WorldWideScience

Sample records for model length scale

  1. Analysis Models for Polymer Composites Across Different Length Scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camanho, Pedro P.; Arteiro, Albertino

    This chapter presents the analysis models, developed at different length scales, for the prediction of inelastic deformation and fracture of polymer composite materials reinforced by unidirectional fibers. Three different length scales are covered. Micro-mechanical models are used to understand in detail the effects of the constituents on the response of the composite material, and to support the development of analysis models based on homogenized representations of composite materials. Meso-mechanical models are used to predict the strength of composite structural components under general loading conditions. Finally, macro-mechanical models based on Finite Fracture Mechanics, which enable fast strength predictions of simple structural details, are discussed.

  2. Chemical theory and modelling through density across length scales

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghosh, Swapan K.

    2016-01-01

    One of the concepts that has played a major role in the conceptual as well as computational developments covering all the length scales of interest in a number of areas of chemistry, physics, chemical engineering and materials science is the concept of single-particle density. Density functional theory has been a versatile tool for the description of many-particle systems across length scales. Thus, in the microscopic length scale, an electron density based description has played a major role in providing a deeper understanding of chemical binding in atoms, molecules and solids. Density concept has been used in the form of single particle number density in the intermediate mesoscopic length scale to obtain an appropriate picture of the equilibrium and dynamical processes, dealing with a wide class of problems involving interfacial science and soft condensed matter. In the macroscopic length scale, however, matter is usually treated as a continuous medium and a description using local mass density, energy density and other related property density functions has been found to be quite appropriate. The basic ideas underlying the versatile uses of the concept of density in the theory and modelling of materials and phenomena, as visualized across length scales, along with selected illustrative applications to some recent areas of research on hydrogen energy, soft matter, nucleation phenomena, isotope separation, and separation of mixture in condensed phase, will form the subject matter of the talk. (author)

  3. Density Functional Theory and Materials Modeling at Atomistic Length Scales

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Swapan K. Ghosh

    2002-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: We discuss the basic concepts of density functional theory (DFT as applied to materials modeling in the microscopic, mesoscopic and macroscopic length scales. The picture that emerges is that of a single unified framework for the study of both quantum and classical systems. While for quantum DFT, the central equation is a one-particle Schrodinger-like Kohn-Sham equation, the classical DFT consists of Boltzmann type distributions, both corresponding to a system of noninteracting particles in the field of a density-dependent effective potential, the exact functional form of which is unknown. One therefore approximates the exchange-correlation potential for quantum systems and the excess free energy density functional or the direct correlation functions for classical systems. Illustrative applications of quantum DFT to microscopic modeling of molecular interaction and that of classical DFT to a mesoscopic modeling of soft condensed matter systems are highlighted.

  4. Characteristic length scale of input data in distributed models: implications for modeling grid size

    Science.gov (United States)

    Artan, G. A.; Neale, C. M. U.; Tarboton, D. G.

    2000-01-01

    The appropriate spatial scale for a distributed energy balance model was investigated by: (a) determining the scale of variability associated with the remotely sensed and GIS-generated model input data; and (b) examining the effects of input data spatial aggregation on model response. The semi-variogram and the characteristic length calculated from the spatial autocorrelation were used to determine the scale of variability of the remotely sensed and GIS-generated model input data. The data were collected from two hillsides at Upper Sheep Creek, a sub-basin of the Reynolds Creek Experimental Watershed, in southwest Idaho. The data were analyzed in terms of the semivariance and the integral of the autocorrelation. The minimum characteristic length associated with the variability of the data used in the analysis was 15 m. Simulated and observed radiometric surface temperature fields at different spatial resolutions were compared. The correlation between agreement simulated and observed fields sharply declined after a 10×10 m2 modeling grid size. A modeling grid size of about 10×10 m2 was deemed to be the best compromise to achieve: (a) reduction of computation time and the size of the support data; and (b) a reproduction of the observed radiometric surface temperature.

  5. Characteristic length scale of input data in distributed models: implications for modeling grain size

    Science.gov (United States)

    Artan, Guleid A.; Neale, C. M. U.; Tarboton, D. G.

    2000-01-01

    The appropriate spatial scale for a distributed energy balance model was investigated by: (a) determining the scale of variability associated with the remotely sensed and GIS-generated model input data; and (b) examining the effects of input data spatial aggregation on model response. The semi-variogram and the characteristic length calculated from the spatial autocorrelation were used to determine the scale of variability of the remotely sensed and GIS-generated model input data. The data were collected from two hillsides at Upper Sheep Creek, a sub-basin of the Reynolds Creek Experimental Watershed, in southwest Idaho. The data were analyzed in terms of the semivariance and the integral of the autocorrelation. The minimum characteristic length associated with the variability of the data used in the analysis was 15 m. Simulated and observed radiometric surface temperature fields at different spatial resolutions were compared. The correlation between agreement simulated and observed fields sharply declined after a 10×10 m2 modeling grid size. A modeling grid size of about 10×10 m2 was deemed to be the best compromise to achieve: (a) reduction of computation time and the size of the support data; and (b) a reproduction of the observed radiometric surface temperature.

  6. Analytic determination of dynamical and mosaic length scales in a Kac glass model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Franz, S [Abdus Salam ICTP, Strada Costiera 11, PO Box 586, I-34100 Trieste (Italy); Montanari, A [Isaac Newton Institute for Mathematical Sciences 20 Clarkson Road, Cambridge, CB3 0EH (United Kingdom)

    2007-03-16

    We consider a disordered spin model with multi-spin interactions undergoing a glass transition. We introduce dynamic and static length scales and compute them in the Kac limit (long-but-finite range interactions). They diverge at the dynamic and static phase transition with exponents -1/4 and -1 (respectively). The two length scales are approximately equal well above the mode coupling transition. Their discrepancy increases rapidly as this transition is approached. We argue that this signals a crossover from mode coupling to activated dynamics. (fast track communication)

  7. Lower Length Scale Model Development for Embrittlement of Reactor Presure Vessel Steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Yongfeng [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Schwen, Daniel [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Chakraborty, Pritam [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Bai, Xianming [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2016-09-01

    This report summarizes the lower-length-scale effort during FY 2016 in developing mesoscale capabilities for microstructure evolution, plasticity and fracture in reactor pressure vessel steels. During operation, reactor pressure vessels are subject to hardening and embrittlement caused by irradiation induced defect accumulation and irradiation enhanced solute precipitation. Both defect production and solute precipitation start from the atomic scale, and manifest their eventual effects as degradation in engineering scale properties. To predict the property degradation, multiscale modeling and simulation are needed to deal with the microstructure evolution, and to link the microstructure feature to material properties. In this report, the development of mesoscale capabilities for defect accumulation and solute precipitation are summarized. A crystal plasticity model to capture defect-dislocation interaction and a damage model for cleavage micro-crack propagation is also provided.

  8. Length scale effects and multiscale modeling of thermally induced phase transformation kinetics in NiTi SMA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frantziskonis, George N.; Gur, Sourav

    2017-06-01

    Thermally induced phase transformation in NiTi shape memory alloys (SMAs) shows strong size and shape, collectively termed length scale effects, at the nano to micrometer scales, and that has important implications for the design and use of devices and structures at such scales. This paper, based on a recently developed multiscale model that utilizes molecular dynamics (MDs) simulations at small scales and MD-verified phase field (PhF) simulations at larger scales, reports results on specific length scale effects, i.e. length scale effects in martensite phase fraction (MPF) evolution, transformation temperatures (martensite and austenite start and finish) and in the thermally cyclic transformation between austenitic and martensitic phase. The multiscale study identifies saturation points for length scale effects and studies, for the first time, the length scale effect on the kinetics (i.e. developed internal strains) in the B19‧ phase during phase transformation. The major part of the work addresses small scale single crystals in specific orientations. However, the multiscale method is used in a unique and novel way to indirectly study length scale and grain size effects on evolution kinetics in polycrystalline NiTi, and to compare the simulation results to experiments. The interplay of the grain size and the length scale effect on the thermally induced MPF evolution is also shown in this present study. Finally, the multiscale coupling results are employed to improve phenomenological material models for NiTi SMA.

  9. Evaluating the accuracy of finite element models at reduced length scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kemp, Connor

    Finite element models are used frequently in both engineering and scientific research. While they can provide useful information as to the performance of materials, as length scales are decreased more sophisticated model descriptions are required. It is also important to develop methods by which existing models may be verified against experimental findings. The present study evaluates the ability of various finite element models to predict materials behaviour at length scales ranging from several microns to tens of nanometers. Considering this motivation, this thesis is provided in manuscript form with the bulk of material coming from two case studies. Following an overview of relevant literature in Chapter 2, Chapter 3 considers the nucleation of delta-zirconium hydrides in a Zircaloy-2 matrix. Zirconium hydrides are an important topic in the nuclear industry as they form a brittle phase which leads to delayed hydride cracking during reactor start-up and shut-down. Several FE models are used to compare present results with literature findings and illustrate the weaknesses of standard FE approaches. It is shown that standard continuum techniques do not sufficiently capture the interfacial effects of an inclusion-matrix system. By using nano-scale material descriptions, nucleation lattice strains are obtained which are in good agreement with previous experimental studies. The motivation for Chapter 4 stems from a recognized need to develop a method for modeling corrosion behaviour of materials. Corrosion is also an issue for reactor design and an ability to predict failure points is needed. Finite element models could be used for this purpose, provided model accuracy is verified first. In Chapter 4 a technique is developed which facilitates the extraction of sub-micron resolution strain data from correlation images obtained during in-situ tensile deformation. By comparing image correlation results with a crystal plasticity finite element code it is found that good

  10. On the performance of a generic length scale turbulence model within an adaptive finite element ocean model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Jon; Piggott, M. D.; Ham, David A.; Popova, E. E.; Srokosz, M. A.

    2012-10-01

    Research into the use of unstructured mesh methods for ocean modelling has been growing steadily in the last few years. One advantage of using unstructured meshes is that one can concentrate resolution where it is needed. In addition, dynamic adaptive mesh optimisation (DAMO) strategies allow resolution to be concentrated when this is required. Despite the advantage that DAMO gives in terms of improving the spatial resolution where and when required, small-scale turbulence in the oceans still requires parameterisation. A two-equation, generic length scale (GLS) turbulence model (one equation for turbulent kinetic energy and another for a generic turbulence length-scale quantity) adds this parameterisation and can be used in conjunction with adaptive mesh techniques. In this paper, an implementation of the GLS turbulence parameterisation is detailed in a non-hydrostatic, finite-element, unstructured mesh ocean model, Fluidity-ICOM. The implementation is validated by comparing to both a laboratory-scale experiment and real-world observations, on both fixed and adaptive meshes. The model performs well, matching laboratory and observed data, with resolution being adjusted as necessary by DAMO. Flexibility in the prognostic fields used to construct the error metric used in DAMO is required to ensure best performance. Moreover, the adaptive mesh models perform as well as fixed mesh models in terms of root mean square error to observation or theoretical mixed layer depths, but uses fewer elements and hence has a reduced computational cost.

  11. Motion of nanoprobes in complex liquids within the framework of the length-scale dependent viscosity model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalwarczyk, Tomasz; Sozanski, Krzysztof; Ochab-Marcinek, Anna; Szymanski, Jedrzej; Tabaka, Marcin; Hou, Sen; Holyst, Robert

    2015-09-01

    This paper deals with the recent phenomenological model of the motion of nanoscopic objects (colloidal particles, proteins, nanoparticles, molecules) in complex liquids. We analysed motion in polymer, micellar, colloidal and protein solutions and the cytoplasm of living cells using the length-scale dependent viscosity model. Viscosity monotonically approaches macroscopic viscosity as the size of the object increases and thus gives a single, coherent picture of motion at the nano and macro scale. The model includes interparticle interactions (solvent-solute), temperature and the internal structure of a complex liquid. The depletion layer ubiquitously occurring in complex liquids is also incorporated into the model. We also discuss the biological aspects of crowding in terms of the length-scale dependent viscosity model. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Modelling of multiple short-length-scale stall cells in an axial compressor using evolved GMDH neural networks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amanifard, N.; Nariman-Zadeh, N.; Farahani, M.H.; Khalkhali, A.

    2008-01-01

    Over the past 15 years there have been several research efforts to capture the stall inception nature in axial flow compressors. However previous analytical models could not explain the formation of short-length-scale stall cells. This paper provides a new model based on evolved GMDH neural network for transient evolution of multiple short-length-scale stall cells in an axial compressor. Genetic Algorithms (GAs) are also employed for optimal design of connectivity configuration of such GMDH-type neural networks. In this way, low-pass filter (LPF) pressure trace near the rotor leading edge is modelled with respect to the variation of pressure coefficient, flow rate coefficient, and number of rotor rotations which are defined as inputs

  13. Reduced 3d modeling on injection schemes for laser wakefield acceleration at plasma scale lengths

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helm, Anton; Vieira, Jorge; Silva, Luis; Fonseca, Ricardo

    2017-10-01

    Current modelling techniques for laser wakefield acceleration (LWFA) are based on particle-in-cell (PIC) codes which are computationally demanding. In PIC simulations the laser wavelength λ0, in μm-range, has to be resolved over the acceleration lengths in meter-range. A promising approach is the ponderomotive guiding center solver (PGC) by only considering the laser envelope for laser pulse propagation. Therefore only the plasma skin depth λp has to be resolved, leading to speedups of (λp /λ0) 2. This allows to perform a wide-range of parameter studies and use it for λ0 Tecnologia (FCT), Portugal, through Grant No. PTDC/FIS-PLA/2940/2014 and PD/BD/105882/2014.

  14. Minimal Length Scale Scenarios for Quantum Gravity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hossenfelder, Sabine

    2013-01-01

    We review the question of whether the fundamental laws of nature limit our ability to probe arbitrarily short distances. First, we examine what insights can be gained from thought experiments for probes of shortest distances, and summarize what can be learned from different approaches to a theory of quantum gravity. Then we discuss some models that have been developed to implement a minimal length scale in quantum mechanics and quantum field theory. These models have entered the literature as the generalized uncertainty principle or the modified dispersion relation, and have allowed the study of the effects of a minimal length scale in quantum mechanics, quantum electrodynamics, thermodynamics, black-hole physics and cosmology. Finally, we touch upon the question of ways to circumvent the manifestation of a minimal length scale in short-distance physics.

  15. Minimal Length Scale Scenarios for Quantum Gravity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabine Hossenfelder

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We review the question of whether the fundamental laws of nature limit our ability to probe arbitrarily short distances. First, we examine what insights can be gained from thought experiments for probes of shortest distances, and summarize what can be learned from different approaches to a theory of quantum gravity. Then we discuss some models that have been developed to implement a minimal length scale in quantum mechanics and quantum field theory. These models have entered the literature as the generalized uncertainty principle or the modified dispersion relation, and have allowed the study of the effects of a minimal length scale in quantum mechanics, quantum electrodynamics, thermodynamics, black-hole physics and cosmology. Finally, we touch upon the question of ways to circumvent the manifestation of a minimal length scale in short-distance physics.

  16. Calibration of Eringen's small length scale coefficient for initially stressed vibrating nonlocal Euler beams based on microstructured beam model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, C M; Zhang, Z; Challamel, N; Duan, W H

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, we calibrate Eringen's small length scale coefficient e 0 for an initially stressed vibrating nonlocal Euler beam via a microstructured beam modelled by some repetitive cells comprising finite rigid segments and elastic rotational springs. By adopting the pseudo-differential operator and Padé's approximation, an analytical solution for the vibration frequency in terms of initial stress may be developed for the microstructured beam model. When comparing this analytical solution with the established exact vibration solution from the nonlocal beam theory, one finds that the calibrated Eringen's small length scale coefficient e 0 is given by e 0 = √(1/6)-(1/12)(σ 0 /σ-breve m ) where σ 0 is the initial stress and σ-breve m is the mth mode buckling stress of the corresponding local Euler beam. It is shown that e 0 varies with respect to the initial axial stress, from 1/√(12)∼0.289 at the buckling compressive stress to 1/√6∼0.408 when the axial stress is zero and it monotonically increases with increasing initial tensile stress. The small length scale coefficient e 0 , however, does not depend on the vibration/buckling mode considered. (paper)

  17. Mixing lengths scaling in a gravity flow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ecke, Robert E [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Rivera, Micheal [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Chen, Jun [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Ecke, Robert E [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2009-01-01

    We present an experimental study of the mixing processes in a gravity current. The turbulent transport of momentum and buoyancy can be described in a very direct and compact form by a Prandtl mixing length model [1]: the turbulent vertical fluxes of momentum and buoyancy are found to scale quadraticatly with the vertical mean gradients of velocity and density. The scaling coefficient is the square of the mixing length, approximately constant over the mixing zone of the stratified shear layer. We show in this paper how, in different flow configurations, this length can be related to the shear length of the flow {radical}({var_epsilon}/{partial_derivative}{sub z}u{sup 3}).

  18. Length-scales of Slab-induced Asthenospheric Deformation from Geodynamic Modeling, Mantle Deformation Fabric, and Synthetic Shear Wave Splitting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jadamec, M. A.; MacDougall, J.; Fischer, K. M.

    2017-12-01

    The viscosity structure of the Earth's interior is critically important, because it places a first order constraint on plate motion and mantle flow rates. Geodynamic models using a composite viscosity based on experimentally derived flow laws for olivine aggregates show that lateral viscosity variations emerge in the upper mantle due to the subduction dynamics. However, the length-scale of this transition is still not well understood. Two-dimensional numerical models of subduction are presented that investigate the effect of initial slab dip, maximum yield stress (slab strength), and viscosity formulation (Newtonian versus composite) on the emergent lateral viscosity variations in the upper-mantle and magnitude of slab-driven mantle flow velocity. Significant viscosity reductions occur in regions of large flow velocity gradients due to the weakening effect of the dislocation creep deformation mechanism. The dynamic reductions in asthenospheric viscosity (less than 1018 Pa s) occur within approximately 500 km from driving force of the slab, with peak flow velocities occurring in models with a lower yield stress (weaker slab) and higher stress exponent. This leads to a sharper definition of the rheological base of the lithosphere and implies lateral variability in tractions along the base of the lithosphere. As the dislocation creep mechanism also leads to mantle deformation fabric, we then examine the spatial variation in the LPO development in the asthenosphere and calculate synthetic shear wave splitting. The models show that olivine LPO fabric in the asthenosphere generally increases in alignment strength with increased proximity to the slab, but can be transient and spatially variable on small length scales. The vertical flow fields surrounding the slab tip can produce shear-wave splitting variations with back-azimuth that deviate from the predictions of uniform trench-normal anisotropy, a result that bears on the interpretation of complexity in shear

  19. Topographical length scales of hierarchical superhydrophobic surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dhillon, P.K. [Department of Physics, Indian Institute of Technology Ropar, Nangal Road, Rupnagar, Punjab 140001 (India); Brown, P.S.; Bain, C.D.; Badyal, J.P.S. [Department of Chemistry, Science Laboratories, Durham University, Durham DH1 3LE, England (United Kingdom); Sarkar, S., E-mail: sarkar@iitrpr.ac.in [Department of Physics, Indian Institute of Technology Ropar, Nangal Road, Rupnagar, Punjab 140001 (India)

    2014-10-30

    Highlights: • Hydrophobic CF{sub 4} plasma fluorinated polybutadiene surfaces has been characterised using AFM. • Micro, Nano, and Micro + Nano topographies generated by altering plasma power and duration. • Dynamic scaling theory and FFT analysis used to characterize these surfaces quantitatively. • Roughnesses are different for different length scales of the surfaces considered. • Highest local roughness obtained from scaling analysis for shorter length scales of about 500 nm explains the superhydrophobicity for the Micro + Nano surface. - Abstract: The morphology of hydrophobic CF{sub 4} plasma fluorinated polybutadiene surfaces has been characterised using atomic force microscopy (AFM). Judicious choice of the plasma power and exposure duration leads to formation of three different surface morphologies (Micro, Nano, and Micro + Nano). Scaling theory analysis shows that for all three surface topographies, there is an initial increase in roughness with length scale followed by a levelling-off to a saturation level. At length scales around 500 nm, it is found that the roughness is very similar for all three types of surfaces, and the saturation roughness value for the Micro + Nano morphology is found to be intermediate between those for the Micro and Nano surfaces. Fast Fourier Transform (FFT) analysis has shown that the Micro + Nano topography comprises a hierarchical superposition of Micro and Nano morphologies. Furthermore, the Micro + Nano surfaces display the highest local roughness (roughness exponent α = 0.42 for length scales shorter than ∼500 nm), which helps to explain their superhydrophobic behaviour (large water contact angle (>170°) and low hysteresis (<1°))

  20. Length-scale dependent phonon interactions

    CERN Document Server

    Srivastava, Gyaneshwar

    2014-01-01

    This book presents  a comprehensive description of phonons and their interactions in systems with different dimensions and length scales. Internationally-recognized leaders describe theories and measurements of phonon interactions  in relation to the design of materials with exotic properties such as metamaterials, nano-mechanical systems, next-generation electronic, photonic, and acoustic devices, energy harvesting, optical information storage, and applications of phonon lasers in a variety of fields. The emergence of techniques for control of semiconductor properties and geometry has enabled engineers to design structures in which functionality is derived from controlling electron behavior. As manufacturing techniques have greatly expanded the list of available materials and the range of attainable length scales, similar opportunities now exist for designing devices whose functionality is derived from controlling phonon behavior. However, progress in this area is hampered by gaps in our knowledge of phono...

  1. Determining multiple length scales in rocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Yi-Qiao; Ryu, Seungoh; Sen, Pabitra N.

    2000-07-01

    Carbonate reservoirs in the Middle East are believed to contain about half of the world's oil. The processes of sedimentation and diagenesis produce in carbonate rocks microporous grains and a wide range of pore sizes, resulting in a complex spatial distribution of pores and pore connectivity. This heterogeneity makes it difficult to determine by conventional techniques the characteristic pore-length scales, which control fluid transport properties. Here we present a bulk-measurement technique that is non-destructive and capable of extracting multiple length scales from carbonate rocks. The technique uses nuclear magnetic resonance to exploit the spatially varying magnetic field inside the pore space itself-a `fingerprint' of the pore structure. We found three primary length scales (1-100µm) in the Middle-East carbonate rocks and determined that the pores are well connected and spatially mixed. Such information is critical for reliably estimating the amount of capillary-bound water in the rock, which is important for efficient oil production. This method might also be used to complement other techniques for the study of shaly sand reservoirs and compartmentalization in cells and tissues.

  2. Large-scale collection and annotation of full-length enriched cDNAs from a model halophyte, Thellungiella halophila

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seki Motoaki

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Thellungiella halophila (also known as Thellungiella salsuginea is a model halophyte with a small plant size, short life cycle, and small genome. It easily undergoes genetic transformation by the floral dipping method used with its close relative, Arabidopsis thaliana. Thellungiella genes exhibit high sequence identity (approximately 90% at the cDNA level with Arabidopsis genes. Furthermore, Thellungiella not only shows tolerance to extreme salinity stress, but also to chilling, freezing, and ozone stress, supporting the use of Thellungiella as a good genomic resource in studies of abiotic stress tolerance. Results We constructed a full-length enriched Thellungiella (Shan Dong ecotype cDNA library from various tissues and whole plants subjected to environmental stresses, including high salinity, chilling, freezing, and abscisic acid treatment. We randomly selected about 20 000 clones and sequenced them from both ends to obtain a total of 35 171 sequences. CAP3 software was used to assemble the sequences and cluster them into 9569 nonredundant cDNA groups. We named these cDNAs "RTFL" (RIKEN Thellungiella Full-Length cDNAs. Information on functional domains and Gene Ontology (GO terms for the RTFL cDNAs were obtained using InterPro. The 8289 genes assigned to InterPro IDs were classified according to the GO terms using Plant GO Slim. Categorical comparison between the whole Arabidopsis genome and Thellungiella genes showing low identity to Arabidopsis genes revealed that the population of Thellungiella transport genes is approximately 1.5 times the size of the corresponding Arabidopsis genes. This suggests that these genes regulate a unique ion transportation system in Thellungiella. Conclusion As the number of Thellungiella halophila (Thellungiella salsuginea expressed sequence tags (ESTs was 9388 in July 2008, the number of ESTs has increased to approximately four times the original value as a result of this effort. Our

  3. Multi-length-scale Material Model for SiC/SiC Ceramic-Matrix Composites (CMCs): Inclusion of In-Service Environmental Effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grujicic, M.; Galgalikar, R.; Snipes, J. S.; Ramaswami, S.

    2016-01-01

    In our recent work, a multi-length-scale room-temperature material model for SiC/SiC ceramic-matrix composites (CMCs) was derived and parameterized. The model was subsequently linked with a finite-element solver so that it could be used in a general room-temperature, structural/damage analysis of gas-turbine engine CMC components. Due to its multi-length-scale character, the material model enabled inclusion of the effects of fiber/tow (e.g., the volume fraction, size, and properties of the fibers; fiber-coating material/thickness; decohesion properties of the coating/matrix interfaces; etc.) and ply/lamina (e.g., the 0°/90° cross-ply versus plain-weave architectures, the extent of tow crimping in the case of the plain-weave plies, cohesive properties of the inter-ply boundaries, etc.) length-scale microstructural/architectural parameters on the mechanical response of the CMCs. One of the major limitations of the model is that it applies to the CMCs in their as-fabricated conditions (i.e., the effect of prolonged in-service environmental exposure and the associated material aging-degradation is not accounted for). In the present work, the model is upgraded to include such in-service environmental-exposure effects. To demonstrate the utility of the upgraded material model, it is used within a finite-element structural/failure analysis involving impact of a toboggan-shaped turbine shroud segment by a foreign object. The results obtained clearly revealed the effects that different aspects of the in-service environmental exposure have on the material degradation and the extent of damage suffered by the impacted CMC toboggan-shaped shroud segment.

  4. Overview of lower length scale model development for accident tolerant fuels regarding U3Si2 fuel and FeCrAl cladding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Yongfeng [Idaho National Laboratory

    2016-09-01

    U3Si2 and FeCrAl have been proposed as fuel and cladding concepts, respectively, for accident tolerance fuels with higher tolerance to accident scenarios compared to UO2. However, a lot of key physics and material properties regarding their in-pile performance are yet to be explored. To accelerate the understanding and reduce the cost of experimental studies, multiscale modeling and simulation are used to develop physics-based materials models to assist engineering scale fuel performance modeling. In this report, the lower-length-scale efforts in method and material model development supported by the Accident Tolerance Fuel (ATF) high-impact-problem (HIP) under the NEAMS program are summarized. Significant progresses have been made regarding interatomic potential, phase field models for phase decomposition and gas bubble formation, and thermal conductivity for U3Si2 fuel, and precipitation in FeCrAl cladding. The accomplishments are very useful by providing atomistic and mesoscale tools, improving the current understanding, and delivering engineering scale models for these two ATF concepts.

  5. Interplay between multiple length and time scales in complex ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Administrator

    micelles and enzymes, can span several orders of magnitude in length and time scales. The length and time scales of ... length and time scales is required in order to understand and predict structure and dynamics in such com- plex systems. This review .... The late 1980s saw the birth of femtochemistry with Ahmed Zewail ...

  6. A dual length scale method for plane-wave-based, simulation studies of chemical systems modeled using mixed ab initio/empirical force field descriptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yarne, Dawn A.; Tuckerman, Mark E.; Martyna, Glenn J.

    2001-08-01

    Mixed ab initio/empirical force-field simulation studies, calculations in which one part of the system is treated using a fully ab initio description and another part is treated using an empirical description, are becoming increasingly popular. Here, the ability of the commonly used, plane wave-based generalized gradient approximation to density functional theory is extended to model systems in which the electrons are assumed to be localized in a single small region of space, that is, itself, embedded within a large chemically inert bath. This is accomplished by introducing two length scales, so that the rapidly varying, short range, electron-electron and electron-atom interactions, arising from the region where the electrons are localized, can be treated using an appropriately large plane wave basis, while the corresponding, slowly varying, long range interactions of the electrons with the full system or bath, can be treated using a small basis. Briefly, a novel Cardinal B-spline based formalism is employed to derive a smooth, differentiable, and rapidly convergent (with respect to the small basis) expression for the total electronic energy, which explicitly contains the two length scales. The method allows reciprocal space based techniques designed to treat clusters, wires, surfaces and solids/liquids (open, and 1-D and 2-D periodic boundary conditions, respectively) to be utilized. Other plane wave-based "mixed" methods are restricted to clusters. The new methodology, which scales as N log N at fixed size of the chemically active region, has been implemented for parallel computing platforms and tested through applications to both model and realistic problems including an enzyme, human carbonic anhydrase II solvated in an explicit bath of water molecules.

  7. Derivation of effective fission gas diffusivities in UO2 from lower length scale simulations and implementation of fission gas diffusion models in BISON

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andersson, Anders David Ragnar [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Pastore, Giovanni [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Liu, Xiang-Yang [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Perriot, Romain Thibault [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Tonks, Michael [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Stanek, Christopher Richard [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2014-11-07

    This report summarizes the development of new fission gas diffusion models from lower length scale simulations and assessment of these models in terms of annealing experiments and fission gas release simulations using the BISON fuel performance code. Based on the mechanisms established from density functional theory (DFT) and empirical potential calculations, continuum models for diffusion of xenon (Xe) in UO2 were derived for both intrinsic conditions and under irradiation. The importance of the large XeU3O cluster (a Xe atom in a uranium + oxygen vacancy trap site with two bound uranium vacancies) is emphasized, which is a consequence of its high mobility and stability. These models were implemented in the MARMOT phase field code, which is used to calculate effective Xe diffusivities for various irradiation conditions. The effective diffusivities were used in BISON to calculate fission gas release for a number of test cases. The results are assessed against experimental data and future directions for research are outlined based on the conclusions.

  8. Progress in Long Scale Length Laser-Plasma Interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glenzer, S H; Arnold, P; Bardsley, G; Berger, R L; Bonanno, G; Borger, T; Bower, D E; Bowers, M; Bryant, R; Buckman, S.; Burkhart, S C; Campbell, K; Chrisp, M P; Cohen, B I; Constantin, G; Cooper, F; Cox, J; Dewald, E; Divol, L; Dixit, S; Duncan, J; Eder, D; Edwards, J; Erbert, G; Felker, B; Fornes, J; Frieders, G; Froula, D H; Gardner, S D; Gates, C; Gonzalez, M; Grace, S; Gregori, G; Greenwood, A; Griffith, R; Hall, T; Hammel, B A; Haynam, C; Heestand, G; Henesian, M; Hermes, G; Hinkel, D; Holder, J; Holdner, F; Holtmeier, G; Hsing, W; Huber, S; James, T; Johnson, S; Jones, O S; Kalantar, D; Kamperschroer, J H; Kauffman, R; Kelleher, T; Knight, J; Kirkwood, R K; Kruer, W L; Labiak, W; Landen, O L; Langdon, A B; Langer, S; Latray, D; Lee, A; Lee, F D; Lund, D; MacGowan, B; Marshall, S; McBride, J; McCarville, T; McGrew, L; Mackinnon, A J; Mahavandi, S; Manes, K; Marshall, C; Mertens, E; Meezan, N; Miller, G; Montelongo, S; Moody, J D; Moses, E; Munro, D; Murray, J; Neumann, J; Newton, M; Ng, E; Niemann, C; Nikitin, A; Opsahl, P; Padilla, E; Parham, T; Parrish, G; Petty, C; Polk, M; Powell, C; Reinbachs, I; Rekow, V; Rinnert, R; Riordan, B; Rhodes, M.

    2003-01-01

    The first experiments on the National Ignition Facility (NIF) have employed the first four beams to measure propagation and laser backscattering losses in large ignition-size plasmas. Gas-filled targets between 2 mm and 7 mm length have been heated from one side by overlapping the focal spots of the four beams from one quad operated at 351 nm (3ω) with a total intensity of 2 x 10 15 W cm -2 . The targets were filled with 1 atm of CO 2 producing of up to 7 mm long homogeneously heated plasmas with densities of n e = 6 x 10 20 cm -3 and temperatures of T e = 2 keV. The high energy in a NIF quad of beams of 16kJ, illuminating the target from one direction, creates unique conditions for the study of laser plasma interactions at scale lengths not previously accessible. The propagation through the large-scale plasma was measured with a gated x-ray imager that was filtered for 3.5 keV x rays. These data indicate that the beams interact with the full length of this ignition-scale plasma during the last ∼1 ns of the experiment. During that time, the full aperture measurements of the stimulated Brillouin scattering and stimulated Raman scattering show scattering into the four focusing lenses of 6% for the smallest length (∼2 mm). increasing to 12% for ∼7 mm. These results demonstrate the NIF experimental capabilities and further provide a benchmark for three-dimensional modeling of the laser-plasma interactions at ignition-size scale lengths

  9. Progress in long scale length laser plasma interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glenzer, S. H.; Arnold, P.; Bardsley, G.; Berger, R. L.; Bonanno, G.; Borger, T.; Bower, D. E.; Bowers, M.; Bryant, R.; Buckman, S.; Burkhart, S. C.; Campbell, K.; Chrisp, M. P.; Cohen, B. I.; Constantin, C.; Cooper, F.; Cox, J.; Dewald, E.; Divol, L.; Dixit, S.; Duncan, J.; Eder, D.; Edwards, J.; Erbert, G.; Felker, B.; Fornes, J.; Frieders, G.; Froula, D. H.; Gardner, S. D.; Gates, C.; Gonzalez, M.; Grace, S.; Gregori, G.; Greenwood, A.; Griffith, R.; Hall, T.; Hammel, B. A.; Haynam, C.; Heestand, G.; Henesian, M.; Hermes, G.; Hinkel, D.; Holder, J.; Holdner, F.; Holtmeier, G.; Hsing, W.; Huber, S.; James, T.; Johnson, S.; Jones, O. S.; Kalantar, D.; Kamperschroer, J. H.; Kauffman, R.; Kelleher, T.; Knight, J.; Kirkwood, R. K.; Kruer, W. L.; Labiak, W.; Landen, O. L.; Langdon, A. B.; Langer, S.; Latray, D.; Lee, A.; Lee, F. D.; Lund, D.; MacGowan, B.; Marshall, S.; McBride, J.; McCarville, T.; McGrew, L.; Mackinnon, A. J.; Mahavandi, S.; Manes, K.; Marshall, C.; Menapace, J.; Mertens, E.; Meezan, N.; Miller, G.; Montelongo, S.; Moody, J. D.; Moses, E.; Munro, D.; Murray, J.; Neumann, J.; Newton, M.; Ng, E.; Niemann, C.; Nikitin, A.; Opsahl, P.; Padilla, E.; Parham, T.; Parrish, G.; Petty, C.; Polk, M.; Powell, C.; Reinbachs, I.; Rekow, V.; Rinnert, R.; Riordan, B.; Rhodes, M.; Roberts, V.; Robey, H.; Ross, G.; Sailors, S.; Saunders, R.; Schmitt, M.; Schneider, M. B.; Shiromizu, S.; Spaeth, M.; Stephens, A.; Still, B.; Suter, L. J.; Tietbohl, G.; Tobin, M.; Tuck, J.; Van Wonterghem, B. M.; Vidal, R.; Voloshin, D.; Wallace, R.; Wegner, P.; Whitman, P.; Williams, E. A.; Williams, K.; Winward, K.; Work, K.; Young, B.; Young, P. E.; Zapata, P.; Bahr, R. E.; Seka, W.; Fernandez, J.; Montgomery, D.; Rose, H.

    2004-12-01

    The first experiments on the National Ignition Facility (NIF) have employed the first four beams to measure propagation and laser backscattering losses in large ignition-size plasmas. Gas-filled targets between 2 and 7 mm length have been heated from one side by overlapping the focal spots of the four beams from one quad operated at 351 nm (3ω) with a total intensity of 2 × 1015 W cm-2. The targets were filled with 1 atm of CO2 producing up to 7 mm long homogeneously heated plasmas with densities of ne = 6 × 1020 cm-3 and temperatures of Te = 2 keV. The high energy in an NIF quad of beams of 16 kJ, illuminating the target from one direction, creates unique conditions for the study of laser-plasma interactions at scale lengths not previously accessible. The propagation through the large-scale plasma was measured with a gated x-ray imager that was filtered for 3.5 keV x-rays. These data indicate that the beams interact with the full length of this ignition-scale plasma during the last ~1 ns of the experiment. During that time, the full aperture measurements of the stimulated Brillouin scattering and stimulated Raman scattering show scattering into the four focusing lenses of 3% for the smallest length (~2 mm), increasing to 10-12% for ~7 mm. These results demonstrate the NIF experimental capabilities and further provide a benchmark for three-dimensional modelling of the laser-plasma interactions at ignition-size scale lengths.

  10. Optimal smoothing length scale for actuator line models of wind turbine blades based on Gaussian body force distribution: Wind energy, actuator line model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martínez-Tossas, L. A. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore 21218 MD USA; Churchfield, M. J. [National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Golden 80401 CO USA; Meneveau, C. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore 21218 MD USA

    2017-01-20

    The actuator line model (ALM) is a commonly used method to represent lifting surfaces such as wind turbine blades within large-eddy simulations (LES). In the ALM, the lift and drag forces are replaced by an imposed body force that is typically smoothed over several grid points using a Gaussian kernel with some prescribed smoothing width e. To date, the choice of e has most often been based on numerical considerations related to the grid spacing used in LES. However, especially for finely resolved LES with grid spacings on the order of or smaller than the chord length of the blade, the best choice of e is not known. In this work, a theoretical approach is followed to determine the most suitable value of e, based on an analytical solution to the linearized inviscid flow response to a Gaussian force. We find that the optimal smoothing width eopt is on the order of 14%-25% of the chord length of the blade, and the center of force is located at about 13%-26% downstream of the leading edge of the blade for the cases considered. These optimal values do not depend on angle of attack and depend only weakly on the type of lifting surface. It is then shown that an even more realistic velocity field can be induced by a 2-D elliptical Gaussian lift-force kernel. Some results are also provided regarding drag force representation.

  11. Length Scales in Bayesian Automatic Adaptive Quadrature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam Gh.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Two conceptual developments in the Bayesian automatic adaptive quadrature approach to the numerical solution of one-dimensional Riemann integrals [Gh. Adam, S. Adam, Springer LNCS 7125, 1–16 (2012] are reported. First, it is shown that the numerical quadrature which avoids the overcomputing and minimizes the hidden floating point loss of precision asks for the consideration of three classes of integration domain lengths endowed with specific quadrature sums: microscopic (trapezoidal rule, mesoscopic (Simpson rule, and macroscopic (quadrature sums of high algebraic degrees of precision. Second, sensitive diagnostic tools for the Bayesian inference on macroscopic ranges, coming from the use of Clenshaw-Curtis quadrature, are derived.

  12. Length Scales in Bayesian Automatic Adaptive Quadrature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adam, Gh.; Adam, S.

    2016-02-01

    Two conceptual developments in the Bayesian automatic adaptive quadrature approach to the numerical solution of one-dimensional Riemann integrals [Gh. Adam, S. Adam, Springer LNCS 7125, 1-16 (2012)] are reported. First, it is shown that the numerical quadrature which avoids the overcomputing and minimizes the hidden floating point loss of precision asks for the consideration of three classes of integration domain lengths endowed with specific quadrature sums: microscopic (trapezoidal rule), mesoscopic (Simpson rule), and macroscopic (quadrature sums of high algebraic degrees of precision). Second, sensitive diagnostic tools for the Bayesian inference on macroscopic ranges, coming from the use of Clenshaw-Curtis quadrature, are derived.

  13. Scale Length of the Galactic Thin Disk

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    tribpo

    the new value of hR. The model fit with data is not, however, completely satisfactory in J-KS, which might be improved by a slight change of SFR history in the model. One expects that the Galactic evolution parameters will be better known after the analysis of the Hipparcos and Tycho catalogues. The Besancon model is in a.

  14. Length scales for the Navier-Stokes equations on a rotating sphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kyrychko, Yuliya N.; Bartuccelli, Michele V.

    2004-01-01

    In this Letter we obtain the dissipative length scale for the Navier-Stokes equations on a two-dimensional rotating sphere S 2 . This system is a fundamental model of the large scale atmospheric dynamics. Using the equations of motion in their vorticity form, we construct the ladder inequalities from which a set of time-averaged length scales is obtained

  15. Reducing the item number to obtain the same-length self-assessment scales: a systematic approach using result of graphical loglinear rasch models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Tine; Kreiner, Svend

    2011-01-01

    . For self-assessment, self-scoring and self-interpretational purposes it is deemed prudent that subscales measuring comparable constructs are of the same item length. Consequently, in order to obtain a self-assessment version of the R-D-LSI with an equal number of items in each subscale, a systematic...... approach to item reduction based on results of graphical loglinear Rasch modeling (GLLRM) was designed. This approach was then used to reduce the number of items in the subscales of the R-D-LSI which had an item-length of more than seven items, thereby obtaining the Danish Self-Assessment Learning Styles...

  16. Interaction of turbulent length scales with wind turbine blades

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres-Nieves, Sheilla N.

    0.55delta95) and, even, very-large scales (r ≤ 11delta95). This observation is even more evident when additional levels of turbulence are present in the free-stream. Again, the complex dynamics between the length scales of the flow, observed in the study of the flow over the S809 wind turbine blade, are confirmed here. In general, all of the external conditions analyzed have an impact on the largest and more energized scales of the flow. Therefore, free-stream turbulence and surface roughness should be taken into account when modeling the flow over wind turbine blades. This will certainly reduce the uncertainties and inaccuracies that currently result from the modeling, specially under separated flow conditions, due to the exclusion of free-stream turbulence from the analysis.

  17. On transition in plasma turbulence with multiple scale lengths

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Itoh, K.; Spineanu, F.; Vlad, M.O. [National Inst. for Fusion Science, Toki, Gifu (Japan); Itoh, S.-I.; Kawasaki, M. [Kyushu Univ., Research Institute for Applied Mechanics, Kasuga, Fukuoka (Japan)

    2003-05-01

    A statistical theory of plasma turbulence which is composed of multiple-scale fluctuations is examined. Influences of statistical noise and variance of rapidly-changing variable in an adiabatic approximation are investigated. It is confirmed that the contributions of noise and variance remain higher order corrections. Transition rate of the turbulence with multiple scale lengths is obtained under the refined adiabatic approximation. (author)

  18. Critical length scales for flow phenomena in liquid metal batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelley, Douglas; Weier, Tom

    2017-11-01

    Liquid metal batteries, a new technology for grid-scale energy storage, are composed of three liquid layers and therefore subject to a wide variety of fluid dynamical phenomena, both beneficial and detrimental. Some, like thermal convection and electrovortex flow, drive finite flow regardless of the size, current density, and temperature of the battery. Others, like the Tayler instability and the metal pad instability, occur only in certain parameter regimes - almost always dependent on length scale. I will discuss critical length scales, considering implications for battery design in light of fundamental fluid dynamics. This work was supported by the National Science Foundation under Award Number CBET-1552182.

  19. A New Universal Gas Breakdown Theory for Classical Length Scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loveless, Amanda Mae

    While Paschen's law is commonly used to predict breakdown voltage, it fails at microscale gaps when field emission becomes important. Accurate breakdown voltage predictions at microscale are even more important as electronic device dimensions decrease. Developing analytic models to accurately predict breakdown at microscale is vital for understanding the underlying physics occurring within the system and to either prevent or produce a discharge, depending on the application. We first take a pre-existing breakdown model coupling field emission and Townsend breakdown and perform a matched asymptotic analysis to obtain analytic equations for breakdown voltage in argon at atmospheric pressure. Next, we extend this model to generalize for gas and further explore the independent contributions of field emission and Townsend discharge. Finally, we present analytic expressions for breakdown voltage valid for any gas at any pressure, and discuss the modified Paschen minimum at microscale. The presented models agree well with numerical simulations and experimental data when using the field enhancement factor as a fitting parameter. The work presented in this thesis is a first step in unifying gas breakdown across length scales and breakdown mechanisms. Future work will aim to incorporate other breakdown mechanisms, such as quantum effects and space charge, to provide a more complete unified model for gas breakdown.

  20. Modelling of rate effects at multiple scales

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, R.R.; Simone, A.; Sluys, L. J.

    2008-01-01

    , the length scale in the meso-model and the macro-model can be coupled. In this fashion, a bridging of length scales can be established. A computational analysis of  a Split Hopkinson bar test at medium and high impact load is carried out at macro-scale and meso-scale including information from  the micro-scale....

  1. Maximum length scale in density based topology optimization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lazarov, Boyan Stefanov; Wang, Fengwen

    2017-01-01

    The focus of this work is on two new techniques for imposing maximum length scale in topology optimization. Restrictions on the maximum length scale provide designers with full control over the optimized structure and open possibilities to tailor the optimized design for broader range...... of manufacturing processes by fulfilling the associated technological constraints. One of the proposed methods is based on combination of several filters and builds on top of the classical density filtering which can be viewed as a low pass filter applied to the design parametrization. The main idea...

  2. Length and time scales of atmospheric moisture recycling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. J. van der Ent

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available It is difficult to quantify the degree to which terrestrial evaporation supports the occurrence of precipitation within a certain study region (i.e. regional moisture recycling due to the scale- and shape-dependence of regional moisture recycling ratios. In this paper we present a novel approach to quantify the spatial and temporal scale of moisture recycling, independent of the size and shape of the region under study. In contrast to previous studies, which essentially used curve fitting, the scaling laws presented by us follow directly from the process equation. thus allowing a fair comparison between regions and seasons. The calculation is based on ERA-Interim reanalysis data for the period 1999 to 2008. It is shown that in the tropics or in mountainous terrain the length scale of recycling can be as low as 500 to 2000 km. In temperate climates the length scale is typically between 3000 to 5000 km whereas it amounts to more than 7000 km in desert areas. The time scale of recycling ranges from 3 to 20 days, with the exception of deserts, where it is much longer. The most distinct seasonal differences can be observed over the Northern Hemisphere: in winter, moisture recycling is insignificant, whereas in summer it plays a major role in the climate. The length and time scales of atmospheric moisture recycling can be useful metrics to quantify local climatic effects of land use change.

  3. Length scales and selforganization in dense suspension flows

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Düring, G.; Lerner, E.; Wyart, M.

    2014-01-01

    Dense non-Brownian suspension flows of hard particles display mystifying properties: As the jamming threshold is approached, the viscosity diverges, as well as a length scale that can be identified from velocity correlations. To unravel the microscopic mechanism governing dissipation and its

  4. Modeling Nonreactive Molecule-Surface Systems on Experimentally Relevant Time and Length Scales: Dynamics and Conductance of Polyfluorene on Au(111).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhi; Tkatchenko, Alexandre; Franco, Ignacio

    2018-03-01

    We propose a computationally efficient strategy to accurately model nonreactive molecule-surface interactions that adapts density functional theory calculations with the Tkatchenko-Scheffler scheme for van der Waals interactions into a simple classical force field. The resulting force field requires just two adjustable parameters per atom type that are needed to capture short-range and polarization interactions. The developed strategy allows for classical molecular dynamics simulation of molecules on surfaces with the accuracy of high-level electronic structure methods but for system sizes (10 3 to 10 7 atoms) and timescales (picoseconds to microseconds) that go well beyond what can be achieved with first-principles methods. Parameters for H, sp 2 C, and O on Au(111) are developed and employed to atomistically model experiments that measure the conductance of a single polyfluorene on Au(111) as a continuous function of its length. The simulations qualitatively capture both the gross and fine features of the observed conductance decay during initial junction elongation and lead to a revised atomistic understanding of the experiment.

  5. Determination of length scale effects in nonlocal media

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Simone, A; Iacono, C; Sluys, LJ; Yao, ZH; Yuan, MW; Zhong, WX

    2004-01-01

    A combined continuous-discontinuous framework for failure is presented. Continuous failure is described with a gradient enhanced damage model and discontinuous failure is introduced by adding discontinuities to finite elements through a node-based enhancement. The continuous model contains a length

  6. Length Scale of Leidenfrost Ratchet Switches Droplet Directionality

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Agapov, Rebecca L [ORNL; Boreyko, Jonathan B [ORNL; Briggs, Dayrl P [ORNL; Srijanto, Bernadeta R [ORNL; Retterer, Scott T [ORNL; Collier, Pat [ORNL; Lavrik, Nickolay V [ORNL

    2014-01-01

    Arrays of tilted pillars with characteristic heights spanning from hundreds of nanometers to tens of micrometers were created using wafer level processing and used as Leidenfrost ratchets to control droplet directionality. Dynamic Leidenfrost droplets on the ratchets with nanoscale features were found to move in the direction of the pillar tilt while the opposite directionality was observed on the microscale ratchets. This remarkable switch in the droplet directionality can be explained by varying contributions from the two distinct mechanisms controlling droplet motion on Leidenfrost ratchets with nanoscale and microscale features. In particular, asymmetric wettability of dynamic Leidenfrost droplets upon initial impact appears to be the dominant mechanism determining their directionality on tilted nanoscale pillar arrays. By contrast, asymmetric wetting does not provide a strong enough driving force compared to the forces induced by asymmetric vapour flow on arrays of much taller tilted microscale pillars. Furthermore, asymmetric wetting plays a role only in the dynamic Leidenfrost regime, for instance when droplets repeatedly jump after their initial impact. The point of crossover between the two mechanisms coincides with the pillar heights comparable to the values of the thinnest vapor layers still capable of cushioning Leidenfrost droplets upon their initial impact. The proposed model of the length scale dependent interplay between the two mechanisms points to the previously unexplored ability to bias movement of dynamic Leidenfrost droplets and even switch their directionality.

  7. Length scale of Leidenfrost ratchet switches droplet directionality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agapov, Rebecca L; Boreyko, Jonathan B; Briggs, Dayrl P; Srijanto, Bernadeta R; Retterer, Scott T; Collier, C Patrick; Lavrik, Nickolay V

    2014-08-07

    Arrays of tilted pillars with characteristic heights spanning from hundreds of nanometers to tens of micrometers were created using wafer level processing and used as Leidenfrost ratchets to control droplet directionality. Dynamic Leidenfrost droplets on the ratchets with nanoscale features were found to move in the direction of the pillar tilt while the opposite directionality was observed on the microscale ratchets. This remarkable switch in the droplet directionality can be explained by varying contributions from the two distinct mechanisms controlling droplet motion on Leidenfrost ratchets with nanoscale and microscale features. In particular, asymmetric wettability of dynamic Leidenfrost droplets upon initial impact appears to be the dominant mechanism determining their directionality on tilted nanoscale pillar arrays. By contrast, asymmetric wetting does not provide a strong enough driving force compared to the forces induced by asymmetric vapour flow on arrays of much taller tilted microscale pillars. Furthermore, asymmetric wetting plays a role only in the dynamic Leidenfrost regime, for instance when droplets repeatedly jump after their initial impact. The point of crossover between the two mechanisms coincides with the pillar heights comparable to the values of the thinnest vapor layers still capable of cushioning Leidenfrost droplets upon their initial impact. The proposed model of the length scale dependent interplay between the two mechanisms points to the previously unexplored ability to bias movement of dynamic Leidenfrost droplets and even switch their directionality.

  8. Scattering Length Scaling Laws for Ultracold Three-Body Collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    D'Incao, J.P.; Esry, B.D.

    2005-01-01

    We present a simple and unifying picture that provides the energy and scattering length dependence for all inelastic three-body collision rates in the ultracold regime for three-body systems with short-range two-body interactions. Here, we present the scaling laws for vibrational relaxation, three-body recombination, and collision-induced dissociation for systems that support s-wave two-body collisions. These systems include three identical bosons, two identical bosons, and two identical fermions. Our approach reproduces all previous results, predicts several others, and gives the general form of the scaling laws in all cases

  9. Transition in multiple-scale-lengths turbulence in plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Itoh, S.-I.; Yagi, M.; Kawasaki, M.; Kitazawa, A.

    2002-02-01

    The statistical theory of strong turbulence in inhomogeneous plasmas is developed for the cases where fluctuations with different scale-lengths coexist. Statistical nonlinear interactions between semi-micro and micro modes are first kept in the analysis as the drag, noise and drive. The nonlinear dynamics determines both the fluctuation levels and the cross field turbulent transport for the fixed global parameters. A quenching or suppressing effect is induced by their nonlinear interplay, even if both modes are unstable when analyzed independently. Influence of the inhomogeneous global radial electric field is discussed. A new insight is given for the physics of internal transport barrier. The thermal fluctuation of the scale length of λ D is assumed to be statistically independent. The hierarchical structure is constructed according to the scale lengths. Transitions in turbulence are found and phase diagrams with cusp type catastrophe are obtained. Dynamics is followed. Statistical properties of the subcritical excitation are discussed. The probability density function (PDF) and transition probability are obtained. Power-laws are obtained in the PDF as well as in the transition probability. Generalization for the case where turbulence is composed of three-classes of modes is also developed. A new catastrophe of turbulent sates is obtained. (author)

  10. Minimum Description Length Shape and Appearance Models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thodberg, Hans Henrik

    2003-01-01

    The Minimum Description Length (MDL) approach to shape modelling is reviewed. It solves the point correspondence problem of selecting points on shapes defined as curves so that the points correspond across a data set. An efficient numerical implementation is presented and made available as open s...

  11. Minimum Description Length Shape and Appearance Models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thodberg, Hans Henrik

    2003-01-01

    The Minimum Description Length (MDL) approach to shape modelling is reviewed. It solves the point correspondence problem of selecting points on shapes defined as curves so that the points correspond across a data set. An efficient numerical implementation is presented and made available as open s...... source Matlab code. The problems with the early MDL approaches are discussed. Finally the MDL approach is extended to an MDL Appearance Model, which is proposed as a means to perform unsupervised image segmentation....

  12. Length scale and manufacturability in density-based topology optimization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lazarov, Boyan Stefanov; Wang, Fengwen; Sigmund, Ole

    2016-01-01

    Since its original introduction in structural design, density-based topology optimization has been applied to a number of other fields such as microelectromechanical systems, photonics, acoustics and fluid mechanics. The methodology has been well accepted in industrial design processes where it can...... performance and in many cases can completely destroy the optimality of the solution. Therefore, the goal of this paper is to review recent advancements in obtaining manufacturable topology-optimized designs. The focus is on methods for imposing minimum and maximum length scales, and ensuring manufacturable...

  13. Multi length-scale characterisation inorganic materials series

    CERN Document Server

    Bruce, Duncan W; Walton, Richard I

    2013-01-01

    Whereas the first five volumes in the Inorganic Materials Series focused on particular classes of materials (synthesis, structures, chemistry, and properties), it is now very timely to provide complementary volumes that introduce and review state-of-the-art techniques for materials characterization. This is an important way of emphasizing the interplay of chemical synthesis and physical characterization. The methods reviewed include spectroscopic, diffraction, and surface techniques that examine the structure of materials on all length scales, from local atomic structure to long-range crystall

  14. Cosmogenesis and the origin of the fundamental length scale

    CERN Document Server

    Brout, R; Frère, J M; Gunzig, E; Nardone, P; Truffin, C; Spindel, P

    1980-01-01

    The creation of the universe is regarded as a self-consistent process in which matter is engendered by the space-time varying cosmological gravitational field and vice versa. Abundant production can occur only if the mass of the particles so created is of the order of the Planck mass $(=K^{-1/2})$. We conjecture that this is the origin of the fundamental length scale in field theory, as it is encountered, for example, in present efforts towards grandunification. The region of particle production is steady state in character. It ceases when the produced particles decay. The geometry of this steady state is characteristic of a de Sitter space. It permits one to estimate the number of ordinary particles presently observed, N. We find log N = O (mτ$_{decay}$) = O(g$^{−2}$) = O(10$^2$), with the usual estimate of g = O(10$^{−1}$) at the Planck length scale. This is not inconsistent with the experimental estimate $N \\approx O(10^{90})$. After production, cosmological history gives way to the more conventional ...

  15. Dynamic Leidenfrost Effect: Relevant Time and Length Scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shirota, Minori; van Limbeek, Michiel A. J.; Sun, Chao; Prosperetti, Andrea; Lohse, Detlef

    2016-02-01

    When a liquid droplet impacts a hot solid surface, enough vapor may be generated under it to prevent its contact with the solid. The minimum solid temperature for this so-called Leidenfrost effect to occur is termed the Leidenfrost temperature, or the dynamic Leidenfrost temperature when the droplet velocity is non-negligible. We observe the wetting or drying and the levitation dynamics of the droplet impacting on an (isothermal) smooth sapphire surface using high-speed total internal reflection imaging, which enables us to observe the droplet base up to about 100 nm above the substrate surface. By this method we are able to reveal the processes responsible for the transitional regime between the fully wetting and the fully levitated droplet as the solid temperature increases, thus shedding light on the characteristic time and length scales setting the dynamic Leidenfrost temperature for droplet impact on an isothermal substrate.

  16. Length-scale dependent ensemble-averaged conductance of a 1D disordered conductor: Conductance minimum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tit, N.; Kumar, N.; Pradhan, P.

    1993-07-01

    Exact numerical calculation of ensemble averaged length-scale dependent conductance for the 1D Anderson model is shown to support an earlier conjecture for a conductance minimum. Numerical results can be understood in terms of the Thouless expression for the conductance and the Wigner level-spacing statistics. (author). 8 refs, 2 figs

  17. Natural Length Scales of Ecological Systems: Applications at Community and Ecosystem Levels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Craig R. Johnson

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available The characteristic, or natural, length scales of a spatially dynamic ecological landscape are the spatial scales at which the deterministic trends in the dynamic are most sharply in focus. Given recent development of techniques to determine the characteristic length scales (CLSs of real ecological systems, I explore the potential for using CLSs to address three important and vexing issues in applied ecology, viz. (i determining the optimum scales to monitor ecological systems, (ii interpreting change in ecological communities, and (iii ascertaining connectivity between species in complex ecologies. In summarizing the concept of characteristic length scales as system-level scaling thresholds, I emphasize that the primary CLS is, by definition, the optimum scale at which to monitor a system if the objective is to observe its deterministic dynamics at a system level. Using several different spatially explicit individual-based models, I then explore predictions of the underlying theory of CLSs in the context of interpreting change and ascertaining connectivity among species in ecological systems. Analysis of these models support predictions that systems with strongly fluctuating community structure, but an otherwise stable long-term dynamic defined by a stationary attractor, indicate an invariant length scale irrespective of community structure at the time of analysis, and irrespective of the species analyzed. In contrast, if changes in the underlying dynamic are forcibly induced, the shift in dynamics is reflected by a change in the primary length scale. Thus, consideration of the magnitude of the CLS through time enables distinguishing between circumstances where there are temporal changes in community structure but not in the long-term dynamic, from that where changes in community structure reflect some kind of fundamental shift in dynamics. In this context, CLSs emerge as a diagnostic tool to identify phase shifts to alternative stable states

  18. Genome-Scale Models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bergdahl, Basti; Sonnenschein, Nikolaus; Machado, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    An introduction to genome-scale models, how to build and use them, will be given in this chapter. Genome-scale models have become an important part of systems biology and metabolic engineering, and are increasingly used in research, both in academica and in industry, both for modeling chemical pr...

  19. A Bayesian joint model of menstrual cycle length and fecundity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lum, Kirsten J; Sundaram, Rajeshwari; Buck Louis, Germaine M; Louis, Thomas A

    2016-03-01

    Menstrual cycle length (MCL) has been shown to play an important role in couple fecundity, which is the biologic capacity for reproduction irrespective of pregnancy intentions. However, a comprehensive assessment of its role requires a fecundity model that accounts for male and female attributes and the couple's intercourse pattern relative to the ovulation day. To this end, we employ a Bayesian joint model for MCL and pregnancy. MCLs follow a scale multiplied (accelerated) mixture model with Gaussian and Gumbel components; the pregnancy model includes MCL as a covariate and computes the cycle-specific probability of pregnancy in a menstrual cycle conditional on the pattern of intercourse and no previous fertilization. Day-specific fertilization probability is modeled using natural, cubic splines. We analyze data from the Longitudinal Investigation of Fertility and the Environment Study (the LIFE Study), a couple based prospective pregnancy study, and find a statistically significant quadratic relation between fecundity and menstrual cycle length, after adjustment for intercourse pattern and other attributes, including male semen quality, both partner's age, and active smoking status (determined by baseline cotinine level 100 ng/mL). We compare results to those produced by a more basic model and show the advantages of a more comprehensive approach. © 2015, The International Biometric Society.

  20. On the length-scale of the wind profile

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pena Diaz, Alfredo; Gryning, Sven-Erik; Mann, Jakob

    2010-01-01

    We present the results of an analysis of simultaneous sonic anemometer observations of wind speed and velocity spectra over flat and homogeneous terrain from 10 up to 160 m height performed at the National Test Station for Wind Turbines at Høvsøre, Denmark. The mixing length, l, derived from the ...

  1. The length-scale dependence of strain in networks by SANS

    CERN Document Server

    Pyckhout-Hintzen, W; Heinrich, M; Richter, D; Westermann, S; Straube, E

    2002-01-01

    We present a SANS study of the length-scale dependence of chain deformation by means of a suitable labeling in dense, cross-linked elastomers of the HDH-type. This length scale is controlled by the size of the label as well as the cross-link density. The results are compared to long homopolymers. The data are analyzed by means of the tube model of topology in rubber elasticity in combination with the random-phase approximation (RPA) to account for interchain correlations. Chain degradation during cross linking is treated by the standard RPA approach for polydisperse multicomponent systems. A transition from locally freely fluctuating to tube-constrained segmental motion was observed. (orig.)

  2. Non-perturbative gravity at different length scales

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Folkerts, Sarah

    2013-01-01

    In this thesis, we investigate different aspects of gravity as an effective field theory. Building on the arguments of self-completeness of Einstein gravity, we argue that any sensible theory, which does not propagate negative-norm states and reduces to General Relativity in the low energy limit is self-complete. Due to black hole formation in high energy scattering experiments, distances smaller than the Planck scale are shielded from any accessibility. Degrees of freedom with masses larger than the Planck mass are mapped to large classical black holes which are described by the already existing infrared theory. Since high energy (UV) modifications of gravity which are ghost-free can only produce stronger gravitational interactions than Einstein gravity, the black hole shielding is even more efficient in such theories. In this light, we argue that conventional attempts of a Wilsonian UV completion are severely constrained. Furthermore, we investigate the quantum picture for black holes which emerges in the low energy description put forward by Dvali and Gomez in which black holes are described as Bose-Einstein condensates of many weakly coupled gravitons. Specifically, we investigate a non-relativistic toy model which mimics certain aspects of the graviton condensate picture. This toy model describes the collapse of a condensate of attractive bosons which emits particles due to incoherent scattering. We show that it is possible that the evolution of the condensate follows the critical point which is accompanied by the appearance of a light mode. Another aspect of gravitational interactions concerns the question whether quantum gravity breaks global symmetries. Arguments relying on the no hair theorem and wormhole solutions suggest that global symmetries can be violated. In this thesis, we parametrize such effects in terms of an effective field theory description of three-form fields. We investigate the possible implications for the axion solution of the strong CP

  3. Non-perturbative gravity at different length scales

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Folkerts, Sarah

    2013-12-18

    In this thesis, we investigate different aspects of gravity as an effective field theory. Building on the arguments of self-completeness of Einstein gravity, we argue that any sensible theory, which does not propagate negative-norm states and reduces to General Relativity in the low energy limit is self-complete. Due to black hole formation in high energy scattering experiments, distances smaller than the Planck scale are shielded from any accessibility. Degrees of freedom with masses larger than the Planck mass are mapped to large classical black holes which are described by the already existing infrared theory. Since high energy (UV) modifications of gravity which are ghost-free can only produce stronger gravitational interactions than Einstein gravity, the black hole shielding is even more efficient in such theories. In this light, we argue that conventional attempts of a Wilsonian UV completion are severely constrained. Furthermore, we investigate the quantum picture for black holes which emerges in the low energy description put forward by Dvali and Gomez in which black holes are described as Bose-Einstein condensates of many weakly coupled gravitons. Specifically, we investigate a non-relativistic toy model which mimics certain aspects of the graviton condensate picture. This toy model describes the collapse of a condensate of attractive bosons which emits particles due to incoherent scattering. We show that it is possible that the evolution of the condensate follows the critical point which is accompanied by the appearance of a light mode. Another aspect of gravitational interactions concerns the question whether quantum gravity breaks global symmetries. Arguments relying on the no hair theorem and wormhole solutions suggest that global symmetries can be violated. In this thesis, we parametrize such effects in terms of an effective field theory description of three-form fields. We investigate the possible implications for the axion solution of the strong CP

  4. Internal Length Gradient (ILG) Material Mechanics Across Scales & Disciplines

    OpenAIRE

    Aifantis, Elias C.

    2016-01-01

    A combined theoretical/numerical/experimental program is outlined for extending the ILG approach to consider time lags, stochasticity and multiphysics couplings. Through this extension it is possible to discuss the interplay between deformation internal lengths (ILs) and ILs induced by thermal, diffusion or electric field gradients. Size-dependent multiphysics stability diagrams are obtained, and size-dependent serrated stress-strain curves are interpreted through combined gradient-stochastic...

  5. A multiple length scale description of the mechanism of elastomer stretching

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Neuefeind, J.; Skov, Anne Ladegaard; Daniels, J. E.

    2016-01-01

    Conventionally, the stretching of rubber is modeled exclusively by rotations of segments of the embedded polymer chains; i.e. changes in entropy. However models have not been tested on all relevant length scales due to a lack of appropriate probes. Here we present a universal X-ray based method...... within the individual monomers, but among the contributions is also an elastic strain, acting between chains, which is 3-4 orders of magnitude smaller than the macroscopic strain, and of the opposite sign, i.e. extension of polymer chains in the direction perpendicular to the stretch. This may be due...

