WorldWideScience

Sample records for model l4 monthly

  1. SU_L(4) x U(1) model for electroweak unification

    CERN Document Server

    Fayyazuddin, A

    2004-01-01

    After some general remarks about SU_L(4) electroweak unification, the model is extended to SU_L(4)xU_X(1) to accomodate fractionally charged quarks. The unification scale is expected to be in TeV region. A right-handed Majorana neutrino along with known lepton are put in the fundamental representation of SU_L(4) with Y_X=0. The see-saw mechanism for neutrino masses and flavor mixing in neutrino sector is a natural feature of the model. The lepton number violating processes can occure through dilepton gauge bosons contained in the model.

  2. A finite element model of the L4-L5-S1 human spine segment including the heterogeneity and anisotropy of the discs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaramillo, Hector E; Gómez, Lessby; García, Jose J

    2015-01-01

    With the aim to study disc degeneration and the risk of injury during occupational activities, a new finite element (FE) model of the L4-L5-S1 segment of the human spine was developed based on the anthropometry of a typical Colombian worker. Beginning with medical images, the programs CATIA and SOLIDWORKS were used to generate and assemble the vertebrae and create the soft structures of the segment. The software ABAQUS was used to run the analyses, which included a detailed model calibration using the experimental step-wise reduction data for the L4-L5 component, while the L5-S1 segment was calibrated in the intact condition. The range of motion curves, the intradiscal pressure and the lateral bulging under pure moments were considered for the calibration. As opposed to other FE models that include the L5-S1 disc, the model developed in this study considered the regional variations and anisotropy of the annulus as well as a realistic description of the nucleus geometry, which allowed an improved representation of experimental data during the validation process. Hence, the model can be used to analyze the stress and strain distributions in the L4-L5 and L5-S1 discs of workers performing activities such as lifting and carrying tasks.

  3. Material Parameter Determination of an L4-L5 Motion Segment Finite Element Model Under High Loading Rates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pyles, C O; Zhang, J; Demetropoulos, C K; Bradfield, C A; Ott, K A; Armiger, R S; Merkle, A C

    2015-01-01

    Underbody blast (UBB) events impart vertical loads through a victim’s lumbar spine, resulting in fracture, paralysis, and disc rupture. Validated biofidelic lumbar models allow characterization of injury mechanisms and development of personal protective equipment. Previous studies have focused on lumbar mechanics under quasi-static loading. However, it is unclear how the role and response of individual spinal components of the lumbar spine change under dynamic loading. The present study leverages high-rate impacts of progressively dissected two-vertebra lumbar motion segments and Split-Hopkinson pressure bar tissue characterization to identify and validate material properties of a high-fidelity lumbar spine finite element model for UBB. The annulus fibrosus was modeled as a fiber-reinforced Mooney-Rivlin material, while ligaments were represented by nonlinear spring elements. Optimization and evaluation of material parameters was achieved by minimizing the root-mean-square (RMS) of compressive displacement and sagittal rotation for selected experimental conditions. Applying dynamic based material models and parameters resulted in a 0.42% difference between predicted and experiment axial compression during impact loading. This dynamically optimized lumbar model is suited for cross validation against whole-lumbar loading scenarios, and prediction of injury during UBB and other dynamic events.

  4. Monthly Water Balance Model Hydrology Futures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bock, Andy; Hay, Lauren E.; Markstrom, Steven; Atkinson, R. Dwight

    2016-01-01

    A monthly water balance model (MWBM) was driven with precipitation and temperature using a station-based dataset for current conditions (1950 to 2010) and selected statistically-downscaled general circulation models (GCMs) for current and future conditions (1950 to 2099) across the conterminous United States (CONUS) using hydrologic response units from the Geospatial Fabric for National Hydrologic Modeling (http://dx.doi.org/doi:10.5066/F7542KMD). Six MWBM output variables (actual evapotranspiration (AET), potential evapotranspiration (PET), runoff (RO), streamflow (STRM), soil moisture storage (SOIL), and snow water equivalent (SWE)) and the two MWBM input variables (atmospheric temperature (TAVE) and precipitation (PPT)) were summarized for hydrologic response units and aggregated at points of interest on a stream network. Results were then organized into the Monthly Water Balance Hydrology Futures database, an open-access database using netCDF format (http://cida-eros-mows1.er.usgs.gov/thredds/dodsC/nwb_pub/).  Methods used to calibrate and parameterize the MWBM are detailed in the Hydrology and Earth System Sciences (HESS)  paper "Parameter regionalization of a monthly water balance model for the conterminous United States" by Bock and others (2016).  See the discussion paper link in the "Related External Resources" section for access.  Supplemental data files related to the plots and data analysis in Bock and others (2016) can be found in the HESS-2015-325.zip folder in the "Attached Files" section.  Detailed information on the files and data can be found in the ReadMe.txt contained within the zipped folder. Recommended citation of discussion paper:Bock, A.R., Hay, L.E., McCabe, G.J., Markstrom, S.L., and Atkinson, R.D., 2016, Parameter regionalization of a monthly water balance model for the conterminous United States: Hydrology and Earth System Sciences, v. 20, 2861-2876, doi:10.5194/hess-20-2861-2016, 2016

  5. Impact of improved snowmelt modelling in a monthly hydrological model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Folton, Nathalie; Garcia, Florine

    2016-04-01

    The quantification and the management of water resources at the regional scale require hydrological models that are both easy to implement and efficient. To be reliable and robust, these models must be calibrated and validated on a large number of catchments that are representative of various hydro-meteorological conditions, physiographic contexts, and specific hydrological behavior (e.g. mountainous catchments). The GRLoiEau monthly model, with its simple structure and its two free parameters, answer our need of such a simple model. It required the development of a snow routine to model catchments with temporarily snow-covered areas. The snow routine developed here does not claim to represent physical snowmelt processes but rather to simulate them globally on the catchment. The snowmelt equation is based on the degree-day method which is widely used by the hydrological community, in particular in engineering studies (Etchevers 2000). A potential snowmelt (Schaefli et al. 2005) was computed, and the parameters of the snow routine were regionalized for each mountain area. The GRLoiEau parsimonious structure requires meteorological data. They come from the distributed mesoscale atmospheric analysis system SAFRAN, which provides estimations of daily solid and liquid precipitations and temperatures on a regular square grid at the spatial resolution of 8*8 km², throughout France. Potential evapotranspiration was estimated using the formula by Oudin et al. (2005). The aim of this study is to improve the quality of monthly simulations for ungauged basins, in particular for all types of mountain catchments, without increasing the number of free parameters of the model. By using daily SAFRAN data, the production store and snowmelt can be run at a daily time scale. The question then arises whether simulating the monthly flows using a production function at a finer time step would improve the results. And by using the SAFRAN distributed climate series, a distributed approach

  6. Technical Report Series on Global Modeling and Data Assimilation. Volume 42; Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) Project Calibration and Validation for the L4_C Beta-Release Data Product

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koster, Randal D. (Editor); Kimball, John S.; Jones, Lucas A.; Glassy, Joseph; Stavros, E. Natasha; Madani, Nima (Editor); Reichle, Rolf H.; Jackson, Thomas; Colliander, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    During the post-launch Cal/Val Phase of SMAP there are two objectives for each science product team: 1) calibrate, verify, and improve the performance of the science algorithms, and 2) validate accuracies of the science data products as specified in the L1 science requirements according to the Cal/Val timeline. This report provides analysis and assessment of the SMAP Level 4 Carbon (L4_C) product specifically for the beta release. The beta-release version of the SMAP L4_C algorithms utilizes a terrestrial carbon flux model informed by SMAP soil moisture inputs along with optical remote sensing (e.g. MODIS) vegetation indices and other ancillary biophysical data to estimate global daily NEE and component carbon fluxes, particularly vegetation gross primary production (GPP) and ecosystem respiration (Reco). Other L4_C product elements include surface (<10 cm depth) soil organic carbon (SOC) stocks and associated environmental constraints to these processes, including soil moisture and landscape FT controls on GPP and Reco (Kimball et al. 2012). The L4_C product encapsulates SMAP carbon cycle science objectives by: 1) providing a direct link between terrestrial carbon fluxes and underlying freeze/thaw and soil moisture constraints to these processes, 2) documenting primary connections between terrestrial water, energy and carbon cycles, and 3) improving understanding of terrestrial carbon sink activity in northern ecosystems.

  7. Statistical procedures for evaluating daily and monthly hydrologic model predictions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coffey, M.E.; Workman, S.R.; Taraba, J.L.; Fogle, A.W.

    2004-01-01

    The overall study objective was to evaluate the applicability of different qualitative and quantitative methods for comparing daily and monthly SWAT computer model hydrologic streamflow predictions to observed data, and to recommend statistical methods for use in future model evaluations. Statistical methods were tested using daily streamflows and monthly equivalent runoff depths. The statistical techniques included linear regression, Nash-Sutcliffe efficiency, nonparametric tests, t-test, objective functions, autocorrelation, and cross-correlation. None of the methods specifically applied to the non-normal distribution and dependence between data points for the daily predicted and observed data. Of the tested methods, median objective functions, sign test, autocorrelation, and cross-correlation were most applicable for the daily data. The robust coefficient of determination (CD*) and robust modeling efficiency (EF*) objective functions were the preferred methods for daily model results due to the ease of comparing these values with a fixed ideal reference value of one. Predicted and observed monthly totals were more normally distributed, and there was less dependence between individual monthly totals than was observed for the corresponding predicted and observed daily values. More statistical methods were available for comparing SWAT model-predicted and observed monthly totals. The 1995 monthly SWAT model predictions and observed data had a regression Rr2 of 0.70, a Nash-Sutcliffe efficiency of 0.41, and the t-test failed to reject the equal data means hypothesis. The Nash-Sutcliffe coefficient and the R r2 coefficient were the preferred methods for monthly results due to the ability to compare these coefficients to a set ideal value of one.

