigate some factors and mechanisms of the gut microbiota independent of the effects of the host. This study tested the use of immobilized fecal microbiota to develop different designs of continuous colonic fermentation models mimicking elderly gut fermentation. Model 1 was a three-stage fermentation mimicking the proximal, transverse and distal colon. Models 2 and 3 were based on the new PolyFermS platform composed of an inoculum reactor seeded with immobilized fecal microbiota and used to continuously inoculate with the same microbiota different second-stage reactors mounted in parallel. The main gut bacterial groups, microbial diversity and metabolite production were monitored in effluents of all reactors using quantitative PCR, 16S rRNA gene 454-pyrosequencing, and HPLC, respectively. In all models, a diverse microbiota resembling the one tested in donor's fecal sample was established. Metabolic stability in inoculum reactors seeded with immobilized fecal microbiota was shown for operation times of up to 80 days. A high microbial and metabolic reproducibility was demonstrated for downstream control and experimental reactors of a PolyFermS model. The PolyFermS models tested here are particularly suited to investigate the effects of environmental factors, such as diet and drugs, in a controlled setting with the same microbiota source.

  7. Atomic force microscopy of model lipid membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morandat, Sandrine; Azouzi, Slim; Beauvais, Estelle; Mastouri, Amira; El Kirat, Karim

    2013-02-01

    Supported lipid bilayers (SLBs) are biomimetic model systems that are now widely used to address the biophysical and biochemical properties of biological membranes. Two main methods are usually employed to form SLBs: the transfer of two successive monolayers by Langmuir-Blodgett or Langmuir-Schaefer techniques, and the fusion of preformed lipid vesicles. The transfer of lipid films on flat solid substrates offers the possibility to apply a wide range of surface analytical techniques that are very sensitive. Among them, atomic force microscopy (AFM) has opened new opportunities for determining the nanoscale organization of SLBs under physiological conditions. In this review, we first focus on the different protocols generally employed to prepare SLBs. Then, we describe AFM studies on the nanoscale lateral organization and mechanical properties of SLBs. Lastly, we survey recent developments in the AFM monitoring of bilayer alteration, remodeling, or digestion, by incubation with exogenous agents such as drugs, proteins, peptides, and nanoparticles.

  8. Modeling the pharmacodynamics of passive membrane permeability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swift, Robert V.; Amaro, Rommie E.

    2011-11-01

    Small molecule permeability through cellular membranes is critical to a better understanding of pharmacodynamics and the drug discovery endeavor. Such permeability may be estimated as a function of the free energy change of barrier crossing by invoking the barrier domain model, which posits that permeation is limited by passage through a single "barrier domain" and assumes diffusivity differences among compounds of similar structure are negligible. Inspired by the work of Rezai and co-workers (JACS 128:14073-14080, 2006), we estimate this free energy change as the difference in implicit solvation free energies in chloroform and water, but extend their model to include solute conformational affects. Using a set of eleven structurally diverse FDA approved compounds and a set of thirteen congeneric molecules, we show that the solvation free energies are dominated by the global minima, which allows solute conformational distributions to be effectively neglected. For the set of tested compounds, the best correlation with experiment is obtained when the implicit chloroform global minimum is used to evaluate the solvation free energy difference.

  9. Membranous nephropathy: from models to man

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beck, Laurence H.; Salant, David J.

    2014-01-01

    As recently as 2002, most cases of primary membranous nephropathy (MN), a relatively common cause of nephrotic syndrome in adults, were considered idiopathic. We now recognize that MN is an organ-specific autoimmune disease in which circulating autoantibodies bind to an intrinsic antigen on glomerular podocytes and form deposits of immune complexes in situ in the glomerular capillary walls. Here we define the clinical and pathological features of MN and describe the experimental models that enabled the discovery of the major target antigen, the M-type phospholipase A2 receptor 1 (PLA2R). We review the pathophysiology of experimental MN and compare and contrast it with the human disease. We discuss the diagnostic value of serological testing for anti-PLA2R and tissue staining for the redistributed antigen, and their utility for differentiating between primary and secondary MN, and between recurrent MN after kidney transplant and de novo MN. We end with consideration of how knowledge of the antigen might direct future therapeutic strategies. PMID:24892704

  10. Evaluation of membrane models and their composition for islet amyloid polypeptide-membrane aggregation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caillon, Lucie; Lequin, Olivier; Khemtémourian, Lucie

    2013-09-01

    Human islet amyloid polypeptide (IAPP) forms amyloid fibrils in the pancreatic islets of patients suffering from type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). The formation of IAPP fibrils has been shown to cause membrane damage which most likely is responsible for the death of pancreatic islet β-cells during the pathogenesis of T2DM. Several studies have demonstrated a clear interaction between IAPP and lipid membranes. However the effect of different lipid compositions and of various membrane mimetics (including micelles, bicelles, SUV and LUV) on fibril formation kinetics and fibril morphology has not yet systematically been analysed. Here we report that the interaction of IAPP with various membrane models promoted different processes of fibril formation. Our data reveal that in SDS and DPC micelles, IAPP adopts a stable α-helical structure for several days, suggesting that the micelle models may stabilize monomeric or small oligomeric species of IAPP. In contrast, zwitterionic DMPC/DHPC bicelles and DOPC SUV accelerate the fibril formation compared to zwitterionic DOPC LUV, indicating that the size of the membrane model and its curvature influence the fibrillation process. Negatively charged membranes decrease the lag-time of the fibril formation kinetics while phosphatidylethanolamine and cholesterol have an opposite effect, probably due to the modulation of the physical properties of the membrane and/or due to direct interactions with IAPP within the membrane core. Finally, our results show that the modulation of lipid composition influences not only the growth of fibrils at the membrane surface but also the interactions of β-sheet oligomers with membranes.

  11. Ligand binding alters dimerization and sequestering of urokinase receptors in raft-mimicking lipid mixtures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ge, Yifan; Siegel, Amanda P; Jordan, Rainer; Naumann, Christoph A

    2014-11-01

    Lipid heterogeneities, such as lipid rafts, are widely considered to be important for the sequestering of membrane proteins in plasma membranes, thereby influencing membrane protein functionality. However, the underlying mechanisms of such sequestration processes remain elusive, in part, due to the small size and often transient nature of these functional membrane heterogeneities in cellular membranes. To overcome these challenges, here we report the sequestration behavior of urokinase receptor (uPAR), a glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored protein, in a planar model membrane platform with raft-mimicking lipid mixtures of well-defined compositions using a powerful optical imaging platform consisting of confocal spectroscopy XY-scans, photon counting histogram, and fluorescence correlation spectroscopy analyses. This methodology provides parallel information about receptor sequestration, oligomerization state, and lateral mobility with single molecule sensitivity. Most notably, our experiments demonstrate that moderate changes in uPAR sequestration are not only associated with modifications in uPAR dimerization levels, but may also be linked to ligand-mediated allosteric changes of these membrane receptors. Our data show that these modifications in uPAR sequestration can be induced by exposure to specific ligands (urokinase plasminogen activator, vitronectin), but not via adjustment of the cholesterol level in the planar model membrane system. Good agreement of our key findings with published results on cell membranes confirms the validity of our model membrane approach. We hypothesize that the observed mechanism of receptor translocation in the presence of raft-mimicking lipid mixtures is also applicable to other glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored proteins.

  12. Spatiotemporal Organization of Spin-Coated Supported Model Membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simonsen, Adam Cohen

    All cells of living organisms are separated from their surroundings and organized internally by means of flexible lipid membranes. In fact, there is consensus that the minimal requirements for self-replicating life processes include the following three features: (1) information carriers (DNA, RNA), (2) a metabolic system, and (3) encapsulation in a container structure [1]. Therefore, encapsulation can be regarded as an essential part of life itself. In nature, membranes are highly diverse interfacial structures that compartmentalize cells [2]. While prokaryotic cells only have an outer plasma membrane and a less-well-developed internal membrane structure, eukaryotic cells have a number of internal membranes associated with the organelles and the nucleus. Many of these membrane structures, including the plasma membrane, are complex layered systems, but with the basic structure of a lipid bilayer. Biomembranes contain hundreds of different lipid species in addition to embedded or peripherally associated membrane proteins and connections to scaffolds such as the cytoskeleton. In vitro, lipid bilayers are spontaneously self-organized structures formed by a large group of amphiphilic lipid molecules in aqueous suspensions. Bilayer formation is driven by the entropic properties of the hydrogen bond network in water in combination with the amphiphilic nature of the lipids. The molecular shapes of the lipid constituents play a crucial role in bilayer formation, and only lipids with approximately cylindrical shapes are able to form extended bilayers. The bilayer structure of biomembranes was discovered by Gorter and Grendel in 1925 [3] using monolayer studies of lipid extracts from red blood cells. Later, a number of conceptual models were developed to rationalize the organization of lipids and proteins in biological membranes. One of the most celebrated is the fluid-mosaic model by Singer and Nicolson (1972) [4]. According to this model, the lipid bilayer component of

  13. The role of ultraviolet colour in the assessment of mimetic accuracy between Batesian mimics and their models: a case study using ant-mimicking spiders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corcobado, Guadalupe; Herberstein, Marie E.; Pekár, Stano

    2016-12-01

    The use of ultraviolet (UV) cues for intra- and inter-specific communication is common in many animal species. Still, the role of UV signals under some predator-prey contexts, such as Batesian mimicry, is not clear. Batesian mimicry is a defensive strategy by which a palatable species (the mimic) resembles an unpalatable or noxious species (the model) to avoid predation. This strategy has evolved independently in many different taxa that are predated by species capable of UV perception. Moreover, there is considerable variation in how accurately Batesian mimics resemble their models across species. Our aim was to investigate how UV colour contributed to mimetic accuracy using several ant-mimicking spider species as a case study. We measured the reflectance spectrum (300-700 nm) for several species of mimics and models, and we tested whether they differ in visible and UV colour. We modelled whether two different predators could discriminate between mimics and models using colour information. We found that generally, ant-mimicking spiders differed significantly from their ant models in UV colour and that information from the visible range of light cannot be extrapolated into the UV. Our modelling suggested that wasps should be able to discriminate between mimics and models combining information from visible and the UV light, whereas birds may not discriminate between them. Thus, we show that UV colour can influence mimic accuracy and we discuss its potential role in Batesian mimicry. We conclude that colour, especially in the UV range, should be taken into account when measuring mimetic accuracy.

  14. Performance modeling of direct contact membrane distillation (DCMD) seawater desalination process using a commercial composite membrane

    KAUST Repository

    Lee, Junggil

    2015-01-10

    This paper presents the development of a rigorous theoretical model to predict the transmembrane flux of a flat sheet hydrophobic composite membrane, comprising both an active layer of polytetrafluoroethylene and a scrim-backing support layer of polypropylene, in the direct contact membrane distillation (DCMD) process. An integrated model includes the mass, momentum, species and energy balances for both retentate and permeate flows, coupled with the mass transfer of water vapor through the composite membrane and the heat transfer across the membrane and through the boundary layers adjacent to the membrane surfaces. Experimental results and model predictions for permeate flux and performance ratio are compared and shown to be in good agreement. The permeate flux through the composite layer can be ignored in the consideration of mass transfer pathways at the composite membrane. The effect of the surface porosity and the thickness of active and support layers on the process performance of composite membrane has also been studied. Among these parameters, surface porosity is identified to be the main factor significantly influencing the permeate flux and performance ratio, while the relative influence of the surface porosity on the performance ratio is less than that on flux.

  15. CHARMM-GUI HMMM Builder for Membrane Simulations with the Highly Mobile Membrane-Mimetic Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Yifei; Cheng, Xi; Lee, Jumin; Vermaas, Josh V; Pogorelov, Taras V; Tajkhorshid, Emad; Park, Soohyung; Klauda, Jeffery B; Im, Wonpil

    2015-11-17

    Slow diffusion of the lipids in conventional all-atom simulations of membrane systems makes it difficult to sample large rearrangements of lipids and protein-lipid interactions. Recently, Tajkhorshid and co-workers developed the highly mobile membrane-mimetic (HMMM) model with accelerated lipid motion by replacing the lipid tails with small organic molecules. The HMMM model provides accelerated lipid diffusion by one to two orders of magnitude, and is particularly useful in studying membrane-protein associations. However, building an HMMM simulation system is not easy, as it requires sophisticated treatment of the lipid tails. In this study, we have developed CHARMM-GUI HMMM Builder (http://www.charmm-gui.org/input/hmmm) to provide users with ready-to-go input files for simulating HMMM membrane systems with/without proteins. Various lipid-only and protein-lipid systems are simulated to validate the qualities of the systems generated by HMMM Builder with focus on the basic properties and advantages of the HMMM model. HMMM Builder supports all lipid types available in CHARMM-GUI and also provides a module to convert back and forth between an HMMM membrane and a full-length membrane. We expect HMMM Builder to be a useful tool in studying membrane systems with enhanced lipid diffusion.

  16. Mathematical modelling of dextran filtration through hollow fibre membranes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vinther, Frank; Pinelo, Manuel; Brøns, Morten

    2014-01-01

    In this paper we present a mathematical model of an ultrafiltration process. The results of the model are produced using standard numerical techniques with Comsol Multiphysics. The model describes the fluid flow and separation in hollow fibre membranes. The flow of solute and solvent within...... of the solute permeability the concentration dependent viscosity decreases the volumetric flux through the membrane at high pressures. This effect is due to a very high concentration at the membrane surface. The model is related to experimental data. There is a good qualitative and a reasonable quantitative...

  17. An Integrated Framework Advancing Membrane Protein Modeling and Design.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rebecca F Alford

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Membrane proteins are critical functional molecules in the human body, constituting more than 30% of open reading frames in the human genome. Unfortunately, a myriad of difficulties in overexpression and reconstitution into membrane mimetics severely limit our ability to determine their structures. Computational tools are therefore instrumental to membrane protein structure prediction, consequently increasing our understanding of membrane protein function and their role in disease. Here, we describe a general framework facilitating membrane protein modeling and design that combines the scientific principles for membrane protein modeling with the flexible software architecture of Rosetta3. This new framework, called RosettaMP, provides a general membrane representation that interfaces with scoring, conformational sampling, and mutation routines that can be easily combined to create new protocols. To demonstrate the capabilities of this implementation, we developed four proof-of-concept applications for (1 prediction of free energy changes upon mutation; (2 high-resolution structural refinement; (3 protein-protein docking; and (4 assembly of symmetric protein complexes, all in the membrane environment. Preliminary data show that these algorithms can produce meaningful scores and structures. The data also suggest needed improvements to both sampling routines and score functions. Importantly, the applications collectively demonstrate the potential of combining the flexible nature of RosettaMP with the power of Rosetta algorithms to facilitate membrane protein modeling and design.

  18. Membrane Tolerance to Ethanol is Rapidly Lost after Withdrawal: A Model for Studies of Membrane Adaptation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taraschi, Theodore F.; Ellingson, John S.; Wu, Alice; Zimmerman, Robert; Rubin, Emanuel

    1986-06-01

    The structural properties of liver microsomes and erythrocytes obtained from rats that had been chronically administered ethanol were examined by electron spin resonance (ESR) following ethanol withdrawal for 1-10 days. Membranes obtained from control animals exhibited considerable molecular disordering upon the addition of ethanol in vitro (50-100 mM). Conversely, microsomal and erythrocyte membranes from alcoholic animals were resistant to this disordering by ethanol (membrane tolerance). These membrane properties were also apparent in lipid bilayers comprised of either total lipids or phospholipids isolated from the control and alcoholic animals. While several weeks of ethanol administration were required for both erythrocytes and microsomes to develop membrane tolerance, erythrocytes from alcoholic animals were disordered by ethanol in vitro after the animals had been withdrawn from ethanol for only 1 day. The same rapid loss of tolerance was observed in microsomes after 2 days of withdrawal. The same time course for the loss of tolerance was observed in lipid bilayers prepared from the total lipid and phospholipid extracts. No significant differences in the cholesterol/phospholipid ratio were observed between the microsomal or erythrocyte membranes isolated before and after withdrawal. Thus, alterations in the microsomal and erythrocyte phospholipids, and not cholesterol content, were responsible for conveying membrane tolerance. Membrane structural properties can be rapidly adjusted in a mammalian system in response to the withdrawal of the external membrane perturbant ethanol. The withdrawal model, which begins with established membrane tolerance and leads to rapid and complete loss of tolerance, provides a model to analyze the compositional changes responsible for this tolerance to disordering by ethanol.

  19. Numerical Poisson-Boltzmann Model for Continuum Membrane Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Botello-Smith, Wesley M; Liu, Xingping; Cai, Qin; Li, Zhilin; Zhao, Hongkai; Luo, Ray

    2013-01-01

    Membrane protein systems are important computational research topics due to their roles in rational drug design. In this study, we developed a continuum membrane model utilizing a level set formulation under the numerical Poisson-Boltzmann framework within the AMBER molecular mechanics suite for applications such as protein-ligand binding affinity and docking pose predictions. Two numerical solvers were adapted for periodic systems to alleviate possible edge effects. Validation on systems ranging from organic molecules to membrane proteins up to 200 residues, demonstrated good numerical properties. This lays foundations for sophisticated models with variable dielectric treatments and second-order accurate modeling of solvation interactions.

  20. Comparison of endoscopic submucosal implantation vs. surgical intramuscular implantation of VX2 fragments for establishing a rabbit esophageal tumor model for mimicking human esophageal squamous carcinoma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jin Huang

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: This study was undertaken to establish a rabbit esophageal tumor model for mimicking human esophageal squamous carcinoma (ESC by endoscopic and surgical implantation of VX2 tumors. METHODS: Fragments of a VX2 tumour were endoscopically implanted in the submucosal layer of the thoracic esophagus of 32 New Zealand white rabbits, while 34 animals received surgical implantation into the muscular layer. Then, the animals were studied endoscopically and pathologically. The safety and efficiency of the two methods and the pathological features of the animal models were analyzed. RESULTS: Both the endoscopic and the surgical method had a relatively high success rate of tumor implantation [93.7% (30/32 vs. 97.1% (33/34] and tumor growth [86.7% (26/30 vs. 81.8% (27/33], and the variation in the results was not statistically significant (P>0.05. Compared with those produced by the surgical method, the models produced by the endoscopic method had a higher rate of severe esophageal stricture [61.5% (16/26 vs. 29.6% (8/27] and of intra-luminal tumor growth [73.1% (19/26 vs. 37.0% (10/27], and had a lower rate of tumor invasion of adjacent organs [53.8% (14/26 vs. 81.5% (22/27]; all of these results were statistically significant (P0.05. CONCLUSION: The endoscopic and surgical methods are both safe and effective for establishment of VX2 tumors in the rabbit esophagus. The models produced by the two methods have different pathologic features mimicking that of human ESC. We recommend the models for studies on surgical procedures and minimally invasive treatments.

  1. Rhabdoid Tumor Mimicking Hemangioma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Assen, Yvette J.; Madern, Gerard C.; de Laat, Peter C. J.; den Hollander, Jan C.; Oranje, Arnold P.

    2011-01-01

    We report a young boy with a malignant tumor, which remained unrecognized for 8 months because it was assumed to be a hemangioma. The presentation of a rhabdoid tumor mimicking hemangioma is very rare. It was reported only on two earlier occasions. Rhabdoid tumors are one of the most aggressive type

  2. Rhabdoid Tumor Mimicking Hemangioma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Assen, Yvette J.; Madern, Gerard C.; de Laat, Peter C. J.; den Hollander, Jan C.; Oranje, Arnold P.

    2011-01-01

    We report a young boy with a malignant tumor, which remained unrecognized for 8 months because it was assumed to be a hemangioma. The presentation of a rhabdoid tumor mimicking hemangioma is very rare. It was reported only on two earlier occasions. Rhabdoid tumors are one of the most aggressive

  3. Simplified model for fouling of a pleated membrane filter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanaei, Pejman; Cummings, Linda

    2014-11-01

    Pleated filter cartridge are widely used to remove undesired impurities from a fluid. A filter membrane is sandwiched between porous support layers, then pleated and packed in to an annular cylindrical cartridge. Although this arrangement offers a high ratio of surface filtration area to volume, the filter performance (measured, e.g., by graph of total flux versus throughput for a given pressure drop), is not as good as a flat filter membrane. The reasons for this difference in performance are currently unclear, but likely factors include the additional resistance of the porous support layers upstream and downstream of the membrane, the pleat packing density (PPD) and possible damage to the membrane during the pleating process. To investigate this, we propose a simplified mathematical model of the filtration within a single pleat. We consider the fluid dynamics through the membrane and support layers, and propose a model by which the pores of the membrane become fouled (i) by particles smaller than the membrane pore size; and (ii) by particles larger than the pores.We present some simulations of our model, investigating how flow and fouling differ between not only flat and pleated membranes, but also for support layers of different permeability profiles. NSF DMS-1261596.

  4. Transferable coarse-grained model for perfluorosulfonic acid polymer membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuo, An-Tsung; Okazaki, Susumu; Shinoda, Wataru

    2017-09-01

    Perfluorosulfonic acid (PFSA) polymer membranes are widely used as proton exchange membranes. Because the structure of the aqueous domain within the PFSA membrane is expected to directly influence proton conductance, many coarse-grained (CG) simulation studies have been performed to investigate the membrane morphology; these studies mostly used phenomenological models, such as dissipative particle dynamics. However, a chemically accurate CG model is required to investigate the morphology in realistic membranes and to provide a concrete molecular design. Here, we attempt to construct a predictive CG model for the structure and morphology of PFSA membranes that is compatible with the Sinoda-DeVane-Klein (SDK) CG water model [Shinoda et al., Mol. Simul. 33, 27 (2007)]. First, we extended the parameter set for the SDK CG force field to examine a hydrated PFSA membrane based on thermodynamic and structural data from experiments and all-atom (AA) molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. However, a noticeable degradation of the morphology motivated us to improve the structural properties by using the iterative Boltzmann inversion (IBI) approach. Thus, we explored a possible combination of the SDK and IBI approaches to describe the nonbonded interaction. The hybrid SDK/IBI model improved the structural issues of SDK, showing a better agreement with AA-MD in the radial distribution functions. The hybrid SDK/IBI model was determined to reasonably reproduce both the thermodynamic and structural properties of the PFSA membrane for all examined water contents. In addition, the model demonstrated good transferability and has considerable potential for application to realistic long-chained PFSA membranes.

  5. N-3 fatty acids and membrane microdomains: from model membranes to lymphocyte function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaikh, Saame Raza; Teague, Heather

    2012-12-01

    This article summarizes the author's research on fish oil derived n-3 fatty acids, plasma membrane organization and B cell function. We first cover basic model membrane studies that investigated how docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) targeted the organization of sphingolipid-cholesterol enriched lipid microdomains. A key finding here was that DHA had a relatively poor affinity for cholesterol. This work led to a model that predicted DHA acyl chains in cells would manipulate lipid-protein microdomain organization and thereby function. We then review how the predictions of the model were tested with B cells in vitro followed by experiments using mice fed fish oil. These studies reveal a highly complex picture on how n-3 fatty acids target lipid-protein organization and B cell function. Key findings are as follows: (1) n-3 fatty acids target not just the plasma membrane but also endomembrane organization; (2) DHA, but not eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA), disrupts microdomain spatial distribution (i.e. clustering), (3) DHA alters protein lateral organization and (4) changes in membrane organization are accompanied by functional effects on both innate and adaptive B cell function. Altogether, the research over the past 10 years has led to an evolution of the original model on how DHA reorganizes membrane microdomains. The work raises the intriguing possibility of testing the model at the human level to target health and disease. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. There Is No Simple Model of the Plasma Membrane Organization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernardino de la Serna, Jorge; Schütz, Gerhard J.; Eggeling, Christian; Cebecauer, Marek

    2016-01-01

    Ever since technologies enabled the characterization of eukaryotic plasma membranes, heterogeneities in the distributions of its constituents were observed. Over the years this led to the proposal of various models describing the plasma membrane organization such as lipid shells, picket-and-fences, lipid rafts, or protein islands, as addressed in numerous publications and reviews. Instead of emphasizing on one model we in this review give a brief overview over current models and highlight how current experimental work in one or the other way do not support the existence of a single overarching model. Instead, we highlight the vast variety of membrane properties and components, their influences and impacts. We believe that highlighting such controversial discoveries will stimulate unbiased research on plasma membrane organization and functionality, leading to a better understanding of this essential cellular structure. PMID:27747212

  7. There is no simple model of the plasma membrane organisation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge Bernardino De La Serna

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Ever since technologies enabled the characterisation of eukaryotic plasma membranes, heterogeneities in the distributions of its constituents were observed. Over the years this led to the proposal of various models describing the plasma membrane organisation such as lipid shells, picket-and-fences, lipid rafts, or protein islands, as addressed in numerous publications and reviews. Instead of emphasising on one model we in this review give a brief overview over current models and highlight how current experimental work in one or the other way do not support the existence of a single overarching model. Instead, we highlight the vast variety of membrane properties and components, their influences and impacts. We believe that highlighting such controversial discoveries will stimulate unbiased research on plasma membrane organisation and functionality, leading to a better understanding of this essential cellular structure.

  8. Dynamic modeling of ultrafiltration membranes for whey separation processes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Saltık, M.B.; Özkan, Leyla; Jacobs, Marc; Padt, van der Albert

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, we present a control relevant rigorous dynamic model for an ultrafiltration membrane unit in a whey separation process. The model consists of a set of differential algebraic equations and is developed for online model based applications such as model based control and process monitori

  9. Interactions between model bacterial membranes and synthetic antimicrobials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Lihua; Mishra, Abhijit; Som, Abhigyan; Tew, Gregory N.; Wong, Gerard C. L.

    2006-03-01

    Antimicrobial peptides comprise a key component of innate immunity for a wide range of multicellular organisms. It has been shown that natural antimicrobial peptides and their analogs can permeate bacterial membranes selectively. There are a number of proposed models for this action, but the detailed molecular mechanism of the induced membrane permeation remains unclear. We investigate interactions between model bacterial membranes and a prototypical family of phenylene ethynylene-based antimicrobials with controllable hydrophilic and hydrophobic volume fractions, controllable charge placement. Preliminary results from synchrotron small angle x-ray scattering (SAXS) results will be presented.

  10. Methyl-orvinol-Dual activity opioid receptor ligand inhibits gastrointestinal transit and alleviates abdominal pain in the mouse models mimicking diarrhea-predominant irritable bowel syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zielińska, Marta; Jarmuż, Agata; Wasilewski, Andrzej; Cami-Kobeci, Gerta; Husbands, Stephen; Fichna, Jakub

    2017-04-01

    Diarrhea-predominant irritable bowel syndrome (IBS-D) is a functional disorder of the gastrointestinal (GI) tract. The major IBS-D symptoms include diarrhea, abdominal pain and discomfort. High density of opioid receptors (ORs) in the GI tract and their participation in the maintenance of GI homeostasis make ORs ligands an attractive option for developing new anti-IBS-D treatments. The aim of this study was to characterize the effect of methyl-orvinol on the GI motility and secretion and in mouse models mimicking symptoms of IBS-D. In vitro, the effects of methyl-orvinol on electrical field stimulated smooth muscle contractility and epithelial ion transport were characterized in the mouse colon. In vivo, the following tests were used to determine methyl-orvinol effect on mouse GI motility: colonic bead expulsion, whole GI transit and fecal pellet output. An antinociceptive action of methyl-orvinol was assessed in the mouse model of visceral pain induced by mustard oil. Methyl-orvinol (10(-10) to 10(-6)M) inhibited colonic smooth muscle contractions in a concentration-dependent manner. This effect was reversed by naloxone (non-selective opioid antagonist) and β-funaltrexamine (selective MOP antagonist). Experiments with a selective KOP receptor agonist, U50488 revealed that methyl-orvinol is a KOP receptor antagonist in the GI tract. Methyl-orvinol enhanced epithelial ion transport. In vivo, methyl-orvinol inhibited colonic bead expulsion and prolonged GI transit. Methyl-orvinol improved hypermotility and reduced abdominal pain in the mouse models mimicking IBS-D symptoms. Methyl-orvinol could become a promising drug candidate in chronic therapy of functional GI diseases such as IBS-D. Copyright © 2016 Institute of Pharmacology, Polish Academy of Sciences. Published by Elsevier Urban & Partner Sp. z o.o. All rights reserved.

  11. Novel mixed NOP/MOP agonist BU08070 alleviates pain and inhibits gastrointestinal motility in mouse models mimicking diarrhea-predominant irritable bowel syndrome symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobczak, Marta; Cami-Kobeci, Gerta; Sałaga, Maciej; Husbands, Stephen M; Fichna, Jakub

    2014-08-05

    The opioid and nociceptin systems play a crucial role in the maintenance of homeostasis in the gastrointestinal (GI) tract. The aim of this study was to characterize the effect of BU08070, a novel mixed MOP/NOP agonist, on mouse intestinal contractility in vitro and GI motility in vivo in physiological conditions and in animal models mimicking symptoms of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), including diarrhea and abdominal pain. The effect of BU08070 on muscle contractility in vitro was characterized in the ileum and colon. To assess the effect of BU08070 in vivo, the following parameters were assessed: whole GI transit, gastric emptying, geometric center, colonic bead expulsion, fecal pellet output and time to castor oil-induced diarrhea. The antinociceptive activity of BU08070 was characterized in the mustard oil (MO)-induced abdominal pain model and the writhing test, alone and in the presence of MOP and NOP antagonists. in vitro, BU08070 (10(-10)-10(-6) M) inhibited colonic and ileal smooth muscle contractions in a concentration-dependent manner. in vivo, BU08070 prolonged the whole GI transit and inhibited colonic bead expulsion. The antitransit and antidiarrheal effects of BU08070 were observed already at the dose of 0.1 mg/kg (i.p.). BU08070 reversed hypermotility and reduced pain in mouse models mimicking IBS-D symptoms. Our results suggest that BU08070 has a potential of becoming an efficient drug in IBS-D therapy. Here we also validate mixed NOP/MOP receptor targeting as possible future treatment of functional GI diseases.

  12. The effect of sediment mimicking drill cuttings on deep water rhodoliths in a flow-through system: Experimental work and modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Figueiredo, Marcia A O; Eide, Ingvar; Reynier, Marcia; Villas-Bôas, Alexandre B; Tâmega, Frederico T S; Ferreira, Carlos Gustavo; Nilssen, Ingunn; Coutinho, Ricardo; Johnsen, Ståle

    2015-06-15

    The impact of sediment coverage on two rhodolith-forming calcareous algae species collected at 100m water depth off the coast of Brazil was studied in an experimental flow-through system. Natural sediment mimicking drill cuttings with respect to size distribution was used. Sediment coverage and photosynthetic efficiency (maximum quantum yield of charge separation in photosystem II, ϕPSIImax) were measured as functions of light intensity, flow rate and added amount of sediment once a week for nine weeks. Statistical experimental design and multivariate data analysis provided statistically significant regression models which subsequently were used to establish exposure-response relationship for photosynthetic efficiency as function of sediment coverage. For example, at 70% sediment coverage the photosynthetic efficiency was reduced 50% after 1-2weeks of exposure, most likely due to reduced gas exchange. The exposure-response relationship can be used to establish threshold levels and impact categories for environmental monitoring.

  13. Human in vitro 3D co-culture model to engineer vascularized bone-mimicking tissues combining computational tools and statistical experimental approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bersini, Simone; Gilardi, Mara; Arrigoni, Chiara; Talò, Giuseppe; Zamai, Moreno; Zagra, Luigi; Caiolfa, Valeria; Moretti, Matteo

    2016-01-01

    The generation of functional, vascularized tissues is a key challenge for both tissue engineering applications and the development of advanced in vitro models analyzing interactions among circulating cells, endothelium and organ-specific microenvironments. Since vascularization is a complex process guided by multiple synergic factors, it is critical to analyze the specific role that different experimental parameters play in the generation of physiological tissues. Our goals were to design a novel meso-scale model bridging the gap between microfluidic and macro-scale studies, and high-throughput screen the effects of multiple variables on the vascularization of bone-mimicking tissues. We investigated the influence of endothelial cell (EC) density (3-5 Mcells/ml), cell ratio among ECs, mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) and osteo-differentiated MSCs (1:1:0, 10:1:0, 10:1:1), culture medium (endothelial, endothelial + angiopoietin-1, 1:1 endothelial/osteo), hydrogel type (100%fibrin, 60%fibrin+40%collagen), tissue geometry (2 × 2 × 2, 2 × 2 × 5 mm(3)). We optimized the geometry and oxygen gradient inside hydrogels through computational simulations and we analyzed microvascular network features including total network length/area and vascular branch number/length. Particularly, we employed the "Design of Experiment" statistical approach to identify key differences among experimental conditions. We combined the generation of 3D functional tissue units with the fine control over the local microenvironment (e.g. oxygen gradients), and developed an effective strategy to enable the high-throughput screening of multiple experimental parameters. Our approach allowed to identify synergic correlations among critical parameters driving microvascular network development within a bone-mimicking environment and could be translated to any vascularized tissue. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Membraner

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bach, Finn

    2009-01-01

    Notatet giver en kort introduktion til den statiske virkemåde af membraner og membrankonstruktioner......Notatet giver en kort introduktion til den statiske virkemåde af membraner og membrankonstruktioner...

  15. Mesenchymal stem cells enhance ovarian cancer cell infiltration through IL6 secretion in an amniochorionic membrane based 3D model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Touboul Cyril

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The early peritoneal invasion of epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC by tumoral aggregates presents in ascites is a major concern. The role of the microenvironment seems to be important in this process but the lack of adequate models to study cellular interactions between cancer cells and stromal cells does not allow to uncover the molecular pathways involved. Our goal was to study the interactions between ovarian cancer cells (OCC and mesenchymal stem cells (MSC using a 3D model. Methods We used millimetric pieces of amniochorionic membrane - referred to as amniotic membrane scaffold (AMS - to create 3D peritoneal nodules mimicking EOC early invasion. We were able to measure the distribution and the depth of infiltration using confocal microsopy. We extracted MSC from the amniochorionic membrane using the markers CD34-, CD45-, CD73+, CD90+, CD105+ and CD29+ at the Fluorescence Activated Cell Sorting (FACS analysis. We used transwell and wound healing tests to test OCC migration and invasion in vitro. Results Here we show that OCC tumors were located in regions rich in MSC (70%. The tumors infiltrated deeper within AMS in regions rich in MSC (p Conclusions The use of tridimensional models using AMS could be a useful tool to decipher early molecular events in ovarian cancer metastasis. Cytokine inhibitors interrupting the cross-talk between OCCs and MSCs such as IL6 should be investigated as a new therapeutic approach in ovarian cancer.

  16. Necrobiosis lipoidica mimicking cellulitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joshi A

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available A 57-year-old obese patient presented with a 5 month history of tender, indurated, erythematous plaques with superficial ulceration on the right shin. The lesions closely mimicked cellulitis but were unresponsive to antibiotics. Though the patient was not a known diabetic, on investigations she was found to be a diabetic. Histology confirmed the diagnosis of necrobiosis lipoidica. This acutely inflammed presentation of necrobiosis lipoidica is extremely rare.

  17. Modeling and vibration control of an active membrane mirror

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruggiero, Eric J.; Inman, Daniel J.

    2009-09-01

    The future of space satellite technology lies in ultra-large mirrors and radar apertures for significant improvements in imaging and communication bandwidths. The availability of optical-quality membranes drives a parallel effort for structural models that can capture the dominant dynamics of large, ultra-flexible satellite payloads. Unfortunately, the inherent flexibility of membrane mirrors wreaks havoc with the payload's on-orbit stability and maneuverability. One possible means of controlling these undesirable dynamics is by embedding active piezoelectric ceramics near the boundary of the membrane mirror. In doing so, active feedback control can be used to eliminate detrimental vibration, perform static shape control, and evaluate the health of the structure. The overall motivation of the present work is to design a control system using distributed bimorph actuators to eliminate any detrimental vibration of the membrane mirror. As a basis for this study, a piezoceramic wafer was attached in a bimorph configuration near the boundary of a tensioned rectangular membrane sample. A finite element model of the system was developed to capture the relevant system dynamics from 0 to 300 Hz. The finite element model was compared against experimental results, and fair agreement found. Using the validated finite element models, structural control using linear quadratic regulator control techniques was then used to numerically demonstrate effective vibration control. Typical results show that less than 12 V of actuation voltage is required to eliminate detrimental vibration of the membrane samples in less than 15 ms. The functional gains of the active system are also derived and presented. These spatially descriptive control terms dictate favorable regions within the membrane domain for placing sensors and can be used as a design guideline for structural control applications. The results of the present work demonstrate that thin plate theory is an appropriate modeling

  18. Proton exchange membrane fuel cells modeling

    CERN Document Server

    Gao, Fengge; Miraoui, Abdellatif

    2013-01-01

    The fuel cell is a potential candidate for energy storage and conversion in our future energy mix. It is able to directly convert the chemical energy stored in fuel (e.g. hydrogen) into electricity, without undergoing different intermediary conversion steps. In the field of mobile and stationary applications, it is considered to be one of the future energy solutions.Among the different fuel cell types, the proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cell has shown great potential in mobile applications, due to its low operating temperature, solid-state electrolyte and compactness.This book pre

  19. Modeling the Elastic Properties of Lipid Bilayer Membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barry, Edward; Gibaud, Thomas; Zakhary, Mark; Dogic, Zvonimir

    2011-03-01

    Model membranes such as lipid bilayers have been indispensable tools for our understanding of the elastic properties of biological membranes. In this talk, I will introduce a colloidal model for membranes and demonstrate that the physical properties of these colloidal membranes are identical to lipid bilayers. The model system is unique in that the constituent molecules are homogenous and non-amphiphilic, yet their self-assembly into membranes and other hierarchical assemblages, such as a lamellar type phases and chiral ribbons, proceeds spontaneously in solution. Owing to the large size of the constituent molecules, individual molecules can be directly visualized and simultaneous observations at the continuum and molecular lengthscales are used to characterize the behavior of model membranes with unprecedented detail. Moreover, once assembled in solution, molecular interactions can be controlled in situ. In particular, the strength of chiral interactions can be varied, leading to fascinating transitions in behavior that resembles the formation of starfish vesicles. These observations point towards the important role of line tension, and have potential implications for phase separated lipid mixtures or lipid rafts.

  20. Stability and rupture of archaebacterial cell membrane: a model study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Shuangyang; Zheng, Fengxian; Zhang, Xianren; Wang, Wenchuan

    2009-01-29

    It is known that the thermoacidophilic archaebacterium Sulfolobus acidocaldarius can grow in hot springs at 65-80 degrees C and live in acidic environments (pH 2-3); however, the origin of its unusual thermal stability remains unclear. In this work, using a vesicle as a model, we study the thermal stability and rupture of archaebacterial cell membrane. We perform a simulation investigation of the structure-property relationship of monolayer membrane formed by bolaform lipids and compare it with that of bilayer membrane formed by monopolar lipids. The origin of the unusually thermal stability of archaebacterial cell and the mechanism for its rupture are presented in molecular details.

  1. Critical Review of Membrane Bioreactor Models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Naessens, W.; Maere, T.; Ratkovich, Nicolas Rios;

    2012-01-01

    modelling. In this paper, the vast literature on hydrodynamic and integrated modelling in MBR is critically reviewed. Hydrodynamic models are used at different scales and focus mainly on fouling and only little on system design/optimisation. Integrated models also focus on fouling although the ones...

  2. Interactions of biocidal guanidine hydrochloride polymer analogs with model membranes: a comparative biophysical study

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhongxin Zhou; Anna Zheng; Jianjiang Zhong

    2011-01-01

    Four synthesized biocidal guanidine hydrochloride polymers with different alkyl chain length,including polyhexamethylene guanidine hydrochloride and its three new analogs,were used to investigate their interactions with phospholipids vesicles mimicking bacterial membrane.Characterization was conducted by using fluorescence dye leakage,isothermal titration calorimetry,and differential scanning calorimetry.The results showed that the gradually lengthened alkyl chain of the polymer increased the biocidal activity,accompanied with the increased dye leakage rate and the increased binding constant and energy change value of polymer-membrane interaction.The polymer-membrane interaction induced the change of pretransition and main phase transition (decreased temperature and increased width) of phospholipids vesicles,suggesting the conformational change in the phospholipids headgroups and disordering in the hydrophobic regions of lipid membranes.The above information revealed that the membrane disruption actions of guanidine hydrochloride polymers are the results of the polymer's strong binding to the phospholipids membrane and the subsequent perturbations of the polar headgroups and hydrophobic core region of the phospholipids membrane.The alkyl chain structure significantly affects the binding constant and energy change value of the polymer-membrane interactions and the perturbation extent of the phospholipids membrane,which lead to the different biocidal activity of the polymer analogs.This work provides important information about the membrane disruption action mechanism of biocidal guanidine hydrochloride polymers.

  3. Modeling Of Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cell Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Mads Pagh

    The objective of this doctoral thesis was to develop reliable steady-state and transient component models suitable to asses-, develop- and optimize proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cell systems. Several components in PEM fuel cell systems were characterized and modeled. The developed component...

  4. Carbon dioxide (hydrogen sulfide) membrane separations and WGS membrane reactor modeling for fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Jin

    Acid-gas removal is of great importance in many environmental or energy-related processes. Compared to current commercial technologies, membrane-based CO2 and H2S capture has the advantages of low energy consumption, low weight and space requirement, simplicity of installation/operation, and high process flexibility. However, the large-scale application of the membrane separation technology is limited by the relatively low transport properties. In this study, CO2 (H2S)-selective polymeric membranes with high permeability and high selectivity have been studied based on the facilitated transport mechanism. The membrane showed facilitated effect for both CO2 and H2S. A CO2 permeability of above 2000 Barrers, a CO2/H2 selectivity of greater than 40, and a CO2/N2 selectivity of greater than 200 at 100--150°C were observed. As a result of higher reaction rate and smaller diffusing compound, the H2S permeability and H2S/H2 selectivity were about three times higher than those properties for CO2. The novel CO2-selective membrane has been applied to capture CO 2 from flue gas and natural gas. In the CO2 capture experiments from a gas mixture with N2 and H2, a permeate CO 2 dry concentration of greater than 98% was obtained by using steam as the sweep gas. In CO2/CH4 separation, decent CO 2 transport properties were obtained with a feed pressure up to 500 psia. With the thin-film composite membrane structure, significant increase on the CO2 flux was achieved with the decrease of the selective layer thickness. With the continuous removal of CO2, CO2-selective water-gas-shift (WGS) membrane reactor is a promising approach to enhance CO conversion and increase the purity of H2 at process pressure under relatively low temperature. The simultaneous reaction and transport process in the countercurrent WGS membrane reactor was simulated by using a one-dimensional non-isothermal model. The modeling results show that a CO concentration of less than 10 ppm and a H2 recovery of greater

  5. Membrane Modeling, Simulation and Optimization for Propylene/Propane Separation

    KAUST Repository

    Alshehri, Ali

    2015-06-01

    Energy efficiency is critical for sustainable industrial growth and the reduction of environmental impacts. Energy consumption by the industrial sector accounts for more than half of the total global energy usage and, therefore, greater attention is focused on enhancing this sector’s energy efficiency. It is predicted that by 2020, more than 20% of today’s energy consumption can be avoided in countries that have effectively implemented an action plan towards efficient energy utilization. Breakthroughs in material synthesis of high selective membranes have enabled the technology to be more energy efficient. Hence, high selective membranes are increasingly replacing conventional energy intensive separation processes, such as distillation and adsorption units. Moreover, the technology offers more special features (which are essential for special applications) and its small footprint makes membrane technology suitable for platform operations (e.g., nitrogen enrichment for oil and gas offshore sites). In addition, its low maintenance characteristics allow the technology to be applied to remote operations. For these reasons, amongst other, the membrane technology market is forecast to reach $16 billion by 2017. This thesis is concerned with the engineering aspects of membrane technology and covers modeling, simulation and optimization of membranes as a stand-alone process or as a unit operation within a hybrid system. Incorporating the membrane model into a process modeling software simplifies the simulation and optimization of the different membrane processes and hybrid configurations, since all other unit operations are pre-configured. Various parametric analyses demonstrated that only the membrane selectivity and transmembrane pressure ratio parameters define a membrane’s ability to accomplish a certain separation task. Moreover, it was found that both membrane selectivity and pressure ratio exhibit a minimum value that is only defined by the feed composition

  6. A Dry Membrane Protection Technique to Allow Surface Acoustic Wave Biosensor Measurements of Biological Model Membrane Approaches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marius Enachescu

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Model membrane approaches have attracted much attention in biomedical sciences to investigate and simulate biological processes. The application of model membrane systems for biosensor measurements is partly restricted by the fact that the integrity of membranes critically depends on the maintenance of an aqueous surrounding, while various biosensors require a preconditioning of dry sensors. This is for example true for the well-established surface acoustic wave (SAW biosensor SAM®5 blue. Here, a simple drying procedure of sensor-supported model membranes is introduced using the protective disaccharide trehalose. Highly reproducible model membranes were prepared by the Langmuir-Blodgett technique, transferred to SAW sensors and supplemented with a trehalose solution. Membrane rehydration after dry incorporation into the SAW device becomes immediately evident by phase changes. Reconstituted model membranes maintain their full functionality, as indicated by biotin/avidin binding experiments. Atomic force microscopy confirmed the morphological invariability of dried and rehydrated membranes. Approximating to more physiological recognition phenomena, the site-directed immobilization of the integrin VLA-4 into the reconstituted model membrane and subsequent VCAM-1 ligand binding with nanomolar affinity were illustrated. This simple drying procedure is a novel way to combine the model membrane generation by Langmuir-Blodgett technique with SAW biosensor measurements, which extends the applicability of SAM®5 blue in biomedical sciences.

  7. Continuous Modeling of Calcium Transport Through Biological Membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jasielec, J. J.; Filipek, R.; Szyszkiewicz, K.; Sokalski, T.; Lewenstam, A.

    2016-08-01

    In this work an approach to the modeling of the biological membranes where a membrane is treated as a continuous medium is presented. The Nernst-Planck-Poisson model including Poisson equation for electric potential is used to describe transport of ions in the mitochondrial membrane—the interface which joins mitochondrial matrix with cellular cytosis. The transport of calcium ions is considered. Concentration of calcium inside the mitochondrion is not known accurately because different analytical methods give dramatically different results. We explain mathematically these differences assuming the complexing reaction inside mitochondrion and the existence of the calcium set-point (concentration of calcium in cytosis below which calcium stops entering the mitochondrion).

  8. Insights into thermophilic archaebacterial membrane stability from simplified models of lipid membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Charles H.; Nie, Huifen; Dokholyan, Nikolay V.

    2007-05-01

    Lipid aggregation into fluid bilayers is an essential process for sustaining life. Simplified models of lipid structure, which allow for long time scales or large length scales not obtainable with all-atom simulations, have recently been developed and show promise for describing lipid dynamics in biological systems. Here, we describe two simplified models, a reduced-lipid model and a bola-lipid model for thermophilic bacterial membranes, developed for use with the rapid discrete molecular dynamics simulation method. In the reduced-lipid model, we represent the lipid chain by a series of three beads interacting through pairwise discrete potentials that model hydrophobic attractions between hydrocarbon tails in implicit solvent. Our phase diagram recapitulates those produced by continuous potential models with similar coarse-grained lipid representations. We also find that phase transition temperatures for our reduced-lipid model are dependent upon the flexibility of the lipid chain, giving an insight into archaebacterial membrane stability and prompting development of a bola-lipid model specific for archaebacteria lipids. With both the reduced-lipid and bola-lipid model, we find that the reduced flexibility inherent in archaebacteria lipids yields more stable bilayers as manifested by increased phase transition temperatures. The results of these studies provide a simulation methodology for lipid molecules in biological systems and show that discrete molecular dynamics is applicable to lipid aggregation and dynamics.

  9. Stability properties of elementary dynamic models of membrane transport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández, Julio A

    2003-01-01

    Living cells are characterized by their capacity to maintain a stable steady state. For instance, cells are able to conserve their volume, internal ionic composition and electrical potential difference across the plasma membrane within values compatible with the overall cell functions. The dynamics of these cellular variables is described by complex integrated models of membrane transport. Some clues for the understanding of the processes involved in global cellular homeostasis may be obtained by the study of the local stability properties of some partial cellular processes. As an example of this approach, I perform, in this study, the neighborhood stability analysis of some elementary integrated models of membrane transport. In essence, the models describe the rate of change of the intracellular concentration of a ligand subject to active and passive transport across the plasma membrane of an ideal cell. The ligand can be ionic or nonionic, and it can affect the cell volume or the plasma membrane potential. The fundamental finding of this study is that, within the physiological range, the steady states are asymptotically stable. This basic property is a necessary consequence of the general forms of the expressions employed to describe the active and passive fluxes of the transported ligand.

  10. Membrane Phospholipid Redistribution in Cytokinesis: A Theoretical Model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mei-Wen AN; Wen-Zhou WU; Wei-Yi CHEN

    2005-01-01

    In cell mitosis, cytokinesis is a major deformation process, during which the site of the contractile ring is determined by the biochemical stimulus from asters of the mitotic apparatus, actin and myosin assembly is related to the motion of membrane phospholipids, and local distribution and arrangement of the microfilament cytoskeleton are different at different cytokinesis stages. Based on the Zinemanas-Nir model, a new model is proposed in this study to simulate the entire process by coupling the biochemical stimulus with the mechanical actions. There were three assumptions in this model: the movements of phospholipid proteins are driven by gradients of biochemical stimulus on the membrane surface; the local assembly of actin and myosin filament depends on the amount of phospholipid proteins at the same location;and the surface tension includes membrane tensions due to both the passive deformation of the membrane and the active contraction of actin filament, which is determined by microfilament redistribution and rearrangement. This model could explain the dynamic movement of microfilaments during cytokinesis and predict cell deformation. The calculated results from this model demonstrated that the reorientation of phospholipid proteins and the redistribution and reorientation of microfilaments may play a crucial role in cell division. This model may better represent the cytokinesis process by the introduction of biochemical stimulus.

  11. Novel orally available salvinorin A analog PR-38 inhibits gastrointestinal motility and reduces abdominal pain in mouse models mimicking irritable bowel syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sałaga, M; Polepally, P R; Sobczak, M; Grzywacz, D; Kamysz, W; Sibaev, A; Storr, M; Do Rego, J C; Zjawiony, J K; Fichna, J

    2014-07-01

    The opioid and cannabinoid systems play a crucial role in multiple physiological processes in the central nervous system and in the periphery. Selective opioid as well as cannabinoid (CB) receptor agonists exert a potent inhibitory action on gastrointestinal (GI) motility and pain. In this study, we examined (in vitro and in vivo) whether PR-38 (2-O-cinnamoylsalvinorin B), a novel analog of salvinorin A, can interact with both systems and demonstrate therapeutic effects. We used mouse models of hypermotility, diarrhea, and abdominal pain. We also assessed the influence of PR-38 on the central nervous system by measurement of motoric parameters and exploratory behaviors in mice. Subsequently, we investigated the pharmacokinetics of PR-38 in mouse blood samples after intraperitoneal and oral administration. PR-38 significantly inhibited mouse colonic motility in vitro and in vivo. Administration of PR-38 significantly prolonged the whole GI transit time, and this effect was mediated by µ- and κ-opioid receptors and the CB1 receptor. PR-38 reversed hypermotility and reduced pain in mouse models mimicking functional GI disorders. These data expand our understanding of the interactions between opioid and cannabinoid systems and their functions in the GI tract. We also provide a novel framework for the development of future potential treatments of functional GI disorders.

  12. [Membrane model of the cupula of the vestibular semicircular canals].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kondrachuk, A V; Shipov, A A; Sirenko, S P

    1987-01-01

    A mathematical model of the time-course variations of the cupula of the semicircular canals of the vestibular apparatus is presented. The model is found to be in good agreement with experimental data which suggests that the cupular matter has viscosity-elasticity properties. Their role in the functioning of the vestibular apparatus is discussed in qualitative terms. The applicability of the membrane model to the description of the time-course variations of the cupula is considered.

  13. Micro pore arrays in free standing cyclic olefin copolymer membranes: fabrication and surface functionalization strategies for in-vitro barrier tissue models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gel, M.; Kandasamy, S.; Cartledge, K.; Be, C. L.; Haylock, D.

    2013-12-01

    In recent years there has been growing interest in micro engineered in-vitro models of tissues and organs. These models are designed to mimic the in-vivo like physiological conditions with a goal to study human physiology in an organ-specific context or to develop in-vitro disease models. One of the challenges in the development of these models is the formation of barrier tissues in which the permeability is controlled locally by the tissues cultured at the interface. In-vitro models of barrier tissues are typically created by generating a monolayer of cells grown on thin porous membranes. This paper reports a robust preparation method for free standing porous cyclic olefin copolymer (COC) membranes. We also demonstrate that gelatin coated membranes facilitate formation of highly confluent monolayer of HUVECs. Membranes with thickness in the range of 2-3 um incorporating micro pores with diameter approximately 20 um were fabricated and integrated with microfluidic channels. The performance of the device was demonstrated with a model system mimicking the endothelial barrier in bone marrow sinusoids.

  14. Modeling and Simulation for Fuel Cell Polymer Electrolyte Membrane

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takahiro Hayashi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We have established methods to evaluate key properties that are needed to commercialize polyelectrolyte membranes for fuel cell electric vehicles such as water diffusion, gas permeability, and mechanical strength. These methods are based on coarse-graining models. For calculating water diffusion and gas permeability through the membranes, the dissipative particle dynamics–Monte Carlo approach was applied, while mechanical strength of the hydrated membrane was simulated by coarse-grained molecular dynamics. As a result of our systematic search and analysis, we can now grasp the direction necessary to improve water diffusion, gas permeability, and mechanical strength. For water diffusion, a map that reveals the relationship between many kinds of molecular structures and diffusion constants was obtained, in which the direction to enhance the diffusivity by improving membrane structure can be clearly seen. In order to achieve high mechanical strength, the molecular structure should be such that the hydrated membrane contains narrow water channels, but these might decrease the proton conductivity. Therefore, an optimal design of the polymer structure is needed, and the developed models reviewed here make it possible to optimize these molecular structures.

  15. Ultrafast spectroscopy of model biological membranes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ghosh, Avishek

    2009-01-01

    In this PhD thesis, I have described the novel time-resolved sum-frequency generation (TR-SFG) spectroscopic technique that I developed during the course of my PhD research and used it study the ultrafast vibrational, structural and orientational dynamics of water molecules at model biological membr

  16. Interaction of Cytotoxic and Cytoprotective Bile Acids with Model Membranes: Influence of the Membrane Composition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esteves, M; Ferreira, M J; Kozica, A; Fernandes, A C; Gonçalves da Silva, A; Saramago, B

    2015-08-18

    To understand the role of bile acids (BAs) in cell function, many authors have investigated their effect on biomembrane models which are less complex systems, but there are still many open questions. The present study aims to contribute for the deepening of the knowledge of the interaction between BAs and model membranes, in particular, focusing on the effect of BA mixtures. The cytotoxic deoxycholic acid (DCA), the cytoprotective ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA), and the equimolar mixture (DCA + UDCA) were investigated. Monolayers and liposomes were taken as model membranes with two lipid compositions: an equimolar mixture of 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (POPC), sphingomyelin (SM), and cholesterol (Chol)) traditionally associated with the formation of lipid rafts and an equimolar POPC/SM binary mixture. The obtained results showed that DCA causes the fluidization of monolayers and bilayers, leading to the eventual rupture of POPC/SM liposomes at high concentration. UDCA may provide a stabilization of POPC/SM membranes but has a negligible effect on the Chol-containing liposomes. In the case of equimolar mixture DCA/UDCA, the interactions depend not only on the lipid composition but also on the design of the experiment. The BA mixture has a greater impact on the monolayers than do pure BAs, suggesting a cooperative DCA-UDCA interaction that enhances the penetration of UDCA in both POPC/SM and POPC/SM/Chol monolayers. For the bilayers, the presence of UDCA in the mixture decreases the disturbing effect of DCA.