  6. Chirality transfer across length-scales in nematic liquid crystals: fundamentals and applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pieraccini, Silvia; Masiero, Stefano; Ferrarini, Alberta; Piero Spada, Gian

    2011-01-01

    When a chiral dopant is dissolved in an achiral liquid crystal medium, the whole sample organizes into a helical structure with a characteristic length-scale of the order of microns. The relation between chirality at these quite different length-scales can be rationalized by a relatively simple model, which retains the relevant factors coming into play: the molecular shape of the chiral dopant, which controls the chirality of short range intermolecular interactions, and the elastic properties of the nematic environment, which control the restoring torques opposing distortion of the director. In this tutorial review the relation between molecular and phase chirality will be reviewed and several applications of the chiral doping of nematic LCs will be discussed. These range from the exploitation of the amplified molecular chirality for stereochemical purposes (e.g., the determination of the absolute configuration or the enantiomeric excess), to newer applications in physico-chemical fields. The latter take advantage of the periodicity of the chiral field, with length-scales ranging from hundreds to thousands of nanometres, which characterise the cholesteric phase.

  7. Second-moment closures and length scales for weakly stratified turbulent shear flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumert, Helmut; Peters, Hartmut

    2000-03-01

    For the special hydrodynamic situation of unbounded homogeneous shear layers, turbulence closure models of Mellor-Yamada type (MY) and k-ɛ type are put into a single canonical form. For this situation we show that conventional versions of MY and various k-ɛ versions lack a proper steady state, and are unable to simulate the most basic properties of stratified shear flows exemplified in, for example, the Rohr et al. [1988] experiments: exponential growth at sufficiently low gradient Richardson number (Rg), exponential decay at sufficiently large Rg, and a steady state in between. Proper choice of one special model parameter readily solves the problems. In the fairly general case of structural equilibrium (state of exponential evolution) in weakly to moderately stratified turbulence (Rg ≲ 0.25), the ratio between the Thorpe scale (or Ellison scale) and the Ozmidov scale varies like the gradient Richardson number (Rg) to the power 3/4, and the ratio of the Thorpe scale to the buoyancy scale varies like Rg1/2. Length scales predicted by our current model are consistent with laboratory measurements of Rohr et al. [1988], with large-eddy numerical simulations of Schumann and Gerz [1995], and with microstructure measurements from the 1987 Tropic Heat Experiment in the equatorial Pacific by Peters et al. [1995].

  8. SQUID magnetometry from nanometer to centimeter length scales

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hatridge, Michael J.

    2010-01-01

    The development of Superconducting QUantum Interference Device (SQUID)-based magnetometer for two applications, in vivo prepolarized, ultra-low field MRI of humans and dispersive readout of SQUIDs for micro- and nano-scale magnetometery, are the focus of this thesis.

  9. SQUID magnetometry from nanometer to centimeter length scales

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hatridge, Michael J. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2010-06-01

    The development of Superconducting QUantum Interference Device (SQUID)-based magnetometer for two applications, in vivo prepolarized, ultra-low field MRI of humans and dispersive readout of SQUIDs for micro- and nano-scale magnetometery, are the focus of this thesis.

  10. Length and time scales of atmospheric moisture recycling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van der Ent, R.J.; Savenije, H.H.G.

    2011-01-01

    It is difficult to quantify the degree to which terrestrial evaporation supports the occurrence of precipitation within a certain study region (i.e. regional moisture recycling) due to the scale- and shape-dependence of regional moisture recycling ratios. In this paper we present a novel approach to

  11. Alberta Essay Scales: Models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nyberg, Verner R.; Nyberg, Adell M.

    The Alberta Essay Scales were developed to assist teachers in the grading of essays. They represent a standard based on written compositions at the 12th grade level in 1964 to be compared with current composition writing achievement. A scale for mechanics in English and one for writing style and content are defined through model essays and…

  12. Determination of Longitudinal Electron Bunch Lengths on Picosecond Time Scales

    CERN Document Server

    Martínez, C; Calviño, F

    1999-01-01

    At CERN (European Laboratory for Particle Physics) the CLIC (Compact Linear Collider) study is pursuing the design of an electron-positron high-energy linear collider using an innovative concept for the RF (Radio Frequency) power production, the socalled two-beam acceleration scheme. In order to keep the length of the collider in a reasonable range while being able of accelerating electrons and positrons up to 5 TeV, the normal-conducting accelerating structures should operate at very high frequency (in this case 30 GHz). The RF power necessary to feed the accelerating cavities is provided by a second electron beam, the drive beam, running parallel to the main beam. The CLIC Test Facility (CTF) was build with the main aim of studying and demonstrating the feasibility of the two beam acceleration scheme and technology. It is composed of two beams, the drive beam that will generate the 30 GHz RF power and the main beam which will be accelerated by this power. In order to have a good efficiency for the power gen...

  13. Displacement-length scaling of brittle faults in ductile shear.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grasemann, Bernhard; Exner, Ulrike; Tschegg, Cornelius

    2011-11-01

    Within a low-grade ductile shear zone, we investigated exceptionally well exposed brittle faults, which accumulated antithetic slip and rotated into the shearing direction. The foliation planes of the mylonitic host rock intersect the faults approximately at their centre and exhibit ductile reverse drag. Three types of brittle faults can be distinguished: (i) Faults developing on pre-existing K-feldspar/mica veins that are oblique to the shear direction. These faults have triclinic flanking structures. (ii) Wing cracks opening as mode I fractures at the tips of the triclinic flanking structures, perpendicular to the shear direction. These cracks are reactivated as faults with antithetic shear, extend from the parent K-feldspar/mica veins and form a complex linked flanking structure system. (iii) Joints forming perpendicular to the shearing direction are deformed to form monoclinic flanking structures. Triclinic and monoclinic flanking structures record elliptical displacement-distance profiles with steep displacement gradients at the fault tips by ductile flow in the host rocks, resulting in reverse drag of the foliation planes. These structures record one of the greatest maximum displacement/length ratios reported from natural fault structures. These exceptionally high ratios can be explained by localized antithetic displacement along brittle slip surfaces, which did not propagate during their rotation during surrounding ductile flow.

  14. Displacement–length scaling of brittle faults in ductile shear

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grasemann, Bernhard; Exner, Ulrike; Tschegg, Cornelius

    2011-01-01

    Within a low-grade ductile shear zone, we investigated exceptionally well exposed brittle faults, which accumulated antithetic slip and rotated into the shearing direction. The foliation planes of the mylonitic host rock intersect the faults approximately at their centre and exhibit ductile reverse drag. Three types of brittle faults can be distinguished: (i) Faults developing on pre-existing K-feldspar/mica veins that are oblique to the shear direction. These faults have triclinic flanking structures. (ii) Wing cracks opening as mode I fractures at the tips of the triclinic flanking structures, perpendicular to the shear direction. These cracks are reactivated as faults with antithetic shear, extend from the parent K-feldspar/mica veins and form a complex linked flanking structure system. (iii) Joints forming perpendicular to the shearing direction are deformed to form monoclinic flanking structures. Triclinic and monoclinic flanking structures record elliptical displacement–distance profiles with steep displacement gradients at the fault tips by ductile flow in the host rocks, resulting in reverse drag of the foliation planes. These structures record one of the greatest maximum displacement/length ratios reported from natural fault structures. These exceptionally high ratios can be explained by localized antithetic displacement along brittle slip surfaces, which did not propagate during their rotation during surrounding ductile flow. PMID:26806996

  15. Stimulated Brillouin scattering in long-scale-length laser plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chirokikh, A.; Seka, W.; Simon, A.; Craxton, R.S.; Tikhonchuk, V.T.

    1998-01-01

    Brillouin scattering from a preformed, inhomogeneous, expanding plasma has been investigated. Backscattered light near the incident laser wavelength (λ=1054 nm) from CH planar targets has been spectrally and temporally resolved. By varying the time delay of the interaction beam, the scattering was studied for different plasma conditions. The backscattered light is predominantly blue-shifted and appears before the peak of the laser pulse. The experimental time-integrated reflectivity of backscattered light is in the range of 1%endash 10% and decreases with the plasma density. The time-resolved spectra and total reflectivity were calculated using a theory of convective stimulated Brillouin scattering (SBS) in a flowing inhomogeneous plasma combined with a statistical hot spot model for the interaction beam. The plasma parameters for these calculations were provided by simulations using a two-dimensional hydrodynamic code. The calculated SBS spectra are similar to the experimental observations. The time-integrated reflectivities agree well with the experimental results for the higher peak density interactions, but are below the observations by orders of magnitude for the lowest peak density cases. copyright 1998 American Institute of Physics

  16. Kelvin Absolute Temperature Scale Identified as Length Scale and Related to de Broglie Thermal Wavelength

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sohrab, Siavash

    Thermodynamic equilibrium between matter and radiation leads to de Broglie wavelength λdβ = h /mβvrβ and frequency νdβ = k /mβvrβ of matter waves and stochastic definitions of Planck h =hk =mk c and Boltzmann k =kk =mk c constants, λrkνrk = c , that respectively relate to spatial (λ) and temporal (ν) aspects of vacuum fluctuations. Photon massmk =√{ hk /c3 } , amu =√{ hkc } = 1 /No , and universal gas constant Ro =No k =√{ k / hc } result in internal Uk = Nhνrk = Nmkc2 = 3 Nmkvmpk2 = 3 NkT and potential pV = uN\\vcirc / 3 = N\\ucirc / 3 = NkT energy of photon gas in Casimir vacuum such that H = TS = 4 NkT . Therefore, Kelvin absolute thermodynamic temperature scale [degree K] is identified as length scale [meter] and related to most probable wavelength and de Broglie thermal wavelength as Tβ =λmpβ =λdβ / 3 . Parallel to Wien displacement law obtained from Planck distribution, the displacement law λwS T =c2 /√{ 3} is obtained from Maxwell -Boltzmann distribution of speed of ``photon clusters''. The propagation speeds of sound waves in ideal gas versus light waves in photon gas are described in terms of vrβ in harmony with perceptions of Huygens. Newton formula for speed of long waves in canals √{ p / ρ } is modified to √{ gh } =√{ γp / ρ } in accordance with adiabatic theory of Laplace.

  17. Morphology Characterization of PP/Clay Nanocomposites Across the Length Scales of the Structural Architecture

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Szazdi, Laszlo; Abranyi, Agnes; Pukansky Jr, Bela; Vancso, Gyula J.; Pukanszky, B.; Pukanszky, Bela

    2006-01-01

    The structure and rheological properties of a large number of layered silicate poly(propylene) nanocomposites were studied with widely varying compositions. Morphology characterization at different length scales was achieved by SEM, TEM, and XRD. Rheological measurements supplied additional

  18. A stochastic immersed boundary method for fluid-structure dynamics at microscopic length scales

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Atzberger, Paul J.; Kramer, Peter R.; Peskin, Charles S.

    2007-01-01

    In modeling many biological systems, it is important to take into account flexible structures which interact with a fluid. At the length scale of cells and cell organelles, thermal fluctuations of the aqueous environment become significant. In this work, it is shown how the immersed boundary method of [C.S. Peskin, The immersed boundary method, Acta Num. 11 (2002) 1-39.] for modeling flexible structures immersed in a fluid can be extended to include thermal fluctuations. A stochastic numerical method is proposed which deals with stiffness in the system of equations by handling systematically the statistical contributions of the fastest dynamics of the fluid and immersed structures over long time steps. An important feature of the numerical method is that time steps can be taken in which the degrees of freedom of the fluid are completely underresolved, partially resolved, or fully resolved while retaining a good level of accuracy. Error estimates in each of these regimes are given for the method. A number of theoretical and numerical checks are furthermore performed to assess its physical fidelity. For a conservative force, the method is found to simulate particles with the correct Boltzmann equilibrium statistics. It is shown in three dimensions that the diffusion of immersed particles simulated with the method has the correct scaling in the physical parameters. The method is also shown to reproduce a well-known hydrodynamic effect of a Brownian particle in which the velocity autocorrelation function exhibits an algebraic (τ -3/2 ) decay for long times [B.J. Alder, T.E. Wainwright, Decay of the Velocity Autocorrelation Function, Phys. Rev. A 1(1) (1970) 18-21]. A few preliminary results are presented for more complex systems which demonstrate some potential application areas of the method. Specifically, we present simulations of osmotic effects of molecular dimers, worm-like chain polymer knots, and a basic model of a molecular motor immersed in fluid subject to a

  19. Comparison of the Effects of the Different Methods for Computing the Slope Length Factor at a Watershed Scale

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fu Suhua

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The slope length factor is one of the parameters of the Universal Soil Loss Equation (USLE and the Revised Universal Soil Loss Equation (RUSLE and is sometimes calculated based on a digital elevation model (DEM. The methods for calculating the slope length factor are important because the values obtained may depend on the methods used for calculation. The purpose of this study was to compare the difference in spatial distribution of the slope length factor between the different methods at a watershed scale. One method used the uniform slope length factor equation (USLFE where the effects of slope irregularities (such as slope gradient, etc. on soil erosion by water were not considered. The other method used segmented slope length factor equation(SSLFE which considered the effects of slope irregularities on soil erosion by water. The Arc Macro Language (AML Version 4 program for the revised universal soil loss equation(RUSLE.which uses the USLFE, was chosen to calculate the slope length factor. In a parallel analysis, the AML code of RUSLE Version 4 was modified according to the SSLFE to calculate the slope length factor. Two watersheds with different slope and gully densities were chosen. The results show that the slope length factor and soil loss using the USLFE method were lower than those using the SSLFE method, especially on downslopes watershed with more frequent steep slopes and higher gully densities. In addition, the slope length factor and soil loss calculated by the USLFE showed less spatial variation.

  20. Flame Treatment of Low-Density Polyethylene: Surface Chemistry Across the Length Scale

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Song, Jing; Gunst, Ullrich; Arlinghaus, Heinrich F.; Vancso, Gyula J.

    2007-01-01

    The relationship between surface chemistry and morphology of flame treated low-density polyethylene (LDPE) was studied by various characterization techniques across different length scales. The chemical composition of the surface was determined on the micrometer scale by X-ray photoelectron

  1. The PVC technique a method to estimate the dissipation length scale in turbulent flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Chih-Ming; Zohar, Yitshak

    1997-12-01

    A time-averaged length scale can be defined by a pair of successive turbulent-velocity derivatives, i.e. [dnu(x)/ dxn][prime prime or minute]/ [dn+1u(x)/ dxn+1][prime prime or minute]. The length scale associated with the zeroth- and the first-order derivatives, u[prime prime or minute]/u[prime prime or minute]x, is the Taylor microscale. In isotropic turbulence, this scale is the average length between zero crossings of the velocity signal. The average length between zero crossings of the first velocity derivative, i.e. u[prime prime or minute]x/u[prime prime or minute]xx, can be reliably obtained by using the peak-valley-counting (PVC) technique. We have found that the most probable scale, rather than the average, equals the wavelength at the peak of the dissipation spectrum in a plane mixing layer (Zohar & Ho 1996). In this study, we experimentally investigate the generality of applying the PVC technique to estimate the dissipation scale in three basic turbulent shear flows: a flat-plate boundary layer, a wake behind a two-dimensional cylinder and a plane mixing layer. We also analytically explore the quantitative relationships among this length scale and the Kolmogorov and Taylor microscales.

  2. Zebrafish brain mapping--standardized spaces, length scales, and the power of N and n.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunter, Paul R; Hendry, Aenea C; Lowe, Andrew S

    2015-06-01

    Mapping anatomical and functional parameters of the zebrafish brain is moving apace. Research communities undertaking such studies are becoming ever larger and more diverse. The unique features, tools, and technologies associated with zebrafish are propelling them as the 21st century model organism for brain mapping. Uniquely positioned as a vertebrate model system, the zebrafish enables imaging of anatomy and function at different length scales from intraneuronal compartments to sparsely distributed whole brain patterns. With a variety of diverse and established statistical modeling and analytic methods available from the wider brain mapping communities, the richness of zebrafish neuroimaging data is being realized. The statistical power of population observations (N) within and across many samples (n) projected onto a standardized space will provide vast databases for data-driven biological approaches. This article reviews key brain mapping initiatives at different levels of scale that highlight the potential of zebrafish brain mapping. By way of introduction to the next wave of brain mappers, an accessible introduction to the key concepts and caveats associated with neuroimaging are outlined and discussed. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Fabrication of Cu-induced networks of linear nanostructures on different length scales

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adelung, R.; Hartung, W.; Ernst, F.

    2002-01-01

    Scanning electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy revealed that the deposition Cu onto VSe 2 substrates in ultra-high vacuum leads to the self-organized formation of linear nanostructures, nanowires and nanotunnels, on the substrate surface. The nanowires and nanotunnels are approximately equi-axed and form networks with a mesh width much larger than their diameter. Surprisingly, systematic increase of the Cu coverage studied here does not simply increase the thickness of the nanowires and nanotunnels, but induces the formation of further, distinct networks with increased feature size and increased mesh width. At very high Cu coverages, eventually, we obtained a hierarchy of apparently independent nanowire and nanotunnel networks on different length scales. A model is presented for the micromechanism that leads to this complex arrangement of nanostructures

  4. Multi-scale modeling strategies in materials science—The ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    modeling strategies exist for each length-scale, the thrust of research has shifted, in recent times, to developing modeling strategies that bridge the length-scales. The quasicontinuum method pivots on a strategy which attempts to take advantage of both conventional atomistic simulations and continuum mechanics to ...

  5. Large scale model testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brumovsky, M.; Filip, R.; Polachova, H.; Stepanek, S.

    1989-01-01

    Fracture mechanics and fatigue calculations for WWER reactor pressure vessels were checked by large scale model testing performed using large testing machine ZZ 8000 (with a maximum load of 80 MN) at the SKODA WORKS. The results are described from testing the material resistance to fracture (non-ductile). The testing included the base materials and welded joints. The rated specimen thickness was 150 mm with defects of a depth between 15 and 100 mm. The results are also presented of nozzles of 850 mm inner diameter in a scale of 1:3; static, cyclic, and dynamic tests were performed without and with surface defects (15, 30 and 45 mm deep). During cyclic tests the crack growth rate in the elastic-plastic region was also determined. (author). 6 figs., 2 tabs., 5 refs

  6. Scaling of localization length of a quasi 1D system with longitudinal boundary roughness

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abhijit Kar Gupta; Sen, A.K.

    1994-08-01

    We introduce irregularities on one of the longitudinal boundaries of a quasi 1D strip which has no bulk disorder. We calculate the localization length of such a system within the scope of tight-binding formalism and see how it behaves with the roughness introduced on the boundary and with the strip-width. We find that localization length scales with a composite one parameter. (author). 6 refs, 4 figs

  7. Statistical theory and transition in multiple-scale-lengths turbulence in plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Itoh, Sanae-I.; Itoh, Kimitaka

    2001-06-01

    The statistical theory of strong turbulence in inhomogeneous plasmas is developed for the cases where fluctuations with different scale-lengths coexist. Nonlinear interactions in the same kind of fluctuations as well as nonlinear interplay between different classes of fluctuations are kept in the analysis. Nonlinear interactions are modelled as turbulent drag, nonlinear noise and nonlinear drive, and a set of Langevin equations is formulated. With the help of an Ansatz of a large number of degrees of freedom with positive Lyapunov number, Langevin equations are solved and the fluctuation dissipation theorem in the presence of strong plasma turbulence has been derived. A case where two driving mechanisms (one for micro mode and the other for semi-micro mode) coexist is investigated. It is found that there are several states of fluctuations: in one state, the micro mode is excited and the semi-micro mode is quenched; in the other state, the semi-micro mode is excited, and the micro mode remains at finite but suppressed level. New type of turbulence transition is obtained, and a cusp type catastrophe is revealed. A phase diagram is drawn for turbulence which is composed of multiple classes of fluctuations. Influence of the inhomogeneous global radial electric field is discussed. A new insight is given for the physics of internal transport barrier. Finally, the nonlocal heat transport due to the long-wave-length fluctuations, which are noise-pumped by shorter-wave-length ones, is analyzed and the impact on transient transport problems is discussed. (author)

  8. Microstructural characterization of transformable Fe-Mn alloys at different length scales

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liang, X.; Wang, X.; Zurob, H.S.

    2009-01-01

    The as-annealed and deformed Microstructure of transformable Fe-Mn alloys were, comprehensively, characterized over a wide range of length scales. Differential interference contrast optical metallography, combined with a tinting etching method, was employed to examine the grain morphology. A new specimen preparation method, involving electro-polishing and electro-etching, was developed for scanning electron microscopy and electron back-scattered diffraction analysis. This method leads to a very good imaging contrast and thus bridges the length scale gap between optical metallography and transmission electron microscopy. Moreover, it enables simultaneous scanning electron microscopy and electron backscatter diffraction analysis which allows correlations among morphology, crystal orientation and phase analysis in the length scale of microns. Transmission electron microscopy investigations were also made to evaluate the thermal and mechanical transformation products as well as defect structures.

  9. Decomposing the queue length distribution of processor-sharing models into queue lengths of permanent customer queues

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cheung, S.-K.; Berg, H. van den; Boucherie, R.J.

    2005-01-01

    We obtain a decomposition result for the steady state queue length distribution in egalitarian processor-sharing (PS) models. In particular, for multi-class egalitarian PS queues, we show that the marginal queue length distribution for each class equals the queue length distribution of an equivalent

  10. A micromechanical approach of suffusion based on a length scale analysis of the grain detachment and grain transport processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wautier, Antoine; Bonelli, Stéphane; Nicot, François

    2017-06-01

    Suffusion is the selective erosion of the finest particles of a soil subjected to an internal flow. Among the four types of internal erosion and piping identified today, suffusion is the least understood. Indeed, there is a lack of micromechanical approaches for identifying the critical microstructural parameters responsible for this process. Based on a discrete element modeling of non cohesive granular assemblies, specific micromechanical tools are developed in a unified framework to account for the two first steps of suffusion, namely the grain detachment and the grain transport processes. Thanks to the use of an enhanced force chain definition and autocorrelation functions the typical lengths scales associated with grain detachment are characterized. From the definition of transport paths based on a graph description of the pore space the typical lengths scales associated with grain transport are recovered. For a uniform grain size distribution, a separation of scales between these two processes exists for the finest particles of a soil

  11. Sub-pixel correlation length neutron imaging: Spatially resolved scattering information of microstructures on a macroscopic scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harti, Ralph P.; Strobl, Markus; Betz, Benedikt; Jefimovs, Konstantins; Kagias, Matias; Grünzweig, Christian

    2017-01-01

    Neutron imaging and scattering give data of significantly different nature and traditional methods leave a gap of accessible structure sizes at around 10 micrometers. Only in recent years overlap in the probed size ranges could be achieved by independent application of high resolution scattering and imaging methods, however without providing full structural information when microstructures vary on a macroscopic scale. In this study we show how quantitative neutron dark-field imaging with a novel experimental approach provides both sub-pixel resolution with respect to microscopic correlation lengths and imaging of macroscopic variations of the microstructure. Thus it provides combined information on multiple length scales. A dispersion of micrometer sized polystyrene colloids was chosen as a model system to study gravity induced crystallisation of microspheres on a macro scale, including the identification of ordered as well as unordered phases. Our results pave the way to study heterogeneous systems locally in a previously impossible manner. PMID:28303923

  12. A micromechanical approach of suffusion based on a length scale analysis of the grain detachment and grain transport processes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wautier Antoine

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Suffusion is the selective erosion of the finest particles of a soil subjected to an internal flow. Among the four types of internal erosion and piping identified today, suffusion is the least understood. Indeed, there is a lack of micromechanical approaches for identifying the critical microstructural parameters responsible for this process. Based on a discrete element modeling of non cohesive granular assemblies, specific micromechanical tools are developed in a unified framework to account for the two first steps of suffusion, namely the grain detachment and the grain transport processes. Thanks to the use of an enhanced force chain definition and autocorrelation functions the typical lengths scales associated with grain detachment are characterized. From the definition of transport paths based on a graph description of the pore space the typical lengths scales associated with grain transport are recovered. For a uniform grain size distribution, a separation of scales between these two processes exists for the finest particles of a soil

  13. Itinerary planning: Modelling cruise lines’ lengths of stay in ports

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chen, Jamie M.; Nijkamp, Peter

    Cruise tourism is a fast-growing segment of the tourism industry that generates substantial benefits to port cities. This study explores strategic aspects of cruise lines’ itinerary planning, and models the determinants of their lengths of stay in ports, based on extensive observations of network

  14. Adding Curvature to Minimum Description Length Shape Models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thodberg, Hans Henrik; Ólafsdóttir, Hildur

    2003-01-01

    The Minimum Description Length (MDL) approach to shape modelling seeks a compact description of a set of shapes in terms of the coordinates of marks on the shapes. It has been shown that the mark positions resulting from this optimisation to a large extent solve the so-called point correspondence...

  15. Electropolishing effect on roughness metrics of ground stainless steel: a length scale study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakar, Doron; Harel, David; Hirsch, Baruch

    2018-03-01

    Electropolishing is a widely-used electrochemical surface finishing process for metals. The electropolishing of stainless steel has vast commercial application, such as improving corrosion resistance, improving cleanness, and brightening. The surface topography characterization is performed using several techniques with different lateral resolutions and length scales, from atomic force microscopy in the nano-scale (process in the micro and meso lateral scales. Both stylus and optical profilometers are used, and multiple cut-off lengths of the standard Gaussian filter are adopted. While the commonly used roughness amplitude parameters (Ra, Rq and Rz) fail to characterize electropolished textures, the root mean square slope (RΔq) is found to better describe the electropolished surfaces and to be insensitive to scale.

  16. A multi-resolution analysis of lidar-DTMs to identify geomorphic processes from characteristic topographic length scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sangireddy, H.; Passalacqua, P.; Stark, C. P.

    2013-12-01

    Characteristic length scales are often present in topography, and they reflect the driving geomorphic processes. The wide availability of high resolution lidar Digital Terrain Models (DTMs) allows us to measure such characteristic scales, but new methods of topographic analysis are needed in order to do so. Here, we explore how transitions in probability distributions (pdfs) of topographic variables such as (log(area/slope)), defined as topoindex by Beven and Kirkby[1979], can be measured by Multi-Resolution Analysis (MRA) of lidar DTMs [Stark and Stark, 2001; Sangireddy et al.,2012] and used to infer dominant geomorphic processes such as non-linear diffusion and critical shear. We show this correlation between dominant geomorphic processes to characteristic length scales by comparing results from a landscape evolution model to natural landscapes. The landscape evolution model MARSSIM Howard[1994] includes components for modeling rock weathering, mass wasting by non-linear creep, detachment-limited channel erosion, and bedload sediment transport. We use MARSSIM to simulate steady state landscapes for a range of hillslope diffusivity and critical shear stresses. Using the MRA approach, we estimate modal values and inter-quartile ranges of slope, curvature, and topoindex as a function of resolution. We also construct pdfs at each resolution and identify and extract characteristic scale breaks. Following the approach of Tucker et al.,[2001], we measure the average length to channel from ridges, within the GeoNet framework developed by Passalacqua et al.,[2010] and compute pdfs for hillslope lengths at each scale defined in the MRA. We compare the hillslope diffusivity used in MARSSIM against inter-quartile ranges of topoindex and hillslope length scales, and observe power law relationships between the compared variables for simulated landscapes at steady state. We plot similar measures for natural landscapes and are able to qualitatively infer the dominant geomorphic

  17. Nano-scaled graphene platelets with a high length-to-width aspect ratio

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhamu, Aruna; Guo, Jiusheng; Jang, Bor Z.

    2010-09-07

    This invention provides a nano-scaled graphene platelet (NGP) having a thickness no greater than 100 nm and a length-to-width ratio no less than 3 (preferably greater than 10). The NGP with a high length-to-width ratio can be prepared by using a method comprising (a) intercalating a carbon fiber or graphite fiber with an intercalate to form an intercalated fiber; (b) exfoliating the intercalated fiber to obtain an exfoliated fiber comprising graphene sheets or flakes; and (c) separating the graphene sheets or flakes to obtain nano-scaled graphene platelets. The invention also provides a nanocomposite material comprising an NGP with a high length-to-width ratio. Such a nanocomposite can become electrically conductive with a small weight fraction of NGPs. Conductive composites are particularly useful for shielding of sensitive electronic equipment against electromagnetic interference (EMI) or radio frequency interference (RFI), and for electrostatic charge dissipation.

  18. Wind direction variations in the natural wind – A new length scale

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansson, Jens; Christensen, Silas Sverre

    2018-01-01

    During an observation period of e.g. 10min, the wind direction will differ from its mean direction for short periods of time, and a body of air will pass by from that direction before the direction changes once again. The present paper introduces a new length scale which we have labeled the angul...

  19. Channel length scaling and the impact of metal gate work function ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Channel length decreases and becomes crucial in deep-submicrometre technologies. In this work, we study the effect of short channel and the influences of quantum mechanical on nanoscale DG-MOSFETs. As CMOS technology continues to scale, metal gate electrodes need to be intro- duced to overcome the deleterious ...

  20. Efficient coupling of 527 nm laser beam power to a long scale-length plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moody, J.D.; Divol, L.; Glenzer, S.H.; MacKinnon, A.J.; Froula, D.H.; Gregori, G.; Kruer, W.L.; Meezan, N.B.; Suter, L.J.; Williams, E.A.; Bahr, R.; Seka, W.

    2006-01-01

    We experimentally demonstrate that application of laser smoothing schemes including smoothing by spectral dispersion (SSD) and polarization smoothing (PS) increases the intensity range for efficient coupling of frequency doubled (527 nm) laser light to a long scale-length plasma with n e /n cr equals 0.14 and T e equals 2 keV. (authors)

  1. Numerical scalings of the decay lengths in the scrape-off layer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Militello, F.; Naulin, V; Nielsen, Anders Henry

    2013-01-01

    Numerical simulations of L-mode turbulence in the scrape-off layer (SOL) are used to construct power scaling laws for the characteristic decay lengths of the temperature, density and heat flux at the outer mid-plane. Most of the results obtained are in qualitative agreement with the experimental...

  2. Studying fractal geometry on submicron length scales by small-angle scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wong, P.; Lin, J.

    1988-01-01

    Recent studies have shown that internal surfaces of porous geological materials, such as rocks and lignite coals, can be described by fractals down to atomic length scales. In this paper, the basic properties of self-similar and self-affine fractals are reviewed and how fractal dimensions can be measured by small-angle scattering experiments are discussed

  3. Length Scales of Reactive Transport in Basalt: Hydrothermal Flow-through Experiments and Anhydrite Precipitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Los, C.; Kahl, W. A.; Bach, W.

    2017-12-01

    Hydrothermal circulation is a large contributor to mass and heat exchange between oceanic lithosphere and hydrosphere. Cold, unaltered seawater infiltrates in the shallow basaltic crust, leading to sulfate precipitation and clogging of fluid pathways. Anhydrite (CaSO4) veins are common in hydrothermal discharge zones, where entrained seawater is heated and anhydrite quickly forms. Anhydrite is also found in hydrothermal recharge zones, but questions regarding time and length scale in this setting remain. To investigate element transport and anhydrite precipitation we have conducted flow-through experiments using a gypsum-undersaturated CaSO4 solution in pre-fractured basalt at 95, 110 and 140°C. Each run was terminated upon clogging of the input tubes, which took 2-8 weeks. The rock core was scanned before the run and weekly during the experiment using X-ray tomography. Fluid major element chemistry was analyzed using ICP-OES. Geochemical modeling with the software package EQ3/6 showed that the starting solution became supersaturated in anhydrite (SI=IAP/K of 2.5 or higher) in all cases upon heating to the experimental temperature. The software CRUNCH FLOW was used to analyze chemical effects over the length of the core (3cm). The 95°C run and a first run at 110°C did not show any anhydrite. Instead, hematite rosettes and sulfur-bearing (maximum of 1 wt.%) globular Fe-rich structures were present. Tomography images showed that fractures and pores were slightly thinned over the whole core length. Single pores in a second 110°C run and fractures in the 140°C run did show formation of anhydrite and quartz close to the outlet. CRUNCH FLOW modeling predicts the observed release of Mg, Fe, Si, Al, Na and K due to silicate dissolution close to the inlet, while the outlet area should contain some anhydrite. No other sulfur-bearing phases were predicted. The results of this study show that anhydrite needs a large supersaturation (SI>2.5) to precipitate at temperatures

  4. Scale and time dependence of serial correlations in word-length time series of written texts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez, E.; Aguilar-Cornejo, M.; Femat, R.; Alvarez-Ramirez, J.

    2014-11-01

    This work considered the quantitative analysis of large written texts. To this end, the text was converted into a time series by taking the sequence of word lengths. The detrended fluctuation analysis (DFA) was used for characterizing long-range serial correlations of the time series. To this end, the DFA was implemented within a rolling window framework for estimating the variations of correlations, quantified in terms of the scaling exponent, strength along the text. Also, a filtering derivative was used to compute the dependence of the scaling exponent relative to the scale. The analysis was applied to three famous English-written literary narrations; namely, Alice in Wonderland (by Lewis Carrol), Dracula (by Bram Stoker) and Sense and Sensibility (by Jane Austen). The results showed that high correlations appear for scales of about 50-200 words, suggesting that at these scales the text contains the stronger coherence. The scaling exponent was not constant along the text, showing important variations with apparent cyclical behavior. An interesting coincidence between the scaling exponent variations and changes in narrative units (e.g., chapters) was found. This suggests that the scaling exponent obtained from the DFA is able to detect changes in narration structure as expressed by the usage of words of different lengths.

  5. Low frequency energy scavenging using sub-wave length scale acousto-elastic metamaterial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Riaz U. Ahmed

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available This letter presents the possibility of energy scavenging (ES utilizing the physics of acousto-elastic metamaterial (AEMM at low frequencies (<∼3KHz. It is proposed to use the AEMM in a dual mode (Acoustic Filter and Energy Harvester, simultaneously. AEMM’s are typically reported for filtering acoustic waves by trapping or guiding the acoustic energy, whereas this letter shows that the dynamic energy trapped inside the soft constituent (matrix of metamaterials can be significantly harvested by strategically embedding piezoelectric wafers in the matrix. With unit cell AEMM model, we experimentally asserted that at lower acoustic frequencies (< ∼3 KHz, maximum power in the micro Watts (∼35µW range can be generated, whereas, recently reported phononic crystal based metamaterials harvested only nano Watt (∼30nW power against 10KΩ resistive load. Efficient energy scavengers at low acoustic frequencies are almost absent due to large required size relevant to the acoustic wavelength. Here we report sub wave length scale energy scavengers utilizing the coupled physics of local, structural and matrix resonances. Upon validation of the argument through analytical, numerical and experimental studies, a multi-frequency energy scavenger (ES with multi-cell model is designed with varying geometrical properties capable of scavenging energy (power output from ∼10µW – ∼90µW between 0.2 KHz and 1.5 KHz acoustic frequencies.

  6. Drift Scale THM Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J. Rutqvist

    2004-10-07

    This model report documents the drift scale coupled thermal-hydrological-mechanical (THM) processes model development and presents simulations of the THM behavior in fractured rock close to emplacement drifts. The modeling and analyses are used to evaluate the impact of THM processes on permeability and flow in the near-field of the emplacement drifts. The results from this report are used to assess the importance of THM processes on seepage and support in the model reports ''Seepage Model for PA Including Drift Collapse'' and ''Abstraction of Drift Seepage'', and to support arguments for exclusion of features, events, and processes (FEPs) in the analysis reports ''Features, Events, and Processes in Unsaturated Zone Flow and Transport and Features, Events, and Processes: Disruptive Events''. The total system performance assessment (TSPA) calculations do not use any output from this report. Specifically, the coupled THM process model is applied to simulate the impact of THM processes on hydrologic properties (permeability and capillary strength) and flow in the near-field rock around a heat-releasing emplacement drift. The heat generated by the decay of radioactive waste results in elevated rock temperatures for thousands of years after waste emplacement. Depending on the thermal load, these temperatures are high enough to cause boiling conditions in the rock, resulting in water redistribution and altered flow paths. These temperatures will also cause thermal expansion of the rock, with the potential of opening or closing fractures and thus changing fracture permeability in the near-field. Understanding the THM coupled processes is important for the performance of the repository because the thermally induced permeability changes potentially effect the magnitude and spatial distribution of percolation flux in the vicinity of the drift, and hence the seepage of water into the drift. This is important because

  7. Dependence of exponents on text length versus finite-size scaling for word-frequency distributions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corral, Álvaro; Font-Clos, Francesc

    2017-08-01

    Some authors have recently argued that a finite-size scaling law for the text-length dependence of word-frequency distributions cannot be conceptually valid. Here we give solid quantitative evidence for the validity of this scaling law, using both careful statistical tests and analytical arguments based on the generalized central-limit theorem applied to the moments of the distribution (and obtaining a novel derivation of Heaps' law as a by-product). We also find that the picture of word-frequency distributions with power-law exponents that decrease with text length [X. Yan and P. Minnhagen, Physica A 444, 828 (2016), 10.1016/j.physa.2015.10.082] does not stand with rigorous statistical analysis. Instead, we show that the distributions are perfectly described by power-law tails with stable exponents, whose values are close to 2, in agreement with the classical Zipf's law. Some misconceptions about scaling are also clarified.

  8. Characterizing the Surface Roughness Length Scales of Lactose Carrier Particles in Dry Powder Inhalers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Bernice Mei Jin; Chan, Lai Wah; Heng, Paul Wan Sia

    2018-03-06

    Surface roughness is well recognized as a critical physical property of particulate systems, particularly in relation to adhesion, friction, and flow. An example is the surface property of carrier particles in carrier-based dry powder inhaler (DPI) formulations. The numerical characterization of roughness remains rather unsatisfactory due to the lack of spatial (or length scale) information about surface features when a common amplitude parameter such as average roughness ( R a ) is used. An analysis of the roughness of lactose carrier particles at three different length scales, designed for specificity to the study of interactive mixtures in DPI, was explored in this study. Three R a parameters were used to represent the microscale, intermediate scale, and macroscale roughness of six types of surface-modified carriers. Coating of micronized lactose fines on coarse carrier particles increased their microroughness from 389 to 639 nm while the macroroughness was not affected. Roller compaction at higher roll forces led to very effective surface roughening, particularly at longer length scales. Changes in R a parameters corroborated the visual observations of particles under the scanning electron microscope. Roughness at the intermediate scale showed the best correlation with the fine particle fraction (FPF) of DPI formulations. From the range of 250 to 650 nm, every 100 nm increase in the intermediate roughness led to ∼8% increase in the FPF. However, the effect of surface roughness was greatly diminished when fine lactose (median size, 9 μm) of comparable amounts to the micronized drug were added to the formulation. The combination of roughness parameters at various length scales provided much discriminatory surface information, which then revealed the "quality" of roughness necessary for improving DPI performance.

  9. Determining the minimal length scale of the generalized uncertainty principle from the entropy-area relationship

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Wontae; Oh, John J.

    2008-01-01

    We derive the formula of the black hole entropy with a minimal length of the Planck size by counting quantum modes of scalar fields in the vicinity of the black hole horizon, taking into account the generalized uncertainty principle (GUP). This formula is applied to some intriguing examples of black holes - the Schwarzschild black hole, the Reissner-Nordstrom black hole, and the magnetically charged dilatonic black hole. As a result, it is shown that the GUP parameter can be determined by imposing the black hole entropy-area relationship, which has a Planck length scale and a universal form within the near-horizon expansion

  10. A simple physical model predicts small exon length variations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available One of the most common splice variations are small exon length variations caused by the use of alternative donor or acceptor splice sites that are in very close proximity on the pre-mRNA. Among these, three-nucleotide variations at so-called NAGNAG tandem acceptor sites have recently attracted considerable attention, and it has been suggested that these variations are regulated and serve to fine-tune protein forms by the addition or removal of a single amino acid. In this paper we first show that in-frame exon length variations are generally overrepresented and that this overrepresentation can be quantitatively explained by the effect of nonsense-mediated decay. Our analysis allows us to estimate that about 50% of frame-shifted coding transcripts are targeted by nonsense-mediated decay. Second, we show that a simple physical model that assumes that the splicing machinery stochastically binds to nearby splice sites in proportion to the affinities of the sites correctly predicts the relative abundances of different small length variations at both boundaries. Finally, using the same simple physical model, we show that for NAGNAG sites, the difference in affinities of the neighboring sites for the splicing machinery accurately predicts whether splicing will occur only at the first site, splicing will occur only at the second site, or three-nucleotide splice variants are likely to occur. Our analysis thus suggests that small exon length variations are the result of stochastic binding of the spliceosome at neighboring splice sites. Small exon length variations occur when there are nearby alternative splice sites that have similar affinity for the splicing machinery.

  11. Length-scale effect due to periodic variation of geometrically necessary dislocation densities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Oztop, M. S.; Niordson, Christian Frithiof; Kysar, J. W.

    2013-01-01

    Strain gradient plasticity theories have been successful in predicting qualitative aspects of the length scale effect, most notably the increase in yield strength and hardness as the size of the deforming volume decreases. However new experimental methodologies enabled by recent developments...... the microstructure of deformed metals in addition to the size effect. Recent GND measurements have revealed a distribution of length scales that evolves within a metal undergoing plastic deformation. Furthermore, these experiments have shown an accumulation of GND densities in cell walls as well as a variation...... of the saturation value of dislocation densities in these cell walls and dislocation structures. In this study, a strain gradient plasticity framework is extended by incorporating the physical quantities obtained from experimental observations: the quasi-periodicity and the saturation value of GND densities...

  12. The "lotus effect" explained: two reasons why two length scales of topography are important.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Lichao; McCarthy, Thomas J

    2006-03-28

    Surfaces containing 4 x 8 x 40 microm staggered rhombus posts were hydrophobized using two methods. One, using a dimethyldichlorosilane reaction in the vapor phase, introduces a smooth modified layer, and the other, a solution reaction using methyltrichlorosilane, imparts a second (nanoscopic) length scale of topography. The smooth modified surface exhibits contact angles of thetaA/thetaR = 176 degrees /156 degrees . Arguments are made that the pinning of the receding contact line by the post tops (with thetaA/thetaR = 104 degrees /103 degrees ) is responsible for the hysteresis. The second level of topography raises the contact angles of the post tops and the macroscopic sample to theta(A)/theta(R) = >176 degrees />176 degrees and eliminates hysteresis. The increase in Laplace pressure due to the increase in the advancing contact angle of the post tops is a second reason that two length scales of topography are important.

  13. Observation of two length scales in the magnetic critical fluctuations of holmium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thurston, T.R.; Helgesen, G.; Gibbs, D.; Hill, J.P.; Gaulin, B.D.; Shirane, G.

    1993-01-01

    The short-ranged correlations associated with magneitc ordering in the rare earth antiferromagnet holmium have been characterized in high-resolution x-ray and neutron scattering studies. We find that within about 2 K of T c , the magnetic fluctuations exhibit two length scales, instead of one as expected in an ideal system. This result is reminiscent of behavior observed at the cubic-to-tegragonal structural phase transitions of the perovskites

  14. Image processing for quantifying fracture orientation and length scale transitions during brittle deformation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rizzo, R. E.; Healy, D.; Farrell, N. J.

    2017-12-01

    We have implemented a novel image processing tool, namely two-dimensional (2D) Morlet wavelet analysis, capable of detecting changes occurring in fracture patterns at different scales of observation, and able of recognising the dominant fracture orientations and the spatial configurations for progressively larger (or smaller) scale of analysis. Because of its inherited anisotropy, the Morlet wavelet is proved to be an excellent choice for detecting directional linear features, i.e. regions where the amplitude of the signal is regular along one direction and has sharp variation along the perpendicular direction. Performances of the Morlet wavelet are tested against the 'classic' Mexican hat wavelet, deploying a complex synthetic fracture network. When applied to a natural fracture network, formed triaxially (σ1>σ2=σ3) deforming a core sample of the Hopeman sandstone, the combination of 2D Morlet wavelet and wavelet coefficient maps allows for the detection of characteristic scale orientation and length transitions, associated with the shifts from distributed damage to the growth of localised macroscopic shear fracture. A complementary outcome arises from the wavelet coefficient maps produced by increasing the wavelet scale parameter. These maps can be used to chart the variations in the spatial distribution of the analysed entities, meaning that it is possible to retrieve information on the density of fracture patterns at specific length scales during deformation.

  15. Differential scaling patterns of vertebrae and the evolution of neck length in mammals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnold, Patrick; Amson, Eli; Fischer, Martin S

    2017-06-01

    Almost all mammals have seven vertebrae in their cervical spines. This consistency represents one of the most prominent examples of morphological stasis in vertebrae evolution. Hence, the requirements associated with evolutionary modifications of neck length have to be met with a fixed number of vertebrae. It has not been clear whether body size influences the overall length of the cervical spine and its inner organization (i.e., if the mammalian neck is subject to allometry). Here, we provide the first large-scale analysis of the scaling patterns of the cervical spine and its constituting cervical vertebrae. Our findings reveal that the opposite allometric scaling of C1 and C2-C7 accommodate the increase of neck bending moment with body size. The internal organization of the neck skeleton exhibits surprisingly uniformity in the vast majority of mammals. Deviations from this general pattern only occur under extreme loading regimes associated with particular functional and allometric demands. Our results indicate that the main source of variation in the mammalian neck stems from the disparity of overall cervical spine length. The mammalian neck reveals how evolutionary disparity manifests itself in a structure that is otherwise highly restricted by meristic constraints. © 2017 The Author(s). Evolution © 2017 The Society for the Study of Evolution.

  16. Quantitative atom probe analysis of nanostructure containing clusters and precipitates with multiple length scales

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marceau, R.K.W.; Stephenson, L.T.; Hutchinson, C.R.; Ringer, S.P.

    2011-01-01

    A model Al-3Cu-(0.05 Sn) (wt%) alloy containing a bimodal distribution of relatively shear-resistant θ' precipitates and shearable GP zones is considered in this study. It has recently been shown that the addition of the GP zones to such microstructures can lead to significant increases in strength without a decrease in the uniform elongation. In this study, atom probe tomography (APT) has been used to quantitatively characterise the evolution of the GP zones and the solute distribution in the bimodal microstructure as a function of applied plastic strain. Recent nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) analysis has clearly shown strain-induced dissolution of the GP zones, which is supported by the current APT data with additional spatial information. There is significant repartitioning of Cu from the GP zones into the solid solution during deformation. A new approach for cluster finding in APT data has been used to quantitatively characterise the evolution of the sizes and shapes of the Cu containing features in the solid solution solute as a function of applied strain. -- Research highlights: → A new approach for cluster finding in atom probe tomography (APT) data has been used to quantitatively characterise the evolution of the sizes and shapes of the Cu containing features with multiple length scales. → In this study, a model Al-3Cu-(0.05 Sn) (wt%) alloy containing a bimodal distribution of relatively shear-resistant θ' precipitates and shearable GP zones is considered. → APT has been used to quantitatively characterise the evolution of the GP zones and the solute distribution in the bimodal microstructure as a function of applied plastic strain. → It is clearly shown that there is strain-induced dissolution of the GP zones with significant repartitioning of Cu from the GP zones into the solid solution during deformation.

  17. Length-scale and strain rate-dependent mechanism of defect formation and fracture in carbon nanotubes under tensile loading

    Science.gov (United States)

    Javvaji, Brahmanandam; Raha, S.; Mahapatra, D. Roy

    2017-02-01

    Electromagnetic and thermo-mechanical forces play a major role in nanotube-based materials and devices. Under high-energy electron transport or high current densities, carbon nanotubes fail via sequential fracture. The failure sequence is governed by certain length scale and flow of current. We report a unified phenomenological model derived from molecular dynamic simulation data, which successfully captures the important physics of the complex failure process. Length-scale and strain rate-dependent defect nucleation, growth, and fracture in single-walled carbon nanotubes with diameters in the range of 0.47 to 2.03 nm and length which is about 6.17 to 26.45 nm are simulated. Nanotubes with long length and small diameter show brittle fracture, while those with short length and large diameter show transition from ductile to brittle fracture. In short nanotubes with small diameters, we observe several structural transitions like Stone-Wales defect initiation, its propagation to larger void nucleation, formation of multiple chains of atoms, conversion to monatomic chain of atoms, and finally complete fracture of the carbon nanotube. Hybridization state of carbon-carbon bonds near the end cap evolves, leading to the formation of monatomic chain in short nanotubes with small diameter. Transition from ductile to brittle fracture is also observed when strain rate exceeds a critical value. A generalized analytical model of failure is established, which correlates the defect energy during the formation of atomic chain with aspect ratio of the nanotube and strain rate. Variation in the mechanical properties such as elastic modulus, tensile strength, and fracture strain with the size and strain rate shows important implications in mitigating force fields and ways to enhance the life of electronic devices and nanomaterial conversion via fracture in manufacturing.

  18. Length-scale and strain rate-dependent mechanism of defect formation and fracture in carbon nanotubes under tensile loading

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Javvaji, Brahmanandam [Indian Institute of Science, Department of Aerospace Engineering (India); Raha, S. [Indian Institute of Science, Department of Computational and Data Sciences (India); Mahapatra, D. Roy, E-mail: droymahapatra@aero.iisc.ernet.in [Indian Institute of Science, Department of Aerospace Engineering (India)

    2017-02-15

    Electromagnetic and thermo-mechanical forces play a major role in nanotube-based materials and devices. Under high-energy electron transport or high current densities, carbon nanotubes fail via sequential fracture. The failure sequence is governed by certain length scale and flow of current. We report a unified phenomenological model derived from molecular dynamic simulation data, which successfully captures the important physics of the complex failure process. Length-scale and strain rate-dependent defect nucleation, growth, and fracture in single-walled carbon nanotubes with diameters in the range of 0.47 to 2.03 nm and length which is about 6.17 to 26.45 nm are simulated. Nanotubes with long length and small diameter show brittle fracture, while those with short length and large diameter show transition from ductile to brittle fracture. In short nanotubes with small diameters, we observe several structural transitions like Stone-Wales defect initiation, its propagation to larger void nucleation, formation of multiple chains of atoms, conversion to monatomic chain of atoms, and finally complete fracture of the carbon nanotube. Hybridization state of carbon-carbon bonds near the end cap evolves, leading to the formation of monatomic chain in short nanotubes with small diameter. Transition from ductile to brittle fracture is also observed when strain rate exceeds a critical value. A generalized analytical model of failure is established, which correlates the defect energy during the formation of atomic chain with aspect ratio of the nanotube and strain rate. Variation in the mechanical properties such as elastic modulus, tensile strength, and fracture strain with the size and strain rate shows important implications in mitigating force fields and ways to enhance the life of electronic devices and nanomaterial conversion via fracture in manufacturing.

  19. Boundary asymptotics for a non-neutral electrochemistry model with small Debye length

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Chiun-Chang; Ryham, Rolf J.

    2018-04-01

    This article addresses the boundary asymptotics of the electrostatic potential in non-neutral electrochemistry models with small Debye length in bounded domains. Under standard physical assumptions motivated by non-electroneutral phenomena in oxidation-reduction reactions, we show that the electrostatic potential asymptotically blows up at boundary points with respect to the bulk reference potential as the scaled Debye length tends to zero. The analysis gives a lower bound for the blow-up rate with respect to the model parameters. Moreover, the maximum potential difference over any compact subset of the physical domain vanishes exponentially in the zero-Debye-length limit. The results mathematically confirm the physical description that electrolyte solutions are electrically neutral in the bulk and are strongly electrically non-neutral near charged surfaces.

  20. Context Tree Estimation in Variable Length Hidden Markov Models

    OpenAIRE

    Dumont, Thierry

    2011-01-01

    We address the issue of context tree estimation in variable length hidden Markov models. We propose an estimator of the context tree of the hidden Markov process which needs no prior upper bound on the depth of the context tree. We prove that the estimator is strongly consistent. This uses information-theoretic mixture inequalities in the spirit of Finesso and Lorenzo(Consistent estimation of the order for Markov and hidden Markov chains(1990)) and E.Gassiat and S.Boucheron (Optimal error exp...

  1. Modeling Wood Fibre Length in Black Spruce (Picea mariana (Mill. BSP Based on Ecological Land Classification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisha Townshend

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Effective planning to optimize the forest value chain requires accurate and detailed information about the resource; however, estimates of the distribution of fibre properties on the landscape are largely unavailable prior to harvest. Our objective was to fit a model of the tree-level average fibre length related to ecosite classification and other forest inventory variables depicted at the landscape scale. A series of black spruce increment cores were collected at breast height from trees in nine different ecosite groups within the boreal forest of northeastern Ontario, and processed using standard techniques for maceration and fibre length measurement. Regression tree analysis and random forests were used to fit hierarchical classification models and find the most important predictor variables for the response variable area-weighted mean stem-level fibre length. Ecosite group was the best predictor in the regression tree. Longer mean fibre-length was associated with more productive ecosites that supported faster growth. The explanatory power of the model of fitted data was good; however, random forests simulations indicated poor generalizability. These results suggest the potential to develop localized models linking wood fibre length in black spruce to landscape-level attributes, and improve the sustainability of forest management by identifying ideal locations to harvest wood that has desirable fibre characteristics.

  2. International Symposia on Scale Modeling

    CERN Document Server

    Ito, Akihiko; Nakamura, Yuji; Kuwana, Kazunori

    2015-01-01

    This volume thoroughly covers scale modeling and serves as the definitive source of information on scale modeling as a powerful simplifying and clarifying tool used by scientists and engineers across many disciplines. The book elucidates techniques used when it would be too expensive, or too difficult, to test a system of interest in the field. Topics addressed in the current edition include scale modeling to study weather systems, diffusion of pollution in air or water, chemical process in 3-D turbulent flow, multiphase combustion, flame propagation, biological systems, behavior of materials at nano- and micro-scales, and many more. This is an ideal book for students, both graduate and undergraduate, as well as engineers and scientists interested in the latest developments in scale modeling. This book also: Enables readers to evaluate essential and salient aspects of profoundly complex systems, mechanisms, and phenomena at scale Offers engineers and designers a new point of view, liberating creative and inno...

  3. Self-Consistent Field Theories for the Role of Large Length-Scale Architecture in Polymers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, David

    At large length-scales, the architecture of polymers can be described by a coarse-grained specification of the distribution of branch points and monomer types within a molecule. This includes molecular topology (e.g., cyclic or branched) as well as distances between branch points or chain ends. Design of large length-scale molecular architecture is appealing because it offers a universal strategy, independent of monomer chemistry, to tune properties. Non-linear analogs of linear chains differ in molecular-scale properties, such as mobility, entanglements, and surface segregation in blends that are well-known to impact rheological, dynamical, thermodynamic and surface properties including adhesion and wetting. We have used Self-Consistent Field (SCF) theories to describe a number of phenomena associated with large length-scale polymer architecture. We have predicted the surface composition profiles of non-linear chains in blends with linear chains. These predictions are in good agreement with experimental results, including from neutron scattering, on a range of well-controlled branched (star, pom-pom and end-branched) and cyclic polymer architectures. Moreover, the theory allows explanation of the segregation and conformations of branched polymers in terms of effective surface potentials acting on the end and branch groups. However, for cyclic chains, which have no end or junction points, a qualitatively different topological mechanism based on conformational entropy drives cyclic chains to a surface, consistent with recent neutron reflectivity experiments. We have also used SCF theory to calculate intramolecular and intermolecular correlations for polymer chains in the bulk, dilute solution, and trapped at a liquid-liquid interface. Predictions of chain swelling in dilute star polymer solutions compare favorably with existing PRISM theory and swelling at an interface helps explain recent measurements of chain mobility at an oil-water interface. In collaboration

  4. Nature of the spin-glass phase at experimental length scales

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alvarez Baños, R; Cruz, A; Fernandez, L A; Gil-Narvion, J M; Gordillo-Guerrero, A; Maiorano, A; Martin-Mayor, V; Monforte-Garcia, J; Perez-Gaviro, S; Ruiz-Lorenzo, J J; Seoane, B; Tarancon, A; Guidetti, M; Mantovani, F; Schifano, S F; Tripiccione, R; Marinari, E; Parisi, G; Muñoz Sudupe, A; Navarro, D

    2010-01-01

    We present a massive equilibrium simulation of the three-dimensional Ising spin glass at low temperatures. The Janus special-purpose computer has allowed us to equilibrate, using parallel tempering, L = 32 lattices down to T ≈ 0.64T c . We demonstrate the relevance of equilibrium finite size simulations to understanding experimental non-equilibrium spin glasses in the thermodynamical limit by establishing a time-length dictionary. We conclude that non-equilibrium experiments performed on a timescale of 1 h can be matched with equilibrium results on L ≈ 110 lattices. A detailed investigation of the probability distribution functions of the spin and link overlap, as well as of their correlation functions, shows that Replica Symmetry Breaking is the appropriate theoretical framework for the physically relevant length scales. Besides, we improve over existing methodologies in ensuring equilibration in parallel tempering simulations

  5. Multi-scale modeling strategies in materials science—The ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    will review the recently developed quasicontinuum method which is an attempt to bridge the length scales in a single seamless model with the aid of the finite element method. Attempts to generalize this method to finite temperatures will be outlined. Keywords. Multi-scale models; quasicontinuum method; finite elements. 1.

  6. Length Scale Dependence of the Dynamic Properties of Hyaluronic Acid Solutions in the Presence of Salt

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Horkay, Ferenc; Falus, Peter; Hecht, Anne-Marie; Geissler, Erik (CNRS-UMR); (NIH); (ILL)

    2010-12-07

    In solutions of the charged semirigid biopolymer hyaluronic acid in salt-free conditions, the diffusion coefficient D{sub NSE} measured at high transfer momentum q by neutron spin echo is more than an order of magnitude smaller than that determined by dynamic light scattering, D{sub DLS}. This behavior contrasts with neutral polymer solutions. With increasing salt content, D{sub DLS} approaches D{sub NSE}, which is independent of ionic strength. Contrary to theoretical expectation, the ion-polymer coupling, which dominates the low q dynamics of polyelectrolyte solutions, already breaks down at distance scales greater than the Debye-Hueckel length.

  7. Synchrotron X-Ray Scattering as a Tool for Characterising Catalysts on Multiple Length Scales

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hudspeth, Jessica M.; Kvashnina, Kristina O.; Kimber, Simon A.J.; Mitchell, Edward P.

    2015-01-01

    Optimising the properties of catalysts for industrial processes requires a detailed knowledge of their structure and properties on multiple length scales. Synchrotron light sources are ideal tools for characterising catalysts for industrial R and D, providing data with high temporal and spatial resolution, under realistic operating conditions, in a non-destructive way. Here, we describe the different synchrotron techniques that can be employed to gain a wealth of complementary information, and highlight recent developments that have allowed remarkable insight to be gained into working catalytic systems. These techniques have the potential to guide future industrial catalyst design. (authors)

  8. Explanation of the values of Hack's drainage basin, river length scaling exponent

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunt, A. G.

    2015-08-01

    Percolation theory can be used to find water flow paths of least resistance. The application of percolation theory to drainage networks allows identification of the range of exponent values that describe the tortuosity of rivers in real river networks, which is then used to generate the observed scaling between drainage basin area and channel length, a relationship known as Hack's law. Such a theoretical basis for Hack's law allows interpretation of the range of exponent values based on an assessment of the heterogeneity of the substrate.

  9. Brief communication: Possible explanation of the values of Hack's drainage basin, river length scaling exponent

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunt, Allen G.

    2016-04-01

    Percolation theory can be used to find water flow paths of least resistance. Application of percolation theory to drainage networks allows identification of the range of exponent values that describe the tortuosity of rivers in real river networks, which is then used to generate the observed scaling between drainage basin area and channel length, a relationship known as Hack's law. Such a theoretical basis for Hack's law may allow interpretation of the range of exponent values based on an assessment of the heterogeneity of the substrate.

  10. Lead Selenide Nanostructures Self-Assembled across Multiple Length Scales and Dimensions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evan K. Wujcik

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A self-assembly approach to lead selenide (PbSe structures that have organized across multiple length scales and multiple dimensions has been achieved. These structures consist of angstrom-scale 0D PbSe crystals, synthesized via a hot solution process, which have stacked into 1D nanorods via aligned dipoles. These 1D nanorods have arranged into nanoscale 2D sheets via directional short-ranged attraction. The nanoscale 2D sheets then further aligned into larger 2D microscale planes. In this study, the authors have characterized the PbSe structures via normal and cryo-TEM and EDX showing that this multiscale multidimensional self-assembled alignment is not due to drying effects. These PbSe structures hold promise for applications in advanced materials—particularly electronic technologies, where alignment can aid in device performance.

  11. Strain rate, temperature and representative length scale influence on plasticity and yield stress in copper

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dupont, Virginie [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Germann, Timothy C [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2011-01-18

    Shock compression of materials constitutes a complex process involving high strain rates, elevated temperatures and compression of the lattice. Materials properties are greatly affected by temperature, the representative length scale and the strain rate of the deformation. Experimentally, it is difficult to study the dynamic microscopic mechanisms that affect materials properties following high intensity shock loading, but they can be investigated using molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. Moreover, MD allows a better control over some parameters. We are using MD simulations to study the effect of the strain rate, representative length scale and temperature on the properties of metals during compression. A half-million-atom Cu sample is subjected to strain rates ranging from 10{sup 7} s{sup -1} to 10{sup 12} s{sup -1} at different temperatures ranging from 50K to 1500K. Single crystals as well as polycrystals are investigated. Plasticity mechanisms as well as the evolution of the micro- and macro-yield stress are observed. Our results show that the yield stress increases with increasing strain rate and decreasing temperature. We also show that the strain rate at which the transition between constant and increasing yield stress as a function of the temperature occurs increases with increasing temperature. Calculations at different grain sizes will give an insight into the grain size effect on the plasticity mechanisms and the yield stress.

  12. Origin of the second length scale found above TN in UO2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watson, G.M.; Gaulin, B.D.; Gibbs, D.; Thurston, T.R.; Simpson, P.J.; Shapiro, S.M.; Lander, G.H.; Matzke, H.; Wang, S.; Dudley, M.

    1996-01-01

    We present the results of x-ray- and neutron-scattering studies of the temperature dependence of the magnetic scattering exhibited by the type-I, triple-Q antiferromagnet UO 2 . Our neutron-scattering results are consistent with those of earlier studies, including the observation of short-ranged magnetic correlations at temperatures near and above T N . However, it is found by x-ray diffraction that a second, longer length scale is induced near T N when the near-surface volume of the sample is mechanically roughened. The longitudinal and transverse widths of the additional scattering increase continuously with increasing temperature above T N , similar to that which has been observed near the magnetic ordering transitions of Ho, Tb, and NpAs and near the tetragonal-to-cubic transitions of various perovskites. Another unusual feature of the present results for UO 2 involves the apparent shift with temperature of the magnetic scattering along the surface normal direction at the (1,1,0) reflection, but not at the (2,1,0) reflection. To our knowledge, this is the first observation of a second length scale near a first-order transition. copyright 1996 The American Physical Society

  13. Taylor-plasticity-based analysis of length scale effects in void growth

    KAUST Repository

    Liu, Junxian

    2014-09-25

    We have studied the void growth problem by employing the Taylor-based strain gradient plasticity theories, from which we have chosen the following three, namely, the mechanism-based strain gradient (MSG) plasticity (Gao et al 1999 J. Mech. Phys. Solids 47 1239, Huang et al 2000 J. Mech. Phys. Solids 48 99-128), the Taylor-based nonlocal theory (TNT; 2001 Gao and Huang 2001 Int. J. Solids Struct. 38 2615) and the conventional theory of MSG (CMSG; Huang et al 2004 Int. J. Plast. 20 753). We have addressed the following three issues which occur when plastic deformation at the void surface is unconstrained. (1) Effects of elastic deformation. Elasticity is essential for cavitation instability. It is therefore important to guarantee that the gradient term entering the Taylor model is the effective plastic strain gradient instead of the total strain gradient. We propose a simple elastic-plastic decomposition method. When the void size approaches the minimum allowable initial void size related to the maximum allowable geometrically necessary dislocation density, overestimation of the flow stress due to the negligence of the elastic strain gradient is on the order of lεY/R0 near the void surface, where l, εY and R0 are, respectively, the intrinsic material length scale, the yield strain and the initial void radius. (2) MSG intrinsic inconsistency, which was initially mentioned in Gao et al (1999 J. Mech. Phys. Solids 47 1239) but has not been the topic of follow-up studies. We realize that MSG higher-order stress arises due to the linear-strain-field approximation within the mesoscale cell with a nonzero size, lε. Simple analysis shows that within an MSG mesoscale cell near the void surface, the difference between microscale and mesoscale strains is on the order of (lε/R0)2, indicating that when lε/R0 ∼ 1.0, the higher-order stress effect can make the MSG result considerably different from the TNT or CMSG results. (3) Critical condition for cavitation instability

  14. Role of Length Scales on Environmental Performance Metrics for Statistical Characterization of Well-Head Protection Regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Barros, F.; Guadagnini, A.; Fernandez-Garcia, D.; Riva, M.; Sanchez-Vila, X.

    2012-12-01

    We address the value of typically available hydrogeological information on environmental performance metrics (EPMs) as a function of several characteristic length scales that define groundwater flow and nonreactive solute transport in the presence of a pumping well. Improvement in the delineation of the well region of influence and reduction of the uncertainty associated with transport predictions is usually performed by means of hydrogeological sampling campaigns. We model aquifer heterogeneity through a spatially random hydraulic conductivity distribution and assess the ensuing uncertainty associated with predictions of key transport quantities conditioned to the probability that a distributed contaminant spill is captured by the well. We focus on the assessment of the impact of the acquisition of typical hydrogeological data on the reduction of uncertainty linked to the environmental scenario analyzed. We present a numerical investigation of the significance of the amount of available transmissivity measurements to yield predictions at a desired level of uncertainty of the following EPMs: (a) characteristic solute residence times in the system, and (b) the total mass exceeding a given threshold which is recovered by the well. We elucidate the role of the main (dimensionless) length scales that define and control the uncertainty associated with the target EPMs and infer a probabilistic model characterizing such uncertainty.