  8. Modeling of the Monthly Rainfall-Runoff Process Through Regressions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Campos-Aranda Daniel Francisco

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available To solve the problems associated with the assessment of water resources of a river, the modeling of the rainfall-runoff process (RRP allows the deduction of runoff missing data and to extend its record, since generally the information available on precipitation is larger. It also enables the estimation of inputs to reservoirs, when their building led to the suppression of the gauging station. The simplest mathematical model that can be set for the RRP is the linear regression or curve on a monthly basis. Such a model is described in detail and is calibrated with the simultaneous record of monthly rainfall and runoff in Ballesmi hydrometric station, which covers 35 years. Since the runoff of this station has an important contribution from the spring discharge, the record is corrected first by removing that contribution. In order to do this a procedure was developed based either on the monthly average regional runoff coefficients or on nearby and similar watershed; in this case the Tancuilín gauging station was used. Both stations belong to the Partial Hydrologic Region No. 26 (Lower Rio Panuco and are located within the state of San Luis Potosi, México. The study performed indicates that the monthly regression model, due to its conceptual approach, faithfully reproduces monthly average runoff volumes and achieves an excellent approximation in relation to the dispersion, proved by calculation of the means and standard deviations.

  9. A complex autoregressive model and application to monthly temperature forecasts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    X. Gu

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available A complex autoregressive model was established based on the mathematic derivation of the least squares for the complex number domain which is referred to as the complex least squares. The model is different from the conventional way that the real number and the imaginary number are separately calculated. An application of this new model shows a better forecast than forecasts from other conventional statistical models, in predicting monthly temperature anomalies in July at 160 meteorological stations in mainland China. The conventional statistical models include an autoregressive model, where the real number and the imaginary number are separately disposed, an autoregressive model in the real number domain, and a persistence-forecast model.

  10. Modelling raster-based monthly water balance components for Europe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ulmen, C.

    2000-11-01

    The terrestrial runoff component is a comparatively small but sensitive and thus significant quantity in the global energy and water cycle at the interface between landmass and atmosphere. As opposed to soil moisture and evapotranspiration which critically determine water vapour fluxes and thus water and energy transport, it can be measured as an integrated quantity over a large area, i.e. the river basin. This peculiarity makes terrestrial runoff ideally suited for the calibration, verification and validation of general circulation models (GCMs). Gauging stations are not homogeneously distributed in space. Moreover, time series are not necessarily continuously measured nor do they in general have overlapping time periods. To overcome this problems with regard to regular grid spacing used in GCMs, different methods can be applied to transform irregular data to regular so called gridded runoff fields. The present work aims to directly compute the gridded components of the monthly water balance (including gridded runoff fields) for Europe by application of the well-established raster-based macro-scale water balance model WABIMON used at the Federal Institute of Hydrology, Germany. Model calibration and validation is performed by separated examination of 29 representative European catchments. Results indicate a general applicability of the model delivering reliable overall patterns and integrated quantities on a monthly basis. For time steps less then too weeks further research and structural improvements of the model are suggested. (orig.)

  11. Modelling and forecasting monthly swordfish catches in the Eastern Mediterranean

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Konstantinos I. Stergiou

    2003-04-01

    Full Text Available In this study, we used the X-11 census technique for modelling and forecasting the monthly swordfish (Xiphias gladius catches in the Greek Seas during 1982-1996 and 1997 respectively, using catches reported by the National Statistical Service of Greece (NSSG. Forecasts built with X-11 were also compared with those derived from ARIMA andWinter’s exponential smoothing (WES models. The X-11 method captured the features of the study series and outperformed the other two methods, in terms of both fitting and forecasting performance, for all the accuracy measures used. Thus, with the exception of October, November and December 1997, when the corresponding absolute percentage error(APE values were very high (as high as 178.6% because of the low level of the catches, monthly catches during the remaining months of 1997 were predicted accurately, with a mean APE of 12.5%. In contrast, the mean APE values of the other two methods for the same months were higher (ARIMA: 14.6%; WES: 16.6%. The overall good performance of X-11 andthe fact that it provides an insight into the various components (i.e. the seasonal, trend-cycle and irregular components of the time series of interest justify its use in fisheries research. The basic features of the swordfish catches revealed by the application of the X-11 method, the effect of the length of the forecasting horizon on forecasting accuracy and the accuracy of the catches reported by NSSG are also discussed.

  12. Greenland Ice Sheet Mass Loss from GRACE Monthly Models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Louise Sandberg; Forsberg, René

    2010-01-01

    model ICE-5G and on ground measurements made in Scandinavia. We find that the PGR signal corresponds to a mass change signal of approximately -4 Gt per year. We conclude that there are large differences between these estimated mass change models. We find a total mass loss of 189, 146 and 67 Gt......The Greenland ice sheet is currently experiencing a net mass loss. There are however large discrepancies between the published qualitative mass loss estimates, based on different data sets and methods. There are even large differences between the results based on the same data sources...... these monthly global gravity models, we first calculate the gravity trend from these. When isolating the gravity trend signal, which is caused by the ice mass change, we first subtract the signal produced by the postglacial rebound (PGR) in Greenland. This is done by a simple method based on the ice history...

  13. Monthly to seasonal low flow prediction: statistical versus dynamical models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ionita-Scholz, Monica; Klein, Bastian; Meissner, Dennis; Rademacher, Silke

    2016-04-01

    While the societal and economical impacts of floods are well documented and assessable, the impacts of lows flows are less studied and sometimes overlooked. For example, over the western part of Europe, due to intense inland waterway transportation, the economical loses due to low flows are often similar compared to the ones due to floods. In general, the low flow aspect has the tendency to be underestimated by the scientific community. One of the best examples in this respect is the facts that at European level most of the countries have an (early) flood alert system, but in many cases no real information regarding the development, evolution and impacts of droughts. Low flows, occurring during dry periods, may result in several types of problems to society and economy: e.g. lack of water for drinking, irrigation, industrial use and power production, deterioration of water quality, inland waterway transport, agriculture, tourism, issuing and renewing waste disposal permits, and for assessing the impact of prolonged drought on aquatic ecosystems. As such, the ever-increasing demand on water resources calls for better a management, understanding and prediction of the water deficit situation and for more reliable and extended studies regarding the evolution of the low flow situations. In order to find an optimized monthly to seasonal forecast procedure for the German waterways, the Federal Institute of Hydrology (BfG) is exploring multiple approaches at the moment. On the one hand, based on the operational short- to medium-range forecasting chain, existing hydrological models are forced with two different hydro-meteorological inputs: (i) resampled historical meteorology generated by the Ensemble Streamflow Prediction approach and (ii) ensemble (re-) forecasts of ECMWF's global coupled ocean-atmosphere general circulation model, which have to be downscaled and bias corrected before feeding the hydrological models. As a second approach BfG evaluates in cooperation with

  14. [L4 crural neuralgia and disc hernia of the L4-L5 intervertebral foramen].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Recoules-Arché, D; Gayet, A

    1986-03-01

    Discal L4 crural neuralgia is conventionally considered secondary to a hernia of the L3-L4 disc. Now, another source of discoradicular conflict exists on the path of the L4 root: hernia of the link canal of the L4-L5 canal through which the root leaves the rachidian canal. Of 27 discal neuralgias operated upon, 9 were linked to a hernia of the L3-L4 disc, while 18 were secondary to a hernia of the L4-L5 foramen, that is 2 foramina hernias for 1 "intrarachidian" hernia. The diagnostic difficulties resulting from foramina hernias probably reflect a rarity that is more apparent than real. The etiology of crural neuralgia is conventionally sought at the L3-L4 disc. This search is often unsuccessful: one speaks of "essential crural neuralgia". The scanner provides the only certain way of revealing foramina hernias, and will probably detect increasing numbers and thus reduce the number of "idiopathic crural neuralgias".

  15. Blood-brain barrier (BBB) toxicity and permeability assessment after L-(4-¹⁰Boronophenyl)alanine, a conventional B-containing drug for boron neutron capture therapy, using an in vitro BBB model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roda, E; Nion, S; Bernocchi, G; Coccini, T

    2014-10-01

    Since brain tumours are the primary candidates for treatment by Boron Neutron Capture Therapy, one major challenge in the selective drug delivery to CNS is the crossing of the blood-brain barrier (BBB). The present pilot study investigated (i) the transport of a conventional B-containing product (i.e., L-(4-(10)Boronophenyl)alanine, L-(10)BPA), already used in medicine but still not fully characterized regarding its CNS interactions, as well as (ii) the effects of the L-(10)BPA on the BBB integrity using an in vitro model, consisting of brain capillary endothelial cells co-cultured with glial cells, closely mimicking the in vivo conditions. The multi-step experimental strategy (i.e. Integrity test, Filter study, Transport assay) checked L-(10)BPA toxicity at 80 µg Boron equivalent/ml, and its ability to cross the BBB, additionally by characterizing the cytoskeletal and TJ's proteins by immunocytochemistry and immunoblotting. In conclusion, a lack of toxic effects of L-(10)BPA was demonstrated, nevertheless accompanied by cellular stress phenomena (e.g. vimentin expression modification), paralleled by a low permeability coefficient (0.39 ± 0.01 × 10(-3)cm min(-1)), corroborating the scarce probability that L-(10)BPA would reach therapeutically effective cerebral concentration. These findings emphasized the need for novel strategies aimed at optimizing boron delivery to brain tumours, trying to ameliorate the compound uptake or developing new targeted products suitable to safely and effectively treat head cancer. Thus, the use of in vitro BBB model for screening studies may provide a useful early safety assessment for new effective compounds.