  17. A Mathematical Model for Predicting the Life of PEM Fuel Cell Membranes Subjected to Hydration Cycling

    CERN Document Server

    Burlatsky, S F; O'Neill, J; Atrazhev, V V; Varyukhin, A N; Dmitriev, D V; Erikhman, N S

    2013-01-01

    Under typical PEM fuel cell operating conditions, part of membrane electrode assembly is subjected to humidity cycling due to variation of inlet gas RH and/or flow rate. Cyclic membrane hydration/dehydration would cause cyclic swelling/shrinking of the unconstrained membrane. In a constrained membrane, it causes cyclic stress resulting in mechanical failure in the area adjacent to the gas inlet. A mathematical modeling framework for prediction of the lifetime of a PEM FC membrane subjected to hydration cycling is developed in this paper. The model predicts membrane lifetime as a function of RH cycling amplitude and membrane mechanical properties. The modeling framework consists of three model components: a fuel cell RH distribution model, a hydration/dehydration induced stress model that predicts stress distribution in the membrane, and a damage accrual model that predicts membrane life-time. Short descriptions of the model components along with overall framework are presented in the paper. The model was used...

  18. New hybrid model of proton exchange membrane fuel cell

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Rui-min; CAO Guang-yi; ZHU Xin-jian

    2007-01-01

    Model and simulation are good tools for design optimization of fuel cell systems. This paper proposes a new hybrid model of proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC). The hybrid model includes physical component and black-box component. The physical component represents the well-known part of PEMFC, while artificial neural network (ANN) component estimates the poorly known part of PEMFC. The ANN model can compensate the performance of the physical model. This hybrid model is implemented on Matlab/Simulink software. The hybrid model shows better accuracy than that of the physical model and ANN model. Simulation results suggest that the hybrid model can be used as a suitable and accurate model for PEMFC.

  19. Kinetic modelling of coupled transport across biological membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korla, Kalyani; Mitra, Chanchal K

    2014-04-01

    In this report, we have modelled a secondary active co-transporter (symport and antiport), based on the classical kinetics model. Michaelis-Menten model of enzyme kinetics for a single substrate, single intermediate enzyme catalyzed reaction was proposed more than a hundred years ago. However, no single model for the kinetics of co-transport of molecules across a membrane is available in the literature We have made several simplifying assumptions and have followed the basic Michaelis-Menten approach. The results have been simulated using GNU Octave. The results will be useful in general kinetic simulations and modelling.

  20. Mimicking the action of folding chaperones by Hamiltonian replica-exchange molecular dynamics simulations: application in the refinement of de novo models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Hao; Periole, Xavier; Mark, Alan E

    2012-07-01

    The efficiency of using a variant of Hamiltonian replica-exchange molecular dynamics (Chaperone H-replica-exchange molecular dynamics [CH-REMD]) for the refinement of protein structural models generated de novo is investigated. In CH-REMD, the interaction between the protein and its environment, specifically, the electrostatic interaction between the protein and the solvating water, is varied leading to cycles of partial unfolding and refolding mimicking some aspects of folding chaperones. In 10 of the 15 cases examined, the CH-REMD approach sampled structures in which the root-mean-square deviation (RMSD) of secondary structure elements (SSE-RMSD) with respect to the experimental structure was more than 1.0 Å lower than the initial de novo model. In 14 of the 15 cases, the improvement was more than 0.5 Å. The ability of three different statistical potentials to identify near-native conformations was also examined. Little correlation between the SSE-RMSD of the sampled structures with respect to the experimental structure and any of the scoring functions tested was found. The most effective scoring function tested was the DFIRE potential. Using the DFIRE potential, the SSE-RMSD of the best scoring structures was on average 0.3 Å lower than the initial model. Overall the work demonstrates that targeted enhanced-sampling techniques such as CH-REMD can lead to the systematic refinement of protein structural models generated de novo but that improved potentials for the identification of near-native structures are still needed.

  1. Understanding Peptide Dendrimer Interactions with Model Cell Membrane Mimics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lind, Tania Kjellerup

    membranes or highly conserved motifs, effectively making resistance due to mutations less likely to develop and spread. For this we studied the conditions to form supported lipid bilayers with basic systems and further established a protocol for producing biomimetic bacterial model membranes via the vesicle...... fusion method, which presents improved means for studying drug-membrane interactions in the future. The interaction mechanism of a family of dendrimers was examined and in particular one dendrimer (BALY) was extensively studied by the combined use of quartz crystal microbalance, atomic force microscopy...... and neutron reection. The application of several complementary surface-sensitive techniques allowed for systematically addressing the interface-related processes and gain insights into different aspects of the interaction. BALY was found to interact via a uidity-dependent mechanism. It inserted into the outer...

  2. Phase behaviors and membrane properties of model liposomes: Temperature effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Hsing-Lun; Sheng, Yu-Jane; Tsao, Heng-Kwong

    2014-09-01

    The phase behaviors and membrane properties of small unilamellar vesicles have been explored at different temperatures by dissipative particle dynamics simulations. The vesicles spontaneously formed by model lipids exhibit pre-transition from gel to ripple phase and main transition from ripple to liquid phase. The vesicle shape exhibits the faceted feature at low temperature, becomes more sphere-like with increasing temperature, but loses its sphericity at high temperature. As the temperature rises, the vesicle size grows but the membrane thickness declines. The main transition (Tm) can be identified by the inflection point. The membrane structural characteristics are analyzed. The inner and outer leaflets are asymmetric. The length of the lipid tail and area density of the lipid head in both leaflets decrease with increasing temperature. However, the mean lipid volume grows at low temperature but declines at high temperature. The membrane mechanical properties are also investigated. The water permeability grows exponentially with increasing T but the membrane tension peaks at Tm. Both the bending and stretching moduli have their minima near Tm. Those results are consistent with the experimental observations, indicating that the main signatures associated with phase transition are clearly observed in small unilamellar vesicles.

  3. Structural Elucidation of the Cell-Penetrating Penetratin Peptide in Model Membranes at the Atomic Level: Probing Hydrophobic Interactions in the Blood-Brain Barrier.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bera, Swapna; Kar, Rajiv K; Mondal, Susanta; Pahan, Kalipada; Bhunia, Anirban

    2016-09-06

    Cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs) have shown promise in nonpermeable therapeutic drug delivery, because of their ability to transport a variety of cargo molecules across the cell membranes and their noncytotoxicity. Drosophila antennapedia homeodomain-derived CPP penetratin (RQIKIWFQNRRMKWKK), being rich in positively charged residues, has been increasingly used as a potential drug carrier for various purposes. Penetratin can breach the tight endothelial network known as the blood-brain barrier (BBB), permitting treatment of several neurodegenerative maladies, including Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, and Huntington's disease. However, a detailed structural understanding of penetratin and its mechanism of action is lacking. This study defines structural features of the penetratin-derived peptide, DK17 (DRQIKIWFQNRRMKWKK), in several model membranes and describes a membrane-induced conformational transition of the DK17 peptide in these environments. A series of biophysical experiments, including high-resolution nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, provides the three-dimensional structure of DK17 in different membranes mimicking the BBB or total brain lipid extract. Molecular dynamics simulations support the experimental results showing preferential binding of DK17 to particular lipids at atomic resolution. The peptide conserves the structure of the subdomain spanning residues Ile6-Arg11, despite considerable conformational variation in different membrane models. In vivo data suggest that the wild type, not a mutated sequence, enters the central nervous system. Together, these data highlight important structural and functional attributes of DK17 that could be utilized in drug delivery for neurodegenerative disorders.

  4. Mathematical and Computational Modeling of Polymer Exchange Membrane Fuel Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulusoy, Sehribani

    In this thesis a comprehensive review of fuel cell modeling has been given and based on the review, a general mathematical fuel cell model has been developed in order to understand the physical phenomena governing the fuel cell behavior and in order to contribute to the efforts investigating the optimum performance at different operating conditions as well as with different physical parameters. The steady state, isothermal model presented here accounts for the combined effects of mass and species transfer, momentum conservation, electrical current distribution through the gas channels, the electrodes and the membrane, and the electrochemical kinetics of the reactions in the anode and cathode catalyst layers. One of the important features of the model is that it proposes a simpler modified pseudo-homogeneous/agglomerate catalyst layer model which takes the advantage of the simplicity of pseudo-homogenous modeling while taking into account the effects of the agglomerates in the catalyst layer by using experimental geometric parameters published. The computation of the general mathematical model can be accomplished in 3D, 2D and 1D with the proper assumptions. Mainly, there are two computational domains considered in this thesis. The first modeling domain is a 2D Membrane Electrode Assembly (MEA) model including the modified agglomerate/pseudo-homogeneous catalyst layer modeling with consistent treatment of water transport in the MEA while the second domain presents a 3D model with different flow filed designs: straight, stepped and tapered. COMSOL Multiphysics along with Batteries and Fuel Cell Module have been used for 2D & 3D model computations while ANSYS FLUENT PEMFC Module has been used for only 3D two-phase computation. Both models have been validated with experimental data. With 2D MEA model, the effects of temperature and water content of the membrane as well as the equivalent weight of the membrane on the performance have been addressed. 3D COMSOL simulation

  5. Percolative model of proton conductivity of Nafion {sup registered} membranes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Costamagna, Paola; Grosso, Simone; Di Felice, Renzo [DICheP, Department of Chemical and Process Engineering ' G.B. Bonino' , University of Genoa, Via Opera Pia 15, 16145 Genoa (Italy)

    2008-04-01

    A model is proposed for the simulation of Nafion {sup registered} proton conductivity, where it is assumed that proton conduction occurs only in the water present in the membrane pores. Water is considered to be present in the pores due to two different phenomena: adsorption and capillary condensation. In the latter case, the pore is flooded and proton conduction occurs throughout the whole pore section. The conditions under which capillary condensation occurs are simulated in the model through the Kelvin-Cohan equation for condensation. The Kelvin-Cohan equation is a function of RH, temperature and the pore radius; the larger the pore, the higher the RH for which capillary condensation takes place. If the conditions for capillary condensation are not satisfied, then water is present in the pore due to adsorption under the form of a water layer which covers the pore walls and provides a path for proton conduction. In this case, the modified Brunauer-Emmet-Teller (BET) equation has been used in the model to simulate the thickness of the water layer. In both cases of capillary condensation and adsorption, the conductance g of a pore has then been calculated through the formula g = {kappa}S/l, where {kappa} is the proton conductivity of water, S the cross-section of the pore volume which is occupied by water, and l is the pore length. Pores of different size are present in the membrane (data of pore size distribution have been extracted from the literature); connectivity of the water layers present in the different pores is necessary in order to achieve a continuous path of proton conduction through the membrane, which is a percolation problem. To this end, the structure of the membrane pores has been simulated in the model through the effective medium approximation (EMA). The simulation results of proton conductivity of the membrane show good agreement with literature experimental data, even when varying the RH operating conditions. (author)

  6. Confronting dark energy models mimicking {Lambda}CDM epoch with observational constraints: Future cosmological perturbations decay or future Rip?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Astashenok, Artyom V., E-mail: artyom.art@gmail.com [Baltic Federal University of I. Kant, Department of Theoretical Physics, 236041, 14, Nevsky st., Kaliningrad (Russian Federation); Odintsov, Sergei D. [Institucio Catalana de Recerca i Estudis Avancats (ICREA), Barcelona (Spain); Institut de Ciencies de l' Espai (CSIC-IEEC), Campus UAB, Torre C5-Par-2a pl, E-08193 Bellaterra (Barcelona) (Spain); Eurasian International Center for Theor. Physics, Eurasian National University, Astana 010008 (Kazakhstan); Tomsk State Pedagogical University, Tomsk (Russian Federation)

    2013-01-29

    We confront dark energy models which are currently similar to {Lambda}CDM theory with observational data which include the SNe data, matter density perturbations and baryon acoustic oscillations data. DE cosmology under consideration may evolve to Big Rip, type II or type III future singularity, or to Little Rip or Pseudo-Rip universe. It is shown that matter perturbations data define more precisely the possible deviation from {Lambda}CDM model than consideration of SNe data only. The combined data analysis proves that DE models under consideration are as consistent as {Lambda}CDM model. We demonstrate that growth of matter density perturbations may occur at sufficiently small background density but still before the possible disintegration of bound objects (like clusters of galaxies, galaxies, etc.) in Big Rip, type III singularity, Little Rip or Pseudo-Rip universe. This new effect may bring the future universe to chaotic state well before disintegration or Rip.

  7. Clostridium difficile colonization and antibiotics response in PolyFermS continuous model mimicking elderly intestinal fermentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sophie Fehlbaum

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Clostridium difficile (CD, a spore-forming and toxin-producing bacterium, is the main cause for antibiotic-associated diarrhea in the elderly. Here we investigated CD colonization in novel in vitro fermentation models inoculated with immobilized elderly fecal microbiota and the effects of antibiotic treatments. Methods Two continuous intestinal PolyFermS models inoculated with different immobilized elder microbiota were used to investigate selected factors of colonization of CD in proximal (PC, model 1 and transverse-distal (TDC, model 1 and 2 colon conditions. Colonization of two CD strains of different PCR ribotypes, inoculated as vegetative cells (ribotype 001, model 1 or spores (ribotypes 001 and 012, model 2, was tested. Treatments with two antibiotics, ceftriaxone (daily 150 mg L−1 known to induce CD infection in vivo or metronidazole (twice daily 333 mg L−1 commonly used to treat CD, were investigated in TDC conditions (model 2 for their effects on gut microbiota composition (qPCR, 16S pyrosequencing and activity (HPLC, CD spore germination and colonization, and cytotoxin titer (Vero cell assay. Results CD remained undetected after inoculating vegetative cells in PC reactors of model 1, but was shown to colonize TDC reactors of both models, reaching copy numbers of up to log10 8 mL−1 effluent with stable production of toxin correlating with CD cell numbers. Ceftriaxone treatment in TDC reactors showed only small effects on microbiota composition and activity and did not promote CD colonization compared to antibiotic-free control reactor. In contrast, treatment with metronidazole after colonization of CD induced large modifications in the microbiota and decreased CD numbers below the detection limit of the specific qPCR. However, a fast CD recurrence was measured only 2 days after cessation of metronidazole treatment. Conclusions Using our in vitro fermentation models, we demonstrated that stable CD

  8. Mimicking the tumor microenvironment to regulate macrophage phenotype and assessing chemotherapeutic efficacy in embedded cancer cell/macrophage spheroid models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tevis, Kristie M; Cecchi, Ryan J; Colson, Yolonda L; Grinstaff, Mark W

    2017-03-01

    Tumor associated macrophages (TAMs) are critical stromal components intimately involved with the progression, invasion, and metastasis of cancer cells. To address the need for an in vitro system that mimics the clinical observations of TAM localizations and subsequent functional performance, a cancer cell/macrophage spheroid model is described. The central component of the model is a triple negative breast cancer spheroid embedded in a three-dimensional collagen gel. Macrophages are incorporated in two different ways. The first is a heterospheroid, a spheroid containing both tumor cells and macrophages. The heterospheroid mimics the population of TAMs infiltrated into the tumor mass, thus being exposed to hypoxia and metabolic gradients. In the second model, macrophages are diffusely seeded in the collagen surrounding the spheroid, thus modeling TAMs in the cancer stroma. The inclusion of macrophages as a heterospheroid changes the metabolic profile, indicative of synergistic growth. In contrast, macrophages diffusely seeded in the collagen bear the same profile regardless of the presence of a tumor cell spheroid. The macrophages in the heterospheroid secrete EGF, a cytokine critical to tumor/macrophage co-migration, and an EGF inhibitor decreases the metabolic activity of the heterospheroid, which is not observed in the other systems. The increased secretion of IL-10 indicates that the heterospheroid macrophages follow an M2/TAM differentiation pathway. Lastly, the heterospheroid exhibits resistance to paclitaxel. In summary, the collagen embedded heterospheroid model promotes TAM-like characteristics, and will be of utility in cancer biology and drug discovery.

  9. Modeling Of Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cell Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Mads Pagh

    The objective of this doctoral thesis was to develop reliable steady-state and transient component models suitable to asses-, develop- and optimize proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cell systems. Several components in PEM fuel cell systems were characterized and modeled. The developed component...... cell systems. Consequences of indirectly fueling PEM stacks with hydrocarbons using reforming technology were investigated using a PEM stack model including CO poisoning kinetics and a transient Simulink steam reforming system model. Aspects regarding the optimization of PEM fuel cell systems...

  10. Computational model for amoeboid motion: Coupling membrane and cytosol dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moure, Adrian; Gomez, Hector

    2016-10-01

    A distinguishing feature of amoeboid motion is that the migrating cell undergoes large deformations, caused by the emergence and retraction of actin-rich protrusions, called pseudopods. Here, we propose a cell motility model that represents pseudopod dynamics, as well as its interaction with membrane signaling molecules. The model accounts for internal and external forces, such as protrusion, contraction, adhesion, surface tension, or those arising from cell-obstacle contacts. By coupling the membrane and cytosol interactions we are able to reproduce a realistic picture of amoeboid motion. The model results are in quantitative agreement with experiments and show how cells may take advantage of the geometry of their microenvironment to migrate more efficiently.

  11. Longitudinal analysis of osteogenic and angiogenic signaling factors in healing models mimicking atrophic and hypertrophic non-unions in rats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susann Minkwitz

    Full Text Available Impaired bone healing can have devastating consequences for the patient. Clinically relevant animal models are necessary to understand the pathology of impaired bone healing. In this study, two impaired healing models, a hypertrophic and an atrophic non-union, were compared to physiological bone healing in rats. The aim was to provide detailed information about differences in gene expression, vascularization and histology during the healing process. The change from a closed fracture (healing control group to an open osteotomy (hypertrophy group led to prolonged healing with reduced mineralized bridging after 42 days. RT-PCR data revealed higher gene expression of most tested osteogenic and angiogenic factors in the hypertrophy group at day 14. After 42 days a significant reduction of gene expression was seen for Bmp4 and Bambi in this group. The inhibition of angiogenesis by Fumagillin (atrophy group decreased the formation of new blood vessels and led to a non-healing situation with diminished chondrogenesis. RT-PCR results showed an attempt towards overcoming the early perturbance by significant up regulation of the angiogenic regulators Vegfa, Angiopoietin 2 and Fgf1 at day 7 and a further continuous increase of Fgf1, -2 and Angiopoietin 2 over time. However µCT angiograms showed incomplete recovery after 42 days. Furthermore, lower expression values were detected for the Bmps at day 14 and 21. The Bmp antagonists Dan and Twsg1 tended to be higher expressed in the atrophy group at day 42. In conclusion, the investigated animal models are suitable models to mimic human fracture healing complications and can be used for longitudinal studies. Analyzing osteogenic and angiogenic signaling patterns, clear changes in expression were identified between these three healing models, revealing the importance of a coordinated interplay of different factors to allow successful bone healing.

  12. Co-treating with arecoline and 4-nitroquinoline 1-oxide to establish a mouse model mimicking oral tumorigenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Nai-Wen; Pei, Ren-Jeng; Tseng, Hsien-Chang; Yeh, Kun-Tu; Chan, Hsu-Chin; Lee, Miau-Rong; Lin, Chingju; Hsieh, Wen-Tsong; Kao, Ming-Ching; Tsai, Ming-Hsui; Lin, Chin-Fen

    2010-01-05

    The aim of this study was to establish an effective mouse model of oral cancer and to use this model to identify potential markers of oral tumor progression. C57BL/6JNarl mice were treated with arecoline, 4-nitroquinoline 1-oxide (4-NQO), or both arecoline and 4-NQO in high and low doses for 8 weeks to induce oral tumor. The induced oral lesions were observed for 20 weeks to assess the efficiency of cancer induction and survival rate of the mice. In addition, two target proteins that are frequently overexpressed during tongue cancer tumorigenesis, alphaB-crystallin and Hsp27, were examined by immunohistochemical analysis. In mice exposed to 4-NQO (200 microg/mL) and arecoline (500 microg/mL), the tongue lesions showed evidence of hyperplasia, papilloma, dysplasia, and carcinoma, and the lesions were pathologically similar to those lesions in human oral cancer. The tongue tumor incidence rate was 100% in mice exposed to concomitant 4-NQO (200 microg/mL) and arecoline (500 microg/mL) treatment, 57% in mice exposed to 4-NQO only, and 0% in mice exposed to arecoline only. Immunohistochemical analysis demonstrated that, consistent with human studies, alphaB-crystallin and Hsp27 were upregulated in murine oral tumors. In conclusion, we have established a powerful animal model that enables the study of the promoting effects of arecoline on tongue tumorigenesis. Data subsequently attained from this mouse model support a role for alphaB-crystallin and Hsp27 as clinical markers for tumor progression.

  13. KRAS (G12D Cooperates with AML1/ETO to Initiate a Mouse Model Mimicking Human Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shanmin Zhao

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: It has been demonstrated that KRAS mutations represent about 90% of cancer-associated mutations, and that KRAS mutations play an essential role in neoplastic transformation. Cancer-associated RAS mutations occur frequently in acute myeloid leukemia (AML, suggesting a functional role for Ras in leukemogenesis. Methods: We successfully established a mouse model of human leukemia by transplanting bone marrow cells co-transfected with the K-ras (G12D mutation and AML1/ETO fusion protein. Results: Mice transplanted with AML/ETO+KRAS co-transduced cells had the highest mortality rate than mice transplanted with AML/ETO- or KRAS-transduced cells (115d vs. 150d. Upon reaching a terminal disease stage, EGFP-positive cells dominated their spleen, lymph nodes, peripheral blood and central nervous system tissue. Immunophenotyping, cytologic analyses revealed that AML/ETO+KRAS leukemias predominantly contained immature myeloid precursors (EGFP+/c-Kit+/Mac-1-/Gr-1-. Histologic analyses revealed that massive leukemic infiltrations were closely packed in dense sheets that effaced the normal architecture of spleen and thymus in mice transplanted with AML1/ETO + KRAS co-transduced cells. K-ras mRNA and protein expression were upregulated in bone marrow cells of the K-ras group and AML1/ETO + Kras group. The phosphorylation of MEK/ERK was significantly enhanced in the AML1/ETO + Kras group. The similar results of the AML1/ETO + Nras group were consistent with those reported previously. Conclusion: Co-transduction of KrasG12D and AML1/ETO induces acute monoblastic leukemia. Since expression of mutant K-ras alone was insufficient to induce leukemia, this model may be useful for investigating the multi-step leukemogenesis model of human leukemia.

  14. Helfrich model of membrane bending: from Gibbs theory of liquid interfaces to membranes as thick anisotropic elastic layers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campelo, Felix; Arnarez, Clement; Marrink, Siewert J; Kozlov, Michael M

    2014-06-01

    Helfrich model of membrane bending elasticity has been most influential in establishment and development of Soft-Matter Physics of lipid bilayers and biological membranes. Recently, Helfrich theory has been extensively used in Cell Biology to understand the phenomena of shaping, fusion and fission of cellular membranes. The general background of Helfrich theory on the one hand, and the ways of specifying the model parameters on the other, are important for quantitative treatment of particular biologically relevant membrane phenomena. Here we present the origin of Helfrich model within the context of the general Gibbs theory of capillary interfaces, and review the strategies of computing the membrane elastic moduli based on considering a lipid monolayer as a three-dimensional thick layer characterized by trans-monolayer profiles of elastic parameters. We present the results of original computations of these profiles by a state-of-the-art numerical approach.

  15. A model for a liquid membrane separation stage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-02-01

    The coupled mixer-settlers having a common settling zone suggested for use to extract fission products from a conversion reactor blanket are analogues of membrane apparatuses and at a first glance in terms of hydrodynamics do not differ from conventional mixer-settlers. However, the common settling zone complicates both the design solutions and their modelling. For example, different emulsion types can result in mixers and it is not known how this fact will affect phenomena such as separation rates, disperse phase entrainment under conditions close to flooding. For initial studies of the feasibility of the process in principle and the primary optimization of the structure of the transfer scheme one needs to have a model and a program to calculate the statics of a multistage membrane facility of this type.

  16. Simulation modeling of supported lipid membranes - a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirtz, Michael; Kumar, Naresh; Chi, Lifeng

    2014-03-01

    Lipid membranes are of great importance for many biological systems and biotechnological applications. One method to gain a profound understanding of the dynamics in lipid membranes and their interaction with other system components is by modeling these systems by computer simulations. Many different approaches have been undertaken in this endeavor that have led to molecular level insights into the underlying mechanisms of several experimental observations and biological processes with an extremely high temporal resolution. As compared to the free-standing lipid bilayers, there are fewer simulation studies addressing the systems of supported lipid membranes. Nevertheless, these have significantly enhanced our understanding of the behavior of lipid layers employed in applications spanning from biosensors to drug delivery and for biological processes such as the breathing cycle of lung surfactants. In this review, we give an account of the state of the art of methods and applications of the simulations of supported lipid bilayers, interfacial membranes at the air/water interface and on solid surfaces.

  17. Tumoral calcinosis mimicking recurrent osteosarcoma

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Petscavage, Jonelle M; Richardson, Michael L

    2009-01-01

    We report a case of a tumoral calcinosis mimicking the appearance of recurrent osteosarcoma of the left femur and tibia in a 29-year-old woman with a history of osteosarcoma and chronic renal failure...

  18. Ex vivo model for pre-clinical evaluation of dialyzers containing new membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahiout, A; Meinhold, H; Jörres, A; Krieg, R; Kessel, M; Tretzel, J; Baurmeister, U

    1985-01-01

    The ex vivo model which reflects hemodialysis modulating factors during the first twenty minutes of blood membrane interaction, is applicable as a pre-clinical test for new membranes. The biocompatibility of a new cellulosic membrane (MC) proved to be superior to regenerated cellulose and comparable to synthetic membranes such as PAN regarding complement activation.

  19. Towards an in vitro model mimicking the foreign body response: tailoring the surface properties of biomaterials to modulate extracellular matrix

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damanik, Febriyani F. R.; Rothuizen, Tonia C.; van Blitterswijk, Clemens; Rotmans, Joris I.; Moroni, Lorenzo

    2014-09-01

    Despite various studies to minimize host reaction following a biomaterial implantation, an appealing strategy in regenerative medicine is to actively use such an immune response to trigger and control tissue regeneration. We have developed an in vitro model to modulate the host response by tuning biomaterials' surface properties through surface modifications techniques as a new strategy for tissue regeneration applications. Results showed tunable surface topography, roughness, wettability, and chemistry by varying treatment type and exposure, allowing for the first time to correlate the effect of these surface properties on cell attachment, morphology, strength and proliferation, as well as proinflammatory (IL-1β, IL-6) and antiflammatory cytokines (TGF-β1, IL-10) secreted in medium, and protein expression of collagen and elastin. Surface microstructuring, derived from chloroform partial etching, increased surface roughness and oxygen content. This resulted in enhanced cell adhesion, strength and proliferation as well as a balance of soluble factors for optimum collagen and elastin synthesis for tissue regeneration. By linking surface parameters to cell activity, we could determine the fate of the regenerated tissue to create successful soft tissue-engineered replacement.

  20. Randomized clinical trial comparing manual suture and different models of mechanical suture in the mimicking of bariatric surgery in swine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernandes MA

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Marcos AP Fernandes,1 Bruno MT Pereira,2 Sandra M Guimarães,1 Aline Paganelli,3 Carlos Manoel CT Pereira,1 Claudio Sergio Batista4 1Institute of Obesity and Advanced Video Laparoscopic Surgery of Petropolis, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil; 2Division of Trauma, University of Campinas, São Paulo, Brazil; 3Laboratório de Patologia Micron Cell Diagnóstico, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil; 4Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics, Faculty of Medicine of Petropolis, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil Context and objective: Variations in the ability of surgeons served as motivation for the development of devices that, overcoming individual differences, allow the techniques to be properly performed, and of which the end result was the best possible. Every technique must be reproduced reliably by the majority of surgeons for their results to be adopted and recognized as effective. The aim of this study was to compare the results, from the point of view of anatomic pathology, of manual sutures versus mechanical sutures using different models of linear mechanical staplers, in the procedure of gastroenteroanastomosis and enteroanastomosis in swine. Methods: Thirty-six healthy, adult, male Sus scrofa domesticus pigs, weighing between 20.7 and 25.5 kg, were used. The swine were randomly divided into four groups of nine pigs, according to the type of suture employed: group A, manual suture with Polysorb® 3-0 wire; group B, 80-shear linear stapler (Covidien® Gia 8038-S; group C, 75-shear linear stapler (Ethicon® Tlc 75; and group D, 75-shear linear stapler (Resource® Yq 75-3. A temporal study was established on the seventh postoperative day for histopathological analysis, and the degree of inflammation, fibrosis, and newly formed vessels, as well as the presence or absence of granulation tissue, foreign body granuloma, and necrosis were all evaluated qualitatively and semiquantitatively. The results were analyzed statistically. Results: Observations during the histopathological

  1. Modeling and optimization of membrane lifetime in dead-end ultra filtration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zondervan, Edwin; Roffel, Brian

    2008-01-01

    In this paper, a membrane lifetime model is developed and experimentally validated. The lifetime model is based on the Weibull probability density function. The lifetime model can be used to determine an unambiguous characteristic membrane lifetime. Experimental results showed that membrane lifetime

  2. Spherical Boson Stars as Black Hole mimickers

    CERN Document Server

    Guzman, F S; 10.1103/PhysRevD.80.084023

    2010-01-01

    We present spherically symmetric boson stars as black hole mimickers based on the power spectrum of a simple accretion disk model. The free parameters of the boson star are the mass of the boson and the fourth order self-interaction coefficient in the scalar field potential. We show that even if the mass of the boson is the only free parameter it is possible to find a configuration that mimics the power spectrum of the disk due to a black hole of the same mass. We also show that for each value of the self-interaction a single boson star configuration can mimic a black hole at very different astrophysical scales in terms of the mass of the object and the accretion rate. In order to show that it is possible to distinguish one of our mimickers from a black hole we also study the deflection of light.

  3. Penetration of alkali atoms throughout a graphene membrane: theoretical modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boukhvalov, D W; Virojanadara, C

    2012-03-07

    Theoretical studies of penetration of various alkali atoms (Li, Na, Rb, Cs) throughout a graphene membrane grown on a silicon carbide substrate are reported and compared with recent experimental results. Results of first principles modeling demonstrate a rather low (about 0.8 eV) energy barrier for the formation of temporary defects in the carbon layer required for the penetration of Li at a high concentration of adatoms, a higher (about 2 eV) barrier for Na, and barriers above 4 eV for Rb and Cs. Experiments prove migration of lithium adatoms from the graphene surface to the buffer layer and SiC substrate at room temperature, sodium at 100 °C and impenetrability of the graphene membrane for Rb and Cs. Differences between epitaxial and free-standing graphene for the penetration of alkali ions are also discussed.

  4. Biophysical studies of cholesterol in unsaturated phospholipid model membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Justin Adam

    Cellular membranes contain a staggering diversity of lipids. The lipids are heterogeneously distributed to create regions, or domains, whose physical properties differ from the bulk membrane and play an essential role in modulating the function of resident proteins. Many basic questions pertaining to the formation of these lateral assemblies remain. This research employs model membranes of well-defined composition to focus on the potential role of polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) and their interaction with cholesterol (chol) in restructuring the membrane environment. Omega-3 (n-3) PUFAs are the main bioactive components of fish oil, whose consumption alleviates a variety of health problems by a molecular mechanism that is unclear. We hypothesize that the incorporation of PUFAs into membrane lipids and the effect they have on molecular organization may be, in part, responsible. Chol is a major constituent in the plasma membrane of mammals. It determines the arrangement and collective properties of neighboring lipids, driving the formation of domains via differential affinity for different lipids. The molecular organization of 1-[2H31]palmitoyl-2-eicosapentaenoylphosphatidylcholine (PEPC-d31) and 1-[2H31]palmitoyl-2-docosahexaenoylphosphatidylcholine (PDPC-d31) in membranes with sphingomyelin (SM) and chol (1:1:1 mol) was compared by solid-state 2H NMR spectroscopy. Eicosapentaenoic (EPA) and docosahexaenoic (DHA) acids are the two major n-3 PUFAs found in fish oil, while PEPC-d31 and PDPC-d31 are phospholipids containing the respective PUFAs at the sn-2 position and a perdeuterated palmitic acid at the sn-1 position. Analysis of spectra recorded as a function of temperature indicates that in both cases, formation of PUFA-rich (less ordered) and SM-rich (more ordered) domains occurred. A surprisingly substantial proportion of PUFA was found to infiltrate the more ordered domain. There was almost twice as much DHA (65%) as EPA (30%). The implication is that n-3

  5. Oscillations and multiple steady states in active membrane transport models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vieira, F M; Bisch, P M

    1994-01-01

    The dynamic behavior of some non-linear extensions of the six-state alternating access model for active membrane transport is investigated. We use stoichio-metric network analysis to study the stability of steady states. The bifurcation analysis has been done through standard numerical methods. For the usual six-state model we have proved that there is only one steady state, which is globally asymptotically stable. When we added an autocatalytic step we found self-oscillations. For the competition between a monomer cycle and a dimer cycle, with steps of dimer formation, we have also found self-oscillations. We have also studied models involving the formation of a complex with other molecules. The addition of two steps for formation of a complex of the monomer with another molecule does not alter either the number or the stability of steady states of the basic six-state model. The model which combines the formation of a complex with an autocatalytic step shows both self-oscillations and multiple steady states. The results lead us to conclude that oscillations could be produced by active membrane transport systems if the transport cycle contains a sufficiently large number of steps (six in the present case) and is coupled to at least one autocatalytic reaction,. Oscillations are also predicted when the monomer cycle is coupled to a dimer cycle. In fact, the autocatalytic reaction can be seen as a simplification of the model involving competition between monomer and dimer cycles, which seems to be a more realistic description of biological systems. A self-regulation mechanism of the pumps, related to the multiple stationary states, is expected only for a combined effect of autocatalysis and formation of complexes with other molecules. Within the six-state model this model also leads to oscillation.

  6. Nucleus-staining with biomolecule-mimicking nitrogen-doped carbon dots prepared by a fast neutralization heat strategy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Yan-Fei; Fang, Yang-Wu; Li, Yu-Hao; Li, Wen; Yin, Xue-Bo

    2015-12-11

    Biomolecule-mimicking nitrogen-doped carbon dots (N-Cdots) were synthesized from dopamine by a neutralization heat strategy. Fluorescence imaging of various cells validated their nucleus-staining efficiency. The dopamine-mimicking N-Cdots "trick" nuclear membranes to achieve nuclear localization and imaging.

  7. Membrane dynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bendix, Pól Martin

    2015-01-01

    Current topics include membrane-protein interactions with regard to membrane deformation or curvature sensing by BAR domains. Also, we study the dynamics of membrane tubes of both cells and simple model membrane tubes. Finally, we study membrane phase behavior which has important implications...... for the lateral organization of membranes as wells as for physical properties like bending, permeability and elasticity...

  8. Modelling wastewater treatment in a submerged anaerobic membrane bioreactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spagni, Alessandro; Ferraris, Marco; Casu, Stefania

    2015-01-01

    Mathematical modelling has been widely applied to membrane bioreactor (MBRs) processes. However, to date, very few studies have reported on the application of the anaerobic digestion model N.1 (ADM1) to anaerobic membrane processes. The aim of this study was to evaluate the applicability of the ADM1 to a submerged anaerobic MBR (SAMBR) treating simulated industrial wastewater composed of cheese whey and sucrose. This study demonstrated that the biological processes involved in SAMBRs can be modelled by using the ADM1. Moreover, the results showed that very few modifications of the parameters describing the ADM1 were required to reasonably fit the experimental data. In particular, adaptation to the specific conditions of the coefficients describing the wastewater characterisation and the reduction of the hydrolysis rate of particulate carbohydrate (khyd,ch) from 0.25 d(-1) (as suggested by the ADM1 for high-rate mesophilic reactors) to 0.13 d(-1) were required to fit the experimental data.

  9. Model for probing membrane-cortex adhesion by micropipette aspiration and fluctuation spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Alert, Ricard; Brugués, Jan; Sens, Pierre

    2016-01-01

    We propose a model for membrane-cortex adhesion which couples membrane deformations, hydrodynamics and kinetics of membrane-cortex ligands. In its simplest form, the model gives explicit predictions for the critical pressure for membrane detachment and for the value of adhesion energy. We show that these quantities exhibit a significant dependence on the active acto-myosin stresses. The model provides a simple framework to access quantitative information on cortical activity by means of micropipette experiments. We also extend the model to incorporate fluctuations and show that detailed information on the stability of membrane-cortex coupling can be obtained by a combination of micropipette aspiration and fluctuation spectroscopy measurements.

  10. Time-dependent cell membrane damage under mechanical tension: Experiments and modeling

    OpenAIRE

    Lu, Bo; Chang, Jay Han-Chieh; Tai, Yu-Chong

    2011-01-01

    This paper reports a study of cancer cell membrane damage during filtration caused by cell membrane tension. The membrane tension was induced when cells were captured on a microfabricated parylene-C filter during the constant-pressure-driven filtration. This work includes both experiments and modeling to explore the underlying biomechanics of the cell membrane damage. The developed model not only agrees with our time-dependent cell damage data, but also fits well with previous results on red ...

  11. Fouling of a microfiltration membrane by humic-like substances: a mathematical approach to modelling permeate flux and membrane retention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poorasgari, Eskandar; Farsi, Ali; Christensen, Morten Lykkegaard

    2016-01-01

    Membrane retention of the humic-like substances present in a soluble microbial products (SMP) suspension was studied by using a dead-end filtration system. The SMP suspension was extracted from the sludge of an enhanced biological phosphorus removal-membrane bioreactor. Our results showed that both adsorption and steric retention of the humic-like substances governed their transport through the membrane during the filtration. The adsorption, which followed pseudo-first order kinetics, did not cause substantial decline of permeate flux. The steric retention, on the other hand, formed a gel layer, which in turn led to a major decrease in the flux. The reduction of permeate flux was well predicted by cake filtration theory. Based on the adsorption and the steric retention, a new model was developed for predicting the overall membrane retention of the humic-like substances. The general trend of the modelled overall retention was in partial agreement with the experimental results.

  12. Mathematical modelling of methane steam reforming in a membrane reactor: an isothermal model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Assaf, E.M. [Sao Paulo Univ., Sao Carlos, SP (Brazil). Dept. de Fisico-Quimica; Jesus, C.D.F.; Assaf, J.M. [Sao Carlos Univ., SP (Brazil). Dept. de Engenharia Quimica

    1998-06-01

    A mathematical modelling of one-dimensional, stationary and isothermic membrane reactor for methane steam reforming was developed to compare the maximum yield for methane conversion in this reactor with that in a conventional fixed-bed reactor. Fick`s first law was used to describe the mechanism of hydrogen permeation. The variables studied include: reaction temperature, hydrogen feed flow rate and membrane thickness. The results show that the membrane reactor presents a higher methane conversion yield than the conventional fixed-bed reactor. (author) 16 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.; e-mail: eassaf at iqsc.sc.usp.br; mansur at power.ufscar.br

  13. MATHEMATICAL MODELLING OF METHANE STEAM REFORMING IN A MEMBRANE REACTOR: AN ISOTHERMIC MODEL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E.M. ASSAF

    1998-06-01

    Full Text Available A mathematical modelling of one-dimensional, stationary and isothermic membrane reactor for methane steam reforming was developed to compare the maximum yield for methane conversion in this reactor with that in a conventional fixed-bed reactor. Fick's first law was used to describe the mechanism of hydrogen permeation. The variables studied include: reaction temperature, hydrogen feed flow rate and membrane thickness. The results show that the membrane reactor presents a higher methane conversion yield than the conventional fixed-bed reactor.

  14. Recombinant Dengue virus protein NS2B alters membrane permeability in different membrane models

    OpenAIRE

    León-Juárez, Moisés; Martínez-Castillo, Macario; Shrivastava, Gaurav; García-Cordero, Julio; Villegas-Sepulveda, Nicolás; Mondragón-Castelán, Mónica; Mondragón-Flores, Ricardo; Cedillo-Barrón, Leticia

    2016-01-01

    Background One of the main phenomena occurring in cellular membranes during virus infection is a change in membrane permeability. It has been observed that numerous viral proteins can oligomerize and form structures known as viroporins that alter the permeability of membranes. Previous findings have identified such proteins in cells infected with Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV), a member of the same family that Dengue virus (DENV) belongs to (Flaviviridae). In the present work, we investiga...

  15. Mathematical Model of Natural Gas Desulfurization Based on Membrane Absorption

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang Shuli; Ma Jun; Wang Ganyu; Zhou Heng

    2014-01-01

    Models of mass transfer kinetics combined with mass transfer differential equation and mass transfer resistance equation were established on the basis of double-iflm theory. Mass transfer process of H2S absorption by means of polypro-pylene hydrophobic microporous hollow ifber membrane contactor was simulated using MDEA (N-methyldiethanolamine) as the absorption liquid and corresponding experiments of natural gas desulfurization were performed. The simulation re-sults indicated that the removal rate of hydrogen sulifde showed positive dependence on the absorption liquid concentration and gas pressure. However, the desulfurization rate showed negative dependence on gas lfow. The simulated values were in good agreement with the experimental results. The in-tube concentration of hydrogen sulifde at the same point increased with increase in the gas velocity. Axial concentration of hydrogen sulifde decreased rapidly at the beginning, and the de-crease saw a slowdown during the latter half period. Hydrogen sulifde concentration dropped quickly in the radial direction, and the reduction in the radial direction was weakened with the increase of axial length due to the gradual reduction of hy-drogen sulifde concentration along the tube. The desulfurization rate under given operating conditions can be predicted by this model, and the theoretical basis for membrane module design can also be provided.

  16. Modeling impermeable membranes as acoustic filters for biomedical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goenaga, Miguel A; Juan, Eduardo J

    2006-01-01

    The main purpose of this research project was to explore a mathematical expression that could be used by medical device designers to appropriately select impermeable membranes to isolate acoustic transducers from water, dust, earwax or other foreign material. The sound transmission properties of various types of impermeable membranes were analytically evaluated and compared to experimental measurements. Computer simulations were also performed to estimate the effects of three key membrane parameters: thickness (h), density (p) and sound speed (c), on the membrane's overall acoustic response. Results indicated that membrane thickness and density affect sound transmission the most. Membrane sound speed had minimal effect on sound transmission.

  17. Computer-aided modeling framework – a generic modeling template for catalytic membrane fixed bed reactors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fedorova, Marina; Sin, Gürkan; Gani, Rafiqul

    2013-01-01

    This work focuses on development of computer-aided modeling framework. The framework is a knowledge-based system that is built on a generic modeling language and structured based on workflows for different general modeling tasks. The overall objective of this work is to support the model developers...... and users to generate and test models systematically, efficiently and reliably. In this way, development of products and processes can be faster, cheaper and very efficient. In this contribution, as part of the framework a generic modeling template for the systematic derivation of problem specific catalytic...... membrane fixed bed models is developed. The application of the modeling template is highlighted with a case study related to the modeling of a catalytic membrane reactor coupling dehydrogenation of ethylbenzene with hydrogenation of nitrobenzene....

  18. Liposomal nanocontainers as models for viral infection: monitoring viral genomic RNA transfer through lipid membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilek, Gerhard; Matscheko, Nena M; Pickl-Herk, Angela; Weiss, Victor U; Subirats, Xavier; Kenndler, Ernst; Blaas, Dieter

    2011-08-01

    After uptake into target cells, many nonenveloped viruses undergo conformational changes in the low-pH environment of the endocytic compartment. This results in exposure of amphipathic viral peptides and/or hydrophobic protein domains that are inserted into and either disrupt or perforate the vesicular membranes. The viral nucleic acids thereby gain access to the cytosol and initiate replication. We here demonstrate the in vitro transfer of the single-stranded positive-sense RNA genome of human rhinovirus 2 into liposomes decorated with recombinant very-low-density lipoprotein receptor fragments. Membrane-attached virions were exposed to pH 5.4, mimicking the in vivo pH environment of late endosomes. This triggered the release of the RNA whose arrival in the liposomal lumen was detected via in situ cDNA synthesis by encapsulated reverse transcriptase. Subsequently, cDNA was PCR amplified. At a low ratio between virions and lipids, RNA transfer was positively correlated with virus concentration. However, membranes became leaky at higher virus concentrations, which resulted in decreased cDNA synthesis. In accordance with earlier in vivo data, the RNA passes through the lipid membrane without causing gross damage to vesicles at physiologically relevant virus concentrations.

  19. Pervaporation : membranes and models for the dehydration of ethanol

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spitzen, Johannes Wilhelmus Franciscus

    1988-01-01

    In this thesis the dehydration of ethanol/water mixtures by pervaporation using homogeneous membranes is studied. Both the general transport mechanism as well as the development of highly selective membranes for ethanol/water separation are investigated.

  20. Xanthogranulomatous cholecystitis mimicking gallbladder cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ewelukwa, Ofor; Ali, Omair; Akram, Salma

    2014-05-08

    Xanthogranulomatous cholecystitis (XGC) is a benign, uncommon variant of chronic cholecystitis characterised by focal or diffuse destructive inflammatory process of the gallbladder (GB). Macroscopically, it appears like yellowish tumour-like masses in the wall of the GB. This article reports on a 74-year-old woman with XGC mimicking GB cancer.

  1. Model Checking the Biological Model of Membrane Computing with Probabilistic Symbolic Model Checker by Using Two Biological Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ravie c. Muniyandi

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: Membrane computing formalism has provided better modeling capabilities for biological systems in comparison to conventional mathematical models. Model checking could be used to reason about the biological system in detail and with precision by verifying formally whether membrane computing model meets the properties of the system. Approach: This study was carried to investigate the preservation of properties of two biological systems that had been modeled and simulated in membrane computing by a method of model checking using PRISM. The two biological systems were prey-predator population and signal processing in the legend-receptor networks of protein TGF-ß. Results: The model checking of membrane computing model of the biological systems with five different properties showed that the properties of the biological systems could be preserved in the membrane computing model. Conclusion: Membrane computing model not only provides a better approach in representing and simulating a biological system but also able to sustain the basic properties of the system.

  2. Eicosapentaenoic acid reduces membrane fluidity, inhibits cholesterol domain formation, and normalizes bilayer width in atherosclerotic-like model membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mason, R Preston; Jacob, Robert F; Shrivastava, Sandeep; Sherratt, Samuel C R; Chattopadhyay, Amitabha

    2016-12-01

    Cholesterol crystalline domains characterize atherosclerotic membranes, altering vascular signaling and function. Omega-3 fatty acids reduce membrane lipid peroxidation and subsequent cholesterol domain formation. We evaluated non-peroxidation-mediated effects of eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA), other TG-lowering agents, docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), and other long-chain fatty acids on membrane fluidity, bilayer width, and cholesterol domain formation in model membranes. In membranes prepared at 1.5:1 cholesterol-to-phospholipid (C/P) mole ratio (creating pre-existing domains), EPA, glycyrrhizin, arachidonic acid, and alpha linolenic acid promoted the greatest reductions in cholesterol domains (by 65.5%, 54.9%, 46.8%, and 45.2%, respectively) compared to controls; other treatments had modest effects. EPA effects on cholesterol domain formation were dose-dependent. In membranes with 1:1 C/P (predisposing domain formation), DHA, but not EPA, dose-dependently increased membrane fluidity. DHA also induced cholesterol domain formation without affecting temperature-induced changes in-bilayer unit cell periodicity relative to controls (d-space; 57Å-55Å over 15-30°C). Together, these data suggest simultaneous formation of distinct cholesterol-rich ordered domains and cholesterol-poor disordered domains in the presence of DHA. By contrast, EPA had no effect on cholesterol domain formation and produced larger d-space values relative to controls (60Å-57Å; pmembrane bilayer width, membrane fluidity, and cholesterol crystalline domain formation; suggesting omega-3 fatty acids with differing chain length or unsaturation may differentially influence membrane lipid dynamics and structural organization as a result of distinct phospholipid/sterol interactions.

  3. Derivation of adsorption parameters for nanofiltration membranes using a 1-pK Basic Stern model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Lint, W.B.S.; Benes, Nieck Edwin; Higler, A.P.; Verweij, H.

    2002-01-01

    The ion retention and flux of nanofiltration (NF) membranes are to a large extent determined by the membrane surface charge. This surface charge is in turn strongly influenced by adsorption of ions from the solution onto the membrane material. A 1-pK adsorption model with a Basic Stern electrostatic

  4. The antimicrobial peptide aurein 1.2 disrupts model membranes via the carpet mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez, David I; Le Brun, Anton P; Whitwell, Thomas C; Sani, Marc-Antoine; James, Michael; Separovic, Frances

    2012-12-05

    The membrane interactions of the antimicrobial peptide aurein 1.2 were studied using a range of biophysical techniques to determine the location and the mechanism of action in DMPC (dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine) and DMPC/DMPG (dimyristoylphosphatidylglycerol) model membranes that mimic characteristics of eukaryotic and prokaryotic membranes, respectively. Neutron reflectometry and solid-state NMR revealed subtle changes in membrane structure caused by the peptide. Quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation, vesicle dye leakage and atomic force microscopy measurements were used to investigate the global mode of peptide interaction. Aurein 1.2 displayed an enhanced interaction with the anionic DMPC/DMPG membrane while exhibiting primarily a surface interaction with both types of model membranes, which led to bilayer disruption and membrane lysis. The antimicrobial peptide interaction is consistent with the carpet mechanism for aurein 1.2 with discrete structural changes depending on the type of phospholipid membrane.

  5. Polymer Electrolyte Membrane (PEM) Fuel Cells Modeling and Optimization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhuqian; Wang, Xia; Shi, Zhongying; Zhang, Xinxin; Yu, Fan

    2006-11-01

    Performance of polymer electrolyte membrane (PEM) fuel cells is dependent on operating parameters and designing parameters. Operating parameters mainly include temperature, pressure, humidity and the flow rate of the inlet reactants. Designing parameters include reactants distributor patterns and dimensions, electrodes dimensions, and electrodes properties such as porosity, permeability and so on. This work aims to investigate the effects of various designing parameters on the performance of PEM fuel cells, and the optimum values will be determined under a given operating condition.A three-dimensional steady-state electrochemical mathematical model was established where the mass, fluid and thermal transport processes are considered as well as the electrochemical reaction. A Powell multivariable optimization algorithm will be applied to investigate the optimum values of designing parameters. The objective function is defined as the maximum potential of the electrolyte fluid phase at the membrane/cathode interface at a typical value of the cell voltage. The robustness of the optimum design of the fuel cell under different cell potentials will be investigated using a statistical sensitivity analysis. By comparing with the reference case, the results obtained here provide useful tools for a better design of fuel cells.

  6. Modelling and Fabrication of Micro-SOFC Membrane Structure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brigita ABAKEVIČIENĖ

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Fabrication process of micro-SOFC membrane structure using the bulk micromachining of silicon technique with SiO2 and Si3N4 sacrificial layers is presented in this study. The process involves back side photolithography, magnetron sputtering of platinum thin films, thermal evaporation of YSZ electrolyte, deep reactive ion etching of silicon, and, finally, release of free-standing membrane using CF4/O2 plasma etching.X-ray analysis shows the cubic phase of YSZ electrolyte and platinum electrodes. Modelling of normal stress distribution in the micro-SOFC structure with the Si3N4 sacrificial layer shows that at high temperatures the substrate expands less than the coating, causing tensile stresses in the substrate area next to the coating and compressive stresses in the coating, as the substrate material has a lower coefficient of thermal expansion than the layered Pt/YSZ/Pt coating. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5755/j01.ms.20.2.5585

  7. Modelling and Fabrication of Micro-SOFC Membrane Structure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brigita ABAKEVIČIENĖ

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Fabrication process of micro-SOFC membrane structure using the bulk micromachining of silicon technique with SiO2 and Si3N4 sacrificial layers is presented in this study. The process involves back side photolithography, magnetron sputtering of platinum thin films, thermal evaporation of YSZ electrolyte, deep reactive ion etching of silicon, and, finally, release of free-standing membrane using CF4/O2 plasma etching.X-ray analysis shows the cubic phase of YSZ electrolyte and platinum electrodes. Modelling of normal stress distribution in the micro-SOFC structure with the Si3N4 sacrificial layer shows that at high temperatures the substrate expands less than the coating, causing tensile stresses in the substrate area next to the coating and compressive stresses in the coating, as the substrate material has a lower coefficient of thermal expansion than the layered Pt/YSZ/Pt coating. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5755/j01.ms.20.2.5585

  8. Membrane trafficking in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feyder, Serge; De Craene, Johan-Owen; Bär, Séverine; Bertazzi, Dimitri L; Friant, Sylvie

    2015-01-09

    The yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is one of the best characterized eukaryotic models. The secretory pathway was the first trafficking pathway clearly understood mainly thanks to the work done in the laboratory of Randy Schekman in the 1980s. They have isolated yeast sec mutants unable to secrete an extracellular enzyme and these SEC genes were identified as encoding key effectors of the secretory machinery. For this work, the 2013 Nobel Prize in Physiology and Medicine has been awarded to Randy Schekman; the prize is shared with James Rothman and Thomas Südhof. Here, we present the different trafficking pathways of yeast S. cerevisiae. At the Golgi apparatus newly synthesized proteins are sorted between those transported to the plasma membrane (PM), or the external medium, via the exocytosis or secretory pathway (SEC), and those targeted to the vacuole either through endosomes (vacuolar protein sorting or VPS pathway) or directly (alkaline phosphatase or ALP pathway). Plasma membrane proteins can be internalized by endocytosis (END) and transported to endosomes where they are sorted between those targeted for vacuolar degradation and those redirected to the Golgi (recycling or RCY pathway). Studies in yeast S. cerevisiae allowed the identification of most of the known effectors, protein complexes, and trafficking pathways in eukaryotic cells, and most of them are conserved among eukaryotes.

  9. Membrane Trafficking in the Yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Serge Feyder

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is one of the best characterized eukaryotic models. The secretory pathway was the first trafficking pathway clearly understood mainly thanks to the work done in the laboratory of Randy Schekman in the 1980s. They have isolated yeast sec mutants unable to secrete an extracellular enzyme and these SEC genes were identified as encoding key effectors of the secretory machinery. For this work, the 2013 Nobel Prize in Physiology and Medicine has been awarded to Randy Schekman; the prize is shared with James Rothman and Thomas Südhof. Here, we present the different trafficking pathways of yeast S. cerevisiae. At the Golgi apparatus newly synthesized proteins are sorted between those transported to the plasma membrane (PM, or the external medium, via the exocytosis or secretory pathway (SEC, and those targeted to the vacuole either through endosomes (vacuolar protein sorting or VPS pathway or directly (alkaline phosphatase or ALP pathway. Plasma membrane proteins can be internalized by endocytosis (END and transported to endosomes where they are sorted between those targeted for vacuolar degradation and those redirected to the Golgi (recycling or RCY pathway. Studies in yeast S. cerevisiae allowed the identification of most of the known effectors, protein complexes, and trafficking pathways in eukaryotic cells, and most of them are conserved among eukaryotes.