  15. Learning atomic human actions using variable-length Markov models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Yu-Ming; Shih, Sheng-Wen; Shih, Arthur Chun-Chieh; Liao, Hong-Yuan Mark; Lin, Cheng-Chung

    2009-02-01

    Visual analysis of human behavior has generated considerable interest in the field of computer vision because of its wide spectrum of potential applications. Human behavior can be segmented into atomic actions, each of which indicates a basic and complete movement. Learning and recognizing atomic human actions are essential to human behavior analysis. In this paper, we propose a framework for handling this task using variable-length Markov models (VLMMs). The framework is comprised of the following two modules: a posture labeling module and a VLMM atomic action learning and recognition module. First, a posture template selection algorithm, based on a modified shape context matching technique, is developed. The selected posture templates form a codebook that is used to convert input posture sequences into discrete symbol sequences for subsequent processing. Then, the VLMM technique is applied to learn the training symbol sequences of atomic actions. Finally, the constructed VLMMs are transformed into hidden Markov models (HMMs) for recognizing input atomic actions. This approach combines the advantages of the excellent learning function of a VLMM and the fault-tolerant recognition ability of an HMM. Experiments on realistic data demonstrate the efficacy of the proposed system.

  16. On the Evolution of the Integral Length Scale in the Wake of Wind Turbines and within Wind Farms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Huiwen; Jin, Yaqing; Hayat, Imran; Chamorro, Leonardo P.

    2017-11-01

    Wind tunnel experiments were performed to characterize the evolution of integral length scale in the wake of a single turbine, and around wind farms. Hotwire anemometry was used to obtain high-resolution measurements of the streamwise velocity fluctuation at various locations. Negligible and high freestream turbulence levels were considered in the case of single turbine. The integral length scale along the rotor axis is found to grow nearly linearly with distance independent of the incoming turbulence levels, and appears to reach the incoming level in the high turbulence case at about 35-40 rotor diameters downstream. In the wind farm, results suggest that the distribution of integral length scale can be roughly described by a power-law growth with distance within consecutive turbines. Approximately past the third row, the integral length scale appears to reach equilibrium of the spatial distribution.

  17. Advancing the speed, sensitivity and accuracy of biomolecular detection using multi-length-scale engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelley, Shana O.; Mirkin, Chad A.; Walt, David R.; Ismagilov, Rustem F.; Toner, Mehmet; Sargent, Edward H.

    2014-12-01

    Rapid progress in identifying disease biomarkers has increased the importance of creating high-performance detection technologies. Over the last decade, the design of many detection platforms has focused on either the nano or micro length scale. Here, we review recent strategies that combine nano- and microscale materials and devices to produce large improvements in detection sensitivity, speed and accuracy, allowing previously undetectable biomarkers to be identified in clinical samples. Microsensors that incorporate nanoscale features can now rapidly detect disease-related nucleic acids expressed in patient samples. New microdevices that separate large clinical samples into nanocompartments allow precise quantitation of analytes, and microfluidic systems that utilize nanoscale binding events can detect rare cancer cells in the bloodstream more accurately than before. These advances will lead to faster and more reliable clinical diagnostic devices.

  18. Hierarchical self-assembly of two-length-scale multiblock copolymers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brinke, Gerrit ten; Loos, Katja; Vukovic, Ivana; Du Sart, Gerrit Gobius

    2011-01-01

    The self-assembly in diblock copolymer-based supramolecules, obtained by hydrogen bonding short side chains to one of the blocks, as well as in two-length-scale linear terpolymers results in hierarchical structure formation. The orientation of the different domains, e.g. layers in the case of a lamellar-in-lamellar structure, is determined by the molecular architecture, graft-like versus linear, and the relative magnitude of the interactions involved. In both cases parallel and perpendicular arrangements have been observed. The comb-shaped supramolecules approach is ideally suited for the preparation of nanoporous structures. A bicontinuous morphology with the supramolecular comb block forming the channels was finally achieved by extending the original approach to suitable triblock copolymer-based supramolecules.

  19. Comparison of relativity theories with observer-independent scales of both velocity and length/mass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amelino-Camelia, Giovanni; Benedetti, Dario; D'Andrea, Francesco; Procaccini, Andrea

    2003-01-01

    We consider the two most studied proposals of relativity theories with observer-independent scales of both velocity and length/mass: the one discussed by Amelino-Camelia as an illustrative example for the original proposal (Preprint gr-qc/0012051) of theories with two relativistic invariants, and an alternative more recently proposed by Magueijo and Smolin (Preprint hep-th/0112090). We show that these two relativistic theories are much more closely connected than it would appear on the basis of a naive analysis of their original formulations. In particular, in spite of adopting a rather different formal description of the deformed boost generators, they end up assigning the same dependence of momentum on rapidity, which can be described as the core feature of these relativistic theories. We show that this observation can be used to clarify the concepts of particle mass, particle velocity and energy-momentum conservation rules in these theories with two relativistic invariants

  20. In Situ Observation of Strain Evolution in Cp-Ti Over Multiple Length Scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bettles, C. J.; Lynch, P. A.; Stevenson, A. W.; Tomus, D.; Gibson, M. A.; Wallwork, K.; Kimpton, J.

    2011-01-01

    The strain evolution in polycrystalline CP-Ti strip under tension was studied in situ and at two length scales using Synchrotron X-ray diffraction. To establish the bulk material behavior, experiments were performed at the Australian Synchrotron facility. Because of the relatively large grain size, discontinuous "spotty" Debye ring patterns were observed, and a peak fitting algorithm was developed to determine the individual spot positions with the necessary precision for strain determination. The crystallographic directional dependence of strain anisotropy during the loading cycle was determined. Strain anisotropy and yielding of individual crystallographic planes prior to the macroscopic yield point were further clarified by in situ loading experiments performed at the Advanced Light Source (ALS). The deviatoric strain accumulation and plastic response were mapped on a grain-by-grain basis. The onset of microscopic yielding in the grains was identified and correlated with the relative orientation of the grains with respect to the loading direction.

  1. Multi-length scale porous polymer films from hypercrosslinked breath figure arrays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Lei; Zhang, Aijuan; Li, Wenqing; Bai, Hua; Li, Lei

    2016-01-01

    Multi-length scale porous polymer (MLSPP) films were fabricated using commercially available polystyrene (PS) via static breath figure (BF) process and sequent hypercrosslinking reaction. One level of ordered pores in microscale were introduced using static BF process, and the other level in nanoscale were produced by the sequent Friedel-Crafts hypercrosslinking reaction. The chemical structure of the PS MLSPP film was investigated by Fourier transformation infrared spectrometry and solid state nuclear magnetic resonance, and the morphology of the film was observed with electron microscopes. The MLSPP films showed large specific surface areas and excellent chemical and thermal stabilities, owing to the micropores and the crosslinked chemical structure produced by the Friedel-Crafts reaction. The methodology reported in this paper is a template-free, low cost and general strategy for the preparation of MLSPP films, which has potential applications in the areas of environment and energy. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Long-gauge length embedded fiber optic ultrasonic sensor for large-scale concrete structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Libo; Zhou, Limin; Jin, Wei

    2004-02-01

    A fiber optic ultrasonic sensor based on Fizeau interferometer has been developed and demonstrated. A helium-neon laser light source with wavelength 0.6328 μm is used in our experiment. A special feature is its Fizeau configuration, which enables one to eliminate much undesirable noise by combining both the reference arm and the sensing arm within the same length of fiber. The dynamic response model of photo-elastic effect of ultrasonic wave and optical fiber is established. The fiber optic ultrasonic sensor experimental results are obtained and compared with the convenient PZT transducer.

  3. Beam displacement as a function of temperature and turbulence length scale at two different laser radiation wavelengths.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isterling, William M; Dally, Bassam B; Alwahabi, Zeyad T; Dubovinsky, Miro; Wright, Daniel

    2012-01-01

    Narrow laser beams directed from aircraft may at times pass through the exhaust plume of the engines and potentially degrade some of the laser beam characteristics. This paper reports on controlled studies of laser beam deviation arising from propagation through turbulent hot gases, in a well-characterized laboratory burner, with conditions of relevance to aircraft engine exhaust plumes. The impact of the temperature, laser wavelength, and turbulence length scale on the beam deviation has been investigated. It was found that the laser beam displacement increases with the turbulent integral length scale. The effect of temperature on the laser beam angular deviation, σ, using two different laser wavelengths, namely 4.67 μm and 632.8 nm, was recorded. It was found that the beam deviation for both wavelengths may be semiempirically modeled using a single function of the form, σ=a(b+(1/T)(2))(-1), with two parameters only, a and b, where σ is in microradians and T is the temperature in °C. © 2012 Optical Society of America

  4. Comparison of Echo 7 field line length measurements to magnetospheric model predictions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nemzek, R.J.; Winckler, J.R.; Malcolm, P.R.

    1992-01-01

    The Echo 7 sounding rocket experiment injected electron beams on central tail field lines near L = 6.5. Numerous injections returned to the payload as conjugate echoes after mirroring in the southern hemisphere. The authors compare field line lengths calculated from measured conjugate echo bounce times and energies to predictions made by integrating electron trajectories through various magnetospheric models: the Olson-Pfitzer Quiet and Dynamic models and the Tsyganenko-Usmanov model. Although Kp at launch was 3-, quiet time magnetic models est fit the echo measurements. Geosynchronous satellite magnetometer measurements near the Echo 7 field lies during the flight were best modeled by the Olson-Pfitzer Dynamic Model and the Tsyganenko-Usmanov model for Kp = 3. The discrepancy between the models that best fit the Echo 7 data and those that fit the satellite data was most likely due to uncertainties in the small-scale configuration of the magnetospheric models. The field line length measured by the conjugate echoes showed some temporal variation in the magnetic field, also indicated by the satellite magnetometers. This demonstrates the utility an Echo-style experiment could have in substorm studies

  5. Correlation Lengths for Estimating the Large-Scale Carbon and Heat Content of the Southern Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazloff, M. R.; Cornuelle, B. D.; Gille, S. T.; Verdy, A.

    2018-02-01

    The spatial correlation scales of oceanic dissolved inorganic carbon, heat content, and carbon and heat exchanges with the atmosphere are estimated from a realistic numerical simulation of the Southern Ocean. Biases in the model are assessed by comparing the simulated sea surface height and temperature scales to those derived from optimally interpolated satellite measurements. While these products do not resolve all ocean scales, they are representative of the climate scale variability we aim to estimate. Results show that constraining the carbon and heat inventory between 35°S and 70°S on time-scales longer than 90 days requires approximately 100 optimally spaced measurement platforms: approximately one platform every 20° longitude by 6° latitude. Carbon flux has slightly longer zonal scales, and requires a coverage of approximately 30° by 6°. Heat flux has much longer scales, and thus a platform distribution of approximately 90° by 10° would be sufficient. Fluxes, however, have significant subseasonal variability. For all fields, and especially fluxes, sustained measurements in time are required to prevent aliasing of the eddy signals into the longer climate scale signals. Our results imply a minimum of 100 biogeochemical-Argo floats are required to monitor the Southern Ocean carbon and heat content and air-sea exchanges on time-scales longer than 90 days. However, an estimate of formal mapping error using the current Argo array implies that in practice even an array of 600 floats (a nominal float density of about 1 every 7° longitude by 3° latitude) will result in nonnegligible uncertainty in estimating climate signals.

  6. Influence of the course boundary value problem on length scale parmeters for second-gradient continuum theories

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luscher, Darby J [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Bronkhorst, Curt A [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Mc Dowell, David L [GEORGIA TECH

    2010-12-20

    All nonlocal continuum descriptions of inelastic material response involve length scale parameters that either directly or implicitly quantify the physical dimensions of a neighborhood of response which influences the behavior at a particular point. The second-gradient continuum theories such as those developed by Germain, Toupin and Mindlin, and Eringen, and giving rise to strain-gradient plasticity, is becoming a common coarse-scale basis for homogenization of material response that respects the non local nature of heterogeneous material response. Ideally, the length scale parameters involved in such homogenization would be intrinsically associated with dominant aspects of the microstructure. However, these parameters, at least in some cases, are inextricably linked to the details of the coarse scale boundary value problem. Accordingly, they cannot be viewed as pure constitutive parameters. An example problem of multiscale homogenization is presented to underscore the dependence of second-gradient length scale parameters on the coarse scale boundary value problem, namely the multiscale response of an idealized porous microstructure. The fine scale (microstructure) comprises elastic perfectly plastic matrix with a periodic array of circular voids. This fine scale description of the problem is identical for two separate classes of coarse scale boundary value problem, viz. an extruded channel subject to compression and eventually developing plastic shear bands and a thin layer of material with larger (coarse scale) elliptical voids subject to shear deformation. Implications of the relationship between length scale parameters and the details of the coarse scale boundary value problem are discussed and ideas to ascertain such length parameters from evolving response fields are presented.

  7. Predicting permeability of regular tissue engineering scaffolds: scaling analysis of pore architecture, scaffold length, and fluid flow rate effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahbari, A; Montazerian, H; Davoodi, E; Homayoonfar, S

    2017-02-01

    The main aim of this research is to numerically obtain the permeability coefficient in the cylindrical scaffolds. For this purpose, a mathematical analysis was performed to derive an equation for desired porosity in terms of morphological parameters. Then, the considered cylindrical geometries were modeled and the permeability coefficient was calculated according to the velocity and pressure drop values based on the Darcy's law. In order to validate the accuracy of the present numerical solution, the obtained permeability coefficient was compared with the published experimental data. It was observed that this model can predict permeability with the utmost accuracy. Then, the effect of geometrical parameters including porosity, scaffold pore structure, unit cell size, and length of the scaffolds as well as entrance mass flow rate on the permeability of porous structures was studied. Furthermore, a parametric study with scaling laws analysis of sample length and mass flow rate effects on the permeability showed good fit to the obtained data. It can be concluded that the sensitivity of permeability is more noticeable at higher porosities. The present approach can be used to characterize and optimize the scaffold microstructure due to the necessity of cell growth and transferring considerations.

  8. Failure analysis of fuel cell electrodes using three-dimensional multi-length scale X-ray computed tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pokhrel, A.; El Hannach, M.; Orfino, F. P.; Dutta, M.; Kjeang, E.

    2016-10-01

    X-ray computed tomography (XCT), a non-destructive technique, is proposed for three-dimensional, multi-length scale characterization of complex failure modes in fuel cell electrodes. Comparative tomography data sets are acquired for a conditioned beginning of life (BOL) and a degraded end of life (EOL) membrane electrode assembly subjected to cathode degradation by voltage cycling. Micro length scale analysis shows a five-fold increase in crack size and 57% thickness reduction in the EOL cathode catalyst layer, indicating widespread action of carbon corrosion. Complementary nano length scale analysis shows a significant reduction in porosity, increased pore size, and dramatically reduced effective diffusivity within the remaining porous structure of the catalyst layer at EOL. Collapsing of the structure is evident from the combination of thinning and reduced porosity, as uniquely determined by the multi-length scale approach. Additionally, a novel image processing based technique developed for nano scale segregation of pore, ionomer, and Pt/C dominated voxels shows an increase in ionomer volume fraction, Pt/C agglomerates, and severe carbon corrosion at the catalyst layer/membrane interface at EOL. In summary, XCT based multi-length scale analysis enables detailed information needed for comprehensive understanding of the complex failure modes observed in fuel cell electrodes.

  9. Effect of artificial length scales in large eddy simulation of a neutral atmospheric boundary layer flow: A simple solution to log-layer mismatch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatterjee, Tanmoy; Peet, Yulia T.

    2017-07-01

    A large eddy simulation (LES) methodology coupled with near-wall modeling has been implemented in the current study for high Re neutral atmospheric boundary layer flows using an exponentially accurate spectral element method in an open-source research code Nek 5000. The effect of artificial length scales due to subgrid scale (SGS) and near wall modeling (NWM) on the scaling laws and structure of the inner and outer layer eddies is studied using varying SGS and NWM parameters in the spectral element framework. The study provides an understanding of the various length scales and dynamics of the eddies affected by the LES model and also the fundamental physics behind the inner and outer layer eddies which are responsible for the correct behavior of the mean statistics in accordance with the definition of equilibrium layers by Townsend. An economical and accurate LES model based on capturing the near wall coherent eddies has been designed, which is successful in eliminating the artificial length scale effects like the log-layer mismatch or the secondary peak generation in the streamwise variance.

  10. Influence of Growth Rate on Microstructural Length Scales in Directionally Solidified NiAl-Mo Hypo-Eutectic Alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jianfei; Ma, Xuewei; Ren, Huiping; Chen, Lin; Jin, Zili; Li, Zhenliang; Shen, Jun

    2016-01-01

    In this article, the Ni-46.1Al-7.8Mo (at.%) alloy was directionally solidified at different growth rates ranging from 15 μm/s to 1000 μm/s under a constant temperature gradient (334 K/cm). The dependence of microstructural length scales on the growth rate was investigated. The results show that, with the growth rate increasing, the primary dendritic arm spacings (PDAS) and secondary dendritic arm spacings (SDAS) decreased. There exists a large distribution range in PDAS under directional solidification conditions at a constant temperature gradient. The average PDAS and SDAS as a function of growth rate can be given as λ1 = 848.8967 V-0.4509 and λ2 = 64.2196 V-0.4140, respectively. In addition, a comparison of our results with the current theoretical models and previous experimental results has also been made.

  11. Instantaneous equations for multiphase flow in porous media without length-scale restrictions using a non-local averaging volume

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Espinosa-Paredes, Gilberto

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to propose a framework to obtain a new formulation for multiphase flow conservation equations without length-scale restrictions, based on the non-local form of the averaged volume conservation equations. The simplification of the local averaging volume of the conservation equations to obtain practical equations is subject to the following length-scale restrictions: d << l << L, where d is the characteristic length of the dispersed phases, l is the characteristic length of the averaging volume, and L is the characteristic length of the physical system. If the foregoing inequality does not hold, or if the scale of the problem of interest is of the order of l, the averaging technique and therefore, the macroscopic theories of multiphase flow should be modified in order to include appropriate considerations and terms in the corresponding equations. In these cases the local form of the averaged volume conservation equations are not appropriate to describe the multiphase system. As an example of the conservation equations without length-scale restrictions, the natural circulation boiling water reactor was consider to study the non-local effects on the thermal-hydraulic core performance during steady-state and transient behaviors, and the results were compared with the classic local averaging volume conservation equations.

  12. Genetic variability of the stable fly assessed on a global scale using amplified fragment length polymorphism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kneeland, Kathleen M; Skoda, Steven R; Foster, John E

    2016-10-01

    The stable fly, Stomoxys calcitrans (L.) (Diptera: Muscidae), is a blood-feeding, economically important pest of animals and humans worldwide. Improved management strategies are essential and their development would benefit from studies on genetic diversity of stable flies. Especially if done on a global scale, such research could generate information necessary for the development and application of more efficient control methods. Herein we report on a genetic study of stable flies using amplified fragment length polymorphism, with samples of 10-40 individuals acquired from a total of 25 locations in the Nearctic, Neotropic, Palearctic, Afrotropic and Australasian biogeographical regions. We hypothesized that genetic differentiation would exist across geographical barriers. Although FST (0.33) was moderately high, the GST (0.05; representing genetic diversity between individuals) was very low; Nm values (representing gene flow) were high (9.36). The mismatch distribution and tests of neutrality suggested population expansion, with no genetic differentiation between locations. The analysis of molecular variance (AMOVA) results showed the majority of genetic diversity was within groups. The mantel test showed no correlation between geographic and genetic distance; this strongly supports the AMOVA results. These results suggest that stable flies did not show genetic differentiation but are panmictic, with no evidence of isolation by distance or across geographical barriers. © 2015 Institute of Zoology, Chinese Academy of Sciences.

  13. Relevant time- and length scale of touch-down for drops impacting on a heated surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Limbeek, Michiel A. J.; Shirota, Minori; Sun, Chao; Prosperetti, Andrea; Lohse, Detlef

    2015-11-01

    The vapor generated from a liquid drop impacting a hot solid surface can prevent it to make contact, depending on the solid temperature. The minimum temperature when no contact is made between the drop and the solid is called the dynamic Leidenfrost temperature. The latent heat needed to generated the vapor is drawn from the solid, and in general the Leidenfrost temperature depends on the solid thermal properties. Here we show experiments conducted on a sapphire plate, to minimize the cooling of the solid and ensuring nearly isothermal conditions. By using high speed total internal reflection imaging, we observe the drop base during impact up to about 100nm above the substrate surface. By this technique we are able to study the processes responsible for the transition between fully wetting and fully levitating drop impact conditions as the solid temperature increases. We reveal the relevant length- and time-scales for the dimple formation under the drop and explain their relevance for the late-time dynamics. As the transition regime is traversed from low to high temperature, the liquid-solid contact gradually decreases which reduces the friction with the solid, enhancing the spreading of the drop considerably.

  14. Extending the length and time scales of Gram–Schmidt Lyapunov vector computations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Costa, Anthony B.; Green, Jason R.

    2013-01-01

    Lyapunov vectors have found growing interest recently due to their ability to characterize systems out of thermodynamic equilibrium. The computation of orthogonal Gram–Schmidt vectors requires multiplication and QR decomposition of large matrices, which grow as N 2 (with the particle count). This expense has limited such calculations to relatively small systems and short time scales. Here, we detail two implementations of an algorithm for computing Gram–Schmidt vectors. The first is a distributed-memory message-passing method using Scalapack. The second uses the newly-released MAGMA library for GPUs. We compare the performance of both codes for Lennard–Jones fluids from N=100 to 1300 between Intel Nahalem/Infiniband DDR and NVIDIA C2050 architectures. To our best knowledge, these are the largest systems for which the Gram–Schmidt Lyapunov vectors have been computed, and the first time their calculation has been GPU-accelerated. We conclude that Lyapunov vector calculations can be significantly extended in length and time by leveraging the power of GPU-accelerated linear algebra

  15. Bifurcation and phase diagram of turbulence constituted from three different scale-length modes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Itoh, S.-I.; Kitazawa, A.; Yagi, M.; Itoh, K.

    2002-04-01

    Cases where three kinds of fluctuations having the different typical scale-lengths coexist are analyzed, and the statistical theory of strong turbulence in inhomogeneous plasmas is developed. Statistical nonlinear interactions between fluctuations are kept in the analysis as the renormalized drag, statistical noise and the averaged drive. The nonlinear interplay through them induces a quenching or suppressing effect, even if all the modes are unstable when they are analyzed independently. Variety in mode appearance takes place: one mode quenches the other two modes, or one mode is quenched by the other two modes, etc. The bifurcation of turbulence is analyzed and a phase diagram is drawn. Phase diagrams with cusp type catastrophe and butterfly type catastrophe are obtained. The subcritical bifurcation is possible to occur through the nonlinear interplay, even though each one is supercritical turbulence when analyzed independently. Analysis reveals that the nonlinear stability boundary (marginal point) and the amplitude of each mode may substantially shift from the conventional results of independent analyses. (author)

  16. Cellular adaptation to biomechanical stress across length scales in tissue homeostasis and disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbert, Penney M; Weaver, Valerie M

    2017-07-01

    Human tissues are remarkably adaptable and robust, harboring the collective ability to detect and respond to external stresses while maintaining tissue integrity. Following injury, many tissues have the capacity to repair the damage - and restore form and function - by deploying cellular and molecular mechanisms reminiscent of developmental programs. Indeed, it is increasingly clear that cancer and chronic conditions that develop with age arise as a result of cells and tissues re-implementing and deregulating a selection of developmental programs. Therefore, understanding the fundamental molecular mechanisms that drive cell and tissue responses is a necessity when designing therapies to treat human conditions. Extracellular matrix stiffness synergizes with chemical cues to drive single cell and collective cell behavior in culture and acts to establish and maintain tissue homeostasis in the body. This review will highlight recent advances that elucidate the impact of matrix mechanics on cell behavior and fate across these length scales during times of homeostasis and in disease states. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Revisiting the Scale Length-μ0 Plane and the Freeman Law in the Local Universe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fathi, Kambiz

    2010-10-01

    We have used Virtual Observatory technology to analyze the disk scale length rd and central surface brightness μ0 for a sample of 29,955 bright disk galaxies from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. We use the results in the r band and revisit the relation between these parameters and the galaxy morphology, and find the average value langμ0rang = 20.2 ± 0.7 mag arcsec-2. We confirm that late-type spirals populate the lower left corner of the rd -μ0 plane and that the early and intermediate spirals are mixed in this diagram, with disky ellipticals at the top left corner. We further investigate the Freeman Law and confirm that it indeed defines an upper limit for μ0 in bright disk galaxies with r mag = 6) have fainter central surface brightness. Our results are based on a volume-corrected sample of galaxies in the local universe (z numerical simulations of galaxy formation and evolution.

  18. Quantum chaos of a particle in a square well: Competing length scales and dynamical localization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sankaranarayanan, R.; Lakshminarayan, A.; Sheorey, V. B.

    2001-10-01

    The classical and quantum dynamics of a particle trapped in a one-dimensional infinite square well with a time-periodic pulsed field is investigated. This is a two-parameter non-KAM (Kolmogorov-Arnold-Moser) generalization of the kicked rotor, which can be seen as the standard map of particles subjected to both smooth and hard potentials. The virtue of the generalization lies in the introduction of an extra parameter R, which is the ratio of two length scales, namely, the well width and the field wavelength. If R is a noninteger the dynamics is discontinuous and non-KAM. We have explored the role of R in controlling the localization properties of the eigenstates. In particular, the connection between classical diffusion and localization is found to generalize reasonably well. In unbounded chaotic systems such as these, while the nearest neighbor spacing distribution of the eigenvalues is less sensitive to the nature of the classical dynamics, the distribution of participation ratios of the eigenstates proves to be a sensitive measure; in the chaotic regimes the latter is log-normal. We find that the tails of the well converged localized states are exponentially localized despite the discontinuous dynamics while the bulk part shows fluctuations that tend to be closer to random matrix theory predictions. Time evolving states show considerable R dependence, and tuning R to enhance classical diffusion can lead to significantly larger quantum diffusion for the same field strengths, an effect that is potentially observable in present day experiments.

  19. Surface-immobilized hydrogel patterns on length scales from micrometer to nanometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeira, Assaf

    The present work concentrates on the study of pattern generation and transfer processes of monolayer covered surfaces, deriving from the basic working concept of Constructive Lithography. As an advancement of constructive lithography, we developed a direct, one-step printing (contact electrochemical printing, CEP) and replication (contact electrochemical replication, CER) of hydrophilic organic monolayer patterns surrounded by a hydrophobic monolayer background. In addition, we present a process of transfer of metal between two contacting solid surfaces to predefined monolayer template pattern sites (contact electrochemical transfer, CET). This thesis shows that CEP, CER, and CET may be implemented under a variety of different experimental conditions, regardless of whether the initial "master" pattern was created by a parallel (fast) or serial (slow) patterning process. CEP and CER also posses the unique attractive property that each replica may equally function as master stamp in the fabrication of additional replicas. Moreover, due to a mechanism of selfcorrection patterned surfaces produced these process are often free of defects that the initial "master" stamp may had. We finally show that the electrochemical patterning of OTS monolayers on silicon can be further extended to flexible polymeric substrate materials as well as to a variety of chemical manipulations, allowing the fabrication of tridimensional (3D) composite structures made on the basis of readily available OTS compound. The results obtained suggest that such contact electrochemical processes could be used to rapidly generate multiple copies of surface patterns spanning variable length scales, this basic approach being applicable to rigid as well as flexible substrate materials.

  20. Length-Displacement Scaling of Lunar Thrust Faults and the Formation of Uphill-Facing Scarps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiesinger, Harald; Roggon, Lars; Hetzel, Ralf; Clark, Jaclyn D.; Hampel, Andrea; van der Bogert, Carolyn H.

    2017-04-01

    Lobate scarps are straight to curvilinear positive-relief landforms that occur on all terrestrial bodies [e.g., 1-3]. They are the surface manifestation of thrust faults that cut through and offset the upper part of the crust. Fault scarps on planetary surfaces provide the opportunity to study the growth of faults under a wide range of environmental conditions (e.g., gravity, temperature, pore pressure) [4]. We studied four lunar thrust-fault scarps (Simpelius-1, Morozov (S1), Fowler, Racah X-1) ranging in length from 1.3 km to 15.4 km [5] and found that their maximum total displacements are linearly correlated with length over one order of magnitude. We propose that during the progressive accumulation of slip, lunar faults propagate laterally and increase in length. On the basis of our measurements, the ratio of maximum displacement, D, to fault length, L, ranges from 0.017 to 0.028 with a mean value of 0.023 (or 2.3%). This is an order of magnitude higher than the value of 0.1% derived by theoretical considerations [4], and about twice as large as the value of 0.012-0.013 estimated by [6,7]. Our results, in addition to recently published findings for other lunar scarps [2,8], indicate that the D/L ratios of lunar thrust faults are similar to those of faults on Mercury and Mars (e.g., 1, 9-11], and almost as high as the average D/L ratio of 3% for faults on Earth [16,23]. Three of the investigated thrust fault scarps (Simpelius-1, Morozov (S1), Fowler) are uphill-facing scarps generated by slip on faults that dip in the same direction as the local topography. Thrust faults with such a geometry are common ( 60% of 97 studied scarps) on the Moon [e.g., 2,5,7]. To test our hypothesis that the surface topography plays an important role in the formation of uphill-facing fault scarps by controlling the vertical load on a fault plane, we simulated thrust faulting and its relation to topography with two-dimensional finite-element models using the commercial code ABAQUS

  1. Chain length distributions in linear polyaddition proceeding in nano-scale small volumes without mass transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szymanski, R.; Sosnowski, S.

    2017-01-01

    Computer simulations (Monte Carlo and numerical integration of differential equations) and theoretical analysis show that the statistical nature of polyaddition, both irreversible and reversible one, affects the way the macromolecules of different lengths are distributed among the small volume nano-reactors (droplets in this study) at any reaction time. The corresponding droplet distributions in respect to the number of reacting chains as well as the chain length distributions depend, for the given reaction time, on rate constants of polyaddition kp and depolymerization kd (reversible process), and the initial conditions: monomer concentration and the number of its molecules in a droplet. As a model reaction, a simple polyaddition process (M)1+(M)1 ⟶ ⟵ (M)2 , (M)i+(M)j ⟶ ⟵ (M)i+j was chosen, enabling to observe both kinetic and thermodynamic (apparent equilibrium constant) effects of a small number of reactant molecules in a droplet. The average rate constant of polymerization is lower than in a macroscopic system, depending on the average number of reactant molecules in a droplet. The apparent equilibrium constants of polymerization Ki j=[(M)i +j] ¯ /([(M)i] ¯ [(M)j] ¯ ) appear to depend on oligomer/polymer sizes as well as on the initial number of monomer molecules in a droplet. The corresponding equations, enabling prediction of the equilibrium conditions, were derived. All the analyzed effects are observed not only for ideally dispersed systems, i.e. with all droplets containing initially the same number of monomer (M)1 molecules, but also when initially the numbers of monomer molecules conform the Poisson distribution, expected for dispersions of reaction mixtures.

  2. Diffusion effects on volume-selective NMR at small length scales

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gaedke, Achim

    2009-01-01

    In this thesis, the interplay between diffusion and relaxation effects in spatially selective NMR experiments at short length scales is explored. This is especially relevant in the context of both conventional and mechanically detected MRI at (sub)micron resolution in biological specimens. Recent results on selectively excited very thin slices showed an in-slice-magnetization recovery orders of magnitude faster than the longitudinal relaxation time T1. However, those experiments were run on fully relaxed samples while MRI and especially mechanically detected NMR experiments are typically run in a periodic fashion with repetition times far below T1. The main purpose of this work therefore was to extend the study of the interplay between diffusion and longitudinal relaxation to periodic excitations. In some way, this is inverse phenomenon to the DESIRE (Diffusive Enhancement of SIgnal and REsolution) approach, proposed 1992 by Lauterbur. Experiments on periodically excited thin slices were carried out at a dedicated static field gradient cryomagnet with magnetic field gradients up to 180 T/m. In order to obtain plane slices, an appropriate isosurface of the gradient magnet had to be identified. It was found at a field of 3.8 T with a gradient of 73 T/m. In this field, slices down to a thickness of 3.2 μm could be excited. The detection of the NMR signal was done using FIDs instead of echoes as the excitation bandwidth of those thin slices is sufficiently small to observe FIDs which are usually considered to be elusive to detection in such strong static field gradients. A simulation toolbox based on the full Bloch-Torrey-equation was developed to describe the excitation and the formation of NMR signals under those unusual conditions as well as the interplay of diffusion and magnetization recovery. Both the experiments and the simulations indicate that diffusion effects lead to a strongly enhanced magnetization modulation signal also under periodic excitation

  3. Ion-beam induced transformations in nanoscale multilayers: Evolution of clusters with preferred length scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bera, S.; Satpati, B.; Goswami, D. K.; Bhattacharjee, K.; Satyam, P. V.; Dev, B. N.

    2006-04-01

    Ion-irradiation-induced modifications of a periodic Pt/C multilayer system containing a small amount of Fe have been analyzed by transmission electron microscopy and grazing incidence x-ray diffraction (GIXRD) studies. The multilayer stack with 16 Pt/C layer pairs (period of 4.23 nm) was fabricated on a glass substrate. A 2 MeV Au2+ ion beam was rastered on the sample to obtain uniformly irradiated strips with fluences from 1×1014 to 1×1015 ions/cm2. Ion irradiation has been found to cause preferential migration of Fe towards Pt layers [Bera et al., Nucl. Instrum. Methods Phys. Res. B 212, 530 (2003)]. Cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy (XTEM) shows considerable atomic redistribution for irradiation at the highest ion fluence (1×1015 ions/cm2). This structure is composed of small clusters. Phase separation and cluster formation processes are discussed. Periodic multilayers have periodicity only in the direction normal to the multilayer surface. However, Fourier transform (FT) of the XTEM images of the sample irradiated at the highest fluence shows extra off-normal Fourier components of superlattice periodicities arising due to ion irradiation. These extra spots in the FT are due to preferential length scales in intercluster separation in three dimensions. With a proper understanding of this phenomenon it may be possible to fabricate useful three-dimensional self-assembled structures of nanoclusters. Our high resolution transmission electron microscopy and GIXRD results reveal the formation of an FePt alloy. As FePt is a magnetic alloy, our observation raises the possibility of fabrication of ion-beam induced magnetic nanocluster lattices.

  4. Ion-beam induced transformations in nanoscale multilayers: Evolution of clusters with preferred length scales

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bera, S.; Satpati, B.; Goswami, D. K.; Bhattacharjee, K.; Satyam, P. V.; Dev, B. N.

    2006-01-01

    Ion-irradiation-induced modifications of a periodic Pt/C multilayer system containing a small amount of Fe have been analyzed by transmission electron microscopy and grazing incidence x-ray diffraction (GIXRD) studies. The multilayer stack with 16 Pt/C layer pairs (period of 4.23 nm) was fabricated on a glass substrate. A 2 MeV Au 2+ ion beam was rastered on the sample to obtain uniformly irradiated strips with fluences from 1x10 14 to 1x10 15 ions/cm 2 . Ion irradiation has been found to cause preferential migration of Fe towards Pt layers [Bera et al., Nucl. Instrum. Methods Phys. Res. B 212, 530 (2003)]. Cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy (XTEM) shows considerable atomic redistribution for irradiation at the highest ion fluence (1x10 15 ions/cm 2 ). This structure is composed of small clusters. Phase separation and cluster formation processes are discussed. Periodic multilayers have periodicity only in the direction normal to the multilayer surface. However, Fourier transform (FT) of the XTEM images of the sample irradiated at the highest fluence shows extra off-normal Fourier components of superlattice periodicities arising due to ion irradiation. These extra spots in the FT are due to preferential length scales in intercluster separation in three dimensions. With a proper understanding of this phenomenon it may be possible to fabricate useful three-dimensional self-assembled structures of nanoclusters. Our high resolution transmission electron microscopy and GIXRD results reveal the formation of an FePt alloy. As FePt is a magnetic alloy, our observation raises the possibility of fabrication of ion-beam induced magnetic nanocluster lattices

  5. In situ spatiotemporal mapping of flow fields around seeded stem cells at the subcellular length scale.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Min Jae Song

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available A major hurdle to understanding and exploiting interactions between the stem cell and its environment is the lack of a tool for precise delivery of mechanical cues concomitant to observing sub-cellular adaptation of structure. These studies demonstrate the use of microscale particle image velocimetry (μ-PIV for in situ spatiotemporal mapping of flow fields around mesenchymal stem cells, i.e. murine embryonic multipotent cell line C3H10T1/2, at the subcellular length scale, providing a tool for real time observation and analysis of stem cell adaptation to the prevailing mechanical milieu. In the absence of cells, computational fluid dynamics (CFD predicts flow regimes within 12% of μ-PIV measures, achieving the technical specifications of the chamber and the flow rates necessary to deliver target shear stresses at a particular height from the base of the flow chamber. However, our μ-PIV studies show that the presence of cells per se as well as the density at which cells are seeded significantly influences local flow fields. Furthermore, for any given cell or cell seeding density, flow regimes vary significantly along the vertical profile of the cell. Hence, the mechanical milieu of the stem cell exposed to shape changing shear stresses, induced by fluid drag, varies with respect to proximity of surrounding cells as well as with respect to apical height. The current study addresses a previously unmet need to predict and observe both flow regimes as well as mechanoadaptation of cells in flow chambers designed to deliver precisely controlled mechanical signals to live cells. An understanding of interactions and adaptation in response to forces at the interface between the surface of the cell and its immediate local environment may be key for de novo engineering of functional tissues from stem cell templates as well as for unraveling the mechanisms underlying multiscale development, growth and adaptation of organisms.

  6. Dynamically Scaled Model Experiment of a Mooring Cable

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lars Bergdahl

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The dynamic response of mooring cables for marine structures is scale-dependent, and perfect dynamic similitude between full-scale prototypes and small-scale physical model tests is difficult to achieve. The best possible scaling is here sought by means of a specific set of dimensionless parameters, and the model accuracy is also evaluated by two alternative sets of dimensionless parameters. A special feature of the presented experiment is that a chain was scaled to have correct propagation celerity for longitudinal elastic waves, thus providing perfect geometrical and dynamic scaling in vacuum, which is unique. The scaling error due to incorrect Reynolds number seemed to be of minor importance. The 33 m experimental chain could then be considered a scaled 76 mm stud chain with the length 1240 m, i.e., at the length scale of 1:37.6. Due to the correct elastic scale, the physical model was able to reproduce the effect of snatch loads giving rise to tensional shock waves propagating along the cable. The results from the experiment were used to validate the newly developed cable-dynamics code, MooDy, which utilises a discontinuous Galerkin FEM formulation. The validation of MooDy proved to be successful for the presented experiments. The experimental data is made available here for validation of other numerical codes by publishing digitised time series of two of the experiments.

  7. Scales in single root water uptake models: a review, analysis and synthesis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Metselaar, K.; Lier, van Q.D.

    2011-01-01

    Scales in transport of water to roots are compared with the length and volume scales by using the concepts associated with the representative elementary volume (REV). The possibility of a mismatch between model scale and system scale when using a Darcy-Buckingham-based model to describe soil water

  8. Manufacturing test of large scale hollow capsule and long length cladding in the large scale oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) martensitic steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Narita, Takeshi; Ukai, Shigeharu; Kaito, Takeji; Ohtsuka, Satoshi; Fujiwara, Masayuki

    2004-04-01

    Mass production capability of oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) martensitic steel cladding (9Cr) has being evaluated in the Phase II of the Feasibility Studies on Commercialized Fast Reactor Cycle System. The cost for manufacturing mother tube (raw materials powder production, mechanical alloying (MA) by ball mill, canning, hot extrusion, and machining) is a dominant factor in the total cost for manufacturing ODS ferritic steel cladding. In this study, the large-sale 9Cr-ODS martensitic steel mother tube which is made with a large-scale hollow capsule, and long length claddings were manufactured, and the applicability of these processes was evaluated. Following results were obtained in this study. (1) Manufacturing the large scale mother tube in the dimension of 32 mm OD, 21 mm ID, and 2 m length has been successfully carried out using large scale hollow capsule. This mother tube has a high degree of accuracy in size. (2) The chemical composition and the micro structure of the manufactured mother tube are similar to the existing mother tube manufactured by a small scale can. And the remarkable difference between the bottom and top sides in the manufactured mother tube has not been observed. (3) The long length cladding has been successfully manufactured from the large scale mother tube which was made using a large scale hollow capsule. (4) For reducing the manufacturing cost of the ODS steel claddings, manufacturing process of the mother tubes using a large scale hollow capsules is promising. (author)

  9. Hierarchical Self-Assembly of Peptide Amphiphiles: Form and Function at Multiple Length Scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zha, Runye Helen

    Hierarchical self-assembly, the organization of molecules into supramolecular structures of increasing size and complexity, is a potent tool for materials synthesis and requires understanding the connections of structure across multiple length scales. Herein, self-assembly of peptide amphiphiles (PAs) into nanoscopic and macroscopic materials is explored, and their anti-cancer applications are investigated. First, nanoscale assembly is examined in the context of an anti-angiogenic PA bearing the G-helix motif of maspin, a tumor suppressor protein. Assembly of this maspin-mimetic PA (MMPA) stabilizes the native G-helix conformation and improves binding to endothelial cells. Furthermore, PA nanostructures significantly increase cell adhesion to fibronectin as compared to G-helix peptide alone. Combined with its inhibitory effect on cell migration, MMPA nanostructures thus show anti-angiogenic activity on par with maspin protein in vitro and in vivo. Second, assembly of cationic PAs with hyaluronic acid (HA), an anionic polyelectrolyte, into macroscopic membranes is explored using PAs with identical formal charge but systematically varied self-assembly domains. Results suggest that membrane formation is dictated by the initial moments of component aggregation and is highly sensitive to PA molecular structure via nanoscale assembly. Specifically, PAs with beta-sheet forming residues are nanofibrous and have high surface charge density, leading to robust membranes with aligned-fiber microstructure. PAs without beta-sheet forming residues are nanospherical and have low surface charge density, leading to weak membranes with non-fibrous finger-like microstructure. Lastly, the principles of PA-HA membrane assembly are applied towards development of anti-cancer therapeutic biomaterials. Here, cytotoxic PAs bearing the epitope (KLAKLAKbeta)2 are co-assembled with non-bioactive cationic PA in order to achieve varying nanoscale morphology. These nanostructures are then

  10. Continuum and crystal strain gradient plasticity with energetic and dissipative length scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faghihi, Danial

    This work, standing as an attempt to understand and mathematically model the small scale materials thermal and mechanical responses by the aid of Materials Science fundamentals, Continuum Solid Mechanics, Misro-scale experimental observations, and Numerical methods. Since conventional continuum plasticity and heat transfer theories, based on the local thermodynamic equilibrium, do not account for the microstructural characteristics of materials, they cannot be used to adequately address the observed mechanical and thermal response of the micro-scale metallic structures. Some of these cases, which are considered in this dissertation, include the dependency of thin films strength on the width of the sample and diffusive-ballistic response of temperature in the course of heat transfer. A thermodynamic-based higher order gradient framework is developed in order to characterize the mechanical and thermal behavior of metals in small volume and on the fast transient time. The concept of the thermal activation energy, the dislocations interaction mechanisms, nonlocal energy exchange between energy carriers and phonon-electrons interactions are taken into consideration in proposing the thermodynamic potentials such as Helmholtz free energy and rate of dissipation. The same approach is also adopted to incorporate the effect of the material microstructural interface between two materials (e.g. grain boundary in crystals) into the formulation. The developed grain boundary flow rule accounts for the energy storage at the grain boundary due to the dislocation pile up as well as energy dissipation caused by the dislocation transfer through the grain boundary. Some of the abovementioned responses of small scale metallic compounds are addressed by means of the numerical implementation of the developed framework within the finite element context. In this regard, both displacement and plastic strain fields are independently discretized and the numerical implementation is performed in

  11. Multi-scale Modeling of Chromosomal DNA in Living Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spakowitz, Andrew

    The organization and dynamics of chromosomal DNA play a pivotal role in a range of biological processes, including gene regulation, homologous recombination, replication, and segregation. Establishing a quantitative theoretical model of DNA organization and dynamics would be valuable in bridging the gap between the molecular-level packaging of DNA and genome-scale chromosomal processes. Our research group utilizes analytical theory and computational modeling to establish a predictive theoretical model of chromosomal organization and dynamics. In this talk, I will discuss our efforts to develop multi-scale polymer models of chromosomal DNA that are both sufficiently detailed to address specific protein-DNA interactions while capturing experimentally relevant time and length scales. I will demonstrate how these modeling efforts are capable of quantitatively capturing aspects of behavior of chromosomal DNA in both prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells. This talk will illustrate that capturing dynamical behavior of chromosomal DNA at various length scales necessitates a range of theoretical treatments that accommodate the critical physical contributions that are relevant to in vivo behavior at these disparate length and time scales. National Science Foundation, Physics of Living Systems Program (PHY-1305516).

  12. On the use of the Prandtl mixing length model in the cutting torch modeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mancinelli, B; Minotti, F O; Kelly, H

    2011-01-01

    The Prandtl mixing length model has been used to take into account the turbulent effects in a 30 A high-energy density cutting torch model. In particular, the model requires the introduction of only one adjustable coefficient c corresponding to the length of action of the turbulence. It is shown that the c value has little effect on the plasma temperature profiles outside the nozzle (the differences being less than 10 %), but severely affects the plasma velocity distribution, with differences reaching about 100% at the middle of the nozzle-anode gap. Within the experimental uncertainties it was also found that the value c = 0.08 allows to reproduce both, the experimental data of velocity and temperature

  13. Mixed Discrete-Continuous Railway Disruption-Length Models with Copulas

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zilko, A.A.

    2017-01-01

    The uncertainty of railway disruption length hinders the performance of the Operational Control Centre Rail (OCCR) in Utrecht. One way to model this uncertainty is by representing the disruption length as a probabilistic distribution. A dependence model, taking the form of a joint distribution,

  14. Selection of optimal complexity for ENSO-EMR model by minimum description length principle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loskutov, E. M.; Mukhin, D.; Mukhina, A.; Gavrilov, A.; Kondrashov, D. A.; Feigin, A. M.

    2012-12-01

    One of the main problems arising in modeling of data taken from natural system is finding a phase space suitable for construction of the evolution operator model. Since we usually deal with strongly high-dimensional behavior, we are forced to construct a model working in some projection of system phase space corresponding to time scales of interest. Selection of optimal projection is non-trivial problem since there are many ways to reconstruct phase variables from given time series, especially in the case of a spatio-temporal data field. Actually, finding optimal projection is significant part of model selection, because, on the one hand, the transformation of data to some phase variables vector can be considered as a required component of the model. On the other hand, such an optimization of a phase space makes sense only in relation to the parametrization of the model we use, i.e. representation of evolution operator, so we should find an optimal structure of the model together with phase variables vector. In this paper we propose to use principle of minimal description length (Molkov et al., 2009) for selection models of optimal complexity. The proposed method is applied to optimization of Empirical Model Reduction (EMR) of ENSO phenomenon (Kravtsov et al. 2005, Kondrashov et. al., 2005). This model operates within a subset of leading EOFs constructed from spatio-temporal field of SST in Equatorial Pacific, and has a form of multi-level stochastic differential equations (SDE) with polynomial parameterization of the right-hand side. Optimal values for both the number of EOF, the order of polynomial and number of levels are estimated from the Equatorial Pacific SST dataset. References: Ya. Molkov, D. Mukhin, E. Loskutov, G. Fidelin and A. Feigin, Using the minimum description length principle for global reconstruction of dynamic systems from noisy time series, Phys. Rev. E, Vol. 80, P 046207, 2009 Kravtsov S, Kondrashov D, Ghil M, 2005: Multilevel regression

  15. Channel length scaling and the impact of metal gate work function ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    port and experimental data extracted in DG-MOSFETs devices. At these channel length limits, the susceptibility of the transistor to short-channel effects (SCE) is monitored in several ways such as threshold voltage (VTH), subthreshold voltage slope (S), leakage current (IOFF) and the drain-induced barrier lowering (DIBL).

  16. Scaling and percolation in the small-world network model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Newman, M. E. J.; Watts, D. J.

    1999-01-01

    In this paper we study the small-world network model of Watts and Strogatz, which mimics some aspects of the structure of networks of social interactions. We argue that there is one nontrivial length-scale in the model, analogous to the correlation length in other systems, which is well-defined in the limit of infinite system size and which diverges continuously as the randomness in the network tends to zero, giving a normal critical point in this limit. This length-scale governs the crossover from large- to small-world behavior in the model, as well as the number of vertices in a neighborhood of given radius on the network. We derive the value of the single critical exponent controlling behavior in the critical region and the finite size scaling form for the average vertex-vertex distance on the network, and, using series expansion and Pade approximants, find an approximate analytic form for the scaling function. We calculate the effective dimension of small-world graphs and show that this dimension varies as a function of the length-scale on which it is measured, in a manner reminiscent of multifractals. We also study the problem of site percolation on small-world networks as a simple model of disease propagation, and derive an approximate expression for the percolation probability at which a giant component of connected vertices first forms (in epidemiological terms, the point at which an epidemic occurs). The typical cluster radius satisfies the expected finite size scaling form with a cluster size exponent close to that for a random graph. All our analytic results are confirmed by extensive numerical simulations of the model. (c) 1999 The American Physical Society

  17. Scanning transmission x-ray microscopy of polymer nanoparticles: probing morphology on sub-10 nm length scales.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burke, Kerry B; Stapleton, Andrew J; Vaughan, Ben; Zhou, Xiaojing; Kilcoyne, A L David; Belcher, Warwick J; Dastoor, Paul C

    2011-07-01

    Water-processable nanoparticle dispersions of semiconducting polymers offer an attractive approach to the fabrication of organic electronic devices since they offer: (1) control of nanoscale morphology and (2) environmentally friendly fabrication. Although the nature of phase segregation in these polymer nanoparticles is critical to device performance, to date there have been no techniques available to directly determine their intra-particle structure, which consequently has been poorly understood. Here, we present scanning transmission x-ray microscopy (STXM) compositional maps for nanoparticles fabricated from poly(9,9-dioctyl-fluorene-2,7-diyl-co-bis-N, N'-(4-butylphenyl)-bis-N, N'-phenyl-1,4-phenylenedi-amine) (PFB) and poly(9,9-dioctylfluorene-2,7-diyl-co-benzothiadiazole) (F8BT) 1:1 blend mixtures. The images show distinct phase segregation within the nanoparticles. The compositional data reveals that, within these nanoparticles, PFB and F8BT segregate into a core-shell morphology, with an F8BT-rich core and a PFB-rich shell. Structural modelling demonstrates that the STXM technique is capable of quantifying morphological features on a sub-10 nm length scale; below the spot size of the incident focused x-ray beam. These results have important implications for the development of water-based 'solar paints' fabricated from microemulsions of semiconducting polymers.

  18. Scanning transmission x-ray microscopy of polymer nanoparticles: probing morphology on sub-10 nm length scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burke, Kerry B.; Stapleton, Andrew J.; Vaughan, Ben; Zhou, Xiaojing; Kilcoyne, A. L. David; Belcher, Warwick J.; Dastoor, Paul C.

    2011-07-01

    Water-processable nanoparticle dispersions of semiconducting polymers offer an attractive approach to the fabrication of organic electronic devices since they offer: (1) control of nanoscale morphology and (2) environmentally friendly fabrication. Although the nature of phase segregation in these polymer nanoparticles is critical to device performance, to date there have been no techniques available to directly determine their intra-particle structure, which consequently has been poorly understood. Here, we present scanning transmission x-ray microscopy (STXM) compositional maps for nanoparticles fabricated from poly(9,9-dioctyl-fluorene-2,7-diyl-co-bis-N, N'-(4-butylphenyl)-bis-N, N'-phenyl-1,4-phenylenedi-amine) (PFB) and poly(9,9-dioctylfluorene-2,7-diyl-co-benzothiadiazole) (F8BT) 1:1 blend mixtures. The images show distinct phase segregation within the nanoparticles. The compositional data reveals that, within these nanoparticles, PFB and F8BT segregate into a core-shell morphology, with an F8BT-rich core and a PFB-rich shell. Structural modelling demonstrates that the STXM technique is capable of quantifying morphological features on a sub-10 nm length scale; below the spot size of the incident focused x-ray beam. These results have important implications for the development of water-based 'solar paints' fabricated from microemulsions of semiconducting polymers.

  19. Scanning transmission x-ray microscopy of polymer nanoparticles: probing morphology on sub-10 nm length scales

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burke, Kerry B; Stapleton, Andrew J; Vaughan, Ben; Zhou Xiaojing; Belcher, Warwick J; Dastoor, Paul C; Kilcoyne, A L David

    2011-01-01

    Water-processable nanoparticle dispersions of semiconducting polymers offer an attractive approach to the fabrication of organic electronic devices since they offer: (1) control of nanoscale morphology and (2) environmentally friendly fabrication. Although the nature of phase segregation in these polymer nanoparticles is critical to device performance, to date there have been no techniques available to directly determine their intra-particle structure, which consequently has been poorly understood. Here, we present scanning transmission x-ray microscopy (STXM) compositional maps for nanoparticles fabricated from poly(9,9-dioctyl-fluorene-2,7-diyl-co-bis-N, N ' -(4-butylphenyl)-bis-N, N ' -phenyl-1,4-phenylenedi-amine) (PFB) and poly(9,9-dioctylfluorene-2,7-diyl-co-benzothiadiazole) (F8BT) 1:1 blend mixtures. The images show distinct phase segregation within the nanoparticles. The compositional data reveals that, within these nanoparticles, PFB and F8BT segregate into a core-shell morphology, with an F8BT-rich core and a PFB-rich shell. Structural modelling demonstrates that the STXM technique is capable of quantifying morphological features on a sub-10 nm length scale; below the spot size of the incident focused x-ray beam. These results have important implications for the development of water-based 'solar paints' fabricated from microemulsions of semiconducting polymers.

  20. Scanning transmission x-ray microscopy of polymer nanoparticles: probing morphology on sub-10 nm length scales

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burke, Kerry B; Stapleton, Andrew J; Vaughan, Ben; Zhou Xiaojing; Belcher, Warwick J; Dastoor, Paul C [Centre for Organic Electronics, University of Newcastle, Callaghan, NSW 2308 (Australia); Kilcoyne, A L David, E-mail: Paul.Dastoor@newcastle.edu.au [Advanced Light Source, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States)

    2011-07-01

    Water-processable nanoparticle dispersions of semiconducting polymers offer an attractive approach to the fabrication of organic electronic devices since they offer: (1) control of nanoscale morphology and (2) environmentally friendly fabrication. Although the nature of phase segregation in these polymer nanoparticles is critical to device performance, to date there have been no techniques available to directly determine their intra-particle structure, which consequently has been poorly understood. Here, we present scanning transmission x-ray microscopy (STXM) compositional maps for nanoparticles fabricated from poly(9,9-dioctyl-fluorene-2,7-diyl-co-bis-N, N{sup '}-(4-butylphenyl)-bis-N, N{sup '}-phenyl-1,4-phenylenedi-amine) (PFB) and poly(9,9-dioctylfluorene-2,7-diyl-co-benzothiadiazole) (F8BT) 1:1 blend mixtures. The images show distinct phase segregation within the nanoparticles. The compositional data reveals that, within these nanoparticles, PFB and F8BT segregate into a core-shell morphology, with an F8BT-rich core and a PFB-rich shell. Structural modelling demonstrates that the STXM technique is capable of quantifying morphological features on a sub-10 nm length scale; below the spot size of the incident focused x-ray beam. These results have important implications for the development of water-based 'solar paints' fabricated from microemulsions of semiconducting polymers.

  1. Distribution of shortest path lengths in a class of node duplication network models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinbock, Chanania; Biham, Ofer; Katzav, Eytan

    2017-09-01

    We present analytical results for the distribution of shortest path lengths (DSPL) in a network growth model which evolves by node duplication (ND). The model captures essential properties of the structure and growth dynamics of social networks, acquaintance networks, and scientific citation networks, where duplication mechanisms play a major role. Starting from an initial seed network, at each time step a random node, referred to as a mother node, is selected for duplication. Its daughter node is added to the network, forming a link to the mother node, and with probability p to each one of its neighbors. The degree distribution of the resulting network turns out to follow a power-law distribution, thus the ND network is a scale-free network. To calculate the DSPL we derive a master equation for the time evolution of the probability Pt(L =ℓ ) , ℓ =1 ,2 ,⋯ , where L is the distance between a pair of nodes and t is the time. Finding an exact analytical solution of the master equation, we obtain a closed form expression for Pt(L =ℓ ) . The mean distance 〈L〉 t and the diameter Δt are found to scale like lnt , namely, the ND network is a small-world network. The variance of the DSPL is also found to scale like lnt . Interestingly, the mean distance and the diameter exhibit properties of a small-world network, rather than the ultrasmall-world network behavior observed in other scale-free networks, in which 〈L〉 t˜lnlnt .

  2. Prediction model for the diffusion length in silicon-based solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheknane, A [Laboratoire d' Etude et Developpement des Materiaux Semiconducteurs et Dielectrques, Universite Amar Telidji de Laghouat, BP 37G, Laghouat 03000 (Algeria); Benouaz, T, E-mail: cheknanali@yahoo.co [Laboratoire de Modelisation, Universite Abou BakarBelkaid de Tlemcen Algerie (Algeria)

    2009-07-15

    A novel approach to compute diffusion lengths in solar cells is presented. Thus, a simulation is done; it aims to give computational support to the general development of a neural networks (NNs), which is a very powerful predictive modelling technique used to predict the diffusion length in mono-crystalline silicon solar cells. Furthermore, the computation of the diffusion length and the comparison with measurement data, using the infrared injection method, are presented and discussed.

  3. Length-scales of chemical and isotopic heterogeneity in the mantle section of the Shetland Ophiolite Complex, Scotland

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Driscoll, B.; Walker, R. J.; Clay, P. L.; Day, J. M. D.; Ash, R. D.; Daly, J. S.

    2018-04-01

    Kilometre to sub-metre scale heterogeneities have been inferred in the oceanic mantle based on sampling of both ophiolites and abyssal peridotites. The ∼492 Ma Shetland Ophiolite Complex (SOC) contains a well-preserved mantle section that is dominated by harzburgite (∼70 vol.%) previously reported to have variable major and trace element compositions, yet dominantly chondritic initial 187Os/188Os compositions. To assess the preservation of compositional heterogeneities at sub-metre length-scales in the oceanic mantle, a ∼45 m2 area of the SOC mantle section was mapped and sampled in detail. Harzburgites, dunites and a pyroxenite from this area were analysed for lithophile and highly-siderophile element (HSE) abundances, as well as for 187Os/188Os ratios. Lithophile element data for most rocks are characteristic of supra-subduction zone (SSZ) metasomatic processes. Two dunites have moderately fractionated HSE patterns and suprachondritic γOs(492 Ma) values (+5.1 and +7.5) that are also typical of ophiolitic dunites generated by SSZ melt-rock interactions. By contrast, six harzburgites and four dunites have approximately chondritic-relative abundances of Os, Ir and Ru, and γOs(492 Ma) values ranging only from -0.6 to +2.7; characteristics that imply no significant influence during SSZ processes. Two harzburgites are also characterised by significantly less radiogenic γOs(492 Ma) values (-3.5 and -4), and yield Mesoproterozoic time of Re depletion (TRD) model ages. The range of Os isotope compositions in the studied area is comparable to the range reported for a suite of samples representative of the entire SOC mantle section, and approaches the total isotopic variation of the oceanic mantle, as observed in abyssal peridotites. Mechanisms by which this heterogeneity can be formed and preserved involve inefficient and temporally distinct melt extraction events and strong localised channelling of these melts.

  4. Distinct Length Scales in the VO2 Metal-Insulator Transition Revealed by Bi-chromatic Optical Probing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Lei; Novikova, Irina B.; Klopf, John M.; Madaras, Scott E.; Williams, Gwyn P.; Madaras, Eric; Lu, Liwei; Wolf, Stuart A.; Lukaszew, Rosa A.

    2014-01-01

    Upon a heating-induced metal-insulator transition (MIT) in VO 2 , microscopic metallic VO 2 puddles nucleate and coarsen within the insulating matrix. This coexistence of the two phases across the transition spans distinct length scales as their relative domain sizes change. Far-field optical probing is applied to follow the dynamic evolution of the highly correlated metallic domains as the MIT progresses

  5. Modeling wildland fire containment with uncertain flame length and fireline width

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romain Mees; David Strauss; Richard Chase

    1993-01-01

    We describe a mathematical model for the probability that a fireline succeeds in containing a fire. The probability increases as the fireline width increases, and also as the fire's flame length decreases. More interestingly, uncertainties in width and flame length affect the computed containment probabilities, and can thus indirectly affect the optimum allocation...

  6. Validation of hamstrings musculoskeletal modeling by calculating peak hamstrings length at different hip angles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Krogt, M.M.; Doorenbosch, C.A.M.; Harlaar, J.

    2008-01-01

    Accurate estimates of hamstrings lengths are useful, for example, to facilitate planning for surgical lengthening of the hamstrings in patients with cerebral palsy. In this study, three models used to estimate hamstrings length (M1: Delp, M2: Klein Horsman, M3: Hawkins and Hull) were evaluated. This

  7. Evolution of deformation heterogeneity at multiple length scales in a strongly textured zinc layer on galvanized steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghosh, A; Gurao, N P

    2015-01-01

    The evolution of heterogeneity of plastic deformation in a zinc layer has been probed at multiple length scales using a battery of characterization tools like X-ray diffraction, electron back scatter diffraction (EBSD) and digital image correlation. The experimental results indicate that plastic deformation is heterogeneous at different length scales and the value of micro, meso and macro strain by different characterization techniques shows a different value. The value of strain determined at the meso and micro length scale from EBSD and X-ray diffraction was negligible, however, the macro-strain as determined from X-ray peak shift was significant. EBSD results showed evidence of profuse {101-bar2} <101-bar1> contraction twinning in the zinc layer with higher intragranular misorientation in the twin compared to the matrix. It is therefore, inferred that the evolution of higher intergranular (between matrix and twin) strain due to prolific contraction twinning contributes to the failure of zinc layer on galvanized steel. (paper)

  8. CHANG-ES. IX. Radio scale heights and scale lengths of a consistent sample of 13 spiral galaxies seen edge-on and their correlations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krause, Marita; Irwin, Judith; Wiegert, Theresa; Miskolczi, Arpad; Damas-Segovia, Ancor; Beck, Rainer; Li, Jiang-Tao; Heald, George; Müller, Peter; Stein, Yelena; Rand, Richard J.; Heesen, Volker; Walterbos, Rene A. M.; Dettmar, Ralf-Jürgen; Vargas, Carlos J.; English, Jayanne; Murphy, Eric J.

    2018-03-01

    Aim. The vertical halo scale height is a crucial parameter to understand the transport of cosmic-ray electrons (CRE) and their energy loss mechanisms in spiral galaxies. Until now, the radio scale height could only be determined for a few edge-on galaxies because of missing sensitivity at high resolution. Methods: We developed a sophisticated method for the scale height determination of edge-on galaxies. With this we determined the scale heights and radial scale lengths for a sample of 13 galaxies from the CHANG-ES radio continuum survey in two frequency bands. Results: The sample average values for the radio scale heights of the halo are 1.1 ± 0.3 kpc in C-band and 1.4 ± 0.7 kpc in L-band. From the frequency dependence analysis of the halo scale heights we found that the wind velocities (estimated using the adiabatic loss time) are above the escape velocity. We found that the halo scale heights increase linearly with the radio diameters. In order to exclude the diameter dependence, we defined a normalized scale height h˜ which is quite similar for all sample galaxies at both frequency bands and does not depend on the star formation rate or the magnetic field strength. However, h˜ shows a tight anticorrelation with the mass surface density. Conclusions: The sample galaxies with smaller scale lengths are more spherical in the radio emission, while those with larger scale lengths are flatter. The radio scale height depends mainly on the radio diameter of the galaxy. The sample galaxies are consistent with an escape-dominated radio halo with convective cosmic ray propagation, indicating that galactic winds are a widespread phenomenon in spiral galaxies. While a higher star formation rate or star formation surface density does not lead to a higher wind velocity, we found for the first time observational evidence of a gravitational deceleration of CRE outflow, e.g. a lowering of the wind velocity from the galactic disk.

  9. Technical Report on Alberta Essay Scales: Models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nyberg, Verner R.; Nyberg, Adell M.

    The supplementary information on "Alberta Essay Scales: Models" presented here includes similar models to employ in grading essays, the background and development of the scales, and the rationale for developing two scales of English mechanics and style/content. A standard is presented for evaluating current writing achievement by…

  10. Empirical model description of photon path length for differential path length spectroscopy: combined effect of scattering and absorption

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kanick, Stephen C.; Sterenborg, Henricus J. C. M.; Amelink, Arjen

    2008-01-01

    Differential path length spectroscopy (DPS) is a method of reflectance spectroscopy that utilizes a specialized fiber geometry to make the photon path length (tau) insensitive to variations in tissue optical properties over a wide range of absorption (mu(a)) and total scattering (mu(s))

  11. Validity of plant fiber length measurement : a review of fiber length measurement based on kenaf as a model

    Science.gov (United States)

    James S. Han; Theodore. Mianowski; Yi-yu. Lin

    1999-01-01

    The efficacy of fiber length measurement techniques such as digitizing, the Kajaani procedure, and NIH Image are compared in order to determine the optimal tool. Kenaf bast fibers, aspen, and red pine fibers were collected from different anatomical parts, and the fiber lengths were compared using various analytical tools. A statistical analysis on the validity of the...

