WorldWideScience

Sample records for model length scale

  1. A two-scale damage model with material length

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dascalu, Cristian

    2009-09-01

    The Note presents the formulation of a class of two-scale damage models involving a micro-structural length. A homogenization method based on asymptotic developments is employed to deduce the macroscopic damage equations. The damage model completely results from energy-based micro-crack propagation laws, without supplementary phenomenological assumptions. We show that the resulting two-scale model has the property of capturing micro-structural lengths. When damage evolves, the micro-structural length is given by the ratio of the surface density of energy dissipated during the micro-crack growth and the macroscopic damage energy release rate per unit volume of the material. The use of fracture criteria based on resistance curves or power laws for sub-critical growth of micro-cracks leads to quasi-brittle and, respectively, time-dependent damage models. To cite this article: C. Dascalu, C. R. Mecanique 337 (2009).

  2. Density Functional Theory and Materials Modeling at Atomistic Length Scales

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Swapan K. Ghosh

    2002-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: We discuss the basic concepts of density functional theory (DFT as applied to materials modeling in the microscopic, mesoscopic and macroscopic length scales. The picture that emerges is that of a single unified framework for the study of both quantum and classical systems. While for quantum DFT, the central equation is a one-particle Schrodinger-like Kohn-Sham equation, the classical DFT consists of Boltzmann type distributions, both corresponding to a system of noninteracting particles in the field of a density-dependent effective potential, the exact functional form of which is unknown. One therefore approximates the exchange-correlation potential for quantum systems and the excess free energy density functional or the direct correlation functions for classical systems. Illustrative applications of quantum DFT to microscopic modeling of molecular interaction and that of classical DFT to a mesoscopic modeling of soft condensed matter systems are highlighted.

  3. Modelling Time and Length Scales of Scour Around a Pipeline

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, H. D.; Foster, D. L.

    2002-12-01

    The scour and burial of submarine objects is an area of interest for engineers, oceanographers and military personnel. Given the limited availability of field observations, there exists a need to accurately describe the hydrodynamics and sediment response around an obstacle using numerical models. In this presentation, we will compare observations of submarine pipeline scour with model predictions. The research presented here uses the computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model FLOW-3D. FLOW-3D, developed by Flow Science in Santa Fe, NM, is a 3-dimensional finite-difference model that solves the Navier-Stokes and continuity equations. Using the Volume of Fluid (VOF) technique, FLOW-3D is able to resolve fluid-fluid and fluid-air interfaces. The FAVOR technique allows for complex geometry to be resolved with rectangular grids. FLOW-3D uses a bulk transport method to describe sediment transport and feedback to the hydrodynamic solver is accomplished by morphology evolution and fluid viscosity due to sediment suspension. Previous investigations by the authors have shown FLOW-3D to well-predict the hydrodynamics around five static scoured bed profiles and a stationary pipeline (``Modelling of Flow Around a Cylinder Over a Scoured Bed,'' submit to Journal of Waterway, Port, Coastal, and Ocean Engineering). Following experiments performed by Mao (1986, Dissertation, Technical University of Denmark), we will be performing model-data comparisons of length and time scales for scour around a pipeline. Preliminary investigations with LES and k-ɛ closure schemes have shown that the model predicts shorter time scales in scour hole development than that observed by Mao. Predicted time and length scales of scour hole development are shown to be a function of turbulence closure scheme, grain size, and hydrodynamic forcing. Subsequent investigations consider variable wave-current flow regimes and object burial. This investigation will allow us to identify different regimes for the

  4. Filter length scale for continuum modeling of subgrid physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simeonov, Julian; Calantoni, Joseph

    2014-11-01

    Modeling the wide range of scales of geophysical processes with direct numerical simulations (DNS) is currently not feasible. It is therefore typical to explicitly resolve only the large energy-containing scales and to parameterize the unresolved small scales. One approach to separate the scales is by means of spatial filters and here we discuss practical considerations regarding the choice of a volume averaging scale L. We use a macroscopically homogeneous scalar field and quantify the smoothness of the filtered field using a noise metric, ν, defined by the standard deviation of the filtered field normalized by the domain-averaged value of the field. For illustration, we consider the continuum modeling of the particle phase in discrete element method (DEM) simulations and the salt fingers in DNS of double-diffusive convection. We find that ν2 follows an inverse power law dependence on L with an exponent and coefficients proportional to the domain-averaged field value. The empirical power law relation can aid in the development of continuum models from fully resolved simulations while also providing uncertainty estimates of the modeled continuum fields.

  5. An actuator line model simulation with optimal body force projection length scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez-Tossas, Luis; Churchfield, Matthew J.; Meneveau, Charles

    2016-11-01

    In recent work (Martínez-Tossas et al. "Optimal smoothing length scale for actuator line models of wind turbine blades", preprint), an optimal body force projection length-scale for an actuator line model has been obtained. This optimization is based on 2-D aerodynamics and is done by comparing an analytical solution of inviscid linearized flow over a Gaussian body force to the potential flow solution of flow over a Joukowski airfoil. The optimization provides a non-dimensional optimal scale ɛ / c for different Joukowski airfoils, where ɛ is the width of the Gaussian kernel and c is the chord. A Gaussian kernel with different widths in the chord and thickness directions can further reduce the error. The 2-D theory developed is extended by simulating a full scale rotor using the optimal body force projection length scales. Using these values, the tip losses are captured by the LES and thus, no additional explicit tip-loss correction is needed for the actuator line model. The simulation with the optimal values provides excellent agreement with Blade Element Momentum Theory. This research is supported by the National Science Foundation (Grant OISE-1243482, the WINDINSPIRE project).

  6. Infrared length scale and extrapolations for the no-core shell model

    CERN Document Server

    Wendt, K A; Papenbrock, T; Sääf, D

    2015-01-01

    We precisely determine the infrared (IR) length scale of the no-core shell model (NCSM). In the NCSM, the $A$-body Hilbert space is truncated by the total energy, and the IR length can be determined by equating the intrinsic kinetic energy of $A$ nucleons in the NCSM space to that of $A$ nucleons in a $3(A-1)$-dimensional hyper-radial well with a Dirichlet boundary condition for the hyper radius. We demonstrate that this procedure indeed yields a very precise IR length by performing large-scale NCSM calculations for $^{6}$Li. We apply our result and perform accurate IR extrapolations for bound states of $^{4}$He, $^{6}$He, $^{6}$Li, $^{7}$Li. We also attempt to extrapolate NCSM results for $^{10}$B and $^{16}$O with bare interactions from chiral effective field theory over tens of MeV.

  7. Model of a fluid at small and large length scales and the hydrophobic effect

    OpenAIRE

    tenWolde, Pieter Rein; Sun, Sean X.; Chandler, David

    2001-01-01

    We present a statistical field theory to describe large length scale effects induced by solutes in a cold and otherwise placid liquid. The theory divides space into a cubic grid of cells. The side length of each cell is of the order of the bulk correlation length of the bulk liquid. Large length scale states of the cells are specified with an Ising variable. Finer length scale effects are described with a Gaussian field, with mean and variance affected by both the large length scale field and...

  8. A mass-length scaling law for modeling muscle strength in the lower limb.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Correa, Tomas A; Pandy, Marcus G

    2011-11-10

    Musculoskeletal computer models are often used to study muscle function in children with and without impaired mobility. Calculations of muscle forces depend in part on the assumed strength of each muscle, represented by the peak isometric force parameter, which is usually based on measurements obtained from cadavers of adult donors. The aim of the present study was twofold: first, to develop a method for scaling lower-limb peak isometric muscle forces in typically-developing children; and second, to determine the effect of this scaling method on model calculations of muscle forces obtained for normal gait. Muscle volumes were determined from magnetic resonance (MR) images obtained from ten children aged from 7 to 13yr. A new mass-length scaling law was developed based on the assumption that muscle volume and body mass are linearly related, which was confirmed by the obtained volume and body mass data. Two musculoskeletal models were developed for each subject: one in which peak isometric muscle forces were estimated using the mass-length scaling law; and another in which these parameters were determined directly from the MR-derived muscle volumes. Musculoskeletal modeling and quantitative gait analysis were then used to calculate lower-limb muscle forces in normal walking. The patterns of muscle forces predicted by the model with scaled peak isometric force values were similar to those predicted by the MR-based model, implying that assessments of muscle function obtained from these two methods are practically equivalent. These results support the use of mass-length scaling in the development of subject-specific musculoskeletal models of children.

  9. Phase field modelling of stressed grain growth: Analytical study and the effect of microstructural length scale

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jamshidian, M., E-mail: mostafa.jamshidian@gmail.com [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Isfahan University of Technology, Isfahan (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Institute of Structural Mechanics, Bauhaus-University Weimar, Marienstrasse 15, 99423 Weimar (Germany); Rabczuk, T., E-mail: timon.rabczuk@uni-weimar.de [Institute of Structural Mechanics, Bauhaus-University Weimar, Marienstrasse 15, 99423 Weimar (Germany); School of Civil, Environmental and Architectural Engineering, Korea University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-03-15

    We establish the correlation between the diffuse interface and sharp interface descriptions for stressed grain boundary migration by presenting analytical solutions for stressed migration of a circular grain boundary in a bicrystalline phase field domain. The validity and accuracy of the phase field model is investigated by comparing the phase field simulation results against analytical solutions. The phase field model can reproduce precise boundary kinetics and stress evolution provided that a thermodynamically consistent theory and proper expressions for model parameters in terms of physical material properties are employed. Quantitative phase field simulations are then employed to investigate the effect of microstructural length scale on microstructure and texture evolution by stressed grain growth in an elastically deformed polycrystalline aggregate. The simulation results reveal a transitional behaviour from normal to abnormal grain growth by increasing the microstructural length scale.

  10. Application of nonlocal models to nano beams. Part I: Axial length scale effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jun-Sik

    2014-10-01

    Applicability of nonlocal models to nano-beams is discussed in terms of physical implications via the similarity between a nonlocal Euler-Bernoulli (EB) beam theory and a classical Rankine-Timoshenko (RT) beam theory. The nonlocal EB beam model, Eringen's model, is briefly reviewed and the classical RT beam theory is recast by the primary variables of the EB model. A careful comparison of these two models reveals that the scale parameter used to the Eringen's model has a strike resemblance to the shear flexibility in the RT model. This implies that the nonlocal model employed in literature consider the axial length scale effect only. In addition, the paradox for a cantilevered nano-beam subjected to tip shear force is clearly explained by finding appropriate displacement prescribed boundary conditions.

  11. A Generic Length-scale Equation For Second-order Turbulence Models of Oceanic Boundary Layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umlauf, L.; Burchard, H.

    A generic transport equation for a generalized length-scale in second-order turbulence closure models for geophysical boundary layers is suggested. This variable consists of the products of powers of the turbulent kinetic energy, k, and the integral length-scale, l. The new approach generalizes traditional second-order models used in geophysical boundary layer modelling, e.g. the Mellor-Yamada model and the k- model, which, however, can be recovered as special cases. It is demonstrated how this new model can be calibrated with measurements in some typical geophysical boundary layer flows. As an example, the generic model is applied to the uppermost oceanic boundary layer directly influenced by the effects of breaking surface waves. Recent measurements show that in this layer the classical law of the wall is invalid, since there turbulence is dominated by turbulent transport of TKE from above, and not by shear-production. A widely accepted approach to describe the wave-affected layer with a one-equation turbulence model was suggested by Craig and Banner (1994). Here, some deficien- cies of their solutions are pointed out and a generalization of their ideas for the case of two-equation models is suggested. Direct comparison with very recently obtained measurements of the dissipation rate, , in the wave-affected boundary layer with com- puted results clearly demonstrate that only the generic two-equation model yields cor- rect predictions for the profiles of and the turbulent length scale, l. Also, the pre- dicted velocity profiles in the wave-affected layer, important e.g. for the interpretation of surface drifter experiments, are reproduced correctly only by the generic model. Implementation and computational costs of the generic model are comparable with traditonal two-equation models.

  12. Lower Length Scale Model Development for Embrittlement of Reactor Presure Vessel Steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Yongfeng [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Schwen, Daniel [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Chakraborty, Pritam [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Bai, Xianming [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2016-09-01

    This report summarizes the lower-length-scale effort during FY 2016 in developing mesoscale capabilities for microstructure evolution, plasticity and fracture in reactor pressure vessel steels. During operation, reactor pressure vessels are subject to hardening and embrittlement caused by irradiation induced defect accumulation and irradiation enhanced solute precipitation. Both defect production and solute precipitation start from the atomic scale, and manifest their eventual effects as degradation in engineering scale properties. To predict the property degradation, multiscale modeling and simulation are needed to deal with the microstructure evolution, and to link the microstructure feature to material properties. In this report, the development of mesoscale capabilities for defect accumulation and solute precipitation are summarized. A crystal plasticity model to capture defect-dislocation interaction and a damage model for cleavage micro-crack propagation is also provided.

  13. Length scale effects and multiscale modeling of thermally induced phase transformation kinetics in NiTi SMA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frantziskonis, George N.; Gur, Sourav

    2017-06-01

    Thermally induced phase transformation in NiTi shape memory alloys (SMAs) shows strong size and shape, collectively termed length scale effects, at the nano to micrometer scales, and that has important implications for the design and use of devices and structures at such scales. This paper, based on a recently developed multiscale model that utilizes molecular dynamics (MDs) simulations at small scales and MD-verified phase field (PhF) simulations at larger scales, reports results on specific length scale effects, i.e. length scale effects in martensite phase fraction (MPF) evolution, transformation temperatures (martensite and austenite start and finish) and in the thermally cyclic transformation between austenitic and martensitic phase. The multiscale study identifies saturation points for length scale effects and studies, for the first time, the length scale effect on the kinetics (i.e. developed internal strains) in the B19‧ phase during phase transformation. The major part of the work addresses small scale single crystals in specific orientations. However, the multiscale method is used in a unique and novel way to indirectly study length scale and grain size effects on evolution kinetics in polycrystalline NiTi, and to compare the simulation results to experiments. The interplay of the grain size and the length scale effect on the thermally induced MPF evolution is also shown in this present study. Finally, the multiscale coupling results are employed to improve phenomenological material models for NiTi SMA.

  14. Evaluating the accuracy of finite element models at reduced length scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kemp, Connor

    Finite element models are used frequently in both engineering and scientific research. While they can provide useful information as to the performance of materials, as length scales are decreased more sophisticated model descriptions are required. It is also important to develop methods by which existing models may be verified against experimental findings. The present study evaluates the ability of various finite element models to predict materials behaviour at length scales ranging from several microns to tens of nanometers. Considering this motivation, this thesis is provided in manuscript form with the bulk of material coming from two case studies. Following an overview of relevant literature in Chapter 2, Chapter 3 considers the nucleation of delta-zirconium hydrides in a Zircaloy-2 matrix. Zirconium hydrides are an important topic in the nuclear industry as they form a brittle phase which leads to delayed hydride cracking during reactor start-up and shut-down. Several FE models are used to compare present results with literature findings and illustrate the weaknesses of standard FE approaches. It is shown that standard continuum techniques do not sufficiently capture the interfacial effects of an inclusion-matrix system. By using nano-scale material descriptions, nucleation lattice strains are obtained which are in good agreement with previous experimental studies. The motivation for Chapter 4 stems from a recognized need to develop a method for modeling corrosion behaviour of materials. Corrosion is also an issue for reactor design and an ability to predict failure points is needed. Finite element models could be used for this purpose, provided model accuracy is verified first. In Chapter 4 a technique is developed which facilitates the extraction of sub-micron resolution strain data from correlation images obtained during in-situ tensile deformation. By comparing image correlation results with a crystal plasticity finite element code it is found that good

  15. On the performance of a generic length scale turbulence model within an adaptive finite element ocean model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Jon; Piggott, M. D.; Ham, David A.; Popova, E. E.; Srokosz, M. A.

    2012-10-01

    Research into the use of unstructured mesh methods for ocean modelling has been growing steadily in the last few years. One advantage of using unstructured meshes is that one can concentrate resolution where it is needed. In addition, dynamic adaptive mesh optimisation (DAMO) strategies allow resolution to be concentrated when this is required. Despite the advantage that DAMO gives in terms of improving the spatial resolution where and when required, small-scale turbulence in the oceans still requires parameterisation. A two-equation, generic length scale (GLS) turbulence model (one equation for turbulent kinetic energy and another for a generic turbulence length-scale quantity) adds this parameterisation and can be used in conjunction with adaptive mesh techniques. In this paper, an implementation of the GLS turbulence parameterisation is detailed in a non-hydrostatic, finite-element, unstructured mesh ocean model, Fluidity-ICOM. The implementation is validated by comparing to both a laboratory-scale experiment and real-world observations, on both fixed and adaptive meshes. The model performs well, matching laboratory and observed data, with resolution being adjusted as necessary by DAMO. Flexibility in the prognostic fields used to construct the error metric used in DAMO is required to ensure best performance. Moreover, the adaptive mesh models perform as well as fixed mesh models in terms of root mean square error to observation or theoretical mixed layer depths, but uses fewer elements and hence has a reduced computational cost.

  16. IMF Length Scales and Predictability: The Two Length Scale Medium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collier, Michael R.; Szabo, Adam; Slavin, James A.; Lepping, R. P.; Kokubun, S.

    1999-01-01

    We present preliminary results from a systematic study using simultaneous data from three spacecraft, Wind, IMP 8 (Interplanetary Monitoring Platform) and Geotail to examine interplanetary length scales and their implications on predictability for magnetic field parcels in the typical solar wind. Time periods were selected when the plane formed by the three spacecraft included the GSE (Ground Support Equipment) x-direction so that if the parcel fronts were strictly planar, the two adjacent spacecraft pairs would determine the same phase front angles. After correcting for the motion of the Earth relative to the interplanetary medium and deviations in the solar wind flow from radial, we used differences in the measured front angle between the two spacecraft pairs to determine structure radius of curvature. Results indicate that the typical radius of curvature for these IMF parcels is of the order of 100 R (Sub E). This implies that there are two important IMF (Interplanetary Magnetic Field) scale lengths relevant to predictability: (1) the well-established scale length over which correlations observed by two spacecraft decay along a given IMF parcel, of the order of a few tens of Earth radii and (2) the scale length over which two spacecraft are unlikely to even observe the same parcel because of its curvature, of the order of a hundred Earth radii.

  17. Numerical evaluation of the phase-field model for brittle fracture with emphasis on the length scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xue; Vignes, Chet; Sloan, Scott W.; Sheng, Daichao

    2017-05-01

    The phase-field model has been attracting considerable attention due to its capability of capturing complex crack propagations without mesh dependence. However, its validation studies have primarily focused on the ability to predict reasonable, sharply defined crack paths. Very limited works have so far been contributed to estimate its accuracy in predicting force responses, which is majorly attributed to the difficulty in the determination of the length scale. Indeed, accurate crack path simulation can be achieved by setting the length scale to be sufficiently small, whereas a very small length scale may lead to unrealistic force-displacement responses and overestimate critical structural loads. This paper aims to provide a critical numerical investigation of the accuracy of phase-field modelling of brittle fracture with special emphasis on a possible formula for the length scale estimation. Phase-field simulations of a number of classical fracture experiments for brittle fracture in concretes are performed with simulated results compared with experimental data qualitatively and quantitatively to achieve this goal. Furthermore, discussions are conducted with the aim to provide guidelines for the application of the phase-field model.

  18. Evaluation of a Two-Length Scale Turbulence Model with Experiments on Shock-Driven Turbulent Mixing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, John; Gore, Rob; Ranjan, Devesh

    2015-11-01

    A new second moment turbulence model which uses separate transport and decay length scales is used to model the shock-driven instability. The ability of the model to capture the evolution of turbulence statistics and mixing is discussed. Evaluation is based on comparison to the Georgia Tech shock tube experiments. In the experiments a membraneless light-over-heavy interface is created. There is a long-wavelength perturbation which exists due to inclination of the entire shock tube. By limiting calculations to one dimension, there is not a geometric description of the incline, and the ability of the transport length scale alone to capture the effect of the long-wavelength perturbation is tested.

  19. Application of nonlocal models to nano beams. Part II: Thickness length scale effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jun-Sik

    2014-10-01

    Applicability of nonlocal models to nano-beams is discussed in terms of the Eringen's nonlocal Euler-Bernoulli (EB) beam model. In literature, most work has taken the axial coordinate derivative in the Laplacian operator presented in nonlocal elasticity. This causes that the non-locality always makes the beam soften as compared to the local counterpart. In this paper, the thickness scale effect is solely considered to investigate if the nonlocal model can simulate stiffening effect. Taking the thickness derivative in the Laplacian operator leads to the presence of a surface stress state. The governing equation derived is compared to that of the EB model with the surface stress. The results obtained reveal that the nonlocality tends to decrease the bending moment stiffness whereas to increase the bending rigidity in the governing equation. This tendency also depends on the surface conditions.

  20. Minimal Length Scale Scenarios for Quantum Gravity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabine Hossenfelder

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We review the question of whether the fundamental laws of nature limit our ability to probe arbitrarily short distances. First, we examine what insights can be gained from thought experiments for probes of shortest distances, and summarize what can be learned from different approaches to a theory of quantum gravity. Then we discuss some models that have been developed to implement a minimal length scale in quantum mechanics and quantum field theory. These models have entered the literature as the generalized uncertainty principle or the modified dispersion relation, and have allowed the study of the effects of a minimal length scale in quantum mechanics, quantum electrodynamics, thermodynamics, black-hole physics and cosmology. Finally, we touch upon the question of ways to circumvent the manifestation of a minimal length scale in short-distance physics.

  1. Minimal Length Scale Scenarios for Quantum Gravity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hossenfelder, Sabine

    2013-01-01

    We review the question of whether the fundamental laws of nature limit our ability to probe arbitrarily short distances. First, we examine what insights can be gained from thought experiments for probes of shortest distances, and summarize what can be learned from different approaches to a theory of quantum gravity. Then we discuss some models that have been developed to implement a minimal length scale in quantum mechanics and quantum field theory. These models have entered the literature as the generalized uncertainty principle or the modified dispersion relation, and have allowed the study of the effects of a minimal length scale in quantum mechanics, quantum electrodynamics, thermodynamics, black-hole physics and cosmology. Finally, we touch upon the question of ways to circumvent the manifestation of a minimal length scale in short-distance physics.

  2. Wall-modeled large eddy simulation of turbulent channel flow at high Reynolds number using the von Karman length scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jinglei; Li, Meng; Zhang, Yang; Chen, Longfei

    2016-12-01

    The von Karman length scale is able to reflect the size of the local turbulence structure. However, it is not suitable for the near wall region of wall-bounded flows, for its value is almost infinite there. In the present study, a simple and novel length scale combining the wall distance and the von Karman length scale is proposed by introducing a structural function. The new length scale becomes the von Karman length scale once local unsteady structures are detected. The proposed method is adopted in a series of turbulent channel flows at different Reynolds numbers. The results show that the proposed length scale with the structural function can precisely simulate turbulence at high Reynolds numbers, even with a coarse grid resolution.

  3. Optimal smoothing length scale for actuator line models of lifting surfaces

    CERN Document Server

    Martinez-Tossas, Luis A

    2015-01-01

    The actuator line model (ALM) is a commonly used method to represent lifting surfaces such as wind turbine blades within Large-Eddy Simulations (LES). In ALM the lift and drag forces are replaced by an imposed body force which is typically smoothed over several grid points using a Gaussian kernel with some prescribed smoothing width $\\epsilon$. To date, the choice of $\\epsilon$ has most often been based on numerical considerations mostly related to the grid spacing used in LES. However, especially for finely resolved LES with grid spacings on the order or smaller than the chord-length of the blade, the best choice of $\\epsilon$ is not known. Focusing first on the lift force, here we find $\\epsilon$ and the force center location that minimize the square difference between the velocity fields obtained from solving 2D potential flow over Joukowski airfoils and solving the Euler equations including the imposed body force. The latter solution is found for the linearized problem, and is valid for small angles of at...

  4. Sizing Up the Milky Way: A Bayesian Mixture Model Meta-analysis of Photometric Scale Length Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Licquia, Timothy C.; Newman, Jeffrey A.

    2016-11-01

    The exponential scale length (L d ) of the Milky Way’s (MW’s) disk is a critical parameter for describing the global physical size of our Galaxy, important both for interpreting other Galactic measurements and helping us to understand how our Galaxy fits into extragalactic contexts. Unfortunately, current estimates span a wide range of values and are often statistically incompatible with one another. Here, we perform a Bayesian meta-analysis to determine an improved, aggregate estimate for L d , utilizing a mixture-model approach to account for the possibility that any one measurement has not properly accounted for all statistical or systematic errors. Within this machinery, we explore a variety of ways of modeling the nature of problematic measurements, and then employ a Bayesian model averaging technique to derive net posterior distributions that incorporate any model-selection uncertainty. Our meta-analysis combines 29 different (15 visible and 14 infrared) photometric measurements of L d available in the literature; these involve a broad assortment of observational data sets, MW models and assumptions, and methodologies, all tabulated herein. Analyzing the visible and infrared measurements separately yields estimates for L d of {2.71}-0.20+0.22 kpc and {2.51}-0.13+0.15 kpc, respectively, whereas considering them all combined yields 2.64 ± 0.13 kpc. The ratio between the visible and infrared scale lengths determined here is very similar to that measured in external spiral galaxies. We use these results to update the model of the Galactic disk from our previous work, constraining its stellar mass to be {4.8}-1.1+1.5× {10}10 M ⊙, and the MW’s total stellar mass to be {5.7}-1.1+1.5× {10}10 M ⊙.

  5. Optical modeling of plasma-deposited ZnO films: Electron scattering at different length scales

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knoops, Harm C. M., E-mail: H.C.M.Knoops@tue.nl; Loo, Bas W. H. van de; Smit, Sjoerd; Ponomarev, Mikhail V.; Weber, Jan-Willem; Sharma, Kashish [Department of Applied Physics, Eindhoven University of Technology, P.O. Box 513, 5600 MB Eindhoven (Netherlands); Kessels, Wilhelmus M. M.; Creatore, Mariadriana, E-mail: M.Creatore@tue.nl [Department of Applied Physics, Eindhoven University of Technology, P.O. Box 513, 5600 MB Eindhoven, The Netherlands and Solliance, High Tech Campus 5, 5656 AE Eindhoven (Netherlands)

    2015-03-15

    In this work, an optical modeling study on electron scattering mechanisms in plasma-deposited ZnO layers is presented. Because various applications of ZnO films pose a limit on the electron carrier density due to its effect on the film transmittance, higher electron mobility values are generally preferred instead. Hence, insights into the electron scattering contributions affecting the carrier mobility are required. In optical models, the Drude oscillator is adopted to represent the free-electron contribution and the obtained optical mobility can be then correlated with the macroscopic material properties. However, the influence of scattering phenomena on the optical mobility depends on the considered range of photon energy. For example, the grain-boundary scattering is generally not probed by means of optical measurements and the ionized-impurity scattering contribution decreases toward higher photon energies. To understand this frequency dependence and quantify contributions from different scattering phenomena to the mobility, several case studies were analyzed in this work by means of spectroscopic ellipsometry and Fourier transform infrared (IR) spectroscopy. The obtained electrical parameters were compared to the results inferred by Hall measurements. For intrinsic ZnO (i-ZnO), the in-grain mobility was obtained by fitting reflection data with a normal Drude model in the IR range. For Al-doped ZnO (Al:ZnO), besides a normal Drude fit in the IR range, an Extended Drude fit in the UV-vis range could be used to obtain the in-grain mobility. Scattering mechanisms for a thickness series of Al:ZnO films were discerned using the more intuitive parameter “scattering frequency” instead of the parameter “mobility”. The interaction distance concept was introduced to give a physical interpretation to the frequency dependence of the scattering frequency. This physical interpretation furthermore allows the prediction of which Drude models can be used in a specific

  6. Estimation of length scale of RS II-$p$ braneworld model through perturbations in Helium's atom ground state energy

    CERN Document Server

    Garrido, Nephtali

    2012-01-01

    We put to the test an effective three-dimensional electrostatic potential, obtained effectively by considering an electrostatic source inside a (5+$p$)-dimensional braneworld scenario with $p$ compact and one infinite spacial extra dimensions in the RS II-$p$ model, for $p=1$ and $p=2$. This potential is regular at the source and matches the standard Coulomb potential outside a neighborhood. We use variational and perturbative approximation methods to calculate corrections to the ground energy of the Helium atom modified by this potential, by making use of a 6 and 39-parameter trial wave function of Hylleraas type for the ground state. These corrections to the ground-state energy are compared with experimental data for Helium atom in order to set bounds for the extra dimensions length scale. We find that these bounds are less restrictive than the ones obtained by Morales et. al. through a calculation using the Lamb shift in Hydrogen.

  7. Scale Length of the Galactic Thin Disk

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    D. Κ. Ojha

    2000-06-01

    This paper presents an analysis of the first 2MASS (The Two Micron All Sky Survey) sampler data as observed at lower Galactic latitude in our Galaxy. These new near-infrared data provide insight into the structure of the thin disk of our Galaxy, The interpretation of star counts and color distributions of stars in the near-infrared with the synthetic stellar population model, gives strong evidence that the Galactic thin disk density scale length, ℎ, is rather short (2.7 ± 0.1 kpc).

  8. Optimal Length Scale for a Turbulent Dynamo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadek, Mira; Alexakis, Alexandros; Fauve, Stephan

    2016-02-19

    We demonstrate that there is an optimal forcing length scale for low Prandtl number dynamo flows that can significantly reduce the required energy injection rate. The investigation is based on simulations of the induction equation in a periodic box of size 2πL. The flows considered are the laminar and turbulent ABC flows forced at different forcing wave numbers k_{f}, where the turbulent case is simulated using a subgrid turbulence model. At the smallest allowed forcing wave number k_{f}=k_{min}=1/L the laminar critical magnetic Reynolds number Rm_{c}^{lam} is more than an order of magnitude smaller than the turbulent critical magnetic Reynolds number Rm_{c}^{turb} due to the hindering effect of turbulent fluctuations. We show that this hindering effect is almost suppressed when the forcing wave number k_{f} is increased above an optimum wave number k_{f}L≃4 for which Rm_{c}^{turb} is minimum. At this optimal wave number, Rm_{c}^{turb} is smaller by more than a factor of 10 than the case forced in k_{f}=1. This leads to a reduction of the energy injection rate by 3 orders of magnitude when compared to the case where the system is forced at the largest scales and thus provides a new strategy for the design of a fully turbulent experimental dynamo.

  9. Length-scale dependent phonon interactions

    CERN Document Server

    Srivastava, Gyaneshwar

    2014-01-01

    This book presents  a comprehensive description of phonons and their interactions in systems with different dimensions and length scales. Internationally-recognized leaders describe theories and measurements of phonon interactions  in relation to the design of materials with exotic properties such as metamaterials, nano-mechanical systems, next-generation electronic, photonic, and acoustic devices, energy harvesting, optical information storage, and applications of phonon lasers in a variety of fields. The emergence of techniques for control of semiconductor properties and geometry has enabled engineers to design structures in which functionality is derived from controlling electron behavior. As manufacturing techniques have greatly expanded the list of available materials and the range of attainable length scales, similar opportunities now exist for designing devices whose functionality is derived from controlling phonon behavior. However, progress in this area is hampered by gaps in our knowledge of phono...

  10. Multi-Length Scale-Enriched Continuum-Level Material Model for Kevlar (registered trademark)-Fiber-Reinforced Polymer-Matrix Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-01

    polymer matrix composite materials display quite complex deformation and failure behavior under ballistic/blast impact loading conditions. This complexity is generally attributed to a number of factors such as (a) hierarchical/multi-length scale architecture of the material microstructure; (b) nonlinear, rate-dependent and often pressure-sensitive mechanical response; and (c) the interplay of various intrinsic phenomena and processes such as fiber twisting, interfiber friction/sliding, etc. Material models currently employed in the computational engineering

  11. Large-scale collection and annotation of full-length enriched cDNAs from a model halophyte, Thellungiella halophila

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seki Motoaki

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Thellungiella halophila (also known as Thellungiella salsuginea is a model halophyte with a small plant size, short life cycle, and small genome. It easily undergoes genetic transformation by the floral dipping method used with its close relative, Arabidopsis thaliana. Thellungiella genes exhibit high sequence identity (approximately 90% at the cDNA level with Arabidopsis genes. Furthermore, Thellungiella not only shows tolerance to extreme salinity stress, but also to chilling, freezing, and ozone stress, supporting the use of Thellungiella as a good genomic resource in studies of abiotic stress tolerance. Results We constructed a full-length enriched Thellungiella (Shan Dong ecotype cDNA library from various tissues and whole plants subjected to environmental stresses, including high salinity, chilling, freezing, and abscisic acid treatment. We randomly selected about 20 000 clones and sequenced them from both ends to obtain a total of 35 171 sequences. CAP3 software was used to assemble the sequences and cluster them into 9569 nonredundant cDNA groups. We named these cDNAs "RTFL" (RIKEN Thellungiella Full-Length cDNAs. Information on functional domains and Gene Ontology (GO terms for the RTFL cDNAs were obtained using InterPro. The 8289 genes assigned to InterPro IDs were classified according to the GO terms using Plant GO Slim. Categorical comparison between the whole Arabidopsis genome and Thellungiella genes showing low identity to Arabidopsis genes revealed that the population of Thellungiella transport genes is approximately 1.5 times the size of the corresponding Arabidopsis genes. This suggests that these genes regulate a unique ion transportation system in Thellungiella. Conclusion As the number of Thellungiella halophila (Thellungiella salsuginea expressed sequence tags (ESTs was 9388 in July 2008, the number of ESTs has increased to approximately four times the original value as a result of this effort. Our

  12. Atomistic simulation of laser-pulse surface modification: Predictions of models with various length and time scales

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Starikov, Sergey V., E-mail: starikov@ihed.ras.ru; Pisarev, Vasily V. [Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology, Dolgoprudny 141700 (Russian Federation); Joint Institute for High Temperatures, Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow 125412 (Russian Federation)

    2015-04-07

    In this work, the femtosecond laser pulse modification of surface is studied for aluminium (Al) and gold (Au) by use of two-temperature atomistic simulation. The results are obtained for various atomistic models with different scales: from pseudo-one-dimensional to full-scale three-dimensional simulation. The surface modification after laser irradiation can be caused by ablation and melting. For low energy laser pulses, the nanoscale ripples may be induced on a surface by melting without laser ablation. In this case, nanoscale changes of the surface are due to a splash of molten metal under temperature gradient. Laser ablation occurs at a higher pulse energy when a crater is formed on the surface. There are essential differences between Al ablation and Au ablation. In the first step of shock-wave induced ablation, swelling and void formation occur for both metals. However, the simulation of ablation in gold shows an additional athermal type of ablation that is associated with electron pressure relaxation. This type of ablation takes place at the surface layer, at a depth of several nanometers, and does not induce swelling.

  13. Hydrodynamic length-scale selection in microswimmer suspensions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heidenreich, Sebastian; Dunkel, Jörn; Klapp, Sabine H. L.; Bär, Markus

    2016-08-01

    A universal characteristic of mesoscale turbulence in active suspensions is the emergence of a typical vortex length scale, distinctly different from the scale invariance of turbulent high-Reynolds number flows. Collective length-scale selection has been observed in bacterial fluids, endothelial tissue, and active colloids, yet the physical origins of this phenomenon remain elusive. Here, we systematically derive an effective fourth-order field theory from a generic microscopic model that allows us to predict the typical vortex size in microswimmer suspensions. Building on a self-consistent closure condition, the derivation shows that the vortex length scale is determined by the competition between local alignment forces, rotational diffusion, and intermediate-range hydrodynamic interactions. Vortex structures found in simulations of the theory agree with recent measurements in Bacillus subtilis suspensions. Moreover, our approach yields an effective viscosity enhancement (reduction), as reported experimentally for puller (pusher) microorganisms.

  14. Overview of lower length scale model development for accident tolerant fuels regarding U3Si2 fuel and FeCrAl cladding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Yongfeng [Idaho National Laboratory

    2016-09-01

    U3Si2 and FeCrAl have been proposed as fuel and cladding concepts, respectively, for accident tolerance fuels with higher tolerance to accident scenarios compared to UO2. However, a lot of key physics and material properties regarding their in-pile performance are yet to be explored. To accelerate the understanding and reduce the cost of experimental studies, multiscale modeling and simulation are used to develop physics-based materials models to assist engineering scale fuel performance modeling. In this report, the lower-length-scale efforts in method and material model development supported by the Accident Tolerance Fuel (ATF) high-impact-problem (HIP) under the NEAMS program are summarized. Significant progresses have been made regarding interatomic potential, phase field models for phase decomposition and gas bubble formation, and thermal conductivity for U3Si2 fuel, and precipitation in FeCrAl cladding. The accomplishments are very useful by providing atomistic and mesoscale tools, improving the current understanding, and delivering engineering scale models for these two ATF concepts.

  15. Micellization of dodecyltrimethylammonium bromide in water-dimethylsulfoxide mixtures: a multi-length scale approach in a model system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peyre, Véronique; Bouguerra, Sabah; Testard, Fabienne

    2013-01-01

    The micellization in mixed solvent was studied using conductimetry, density measurements (molar volumes), and small angle neutron scattering (SANS) to explore dodecyltrimethylammonium bromide (DTABr) micelle formation throughout the entire composition range of water-dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO) mixtures. As the concentration of DMSO was increased in the mixture, the critical micelle concentration (CMC) increased, the aggregation number decreased and the ionization degree increased, until no aggregates could be detected any more for DMSO molar fraction higher than 0.51. The results were consistent with the presence of globular micelles interacting via a coulombic potential. The experimental CMC values and aggregation numbers were successfully reconciled with a molecular thermodynamic model describing the micellization process in solvent mixtures (R. Nagarajan and C.-C. Wang, Langmuir 16 (2000) 5242). The structural and thermodynamic characterization of the micelles agreed with the prediction of a dissymmetric solvation of the surfactant entity: the hydrocarbon chain was surrounded only by DMSO while the polar head was surrounded only by water. The decrease in the ionization degree was due to the condensation of the counterions and was definitely linked to the geometrical characteristics of the aggregates and by no means to the CMC or salinity. This multi-technique study provides new insight into the role of solvation in micellization and the reason for the decrease in ionization degree, emphasizing the dissymmetric solvation of the chain by DMSO and the head by water. This is the first time that, for a given surfactant in solvent mixtures, micellization is described using combined analysis from molecular to macroscopic scale.

  16. Length scales in cryogenic injection at supercritical pressure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Branam, R.; Mayer, W. [German Aerospace Center, DLR Lampoldshausen, 74239 Hardthausen (Germany)

    2002-09-01

    Length scales provide some understanding of the injection of cryogenic propellants in rocket chambers on mixing efficiency, which translates to burning efficiency and performance. This project uses supercritical cryogenic nitrogen to look at high-density core flows such as those of coaxial injectors used in rocket engines. The investigation considers test conditions from 4.0 to 6.0 MPa chamber pressure at two injection velocities and temperatures. Experimental data taken by using shadowgraph images provides a means of characterizing turbulent flow structures using a two-point correlation method to determine length scales and structure shapes. The experimental results are compared to computational models. (orig.)

  17. Large scale full-length cDNA sequencing reveals a unique genomic landscape in a lepidopteran model insect, Bombyx mori.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suetsugu, Yoshitaka; Futahashi, Ryo; Kanamori, Hiroyuki; Kadono-Okuda, Keiko; Sasanuma, Shun-ichi; Narukawa, Junko; Ajimura, Masahiro; Jouraku, Akiya; Namiki, Nobukazu; Shimomura, Michihiko; Sezutsu, Hideki; Osanai-Futahashi, Mizuko; Suzuki, Masataka G; Daimon, Takaaki; Shinoda, Tetsuro; Taniai, Kiyoko; Asaoka, Kiyoshi; Niwa, Ryusuke; Kawaoka, Shinpei; Katsuma, Susumu; Tamura, Toshiki; Noda, Hiroaki; Kasahara, Masahiro; Sugano, Sumio; Suzuki, Yutaka; Fujiwara, Haruhiko; Kataoka, Hiroshi; Arunkumar, Kallare P; Tomar, Archana; Nagaraju, Javaregowda; Goldsmith, Marian R; Feng, Qili; Xia, Qingyou; Yamamoto, Kimiko; Shimada, Toru; Mita, Kazuei

    2013-09-01

    The establishment of a complete genomic sequence of silkworm, the model species of Lepidoptera, laid a foundation for its functional genomics. A more complete annotation of the genome will benefit functional and comparative studies and accelerate extensive industrial applications for this insect. To realize these goals, we embarked upon a large-scale full-length cDNA collection from 21 full-length cDNA libraries derived from 14 tissues of the domesticated silkworm and performed full sequencing by primer walking for 11,104 full-length cDNAs. The large average intron size was 1904 bp, resulting from a high accumulation of transposons. Using gene models predicted by GLEAN and published mRNAs, we identified 16,823 gene loci on the silkworm genome assembly. Orthology analysis of 153 species, including 11 insects, revealed that among three Lepidoptera including Monarch and Heliconius butterflies, the 403 largest silkworm-specific genes were composed mainly of protective immunity, hormone-related, and characteristic structural proteins. Analysis of testis-/ovary-specific genes revealed distinctive features of sexual dimorphism, including depletion of ovary-specific genes on the Z chromosome in contrast to an enrichment of testis-specific genes. More than 40% of genes expressed in specific tissues mapped in tissue-specific chromosomal clusters. The newly obtained FL-cDNA sequences enabled us to annotate the genome of this lepidopteran model insect more accurately, enhancing genomic and functional studies of Lepidoptera and comparative analyses with other insect orders, and yielding new insights into the evolution and organization of lepidopteran-specific genes.

  18. Scaled Particle Theory and the Length-scales Involved in Hydrophobic Hydration of Aqueous Biomolecular Assemblies

    CERN Document Server

    Ashbaugh, H S; Ashbaugh, Henry S.; Pratt, Lawrence R.

    2003-01-01

    Hydrophobic hydration plays a crucial role in self-assembly processes over multiple-length scales, from the microscopic origins of inert gas solubility in water, to the mesoscopic organization of proteins and surfactant structures, to macroscopic phase separation. Many theoretical studies focus on the molecularly detailed interactions between oil and water, but the extrapolation of molecular-scale models to larger length scale hydration phenomena is sometimes not warranted. We revisit the scaled particle theory proposed thirty years ago by Stillinger, adopt a practical generalization, and consider the implications for hydrophobic hydration in light of our current understanding. The generalization is based upon identifying a molecular length, implicit in previous applications of scaled particle models, that provides an effective boundary radius for joining microscopic and macroscopic descriptions. We demonstrate that the generalized theory correctly reproduces many of the anomalous thermodynamic properties of ...

  19. Interacting length scales in the reactive-infiltration instability

    CERN Document Server

    Szymczak, Piotr

    2013-01-01

    The reactive-infiltration instability, which develops when a porous matrix is dissolved by a flowing fluid, contains two important length scales. Here we outline a linear stability analysis that simultaneously incorporates both scales. We show that the commonly used "thin-front" model is a limiting case of a more general theory, which also includes convection-dominated dissolution as another special case. The wavelength of the instability is bounded from below, and lies in the range 1mm to 1km for physically reasonable flow rates and reaction rates. We obtain a closed form for the growth rate when the change in porosity is small.

  20. Derivation of effective fission gas diffusivities in UO2 from lower length scale simulations and implementation of fission gas diffusion models in BISON

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andersson, Anders David Ragnar [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Pastore, Giovanni [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Liu, Xiang-Yang [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Perriot, Romain Thibault [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Tonks, Michael [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Stanek, Christopher Richard [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2014-11-07

    This report summarizes the development of new fission gas diffusion models from lower length scale simulations and assessment of these models in terms of annealing experiments and fission gas release simulations using the BISON fuel performance code. Based on the mechanisms established from density functional theory (DFT) and empirical potential calculations, continuum models for diffusion of xenon (Xe) in UO2 were derived for both intrinsic conditions and under irradiation. The importance of the large XeU3O cluster (a Xe atom in a uranium + oxygen vacancy trap site with two bound uranium vacancies) is emphasized, which is a consequence of its high mobility and stability. These models were implemented in the MARMOT phase field code, which is used to calculate effective Xe diffusivities for various irradiation conditions. The effective diffusivities were used in BISON to calculate fission gas release for a number of test cases. The results are assessed against experimental data and future directions for research are outlined based on the conclusions.

  1. Optimal smoothing length scale for actuator line models of wind turbine blades based on Gaussian body force distribution: Wind energy, actuator line model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martínez-Tossas, L. A. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore 21218 MD USA; Churchfield, M. J. [National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Golden 80401 CO USA; Meneveau, C. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore 21218 MD USA

    2017-01-20

    The actuator line model (ALM) is a commonly used method to represent lifting surfaces such as wind turbine blades within large-eddy simulations (LES). In the ALM, the lift and drag forces are replaced by an imposed body force that is typically smoothed over several grid points using a Gaussian kernel with some prescribed smoothing width e. To date, the choice of e has most often been based on numerical considerations related to the grid spacing used in LES. However, especially for finely resolved LES with grid spacings on the order of or smaller than the chord length of the blade, the best choice of e is not known. In this work, a theoretical approach is followed to determine the most suitable value of e, based on an analytical solution to the linearized inviscid flow response to a Gaussian force. We find that the optimal smoothing width eopt is on the order of 14%-25% of the chord length of the blade, and the center of force is located at about 13%-26% downstream of the leading edge of the blade for the cases considered. These optimal values do not depend on angle of attack and depend only weakly on the type of lifting surface. It is then shown that an even more realistic velocity field can be induced by a 2-D elliptical Gaussian lift-force kernel. Some results are also provided regarding drag force representation.

  2. Multi-Length Scale-Enriched Continuum-Level Material Model for Kevlar®-Fiber-Reinforced Polymer-Matrix Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grujicic, M.; Pandurangan, B.; Snipes, J. S.; Yen, C.-F.; Cheeseman, B. A.

    2013-03-01

    Fiber-reinforced polymer matrix composite materials display quite complex deformation and failure behavior under ballistic/blast impact loading conditions. This complexity is generally attributed to a number of factors such as (a) hierarchical/multi-length scale architecture of the material microstructure; (b) nonlinear, rate-dependent and often pressure-sensitive mechanical response; and (c) the interplay of various intrinsic phenomena and processes such as fiber twisting, interfiber friction/sliding, etc. Material models currently employed in the computational engineering analyses of ballistic/blast impact protective structures made of this type of material do not generally include many of the aforementioned aspects of the material dynamic behavior. Consequently, discrepancies are often observed between computational predictions and their experimental counterparts. To address this problem, the results of an extensive set of molecular-level computational analyses regarding the role of various microstructural/morphological defects on the Kevlar® fiber mechanical properties are used to upgrade one of the existing continuum-level material models for fiber-reinforced composites. The results obtained show that the response of the material is significantly affected as a result of the incorporation of microstructural effects both under quasi-static simple mechanical testing condition and under dynamic ballistic-impact conditions.

  3. Length Scales in Bayesian Automatic Adaptive Quadrature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam Gh.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Two conceptual developments in the Bayesian automatic adaptive quadrature approach to the numerical solution of one-dimensional Riemann integrals [Gh. Adam, S. Adam, Springer LNCS 7125, 1–16 (2012] are reported. First, it is shown that the numerical quadrature which avoids the overcomputing and minimizes the hidden floating point loss of precision asks for the consideration of three classes of integration domain lengths endowed with specific quadrature sums: microscopic (trapezoidal rule, mesoscopic (Simpson rule, and macroscopic (quadrature sums of high algebraic degrees of precision. Second, sensitive diagnostic tools for the Bayesian inference on macroscopic ranges, coming from the use of Clenshaw-Curtis quadrature, are derived.

  4. Length Scale of the Spin Seebeck Effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kehlberger, Andreas; Ritzmann, Ulrike; Hinzke, Denise; Guo, Er-Jia; Cramer, Joel; Jakob, Gerhard; Onbasli, Mehmet C.; Kim, Dong Hun; Ross, Caroline A.; Jungfleisch, Matthias B.; Hillebrands, Burkard; Nowak, Ulrich; Kläui, Mathias

    2015-08-01

    We investigate the origin of the spin Seebeck effect in yttrium iron garnet (YIG) samples for film thicknesses from 20 nm to 50 μ m at room temperature and 50 K. Our results reveal a characteristic increase of the longitudinal spin Seebeck effect amplitude with the thickness of the insulating ferrimagnetic YIG, which levels off at a critical thickness that increases with decreasing temperature. The observed behavior cannot be explained as an interface effect or by variations of the material parameters. Comparison to numerical simulations of thermal magnonic spin currents yields qualitative agreement for the thickness dependence resulting from the finite magnon propagation length. This allows us to trace the origin of the observed signals to genuine bulk magnonic spin currents due to the spin Seebeck effect ruling out an interface origin and allowing us to gauge the reach of thermally excited magnons in this system for different temperatures. At low temperature, even quantitative agreement with the simulations is found.

  5. Time and length scales within a fire and implications for numerical simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    TIESZEN,SHELDON R.

    2000-02-02

    A partial non-dimensionalization of the Navier-Stokes equations is used to obtain order of magnitude estimates of the rate-controlling transport processes in the reacting portion of a fire plume as a function of length scale. Over continuum length scales, buoyant times scales vary as the square root of the length scale; advection time scales vary as the length scale, and diffusion time scales vary as the square of the length scale. Due to the variation with length scale, each process is dominant over a given range. The relationship of buoyancy and baroclinc vorticity generation is highlighted. For numerical simulation, first principles solution for fire problems is not possible with foreseeable computational hardware in the near future. Filtered transport equations with subgrid modeling will be required as two to three decades of length scale are captured by solution of discretized conservation equations. By whatever filtering process one employs, one must have humble expectations for the accuracy obtainable by numerical simulation for practical fire problems that contain important multi-physics/multi-length-scale coupling with up to 10 orders of magnitude in length scale.

  6. Minimum length scale in topology optimization by geometric constraints

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhou, Mingdong; Lazarov, Boyan Stefanov; Wang, Fengwen

    2015-01-01

    A density-based topology optimization approach is proposed to design structures with strict minimum length scale. The idea is based on using a filtering-threshold topology optimization scheme and computationally cheap geometric constraints. The constraints are defined over the underlying structural...... geometry represented by the filtered and physical fields. Satisfying the constraints leads to a design that possesses user-specified minimum length scale. Conventional topology optimization problems can be augmented with the proposed constraints to achieve minimum length scale on the final design....... No additional finite element analysis is required for the constrained optimization. Several benchmark examples are presented to show the effectiveness of this approach....

  7. Spontaneous transmission of chirality through multiple length scales.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iski, Erin V; Tierney, Heather L; Jewell, April D; Sykes, E Charles H

    2011-06-20

    The hierarchical transfer of chirality in nature, from the nano-, to meso-, to macroscopic length scales, is very complex, and as of yet, not well understood. The advent of scanning probes has allowed chirality to be monitored at the single molecule or monolayer level and has opened up the possibility to track enantiospecific interactions and chiral self-assembly with molecular-scale detail. This paper describes the self-assembly of a simple, model molecule (naphtho[2,3-a]pyrene) that is achiral in the gas phase, but becomes chiral when adsorbed on a surface. This polyaromatic hydrocarbon forms a stable and reversibly ordered system on Cu(111) in which the transmission of chirality from single surface-bound molecules to complex 2D chiral architectures can be monitored as a function of molecular packing density and surface temperature. In addition to the point chirality of the surface-bound molecule, the unit cell of the molecular domains was also found to be chiral due to the incommensurate alignment of the molecular rows with respect to the underlying metal lattice. These molecular domains always aggregated in groups of three, all of the same chirality, but with different rotational orientations, forming homochiral "tri-lobe" ensembles. At a larger length scale, these tri-lobe ensembles associated with nearest-neighbor tri-lobe units of opposite chirality at lower packing densities before forming an extended array of homochiral tri-lobe ensembles at higher converges. This system displayed chirality at a variety of size scales from the molecular (≈1 nm) and domain (≈5 nm) to the tri-lobe ensemble (≈10 nm) and extended array (>25 nm) levels. The chirality of the tri-lobe ensembles dictated how the overall surface packing occurred and both homo- and heterochiral arrays could be reproducibly and reversibly formed and interchanged as a function of surface coverage. Finally, these chirally templated surfaces displayed remarkable enantiospecificity for

  8. Structural and cooperative length scales in polymer gels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Géraud, Baudouin; Jørgensen, Loren; Ybert, Christophe; Delanoë-Ayari, Hélène; Barentin, Catherine

    2017-01-01

    Understanding the relationship between the material structural details, the geometrical confining constraints, the local dynamical events and the global rheological response is at the core of present investigations on complex fluid properties. In the present article, this problem is addressed on a model yield stress fluid made of highly entangled polymer gels of Carbopol which follows at the macroscopic scale the well-known Herschel-Bulkley rheological law. First, performing local rheology measurements up to high shear rates ([Formula: see text] s(-1))and under confinement, we evidence unambiguously the breakdown of bulk rheology associated with cooperative processes under flow. Moreover, we show that these behaviors are fully captured with a unique cooperativity length [Formula: see text] over the whole range of experimental conditions. Second, we introduce an original optical microscopy method to access structural properties of the entangled polymer gel in the direct space. Performing image correlation spectroscopy of fluorophore-loaded gels, the characteristic size D of carbopol gels microstructure is determined as a function of preparation protocol. Combining both dynamical and structural information shows that the measured cooperative length [Formula: see text] corresponds to 2-5 times the underlying structural size D, thus providing a strong grounding to the "Shear Transformation Zones" modeling approach.

  9. Minimum description length methods of medium-scale simultaneous inference

    CERN Document Server

    Bickel, David R

    2010-01-01

    Nonparametric statistical methods developed for analyzing data for high numbers of genes, SNPs, or other biological features tend to overfit data with smaller numbers of features such as proteins, metabolites, or, when expression is measured with conventional instruments, genes. For this medium-scale inference problem, the minimum description length (MDL) framework quantifies the amount of information in the data supporting a null or alternative hypothesis for each feature in terms of parametric model selection. Two new MDL techniques are proposed. First, using test statistics that are highly informative about the parameter of interest, the data are reduced to a single statistic per feature. This simplifying step is already implicit in conventional hypothesis testing and has been found effective in empirical Bayes applications to genomics data. Second, the codelength difference between the alternative and null hypotheses of any given feature can take advantage of information in the measurements from all other...

  10. Turbulence and entrainment length scales in large wind farms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersen, Søren J.; Sørensen, Jens N.; Mikkelsen, Robert F.

    2017-03-01

    A number of large wind farms are modelled using large eddy simulations to elucidate the entrainment process. A reference simulation without turbines and three farm simulations with different degrees of imposed atmospheric turbulence are presented. The entrainment process is assessed using proper orthogonal decomposition, which is employed to detect the largest and most energetic coherent turbulent structures. The dominant length scales responsible for the entrainment process are shown to grow further into the wind farm, but to be limited in extent by the streamwise turbine spacing, which could be taken into account when developing farm layouts. The self-organized motion or large coherent structures also yield high correlations between the power productions of consecutive turbines, which can be exploited through dynamic farm control. This article is part of the themed issue 'Wind energy in complex terrains'.

  11. Turbulence and entrainment length scales in large wind farms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersen, Søren J; Sørensen, Jens N; Mikkelsen, Robert F

    2017-04-13

    A number of large wind farms are modelled using large eddy simulations to elucidate the entrainment process. A reference simulation without turbines and three farm simulations with different degrees of imposed atmospheric turbulence are presented. The entrainment process is assessed using proper orthogonal decomposition, which is employed to detect the largest and most energetic coherent turbulent structures. The dominant length scales responsible for the entrainment process are shown to grow further into the wind farm, but to be limited in extent by the streamwise turbine spacing, which could be taken into account when developing farm layouts. The self-organized motion or large coherent structures also yield high correlations between the power productions of consecutive turbines, which can be exploited through dynamic farm control.This article is part of the themed issue 'Wind energy in complex terrains'.

  12. Introducing artificial length scales to tailor magnetic properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fassbender, J; Strache, T; Liedke, M O; Marko, D; Wintz, S; Lenz, K; Keller, A; Facsko, S [Institute of Ion Beam Physics and Materials Research, Forschungszentrum Dresden-Rossendorf, PO Box 51 01 19, D-01314 Dresden (Germany); Moench, I; McCord, J [Leibniz Institute for Solid State and Materials Research IFW Dresden, PO Box 27 01 16, D-01171 Dresden (Germany)], E-mail: J.Fassbender@fzd.de

    2009-12-15

    Magnetism is a collective phenomenon. Hence, a local variation on the nanoscale of material properties, which act on the magnetic properties, affects the overall magnetism in an intriguing way. Of particular importance are the length scales on which a material property changes. These might be related to the exchange length, the domain wall width, a typical roughness correlation length, or a length scale introduced by patterning of the material. Here we report on the influence of two artificially created length scales: (i) ion erosion templates that serve as a source of a predefined surface morphology (ripple structure) and hence allow for the investigation of roughness phenomena. It is demonstrated that the ripple wave length can be easily tuned over a wide range (25-175 nm) by varying the primary ion erosion energy. The effect of this ripple morphology on the induced uniaxial magnetic anisotropy in soft magnetic Permalloy films is studied. Only below a ripple wavelength threshold ({approx}60 nm) is a significant induced magnetic anisotropy found. Above this threshold the corrugated Permalloy film acts as a flat film. This cross-over is discussed in the frame of dipolar interactions giving rise to the induced anisotropies. (ii) Ion implantation through a lithographically defined mask, which is used for a magnetic property patterning on various length scales. The resulting magnetic properties are neither present in non-implanted nor in homogeneously implanted films. Here new insight is gained by the comparison of different stripe patterning widths ranging from 1 to 10 {mu}m. In addition, the appearance of more complicated magnetic domain structures, i.e. spin-flop domain configurations and head-on domain walls, during hard axis magnetization reversal is demonstrated. In both cases the magnetic properties, the magnetization reversal process as well as the magnetic domain configurations depend sensitively on the artificially introduced length scale.

  13. Reducing the item number to obtain the same-length self-assessment scales: a systematic approach using result of graphical loglinear rasch models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Tine; Kreiner, Svend

    2011-01-01

    approach to item reduction based on results of graphical loglinear Rasch modeling (GLLRM) was designed. This approach was then used to reduce the number of items in the subscales of the R-D-LSI which had an item-length of more than seven items, thereby obtaining the Danish Self-Assessment Learning Styles......The Revised Danish Learning Styles Inventory (R-D-LSI) (Nielsen 2005), which is an adaptation of Sternberg- Wagner Thinking Styles Inventory (Sternberg, 1997), comprises 14 subscales, each measuring a separate learning style. Of these 14 subscales, 9 are eight items long and 5 are seven items long...

  14. DHS Internship Summary-Crystal Assembly at Different Length Scales

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mishchenko, L

    2009-08-06

    I was part of a project in which in situ atomic force microscopy (AFM) was used to monitor growth and dissolution of atomic and colloidal crystals. At both length scales, the chemical environment of the system greatly altered crystal growth and dissolution. Calcium phosphate was used as a model system for atomic crystals. A dissolution-reprecipitation reaction was observed in this first system, involving the conversion of brushite (DCPD) to octacalcium phosphate (OCP). In the second system, polymeric colloidal crystals were dissolved in an ionic solvent, revealing the underlying structure of the crystal. The dissolved crystal was then regrown through an evaporative step method. Recently, we have also found that colloids can be reversibly deposited in situ onto an ITO (indium tin oxide) substrate via an electrochemistry setup. The overall goal of this project was to develop an understanding of the mechanisms that control crystallization and order, so that these might be controlled during material synthesis. Controlled assembly of materials over a range of length scales from molecules to nanoparticles to colloids is critical for designing new materials. In particular, developing materials for sensor applications with tailorable properties and long range order is important. In this work, we examine two of these length scales: small molecule crystallization of calcium phosphate (whose crystal phases include DCPD, OCP, and HAP) and colloidal crystallization of Poly(methyl methacrylate) beads. Atomic Force Microscopy is ideal for this line of work because it allows for the possibility of observing non-conducting samples in fluid during growth with high resolution ({approx} 10 nm). In fact, during atomic crystal growth one can observe changes in atomic steps, and with colloidal crystals, one can monitor the individual building blocks of the crystal. Colloids and atoms crystallize under the influence of different forces acting at different length scales as seen in Table 1

  15. Inlet Turbulence and Length Scale Measurements in a Large Scale Transonic Turbine Cascade

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thurman, Douglas; Flegel, Ashlie; Giel, Paul

    2014-01-01

    Constant temperature hotwire anemometry data were acquired to determine the inlet turbulence conditions of a transonic turbine blade linear cascade. Flow conditions and angles were investigated that corresponded to the take-off and cruise conditions of the Variable Speed Power Turbine (VSPT) project and to an Energy Efficient Engine (EEE) scaled rotor blade tip section. Mean and turbulent flowfield measurements including intensity, length scale, turbulence decay, and power spectra were determined for high and low turbulence intensity flows at various Reynolds numbers and spanwise locations. The experimental data will be useful for establishing the inlet boundary conditions needed to validate turbulence models in CFD codes.

  16. Maximum length scale in density based topology optimization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lazarov, Boyan Stefanov; Wang, Fengwen

    2017-01-01

    The focus of this work is on two new techniques for imposing maximum length scale in topology optimization. Restrictions on the maximum length scale provide designers with full control over the optimized structure and open possibilities to tailor the optimized design for broader range...... of manufacturing processes by fulfilling the associated technological constraints. One of the proposed methods is based on combination of several filters and builds on top of the classical density filtering which can be viewed as a low pass filter applied to the design parametrization. The main idea...

  17. Scaling carbon nanotube complementary transistors to 5-nm gate lengths

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Chenguang; Zhang, Zhiyong; Xiao, Mengmeng; Yang, Yingjun; Zhong, Donglai; Peng, Lian-Mao

    2017-01-01

    High-performance top-gated carbon nanotube field-effect transistors (CNT FETs) with a gate length of 5 nanometers can be fabricated that perform better than silicon complementary metal-oxide semiconductor (CMOS) FETs at the same scale. A scaling trend study revealed that the scaled CNT-based devices, which use graphene contacts, can operate much faster and at much lower supply voltage (0.4 versus 0.7 volts) and with much smaller subthreshold slope (typically 73 millivolts per decade). The 5-nanometer CNT FETs approached the quantum limit of FETs by using only one electron per switching operation. In addition, the contact length of the CNT CMOS devices was also scaled down to 25 nanometers, and a CMOS inverter with a total pitch size of 240 nanometers was also demonstrated.

  18. Physics on Smallest Scales - An Introduction to Minimal Length Phenomenology

    CERN Document Server

    Sprenger, Martin; Bleicher, Marcus

    2012-01-01

    Many modern theories which try to unite gravity with the Standard Model of particle physics, as e.g. string theory, propose two key modifications to the commonly known physical theories: i) the existence of additional space dimensions; ii) the existence of a minimal length distance or maximal resolution. While extra dimensions have received a wide coverage in publications over the last ten years (especially due to the prediction of micro black hole production at the LHC), the phenomenology of models with a minimal length is still less investigated. In a summer study project for bachelor students in 2010 we have explored some phenomenological implications of the potential existence of a minimal length. In this paper we review the idea and formalism of a quantum gravity induced minimal length in the generalised uncertainty principle framework as well as in the coherent state approach to non-commutative geometry. These approaches are effective models which can make model-independent predictions for experiments a...

  19. Length scales and selforganization in dense suspension flows

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Düring, G.; Lerner, E.; Wyart, M.

    2014-01-01

    Dense non-Brownian suspension flows of hard particles display mystifying properties: As the jamming threshold is approached, the viscosity diverges, as well as a length scale that can be identified from velocity correlations. To unravel the microscopic mechanism governing dissipation and its

  20. An updated length-scale formulation for turbulent mixing in clear and cloudy boundary layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenderink, G.; Holtslag, A. A. M.

    2004-10-01

    A new mixing-length scale is presented for turbulence-closure schemes, with special emphasis on neutral-to-convective conditions in clear and cloudy boundary layers. The length scale is intended for a prognostic turbulent-kinetic-energy closure. It is argued that present-day length-scale formulations may easily fail in one of two limiting situations. Schemes based on a local stability measure (e.g.the Richardson number) display unrealistic behaviour and instabilities in the convective limit. This strongly limits the representation of mixing in cloudy boundary layers. On the other hand, it is shown that non-local parcel methods may misrepresent mixing near the surface. The new length-scale formulation combines local and non-local stability in a new way; it uses vertical integrals over the stability (the Richardson number) in a simple 'parcel' framework. The length scale matches with surface-layer similarity for near-neutral conditions and displays a realistic convective limit. The use of the length-scale formulation can be extended easily to cloudy boundary layers. The scheme is numerically stable and computationally cheap. The behaviour of the length scale is evaluated in a single-column model (SCM) and in a high-resolution limited-area model (LAM). The SCM shows good behaviour in three cases with and without boundary-layer clouds. The prediction of the near-surface wind and temperature in the LAM compares favourably with tower measurements at Cabauw (the Netherlands).