  10. Acidic phospholipid bicelles: a versatile model membrane system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Struppe, J; Whiles, J A; Vold, R R

    2000-01-01

    With the aim of establishing acidic bicellar solutions as a useful membrane model system, we have used deuterium NMR spectroscopy to investigate the properties of dimyristoyl/dihexanoylphosphatidylcholine (DMPC/DHPC) bicelles containing 25% (w/w in H(2)O) of either dimyristoylphosphatidylserine (DMPS) or dimyristoylphosphatidylglycerol (DMPG). The addition of the acidic lipid component to this lyotropic liquid crystalline system reduces its range of stability because of poor miscibility of the two dimyristoylated phospholipids. Compared to the neutral bicelles, which are stable at pH 4 to pH 7, acidic bicelles are stable only from pH 5.5 to pH 7. Solid-state deuterium NMR analysis of d(54)-DMPC showed similar ordering in neutral and acidic bicelles. Fully deuterated DMPS or DMPG is ordered in a way similar to that of DMPC. Study of the binding of the myristoylated N-terminal 14-residue peptide mu-GSSKSKPKDPSQRR from pp60(nu-src) to both neutral and acidic bicelles shows the utility of these novel membrane mimetics. PMID:10620292

  11. Defective membrane remodeling in neuromuscular diseases: insights from animal models.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Belinda S Cowling

    Full Text Available Proteins involved in membrane remodeling play an essential role in a plethora of cell functions including endocytosis and intracellular transport. Defects in several of them lead to human diseases. Myotubularins, amphiphysins, and dynamins are all proteins implicated in membrane trafficking and/or remodeling. Mutations in myotubularin, amphiphysin 2 (BIN1, and dynamin 2 lead to different forms of centronuclear myopathy, while mutations in myotubularin-related proteins cause Charcot-Marie-Tooth neuropathies. In addition to centronuclear myopathy, dynamin 2 is also mutated in a dominant form of Charcot-Marie-Tooth neuropathy. While several proteins from these different families are implicated in similar diseases, mutations in close homologues or in the same protein in the case of dynamin 2 lead to diseases affecting different tissues. This suggests (1 a common molecular pathway underlying these different neuromuscular diseases, and (2 tissue-specific regulation of these proteins. This review discusses the pathophysiology of the related neuromuscular diseases on the basis of animal models developed for proteins of the myotubularin, amphiphysin, and dynamin families. A better understanding of the common mechanisms between these neuromuscular disorders will lead to more specific health care and therapeutic approaches.

  12. Temperature Driven Annealing of Perforations in Bicellar Model Membranes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nieh, Mu-Ping [University of Connecticut, Storrs; Raghunathan, V.A. [Raman Research Institute, India; Pabst, Georg [Austrian Academy of Sciences, Graz, Austria; Harroun, Thad [Brock University, St. Catharines, ON, Canada; Nagashima, K [University of Toronto, Mississauga, ON, Canada; Morales, H [University of Toronto, Mississauga, ON, Canada; Katsaras, John [ORNL; Macdonald, P [University of Toronto, Mississauga, ON, Canada

    2011-01-01

    Bicellar model membranes composed of 1,2-dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine (DMPC) and 1,2-dihexanoylphosphatidylcholine (DHPC), with a DMPC/DHPC molar ratio of 5, and doped with the negatively charged lipid 1,2-dimyristoylphosphatidylglycerol (DMPG), at DMPG/DMPC molar ratios of 0.02 or 0.1, were examined using small angle neutron scattering (SANS), {sup 31}P NMR, and {sup 1}H pulsed field gradient (PFG) diffusion NMR with the goal of understanding temperature effects on the DHPC-dependent perforations in these self-assembled membrane mimetics. Over the temperature range studied via SANS (300-330 K), these bicellar lipid mixtures exhibited a well-ordered lamellar phase. The interlamellar spacing d increased with increasing temperature, in direct contrast to the decrease in d observed upon increasing temperature with otherwise identical lipid mixtures lacking DHPC. {sup 31}P NMR measurements on magnetically aligned bicellar mixtures of identical composition indicated a progressive migration of DHPC from regions of high curvature into planar regions with increasing temperature, and in accord with the 'mixed bicelle model' (Triba, M. N.; Warschawski, D. E.; Devaux, P. E. Biophys. J.2005, 88, 1887-1901). Parallel PFG diffusion NMR measurements of transbilayer water diffusion, where the observed diffusion is dependent on the fractional surface area of lamellar perforations, showed that transbilayer water diffusion decreased with increasing temperature. A model is proposed consistent with the SANS, {sup 31}P NMR, and PFG diffusion NMR data, wherein increasing temperature drives the progressive migration of DHPC out of high-curvature regions, consequently decreasing the fractional volume of lamellar perforations, so that water occupying these perforations redistributes into the interlamellar volume, thereby increasing the interlamellar spacing.

  13. Temperature driven annealing of perforations in bicellar model membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nieh, Mu-Ping; Raghunathan, V A; Pabst, Georg; Harroun, Thad; Nagashima, Kazuomi; Morales, Hannah; Katsaras, John; Macdonald, Peter

    2011-04-19

    Bicellar model membranes composed of 1,2-dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine (DMPC) and 1,2-dihexanoylphosphatidylcholine (DHPC), with a DMPC/DHPC molar ratio of 5, and doped with the negatively charged lipid 1,2-dimyristoylphosphatidylglycerol (DMPG), at DMPG/DMPC molar ratios of 0.02 or 0.1, were examined using small angle neutron scattering (SANS), (31)P NMR, and (1)H pulsed field gradient (PFG) diffusion NMR with the goal of understanding temperature effects on the DHPC-dependent perforations in these self-assembled membrane mimetics. Over the temperature range studied via SANS (300-330 K), these bicellar lipid mixtures exhibited a well-ordered lamellar phase. The interlamellar spacing d increased with increasing temperature, in direct contrast to the decrease in d observed upon increasing temperature with otherwise identical lipid mixtures lacking DHPC. (31)P NMR measurements on magnetically aligned bicellar mixtures of identical composition indicated a progressive migration of DHPC from regions of high curvature into planar regions with increasing temperature, and in accord with the "mixed bicelle model" (Triba, M. N.; Warschawski, D. E.; Devaux, P. E. Biophys. J.2005, 88, 1887-1901). Parallel PFG diffusion NMR measurements of transbilayer water diffusion, where the observed diffusion is dependent on the fractional surface area of lamellar perforations, showed that transbilayer water diffusion decreased with increasing temperature. A model is proposed consistent with the SANS, (31)P NMR, and PFG diffusion NMR data, wherein increasing temperature drives the progressive migration of DHPC out of high-curvature regions, consequently decreasing the fractional volume of lamellar perforations, so that water occupying these perforations redistributes into the interlamellar volume, thereby increasing the interlamellar spacing.

  14. Multiscale modeling of droplet interface bilayer membrane networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freeman, Eric C; Farimani, Amir B; Aluru, Narayana R; Philen, Michael K

    2015-11-01

    Droplet interface bilayer (DIB) networks are considered for the development of stimuli-responsive membrane-based materials inspired by cellular mechanics. These DIB networks are often modeled as combinations of electrical circuit analogues, creating complex networks of capacitors and resistors that mimic the biomolecular structures. These empirical models are capable of replicating data from electrophysiology experiments, but these models do not accurately capture the underlying physical phenomena and consequently do not allow for simulations of material functionalities beyond the voltage-clamp or current-clamp conditions. The work presented here provides a more robust description of DIB network behavior through the development of a hierarchical multiscale model, recognizing that the macroscopic network properties are functions of their underlying molecular structure. The result of this research is a modeling methodology based on controlled exchanges across the interfaces of neighboring droplets. This methodology is validated against experimental data, and an extension case is provided to demonstrate possible future applications of droplet interface bilayer networks.

  15. Advanced Wastewater Treatment Engineering—Investigating Membrane Fouling in both Rotational and Static Membrane Bioreactor Systems Using Empirical Modelling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parneet Paul

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Advanced wastewater treatment using membranes are popular environmental system processes since they allow reuse and recycling. However, fouling is a key limiting factor and so proprietary systems such as Avanti’s RPU-185 Flexidisks membrane bioreactor (MBR use novel rotating membranes to assist in ameliorating it. In earlier research, this rotating process was studied by creating a simulation model based on first principles and traditional fouling mechanisms. In order to directly compare the potential benefits of this rotational system, this follow-up study was carried out using Avanti’s newly developed static (non-rotating Flexidisks MBR system. The results from operating the static pilot unit were simulated and modelled using the rotational fouling model developed earlier however with rotational switching functions turned off and rotational parameters set to a static mode. The study concluded that a rotating MBR system could increase flux throughput when compared against a similar static system. It is thought that although the slowly rotating spindle induces a weak crossflow shear, it is still able to even out cake build up across the membrane surface, thus reducing the likelihood of localised critical flux being exceeded at the micro level and lessening the potential of rapid trans-membrane pressure increases at the macro level.

  16. Advanced Wastewater Treatment Engineering-Investigating Membrane Fouling in both Rotational and Static Membrane Bioreactor Systems Using Empirical Modelling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, Parneet; Jones, Franck Anderson

    2016-01-05

    Advanced wastewater treatment using membranes are popular environmental system processes since they allow reuse and recycling. However, fouling is a key limiting factor and so proprietary systems such as Avanti's RPU-185 Flexidisks membrane bioreactor (MBR) use novel rotating membranes to assist in ameliorating it. In earlier research, this rotating process was studied by creating a simulation model based on first principles and traditional fouling mechanisms. In order to directly compare the potential benefits of this rotational system, this follow-up study was carried out using Avanti's newly developed static (non-rotating) Flexidisks MBR system. The results from operating the static pilot unit were simulated and modelled using the rotational fouling model developed earlier however with rotational switching functions turned off and rotational parameters set to a static mode. The study concluded that a rotating MBR system could increase flux throughput when compared against a similar static system. It is thought that although the slowly rotating spindle induces a weak crossflow shear, it is still able to even out cake build up across the membrane surface, thus reducing the likelihood of localised critical flux being exceeded at the micro level and lessening the potential of rapid trans-membrane pressure increases at the macro level.

  17. Bilayer Thickness Mismatch Controls Domain Size in Model Membranes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heberle, Frederick A [ORNL; Petruzielo, Robin S [ORNL; Pan, Jianjun [ORNL; Drazba, Paul [ORNL; Kucerka, Norbert [Canadian Neutron Beam Centre and Comelius University (Slovakia); Feigenson, Gerald [Cornell University; Katsaras, John [ORNL

    2013-01-01

    The observation of lateral phase separation in lipid bilayers has received considerable attention, especially in connection to lipid raft phenomena in cells. It is widely accepted that rafts play a central role in cellular processes, notably signal transduction. While micrometer-sized domains are observed with some model membrane mixtures, rafts much smaller than 100 nm beyond the reach of optical microscopy are now thought to exist, both in vitro and in vivo. We have used small-angle neutron scattering, a probe free technique, to measure the size of nanoscopic membrane domains in unilamellar vesicles with unprecedented accuracy. These experiments were performed using a four-component model system containing fixed proportions of cholesterol and the saturated phospholipid 1,2-distearoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DSPC), mixed with varying amounts of the unsaturated phospholipids 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (POPC) and 1,2-dioleoylsn- glycero-3-phosphocholine (DOPC). We find that liquid domain size increases with the extent of acyl chain unsaturation (DOPC:POPC ratio). Furthermore, we find a direct correlation between domain size and the mismatch in bilayer thickness of the coexisting liquid-ordered and liquid-disordered phases, suggesting a dominant role for line tension in controlling domain size. While this result is expected from line tension theories, we provide the first experimental verification in free-floating bilayers. Importantly, we also find that changes in bilayer thickness, which accompany changes in the degree of lipid chain unsaturation, are entirely confined to the disordered phase. Together, these results suggest how the size of functional domains in homeothermic cells may be regulated through changes in lipid composition.

  18. Modeling of interactions between nanoparticles and cell membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ban, Young-Min

    Rapid development of nanotechnology and ability to manufacture materials and devices with nanometer feature size leads to exciting innovations in many areas including the medical and electronic fields. However, the possible health and environmental impacts of manufactured nanomaterials are not fully known. Recent experimental reports suggest that some of the manufactured nanomaterials, such as fullerenes and carbon nanotubes, are highly toxic even in small concentrations. The goal of the current work is to understand the mechanisms responsible for the toxicity of nanomaterials. In the current study coarse-grained molecular dynamics simulations are employed to investigate the interactions between NPs and cellular membranes at a molecular level. One of the possible toxicity mechanisms of the nanomaterials is membrane disruption. Possibility of membrane disruption exposed to the manufactured nanomaterials are examined by considering chemical reactions and non-reactive physical interactions as chemical as well as physical mechanisms. Mechanisms of transport of carbon-based nanoparticles (fullerene and its derivative) across a phospholipid bilayer are investigated. The free energy profile is obtained using constrained simulations. It is shown that the considered nanoparticles are hydrophobic and therefore they tend to reside in the interior of the lipid bilayer. In addition, the dynamics of the membrane fluctuations is significantly affected by the nanoparticles at the bilayer-water interface. The hydrophobic interaction between the particles and membrane core induces the strong coupling between the nanoparticle motion and membrane deformation. It is observed that the considered nanoparticles affect several physical properties of the membrane. The nanoparticles embedded into the membrane interior lead to the membrane softening, which becomes more significant with increase in CNT length and concentration. The lateral pressure profile and membrane energy in the membrane

  19. Network modeling of membrane-based artificial cellular systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freeman, Eric C.; Philen, Michael K.; Leo, Donald J.

    2013-04-01

    Computational models are derived for predicting the behavior of artificial cellular networks for engineering applications. The systems simulated involve the use of a biomolecular unit cell, a multiphase material that incorporates a lipid bilayer between two hydrophilic compartments. These unit cells may be considered building blocks that enable the fabrication of complex electrochemical networks. These networks can incorporate a variety of stimuli-responsive biomolecules to enable a diverse range of multifunctional behavior. Through the collective properties of these biomolecules, the system demonstrates abilities that recreate natural cellular phenomena such as mechanotransduction, optoelectronic response, and response to chemical gradients. A crucial step to increase the utility of these biomolecular networks is to develop mathematical models of their stimuli-responsive behavior. While models have been constructed deriving from the classical Hodgkin-Huxley model focusing on describing the system as a combination of traditional electrical components (capacitors and resistors), these electrical elements do not sufficiently describe the phenomena seen in experiment as they are not linked to the molecular scale processes. From this realization an advanced model is proposed that links the traditional unit cell parameters such as conductance and capacitance to the molecular structure of the system. Rather than approaching the membrane as an isolated parallel plate capacitor, the model seeks to link the electrical properties to the underlying chemical characteristics. This model is then applied towards experimental cases in order that a more complete picture of the underlying phenomena responsible for the desired sensing mechanisms may be constructed. In this way the stimuli-responsive characteristics may be understood and optimized.

  20. A new method for modeling rough membrane surface and calculation of interfacial interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Leihong; Zhang, Meijia; He, Yiming; Chen, Jianrong; Hong, Huachang; Liao, Bao-Qiang; Lin, Hongjun

    2016-01-01

    Membrane fouling control necessitates the establishment of an effective method to assess interfacial interactions between foulants and rough surface membrane. This study proposed a new method which includes a rigorous mathematical equation for modeling membrane surface morphology, and combination of surface element integration (SEI) method and the composite Simpson's approach for assessment of interfacial interactions. The new method provides a complete solution to quantitatively calculate interfacial interactions between foulants and rough surface membrane. Application of this method in a membrane bioreactor (MBR) showed that, high calculation accuracy could be achieved by setting high segment number, and moreover, the strength of three energy components and energy barrier was remarkably impaired by the existence of roughness on the membrane surface, indicating that membrane surface morphology exerted profound effects on membrane fouling in the MBR. Good agreement between calculation prediction and fouling phenomena was found, suggesting the feasibility of this method.

  1. Random walk model of subdiffusion in a system with a thin membrane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kosztołowicz, Tadeusz

    2015-02-01

    We consider in this paper subdiffusion in a system with a thin membrane. The subdiffusion parameters are the same in both parts of the system separated by the membrane. Using the random walk model with discrete time and space variables the probabilities (Green's functions) P(x,t) describing a particle's random walk are found. The membrane, which can be asymmetrical, is characterized by the two probabilities of stopping a random walker by the membrane when it tries to pass through the membrane in both opposite directions. Green's functions are transformed to the system in which the variables are continuous, and then the membrane permeability coefficients are given by special formulas which involve the probabilities mentioned above. From the obtained Green's functions, we derive boundary conditions at the membrane. One of the conditions demands the continuity of a flux at the membrane, but the other one is rather unexpected and contains the Riemann-Liouville fractional time derivative P(x(N)(-),t)=λ(1)P(x(N)(+),t)+λ(2)∂(α/2)P(x(N)(+),t)/∂t(α/2), where λ(1),λ(2) depending on membrane permeability coefficients (λ(1)=1 for a symmetrical membrane), α is a subdiffusion parameter, and x(N) is the position of the membrane. This boundary condition shows that the additional "memory effect," represented by the fractional derivative, is created by the membrane. This effect is also created by the membrane for a normal diffusion case in which α=1.

  2. Experimental and Modeling Studies of the Methane Steam Reforming Reaction at High Pressure in a Ceramic Membrane Reactor

    OpenAIRE

    Hacarlioglu, Pelin

    2007-01-01

    This dissertation describes the preparation of a novel inorganic membrane for hydrogen permeation and its application in a membrane reactor for the study of the methane steam reforming reaction. The investigations include both experimental studies of the membrane permeation mechanism and theoretical modeling of mass transfer through the membrane and simulation of the membrane reactor with 1-D and 2-D models. A hydrothermally stable and hydrogen selective membrane composed of silica and a...

  3. The Fluid-Mosaic Model of Membrane Structure: still relevant to understanding the structure, function and dynamics of biological membranes after more than 40 years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicolson, Garth L

    2014-06-01

    In 1972 the Fluid-Mosaic Membrane Model of membrane structure was proposed based on thermodynamic principals of organization of membrane lipids and proteins and available evidence of asymmetry and lateral mobility within the membrane matrix [S. J. Singer and G. L. Nicolson, Science 175 (1972) 720-731]. After over 40years, this basic model of the cell membrane remains relevant for describing the basic nano-structures of a variety of intracellular and cellular membranes of plant and animal cells and lower forms of life. In the intervening years, however, new information has documented the importance and roles of specialized membrane domains, such as lipid rafts and protein/glycoprotein complexes, in describing the macrostructure, dynamics and functions of cellular membranes as well as the roles of membrane-associated cytoskeletal fences and extracellular matrix structures in limiting the lateral diffusion and range of motion of membrane components. These newer data build on the foundation of the original model and add new layers of complexity and hierarchy, but the concepts described in the original model are still applicable today. In updated versions of the model more emphasis has been placed on the mosaic nature of the macrostructure of cellular membranes where many protein and lipid components are limited in their rotational and lateral motilities in the membrane plane, especially in their natural states where lipid-lipid, protein-protein and lipid-protein interactions as well as cell-matrix, cell-cell and intracellular membrane-associated protein and cytoskeletal interactions are important in restraining the lateral motility and range of motion of particular membrane components. The formation of specialized membrane domains and the presence of tightly packed integral membrane protein complexes due to membrane-associated fences, fenceposts and other structures are considered very important in describing membrane dynamics and architecture. These structures along

  4. Mimicking Dark Matter

    OpenAIRE

    Bel, Lluís

    2017-01-01

    I show that a very simple model in the context of Newtonian physics promoted to a first approximation of general relativity can mimic Dark matter and explain most of its intriguing properties. Namely: i) Dark matter is a halo associated to ordinary matter; ii) Dark matter does not interact with ordinary matter nor with itself; iii) Its influence grows with the size of the aggregate of ordinary matter that is considered, and iv) Dark matter influences the propagation of light.

  5. Protein-lipid interactions in bilayer membranes: a lattice model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pink, D A; Chapman, D

    1979-04-01

    A lattice model has been developed to study the effects of intrinsic membrane proteins upon the thermodynamic properties of a lipid bilayer membrane. We assume that only nearest-neighbor van der Waals and steric interactions are important and that the polar group interactions can be represented by effective pressure-area terms. Phase diagrams, the temperature T(0), which locates the gel-fluid melting, the transition enthalpy, and correlations were calculated by mean field and cluster approximations. Average lipid chain areas and chain areas when the lipid is in a given protein environment were obtained. Proteins that have a "smooth" homogeneous surface ("cholesterol-like") and those that have inhomogeneous surfaces or that bind lipids specifically were considered. We find that T(0) can vary depending upon the interactions and that another peak can appear upon the shoulder of the main peak which reflects the melting of a eutectic mixture. The transition enthalpy decreases generally, as was found before, but when a second peak appears departures from this behavior reflect aspects of the eutectic mixture. We find that proteins have significant nonzero probabilities for being adjacent to one another so that no unbroken "annulus" of lipid necessarily exists around a protein. If T(0) does not increase much, or decreases, with increasing c, then lipids adjacent to a protein cannot all be all-trans on the time scale (10(-7) sec) of our system. Around a protein the lipid correlation depth is about one lipid layer, and this increases with c. Possible consequences of ignoring changes in polar group interactions due to clustering of proteins are discussed.

  6. Opioids Inhibit Angiogenesis in a Chorioallantoic Membrane Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karaman, Haktan; Tufek, Adnan; Karaman, Evren; Tokgoz, Orhan

    2017-02-01

    Angiogenesis is an important characteristic of cancer. Switching from the avascular phase to the vascular phase is a necessary process for tumor growth. Therefore, research in cancer treatment has focused on angiogenesis as a drug target. Despite the widespread use of opioids to treat pain in patients with cancer, little is known about the effect of these drugs on vascular endothelium and angiogenesis. We aimed to investigate the efficacies of morphine, codeine, and tramadol in 3 different concentrations on angiogenesis in hens' eggs. This is a prospective, observational, controlled, in-vivo animal study. Single academic medical center. This study was conducted on the chorioallantoic membrane (CAM) of fertilized hens' eggs. The efficacies of morphine, codeine, and tramadol in 3 different concentrations were evaluated on angiogenesis in a total of 165 hens' eggs. Statistically significant differences were found between drug-free agarose used as a negative control and concentrations of morphine of 10 µM and 1 µM, a concentration of tramadol of 10 µM, and concentrations of codeine of 10 µM and 1 µM. Concentrations of morphine of 10 µM and 1 µM showed strong antiangiogenic effects. While codeine had strong antiangiogenic effects at high concentrations, at 0.1 µM it was shown to have weak antiangiogenic effects. However, tramadol at a concentration of 10 µM had only weak antiangiogenic effects. This is just a CAM model study. In this study, we tested the effects of 3 different opioid drugs on angiogenesis in 3 different concentrations, and we observed that morphine was a good anti-angiogenic agent, but tramadol and codeine only had anti-angiogenic effects at high doses.Key Words: Morphine, codeine, tramadol, opioid, bevacizumab, chorioallantoic membrane (CAM), angiogenesis.

  7. Resveratrol induces chain interdigitation in DPPC cell membrane model systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Longo, Elena; Ciuchi, Federica; Guzzi, Rita; Rizzuti, Bruno; Bartucci, Rosa

    2016-12-01

    Resveratrol is a natural polyphenol found in various plants with potential therapeutic activity as anti-oxidant, anti-inflammatory, cardioprotective and anti-tumoral. Lipid membranes are among cellular components that are targets of its action. In this work ESR of chain labeled lipids, calorimetry, X-ray diffraction and molecular docking are used to study the interaction of resveratrol with membrane model systems of dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC) as a function of resveratrol concentration (0-30 mol% of the lipid) and temperature (10-50°C). Resveratrol incorporated in DPPC bilayers induces considerable motional restriction at the lipid tail termini, removing the gradient of increasing mobility along the chain found in DPPC bilayers in the gel phase. In contrast, it leaves unperturbed the DPPC chain flexibility profile in the liquid-crystalline phase. At low concentration, resveratrol progressively reduces the pre-transition temperature and eliminates the pre-transition for content ≥5mol%. A reduced cooperativity and a downshift of the main transition temperature are observed, especially at high content. The typical diffraction pattern of DPPC multibilayers in the Lβ' phase is converted to a lamellar pattern with reduced d-spacing of untilted lipid chain in a hexagonal packing at 30 mol% of resveratrol. Molecular docking indicates that the energetically favoured anchoring site is the polar headgroup region, where resveratrol acts as a spacer. The overall results are consistent with the formation in DPPC of an interdigitated Lβi gel phase induced by 30 mol% resveratrol. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Multicystic Hepatocarcinoma Mimicking Liver Abscess

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evangelos Falidas

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The diagnosis of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC became easier in relation to the improved radiological examinations; however, the neoplasm may occur under atypical presentations mimicking other benign or malignant processes. Multicystic HCC mimicking a liver abscess associated with septic-type fever and leukocytosis is rare, has a poor prognosis, and poses diagnostic and therapeutic dilemmas. We present the case of an 80-year-old patient, who presented with fever, leukocytosis, and large cystic masses involving right and left lobes of the liver initially considered abscesses and finally diagnosed as HCC after open drainage and liver biopsy. Although the patient died on the tenth postoperative day due to pulmonary oedema, the authors emphasize the high index of suspicion needed in the diagnosis of this unusual presentation of HCC.

  9. Molecular Modeling of Interfacial Proton Transport in Polymer Electrolyte Membranes

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    The proton conductivity of polymer electrolyte membranes (PEMs) plays a crucial role for the performance of polymer electrolyte fuel cells (PEFCs). High hydration of Nafion-like membranes is crucial to high proton conduction across the PEM, which limits the operation temperature of PEFCs to <100o C. At elevated temperatures (>100o C) and minimal hydration, interfacial proton transport becomes vital for membrane operation. Along with fuel cell systems, interfacial proton conduction is of...

  10. Mimicking Photosynthesis with Electrode-Supported Lipid Nanoassemblies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Mingming; Zhan, Wei

    2016-11-15

    The grand scale, ultimate efficiency, and sustainability of natural photosynthesis have inspired generations of researchers in biomimetic light energy utilization. As an essential and ubiquitous component in all photosynthetic machinery, lipids and their assemblies have long been recognized as powerful molecular scaffolds in building artificial photosynthetic systems. Model lipid bilayers, such as black lipid membranes and liposomes (vesicles), have been extensively used to host natural as well as synthetic photo- and redox-active species, thereby enabling key photosynthetic processes, such as energy transfer and photoinduced electron transfer, to be examined in well-defined, natural-like membrane settings. Despite their long history, these lipid models remain highly relevant and still enjoy wide practice today. In this Account, we share with the reader our recent effort of introducing electrode-supported lipid nanoassemblies as new lipid models into photosynthesis biomimicking. This line of research builds off several solid-supported lipid bilayer architectures established relatively recently by workers in membrane biophysics and reveals important new features that match and sometimes exceed what earlier lipid models are capable of offering. Here, our eight-year exploration unfolds in three sections: (1) New photosynthetic mimics based on solid-supported lipid bilayers. This systematic effort has brought three solid-supported bilayers into artificial photosynthesis research: lipid bilayers supported on indium tin oxide electrodes, hybrid bilayers, and tethered lipid bilayers formed on gold. Quantitative on-electrode deposition of various photo- and redox-active agents, including fullerene, Ru(bpy)3(2+), and porphyrin, is realized via liposomal hosts. Vectorial electron transfer across single lipid-bilayer leaflets is achieved between electron donor/acceptor directionally organized therein, taking advantage of multiple incorporation sites offered by these bilayers

  11. Hypercalcaemia Mimicking STEMI on Electrocardiography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph Donovan

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Acute coronary syndrome is a common cause of presentation to hospital. ST segment elevation on an electrocardiogram (ECG is likely to be cardiac in origin, but in low-risk patients other causes must be ruled out. We describe a case of a man with hypercalcaemia, no evidence of cardiac disease, and ECG changes mimicking acute myocardial infarction. These ECG changes resolved after treatment of the hypercalcaemia.

  12. Aroma Stripping under various Forms of Membrane Distillation Processes: Experiments and modeling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jonsson, Gunnar Eigil

    of MD configurations: Vacuum Membrane Distillation , Sweeping Gas Membrane Distillation , Direct Contact Membrane Distillation and Osmotic Membrane Distillation. The influence of feed temperature and feed flow rate on the permeate flux and concentration factor for different types of aroma compounds have...... been measured for these MD configurations. A general transport model for the flux of water and aroma compounds have been derived and compared with the experimental data. A reasonable agreement between the modelling and the experiments could be obtained. From the modelling it was possible to explain...

  13. Investigating cellular electroporation using planar membrane models and miniaturized devices

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Uitert, van Iris

    2010-01-01

    This thesis focuses on increasing our understanding of the electroporation process. Electroporation is a technique employed to introduce foreign molecules into cells that can normally not pass the cell membrane. By applying a short but high electric field, pores appear in the membrane through which

  14. The Matrix protein M1 from influenza C virus induces tubular membrane invaginations in an in vitro cell membrane model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saletti, David; Radzimanowski, Jens; Effantin, Gregory; Midtvedt, Daniel; Mangenot, Stéphanie; Weissenhorn, Winfried; Bassereau, Patricia; Bally, Marta

    2017-01-01

    Matrix proteins from enveloped viruses play an important role in budding and stabilizing virus particles. In order to assess the role of the matrix protein M1 from influenza C virus (M1-C) in plasma membrane deformation, we have combined structural and in vitro reconstitution experiments with model membranes. We present the crystal structure of the N-terminal domain of M1-C and show by Small Angle X-Ray Scattering analysis that full-length M1-C folds into an elongated structure that associates laterally into ring-like or filamentous polymers. Using negatively charged giant unilamellar vesicles (GUVs), we demonstrate that M1-C full-length binds to and induces inward budding of membrane tubules with diameters that resemble the diameter of viruses. Membrane tubule formation requires the C-terminal domain of M1-C, corroborating its essential role for M1-C polymerization. Our results indicate that M1-C assembly on membranes constitutes the driving force for budding and suggest that M1-C plays a key role in facilitating viral egress. PMID:28120862

  15. Pulsation models for the 0.26M_sun star mimicking RR Lyrae pulsator. Model survey for the new class of variable stars

    CERN Document Server

    Smolec, R; Graczyk, D; Pilecki, B; Gieren, W; Thompson, I; Stepien, K; Karczmarek, P; Konorski, P; Gorski, M; Suchomska, K; Bono, G; Moroni, P G Prada; Nardetto, N

    2012-01-01

    We present non-linear hydrodynamic pulsation models for OGLE-BLG-RRLYR-02792 - a 0.26M_sun pulsator, component of the eclipsing binary system, analysed recently by Pietrzynski et al. The star's light and radial velocity curves mimic that of classical RR Lyrae stars, except for the bump in the middle of the ascending branch of the radial velocity curve. We show that the bump is caused by the 2:1 resonance between the fundamental mode and the second overtone - the same mechanism that causes the Hertzsprung bump progression in classical Cepheids. The models allow to constrain the parameters of the star, in particular to estimate its absolute luminosity (approx 33L_sun) and effective temperature (approx 6970K, close to the blue edge of the instability strip). We conduct a model survey for the new class of low mass pulsators similar to OGLE-BLG-RRLYR-02792 - products of evolution in the binary systems. We compute a grid of models with masses corresponding to half (and less) of the typical mass of RR Lyrae variable...

  16. A Coarse Grained Model for a Lipid Membrane with Physiological Composition and Leaflet Asymmetry.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satyan Sharma

    Full Text Available The resemblance of lipid membrane models to physiological membranes determines how well molecular dynamics (MD simulations imitate the dynamic behavior of cell membranes and membrane proteins. Physiological lipid membranes are composed of multiple types of phospholipids, and the leaflet compositions are generally asymmetric. Here we describe an approach for self-assembly of a Coarse-Grained (CG membrane model with physiological composition and leaflet asymmetry using the MARTINI force field. An initial set-up of two boxes with different types of lipids according to the leaflet asymmetry of mammalian cell membranes stacked with 0.5 nm overlap, reliably resulted in the self-assembly of bilayer membranes with leaflet asymmetry resembling that of physiological mammalian cell membranes. Self-assembly in the presence of a fragment of the plasma membrane protein syntaxin 1A led to spontaneous specific positioning of phosphatidylionositol(4,5bisphosphate at a positively charged stretch of syntaxin consistent with experimental data. An analogous approach choosing an initial set-up with two concentric shells filled with different lipid types results in successful assembly of a spherical vesicle with asymmetric leaflet composition. Self-assembly of the vesicle in the presence of the synaptic vesicle protein synaptobrevin 2 revealed the correct position of the synaptobrevin transmembrane domain. This is the first CG MD method to form a membrane with physiological lipid composition as well as leaflet asymmetry by self-assembly and will enable unbiased studies of the incorporation and dynamics of membrane proteins in more realistic CG membrane models.

  17. Atomic-level description of protein-lipid interactions using an accelerated membrane model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baylon, Javier L; Vermaas, Josh V; Muller, Melanie P; Arcario, Mark J; Pogorelov, Taras V; Tajkhorshid, Emad

    2016-07-01

    Peripheral membrane proteins are structurally diverse proteins that are involved in fundamental cellular processes. Their activity of these proteins is frequently modulated through their interaction with cellular membranes, and as a result techniques to study the interfacial interaction between peripheral proteins and the membrane are in high demand. Due to the fluid nature of the membrane and the reversibility of protein-membrane interactions, the experimental study of these systems remains a challenging task. Molecular dynamics simulations offer a suitable approach to study protein-lipid interactions; however, the slow dynamics of the lipids often prevents sufficient sampling of specific membrane-protein interactions in atomistic simulations. To increase lipid dynamics while preserving the atomistic detail of protein-lipid interactions, in the highly mobile membrane-mimetic (HMMM) model the membrane core is replaced by an organic solvent, while short-tailed lipids provide a nearly complete representation of natural lipids at the organic solvent/water interface. Here, we present a brief introduction and a summary of recent applications of the HMMM to study different membrane proteins, complementing the experimental characterization of the presented systems, and we offer a perspective of future applications of the HMMM to study other classes of membrane proteins. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Membrane proteins edited by J.C. Gumbart and Sergei Noskov.

  18. Study of Raft Domains in Model Membrane of DPPC/PE/Cholesterol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lor, Chai; Hirst, Linda

    2010-10-01

    Raft domains in bilayer membrane are thought to play an important role in many cell functions such as cell signaling or trans-membrane protein activation. Here we use a model membrane consisting of DPPC/PE/cholesterol to examine the structure of membrane rafts and phase interactions. In particular we are interested in lipids containing the highly polyunsaturated fatty acid DHA. We use both atomic force microscopy (AFM) and fluorescence microscopy to obtain information on the structural properties of raft regions and track cholesterol. As expected, we find phase separation of raft regions between saturated and unsaturated lipids. Moreover, we find that the roughness of the domains change with varying cholesterol concentration possibly due to overpacking. This model study provides further understanding of the role of cholesterol in bilayer membrane leading towards a better knowledge of cell membranes.

  19. Immunology of membranous nephropathy: from animal models to humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinico, R A; Mezzina, N; Trezzi, B; Ghiggeri, G M; Radice, A

    2016-02-01

    Membranous nephropathy (MN), the leading cause of nephrotic syndrome in adults, is characterized by the deposition of subepithelial immune deposits that consist mainly of immunoglobulin (Ig)G and complement. Most of the cases are primary or idiopathic (iMN), while only approximately 25% of the cases are secondary to some known disease such as systemic lupus erythematosus, hepatitis B, drugs and malignancies. Most of our knowledge on the pathogenesis of iMN has relied upon old experimental models (i.e. Heymann nephritis) that have shown that immune deposits are formed in situ by the reaction of autoantibodies against the respective podocyte antigen. Recent findings indicate that podocyte proteins also act as an autoantigen in human iMN. The M-type phospholipase A2 receptor (PLA2R) has been identified as the main target antigen, as it can be found in approximately 70% of iMN patients but only rarely in other glomerulonephritides. Podocytes damage in the experimental model of Heymann nephritis is complement-mediated. In humans, the presence of complement within the subepithelial deposits is well established, but IgG4, which does not activate complement by classical or alternative pathways, represents the predominant subclass of IgG anti-PLA2R. Some evidence suggests that IgG4 anti-PLA2R autoantibodies can bind mannan-binding lectin (MBL) and activate the lectin complement pathway. A genetic background for iMN has been demonstrated by genome-wide association studies that have shown highly significant associations of the PLA2R1 and the human leucocyte antigen (HLA)-DQA1 loci with iMN. In addition to their diagnostic value, anti-PLA2R antibodies may be useful to monitor disease activity and predict response to treatment.

  20. Theoretical modeling and experimental validation of transport and separation properties of carbon nanotube electrospun membrane distillation

    KAUST Repository

    Lee, Jung-Gil

    2016-12-27

    Developing a high flux and selective membrane is required to make membrane distillation (MD) a more attractive desalination process. Amongst other characteristics membrane hydrophobicity is significantly important to get high vapor transport and low wettability. In this study, a laboratory fabricated carbon nanotubes (CNTs) composite electrospun (E-CNT) membrane was tested and has showed a higher permeate flux compared to poly(vinylidene fluoride-co-hexafluoropropylene) (PH) electrospun membrane (E-PH membrane) in a direct contact MD (DCMD) configuration. Only 1% and 2% of CNTs incorporation resulted in an enhanced permeate flux with lower sensitivity to feed salinity while treating a 35 and 70 g/L NaCl solutions. Experimental results and the mechanisms of E-CNT membrane were validated by a proposed new step-modeling approach. The increased vapor transport in E-CNT membranes could not be elucidated by an enhancement of mass transfer only at a given physico-chemical properties. However, the theoretical modeling approach considering the heat and mass transfers simultaneously enabled to explain successfully the enhanced flux in the DCMD process using E-CNT membranes. This indicates that both mass and heat transfers improved by CNTs are attributed to the enhanced vapor transport in the E-CNT membrane.

  1. Relating rejection of trace organic contaminants to membrane properties in forward osmosis: measurements, modelling and implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Ming; Nghiem, Long D; Price, William E; Elimelech, Menachem

    2014-02-01

    This study elucidates the relationship between membrane properties and the rejection of trace organic contaminants (TrOCs) in forward osmosis (FO). An asymmetric cellulose triacetate (CTA) and a thin-film composite (TFC) polyamide FO membrane were used for this investigation. The effective average pore radius (rp), selective barrier thickness over porosity parameter (l/ε), surface charge, support layer structural parameter (S), pure water permeability coefficient (A) and salt (NaCl) permeability coefficient (B) of the two membranes were systematically characterised. Results show that measured rejection of TrOCs as a function of permeate water flux can be well described by the pore hindrance transport model. This observation represents the first successful application of this model, which was developed for pressure-driven nanofiltration, to an osmotically-driven membrane process. The rejection of charged TrOCs by the CTA and TFC membranes was high and was governed by both electrostatic repulsion and steric hindrance. The TFC membrane exhibited higher rejection of neutral TrOCs with low molecular weight than the CTA membrane, although the estimated pore size of the TFC membrane (0.42 nm) was slightly larger than that of the CTA membrane (0.37 nm). This higher rejection of neutral TrOCs by the TFC membrane is likely attributed to its active layer properties, namely a more effective active layer structure, as indicated by a larger l/ε parameter, and pore hydration induced by the negative surface charge.

  2. C. elegans as a model for membrane traffic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Ken; Norris, Anne; Sato, Miyuki; Grant, Barth D

    2014-01-01

    The counterbalancing action of the endocytosis and secretory pathways maintains a dynamic equilibrium that regulates the composition of the plasma membrane, allowing it to maintain homeostasis and to change rapidly in response to alterations in the extracellular environment and/or intracellular metabolism. These pathways are intimately integrated with intercellular signaling systems and play critical roles in all cells. Studies in Caenorhabditis elegans have revealed diverse roles of membrane trafficking in physiology and development and have also provided molecular insight into the fundamental mechanisms that direct cargo sorting, vesicle budding, and membrane fisson and fusion. In this review, we summarize progress in understanding membrane trafficking mechanisms derived from work in C. elegans, focusing mainly on work done in non-neuronal cell-types, especially the germline, early embryo, coelomocytes, and intestine.

  3. The molecular face of lipid rafts in model membranes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Risselada, H. Jelger; Marrink, Siewert J.

    2008-01-01

    Cell membranes contain a large number of different lipid species. Such a multicomponent mixture exhibits a complex phase behavior with regions of structural and compositional heterogeneity. Especially domains formed in ternary mixtures, composed of saturated and unsaturated lipids together with

  4. Defective Membrane Remodeling in Neuromuscular Diseases: Insights from Animal Models

    OpenAIRE

    Cowling, Belinda S; Anne Toussaint; Jean Muller; Jocelyn Laporte

    2012-01-01

    Proteins involved in membrane remodeling play an essential role in a plethora of cell functions including endocytosis and intracellular transport. Defects in several of them lead to human diseases. Myotubularins, amphiphysins, and dynamins are all proteins implicated in membrane trafficking and/or remodeling. Mutations in myotubularin, amphiphysin 2 (BIN1), and dynamin 2 lead to different forms of centronuclear myopathy, while mutations in myotubularin-related proteins cause Charcot-Marie-Too...

  5. Decidualized Ovarian Mass Mimicking Malignancy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lufee Wong

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Deciduosis classically occurs in the context of known endometriosis in the pelvis, most commonly in the ovaries, but also in the peritoneum. However, ovarian deciduosis outside the context of endometriosis is rare and makes diagnosis difficult, especially as the sonographic appearance suggests a malignant process. We report a case of decidualized ovarian mass in a patient without prior history of endometriosis that mimicked an ovarian malignancy. MRI may be a useful imaging modality to monitor these lesions and guide management. Consultation with a multidisciplinary team accustomed to such conditions will help to tailor the management to each individual.

  6. Comparison of the Modeling Approach between Membrane Bioreactor and Conventional Activated Sludge Processes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jiang, Tao; Sin, Gürkan; Spanjers, Henri

    2009-01-01

    Activated sludge models (ASM) have been developed and largely applied in conventional activated sludge (CAS) systems. The applicability of ASM to model membrane bioreactors (MBR) and the differences in modeling approaches have not been studied in detail. A laboratory-scale MBR was modeled using ASM...... to the inhibition effect of soluble microbial products (SMP) at elevated concentration. Second, a greater biomass affinity to oxygen and ammonium was found, which was probably related to smaller MBR sludge flocs. Finally, the membrane throughput during membrane backwashing/relaxation can be normalized...

  7. Zonal rate model for stacked membrane chromatography part II: characterizing ion-exchange membrane chromatography under protein retention conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francis, Patrick; von Lieres, Eric; Haynes, Charles

    2012-03-01

    The Zonal Rate Model (ZRM) has previously been shown to accurately account for contributions to elution band broadening, including external flow nonidealities and radial concentration gradients, in ion-exchange membrane (IEXM) chromatography systems operated under nonbinding conditions. Here, we extend the ZRM to analyze and model the behavior of retained proteins by introducing terms for intra-column mass transfer resistances and intrinsic binding kinetics. Breakthrough curve (BTC) data from a scaled-down anion-exchange membrane chromatography module using ovalbumin as a model protein were collected at flow rates ranging from 1.5 to 20 mL min(-1). Through its careful accounting of transport nonidealities within and external to the membrane stack, the ZRM is shown to provide a useful framework for characterizing putative protein binding mechanisms and models, for predicting BTCs and complex elution behavior, including the common observation that the dynamic binding capacity can increase with linear velocity in IEXM systems, and for simulating and scaling separations using IEXM chromatography. Global fitting of model parameters is used to evaluate the performance of the Langmuir, bi-Langmuir, steric mass action (SMA), and spreading-type protein binding models in either correlating or fundamentally describing BTC data. When combined with the ZRM, the bi-Langmuir, and SMA models match the chromatography data, but require physically unrealistic regressed model parameters to do so. In contrast, for this system a spreading-type model is shown to accurately predict column performance while also providing a realistic fundamental explanation for observed trends, including an observed increase in dynamic binding capacity with flow rate.

  8. Pore-scale modeling and simulation of flow, transport, and adsorptive or osmotic effects in membranes: the influence of membrane microstructure

    KAUST Repository

    Calo, Victor M.

    2015-07-17

    The selection of an appropriate membrane for a particular application is a complex and expensive process. Computational modeling can significantly aid membrane researchers and manufacturers in this process. The membrane morphology is highly influential on its efficiency within several applications, but is often overlooked in simulation. Two such applications which are very important in the provision of clean water are forward osmosis and filtration using functionalized micro/ultra/nano-filtration membranes. Herein, we investigate the effect of the membrane morphology in these two applications. First we present results of the separation process using resolved finger- and sponge-like support layers. Second, we represent the functionalization of a typical microfiltration membrane using absorptive pore walls, and illustrate the effect of different microstructures on the reactive process. Such numerical modeling will aid manufacturers in optimizing operating conditions and designing efficient membranes.

  9. Boric acid permeation in forward osmosis membrane processes: modeling, experiments, and implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Xue; Tang, Chuyang Y; Gu, Yangshuo; She, Qianhong; Qi, Saren

    2011-03-15

    Forward osmosis (FO) is attracting increasing interest for its potential applications in desalination. In FO, permeation of contaminants from feed solution into draw solution through the semipermeable membrane can take place simultaneously with water diffusion. Understanding the contaminants transport through and rejection by FO membrane has significant technical implications in the way to separate clean water from the diluted draw solution. In this study, a model was developed to predict boron flux in FO operation. A strong agreement between modeling results and experimental data indicates that the model developed in this study can accurately predict the boron transport through FO membranes. Furthermore, the model can guide the fabrication of improved FO membranes with decreased boron permeability and structural parameter to minimize boron flux. Both theoretical model and experimental results demonstrated that when membrane active layer was facing draw solution, boron flux was substantially greater compared to the other membrane orientation due to more severe internal concentration polarization. In this investigation, for the first time, rejection of contaminants was defined in FO processes. This is critical to compare the membrane performance between different membranes and experimental conditions.

  10. Studies on the interactions of bisphenols with anionic phospholipids of decomposer membranes in model systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broniatowski, Marcin; Sobolewska, Katarzyna; Flasiński, Michał; Wydro, Paweł

    2016-04-01

    Bisphenol A (BPA) and other bisphenols constitute a class of organic pollutants, which because of their estrogenic properties, low dose activity and bioaccumulation pose considerable risk for public health as well as for the environment. Accumulated in the sediment bisphenols can endanger the decomposers' populations being incorporated into their cellular membranes; however, the mechanism of their membrane activity is unknown. Therefore, to study these phenomena we applied anionic phospholipid Langmuir monolayers as simple but versatile models of decomposers biomembranes. Phosphatidylglycerols and cardiolipins are not only the main components of bacterial membranes but also of crucial importance in mitochondrial and thylakoid membranes in eukaryotic cells. In our investigations we applied five compounds of the bisphenol class most commonly detected in the environment. To characterize the bisphenols-model membrane interactions we applied multiple mutually independent methods of physical chemistry; namely: the Langmuir monolayer technique, surface potential measurements, Brewster angle microscopy for the visualization of the monolayers' texture and grazing incidence X-ray diffraction for the discussion of the phospholipids packing within the monolayers. Our studies indicated that all the investigated bisphenols interact with the model membrane, but the strength of the interactions is dependent on the bisphenol structure and hydrophobicity and the fluidity of the model membranes. We proved that bisphenol S often treated as the least toxic BPA analog can also be incorporated to the model membranes changing their structure and fluidity.

  11. Membrane-elasticity model of Coatless vesicle budding induced by ESCRT complexes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bartosz Różycki

    Full Text Available The formation of vesicles is essential for many biological processes, in particular for the trafficking of membrane proteins within cells. The Endosomal Sorting Complex Required for Transport (ESCRT directs membrane budding away from the cytosol. Unlike other vesicle formation pathways, the ESCRT-mediated budding occurs without a protein coat. Here, we propose a minimal model of ESCRT-induced vesicle budding. Our model is based on recent experimental observations from direct fluorescence microscopy imaging that show ESCRT proteins colocalized only in the neck region of membrane buds. The model, cast in the framework of membrane elasticity theory, reproduces the experimentally observed vesicle morphologies with physically meaningful parameters. In this parameter range, the minimum energy configurations of the membrane are coatless buds with ESCRTs localized in the bud neck, consistent with experiment. The minimum energy configurations agree with those seen in the fluorescence images, with respect to both bud shapes and ESCRT protein localization. On the basis of our model, we identify distinct mechanistic pathways for the ESCRT-mediated budding process. The bud size is determined by membrane material parameters, explaining the narrow yet different bud size distributions in vitro and in vivo. Our membrane elasticity model thus sheds light on the energetics and possible mechanisms of ESCRT-induced membrane budding.

  12. Modeling of hydrodynamics in hollow fiber membrane bioreactor for mammalian cells cultivation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. V. Menshutina

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The mathematical modelling in CFD-packages are powerfull instrument for design and calculation of any engineering tasks. CFD-package contains the set of programs that allow to model the different objects behavior based on the mathematical lows. ANSYS Fluent are widely used for modelling of biotechnological and chemical-technological processes. This package is convenient to describe their hydrodynamics. As cell cultivation is one of the actual scientific direction in modern biotechnology ANSYS Fluent was used to create the model of hollow fiber membrane bioreactor. The fibers are hollow cylindrical membrane to be used for cell cultivation. The criterion of process effectiveness for cell growth is full filling of the membrane surface by cells in the bioreactor. While the cell growth the fiber permeability is decreased which effects to feed flow through membrane pores. The specific feature of this process is to ensure such feed flow to deliver the optimal nutrition for the cells on the external membrane surface. The velocity distribution inside the fiber and in all bioreactor as a whole has been calculated based on mass an impulse conservation equations taking into account the mathematical model assumptions. The hydrodynamics analysis in hollow fiber membrane bioreactor is described by the three-dimensional model created in ANSYS Fluent. The specific features of one membrane model are considered and for whole bioreactor too.

  13. An Equivalent Electrical Circuit Model of Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cells Based on Mathematical Modelling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dinh An Nguyen

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Many of the Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cell (PEMFC models proposed in the literature consist of mathematical equations. However, they are not adequately practical for simulating power systems. The proposed model takes into account phenomena such as activation polarization, ohmic polarization, double layer capacitance and mass transport effects present in a PEM fuel cell. Using electrical analogies and a mathematical modeling of PEMFC, the circuit model is established. To evaluate the effectiveness of the circuit model, its static and dynamic performances under load step changes are simulated and compared to the numerical results obtained by solving the mathematical model. Finally, the applicability of our model is demonstrated by simulating a practical system.

  14. Key factors regulating the mass delivery of macromolecules to model cell membranes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Campbell, Richard A.; Watkins, Erik B.; Jagalski, Vivien

    2014-01-01

    We show that both gravity and electrostatics are key factors regulating interactions between model cell membranes and self-assembled liquid crystalline aggregates of dendrimers and phospholipids. The system is a proxy for the trafficking of reservoirs of therapeutic drugs to cell membranes for slow...... diffusion and continuous delivery. Neutron reflectometry measurements were carried out on supported lipid bilayers of varying charge and on hydrophilic silica surfaces. Translocation of the macromolecule across the membrane and adsorption of the lamellar aggregates occur only when the membrane (1...... of the aggregates to activate endocytosis pathways on specific cell types is discussed in the context of targeted drug delivery applications....

  15. Air gap membrane distillation. 2. Model validation and hollow fibre module performance analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Guijt, C.M.; Meindersma, G.W.; Reith, T.; de Haan, A.B.

    2005-01-01

    In this paper the experimental results of counter current flow air gap membrane distillation experiments are presented and compared with predictive model calculations. Measurements were carried out with a cylindrical test module containing a single hollow fibre membrane in the centre and a

  16. Structural models of the membrane anchors of envelope glycoproteins E1 and E2 from pestiviruses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Jimin, E-mail: jimin.wang@yale.edu; Li, Yue; Modis, Yorgo, E-mail: yorgo.modis@yale.edu

    2014-04-15

    The membrane anchors of viral envelope proteins play essential roles in cell entry. Recent crystal structures of the ectodomain of envelope protein E2 from a pestivirus suggest that E2 belongs to a novel structural class of membrane fusion machinery. Based on geometric constraints from the E2 structures, we generated atomic models of the E1 and E2 membrane anchors using computational approaches. The E1 anchor contains two amphipathic perimembrane helices and one transmembrane helix; the E2 anchor contains a short helical hairpin stabilized in the membrane by an arginine residue, similar to flaviviruses. A pair of histidine residues in the E2 ectodomain may participate in pH sensing. The proposed atomic models point to Cys987 in E2 as the site of disulfide bond linkage with E1 to form E1–E2 heterodimers. The membrane anchor models provide structural constraints for the disulfide bonding pattern and overall backbone conformation of the E1 ectodomain. - Highlights: • Structures of pestivirus E2 proteins impose constraints on E1, E2 membrane anchors. • Atomic models of the E1 and E2 membrane anchors were generated in silico. • A “snorkeling” arginine completes the short helical hairpin in the E2 membrane anchor. • Roles in pH sensing and E1–E2 disulfide bond formation are proposed for E1 residues. • Implications for E1 ectodomain structure and disulfide bonding pattern are discussed.

  17. Statistical modelling of the interplay between solute shape and rejection in porous membranes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vinther, Frank; Pinelo, Manuel; Brøns, Morten

    2012-01-01

    membrane, it can be expected that the possibility for a solute particle to enter the membrane pore will only depend upon the relation between such molecular conformation and pore size. The objective of the present study is to use geometric and statistical modelling to determine the effect of particle elongation...

  18. Modelling Meso-Scale Diffusion Processes in Stochastic Fluid Bio-Membranes

    CERN Document Server

    Rafii-Tabar, H

    1999-01-01

    The space-time dynamics of rigid inhomogeneities (inclusions) free to move in a randomly fluctuating fluid bio-membrane is derived and numerically simulated as a function of the membrane shape changes. Both vertically placed (embedded) inclusions and horizontally placed (surface) inclusions are considered. The energetics of the membrane, as a two-dimensional (2D) meso-scale continuum sheet, is described by the Canham-Helfrich Hamiltonian, with the membrane height function treated as a stochastic process. The diffusion parameter of this process acts as the link coupling the membrane shape fluctuations to the kinematics of the inclusions. The latter is described via Ito stochastic differential equation. In addition to stochastic forces, the inclusions also experience membrane-induced deterministic forces. Our aim is to simulate the diffusion-driven aggregation of inclusions and show how the external inclusions arrive at the sites of the embedded inclusions. The model has potential use in such emerging fields as...

  19. Interactions of a Photochromic Spiropyran with Liposome Model Membranes

    KAUST Repository

    Jonsson, Fabian

    2013-02-19

    The interactions between anionic or zwitterionic liposomes and a water-soluble, DNA-binding photochromic spiropyran are studied using UV/vis absorption and linear dichroism (LD) spectroscopy. The spectral characteristics as well as the kinetics of the thermal isomerization process in the absence and presence of the two different liposome types provide information about the environment and whether or not the spiropyran resides in the liposome membrane. By measuring LD on liposomes deformed and aligned by shear flow, further insight is obtained about interaction and binding geometry of the spiropyran at the lipid membranes. We show that the membrane interactions differ between the two types of liposomes used as well as the isomeric forms of the spiropyran photoswitch. © 2013 American Chemical Society.

  20. [Membrane-based photochemical systems as models for photosynthetic cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hurst, J.K.

    1992-01-01

    The objectives of this research are to improve our conceptual view of the ways in which membranes and interfaces can be used to control chemical reactivity. We have focused on understanding three elementary processes that are central to developing membrane-based integrated chemical systems for water photolysis or related photoconversion/photostorage processes. Specifically, we have sought to identify: the influence of interfaces upon charge separation/recombination reactions, pathways for transmembrane charge separation across hydrocarbon bilayer membranes, and mechanisms of water oxidation catalyzed by transition metal coordination complexes. Historically, the chemical dynamics of each of these processes has been poorly understood, with numerous unresolved issues and conflicting viewpoints appearing in the literature. As described in this report our recent research has led to considerable clarification of the underlying reaction mechanisms.

  1. Structural elucidation of the interaction between neurodegenerative disease-related tau protein with model lipid membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Emmalee M.