  12. Length Variation Effect of the Impulse Response Model of a Secondary Path in Embedded Control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Young-Sup Lee

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This study presents theoretical and experimental investigation on the length variation effect of the impulse response function (IRF for the secondary path model in active noise control using an embedded control board. A narrowband sweep noise was the disturbance for control in a duct with the length of 1800 mm. The IRF model incorporated into an adaptive feedforward filtered-x LMS (FxLMS algorithm was then analyzed in the variation of its length in terms of the mean square error, computation complexity, stability requirement, and attenuation performance before and after control. The FxLMS algorithm with various IRF lengths was implemented in a dSPACE DS1104 embedded control board for the real-time control. Finally the most reasonable IRF length, considering the computation complexity and performance, can be determined through the systematic investigation. The results in this study can be used for practical active noise control systems.

  13. Introduction of the Abbreviated Westmead Post-Traumatic Amnesia Scale and Impact on Length of Stay

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Watson, C. E.; Clous, E. A.; Jaeger, M.; D'Amours, S. K.

    2017-01-01

    Mild traumatic brain injury is a common presentation to Emergency Departments. Early identification of patients with cognitive deficits and provision of discharge advice are important. The Abbreviated Westmead Post-traumatic Amnesia Scale provides an early and efficient assessment of post-traumatic

  14. On the validity of 2D critical taper theory in 3D wedges: defining a lateral deformation length scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leever, Karen; Oncken, Onno; Thorden Haug, Øystein

    2015-04-01

    For 2D critical taper theory to be applicable to 3D natural cases, cylindric deformation is a requirement. The assumption of cylindricity is violated in case of localized perturbations (subducting seamount, localized sedimentation) or due to a lateral change in decollement strength or depth. In natural accretionary wedges and fold-and-thrust belts, along strike changes may occur in a variety of ways: geometrical (due to a protruding indenter or a change in decollement depth), through a lateral change in basal friction (leading to laterally different tapers), or through a change in surface slope (by strongly localized fan sedimentation on accretionary wedges). Recent numerical modelling results (Ruh et al., 2013) have shown that lateral coupling preferentially occurs for relatively small perturbations, i.e. the horizontal shear stress caused by the perturbation is supported by the system. Lateral linking of the wedge in front of a protruding indenter to the wedge in front of the trailing edge of the back stop leads to curved thrust fronts and importantly it has been noted that even outside the curved zone, where the wedge front is again parallel to the direction of tectonic transport, the lateral effect is still evident: both tapers are different from the analytical prediction. We present results from a 3D analogue modelling parameter study to investigate this behavior more quantitatively, with the objective of empirically finding a lateral length scale of deformation in brittle contractional wedges. For a given wedge strength (angle of internal friction), we infer this to be a function of the size (width) of the perturbation and its magnitude (difference in basal friction). To this end we run different series of models in which we systematically vary the width and/or magnitude of a local perturbation. In the first series, the width of a zone of high basal friction is varied, in the second series we vary the width of an indenter and in the third series

  15. Gate length scaling trends of drive current enhancement in CMOSFETs with dual stress overlayers and embedded-SiGe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flachowsky, S.; Wei, A.; Herrmann, T.; Illgen, R.; Horstmann, M.; Richter, R.; Salz, H.; Klix, W.; Stenzel, R.

    2008-01-01

    Strain engineering in MOSFETs using tensile nitride overlayer (TOL) films, compressive nitride overlayer (COL) films, and embedded-SiGe (eSiGe) is studied by extensive device experiments and numerical simulations. The scaling behavior was analyzed by gate length reduction down to 40 nm and it was found that drive current strongly depends on the device dimensions. The reduction of drain-current enhancement for short-channel devices can be attributed to two competing factors: shorter gate length devices have increased longitudinal and vertical stress components which should result in improved drain-currents. However, there is a larger degradation from external resistance as the gate length decreases, due to a larger voltage dropped across the external resistance. Adding an eSiGe stressor reduces the external resistance in the p-MOSFET, to the extent that the drive current improvement from COL continues to increase even down the shortest gate length studied. This is due to the reduced resistivity of SiGe itself and the SiGe valence band offset relative to Si, leading to a smaller silicide-active contact resistance. It demonstrates the advantage of combining eSiGe and COL, not only for increased stress, but also for parasitic resistance reduction to enable better COL drive current benefit

  16. Membrane undulations in a structured fluid: Universal dynamics at intermediate length and time scales.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granek, Rony; Diamant, Haim

    2018-01-05

    The dynamics of membrane undulations inside a viscous solvent is governed by distinctive, anomalous, power laws. Inside a viscoelastic continuous medium these universal behaviors are modified by the specific bulk viscoelastic spectrum. Yet, in structured fluids the continuum limit is reached only beyond a characteristic correlation length. We study the crossover to this asymptotic bulk dynamics. The analysis relies on a recent generalization of the hydrodynamic interaction in structured fluids, which shows a slow spatial decay of the interaction toward the bulk limit. For membranes which are weakly coupled to the structured medium we find a wide crossover regime characterized by different, universal, dynamic power laws. We discuss various systems for which this behavior is relevant, and delineate the time regime over which it may be observed.

  17. The role of discharge variation in scaling of drainage area and food chain length in rivers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabo, John L.; Finlay, Jacques C.; Kennedy, Theodore A.; Post, David M.

    2010-01-01

    Food chain length (FCL) is a fundamental component of food web structure. Studies in a variety of ecosystems suggest that FCL is determined by energy supply, environmental stability, and/or ecosystem size, but the nature of the relationship between environmental stability and FCL, and the mechanism linking ecosystem size to FCL, remain unclear. Here we show that FCL increases with drainage area and decreases with hydrologic variability and intermittency across 36 North American rivers. Our analysis further suggests that hydrologic variability is the mechanism underlying the correlation between ecosystem size and FCL in rivers. Ecosystem size lengthens river food chains by integrating and attenuating discharge variation through stream networks, thereby enhancing environmental stability in larger river systems.

  18. Accurate switching intensities and length scales in quasi-phase-matched materials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bang, Ole; Graversen, Torben Winther; Corney, Joel Frederick

    2001-01-01

    We consider unseeded typeI second-harmonic generation in quasi-phase-matched quadratic nonlinear materials and derive an accurate analytical expression for the evolution of the average intensity. The intensity- dependent nonlinear phase mismatch that is due to the cubic nonlinearity induced...... by quasi phase matching is found. The equivalent formula for the intensity of maximum conversion, the crossing of which changes the one-period nonlinear phase shift of the fundamental abruptly by p , corrects earlier estimates [Opt.Lett. 23, 506 (1998)] by a factor of 5.3. We find the crystal lengths...... that are necessary to obtain an optimal flat phase versus intensity response on either side of this separatrix intensity....

  19. 33 CFR 157.104 - Scale models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Scale models. 157.104 Section 157... Oil Washing (COW) System on Tank Vessels General § 157.104 Scale models. If the pattern under § 157.100(a)(4) or § 157.102(d) cannot be shown on a plan, a scale model of each tank must be built for...

  20. Compensation in Root Water Uptake Models Combined with Three-Dimensional Root Length Density Distribution

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heinen, M.

    2014-01-01

    A three-dimensional root length density distribution function is introduced that made it possible to compare two empirical uptake models with a more mechanistic uptake model. Adding a compensation component to the more empirical model resulted in predictions of root water uptake distributions

  1. Modeling study on axial wetting length of meniscus in vertical rectangular microgrooves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nie, Xuelei; Hu, Xuegong; Tang, Dawei

    2013-01-01

    In this work, the traditional model for predicting axial wetting length of meniscus in vertical microgrooves is introduced firstly. The traditional model may cause inaccurate results in predicting wetting length in vertical microgrooves because of the assumption of round meniscus in cross sections of microgrooves and the way of calculating curvature. In order to develop this model and make it more accurate, a revised micro-PIV system is built to test the meniscus shapes in cross sections of vertical and horizontal microgrooves, and the experimental results prove that the real shapes of meniscus are parabolic other than round. The fitting formulas of meniscus shapes are obtained with software Origin 7.5. Based on experimental results and fitting formulas, the traditional model is revised by changing the way to calculate curvature. In the modified model, the curvature for calculating axial wetting length of meniscus equals average curvature of meniscus in cross section of vertical microgrooves minus the average curvature of meniscus in cross section of horizontal microgrooves. It is proved that the modified model can predict the wetting length in vertical microgrooves better than the original model. The average difference between experiment and modified model is 2.5% while that between experiment and traditional model is 174.2%. The disadvantage of the modified model is that using the new model to predict wetting length needs to know the real shapes of meniscus in vertical and horizontal microgrooves. -- Highlights: ► An experimental system is designed to test the shapes of meniscus in microgrooves. ► The real shapes of meniscus in microgrooves are obtained for first time. ► The shapes of meniscus in microgrooves is compared and analyzed. ► The model for predicting wetting length of meniscus in microgrooves is developed

  2. Developing a preoperative predictive model for ureteral length for ureteral stent insertion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawahara, Takashi; Sakamaki, Kentaro; Ito, Hiroki; Kuroda, Shinnosuke; Terao, Hideyuki; Makiyama, Kazuhide; Uemura, Hiroji; Yao, Masahiro; Miyamoto, Hiroshi; Matsuzaki, Junichi

    2016-11-30

    Ureteral stenting has been a fundamental part of various urological procedures. Selecting a ureteral stent of optimal length is important for decreasing the incidence of stent migration and complications. The aim of the present study was to develop and internally validate a model for predicting the ureteral length for ureteral stent insertion. This study included a total of 127 patients whose ureters had previously been assessed by both intravenous urography (IVU) and CT scan. The actual ureteral length was determined by direct measurement using a 5-Fr ureteral catheter. Multiple linear regression analysis with backward selection was used to model the relationship between the factors analyzed and actual ureteral length. Bootstrapping was used to internally validate the predictive model. Patients all of whom had stone disease included 76 men (59.8%) and 51 women (40.2%), with the median and mean (± SD) ages of 60 and 58.7 (±14.2) years. In these patients, 53 (41.7%) right and 74 (58.3%) left ureters were analyzed. The median and mean (± SD) actual ureteral lengths were 24.0 and 23.3 (±2.0) cm, respectively. Using the bootstrap methods for internal validation, the correlation coefficient (R2) was 0.57 ± 0.07. We have developed a predictive model, for the first time, which predicts ureteral length using the following five preoperative characteristics: age, side, sex, IVU measurement, and CT calculation. This predictive model can be used to reliably predict ureteral length based on clinical and radiological factors and may thus be a useful tool to help determining the optimal length of ureteral stent.

  3. The Sensitivity of Income Polarization - Time, length of accounting periods, equivalence scales, and income definitions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Azhar, Hussain

    This study looks at polarization and its components’ sensitivity to assumptions about equivalence scales, income definition, ethical income distribution parameters, and the income accounting period. A representative sample of Danish individual incomes from 1984 to 2002 is utilised. Results show...... that polarization has increased over time, regardless of the applied measure, when the last part of the period is compared to the first part of the period. Primary causes being increased inequality (alienation) and faster income growth among high incomes relative to those in the middle of the distribution...

  4. Health inequalities in Ethiopia: modeling inequalities in length of life within and between population groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tranvåg, Eirik Joakim; Ali, Merima; Norheim, Ole Frithjof

    2013-07-11

    Most studies on health inequalities use average measures, but describing the distribution of health can also provide valuable knowledge. In this paper, we estimate and compare within-group and between-group inequalities in length of life for population groups in Ethiopia in 2000 and 2011. We used data from the 2011 and 2000 Ethiopia Demographic and Health Survey and the Global Burden of Disease study 2010, and the MODMATCH modified logit life table system developed by the World Health Organization to model mortality rates, life expectancy, and length of life for Ethiopian population groups stratified by wealth quintiles, gender and residence. We then estimated and compared within-group and between-group inequality in length of life using the Gini index and absolute length of life inequality. Length of life inequality has decreased and life expectancy has increased for all population groups between 2000 and 2011. Length of life inequality within wealth quintiles is about three times larger than the between-group inequality of 9 years. Total length of life inequality in Ethiopia was 27.6 years in 2011. Longevity has increased and the distribution of health in Ethiopia is more equal in 2011 than 2000, with length of life inequality reduced for all population groups. Still there is considerable potential for further improvement. In the Ethiopian context with a poor and highly rural population, inequality in length of life within wealth quintiles is considerably larger than between them. This suggests that other factors than wealth substantially contribute to total health inequality in Ethiopia and that identification and quantification of these factors will be important for identifying proper measures to further reduce length of life inequality.

  5. Characterizing the reinforcement mechanisms in multiwall nanotube/polycarbonate composites across different length and time scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duncan, Renee Kelly

    The enthusiasm and interest in the potential properties of nanotube (NT)/polymer composites are based on several factors, including the potential for unsurpassed enhancements in mechanical properties together with electrical, thermal and optical properties. Using multiwall nanotubes (MWNTs) grown to a long aspect ratio, the study found that fragmentation tests can be completed in a similar manner to traditional fiber composites. It was found that the fragmentation length does not depend on the angle of the nanotube to the loading direction hence the ISS does not change with the orientation angle of the nanotube in the composite. A critical aspect ratio of 100 and 300 for untreated nanotubes (ARNT) and treated nanotubes (EPNT), respectively was also measured. For nanotubes that are well dispersed in the polycarbonate, it was observed at a critical angle of 60° that there was a change in failure mechanism from pullout to fracture of the nanotubes due to bending shear. Because the tensile strength of a MWNT is unknown a cumulative distribution was used to characterize the relative interfacial shear strength as a function of nanotube chemical modification. The second goal of this thesis is to use Dynamic Mechanical Thermal Analysis (DMTA) with controlled aspect ratios of multiwall nanotubes (MWNT) to isolate and quantify the effects of the interfacial region on modulus enhancements in nanotube-reinforced composites. One major finding of this study was that the shortest aspect ratio showed a significantly broadened relaxation spectrum than the longer aspect ratio nanotubes, despite the longer aspect ratio nanotubes being more percolated at the given weight percent. There is also a direct correlation between the free space parameter of the short aspect ratio nantoubes network and broadening of the relaxation spectrum, concluded to be a result of increased interaction of the interfacial polymer. The study found agreement with the premise that at a constant filler weight

  6. Scaling and asymptotic scaling in two-dimensional CPN-1 models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Campostrini, M.; Rossi, P.; Vicari, E.

    1993-01-01

    Two-dimensional CP N-1 models are investigated by Monte Carlo methods on the lattice, for values of N ranging from 2 to 21. Scaling and rotation invariance are studied by comparing different definitions of correlation length ξ. Several lattice formulations are compared and shown to enjoy scaling for ξ as small as 2.5. Asymptotic scaling is investigated using as bare coupling constant both the usual β and β E (related to the internal energy); the latter is shown to improve asymptotic scaling properties. Studies of finite size effects show their N-dependence to be highly non-trivial, due to the increasing radius of the anti zz bound states at large N. (orig.)

  7. Effects of fracture distribution and length scale on the equivalent continuum elastic compliance of fractured rock masses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marte Gutierrez

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Fracture systems have strong influence on the overall mechanical behavior of fractured rock masses due to their relatively lower stiffness and shear strength than those of the rock matrix. Understanding the effects of fracture geometrical distribution, such as length, spacing, persistence and orientation, is important for quantifying the mechanical behavior of fractured rock masses. The relation between fracture geometry and the mechanical characteristics of the fractured rock mass is complicated due to the fact that the fracture geometry and mechanical behaviors of fractured rock mass are strongly dependent on the length scale. In this paper, a comprehensive study was conducted to determine the effects of fracture distribution on the equivalent continuum elastic compliance of fractured rock masses over a wide range of fracture lengths. To account for the stochastic nature of fracture distributions, three different simulation techniques involving Oda's elastic compliance tensor, Monte Carlo simulation (MCS, and suitable probability density functions (PDFs were employed to represent the elastic compliance of fractured rock masses. To yield geologically realistic results, parameters for defining fracture distributions were obtained from different geological fields. The influence of the key fracture parameters and their relations to the overall elastic behavior of the fractured rock mass were studied and discussed. A detailed study was also carried out to investigate the validity of the use of a representative element volume (REV in the equivalent continuum representation of fractured rock masses. A criterion was also proposed to determine the appropriate REV given the fracture distribution of the rock mass.

  8. Estimating microstructural length scales in k-carrageenan hydrogels by PFG NMR nanoprobe diffusometry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kort, de D.W.; As, van H.; Duynhoven, van J.P.M.

    2016-01-01

    We use PFG NMR to measure hindered self-diffusion of spherical, monodisperse diffusional nanoprobes in a polysaccharide network.
    These nanoprobes have different diameters in the 1–10 nm range, but identical inert (PEG) surfaces. We use Johnson’s model of
    particle self-diffusion in fibrous

  9. Large Scale Computations in Air Pollution Modelling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zlatev, Z.; Brandt, J.; Builtjes, P. J. H.

    Proceedings of the NATO Advanced Research Workshop on Large Scale Computations in Air Pollution Modelling, Sofia, Bulgaria, 6-10 July 1998......Proceedings of the NATO Advanced Research Workshop on Large Scale Computations in Air Pollution Modelling, Sofia, Bulgaria, 6-10 July 1998...

  10. Independent and collective roles of surface structures at different length scales on pool boiling heat transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Calvin H.; Rioux, Russell P.

    2016-01-01

    Spherical Cu nanocavity surfaces are synthesized to examine the individual role of contact angles in connecting lateral Rayleigh-Taylor wavelength to vertical Kevin-Helmholtz wavelength on hydrodynamic instability for the onset of pool boiling Critical Heat Flux (CHF). Solid and porous Cu pillar surfaces are sintered to investigate the individual role of pillar structure pitch at millimeter scale, named as module wavelength, on hydrodynamic instability at CHF. Last, spherical Cu nanocavities are coated on the porous Cu pillars to create a multiscale Cu structure, which is studied to examine the collective role and relative significance of contact angles and module wavelength on hydrodynamic instability at CHF, and the results indicate that module wavelength plays the dominant role on hydrodynamic instability at CHF when the height of surface structures is equal or above ¼ Kelvin-Helmholtz wavelength. Pool boiling Heat Transfer Coefficient (HTC) enhancements on spherical Cu nanocavity surfaces, solid and porous Cu pillar surfaces, and the integrated multiscale structure have been investigated, too. The experimental results reveal that the nanostructures and porous pillar structures can be combined together to achieve even higher enhancement of HTC than that of individual structures. PMID:27841322

  11. Multi-scale modeling of composites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Azizi, Reza

    A general method to obtain the homogenized response of metal-matrix composites is developed. It is assumed that the microscopic scale is sufficiently small compared to the macroscopic scale such that the macro response does not affect the micromechanical model. Therefore, the microscopic scale...... is analyzed using a Representative Volume Element (RVE), while the homogenized data are saved and used as an input to the macro scale. The dependence of fiber size is analyzed using a higher order plasticity theory, where the free energy is stored due to plastic strain gradients at the micron scale. Hill...... to plastic deformation. The macroscopic operators found, can be used to model metal matrix composites on the macroscopic scale using a hierarchical multi-scale approach. Finally, decohesion under tension and shear loading is studied using a cohesive law for the interface between matrix and fiber....

  12. Determining the influence of muscle operating length on muscle performance during frog swimming using a bio-robotic model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clemente, Christofer J; Richards, Christopher

    2012-09-01

    Frogs are capable of impressive feats of jumping and swimming. Recent work has shown that anuran hind limb muscles can operate at lengths longer than the 'optimal length'. To address the implications of muscle operating length on muscle power output and swimming mechanics, we built a robotic frog hind limb model based upon Xenopus laevis. The model simulated the force-length and force-velocity properties of vertebrate muscle, within the skeletal environment. We tested three muscle starting lengths, representing long, optimal and short starting lengths. Increasing starting length increased maximum muscle power output by 27% from 98.1 W kg(-1) when muscle begins shortening from the optimal length, to 125.1 W kg(-1) when the muscle begins at longer initial lengths. Therefore, longer starting lengths generated greater hydrodynamic force for extended durations, enabling faster swimming speeds of the robotic frog. These swimming speeds increased from 0.15 m s(-1) at short initial muscle lengths, to 0.39 m s(-1) for the longest initial lengths. Longer starting lengths were able to increase power as the muscle's force-length curve was better synchronized with the muscle's activation profile. We further dissected the underlying components of muscle force, separating force-length versus force-velocity effects, showing a transition from force-length limitations to force-velocity limitations as starting length increased.

  13. Functional Scaling of Musculoskeletal Models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, Morten Enemark; Andersen, Michael Skipper; de Zee, Mark

    specific to the patient. This is accomplished using optimisation methods to determine patient-specific joint positions and orientations, which minimise the least-squares error between model markers and the recorded markers from a motion capture experiment. Functional joint positions and joint axis...... geometry, without the need for MR/CT scans. However, more validation activities are needed to better understand the effect of morphing musculoskeletal models based on functional joint parameters....

  14. Age-related changes in the plasticity and toughness of human cortical bone at multiple length-scales

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zimmermann, Elizabeth A.; Schaible, Eric; Bale, Hrishikesh; Barth, Holly D.; Tang, Simon Y.; Reichert, Peter; Busse, Bjoern; Alliston, Tamara; Ager III, Joel W.; Ritchie, Robert O.

    2011-08-10

    The structure of human cortical bone evolves over multiple length-scales from its basic constituents of collagen and hydroxyapatite at the nanoscale to osteonal structures at nearmillimeter dimensions, which all provide the basis for its mechanical properties. To resist fracture, bone’s toughness is derived intrinsically through plasticity (e.g., fibrillar sliding) at structural-scales typically below a micron and extrinsically (i.e., during crack growth) through mechanisms (e.g., crack deflection/bridging) generated at larger structural-scales. Biological factors such as aging lead to a markedly increased fracture risk, which is often associated with an age-related loss in bone mass (bone quantity). However, we find that age-related structural changes can significantly degrade the fracture resistance (bone quality) over multiple lengthscales. Using in situ small-/wide-angle x-ray scattering/diffraction to characterize sub-micron structural changes and synchrotron x-ray computed tomography and in situ fracture-toughness measurements in the scanning electron microscope to characterize effects at micron-scales, we show how these age-related structural changes at differing size-scales degrade both the intrinsic and extrinsic toughness of bone. Specifically, we attribute the loss in toughness to increased non-enzymatic collagen cross-linking which suppresses plasticity at nanoscale dimensions and to an increased osteonal density which limits the potency of crack-bridging mechanisms at micron-scales. The link between these processes is that the increased stiffness of the cross-linked collagen requires energy to be absorbed by “plastic” deformation at higher structural levels, which occurs by the process of microcracking.

  15. Electrical contacts to nanorod networks at different length scales: From macroscale ensembles to single nanorod chains

    KAUST Repository

    Lavieville, Romain

    2013-11-01

    The nature of metal-semiconductor interfaces at the nanoscale is an important issue in micro- and nanoelectronic engineering. The study of charge transport through chains of CdSe semiconductor nanorods linked by Au particles represents an ideal model system for this matter, because the metal semiconductor interface is an intrinsic feature of the nanosystem. Here we show the controlled fabrication of all-inorganic hybrid metal-semiconductor networks with different size, in which the semiconductor nanorods are linked by Au domains at their tips. We demonstrate different approaches to selectively contact the networks and single nanorod chains with planar electrodes, and we investigate their charge transport at room temperature. © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Modeling and Validation across Scales: Parametrizing the effect of the forested landscape

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dellwik, Ebba; Badger, Merete; Angelou, Nikolas

    be transferred into a parametrization of forests in wind models. The presentation covers three scales: the single tree, the forest edges and clearings, and the large-scale forested landscape in which the forest effects are parameterized with a roughness length. Flow modeling results and validation against...

  17. Conjecture on superrotation in planetary atmospheres - A diffusion model with mixing length theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayr, H. G.; Harris, I.; Hartle, R. E.; Schatten, K. H.; Chan, K. L.

    1985-01-01

    The component of rigid shell superrotation on Venus is discussed in the context of comparative planetary atmospheres. A simplified, heuristic analysis, utilizing mixed length theory to describe the small scale nonlinear advections of energy and angular momentum, thereby providing a closure of the dynamic system, is presented, on the basis of which a crude estimate of zonal velocity is made. The rigid shell (global average) component on Venus was calculated to be 105 m/sec.

  18. Determining the influence of muscle operating length on muscle performance during frog swimming using a bio-robotic model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clemente, Christofer J; Richards, Christopher

    2012-01-01

    Frogs are capable of impressive feats of jumping and swimming. Recent work has shown that anuran hind limb muscles can operate at lengths longer than the ‘optimal length’. To address the implications of muscle operating length on muscle power output and swimming mechanics, we built a robotic frog hind limb model based upon Xenopus laevis. The model simulated the force–length and force–velocity properties of vertebrate muscle, within the skeletal environment. We tested three muscle starting lengths, representing long, optimal and short starting lengths. Increasing starting length increased maximum muscle power output by 27% from 98.1 W kg −1 when muscle begins shortening from the optimal length, to 125.1 W kg −1 when the muscle begins at longer initial lengths. Therefore, longer starting lengths generated greater hydrodynamic force for extended durations, enabling faster swimming speeds of the robotic frog. These swimming speeds increased from 0.15 m s −1 at short initial muscle lengths, to 0.39 m s −1 for the longest initial lengths. Longer starting lengths were able to increase power as the muscle's force–length curve was better synchronized with the muscle's activation profile. We further dissected the underlying components of muscle force, separating force–length versus force–velocity effects, showing a transition from force–length limitations to force–velocity limitations as starting length increased. (paper)

  19. Magneto-Induced ac Electrical Permittivity of Metal-Dielectric Composites with a Two Characteristic Length Scales Periodic Microstructure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strelniker, Y.M.; Bergman, D.J.

    1998-01-01

    A new effect was recently predicted in conducting composites that have a periodic microstructure: an induced strongly anisotropic dc magneto-resistance. This phenomenon is already verified on high mobility n-GaAs films. Here we discuss the possibility of observing analogous behavior in the ac electric permittivity of a metal-dielectric composite with a periodic microstructure in the presence of a strong magnetic field. We developed new analytical and numerical methods to treat the low-frequency magneto-optical properties in composite media with both disordered and periodic conducting micro-structures. Those methods allow us to study composites with inclusions of arbitrary shape (and arbitrary volume fraction) at arbitrarily strong magnetic field. This is exploited in order to calculate an effective dielectric tensor for this system as a function of applied magnetic field and ac frequency. We show that in a non-dilute metal-dielectric composite medium the magneto-plasma resonance and the cyclotron resonance depend upon both the applied magnetic field as well as on the geometric shape of the inclusion. Near such a resonance, it is possible to achieve large values for the ratio of the off-diagonal-to-diagonal electric permittivity tensor components, ε xy /ε xx , (since ε xx →0, while ε xy ≠0), which is analogous to similar ratio of the resistivity tensor components, ρ xy /ρ xx , in the case of dc magneto-transport problem. Motivated by this observation and by results of previous studies of dc magneto-transport in composite conductors, we then performed a numerical study of the ac magneto-electric properties of a particular metal-dielectric composite film with a periodic columnar microstructure which has a two characteristic length scales. The unit cell of such composite is prepared as follows: We placed the conducting square (in cross section) rods (first characteristic length scale) along the perimeter of the unit cell in order to create a dielectric host

  20. Flame Length

    Data.gov (United States)

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — Flame length was modeled using FlamMap, an interagency fire behavior mapping and analysis program that computes potential fire behavior characteristics. The tool...

  1. A New European Slope Length and Steepness Factor (LS-Factor for Modeling Soil Erosion by Water

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Panos Panagos

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The Universal Soil Loss Equation (USLE model is the most frequently used model for soil erosion risk estimation. Among the six input layers, the combined slope length and slope angle (LS-factor has the greatest influence on soil loss at the European scale. The S-factor measures the effect of slope steepness, and the L-factor defines the impact of slope length. The combined LS-factor describes the effect of topography on soil erosion. The European Soil Data Centre (ESDAC developed a new pan-European high-resolution soil erosion assessment to achieve a better understanding of the spatial and temporal patterns of soil erosion in Europe. The LS-calculation was performed using the original equation proposed by Desmet and Govers (1996 and implemented using the System for Automated Geoscientific Analyses (SAGA, which incorporates a multiple flow algorithm and contributes to a precise estimation of flow accumulation. The LS-factor dataset was calculated using a high-resolution (25 m Digital Elevation Model (DEM for the whole European Union, resulting in an improved delineation of areas at risk of soil erosion as compared to lower-resolution datasets. This combined approach of using GIS software tools with high-resolution DEMs has been successfully applied in regional assessments in the past, and is now being applied for first time at the European scale.

  2. Large-scale amplification, cloning and sequencing of near full-length HIV-1 subtype C genomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rousseau, Christine M; Birditt, Brian A; McKay, Angela R; Stoddard, Julia N; Lee, Tsan Chun; McLaughlin, Sherry; Moore, Sarah W; Shindo, Nice; Learn, Gerald H; Korber, Bette T; Brander, Christian; Goulder, Philip J R; Kiepiela, Photini; Walker, Bruce D; Mullins, James I

    2006-09-01

    Full-length HIV-1 genome sequencing provides important data needed to address several vaccine design, molecular epidemiologic and pathogenesis questions. A protocol is presented for obtaining near full-length genomes (NFLGs) from subjects infected with HIV-1 subtype C. This protocol was used to amplify NFLGs from 244 of 366 (67%) samples collected at two clinics in Durban, South Africa (SK and PS). Viral load was directly associated with frequency of successful NFLG amplification for both cohorts (PS; p = 0.005 and SK; p clones were obtained from all 244 NFLG-positive PCR products, and both strands of each genome were sequenced, using a primary set of 46 primers. These methods thus allow the large-scale collection of HIV-1 NFLGs from populations infected primarily with subtype C. The methods are readily adaptable to other HIV-1 subtypes, and provide materials for viral functional analyses and population-based molecular epidemiology studies that include analysis of viral genome chimerization.

  3. Comparing mixing-length models of the diabatic wind profile over homogeneous terrain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pena Diaz, Alfredo; Gryning, Sven-Erik; Hasager, Charlotte Bay

    2010-01-01

    Models of the diabatic wind profile over homogeneous terrain for the entire atmospheric boundary layer are developed using mixing-length theory and are compared to wind speed observations up to 300 m at the National Test Station for Wind Turbines at Høvsøre, Denmark. The measurements are performed...

  4. A Short Introduction to Model Selection, Kolmogorov Complexity and Minimum Description Length (MDL)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nannen, Volker

    2010-01-01

    The concept of overtting in model selection is explained and demon- strated. After providing some background information on information theory and Kolmogorov complexity, we provide a short explanation of Minimum Description Length and error minimization. We conclude with a discussion of the typical

  5. Charnock's Roughness Length Model and Non-dimensional Wind Profiles Over the Sea

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pena Diaz, Alfredo; Gryning, Sven-Erik

    2008-01-01

    An analysis tool for the study of wind speed profiles over the water has been developed. The profiles are analysed using a modified dimensionless wind speed and dimensionless height, assuming that the sea surface roughness can be predicted by Charnock's roughness length model. In this form, the r...

  6. ππ-scattering in the quark confinement model. Scattering lengths

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Efimov, G.V.; Ivanov, M.A.; Mashnik, S.G.

    1990-01-01

    The ππ0scattering lengths α l I (I=0.1.2; l=0.1.2.3.4) are calculated in the quark confinement model. The dependence of their values on the scalar meson parameters are investigated. The obtained results are in agreement with the available experimental data and predictions of other approaches. 6 refs.; 7 figs.; 1 tab

  7. On scaling of human body models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hynčík L.

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Human body is not an unique being, everyone is another from the point of view of anthropometry and mechanical characteristics which means that division of the human body population to categories like 5%-tile, 50%-tile and 95%-tile from the application point of view is not enough. On the other hand, the development of a particular human body model for all of us is not possible. That is why scaling and morphing algorithms has started to be developed. The current work describes the development of a tool for scaling of the human models. The idea is to have one (or couple of standard model(s as a base and to create other models based on these basic models. One has to choose adequate anthropometrical and biomechanical parameters that describe given group of humans to be scaled and morphed among.

  8. The Extended Relativity Theory in Born-Clifford Phase Spaces with a Lower and Upper Length Scales and Clifford Group Geometric Unification

    CERN Document Server

    Castro, C

    2004-01-01

    We construct the Extended Relativity Theory in Born-Clifford-Phase spaces with an upper and lower length scales (infrared/ultraviolet cutoff). The invariance symmetry leads naturally to the real Clifford algebra Cl (2, 6, R ) and complexified Clifford Cl_C ( 4 ) algebra related to Twistors. We proceed with an extensive review of Smith's 8D model based on the Clifford algebra Cl ( 1 ,7) that reproduces at low energies the physics of the Standard Model and Gravity; including the derivation of all the coupling constants, particle masses, mixing angles, ....with high precision. Further results by Smith are discussed pertaining the interplay among Clifford, Jordan, Division and Exceptional Lie algebras within the hierarchy of dimensions D = 26, 27, 28 related to bosonic string, M, F theory. Two Geometric actions are presented like the Clifford-Space extension of Maxwell's Electrodynamics, Brandt's action related the 8D spacetime tangent-bundle involving coordinates and velocities (Finsler geometries) followed by a...

  9. Modeling fast and slow earthquakes at various scales.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ide, Satoshi

    2014-01-01

    Earthquake sources represent dynamic rupture within rocky materials at depth and often can be modeled as propagating shear slip controlled by friction laws. These laws provide boundary conditions on fault planes embedded in elastic media. Recent developments in observation networks, laboratory experiments, and methods of data analysis have expanded our knowledge of the physics of earthquakes. Newly discovered slow earthquakes are qualitatively different phenomena from ordinary fast earthquakes and provide independent information on slow deformation at depth. Many numerical simulations have been carried out to model both fast and slow earthquakes, but problems remain, especially with scaling laws. Some mechanisms are required to explain the power-law nature of earthquake rupture and the lack of characteristic length. Conceptual models that include a hierarchical structure over a wide range of scales would be helpful for characterizing diverse behavior in different seismic regions and for improving probabilistic forecasts of earthquakes.

  10. Modelling of the glass fiber length and the glass fiber length distribution in the compounding of short glass fiber-reinforced thermoplastics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kloke, P.; Herken, T.; Schöppner, V.; Rudloff, J.; Kretschmer, K.; Heidemeyer, P.; Bastian, M.; Walther, Dridger, A.

    2014-05-01

    The use of short glass fiber-reinforced thermoplastics for the production of highly stressed parts in the plastics processing industry has experienced an enormous boom in the last few years. The reasons for this are primarily the improvements to the stiffness and strength properties brought about by fiber reinforcement. These positive characteristics of glass fiber-reinforced polymers are governed predominantly by the mean glass fiber length and the glass fiber length distribution. It is not enough to describe the properties of a plastics component solely as a function of the mean glass fiber length [1]. For this reason, a mathematical-physical model has been developed for describing the glass fiber length distribution in compounding. With this model, it is possible on the one hand to optimize processes for the production of short glass fiber-reinforced thermoplastics, and, on the other, to obtain information on the final distribution, on the basis of which much more detailed statements can be made about the subsequent properties of the molded part. Based on experimental tests, it was shown that this model is able to accurately describe the change in glass fiber length distribution in compounding.

  11. Tornado hazard model with the variation effects of tornado intensity along the path length

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirakuchi, Hiromaru; Nohara, Daisuke; Sugimoto, Soichiro; Eguchi, Yuzuru; Hattori, Yasuo

    2015-01-01

    Most of Japanese tornados have been reported near the coast line, where all of Japanese nuclear power plants are located. It is necessary for Japanese electric power companies to assess tornado risks on the plants according to a new regulation in 2013. The new regulatory guide exemplifies a tornado hazard model, which cannot consider the variation of tornado intensity along the path length and consequently produces conservative risk estimates. The guide also recommends the long narrow strip area along the coast line with the width of 5-10 km as a region of interest, although the model tends to estimate inadequate wind speeds due to the limit of application. The purpose of this study is to propose a new tornado hazard model which can be apply to the long narrow strip area. The new model can also consider the variation of tornado intensity along the path length and across the path width. (author)

  12. Stochastic Analysis of a Queue Length Model Using a Graphics Processing Unit

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Přikryl, Jan; Kocijan, J.

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 5, č. 2 (2012), s. 55-62 ISSN 1802-971X R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) MEB091015 Institutional support: RVO:67985556 Keywords : graphics processing unit * GPU * Monte Carlo simulation * computer simulation * modeling Subject RIV: BC - Control Systems Theory http://library.utia.cas.cz/separaty/2012/AS/prikryl-stochastic analysis of a queue length model using a graphics processing unit.pdf

  13. A stochastic length-based assessment model for the Pandalus stock in Skagerrak and the Norwegian Deep

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Anders; Munch-Petersen, Sten; Eigaard, Ole Ritzau

    2013-01-01

    This working document describes a length based stochastic assessment model of Pandalus in ICES areas IIIA and IVA. The model describing stock development is age based, but the model also estimates the relation between age and length assuming a von Bertalany growth curve. The model presented...

  14. On mechanics and material length scales of failure in heterogeneous interfaces using a finite strain high performance solver

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mosby, Matthew; Matouš, Karel

    2015-12-01

    Three-dimensional simulations capable of resolving the large range of spatial scales, from the failure-zone thickness up to the size of the representative unit cell, in damage mechanics problems of particle reinforced adhesives are presented. We show that resolving this wide range of scales in complex three-dimensional heterogeneous morphologies is essential in order to apprehend fracture characteristics, such as strength, fracture toughness and shape of the softening profile. Moreover, we show that computations that resolve essential physical length scales capture the particle size-effect in fracture toughness, for example. In the vein of image-based computational materials science, we construct statistically optimal unit cells containing hundreds to thousands of particles. We show that these statistically representative unit cells are capable of capturing the first- and second-order probability functions of a given data-source with better accuracy than traditional inclusion packing techniques. In order to accomplish these large computations, we use a parallel multiscale cohesive formulation and extend it to finite strains including damage mechanics. The high-performance parallel computational framework is executed on up to 1024 processing cores. A mesh convergence and a representative unit cell study are performed. Quantifying the complex damage patterns in simulations consisting of tens of millions of computational cells and millions of highly nonlinear equations requires data-mining the parallel simulations, and we propose two damage metrics to quantify the damage patterns. A detailed study of volume fraction and filler size on the macroscopic traction-separation response of heterogeneous adhesives is presented.

  15. Paradigm for Subgrid Scale Closure Modeling in Multiphase Geophysical Flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calantoni, J.; Simeonov, J.; Penko, A. M.; Bateman, S. P.; Palmsten, M. L.; Holland, K.

    2012-12-01

    We present a new paradigm for modeling multiphase geophysical flows to produce highly accurate and highly efficient forecasting of the complexity of the natural environment across the full range of relevant length and time scales. The assumption that computing technology will never allow us to perform direct numerical simulations (DNS) of the natural environment often limits our ambition in forward thinking model development and produces only incremental improvements in the state-of-the-art technology. Regional and global forecasting models for earth, ocean, and atmospheric processes based on averaged equations (e.g. RANS) must advance beyond simple closures relations obtained for single-phase fluid turbulence (e.g., k-epsilon, k-omega, and Mellor-Yamada). We propose using a hierarchy of computationally intensive, high fidelity simulations to resolve subgrid processes across a range of cascading length and time scales in the model domain to generate numerical interpolations for the unresolved physical processes. Further, we believe that it is possible to use the cumulative results of these subgrid scale simulations to develop a Bayesian network, for example, which may eventually replace the computationally intensive simulations with a highly efficient probabilistic closure model for the unresolved physical processes. The success of our approach will be greatly enhanced through rigorous validation of our subgrid scale models using three-dimensional laboratory and field measurements of fluid-particle turbulence at the scales of interest. Recent advances in optical imaging techniques have made it possible to make highly resolved three-dimensional measurements of fluid-particle turbulent interactions in the laboratory with spatial and temporal resolutions at or near the Kolmogorov scales. Additional work must be done to transition these technologies for use in the field. As a pilot test case we introduce our new paradigm using a hierarchy of models we have developed

  16. Uranium fission track length distribution modelling for retracing chronothermometrical history of minerals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rebetez, M.

    1987-01-01

    Spontaneous fission of uranium 238 isotope contained in certain minerals creates damage zones called latent tracks, that can be etched chemically. The observation of these etched tracks and the measurement of their characteristics using an optical microscope are the basis of several applications in the domain of the earth sciences. First, the determination of their densities permits dating a mineral and establishing uranium mapping of rocks. Second, the measurement of their lengths can be a good source of information for retracing the thermal and tectonic history of the sample. The study of the partial annealing of tracks in apatite appears to be the ideal indicator for the evaluation of petroleum potential of a sedimentary basin. To allow the development of this application, it is necessary to devise a theoretical model of track length distributions. The model which is proposed takes into account the most realistic hypotheses concerning registration, etching and observation of tracks. The characteristics of surface tracks (projected lengths, depths, inclination angles, real lengths) and confined tracks (Track IN Track and Track IN Cleavage) are calculated. Surface tracks and confined tracks are perfectly complementary for chrono-thermometric interpretation of complex geological histories. The method is applied to the case of two samples with different tectonic history, issued from the cretaceous alcalin magmatism from the Pyrenees (Bilbao, Spain). A graphic method of distribution deconvolution is proposed. Finally, the uranium migration, depending on the hydrothermal alteration, is studied on the granite from Auriat (France) [fr

  17. Site-Scale Saturated Zone Flow Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    G. Zyvoloski

    2003-12-17

    The purpose of this model report is to document the components of the site-scale saturated-zone flow model at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, in accordance with administrative procedure (AP)-SIII.lOQ, ''Models''. This report provides validation and confidence in the flow model that was developed for site recommendation (SR) and will be used to provide flow fields in support of the Total Systems Performance Assessment (TSPA) for the License Application. The output from this report provides the flow model used in the ''Site-Scale Saturated Zone Transport'', MDL-NBS-HS-000010 Rev 01 (BSC 2003 [162419]). The Site-Scale Saturated Zone Transport model then provides output to the SZ Transport Abstraction Model (BSC 2003 [164870]). In particular, the output from the SZ site-scale flow model is used to simulate the groundwater flow pathways and radionuclide transport to the accessible environment for use in the TSPA calculations. Since the development and calibration of the saturated-zone flow model, more data have been gathered for use in model validation and confidence building, including new water-level data from Nye County wells, single- and multiple-well hydraulic testing data, and new hydrochemistry data. In addition, a new hydrogeologic framework model (HFM), which incorporates Nye County wells lithology, also provides geologic data for corroboration and confidence in the flow model. The intended use of this work is to provide a flow model that generates flow fields to simulate radionuclide transport in saturated porous rock and alluvium under natural or forced gradient flow conditions. The flow model simulations are completed using the three-dimensional (3-D), finite-element, flow, heat, and transport computer code, FEHM Version (V) 2.20 (software tracking number (STN): 10086-2.20-00; LANL 2003 [161725]). Concurrently, process-level transport model and methodology for calculating radionuclide transport in the saturated zone at Yucca

  18. Site-Scale Saturated Zone Flow Model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    G. Zyvoloski

    2003-01-01

    The purpose of this model report is to document the components of the site-scale saturated-zone flow model at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, in accordance with administrative procedure (AP)-SIII.lOQ, ''Models''. This report provides validation and confidence in the flow model that was developed for site recommendation (SR) and will be used to provide flow fields in support of the Total Systems Performance Assessment (TSPA) for the License Application. The output from this report provides the flow model used in the ''Site-Scale Saturated Zone Transport'', MDL-NBS-HS-000010 Rev 01 (BSC 2003 [162419]). The Site-Scale Saturated Zone Transport model then provides output to the SZ Transport Abstraction Model (BSC 2003 [164870]). In particular, the output from the SZ site-scale flow model is used to simulate the groundwater flow pathways and radionuclide transport to the accessible environment for use in the TSPA calculations. Since the development and calibration of the saturated-zone flow model, more data have been gathered for use in model validation and confidence building, including new water-level data from Nye County wells, single- and multiple-well hydraulic testing data, and new hydrochemistry data. In addition, a new hydrogeologic framework model (HFM), which incorporates Nye County wells lithology, also provides geologic data for corroboration and confidence in the flow model. The intended use of this work is to provide a flow model that generates flow fields to simulate radionuclide transport in saturated porous rock and alluvium under natural or forced gradient flow conditions. The flow model simulations are completed using the three-dimensional (3-D), finite-element, flow, heat, and transport computer code, FEHM Version (V) 2.20 (software tracking number (STN): 10086-2.20-00; LANL 2003 [161725]). Concurrently, process-level transport model and methodology for calculating radionuclide transport in the saturated zone at Yucca Mountain using FEHM V 2.20 are being

  19. Modelling Kepler red giants in eclipsing binaries: calibrating the mixing-length parameter with asteroseismology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Tanda; Bedding, Timothy R.; Huber, Daniel; Ball, Warrick H.; Stello, Dennis; Murphy, Simon J.; Bland-Hawthorn, Joss

    2018-03-01

    Stellar models rely on a number of free parameters. High-quality observations of eclipsing binary stars observed by Kepler offer a great opportunity to calibrate model parameters for evolved stars. Our study focuses on six Kepler red giants with the goal of calibrating the mixing-length parameter of convection as well as the asteroseismic surface term in models. We introduce a new method to improve the identification of oscillation modes that exploits theoretical frequencies to guide the mode identification (`peak-bagging') stage of the data analysis. Our results indicate that the convective mixing-length parameter (α) is ≈14 per cent larger for red giants than for the Sun, in agreement with recent results from modelling the APOGEE stars. We found that the asteroseismic surface term (i.e. the frequency offset between the observed and predicted modes) correlates with stellar parameters (Teff, log g) and the mixing-length parameter. This frequency offset generally decreases as giants evolve. The two coefficients a-1 and a3 for the inverse and cubic terms that have been used to describe the surface term correction are found to correlate linearly. The effect of the surface term is also seen in the p-g mixed modes; however, established methods for correcting the effect are not able to properly correct the g-dominated modes in late evolved stars.

  20. Optical fiber Bragg gratings. Part II. Modeling of finite-length gratings and grating arrays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Passaro, Vittorio M N; Diana, Roberto; Armenise, Mario N

    2002-09-01

    A model of both uniform finite-length optical fiber Bragg gratings and grating arrays is presented. The model is based on the Floquet-Bloch formalism and allows rigorous investigation of all the physical aspects in either single- or multiple-periodic structures realized on the core of a monomodal fiber. Analytical expressions of reflectivity and transmittivity for both single gratings and grating arrays are derived. The influence of the grating length and the index modulation amplitude on the reflected and transmitted optical power for both sinusoidal and rectangular profiles is evaluated. Good agreement between our method and the well-known coupled-mode theory (CMT) approach has been observed for both single gratings and grating arrays only in the case of weak index perturbation. Significant discrepancies exist there in cases of strong index contrast because of the increasing approximation of the CMT approach. The effects of intragrating phase shift are also shown and discussed.

  1. Proportional hazards model with varying coefficients for length-biased data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Feipeng; Chen, Xuerong; Zhou, Yong

    2014-01-01

    Length-biased data arise in many important applications including epidemiological cohort studies, cancer prevention trials and studies of labor economics. Such data are also often subject to right censoring due to loss of follow-up or the end of study. In this paper, we consider a proportional hazards model with varying coefficients for right-censored and length-biased data, which is used to study the interact effect nonlinearly of covariates with an exposure variable. A local estimating equation method is proposed for the unknown coefficients and the intercept function in the model. The asymptotic properties of the proposed estimators are established by using the martingale theory and kernel smoothing techniques. Our simulation studies demonstrate that the proposed estimators have an excellent finite-sample performance. The Channing House data is analyzed to demonstrate the applications of the proposed method.

  2. Measurement and Modelling of Scaling Minerals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Villafafila Garcia, Ada

    2005-01-01

    of temperature and pressure. Reliable experimental solubility measurements under conditions similar to those found in reality will help the development of strong and consistent models. Chapter 1 is a short introduction to the problem of scale formation, the model chosen to study it, and the experiments performed......). Chapters 8 and 9 focus on the experimental part of this dissertation, analyzing different experimental procedures to determine salt solubility at high temperature and pressure, and developing a setup to perform those measurements. The motivation behind both parts of the Ph.D. project is the problem...... of scale formation found in many industrial processes, and especially in oilfield and geothermal operations. We want to contribute to the study of this problem by releasing a simple and accurate thermodynamic model capable of calculating the behaviour of scaling minerals, covering a wide range...

  3. Hair length, facial attractiveness, personality attribution: A multiple fitness model of hairdressing

    OpenAIRE

    Bereczkei, Tamas; Mesko, Norbert

    2007-01-01

    Multiple Fitness Model states that attractiveness varies across multiple dimensions, with each feature representing a different aspect of mate value. In the present study, male raters judged the attractiveness of young females with neotenous and mature facial features, with various hair lengths. Results revealed that the physical appearance of long-haired women was rated high, regardless of their facial attractiveness being valued high or low. Women rated as most attractive were those whose f...

  4. Modeling relaxation length and density of acacia mangium wood using gamma - ray attenuation technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tamer A Tabet; Fauziah Abdul Aziz

    2009-01-01

    Wood density measurement is related to the several factors that influence wood quality. In this paper, density, relaxation length and half-thickness value of eight ages, 3, 5, 7, 10, 11, 13 and 15 year-old of Acacia mangium wood were determined using gamma radiation from 137 Cs source. Results show that Acacia mangium tree of age 3 year has the highest relaxation length of 83.33 cm and least density of 0.43 gcm -3 , while the tree of age 15 year has the least Relaxation length of 28.56 cm and highest density of 0.76 gcm -3 . Results also show that the 3 year-old Acacia mangium wood has the highest half thickness value of 57.75 cm and 15 year-old tree has the least half thickness value of 19.85 cm. Two mathematical models have been developed for the prediction of density, variation with relaxation length and half-thickness value of different age of tree. A good agreement (greater than 85% in most cases) was observed between the measured values and predicted ones. Very good linear correlation was found between measured density and the age of tree (R2 = 0.824), and between estimated density and Acacia mangium tree age (R2 = 0.952). (Author)

  5. Contact damage and fracture micromechanisms of multilayered TiN/CrN coatings at micro- and nano-length scales

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roa, J.J., E-mail: joan.josep.roa@upc.edu [CIEFMA — Departament de Ciència dels Materials i Eng. Metallúrgica, Universitat Politècnica de Catalunya, Avda. Diagonal 647, 08028 Barcelona (Spain); CRnE, Universitat Politècnica de Catalunya, C. Pasqual i Vila 15, 08028 Barcelona (Spain); Jiménez-Piqué, E. [CIEFMA — Departament de Ciència dels Materials i Eng. Metallúrgica, Universitat Politècnica de Catalunya, Avda. Diagonal 647, 08028 Barcelona (Spain); CRnE, Universitat Politècnica de Catalunya, C. Pasqual i Vila 15, 08028 Barcelona (Spain); Martínez, R. [Centro de Ingeniería Avanzada de Superfícies, Asociación de la Industria Navarra — AIN, Crta. Pamplona, 1, Edificio AIN, 31191 Cordovilla (Spain); Ramírez, G. [CIEFMA — Departament de Ciència dels Materials i Eng. Metallúrgica, Universitat Politècnica de Catalunya, Avda. Diagonal 647, 08028 Barcelona (Spain); Fundació CTM Centre Tecnològic, Avda. Bases de Manresa 1, 08243 Manresa (Spain); Tarragó, J.M. [CIEFMA — Departament de Ciència dels Materials i Eng. Metallúrgica, Universitat Politècnica de Catalunya, Avda. Diagonal 647, 08028 Barcelona (Spain); CRnE, Universitat Politècnica de Catalunya, C. Pasqual i Vila 15, 08028 Barcelona (Spain); and others

    2014-11-28

    In this study, systematic nanomechanical and micromechanical studies have been conducted in three multilayer TiN/CrN systems with different bilayer periods (8, 19 and 25 nm). Additionally, experimental work has been performed on corresponding TiN and CrN single layers, for comparison purposes. The investigation includes the use of different indenter tip geometries as well as contact loading conditions (i.e. indentation/scratch) such to induce different stress field and damage scenarios within the films. The surface and subsurface damage under the different indentation imprints and scratch tracks have been observed by atomic force microscopy, field emission scanning electron microscopy and focused ion beam. Multilayer TiN/CrN coated systems are found to exhibit higher adhesion strength (under sliding contact load) and cracking resistance (under spherical indentation) than those coated with reference TiN and CrN monolayers. The main reason behind these findings is the effective development of microstructurally-driven deformation and cracking resistant micromechanisms: rotation of columnar grains (and associated distortion of bilayer period) and crack deflection of interlayer thickness length scale, respectively. - Highlights: • Nanomechanical and micromechanical study in TiN/CrN systems • TiN/CrN coated systems exhibit higher adhesion strength and cracking resistance. • Main deformation and cracking micromechanisms: columnar grain rotation and crack deflection.

  6. Soft x-ray microscopy - a powerful analytical tool to image magnetism down to fundamental length and times scales

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fischer, Peter

    2008-08-01

    The magnetic properties of low dimensional solid state matter is of the utmost interest both scientifically as well as technologically. In addition to the charge of the electron which is the base for current electronics, by taking into account the spin degree of freedom in future spintronics applications open a new avenue. Progress towards a better physical understanding of the mechanism and principles involved as well as potential applications of nanomagnetic devices can only be achieved with advanced analytical tools. Soft X-ray microscopy providing a spatial resolution towards 10nm, a time resolution currently in the sub-ns regime and inherent elemental sensitivity is a very promising technique for that. This article reviews the recent achievements of magnetic soft X-ray microscopy by selected examples of spin torque phenomena, stochastical behavior on the nanoscale and spin dynamics in magnetic nanopatterns. The future potential with regard to addressing fundamental magnetic length and time scales, e.g. imaging fsec spin dynamics at upcoming X-ray sources is pointed out.

  7. Surface physicochemical properties at the micro and nano length scales: role on bacterial adhesion and Xylella fastidiosa biofilm development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorite, Gabriela S; Janissen, Richard; Clerici, João H; Rodrigues, Carolina M; Tomaz, Juarez P; Mizaikoff, Boris; Kranz, Christine; de Souza, Alessandra A; Cotta, Mônica A

    2013-01-01

    The phytopathogen Xylella fastidiosa grows as a biofilm causing vascular occlusion and consequently nutrient and water stress in different plant hosts by adhesion on xylem vessel surfaces composed of cellulose, hemicellulose, pectin and proteins. Understanding the factors which influence bacterial adhesion and biofilm development is a key issue in identifying mechanisms for preventing biofilm formation in infected plants. In this study, we show that X. fastidiosa biofilm development and architecture correlate well with physicochemical surface properties after interaction with the culture medium. Different biotic and abiotic substrates such as silicon (Si) and derivatized cellulose films were studied. Both biofilms and substrates were characterized at the micro- and nanoscale, which corresponds to the actual bacterial cell and membrane/ protein length scales, respectively. Our experimental results clearly indicate that the presence of surfaces with different chemical composition affect X. fastidiosa behavior from the point of view of gene expression and adhesion functionality. Bacterial adhesion is facilitated on more hydrophilic surfaces with higher surface potentials; XadA1 adhesin reveals different strengths of interaction on these surfaces. Nonetheless, despite different architectural biofilm geometries and rates of development, the colonization process occurs on all investigated surfaces. Our results univocally support the hypothesis that different adhesion mechanisms are active along the biofilm life cycle representing an adaptation mechanism for variations on the specific xylem vessel composition, which the bacterium encounters within the infected plant.

  8. Phenomenology of Low Quantum Gravity Scale Models

    CERN Document Server

    Benakli, Karim

    1999-01-01

    We study some phenomenological implications of models where the scale of quantum gravity effects lies much below the four-dimensional Planck scale. These models arise from M-theory vacua where either the internal space volume is large or the string coupling is very small. We provide a critical analysis of ways to unify electroweak, strong and gravitational interactions in M-theory. We discuss the relations between different scales in two M-vacua: Type I strings and Ho\\v rava--Witten supergravity models. The latter allows possibilities for an eleven-dimensional scale at TeV energies with one large dimension below separating our four-dimensional world from a hidden one. Different mechanisms for breaking supersymmetry (gravity mediated, gauge mediated and Scherk-Schwarz mechanisms) are discussed in this framework. Some phenomenological issues such as dark matter (with masses that may vary in time), origin of neutrino masses and axion scale are discussed. We suggest that these are indications that the string scal...

  9. Scaled Experimental Modeling of VHTR Plenum Flows

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    ICONE, 15

    2007-01-01

    The Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) is the leading candidate for the Next Generation Nuclear Power (NGNP) Project in the U.S. which has the goal of demonstrating the production of emissions free electricity and hydrogen by 2015. Various scaled heated gas and water flow facilities were investigated for modeling VHTR upper and lower plenum flows during the decay heat portion of a pressurized conduction-cooldown scenario and for modeling thermal mixing and stratification (''thermal striping'') in the lower plenum during normal operation. It was concluded, based on phenomena scaling and instrumentation and other practical considerations, that a heated water flow scale model facility is preferable to a heated gas flow facility and to unheated facilities which use fluids with ranges of density to simulate the density effect of heating. For a heated water flow lower plenum model, both the Richardson numbers and Reynolds numbers may be approximately matched for conduction-cooldown natural circulation conditions. Thermal mixing during normal operation may be simulated but at lower, but still fully turbulent, Reynolds numbers than in the prototype. Natural circulation flows in the upper plenum may also be simulated in a separate heated water flow facility that uses the same plumbing as the lower plenum model. However, Reynolds number scaling distortions will occur at matching Richardson numbers due primarily to the necessity of using a reduced number of channels connected to the plenum than in the prototype (which has approximately 11,000 core channels connected to the upper plenum) in an otherwise geometrically scaled model. Experiments conducted in either or both facilities will meet the objectives of providing benchmark data for the validation of codes proposed for NGNP designs and safety studies, as well as providing a better understanding of the complex flow phenomena in the plenums

  10. Scaled experimental modeling of VHTR plenum flows

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McCreery, Glenn E.; Condie, Keith G.; Schultz, Richard R.

    2007-01-01

    The Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) is the leading candidate for the Next Generation Nuclear Power (NGNP) Project in the U.S. Various scaled heated and unheated gas and water flow facilities were investigated for modeling VHTR upper and lower plenum flows during the decay heat portion of a pressurized conduction-cooldown scenario and for modeling thermal mixing and stratification ('thermal striping') in the lower plenum during normal operation. It was concluded, based on phenomena scaling and instrumentation and other practical considerations, that a heated water flow scale model facility is preferable to a heated gas flow facility and to unheated facilities which use fluids with ranges of density to simulate the buoyancy effect of heating. For a heated water flow lower plenum model, both the Richardson numbers and Reynolds numbers may be approximately matched for conduction-cooldown natural circulation conditions. Thermal mixing during normal operation may be simulated but at lower, but still fully turbulent, Reynolds numbers than in the prototype. Natural circulation flows in the upper plenum may also be simulated in a separate heated water flow facility that uses the same plumbing as the lower plenum model. However, scaling distortions will occur due primarily to the necessity of using a reduced number of channels connected to the upper plenum than in the prototype in an otherwise geometrically scaled model. Experiments conducted in either or both facilities will meet the objectives of providing benchmark data for the validation of codes proposed for NGNP designs and safety studies, as well as providing a better understanding of the complex flow phenomena in the plenums. (author)

  11. Scaled Experimental Modeling of VHTR Plenum Flows

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    ICONE 15

    2007-04-01

    Abstract The Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) is the leading candidate for the Next Generation Nuclear Power (NGNP) Project in the U.S. which has the goal of demonstrating the production of emissions free electricity and hydrogen by 2015. Various scaled heated gas and water flow facilities were investigated for modeling VHTR upper and lower plenum flows during the decay heat portion of a pressurized conduction-cooldown scenario and for modeling thermal mixing and stratification (“thermal striping”) in the lower plenum during normal operation. It was concluded, based on phenomena scaling and instrumentation and other practical considerations, that a heated water flow scale model facility is preferable to a heated gas flow facility and to unheated facilities which use fluids with ranges of density to simulate the density effect of heating. For a heated water flow lower plenum model, both the Richardson numbers and Reynolds numbers may be approximately matched for conduction-cooldown natural circulation conditions. Thermal mixing during normal operation may be simulated but at lower, but still fully turbulent, Reynolds numbers than in the prototype. Natural circulation flows in the upper plenum may also be simulated in a separate heated water flow facility that uses the same plumbing as the lower plenum model. However, Reynolds number scaling distortions will occur at matching Richardson numbers due primarily to the necessity of using a reduced number of channels connected to the plenum than in the prototype (which has approximately 11,000 core channels connected to the upper plenum) in an otherwise geometrically scaled model. Experiments conducted in either or both facilities will meet the objectives of providing benchmark data for the validation of codes proposed for NGNP designs and safety studies, as well as providing a better understanding of the complex flow phenomena in the plenums.

  12. Managing large-scale models: DBS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-05-01

    A set of fundamental management tools for developing and operating a large scale model and data base system is presented. Based on experience in operating and developing a large scale computerized system, the only reasonable way to gain strong management control of such a system is to implement appropriate controls and procedures. Chapter I discusses the purpose of the book. Chapter II classifies a broad range of generic management problems into three groups: documentation, operations, and maintenance. First, system problems are identified then solutions for gaining management control are disucssed. Chapters III, IV, and V present practical methods for dealing with these problems. These methods were developed for managing SEAS but have general application for large scale models and data bases

  13. Photon path length distributions for cloudy skies – oxygen A-Band measurements and model calculations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. Funk

    Full Text Available This paper addresses the statistics underlying cloudy sky radiative transfer (RT by inspection of the distribution of the path lengths of solar photons. Recent studies indicate that this approach is promising, since it might reveal characteristics about the diffusion process underlying atmospheric radiative transfer (Pfeilsticker, 1999. Moreover, it uses an observable that is directly related to the atmospheric absorption and, therefore, of climatic relevance. However, these studies are based largely on the accuracy of the measurement of the photon path length distribution (PPD. This paper presents a refined analysis method based on high resolution spectroscopy of the oxygen A-band. The method is validated by Monte Carlo simulation atmospheric spectra. Additionally, a new method to measure the effective optical thickness of cloud layers, based on fitting the measured differential transmissions with a 1-dimensional (discrete ordinate RT model, is presented. These methods are applied to measurements conducted during the cloud radar inter-comparison campaign CLARE’98, which supplied detailed cloud structure information, required for the further analysis. For some exemplary cases, measured path length distributions and optical thicknesses are presented and backed by detailed RT model calculations. For all cases, reasonable PPDs can be retrieved and the effects of the vertical cloud structure are found. The inferred cloud optical thicknesses are in agreement with liquid water path measurements.

    Key words. Meteorology and atmospheric dynamics (radiative processes; instruments and techniques

  14. Photon path length distributions for cloudy skies – oxygen A-Band measurements and model calculations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. Funk

    2003-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper addresses the statistics underlying cloudy sky radiative transfer (RT by inspection of the distribution of the path lengths of solar photons. Recent studies indicate that this approach is promising, since it might reveal characteristics about the diffusion process underlying atmospheric radiative transfer (Pfeilsticker, 1999. Moreover, it uses an observable that is directly related to the atmospheric absorption and, therefore, of climatic relevance. However, these studies are based largely on the accuracy of the measurement of the photon path length distribution (PPD. This paper presents a refined analysis method based on high resolution spectroscopy of the oxygen A-band. The method is validated by Monte Carlo simulation atmospheric spectra. Additionally, a new method to measure the effective optical thickness of cloud layers, based on fitting the measured differential transmissions with a 1-dimensional (discrete ordinate RT model, is presented. These methods are applied to measurements conducted during the cloud radar inter-comparison campaign CLARE’98, which supplied detailed cloud structure information, required for the further analysis. For some exemplary cases, measured path length distributions and optical thicknesses are presented and backed by detailed RT model calculations. For all cases, reasonable PPDs can be retrieved and the effects of the vertical cloud structure are found. The inferred cloud optical thicknesses are in agreement with liquid water path measurements. Key words. Meteorology and atmospheric dynamics (radiative processes; instruments and techniques

  15. Multi-Scale Modeling of Magnetospheric Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuznetsova, M. M.; Hesse, M.; Toth, G.