  16. Technical Report Series on Global Modeling and Data Assimilation. Volume 40; Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) Project Assessment Report for the Beta-Release L4_SM Data Product

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koster, Randal D.; Reichle, Rolf H.; De Lannoy, Gabrielle J. M.; Liu, Qing; Colliander, Andreas; Conaty, Austin; Jackson, Thomas; Kimball, John

    2015-01-01

    During the post-launch SMAP calibration and validation (Cal/Val) phase there are two objectives for each science data product team: 1) calibrate, verify, and improve the performance of the science algorithm, and 2) validate the accuracy of the science data product as specified in the science requirements and according to the Cal/Val schedule. This report provides an assessment of the SMAP Level 4 Surface and Root Zone Soil Moisture Passive (L4_SM) product specifically for the product's public beta release scheduled for 30 October 2015. The primary objective of the beta release is to allow users to familiarize themselves with the data product before the validated product becomes available. The beta release also allows users to conduct their own assessment of the data and to provide feedback to the L4_SM science data product team. The assessment of the L4_SM data product includes comparisons of SMAP L4_SM soil moisture estimates with in situ soil moisture observations from core validation sites and sparse networks. The assessment further includes a global evaluation of the internal diagnostics from the ensemble-based data assimilation system that is used to generate the L4_SM product. This evaluation focuses on the statistics of the observation-minus-forecast (O-F) residuals and the analysis increments. Together, the core validation site comparisons and the statistics of the assimilation diagnostics are considered primary validation methodologies for the L4_SM product. Comparisons against in situ measurements from regional-scale sparse networks are considered a secondary validation methodology because such in situ measurements are subject to upscaling errors from the point-scale to the grid cell scale of the data product. Based on the limited set of core validation sites, the assessment presented here meets the criteria established by the Committee on Earth Observing Satellites for Stage 1 validation and supports the beta release of the data. The validation against

  17. The experiment of monthly mean circulation prediction using the analogy-dynamical model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    BAO Ming; NI Yunqi; CHOU Jifan

    2004-01-01

    Based on the past related research work, a new analogy-dynamical monthly prediction model is established with the operational dynamic extended-range forecast model T63L16 (hereafter T63) as a dynamic kernel. The monthly mean circulation prediction with T63 is considered as a control experiment, and the prediction with the analogy-dynamical model as a contrast one. It is found that the analogy-dynamical model has more precise forecast skill than the T63 model through monthly mean numerical prediction experiment.

  18. Comparison of semivariogram models for kriging monthly rainfall in eastern China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    汤燕冰

    2002-01-01

    An exploratory spatial data analysis method(ESDA) was designed Apr.28,2002 for kriging monthly rainfall.Samples were monthly rainfall observed at 61 weather stations in eastern China over the period 1961-1998.Comparison of five semivariogram models(Spherical,Exponential,Linear,Gaussian and Rational Quadratic)indicated that kriging fulfills the objective of finding better ways to estimate interpolation weights and can provide error information for monthly rainfall interpolation.ESDA yielded the three most common forms of experimental semivariogram for monthly rainfall in the erea.All five models were appropriate for monthly rainflaa interpolation but under different circumstances.Spherical,Exponential and Linear models perform as smoothing interpolator of the data,whereas Gaussian and Rational Quadratic models serve as an exact interpolator.Spherical,Exponential and Linear models tend to underestimate the values,On the contrayr,Gaussian and Rational Quadratic models tend to overestimate the values.On the contrary,Gaussian and Rational Quadratic models tend to overestimate the values,Since the suitable model for a specific month usually is not unique and each model does not show any bias toward one or more specific months,an ESDA is recommended for a better interpolation result.

  19. Comparison of semivariogram models for Kriging monthly rainfall in eastern China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    汤燕冰

    2002-01-01

    An exploratory spatial data analysis method (ESDA) was designed Apr.28,2002 for kriging monthly rainfall. Samples were monthly rainfall observed at 61 weather stations in eastern China over the period 1961-1998. Comparison of five semivariogram models (Spherical, Exponential, Linear, Gaussian and Rational Quadratic) indicated that kriging fulfills the objective of finding better ways to estimate interpolation weights and can provide error information for monthly rainfall interpolation. ESDA yielded the three most common forms of experimental semivariogram for monthly rainfall in the area. All five models were appropriate for monthly rainfall interpolation but under different circumstances. Spherical, Exponential and Linear models perform as smoothing interpolator of the data, whereas Gaussian and Rational Quadratic models serve as an exact interpolator. Spherical, Exponential and Linear models tend to underestimate the values. On the contrary, Gaussian and Rational Quadratic models tend to overestimate the values. Since the suitable model for a specific month usually is not unique and each model does not show any bias toward one or more specific months, an ESDA is recommended for a better interpolation result.

  20. Comparison of performance of statistical models in forecasting monthly streamflow of Kizil River,China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shalamu ABUDU; Chun-liang CUI; James Phillip KING; Kaiser ABUDUKADEER

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents the application of autoregressive integrated moving average(ARIMA),seasonal ARIMA(SARIMA),and Jordan-Elman artificial neural networks(ANN)models in forecasting the monthly streamflow of the Kizil River in Xinjiang,China.Two different types of monthly streamflow data(original and deseasonalized data)were used to develop time series and Jordan-Elman ANN models using previous flow conditions as predictors.The one-month-ahead forecasting performances of all models for the testing period(1998-2005)were compared using the average monthly flow data from the Kalabeili gaging station on the Kizil River.The Jordan-Elman ANN models,using previous flow conditions as inputs,resulted in no significant improvement over time series models in one-month-ahead forecasting.The results suggest that the simple time series models(ARIMA and SARIMA)can be used in one-month-ahead streamflow forecasting at the study site with a simple and explicit model structure and a model performance similar to the Jordan-Elman ANN models.

  1. Monthly Precipitation Input Data for the Central Valley Hydrologic Model (CVHM)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This digital dataset contains the monthly precipitation for the Central Valley Hydrologic Model (CVHM). The Central Valley encompasses an approximate 50,000...

  2. Monthly Diversions from the Surface-Water Network of the Central Valley Hydrologic Model (CVHM)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This digital dataset contains the monthly diversions from the surface-water network for the Central Valley Hydrologic Model (CVHM). The Central Valley encompasses an...

  3. Monthly inflows to the surface-water network for the Central Valley Hydrologic Model (CVHM)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This digital dataset contains the monthly inflows to the surface-water network for the Central Valley Hydrologic Model (CVHM). The Central Valley encompasses an...

  4. Distributed modeling of monthly air temperatures over the rugged terrain of the Yellow River Basin

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZENG Yan; QIU XinFa; HE YongJian; SHI GuoPing; LIU ChangMing

    2009-01-01

    Our analyses of the monthly mean air temperature of meteorological stations show that altitude, global solar radiation and surface effective radiation have a significant impact on air temperature. We set up a physically-based empirical model for monthly air temperature simulation. Combined the proposed model with the distributed modeling results of global solar radiation and routine meteorological ob-servation data, we also developed a method for the distributed simulation of monthly sir temperatures over rugged terrain. Spatial distribution maps are generated at a resolution of 1 km×1 km for the monthly mean, the monthly mean maximum and the monthly mean minimum air temperatures for the Yellow River Basin. Analysis shows that the simulation results reflect to a considerable extent the macro and local distribution characteristics of air temperature. Cross-validation shows that the pro-posed model displays good stability with mean absolute bias errors of 0.19℃-0.35℃. Tests carried out on local meteorological station data and case year data show that the model has good spatial and temporal simulation capacity. The proposed model solely uses routine meteorological data and can be applied easily to other regions.

  5. Distributed modeling of monthly air temperatures over the rugged terrain of the Yellow River Basin

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    Our analyses of the monthly mean air temperature of meteorological stations show that altitude,global solar radiation and surface effective radiation have a significant impact on air temperature.We set up a physically-based empirical model for monthly air temperature simulation.Combined the proposed model with the distributed modeling results of global solar radiation and routine meteorological observation data,we also developed a method for the distributed simulation of monthly air temperatures over rugged terrain.Spatial distribution maps are generated at a resolution of 1 km×1 km for the monthly mean,the monthly mean maximum and the monthly mean minimum air temperatures for the Yellow River Basin.Analysis shows that the simulation results reflect to a considerable extent the macro and local distribution characteristics of air temperature.Cross-validation shows that the proposed model displays good stability with mean absolute bias errors of 0.19℃-0.35℃.Tests carried out on local meteorological station data and case year data show that the model has good spatial and temporal simulation capacity.The proposed model solely uses routine meteorological data and can be applied easily to other regions.

  6. On the treatment of evapotranspiration, soil moisture accounting, and aquifer recharge in monthly water balance models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alley, W.M.

    1984-01-01

    Several two- to six-parameter regional water balance models are examined by using 50-year records of monthly streamflow at 10 sites in New Jersey. These models include variants of the Thornthwaite-Mather model, the Palmer model, and the more recent Thomas abcd model. Prediction errors are relatively similar among the models. However, simulated values of state variables such as soil moisture storage differ substantially among the models, and fitted parameter values for different models sometimes indicated an entirely different type of basin response to precipitation.-from Author

  7. Predicting monthly precipitation along coastal Ecuador: ENSO and transfer function models

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Guenni, Lelys B.; García, Mariangel; Muñoz, Ángel G.; Santos, José L.; Cedeño, Alexandra; Perugachi, Carlos; Castillo, José

    2017-08-01

    It is well known that El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO) modifies precipitation patterns in several parts of the world. One of the most impacted areas is the western coast of South America, where Ecuador is located. El Niño events that occurred in 1982-1983, 1987-1988, 1991-1992, and 1997-1998 produced important positive rainfall anomalies in the coastal zone of Ecuador, bringing considerable damage to livelihoods, agriculture, and infrastructure. Operational climate forecasts in the region provide only seasonal scale (e.g., 3-month averages) information, but during ENSO events it is key for decision-makers to use reliable sub-seasonal scale forecasts, which at the present time are still non-existent in most parts of the world. This study analyzes the potential predictability of coastal Ecuador rainfall at monthly scale. Instead of the discrete approach that considers training models using only particular seasons, continuous (i.e., all available months are used) transfer function models are built using standard ENSO indices to explore rainfall forecast skill along the Ecuadorian coast and Galápagos Islands. The modeling approach considers a large-scale contribution, represented by the role of a sea-surface temperature index, and a local-scale contribution represented here via the use of previous precipitation observed in the same station. The study found that the Niño3 index is the best ENSO predictor of monthly coastal rainfall, with a lagged response varying from 0 months (simultaneous) for Galápagos up to 3 months for the continental locations considered. Model validation indicates that the skill is similar to the one obtained using principal component regression models for the same kind of experiments. It is suggested that the proposed approach could provide skillful rainfall forecasts at monthly scale for up to a few months in advance.

  8. Catalytic dehalogenation of N-acetyl-L-4-chloro- and N-acetyl-L-4-iodophenylalanine amide in the presence of deuterium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oehlke, J.; Bienert, M.; Niedrich, H.; Zoepfl, H.-J.; Franke, P.