  1. An inertial range length scale in structure functions

    CERN Document Server

    Kerr, R M; Gotoh, T; Kerr, Robert M.; Meneguzzi, Maurice; Gotoh, Toshiyuki

    2000-01-01

    It is shown using experimental and numerical data that within the traditional inertial subrange defined by where the third order structure function is linear that the higher order structure function scaling exponents for longitudinal and transverse structure functions converge only over larger scales, $r>r_S$, where $r_S$ has scaling intermediate between $\\eta$ and $\\lambda$ as a function of $R_\\lambda$. Below these scales, scaling exponents cannot be determined for any of the structure functions without resorting to procedures such as extended self-similarity (ESS). With ESS, different longitudinal and transverse higher order exponents are obtained that are consistent with earlier results. The relationship of these statistics to derivative and pressure statistics, to turbulent structures and to length scales is discussed.

  2. Cable dynamics applied to long-length scale mechanics of DNA

    OpenAIRE

    Goyal, Sachin; Lillian, Todd; Noel C Perkins; Meyhofer, Edgar

    2007-01-01

    This paper introduces the use of cable dynamics models as a means to explore the mechanics of DNA on long-length scales. It is on these length scales that DNA forms twisted and curved three-dimensional shapes known as supercoils and loops. These long-length scale DNA structures have a pronounced influence on the functions of this molecule within the cell including the packing of DNA in the cell nucleus, transcription, replication and gene repair. We provide a short background to the mechanics...

  3. Determination of length scale effects in nonlocal media

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Simone, A; Iacono, C; Sluys, LJ; Yao, ZH; Yuan, MW; Zhong, WX

    2004-01-01

    A combined continuous-discontinuous framework for failure is presented. Continuous failure is described with a gradient enhanced damage model and discontinuous failure is introduced by adding discontinuities to finite elements through a node-based enhancement. The continuous model contains a length

  4. Physics on smallest scales. An introduction to minimal length phenomenology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sprenger, Martin [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany); Goethe Univ., Frankfurt am Main (Germany). Inst. for Theoretical Physics and Frankfurt Institute for Advanced Studies; Nicolini, Piero; Bleicher, Marcus [Goethe Univ., Frankfurt am Main (Germany). Inst. for Theoretical Physics and Frankfurt Institute for Advanced Studies

    2012-02-15

    Many modern theories which try to unite gravity with the Standard Model of particle physics, as e.g. string theory, propose two key modifications to the commonly known physical theories: - the existence of additional space dimensions - the existence of a minimal length distance or maximal resolution. While extra dimensions have received a wide coverage in publications over the last ten years (especially due to the prediction of micro black hole production at the LHC), the phenomenology of models with a minimal length is still less investigated. In a summer study project for bachelor students in 2010 we have explored some phenomenological implications of the potential existence of a minimal length. In this paper we review the idea and formalism of a quantum gravity induced minimal length in the generalised uncertainty principle framework as well as in the coherent state approach to non- commutative geometry. These approaches are effective models which can make model-independent predictions for experiments and are ideally suited for phenomenological studies. Pedagogical examples are provided to grasp the effects of a quantum gravity induced minimal length. (orig.)

  5. Size effects and internal length scales in the elasticity of random fiber networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Picu, Catalin; Berkache, Kamel; Shahsavari, Ali; Ganghoffer, Jean-Francois

    Random fiber networks are the structural element of many biological and man-made materials, including connective tissue, various consumer products and packaging materials. In all cases of practical interest the scale at which the material is used and the scale of the fiber diameter or the mean segment length of the network are separated by several orders of magnitude. This precludes solving boundary value problems defined on the scale of the application while resolving every fiber in the system, and mandates the development of continuum equivalent models. To this end, we study the intrinsic geometric and mechanical length scales of the network and the size effect associated with them. We consider both Cauchy and micropolar continuum models and calibrate them based on the discrete network behavior. We develop a method to predict the characteristic length scales of the problem and the minimum size of a representative element of the network based on network structural parameters and on fiber properties.

  6. Strength-length scaling of elementary hemp fibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poriķe, E.; Andersons, J.

    2013-03-01

    The application of hemp fibers as a reinforcement of composite materials necessitates the characterization of fiber strength scatter and the effect of fiber length on its strength. With this aim, elementary hemp fibers were tested in tension at two different gage lengths. Due to the similar morphology of hemp and flax fibers, the probabilistic strength models derived and verified for the latter were applied to the former. The fiber strength was found to agree with the modified Weibull distribution. The modeling approaches developed for describing the variability of the strength and failure strain of elementary flax fibers are shown to be also applicable to hemp fibers.

  7. Dynamic length-scale characterization and nonequilibrium statistical mechanics of transport in open-cell foams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brosten, Tyler R; Codd, Sarah L; Maier, Robert S; Seymour, Joseph D

    2009-11-20

    Nuclear magnetic resonance measurements of scale dependent dynamics in a random solid open-cell foam reveal a characteristic length scale for transport processes in this novel type of porous medium. These measurements and lattice Boltzmann simulations for a model foam structure indicate dynamical behavior analogous to lower porosity consolidated granular porous media, despite extremely high porosity in solid cellular foams. Scaling by the measured characteristic length collapses data for different foam structures as well as consolidated granular media. The nonequilibrium statistical mechanics theory of preasymptotic dispersion, developed for hierarchical porous media, is shown to model the hydrodynamic dispersive transport in a foam structure.

  8. Similarity theory based on the Dougherty-Ozmidov length scale

    CERN Document Server

    Grachev, Andrey A; Fairall, Christopher W; Guest, Peter S; Persson, P Ola G

    2014-01-01

    Local similarity theory is suggested based on the Brunt-Vaisala frequency and the dissipation rate of turbulent kinetic energy instead the turbulent fluxes used in the traditional Monin-Obukhov similarity theory. Based on dimensional analysis (Pi theorem), it is shown that any properly scaled statistics of the small-scale turbulence are universal functions of a stability parameter defined as the ratio of a reference height z and the Dougherty-Ozmidov length scale which in the limit of z-less stratification is linearly proportional to the Obukhov length scale. Measurements of atmospheric turbulence made at five levels on a 20-m tower over the Arctic pack ice during the Surface Heat Budget of the Arctic Ocean experiment (SHEBA) are used to examine the behaviour of different similarity functions in the stable boundary layer. It is found that in the framework of this approach the non-dimensional turbulent viscosity is equal to the gradient Richardson number whereas the non-dimensional turbulent thermal diffusivit...

  9. Desert bird associations with broad-scale boundary length: Applications in avian conservation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutzwiller, K.J.; Barrow, W.C.

    2008-01-01

    1. Current understanding regarding the effects of boundaries on bird communities has originated largely from studies of forest-non-forest boundaries in mesic systems. To assess whether broad-scale boundary length can affect bird community structure in deserts, and to identify patterns and predictors of species' associations useful in avian conservation, we studied relations between birds and boundary-length variables in Chihuahuan Desert landscapes. Operationally, a boundary was the border between two adjoining land covers, and broad-scale boundary length was the total length of such borders in a large area. 2. Within 2-km radius areas, we measured six boundary-length variables. We analysed bird-boundary relations for 26 species, tested for assemblage-level patterns in species' associations with boundary-length variables, and assessed whether body size, dispersal ability and cowbird-host status were correlates of these associations. 3. The abundances or occurrences of a significant majority of species were associated with boundary-length variables, and similar numbers of species were related positively and negatively to boundary-length variables. 4. Disproportionately small numbers of species were correlated with total boundary length, land-cover boundary length and shrubland-grassland boundary length (variables responsible for large proportions of boundary length). Disproportionately large numbers of species were correlated with roadside boundary length and riparian vegetation-grassland boundary length (variables responsible for small proportions of boundary length). Roadside boundary length was associated (positively and negatively) with the most species. 5. Species' associations with boundary-length variables were not correlated with body size, dispersal ability or cowbird-host status. 6. Synthesis and applications. For the species we studied, conservationists can use the regressions we report as working models to anticipate influences of boundary-length changes

  10. Delayed feedback model of axonal length sensing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karamched, Bhargav R; Bressloff, Paul C

    2015-05-05

    A fundamental question in cell biology is how the sizes of cells and organelles are regulated at various stages of development. Size homeostasis is particularly challenging for neurons, whose axons can extend from hundreds of microns to meters (in humans). Recently, a molecular-motor-based mechanism for axonal length sensing has been proposed, in which axonal length is encoded by the frequency of an oscillating retrograde signal. In this article, we develop a mathematical model of this length-sensing mechanism in which advection-diffusion equations for bidirectional motor transport are coupled to a chemical signaling network. We show that chemical oscillations emerge due to delayed negative feedback via a Hopf bifurcation, resulting in a frequency that is a monotonically decreasing function of axonal length. Knockdown of either kinesin or dynein causes an increase in the oscillation frequency, suggesting that the length-sensing mechanism would produce longer axons, which is consistent with experimental findings. One major prediction of the model is that fluctuations in the transport of molecular motors lead to a reduction in the reliability of the frequency-encoding mechanism for long axons. Copyright © 2015 Biophysical Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Minimum Description Length Shape and Appearance Models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thodberg, Hans Henrik

    2003-01-01

    The Minimum Description Length (MDL) approach to shape modelling is reviewed. It solves the point correspondence problem of selecting points on shapes defined as curves so that the points correspond across a data set. An efficient numerical implementation is presented and made available as open s...... source Matlab code. The problems with the early MDL approaches are discussed. Finally the MDL approach is extended to an MDL Appearance Model, which is proposed as a means to perform unsupervised image segmentation....

  12. DNA flexibility on short length scales probed by atomic force microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazur, Alexey K; Maaloum, Mounir

    2014-02-14

    Unusually high bending flexibility has been recently reported for DNA on short length scales. We use atomic force microscopy (AFM) in solution to obtain a direct estimate of DNA bending statistics for scales down to one helical turn. It appears that DNA behaves as a Gaussian chain and is well described by the wormlike chain model at length scales beyond 3 helical turns (10.5 nm). Below this threshold, the AFM data exhibit growing noise because of experimental limitations. This noise may hide small deviations from the Gaussian behavior, but they can hardly be significant.

  13. Turbulence and entrainment length scales in large wind farms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Søren Juhl; Sørensen, Jens Nørkær; Mikkelsen, Robert Flemming

    2017-01-01

    be taken into account when developing farm layouts. The self-organized motion or large coherent structures also yield high correlations between the power productions of consecutive turbines, which can be exploited through dynamic farm control.This article is part of the themed issue 'Wind energy in complex...... orthogonal decomposition, which is employed to detect the largest and most energetic coherent turbulent structures. The dominant length scales responsible for the entrainment process are shown to grow further into the wind farm, but to be limited in extent by the streamwise turbine spacing, which could...

  14. Transition in multiple-scale-lengths turbulence in plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Itoh, Sanae-I. [Kyushu Univ., Fukuoka (Japan). Research Inst. for Applied Mechanics; Itoh, Kimitaka [National Inst. for Fusion Science, Toki, Gifu (Japan)

    2001-05-01

    Statistical theory of strong turbulence in inhomogeneous plasmas is extended to the state where fluctuations with different scale lengths, micro and semi-micro modes, coexist. Their nonlinear interactions give several states of turbulence: in one state, the micro mode is excited while the semi-micro mode is quenched; in another state, the latter is excited while the micro mode is suppressed. A new turbulence transition with a hard bifurcation was obtained. A phase diagram was obtained. A new insight is given for the physics of internal transport barrier. (author)

  15. Multi length-scale characterisation inorganic materials series

    CERN Document Server

    Bruce, Duncan W; Walton, Richard I

    2013-01-01

    Whereas the first five volumes in the Inorganic Materials Series focused on particular classes of materials (synthesis, structures, chemistry, and properties), it is now very timely to provide complementary volumes that introduce and review state-of-the-art techniques for materials characterization. This is an important way of emphasizing the interplay of chemical synthesis and physical characterization. The methods reviewed include spectroscopic, diffraction, and surface techniques that examine the structure of materials on all length scales, from local atomic structure to long-range crystall

  16. A multiple length scale description of the mechanism of elastomer stretching

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Neuefeind, J.; Skov, Anne Ladegaard; Daniels, J. E.;

    2016-01-01

    Conventionally, the stretching of rubber is modeled exclusively by rotations of segments of the embedded polymer chains; i.e. changes in entropy. However models have not been tested on all relevant length scales due to a lack of appropriate probes. Here we present a universal X-ray based method...

  17. Empirical scaling of the length of the longest increasing subsequences of random walks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendonça, J. Ricardo G.

    2017-02-01

    We provide Monte Carlo estimates of the scaling of the length L n of the longest increasing subsequences of n-step random walks for several different distributions of step lengths, short and heavy-tailed. Our simulations indicate that, barring possible logarithmic corrections, {{L}n}∼ {{n}θ} with the leading scaling exponent 0.60≲ θ ≲ 0.69 for the heavy-tailed distributions of step lengths examined, with values increasing as the distribution becomes more heavy-tailed, and θ ≃ 0.57 for distributions of finite variance, irrespective of the particular distribution. The results are consistent with existing rigorous bounds for θ, although in a somewhat surprising manner. For random walks with step lengths of finite variance, we conjecture that the correct asymptotic behavior of L n is given by \\sqrt{n}\\ln n , and also propose the form for the subleading asymptotics. The distribution of L n was found to follow a simple scaling form with scaling functions that vary with θ. Accordingly, when the step lengths are of finite variance they seem to be universal. The nature of this scaling remains unclear, since we lack a working model, microscopic or hydrodynamic, for the behavior of the length of the longest increasing subsequences of random walks.

  18. The dynamics of rapid fracture: instabilities, nonlinearities and length scales.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouchbinder, Eran; Goldman, Tamar; Fineberg, Jay

    2014-04-01

    The failure of materials and interfaces is mediated by cracks, almost singular dissipative structures that propagate at velocities approaching the speed of sound. Crack initiation and subsequent propagation-the dynamic process of fracture-couples a wide range of time and length scales. Crack dynamics challenge our understanding of the fundamental physics processes that take place in the extreme conditions within the almost singular region where material failure occurs. Here, we first briefly review the classic approach to dynamic fracture, namely linear elastic fracture mechanics (LEFM), and discuss its successes and limitations. We show how, on the one hand, recent experiments performed on straight cracks propagating in soft brittle materials have quantitatively confirmed the predictions of this theory to an unprecedented degree. On the other hand, these experiments show how LEFM breaks down as the singular region at the tip of a crack is approached. This breakdown naturally leads to a new theoretical framework coined 'weakly nonlinear fracture mechanics', where weak elastic nonlinearities are incorporated. The stronger singularity predicted by this theory gives rise to a new and intrinsic length scale, ℓnl. These predictions are verified in detail through direct measurements. We then theoretically and experimentally review how the emergence of ℓnl is linked to a new equation for crack motion, which predicts the existence of a high-speed oscillatory crack instability whose wavelength is determined by ℓnl. We conclude by delineating outstanding challenges in the field.

  19. Spatial length scales of large-scale structures in atmospheric surface layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, HongYou; Wang, GuoHua; Zheng, XiaoJing

    2017-06-01

    Synchronous multipoint measurements were performed in the atmospheric surface layer at the Qingtu Lake Observation Array site to obtain high-Reynolds-number [Reτ˜O (106) ] data. Based on the selected high-quality data in the near-neutral surface layer, the spatial length scales of the large-scale dominant structures in the outer region of the turbulent boundary layer are investigated. The characteristic length scales are extracted from the two-point streamwise velocity correlations. Results show that the spatial length scales are invariant over a three order of magnitude change in Reynolds number [Reτ˜O (103) -O (106) ] . However, they increase significantly with the wall-normal distance, showing reasonable collapses on outer-scaled axes. The variation of the spanwise width scale in the logarithmic region follows a linear increase, with the rate of increase much larger than that in the wake region. Moreover, the variation of the wall-normal length scale is also revealed, which displays a qualitative behavior similar to that of the spanwise width scale. The universal laws revealed in the present work contribute to a better understanding of the dominant structures in the outer region of the turbulent boundary layer at high Reynolds numbers.

  20. Proton conduction in exchange membranes across multiple length scales.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jorn, Ryan; Savage, John; Voth, Gregory A

    2012-11-20

    Concerns over global climate change associated with fossil-fuel consumption continue to drive the development of electrochemical alternatives for energy technology. Proton exchange fuel cells are a particularly promising technology for stationary power generation, mobile electronics, and hybrid engines in automobiles. For these devices to work efficiently, direct electrical contacts between the anode and cathode must be avoided; hence, the separator material must be electronically insulating but highly proton conductive. As a result, researchers have examined a variety of polymer electrolyte materials for use as membranes in these systems. In the optimization of the membrane, researchers are seeking high proton conductivity, low electronic conduction, and mechanical stability with the inclusion of water in the polymer matrix. A considerable number of potential polymer backbone and side chain combinations have been synthesized to meet these requirements, and computational studies can assist in the challenge of designing the next generation of technologically relevant membranes. Such studies can also be integrated in a feedback loop with experiment to improve fuel cell performance. However, to accurately simulate the currently favored class of membranes, perfluorosulfonic acid containing moieties, several difficulties must be addressed including a proper treatment of the proton-hopping mechanism through the membrane and the formation of nanophase-separated water networks. We discuss our recent efforts to address these difficulties using methods that push the limits of computer simulation and expand on previous theoretical developments. We describe recent advances in the multistate empirical valence bond (MS-EVB) method that can probe proton diffusion at the nanometer-length scale and accurately model the so-called Grotthuss shuttling mechanism for proton diffusion in water. Using both classical molecular dynamics and coarse-grained descriptions that replace atomistic

  1. Dynamic Leidenfrost effect: relevant time- and length-scales

    CERN Document Server

    Shirota, Minori; Sun, Chao; Prosperetti, Andrea; Lohse, Detlef

    2015-01-01

    When a liquid droplet impacts a hot solid surface, enough vapor may be generated under it as to prevent its contact with the solid. The minimum solid temperature for this so-called Leidenfrost effect to occur is termed the Leidenfrost temperature, or the dynamic Leidenfrost temperature when the droplet velocity is non-negligible. We observe the wetting/drying and the levitation dynamics of the droplet impacting on an (isothermal) smooth sapphire surface using high speed total internal reflection imaging, which enables us to observe the droplet base up to about 100 nm above the substrate surface. By this method we are able to reveal the processes responsible for the transitional regime between the fully wetting and the fully levitated droplet as the solid temperature increases, thus shedding light on the characteristic time- and length-scales setting the dynamic Leidenfrost temperature for droplet impact on an isothermal substrate.

  2. Cooperative length scale of Aroclor near its dynamic glass transition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rizos, A.K. [Univ. of Crete, Heraklion (Greece); Ngai, K.L. [Naval Research Lab., Washington, DC (United States)

    1997-12-31

    Photon correlation spectroscopy in the depolarized mode has been used to monitor the reorientational dynamics of Aroclor (A1248) (polychlorinated biphenyls) that contain in solutions various amounts of low and high molecular weight (M{sub W}) polymers. For the high M{sub W} polymer/A1248 solutions the authors observe a very small dependence of the stretched exponential parameter {beta} on temperature. In contrast, the low M{sub W} polymer/A1248 solutions display a pronounced temperature dependence of {beta}. These preliminary experiments allow them to use the effect of modification of the solvent dynamics by added polymer to estimate the length scale of cooperative motion in glass forming systems from the size of the polymer chain.

  3. Composition and temperature-induced structural changes in lead-tellurite glasses on different length scales.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakraborty, S; Arora, A K; Sivasubramanian, V; Krishna, P S R; Krishnan, R Venkata

    2012-12-19

    Processes occurring at macroscopic and microscopic length scales across the glass transition (T(g)) in lead-tellurite glass (PbO)(x)(TeO(2))(1-x) (x = 0.1-0.3) are investigated using Brillouin and Raman spectroscopy, respectively. For all the samples, the temperature dependence of the longitudinal acoustic (LA) mode is found to exhibit a universal scaling below T(g) and a rapid softening above T(g). The lower value of elastic modulus at a higher concentration of network modifier PbO, estimated from Brillouin data, arises due to loss of network rigidity. From quantitative analysis of the reduced Raman spectra, several modes are found to exhibit anomalous changes across T(g). Instead of the expected anharmonic behaviour, several modes exhibit hardening, suggesting stiffening of the stretching force constants with temperature, the effect being more pronounced in glasses with higher x. In addition, incorporation of PbO in the glass is also found to narrow down the bond-length distribution, as evident from the sharpening of the Raman bands. The stiffening of the force constants of molecular units at a microscopic length scale and the decrease of elastic constant attributed to loss of network rigidity on a macroscopic length scale appear to be opposite. These different behaviours at two length scales are understood on the basis of a microscopic model involving TeO(n) and PbO units in the structure.

  4. Microstructural features of composite whey protein/polysaccharide gels characterized at different length scales

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berg, van den L.; Rosenberg, Y.; Boekel, van M.A.J.S.; Rosenberg, M.; Velde, van de F.

    2009-01-01

    Mixed biopolymer gels are often used to model semi-solid food products. Understanding of their functional properties requires knowledge about structural elements composing these systems at various length scales. This study has been focused on investigating the structural features of mixed cold-set g

  5. Microstructural features of composite whey protein/polysaccharide gels characterized at different length scales

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berg, van den L.; Rosenberg, Y.; Boekel, van M.A.J.S.; Rosenberg, M.; Velde, van de F.

    2009-01-01

    Mixed biopolymer gels are often used to model semi-solid food products. Understanding of their functional properties requires knowledge about structural elements composing these systems at various length scales. This study has been focused on investigating the structural features of mixed cold-set g

  6. Fault zone rheology and length scales of frictional failure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fagereng, A.

    2011-12-01

    Faults have a finite thickness and commonly contain fault rocks of heterogeneous composition, leading to rheological contrasts between intermingled lithologies (at the macroscale) and minerals (at the microscale) within the fault zone. The distribution and volumetric ratio of materials with different viscosity, frictional behavior, and preferred deformation mechanism, may therefore be a critical factor controlling the bulk rheology of heterogeneous fault zones. For example, at subgreenschist facies metamorphic conditions, fine-grained phyllosilicate-dominated mudstones tend to experience viscous shearing flow by dissolution-precipitation creep, whereas coarse grained quartz-dominated sandstones tend to act like competent, brittle volumes. In the rock record, deformation of mixed lithologies is well represented in tectonic mélanges. The subgreenschist facies (P defined by slickenfibre-coated shear surfaces linked by quartz-calcite extension veins. The frequency-size distribution of competent lenses (phacoids) in the Chrystalls Beach Complex follows a power-law distribution and is scale-invariant. The exponent of the power-law distribution varies with dominant deformation style, and is high in zones of dominantly continuous deformation - relating to a high matrix fraction, predominance of small phacoids, and small phacoid aspect ratios, whereas a low power-law exponent relates to a small matrix fraction and localized deformation accommodated on shear discontinuities. This variation in power-law exponent indicates that whether deformation occurs predominantly by continuous or discontinuous deformation may be predicted from the shape of the frequency-size distribution of competent lenses, and supports the hypothesis that bulk rheology is determined by the volume fraction of competent material. The distribution of competent material likely affects the seismic style of actively deforming fault zones. The length scales of shear discontinuities are likely to be a factor

  7. On the damage and fracture of nuclear graphite at multiple length-scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Dong; Mingard, Ken; Lord, Oliver T.; Flewitt, Peter

    2017-09-01

    Gilsocarbon graphite, as a neutron moderator and load-bearing component in the core of the UK fleet of Advanced Gas-Cooled Reactors, possesses complex microstructural features including defects/pores over a range of length-scales from nanometres to millimetres in size. As a consequence, this material exhibits different characteristics when specimens of different length-scale are deformed. In this work, the deformation and fracture of this material have been characterised using in situ methods for specimens of micrometre size (meso-scale) and the results are then compared with those measured one length-scale smaller, and those at the macro-scale. At the micro-scale, sampling a volume of material (2 × 2 × 10 μm) excludes micro- and macro-size pores, the strength was measured to be as high as 1000 MPa (an elastic modulus of about 67 GPa). When the specimen size is increased by one order of magnitude to the meso-scale, the strength is reduced to about 100 MPa (an elastic modulus of about 20 GPa) due to the inclusion of micro-size pores. For larger engineering-size specimens that include millimetre-size pores, the strength of the material averages about 20 MPa (an elastic modulus of about 11 GPa). This trend in the data is discussed and considered in the context of selecting the appropriate data for relevant multi-scale modelling.

  8. Multiresolution analysis of characteristic length scales with high-resolution topographic data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sangireddy, Harish; Stark, Colin P.; Passalacqua, Paola

    2017-07-01

    Characteristic length scales (CLS) define landscape structure and delimit geomorphic processes. Here we use multiresolution analysis (MRA) to estimate such scales from high-resolution topographic data. MRA employs progressive terrain defocusing, via convolution of the terrain data with Gaussian kernels of increasing standard deviation, and calculation at each smoothing resolution of (i) the probability distributions of curvature and topographic index (defined as the ratio of slope to area in log scale) and (ii) characteristic spatial patterns of divergent and convergent topography identified by analyzing the curvature of the terrain. The MRA is first explored using synthetic 1-D and 2-D signals whose CLS are known. It is then validated against a set of MARSSIM (a landscape evolution model) steady state landscapes whose CLS were tuned by varying hillslope diffusivity and simulated noise amplitude. The known CLS match the scales at which the distributions of topographic index and curvature show scaling breaks, indicating that the MRA can identify CLS in landscapes based on the scaling behavior of topographic attributes. Finally, the MRA is deployed to measure the CLS of five natural landscapes using meter resolution digital terrain model data. CLS are inferred from the scaling breaks of the topographic index and curvature distributions and equated with (i) small-scale roughness features and (ii) the hillslope length scale.

  9. Length Scales and Turbulent Properties of Magnetic Fields in Simulated Galaxy Clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Egan, Hilary; Hallman, Eric; Burns, Jack; Xu, Hao; Collins, David; Li, Hui; Norman, Michael L

    2016-01-01

    Additional physics beyond standard hydrodynamics is needed to fully model the intracluster medium (ICM); however, as we move to more sophisticated models, it is important to consider the role of magnetic fields and the way the fluid approximation breaks down. This paper represents a first step towards developing a self-consistent model of the ICM by characterizing the statistical properties of magnetic fields in cosmological simulations of galaxy clusters. We find that plasma conditions are largely homogeneous across a range of cluster masses and relaxation states. We also find that the magnetic field length scales are resolution dependent and not based on any particular physical process. Energy transfer mechanisms and scales are also identified, and imply the existence of small scale dynamo action. The scales of the small scale dynamo are resolution limited and driven by numerical resistivity and viscosity.

  10. Application of image processing for simulation of mechanical response of multi-length scale microstructures of engineering alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gokhale, A.M.; Yang, S. [Georgia Inst. of Tech., Atlanta, GA (United States). Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering

    1999-09-01

    Microstructures of engineering alloys often contain features at widely different length scales. In this contribution, a digital image processing technique is presented to incorporate the effect of features at higher length scales on the damage evolution and local fracture processes occurring at lower length scales. The method is called M-SLIP: Microstructural Scale Linking by Image Processing. The technique also enables incorporation of the real microstructure at different length scales in the finite element (FE)-based simulations. The practical application of the method is demonstrated via FE analysis on the microstructure of an aluminum cast alloy (A356), where the length scales of micropores and silicon particles differ by two orders of magnitude. The simulation captures the effect of nonuniformly distributed micropores at length scales of 200 to 500 {micro}m on the local stresses and strains around silicon particles that are at the length scales of 3 to 5 {micro}m. The procedure does not involve any simplifying assumptions regarding the microstructural geometry, and therefore, it is useful to model the mechanical response of the real multi-length scale microstructures of metals and alloys.

  11. Optically controlled thermal management on the nanometer length scale

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garwe, F [Institute of Photonic Technology (IPHT) Jena, PO Box 100239, D-07745 Jena (Germany); Bauerschaefer, U [GmBU, Erich-Neuss-Weg 5, D-06120 Halle/S (Germany); Csaki, A [Institute of Photonic Technology (IPHT) Jena, PO Box 100239, D-07745 Jena (Germany); Steinbrueck, A [Institute of Photonic Technology (IPHT) Jena, PO Box 100239, D-07745 Jena (Germany); Ritter, K [Technical University Ilmenau, D-98693 Ilmenau (Germany); Bochmann, A [Institute of Photonic Technology (IPHT) Jena, PO Box 100239, D-07745 Jena (Germany); Bergmann, J [Institute of Photonic Technology (IPHT) Jena, PO Box 100239, D-07745 Jena (Germany); Weise, A [Friedrich Schiller University Jena, Institute of Human Genetics and Anthropology, D-07702 Jena (Germany); Akimov, D [Friedrich Schiller University Jena, Institute of Physical Chemistry, D-07743 Jena (Germany); Maubach, G [Institute of Photonic Technology (IPHT) Jena, PO Box 100239, D-07745 Jena (Germany); Koenig, K [Fraunhofer Institut St Ingbert, D-07702 St Ingbert (Germany); Huettmann, G [Medical Laser Center Luebeck, D-23552 Luebeck (Germany); Paa, W [Institute of Photonic Technology (IPHT) Jena, PO Box 100239, D-07745 Jena (Germany); Popp, J [Institute of Photonic Technology (IPHT) Jena, PO Box 100239, D-07745 Jena (Germany); Fritzsche, W [Institute of Photonic Technology (IPHT) Jena, PO Box 100239, D-07745 Jena (Germany)

    2008-02-06

    The manipulation of polymers and biological molecules or the control of chemical reactions on a nanometer scale by means of laser pulses shows great promise for applications in modern nanotechnology, biotechnology, molecular medicine or chemistry. A controllable, parallel, highly efficient and very local heat conversion of the incident laser light into metal nanoparticles without ablation or fragmentation provides the means for a tool like a 'nanoreactor', a 'nanowelder', a 'nanocrystallizer' or a 'nanodesorber'. In this paper we explain theoretically and show experimentally the interaction of laser radiation with gold nanoparticles on a polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) layer (one-photon excitation) by means of different laser pulse lengths, wavelengths and pulse repetition rates. To the best of our knowledge this is the first report showing the possibility of highly local (in a 40 nm range) regulated heat insertion into the nanoparticle and its surroundings without ablation of the gold nanoparticles. In an earlier paper we showed that near-infrared femtosecond irradiation can cut labeled DNA sequences in metaphase chromosomes below the diffraction-limited spot size. Now, we use gold as well as silver-enhanced gold nanoparticles on DNA (also within chromosomes) as energy coupling objects for femtosecond laser irradiation with single-and two-photon excitation. We show the results of highly localized destruction effects on DNA that occur only nearby the nanoparticles.

  12. Broadband dielectric microwave microscopy on micron length scales.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tselev, Alexander; Anlage, Steven M; Ma, Zhengkun; Melngailis, John

    2007-04-01

    We demonstrate that a near-field microwave microscope based on a transmission line resonator allows imaging in a substantially wide range of frequencies, so that the microscope properties approach those of a spatially resolved impedance analyzer. In the case of an electric probe, the broadband imaging can be used in a direct fashion to separate contributions from capacitive and resistive properties of a sample at length scales on the order of one micron. Using a microwave near-field microscope based on a transmission line resonator we imaged the local dielectric properties of a focused ion beam milled structure on a high-dielectric-constant Ba(0.6)Sr(0.4)TiO(3) thin film in the frequency range from 1.3 to 17.4 GHz. The electrostatic approximation breaks down already at frequencies above approximately 10 GHz for the probe geometry used, and a full-wave analysis is necessary to obtain qualitative information from the images.

  13. Functional Scaling of Musculoskeletal Models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, Morten Enemark; Andersen, Michael Skipper; de Zee, Mark;

    The validity of the predictions from musculoskeletal models depends largely on how well the morphology of the model matches that of the patient. To address this problem, we present a novel method to scale a cadaver-based musculoskeletal model to match both the segment lengths and joint parameters...... orientations are then used to morph/scale a cadaver based musculoskeletal model using a set of radial basis functions (RBFs). Using the functional joint axes to scale musculoskeletal models provides a better fit to the marker data, and allows for representation of patients with considerable difference in bone...... geometry, without the need for MR/CT scans. However, more validation activities are needed to better understand the effect of morphing musculoskeletal models based on functional joint parameters....

  14. Energy dependent transport length scales in strongly diffusive carbon nanotubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lassagne, B [Laboratoire National des Champs Magnetiques Pulses, UMR5147 143 avenida de rangueil, 31400 Toulouse (France); Raquet, B [Laboratoire National des Champs Magnetiques Pulses, UMR5147 143 avenida de rangueil, 31400 Toulouse (France); Broto, J M [Laboratoire National des Champs Magnetiques Pulses, UMR5147 143 avenida de rangueil, 31400 Toulouse (France); Gonzalez, J [Centro de Estudios de Semiconductores Facultad de Ciencias, Departamento de Fisica, Universidad de Los Andes, Merida (Venezuela)

    2006-05-17

    We report magneto-transport measurements in parallel magnetic field and {mu}-Raman spectroscopy on diffusive multiwall carbon nanotubes. The disorder effects on the characteristic transport lengths are probed by combining applied magnetic field and back-gate tuning of the Fermi level. Modulations of the differential conductance versus energy depict the modulation of the strength of the weak localization. Both the electronic mean free path and the phase coherence length are found to be energy dependent. The role of disorder in the density of states and in the characteristic transport lengths is discussed.

  15. Genome-Scale Models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bergdahl, Basti; Sonnenschein, Nikolaus; Machado, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    An introduction to genome-scale models, how to build and use them, will be given in this chapter. Genome-scale models have become an important part of systems biology and metabolic engineering, and are increasingly used in research, both in academica and in industry, both for modeling chemical pr...

  16. Modelling of rate effects at multiple scales

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, R.R.; Simone, A.; Sluys, L. J.

    2008-01-01

    At the macro- and meso-scales a rate dependent constitutive model is used in which visco-elasticity is coupled to visco-plasticity and damage. A viscous length scale effect is introduced to control the size of the fracture process zone. By comparison of the widths of the fracture process zone......, the length scale in the meso-model and the macro-model can be coupled. In this fashion, a bridging of length scales can be established. A computational analysis of  a Split Hopkinson bar test at medium and high impact load is carried out at macro-scale and meso-scale including information from  the micro-scale....

  17. Measurements of the Influence of Integral Length Scale on Stagnation Region Heat Transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanfossen, G. James; Ching, Chang Y.

    1994-01-01

    The purpose was twofold: first, to determine if a length scale existed that would cause the greatest augmentation in stagnation region heat transfer for a given turbulence intensity and second, to develop a prediction tool for stagnation heat transfer in the presence of free stream turbulence. Toward this end, a model with a circular leading edge was fabricated with heat transfer gages in the stagnation region. The model was qualified in a low turbulence wind tunnel by comparing measurements with Frossling's solution for stagnation region heat transfer in a laminar free stream. Five turbulence generating grids were fabricated; four were square mesh, biplane grids made from square bars. Each had identical mesh to bar width ratio but different bar widths. The fifth grid was an array of fine parallel wires that were perpendicular to the axis of the cylindrical leading edge. Turbulence intensity and integral length scale were measured as a function of distance from the grids. Stagnation region heat transfer was measured at various distances downstream of each grid. Data were taken at cylinder Reynolds numbers ranging from 42,000 to 193,000. Turbulence intensities were in the range 1.1 to 15.9 percent while the ratio of integral length scale to cylinder diameter ranged from 0.05 to 0.30. Stagnation region heat transfer augmentation increased with decreasing length scale. An optimum scale was not found. A correlation was developed that fit heat transfer data for the square bar grids to within +4 percent. The data from the array of wires were not predicted by the correlation; augmentation was higher for this case indicating that the degree of isotropy in the turbulent flow field has a large effect on stagnation heat transfer. The data of other researchers are also compared with the correlation.

  18. Abridgment of nano and micro length scale mechanical properties of novel Mg–9Li–7Al–1Sn and Mg–9Li–5Al–3Sn–1Zn alloys using object oriented finite element modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gupta, Ankur [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology, Kanpur 208016 (India); Advanced Materials Processing and Analysis Center, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Central Florida, Orlando, FL 32826 (United States); Kumar, Vinod [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology, Kanpur 208016 (India); Department of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering, Malaviya National Institute of Technology, Jaipur 302017 (India); Nair, Jitin [Department of Materials and Metallurgical Engineering, National Institute of Foundry and Forge Technology, Ranchi 834003 (India); Bansal, Ankit [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology, Kanpur 208016 (India); Tata Steel Ltd., Jamshedpur, Jharkhand 831001 (India); Balani, Kantesh, E-mail: kbalani@iitk.ac.in [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology, Kanpur 208016 (India)

    2015-06-15

    Highlights: • Dual phase (α + β) Mg–9Li–7Al–1Sn (LAT971) and Mg–9Li–5Al–3Sn–1Zn (LATZ9531) alloys. • Effective elastic modulus estimated from finite element method (FEM). • Correlation of nanoscale mechanical data with microstress distribution. • Precipitates of Mg–Al–Li act as stress relaxer and Mg–Li–Sn as stress concentrator. • Higher local heterogeneous stress distribution (∼0.6–5.7 GPa) in LATZ9531 alloys. - Abstract: In the recent years, magnesium–lithium (Mg–Li) alloys have attracted considerable attention/interest due to their high strength-to-density ratio and damping characteristic; and have found potential use in structural and biomedical applications. Here the mechanical behavior of novel Mg–9 wt.% Li–7 wt.% Al–1 wt.% Sn (LAT971) and Mg–9 wt.% Li–5 wt.% Al–3 wt.% Sn–1 wt.% Zn (LATZ9531) alloys is reported. Both, as cast and thermomechanically processed alloys have been studied which possess dual phase microstructure. Nanoindentation data have been utilized to envisage the elastic modulus of alloy via various micromechanics models (such as rule of mixtures, Voigt–Reuss, Cox model, Halpin–Tsai and Guth model) in order to estimate the elastic modulus. Object oriented finite element modeling (FEM) has been performed to predict stress distribution under tensile and compressive strain state. Close match between Halpin–Tsai model and FEM results show the abridgment of nano length scale property to evolution of microscopic stress distribution in novel LAT971 and LATZ9531 Mg–Li–Al based alloys.

  19. Scaling Between Localization Length and TC in Disordered YBa2Cu3 O6.9

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gauzzi, Andrea; Pavuna, Davor

    We quantitatively study the effect of growth-induced reduction of long range structural order on the superconducting transition in epitaxial YBa2Cu3O6.9 films. The corresponding reduction of structural coherence length rc is determined from the width of X-ray diffraction rocking curves. Tc measurements in the films give evidence for the validity of the empirical scaling relation ΔTc~ rc,ab-2, where ΔTc is the disorder-induced reduction of Tc and rc,ab is the structural coherence length in the ab-plane. To explain this algebraic law we propose a simple phenomenological model based on the disorder-induced localization of the charge carriers within each ordered domain of size rc,ab. This picture enables us to precisely determine the Ginzburg-Landau superconducting coherence length in the ab-plane, and we obtain ξab=1.41±0.04 nm.

  20. Mathematical model of alternative mechanism of telomere length maintenance

    CERN Document Server

    Kollár, Richard; Nosek, Jozef; Tomaska, Lubomir

    2014-01-01

    Biopolymer length regulation is a complex process that involves a large number of subprocesses acting simultaneously across multiple spatial and temporal scales. An illustrative example important for genomic stability is the length regulation of telomeres---nucleo-protein structures at the ends of linear chromosomes. Maintenance of telomeres is often facilitated by the enzyme telomerase but, particularly in telomerase-free systems, the maintenance of chromosomal termini depends on alternative lengthening of telomeres (ALT) mechanisms mediated by recombination. Various linear and circular DNA structures were identified to participate in ALT, however, dynamics of the whole process is still poorly understood. We propose a chemical kinetics model of ALT with kinetic rates systematically derived from the biophysics of DNA diffusion and looping. The reaction system is reduced to a coagulation-fragmentation system by quasi-steady state approximation. The detailed treatment of kinetic rates yields explicit formulae f...

  1. Scaling analysis of random walks with persistence lengths: Application to self-avoiding walks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granzotti, C. R. F.; Martinez, A. S.; da Silva, M. A. A.

    2016-05-01

    We develop an approach for performing scaling analysis of N -step random walks (RWs). The mean square end-to-end distance, , is written in terms of inner persistence lengths (IPLs), which we define by the ensemble averages of dot products between the walker's position and displacement vectors, at the j th step. For RW models statistically invariant under orthogonal transformations, we analytically introduce a relation between and the persistence length, λN, which is defined as the mean end-to-end vector projection in the first step direction. For self-avoiding walks (SAWs) on 2D and 3D lattices we introduce a series expansion for λN, and by Monte Carlo simulations we find that λ∞ is equal to a constant; the scaling corrections for λN can be second- and higher-order corrections to scaling for . Building SAWs with typically 100 steps, we estimate the exponents ν0 and Δ1 from the IPL behavior as function of j . The obtained results are in excellent agreement with those in the literature. This shows that only an ensemble of paths with the same length is sufficient for determining the scaling behavior of , being that the whole information needed is contained in the inner part of the paths.

  2. The length-scale dependence of strain in networks by SANS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pyckhout-Hintzen, W.; Botti, A.; Heinrich, M.; Richter, D. [IFF-Forschungszentrum Juelich, 52425 Juelich (Germany); Westermann, S. [Goodyear, 7750 Colmar-Berg (Luxembourg); Straube, E. [University of Halle, FB Physik, 06099 Halle (Germany)

    2002-07-01

    We present a SANS study of the length-scale dependence of chain deformation by means of a suitable labeling in dense, cross-linked elastomers of the HDH-type. This length scale is controlled by the size of the label as well as the cross-link density. The results are compared to long homopolymers. The data are analyzed by means of the tube model of topology in rubber elasticity in combination with the random-phase approximation (RPA) to account for interchain correlations. Chain degradation during cross linking is treated by the standard RPA approach for polydisperse multicomponent systems. A transition from locally freely fluctuating to tube-constrained segmental motion was observed. (orig.)

  3. The length-scale dependence of strain in networks by SANS

    CERN Document Server

    Pyckhout-Hintzen, W; Heinrich, M; Richter, D; Westermann, S; Straube, E

    2002-01-01

    We present a SANS study of the length-scale dependence of chain deformation by means of a suitable labeling in dense, cross-linked elastomers of the HDH-type. This length scale is controlled by the size of the label as well as the cross-link density. The results are compared to long homopolymers. The data are analyzed by means of the tube model of topology in rubber elasticity in combination with the random-phase approximation (RPA) to account for interchain correlations. Chain degradation during cross linking is treated by the standard RPA approach for polydisperse multicomponent systems. A transition from locally freely fluctuating to tube-constrained segmental motion was observed. (orig.)

  4. Non-perturbative gravity at different length scales

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Folkerts, Sarah

    2013-12-18

    In this thesis, we investigate different aspects of gravity as an effective field theory. Building on the arguments of self-completeness of Einstein gravity, we argue that any sensible theory, which does not propagate negative-norm states and reduces to General Relativity in the low energy limit is self-complete. Due to black hole formation in high energy scattering experiments, distances smaller than the Planck scale are shielded from any accessibility. Degrees of freedom with masses larger than the Planck mass are mapped to large classical black holes which are described by the already existing infrared theory. Since high energy (UV) modifications of gravity which are ghost-free can only produce stronger gravitational interactions than Einstein gravity, the black hole shielding is even more efficient in such theories. In this light, we argue that conventional attempts of a Wilsonian UV completion are severely constrained. Furthermore, we investigate the quantum picture for black holes which emerges in the low energy description put forward by Dvali and Gomez in which black holes are described as Bose-Einstein condensates of many weakly coupled gravitons. Specifically, we investigate a non-relativistic toy model which mimics certain aspects of the graviton condensate picture. This toy model describes the collapse of a condensate of attractive bosons which emits particles due to incoherent scattering. We show that it is possible that the evolution of the condensate follows the critical point which is accompanied by the appearance of a light mode. Another aspect of gravitational interactions concerns the question whether quantum gravity breaks global symmetries. Arguments relying on the no hair theorem and wormhole solutions suggest that global symmetries can be violated. In this thesis, we parametrize such effects in terms of an effective field theory description of three-form fields. We investigate the possible implications for the axion solution of the strong CP

  5. Convergence of macroscopic tongue anatomy in ruminants and scaling relationships with body mass or tongue length.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meier, Andrea R; Schmuck, Ute; Meloro, Carlo; Clauss, Marcus; Hofmann, Reinhold R

    2016-03-01

    Various morphological measures demonstrate convergent evolution in ruminants with their natural diet, in particular with respect to the browser/grazer dichotomy. Here, we report quantitative macroanatomical measures of the tongue (length and width of specific parts) of 65 ruminant species and relate them to either body mass (BM) or total tongue length, and to the percentage of grass in the natural diet (%grass). Models without and with accounting for the phylogenetic structures of the dataset were used, and models were ranked using Akaike's Information Criterion. Scaling relationships followed geometric principles, that is, length measures scaled with BM to the power of 0.33. Models that used tongue length rather than BM as a body size proxy were consistently ranked better, indicating that using size proxies that are less susceptible to a wider variety of factors (such as BM that fluctuates with body condition) should be attempted whenever possible. The proportion of the freely mobile tongue tip of the total tongue (and hence also the corpus length) was negatively correlated to %grass, in accordance with concepts that the feeding mechanism of browsers requires more mobile tongues. It should be noted that some nonbrowsers, such as cattle, use a peculiar mechanism for grazing that also requires long, mobile tongues, but they appear to be exceptions. A larger corpus width with increasing %grass corresponds to differences in snout shape with broader snouts in grazers. The Torus linguae is longer with increasing %grass, a finding that still warrants functional interpretation. This study shows that tongue measures covary with diet in ruminants. In contrast, the shape of the tongue (straight or "hourglass-shaped" as measured by the ratio of the widest and smallest corpus width) is unrelated to diet and is influenced strongly by phylogeny.

  6. Analysis of Average Shortest-Path Length of Scale-Free Network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guoyong Mao

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Computing the average shortest-path length of a large scale-free network needs much memory space and computation time. Hence, parallel computing must be applied. In order to solve the load-balancing problem for coarse-grained parallelization, the relationship between the computing time of a single-source shortest-path length of node and the features of node is studied. We present a dynamic programming model using the average outdegree of neighboring nodes of different levels as the variable and the minimum time difference as the target. The coefficients are determined on time measurable networks. A native array and multimap representation of network are presented to reduce the memory consumption of the network such that large networks can still be loaded into the memory of each computing core. The simplified load-balancing model is applied on a network of tens of millions of nodes. Our experiment shows that this model can solve the load-imbalance problem of large scale-free network very well. Also, the characteristic of this model can meet the requirements of networks with ever-increasing complexity and scale.

  7. A multiple length scale description of the mechanism of elastomer stretching

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Neuefeind, J.; Skov, Anne Ladegaard; Daniels, J. E.

    2016-01-01

    Conventionally, the stretching of rubber is modeled exclusively by rotations of segments of the embedded polymer chains; i.e. changes in entropy. However models have not been tested on all relevant length scales due to a lack of appropriate probes. Here we present a universal X-ray based method...... within the individual monomers, but among the contributions is also an elastic strain, acting between chains, which is 3-4 orders of magnitude smaller than the macroscopic strain, and of the opposite sign, i.e. extension of polymer chains in the direction perpendicular to the stretch. This may be due...

  8. Energy Dependence and Scaling Property of Localization Length near a Gapped Flat Band

    CERN Document Server

    Ge, Li

    2015-01-01

    Using a tight-binding model for a one-dimensional Lieb lattice, we show that the localization length near a gapped flat band behaves differently from the typical Urbach tail in a band gap: instead of reducing monotonically as the energy E moves away from the flat band energy E_{FB}, the presence of the flat band causes a nonmonotonic energy dependence of the localization length. This energy dependence follows a scaling property when the energy is within the spread (W) of uniformly distributed diagonal disorder, i.e. the localization length is only a function of (E-E_{FB})/W. Several other lattices are compared to distinguish the effect of the flat band on the localization length, where we eliminate, shift, or duplicate the flat band, without changing the dispersion relations of other bands. Using the top right element of the Green's matrix, we derive an analytical relation between the density of states and the localization length, which shines light on these properties of the latter, including a summation rul...

  9. Correlation length, universality classes, and scaling laws associated with topological phase transitions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Wei; Legner, Markus; Rüegg, Andreas; Sigrist, Manfred

    2017-02-01

    The correlation functions related to topological phase transitions in inversion-symmetric lattice models described by 2 ×2 Dirac Hamiltonians are discussed. In one dimension, the correlation function measures the charge-polarization correlation between Wannier states at different positions, while in two dimensions it measures the itinerant-circulation correlation between Wannier states. The correlation function is nonzero in both the topologically trivial and nontrivial states, and allows us to extract a correlation length that diverges at topological phase transitions. The correlation length and the curvature function that defines the topological invariants are shown to have universal critical exponents, allowing the notion of universality classes to be introduced. Particularly in two dimensions, the universality class is determined by the orbital symmetry of the Dirac model. The scaling laws that constrain the critical exponents are revealed, and are predicted to be satisfied even in interacting systems, as demonstrated in an interacting topological Kondo insulator.

  10. Length scales in glass-forming liquids and related systems: a review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karmakar, Smarajit; Dasgupta, Chandan; Sastry, Srikanth

    2016-01-01

    The central problem in the study of glass-forming liquids and other glassy systems is the understanding of the complex structural relaxation and rapid growth of relaxation times seen on approaching the glass transition. A central conceptual question is whether one can identify one or more growing length scale(s) associated with this behavior. Given the diversity of molecular glass-formers and a vast body of experimental, computational and theoretical work addressing glassy behavior, a number of ideas and observations pertaining to growing length scales have been presented over the past few decades, but there is as yet no consensus view on this question. In this review, we will summarize the salient results and the state of our understanding of length scales associated with dynamical slow down. After a review of slow dynamics and the glass transition, pertinent theories of the glass transition will be summarized and a survey of ideas relating to length scales in glassy systems will be presented. A number of studies have focused on the emergence of preferred packing arrangements and discussed their role in glassy dynamics. More recently, a central object of attention has been the study of spatially correlated, heterogeneous dynamics and the associated length scale, studied in computer simulations and theoretical analysis such as inhomogeneous mode coupling theory. A number of static length scales have been proposed and studied recently, such as the mosaic length scale discussed in the random first-order transition theory and the related point-to-set correlation length. We will discuss these, elaborating on key results, along with a critical appraisal of the state of the art. Finally we will discuss length scales in driven soft matter, granular fluids and amorphous solids, and give a brief description of length scales in aging systems. Possible relations of these length scales with those in glass-forming liquids will be discussed.

  11. Minimum Pay Scale and Career Length in the NBA

    OpenAIRE

    Johnny Ducking; Peter A. Groothuis; James Richard Hill

    2012-01-01

    We use data from the National Basketball Association (NBA) to analyze the impact of minimum salaries on an employee’s career length. The NBA has a salary structure in which the minimum salary a player can receive increases with the player’s years of experience. Salary schedules similar to the NBA’s exist in public education, federal government agencies, the Episcopalian church, and unionized industries. Even though the magnitude of the salaries in the NBA differs from other industries, this s...

  12. Shear strength of chromia across multiple length scales: An LDA + U study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mosey, Nicholas J. [Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering and Program in Applied and Computational Mathematics, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08544-5263 (United States); Carter, Emily A., E-mail: eac@princeton.edu [Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering and Program in Applied and Computational Mathematics, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08544-5263 (United States)

    2009-06-15

    A method for predicting the shear strength of materials over multiple length scales is developed and tested. The method is based on renormalizing the energies and shear displacements obtained through electronic structure calculations of nanoscale models of the material of interest. All material- and size-dependent quantities are incorporated into the renormalization factors, yielding a universal model that can be applied to many materials and length scales. The model is used to predict the shear strength of Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} along three relevant slip planes and slip directions. The results demonstrate that the shear strengths of the nanoscale systems used in the calculations range from 19.4 to 29.4 GPa. These data are then renormalized to predict the shear strength of a grain that is 10 {mu}m thick, yielding shear strengths ranging from 189 to 342 MPa. The large decrease in the shear strength with increasing grain size is consistent with the behavior of many materials. The ability to capture this change using electronic structure calculations that do not require experimental input may be useful in developing cohesive laws of novel materials for use in large-scale mechanical engineering simulations of materials failure.

  13. SQUID magnetometry from nanometer to centimeter length scales

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hatridge, Michael J. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2010-06-01

    The development of Superconducting QUantum Interference Device (SQUID)-based magnetometer for two applications, in vivo prepolarized, ultra-low field MRI of humans and dispersive readout of SQUIDs for micro- and nano-scale magnetometery, are the focus of this thesis.

  14. Wind adaptive modeling of transmission lines using minimum description length

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaw, Yoonseok; Sohn, Gunho

    2017-03-01

    The transmission lines are moving objects, which positions are dynamically affected by wind-induced conductor motion while they are acquired by airborne laser scanners. This wind effect results in a noisy distribution of laser points, which often hinders accurate representation of transmission lines and thus, leads to various types of modeling errors. This paper presents a new method for complete 3D transmission line model reconstruction in the framework of inner and across span analysis. The highlighted fact is that the proposed method is capable of indirectly estimating noise scales, which corrupts the quality of laser observations affected by different wind speeds through a linear regression analysis. In the inner span analysis, individual transmission line models of each span are evaluated based on the Minimum Description Length theory and erroneous transmission line segments are subsequently replaced by precise transmission line models with wind-adaptive noise scale estimated. In the subsequent step of across span analysis, detecting the precise start and end positions of the transmission line models, known as the Point of Attachment, is the key issue for correcting partial modeling errors, as well as refining transmission line models. Finally, the geometric and topological completion of transmission line models are achieved over the entire network. A performance evaluation was conducted over 138.5 km long corridor data. In a modest wind condition, the results demonstrates that the proposed method can improve the accuracy of non-wind-adaptive initial models on an average of 48% success rate to produce complete transmission line models in the range between 85% and 99.5% with the positional accuracy of 9.55 cm transmission line models and 28 cm Point of Attachment in the root-mean-square error.

  15. SMALL SCALE MORPHODYNAMICAL MODELLING

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    D. Ditschke; O. Gothel; H. Weilbeer

    2001-01-01

    Long term morphological simulations using complete coupled models lead to very time consuming computations. Latteux (1995) presented modelling techniques developed for tidal current situations in order to reduce the computational effort. In this paper the applicability of such methods to small scale problems is investigated. It is pointed out that these methods can be transferred to small scale problems using the periodicity of the vortex shedding process.

  16. Length scale of a chaotic element in Rayleigh-Bénard convection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karimi, A; Paul, M R

    2012-12-01

    We describe an approach to quantify the length scale of a chaotic element of a Rayleigh-Bénard convection layer exhibiting spatiotemporal chaos. The length scale of a chaotic element is determined by simultaneously evolving the dynamics of two convection layers with a unidirectional coupling that involves only the time-varying values of the fluid velocity and temperature on the lateral boundaries of the domain. In our results we numerically simulate the full Boussinesq equations for the precise conditions of experiment. By varying the size of the boundary used for the coupling we identify a length scale that describes the size of a chaotic element. The length scale of the chaotic element is of the same order of magnitude, and exhibits similar trends, as the natural chaotic length scale that is based upon the fractal dimension.

  17. Scaling limits for shortest path lengths along the edges of stationary tessellations - Supplementary material

    CERN Document Server

    Voss, Florian; Schmidt, Volker

    2009-01-01

    We consider spatial stochastic models, which can be applied e.g. to telecommunication networks with two hierarchy levels. In particular, we consider two Cox processes concentrated on the edge set of a random tessellation, where the points can describe the locations of low-level and high-level network components, respectively, and the edge set the underlying infrastructure of the network, like road systems, railways, etc. Furthermore, each low-level component is marked with the shortest path along the edge set to the nearest high-level component. We investigate the typical shortest path length of the resulting marked point process, which is an important characteristic e.g. in performance analysis and planning of telecommunication networks. In particular, we show that its distribution converges to simple parametric limit distributions if a certain scaling factor converges to zero and infinity, respectively. This can be used to approximate the density of the typical shortest path length by analytical formulae.

  18. Optimal Heavy-Traffic Queue Length Scaling in an Incompletely Saturated Switch

    OpenAIRE

    Maguluri, Siva Theja; Burle, Sai Kiran; Srikant, R.

    2016-01-01

    We consider an input queued switch operating under the MaxWeight scheduling algorithm. This system is interesting to study because it is a model for Internet routers and data center networks. Recently, it was shown that the MaxWeight algorithm has optimal heavy-traffic queue length scaling when all ports are uniformly saturated. Here we consider the case when an arbitrary number of ports are saturated (which we call the incompletely saturated case), and each port is allowed to saturate at a d...

  19. Determination of Longitudinal Electron Bunch Lengths on Picosecond Time Scales

    CERN Document Server

    Martínez, C; Calviño, F

    1999-01-01

    At CERN (European Laboratory for Particle Physics) the CLIC (Compact Linear Collider) study is pursuing the design of an electron-positron high-energy linear collider using an innovative concept for the RF (Radio Frequency) power production, the socalled two-beam acceleration scheme. In order to keep the length of the collider in a reasonable range while being able of accelerating electrons and positrons up to 5 TeV, the normal-conducting accelerating structures should operate at very high frequency (in this case 30 GHz). The RF power necessary to feed the accelerating cavities is provided by a second electron beam, the drive beam, running parallel to the main beam. The CLIC Test Facility (CTF) was build with the main aim of studying and demonstrating the feasibility of the two beam acceleration scheme and technology. It is composed of two beams, the drive beam that will generate the 30 GHz RF power and the main beam which will be accelerated by this power. In order to have a good efficiency for the power gen...

  20. Scaling of the critical free length for progressive unfolding of self-bonded graphene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kwan, Kenny; Cranford, Steven W., E-mail: s.cranford@neu.edu [Laboratory of Nanotechnology in Civil Engineering (NICE), Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Northeastern University, 400 Snell Engineering, 360 Huntington Avenue, Boston, Massachusetts 02115 (United States)

    2014-05-19

    Like filled pasta, rolled or folded graphene can form a large nanocapsule surrounding a hollow interior. Use as a molecular carrier, however, requires understanding of the opening of such vessels. Here, we investigate a monolayer sheet of graphene as a theoretical trial platform for such a nanocapsule. The graphene is bonded to itself via aligned disulfide (S-S) bonds. Through theoretical analysis and atomistic modeling, we probe the critical nonbonded length (free length, L{sub crit}) that induces fracture-like progressive unfolding as a function of folding radius (R{sub i}). We show a clear linear scaling relationship between the length and radius, which can be used to determine the necessary bond density to predict mechanical opening/closing. However, stochastic dissipated energy limits any exact elastic formulation, and the required energy far exceeds the dissociation energy of the S-S bond. We account for the necessary dissipated kinetic energy through a simple scaling factor (Ω), which agrees well with computational results.

  1. Cosmic string loop distribution on all length scales and at any redshift

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lorenz, Larissa; Ringeval, Christophe [Institute of Mathematics and Physics, Centre for Cosmology, Particle Physics and Phenomenology, Louvain University, 2 Chemin du Cyclotron, 1348 Louvain-la-Neuve (Belgium); Sakellariadou, Mairi, E-mail: larissa.lorenz@uclouvain.be, E-mail: christophe.ringeval@uclouvain.be, E-mail: mairi.sakellariadou@kcl.ac.uk [Department of Physics, King' s College, University of London, Strand, London WC2R 2LS (United Kingdom)

    2010-10-01

    We analytically derive the expected number density distribution of Nambu-Goto cosmic string loops at any redshift soon after the time of string formation to today. Our approach is based on the Polchinski-Rocha model of loop formation from long strings which we adjust to fit numerical simulations and complement by a phenomenological modelling of gravitational backreaction. Cosmological evolution drives the loop distribution towards scaling on all length scales in both the radiation and matter era. Memory of any reasonable initial loop distribution in the radiation era is shown to be erased well before Big Bang Nucleosynthesis. In the matter era, the loop distribution reaches full scaling, up to some residual loops from the radiation era which may be present for extremely low string tension. Finally, the number density of loops below the gravitational cutoff is shown to be scale independent, proportional to a negative power of the string tension and insensitive to the details of the backreaction modelling. As an application, we show that the energy density parameter of loops today cannot exceed 10{sup −5} for currently allowed string tension values, while the loop number density cannot be less than 10{sup −6} per Mpc{sup 3}. Our result should provide a more robust basis for studying the cosmological consequences of cosmic string loops.

  2. Nonsymmorphic Phononic Metamaterials: shaping waves over multiple length scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koh, Cheongyang; Thomas, Edwin

    2012-02-01

    The vector nature of the phonon makes rational design of phononic metamaterials challenging, despite potential in unique wave propagation behavior, such as negative refraction and hyper-lensing. While most designs to date focus on the ``meta-atom'' (building block) design, their ``spatial arrangement'' (non-locality) is equally instrumental in dispersion engineering. Here, we present a generalized design framework (DF) for PMM design, utilizing both ``global'' and ``local'' symmetry concepts. We demonstrate, utilizing specific properties of nonsymmorphic plane groups, PMMs possessing i) a low-frequency in-plane complete spectral gap (ICSG) of 102% (CSG of 88%), ii) a set of polychromatic ICSGs totaling over 100% in normalized gap size. Within the same DF, we further integrate broken symmetry states (BSS) (edge states, waveguides, etc) with designed polarization, (de)localization and group velocities. In particular, we demonstrate how these BSS may be utilized to elucidate signatures of complex polarization fields through phonon-structure interactions, leading to interesting applications in elastic-wave imaging, as well as information retrieval by probing polarization states of scattering bodies over multiple scales.

  3. Exploring heavy fermions from macroscopic to microscopic length scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wirth, Steffen; Steglich, Frank

    2016-10-01

    Strongly correlated systems present fundamental challenges, especially in materials in which electronic correlations cause a strong increase of the effective mass of the charge carriers. Heavy fermion metals — intermetallic compounds of rare earth metals (such as Ce, Sm and Yb) and actinides (such as U, Np and Pu) — are prototype systems for complex and collective quantum states; they exhibit both a lattice Kondo effect and antiferromagnetic correlations. These materials show unexpected phenomena; for example, they display unconventional superconductivity (beyond Bardeen-Cooper-Schrieffer (BCS) theory) and unconventional quantum criticality (beyond the Landau framework). In this Review, we focus on systems in which Landau's Fermi-liquid theory does not apply. Heavy fermion metals and semiconductors are well suited for the study of strong electronic correlations, because the relevant energy scales (for charge carriers, magnetic excitations and lattice dynamics) are well separated from each other, allowing the exploration of concomitant physical phenomena almost independently. Thus, the study of these materials also provides valuable insight for the understanding — and tailoring — of other correlated systems.

  4. Length Scale and Gravity Effects on Microgravity Boiling Heat Transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jungho; McQuillen, John; Balombin, Joe

    2002-01-01

    Boiling is a complex phenomenon where hydrodynamics, heat transfer, mass transfer, and interfacial phenomena are tightly interwoven. An understanding of boiling and critical heat flux in microgravity environments is of importance to space based hardware and processes such as heat exchange, cryogenic fuel storage and transportation, electronic cooling, and material processing due to the large amounts of heat that can be removed with relatively little increase in temperature. Although research in this area has been performed in the past four decades, the mechanisms by which heat is removed from surfaces in microgravity are still unclear. In earth gravity, buoyancy is an important parameter that affects boiling heat transfer through the rate at which bubbles are removed from the surface. A simple model describing the bubble departure size based on a quasistatic force balance between buoyancy and surface tension is given by the Fritz [I] relation: Bo(exp 1/2) = 0.0208 theta where Bo is the ratio between buoyancy and surface tension forces. For small, rapidly growing bubbles, inertia associated with the induced liquid motion can also cause bubble departure. In microgravity, the magnitude of effects related to natural convection and buoyancy are small and physical mechanisms normally masked by natural convection in earth gravity such as Marangoni convection can substantially influence the boiling and vapor bubble dynamics. CHF (critical heat transfer) is also substantially affected by microgravity. In 1 g environments, Bo has been used as a correlating parameter for CHF. Zuber's CHF model for an infinite horizontal surface assumes that vapor columns formed by the merger of bubbles become unstable due to a Helmholtz instability blocking the supply of liquid to the surface. The jets are spaced lambda(sub D) apart, where lambda(sub D) = 2pi square root of 3[(sigma)/(g(rho(sub l) - rho(sub v)](exp 1/2) = 2pi square root of 3 L Bo(exp -1/2) = square root of 3 lambda(sub c

  5. Plasma scale-length effects on electron energy spectra in high-irradiance laser plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Culfa, O.; Tallents, G. J.; Rossall, A. K.; Wagenaars, E.; Ridgers, C. P.; Murphy, C. D.; Dance, R. J.; Gray, R. J.; McKenna, P.; Brown, C. D. R.; James, S. F.; Hoarty, D. J.; Booth, N.; Robinson, A. P. L.; Lancaster, K. L.; Pikuz, S. A.; Faenov, A. Ya.; Kampfer, T.; Schulze, K. S.; Uschmann, I.; Woolsey, N. C.