    2012-01-01

    Magnetic reconnection is a key element in many phenomena in space plasma, e.g. Coronal mass Ejections, Magnetosphere substorms. One of the major challenges in modeling the dynamics of large-scale systems involving magnetic reconnection is to quantifY the interaction between global evolution of the magnetosphere and microphysical kinetic processes in diffusion regions near reconnection sites. Recent advances in small-scale kinetic modeling of magnetic reconnection significantly improved our understanding of physical mechanisms controlling the dissipation in the vicinity of the reconnection site in collisionless plasma. However the progress in studies of small-scale geometries was not very helpful for large scale simulations. Global magnetosphere simulations usually include non-ideal processes in terms of numerical dissipation and/or ad hoc anomalous resistivity. Comparative studies of magnetic reconnection in small scale geometries demonstrated that MHD simulations that included non-ideal processes in terms of a resistive term 11 J did not produce fast reconnection rates observed in kinetic simulations. In collisionless magnetospheric plasma, the primary mechanism controlling the dissipation in the vicinity of the reconnection site is nongyrotropic pressure effects with spatial scales comparable with the particle Larmor radius. We utilize the global MHD code BATSRUS and replace ad hoc parameters such as "critical current density" and "anomalous resistivity" with a physically motivated model of dissipation. The primary mechanism controlling the dissipation in the vicinity of the reconnection site in incorporated into MHD description in terms of non-gyrotropic corrections to the induction equation. We will demonstrate that kinetic nongyrotropic effects can significantly alter the global magnetosphere evolution. Our approach allowed for the first time to model loading/unloading cycle in response to steady southward IMF driving. The role of solar wind parameters and

  16. The optimal intestinal segment length for experimental size-mismatched intestinal transplantation: Defining the maximum length with the lowest blood flow needs in a porcine model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frongia, Giovanni; Majlesara, Ali; Saffari, Arash; Emami, Golnaz; Golriz, Mohammad; Günther, Patrick; Mehrabi, Arianeb

    2018-03-01

    Transplanted Intestinal Segments (IS) must match the perfusion capacities of the recipient. This can be challenging during a size-mismatched SBTX. In this study, we defined the maximum IS length with lowest blood flow needs in a porcine model by evaluating the physiological perfusion rates of different IS lengths. Blood flow in the SMA, aorta segment four, and general circulatory parameters were monitored before and after sequential intestinal resection. IS lengths of 30 cm, 60 cm, 120 cm, and 300 cm (n = 8 each) were compared. The IS blood flow requirements increased with IS length (30 cm: 19.5 ± 3.4 mL/min; 60 cm: 16.9 ± 6.7 mL/min; 120 cm: 34.9 ± 8.5 mL/min; 300 cm: 62.9 ± 11.6 mL/min). Absolute IS blood flow (P = .004), percentage IS blood flow uptake from the SMA (P = .001), and percentage IS blood flow uptake from the aorta (P = .005) increased significantly between 60 cm and 120 cm. We concluded that 60 cm was the maximum IS length before blood flow demands significantly increased in a porcine model. © 2018 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Diffusion effects on volume-selective NMR at small length scales; Diffusionseffekte in volumenselektiver NMR auf kleinen Laengenskalen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gaedke, Achim

    2009-01-21

    In this thesis, the interplay between diffusion and relaxation effects in spatially selective NMR experiments at short length scales is explored. This is especially relevant in the context of both conventional and mechanically detected MRI at (sub)micron resolution in biological specimens. Recent results on selectively excited very thin slices showed an in-slice-magnetization recovery orders of magnitude faster than the longitudinal relaxation time T1. However, those experiments were run on fully relaxed samples while MRI and especially mechanically detected NMR experiments are typically run in a periodic fashion with repetition times far below T1. The main purpose of this work therefore was to extend the study of the interplay between diffusion and longitudinal relaxation to periodic excitations. In some way, this is inverse phenomenon to the DESIRE (Diffusive Enhancement of SIgnal and REsolution) approach, proposed 1992 by Lauterbur. Experiments on periodically excited thin slices were carried out at a dedicated static field gradient cryomagnet with magnetic field gradients up to 180 T/m. In order to obtain plane slices, an appropriate isosurface of the gradient magnet had to be identified. It was found at a field of 3.8 T with a gradient of 73 T/m. In this field, slices down to a thickness of 3.2 {mu}m could be excited. The detection of the NMR signal was done using FIDs instead of echoes as the excitation bandwidth of those thin slices is sufficiently small to observe FIDs which are usually considered to be elusive to detection in such strong static field gradients. A simulation toolbox based on the full Bloch-Torrey-equation was developed to describe the excitation and the formation of NMR signals under those unusual conditions as well as the interplay of diffusion and magnetization recovery. Both the experiments and the simulations indicate that diffusion effects lead to a strongly enhanced magnetization modulation signal also under periodic excitation

  18. Magnetic corrections to π -π scattering lengths in the linear sigma model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loewe, M.; Monje, L.; Zamora, R.

    2018-03-01

    In this article, we consider the magnetic corrections to π -π scattering lengths in the frame of the linear sigma model. For this, we consider all the one-loop corrections in the s , t , and u channels, associated to the insertion of a Schwinger propagator for charged pions, working in the region of small values of the magnetic field. Our calculation relies on an appropriate expansion for the propagator. It turns out that the leading scattering length, l =0 in the S channel, increases for an increasing value of the magnetic field, in the isospin I =2 case, whereas the opposite effect is found for the I =0 case. The isospin symmetry is valid because the insertion of the magnetic field occurs through the absolute value of the electric charges. The channel I =1 does not receive any corrections. These results, for the channels I =0 and I =2 , are opposite with respect to the thermal corrections found previously in the literature.

  19. MODELLING FINE SCALE MOVEMENT CORRIDORS FOR THE TRICARINATE HILL TURTLE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Mondal

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Habitat loss and the destruction of habitat connectivity can lead to species extinction by isolation of population. Identifying important habitat corridors to enhance habitat connectivity is imperative for species conservation by preserving dispersal pattern to maintain genetic diversity. Circuit theory is a novel tool to model habitat connectivity as it considers habitat as an electronic circuit board and species movement as a certain amount of current moving around through different resistors in the circuit. Most studies involving circuit theory have been carried out at small scales on large ranging animals like wolves or pumas, and more recently on tigers. This calls for a study that tests circuit theory at a large scale to model micro-scale habitat connectivity. The present study on a small South-Asian geoemydid, the Tricarinate Hill-turtle (Melanochelys tricarinata, focuses on habitat connectivity at a very fine scale. The Tricarinate has a small body size (carapace length: 127–175 mm and home range (8000–15000 m2, with very specific habitat requirements and movement patterns. We used very high resolution Worldview satellite data and extensive field observations to derive a model of landscape permeability at 1 : 2,000 scale to suit the target species. Circuit theory was applied to model potential corridors between core habitat patches for the Tricarinate Hill-turtle. The modelled corridors were validated by extensive ground tracking data collected using thread spool technique and found to be functional. Therefore, circuit theory is a promising tool for accurately identifying corridors, to aid in habitat studies of small species.

  20. Modelling Fine Scale Movement Corridors for the Tricarinate Hill Turtle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mondal, I.; Kumar, R. S.; Habib, B.; Talukdar, G.

    2016-06-01

    Habitat loss and the destruction of habitat connectivity can lead to species extinction by isolation of population. Identifying important habitat corridors to enhance habitat connectivity is imperative for species conservation by preserving dispersal pattern to maintain genetic diversity. Circuit theory is a novel tool to model habitat connectivity as it considers habitat as an electronic circuit board and species movement as a certain amount of current moving around through different resistors in the circuit. Most studies involving circuit theory have been carried out at small scales on large ranging animals like wolves or pumas, and more recently on tigers. This calls for a study that tests circuit theory at a large scale to model micro-scale habitat connectivity. The present study on a small South-Asian geoemydid, the Tricarinate Hill-turtle (Melanochelys tricarinata), focuses on habitat connectivity at a very fine scale. The Tricarinate has a small body size (carapace length: 127-175 mm) and home range (8000-15000 m2), with very specific habitat requirements and movement patterns. We used very high resolution Worldview satellite data and extensive field observations to derive a model of landscape permeability at 1 : 2,000 scale to suit the target species. Circuit theory was applied to model potential corridors between core habitat patches for the Tricarinate Hill-turtle. The modelled corridors were validated by extensive ground tracking data collected using thread spool technique and found to be functional. Therefore, circuit theory is a promising tool for accurately identifying corridors, to aid in habitat studies of small species.

  1. Modeling and Characterization of Near-Crack-Tip Plasticity from Micro- to Nano-Scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glaessgen, Edward H.; Saether, Erik; Hochhalter, Jacob; Smith, Stephen W.; Ransom, Jonathan B.; Yamakov, Vesselin; Gupta, Vipul

    2011-01-01

    Methodologies for understanding the plastic deformation mechanisms related 10 crack propagation at the nano, meso- and micro-length scales are being developed. These efforts include the development and application of several computational methods including atomistic simulation, discrete dislocation plasticity, strain gradient plasticity and crystal plasticity; and experimental methods including electron backscattered diffraction and video image correlation. Additionally, methodologies for multi-scale modeling and characterization that can be used to bridge the relevant length scales from nanometers to millimeters are being developed. The paper focuses on the discussion of newly developed methodologies in these areas and their application to understanding damage processes in aluminum and its alloys.

  2. Landscape modelling at Regional to Continental scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirkby, M. J.

    Most work on simulating landscape evolution has been focused at scales of about 1 Ha, there are still limitations, particularly in understanding the links between hillslope process rates and climate, soils and channel initiation. However, the need for integration with GCM outputs and with Continental Geosystems now imposes an urgent need for scaling up to Regional and Continental scales. This is reinforced by a need to incorporate estimates of soil erosion and desertification rates into national and supra-national policy. Relevant time-scales range from decadal to geological. Approaches at these regional to continental scales are critical to a fuller collaboration between geomorphologists and others interested in Continental Geosystems. Two approaches to the problem of scaling up are presented here for discussion. The first (MEDRUSH) is to embed representative hillslope flow strips into sub-catchments within a larger catchment of up to 5,000 km2. The second is to link one-dimensional models of SVAT type within DEMs at up to global scales (CSEP/SEDWEB). The MEDRUSH model is being developed as part of the EU Desertification Programme (MEDALUS project), primarily for semi-natural vegetation in southern Europe over time spans of up to 100 years. Catchments of up to 2500 km2 are divided into 50-200 sub-catchments on the basis of flow paths derived from DEMs with a horizontal resolution of 50 m or better. Within each sub-catchment a representative flow strip is selected and Hydrology, Sediment Transport and Vegetation change are simulated in detail for the flow strip, using a 1 hour time step. Changes within each flow strip are transferred back to the appropriate sub-catchment and flows of water and sediment are then routed through the channel network, generating changes in flood plain morphology.

  3. Variable length and context-dependent HMM letter form models for Arabic handwritten word recognition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bianne-Bernard, Anne-Laure; Menasri, Fares; Likforman-Sulem, Laurence; Mokbel, Chafic; Kermorvant, Christopher

    2012-01-01

    We present in this paper an HMM-based recognizer for the recognition of unconstrained Arabic handwritten words. The recognizer is a context-dependent HMM which considers variable topology and contextual information for a better modeling of writing units. We propose an algorithm to adapt the topology of each HMM to the character to be modeled. For modeling the contextual units, a state-tying process based on decision tree clustering is introduced which significantly reduces the number of parameters. Decision trees are built according to a set of expert-based questions on how characters are written. Questions are divided into global questions yielding larger clusters and precise questions yielding smaller ones. We apply this modeling to the recognition of Arabic handwritten words. Experiments conducted on the OpenHaRT2010 database show that variable length topology and contextual information significantly improves the recognition rate.

  4. Accessible length scale of the in-plane structure in polarized neutron off-specular and grazing-incidence small-angle scattering measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maruyama, R.; Bigault, T.; Wildes, A. R.; Dewhurst, C. D.; Saerbeck, T.; Honecker, D.; Yamazaki, D.; Soyama, K.; Courtois, P.

    2017-06-01

    Polarized neutron off-specular and grazing-incidence small-angle scattering measurements are useful methods to investigate the in-plane structure and its correlation of layered systems. Although these measurements give information on complementary and overlapping length scale, the different characteristics between them need to be taken into account when performed. In this study, the difference in the accessible length scale of the in-plane structure, which is one of the most important characteristics, was discussed using an Fe/Si multilayer together with simulations based on the distorted wave Born approximation.

  5. Infant bone age estimation based on fibular shaft length: model development and clinical validation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsai, Andy; Stamoulis, Catherine; Bixby, Sarah D.; Breen, Micheal A.; Connolly, Susan A.; Kleinman, Paul K. [Boston Children' s Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Department of Radiology, Boston, MA (United States)

    2016-03-15

    Bone age in infants (<1 year old) is generally estimated using hand/wrist or knee radiographs, or by counting ossification centers. The accuracy and reproducibility of these techniques are largely unknown. To develop and validate an infant bone age estimation technique using fibular shaft length and compare it to conventional methods. We retrospectively reviewed negative skeletal surveys of 247 term-born low-risk-of-abuse infants (no persistent child protection team concerns) from July 2005 to February 2013, and randomized them into two datasets: (1) model development (n = 123) and (2) model testing (n = 124). Three pediatric radiologists measured all fibular shaft lengths. An ordinary linear regression model was fitted to dataset 1, and the model was evaluated using dataset 2. Readers also estimated infant bone ages in dataset 2 using (1) the hemiskeleton method of Sontag, (2) the hemiskeleton method of Elgenmark, (3) the hand/wrist atlas of Greulich and Pyle, and (4) the knee atlas of Pyle and Hoerr. For validation, we selected lower-extremity radiographs of 114 normal infants with no suspicion of abuse. Readers measured the fibulas and also estimated bone ages using the knee atlas. Bone age estimates from the proposed method were compared to the other methods. The proposed method outperformed all other methods in accuracy and reproducibility. Its accuracy was similar for the testing and validating datasets, with root-mean-square error of 36 days and 37 days; mean absolute error of 28 days and 31 days; and error variability of 22 days and 20 days, respectively. This study provides strong support for an infant bone age estimation technique based on fibular shaft length as a more accurate alternative to conventional methods. (orig.)

  6. Scaling microbial physiology in global models (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wieder, W. R.; Bonan, G. B.; Hinckley, E. S.; Allison, S. D.

    2013-12-01

    A growing chorus from the biogeochemistry, soil science, and ecosystem modeling communities calls for model structures that provide direct microbial control over soil C dynamics. Thus, we describe a new model that explicitly represents microbial physiology in its representation of soil C cycling on the global scale. Presently, the model is parameterized based on measurements of microbial enzyme kinetics, but we must make assumptions about other aspects of microbial physiology (e.g., microbial growth efficiency and microbial turnover rates). We demonstrate that, compared to traditional soil biogeochemistry modeling approaches, the microbial explicit model can simulate global soil C pools that more closely match contemporary observations (based on the Harmonized World Soils Database), but generate wildly divergent results in response to environmental perturbations. The discrepancy between projections in non-steady state simulations highlight the modeling processes, parameters, and structures that deserve greater attention from both empirical and modeling communities and provide avenues to begin exploring soil biogeochemical theory across spatial and temporal scales.

  7. Modelling large-scale hydrogen infrastructure development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Groot, A.; Smit, R.; Weeda, M.

    2005-08-01

    In modelling a possible H2 infrastructure development the following questions are answered in this presentation: How could the future demand for H2 develop in the Netherlands?; and In which year and where would it be economically viable to construct a H2 infrastructure in the Netherlands? Conclusions are that: A model for describing a possible future H2 infrastructure is successfully developed; The model is strongly regional and time dependent; Decrease of fuel cell cost appears to be a sensitive parameter for development of H2 demand; Cost-margin between large-scale and small-scale H2 production is a main driver for development of a H2 infrastructure; A H2 infrastructure seems economically viable in the Netherlands starting from the year 2022

  8. Length-displacement scaling of thrust faults on the Moon and the formation of uphill-facing scarps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roggon, Lars; Hetzel, Ralf; Hiesinger, Harald; Clark, Jaclyn D.; Hampel, Andrea; van der Bogert, Carolyn H.

    2017-08-01

    Fault populations on terrestrial planets exhibit a linear relationship between their length, L, and the maximum displacement, D, which implies a constant D/L ratio during fault growth. Although it is known that D/L ratios of faults are typically a few percent on Earth and 0.2-0.8% on Mars and Mercury, the D/L ratios of lunar faults are not well characterized. Quantifying the D/L ratios of faults on the Moon is, however, crucial for a better understanding of lunar tectonics, including for studies of the amount of global lunar contraction. Here, we use high-resolution digital terrain models to perform a topographic analysis of four lunar thrust faults - Simpelius-1, Morozov (S1), Fowler, and Racah X-1 - that range in length from 1.3 km to 15.4 km. First, we determine the along-strike variation of the vertical displacement from ≥ 20 topographic profiles across each fault. For measuring the vertical displacements, we use a method that is commonly applied to fault scarps on Earth and that does not require detrending of the profiles. The resulting profiles show that the displacement changes gradually along these faults' strike, with maximum vertical displacements ranging from 17 ± 2 m for Simpelius-1 to 192 ± 30 m for Racah X-1. Assuming a fault dip of 30° yields maximum total displacements (D) that are twice as large as the vertical displacements. The linear relationship between D and L supports the inference that lunar faults gradually accumulate displacement as they propagate laterally. For the faults we investigated, the D/L ratio is ∼2.3%, an order of magnitude higher than theoretical predictions for the Moon, but a value similar for faults on Earth. We also employ finite-element modeling and a Mohr circle stress analysis to investigate why many lunar thrust faults, including three of those studied here, form uphill-facing scarps. Our analysis shows that fault slip is preferentially initiated on planes that dip in the same direction as the topography, because

  9. Towards dynamic genome-scale models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbert, David; Heiner, Monika; Jayaweera, Yasoda; Rohr, Christian

    2017-10-13

    The analysis of the dynamic behaviour of genome-scale models of metabolism (GEMs) currently presents considerable challenges because of the difficulties of simulating such large and complex networks. Bacterial GEMs can comprise about 5000 reactions and metabolites, and encode a huge variety of growth conditions; such models cannot be used without sophisticated tool support. This article is intended to aid modellers, both specialist and non-specialist in computerized methods, to identify and apply a suitable combination of tools for the dynamic behaviour analysis of large-scale metabolic designs. We describe a methodology and related workflow based on publicly available tools to profile and analyse whole-genome-scale biochemical models. We use an efficient approximative stochastic simulation method to overcome problems associated with the dynamic simulation of GEMs. In addition, we apply simulative model checking using temporal logic property libraries, clustering and data analysis, over time series of reaction rates and metabolite concentrations. We extend this to consider the evolution of reaction-oriented properties of subnets over time, including dead subnets and functional subsystems. This enables the generation of abstract views of the behaviour of these models, which can be large-up to whole genome in size-and therefore impractical to analyse informally by eye. We demonstrate our methodology by applying it to a reduced model of the whole-genome metabolism of Escherichia coli K-12 under different growth conditions. The overall context of our work is in the area of model-based design methods for metabolic engineering and synthetic biology. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press.

  10. Probabilistic, meso-scale flood loss modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kreibich, Heidi; Botto, Anna; Schröter, Kai; Merz, Bruno

    2016-04-01

    Flood risk analyses are an important basis for decisions on flood risk management and adaptation. However, such analyses are associated with significant uncertainty, even more if changes in risk due to global change are expected. Although uncertainty analysis and probabilistic approaches have received increased attention during the last years, they are still not standard practice for flood risk assessments and even more for flood loss modelling. State of the art in flood loss modelling is still the use of simple, deterministic approaches like stage-damage functions. Novel probabilistic, multi-variate flood loss models have been developed and validated on the micro-scale using a data-mining approach, namely bagging decision trees (Merz et al. 2013). In this presentation we demonstrate and evaluate the upscaling of the approach to the meso-scale, namely on the basis of land-use units. The model is applied in 19 municipalities which were affected during the 2002 flood by the River Mulde in Saxony, Germany (Botto et al. submitted). The application of bagging decision tree based loss models provide a probability distribution of estimated loss per municipality. Validation is undertaken on the one hand via a comparison with eight deterministic loss models including stage-damage functions as well as multi-variate models. On the other hand the results are compared with official loss data provided by the Saxon Relief Bank (SAB). The results show, that uncertainties of loss estimation remain high. Thus, the significant advantage of this probabilistic flood loss estimation approach is that it inherently provides quantitative information about the uncertainty of the prediction. References: Merz, B.; Kreibich, H.; Lall, U. (2013): Multi-variate flood damage assessment: a tree-based data-mining approach. NHESS, 13(1), 53-64. Botto A, Kreibich H, Merz B, Schröter K (submitted) Probabilistic, multi-variable flood loss modelling on the meso-scale with BT-FLEMO. Risk Analysis.

  11. Drift-Scale THC Seepage Model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    C.R. Bryan

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this report (REV04) is to document the thermal-hydrologic-chemical (THC) seepage model, which simulates the composition of waters that could potentially seep into emplacement drifts, and the composition of the gas phase. The THC seepage model is processed and abstracted for use in the total system performance assessment (TSPA) for the license application (LA). This report has been developed in accordance with ''Technical Work Plan for: Near-Field Environment and Transport: Coupled Processes (Mountain-Scale TH/THC/THM, Drift-Scale THC Seepage, and Post-Processing Analysis for THC Seepage) Report Integration'' (BSC 2005 [DIRS 172761]). The technical work plan (TWP) describes planning information pertaining to the technical scope, content, and management of this report. The plan for validation of the models documented in this report is given in Section 2.2.2, ''Model Validation for the DS THC Seepage Model,'' of the TWP. The TWP (Section 3.2.2) identifies Acceptance Criteria 1 to 4 for ''Quantity and Chemistry of Water Contacting Engineered Barriers and Waste Forms'' (NRC 2003 [DIRS 163274]) as being applicable to this report; however, in variance to the TWP, Acceptance Criterion 5 has also been determined to be applicable, and is addressed, along with the other Acceptance Criteria, in Section 4.2 of this report. Also, three FEPS not listed in the TWP (2.2.10.01.0A, 2.2.10.06.0A, and 2.2.11.02.0A) are partially addressed in this report, and have been added to the list of excluded FEPS in Table 6.1-2. This report has been developed in accordance with LP-SIII.10Q-BSC, ''Models''. This report documents the THC seepage model and a derivative used for validation, the Drift Scale Test (DST) THC submodel. The THC seepage model is a drift-scale process model for predicting the composition of gas and water that could enter waste emplacement drifts and the effects of mineral alteration on flow in rocks surrounding drifts. The DST THC submodel uses a drift-scale

  12. Drift-Scale THC Seepage Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    C.R. Bryan

    2005-02-17

    The purpose of this report (REV04) is to document the thermal-hydrologic-chemical (THC) seepage model, which simulates the composition of waters that could potentially seep into emplacement drifts, and the composition of the gas phase. The THC seepage model is processed and abstracted for use in the total system performance assessment (TSPA) for the license application (LA). This report has been developed in accordance with ''Technical Work Plan for: Near-Field Environment and Transport: Coupled Processes (Mountain-Scale TH/THC/THM, Drift-Scale THC Seepage, and Post-Processing Analysis for THC Seepage) Report Integration'' (BSC 2005 [DIRS 172761]). The technical work plan (TWP) describes planning information pertaining to the technical scope, content, and management of this report. The plan for validation of the models documented in this report is given in Section 2.2.2, ''Model Validation for the DS THC Seepage Model,'' of the TWP. The TWP (Section 3.2.2) identifies Acceptance Criteria 1 to 4 for ''Quantity and Chemistry of Water Contacting Engineered Barriers and Waste Forms'' (NRC 2003 [DIRS 163274]) as being applicable to this report; however, in variance to the TWP, Acceptance Criterion 5 has also been determined to be applicable, and is addressed, along with the other Acceptance Criteria, in Section 4.2 of this report. Also, three FEPS not listed in the TWP (2.2.10.01.0A, 2.2.10.06.0A, and 2.2.11.02.0A) are partially addressed in this report, and have been added to the list of excluded FEPS in Table 6.1-2. This report has been developed in accordance with LP-SIII.10Q-BSC, ''Models''. This report documents the THC seepage model and a derivative used for validation, the Drift Scale Test (DST) THC submodel. The THC seepage model is a drift-scale process model for predicting the composition of gas and water that could enter waste emplacement drifts and the effects of mineral

  13. Models for mean bonding length, melting point and lattice thermal expansion of nanoparticle materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Omar, M.S., E-mail: dr_m_s_omar@yahoo.com [Department of Physics, College of Science, University of Salahaddin-Erbil, Arbil, Kurdistan (Iraq)

    2012-11-15

    Graphical abstract: Three models are derived to explain the nanoparticles size dependence of mean bonding length, melting temperature and lattice thermal expansion applied on Sn, Si and Au. The following figures are shown as an example for Sn nanoparticles indicates hilly applicable models for nanoparticles radius larger than 3 nm. Highlights: ► A model for a size dependent mean bonding length is derived. ► The size dependent melting point of nanoparticles is modified. ► The bulk model for lattice thermal expansion is successfully used on nanoparticles. -- Abstract: A model, based on the ratio number of surface atoms to that of its internal, is derived to calculate the size dependence of lattice volume of nanoscaled materials. The model is applied to Si, Sn and Au nanoparticles. For Si, that the lattice volume is increases from 20 Å{sup 3} for bulk to 57 Å{sup 3} for a 2 nm size nanocrystals. A model, for calculating melting point of nanoscaled materials, is modified by considering the effect of lattice volume. A good approach of calculating size-dependent melting point begins from the bulk state down to about 2 nm diameter nanoparticle. Both values of lattice volume and melting point obtained for nanosized materials are used to calculate lattice thermal expansion by using a formula applicable for tetrahedral semiconductors. Results for Si, change from 3.7 × 10{sup −6} K{sup −1} for a bulk crystal down to a minimum value of 0.1 × 10{sup −6} K{sup −1} for a 6 nm diameter nanoparticle.

  14. Models for mean bonding length, melting point and lattice thermal expansion of nanoparticle materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Omar, M.S.

    2012-01-01

    Graphical abstract: Three models are derived to explain the nanoparticles size dependence of mean bonding length, melting temperature and lattice thermal expansion applied on Sn, Si and Au. The following figures are shown as an example for Sn nanoparticles indicates hilly applicable models for nanoparticles radius larger than 3 nm. Highlights: ► A model for a size dependent mean bonding length is derived. ► The size dependent melting point of nanoparticles is modified. ► The bulk model for lattice thermal expansion is successfully used on nanoparticles. -- Abstract: A model, based on the ratio number of surface atoms to that of its internal, is derived to calculate the size dependence of lattice volume of nanoscaled materials. The model is applied to Si, Sn and Au nanoparticles. For Si, that the lattice volume is increases from 20 Å 3 for bulk to 57 Å 3 for a 2 nm size nanocrystals. A model, for calculating melting point of nanoscaled materials, is modified by considering the effect of lattice volume. A good approach of calculating size-dependent melting point begins from the bulk state down to about 2 nm diameter nanoparticle. Both values of lattice volume and melting point obtained for nanosized materials are used to calculate lattice thermal expansion by using a formula applicable for tetrahedral semiconductors. Results for Si, change from 3.7 × 10 −6 K −1 for a bulk crystal down to a minimum value of 0.1 × 10 −6 K −1 for a 6 nm diameter nanoparticle.

  15. Scale Model Thruster Acoustic Measurement Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vargas, Magda; Kenny, R. Jeremy

    2013-01-01

    The Space Launch System (SLS) Scale Model Acoustic Test (SMAT) is a 5% scale representation of the SLS vehicle, mobile launcher, tower, and launch pad trench. The SLS launch propulsion system will be comprised of the Rocket Assisted Take-Off (RATO) motors representing the solid boosters and 4 Gas Hydrogen (GH2) thrusters representing the core engines. The GH2 thrusters were tested in a horizontal configuration in order to characterize their performance. In Phase 1, a single thruster was fired to determine the engine performance parameters necessary for scaling a single engine. A cluster configuration, consisting of the 4 thrusters, was tested in Phase 2 to integrate the system and determine their combined performance. Acoustic and overpressure data was collected during both test phases in order to characterize the system's acoustic performance. The results from the single thruster and 4- thuster system are discussed and compared.

  16. Implementation of a Mixing Length Turbulence Formulation Into the Dynamic Wake Meandering Model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Keck, Rolf-Erik; Veldkamp, Dick; Aagaard Madsen, Helge

    2012-01-01

    The work presented in this paper focuses on improving the description of wake evolution due to turbulent mixing in the dynamic wake meandering (DWM) model. From wake investigations performed with high-fidelity actuator line simulations carried out in ELLIPSYS3D, it is seen that the current DWM...... description, where the eddy viscosity is assumed to be constant in each cross-section of the wake, is insufficient. Instead, a two-dimensional eddy viscosity formulation is proposed to model the shear layer generated turbulence in the wake, based on the classical mixing length model. The performance...... from 3 to 12 diameters behind the rotor, is reduced by 27% by using the new eddy viscosity formulation. ©2012 American Society of Mechanical Engineers...

  17. Pore-Scale Model for Microbial Growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tartakovsky, G.; Tartakovsky, A. M.; Scheibe, T. D.

    2011-12-01

    A lagrangian particle model based on smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) is used to simulate pore-scale flow, reactive transport and biomass growth which is controlled by the mixing of an electron donor and acceptor, in a microfluidic porous cell. The experimental results described in Ch. Zhang et al "Effects of pore-scale heterogeneity and transverse mixing on bacterial growth in porous media" were used for this study. The model represents the homogeneous pore structure of a uniform array of cylindrical posts with microbes uniformly distributed on the grain surfaces. Each one of the two solutes (electron donor and electron acceptor) enters the domain unmixed through separate inlets. In the model, pair-wise particle-particle interactions are used to simulate interactions within the biomass, and both biomass-fluid and biomass-soil grain interactions. The biomass growth rate is described by double Monod kinetics. For the set of parameters used in the simulations the model predicts that: 1) biomass grows in the shape of bridges connecting soil grains and oriented in the direction of flow so as to minimize resistance to the fluid flow; and 2) the biomass growth occurs only in the mixing zone. Using parameters available in the literature, the biomass growth model agrees qualitatively with the experimental results. In order to achieve quantitative agreement, model calibration is required.

  18. Predictors of extended length of stay, discharge to inpatient rehab, and hospital readmission following elective lumbar spine surgery: introduction of the Carolina-Semmes Grading Scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGirt, Matthew J; Parker, Scott L; Chotai, Silky; Pfortmiller, Deborah; Sorenson, Jeffrey M; Foley, Kevin; Asher, Anthony L

    2017-10-01

    OBJECTIVE Extended hospital length of stay (LOS), unplanned hospital readmission, and need for inpatient rehabilitation after elective spine surgery contribute significantly to the variation in surgical health care costs. As novel payment models shift the risk of cost overruns from payers to providers, understanding patient-level risk of LOS, readmission, and inpatient rehabilitation is critical. The authors set out to develop a grading scale that effectively stratifies risk of these costly events after elective surgery for degenerative lumbar pathologies. METHODS The Quality and Outcomes Database (QOD) registry prospectively enrolls patients undergoing surgery for degenerative lumbar spine disease. This registry was queried for patients who had undergone elective 1- to 3-level lumbar surgery for degenerative spine pathology. The association between preoperative patient variables and extended postoperative hospital LOS (LOS ≥ 7 days), discharge status (inpatient facility vs home), and 90-day hospital readmission was assessed using stepwise multivariate logistic regression. The Carolina-Semmes grading scale was constructed using the independent predictors for LOS (0-12 points), discharge to inpatient facility (0-18 points), and 90-day readmission (0-6 points), and its performance was assessed using the QOD data set. The performance of the grading scale was then confirmed separately after using it in 2 separate neurosurgery practice sites (Carolina Neurosurgery & Spine Associates [CNSA] and Semmes Murphey Clinic). RESULTS A total of 6921 patients were analyzed. Overall, 290 (4.2%) patients required extended LOS, 654 (9.4%) required inpatient facility care/rehabilitation on hospital discharge, and 474 (6.8%) were readmitted to the hospital within 90 days postdischarge. Variables that remained as independently associated with these unplanned events in multivariate analysis included age ≥ 70 years, American Society of Anesthesiologists Physical Classification System

  19. Establishment of Approximate Analytical Model of Oil Film Force for Finite Length Tilting Pad Journal Bearings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yongliang Wang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Tilting pad bearings offer unique dynamic stability enabling successful deployment of high-speed rotating machinery. The model of dynamic stiffness, damping, and added mass coefficients is often used for rotordynamic analyses, and this method does not suffice to describe the dynamic behaviour due to the nonlinear effects of oil film force under larger shaft vibration or vertical rotor conditions. The objective of this paper is to present a nonlinear oil force model for finite length tilting pad journal bearings. An approximate analytic oil film force model was established by analysing the dynamic characteristic of oil film of a single pad journal bearing using variable separation method under the dynamic π oil film boundary condition. And an oil film force model of a four-tilting-pad journal bearing was established by using the pad assembly technique and considering pad tilting angle. The validity of the model established was proved by analyzing the distribution of oil film pressure and the locus of journal centre for tilting pad journal bearings and by comparing the model established in this paper with the model established using finite difference method.

  20. Effect of polydispersity on the structure factor of a melt of binary multiblock copolymers with a two-length-scale macromolecular architecture

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuchanov, S.; Zharnikov, T.; Brinke, G. ten

    2011-01-01

    A theoretical study on the effect of polydispersity of two-length-scale binary multiblock copolymers on the shape of the structure factor is presented. A bifurcation diagram is constructed showing the partition of the parameter space into domains differing in the way in which the homogeneous melt

  1. Genome scale metabolic modeling of cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nilsson, Avlant; Nielsen, Jens

    2017-01-01

    of metabolism which allows simulation and hypotheses testing of metabolic strategies. It has successfully been applied to many microorganisms and is now used to study cancer metabolism. Generic models of human metabolism have been reconstructed based on the existence of metabolic genes in the human genome......Cancer cells reprogram metabolism to support rapid proliferation and survival. Energy metabolism is particularly important for growth and genes encoding enzymes involved in energy metabolism are frequently altered in cancer cells. A genome scale metabolic model (GEM) is a mathematical formalization...

  2. Modeling of liquid–gas meniscus for textured surfaces: effects of curvature and local slip length

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gaddam, Anvesh; Garg, Mayank; Agrawal, Amit; Joshi, Suhas S

    2015-01-01

    Surface texturing at the micro/nanolevel allows air to be trapped in sufficiently small cavities, thereby reducing the flow resistance over the surface in the laminar regime. The nature of the liquid–gas meniscus plays an important role in defining the boundary condition and it depends on the flow conditions and geometrical properties of textures. In the present work, we employ the unsteady volume of fluid model to investigate the behavior of the liquid–gas meniscus for ridges arranged normal to the flow direction to substantiate the frictional resistance of flow in a microchannel. It is found that the assumption of ‘zero shear stress’ at the liquid–gas interface grossly overpredicts the effective slip length with meniscus curvature and local partial slip length playing the dominant role. Numerical simulations performed in the laminar regime (20  <  Re  <  120) over single layered ridges normal to the flow direction revealed the effect of texture geometry on the reduction in pressure drop. In single layered structures, lotus-like geometries exhibited a greater reduction in drag (more than 30%) when compared to all other texture geometries. It is recognized that the flow experiences expansion and contraction cycles as it flows over the transverse ridges increasing the frictional resistance. Our findings will help to modify the boundary condition at the liquid–gas meniscus for accurate modeling in the laminar regime and to optimize the texture geometry to improve drag reduction. (paper)

  3. 'Length'at Length

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Admin

    He was interested to know how `large' is the set of numbers x for which the series is convergent. Here large refers to its length. But his set is not in the class ♢. Here is another problem discussed by Borel. Consider .... have an infinite collection of pairs of new shoes and want to choose one shoe from each pair. We have an ...

  4. Long length scales of element transport during reaction texture development in orthoamphibole-cordierite gneiss: Thor-Odin dome, British Columbia, Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goergen, Eric T.; Whitney, Donna L.

    2012-02-01

    First-order factors controlling the textural and chemical evolution of metamorphic rocks are bulk composition and pressure-temperature-time ( P- T- t) path. Although it is common to assume that major element bulk composition does not change during regional metamorphism, rocks with reaction textures such as corona structures record evidence for major changes in effective bulk composition (EBC) and therefore provide significant insight into the scale, pathways, and mechanisms of element transport during metamorphism. Quantifying changes in EBC is essential for petrologic applications such as calculation of phase diagrams (pseudosections). The progressive growth of complex corona structures on garnet and Al2SiO5 porphyroblasts in orthoamphibole-cordierite gneiss Thor-Odin dome (British Columbia, Canada) reduced the EBC volume of the rock during metamorphism and therefore had a dramatic effect on the evolution of the stable mineral assemblage. These rocks contain a chemical and textural record of metamorphic reactions and preserve 3D networks (reaction pathways) connecting corona structures. These coronal networks record long (>cm) length scales of localized element transport during metamorphism. P- T, T- X, and P- X pseudosections are used to investigate the control of effective bulk composition on phase assemblage evolution. Despite textural complexity and evidence for disequilibrium, mineral assemblages and compositions were successfully modeled and peak metamorphic conditions estimated at 750°C and 9 kbar. These results illustrate how textural and chemical changes during metamorphism can be evaluated using an integrated petrographic and pseudosection approach, highlight the importance of effective bulk composition choice for application of phase equilibria methods in metamorphic rocks, and show how corona structures can be used to understand the scale of compositional change and element transport during metamorphism.

  5. Sepsis Alert - a triage model that reduces time to antibiotics and length of hospital stay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenqvist, Mari; Fagerstrand, Emma; Lanbeck, Peter; Melander, Olle; Åkesson, Per

    2017-07-01

    To study if a modified triage system at an Emergency Department (ED) combined with educational efforts resulted in reduced time to antibiotics and decreased length of hospital stay (LOS) for patients with severe infection. A retrospective, observational study comparing patients before and after the start of a new triage model at the ED of a University Hospital. After the implementation of the model, patients with fever and abnormal vital signs were triaged into a designated sepsis line (Sepsis Alert) for rapid evaluation by the attending physician supported by a infectious diseases (IDs) specialist. Also, all ED staff participated in a designated sepsis education before Sepsis Alert was introduced. Medical records were evaluated for patients during a 3-month period after the triage system was started in 2012, and also during the corresponding months in 2010 and 2014. A total of 1837 patients presented with abnormal vital signs. Of these, 221 patients presented with fever and thus at risk of having severe sepsis. Among patients triaged according to the new model, median time to antibiotics was 58.5 at startup and 24.5 minutes at follow-up two years later. This was significantly less than for patients treated before the new model, 190 minutes. Also, median LOS was significantly decreased after introduction of the new triage model, from nine to seven days. A triage model at the ED with special attention to severe sepsis patients, led to sustained improvements of time to antibiotic treatment and LOS.

  6. Large-scale multimedia modeling applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Droppo, J.G. Jr.; Buck, J.W.; Whelan, G.; Strenge, D.L.; Castleton, K.J.; Gelston, G.M.

    1995-08-01

    Over the past decade, the US Department of Energy (DOE) and other agencies have faced increasing scrutiny for a wide range of environmental issues related to past and current practices. A number of large-scale applications have been undertaken that required analysis of large numbers of potential environmental issues over a wide range of environmental conditions and contaminants. Several of these applications, referred to here as large-scale applications, have addressed long-term public health risks using a holistic approach for assessing impacts from potential waterborne and airborne transport pathways. Multimedia models such as the Multimedia Environmental Pollutant Assessment System (MEPAS) were designed for use in such applications. MEPAS integrates radioactive and hazardous contaminants impact computations for major exposure routes via air, surface water, ground water, and overland flow transport. A number of large-scale applications of MEPAS have been conducted to assess various endpoints for environmental and human health impacts. These applications are described in terms of lessons learned in the development of an effective approach for large-scale applications

  7. Determination of normal values for navicular drop during walking: a new model correcting for foot length and gender

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Rasmus G; Rathleff, Michael S; Simonsen, Ole H

    2009-01-01

    participants. Normal values have not yet been established as foot length, age, gender, and Body Mass Index (BMI) may influence the navicular drop. The purpose of the study was to investigate the influence of foot length, age, gender, and BMI on the navicular drop during walking. METHODS: Navicular drop...... increased by 0.40 mm for males and 0.31 mm for females. Linear models were created to calculate the navicular drop relative to foot length. CONCLUSION: The study demonstrated that the dynamic navicular drop is influenced by foot length and gender. Lack of adjustment for these factors may explain, at least...

  8. Correlations of properties and structures at different length scales of hydro- and organo-gels based on N-alkyl-(R)-12-hydroxyoctadecylammonium chlorides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mallia, V Ajay; Terech, Pierre; Weiss, Richard G

    2011-11-03

    The self-assembly and gelating ability of a set of N-alkyl-(R)-12-hydroxyoctadecylammonium chlorides (NCl-n, where n = 0-6, 18 is the length of the alkyl chain on nitrogen) are described. Several are found to be ambidextrous (gelating both water and a variety of organic liquids) and very efficient (needing less than ca. 0.5 wt % at room temperature). Structure-property correlations at different distance scales of the NCl-n in their hydro- and organo-gels and neat, solid states have been made using X-ray diffraction, neutron scattering, thermal, optical, cryo-SEM and rheological techniques. The self-assembled fibrillar networks consist of spherulitic objects with fibers whose diameters and degrees of twisting differ in the hydro- and organo-gels. Increasing n (and, thus, the molecular length) increases the width of the fibers in their hydrogels; an irregular, less pronounced trend between n and fiber width is observed in the corresponding toluene gels. Time-dependent, small angle neutron scattering data for the isothermal sol-to-gel transformation of sols of NCl-18/toluene to their gels, treated according to Avrami theory, indicate heterogeneous nucleation involving rodlike growth. Rheological studies of gels of NCl-3 in water and toluene confirm their viscoelastic nature and show that the hydrogel is mechanically stronger than the toluene gel. Models for the different molecular packing arrangements within the fibrillar gel networks of the hydro- and organogels have been inferred from X-ray diffraction. The variations in the fibrillar networks provide a comprehensive picture and detailed insights into why seemingly very similar NCl-n behave very differently during their self-assembly processes in water and organic liquids. It is shown that the NCl-n provide a versatile platform for interrogating fundamental questions regarding the links between molecular structure and one-dimensional self-aggregation, leading to gelation.

  9. Aerosol numerical modelling at local scale

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Albriet, Bastien

    2007-01-01

    At local scale and in urban areas, an important part of particulate pollution is due to traffic. It contributes largely to the high number concentrations observed. Two aerosol sources are mainly linked to traffic. Primary emission of soot particles and secondary nanoparticle formation by nucleation. The emissions and mechanisms leading to the formation of such bimodal distribution are still badly understood nowadays. In this thesis, we try to provide an answer to this problematic by numerical modelling. The Modal Aerosol Model MAM is used, coupled with two 3D-codes: a CFD (Mercure Saturne) and a CTM (Polair3D). A sensitivity analysis is performed, at the border of a road but also in the first meters of an exhaust plume, to identify the role of each process involved and the sensitivity of different parameters used in the modelling. (author) [fr

  10. Multi-scale atmospheric environment modelling for urban areas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. A. Baklanov

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Modern supercomputers allow realising multi-scale systems for assessment and forecasting of urban meteorology, air pollution and emergency preparedness and considering nesting with obstacle-resolved models. A multi-scale modelling system with downscaling from regional to city-scale with the Environment – HIgh Resolution Limited Area Model (Enviro-HIRLAM and to micro-scale with the obstacle-resolved Micro-scale Model for Urban Environment (M2UE is suggested and demonstrated. The M2UE validation results versus the Mock Urban Setting Trial (MUST experiment indicate satisfactory quality of the model. Necessary conditions for the choice of nested models, building descriptions, areas and resolutions of nested models are analysed. Two-way nesting (up- and down-scaling, when scale effects both directions (from the meso-scale on the micro-scale and from the micro-scale on the meso-scale, is also discussed.

  11. The application of slip length models to larger textures in turbulent flows over superhydrophobic surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fairhall, Chris; Garcia-Mayoral, Ricardo

    2017-11-01

    We present results from direct numerical simulations of turbulent flows over superhydrophobic surfaces. We assess the validity of simulations where the surface is modelled as homogeneous slip lengths, comparing them to simulations where the surface texture is resolved. Our results show that once the coherent flow induced by the texture is removed from the velocity fields, the remaining flow sees the surface as homogeneous. We then investigate how the overlying turbulence is modified by the presence of surface texture. For small textures, we show that turbulence is shifted closer to the wall due to the presence of slip, but otherwise remains essentially unmodified. For larger textures, the texture interacts with the turbulent lengthscales, thereby modifying the overlying turbulence. We also show that the saturation of the effect of the spanwise slip length (Fukagata et al. 2006, Busse & Sandham 2012, Seo & Mani 2016), which is drag increasing, is caused by the impermeability imposed at the surface. This work was supported by the Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council.

  12. Current increment of tunnel field-effect transistor using InGaAs nanowire/Si heterojunction by scaling of channel length

    OpenAIRE

    Tomioka, Katsuhiro; Fukui, Takashi

    2014-01-01

    We report on a fabrication of tunnel field-effect transistors using InGaAs nanowire/Si heterojunctions and the characterization of scaling of channel lengths. The devices consisted of single InGaAs nanowires with a diameter of 30 nm grown on p-type Si(111) substrates. The switch demonstrated steep subthreshold-slope (30 mV/decade) at drain-source voltage (V-DS) of 0.10 V. Also, pinch-off behavior appeared at moderately low VDS, below 0.10 V. Reducing the channel length of the transistors atta...

  13. Modelling biological invasions: Individual to population scales at interfaces

    KAUST Repository

    Belmonte-Beitia, J.

    2013-10-01

    Extracting the population level behaviour of biological systems from that of the individual is critical in understanding dynamics across multiple scales and thus has been the subject of numerous investigations. Here, the influence of spatial heterogeneity in such contexts is explored for interfaces with a separation of the length scales characterising the individual and the interface, a situation that can arise in applications involving cellular modelling. As an illustrative example, we consider cell movement between white and grey matter in the brain which may be relevant in considering the invasive dynamics of glioma. We show that while one can safely neglect intrinsic noise, at least when considering glioma cell invasion, profound differences in population behaviours emerge in the presence of interfaces with only subtle alterations in the dynamics at the individual level. Transport driven by local cell sensing generates predictions of cell accumulations along interfaces where cell motility changes. This behaviour is not predicted with the commonly used Fickian diffusion transport model, but can be extracted from preliminary observations of specific cell lines in recent, novel, cryo-imaging. Consequently, these findings suggest a need to consider the impact of individual behaviour, spatial heterogeneity and especially interfaces in experimental and modelling frameworks of cellular dynamics, for instance in the characterisation of glioma cell motility. © 2013 Elsevier Ltd.

  14. Dynamics of an elastic sphere containing a thin creeping region and immersed in an acoustic region for similar viscous-elastic and acoustic time- and length-scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gat, Amir; Friedman, Yonathan

    2017-11-01

    The characteristic time of low-Reynolds number fluid-structure interaction scales linearly with the ratio of fluid viscosity to solid Young's modulus. For sufficiently large values of Young's modulus, both time- and length-scales of the viscous-elastic dynamics may be similar to acoustic time- and length-scales. However, the requirement of dominant viscous effects limits the validity of such regimes to micro-configurations. We here study the dynamics of an acoustic plane wave impinging on the surface of a layered sphere, immersed within an inviscid fluid, and composed of an inner elastic sphere, a creeping fluid layer and an external elastic shell. We focus on configurations with similar viscous-elastic and acoustic time- and length-scales, where the viscous-elastic speed of interaction between the creeping layer and the elastic regions is similar to the speed of sound. By expanding the linearized spherical Reynolds equation into the relevant spectral series solution for the hyperbolic elastic regions, a global stiffness matrix of the layered elastic sphere was obtained. This work relates viscous-elastic dynamics to acoustic scattering and may pave the way to the design of novel meta-materials with unique acoustic properties. ISF 818/13.

  15. Coarse-graining to the meso and continuum scales with molecular-dynamics-like models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plimpton, Steve

    Many engineering-scale problems that industry or the national labs try to address with particle-based simulations occur at length and time scales well beyond the most optimistic hopes of traditional coarse-graining methods for molecular dynamics (MD), which typically start at the atomic scale and build upward. However classical MD can be viewed as an engine for simulating particles at literally any length or time scale, depending on the models used for individual particles and their interactions. To illustrate I'll highlight several coarse-grained (CG) materials models, some of which are likely familiar to molecular-scale modelers, but others probably not. These include models for water droplet freezing on surfaces, dissipative particle dynamics (DPD) models of explosives where particles have internal state, CG models of nano or colloidal particles in solution, models for aspherical particles, Peridynamics models for fracture, and models of granular materials at the scale of industrial processing. All of these can be implemented as MD-style models for either soft or hard materials; in fact they are all part of our LAMMPS MD package, added either by our group or contributed by collaborators. Unlike most all-atom MD simulations, CG simulations at these scales often involve highly non-uniform particle densities. So I'll also discuss a load-balancing method we've implemented for these kinds of models, which can improve parallel efficiencies. From the physics point-of-view, these models may be viewed as non-traditional or ad hoc. But because they are MD-style simulations, there's an opportunity for physicists to add statistical mechanics rigor to individual models. Or, in keeping with a theme of this session, to devise methods that more accurately bridge models from one scale to the next.

  16. Multi-length scale tomography for the determination and optimization of the effective microstructural properties in novel hierarchical solid oxide fuel cell anodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Xuekun; Taiwo, Oluwadamilola O.; Bertei, Antonio; Li, Tao; Li, Kang; Brett, Dan J. L.; Shearing, Paul R.

    2017-11-01

    Effective microstructural properties are critical in determining the electrochemical performance of solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs), particularly when operating at high current densities. A novel tubular SOFC anode with a hierarchical microstructure, composed of self-organized micro-channels and sponge-like regions, has been fabricated by a phase inversion technique to mitigate concentration losses. However, since pore sizes span over two orders of magnitude, the determination of the effective transport parameters using image-based techniques remains challenging. Pioneering steps are made in this study to characterize and optimize the microstructure by coupling multi-length scale 3D tomography and modeling. The results conclusively show that embedding finger-like micro-channels into the tubular anode can improve the mass transport by 250% and the permeability by 2-3 orders of magnitude. Our parametric study shows that increasing the porosity in the spongy layer beyond 10% enhances the effective transport parameters of the spongy layer at an exponential rate, but linearly for the full anode. For the first time, local and global mass transport properties are correlated to the microstructure, which is of wide interest for rationalizing the design optimization of SOFC electrodes and more generally for hierarchical materials in batteries and membranes.

  17. Modelling landscape evolution at the flume scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheraghi, Mohsen; Rinaldo, Andrea; Sander, Graham C.; Barry, D. Andrew

    2017-04-01

    The ability of a large-scale Landscape Evolution Model (LEM) to simulate the soil surface morphological evolution as observed in a laboratory flume (1-m × 2-m surface area) was investigated. The soil surface was initially smooth, and was subjected to heterogeneous rainfall in an experiment designed to avoid rill formation. Low-cohesive fine sand was placed in the flume while the slope and relief height were 5 % and 20 cm, respectively. Non-uniform rainfall with an average intensity of 85 mm h-1 and a standard deviation of 26 % was applied to the sediment surface for 16 h. We hypothesized that the complex overland water flow can be represented by a drainage discharge network, which was calculated via the micro-morphology and the rainfall distribution. Measurements included high resolution Digital Elevation Models that were captured at intervals during the experiment. The calibrated LEM captured the migration of the main flow path from the low precipitation area into the high precipitation area. Furthermore, both model and experiment showed a steep transition zone in soil elevation that moved upstream during the experiment. We conclude that the LEM is applicable under non-uniform rainfall and in the absence of surface incisions, thereby extending its applicability beyond that shown in previous applications. Keywords: Numerical simulation, Flume experiment, Particle Swarm Optimization, Sediment transport, River network evolution model.

  18. Development of Lab-to-Fab Production Equipment Across Several Length Scales for Printed Energy Technologies, Including Solar Cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hösel, Markus; Dam, Henrik Friis; Krebs, Frederik C

    2015-01-01

    We describe and review how the scaling of printed energy technologies not only requires scaling of the input materials but also the machinery used in the processes. The general consensus that ultrafast processing of technologies with large energy capacity can only be realized using roll-to-roll m......We describe and review how the scaling of printed energy technologies not only requires scaling of the input materials but also the machinery used in the processes. The general consensus that ultrafast processing of technologies with large energy capacity can only be realized using roll...... the lower end of the industrial scale. The machinery bridges the gap through firstly achieving improved ink efficiency without surface contact, followed by better ink efficiency at higher speeds, and finally large-area processing at high speed with very high ink efficiency....

  19. INCLUSION RATIO BASED ESTIMATOR FOR THE MEAN LENGTH OF THE BOOLEAN LINE SEGMENT MODEL WITH AN APPLICATION TO NANOCRYSTALLINE CELLULOSE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mikko Niilo-Rämä

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available A novel estimator for estimating the mean length of fibres is proposed for censored data observed in square shaped windows. Instead of observing the fibre lengths, we observe the ratio between the intensity estimates of minus-sampling and plus-sampling. It is well-known that both intensity estimators are biased. In the current work, we derive the ratio of these biases as a function of the mean length assuming a Boolean line segment model with exponentially distributed lengths and uniformly distributed directions. Having the observed ratio of the intensity estimators, the inverse of the derived function is suggested as a new estimator for the mean length. For this estimator, an approximation of its variance is derived. The accuracies of the approximations are evaluated by means of simulation experiments. The novel method is compared to other methods and applied to real-world industrial data from nanocellulose crystalline.

  20. Integrated multi-scale modelling and simulation of nuclear fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valot, C.; Bertolus, M.; Masson, R.; Malerba, L.; Rachid, J.; Besmann, T.; Phillpot, S.; Stan, M.

    2015-01-01

    This chapter aims at discussing the objectives, implementation and integration of multi-scale modelling approaches applied to nuclear fuel materials. We will first show why the multi-scale modelling approach is required, due to the nature of the materials and by the phenomena involved under irradiation. We will then present the multiple facets of multi-scale modelling approach, while giving some recommendations with regard to its application. We will also show that multi-scale modelling must be coupled with appropriate multi-scale experiments and characterisation. Finally, we will demonstrate how multi-scale modelling can contribute to solving technology issues. (authors)

  1. Mechanical principles of effects of botulinum toxin on muscle length-force characteristics: an assessment by finite element modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turkoglu, Ahu N; Huijing, Peter A; Yucesoy, Can A

    2014-05-07

    Recent experiments involving muscle force measurements over a range of muscle lengths show that effects of botulinum toxin (BTX) are complex e.g., force reduction varies as a function of muscle length. We hypothesized that altered conditions of sarcomeres within active parts of partially paralyzed muscle is responsible for this effect. Using finite element modeling, the aim was to test this hypothesis and to study principles of how partial activation as a consequence of BTX affects muscle mechanics. In order to model the paralyzing effect of BTX, only 50% of the fascicles (most proximal, or middle, or most distal) of the modeled muscle were activated. For all muscle lengths, a vast majority of sarcomeres of these BTX-cases were at higher lengths than identical sarcomeres of the BTX-free muscle. Due to such "longer sarcomere effect", activated muscle parts show an enhanced potential of active force exertion (up to 14.5%). Therefore, a muscle force reduction originating exclusively from the paralyzed muscle fiber populations, is compromised by the changes of active sarcomeres leading to a smaller net force reduction. Moreover, such "compromise to force reduction" varies as a function of muscle length and is a key determinant of muscle length dependence of force reduction caused by BTX. Due to longer sarcomere effect, muscle optimum length tends to shift to a lower muscle length. Muscle fiber-extracellular matrix interactions occurring via their mutual connections along full peripheral fiber lengths (i.e., myofascial force transmission) are central to these effects. Our results may help improving our understanding of mechanisms of how the toxin secondarily affects the muscle mechanically. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Modeling of a Variable Focal Length Flat Lens Using Left Handed Metamaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reinert, Jason

    2004-01-01

    Left Handed Metamaterials (LHM) were originally purposed by Victor Veselago in1968. These substances would allow a flat structure to focus electromagnetic (EM) waves because they have a negative index of refraction. A similar structure made from conventional materials, those with a positive index of refraction, would disperse the waves. But until recently, these structures have been purely theoretical because substances with both a negative permittivity and negative permeability, material properties necessary for a negative index of refraction, do not naturally exist, Recent developments have produced a structure composed of an array of thin wires and split ring resonators that shows a negative index of refraction. area smaller than a square wavelength. How small the area is can be determined by how perfectly the lens is polished and how pure the substance is that composes the lens. These lenses must also be curved for focusing to occur. The focal length is determined by the curvature of the lens and the material. On the other hand, a flat structure made from LHM would focus light because of the effect of a negative index of refraction in Snell s law. The focal length could also be varied by simply adjusting the distance of the lens from the source of radiation. This could create many devices that are adjustable to different situations in fields such as biomedical imaging and communication. the software package XFDTD which solves Maxwell s equations in the frequency domain as well as the time domain. The program used Drude models of materials to simulate the effect of negative permittivity and negative permeability. Because of this, a LHM can be simulated as a solid block of material instead of an array of wires and split ring resonators. After a flat lens is formed, I am to examine the focusing effect of the lens and determine if a higher resolution flat lens can be developed. Traditional lenses made from conventional materials cannot focus an EM wave onto an My

  3. Study of the Inception Length of Flow over Stepped Spillway Models ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The results showed that the inception (development) length increases as the unit discharge increases and it decreases with an increase in both stepped roughness height and chute angle. The ratio of the development length, in this study, to that of Bauer's was found to be 4:5. Finally, SMM-5 produced the least velocity of ...

  4. Length-scale dependent microalloying effects on precipitation behaviors and mechanical properties of Al–Cu alloys with minor Sc addition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jiang, L.; Li, J.K.; Liu, G.; Wang, R.H.; Chen, B.A.; Zhang, J.Y.; Sun, J.; Yang, M.X.; Yang, G.; Yang, J.; Cao, X.Z.

    2015-01-01

    Heat-treatable Al alloys containing Al–2.5 wt% Cu (Al–Cu) and Al–2.5 wt% Cu–0.3 wt% Sc (Al–Cu–Sc) with different grain length scales, i.e., average grain size >10 μm ( defined coarse grained, CG), 1–2 μm (fine grained, FG), and <1 μm (ultrafine grained, UFG), were prepared by equal-channel angular pressing (ECAP). The length scale and Sc microalloying effects and their interplay on the precipitation behavior and mechanical properties of the Al–Cu alloys were systematically investigated. In the Al–Cu alloys, intergranular θ-Al 2 Cu precipitation gradually dominated by sacrificing the intragranular θ′-Al 2 Cu precipitation with reducing the length scale. Especially in the UFG regime, only intergranular θ-Al 2 Cu particles were precipitated and intragranular θ′-Al 2 Cu precipitation was completely disappeared. This led to a remarkable reduction in yield strength and ductility due to insufficient dislocation storage capacity. The minor Sc addition resulted in a microalloying effect in the Al–Cu alloy, which, however, is strongly dependent on the length scale. The smaller is the grain size, the more active is the microalloying effect that promotes the intragranular precipitation while reduces the intergranular precipitation. Correspondingly, compared with their Sc-free counterparts, the yield strength of post-aged CG, FG, and UFG Al–Cu alloys with Sc addition increased by ~36 MPa, ~56 MPa, and ~150 MPa, simultaneously in tensile elongation by ~20%, ~30%, and 280%, respectively. The grain size-induced evolutions in vacancy concentration/distribution and number density of vacancy-solute/solute–solute clusters and their influences on precipitation nucleation and kinetics have been comprehensively considered to rationalize the length scale-dependent Sc microalloying mechanisms using positron annihilation lifetime spectrum and three dimension atom probe. The increase in ductility was analyzed in the light of Sc microalloying effect and the

  5. Length-scale dependent microalloying effects on precipitation behaviors and mechanical properties of Al–Cu alloys with minor Sc addition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jiang, L.; Li, J.K. [State Key Laboratory for Mechanical Behavior of Materials, Xi' an Jiaotong University, Xi' an 710049 (China); Liu, G., E-mail: lgsammer@mail.xjtu.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory for Mechanical Behavior of Materials, Xi' an Jiaotong University, Xi' an 710049 (China); Wang, R.H. [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Xi' an University of Technology, Xi' an 710048 (China); Chen, B.A.; Zhang, J.Y. [State Key Laboratory for Mechanical Behavior of Materials, Xi' an Jiaotong University, Xi' an 710049 (China); Sun, J., E-mail: junsun@mail.xjtu.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory for Mechanical Behavior of Materials, Xi' an Jiaotong University, Xi' an 710049 (China); Yang, M.X.; Yang, G. [Central Iron and Steel Research Institute, Beijing 100081 (China); Yang, J.; Cao, X.Z. [Key Laboratory of Nuclear Radiation and Nuclear Energy Technology, Institute of High Energy Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China)

    2015-06-18

    Heat-treatable Al alloys containing Al–2.5 wt% Cu (Al–Cu) and Al–2.5 wt% Cu–0.3 wt% Sc (Al–Cu–Sc) with different grain length scales, i.e., average grain size >10 μm ( defined coarse grained, CG), 1–2 μm (fine grained, FG), and <1 μm (ultrafine grained, UFG), were prepared by equal-channel angular pressing (ECAP). The length scale and Sc microalloying effects and their interplay on the precipitation behavior and mechanical properties of the Al–Cu alloys were systematically investigated. In the Al–Cu alloys, intergranular θ-Al{sub 2}Cu precipitation gradually dominated by sacrificing the intragranular θ′-Al{sub 2}Cu precipitation with reducing the length scale. Especially in the UFG regime, only intergranular θ-Al{sub 2}Cu particles were precipitated and intragranular θ′-Al{sub 2}Cu precipitation was completely disappeared. This led to a remarkable reduction in yield strength and ductility due to insufficient dislocation storage capacity. The minor Sc addition resulted in a microalloying effect in the Al–Cu alloy, which, however, is strongly dependent on the length scale. The smaller is the grain size, the more active is the microalloying effect that promotes the intragranular precipitation while reduces the intergranular precipitation. Correspondingly, compared with their Sc-free counterparts, the yield strength of post-aged CG, FG, and UFG Al–Cu alloys with Sc addition increased by ~36 MPa, ~56 MPa, and ~150 MPa, simultaneously in tensile elongation by ~20%, ~30%, and 280%, respectively. The grain size-induced evolutions in vacancy concentration/distribution and number density of vacancy-solute/solute–solute clusters and their influences on precipitation nucleation and kinetics have been comprehensively considered to rationalize the length scale-dependent Sc microalloying mechanisms using positron annihilation lifetime spectrum and three dimension atom probe. The increase in ductility was analyzed in the light of Sc microalloying

  6. Multi-scale modeling of inter-granular fracture in UO2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chakraborty, Pritam [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Zhang, Yongfeng [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Tonks, Michael R. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Biner, S. Bulent [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2015-03-01

    A hierarchical multi-scale approach is pursued in this work to investigate the influence of porosity, pore and grain size on the intergranular brittle fracture in UO2. In this approach, molecular dynamics simulations are performed to obtain the fracture properties for different grain boundary types. A phase-field model is then utilized to perform intergranular fracture simulations of representative microstructures with different porosities, pore and grain sizes. In these simulations the grain boundary fracture properties obtained from molecular dynamics simulations are used. The responses from the phase-field fracture simulations are then fitted with a stress-based brittle fracture model usable at the engineering scale. This approach encapsulates three different length and time scales, and allows the development of microstructurally informed engineering scale model from properties evaluated at the atomistic scale.

  7. Model of vortex dynamics in superconducting films in two-coil measurements of the coherence length

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemberger, Thomas; Loh, Yen Lee

    In two-coil measurements on superconducting films, a magnetic field from a small coil is applied to the center of the film. When the amplitude of the ac field is increased, the film undergoes a transition from the ``Meissner'' state to a state with vortices and antivortices. Ultimately, the vortex density matches the applied magnetic field and field screening is negligible. Experimentally, the field at the transition is related to the superconducting coherence length, although a full theory of the relationship is lacking. We show that the mutual inductance between drive and pickup coils, on opposite sides of the film, as a function of ac field amplitude is well-described by a phenomenological model in which vortices and antivortices appear together in the film at the radius where the induced supercurrent is strongest, and then they move through a landscape of moderately strong vortex pinning sites. Work at OSU supported by DOE-Basic Energy Sciences through Grant No. FG02-08ER46533.

  8. Diffusion as a Ruler: Modeling Kinesin Diffusion as a Length Sensor for Intraflagellar Transport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendel, Nathan L; Thomson, Matthew; Marshall, Wallace F

    2018-02-06

    An important question in cell biology is whether cells are able to measure size, either whole cell size or organelle size. Perhaps cells have an internal chemical representation of size that can be used to precisely regulate growth, or perhaps size is just an accident that emerges due to constraint of nutrients. The eukaryotic flagellum is an ideal model for studying size sensing and control because its linear geometry makes it essentially one-dimensional, greatly simplifying mathematical modeling. The assembly of flagella is regulated by intraflagellar transport (IFT), in which kinesin motors carry cargo adaptors for flagellar proteins along the flagellum and then deposit them at the tip, lengthening the flagellum. The rate at which IFT motors are recruited to begin transport into the flagellum is anticorrelated with the flagellar length, implying some kind of communication between the base and the tip and possibly indicating that cells contain some mechanism for measuring flagellar length. Although it is possible to imagine many complex scenarios in which additional signaling molecules sense length and carry feedback signals to the cell body to control IFT, might the already-known components of the IFT system be sufficient to allow length dependence of IFT? Here we investigate a model in which the anterograde kinesin motors unbind after cargo delivery, diffuse back to the base, and are subsequently reused to power entry of new IFT trains into the flagellum. By mathematically modeling and simulating such a system, we are able to show that the diffusion time of the motors can in principle be sufficient to serve as a proxy for length measurement. We found that the diffusion model can not only achieve a stable steady-state length without the addition of any other signaling molecules or pathways, but also is able to produce the anticorrelation between length and IFT recruitment rate that has been observed in quantitative imaging studies. Copyright © 2017 Biophysical

  9. Global-scale modeling of groundwater recharge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Döll

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Long-term average groundwater recharge, which is equivalent to renewable groundwater resources, is the major limiting factor for the sustainable use of groundwater. Compared to surface water resources, groundwater resources are more protected from pollution, and their use is less restricted by seasonal and inter-annual flow variations. To support water management in a globalized world, it is necessary to estimate groundwater recharge at the global scale. Here, we present a best estimate of global-scale long-term average diffuse groundwater recharge (i.e. renewable groundwater resources that has been calculated by the most recent version of the WaterGAP Global Hydrology Model WGHM (spatial resolution of 0.5° by 0.5°, daily time steps. The estimate was obtained using two state-of-the-art global data sets of gridded observed precipitation that we corrected for measurement errors, which also allowed to quantify the uncertainty due to these equally uncertain data sets. The standard WGHM groundwater recharge algorithm was modified for semi-arid and arid regions, based on independent estimates of diffuse groundwater recharge, which lead to an unbiased estimation of groundwater recharge in these regions. WGHM was tuned against observed long-term average river discharge at 1235 gauging stations by adjusting, individually for each basin, the partitioning of precipitation into evapotranspiration and total runoff. We estimate that global groundwater recharge was 12 666 km3/yr for the climate normal 1961–1990, i.e. 32% of total renewable water resources. In semi-arid and arid regions, mountainous regions, permafrost regions and in the Asian Monsoon region, groundwater recharge accounts for a lower fraction of total runoff, which makes these regions particularly vulnerable to seasonal and inter-annual precipitation variability and water pollution. Average per-capita renewable groundwater resources of countries vary between 8 m3

  10. Global-scale modeling of groundwater recharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Döll, P.; Fiedler, K.