    A protein's sequence of amino acids determines how it folds. That folded structure is linked to protein function, and misfolding to dysfunction. Protein misfolding and aggregation into beta-sheet rich fibrillar aggregates is connected with over 20 neurodegenerative diseases, including Alzheimer's disease (AD). AD is characterized in part by misfolding, aggregation and deposition of the microtubule associated tau protein into neurofibrillary tangles (NFTs). However, two questions remain: What is tau's fibrillization mechanism, and what is tau's cytotoxicity mechanism? Tau is prone to heterogeneous interactions, including with lipid membranes. Lipids have been found in NFTs, anionic lipid vesicles induced aggregation of the microtubule binding domain of tau, and other protein aggregates induced ion permeability in cells. This evidence prompted our investigation of tau's interaction with model lipid membranes to elucidate the structural perturbations those interactions induced in tau protein and in the membrane. We show that although tau is highly charged and soluble, it is highly surface active and preferentially interacts with anionic membranes. To resolve molecular-scale structural details of tau and model membranes, we utilized X-ray and neutron scattering techniques. X-ray reflectivity indicated tau aggregated at air/water and anionic lipid membrane interfaces and penetrated into membranes. More significantly, membrane interfaces induced tau protein to partially adopt a more compact conformation with density similar to folded protein and ordered structure characteristic of beta-sheet formation. This suggests possible membrane-based mechanisms of tau aggregation. Membrane morphological changes were seen using fluorescence microscopy, and X-ray scattering techniques showed tau completely disrupts anionic membranes, suggesting an aggregate-based cytotoxicity mechanism. Further investigation of protein constructs and a "hyperphosphorylation" disease mimic helped

  2. A Comprehensive Subcellular Proteomic Survey of Salmonella Grown under Phagosome-Mimicking versus Standard Laboratory Conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, Roslyn N.; Sanford, James A.; Park, Jea H.; Deatherage, Brooke L.; Champion, Boyd L.; Smith, Richard D.; Heffron, Fred; Adkins, Joshua N.

    2012-06-01

    Towards developing a systems-level pathobiological understanding of Salmonella enterica, we performed a subcellular proteomic analysis of this pathogen grown under standard laboratory and infection-mimicking conditions in vitro. Analysis of proteins from cytoplasmic, inner membrane, periplasmic, and outer membrane fractions yielded coverage of over 30% of the theoretical proteome. Confident subcellular location could be assigned to over 1000 proteins, with good agreement between experimentally observed location and predicted/known protein properties. Comparison of protein location under the different environmental conditions provided insight into dynamic protein localization and possible moonlighting (multiple function) activities. Notable examples of dynamic localization were the response regulators of two-component regulatory systems (e.g., ArcB, PhoQ). The DNA-binding protein Dps that is generally regarded as cytoplasmic was significantly enriched in the outer membrane for all growth conditions examined, suggestive of moonlighting activities. These observations imply the existence of unknown transport mechanisms and novel functions for a subset of Salmonella proteins. Overall, this work provides a catalog of experimentally verified subcellular protein location for Salmonella and a framework for further investigations using computational modeling.

  3. A Comprehensive Subcellular Proteomic Survey of Salmonella Grown under Phagosome-Mimicking versus Standard Laboratory Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roslyn N. Brown

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Towards developing a systems-level pathobiological understanding of Salmonella enterica, we performed a subcellular proteomic analysis of this pathogen grown under standard laboratory and phagosome-mimicking conditions in vitro. Analysis of proteins from cytoplasmic, inner membrane, periplasmic, and outer membrane fractions yielded coverage of 25% of the theoretical proteome. Confident subcellular location could be assigned to over 1000 proteins, with good agreement between experimentally observed location and predicted/known protein properties. Comparison of protein location under the different environmental conditions provided insight into dynamic protein localization and possible moonlighting (multiple function activities. Notable examples of dynamic localization were the response regulators of two-component regulatory systems (e.g., ArcB and PhoQ. The DNA-binding protein Dps that is generally regarded as cytoplasmic was significantly enriched in the outer membrane for all growth conditions examined, suggestive of moonlighting activities. These observations imply the existence of unknown transport mechanisms and novel functions for a subset of Salmonella proteins. Overall, this work provides a catalog of experimentally verified subcellular protein locations for Salmonella and a framework for further investigations using computational modeling.

  4. Lipid-packing perturbation of model membranes by pH-responsive antimicrobial peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvares, Dayane S; Viegas, Taisa Giordano; Ruggiero Neto, João

    2017-08-29

    The indiscriminate use of conventional antibiotics is leading to an increase in the number of resistant bacterial strains, motivating the search for new compounds to overcome this challenging problem. Antimicrobial peptides, acting only in the lipid phase of membranes without requiring specific membrane receptors as do conventional antibiotics, have shown great potential as possible substituents of these drugs. These peptides are in general rich in basic and hydrophobic residues forming an amphipathic structure when in contact with membranes. The outer leaflet of the prokaryotic cell membrane is rich in anionic lipids, while the surface of the eukaryotic cell is zwitterionic. Due to their positive net charge, many of these peptides are selective to the prokaryotic membrane. Notwithstanding this preference for anionic membranes, some of them can also act on neutral ones, hampering their therapeutic use. In addition to the electrostatic interaction driving peptide adsorption by the membrane, the ability of the peptide to perturb lipid packing is of paramount importance in their capacity to induce cell lysis, which is strongly dependent on electrostatic and hydrophobic interactions. In the present research, we revised the adsorption of antimicrobial peptides by model membranes as well as the perturbation that they induce in lipid packing. In particular, we focused on some peptides that have simultaneously acidic and basic residues. The net charges of these peptides are modulated by pH changes and the lipid composition of model membranes. We discuss the experimental approaches used to explore these aspects of lipid membranes using lipid vesicles and lipid monolayer as model membranes.

  5. Analysis of mass transfer characteristics in a tubular membrane using CFD modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jixiang; Vedantam, Sreepriya; Spanjers, Henri; Nopens, Ingmar; van Lier, Jules B

    2012-10-01

    In contrast to the large amount of research into aerobic membrane bioreactors, little work has been reported on anaerobic membrane bioreactors (AMBRs). As to the application of membrane bioreactors, membrane fouling is a key issue. Membrane fouling generally occurs more seriously in AMBRs than in aerobic membrane bioreactors. However, membrane fouling could be managed through the application of suitable shear stress that can be introduced by the application of a two-phase flow. When the two-phase flow is applied in AMBRs, little is known about the mass transfer characteristics, which is of particular importance, in tubular membranes of AMBRs. In our present work, we have employed fluid dynamic modeling to analyze the mass transfer characteristics in the tubular membrane of a side stream AMBR in which, gas-lift two-phase flow was applied. The modeling indicated that the mass transfer capacity at the membrane surface at the noses of gas bubbles was higher than the mass transfer capacity at the tails of the bubbles, which is in contrast to the results when water instead of sludge is applied. At the given mass transfer rate, the filterability of the sludge was found to have a strong influence on the transmembrane pressure at a steady flux. In addition, the model also showed that the shear stress in the internal space of the tubular membrane was mainly around 20 Pa but could be as high as about 40 Pa due to gas bubble movements. Nonetheless, at these shear stresses a stable particle size distribution was found for sludge particles.

  6. Modeling the improvement of ultrafiltration membrane mass transfer when using biofiltration pretreatment in surface water applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Netcher, Andrea C; Duranceau, Steven J

    2016-03-01

    In surface water treatment, ultrafiltration (UF) membranes are widely used because of their ability to supply safe drinking water. Although UF membranes produce high-quality water, their efficiency is limited by fouling. Improving UF filtrate productivity is economically desirable and has been attempted by incorporating sustainable biofiltration processes as pretreatment to UF with varying success. The availability of models that can be applied to describe the effectiveness of biofiltration on membrane mass transfer are lacking. In this work, UF water productivity was empirically modeled as a function of biofilter feed water quality using either a quadratic or Gaussian relationship. UF membrane mass transfer variability was found to be governed by the dimensionless mass ratio between the alkalinity (ALK) and dissolved organic carbon (DOC). UF membrane productivity was optimized when the biofilter feed water ALK to DOC ratio fell between 10 and 14. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Ice Formation in Model Biological Membranes in the Presence of Cryoprotectors

    CERN Document Server

    Kiselev, M A; Kisselev, A M; Ollivon, M

    2000-01-01

    Ice formation in model biological membranes is studied by SAXS and WAXS in the presence of cryoprotectors: dimethyl sulfoxide and glycerol. Three types of phospholipid membranes: DPPC, DMPC, DSPC are chosen for the investigation as well-studied model biological membranes. A special cryostat is used for sample cooling from 14.1C to -55.4C. The ice formation is only detected by WAXS in binary phospholipid/water and ternary phospholipid/cryoprotector/water systems in the condition of excess solvent. Ice formation in a binary phospholipid/water system creates an abrupt decrease of the membrane repeat distance by delta-d, so-called ice-induced dehydration of intermembrane space. The value of delta-d decreases as the cryoprotector concentration increases. The formation of ice does not influence the membrane structure (delta-d = 0) for cryoprotector mole fractions higher than 0.05.

  8. Free energy difference in indolicidin attraction to eukaryotic and prokaryotic model cell membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeh, In-Chul; Ripoll, Daniel R; Wallqvist, Anders

    2012-03-15

    We analyzed the thermodynamic and structural determinants of indolicidin interactions with eukaryotic and prokaryotic cell membranes using a series of atomistically detailed molecular dynamics simulations. We used quartz-supported bilayers with two different compositions of zwitterionic and anionic phospholipids as model eukaryotic and prokaryotic cell membranes. Indolicidin was preferentially attracted to the model prokaryotic cell membrane in contrast to the weak adsorption on the eukaryotic membrane. The nature of the indolicidin surface adsorption depended on an electrostatic guiding component, an attractive enthalpic component derived from van der Waals interactions, and a balance between entropic factors related to peptide confinement at the interface and counterion release from the bilayer surface. Thus, whereas we attributed the specificity of the indolicidin/membrane interaction to electrostatics, these interactions were not the sole contributors to the free energy of adsorption. Instead, a balance between an attractive van der Waals enthalpic component and a repulsive entropic component determined the overall strength of indolicidin adsorption.

  9. Models of natural computation : gene assembly and membrane systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brijder, Robert

    2008-01-01

    This thesis is concerned with two research areas in natural computing: the computational nature of gene assembly and membrane computing. Gene assembly is a process occurring in unicellular organisms called ciliates. During this process genes are transformed through cut-and-paste operations. We

  10. Trafficking of Intracellular Membranes: Mass action model of virus fusion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nir, Shlomo; Duzgunes, Nejat; Hoekstra, Dick; Ramalho-Santos, Joao; Pedroso de Lima, Maria C

    1995-01-01

    :Shlomo Nir, Nejat Düzgüneş, Dick Hoekstra, João Ramalho-Santos, Maria C. Pedroso de Lima The purpose of this presentation is to describe procedures of analysis of final extents and kinetics of virus fusion with target membranes. The presentation of results will focus on deductions from studies of f

  11. Partitioning of Lipids at Domain Boundaries in Model Membranes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schafer, Lars V.; Marrink, Siewert J.

    2010-01-01

    Line-active molecules ("linactants") that bind to the boundary interface between different fluid lipid domains in membranes have a strong potential as regulators of the lateral heterogeneity that is important for many biological processes. Here, we use molecular dynamics simulations in combination w

  12. Models of natural computation : gene assembly and membrane systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brijder, Robert

    2008-01-01

    This thesis is concerned with two research areas in natural computing: the computational nature of gene assembly and membrane computing. Gene assembly is a process occurring in unicellular organisms called ciliates. During this process genes are transformed through cut-and-paste operations. We stud

  13. Mathematical model analysis on the enhancement of aeration efficiency using ladder-type flat membrane module forms in the Submerged Membrane Bio-reactor(SMBR)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    The cross-flow shearing action produced from the inferior aeration in the Submerged Membrane Bio-reactor(SMBR) is an effective way to further improve anti-fouling effects of membrane modules.Based on the widely-applied vertical structure of flat membrane modules,improvements are made that ladder-type flat membrane structure is designed with a certain inclined angle θ so that the cross-flow velocity of bubble near the membrane surface can be held,and the intensity and times of elastic colli-sion between bubbles and membrane surface can be increased.This can improve scouring action of membrane surface on aeration and reduce energy consumption of strong aeration in SMBR.By de-ducing and improving the mathematics model of collision between bubble and vertical flat put forward by Vries,the relatively suitable incline angle θ under certain aeration place and in certain size rang of bubble can be obtained with the computer iterative calculation technology.Finally,for many groups of ladder-type flat membrane in parallel placement in the practical application of SMBR,some sugges-tions are offered:the interval distance of membrane modules is 8―15 mm,and aeration should be op-erated at 5―7 mm among membrane modules,and the optimal design angle of trapeziform membrane is 1.7°―2.5°.

  14. Gout: radiographic findings mimicking infection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rousseau, I.; Raymond-Tremblay, D. [Dept. of Diagnostic Radiology, Centre Hospitalier de l' Univ. de Montreal, Que. (Canada); Cardinal, E. [Dept. of Radiology, Centre Hospitalier de l' Univ. de Montreal, Que. (Canada); Beauregard, C.G. [Dept. of Diagnostic Radiology, Hopital du Sacre-Coeur de Montreal,Que. (Canada); Braunstein, E.M. [Dept. of Radiology, Indiana University Hospital (United States); Saint-Pierre, A. [Rheumatology Unit, Centre Hospitalier de l' Univ. de Montreal, Que. (Canada)

    2001-10-01

    Objective: To describe radiographic features of gout that may mimic infection. Design and patients: We report five patients with acute bacterial gout who presented with clinical as well as radiological findings mimicking acute bacterial septic arthritis or osteomyelitis. Three patients had delay in the appropriate treatment with the final diagnosis being established after needle aspiration and identification of urate crystals under polarized light microscopy. Two patients underwent digit amputation for not responding to antibiotic treatment and had histological findings confirming the diagnosis of gout. Conclusion: It is important for the radiologist to be aware of the radiological manifestations of acute gout that can resemble infection in order to avoid inappropriate diagnosis and delay in adequate treatment. The definitive diagnosis should rely on needle aspiration and a specific search for urate crystals. (orig.)

  15. Establishment of the model of vascular endothelial cell membrane chromatography and its preliminary application

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI YiPing; HE LangChong

    2007-01-01

    A model of vascular endothelial cell membrane chromatography was established by using an ECV304 cell membrane stationary phase (ECV304 CMSP) prepared by immobilizing the ECV304 cell membrane onto the surface of silica carrier. The surface and chromatographic characteristics of ECV304 CMSP were studied. The active component from Caulophyllum robustum was screened by using the model of vascular endothelial cell membrane chromatography. The interaction between the active component and membrane receptor was determined by using a replace experiments. The effect of the active component was tested by using tube formation of ECV304 cell. The results indicated that the model of ECV304 cell membrane chromatograph (ECV304 CMC) can stimulate the interaction between drug and receptor in vitro and the retention characteristics of taspine as active component was similar to that of model molecule in the model of ECV304 CMC. And therefore, taspine acted on VEGFR2 and inhibited the tube formation of ECV304 cell induced by VEGF. This model can be used to screen definite active component as a screening model.

  16. Mathematical model using non-uniform flow distribution for dynamic protein breakthrough with membrane adsorption media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneiderman, Steven; Varadaraju, Hemanthram; Zhang, Lifeng; Fong, Hao; Menkhaus, Todd J

    2011-12-23

    A mathematical model has been investigated to predict protein breakthrough during membrane adsorption/chromatography operations. The new model incorporates a non-uniform boundary condition at the column inlet to help describe the deviation from plug flow within real membrane adsorption devices. The model provides estimated breakthrough profiles of a binding protein while explicitly accounting for non-uniform flow at the inlet of the separation operation by modeling the flow distribution by a polynomial. We have explored experimental breakthrough curves produced using commercial membrane adsorption devices, as well as novel adsorption media of nanolayered nanofiber membranes, and compare them to model predictions. Further, the impact of using various simplifying assumptions is considered, which can have a dramatic effect on the accuracy and predictive ability of the proposed models. The new model, using only simple batch equilibrium and kinetic uptake rate data, along with membrane properties, is able to accurately predict the non-uniform and unsymmetrical shape for protein breakthrough during operation of membrane adsorption/chromatography devices. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Exploring large-scale phenomena in composite membranes through an efficient implicit-solvent model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laradji, Mohamed; Kumar, P. B. Sunil; Spangler, Eric J.

    2016-07-01

    Several microscopic and mesoscale models have been introduced in the past to investigate various phenomena in lipid membranes. Most of these models account for the solvent explicitly. Since in a typical molecular dynamics simulation, the majority of particles belong to the solvent, much of the computational effort in these simulations is devoted for calculating forces between solvent particles. To overcome this problem, several implicit-solvent mesoscale models for lipid membranes have been proposed during the last few years. In the present article, we review an efficient coarse-grained implicit-solvent model we introduced earlier for studies of lipid membranes. In this model, lipid molecules are coarse-grained into short semi-flexible chains of beads with soft interactions. Through molecular dynamics simulations, the model is used to investigate the thermal, structural and elastic properties of lipid membranes. We will also review here few studies, based on this model, of the phase behavior of nanoscale liposomes, cytoskeleton-induced blebbing in lipid membranes, as well as nanoparticles wrapping and endocytosis by tensionless lipid membranes. Topical Review article submitted to the Journal of Physics D: Applied Physics, May 9, 2016

  18. Berberine Improves Intestinal Motility and Visceral Pain in the Mouse Models Mimicking Diarrhea-Predominant Irritable Bowel Syndrome (IBS-D Symptoms in an Opioid-Receptor Dependent Manner.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chunqiu Chen

    Full Text Available Berberine and its derivatives display potent analgesic, anti-inflammatory and anticancer activity. Here we aimed at characterizing the mechanism of action of berberine in the gastrointestinal (GI tract and cortical neurons using animal models and in vitro tests.The effect of berberine was characterized in murine models mimicking diarrhea-predominant irritable bowel syndrome (IBS-D symptoms. Then the opioid antagonists were used to identify the receptors involved. Furthermore, the effect of berberineon opioid receptors expression was established in the mouse intestine and rat fetal cortical neurons.In mouse models, berberine prolonged GI transit and time to diarrhea in a dose-dependent manner, and significantly reduced visceral pain. In physiological conditions the effects of berberine were mediated by mu- (MOR and delta- (DOR opioid receptors; hypermotility, excessive secretion and nociception were reversed by berberine through MOR and DOR-dependent action. We also found that berberine increased the expression of MOR and DOR in the mouse bowel and rat fetal cortical neurons.Berberine significantly improved IBS-D symptoms in animal models, possibly through mu- and delta- opioid receptors. Berberine may become a new drug candidate for the successful treatment of IBS-D in clinical conditions.

  19. A Complete Transport Validated Model on a Zeolite Membrane for Carbon Dioxide Permeance and Capture

    CERN Document Server

    Gkanas, Evangelos I; Stubos, Athanasios K; Makridis, Sofoklis S

    2013-01-01

    The CO2 emissions from major industries cause serious global environment problems and their mitigation is urgently needed. The use of zeolite membranes is a very efficient way in order to capture CO2 from some flue gases. The dominant transport mechanism at low temperature andor high pressure is the diffusion through the membrane. This procedure can be divided in three steps: Adsorption of the molecules of the species in the surface of the membrane, then a driving force gives a path where the species follow inside the membrane and finally the species desorbed from the surface of the membrane. The current work is aimed at developing a simulation model for the CO2 transport through a zeolite membrane and estimate the diffusion phenomenon through a very thin membrane of 150 nm in a Wicke-Kallenbach cell. The cell is cylindrical in shape with diameter of 19 mm and consists of a retentate gas chamber, a permeate gas chamber which are separated by a cylindrical zeolite membrane. This apparatus have been modeled wit...

  20. Viroporins, Examples of the Two-Stage Membrane Protein Folding Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis Martinez-Gil

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Viroporins are small, α-helical, hydrophobic virus encoded proteins, engineered to form homo-oligomeric hydrophilic pores in the host membrane. Viroporins participate in multiple steps of the viral life cycle, from entry to budding. As any other membrane protein, viroporins have to find the way to bury their hydrophobic regions into the lipid bilayer. Once within the membrane, the hydrophobic helices of viroporins interact with each other to form higher ordered structures required to correctly perform their porating activities. This two-step process resembles the two-stage model proposed for membrane protein folding by Engelman and Poppot. In this review we use the membrane protein folding model as a leading thread to analyze the mechanism and forces behind the membrane insertion and folding of viroporins. We start by describing the transmembrane segment architecture of viroporins, including the number and sequence characteristics of their membrane-spanning domains. Next, we connect the differences found among viroporin families to their viral genome organization, and finalize focusing on the pathways used by viroporins in their way to the membrane and on the transmembrane helix-helix interactions required to achieve proper folding and assembly.

  1. Modeling of Pervaporation Separation Benzene from Dilute Aqueous Solutions Through Polydimethylsiloxane Membranes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    彭福兵; 姜忠义

    2005-01-01

    A modified solution-diffusion model was established based on Flory-Huggins thermodynamic theory and Fujita's free volume theory. This model was used for description of the mass transfer of removal benzene from dilute aqueous solutions through polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) membranes. The effect of component concentration on the interaction parameter between components, that of the polymer membrane on the selectivity to benzene, and that of feed concentration and temperature on the permeation flux and separation factor of benzene/water through PDMS membranes were investigated. Calculated pervaporation fluxes of benzene and water were compared with the experimental results and were in good agreement with the experimental data.

  2. A Mathematical Model for Diffusion-Controlled Monolithic Matrix Coated with outer Membrane System

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    A release model for diffusion-controlled monolithic matrix coated with outer membrane system is proposed and solved by using the refined double integral method. The calculated results are in satisfactory agreement with the experimental release data. The present model can be well used to describe the release process for all cd/cs values. In addition, the release effects of the monolithic matrix coated with outer membrane system are discussed theoretically.

  3. A macroscopic model of proton transport through the membrane-ionomer interface of a polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Milan; Edwards, Brian J.; Paddison, Stephen J.

    2013-02-01

    The membrane-ionomer interface is the critical interlink of the electrodes and catalyst to the polymer electrolyte membrane (PEM); together forming the membrane electrode assembly in current state-of-the-art PEM fuel cells. In this paper, proton conduction through the interface is investigated to understand its effect on the performance of a PEM fuel cell. The water containing domains at this interface were modeled as cylindrical pores/channels with the anionic groups (i.e., -SO3-) assumed to be fixed on the pore wall. The interactions of each species with all other species and an applied external field were examined. Molecular-based interaction potential energies were computed in a small test element of the pore and were scaled up in terms of macroscopic variables. Evolution equations of the density and momentum of the species (water molecules and hydronium ions) were derived within a framework of nonequilibrium thermodynamics. The resulting evolution equations for the species were solved analytically using an order-of-magnitude analysis to obtain an expression for the proton conductivity. Results show that the conductivity increases with increasing water content and pore radius, and strongly depends on the separation distance between the sulfonate groups and their distribution on the pore wall. It was also determined that the conductivity of two similar pores of different radii in series is limited by the pore with the smaller radius.

  4. Modeling and Design Optimization of Multifunctional Membrane Reactors for Direct Methane Aromatization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fouty, Nicholas J; Carrasco, Juan C; Lima, Fernando V

    2017-08-29

    Due to the recent increase of natural gas production in the U.S., utilizing natural gas for higher-value chemicals has become imperative. Direct methane aromatization (DMA) is a promising process used to convert methane to benzene, but it is limited by low conversion of methane and rapid catalyst deactivation by coking. Past work has shown that membrane separation of the hydrogen produced in the DMA reactions can dramatically increase the methane conversion by shifting the equilibrium toward the products, but it also increases coke production. Oxygen introduction into the system has been shown to inhibit this coke production while not inhibiting the benzene production. This paper introduces a novel mathematical model and design to employ both methods in a multifunctional membrane reactor to push the DMA process into further viability. Multifunctional membrane reactors, in this case, are reactors where two different separations occur using two differently selective membranes, on which no systems studies have been found. The proposed multifunctional membrane design incorporates a hydrogen-selective membrane on the outer wall of the reaction zone, and an inner tube filled with airflow surrounded by an oxygen-selective membrane in the middle of the reactor. The design is shown to increase conversion via hydrogen removal by around 100%, and decrease coke production via oxygen addition by 10% when compared to a tubular reactor without any membranes. Optimization studies are performed to determine the best reactor design based on methane conversion, along with coke and benzene production. The obtained optimal design considers a small reactor (length = 25 cm, diameter of reaction tube = 0.7 cm) to subvert coke production and consumption of the product benzene as well as a high permeance (0.01 mol/s·m²·atm(1/4)) through the hydrogen-permeable membrane. This modeling and design approach sets the stage for guiding further development of multifunctional membrane reactor

  5. A bilayer-couple model of bacterial outer membrane vesicle biogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schertzer, Jeffrey W; Whiteley, Marvin

    2012-01-01

    Gram-negative bacteria naturally produce outer membrane vesicles (OMVs) that arise through bulging and pinching off of the outer membrane. OMVs have several biological functions for bacteria, most notably as trafficking vehicles for toxins, antimicrobials, and signaling molecules. While their biological roles are now appreciated, the mechanism of OMV formation has not been fully elucidated. We recently demonstrated that the signaling molecule 2-heptyl-3-hydroxy-4-quinolone (PQS) is required for OMV biogenesis in P. aeruginosa. We hypothesized that PQS stimulates OMV formation through direct interaction with the outer leaflet of the outer membrane. To test this hypothesis, we employed a red blood cell (RBC) model that has been used extensively to study small-molecule-membrane interactions. Our results revealed that addition of PQS to RBCs induced membrane curvature, resulting in the formation of membrane spicules (spikes), consistent with small molecules that are inserted stably into the outer leaflet of the membrane. Radiotracer experiments demonstrated that sufficient PQS was inserted into the membrane to account for this curvature and that curvature induction was specific to PQS structure. These data suggest that a low rate of interleaflet flip-flop forces PQS to accumulate in and expand the outer leaflet relative to the inner leaflet, thus inducing membrane curvature. In support of PQS-mediated outer leaflet expansion, the PQS effect was antagonized by chlorpromazine, a molecule known to be preferentially inserted into the inner leaflet. Based on these data, we propose a bilayer-couple model to describe P. aeruginosa OMV biogenesis and suggest that this is a general mechanism for bacterial OMV formation. Despite the ubiquity and importance of outer membrane vesicle (OMV) production in Gram-negative bacteria, the molecular details of OMV biogenesis are not fully understood. Early experiments showed that 2-heptyl-3-hydroxy-4-quinolone (PQS) induces OMV formation

  6. Anisotropic viscoelastic models in large deformation for architectured membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rebouah, Marie; Chagnon, Gregory; Heuillet, Patrick

    2016-08-01

    Due to the industrial elaboration process, membranes can have an in-plane anisotropic mechanical behaviour. In this paper, anisotropic membranes elaborated with two different materials were developed either by calendering or by inducing a force in one direction during the process. Experimental tests are developed to measure the differences of mechanical behaviour for both materials in different in-plane properties: stiffness, viscoelasticity and stress-softening. A uniaxial formulation is developed, and a homogenisation by means of a sphere unit approach is used to propose a three-dimensional formulation to represent the materials behaviour. An evolution of the mechanical parameters, depending on the direction, is imposed to reproduce the anisotropic behaviour of the materials. Comparison with experimental data highlights very promising results.

  7. Enhancement of the Computational Efficiency of Membrane Computing Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-04-01

    molecular inhibition of dopamine (e.g., a neurotransmitter ) transporter has been linked to the euphoria and the reinforcing properties of psycho...stimulants like cocaine and amphetamines . Also, major classes of antidepressants act by inhibiting norepinepherine and/or serotonin (other two...their intracellular contents after they are placed in a hypotonic media. These membranes reseal themselves by an unknown mechanism , yielding a closed

  8. Nanobiohybrids: New Model Systems for Membranes and Sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-06-01

    15358, 2004 137. S.R. Scully, M.T. Lloyd, R. Herrera, E.P. Giannelis and G.G. Malliaras, "Dye Sensitized Solar Cells Employing a Highly Conductive and...evaluate the sensing capability of our bioinspired membranes, films were formed on interdigitated electrodes (Figure 16) by solvent casting a...SEM picture of the sensor, the response of our sensor to glucose and sucrose microfabricated interdigitated was investigated. No significant

  9. Time resolved multiphoton excited fluorescence probes in model membranes

    CERN Document Server

    Bai, Y

    2000-01-01

    Using the time-correlated single-photon counting technique, this thesis reports on a time-resolved fluorescence study of several fluorescent probes successfully employed in membrane research. Concentration and temperature effects on fluorescence anisotropy parameters are demonstrated by DPH, p-terphenyl, alpha-NPO and PPO in DPPC lipid bilayers. Fluorescence anisotropy has shown that trans-stilbene and Rhd 800 have a two-site location in membranes. Multiphoton induced fluorescence of DPH, p-terphenyl, alpha-NPO and v-biphenyl in liposomes was measured using 800nm excitation with a femtosecond Ti:Sapphire laser. P-terphenyl, alpha-NPO and v-biphenyl are new probes for membranes. Comparison of one and multiphoton excitation results has demonstrated higher initial anisotropy with multiphoton excitation than with one-photon excitation. The rotational times were identical for one and multiphoton excitation, indicating the absence of significant local heating or sample perturbation. Excimer formation of alpha-NPO w...

  10. Modelling the Bioelectronic Interface in Engineered Tethered Membranes: From Biosensing to Electroporation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoiles, William; Krishnamurthy, Vikram; Cornell, Bruce

    2015-06-01

    This paper studies the construction and predictive models of three novel measurement platforms: (i) a Pore Formation Measurement Platform (PFMP) for detecting the presence of pore forming proteins and peptides, (ii) the Ion Channel Switch (ICS) biosensor for detecting the presence of analyte molecules in a fluid chamber, and (iii) an Electroporation Measurement Platform (EMP) that provides reliable measurements of the electroporation phenomenon. Common to all three measurement platforms is that they are comprised of an engineered tethered membrane that is formed via a rapid solvent exchange technique allowing the platform to have a lifetime of several months. The membrane is tethered to a gold electrode bioelectronic interface that includes an ionic reservoir separating the membrane and gold surface, allowing the membrane to mimic the physiological response of natural cell membranes. The electrical response of the PFMP, ICS, and EMP are predicted using continuum theories for electrodiffusive flow coupled with boundary conditions for modelling chemical reactions and electrical double layers present at the bioelectronic interface. Experimental measurements are used to validate the predictive accuracy of the dynamic models. These include using the PFMP for measuring the pore formation dynamics of the antimicrobial peptide PGLa and the protein toxin Staphylococcal α-Hemolysin; the ICS biosensor for measuring nano-molar concentrations of streptavidin, ferritin, thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH), and human chorionic gonadotropin (pregnancy hormone hCG); and the EMP for measuring electroporation of membranes with different tethering densities, and membrane compositions.

  11. Modeling and parametric analysis of hollow fiber membrane system for carbon capture from multicomponent flue gas

    KAUST Repository

    Khalilpour, Rajab

    2011-08-12

    The modeling and optimal design/operation of gas membranes for postcombustion carbon capture (PCC) is presented. A systematic methodology is presented for analysis of membrane systems considering multicomponent flue gas with CO 2 as target component. Simplifying assumptions is avoided by namely multicomponent flue gas represented by CO 2/N 2 binary mixture or considering the co/countercurrent flow pattern of hollow-fiber membrane system as mixed flow. Optimal regions of flue gas pressures and membrane area were found within which a technoeconomical process system design could be carried out. High selectivity was found to not necessarily have notable impact on PCC membrane performance, rather, a medium selectivity combined with medium or high permeance could be more advantageous. © 2011 American Institute of Chemical Engineers (AIChE).

  12. Modeling hydrogen starvation conditions in proton-exchange membrane fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohs, Jan Hendrik; Sauter, Ulrich; Maass, Sebastian; Stolten, Detlef

    In this study, a steady state and isothermal 2D-PEM fuel cell model is presented. By simulation of a single cell along the channel and in through-plane direction, its behaviour under hydrogen starvation due to nitrogen dilution is analysed. Under these conditions, carbon corrosion and water electrolysis are observed on the cathode side. This phenomenon, causing severe cell degradation, is known as reverse current decay mechanism in literature. Butler-Volmer equations are used to model the electrochemical reactions. In addition, we account for permeation of gases through the membrane and for the local water content within the membrane. The results show that the membrane potential locally drops in areas starved from hydrogen. This leads to potential gradients >1.2 V between electrode and membrane on the cathode side resulting in significant carbon corrosion and electrolysis reaction rates. The model enables the analysis of sub-stoichiometric states occurring during anode gas recirculation or load transients.

  13. Modeling hydrogen starvation conditions in proton-exchange membrane fuel cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ohs, Jan Hendrik; Sauter, Ulrich; Maass, Sebastian [Robert Bosch GmbH, Robert-Bosch-Platz 1, 70839 Gerlingen-Schillerhoehe (Germany); Stolten, Detlef [Forschungszentrum Juelich GmbH, IEF-3: Fuel Cells, 52425 Juelich (Germany)

    2011-01-01

    In this study, a steady state and isothermal 2D-PEM fuel cell model is presented. By simulation of a single cell along the channel and in through-plane direction, its behaviour under hydrogen starvation due to nitrogen dilution is analysed. Under these conditions, carbon corrosion and water electrolysis are observed on the cathode side. This phenomenon, causing severe cell degradation, is known as reverse current decay mechanism in literature. Butler-Volmer equations are used to model the electrochemical reactions. In addition, we account for permeation of gases through the membrane and for the local water content within the membrane. The results show that the membrane potential locally drops in areas starved from hydrogen. This leads to potential gradients >1.2 V between electrode and membrane on the cathode side resulting in significant carbon corrosion and electrolysis reaction rates. The model enables the analysis of sub-stoichiometric states occurring during anode gas recirculation or load transients. (author)

  14. Spreading of a chain macromolecule onto a cell membrane by a computer simulation Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Jun; Pandey, Ras

    2002-03-01

    Computer simulations are performed to study conformation and dynamics of a relatively large chain macromolecule at the surface of a model membrane - a preliminary attempt to ultimately realistic model for protein on a cell membrane. We use a discrete lattice of size Lx × L × L. The chain molecule of length Lc is modeled by consecutive nodes connected by bonds on the trail of a random walk with appropriate constraints such as excluded volume, energy dependent configurational bias, etc. Monte Carlo method is used to move chains via segmental dynamics, i.e., end-move, kink-jump, crank-shaft, reptation, etc. Membrane substrate is designed by a self-assemble biased short chains on a substrate. Large chain molecule is then driven toward the membrane by a field. We investigate the dynamics of chain macromolecule, spread of its density, and conformation.

  15. Mathematical modeling of liquid/liquid hollow fiber membrane contactor accounting for interfacial transport phenomena: Extraction of lanthanides as a surrogate for actinides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rogers, J.D.

    1994-08-04

    This report is divided into two parts. The second part is divided into the following sections: experimental protocol; modeling the hollow fiber extractor using film theory; Graetz model of the hollow fiber membrane process; fundamental diffusive-kinetic model; and diffusive liquid membrane device-a rigorous model. The first part is divided into: membrane and membrane process-a concept; metal extraction; kinetics of metal extraction; modeling the membrane contactor; and interfacial phenomenon-boundary conditions-applied to membrane transport.

  16. Modeling Yeast Organelle Membranes and How Lipid Diversity Influences Bilayer Properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monje-Galvan, Viviana; Klauda, Jeffery B

    2015-11-17

    Membrane lipids are important for the health and proper function of cell membranes. We have improved computational membrane models for specific organelles in yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae to study the effect of lipid diversity on membrane structure and dynamics. Previous molecular dynamics simulations were performed by Jo et al. [(2009) Biophys J. 97, 50-58] on yeast membrane models having six lipid types with compositions averaged between the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and the plasma membrane (PM). We incorporated ergosterol, phosphatidic acid, phosphatidylcholine, phosphatidylethanolamine, phosphatidylserine, and phosphatidylinositol lipids in our models to better describe the unique composition of the PM, ER, and trans-Golgi network (TGN) bilayers of yeast. Our results describe membrane structure based on order parameters (SCD), electron density profiles (EDPs), and lipid packing. The average surface area per lipid decreased from 63.8 ± 0.4 Å(2) in the ER to 47.1 ± 0.3 Å(2) in the PM, while the compressibility modulus (KA) varied in the opposite direction. The high SCD values for the PM lipids indicated a more ordered bilayer core, while the corresponding lipids in the ER and TGN models had lower parameters by a factor of at least 0.7. The hydrophobic core thickness (2DC) as estimated from EDPs is the thickest for PM, which is in agreement with estimates of hydrophobic regions of transmembrane proteins from the Orientation of Proteins in Membranes database. Our results show the importance of lipid diversity and composition on a bilayer's structural and mechanical properties, which in turn influences interactions with the proteins and membrane-bound molecules.

  17. Mathematical model analysis on the enhancement of aeration efficiency using ladder-type flat membrane module forms in the Submerged Membrane Bio-reactor (SMBR)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Bo; YE MaoSheng; YANG FengLin; MA Hui

    2009-01-01

    The cross-flow shearing action produced from the inferior aeration in the Submerged Membrane Bio-reactor (SMBR) Is an effective way to further improve anti-fouling effects of membrane modules.Based on the widely-applied vertical structure of flat membrane modules, improvements are made that ladder-type flat membrane structure is designed with a certain inclined angle θ so that the cross-flow velocity of bubble near the membrane surface can be held, and the intensity and times of elastic colli-sion between bubbles and membrane surface can be increased. This can improve scouring action ofmembrane surface on aeration and reduce energy consumption of strong aeration in SMBR. By de-ducing and improving the mathematics model of collision between bubble and vertical flat put forward by Vries, the relatively suitable Incline angle θ under certain aeration place and in certain size rang ofbubble can be obtained with the computer iterative calculation technology. Finally, for many groups of ladder-type flat membrane in parallel placement in the practical application of SMBR, some sugges-tions are offered: the interval distance of membrane modules is 8--15 mm, and aeration should be op-erated at 5--7 mm among membrane modules, and the optimal design angle of trapeziform membrane is 1.7°--2.5°.

  18. A study of the isobutane dehydrogenation in a porous membrane catalytic reactor: design, use and modelling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Casanave, D.

    1996-01-26

    The aim of this study was to set up and model a catalytic fixed-bed membrane reactor for the isobutane dehydrogenation. The catalyst, developed at Catalysis Research Institute (IRC), was a silicalite-supported Pt-based catalyst. Their catalytic performances (activity, selectivity, stability) where found better adapted to the membrane reactor, when compared with commercial Pt or Cr based catalysts. The kinetic study of the reaction has been performed in a differential reactor and led to the determination of a kinetic law, suitable when the catalyst is used near thermodynamic equilibrium. The mass transfer mechanisms were determined in meso-porous and microporous membranes through both permeability and gas mixtures (iC{sub 4}/H{sub 2}/N{sub 2}) separation measurements. For the meso-porous {gamma}-alumina, the mass transfer is ensured by a Knudsen diffusion mechanism which can compete with surface diffusion for condensable gas like isobutane. The resulting permselectivity H{sub 2}/iC4 of this membrane is low ({approx} 4). For the microporous zeolite membrane, molecular sieving occurs due to steric hindrance, leading to higher permselectivity {approx}14. Catalyst/membrane associations were compared in terms of isobutane dehydrogenation performances, for both types of membranes (meso-porous and microporous) and for two different reactor configurations (co-current and counter-current sweep gas flow). The best experimental results were obtained with the zeolite membrane, when sweeping the outer compartment in a co-current flow. The equilibrium displacement observed with the {gamma}-alumina membrane was lower and mainly due to a dilution effect of the reaction mixture by the sweep gas. A mathematical model was developed, which correctly describes all the experimental results obtained with the zeolite membrane, when the co-current mode is used. (Abstract Truncated)

  19. Performances of nanofiltration and low pressure reverse osmosis membranes for desalination: characterization and modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boussouga, Y. A.; Lhassani, A.

    2017-03-01

    The nanofiltration and the reverse osmosis processes are the most common techniques for the desalination of water contaminated by an excess of salts. In this present study, we were interested in the characterization of commercial, composite and asymmetric membranes of nanofiltration (NF90, NF270) and low pressure reverse osmosis (BW30LE). The two types of characterization that we opted for our study: (i) characterization of electrical proprieties, in terms of the surface charge of various membranes studied by the measurement of the streaming potential, (ii) hydrodynamic characterization in terms of hydraulic permeability with pure water, mass transfer and phenomenological parameters for each system membrane/salt using hydrodynamic approaches. The irreversible thermodynamics allowed us to model the observed retention Robs of salts (NaCl and Na2SO4) for the different membranes studied, to understand and to predict a good filtration with a membrane. A study was conducted on the type of mass transfer for each system membrane/salt: convection and diffusion. The results showed that all tested membranes are negatively charged for the solutions at neutral pH, this is explained by their material composition. The results also showed competitiveness between the different types of membranes. In view of that the NF remains effective in terms of selective retention with less energy consumption than LPRO.

  20. Salt transport properties of model reverse osmosis membranes using electrochemical impedance spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feldman, Kathleen; Chan, Edwin; Stafford, Gery; Stafford, Christopher

    With the increasing shortage of clean water, efficient purification technologies including membrane separations are becoming critical. The main requirement of reverse osmosis in particular is to maximize water permeability while minimizing salt permeability. Such performance optimization has typically taken place through trial and error approaches. In this work, key salt transport metrics are instead measured in model reverse osmosis membranes using electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). As shown previously, EIS can provide both the membrane resistance Rm and membrane capacitance Cm, with Rm directly related to salt permeability. The membranes are fabricated in a molecular layer by layer approach, which allows for control over such parameters as thickness, surface and bulk chemistry, and network geometry/connectivity. Rm, and therefore salt permeability, follows the expected trends with thickness and membrane area but shows unusual behavior when the network geometry is systematically varied. By connecting intrinsic material properties such as the salt permeability with macroscopic performance measures we can begin to establish design rules for improving membrane efficiency and facilitate the creation of next-generation separation membranes.

  1. Two-dimensional modeling of a polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell with long flow channel. Part I. Model development

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    A two-dimensional single-phase model is developed for the steady-state and transient analysis of polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells (PEMFC). Based on diluted and concentrated solution theories, viscous flow is introduced into a phenomenological multi-component modeling framework in the membrane. Characteristic variables related to the water uptake are discussed. A ButlereVolmer formulation of the current-overpotential relationship is developed based on an elementary mechanism of elect...

  2. Parameter estimation in neuronal stochastic differential equation models from intracellular recordings of membrane potentials in single neurons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ditlevsen, Susanne; Samson, Adeline

    2016-01-01

    evolution. One-dimensional models are the stochastic integrate-and-fire neuronal diffusion models. Biophysical neuronal models take into account the dynamics of ion channels or synaptic activity, leading to multidimensional diffusion models. Since only the membrane potential can be measured......Dynamics of the membrane potential in a single neuron can be studied by estimating biophysical parameters from intracellular recordings. Diffusion processes, given as continuous solutions to stochastic differential equations, are widely applied as models for the neuronal membrane potential...

  3. Buffers affect the bending rigidity of model lipid membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouvrais, Hélène; Duelund, Lars; Ipsen, John H

    2014-01-14

    In biophysical and biochemical studies of lipid bilayers the influence of the used buffer is often ignored or assumed to be negligible on membrane structure, elasticity, or physical properties. However, we here present experimental evidence, through bending rigidity measurements performed on giant vesicles, of a more complex behavior, where the buffering molecules may considerably affect the bending rigidity of phosphatidylcholine bilayers. Furthermore, a synergistic effect on the bending modulus is observed in the presence of both salt and buffer molecules, which serves as a warning to experimentalists in the data interpretation of their studies, since typical lipid bilayer studies contain buffer and ion molecules.

  4. Molecular dynamics study of lipid bilayers modeling the plasma membranes of mouse hepatocytes and hepatomas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andoh, Yoshimichi; Aoki, Noriyuki; Okazaki, Susumu

    2016-02-01

    Molecular dynamics (MD) calculations of lipid bilayers modeling the plasma membranes of normal mouse hepatocytes and hepatomas in water have been performed under physiological isothermal-isobaric conditions (310.15 K and 1 atm). The changes in the membrane properties induced by hepatic canceration were investigated and were compared with previous MD calculations included in our previous study of the changes in membrane properties induced by murine thymic canceration. The calculated model membranes for normal hepatocytes and hepatomas comprised 23 and 24 kinds of lipids, respectively. These included phosphatidylcholine, phosphatidylethanolamine, phosphatidylserine, phosphatidylinositol, sphingomyelin, lysophospholipids, and cholesterol. We referred to previously published experimental values for the mole fraction of the lipids adopted in the present calculations. The calculated structural and dynamic properties of the membranes such as lateral structure, order parameters, lateral self-diffusion constants, and rotational correlation times all showed that hepatic canceration causes plasma membranes to become more ordered laterally and less fluid. Interestingly, this finding contrasts with the less ordered structure and increased fluidity of plasma membranes induced by thymic canceration observed in our previous MD study.

  5. Fatty acid membrane assembly on coacervate microdroplets as a step towards a hybrid protocell model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dora Tang, T.-Y.; Rohaida Che Hak, C.; Thompson, Alexander J.; Kuimova, Marina K.; Williams, D. S.; Perriman, Adam W.; Mann, Stephen

    2014-06-01

    Mechanisms of prebiotic compartmentalization are central to providing insights into how protocellular systems emerged on the early Earth. Protocell models are based predominantly on the membrane self-assembly of fatty-acid vesicles, although membrane-free scenarios that involve liquid-liquid microphase separation (coacervation) have also been considered. Here we integrate these alternative models of prebiotic compartmentalization and develop a hybrid protocell model based on the spontaneous self-assembly of a continuous fatty-acid membrane at the surface of preformed coacervate microdroplets prepared from cationic peptides/polyelectrolytes and adenosine triphosphate or oligo/polyribonucleotides. We show that the coacervate-supported membrane is multilamellar, and mediates the selective uptake or exclusion of small and large molecules. The coacervate interior can be disassembled without loss of membrane integrity, and fusion and growth of the hybrid protocells can be induced under conditions of high ionic strength. Our results highlight how notions of membrane-mediated compartmentalization, chemical enrichment and internalized structuration can be integrated in protocell models via simple chemical and physical processes.

  6. Modeling of air-gap membrane distillation process: A theoretical and experimental study

    KAUST Repository

    Alsaadi, Ahmad Salem

    2013-06-03

    A one dimensional (1-D) air gap membrane distillation (AGMD) model for flat sheet type modules has been developed. This model is based on mathematical equations that describe the heat and mass transfer mechanisms of a single-stage AGMD process. It can simulate AGMD modules in both co-current and counter-current flow regimes. The theoretical model was validated using AGMD experimental data obtained under different operating conditions and parameters. The predicted water vapor flux was compared to the flux measured at five different feed water temperatures, two different feed water salinities, three different air gap widths and two MD membranes with different average pore sizes. This comparison showed that the model flux predictions are strongly correlated with the experimental data, with model predictions being within +10% of the experimentally determined values. The model was then used to study and analyze the parameters that have significant effect on scaling-up the AGMD process such as the effect of increasing the membrane length, and feed and coolant flow rates. The model was also used to analyze the maximum thermal efficiency of the AGMD process by tracing changes in water production rate and the heat input to the process along the membrane length. This was used to understand the gain in both process production and thermal efficiency for different membrane surface areas and the resultant increases in process capital and water unit cost. © 2013 Elsevier B.V.

  7. Electrical Thermal Network for Direct Contact Membrane Distillation Modeling and Analysis

    KAUST Repository

    Karam, Ayman M.

    2015-02-04

    Membrane distillation is an emerging water distillation technology that offers several advantages compared to conventional water desalination processes. Although progress has been made to model and understand the physics of the process, many studies are based on steady-state assumptions or are computationally not appropriate for real time control. This paper presents the derivation of a novel dynamical model, based on analogy between electrical and thermal systems, for direct contact membrane distillation (DCMD). The proposed model captures the dynamics of temperature distribution and distilled water flux. To demonstrate the adequacy of the proposed model, validation with transient and steady-state experimental data is presented.

  8. Modelling membrane hydration and water balance of a pem fuel cell

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liso, Vincenzo; Nielsen, Mads Pagh

    2015-01-01

    propose a novel mathematical zero-dimensional model for water mass balance of a polymer electrolyte membrane. Physical and electrochemical processes occurring in the membrane electrolyte are included; water adsorption/desorption phenomena are also considered. The effect of diffusivity, surface roughness...... and water content driving force is considered. We validate the model against experimental data. The water balance calculated by this model shows better fit with experimental data-points compared to other models such as the one by Springer et al.. We conclude that this discrepancy is due a different rate...

  9. Equilibrium microphase separation in the two-leaflet model of lipid membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reigada, Ramon; Mikhailov, Alexander S.

    2016-01-01

    Because of the coupling between local lipid composition and the thickness of the membrane, microphase separation in two-component lipid membranes can take place; such effects may underlie the formation of equilibrium nanoscale rafts. Using a kinetic description, this phenomenon is analytically and numerically investigated. The phase diagram is constructed through the stability analysis for linearized kinetic equations, and conditions for microphase separation are discussed. Simulations of the full kinetic model reveal the development of equilibrium membrane nanostructures with various morphologies from the initial uniform state.

  10. Aroma Stripping under various Forms of Membrane Distillation Processes: Experiments and modeling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jonsson, Gunnar Eigil

    Concentration of fruit juices by membrane distillation is an interesting process as it can be done at low temperature giving a gentle concentration process with little deterioration of the juices. Since the juices contains many different aroma compounds with a wide range of chemical properties...... such as volatility, activity coefficient and vapor pressure, it is important to know how these aroma compounds will eventually pass through the membrane. Experiments have been made on an aroma model solution and on black currant juice in a lab scale membrane distillation set up which can be operated in various types...

  11. Nonlinear Dynamics of Ion Concentration Polarization in Porous Media: The Leaky Membrane Model

    CERN Document Server

    Dydek, E Victoria

    2013-01-01

    The conductivity of highly charged membranes is nearly constant, due to counter-ions screening pore surfaces. Weakly charged porous media, or "leaky membranes", also contain a significant concentration of co-ions, whose depletion at high current leads to ion concentration polarization and conductivity shock waves. To describe these nonlinear phenomena the absence of electro-osmotic flow, a simple Leaky Membrane Model is formulated, based on macroscopic electroneutrality and Nernst-Planck ionic fluxes. The model is solved in cases of unsupported binary electrolytes: steady conduction from a reservoir to a cation-selective surface, transient response to a current step, steady conduction to a flow-through porous electrode, and steady conduction between cation-selective surfaces in cross flow. The last problem is motivated by separations in leaky membranes, such as shock electrodialysis. The article begins with a tribute to Neal Amundson, whose pioneering work on shock waves in chromatography involved similar mat...

  12. Modeling the dynamic behavior of proton-exchange membrane fuel cell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Llapade, Peter O [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Mukundan, Rangachary [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Davey, John R [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Borup, Rodney L [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Meyers, Jeremy P [UNIV OF TEXAS-AUSTIN

    2010-01-01

    A two-phase transient model that incorporates the permanent hysteresis observed in the experimentally measured capillary pressure of GDL has been developed. The model provides explanation for the difference in time constant between membrane hydration and dehydration observed in the HFR experiment conducted at LANL. When there is liquid water at the cathode catalyst layer, time constant of the water content in the membrane is closely tied to that of liquid water saturation in the CCL, as the vapor is already saturated. The water content in the membrane will not reach steady state as long as the liquid water flow in the CCL is not at steady state. Also, Increased resistance to proton transport in the membrane is observed when the cell voltage is stepped down to a very low value.

  13. A Brownian Energy Depot Model of the Basilar Membrane Oscillation with a Braking Mechanism

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, Yong; Lee, Kong-Ju-Bock; Park, Youngah

    2008-01-01

    High auditory sensitivity, sharp frequency selectivity, and otoacoustic emissions are signatures of active amplification of the cochlea. The human ear can also detect very large amplitude sound without being damaged as long as the exposed time is not too long. The outer hair cells are believed as the best candidate for the active force generator of the mammalian cochlea. In this paper, we propose a new model for the basilar membrane oscillation which successfully describes both the active and the protective mechanisms by employing an energy depot concept and a critical velocity of the basilar membrane. One of the main results is that thermal noise in the absence of external stimulation can be amplified leading to the spontaneous basilar membrane oscillation. The compressive response of the basilar membrane at the characteristic frequency and the dynamic response to the stimulation are consistent with the experimental results as expected. Our model also shows the nonlinear distortion of the response of the bas...

  14. Modeling of Fischer-Tropsch Synthesis in a Slurry Reactor with Water Permeable Membrane

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Fabiano A. N. Fernandes

    2007-01-01

    Fischer-Tropsch synthesis is an important chemical process for the production of liquid fuels and olefins. In recent years, the abundant availability of natural gas and the increasing demand of olefins, diesel, and waxes have led to a high interest to further develop this process. A mathematical model of a slurry membrane reactor used for syngas polymerization was developed to simulate and compare the maximum yields and operating conditions in the reactor with that in a conventional slurry reactor.The carbon polymerization was studied from a modeling point of view in a slurry reactor with a water permeable membrane and a conventional slurry reactor. Simulation results show that different parameters affect syngas conversion and carbon product distribution, such as the hydrogen to carbon monoxide ratio,and the membrane parameters such as membrane permeance.

  15. Effects of oxyethylated glycerol cryoprotectants on phase transitions of DPPC model membranes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kasian N. A.

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To determine the effect of the oxyethylated glycerol cryoprotectants (OEGn with polymerization degrees n = 5, 25, 30 on the phase states and phase transitions of dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC-based model membranes. Methods. Differential scanning calorimetry. Results. Model lipid membranes on water/OEGn and water/glycerol subphases with varying cryoprotectant concentrations from 0 to ~ 100 % w/w were studied. A significant raise in the pre-transition and main phase transition temperatures with increasing OEGn concentration was noted whereas the membrane melting peak persist to 100 % w/w OEGn. A sharp increase in the melting enthalpy was observed for OEGn = 5. Conclusions. The solvating ability of the subphase in DPPC membranes decreases in the order water > glycerol > OEGn = 5 > OEGn = 25 > OEGn = 30, which correlates with the relative number of groups effectively contributing to the solvation process.

  16. Fluidic and air-stable supported lipid bilayer and cell-mimicking microarrays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Yang; Wang, Yini; Holtz, Bryan; Li, Jingyi; Traaseth, Nathan; Veglia, Gianluigi; Stottrup, Benjamin J; Elde, Robert; Pei, Duanqing; Guo, Athena; Zhu, X-Y

    2008-05-14

    As drug delivery, therapy, and medical imaging are becoming increasingly cell-specific, there is a critical need for high fidelity and high-throughput screening methods for cell surface interactions. Cell membrane-mimicking surfaces, i.e., supported lipid bilayers (SLBs), are currently not sufficiently robust to meet this need. Here we describe a method of forming fluidic and air-stable SLBs through tethered and dispersed cholesterol groups incorporated into the bottom leaflet. Achieving air stability allows us to easily fabricate SLB microarrays from direct robotic spotting of vesicle solutions. We demonstrate their application as cell membrane-mimicking microarrays by reconstituting peripheral as well as integral membrane components that can be recognized by their respective targets. These demonstrations establish the viability of the fluidic and air-stable SLB platform for generating content microarrays in high throughput studies, e.g., the screening of drugs and nanomedicine targeting cell surface receptors.