    2016-04-01

    An analysis of an electron spectrometer used to characterize fast electrons generated by ultraintense (1020W cm-2 ) laser interaction with a preformed plasma of scale length measured by shadowgraphy is presented. The effects of fringing magnetic fields on the electron spectral measurements and the accuracy of density scale-length measurements are evaluated. 2D EPOCH PIC code simulations are found to be in agreement with measurements of the electron energy spectra showing that laser filamentation in plasma preformed by a prepulse is important with longer plasma scale lengths (>8 μ m ).

  6. Improved Estimates of the Milky Way's Disk Scale Length From Hierarchical Bayesian Techniques

    CERN Document Server

    Licquia, Timothy C

    2016-01-01

    The exponential scale length ($L_d$) of the Milky Way's (MW's) disk is a critical parameter for describing the global physical size of our Galaxy, important both for interpreting other Galactic measurements and helping us to understand how our Galaxy fits into extragalactic contexts. Unfortunately, current estimates span a wide range of values and often are statistically incompatible with one another. Here, we aim to determine an improved, aggregate estimate for $L_d$ by utilizing a hierarchical Bayesian (HB) meta-analysis technique that accounts for the possibility that any one measurement has not properly accounted for all statistical or systematic errors. Within this machinery we explore a variety of ways of modeling the nature of problematic measurements, and then use a Bayesian model averaging technique to derive net posterior distributions that incorporate any model-selection uncertainty. Our meta-analysis combines 29 different (15 visible and 14 infrared) photometric measurements of $L_d$ available in ...

  7. Kelvin Absolute Temperature Scale Identified as Length Scale and Related to de Broglie Thermal Wavelength

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sohrab, Siavash

    Thermodynamic equilibrium between matter and radiation leads to de Broglie wavelength λdβ = h /mβvrβ and frequency νdβ = k /mβvrβ of matter waves and stochastic definitions of Planck h =hk =mk c and Boltzmann k =kk =mk c constants, λrkνrk = c , that respectively relate to spatial (λ) and temporal (ν) aspects of vacuum fluctuations. Photon massmk =√{ hk /c3 } , amu =√{ hkc } = 1 /No , and universal gas constant Ro =No k =√{ k / hc } result in internal Uk = Nhνrk = Nmkc2 = 3 Nmkvmpk2 = 3 NkT and potential pV = uN\\vcirc / 3 = N\\ucirc / 3 = NkT energy of photon gas in Casimir vacuum such that H = TS = 4 NkT . Therefore, Kelvin absolute thermodynamic temperature scale [degree K] is identified as length scale [meter] and related to most probable wavelength and de Broglie thermal wavelength as Tβ =λmpβ =λdβ / 3 . Parallel to Wien displacement law obtained from Planck distribution, the displacement law λwS T =c2 /√{ 3} is obtained from Maxwell -Boltzmann distribution of speed of ``photon clusters''. The propagation speeds of sound waves in ideal gas versus light waves in photon gas are described in terms of vrβ in harmony with perceptions of Huygens. Newton formula for speed of long waves in canals √{ p / ρ } is modified to √{ gh } =√{ γp / ρ } in accordance with adiabatic theory of Laplace.

  8. Morphology Characterization of PP/Clay Nanocomposites Across the Length Scales of the Structural Architecture

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Szazdi, Laszlo; Abranyi, Agnes; Pukansky Jr, Bela; Vancso, G. Julius; Pukanszky, Bela

    2006-01-01

    The structure and rheological properties of a large number of layered silicate poly(propylene) nanocomposites were studied with widely varying compositions. Morphology characterization at different length scales was achieved by SEM, TEM, and XRD. Rheological measurements supplied additional informat

  9. Identifying and characterising the different structural length scales in liquids and glasses: an experimental approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salmon, Philip S; Zeidler, Anita

    2013-10-07

    The structure of several network-forming liquids and glasses is considered, where a focus is placed on the detailed information that is made available by using the method of neutron diffraction with isotope substitution (NDIS). In the case of binary network glass-forming materials with the MX2 stoichiometry (e.g. GeO2, GeSe2, ZnCl2), two different length scales at distances greater than the nearest-neighbour distance manifest themselves by peaks in the measured diffraction patterns. The network properties are influenced by a competition between the ordering on these "intermediate" and "extended" length scales, which can be manipulated by changing the chemical identity of the atomic constituents or by varying state parameters such as the temperature and pressure. The extended-range ordering, which describes the decay of the pair-correlation functions at large-r, can be represented by making a pole analysis of the Ornstein-Zernike equations, an approach that can also be used to describe the large-r behaviour of the pair-correlation functions for liquid and amorphous metals where packing constraints are important. The first applications are then described of the NDIS method to measure the detailed structure of aerodynamically-levitated laser-heated droplets of "fragile" glass-forming liquid oxides (CaAl2O4 and CaSiO3) at high-temperatures (~2000 K) and the structure of a "strong" network-forming glass (GeO2) under pressures ranging from ambient to ~8 GPa. The high-temperature experiments show structural changes on multiple length scales when the oxides are vitrified. The high-pressure experiment offers insight into the density-driven mechanisms of network collapse in GeO2 glass, and parallels are drawn with the high-pressure behaviour of silica glass. Finally, the hydrogen-bonded network of water is considered, where the first application of the method of oxygen NDIS is used to measure the structures of light versus heavy water and a difference of approximately equal

  10. Length Scaling of Shear Zones at the Frictional-Viscous Transition (FVT)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schrank, C. E.; Handy, M. R.; Fusseis, F.

    2005-12-01

    We present a new method for determining the characteristic length scales of strain localization in crustal scale shear zones. This entails determining two parameters that describe the degree of strain heterogeneity in natural shear zones: (1) the strain localization factor, LfRA, defined as the ratio of the shear zone area to a chosen reference area, ARA, and (2) the relative localization intensity, Iloc, a function of the ratio of the mean shear strain to the maximum shear strain measured in a transect of the shear zone. ARA is a geometric homogenization scale determined from autocorrelation functions (ACF) of 2-D images (thin sections, foliation maps and aerial photographs) of shear zone networks on different scales that formed during a single deformational event. When applied to shear zones from a well exposed segment of the frictional-to-viscous transition (FVT) in NE Spain, we found that maxima in LfRA on the mm, cm, m and km scales coincided with the length scales of existing mineralogical and lithological heterogeneities. On any of these characteristic length scales, Iloc increased both along and across the length of the shear zones, suggesting that the shear zones weakening as a function of time and strain. This is consistent with structural evidence for progressive weakening of the crust on the characteristic length scales of strain heterogeneity.

  11. Quantum electrodynamics and the electron self-energy in a deformed space with a minimal length scale

    CERN Document Server

    Silva, Apollo V; Neves, M J

    2016-01-01

    The main motivation to study models in the presence of a minimal length is to obtain a quantum field theory free of the divergences. In this way, in this paper, we have constructed a new framework for quantum electrodynamics embedded in a minimal length scale background. New operators are introduced and the Green function method was used for the solution of the field equations, i.e., the Maxwell, Klein-Gordon and Dirac equations. We have analyzed specifically the scalar field and its one loop propagator. The mass of the scalar field regularized by the minimal length was obtained. The QED Lagrangian containing a minimal length was also constructed and the divergences were analyzed. The electron and photon propagators, and the electron self-energy at one loop as a function of the minimal length was also obtained.

  12. Multi Scale Modelling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huemmer, Matthias [AREVA NP GmbH, Paul-Gossen Strasse 100, Erlangen (Germany)

    2008-07-01

    The safety of the Reactor Pressure Vessels (RPV) must be assured and demonstrated by safety assessments against brittle fracture according to the codes and standards. In addition to these deterministic methods, researchers developed statistic methods, so called local approach (LA) models, to predict specimen or component failure. These models transfer the microscopic fracture events to the macro scale by means of Weibull stresses and therefore can describe the fracture behavior more accurate. This paper will propose a recently developed LA model. After the calibration of the model parameters the wide applicability of the model will be demonstrated. Therefore a large number of computations, based on 3D finite element simulations, have been conducted, containing different specimen types and materials in unirradiated and irradiated condition. Comparison of the experimental data with the predictions attained by means of the LA model shows that the fracture behavior can be well described. (authors)

  13. A High-Quality Preconditioning Technique for Multi-Length-Scale Symmetric Positive Definite Linear Systems

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ichitaro Yamazaki; Zhaojun Bai; Wenbin Chen; Richard Scalettar

    2009-01-01

    We study preconditioning techniques used in conjunction with the conjugate gradient method for solving multi-length-scale symmetric positive definite linear systems originating from the quantum Monte Carlo simulation of electron interaction of correlated materials. Existing preconditioning techniques are not designed to be adaptive to varying numerical properties of the multi-length-scale systems. In this paper, we propose a hybrid incomplete Cholesky (HIC) preconditioner and demonstrate its adaptivity to the multi-length-scale systems. In addition, we propose an extension of the compressed sparse column with row access (CSCR) sparse matrix storage format to efficiently accommodate the data access pattern to compute the HIC preconditioner. We show that for moderately correlated materials, the HIC preconditioner achieves the optimal linear scaling of the simulation. The development of a linear-scaling preconditioner for strongly correlated materials remains an open topic.

  14. Comparison of the Effects of the Different Methods for Computing the Slope Length Factor at a Watershed Scale

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fu Suhua

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The slope length factor is one of the parameters of the Universal Soil Loss Equation (USLE and the Revised Universal Soil Loss Equation (RUSLE and is sometimes calculated based on a digital elevation model (DEM. The methods for calculating the slope length factor are important because the values obtained may depend on the methods used for calculation. The purpose of this study was to compare the difference in spatial distribution of the slope length factor between the different methods at a watershed scale. One method used the uniform slope length factor equation (USLFE where the effects of slope irregularities (such as slope gradient, etc. on soil erosion by water were not considered. The other method used segmented slope length factor equation(SSLFE which considered the effects of slope irregularities on soil erosion by water. The Arc Macro Language (AML Version 4 program for the revised universal soil loss equation(RUSLE.which uses the USLFE, was chosen to calculate the slope length factor. In a parallel analysis, the AML code of RUSLE Version 4 was modified according to the SSLFE to calculate the slope length factor. Two watersheds with different slope and gully densities were chosen. The results show that the slope length factor and soil loss using the USLFE method were lower than those using the SSLFE method, especially on downslopes watershed with more frequent steep slopes and higher gully densities. In addition, the slope length factor and soil loss calculated by the USLFE showed less spatial variation.

  15. Scrape-off Layer Flows With Pressure Gradient Scale Length ~ {rho}{sub p}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robert J. Goldston

    2013-03-08

    A heuristic model for the plasma scrape-off width balances magnetic drifts against parallel loss at c{sub s} /2, resulting in a SOL width ~ {rho}{sub p}. T{sub sep} is calculated from Spitzer–Härm parallel thermal conduction. This results in a prediction for the power scrape-off width in quantitative agreement both in magnitude and scaling with recent experimental data. To achieve the ~ c{sub s} /2 flow assumed in this model and measured experimentally sets requirements on the ratio of upstream to total SOL particle sources, relative to the square-root of the ratio of target to upstream temperature. The Pfisch-Schlüter model for equilibrium flows has been modified to allow near-sonic flows, appropriate for gradient scale lengths of order {rho}{sub p}, resulting in a new quadrupole radial flow pattern. The strong parallel flows and plasma charging implied by this model suggest a mechanism for H-mode transition, consistent with many observations

  16. Scrape-off layer flows with pressure gradient scale length ∼ρ{sub p}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goldston, Robert J., E-mail: rgoldston@pppl.gov [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, MS-41, Princeton, NJ 08543 (United States)

    2013-07-15

    A heuristic model for the plasma scrape-off width balances magnetic drifts against parallel loss at c{sub s}/2, resulting in a SOL width ∼ρ{sub p}. T{sub sep} is calculated from Spitzer–Härm parallel thermal conduction. This results in a prediction for the power scrape-off width in quantitative agreement both in magnitude and scaling with recent experimental data. To achieve the ∼c{sub s}/2 flow assumed in this model and measured experimentally sets requirements on the ratio of upstream to total SOL particle sources, relative to the square-root of the ratio of target to upstream temperature. The Pfisch–Schlüter model for equilibrium flows has been modified to allow near-sonic flows, appropriate for gradient scale lengths of order ρ{sub p}, resulting in a new quadrupole radial flow pattern. The strong parallel flows and plasma charging implied by this model suggest a mechanism for H-mode transition, consistent with many observations.

  17. Evaluation of a deformable musculoskeletal model for estimating muscle-tendon lengths during crouch gait.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnold, A S; Blemker, S S; Delp, S L

    2001-03-01

    The hamstrings and psoas muscles are often lengthened surgically in an attempt to correct crouch gait in persons with cerebral palsy. The purpose of this study was to determine if, and under what conditions, medial hamstrings and psoas lengths estimated with a "deformable" musculoskeletal model accurately characterize the lengths of the muscles during walking in individuals with crouch gait. Computer models of four subjects with crouch gait were developed from magnetic resonance (MR) images. These models were used in conjunction with the subjects' measured gait kinematics to calculate the muscle-tendon lengths at the body positions corresponding to walking. The lengths calculated with the MR-based models were normalized and were compared to the lengths estimated using a deformable generic model. The deformable model was either left undeformed and unscaled, or was deformed or scaled to more closely approximate the femoral geometry or bone dimensions of each subject. In most cases, differences between the normalized lengths of the medial hamstrings computed with the deformable and MR-based models were less than 5 mm. Differences in the psoas lengths computed with the deformable and MR-based models were also small (psoas lengths in persons with neuromuscular disorders.

  18. Mathematical model of alternative mechanism of telomere length maintenance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kollár, Richard; Bod'ová, Katarína; Nosek, Jozef; Tomáška, L'ubomír

    2014-03-01

    Biopolymer length regulation is a complex process that involves a large number of biological, chemical, and physical subprocesses acting simultaneously across multiple spatial and temporal scales. An illustrative example important for genomic stability is the length regulation of telomeres—nucleoprotein structures at the ends of linear chromosomes consisting of tandemly repeated DNA sequences and a specialized set of proteins. Maintenance of telomeres is often facilitated by the enzyme telomerase but, particularly in telomerase-free systems, the maintenance of chromosomal termini depends on alternative lengthening of telomeres (ALT) mechanisms mediated by recombination. Various linear and circular DNA structures were identified to participate in ALT, however, dynamics of the whole process is still poorly understood. We propose a chemical kinetics model of ALT with kinetic rates systematically derived from the biophysics of DNA diffusion and looping. The reaction system is reduced to a coagulation-fragmentation system by quasi-steady-state approximation. The detailed treatment of kinetic rates yields explicit formulas for expected size distributions of telomeres that demonstrate the key role played by the J factor, a quantitative measure of bending of polymers. The results are in agreement with experimental data and point out interesting phenomena: an appearance of very long telomeric circles if the total telomere density exceeds a critical value (excess mass) and a nonlinear response of the telomere size distributions to the amount of telomeric DNA in the system. The results can be of general importance for understanding dynamics of telomeres in telomerase-independent systems as this mode of telomere maintenance is similar to the situation in tumor cells lacking telomerase activity. Furthermore, due to its universality, the model may also serve as a prototype of an interaction between linear and circular DNA structures in various settings.

  19. Relations between overturning length scales at the Spanish planetary boundary layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    López, Pilar; Cano, José L.

    2016-04-01

    tides and Thorpe scale in Uchiura Bay, Journal of Oceanography, 59, 845-850, 2003. López P., Cano J. L., Cano D. and Tijera M.: Thorpe method applied to planetary boundary layer data, Il Nuovo Cimento, 31C(5-6), 881-892, 2008. DOI: 10.1393/ncc/i2009-10338-3. Lorke A. and Wüest A.: Probability density of displacement and overturning length scales under diverse stratification, J. Geophys. Res., 107 (C12), 3214-3225, 2002. Piera, J., Roget, E. and Catalan, J.: Turbulent patch identification in microstructure profiles: a method based on wavelet denoising and Thorpe displacement analysis, J. Atmospheric and Oceanic Technology, 19, 1390-1402, 2002. Piera, J.: Signal processing of microstructure profiles: integrating turbulent spatial scales in aquatic ecological modelling, Ph. D. Thesis, Gerona University, Spain, 2004. Smyth, W. D. and Moum, J. N.: Length scales of turbulence in stably stratified mixing layers, Phys. Fluids., 12, 1327-1342, 2000. Thorpe, S.A.: Turbulence and Mixing in a Scottish Loch, Philos. Trans. R. Soc. London (Ser. A), 286(1334), 125-18, 1977.

  20. Zebrafish brain mapping--standardized spaces, length scales, and the power of N and n.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunter, Paul R; Hendry, Aenea C; Lowe, Andrew S

    2015-06-01

    Mapping anatomical and functional parameters of the zebrafish brain is moving apace. Research communities undertaking such studies are becoming ever larger and more diverse. The unique features, tools, and technologies associated with zebrafish are propelling them as the 21st century model organism for brain mapping. Uniquely positioned as a vertebrate model system, the zebrafish enables imaging of anatomy and function at different length scales from intraneuronal compartments to sparsely distributed whole brain patterns. With a variety of diverse and established statistical modeling and analytic methods available from the wider brain mapping communities, the richness of zebrafish neuroimaging data is being realized. The statistical power of population observations (N) within and across many samples (n) projected onto a standardized space will provide vast databases for data-driven biological approaches. This article reviews key brain mapping initiatives at different levels of scale that highlight the potential of zebrafish brain mapping. By way of introduction to the next wave of brain mappers, an accessible introduction to the key concepts and caveats associated with neuroimaging are outlined and discussed.

  1. Magnetically stabilized bed dust filters-Analysis through variable length scale approach

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jordan Hristov

    2007-01-01

    Magnetically stabilized beds are packed beds subjected to fluid-driven deformation and controlled by magnetically induced interparticle forces.This paper deals with magnetically stabilized beds as deformable porous media and describes their application in dust filtration. The Richardson-Zaki scaling law, U/Ut = εn describes the field controlled bed expansion via the exponent n, that yields a porosity-dependent flow length scale dc =dpεn.The paper addresses two issues: (i) deformation characteristics by assuming homogeneous bed expansion and a definition of bed variable flow length scale; (ii) dust filtration characteristics such as filter coefficient, specific deposit and filtration efficiency expressed in terms of the variable flow length scale and illustrated by experimental data.

  2. Large-scale length that could determine the mean rate of energy dissipation in turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Mouri, H; Kawashima, Y; Hashimoto, K

    2012-01-01

    The mean rate of energy dissipation in turbulence is traditionally assumed to scale with parameters of the energy-containing large scales, i.e., the root-mean-square fluctuation of the longitudinal velocity u and its correlation length L(u). However, the resultant scaling coefficient C(u) is known to depend on the large-scale configuration of the flow. We define the correlation length L(u2) of the local energy u2, study the scaling coefficient C(u2) with experimental data of several flows, and find a possibility that C(u2) does not depend on the flow configuration. Not L(u) but rather L(u2) could scale with the typical size of the energy-containing eddies, so that L(u2) determines the mean rate at which the energy is transferred from those eddies to the smaller eddies and is eventually dissipated into heat.

  3. Minimal Length Effects on Entanglement Entropy of Spherically Symmetric Black Holes in Brick Wall Model

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Peng; Ying, Shuxuan

    2015-01-01

    We compute the black hole horizon entanglement entropy for a massless scalar field in the brick wall model by incorporating the minimal length. Taking the minimal length effects on the occupation number $n(\\omega,l)$ and the Hawking temperature into consideration, we obtain the leading UV divergent term and the subleading logarithmic term in the entropy. The leading divergent term scales with the horizon area. The subleading logarithmic term is the same as that in the usual brick wall model without the minimal length.

  4. Statistical theory and transition in multiple-scale-lengths turbulence in plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Itoh, Sanae-I. [Research Institute for Applied Mechanics, Kyushu Univ., Kasuga, Fukuoka (Japan); Itoh, Kimitaka [National Inst. for Fusion Science, Toki, Gifu (Japan)

    2001-06-01

    The statistical theory of strong turbulence in inhomogeneous plasmas is developed for the cases where fluctuations with different scale-lengths coexist. Nonlinear interactions in the same kind of fluctuations as well as nonlinear interplay between different classes of fluctuations are kept in the analysis. Nonlinear interactions are modelled as turbulent drag, nonlinear noise and nonlinear drive, and a set of Langevin equations is formulated. With the help of an Ansatz of a large number of degrees of freedom with positive Lyapunov number, Langevin equations are solved and the fluctuation dissipation theorem in the presence of strong plasma turbulence has been derived. A case where two driving mechanisms (one for micro mode and the other for semi-micro mode) coexist is investigated. It is found that there are several states of fluctuations: in one state, the micro mode is excited and the semi-micro mode is quenched; in the other state, the semi-micro mode is excited, and the micro mode remains at finite but suppressed level. New type of turbulence transition is obtained, and a cusp type catastrophe is revealed. A phase diagram is drawn for turbulence which is composed of multiple classes of fluctuations. Influence of the inhomogeneous global radial electric field is discussed. A new insight is given for the physics of internal transport barrier. Finally, the nonlocal heat transport due to the long-wave-length fluctuations, which are noise-pumped by shorter-wave-length ones, is analyzed and the impact on transient transport problems is discussed. (author)

  5. The effects of geometry and length scale on nanomechanical properties in constrained systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jungk, John Michael

    2005-07-01

    The determination of mechanical properties in nanoscale geometries is becoming increasingly important as microsystem and integrated circuit technologies continue to mature. Many devices produced by these technologies are composed of materials with critical sample dimensions smaller than 100 nm. In microelectronics, this can be the thickness of a metallization or dielectric layer, while wear coatings on MEMS devices are frequently thinner than this length scale. Since structures of this type are susceptible to plasticity and fracture as a result of either contact or residual stresses, it is critical that the mechanical behavior of the individual components be well described. This thesis is directed at the development of methods for characterizing the mechanical properties in small volume systems. Using instrumented indentation techniques, typically called nanoindentation, a systematic study of the mechanical response of materials ranging from ductile metals to brittle ceramics was executed. More specifically, investigations into how single length scale approaches may be used to describe mechanical properties such as indentation hardening, ductile film delamination and strain energy release rates were performed. In addition, the acoustic energy released during the fracture of brittle ceramics was related to both stress intensity and a strain energy release rate. Finite element simulations of nanoindentation tests were performed using ABAQUS, a commercially available material modeling software program. These simulations were used to separate individual film and substrate responses from the experimentally observed film/substrate composite mechanical behavior. Finally, quasi-tribological experiments were performed to probe for transitions in friction or wear response as the local deformation varied from the nanoscale to the macroscale.

  6. Laser Acoustic Microstructure Analysis at the Micron and Nanometer Length Scale

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Telschow, K.L.; Hurley, D.H.

    2002-05-15

    Laser acoustic approaches to investigating the interaction of elastic waves with microstructure in materials is presented that probe both the micron and nanometer length scales. At the micron length scale, a full-field imaging approach is described that provides quantitative measurement of amplitude and phase of the out-of-plane acoustical motion at GHz frequencies. Specific lateral acoustic modes can be identified in addition to the primary thickness mode with spatial resolution sufficient to image wavelengths as small as 4.5 microns.

  7. Laser Acoustic Microstructure Analysis at the Micron and Nanometer Length Scale

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Telschow, Kenneth Louis; Hurley, David Howard

    2002-05-01

    Laser acoustic approaches to investigating the interaction of elastic waves with microstructure in materials is presented that probe both the micron and nanometer length scales. At the micron length scale, a full-field imaging approach is described that provides quantitative measurement of amplitude and phase of the out-of-plane acoustical motion at GHz frequencies. Specific lateral acoustic modes can be identified in addition to the primary thickness mode with spatial resolution sufficient to image wavelengths as small as 4.5 microns.

  8. Effect of regional lung inflation on ventilation heterogeneity at different length scales during mechanical ventilation of normal sheep lungs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wellman, Tyler J; Winkler, Tilo; Costa, Eduardo L V; Musch, Guido; Harris, R Scott; Venegas, Jose G; Vidal Melo, Marcos F

    2012-09-01

    Heterogeneous, small-airway diameters and alveolar derecruitment in poorly aerated regions of normal lungs could produce ventilation heterogeneity at those anatomic levels. We modeled the washout kinetics of (13)NN with positron emission tomography to examine how specific ventilation (sV) heterogeneity at different length scales is influenced by lung aeration. Three groups of anesthetized, supine sheep were studied: high tidal volume (Vt; 18.4 ± 4.2 ml/kg) and zero end-expiratory pressure (ZEEP) (n = 6); low Vt (9.2 ± 1.0 ml/kg) and ZEEP (n = 6); and low Vt (8.2 ± 0.2 ml/kg) and positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP; 19 ± 1 cmH(2)O) (n = 4). We quantified fractional gas content with transmission scans, and sV with emission scans of infused (13)NN-saline. Voxel (13)NN-washout curves were fit with one- or two-compartment models to estimate sV. Total heterogeneity, measured as SD[log(10)(sV)], was divided into length-scale ranges by measuring changes in variance of log(10)(sV), resulting from progressive filtering of sV images. High-Vt ZEEP showed higher sV heterogeneity at 36-mm (r = -0.72) length scales (P < 0.001). We conclude that sV heterogeneity at length scales <60 mm increases in poorly aerated regions of mechanically ventilated normal lungs, likely due to heterogeneous small-airway narrowing and alveolar derecruitment. PEEP reduces sV heterogeneity by maintaining lung expansion and airway patency at those small length scales.

  9. Observing Evolution in the Supergranular Length Scale During Periods of Low Solar Activity

    CERN Document Server

    McIntosh, Scott W; Hoch, Rachel A; Rast, Mark P; Ulrich, Roger K

    2011-01-01

    We present the initial results of an observational study into the variation of the dominant length-scale of quiet solar emission: supergranulation. This length-scale reflects the radiative energy in the plasma of the upper solar chromosphere and transition region at the magnetic network boundaries forming as a result of the relentless interaction of magnetic fields and convective motions of the Sun's interior. We demonstrate that a net difference of ~0.5Mm in the supergranular emission length-scale occurs when comparing observations cycle 22/23 and cycle 23/24 minima. This variation in scale is reproduced in the datasets of multiple space- and ground-based instruments and using different diagnostic measures. By means of extension, we consider the variation of the supergranular length-scale over multiple solar minima by analyzing a subset of the Mt Wilson Solar Observatory (MWO) Ca II K image record. The observations and analysis presented provide a tantalizing look at solar activity in the absence of large-sc...

  10. Interplay between multiple length and time scales in complex chemical systems

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Biman Bagchi; Charusita Chakravarty

    2010-07-01

    Processes in complex chemical systems, such as macromolecules, electrolytes, interfaces, micelles and enzymes, can span several orders of magnitude in length and time scales. The length and time scales of processes occurring over this broad time and space window are frequently coupled to give rise to the control necessary to ensure specificity and the uniqueness of the chemical phenomena. A combination of experimental, theoretical and computational techniques that can address a multiplicity of length and time scales is required in order to understand and predict structure and dynamics in such complex systems. This review highlights recent experimental developments that allow one to probe structure and dynamics at increasingly smaller length and time scales. The key theoretical approaches and computational strategies for integrating information across time-scales are discussed. The application of these ideas to understand phenomena in various areas, ranging from materials science to biology, is illustrated in the context of current developments in the areas of liquids and solvation, protein folding and aggregation and phase transitions, nucleation and self-assembly.

  11. Temporal coherence length of light in semiclassical field theory models

    CERN Document Server

    Jagielski, Borys; Vistnes, Arnt Inge

    2010-01-01

    The following work is motivated by the conceptual problems associated with the wave-particle duality and the notion of the photon. Two simple classical models for radiation from individual emitters are compared, one based on sines with random phasejumps, another based on pulse trains. The sum signal is calculated for a varying number of emitters. The focus lies on the final signal's statistical features quantified by means of the temporal coherence function and the temporal coherence length. We show how these features might be used to experimentally differentiate between the models. We also point to ambiguities in the definition of the temporal coherence length.

  12. Sub-pixel correlation length neutron imaging: Spatially resolved scattering information of microstructures on a macroscopic scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harti, Ralph P.; Strobl, Markus; Betz, Benedikt; Jefimovs, Konstantins; Kagias, Matias; Grünzweig, Christian

    2017-01-01

    Neutron imaging and scattering give data of significantly different nature and traditional methods leave a gap of accessible structure sizes at around 10 micrometers. Only in recent years overlap in the probed size ranges could be achieved by independent application of high resolution scattering and imaging methods, however without providing full structural information when microstructures vary on a macroscopic scale. In this study we show how quantitative neutron dark-field imaging with a novel experimental approach provides both sub-pixel resolution with respect to microscopic correlation lengths and imaging of macroscopic variations of the microstructure. Thus it provides combined information on multiple length scales. A dispersion of micrometer sized polystyrene colloids was chosen as a model system to study gravity induced crystallisation of microspheres on a macro scale, including the identification of ordered as well as unordered phases. Our results pave the way to study heterogeneous systems locally in a previously impossible manner. PMID:28303923

  13. Decomposing the queue length distribution of processor-sharing models into queue lengths of permanent customer queues

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cheung, S.-K.; Berg, H. van den; Boucherie, R.J.

    2005-01-01

    We obtain a decomposition result for the steady state queue length distribution in egalitarian processor-sharing (PS) models. In particular, for multi-class egalitarian PS queues, we show that the marginal queue length distribution for each class equals the queue length distribution of an equivalent

  14. Scale and construal: how larger measurement units shrink length estimates and expand mental horizons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maglio, Sam J; Trope, Yaacov

    2011-02-01

    Scale can vary by requiring a different number of units to measure the same target. But what are the consequences of using fewer, larger units? We draw on past psychophysical research that shows how using fewer units reduces clutter in measurement, translating to shorter length estimates. Additionally, we propose that larger scale is associated with targets further from a person's immediate experience (i.e., psychologically distant) and higher order mental representation. Evidence from Study 1 indicates that framing a target as further away causes it to be estimated as shorter because people use larger units to measure it compared to when the same target is framed as nearby. Two subsequent studies suggest that direct manipulation of larger (versus smaller) measurement scale produces not only shorter length estimates, but also more distal timing judgments (Study 2) and abstract mental representation (Study 3). Implications for scale and level of mental construal are discussed.

  15. What structural length scales can be detected by the spectral variance of a microscope image?

    OpenAIRE

    Cherkezyan, Lusik; Subramanian, Hariharan; Backman, Vadim

    2014-01-01

    A spectroscopic microscope, configured to detect interference spectra of backscattered light in the far zone, quantifies the statistics of refractive-index (RI) distribution via the spectral variance (Σ̃2) of the acquired bright-field image. Its sensitivity to subtle structural changes within weakly scattering, label-free media at subdiffraction scales shows great promise in fields from material science to medical diagnostics. We further investigate the length-scale sensitivity of Σ̃ and reve...

  16. Modified pendulum model for mean step length estimation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González, Rafael C; Alvarez, Diego; López, Antonio M; Alvarez, Juan C

    2007-01-01

    Step length estimation is an important issue in areas such as gait analysis, sport training or pedestrian localization. It has been shown that the mean step length can be computed by means of a triaxial accelerometer placed near the center of gravity of the human body. Estimations based on the inverted pendulum model are prone to underestimate the step length, and must be corrected by calibration. In this paper we present a modified pendulum model in which all the parameters correspond to anthropometric data of the individual. The method has been tested with a set of volunteers, both males and females. Experimental results show that this method provides an unbiased estimation of the actual displacement with a standard deviation lower than 2.1%.

  17. Nano-scaled graphene platelets with a high length-to-width aspect ratio

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhamu, Aruna; Guo, Jiusheng; Jang, Bor Z.

    2010-09-07

    This invention provides a nano-scaled graphene platelet (NGP) having a thickness no greater than 100 nm and a length-to-width ratio no less than 3 (preferably greater than 10). The NGP with a high length-to-width ratio can be prepared by using a method comprising (a) intercalating a carbon fiber or graphite fiber with an intercalate to form an intercalated fiber; (b) exfoliating the intercalated fiber to obtain an exfoliated fiber comprising graphene sheets or flakes; and (c) separating the graphene sheets or flakes to obtain nano-scaled graphene platelets. The invention also provides a nanocomposite material comprising an NGP with a high length-to-width ratio. Such a nanocomposite can become electrically conductive with a small weight fraction of NGPs. Conductive composites are particularly useful for shielding of sensitive electronic equipment against electromagnetic interference (EMI) or radio frequency interference (RFI), and for electrostatic charge dissipation.

  18. Numerical scalings of the decay lengths in the scrape-off layer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Militello, F.; Naulin, V; Nielsen, Anders Henry

    2013-01-01

    Numerical simulations of L-mode turbulence in the scrape-off layer (SOL) are used to construct power scaling laws for the characteristic decay lengths of the temperature, density and heat flux at the outer mid-plane. Most of the results obtained are in qualitative agreement with the experimental...

  19. Microphase separation in multiblock copolymer melts : Nonconventional morphologies and two-length-scale switching

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smirnova, YG; ten Brinke, G; Erukhimovich, IY; Smirnova, Yuliya G.; Erukhimovich, Igor Ya.

    2006-01-01

    The phase behavior of A(fmN)(B(N/2)A(N/2))B(1-f)mN multiblock copolymer melts is studied within the weak segregation theory. The interplay between ordering on different length scales is shown to cause dramatic changes both in the ordered phase symmetry and periodicity upon small variation of the arc

  20. Enhanced Strain in Functional Nanoporous Gold with a Dual Microscopic Length Scale Structure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Detsi, Eric; Punzhin, Sergey; Rao, Jiancun; Onck, Patrick R.; De Hosson, Jeff Th. M.

    2012-01-01

    We have synthesized nanoporous Au with a dual microscopic length scale by exploiting the crystal structure of the alloy precursor. The synthesized mesoscopic material is characterized by stacked Au layers of submicrometer thickness. In addition, each layer displays nanoporosity through the entire bu

  1. Microphase separation in multiblock copolymer melts : Nonconventional morphologies and two-length-scale switching

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smirnova, YG; ten Brinke, G; Erukhimovich, IY; Smirnova, Yuliya G.; Erukhimovich, Igor Ya.

    2006-01-01

    The phase behavior of A(fmN)(B(N/2)A(N/2))B(1-f)mN multiblock copolymer melts is studied within the weak segregation theory. The interplay between ordering on different length scales is shown to cause dramatic changes both in the ordered phase symmetry and periodicity upon small variation of the arc

  2. Roughness controlled superhydrophobicity on single nanometer length scale with metal nanoparticles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    ten Brink, Gert H.; Foley, Nolan; Zwaan, Darin; Kooi, Bart J.; Palasantzas, Georgios

    2015-01-01

    Here we demonstrate high water pinning nanostructures and trapping of water droplets onto surfaces via control of roughness on a single nanometer length-scale generated by deposition of preformed gas phase distinct copper nanoparticles on hydrophilic and hydrophobic surfaces. It was found that the c

  3. Roughness controlled superhydrophobicity on single nanometer length scale with metal nanoparticles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    ten Brink, Gert H.; Foley, Nolan; Zwaan, Darin; Kooi, Bart J.; Palasantzas, Georgios

    2015-01-01

    Here we demonstrate high water pinning nanostructures and trapping of water droplets onto surfaces via control of roughness on a single nanometer length-scale generated by deposition of preformed gas phase distinct copper nanoparticles on hydrophilic and hydrophobic surfaces. It was found that the

  4. Wind direction variations in the natural wind – A new length scale

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansson, Jens; Christensen, Silas Sverre

    2017-01-01

    During an observation period of e.g. 10min, the wind direction will differ from its mean direction for short periods of time, and a body of air will pass by from that direction before the direction changes once again. The present paper introduces a new length scale which we have labeled the angul...

  5. Adding Curvature to Minimum Description Length Shape Models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thodberg, Hans Henrik; Ólafsdóttir, Hildur

    2003-01-01

    The Minimum Description Length (MDL) approach to shape modelling seeks a compact description of a set of shapes in terms of the coordinates of marks on the shapes. It has been shown that the mark positions resulting from this optimisation to a large extent solve the so-called point correspondence...

  6. Scale and time dependence of serial correlations in word-length time series of written texts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez, E.; Aguilar-Cornejo, M.; Femat, R.; Alvarez-Ramirez, J.

    2014-11-01

    This work considered the quantitative analysis of large written texts. To this end, the text was converted into a time series by taking the sequence of word lengths. The detrended fluctuation analysis (DFA) was used for characterizing long-range serial correlations of the time series. To this end, the DFA was implemented within a rolling window framework for estimating the variations of correlations, quantified in terms of the scaling exponent, strength along the text. Also, a filtering derivative was used to compute the dependence of the scaling exponent relative to the scale. The analysis was applied to three famous English-written literary narrations; namely, Alice in Wonderland (by Lewis Carrol), Dracula (by Bram Stoker) and Sense and Sensibility (by Jane Austen). The results showed that high correlations appear for scales of about 50-200 words, suggesting that at these scales the text contains the stronger coherence. The scaling exponent was not constant along the text, showing important variations with apparent cyclical behavior. An interesting coincidence between the scaling exponent variations and changes in narrative units (e.g., chapters) was found. This suggests that the scaling exponent obtained from the DFA is able to detect changes in narration structure as expressed by the usage of words of different lengths.

  7. Drift Scale THM Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J. Rutqvist

    2004-10-07

    This model report documents the drift scale coupled thermal-hydrological-mechanical (THM) processes model development and presents simulations of the THM behavior in fractured rock close to emplacement drifts. The modeling and analyses are used to evaluate the impact of THM processes on permeability and flow in the near-field of the emplacement drifts. The results from this report are used to assess the importance of THM processes on seepage and support in the model reports ''Seepage Model for PA Including Drift Collapse'' and ''Abstraction of Drift Seepage'', and to support arguments for exclusion of features, events, and processes (FEPs) in the analysis reports ''Features, Events, and Processes in Unsaturated Zone Flow and Transport and Features, Events, and Processes: Disruptive Events''. The total system performance assessment (TSPA) calculations do not use any output from this report. Specifically, the coupled THM process model is applied to simulate the impact of THM processes on hydrologic properties (permeability and capillary strength) and flow in the near-field rock around a heat-releasing emplacement drift. The heat generated by the decay of radioactive waste results in elevated rock temperatures for thousands of years after waste emplacement. Depending on the thermal load, these temperatures are high enough to cause boiling conditions in the rock, resulting in water redistribution and altered flow paths. These temperatures will also cause thermal expansion of the rock, with the potential of opening or closing fractures and thus changing fracture permeability in the near-field. Understanding the THM coupled processes is important for the performance of the repository because the thermally induced permeability changes potentially effect the magnitude and spatial distribution of percolation flux in the vicinity of the drift, and hence the seepage of water into the drift. This is important because

  8. Short length scale mantle heterogeneity beneath Iceland probed by glacial modulation of melting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sims, Kenneth W. W.; Maclennan, John; Blichert-Toft, Janne; Mervine, Evelyn M.; Blusztajn, Jurek; Grönvold, Karl

    2013-10-01

    Glacial modulation of melting beneath Iceland provides a unique opportunity to better understand both the nature and length scale of mantle heterogeneity. At the end of the last glacial period, ∼13 000 yr BP, eruption rates were ∼20-100 times greater than in glacial or late postglacial times and geophysical modeling posits that rapid melting of the large ice sheet covering Iceland caused a transient increase in mantle decompression melting rates. Here we present the first time-series of Sr-Nd-Hf-Pb isotopic data for a full glacial cycle from a spatially confined region of basaltic volcanism in northern Iceland. Basalts and picrites erupted during the early postglacial burst of volcanic activity are systematically offset to more depleted isotopic compositions than those of lavas erupted during glacial or recent (Iceland is heterogeneous on small (glacial unloading indicates that the isotopic composition of mantle heterogeneities can be linked to their melting behavior. The present geochemical data can be accounted for by a melting model in which a lithologically heterogeneous mantle source contains an enriched component more fusible than its companion depleted component.

  9. Low frequency energy scavenging using sub-wave length scale acousto-elastic metamaterial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Riaz U. Ahmed

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available This letter presents the possibility of energy scavenging (ES utilizing the physics of acousto-elastic metamaterial (AEMM at low frequencies (<∼3KHz. It is proposed to use the AEMM in a dual mode (Acoustic Filter and Energy Harvester, simultaneously. AEMM’s are typically reported for filtering acoustic waves by trapping or guiding the acoustic energy, whereas this letter shows that the dynamic energy trapped inside the soft constituent (matrix of metamaterials can be significantly harvested by strategically embedding piezoelectric wafers in the matrix. With unit cell AEMM model, we experimentally asserted that at lower acoustic frequencies (< ∼3 KHz, maximum power in the micro Watts (∼35µW range can be generated, whereas, recently reported phononic crystal based metamaterials harvested only nano Watt (∼30nW power against 10KΩ resistive load. Efficient energy scavengers at low acoustic frequencies are almost absent due to large required size relevant to the acoustic wavelength. Here we report sub wave length scale energy scavengers utilizing the coupled physics of local, structural and matrix resonances. Upon validation of the argument through analytical, numerical and experimental studies, a multi-frequency energy scavenger (ES with multi-cell model is designed with varying geometrical properties capable of scavenging energy (power output from ∼10µW – ∼90µW between 0.2 KHz and 1.5 KHz acoustic frequencies.

  10. Dependence of exponents on text length versus finite-size scaling for word-frequency distributions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corral, Álvaro; Font-Clos, Francesc

    2017-08-01

    Some authors have recently argued that a finite-size scaling law for the text-length dependence of word-frequency distributions cannot be conceptually valid. Here we give solid quantitative evidence for the validity of this scaling law, using both careful statistical tests and analytical arguments based on the generalized central-limit theorem applied to the moments of the distribution (and obtaining a novel derivation of Heaps' law as a by-product). We also find that the picture of word-frequency distributions with power-law exponents that decrease with text length [X. Yan and P. Minnhagen, Physica A 444, 828 (2016), 10.1016/j.physa.2015.10.082] does not stand with rigorous statistical analysis. Instead, we show that the distributions are perfectly described by power-law tails with stable exponents, whose values are close to 2, in agreement with the classical Zipf's law. Some misconceptions about scaling are also clarified.

  11. Modelling length of hospital stay in motor victims

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mercedes Ayuso-Gutiérrez

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To analyze which socio-demographic and other factors related to motor injuries affect the length of hospital recovery stay. Materials and methods. In the study a sample of 17 932 motor accidents was used. All the crashes occurred in Spain between 2000 and 2007. Different regression models were fitted to data to identify and measure the impact of a set of explanatory regressors. Results. Time of hospital stay for men is on average 41% larger than for women. When the victim has a fracture as a consequence of the accident, the mean time of hospital stay is multiplied by five. Injuries located in lower extremities, the head and abdomen are associated with greater hospitalization lengths. Conclusions. Gender, age and type of victim, as well as the location and nature of injuries, are found to be factors that have significant impact on the expected length of hospital stay.

  12. Cycle length maximization in PWRs using empirical core models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Okafor, K.C.; Aldemir, T.

    1987-01-01

    The problem of maximizing cycle length in nuclear reactors through optimal fuel and poison management has been addressed by many investigators. An often-used neutronic modeling technique is to find correlations between the state and control variables to describe the response of the core to changes in the control variables. In this study, a set of linear correlations, generated by two-dimensional diffusion-depletion calculations, is used to find the enrichment distribution that maximizes cycle length for the initial core of a pressurized water reactor (PWR). These correlations (a) incorporate the effect of composition changes in all the control zones on a given fuel assembly and (b) are valid for a given range of control variables. The advantage of using such correlations is that the cycle length maximization problem can be reduced to a linear programming problem.

  13. Length Scale of Free Stream Turbulence and Its Impact on Bypass Transition in a Boundary Layer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Grzelak

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available An experimental investigation was carried out to study the turbulent flow over a flat plate in a subsonic wind tunnel. The enhanced level of turbulence was generated by five wicker grids with square meshes, and different parameters (diameter of the grid rod d = 0.3 to 3 mm and the grid mesh size M = 1 to 30 mm. The velocity of the flow was measured by means of a 1D hot-wire probe, suitable for measurements in a boundary layer. The main aim of the investigation was to explore the influence of the free stream turbulence length scale on the onset of laminar-turbulent bypass transition in a boundary layer on a flat plate. For this purpose, several transition correlations were presented, including intensity and length scales of turbulence, both at the leading edge of a plate and at the onset of transition. The paper ends with an attempt to create a correlation, which takes into account a simultaneous impact of turbulence intensity and turbulence scale on the boundary layer transition. To assess the isotropy of turbulence, the skewness factor of the flow velocity distribution was determined. Also several longitudinal scales of turbulence were determined and compared (integral scale, dissipation scale, Taylor microscale and Kolmogorov scale for different grids and different velocities of the mean flow U = 4, 6, 10, 15, 20 m/s.

  14. Frequency-wavenumber velocity spectra, Taylor's hypothesis, and length scales in a natural gravel bed river

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macmahan, Jamie; Reniers, Ad; Ashley, Will; Thornton, Ed

    2012-09-01

    Macroscale turbulent coherent flow structures in a natural fast-flowing river were examined with a combination of a novel 2 MHz Acoustic Doppler Beam (ADB) and a Maximum Likelihood Estimator (MLE) to characterize the streamwise horizontal length scales and persistence of coherent flow structures by measuring the frequency (f)-streamwise-wavenumber (ks) energy density velocity spectrum, E(f, ks), for the first time in natural rivers. The ADB was deployed under a range of Froude numbers (0.1-0.6) at high Reynolds numbers (˜106) based on depth and velocity conditions within a gravel bed reach of the Kootenai River, Idaho. The MLE employed on the ADB data increased our ability to describe river motions with relatively long (>10 m) length scales in ˜1 m water depths. The E(f, ks) spectra fell along a ridge described by V = f/ks, where Vis the mean velocity over depth, consistent with Taylor's hypothesis. New, consistent length scale measures are defined based on averaged wavelengths of the low-frequencyE(f, ks) and coherence spectra. Energetic (˜50% of the total spectral energy), low-frequency (f 1 m/s,Lmwere found to be significantly longer than their corresponding coherence lengths, suggesting that the turbulent structures evolve rapidly under these conditions. This is attributed to the stretching and concomitant deformation of preexisting macroturbulent motions by the ubiquitous bathymetry-induced spatial flow accelerations present in a natural gravel bed river.

  15. A Model for Geometry-Dependent Errors in Length Artifacts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawyer, Daniel; Parry, Brian; Phillips, Steven; Blackburn, Chris; Muralikrishnan, Bala

    2012-01-01

    We present a detailed model of dimensional changes in long length artifacts, such as step gauges and ball bars, due to bending under gravity. The comprehensive model is based on evaluation of the gauge points relative to the neutral bending surface. It yields the errors observed when the gauge points are located off the neutral bending surface of a bar or rod but also reveals the significant error associated with out-of-straightness of a bar or rod even if the gauge points are located in the neutral bending surface. For example, one experimental result shows a length change of greater than 1.5 µm on a 1 m ball bar with an out-of-straightness of 0.4 mm. This and other results are in agreement with the model presented in this paper.

  16. Seeing the Forest in Lieu of the Trees: Continuum Simulations of Cell Membranes at Large Length Scales.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sapp, Kayla; Shlomovitz, Roie; Maibaum, Lutz

    Biological membranes exhibit long-range spatial structure in both chemical composition and geometric shape, which gives rise to remarkable physical phenomena and important biological functions. Continuum models that describe these effects play an important role in our understanding of membrane biophysics at large length scales. We review the mathematical framework used to describe both composition and shape degrees of freedom, and present best practices to implement such models in a computer simulation. We discuss in detail two applications of continuum models of cell membranes: the formation of microemulsion and modulated phases, and the effect of membrane-mediated interactions on the assembly of membrane proteins.

  17. Modeling DNA beacons at the mesoscopic scale

    CERN Document Server

    Errami, Jalal; Theodorakopoulos, Nikos

    2007-01-01

    We report model calculations on DNA single strands which describe the equilibrium dynamics and kinetics of hairpin formation and melting. Modeling is at the level of single bases. Strand rigidity is described in terms of simple polymer models; alternative calculations performed using the freely rotating chain and the discrete Kratky-Porod models are reported. Stem formation is modeled according to the Peyrard-Bishop-Dauxois Hamiltonian. The kinetics of opening and closing is described in terms of a diffusion-controlled motion in an effective free energy landscape. Melting profiles, dependence of melting temperature on loop length, and kinetic time scales are in semiquantitative agreement with experimental data obtained from fluorescent DNA beacons forming poly(T) loops. Variation in strand rigidity is not sufficient to account for the large activation enthalpy of closing and the strong loop length dependence observed in hairpins forming poly(A) loops. Implications for modeling single strands of DNA or RNA are...

  18. A Test Of Newtonian Gravity At The 25 Micron Length Scale

    CERN Document Server

    Smullin, S J

    2005-01-01

    Several recent predictions of extra dimensions and exotic particles include Yukawa-type modifications to the classical Newtonian gravitational potential at length scales and magnitudes that may be accessible in tabletop experiments. To test these theories of physics beyond the Standard Model, we have built a probe to measure forces as small as 10−18 N between masses separated by distances on the order of 25 microns. The force sensor is a micromachined silicon cantilever. A gold test mass approximately (50 x 50 x 30) μm3 in size is glued to the end of the cantilever. An alternating pattern of gold and silicon bars is oscillated below the test mass; the coupling between the test mass and the varying gravitational field of the moving drive mass excites the cantilever on resonance. A fiber interferometer measures the cantilever motion and from this measurement, the force between the masses is deduced. The experiment is run at low temperatures in vacuum to reduce the thermal noise of the cantileve...

  19. A simple physical model predicts small exon length variations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available One of the most common splice variations are small exon length variations caused by the use of alternative donor or acceptor splice sites that are in very close proximity on the pre-mRNA. Among these, three-nucleotide variations at so-called NAGNAG tandem acceptor sites have recently attracted considerable attention, and it has been suggested that these variations are regulated and serve to fine-tune protein forms by the addition or removal of a single amino acid. In this paper we first show that in-frame exon length variations are generally overrepresented and that this overrepresentation can be quantitatively explained by the effect of nonsense-mediated decay. Our analysis allows us to estimate that about 50% of frame-shifted coding transcripts are targeted by nonsense-mediated decay. Second, we show that a simple physical model that assumes that the splicing machinery stochastically binds to nearby splice sites in proportion to the affinities of the sites correctly predicts the relative abundances of different small length variations at both boundaries. Finally, using the same simple physical model, we show that for NAGNAG sites, the difference in affinities of the neighboring sites for the splicing machinery accurately predicts whether splicing will occur only at the first site, splicing will occur only at the second site, or three-nucleotide splice variants are likely to occur. Our analysis thus suggests that small exon length variations are the result of stochastic binding of the spliceosome at neighboring splice sites. Small exon length variations occur when there are nearby alternative splice sites that have similar affinity for the splicing machinery.

  20. Length Scales of Magmatic Segments at Intermediate and Fast Spreading Ridges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boulahanis, B.; Carbotte, S. M.; Klein, E. M.; Smith, D. K.; Cannat, M.

    2014-12-01

    A synthesis of observations from fast and magmatically-robust intermediate spreading ridges suggest that fine-scale tectonic segments, previously classified as 3rd order, correspond with principle magmatic segments along these ridges, each with their own magmatic plumbing system in the crust and shallow mantle. In this study, we use multi-beam sonar data available for fast and intermediate spreading ridges to determine the length distribution of these segments for comparison with the primary segmentation of the ridge axis found at slower spreading ridges. A study of intermediate, slow and ultraslow-spreading ridges using global satellite-derived bathymetry indicates a dominant segment length of 53 km [Briais and Rabinowicz, J. Geophys. Res. 2002]. However, satellite-derived bathymetry cannot be used to identify fine-scale tectonic segmentation of fast and magmatically-robust intermediate spreading ridges due to the subdued low-relief expression of ridge-axis discontinuities along these spreading rates. This study focuses on the well-mapped regions of the East Pacific Rise between 13.35°S and 18°N, and the Galapagos Spreading Center between 85° and 95.38° W. We reexamine tectonic segmentation of the ridge axis previously identified in the literature and modify the locations of ridge-axis discontinuities defining segment ends in regions where modern multi-beam bathymetric data coverage has improved relative to that available in early studies. Discontinuities of first, second, and third order are used to define tectonic segment lengths. Initial results show a mean segment length of 42 km (standard deviation of 27 km) and a median of 33 km, with 85 segments studied, similar to the segment length distributions observed at slower spreading ridges. To further evaluate the hypothesis of principle magmatic segments, we also examine the relationship between fine-scale tectonic segmentation and properties of the crustal magmatic system imaged in prior seismic studies of

  1. Application of DDES and IDDES with shear layer adapted subgrid length-scale to separated flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guseva, E. K.; Garbaruk, A. V.; Strelets, M. Kh

    2016-11-01

    A comparative study is conducted of the original versions of Delayed Detached- Eddy Simulation (DDES) and Improved DDES (IDDES) and these approaches combined with “shear-layer-adapted” (SLA) subgrid length-scale proposed recently for resolving the issue of delayed RANS-to-LES transition in separated shear layers in global hybrid RANS-LES approaches. Computations were carried out of two separated flows: a transonic flow past M 219 cavity and a subsonic flow over NASA wall mounted hump. Results of the computations suggest that the use of the SLA subgrid length-scale considerably accelerates transition to resolved three-dimensional turbulence in the separated shear layers and substantially improves agreement with the experimental data.

  2. Characterizing tumor response to chemotherapy at various length scales using temporal diffusion spectroscopy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junzhong Xu

    Full Text Available Measurements of apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI have been suggested as potential imaging biomarkers for monitoring tumor response to treatment. However, conventional pulsed-gradient spin echo (PGSE methods incorporate relatively long diffusion times, and are usually sensitive to changes in cell density and necrosis. Diffusion temporal spectroscopy using the oscillating gradient spin echo (OGSE sequence is capable of probing short length scales, and may detect significant intracellular microstructural changes independent of gross cell density changes following anti-cancer treatment. To test this hypothesis, SW620 xenografts were treated by barasertib (AZD1152, a selective inhibitor of Aurora B kinase which causes SW620 cancer cells to develop polyploidy and increase in size following treatment, ultimately leading to cell death through apoptosis. Following treatment, the ADC values obtained by both the PGSE and low frequency OGSE methods increased. However, the ADC values at high gradient frequency (i.e. short diffusion times were significantly lower in treated tumors, consistent with increased intracellular restrictions/hindrances. This suggests that ADC values at long diffusion times are dominated by tumor microstructure at long length scales, and may not convey unambiguous information of subcellular space. While the diffusion temporal spectroscopy provides more comprehensive means to probe tumor microstructure at various length scales. This work is the first study to probe intracellular microstructural variations due to polyploidy following treatment using diffusion MRI in vivo. It is also the first observation of post-treatment ADC changes occurring in opposite directions at short and long diffusion times. The current study suggests that temporal diffusion spectroscopy potentially provides pharmacodynamic biomarkers of tumor early response which distinguish microstructural variations following

  3. Multi-Length-Scale Morphologies Driven by Mixed Additives in Porphyrin-Based Organic Photovoltaics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Ke; Miao, Jingsheng; Xiao, Liangang; Deng, Wanyuan; Kan, Yuanyuan; Liang, Tianxiang; Wang, Cheng; Huang, Fei; Peng, Junbiao; Cao, Yong; Liu, Feng; Russell, Thomas P; Wu, Hongbin; Peng, Xiaobin

    2016-06-01

    A new category of deep-absorbing small molecules is developed. Optimized devices driven by mixed additives show a remarkable short-circuit current of ≈20 mA cm(-2) and a highest power conversion efficiency of 9.06%. A multi-length-scale morphology is formed, which is fully characterized by resonant soft X-ray scattering, high-angle annular dark film image transmission electron microscopy, etc.

  4. The distribution of length scales generated by mixing processes in time-p eriodic chaotic flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muzzio, Fernando; Alvarez, Mario; Cerbelli, Stefano

    1997-11-01

    This talk explores in some detail the evolution of the spatial structure and th e statistical properties of partially mixed systems as they evolve on a torus by using a direct numerical simulation of the evolution of continuous material lin es as they are stretched, reoriented, and folded by the flow. In the time scale s of interest to mixing processes, such material lines grow exponentially fast, but much faster than predicted by the Lyapunov exponent. The filament develops into a self-similar structure; frequency distribution of filament densities corr esponding to different times collapses onto an invariant curve by a simple homog eneous scaling. It is shown that this behavior is a direct consequence of a gen eric asymptotic directionality property characteristic of 2D time-periodic flows . Mixture microstructure is also analyzed by computing the evolution of th e distribution of length scales in the flow. Once again, the result is a family of self-similar curves that scale homogeneously by the mean length scale, which collapses in inverse proportion to the rate of growth of the filament. It is s hown that this rate of collapse, which has direct relevance to mixing applicatio ns, can be accurately and straightforwardly predicted from the ergodic average o f the stretching field. Implications for mixing processes in realistic systems are also discussed.

  5. LPI Thresholds in Longer Scale Length Plasmas Driven by the Nike Laser*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weaver, J.; Oh, J.; Phillips, L.; Afeyan, B.; Seely, J.; Kehne, D.; Brown, C.; Obenschain, S.; Serlin, V.; Schmitt, A. J.; Feldman, U.; Holland, G.; Lehmberg, R. H.; McLean, E.; Manka, C.

    2010-11-01

    The Krypton-Fluoride (KrF) laser is an attractive driver for inertial confinement fusion due to its short wavelength (248nm), large bandwidth (1-3 THz), and beam smoothing by induced spatial incoherence. Experiments with the Nike KrF laser have demonstrated intensity thresholds for laser plasma instabilities (LPI) higher than reported for other high power lasers operating at longer wavelengths (>=351 nm). The previous Nike experiments used short pulses (350 ps FWHM) and small spots (<260 μm FWHM) that created short density scale length plasmas (Ln˜50-70 μm) from planar CH targets and demonstrated the onset of two-plasmon decay (2φp) at laser intensities ˜2x10^15 W/cm^2. This talk will present an overview of the current campaign that uses longer pulses (0.5-4.0 ns) to achieve greater density scale lengths (Ln˜100-200 μm). X-rays, emission near ^1/2φo and ^3/2φo harmonics, and reflected laser light have been monitored for onset of 2φp. The longer density scale lengths will allow better comparison to results from other laser facilities. *Work supported by DoE/NNSA and ONR.

  6. Aberration-Corrected Electron Beam Lithography at the One Nanometer Length Scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manfrinato, Vitor R; Stein, Aaron; Zhang, Lihua; Nam, Chang-Yong; Yager, Kevin G; Stach, Eric A; Black, Charles T

    2017-08-09

    Patterning materials efficiently at the smallest length scales is a longstanding challenge in nanotechnology. Electron-beam lithography (EBL) is the primary method for patterning arbitrary features, but EBL has not reliably provided sub-4 nm patterns. The few competing techniques that have achieved this resolution are orders of magnitude slower than EBL. In this work, we employed an aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscope for lithography to achieve unprecedented resolution. Here we show aberration-corrected EBL at the one nanometer length scale using poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) and have produced both the smallest isolated feature in any conventional resist (1.7 ± 0.5 nm) and the highest density patterns in PMMA (10.7 nm pitch for negative-tone and 17.5 nm pitch for positive-tone PMMA). We also demonstrate pattern transfer from the resist to semiconductor and metallic materials at the sub-5 nm scale. These results indicate that polymer-based nanofabrication can achieve feature sizes comparable to the Kuhn length of PMMA and ten times smaller than its radius of gyration. Use of aberration-corrected EBL will increase the resolution, speed, and complexity in nanomaterial fabrication.

  7. A new algebraic transition model based on stress length function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Meng-Juan; She, Zhen-Su

    2016-11-01

    Transition, as one of the two biggest challenges in turbulence research, is of critical importance for engineering application. For decades, the fundamental research seems to be unable to capture the quantitative details in real transition process. On the other hand, numerous empirical parameters in engineering transition models provide no unified description of the transition under varying physical conditions. Recently, we proposed a symmetry-based approach to canonical wall turbulence based on stress length function, which is here extended to describe the transition via a new algebraic transition model. With a multi-layer analytic form of the stress length function in both the streamwise and wall normal directions, the new model gives rise to accurate description of the mean field and friction coefficient, comparing with both the experimental and DNS results at different inlet conditions. Different types of transition process, such as the transition with varying incoming turbulence intensities or that with blow and suck disturbance, are described by only two or three model parameters, each of which has their own specific physical interpretation. Thus, the model enables one to extract physical information from both experimental and DNS data to reproduce the transition process, which may prelude to a new class of generalized transition model for engineering applications.

  8. Length-scale and strain rate-dependent mechanism of defect formation and fracture in carbon nanotubes under tensile loading

    Science.gov (United States)

    Javvaji, Brahmanandam; Raha, S.; Mahapatra, D. Roy

    2017-02-01

    Electromagnetic and thermo-mechanical forces play a major role in nanotube-based materials and devices. Under high-energy electron transport or high current densities, carbon nanotubes fail via sequential fracture. The failure sequence is governed by certain length scale and flow of current. We report a unified phenomenological model derived from molecular dynamic simulation data, which successfully captures the important physics of the complex failure process. Length-scale and strain rate-dependent defect nucleation, growth, and fracture in single-walled carbon nanotubes with diameters in the range of 0.47 to 2.03 nm and length which is about 6.17 to 26.45 nm are simulated. Nanotubes with long length and small diameter show brittle fracture, while those with short length and large diameter show transition from ductile to brittle fracture. In short nanotubes with small diameters, we observe several structural transitions like Stone-Wales defect initiation, its propagation to larger void nucleation, formation of multiple chains of atoms, conversion to monatomic chain of atoms, and finally complete fracture of the carbon nanotube. Hybridization state of carbon-carbon bonds near the end cap evolves, leading to the formation of monatomic chain in short nanotubes with small diameter. Transition from ductile to brittle fracture is also observed when strain rate exceeds a critical value. A generalized analytical model of failure is established, which correlates the defect energy during the formation of atomic chain with aspect ratio of the nanotube and strain rate. Variation in the mechanical properties such as elastic modulus, tensile strength, and fracture strain with the size and strain rate shows important implications in mitigating force fields and ways to enhance the life of electronic devices and nanomaterial conversion via fracture in manufacturing.

  9. International Symposia on Scale Modeling

    CERN Document Server

    Ito, Akihiko; Nakamura, Yuji; Kuwana, Kazunori

    2015-01-01

    This volume thoroughly covers scale modeling and serves as the definitive source of information on scale modeling as a powerful simplifying and clarifying tool used by scientists and engineers across many disciplines. The book elucidates techniques used when it would be too expensive, or too difficult, to test a system of interest in the field. Topics addressed in the current edition include scale modeling to study weather systems, diffusion of pollution in air or water, chemical process in 3-D turbulent flow, multiphase combustion, flame propagation, biological systems, behavior of materials at nano- and micro-scales, and many more. This is an ideal book for students, both graduate and undergraduate, as well as engineers and scientists interested in the latest developments in scale modeling. This book also: Enables readers to evaluate essential and salient aspects of profoundly complex systems, mechanisms, and phenomena at scale Offers engineers and designers a new point of view, liberating creative and inno...