    2008-05-01

    Long-term average groundwater recharge, which is equivalent to renewable groundwater resources, is the major limiting factor for the sustainable use of groundwater. Compared to surface water resources, groundwater resources are more protected from pollution, and their use is less restricted by seasonal and inter-annual flow variations. To support water management in a globalized world, it is necessary to estimate groundwater recharge at the global scale. Here, we present a best estimate of global-scale long-term average diffuse groundwater recharge (i.e. renewable groundwater resources) that has been calculated by the most recent version of the WaterGAP Global Hydrology Model WGHM (spatial resolution of 0.5° by 0.5°, daily time steps). The estimate was obtained using two state-of-the-art global data sets of gridded observed precipitation that we corrected for measurement errors, which also allowed to quantify the uncertainty due to these equally uncertain data sets. The standard WGHM groundwater recharge algorithm was modified for semi-arid and arid regions, based on independent estimates of diffuse groundwater recharge, which lead to an unbiased estimation of groundwater recharge in these regions. WGHM was tuned against observed long-term average river discharge at 1235 gauging stations by adjusting, individually for each basin, the partitioning of precipitation into evapotranspiration and total runoff. We estimate that global groundwater recharge was 12 666 km3/yr for the climate normal 1961-1990, i.e. 32% of total renewable water resources. In semi-arid and arid regions, mountainous regions, permafrost regions and in the Asian Monsoon region, groundwater recharge accounts for a lower fraction of total runoff, which makes these regions particularly vulnerable to seasonal and inter-annual precipitation variability and water pollution. Average per-capita renewable groundwater resources of countries vary between 8 m3/(capita yr) for Egypt to more than 1 million m3

  11. Effects of magnetic order on the superconducting length scales and critical fields in single crystal ErNi2B2C

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gammel, P.L.; Barber, B.P.; Ramirez, A.P.

    1999-01-01

    The flux line form factor in small angle neutron scattering and transport data determines the superconducting length scares and critical fields in single crystal ErNi2B2C. For H parallel to c, the coherence length xi increases and the penetration depth lambda decreases when crossing T-N = 6.0 K......, the Neel transition. The critical fields show corresponding anomalies near T-N. For H perpendicular to c, the fourfold modulation of the upper critical field H-c2 is strongly temperature dependent, changing sign near T-N, and can be modeled using the anisotropy of the sublattice magnetization....

  12. Criterion Noise in Ratings-Based Recognition: Evidence from the Effects of Response Scale Length on Recognition Accuracy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benjamin, Aaron S.; Tullis, Jonathan G.; Lee, Ji Hae

    2013-01-01

    Rating scales are a standard measurement tool in psychological research. However, research has suggested that the cognitive burden involved in maintaining the criteria used to parcel subjective evidence into ratings introduces "decision noise" and affects estimates of performance in the underlying task. There has been debate over whether…

  13. Multi-mass dynamic model of a variable-length tether used in a high altitude wind energy system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Milutinović, Milan; Kranjčević, Nenad; Deur, Joško

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • A multi-mass dynamics model of a variable length tether has been developed. • The modelling approach enables straightforward description of the aerodynamic drag. • The model is used in high altitude wind energy system control-oriented simulations. • The model accurately describes the shape, forces and vibrations of the tether. - Abstract: This paper presents a multibody approach to dynamics modelling of a variable-length tether moving through air, in a system where an airborne module generates aerodynamic lift and uses the tether to cyclically drive the winch-generator unit fixed on the ground. The rope is modelled as a series of straight, massless, elastic segments with the rope mass fragments lumped to the segment joints. Individual segment length is constant, with the exception of segment being wound out from the winch, while the number of segments is variable. For the segment being wound out, a special modelling approach is derived. The forces acting on the rope are also concentrated at the joints, thus simplifying computations and facilitating rope aerodynamic drag modelling. The proposed tether dynamics model is integrated into the overall model of controlled power production system and verified by computer simulation. The model is compared with two simpler tether dynamics models also proposed in the paper

  14. Mechanical Behavior of UO2 at Sub-grain Length Scales: Quantification of Elastic, Plastic and Creep Properties via Microscale Testing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peralta, Pedro

    2018-04-16

    concluded successfully, resulting in: 1) the successful fabrication, processing, and characterization of large-grained samples with various orientations (up to and including single crystals) having stoichiometric and hyper-stoichiometric O/U ratios; 2) formulation, calibration, and validation of a crystal plasticity constitutive model to describe the creep deformation of UO2 at the sub-grain length scale (single crystal level) at intermediate temperatures; 3) the successful calibration of a crystal plasticity constitutive model to describe the elasto-plastic deformation of microcantilever beams, also at moderate temperatures. Samples were prepared from natural uranium oxide powder of production-quality provided by Areva. The powder was pressed in a die to a pressure of 100 MPa to produce green pellets with no sintering aids, lubricants, or any other additives. The green pellets were then heated up to 1700 °C under ultra-high purity argon atmosphere (~1 ppm O2). The atmosphere was then changed to 79% Argon, 21% O2 and the temperature was held at 1700 °C for 2 hours to sinter the pellets under oxidative conditions [1] that are known to increase grain growth kinetics in UO2 [2]. Samples were then cooled down under Ar-4%H2 atmosphere to reduce the samples back to stoichiometric UO2. For macro-scale procedures, testing of UO2 samples with large grains was performed at 1200 °C using a modified load frame capable of applying dead-weight loads to ensure constant stress conditions, while displacement of the sample produced by the applied load was measured with high precision micrometers to obtain strains. Stress steps were used during testing and the strains were monitored to measured creep strain rates under steady state for each level of stress used, so that stress exponents could be obtained. The results of the mechanical testing, along with sample geometry and crystal orientation of the grains in the samples, as well as post-test sample characterization were used to formulate

  15. Quasi-Continuum Reduction of Field Theories: A Route to Seamlessly Bridge Quantum and Atomistic Length-Scales with Continuum

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-04-01

    this form contains classified information, stamp classification level on the top and bottom of this page. 17. LIMITATION OF ABSTRACT. This block... techniques have been developed that enable large-scale real-space electronic structure calculations using Kohn-Sham density functional theory. In...particular, the various components of the developed techniques include (i) real-space formulation of Kohn-Sham density-functional theory (DFT) for both

  16. Longitudinal patterns and response lengths of algae in riverine ecosystems: A model analysis emphasising benthic-pelagic interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jäger, Christoph G; Borchardt, Dietrich

    2018-04-07

    In riverine ecosystems primary production is principally possible in two habitats: in the benthic layer by sessile algae and in the surface water by planktonic algae being transported downstream. The relevance of these two habitats generally changes along the rivers' continuum. However, analyses of the interaction of algae in these two habitats and their controlling factors in riverine ecosystems are, so far, very rare. We use a simplified advection-diffusion model system combined with ecological process kinetics to analyse the interaction of benthic and planktonic algae and nutrients along idealised streams and rivers at regional to large scales. Because many of the underlying processes affecting algal dynamics are influenced by depth, we focus particularly on the impact of river depth on this interaction. At constant environmental conditions all state variables approach stable spatial equilibria along the river, independent of the boundary conditions at the upstream end. Because our model is very robust against changes of turbulent diffusion and stream velocity, these spatial equilibria can be analysed by a simplified ordinary differential equation (ode) version of our model. This model variant reveals that at shallower river depths, phytoplankton can exist only when it is subsidised by detaching benthic algae, and in turn, at deeper river depths, benthic algae can exist only in low biomasses which are subsidised by sinking planktonic algae. We generalise the spatial dynamics of the model system using different conditions at the upstream end of the model, which mimic various natural or anthropogenic factors (pristine source, dam, inflow of a waste water treatment plant, and dilution from e.g. a tributary) and analyse how these scenarios influence different aspects of the longitudinal spatial dynamics of the full spatial model: the relation of spatial equilibrium to spatial maximum, the distance to the spatial maximum, and the response length. Generally, our

  17. Current increment of tunnel field-effect transistor using InGaAs nanowire/Si heterojunction by scaling of channel length

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomioka, Katsuhiro; Fukui, Takashi

    2014-02-01

    We report on a fabrication of tunnel field-effect transistors using InGaAs nanowire/Si heterojunctions and the characterization of scaling of channel lengths. The devices consisted of single InGaAs nanowires with a diameter of 30 nm grown on p-type Si(111) substrates. The switch demonstrated steep subthreshold-slope (30 mV/decade) at drain-source voltage (VDS) of 0.10 V. Also, pinch-off behavior appeared at moderately low VDS, below 0.10 V. Reducing the channel length of the transistors attained a steep subthreshold slope (<60 mV/decade) and enhanced the drain current, which was 100 higher than that of the longer channels.

  18. Multi-scale modeling strategies in materials science—The ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The problem of prediction of finite temperature properties of materials poses great computational challenges. The computational treatment of the multitude of length and time scales involved in determining macroscopic properties has been attempted by several workers with varying degrees of success. This paper will review ...

  19. Modeling cancer metabolism on a genome scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yizhak, Keren; Chaneton, Barbara; Gottlieb, Eyal; Ruppin, Eytan

    2015-01-01

    Cancer cells have fundamentally altered cellular metabolism that is associated with their tumorigenicity and malignancy. In addition to the widely studied Warburg effect, several new key metabolic alterations in cancer have been established over the last decade, leading to the recognition that altered tumor metabolism is one of the hallmarks of cancer. Deciphering the full scope and functional implications of the dysregulated metabolism in cancer requires both the advancement of a variety of omics measurements and the advancement of computational approaches for the analysis and contextualization of the accumulated data. Encouragingly, while the metabolic network is highly interconnected and complex, it is at the same time probably the best characterized cellular network. Following, this review discusses the challenges that genome-scale modeling of cancer metabolism has been facing. We survey several recent studies demonstrating the first strides that have been done, testifying to the value of this approach in portraying a network-level view of the cancer metabolism and in identifying novel drug targets and biomarkers. Finally, we outline a few new steps that may further advance this field. PMID:26130389

  20. Modeling cancer metabolism on a genome scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yizhak, Keren; Chaneton, Barbara; Gottlieb, Eyal; Ruppin, Eytan

    2015-06-30

    Cancer cells have fundamentally altered cellular metabolism that is associated with their tumorigenicity and malignancy. In addition to the widely studied Warburg effect, several new key metabolic alterations in cancer have been established over the last decade, leading to the recognition that altered tumor metabolism is one of the hallmarks of cancer. Deciphering the full scope and functional implications of the dysregulated metabolism in cancer requires both the advancement of a variety of omics measurements and the advancement of computational approaches for the analysis and contextualization of the accumulated data. Encouragingly, while the metabolic network is highly interconnected and complex, it is at the same time probably the best characterized cellular network. Following, this review discusses the challenges that genome-scale modeling of cancer metabolism has been facing. We survey several recent studies demonstrating the first strides that have been done, testifying to the value of this approach in portraying a network-level view of the cancer metabolism and in identifying novel drug targets and biomarkers. Finally, we outline a few new steps that may further advance this field. © 2015 The Authors. Published under the terms of the CC BY 4.0 license.

  1. Morphological quantification of hierarchical geomaterials by X-ray nano-CT bridges the gap from nano to micro length scales

    KAUST Repository

    Brisard, S.

    2012-01-30

    Morphological quantification of the complex structure of hierarchical geomaterials is of great relevance for Earth science and environmental engineering, among others. To date, methods that quantify the 3D morphology on length scales ranging from a few tens of nanometers to several hun-dred nanometers have had limited success. We demonstrate, for the first time, that it is possible to go beyond visualization and to extract quantitative morphological information from X-ray images in the aforementioned length scales. As examples, two different hierarchical geomaterials exhibiting complex porous structures ranging from nanometer to macroscopic scale are studied: a flocculated clay water suspension and two hydrated cement pastes. We show that from a single projection image it is possible to perform a direct computation of the ultra-small angle-scattering spectra. The predictions matched very well the experimental data obtained by the best ultra-small angle-scattering experimental setups as observed for the cement paste. In this context, we demonstrate that the structure of flocculated clay suspension exhibit two well-distinct regimes of aggregation, a dense mass fractal aggregation at short distance and a more open structure at large distance, which can be generated by a 3D reaction limited cluster-cluster aggregation process. For the first time, a high-resolution 3D image of fibrillar cement paste cluster was obtained from limited angle nanotomography.

  2. Capturing recrystallization of metals with a multi-scale materials model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D. A. Hughes; D. J. Bammann; A. Godfrey; V. C. Prantil; E. A. Holm; M. A. Miodownik; D. C. Chrzan; M. T. Lusk

    2000-04-01

    The final report for a Laboratory Directed Research and Development project entitled, ``Capturing Recrystallization of Metals in a Multiscale Materials Model'' is presented. In this project, deformation and recrystallization processes have been followed experimentally and theoretically in order to incorporate essential mechanisms from the defect (dislocation) and grain size length scales. A nonlinear rotational gradient theory has been developed which enables the incorporation of microstructural parameters. The evolution of these parameters during deformation and recrystallization has been characterized qualitatively and quantitatively, applying various electron optic techniques ranging over several length scales. The theoretical and experimental framework developed is general. It has been exemplified by an application to recrystallization in single crystals and bicrystals of aluminum. The recrystallization process has been modeled using a 3-D model for the changes in key structural parameters during recrystallization.

  3. SDG and qualitative trend based model multiple scale validation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Dong; Xu, Xin; Yin, Jianjin; Zhang, Hongyu; Zhang, Beike

    2017-09-01

    Verification, Validation and Accreditation (VV&A) is key technology of simulation and modelling. For the traditional model validation methods, the completeness is weak; it is carried out in one scale; it depends on human experience. The SDG (Signed Directed Graph) and qualitative trend based multiple scale validation is proposed. First the SDG model is built and qualitative trends are added to the model. And then complete testing scenarios are produced by positive inference. The multiple scale validation is carried out by comparing the testing scenarios with outputs of simulation model in different scales. Finally, the effectiveness is proved by carrying out validation for a reactor model.

  4. Quantifying the length and variance of the eukaryotic cell cycle phases by a stochastic model and dual nucleoside pulse labelling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, Tom Serge; Jaehnert, Irene; Schichor, Christian; Or-Guil, Michal; Carneiro, Jorge

    2014-07-01

    A fundamental property of cell populations is their growth rate as well as the time needed for cell division and its variance. The eukaryotic cell cycle progresses in an ordered sequence through the phases G1, S, G2, and M, and is regulated by environmental cues and by intracellular checkpoints. Reflecting this regulatory complexity, the length of each phase varies considerably in different kinds of cells but also among genetically and morphologically indistinguishable cells. This article addresses the question of how to describe and quantify the mean and variance of the cell cycle phase lengths. A phase-resolved cell cycle model is introduced assuming that phase completion times are distributed as delayed exponential functions, capturing the observations that each realization of a cycle phase is variable in length and requires a minimal time. In this model, the total cell cycle length is distributed as a delayed hypoexponential function that closely reproduces empirical distributions. Analytic solutions are derived for the proportions of cells in each cycle phase in a population growing under balanced growth and under specific non-stationary conditions. These solutions are then adapted to describe conventional cell cycle kinetic assays based on pulse labelling with nucleoside analogs. The model fits well to data obtained with two distinct proliferating cell lines labelled with a single bromodeoxiuridine pulse. However, whereas mean lengths are precisely estimated for all phases, the respective variances remain uncertain. To overcome this limitation, a redesigned experimental protocol is derived and validated in silico. The novelty is the timing of two consecutive pulses with distinct nucleosides that enables accurate and precise estimation of both the mean and the variance of the length of all phases. The proposed methodology to quantify the phase length distributions gives results potentially equivalent to those obtained with modern phase-specific biosensor

  5. Dependence of the crossing time on the sequence length in the continuous-time mutation-selection model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gill, Wonpyong

    2010-01-01

    The dependence of the crossing time on the sequence length in the coupled and the decoupled continuous-time mutation-selection models in an asymmetric sharply-peaked landscape with a positive asymmetric parameter, r, was examined for a fixed extension parameter, E, which is defined as the average Hamming distance from the optimal allele of the initial quasispecies divided by the sequence length. Two versions of the coupled mutation-selection model, the continuous-time version and discrete-time version, were found to have the same boundary between the deterministic and the stochastic regions, which is different from the boundary between the deterministic and the stochastic regions in the decoupled continuous-time mutation-selection model. The maximum sequence length for a finite population that can evolve through the fitness barrier, e.g., within 10 6 generations in the decoupled continuous-time mutation-selection model, increased by approximately eight sequence elements with increasing population size by a factor of a thousand when E = 0.1 and r = 0.1. The crossing time for a finite population in the decoupled model in the stochastic region was shorter than the crossing time for a finite population in the coupled model, and the maximum evolvable sequence length for a finite population in the decoupled model was longer than the maximum evolvable sequence length for a finite population in the coupled model. This suggests that a mutation allowed at any time during the life cycle might be more effective than a mutation allowed only at reproduction events when a finite population transits to a higher fitness peak through the fitness barrier in an asymmetric sharply-peaked landscape.

  6. Search for Screened Interactions Associated with Dark Energy below the 100 μm Length Scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rider, Alexander D; Moore, David C; Blakemore, Charles P; Louis, Maxime; Lu, Marie; Gratta, Giorgio

    2016-09-02

    We present the results of a search for unknown interactions that couple to mass between an optically levitated microsphere and a gold-coated silicon cantilever. The scale and geometry of the apparatus enable a search for new forces that appear at distances below 100  μm and which would have evaded previous searches due to screening mechanisms. The data are consistent with electrostatic backgrounds and place upper limits on the strength of new interactions at 5.6×10^{4} in the region of parameter space where the self-coupling Λ≳5  meV and the microspheres are not fully screened.

  7. Nano-regime Length Scales Extracted from the First Sharp Diffraction Peak in Non-crystalline SiO2 and Related Materials: Device Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Phillips James

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract This paper distinguishes between two different scales of medium range order, MRO, in non-crystalline SiO2: (1 the first is ~0.4 to 0.5 nm and is obtained from the position of the first sharp diffraction peak, FSDP, in the X-ray diffraction structure factor, S(Q, and (2 the second is ~1 nm and is calculated from the FSDP full-width-at-half-maximum FWHM. Many-electron calculations yield Si–O third- and O–O fourth-nearest-neighbor bonding distances in the same 0.4–0.5 nm MRO regime. These derive from the availability of empty Si dπ orbitals for back-donation from occupied O pπ orbitals yielding narrow symmetry determined distributions of third neighbor Si–O, and fourth neighbor O–O distances. These are segments of six member rings contributing to connected six-member rings with ~1 nm length scale within the MRO regime. The unique properties of non-crystalline SiO2 are explained by the encapsulation of six-member ring clusters by five- and seven-member rings on average in a compliant hard-soft nano-scaled inhomogeneous network. This network structure minimizes macroscopic strain, reducing intrinsic bonding defects as well as defect precursors. This inhomogeneous CRN is enabling for applications including thermally grown ~1.5 nm SiO2 layers for Si field effect transistor devices to optical components with centimeter dimensions. There are qualitatively similar length scales in nano-crystalline HfO2 and phase separated Hf silicates based on the primitive unit cell, rather than a ring structure. Hf oxide dielectrics have recently been used as replacement dielectrics for a new generation of Si and Si/Ge devices heralding a transition into nano-scale circuits and systems on a Si chip.

  8. Intensity limits for propagation of 0.527 μm laser beams through large-scale-length plasmas for inertial confinement fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Niemann, C.; Divol, L.; Froula, D.H.; Gregori, G.; Jones, O.; Kirkwood, R.K.; MacKinnon, A.J.; Meezan, N.B.; Moody, J.D.; Sorce, C.; Suter, L.J.; Glenzer, S.H.; Bahr, R.; Seka, W.

    2005-01-01

    We have established the intensity limits for propagation of a frequency-doubled (2ω, 527 nm) high intensity interaction beam through an underdense large-scale-length plasma. We observe good beam transmission at laser intensities at or below 2x10 14 W/cm 2 and a strong reduction at intensities up to 10 15 W/cm 2 due to the onset of parametric scattering instabilities. We show that temporal beam smoothing by spectral dispersion allows a factor of 2 higher intensities while keeping the beam spray constant, which establishes frequency-doubled light as an option for ignition and burn in inertial confinement fusion experiments

  9. Ventricular flow dynamics with varying LVAD inflow cannula lengths: In-silico evaluation in a multiscale model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Sam; Neidlin, Michael; Li, Zhiyong; Simpson, Benjamin; Gregory, Shaun D

    2018-03-10

    Left ventricular assist devices are associated with thromboembolic events, which are potentially caused by altered intraventricular flow. Due to patient variability, differences in apical wall thickness affects cannula insertion lengths, potentially promoting unfavourable intraventricular flow patterns which are thought to be correlated to the risk of thrombosis. This study aimed to present a 3D multiscale computational fluid dynamic model of the left ventricle (LV) developed using a commercial software, Ansys, and evaluate the risk of thrombosis with varying inflow cannula insertion lengths in a severely dilated LV. Based on a HeartWare HVAD inflow cannula, insertion lengths of 5, 19, 24 and 50 mm represented cases of apical hypertrophy, typical ranges of apical thicknesses and an experimental length, respectively. The risk of thrombosis was evaluated based on blood washout, residence time, instantaneous blood stagnation and a pulsatility index. By introducing fresh blood to displace pre-existing blood in the LV, after 5 cardiac cycles, 46.7%, 45.7%, 45.1% and 41.8% of pre-existing blood remained for insertion lengths of 5, 19, 24 and 50 mm, respectively. Compared to the 50 mm insertion, blood residence time was at least 9%, 7% and 6% higher with the 5, 19 and 24 mm insertion lengths, respectively. No instantaneous stagnation at the apex was observed directly after the E-wave. Pulsatility indices adjacent to the cannula increased with shorter insertion lengths. For the specific scenario studied, a longer insertion length, relative to LV size, may be advantageous to minimise thrombosis by increasing LV washout and reducing blood residence time. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Fuzzy time series forecasting model with natural partitioning length approach for predicting the unemployment rate under different degree of confidence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramli, Nazirah; Mutalib, Siti Musleha Ab; Mohamad, Daud

    2017-08-01

    Fuzzy time series forecasting model has been proposed since 1993 to cater for data in linguistic values. Many improvement and modification have been made to the model such as enhancement on the length of interval and types of fuzzy logical relation. However, most of the improvement models represent the linguistic term in the form of discrete fuzzy sets. In this paper, fuzzy time series model with data in the form of trapezoidal fuzzy numbers and natural partitioning length approach is introduced for predicting the unemployment rate. Two types of fuzzy relations are used in this study which are first order and second order fuzzy relation. This proposed model can produce the forecasted values under different degree of confidence.

  11. Scale Effect of Premixed Methane-Air Combustion in Confined Space Using LES Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liang Wang

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Gas explosion is the most hazardous incident occurring in underground airways. Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD techniques are sophisticated in simulating explosions in confined spaces; specifically, when testing large-scale gaseous explosions, such as methane explosions in underground mines. The dimensions of a confined space where explosions could occur vary significantly. Thus, the scale effect on explosion parameters is worth investigating. In this paper, the impact of scaling on explosion overpressures is investigated by employing two scaling factors: The Gas-fill Length Scaling Factor (FLSF and the Hydraulic Diameter Scaling Factor (HDSF. The combinations of eight FLSFs and five HDSFs will cover a wide range of space dimensions where flammable gas could accumulate. Experiments were also conducted to evaluate the selected numerical models. The Large Eddy Simulation turbulence model was selected because it shows accuracy compared to the widely used Reynolds’ averaged models for the scenarios investigated in the experiments. Three major conclusions can be drawn: (1 The overpressure increases with both FLSF and HDSF within the deflagration regime; (2 In an explosion duct with a length to diameter ratio greater than 54, detonation is more likely to be triggered for a stoichiometric methane/air mixture; (3 Overpressure increases as an increment hydraulic diameter of a geometry within deflagration regime. A relative error of 7% is found when predicting blast peak overpressure for the base case compared to the experiment; a good agreement for the wave arrival time is also achieved.

  12. Finite element modeling of aponeurotomy: altered intramuscular myofascial force transmission yields complex sarcomere length distributions determining acute effects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yucesoy, C.A.; Koopman, B.H.; Grootenboer, H.J.; Huijing, P.A.J.B.M.

    2007-01-01

    Finite element modeling of aponeurotomized rat extensor digitorium longus muscle was performed to investigate the acute effects of proximal aponeurotomy. The specific goal was to assess the changes in lengths of sarcomeres within aponeurotomized muscle and to explain how the intervention leads to

  13. A New Method of Building Scale-Model Houses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richard N. Malcolm

    1978-01-01

    Scale-model houses are used to display new architectural and construction designs.Some scale-model houses will not withstand the abuse of shipping and handling.This report describes how to build a solid-core model house which is rigid, lightweight, and sturdy.

  14. Static Aeroelastic Scaling and Analysis of a Sub-Scale Flexible Wing Wind Tunnel Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ting, Eric; Lebofsky, Sonia; Nguyen, Nhan; Trinh, Khanh

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents an approach to the development of a scaled wind tunnel model for static aeroelastic similarity with a full-scale wing model. The full-scale aircraft model is based on the NASA Generic Transport Model (GTM) with flexible wing structures referred to as the Elastically Shaped Aircraft Concept (ESAC). The baseline stiffness of the ESAC wing represents a conventionally stiff wing model. Static aeroelastic scaling is conducted on the stiff wing configuration to develop the wind tunnel model, but additional tailoring is also conducted such that the wind tunnel model achieves a 10% wing tip deflection at the wind tunnel test condition. An aeroelastic scaling procedure and analysis is conducted, and a sub-scale flexible wind tunnel model based on the full-scale's undeformed jig-shape is developed. Optimization of the flexible wind tunnel model's undeflected twist along the span, or pre-twist or wash-out, is then conducted for the design test condition. The resulting wind tunnel model is an aeroelastic model designed for the wind tunnel test condition.

  15. Material length scale and nonlocal effects on the wave propagation of composite laminated cylindrical micro/nanoshells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeighampour, Hamid; Tadi Beni, Yaghoub; Karimipour, Iman

    2017-12-01

    Wave propagation in composite laminated cylindrical microshell was investigated by accounting for simultaneous effects of two influential parameters resulting from the nonlocal and strain gradient effects. The thin shell model was used for modeling the composite laminated cylindrical microshell, and the nonlocal strain gradient theory was employed as well. Classical governing equations were derived from Hamilton's principle. The results demonstrate that the rigidity of the composite laminated cylindrical microshell in the strain gradient theory is more than that in the classical theory and less than that in the nonlocal theory. Moreover, the effect of fiber angle in layers on phase velocity of the composite laminated cylindrical microshell was investigated, demonstrating that the size parameter, the composite laminated cylindrical microshell thickness, and the circumferential wave number have considerable effects on the phase velocity of the composite laminated cylindrical microshell.

  16. Phase Behavior of Blends of Linear and Branched Polyethylenes on Micron-Length Scales via Ultra-Small-Angle Neutron Scattering (USANS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Agamalian, M.M.; Alamo, R.G.; Londono, J.D.; Mandelkern, L.; Wignall, G.D.

    1999-01-01

    SANS experiments on blends of linear, high density (HD) and long chain branched, low density (LD) polyethylenes indicate that these systems form a one-phase mixture in the melt. However, the maximum spatial resolution of pinhole cameras is approximately equal to 10 3 and it has therefore been suggested that data might also be interpreted as arising from a bi-phasic melt with large a particle size ( 1 m), because most of the scattering from the different phases would not be resolved. We have addressed this hypothesis by means of USANS experiments, which confirm that HDPEILDPE blends are homogenous in the melt on length scales up to 20 m. We have also studied blends of HDPE and short-chain branched linear low density polyethylenes (LLDPEs), which phase separate when the branch content is sufficiently high. LLDPEs prepared with Ziegler-Natta catalysts exhibit a wide distribution of compositions, and may therefore be thought of as a blend of different species. When the composition distribution is broad enough, a fraction of highly branched chains may phase separate on m-length scales, and USANS has also been used to quantify this phenomenon

  17. Model of cosmology and particle physics at an intermediate scale

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bastero-Gil, M.; Di Clemente, V.; King, S. F.

    2005-01-01

    We propose a model of cosmology and particle physics in which all relevant scales arise in a natural way from an intermediate string scale. We are led to assign the string scale to the intermediate scale M * ∼10 13 GeV by four independent pieces of physics: electroweak symmetry breaking; the μ parameter; the axion scale; and the neutrino mass scale. The model involves hybrid inflation with the waterfall field N being responsible for generating the μ term, the right-handed neutrino mass scale, and the Peccei-Quinn symmetry breaking scale. The large scale structure of the Universe is generated by the lightest right-handed sneutrino playing the role of a coupled curvaton. We show that the correct curvature perturbations may be successfully generated providing the lightest right-handed neutrino is weakly coupled in the seesaw mechanism, consistent with sequential dominance

  18. Effect of Ceramide Tail Length on the Structure of Model Stratum Corneum Lipid Bilayers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Timothy C; Hartkamp, Remco; Iacovella, Christopher R; Bunge, Annette L; McCabe, Clare

    2018-01-09

    Lipid bilayers composed of non-hydroxy sphingosine ceramide (CER NS), cholesterol (CHOL), and free fatty acids (FFAs), which are components of the human skin barrier, are studied via molecular dynamics simulations. Since mixtures of these lipids exist in dense gel phases with little molecular mobility at physiological conditions, care must be taken to ensure that the simulations become decorrelated from the initial conditions. Thus, we propose and validate an equilibration protocol based on simulated tempering, in which the simulation takes a random walk through temperature space, allowing the system to break out of metastable configurations and hence become decorrelated from its initial configuration. After validating the equilibration protocol, which we refer to as random-walk molecular dynamics, the effects of the lipid composition and ceramide tail length on bilayer properties are studied. Systems containing pure CER NS, CER NS + CHOL, and CER NS + CHOL + FFA, with the CER NS fatty acid tail length varied within each CER NS-CHOL-FFA composition, are simulated. The bilayer thickness is found to depend on the structure of the center of the bilayer, which arises as a result of the tail-length asymmetry between the lipids studied. The hydrogen bonding between the lipid headgroups and with water is found to change with the overall lipid composition, but is mostly independent of the CER fatty acid tail length. Subtle differences in the lateral packing of the lipid tails are also found as a function of CER tail length. Overall, these results provide insight into the experimentally observed trend of altered barrier properties in skin systems where there are more CERs with shorter tails present. Copyright © 2017 Biophysical Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Stochastic Simulation of a Full-Chain Reptation Model with Constraint Release, Chain-Length Fluctuations and Chain Stretching

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Neergaard, Jesper; Schieber, Jay D.

    1999-01-01

    A self-consistent reptation model that includes chain stretching, chain-length fluctuations, segment connectivity and constraint release is used to predict transient and steady flows. Quantitative comparisons are made with entangledsolution data. The model is able to capture quantitatively all...... for differentmolecular weight, the transient and steady-state behavior of the extinction angle, and the stress relaxation in cessation of steady shear flow....

  20. Advanced computational workflow for the multi-scale modeling of the bone metabolic processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dao, Tien Tuan

    2017-06-01

    Multi-scale modeling of the musculoskeletal system plays an essential role in the deep understanding of complex mechanisms underlying the biological phenomena and processes such as bone metabolic processes. Current multi-scale models suffer from the isolation of sub-models at each anatomical scale. The objective of this present work was to develop a new fully integrated computational workflow for simulating bone metabolic processes at multi-scale levels. Organ-level model employs multi-body dynamics to estimate body boundary and loading conditions from body kinematics. Tissue-level model uses finite element method to estimate the tissue deformation and mechanical loading under body loading conditions. Finally, cell-level model includes bone remodeling mechanism through an agent-based simulation under tissue loading. A case study on the bone remodeling process located on the human jaw was performed and presented. The developed multi-scale model of the human jaw was validated using the literature-based data at each anatomical level. Simulation outcomes fall within the literature-based ranges of values for estimated muscle force, tissue loading and cell dynamics during bone remodeling process. This study opens perspectives for accurately simulating bone metabolic processes using a fully integrated computational workflow leading to a better understanding of the musculoskeletal system function from multiple length scales as well as to provide new informative data for clinical decision support and industrial applications.

  1. Telomere Lengths and Telomerase Activity in Dog Tissues: A Potential Model System to Study Human Telomere and Telomerase Biology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lubna Nasir

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Studies on telomere and telomerase biology are fundamental to the understanding of aging and age-related diseases such as cancer. However, human studies have been hindered by differences in telomere biology between humans and the classical murine animal model system. In this paper, we describe basic studies of telomere length and telomerase activity in canine normal and neoplastic tissues and propose the dog as an alternative model system. Briefly, telomere lengths were measured in normal canine peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs, a range of normal canine tissues, and in a panel of naturally occurring soft tissue tumours by terminal restriction fragment (TRF analysis. Further, telomerase activity was measured in canine cell lines and multiple canine tissues using a combined polymerase chain reaction/enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay method. TRF analysis in canine PBMCs and tissues demonstrated mean TRF lengths to range between 12 and 23 kbp with heterogeneity in telomere lengths being observed in a range of normal somatic tissues. In soft tissue sarcomas, two subgroups were identified with mean TRFs of 22.2 and 18.2 kbp. Telomerase activity in canine tissue was present in tumour tissue and testis with little or no activity in normal somatic tissues. These results suggest that the dog telomere biology is similar to that in humans and may represent an alternative model system for studying telomere biology and telomerase-targeted anticancer therapies.

  2. A comparison of two models for scaling health indicators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kind, P

    1982-09-01

    The measurement properties of a health status indicator are closely related to the scaling model on which it is based. The Thurstone and Bradley-Terry models are applied to paired comparisons data which had been used to scale the sleep category of the Nottingham Health Profile. The data in their original form are shown to be inadequately represented by either model. Weaknesses in the data are identified and the two scaling models are applied to the amended data. The results of applying two sets of scale values are compared.

  3. Micro-scale testing and micromechanical modelling for high cycle fatigue of CoCr stent material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sweeney, C A; O'Brien, B; Dunne, F P E; McHugh, P E; Leen, S B

    2015-06-01

    This paper presents a framework of experimental testing and crystal plasticity micromechanics for high cycle fatigue (HCF) of micro-scale L605 CoCr stent material. Micro-scale specimens, representative of stent struts, are manufactured via laser micro-machining and electro-polishing from biomedical grade CoCr alloy foil. Crystal plasticity models of the micro-specimens are developed using a length scale-dependent, strain-gradient constitutive model and a phenomenological (power-law) constitutive model, calibrated from monotonic and cyclic plasticity test data. Experimental microstructural characterisation of the grain morphology and precipitate distributions is used as input for the polycrystalline finite element (FE) morphologies. Two microstructure-sensitive fatigue indicator parameters are applied, using local and non-local (grain-averaged) implementations, for the phenomenological and length scale-dependent models, respectively, to predict fatigue crack initiation (FCI) in the HCF experiments. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Multi Scale Modeling of Continuous Aramid Fiber Reinforced Polymer Matrix Composites Used in Ballistic Protection Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-11-16

    exploded mine propelled soil ejecta, fragments of improvised explosive devices, turbine blades, etc.). Within the proposed multi length scale modeling...level of penetration resistance against high kinetic energy projectiles (e.g. bullets, exploded mine propelled soil ejecta, fragments of improvised...c) Figure 8. Typical results obtained in three dimensional FEM analyses of the deformation of the single ply fabric unit cell under: (a) in

  5. Unit-Weighted Scales Imply Models that Should Be Tested!

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andre Beauducel

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available In several studies unit-weighted sum scales based on the unweighted sum of items are derived from the pattern of salient loadings in confirmatory factor analysis. The problem of this procedure is that the unit-weighted sum scales imply a model other than the initially tested confirmatory factor model. In consequence, it remains generally unknown how well the model implied by the unit-weighted sum scales fits the data. Nevertheless, the derived unit-weighted sum scales are often used in applied settings. The paper demonstrates how model parameters for the unit-weighted sum scales can be computed and tested by means of structural equation modeling. An empirical example based on a personality questionnaire and subsequent unit-weighted scale analyses are presented in order to demonstrate the procedure.

  6. Gauge coupling unification in a classically scale invariant model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haba, Naoyuki; Ishida, Hiroyuki [Graduate School of Science and Engineering, Shimane University,Matsue 690-8504 (Japan); Takahashi, Ryo [Graduate School of Science, Tohoku University,Sendai, 980-8578 (Japan); Yamaguchi, Yuya [Graduate School of Science and Engineering, Shimane University,Matsue 690-8504 (Japan); Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Hokkaido University,Sapporo 060-0810 (Japan)

    2016-02-08

    There are a lot of works within a class of classically scale invariant model, which is motivated by solving the gauge hierarchy problem. In this context, the Higgs mass vanishes at the UV scale due to the classically scale invariance, and is generated via the Coleman-Weinberg mechanism. Since the mass generation should occur not so far from the electroweak scale, we extend the standard model only around the TeV scale. We construct a model which can achieve the gauge coupling unification at the UV scale. In the same way, the model can realize the vacuum stability, smallness of active neutrino masses, baryon asymmetry of the universe, and dark matter relic abundance. The model predicts the existence vector-like fermions charged under SU(3){sub C} with masses lower than 1 TeV, and the SM singlet Majorana dark matter with mass lower than 2.6 TeV.

  7. From Interfaces to Bulk: Experimental-Computational Studies Across Time and Length Scales of Multi-Functional Ionic Polymers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perahia, Dvora [Clemson Univ., SC (United States); Grest, Gary S. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2017-01-25

    Neutron experiments coupled with computational components have resulted in unprecedented understanding of the factors that impact the behavior of ionic structured polymers. Additionally, new computational tools to study macromolecules, were developed. In parallel, this DOE funding have enabled the education of the next generation of material researchers who are able to take the advantage neutron tools offer to the understanding and design of advanced materials. Our research has provided unprecedented insight into one of the major factors that limits the use of ionizable polymers, combining the macroscopic view obtained from the experimental techniques with molecular insight extracted from computational studies leading to transformative knowledge that will impact the design of nano-structured, materials. With the focus on model systems, of broad interest to the scientific community and to industry, the research addressed challenges that cut across a large number of polymers, independent of the specific chemical structure or the transported species.

  8. Cholinergic axon length reduced by 300 meters in the brain of an Alzheimer mouse model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nikolajsen, Gitte; Jensen, Morten Skovgaard; West, Mark J.

    2011-01-01

    Modern stereological techniques have been used to show that the total length of the cholinergic fibers in the cerebral cortex of the APPswe/PS1deltaE9 mouse is reduced by almost 300 meters at 18 months of age and has a nonlinear relationship to the amount of transgenetically-induced amyloidosis. ....... These data provide rigorous quantitative morphological evidence that Alzheimer's-like amyloidosis affects the axons of the cholinergic enervation of the cerebral cortex....

  9. Studying Soft-matter and Biological Systems over a Wide Length-scale from Nanometer and Micrometer Sizes at the Small-angle Neutron Diffractometer KWS-2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radulescu, Aurel; Szekely, Noemi Kinga; Appavou, Marie-Sousai; Pipich, Vitaliy; Kohnke, Thomas; Ossovyi, Vladimir; Staringer, Simon; Schneider, Gerald J.; Amann, Matthias; Zhang-Haagen, Bo; Brandl, Georg; Drochner, Matthias; Engels, Ralf; Hanslik, Romuald; Kemmerling, Günter

    2016-01-01

    The KWS-2 SANS diffractometer is dedicated to the investigation of soft matter and biophysical systems covering a wide length scale, from nm to µm. The instrument is optimized for the exploration of the wide momentum transfer Q range between 1x10-4 and 0.5 Å-1 by combining classical pinhole, focusing (with lenses), and time-of-flight (with chopper) methods, while simultaneously providing high-neutron intensities with an adjustable resolution. Because of its ability to adjust the intensity and the resolution within wide limits during the experiment, combined with the possibility to equip specific sample environments and ancillary devices, the KWS-2 shows a high versatility in addressing the broad range of structural and morphological studies in the field. Equilibrium structures can be studied in static measurements, while dynamic and kinetic processes can be investigated over time scales between minutes to tens of milliseconds with time-resolved approaches. Typical systems that are investigated with the KWS-2 cover the range from complex, hierarchical systems that exhibit multiple structural levels (e.g., gels, networks, or macro-aggregates) to small and poorly-scattering systems (e.g., single polymers or proteins in solution). The recent upgrade of the detection system, which enables the detection of count rates in the MHz range, opens new opportunities to study even very small biological morphologies in buffer solution with weak scattering signals close to the buffer scattering level at high Q. In this paper, we provide a protocol to investigate samples with characteristic size levels spanning a wide length scale and exhibiting ordering in the mesoscale structure using KWS-2. We present in detail how to use the multiple working modes that are offered by the instrument and the level of performance that is achieved. PMID:28060296

  10. Cognitive flexibility deficits in a mouse model for the absence of full-length dystrophin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Remmelink, E; Aartsma-Rus, A; Smit, A B; Verhage, M; Loos, M; van Putten, M

    2016-07-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is a progressive muscle-wasting disorder, caused by mutations in the DMD gene and the resulting lack of dystrophin. The DMD gene has seven promoters, giving rise to multiple full-length and shorter isoforms. Besides the expression of dystrophin in muscles, the majority of dystrophin isoforms is expressed in brain and dystrophinopathy can lead to cognitive deficits, including intellectual impairments and deficits in executive function. In contrast to the muscle pathology, the impact of the lack of dystrophin on the brain is not very well studied. Here, we study the behavioral consequences of a lack of full-length dystrophin isoforms in mdx mice, particularly with regard to domains of executive functions and anxiety. We observed a deficit in cognitive flexibility in mdx mice in the absence of motor dysfunction or general learning impairments using two independent behavioral tests. In addition, increased anxiety was observed, but its expression depended on the context. Overall, these results suggest that the absence of full-length dystrophin in mice has specific behavioral effects that compare well to deficits observed in DMD patients. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd and International Behavioural and Neural Genetics Society.

  11. Parameterizing Subgrid-Scale Orographic Drag in the High-Resolution Rapid Refresh (HRRR) Atmospheric Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toy, M. D.; Olson, J.; Kenyon, J.; Smirnova, T. G.; Brown, J. M.

    2017-12-01

    The accuracy of wind forecasts in numerical weather prediction (NWP) models is improved when the drag forces imparted on atmospheric flow by subgrid-scale orography are included. Without such parameterizations, only the terrain resolved by the model grid, along with the small-scale obstacles parameterized by the roughness lengths can have an effect on the flow. This neglects the impacts of subgrid-scale terrain variations, which typically leads to wind speeds that are too strong. Using statistical information about the subgrid-scale orography, such as the mean and variance of the topographic height within a grid cell, the drag forces due to flow blocking, gravity wave drag, and turbulent form drag are estimated and distributed vertically throughout the grid cell column. We recently implemented the small-scale gravity wave drag paramterization of Steeneveld et al. (2008) and Tsiringakis et al. (2017) for stable planetary boundary layers, and the turbulent form drag parameterization of Beljaars et al. (2004) in the High-Resolution Rapid Refresh (HRRR) NWP model developed at the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA). As a result, a high surface wind speed bias in the model has been reduced and small improvement to the maintenance of stable layers has also been found. We present the results of experiments with the subgrid-scale orographic drag parameterization for the regional HRRR model, as well as for a global model in development at NOAA, showing the direct and indirect impacts.

  12. Length of intensive care unit stay following cardiac surgery: is it impossible to find a universal prediction model?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Widyastuti, Yunita; Stenseth, Roar; Wahba, Alexander; Pleym, Hilde; Videm, Vibeke

    2012-11-01

    Accurate models for prediction of a prolonged intensive care unit (ICU) stay following cardiac surgery may be developed using Cox proportional hazards regression. Our aims were to develop a preoperative and intraoperative model to predict the length of the ICU stay and to compare our models with published risk models, including the EuroSCORE II. Models were developed using data from all patients undergoing cardiac surgery at St. Olavs Hospital, Trondheim, Norway from 2000-2007 (n = 4994). Internal validation and calibration were performed by bootstrapping. Discrimination was assessed by areas under the receiver operating characteristics curves and calibration for the published logistic regression models with the Hosmer-Lemeshow test. Despite a diverse risk profile, 93.7% of the patients had an ICU stay prediction of a prolonged stay of more than 2, 5 or 7 days. Discrimination by the EuroSCORE II and other published models was good, but calibration was poor (Hosmer-Lemeshow test: P prediction of ICU stay in individual patients because most patients in all risk categories of all models had short ICU stays (75th percentiles: 1 day). A universal model for prediction of ICU stay may be difficult to develop, as the distribution of length of stay may depend on both medical factors and institutional policies governing ICU discharge.

  13. The Goddard multi-scale modeling system with unified physics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W.-K. Tao

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Recently, a multi-scale modeling system with unified physics was developed at NASA Goddard. It consists of (1 a cloud-resolving model (CRM, (2 a regional-scale model, the NASA unified Weather Research and Forecasting Model (WRF, and (3 a coupled CRM-GCM (general circulation model, known as the Goddard Multi-scale Modeling Framework or MMF. The same cloud-microphysical processes, long- and short-wave radiative transfer and land-surface processes are applied in all of the models to study explicit cloud-radiation and cloud-surface interactive processes in this multi-scale modeling system. This modeling system has been coupled with a multi-satellite simulator for comparison and validation with NASA high-resolution satellite data.

    This paper reviews the development and presents some applications of the multi-scale modeling system, including results from using the multi-scale modeling system to study the interactions between clouds, precipitation, and aerosols. In addition, use of the multi-satellite simulator to identify the strengths and weaknesses of the model-simulated precipitation processes will be discussed as well as future model developments and applications.

  14. Microphysics in Multi-scale Modeling System with Unified Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Wei-Kuo

    2012-01-01

    Recently, a multi-scale modeling system with unified physics was developed at NASA Goddard. It consists of (1) a cloud-resolving model (Goddard Cumulus Ensemble model, GCE model), (2) a regional scale model (a NASA unified weather research and forecast, WRF), (3) a coupled CRM and global model (Goddard Multi-scale Modeling Framework, MMF), and (4) a land modeling system. The same microphysical processes, long and short wave radiative transfer and land processes and the explicit cloud-radiation, and cloud-land surface interactive processes are applied in this multi-scale modeling system. This modeling system has been coupled with a multi-satellite simulator to use NASA high-resolution satellite data to identify the strengths and weaknesses of cloud and precipitation processes simulated by the model. In this talk, a review of developments and applications of the multi-scale modeling system will be presented. In particular, the microphysics development and its performance for the multi-scale modeling system will be presented.

  15. Simultaneous nested modeling from the synoptic scale to the LES scale for wind energy applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Yubao; Warner, Tom; Liu, Yuewei

    2011-01-01

    This paper describes an advanced multi-scale weather modeling system, WRF–RTFDDA–LES, designed to simulate synoptic scale (~2000 km) to small- and micro-scale (~100 m) circulations of real weather in wind farms on simultaneous nested grids. This modeling system is built upon the National Center...... experiments are conducted to investigate the impacts of subgrid scale (SGS) mixing parameters and nesting approaches. This study demonstrates that the WRF–RTFDDA–LES system is a valuable tool for simulating real world microscale weather flows and for development of future real-time forecasting system...

  16. Gravitational waves during inflation from a 5D large-scale repulsive gravity model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reyes, Luz M., E-mail: luzmarinareyes@gmail.com [Departamento de Matematicas, Centro Universitario de Ciencias Exactas e ingenierias (CUCEI), Universidad de Guadalajara (UdG), Av. Revolucion 1500, S.R. 44430, Guadalajara, Jalisco (Mexico); Moreno, Claudia, E-mail: claudia.moreno@cucei.udg.mx [Departamento de Matematicas, Centro Universitario de Ciencias Exactas e ingenierias (CUCEI), Universidad de Guadalajara (UdG), Av. Revolucion 1500, S.R. 44430, Guadalajara, Jalisco (Mexico); Madriz Aguilar, Jose Edgar, E-mail: edgar.madriz@red.cucei.udg.mx [Departamento de Matematicas, Centro Universitario de Ciencias Exactas e ingenierias (CUCEI), Universidad de Guadalajara (UdG), Av. Revolucion 1500, S.R. 44430, Guadalajara, Jalisco (Mexico); Bellini, Mauricio, E-mail: mbellini@mdp.edu.ar [Departamento de Fisica, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales, Universidad Nacional de Mar del Plata (UNMdP), Funes 3350, C.P. 7600, Mar del Plata (Argentina); Instituto de Investigaciones Fisicas de Mar del Plata (IFIMAR) - Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Cientificas y Tecnicas (CONICET) (Argentina)

    2012-10-22

    We investigate, in the transverse traceless (TT) gauge, the generation of the relic background of gravitational waves, generated during the early inflationary stage, on the framework of a large-scale repulsive gravity model. We calculate the spectrum of the tensor metric fluctuations of an effective 4D Schwarzschild-de Sitter metric on cosmological scales. This metric is obtained after implementing a planar coordinate transformation on a 5D Ricci-flat metric solution, in the context of a non-compact Kaluza-Klein theory of gravity. We found that the spectrum is nearly scale invariant under certain conditions. One interesting aspect of this model is that it is possible to derive the dynamical field equations for the tensor metric fluctuations, valid not just at cosmological scales, but also at astrophysical scales, from the same theoretical model. The astrophysical and cosmological scales are determined by the gravity-antigravity radius, which is a natural length scale of the model, that indicates when gravity becomes repulsive in nature.

  17. Gravitational waves during inflation from a 5D large-scale repulsive gravity model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reyes, Luz M.; Moreno, Claudia; Madriz Aguilar, José Edgar; Bellini, Mauricio

    2012-01-01

    We investigate, in the transverse traceless (TT) gauge, the generation of the relic background of gravitational waves, generated during the early inflationary stage, on the framework of a large-scale repulsive gravity model. We calculate the spectrum of the tensor metric fluctuations of an effective 4D Schwarzschild-de Sitter metric on cosmological scales. This metric is obtained after implementing a planar coordinate transformation on a 5D Ricci-flat metric solution, in the context of a non-compact Kaluza-Klein theory of gravity. We found that the spectrum is nearly scale invariant under certain conditions. One interesting aspect of this model is that it is possible to derive the dynamical field equations for the tensor metric fluctuations, valid not just at cosmological scales, but also at astrophysical scales, from the same theoretical model. The astrophysical and cosmological scales are determined by the gravity-antigravity radius, which is a natural length scale of the model, that indicates when gravity becomes repulsive in nature.

  18. Nearly constant ratio between the proton inertial scale and the spectrum break length scale in the plasma beta range from 0.2 to 1.4 in the solar wind turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, X.; Tu, C. Y.; He, J.; Wang, L.

    2017-12-01

    The spectrum break at the ion scale of the solar wind magnetic fluctuations are considered to give important clue on the turbulence dissipation mechanism. Among several possible mechanisms, the most notable ones are the two mechanisms that related respectively with proton thermal gyro-radius and proton inertial length. However, no definite conclusion has been given for which one is more reasonable because the two parameters have similar values in the normal plasma beta range. Here we do a statistical study for the first time to see if the two mechanism predictions have different dependence on the solar wind velocity and on the plasma beta in the normal plasma beta range in the solar wind at 1 AU. From magnetic measurements by Wind, Ulysses and Messenger, we select 60 data sets with duration longer than 8 hours. We found that the ratio between the proton inertial scale and the spectrum break scale do not change considerably with both varying the solar wind speed from 300km/s to 800km/s and varying the plasma beta from 0.2 to 1.4. The average value of the ratio times 2pi is 0.46 ± 0.08. However, the ratio between the proton gyro-radius and the break scale changes clearly. This new result shows that the proton inertial scale could be a single factor that determines the break length scale and hence gives a strong evidence to support the dissipation mechanism related to it in the normal plasma beta range. The value of the constant ratio may relate with the dissipation mechanism, but it needs further theoretical study to give detailed explanation.

  19. Modeling Human Behavior at a Large Scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    online messages, along with text analysis of those messages, enables us to predict the progress of a contagion from person to person at a population scale...tation, we represent probabilities and likelihoods with their log-counterparts to avoid arithmetic underflow. At testing time, we are interested in...patterns of people taking taxis, rating movies, choosing a cell phone provider, or sharing music are best explained and predicted by the habits of

  20. GENERALIZATION TECHNIQUE FOR 2D+SCALE DHE DATA MODEL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Karim

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Different users or applications need different scale model especially in computer application such as game visualization and GIS modelling. Some issues has been raised on fulfilling GIS requirement of retaining the details while minimizing the redundancy of the scale datasets. Previous researchers suggested and attempted to add another dimension such as scale or/and time into a 3D model, but the implementation of scale dimension faces some problems due to the limitations and availability of data structures and data models. Nowadays, various data structures and data models have been proposed to support variety of applications and dimensionality but lack research works has been conducted in terms of supporting scale dimension. Generally, the Dual Half Edge (DHE data structure was designed to work with any perfect 3D spatial object such as buildings. In this paper, we attempt to expand the capability of the DHE data structure toward integration with scale dimension. The description of the concept and implementation of generating 3D-scale (2D spatial + scale dimension for the DHE data structure forms the major discussion of this paper. We strongly believed some advantages such as local modification and topological element (navigation, query and semantic information in scale dimension could be used for the future 3D-scale applications.

  1. Using LISREL to Evaluate Measurement Models and Scale Reliability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleishman, John; Benson, Jeri

    1987-01-01

    LISREL program was used to examine measurement model assumptions and to assess reliability of Coopersmith Self-Esteem Inventory for Children, Form B. Data on 722 third-sixth graders from over 70 schools in large urban school district were used. LISREL program assessed (1) nature of basic measurement model for scale, (2) scale invariance across…

  2. Unit-Weighted Scales Imply Models that Should Be Tested!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beauducel, Andre; Leue, Anja

    2013-01-01

    In several studies unit-weighted sum scales based on the unweighted sum of items are derived from the pattern of salient loadings in confirmatory factor analysis. The problem of this procedure is that the unit-weighted sum scales imply a model other than the initially tested confirmatory factor model. In consequence, it remains generally unknown…

  3. Nuclear cycle length economics strategy using stochastic and deterministic Monte Carlo computation models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wook Ahn, T.

    2014-07-01

    Nuclear power plants (NPP) have historically been a low cost base-load electricity source because of their high fuel density and operational reliability. In the United States, NPPs typically run 18- to 24-month cycles to limit outage times and maximize capacity factor. recently, however, increased volatility in energy and fuel prices, lower natural gas prices, higher material costs, and new sources are challenging the nuclear industry. This warrants a study in developing a more robust cycle length and fuel burnup strategy to make NPPs more competitive. (Author)

  4. Vortex matter beyond SANS. Neutron studies of vortex structures covering a length scale of 0.01 ti 10 μm

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reimann, Tommy

    2017-01-09

    This thesis is concerned with different generic types of vortex matter arising in the intermediate state of the type-I superconductor lead, the intermediate mixed state of the type-II superconductor niobium, and the helimagnetic phase of the compound manganese silicide. It is demonstrated and explained how a combination of i) the radiographic techniques neutron grating interferometry and neutron diffractive imaging with ii) scattering methods such as small-angle-neutron scattering and ultra-small-angle neutron scattering can provide novel insight into the bulk behavior of these vortex systems. By means of the used scattering methods, detailed information on the morphology of the vortex phases covering a length scale of 0.01 to 10 μm are obtained, while the radiographic approaches additionally map the spatial distribution of vortices within the sample. In particular, this thesis focuses on the strong influences of demagnetization, geometric barriers and pinning on the vortex configuration.

  5. Vortex matter beyond SANS. Neutron studies of vortex structures covering a length scale of 0.01 ti 10 μm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reimann, Tommy

    2017-01-01

    This thesis is concerned with different generic types of vortex matter arising in the intermediate state of the type-I superconductor lead, the intermediate mixed state of the type-II superconductor niobium, and the helimagnetic phase of the compound manganese silicide. It is demonstrated and explained how a combination of i) the radiographic techniques neutron grating interferometry and neutron diffractive imaging with ii) scattering methods such as small-angle-neutron scattering and ultra-small-angle neutron scattering can provide novel insight into the bulk behavior of these vortex systems. By means of the used scattering methods, detailed information on the morphology of the vortex phases covering a length scale of 0.01 to 10 μm are obtained, while the radiographic approaches additionally map the spatial distribution of vortices within the sample. In particular, this thesis focuses on the strong influences of demagnetization, geometric barriers and pinning on the vortex configuration.

  6. Quantum-critical scaling of fidelity in 2D pairing models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adamski, Mariusz; Jȩdrzejewski, Janusz; Krokhmalskii, Taras

    2017-01-01

    The laws of quantum-critical scaling theory of quantum fidelity, dependent on the underlying system dimensionality D, have so far been verified in exactly solvable 1D models, belonging to or equivalent to interacting, quadratic (quasifree), spinless or spinfull, lattice-fermion models. The obtained results are so appealing that in quest for correlation lengths and associated universal critical indices ν, which characterize the divergence of correlation lengths on approaching critical points, one might be inclined to substitute the hard task of determining an asymptotic behavior at large distances of a two-point correlation function by an easier one, of determining the quantum-critical scaling of the quantum fidelity. However, the role of system's dimensionality has been left as an open problem. Our aim in this paper is to fill up this gap, at least partially, by verifying the laws of quantum-critical scaling theory of quantum fidelity in a 2D case. To this end, we study correlation functions and quantum fidelity of 2D exactly solvable models, which are interacting, quasifree, spinfull, lattice-fermion models. The considered 2D models exhibit new, as compared with 1D ones, features: at a given quantum-critical point there exists a multitude of correlation lengths and multiple universal critical indices ν, since these quantities depend on spatial directions, moreover, the indices ν may assume larger values. These facts follow from the obtained by us analytical asymptotic formulae for two-point correlation functions. In such new circumstances we discuss the behavior of quantum fidelity from the perspective of quantum-critical scaling theory. In particular, we are interested in finding out to what extent the quantum fidelity approach may be an alternative to the correlation-function approach in studies of quantum-critical points beyond 1D.

  7. Scaling of Precipitation Extremes Modelled by Generalized Pareto Distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajulapati, C. R.; Mujumdar, P. P.

    2017-12-01

    Precipitation extremes are often modelled with data from annual maximum series or peaks over threshold series. The Generalized Pareto Distribution (GPD) is commonly used to fit the peaks over threshold series. Scaling of precipitation extremes from larger time scales to smaller time scales when the extremes are modelled with the GPD is burdened with difficulties arising from varying thresholds for different durations. In this study, the scale invariance theory is used to develop a disaggregation model for precipitation extremes exceeding specified thresholds. A scaling relationship is developed for a range of thresholds obtained from a set of quantiles of non-zero precipitation of different durations. The GPD parameters and exceedance rate parameters are modelled by the Bayesian approach and the uncertainty in scaling exponent is quantified. A quantile based modification in the scaling relationship is proposed for obtaining the varying thresholds and exceedance rate parameters for shorter durations. The disaggregation model is applied to precipitation datasets of Berlin City, Germany and Bangalore City, India. From both the applications, it is observed that the uncertainty in the scaling exponent has a considerable effect on uncertainty in scaled parameters and return levels of shorter durations.

  8. Chemotaxis: A Multi-Scale Modeling Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhowmik, Arpan

    We are attempting to build a working simulation of population level self-organization in dictyostelium discoideum cells by combining existing models for chemo-attractant production and detection, along with phenomenological motility models. Our goal is to create a computationally-viable model-framework within which a population of cells can self-generate chemo-attractant waves and self-organize based on the directional cues of those waves. The work is a direct continuation of our previous work published in Physical Biology titled ``Excitable waves and direction-sensing in Dictyostelium Discoideum: steps towards a chemotaxis model''. This is a work in progress, no official draft/paper exists yet.

  9. Macro scale models for freight railroad terminals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-03-02

    The project has developed a yard capacity model for macro-level analysis. The study considers the detailed sequence and scheduling in classification yards and their impacts on yard capacities simulate typical freight railroad terminals, and statistic...

  10. Downstream fish passage guide walls: A hydraulic scale model analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulligan, Kevin; Towler, Brett; Haro, Alexander J.; Ahlfeld, David P.

    2018-01-01

    Partial-depth guide walls are used to improve passage efficiency and reduce the delay of out-migrating anadromous fish species by guiding fish to a bypass route (i.e. weir, pipe, sluice gate) that circumvents the turbine intakes, where survival is usually lower. Evaluation and monitoring studies, however, indicate a high propensity for some fish to pass underneath, rather than along, the guide walls, compromising their effectiveness. In the present study we evaluated a range of guide wall structures to identify where/if the flow field shifts from sweeping (i.e. flow direction primarily along the wall and towards the bypass) to downward-dominant. Many migratory fish species, particularly juveniles, are known to drift with the flow and/or exhibit rheotactic behaviour during their migration. When these behaviours are present, fish follow the path of the flow field. Hence, maintaining a strong sweeping velocity in relation to the downward velocity along a guide wall is essential to successful fish guidance. Nine experiments were conducted to measure the three-dimensional velocity components upstream of a scale model guide wall set at a wide range of depths and angles to flow. Results demonstrated how each guide wall configuration affected the three-dimensional velocity components, and hence the downward and sweeping velocity, along the full length of the guide wall. In general, the velocities produced in the scale model were sweeping dominant near the water surface and either downward dominant or close to the transitional depth near the bottom of the guide wall. The primary exception to this shift from sweeping do downward flow was for the minimum guide wall angle tested in this study (15°). At 15° the flow pattern was fully sweeping dominant for every cross-section, indicating that a guide wall with a relatively small angle may be more likely to produce conditions favorable to efficient guidance. A critical next step is to evaluate the behaviour of migratory fish as

  11. Optimal Scaling of Interaction Effects in Generalized Linear Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Rosmalen, Joost; Koning, Alex J.; Groenen, Patrick J. F.

    2009-01-01

    Multiplicative interaction models, such as Goodman's (1981) RC(M) association models, can be a useful tool for analyzing the content of interaction effects. However, most models for interaction effects are suitable only for data sets with two or three predictor variables. Here, we discuss an optimal scaling model for analyzing the content of…

  12. Atmospheric CO2 modeling at the regional scale: an intercomparison of 5 meso-scale atmospheric models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sarrat, C.; Noilhan, J.; Dolman, A.J.; Gerbig, C.; Ahmadov, R.; Tolk, L.F.; Meesters, A.G.C.A.; Hutjes, R.W.A.; Maat, ter H.W.; Pérez-Landa, G.; Donier, S.

    2007-01-01

    Atmospheric CO2 modeling in interaction with the surface fluxes, at the regional scale is developed within the frame of the European project CarboEurope-IP and its Regional Experiment component. In this context, five meso-scale meteorological models participate in an intercomparison exercise. Using

  13. Multi-scale modeling for sustainable chemical production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhuang, Kai; Bakshi, Bhavik R; Herrgård, Markus J

    2013-09-01

    With recent advances in metabolic engineering, it is now technically possible to produce a wide portfolio of existing petrochemical products from biomass feedstock. In recent years, a number of modeling approaches have been developed to support the engineering and decision-making processes associated with the development and implementation of a sustainable biochemical industry. The temporal and spatial scales of modeling approaches for sustainable chemical production vary greatly, ranging from metabolic models that aid the design of fermentative microbial strains to material and monetary flow models that explore the ecological impacts of all economic activities. Research efforts that attempt to connect the models at different scales have been limited. Here, we review a number of existing modeling approaches and their applications at the scales of metabolism, bioreactor, overall process, chemical industry, economy, and ecosystem. In addition, we propose a multi-scale approach for integrating the existing models into a cohesive framework. The major benefit of this proposed framework is that the design and decision-making at each scale can be informed, guided, and constrained by simulations and predictions at every other scale. In addition, the development of this multi-scale framework would promote cohesive collaborations across multiple traditionally disconnected modeling disciplines to achieve sustainable chemical production. Copyright © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  14. Allometric Convergence in Savanna Trees and Implications for the Use of Plant Scaling Models in Variable Ecosystems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tredennick, Andrew T.; Bentley, Lisa Patrick; Hanan, Niall P.