    1986-09-01

    As a model for the tritium labeling of peptides, the catalytic dehalogenation of N-Acetyl-L-4-chloro- and N-Acetyl-L-4-iodo-phenylalanine amide was investigated in the presence of deuterium, using different reaction conditions. A catalyst-mediated transfer of the solvent-hydrogen to the substrate was found to be the most probable reason for the exchange of halogen by hydrogen instead of deuterium. This unwanted transfer was most intensive in the presence of water. An incorporation of additional deuterium besides the 4-position of phenylalanine takes place simultaneously with the dehalogenation especially of the chloro derivative.

  9. A regional GIS-based model for reconstructing natural monthly streamflow series at ungauged sites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pumo, Dario; Lo Conti, Francesco; Viola, Francesco; Noto, Leonardo V.

    2016-04-01

    Several hydrologic applications require reliable estimates of monthly runoff in river basins to face the widespread lack of data, both in time and in space. The main aim of this work is to propose a regional model for the estimation of monthly natural runoff series at ungauged sites, analyzing its applicability, reliability and limitations. A GIS (Geographic Information System) based model is here developed and applied to the entire region of Sicily (Italy). The core of this tool is a regional model for the estimation of monthly natural runoff series, based on a simple modelling structure, consisting of a regression based rainfall-runoff model with only four parameters. The monthly runoff is obtained as a function of precipitation and mean temperature at the same month and runoff at the previous month. For a given basin, the four model parameters are assessed by specific regional equations as a function of some easily measurable geomorphic and climate basins' descriptors. The model is calibrated by a "two-step" procedure applied to a number of gauged basins over the region. The first step is aimed at the identification of a set of parameters optimizing model performances at the level of single basin. Such "optimal" parameters sets, derived for each calibration basin, are successively used inside a regional regression analysis, performed at the second step, by which the regional equations for model parameters assessment are defined and calibrated. All the gauged watersheds across the Sicily have been analyzed, selecting 53 basins for model calibration and using other 6 basins exclusively for validation purposes. Model performances, quantitatively evaluated considering different statistical indexes, demonstrate a relevant model ability in capturing the observed hydrological response at both the monthly level and higher time scales (seasonal and annual). One of the key features related to the proposed methodology is its easy transferability to other arid and semiarid

  10. Characterization of the L4-L5-S1 motion segment using the stepwise reduction method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaramillo, Héctor Enrique; Puttlitz, Christian M; McGilvray, Kirk; García, José J

    2016-05-03

    The two aims of this study were to generate data for a more accurate calibration of finite element models including the L5-S1 segment, and to find mechanical differences between the L4-L5 and L5-S1 segments. Then, the range of motion (ROM) and facet forces for the L4-S1 segment were measured using the stepwise reduction method. This consists of sequentially testing and reducing each segment in nine stages by cutting the ligaments, facet capsules, and removing the nucleus. Five L4-S1 human segments (median: 65 years, range: 53-84 years, SD=11.0 years) were loaded under a maximum pure moment of 8Nm. The ROM was measured using stereo-photogrammetry via tracking of three markers and the facet contact forces (CF) were measured using a Tekscan system. The ROM for the L4-L5 segment and all stages showed good agreement with published data. The major differences in ROM between the L4-L5 and L5-S1 segments were found for lateral bending and all stages, for which the L4-L5 ROM was about 1.5-3 times higher than that of the L5-S1 segment, consistent with L5-S1 facet CF about 1.3 to 4 times higher than those measured for the L4-L5 segment. For the other movements and few stages, the L4-L5 ROM was significantly lower that of the L5-S1 segment. ROM and CF provide important baseline data for more accurate calibration of FE models and to understand the role that their structures play in lower lumbar spine mechanics.

  11. Generation of Natural Runoff Monthly Series at Ungauged Sites Using a Regional Regressive Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dario Pumo

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Many hydrologic applications require reliable estimates of runoff in river basins to face the widespread lack of data, both in time and in space. A regional method for the reconstruction of monthly runoff series is here developed and applied to Sicily (Italy. A simple modeling structure is adopted, consisting of a regression-based rainfall–runoff model with four model parameters, calibrated through a two-step procedure. Monthly runoff estimates are based on precipitation, temperature, and exploiting the autocorrelation with runoff at the previous month. Model parameters are assessed by specific regional equations as a function of easily measurable physical and climate basin descriptors. The first calibration step is aimed at the identification of a set of parameters optimizing model performances at the level of single basin. Such “optimal” sets are used at the second step, part of a regional regression analysis, to establish the regional equations for model parameters assessment as a function of basin attributes. All the gauged watersheds across the region have been analyzed, selecting 53 basins for model calibration and using the other six basins exclusively for validation. Performances, quantitatively evaluated by different statistical indexes, demonstrate relevant model ability in reproducing the observed hydrological time-series at both the monthly and coarser time resolutions. The methodology, which is easily transferable to other arid and semi-arid areas, provides a reliable tool for filling/reconstructing runoff time series at any gauged or ungauged basin of a region.

  12. Wildland fire probabilities estimated from weather model-deduced monthly mean fire danger indices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haiganoush K. Preisler; Shyh-Chin Chen; Francis Fujioka; John W. Benoit; Anthony L. Westerling

    2008-01-01

    The National Fire Danger Rating System indices deduced from a regional simulation weather model were used to estimate probabilities and numbers of large fire events on monthly and 1-degree grid scales. The weather model simulations and forecasts are ongoing experimental products from the Experimental Climate Prediction Center at the Scripps Institution of Oceanography...

  13. The U.S. Geological Survey Monthly Water Balance Model Futures Portal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bock, Andrew R.; Hay, Lauren E.; Markstrom, Steven L.; Emmerich, Christopher; Talbert, Marian

    2017-05-03

    The U.S. Geological Survey Monthly Water Balance Model Futures Portal (https://my.usgs.gov/mows/) is a user-friendly interface that summarizes monthly historical and simulated future conditions for seven hydrologic and meteorological variables (actual evapotranspiration, potential evapotranspiration, precipitation, runoff, snow water equivalent, atmospheric temperature, and streamflow) at locations across the conterminous United States (CONUS).The estimates of these hydrologic and meteorological variables were derived using a Monthly Water Balance Model (MWBM), a modular system that simulates monthly estimates of components of the hydrologic cycle using monthly precipitation and atmospheric temperature inputs. Precipitation and atmospheric temperature from 222 climate datasets spanning historical conditions (1952 through 2005) and simulated future conditions (2020 through 2099) were summarized for hydrographic features and used to drive the MWBM for the CONUS. The MWBM input and output variables were organized into an open-access database. An Open Geospatial Consortium, Inc., Web Feature Service allows the querying and identification of hydrographic features across the CONUS. To connect the Web Feature Service to the open-access database, a user interface—the Monthly Water Balance Model Futures Portal—was developed to allow the dynamic generation of summary files and plots  based on plot type, geographic location, specific climate datasets, period of record, MWBM variable, and other options. Both the plots and the data files are made available to the user for download 

  14. Monthly Hydrological Model Evaluation through Mapping the Hydrological Pattern to Information Space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, B.; Cong, Z.

    2014-12-01

    Conceptual and stochastic monthly hydrological models have been widely used for climatic change impact exploration and long-range stream flow forecast. With disparate philosophies and different but insufficient inputs, most of the existing models are capable of generating satisfying outputs, which reveals a relatively robust idiosyncrasy of hydrological pattern over monthly time scale. This research uses the epistemic-aleatory uncertainties evaluation framework to examine the information source sink terms and flows of 6 conceptual monthly water balance models and a seasonal autoregressive stochastic hydrologic model over 19 basins in Jiangxi Province, China and the experiment basins of MOPEX project. By using the stream technique of Lisp, we constructed two programming paradigms into which the hydrological models mentioned above could be fitted. We focus on detecting and explaining the best achievable predictive performances and data-revealed insufficient of the models in each paradigm, especially the hydrological meaning of the iteration variables in these models. Finally, we make an attempt to compare and connect these two paradigms against the backdrop of algorithmic information theory to help us form a better understanding of monthly hydrological pattern.

  15. Ligation of mouse L4 and L5 spinal nerves produces robust allodynia without major motor function deficit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Gui-Lan; Savelieva, Katerina V; Vogel, Peter; Baker, Kevin B; Mason, Sara; Lanthorn, Thomas H; Rajan, Indrani

    2015-01-01

    Spinal nerve L5/L6 ligation (SNL) in rats has become the standard for mechanistic studies of peripheral neuropathy and screening for novel analgesics. Conventional SNL in our hybrid mice resulted in a wide range of allodynia. Anatomical evaluation indicated that a variable number of lumbar vertebrae existed, resulting in L4/L5 or L5/L6 being ligated. Surprisingly, L4/L5 ligation did not result in ipsilateral hind limb paralysis and produced robust allodynia. Following a recent report that the mouse L4 neural segment is homologous with rat L5 we generated L4, L5 or both L4 and L5 (L4/L5) ligations in C57 mice after establishing a modified set of surgical landmarks. In contrast to rats, L4 ligation in these mice did not result in hind limb paralysis. Robust allodynia was observed in all three ligation groups. Nerve degeneration confirmed that L4 and L5, respectively, are primary contributors to the tibial and sural branches of the sciatic nerve in mice. A larger von Frey sensitive area reflected the wider distribution of Wallerian degeneration in the hindlimb of L4- compared to L5-ligated mice. Ligation of mouse L4 and L5 spinal nerves produces consistent, robust neuropathic pain behaviors and is suitable as a model for investigating mechanisms of neuropathic pain and for testing of novel analgesics. Gabapentin, used as a validation drug in neuropathic pain models and as a reference compound for novel analgesics, significantly reduced allodynia in the mice tested (L4/L5 ligations). Given the ease of surgery, robust allodynia, and larger von Frey sensitive area, we conclude that combined ligation of spinal nerves L4 and L5 optimizes the SNL model in mice.