  17. Growth of the chorioallantoic membrane into a rapid-prototyped model pore system: experiments and mathematical model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemon, Greg; Howard, Daniel; Yang, Hongyi; Ratchev, Svetan M; Segal, Joel I; Rose, Felicity R A J; Jensen, Oliver E; Waters, Sarah L; King, John R

    2011-07-01

    This paper presents a mathematical model to describe the growth of tissue into a rapid-prototyped porous scaffold when it is implanted onto the chorioallantoic membrane (CAM). The scaffold was designed to study the effects of the size and shape of pores on tissue growth into conventional tissue engineering scaffolds, and consists of an array of pores each having a pre-specified shape. The experimental observations revealed that the CAM grows through each pore as an intact layer of tissue, provided the width of the pore exceeds a threshold value. Based on these results a mathematical model is described to simulate the growth of the membrane, assuming that the growth is a function of the local isotropic membrane tension. The model predictions are compared against measurements of the extent of membrane growth through the pores as a function of time for pores with different dimensions.

  18. Modelling and sequential simulation of multi-tubular metallic membrane and techno-economics of a hydrogen production process employing thin-layer membrane reactor

    KAUST Repository

    Shafiee, Alireza

    2016-09-24

    A theoretical model for multi-tubular palladium-based membrane is proposed in this paper and validated against experimental data for two different sized membrane modules that operate at high temperatures. The model is used in a sequential simulation format to describe and analyse pure hydrogen and hydrogen binary mixture separations, and then extended to simulate an industrial scale membrane unit. This model is used as a sub-routine within an ASPEN Plus model to simulate a membrane reactor in a steam reforming hydrogen production plant. A techno-economic analysis is then conducted using the validated model for a plant producing 300 TPD of hydrogen. The plant utilises a thin (2.5 μm) defect-free and selective layer (Pd75Ag25 alloy) membrane reactor. The economic sensitivity analysis results show usefulness in finding the optimum operating condition that achieves minimum hydrogen production cost at break-even point. A hydrogen production cost of 1.98 $/kg is estimated while the cost of the thin-layer selective membrane is found to constitute 29% of total process capital cost. These results indicate the competiveness of this thin-layer membrane process against conventional methods of hydrogen production. © 2016 Hydrogen Energy Publications LLC

  19. Humanlike Robots - Synthetically Mimicking Humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bar-Cohen, Yoseph

    2012-01-01

    Nature inspired many inventions and the field of technology that is based on the mimicking or inspiration of nature is widely known as Biomimetics and it is increasingly leading to many new capabilities. There are numerous examples of biomimetic successes including the copying of fins for swimming, and the inspiration of the insects and birds flight. More and more commercial implementations of biomimetics are appearing and behaving lifelike and applications are emerging that are important to our daily life. Making humanlike robots is the ultimate challenge to biomimetics and, for many years, it was considered science fiction, but such robots are becoming an engineering reality. Advances in producing such robot are allowing them to perform impressive functions and tasks. The development of such robots involves addressing many challenges and is raising concerns that are related to fear of their application implications and potential ethical issues. In this paper, the state-of-the-art of humanlike robots, potential applications and challenges will be reviewed.

  20. Anion exchange membranes for fuel cells and flow batteries : transport and stability of model systems

    OpenAIRE

    Marino, Michael G

    2015-01-01

    Polymeric anion exchange materials in membrane form can be key components in emerging energy storage and conversions systems such as the alkaline fuel cell and the RedOx flow battery. For these applications the membrane properties need to include good ionic conductivity and sufficient chemical stability, two aspects, that are not sufficiently understood in terms of materials science. Materials fulfilling both criteria are currently not available. The transport of ions and water in a model...

  1. Rubber particle proteins, HbREF and HbSRPP, show different interactions with model membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berthelot, Karine; Lecomte, Sophie; Estevez, Yannick; Zhendre, Vanessa; Henry, Sarah; Thévenot, Julie; Dufourc, Erick J; Alves, Isabel D; Peruch, Frédéric

    2014-01-01

    The biomembrane surrounding rubber particles from the hevea latex is well known for its content of numerous allergen proteins. HbREF (Hevb1) and HbSRPP (Hevb3) are major components, linked on rubber particles, and they have been shown to be involved in rubber synthesis or quality (mass regulation), but their exact function is still to be determined. In this study we highlighted the different modes of interactions of both recombinant proteins with various membrane models (lipid monolayers, liposomes or supported bilayers, and multilamellar vesicles) to mimic the latex particle membrane. We combined various biophysical methods (polarization-modulation-infrared reflection-adsorption spectroscopy (PM-IRRAS)/ellipsometry, attenuated-total reflectance Fourier-transform infrared (ATR-FTIR), solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), plasmon waveguide resonance (PWR), fluorescence spectroscopy) to elucidate their interactions. Small rubber particle protein (SRPP) shows less affinity than rubber elongation factor (REF) for the membranes but displays a kind of "covering" effect on the lipid headgroups without disturbing the membrane integrity. Its structure is conserved in the presence of lipids. Contrarily, REF demonstrates higher membrane affinity with changes in its aggregation properties, the amyloid nature of REF, which we previously reported, is not favored in the presence of lipids. REF binds and inserts into membranes. The membrane integrity is highly perturbed, and we suspect that REF is even able to remove lipids from the membrane leading to the formation of mixed micelles. These two homologous proteins show affinity to all membrane models tested but neatly differ in their interacting features. This could imply differential roles on the surface of rubber particles.

  2. Penetration Deep into Tissues of Reactive Oxygen Species Generated in Floating-Electrode Dielectric Barrier Discharge (FE-DBD): in Vitro Agarose Gel Model Mimicking an Open Wound

    CERN Document Server

    Dobrynin, Danil; Friedman, Gary; Fridman, Alexander

    2013-01-01

    In this manuscript we present an in vitro model based on agarose gel that can be used to simulate a dirty, oily, bloody, and morphologically complex surface of, for example, an open wound. We show this models effectiveness in simulating depth of penetration of reactive species generated in plasma deep into tissue of a rat and confirm the penetration depths with agarose gel model. We envision that in the future such a model could be used to study plasma discharges (and other modalities) and minimize the use of live animals: plasma can be optimized on the agarose gel wound model and then finally verified using an actual wound.

  3. A Hidden Markov Model method, capable of predicting and discriminating β-barrel outer membrane proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamodrakas Stavros J

    2004-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Integral membrane proteins constitute about 20–30% of all proteins in the fully sequenced genomes. They come in two structural classes, the α-helical and the β-barrel membrane proteins, demonstrating different physicochemical characteristics, structure and localization. While transmembrane segment prediction for the α-helical integral membrane proteins appears to be an easy task nowadays, the same is much more difficult for the β-barrel membrane proteins. We developed a method, based on a Hidden Markov Model, capable of predicting the transmembrane β-strands of the outer membrane proteins of gram-negative bacteria, and discriminating those from water-soluble proteins in large datasets. The model is trained in a discriminative manner, aiming at maximizing the probability of correct predictions rather than the likelihood of the sequences. Results The training has been performed on a non-redundant database of 14 outer membrane proteins with structures known at atomic resolution; it has been tested with a jacknife procedure, yielding a per residue accuracy of 84.2% and a correlation coefficient of 0.72, whereas for the self-consistency test the per residue accuracy was 88.1% and the correlation coefficient 0.824. The total number of correctly predicted topologies is 10 out of 14 in the self-consistency test, and 9 out of 14 in the jacknife. Furthermore, the model is capable of discriminating outer membrane from water-soluble proteins in large-scale applications, with a success rate of 88.8% and 89.2% for the correct classification of outer membrane and water-soluble proteins respectively, the highest rates obtained in the literature. That test has been performed independently on a set of known outer membrane proteins with low sequence identity with each other and also with the proteins of the training set. Conclusion Based on the above, we developed a strategy, that enabled us to screen the entire proteome of E. coli for

  4. Experiments and Modeling of Boric Acid Permeation through Double-Skinned Forward Osmosis Membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Lin; Zhou, Zhengzhong; Chung, Tai-Shung; Weber, Martin; Staudt, Claudia; Maletzko, Christian

    2016-07-19

    Boron removal is one of the great challenges in modern wastewater treatment, owing to the unique small size and fast diffusion rate of neutral boric acid molecules. As forward osmosis (FO) membranes with a single selective layer are insufficient to reject boron, double-skinned FO membranes with boron rejection up to 83.9% were specially designed for boron permeation studies. The superior boron rejection properties of double-skinned FO membranes were demonstrated by theoretical calculations, and verified by experiments. The double-skinned FO membrane was fabricated using a sulfonated polyphenylenesulfone (sPPSU) polymer as the hydrophilic substrate and polyamide as the selective layer material via interfacial polymerization on top and bottom surfaces. A strong agreement between experimental data and modeling results validates the membrane design and confirms the success of model prediction. The effects of key parameters on boron rejection, such as boron permeability of both selective layers and structure parameter, were also investigated in-depth with the mathematical modeling. This study may provide insights not only for boron removal from wastewater, but also open up the design of next generation FO membranes to eliminate low-rejection molecules in wider applications.

  5. Electrophorus electricus as a model system for the study of membrane excitability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gotter, A L; Kaetzel, M A; Dedman, J R

    1998-01-01

    The stunning sensations produced by electric fish, particularly the electric eel, Electrophorus electricus, have fascinated scientists for centuries. Within the last 50 years, however, electric cells of Electrophorus have provided a unique model system that is both specialized and appropriate for the study of excitable cell membrane electrophysiology and biochemistry. Electric tissue generates whole animal electrical discharges by means of membrane potentials that are remarkably similar to those of mammalian neurons, myocytes and secretory cells. Electrocytes express ion channels, ATPases and signal transduction proteins common to these other excitable cells. Action potentials of electrocytes represent the specialized end function of electric tissue whereas other excitable cells use membrane potential changes to trigger sophisticated cellular processes, such as myofilament cross-bridging for contraction, or exocytosis for secretion. Because electric tissue lacks these functions and the proteins associated with them, it provides a highly specialized membrane model system. This review examines the basic mechanisms involved in the generation of the electrical discharge of the electric eel and the membrane proteins involved. The valuable contributions that electric tissue continues to make toward the understanding of excitable cell physiology and biochemistry are summarized, particularly those studies using electrocytes as a model system for the study of the regulation of membrane excitability by second messengers and signal transduction pathways.

  6. Phospholipid diffusion coefficients of cushioned model membranes determined via z-scan fluorescence correlation spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sterling, Sarah M; Allgeyer, Edward S; Fick, Jörg; Prudovsky, Igor; Mason, Michael D; Neivandt, David J

    2013-06-25

    Model cellular membranes enable the study of biological processes in a controlled environment and reduce the traditional challenges associated with live or fixed cell studies. However, model membrane systems based on the air/water or oil/solution interface do not allow for incorporation of transmembrane proteins or for the study of protein transport mechanisms. Conversely, a phospholipid bilayer deposited via the Langmuir-Blodgett/Langmuir-Schaefer method on a hydrogel layer is potentially an effective mimic of the cross section of a biological membrane and facilitates both protein incorporation and transport studies. Prior to application, however, such membranes must be fully characterized, particularly with respect to the phospholipid bilayer phase transition temperature. Here we present a detailed characterization of the phase transition temperature of the inner and outer leaflets of a chitosan supported model membrane system. Specifically, the lateral diffusion coefficient of each individual leaflet has been determined as a function of temperature. Measurements were performed utilizing z-scan fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS), a technique that yields calibration-free diffusion information. Analysis via the method of Wawrezinieck and co-workers revealed that phospholipid diffusion changes from raftlike to free diffusion as the temperature is increased-an insight into the dynamic behavior of hydrogel supported membranes not previously reported.

  7. Hydrostatic Pressure Promotes Domain Formation in Model Lipid Raft Membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Worcester, David L; Weinrich, Michael

    2015-11-01

    Neutron diffraction measurements demonstrate that hydrostatic pressure promotes liquid-ordered (Lo) domain formation in lipid membranes prepared as both oriented multilayers and unilamellar vesicles made of a canonical ternary lipid mixture for which demixing transitions have been extensively studied. The results demonstrate an unusually large dependence of the mixing transition on hydrostatic pressure. Additionally, data at 28 °C show that the magnitude of increase in Lo caused by 10 MPa pressure is much the same as the decrease in Lo produced by twice minimum alveolar concentrations (MAC) of general anesthetics such as halothane, nitrous oxide, and xenon. Therefore, the results may provide a plausible explanation for the reversal of general anesthesia by hydrostatic pressure.

  8. Modeling the effect of dynamic surfaces on membrane penetration

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Lehn, Reid; Alexander-Katz, Alfredo

    2011-03-01

    The development of nanoscale materials for targeted drug delivery is an important current pursuit in materials science. One task of drug carriers is to release therapeutic agents within cells by bypassing the cell membrane to maximize the effectiveness of their payload and minimize bodily exposure. In this work, we use coarse-grained simulations to study nanoparticles (NPs) grafted with hydrophobic and hydrophilic ligands that rearrange in response to the amphiphilic lipid bilayer. We demonstrate that this dynamic surface permits the NP to spontaneously penetrate to the bilayer midplane when the surface ligands are near an order-disorder transition. We believe that this work will lead to the design of new drug carriers capable of non-specifically accessing cell interiors based solely on their dynamic surface properties. Our work is motivated by existing nanoscale systems such as micelles, or NPs grafted with highly mobile ligands or polymer brushes.

  9. A New Mouse Model of Limb-Girdle Muscular Dystrophy Type 2I Homozygous for the Common L276I Mutation Mimicking the Mild Phenotype in Humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krag, Thomas O; Vissing, John

    2015-01-01

    Limb-girdle muscular dystrophy type 2I (LGMD2I) is caused by mutations in the Fukutin-related protein (FKRP) gene, leading to inadequate glycosylation of α-dystroglycan, an important protein linking the extracellular matrix to the cytoskeleton. We created a mouse model of the common FKRP L276I...... mutation and a hemizygous FKRP L276I knockout model. We studied histopathology and protein expression in the models at different ages and found that homozygous FKRP L276I mice developed a mild progressive myopathy with increased muscle regeneration and fibrosis starting from 1 year of age. This was likely...... caused by progressive loss of α-dystroglycan-specific glycosylation, which was decreased by 78% at 20 months. The homozygous FKRP knockout was embryonic lethal, but the hemizygous L276I model resembled the homozygous FKRP L276I model at comparable ages. These models emphasize the importance of FKRP...

  10. Analysis of wrinkled membrane structures based on a wrinkle-wave model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mingjun Liu

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available As research on the applications of high-precision membrane structures develops, wrinkling has become a popular topic. Here, we present a new wrinkle-wave model to describe wrinkles more accurately. First, the characteristics of wrinkle-waves that result from radial tension stress applied at the vertex of a triangular structure were analyzed. However, for polygonal structures under more than two tensions, the influence of the other vertexes should also be considered. Therefore, by introducing a load ratio, we constructed a wrinkle-wave model of a square membrane structure subjected to corner forces. This model is applicable to various loading cases and polygonal membrane structures. Comparison among the results of the finite element analysis, and the experimental and analytical results showed that the proposed model more accurately described the wrinkling details and solved the problem of convergence that is encountered during finite element analysis.

  11. Lattice solution model for order-disorder transitions in membranes and Langmuir monolayers

    CERN Document Server

    Guidi, Henrique S

    2013-01-01

    Lipid monolayers and bilayers have been used as experimental models for the investigation of membrane thermal transitions. The main transition takes place near ambient temperatures for several lipids and reflects the order-disorder transition of lipid hydrocarbonic chains, which is accompanied by a small density gap. Equivalence between the transitions in the two systems has been argued by several authors. The two-state statistical model adopted by numerous authors for different properties of the membrane, such as permeability, diffusion, mixture or insertion of cholesterol or protein, is inadequate for the description of charged membranes, since it lacks a proper description of surface density. We propose a lattice solution model which adds interactions with water molecules to lipid-lipid interactions and obtain its thermal properties under a mean-field approach. Density variations, although concomitant with chain order variations, are independent of the latter. The model presents both chain order and gas-li...

  12. Development of a Comprehensive Fouling Model for a Rotating Membrane Bioreactor System Treating Wastewater

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parneet Paul

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Membrane bioreactors (MBRs are now main stream wastewater treatment technologies. In recent times, novel pressure driven rotating membrane disc modules have been specially developed that induce high shear on the membrane surface, thereby reducing fouling. Previous research has produced dead-end filtration fouling model which combines all three classical mechanisms that was later used by another researcher as a starting point for a greatly refined model of a cross flow side-stream MBR that incorporated both hydrodynamics and soluble microbial products’ (SMP effects. In this study, a comprehensive fouling model was created based on this earlier work that incorporated all three classical fouling mechanisms for a rotating MBR system. It was tested and validated for best fit using appropriate data sets. The initial model fit appeared good for all simulations, although it still needs to be calibrated using further appropriate data sets.

  13. A New Mouse Model of Limb-Girdle Muscular Dystrophy Type 2I Homozygous for the Common L276I Mutation Mimicking the Mild Phenotype in Humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krag, Thomas O; Vissing, John

    2015-12-01

    Limb-girdle muscular dystrophy type 2I (LGMD2I) is caused by mutations in the Fukutin-related protein (FKRP) gene, leading to inadequate glycosylation of α-dystroglycan, an important protein linking the extracellular matrix to the cytoskeleton. We created a mouse model of the common FKRP L276I mutation and a hemizygous FKRP L276I knockout model. We studied histopathology and protein expression in the models at different ages and found that homozygous FKRP L276I mice developed a mild progressive myopathy with increased muscle regeneration and fibrosis starting from 1 year of age. This was likely caused by progressive loss of α-dystroglycan-specific glycosylation, which was decreased by 78% at 20 months. The homozygous FKRP knockout was embryonic lethal, but the hemizygous L276I model resembled the homozygous FKRP L276I model at comparable ages. These models emphasize the importance of FKRP in maintaining proper glycosylation of α-dystroglycan. The mild progression in the homozygous FKRP L276I model resembles that in patients with LGMD2I who are homozygous for the L276I mutation. This animal model could, therefore, be relevant for understanding the pathophysiology of and developing a treatment strategy for the human disorder.

  14. A Novel Chip for Cyclic Stretch and Intermittent Hypoxia Cell Exposures Mimicking Obstructive Sleep Apnea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campillo, Noelia; Jorba, Ignasi; Schaedel, Laura; Casals, Blai; Gozal, David; Farré, Ramon; Almendros, Isaac; Navajas, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Intermittent hypoxia (IH), a hallmark of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA), plays a critical role in the pathogenesis of OSA-associated morbidities, especially in the cardiovascular and respiratory systems. Oxidative stress and inflammation induced by IH are suggested as main contributors of end-organ dysfunction in OSA patients and animal models. Since the molecular mechanisms underlying these in vivo pathological responses remain poorly understood, implementation of experimental in vitro cell-based systems capable of inducing high-frequency IH would be highly desirable. Here, we describe the design, fabrication, and validation of a versatile chip for subjecting cultured cells to fast changes in gas partial pressure and to cyclic stretch. The chip is fabricated with polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) and consists of a cylindrical well-covered by a thin membrane. Cells cultured on top of the membrane can be subjected to fast changes in oxygen concentration (equilibrium time ~6 s). Moreover, cells can be subjected to cyclic stretch at cardiac or respiratory frequencies independently or simultaneously. Rat bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) exposed to IH mimicking OSA and cyclic stretch at cardiac frequencies revealed that hypoxia-inducible factor 1α (HIF-1α) expression was increased in response to both stimuli. Thus, the chip provides a versatile tool for the study of cellular responses to cyclical hypoxia and stretch. PMID:27524971

  15. A Novel Chip for Cyclic Stretch and Intermittent Hypoxia Cell Exposures Mimicking Obstructive Sleep Apnea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noelia Campillo

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Intermittent hypoxia (IH, a hallmark of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA, plays a critical role in the pathogenesis of OSA-associated morbidities, especially in the cardiovascular and respiratory systems. Oxidative stress and inflammation induced by IH are suggested as main contributors of end-organ dysfunction in OSA patients and animal models. Since the molecular mechanisms underlying these in vivo pathological responses remain poorly understood, implementation of experimental in vitro cell-based systems capable of inducing high-frequency IH would be highly desirable. Here, we describe the design, fabrication and validation of a versatile chip for subjecting cultured cells to fast changes in gas partial pressure and to cyclic stretch. The chip is fabricated with polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS and consists of a cylindrical well covered by a thin membrane. Cells cultured on top of the membrane can be subjected to fast changes in oxygen concentration (equilibrium time 6 s. Moreover, cells can be subjected to cyclic stretch at cardiac or respiratory frequencies independently or simultaneously. Rat bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs exposed to IH mimicking OSA and cyclic stretch at cardiac frequencies revealed that hypoxia-inducible factor 1α (HIF-1α expression was increased in response to both stimuli. Thus, the chip provides a versatile tool for the study of cellular responses to cyclical hypoxia and stretch.

  16. Atomic Force Microscopy Study of the Interactions of Indolicidin with Model Membranes and DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fojan, Peter; Gurevich, Leonid

    2017-01-01

    The cell membrane is the first barrier and quite often the primary target that antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) have to destroy or penetrate to fulfill their mission. Upon penetrating through the membrane, the peptides can further attack intracellular targets, in particular DNA. Studying the interaction of an antimicrobial peptide with a cell membrane and DNA holds keys to understanding its killing mechanisms. Commonly, these interactions are studied by using optical or scanning electron microscopy and appropriately labeled peptides. However, labeling can significantly affect the hydrophobicity, conformation, and size of the peptide, hence altering the interaction significantly. Here, we describe the use of atomic force microscopy (AFM) for a label-free study of the interactions of peptides with model membranes under physiological conditions and DNA as a possible intracellular target.

  17. Basement membrane chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan alterations in a rat model of polycystic kidney disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ehara, T; Carone, F A; McCarthy, K J;

    1994-01-01

    Alterations in basement membrane components, notably proteoglycans, in a rat model of polycystic kidney disease have been investigated. Rats were fed phenol II (2-amino-4-hydroxyphenyl-5-phenyl thiazole) for 4 days and then changed to normal diet for a 7-day recovery period. Marked dilation...... of distal tubules and collecting ducts was observed by 4 days with phenol II treatment, but the morphology returned to normal after 7 days of subsequent normal diet. Staining of tissue sections with two mouse monoclonal antibodies to a recently described basement membrane chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan...... membrane heparan sulfate proteoglycan core protein related to perlecan did not diminish but rather stained affected tubules intensely, whereas laminin, on the other hand, was apparently diminished in the basement membranes of the cystic tubules. Type IV collagen staining did not change through disease...

  18. Artificial cell membranes for diagnostics and therapeutics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Charych, D.; Nagy, J.O. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (United States)

    1996-09-01

    Receptors on the membrane can recognize and bind extracellular molecules and convert that event into signals that elicit molecular changes within the cell. These two properties alone--molecular recognition and signal transduction--make the cell membrane an attractive model for designing novel biosensors or therapeutics. Natural cell membranes, however, are highly complex; mimicking the intricate choreography of the cell`s daily activities would be a daunting task. Instead, the authors turn to simpler, synthetic versions of the cell, where they can build in the components that give rise to specific activities and functions, one at a time. The process of forming artificial membranes is identical to that of forming natural membranes and is sometimes referred to as molecular self-assembly. From a practical point of view, the process is simple, because no external intervention is required--the molecules organize themselves into useful structures. The molecules that constitute the membranes are amphiphilic and therefore will spontaneously form lipid aggregates when mixed with water.

  19. Nuclide separation modeling through reverse osmosis membranes in radioactive liquid waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Byung Sik [KEPCO Engineering and Construction, Gimcheon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-12-15

    The aim of this work is to investigate the transport mechanism of radioactive nuclides through the reverse osmosis (RO) membrane and to estimate its effectiveness for nuclide separation from radioactive liquid waste. An analytical model is developed to simulate the RO separation, and a series of experiments are set up to confirm its estimated separation behavior. The model is based on the extended Nernst-Plank equation, which handles the convective flux, diffusive flux, and electromigration flux under electroneutrality and zero electric current conditions. The distribution coefficient which arises due to ion interactions with the membrane material and the electric potential jump at the membrane interface are included as boundary conditions in solving the equation. A high Peclet approximation is adopted to simplify the calculation, but the effect of concentration polarization is included for a more accurate prediction of separation. Cobalt and cesium are specifically selected for the experiments in order to check the separation mechanism from liquid waste composed of various radioactive nuclides and nonradioactive substances, and the results are compared with the estimated cobalt and cesium rejections of the RO membrane using the model. Experimental and calculated results are shown to be in excellent agreement. The proposed model will be very useful for the prediction of separation behavior of various radioactive nuclides by the RO membrane.

  20. Experimental investigation and modeling of industrial oily wastewater treatment using modified polyethersulfone ultrafiltration hollow fiber membranes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salahi, Abdolhamid; Mohammadi, Toraj [Iran University of Science and Technology (IUST), Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Behbahani, Reza Mosayebi [Petroleum University of Technology (PUT), Ahwaz (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Hemmati, Mahmood [Research Institute of Petroleum Industry, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2015-06-15

    Hollow fiber membranes were prepared from polyethersulfone/additives/NMP and DMSO system via phase inversion induced by precipitation in non-solvent coagulation bath. The interaction effects of polyethylene-glycol (PEG), propionic-acid (PA), Tween-20, PEG molecular weight and polyvinyl-pyrrolidone (PVP) on morphology and performance of synthesized membranes were investigated. Taguchi method (L{sub 16} orthogonal array) was used initially to plan a minimum number of experiments. 32 membranes were synthesized (with two replications) and their permeation flux and TOC rejection properties to oily wastewater treatment were studied. The obtained results indicated that addition of PA to spinning dope decreases flux while it increases TOC rejection of prepared membranes. Also, the result shows that addition of PVP, Tween-20 and PEG content in spinning dope enhances permeation flux while reducing TOC rejection. The obtained results indicated that the synthesized membranes was effective and suitable for treatment of the oily wastewater to achieve up to 92.6, 98.2, and 98.5% removal of TOC, TSS, and OGC, respectively with a flux of 247.19 L/(m{sup 2}h). Moreover, Hermia's models were used for permeation flux decline prediction. Experimental data and models predictions were compared. The results showed that there is reasonable agreement between experimental data and the cake layer model followed by the intermediate blocking model.

  1. Nuclide separation modeling through reverse osmosis membranes in radioactive liquid waste

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Byung-Sik Lee

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this work is to investigate the transport mechanism of radioactive nuclides through the reverse osmosis (RO membrane and to estimate its effectiveness for nuclide separation from radioactive liquid waste. An analytical model is developed to simulate the RO separation, and a series of experiments are set up to confirm its estimated separation behavior. The model is based on the extended Nernst–Plank equation, which handles the convective flux, diffusive flux, and electromigration flux under electroneutrality and zero electric current conditions. The distribution coefficient which arises due to ion interactions with the membrane material and the electric potential jump at the membrane interface are included as boundary conditions in solving the equation. A high Peclet approximation is adopted to simplify the calculation, but the effect of concentration polarization is included for a more accurate prediction of separation. Cobalt and cesium are specifically selected for the experiments in order to check the separation mechanism from liquid waste composed of various radioactive nuclides and nonradioactive substances, and the results are compared with the estimated cobalt and cesium rejections of the RO membrane using the model. Experimental and calculated results are shown to be in excellent agreement. The proposed model will be very useful for the prediction of separation behavior of various radioactive nuclides by the RO membrane.

  2. Modelling heat and mass transfer in a membrane-based air-to-air enthalpy exchanger

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dugaria, S.; Moro, L.; Del, D., Col

    2015-11-01

    The diffusion of total energy recovery systems could lead to a significant reduction in the energy demand for building air-conditioning. With these devices, sensible heat and humidity can be recovered in winter from the exhaust airstream, while, in summer, the incoming air stream can be cooled and dehumidified by transferring the excess heat and moisture to the exhaust air stream. Membrane based enthalpy exchangers are composed by different channels separated by semi-permeable membranes. The membrane allows moisture transfer under vapour pressure difference, or water concentration difference, between the two sides and, at the same time, it is ideally impermeable to air and other contaminants present in exhaust air. Heat transfer between the airstreams occurs through the membrane due to the temperature gradient. The aim of this work is to develop a detailed model of the coupled heat and mass transfer mechanisms through the membrane between the two airstreams. After a review of the most relevant models published in the scientific literature, the governing equations are presented and some simplifying assumptions are analysed and discussed. As a result, a steady-state, two-dimensional finite difference numerical model is setup. The developed model is able to predict temperature and humidity evolution inside the channels. Sensible and latent heat transfer rate, as well as moisture transfer rate, are determined. A sensitive analysis is conducted in order to determine the more influential parameters on the thermal and vapour transfer.

  3. On the study of catalytic membrane reactor for water detritiation: Modeling approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liger, Karine, E-mail: karine.liger@cea.fr [CEA, DEN, DTN/SMTA/LIPC Cadarache, Saint Paul-lez-Durance F-13108 (France); Mascarade, Jérémy [CEA, DEN, DTN/SMTA/LIPC Cadarache, Saint Paul-lez-Durance F-13108 (France); Joulia, Xavier; Meyer, Xuan-Mi [Université de Toulouse, INPT, UPS, Laboratoire de Génie Chimique, 4, Allée Emile Monso, Toulouse F-31030 (France); CNRS, Laboratoire de Génie Chimique, Toulouse F-31030 (France); Troulay, Michèle; Perrais, Christophe [CEA, DEN, DTN/SMTA/LIPC Cadarache, Saint Paul-lez-Durance F-13108 (France)

    2016-11-01

    Highlights: • Experimental results for the conversion of tritiated water (using deuterium as a simulant of tritium) by means of a catalytic membrane reactor in view of tritium recovery. • Phenomenological 2D model to represent catalytic membrane reactor behavior including the determination of the compositions of gaseous effluents. • Good agreement between the simulation results and experimental measurements performed on the dedicated facility. • Explanation of the unexpected behavior of the catalytic membrane reactor by the modeling results and in particular the gas composition estimation. - Abstract: In the framework of tritium recovery from tritiated water, efficiency of packed bed membrane reactors have been successfully demonstrated. Thanks to protium isotope swamping, tritium bonded water can be recovered under the valuable Q{sub 2} form (Q = H, D or T) by means of isotope exchange reactions occurring on catalyst surface. The use of permselective Pd-based membrane allows withdrawal of reactions products all along the reactor, and thus limits reverse reaction rate to the benefit of the direct one (shift effect). The reactions kinetics, which are still little known or unknown, are generally assumed to be largely greater than the permeation ones so that thermodynamic equilibriums of isotope exchange reactions are generally assumed. This paper proposes a new phenomenological 2D model to represent catalytic membrane reactor behavior with the determination of gas effluents compositions. A good agreement was obtained between the simulation results and experimental measurements performed on a dedicated facility. Furthermore, the gas composition estimation permits to interpret unexpected behavior of the catalytic membrane reactor. In the next future, further sensitivity analysis will be performed to determine the limits of the model and a kinetics study will be conducted to assess the thermodynamic equilibrium of reactions.

  4. Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cell Modeling Based on Seeker Optimization Algorithm

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Qi; DAI Chao-hua; Chen Wei-rong; JIA Jun-bo; HAN Ming

    2008-01-01

    Seeker optimization algorithm (SOA) has applications in continuous space of swarm intelligence. In the fields of proton ex-change membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) modeling, SOA was proposed to research a set of optimized parameters in PEMFC polariza-tion curve model. Experimental result showed that the mean square error of the optimization modeling strategy was only 6.9 × 10-23. Hence, the optimization model could fit the experiment data with high precision.

  5. Partitioning, diffusion, and ligand binding of raft lipid analogs in model and cellular plasma membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sezgin, Erdinc; Levental, Ilya; Grzybek, Michal; Schwarzmann, Günter; Mueller, Veronika; Honigmann, Alf; Belov, Vladimir N; Eggeling, Christian; Coskun, Unal; Simons, Kai; Schwille, Petra

    2012-07-01

    Several simplified membrane models featuring coexisting liquid disordered (Ld) and ordered (Lo) lipid phases have been developed to mimic the heterogeneous organization of cellular membranes, and thus, aid our understanding of the nature and functional role of ordered lipid-protein nanodomains, termed "rafts". In spite of their greatly reduced complexity, quantitative characterization of local lipid environments using model membranes is not trivial, and the parallels that can be drawn to cellular membranes are not always evident. Similarly, various fluorescently labeled lipid analogs have been used to study membrane organization and function in vitro, although the biological activity of these probes in relation to their native counterparts often remains uncharacterized. This is particularly true for raft-preferring lipids ("raft lipids", e.g. sphingolipids and sterols), whose domain preference is a strict function of their molecular architecture, and is thus susceptible to disruption by fluorescence labeling. Here, we analyze the phase partitioning of a multitude of fluorescent raft lipid analogs in synthetic Giant Unilamellar Vesicles (GUVs) and cell-derived Giant Plasma Membrane Vesicles (GPMVs). We observe complex partitioning behavior dependent on label size, polarity, charge and position, lipid headgroup, and membrane composition. Several of the raft lipid analogs partitioned into the ordered phase in GPMVs, in contrast to fully synthetic GUVs, in which most raft lipid analogs mis-partitioned to the disordered phase. This behavior correlates with the greatly enhanced order difference between coexisting phases in the synthetic system. In addition, not only partitioning, but also ligand binding of the lipids is perturbed upon labeling: while cholera toxin B binds unlabeled GM1 in the Lo phase, it binds fluorescently labeled GMI exclusively in the Ld phase. Fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) by stimulated emission depletion (STED) nanoscopy on intact

  6. Modeling the electrostatic potential of asymmetric lipopolysaccharide membranes: the MEMPOT algorithm implemented in DelPhi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dias, Roberta P; Li, Lin; Soares, Thereza A; Alexov, Emil

    2014-07-15

    Four chemotypes of the rough lipopolysaccharides (LPS) membrane from Pseudomonas aeruginosa were investigated by a combined approach of explicit water molecular dynamics (MD) simulations and Poisson-Boltzmann continuum electrostatics with the goal to deliver the distribution of the electrostatic potential across the membrane. For the purpose of this investigation, a new tool for modeling the electrostatic potential profile along the axis normal to the membrane, MEMbrane POTential (MEMPOT), was developed and implemented in DelPhi. Applying MEMPOT on the snapshots obtained by MD simulations, two observations were made: (a) the average electrostatic potential has a complex profile but is mostly positive inside the membrane due to the presence of Ca(2+) ions, which overcompensate for the negative potential created by lipid phosphate groups; and (b) correct modeling of the electrostatic potential profile across the membrane requires taking into account the water phase, while neglecting it (vacuum calculations) results in dramatic changes including a reversal of the sign of the potential inside the membrane. Furthermore, using DelPhi to assign different dielectric constants for different regions of the LPS membranes, it was investigated whether a single frame structure before MD simulations with appropriate dielectric constants for the lipid tails, inner, and the external leaflet regions, can deliver the same average electrostatic potential distribution as obtained from the MD-generated ensemble of structures. Indeed, this can be attained by using smaller dielectric constant for the tail and inner leaflet regions (mostly hydrophobic) than for the external leaflet region (hydrophilic) and the optimal dielectric constant values are chemotype-specific.

  7. Modelling Ser129 phosphorylation inhibits membrane binding of pore-forming alpha-synuclein oligomers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Georg Sebastian Nübling

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: In several neurodegenerative diseases, hyperphosphorylation at position Ser129 is found in fibrillar deposits of alpha-synuclein (asyn, implying a pathophysiological role of asyn phosphorylation in neurodegeneration. However, recent animal models applying asyn phosphorylation mimics demonstrated a protective effect of phosphorylation. Since metal-ion induced asyn oligomers were identified as a potential neurotoxic aggregate species with membrane pore-forming abilities, the current study was undertaken to determine effects of asyn phosphorylation on oligomer membrane binding. METHODS: We investigated the influence of S129 phosphorylation on interactions of metal-ion induced asyn oligomers with small unilamellar lipid vesicles (SUV composed of POPC and DPPC applying the phosphorylation mimic asyn129E. Confocal single-particle fluorescence techniques were used to monitor membrane binding at the single-particle level. RESULTS: Binding of asyn129E monomers to gel-state membranes (DPPC-SUV is slightly reduced compared to wild-type asyn, while no interactions with membranes in the liquid-crystalline state (POPC-SUV are seen for both asyn and asyn129E. Conversely, metal-ion induced oligomer formation is markedly increased in asyn129E. Surprisingly, membrane binding to POPC-SUV is nearly absent in Fe(3+ induced asyn129E oligomers and markedly reduced in Al(3+ induced oligomers. CONCLUSION: The protective effect of pseudophosphorylation seen in animal models may be due to impeded oligomer membrane binding. Phosphorylation at Ser129 may thus have a protective effect against neurotoxic asyn oligomers by preventing oligomer membrane binding and disruption of the cellular electrophysiological equilibrium. Importantly, these findings put a new complexion on experimental pharmaceutical interventions against POLO-2 kinase.

  8. Mathematical models of membrane fouling in cross-flow micro-filtration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mónica Jimena Ortíz Jerez

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available The greatest difficulty arising during cross-flow micro-filtration is the formation of a cake layer on the membrane sur-face (also called fouling, thereby affecting system performance. Fouling has been related to permeate flux decay re-sulting from changes in operating variables. Many articles have been published in an attempt to explain this phe-nomenon but it has not yet been fully understood because it depends on specific solution/membrane interactions and differing parameters. This work was aimed at presenting an analytical review of recently published mathematical models to explain fouling. Although the reviewed models can be adjusted to any type of application, a simple “con-centration polarisation” model is advisable in the particular case of tropical fruit juices for describing the insoluble solids being deposited on membrane surface.

  9. Theoretical Model for the Formation of Caveolae and Similar Membrane Invaginations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sens, Pierre; Turner, Matthew S.

    2004-01-01

    We study a physical model for the formation of bud-like invaginations on fluid lipid membranes under tension, and apply this model to caveolae formation. We demonstrate that budding can be driven by membrane-bound proteins, provided that they exert asymmetric forces on the membrane that give rise to bending moments. In particular, caveolae formation does not necessarily require forces to be applied by the cytoskeleton. Our theoretical model is able to explain several features observed experimentally in caveolae, where proteins in the caveolin family are known to play a crucial role in the formation of caveolae buds. These include 1), the formation of caveolae buds with sizes in the 100-nm range and 2), that certain N- and C-termini deletion mutants result in vesicles that are an order-of-magnitude larger. Finally, we discuss the possible origin of the morphological striations that are observed on the surfaces of the caveolae. PMID:15041647

  10. A generic model for lipid monolayers, bilayers, and membranes

    CERN Document Server

    Schmid, F; Lenz, O; West, B

    2007-01-01

    We describe a simple coarse-grained model which is suited to study lipid layers and their phase transitions. Lipids are modeled by short semiflexible chains of beads with a solvophilic head and a solvophobic tail component. They are forced to self-assemble into bilayers by a computationally cheap `phantom solvent' environment. The model reproduces the most important phases and phase transitions of monolayers and bilayers. Technical issues such as Monte Carlo parallelization schemes are briefly discussed.

  11. Screening of different stress factors and development of growth/no growth models for Zygosaccharomyces rouxii in modified Sabouraud medium, mimicking intermediate moisture foods (IMF).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vermeulen, A; Daelman, J; Van Steenkiste, J; Devlieghere, F

    2012-12-01

    The microbial stability of intermediate moisture foods (IMF) is linked with the possible growth of osmophilic yeast and xerophilic moulds. As most of these products have a long shelf life the assessment of the microbial stability is often an important hurdle in product innovation. In this study a screening of several Zygosaccharomyces rouxii strains towards individual stress factors was performed and growth/no growth models were developed, incorporating a(w), pH, acetic acid and ethanol concentrations. These stress factors are important for sweet IMF such as chocolate fillings, ganache, marzipan, etc. A comparison was made between a logistic regression model with and without the incorporation of time as an explanatory variable. Next to the model development, a screening of the effect of chemical preservatives (sorbate and benzoate) was performed, in combination with relevant stress factors within the experimental design of the model. The results of the study showed that the influence of the investigated environmental stress factors on the growth/no growth boundary of Z. rouxii is the most significant in the first 30-40 days of incubation. Incorporating time as an explanatory variable in the model had the advantage that the growth/no growth boundary could be predicted at each time between 0 and 60 days of incubation at 22 °C. However, the growth/no growth boundary enlarged significantly leading to a less accurate prediction on the growth probability of Z. rouxii. The developed models can be a useful tool for product developers of sweet IMF. Screening with chemical preservatives revealed that benzoic acid was much less active towards Z. rouxii than sorbic acid or a mixture of both acids. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Solving Problem of Graph Isomorphism by Membrane-Quantum Hybrid Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Artiom Alhazov

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available This work presents the application of new parallelization methods based on membrane-quantum hybrid computing to graph isomorphism problem solving. Applied membrane-quantum hybrid computational model was developed by authors. Massive parallelism of unconventional computing is used to implement classic brute force algorithm efficiently. This approach does not suppose any restrictions of considered graphs types. The estimated performance of the model is less then quadratic that makes a very good result for the problem of \\textbf{NP} complexity.

  13. Membrane configuration optimization for a murine in vitro blood-brain barrier model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wuest, Diane M; Wing, Allison M; Lee, Kelvin H

    2013-01-30

    A powerful experimental tool used to study the dynamic functions of the blood-brain barrier (BBB) is an in vitro cellular based system utilizing cell culture inserts in multi-well plates. Currently, usage of divergent model configurations without explanation of selected variable set points renders data comparisons difficult and limits widespread understanding. This work presents for the first time in literature a comprehensive screening study to optimize membrane configuration, with aims to unveil influential membrane effects on the ability of cerebral endothelial cells to form a tight monolayer. First, primary murine brain endothelial cells and astrocytes were co-cultured in contact and non-contact orientations on membranes of pore diameter sizes ranging from 0.4 μm to 8.0 μm, and the non-contact orientation and smallest pore diameter size were shown to support a significantly tighter monolayer formation. Then, membranes made from polyethylene terephthalate (PET) and polycarbonate (PC) purchased from three different commercial sources were compared, and PET membranes purchased from two manufacturers facilitated a significantly tighter monolayer formation. Models were characterized by transendothelial electrical resistance (TEER), sodium fluorescein permeability, and immunocytochemical labeling of tight junction proteins. Finally, a murine brain endothelial cell line, bEnd.3, was grown on the different membranes, and similar results were obtained with respect to optimal membrane configuration selection. The results and methodology presented here on high throughput 24-well plate inserts can be translated to other BBB systems to advance model understanding. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. A New Mouse Model of Limb-Girdle Muscular Dystrophy Type 2I Homozygous for the Common L276I Mutation Mimicking the Mild Phenotype in Humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krag, Thomas O; Vissing, John

    2015-01-01

    Limb-girdle muscular dystrophy type 2I (LGMD2I) is caused by mutations in the Fukutin-related protein (FKRP) gene, leading to inadequate glycosylation of α-dystroglycan, an important protein linking the extracellular matrix to the cytoskeleton. We created a mouse model of the common FKRP L276I...

  15. Mimicking the action of folding chaperones by Hamiltonian replica-exchange molecular dynamics simulations : Application in the refinement of de novo models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fan, Hao; Periole, Xavier; Mark, Alan E.

    2012-01-01

    The efficiency of using a variant of Hamiltonian replica-exchange molecular dynamics (Chaperone H-replica-exchange molecular dynamics [CH-REMD]) for the refinement of protein structural models generated de novo is investigated. In CH-REMD, the interaction between the protein and its environment, spe

  16. In the hunt for therapeutic targets: mimicking the growth, metastasis, and stromal associations of early-stage lung cancer using a novel orthotopic animal model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, Ido D; Ella, Ezra; Dominsky, Omri; Smith, Yoav; Abraham, Michal; Wald, Hanna; Shlomai, Zippora; Zamir, Gideon; Feigelson, Sara W; Shezen, Elias; Bar-Shai, Amir; Alon, Ronen; Izhar, Uzi; Peled, Amnon; Shapira, Oz M; Wald, Ori

    2015-01-01

    The existing shortage of animal models that properly mimic the progression of early-stage human lung cancer from a solitary confined tumor to an invasive metastatic disease hinders accurate characterization of key interactions between lung cancer cells and their stroma. We herein describe a novel orthotopic animal model that addresses these concerns and consequently serves as an attractive platform to study tumor-stromal cell interactions under conditions that reflect early-stage lung cancer. Unlike previous methodologies, we directly injected small numbers of human or murine lung cancer cells into murine's left lung and longitudinally monitored disease progression. Next, we used green fluorescent protein-tagged tumor cells and immuno-fluorescent staining to determine the tumor's microanatomic distribution and to look for tumor-infiltrating immune cells and stromal cells. Finally, we compared chemokine gene expression patterns in the tumor and lung microenvironment. We successfully generated a solitary pulmonary nodule surrounded by normal lung parenchyma that grew locally and spread distally over time. Notably, we found that both fibroblasts and leukocytes are recruited to the tumor's margins and that distinct myeloid cell attracting and CCR2-binding chemokines are specifically induced in the tumor microenvironment. Our orthotopic lung cancer model closely mimics the pathologic sequence of events that characterizes early-stage human lung cancer propagation. It further introduces new means to monitor tumor-stromal cell interactions and offers unique opportunities to test therapeutic targets under conditions that reflect early-stage lung cancer. We argue that for such purposes our model is superior to lung cancer models that are based either on genetic induction of epithelial transformation or on ectopic transplantation of malignant cells.

  17. Predictive model of transport properties of fuel cell membrane : from microscopic to macroscopic level

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Colinart, T.; Lottin, O.; Maranzana, G.; Didierjean, S.; Moyne, C. [Nancy-Univ., Vandoeuvre-les-Nancy (France). Laboratoire d' Energetique et de Mecanique Theorique et Appliquee

    2007-07-01

    Because of their attractiveness as efficient and clean energy producers, proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFC) can be used in automotive and small stationary applications. The electrochemical reaction takes place on two electrodes separated by a ionomer membrane. An important component of fuel cell water management and a problem for fuel cell performances involves the transport of protons from the anode to the cathode as its' transport properties are highly water dependent. Nafion membranes are widely used as an electrolyte for PEMFC. This paper presented a model to predict transport properties of polymer membranes such as Nafion used as electrolytes in a low temperature fuel cell. The paper discussed the electrical double layer that was used to determine surface charge density. The paper then discussed the analytical solution to the physical problem in the diffuse part of a cylindrical pore which involved solving the Poisson-Boltzmann, the Navier-Stokes and the Nernst-Planck equations. The properties of the electrolytic solution were equal to those of water and they were considered to be constant within the pore. A literature comparison with other models was also presented. It was concluded that in order to supplement the model, it is necessary to investigate the mechanics of the membrane, particularly the swelling behaviour, and the adsorption phenomena of the ions in the stern layer. 15 refs., 1 tab., 3 figs.

  18. Modeling the Influence of Transport on Chemical Reactivity in Microbial Membranes: Mineral Precipitation/Dissolution Reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felmy, A. R.; Liu, C.; Clark, S.; Straatsma, T.; Rustad, J.

    2003-12-01

    It has long been known that microorganisms can alter the chemical composition of their immediate surroundings and influence such processes as ion uptake or adsorption and mineral precipitation dissolution. However, only recently have molecular imaging and molecular modeling capabilities been developed that begin to shed light on the nature of these processes at the nm to um scale at the surface of bacterial membranes. In this presentation we will show the results of recent molecular simulations of microbial surface reactions and describe our efforts to develop accurate non-equilibrium thermodynamic models for the microbial surface that can describe ion uptake and surface induced mineral precipitation. The thermodynamic models include the influence of the bacterial electrical double layer on the uptake of ions from solution and the removal, or exclusion, of ions from the surface of the cell, non-equilibrium diffusion and chemical reaction within the membrane, as well as a new thermodynamic approach to representing ion activities within the microbial membrane. In the latter case, the variability in the water content within the microbial membrane has a significant influence on the calculated mineral saturation indices. In such cases, we will propose the use of recently developed mixed solvent-electrolyte formalisms. Recent experimental data for mixed-solvent electrolyte systems will also be presented to demonstrate the potential impact of the variable water content on calculated ion activities within the membrane.

  19. A QSAR model for predicting rejection of emerging contaminants (pharmaceuticals, endocrine disruptors) by nanofiltration membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yangali-Quintanilla, Victor; Sadmani, Anwar; McConville, Megan; Kennedy, Maria; Amy, Gary

    2010-01-01

    A quantitative structure activity relationship (QSAR) model has been produced for predicting rejection of emerging contaminants (pharmaceuticals, endocrine disruptors, pesticides and other organic compounds) by polyamide nanofiltration (NF) membranes. Principal component analysis, partial least square regression and multiple linear regressions were used to find a general QSAR equation that combines interactions between membrane characteristics, filtration operating conditions and compound properties for predicting rejection. Membrane characteristics related to hydrophobicity (contact angle), salt rejection, and surface charge (zeta potential); compound properties describing hydrophobicity (log K(ow), log D), polarity (dipole moment), and size (molar volume, molecular length, molecular depth, equivalent width, molecular weight); and operating conditions namely flux, pressure, cross flow velocity, back diffusion mass transfer coefficient, hydrodynamic ratio (J(o)/k), and recovery were identified as candidate variables for rejection prediction. An experimental database produced by the authors that accounts for 106 rejection cases of emerging contaminants by NF membranes as result of eight experiments with clean and fouled membranes (NF-90, NF-200) was used to produce the QSAR model. Subsequently, using the QSAR model, rejection predictions were made for external experimental databases. Actual rejections were compared against predicted rejections and acceptable R(2) correlation coefficients were found (0.75 and 0.84) for the best models. Additionally, leave-one-out cross-validation of the models achieved a Q(2) of 0.72 for internal validation. In conclusion, a unified general QSAR equation was able to predict rejections of emerging contaminants during nanofiltration; moreover the present approach is a basis to continue investigation using multivariate analysis techniques for understanding membrane rejection of organic compounds.

  20. Selective Interaction of a Cationic Polyfluorene with Model Lipid Membranes: Anionic versus Zwitterionic Lipids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zehra Kahveci

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper explores the interaction mechanism between the conjugated polyelectrolyte {[9,9-bis(6'-N,N,N-trimethylammoniumhexyl]fluorene-phenylene}bromide (HTMA-PFP and model lipid membranes. The study was carried out using different biophysical techniques, mainly fluorescence spectroscopy and microscopy. Results show that despite the preferential interaction of HTMA-PFP with anionic lipids, HTMA-PFP shows affinity for zwitterionic lipids; although the interaction mechanism is different as well as HTMA-PFP’s final membrane location. Whilst the polyelectrolyte is embedded within the lipid bilayer in the anionic membrane, it remains close to the surface, forming aggregates that are sensitive to the physical state of the lipid bilayer in the zwitterionic system. The different interaction mechanism is reflected in the polyelectrolyte fluorescence spectrum, since the maximum shifts to longer wavelengths in the zwitterionic system. The intrinsic fluorescence of HTMA-PFP was used to visualize the interaction between polymer and vesicles via fluorescence microscopy, thanks to its high quantum yield and photostability. This technique allows the selectivity of the polyelectrolyte and higher affinity for anionic membranes to be observed. The results confirmed the appropriateness of using HTMA-PFP as a membrane fluorescent marker and suggest that, given its different behaviour towards anionic and zwitterionic membranes, HTMA-PFP could be used for selective recognition and imaging of bacteria over mammalian cells.

  1. A kinetic model for the effects of vanadate on human erythrocyte membrane

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张天蓝; 王夔

    1999-01-01

    The effects of vanadate on human erythrocyte membrane have been investigated with stopped-flow and equilibrium fluorescence quenching techniques. The equilibrium study showed a half-quenching concentration (K1/2) of 0.27 mmol·L-1. The stopped-flow experiment exhibited a fast rise (t1、2f~1s) and a slow drop (t1/2s 1~2 min) in fluorescence. Based on the results and that from the across membrane transport of vanadate, a kinetic model is proposed which suggests that the membrane proteins experience a series of conformational changes before and during the quenching of the intrinsic fluorescence. These changes are induced mainly by three kinds of interactions: (i) the long-distance, non-specific interaction between the vanadate and the erythrocyte membrane surface, (ⅱ) the charge interaction between the vanadate and parts of the membrane proteins, and(ⅲ) the binding of the vanadate to some membrane proteins.

  2. Delivery of human mesenchymal adipose-derived stem cells restores multiple urological dysfunctions in a rat model mimicking radical prostatectomy damages through tissue-specific paracrine mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yiou, René; Mahrouf-Yorgov, Meriem; Trébeau, Céline; Zanaty, Marc; Lecointe, Cécile; Souktani, Richard; Zadigue, Patricia; Figeac, Florence; Rodriguez, Anne-Marie

    2016-02-01

    Urinary incontinence (UI) and erectile dysfunction (ED) are the most common functional urological disorders and the main sequels of radical prostatectomy (RP) for prostate cancer. Mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) therapy holds promise for repairing tissue damage due to RP. Because animal studies accurately replicating post-RP clinical UI and ED are lacking, little is known about the mechanisms underlying the urological benefits of MSC in this setting. To determine whether and by which mechanisms MSC can repair damages to both striated urethral sphincter (SUS) and penis in the same animal, we delivered human multipotent adipose stem cells, used as MSC model, in an immunocompetent rat model replicating post-RP UI and ED. In this model, we demonstrated by using noninvasive methods in the same animal from day 7 to day 90 post-RP injury that MSC administration into both the SUS and the penis significantly improved urinary continence and erectile function. The regenerative effects of MSC therapy were not due to transdifferentiation and robust engraftment at injection sites. Rather, our results suggest that MSC benefits in both target organs may involve a paracrine process with not only soluble factor release by the MSC but also activation of the recipient's secretome. These two effects of MSC varied across target tissues and damaged-cell types. In conclusion, our work provides new insights into the regenerative properties of MSC and supports the ability of MSC from a single source to repair multiple types of damage, such as those seen after RP, in the same individual.

  3. Effects of phenylpropanolamine (PPA) on in vitro human erythrocyte membranes and molecular models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suwalsky, Mario, E-mail: msuwalsk@udec.cl [Faculty of Chemical Sciences, University of Concepcion, Concepcion (Chile); Zambrano, Pablo; Mennickent, Sigrid [Faculty of Pharmacy, University of Concepcion, Concepcion (Chile); Villena, Fernando [Faculty of Biological Sciences, University of Concepcion, Concepcion (Chile); Sotomayor, Carlos P.; Aguilar, Luis F. [Instituto de Quimica, Pontificia Universidad Catolica de Valparaiso, Valparaiso (Chile); Bolognin, Silvia [CNR-Institute for Biomedical Technologies, University of Padova, Padova (Italy)

    2011-03-18

    Research highlights: {yields} PPA is a common ingredient in cough-cold medication and appetite suppressants. {yields} Reports on its effects on human erythrocytes are very scarce. {yields} We found that PPA induced in vitro morphological changes to human erythrocytes. {yields} PPA interacted with isolated unsealed human erythrocyte membranes. {yields} PPA interacted with class of lipid present in the erythrocyte membrane outer monolayer. -- Abstract: Norephedrine, also called phenylpropanolamine (PPA), is a synthetic form of the ephedrine alkaloid. After reports of the occurrence of intracranial hemorrhage and other adverse effects, including several deaths, PPA is no longer sold in USA and Canada. Despite the extensive information about PPA toxicity, reports on its effects on cell membranes are scarce. With the aim to better understand the molecular mechanisms of the interaction of PPA with cell membranes, ranges of concentrations were incubated with intact human erythrocytes, isolated unsealed human erythrocyte membranes (IUM), and molecular models of cell membranes. The latter consisted in bilayers built-up of dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine (DMPC) and dimyristoylphosphatidylethanolamine (DMPE), phospholipid classes present in the outer and inner monolayers of most plasmatic cell membranes, respectively. The capacity of PPA to perturb the bilayer structures of DMPC and DMPE was assessed by X-ray diffraction, DMPC large unilamellar vesicles (LUV) and IUM were studied by fluorescence spectroscopy, and intact human erythrocytes were observed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). This study presents evidence that PPA affects human red cell membranes as follows: (a) in SEM studies on human erythrocytes it was observed that 0.5 mM PPA induced shape changes; (b) in IUM PPA induced a sharp decrease in the fluorescence anisotropy in the lipid bilayer acyl chains in a concentration range lower than 100 {mu}M; (c) X-ray diffraction studies showed that PPA in the 0.1-0.5 m

  4. Models of plasma membrane organization can be applied to mitochondrial membranes to target human health and disease with polyunsaturated fatty acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raza Shaikh, Saame; Brown, David A

    2013-01-01

    Bioactive n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA), abundant in fish oil, have potential for treating symptoms associated with inflammatory and metabolic disorders; therefore, it is essential to determine their fundamental molecular mechanisms. Recently, several labs have demonstrated the n-3 PUFA docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) exerts anti-inflammatory effects by targeting the molecular organization of plasma membrane microdomains. Here we briefly review the evidence that DHA reorganizes the spatial distribution of microdomains in several model systems. We then emphasize how models on DHA and plasma membrane microdomains can be applied to mitochondrial membranes. We discuss the role of DHA acyl chains in regulating mitochondrial lipid-protein clustering, and how these changes alter several aspects of mitochondrial function. In particular, we summarize effects of DHA on mitochondrial respiration, electron leak, permeability transition, and mitochondrial calcium handling. Finally, we conclude by postulating future experiments that will augment our understanding of DHA-dependent membrane organization in health and disease.