  10. Physics on the Smallest Scales: An Introduction to Minimal Length Phenomenology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sprenger, Martin; Nicolini, Piero; Bleicher, Marcus

    2012-01-01

    Many modern theories which try to unify gravity with the Standard Model of particle physics, such as e.g. string theory, propose two key modifications to the commonly known physical theories: the existence of additional space dimensions; the existence of a minimal length distance or maximal resolution. While extra dimensions have received a wide…

  11. Fracture Testing at Small-Length Scales: From Plasticity in Si to Brittleness in Pt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaya, B. Nagamani; Jayaram, Vikram

    2016-01-01

    The field of micro-/nano-mechanics of materials has been driven, on the one hand by the development of ever smaller structures in devices, and, on the other, by the need to map property variations in large systems that are microstructurally graded. Observations of `smaller is stronger' have also brought in questions of accompanying fracture property changes in the materials. In the wake of scattered articles on micro-scale fracture testing of various material classes, this review attempts to provide a holistic picture of the current state of the art. In the process, various reliable micro-scale geometries are shown, challenges with respect to instrumentation to probe ever smaller length scales are discussed and examples from recent literature are put together to exhibit the expanse of unusual fracture response of materials, from ductility in Si to brittleness in Pt. Outstanding issues related to fracture mechanics of small structures are critically examined for plausible solutions.

  12. Hydrodynamic simulations of long-scale-length two-plasmon-decay experiments at the Omega Laser Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hu, S. X.; Michel, D. T.; Edgell, D. H.; Froula, D. H.; Follett, R. K.; Goncharov, V. N.; Myatt, J. F.; Skupsky, S.; Yaakobi, B. [Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, 250 E. River Road, Rochester, New York 14623 (United States)

    2013-03-15

    Direct-drive-ignition designs with plastic CH ablators create plasmas of long density scale lengths (L{sub n} {>=} 500 {mu}m) at the quarter-critical density (N{sub qc}) region of the driving laser. The two-plasmon-decay (TPD) instability can exceed its threshold in such long-scale-length plasmas (LSPs). To investigate the scaling of TPD-induced hot electrons to laser intensity and plasma conditions, a series of planar experiments have been conducted at the Omega Laser Facility with 2-ns square pulses at the maximum laser energies available on OMEGA and OMEGA EP. Radiation-hydrodynamic simulations have been performed for these LSP experiments using the two-dimensional hydrocode draco. The simulated hydrodynamic evolution of such long-scale-length plasmas has been validated with the time-resolved full-aperture backscattering and Thomson-scattering measurements. draco simulations for CH ablator indicate that (1) ignition-relevant long-scale-length plasmas of L{sub n} approaching {approx}400 {mu}m have been created; (2) the density scale length at N{sub qc} scales as L{sub n}({mu}m) Asymptotically-Equal-To (R{sub DPP} Multiplication-Sign I{sup 1/4}/2); and (3) the electron temperature T{sub e} at N{sub qc} scales as T{sub e}(keV) Asymptotically-Equal-To 0.95 Multiplication-Sign {radical}(I), with the incident intensity (I) measured in 10{sup 14} W/cm{sup 2} for plasmas created on both OMEGA and OMEGA EP configurations with different-sized (R{sub DPP}) distributed phase plates. These intensity scalings are in good agreement with the self-similar model predictions. The measured conversion fraction of laser energy into hot electrons f{sub hot} is found to have a similar behavior for both configurations: a rapid growth [f{sub hot} Asymptotically-Equal-To f{sub c} Multiplication-Sign (G{sub c}/4){sup 6} for G{sub c} < 4] followed by a saturation of the form, f{sub hot} Asymptotically-Equal-To f{sub c} Multiplication-Sign (G{sub c}/4){sup 1.2} for G{sub c} {>=} 4, with the

  13. Decoherence of trapped bosons by buffer gas scattering: What length scales matter?

    CERN Document Server

    Gilz, Lukas; Anglin, James R

    2014-01-01

    We ask and answer a basic question about the length scales involved in quantum decoherence: how far apart in space do two parts of a quantum system have to be, before a common quantum environment decoheres them as if they were entirely separate? We frame this question specifically in a cold atom context. How far apart do two populations of bosons have to be, before an environment of thermal atoms of a different species (`buffer gas') responds to their two particle numbers separately? An initial guess for this length scale is the thermal coherence length of the buffer gas; we show that a standard Born-Markov treatment partially supports this guess, but predicts only inverse-square saturation of decoherence rates with distance, and not the much more abrupt Gaussian behavior of the buffer gas's first-order coherence. We confirm this Born-Markov result with a more rigorous theory, based on an exact solution of a two-scatterer scattering problem, which also extends the result beyond weak scattering. Finally, howev...

  14. Role of length scales on microwave thawing dynamics in 2D cylinders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Basak, T.; Ayappa, K.G. [Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore (India). Department of Chemical Engineering

    2002-11-01

    Microwave (MW) thawing of 2D frozen cylinders exposed to uniform plane waves from one face, is modeled using the effective heat capacity formulation with the MW power obtained from the electric field equations. Computations are illustrated for tylose (23% methyl cellulose gel) which melts over a range of temperatures giving rise to a mushy zone. Within the mushy region the dielectric properties are functions of the liquid volume fraction. The resulting coupled, time dependent non-linear equation are solved using the Galerkin finite element method with a fixed mesh. Our method efficiently captures the multiple connected thawed domains that arise due to the penetration of MWs in the sample. For a cylinder of diameter D, the two length scales that control the thawing dynamics are D/D{sub p}, and D/{lambda}{sub m}, where D{sub p} and {lambda}{sub m} are the penetration depth and wavelength of radiation in the sample respectively. For D/D{sub p}, D/{lambda}{sub m}<<1 power absorption is uniform and thawing occurs almost simultaneously across the sample (Regime I). For D/D{sub p}>>1 thawing is seen to occur from the incident face, since the power decays exponentially into the sample (Regime III). At intermediate values, 0.2

  15. Exploring soil organic matter-mineral interactions: mechanistic insights at the nanometer and molecular length scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newcomb, C.; Qafoku, N. P.; Grate, J. W.; Hufschmid, R.; Browning, N.; De Yoreo, J. J.

    2015-12-01

    With elevated levels of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere due to anthropogenic emissions and disruption to the carbon cycle, the effects of climate change are being accelerated. Approximately 80% of Earth's terrestrial organic carbon is stored in soil, and the residence time of this carbon can range from hours to millenia. Understanding the dynamics of this carbon pool in the carbon cycle is crucial to both predicting climate and sustaining ecosystem services. Soil organic carbon is known to be strongly associated with high surface area clay minerals. The nature of these interactions is not well understood primarily due to the heterogeneity of soil, as much of the current knowledge relies on experiments that take a top-down approach using bulk experimental measurements. Our work seeks to probe physical, chemical, and molecular-level interactions at the organic-mineral interface using a bottom-up approach that establishes a model system where complexity can be built in systematically. By performing in situ techniques such as dynamic force spectroscopy, a technique where organic molecules can be brought into contact with mineral surfaces in a controlled manner using an atomic force microscope, we demonstrate the ability to mechanistically probe the energy landscape of individual organic molecules with mineral surfaces. We demonstrate the ability to measure the binding energies of soil-inspired organic functional groups (including carboxylic acid, amine, methyl, and phosphate) with clay and mineral surfaces as a function of solution chemistry. This effort can provide researchers with both guiding principles about carbon dynamics at the sub-nanometer length scale and insights into early aggregation events, where organic-mineral interactions play a significant role.

  16. Statistical theory and transition in multiple-scale-length turbulence in plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Itoh, Sanae-I [Research Institute for Applied Mechanics, Kyushu University, Kasuga (Japan); Itoh, Kimitaka [National Institute for Fusion Science, Toki (Japan)

    2001-08-01

    The statistical theory of strong turbulence in inhomogeneous plasmas is developed for the cases where fluctuations with different scale lengths coexist. Nonlinear interactions in the same kind of fluctuations as well as nonlinear interplay between different classes of fluctuations are kept in the analysis. Nonlinear interactions are modelled as turbulent drag, nonlinear noise and nonlinear drive, and a set of Langevin equations is formulated. With the help of an Ansatz of a large number of degrees of freedom with positive Lyapunov number, Langevin equations are solved and the fluctuation dissipation theorem in the presence of strong plasma turbulence has been derived. A case where two driving mechanisms (one for the micro mode and the other for semi-micro mode) coexist is investigated. It is found that there are several states of fluctuations: in one state, the micro mode is excited and the semi-micro mode is quenched; in the other state, the semi-micro mode is excited, and the micro mode remains at finite but at a suppressed level. A new type of turbulence transition is obtained, and a cusp-type catastrophe is revealed. A phase diagram is drawn for turbulence which is composed of multiple classes of fluctuations. The influence of the inhomogeneous global radial electric field is discussed. A new insight is given for the physics of the internal transport barrier. Finally, the non-local heat transport due to the long-wavelength fluctuations, which are noise-pumped by shorter-wavelength fluctuations, is analysed and its impact on transient transport problems is discussed. (author)

  17. Modeling Wood Fibre Length in Black Spruce (Picea mariana (Mill. BSP Based on Ecological Land Classification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisha Townshend

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Effective planning to optimize the forest value chain requires accurate and detailed information about the resource; however, estimates of the distribution of fibre properties on the landscape are largely unavailable prior to harvest. Our objective was to fit a model of the tree-level average fibre length related to ecosite classification and other forest inventory variables depicted at the landscape scale. A series of black spruce increment cores were collected at breast height from trees in nine different ecosite groups within the boreal forest of northeastern Ontario, and processed using standard techniques for maceration and fibre length measurement. Regression tree analysis and random forests were used to fit hierarchical classification models and find the most important predictor variables for the response variable area-weighted mean stem-level fibre length. Ecosite group was the best predictor in the regression tree. Longer mean fibre-length was associated with more productive ecosites that supported faster growth. The explanatory power of the model of fitted data was good; however, random forests simulations indicated poor generalizability. These results suggest the potential to develop localized models linking wood fibre length in black spruce to landscape-level attributes, and improve the sustainability of forest management by identifying ideal locations to harvest wood that has desirable fibre characteristics.

  18. PIV measurements of the turbulence integral length scale on cold combustion flow field of tangential firing boiler

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Wen-fei; Xie, Jing-xing; Gong, Zhi-jun; Li, Bao-wei [Inner Mongolia Univ. of Science and Technology, Baotou (China). Inner Mongolia Key Lab. for Utilization of Bayan Obo Multi-Metallic Resources: Elected State Key Lab.

    2013-07-01

    The process of the pulverized coal combustion in tangential firing boiler has prominent significance on improving boiler operation efficiency and reducing NO{sub X} emission. This paper aims at researching complex turbulent vortex coherent structure formed by the four corners jets in the burner zone, a cold experimental model of tangential firing boiler has been built. And by employing spatial correlation analysis method and PIV (Particle Image Velocimetry) technique, the law of Vortex scale distribution on the three typical horizontal layers of the model based on the turbulent Integral Length Scale (ILS) has been researched. According to the correlation analysis of ILS and the temporal average velocity, it can be seen that the turbulent vortex scale distribution in the burner zone of the model is affected by both jet velocity and the position of wind layers, and is not linear with the variation of jet velocity. The vortex scale distribution of the upper primary air is significantly different from the others. Therefore, studying the ILS of turbulent vortex integral scale is instructive to high efficiency cleaning combustion of pulverized coal in theory.

  19. An estimation formula for the average path length of scale-free networks

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li Ying; Cao Hong-Duo; Shan Xiu-Ming; Ren Yong

    2008-01-01

    A universal estimation formula for the average path length of scale free networks is given in this paper. Different from other estimation formulas, most of which use the size of network, N, as the only parameter, two parameters including N and a second parameter α are included in our formula. The parameter α is the power-law exponent, which represents the local connectivity property of a network. Because of this, the formula captures an important property that the local connectivity property at a microscopic level can determine the global connectivity of the whole network. The use of this new parameter distinguishes this approach from the other estimation formulas, and makes it a universal estimation formula, which can be applied to all types of scale-free networks. The conclusion is made that the small world feature is a derivative feature of a scale free network. If a network follows the power-law degree distribution, it must be a small world network. The power-law degree distribution property, while making the network economical, preserves the efficiency through this small world property when the network is scaled up. In other words, a real scale-free network is scaled at a relatively small cost and a relatively high efficiency, and that is the desirable result of self-organization optimization.

  20. Mask roughness induced LER: geometric model at long correlation lengths

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McClinton, Brittany M.; Naulleau, Patrick P.

    2011-02-11

    Collective understanding of how both the resist and line-edge roughness (LER) on the mask affect the final printed LER has made significant advances. What is poorly understood, however, is the extent to which mask surface roughness couples to image plane LER as a function of illumination conditions, NA, and defocus. Recently, progress has been made in formulating a simplified solution for mask roughness induced LER. Here, we investigate the LER behavior at long correlation lengths of surface roughness on the mask. We find that for correlation lengths greater than 3/NA in wafer dimensions and CDs greater than approximately 0.75/NA, the previously described simplified model, which remains based on physical optics, converges to a 'geometric regime' which is based on ray optics and is independent of partial coherence. In this 'geometric regime', the LER is proportional to the mask slope error as it propagates through focus, and provides a faster alternative to calculating LER in contrast to either full 2D aerial image simulation modeling or the newly proposed physical optics model. Data is presented for both an NA = 0.32 and an NA = 0.5 imaging system for CDs of 22-nm and 50-nm horizontal-line-dense structures.

  1. Solvable Models on Noncommutative Spaces with Minimal Length Uncertainty Relations

    CERN Document Server

    Dey, Sanjib

    2014-01-01

    Our main focus is to explore different models in noncommutative spaces in higher dimensions. We provide a procedure to relate a three dimensional q-deformed oscillator algebra to the corresponding algebra satisfied by canonical variables describing non-commutative spaces. The representations for the corresponding operators obey algebras whose uncertainty relations lead to minimal length, areas and volumes in phase space, which are in principle natural candidates of many different approaches of quantum gravity. We study some explicit models on these types of noncommutative spaces, first by utilising the perturbation theory, later in an exact manner. In many cases the operators are not Hermitian, therefore we use PT -symmetry and pseudo-Hermiticity property, wherever applicable, to make them self-consistent. Apart from building mathematical models, we focus on the physical implications of noncommutative theories too. We construct Klauder coherent states for the perturbative and nonperturbative noncommutative ha...

  2. Analysis of Voltage Transfer Characteristics of Nano-scale SOI CMOS Inverter with Variable Channel Length and Doping Concentration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Daniyel Raj

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available During many decades, continuous device performance improvement has been made possible only through device scaling. But presently, due to aggressive scaling at the sub-micron or nanometer region, the conventional planner silicon technology is suffering from the fundamental physical limits. Such imposed limits on further downscaling of silicon planner technology have lead to alternative device technology like Silicon-On-Insulator (SOI technology. Due-to some of its inherent advantages, the Silicon-On-Insulator (SOI technology has reduced the Short-channel-effects (SCEs and thus increased transistor scalability. Till now, intense research interests have been paid in practical fabrication and theoretical modeling of SOI MOSFETs but a little attention has been paid to understand the circuit level performance improvement with nano-scale SOI MOSFETs. The circuit level performance analysis of SOI MOSFET is highly essential to understand the impact of SOI technology on next level VLSI circuit and chip design and for doing so device compact models are high on demand. In such scenario, under present research, a physics based compact device model of SOI MOSFET has been developed. At the first phase of the compact model development, a physics based threshold voltage model has been developed by solving 2-D Poisson’s equation at the channel region and at the second phase, a current-voltage model has been developed with drift-diffusion analysis. Different SCEs, valid at nano-scale, are effectively incorporated in threshold voltage and Current-Voltage model. At the third phase, using the compact model, the Voltage Transfer Characteristics (VTC for a nano-scale SOI CMOS inverter has been derived with graphical analysis. The impacts of different device parameters e.g.; channel length and channel doping concentration on VTC has been investigated through simulation and the results have been analyzed.

  3. On the influence of free-stream turbulence length scales on boundary-layer transition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fransson, Jens; Shahinfar, Shahab

    2015-11-01

    A measurement campaign on the free-stream turbulence (FST) induced boundary layer transition has been carried out in the Minimum-Turbulence-Level wind tunnel at KTH. Previous numerical investigations where the turbulence intensity (Tu) has been kept constant, while the integral length scale (Λx) has been varied, have shown that the transition location is advanced for increasing Λx. The present measurement campaign has been carried out using hot-wire anemometry and consists of 42 unique FST conditions with thorough measurements throughout the transitional region. Unlike other extensive FST induced transition measurements the free-stream velocity was here kept constant for all cases, implying that the boundary layer scale is locked up to transition onset. Our measurements confirm previous results on the advancement of the transition location with increasing Λx for low to moderate Tu levels, but show the opposite effect for higher levels, i.e. a delay in the transition location for larger Λx, which to the knowledge of the present authors so far is unreported. In addition, the common belief that the FST length scales have a negligible effect on the transition location with regards to the Tu level does not seem to be fully true.

  4. Determination of critical length scales for corrosion processes using microelectroanalytical techniques.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zavadil, Kevin Robert; Wall, Frederick Douglas

    2004-03-01

    A key factor in our ability to produce and predict the stability of metal-based macro- to nano-scale structures and devices is a fundamental understanding of the localized nature of corrosion. Corrosion processes where physical dimensions become critical in the degradation process include localized corrosion initiation in passivated metals, microgalvanic interactions in metal alloys, and localized corrosion in structurally complex materials like nanocrystalline metal films under atmospheric and inundated conditions. This project focuses on two areas of corrosion science where a fundamental understanding of processes occurring at critical dimensions is not currently available. Sandia will study the critical length scales necessary for passive film breakdown in the inundated aluminum (Al) system and the chemical processes and transport in ultra-thin water films relevant to the atmospheric corrosion of nanocrystalline tungsten (W) films. Techniques are required that provide spatial information without significantly perturbing or masking the underlying relationships. Al passive film breakdown is governed by the relationship between area of the film sampled and its defect structure. We will combine low current measurements with microelectrodes to study the size scale required to observe a single initiation event and record electrochemical breakdown events. The resulting quantitative measure of stability will be correlated with metal grain size, secondary phase size and distribution to understand which metal properties control stability at the macro- and nano-scale. Mechanisms of atmospheric corrosion on W are dependent on the physical dimensions and continuity of adsorbed water layers as well as the chemical reactions that take place in this layer. We will combine electrochemical and scanning probe microscopic techniques to monitor the chemistry and resulting material transport in these thin surface layers. A description of the length scales responsible for driving the

  5. Material length scales in gradient-dependent plasticity/damage and size effects: Theory and computation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abu Al-Rub, Rashid Kamel

    Structural materials display a strong size-dependence when deformed non-uniformly into the inelastic range: smaller is stronger. This effect has important implications for an increasing number of applications in structural failure, electronics, functional coatings, composites, micro-electro-mechanical systems (MEMS), nanostructured materials, micro/nanometer fabrication technologies, etc. The mechanical behavior of these applications cannot be characterized by classical (local) continuum theories because they incorporate no, 'material length scales' and consequently predict no size effects. On the other hand, it is still not possible to perform quantum and atomistic simulations on realistic time and structures. It is therefore necessary to develop a scale-dependent continuum theory bridging the gap between the classical continuum theories and the atomistic simulations in order to be able to design the size-dependent structures of modern technology. Nonlocal rate-dependent and gradient-dependent theories of plasticity and damage are developed in this work for this purpose. We adopt a multi-scale, hierarchical thermodynamic consistent framework to construct the material constitutive relations for the scale-dependent plasticity/damage behavior. Material length scales are implicitly and explicitly introduced into the governing equations through material rate-dependency (viscosity) and coefficients of spatial higher-order gradients of one or more material state variables, respectively. The proposed framework is implemented into the commercially well-known finite element software ABAQUS. The finite element simulations of material instability problems converge to meaningful results upon further refinement of the finite element mesh, since the width of the fracture process zone (shear band) is determined by the intrinsic material length scale; while the classical continuum theories fail to address this problem. It is also shown that the proposed theory is successful for

  6. Length Scale Dependence of the Dynamic Properties of Hyaluronic Acid Solutions in the Presence of Salt

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Horkay, Ferenc; Falus, Peter; Hecht, Anne-Marie; Geissler, Erik (CNRS-UMR); (NIH); (ILL)

    2010-12-07

    In solutions of the charged semirigid biopolymer hyaluronic acid in salt-free conditions, the diffusion coefficient D{sub NSE} measured at high transfer momentum q by neutron spin echo is more than an order of magnitude smaller than that determined by dynamic light scattering, D{sub DLS}. This behavior contrasts with neutral polymer solutions. With increasing salt content, D{sub DLS} approaches D{sub NSE}, which is independent of ionic strength. Contrary to theoretical expectation, the ion-polymer coupling, which dominates the low q dynamics of polyelectrolyte solutions, already breaks down at distance scales greater than the Debye-Hueckel length.

  7. Lab on a chip Canada--rapid diffusion over large length scales.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juncker, David; Wheeler, Aaron R; Sinton, David

    2013-07-07

    The roots of lab on a chip in Canada are deep, comprising of some of the earliest contributions and first demonstrations of the potential of microfluidic chips. In an editorial leading off this special issue, Jed Harrison of University of Alberta reflects on these early days and Canada's role in the field's development (DOI: 10.1039/c3lc50522g). Over the last decade, microfluidics and lab-on-a-chip research efforts grew exponentially - rapidly diffusing across the vast Canadian length scales.

  8. Explanation of the values of Hack's drainage basin, river length scaling exponent

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunt, A. G.

    2015-08-01

    Percolation theory can be used to find water flow paths of least resistance. The application of percolation theory to drainage networks allows identification of the range of exponent values that describe the tortuosity of rivers in real river networks, which is then used to generate the observed scaling between drainage basin area and channel length, a relationship known as Hack's law. Such a theoretical basis for Hack's law allows interpretation of the range of exponent values based on an assessment of the heterogeneity of the substrate.

  9. Brief communication: Possible explanation of the values of Hack's drainage basin, river length scaling exponent

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunt, Allen G.

    2016-04-01

    Percolation theory can be used to find water flow paths of least resistance. Application of percolation theory to drainage networks allows identification of the range of exponent values that describe the tortuosity of rivers in real river networks, which is then used to generate the observed scaling between drainage basin area and channel length, a relationship known as Hack's law. Such a theoretical basis for Hack's law may allow interpretation of the range of exponent values based on an assessment of the heterogeneity of the substrate.

  10. Lead Selenide Nanostructures Self-Assembled across Multiple Length Scales and Dimensions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evan K. Wujcik

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A self-assembly approach to lead selenide (PbSe structures that have organized across multiple length scales and multiple dimensions has been achieved. These structures consist of angstrom-scale 0D PbSe crystals, synthesized via a hot solution process, which have stacked into 1D nanorods via aligned dipoles. These 1D nanorods have arranged into nanoscale 2D sheets via directional short-ranged attraction. The nanoscale 2D sheets then further aligned into larger 2D microscale planes. In this study, the authors have characterized the PbSe structures via normal and cryo-TEM and EDX showing that this multiscale multidimensional self-assembled alignment is not due to drying effects. These PbSe structures hold promise for applications in advanced materials—particularly electronic technologies, where alignment can aid in device performance.

  11. Electroweak symmetries from the topology of deformed spacetime with minimal length scale

    CERN Document Server

    Gresnigt, Niels G

    2015-01-01

    Lie-type deformations provide a systematic way of generalising the symmetries of modern physics. Deforming the isometry group of Minkowski spacetime through the introduction of a minimal length scale $\\ell$ leads to anti de Sitter spacetime with isometry group $SO(2,3)$. Quantum spacetime on scales of the order $\\ell$ therefore carries negative curvature. Considering extended particles of characteristic size $\\ell$ carrying topological information and requiring that their topological properties be compatible with those of the underlying spacetime, we show that electroweak symmetries emerge from the maximal compact subgroup of the anti de Sitter isometry group in a way that is consistent with no-go theorems. It is speculated that additional deformation outside the Lie-algebraic framework, such as $q$-deformations, could likewise provide an explanation of the origin of the strong force.

  12. Effects of mean shear and scalar initial length scale on three-scalar mixing in turbulent coaxial jets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong, Chenning; Li, Wei; Yuan, Mengyuan; Carter, Campbell

    2016-11-01

    We investigate three-scalar mixing in a turbulent coaxial jet, in which a center jet and an annular flow, consisting of acetone-doped air and ethylene respectively, are mixed with the co-flow air. We investigate the effects of the velocity and length scale ratios of the annular flow to the center jet. Planar laser-induced fluorescence and Rayleigh scattering are employed to image the scalars. The results show that the velocity ratio alters the relative mean shear rates in the mixing layers between the center jet and the annular flow and between the annular flow and the co-flow, modifying the scalar fields through mean-flow advection, turbulent transport, and small-scale mixing. The length scale ratio determines the degree of separation between the center jet and the co-flow. The results show that while varying the velocity ratio can alter the mixing characteristics qualitatively, varying the annulus width only has quantitative effects. The evolution of the mean scalar profiles are dominated by the mean-flow advection, while the shape of the joint probability density function is largely determined by the turbulent transport and molecular diffusion. The results in the present study have implications for understanding and modeling multiscalar mixing in turbulent reactive flows. Supported by NSF.

  13. Magnetic studies of colossal magnetoresistance perovskites on macroscopic, mesoscopic and microscopic length scales

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    S M Yusuf

    2004-07-01

    We have investigated magnetic correlations in various CMR manganites on macroscopic, mesoscopic and microscopic length scales by carrying out DC magnetization, neutron depolarization, and neutron diffraction measurements. We present here the effect of substituting Mn with Fe and La with Dy in the ferromagnetic La0.7- CaMnO3 ( ∼ 0.3 - 0.33) compounds. Neutron diffraction has been used in order to characterize the long-range magnetic order and its gradual suppression by the substitution. Neutron depolarization study has been carried out in order to bridge the gap in our understanding regarding the nature of magnetic correlation obtained from the macroscopic and microscopic measurements. In particular, our study on La0.67Ca0.33Mn0.9Fe0.1O3 has established the fact that a true double exchange mediated spin-glass is insulating. In another study of La-site ionic size effect and its disorder in (La1-Dy)0.7Ca0.3MnO3, we have investigated the evolution of the length scale of magnetic ordering with a possible microscopic explanation and the results have been compared with that for the light rare earth substituted compounds.

  14. Length measurement in absolute scale via low-dispersion optical cavity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pravdova, Lenka; Lesundak, Adam; Smid, Radek; Hrabina, Jan; Rerucha, Simon; Cip, Ondrej

    2016-12-01

    We report on the length measuring instrument with the absolute scale that was based on the combination of an optical frequency comb and a passive optical cavity. The time spacing of short femtosecond pulses, generated by the optical frequency comb, is optically phase locked onto the cavity free spectral range with a derivative spectroscopy technique so that the value of the repetition frequency of the femtosecond laser is tied to and determines the measured displacement. The instantaneous value of the femtosecond pulse train frequency is counted by a frequency counter. This counted value corresponds to the length given by the spacing between the two mirrors of the passive cavity. The phase lock between the femtosecond pulsed beam and the passive cavity is possible due to the low-dispersion of the cavity mirrors, where the silver coating on the mirrors was used to provide the low dispersion for the broadband radiation of the comb. Every reflection on the output mirror feeds a portion of the beam back to the cavity so that the output beam is a result of multiple interfering components. The parameters of the output beam are given not only by the parameters of the mirrors but mainly by the absolute distance between the mirror surfaces. Thus, one cavity mirror can be considered as the reference starting point of the distance to be measured and the other mirror is the measuring probe surveying the unknown distance. The measuring mirror of the experimental setup of the low-dispersion cavity is mounted on a piezoelectric actuator which provides small changes in the cavity length we used to test the length measurement method. For the verification of the measurement accuracy a reference incremental interferometer was integrated into our system so that the displacement of the piezoelectric actuator could be obtained with both measuring methods simultaneously.

  15. A simulation procedure for light-matter interaction at different length scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leiner, Claude; Nemitz, Wolfgang; Wenzl, Franz P.; Hartmann, Paul; Hohenester, Ulrich; Sommer, Christian

    2012-06-01

    The development of photonic devices with tailor-made optical properties requires the control and the manipulation of light propagation within structures of different length scales, ranging from sub-wavelength to macroscopic dimensions. However, optical simulation at different length scales necessitates the combination of different simulation methods, which have to account properly for various effects such as polarization, interference, or diffraction: At dimensions much larger than the wavelength of light common ray-tracing (RT) techniques are conveniently employed, while in the subwavelength regime more sophisticated approaches, like the so-called finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) technique, are needed. Describing light propagation both in the sub-wavelength regime as well as at macroscopic length scales can only be achieved by bridging between these two approaches. In this contribution we present on the one hand a study aiming at the determination of the intermediate size range for which both simulation methods are applicable and on the other hand an approach for combining classical ray-tracing with FDTD simulation in order to handle optical elements of large sizes. Generally, the interface between RT and FDTD is restricted to very small sample areas. Nevertheless, many real world optical devices use e.g. diffractive optical elements (DOEs) having comparably large areas in the order of 1-2 mm² (or larger). Therefore, one has to develop strategies in order to handle the data transfer between FDTD and RT also for structures of such larger size scales. Our approach in this regard is based on the symmetries of the structures. In this way support programs like e.g. MATLAB can be used to replicate the near-field of a single structure and to merge it to the near-field of a larger area. Comparisons of RT and FDTD simulations in the far-field can be used to validate the physical correctness of this approach. With such procedure it is possible to optimize light

  16. Numerical study of the scaling of the maximum kinetic energy per unit length for imploding Z-pinch liner

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zeng Zheng-Zhong; Qiu Ai-Ci

    2004-01-01

    Numerical computation based on a zero-dimensional thin-plasma-shell model has been carried out to study the scaling of the maximum kinetic energy per unit length, the current amplitude and the compression ratio for the imploding Z-pinch liner driven by peaked current pulses. A dimensionless scaling constant of 0.9 with an error less than 10% is extracted at the optimal choice of the current and liner parameters. Deviation of the chosen experimental parameter from the optimal exerts a minor influence on the kinetic energy for wider-shaped and slower-decaying pulses, but the influence becomes significant for narrower-shaped and faster-decaying pulses. The computation is in reasonable agreement with experimental data from the Z, Saturn, Blackjack 5 and Qiangguang-I liners.

  17. Taylor-plasticity-based analysis of length scale effects in void growth

    KAUST Repository

    Liu, Junxian

    2014-09-25

    We have studied the void growth problem by employing the Taylor-based strain gradient plasticity theories, from which we have chosen the following three, namely, the mechanism-based strain gradient (MSG) plasticity (Gao et al 1999 J. Mech. Phys. Solids 47 1239, Huang et al 2000 J. Mech. Phys. Solids 48 99-128), the Taylor-based nonlocal theory (TNT; 2001 Gao and Huang 2001 Int. J. Solids Struct. 38 2615) and the conventional theory of MSG (CMSG; Huang et al 2004 Int. J. Plast. 20 753). We have addressed the following three issues which occur when plastic deformation at the void surface is unconstrained. (1) Effects of elastic deformation. Elasticity is essential for cavitation instability. It is therefore important to guarantee that the gradient term entering the Taylor model is the effective plastic strain gradient instead of the total strain gradient. We propose a simple elastic-plastic decomposition method. When the void size approaches the minimum allowable initial void size related to the maximum allowable geometrically necessary dislocation density, overestimation of the flow stress due to the negligence of the elastic strain gradient is on the order of lεY/R0 near the void surface, where l, εY and R0 are, respectively, the intrinsic material length scale, the yield strain and the initial void radius. (2) MSG intrinsic inconsistency, which was initially mentioned in Gao et al (1999 J. Mech. Phys. Solids 47 1239) but has not been the topic of follow-up studies. We realize that MSG higher-order stress arises due to the linear-strain-field approximation within the mesoscale cell with a nonzero size, lε. Simple analysis shows that within an MSG mesoscale cell near the void surface, the difference between microscale and mesoscale strains is on the order of (lε/R0)2, indicating that when lε/R0 ∼ 1.0, the higher-order stress effect can make the MSG result considerably different from the TNT or CMSG results. (3) Critical condition for cavitation instability

  18. Variability of interconnected wind plants: correlation length and its dependence on variability time scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    St. Martin, Clara M.; Lundquist, Julie K.; Handschy, Mark A.

    2015-04-01

    The variability in wind-generated electricity complicates the integration of this electricity into the electrical grid. This challenge steepens as the percentage of renewably-generated electricity on the grid grows, but variability can be reduced by exploiting geographic diversity: correlations between wind farms decrease as the separation between wind farms increases. But how far is far enough to reduce variability? Grid management requires balancing production on various timescales, and so consideration of correlations reflective of those timescales can guide the appropriate spatial scales of geographic diversity grid integration. To answer ‘how far is far enough,’ we investigate the universal behavior of geographic diversity by exploring wind-speed correlations using three extensive datasets spanning continents, durations and time resolution. First, one year of five-minute wind power generation data from 29 wind farms span 1270 km across Southeastern Australia (Australian Energy Market Operator). Second, 45 years of hourly 10 m wind-speeds from 117 stations span 5000 km across Canada (National Climate Data Archive of Environment Canada). Finally, four years of five-minute wind-speeds from 14 meteorological towers span 350 km of the Northwestern US (Bonneville Power Administration). After removing diurnal cycles and seasonal trends from all datasets, we investigate dependence of correlation length on time scale by digitally high-pass filtering the data on 0.25-2000 h timescales and calculating correlations between sites for each high-pass filter cut-off. Correlations fall to zero with increasing station separation distance, but the characteristic correlation length varies with the high-pass filter applied: the higher the cut-off frequency, the smaller the station separation required to achieve de-correlation. Remarkable similarities between these three datasets reveal behavior that, if universal, could be particularly useful for grid management. For high

  19. Singular value decomposition of genome-scale mRNA lengths distribution reveals asymmetry in RNA gel electrophoresis band broadening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alter, Orly; Golub, Gene H

    2006-08-01

    We describe the singular value decomposition (SVD) of yeast genome-scale mRNA lengths distribution data measured by DNA microarrays. SVD uncovers in the mRNA abundance levels data matrix of genes x arrays, i.e., electrophoretic gel migration lengths or mRNA lengths, mathematically unique decorrelated and decoupled "eigengenes." The eigengenes are the eigenvectors of the arrays x arrays correlation matrix, with the corresponding series of eigenvalues proportional to the series of the "fractions of eigen abundance." Each fraction of eigen abundance indicates the significance of the corresponding eigengene relative to all others. We show that the eigengenes fit "asymmetric Hermite functions," a generalization of the eigenfunctions of the quantum harmonic oscillator and the integral transform which kernel is a generalized coherent state. The fractions of eigen abundance fit a geometric series as do the eigenvalues of the integral transform which kernel is a generalized coherent state. The "asymmetric generalized coherent state" models the measured data, where the profiles of mRNA abundance levels of most genes as well as the distribution of the peaks of these profiles fit asymmetric Gaussians. We hypothesize that the asymmetry in the distribution of the peaks of the profiles is due to two competing evolutionary forces. We show that the asymmetry in the profiles of the genes might be due to a previously unknown asymmetry in the gel electrophoresis thermal broadening of a moving, rather than a stationary, band of RNA molecules.

  20. Delineating tectonic units beneath the Donbas Fold Belt using scale lengths estimated from DOBRE 2000/2001 deep reflection data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carpentier, S. F. A.; Roy-Chowdhury, K.; Stephenson, R. A.; Stovba, S.

    2009-10-01

    A novel statistical analysis, which augments conventional interpretation of deep seismic reflection/refraction data, is applied to the DOBRE 2000/2001 reflection profile. The goal is to improve delineation of the lithosphere in terms of lithotectonic units and to compare these to existing interpretations. After a successful validation of the method using synthetic data, stochastic parameters estimated from windowed average lateral autocorrelations in the DOBRE data are compiled in a two-dimensional profile of von Karman-type causative reflectivity. These estimates in terms of lateral correlation lengths and power law exponents are accompanied by associated uncertainties. Given its low uncertainties, the lateral correlation length ax turns out to be a robust delineator. The profile of ax reveals systematic spatial variations in the lithospheric fabric below the Donbas Fold Belt. As in earlier interpretations based upon conventional processing of reflection/refraction data, both the sedimentary basin and Moho discontinuity stand out clearly, as well as a region indicating massive vertical intrusion in the crust from upper mantle sills and ultramafic underplating of the lower crust. Notable differences with conventional interpretations include the number and extent of supra-Moho rift pillow structures, the lack of imaging a crust-cutting dislocation feature and a laterally disturbed uppermost mantle. Von Karman lateral correlation length provides new independent information at a scale between velocity models from wide-angle reflection/refraction data and line drawings from near vertical reflections and provides new insights and understanding of lithospheric evolution.

  1. Local transport measurements at mesoscopic length scales using scanning tunneling potentiometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Weigang; Munakata, Ko; Rozler, Michael; Beasley, Malcolm R

    2013-06-07

    Under mesoscopic conditions, the transport potential on a thin film carrying a current is theoretically expected to bear spatial variation due to quantum interference. Scanning tunneling potentiometry is the ideal tool to investigate such variation, by virtue of its high spatial resolution. We report in this Letter the first detailed measurement of transport potential under mesoscopic conditions. Epitaxial graphene at a temperature of 17 K was chosen as the initial system for study because the characteristic transport length scales in this material are relatively large. Tip jumping artifacts are a major possible contribution to systematic errors; and we mitigate such problems by using custom-made slender and sharp tips manufactured by focused ion beam. In our data, we observe residual resistivity dipoles associated with topographical defects, and local peaks and dips in the potential that are not associated with topographical defects.

  2. Advancing the speed, sensitivity and accuracy of biomolecular detection using multi-length-scale engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelley, Shana O.; Mirkin, Chad A.; Walt, David R.; Ismagilov, Rustem F.; Toner, Mehmet; Sargent, Edward H.

    2014-12-01

    Rapid progress in identifying disease biomarkers has increased the importance of creating high-performance detection technologies. Over the last decade, the design of many detection platforms has focused on either the nano or micro length scale. Here, we review recent strategies that combine nano- and microscale materials and devices to produce large improvements in detection sensitivity, speed and accuracy, allowing previously undetectable biomarkers to be identified in clinical samples. Microsensors that incorporate nanoscale features can now rapidly detect disease-related nucleic acids expressed in patient samples. New microdevices that separate large clinical samples into nanocompartments allow precise quantitation of analytes, and microfluidic systems that utilize nanoscale binding events can detect rare cancer cells in the bloodstream more accurately than before. These advances will lead to faster and more reliable clinical diagnostic devices.

  3. Kink stability, propagation, and length scale competition in the periodically modulated sine-Gordon equation

    CERN Document Server

    Sánchez, A; Domínguez-Adame, F; Angel Sanchez; Francisco Dominguez-Adame

    1994-01-01

    We have examined the dynamical behavior of the kink solutions of the one-dimensional sine-Gordon equation in the presence of a spatially periodic parametric perturbation. Our study clarifies and extends the currently available knowledge on this and related nonlinear problems in four directions. First, we present the results of a numerical simulation program which are not compatible with the existence of a radiative threshold, predicted by earlier calculations. Second, we carry out a perturbative calculation which helps interpret those previous predictions, enabling us to understand in depth our numerical results. Third, we apply the collective coordinate formalism to this system and demonstrate numerically that it accurately reproduces the observed kink dynamics. Fourth, we report on a novel occurrence of length scale competition in this system and show how it can be understood by means of linear stability analysis. Finally, we conclude by summarizing the general physical framework that arises from our study.

  4. Cellular adaptation to biomechanical stress across length scales in tissue homeostasis and disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbert, Penney M; Weaver, Valerie M

    2016-09-15

    Human tissues are remarkably adaptable and robust, harboring the collective ability to detect and respond to external stresses while maintaining tissue integrity. Following injury, many tissues have the capacity to repair the damage - and restore form and function - by deploying cellular and molecular mechanisms reminiscent of developmental programs. Indeed, it is increasingly clear that cancer and chronic conditions that develop with age arise as a result of cells and tissues re-implementing and deregulating a selection of developmental programs. Therefore, understanding the fundamental molecular mechanisms that drive cell and tissue responses is a necessity when designing therapies to treat human conditions. Extracellular matrix stiffness synergizes with chemical cues to drive single cell and collective cell behavior in culture and acts to establish and maintain tissue homeostasis in the body. This review will highlight recent advances that elucidate the impact of matrix mechanics on cell behavior and fate across these length scales during times of homeostasis and in disease states.

  5. Implementing structural slow light on short length scales: the photonic speed-bump

    CERN Document Server

    Faggiani, Remi; Hostein, Richard; Lalanne, Philippe

    2016-01-01

    One-dimensional (1D) infinite periodic systems exhibit vanishing group velocity and diverging density of states (DOS) near band edges. However, in practice, systems have finite sizes and inevitably this prompts the question of whether helpful physical quantities related to infinite systems, such as the group velocity that is deduced from the band structure, remain relevant in finite systems. For instance, one may wonder how the DOS divergence can be approached with finite systems. Intuitively, one may expect that the implementation of larger and larger DOS, or equivalently smaller and smaller group velocities, would critically increase the system length. Based on general 1D-wave-physics arguments, we demonstrate that the large slow-light DOS enhancement of periodic systems can be observed with very short systems, whose lengths scale with the logarithm of the inverse of the group velocities. The understanding obtained for 1D systems leads us to propose a novel sort of microstructure to enhance light-matter int...

  6. Beam displacement as a function of temperature and turbulence length scale at two different laser radiation wavelengths.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isterling, William M; Dally, Bassam B; Alwahabi, Zeyad T; Dubovinsky, Miro; Wright, Daniel

    2012-01-01

    Narrow laser beams directed from aircraft may at times pass through the exhaust plume of the engines and potentially degrade some of the laser beam characteristics. This paper reports on controlled studies of laser beam deviation arising from propagation through turbulent hot gases, in a well-characterized laboratory burner, with conditions of relevance to aircraft engine exhaust plumes. The impact of the temperature, laser wavelength, and turbulence length scale on the beam deviation has been investigated. It was found that the laser beam displacement increases with the turbulent integral length scale. The effect of temperature on the laser beam angular deviation, σ, using two different laser wavelengths, namely 4.67 μm and 632.8 nm, was recorded. It was found that the beam deviation for both wavelengths may be semiempirically modeled using a single function of the form, σ=a(b+(1/T)(2))(-1), with two parameters only, a and b, where σ is in microradians and T is the temperature in °C.

  7. Predicting the roughness length of turbulent flows over landscapes with multi-scale microtopography

    OpenAIRE

    Pelletier, Jon D.; Field, Jason P.

    2016-01-01

    The fully rough form of the law of the wall is commonly used to quantify velocity profiles and associated bed shear stresses in fluvial, aeolian, and coastal environments. A key parameter in this law is the roughness length, z0. Here we propose a predictive formula for z0 that uses the amplitude and slope of each wavelength of microtopography within a discrete-Fourier-transform-based approach. Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) modeling is used to quantify the effective z0 valu...

  8. Modeling insertional mutagenesis using gene length and expression in murine embryonic stem cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alex S Nord

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: High-throughput mutagenesis of the mammalian genome is a powerful means to facilitate analysis of gene function. Gene trapping in embryonic stem cells (ESCs is the most widely used form of insertional mutagenesis in mammals. However, the rules governing its efficiency are not fully understood, and the effects of vector design on the likelihood of gene-trapping events have not been tested on a genome-wide scale. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In this study, we used public gene-trap data to model gene-trap likelihood. Using the association of gene length and gene expression with gene-trap likelihood, we constructed spline-based regression models that characterize which genes are susceptible and which genes are resistant to gene-trapping techniques. We report results for three classes of gene-trap vectors, showing that both length and expression are significant determinants of trap likelihood for all vectors. Using our models, we also quantitatively identified hotspots of gene-trap activity, which represent loci where the high likelihood of vector insertion is controlled by factors other than length and expression. These formalized statistical models describe a high proportion of the variance in the likelihood of a gene being trapped by expression-dependent vectors and a lower, but still significant, proportion of the variance for vectors that are predicted to be independent of endogenous gene expression. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The findings of significant expression and length effects reported here further the understanding of the determinants of vector insertion. Results from this analysis can be applied to help identify other important determinants of this important biological phenomenon and could assist planning of large-scale mutagenesis efforts.

  9. Validation of a Scaling Law for the Coronal Magnetic Field Strengths and Loop Lengths of Solar and Stellar Flares

    CERN Document Server

    Namekata, Kosuke; Watanabe, Kyoko; Asai, Ayumi; Shibata, Kazunari

    2016-01-01

    Shibata & Yokoyama (1999, 2002) proposed a method of estimating the coronal magnetic field strengths ($B$) and magnetic loop lengths ($L$) of solar and stellar flares, on the basis of magnetohydrodynamic simulations of the magnetic reconnection model. Using the scaling law provided by Shibata & Yokoyama (1999, 2002), $B$ and $L$ are obtained as functions of the emission measure ($EM=n^2L^3$) and temperature ($T$) at the flare peak. Here, $n$ is the coronal electron density of the flares. This scaling law enables the estimation of $B$ and $L$ for unresolved stellar flares from the observable physical quantities $EM$ and $T$, which is helpful for studying stellar surface activities. To apply this scaling law to stellar flares, we discuss its validity for spatially resolved solar flares. $EM$ and $T$ were calculated from GOES soft X-ray flux data, and $B$ and $L$ are theoretically estimated using the scaling law. For the same flare events, $B$ and $L$ were also observationally estimated with images taken...

  10. Multi-length Scale Material Model Development for Armorgrade Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-05-02

    synthesis -/processing-induced defects; (c) effect of 3 synthesis -/processing-induced defects on PPTA-fiber properties; (d) effect of fiber-/ yarn ...Derivation of the Materials Constitutive Relations for Carbon Nanotube Reinforced Poly-Vinyl-Ester-Epoxy Based Composites,” Journal of Materials Science, 42...fabric or PPTA-fiber-reinforced polymer-matrix composites. Specifically, the role of various material- synthesis -/fiber-processing-induced defects, as

  11. Turbulent boundary layer over roughness transition with variation in spanwise roughness length scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westerweel, Jerry; Tomas, Jasper; Eisma, Jerke; Pourquie, Mathieu; Elsinga, Gerrit; Jonker, Harm

    2016-11-01

    Both large-eddy simulations (LES) and water-tunnel experiments, using simultaneous stereoscopic PIV and LIF were done to investigate pollutant dispersion in a region where the surface changes from rural to urban roughness. This consists of rectangular obstacles where we vary the spanwise aspect ratio of the obstacles. A line source of passive tracer was placed upstream of the roughness transition. The objectives of the study are: (i) to determine the influence of the aspect ratio on the roughness-transition flow, and (ii) to determine the dominant mechanisms of pollutant removal from street canyons in the transition region. It is found that for a spanwise aspect ratio of 2 the drag induced by the roughness is largest of all considered cases, which is caused by a large-scale secondary flow. In the roughness transition the vertical advective pollutant flux is the main ventilation mechanism in the first three streets. Furthermore, by means of linear stochastic estimation the mean flow structure is identied that is responsible for exchange of the fluid between the roughness obstacles and the outer part of the boundary layer. Furthermore, it is found that the vertical length scale of this structure increases with increasing aspect ratio of the obstacles in the roughness region.

  12. A phenomenological description of BslA assemblies across multiple length scales.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, Ryan J; Bromley, Keith M; Stanley-Wall, Nicola; MacPhee, Cait E

    2016-07-28

    Intrinsically interfacially active proteins have garnered considerable interest recently owing to their potential use in a range of materials applications. Notably, the fungal hydrophobins are known to form robust and well-organized surface layers with high mechanical strength. Recently, it was shown that the bacterial biofilm protein BslA also forms highly elastic surface layers at interfaces. Here we describe several self-assembled structures formed by BslA, both at interfaces and in bulk solution, over a range of length scales spanning from nanometres to millimetres. First, we observe transiently stable and highly elongated air bubbles formed in agitated BslA samples. We study their behaviour in a range of solution conditions and hypothesize that their dissipation is a consequence of the slow adsorption kinetics of BslA to an air-water interface. Second, we describe elongated tubules formed by BslA interfacial films when shear stresses are applied in both a Langmuir trough and a rheometer. These structures bear a striking resemblance, although much larger in scale, to the elongated air bubbles formed during agitation. Taken together, this knowledge will better inform the conditions and applications of how BslA can be used in the stabilization of multi-phase materials.This article is part of the themed issue 'Soft interfacial materials: from fundamentals to formulation'.

  13. A new model predicting locomotor cost from limb length via force production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pontzer, Herman

    2005-04-01

    Notably absent from the existing literature is an explicit biomechanical model linking limb design to the energy cost of locomotion, COL. Here, I present a simple model that predicts the rate of force production necessary to support the body and swing the limb during walking and running as a function of speed, limb length, limb proportion, excursion angle and stride frequency. The estimated rate of force production is then used to predict COL via this model following previous studies that have linked COL to force production. To test this model, oxygen consumption and kinematics were measured in nine human subjects while walking and running on a treadmill at range of speeds. Following the model, limb length, speed, excursion angle and stride frequency were used to predict the rate of force production both to support the body's center of mass and to swing the limb. Model-predicted COL was significantly correlated with observed COL, performing as well or better than contact time and Froude number as a predictor of COL for running and walking, respectively. Furthermore, the model presented here predicts relationships between COL, kinematic variables and body size that are supported by published reduced-gravity experiments and scaling studies. Results suggest the model is useful for predicting COL from anatomical and kinematic variables, and may be useful in intra- and inter-specific studies of locomotor anatomy and performance.

  14. Predicting permeability of regular tissue engineering scaffolds: scaling analysis of pore architecture, scaffold length, and fluid flow rate effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahbari, A; Montazerian, H; Davoodi, E; Homayoonfar, S

    2017-02-01

    The main aim of this research is to numerically obtain the permeability coefficient in the cylindrical scaffolds. For this purpose, a mathematical analysis was performed to derive an equation for desired porosity in terms of morphological parameters. Then, the considered cylindrical geometries were modeled and the permeability coefficient was calculated according to the velocity and pressure drop values based on the Darcy's law. In order to validate the accuracy of the present numerical solution, the obtained permeability coefficient was compared with the published experimental data. It was observed that this model can predict permeability with the utmost accuracy. Then, the effect of geometrical parameters including porosity, scaffold pore structure, unit cell size, and length of the scaffolds as well as entrance mass flow rate on the permeability of porous structures was studied. Furthermore, a parametric study with scaling laws analysis of sample length and mass flow rate effects on the permeability showed good fit to the obtained data. It can be concluded that the sensitivity of permeability is more noticeable at higher porosities. The present approach can be used to characterize and optimize the scaffold microstructure due to the necessity of cell growth and transferring considerations.

  15. Failure analysis of fuel cell electrodes using three-dimensional multi-length scale X-ray computed tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pokhrel, A.; El Hannach, M.; Orfino, F. P.; Dutta, M.; Kjeang, E.

    2016-10-01

    X-ray computed tomography (XCT), a non-destructive technique, is proposed for three-dimensional, multi-length scale characterization of complex failure modes in fuel cell electrodes. Comparative tomography data sets are acquired for a conditioned beginning of life (BOL) and a degraded end of life (EOL) membrane electrode assembly subjected to cathode degradation by voltage cycling. Micro length scale analysis shows a five-fold increase in crack size and 57% thickness reduction in the EOL cathode catalyst layer, indicating widespread action of carbon corrosion. Complementary nano length scale analysis shows a significant reduction in porosity, increased pore size, and dramatically reduced effective diffusivity within the remaining porous structure of the catalyst layer at EOL. Collapsing of the structure is evident from the combination of thinning and reduced porosity, as uniquely determined by the multi-length scale approach. Additionally, a novel image processing based technique developed for nano scale segregation of pore, ionomer, and Pt/C dominated voxels shows an increase in ionomer volume fraction, Pt/C agglomerates, and severe carbon corrosion at the catalyst layer/membrane interface at EOL. In summary, XCT based multi-length scale analysis enables detailed information needed for comprehensive understanding of the complex failure modes observed in fuel cell electrodes.

  16. Multiscale modeling of soft matter: scaling of dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fritz, Dominik; Koschke, Konstantin; Harmandaris, Vagelis A; van der Vegt, Nico F A; Kremer, Kurt

    2011-06-14

    Many physical phenomena and properties of soft matter systems are characterized by an interplay of interactions and processes that span a wide range of length- and time scales. Computer simulation approaches require models, which cover these scales. These are typically multiscale models that combine and link different levels of resolution. In order to reach mesoscopic time- and length scales, necessary to access material properties, coarse-grained models are developed. They are based on microscopic, atomistic descriptions of systems and represent these systems on a coarser, mesoscopic level. While the connection between length scales can be established immediately, the link between the different time scales that takes into account the faster dynamics of the coarser system cannot be obtained directly. In this perspective paper we discuss methods that link the time scales in structure based multiscale models. Concepts which try to rigorously map dynamics of related models are limited to simple model systems, while the challenge in soft matter systems is the multitude of fluctuating energy barriers of comparable height. More pragmatic methods to match time scales are applied successfully to quantitatively understand and predict dynamics of one-component soft matter systems. However, there are still open questions. We point out that the link between the dynamics on different resolution levels can be affected by slight changes of the system, as for different tacticities. Furthermore, in two-component systems the dynamics of the host polymer and of additives are accelerated very differently.

  17. First-principles computation of random-pinning glass transition, glass cooperative length scales, and numerical comparisons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cammarota, Chiara; Seoane, Beatriz

    2016-11-01

    As a guideline for experimental tests of the ideal glass transition (random-pinning glass transition, RPGT) that shall be induced in a system by randomly pinning particles, we performed first-principle computations within the hypernetted chain approximation and numerical simulations of a hard-sphere model of a glass former. We obtain confirmation of the expected enhancement of glassy behavior under the procedure of random pinning. We present the analytical phase diagram as a function of c and of the packing fraction ϕ , showing a line of RPGT ending in a critical point. We also obtain microscopic results on cooperative length scales characterizing medium-range amorphous order in hard-sphere glasses and indirect quantitative information on a key thermodynamic quantity defined in proximity to ideal glass transitions, the amorphous surface tension. Finally, we present numerical results of pair correlation functions able to differentiate the liquid and the glass phases, as predicted by the analytic computations.

  18. The three-state antiferromagnetic Potts model: scaling laws

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gottlob, A.P. [Kaiserslautern Univ. (Germany); Hasenbusch, M. [Cambridge Univ. (United Kingdom). Dept. of Applied Mathematics and Theoretical Physics (DAMTP)

    1995-04-01

    We present the results of a Monte Carlo study of the three-dimensional anti-ferromagnetic three-state Potts model. We computed the correlation length, the magnetic susceptibility and the specific heat for various coupling parameters in the high temperature phase of the model. From the scaling behaviour of these quantities we determine estimates for the critical temperature and critical exponents. ((orig.)).

  19. Instantaneous equations for multiphase flow in porous media without length-scale restrictions using a non-local averaging volume

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Espinosa-Paredes, Gilberto, E-mail: gepe@xanum.uam.m [Area de Ingenieria en Recursos Energeticos, Universidad Autonoma Metropolitana-Iztapalapa, Av. San Rafael Atlixco 186, Col. Vicentina, Apartado Postal 55-535, Mexico D.F. 09340 (Mexico)

    2010-05-15

    The aim of this paper is to propose a framework to obtain a new formulation for multiphase flow conservation equations without length-scale restrictions, based on the non-local form of the averaged volume conservation equations. The simplification of the local averaging volume of the conservation equations to obtain practical equations is subject to the following length-scale restrictions: d << l << L, where d is the characteristic length of the dispersed phases, l is the characteristic length of the averaging volume, and L is the characteristic length of the physical system. If the foregoing inequality does not hold, or if the scale of the problem of interest is of the order of l, the averaging technique and therefore, the macroscopic theories of multiphase flow should be modified in order to include appropriate considerations and terms in the corresponding equations. In these cases the local form of the averaged volume conservation equations are not appropriate to describe the multiphase system. As an example of the conservation equations without length-scale restrictions, the natural circulation boiling water reactor was consider to study the non-local effects on the thermal-hydraulic core performance during steady-state and transient behaviors, and the results were compared with the classic local averaging volume conservation equations.

  20. Validation of a scaling law for the coronal magnetic field strength and loop length of solar and stellar flares

    Science.gov (United States)

    Namekata, Kosuke; Sakaue, Takahito; Watanabe, Kyoko; Asai, Ayumi; Shibata, Kazunari

    2017-02-01

    Shibata and Yokoyama (1999, ApJ, 526, L49; 2002, ApJ, 577, 422) proposed a method of estimating the coronal magnetic field strength (B) and magnetic loop length (L) of solar and stellar flares, on the basis of magnetohydrodynamic simulations of the magnetic reconnection model. Using the scaling law provided by Shibata and Yokoyama (1999, ApJ, 526, L49; 2002, ApJ, 577, 422), we obtain B and L as functions of the emission measure (EM = n2L3) and temperature (T) at the flare peak. Here, n is the coronal electron density of the flares. This scaling law enables the estimation of B and L for unresolved stellar flares from the observable physical quantities EM and T, which is helpful for studying stellar surface activities. To apply this scaling law to stellar flares, we discuss its validity for spatially resolved solar flares. Quantities EM and T are calculated from GOES (Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite) soft X-ray flux data, and B and L are theoretically estimated using the scaling law. For the same flare events, B and L were also observationally estimated with images taken by the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO)/Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (HMI) Magnetogram and Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) 94 Å pass band. As expected, a positive correlation was found between the theoretically and observationally estimated values. We interpret this result as indirect evidence that flares are caused by magnetic reconnection. Moreover, this analysis makes us confident about the validity of applying this scaling law to stellar flares as well as solar flares.

  1. Biomass density and filament length synergistically affect activated sludge settling: systematic quantification and modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jassby, D; Xiao, Y; Schuler, A J

    2014-01-01

    Settling of the biomass produced during biological treatment of wastewater is a critical and often problematic process. Filamentous bacteria content is the best-known factor affecting biomass settleability in activated sludge wastewater treatment systems, and varying biomass density has recently been shown to play an important role as well. The objective of this study was to systematically determine how filament content and biomass density combine to affect microbial biomass settling, with a focus on density variations over the range found in full-scale systems. A laboratory-scale bioreactor system was operated to produce biomass with a range of filamentous bacterium contents. Biomass density was systematically varied in samples from this system by addition of synthetic microspheres to allow separation of filament content and density effects on settleability. Fluorescent in-situ hybridization indicated that the culture was dominated by Sphaerotilus natans, a common contributor to poor settling in full-scale systems. A simple, image-based metric of filament content (filament length per floc area) was linearly correlated with the more commonly used filament length per dry biomass measurement. A non-linear, semi-empirical model of settleability as a function of filament content and density was developed and evaluated, providing a better understanding of how these two parameters combine to affect settleability. Filament content (length per dry biomass weight) was nearly linearly related to sludge volume index (SVI) values, with a slightly decreasing differential, and biomass density exhibited an asymptotic relationship with SVI. The filament content associated with bulking was shown to be a function of biomass density. The marginal effect of filament content on settleability increased with decreasing biomass density (low density biomass was more sensitive to changes in filament content than was high density biomass), indicating a synergistic relationship between these

  2. Thermal Correlators in Holographic Models with Lifshitz scaling

    CERN Document Server

    Keranen, Ville

    2012-01-01

    We study finite temperature effects in two distinct holographic models that exhibit Lifshitz scaling, looking to identify model independent features in the dual strong coupling physics. We consider the thermodynamics of black branes and find different low-temperature behavior of the specific heat. Deformation away from criticality leads to non-trivial temperature dependence of correlation functions and we study how the characteristic length scale in the two point function of scalar operators varies as a function of temperature and deformation parameters.

  3. Intermediate length scale organisation in tin borophosphate glasses: new insights from high field correlation NMR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tricot, G; Saitoh, A; Takebe, H

    2015-11-28

    The structure of tin borophosphate glasses, considered for the development of low temperature sealing glasses or anode materials for Li-batteries, has been analysed at the intermediate length scale by a combination of high field standard and advanced 1D/2D nuclear magnetic resonance techniques. The nature and extent of B/P mixing were analysed using the (11)B((31)P) dipolar heteronuclear multiple quantum coherence NMR sequence and the data interpretation allowed (i) detecting the presence and analysing the nature of the B-O-P linkages, (ii) re-interpreting the 1D (31)P spectra and (iii) extracting the proportion of P connected to borate species. Interaction between the different borate species was analysed using the (11)B double quantum-simple quantum experiment to (i) investigate the presence and nature of the B-O-B linkage, (ii) assign the different borate species observed all along the composition line and (iii) monitor the borate network formation. In addition, (119)Sn static NMR was used to investigate the evolution of the chemical environment of the tin polyhedra. Altogether, the set of data allowed determining the structural units constituting the glass network and quantifying the extent of B/P mixing. The structural data were then used to explain the non-linear and unusual evolution of the glass transition temperature.

  4. The role of reactant unmixedness, strain rate, and length scale on premixed combustor performance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Samuelsen, S.; LaRue, J.; Vilayanur, S. [Univ. of California, Irvine, CA (United States)] [and others

    1995-10-01

    Lean premixed combustion provides a means to reduce pollutant formation and increase combustion efficiency. However, fuel-air mixing is rarely uniform in space and time. This nonuniformity in concentration will lead to relative increases in pollutant formation and decreases in combustion efficiency. The nonuniformity of the concentration at the exit of the premixer has been defined by Lyons (1981) as the {open_quotes}unmixedness.{close_quotes} Although turbulence properties such as length scales and strain rate are known to effect unmixedness, the exact relationship is unknown. Evaluating this relationship and the effect of unmixedness in premixed combustion on pollutant formation and combustion efficiency are an important part of the overall goal of US Department of Energy`s Advanced Turbine Systems (ATS) program and are among the goals of the program described herein. The information obtained from ATS is intended to help to develop and commercialize gas turbines which have (1) a wide range of operation/stability, (2) a minimal amount of pollutant formation, and (3) high combustion efficiency. Specifically, with regard to pollutants, the goals are to reduce the NO{sub x} emissions by at least 10%, obtain less than 20 PPM of both CO and UHC, and increase the combustion efficiency by 5%.

  5. Application of computer-aided multi-scale modelling framework - Aerosol case study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heitzig, Martina; Gregson, Christopher; Sin, Gürkan;

    2011-01-01

    A computer-aided modelling tool for efficient multi-scale modelling has been developed and is applied to solve a multi-scale modelling problem related to design and evaluation of fragrance aerosol products. The developed modelling scenario spans three length scales and describes how droplets...

  6. Length-Displacement Scaling of Lunar Thrust Faults and the Formation of Uphill-Facing Scarps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiesinger, Harald; Roggon, Lars; Hetzel, Ralf; Clark, Jaclyn D.; Hampel, Andrea; van der Bogert, Carolyn H.

    2017-04-01

    Lobate scarps are straight to curvilinear positive-relief landforms that occur on all terrestrial bodies [e.g., 1-3]. They are the surface manifestation of thrust faults that cut through and offset the upper part of the crust. Fault scarps on planetary surfaces provide the opportunity to study the growth of faults under a wide range of environmental conditions (e.g., gravity, temperature, pore pressure) [4]. We studied four lunar thrust-fault scarps (Simpelius-1, Morozov (S1), Fowler, Racah X-1) ranging in length from 1.3 km to 15.4 km [5] and found that their maximum total displacements are linearly correlated with length over one order of magnitude. We propose that during the progressive accumulation of slip, lunar faults propagate laterally and increase in length. On the basis of our measurements, the ratio of maximum displacement, D, to fault length, L, ranges from 0.017 to 0.028 with a mean value of 0.023 (or 2.3%). This is an order of magnitude higher than the value of 0.1% derived by theoretical considerations [4], and about twice as large as the value of 0.012-0.013 estimated by [6,7]. Our results, in addition to recently published findings for other lunar scarps [2,8], indicate that the D/L ratios of lunar thrust faults are similar to those of faults on Mercury and Mars (e.g., 1, 9-11], and almost as high as the average D/L ratio of 3% for faults on Earth [16,23]. Three of the investigated thrust fault scarps (Simpelius-1, Morozov (S1), Fowler) are uphill-facing scarps generated by slip on faults that dip in the same direction as the local topography. Thrust faults with such a geometry are common ( 60% of 97 studied scarps) on the Moon [e.g., 2,5,7]. To test our hypothesis that the surface topography plays an important role in the formation of uphill-facing fault scarps by controlling the vertical load on a fault plane, we simulated thrust faulting and its relation to topography with two-dimensional finite-element models using the commercial code ABAQUS

  7. Comparison of model predictions for coherence length to in-flight measurements at cruise conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haxter, Stefan; Spehr, Carsten

    2017-03-01

    In this paper, we will focus on coherence lengths of pressure fluctuations underneath a turbulent boundary layer on an actual aircraft measured during a flight test. Coherence lengths of pressure fluctuations have already been measured in the past and various models have been set up in order to predict the values. However, most of the underlying data were measured at Mach numbers and pressures different from our region of interest and it is not known if the models are applicable. In some of the investigations also unknown alignment procedures between array and flow were used and it will be shown that this can have a considerable influence on the result. We have performed flight tests at cruising speed and altitude in which we took due account of this alignment by means of an array processing technique which is capable of determining the flow direction for each frequency bin under consideration. In this paper one of the data points will be evaluated and compared to the prediction models. From the differences and subsequently from the adopted run conditions for the measurement of the data of the models, several conclusions are drawn concerning scaling effects and importance of alignment. Also, two of the prediction models are adjusted to our measurements.