  16. Advancing monthly streamflow prediction accuracy of CART models using ensemble learning paradigms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erdal, Halil Ibrahim; Karakurt, Onur

    2013-01-01

    SummaryStreamflow forecasting is one of the most important steps in the water resources planning and management. Ensemble techniques such as bagging, boosting and stacking have gained popularity in hydrological forecasting in the recent years. The study investigates the potential usage of two ensemble learning paradigms (i.e., bagging; stochastic gradient boosting) in building classification and regression trees (CARTs) ensembles to advance the streamflow prediction accuracy. The study, initially, investigates the use of classification and regression trees for monthly streamflow forecasting and employs a support vector regression (SVR) model as the benchmark model. The analytic results indicate that CART outperforms SVR in both training and testing phases. Although the obtained results of CART model in training phase are considerable, it is not in testing phase. Thus, to optimize the prediction accuracy of CART for monthly streamflow forecasting, we incorporate bagging and stochastic gradient boosting which are rooted in same philosophy, advancing the prediction accuracy of weak learners. Comparing with the results of bagged regression trees (BRTs) and stochastic gradient boosted regression trees (GBRTs) models possess satisfactory monthly streamflow forecasting performance than CART and SVR models. Overall, it is found that ensemble learning paradigms can remarkably advance the prediction accuracy of CART models in monthly streamflow forecasting.

  17. Comparison of Energetic Electron Distribution Functions Derived from CXDs (L~4.2), CPAs and SOPAs (L~6.6), and Model AE8 at or near the Magnetic Equator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cayton, T. E.; Denton, M.; Borovsky, J.; Belian, R. D.; Christensen, R. A.; Ingraham, J. C.

    2015-12-01

    Throughout the range of L-shells important for GPS and GEO spacecraft (4.21.) K. W. Chan, M. J. Teague, N. J. Schofield, and J. I. Vette, "Modeling of Electron Time Variations in the Radiation Belts," Quantitative Modeling of Magnetospheric Processes, W. P. Olson, ed., AGU, Washington D.C., 1979, p. 147. 2.) J. J. Duderstadt and L. J. Hamilton, Nuclear Reactor Analysis, John Wiley, New York, 1976, pp.381-383.

  18. [VALUE OF SMART PHONE Scoliometer SOFTWARE IN OBTAINING OPTIMAL LUMBAR LORDOSIS DURING L4-S1 FUSION SURGERY].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Weibo; Liang, De; Ye, Linqiang; Jiang, Xiaobing; Yao, Zhensong; Tang, Jingjing; Tang, Yongchao

    2015-10-01

    To investigate the value of smart phone Scoliometer software in obtaining optimal lumbar lordosis (LL) during L4-S1 fusion surgery. Between November 2014 and February 2015, 20 patients scheduled for L4-S1 fusion surgery were prospectively enrolled the study. There were 8 males and 12 females, aged 41-65 years (mean, 52.3 years). The disease duration ranged from 6 months to 6 years (mean, 3.4 years). Before operation, the pelvic incidence (PI) and Cobb angle of L4-S1 (CobbL4-S1) were measured on lateral X-ray film of lumbosacral spine by PACS system; and the ideal CobbL4-S1 was then calculated according to previously published methods [(PI+9 degrees) x 70%]. Subsequently, intraoperative CobbL4-S1 was monitored by the Scoliometer software and was defined as optimal while it was less than 5 degrees difference compared with ideal CobbL4-S1. Finally, the CobbL4-S1 was measured by the PACS system after operation and the consistency was compared between Scoliometer software and PACS system to evaluate the accuracy of this software. In addition, value of this method in obtaining optimal LL was validated by comparing the difference between ideal CobbL4-S1 and preoperative one with that between ideal CobbL4-S1 and postoperative one. The CobbL4-S1 was (36.17 ± 1.53)degrees for ideal one, (22.57 ± 5.50)degrees for preoperative one, (32.25 ± 1.46)degrees for intraoperative one measured by Scoliometer software, and (34.43 ± 1.72)degrees for postoperative one, respectively. The observed intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) was excellent [ICC = 0.96, 95% confidence interval (0.93, 0.97)] and the mean absolute difference (MAD) was low (MAD = 1.23) between Scoliometer software and PACS system. The deviation between ideal CobbL4-S1 and postoperative CobbL4-S1 was (2.31 ± 0.23)degrees, which was significantly lower than the deviation between ideal CobbL4-S1 and preoperative CobbL4-S1 (13.60 ± 1.85)degrees (t = 6.065, P = 0.001). Scoliometer software can help surgeon obtain

  19. Research on monthly flow uncertain reasoning model based on cloud theory

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    In view of the mid and long term runoff forecasting containing many uncertain factors,this paper constructs a uncertain reasoning model (UR) based on the cloud theory to solve the problem of uncertain reasoning.Firstly,in the proposed model,a classification method,i.e.,attribute oriented induction maximum variance (MaxVar),is used to divide the runoff series into different intervals,which are softened and described by the cloud membership with expected value (Ex),entropy (En) and hyper-entropy (He),then an uncertain reasoning rule set is constructed by means of the runoff value generalization and applied to monthly flow for uncertain prediction.Next,a new modification formula is used to calculate He in runoff forecasting,and a confident level probability prediction interval is obtained by statistical method.Finally,this paper takes the monthly flow of Manwan station in China as an example and uses UR model,LSSVM model,and ARMA model to calculate the monthly flow,respectively.The results show that the UR model has the highest prediction accuracy compared to other models,and that it not only provides random output but also supports probability interval prediction.

  20. Time-Series Modeling and Prediction of Global Monthly Absolute Temperature for Environmental Decision Making

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YE Liming; YANG Guixia; Eric VAN RANST; TANG Huajun

    2013-01-01

    A generalized,structural,time series modeling framework was developed to analyze the monthly records of absolute surface temperature,one of the most important environmental parameters,using a deterministicstochastic combined (DSC) approach.Although the development of the framework was based on the characterization of the variation patterns of a global dataset,the methodology could be applied to any monthly absolute temperature record.Deterministic processes were used to characterize the variation patterns of the global trend and the cyclic oscillations of the temperature signal,involving polynomial functions and the Fourier method,respectively,while stochastic processes were employed to account for any remaining patterns in the temperature signal,involving seasonal autoregressive integrated moving average (SARIMA) models.A prediction of the monthly global surface temperature during the second decade of the 21st century using the DSC model shows that the global temperature will likely continue to rise at twice the average rate of the past 150 years.The evaluation of prediction accuracy shows that DSC models perform systematically well against selected models of other authors,suggesting that DSC models,when coupled with other ecoenvironmental models,can be used as a supplemental tool for short-term (~10-year) environmental planning and decision making.

  1. Statistical modelling of monthly mean sea level at coastal tide gauge stations along the Indian subcontinent

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Srinivas, K.; Das, V.K.; DineshKumar, P.K.

    on the west coast have shown minimum RMSEs for the corresponding coasts for all the three models, while Bhavnagar on west coast has shown very high RMSE values. The EWMA technique (which yields forecast with a lead time of only one month) gave the lowest root...

  2. The Effect of Social Engagement on 24-Month-Olds' Imitation from Live and Televised Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielsen, Mark; Simcock, Gabrielle; Jenkins, Linda

    2008-01-01

    To date, developmental research has rarely addressed the notion that imitation serves an interpersonal, socially based function. The present research thus examined the role of social engagement on 24-month-olds' imitation by manipulating the social availability of the model. In Experiment 1, the children were more likely to imitate the exact…

  3. Prediction of Monthly Summer Monsoon Rainfall Using Global Climate Models Through Artificial Neural Network Technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nair, Archana; Singh, Gurjeet; Mohanty, U. C.

    2017-08-01

    The monthly prediction of summer monsoon rainfall is very challenging because of its complex and chaotic nature. In this study, a non-linear technique known as Artificial Neural Network (ANN) has been employed on the outputs of Global Climate Models (GCMs) to bring out the vagaries inherent in monthly rainfall prediction. The GCMs that are considered in the study are from the International Research Institute (IRI) (2-tier CCM3v6) and the National Centre for Environmental Prediction (Coupled-CFSv2). The ANN technique is applied on different ensemble members of the individual GCMs to obtain monthly scale prediction over India as a whole and over its spatial grid points. In the present study, a double-cross-validation and simple randomization technique was used to avoid the over-fitting during training process of the ANN model. The performance of the ANN-predicted rainfall from GCMs is judged by analysing the absolute error, box plots, percentile and difference in linear error in probability space. Results suggest that there is significant improvement in prediction skill of these GCMs after applying the ANN technique. The performance analysis reveals that the ANN model is able to capture the year to year variations in monsoon months with fairly good accuracy in extreme years as well. ANN model is also able to simulate the correct signs of rainfall anomalies over different spatial points of the Indian domain.

  4. A Wavelet Neural Network Hybrid Model for Monthly Ammonia Forecasting in River Water

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    Forecasting water quality is always an effective approach for water environmental management. This study presents a combined Wavelet transform (WA) and Artificial Neural Network (ANN) model for monthly ammonia nitrogen series prediction in river water. The WA decomposed original time series into different subseries, in which the most significant one was chosen as the training data instead of the original series. Compared to the traditional ANN, the WA-ANN models were found more accurate and r...