  5. A simple numerical model for membrane oxygenation of an artificial lung machine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subraveti, Sai Nikhil; Sai, P. S. T.; Viswanathan Pillai, Vinod Kumar; Patnaik, B. S. V.

    2015-11-01

    Optimal design of membrane oxygenators will have far reaching ramification in the development of artificial heart-lung systems. In the present CFD study, we simulate the gas exchange between the venous blood and air that passes through the hollow fiber membranes on a benchmark device. The gas exchange between the tube side fluid and the shell side venous liquid is modeled by solving mass, momentum conservation equations. The fiber bundle was modelled as a porous block with a bundle porosity of 0.6. The resistance offered by the fiber bundle was estimated by the standard Ergun correlation. The present numerical simulations are validated against available benchmark data. The effect of bundle porosity, bundle size, Reynolds number, non-Newtonian constitutive relation, upstream velocity distribution etc. on the pressure drop, oxygen saturation levels etc. are investigated. To emulate the features of gas transfer past the alveoli, the effect of pulsatility on the membrane oxygenation is also investigated.

  6. Cytochrome c location in phosphatidylcholine/cardiolipin model membranes: resonance energy transfer study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorbenko, Galina P; Domanov, Yegor A

    2003-03-25

    Resonance energy transfer between lipid-bound fluorescent probe 3-methoxybenzanthrone as a donor and heme group of cytochrome c as an acceptor has been examined to ascertain the protein disposition relative to the surface of model membranes composed of phosphatidylcholine and cardiolipin (10, 50 and 80 mol%). The model of energy transfer in membrane systems has been extended to the case of donors distributed between the two-bilayer leaflets and acceptors located at the outer monolayer taking into account the donor and acceptor orientational behavior. Assuming specific protein orientation relative to the membrane surface and varying lateral distance of the donor-acceptor closest approach in the range from 0 to 3.5 nm the limits for possible heme distances from the bilayer midplane have been found to be 0.8-3 nm (10 mol% CL), 0-2.6 nm (50 mol% CL), and 1.4-3.3 nm (80 mol% CL).

  7. Comparative inhibitory effects of Thymus vulgaris L. essential oil against Staphylococcus aureus, Listeria monocytogenes and mesophilic starter co-culture in cheese-mimicking models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Carvalho, Rayssa Julliane; de Souza, Geanny Targino; Honório, Vanessa Gonçalves; de Sousa, Jossana Pereira; da Conceição, Maria Lúcia; Maganani, Marciane; de Souza, Evandro Leite

    2015-12-01

    In the present study, we assessed the effects of Thymus vulgaris L. essential oil (TVEO) on Staphylococcus aureus and Listeria monocytogenes, pathogenic bacteria frequently associated with fresh or low-ripened cheeses (e.g., Brazilian coalho cheese), and on a starter co-culture comprising Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis and L. lactis subsp. cremoris, which are commonly used for the production of different cheeses. To measure these effects, we determined the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) and assessed bacterial cell viability over time in (coalho) cheese-based broth and in a semi-solid (coalho) cheese model at 10 °C. The MIC for TVEO was 2.5 μL/mL against S. aureus and L. monocytogenes, while the MIC was 1.25 μL/mL against the starter co-culture. The TVEO (5 and 2.5 μL/mL) sharply reduced the viable counts of all assayed bacteria in cheese broth over 24 h; although, at 5 μL/mL, TVEO more severely affected the viability of the starter co-culture compared with pathogenic bacteria. The addition of 1.25 μL/g of TVEO in the semi-solid cheese model did not reduce the viable counts of all assayed bacteria. At 2.5 μL/g, TVEO slightly decreased the viable counts of S. aureus, L. monocytogenes and Lactococcus spp. in the semi-solid cheese model over 72 h. The final counts of Lactococcus spp. in a semi-solid cheese model containing 2.5 μL/mL TVEO were lower than those of pathogenic bacteria under the same conditions. These results suggest that the doses of TVEO used to control pathogenic bacteria in fermented dairy products, especially in low-ripened cheeses, should be cautiously considered for potential negative effects on the growth and survival of starter cultures.

  8. Fast Simulation of Membrane Filtration by Combining Particle Retention Mechanisms and Network Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krupp, Armin; Griffiths, Ian; Please, Colin

    2016-11-01

    Porous membranes are used for their particle retention capabilities in a wide range of industrial filtration processes. The underlying mechanisms for particle retention are complex and often change during the filtration process, making it hard to predict the change in permeability of the membrane during the process. Recently, stochastic network models have been shown to predict the change in permeability based on retention mechanisms, but remain computationally intensive. We show that the averaged behaviour of such a stochastic network model can efficiently be computed using a simple partial differential equation. Moreover, we also show that the geometric structure of the underlying membrane and particle-size distribution can be represented in our model, making it suitable for modelling particle retention in interconnected membranes as well. We conclude by demonstrating the particular application to microfluidic filtration, where the model can be used to efficiently compute a probability density for flux measurements based on the geometry of the pores and particles. A. U. K. is grateful for funding from Pall Corporation and the Mathematical Institute, University of Oxford. I.M.G. gratefully acknowledges support from the Royal Society through a University Research Fellowship.

  9. Parameter estimation in neuronal stochastic differential equation models from intracellular recordings of membrane potentials in single neurons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ditlevsen, Susanne; Samson, Adeline

    2016-01-01

    Dynamics of the membrane potential in a single neuron can be studied by estimating biophysical parameters from intracellular recordings. Diffusion processes, given as continuous solutions to stochastic differential equations, are widely applied as models for the neuronal membrane potential...... evolution. One-dimensional models are the stochastic integrate-and-fire neuronal diffusion models. Biophysical neuronal models take into account the dynamics of ion channels or synaptic activity, leading to multidimensional diffusion models. Since only the membrane potential can be measured......, this complicates the statistical inference and parameter estimation from these partially observed detailed models. This paper reviews parameter estimation techniques from intracellular recordings in these diffusion models....

  10. Phytosphingosine, sphingosine and dihydrosphingosine ceramides in model skin lipid membranes: permeability and biophysics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Školová, Barbora; Kováčik, Andrej; Tesař, Ondřej; Opálka, Lukáš; Vávrová, Kateřina

    2017-05-01

    Ceramides based on phytosphingosine, sphingosine and dihydrosphingosine are essential constituents of the skin lipid barrier that protects the body from excessive water loss. The roles of the individual ceramide subclasses in regulating skin permeability and the reasons for C4-hydroxylation of these sphingolipids are not completely understood. We investigated the chain length-dependent effects of dihydroceramides, sphingosine ceramides (with C4-unsaturation) and phytoceramides (with C4-hydroxyl) on the permeability, lipid organization and thermotropic behavior of model stratum corneum lipid membranes composed of ceramide/lignoceric acid/cholesterol/cholesteryl sulfate. Phytoceramides with very long C24 acyl chains increased the permeability of the model lipid membranes compared to dihydroceramides or sphingosine ceramides with the same chain lengths. Either unsaturation or C4-hydroxylation of dihydroceramides induced chain length-dependent increases in membrane permeability. Infrared spectroscopy showed that C4-hydroxylation of the sphingoid base decreased the relative ratio of orthorhombic chain packing in the membrane and lowered the miscibility of C24 phytoceramide with lignoceric acid. The phase separation in phytoceramide membranes was confirmed by X-ray diffraction. In contrast, phytoceramides formed strong hydrogen bonds and highly thermostable domains. Thus, the large heterogeneity in ceramide structures and in their aggregation mechanisms may confer resistance towards the heterogeneous external stressors that are constantly faced by the skin barrier. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Solute transport model for trace organic neutral and charged compounds through nanofiltration and reverse osmosis membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Tae-Uk; Drewes, Jörg E; Scott Summers, R; Amy, Gary L

    2007-09-01

    Rejection of trace organic compounds, including disinfection by-products (DBPs) and pharmaceutical active compounds (PhACs), by high-pressure membranes has become a focus of public interest internationally in both drinking water treatment and wastewater reclamation/reuse. The ability to simulate, or even predict, the rejection of these compounds by high-pressure membranes, encompassing nanofiltration (NF) and reverse osmosis (RO), will improve process economics and expand membrane applications. The objective of this research is to develop a membrane transport model to account for diffusive and convective contributions to solute transport and rejection. After completion of cross-flow tests and diffusion cell tests with target compounds, modeling efforts were performed in accordance with a non-equilibrium thermodynamic transport equation. Comparing the percentages of convection and diffusion contributions to transport, convection is dominant for most compounds, but diffusion is important for more hydrophobic non-polar compounds. Convection is also more dominant for looser membranes (i.e., NF). In addition, higher initial compound concentrations and greater J(0)/k ratios contribute to solute fluxes more dominated by convection. Given the treatment objective of compound rejection, compound transport and rejection trends are inversely related.

  12. Vibroacoustic modeling of an acoustic resonator tuned by dielectric elastomer membrane with voltage control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Xiang; Lu, Zhenbo; Cheng, Li; Cui, Fangsen

    2017-01-01

    This paper investigates the acoustic properties of a duct resonator tuned by an electro-active membrane. The resonator takes the form of a side-branch cavity which is attached to a rigid duct and covered by a pre-stretched Dielectric Elastomer (DE) in the neck area. A three-dimensional, analytical model based on the sub-structuring approach is developed to characterize the complex structure-acoustic coupling between the DE membrane and its surrounding acoustic media. We show that such resonator provides sound attenuation in the medium frequency range mainly by means of sound reflection, as a result of the membrane vibration. The prediction accuracy of the proposed model is validated against experimental test. The pre-stretched DE membrane with fixed edges responds to applied voltage change with a varying inner stress and, by the same token, its natural frequency and vibrational response can be tuned to suit particular frequencies of interest. The peaks in the transmission loss (TL) curves can be shifted towards lower frequencies when the voltage applied to the DE membrane is increased. Through simulations on the effect of increasing the voltage level, the TL shifting mechanism and its possible tuning range are analyzed. This paves the way for applying such resonator device for adaptive-passive noise control.

  13. Proton exchange membrane fuel cells modeling based on artificial neural networks

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yudong Tian; Xinjian Zhu; Guangyi Cao

    2005-01-01

    To understand the complexity of the mathematical models of a proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) and their shortage of practical PEMFC control, the PEMFC complex mechanism and the existing PEMFC models are analyzed, and artificial neural networks based PEMFC modeling is advanced. The structure, algorithm, training and simulation of PEMFC modeling based on improved BP networks are given out in detail. The computer simulation and conducted experiment verify that this model is fast and accurate, and can be used as a suitable operational model for PEMFC real-time control.

  14. Estimation of Separation of Electrolytes and Organic Compounds by Nanofiltration Membranes Using an Irreversible Thermodynamic Model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    PallabGhosh

    2003-01-01

    Nanofiltration separation has become a popular technique for removing large organic molecules and inorganic substances from water. It is achieved by a combination of three mechanisms: electrostatic repulsion,sieving and diffusion. In the present work, a model based on irreversible thermodynamics is extended and used to estimate rejection of inorganic salts and organic substances. Binary systems are modeled, where the feed contains an ion that is much less permeable to the membrane as compared with the other ion. The two model parameters are estimated by fitting the model to the experimental data. Variation of these parameters with the composition of the feed is described by an empirical correlation. This work attempts to describe transport through the nanofiltration membranes bv a simple model.

  15. Basement membrane chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan alterations in a rat model of polycystic kidney disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ehara, T; Carone, F A; McCarthy, K J

    1994-01-01

    Alterations in basement membrane components, notably proteoglycans, in a rat model of polycystic kidney disease have been investigated. Rats were fed phenol II (2-amino-4-hydroxyphenyl-5-phenyl thiazole) for 4 days and then changed to normal diet for a 7-day recovery period. Marked dilation of di...

  16. A Model of Direct Contact Membrane Distillation of Black Currant Juice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Morten Busch; Christensen, Knud Villy; Andrésen, René

    2011-01-01

    -side spacing of tubular-type unit."  Turtuosity and porosity are characteristics of the membrane in use and have been estimated base don eksperimental studies on destillation of pure water. The fitted model shows a good fit to experimental data obtained by destillation of black currant juice....

  17. Targeted labeling of early-​stage tumor spheroid in chorioallantoic membrane model with upconversion nanoparticles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    K. Liu; J.A. Holz; Y. Ding; X. Liu; Y. Zhang; L. Tu; X. Kong; B. Priem; A. Nadort; S.A.G. Lambrechts; M.C.G. Aalders; W.J. Buma; Y. Liu; H. Zhang

    2015-01-01

    In vivo detection of cancer at early-​stage, i.e. smaller than 2 mm, is a challenge in biomedicine. In this work target labeling of early-​stage tumor spheroid (∼500 μm) is realized for the first time in chick embryo chorioallantoic membrane (CAM) model with monoclonal antibody functionalized upconv

  18. Modelling of the diffusion of gases through membranes of novel polyimides

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smit, Evert

    1991-01-01

    When new, better polymeric materials are to be developed for use as gas separation membranes, knowledge of the underlying principles of the separation process is essential. Much research is spent on the elucidation of the mechanism by which gas molecules sorb into and move through a polymer. Models

  19. Droplet formation in a T-shaped microchannel junction: A model system for membrane emulsification

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Graaf, van der S.; Steegmans, M.L.J.; Sman, van der R.G.M.; Schroën, C.G.P.H.; Boom, R.M.

    2005-01-01

    Droplet formation was studied in a glass microchip with a small channel containing to-be-dispersed phase perpendicular to a large channel with a cross-flowing continuous phase. This resembles the situation during cross-flow membrane emulsification. In this model system, droplets are formed at a

  20. A model of plasma membrane flow and cytosis regulation in growing pollen tubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chavarría-Krauser, Andrés; Yejie, Du

    2011-09-21

    A model of cytosis regulation in growing pollen tubes is developed and simulations presented. The authors address the question on the minimal assumptions needed to describe the pattern of exocytosis and endocytosis reported recently by experimental biologists. Biological implications of the model are also treated. Concepts of flow and conservation of membrane material are used to pose an equation system, which describes the movement of plasma membrane in the tip of growing pollen tubes. After obtaining the central equations, relations describing the rates of endocytosis and exocytosis are proposed. Two cytosis receptors (for exocytosis and endocytosis), which have different recycling rates and activation times, suffice to describe a stable growing tube. Simulations show a very good spatial separation between endocytosis and exocytosis, in which separation is shown to depend strongly on exocytic vesicle delivery. In accordance to measurements, most vesicles in the clear zone are predicted to be endocytic. Membrane flow is essential to maintain cell polarity, and bi-directional flow seems to be a natural consequence of the proposed mechanism. For the first time, a model addressing plasma membrane flow and cytosis regulation were posed. Therefore, it represents a missing piece in an integrative model of pollen tube growth, in which cell wall mechanics, hydrodynamic fluxes and regulation mechanisms are combined.

  1. Atomic-level structural and functional model of a bacterial photosynthetic membrane vesicle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sener, Melih K; Olsen, John D; Hunter, C Neil; Schulten, Klaus

    2007-10-02

    The photosynthetic unit (PSU) of purple photosynthetic bacteria consists of a network of bacteriochlorophyll-protein complexes that absorb solar energy for eventual conversion to ATP. Because of its remarkable simplicity, the PSU can serve as a prototype for studies of cellular organelles. In the purple bacterium Rhodobacter sphaeroides the PSU forms spherical invaginations of the inner membrane, approximately 70 nm in diameter, composed mostly of light-harvesting complexes, LH1 and LH2, and reaction centers (RCs). Atomic force microscopy studies of the intracytoplasmic membrane have revealed the overall spatial organization of the PSU. In the present study these atomic force microscopy data were used to construct three-dimensional models of an entire membrane vesicle at the atomic level by using the known structure of the LH2 complex and a structural model of the dimeric RC-LH1 complex. Two models depict vesicles consisting of 9 or 18 dimeric RC-LH1 complexes and 144 or 101 LH2 complexes, representing a total of 3,879 or 4,464 bacteriochlorophylls, respectively. The in silico reconstructions permit a detailed description of light absorption and electronic excitation migration, including computation of a 50-ps excitation lifetime and a 95% quantum efficiency for one of the model membranes, and demonstration of excitation sharing within the closely packed RC-LH1 dimer arrays.

  2. Dynamic Thermal Model and Temperature Control of Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cell Stack

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    邵庆龙; 卫东; 曹广益; 朱新坚

    2005-01-01

    A dynamic thermal transfer model of a proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) stack is developed based on energy conservation in order to reach better temperature control of PEMFC stack. Considering its uncertain parameters and disturbance, we propose a robust adaptive controller based on backstepping algorithm of Lyaponov function. Numerical simulations indicate the validity of the proposed controller.

  3. Modelling of the diffusion of gases through membranes of novel polyimides

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smit, Evert

    1991-01-01

    When new, better polymeric materials are to be developed for use as gas separation membranes, knowledge of the underlying principles of the separation process is essential. Much research is spent on the elucidation of the mechanism by which gas molecules sorb into and move through a polymer. Models

  4. Using the Past in the Class: Learning from Historical Models of Cell Membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Cameron; Luft, Julie A.

    2001-01-01

    Including historical events and cultural contexts to enrich science teaching helps students understand the human aspect of science. Describes a sample lesson that includes the historical milestones that led to our current understanding of the structure of cell membranes. Examines the development and use of scientific models within the historical…

  5. Two-dimensional, isothermal, multi-component model for a polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mahinpey, N.; Jagannathan, A.; Idem, R. [Regina Univ., SK (Canada). Faculty of Engineering

    2007-07-01

    A fuel cell is an electrochemical energy conversion device which is more efficient than an internal combustion engine in converting fuel to power. Numerous fuel cell models have been developed by a number of authors accounting for the various physical processes. Earlier models were restricted to being one dimensional, steady-state, and isothermal while more recent two-dimensional models had several limitations. This paper presented the results of a study that developed a two-dimensional computational fluid dynamics model of a polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell using a finite element method to solve a multi-component transport model coupled with flow in porous media, charge balance, electrochemical kinetics, and rigorous water balance in the membrane. The mass transport, momentum transport, and electrochemical processes occurring in the membrane electrolyte and catalyst layers were modeled. The local equilibrium was assumed at the interfaces and the model was combined with the kinetics and was analytically solved for the anodic and cathodic current using an agglomerate spherical catalyst pellet. The paper compared the modeling results with previously published experimental data. The study investigated the effects of channel and bipolar plate shoulder size, porosity of the electrodes, temperature, relative humidity and current densities on the cell performance. It was concluded that smaller sized channels and bipolar plate shoulders were required to obtain higher current densities, although larger channels were satisfactory at moderate current densities. 13 refs., 5 figs.

  6. Binding of vinyl polymers to anionic model membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torrens, F; Campos, A; Abad, C

    2003-09-01

    The association of poly2-vinylpyridine (P2VPy) and poly4-vinylpyridine (P4VPy) to dimyristoylphosphatidic acid (DMPA) small unilamellar vesicles (SUVs) was studied as a function of pH, ionic strength (I), polymer concentration and temperature using spectrofluorimetry. Poly(vinylpyridine) (PVPy) data were transformed into association isotherms and analyzed in terms of binding and partition models. In the case of polyions, the inclusion of the activity coefficient in both models was essential. Moreover, a relating equation was proposed to compare parameters based on both theoretical approaches. On the basis of the results obtained, a model was developed to analyze polymer adsorption at the surface level, in which the length of the hydrophobic chain and the position of the N atom in the pyridinium ring play an important role. Transition temperature (Tc) for DMPA (ca. 55 degrees C) is decreased between 15 degrees C-19 degrees C in the presence of PVPy. Van't Hoff isochore showed that the binding constant (KA) accounted for average PVPy-DMPA two-dimensional solid and liquid interactions. KA decreased with I in the presence of both polymers, but was more sensitive to I in the case of P2VPy. Likewise, the number of phospholipid heads (N) involved in the binding process decreased with I in the presence of PVPy. The influence of I was more significant on N than on KA.

  7. Recurrent epiploic appendagitis mimicking appendicitis and cholecystitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hearne, Christopher B.; Taboada, Jorge

    2017-01-01

    Epiploic appendagitis (EA) is a rare cause of acute abdominal pain caused by inflammation of an epiploic appendage. It has a nonspecific clinical presentation that may mimic other acute abdominal pathologies on physical exam, such as appendicitis, diverticulitis, or cholecystitis. However, EA is usually benign and self-limiting and can be treated conservatively. We present the case of a patient with two episodes of EA, the first mimicking acute appendicitis and the second mimicking acute cholecystitis. Although recurrence of EA is rare, it should be part of the differential diagnosis of acute, localized abdominal pain. A correct diagnosis of EA will prevent unnecessary hospitalization, antibiotic use, and surgical procedures. PMID:28127129

  8. Mechanical and optical behavior of a tunable liquid lens using a variable cross section membrane: modeling results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flores-Bustamante, Mario C.; Rosete-Aguilar, Martha; Calixto, Sergio

    2016-03-01

    A lens containing a liquid medium and having at least one elastic membrane as one of its components is known as an elastic membrane lens (EML). The elastic membrane may have a constant or variable thickness. The optical properties of the EML change by modifying the profile of its elastic membrane(s). The EML formed of elastic constant thickness membrane(s) have been studied extensively. However, EML information using elastic membrane of variable thickness is limited. In this work, we present simulation results of the mechanical and optical behavior of two EML with variable thickness membranes (convex-plane membranes). The profile of its surfaces were modified by liquid medium volume increases. The model of the convex-plane membranes, as well as the simulation of its mechanical behavior, were performed using Solidworks® software; and surface's points of the deformed elastic lens were obtained. Experimental stress-strain data, obtained from a silicone rubber simple tensile test, according to ASTM D638 norm, were used in the simulation. Algebraic expressions, (Schwarzschild formula, up to four deformation coefficients, in a cylindrical coordinate system (r, z)), of the meridional profiles of the first and second surfaces of the deformed convex-plane membranes, were obtained using the results from Solidworks® and a program in the software Mathematica®. The optical performance of the EML was obtained by simulation using the software OSLO® and the algebraic expressions obtained in Mathematica®.

  9. Molecular dynamics study of lipid bilayers modeling the plasma membranes of normal murine thymocytes and leukemic GRSL cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andoh, Yoshimichi; Okazaki, Susumu; Ueoka, Ryuichi

    2013-04-01

    Molecular dynamics (MD) calculations for the plasma membranes of normal murine thymocytes and thymus-derived leukemic GRSL cells in water have been performed under physiological isothermal-isobaric conditions (310.15K and 1 atm) to investigate changes in membrane properties induced by canceration. The model membranes used in our calculations for normal and leukemic thymocytes comprised 23 and 25 kinds of lipids, respectively, including phosphatidylcholine, phosphatidylethanolamine, phosphatidylserine, phosphatidylinositol, sphingomyelin, lysophospholipids, and cholesterol. The mole fractions of the lipids adopted here were based on previously published experimental values. Our calculations clearly showed that the membrane area was increased in leukemic cells, and that the isothermal area compressibility of the leukemic plasma membranes was double that of normal cells. The calculated membranes of leukemic cells were thus considerably bulkier and softer in the lateral direction compared with those of normal cells. The tilt angle of the cholesterol and the conformation of the phospholipid fatty acid tails both showed a lower level of order in leukemic cell membranes compared with normal cell membranes. The lateral radial distribution function of the lipids also showed a more disordered structure in leukemic cell membranes than in normal cell membranes. These observations all show that, for the present thymocytes, the lateral structure of the membrane is considerably disordered by canceration. Furthermore, the calculated lateral self-diffusion coefficient of the lipid molecules in leukemic cell membranes was almost double that in normal cell membranes. The calculated rotational and wobbling autocorrelation functions also indicated that the molecular motion of the lipids was enhanced in leukemic cell membranes. Thus, here we have demonstrated that the membranes of thymocyte leukemic cells are more disordered and more fluid than normal cell membranes.

  10. Thermotropic phase transitions in model membranes of the outer skin layer based on ceramide 6

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gruzinov, A. Yu.; Kiselev, M. A.; Ermakova, E. V.; Zabelin, A. V.

    2014-01-01

    The lipid intercellular matrix stratum corneum of the outer skin layer is a multilayer membrane consisting of a complex mixture of different lipids: ceramides, fatty acids, cholesterol, and its derivatives. The basis of the multilayer membrane is the lipid bilayer, i.e., a two-dimensional liquid crystal. Currently, it is known that the main way of substance penetration through the skin is the lipid matrix. The complexity of the actual biological system does not allow reliable direct study of its properties; therefore, system modeling is often used. Phase transitions in the lipid system whose composition simulates the native lipid matrix are studied by the X-ray synchrotron radiation diffraction method.

  11. Understanding Detergent Effects on Lipid Membranes: A Model Study of Lysolipids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, Jonas Rosager; Andresen, Thomas Lars; Feldborg, Lise Nørkjær

    2010-01-01

    -phosphatidylcholine lipids (LPCs) on 1-palmitoy1-2-oleyl-sn-glycerol-3-phosphatidylcholine (POPC) lipid membranes by use of isothermal titration calorimetry and vesicle fluctuation analysis. The membrane partition coefficient (K) and critical micelle concentration (cmc) are determined by isothermal titration calorimetry...... in terms of a phenomenological model based on continuum elastic theory, which yields information about the curvature-inducing properties of the LPC molecule. The results reveal: 1), an increase in the partition coefficient with increasing LPC acyl-chain length; and 2), that the degree of acyl...

  12. Analysis of resonance energy transfer in model membranes: role of orientational effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domanov, Yegor A; Gorbenko, Galina P

    2002-10-16

    The model of resonance energy transfer (RET) in membrane systems containing donors randomly distributed over two parallel planes separated by fixed distance and acceptors confined to a single plane is presented. Factors determining energy transfer rate are considered with special attention being given to the contribution from orientational heterogeneity of the donor emission and acceptor absorption transition dipoles. Analysis of simulated data suggests that RET in membranes, as compared to intramolecular energy transfer, is substantially less sensitive to the degree of reorientational freedom of chromophores due to averaging over multiple donor-acceptor pairs. The uncertainties in the distance estimation resulting from the unknown mutual orientation of the donor and acceptor are analyzed.

  13. Cooperative Effects of Noise and Coupling on Stochastic Dynamics of a Membrane-Bulk Coupling Model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TANG Jun; JIA Ya; YI Ming

    2009-01-01

    Based on a membrane-bulk coupling cell model proposed by Gomez-Marin et al. [ Phys. Rev. Lett. 98 (2007) 168303], the cooperative effects of noise and coupling on the stochastic dynamical behavior are investigated, For parameters in a certain region, the oscillation can be induced by the cooperative effect of noise and coupling. Whether considering the coupling or not, corresponding coherence resonance phenomena are observed. Furthermore, the effects of two coupling parameters, cell size L and coupling intensity k, on the noise-induced oscillation of membranes are studied. Contrary effects of noise are found in and out of the deterministic oscillatory regions.

  14. Integration of Bioreactor and Membrane Separation Processes: A Model Based Approach

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Prado Rubio, Oscar Andres

    to as Reverse Electro-Enhanced Dialysis (REED). Unconsumed substrate and biomass are effectively recycled to the fermenter. In the second membrane separation stage, the lactate is recovered and concentrated as lactic acid using Electrodialysis with bipolar membranes (EDBM), while sodium hydroxide is regenerated...... test. Satisfactory results are obtained regulating the pH and managing the input constraints. The design and operability of the integrated bioreactor and REED module are investigated using the developed models and control structure. The study involves two different case studies: continuous lactic acid...

  15. Modelling multiphase flow inside the porous media of a polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berning, Torsten; Kær, Søren Knudsen

    2011-01-01

    Transport processes inside polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells (PEMFC’s) are highly complex and involve convective and diffusive multiphase, multispecies flow through porous media along with heat and mass transfer and electrochemical reactions in conjunction with water transport through...... an electrolyte membrane. We will present a computational model of a PEMFC with focus on capillary transport of water through the porous layers and phase change and discuss the impact of the liquid phase boundary condition between the porous gas diffusion layer and the flow channels, where water droplets can...

  16. Integration of Bioreactor and Membrane Separation Processes: A Model Based Approach

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Prado Rubio, Oscar Andres

    to as Reverse Electro-Enhanced Dialysis (REED). Unconsumed substrate and biomass are effectively recycled to the fermenter. In the second membrane separation stage, the lactate is recovered and concentrated as lactic acid using Electrodialysis with bipolar membranes (EDBM), while sodium hydroxide is regenerated...... test. Satisfactory results are obtained regulating the pH and managing the input constraints. The design and operability of the integrated bioreactor and REED module are investigated using the developed models and control structure. The study involves two different case studies: continuous lactic acid...

  17. The Effect of Lidocaine · HCl on the Fluidity of Native and Model Membrane Lipid Bilayers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jun-Seop; Jung, Tae-Sang; Noh, Yang-Ho; Kim, Woo-Sung; Park, Won-Ick; Kim, Young-Soo; Chung, In-Kyo; Sohn, Uy Dong; Bae, Soo-Kyung; Bae, Moon-Kyoung; Jang, Hye-Ock; Yun, Il

    2012-12-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigated the mechanism of pharmacological action of local anesthetic and provide the basic information about the development of new effective local anesthetics. Fluorescent probe techniques were used to evaluate the effect of lidocaine·HCl on the physical properties (transbilayer asymmetric lateral and rotational mobility, annular lipid fluidity and protein distribution) of synaptosomal plasma membrane vesicles (SPMV) isolated from bovine cerebral cortex, and liposomes of total lipids (SPMVTL) and phospholipids (SPMVPL) extracted from the SPMV. An experimental procedure was used based on selective quenching of 1,3-di(1-pyrenyl)propane (Py-3-Py) and 1,6-diphenyl-1,3,5-hexatriene (DPH) by trinitrophenyl groups, and radiationless energy transfer from the tryptophans of membrane proteins to Py-3-Py. Lidocaine·HCl increased the bulk lateral and rotational mobility of neuronal and model membrane lipid bilayes, and had a greater fluidizing effect on the inner monolayer than the outer monolayer. Lidocaine·HCl increased annular lipid fluidity in SPMV lipid bilayers. It also caused membrane proteins to cluster. The most important finding of this study is that there is far greater increase in annular lipid fluidity than that in lateral and rotational mobilities by lidocaine·HCl. Lidocaine·HCl alters the stereo or dynamics of the proteins in the lipid bilayers by combining with lipids, especially with the annular lipids. In conclusion, the present data suggest that lidocaine, in addition to its direct interaction with proteins, concurrently interacts with membrane lipids, fluidizing the membrane, and thus inducing conformational changes of proteins known to be intimately associated with membrane lipid.

  18. Manipulating lipid membrane architecture by liquid crystal-analog curvature elasticity (Presentation Recording)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sin-Doo

    2015-10-01

    Soft matters such as liquid crystals and biological molecules exhibit a variety of interesting physical phenomena as well as new applications. Recently, in mimicking biological systems that have the ability to sense, regulate, grow, react, and regenerate in a highly responsive and self-adaptive manner, the significance of the liquid crystal order in living organisms, for example, a biological membrane possessing the lamellar order, is widely recognized from the viewpoints of physics and chemistry of interfaces and membrane biophysics. Lipid bilayers, resembling cell membranes, provide primary functions for the transport of biological components of ions and molecules in various cellular activities, including vesicle budding and membrane fusion, through lateral organization of the membrane components such as proteins. In this lecture, I will describe how the liquid crystal-analog curvature elasticity of a lipid bilayer plays a critical role in developing a new platform for understanding diverse biological functions at a cellular level. The key concept is to manipulate the local curvature at an interface between a solid substrate and a model membrane. Two representative examples will be demonstrated: one of them is the topographic control of lipid rafts in a combinatorial array where the ligand-receptor binding event occurs and the other concerns the reconstitution of a ring-type lipid raft in bud-mimicking architecture within the framework of the curvature elasticity.

  19. Analysis of direct contact membrane distillation based on a lumped-parameter dynamic predictive model

    KAUST Repository

    Karam, Ayman M.

    2016-10-03

    Membrane distillation (MD) is an emerging technology that has a great potential for sustainable water desalination. In order to pave the way for successful commercialization of MD-based water desalination techniques, adequate and accurate dynamical models of the process are essential. This paper presents the predictive capabilities of a lumped-parameter dynamic model for direct contact membrane distillation (DCMD) and discusses the results under wide range of steady-state and dynamic conditions. Unlike previous studies, the proposed model captures the time response of the spacial temperature distribution along the flow direction. It also directly solves for the local temperatures at the membrane interfaces, which allows to accurately model and calculate local flux values along with other intrinsic variables of great influence on the process, like the temperature polarization coefficient (TPC). The proposed model is based on energy and mass conservation principles and analogy between thermal and electrical systems. Experimental data was collected to validated the steady-state and dynamic responses of the model. The obtained results shows great agreement with the experimental data. The paper discusses the results of several simulations under various conditions to optimize the DCMD process efficiency and analyze its response. This demonstrates some potential applications of the proposed model to carry out scale up and design studies. © 2016

  20. Pseudo-2D model of a cross-flow membrane humidifier for a PEM fuel cell under multiphase conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dalet, C.; Diny, M. [Peugeot Citroen Automobile, Carrieres sous Poissy (France). Fuel Cell Program; Maranzana, G.; Lottin, O.; Dillet, J. [Nancy Univ., Vanoeuvre les Nancy (France). Centre national de la recherche scientifique

    2009-07-01

    Membrane dehydration can reduce the performance of proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs). However, excessive water at the inlet of the fuel cells can flood cathodes. An understanding of the coupled mass and heat transfer processes involved in membrane humidifiers is needed in order to successfully manage water in PEMFCs. This paper discussed a pseudo-2D model of a cross-flow membrane humidifier for PEMFCs. The model was used to test correlations of the water transport coefficient through a Nafion 115 membrane. The study showed that results obtained using the model differed from experimental results. The effects of inlet operating conditions, flow rates, and temperature on the performance of a planar membrane humidifier under both single- and multi-phase conditions were also investigated.

  1. Model of a vanadium redox flow battery with an anion exchange membrane and a Larminie-correction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wandschneider, F. T.; Finke, D.; Grosjean, S.; Fischer, P.; Pinkwart, K.; Tübke, J.; Nirschl, H.

    2014-12-01

    Membranes are an important part of vanadium redox flow battery cells. Most cell designs use Nafion®-type membranes which are cation exchange membranes. Anion exchange membranes are reported to improve cell performance. A model for a vanadium redox flow battery with an anion exchange membrane is developed. The model is then used to calculate terminal voltages for open circuit and charge-discharge conditions. The results are compared to measured data from a laboratory test cell with 40 cm2 active membrane area. For higher charge and discharge currents, an empirical correction for the terminal voltage is proposed. The model geometry comprises the porous electrodes and the connected pipes, allowing a study of the flow in the entrance region for different state-of-charges.

  2. Modeling and Simulation of Membrane-Based Dehumidification and Energy Recovery Process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gao, Zhiming [ORNL; Abdelaziz, Omar [ORNL; Qu, Ming [ORNL

    2017-01-01

    This paper introduces a first-order physics-based model that accounts for the fundamental heat and mass transfer between a humid-air vapor stream on feed side to another flow stream on permeate side. The model comprises a few optional submodels for membrane mass transport; and it adopts a segment-by-segment method for discretizing heat and mass transfer governing equations for flow streams on feed and permeate sides. The model is able to simulate both dehumidifiers and energy recovery ventilators in parallel-flow, cross-flow, and counter-flow configurations. The predicted tresults are compared reasonably well with the measurements. The open-source codes are written in C++. The model and open-source codes are expected to become a fundament tool for the analysis of membrane-based dehumidification in the future.

  3. Effects of the local anesthetic benzocaine on the human erythrocyte membrane and molecular models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suwalsky, Mario; Schneider, Carlos; Villena, Fernando; Norris, Beryl; Cárdenas, Hernán; Cuevas, Francisco; Sotomayor, Carlos P

    2004-04-01

    The interaction of the local anesthetic benzocaine with the human erythrocyte membrane and molecular models is described. The latter consisted of isolated unsealed human erythrocyte membranes (IUM), large unilamellar vesicles (LUV) of dimyristoylphospatidylcholine (DMPC), and phospholipid multilayers of DMPC and dimyristoylphospatidyletanolamine (DMPE), representatives of phospholipid classes located in the outer and inner monolayers of the human erythrocyte membrane, respectively. Optical and scanning electron microscopy of human erythrocytes revealed that benzocaine induced the formation of echinocytes. Experiments performed on IUM and DMPC LUV by fluorescence spectroscopy showed that benzocaine interacted with the phospholipid bilayer polar groups and hydrophobic acyl chains. X-ray diffraction analysis of DMPC confirmed these results and showed that benzocaine had no effects on DMPE. The effect on sodium transport was also studied using the isolated toad skin. Electrophysiological measurements indicated a significant decrease in the potential difference (PD) and in the short-circuit current (Isc) after the application of benzocaine, reflecting inhibition of active ion transport.

  4. A Simple Experimental Model to Investigate Force Range for Membrane Nanotube Formation

    CERN Document Server

    Lor, Chai; Mattson-Hoss, Michelle K; Xu, Jing; Hirst, Linda S

    2016-01-01

    The presence of membrane tubules in living cells is essential to many biological processes. In cells, one mechanism to form nanosized lipid tubules is via molecular motor induced bilayer extraction. In this paper, we describe a simple experimental model to investigate the forces required for lipid tube formation using kinesin motors anchored to DOPC vesicles. Previous related studies have used molecular motors actively pulling on the membrane to extract a nanotube. Here, we invert the system geometry; molecular motors are used as static anchors linking DOPC vesicles to a two-dimensional microtubule network and an external flow is introduced to generate nanotubes facilitated by the drag force. We found that a drag force of ~7 pN was sufficient for tubule extraction for vesicles ranging from 1 to 2 um in radius. By our method, we found that the force generated by a single molecular motor was sufficient for membrane tubule extraction from a spherical lipid vesicle.

  5. Transport phenomena and fouling in vacuum enhanced direct contact membrane distillation: Experimental and modelling

    KAUST Repository

    Naidu, Gayathri

    2016-08-27

    The application of vacuum to direct contact membrane distillation (vacuum enhanced direct contact membrane distillation, V-DCMD) removed condensable gasses and reduced partial pressure in the membrane pores, achieving 37.6% higher flux than DCMD at the same feed temperature. Transfer mechanism and temperature distribution profile in V-DCMD were studied. The empirical flux decline (EFD) model represented fouling profiles of V-DCMD. In a continuous V-DCMD operation with moderate temperature (55 degrees C) and permeate pressure (300 mbar) for treating wastewater ROC, a flux of 16.0 +/- 0.3 L/m(2) h and high quality distillate were achieved with water flushing, showing the suitability of V-DCMD for ROC treatment. (C) 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Statistical modelling of the interplay between solute shape and rejection in porous membranes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vinther, Frank; Pinelo, Manuel; Brøns, Morten

    2012-01-01

    membrane, it can be expected that the possibility for a solute particle to enter the membrane pore will only depend upon the relation between such molecular conformation and pore size. The objective of the present study is to use geometric and statistical modelling to determine the effect of particle elongation...... suggested that the retention during porous membrane filtration can be manipulated when working with solute particles prone to alter conformation via, e.g., adding proper functional groups to the molecule, or modifying charge density/distribution by varying pH.......The structural conformation of complex molecules, e.g., polymers and proteins, is determined by several factors like composition of the basic structural units, charge, and properties of the surrounding solvent. In absence of any chemical or physical interaction solute–solute and/or solute...

  7. Scale-up of osmotic membrane bioreactors by modeling salt accumulation and draw solution dilution using hollow-fiber membrane characteristics and operation conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Suhan

    2014-08-01

    A full-scale osmotic membrane bioreactor (OMBR) model was developed to simulate salt accumulation, draw solution (DS) dilution, and water flux over the hollow-fiber membrane length. The model uses the OMBR design parameters, DS properties, and forward osmosis (FO) membrane characteristics obtained from lab-scale tests. The modeling results revealed a tremendous water flux decline (10→0.82LMH) and short solids retention time (SRT: 5days) due to salt accumulation and DS dilution when OMBR is scaled up using commercially available DS and FO membrane. Simulated water flux is a result of interplay among reverse salt flux, internal and external concentration polarization (ICP and ECP). ECP adversely impacts water flux considerably in full-scale OMBR although it is often ignored in previous works. The OMBR model makes it possible to select better DS properties (higher flow rate and salt concentration) and FO membranes with higher water flux propensity in full-scale operation. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Water balance simulations of a polymer-electrolyte membrane fuel cell using a two-fluid model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berning, Torsten; Odgaard, M.; Kær, Søren Knudsen

    2011-01-01

    A previously published computational multi-phase model of a polymer-electrolyte membrane fuel cell cathode has been extended in order to account for the anode side and the electrolyte membrane. The model has been applied to study the water balance of a fuel cell during operation under various hum...

  9. A theoretical model for evaluation of the design of a hollow-fiber membrane oxygenator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabesh, Hadi; Amoabediny, Ghassem; Poorkhalil, Ali; Khachab, Ali; Kashefi, Ali; Mottaghy, Khosrow

    2012-12-01

    Geometric data are fundamental to the design of a contactor. The efficiency of a membrane contactor is mainly defined by its mass-transfer coefficient. However, design modifications also have significant effects on the performance of membrane contactors. In a hollow-fiber membrane oxygenator (HFMO), properties such as priming volume and effective membrane surface area (referred to as design specifications) can be determined. In this study, an extensive theoretical model for calculation of geometric data and configuration properties, and, consequently, optimization of the design of an HFMO, is presented. Calculations were performed for Oxyphan(®) hollow-fiber micro-porous membranes, which are frequently used in current HFMOs because of their high gas exchange performance. The results reveal how to regulate both the transverse and longitudinal pitches of fiber bundles to obtain a lower rand width and a greater number of windings. Such modifications assist optimization of module design and, consequently, substantially increase the efficiency of an HFMO. On the basis of these considerations, three values, called efficiency factors, are proposed for evaluation of the design specifications of an HFMO with regard with its performance characteristics (i.e. oxygen-transfer rate and blood pressure drop). Moreover, the performance characteristics of six different commercial HFMOs were measured experimentally, in vitro, under the same standard conditions. Comparison of calculated efficiency factors reveals Quadrox(®) is the oxygenator with the most efficient design with regard with its performance among the oxygenators tested.

  10. Computational microscopy of cyclodextrin mediated cholesterol extraction from lipid model membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López, Cesar A; de Vries, Alex H; Marrink, Siewert J

    2013-01-01

    Beta-cyclodextrins (β-CDs) can form inclusion complexes with cholesterol, and are commonly used to manipulate cholesterol levels of biomembranes. In this work, we have used multiscale molecular dynamics simulations to provide a detailed view on the interaction between β-CDs and lipid model membranes. We show that cholesterol can be extracted efficiently upon adsorption of β-CD dimers at the membrane/water interface. However, extraction is only observed to occur spontaneously in membranes with high cholesterol levels. Free energy calculations reveal the presence of a kinetic barrier for cholesterol extraction in the case of low cholesterol content. Cholesterol uptake is facilitated in case of (poly)unsaturated lipid membranes, which increases the free energy of the membrane bound state of cholesterol. Comparing lipid/cholesterol compositions typical of liquid-disordered (L(d)) and liquid-order (L(o)) domains, we furthermore show that cholesterol is preferentially extracted from the disordered regions, in line with recent experimental data.

  11. Effects of GPI-anchored TNAP on the dynamic structure of model membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, A. F.; Simão, A. M. S.; Bolean, M; Hoylaerts, M. F.; Millán, J. L.; Ciancaglini, P; Costa-Filho, A. J.

    2017-01-01

    Tissue-nonspecific alkaline phosphatase (TNAP) plays a crucial role during skeletal mineralization, and TNAP deficiency leads to the soft bone disease hypophosphatasia. TNAP is anchored to the external surface of the plasma membranes by means of a GPI (glycosylphosphatidylinositol) anchor. Membrane-anchored and solubilized TNAP displays different kinetic properties against physiological substrates, indicating that membrane anchoring influences the enzyme function. Here, we used Electron Spin Resonance (ESR) measurements along with spin labeled phospholipids to probe the possible dynamic changes prompted by the interaction of GPI-anchored TNAP with model membranes. The goal was to systematically analyze the ESR data in terms of line shape changes and of alterations in parameters such as rotational diffusion rates and order parameters obtained from non-linear least-squares simulations of the ESR spectra of probes incorporated into DPPC liposomes and proteoliposomes. Overall, the presence of TNAP increased the dynamics and decreased the ordering in the three distinct regions probed by the spin labeled lipids DOPTC (headgroup), and 5- and 16-PCSL (acyl chains). The largest change was observed for 16-PCSL, thus suggesting that GPI-anchored TNAP can give rise to long reaching modifications that could influence membrane processes halfway through the bilayer. PMID:26389140

  12. Sphingomyelinase D activity in model membranes: structural effects of in situ generation of ceramide-1-phosphate.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberto P Stock

    Full Text Available The toxicity of Loxosceles spider venom has been attributed to a rare enzyme, sphingomyelinase D, which transforms sphingomyelin to ceramide-1-phosphate. The bases of its inflammatory and dermonecrotic activity, however, remain unclear. In this work the effects of ceramide-1-phosphate on model membranes were studied both by in situ generation of this lipid using a recombinant sphingomyelinase D from the spider Loxosceles laeta and by pre-mixing it with sphingomyelin and cholesterol. The systems of choice were large unilamellar vesicles for bulk studies (enzyme kinetics, fluorescence spectroscopy and dynamic light scattering and giant unilamellar vesicles for fluorescence microscopy examination using a variety of fluorescent probes. The influence of membrane lateral structure on the kinetics of enzyme activity and the consequences of enzyme activity on the structure of target membranes containing sphingomyelin were examined. The findings indicate that: 1 ceramide-1-phosphate (particularly lauroyl ceramide-1-phosphate can be incorporated into sphingomyelin bilayers in a concentration-dependent manner and generates coexistence of liquid disordered/solid ordered domains, 2 the activity of sphingomyelinase D is clearly influenced by the supramolecular organization of its substrate in membranes and, 3 in situ ceramide-1-phosphate generation by enzymatic activity profoundly alters the lateral structure and morphology of the target membranes.

  13. Probing Site-Specific Structural Information of Peptides at Model Membrane Interface In Situ.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Bei; Panahi, Afra; Ho, Jia-Jung; Laaser, Jennifer E; Brooks, Charles L; Zanni, Martin T; Chen, Zhan

    2015-08-19

    Isotope labeling is a powerful technique to probe detailed structures of biological molecules with a variety of analytical methods such as NMR and vibrational spectroscopies. It is important to obtain molecular structural information on biological molecules at interfaces such as cell membranes, but it is challenging to use the isotope labeling method to study interfacial biomolecules. Here, by individually (13)C═(16)O labeling ten residues of a peptide, Ovispirin-1, we have demonstrated for the first time that a site-specific environment of membrane associated peptide can be probed by the submonolayer surface sensitive sum frequency generation (SFG) vibrational spectroscopy in situ. With the peptide associated with a single lipid bilayer, the sinusoidal trend of the SFG line width and peak-center frequency suggests that the peptide is located at the interface beneath the lipid headgroup region. The constructive interferences between the isotope labeled peaks and the main peptide amide I peak contributed by the unlabeled components were used to determine the membrane orientation of the peptide. From the SFG spectral peak-center frequency, line width, and polarization dependence of the isotope labeled units, we deduced structural information on individual units of the peptide associated with a model cell membrane. We also performed molecular dynamics (MD) simulations to understand peptide-membrane interactions. The physical pictures described by simulation agree well with the SFG experimental result. This research demonstrates the feasibility and power of using isotope labeling SFG to probe molecular structures of interfacial biological molecules in situ in real time.

  14. Development of the model of pancreatic β-cell membrane chromatography and its chromatographiccharacteristics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Guangde; HE Langchong; BIAN Xiaoli; ZHAO Liang

    2005-01-01

    A new model of pancreatic β-cell membrane chromatography has been established by using a β-cell membrane stationary phase (β-CMSP) prepared by immobilizing the β-cell membrane onto the surface of silica carrier. The protein level and K+, Na+-ATP enzymatic activity of the β-CMSP were detected respectively. The surface characteristics of the β-CMSP were tested by using the scanning electron microscope and surface energy spectrometer. In this model, the column (10 mm × 2 mm, I.D.) packed with β-CMSP, 25 mmo1/L ammonium sulfate buffer solution (pH 7.4) as mobile phase with the flow rate of 0.2 mL/min at 37 ± 0.5℃ were used in the following studies. The retention characteristics of the sulfonylureas (gliquidone, glibenclamide, gliclazide and glipizide) were investigated under the chromatographic conditions above. The affinities of the sulfonylureas on β-cell membrane and receptor will be expressed by using the logk′ values (the logarithm of capacity factor of a solute) in the model. The correlation of the affinity with the pharmacological effect of the sulfonylureas was analyzed also.

  15. Observing a model ion channel gating action in model cell membranes in real time in situ: membrane potential change induced alamethicin orientation change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Shuji; Li, Hongchun; Wei, Feng; Jasensky, Joshua; Boughton, Andrew P; Yang, Pei; Chen, Zhan

    2012-04-11

    Ion channels play crucial roles in transport and regulatory functions of living cells. Understanding the gating mechanisms of these channels is important to understanding and treating diseases that have been linked to ion channels. One potential model peptide for studying the mechanism of ion channel gating is alamethicin, which adopts a split α/3(10)-helix structure and responds to changes in electric potential. In this study, sum frequency generation vibrational spectroscopy (SFG-VS), supplemented by attenuated total reflectance Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (ATR-FTIR), has been applied to characterize interactions between alamethicin (a model for larger channel proteins) and 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (POPC) lipid bilayers in the presence of an electric potential across the membrane. The membrane potential difference was controlled by changing the pH of the solution in contact with the bilayer and was measured using fluorescence spectroscopy. The orientation angle of alamethicin in POPC lipid bilayers was then determined at different pH values using polarized SFG amide I spectra. Assuming that all molecules adopt the same orientation (a δ distribution), at pH = 6.7 the α-helix at the N-terminus and the 3(10)-helix at the C-terminus tilt at about 72° (θ(1)) and 50° (θ(2)) versus the surface normal, respectively. When pH increases to 11.9, θ(1) and θ(2) decrease to 56.5° and 45°, respectively. The δ distribution assumption was verified using a combination of SFG and ATR-FTIR measurements, which showed a quite narrow distribution in the angle of θ(1) for both pH conditions. This indicates that all alamethicin molecules at the surface adopt a nearly identical orientation in POPC lipid bilayers. The localized pH change in proximity to the bilayer modulates the membrane potential and thus induces a decrease in both the tilt and the bend angles of the two helices in alamethicin. This is the first reported application of SFG

  16. APPLICATION OF REGRESSION MODELLING TECHNIQUES IN DESALINATION OF SEA WATER BY MEMBRANE DISTILLATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SELVI S. R

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this work is to gain an idea about the statistical significance of experimental parameters on the performance of membrane distillation. In this work the raw sea water sample without pretreatment was collected from Puducherry and desalinated using direct contact membrane distillation method. Experimental data analysis was carried out using statistical methods. The experimental data involves the effects of feed temperature, feed flow rate and feed concentration on the permeate flux. In statistical methods, regression model was developed to correlate the significance of input parameters like feed temperature, feed concentration and feed flow rate with the output parameter like permeate flux in the process of membrane distillation. Since the performance of the membrane distillation in the desalination of water is characterised by permeate flux, regression model using simple linear method was carried out. Goodness of model fitting should always has to be validated. Regression model was validated using ANOVA. Estimates of ANOVA for the parameter study was given and the coefficient obtained by regression analysis was specified in the regression equation and concluded that the highest coefficient of input parameter is significant, highly influences the response. Feed flow rate and feed temperature has higher influence on permeate flux than that of feed concentration. The coefficient of feed concentration was found to be negative which indicates less significant factor on permeate flux. The chemical composition of sea water was given by water quality analysis . TDS of membrane distilled water was found to be 18ppm than the initial feed TDS of sea water 27,720 ppm. From the experimental work it was found, salt rejection as 99% and water analysis report confirms the quality of distillate obtained by this desalination process as potable water.

  17. Lymphomatoid granulomatosis mimicking interstitial lung disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braham, Emna; Ayadi-Kaddour, Aïda; Smati, Belhassen; Ben Mrad, Sonia; Besbes, Mohammed; El Mezni, Faouzi

    2008-11-01

    Lymphoid granulomatosis is a rare form of pulmonary angiitis. This case report presents a patient with lymphoid granulomatosis in whom the clinical presentation, radiological features and the partial response to corticosteroid therapy mimicked interstitial lung disease. Lymphoid granulomatosis was only diagnosed at post-mortem examination. The range of reported clinical presentations, diagnostic approaches and outcomes are described.

  18. Ovarian Heterotopic Pregnancy Clinically Mimicking Endometrioma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nilüfer ONAK KANDEMİR

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Heterotopic pregnancy is a very uncommon entity with a difficult preoperative diagnosis. In the present study, we presented an ovarian heterotopic pregnancy case, clinically mimicking endometrioma developed in a 33-year-old female following an in vitro fertilization procedure. The importance of clinical, histopathological, and immunohistochemical examinations in the diagnosis of heterotopic pregnancy are emphasized.

  19. An adult intussusception mimicking early appendicitis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wei-Chun Tseng; Cheng-Ting Hsiao; Yu-Cheng Hung

    2012-01-01

    Adult intussusception is rare with variable clinical presentation. We reported a case of adult intussusception presenting with symptoms mimicking acute appendicitis. The patient presented as an abdominal pain from epigastric area with shifting gradually to RLQ. The atypical presentation of adult intussusception remains a diagnostic challenge to the emergency physician.

  20. Acute dystonia mimicking angioedema of the tongue

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Eva Rye; Pallesen, Kristine A U; Bygum, Anette

    2013-01-01

    We report a case of acute dystonia of the face, jaw and tongue caused by metoclopramide and mimicking angioedema. The patient had attacks for several years before the correct diagnosis was made and we present the first ever published video footage of an attack. This adverse drug reaction is known...