  8. Chain length distributions in linear polyaddition proceeding in nano-scale small volumes without mass transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szymanski, R.; Sosnowski, S.

    2017-01-01

    Computer simulations (Monte Carlo and numerical integration of differential equations) and theoretical analysis show that the statistical nature of polyaddition, both irreversible and reversible one, affects the way the macromolecules of different lengths are distributed among the small volume nano-reactors (droplets in this study) at any reaction time. The corresponding droplet distributions in respect to the number of reacting chains as well as the chain length distributions depend, for the given reaction time, on rate constants of polyaddition kp and depolymerization kd (reversible process), and the initial conditions: monomer concentration and the number of its molecules in a droplet. As a model reaction, a simple polyaddition process (M)1+(M)1 ⟶ ⟵ (M)2 , (M)i+(M)j ⟶ ⟵ (M)i+j was chosen, enabling to observe both kinetic and thermodynamic (apparent equilibrium constant) effects of a small number of reactant molecules in a droplet. The average rate constant of polymerization is lower than in a macroscopic system, depending on the average number of reactant molecules in a droplet. The apparent equilibrium constants of polymerization Ki j=[(M)i +j] ¯ /([(M)i] ¯ [(M)j] ¯ ) appear to depend on oligomer/polymer sizes as well as on the initial number of monomer molecules in a droplet. The corresponding equations, enabling prediction of the equilibrium conditions, were derived. All the analyzed effects are observed not only for ideally dispersed systems, i.e. with all droplets containing initially the same number of monomer (M)1 molecules, but also when initially the numbers of monomer molecules conform the Poisson distribution, expected for dispersions of reaction mixtures.

  9. Application of the linear/exponential hybrid force field scaling scheme to the bond length alternation modes of polyacetylene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Shujiang; Kertesz, Miklos

    2006-12-01

    The two bond length alternation related backbone carbon-carbon stretching Raman active normal modes of polyacetylene are notoriously difficulty to predict theoretically. We apply our new linear/exponential scaled quantum mechanical force field scheme to tackle this problem by exponentially adjusting the decay of the coupling force constants between backbone stretchings based on their distance which extends over many neighbors. With transferable scaling parameters optimized by least squares fitting to the experimental vibrational frequencies of short oligoenes, the scaled frequencies of trans-polyacetylene and its isotopic analogs agree very well with experiments. The linear/exponential scaling scheme is also applicable to the cis-polyacetylene case.

  10. Roughness distribution of multiple hit and long surface diffusion length noise reduced discrete growth models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Disrattakit, P.; Chanphana, R.; Chatraphorn, P.

    2016-11-01

    Conventionally, the universality class of a discrete growth model is identified via the scaling of interface width. This method requires large-scale simulations to minimize finite-size effects on the results. The multiple hit noise reduction techniques (m > 1 NRT) and the long surface diffusion length noise reduction techniques (ℓ > 1 NRT) have been used to promote the asymptotic behaviors of the growth models. Lately, an alternative method involving comparison of roughness distribution in the steady state has been proposed. In this work, the roughness distribution of the (2 +1)-dimensional Das Sarma-Tamborenea (DT), Wolf-Villain (WV), and Larger Curvature (LC) models, with and without NRTs, are calculated in order to investigate effects of the NRTs on the roughness distribution. Additionally, effective growth exponents of the noise reduced (2 +1)-dimensional DT, WV and LC models are also calculated. Our results indicate that the NRTs affect the interface width both in the growth and the saturation regimes. In the steady state, the NRTs do not seem to have any impact on the roughness distribution of the DT model, but it significantly changes the roughness distribution of the WV and LC models to the normal distribution curves.

  11. Dynamically Scaled Model Experiment of a Mooring Cable

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lars Bergdahl

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The dynamic response of mooring cables for marine structures is scale-dependent, and perfect dynamic similitude between full-scale prototypes and small-scale physical model tests is difficult to achieve. The best possible scaling is here sought by means of a specific set of dimensionless parameters, and the model accuracy is also evaluated by two alternative sets of dimensionless parameters. A special feature of the presented experiment is that a chain was scaled to have correct propagation celerity for longitudinal elastic waves, thus providing perfect geometrical and dynamic scaling in vacuum, which is unique. The scaling error due to incorrect Reynolds number seemed to be of minor importance. The 33 m experimental chain could then be considered a scaled 76 mm stud chain with the length 1240 m, i.e., at the length scale of 1:37.6. Due to the correct elastic scale, the physical model was able to reproduce the effect of snatch loads giving rise to tensional shock waves propagating along the cable. The results from the experiment were used to validate the newly developed cable-dynamics code, MooDy, which utilises a discontinuous Galerkin FEM formulation. The validation of MooDy proved to be successful for the presented experiments. The experimental data is made available here for validation of other numerical codes by publishing digitised time series of two of the experiments.

  12. In situ spatiotemporal mapping of flow fields around seeded stem cells at the subcellular length scale.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Min Jae Song

    Full Text Available A major hurdle to understanding and exploiting interactions between the stem cell and its environment is the lack of a tool for precise delivery of mechanical cues concomitant to observing sub-cellular adaptation of structure. These studies demonstrate the use of microscale particle image velocimetry (μ-PIV for in situ spatiotemporal mapping of flow fields around mesenchymal stem cells, i.e. murine embryonic multipotent cell line C3H10T1/2, at the subcellular length scale, providing a tool for real time observation and analysis of stem cell adaptation to the prevailing mechanical milieu. In the absence of cells, computational fluid dynamics (CFD predicts flow regimes within 12% of μ-PIV measures, achieving the technical specifications of the chamber and the flow rates necessary to deliver target shear stresses at a particular height from the base of the flow chamber. However, our μ-PIV studies show that the presence of cells per se as well as the density at which cells are seeded significantly influences local flow fields. Furthermore, for any given cell or cell seeding density, flow regimes vary significantly along the vertical profile of the cell. Hence, the mechanical milieu of the stem cell exposed to shape changing shear stresses, induced by fluid drag, varies with respect to proximity of surrounding cells as well as with respect to apical height. The current study addresses a previously unmet need to predict and observe both flow regimes as well as mechanoadaptation of cells in flow chambers designed to deliver precisely controlled mechanical signals to live cells. An understanding of interactions and adaptation in response to forces at the interface between the surface of the cell and its immediate local environment may be key for de novo engineering of functional tissues from stem cell templates as well as for unraveling the mechanisms underlying multiscale development, growth and adaptation of organisms.

  13. Compositional variations at ultra-structure length scales in coral skeleton

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meibom, Anders; Cuif, Jean-Pierre; Houlbreque, Fanny; Mostefaoui, Smail; Dauphin, Yannicke; Meibom, Karin L.; Dunbar, Robert

    2008-03-01

    Distributions of Mg and Sr in the skeletons of a deep-sea coral ( Caryophyllia ambrosia) and a shallow-water, reef-building coral ( Pavona clavus) have been obtained with a spatial resolution of 150 nm, using the NanoSIMS ion microprobe at the Muséum National d'Histoire Naturelle in Paris. These trace element analyses focus on the two primary ultra-structural components in the skeleton: centers of calcification (COC) and fibrous aragonite. In fibrous aragonite, the trace element variations are typically on the order of 10% or more, on length scales on the order of 1-10 μm. Sr/Ca and Mg/Ca variations are not correlated. However, Mg/Ca variations in Pavona are strongly correlated with the layered organization of the skeleton. These data allow for a direct comparison of trace element variations in zooxanthellate and non-zooxanthellate corals. In both corals, all trace elements show variations far beyond what can be attributed to variations in the marine environment. Furthermore, the observed trace element variations in the fibrous (bulk) part of the skeletons are not related to the activity of zooxanthellae, but result from other biological activity in the coral organism. To a large degree, this biological forcing is independent of the ambient marine environment, which is essentially constant on the growth timescales considered here. Finally, we discuss the possible detection of a new high-Mg calcium carbonate phase, which appears to be present in both deep-sea and reef-building corals and is neither aragonite nor calcite.

  14. Frequency-Wavenumber Velocity Spectra, Taylor's Hypothesis and Length-Scales in a Natural Gravel-Bed River

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thornton, E. B.; MacMahan, J. H.; Reniers, A. J.; Ashley, W.

    2012-12-01

    Macro-scale turbulent coherent flow structures in a natural fast-flowing river were examined with a combination of a novel 2 MHz Acoustic Doppler Beam (ADB) and a Maximum Likelihood Estimator (MLE) to characterize the stream-wise horizontal length scales and persistence of coherent flow structures by measuring the frequency (f)- streamwise-wavenumber (k) energy density velocity spectrum, E(f,k ), for the first time in natural rivers. The ADB was deployed under a range of Froude numbers (0.1-0.6) at high Reynolds Numbers based on depth and velocity conditions within a gravel-bed reach of the Kootenai River, ID. The MLE employed on the ADB data increased our ability to describe river motions with relatively long (>10 m) length scales in ~1 m water depths. The E(f,k) fall along a ridge described by V=f/k, where V is the mean velocity over depth, verifying Taylor's hypothesis. New, consistent length scale measures are defined based on averaged wave lengths of the low frequency E(f,k) and coherence spectra. Energetic (~50% of the total spectral energy), low-frequency (f1 m/s, L were found to be significantly longer than their corresponding coherence lengths suggesting that the turbulent structures evolve rapidly under these conditions. This is attributed to the stretching and concomitant deformation of pre-existing macro-turbulent motions by the ubiquitous bathymetry-induced spatial flow accelerations present in a natural gravel-bed river.Mean motion lengths, Lm, (circles) and coherence lengths, Lc, (squares) as a function of the mean streamwise velocity at locations in Zones 1-4.

  15. Modeling agreement on bounded scales.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanbelle, Sophie; Lesaffre, Emmanuel

    2017-01-01

    Agreement is an important concept in medical and behavioral sciences, in particular in clinical decision making where disagreements possibly imply a different patient management. The concordance correlation coefficient is an appropriate measure to quantify agreement between two scorers on a quantitative scale. However, this measure is based on the first two moments, which could poorly summarize the shape of the score distribution on bounded scales. Bounded outcome scores are common in medical and behavioral sciences. Typical examples are scores obtained on visual analog scales and scores derived as the number of positive items on a questionnaire. These kinds of scores often show a non-standard distribution, like a J- or U-shape, questioning the usefulness of the concordance correlation coefficient as agreement measure. The logit-normal distribution has shown to be successful in modeling bounded outcome scores of two types: (1) when the bounded score is a coarsened version of a latent score with a logit-normal distribution on the [0,1] interval and (2) when the bounded score is a proportion with the true probability having a logit-normal distribution. In the present work, a model-based approach, based on a bivariate generalization of the logit-normal distribution, is developed in a Bayesian framework to assess the agreement on bounded scales. This method permits to directly study the impact of predictors on the concordance correlation coefficient and can be simply implemented in standard Bayesian softwares, like JAGS and WinBUGS. The performances of the new method are compared to the classical approach using simulations. Finally, the methodology is used in two different medical domains: cardiology and rheumatology.

  16. Scaling of musculoskeletal models from static and dynamic trials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, Morten Enemark; Andersen, Michael Skipper; de Zee, Mark

    2015-01-01

    Subject-specific scaling of cadaver-based musculoskeletal models is important for accurate musculoskeletal analysis within multiple areas such as ergonomics, orthopaedics and occupational health. We present two procedures to scale ‘generic’ musculoskeletal models to match segment lengths and joint...... parameters to a specific subject and compare the results to a simpler approach based on linear, segment-wise scaling. By incorporating data from functional and standing reference trials, the new scaling approaches reduce the model sensitivity to assumed model marker positions. For validation, we applied all...... three scaling methods to an inverse dynamics-based musculoskeletal model and compared predicted knee joint contact forces to those measured with an instrumented prosthesis during gait. Additionally, a Monte Carlo study was used to investigate the sensitivity of the knee joint contact force to random...

  17. Integrating Local Scale Drainage Measures in Meso Scale Catchment Modelling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra Hellmers

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This article presents a methodology to optimize the integration of local scale drainage measures in catchment modelling. The methodology enables to zoom into the processes (physically, spatially and temporally where detailed physical based computation is required and to zoom out where lumped conceptualized approaches are applied. It allows the definition of parameters and computation procedures on different spatial and temporal scales. Three methods are developed to integrate features of local scale drainage measures in catchment modelling: (1 different types of local drainage measures are spatially integrated in catchment modelling by a data mapping; (2 interlinked drainage features between data objects are enabled on the meso, local and micro scale; (3 a method for modelling multiple interlinked layers on the micro scale is developed. For the computation of flow routing on the meso scale, the results of the local scale measures are aggregated according to their contributing inlet in the network structure. The implementation of the methods is realized in a semi-distributed rainfall-runoff model. The implemented micro scale approach is validated with a laboratory physical model to confirm the credibility of the model. A study of a river catchment of 88 km2 illustrated the applicability of the model on the regional scale.

  18. Models of large scale structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frenk, C.S. (Physics Dept., Univ. of Durham (UK))

    1991-01-01

    The ingredients required to construct models of the cosmic large scale structure are discussed. Input from particle physics leads to a considerable simplification by offering concrete proposals for the geometry of the universe, the nature of the dark matter and the primordial fluctuations that seed the growth of structure. The remaining ingredient is the physical interaction that governs dynamical evolution. Empirical evidence provided by an analysis of a redshift survey of IRAS galaxies suggests that gravity is the main agent shaping the large-scale structure. In addition, this survey implies large values of the mean cosmic density, {Omega}> or approx.0.5, and is consistent with a flat geometry if IRAS galaxies are somewhat more clustered than the underlying mass. Together with current limits on the density of baryons from Big Bang nucleosynthesis, this lends support to the idea of a universe dominated by non-baryonic dark matter. Results from cosmological N-body simulations evolved from a variety of initial conditions are reviewed. In particular, neutrino dominated and cold dark matter dominated universes are discussed in detail. Finally, it is shown that apparent periodicities in the redshift distributions in pencil-beam surveys arise frequently from distributions which have no intrinsic periodicity but are clustered on small scales. (orig.).

  19. Determining pore length scales and pore surface relaxivity of rock cores by internal magnetic fields modulation at 2MHz NMR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Huabing; Nogueira d'Eurydice, Marcel; Obruchkov, Sergei; Galvosas, Petrik

    2014-09-01

    Pore length scales and pore surface relaxivities of rock cores with different lithologies were studied on a 2MHz Rock Core Analyzer. To determine the pore length scales of the rock cores, the high eigenmodes of spin bearing molecules satisfying the diffusion equation were detected with optimized encoding periods in the presence of internal magnetic fields Bin. The results were confirmed using a 64MHz NMR system, which supports the feasibility of high eigenmode detection at fields as low as 2MHz. Furthermore, this methodology was combined with relaxometry measurements to a two-dimensional experiment, which provides correlation between pore length and relaxation time. This techniques also yields information on the surface relaxivity of the rock cores. The estimated surface relaxivities were then compared to the results using an independent NMR method.

  20. Self-organization of Au–CdSe hybrid nanoflowers at different length scales via bi-functional diamine linkers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    AbouZeid, Khaled Mohamed [Virginia Commonwealth University, Department of Chemistry (United States); Mohamed, Mona Bakr [Cairo University, National Institute of Laser Enhanced Science (NILES) (Egypt); El-Shall, M. Samy, E-mail: mselshal@vcu.edu [Virginia Commonwealth University, Department of Chemistry (United States)

    2016-01-15

    This work introduces a series of molecular bridging bi-functional linkers to produce laterally self-assembled nanostructures of the Au–CdSe nanoflowers on different length scales ranging from 10 nm to 100 microns. Assembly of Au nanocrystals within amorphous CdSe rods is found in the early stages of the growth of the Au–CdSe nanoflowers. The Au–CdSe nanoflowers are formed through a one-pot low temperature (150 °C) process where CdSe clusters are adsorbed on the surface of the Au cores, and they then start to form multiple arms and branches resulting in flower-shaped hybrid nanostructures. More complex assembly at a micron length scale can be achieved by means of bi-functional capping agents with appropriate alkyl chain lengths, such as 1,12-diaminododecane.

  1. Surface roughness length dynamic over several different surfaces and its effects on modeling fluxes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    <正>Roughness length and zero-plane displacement over three typical surfaces were calculated iteratively by least-square method, which are Yucheng Experimental Station for agriculture surfaces, Qianyanzhou Experimental Station for complex and undulant surfaces, and Changbai Mountains Experimental Station for forest surfaces. On the basis of roughness length dynamic, the effects of roughness length dynamic on fluxes were analyzed with SEBS model. The results indicate that, aerodynamic roughness length changes with vegetation conditions (such as vegetation height, LAI), wind speed, friction velocity and some other factors. In Yucheng and Changbai Mountains Experimental Station, aerodynamic roughness length over the fetch of flux tower changes with vegetation height and LAI obviously, that is, with the increase of LAI, roughness length increases to the peak value firstly, and then decreases. In Qianyanzhou Experimental Station, LAI changes slightly, so the relationship between roughness length and LAI is not obvious. The aerodynamic roughness length of Yucheng and Changbai Mountains Experimental Station changes slightly with wind direction, while aerodynamic roughness length of Qianyanzhou Experimental Station changes obviously with wind direction. The reason for that is the terrain in Yucheng and Changbai Mountains Experimental Station is relatively flat, while in Qianyanzhou Experimental Station the terrain is very undulant and heterogeneous. With the increase of wind speed, aerodynamic roughness length of Yucheng Experimental Station changes slightly, while it decreases obviously in Qianyanzhou Experimental Station and Changbai Mountains Experimental Station. Roughness length dynamic takes great effects on fluxes calculation, and the effects are analyzed by SEBS model. By comparing 1 day averaged roughness length in Yucheng Experimental Station and 5 day averaged roughness length of Qianyanzhou and Changbai Mountains Experimental Station with roughness length

  2. Full-Scale Tunnel (FST) model

    Science.gov (United States)

    1929-01-01

    Model of Full-Scale Tunnel (FST) under construction. On June 26, 1929, Elton W. Miller wrote to George W. Lewis proposing the construction of a model of the full-scale tunnel . 'The excellent energy ratio obtained in the new wind tunnel of the California Institute of Technology suggests that before proceeding with our full scale tunnel design, we ought to investigate the effect on energy ratio of such factors as: 1. Small included angle for the exit cone; 2. Carefully designed return passages of circular section as far as possible, without sudden changes in cross sections; 3. Tightness of walls. It is believed that much useful information can be obtained by building a model of about 1/16 scale, that is, having a closed throat of 2 ft. by 4 ft. The outside dimensions would be about 12 ft. by 25 ft. in plan and the height 4 ft. Two propellers will be required about 28 in. in diameter, each to be driven by direct current motor at a maximum speed of 4500 R.P.M. Provision can be made for altering the length of certain portions, particularly the exit cone, and possibly for the application of boundary layer control in order to effect satisfactory air flow. This model can be constructed in a comparatively short time, using 2 by 4 framing with matched sheathing inside, and where circular sections are desired they can be obtained by nailing sheet metal to wooden ribs, which can be cut on the band saw. It is estimated that three months will be required for the construction and testing of such a model and that the cost will be approximately three thousand dollars, one thousand dollars of which will be for the motors. No suitable location appears to exist in any of our present buildings, and it may be necessary to build it outside and cover it with a roof.' George Lewis responded immediately (June 27) granting the authority to proceed. He urged Langley to expedite construction and to employ extra carpenters if necessary. Funds for the model came from the FST project. In a 1979

  3. Eddy length scales and the Rossby radius in the Arctic Ocean

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. J. G. Nurser

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available The first (and second baroclinic deformation (or Rossby radii are presented and discussed north of ~60° N, focusing on deep basins and shelf seas in the high Arctic Ocean, the Nordic Seas, Baffin Bay, Hudson Bay and the Canadian Arctic Archipelago, derived from high-resolution ice-ocean general circulation model output. Comparison of the model output with measured results shows that low values of the Rossby radius (in shallow water and high values (in the Canada Basin are accurately reproduced, while intermediate values (in the region of the Makarov and Amundsen Basins are overestimated. In the high Arctic Ocean, the first Rossby radius increases from ~5 km in the Nansen Basin to ~15 km in the central Canadian Basin. In the shelf seas and elsewhere, values are low (1–7 km, reflecting weak density stratification, shallow water, or both. Seasonality only strongly impacts the Rossby radii in shallow seas where winter homogenisation of the water column can reduce it to the order of 100 m. We also offer an interpretation and explanation of the observed scales of Arctic Ocean eddies.

  4. Brane World Models Need Low String Scale

    CERN Document Server

    Antoniadis, Ignatios; Calmet, Xavier

    2011-01-01

    Models with large extra dimensions offer the possibility of the Planck scale being of order the electroweak scale, thus alleviating the gauge hierarchy problem. We show that these models suffer from a breakdown of unitarity at around three quarters of the low effective Planck scale. An obvious candidate to fix the unitarity problem is string theory. We therefore argue that it is necessary for the string scale to appear below the effective Planck scale and that the first signature of such models would be string resonances. We further translate experimental bounds on the string scale into bounds on the effective Planck scale.

  5. Auto-Regressive Models of Non-Stationary Time Series with Finite Length

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FEI Wanchun; BAI Lun

    2005-01-01

    To analyze and simulate non-stationary time series with finite length, the statistical characteristics and auto-regressive (AR) models of non-stationary time series with finite length are discussed and studied. A new AR model called the time varying parameter AR model is proposed for solution of non-stationary time series with finite length. The auto-covariances of time series simulated by means of several AR models are analyzed. The result shows that the new AR model can be used to simulate and generate a new time series with the auto-covariance same as the original time series. The size curves of cocoon filaments regarded as non-stationary time series with finite length are experimentally simulated. The simulation results are significantly better than those obtained so far, and illustrate the availability of the time varying parameter AR model. The results are useful for analyzing and simulating non-stationary time series with finite length.

  6. On scaling laws at the phase transition of systems with divergent order parameter and/or internal length the example of DNA denaturation

    CERN Document Server

    Buyukdagli, S; Buyukdagli, Sahin; Joyeux, Marc

    2006-01-01

    We used the Transfer-Integral method to compute, with an uncertainty smaller than 5%, the six fundamental characteristic exponents of two dynamical models for DNA thermal denaturation and investigate the validity of the scaling laws. Doubts concerning this point arise because the investigated systems (i) have a divergent internal length, (ii) are described by a divergent order parameter, (iii) are of dimension 1. We found that the assumption that the free energy can be described by a single homogeneous function is robust, despite the divergence of the order parameter, so that Rushbrooke's and Widom's identities are valid relations. Josephson's identity is instead not satisfied. This is probably due to the divergence of the internal length, which invalidates the assumption that the correlation length is solely responsible for singular contributions to thermodynamic quantities. Fisher's identity is even wronger. We showed that this is due to the d=1 dimensionality and obtained an alternative law, which is well ...

  7. On the use of the Prandtl mixing length model in the cutting torch modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mancinelli, B [Grupo de Descargas Electricas, Departamento Ing. Electromecanica, Universidad Tecnologica Nacional, Regional Venado Tuerto, Laprida 651, Venado Tuerto (2600), Santa Fe (Argentina); Minotti, F O; Kelly, H, E-mail: bmancinelli@arnet.com.ar [Instituto de Fisica del Plasma (CONICET), Departamento de Fisica, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales (UBA) Ciudad Universitaria Pab. I, 1428 Buenos Aires (Argentina)

    2011-05-01

    The Prandtl mixing length model has been used to take into account the turbulent effects in a 30 A high-energy density cutting torch model. In particular, the model requires the introduction of only one adjustable coefficient c corresponding to the length of action of the turbulence. It is shown that the c value has little effect on the plasma temperature profiles outside the nozzle (the differences being less than 10 %), but severely affects the plasma velocity distribution, with differences reaching about 100% at the middle of the nozzle-anode gap. Within the experimental uncertainties it was also found that the value c = 0.08 allows to reproduce both, the experimental data of velocity and temperature

  8. Scaling between superconducting critical temperature and structural coherence length in YBa2Cu3O6.9 films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gauzzi, A.; Jönsson-Åkerman, B. Johan; Clerc-Dubois, A.; Pavuna, D.

    2000-09-01

    Measurements of critical temperature Tc in superconducting YBa2Cu3O6.9 films with reduced long-range structural order show the validity of the empirical scaling relation ΔTc propto rc-2 between disorder-induced reduction of Tc and structural coherence length rc in the ab-plane. This result is quantitatively explained by the disorder-induced confinement of the charge carriers within each ordered domain of size rc. Our analysis of the data based on this picture enables us to precisely determine the Ginzburg-Landau superconducting coherence length in the ab-plane, ξab = 1.41 ± 0.04 nm.

  9. Multilayer Numerical Modeling of Flows through Vegetation Using a Mixing-Length Turbulence Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hector Barrios-Piña

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available This work focuses on the effects of vegetation on a fluid flow pattern. In this numerical research, we verify the applicability of a simpler turbulence model than the commonly used k-" model to predict the mean flow through vegetation. The novel characteristic of this turbulence model is that the horizontal mixing-length is explicitly calculated and coupled with a multi-layer approach for the vertical mixing-length, within a general three-dimensional eddy-viscosity formulation. This mixing-length turbulence model has been validated in previous works for different kinds of non-vegetated flows. The hydrodynamic numerical model used for simulations is based on the Reynolds-averaged Navier–Stokes equations for shallow water flows, where a vegetation shear stress term is considered to reproduce the effects of drag forces on flow. A second-order approximation is used for spatial discretization and a semi-implicit Lagrangian–Eulerian scheme is used for time discretization. In order to validate the numerical results, we compare them against experimental data reported in the literature. The comparisons are carried out for two cases of study: submerged vegetation and submerged and emergent vegetation, both within an open channel flow.

  10. Scaling and percolation in the small-world network model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Newman, M. E. J. [Santa Fe Institute, 1399 Hyde Park Road, Santa Fe, New Mexico 87501 (United States); Watts, D. J. [Santa Fe Institute, 1399 Hyde Park Road, Santa Fe, New Mexico 87501 (United States)

    1999-12-01

    In this paper we study the small-world network model of Watts and Strogatz, which mimics some aspects of the structure of networks of social interactions. We argue that there is one nontrivial length-scale in the model, analogous to the correlation length in other systems, which is well-defined in the limit of infinite system size and which diverges continuously as the randomness in the network tends to zero, giving a normal critical point in this limit. This length-scale governs the crossover from large- to small-world behavior in the model, as well as the number of vertices in a neighborhood of given radius on the network. We derive the value of the single critical exponent controlling behavior in the critical region and the finite size scaling form for the average vertex-vertex distance on the network, and, using series expansion and Pade approximants, find an approximate analytic form for the scaling function. We calculate the effective dimension of small-world graphs and show that this dimension varies as a function of the length-scale on which it is measured, in a manner reminiscent of multifractals. We also study the problem of site percolation on small-world networks as a simple model of disease propagation, and derive an approximate expression for the percolation probability at which a giant component of connected vertices first forms (in epidemiological terms, the point at which an epidemic occurs). The typical cluster radius satisfies the expected finite size scaling form with a cluster size exponent close to that for a random graph. All our analytic results are confirmed by extensive numerical simulations of the model. (c) 1999 The American Physical Society.

  11. Integral Length and Time Scales of Velocity, Heat and Mass At and Near a Turbulent Free Surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curtis, G. M.; Zappa, C. J.; Variano, E. A.

    2010-12-01

    Turbulence enhances both heat and CO2 gas exchange at a free surface. At the air-water interface, heat and mass transport is controlled by a thin thermal/diffusive boundary layer. Turbulence in the flow acts to thin the heat and mass boundary layers, thereby increasing the rate at which surface water is mixed into the bulk. Surface water is typically cool, and mixing replaces it with warmer water from the bulk. In our experiment, and in many environmental cases, the surface has a higher concentration of dissolved CO2 and carbonate species. . The dissolved gas is transported between the surface and bulk in a similar way to the heat. Because of this similarity, attempts are often made to find and exploit a relationship between the heat and mass transfer. Using a laboratory tank, which generates turbulence with very low mean shear flow, we measured heat and mass transfer by using infrared imagery to map the two-dimensional surface temperature field and by using planar laser-induced fluorescence (PLIF) to map the two-dimensional subsurface CO2 flux. In addition, particle image velocimetry (PIV) was used to measure subsurface velocity fields. A comparative analysis of these results allows us to determine the similarities and differences between heat, mass, and momentum transport at a free surface. This will contribute to the use of one quantity to predict transport of the others. The setup used here, i.e., turbulence with very low mean shear at the surface, allows us to evaluate the turbulent components of interfacial flux in a way that can be applied equally well to flows created by wind, waves, or current. Here, we quantify the integral length and time scales of the surface temperature and sub-surface CO2 and velocity measurements. Initial analysis shows that the integral length scales of temperature at the surface are significantly smaller than the sub-surface velocity scales. However, the integral scale of sub-surface velocity decreases approaching the surface. The

  12. Two body scattering length of Yukawa model on a lattice

    CERN Document Server

    De Soto, F; Roiesnel, C; Boucaud, P; Leroy, J P; Pène, O; Boucaud, Ph.

    2007-01-01

    The extraction of scattering parameters from Euclidean simulations of a Yukawa model in a finite volume with periodic boundary conditions is analyzed both in non relativistic quantum mechanics and in quantum field theory.

  13. A direct dynamical measurement of the Milky Way's disk surface density profile, disk scale length, and dark matter profile at 4 kpc < R < 9 kpc

    CERN Document Server

    Bovy, Jo

    2013-01-01

    We present and apply rigorous dynamical modeling with which we infer unprecedented constraints on the stellar and dark matter mass distribution within our Milky Way (MW), based on large sets of phase-space data on individual stars. Specifically, we model the dynamics of 16,269 G-type dwarfs from SEGUE, which sample 5 < R/kpc < 12 and 0.3 < |Z|/kpc < 3. We independently fit a parameterized MW potential and a three-integral, action-based distribution function (DF) to the phase-space data of 43 separate abundance-selected sub-populations (MAPs), accounting for the complex selection effects affecting the data. We robustly measure the total surface density within 1.1 kpc of the mid-plane to about 5% over the range 4.5< R/kpc < 9. Using metal-poor MAPs with small radial scale lengths as dynamical tracers probes 4.5 < R/kpc < 7, while MAPs with longer radial scale lengths sample 7 < R/kpc < 9. We measure the mass-weighted Galactic disk scale length to be R_d = 2.15+/-0.14 kpc, in agreem...

  14. Dependence of displacement-length scaling relations for fractures and deformation bands on the volumetric changes across them

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schultz, R.A.; Soliva, R.; Fossen, H.; Okubo, C.H.; Reeves, D.M.

    2008-01-01

    Displacement-length data from faults, joints, veins, igneous dikes, shear deformation bands, and compaction bands define two groups. The first group, having a power-law scaling relation with a slope of n = 1 and therefore a linear dependence of maximum displacement and discontinuity length (Dmax = ??L), comprises faults and shear (non-compactional or non-dilational) deformation bands. These shearing-mode structures, having shearing strains that predominate over volumetric strains across them, grow under conditions of constant driving stress, with the magnitude of near-tip stress on the same order as the rock's yield strength in shear. The second group, having a power-law scaling relation with a slope of n = 0.5 and therefore a dependence of maximum displacement on the square root of discontinuity length (Dmax = ??L0.5), comprises joints, veins, igneous dikes, cataclastic deformation bands, and compaction bands. These opening- and closing-mode structures grow under conditions of constant fracture toughness, implying significant amplification of near-tip stress within a zone of small-scale yielding at the discontinuity tip. Volumetric changes accommodated by grain fragmentation, and thus control of propagation by the rock's fracture toughness, are associated with scaling of predominantly dilational and compactional structures with an exponent of n = 0.5. ?? 2008 Elsevier Ltd.

  15. Zero-temperature transition and correlation-length exponent of the frustrated XY model on a honeycomb lattice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granato, Enzo

    2012-02-01

    Phase coherence and vortex order in the fully frustrated XY model on a two-dimensional honeycomb lattice are studied by extensive Monte Carlo simulations using the parallel tempering method and finite-size scaling. No evidence is found for an equilibrium order-disorder or a spin/vortex-glass transition, suggested in previous simulation works. Instead, the scaling analysis of correlations of phase and vortex variables in the full equilibrated system is consistent with a phase transition where the critical temperature vanishes and the correlation lengths diverge as a power law with decreasing temperatures and corresponding critical exponents νph and νv. This behavior and the near agreement of the critical exponents suggest a zero-temperature transition scenario where phase and vortex variables remain coupled on large length scales.

  16. Molecular density functional theory of water describing hydrophobicity at short and long length scales.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeanmairet, Guillaume; Levesque, Maximilien; Borgis, Daniel

    2013-10-21

    We present an extension of our recently introduced molecular density functional theory of water [G. Jeanmairet et al., J. Phys. Chem. Lett. 4, 619 (2013)] to the solvation of hydrophobic solutes of various sizes, going from angstroms to nanometers. The theory is based on the quadratic expansion of the excess free energy in terms of two classical density fields: the particle density and the multipolar polarization density. Its implementation requires as input a molecular model of water and three measurable bulk properties, namely, the structure factor and the k-dependent longitudinal and transverse dielectric susceptibilities. The fine three-dimensional water structure around small hydrophobic molecules is found to be well reproduced. In contrast, the computed solvation free-energies appear overestimated and do not exhibit the correct qualitative behavior when the hydrophobic solute is grown in size. These shortcomings are corrected, in the spirit of the Lum-Chandler-Weeks theory, by complementing the functional with a truncated hard-sphere functional acting beyond quadratic order in density, and making the resulting functional compatible with the Van-der-Waals theory of liquid-vapor coexistence at long range. Compared to available molecular simulations, the approach yields reasonable solvation structure and free energy of hard or soft spheres of increasing size, with a correct qualitative transition from a volume-driven to a surface-driven regime at the nanometer scale.

  17. Dominant length scale of the ``pure'' turbulent fluctuations in the outer region of wall turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Yong Seok; Monty, Jason; Hutchins, Nick

    2014-11-01

    A new method of decomposing the total velocity in boundary layers, which removes the influence of instantaneous boundary layer thickness variations to the fluctuating velocity component, is proposed. The recent proposition of the quiescent core of turbulent channel flow by Kwon et al. (J. Fluid Mech., 751, 228 (2014)) permits us to apply the same decomposition to channel flows where the quiescent core is analogous to the free-stream. Using this decomposition, it is observed that the majority of the large-scale streamwise velocity fluctuation within the intermittent region is attributed to the oscillation of the turbulent/non-turbulent interface or the quiescent core. It suggests that the quiescent core and the free-stream play a similar role and the flow nearer to the wall in both flows is more similar than previously thought while the different characteristics of the free-stream and the quiescent core account for the differences in the outer region of two flows. These findings re-affirm the analogy between the quiescent core and the free-stream, which could potentially lead to the unified conceptual model between internal and external flows. This work is financially supported by the Australian Research Council and the Defence Science and Technology Organisation.

  18. Pollutant Dispersion in Boundary Layers Exposed to Rural-to-Urban Transitions: Varying the Spanwise Length Scale of the Roughness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomas, J. M.; Eisma, H. E.; Pourquie, M. J. B. M.; Elsinga, G. E.; Jonker, H. J. J.; Westerweel, J.

    2017-01-01

    Both large-eddy simulations (LES) and water-tunnel experiments, using simultaneous stereoscopic particle image velocimetry and laser-induced fluorescence, have been used to investigate pollutant dispersion mechanisms in regions where the surface changes from rural to urban roughness. The urban roughness was characterized by an array of rectangular obstacles in an in-line arrangement. The streamwise length scale of the roughness was kept constant, while the spanwise length scale was varied by varying the obstacle aspect ratio l / h between 1 and 8, where l is the spanwise dimension of the obstacles and h is the height of the obstacles. Additionally, the case of two-dimensional roughness (riblets) was considered in LES. A smooth-wall turbulent boundary layer of depth 10h was used as the approaching flow, and a line source of passive tracer was placed 2h upstream of the urban canopy. The experimental and numerical results show good agreement, while minor discrepancies are readily explained. It is found that for l/h=2 the drag induced by the urban canopy is largest of all considered cases, and is caused by a large-scale secondary flow. In addition, due to the roughness transition the vertical advective pollutant flux is the main ventilation mechanism in the first three streets. Furthermore, by means of linear stochastic estimation the mean flow structure is identified that is responsible for street-canyon ventilation for the sixth street and onwards. Moreover, it is shown that the vertical length scale of this structure increases with increasing aspect ratio of the obstacles in the canopy, while the streamwise length scale does not show a similar trend.

  19. Static and dynamic length scales in supercooled liquids: insights from molecular dynamics simulations of water and tri-propylene oxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klameth, F; Henritzi, P; Vogel, M

    2014-04-14

    We perform molecular dynamics simulations to study static and dynamic length scales in molecular supercooled liquids, in particular, water. For a determination of these scales, we use equilibrium configurations and pin appropriate subsets of molecules so as to obtain random matrices, cylindrical pores, and slit confinements. Static length scales ξ(s) are determined by analyzing overlap correlation functions for various fractions of pinned molecules or distances to the confining walls. For water in all confinements and for propylene oxide trimers in random geometry, a linear increase of ξ(s) with inverse temperature is found. Dynamic length scales ξ(d) are determined by analogous analysis of fraction-dependent or position-resolved correlation times of structural relaxation. While ξ(d) continuously grows upon cooling in the cylindrical and slit confinements, we find no evidence for a temperature dependence in random matrices, implying that molecular dynamics in parsed volumes is qualitatively different from that in bulk liquids. Finally, we study possible connections between the growth of the static and dynamic length scales and the slowdown of the structural relaxation of the supercooled bulk liquids. For water, we observe a linear relation between ln τ(α) and ξ(s)²/T in the whole accessible range down to the critical temperature of mode-coupling theory, T(c). In the weakly supercooled regime, the same relation holds also for ξ(d), as obtained from cylindrical and slit confinements, but deviations from this behavior are observed near T(c). The results are discussed in connection with random first-order theory and experimental studies of liquid dynamics in nanoscopic confinements and binary mixtures.

  20. Global-scale pattern of peatland Sphagnum growth driven by photosynthetically active radiation and growing season length

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z. Yu

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available High-latitude peatlands contain about one third of the world's soil organic carbon, most of which is derived from partly decomposed Sphagnum (peat moss plants. We conducted a meta-analysis based on a global data set of Sphagnum growth measurements collected from published literature to investigate the effects of bioclimatic variables on Sphagnum growth. Analysis of variance and general linear models were used to relate Sphagnum magellanicum and S. fuscum growth rates to photosynthetically active radiation integrated over the growing season (PAR0 and a moisture index. We found that PAR0 was the main predictor of Sphagnum growth for the global data set, and effective moisture was only correlated with moss growth at continental sites. The strong correlation between Sphagnum growth and PAR0 suggests the existence of a global pattern of growth, with slow rates under cool climate and short growing seasons, highlighting the important role of growing season length in explaining peatland biomass production. Large-scale patterns of cloudiness during the growing season might also limit moss growth. Although considerable uncertainty remains over the carbon balance of peatlands under a changing climate, our results suggest that increasing PAR0 as a result of global warming and lengthening growing seasons, without major change in cloudiness, could promote Sphagnum growth. Assuming that production and decomposition have the same sensitivity to temperature, this enhanced growth could lead to greater peat-carbon sequestration, inducing a negative feedback to climate change.

  1. Global-scale pattern of peatland Sphagnum growth driven by photosynthetically active radiation and growing season length

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z. Yu

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available High-latitude peatlands contain about one third of the world's soil organic carbon, most of which is derived from partly decomposed Sphagnum (peat moss plants. We conducted a meta-analysis based on a global dataset of Sphagnum growth measurements collected from published literature to investigate the effects of bioclimatic variables on Sphagnum growth. Analysis of variance and general linear models were used to relate Sphagnum magellanicum and S. fuscum growth rates to photosynthetically active radiation integrated over the growing season (PAR0 and a moisture index. We found that PAR0 was the main predictor of Sphagnum growth for the global dataset, and effective moisture was only correlated with moss growth at continental sites. The strong correlation between Sphagnum growth and PAR0 suggests the existence of a global pattern of growth, with slow rates under cool climate and short growing seasons, highlighting the important role of temperature and growing season length in explaining peatland biomass production. Large-scale patterns of cloudiness during the growing season might also limit moss growth. Although considerable uncertainty remains over the carbon balance of peatlands under a changing climate, our results suggest that increasing PAR0 as a result of global warming and lengthening growing seasons could promote Sphagnum growth. Assuming that production and decomposition have the same sensitivity to temperature, this enhanced growth could lead to greater peat-carbon sequestration, inducing a negative feedback to climate change.

  2. Validating a Mentoring Relationship Quality Scale: Does Match Strength Predict Match Length?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhodes, Jean E.; Schwartz, Sarah E. O.; Willis, Margaret M.; Wu, Max B.

    2017-01-01

    Youth mentoring relationships have significant potential for promoting positive youth development. Nonetheless, the benefits derived from such relationships depend considerably on the length and quality of the bonds that are created between mentors and youth. Although some attention has been paid to youth's experience of relationship quality, few…

  3. The Stagger-grid: A grid of 3D stellar atmosphere models. III. The relation to mixing length convection theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magic, Z.; Weiss, A.; Asplund, M.

    2015-01-01

    Aims: We investigate the relation between 1D atmosphere models that rely on the mixing length theory and models based on full 3D radiative hydrodynamic (RHD) calculations to describe convection in the envelopes of late-type stars. Methods: The adiabatic entropy value of the deep convection zone, sbot, and the entropy jump, Δs, determined from the 3D RHD models, were matched with the mixing length parameter, αMLT, from 1D hydrostatic atmosphere models with identical microphysics (opacities and equation-of-state). We also derived the mass mixing length parameter, αm, and the vertical correlation length of the vertical velocity, C[vz,vz], directly from the 3D hydrodynamical simulations of stellar subsurface convection. Results: The calibrated mixing length parameter for the Sun is α๏MLT (Sbot) = 1.98. . For different stellar parameters, αMLT varies systematically in the range of 1.7 - 2.4. In particular, αMLT decreases towards higher effective temperature, lower surface gravity and higher metallicity. We find equivalent results for α๏MLT (ΔS). In addition, we find a tight correlation between the mixing length parameter and the inverse entropy jump. We derive an analytical expression from the hydrodynamic mean-field equations that motivates the relation to the mass mixing length parameter, αm, and find that it qualitatively shows a similar variation with stellar parameter (between 1.6 and 2.4) with the solar value of α๏m = 1.83.. The vertical correlation length scaled with the pressure scale height yields 1.71 for the Sun, but only displays a small systematic variation with stellar parameters, the correlation length slightly increases with Teff. Conclusions: We derive mixing length parameters for various stellar parameters that can be used to replace a constant value. Within any convective envelope, αm and related quantities vary strongly. Our results will help to replace a constant αMLT. Appendices are available in electronic form at http

  4. Hospital- and patient-related characteristics determining maternity length of stay: a hierarchical linear model approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leung, K M; Elashoff, R M; Rees, K S; Hasan, M M; Legorreta, A P

    1998-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify factors related to pregnancy and childbirth that might be predictive of a patient's length of stay after delivery and to model variations in length of stay. California hospital discharge data on maternity patients (n = 499,912) were analyzed. Hierarchical linear modeling was used to adjust for patient case mix and hospital characteristics and to account for the dependence of outcome variables within hospitals. Substantial variation in length of stay among patients was observed. The variation was mainly attributed to delivery type (vaginal or cesarean section), the patient's clinical risk factors, and severity of complications (if any). Furthermore, hospitals differed significantly in maternity lengths of stay even after adjustment for patient case mix. Developing risk-adjusted models for length of stay is a complex process but is essential for understanding variation. The hierarchical linear model approach described here represents a more efficient and appropriate way of studying interhospital variations than the traditional regression approach.

  5. Two-dimensional Length Extraction of Ballistic Target from ISAR Images Using a New Scaling Method by Affine Registration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jin Guanghu

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The length of ballistic target is one of the most important features for target recognition. It can be extracted from ISAR Images. Unlike from the optical image, the length extraction from ISAR image has two difficulties. The first one is that it is hard to get the actual position of scattering centres by the traditional target extraction method. The second one is that the ISAR image’s cross scale is not known because of the target’s complex rotation. Here we propose two methods to solve these problems. Firstly, we use clustering method to get scattering centers. Secondly we propose to get cross scale of the ISAR images by affine registration. Experiments verified that our approach is realisable and has good performance.Defence Science Journal, Vol. 64, No. 5, September 2014, pp.458-463, DOI:http://dx.doi.org/10.14429/dsj.64.5001

  6. BAYES ESTIMATES FOR THE PARAMETERS OF POISSON TYPE LENGTH BIASED EXPONENTIAL CLASS MODEL USING NON-INFORMATIVE PRIORS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajesh Singh

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, the failure intensity has been characterized by one parameter length biased exponential class Software Reliability Growth Model (SRGM considering the Poisson process of occurrence of software failures. This proposed length biased exponential class model is a function of parameters namely; total number of failures θ0 and scale parameter θ1. It is assumed that very little or no information is available about both these parameters. The Bayes estimators for parameters θ0 and θ1 have been obtained using non-informative priors for each parameter under square error loss function. The Monte Carlo simulation technique is used to study the performance of proposed Bayes estimators against their corresponding maximum likelihood estimators on the basis of risk efficiencies. It is concluded that both the proposed Bayes estimators of total number of failures and scale parameter perform well for proper choice of execution time.

  7. From divots to swales: Hillslope sediment transport across divers length scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furbish, David Jon; Haff, Peter K.

    2010-09-01

    In soil-mantled steeplands, soil motions associated with creep, ravel, rain splash, soil slips, tree throw, and rodent activity are patchy and intermittent and involve widely varying travel distances. To describe the collective effect of these motions, we formulate a nonlocal expression for the soil flux. This probabilistic formulation involves upslope and downslope convolutions of land surface geometry to characterize motions in both directions, notably accommodating the bidirectional dispersal of material on gentle slopes as well as mostly downslope dispersal on steeper slopes, and it distinguishes between the mobilization of soil material and the effect of surface slope in giving a downslope bias to the dispersal of mobilized material. The formulation separates dispersal associated with intermittent surface motions from the slower bulk behavior associated with small-scale bioturbation and similar dilational processes operating mostly within the soil column. With a uniform rate of mobilization of soil material, the nearly parabolic form of a hillslope profile at steady state resembles a diffusive behavior. With a slope-dependent rate of mobilization, the steady state hillslope profile takes on a nonparabolic form where land surface elevation varies with downslope distance x as xa with a ˜ 3/2, consistent with field observations and where the flux increases nonlinearly with increasing slope. The convolution description of the soil flux, when substituted into a suitable expression of conservation, yields a nonlinear Fokker-Planck equation and can be mapped to discrete particle models of hillslope behavior and descriptions of soil-grain transport by rain splash as a stochastic advection-dispersion process.

  8. Technical measures without enforcement tools: is there any sense? A methodological approach for the estimation of passive net length in small scale fisheries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. LUCCHETTI

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Passive nets are currently among the most important fishing gears largely used along the Mediterranean coasts by the small scale fisheries sector. The fishing effort exerted by this sector is strongly correlated with net dimensions. Therefore, the use of passive nets is worldwide managed by defining net length and net drop. The EC Reg. 1967/2006 reports that the length of bottom-set and drifting nets may be also defined considering their weight or volume; however, no practical suggestions for fisheries inspectors are yet available. Consequently,  even if such technical measures are reasonable from a theoretical viewpoint, they are hardly suitable as a management tool, due to the difficulties in harbour control. The overall objective of this paper is to provide a quick methodological approach for the gross estimation of passive net length (by net type on the basis of net volume. The final goal is to support fisheries managers with suitable advice for enforcement and control purposes. The results obtained are important for the management of the fishing effort exerted by small scale fisheries. The methodology developed in this study should be considered as a first attempt to tackle the tangled problem of net length estimation that can be easily applied in other fisheries and areas in order to improve the precision of the models developed herein.

  9. Technical measures without enforcement tools: is there any sense? A methodological approach for the estimation of passive net length in small scale fisheries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. LUCCHETTI

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Passive nets are currently among the most important fishing gears largely used along the Mediterranean coasts by the small scale fisheries sector. The fishing effort exerted by this sector is strongly correlated with net dimensions. Therefore, the use of passive nets is worldwide managed by defining net length and net drop. The EC Reg. 1967/2006 reports that the length of bottom-set and drifting nets may be also defined considering their weight or volume; however, no practical suggestions for fisheries inspectors are yet available. Consequently,  even if such technical measures are reasonable from a theoretical viewpoint, they are hardly suitable as a management tool, due to the difficulties in harbour control. The overall objective of this paper is to provide a quick methodological approach for the gross estimation of passive net length (by net type on the basis of net volume. The final goal is to support fisheries managers with suitable advice for enforcement and control purposes. The results obtained are important for the management of the fishing effort exerted by small scale fisheries. The methodology developed in this study should be considered as a first attempt to tackle the tangled problem of net length estimation that can be easily applied in other fisheries and areas in order to improve the precision of the models developed herein.

  10. The scaling of the minimum sum of edge lengths in uniformly random trees

    CERN Document Server

    Esteban, Juan Luis; Gómez-Rodríguez, Carlos

    2016-01-01

    The minimum linear arrangement problem on a network consists of finding the minimum sum of edge lengths that can be achieved when the vertices are arranged linearly. Although there are algorithms to solve this problem on trees in polynomial time, they have remained theoretical and have not been implemented in practical contexts to our knowledge. Here we use one of those algorithms to investigate the growth of this sum as a function of the size of the tree in uniformly random trees. We show that this sum is bounded above by its value in a star tree. We also show that the mean edge length grows logarithmically in optimal linear arrangements, in stark contrast to the linear growth that is expected on optimal arrangements of star trees or on random linear arrangements.

  11. The scaling of the minimum sum of edge lengths in uniformly random trees

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esteban, Juan Luis; Ferrer-i-Cancho, Ramon; Gómez-Rodríguez, Carlos

    2016-06-01

    The minimum linear arrangement problem on a network consists of finding the minimum sum of edge lengths that can be achieved when the vertices are arranged linearly. Although there are algorithms to solve this problem on trees in polynomial time, they have remained theoretical and have not been implemented in practical contexts to our knowledge. Here we use one of those algorithms to investigate the growth of this sum as a function of the size of the tree in uniformly random trees. We show that this sum is bounded above by its value in a star tree. We also show that the mean edge length grows logarithmically in optimal linear arrangements, in stark contrast to the linear growth that is expected on optimal arrangements of star trees or on random linear arrangements.

  12. Gastrocnemius tendon length and strain are different when assessed using straight or curved tendon model

    OpenAIRE

    Stosic, Jelena; Finni Juutinen, Taija

    2011-01-01

    The present study investigated the effects of tendon curvature on measurements of tendon length using 3D-kinematic analysis. Curved and straight tendon models were employed for assessing medial gastrocnemius tendon length and strain during hopping (N = 8). Tendon curvature was identified using small reflective markers placed on the skin surface along the length of the tendon and a sum of vectors between the markers from the calcaneous up to the marker at the origin of tendon was calculated. T...

  13. Gastrocnemius tendon length and strain are different when assessed using straight or curved tendon model

    OpenAIRE

    Stosic, Jelena; Finni Juutinen, Taija

    2011-01-01

    The present study investigated the effects of tendon curvature on measurements of tendon length using 3D-kinematic analysis. Curved and straight tendon models were employed for assessing medial gastrocnemius tendon length and strain during hopping (N = 8). Tendon curvature was identified using small reflective markers placed on the skin surface along the length of the tendon and a sum of vectors between the markers from the calcaneous up to the marker at the origin of tendon was calculated. T...

  14. Length-scale mediated adhesion and directed growth of neural cells by surface-patterned poly(ethylene glycol) hydrogels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krsko, Peter; McCann, Thomas E; Thach, Thu-Trang; Laabs, Tracy L; Geller, Herbert M; Libera, Matthew R

    2009-02-01

    We engineered surfaces that permit the adhesion and directed growth of neuronal cell processes but that prevent the adhesion of astrocytes. This effect was achieved based on the spatial distribution of sub-micron-sized cell-repulsive poly(ethylene glycol) [PEG] hydrogels patterned on an otherwise cell-adhesive substrate. Patterns were identified that promoted cellular responses ranging from complete non-attachment, selective attachment, and directed growth at both cellular and subcellular length scales. At the highest patterning density where the individual hydrogels almost overlapped, there was no cellular adhesion. As the spacing between individual hydrogels was increased, patterns were identified where neurites could grow on the adhesive surface between hydrogels while astrocytes were unable to adhere. Patterns such as lines or arrays were identified that could direct the growth of these subcellular neuronal processes. At higher hydrogel spacings, both neurons and astrocytes adhered and grew in a manner approaching that of unpatterned control surfaces. Patterned lines could once again direct growth at cellular length scales. Significantly, we have demonstrated that the patterning of sub-micron/nano scale cell-repulsive features at microscale lengths on an otherwise cell-adhesive surface can differently control the adhesion and growth of cells and cell processes based on the difference in their characteristic sizes. This concept could potentially be applied to an implantable nerve-guidance device that would selectively enable regrowing axons to bridge a spinal-cord injury without interference from the glial scar.

  15. MULTI-SCALE GAUSSIAN PROCESSES MODEL

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhou Yatong; Zhang Taiyi; Li Xiaohe

    2006-01-01

    A novel model named Multi-scale Gaussian Processes (MGP) is proposed. Motivated by the ideas of multi-scale representations in the wavelet theory, in the new model, a Gaussian process is represented at a scale by a linear basis that is composed of a scale function and its different translations. Finally the distribution of the targets of the given samples can be obtained at different scales. Compared with the standard Gaussian Processes (GP) model, the MGP model can control its complexity conveniently just by adjusting the scale parameter. So it can trade-off the generalization ability and the empirical risk rapidly. Experiments verify the feasibility of the MGP model, and exhibit that its performance is superior to the GP model if appropriate scales are chosen.

  16. Nondriven Polymer Translocation Through a Nanopore:Scaling for Translocation Time with Chain Length

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Hui; ZHANG Jing; LIU Hong; SUN Chia-chung

    2011-01-01

    We investigated the dynamics of the passage for a polymer chain through a nanopore in the absence of any external driving force with Weeks-Chandler-Andersen potential in two-dimensional simulations,in particular,focused our attention on the scaling law of the mean translocation time.We found that the effect of hydrodynamic interactions is the major factor in determining the scaling exponents with increasing pore size.The scaling close to N1+2v was observed when the hydrodynamic interactions were screened in the cases of small pore sizes,while the scaling close to N3v was obtained when the hydrodynamic interactions were present in the cases of large pore sizes.

  17. Systematic review of risk adjustment models of hospital length of stay (LOS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Mingshan; Sajobi, Tolulope; Lucyk, Kelsey; Lorenzetti, Diane; Quan, Hude

    2015-04-01

    Policy decisions in health care, such as hospital performance evaluation and performance-based budgeting, require an accurate prediction of hospital length of stay (LOS). This paper provides a systematic review of risk adjustment models for hospital LOS, and focuses primarily on studies that use administrative data. MEDLINE, EMBASE, Cochrane, PubMed, and EconLit were searched for studies that tested the performance of risk adjustment models in predicting hospital LOS. We included studies that tested models developed for the general inpatient population, and excluded those that analyzed risk factors only correlated with LOS, impact analyses, or those that used disease-specific scales and indexes to predict LOS. Our search yielded 3973 abstracts, of which 37 were included. These studies used various disease groupers and severity/morbidity indexes to predict LOS. Few models were developed specifically for explaining hospital LOS; most focused primarily on explaining resource spending and the costs associated with hospital LOS, and applied these models to hospital LOS. We found a large variation in predictive power across different LOS predictive models. The best model performance for most studies fell in the range of 0.30-0.60, approximately. The current risk adjustment methodologies for predicting LOS are still limited in terms of models, predictors, and predictive power. One possible approach to improving the performance of LOS risk adjustment models is to include more disease-specific variables, such as disease-specific or condition-specific measures, and functional measures. For this approach, however, more comprehensive and standardized data are urgently needed. In addition, statistical methods and evaluation tools more appropriate to LOS should be tested and adopted.

  18. Validity of plant fiber length measurement : a review of fiber length measurement based on kenaf as a model

    Science.gov (United States)

    James S. Han; Theodore. Mianowski; Yi-yu. Lin

    1999-01-01

    The efficacy of fiber length measurement techniques such as digitizing, the Kajaani procedure, and NIH Image are compared in order to determine the optimal tool. Kenaf bast fibers, aspen, and red pine fibers were collected from different anatomical parts, and the fiber lengths were compared using various analytical tools. A statistical analysis on the validity of the...

  19. A mixing-length model for the prediction of convex curvature effects on turbulent boundary layers. [for turbine blade convective heat transfer prediction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, E. W.; Johnston, J. P.

    1983-01-01

    A mixing-length model is developed for the prediction of turbulent boundary layers with convex streamwise curvature. For large layer thickness ratio, delta/R greater than 0.05, the model scales mixing length on the wall radius of curvature, R. For small delta/R, ordinary flat wall modeling is used for the mixing-length profile with curvature corrections, following the recommendations of Eide and Johnston (1976). Effects of streamwise change of curvature are considered; a strong lag from equilibrium is required when R increases downstream. Fifteen separate data sets were compared, including both hydrodynamic and heat transfer results. Six of these computations are presented and compared to experiment.

  20. Contact Mechanics of UV/Ozone-Treated PDMS by AFM and JKR Testing: Mechanical Performance from Nano- to Micrometer Length Scales

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Song, Jing; Tranchida, Davide; Vancso, G. Julius

    2008-01-01

    The Young’s modulus of cross-linked poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) surface was quantitatively investigated as a function of UV/ozone treatment time across different length scales. An AFM was used to probe PDMS surface mechanical properties at the nanometer length scale. The Young’s modulus of each sa

  1. In situ structural characterization of ageing kinetics in aluminum alloy 2024 across angstrom-to-micrometer length scales

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Fan; Levine, Lyle E.; Allen, Andrew J.; Campbell, Carelyn E.; Creuziger, Adam A.; Kazantseva, Nataliya; Ilavsky, Jan

    2016-06-01

    The precipitate structure and precipitation kinetics in an Al-Cu-Mg alloy (AA2024) aged at 190 °C, 208 °C, and 226 °C have been studied using ex situ Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) and in situ synchrotron-based, combined ultra-small angle X-ray scattering, small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS), and wide angle X-ray scattering (WAXS) across a length scale from sub-Angstrom to several micrometers. TEM brings information concerning the nature, morphology, and size of the precipitates while SAXS and WAXS provide qualitative and quantitative information concerning the time-dependent size and volume fraction evolution of the precipitates at different stages of the precipitation sequence. Within the experimental time resolution, precipitation at these ageing temperatures involves dissolution of nanometer-sized small clusters and formation of the planar S phase precipitates. Using a three-parameter scattering model constructed on the basis of TEM results, we established the temperature-dependent kinetics for the cluster-dissolution and S-phase formation processes simultaneously. These two processes are shown to have different kinetic rates, with the cluster-dissolution rate approximately double the S-phase formation rate. We identified a dissolution activation energy at (149.5 ± 14.6) kJ mol-1, which translates to (1.55 ± 0.15) eV/atom, as well as an activation energy for the formation of S precipitates at (129.2 ± 5.4) kJ mol-1, i.e. (1.33 ± 0.06) eV/atom. Importantly, the SAXS/WAXS results show the absence of an intermediate Guinier-Preston Bagaryatsky 2 (GPB2)/S" phase in the samples under the experimental ageing conditions. These results are further validated by precipitation simulations that are based on Langer-Schwartz theory and a Kampmann-Wagner numerical method.

  2. The Sensitivity of Income Polarization - Time, length of accounting periods, equivalence scales, and income definitions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Azhar, Hussain

    This study looks at polarization and its components’ sensitivity to assumptions about equivalence scales, income definition, ethical income distribution parameters, and the income accounting period. A representative sample of Danish individual incomes from 1984 to 2002 is utilised. Results show...... that polarization has increased over time, regardless of the applied measure, when the last part of the period is compared to the first part of the period. Primary causes being increased inequality (alienation) and faster income growth among high incomes relative to those in the middle of the distribution....... Increasing the accounting period confirms the reduction in inequality found for shorter periods, but polarization is virtually unchanged, because income group identification increases. Applying different equivalence scales does not change polarization ranking for different years, but identification ranks...

  3. Standard Model in multi-scale theories and observational constraints

    CERN Document Server

    Calcagni, Gianluca; Rodríguez-Fernández, David

    2015-01-01

    We construct and analyze the Standard Model of electroweak and strong interactions in multi-scale spacetimes with (i) weighted derivatives and (ii) $q$-derivatives. Both theories can be formulated in two different frames, called fractional and integer picture. By definition, the fractional picture is where physical predictions should be made. (i) In the theory with weighted derivatives, it is shown that gauge invariance and the requirement of having constant masses in all reference frames make the Standard Model in the integer picture indistinguishable from the ordinary one. Experiments involving only weak and strong forces are insensitive to a change of spacetime dimensionality also in the fractional picture, and only the electromagnetic and gravitational sectors can break the degeneracy. For the simplest multi-scale measures with only one characteristic time, length and energy scale $t_*$, $\\ell_*$ and $E_*$, we compute the Lamb shift in the hydrogen atom and constrain the multi-scale correction to the ordi...

  4. Gait dynamics in Parkinson's disease: Common and distinct behavior among stride length, gait variability, and fractal-like scaling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hausdorff, Jeffrey M.

    2009-06-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a common, debilitating neurodegenerative disease. Gait disturbances are a frequent cause of disability and impairment for patients with PD. This article provides a brief introduction to PD and describes the gait changes typically seen in patients with this disease. A major focus of this report is an update on the study of the fractal properties of gait in PD, the relationship between this feature of gait and stride length and gait variability, and the effects of different experimental conditions on these three gait properties. Implications of these findings are also briefly described. This update highlights the idea that while stride length, gait variability, and fractal scaling of gait are all impaired in PD, distinct mechanisms likely contribute to and are responsible for the regulation of these disparate gait properties.

  5. Fine-scale local adaptation of weevil mouthpart length and camellia pericarp thickness: altitudinal gradient of a putative arms race.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toju, Hirokazu

    2008-05-01

    Although coevolutionary theory predicts that evolutionary interactions between species are spatially hierarchical, few studies have examined coevolutionary processes at multiple spatial scales. In an antagonistic system involving a plant, the Japanese camellia (Camellia japonica), and its obligate seed predator, the camellia weevil (Curculio camelliae), I elucidated the local adaptation of a camellia defensive armament (pericarp thickness) and a weevil offensive armament (rostrum length) within Yakushima Island (ca. 30 km in diameter), compared to a larger-scale variation in those traits throughout Japan reported in previous studies. Results showed that camellia pericarp thickness and weevil rostrum length vary remarkably within several kilometers on this island. In addition, geographic variation in each camellia and weevil armament was best explained by the armament size of the sympatric participant than by abiotic environmental heterogeneity. However, I also found that camellia pericarp thickness significantly decreased in cool-temperate (i.e., highland) areas, suggesting the contributions of climate on the spatial structuring of the weevil-camellia interaction. Interestingly, relatively thin pericarps occurred not only in the highlands but also in some low-altitude areas, indicating that other factors such as nonrandom or asymmetric gene flow play important roles in the metapopulation processes of interspecific interactions at small spatial scales.