  5. Forecasting monthly inflow discharge of the Iffezheim reservoir using data-driven models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qing; Aljoumani, Basem; Hillebrand, Gudrun; Hoffmann, Thomas; Hinkelmann, Reinhard

    2017-04-01

    River stream flow is an essential element in hydrology study fields, especially for reservoir management, since it defines input into reservoirs. Forecasting this stream flow plays an important role in short or long-term planning and management in the reservoir, e.g. optimized reservoir and hydroelectric operation or agricultural irrigation. Highly accurate flow forecasting can significantly reduce economic losses and is always pursued by reservoir operators. Therefore, hydrologic time series forecasting has received tremendous attention of researchers. Many models have been proposed to improve the hydrological forecasting. Due to the fact that most natural phenomena occurring in environmental systems appear to behave in random or probabilistic ways, different cases may need a different methods to forecast the inflow and even a unique treatment to improve the forecast accuracy. The purpose of this study is to determine an appropriate model for forecasting monthly inflow to the Iffezheim reservoir in Germany, which is the last of the barrages in the Upper Rhine. Monthly time series of discharges, measured from 1946 to 2001 at the Plittersdorf station, which is located 6 km downstream of the Iffezheim reservoir, were applied. The accuracies of the used stochastic models - Fiering model and Auto-Regressive Integrated Moving Average models (ARIMA) are compared with Artificial Intelligence (AI) models - single Artificial Neural Network (ANN) and Wavelet ANN models (WANN). The Fiering model is a linear stochastic model and used for generating synthetic monthly data. The basic idea in modeling time series using ARIMA is to identify a simple model with as few model parameters as possible in order to provide a good statistical fit to the data. To identify and fit the ARIMA models, four phase approaches were used: identification, parameter estimation, diagnostic checking, and forecasting. An automatic selection criterion, such as the Akaike information criterion, is utilized

  6. A Different View of Solar Spectral Irradiance Variations: Modeling Total Energy over Six-Month Intervals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woods, Thomas N; Snow, Martin; Harder, Jerald; Chapman, Gary; Cookson, Angela

    A different approach to studying solar spectral irradiance (SSI) variations, without the need for long-term (multi-year) instrument degradation corrections, is examining the total energy of the irradiance variation during 6-month periods. This duration is selected because a solar active region typically appears suddenly and then takes 5 to 7 months to decay and disperse back into the quiet-Sun network. The solar outburst energy, which is defined as the irradiance integrated over the 6-month period and thus includes the energy from all phases of active region evolution, could be considered the primary cause for the irradiance variations. Because solar cycle variation is the consequence of multiple active region outbursts, understanding the energy spectral variation may provide a reasonable estimate of the variations for the 11-year solar activity cycle. The moderate-term (6-month) variations from the Solar Radiation and Climate Experiment (SORCE) instruments can be decomposed into positive (in-phase with solar cycle) and negative (out-of-phase) contributions by modeling the variations using the San Fernando Observatory (SFO) facular excess and sunspot deficit proxies, respectively. These excess and deficit variations are fit over 6-month intervals every 2 months over the mission, and these fitted variations are then integrated over time for the 6-month energy. The dominant component indicates which wavelengths are in-phase and which are out-of-phase with solar activity. The results from this study indicate out-of-phase variations for the 1400 - 1600 nm range, with all other wavelengths having in-phase variations.

  7. Wavelet-linear genetic programming: A new approach for modeling monthly streamflow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravansalar, Masoud; Rajaee, Taher; Kisi, Ozgur

    2017-06-01

    The streamflows are important and effective factors in stream ecosystems and its accurate prediction is an essential and important issue in water resources and environmental engineering systems. A hybrid wavelet-linear genetic programming (WLGP) model, which includes a discrete wavelet transform (DWT) and a linear genetic programming (LGP) to predict the monthly streamflow (Q) in two gauging stations, Pataveh and Shahmokhtar, on the Beshar River at the Yasuj, Iran were used in this study. In the proposed WLGP model, the wavelet analysis was linked to the LGP model where the original time series of streamflow were decomposed into the sub-time series comprising wavelet coefficients. The results were compared with the single LGP, artificial neural network (ANN), a hybrid wavelet-ANN (WANN) and Multi Linear Regression (MLR) models. The comparisons were done by some of the commonly utilized relevant physical statistics. The Nash coefficients (E) were found as 0.877 and 0.817 for the WLGP model, for the Pataveh and Shahmokhtar stations, respectively. The comparison of the results showed that the WLGP model could significantly increase the streamflow prediction accuracy in both stations. Since, the results demonstrate a closer approximation of the peak streamflow values by the WLGP model, this model could be utilized for the simulation of cumulative streamflow data prediction in one month ahead.

  8. Technical note: 3-hourly temporal downscaling of monthly global terrestrial biosphere model net ecosystem exchange

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, Joshua B.; Sikka, Munish; Huntzinger, Deborah N.; Schwalm, Christopher; Liu, Junjie

    2016-07-01

    The land surface provides a boundary condition to atmospheric forward and flux inversion models. These models require prior estimates of CO2 fluxes at relatively high temporal resolutions (e.g., 3-hourly) because of the high frequency of atmospheric mixing and wind heterogeneity. However, land surface model CO2 fluxes are often provided at monthly time steps, typically because the land surface modeling community focuses more on time steps associated with plant phenology (e.g., seasonal) than on sub-daily phenomena. Here, we describe a new dataset created from 15 global land surface models and 4 ensemble products in the Multi-scale Synthesis and Terrestrial Model Intercomparison Project (MsTMIP), temporally downscaled from monthly to 3-hourly output. We provide 3-hourly output for each individual model over 7 years (2004-2010), as well as an ensemble mean, a weighted ensemble mean, and the multi-model standard deviation. Output is provided in three different spatial resolutions for user preferences: 0.5° × 0.5°, 2.0° × 2.5°, and 4.0° × 5.0° (latitude × longitude). These data are publicly available from doi:10.3334/ORNLDAAC/1315.

  9. Forecasting and Analysis of Monthly Rainfalls in Ardabil Province by Arima, Autoregrressive, and Winters Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Salahi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Rainfall has the highest variability at time and place scale. Rainfall fluctuation in different geographical areas reveals the necessity of investigating this climate element and suitable models to forecast the rate of precipitation for regional planning. Ardabil province has always faced rainfall fluctuations and shortage of water supply. Precipitation is one of the most important features of the environment. The amount of precipitation over time and in different places is subject to large fluctuations which may be periodical. Studies show that, due to the certain complexities of rainfall, the models which used to predict future values will also need greater accuracy and less error. Among the forecasting models, Arima has more applications and it has replaced with other models. Materials and Methods: In this research, through order 2 Autoregrressive, Winters, and Arima models, monthly rainfalls of Ardabil synoptic station (representing Ardabil province for a 31-year period (1977-2007 were investigated. To assess the presence or absence of significant changes in mean precipitation of Ardabil synoptic station, rainfall of this station was divided into two periods: 1977-1993 and 1994-2010. T-test was used to statistically examine the difference between the two periods. After adjusting the data, descriptive statistics were applied. In order to model the total monthly precipitation of Ardabil synoptic station, Winters, Autoregressive, and Arima models were used. Among different models, the best options were chosen to predict the time series including the mean absolute deviation (MAD, the mean squared errors (MSE, root mean square errors (RMSE and mean absolute percentage errors (MAPE. In order to select the best model among the available options under investigation, the predicted value of the deviation of the actual value was utilized for the months of 2006-2010. Results and Discussion: Statistical characteristics of the total monthly

  10. Primary structure of brevilysin L4, an enzymatically active fragment of a disintegrin precursor from Gloydius halys brevicaudus venom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deshimaru, Masanobu; Ichihara, Makoto; Hattori, Takahiro; Koba, Kumiko; Terada, Shigeyuki

    2005-04-01

    Brevilysin L4 (L4) is a non-hemorrhagic P-I class metalloprotease (MP) isolated from Gloydius halys brevicaudus venom. Its complete amino acid sequence has been determined. L4 is a single-chain polypeptide and highly homologous to those of other snake venom MPs. A zinc-binding motif, HExxHxxGxxH, is located at residues 142-152. A characteristic feature of L4 is the presence of a spacer sequence (LRTDTVS) at the C-terminal that links metalloprotease and disintegrin domains and is usually removed by post-translational proteolysis, suggesting that L4 is expressed together with a spacer region and a disintegrin domain at the C-terminal. The nucleotide sequence of a cDNA clone encoding L4 has revealed that L4 is a disintegrin precursor and produced as a P-II class MP. The disintegrin coded after L4 sequence was brevicaudin 1, a disintegrin previously isolated from the same venom. P-II class MPs have been suspected to undergo autoproteolysis to release disintegrins. Although being P-I class MP, L4 itself autocatalytically degrades with a half-life of 30min at pH 8.5 and 37 degrees C in the absence of Ca(2+). Sequence analysis of several fragment peptides produced during the autolysis of L4 indicated that more than 40 peptide bonds were split, and the cleavages of Ser(60)-Asn(61), Thr(99)-Ala(100), and Phe(103)-Asp(104) bonds may trigger the autoproteolysis. Addition of Ca(2+) completely suppressed the cleavage of these particular bonds, resulting in a marked prevention of autoproteolysis. Thus, L4 provides a good model for the investigation of autolysis of some MPs.

  11. A Cornea Substitute Derived from Fish Scale: 6-Month Followup on Rabbit Model

    OpenAIRE

    Fei Yuan; Liyan Wang; Chien-Chen Lin; Cheng-Hung Chou; Lei Li

    2014-01-01

    A fish scale-derived cornea substitute (Biocornea) is proposed as an alternative for human donor corneal tissue. We adopt a regenerative medicine approach to design a primary alternative to the use of fish scale for restoring sight by corneal replacement. Biocornea with corneal multilayer arrangement collagen was implanted to rabbits by pocket implantation. Our study demonstrated the safety and detailed morphologic and physiologic results from the 6 months of followup of rabbit model. In the ...

  12. Modeling summer month hydrological drought probabilities in the United States using antecedent flow conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Austin, Samuel H.; Nelms, David L.

    2017-01-01

    Climate change raises concern that risks of hydrological drought may be increasing. We estimate hydrological drought probabilities for rivers and streams in the United States (U.S.) using maximum likelihood logistic regression (MLLR). Streamflow data from winter months are used to estimate the chance of hydrological drought during summer months. Daily streamflow data collected from 9,144 stream gages from January 1, 1884 through January 9, 2014 provide hydrological drought streamflow probabilities for July, August, and September as functions of streamflows during October, November, December, January, and February, estimating outcomes 5-11 months ahead of their occurrence. Few drought prediction methods exploit temporal links among streamflows. We find MLLR modeling of drought streamflow probabilities exploits the explanatory power of temporally linked water flows. MLLR models with strong correct classification rates were produced for streams throughout the U.S. One ad hoc test of correct prediction rates of September 2013 hydrological droughts exceeded 90% correct classification. Some of the best-performing models coincide with areas of high concern including the West, the Midwest, Texas, the Southeast, and the Mid-Atlantic. Using hydrological drought MLLR probability estimates in a water management context can inform understanding of drought streamflow conditions, provide warning of future drought conditions, and aid water management decision making.