  1. Rate equation model of phototransduction into the membranous disks of mouse rod cells

    CERN Document Server

    Takamoto, Rei; Awazu, Akinori

    2015-01-01

    A theoretical model was developed to investigate the rod phototransduction process in the mouse. In particular, we explored the biochemical reactions of several chemical components that contribute to the signaling process into/around the membranous disks in the outer segments of the rod cells. We constructed a rate equation model incorporating the molecular crowding effects of rhodopsin according to experimental results, which may hinder the diffusion of molecules on the disk mem- brane. The present model could effectively reproduce and explain the mechanisms of the following phenomena observed in experiments. First, the activations and relaxation of the wild-type mouse rod cell progressed more slowly than those of mutant cells containing half the amount of rhodopsin on the disk membrane. Second, the strong photoactivated state of the cell was sustained for a longer period when the light stimuli were strong. Finally, the lifetime of photoactivation exhibited a logarithmic increase with increasing light streng...

  2. Water balance simulations of a polymer-electrolyte membrane fuel cell using a two-fluid model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berning, Torsten; Odgaard, M.; Kær, Søren Knudsen

    2011-01-01

    A previously published computational multi-phase model of a polymer-electrolyte membrane fuel cell cathode has been extended in order to account for the anode side and the electrolyte membrane. The model has been applied to study the water balance of a fuel cell during operation under various...... humidification conditions. It was found that the specific surface area of the electrolyte in the catalyst layers close to the membrane is of critical importance for the overall water balance. Applying a high specific electrolyte surface area close to the membrane (a water-uptake layer) can prevent drying out...... of the anode and flooding at the cathode while the average membrane water content is only weakly affected. The results also indicate that in contrast to common presumption membrane dehydration may occur at either anode or cathode side, entirely depending on the direction of the net water transport because...

  3. Modeling of the buckstay system of membrane-walls in watertube boiler construction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nagiar Hasan Mehdi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Membrane walls are very important structural parts of water-tube boiler construction. Based on their specific geometry, one special type of finite element was defined to help model the global boiler construction. That is the element of reduced orthotropic plate with two thicknesses and two elasticity matrixes, for membrane and bending load separately. A global model of the boiler construction showed that the high value of stress is concentrated in plates of the buckstay system in boiler corners. Validation of the new finite element was done on the local model of the part of membrane wall and buckstay. A very precise model of tubes and flanges was compared to the model formed on the element of a reduced orthotropic plate. Pressure and thermal loads were discussed. Obtained results indicated that the defined finite element was quite favorable in the design and reconstruction of the boiler substructures such as a buckstay system. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. TR 35040 i br. TR 35011

  4. Mathematical Modeling of Hollow-Fiber Membrane System in Biological Wastewater Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian PENG

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available A set of mathematical models were derived based on the bio-kinetics and material balance principles to describe the performance of membrane system in this research. A synthetic wastewater and a meat packing wastewater were processed through a lab-scale membrane bioreactor system to generate experimental data for calibration and verification of the derived models. For the synthetic wastewater treatment, a high and stable Total Organic Carbon (TOC removal was achieved with volumetric organic loading from 0.2 to 24.2 kg TOC/m3ƒ(d. It was found that the derived system models fit the experimental data well. The bio-kinetic coefficients of k, Ks, Y and kd in the models were found to be 0.16 d-1, 1.0 mg/L, 1.75 mg Mixed Liquor Volatile Suspended Solids (MLVSS/mg TOC and 0.11 d-1, respectively. For the meat packing wastewater treatment, the bio-kinetic coefficients of k, Ks, Y and kd were found to be 0.48 d-1, 56.3 mg/L, 0.53 mg MLVSS/mg COD and 0.04 d-1, respectively. F/M ratio of 0.08 was found to be the proper operating condition for the system. Based on the proposed system models, the optimum MLSS concentration and F/M ratio can be computed to yield minimum cost of a membrane bioreactor system without excess biomass production.

  5. Cell-free synthesis of membrane proteins: tailored cell models out of microsomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fenz, Susanne F; Sachse, Rita; Schmidt, Thomas; Kubick, Stefan

    2014-05-01

    Incorporation of proteins in biomimetic giant unilamellar vesicles (GUVs) is one of the hallmarks towards cell models in which we strive to obtain a better mechanistic understanding of the manifold cellular processes. The reconstruction of transmembrane proteins, like receptors or channels, into GUVs is a special challenge. This procedure is essential to make these proteins accessible to further functional investigation. Here we describe a strategy combining two approaches: cell-free eukaryotic protein expression for protein integration and GUV formation to prepare biomimetic cell models. The cell-free protein expression system in this study is based on insect lysates, which provide endoplasmic reticulum derived vesicles named microsomes. It enables signal-induced translocation and posttranslational modification of de novo synthesized membrane proteins. Combining these microsomes with synthetic lipids within the electroswelling process allowed for the rapid generation of giant proteo-liposomes of up to 50 μm in diameter. We incorporated various fluorescent protein-labeled membrane proteins into GUVs (the prenylated membrane anchor CAAX, the heparin-binding epithelial growth factor like factor Hb-EGF, the endothelin receptor ETB, the chemokine receptor CXCR4) and thus presented insect microsomes as functional modules for proteo-GUV formation. Single-molecule fluorescence microscopy was applied to detect and further characterize the proteins in the GUV membrane. To extend the options in the tailoring cell models toolbox, we synthesized two different membrane proteins sequentially in the same microsome. Additionally, we introduced biotinylated lipids to specifically immobilize proteo-GUVs on streptavidin-coated surfaces. We envision this achievement as an important first step toward systematic protein studies on technical surfaces.

  6. Mutual structural effect of bilirubin and model membranes by vibrational circular dichroism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novotná, Pavlína; Goncharova, Iryna; Urbanová, Marie

    2014-03-01

    In this study, vibrational circular dichroism (VCD) spectroscopy was employed for the first time to study the bilirubin (BR) interaction with model membranes and models for membrane proteins. An enantioselective interaction of BR with zwitterionic 1,2-dimyristoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DMPC) and sphingomyelin (SPM) liposomes was observed by VCD and electronic circular dichroism (ECD) complemented by absorption and fluorescence spectroscopy. The M-form of BR was preferentially recognized in the BR/DMPC system at concentration above 1×10(-4)M, for lower concentrations the P-form of BR was recognized by the DMPC liposomes. The VCD spectra also showed that the SPM liposomes, which represent the main component of nerve cell membrane, were significantly more disturbed by the presence of BR than the DMPC liposomes-a stable association with a strong VCD signal was observed providing the explanations for the supposed BR neurotoxicity. The effect of time and pH on the BR/DMPC or SPM liposome systems was shown to be essential while the effect of temperature in the range of 15-70°C was negligible demonstrating the surprisingly high temperature stability of BR when interacting with the studied membranes. The influence of a membrane protein was tested on a model consisting of poly-l-arginine (PLAG) bound in the α-helical form to the surface of 1,2-dimyristoyl-sn-glycero-3-phospho-(1'-rac-glycerol) liposomes and sodium dodecyl sulfate micelles. VCD and also ECD spectra showed that a variety of BR diastereoisomers interacted with PLAG in such systems. In a system of PLAG with micelles composed of sodium dodecyl sulfate, the M-form of bound BR was observed. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Deuterium Labeling Strategies for Creating Contrast in Structure-Function Studies of Model Bacterial Outer Membranes Using Neutron Reflectometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Brun, Anton P; Clifton, Luke A; Holt, Stephen A; Holden, Peter J; Lakey, Jeremy H

    2016-01-01

    Studying the outer membrane of Gram-negative bacteria is challenging due to the complex nature of its structure. Therefore, simplified models are required to undertake structure-function studies of processes that occur at the outer membrane/fluid interface. Model membranes can be created by immobilizing bilayers to solid supports such as gold or silicon surfaces, or as monolayers on a liquid support where the surface pressure and fluidity of the lipids can be controlled. Both model systems are amenable to having their structure probed by neutron reflectometry, a technique that provides a one-dimensional depth profile through a membrane detailing its thickness and composition. One of the strengths of neutron scattering is the ability to use contrast matching, allowing molecules containing hydrogen and those enriched with deuterium to be highlighted or matched out against the bulk isotopic composition of the solvent. Lipopolysaccharides, a major component of the outer membrane, can be isolated for incorporation into model membranes. Here, we describe the deuteration of lipopolysaccharides from rough strains of Escherichia coli for incorporation into model outer membranes, and how the use of deuterated materials enhances structural analysis of model membranes by neutron reflectometry.

  8. Electrostatic models of electron-driven proton transfer across a lipid membrane

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smirnov, Anatoly Yu; Nori, Franco [Advanced Science Institute, RIKEN, Wako-shi, Saitama, 351-0198 (Japan); Mourokh, Lev G [Department of Physics, Queens College, The City University of New York, Flushing, NY 11367 (United States)

    2011-06-15

    We present two models for electron-driven uphill proton transport across lipid membranes, with the electron energy converted to the proton gradient via the electrostatic interaction. In the first model, associated with the cytochrome c oxidase complex in the inner mitochondria membranes, the electrostatic coupling to the site occupied by an electron lowers the energy level of the proton-binding site, making proton transfer possible. In the second model, roughly describing the redox loop in a nitrate respiration of E. coli bacteria, an electron displaces a proton from the negative side of the membrane to a shuttle, which subsequently diffuses across the membrane and unloads the proton to its positive side. We show that both models can be described by the same approach, which can be significantly simplified if the system is separated into several clusters, with strong Coulomb interaction inside each cluster and weak transfer couplings between them. We derive and solve the equations of motion for the electron and proton creation/annihilation operators, taking into account the appropriate Coulomb terms, tunnel couplings, and the interaction with the environment. For the second model, these equations of motion are solved jointly with a Langevin-type equation for the shuttle position. We obtain expressions for the electron and proton currents and determine their dependence on the electron and proton voltage build-ups, on-site charging energies, reorganization energies, temperature, and other system parameters. We show that the quantum yield in our models can be up to 100% and the power-conversion efficiency can reach 35%.

  9. Modeling and simulation of the dynamic behavior of portable proton exchange membrane fuel cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ziegler, C.

    2005-07-01

    In order to analyze the operational behavior, a mathematical model of planar self-breathing fuel cells is developed and validated in Chapter 3 of this thesis. The multicomponent transport of the species is considered as well as the couplings between the transport processes of heat, charge, and mass and the electrochemical reactions. Furthermore, to explain the oxygen mass transport limitation in the porous electrode of the cathode side an agglomerate model for the oxygen reduction reaction is developed. In Chapter 4 the important issue of liquid water generation and transport in PEMFCs is addressed. One of the major tasks when operating this type of fuel cell is avoiding the complete flooding of the PEMFC during operation. A one-dimensional and isothermal model is developed that is based on a coupled system of partial differential equations. The model contains a dynamic and two-phase description of the proton exchange membrane fuel cell. The mass transport in the gas phase and in the liquid phase is considered as well as the phase transition between liquid water and water vapor. The transport of charges and the electrochemical reactions are part of the model. Flooding effects that are caused by liquid water accumulation are described by this model. Moreover, the model contains a time-dependent description of the membrane that accounts for Schroeder's paradox. The model is applied to simulate cyclic voltammograms. Chapter 5 is focused on the dynamic investigation of PEMFC stacks. Understanding the dynamic behavior of fuel cell stacks is important for the operation and control of fuel cell stacks. Using the single cell model of Chapter 3 and the dynamic model of Chapter 4 as basis, a mathematical model of a PEMFC stack is developed. However, due to the complexity of a fuel cell stack, the spatial resolution and dynamic description of the liquid water transport are not accounted for. These restrictions allow for direct comparison between the solution variables of

  10. Meso-scale Modeling of Block Copolymers Self-Assembly in Casting Solutions for Membrane Manufacture

    KAUST Repository

    Moreno Chaparro, Nicolas

    2016-05-01

    Isoporous membranes manufactured from diblock copolymer are successfully produced at laboratory scale under controlled conditions. Because of the complex phenomena involved, membrane preparation requires trial and error methodologies to find the optimal conditions, leading to a considerable demand of resources. Experimental insights demonstrate that the self-assembly of the block copolymers in solution has an effect on the final membrane structure. Nevertheless, the complete understanding of these multi-scale phenomena is elusive. Herein we use the coarse-grained method Dissipative Particle Dynamics to study the self-assembly of block copolymers that are used for the preparation of the membranes. To simulate representative time and length scales, we introduce a framework for model reduction of polymer chain representations for dissipative particle dynamics, which preserves the properties governing the phase equilibria. We reduce the number of degrees of freedom by accounting for the correlation between beads in fine-grained models via power laws and the consistent scaling of the simulation parameters. The coarse-graining models are consistent with the experimental evidence, showing a morphological transition of the aggregates as the polymer concentration and solvent affinity change. We show that hexagonal packing of the micelles can occur in solution within different windows of polymer concentration depending on the solvent affinity. However, the shape and size dispersion of the micelles determine the characteristic arrangement. We describe the order of crew-cut micelles using a rigid-sphere approximation and propose different phase parameters that characterize the emergence of monodisperse-spherical micelles in solution. Additionally, we investigate the effect of blending asymmetric diblock copolymers (AB/AC) over the properties of the membranes. We observe that the co-assembly mechanism localizes the AC molecules at the interface of A and B domains, and induces

  11. EXPERIMENTAL DESIGN AND RESPONSE SURFACE MODELING OF PI/PES-ZEOLITE 4A MIXED MATRIX MEMBRANE FOR CO2 SEPARATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. D. KUSWORO

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper investigates the effect of preparation of polyimide/polyethersulfone (PI/PES blending-zeolite mixed matrix membrane through the manipulation of membrane production variables such as polymer concentration, blending composition and zeolite loading. Combination of central composite design and response surface methodology were applied to determine the main effect and interaction effects of these variables on membrane separation performance. The quadratic models between each response and the independent parameters were developed and the response surface models were tested with analysis of variance (ANOVA. In this study, PI/ (PES–zeolite 4A mixed matrix membranes were casted using dry/wet phase inversion technique. The separation performance of mixed matrix membrane had been tested using pure gases such as CO2 and CH4. The results showed that zeolite loading was the most significant variable that influenced the CO2/CH4 selectivity among three variables and the experimental results were in good agreement with those predicted by the proposed regression models. The gas separation performance of the membrane was relatively higher as compare to polymeric membrane. Therefore, combination of central composite design and response surface methodology can be used to prepare optimal condition for mixed matrix membrane fabrication. The incorporation of 20 wt% zeolite 4A into 25 wt% of PI/PES matrix had resulted in a high separation performance of membrane material.

  12. Extension of CAVS coarse-grained model to phospholipid membranes: The importance of electrostatics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Hujun; Deng, Mingsen; Zhang, Yachao

    2017-05-15

    It is evident from experiment that electrostatic potential (or dipole potential) is positive inside PC or PE lipid bilayers in the absence of ions. MARTINI coarse-grained (CG) model, which has been widely used in simulating physical properties of lipid bilayers, fails to reproduce the positive value for the dipole potential in the membrane interior. Although the total dipole potential can be correctly described by the BMW/MARTINI model, the contribution from the ester dipoles, playing a nontrivial role in the electrostatic potential across lipid membranes, is neglected by this hybrid approach. In the ELBA CG model, the role of the ester dipoles is considered, but it is overweighed because various atomistic models have consistently shown that water is actually the leading contributor of dipole potential. Here, we present a CG approach by combining the BMW-like water model (namely CAVS model) with the ELBA-like lipid model proposed in this work. Our CG model was designed not only to correctly reproduce the positive values for the dipole potential inside PC and PE lipid bilayers but also to properly balance the individual contributions from the ester dipoles and water, surmounting the limitations of current CG models in the calculations of dipole potential. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. A mathematical model of thrombin production in blood coagulation, Part I: The sparsely covered membrane case.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldwin, S A; Basmadjian, D

    1994-01-01

    This paper presents the first attempt to model the blood coagulation reactions in flowing blood. The model focuses on the common pathway and includes activation of factor X and prothrombin, including feedback activation of cofactors VIII and V by thrombin, and plasma inhibition of factor Xa and thrombin. In this paper, the first of two, the sparsely covered membrane (SCM) case is presented. This considers the limiting situation where platelet membrane binding sites are in excess, such that no membrane saturation or binding competition occurs. Under these conditions, the model predicts that the two positive feedback loops lead to multiple steady-state behavior in the range of intermediate mass transfer rates. It will be shown that this results in three parameter regions exhibiting very different thrombin production patterns. The model predicts the effect of flow on steady-state and dynamic thrombin production and attempts to explain the difference between venous and arterial thrombi. The reliance of thrombin production on precursor procoagulant protein concentrations is also assessed.

  14. Dynamical clustering and a mechanism for raft-like structures in a model lipid membrane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starr, Francis W; Hartmann, Benedikt; Douglas, Jack F

    2014-05-01

    We use molecular dynamics simulations to examine the dynamical heterogeneity of a model single-component lipid membrane using a coarse-grained representation of lipid molecules. This model qualitatively reproduces the known phase transitions between disordered, ordered, and gel membrane phases, and the phase transitions are accompanied by significant changes in the nature of the lipid dynamics. In particular, lipid diffusion in the liquid-ordered phase is hindered by the transient trapping of molecules by their neighbors, similar to the dynamics of a liquid approaching its glass transition. This transient molecular caging gives rise to two distinct mobility groups within a single-component membrane: lipids that are transiently trapped, and lipids with displacements on the scale of the intermolecular spacing. Most significantly, lipids within these distinct mobility states spatially segregate, creating transient "islands" of enhanced mobility having a size and time scale compatible with lipid "rafts," dynamical structures thought to be important for cell membrane function. Although the dynamic lipid clusters that we observe do not themselves correspond to rafts (which are more complex, multicomponent structures), we hypothesize that such rafts may develop from the same universal mechanism, explaining why raft-like regions should arise, regardless of lipid structural or compositional details. These clusters are strikingly similar to the dynamical clusters found in glass-forming fluids, and distinct from phase-separation clusters. We also show that mobile lipid clusters can be dissected into smaller clusters of cooperatively rearranging molecules. The geometry of these clusters can be understood in the context of branched equilibrium polymers, related to percolation theory. We discuss how these dynamical structures relate to a range observations on the dynamics of lipid membranes.

  15. Syrinx fluid transport: modeling pressure-wave-induced flux across the spinal pial membrane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elliott, N S J

    2012-03-01

    Syrinxes are fluid-filled cavities of the spinal cord that characterize syringomyelia, a disease involving neurological damage. Their formation and expansion is poorly understood, which has hindered successful treatment. Syrinx cavities are hydraulically connected with the spinal subarachnoid space (SSS) enveloping the spinal cord via the cord interstitium and the network of perivascular spaces (PVSs), which surround blood vessels penetrating the pial membrane that is adherent to the cord surface. Since the spinal canal supports pressure wave propagation, it has been hypothesized that wave-induced fluid exchange across the pial membrane may play a role in syrinx filling. To investigate this conjecture a pair of one-dimensional (1-d) analytical models were developed from classical elastic tube theory coupled with Darcy's law for either perivascular or interstitial flow. The results show that transpial flux serves as a mechanism for damping pressure waves by alleviating hoop stress in the pial membrane. The timescale ratio over which viscous and inertial forces compete was explicitly determined, which predicts that dilated PVS, SSS flow obstructions, and a stiffer and thicker pial membrane-all associated with syringomyelia-will increase transpial flux and retard wave travel. It was also revealed that the propagation of a pressure wave is aided by a less-permeable pial membrane and, in contrast, by a more-permeable spinal cord. This is the first modeling of the spinal canal to include both pressure-wave propagation along the spinal axis and a pathway for fluid to enter and leave the cord, which provides an analytical foundation from which to approach the full poroelastic problem.

  16. Modeling flow in nanoporous, membrane reservoirs and interpretation of coupled fluxes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geren, Filiz

    The average pore size in unconventional, tight-oil reservoirs is estimated to be less than 100 nm. At this pore size, Darcy flow is no longer the dominating flow mechanism and a combination of diffusive flows determines the flow characteristics. Concentration driven self-diffusion has been well known and included in the flow and transport models in porous media. However, when the sizes of the pores and pore-throats decrease down to the size of the hydrocarbon molecules, the porous medium acts like a semi-permeable membrane, and the size of the pore openings dictates the direction of transport between adjacent pores. Accordingly, characterization of flow and transport in tight unconventional plays requires understanding of their membrane properties. This Master of Science thesis first highlights the membrane properties of nanoporous, unconventional reservoirs and then discusses how filtration effects can be incorporated into the models of transport in nanoporous media within the coupled flux concept. The effect of filtration on fluid composition and its impact on black-oil fluid properties like bubble point pressure is also demonstrated. To define filtration and filtration pressure in unconventional, tight-oil reservoirs, analogy to chemical osmosis is applied two pore systems connected with a pore throat, which shows membrane properties. Because the pore throat selectivity permits the passage of fluid molecules by their sizes, given a filtration pressure difference between the two pore systems, the concentration difference between the systems is determined by flash calculations. The results are expressed in the form of filtration (membrane) efficiency, which is essential parameter to define coupled fluxes for porous media flow.

  17. Modeling the local potential at Pt nanoparticles in polymer electrolyte membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eslamibidgoli, Mohammad Javad; Melchy, Pierre-Éric Alix; Eikerling, Michael H

    2015-04-21

    We present a physical-analytical model for the potential distribution at Pt nanodeposits in a polymer electrolyte membrane (PEM). Experimental studies have shown that solid deposits of Pt in PEM play a dual role in radical-initiated membrane degradation. Surface reactions at Pt particles could facilitate the formation as well as the scavenging of ionomer-attacking radical species. The net radical balance depends on local equilibrium conditions at Pt nanodeposits in the PEM, specifically, their equivalent local electrode potential. Our approach utilizes a continuum description of crossover fluxes of reactant gases, coupled with the kinetics of electrochemical surface reactions at Pt nanodeposits to calculate the potential distribution. The local potential is a function of the PEM structure and composition, which is determined by PEM thickness, concentrations of H2 and O2, as well as the size and density distribution of Pt particles. Model results compare well with experimental data for the potential distribution in PEMs.

  18. Modeling and simulation of membrane separation process using computational fluid dynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kambiz Tahvildari

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Separation of CO2 from air was simulated in this work. The considered process for removal of CO2 was a hollow-fiber membrane contactor and an aqueous solution of 2-amino-2-metyl-1-propanol (AMP as absorbent. The model was developed based on mass transfer as well as chemical reaction for CO2 and solvent in the contactor. The equations of model were solved using finite element method. Simulation results were compared with experimental data, and good agreement was observed. The results revealed that increasing solvent velocity enhances removal of CO2 in the hollow-fiber membrane contactor. Moreover, it was found that counter-current process mode is more favorable to achieve the highest separation efficiency.

  19. Direct measurement of the critical pore size in a model membrane

    CERN Document Server

    Ilton, Mark; Dalnoki-Veress, Kari

    2016-01-01

    We study pore nucleation in a model membrane system, a freestanding polymer film. Nucleated pores smaller than a critical size close, while pores larger than the critical size grow. Holes of varying size were purposefully prepared in liquid polymer films, and their evolution in time was monitored using optical and atomic force microscopy to extract a critical radius. The critical radius scales linearly with film thickness for a homopolymer film. The results agree with a simple model which takes into account the energy cost due to surface area at the edge of the pore. The energy cost at the edge of the pore is experimentally varied by using a lamellar-forming diblock copolymer membrane. The underlying molecular architecture causes increased frustration at the pore edge resulting in an enhanced cost of pore formation.

  20. Modeling of submerged membrane bioreactor treating cheese whey wastewater by artificial neural network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cinar, Ozer; Hasar, Halil; Kinaci, Cumali

    2006-05-17

    A submerged membrane bioreactor receiving cheese whey was modeled by artificial neural network and its performance over a period of 100 days at different solids retention times was evaluated with this robust tool. A cascade-forward network was used to model the membrane bioreactor and normalization was used as a preprocessing method. The network was fed with two subsets of operational data, with two-thirds being used for training and one-third for testing the performance of the artificial neural network. The training procedure for effluent chemical oxygen demand (COD), ammonia, nitrate and total phosphate concentrations was very successful and a perfect match was obtained between the measured and the calculated concentrations. The results of the confirmation (or testing) procedure for effluent ammonia and nitrate concentrations were very successful; however, the results of the confirmation procedure for effluent COD and total phosphate concentrations were only satisfactory.

  1. A review on the performance and modelling of proton exchange membrane fuel cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boucetta, A., E-mail: abirboucetta@yahoo.fr; Ghodbane, H., E-mail: h.ghodbane@mselab.org; Bahri, M., E-mail: m.bahri@mselab.org [Department of Electrical Engineering, MSE Laboratory, Mohamed khider Biskra University (Algeria); Ayad, M. Y., E-mail: ayadmy@gmail.com [R& D, Industrial Hybrid Vehicle Applications (France)

    2016-07-25

    Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cells (PEMFC), are energy efficient and environmentally friendly alternative to conventional energy conversion for various applications in stationary power plants, portable power device and transportation. PEM fuel cells provide low operating temperature and high-energy efficiency with near zero emission. A PEM fuel cell is a multiple distinct parts device and a series of mass, energy, transport through gas channels, electric current transport through membrane electrode assembly and electrochemical reactions at the triple-phase boundaries. These processes play a decisive role in determining the performance of the Fuel cell, so that studies on the phenomena of gas flows and the performance modelling are made deeply. This paper gives a comprehensive overview of the state of the art on the Study of the phenomena of gas flow and performance modelling of PEMFC.

  2. A review on the performance and modelling of proton exchange membrane fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boucetta, A.; Ghodbane, H.; Ayad, M. Y.; Bahri, M.

    2016-07-01

    Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cells (PEMFC), are energy efficient and environmentally friendly alternative to conventional energy conversion for various applications in stationary power plants, portable power device and transportation. PEM fuel cells provide low operating temperature and high-energy efficiency with near zero emission. A PEM fuel cell is a multiple distinct parts device and a series of mass, energy, transport through gas channels, electric current transport through membrane electrode assembly and electrochemical reactions at the triple-phase boundaries. These processes play a decisive role in determining the performance of the Fuel cell, so that studies on the phenomena of gas flows and the performance modelling are made deeply. This paper gives a comprehensive overview of the state of the art on the Study of the phenomena of gas flow and performance modelling of PEMFC.

  3. Independent air dehumidification with membrane-based total heat recovery: Modeling and experimental validation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liang, C.H.; Zhang, L.Z.; Pei, L.X. [Key Laboratory of Enhanced Heat Transfer and Energy Conservation of Education Ministry, School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, South China University of Technology, Guangzhou 510640 (China)

    2010-03-15

    Fresh air ventilation is helpful for the control of epidemic respiratory disease like Swine flu (H1N1). Fresh air dehumidification systems with energy recovery measures are the key equipments to realize this goal. As a solution, an independent air dehumidification system with membrane-based total heat recovery is proposed. A prototype is built in laboratory. A detailed model is proposed and a cell-by-cell simulation technique is used in simulation to evaluate performances. The results indicate that the model can predict the system accurately. The effects of varying operating conditions like air-flow rates, temperature, and air relative humidity on the air dehumidification rates, cooling powers, electric power consumption, and thermal coefficient of performance are evaluated. The prototype has a COP of 6.8 under nominal operating conditions with total heat recovery. The performance is rather robust to outside weather conditions with a membrane-based total heat exchanger. (author)

  4. Validation of computational non-Newtonian fluid model for membrane bioreactor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Lasse; Bentzen, Thomas Ruby; Skov, Kristian

    2015-01-01

    for optimizing MBR-systems is computational fluid dynamics (CFD) modelling, giving the ability to describe the flow in the systems. A parameter which is often neglected in such models is the non-Newtonian properties of active sludge, which is of great importance for MBR systems since they operate at sludge...... concentrations up to a factor 10 compared to conventional activated sludge (CAS) systems, resulting in strongly shear thinning liquids. A CFD-model is validated against measurements conducted in a system with rotating cross flow membranes submerged in non-Newtonian liquids, where tangential velocities...

  5. A continuum membrane model for small deformations of a spider orb-web

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morassi, Antonino; Soler, Alejandro; Zaera, Ramón

    2017-09-01

    In this paper we propose a continuum membrane model for the infinitesimal deformation of a spider web. The model is derived in the simple context of axially-symmetric webs formed by radial threads connected with circumferential threads belonging to concentric circles. Under suitable assumption on the tensile pre-stress acting in the referential configuration, the out-of-plane static equilibrium and the free transverse and in-plane vibration of a supported circular orb-web are studied in detail. The accuracy of the model in describing a discrete spider web is numerically investigated.

  6. Oxygen Transfer Model for a Flow-Through Hollow-Fiber Membrane Biofilm Reactor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gilmore, K. R.; Little, J. C.; Smets, Barth F.

    2009-01-01

    A mechanistic oxygen transfer model was developed and applied to a flow-through hollow-fiber membrane-aerated biofilm reactor. Model results are compared to conventional clean water test results as well as performance data obtained when an actively nitrifying biofilm was present on the fibers....... With the biofilm present, oxygen transfer efficiencies between 30 and 55% were calculated from the measured data including the outlet gas oxygen concentration, ammonia consumption stoichiometry, and oxidized nitrogen production stoichiometry, all of which were in reasonable agreement. The mechanistic model...

  7. Electrical equivalent thermal network for direct contact membrane distillation modeling and analysis

    KAUST Repository

    Karam, Ayman M.

    2016-09-19

    Membrane distillation (MD) is an emerging water desalination technology that offers several advantages compared to conventional desalination methods. Although progress has been made to model the physics of the process, there are two common limitations of existing models. Firstly, many of the models are based on the steady-state analysis of the process and secondly, some of the models are based on partial differential equations, which when discretized introduce many states which are not accessible in practice. This paper presents the derivation of a novel dynamic model, based on the analogy between electrical and thermal systems, for direct contact membrane distillation (DCMD). An analogous electrical thermal network is constructed and its elements are parameterized such that the response of the network models the DCMD process. The proposed model captures the spatial and temporal responses of the temperature distribution along the flow direction and is able to accurately predict the distilled water flux output. To demonstrate the adequacy of the proposed model, validation with time varying and steady-state experimental data is presented. (C) 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Effect of Organic Tin Compounds on Electric Properties of Model Membranes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Podolak, M.; Engel, G.; Man, D. [Inst. of Physics, Opole Univ., Opole (Poland)

    2006-05-15

    The objective of the present work was to investigate the effect of selected organic tin compounds and potassium chloride (used as a reference substance) on the trans-membrane electric voltage and electric resistance of model membranes, the latter being nitrocellulose filters impregnated with butylene ester of lauric acid. The increasing KCl concentration (in the measurement chambers) caused a rapid rise of the negative trans-membrane voltage, whose value stabilized afterwards. In the case of (C{sub 3}H{sub 7}){sub 3}SnCl an abrupt maximum of the negative voltage was observed followed by a monotonic drop to zero. In the case of highest concentrations of this compound the voltages, after having reached zero, changed their polarization to the opposite. Within the range of small concentrations two slight voltage maxima were observed. Non-ionic tin compounds like (CH{sub 3}){sub 4}Sn and (C{sub 2}H{sub 5}){sub 4}Sn had an insignificant influence on the electric properties of the studied membranes. (orig.)

  9. Choline Modulation of the Aβ P1-40 Channel Reconstituted into a Model Lipid Membrane

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela Meleleo

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (AChRs, implicated in memory and learning, in subjects affected by Alzheimer's disease result altered. Stimulation of α7-nAChRs inhibits amyloid plaques and increases ACh release. β-amyloid peptide (AβP forms ion channels in the cell and model phospholipid membranes that are retained responsible in Alzheimer disease. We tested if choline, precursor of ACh, could affect the AβP1-40 channels in oxidized cholesterol (OxCh and in palmitoyl-oleoyl-phosphatidylcholine (POPC:Ch lipid bilayers. Choline concentrations of 5 × 10−11 M–1.5 × 10−8 M added to the cis- or trans-side of membrane quickly increased AβP1-40 ion channel frequency (events/min and ion conductance in OxCh membranes, but not in POPC:Ch membranes. Circular Dichroism (CD spectroscopy shows that after 24 and 48 hours of incubation with AβP1-40, choline stabilizes the random coil conformation of the peptide, making it less prone to fibrillate. These actions seem to be specific in that ACh is ineffective either in solution or on AβP1-40 channel incorporated into PLMs.

  10. Experimental Study and Model Analysis of the Performance of IPMC Membranes with Various Thickness

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qingsong He; Min Yu; Linlin Song; Haitao Ding; Xiaoqing Zhang; Zhendong Dai

    2011-01-01

    Ionic Polymer-Metal Composite (IPMC) is a new electro-active polymer, which has the advantages of light weight, flexi-bility, and large stroke with low driving voltage. Because of these features, IPMC can be applied to bionic robotic actuators,artificial muscles, as well as dynamic sensors. However, IPMC has the major drawback of low generative blocking force. In this paper, in order to enhance the blocking force, the Nafion membranes with thickness of 0.22 mm, 0.32 mm, 0.42 mm, 0.64 mm and 0.8 mm were prepared by casting from liquid solution. By employing these Nafion membranes, IPMCs with varying thickness were fabricated by electroless plating. The elastic modulus of the casted Nation membranes were obtained by a nano-indenter, and the current, the displacement and the blocking force were respectively measured by the apparatus for actuation test. Finally, the effects of the thickness on the performance of IPMC were analyzed with an electromechanical model.Experimental study and theory analysis indicate that as the thickness increases, the elastic modulus of Nation membrane and the blocking force of IPMC increase, however, the current and the displacement decrease.

  11. Modeling the effect of nano-sized polymer particles on the properties of lipid membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossi, Giulia; Monticelli, Luca

    2014-12-01

    The interaction between polymers and biological membranes has recently gained significant interest in several research areas. On the biomedical side, dendrimers, linear polyelectrolytes, and neutral copolymers find application as drug and gene delivery agents, as biocidal agents, and as platforms for biological sensors. On the environmental side, plastic debris is often disposed of in the oceans and gets degraded into small particles; therefore concern is raising about the interaction of small plastic particles with living organisms. From both perspectives, it is crucial to understand the processes driving the interaction between polymers and cell membranes. In recent times progress in computer technology and simulation methods has allowed computational predictions on the molecular mechanism of interaction between polymeric materials and lipid membranes. Here we review the computational studies on the interaction between lipid membranes and different classes of polymers: dendrimers, linear charged polymers, polyethylene glycol (PEG) and its derivatives, polystyrene, and some generic models of polymer chains. We conclude by discussing some of the technical challenges in this area and future developments.

  12. Comparing and Contrasting Traditional Membrane Bioreactor Models with Novel Ones Based on Time Series Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parneet Paul

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available The computer modelling and simulation of wastewater treatment plant and their specific technologies, such as membrane bioreactors (MBRs, are becoming increasingly useful to consultant engineers when designing, upgrading, retrofitting, operating and controlling these plant. This research uses traditional phenomenological mechanistic models based on MBR filtration and biochemical processes to measure the effectiveness of alternative and novel time series models based upon input–output system identification methods. Both model types are calibrated and validated using similar plant layouts and data sets derived for this purpose. Results prove that although both approaches have their advantages, they also have specific disadvantages as well. In conclusion, the MBR plant designer and/or operator who wishes to use good quality, calibrated models to gain a better understanding of their process, should carefully consider which model type is selected based upon on what their initial modelling objectives are. Each situation usually proves unique.

  13. Modeling two-tone suppression and distortion product on basilar membrane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murakami, Yasuki; Ishimitsu, Shunsuke

    2015-12-01

    This paper reveals mechanisms of two-tone suppression (2TS) and distortion product (DP) on the basilar membrane (BM) using a model. Computational simulation is conducted with an active and nonlinear transmission line model including a nonlinear outer hair cell model that shows compressive property in two dimensionally where two tones are input. To evaluate the cochlear model, over all responses of BM model are used. For simultaneous input pairs, the response is suppressed by a stronger tone, or distorted where levels of a pair are equaled. Cubic distortion produced by a simple nonlinear feedback system including the OHC model appears similar to DPs in the cochlear model. These results suggest that two dimensional property of the OHC and its feedback generate 2TS and DPs. This further suggests the importance of the overall responses for investigating mechanisms of cochlear nonlinearities without fluid coupling in the cochlea.

  14. Computational fluid dynamics modelling of a polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell under transient automotive operations

    OpenAIRE

    Choopanya, Pattarapong

    2016-01-01

    A polymer electrolyte membrane (PEM) fuel cell is probably the most promising technology that will replace conventional internal combustion engines in the near future. As a primary power source for an automobile, the transient performance of a PEM fuel cell is of prime importance. In this thesis, a comprehensive, three-dimensional, two-phase, multi-species computational fuel cell dynamics model is developed in order to investigate the effect of flow-field design on the magnitude of current ov...

  15. Biophysical implications of sphingosine accumulation in membrane properties at neutral and acidic pH.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zupancic, Eva; Carreira, Ana C; de Almeida, Rodrigo F M; Silva, Liana C

    2014-05-08

    Sphingosine (Sph) is a simple lipid involved in the regulation of several biological processes. When accumulated in the late endosomal/lysosomal compartments, Sph causes changes in ion signaling and membrane trafficking, leading to the development of Niemann-Pick disease type C. Little is known about Sph interaction with other lipids in biological membranes; however, understanding the effect of Sph in the physical state of membranes might provide insights into its mode of action. Using complementary established fluorescence approaches, we show that Sph accumulation leads to the formation of Sph-enriched gel domains in 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (POPC) and POPC/sphingomyelin (SM)/cholesterol (Chol) model membranes. These domains are more easily formed in membrane models mimicking the neutral pH plasma membrane environment (PM) as compared to the acidic lysosomal membrane environment (LM), where higher Sph concentrations (or lower temperatures) are required. Electrophoretic light scattering measurements further revealed that in PM-raft models (POPC/SM/Chol), Sph is mainly neutral, whereas in LM models, the positive charge of Sph leads to electrostatic repulsion, reducing the Sph ability to form gel domains. Thus, formation of Sph-enriched domains in cellular membranes might be strongly regulated by Sph charge.

  16. Mimicking liver sinusoidal structures and functions using a 3D-configured microfluidic chip.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Yu; Li, Ning; Yang, Hao; Luo, Chunhua; Gong, Yixin; Tong, Chunfang; Gao, Yuxin; Lü, Shouqin; Long, Mian

    2017-02-28

    Physiologically, four major types of hepatic cells - the liver sinusoidal endothelial cells, Kupffer cells, hepatic stellate cells, and hepatocytes - reside inside liver sinusoids and interact with flowing peripheral cells under blood flow. It is hard to mimic an in vivo liver sinusoid due to its complex multiple cell-cell interactions, spatiotemporal construction, and mechanical microenvironment. Here we developed an in vitro liver sinusoid chip by integrating the four types of primary murine hepatic cells into two adjacent fluid channels separated by a porous permeable membrane, replicating liver's key structures and configurations. Each type of cells was identified with its respective markers, and the assembled chip presented the liver-specific unique morphology of fenestration. The flow field in the liver chip was quantitatively analyzed by computational fluid dynamics simulations and particle tracking visualization tests. Intriguingly, co-culture and shear flow enhance albumin secretion independently or cooperatively, while shear flow alone enhances HGF production and CYP450 metabolism. Under lipopolysaccharide (LPS) stimulations, the hepatic cell co-culture facilitated neutrophil recruitment in the liver chip. Thus, this 3D-configured in vitro liver chip integrates the two key factors of shear flow and the four types of primary hepatic cells to replicate key structures, hepatic functions, and primary immune responses and provides a new in vitro model to investigate the short-duration hepatic cellular interactions under a microenvironment mimicking the physiology of a liver.

  17. Competitive Adsorption between B-Casein or B-Lactoglobulin and Model Milk Membrane Lipids at Oil-Water Interfaces

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Waninge, R.; Walstra, P.; Bastiaans, J.; Nieuwenhuijse, H.; Nylander, T.; Paulsson, M.; Bergenstahl, B.

    2005-01-01

    This study investigated the competitive adsorption between milk proteins and model milk membrane lipids at the oil-water interface and its dependence on the state of the lipid dispersion and the formation of emulsions. Both protein and membrane lipid surface load were determined using a serum

  18. Lipid rafts-mediated endocytosis and physiology-based cell membrane traffic models of doxorubicin liposomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yinghuan; Gao, Lei; Tan, Xi; Li, Feiyang; Zhao, Ming; Peng, Shiqi

    2016-08-01

    The clathrin-mediated endocytosis is likely a major mechanism of liposomes' internalization. A kinetic approach was used to assess the internalization mechanism of doxorubicin (Dox) loaded cationic liposomes and to establish physiology-based cell membrane traffic mathematic models. Lipid rafts-mediated endocytosis, including dynamin-dependent or -independent endocytosis of noncaveolar structure, was a dominant process. The mathematic models divided Dox loaded liposomes binding lipid rafts (B) into saturable binding (SB) and nonsaturable binding (NSB) followed by energy-driven endocytosis. The intracellular trafficking demonstrated early endosome-late endosome-lysosome or early/late endosome-cytoplasm-nucleus pathways. The three properties of liposome structures, i.e., cationic lipid, fusogenic lipid, and pegylation, were investigated to compare their contributions to cell membrane and intracellular traffic. The results revealed great contribution of cationic lipid DOTAP and fusogenic lipid DOPE to cell membrane binding and internalization. The valid Dox in the nuclei of HepG2 and A375 cells treated with cationic liposomes containing 40mol% of DOPE were 1.2-fold and 1.5-fold higher than that in the nuclei of HepG2 and A375 cells treated with liposomes containing 20mol% of DOPE, respectively, suggesting the dependence of cell type. This tendency was proportional to the increase of cell-associated total liposomal Dox. The mathematic models would be useful to predict intracellular trafficking of liposomal Dox.

  19. A membrane-integrated advanced scheme for treatment of industrial wastewater: dynamic modeling towards scale up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Ramesh; Pal, Parimal

    2013-08-01

    Modeling and simulation was carried out for an advanced membrane-integrated hybrid treatment process that ensures reuse of water with conversion and recovery of ammoniacal nitrogen as value-added struvite fertilizer from coke wastewater. While toxic cyanide was largely removed in a pre-chemical treatment unit using Fenton's reagents under optimized conditions, more than 95% of NH4(+)-N could be recovered as a valuable by-product called struvite through addition of appropriate doses of magnesium and phosphate salts. Water could be turned reusable through a polishing treatment by nanofiltration membranes in a largely fouling free membrane module following a biodegradation step. Mathematical modeling of such an integrated process was done with Haldane-Andrew approach for the associated microbial degradation of phenol by Pseudomonas putida. Residual NH4(+) was degraded by nitrification and denitrification following the modified Monod kinetics. The model could successfully predict the plant performance as reflected in reasonably low relative error (0.03-0.18) and high Willmott d-index (>0.98).

  20. Deformation of Two-Dimensional Nonuniform-Membrane Red Blood Cells Simulated by a Lattice Boltzmann Model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Hua-Bing; JIN Li; QIU Bing

    2008-01-01

    To study two-dimensional red blood cells deforming in a shear flow with the membrane nonuniform on the rigidity and mass, the membrane is discretized into equilength segments. The fluid inside and outside the red blood cell is simulated by the D2Q9 lattice Boltzmann model and the hydrodynamic forces exerted on the membrane from the inner and outer of the red blood cell are calculated by a stress-integration method. Through the global deviation from the curvature of uniform-membrane, we find that when the membrane is nonuniform on the rigidity, the deviation first decreases with the time increases and implies that the terminal profile of the red blood cell is static. To a red blood cell with the mass nonuniform on the membrane, the deviation becomes more large, and the mass distribution affects the profile of the two sides of the flattened red blood cell in a shear flow.

  1. A High Temperature Polymer Electrolyte Membrane Fuel Cell Model for Reformate Gas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Mamlouk

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available A one-dimensional model of a high temperature polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell using polybenzimidazole (PBI membranes is described. The model considers mass transport through a thin film electrolyte covering the catalyst particles as well as through the porous media. The incorporation of a thin film model describing reactant gas mass transport through electrolyte covering the electrocatalyst is shown to be an essential requirement for accurate simulation. The catalyst interface is represented using a macrohomogeneous model. The influence of carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide, and methane, which would be present in a reformate gas, is considered in terms of the effect on the anode polarisation/kinetics behaviour. The model simulates the influence of operating conditions, cell parameters, and fuel gas compositions on the cell voltage current density characteristics. The model gives good predictions of the effect of oxygen and air pressures on cell behaviour and correctly simulates the mass transport behaviour of the cell. The model with reformate gas shows that additional voltage losses associated with CO poisoning can lead to loss in voltage of tens of mV and thus reduction in power.

  2. Mimickers of breast malignancy on breast sonography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, So Hyun; Park, Sung Hee

    2013-11-01

    The aim of this article is to review benign breast lesions that can mimic carcinoma on sonography. Cases of benign lesions mimicking carcinoma on sonography were collected among lesions that were initially assessed as suspicious on sonography according to the American College of Radiology Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System category. Sonographically guided core needle biopsy was performed, and the pathologic types were confirmed to be benign. Cases of benign lesions mimicking carcinoma on sonography were shown to include fat necrosis, diabetic mastopathy, fibrocystic changes, sclerosing adenosis, ruptured inflammatory cysts, inflammatory abscesses, granulomatous mastitis, fibroadenomas, fibroadenomatous mastopathy, and apocrine metaplasia. Benign breast lesions may present with malignant features on imaging. A clear understanding of the range of appearances of benign breast lesions that mimic malignancy is important in radiologic-pathologic correlation to ensure that benign results are accepted when concordant with imaging and clinical features but, when discordant, there is no delay in further evaluation up to and including excisional biopsy.

  3. Cardiac sarcoidosis mimicking right ventricular dysplasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiraishi, Jun; Tatsumi, Tetsuya; Shimoo, Kazutoshi; Katsume, Asako; Mani, Hiroki; Kobara, Miyuki; Shirayama, Takeshi; Azuma, Akihiro; Nakagawa, Masao

    2003-02-01

    A 59-year-old woman with skin sarcoidosis was admitted to hospital for assessment of complete atrioventricular block. Cross-sectional echocardiography showed that the apical free wall of the right ventricle was thin and dyskinetic with dilation of the right ventricle. Thallium-201 myocardial imaging revealed a normal distribution. Both gallium-67 and technetium-99m pyrophosphate scintigraphy revealed no abnormal uptake in the myocardium. Right ventriculography showed chamber dilation and dyskinesis of the apical free wall, whereas left ventriculography showed normokinesis, mimicking right ventricular dysplasia. Cardiac sarcoidosis was diagnosed on examination of an endomyocardial biopsy specimen from the right ventricle. A permanent pacemaker was implanted to manage the complete atrioventricular block. After steroid treatment, electrocardiography showed first-degree atrioventricular block and echocardiography revealed an improvement in the right ventricular chamber dilation. Reports of cardiac sarcoidosis mimicking right ventricular dysplasia are extremely rare and as this case shows, right ventricular involvement may be one of its manifestations.

  4. Correlating antimicrobial activity and model membrane leakage induced by nylon-3 polymers and detergents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hovakeemian, Sara G; Liu, Runhui; Gellman, Samuel H; Heerklotz, Heiko

    2015-09-14

    Most antimicrobial peptides act upon target microorganisms by permeabilizing their membranes. The mode of action is often assessed by vesicle leakage experiments that use model membranes, with the assumption that biological activity correlates with the permeabilization of the lipid bilayer. The current work aims to extend the interpretation of vesicle leakage results and examine the correlation between vesicle leakage and antimicrobial activity. To this end, we used a lifetime-based leakage assay with calcein-loaded vesicles to study the membrane permeabilizing properties of a novel antifungal polymer poly-NM, two of its analogs, and a series of detergents. In conjunction, the biological activities of these compounds against Candida albicans were assessed and correlated with data from vesicle leakage. Poly-NM induces all-or-none leakage in polar yeast lipid vesicles at the polymer's MIC, 3 μg mL(-1). At this and higher concentrations, complete leakage after an initial lag time was observed. Concerted activity tests imply that this polymer acts independently of the detergent octyl glucoside (OG) for both vesicle leakage and activity against C. albicans spheroplasts. In addition, poly-NM was found to have negligible activity against zwitterionic vesicles and red blood cells. Our results provide a consistent, detailed picture of the mode of action of poly-NM: this polymer induces membrane leakage by electrostatic lipid clustering. In contrast, poly-MM:CO, a nylon-3 polymer comprised of both cationic and hydrophobic segments, seems to act by a different mechanism that involves membrane asymmetry stress. Vesicle leakage for this polymer is transient (limited to nylon-3 polymers we examined act via similar mechanisms; it is surprising that their mechanisms are so distinct. Some, but not all mechanisms of vesicle permeabilization allow for antimicrobial activity.

  5. Location and activity of ubiquinone 10 and ubiquinone analogues in model and biological membranes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cornell, B.A.; Keniry, M.A.; Post, A.; Roberston, R.N.; Weir, L.E.; Westerman, P.W.

    1987-12-01

    Deuteriated analogues of ubiquinone 10 (Q/sup 10/) have been dispersed with plasma membranes of Escherichia coli and with the inner membranes of beetroot mitochondria. Orientational order at various deuteriated sites was measured by solid-state deuterium nuclear magnetic resonance (/sup 2/H NMR). Similar measurements were made, using the compounds dispersed in dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine (DMPC) and egg yolk lecithin and dispersions prepared from the lipid extracts of beetroot mitochondria. In all cases only a single unresolved /sup 2/H NMR spectrum (typically 1000-Hz full width at half-height) was observed at concentrations down to 0.02 mol % Q/sub 10/ per membrane lipid. This result shows that most Q/sub 10/ is in a mobile environment which is physically separate from the orientational constraints of the bilayer lipid chains. In contrast, a short-chain analog of Q/sub 10/, in which the 10 isoprene groups have been replaced by a perdeuteriated tridecyl chain, showed /sup 2/H NMR spectra with quadrupolar splittings typical of an ordered lipid that is intercalated into the bilayer. The NADH oxidase activity and O/sub 2/ uptake in Escherichia coli and in mitochondria were independent of which analog was incorporated into the membrane. Thus, despite the major difference in their physical association with membranes, or their lipid extracts, the electron transport function of the long- and short-chain ubiquinones is similar, suggesting that the bulk of the long-chain ubiquinone does not have a direct function in electron transporting activity. The physiologically active Q/sub 10/ may only be a small fraction of the total ubiquinone, a fraction that is below the level of detection of the present NMR equipment. However, our results do not support any model of Q/sub 10/ electron transport action that includes intercalation of the long isoprenoid chain in lipid.

  6. Kinetic Defects Induced by Melittin in Model Lipid Membranes: A Solution Atomic Force Microscopy Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Jianjun; Khadka, Nawal K

    2016-05-26

    Quantitative characterization of membrane defects (pores) is important for elucidating the molecular basis of many membrane-active peptides. We study kinetic defects induced by melittin in vesicular and planar lipid bilayers. Fluorescence spectroscopy measurements indicate that melittin induces time-dependent calcein leakage. Solution atomic force microscopy (AFM) is used to visualize melittin-induced membrane defects. After initial equilibration, the most probable defect radius is ∼3.8 nm in 1,2-dilauroyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DLPC) bilayers. Unexpectedly, defects become larger with longer incubation, accompanied by substantial shape transformation. The initial defect radius is ∼4.7 nm in 1,2-dioleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DOPC) bilayers. Addition of 30 mol % cholesterol to DOPC bilayers suppresses defect kinetics, although the inhibitory impact is negated by longer incubation. Overall, the kinetic rate of defect development follows DLPC > DOPC > DOPC/cholesterol. Kinetic defects are also observed when anionic lipids are present. Based on the observation that defects can occupy as large as 40% of the bilayer surface, we propose a kinetic defect growth model. We also study the effect of melittin on the phase behavior of DOPC/egg-sphingomyelin/cholesterol bilayers. We find that melittin initially suppresses or eliminates liquid-ordered (Lo) domains; Lo domains gradually emerge and become the dominant species with longer incubation; and defects in phase-coexisting bilayers have a most probable radius of ∼5 nm and are exclusively localized in the liquid-disordered (Ld) phase. Our experimental data highlight that melittin-induced membrane defects are not static; conversely, spontaneous defect growth is intrinsically associated with membrane permeabilization exerted by melittin.

  7. Partitioning of amino-acid analogues in a five-slab membrane model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sengupta, D [University of Heidelberg; Smith, Jeremy C [ORNL; Ullmann, G. Matthias [University of Bayreuth

    2008-09-01

    The positional preferences of the twenty amino-acid residues in a phospholipid bilayer are investigated by calculating the solvation free energy of the corresponding side chain analogues using a five-slab continuum electrostatic model. The side-chain analogues of the aromatic residues tryptophan and tyrosine are found to partition in the head-group region, due to compensation between the increase of the non-polar component of the solvation free energy at the boundary with the aqueous region and the decrease in the electrostatic component. The side chain analogue of phenylalanine differs from the other aromatic molecules by being able to partition in both the head-group region and the membrane core. This finding is consistent with experimental findings of the position of phenylalanine in membrane helices. Interestingly, the charged side-chain analogues of arginine and lysine are shown to prefer the head-group region in an orientation that allows the charged moiety to interact with the aqueous layer. The orientation adopted is similar to the 'snorkelling' effect seen in lysine and arginine residues in membrane helices. In contrast, the preference of the charged side-chain analogues of histidine (protonated) and aspartate (deprotonated) for the aqueous layer is shown to be due to a steep decrease in the electrostatic component of the solvation free energy at the boundary to the aqueous region. The calculations allow an understanding of the origins of side chain positioning in membranes and are thus useful in understanding membrane-protein:lipid thermodynamics.

  8. Three-dimensional dynamic modelling of Polymer-Electrolyte-Membrane-Fuel-Cell-Systems; Dreidimensionale dynamische Modellierung und Berechnung von Polymer-Elektrolyt-Membran-Brennstoffzellen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vath, Andreas

    2008-12-15

    This thesis deals with dynamic and multi-dimensional modelling of Polymer- Electrolyte-Membrane-Fuel-Cells (PEMFC). The developed models include all the different layers of the fuel cell e.g. flow field, gas diffusion layer, catalyst layer and membrane with their particular physical, chemical and electrical characteristics. The simulation results have been verified by detailed measurements performed at the research centre for hydrogen and solar energy in Ulm (ZSW Ulm). The developed three dimensional model describes the time- and spatial-dependent charge and mass transport in a fuel cell. Additionally, this model allows the analysis of critical operating conditions. For example, the current density distribution for different membranes is shown during insufficient humidification which results in local overstraining and degradation. The model also allows to analyse extreme critical operating conditions, e.g. short time breakdown of the humidification. Furthermore, the model shows the available potential of improvement opportunities in power density and efficiency of PEMFC due to optimisation of the gas diffusion layer, the catalyst and membrane. In the second part of the work the application of PEMFC systems for combined heat and power units is described by one-dimensional models for an electrical power range between 1 kW and 5 kW. This model contains the necessary components, e.g. gas processing, humidification, gas supply, fuel cell stack, heat storage, pumps, auxiliary burner, power inverter und additional aggregates. As a main result, it is possible to distinctly reduce the energy demand and the carbon dioxide exhaust for different load profiles. Today the costs for fuel cell systems are considerably higher than that of the conventional electrical energy supply. (orig.)

  9. Global Proteomic Analysis Reveals an Exclusive Role of Thylakoid Membranes in Bioenergetics of a Model Cyanobacterium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liberton, Michelle; Saha, Rajib; Jacobs, Jon M.; Nguyen, Amelia Y.; Gritsenko, Marina A.; Smith, Richard D.; Koppenaal, David W.; Pakrasi, Himadri B.