  6. Selected studies on the thermal and mechanical responses of amorphous glassy polymers at different length scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crawford, Emmett Dudley

    This thesis describes investigations into the mechanical and thermal characteristics of amorphous polymeric materials by structural changes on the molecular and the microscopic scale. On the molecular scale, the structure of a cross-linked polymeric material is controlled by changes in the molecular weight between cross-links, cross-link functionality, and chain stiffness. With control of the network structure, an expansive range of mechanical and thermal characteristics is possible. These properties range from intrinsic properties, such as the glass transition temperature, to performance properties, such as impact behavior. Relationships between the network structure and measured properties are established by the use of a variety of theories from rubber elasticity to free volume. Relationships are also established between the various measured properties through solid and fracture mechanics. The introduction of soft rubbery particles on the microscopic scale into a glassy polymeric matrix is commonly employed to create a tougher material. Despite the prevalent use, the mechanisms and sequence of mechanisms of toughening are poorly understood. The mechanisms and sequence of mechanisms are elucidated in this investigation through the use of unique mechanical tests and materials with favorable properties. The unique mechanical tests in this investigation include tensile dilatometry and a multi-axial stress state test. The multi-axial stress state test, which allows independent control of the dilational and deviatoric stresses of a material between uniaxial compression and equal biaxial tension, consists of a uniaxially loaded and pressurized thin walled hollow cylinder. The materials include liquid rubber modified epoxies, voided epoxies, and core-shell rubber modified polyvinylchloride. The voided epoxy material separates the matrix contributions from those of the rubbery phase, while the core-shell rubber modified polyvinylchloride provides optical verification of

  7. Search for Screened Interactions Below the Dark Energy Length Scale Using Optically Levitated Microspheres

    CERN Document Server

    Rider, Alexander D; Blakemore, Charles P; Louis, Maxime; Lu, Marie; Gratta, Giorgio

    2016-01-01

    We present the results of a search for unknown interactions that couple to mass between an optically levitated microsphere and a gold-coated silicon cantilever. The scale and geometry of the apparatus enables a search for new forces that appear at distances below 100 $\\mu$m and which would have evaded previous searches due to screening mechanisms. The data are consistent with electrostatic backgrounds and place upper limits on the strength of new interactions at 5.6 \\times 10^4$ in the region of parameter space where the self-coupling $\\Lambda \\gtrsim 5$ meV and the microspheres are not fully screened.

  8. Patchiness of ion-exchanged mica revealed by DNA binding dynamics at short length scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Billingsley, D. J.; Lee, A. J.; Johansson, N. A. B.; Walton, A.; Stanger, L.; Crampton, N.; Bonass, W. A.; Thomson, N. H.

    2014-01-01

    The binding of double-stranded (ds) DNA to mica can be controlled through ion-exchanging the mica with divalent cations. Measurements of the end-to-end distance of linear DNA molecules discriminate whether the binding mechanism occurs through 2D surface equilibration or kinetic trapping. A range of linear dsDNA fragments have been used to investigate length dependences of binding. Mica, ion-exchanged with Ni(II) usually gives rise to kinetically trapped DNA molecules, however, short linear fragments (ion-exchanged mica is heterogeneous, and contains patches or domains, separating different ionic species. These results correlate with imaging of dsDNA under aqueous buffer on Ni(II)-mica and indicate that binding domains are of the order of 100 nm in diameter. Shorter DNA fragments behave intermediate to the two extreme cases of 2D equilibration and kinetic trapping. Increasing the incubation time of Ni(II) on mica, from minutes to hours, brings the conformations of the shorter DNA fragments closer to the theoretical value for kinetic trapping, indicating that long timescale kinetics play a role in ion-exchange. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) was used to confirm that the relative abundance of Ni(II) ions on the mica surface increases with time. These findings can be used to enhance spatial control of binding of DNA to inorganic surfaces with a view to patterning high densities arrays.

  9. Laser propagation measurements in long-scale-length underdense plasmas relevant to magnetized liner inertial fusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harvey-Thompson, A. J.; Sefkow, A. B.; Wei, M. S.; Nagayama, T.; Campbell, E. M.; Blue, B. E.; Heeter, R. F.; Koning, J. M.; Peterson, K. J.; Schmitt, A.

    2016-11-01

    We report experimental results and simulations showing efficient laser energy coupling into plasmas at conditions relevant to the magnetized liner inertial fusion (MagLIF) concept. In MagLIF, to limit convergence and increase the hydrodynamic stability of the implosion, the fuel must be efficiently preheated. To determine the efficiency and physics of preheating by a laser, an Ar plasma with ne/nc r i t˜0.04 is irradiated by a multi-ns, multi-kJ, 0.35-μm, phase-plate-smoothed laser at spot-averaged intensities ranging from 1.0 ×1014 to 2.5 ×1014W /c m2 and pulse widths from 2 to 10 ns. Time-resolved x-ray images of the laser-heated plasma are compared to two-dimensional radiation-hydrodynamic simulations that show agreement with the propagating emission front, a comparison that constrains laser energy deposition to the plasma. The experiments show that long-pulse, modest-intensity (I =1.5 ×1014W /c m2 ) beams can efficiently couple energy (˜82 % of the incident energy) to MagLIF-relevant long-length (9.5 mm) underdense plasmas. The demonstrated heating efficiency is significantly higher than is thought to have been achieved in early integrated MagLIF experiments [A. B. Sefkow et al., Phys. Plasmas 21, 072711 (2014), 10.1063/1.4890298].

  10. Compensation in Root Water Uptake Models Combined with Three-Dimensional Root Length Density Distribution

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heinen, M.

    2014-01-01

    A three-dimensional root length density distribution function is introduced that made it possible to compare two empirical uptake models with a more mechanistic uptake model. Adding a compensation component to the more empirical model resulted in predictions of root water uptake distributions

  11. Applications of the Local Mode Model to CH Bond Length Changes, Molecular Conformations and Vibrational Dynamics

    OpenAIRE

    Henry, Bryan R.; Gough, Kathleen M.

    1983-01-01

    The theoretical basis for the local mode model is reviewed. The model is applied to gas phase overtone spectra of aromatic molecules to investigate both substituent induced CH bond length changes and conformationally inequivalent hydrogens. The dynamic implications of the local mode model are discussed.

  12. Cell-to-cell communication: Time and length scales of ligand internalization in cultures of suspended cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berezhkovskii, Alexander M.; Coppey, Mathieu; Sealfon, Stuart C.; Shvartsman, Stanislav

    2008-06-01

    A problem of cell-to-cell communication by diffusible ligands is analyzed for the case when cells are distributed in three dimensions and diffusible ligands are secreted by cells and reversibly bind to cell surface receptors. Following its binding to a receptor, the ligand can either dissociate and be released back in the medium or be absorbed by the cell in a process that is called internalization. Using an effective medium approximation, we derive analytical expressions that characterize the time and length scales associated with the ligand trajectories leading to internalization. We discuss the applicability of our approximation and illustrate the application of our results to a specific cellular system.

  13. Characterization of length and velocity scales of free stream turbulence and investigation of their effects on surface heat transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yavuzkurt, Savash

    1991-01-01

    The main objective of this research is to address two important but unresolved problems: (1) the measurement of vertical and transverse length scales via space correlations for all Reynolds stress components and velocity-temperature correlations, both in the free stream and within the boundary layer using the existing triple and quad-wire probes; and (2) to relate the character of the free stream turbulence to the character of the turbulence within the boundary layer in order to determine the effect on surface heat transfer.

  14. Coupling Length Scales for Multiscale Atomistics-Continuum Simulations: Atomistically Induced Stress Distributions in Si/Si{sub 3}N

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lidorikis, Elefterios; Bachlechner, Martina E.; Kalia, Rajiv K.; Nakano, Aiichiro; Vashishta, Priya; Voyiadjis, George Z.

    2001-08-20

    A hybrid molecular-dynamics (MD) and finite-element simulation approach is used to study stress distributions in silicon/silicon-nitride nanopixels. The hybrid approach provides atomistic description near the interface and continuum description deep into the substrate, increasing the accessible length scales and greatly reducing the computational cost. The results of the hybrid simulation are in good agreement with full multimillion-atom MD simulations: atomic structures at the lattice-mismatched interface between amorphous silicon nitride and silicon induce inhomogeneous stress patterns in the substrate that cannot be reproduced by a continuum approach alone.

  15. Problems in biology with many scales of length: Cell-cell adhesion and cell jamming in collective cellular migration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pegoraro, Adrian F; Fredberg, Jeffrey J; Park, Jin-Ah

    2016-04-10

    As do all things in biology, cell mechanosensation, adhesion and migration begin at the scale of the molecule. Collections of molecules assemble to comprise microscale objects such as adhesions, organelles and cells. And collections of cells in turn assemble to comprise macroscale tissues. From the points of view of mechanism and causality, events at the molecular scale are seen most often as being the most upstream and, therefore, the most fundamental and the most important. In certain collective systems, by contrast, events at many scales of length conspire to make contributions of equal importance, and even interact directly and strongly across disparate scales. Here we highlight recent examples in cellular mechanosensing and collective cellular migration where physics at some scale bigger than the cell but smaller than the tissue - the mesoscale - becomes the missing link that is required to tie together findings that might otherwise seem counterintuitive or even unpredictable. These examples, taken together, establish that the phenotypes and the underlying physics of collective cellular migration are far richer than previously anticipated. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Broadband Structural Dynamics: Understanding the Impulse-Response of Structures Across Multiple Length and Time Scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-18

    annual progress in this effort in four research areas: (1) structural health monitoring, (2) experimental structural dynamics , (3) spectral modeling of wave propagation, and (4) wavelet analysis for damage detection.

  17. Large Scale Computations in Air Pollution Modelling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zlatev, Z.; Brandt, J.; Builtjes, P. J. H.

    Proceedings of the NATO Advanced Research Workshop on Large Scale Computations in Air Pollution Modelling, Sofia, Bulgaria, 6-10 July 1998......Proceedings of the NATO Advanced Research Workshop on Large Scale Computations in Air Pollution Modelling, Sofia, Bulgaria, 6-10 July 1998...

  18. Uncertainty Consideration in Watershed Scale Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watershed scale hydrologic and water quality models have been used with increasing frequency to devise alternative pollution control strategies. With recent reenactment of the 1972 Clean Water Act’s TMDL (total maximum daily load) component, some of the watershed scale models are being recommended ...

  19. Large Scale Computations in Air Pollution Modelling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zlatev, Z.; Brandt, J.; Builtjes, P. J. H.

    Proceedings of the NATO Advanced Research Workshop on Large Scale Computations in Air Pollution Modelling, Sofia, Bulgaria, 6-10 July 1998......Proceedings of the NATO Advanced Research Workshop on Large Scale Computations in Air Pollution Modelling, Sofia, Bulgaria, 6-10 July 1998...

  20. Diffusion-coupled molecular assembly: structuring of coordination polymers across multiple length scales.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirai, Kenji; Reboul, Julien; Morone, Nobuhiro; Heuser, John E; Furukawa, Shuhei; Kitagawa, Susumu

    2014-10-22

    Porous coordination polymers (PCPs) are an intriguing class of molecular-based materials because of the designability of framework scaffolds, pore sizes and pore surface functionalities. Besides the structural designability at the molecular scale, the structuring of PCPs into mesoscopic/macroscopic morphologies has attracted much attention due to the significance for the practical applications. The structuring of PCPs at the mesoscopic/macroscopic scale has been so far demonstrated by the spatial localization of coordination reactions on the surface of templates or at the phase boundaries. However, these methodologies have never been applied to the fabrication of solid-solution or multivariate metal-organic frameworks (MOFs), in which multiple components are homogeneously mixed. Herein, we demonstrate the structuring of a box-type superstructure comprising of a solid-solution PCP by integrating a bidirectional diffusion of multiple organic ligands into molecular assembly. The parent crystals of [Zn2(ndc)2(bpy)]n were placed in the DMF solution of additional organic component of H2bdc, and the temperature was rapidly elevated up to 80 °C (ndc = 1,4-naphthalenedicarboxylate, bpy = 4,4'-bipyridyl, bdc = 1,4-benzenedicarboxylate). The dissolution of the parent crystals induced the outward diffusion of components; contrariwise, the accumulation of the other organic ligand of H2bdc induced the inward diffusion toward the surface of the parent crystals. This bidirectional diffusion of multiple components spatially localized the recrystallization at the surface of cuboid parent crystals; therefore, the nanocrystals of a solid-solution PCP ([Zn2(bdc)1.5(ndc)0.5(bpy)]n) were organized into a mesoscopic box superstructure. Furthermore, we demonstrated that the box superstructures enhanced the mass transfer kinetics for the separation of hydrocarbons.

  1. Critical points, phase transitions and water-like anomalies for an isotropic two length scale potential with increasing attractive well

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinheiro, L.; Furlan, A. P.; Krott, L. B.; Diehl, A.; Barbosa, M. C.

    2017-02-01

    Molecular Dynamic and Monte Carlo studies are performed in a system of particles interacting through core-softened (CS) potential, composed by two length scales: a repulsive shoulder at short distances and the another a variable scale, that can be repulsive or strongly attractive depending on the parameters used. The system show water-like anomalous behavior. The density, diffusion and structural anomalous regions in the pressure versus temperature phase diagram shrink in pressure as the system becomes more attractive. The transition appears with the increase of the attraction well. We found that the liquid-gas phase transition is Ising-like for all the CS potentials and its critical temperature increases with the increase of the attraction. No Ising-like behavior for the liquid-liquid phase transition was detected in the Monte Carlo simulations what might be due to the presence of stable amorphous phases.

  2. Comparison of aerodynamically and model-derived roughness lengths (zo) over diverse surfaces, central Mojave Desert, California, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacKinnon, D.J.; Clow, G.D.; Tigges, R.K.; Reynolds, R.L.; Chavez, P.S.

    2004-01-01

    The vulnerability of dryland surfaces to wind erosion depends importantly on the absence or the presence and character of surface roughness elements, such as plants, clasts, and topographic irregularities that diminish wind speed near the surface. A model for the friction velocity ratio has been developed to account for wind sheltering by many different types of co-existing roughness elements. Such conditions typify a monitored area in the central Mojave Desert, California, that experiences frequent sand movement and dust emission. Two additional models are used to convert the friction velocity ratio to the surface roughness length (zo) for momentum. To calculate roughness lengths from these models, measurements were made at 11 sites within the monitored area to characterize the surface roughness element. Measurements included (1) the number of roughness species (e.g., plants, small-scale topography, clasts), and their associated heights and widths, (2) spacing among species, and (3) vegetation porosity (a measurement of the spatial distribution of woody elements of a plant). Documented or estimated values of drag coefficients for different species were included in the modeling. At these sites, wind-speed profiles were measured during periods of neutral atmospheric stability using three 9-m towers with three or four calibrated anemometers on each. Modeled roughness lengths show a close correspondence (correlation coefficient, 0.84-0.86) to the aerodynamically determined values at the field sites. The geometric properties of the roughness elements in the model are amenable to measurement at much higher temporal and spatial resolutions using remote-sensing techniques than can be accomplished through laborious ground-based methods. A remote-sensing approach to acquire values of the modeled roughness length is particularly important for the development of linked surface/atmosphere wind-erosion models sensitive to climate variability and land-use changes in areas such

  3. Effects of fracture distribution and length scale on the equivalent continuum elastic compliance of fractured rock masses

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Marte Gutierrez; Dong-Joon Youn

    2015-01-01

    Fracture systems have strong influence on the overall mechanical behavior of fractured rock masses due to their relatively lower stiffness and shear strength than those of the rock matrix. Understanding the effects of fracture geometrical distribution, such as length, spacing, persistence and orientation, is important for quantifying the mechanical behavior of fractured rock masses. The relation between fracture geometry and the mechanical characteristics of the fractured rock mass is complicated due to the fact that the fracture geometry and mechanical behaviors of fractured rock mass are strongly dependent on the length scale. In this paper, a comprehensive study was conducted to determine the effects of fracture distribution on the equivalent continuum elastic compliance of fractured rock masses over a wide range of fracture lengths. To account for the stochastic nature of fracture distributions, three different simulation techniques involving Oda’s elastic compliance tensor, Monte Carlo simulation (MCS), and suitable probability density functions (PDFs) were employed to represent the elastic compliance of fractured rock masses. To yield geologically realistic results, parameters for defining fracture distribu-tions were obtained from different geological fields. The influence of the key fracture parameters and their relations to the overall elastic behavior of the fractured rock mass were studied and discussed. A detailed study was also carried out to investigate the validity of the use of a representative element volume (REV) in the equivalent continuum representation of fractured rock masses. A criterion was also proposed to determine the appropriate REV given the fracture distribution of the rock mass.

  4. Effects of fracture distribution and length scale on the equivalent continuum elastic compliance of fractured rock masses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marte Gutierrez

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Fracture systems have strong influence on the overall mechanical behavior of fractured rock masses due to their relatively lower stiffness and shear strength than those of the rock matrix. Understanding the effects of fracture geometrical distribution, such as length, spacing, persistence and orientation, is important for quantifying the mechanical behavior of fractured rock masses. The relation between fracture geometry and the mechanical characteristics of the fractured rock mass is complicated due to the fact that the fracture geometry and mechanical behaviors of fractured rock mass are strongly dependent on the length scale. In this paper, a comprehensive study was conducted to determine the effects of fracture distribution on the equivalent continuum elastic compliance of fractured rock masses over a wide range of fracture lengths. To account for the stochastic nature of fracture distributions, three different simulation techniques involving Oda's elastic compliance tensor, Monte Carlo simulation (MCS, and suitable probability density functions (PDFs were employed to represent the elastic compliance of fractured rock masses. To yield geologically realistic results, parameters for defining fracture distributions were obtained from different geological fields. The influence of the key fracture parameters and their relations to the overall elastic behavior of the fractured rock mass were studied and discussed. A detailed study was also carried out to investigate the validity of the use of a representative element volume (REV in the equivalent continuum representation of fractured rock masses. A criterion was also proposed to determine the appropriate REV given the fracture distribution of the rock mass.

  5. On determining characteristic length scales in pressure-gradient turbulent boundary layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinuesa, R.; Bobke, A.; Örlü, R.; Schlatter, P.

    2016-05-01

    In the present work, we analyze three commonly used methods to determine the edge of pressure gradient turbulent boundary layers: two based on composite profiles, the one by Chauhan et al. ["Criteria for assessing experiments in zero pressure gradient boundary layers," Fluid Dyn. Res. 41, 021404 (2009)] and the one by Nickels ["Inner scaling for wall-bounded flows subject to large pressure gradients," J. Fluid Mech. 521, 217-239 (2004)], and the other one based on the condition of vanishing mean velocity gradient. Additionally, a new method is introduced based on the diagnostic plot concept by Alfredsson et al. ["A new scaling for the streamwise turbulence intensity in wall-bounded turbulent flows and what it tells us about the `outer' peak," Phys. Fluids 23, 041702 (2011)]. The boundary layers developing over the suction and pressure sides of a NACA4412 wing section, extracted from a direct numerical simulation at chord Reynolds number Rec = 400 000, are used as the test case, besides other numerical and experimental data from favorable, zero, and adverse pressure-gradient flat-plate turbulent boundary layers. We find that all the methods produce robust results with mild or moderate pressure gradients, although the composite-profile techniques require data preparation, including initial estimations of fitting parameters and data truncation. Stronger pressure gradients (with a Rotta-Clauser pressure-gradient parameter β larger than around 7) lead to inconsistent results in all the techniques except the diagnostic plot. This method also has the advantage of providing an objective way of defining the point where the mean streamwise velocity is 99% of the edge velocity and shows consistent results in a wide range of pressure gradient conditions, as well as flow histories. Collapse of intermittency factors obtained from a wide range of pressure-gradient and Re conditions on the wing further highlights the robustness of the diagnostic plot method to determine the

  6. Definition of the persistence length in the coarse-grained models of DNA elasticity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fathizadeh, A.; Eslami-Mossallam, B.; Ejtehadi, M. R.

    2012-11-01

    By considering the detailed structure of DNA in the base pair level, two possible definitions of the persistence length are compared. One definition is related to the orientation of the terminal base pairs, and the other is based on the vectors which connect two adjacent base pairs at each end of the molecule. It is shown that although these definitions approach each other for long DNA molecules, they are dramatically different on short length scales. We show analytically that the difference mostly comes from the shear flexibility of the molecule and can be used to measure the shear modulus of DNA.

  7. On the coherence length of large-scale peculiar velocities and gravitational clustering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kashlinsky, A. (National Radio Astronomy Observatory, Charlottesville, VA (USA); Queen Mary College, London (England))

    1989-08-01

    If the large-scale structure in the universe is formed by gravitational clustering of less than 0 density fluctuations, the correlation function of massive objects/clusters of the clustering hierarchy would be increased over the underlying mass autocorrelation function. This means that if light traces mass, the peculiar gravitational field on the average would be stronger when measured by galaxies associated with such clusters. This in turn would lead to larger rms peculiar velocities deduced from the motions of such samples. Ellipticals are known to populate preferentially dense regions/(rich) clusters, and it is, therefore, suggested that this mechanism is responsible for the large peculiar motions observed recently by the Seven Samurai in a sample of elliptical galaxies. On the assumption that light traces mass, these and the cluster-cluster correlation function results are consistent with gravitational clustering of n of about -1 fluctuations in Omega of about 0.2 universe. It is further shown that according to the gravitational clustering theory, galaxies selected preferentially from poor groups should exhibit small rms peculiar velocities. 21 refs.

  8. Independent and collective roles of surface structures at different length scales on pool boiling heat transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Calvin H.; Rioux, Russell P.

    2016-01-01

    Spherical Cu nanocavity surfaces are synthesized to examine the individual role of contact angles in connecting lateral Rayleigh-Taylor wavelength to vertical Kevin-Helmholtz wavelength on hydrodynamic instability for the onset of pool boiling Critical Heat Flux (CHF). Solid and porous Cu pillar surfaces are sintered to investigate the individual role of pillar structure pitch at millimeter scale, named as module wavelength, on hydrodynamic instability at CHF. Last, spherical Cu nanocavities are coated on the porous Cu pillars to create a multiscale Cu structure, which is studied to examine the collective role and relative significance of contact angles and module wavelength on hydrodynamic instability at CHF, and the results indicate that module wavelength plays the dominant role on hydrodynamic instability at CHF when the height of surface structures is equal or above ¼ Kelvin-Helmholtz wavelength. Pool boiling Heat Transfer Coefficient (HTC) enhancements on spherical Cu nanocavity surfaces, solid and porous Cu pillar surfaces, and the integrated multiscale structure have been investigated, too. The experimental results reveal that the nanostructures and porous pillar structures can be combined together to achieve even higher enhancement of HTC than that of individual structures. PMID:27841322

  9. Independent and collective roles of surface structures at different length scales on pool boiling heat transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Calvin H; Rioux, Russell P

    2016-11-14

    Spherical Cu nanocavity surfaces are synthesized to examine the individual role of contact angles in connecting lateral Rayleigh-Taylor wavelength to vertical Kevin-Helmholtz wavelength on hydrodynamic instability for the onset of pool boiling Critical Heat Flux (CHF). Solid and porous Cu pillar surfaces are sintered to investigate the individual role of pillar structure pitch at millimeter scale, named as module wavelength, on hydrodynamic instability at CHF. Last, spherical Cu nanocavities are coated on the porous Cu pillars to create a multiscale Cu structure, which is studied to examine the collective role and relative significance of contact angles and module wavelength on hydrodynamic instability at CHF, and the results indicate that module wavelength plays the dominant role on hydrodynamic instability at CHF when the height of surface structures is equal or above ¼ Kelvin-Helmholtz wavelength. Pool boiling Heat Transfer Coefficient (HTC) enhancements on spherical Cu nanocavity surfaces, solid and porous Cu pillar surfaces, and the integrated multiscale structure have been investigated, too. The experimental results reveal that the nanostructures and porous pillar structures can be combined together to achieve even higher enhancement of HTC than that of individual structures.

  10. Plasma-field Coupling at Small Length Scales in Solar Wind Near 1 AU

    Science.gov (United States)

    Livadiotis, G.; Desai, M. I.

    2016-10-01

    In collisionless plasmas such as the solar wind, the coupling between plasma constituents and the embedded magnetic field occurs on various temporal and spatial scales, and is primarily responsible for the transfer of energy between waves and particles. Recently, it was shown that the transfer of energy between solar wind plasma particles and waves is governed by a new and unique relationship: the ratio between the magnetosonic energy and the plasma frequency is constant, E ms/ω pl ˜ ℏ*. This paper examines the variability and substantial departure of this ratio from ℏ* observed at ˜1 au, which is caused by a dispersion of fast magnetosonic (FMS) waves. In contrast to the efficiently transferred energy in the fast solar wind, the lower efficiency of the slow solar wind can be caused by this dispersion, whose relation and characteristics are derived and studied. In summary, we show that (i) the ratio E ms/ω pl transitions continuously from the slow to the fast solar wind, tending toward the constant ℏ* (ii) the transition is more efficient for larger thermal, Alfvén, or FMS speeds; (iii) the fast solar wind is almost dispersionless, characterized by quasi-constant values of the FMS speed, while the slow wind is subject to dispersion that is less effective for larger wind or magnetosonic speeds; and (iv) the constant ℏ* is estimated with the best known precision, ℏ* ≈ (1.160 ± 0.083) × 10-22 Js.

  11. Scaling limits of a model for selection at two scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Shishi; Mattingly, Jonathan C.

    2017-04-01

    The dynamics of a population undergoing selection is a central topic in evolutionary biology. This question is particularly intriguing in the case where selective forces act in opposing directions at two population scales. For example, a fast-replicating virus strain outcompetes slower-replicating strains at the within-host scale. However, if the fast-replicating strain causes host morbidity and is less frequently transmitted, it can be outcompeted by slower-replicating strains at the between-host scale. Here we consider a stochastic ball-and-urn process which models this type of phenomenon. We prove the weak convergence of this process under two natural scalings. The first scaling leads to a deterministic nonlinear integro-partial differential equation on the interval [0,1] with dependence on a single parameter, λ. We show that the fixed points of this differential equation are Beta distributions and that their stability depends on λ and the behavior of the initial data around 1. The second scaling leads to a measure-valued Fleming–Viot process, an infinite dimensional stochastic process that is frequently associated with a population genetics.

  12. Planar Laser-Plasma Interaction Experiments at Direct-Drive Ignition-Relevant Scale Lengths at the National Ignition Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenberg, M. J.; Solodov, A. A.; Seka, W.; Myatt, J. F.; Regan, S. P.; Hohenberger, M.; Epstein, R.; Froula, D. H.; Radha, P. B.; Michel, P. A.; Moody, J. D.; Masse, L.; Goyon, C.; Turnbull, D. P.; Barrios, M. A.; Bates, J. W.; Schmitt, A. J.

    2016-10-01

    The first experiments at the National Ignition Facility to probe laser-plasma interactions and the hot electron production at scale lengths relevant to direct-drive ignition are reported. The irradiation on one side of planar CH foils generated a plasma at the quarter-critical surface with predicted density scale lengths of Ln 600 μm, measured electron temperatures of Te 3.5 to 4.0 keV, and overlapped laser intensities of I 6 to 15 ×1014W/cm2. Optical emission from stimulated Raman scattering (SRS) and at ω/2 are correlated with the time-dependent hard x-ray signal. The fraction of laser energy converted to hot electrons increased from 0.5 % to 2.3 % as the laser intensity increased from 6 to 15 ×1014W/cm2, while the hot electron temperature was nearly constant around 40 to 50 keV. Only a sharp red-shifted feature is observed around ω/2, and both refracted and sidescattered SRS are detected, suggesting that multibeam SRS contributes to, and may even dominate, hot-electron production. These results imply a diminished presence of two-plasmon decay relative to SRS at these conditions, which has implications for hot-electron preheat mitigation strategies for direct-drive ignition. This work is supported by the DOE NNSA under Award Number DE-NA0001944.

  13. Exact Solution of Mutator Model with Linear Fitness and Finite Genome Length

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saakian, David B.

    2017-08-01

    We considered the infinite population version of the mutator phenomenon in evolutionary dynamics, looking at the uni-directional mutations in the mutator-specific genes and linear selection. We solved exactly the model for the finite genome length case, looking at the quasispecies version of the phenomenon. We calculated the mutator probability both in the statics and dynamics. The exact solution is important for us because the mutator probability depends on the genome length in a highly non-trivial way.

  14. A survey on stochastic multi-scale modeling in biomechanics: computational challenges

    CERN Document Server

    Favino, Marco; Pivkin, Igor

    2016-01-01

    During the last decade, multi-scale models in mechanics, bio-mechanics and life sciences have gained increasing attention. Using multi-scale approaches, effects on different time and length scales, such as, e.g., cellular and organ scale, can be coupled and their interaction can be studied. Clearly, this requires the development of new mathematical models and numerical methods for multi-scale problems, in order to provide reliable and efficient tools for the investigation of multi-scale effects. Here, we give an overview on existing numerical approaches for multi-scale simulations in bio-mechanics with particular emphasis on stochastic effects.

  15. Modeling and simulation with operator scaling

    CERN Document Server

    Cohen, Serge; Rosinski, Jan

    2009-01-01

    Self-similar processes are useful in modeling diverse phenomena that exhibit scaling properties. Operator scaling allows a different scale factor in each coordinate. This paper develops practical methods for modeling and simulating stochastic processes with operator scaling. A simulation method for operator stable Levy processes is developed, based on a series representation, along with a Gaussian approximation of the small jumps. Several examples are given to illustrate practical applications. A classification of operator stable Levy processes in two dimensions is provided according to their exponents and symmetry groups. We conclude with some remarks and extensions to general operator self-similar processes.

  16. Health inequalities in Ethiopia: modeling inequalities in length of life within and between population groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tranvåg, Eirik Joakim; Ali, Merima; Norheim, Ole Frithjof

    2013-07-11

    Most studies on health inequalities use average measures, but describing the distribution of health can also provide valuable knowledge. In this paper, we estimate and compare within-group and between-group inequalities in length of life for population groups in Ethiopia in 2000 and 2011. We used data from the 2011 and 2000 Ethiopia Demographic and Health Survey and the Global Burden of Disease study 2010, and the MODMATCH modified logit life table system developed by the World Health Organization to model mortality rates, life expectancy, and length of life for Ethiopian population groups stratified by wealth quintiles, gender and residence. We then estimated and compared within-group and between-group inequality in length of life using the Gini index and absolute length of life inequality. Length of life inequality has decreased and life expectancy has increased for all population groups between 2000 and 2011. Length of life inequality within wealth quintiles is about three times larger than the between-group inequality of 9 years. Total length of life inequality in Ethiopia was 27.6 years in 2011. Longevity has increased and the distribution of health in Ethiopia is more equal in 2011 than 2000, with length of life inequality reduced for all population groups. Still there is considerable potential for further improvement. In the Ethiopian context with a poor and highly rural population, inequality in length of life within wealth quintiles is considerably larger than between them. This suggests that other factors than wealth substantially contribute to total health inequality in Ethiopia and that identification and quantification of these factors will be important for identifying proper measures to further reduce length of life inequality.

  17. Age-related changes in the plasticity and toughness of human cortical bone at multiple length-scales

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zimmermann, Elizabeth A.; Schaible, Eric; Bale, Hrishikesh; Barth, Holly D.; Tang, Simon Y.; Reichert, Peter; Busse, Bjoern; Alliston, Tamara; Ager III, Joel W.; Ritchie, Robert O.

    2011-08-10

    The structure of human cortical bone evolves over multiple length-scales from its basic constituents of collagen and hydroxyapatite at the nanoscale to osteonal structures at nearmillimeter dimensions, which all provide the basis for its mechanical properties. To resist fracture, bone’s toughness is derived intrinsically through plasticity (e.g., fibrillar sliding) at structural-scales typically below a micron and extrinsically (i.e., during crack growth) through mechanisms (e.g., crack deflection/bridging) generated at larger structural-scales. Biological factors such as aging lead to a markedly increased fracture risk, which is often associated with an age-related loss in bone mass (bone quantity). However, we find that age-related structural changes can significantly degrade the fracture resistance (bone quality) over multiple lengthscales. Using in situ small-/wide-angle x-ray scattering/diffraction to characterize sub-micron structural changes and synchrotron x-ray computed tomography and in situ fracture-toughness measurements in the scanning electron microscope to characterize effects at micron-scales, we show how these age-related structural changes at differing size-scales degrade both the intrinsic and extrinsic toughness of bone. Specifically, we attribute the loss in toughness to increased non-enzymatic collagen cross-linking which suppresses plasticity at nanoscale dimensions and to an increased osteonal density which limits the potency of crack-bridging mechanisms at micron-scales. The link between these processes is that the increased stiffness of the cross-linked collagen requires energy to be absorbed by “plastic” deformation at higher structural levels, which occurs by the process of microcracking.

  18. Stochastic modeling of length-dependent telomere shortening in Corvus monedula

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Grasman, J.; Salomons, H. M.; Verhulst, S.

    2011-01-01

    It was recently shown that, within individuals, longer telomeres shorten at a higher rate. This explorative study deals with a mathematical model of this process. It is a nonlinear differential equation describing length-dependent decrease that can be linked to a Poisson process. The model also take

  19. Stochastic modelling of length-dependent telomere shortening in Corvus monedula

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Grasman, J.; Salomons, H.M.; Verhulst, S.

    2011-01-01

    It was recently shown that, within individuals, longer telomeres shorten at a higher rate. This explorative study deals with a mathematical model of this process. It is a nonlinear differential equation describing length-dependent decrease that can be linked to a Poisson process. The model also take

  20. Electrical contacts to nanorod networks at different length scales: From macroscale ensembles to single nanorod chains

    KAUST Repository

    Lavieville, Romain

    2013-11-01

    The nature of metal-semiconductor interfaces at the nanoscale is an important issue in micro- and nanoelectronic engineering. The study of charge transport through chains of CdSe semiconductor nanorods linked by Au particles represents an ideal model system for this matter, because the metal semiconductor interface is an intrinsic feature of the nanosystem. Here we show the controlled fabrication of all-inorganic hybrid metal-semiconductor networks with different size, in which the semiconductor nanorods are linked by Au domains at their tips. We demonstrate different approaches to selectively contact the networks and single nanorod chains with planar electrodes, and we investigate their charge transport at room temperature. © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Molecular Density Functional Theory of Water describing Hydrophobicity at Short and Long Length Scales

    CERN Document Server

    Jeanmairet, Guillaume; Borgis, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    We present an extension of our recently introduced molecular density functional theory of water [G. Jeanmairet et al., J. Phys. Chem. Lett. 4, 619, 2013] to the solvation of hydrophobic solutes of various sizes, going from angstroms to nanometers. The theory is based on the quadratic expansion of the excess free energy in terms of two classical density fields, the particle density and the multipolar polarization density. Its implementation requires as input a molecular model of water and three measurable bulk properties, namely the structure factor and the k-dependent longitudinal and transverse dielectric susceptibilities. The fine three-dimensional water structure around small hydrophobic molecules is found to be well reproduced. In contrast the computed solvation free-energies appear overestimated and do not exhibit the correct qualitative behavior when the hydrophobic solute is grown in size. These shortcomings are corrected, in the spirit of the Lum-Chandler-Weeks theory, by complementing the functional ...

  2. Measurement and Modelling of Scaling Minerals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Villafafila Garcia, Ada

    2005-01-01

    of scale formation found in many industrial processes, and especially in oilfield and geothermal operations. We want to contribute to the study of this problem by releasing a simple and accurate thermodynamic model capable of calculating the behaviour of scaling minerals, covering a wide range...... of temperature and pressure. Reliable experimental solubility measurements under conditions similar to those found in reality will help the development of strong and consistent models. Chapter 1 is a short introduction to the problem of scale formation, the model chosen to study it, and the experiments performed...... the thermodynamic model used in this Ph.D. project. A review of alternative activity coefficient models an earlier work on scale formation is provided. A guideline to the parameter estimation procedure and the number of parameters estimated in the present work are also described. The prediction of solid...

  3. Distribution of branch lengths and phylogenetic diversity under homogeneous speciation models

    CERN Document Server

    Stadler, Tanja

    2011-01-01

    The constant rate birth--death process is a popular null model for speciation and extinction. If one removes extinct and non-sampled lineages, this process induces `reconstructed trees' which describe the relationship between extant lineages. We derive the probability density of the length of a randomly chosen pendant edge in a reconstructed tree. For the special case of a pure-birth process with complete sampling, we also provide the probability density of the length of an interior edge, of the length of an edge descending from the root, and of the diversity (which is the sum of all edge lengths). We show that the results depend on whether the reconstructed trees are conditioned on the number of leaves, the age, or both.

  4. Modeling individual specific fish length from capture-recapture data using the von Bertalanffy growth curve.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schofield, Matthew R; Barker, Richard J; Taylor, Peter

    2013-12-01

    We use Bayesian methods to explore fitting the von Bertalanffy length model to tag-recapture data. We consider two popular parameterizations of the von Bertalanffy model. The first models the data relative to age at first capture; the second models in terms of length at first capture. Using data from a rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss study we explore the relationship between the assumptions and resulting inference using posterior predictive checking, cross validation and a simulation study. We find that untestable hierarchical assumptions placed on the nuisance parameters in each model can influence the resulting inference about parameters of interest. Researchers should carefully consider these assumptions when modeling growth from tag-recapture data. © 2013, The International Biometric Society.

  5. Scaling between localization length and {Tc} in disordered YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 6.9}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gauzzi, A.; Pavuna, D.

    1999-12-20

    The authors quantitatively study the effect of growth-induced reduction of long range structural order on the superconducting transition in epitaxial YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 6.9} films. The corresponding reduction of structural coherence length r{sub c} is determined from the width of X-ray diffraction rocking curves. {Tc} measurements in the films give evidence for the validity of the empirical scaling relation {Delta}{Tc} {approximately} r{sub c,ab}{sup {minus}2}, where {Delta}{Tc} is the disorder-induced reduction of {Tc} and r{sub c,ab} is the structural coherence length in the ab-plane. To explain this algebraic law the authors propose a simple phenomenological model based on the disorder-induced localization of the charge carriers within each ordered domain of size r{sub c,ab}. This picture enables them to precisely determine the Ginzburg-Landau superconducting coherence length in the ab-plane, and they obtain {xi}{sub ab} = 1.41 {+-} 0.04 nm.

  6. Multi-scale modeling strategies in materials science—The quasicontinuum method

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Vijay B Shenoy

    2003-01-01

    The problem of prediction of finite temperature properties of materials poses great computational challenges. The computational treatment of the multitude of length and time scales involved in determining macroscopic properties has been attempted by several workers with varying degrees of success. This paper will review the recently developed quasicontinuum method which is an attempt to bridge the length scales in a single seamless model with the aid of the finite element method. Attempts to generalize this method to finite temperatures will be outlined.

  7. On the Elastic Vibration Model for High Length-Diameter Ratio Rocket with Attitude Control System

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    朱伯立; 杨树兴

    2003-01-01

    An elastic vibration model for high length-diameter ratio spinning rocket with attitude control system which can be used for trajectory simulation is established. The basic theory of elastic dynamics and vibration dynamics were both used to set up the elastic vibration model of rocket body. In order to study the problem more conveniently, the rocket's body was simplified to be an even beam with two free ends. The model was validated by simulation results and the test data.

  8. Modeling fast and slow earthquakes at various scales.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ide, Satoshi

    2014-01-01

    Earthquake sources represent dynamic rupture within rocky materials at depth and often can be modeled as propagating shear slip controlled by friction laws. These laws provide boundary conditions on fault planes embedded in elastic media. Recent developments in observation networks, laboratory experiments, and methods of data analysis have expanded our knowledge of the physics of earthquakes. Newly discovered slow earthquakes are qualitatively different phenomena from ordinary fast earthquakes and provide independent information on slow deformation at depth. Many numerical simulations have been carried out to model both fast and slow earthquakes, but problems remain, especially with scaling laws. Some mechanisms are required to explain the power-law nature of earthquake rupture and the lack of characteristic length. Conceptual models that include a hierarchical structure over a wide range of scales would be helpful for characterizing diverse behavior in different seismic regions and for improving probabilistic forecasts of earthquakes.

  9. Extraction of Channel Length Independent Series Resistance for Deeply Scaled Metal-Oxide-Semiconductor Field-Effect Transistors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Li-Juan; Ji, Xiao-Li; Chen, Yuan-Cong; Xia, Hao-Guang; Zhu, Chen-Xin; Guo, Qiang; Yan, Feng

    2014-09-01

    The recently developed four Rsd extraction methods from a single device, involving the constant-mobility method, the direct Id—Vgs method, the conductance method and the Y-function method, are evaluated on 32 nm n-channel metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistors (nMOSFETs). It is found that Rsd achieved from the constant-mobility method exhibits the channel length independent characteristics. The L-dependent Rsd extracted from the other three methods is proven to be associated with the gate-voltage-induced mobility degradation in the extraction procedures. Based on L-dependent behaviors of Rsd, a new method is proposed for accurate series resistance extraction on deeply scaled MOSFETs.

  10. Weyl's Scale Invariance And The Standard Model

    CERN Document Server

    Gold, B S

    2005-01-01

    This paper is an extension of the work by Dr. Subhash Rajpoot, Ph.D. and Dr. Hitoshi Nishino, Ph.D. I introduce Weyl's scale invariance as an additional local symmetry in the standard model of electroweak interactions. An inevitable consequence is the introduction of general relativity coupled to scalar fields a la Dirac and an additional vector particle called the Weylon. This paper shows that once Weyl's scale invariance is broken, the phenomenon (a) generates Newton's gravitational constant GN and (b) triggers spontaneous symmetry breaking in the normal manner resulting in masses for the conventional fermions and bosons. The scale at which Weyl's sclale symmetry breaks is of order Planck mass. If right-handed neutrinos are also introduced, their absence at present energy scales is attributed to their mass which is tied to the scale where scale invariance breaks.

  11. Validating a universal model of particle transport lengths with laboratory measurements of suspended grain motions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naqshband, Suleyman; McElroy, Brandon; Mahon, Robert C.

    2017-05-01

    The mechanics of sediment transport are of fundamental importance for fluvio-deltaic morphodynamics. The present study focuses on quantifying particle motions and trajectories across a wide range of flow conditions. In particular, a continuous model is presented that predicts particle travel distances for saltation and suspension based on Rouse number and relative grain roughness. By utilizing a series of eight video cameras in a plexiglass flume direct measurements of the distributions of particle travel distances (excursion lengths) were obtained. To this end, experiments were carried out in dark under black lights with fluorescent painted plastic and quartz sand particles. For relatively high Rouse numbers indicating bed load dominant transport regime (P≥2.5), particle motion is governed by the effect of gravitational forces (settling velocities) and measured excursion lengths closely follow a Gaussian distribution. For P=2.5, particle motion is equally subjected to both gravitational and turbulent forces. Consequently, measured excursion lengths exhibit a bimodal distribution with two distinct peaks. As turbulent fluctuations increase and dominate particle motion over gravity (P(P=1.8-8.9). Furthermore, measured excursion lengths are observed to fit within the predicted range of excursion lengths with no significant difference between measured excursion lengths of plastic and quartz sand particles.

  12. The Extended Relativity Theory in Born-Clifford Phase Spaces with a Lower and Upper Length Scales and Clifford Group Geometric Unification

    CERN Document Server

    Castro, C

    2004-01-01

    We construct the Extended Relativity Theory in Born-Clifford-Phase spaces with an upper and lower length scales (infrared/ultraviolet cutoff). The invariance symmetry leads naturally to the real Clifford algebra Cl (2, 6, R ) and complexified Clifford Cl_C ( 4 ) algebra related to Twistors. We proceed with an extensive review of Smith's 8D model based on the Clifford algebra Cl ( 1 ,7) that reproduces at low energies the physics of the Standard Model and Gravity; including the derivation of all the coupling constants, particle masses, mixing angles, ....with high precision. Further results by Smith are discussed pertaining the interplay among Clifford, Jordan, Division and Exceptional Lie algebras within the hierarchy of dimensions D = 26, 27, 28 related to bosonic string, M, F theory. Two Geometric actions are presented like the Clifford-Space extension of Maxwell's Electrodynamics, Brandt's action related the 8D spacetime tangent-bundle involving coordinates and velocities (Finsler geometries) followed by a...

  13. A New European Slope Length and Steepness Factor (LS-Factor for Modeling Soil Erosion by Water

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Panos Panagos

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The Universal Soil Loss Equation (USLE model is the most frequently used model for soil erosion risk estimation. Among the six input layers, the combined slope length and slope angle (LS-factor has the greatest influence on soil loss at the European scale. The S-factor measures the effect of slope steepness, and the L-factor defines the impact of slope length. The combined LS-factor describes the effect of topography on soil erosion. The European Soil Data Centre (ESDAC developed a new pan-European high-resolution soil erosion assessment to achieve a better understanding of the spatial and temporal patterns of soil erosion in Europe. The LS-calculation was performed using the original equation proposed by Desmet and Govers (1996 and implemented using the System for Automated Geoscientific Analyses (SAGA, which incorporates a multiple flow algorithm and contributes to a precise estimation of flow accumulation. The LS-factor dataset was calculated using a high-resolution (25 m Digital Elevation Model (DEM for the whole European Union, resulting in an improved delineation of areas at risk of soil erosion as compared to lower-resolution datasets. This combined approach of using GIS software tools with high-resolution DEMs has been successfully applied in regional assessments in the past, and is now being applied for first time at the European scale.

  14. Parameterization of European perch Perca fluviatilis length-at-age data using stochastic Gompertz growth models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Troynikov, V S; Gorfine, H K; Ložys, L; Pūtys, Z; Jakubavičiūtė, E; Day, R W

    2011-12-01

    Three stochastic versions of the Gompertz growth model were used to parameterize total length (L(T) )-at-age data for perch Perca fluviatilis, an important target species for commercial and recreational fishers and a food species for predatory fishes and aquatic birds. Each model addresses growth heterogeneity by incorporating random parameters from a specific positive distribution: Weibull, gamma or log-normal. The modelling outputs for each version of the model provide L(T) distributions for selected ages and percentiles of L(T) at age for both males and females. The results highlight the importance of using a stochastic approach and the logistic-like growth pattern for analysing growth data for P. fluviatilis in Curonian Lagoon (Lithuania). Outputs from this modelling can be extended to a stochastic analysis of fish cohort dynamics, incorporating all length-based biological relationships, and the selectivity-related interactions between fish cohorts and fishing gear.

  15. Extracting scaling laws from numerical dynamo models

    CERN Document Server

    Stelzer, Z

    2013-01-01

    Earth's magnetic field is generated by processes in the electrically conducting, liquid outer core, subsumed under the term `geodynamo'. In the last decades, great effort has been put into the numerical simulation of core dynamics following from the magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) equations. However, the numerical simulations are far from Earth's core in terms of several control parameters. Different scaling analyses found simple scaling laws for quantities like heat transport, flow velocity, magnetic field strength and magnetic dissipation time. We use an extensive dataset of 116 numerical dynamo models compiled by Christensen and co-workers to analyse these scalings from a rigorous model selection point of view. Our method of choice is leave-one-out cross-validation which rates models according to their predictive abilities. In contrast to earlier results, we find that diffusive processes are not negligible for the flow velocity and magnetic field strength in the numerical dynamos. Also the scaling of the magneti...

  16. Flame Length

    Data.gov (United States)

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — Flame length was modeled using FlamMap, an interagency fire behavior mapping and analysis program that computes potential fire behavior characteristics. The tool...

  17. Effect of calibration data length on performance and optimal parameters of hydrological model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chuan-Zhe LI

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available In order to assess the effects of calibration data length on the performance and optimal parameter values of hydrological model in ungauged or data limited catchments (actually, data are non-continuous and fragmental in some catchments, we choose to use non-continuous calibration periods to have more independent streamflow data for SIMHYD model calibration. Nash-Sutcliffe efficiency (NSE and percentage water balance error (WBE are used as performance measures. The Particle Swarm Optimization (PSO method is used to calibrate the rainfall-runoff models. Different length of data range from 1 year to 10 years randomly sampled used for study on impact of calibration data length. 55 relatively unimpaired catchments all over Australia with daily precipitation, potential evapotranspiration (PET, and streamflow data are tested to obtain more general conclusions. The results show that, longer calibration data does not necessarily result in better model performance. In general, 8 years data are sufficient to obtain steady estimates of model performance and parameters for SIMHYD model. It is also show that most humid catchments require fewer calibration data to get good performance and stable parameter values. The model performs better in humid and semi-humid catchments than arid catchments. Our results may have useful and interesting implications in the efficiency of limited observation data used for hydrological model calibration in different climatic catchments.

  18. CFD modeling using PDF approach for investigating the flame length in rotary kilns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elattar, H. F.; Specht, E.; Fouda, A.; Bin-Mahfouz, Abdullah S.

    2016-12-01

    Numerical simulations using computational fluid dynamics (CFD) are performed to investigate the flame length characteristics in rotary kilns using probability density function (PDF) approach. A commercial CFD package (ANSYS-Fluent) is employed for this objective. A 2-D axisymmetric model is applied to study the effect of both operating and geometric parameters of rotary kiln on the characteristics of the flame length. Three types of gaseous fuel are used in the present work; methane (CH4), carbon monoxide (CO) and biogas (50 % CH4 + 50 % CO2). Preliminary comparison study of 2-D modeling outputs of free jet flames with available experimental data is carried out to choose and validate the proper turbulence model for the present numerical simulations. The results showed that the excess air number, diameter of kiln air entrance, radiation modeling consideration and fuel type have remarkable effects on the flame length characteristics. Numerical correlations for the rotary kiln flame length are presented in terms of the studied kiln operating and geometric parameters within acceptable error.

  19. Comparing mixing-length models of the diabatic wind profile over homogeneous terrain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pena Diaz, Alfredo; Gryning, Sven-Erik; Hasager, Charlotte Bay

    2010-01-01

    Models of the diabatic wind profile over homogeneous terrain for the entire atmospheric boundary layer are developed using mixing-length theory and are compared to wind speed observations up to 300 m at the National Test Station for Wind Turbines at Høvsøre, Denmark. The measurements are performed...

  20. CFD modeling using PDF approach for investigating the flame length in rotary kilns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elattar, H. F.; Specht, E.; Fouda, A.; Bin-Mahfouz, Abdullah S.

    2016-02-01

    Numerical simulations using computational fluid dynamics (CFD) are performed to investigate the flame length characteristics in rotary kilns using probability density function (PDF) approach. A commercial CFD package (ANSYS-Fluent) is employed for this objective. A 2-D axisymmetric model is applied to study the effect of both operating and geometric parameters of rotary kiln on the characteristics of the flame length. Three types of gaseous fuel are used in the present work; methane (CH4), carbon monoxide (CO) and biogas (50 % CH4 + 50 % CO2). Preliminary comparison study of 2-D modeling outputs of free jet flames with available experimental data is carried out to choose and validate the proper turbulence model for the present numerical simulations. The results showed that the excess air number, diameter of kiln air entrance, radiation modeling consideration and fuel type have remarkable effects on the flame length characteristics. Numerical correlations for the rotary kiln flame length are presented in terms of the studied kiln operating and geometric parameters within acceptable error.

  1. A Short Introduction to Model Selection, Kolmogorov Complexity and Minimum Description Length (MDL)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nannen, Volker

    2010-01-01

    The concept of overtting in model selection is explained and demon- strated. After providing some background information on information theory and Kolmogorov complexity, we provide a short explanation of Minimum Description Length and error minimization. We conclude with a discussion of the typical

  2. Charnock's Roughness Length Model and Non-dimensional Wind Profiles Over the Sea

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pena Diaz, Alfredo; Gryning, Sven-Erik

    2008-01-01

    An analysis tool for the study of wind speed profiles over the water has been developed. The profiles are analysed using a modified dimensionless wind speed and dimensionless height, assuming that the sea surface roughness can be predicted by Charnock's roughness length model. In this form, the r...

  3. Modeling the Effects of Argument Length and Validity on Inductive and Deductive Reasoning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rotello, Caren M.; Heit, Evan

    2009-01-01

    In an effort to assess models of inductive reasoning and deductive reasoning, the authors, in 3 experiments, examined the effects of argument length and logical validity on evaluation of arguments. In Experiments 1a and 1b, participants were given either induction or deduction instructions for a common set of stimuli. Two distinct effects were…

  4. Entraining Flow of a Concentrated Benthic Suspension: Computations with the Prandtl Mixing-Length Model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kranenburg, C.

    1999-01-01

    The Prandtl mixing-length model of turbulent exchange of mass and momentum is applied to calculate the entrainment of overlying water into a layer of suspended fine sediment at a horizontal bed. In the field the flow and turbulence in such a concentrated benthic suspension (CBS) are driven by a

  5. Electron-scale reduced fluid models with gyroviscous effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Passot, T.; Sulem, P. L.; Tassi, E.

    2017-08-01

    Reduced fluid models for collisionless plasmas including electron inertia and finite Larmor radius corrections are derived for scales ranging from the ion to the electron gyroradii. Based either on pressure balance or on the incompressibility of the electron fluid, they respectively capture kinetic Alfvén waves (KAWs) or whistler waves (WWs), and can provide suitable tools for reconnection and turbulence studies. Both isothermal regimes and Landau fluid closures permitting anisotropic pressure fluctuations are considered. For small values of the electron beta parameter e$ , a perturbative computation of the gyroviscous force valid at scales comparable to the electron inertial length is performed at order e)$ , which requires second-order contributions in a scale expansion. Comparisons with kinetic theory are performed in the linear regime. The spectrum of transverse magnetic fluctuations for strong and weak turbulence energy cascades is also phenomenologically predicted for both types of waves. In the case of moderate ion to electron temperature ratio, a new regime of KAW turbulence at scales smaller than the electron inertial length is obtained, where the magnetic energy spectrum decays like \\bot -13/3$ , thus faster than the \\bot -11/3$ spectrum of WW turbulence.

  6. Seamless cross-scale modeling with SCHISM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yinglong J.; Ye, Fei; Stanev, Emil V.; Grashorn, Sebastian

    2016-06-01

    We present a new 3D unstructured-grid model (SCHISM) which is an upgrade from an existing model (SELFE). The new advection scheme for the momentum equation includes an iterative smoother to reduce excess mass produced by higher-order kriging method, and a new viscosity formulation is shown to work robustly for generic unstructured grids and effectively filter out spurious modes without introducing excessive dissipation. A new higher-order implicit advection scheme for transport (TVD2) is proposed to effectively handle a wide range of Courant numbers as commonly found in typical cross-scale applications. The addition of quadrangular elements into the model, together with a recently proposed, highly flexible vertical grid system (Zhang et al., A new vertical coordinate system for a 3D unstructured-grid model. Ocean Model. 85, 2015), leads to model polymorphism that unifies 1D/2DH/2DV/3D cells in a single model grid. Results from several test cases demonstrate the model's good performance in the eddying regime, which presents greater challenges for unstructured-grid models and represents the last missing link for our cross-scale model. The model can thus be used to simulate cross-scale processes in a seamless fashion (i.e. from deep ocean into shallow depths).

  7. Site-Scale Saturated Zone Flow Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    G. Zyvoloski

    2003-12-17

    The purpose of this model report is to document the components of the site-scale saturated-zone flow model at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, in accordance with administrative procedure (AP)-SIII.lOQ, ''Models''. This report provides validation and confidence in the flow model that was developed for site recommendation (SR) and will be used to provide flow fields in support of the Total Systems Performance Assessment (TSPA) for the License Application. The output from this report provides the flow model used in the ''Site-Scale Saturated Zone Transport'', MDL-NBS-HS-000010 Rev 01 (BSC 2003 [162419]). The Site-Scale Saturated Zone Transport model then provides output to the SZ Transport Abstraction Model (BSC 2003 [164870]). In particular, the output from the SZ site-scale flow model is used to simulate the groundwater flow pathways and radionuclide transport to the accessible environment for use in the TSPA calculations. Since the development and calibration of the saturated-zone flow model, more data have been gathered for use in model validation and confidence building, including new water-level data from Nye County wells, single- and multiple-well hydraulic testing data, and new hydrochemistry data. In addition, a new hydrogeologic framework model (HFM), which incorporates Nye County wells lithology, also provides geologic data for corroboration and confidence in the flow model. The intended use of this work is to provide a flow model that generates flow fields to simulate radionuclide transport in saturated porous rock and alluvium under natural or forced gradient flow conditions. The flow model simulations are completed using the three-dimensional (3-D), finite-element, flow, heat, and transport computer code, FEHM Version (V) 2.20 (software tracking number (STN): 10086-2.20-00; LANL 2003 [161725]). Concurrently, process-level transport model and methodology for calculating radionuclide transport in the saturated zone at Yucca

  8. On mechanics and material length scales of failure in heterogeneous interfaces using a finite strain high performance solver

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mosby, Matthew; Matouš, Karel

    2015-12-01

    Three-dimensional simulations capable of resolving the large range of spatial scales, from the failure-zone thickness up to the size of the representative unit cell, in damage mechanics problems of particle reinforced adhesives are presented. We show that resolving this wide range of scales in complex three-dimensional heterogeneous morphologies is essential in order to apprehend fracture characteristics, such as strength, fracture toughness and shape of the softening profile. Moreover, we show that computations that resolve essential physical length scales capture the particle size-effect in fracture toughness, for example. In the vein of image-based computational materials science, we construct statistically optimal unit cells containing hundreds to thousands of particles. We show that these statistically representative unit cells are capable of capturing the first- and second-order probability functions of a given data-source with better accuracy than traditional inclusion packing techniques. In order to accomplish these large computations, we use a parallel multiscale cohesive formulation and extend it to finite strains including damage mechanics. The high-performance parallel computational framework is executed on up to 1024 processing cores. A mesh convergence and a representative unit cell study are performed. Quantifying the complex damage patterns in simulations consisting of tens of millions of computational cells and millions of highly nonlinear equations requires data-mining the parallel simulations, and we propose two damage metrics to quantify the damage patterns. A detailed study of volume fraction and filler size on the macroscopic traction-separation response of heterogeneous adhesives is presented.

  9. Diffusion through thin membranes: Modeling across scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aho, Vesa; Mattila, Keijo; Kühn, Thomas; Kekäläinen, Pekka; Pulkkinen, Otto; Minussi, Roberta Brondani; Vihinen-Ranta, Maija; Timonen, Jussi

    2016-04-01

    From macroscopic to microscopic scales it is demonstrated that diffusion through membranes can be modeled using specific boundary conditions across them. The membranes are here considered thin in comparison to the overall size of the system. In a macroscopic scale the membrane is introduced as a transmission boundary condition, which enables an effective modeling of systems that involve multiple scales. In a mesoscopic scale, a numerical lattice-Boltzmann scheme with a partial-bounceback condition at the membrane is proposed and analyzed. It is shown that this mesoscopic approach provides a consistent approximation of the transmission boundary condition. Furthermore, analysis of the mesoscopic scheme gives rise to an expression for the permeability of a thin membrane as a function of a mesoscopic transmission parameter. In a microscopic model, the mean waiting time for a passage of a particle through the membrane is in accordance with this permeability. Numerical results computed with the mesoscopic scheme are then compared successfully with analytical solutions derived in a macroscopic scale, and the membrane model introduced here is used to simulate diffusive transport between the cell nucleus and cytoplasm through the nuclear envelope in a realistic cell model based on fluorescence microscopy data. By comparing the simulated fluorophore transport to the experimental one, we determine the permeability of the nuclear envelope of HeLa cells to enhanced yellow fluorescent protein.

  10. Modelling the scaling properties of human mobility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Chaoming; Koren, Tal; Wang, Pu; Barabási, Albert-László

    2010-10-01

    Individual human trajectories are characterized by fat-tailed distributions of jump sizes and waiting times, suggesting the relevance of continuous-time random-walk (CTRW) models for human mobility. However, human traces are barely random. Given the importance of human mobility, from epidemic modelling to traffic prediction and urban planning, we need quantitative models that can account for the statistical characteristics of individual human trajectories. Here we use empirical data on human mobility, captured by mobile-phone traces, to show that the predictions of the CTRW models are in systematic conflict with the empirical results. We introduce two principles that govern human trajectories, allowing us to build a statistically self-consistent microscopic model for individual human mobility. The model accounts for the empirically observed scaling laws, but also allows us to analytically predict most of the pertinent scaling exponents.

  11. Sub-Grid Scale Plume Modeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Greg Yarwood

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Multi-pollutant chemical transport models (CTMs are being routinely used to predict the impacts of emission controls on the concentrations and deposition of primary and secondary pollutants. While these models have a fairly comprehensive treatment of the governing atmospheric processes, they are unable to correctly represent processes that occur at very fine scales, such as the near-source transport and chemistry of emissions from elevated point sources, because of their relatively coarse horizontal resolution. Several different approaches have been used to address this limitation, such as using fine grids, adaptive grids, hybrid modeling, or an embedded sub-grid scale plume model, i.e., plume-in-grid (PinG modeling. In this paper, we first discuss the relative merits of these various approaches used to resolve sub-grid scale effects in grid models, and then focus on PinG modeling which has been very effective in addressing the problems listed above. We start with a history and review of PinG modeling from its initial applications for ozone modeling in the Urban Airshed Model (UAM in the early 1980s using a relatively simple plume model, to more sophisticated and state-of-the-science plume models, that include a full treatment of gas-phase, aerosol, and cloud chemistry, embedded in contemporary models such as CMAQ, CAMx, and WRF-Chem. We present examples of some typical results from PinG modeling for a variety of applications, discuss the implications of PinG on model predictions of source attribution, and discuss possible future developments and applications for PinG modeling.

  12. Half-length model of a Siberian Snake magnet for RHIC

    CERN Document Server

    Okamura, M; Kawaguchi, T; Katayama, T; Jain, A; Muratore, J; Morgan, G; Willen, E

    2000-01-01

    For the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) Spin Project, super-conducting helical dipole magnets are being constructed. These magnets will be used in 'Siberian Snakes' and 'Spin Rotators', which manipulate spin direction of proton beams in RHIC. The dipole field in these magnets rotates 360 deg. and is required to reach a magnetic field strength of more than 4.0 T. The bore radius of the coils and the magnetic length of the magnets are 50 and 2400 mm, respectively. To ascertain the performance of these magnets, which are built using a new 'coil in a slot' technique, a half-length model has been fabricated and tested. The quench performance, field uniformity and rotation angle have been investigated. The measured values in the model magnet agreed well with field calculations. These results demonstrate the adequacy of the fabrication method adopted in the model magnet. (authors)

  13. Multi-scale modeling of composites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Azizi, Reza

    A general method to obtain the homogenized response of metal-matrix composites is developed. It is assumed that the microscopic scale is sufficiently small compared to the macroscopic scale such that the macro response does not affect the micromechanical model. Therefore, the microscopic scale......-Mandel’s energy principle is used to find macroscopic operators based on micro-mechanical analyses using the finite element method under generalized plane strain condition. A phenomenologically macroscopic model for metal matrix composites is developed based on constitutive operators describing the elastic...... behavior and the trapped free energy in the material, in addition to the plastic behavior in terms of the anisotropic development of the yield surface. It is shown that a generalization of Hill’s anisotropic yield criterion can be used to model the Bauschinger effect, in addition to the pressure and size...

  14. Large scale topic modeling made practical

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wahlgreen, Bjarne Ørum; Hansen, Lars Kai

    2011-01-01

    Topic models are of broad interest. They can be used for query expansion and result structuring in information retrieval and as an important component in services such as recommender systems and user adaptive advertising. In large scale applications both the size of the database (number of docume......Topic models are of broad interest. They can be used for query expansion and result structuring in information retrieval and as an important component in services such as recommender systems and user adaptive advertising. In large scale applications both the size of the database (number...... topics at par with a much larger case specific vocabulary....

  15. The PML gene is linked to a megabase-scale insertion/deletion restriction fragment length polymorphism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goy, A.; Xiao, Y.H.; Passalaris, T. [Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States)] [and others

    1995-03-20

    The PML gene located on chromosome band 15q22 is involved with the RAR{alpha} locus (17q21) in a balanced reciprocal translocation uniquely observed in acute promyelocytic leukemia. Physical mapping studies by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis revealed that the PML gene is flanked by two CpG islands that are separated by a variable distance in normal individuals. Several lines of evidence demonstrate that this is the consequence of a large insertion/deletion polymorphism linked to the PML locus: (1) overlapping fragments obtained with a variety of rare-cutting restriction enzymes demonstrated the same variability in distance between the flanking CpG islands; (2) mapping with restriction enzymes insensitive to CpG methylation confirmed that the findings were not a consequence of variable methylation of CpG dinucleotides; (3) the polymorphism followed a Mendelian inheritance pattern. This polymorphism is localized 3{prime} to the PML locus. There are five common alleles, described on the basis of BssHII fragments, ranging from 220 to 350 kb with increments of approximately 30 kb between alleles. Both heterozygous (61%) and homozygous (391%) patterns were observed in normal individuals. Mega-base-scale insertion/deletion restriction fragment length polymorphisms are very rare and have been described initially in the context of multigene families. Such structures have been also reported as likely regions of genetic instability. High-resolution restriction mapping of this particular structure linked to the PML locus is underway. 47 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  16. Seeing with the nano-eye: accessing structure, function, and dynamics of matter on its natural length and time scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raschke, Markus

    2015-03-01

    To understand and ultimately control the properties of most functional materials, from molecular soft-matter to quantum materials, requires access to the structure, coupling, and dynamics on the elementary time and length scales that define the microscopic interactions in these materials. To gain the desired nanometer spatial resolution with simultaneous spectroscopic specificity we combine scanning probe microscopy with different optical, including coherent, nonlinear, and ultrafast spectroscopies. The underlying near-field interaction mediated by the atomic-force or scanning tunneling microscope tip provides the desired deep-sub wavelength nano-focusing enabling few-nm spatial resolution. I will introduce our generalization of the approach in terms of the near-field impedance matching to a quantum system based on special optical antenna-tip designs. The resulting enhanced and qualitatively new forms of light-matter interaction enable measurements of quantum dynamics in an interacting environment or to image the electromagnetic local density of states of thermal radiation. Other applications include the inter-molecular coupling and dynamics in soft-matter hetero-structures, surface plasmon interferometry as a probe of electronic structure and dynamics in graphene, and quantum phase transitions in correlated electron materials. These examples highlight the general applicability of the new near-field microscopy approach, complementing emergent X-ray and electron imaging tools, aiming towards the ultimate goal of probing matter on its most elementary spatio-temporal level.