    2013-01-01

    Theoretical models of allometric scaling provide frameworks for understanding and predicting how and why the morphology and function of organisms vary with scale. It remains unclear, however, if the predictions of ‘universal’ scaling models for vascular plants hold across diverse species in variable environments. Phenomena such as competition and disturbance may drive allometric scaling relationships away from theoretical predictions based on an optimized tree. Here, we use a hierarchical Bayesian approach to calculate tree-specific, species-specific, and ‘global’ (i.e. interspecific) scaling exponents for several allometric relationships using tree- and branch-level data harvested from three savanna sites across a rainfall gradient in Mali, West Africa. We use these exponents to provide a rigorous test of three plant scaling models (Metabolic Scaling Theory (MST), Geometric Similarity, and Stress Similarity) in savanna systems. For the allometric relationships we evaluated (diameter vs. length, aboveground mass, stem mass, and leaf mass) the empirically calculated exponents broadly overlapped among species from diverse environments, except for the scaling exponents for length, which increased with tree cover and density. When we compare empirical scaling exponents to the theoretical predictions from the three models we find MST predictions are most consistent with our observed allometries. In those situations where observations are inconsistent with MST we find that departure from theory corresponds with expected tradeoffs related to disturbance and competitive interactions. We hypothesize savanna trees have greater length-scaling exponents than predicted by MST due to an evolutionary tradeoff between fire escape and optimization of mechanical stability and internal resource transport. Future research on the drivers of systematic allometric variation could reconcile the differences between observed scaling relationships in variable ecosystems and those

  15. Allometric convergence in savanna trees and implications for the use of plant scaling models in variable ecosystems.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew T Tredennick

    Full Text Available Theoretical models of allometric scaling provide frameworks for understanding and predicting how and why the morphology and function of organisms vary with scale. It remains unclear, however, if the predictions of 'universal' scaling models for vascular plants hold across diverse species in variable environments. Phenomena such as competition and disturbance may drive allometric scaling relationships away from theoretical predictions based on an optimized tree. Here, we use a hierarchical Bayesian approach to calculate tree-specific, species-specific, and 'global' (i.e. interspecific scaling exponents for several allometric relationships using tree- and branch-level data harvested from three savanna sites across a rainfall gradient in Mali, West Africa. We use these exponents to provide a rigorous test of three plant scaling models (Metabolic Scaling Theory (MST, Geometric Similarity, and Stress Similarity in savanna systems. For the allometric relationships we evaluated (diameter vs. length, aboveground mass, stem mass, and leaf mass the empirically calculated exponents broadly overlapped among species from diverse environments, except for the scaling exponents for length, which increased with tree cover and density. When we compare empirical scaling exponents to the theoretical predictions from the three models we find MST predictions are most consistent with our observed allometries. In those situations where observations are inconsistent with MST we find that departure from theory corresponds with expected tradeoffs related to disturbance and competitive interactions. We hypothesize savanna trees have greater length-scaling exponents than predicted by MST due to an evolutionary tradeoff between fire escape and optimization of mechanical stability and internal resource transport. Future research on the drivers of systematic allometric variation could reconcile the differences between observed scaling relationships in variable ecosystems and

  16. Fundamental length and relativistic length

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strel'tsov, V.N.

    1988-01-01

    It si noted that the introduction of fundamental length contradicts the conventional representations concerning the contraction of the longitudinal size of fast-moving objects. The use of the concept of relativistic length and the following ''elongation formula'' permits one to solve this problem

  17. Multi-scale Modelling of Segmentation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hartmann, Martin; Lartillot, Olivier; Toiviainen, Petri

    2016-01-01

    While listening to music, people often unwittingly break down musical pieces into constituent chunks such as verses and choruses. Music segmentation studies have suggested that some consensus regarding boundary perception exists, despite individual differences. However, neither the effects...... of experimental task (i.e., real-time vs. annotated segmentation), nor of musicianship on boundary perception are clear. Our study assesses musicianship effects and differences between segmentation tasks. We conducted a real-time experiment to collect segmentations by musicians and nonmusicians from nine musical...... indication density, although this might be contingent on stimuli and other factors. In line with other studies, no musicianship effects were found: our results showed high agreement between groups and similar inter-subject correlations. Also consistent with previous work, time scales between one and two...

  18. Continental scale modelling of geomagnetically induced currents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sakharov Yaroslav

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available The EURISGIC project (European Risk from Geomagnetically Induced Currents aims at deriving statistics of geomagnetically induced currents (GIC in the European high-voltage power grids. Such a continent-wide system of more than 1500 substations and transmission lines requires updates of the previous modelling, which has dealt with national grids in fairly small geographic areas. We present here how GIC modelling can be conveniently performed on a spherical surface with minor changes in the previous technique. We derive the exact formulation to calculate geovoltages on the surface of a sphere and show its practical approximation in a fast vectorised form. Using the model of the old Finnish power grid and a much larger prototype model of European high-voltage power grids, we validate the new technique by comparing it to the old one. We also compare model results to measured data in the following cases: geoelectric field at the Nagycenk observatory, Hungary; GIC at a Russian transformer; GIC along the Finnish natural gas pipeline. In all cases, the new method works reasonably well.

  19. [The impacts of the multidisciplinary team model on the length of stay and hospital expenses of patients with lung cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Jing; Xu, Xingxiang; Wang, Daxin; Xu, Jin; Gu, Wenju

    2015-05-01

    To explore the impacts of the multidisciplinary team model on the average length of stay and hospital expenses of patients with lung cancer. After the multidisciplinary team discussion, 97 patients with lung cancer were selected as the lung cancer group according to the enrollment and elimination criteria the control group was 97 patients with lung cancer managed without team discussion during the same period. All the patients were firstly diagnosed to have lung cancer from December 2011 to December 2013 in Subei People's Hospital. The length of stay, hospital expenses, stages of tumor, types of tumor, Zubrod-ECOG-WHO score, the form of payment, smoking history, sex and age of all the patients were collected. The difference in the average length of stay and hospital expenses between the 2 groups and the associated factors were analyzed by using χ² test, t test and multi-factor stepwise regression analysis. There were 68 males and 29 females with a mean age of (61 ± 9) years in the lung cancer group, while there were 73 males and 24 females with a mean age of (63 ± 10) years in the control group. There were no differences between the 2 groups in tumor staging, tumor types, Zubrod-ECOG-WHO score, the form of payment, smoking history, sex and age (χ² = 4.854, P = 0.563, χ² = 4.248, P = 0.097; χ² = 0.395, P = 0.821; χ² = 1.191, P = 0.554; χ² = 0.108, P = 0.977; χ² = 1.011, P = 0.389; χ² = 0.649, P = 0.519; P = 0.474, P = 0.845, respectively). The average hospital expenses (13 303 vs 16 553, Yuan) were lower and the length of stay (10.33 vs 12.49, days) was shorter in the lung cancer group as compared to the control group (t = 2.616, P = 0.010; t = 2.730, P = 0.007), especially so for the first clinical hospitalization (15 953 vs 19 485 yuan, t = 2.315, P = 0.022; 12.71 vs 14.75 days, t = 1.979, P = 0.049). The average length of stay and the tumor stages were the main factors associated with the average hospital expenses. Except for patients with the

  20. Enlargement of the Axial Length and Altered Ultrastructural Features of the Sclera in a Mutant Lumican Transgenic Mouse Model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanzheng Song

    Full Text Available Lumican (LUM is a candidate gene for myopia in the MYP3 locus. In this study, a mutant lumican (L199P transgenic mouse model was established to investigate the axial length changes and ultrastructural features of the sclera. The mouse model was established by pronuclear microinjection. Transgenic mice and wild-type B6 mice were killed at eight weeks of age. Gene expression levels of LUM and collagen type I (COL1 in the sclera were analyzed by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qPCR, and the protein levels were assessed by Western blot analysis. Ocular axial lengths were measured on the enucleated whole eye under a dissecting microscope. Ultrastructural features of collagen fibrils in the sclera were examined with transmission electron microscopy (TEM. Lumican and collagen type I were both elevated at the transcriptional and protein levels. The mean axial length of eyes in the transgenic mice was significantly longer than that in the wild-type mice (3,231.0 ± 11.2 μm (transgenic group vs 3,199.7 ± 11.1 μm (controls, p<0.05 =. Some ultrastructural changes were observed in the sclera of the transgenic mice under TEM, such as evident lamellar disorganizations and abnormal inter-fibril spacing. The average collagen fibril diameter was smaller than that in their wild-type counterparts. These results indicate that the ectopic mutant lumican (L199P may induce enlargement of axial lengths and abnormal structures and distributions of collagen fibrils in mouse sclera. This transgenic mouse model can be used for the mechanistic study of myopia.

  1. Analysis of chromosome aberration data by hybrid-scale models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Indrawati, Iwiq; Kumazawa, Shigeru

    2000-02-01

    This paper presents a new methodology for analyzing data of chromosome aberrations, which is useful to understand the characteristics of dose-response relationships and to construct the calibration curves for the biological dosimetry. The hybrid scale of linear and logarithmic scales brings a particular plotting paper, where the normal section paper, two types of semi-log papers and the log-log paper are continuously connected. The hybrid-hybrid plotting paper may contain nine kinds of linear relationships, and these are conveniently called hybrid scale models. One can systematically select the best-fit model among the nine models by among the conditions for a straight line of data points. A biological interpretation is possible with some hybrid-scale models. In this report, the hybrid scale models were applied to separately reported data on chromosome aberrations in human lymphocytes as well as on chromosome breaks in Tradescantia. The results proved that the proposed models fit the data better than the linear-quadratic model, despite the demerit of the increased number of model parameters. We showed that the hybrid-hybrid model (both variables of dose and response using the hybrid scale) provides the best-fit straight lines to be used as the reliable and readable calibration curves of chromosome aberrations. (author)

  2. Flavor gauge models below the Fermi scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babu, K. S.; Friedland, A.; Machado, P. A. N.; Mocioiu, I.

    2017-12-01

    The mass and weak interaction eigenstates for the quarks of the third generation are very well aligned, an empirical fact for which the Standard Model offers no explanation. We explore the possibility that this alignment is due to an additional gauge symmetry in the third generation. Specifically, we construct and analyze an explicit, renormalizable model with a gauge boson, X, corresponding to the B - L symmetry of the third family. Having a relatively light (in the MeV to multi-GeV range), flavor-nonuniversal gauge boson results in a variety of constraints from different sources. By systematically analyzing 20 different constraints, we identify the most sensitive probes: kaon, B +, D + and Upsilon decays, D-{\\overline{D}}^0 mixing, atomic parity violation, and neutrino scattering and oscillations. For the new gauge coupling g X in the range (10-2-10-4) the model is shown to be consistent with the data. Possible ways of testing the model in b physics, top and Z decays, direct collider production and neutrino oscillation experiments, where one can observe nonstandard matter effects, are outlined. The choice of leptons to carry the new force is ambiguous, resulting in additional phenomenological implications, such as non-universality in semileptonic bottom decays. The proposed framework provides interesting connections between neutrino oscillations, flavor and collider physics.

  3. Charge Separation in Intermixed Polymer:PC70BM Photovoltaic Blends: Correlating Structural and Photophysical Length Scales as a Function of Blend Composition

    KAUST Repository

    Utzat, Hendrik

    2017-04-24

    A key challenge in achieving control over photocurrent generation by bulk-heterojunction organic solar cells is understanding how the morphology of the active layer impacts charge separation and in particular the separation dynamics within molecularly intermixed donor-acceptor domains versus the dynamics between phase-segregated domains. This paper addresses this issue by studying blends and devices of the amorphous silicon-indacenodithiophene polymer SiIDT-DTBT and the acceptor PCBM. By changing the blend composition, we modulate the size and density of the pure and intermixed domains on the nanometer length scale. Laser spectroscopic studies show that these changes in morphology correlate quantitatively with the changes in charge separation dynamics on the nanosecond time scale and with device photocurrent densities. At low fullerene compositions, where only a single, molecularly intermixed polymer-fullerene phase is observed, photoexcitation results in a ∼ 30% charge loss from geminate polaron pair recombination, which is further studied via light intensity experiments showing that the radius of the polaron pairs in the intermixed phase is 3-5 nm. At high fullerene compositions (≥67%), where the intermixed domains are 1-3 nm and the pure fullerene phases reach ∼4 nm, the geminate recombination is suppressed by the reduction of the intermixed phase, making the fullerene domains accessible for electron escape.

  4. A study of small-scale foliation in lengths of core enclosing fault zones in borehole WD-3, Permit Area D, Lac du Bonnet Batholith

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ejeckam, R.B.

    1992-12-01

    Small-scale foliation measurements in lengths of core from borehole WD-3 of Permit Area D of the Lac du Bonnet Batholith have defined five major mean orientation sets. They strike NW, N and NE. The orientations (strike to the left of the dip direction/dip) of these sets are as follows: Set I - 028/74 deg; II - 001/66 deg; III - 100/58 deg; IV - 076/83 deg; and V - 210/40 deg. The small-scale foliations were defined by different mineral types such as biotite crystals, plagioclase, mineral banding and quartz lenses. Well-developed biotite foliation is commonly present whenever well-developed plagioclase foliation exists, but as the strength of development weakens, the preferred orientations of plagioclase foliation do not correspond to those of biotite. It is also noted that the foliations appear to strike in directions orthogonal to the fractures in the fracture zones in the same depth interval. No significant change in foliation orientation was observed in Zones I to IV. Set V, however, whose mean orientation is 210/40 deg, is absent from the Zone IV interval, ranging from 872 to 905 m. (auth)

  5. [Unfolding item response model using best-worst scaling].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikehara, Kazuya

    2015-02-01

    In attitude measurement and sensory tests, the unfolding model is typically used. In this model, response probability is formulated by the distance between the person and the stimulus. In this study, we proposed an unfolding item response model using best-worst scaling (BWU model), in which a person chooses the best and worst stimulus among repeatedly presented subsets of stimuli. We also formulated an unfolding model using best scaling (BU model), and compared the accuracy of estimates between the BU and BWU models. A simulation experiment showed that the BWU modell performed much better than the BU model in terms of bias and root mean square errors of estimates. With reference to Usami (2011), the proposed models were apllied to actual data to measure attitudes toward tardiness. Results indicated high similarity between stimuli estimates generated with the proposed models and those of Usami (2011).

  6. The accuracy of three-dimensional fused deposition modeling (FDM) compared with three-dimensional CT-Scans on the measurement of the mandibular ramus vertical length, gonion-menton length, and gonial angle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savitri, I. T.; Badri, C.; Sulistyani, L. D.

    2017-08-01

    Presurgical treatment planning plays an important role in the reconstruction and correction of defects in the craniomaxillofacial region. The advance of solid freeform fabrication techniques has significantly improved the process of preparing a biomodel using computer-aided design and data from medical imaging. Many factors are implicated in the accuracy of the 3D model. To determine the accuracy of three-dimensional fused deposition modeling (FDM) models compared with three-dimensional CT scans in the measurement of the mandibular ramus vertical length, gonion-menton length, and gonial angle. Eight 3D models were produced from the CT scan data (DICOM file) of eight patients at the Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Faculty of Dentistry, University of Indonesia, Cipto Mangunkusumo Hospital. Three measurements were done three times by two examiners. The measurements of the 3D CT scans were made using OsiriX software, while the measurements of the 3D models were made using a digital caliper and goniometry. The measurement results were then compared. There is no significant difference between the measurements of the mandibular ramus vertical length, gonion-menton length, and gonial angle using 3D CT scans and FDM 3D models. FDM 3D models are considered accurate and are acceptable for clinical applications in dental and craniomaxillofacial surgery.

  7. Mathematical model of fructan biosynthesis and polymer length distribution in plants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Gitte Susanne; Thornley, John H. M.; Parsons, Anthony J.

    2013-01-01

    Background and Aims There are many unresolved issues concerning the biochemistry of fructan biosynthesis. The aim of this paper is to address some of these by means of modelling mathematically the biochemical processes.Methods A model has been constructed for the step-by-step synthesis of fructan...... adjustments.Conclusions Mathematical modelling of fructan biosynthesis can provide a useful tool for helping elucidate the details of the biosynthetic processes....

  8. MOUNTAIN-SCALE COUPLED PROCESSES (TH/THC/THM) MODELS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Y.S. Wu

    2005-01-01

    This report documents the development and validation of the mountain-scale thermal-hydrologic (TH), thermal-hydrologic-chemical (THC), and thermal-hydrologic-mechanical (THM) models. These models provide technical support for screening of features, events, and processes (FEPs) related to the effects of coupled TH/THC/THM processes on mountain-scale unsaturated zone (UZ) and saturated zone (SZ) flow at Yucca Mountain, Nevada (BSC 2005 [DIRS 174842], Section 2.1.1.1). The purpose and validation criteria for these models are specified in ''Technical Work Plan for: Near-Field Environment and Transport: Coupled Processes (Mountain-Scale TH/THC/THM, Drift-Scale THC Seepage, and Drift-Scale Abstraction) Model Report Integration'' (BSC 2005 [DIRS 174842]). Model results are used to support exclusion of certain FEPs from the total system performance assessment for the license application (TSPA-LA) model on the basis of low consequence, consistent with the requirements of 10 CFR 63.342 [DIRS 173273]. Outputs from this report are not direct feeds to the TSPA-LA. All the FEPs related to the effects of coupled TH/THC/THM processes on mountain-scale UZ and SZ flow are discussed in Sections 6 and 7 of this report. The mountain-scale coupled TH/THC/THM processes models numerically simulate the impact of nuclear waste heat release on the natural hydrogeological system, including a representation of heat-driven processes occurring in the far field. The mountain-scale TH simulations provide predictions for thermally affected liquid saturation, gas- and liquid-phase fluxes, and water and rock temperature (together called the flow fields). The main focus of the TH model is to predict the changes in water flux driven by evaporation/condensation processes, and drainage between drifts. The TH model captures mountain-scale three-dimensional flow effects, including lateral diversion and mountain-scale flow patterns. The mountain-scale THC model evaluates TH effects on water and gas

  9. MOUNTAIN-SCALE COUPLED PROCESSES (TH/THC/THM)MODELS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Y.S. Wu

    2005-08-24

    This report documents the development and validation of the mountain-scale thermal-hydrologic (TH), thermal-hydrologic-chemical (THC), and thermal-hydrologic-mechanical (THM) models. These models provide technical support for screening of features, events, and processes (FEPs) related to the effects of coupled TH/THC/THM processes on mountain-scale unsaturated zone (UZ) and saturated zone (SZ) flow at Yucca Mountain, Nevada (BSC 2005 [DIRS 174842], Section 2.1.1.1). The purpose and validation criteria for these models are specified in ''Technical Work Plan for: Near-Field Environment and Transport: Coupled Processes (Mountain-Scale TH/THC/THM, Drift-Scale THC Seepage, and Drift-Scale Abstraction) Model Report Integration'' (BSC 2005 [DIRS 174842]). Model results are used to support exclusion of certain FEPs from the total system performance assessment for the license application (TSPA-LA) model on the basis of low consequence, consistent with the requirements of 10 CFR 63.342 [DIRS 173273]. Outputs from this report are not direct feeds to the TSPA-LA. All the FEPs related to the effects of coupled TH/THC/THM processes on mountain-scale UZ and SZ flow are discussed in Sections 6 and 7 of this report. The mountain-scale coupled TH/THC/THM processes models numerically simulate the impact of nuclear waste heat release on the natural hydrogeological system, including a representation of heat-driven processes occurring in the far field. The mountain-scale TH simulations provide predictions for thermally affected liquid saturation, gas- and liquid-phase fluxes, and water and rock temperature (together called the flow fields). The main focus of the TH model is to predict the changes in water flux driven by evaporation/condensation processes, and drainage between drifts. The TH model captures mountain-scale three-dimensional flow effects, including lateral diversion and mountain-scale flow patterns. The mountain-scale THC model evaluates TH effects on

  10. Holonic Modelling of Large Scale Geographic Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mekni, Mehdi; Moulin, Bernard

    In this paper, we propose a novel approach to model Virtual Geographic Environments (VGE) which uses the holonic approach as a computational geographic methodology and holarchy as organizational principle. Our approach allows to automatically build VGE using data provided by Geographic Information Systems (GIS) and enables an explicit representation of the geographic environment for Situated Multi-Agent Systems (SMAS) in which agents are situated and with which they interact. In order to take into account geometric, topologic, and semantic characteristics of the geographic environment, we propose the use of the holonic approach to build the environment holarchy. We illustrate our holonic model using two different environments: an urban environment and a natural environment.

  11. What Models and Satellites Tell Us (and Don't Tell Us) About Arctic Sea Ice Melt Season Length

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahlert, A.; Jahn, A.

    2017-12-01

    Melt season length—the difference between the sea ice melt onset date and the sea ice freeze onset date—plays an important role in the radiation balance of the Arctic and the predictability of the sea ice cover. However, there are multiple possible definitions for sea ice melt and freeze onset in climate models, and none of them exactly correspond to the remote sensing definition. Using the CESM Large Ensemble model simulations, we show how this mismatch between model and remote sensing definitions of melt and freeze onset limits the utility of melt season remote sensing data for bias detection in models. It also opens up new questions about the precise physical meaning of the melt season remote sensing data. Despite these challenges, we find that the increase in melt season length in the CESM is not as large as that derived from remote sensing data, even when we account for internal variability and different definitions. At the same time, we find that the CESM ensemble members that have the largest trend in sea ice extent over the period 1979-2014 also have the largest melt season trend, driven primarily by the trend towards later freeze onsets. This might be an indication that an underestimation of the melt season length trend is one factor contributing to the generally underestimated sea ice loss within the CESM, and potentially climate models in general.

  12. An efficient model for predicting mixing lengths in serial pumping of petroleum products

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baptista, Renan Martins [PETROBRAS S.A., Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Centro de Pesquisas. Div. de Explotacao]. E-mail: renan@cenpes.petrobras.com.br; Rachid, Felipe Bastos de Freitas [Universidade Federal Fluminense, Niteroi, RJ (Brazil). Dept. de Engenharia Mecanica]. E-mail: rachid@mec.uff.br; Araujo, Jose Henrique Carneiro de [Universidade Federal Fluminense, Niteroi, RJ (Brazil). Dept. de Ciencia da Computacao]. E-mail: jhca@dcc.ic.uff.br

    2000-07-01

    This paper presents a new model for estimating mixing volumes which arises in batching transfers in multi product pipelines. The novel features of the model are the incorporation of the flow rate variation with time and the use of a more precise effective dispersion coefficient, which is considered to depend on the concentration. The governing equation of the model forms a non linear initial value problem that is solved by using a predictor corrector finite difference method. A comparison among the theoretical predictions of the proposed model, a field test and other classical procedures show that it exhibits the best estimate over the whole range of admissible concentrations investigated. (author)

  13. Sensitivities in global scale modeling of isoprene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. von Kuhlmann

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available A sensitivity study of the treatment of isoprene and related parameters in 3D atmospheric models was conducted using the global model of tropospheric chemistry MATCH-MPIC. A total of twelve sensitivity scenarios which can be grouped into four thematic categories were performed. These four categories consist of simulations with different chemical mechanisms, different assumptions concerning the deposition characteristics of intermediate products, assumptions concerning the nitrates from the oxidation of isoprene and variations of the source strengths. The largest differences in ozone compared to the reference simulation occured when a different isoprene oxidation scheme was used (up to 30-60% or about 10 nmol/mol. The largest differences in the abundance of peroxyacetylnitrate (PAN were found when the isoprene emission strength was reduced by 50% and in tests with increased or decreased efficiency of the deposition of intermediates. The deposition assumptions were also found to have a significant effect on the upper tropospheric HOx production. Different implicit assumptions about the loss of intermediate products were identified as a major reason for the deviations among the tested isoprene oxidation schemes. The total tropospheric burden of O3 calculated in the sensitivity runs is increased compared to the background methane chemistry by 26±9  Tg( O3 from 273 to an average from the sensitivity runs of 299 Tg(O3. % revised Thus, there is a spread of ± 35% of the overall effect of isoprene in the model among the tested scenarios. This range of uncertainty and the much larger local deviations found in the test runs suggest that the treatment of isoprene in global models can only be seen as a first order estimate at present, and points towards specific processes in need of focused future work.

  14. Anomalous scaling in an age-dependent branching model

    OpenAIRE

    Keller-Schmidt, Stephanie; Tugrul, Murat; Eguíluz, Víctor M.; Hernández-García, Emilio; Klemm, Konstantin

    2015-01-01

    We introduce a one-parametric family of tree growth models, in which branching probabilities decrease with branch age $\\tau$ as $\\tau^{-\\alpha}$. Depending on the exponent $\\alpha$, the scaling of tree depth with tree size $n$ displays a transition between the logarithmic scaling of random trees and an algebraic growth. At the transition ($\\alpha=1$) tree depth grows as $(\\log n)^2$. This anomalous scaling is in good agreement with the trend observed in evolution of biological species, thus p...

  15. Saturation Concentrations of Suspended Fine Sediment : Computations with the Prandtl Mixing-Length Model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kranenburg, C.

    1998-01-01

    Adopting a 1DV numerical model including the standard k-eps turbulence model, Winterwerp et al. (1999) calculated a saturation concentration for an initially uniform distribution of fine sediment concentration in steady flow. At concentrations exceeding the saturation concentration the concentration

  16. Mechanical model of the recovery reaction from stumbling: effect of step length on trunk control

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Forner-Cordero, A.; Koopman, Hubertus F.J.M.; van der Helm, F.C.T.

    2014-01-01

    Falling after a gait perturbation is a major problem for elderly people. The goal of this paper is to model some mechanical limitations of the recovery strategies performed after a trip or stumble, such as elevating or lowering strategies. A biomechanical model of the recovery was used to interpret

  17. The force-length relationship of a muscle-tendon complex : experimental results and model calculations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bobbert, Maarten F.; Ettema, Gertjan C.; Huijing, Peter A.

    1990-01-01

    Models are useful when studying how architectural and physiological properties of muscle-tendon complexes are related to function, because they allow for the simulation of the behaviour of such complexes during natural movements. In the construction of these models, evaluation of their accuracy is

  18. Micro-Scale Experiments and Models for Composite Materials with Materials Research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zike, Sanita

    resin used in polymer/fibre composites for wind turbine blades combining experimental, numerical, and analytical approaches. Experimentally, in order to mimic the stress state created by a void in a bulk material, test samples with finite root radii were made and subjected to a double cantilever beam......Numerical models are frequently implemented to study micro-mechanical processes in polymer/fibre composites. To ensure that these models are accurate, the length scale dependent properties of the fibre and polymer matrix have to be taken into account. Most often this is not the case, and material...... on polymer and polymer/composite materials....

  19. Small-scale models of multiring basins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allemand, Pascal; Thomas, Pierre

    1999-07-01

    Small-scale sand-silicone simulations of multiring impact structures have been undertaken in order to understand the effects of the rheology of the lithosphere on the variability of natural multiring structures. For low sand-silicone thickness ratio (1:3), brittle strain is accommodated by spiral strike-slip faults. For higher sand-silicone ratios (1:1 or 2:1), an inner concentric ring affected by strike-slip faults is relayed by an external ring affected by concentric normal faults. The diameter of the inner ring decreases with the increase of the sand-silicone thickness ratio. It is suggested that the flexure of the brittle layer due to the silicone flow is responsible for the brittle strain field which is enhanced by the channel flow of the lower crust. The characteristic geometry of the intersection of conjugated strike-slip faults can be observed around large multiring basins on silicate crust such as Orientale on the Moon and on icy crust, such as Valhalla on Callisto and Gilgamesh on Ganymede. The strain field around these large craters is discussed in terms of mechanical properties of the lithospheres. On the Moon, large craters without relaxation faults, such as Imbrium are located on thin crust regions. The crust was too thin to have a ductile lower layer at the time of impact. Gilgamesh on Ganymede is surrounded mainly by strike-slip faults. Asgard on Callisto has the same diameter as Gilgamesh but is surrounded by concentric normal faults. The brittle-ductile thickness ratio is thus higher on Callisto than on Ganymede.

  20. Dynamic Response Modeling of Materials Structured at the Grain-Scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Bradley

    2017-06-01

    Advanced manufacturing methods have given researchers additional control over the creation of complex structures, at the sub-millimeter length scale, for use in inert and energetic material applications. While the dynamic behavior and reactivity in energetic materials are typically dictated by their stochastic microstructures and formulation (particle size, constituents, weight percentages), the added benefits resulting from advanced manufacturing techniques are not entirely known. Through modeling we are examining the effects of material architecture on the shock and detonation wave dynamics in energetic materials using modeling at the continuum and grain scales. Wave interactions between different energetic materials and energetic with inert materials are of interest, as well as length scale dependencies due to local architecture and composition. This work will give insight into correlating mixing and behavior at the grain-scale level to the continuum level response. This work was performed under the auspices of the United States Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  1. Scaling Properties of a Hybrid Fermi-Ulam-Bouncer Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diego F. M. Oliveira

    2009-01-01

    under the framework of scaling description. The model is described by using a two-dimensional nonlinear area preserving mapping. Our results show that the chaotic regime below the lowest energy invariant spanning curve is scaling invariant and the obtained critical exponents are used to find a universal plot for the second momenta of the average velocity.

  2. Fractal Modeling and Scaling in Natural Systems - Editorial

    Science.gov (United States)

    The special issue of Ecological complexity journal on Fractal Modeling and Scaling in Natural Systems contains representative examples of the status and evolution of data-driven research into fractals and scaling in complex natural systems. The editorial discusses contributions to understanding rela...

  3. Advances in Modelling of Large Scale Coastal Evolution

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stive, M.J.F.; De Vriend, H.J.

    1995-01-01

    The attention for climate change impact on the world's coastlines has established large scale coastal evolution as a topic of wide interest. Some more recent advances in this field, focusing on the potential of mathematical models for the prediction of large scale coastal evolution, are discussed.

  4. Reference Priors for the General Location-Scale Model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fernández, C.; Steel, M.F.J.

    1997-01-01

    The reference prior algorithm (Berger and Bernardo 1992) is applied to multivariate location-scale models with any regular sampling density, where we establish the irrelevance of the usual assumption of Normal sampling if our interest is in either the location or the scale. This result immediately

  5. Atomic scale simulations for improved CRUD and fuel performance modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andersson, Anders David Ragnar [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Cooper, Michael William Donald [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-01-06

    A more mechanistic description of fuel performance codes can be achieved by deriving models and parameters from atomistic scale simulations rather than fitting models empirically to experimental data. The same argument applies to modeling deposition of corrosion products on fuel rods (CRUD). Here are some results from publications in 2016 carried out using the CASL allocation at LANL.

  6. Meso-scale modeling of a forested landscape

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dellwik, Ebba; Arnqvist, Johan; Bergström, Hans

    2014-01-01

    Meso-scale models are increasingly used for estimating wind resources for wind turbine siting. In this study, we investigate how the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model performs using standard model settings in two different planetary boundary layer schemes for a forested landscape and how...

  7. Evolutionary Models of Red Supergiants: Evidence for A Metallicity-dependent Mixing Length and Implications for Type IIP Supernova Progenitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chun, Sang-Hyun; Yoon, Sung-Chul; Jung, Moo-Keon; Kim, Dong Uk; Kim, Jihoon

    2018-01-01

    Recent studies on the temperatures of red supergiants (RSGs) in the local universe provide us with an excellent observational constraint on RSG models. We calibrate the mixing length parameter by comparing model predictions with the empirical RSG temperatures in Small and Large Magellanic Clouds, Milky Way, and M31, which are inferred from the TiO band and the spectral energy distribution (SED). Although our RSG models are computed with the MESA code, our result may be applied to other stellar evolution codes, including the BEC and TWIN codes. We find evidence that the mixing length increases with increasing metallicity for both cases where the TiO and SED temperatures of RSGs are used for the calibration. Together with the recent finding of a similar correlation in low-mass red giants by Tayar et al., this implies that the metallicity dependence of the mixing length is a universal feature in post-main sequence stars of both low and high masses. Our result implies that typical Type IIP supernova (SN IIP) progenitors with initial masses of ∼ 10{--}16 {M}ȯ have a radius range of 400 {R}ȯ ≲ R≲ 800 {R}ȯ regardless of metallicity. As an auxiliary result of this study, we find that the hydrogen-rich envelope mass of SN IIP progenitors for a given initial mass is predicted to be largely independent of metallicity if the Ledoux criterion with slow semiconvection is adopted, while the Schwarzschild models predict systematically more massive hydrogen-rich envelopes for lower metallicity.

  8. Dynamic Carbohydrate Supply and Demand Model of Vegetative Growth: Response to Temperature, Light, Carbon Dioxide, and Day Length

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin P. N. Gent

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Predicting the growth response of seedlings from the environmental responses of photosynthesis and metabolism may be improved by considering the dynamics of non-structural carbohydrate (NSC over a diurnal cycle. Attenuation of growth metabolism when NSC content is low could explain why some NSC is conserved through the night. A dynamic model, incorporating diurnal variation in NSC, is developed to simulate growth of seedlings hour-by-hour. I compare predictions of this model to published growth and NSC data for seedlings that varied according to temperature, light, day length, or CO2. Prolonged-darkness experiments show a temperature dependent upper limit on the respiration capacity. Respiration is attenuated as NSC is depleted. Furthermore, when NSC is high at dawn, inhibition of photosynthesis could attenuate the accumulation of NSC under low temperature, high light, or high CO2. These concepts are used to simulate plant metabolism and growth rates and diurnal variation of NSC in tomato seedlings under two light levels and various temperatures. Comparison of other results using the same model parameters show the dynamic model could predict results for starch and starch-less plants, and when growth was affected by CO2 enrichment and day length.

  9. Acoustic Scattering by Axisymmetric Finite-Length Bodies with Application to Fish: Measurement and Modeling

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Reeder, D

    2002-01-01

    ... laboratory acoustic measurements. A general acoustic scattering model is developed that is accurate and numerically efficient for a wide range of frequencies, angles of orientation, irregular axisymmetric shapes and boundary...

  10. Model and Full Scale Predictions of a Carrier Flow Field

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Gorski, Joseph

    2002-01-01

    .... These calculations are for a bare hull with skeg, bilge keels and outboard propeller shaft. The calculations indicate there are extensive differences between the model and full scale wakes entering the propeller disks...

  11. Genome-scale biological models for industrial microbial systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Nan; Ye, Chao; Liu, Liming

    2018-04-01

    The primary aims and challenges associated with microbial fermentation include achieving faster cell growth, higher productivity, and more robust production processes. Genome-scale biological models, predicting the formation of an interaction among genetic materials, enzymes, and metabolites, constitute a systematic and comprehensive platform to analyze and optimize the microbial growth and production of biological products. Genome-scale biological models can help optimize microbial growth-associated traits by simulating biomass formation, predicting growth rates, and identifying the requirements for cell growth. With regard to microbial product biosynthesis, genome-scale biological models can be used to design product biosynthetic pathways, accelerate production efficiency, and reduce metabolic side effects, leading to improved production performance. The present review discusses the development of microbial genome-scale biological models since their emergence and emphasizes their pertinent application in improving industrial microbial fermentation of biological products.

  12. Periodic Solutions for a Delayed Population Model on Time Scales

    OpenAIRE

    Kejun Zhuang; Zhaohui Wen

    2010-01-01

    This paper deals with a delayed single population model on time scales. With the assistance of coincidence degree theory, sufficient conditions for existence of periodic solutions are obtained. Furthermore, the better estimations for bounds of periodic solutions are established.

  13. Calibration of the Site-Scale Saturated Zone Flow Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    G. A. Zyvoloski

    2001-06-28

    The purpose of the flow calibration analysis work is to provide Performance Assessment (PA) with the calibrated site-scale saturated zone (SZ) flow model that will be used to make radionuclide transport calculations. As such, it is one of the most important models developed in the Yucca Mountain project. This model will be a culmination of much of our knowledge of the SZ flow system. The objective of this study is to provide a defensible site-scale SZ flow and transport model that can be used for assessing total system performance. A defensible model would include geologic and hydrologic data that are used to form the hydrogeologic framework model; also, it would include hydrochemical information to infer transport pathways, in-situ permeability measurements, and water level and head measurements. In addition, the model should include information on major model sensitivities. Especially important are those that affect calibration, the direction of transport pathways, and travel times. Finally, if warranted, alternative calibrations representing different conceptual models should be included. To obtain a defensible model, all available data should be used (or at least considered) to obtain a calibrated model. The site-scale SZ model was calibrated using measured and model-generated water levels and hydraulic head data, specific discharge calculations, and flux comparisons along several of the boundaries. Model validity was established by comparing model-generated permeabilities with the permeability data from field and laboratory tests; by comparing fluid pathlines obtained from the SZ flow model with those inferred from hydrochemical data; and by comparing the upward gradient generated with the model with that observed in the field. This analysis is governed by the Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM) Analysis and Modeling Report (AMR) Development Plan ''Calibration of the Site-Scale Saturated Zone Flow Model'' (CRWMS M&O 1999

  14. Calibration of the Site-Scale Saturated Zone Flow Model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zyvoloski, G. A.

    2001-01-01

    The purpose of the flow calibration analysis work is to provide Performance Assessment (PA) with the calibrated site-scale saturated zone (SZ) flow model that will be used to make radionuclide transport calculations. As such, it is one of the most important models developed in the Yucca Mountain project. This model will be a culmination of much of our knowledge of the SZ flow system. The objective of this study is to provide a defensible site-scale SZ flow and transport model that can be used for assessing total system performance. A defensible model would include geologic and hydrologic data that are used to form the hydrogeologic framework model; also, it would include hydrochemical information to infer transport pathways, in-situ permeability measurements, and water level and head measurements. In addition, the model should include information on major model sensitivities. Especially important are those that affect calibration, the direction of transport pathways, and travel times. Finally, if warranted, alternative calibrations representing different conceptual models should be included. To obtain a defensible model, all available data should be used (or at least considered) to obtain a calibrated model. The site-scale SZ model was calibrated using measured and model-generated water levels and hydraulic head data, specific discharge calculations, and flux comparisons along several of the boundaries. Model validity was established by comparing model-generated permeabilities with the permeability data from field and laboratory tests; by comparing fluid pathlines obtained from the SZ flow model with those inferred from hydrochemical data; and by comparing the upward gradient generated with the model with that observed in the field. This analysis is governed by the Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM) Analysis and Modeling Report (AMR) Development Plan ''Calibration of the Site-Scale Saturated Zone Flow Model'' (CRWMS M and O 1999a)

  15. Mechanistically-Based Field-Scale Models of Uranium Biogeochemistry from Upscaling Pore-Scale Experiments and Models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tim Scheibe; Alexandre Tartakovsky; Brian Wood; Joe Seymour

    2007-01-01

    Effective environmental management of DOE sites requires reliable prediction of reactive transport phenomena. A central issue in prediction of subsurface reactive transport is the impact of multiscale physical, chemical, and biological heterogeneity. Heterogeneity manifests itself through incomplete mixing of reactants at scales below those at which concentrations are explicitly defined (i.e., the numerical grid scale). This results in a mismatch between simulated reaction processes (formulated in terms of average concentrations) and actual processes (controlled by local concentrations). At the field scale, this results in apparent scale-dependence of model parameters and inability to utilize laboratory parameters in field models. Accordingly, most field modeling efforts are restricted to empirical estimation of model parameters by fitting to field observations, which renders extrapolation of model predictions beyond fitted conditions unreliable. The objective of this project is to develop a theoretical and computational framework for (1) connecting models of coupled reactive transport from pore-scale processes to field-scale bioremediation through a hierarchy of models that maintain crucial information from the smaller scales at the larger scales; and (2) quantifying the uncertainty that is introduced by both the upscaling process and uncertainty in physical parameters. One of the challenges of addressing scale-dependent effects of coupled processes in heterogeneous porous media is the problem-specificity of solutions. Much effort has been aimed at developing generalized scaling laws or theories, but these require restrictive assumptions that render them ineffective in many real problems. We propose instead an approach that applies physical and numerical experiments at small scales (specifically the pore scale) to a selected model system in order to identify the scaling approach appropriate to that type of problem. Although the results of such studies will

  16. Scour around Support Structures of Scaled Model Marine Hydrokinetic Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volpe, M. A.; Beninati, M. L.; Krane, M.; Fontaine, A.

    2013-12-01

    Experiments are presented to explore scour due to flows around support structures of marine hydrokinetic (MHK) devices. Three related studies were performed to understand how submergence, scour condition, and the presence of an MHK device impact scour around the support structure (cylinder). The first study focuses on clear-water scour conditions for a cylinder of varying submergence: surface-piercing and fully submerged. The second study centers on three separate scour conditions (clear-water, transitional and live-bed) around the fully submerged cylinder. Lastly, the third study emphasizes the impact of an MHK turbine on scour around the support structure, in live-bed conditions. Small-scale laboratory testing of model devices can be used to help predict the behavior of MHK devices at full-scale. Extensive studies have been performed on single cylinders, modeling bridge piers, though few have focused on fully submerged structures. Many of the devices being used to harness marine hydrokinetic energy are fully submerged in the flow. Additionally, scour hole dimensions and scour rates have not been addressed. Thus, these three studies address the effect of structure blockage/drag, and the ambient scour conditions on scour around the support structure. The experiments were performed in the small-scale testing platform in the hydraulic flume facility (9.8 m long, 1.2 m wide and 0.4 m deep) at Bucknell University. The support structure diameter (D = 2.54 cm) was held constant for all tests. The submerged cylinder (l/D = 5) and sediment size (d50 = 790 microns) were held constant for all three studies. The MHK device (Dturbine = 10.2 cm) is a two-bladed horizontal axis turbine and the rotating shaft is friction-loaded using a metal brush motor. For each study, bed form topology was measured after a three-hour time interval using a traversing two-dimensional bed profiler. During the experiments, scour hole depth measurements at the front face of the support structure

  17. From Multi-Porosity to Multiple-Scale Permeability Models of Natural Fractured Media

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Dreuzy, J. R.; Davy, P.; Meheust, Y.; Bour, O.

    2014-12-01

    Classical dual-porosity models and homogenization approaches fail to represent the permeability scaling, the high flow channeling and the broad variability observed in natural fractured media. More critically, most modeling frameworks cannot restitute simultaneously the permeability increase with scale and the persistence of channeling. In fact, channeling enhances the impact of bottlenecks, reduces permeability, and increases permeability variability with scale. It is the case of percolation theory but also of more advanced large-range correlated theories including power-law scaling of some of the fracture properties including their length or their mutual distances. More generally, we show with extensive numerical studies on 3D Discrete Fracture Networks (DFNs) that hydraulic behaviors come from a number of local and global fracture characteristics. The concept of effective properties like effective permeability itself appears quite weak and should be replaced by new modeling frameworks. We propose three alternative approaches combining the specificies of fracture flow and transport of DFNs and the simplicity of continuum approaches: 1- Discrete dual porosity media for high flow localization in a subset of the fracture network. 2- Structured Interacting Continua for highly organized diffusive processes in poorly connected fracture structures. 3- Multiple-scale permeability models for hierarchically structured fractured media with 3D concurrent fracture percolating networks. These different approaches can be combined and specified with a limited number of parameters. They are also efficient in representing the potentially large hydraulic impact of minor modification of the fracture network geometry and local connectivity.

  18. The effect of the chain length distribution of free fatty acids on the mixing properties of stratum corneum model membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oguri, Masashi; Gooris, Gert S; Bito, Kotatsu; Bouwstra, Joke A

    2014-07-01

    The stratum corneum (SC) plays a fundamental role in the barrier function of the skin. The SC consists of corneocytes embedded in a lipid matrix. The main lipid classes in the lipid matrix are ceramides (CERs), cholesterol (CHOL) and free fatty acids (FFAs). The aim of this study was to examine the effect of the chain length of FFAs on the thermotropic phase behavior and mixing properties of SC lipids. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and Raman imaging spectroscopy were used to study the mixing properties using either protonated or deuterated FFAs. We selected SC model lipid mixtures containing only a single CER, CHOL and either a single FFA or a mixture of FFAs mimicking the FFA SC composition. The single CER consists of a sphingoid base with 18 carbon atoms and an acyl chain with a chain length of 24 carbon atoms. When using lignoceric acid (24 carbon atoms) or a mixture of FFAs, the CER and FFAs participated in mixed crystals, but hydration of the mixtures induced a slight phase separation between CER and FFA. The mixed crystalline structures did not phase separate during storage even up to a time period of 3months. When using palmitic acid (16 carbon atoms), a slight phase separation was observed between FFA and CER. This phase separation was clearly enhanced during hydration and storage. In conclusion, the thermotropic phase behavior and the mixing properties of the SC lipid mixtures were shown to strongly depend on the chain length and chain length distribution of FFAs, while hydration enhanced the phase separation. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Impact of time-domain IP pulse length on measured data and inverted models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsson, P. I.; Fiandaca, G.; Dahlin, T.

    2015-01-01

    The duration of time domain (TD) induced polarization (IP) current injections has significant impact on the acquired IP data as well as on the inversion models, if the standard evaluation procedure is followed. However, it is still possible to retrieve similar inversion models if the waveform...... of the injected current and the IP response waveform are included in the inversion. The on-time also generally affects the signal-tonoise ratio (SNR) where an increased on-time gives higher SNR for the IP data....

  20. [Modeling continuous scaling of NDVI based on fractal theory].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luan, Hai-Jun; Tian, Qing-Jiu; Yu, Tao; Hu, Xin-Li; Huang, Yan; Du, Ling-Tong; Zhao, Li-Min; Wei, Xi; Han, Jie; Zhang, Zhou-Wei; Li, Shao-Peng

    2013-07-01

    Scale effect was one of the very important scientific problems of remote sensing. The scale effect of quantitative remote sensing can be used to study retrievals' relationship between different-resolution images, and its research became an effective way to confront the challenges, such as validation of quantitative remote sensing products et al. Traditional up-scaling methods cannot describe scale changing features of retrievals on entire series of scales; meanwhile, they are faced with serious parameters correction issues because of imaging parameters' variation of different sensors, such as geometrical correction, spectral correction, etc. Utilizing single sensor image, fractal methodology was utilized to solve these problems. Taking NDVI (computed by land surface radiance) as example and based on Enhanced Thematic Mapper Plus (ETM+) image, a scheme was proposed to model continuous scaling of retrievals. Then the experimental results indicated that: (a) For NDVI, scale effect existed, and it could be described by fractal model of continuous scaling; (2) The fractal method was suitable for validation of NDVI. All of these proved that fractal was an effective methodology of studying scaling of quantitative remote sensing.

  1. Ecohydrological modeling for large-scale environmental impact assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woznicki, Sean A; Nejadhashemi, A Pouyan; Abouali, Mohammad; Herman, Matthew R; Esfahanian, Elaheh; Hamaamin, Yaseen A; Zhang, Zhen

    2016-02-01

    Ecohydrological models are frequently used to assess the biological integrity of unsampled streams. These models vary in complexity and scale, and their utility depends on their final application. Tradeoffs are usually made in model scale, where large-scale models are useful for determining broad impacts of human activities on biological conditions, and regional-scale (e.g. watershed or ecoregion) models provide stakeholders greater detail at the individual stream reach level. Given these tradeoffs, the objective of this study was to develop large-scale stream health models with reach level accuracy similar to regional-scale models thereby allowing for impacts assessments and improved decision-making capabilities. To accomplish this, four measures of biological integrity (Ephemeroptera, Plecoptera, and Trichoptera taxa (EPT), Family Index of Biotic Integrity (FIBI), Hilsenhoff Biotic Index (HBI), and fish Index of Biotic Integrity (IBI)) were modeled based on four thermal classes (cold, cold-transitional, cool, and warm) of streams that broadly dictate the distribution of aquatic biota in Michigan. The Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT) was used to simulate streamflow and water quality in seven watersheds and the Hydrologic Index Tool was used to calculate 171 ecologically relevant flow regime variables. Unique variables were selected for each thermal class using a Bayesian variable selection method. The variables were then used in development of adaptive neuro-fuzzy inference systems (ANFIS) models of EPT, FIBI, HBI, and IBI. ANFIS model accuracy improved when accounting for stream thermal class rather than developing a global model. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Fundamental length

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pradhan, T.

    1975-01-01

    The concept of fundamental length was first put forward by Heisenberg from purely dimensional reasons. From a study of the observed masses of the elementary particles known at that time, it is sumrised that this length should be of the order of magnitude 1 approximately 10 -13 cm. It was Heisenberg's belief that introduction of such a fundamental length would eliminate the divergence difficulties from relativistic quantum field theory by cutting off the high energy regions of the 'proper fields'. Since the divergence difficulties arise primarily due to infinite number of degrees of freedom, one simple remedy would be the introduction of a principle that limits these degrees of freedom by removing the effectiveness of the waves with a frequency exceeding a certain limit without destroying the relativistic invariance of the theory. The principle can be stated as follows: It is in principle impossible to invent an experiment of any kind that will permit a distintion between the positions of two particles at rest, the distance between which is below a certain limit. A more elegant way of introducing fundamental length into quantum theory is through commutation relations between two position operators. In quantum field theory such as quantum electrodynamics, it can be introduced through the commutation relation between two interpolating photon fields (vector potentials). (K.B.)

  3. Large-scale analysis of full-length cDNAs from the tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) cultivar Micro-Tom, a reference system for the Solanaceae genomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aoki, Koh; Yano, Kentaro; Suzuki, Ayako; Kawamura, Shingo; Sakurai, Nozomu; Suda, Kunihiro; Kurabayashi, Atsushi; Suzuki, Tatsuya; Tsugane, Taneaki; Watanabe, Manabu; Ooga, Kazuhide; Torii, Maiko; Narita, Takanori; Shin-I, Tadasu; Kohara, Yuji; Yamamoto, Naoki; Takahashi, Hideki; Watanabe, Yuichiro; Egusa, Mayumi; Kodama, Motoichiro; Ichinose, Yuki; Kikuchi, Mari; Fukushima, Sumire; Okabe, Akiko; Arie, Tsutomu; Sato, Yuko; Yazawa, Katsumi; Satoh, Shinobu; Omura, Toshikazu; Ezura, Hiroshi; Shibata, Daisuke

    2010-03-30

    The Solanaceae family includes several economically important vegetable crops. The tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) is regarded as a model plant of the Solanaceae family. Recently, a number of tomato resources have been developed in parallel with the ongoing tomato genome sequencing project. In particular, a miniature cultivar, Micro-Tom, is regarded as a model system in tomato genomics, and a number of genomics resources in the Micro-Tom-background, such as ESTs and mutagenized lines, have been established by an international alliance. To accelerate the progress in tomato genomics, we developed a collection of fully-sequenced 13,227 Micro-Tom full-length cDNAs. By checking redundant sequences, coding sequences, and chimeric sequences, a set of 11,502 non-redundant full-length cDNAs (nrFLcDNAs) was generated. Analysis of untranslated regions demonstrated that tomato has longer 5'- and 3'-untranslated regions than most other plants but rice. Classification of functions of proteins predicted from the coding sequences demonstrated that nrFLcDNAs covered a broad range of functions. A comparison of nrFLcDNAs with genes of sixteen plants facilitated the identification of tomato genes that are not found in other plants, most of which did not have known protein domains. Mapping of the nrFLcDNAs onto currently available tomato genome sequences facilitated prediction of exon-intron structure. Introns of tomato genes were longer than those of Arabidopsis and rice. According to a comparison of exon sequences between the nrFLcDNAs and the tomato genome sequences, the frequency of nucleotide mismatch in exons between Micro-Tom and the genome-sequencing cultivar (Heinz 1706) was estimated to be 0.061%. The collection of Micro-Tom nrFLcDNAs generated in this study will serve as a valuable genomic tool for plant biologists to bridge the gap between basic and applied studies. The nrFLcDNA sequences will help annotation of the tomato whole-genome sequence and aid in tomato functional

  4. Toward micro-scale spatial modeling of gentrification

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Sullivan, David

    A simple preliminary model of gentrification is presented. The model is based on an irregular cellular automaton architecture drawing on the concept of proximal space, which is well suited to the spatial externalities present in housing markets at the local scale. The rent gap hypothesis on which the model's cell transition rules are based is discussed. The model's transition rules are described in detail. Practical difficulties in configuring and initializing the model are described and its typical behavior reported. Prospects for further development of the model are discussed. The current model structure, while inadequate, is well suited to further elaboration and the incorporation of other interesting and relevant effects.

  5. Nucleon electric dipole moments in high-scale supersymmetric models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hisano, Junji; Kobayashi, Daiki; Kuramoto, Wataru; Kuwahara, Takumi

    2015-01-01

    The electric dipole moments (EDMs) of electron and nucleons are promising probes of the new physics. In generic high-scale supersymmetric (SUSY) scenarios such as models based on mixture of the anomaly and gauge mediations, gluino has an additional contribution to the nucleon EDMs. In this paper, we studied the effect of the CP-violating gluon Weinberg operator induced by the gluino chromoelectric dipole moment in the high-scale SUSY scenarios, and we evaluated the nucleon and electron EDMs in the scenarios. We found that in the generic high-scale SUSY models, the nucleon EDMs may receive the sizable contribution from the Weinberg operator. Thus, it is important to compare the nucleon EDMs with the electron one in order to discriminate among the high-scale SUSY models.

  6. Model Selection and Hypothesis Testing for Large-Scale Network Models with Overlapping Groups

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tiago P. Peixoto

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The effort to understand network systems in increasing detail has resulted in a diversity of methods designed to extract their large-scale structure from data. Unfortunately, many of these methods yield diverging descriptions of the same network, making both the comparison and understanding of their results a difficult challenge. A possible solution to this outstanding issue is to shift the focus away from ad hoc methods and move towards more principled approaches based on statistical inference of generative models. As a result, we face instead the more well-defined task of selecting between competing generative processes, which can be done under a unified probabilistic framework. Here, we consider the comparison between a variety of generative models including features such as degree correction, where nodes with arbitrary degrees can belong to the same group, and community overlap, where nodes are allowed to belong to more than one group. Because such model variants possess an increasing number of parameters, they become prone to overfitting. In this work, we present a method of model selection based on the minimum description length criterion and posterior odds ratios that is capable of fully accounting for the increased degrees of freedom of the larger models and selects the best one according to the statistical evidence available in the data. In applying this method to many empirical unweighted networks from different fields, we observe that community overlap is very often not supported by statistical evidence and is selected as a better model only for a minority of them. On the other hand, we find that degree correction tends to be almost universally favored by the available data, implying that intrinsic node proprieties (as opposed to group properties are often an essential ingredient of network formation.

  7. Characteristic length scale of the magnon accumulation in Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}/Pt bilayer structures by incoherent thermal excitation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anadón, A., E-mail: anadonb@unizar.es; Lucas, I.; Morellón, L. [Instituto de Nanociencia de Aragón, Universidad de Zaragoza, E-50018 Zaragoza (Spain); Departamento de Física de la Materia Condensada, Universidad de Zaragoza, E-50009 Zaragoza (Spain); Ramos, R. [WPI Advanced Institute for Materials Research, Tohoku University, Sendai 980-8577 (Japan); Spin Quantum Rectification Project, ERATO, Japan Science and Technology Agency, Sendai 980-8577 (Japan); Algarabel, P. A. [Departamento de Física de la Materia Condensada, Universidad de Zaragoza, E-50009 Zaragoza (Spain); Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Aragón, Universidad de Zaragoza and Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Científicas, 50009 Zaragoza (Spain); Ibarra, M. R.; Aguirre, M. H. [Instituto de Nanociencia de Aragón, Universidad de Zaragoza, E-50018 Zaragoza (Spain); Departamento de Física de la Materia Condensada, Universidad de Zaragoza, E-50009 Zaragoza (Spain); Laboratorio de Microscopías avanzadas, Universidad de Zaragoza, 50018 Zaragoza (Spain)

    2016-07-04

    The dependence of Spin Seebeck effect (SSE) with the thickness of the magnetic materials is studied by means of incoherent thermal excitation. The SSE voltage signal in Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}/Pt bilayer structure increases with the magnetic material thickness up to 100 nm, approximately, showing signs of saturation for larger thickness. This dependence is well described in terms of a spin current pumped in the platinum film by the magnon accumulation in the magnetic material. The spin current is generated by a gradient of temperature in the system and detected by the Pt top contact by means of inverse spin Hall effect. Calculations in the frame of the linear response theory adjust with a high degree of accuracy the experimental data, giving a thermal length scale of the magnon accumulation (Λ) of 17 ± 3 nm at 300 K and Λ = 40 ± 10 nm at 70 K.

  8. REIONIZATION ON LARGE SCALES. I. A PARAMETRIC MODEL CONSTRUCTED FROM RADIATION-HYDRODYNAMIC SIMULATIONS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Battaglia, N.; Trac, H.; Cen, R.; Loeb, A.

    2013-01-01

    We present a new method for modeling inhomogeneous cosmic reionization on large scales. Utilizing high-resolution radiation-hydrodynamic simulations with 2048 3 dark matter particles, 2048 3 gas cells, and 17 billion adaptive rays in a L = 100 Mpc h –1 box, we show that the density and reionization redshift fields are highly correlated on large scales (∼> 1 Mpc h –1 ). This correlation can be statistically represented by a scale-dependent linear bias. We construct a parametric function for the bias, which is then used to filter any large-scale density field to derive the corresponding spatially varying reionization redshift field. The parametric model has three free parameters that can be reduced to one free parameter when we fit the two bias parameters to simulation results. We can differentiate degenerate combinations of the bias parameters by combining results for the global ionization histories and correlation length between ionized regions. Unlike previous semi-analytic models, the evolution of the reionization redshift field in our model is directly compared cell by cell against simulations and performs well in all tests. Our model maps the high-resolution, intermediate-volume radiation-hydrodynamic simulations onto lower-resolution, larger-volume N-body simulations (∼> 2 Gpc h –1 ) in order to make mock observations and theoretical predictions

  9. Modeling the effect of probe force on length measurements on polymer parts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mohammadi, Ali; Sonne, Mads Rostgaard; Dalla Costa, Giuseppe

    2016-01-01

    Measurement uncertainty at micrometer level is in the future going to be very common in dimensional measurements on polymer parts. Accurate dimensional measurement of polymer parts is becoming a key and common practice in the industry, especially when micrometer tolerances are required. When...... numerically. Both analytical and numerical approaches were compared with the experimental results. The results showed that the numerical model was able to predict the deformation of the polymer part due to different probe forces. Furthermore it was shown, that the probe force should be taking into account...... when measurement with a few micrometer accuracy should be performed on thin walled polymer parts....

  10. Description of Muzzle Blast by Modified Ideal Scaling Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kevin S. Fansler

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available Gun blast data from a large variety of weapons are scaled and presented for both the instantaneous energy release and the constant energy deposition rate models. For both ideal explosion models, similar amounts of data scatter occur for the peak overpressure but the instantaneous energy release model correlated the impulse data significantly better, particularly for the region in front of the gun. Two parameters that characterize gun blast are used in conjunction with the ideal scaling models to improve the data correlation. The gun-emptying parameter works particularly well with the instantaneous energy release model to improve data correlation. In particular, the impulse, especially in the forward direction of the gun, is correlated significantly better using the instantaneous energy release model coupled with the use of the gun-emptying parameter. The use of the Mach disc location parameter improves the correlation only marginally. A predictive model is obtained from the modified instantaneous energy release correlation.

  11. Scaling Dissolved Nutrient Removal in River Networks: A Comparative Modeling Investigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Sheng; Reisinger, Alexander J.; Tank, Jennifer L.; Baker, Michelle A.; Hall, Robert O.; Rosi, Emma J.; Sivapalan, Murugesu

    2017-11-01

    Along the river network, water, sediment, and nutrients are transported, cycled, and altered by coupled hydrological and biogeochemical processes. Our current understanding of the rates and processes controlling the cycling and removal of dissolved inorganic nutrients in river networks is limited due to a lack of empirical measurements in large, (nonwadeable), rivers. The goal of this paper was to develop a coupled hydrological and biogeochemical process model to simulate nutrient uptake at the network scale during summer base flow conditions. The model was parameterized with literature values from headwater streams, and empirical measurements made in 15 rivers with varying hydrological, biological, and topographic characteristics, to simulate nutrient uptake at the network scale. We applied the coupled model to 15 catchments describing patterns in uptake for three different solutes to determine the role of rivers in network-scale nutrient cycling. Model simulation results, constrained by empirical data, suggested that rivers contributed proportionally more to nutrient removal than headwater streams given the fraction of their length represented in a network. In addition, variability of nutrient removal patterns among catchments was varied among solutes, and as expected, was influenced by nutrient concentration and discharge. Net ammonium uptake was not significantly correlated with any environmental descriptor. In contrast, net daily nitrate removal was linked to suspended chlorophyll a (an indicator of primary producers) and land use characteristics. Finally, suspended sediment characteristics and agricultural land use were correlated with net daily removal of soluble reactive phosphorus, likely reflecting abiotic sorption dynamics. Rivers are understudied relative to streams, and our model suggests that rivers can contribute more to network-scale nutrient removal than would be expected based upon their representative fraction of network channel length.

  12. CFD modeling of two immiscible fluids mixing in a commercial scale static mixer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Abdolkarimi

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available A Computational Fluid Dynamics model based on the Eulerian formulation for multiphase flow was developed to model the mixing hydrodynamics of two immiscible fluids in a commercial scale static mixer. The two immiscible liquids were condensate and caustic solutions and were considered as two phases that are interpenetrating each other. The aim of this study was to develop a comprehensive Computational Fluid Dynamics model for predicting the impact of hydrodynamic parameters such as length, diameter and the arrangement of the corrugated plates of a static mixer on the degree of mixing and the pressure drop of the mixture. The model has been evaluated by comparing predictions of the degree of mixing and the mixture pressure drop with the same data available for the static mixer of the desulfurization plant of the Kharg petrochemical company. It has been shown that the predictions of the developed model are well adapted to the experimental data.

  13. Development of the Artistic Supervision Model Scale (ASMS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapusuzoglu, Saduman; Dilekci, Umit

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of the study is to develop the Artistic Supervision Model Scale in accordance with the perception of inspectors and the elementary and secondary school teachers on artistic supervision. The lack of a measuring instrument related to the model of artistic supervision in the field of literature reveals the necessity of such study. 290…

  14. Modelling of evapotranspiration at field and landscape scales. Abstract

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Overgaard, Jesper; Butts, M.B.; Rosbjerg, Dan

    2002-01-01

    observations from a nearby weather station. Detailed land-use and soil maps were used to set up the model. Leaf area index was derived from NDVI (Normalized Difference Vegetation Index) images. To validate the model at field scale the simulated evapotranspiration rates were compared to eddy...

  15. Appropriatie spatial scales to achieve model output uncertainty goals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Booij, Martijn J.; Melching, Charles S.; Chen, Xiaohong; Chen, Yongqin; Xia, Jun; Zhang, Hailun

    2008-01-01

    Appropriate spatial scales of hydrological variables were determined using an existing methodology based on a balance in uncertainties from model inputs and parameters extended with a criterion based on a maximum model output uncertainty. The original methodology uses different relationships between

  16. Role of scaling in the statistical modelling of finance

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. Modelling the evolution of a financial index as a stochastic process is a prob- lem awaiting a full, satisfactory solution since it was first formulated by Bachelier in 1900. Here it is shown that the scaling with time of the return probability density function sampled from the historical series suggests a successful model.

  17. Low-Level Turbulence Forecasts From Fine-Scale Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-02-01

    Obviously, it is the “big picture ” that influences the “small picture ” so additional development in model initialization and model physics will also serve...241–253. 15. Keller, J. L. Clear air turbulence as a response to meso- and synoptic -scale dynamic processes. Mon. Wea. Rev., 1990, 118, 2228–2242

  18. Role of scaling in the statistical modelling of finance

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Modelling the evolution of a financial index as a stochastic process is a problem awaiting a full, satisfactory solution since it was first formulated by Bachelier in 1900. Here it is shown that the scaling with time of the return probability density function sampled from the historical series suggests a successful model.

  19. Modeling nano-scale grain growth of intermetallics

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Administrator

    Abstract. The Monte Carlo simulation is utilized to model the nano-scale grain growth of two nano- crystalline materials, Pd81Zr19 and RuAl. In this regard, the relationship between the real time and the time unit of simulation, i.e. Monte Carlo step (MCS), is determined. The results of modeling show that with increasing time ...

  20. DEVELOPMENT OF SMALL-SCALE CONSTRUCTION ENTERPRISE PROCESS MANAGEMENT MODEL

    OpenAIRE

    E. V. Folomeev

    2012-01-01

    Process approach is one of most effective ways of managing construction companies. Resulting from using models based on this approach, the company’s structure becomes flexible enough to quickly acquire the ability to get functionally and structurally tuned for specific projects. It is demonstrated in this article how to develop a process management model mechanism for a small-scale construction company.

  1. Drift-Scale Coupled Processes (DST and THC Seepage) Models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sonnenthale, E.

    2001-01-01

    The purpose of this Analysis/Model Report (AMR) is to document the Near-Field Environment (NFE) and Unsaturated Zone (UZ) models used to evaluate the potential effects of coupled thermal-hydrologic-chemical (THC) processes on unsaturated zone flow and transport. This is in accordance with the ''Technical Work Plan (TWP) for Unsaturated Zone Flow and Transport Process Model Report'', Addendum D, Attachment D-4 (Civilian Radioactive Waste Management System (CRWMS) Management and Operating Contractor (M and O) 2000 [1534471]) and ''Technical Work Plan for Nearfield Environment Thermal Analyses and Testing'' (CRWMS M and O 2000 [153309]). These models include the Drift Scale Test (DST) THC Model and several THC seepage models. These models provide the framework to evaluate THC coupled processes at the drift scale, predict flow and transport behavior for specified thermal loading conditions, and predict the chemistry of waters and gases entering potential waste-emplacement drifts. The intended use of this AMR is to provide input for the following: Performance Assessment (PA); Near-Field Environment (NFE) PMR; Abstraction of Drift-Scale Coupled Processes AMR (ANL-NBS-HS-000029); and UZ Flow and Transport Process Model Report (PMR). The work scope for this activity is presented in the TWPs cited above, and summarized as follows: Continue development of the repository drift-scale THC seepage model used in support of the TSPA in-drift geochemical model; incorporate heterogeneous fracture property realizations; study sensitivity of results to changes in input data and mineral assemblage; validate the DST model by comparison with field data; perform simulations to predict mineral dissolution and precipitation and their effects on fracture properties and chemistry of water (but not flow rates) that may seep into drifts; submit modeling results to the TDMS and document the models. The model development, input data, sensitivity and validation studies described in this AMR are

  2. Scaling of musculoskeletal models from static and dynamic trials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, Morten Enemark; Andersen, Michael Skipper; de Zee, Mark

    2015-01-01

    three scaling methods to an inverse dynamics-based musculoskeletal model and compared predicted knee joint contact forces to those measured with an instrumented prosthesis during gait. Additionally, a Monte Carlo study was used to investigate the sensitivity of the knee joint contact force to random...... adjustments of the assumed model marker positions (+/− one marker diameter). The model based on linear scaling showed the highest variation in the knee joint contact force of 1.44 body weight (BW) around contra-lateral heel strike, and a variation in root mean square deviation (RMSD) of 0.36 BW. The proposed...