  13. A Cornea Substitute Derived from Fish Scale: 6-Month Followup on Rabbit Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fei Yuan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A fish scale-derived cornea substitute (Biocornea is proposed as an alternative for human donor corneal tissue. We adopt a regenerative medicine approach to design a primary alternative to the use of fish scale for restoring sight by corneal replacement. Biocornea with corneal multilayer arrangement collagen was implanted to rabbits by pocket implantation. Our study demonstrated the safety and detailed morphologic and physiologic results from the 6 months of followup of rabbit model. In the peripheral Biocornea, the collagen fibrils were arranged in reticular fashion. Slit lamp examination showed that haze and an ulcer were not observed in all groups at 3 months postoperatively while all corneas with Biocornea were clear at both 3 months and 6 months postoperatively. The interface of Biocornea and stromal tissue were filled successfully and without observable immune cells at postoperative day 180. Moreover, the Biocornea was not dissolved and degenerated but remained transparent and showed no apparent fragmentation. Our study demonstrated that the Biocornea derived from fish scale as a good substitute had high biocompatibility and support function after a long-term evaluation. This revealed that the new approach of using Biocornea may yield an ideal artificial cornea substitute for long-term inlay placement.

  14. A Wavelet Neural Network Hybrid Model for Monthly Ammonia Forecasting in River Water

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi Wang

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Forecasting water quality is always an effective approach for water environmental management. This study presents a combined Wavelet transform (WA and Artificial Neural Network (ANN model for monthly ammonia nitrogen series prediction in river water. The WA decomposed original time series into different subseries, in which the most significant one was chosen as the training data instead of the original series. Compared to the traditional ANN, the WA-ANN models were found more accurate and reliable. The results of the study indicate that WA could remove the noise of the original datasets and the WA-ANN could help environment decision-maker manage water quality more effective.

  15. Investigation of Shannon and PolyWog Wavelet Neural Networks In Monthly River Flow Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abghari, H.; van de Giesen, N.; Noury, M.

    2009-04-01

    Intelligence models consist of distributed parallel processors that learn to reproduce the relationship between input and output signals and present the best topology of patterns simulation. Due to nonlinearity of hydrological events the learning process has restrictions . In this study, using a combination of Wavelet theory and a Multi Layer Perceptron Network, two Wavelet Neural Network models for monthly flow of Nazloochaei River basin in Iran were developed. Instead of using common sigmoid activation functions in the MLP network a wavelet function was used, The hybrid wavelet neural network (WNNs) employing a nonlinear wavelet basis was developed as an alternative approach to nonlinear fitting. Result of MLP base model show the 86% in training and 79% in model testing. Results of the MLP base model show a goodness of fit of 86% in training and 79% in model testing. Results shows that the Polywog neural network with the best topology has a 94% accuracy in the training phase and 89% in testing of model. The Shannon neural network with the best topology produces 79% accuracy in training phase and 61% in testing of model. Comparison of WNN and MLP shows that Polywog wavelet could have better accuracy in time series modeling. Classic sigmoid activation functions in the MLP network show better results than the Shannon wavelet. Keywords: Shannon and PolyWog Wavelet, Wavelet Neural Networks, Nazloochaei River Basin, River Flow Modeling.

  16. A Prognostic Model for 6-Month Mortality in Elderly Survivors of Critical Illness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narain, Wazim R.; Wunsch, Hannah; Schluger, Neil W.; Cooke, Joseph T.; Maurer, Mathew S.; Rowe, John W.; Lederer, David J.; Bach, Peter B.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Although 1.4 million elderly Americans survive hospitalization involving intensive care annually, many are at risk for early mortality following discharge. No models that predict the likelihood of death after discharge exist explicitly for this population. Therefore, we derived and externally validated a 6-month postdischarge mortality prediction model for elderly ICU survivors. Methods: We derived the model from medical record and claims data for 1,526 consecutive patients aged ≥ 65 years who had their first medical ICU admission in 2006 to 2009 at a tertiary-care hospital and survived to discharge (excluding those patients discharged to hospice). We then validated the model in 1,010 patients from a different tertiary-care hospital. Results: Six-month mortality was 27.3% and 30.2% in the derivation and validation cohorts, respectively. Independent predictors of mortality (in descending order of contribution to the model’s predictive power) were a do-not-resuscitate order, older age, burden of comorbidity, admission from or discharge to a skilled-care facility, hospital length of stay, principal diagnoses of sepsis and hematologic malignancy, and male sex. For the derivation and external validation cohorts, the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve was 0.80 (SE, 0.01) and 0.71 (SE, 0.02), respectively, with good calibration for both (P = 0.31 and 0.43). Conclusions: Clinical variables available at hospital discharge can help predict 6-month mortality for elderly ICU survivors. Variables that capture elements of frailty, disability, the burden of comorbidity, and patient preferences regarding resuscitation during the hospitalization contribute most to this model’s predictive power. The model could aid providers in counseling elderly ICU survivors at high risk of death and their families. PMID:23632902

  17. Modelling the Variability of the Wind Energy Resource on Monthly and Seasonal Timescales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alonzo, Bastien; Ringkjøb, Hans-Kristian; Jourdier, Benedicte; Drobinski, Philippe; Plougonven, Riwal; Tankov, Peter

    2016-04-01

    We study the variability of the wind energy resource in France on monthly to seasonal timescales. On such long-term timescales, the variability of the surface wind speed is strongly influenced by the large-scale situation of the atmosphere. As an example variations in the position of the storm track west of France directly impact surface wind in the North of France in autumn and winter. We investigate the relationship between the large scale circulation and the surface wind speed, summarizing the former by a principal component analysis, so that the large-scale mass distribution is described by a small set of coefficients. We then apply a multi polynomial relationship to model the monthly and seasonal distribution of surface wind speeds given the knowledge of these few coefficients. Different methods for this reconstruction are assessed. While the first attempts to reconstruct the wind with a daily resolution, the three others directly aim at reconstructing the distribution of the wind, assuming it is well described as a Weibull distribution : One is based on the reconstruction of 3 moments of this theoretical distribution, another is based on the reconstruction of two percentiles, and the last one is based on the direct reconstruction of the shape and scale parameter of the Weibull distribution. The last two methods show good performance and better skills to reproduce the monthly and seasonal distribution of the wind speed with respect to the climatology. We then apply those methods to seasonal forecasts from the European Center for Medium-range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF) in an attempt of forecasting the monthly and seasonal distribution of the surface wind speed. For one month time-horizon, the forecasting performance is superior to climatology.

  18. Assessing monthly average solar radiation models: a comparative case study in Turkey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonmete, Mehmet H; Ertekin, Can; Menges, Hakan O; Hacıseferoğullari, Haydar; Evrendilek, Fatih

    2011-04-01

    Solar radiation data are required by solar engineers, architects, agriculturists, and hydrologists for many applications such as solar heating, cooking, drying, and interior illumination of buildings. In order to achieve this, numerous empirical models have been developed all over the world to predict solar radiation. The main objective of this study is to examine and compare 147 solar radiation models available in the literature for the prediction of monthly solar radiation at Ankara (Turkey) based on selected statistical measures such as percentage error, mean percentage error, root mean square error, mean bias error, and correlation coefficient. Our results showed that Ball et al. (Agron J 96:391-397, 2004) model and Chen et al. (Energy Convers Manag 47:2859-2866, 2006) model performed best in the estimation of solar radiation on a horizontal surface for Ankara.

  19. Empirical models of monthly and annual surface albedo in managed boreal forests of Norway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bright, Ryan M.; Astrup, Rasmus; Strømman, Anders H.

    2013-04-01

    As forest management activities play an increasingly important role in climate change mitigation strategies of Nordic regions such as Norway, Sweden, and Finland -- the need for a more comprehensive understanding of the types and magnitude of biogeophysical climate effects and their various tradeoffs with the global carbon cycle becomes essential to avoid implementation of sub-optimal policy. Forest harvest in these regions reduces the albedo "masking effect" and impacts Earth's radiation budget in opposing ways to that of concomitant carbon cycle perturbations; thus, policies based solely on biogeochemical considerations in these regions risk being counterproductive. There is therefore a need to better understand how human disturbances (i.e., forest management activities) affect important biophysical factors like surface albedo. An 11-year remotely sensed surface albedo dataset coupled with stand-level forest management data for a variety of stands in Norway's most productive logging region are used to develop regression models describing temporal changes in monthly and annual forest albedo following clear-cut harvest disturbance events. Datasets are grouped by dominant tree species and site indices (productivity), and two alternate multiple regression models are developed and tested following a potential plus modifier approach. This resulted in an annual albedo model with statistically significant parameters that explains a large proportion of the observed variation, requiring as few as two predictor variables: i) average stand age - a canopy modifier predictor of albedo, and ii) stand elevation - a local climate predictor of a forest's potential albedo. The same model structure is used to derive monthly albedo models, with models for winter months generally found superior to summer models, and conifer models generally outperforming deciduous. We demonstrate how these statistical models can be applied to routine forest inventory data to predict the albedo

  20. The U.S. Geological Survey Monthly Water Balance Model Futures Portal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bock, Andy

    2017-03-16

    Simulations of future climate suggest profiles of temperature and precipitation may differ significantly from those in the past. These changes in climate will likely lead to changes in the hydrologic cycle. As such, natural resource managers are in need of tools that can provide estimates of key components of the hydrologic cycle, uncertainty associated with the estimates, and limitations associated with the climate forcing data used to estimate these components. To help address this need, the U.S. Geological Survey Monthly Water Balance Model Futures Portal (https://my.usgs.gov/mows/) provides a user friendly interface to deliver hydrologic and meteorological variables for monthly historic and potential future climatic conditions across the continental United States.

  1. Non-linear modelling of monthly mean vorticity time changes: an application to the western Mediterranean

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Finizio

    Full Text Available Starting from a number of observables in the form of time-series of meteorological elements in various areas of the northern hemisphere, a model capable of fitting past records and predicting monthly vorticity time changes in the western Mediterranean is implemented. A new powerful statistical methodology is introduced (MARS in order to capture the non-linear dynamics of time-series representing the available 40-year history of the hemispheric circulation. The developed model is tested on a suitable independent data set. An ensemble forecast exercise is also carried out to check model stability in reference to the uncertainty of input quantities.

    Key words. Meteorology and atmospheric dynamics · General circulation ocean-atmosphere interactions · Synoptic-scale meteorology

  2. Global Monthly CO2 Flux Inversion Based on Results of Terrestrial Ecosystem Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, F.; Chen, J.; Peters, W.; Krol, M.