  17. Optical design and multi-length-scale scanning spectro-microscopy possibilities at the Nanoscopium beamline of Synchrotron Soleil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Somogyi, Andrea; Medjoubi, Kadda; Baranton, Gil; Le Roux, Vincent; Ribbens, Marc; Polack, François; Philippot, Pascal; Samama, Jean Pierre

    2015-07-01

    The Nanoscopium 155 m-long beamline of Synchrotron Soleil is dedicated to scanning hard X-ray nanoprobe techniques. Nanoscopium aims to reach ≤100 nm resolution in the 5-20 keV energy range for routine user experiments. The beamline design tackles the tight stability requirements of such a scanning nanoprobe by creating an overfilled secondary source, implementing all horizontally reflecting main beamline optics, applying high mechanical stability equipment and constructing a dedicated high-stability building envelope. Multi-technique scanning imaging and tomography including X-ray fluorescence spectrometry and spectro-microscopy, absorption, differential phase and dark-field contrasts are implemented at the beamline in order to provide simultaneous information on the elemental distribution, speciation and sample morphology. This paper describes the optical concept and the first measured performance of the Nanoscopium beamline followed by the hierarchical length-scale multi-technique imaging experiments performed with dwell times down to 3 ms per pixel.

  18. Imaging of Acoustically Coupled Oscillations Due to Flow Past a Shallow Cavity: Effect of Cavity Length Scale

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    P. Oshkai; M. Geveci; D. Rockwell; M. Pollack

    2002-12-12

    Flow-acoustic interactions due to fully turbulent inflow past a shallow axisymmetric cavity mounted in a pipe are investigated using a technique of high-image-density particle image velocimetry in conjunction with unsteady pressure measurements. This imaging leads to patterns of velocity, vorticity, streamline topology, and hydrodynamic contributions to the acoustic power integral. Global instantaneous images, as well as time-averaged images, are evaluated to provide insight into the flow physics during tone generation. Emphasis is on the manner in which the streamwise length scale of the cavity alters the major features of the flow structure. These image-based approaches allow identification of regions of the unsteady shear layer that contribute to the instantaneous hydrodynamic component of the acoustic power, which is necessary to maintain a flow tone. In addition, combined image analysis and pressure measurements allow categorization of the instantaneous flow patterns that are associated with types of time traces and spectra of the fluctuating pressure. In contrast to consideration based solely on pressure spectra, it is demonstrated that locked-on tones may actually exhibit intermittent, non-phase-locked images, apparently due to low damping of the acoustic resonator. Locked-on flow tones (without modulation or intermittency), locked-on flow tones with modulation, and non-locked-on oscillations with short-term, highly coherent fluctuations are defined and represented by selected cases. Depending on which of,these regimes occur, the time-averaged Q (quality)-factor and the dimensionless peak pressure are substantially altered.

  19. Geometry- and Length Scale-Dependent Deformation and Recovery on Micro- and Nanopatterned Shape Memory Polymer Surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Wei Li; Low, Hong Yee

    2016-03-01

    Micro- and nanoscale surface textures, when optimally designed, present a unique approach to improve surface functionalities. Coupling surface texture with shape memory polymers may generate reversibly tuneable surface properties. A shape memory polyetherurethane is used to prepare various surface textures including 2 μm- and 200 nm-gratings, 250 nm-pillars and 200 nm-holes. The mechanical deformation via stretching and recovery of the surface texture are investigated as a function of length scales and shapes. Results show the 200 nm-grating exhibiting more deformation than 2 μm-grating. Grating imparts anisotropic and surface area-to-volume effects, causing different degree of deformation between gratings and pillars under the same applied macroscopic strain. Full distribution of stress within the film causes the holes to deform more substantially than the pillars. In the recovery study, unlike a nearly complete recovery for the gratings after 10 transformation cycles, the high contribution of surface energy impedes the recovery of holes and pillars. The surface textures are shown to perform a switchable wetting function. This study provides insights into how geometric features of shape memory surface patterns can be designed to modulate the shape programming and recovery, and how the control of reversibly deformable surface textures can be applied to transfer microdroplets.

  20. Detection of different-time-scale signals in the length of day variation based on EEMD analysis technique

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wenbin Shen; Cunchao Peng

    2016-01-01

    Scientists pay great attention to different-time-scale signals in the length of day (LOD)variations ALOD,which provide signatures of the Earth's interior structure,couplings among different layers,and potential excitations of ocean and atmosphere.In this study,based on the ensemble empirical mode decomposition (EEMD),we analyzed the latest time series of ALOD data spanning from January 1962 to March 2015.We observed the signals with periods and amplitudes of about 0.5 month and 0.19 ms,1.0 month and 0.19 ms,0.5 yr and 0.22 ms,1.0 yr and 0.18 ms,2.28 yr and 0.03 ms,5.48 yr and 0.05 ms,respectively,in coincidence with the results of predecessors.In addition,some signals that were previously not definitely observed by predecessors were detected in this study,with periods and amplitudes of 9.13 d and 0.12 ms,13.69 yr and 0.10 ms,respectively.The mechanisms of the LOD fluctuations of these two signals are still open.

  1. Soft x-ray microscopy - a powerful analytical tool to image magnetism down to fundamental length and times scales

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fischer, Peter

    2008-08-01

    The magnetic properties of low dimensional solid state matter is of the utmost interest both scientifically as well as technologically. In addition to the charge of the electron which is the base for current electronics, by taking into account the spin degree of freedom in future spintronics applications open a new avenue. Progress towards a better physical understanding of the mechanism and principles involved as well as potential applications of nanomagnetic devices can only be achieved with advanced analytical tools. Soft X-ray microscopy providing a spatial resolution towards 10nm, a time resolution currently in the sub-ns regime and inherent elemental sensitivity is a very promising technique for that. This article reviews the recent achievements of magnetic soft X-ray microscopy by selected examples of spin torque phenomena, stochastical behavior on the nanoscale and spin dynamics in magnetic nanopatterns. The future potential with regard to addressing fundamental magnetic length and time scales, e.g. imaging fsec spin dynamics at upcoming X-ray sources is pointed out.

  2. Modeling the average shortest-path length in growth of word-adjacency networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulig, Andrzej; DroŻdŻ, Stanisław; Kwapień, Jarosław; OświÈ©cimka, Paweł

    2015-03-01

    We investigate properties of evolving linguistic networks defined by the word-adjacency relation. Such networks belong to the category of networks with accelerated growth but their shortest-path length appears to reveal the network size dependence of different functional form than the ones known so far. We thus compare the networks created from literary texts with their artificial substitutes based on different variants of the Dorogovtsev-Mendes model and observe that none of them is able to properly simulate the novel asymptotics of the shortest-path length. Then, we identify the local chainlike linear growth induced by grammar and style as a missing element in this model and extend it by incorporating such effects. It is in this way that a satisfactory agreement with the empirical result is obtained.

  3. Application Delay Modelling for Variable Length Packets in Single Cell IEEE 802.11 WLANs

    CERN Document Server

    Sunny, Albert; Aggarwal, Saurabh

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, we consider the problem of modelling the average delay experienced by an application packets of variable length in a single cell IEEE 802.11 DCF wireless local area network. The packet arrival process at each node i is assumed to be a stationary and independent increment random process with mean ai and second moment a(2) i . The packet lengths at node i are assumed to be i.i.d random variables Pi with finite mean and second moment. A closed form expression has been derived for the same. We assume the input arrival process across queues to be uncorrelated Poison processes. As the nodes share a single channel, they have to contend with one another for a successful transmission. The mean delay for a packet has been approximated by modelling the system as a 1-limited Random Polling system with zero switchover times. Extensive simulations are conducted to verify the analytical results.

  4. Scaling model for symmetric star polymers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramachandran, Ram; Rai, Durgesh K.; Beaucage, Gregory

    2010-03-01

    Neutron scattering data from symmetric star polymers with six poly (urethane-ether) arms, chemically bonded to a C-60 molecule are fitted using a new scaling model and scattering function. The new scaling function can describe both good solvent and theta solvent conditions as well as resolve deviations in chain conformation due to steric interactions between star arms. The scaling model quantifies the distinction between invariant topological features for this star polymer and chain tortuosity which changes with goodness of solvent and steric interaction. Beaucage G, Phys. Rev. E 70 031401 (2004).; Ramachandran R, et al. Macromolecules 41 9802-9806 (2008).; Ramachandran R, et al. Macromolecules, 42 4746-4750 (2009); Rai DK et al. Europhys. Lett., (Submitted 10/2009).

  5. Hair length, facial attractiveness, personality attribution: A multiple fitness model of hairdressing

    OpenAIRE

    Bereczkei, Tamas; Mesko, Norbert

    2007-01-01

    Multiple Fitness Model states that attractiveness varies across multiple dimensions, with each feature representing a different aspect of mate value. In the present study, male raters judged the attractiveness of young females with neotenous and mature facial features, with various hair lengths. Results revealed that the physical appearance of long-haired women was rated high, regardless of their facial attractiveness being valued high or low. Women rated as most attractive were those whose f...

  6. Simulation Evidence for Nonlocal Interface Models: Two Correlation Lengths Describe Complete Wetting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pang, Lijun; Landau, D. P.; Binder, K.

    2011-06-01

    Monte Carlo simulations of (fluctuating) interfaces in Ising models confined between competing walls at temperatures above the wetting transition are presented and various correlation functions probing the interfacial fluctuation are computed. Evidence for the nonlocal interface Hamiltonian approach of A. O. Parry et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 93, 086104 (2004)PRLTAO0031-900710.1103/PhysRevLett.93.086104] is given. In particular, we show that two correlation lengths exist with different dependence on the distance D between the walls.

  7. Simulation evidence for nonlocal interface models: two correlation lengths describe complete wetting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pang, Lijun; Landau, D P; Binder, K

    2011-06-10

    Monte Carlo simulations of (fluctuating) interfaces in Ising models confined between competing walls at temperatures above the wetting transition are presented and various correlation functions probing the interfacial fluctuation are computed. Evidence for the nonlocal interface Hamiltonian approach of A. O. Parry et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 93, 086104 (2004)] is given. In particular, we show that two correlation lengths exist with different dependence on the distance D between the walls.

  8. The Reactive-Diffusive Length of OH and Ozone in Model Organic Aerosols.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Lance; Wilson, Kevin

    2016-09-01

    A key step in the heterogeneous oxidation of atmospheric aerosols is the reaction of ozone (O3) and hydroxyl radicals (OH) at the gas-particle interface. The formation of reaction products and free radical intermediates and their spatial distribution inside the particle is a sensitive function of the length over which these oxidants diffuse prior to reaction. The reactive-diffusive length of OH and ozone at organic aerosol interfaces is determined by observing the change in the effective uptake coefficient for size-selected model aerosols comprising a reactive core and a thin nanometer-sized (0-12 nm) organic shell. The core and shell materials are selected so that they are immiscible and adopt an assumed core-shell configuration. The results indicate a reactive-diffusive length of 1.4 nm for hydroxyl (OH) radicals in squalane and 1.0 nm for ozone in squalene. Measurements for a purely diffusive system allow for an estimate for diffusion constant (1.6 × 10(-6) cm(2)/s) of ozone in squalane to be determined. The reactive-diffusive length offers a simple first order estimate of how shielding of aerosols by immiscible layers can alter estimates of oxidative lifetimes of aerosols in the atmosphere.

  9. Thermomagnetic correlation lengths of strongly interacting matter in the Nambu-Jona-Lasinio model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayala, Alejandro; Hernández, L. A.; Loewe, M.; Raya, Alfredo; Rojas, J. C.; Zamora, R.

    2017-08-01

    We study the correlation length between test quarks with the same electric and color charges in the Nambu-Jona-Lasinio model, considering thermal and magnetic effects. We extract the correlation length from the quark correlation function. The latter is constructed from the probability amplitude to bring a given quark into the plasma once a previous one with the same quantum numbers is placed at a given distance apart. For temperatures below the transition temperature, the correlation length starts growing as the field strength increases to then decrease for large magnetic fields. For temperatures above the pseudocritical temperature, the correlation length continues increasing as the field strength increases. We found that such behavior can be understood as a competition between the tightening induced by the classical magnetic force versus the random thermal motion. For large enough temperatures, the increase of the occupation number contributes to the screening of the interaction between the test particles. The growth of the correlation distance with the magnetic field can be understood as due to the closer proximity between one of the test quarks and the ones popped up from the vacuum, which in turn appear due to the increase of the occupation number with the temperature.

  10. Ancestry inference in complex admixtures via variable-length Markov chain linkage models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez, Jesse M; Bercovici, Sivan; Elmore, Megan; Batzoglou, Serafim

    2013-03-01

    Inferring the ancestral origin of chromosomal segments in admixed individuals is key for genetic applications, ranging from analyzing population demographics and history, to mapping disease genes. Previous methods addressed ancestry inference by using either weak models of linkage disequilibrium, or large models that make explicit use of ancestral haplotypes. In this paper we introduce ALLOY, an efficient method that incorporates generalized, but highly expressive, linkage disequilibrium models. ALLOY applies a factorial hidden Markov model to capture the parallel process producing the maternal and paternal admixed haplotypes, and models the background linkage disequilibrium in the ancestral populations via an inhomogeneous variable-length Markov chain. We test ALLOY in a broad range of scenarios ranging from recent to ancient admixtures with up to four ancestral populations. We show that ALLOY outperforms the previous state of the art, and is robust to uncertainties in model parameters.

  11. Modelling Fine Scale Movement Corridors for the Tricarinate Hill Turtle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mondal, I.; Kumar, R. S.; Habib, B.; Talukdar, G.

    2016-06-01

    Habitat loss and the destruction of habitat connectivity can lead to species extinction by isolation of population. Identifying important habitat corridors to enhance habitat connectivity is imperative for species conservation by preserving dispersal pattern to maintain genetic diversity. Circuit theory is a novel tool to model habitat connectivity as it considers habitat as an electronic circuit board and species movement as a certain amount of current moving around through different resistors in the circuit. Most studies involving circuit theory have been carried out at small scales on large ranging animals like wolves or pumas, and more recently on tigers. This calls for a study that tests circuit theory at a large scale to model micro-scale habitat connectivity. The present study on a small South-Asian geoemydid, the Tricarinate Hill-turtle (Melanochelys tricarinata), focuses on habitat connectivity at a very fine scale. The Tricarinate has a small body size (carapace length: 127-175 mm) and home range (8000-15000 m2), with very specific habitat requirements and movement patterns. We used very high resolution Worldview satellite data and extensive field observations to derive a model of landscape permeability at 1 : 2,000 scale to suit the target species. Circuit theory was applied to model potential corridors between core habitat patches for the Tricarinate Hill-turtle. The modelled corridors were validated by extensive ground tracking data collected using thread spool technique and found to be functional. Therefore, circuit theory is a promising tool for accurately identifying corridors, to aid in habitat studies of small species.

  12. Diffusion effects on volume-selective NMR at small length scales; Diffusionseffekte in volumenselektiver NMR auf kleinen Laengenskalen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gaedke, Achim

    2009-01-21

    In this thesis, the interplay between diffusion and relaxation effects in spatially selective NMR experiments at short length scales is explored. This is especially relevant in the context of both conventional and mechanically detected MRI at (sub)micron resolution in biological specimens. Recent results on selectively excited very thin slices showed an in-slice-magnetization recovery orders of magnitude faster than the longitudinal relaxation time T1. However, those experiments were run on fully relaxed samples while MRI and especially mechanically detected NMR experiments are typically run in a periodic fashion with repetition times far below T1. The main purpose of this work therefore was to extend the study of the interplay between diffusion and longitudinal relaxation to periodic excitations. In some way, this is inverse phenomenon to the DESIRE (Diffusive Enhancement of SIgnal and REsolution) approach, proposed 1992 by Lauterbur. Experiments on periodically excited thin slices were carried out at a dedicated static field gradient cryomagnet with magnetic field gradients up to 180 T/m. In order to obtain plane slices, an appropriate isosurface of the gradient magnet had to be identified. It was found at a field of 3.8 T with a gradient of 73 T/m. In this field, slices down to a thickness of 3.2 {mu}m could be excited. The detection of the NMR signal was done using FIDs instead of echoes as the excitation bandwidth of those thin slices is sufficiently small to observe FIDs which are usually considered to be elusive to detection in such strong static field gradients. A simulation toolbox based on the full Bloch-Torrey-equation was developed to describe the excitation and the formation of NMR signals under those unusual conditions as well as the interplay of diffusion and magnetization recovery. Both the experiments and the simulations indicate that diffusion effects lead to a strongly enhanced magnetization modulation signal also under periodic excitation

  13. Electric Arc Furnace Modeling with Artificial Neural Networks and Arc Length with Variable Voltage Gradient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raul Garcia-Segura

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Electric arc furnaces (EAFs contribute to almost one third of the global steel production. Arc furnaces use a large amount of electrical energy to process scrap or reduced iron and are relevant to study because small improvements in their efficiency account for significant energy savings. Optimal controllers need to be designed and proposed to enhance both process performance and energy consumption. Due to the random and chaotic nature of the electric arcs, neural networks and other soft computing techniques have been used for modeling EAFs. This study proposes a methodology for modeling EAFs that considers the time varying arc length as a relevant input parameter to the arc furnace model. Based on actual voltages and current measurements taken from an arc furnace, it was possible to estimate an arc length suitable for modeling the arc furnace using neural networks. The obtained results show that the model reproduces not only the stable arc conditions but also the unstable arc conditions, which are difficult to identify in a real heat process. The presented model can be applied for the development and testing of control systems to improve furnace energy efficiency and productivity.

  14. Probabilistic, meso-scale flood loss modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kreibich, Heidi; Botto, Anna; Schröter, Kai; Merz, Bruno

    2016-04-01

    Flood risk analyses are an important basis for decisions on flood risk management and adaptation. However, such analyses are associated with significant uncertainty, even more if changes in risk due to global change are expected. Although uncertainty analysis and probabilistic approaches have received increased attention during the last years, they are still not standard practice for flood risk assessments and even more for flood loss modelling. State of the art in flood loss modelling is still the use of simple, deterministic approaches like stage-damage functions. Novel probabilistic, multi-variate flood loss models have been developed and validated on the micro-scale using a data-mining approach, namely bagging decision trees (Merz et al. 2013). In this presentation we demonstrate and evaluate the upscaling of the approach to the meso-scale, namely on the basis of land-use units. The model is applied in 19 municipalities which were affected during the 2002 flood by the River Mulde in Saxony, Germany (Botto et al. submitted). The application of bagging decision tree based loss models provide a probability distribution of estimated loss per municipality. Validation is undertaken on the one hand via a comparison with eight deterministic loss models including stage-damage functions as well as multi-variate models. On the other hand the results are compared with official loss data provided by the Saxon Relief Bank (SAB). The results show, that uncertainties of loss estimation remain high. Thus, the significant advantage of this probabilistic flood loss estimation approach is that it inherently provides quantitative information about the uncertainty of the prediction. References: Merz, B.; Kreibich, H.; Lall, U. (2013): Multi-variate flood damage assessment: a tree-based data-mining approach. NHESS, 13(1), 53-64. Botto A, Kreibich H, Merz B, Schröter K (submitted) Probabilistic, multi-variable flood loss modelling on the meso-scale with BT-FLEMO. Risk Analysis.

  15. TRANSIENT SOLUTION FOR QUEUE-LENGTH DISTRIBUTION OF Geometry/G/1 QUEUEING MODEL

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Luo Chuanyi; Tang Yinghui; Liu Renbin

    2007-01-01

    In this paper, the Geometry/G/1 queueing model with inter-arrival times generated by a geometric(parameter p) distribution according to a late arrival system with delayed access and service times independently distributed with distribution {gj}, j ≥ 1 is studied. By a simple method (techniques of probability decomposition, renewal process theory) that is different from the techniques used by Hunter(1983), the transient property of the queue with initial state i(i ≥ 0) is discussed. The recursion expression for u -transform of transient queue-length distribution at any time point n+ is obtained, and the recursion expression of the limiting queue length distribution is also obtained.

  16. Measurement and Modelling of Scaling Minerals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Villafafila Garcia, Ada

    2005-01-01

    of scale formation found in many industrial processes, and especially in oilfield and geothermal operations. We want to contribute to the study of this problem by releasing a simple and accurate thermodynamic model capable of calculating the behaviour of scaling minerals, covering a wide range......-liquid equilibrium of sulphate scaling minerals (SrSO4, BaSO4, CaSO4 and CaSO4•2H2O) at temperatures up to 300ºC and pressures up to 1000 bar is described in chapter 4. Results for the binary systems (M2+, )-H2O; the ternary systems (Na+, M2+, )-H2O, and (Na+, M2+, Cl-)-H2O; and the quaternary systems (Na+, M2+)(Cl...

  17. Drift-Scale THC Seepage Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    C.R. Bryan

    2005-02-17

    The purpose of this report (REV04) is to document the thermal-hydrologic-chemical (THC) seepage model, which simulates the composition of waters that could potentially seep into emplacement drifts, and the composition of the gas phase. The THC seepage model is processed and abstracted for use in the total system performance assessment (TSPA) for the license application (LA). This report has been developed in accordance with ''Technical Work Plan for: Near-Field Environment and Transport: Coupled Processes (Mountain-Scale TH/THC/THM, Drift-Scale THC Seepage, and Post-Processing Analysis for THC Seepage) Report Integration'' (BSC 2005 [DIRS 172761]). The technical work plan (TWP) describes planning information pertaining to the technical scope, content, and management of this report. The plan for validation of the models documented in this report is given in Section 2.2.2, ''Model Validation for the DS THC Seepage Model,'' of the TWP. The TWP (Section 3.2.2) identifies Acceptance Criteria 1 to 4 for ''Quantity and Chemistry of Water Contacting Engineered Barriers and Waste Forms'' (NRC 2003 [DIRS 163274]) as being applicable to this report; however, in variance to the TWP, Acceptance Criterion 5 has also been determined to be applicable, and is addressed, along with the other Acceptance Criteria, in Section 4.2 of this report. Also, three FEPS not listed in the TWP (2.2.10.01.0A, 2.2.10.06.0A, and 2.2.11.02.0A) are partially addressed in this report, and have been added to the list of excluded FEPS in Table 6.1-2. This report has been developed in accordance with LP-SIII.10Q-BSC, ''Models''. This report documents the THC seepage model and a derivative used for validation, the Drift Scale Test (DST) THC submodel. The THC seepage model is a drift-scale process model for predicting the composition of gas and water that could enter waste emplacement drifts and the effects of mineral

  18. Imaging of Acoustically Coupled Oscillations Due to Flow Past a Shallow Cavity: Effect of Cavity Length Scale

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    P Oshkai; M Geveci; D Rockwell; M Pollack

    2004-05-24

    Flow-acoustic interactions due to fully turbulent inflow past a shallow axisymmetric cavity mounted in a pipe, which give rise to flow tones, are investigated using a technique of high-image-density particle image velocimetry in conjunction with unsteady pressure measurements. This imaging leads to patterns of velocity, vorticity, streamline topology, and hydrodynamic contributions to the acoustic power integral. Global instantaneous images, as well as time-averaged images, are evaluated to provide insight into the flow physics during tone generation. Emphasis is on the manner in which the streamwise length scale of the cavity alters the major features of the flow structure. These image-based approaches allow identification of regions of the unsteady shear layer that contribute to the instantaneous hydrodynamic component of the acoustic power, which is necessary to maintain a flow tone. In addition, combined image analysis and pressure measurements allow categorization of the instantaneous flow patterns that are associated with types of time traces and spectra of the fluctuating pressure. In contrast to consideration based solely on pressure spectra, it is demonstrated that locked-on tones may actually exhibit intermittent, non-phase-locked images, apparently due to low damping of the acoustic resonator. Locked-on flow tones (without modulation or intermittency), locked-on flow tones with modulation, and non-locked-on oscillations with short-term, highly coherent fluctuations are defined and represented by selected cases. Depending on which of these regimes occur, the time-averaged Q (quality)-factor and the dimensionless peak pressure are substantially altered.

  19. Simulation modeling to explore the effects of length-based harvest regulations for Ictalurus fisheries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, David R.; Long, James M.; Shoup, Daniel E.

    2016-01-01

    Management of Blue Catfish Ictalurus furcatus and Channel Catfish I. punctatus for trophy production has recently become more common. Typically, trophy management is attempted with length-based regulations that allow for the moderate harvest of small fish but restrict the harvest of larger fish. However, the specific regulations used vary considerably across populations, and no modeling efforts have evaluated their effectiveness. We used simulation modeling to compare total yield, trophy biomass (Btrophy), and sustainability (spawning potential ratio [SPR] > 0.30) of Blue Catfish and Channel Catfish populations under three scenarios: (1) current regulation (typically a length-based trophy regulation), (2) the best-performing minimum length regulation (MLRbest), and (3) the best-performing length-based trophy catfish regulation (LTRbest; “best performing” was defined as the regulation that maximized yield, Btrophy, and sustainability). The Btrophy produced did not differ among the three scenarios. For each fishery, the MLRbest and LTRbest produced greater yield (>22% more) than the current regulation and maintained sustainability at higher finite exploitation rates (>0.30) than the current regulation. The MLRbest and LTRbest produced similar yields and SPRs for Channel Catfish and similar yields for Blue Catfish; however, the MLRbest for Blue Catfish produced more resilient fisheries (higher SPR) than the LTRbest. Overall, the variation in yield, Btrophy, and SPR among populations was greater than the variation among regulations applied to any given population, suggesting that population-specific regulations may be preferable to regulations applied to geographic regions. We conclude that LTRs are useful for improving catfish yield and maintaining sustainability without overly restricting harvest but are not effective at increasing the Btrophy of catfish.

  20. Length-displacement scaling of thrust faults on the Moon and the formation of uphill-facing scarps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roggon, Lars; Hetzel, Ralf; Hiesinger, Harald; Clark, Jaclyn D.; Hampel, Andrea; van der Bogert, Carolyn H.

    2017-08-01

    Fault populations on terrestrial planets exhibit a linear relationship between their length, L, and the maximum displacement, D, which implies a constant D/L ratio during fault growth. Although it is known that D/L ratios of faults are typically a few percent on Earth and 0.2-0.8% on Mars and Mercury, the D/L ratios of lunar faults are not well characterized. Quantifying the D/L ratios of faults on the Moon is, however, crucial for a better understanding of lunar tectonics, including for studies of the amount of global lunar contraction. Here, we use high-resolution digital terrain models to perform a topographic analysis of four lunar thrust faults - Simpelius-1, Morozov (S1), Fowler, and Racah X-1 - that range in length from 1.3 km to 15.4 km. First, we determine the along-strike variation of the vertical displacement from ≥ 20 topographic profiles across each fault. For measuring the vertical displacements, we use a method that is commonly applied to fault scarps on Earth and that does not require detrending of the profiles. The resulting profiles show that the displacement changes gradually along these faults' strike, with maximum vertical displacements ranging from 17 ± 2 m for Simpelius-1 to 192 ± 30 m for Racah X-1. Assuming a fault dip of 30° yields maximum total displacements (D) that are twice as large as the vertical displacements. The linear relationship between D and L supports the inference that lunar faults gradually accumulate displacement as they propagate laterally. For the faults we investigated, the D/L ratio is ∼2.3%, an order of magnitude higher than theoretical predictions for the Moon, but a value similar for faults on Earth. We also employ finite-element modeling and a Mohr circle stress analysis to investigate why many lunar thrust faults, including three of those studied here, form uphill-facing scarps. Our analysis shows that fault slip is preferentially initiated on planes that dip in the same direction as the topography, because

  1. Length-Scale-Dependent Phase Transformation of LiFePO4 : An In situ and Operando Study Using Micro-Raman Spectroscopy and XRD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siddique, N A; Salehi, Amir; Wei, Zi; Liu, Dong; Sajjad, Syed D; Liu, Fuqiang

    2015-08-03

    The charge and discharge of lithium ion batteries are often accompanied by electrochemically driven phase-transformation processes. In this work, two in situ and operando methods, that is, micro-Raman spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction (XRD), have been combined to study the phase-transformation process in LiFePO4 at two distinct length scales, namely, particle-level scale (∼1 μm) and macroscopic scale (∼several cm). In situ Raman studies revealed a discrete mode of phase transformation at the particle level. Besides, the preferred electrochemical transport network, particularly the carbon content, was found to govern the sequence of phase transformation among particles. In contrast, at the macroscopic level, studies conducted at four different discharge rates showed a continuous but delayed phase transformation. These findings uncovered the intricate phase transformation in LiFePO4 and potentially offer valuable insights into optimizing the length-scale-dependent properties of battery materials.

  2. Infant bone age estimation based on fibular shaft length: model development and clinical validation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsai, Andy; Stamoulis, Catherine; Bixby, Sarah D.; Breen, Micheal A.; Connolly, Susan A.; Kleinman, Paul K. [Boston Children' s Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Department of Radiology, Boston, MA (United States)

    2016-03-15

    Bone age in infants (<1 year old) is generally estimated using hand/wrist or knee radiographs, or by counting ossification centers. The accuracy and reproducibility of these techniques are largely unknown. To develop and validate an infant bone age estimation technique using fibular shaft length and compare it to conventional methods. We retrospectively reviewed negative skeletal surveys of 247 term-born low-risk-of-abuse infants (no persistent child protection team concerns) from July 2005 to February 2013, and randomized them into two datasets: (1) model development (n = 123) and (2) model testing (n = 124). Three pediatric radiologists measured all fibular shaft lengths. An ordinary linear regression model was fitted to dataset 1, and the model was evaluated using dataset 2. Readers also estimated infant bone ages in dataset 2 using (1) the hemiskeleton method of Sontag, (2) the hemiskeleton method of Elgenmark, (3) the hand/wrist atlas of Greulich and Pyle, and (4) the knee atlas of Pyle and Hoerr. For validation, we selected lower-extremity radiographs of 114 normal infants with no suspicion of abuse. Readers measured the fibulas and also estimated bone ages using the knee atlas. Bone age estimates from the proposed method were compared to the other methods. The proposed method outperformed all other methods in accuracy and reproducibility. Its accuracy was similar for the testing and validating datasets, with root-mean-square error of 36 days and 37 days; mean absolute error of 28 days and 31 days; and error variability of 22 days and 20 days, respectively. This study provides strong support for an infant bone age estimation technique based on fibular shaft length as a more accurate alternative to conventional methods. (orig.)

  3. Bernstein copula approach to model direction-length dependency for 2D discrete fracture network simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendoza-Torres, F.; Diaz-Viera, M. A.

    2015-12-01

    In many natural fractured porous media, such as aquifers, soils, oil and geothermal reservoirs, fractures play a crucial role in their flow and transport properties. An approach that has recently gained popularity for modeling fracture systems is the Discrete Fracture Network (DFN) model. This approach consists in applying a stochastic boolean simulation method, also known as object simulation method, where fractures are represented as simplified geometric objects (line segments in 2D and polygons in 3D). One of the shortcomings of this approach is that it usually does not consider the dependency relationships that may exist between the geometric properties of fractures (direction, length, aperture, etc), that is, each property is simulated independently. In this work a method for modeling such dependencies by copula theory is introduced. In particular, a nonparametric model using Bernstein copulas for direction-length fracture dependency in 2D is presented. The application of this method is illustrated in a case study for a fractured rock sample from a carbonate reservoir outcrop.

  4. Sensitivity of MEMS microwave power sensor with the length of thermopile based on Fourier equivalent model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Liu Tong; Liao Xiaoping; Wang Debo

    2011-01-01

    A Fourier equivalent model is introduced to research the thermal transfer behavior of a terminatingtype MEMS microwave power sensor.The fabrication of this MEMS microwave power sensor is compatible with the GaAs MMIC process.Based on the Fourier equivalent model,the relationship between the sensitivity of a MEMS microwave power sensor and the length of thermopile is studied in particular.The power sensor is measured with an input power from 1 to 100 mW at 10 GHz,and the measurement results show that the power sensor has good input match characteristics and high linearity.The sensitivity calculated from a Fourier equivalent model is about 0.12,0.20 and 0.29 mV/mW with the length at 40,70 and 100 μm,respectively,while the sensitivity of the measurement results is about 0.10,0.22 and 0.30 mV/mW,respectively,and the differences are below 0.02 mV/mW.The sensitivity expression based on the Fourier equivalent model is verified by the measurement results.

  5. How useful are Green-Ampt parameters derived from small rainfall simulation plots for modelling runoff at different plot lengths?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langhans, Christoph; Engels, Lien; Tegenbos, Lize; Govers, Gerard; Diels, Jan

    2010-05-01

    Rainfall simulation on small field plots is an invaluable method to derive effective field parameters for infiltration models such as Green-Ampt. Plot scales of ca. 1m² integrate much of the micro-scale variability and processes, which ring-infiltrometers or soil core measurements cannot capture. However, these parameters have to be used with caution on larger scales, because processes such as run-on infiltration can be considerable. The Green-Ampt parameters suction across the wetting front (psi) and effective hydraulic conductivity (Ke) were estimated from rainfall simulations on two ridged fields in Togo, West Africa. Additionally, rainfall events were recorded, and on plots of 1m width and lengths of 1, 4 and 16m, total runoff volume and sediment concentration were measured. The storm runoff hydrographs of the plots were modelled with Chu's Green-Ampt variable rainfall intensity infiltration model, using the field-average parameters derived from the simulations. Potential effects of runoff lag time were assumed negligible. Calculated total runoff volumes were compared to measured runoff volumes. For the 1m plots, runoff was underestimated, as patches of seal in the furrows produced runoff already at rainfall intensities much lower than the average infiltration capacity. For the longer plots, no run-on infiltration or other scale dependent processes were assumed, so the relative error due to scale effects was proportional to the average difference or runoff depth. In contrast to the 1m plots, runoff was overestimated by a factor of 1.2 and 2 for the 4m and 16m plots, respectively. It appears that the application of the Green-Ampt effective hydraulic conductivity derived from rainfall simulations faces two main problems, which are their dependence on one single rainfall intensity and scale-effects by run-on infiltration. Errors necessarily propagate into the scale dependency of erosion and sediment transport, as these processes are directly dependent on runoff

  6. Finite-size scaling of entanglement entropy in one-dimensional topological models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yuting; Gulden, Tobias; Kamenev, Alex

    2017-02-01

    We consider scaling of the entanglement entropy across a topological quantum phase transition for the Kitaev chain model. The change of the topology manifests itself in a subleading term, which scales as L-1 /α with the size of the subsystem L , here α is the Rényi index. This term reveals the scaling function hα(L /ξ ) , where ξ is the correlation length, which is sensitive to the topological index. The scaling function hα(L /ξ ) is independent of model parameters, suggesting some degree of its universality.

  7. Dual-scale multimedia dynamic synchronization model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李乃祥

    2009-01-01

    Multimedia synchronization is the key technology in application of distributed multimedia.Solution of synchronization conflicts insides and among streams as well as that of user interaction,synchronization granularity refinement and synchronization precision improvement remain great challenges although great efforts have been invested by the academic circle.The construction method of a dual-scale dynamic synchronous model of multimedia presented in this article realizes multimedia synchronization on two sca...

  8. Dense String Networks and the One Scale Model with Friction

    CERN Document Server

    Aulakh, Charanjit S; Soni, V; Aulakh, Charanjit S.; Nagasawa, Michiyasu; Soni, Vikram

    1999-01-01

    We examine the behaviour of string networks with the initial string length densities ($ \\sim T_c^2$) and velocities ($ \\sim 1$) expected on the basis of the Kibble mechanism for string formation during a second order phase transition at $T_c$ in the context of the one scale model with friction. The inclusion of friction and use of the natural initial conditions modifies the current picture of string networks in a basic way.We find that a novel transient regime takes the initially dense and fast network to a sparse (string length density $\\sim T_c^3/M_P$) and slow ($v \\sim (T_c/M_P)^{1/2}$) state in a very short time $\\sim 0.1 t_c$ (where $t_c$ is the time of the phase transition that produces the strings). This allows it to join smoothly on to the well known Kibble Regime which prevails at late times in the friction dominated epoch (with the network scale $L\\sim t^{5/4}$ while the network r.m.s velocity $v \\sim t^{1/4}$) which requires initial conditions of this magnitude. Thus essentially irrespective of str...

  9. Models for mean bonding length, melting point and lattice thermal expansion of nanoparticle materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Omar, M.S., E-mail: dr_m_s_omar@yahoo.com [Department of Physics, College of Science, University of Salahaddin-Erbil, Arbil, Kurdistan (Iraq)

    2012-11-15

    Graphical abstract: Three models are derived to explain the nanoparticles size dependence of mean bonding length, melting temperature and lattice thermal expansion applied on Sn, Si and Au. The following figures are shown as an example for Sn nanoparticles indicates hilly applicable models for nanoparticles radius larger than 3 nm. Highlights: ► A model for a size dependent mean bonding length is derived. ► The size dependent melting point of nanoparticles is modified. ► The bulk model for lattice thermal expansion is successfully used on nanoparticles. -- Abstract: A model, based on the ratio number of surface atoms to that of its internal, is derived to calculate the size dependence of lattice volume of nanoscaled materials. The model is applied to Si, Sn and Au nanoparticles. For Si, that the lattice volume is increases from 20 Å{sup 3} for bulk to 57 Å{sup 3} for a 2 nm size nanocrystals. A model, for calculating melting point of nanoscaled materials, is modified by considering the effect of lattice volume. A good approach of calculating size-dependent melting point begins from the bulk state down to about 2 nm diameter nanoparticle. Both values of lattice volume and melting point obtained for nanosized materials are used to calculate lattice thermal expansion by using a formula applicable for tetrahedral semiconductors. Results for Si, change from 3.7 × 10{sup −6} K{sup −1} for a bulk crystal down to a minimum value of 0.1 × 10{sup −6} K{sup −1} for a 6 nm diameter nanoparticle.

  10. Combined single crystal polarized XAFS and XRD at high pressure: probing the interplay between lattice distortions and electronic order at multiple length scales in high Tc cuprates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fabbris, G.; Hücker, M.; Gu, G. D.; Tranquada, J. M.; Haskel, D.

    2016-07-01

    Some of the most exotic material properties derive from electronic states with short correlation length (~10-500 {\\AA}), suggesting that the local structural symmetry may play a relevant role in their behavior. Here we discuss the combined use of polarized x-ray absorption fine structure and x-ray diffraction at high pressure as a powerful method to tune and probe structural and electronic orders at multiple length scales. Besides addressing some of the technical challenges associated with such experiments, we illustrate this approach with results obtained in the cuprate La$_{1.875}$Ba$_{0.125}$CuO$_4$, in which the response of electronic order to pressure can only be understood by probing the structure at the relevant length scales.

  11. Scale Factor Self-Dual Cosmological Models

    CERN Document Server

    dS, U Camara; Sotkov, G M

    2015-01-01

    We implement a conformal time scale factor duality for Friedmann-Robertson-Walker cosmological models, which is consistent with the weak energy condition. The requirement for self-duality determines the equations of state for a broad class of barotropic fluids. We study the example of a universe filled with two interacting fluids, presenting an accelerated and a decelerated period, with manifest UV/IR duality. The associated self-dual scalar field interaction turns out to coincide with the "radiation-like" modified Chaplygin gas models. We present an equivalent realization of them as gauged K\\"ahler sigma models (minimally coupled to gravity) with very specific and interrelated K\\"ahler- and super-potentials. Their applications in the description of hilltop inflation and also as quintessence models for the late universe are discussed.

  12. Bridging the Gap Between Large-scale Data Sets and Analyses: Semi-automated Methods to Facilitate Length Polymorphism Scoring and Data Analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) markers can be developed more quickly and at a lower cost than microsatellite and single nucleotide polymorphism markers, which makes them ideal markers for large-scale studies of understudied taxa — such as species at risk. However,...

  13. "Bottom-up" meets "top-down" : self-assembly to direct manipulation of nanostructures on length scales from atoms to microns.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Swartzentruber, Brian Shoemaker

    2009-04-01

    This document is the final SAND Report for the LDRD Project 102660 - 'Bottomup' meets 'top-down': Self-assembly to direct manipulation of nanostructures on length scales from atoms to microns - funded through the Strategic Partnerships investment area as part of the National Institute for Nano-Engineering (NINE) project.

  14. Effect of polydispersity on the structure factor of a melt of binary multiblock copolymers with a two-length-scale macromolecular architecture

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuchanov, S.; Zharnikov, T.; Brinke, G. ten

    2011-01-01

    A theoretical study on the effect of polydispersity of two-length-scale binary multiblock copolymers on the shape of the structure factor is presented. A bifurcation diagram is constructed showing the partition of the parameter space into domains differing in the way in which the homogeneous melt lo

  15. Effect of polydispersity on the structure factor of a melt of binary multiblock copolymers with a two-length-scale macromolecular architecture

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuchanov, S.; Zharnikov, T.; Brinke, G. ten

    2011-01-01

    A theoretical study on the effect of polydispersity of two-length-scale binary multiblock copolymers on the shape of the structure factor is presented. A bifurcation diagram is constructed showing the partition of the parameter space into domains differing in the way in which the homogeneous melt lo

  16. The Scales of Time, Length, Mass, Energy, and Other Fundamental Physical Quantities in the Atomic World and the Use of Atomic Units in Quantum Mechanical Calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teo, Boon K.; Li, Wai-Kee

    2011-01-01

    This article is divided into two parts. In the first part, the atomic unit (au) system is introduced and the scales of time, space (length), and speed, as well as those of mass and energy, in the atomic world are discussed. In the second part, the utility of atomic units in quantum mechanical and spectroscopic calculations is illustrated with…

  17. Mathematical model of determination of die bearing length in design of aluminum profile extrusion die

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    闫洪; 王高潮; 夏巨谌; 李志刚

    2004-01-01

    Based on the finite element simulation of profile extrusion process, the effect of local extrusion ratio, die bearing area and the distance between extrusion cylindrical center and local die orfice center on mental flow velocity was investigated. The laws of deformed metalflow on profile extrusion process were obtained. The smaller the local extrusion ratio, the faster the metal flow velocity; the smaller the area of die bearing, the faster the metal flow velocity; the smaller the distance of position of local die orifice(the closer the distance of position of local die orifice from extrusion cylindrical axis), the faster the metal flow velocity. The effect of main parameters of die structure on metal flow velocity was integrated and the mathematical model of determination of die bearing length in design of aluminum profile extrusion die was proposed. The calculated results with proposed model were well compared with the experimental results. The proposed model can be applied to determine die bearing length in design of aluminum profile extrusion die.

  18. Implementation of a Mixing Length Turbulence Formulation Into the Dynamic Wake Meandering Model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Keck, Rolf-Erik; Veldkamp, Dick; Aagaard Madsen, Helge

    2012-01-01

    The work presented in this paper focuses on improving the description of wake evolution due to turbulent mixing in the dynamic wake meandering (DWM) model. From wake investigations performed with high-fidelity actuator line simulations carried out in ELLIPSYS3D, it is seen that the current DWM...... description, where the eddy viscosity is assumed to be constant in each cross-section of the wake, is insufficient. Instead, a two-dimensional eddy viscosity formulation is proposed to model the shear layer generated turbulence in the wake, based on the classical mixing length model. The performance...... from 3 to 12 diameters behind the rotor, is reduced by 27% by using the new eddy viscosity formulation. ©2012 American Society of Mechanical Engineers...

  19. Comparing mixing-length models of the diabatic wind profile over homogeneous terrain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peña, Alfredo; Gryning, Sven-Erik; Hasager, Charlotte Bay

    2010-05-01

    Models of the diabatic wind profile over homogeneous terrain for the entire atmospheric boundary layer are developed using mixing-length theory and are compared to wind speed observations up to 300 m at the National Test Station for Wind Turbines at Høvsøre, Denmark. The measurements are performed within a wide range of atmospheric stability conditions, which allows a comparison of the models with the average wind profile computed in seven stability classes, showing a better agreement than compared to the traditional surface-layer wind profile. The wind profile is measured by combining cup anemometer and lidar observations, showing good agreement at the overlapping heights. The height of the boundary layer, a parameter required for the wind profile models, is estimated under neutral and stable conditions using surface-layer turbulence measurements, and under unstable conditions based on the aerosol backscatter profile from ceilometer observations.

  20. Model Wind Turbines Tested at Full-Scale Similarity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, M. A.; Kiefer, J.; Westergaard, C.; Hultmark, M.

    2016-09-01

    The enormous length scales associated with modern wind turbines complicate any efforts to predict their mechanical loads and performance. Both experiments and numerical simulations are constrained by the large Reynolds numbers governing the full- scale aerodynamics. The limited fundamental understanding of Reynolds number effects in combination with the lack of empirical data affects our ability to predict, model, and design improved turbines and wind farms. A new experimental approach is presented, which utilizes a highly pressurized wind tunnel (up to 220 bar). It allows exact matching of the Reynolds numbers (no matter how it is defined), tip speed ratios, and Mach numbers on a geometrically similar, small-scale model. The design of a measurement and instrumentation stack to control the turbine and measure the loads in the pressurized environment is discussed. Results are then presented in the form of power coefficients as a function of Reynolds number and Tip Speed Ratio. Due to gearbox power loss, a preliminary study has also been completed to find the gearbox efficiency and the resulting correction has been applied to the data set.

  1. Gravitational waves during inflation from a 5D large-scale repulsive gravity model

    CERN Document Server

    Reyes, Luz Marina; Aguilar, José Edgar Madriz; Bellini, Mauricio

    2012-01-01

    We investigate, in the transverse traceless (TT) gauge, the generation of the relic background of gravitational waves, generated during an early inflationary stage, on the framework of a large-scale repulsive gravity model. We calculate the spectrum of the tensor metric fluctuations of an effective 4D Schwarzschild-de-Sitter metric, which is obtained after implementing a planar coordinate transformation on a 5D Ricci-flat metric solution, in the context of a non-compact Kaluza-Klein theory of gravity. We found that the spectrum is nearly scale invariant under certain conditions. One interesting aspect of this model is that is possible to derive dynamical field equations for the tensor metric fluctuations, valid not just at cosmological scales, but also at astrophysical scales, from the same theoretical model. The astrophysical and cosmological scales are determined by the gravity- antigravity radius, which is a natural length scale of the model, that indicates when gravity becomes repulsive in nature.

  2. Large-scale multimedia modeling applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Droppo, J.G. Jr.; Buck, J.W.; Whelan, G.; Strenge, D.L.; Castleton, K.J.; Gelston, G.M.

    1995-08-01

    Over the past decade, the US Department of Energy (DOE) and other agencies have faced increasing scrutiny for a wide range of environmental issues related to past and current practices. A number of large-scale applications have been undertaken that required analysis of large numbers of potential environmental issues over a wide range of environmental conditions and contaminants. Several of these applications, referred to here as large-scale applications, have addressed long-term public health risks using a holistic approach for assessing impacts from potential waterborne and airborne transport pathways. Multimedia models such as the Multimedia Environmental Pollutant Assessment System (MEPAS) were designed for use in such applications. MEPAS integrates radioactive and hazardous contaminants impact computations for major exposure routes via air, surface water, ground water, and overland flow transport. A number of large-scale applications of MEPAS have been conducted to assess various endpoints for environmental and human health impacts. These applications are described in terms of lessons learned in the development of an effective approach for large-scale applications.

  3. Scaling Theory and Modeling of DNA Evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buldyrev, Sergey V.

    1998-03-01

    We present evidence supporting the possibility that the nucleotide sequence in noncoding DNA is power-law correlated. We do not find such long-range correlation in the coding regions of the gene, so we build a ``coding sequence finder'' to locate the coding regions of an unknown DNA sequence. We also propose a different coding sequence finding algorithm, based on the concept of mutual information(I. Große, S. V. Buldyrev, H. Herzel, H. E. Stanley, (preprint).). We describe our recent work on quantification of DNA patchiness, using long-range correlation measures (G. M. Viswanathan, S. V. Buldyrev, S. Havlin, and H. E. Stanley, Biophysical Journal 72), 866-875 (1997).. We also present our recent study of the simple repeat length distributions. We find that the distributions of some simple repeats in noncoding DNA have long power-law tails, while in coding DNA all simple repeat distributions decay exponentially. (N. V. Dokholyan, S. V. Buldyrev, S. Havlin, and H. E. Stanley, Phys. Rev. Lett (in press).) We discuss several models based on insertion-deletion and mutation-duplication mechanisms that relate long-range correlations in non-coding DNA to DNA evolution. Specifically, we relate long-range correlations in non-coding DNA to simple repeat expansion, and propose an evolutionary model that reproduces the power law distribution of simple repeat lengths. We argue that the absence of long-range correlations in protein coding sequences is related to their highly conserved primary structure which is necessary to insure protein folding.

  4. Multi-scale atmospheric environment modelling for urban areas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. A. Baklanov

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Modern supercomputers allow realising multi-scale systems for assessment and forecasting of urban meteorology, air pollution and emergency preparedness and considering nesting with obstacle-resolved models. A multi-scale modelling system with downscaling from regional to city-scale with the Environment – HIgh Resolution Limited Area Model (Enviro-HIRLAM and to micro-scale with the obstacle-resolved Micro-scale Model for Urban Environment (M2UE is suggested and demonstrated. The M2UE validation results versus the Mock Urban Setting Trial (MUST experiment indicate satisfactory quality of the model. Necessary conditions for the choice of nested models, building descriptions, areas and resolutions of nested models are analysed. Two-way nesting (up- and down-scaling, when scale effects both directions (from the meso-scale on the micro-scale and from the micro-scale on the meso-scale, is also discussed.

  5. National evaluation for calving ease, gestation length and birth weight by linear and threshold model methodologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Deukhwan; Misztal, Ignacy; Bertrand, J Keith; Rekaya, Romdhane

    2002-01-01

    Data included 393,097 calving ease, 129,520 gestation length, and 412,484 birth weight records on 412,484 Gelbvieh cattle. Additionally, pedigrees were available on 72,123 animals. Included in the models were effects of sex and age of dam, treated as fixed, as well as direct, maternal genetic and permanent environmental effects and effects of contemporary group (herd-year-season), treated as random. In all analyses, birth weight and gestation length were treated as continuous traits. Calving ease (CE) was treated either as a continuous trait in a mixed linear model (LM), or as a categorical trait in linear-threshold models (LTM). Solutions in TM obtained by empirical Bayes (TMEB) and Monte Carlo (TMMC) methodologies were compared with those by LM. Due to the computational cost, only 10,000 samples were obtained for TMMC. For calving ease, correlations between LM and TMEB were 0.86 and 0.78 for direct and maternal genetic effects, respectively. The same correlations but between TMEB and TMMC were 1.00 and 0.98, respectively. The correlations between LM and TMMC were 0.85 and 0.75, respectively. The correlations for the linear traits were above.97 between LM and TMEB but as low as 0.91 between LM and TMMC, suggesting insufficient convergence of TMMC. Computing time required was about 2 hrs, 5 hrs, and 6 days for LM, TMEB and TMMC, respectively, and memory requirements were 169, 171, and 445 megabytes, respectively. Bayesian implementation of threshold model is simple, can be extended to multiple categorical traits, and allows easy calculation of accuracies; however, computing time is prohibitively long for large models.

  6. Sepsis Alert - a triage model that reduces time to antibiotics and length of hospital stay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenqvist, Mari; Fagerstrand, Emma; Lanbeck, Peter; Melander, Olle; Åkesson, Per

    2017-07-01

    To study if a modified triage system at an Emergency Department (ED) combined with educational efforts resulted in reduced time to antibiotics and decreased length of hospital stay (LOS) for patients with severe infection. A retrospective, observational study comparing patients before and after the start of a new triage model at the ED of a University Hospital. After the implementation of the model, patients with fever and abnormal vital signs were triaged into a designated sepsis line (Sepsis Alert) for rapid evaluation by the attending physician supported by a infectious diseases (IDs) specialist. Also, all ED staff participated in a designated sepsis education before Sepsis Alert was introduced. Medical records were evaluated for patients during a 3-month period after the triage system was started in 2012, and also during the corresponding months in 2010 and 2014. A total of 1837 patients presented with abnormal vital signs. Of these, 221 patients presented with fever and thus at risk of having severe sepsis. Among patients triaged according to the new model, median time to antibiotics was 58.5 at startup and 24.5 minutes at follow-up two years later. This was significantly less than for patients treated before the new model, 190 minutes. Also, median LOS was significantly decreased after introduction of the new triage model, from nine to seven days. A triage model at the ED with special attention to severe sepsis patients, led to sustained improvements of time to antibiotic treatment and LOS.

  7. Computer aided polymer design using multi-scale modelling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. C. Satyanarayana

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available The ability to predict the key physical and chemical properties of polymeric materials from their repeat-unit structure and chain-length architecture prior to synthesis is of great value for the design of polymer-based chemical products, with new functionalities and improved performance. Computer aided molecular design (CAMD methods can expedite the design process by establishing input-output relations between the type and number of functional groups in a polymer repeat unit and the desired macroscopic properties. A multi-scale model-based approach that combines a CAMD technique based on group contribution plus models for predicting polymer repeat unit properties with atomistic simulations for providing first-principles arrangements of the repeat units and for predictions of physical properties of the chosen candidate polymer structures, has been developed and tested for design of polymers with desired properties. A case study is used to highlight the main features of this multi-scale model-based approach for the design of a polymer-based product.

  8. Modelling biological invasions: Individual to population scales at interfaces

    KAUST Repository

    Belmonte-Beitia, J.

    2013-10-01

    Extracting the population level behaviour of biological systems from that of the individual is critical in understanding dynamics across multiple scales and thus has been the subject of numerous investigations. Here, the influence of spatial heterogeneity in such contexts is explored for interfaces with a separation of the length scales characterising the individual and the interface, a situation that can arise in applications involving cellular modelling. As an illustrative example, we consider cell movement between white and grey matter in the brain which may be relevant in considering the invasive dynamics of glioma. We show that while one can safely neglect intrinsic noise, at least when considering glioma cell invasion, profound differences in population behaviours emerge in the presence of interfaces with only subtle alterations in the dynamics at the individual level. Transport driven by local cell sensing generates predictions of cell accumulations along interfaces where cell motility changes. This behaviour is not predicted with the commonly used Fickian diffusion transport model, but can be extracted from preliminary observations of specific cell lines in recent, novel, cryo-imaging. Consequently, these findings suggest a need to consider the impact of individual behaviour, spatial heterogeneity and especially interfaces in experimental and modelling frameworks of cellular dynamics, for instance in the characterisation of glioma cell motility. © 2013 Elsevier Ltd.

  9. Large Scale Modelling of Glow Discharges or Non - Plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shankar, Sadasivan

    The Electron Velocity Distribution Function (EVDF) in the cathode fall of a DC helium glow discharge was evaluated from a numerical solution of the Boltzmann Transport Equation(BTE). The numerical technique was based on a Petrov-Galerkin technique and a unique combination of streamline upwinding with self -consistent feedback-based shock-capturing. EVDF for the cathode fall was solved at 1 Torr, as a function of position x, axial velocity v_{rm x}, radial velocity v_{rm r}, and time t. The electron-neutral collisions consisted of elastic, excitation, and ionization processes. The algorithm was optimized and vectorized to speed execution by more than a factor of 10 on CRAY-XMP. Efficient storage schemes were used to save the memory allocation required by the algorithm. The analysis of the solution of BTE was done in terms of the 8-moments that were evaluated. Higher moments were found necessary to study the momentum and energy fluxes. The time and length scales were estimated and used as a basis for the characterization of DC glow discharges. Based on an exhaustive study of Knudsen numbers, it was observed that the electrons in the cathode fall were in the transition or Boltzmann regime. The shortest relaxation time was the momentum relaxation and the longest times were the ionization and energy relaxation times. The other times in the processes were that for plasma reaction, diffusion, convection, transit, entropy relaxation, and that for mean free flight between the collisions. Different models were classified based on the moments, time scales, and length scales in their applicability to glow discharges. These consisted of BTE with different number af phase and configuration dimensions, Bhatnagar-Gross-Krook equation, moment equations (e.g. Drift-Diffusion, Drift-Diffusion-Inertia), and spherical harmonic expansions.

  10. Coarse-graining to the meso and continuum scales with molecular-dynamics-like models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plimpton, Steve

    Many engineering-scale problems that industry or the national labs try to address with particle-based simulations occur at length and time scales well beyond the most optimistic hopes of traditional coarse-graining methods for molecular dynamics (MD), which typically start at the atomic scale and build upward. However classical MD can be viewed as an engine for simulating particles at literally any length or time scale, depending on the models used for individual particles and their interactions. To illustrate I'll highlight several coarse-grained (CG) materials models, some of which are likely familiar to molecular-scale modelers, but others probably not. These include models for water droplet freezing on surfaces, dissipative particle dynamics (DPD) models of explosives where particles have internal state, CG models of nano or colloidal particles in solution, models for aspherical particles, Peridynamics models for fracture, and models of granular materials at the scale of industrial processing. All of these can be implemented as MD-style models for either soft or hard materials; in fact they are all part of our LAMMPS MD package, added either by our group or contributed by collaborators. Unlike most all-atom MD simulations, CG simulations at these scales often involve highly non-uniform particle densities. So I'll also discuss a load-balancing method we've implemented for these kinds of models, which can improve parallel efficiencies. From the physics point-of-view, these models may be viewed as non-traditional or ad hoc. But because they are MD-style simulations, there's an opportunity for physicists to add statistical mechanics rigor to individual models. Or, in keeping with a theme of this session, to devise methods that more accurately bridge models from one scale to the next.

  11. Small-scale behaviour in deterministic reaction models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Politi, Paolo [Istituto dei Sistemi Complessi, Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, Via Madonna del Piano 10, 50019 Sesto Fiorentino (Italy); Ben-Avraham, Daniel, E-mail: paolo.politi@isc.cnr.i, E-mail: benavraham@clarkson.ed [Physics Department, Clarkson University, Potsdam, NY 13699-5820 (United States)

    2010-10-08

    In a recent paper published in this journal (2009 J. Phys. A: Math. Theor. 42 495004) we studied a one-dimensional particles system where nearest particles attract with a force inversely proportional to a power {alpha} of their distance and coalesce upon encounter. Numerics yielded a distribution function h(z) for the gap between neighbouring particles, with h(z) {approx} z{sup {beta}({alpha})} for small z and {beta}({alpha}) > {alpha}. We can now prove analytically that in the strict limit of z {yields} 0, {beta} = {alpha} for {alpha} > 0, corresponding to the mean-field result, and we compute the length scale where the mean field breaks down. More generally, in that same limit correlations are negligible for any similar reaction model where attractive forces diverge with vanishing distance. The actual meaning of the measured exponent {beta}({alpha}) remains an open question.

  12. The role of length scales in bridging the gap between rock CPO and seismic signals of crustal anisotropy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okaya, D.; Johnson, S. E.; Vel, S. S.; Song, W. J.; Christensen, N. I.

    2012-04-01

    CPO in order to calculate the effective media associated with a structure (see W.J. Song et al., this session). Frontier issues exist to improve the connection between rock CPO and seismic signals. For quantitative analyses of anisotropic elastic tensors: *Improved averaging methods of rock CPO tensors beyond modal or volume averaging, such as asymptotic expansion homogenization (AEH). *Updated series of single-crystal elasticity measurements using modern technologies. For structural geology/tectonics and geodynamics: *Catalogue mapping functions or impulse responses associated with 3D structure. *Identify geometries of anisotropy tensors associated with different tectonic regimes. *Geodynamical modeling of crustal tectonics in order to quantify patterns of metamorphic/deformational fabrics. For seismology: *Two-layer and multi-layer seismic anisotropy methods. *Robust anisotropy tomography methods with improved resolution. *Field experiment methods designed specifically for crustal anisotropy (multi-azimuth, multi-incidence, multi-wavelength using active/passive source types). We discuss the dimensional scales of common seismic waves and earth structures. We illustrate tensor structural operators, effective media, and resulting seismic signals using anisotropic synthetic wave propagation.

  13. The scale-invariant scotogenic model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahriche, Amine [Department of Physics, University of Jijel,PB 98 Ouled Aissa, DZ-18000 Jijel (Algeria); The Abdus Salam International Centre for Theoretical Physics,Strada Costiera 11, I-34014, Trieste (Italy); McDonald, Kristian L. [ARC Centre of Excellence for Particle Physics at the Terascale,School of Physics, The University of Sydney,NSW 2006 (Australia); Nasri, Salah [Physics Department, UAE University,POB 17551, Al Ain (United Arab Emirates)

    2016-06-30

    We investigate a minimal scale-invariant implementation of the scotogenic model and show that viable electroweak symmetry breaking can occur while simultaneously generating one-loop neutrino masses and the dark matter relic abundance. The model predicts the existence of a singlet scalar (dilaton) that plays the dual roles of triggering electroweak symmetry breaking and sourcing lepton number violation. Important constraints are studied, including those from lepton flavor violating effects and dark matter direct-detection experiments. The latter turn out to be somewhat severe, already excluding large regions of parameter space. None the less, viable regions of parameter space are found, corresponding to dark matter masses below (roughly) 10 GeV and above 200 GeV.

  14. Genome scale metabolic modeling of cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nilsson, Avlant; Nielsen, Jens

    2016-01-01

    been used as scaffolds for analysis of high throughput data to allow mechanistic interpretation of changes in expression. Finally, GEMs allow quantitative flux predictions using flux balance analysis (FBA). Here we critically review the requirements for successful FBA simulations of cancer cells......Cancer cells reprogram metabolism to support rapid proliferation and survival. Energy metabolism is particularly important for growth and genes encoding enzymes involved in energy metabolism are frequently altered in cancer cells. A genome scale metabolic model (GEM) is a mathematical formalization...... of metabolism which allows simulation and hypotheses testing of metabolic strategies. It has successfully been applied to many microorganisms and is now used to study cancer metabolism. Generic models of human metabolism have been reconstructed based on the existence of metabolic genes in the human genome...

  15. Prediction model for the diffusion length in silicon-based solar cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Cheknane A; Benouaz T

    2009-01-01

    d to predict the diffusion length in mono-crystalline silicon solar cells. Furthermore, the computation of the diffusion length and the comparison with measurement data, using the infrared injection method, are presented and discussed.

  16. Thermal scale modeling of radiation-conduction-convection systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shannon, R. L.

    1972-01-01

    Investigation of thermal scale modeling applied to radiation-conduction-convection systems with particular emphasis on the spacecraft cabin atmosphere/cabin wall thermal interface. The 'modified material preservation,' 'temperature preservation,' 'scaling compromises,' and 'Nusselt number preservation' scale modeling techniques and their inherent limitations and problem areas are described. The compromised scaling techniques of mass flux preservation and heat transfer coefficient preservation show promise of giving adequate thermal similitude while preserving both gas and temperature in the scale model. The use of these compromised scaling techniques was experimentally demonstrated in tests of full scale and 1/4 scale models. Correlation of test results for free and forced convection under various test conditions shows the effectiveness of these scaling techniques. It is concluded that either mass flux or heat transfer coefficient preservation may result in adequate thermal similitude depending on the system to be modeled. Heat transfer coefficient preservation should give good thermal similitude for manned spacecraft scale modeling applications.

  17. Large Scale, High Resolution, Mantle Dynamics Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geenen, T.; Berg, A. V.; Spakman, W.