  3. Accounting for small scale heterogeneity in ecohydrologic watershed models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burke, W.; Tague, C.

    2017-12-01

    Spatially distributed ecohydrologic models are inherently constrained by the spatial resolution of their smallest units, below which land and processes are assumed to be homogenous. At coarse scales, heterogeneity is often accounted for by computing store and fluxes of interest over a distribution of land cover types (or other sources of heterogeneity) within spatially explicit modeling units. However this approach ignores spatial organization and the lateral transfer of water and materials downslope. The challenge is to account both for the role of flow network topology and fine-scale heterogeneity. We present a new approach that defines two levels of spatial aggregation and that integrates spatially explicit network approach with a flexible representation of finer-scale aspatial heterogeneity. Critically, this solution does not simply increase the resolution of the smallest spatial unit, and so by comparison, results in improved computational efficiency. The approach is demonstrated by adapting Regional Hydro-Ecologic Simulation System (RHESSys), an ecohydrologic model widely used to simulate climate, land use, and land management impacts. We illustrate the utility of our approach by showing how the model can be used to better characterize forest thinning impacts on ecohydrology. Forest thinning is typically done at the scale of individual trees, and yet management responses of interest include impacts on watershed scale hydrology and on downslope riparian vegetation. Our approach allow us to characterize the variability in tree size/carbon reduction and water transfers between neighboring trees while still capturing hillslope to watershed scale effects, Our illustrative example demonstrates that accounting for these fine scale effects can substantially alter model estimates, in some cases shifting the impacts of thinning on downslope water availability from increases to decreases. We conclude by describing other use cases that may benefit from this approach

  4. Transdisciplinary application of the cross-scale resilience model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sundstrom, Shana M.; Angeler, David G.; Garmestani, Ahjond S.; Garcia, Jorge H.; Allen, Craig R.

    2014-01-01

    The cross-scale resilience model was developed in ecology to explain the emergence of resilience from the distribution of ecological functions within and across scales, and as a tool to assess resilience. We propose that the model and the underlying discontinuity hypothesis are relevant to other complex adaptive systems, and can be used to identify and track changes in system parameters related to resilience. We explain the theory behind the cross-scale resilience model, review the cases where it has been applied to non-ecological systems, and discuss some examples of social-ecological, archaeological/ anthropological, and economic systems where a cross-scale resilience analysis could add a quantitative dimension to our current understanding of system dynamics and resilience. We argue that the scaling and diversity parameters suitable for a resilience analysis of ecological systems are appropriate for a broad suite of systems where non-normative quantitative assessments of resilience are desired. Our planet is currently characterized by fast environmental and social change, and the cross-scale resilience model has the potential to quantify resilience across many types of complex adaptive systems.

  5. Predictive modelling of survival and length of stay in critically ill patients using sequential organ failure scores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houthooft, Rein; Ruyssinck, Joeri; van der Herten, Joachim; Stijven, Sean; Couckuyt, Ivo; Gadeyne, Bram; Ongenae, Femke; Colpaert, Kirsten; Decruyenaere, Johan; Dhaene, Tom; De Turck, Filip

    2015-03-01

    The length of stay of critically ill patients in the intensive care unit (ICU) is an indication of patient ICU resource usage and varies considerably. Planning of postoperative ICU admissions is important as ICUs often have no nonoccupied beds available. Estimation of the ICU bed availability for the next coming days is entirely based on clinical judgement by intensivists and therefore too inaccurate. For this reason, predictive models have much potential for improving planning for ICU patient admission. Our goal is to develop and optimize models for patient survival and ICU length of stay (LOS) based on monitored ICU patient data. Furthermore, these models are compared on their use of sequential organ failure (SOFA) scores as well as underlying raw data as input features. Different machine learning techniques are trained, using a 14,480 patient dataset, both on SOFA scores as well as their underlying raw data values from the first five days after admission, in order to predict (i) the patient LOS, and (ii) the patient mortality. Furthermore, to help physicians in assessing the prediction credibility, a probabilistic model is tailored to the output of our best-performing model, assigning a belief to each patient status prediction. A two-by-two grid is built, using the classification outputs of the mortality and prolonged stay predictors to improve the patient LOS regression models. For predicting patient mortality and a prolonged stay, the best performing model is a support vector machine (SVM) with GA,D=65.9% (area under the curve (AUC) of 0.77) and GS,L=73.2% (AUC of 0.82). In terms of LOS regression, the best performing model is support vector regression, achieving a mean absolute error of 1.79 days and a median absolute error of 1.22 days for those patients surviving a nonprolonged stay. Using a classification grid based on the predicted patient mortality and prolonged stay, allows more accurate modeling of the patient LOS. The detailed models allow to support

  6. Multi-scale modeling for sustainable chemical production

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhuang, Kai; Bakshi, Bhavik R.; Herrgard, Markus

    2013-01-01

    associated with the development and implementation of a su stainable biochemical industry. The temporal and spatial scales of modeling approaches for sustainable chemical production vary greatly, ranging from metabolic models that aid the design of fermentative microbial strains to material and monetary flow...... and predictions at every other scale. In addition, the development of this multi-scale framework would promote cohesive collaborations across multiple traditionally disconnected modeling disciplines to achieve sustainable chemical production.......With recent advances in metabolic engineering, it is now technically possible to produce a wide portfolio of existing petrochemical products from biomass feedstock. In recent years, a number of modeling approaches have been developed to support the engineering and decision-making processes...

  7. Ionocovalency and Applications 1. Ionocovalency Model and Orbital Hybrid Scales

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yonghe Zhang

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Ionocovalency (IC, a quantitative dual nature of the atom, is defined and correlated with quantum-mechanical potential to describe quantitatively the dual properties of the bond. Orbiotal hybrid IC model scale, IC, and IC electronegativity scale, XIC, are proposed, wherein the ionicity and the covalent radius are determined by spectroscopy. Being composed of the ionic function I and the covalent function C, the model describes quantitatively the dual properties of bond strengths, charge density and ionic potential. Based on the atomic electron configuration and the various quantum-mechanical built-up dual parameters, the model formed a Dual Method of the multiple-functional prediction, which has much more versatile and exceptional applications than traditional electronegativity scales and molecular properties. Hydrogen has unconventional values of IC and XIC, lower than that of boron. The IC model can agree fairly well with the data of bond properties and satisfactorily explain chemical observations of elements throughout the Periodic Table.

  8. A combined computational and structural model of the full-length human prolactin receptor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bugge, Katrine; Papaleo, Elena; Haxholm, Gitte W.; Hopper, Jonathan T. S.; Robinson, Carol V.; Olsen, Johan G.; Lindorff-Larsen, Kresten; Kragelund, Birthe B.

    2016-05-01

    The prolactin receptor is an archetype member of the class I cytokine receptor family, comprising receptors with fundamental functions in biology as well as key drug targets. Structurally, each of these receptors represent an intriguing diversity, providing an exceptionally challenging target for structural biology. Here, we access the molecular architecture of the monomeric human prolactin receptor by combining experimental and computational efforts. We solve the NMR structure of its transmembrane domain in micelles and collect structural data on overlapping fragments of the receptor with small-angle X-ray scattering, native mass spectrometry and NMR spectroscopy. Along with previously published data, these are integrated by molecular modelling to generate a full receptor structure. The result provides the first full view of a class I cytokine receptor, exemplifying the architecture of more than 40 different receptor chains, and reveals that the extracellular domain is merely the tip of a molecular iceberg.

  9. A general model for metabolic scaling in self-similar asymmetric networks.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander Byers Brummer

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available How a particular attribute of an organism changes or scales with its body size is known as an allometry. Biological allometries, such as metabolic scaling, have been hypothesized to result from selection to maximize how vascular networks fill space yet minimize internal transport distances and resistances. The West, Brown, Enquist (WBE model argues that these two principles (space-filling and energy minimization are (i general principles underlying the evolution of the diversity of biological networks across plants and animals and (ii can be used to predict how the resulting geometry of biological networks then governs their allometric scaling. Perhaps the most central biological allometry is how metabolic rate scales with body size. A core assumption of the WBE model is that networks are symmetric with respect to their geometric properties. That is, any two given branches within the same generation in the network are assumed to have identical lengths and radii. However, biological networks are rarely if ever symmetric. An open question is: Does incorporating asymmetric branching change or influence the predictions of the WBE model? We derive a general network model that relaxes the symmetric assumption and define two classes of asymmetrically bifurcating networks. We show that asymmetric branching can be incorporated into the WBE model. This asymmetric version of the WBE model results in several theoretical predictions for the structure, physiology, and metabolism of organisms, specifically in the case for the cardiovascular system. We show how network asymmetry can now be incorporated in the many allometric scaling relationships via total network volume. Most importantly, we show that the 3/4 metabolic scaling exponent from Kleiber's Law can still be attained within many asymmetric networks.

  10. Drift-Scale Coupled Processes (DST and THC Seepage) Models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    P. Dixon

    2004-04-05

    The purpose of this Model Report (REV02) is to document the unsaturated zone (UZ) models used to evaluate the potential effects of coupled thermal-hydrological-chemical (THC) processes on UZ flow and transport. This Model Report has been developed in accordance with the ''Technical Work Plan for: Performance Assessment Unsaturated Zone'' (Bechtel SAIC Company, LLC (BSC) 2002 [160819]). The technical work plan (TWP) describes planning information pertaining to the technical scope, content, and management of this Model Report in Section 1.12, Work Package AUZM08, ''Coupled Effects on Flow and Seepage''. The plan for validation of the models documented in this Model Report is given in Attachment I, Model Validation Plans, Section I-3-4, of the TWP. Except for variations in acceptance criteria (Section 4.2), there were no deviations from this TWP. This report was developed in accordance with AP-SIII.10Q, ''Models''. This Model Report documents the THC Seepage Model and the Drift Scale Test (DST) THC Model. The THC Seepage Model is a drift-scale process model for predicting the composition of gas and water that could enter waste emplacement drifts and the effects of mineral alteration on flow in rocks surrounding drifts. The DST THC model is a drift-scale process model relying on the same conceptual model and much of the same input data (i.e., physical, hydrological, thermodynamic, and kinetic) as the THC Seepage Model. The DST THC Model is the primary method for validating the THC Seepage Model. The DST THC Model compares predicted water and gas compositions, as well as mineral alteration patterns, with observed data from the DST. These models provide the framework to evaluate THC coupled processes at the drift scale, predict flow and transport behavior for specified thermal-loading conditions, and predict the evolution of mineral alteration and fluid chemistry around potential waste emplacement drifts. The

  11. g4c2c: A Model for Citizen Engagement at Arms’ Length from Government

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Axel Bruns

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Normal 0 false false false EN-AU X-NONE X-NONE MicrosoftInternetExplorer4 /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Table Normal"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-priority:99; mso-style-qformat:yes; mso-style-parent:""; mso-padding-alt:0cm 5.4pt 0cm 5.4pt; mso-para-margin:0cm; mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:11.0pt; font-family:"Calibri","sans-serif"; mso-ascii-font-family:Calibri; mso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-fareast-font-family:"Times New Roman"; mso-fareast-theme-font:minor-fareast; mso-hansi-font-family:Calibri; mso-hansi-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-bidi-font-family:"Times New Roman"; mso-bidi-theme-font:minor-bidi;} The recognition that Web 2.0 applications and social media sites will strengthen and improve interaction between governments and citizens has resulted in a global push into new e-democracy or Government 2.0 spaces. These typically follow government-to-citizen (g2c or citizen-to-citizen (c2c models, but both these approaches are problematic: g2c is often concerned more with service delivery to citizens as clients, or exists to make a show of ‘listening to the public’ rather than to genuinely source citizen ideas for government policy, while c2c often takes place without direct government participation and therefore cannot ensure that the outcomes of citizen deliberations are accepted into the government policy-making process. Building on recent examples of Australian Government 2.0 initiatives, we suggest a new approach based on government support for citizen-to-citizen engagement, or g4c2c, as a workable compromise, and suggest that public service broadcasters should play a key role in facilitating this model of citizen engagement.

  12. Empirical spatial econometric modelling of small scale neighbourhood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerkman, Linda

    2012-07-01

    The aim of the paper is to model small scale neighbourhood in a house price model by implementing the newest methodology in spatial econometrics. A common problem when modelling house prices is that in practice it is seldom possible to obtain all the desired variables. Especially variables capturing the small scale neighbourhood conditions are hard to find. If there are important explanatory variables missing from the model, the omitted variables are spatially autocorrelated and they are correlated with the explanatory variables included in the model, it can be shown that a spatial Durbin model is motivated. In the empirical application on new house price data from Helsinki in Finland, we find the motivation for a spatial Durbin model, we estimate the model and interpret the estimates for the summary measures of impacts. By the analysis we show that the model structure makes it possible to model and find small scale neighbourhood effects, when we know that they exist, but we are lacking proper variables to measure them.

  13. Penalized Estimation in Large-Scale Generalized Linear Array Models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, Adam; Vincent, Martin; Hansen, Niels Richard

    2017-01-01

    Large-scale generalized linear array models (GLAMs) can be challenging to fit. Computation and storage of its tensor product design matrix can be impossible due to time and memory constraints, and previously considered design matrix free algorithms do not scale well with the dimension of the para......Large-scale generalized linear array models (GLAMs) can be challenging to fit. Computation and storage of its tensor product design matrix can be impossible due to time and memory constraints, and previously considered design matrix free algorithms do not scale well with the dimension...... of the parameter vector. A new design matrix free algorithm is proposed for computing the penalized maximum likelihood estimate for GLAMs, which, in particular, handles nondifferentiable penalty functions. The proposed algorithm is implemented and available via the R package glamlasso. It combines several ideas...

  14. Scale modeling of reinforced concrete structures subjected to seismic loading

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dove, R.C.

    1983-01-01

    Reinforced concrete, Category I structures are so large that the possibility of seismicly testing the prototype structures under controlled conditions is essentially nonexistent. However, experimental data, from which important structural properties can be determined and existing and new methods of seismic analysis benchmarked, are badly needed. As a result, seismic experiments on scaled models are of considerable interest. In this paper, the scaling laws are developed in some detail so that assumptions and choices based on judgement can be clearly recognized and their effects discussed. The scaling laws developed are then used to design a reinforced concrete model of a Category I structure. Finally, how scaling is effected by various types of damping (viscous, structural, and Coulomb) is discussed

  15. Stability of the protogalactic clouds - I: Field length in the adiabatic models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ćirković M.M.

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available All gasdynamical models for the evolution of gaseous content of galaxies assume that cooling from the hot, virialized phase to the cold phase occurred through some sort of thermal instability. Subsequent formation of colder clouds embedded in the hot, rarefied medium is a well-known process appearing in many astrophysical circumstances and environments. The characteristics of the condensed clouds depend on the relevant timescales for cloud formation and disruption due to either collisions or one of the operating instabilities. In this paper, the importance of the Kelvin-Helmholtz instability is investigated for the clouds forming in huge gaseous haloes of L galaxies. Recent treatment of this problem by Kamaya (1997 is extended and a more realistic cooling function employed. Results show that the Kelvin-Helmhotz instability proceeds effectively on the same timescale whether we account for self-gravity or not. This has multiple significance, since these objects may have been seen as high-column density absorption line systems against the background QSOs, and probably represent the progenitors of the present-day globular clusters.

  16. Anomalous scaling in an age-dependent branching model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keller-Schmidt, Stephanie; Tuğrul, Murat; Eguíluz, Víctor M; Hernández-García, Emilio; Klemm, Konstantin

    2015-02-01

    We introduce a one-parametric family of tree growth models, in which branching probabilities decrease with branch age τ as τ(-α). Depending on the exponent α, the scaling of tree depth with tree size n displays a transition between the logarithmic scaling of random trees and an algebraic growth. At the transition (α=1) tree depth grows as (logn)(2). This anomalous scaling is in good agreement with the trend observed in evolution of biological species, thus providing a theoretical support for age-dependent speciation and associating it to the occurrence of a critical point.

  17. Computational Modelling of Cancer Development and Growth: Modelling at Multiple Scales and Multiscale Modelling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szymańska, Zuzanna; Cytowski, Maciej; Mitchell, Elaine; Macnamara, Cicely K; Chaplain, Mark A J

    2017-06-20

    In this paper, we present two mathematical models related to different aspects and scales of cancer growth. The first model is a stochastic spatiotemporal model of both a synthetic gene regulatory network (the example of a three-gene repressilator is given) and an actual gene regulatory network, the NF-[Formula: see text]B pathway. The second model is a force-based individual-based model of the development of a solid avascular tumour with specific application to tumour cords, i.e. a mass of cancer cells growing around a central blood vessel. In each case, we compare our computational simulation results with experimental data. In the final discussion section, we outline how to take the work forward through the development of a multiscale model focussed at the cell level. This would incorporate key intracellular signalling pathways associated with cancer within each cell (e.g. p53-Mdm2, NF-[Formula: see text]B) and through the use of high-performance computing be capable of simulating up to [Formula: see text] cells, i.e. the tissue scale. In this way, mathematical models at multiple scales would be combined to formulate a multiscale computational model.

  18. An investigation of viscous-mediated coupling of crickets cercal hair sensors using a scaled up model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alagirisamy, Pasupathy S.; Jeronimidis, George; Le Moàl, Valerie

    2009-08-01

    Viscous coupling between filiform hair sensors of insects and arthropods has gained considerable interest recently. Study of viscous coupling between hairs at micro scale with current technologies is proving difficult and hence the hair system has been physically scaled up by a factor of 100. For instance, a typical filiform hair of 10 μm diameter and 1000 μm length has been physically scaled up to 1 mm in diameter and 100mm in length. At the base, a rotational spring with a bonded strain gauge provides the restoring force and measures the angle of deflection of the model hair. These model hairs were used in a glycerol-filled aquarium where the velocity of flow and the fluid properties were determined by imposing the Reynolds numbers compatible with biological system. Experiments have been conducted by varying the separation distance and the relative position between the moveable model hairs, of different lengths and between the movable and rigid hairs of different lengths for the steady velocity flow with Reynolds numbers of 0.02 and 0.05. In this study, the viscous coupling between hairs has been characterised. The effect of the distance from the physical boundaries, such as tank walls has also been quantified (wall effect). The purpose of this investigation is to provide relevant information for the design of MEMS systems mimicking the cricket's hair array.

  19. Size variation and collapse of emphysema holes at inspiration and expiration CT scan: evaluation with modified length scale method and image co-registration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oh SY

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Sang Young Oh,1,* Minho Lee,1,* Joon Beom Seo,1,* Namkug Kim,1,2,* Sang Min Lee,1 Jae Seung Lee,3 Yeon Mok Oh3 1Department of Radiology, 2Department of Convergence Medicine, 3Department of Pulmonology, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Asan Medical Center, Seoul, Republic of Korea *These authors contributed equally to this work Abstract: A novel approach of size-based emphysema clustering has been developed, and the size variation and collapse of holes in emphysema clusters are evaluated at inspiratory and expiratory computed tomography (CT. Thirty patients were visually evaluated for the size-based emphysema clustering technique and a total of 72 patients were evaluated for analyzing collapse of the emphysema hole in this study. A new approach for the size differentiation of emphysema holes was developed using the length scale, Gaussian low-pass filtering, and iteration approach. Then, the volumetric CT results of the emphysema patients were analyzed using the new method, and deformable registration was carried out between inspiratory and expiratory CT. Blind visual evaluations of EI by two readers had significant correlations with the classification using the size-based emphysema clustering method (r-values of reader 1: 0.186, 0.890, 0.915, and 0.941; reader 2: 0.540, 0.667, 0.919, and 0.942. The results of collapse of emphysema holes using deformable registration were compared with the pulmonary function test (PFT parameters using the Pearson’s correlation test. The mean extents of low-attenuation area (LAA, E1 (<1.5 mm, E2 (<7 mm, E3 (<15 mm, and E4 (≥15 mm were 25.9%, 3.0%, 11.4%, 7.6%, and 3.9%, respectively, at the inspiratory CT, and 15.3%, 1.4%, 6.9%, 4.3%, and 2.6%, respectively at the expiratory CT. The extents of LAA, E2, E3, and E4 were found to be significantly correlated with the PFT ­parameters (r=−0.53, −0.43, −0.48, and −0.25, with forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1; −0.81, −0.62, −0.75, and

  20. From Field- to Landscape-Scale Vadose Zone Processes: Scale Issues, Modeling, and Monitoring

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Corwin, D.L.; Hopmans, J.; Rooij, de G.H.

    2006-01-01

    Modeling and monitoring vadose zone processes across multiple scales is a fundamental component of many environmental and natural resource issues including nonpoint source (NPS) pollution, watershed management, and nutrient management, to mention just a few. In this special section in Vadose Zone

  1. Design and Modelling of Small Scale Low Temperature Power Cycles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wronski, Jorrit

    he work presented in this report contributes to the state of the art within design and modelling of small scale low temperature power cycles. The study is divided into three main parts: (i) fluid property evaluation, (ii) expansion device investigations and (iii) heat exchanger performance...... times and below 10−7 away from the phase boundaries.Regarding expansion devices for small scale organic Rankine cycle (ORC) systems,this work focussed on reciprocating machines. A prototype of a reciprocating expander with a swept volume of 736 cm3 was tested and modelled. he model was written in object......-oriented Modelica code and was included in the thermo Cycle framework for small scale ORC systems. Special attention was paid to the valve system and a control method for variable expansion ratios was introduced based on a cogeneration scenario. Admission control based on evaporator and condenser conditions...

  2. Zero-point length from string fluctuations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fontanini, Michele; Spallucci, Euro; Padmanabhan, T.

    2006-01-01

    One of the leading candidates for quantum gravity, viz. string theory, has the following features incorporated in it. (i) The full spacetime is higher-dimensional, with (possibly) compact extra-dimensions; (ii) there is a natural minimal length below which the concept of continuum spacetime needs to be modified by some deeper concept. On the other hand, the existence of a minimal length (zero-point length) in four-dimensional spacetime, with obvious implications as UV regulator, has been often conjectured as a natural aftermath of any correct quantum theory of gravity. We show that one can incorporate the apparently unrelated pieces of information-zero-point length, extra-dimensions, string T-duality-in a consistent framework. This is done in terms of a modified Kaluza-Klein theory that interpolates between (high-energy) string theory and (low-energy) quantum field theory. In this model, the zero-point length in four dimensions is a 'virtual memory' of the length scale of compact extra-dimensions. Such a scale turns out to be determined by T-duality inherited from the underlying fundamental string theory. From a low energy perspective short distance infinities are cutoff by a minimal length which is proportional to the square root of the string slope, i.e., α ' . Thus, we bridge the gap between the string theory domain and the low energy arena of point-particle quantum field theory

  3. Including investment risk in large-scale power market models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lemming, Jørgen Kjærgaard; Meibom, P.

    2003-01-01

    can be included in large-scale partial equilibrium models of the power market. The analyses are divided into a part about risk measures appropriate for power market investors and a more technical part about the combination of a risk-adjustment model and a partial-equilibrium model. To illustrate...... the analyses quantitatively, a framework based on an iterative interaction between the equilibrium model and a separate risk-adjustment module was constructed. To illustrate the features of the proposed modelling approach we examined how uncertainty in demand and variable costs affects the optimal choice...

  4. Evidence-Based Thresholds for the Volume and Length of Stay Relationship in Total Hip Arthroplasty: Outcomes and Economies of Scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramkumar, Prem N; Navarro, Sergio M; Frankel, William C; Haeberle, Heather S; Delanois, Ronald E; Mont, Michael A

    2018-02-05

    Several studies have indicated that high-volume surgeons and hospitals deliver higher value care. However, no evidence-based volume thresholds currently exist in total hip arthroplasty (THA). The primary objective of this study was to establish meaningful thresholds taking patient outcomes into consideration for surgeons and hospitals performing THA. A secondary objective was to examine the market share of THAs for each surgeon and hospital strata. Using 136,501 patients undergoing hip arthroplasty, we used stratum-specific likelihood ratio (SSLR) analysis of a receiver-operating characteristic curve to generate volume thresholds predictive of increased length of stay (LOS) for surgeons and hospitals. Additionally, we examined the relative proportion of annual THA cases performed by each surgeon and hospital strata established. SSLR analysis of LOS by annual surgeon THA volume produced 3 strata: 0-69 (low), 70-121 (medium), and 121 or more (high). Analysis by annual hospital THA volume produced strata at: 0-120 (low), 121-357 (medium), and 358 or more (high). LOS decreased significantly (P economies of scale in THA by demonstrating a direct relationship between volume and value for THA through risk-based volume stratification of surgeons and hospitals using SSLR analysis of receiver-operating characteristic curves to identify low-, medium-, and high-volume surgeons and hospitals. While the majority of primary THAs are performed at high-volume centers, low-volume surgeons are performing the majority of these cases, which may offer room for improvement in delivering value-based care. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Validity of the Neuromuscular Recovery Scale: a measurement model approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velozo, Craig; Moorhouse, Michael; Ardolino, Elizabeth; Lorenz, Doug; Suter, Sarah; Basso, D Michele; Behrman, Andrea L

    2015-08-01

    To determine how well the Neuromuscular Recovery Scale (NRS) items fit the Rasch, 1-parameter, partial-credit measurement model. Confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) and principal components analysis (PCA) of residuals were used to determine dimensionality. The Rasch, 1-parameter, partial-credit rating scale model was used to determine rating scale structure, person/item fit, point-measure item correlations, item discrimination, and measurement precision. Seven NeuroRecovery Network clinical sites. Outpatients (N=188) with spinal cord injury. Not applicable. NRS. While the NRS met 1 of 3 CFA criteria, the PCA revealed that the Rasch measurement dimension explained 76.9% of the variance. Ten of 11 items and 91% of the patients fit the Rasch model, with 9 of 11 items showing high discrimination. Sixty-nine percent of the ratings met criteria. The items showed a logical item-difficulty order, with Stand retraining as the easiest item and Walking as the most challenging item. The NRS showed no ceiling or floor effects and separated the sample into almost 5 statistically distinct strata; individuals with an American Spinal Injury Association Impairment Scale (AIS) D classification showed the most ability, and those with an AIS A classification showed the least ability. Items not meeting the rating scale criteria appear to be related to the low frequency counts. The NRS met many of the Rasch model criteria for construct validity. Copyright © 2015 American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Multi-Scale Analysis for Characterizing Near-Field Constituent Concentrations in the Context of a Macro-Scale Semi-Lagrangian Numerical Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yearsley, J. R.

    2017-12-01

    The semi-Lagrangian numerical scheme employed by RBM, a model for simulating time-dependent, one-dimensional water quality constituents in advection-dominated rivers, is highly scalable both in time and space. Although the model has been used at length scales of 150 meters and time scales of three hours, the majority of applications have been at length scales of 1/16th degree latitude/longitude (about 5 km) or greater and time scales of one day. Applications of the method at these scales has proven successful for characterizing the impacts of climate change on water temperatures in global rivers and on the vulnerability of thermoelectric power plants to changes in cooling water temperatures in large river systems. However, local effects can be very important in terms of ecosystem impacts, particularly in the case of developing mixing zones for wastewater discharges with pollutant loadings limited by regulations imposed by the Federal Water Pollution Control Act (FWPCA). Mixing zone analyses have usually been decoupled from large-scale watershed influences by developing scenarios that represent critical scenarios for external processes associated with streamflow and weather conditions . By taking advantage of the particle-tracking characteristics of the numerical scheme, RBM can provide results at any point in time within the model domain. We develop a proof of concept for locations in the river network where local impacts such as mixing zones may be important. Simulated results from the semi-Lagrangian numerical scheme are treated as input to a finite difference model of the two-dimensional diffusion equation for water quality constituents such as water temperature or toxic substances. Simulations will provide time-dependent, two-dimensional constituent concentration in the near-field in response to long-term basin-wide processes. These results could provide decision support to water quality managers for evaluating mixing zone characteristics.

  7. Ground-water solute transport modeling using a three-dimensional scaled model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crider, S.S.

    1987-01-01

    Scaled models are used extensively in current hydraulic research on sediment transport and solute dispersion in free surface flows (rivers, estuaries), but are neglected in current ground-water model research. Thus, an investigation was conducted to test the efficacy of a three-dimensional scaled model of solute transport in ground water. No previous results from such a model have been reported. Experiments performed on uniform scaled models indicated that some historical problems (e.g., construction and scaling difficulties; disproportionate capillary rise in model) were partly overcome by using simple model materials (sand, cement and water), by restricting model application to selective classes of problems, and by physically controlling the effect of the model capillary zone. Results from these tests were compared with mathematical models. Model scaling laws were derived for ground-water solute transport and used to build a three-dimensional scaled model of a ground-water tritium plume in a prototype aquifer on the Savannah River Plant near Aiken, South Carolina. Model results compared favorably with field data and with a numerical model. Scaled models are recommended as a useful additional tool for prediction of ground-water solute transport

  8. Wind Farm Wake Models From Full Scale Data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knudsen, Torben; Bak, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    on real full scale data. The modelling is based on so called effective wind speed. It is shown that there is a wake for a wind direction range of up to 20 degrees. Further, when accounting for the wind direction it is shown that the two model structures considered can both fit the experimental data......This investigation is part of the EU FP7 project “Distributed Control of Large-Scale Offshore Wind Farms”. The overall goal in this project is to develop wind farm controllers giving power set points to individual turbines in the farm in order to minimise mechanical loads and optimise power. One...... control configuration examined is distributed control where turbines only communicate with their nearest upwind neighbors. Design of such controllers needs wake models and these models should ideally be distributed. This paper compares two simple multiple wake models for this purpose. The study is based...

  9. A Network Contention Model for the Extreme-scale Simulator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Engelmann, Christian [ORNL; Naughton III, Thomas J [ORNL

    2015-01-01

    The Extreme-scale Simulator (xSim) is a performance investigation toolkit for high-performance computing (HPC) hardware/software co-design. It permits running a HPC application with millions of concurrent execution threads, while observing its performance in a simulated extreme-scale system. This paper details a newly developed network modeling feature for xSim, eliminating the shortcomings of the existing network modeling capabilities. The approach takes a different path for implementing network contention and bandwidth capacity modeling using a less synchronous and accurate enough model design. With the new network modeling feature, xSim is able to simulate on-chip and on-node networks with reasonable accuracy and overheads.

  10. Current state of genome-scale modeling in filamentous fungi

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brandl, Julian; Andersen, Mikael Rørdam

    2015-01-01

    capacity. One of the major bottlenecks in the development of new strains into viable industrial hosts is the alteration of the metabolism towards optimal production. Genome-scale models promise a reduction in the time needed for metabolic engineering by predicting the most potent targets in silico before...... testing them in vivo. The increasing availability of high quality models and molecular biological tools for manipulating filamentous fungi renders the model-guided engineering of these fungal factories possible with comprehensive metabolic networks. A typical fungal model contains on average 1138 unique...... metabolic reactions and 1050 ORFs, making them a vast knowledge-base of fungal metabolism. In the present review we focus on the current state as well as potential future applications of genome-scale models in filamentous fungi....

  11. Atomic scale modelling of materials of the nuclear fuel cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bertolus, M.

    2011-10-01

    This document written to obtain the French accreditation to supervise research presents the research I conducted at CEA Cadarache since 1999 on the atomic scale modelling of non-metallic materials involved in the nuclear fuel cycle: host materials for radionuclides from nuclear waste (apatites), fuel (in particular uranium dioxide) and ceramic cladding materials (silicon carbide). These are complex materials at the frontier of modelling capabilities since they contain heavy elements (rare earths or actinides), exhibit complex structures or chemical compositions and/or are subjected to irradiation effects: creation of point defects and fission products, amorphization. The objective of my studies is to bring further insight into the physics and chemistry of the elementary processes involved using atomic scale modelling and its coupling with higher scale models and experimental studies. This work is organised in two parts: on the one hand the development, adaptation and implementation of atomic scale modelling methods and validation of the approximations used; on the other hand the application of these methods to the investigation of nuclear materials under irradiation. This document contains a synthesis of the studies performed, orientations for future research, a detailed resume and a list of publications and communications. (author)

  12. Multi-scale modeling and analysis of convective boiling: towards the prediction of CHF in rod bundles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Niceno, B.; Sato, Y.; Badillo, A.; Andreani, M.

    2010-01-01

    In this paper we describe current activities on the project Multi-Scale Modeling and Analysis of convective boiling (MSMA), conducted jointly by the Paul Scherrer Institute (PSI) and the Swiss Nuclear Utilities (Swissnuclear). The long-term aim of the MSMA project is to formulate improved closure laws for Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) simulations for prediction of convective boiling and eventually of the Critical Heat Flux (CHF). As boiling is controlled by the competition of numerous phenomena at various length and time scales, a multi-scale approach is employed to tackle the problem at different scales. In the MSMA project, the scales on which we focus range from the CFD scale (macro-scale), bubble size scale (meso-scale), liquid micro-layer and triple interline scale (micro-scale), and molecular scale (nano-scale). The current focus of the project is on micro- and meso- scales modeling. The numerical framework comprises a highly efficient, parallel DNS solver, the PSI-BOIL code. The code has incorporated an Immersed Boundary Method (IBM) to tackle complex geometries. For simulation of meso-scales (bubbles), we use the Constrained Interpolation Profile method: Conservative Semi-Lagrangian 2nd order (CIP-CSL2). The phase change is described either by applying conventional jump conditions at the interface, or by using the Phase Field (PF) approach. In this work, we present selected results for flows in complex geometry using the IBM, selected bubbly flow simulations using the CIP-CSL2 method and results for phase change using the PF approach. In the subsequent stage of the project, the importance of effects of nano-scale processes on the global boiling heat transfer will be evaluated. To validate the models, more experimental information will be needed in the future, so it is expected that the MSMA project will become the seed for a long-term, combined theoretical and experimental program

  13. Modeling root length density of field grown potatoes under different irrigation strategies and soil textures using artificial neural networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ahmadi, Seyed Hamid; Sepaskhah, Ali Reza; Andersen, Mathias Neumann

    2014-01-01

    Root length density (RLD) is a highly wanted parameter for use in crop growth modeling but difficult to measure under field conditions. Therefore, artificial neural networks (ANNs) were implemented to predict the RLD of field grown potatoes that were subject to three irrigation strategies and three...... soil textures with different soil water status and soil densities. The objectives of the study were to test whether soil textural information, soil water status, and soil density might be used by ANN to simulate RLD at harvest. In the study 63 data pairs were divided into data sets of training (80......) of the eight input variables: soil layer intervals (D), percentages of sand (Sa), silt (Si), and clay (Cl), bulk density of soil layers (Bd), weighted soil moisture deficit during the irrigation strategies period (SMD), geometric mean particle size diameter (dg), and geometric standard deviation (σg...

  14. Multilevel method for modeling large-scale networks.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Safro, I. M. (Mathematics and Computer Science)

    2012-02-24

    Understanding the behavior of real complex networks is of great theoretical and practical significance. It includes developing accurate artificial models whose topological properties are similar to the real networks, generating the artificial networks at different scales under special conditions, investigating a network dynamics, reconstructing missing data, predicting network response, detecting anomalies and other tasks. Network generation, reconstruction, and prediction of its future topology are central issues of this field. In this project, we address the questions related to the understanding of the network modeling, investigating its structure and properties, and generating artificial networks. Most of the modern network generation methods are based either on various random graph models (reinforced by a set of properties such as power law distribution of node degrees, graph diameter, and number of triangles) or on the principle of replicating an existing model with elements of randomization such as R-MAT generator and Kronecker product modeling. Hierarchical models operate at different levels of network hierarchy but with the same finest elements of the network. However, in many cases the methods that include randomization and replication elements on the finest relationships between network nodes and modeling that addresses the problem of preserving a set of simplified properties do not fit accurately enough the real networks. Among the unsatisfactory features are numerically inadequate results, non-stability of algorithms on real (artificial) data, that have been tested on artificial (real) data, and incorrect behavior at different scales. One reason is that randomization and replication of existing structures can create conflicts between fine and coarse scales of the real network geometry. Moreover, the randomization and satisfying of some attribute at the same time can abolish those topological attributes that have been undefined or hidden from

  15. Cloud-Scale Numerical Modeling of the Arctic Boundary Layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kruegen, Steven K.; Delnore, Victor E. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The research objective of this NASA grant-funded project was to determine in detail how large-scale processes. in combination with cloud-scale radiative, microphysical, and dynamical processes, govern the formation and multi-layered structure of Arctic stratus clouds. This information will be useful for developing and improving 1D (one dimensional) boundary layer models for the Arctic. Also, to quantitatively determine the effects of leads on the large-scale budgets of sensible heat, water vapor, and condensate in a variety of Arctic winter conditions. This information will be used to identify the most important lead-flux processes that require parameterization in climate models. Our approach was to use a high-resolution numerical model, the 2D (two dimensional) University of Utah Cloud Resolving Model (UU CRM), and its 1D version, the University of Utah Turbulence Closure Model (UU TCM), a boundary layer model based on third-moment turbulence closure, as well as a large-eddy simulation (LES) model originally developed by C.H. Moeng.

  16. Muscle length-dependent contribution of motoneuron Cav1.3 channels to force production in model slow motor unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hojeong

    2017-07-01

    Persistent inward current (PIC)-generating Ca v 1.3 channels in spinal motoneuron dendrites are thought to be actively recruited during normal behaviors. However, whether and how the activation of PIC channels influences force output of motor unit remains elusive. Here, building a physiologically realistic model of slow motor unit I demonstrated that force production induced by the PIC activation is much smaller for short than lengthened muscles during the regular firing of the motoneuron that transitions from the quiescent state by either a brief current pulse at the soma or a brief synaptic excitation at the dendrites. By contrast, the PIC-induced force potentiation was maximal for short muscles when the motoneuron switched from a stable low-frequency firing state to a stable high-frequency firing state by the current pulse at the soma. Under the synaptic excitation at the dendrites, however, the force could not be potentiated by the transitioning of the motoneuron from a low- to a high-frequency firing state due to the simultaneous onset of PIC at the dendrites and firing at the soma. The strong dependency of the input-output relationship of the motor unit on the neuromodulation and Ia afferent inputs for the PIC channels was further shown under static variations in muscle length. Taken together, these findings suggest that the PIC activation in the motoneuron dendrites may differentially affect the force production of the motor unit, depending not only on the firing state history of the motoneuron and the variation in muscle length but also on the mode of motor activity. NEW & NOTEWORTHY Ca v 1.3 channels in motoneuron dendrites are actively involved during normal motor activities. To investigate the effects of the activation of motoneuron Ca v 1.3 channels on force production, a model motor unit was built based on best-available data. The simulation results suggest that force potentiation induced by Ca v 1.3 channel activation is strongly modulated not only by

  17. Upscaling of Long-Term U9VI) Desorption from Pore Scale Kinetics to Field-Scale Reactive Transport Models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andy Miller

    2009-01-25

    Environmental systems exhibit a range of complexities which exist at a range of length and mass scales. Within the realm of radionuclide fate and transport, much work has been focused on understanding pore scale processes where complexity can be reduced to a simplified system. In describing larger scale behavior, the results from these simplified systems must be combined to create a theory of the whole. This process can be quite complex, and lead to models which lack transparency. The underlying assumption of this approach is that complex systems will exhibit complex behavior, requiring a complex system of equations to describe behavior. This assumption has never been tested. The goal of the experiments presented is to ask the question: Do increasingly complex systems show increasingly complex behavior? Three experimental tanks at the intermediate scale (Tank 1: 2.4m x 1.2m x 7.6cm, Tank 2: 2.4m x 0.61m x 7.6cm, Tank 3: 2.4m x 0.61m x 0.61m (LxHxW)) have been completed. These tanks were packed with various physical orientations of different particle sizes of a uranium contaminated sediment from a former uranium mill near Naturita, Colorado. Steady state water flow was induced across the tanks using constant head boundaries. Pore water was removed from within the flow domain through sampling ports/wells; effluent samples were also taken. Each sample was analyzed for a variety of analytes relating to the solubility and transport of uranium. Flow fields were characterized using inert tracers and direct measurements of pressure head. The results show that although there is a wide range of chemical variability within the flow domain of the tank, the effluent uranium behavior is simple enough to be described using a variety of conceptual models. Thus, although there is a wide range in variability caused by pore scale behaviors, these behaviors appear to be smoothed out as uranium is transported through the tank. This smoothing of uranium transport behavior transcends

  18. Towards Characterization, Modeling, and Uncertainty Quantification in Multi-scale Mechanics of Oragnic-rich Shales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abedi, S.; Mashhadian, M.; Noshadravan, A.

    2015-12-01

    uncertainty and consequently construct probabilistic descriptions of properties at multiple length-scales. The combination of experimental characterization and stochastic multi-scale modeling presented in this work improves the robustness in the prediction of essential subsurface parameters in engineering scale.

  19. Failure of heterogeneous materials: Scaling properties of fracture surfaces and implications on models of cracks in disordered media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonamy, Daniel

    2007-03-01

    While there exists a unified theoretical framework - Linear Elastic Fracture Mechanics (LEFM) - to describe the failure of homogeneous materials, understanding and modelling the mechanical properties of heterogeneous media continue to raise significant fundamental challenges. These mechanical properties, observed at the macroscopic scale, result from microscopic processes occurring at the scale of the material. To include these local processes into a statistical description constitutes then a crucial step toward the setup of predictive macroscopic models. Crack surface roughness is a consequence of these local processes. Consequently, many fractography experiments have focussed on their analysis. In this context, it was recently evidenced that, in many materials, fracture surfaces exhibit anisotropic scaling properties reminiscent to interface growth problems, fully characterized by two couples of parameters: The roughness exponents and the characteristic length-scales measured along and perpendicular to the direction of crack growth respectively. While the characteristic length-scales do depend on the considered material, the exponents are surprisingly universal: Two distinct sets of critical exponents are observed whether the surfaces are examined at scales below or above the size of the damaged zone at the crack front. Models of crack growth in disordered media are discussed at the light of these experimental observations. In particular, one can derive a model from LEFM which describe the development of crack roughness as an ``elastic'' manifold creeping in a random media. This approach captures quantitatively the experimental observations performed at length-scales above the size of the process zone. In this approach, the onset of crack propagation can be interpreted as a dynamic phase transition while sub-critical crack growth can be assimilated to thermally-assisted depinning.

  20. Modeling the Footprint and Equivalent Radiance Transfer Path Length for Tower-Based Hemispherical Observations of Chlorophyll Fluorescence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xinjie Liu

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The measurement of solar-induced chlorophyll fluorescence (SIF is a new tool for estimating gross primary production (GPP. Continuous tower-based spectral observations together with flux measurements are an efficient way of linking the SIF to the GPP. Compared to conical observations, hemispherical observations made with cosine-corrected foreoptic have a much larger field of view and can better match the footprint of the tower-based flux measurements. However, estimating the equivalent radiation transfer path length (ERTPL for hemispherical observations is more complex than for conical observations and this is a key problem that needs to be addressed before accurate retrieval of SIF can be made. In this paper, we first modeled the footprint of hemispherical spectral measurements and found that, under convective conditions with light winds, 90% of the total radiation came from an FOV of width 72°, which in turn covered 75.68% of the source area of the flux measurements. In contrast, conical spectral observations covered only 1.93% of the flux footprint. Secondly, using theoretical considerations, we modeled the ERTPL of the hemispherical spectral observations made with cosine-corrected foreoptic and found that the ERTPL was approximately equal to twice the sensor height above the canopy. Finally, the modeled ERTPL was evaluated using a simulated dataset. The ERTPL calculated using the simulated data was about 1.89 times the sensor’s height above the target surface, which was quite close to the results for the modeled ERTPL. Furthermore, the SIF retrieved from atmospherically corrected spectra using the modeled ERTPL fitted well with the reference values, giving a relative root mean square error of 18.22%. These results show that the modeled ERTPL was reasonable and that this method is applicable to tower-based hemispherical observations of SIF.

  1. A scale-free neural network for modelling neurogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perotti, Juan I.; Tamarit, Francisco A.; Cannas, Sergio A.

    2006-11-01

    In this work we introduce a neural network model for associative memory based on a diluted Hopfield model, which grows through a neurogenesis algorithm that guarantees that the final network is a small-world and scale-free one. We also analyze the storage capacity of the network and prove that its performance is larger than that measured in a randomly dilute network with the same connectivity.

  2. Multi-scale Modeling of Plasticity in Tantalum.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lim, Hojun [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Battaile, Corbett Chandler. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Carroll, Jay [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Buchheit, Thomas E. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Boyce, Brad [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Weinberger, Christopher [Drexel Univ., Philadelphia, PA (United States)

    2015-12-01

    In this report, we present a multi-scale computational model to simulate plastic deformation of tantalum and validating experiments. In atomistic/ dislocation level, dislocation kink- pair theory is used to formulate temperature and strain rate dependent constitutive equations. The kink-pair theory is calibrated to available data from single crystal experiments to produce accurate and convenient constitutive laws. The model is then implemented into a BCC crystal plasticity finite element method (CP-FEM) model to predict temperature and strain rate dependent yield stresses of single and polycrystalline tantalum and compared with existing experimental data from the literature. Furthermore, classical continuum constitutive models describing temperature and strain rate dependent flow behaviors are fit to the yield stresses obtained from the CP-FEM polycrystal predictions. The model is then used to conduct hydro- dynamic simulations of Taylor cylinder impact test and compared with experiments. In order to validate the proposed tantalum CP-FEM model with experiments, we introduce a method for quantitative comparison of CP-FEM models with various experimental techniques. To mitigate the effects of unknown subsurface microstructure, tantalum tensile specimens with a pseudo-two-dimensional grain structure and grain sizes on the order of millimeters are used. A technique combining an electron back scatter diffraction (EBSD) and high resolution digital image correlation (HR-DIC) is used to measure the texture and sub-grain strain fields upon uniaxial tensile loading at various applied strains. Deformed specimens are also analyzed with optical profilometry measurements to obtain out-of- plane strain fields. These high resolution measurements are directly compared with large-scale CP-FEM predictions. This computational method directly links fundamental dislocation physics to plastic deformations in the grain-scale and to the engineering-scale applications. Furthermore, direct

  3. Correlation lengths of electrostatic turbulence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guiziou, L.; Garbet, X.

    1995-01-01

    This document deals with correlation length of electrostatic turbulence. First, the model of drift waves turbulence is presented. Then, the radial correlation length is determined analytically with toroidal coupling and non linear coupling. (TEC). 5 refs

  4. Vegetable parenting practices scale: Item response modeling analyses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Our objective was to evaluate the psychometric properties of a vegetable parenting practices scale using multidimensional polytomous item response modeling which enables assessing item fit to latent variables and the distributional characteristics of the items in comparison to the respondents. We al...

  5. Role of scaling in the statistical modelling of finance

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Economics and mathematical finance are multidisciplinary fields in which the ten- dency of statistical physicists to focus on universal laws has been criticized some- ..... is coherent and catches the essential statistical features of a long index history. A very important test for the proposed model concerns the scaling of the ...

  6. Phenomenological aspects of no-scale inflation models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ellis, John [Theoretical Particle Physics and Cosmology Group, Department of Physics,King’s College London,WC2R 2LS London (United Kingdom); Theory Division, CERN,CH-1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland); Garcia, Marcos A.G. [William I. Fine Theoretical Physics Institute, School of Physics and Astronomy,University of Minnesota,116 Church Street SE, Minneapolis, MN 55455 (United States); Nanopoulos, Dimitri V. [George P. and Cynthia W. Mitchell Institute for Fundamental Physics andAstronomy, Texas A& M University,College Station, 77843 Texas (United States); Astroparticle Physics Group, Houston Advanced Research Center (HARC), Mitchell Campus, Woodlands, 77381 Texas (United States); Academy of Athens, Division of Natural Sciences, 28 Panepistimiou Avenue, 10679 Athens (Greece); Olive, Keith A. [William I. Fine Theoretical Physics Institute, School of Physics and Astronomy,University of Minnesota,116 Church Street SE, Minneapolis, MN 55455 (United States)

    2015-10-01

    We discuss phenomenological aspects of inflationary models wiith a no-scale supergravity Kähler potential motivated by compactified string models, in which the inflaton may be identified either as a Kähler modulus or an untwisted matter field, focusing on models that make predictions for the scalar spectral index n{sub s} and the tensor-to-scalar ratio r that are similar to the Starobinsky model. We discuss possible patterns of soft supersymmetry breaking, exhibiting examples of the pure no-scale type m{sub 0}=B{sub 0}=A{sub 0}=0, of the CMSSM type with universal A{sub 0} and m{sub 0}≠0 at a high scale, and of the mSUGRA type with A{sub 0}=B{sub 0}+m{sub 0} boundary conditions at the high input scale. These may be combined with a non-trivial gauge kinetic function that generates gaugino masses m{sub 1/2}≠0, or one may have a pure gravity mediation scenario where trilinear terms and gaugino masses are generated through anomalies. We also discuss inflaton decays and reheating, showing possible decay channels for the inflaton when it is either an untwisted matter field or a Kähler modulus. Reheating is very efficient if a matter field inflaton is directly coupled to MSSM fields, and both candidates lead to sufficient reheating in the presence of a non-trivial gauge kinetic function.

  7. Learning in an estimated medium-scale DSGE model

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Slobodyan, Sergey; Wouters, R.

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 36, č. 1 (2012), s. 26-46 ISSN 0165-1889 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GCP402/11/J018 Institutional support: PRVOUK-P23 Keywords : constant-gain adaptive learning * medium-scale DSGE model * DSGE- VAR Subject RIV: AH - Economics Impact factor: 0.807, year: 2012

  8. Explicit boundary form factors: The scaling Lee–Yang model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hollo, L. [MTA Lendület Holographic QFT Group, Wigner Research Centre for Physics, P.O.B. 49, H-1525 Budapest 114 (Hungary); Laczko, Z.B. [Roland Eötvös University, Pázmány Péter sétány 1/A, 1117 Budapest (Hungary); Bajnok, Z. [MTA Lendület Holographic QFT Group, Wigner Research Centre for Physics, P.O.B. 49, H-1525 Budapest 114 (Hungary)

    2014-09-15

    We provide explicit expressions for boundary form factors in the boundary scaling Lee–Yang model for operators with the mildest ultraviolet behavior for all integrable boundary conditions. The form factors of the boundary stress tensor take a determinant form, while the form factors of the boundary primary field contain additional explicit polynomials.

  9. Small-Scale Helicopter Automatic Autorotation : Modeling, Guidance, and Control

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Taamallah, S.

    2015-01-01

    Our research objective consists in developing a, model-based, automatic safety recovery system, for a small-scale helicopter Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV) in autorotation, i.e. an engine OFF flight condition, that safely flies and lands the helicopter to a pre-specified ground location. In pursuit

  10. Scaling of Core Material in Rubble Mound Breakwater Model Tests

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Burcharth, H. F.; Liu, Z.; Troch, P.

    1999-01-01

    The permeability of the core material influences armour stability, wave run-up and wave overtopping. The main problem related to the scaling of core materials in models is that the hydraulic gradient and the pore velocity are varying in space and time. This makes it impossible to arrive at a fully...

  11. Scale-invariant inclusive spectra in a dual model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chikovani, Z.E.; Jenkovsky, L.L.; Martynov, E.S.

    1979-01-01

    One-particle inclusive distributions at large transverse momentum phisub(tr) are shown to scale, Edσ/d 3 phi approximately phisub(tr)sup(-N)(1-Xsub(tr))sup(1+N/2)lnphisub(tr), in a dual model with Mandelstam analyticity if the Regge trajectories are logarithmic asymptotically

  12. Hybrid modeling for dynamic analysis of cable-pulley systems with time-varying length cable and its application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jing; Qi, Zhaohui; Wang, Gang

    2017-10-01

    The dynamic analysis of cable-pulley systems is investigated in this paper, where the time-varying length characteristic of the cable as well as the coupling motion between the cable and the pulleys are considered. The dynamic model for cable-pulley systems are presented based on the principle of virtual power. Firstly, the cubic spline interpolation is adopted for modeling the flexible cable elements and the virtual 1powers of tensile strain, inertia and gravity forces on the cable are formulated. Then, the coupled motions between the cable and the movable or fixed pulley are described by the input and output contact points, based on the no-slip assumption and the spatial description. The virtual powers of inertia, gravity and applied forces on the contact segment of the cable, the movable and fixed pulleys are formulated. In particular, the internal node degrees of freedom of spline cable elements are reduced, which results in that only the independent description parameters of the nodes connected to the pulleys are included in the final governing dynamic equations. At last, two cable-pulley lifting mechanisms are considered as demonstrative application examples where the vibration of the lifting process is investigated. The comparison with ADAMS models is given to prove the validity of the proposed method.

  13. Application of physical scaling towards downscaling climate model precipitation data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaur, Abhishek; Simonovic, Slobodan P.

    2018-04-01

    Physical scaling (SP) method downscales climate model data to local or regional scales taking into consideration physical characteristics of the area under analysis. In this study, multiple SP method based models are tested for their effectiveness towards downscaling North American regional reanalysis (NARR) daily precipitation data. Model performance is compared with two state-of-the-art downscaling methods: statistical downscaling model (SDSM) and generalized linear modeling (GLM). The downscaled precipitation is evaluated with reference to recorded precipitation at 57 gauging stations located within the study region. The spatial and temporal robustness of the downscaling methods is evaluated using seven precipitation based indices. Results indicate that SP method-based models perform best in downscaling precipitation followed by GLM, followed by the SDSM model. Best performing models are thereafter used to downscale future precipitations made by three global circulation models (GCMs) following two emission scenarios: representative concentration pathway (RCP) 2.6 and RCP 8.5 over the twenty-first century. The downscaled future precipitation projections indicate an increase in mean and maximum precipitation intensity as well as a decrease in the total number of dry days. Further an increase in the frequency of short (1-day), moderately long (2-4 day), and long (more than 5-day) precipitation events is projected.

  14. Modeling and Simulation Techniques for Large-Scale Communications Modeling

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Webb, Steve

    1997-01-01

    .... Tests of random number generators were also developed and applied to CECOM models. It was found that synchronization of random number strings in simulations is easy to implement and can provide significant savings for making comparative studies. If synchronization is in place, then statistical experiment design can be used to provide information on the sensitivity of the output to input parameters. The report concludes with recommendations and an implementation plan.

  15. Drift-Scale Coupled Processes (DST and THC Seepage) Models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    E. Gonnenthal; N. Spyoher

    2001-02-05

    The purpose of this Analysis/Model Report (AMR) is to document the Near-Field Environment (NFE) and Unsaturated Zone (UZ) models used to evaluate the potential effects of coupled thermal-hydrologic-chemical (THC) processes on unsaturated zone flow and transport. This is in accordance with the ''Technical Work Plan (TWP) for Unsaturated Zone Flow and Transport Process Model Report'', Addendum D, Attachment D-4 (Civilian Radioactive Waste Management System (CRWMS) Management and Operating Contractor (M and O) 2000 [153447]) and ''Technical Work Plan for Nearfield Environment Thermal Analyses and Testing'' (CRWMS M and O 2000 [153309]). These models include the Drift Scale Test (DST) THC Model and several THC seepage models. These models provide the framework to evaluate THC coupled processes at the drift scale, predict flow and transport behavior for specified thermal loading conditions, and predict the chemistry of waters and gases entering potential waste-emplacement drifts. The intended use of this AMR is to provide input for the following: (1) Performance Assessment (PA); (2) Abstraction of Drift-Scale Coupled Processes AMR (ANL-NBS-HS-000029); (3) UZ Flow and Transport Process Model Report (PMR); and (4) Near-Field Environment (NFE) PMR. The work scope for this activity is presented in the TWPs cited above, and summarized as follows: continue development of the repository drift-scale THC seepage model used in support of the TSPA in-drift geochemical model; incorporate heterogeneous fracture property realizations; study sensitivity of results to changes in input data and mineral assemblage; validate the DST model by comparison with field data; perform simulations to predict mineral dissolution and precipitation and their effects on fracture properties and chemistry of water (but not flow rates) that may seep into drifts; submit modeling results to the TDMS and document the models. The model development, input data

  16. Disappearing scales in carps: re-visiting Kirpichnikov's model on the genetics of scale pattern formation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Casas

    Full Text Available The body of most fishes is fully covered by scales that typically form tight, partially overlapping rows. While some of the genes controlling the formation and growth of fish scales have been studied, very little is known about the genetic mechanisms regulating scale pattern formation. Although the existence of two genes with two pairs of alleles (S&s and N&n regulating scale coverage in cyprinids has been predicted by Kirpichnikov and colleagues nearly eighty years ago, their identity was unknown until recently. In 2009, the 'S' gene was found to be a paralog of fibroblast growth factor receptor 1, fgfr1a1, while the second gene called 'N' has not yet been identified. We re-visited the original model of Kirpichnikov that proposed four major scale pattern types and observed a high degree of variation within the so-called scattered phenotype due to which this group was divided into two sub-types: classical mirror and irregular. We also analyzed the survival rates of offspring groups and found a distinct difference between Asian and European crosses. Whereas nude × nude crosses involving at least one parent of Asian origin or hybrid with Asian parent(s showed the 25% early lethality predicted by Kirpichnikov (due to the lethality of the NN genotype, those with two Hungarian nude parents did not. We further extended Kirpichnikov's work by correlating changes in phenotype (scale-pattern to the deformations of fins and losses of pharyngeal teeth. We observed phenotypic changes which were not restricted to nudes, as described by Kirpichnikov, but were also present in mirrors (and presumably in linears as well; not analyzed in detail here. We propose that the gradation of phenotypes observed within the scattered group is caused by a gradually decreasing level of signaling (a dose-dependent effect probably due to a concerted action of multiple pathways involved in scale formation.

  17. Disappearing scales in carps: Re-visiting Kirpichnikov's model on the genetics of scale pattern formation

    KAUST Repository

    Casas, Laura

    2013-12-30

    The body of most fishes is fully covered by scales that typically form tight, partially overlapping rows. While some of the genes controlling the formation and growth of fish scales have been studied, very little is known about the genetic mechanisms regulating scale pattern formation. Although the existence of two genes with two pairs of alleles (S&s and N&n) regulating scale coverage in cyprinids has been predicted by Kirpichnikov and colleagues nearly eighty years ago, their identity was unknown until recently. In 2009, the \\'S\\' gene was found to be a paralog of fibroblast growth factor receptor 1, fgfr1a1, while the second gene called \\'N\\' has not yet been identified. We re-visited the original model of Kirpichnikov that proposed four major scale pattern types and observed a high degree of variation within the so-called scattered phenotype due to which this group was divided into two sub-types: classical mirror and irregular. We also analyzed the survival rates of offspring groups and found a distinct difference between Asian and European crosses. Whereas nude x nude crosses involving at least one parent of Asian origin or hybrid with Asian parent(s) showed the 25% early lethality predicted by Kirpichnikov (due to the lethality of the NN genotype), those with two Hungarian nude parents did not. We further extended Kirpichnikov\\'s work by correlating changes in phenotype (scale-pattern) to the deformations of fins and losses of pharyngeal teeth. We observed phenotypic changes which were not restricted to nudes, as described by Kirpichnikov, but were also present in mirrors (and presumably in linears as well; not analyzed in detail here). We propose that the gradation of phenotypes observed within the scattered group is caused by a gradually decreasing level of signaling (a dosedependent effect) probably due to a concerted action of multiple pathways involved in scale formation. 2013 Casas et al.

  18. Disappearing scales in carps: re-visiting Kirpichnikov's model on the genetics of scale pattern formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casas, Laura; Szűcs, Réka; Vij, Shubha; Goh, Chin Heng; Kathiresan, Purushothaman; Németh, Sándor; Jeney, Zsigmond; Bercsényi, Miklós; Orbán, László

    2013-01-01

    The body of most fishes is fully covered by scales that typically form tight, partially overlapping rows. While some of the genes controlling the formation and growth of fish scales have been studied, very little is known about the genetic mechanisms regulating scale pattern formation. Although the existence of two genes with two pairs of alleles (S&s and N&n) regulating scale coverage in cyprinids has been predicted by Kirpichnikov and colleagues nearly eighty years ago, their identity was unknown until recently. In 2009, the 'S' gene was found to be a paralog of fibroblast growth factor receptor 1, fgfr1a1, while the second gene called 'N' has not yet been identified. We re-visited the original model of Kirpichnikov that proposed four major scale pattern types and observed a high degree of variation within the so-called scattered phenotype due to which this group was divided into two sub-types: classical mirror and irregular. We also analyzed the survival rates of offspring groups and found a distinct difference between Asian and European crosses. Whereas nude × nude crosses involving at least one parent of Asian origin or hybrid with Asian parent(s) showed the 25% early lethality predicted by Kirpichnikov (due to the lethality of the NN genotype), those with two Hungarian nude parents did not. We further extended Kirpichnikov's work by correlating changes in phenotype (scale-pattern) to the deformations of fins and losses of pharyngeal teeth. We observed phenotypic changes which were not restricted to nudes, as described by Kirpichnikov, but were also present in mirrors (and presumably in linears as well; not analyzed in detail here). We propose that the gradation of phenotypes observed within the scattered group is caused by a gradually decreasing level of signaling (a dose-dependent effect) probably due to a concerted action of multiple pathways involved in scale formation.

  19. New Models and Methods for the Electroweak Scale

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carpenter, Linda [The Ohio State Univ., Columbus, OH (United States). Dept. of Physics

    2017-09-26

    This is the Final Technical Report to the US Department of Energy for grant DE-SC0013529, New Models and Methods for the Electroweak Scale, covering the time period April 1, 2015 to March 31, 2017. The goal of this project was to maximize the understanding of fundamental weak scale physics in light of current experiments, mainly the ongoing run of the Large Hadron Collider and the space based satellite experiements searching for signals Dark Matter annihilation or decay. This research program focused on the phenomenology of supersymmetry, Higgs physics, and Dark Matter. The properties of the Higgs boson are currently being measured by the Large Hadron collider, and could be a sensitive window into new physics at the weak scale. Supersymmetry is the leading theoretical candidate to explain the natural nessof the electroweak theory, however new model space must be explored as the Large Hadron collider has disfavored much minimal model parameter space. In addition the nature of Dark Matter, the mysterious particle that makes up 25% of the mass of the universe is still unknown. This project sought to address measurements of the Higgs boson couplings to the Standard Model particles, new LHC discovery scenarios for supersymmetric particles, and new measurements of Dark Matter interactions with the Standard Model both in collider production and annihilation in space. Accomplishments include new creating tools for analyses of Dark Matter models in Dark Matter which annihilates into multiple Standard Model particles, including new visualizations of bounds for models with various Dark Matter branching ratios; benchmark studies for new discovery scenarios of Dark Matter at the Large Hardon Collider for Higgs-Dark Matter and gauge boson-Dark Matter interactions; New target analyses to detect direct decays of the Higgs boson into challenging final states like pairs of light jets, and new phenomenological analysis of non-minimal supersymmetric models, namely the set of Dirac

  20. Transport upscaling from pore- to Darcy-scale: Incorporating pore-scale Berea sandstone Lagrangian velocity statistics into a Darcy-scale transport CTRW model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puyguiraud, Alexandre; Dentz, Marco; Gouze, Philippe

    2017-04-01

    For the past several years a lot of attention has been given to pore-scale flow in order to understand and model transport, mixing and reaction in porous media. Nevertheless we believe that an accurate study of spatial and temporal evolution of velocities could bring important additional information for the upscaling from pore to higher scales. To gather these pieces of information, we perform Stokes flow simulations on pore-scale digitized images of a Berea sandstone core. First, micro-tomography (XRMT) imaging and segmentation processes allow us to obtain 3D black and white images of the sample [1]. Then we used an OpenFoam solver to perform the Stokes flow simulations mentioned above, which gives us the velocities at the interfaces of a cubic mesh. Subsequently, we use a particle streamline reconstruction technique which uses the Eulerian velocity field previously obtained. This technique, based on a modified Pollock algorithm [2], enables us to make particle tracking simulations on the digitized sample. In order to build a stochastic pore-scale transport model, we analyze the Lagrangian velocity series in two different ways. First we investigate the velocity evolution by sampling isochronically (t-Lagrangian), and by studying its statistical properties in terms of one- and two-points statistics. Intermittent patterns can be observed. These are due to the persistance of low velocities over a characteristic space length. Other results are investigated, such as correlation functions and velocity PDFs, which permit us to study more deeply this persistence in the velocities and to compute the correlation times. However, with the second approach, doing these same analysis in space by computing the velocities equidistantly, enables us to remove the intermittency shown in the temporal evolution and to model these velocity series as a Markov process. This renders the stochastic particle dynamics into a CTRW [3]. [1] Gjetvaj, F., A. Russian, P. Gouze, and M. Dentz (2015