    2016-04-07

    Cyanobacteria are photosynthetic microbes with highly differentiated membrane systems. These organisms contain an outer membrane, plasma membrane, and an internal system of thylakoid membranes where the photosynthetic and respiratory machinery are found. This existence of compartmentalization and differentiation of membrane systems poses a number of challenges for cyanobacterial cells in terms of organization and distribution of proteins to the correct membrane system. Proteomics studies have long sought to identify the components of the different membrane systems, and to date about 450 different proteins have been attributed to either the plasma membrane or thylakoid membrane. Given the complexity of these membranes, many more proteins remain to be identified in these membrane systems, and a comprehensive catalog of plasma membrane and thylakoid membrane proteins is needed. Here we describe the identification of 635 proteins in Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 by quantitative iTRAQ isobaric labeling; of these, 459 proteins were localized to the plasma membrane and 176 were localized to the thylakoid membrane. Surprisingly, we found over 2.5 times the number of unique proteins identified in the plasma membrane compared to the thylakoid membrane. This suggests that the protein composition of the thylakoid membrane is more homogeneous than the plasma membrane, consistent with the role of the plasma membrane in diverse cellular processes including protein trafficking and nutrient import, compared to a more specialized role for the thylakoid membrane in cellular energetics. Overall, the protein composition of the Synechocystis 6803 plasma membrane and thylakoid membrane is quite similar to the E.coli plasma membrane and Arabidopsis thylakoid membrane, respectively. Synechocystis 6803 can therefore be described as a gram-negative bacterium that has an additional internal membrane system that fulfils the energetic requirements of the cell.

  10. Global Proteomic Analysis Reveals an Exclusive Role of Thylakoid Membranes in Bioenergetics of a Model Cyanobacterium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liberton, Michelle; Saha, Rajib; Jacobs, Jon M; Nguyen, Amelia Y; Gritsenko, Marina A; Smith, Richard D; Koppenaal, David W; Pakrasi, Himadri B

    2016-06-01

    Cyanobacteria are photosynthetic microbes with highly differentiated membrane systems. These organisms contain an outer membrane, plasma membrane, and an internal system of thylakoid membranes where the photosynthetic and respiratory machinery are found. This existence of compartmentalization and differentiation of membrane systems poses a number of challenges for cyanobacterial cells in terms of organization and distribution of proteins to the correct membrane system. Proteomics studies have long sought to identify the components of the different membrane systems in cyanobacteria, and to date about 450 different proteins have been attributed to either the plasma membrane or thylakoid membrane. Given the complexity of these membranes, many more proteins remain to be identified, and a comprehensive catalogue of plasma membrane and thylakoid membrane proteins is needed. Here we describe the identification of 635 differentially localized proteins in Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 by quantitative iTRAQ isobaric labeling; of these, 459 proteins were localized to the plasma membrane and 176 were localized to the thylakoid membrane. Surprisingly, we found over 2.5 times the number of unique proteins identified in the plasma membrane compared with the thylakoid membrane. This suggests that the protein composition of the thylakoid membrane is more homogeneous than the plasma membrane, consistent with the role of the plasma membrane in diverse cellular processes including protein trafficking and nutrient import, compared with a more specialized role for the thylakoid membrane in cellular energetics. Thus, our data clearly define the two membrane systems with distinct functions. Overall, the protein compositions of the Synechocystis 6803 plasma membrane and thylakoid membrane are quite similar to that of the plasma membrane of Escherichia coli and thylakoid membrane of Arabidopsis chloroplasts, respectively. Synechocystis 6803 can therefore be described as a Gram

  11. Global Proteomic Analysis Reveals an Exclusive Role of Thylakoid Membranes in Bioenergetics of a Model Cyanobacterium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liberton, Michelle; Saha, Rajib; Jacobs, Jon M.; Nguyen, Amelia Y.; Gritsenko, Marina A.; Smith, Richard D.; Koppenaal, David W.; Pakrasi, Himadri B.

    2016-04-07

    Cyanobacteria are photosynthetic microbes with highlydifferentiated membrane systems. These organisms contain an outer membrane, plasma membrane, and an internal system of thylakoid membranes where the photosynthetic and respiratory machinery are found. This existence of compartmentalization and differentiation of membrane systems poses a number of challenges for cyanobacterial cells in terms of organization and distribution of proteins to the correct membrane system. Proteomics studies have long sought to identify the components of the different membrane systems in cyanobacteria, and to date about 450 different proteins have been attributed to either the plasma membrane or thylakoid membrane. Given the complexity of these membranes, many more proteins remain to be identified, and a comprehensive catalogue of plasma membrane and thylakoid membrane proteins is needed. Here we describe the identification of 635 differentially localized proteins in Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 by quantitative iTRAQ isobaric labeling; of these, 459 proteins were localized to the plasma membrane and 176 were localized to the thylakoid membrane. Surprisingly, we found over 2.5 times the number of unique proteins identified in the plasma membrane compared with the thylakoid membrane. This suggests that the protein composition of the thylakoid membrane is more homogeneous than the plasma membrane, consistent with the role of the plasma membrane in diverse cellular processes including protein trafficking and nutrient import, compared with a more specialized role for the thylakoid membrane in cellular energetics. Thus, our data clearly define the two membrane systems with distinct functions. Overall, the protein compositions of the Synechocystis 6803 plasma membrane and thylakoid membrane are quite similar to that of the plasma membrane of Escherichia coli and thylakoid membrane of Arabidopsis chloroplasts, respectively. Synechocystis 6803 can therefore be described as a Gram

  12. [Morgagni hernia mimicking intrathoracic lipomatous tumor].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinto, Carlos Silva; Bernardo, João; Eugénio, Luís; Antunes, Manuel J

    2013-01-01

    Morgagni hernia is the rarest type of diaphragmatic hernia, accounting for 2% of all cases. It consists in the thoracic protrusion of fat and/or abdominal viscera through a congenital defect in a retro or parasternal position. The clinical importance of this pathological entity is associated with the fact that it can be asymptomatic, mimicking other diseases, such as a large intrathoracic lipoma, as it happened in the case presented here. Incorrect diagnosis can cause catastrophic complications during surgery.

  13. Intradural extramedullary tuberculoma mimicking en plaque meningioma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ozek Erdinc

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we report an 18 year old woman with an intradural extramedullary tuberculoma mimicking en plaque meningioma located in the thoracic region. The patient was operated via thoracic laminoplasty and tumor was totally resected. On the follow-up examination the magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated the total excision of the tumor. Here we describe a case of intradural extramedullary tuberculoma of the spinal cord as a complication of tuberculosis meningitis in a previously healthy young female.

  14. Benzalkonium Chloride Intoxication Mimicking Herpes Zoster Encephalitis

    OpenAIRE

    Güler, Ekrem; Olgar, Şeref; Davutoğlu, Mehmet; Garipardıç, Mesut; Karabiber, Hamza

    2011-01-01

    Benzalkonium chloride (BAC) is a frequently used disinfectant and its most well-known side effect is contact dermatitis. In this report, two children who had vesicular dermatitis, headache, lethargy, fever and encephalopathy mimicking Herpes zoster encephalitis were presented. Their consciousness level improved on the second day. From the medical history it was understood that the mother had applied 20% BAC solution to the scalps of two children. The aim of the presentation of this report is ...

  15. Benzalkonium Chloride Intoxication Mimicking Herpes Zoster Encephalitis

    OpenAIRE

    Ekrem Güler; Şeref Olgar; Mehmet Davutoğlu; Mesut Garipardıç; Hamza Karabiber

    2014-01-01

    Benzalkonium chloride (BAC) is a frequently used disinfectant and its most well-known side effect is contact dermatitis. In this report, two children who had vesicular dermatitis, headache, lethargy, fever and encephalopathy mimicking Herpes zoster encephalitis were presented. Their consciousness level improved on the second day. From the medical history it was understood that the mother had applied 20% BAC solution to the scalps of two children. The aim of the presentation of this report is...

  16. Hydroxychloroquine-Associated Hyperpigmentation Mimicking Elder Abuse

    OpenAIRE

    Cohen, Philip R

    2013-01-01

    Background Hydroxychloroquine may result in cutaneous dyschromia. Older individuals who are the victims of elder abuse can present with bruising and resolving ecchymoses. Purpose The features of hydroxychloroquine-associated hyperpigmentation are described, the mucosal and skin manifestations of elder abuse are reviewed, and the mucocutaneous mimickers of elder abuse are summarized. Case Report An elderly woman being treated with hydroxychloroquine for systemic lupus erythematosus developed d...

  17. Intra-abdominal gout mimicking pelvic abscess

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Chia-Hui; Chen, Clement Kuen-Huang [Kaohsiung Veterans General Hospital, Department of Radiology, Kaohsiung (Taiwan); National Yang-Ming University, School of Medicine, Taipei (Taiwan); Yeh, Lee-Ren; Pan, Huay-Ban; Yang, Chien-Fang [Kaohsiung Veterans General Hospital, Department of Radiology, Kaohsiung (Taiwan)

    2005-04-01

    Gout is the most common crystal-induced arthritis. Gouty tophi typically deposit in the extremities, especially toes and fingers. We present an unusual case of intrapelvic tophaceous gout in a patient suffering from chronic gouty arthritis. CT and MRI of the abdomen and pelvic cavity disclosed calcified gouty tophi around both hips, and a cystic lesion with peripheral enhancement in the pelvic cavity along the course of the iliopsoas muscle. The intra-abdominal tophus mimicked pelvic abscess. (orig.)

  18. Intracranial capillary hemangioma mimicking a dissociative disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander Lacasse

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Capillary hemangiomas, hamartomatous proliferation of vascular endothelial cells, are rare in the central nervous system (CNS. Intracranial capillary hemangiomas presenting with reversible behavioral abnormalities and focal neurological deficits have rarely been reported. We report a case of CNS capillary hemangioma presenting with transient focal neurological deficits and behavioral abnormalities mimicking Ganser’s syndrome. Patient underwent total excision of the vascular malformation, resulting in complete resolution of his symptoms.

  19. Validation of computational non-Newtonian fluid model for membrane bioreactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sørensen, Lasse; Bentzen, Thomas Ruby; Skov, Kristian

    2015-01-01

    Membrane bioreactor (MBR) systems are often considered as the wastewater treatment method of the future due to their high effluent quality. One of the main problems with such systems is a relative large energy consumption, compared to conventional activated sludge (CAS) systems, which has led to further research in this specific area. A powerful tool for optimizing MBR-systems is computational fluid dynamics (CFD) modelling, which gives researchers the ability to describe the flow in the systems. A parameter which is often neglected in such models is the non-Newtonian properties of active sludge, which is of great importance for MBR systems since they operate at sludge concentrations up to a factor of 10 compared to CAS systems, resulting in strongly shear thinning liquids. A CFD-model is validated against measurements conducted in a system with rotating cross-flow membranes submerged in non-Newtonian liquids, where tangential velocities are measured with a Laser Doppler Anemometer (LDA). The CFD model is found to be capable of modelling the correct velocities in a range of setups, making CFD models a powerful tool for optimization of MBR systems.

  20. Spacer geometry and particle deposition in spiral wound membrane feed channels

    KAUST Repository

    Radu, A.I.

    2014-11-01

    Deposition of microspheres mimicking bacterial cells was studied experimentally and with a numerical model in feed spacer membrane channels, as used in spiral wound nanofiltration (NF) and reverse osmosis (RO) membrane systems. In-situ microscopic observations in membrane fouling simulators revealed formation of specific particle deposition patterns for different diamond and ladder feed spacer orientations. A three-dimensional numerical model combining fluid flow with a Lagrangian approach for particle trajectory calculations could describe very well the in-situ observations on particle deposition in flow cells. Feed spacer geometry, positioning and cross-flow velocity sensitively influenced the particle transport and deposition patterns. The deposition patterns were not influenced by permeate production. This combined experimental-modeling approach could be used for feed spacer geometry optimization studies for reduced (bio)fouling. © 2014 Elsevier Ltd.

  1. Phase coexistence in films composed of DLPC and DPPC: a comparison between different model membrane systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mangiarotti, Agustín; Caruso, Benjamín; Wilke, Natalia

    2014-07-01

    For the biophysical study of membranes, a variety of model systems have been used to measure the different parameters and to extract general principles concerning processes that may occur in cellular membranes. However, there are very few reports in which the results obtained with the different models have been compared. In this investigation, we quantitatively compared the phase coexistence in Langmuir monolayers, freestanding bilayers and supported films composed of a lipid mixture of DLPC and DPPC. Two-phase segregation was observed in most of the systems for a wide range of lipid proportions using fluorescence microscopy. The lipid composition of the coexisting phases was determined and the distribution coefficient of the fluorescent probe in each phase was quantified, in order to explore their thermodynamic properties. The comparison between systems was carried out at 30mN/m, since it is accepted that at this or higher lateral pressures, the mean molecular area in bilayers is equivalent to that observed in monolayers. Our study showed that while Langmuir monolayers and giant unilamellar vesicles had a similar phase behavior, supported films showed a different composition of the phases with the distribution coefficient of the fluorescent probe being close to unity. Our results suggest that, in supported membranes, the presence of the rigid substrate may have led to a stiffening of the liquid-expanded phase due to a loss in the degrees of freedom of the lipids as a consequence of the proximity of the solid material.

  2. Syringotoxin pore formation and inactivation in human red blood cell and model bilayer lipid membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szabó, Zsófia; Gróf, Pál; Schagina, Ludmila V; Gurnev, Philip A; Takemoto, Jon Y; Mátyus, Edit; Blaskó, Katalin

    2002-12-23

    The effect of syringotoxin (ST), a member of the cyclic lipodepsipeptides family (CLPs) produced by Pseudomonas syringae pv. syringae on the membrane permeability of human red blood cells (RBCs) and model bilayer lipid membranes (BLMs) was studied and compared to that of two recently investigated CLPs, syringomycin E (SRE) and syringopeptin 22A (SP22A) [Biochim. Biophys. Acta 1466 (2000) 79 and Bioelectrochemistry 52 (2000) 161]. The permeability-increasing effect of ST on RBCs was the least among the three CLPs. A time-dependent ST pore inactivation was observed on RBCs at 20 and 37 degrees C but not at 8 degrees C. From the kinetic model worked out parameters as permeability coefficient of RBC membrane for 86Rb(+) and pores mean lifetime were calculated. A shorter pores mean lifetime was calculated at 37 degrees C then at 20 degrees C, which gave us an explanation for the unusual slower rate of tracer efflux measured at 37 degrees C then that at 20 degrees C. The results obtained on BLM showed that the pore inactivation was due to a decrease in the number of pores but not to a change of their dwell time or conductance.

  3. Photodynamic effect of hypericin after topical application in the ex ovo quail chorioallantoic membrane model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Čavarga, Ivan; Bilčík, Boris; Výboh, Pavel; Záškvarová, Monika; Chorvát, Dušan; Kasák, Peter; Mlkvý, Peter; Mateašík, Anton; Chorvátová, Alžbeta; Miškovský, Pavol

    2014-01-01

    Photosensitizing properties of hypericin are well known, and the chicken chorioallantoic membrane has previously been used to test photodynamic effects of hypericin and other substances. In our study the photodynamic effect of hypericin in the ex ovo quail chorioallantoic membrane model was evaluated. Steady-state and time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy of hypericin solution in PEG-400 and its mixture in PBS was performed to assess and characterize the process of aggregation and disaggregation of hypericin during the drug formulation preparation. A therapeutical formulation (2 µg/g of embryo weight) was topically applied on CAM into the silicone ring. Hypericin was excited by diode laser with wavelength 405 nm, fluence rate 140 mW/cm2, and fluence 16.8 J/cm2. Hypericin in 100% PEG-400 exhibits typical fluorescence spectra with a maximum of about 600 nm, while hypericin 10% PEG-400 formulation exhibits almost no fluorescence. Time resolved spectra analysis showed fluorescence decay of hypericin in 100% PEG-400 solution with a mean lifetime of 5.1 ns and in 10% PEG 4.1 ns. Damage of quail chorioallantoic membrane vasculature after photodynamic therapy ranged from hemorrhage and vanishing of capillary vessels to thrombosis, lysis, and hemorrhage of larger vessels.The presented findings suggest that quail embryos can be used as a suitable model to test the effect of hypericin and other photodynamic compounds.

  4. Small unilamellar liposomes as a membrane model for cell inactivation by cold atmospheric plasma treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maheux, S.; Frache, G.; Thomann, J. S.; Clément, F.; Penny, C.; Belmonte, T.; Duday, D.

    2016-09-01

    Cold atmospheric plasma is thought to be a promising tool for numerous biomedical applications due to its ability to generate a large diversity of reactive species in a controlled way. In some cases, it can also generate pulsed electric fields at the zone of treatment, which can induce processes such as electroporation in cell membranes. However, the interaction of these reactive species and the pulse electric field with cells in a physiological medium is very complex, and we still need a better understanding in order to be useful for future applications. A way to reach this goal is to work with model cell membranes such as liposomes, with the simplest physiological liquid and in a controlled atmosphere in order to limit the number of parallel reactions and processes. In this paper, where this approach has been chosen, 1,2-Dioleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DOPC) small unilamellar vesicles (SUV) have been synthesized in a phosphate buffered aqueous solution, and this solution has been treated by a nanosecond pulsed plasma jet under a pure nitrogen atmosphere. It is only the composition of the plasma gas that has been changed in order to generate different cocktails of reactive species. After the quantification of the main plasma reactive species in the phosphate buffered saline (PBS) solution, structural, surface charge state, and chemical modifications generated on the plasma treated liposomes, due to the interaction with the plasma reactive species, have been carefully characterized. These results allow us to further understand the effect of plasma reactive species on model cell membranes in physiological liquids. The permeation through the liposomal membrane and the reaction of plasma reactive species with molecules encapsulated inside the liposomes have also been evaluated. New processes of degradation are finally presented and discussed, which come from the specific conditions of plasma treatment under the pure nitrogen atmosphere.

  5. Alveolocapillary membrane permeability in experimental model of ventilator induced lung injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Наталья Александровна Решетняк

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: to assess alveocapillary membrane permeability for the whole protein, middle molecular peptides and some lipoperoxidation markers depending on respiratory volume using in reproduction of ventilator induced lung injury model.Material and methods: Experiments were carried out on 15 laboratory rats- males (body mass 180–240 gr. of “Vistar” line. The mechanical pulmonary ventilation in rats was carried out using tracheostomy cannula ALV Hamilton G 5 apparatus during 2 hours under the total anesthesia with sodium thiopental at a rate of 40 mg|kg of animal body mass. The initial parameters of ventilation were equal in all animals: Inspiratory time = 0,5 seconds; respiratory rate = 60 – 76/minute; pressure at the end of expiration (PEE = 0 - 2 sm. of water column; inspiration-expiration ratio (I:E = 1:1 or 1:2. Depending on the size of respiratory volume (RV animal were divided into 3 groups (n=5. Animals with RV=7 ml/kg of body mass formed the first group (the control one. The second group included animals with RV = 20 ml/kg of body mass (the moderate volutrauma and the third one included animals with RV = 40 ml/kg of body mass (the heavy volutrauma. The bronchoalveolar lavage was carried out on isolated lungs with the volume of filling at a rate 5 ml of 0,9 % sodium chloride solution for 1 g of pulmonary tissue and there was received nearly 2,5+0,5 ml of lavage liquid (sodium chloride solution + bronchoalveolar liquid. The alveolocapillary membrane permeability was assessed by detecting in the received liquid of bronchoalveolar lavage the concentration of whole protein on Lowry, the content of middle mass molecules on extinction at wave lengths 238, 254, 260, and 280 nm; the level of diene conjugates on V.B. Gavrilov and catalase activity on M.A. Koroliuk. The received data were processed using methods of nonparametric statistics. The revealed intergroup differences were assessed on Kruskall-Wallis «ANOVA» criterion. The differences at

  6. Chick Chorioallantoic Membrane Assay: A 3D Animal Model for Study of Human Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Xue; Zhou, Xiaoying; Ming, Huixin; Zhang, Jinyan; Huang, Guangwu; Zhang, Zhe; Li, Ping

    2015-01-01

    Nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) is a highly invasive and metastatic head and neck cancer. However, mechanistic study of the invasion and metastasis of NPC has been hampered by the lack of proper in vivo models. We established an in vivo chick embryo chorioallantoic membrane (CAM) model to study NPC tumor biology. We found 100% micro-tumor formation 3 days after inoculation with NPC cell lines (4/4) or primary tumor biopsy tissue (35/35). The transplanted NPC micro-tumors grew on CAMs with extracellular matrix interaction and induced angiogenesis. In addition, the CAM model could be used to study the growth of transplanted NPC tumors and also several important steps of metastasis, including tumor invasion by detecting the extent of basement membrane penetration, tumor angiogenesis by analyzing the area of neo-vessels, and tumor metastasis by quantifying tumor cells in distant organs. We established and described a feasible, easy-to-manipulate and reliable CAM model for in vivo study of NPC tumor biology. This model closely simulates the clinical features of NPC growth, progression and metastasis and could help elucidate the biological mechanisms of the growth pattern and invasion of NPC cells and in quantitative assessment of angiogenesis and cell intravasation.

  7. Chick Chorioallantoic Membrane Assay: A 3D Animal Model for Study of Human Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xue Xiao

    Full Text Available Nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC is a highly invasive and metastatic head and neck cancer. However, mechanistic study of the invasion and metastasis of NPC has been hampered by the lack of proper in vivo models. We established an in vivo chick embryo chorioallantoic membrane (CAM model to study NPC tumor biology. We found 100% micro-tumor formation 3 days after inoculation with NPC cell lines (4/4 or primary tumor biopsy tissue (35/35. The transplanted NPC micro-tumors grew on CAMs with extracellular matrix interaction and induced angiogenesis. In addition, the CAM model could be used to study the growth of transplanted NPC tumors and also several important steps of metastasis, including tumor invasion by detecting the extent of basement membrane penetration, tumor angiogenesis by analyzing the area of neo-vessels, and tumor metastasis by quantifying tumor cells in distant organs. We established and described a feasible, easy-to-manipulate and reliable CAM model for in vivo study of NPC tumor biology. This model closely simulates the clinical features of NPC growth, progression and metastasis and could help elucidate the biological mechanisms of the growth pattern and invasion of NPC cells and in quantitative assessment of angiogenesis and cell intravasation.

  8. Scale-up of affinity membrane modules: comparison between lumped and physical models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dimartino, Simone; Boi, Cristiana; Sarti, Giulio C

    2015-03-01

    Membrane chromatography represents one of the emerging technologies for downstream processing in the biotechnology industry. This process is currently used in polishing steps for antibody manufacturing, while its application is still under development for the capture step. To promote its employment in large-scale processes, it is crucial to develop a simple, yet reliable, simulation tool able to describe the process performance in a predictive way at all scales. In this work, the physical model for the description of protein purification with affinity membrane chromatography has been used to predict the performance of scaled-up systems and compared with the lumped model, frequently used for its deceptive simplicity. Two commonly used binding kinetics have been implemented in the models, namely the Langmuir and the bi-Langmuir equations. The two models describe equally well experimental data obtained in a lab-scale apparatus, while, on the contrary, important differences are observed in scaled-up systems even at the early stages of breakthrough, which are particularly relevant in industrial-scale operations. It is seen that for both kinetics, the physical model is more appropriate and safer to use for scale-up purposes. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  9. Theoretical and Statistical Models for Predicting Flux in Direct Contact Membrane Distillation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atia E. Khalifa

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Theoretical modelhas been applied to predict the performance of Direct Contact Membrane Distillation (DCMD based on the analysis of heat and mass transfer through the membrane. The performance of DCMD on the account of different operating parameters had been predicted. Feed inlet temperature, coolant inlet temperature, feed flow rate and coolant flow rate are the considered performance variables. Based on the data obtained from theoretical model, statistical analysis of variance (ANOVA was then performed to determine the significant effect of each operating factors on the DCMD system performance. A new regression model was subsequently developed for predicting the performance of the DCMD system. Resultsrevealed that both theoretical and regression models were in good agreement with each other and also with the selected experimental data used for validation. The maximum percentage error between the two models was found to be1.098%. Hence, the developed regression model is adequate for predict the performance of DCMD system within the domain of the considered analysis.

  10. Effects of structure on the interactions between five natural antimicrobial compounds and phospholipids of bacterial cell membrane on model monolayers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monolayers composed of bacterial phospholipids were used as model membranes to study interactions of naturally occurring phenolic compounds 2,5-dihydroxybenzaldehyde, 2-hydroxy-5-methoxybenzaldehyde and the plant essential oil compounds carvacrol, cinnamaldehyde, and geraniol, previously found to be...

  11. Biomimetic membranes for sensor and separation applications

    CERN Document Server

    2012-01-01

    This book addresses the possibilities and challenges in mimicking biological membranes and creating membrane-based sensor and separation devices. It covers recent advances in developing biomimetic membranes for technological applications with a focus on the use of integral membrane protein mediated transport. It describes the fundamentals of biosensing as well as separation and shows how the two processes work together in biological systems. The book provides an overview of the current state of the art, points to areas that need further investigation and anticipates future directions in the field. Biomimetics is a truly cross-disciplinary approach and this is exemplified by the challenges in mimicking osmotic processes as they occur in nature using aquaporin protein water channels as central building blocks. In the development of a biomimetic sensor/separation technology, both channel and carrier proteins are important and examples of how these may be reconstituted and controlled in biomimetic membranes are ...

  12. Mathematical Model of Gas Permeation Through PTFE Porous Membrane and the Effect of Membrane Pore Structure%PTFE多孔膜气体渗透数学模型和膜孔结构的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张秀莉; 张卫东; 郝新敏; 张慧峰; 张泽廷; 张建春

    2003-01-01

    Membrane-based separation processes are new technology combined membrane separation with conven-tional separation. Hydrophobic porous membranes are often used in these processes. The structure of hydrophobicporous membrane has significant effect on mass transfer process. The permeabilities of five kinds of gas, He, N2,O2, CO2 and water vapor, across six polytetrafiuoroethylene(PTFE) flat membranes were tested experimentally.Results indicated that the greater the membrane mean pore size and the wider the pore size distribution are, thehigher the gas permeability. A gas permeation model, including the effects of membrane structure parameter and gasproperties, was established. A comprehensive characteristic parameter (including porosity, thickness and tortuosity)was found more effective to express the influence of membrane structure in gas permeation process. The predictedpermeation coefficients were in good agreement with experimental data.

  13. Exploring the interactions of gliadins with model membranes: effect of confined geometry and interfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banc, Amélie; Desbat, Bernard; Renard, Denis; Popineau, Yves; Mangavel, Cécile; Navailles, Laurence

    2009-08-01

    Mechanisms leading to the assembly of wheat storage proteins into proteins bodies within the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) of endosperm cells are unresolved today. In this work, physical chemistry parameters which could be involved in these processes were explored. To model the confined environment of proteins within the ER, the dynamic behavior of gamma-gliadins inserted inside lyotropic lamellar phases was studied using FRAP experiments. The evolution of the diffusion coefficient as a function of the lamellar periodicity enabled to propose the hypothesis of an interaction between gamma-gliadins and membranes. This interaction was further studied with the help of phospholipid Langmuir monolayers. gamma- and omega-gliadins were injected under DMPC and DMPG monolayers and the two-dimensional (2D) systems were studied by Brewster angle microscopy (BAM), polarization modulation infrared reflection-absorption spectroscopy (PM-IRRAS), and surface tension measurements. Results showed that both gliadins adsorbed under phospholipid monolayers, considered as biological membrane models, and formed micrometer-sized domains at equilibrium. However, their thicknesses, probed by reflectance measurements, were different: omega-gliadins aggregates displayed a constant thickness, consistent with a monolayer, while the thickness of gamma-gliadins aggregates increased with the quantity of protein injected. These different behaviors could find some explanations in the difference of aminoacid sequence distribution: an alternate repeated - unrepeated domain within gamma-gliadin sequence, while one unique repeated domain was present within omega-gliadin sequence. All these findings enabled to propose a model of gliadins self-assembly via a membrane interface and to highlight the predominant role of wheat prolamin repeated domain in the membrane interaction. In the biological context, these results would mean that the repeated domain could be considered as an anchor for the interaction with

  14. Model-based energy optimisation of a small-scale decentralised membrane bioreactor for urban reuse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verrecht, Bart; Maere, Thomas; Benedetti, Lorenzo; Nopens, Ingmar; Judd, Simon

    2010-07-01

    The energy consumption of a small-scale membrane bioreactor, treating high strength domestic wastewater for community level wastewater recycling, has been optimised using a dynamic model of the plant. ASM2d was chosen as biological process model to account for the presence of phosphate accumulating organisms. A tracer test was carried out to determine the hydraulic behaviour of the plant. To realistically simulate the aeration demand, a dedicated aeration model was used incorporating the dependency of the oxygen transfer on the mixed liquor concentration and allowing differentiation between coarse and fine bubble aeration, both typically present in MBRs. A steady state and dynamic calibration was performed, and the calibrated model was able to predict effluent nutrient concentrations and MLSS concentrations accurately. A scenario analysis (SCA) was carried out using the calibrated model to simulate the effect of varying SRT, recirculation ratio and DO set point on effluent quality, MLSS concentrations and aeration demand. Linking the model output with empirically derived correlations for energy consumption allowed an accurate prediction of the energy consumption. The SCA results showed that decreasing membrane aeration and SRT were most beneficial towards total energy consumption, while increasing the recirculation flow led to improved TN removal but at the same time also deterioration in TP removal. A validation of the model was performed by effectively applying better operational parameters to the plant. This resulted in a reduction in energy consumption by 23% without compromising effluent quality, as was accurately predicted by the model. This modelling approach thus allows the operating envelope to be reliably identified for meeting criteria based on energy demand and specific water quality determinants.

  15. Zebrafish larva as a reliable model for in vivo assessment of membrane remodeling involvement in the hepatotoxicity of chemical agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Podechard, Normand; Chevanne, Martine; Fernier, Morgane; Tête, Arnaud; Collin, Aurore; Cassio, Doris; Kah, Olivier; Lagadic-Gossmann, Dominique; Sergent, Odile

    2016-11-28

    The easy-to-use in vivo model, zebrafish larva, is being increasingly used to screen chemical-induced hepatotoxicity, with a good predictivity for various mechanisms of liver injury. However, nothing is known about its applicability in exploring the mechanism called membrane remodeling, depicted as changes in membrane fluidity or lipid raft properties. The aim of this study was, therefore, to substantiate the zebrafish larva as a suitable in vivo model in this context. Ethanol was chosen as a prototype toxicant because it is largely described, both in hepatocyte cultures and in rodents, as capable of inducing a membrane remodeling leading to hepatocyte death and liver injury. The zebrafish larva model was demonstrated to be fully relevant as membrane remodeling was maintained even after a 1-week exposure without any adaptation as usually reported in rodents and hepatocyte cultures. It was also proven to exhibit a high sensitivity as it discriminated various levels of cytotoxicity depending on the extent of changes in membrane remodeling. In this context, its sensitivity appeared higher than that of WIF-B9 hepatic cells, which is suited for analyzing this kind of hepatotoxicity. Finally, the protection afforded by a membrane stabilizer, ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA), or by a lipid raft disrupter, pravastatin, definitely validated zebrafish larva as a reliable model to quickly assess membrane remodeling involvement in chemical-induced hepatotoxicity. In conclusion, this model, compatible with a high throughput screening, might be adapted to seek hepatotoxicants via membrane remodeling, and also drugs targeting membrane features to propose new preventive or therapeutic strategies in chemical-induced liver diseases. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  16. Evaluation of the Photodynamic Therapy effect using a tumor model in Chorioallantoic Membrane with Melanoma cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buzzá, Hilde H.; Pires, Layla; Bagnato, Vanderlei S.; Kurachi, Cristina

    2014-03-01

    Photodynamic Therapy (PDT) is a type of cancer treatment that is based on the interaction of light (with specific wavelength), a photosensitizing agent and molecular oxygen. The photosensitizer (PS) is activated by light and reacts with oxygen resulting in the production of singlet oxygen that is highly reactive and responsible for the cell death. The Chick Chorioallantoic Membrane (CAM) model is a transparent membrane that allows visualization and evaluation of blood vessels and structural changes, where a tumor model was developed. Two induction tumor models were investigated: tumor biopsy or cell culture. It was used a murine melanoma cell B16F10 in culture and a biopsy from a xenograft tumor in hairless mouse. Two PS were tested: Photodithazine® and Photogem®, a chlorine and porphyrin compounds, respectively. Using intravenous administration, the light-drug interval was of 30 minutes, 1 and 3 hours. Illumination was performed at 630 nm and 660 nm, and the vascular and tumor response was monitored and analyzed. The PS distribution was checked with confocal microscopy. This model can be useful to study several parameters of PDT and the effect of this therapy in the cancer treatment since it allows direct visualization of its effects.

  17. Investigation of the pore geometrical structure of nanofibrous membranes using statistical modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khanmohammadi Khoshui, Sedigheh; Hosseini Ravandi, Seyed Abdolkarim; Bagherzadeh, Roohollah; Saberi, Zahra; Karimi, Mohammad

    2016-10-01

    The pore size and its distribution are the two main geometrical properties of nanofibrous membranes in various applications such as filtration and tissue engineering. In the current paper, a modified approach (model) is suggested to predict pore size and its distribution in nanofibrous membranes. In the present work, inter-fibre pores are considered as polygons arising from the fibre contacts. For the first time, these polygons are assumed to be three-, four- and five-gons, and the hydraulic radius of the pores was obtained instead of the equal radius. The pore size of multilayer mats was provided with a different insight. The pore mean size and its distribution were obtained by statistical methods. In order to validate the model, polycaprolactone (PCL) nanofibrous mats were electrospun, and the mean pore size and its distribution were measured using porosimetry. It was found that the probability distribution function of the pore size in both single and multi nanofibrous layers was the Gamma function with two parameters. The effect of the fibre width and porosity raise was increasing of mean pore diameter of multilayer networks. A comparison between the modified model and previous models revealed that the modified approach was more realistic.

  18. A multi-objective optimisation model for a general polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ang, Sheila Mae C.; Brett, Daniel J. L.; Fraga, Eric S.

    This paper presents an optimisation model for a general polymer electrolyte membrane (PEM) fuel cell system suitable for efficiency and size trade-offs investigation. Simulation of the model for a base case shows that for a given output power, a more efficient system is bigger and vice versa. Using the weighting method to perform a multi-objective optimisation, the Pareto sets were generated for different stack output powers. A Pareto set, presented as a plot of the optimal efficiency and area of the membrane electrode assembly (MEA), gives a quantitative description of the compromise between efficiency and size. Overall, our results indicate that, to make the most of the size-efficiency trade-off behaviour, the system must be operated at an efficiency of at least 40% but not more than 47%. Furthermore, the MEA area should be at least 3 cm 2 W -1 for the efficiency to be practically useful. Subject to the constraints imposed on the model, which are based on technical practicalities, a PEM fuel cell system such as the one presented in this work cannot operate at an efficiency above 54%. The results of this work, specifically the multi-objective model, will form a useful and practical basis for subsequent techno-economic studies for specific applications.

  19. Mathematical modelling of flux recovery during chemical cleaning of tubular membrane fouled with whey proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marković Jelena Đ.

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Membrane process efficiency in the dairy industry is impaired by the formation of deposits during filtration processes. This work describes cleaning procedures for ceramic tubular membrane (50 nm fouled with whey proteins. Also, mathematical modelling was performed to obtain models which allow deeper insight into the mechanisms involved during cleaning procedures. The caustic solutions (0.2%w/w, 0.4%w/w and 1.0%w/w NaOH and the mixture of two commercial detergents (0.8%w/w P3-ultrasil 69+0.5% w/w P3-ultrasil 67 and 1.2% P3-ultrasil 69+0.75 P3-ultrasil 67 were used as chemical cleaning agents. The results showed that the best flux recovery was achieved with 0.4%w/w NaOH solution. After analyzing the experimental data, five parameter and six parameter kinetic models were suggested for alkali and detergent cleaning, respectively. The changes of total and specific resistances, as well as the change of the effective pore diameter and deposit thickness during cleaning are estimated by applying these models.

  20. Modelling of Multi-Agent Systems: Experiences with Membrane Computing and Future Challenges

    CERN Document Server

    Kefalas, Petros; 10.4204/EPTCS.33.5

    2010-01-01

    Formal modelling of Multi-Agent Systems (MAS) is a challenging task due to high complexity, interaction, parallelism and continuous change of roles and organisation between agents. In this paper we record our research experience on formal modelling of MAS. We review our research throughout the last decade, by describing the problems we have encountered and the decisions we have made towards resolving them and providing solutions. Much of this work involved membrane computing and classes of P Systems, such as Tissue and Population P Systems, targeted to the modelling of MAS whose dynamic structure is a prominent characteristic. More particularly, social insects (such as colonies of ants, bees, etc.), biology inspired swarms and systems with emergent behaviour are indicative examples for which we developed formal MAS models. Here, we aim to review our work and disseminate our findings to fellow researchers who might face similar challenges and, furthermore, to discuss important issues for advancing research on ...

  1. Modelling of moving bed biofilm membrane reactors (MBBMR) for on-site greywater treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jabornig, Simon; Rauch, Wolfgang

    2015-01-01

    The study evaluates with a mechanistic model the pilot plant results of a combined moving bed biofilm process and membrane filtration (MBBMR) treating single household greywater. It mainly includes the simulation of reactor hydraulics, degradation of pollutants, development of biomass and settlement of sludge. Iterative calibration was made with steady-state results of a 10-month pilot test. The model shows good predictions of readily biodegradable chemical oxygen demand and ammonium removal, as well as biomass concentration on carriers and in suspension. Also, a sensitivity analysis was made which calculates the relative significance factor of each model coefficient and by this provides comparability with other studies. Simulation data and actually measured parameters show that the suggested process was rather independent of ambient temperatures and short-term load fluctuations. Obtained datasets and model structure could be of use for future designers, as well as sellers and users of this process for on-site greywater reclamation.

  2. An non-uniformity voltage model for proton exchange membrane fuel cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Kelei; Li, Yankun; Liu, Jiawei; Guo, Ai

    2017-01-01

    The fuel cell used in transportation has environmental protection, high efficiency and no line traction power system which can greatly reduce line construction investment. That makes it a huge potential. The voltage uniformity is one of the most important factors affecting the operation life of proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC). On the basis of principle and classical model of the PEMFC, single cell voltage is calculated and the location coefficients are introduced so as to establish a non-uniformity voltage model. These coefficients are estimated with the experimental datum at stack current 50 A. The model is validated respectively with datum at 60 A and 100 A. The results show that the model reflects the basic characteristics of voltage non-uniformity and provides the beneficial reference for fuel cell control and single cell voltage detection.

  3. Neural network modeling and control of proton exchange membrane fuel cell

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Yue-hua; CAO Guang-yi; ZHU Xin-jian

    2007-01-01

    A neural network model and fuzzy neural network controller was designed to control the inner impedance of a proton exchange membrane fuel cell(PEMFC)stack. A radial basis function(RBF)neural network model was trained by the input-output data of impedance. A fuzzy neural network controller Was designed to control the impedance response.The RBF neural network model was used to test the fuzzy neural network controller.The results show that the RBF model output Can imitate actual output well, themaximal errorisnotbeyond 20 mΩ, thetrainingtime is about 1 s by using 20 neurons, and the mean squared errors is 141.9 mΩ2.The impedance of the PEMFC stack is controlled within the optimum range when the load changes, and the adjustive time is ahnllt 3 rain.

  4. A Simple Experimental Model to Investigate Force Range for Membrane Nanotube Formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chai eLor

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The presence of membrane tubules in living cells is essential to many biological processes. In cells, one mechanism to form nano-sized lipid tubules is via molecular motor induced bilayer extraction. In this paper, we describe a simple experimental model to investigate the forces required for lipid tube formation using kinesin motors anchored to 1,2-dioleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DOPC vesicles. Previous related studies have used molecular motors actively pulling on the membrane to extract a nanotube. Here we invert the system geometry; molecular motors are used as static anchors linking DOPC vesicles to a two-dimensional microtubule network, and an external flow is introduced to generate nanotubes facilitated by the drag force. We find that a drag force of approximately ≈7 pN is sufficient for tubule extraction for vesicles ranging from 1-2 um in radius. By our method, we find that the force generated by a single molecular motor is sufficient for membrane tubule extraction from a spherical lipid vesicle.

  5. Interaction of 18-residue peptides derived from amphipathic helical segments of globular proteins with model membranes

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Chandrasekaran Sivakamasundari; Ramakrishnan Nagaraj

    2009-06-01

    We investigated the interaction of six 18-residue peptides derived from amphipathic helical segments of globular proteins with model membranes. The net charge of the peptides at neutral pH varies from –1 to +6. Circular dichroism spectra indicate that peptides with a high net positive charge tend to fold into a helical conformation in the presence of negatively charged lipid vesicles. In helical conformation, their average hydrophobic moment and hydrophobicity would render them surface-active. The composition of amino acids on the polar face of the helix in the peptides is considerably different. The peptides show variations in their ability to permeabilise zwitterionic and anionic lipid vesicles. Whereas increased net positive charge favours greater permeabilisation, the distribution of charged residues in the polar face also plays a role in determining membrane activity. The distribution of amino acids in the polar face of the helix in the peptides that were investigated do not fall into the canonical classes described. Amphipathic helices, which are part of proteins, with a pattern of amino acid distribution different from those observed in class L, A and others, could help in providing newer insights into peptide–membrane interactions.

  6. Decreasing Effect of Lidocaine·HCl on the Thickness of the Neuronal and Model Membrane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Sung-Min; Park, Jong-Sun; Kim, Jae-Han; Baek, Jin-Hyun; Yoon, Tae-Gyun; Lee, Do-Keun; Ryu, Won-Hyang; Chung, In-Kyo; Sohn, Uy Dong; Jang, Hye-Ock; Yun, Il

    2013-08-01

    This study examined the mechanism of action of a local anesthetic, lidocaine·HCl. Energy transfer between the surface fluorescent probe, 1-anilinonaphthalene-8-sulfonic acid, and the hydrophobic fluorescent probe, 1,3-di(1-pyrenyl) propane, was used to determine the effect of lidocaine·HCl on the thickness (D) of the synaptosomal plasma membrane vesicles (SPMV) isolated from the bovine cerebral cortex, and liposomes of the total lipids (SPMVTL) and phospholipids (SPMVPL) extracted from the SPMV. The thickness (D) of the intact SPMV, SPMVTL and SPMVPL were 1.044±0.008, 0.914±0.005 and 0.890±0.003 (arbitrary units, n=5) at 37℃ (pH 7.4), respectively. Lidocaine·HCl decreased the thickness of the neuronal and model membrane lipid bilayers in a dose-dependent manner with a significant decrease in the thickness, even at 0.1 mM. The decreasing effect of lidocaine·HCl on the membrane thickness might be responsible for some, but not all of its anesthetic action.

  7. Efficacy of hemofiltration with PEPA membrane for IL-6 removal in a rat sepsis model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maeda, Hayata; Tomisawa, Narumi; Jimbo, Yoichi; Harii, Norikazu; Matsuda, Kenichi

    2017-09-11

    Recently, intensive care physicians have focused on continuous hemodiafiltration with a cytokine-adsorbing hemofilter in the treatment of sepsis. We aimed to establish extracorporeal circulation in a rat sepsis model to evaluate the cytokine removal properties of mini-modules using two types of membrane materials. Rats were divided into polyester polymer alloy (PEPA) and cellulose triacetate (CTA) groups as membrane materials of mini-modules. One hour after 0.1 mg/kg of lipopolysaccharide administration, continuous hemofiltration (CHF) was started in each group. Plasma interleukin-6 (IL-6), an important mediator of sepsis, was measured over time during hemofiltration. The peak IL-6 concentration in PEPA group was approximately 13,000 pg/mL, in comparison to approximately 31,000 pg/mL in CTA group. IL-6 clearance in PEPA group was much more than CTA group. Since IL-6 was not detected in the filtrate in PEPA group, it was considered that IL-6 was adsorbed to the membrane. In conclusion, our results suggest that CHF with PEPA hemofilter can be suitable for removing IL-6 from the blood stream efficiently.

  8. Lipid domains control myelin basic protein adsorption and membrane interactions between model myelin lipid bilayers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Dong Woog; Banquy, Xavier; Kristiansen, Kai; Kaufman, Yair; Boggs, Joan M; Israelachvili, Jacob N

    2014-02-25

    The surface forces apparatus and atomic force microscope were used to study the effects of lipid composition and concentrations of myelin basic protein (MBP) on the structure of model lipid bilayers, as well as the interaction forces and adhesion between them. The lipid bilayers had a lipid composition characteristic of the cytoplasmic leaflets of myelin from "normal" (healthy) and "disease-like" [experimental allergic encephalomyelitis (EAE)] animals. They showed significant differences in the adsorption mechanism of MBP. MBP adsorbs on normal bilayers to form a compact film (3-4 nm) with strong intermembrane adhesion (∼0.36 mJ/m(2)), in contrast to its formation of thicker (7-8 nm) swelled films with weaker intermembrane adhesion (∼0.13 mJ/m(2)) on EAE bilayers. MBP preferentially adsorbs to liquid-disordered submicron domains within the lipid membranes, attributed to hydrophobic attractions. These results show a direct connection between the lipid composition of membranes and membrane-protein adsorption mechanisms that affects intermembrane spacing and adhesion and has direct implications for demyelinating diseases.

  9. SuperLooper--a prediction server for the modeling of loops in globular and membrane proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hildebrand, Peter W; Goede, Andrean; Bauer, Raphael A; Gruening, Bjoern; Ismer, Jochen; Michalsky, Elke; Preissner, Robert

    2009-07-01

    SuperLooper provides the first online interface for the automatic, quick and interactive search and placement of loops in proteins (LIP). A database containing half a billion segments of water-soluble proteins with lengths up to 35 residues can be screened for candidate loops. A specified database containing 180,000 membrane loops in proteins (LIMP) can be searched, alternatively. Loop candidates are scored based on sequence criteria and the root mean square deviation (RMSD) of the stem atoms. Searching LIP, the average global RMSD of the respective top-ranked loops to the original loops is benchmarked to be <2 A, for loops up to six residues or <3 A for loops shorter than 10 residues. Other suitable conformations may be selected and directly visualized on the web server from a top-50 list. For user guidance, the sequence homology between the template and the original sequence, proline or glycine exchanges or close contacts between a loop candidate and the remainder of the protein are denoted. For membrane proteins, the expansions of the lipid bilayer are automatically modeled using the TMDET algorithm. This allows the user to select the optimal membrane protein loop concerning its relative orientation to the lipid bilayer. The server is online since October 2007 and can be freely accessed at URL: http://bioinformatics.charite.de/superlooper/.

  10. SuperLooper—a prediction server for the modeling of loops in globular and membrane proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hildebrand, Peter W.; Goede, Andrean; Bauer, Raphael A.; Gruening, Bjoern; Ismer, Jochen; Michalsky, Elke; Preissner, Robert

    2009-01-01

    SuperLooper provides the first online interface for the automatic, quick and interactive search and placement of loops in proteins (LIP). A database containing half a billion segments of water-soluble proteins with lengths up to 35 residues can be screened for candidate loops. A specified database containing 180 000 membrane loops in proteins (LIMP) can be searched, alternatively. Loop candidates are scored based on sequence criteria and the root mean square deviation (RMSD) of the stem atoms. Searching LIP, the average global RMSD of the respective top-ranked loops to the original loops is benchmarked to be <2 Å, for loops up to six residues or <3 Å for loops shorter than 10 residues. Other suitable conformations may be selected and directly visualized on the web server from a top-50 list. For user guidance, the sequence homology between the template and the original sequence, proline or glycine exchanges or close contacts between a loop candidate and the remainder of the protein are denoted. For membrane proteins, the expansions of the lipid bilayer are automatically modeled using the TMDET algorithm. This allows the user to select the optimal membrane protein loop concerning its relative orientation to the lipid bilayer. The server is online since October 2007 and can be freely accessed at URL: http://bioinformatics.charite.de/superlooper/ PMID:19429894

  11. Structural comparison of highly similar nucleoside-diphosphate kinases: Molecular explanation of distinct membrane-binding behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francois-Moutal, L; Marcillat, O; Granjon, T

    2014-10-01

    NDPK-A, NDPK-B and NDPK-D are three enzymes which belong to the NDPK group I isoforms and are not only involved in metabolism process but also in transcriptional regulation, DNA cleavage, histidine protein kinase activity and metastasis development. Those enzymes were reported to bind to membranes either in mitochondria where NDPK-D influences cardiolipin lateral organization and is thought to be involved in apoptotic pathway or in cytosol where NDPK-A and NDPK-B membrane association was shown to influence several cellular processes like endocytosis, cellular adhesion, ion transport, etc. However, despite numerous studies, the role of NDPK-membrane association and the molecular details of the binding process are still elusive. In the present work, a comparative study of the three NDPK isoforms allowed us to show that although membrane binding is a common feature of these enzymes, mechanisms differ at the molecular scale. NDPK-A was not able to bind to model membranes mimicking the inner leaflet of plasma membrane, suggesting that its in vivo membrane association is mediated by a non-lipidic partner or other partners than the studied phospholipids. On the contrary, NDPK-B and NDPK-D were shown to bind efficiently to liposomes mimicking plasma membrane and mitochondrial inner membrane respectively but details of the binding mechanism differ between the two enzymes as NDPK-B binding necessarily involved an anionic phospholipid partner while NDPK-D can bind either zwitterionic or anionic phospholipids. Although sharing similar secondary structure and homohexameric quaternary arrangement, tryptophan fluorescence revealed fine disparities in NDPK tertiary structures. Interfacial behavior as well as ANS fluorescence showed further dissimilarities between NDPK isoforms, notably the presence of distinct accessible hydrophobic areas as well as different capacity to form Gibbs monolayers related to their surface activity properties. Those distinct features may contribute to

  12. Radial Basis Function Neural Networks-Based Modeling of the Membrane Separation Process: Hydrogen Recovery from Refinery Gases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lei Wang; Cheng Shao; Hai Wang; Hong Wu

    2006-01-01

    Membrane technology has found wide applications in the petrochemical industry, mainly in the purification and recovery of the hydrogen resources. Accurate prediction of the membrane separation performance plays an important role in carrying out advanced process control (APC). For the first time, a soft-sensor model for the membrane separation process has been established based on the radial basis function (RBF) neural networks. The main performance parameters, i.e, permeate hydrogen concentration, permeate gas flux, and residue hydrogen concentration, are estimated quantitatively by measuring the operating temperature, feed-side pressure, permeate-side pressure, residue-side pressure, feed-gas flux, and feed-hydrogen concentration excluding flow structure, membrane parameters, and other compositions. The predicted results can gain the desired effects. The effectiveness of this novel approach lays a foundation for integrating control technology and optimizing the operation of the gas membrane separation process.

  13. Microbial adhesion and biofilm formation on microfiltration membranes: a detailed characterization using model organisms with increasing complexity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanysacker, L; Denis, C; Declerck, P; Piasecka, A; Vankelecom, I F J

    2013-01-01

    Since many years, membrane biofouling has been described as the Achilles heel of membrane fouling. In the present study, an ecological assay was performed using model systems with increasing complexity: a monospecies assay using Pseudomonas aeruginosa or Escherichia coli separately, a duospecies assay using both microorganisms, and a multispecies assay using activated sludge with or without spiked P. aeruginosa. The microbial adhesion and biofilm formation were evaluated in terms of bacterial cell densities, species richness, and bacterial community composition on polyvinyldifluoride, polyethylene, and polysulfone membranes. The data show that biofouling formation was strongly influenced by the kind of microorganism, the interactions between the organisms, and the changes in environmental conditions whereas the membrane effect was less important. The findings obtained in this study suggest that more knowledge in species composition and microbial interactions is needed in order to understand the complex biofouling process. This is the first report describing the microbial interactions with a membrane during the biofouling development.

  14. Computational molecular modeling and structural rationalization for the design of a drug-loaded PLLA/PVA biopolymeric membrane

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sibeko, B; Pillay, V; Choonara, Y E; Khan, R A; Danckwerts, M P [Department of Pharmacy and Pharmacology, University of the Witwatersrand, 7 York Road, Parktown, 2193 Johannesburg (South Africa); Modi, G [Division of Neurosciences, Department of Neurology, University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg (South Africa); Iyuke, S E [School of Chemical and Metallurgical Engineering, University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg (South Africa); Naidoo, D, E-mail: viness.pillay@wits.ac.z [Division of Neurosciences, Department of Neurosurgery, University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg (South Africa)

    2009-02-15

    The purpose of this study was to design, characterize and assess the influence of triethanolamine (TEA) on the physicomechanical properties and release of methotrexate (MTX) from a composite biopolymeric membrane. Conjugated poly(L-lactic acid) (PLLA) and poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA) membranes were prepared by immersion precipitation with and without the addition of TEA. Drug entrapment efficiency (DEE) and release studies were performed in phosphate buffered saline (pH 7.4, 37 deg. C). Scanning electron microscopy elucidated the membrane surface morphology. Computational and structural molecular modeling rationalized the potential mechanisms of membrane formation and MTX release. Bi-axial force-distance (F-D) extensibility profiles were generated to determine the membrane toughness, elasticity and fracturability. Membranes were significantly toughened by the addition of TEA as a discrete rubbery phase within the co-polymer matrix. MTX-TEA-PLLA-PVA membranes were tougher (F = 89 N) and more extensible (D = 8.79 mm) compared to MTX-PLLA-PVA (F = 35 N, D = 3.7 mm) membranes as a greater force of extension and fracture distance were required (N = 10). DEE values were relatively high (>80%, N = 5) for both formulations. Photomicrographs revealed distinct crystalline layered morphologies with macro-pores. MTX was released by tri-phasic kinetics with a lower fractional release of MTX from MTX-TEA-PLLA-PVA membranes compared to MTX-PLLA-PVA. TEA provided a synergistic approach to improving the membrane physicomechanical properties and modulation of MTX release. The composite biopolymeric membrane may therefore be suitable for the novel delivery of MTX in the treatment of chronic primary central nervous system lymphoma.

  15. Interaction of the human N-Ras protein with lipid raft model membranes of varying degrees of complexity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogel, Alexander; Nikolaus, Jörg; Weise, Katrin; Triola, Gemma; Waldmann, Herbert; Winter, Roland; Herrmann, Andreas; Huster, Daniel

    2014-07-01

    Ternary lipid mixtures composed of cholesterol, saturated (frequently with sphingosine backbone), and unsaturated phospholipids show stable phase separation and are often used as model systems of lipid rafts. Yet, their ability to reproduce raft properties and function is still debated. We investigated the properties and functional aspects of three lipid raft model systems of varying degrees of biological relevance--PSM/POPC/Chol, DPPC/POPC/Chol, and DPPC/DOPC/Chol--using 2H solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, fluorescence microscopy, and atomic force microscopy. While some minor differences were observed, the general behavior and properties of all three model mixtures were similar to previously investigated influenza envelope lipid membranes, which closely mimic the lipid composition of biological membranes. For the investigation of the functional aspects, we employed the human N-Ras protein, which is posttranslationally modified by two lipid modifications that anchor the protein to the membrane. It was previously shown that N-Ras preferentially resides in liquid-disordered domains and exhibits a time-dependent accumulation in the domain boundaries of influenza envelope lipid membranes. For all three model mixtures, we observed the same membrane partitioning behavior for N-Ras. Therefore, we conclude that even relatively simple models of raft membranes are able to reproduce many of their specific properties and functions.

  16. Dynamic Model of the High Temperature Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cell Stack Temperature

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andreasen, Søren Juhl; Kær, Søren Knudsen

    2009-01-01

    consists of a prototype cathode air cooled 30 cell HTPEM fuel cell stack developed at the Institute of Energy Technology at Aalborg University. This fuel cell stack uses PEMEAS Celtec P-1000 membranes and runs on pure hydrogen in a dead-end anode configuration with a purge valve. The cooling of the stack...... elements for start-up, heat conduction through stack insulation, cathode air convection, and heating of the inlet gases in the manifold. Various measurements are presented to validate the model predictions of the stack temperatures....