    2007-12-01

    To model the geodynamic evolution of plate convergence, subduction and collision and to allow for a connection to various types of observational data, geophysical, geodetical and geological, we developed a 4D (space-time) numerical mantle convection code. The model is based on a spherical 3D Eulerian fem model, with quadratic elements, on top of which we constructed a 3D Lagrangian particle in cell(PIC) method. We use the PIC method to transport material properties and to incorporate a viscoelastic rheology. Since capturing small scale processes associated with localization phenomena require a high resolution, we spend a considerable effort on implementing solvers suitable to solve for models with over 100 million degrees of freedom. We implemented Additive Schwartz type ILU based methods in combination with a Krylov solver, GMRES. However we found that for problems with over 500 thousend degrees of freedom the convergence of the solver degraded severely. This observation is known from the literature [Saad, 2003] and results from the local character of the ILU preconditioner resulting in a poor approximation of the inverse of A for large A. The size of A for which ILU is no longer usable depends on the condition of A and on the amount of fill in allowed for the ILU preconditioner. We found that for our problems with over 5×105 degrees of freedom convergence became to slow to solve the system within an acceptable amount of walltime, one minute, even when allowing for considerable amount of fill in. We also implemented MUMPS and found good scaling results for problems up to 107 degrees of freedom for up to 32 CPU¡¯s. For problems with over 100 million degrees of freedom we implemented Algebraic Multigrid type methods (AMG) from the ML library [Sala, 2006]. Since multigrid methods are most effective for single parameter problems, we rebuild our model to use the SIMPLE method in the Stokes solver [Patankar, 1980]. We present scaling results from these solvers for 3D

  18. Development of Lab-to-Fab Production Equipment Across Several Length Scales for Printed Energy Technologies, Including Solar Cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hösel, Markus; Dam, Henrik Friis; Krebs, Frederik C

    2015-01-01

    We describe and review how the scaling of printed energy technologies not only requires scaling of the input materials but also the machinery used in the processes. The general consensus that ultrafast processing of technologies with large energy capacity can only be realized using roll-to-roll m......We describe and review how the scaling of printed energy technologies not only requires scaling of the input materials but also the machinery used in the processes. The general consensus that ultrafast processing of technologies with large energy capacity can only be realized using roll...

  19. Structure and mechanism of maximum stability of isolated alpha-helical protein domains at a critical length scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Zhao; Fabre, Andrea; Buehler, Markus J

    2013-05-01

    The stability of alpha helices is important in protein folding, bioinspired materials design, and controls many biological properties under physiological and disease conditions. Here we show that a naturally favored alpha helix length of 9 to 17 amino acids exists at which the propensity towards the formation of this secondary structure is maximized. We use a combination of thermodynamical analysis, well-tempered metadynamics molecular simulation and statistical analyses of experimental alpha helix length distributions and find that the favored alpha helix length is caused by a competition between alpha helix folding, unfolding into a random coil and formation of higher-order tertiary structures. The theoretical result is suggested to be used to explain the statistical distribution of the length of alpha helices observed in natural protein structures. Our study provides mechanistic insight into fundamental controlling parameters in alpha helix structure formation and potentially other biopolymers or synthetic materials. The result advances our fundamental understanding of size effects in the stability of protein structures and may enable the design of de novo alpha-helical protein materials.

  20. Scale-Bridging Model Development for Coal Particle Devolatilization

    CERN Document Server

    Schroeder, Benjamin B; Smith, Philip J; Fletcher, Thomas H; Packard, Andrew; Frenklach, Michael; Hegde, Arun; Li, Wenyu; Oreluk, James

    2016-01-01

    When performing large-scale, high-performance computations of multi-physics applications, it is common to limit the complexity of physics sub-models comprising the simulation. For a hierarchical system of coal boiler simulations a scale-bridging model is constructed to capture characteristics appropriate for the application-scale from a detailed coal devolatilization model. Such scale-bridging allows full descriptions of scale-applicable physics, while functioning at reasonable computational costs. This study presents a variation on multi-fidelity modeling with a detailed physics model, the chemical percolation devolatilization model, being used to calibrate a scale-briding model for the application of interest. The application space provides essential context for designing the scale-bridging model by defining scales, determining requirements and weighting desired characteristics. A single kinetic reaction equation with functional yield model and distributed activation energy is implemented to act as the scal...

  1. Comparison Between Overtopping Discharge in Small and Large Scale Models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Helgason, Einar; Burcharth, Hans F.

    2006-01-01

    small and large scale model tests show no clear evidence of scale effects for overtopping above a threshold value. In the large scale model no overtopping was measured for waveheights below Hs = 0.5m as the water sunk into the voids between the stones on the crest. For low overtopping scale effects...... are presented as the small-scale model underpredicts the overtopping discharge....

  2. Model of Full-Scale Tunnel (FST) under construction

    Science.gov (United States)

    1929-01-01

    Model of Full-Scale Tunnel (FST) under construction. On June 26, 1929, Elton W. Miller wrote to George W. Lewis proposing the construction of a model of the full-scale tunnel. 'The excellent energy ratio obtained in the new wind tunnel of the California Institute of Technology suggests that before proceeding with our full scale tunnel design, we ought to investigate the effect on energy ratio of such factors as: 1. small included angle for the exit cone; 2. carefully designed return passages of circular section as far as possible, without sudden changes in cross sections; 3. tightness of walls. It is believed that much useful information can be obtained by building a model of about 1/16 scale, that is, having a closed throat of 2 ft. by 4 ft. The outside dimensions would be about 12 ft. by 25 ft. in plan and the height 4 ft. Two propellers will be required about 28 in. in diameter, each to be driven by direct current motor at a maximum speed of 4500 R.P.M. Provision can be made for altering the length of certain portions, particularly the exit cone, and possibly for the application of boundary layer control in order to effect satisfactory air flow. This model can be constructed in a comparatively short time, using 2 by 4 framing with matched sheathing inside, and where circular sections are desired they can be obtained by nailing sheet metal to wooden ribs, which can be cut on the band saw. It is estimated that three months will be required for the construction and testing of such a model and that the cost will be approximately three thousand dollars, one thousand dollars of which will be for the motors. No suitable location appears to exist in any of our present buildings, and it may be necessary to build it outside and cover it with a roof.' George Lewis responded immediately (June 27) granting the authority to proceed. He urged Langley to expedite construction and to employ extra carpenters if necessary. Funds for the model came from the FST project. In a 1979

  3. Multiple-Scale Geomechanical Models for Thermal Spallation Drilling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lomov, I.; Walsh, S. D.; Roberts, J. J.

    2011-12-01

    Widespread adoption of geothermal energy will require access to deeply buried geothermal sources in granitic basement rocks at high temperatures and pressures. Exploiting these resources necessitates novel methods for drilling, stimulation, and maintenance, under operating conditions difficult or impossible to test in laboratory settings. Physically rigorous numerical modeling tools are vital to highlight potential risks, guide process optimization and reduce the uncertainties involved in these developing technologies. In this presentation, we discuss a numerical modeling effort investigating the multiscale mechanics of thermal spallation drilling (TSD) - a technique in which rock is fragmented into small flakes by a high temperature fluid jet. This process encompasses interconnected phenomena on several length and time scales: from system-scale fluid dynamics to grain-scale thermomechanics of spallation. Here we describe how these disperate scales are simulated using GEODYN, a parallel Eulerian compressible solid and fluid dynamics code with adaptive mesh refinement (AMR) capabilities. GEODYN is able to simulate materials under extremely large deformations, resolve details of wave propagation within grains, and uses a continuum damage mechanics approach to represent fracture. We will present results from both system- and grain-scale simulations describing the transfer of heat from the high temperature jet to the rock face, and the effect of grain-scale properties such as incipient flaw distribution, grain size and grain size distribution, heat flux, applied temperature and material heterogeneity on the onset of spallation. Detailed computer modeling helps to address several of the uncertainties surrounding TSD: 1) What rock compositions are drillable with TSD? 2) How do grain size and grain size distribution affect TSD and drilling rates? 3) What combination of macroscopic (Poisson ratio, heat capacity and thermal conductivity) and microscopic (flaw distribution

  4. Enhanced strength and temperature dependence of mechanical properties of Li at small length scales and its implications for Li metal anodes

    CERN Document Server

    and, Chen Xu; Aryanfar, Asghar; Viswanathan, Venkatasubramanian; Greer, Julia R

    2016-01-01

    Most next-generation Li-ion battery chemistries require a functioning lithium metal (Li) anode. However, its application in secondary batteries has been inhibited because of uncontrollable dendrite growth during cycling. Mechanical suppression of dendrite growth through solid polymer electrolytes (SPE) or through robust separators has shown the most potential for alleviating this problem. Studies of the mechanical behavior of Li at any length scale and temperature are virtually non-existent because of its extreme reactivity, which renders sample preparation, transfer, microstructure characterization and mechanical testing prohibitively challenging. We conduct nano-mechanical experiments in an in-situ Scanning Electron Microscope and show that micron-sized Li attains extremely high strengths of 105 MPa at room temperature and of 35MPa at 90$^\\circ$C. We demonstrate that single crystalline Li exhibits a power-law size-effect at the micron- and sub-micron length scales, with the strengthening exponent of -0.68 a...

  5. Dynamics of lithium ions in borotellurite mixed former glasses: Correlation between the characteristic length scales of mobile ions and glass network structural units

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shaw, A.; Ghosh, A., E-mail: sspag@iacs.res.in [Department of Solid State Physics, Indian Association for the Cultivation of Science, Jadavpur, Kolkata 700032 (India)

    2014-10-28

    We have studied the mixed network former effect on the dynamics of lithium ions in borotellurite glasses in wide composition and temperature ranges. The length scales of ion dynamics, such as characteristic mean square displacement and spatial extent of sub-diffusive motion of lithium ions have been determined from the ac conductivity and dielectric spectra, respectively, in the framework of linear response theory. The relative concentrations of different network structural units have been determined from the deconvolution of the FTIR spectra. A direct correlation between the ion dynamics and the characteristic length scales and the relative concentration of BO{sub 4} units has been established for different compositions of the borotellurite glasses.

  6. Effects of Cycle Length and Plot Density on Estimators for a National-Scale Forest Monitoring Sample Design

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francis A. Roesch

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The resilience of a National Forest Inventory and Monitoring sample design can sometimes depend upon the degree to which it can adapt to fluctuations in funding. If a budget reduction necessitates the observation of fewer plots per year, some practitioners weigh the problem as a tradeoff between reducing the total number of plots and measuring the original number of plots over a greater number of years. Here, we explore some of the effects of differing plot intensities and cycle lengths on variants of three general classes of estimators for annual cubic meter per hectare volume, using a simulated population and appropriately-graduated sampling simulations. The simulations showed that an increase in cycle length yielded quite dramatic effects while differences due to a simulated reduction in plot intensity had more subtle effects.

  7. Multi-Scale Modeling of Plasma Thrusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batishchev, Oleg

    2004-11-01

    Plasma thrusters are characterized with multiple spatial and temporal scales, which are due to the intrinsic physical processes such as gas ionization, wall effects and plasma acceleration. Characteristic times for hot plasma and cold gas are differing by 6-7 orders of magnitude. The typical collisional mean-free-paths vary by 3-5 orders along the devices. These make questionable a true self-consistent modeling of the thrusters. The latter is vital to the understanding of complex physics, non-linear dynamics and optimization of the performance. To overcome this problem we propose the following approach. All processes are divided into two groups: fast and slow. The slow ones include gas evolution with known sources and ionization sink. The ionization rate, transport coefficients, energy sources are defined during "fast step". Both processes are linked through external iterations. Multiple spatial scales are handled using moving adaptive mesh. Development and application of this method to the VASIMR helicon plasma source and other thrusters will be discussed. Supported by NASA.

  8. Cation ratio fluctuations in Cu2ZnSnS4 at the 20 nm length scale investigated by analytical electron microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aguiar, Jeffery A. [National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Golden CO 80401 USA; Erkan, Mehmet E. [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Utah, UT 84112 USA; Pruzan, Dennis S. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Utah, UT 84112 USA; Nagaoka, Akira [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Utah, UT 84112 USA; Department of Applied Physics and Electronic Engineering, University of Miyazaki, Miyazaki 889 2192 Japan; Yoshino, Kenji [Department of Applied Physics and Electronic Engineering, University of Miyazaki, Miyazaki 889 2192 Japan; Moutinho, Helio [National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Golden CO 80401 USA; Al-Jassim, Mowafak [National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Golden CO 80401 USA; Scarpulla, Michael A. [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Utah, UT 84112 USA; Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Utah, UT 84112 USA

    2016-04-05

    Kesterite Cu2ZnSn(S,Se)4 (CZTSSe) is a sustainable material for thin-film photovoltaics with device efficiencies greater than 12% have been demonstrated. Despite similar crystal structure and polycrystalline film microstructures, there is widespread evidence for larger-amplitude potential and bandgap fluctuations in CZTS than in the analogous Cu(In,Ga)Se2 (CIGSe) chalcopyrite material. This disorder is believed to account for a sizable part of the larger open-circuit voltage (VOC) deficit in CZTS devices, yet the detailed origins and length scales of these fluctuations have not been fully elucidated. Herein, we present a transmission electron microscopy study focusing on composition variation within bulk multicrystals of CZTS grown by the travelling heater method (THM). In these slow-cooled, solution grown crystals we find direct evidence for spatial composition fluctuations of amplitude <1 at.% (~5 x 1020 cm-3) and thus, explainable by point defects. However, rather than being homogeneously-distributed we find a characteristic 20 nm length scale for these fluctuations, which sets a definite length scale for band gap and potential fluctuations. At Σ3 grain boundaries, we find no evidence of composition variation compared to the bulk. The finding highlights such variations reported at grain boundaries in polycrystalline thin-films are direct consequences of processing methods and not intrinsic properties of CZTS itself.

  9. Multi-scale Modelling of Segmentation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hartmann, Martin; Lartillot, Olivier; Toiviainen, Petri

    2016-01-01

    While listening to music, people often unwittingly break down musical pieces into constituent chunks such as verses and choruses. Music segmentation studies have suggested that some consensus regarding boundary perception exists, despite individual differences. However, neither the effects...... of experimental task (i.e., real-time vs. annotated segmentation), nor of musicianship on boundary perception are clear. Our study assesses musicianship effects and differences between segmentation tasks. We conducted a real-time experiment to collect segmentations by musicians and nonmusicians from nine musical...... pieces. In a second experiment on non-real-time segmentation, musicians indicated boundaries and their strength for six examples. Kernel density estimation was used to develop multi-scale segmentation models. Contrary to previous research, no relationship was found between boundary strength and boundary...

  10. Multi-scale modeling of inter-granular fracture in UO2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chakraborty, Pritam [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Zhang, Yongfeng [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Tonks, Michael R. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Biner, S. Bulent [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2015-03-01

    A hierarchical multi-scale approach is pursued in this work to investigate the influence of porosity, pore and grain size on the intergranular brittle fracture in UO2. In this approach, molecular dynamics simulations are performed to obtain the fracture properties for different grain boundary types. A phase-field model is then utilized to perform intergranular fracture simulations of representative microstructures with different porosities, pore and grain sizes. In these simulations the grain boundary fracture properties obtained from molecular dynamics simulations are used. The responses from the phase-field fracture simulations are then fitted with a stress-based brittle fracture model usable at the engineering scale. This approach encapsulates three different length and time scales, and allows the development of microstructurally informed engineering scale model from properties evaluated at the atomistic scale.

  11. INCLUSION RATIO BASED ESTIMATOR FOR THE MEAN LENGTH OF THE BOOLEAN LINE SEGMENT MODEL WITH AN APPLICATION TO NANOCRYSTALLINE CELLULOSE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mikko Niilo-Rämä

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available A novel estimator for estimating the mean length of fibres is proposed for censored data observed in square shaped windows. Instead of observing the fibre lengths, we observe the ratio between the intensity estimates of minus-sampling and plus-sampling. It is well-known that both intensity estimators are biased. In the current work, we derive the ratio of these biases as a function of the mean length assuming a Boolean line segment model with exponentially distributed lengths and uniformly distributed directions. Having the observed ratio of the intensity estimators, the inverse of the derived function is suggested as a new estimator for the mean length. For this estimator, an approximation of its variance is derived. The accuracies of the approximations are evaluated by means of simulation experiments. The novel method is compared to other methods and applied to real-world industrial data from nanocellulose crystalline.

  12. Simultaneous nested modeling from the synoptic scale to the LES scale for wind energy applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Yubao; Warner, Tom; Liu, Yuewei

    2011-01-01

    This paper describes an advanced multi-scale weather modeling system, WRF–RTFDDA–LES, designed to simulate synoptic scale (~2000 km) to small- and micro-scale (~100 m) circulations of real weather in wind farms on simultaneous nested grids. This modeling system is built upon the National Center f...

  13. Design and modeling of small scale multiple fracturing experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cuderman, J F

    1981-12-01

    Recent experiments at the Nevada Test Site (NTS) have demonstrated the existence of three distinct fracture regimes. Depending on the pressure rise time in a borehole, one can obtain hydraulic, multiple, or explosive fracturing behavior. The use of propellants rather than explosives in tamped boreholes permits tailoring of the pressure risetime over a wide range since propellants having a wide range of burn rates are available. This technique of using the combustion gases from a full bore propellant charge to produce controlled borehole pressurization is termed High Energy Gas Fracturing (HEGF). Several series of HEGF, in 0.15 m and 0.2 m diameter boreholes at 12 m depths, have been completed in a tunnel complex at NTS where mineback permitted direct observation of fracturing obtained. Because such large experiments are costly and time consuming, smaller scale experiments are desirable, provided results from small experiments can be used to predict fracture behavior in larger boreholes. In order to design small scale gas fracture experiments, the available data from previous HEGF experiments were carefully reviewed, analytical elastic wave modeling was initiated, and semi-empirical modeling was conducted which combined predictions for statically pressurized boreholes with experimental data. The results of these efforts include (1) the definition of what constitutes small scale experiments for emplacement in a tunnel complex at the Nevada Test Site, (2) prediction of average crack radius, in ash fall tuff, as a function of borehole size and energy input per unit length, (3) definition of multiple-hydraulic and multiple-explosive fracture boundaries as a function of boreholes size and surface wave velocity, (4) semi-empirical criteria for estimating stress and acceleration, and (5) a proposal that multiple fracture orientations may be governed by in situ stresses.

  14. Axion Models with High Scale Inflation

    CERN Document Server

    Moroi, Takeo; Nakayama, Kazunori; Takimoto, Masahiro

    2014-01-01

    We revisit the cosmological aspects of axion models. In the high-scale inflation scenario, the Peccei-Quinn (PQ) symmetry is likely to be restored during/after inflation. If the curvature of the PQ scalar potential at the origin is smaller than its vacuum expectation value; for instance in a class of SUSY axion models, thermal inflation happens before the radial component of the PQ scalar (saxion) relaxes into the global minimum of the potential and the decay of saxion coherent oscillation would produce too much axion dark radiation. In this paper, we study how to avoid the overproduction of axion dark radiation with some concrete examples. We show that, by taking account of the finite-temperature dissipation effect appropriately, the overproduction constraint can be relaxed since the PQ scalar can take part in the thermal plasma again even after the PQ phase transition. We also show that it can be further relaxed owing to the late time decay of another heavy CP-odd scalar, if it is present.

  15. An efficient algorithm for computing fixed length attractors based on bounded model checking in synchronous Boolean networks with biochemical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, X Y; Yang, G W; Zheng, D S; Guo, W S; Hung, W N N

    2015-01-01

    Genetic regulatory networks are the key to understanding biochemical systems. One condition of the genetic regulatory network under different living environments can be modeled as a synchronous Boolean network. The attractors of these Boolean networks will help biologists to identify determinant and stable factors. Existing methods identify attractors based on a random initial state or the entire state simultaneously. They cannot identify the fixed length attractors directly. The complexity of including time increases exponentially with respect to the attractor number and length of attractors. This study used the bounded model checking to quickly locate fixed length attractors. Based on the SAT solver, we propose a new algorithm for efficiently computing the fixed length attractors, which is more suitable for large Boolean networks and numerous attractors' networks. After comparison using the tool BooleNet, empirical experiments involving biochemical systems demonstrated the feasibility and efficiency of our approach.

  16. Global-scale modeling of groundwater recharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Döll, P.; Fiedler, K.

    2008-05-01

    Long-term average groundwater recharge, which is equivalent to renewable groundwater resources, is the major limiting factor for the sustainable use of groundwater. Compared to surface water resources, groundwater resources are more protected from pollution, and their use is less restricted by seasonal and inter-annual flow variations. To support water management in a globalized world, it is necessary to estimate groundwater recharge at the global scale. Here, we present a best estimate of global-scale long-term average diffuse groundwater recharge (i.e. renewable groundwater resources) that has been calculated by the most recent version of the WaterGAP Global Hydrology Model WGHM (spatial resolution of 0.5° by 0.5°, daily time steps). The estimate was obtained using two state-of-the-art global data sets of gridded observed precipitation that we corrected for measurement errors, which also allowed to quantify the uncertainty due to these equally uncertain data sets. The standard WGHM groundwater recharge algorithm was modified for semi-arid and arid regions, based on independent estimates of diffuse groundwater recharge, which lead to an unbiased estimation of groundwater recharge in these regions. WGHM was tuned against observed long-term average river discharge at 1235 gauging stations by adjusting, individually for each basin, the partitioning of precipitation into evapotranspiration and total runoff. We estimate that global groundwater recharge was 12 666 km3/yr for the climate normal 1961-1990, i.e. 32% of total renewable water resources. In semi-arid and arid regions, mountainous regions, permafrost regions and in the Asian Monsoon region, groundwater recharge accounts for a lower fraction of total runoff, which makes these regions particularly vulnerable to seasonal and inter-annual precipitation variability and water pollution. Average per-capita renewable groundwater resources of countries vary between 8 m3/(capita yr) for Egypt to more than 1 million m3

  17. Modeling of a Variable Focal Length Flat Lens Using Left Handed Metamaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reinert, Jason

    2004-01-01

    Left Handed Metamaterials (LHM) were originally purposed by Victor Veselago in1968. These substances would allow a flat structure to focus electromagnetic (EM) waves because they have a negative index of refraction. A similar structure made from conventional materials, those with a positive index of refraction, would disperse the waves. But until recently, these structures have been purely theoretical because substances with both a negative permittivity and negative permeability, material properties necessary for a negative index of refraction, do not naturally exist, Recent developments have produced a structure composed of an array of thin wires and split ring resonators that shows a negative index of refraction. area smaller than a square wavelength. How small the area is can be determined by how perfectly the lens is polished and how pure the substance is that composes the lens. These lenses must also be curved for focusing to occur. The focal length is determined by the curvature of the lens and the material. On the other hand, a flat structure made from LHM would focus light because of the effect of a negative index of refraction in Snell s law. The focal length could also be varied by simply adjusting the distance of the lens from the source of radiation. This could create many devices that are adjustable to different situations in fields such as biomedical imaging and communication. the software package XFDTD which solves Maxwell s equations in the frequency domain as well as the time domain. The program used Drude models of materials to simulate the effect of negative permittivity and negative permeability. Because of this, a LHM can be simulated as a solid block of material instead of an array of wires and split ring resonators. After a flat lens is formed, I am to examine the focusing effect of the lens and determine if a higher resolution flat lens can be developed. Traditional lenses made from conventional materials cannot focus an EM wave onto an My

  18. A maximum likelihood model for fitting power functions with data uncertainty: A case study on the relationship between body lengths and masses for Sciuridae species worldwide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Youhua Chen

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available In this report, a maximum likelihood model is developed to incorporate data uncertainty in response and explanatory variables when fitting power-law bivariate relationships in ecology and evolution. This simple likelihood model is applied to an empirical data set related to the allometric relationship between body mass and length of Sciuridae species worldwide. The results show that the values of parameters estimated by the proposed likelihood model are substantially different from those fitted by the nonlinear least-of-square (NLOS method. Accordingly, the power-law models fitted by both methods have different curvilinear shapes. These discrepancies are caused by the integration of measurement errors in the proposed likelihood model, in which NLOS method fails to do. Because the current likelihood model and the NLOS method can show different results, the inclusion of measurement errors may offer new insights into the interpretation of scaling or power laws in ecology and evolution.

  19. Scale effects and scaling-up by geometric-optical model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李小文; 王锦地; A.H.Strahler

    2000-01-01

    This is a follow-up paper to our "Scale effect of Planck’s law over nonisothermal blackbody surface". More examples are used to describe the scale effect in detail, and the scaling-up of Planck law over blackbody surface is further extended to three-dimension nonisothermal surface. This scaling-up results in a conceptual model for the directionality and spectral signature of thermal radiation at the scale of remote sensing pixels. This new model is also an improvement of Li-Strahler-Friedl conceptual model in a sense that the new model needs only statistic parameters at the pixel scale, without request of sub-pixel scale parameters as the LSF model does.

  20. Scale effects and scaling-up by geometric-optical model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    This is a follow-up paper to our "Scale effect of Planck's law over nonisothermal blackbody surface".More examples are used to describe the scale effect in detail,and the scaling-up of Planck law over blackbody surface is further extended to three-dimension nonisothermal surface.This scaling-up results in a conceptual model for the directionality and spectral signature of thermal radiation at the scale of remote sensing pixels.This new model is also an improvement of Li-Strahler-Friedl conceptual model in a sense that the new model needs only statistic parameters at the pixel scale,without request of sub-pixel scale parameters as the LSF model does.

  1. Criterion Noise in Ratings-Based Recognition: Evidence from the Effects of Response Scale Length on Recognition Accuracy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benjamin, Aaron S.; Tullis, Jonathan G.; Lee, Ji Hae

    2013-01-01

    Rating scales are a standard measurement tool in psychological research. However, research has suggested that the cognitive burden involved in maintaining the criteria used to parcel subjective evidence into ratings introduces "decision noise" and affects estimates of performance in the underlying task. There has been debate over whether…

  2. Composition Dependence of Dynamic Heterogeneity Time- and Length Scales in [Omim][BF4]/Water Binary Mixtures: Molecular Dynamics Simulation Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pal, Tamisra; Biswas, Ranjit

    2015-12-24

    Composition dependence of four-point dynamic susceptibilities, overlap functions, and other dynamic heterogeneity (DH) parameters have been investigated by using all-atom molecular dynamics simulations for aqueous solutions of the ionic liquid (IL), 1-octyl-3-methyl imidazolium tetrafluoroborate ([Omim][BF4]) covering the pure-to-pure range. Upon addition of water in the IL, the DH time scales become faster and the four-point dynamic susceptibility time scale softens. Evidences for jump motions for both water and ions have been found from the simulated single particle displacements that show strong deviation from Gaussian distribution. Estimated dynamic correlation length for water reflects effects of IL, whereas those for ions remain largely insensitive to the mixture composition. Simulated structural aspects and DH time scales provide microscopic explanations to the existing experimental observations from time-resolved fluorescence and Kerr spectroscopic measurements.

  3. Finite element model for arch bridge vibration dynamics considering effect of suspender length adjustment on geometry stiffness matrix

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHONG Yi-feng; WANG Rui; YING Xue-gang; CHEN Huai

    2006-01-01

    In this paper, we established a finite element (FEM) model to analyze the dynamic characteristics of arch bridges. In this model, the effects of adjustment to the length of a suspender on its geometry stiffness matrix are stressed. The FEM equations of mechanics characteristics, natural frequency and main mode are set up based on the first order matrix perturbation theory. Applicantion of the proposed model to analyze a real arch bridge proved the improvement in the simulation precision of dynamical characteristics of the arch bridge by considering the effects of suspender length variation.

  4. Improved jet noise modeling using a new acoustic time scale

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Azarpeyvand, M.; Self, R.H.; Golliard, J.

    2006-01-01

    To calculate the noise emanating from a turbulent flow (such as a jet flow) using Lighthill's analogy, knowledge concerning the unsteady characteristics of the turbulence is required. Specifically, the form of the turbulent correlation tensor together with various time and length-scales and convecti

  5. SDG and qualitative trend based model multiple scale validation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Dong; Xu, Xin; Yin, Jianjin; Zhang, Hongyu; Zhang, Beike

    2017-09-01

    Verification, Validation and Accreditation (VV&A) is key technology of simulation and modelling. For the traditional model validation methods, the completeness is weak; it is carried out in one scale; it depends on human experience. The SDG (Signed Directed Graph) and qualitative trend based multiple scale validation is proposed. First the SDG model is built and qualitative trends are added to the model. And then complete testing scenarios are produced by positive inference. The multiple scale validation is carried out by comparing the testing scenarios with outputs of simulation model in different scales. Finally, the effectiveness is proved by carrying out validation for a reactor model.

  6. Modeling of micro-scale thermoacoustics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Offner, Avshalom; Ramon, Guy Z.

    2016-05-01

    Thermoacoustic phenomena, that is, onset of self-sustained oscillations or time-averaged fluxes in a sound wave, may be harnessed as efficient and robust heat transfer devices. Specifically, miniaturization of such devices holds great promise for cooling of electronics. At the required small dimensions, it is expected that non-negligible slip effects exist at the solid surface of the "stack"-a porous matrix, which is used for maintaining the correct temporal phasing of the heat transfer between the solid and oscillating gas. Here, we develop theoretical models for thermoacoustic engines and heat pumps that account for slip, within the standing-wave approximation. Stability curves for engines with both no-slip and slip boundary conditions were calculated; the slip boundary condition curve exhibits a lower temperature difference compared with the no slip curve for resonance frequencies that characterize micro-scale devices. Maximum achievable temperature differences across the stack of a heat pump were also calculated. For this case, slip conditions are detrimental and such a heat pump would maintain a lower temperature difference compared to larger devices, where slip effects are negligible.

  7. Modeling of micro-scale thermoacoustics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Offner, Avshalom [The Nancy and Stephen Grand Technion Energy Program, Technion-Israel Institute of Technology, Haifa 32000 (Israel); Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Technion-Israel Institute of Technology, Haifa 32000 (Israel); Ramon, Guy Z., E-mail: ramong@technion.ac.il [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Technion-Israel Institute of Technology, Haifa 32000 (Israel)

    2016-05-02

    Thermoacoustic phenomena, that is, onset of self-sustained oscillations or time-averaged fluxes in a sound wave, may be harnessed as efficient and robust heat transfer devices. Specifically, miniaturization of such devices holds great promise for cooling of electronics. At the required small dimensions, it is expected that non-negligible slip effects exist at the solid surface of the “stack”-a porous matrix, which is used for maintaining the correct temporal phasing of the heat transfer between the solid and oscillating gas. Here, we develop theoretical models for thermoacoustic engines and heat pumps that account for slip, within the standing-wave approximation. Stability curves for engines with both no-slip and slip boundary conditions were calculated; the slip boundary condition curve exhibits a lower temperature difference compared with the no slip curve for resonance frequencies that characterize micro-scale devices. Maximum achievable temperature differences across the stack of a heat pump were also calculated. For this case, slip conditions are detrimental and such a heat pump would maintain a lower temperature difference compared to larger devices, where slip effects are negligible.

  8. Modeling cancer metabolism on a genome scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yizhak, Keren; Chaneton, Barbara; Gottlieb, Eyal; Ruppin, Eytan

    2015-01-01

    Cancer cells have fundamentally altered cellular metabolism that is associated with their tumorigenicity and malignancy. In addition to the widely studied Warburg effect, several new key metabolic alterations in cancer have been established over the last decade, leading to the recognition that altered tumor metabolism is one of the hallmarks of cancer. Deciphering the full scope and functional implications of the dysregulated metabolism in cancer requires both the advancement of a variety of omics measurements and the advancement of computational approaches for the analysis and contextualization of the accumulated data. Encouragingly, while the metabolic network is highly interconnected and complex, it is at the same time probably the best characterized cellular network. Following, this review discusses the challenges that genome-scale modeling of cancer metabolism has been facing. We survey several recent studies demonstrating the first strides that have been done, testifying to the value of this approach in portraying a network-level view of the cancer metabolism and in identifying novel drug targets and biomarkers. Finally, we outline a few new steps that may further advance this field. PMID:26130389

  9. The scaling window of the 5D Ising model with free boundary conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lundow, P. H.; Markström, K.

    2016-10-01

    The five-dimensional Ising model with free boundary conditions has recently received a renewed interest in a debate concerning the finite-size scaling of the susceptibility near the critical temperature. We provide evidence in favour of the conventional scaling picture, where the susceptibility scales as L2 inside a critical scaling window of width 1 /L2. Our results are based on Monte Carlo data gathered on system sizes up to L = 79 (ca. three billion spins) for a wide range of temperatures near the critical point. We analyse the magnetisation distribution, the susceptibility and also the scaling and distribution of the size of the Fortuin-Kasteleyn cluster containing the origin. The probability of this cluster reaching the boundary determines the correlation length, and its behaviour agrees with the mean field critical exponent δ = 3, that the scaling window has width 1 /L2.

  10. Structural characterization suggests models for monomeric and dimeric forms of full-length ezrin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phang, Juanita M; Harrop, Stephen J; Duff, Anthony P; Sokolova, Anna V; Crossett, Ben; Walsh, James C; Beckham, Simone A; Nguyen, Cuong D; Davies, Roberta B; Glöckner, Carina; Bromley, Elizabeth H C; Wilk, Krystyna E; Curmi, Paul M G

    2016-09-15

    Ezrin is a member of the ERM (ezrin-radixin-moesin) family of proteins that have been conserved through metazoan evolution. These proteins have dormant and active forms, where the latter links the actin cytoskeleton to membranes. ERM proteins have three domains: an N-terminal FERM [band Four-point-one (4.1) ERM] domain comprising three subdomains (F1, F2, and F3); a helical domain; and a C-terminal actin-binding domain. In the dormant form, FERM and C-terminal domains form a stable complex. We have determined crystal structures of the active FERM domain and the dormant FERM:C-terminal domain complex of human ezrin. We observe a bistable array of phenylalanine residues in the core of subdomain F3 that is mobile in the active form and locked in the dormant form. As subdomain F3 is pivotal in binding membrane proteins and phospholipids, these transitions may facilitate activation and signaling. Full-length ezrin forms stable monomers and dimers. We used small-angle X-ray scattering to determine the solution structures of these species. As expected, the monomer shows a globular domain with a protruding helical coiled coil. The dimer shows an elongated dumbbell structure that is twice as long as the monomer. By aligning ERM sequences spanning metazoan evolution, we show that the central helical region is conserved, preserving the heptad repeat. Using this, we have built a dimer model where each monomer forms half of an elongated antiparallel coiled coil with domain-swapped FERM:C-terminal domain complexes at each end. The model suggests that ERM dimers may bind to actin in a parallel fashion.

  11. Subgrid-scale model for radiative transfer in turbulent participating media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soucasse, L.; Rivière, Ph.; Soufiani, A.

    2014-01-01

    The simulation of turbulent flows of radiating gases, taking into account all turbulence length scales with an accurate radiation transport solver, is computationally prohibitive for high Reynolds or Rayleigh numbers. This is particularly the case when the small structures are not optically thin. We develop in this paper a radiative transfer subgrid model suitable for the coupling with direct numerical simulations of turbulent radiating fluid flows. Owing to the linearity of the Radiative Transfer Equation (RTE), the emission source term is spatially filtered to define large-scale and subgrid-scale radiation intensities. The large-scale or filtered intensity is computed with a standard ray tracing method on a coarse grid, and the subgrid intensity is obtained analytically (in Fourier space) from the Fourier transform of the subgrid emission source term. A huge saving of computational time is obtained in comparison with direct ray tracing applied on the fine mesh. Model accuracy is checked for three 3D fluctuating temperature fields. The first field is stochastically generated and allows us to discuss the effects of the filtering level and of the optical thicknesses of the whole medium, of the integral length scale, and of the cutoff wave length. The second and third cases correspond respectively to turbulent natural convection of humid air in a cubical box, and to the flow of hot combustion products inside a channel. In all cases, the achieved accuracy on radiative powers and wall fluxes is about a few percents.

  12. Internal length parameter and buckling analysis of carbon nanotubes using modified couple stress theory and Timoshenko beam model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khajueenejad, F.; Ghanbari, J.

    2015-10-01

    The internal length parameter of the modified couple stress theory for single walled carbon nanotubes (CNTs) is determined in this paper. Buckling of CNTs have been studied using Timoshenko beam model and modified couple stress theory. The governing equations for three different end conditions, simple-simple, clamped-clamped and clamped-free, are solved using variational methods and an exact solution is provided for the buckling load. The effects of the internal length parameter on the buckling load of various CNT length and diameters are studied. It is observed that the internal length parameter has larger influence on the higher modes of buckling and for shorter nanotubes. A method presented to obtain the internal length parameter of higher order theories. By correlating the obtained results with the more accurate molecular dynamics simulations, the internal length parameter has been calculated for zigzag and armchair nanotubes. It is observed that the internal length parameter has slight dependency on the size of the CNTs and an average value is provided.

  13. Gate length scaling effect on high-electron mobility transistors devices using AlGaN/GaN and AlInN/AlN/GaN heterostructures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, S Y; Lu, C C; Chang, T; Huang, C F; Cheng, C H; Chang, L B

    2014-08-01

    Compared to AlGaN/GaN HEMT with 0.15 μm T-gate length, the AlInN/AlN/GaN one exhibits much higher current density and transconductance of 1558 mA/mm at Vd = 2 V and 330 mS/mm, respectively. The high extrinsic ft and fmax of 82 GHz and 70 GHz are extracted from AlInN/AlN/GaN HEMT. Besides, we find that the transconductance roll-off is significant in AlGaN/GaN, but largely improved in AlInN/AlN/GaN HEMT, suggesting that the high carrier density and lattice-matched epitaxial heterostructure is important to reach both large RF output power and high operation frequency, especially for an aggressively gate length scaling.

  14. Scaling between superconducting critical temperature and structural coherence length in YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 6.9} films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gauzzi, A. [Ecole Polytechnique Federale, Lausanne (Switzerland). Dept. de Physique; Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, Parma (Italy). Lab. MASPEC; Joensson-Aakerman, B.J.; Clerc-Dubois, A.; Pavuna, D. [Ecole Polytechnique Federale, Lausanne (Switzerland). Dept. de Physique

    2000-09-15

    Measurements of critical temperature T{sub c} in superconducting YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 6.9} films with reduced long-range structural order show the validity of the empirical scaling relation {delta}T{sub c}{proportional_to}r{sub c}{sup -2} between disorder-induced reduction of T{sub c} and structural coherence length r{sub c} in the ab-plane. This result is quantitatively explained by the disorder-induced confinement of the charge carriers within each ordered domain of size r{sub c}. Our analysis of the data based on this picture enables us to precisely determine the Ginzburg-Landau superconducting coherence length in the ab-plane, {xi}{sub ab} = 1.41 {+-} 0.04 nm. (orig.)

  15. Capturing recrystallization of metals with a multi-scale materials model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D. A. Hughes; D. J. Bammann; A. Godfrey; V. C. Prantil; E. A. Holm; M. A. Miodownik; D. C. Chrzan; M. T. Lusk

    2000-04-01

    The final report for a Laboratory Directed Research and Development project entitled, ``Capturing Recrystallization of Metals in a Multiscale Materials Model'' is presented. In this project, deformation and recrystallization processes have been followed experimentally and theoretically in order to incorporate essential mechanisms from the defect (dislocation) and grain size length scales. A nonlinear rotational gradient theory has been developed which enables the incorporation of microstructural parameters. The evolution of these parameters during deformation and recrystallization has been characterized qualitatively and quantitatively, applying various electron optic techniques ranging over several length scales. The theoretical and experimental framework developed is general. It has been exemplified by an application to recrystallization in single crystals and bicrystals of aluminum. The recrystallization process has been modeled using a 3-D model for the changes in key structural parameters during recrystallization.

  16. Probabilistic Models for Estimation of Random and Pseudo—Random Test Length

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    向东; 魏道政; 等

    1992-01-01

    A new probabilistic testability measure is presented to ease test length analyses of random testing and pseudorandom testing.The testability measure given in this paper is oriented to signal conflict of reconvergent fanouts.Test length analyses in this paper are based on a hard fault set,calculations of which are practicable and simple.Experimental results have been obtained to show the accuracy of this test length analyser in comparison with that of Savir[6],Chin and McClusker[8],and Wunderlich[4] by using a pseudorandom est generator combined with exhaustive fault simulation.

  17. Morphological quantification of hierarchical geomaterials by X-ray nano-CT bridges the gap from nano to micro length scales

    KAUST Repository

    Brisard, S.

    2012-01-30

    Morphological quantification of the complex structure of hierarchical geomaterials is of great relevance for Earth science and environmental engineering, among others. To date, methods that quantify the 3D morphology on length scales ranging from a few tens of nanometers to several hun-dred nanometers have had limited success. We demonstrate, for the first time, that it is possible to go beyond visualization and to extract quantitative morphological information from X-ray images in the aforementioned length scales. As examples, two different hierarchical geomaterials exhibiting complex porous structures ranging from nanometer to macroscopic scale are studied: a flocculated clay water suspension and two hydrated cement pastes. We show that from a single projection image it is possible to perform a direct computation of the ultra-small angle-scattering spectra. The predictions matched very well the experimental data obtained by the best ultra-small angle-scattering experimental setups as observed for the cement paste. In this context, we demonstrate that the structure of flocculated clay suspension exhibit two well-distinct regimes of aggregation, a dense mass fractal aggregation at short distance and a more open structure at large distance, which can be generated by a 3D reaction limited cluster-cluster aggregation process. For the first time, a high-resolution 3D image of fibrillar cement paste cluster was obtained from limited angle nanotomography.

  18. Scale-Scale Correlation as Discriminant Among the Biased Galaxy Formation Models

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FENG Long-Long; XIANG Shou-Ping

    2001-01-01

    Using the mock galaxy catalogues created from the N-body simulations, various biasing prescriptions for modelling the relative distribution between the galaxies and the underlying dark matter are statistically tested by using scale-scale correlation. We found that the scale-scale correlation is capable of breaking the model degeneracy indicated by the low-order clustering statistics, and could be taken as an effective discriminant among a variety of biasing models. Particularly, comparing with the APM bright galaxy catalogue, we infer that the two parameter Lagrangian biasing model gives the best fit to the observed clustering features.

  19. The Harris-Todaro model and economies of scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panagariya, A; Succar, P

    1986-04-01

    The authors attempt to reanalyze the Harris-Todaro migration model in the presence of economies of scale in the manufacturing sector, focusing on economies of scale that are external to a given firm but internal to the industry.

  20. The Stagger-grid: A grid of 3D stellar atmosphere models - III. The relation to mixing length convection theory

    CERN Document Server

    Magic, Zazralt; Asplund, Martin

    2014-01-01

    We investigate the relation between 1D atmosphere models that rely on the mixing length theory and models based on full 3D radiative hydrodynamic (RHD) calculations to describe convection in the envelopes of late-type stars. The adiabatic entropy value of the deep convection zone, s_bot, and the entropy jump, {\\Delta}s, determined from the 3D RHD models, are matched with the mixing length parameter, {\\alpha}_MLT, from 1D hydrostatic atmosphere models with identical microphysics (opacities and equation-of-state). We also derive the mass mixing length, {\\alpha}_m, and the vertical correlation length of the vertical velocity, C[v_z,v_z], directly from the 3D hydrodynamical simulations of stellar subsurface convection. The calibrated mixing length parameter for the Sun is {\\alpha}_MLT (s_bot) = 1.98. For different stellar parameters, {\\alpha}_MLT varies systematically in the range of 1.7 - 2.4. In particular, {\\alpha}_MLT decreases towards higher effective temperature, lower surface gravity and higher metallicity...

  1. The scaling region of the lattice O(N) sigma model at finite temperature

    CERN Document Server

    Strouthos, C G; Strouthos, Costas G.; Tziligakis, Ioannis N.

    2003-01-01

    We present results from numerical studies of the finite temperature phase transition of the $(3+1)d$ O(N)-symmetric non-linear sigma model for $N=1,2$ and 3. We study the dependence of the width of the 3d critical region on $N$ and we show that the broken phase scaling region is much wider for N=1 and 2 than for N=1. We compare the widths of the critical region in the low $T$ and high $T$ phases of the O(2) model and we show that the scaling region in the broken phase is much wider than in the symmetric phase. We also report results for the width of the scaling region in the low $T$ phase $(2+1)d$ Ising model and we show that the spatial correlation length has to be approximately twice the lattice temporal extent before the 2d scaling region is reached.

  2. On Multiscale Modeling: Preserving Energy Dissipation Across the Scales with Consistent Handshaking Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pineda, Evan J.; Bednarcyk, Brett A.; Arnold, Steven M.; Waas, Anthony M.

    2013-01-01

    A mesh objective crack band model was implemented within the generalized method of cells micromechanics theory. This model was linked to a macroscale finite element model to predict post-peak strain softening in composite materials. Although a mesh objective theory was implemented at the microscale, it does not preclude pathological mesh dependence at the macroscale. To ensure mesh objectivity at both scales, the energy density and the energy release rate must be preserved identically across the two scales. This requires a consistent characteristic length or localization limiter. The effects of scaling (or not scaling) the dimensions of the microscale repeating unit cell (RUC), according to the macroscale element size, in a multiscale analysis was investigated using two examples. Additionally, the ramifications of the macroscale element shape, compared to the RUC, was studied.

  3. Nano-regime Length Scales Extracted from the First Sharp Diffraction Peak in Non-crystalline SiO2 and Related Materials: Device Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Phillips James

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract This paper distinguishes between two different scales of medium range order, MRO, in non-crystalline SiO2: (1 the first is ~0.4 to 0.5 nm and is obtained from the position of the first sharp diffraction peak, FSDP, in the X-ray diffraction structure factor, S(Q, and (2 the second is ~1 nm and is calculated from the FSDP full-width-at-half-maximum FWHM. Many-electron calculations yield Si–O third- and O–O fourth-nearest-neighbor bonding distances in the same 0.4–0.5 nm MRO regime. These derive from the availability of empty Si dπ orbitals for back-donation from occupied O pπ orbitals yielding narrow symmetry determined distributions of third neighbor Si–O, and fourth neighbor O–O distances. These are segments of six member rings contributing to connected six-member rings with ~1 nm length scale within the MRO regime. The unique properties of non-crystalline SiO2 are explained by the encapsulation of six-member ring clusters by five- and seven-member rings on average in a compliant hard-soft nano-scaled inhomogeneous network. This network structure minimizes macroscopic strain, reducing intrinsic bonding defects as well as defect precursors. This inhomogeneous CRN is enabling for applications including thermally grown ~1.5 nm SiO2 layers for Si field effect transistor devices to optical components with centimeter dimensions. There are qualitatively similar length scales in nano-crystalline HfO2 and phase separated Hf silicates based on the primitive unit cell, rather than a ring structure. Hf oxide dielectrics have recently been used as replacement dielectrics for a new generation of Si and Si/Ge devices heralding a transition into nano-scale circuits and systems on a Si chip.

  4. Multi-scale modeling of softening materials

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lloberas Valls, O.; Simone, A.; Sluys, L.J.

    2008-01-01

    This paper presents an assessment of a two-scale framework for the study of softening materials. The procedure is based on a hierarchical Finite Element (FE) scheme in which computations are performed both at macro and mesoscopic scale levels. The methodology is chosen specifically to remain valid

  5. Upscaling a catchment-scale ecohydrology model for regional-scale earth system modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adam, J. C.; Tague, C.; Liu, M.; Garcia, E.; Choate, J.; Mullis, T.; Hull, R.; Vaughan, J. K.; Kalyanaraman, A.; Nguyen, T.

    2014-12-01

    With a focus on the U.S. Pacific Northwest (PNW), BioEarth is an Earth System Model (EaSM) currently in development that explores the interactions between coupled C:N:H2O dynamics and resource management actions at the regional scale. Capturing coupled biogeochemical processes within EaSMs like BioEarth is important for exploring the response of the land surface to changes in climate and resource management actions; information that is important for shaping decisions that promote sustainable use of our natural resources. However, many EaSM frameworks do not adequately represent landscape-scale ( 10 km) are necessitated by computational limitations. Spatial heterogeneity in a landscape arises due to spatial differences in underlying soil and vegetation properties that control moisture, energy and nutrient fluxes; as well as differences that arise due to spatially-organized connections that may drive an ecohydrologic response by the land surface. While many land surface models used in EaSM frameworks capture the first type of heterogeneity, few account for the influence of lateral connectivity on land surface processes. This type of connectivity can be important when considering soil moisture and nutrient redistribution. The RHESSys model is utilized by BioEarth to enable a "bottom-up" approach that preserves fine spatial-scale sensitivities and lateral connectivity that may be important for coupled C:N:H2O dynamics over larger scales. RHESSys is a distributed eco-hydrologic model that was originally developed to run at relatively fine but computationally intensive spatial resolutions over small catchments. The objective of this presentation is to describe two developments to enable implementation of RHESSys over the PNW. 1) RHESSys is being adapted for BioEarth to allow for moderately coarser resolutions and the flexibility to capture both types of heterogeneity at biome-specific spatial scales. 2) A Kepler workflow is utilized to enable RHESSys implementation over

  6. Operational, regional-scale, chemical weather forecasting models in Europe

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kukkonen, J.; Balk, T.; Schultz, D.M.; Baklanov, A.; Klein, T.; Miranda, A.I.; Monteiro, A.; Hirtl, M.; Tarvainen, V.; Boy, M.; Peuch, V.H.; Poupkou, A.; Kioutsioukis, I.; Finardi, S.; Sofiev, M.; Sokhi, R.; Lehtinen, K.; Karatzas, K.; San José, R.; Astitha, M.; Kallos, G.; Schaap, M.; Reimer, E.; Jakobs, H.; Eben, K.

    2011-01-01

    Numerical models that combine weather forecasting and atmospheric chemistry are here referred to as chemical weather forecasting models. Eighteen operational chemical weather forecasting models on regional and continental scales in Europe are described and compared in this article. Topics discussed

  7. Water-Like Solvation Thermodynamics in a Spherically Symmetric Solvent Model with Two Characteristic Lengths

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Sergey V. Buldyrev; Pradeep Kumar; Pablo G. Debenedetti; Peter J. Rossky; H. Eugene Stanley

    2007-01-01

    We examine by molecular dynamics simulation the solubility of small apolar solutes in a solvent whose particles interact via the Jagla potential, a spherically symmetric ramp potential with two characteristic lengths...

  8. Scale Effect of Premixed Methane-Air Combustion in Confined Space Using LES Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liang Wang

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Gas explosion is the most hazardous incident occurring in underground airways. Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD techniques are sophisticated in simulating explosions in confined spaces; specifically, when testing large-scale gaseous explosions, such as methane explosions in underground mines. The dimensions of a confined space where explosions could occur vary significantly. Thus, the scale effect on explosion parameters is worth investigating. In this paper, the impact of scaling on explosion overpressures is investigated by employing two scaling factors: The Gas-fill Length Scaling Factor (FLSF and the Hydraulic Diameter Scaling Factor (HDSF. The combinations of eight FLSFs and five HDSFs will cover a wide range of space dimensions where flammable gas could accumulate. Experiments were also conducted to evaluate the selected numerical models. The Large Eddy Simulation turbulence model was selected because it shows accuracy compared to the widely used Reynolds’ averaged models for the scenarios investigated in the experiments. Three major conclusions can be drawn: (1 The overpressure increases with both FLSF and HDSF within the deflagration regime; (2 In an explosion duct with a length to diameter ratio greater than 54, detonation is more likely to be triggered for a stoichiometric methane/air mixture; (3 Overpressure increases as an increment hydraulic diameter of a geometry within deflagration regime. A relative error of 7% is found when predicting blast peak overpressure for the base case compared to the experiment; a good agreement for the wave arrival time is also achieved.

  9. An adaptive strategy based on linear prediction of queue length to minimize congestion in Barabási-Albert scale-free networks

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shen Yi

    2013-01-01

    In this paper,we propose an adaptive strategy based on the linear prediction of queue length to minimize congestion in Barabási-Albert (BA) scale-free networks.This strategy uses local knowledge of traffic conditions and allows nodes to be able to self-coordinate their accepting probability to the incoming packets.We show that the strategy can delay remarkably the onset of congestion and systems avoiding the congestion can benefit from hierarchical organization of accepting rates of nodes.Furthermore,with the increase of prediction orders,we achieve larger values for the critical load together with a smooth transition from free-flow to congestion.

  10. Coupling Length Scales for Multiscale Atomistics-Continuum Simulations: Atomistically Induced Stress Distributions in Si/Si3N4 Nanopixels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lidorikis, Elefterios; Bachlechner, Martina E.; Kalia, Rajiv K.; Nakano, Aiichiro; Vashishta, Priya; Voyiadjis, George Z.

    2001-08-01

    A hybrid molecular-dynamics (MD) and finite-element simulation approach is used to study stress distributions in silicon/silicon-nitride nanopixels. The hybrid approach provides atomistic description near the interface and continuum description deep into the substrate, increasing the accessible length scales and greatly reducing the computational cost. The results of the hybrid simulation are in good agreement with full multimillion-atom MD simulations: atomic structures at the lattice-mismatched interface between amorphous silicon nitride and silicon induce inhomogeneous stress patterns in the substrate that cannot be reproduced by a continuum approach alone.

  11. Prediction of anisotropic material behavior based on multiresolution continuum mechanics in consideration of a characteristic length scale

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Dock Jin; Choi, Jae Boong; Kim, Moon Ki [Sungkyunkwan Univ., Suwon (Korea, Republic of); Chang, Yoon Suk [Kyunghee Univ., Suwon (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-09-15

    New advanced materials have received more attention from many scientists and engineers because of their outstanding chemical, electrical, thermal, optical, and mechanical properties. Since the design of advanced material by experiments requires high cost and time, numerical approaches have always been of great interest. In this paper, finite element analysis of anisotropic material behavior has been carried out based on a multiresolution continuum theory. Gurson Tvergaard Needleman (GTN) damage model has been applied as a constitutive model at macroscale. Effects of plastic anisotropy on deformation behavior are assessed using Hill's 48 yield function for anisotropic material and von Mises yield function for isotropic material, respectively. The material parameters for both isotropic and anisotropic damage models have systematically been determined from microstructure through unit cell modeling. The newly proposed linear approximation of local velocity gradient resolved the underdetermined problem of the previous homogenization process. Anisotropic material behaviors of a tensile specimen have been investigated by the proposed multiresolution continuum theory.

  12. Analysis of length distribution of short DNA fragments induced by 7Li ions using the random-breakage model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    KONG Fuquan; ZHAO Kui; ZHAN Yong; CAO Tianguang; NI Meinan; SUI Li; CAI Minghui; ZHUO Yizhong

    2005-01-01

    Deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) is an important bio-macromolecule. DNA double strand breaks (DSBs) are considered to be the most important initial damage responsible for all biological effects induced by ionizing radiation. In this paper the length distribution of DNA fragments induced by 7Li ionizing radiation is fitted with the random breakage model. In this model, the parameter u is the average number of DSBs on every DNA molecule induced by ionizing radiation. The fitting result shows that the random breakage model cannot describe the distribution of DNA fragments in lower doses, while the random breakage model is in better accordance with the experimental data in higher doses. It is shown that the length distribution of DNA fragments has random statistical feature in higher doses. In this situation, the random breakage model looks like a model without any parameter since the u has specific physical meaning and can directly be obtained from experimental data.

  13. Effects of CAG repeat length, HTT protein length and protein context on cerebral metabolism measured using magnetic resonance spectroscopy in transgenic mouse models of Huntington's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenkins, Bruce G; Andreassen, Ole A; Dedeoglu, Alpaslan; Leavitt, Blair; Hayden, Michael; Borchelt, David; Ross, Christopher A; Ferrante, Robert J; Beal, M Flint

    2005-10-01

    Huntington's disease is a neurodegenerative illness caused by expansion of CAG repeats at the N-terminal end of the protein huntingtin. We examined longitudinal changes in brain metabolite levels using in vivo magnetic resonance spectroscopy in five different mouse models. There was a large (>50%) exponential decrease in N-acetyl aspartate (NAA) with time in both striatum and cortex in mice with 150 CAG repeats (R6/2 strain). There was a linear decrease restricted to striatum in N171-82Q mice with 82 CAG repeats. Both the exponential and linear decreases of NAA were paralleled in time by decreases in neuronal area measured histologically. Yeast artificial chromosome transgenic mice with 72 CAG repeats, but low expression levels, had less striatal NAA loss than the N171-82Q mice (15% vs. 43%). We evaluated the effect of gene context in mice with an approximate 146 CAG repeat on the hypoxanthine phosphoribosyltransferase gene (HPRT). HPRT mice developed an obese phenotype in contrast to weight loss in the R6/2 and N171-82Q mice. These mice showed a small striatal NAA loss (21%), and a possible increase in brain lipids detectable by magnetic resonance (MR) spectroscopy and decreased brain water T1. Our results indicate profound metabolic defects that are strongly affected by CAG repeat length, as well as gene expression levels and protein context.

  14. Pore-scale modeling of competitive adsorption in porous media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, Emily M; Tartakovsky, Alexandre M; Amon, Cristina

    2011-03-01

    In this paper we present a smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) pore-scale multicomponent reactive transport model with competitive adsorption. SPH is a Lagrangian, particle based modeling method which uses the particles as interpolation points to discretize and solve flow and transport equations. The theory and details of the SPH pore-scale model are presented along with a novel method for handling surface reactions, the continuum surface reaction (CSR) model. The numerical accuracy of the CSR model is validated with analytical and finite difference solutions, and the effects of spatial and temporal resolution on the accuracy of the model are also discussed. The pore-scale model is used to study competitive adsorption for different Damköhler and Peclet numbers in a binary system where a plume of species B is introduced into a system which initially contains species A. The pore-scale model results are compared with a Darcy-scale model to investigate the accuracy of a Darcy-scale reactive transport model for a wide range of Damköhler and Peclet numbers. The comparison shows that the Darcy model over estimates the mass fraction of aqueous and adsorbed species B and underestimates the mass fractions of species A. The Darcy-scale model also predicts faster transport of species A and B through the system than the pore-scale model. The overestimation of the advective velocity and the extent of reactions by the Darcy-scale model are due to incomplete pore-scale mixing. As the degree of the solute mixing decreases with increasing Peclet and Damköhler numbers, so does the accuracy of the Darcy-scale model. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Modelling across bioreactor scales: methods, challenges and limitations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gernaey, Krist

    Scale-up and scale-down of bioreactors are very important in industrial biotechnology, especially with the currently available knowledge on the occurrence of gradients in industrial-scale bioreactors. Moreover, it becomes increasingly appealing to model such industrial scale systems, considering...... that it is challenging and expensive to acquire experimental data of good quality that can be used for characterizing gradients occurring inside a large industrial scale bioreactor. But which model building methods are available? And how can one ensure that the parameters in such a model are properly estimated? And what...... are the limitations of different types of mod - els? This paper will provide examples of models that have been published in the literature for use across bioreactor scales, including computational fluid dynamics (CFD) and population balance models. Furthermore, the importance of good modeling practice...

  16. Length Scale Dependence of Periodic Textures for Photoabsorption Enhancement in Ultra-thin Silicon Foils and Thick Wafers

    CERN Document Server

    Kumar, K; Liu, G; Nogami, J; Kherani, N P

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we simulate a front surface inverted pyramidal grating texture on 2 to 400 micron thick silicon and optimize it to derive maximum photocurrent density from the cell. We identify a one size fits all front grating period of 1000 nm that leads to maximum photo-absorption of normally incident AM1.5g solar spectrum in silicon (configured with a back surface reflector) irrespective of the thickness of the crystalline silicon absorbing layer. With the identification of such universally optimized periodicity for the case of an inverted pyramidal grating texture, a common fabrication process can be designed to manufacture high-efficiency devices on crystalline silicon regardless of wafer thickness. In order to validate the results of the simulation, we fabricated high resolution inverted pyramidal textures on a 400 micron thick silicon wafer with electron beam lithography to compare the reflectance from submicron and wavelength scale periodic textures. The experimental reflectance measurements on textur...

  17. Dependence of the crossing time on the sequence length in the continuous-time mutation-selection model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gill, Wonpyong [Pusan National University, Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-08-15

    The dependence of the crossing time on the sequence length in the coupled and the decoupled continuous-time mutation-selection models in an asymmetric sharply-peaked landscape with a positive asymmetric parameter, r, was examined for a fixed extension parameter, E, which is defined as the average Hamming distance from the optimal allele of the initial quasispecies divided by the sequence length. Two versions of the coupled mutation-selection model, the continuous-time version and discrete-time version, were found to have the same boundary between the deterministic and the stochastic regions, which is different from the boundary between the deterministic and the stochastic regions in the decoupled continuous-time mutation-selection model. The maximum sequence length for a finite population that can evolve through the fitness barrier, e.g., within 10{sup 6} generations in the decoupled continuous-time mutation-selection model, increased by approximately eight sequence elements with increasing population size by a factor of a thousand when E = 0.1 and r = 0.1. The crossing time for a finite population in the decoupled model in the stochastic region was shorter than the crossing time for a finite population in the coupled model, and the maximum evolvable sequence length for a finite population in the decoupled model was longer than the maximum evolvable sequence length for a finite population in the coupled model. This suggests that a mutation allowed at any time during the life cycle might be more effective than a mutation allowed only at reproduction events when a finite population transits to a higher fitness peak through the fitness barrier in an asymmetric sharply-peaked landscape.

  18. Static Aeroelastic Scaling and Analysis of a Sub-Scale Flexible Wing Wind Tunnel Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ting, Eric; Lebofsky, Sonia; Nguyen, Nhan; Trinh, Khanh

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents an approach to the development of a scaled wind tunnel model for static aeroelastic similarity with a full-scale wing model. The full-scale aircraft model is based on the NASA Generic Transport Model (GTM) with flexible wing structures referred to as the Elastically Shaped Aircraft Concept (ESAC). The baseline stiffness of the ESAC wing represents a conventionally stiff wing model. Static aeroelastic scaling is conducted on the stiff wing configuration to develop the wind tunnel model, but additional tailoring is also conducted such that the wind tunnel model achieves a 10% wing tip deflection at the wind tunnel test condition. An aeroelastic scaling procedure and analysis is conducted, and a sub-scale flexible wind tunnel model based on the full-scale's undeformed jig-shape is developed. Optimization of the flexible wind tunnel model's undeflected twist along the span, or pre-twist or wash-out, is then conducted for the design test condition. The resulting wind tunnel model is an aeroelastic model designed for the wind tunnel test condition.

  19. Multi-scale peridynamic modeling of dynamic fracture in concrete

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lammi, Christopher J.; Zhou, Min

    2017-01-01

    Peridynamics simulations of the dynamic deformation and failure of high-performance concrete are performed at the meso-scale. A pressure-dependent, peridynamic plasticity model and failure criteria are used to capture pressure-sensitive granular flow and fracture. The meso-scale framework explicitly resolves reinforcing phases, pores, and intrinsic flaws. A novel scaling approach is formulated to inform the engineering-scale plasticity model parameters with meso-scale simulation results. The effects of composition, porosity, and fracture energy at the meso-scale on the engineering-scale impact resistance are assessed. The fracture process zone at the meso-scale is found to propagate along adjacent pores and reinforcing phases under tensile and shear loading conditions. The simulations show that tensile strength decreases and dissipation increases as the porosity in the concrete increases. The framework and modeling approach allow the delineation of trends that can be used to design more impact-resistant materials.

  20. Modeling the Radar Return of Powerlines Using an Incremental Length Diffraction Coefficient Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macdonald, Douglas

    DIRSIG consistently underestimated the scattered return, especially away from specular observation angles. This underestimation was particularly pronounced for the dihedral targets which have a low acceptance angle in elevation, probably caused by the lack of a physical optics capability in DIRSIG. Powerlines were not apparent in the simulated data. For modeling powerlines outside of DIRSIG using a standalone approach, an Incremental Length Diffraction Coefficient (ILDC) method was used. Traditionally, this method is used to model the scattered radiation from the edge of a wedge, for example the edges on the wings of a stealth aircraft. The Physical Theory of Diffraction provides the 2D diffraction coefficient and the ILDC method performs an integral along the edge to extend this solution to three dimensions. This research takes the ILDC approach but instead of using the wedge diffraction coefficient, the exact far-field diffraction coefficient for scattering from a finite length cylinder is used. Wavenumber-diameter products are limited to less than or about 10. For typical powerline diameters, this translates to X-band frequencies and lower. The advantage of this method is it allows exact 2D solutions to be extended to powerline geometries where sag is present and it is shown to be more accurate than a pure physical optics approach for frequencies lower than millimeter wave. The Radar Cross Sections produced by this method were accurate to within the experimental uncertainty of measured RF anechoic chamber data for both X and C-band frequencies across an 80 degree arc for 5 different target types and diameters. For the X-band data, the mean error was 6.0% for data with 9.5% measurement uncertainty. For the C-band data, the mean error was 11.8% for data with 14.3% measurement uncertainty. The best results were obtained for X-band data in the HH polarization channel within a 20 degree arc about normal incidence. For this configuration, a mean error of 3.0% for data with