    2008-12-01

    Most of our understanding of the sources and sinks of atmospheric CO2 has come from inverse studies of atmospheric CO2 concentration measurements. However, the number of currently available observation stations and our ability to simulate the diurnal planetary boundary layer evolution over continental regions essentially limit the number of regions that can be reliably inverted globally, especially over continental areas. In order to overcome these restrictions, a nested inverse modeling system was developed based on the Bayesian principle for estimating carbon fluxes of 30 regions in North America and 20 regions for the rest of the globe. Inverse modeling was conducted in monthly steps using CO2 concentration measurements of 5 years (2000 - 2005) with the following two models: (a) An atmospheric transport model (TM5) is used to generate the transport matrix where the diurnal variation n of atmospheric CO2 concentration is considered to enhance the use of the afternoon-hour average CO2 concentration measurements over the continental sites. (b) A process-based terrestrial ecosystem model (BEPS) is used to produce hourly step carbon fluxes, which could minimize the limitation due to our inability to solve the inverse problem in a high resolution, as the background of our inversion. We will present our recent results achieved through a combination of the bottom-up modeling with BEPS and the top-down modeling based on TM5 driven by offline meteorological fields generated by the European Centre for Medium Range Weather Forecast (ECMFW).

  3. The Turn-of-the-Month-Effect: Evidence from Periodic Generalized Autoregressive Conditional Heteroskedasticity (PGARCH Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eleftherios Giovanis

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The current study examines the turn of the month effect on stock returns in 20 countries. This will allow us to explore whether the seasonal patterns usually found in global data; America, Australia, Europe and Asia. Ordinary Least Squares (OLS is problematic as it leads to unreliable estimations; because of the autocorrelation and Autoregressive Conditional Heteroskedasticity (ARCH effects existence. For this reason Generalized GARCH models are estimated. Two approaches are followed. The first is the symmetric Generalized ARCH (1,1 model. However, previous studies found that volatility tends to increase more when the stock market index decreases than when the stock market index increases by the same amount. In addition there is higher seasonality in volatility rather on average returns. For this reason the Periodic-GARCH (1,1 is estimated. The findings support the persistence of the specific calendar effect in 19 out of 20 countries examined.

  4. Cooperative heteroassembly of the adenoviral L4-22K and IVa2 proteins onto the viral packaging sequence DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Teng-Chieh; Maluf, Nasib Karl

    2012-02-21

    Human adenovirus (Ad) is an icosahedral, double-stranded DNA virus. Viral DNA packaging refers to the process whereby the viral genome becomes encapsulated by the viral particle. In Ad, activation of the DNA packaging reaction requires at least three viral components: the IVa2 and L4-22K proteins and a section of DNA within the viral genome, called the packaging sequence. Previous studies have shown that the IVa2 and L4-22K proteins specifically bind to conserved elements within the packaging sequence and that these interactions are absolutely required for the observation of DNA packaging. However, the equilibrium mechanism for assembly of IVa2 and L4-22K onto the packaging sequence has not been determined. Here we characterize the assembly of the IVa2 and L4-22K proteins onto truncated packaging sequence DNA by analytical sedimentation velocity and equilibrium methods. At limiting concentrations of L4-22K, we observe a species with two IVa2 monomers and one L4-22K monomer bound to the DNA. In this species, the L4-22K monomer is promoting positive cooperative interactions between the two bound IVa2 monomers. As L4-22K levels are increased, we observe a species with one IVa2 monomer and three L4-22K monomers bound to the DNA. To explain this result, we propose a model in which L4-22K self-assembly on the DNA competes with IVa2 for positive heterocooperative interactions, destabilizing binding of the second IVa2 monomer. Thus, we propose that L4-22K levels control the extent of cooperativity observed between adjacently bound IVa2 monomers. We have also determined the hydrodynamic properties of all observed stoichiometric species; we observe that species with three L4-22K monomers bound have more extended conformations than species with a single L4-22K bound. We suggest this might reflect a molecular switch that controls insertion of the viral DNA into the capsid.

  5. Soil Moisture Active Passive Mission L4_C Data Product Assessment (Version 2 Validated Release)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimball, John S.; Jones, Lucas A.; Glassy, Joseph; Stavros, E. Natasha; Madani, Nima; Reichle, Rolf H.; Jackson, Thomas; Colliander, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    The SMAP satellite was successfully launched January 31st 2015, and began acquiring Earth observation data following in-orbit sensor calibration. Global data products derived from the SMAP L-band microwave measurements include Level 1 calibrated and geolocated radiometric brightness temperatures, Level 23 surface soil moisture and freezethaw geophysical retrievals mapped to a fixed Earth grid, and model enhanced Level 4 data products for surface to root zone soil moisture and terrestrial carbon (CO2) fluxes. The post-launch SMAP mission CalVal Phase had two primary objectives for each science product team: 1) calibrate, verify, and improve the performance of the science algorithms, and 2) validate accuracies of the science data products as specified in the L1 science requirements. This report provides analysis and assessment of the SMAP Level 4 Carbon (L4_C) product pertaining to the validated release. The L4_C validated product release effectively replaces an earlier L4_C beta-product release (Kimball et al. 2015). The validated release described in this report incorporates a longer data record and benefits from algorithm and CalVal refinements acquired during the SMAP post-launch CalVal intensive period. The SMAP L4_C algorithms utilize a terrestrial carbon flux model informed by SMAP soil moisture inputs along with optical remote sensing (e.g. MODIS) vegetation indices and other ancillary biophysical data to estimate global daily net ecosystem CO2 exchange (NEE) and component carbon fluxes for vegetation gross primary production (GPP) and ecosystem respiration (Reco). Other L4_C product elements include surface (10 cm depth) soil organic carbon (SOC) stocks and associated environmental constraints to these processes, including soil moisture and landscape freeze/thaw (FT) controls on GPP and respiration (Kimball et al. 2012). The L4_C product encapsulates SMAP carbon cycle science objectives by: 1) providing a direct link between terrestrial carbon fluxes and

  6. Intercomparison of prediction skills of ensemble methods using monthly mean temperature simulated by CMIP5 models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seong, Min-Gyu; Suh, Myoung-Seok; Kim, Chansoo

    2017-08-01

    This study focuses on an objective comparison of eight ensemble methods using the same data, training period, training method, and validation period. The eight ensemble methods are: BMA (Bayesian Model Averaging), HMR (Homogeneous Multiple Regression), EMOS (Ensemble Model Output Statistics), HMR+ with positive coefficients, EMOS+ with positive coefficients, PEA_ROC (Performance-based Ensemble Averaging using ROot mean square error and temporal Correlation coefficient), WEA_Tay (Weighted Ensemble Averaging based on Taylor's skill score), and MME (Multi-Model Ensemble). Forty-five years (1961-2005) of data from 14 CMIP5 models and APHRODITE (Asian Precipitation- Highly-Resolved Observational Data Integration Towards Evaluation of Water Resources) data were used to compare the performance of the eight ensemble methods. Although some models underestimated the variability of monthly mean temperature (MMT), most of the models effectively simulated the spatial distribution of MMT. Regardless of training periods and the number of ensemble members, the prediction skills of BMA and the four multiple linear regressions (MLR) were superior to the other ensemble methods (PEA_ROC, WEA_Tay, MME) in terms of deterministic prediction. In terms of probabilistic prediction, the four MLRs showed better prediction skills than BMA. However, the differences among the four MLRs and BMA were not significant. This resulted from the similarity of BMA weights and regression coefficients. Furthermore, prediction skills of the four MLRs were very similar. Overall, the four MLRs showed the best prediction skills among the eight ensemble methods. However, more comprehensive work is needed to select the best ensemble method among the numerous ensemble methods.

  7. Monthly sunspot number time series analysis and its modeling through autoregressive artificial neural network

    CERN Document Server

    Chattopadhyay, Goutami; 10.1140/epjp/i2012-12043-9

    2012-01-01

    This study reports a statistical analysis of monthly sunspot number time series and observes non homogeneity and asymmetry within it. Using Mann-Kendall test a linear trend is revealed. After identifying stationarity within the time series we generate autoregressive AR(p) and autoregressive moving average (ARMA(p,q)). Based on minimization of AIC we find 3 and 1 as the best values of p and q respectively. In the next phase, autoregressive neural network (AR-NN(3)) is generated by training a generalized feedforward neural network (GFNN). Assessing the model performances by means of Willmott's index of second order and coefficient of determination, the performance of AR-NN(3) is identified to be better than AR(3) and ARMA(3,1).

  8. A Distributed Monthly Water Balance Model for Analyzing Impacts of Land Cover Change on Flow Regimes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIA Jun; WANG Gang-Sheng; YE Ai-Zhong; NIU Cun-Wen

    2005-01-01

    The Miyun Reservoir is the most important water source for Beijing Municipality, the capital of China with a population of more than 12 million. In recent decades, the inflow to the reservoir has shown a decreasing trend, which has seriously threatened water use in Beijing. In order to analyze the influents of land use and cover change (LUCC)upon inflow to Miyun Reservoir, terrain and land use information from remote sensing were utilized with a revised evapotranspiration estimation formula; a water loss model under conditions of human impacts was introduced; and a distributed monthly water balance model was established and applied to the Chaobai River Basin controlled by the Miyun Reservoir. The model simulation suggested that not only the impact of land cover change on evapotranspiration, but also the extra water loss caused by human activities, such as the water and soil conservation development projects should be considered. Although these development projects were of great benefit to human and ecological protection, they could reallocate water resources in time and space, and in a sense thereby influence the stream flow.

  9. The ScaLIng Macroweather Model (SLIMM) and monthly and inter annual regional forecasting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lovejoy, S.; Del Rio Amador, L.; Sloman, L.

    2015-12-01

    By exploiting the sensitive dependence on initial conditions, GCM's can generate a statistical ensemble of future states in which the high frequency "weather" is treated as a driving noise. Following Hasselman, 1976, this has lead to stochastic models that directly generate the noise, and model the low frequencies using systems of integer ordered linear ordinary differential equations, the most well known are the linear inverse models (LIM). These have been presented as a benchmark for decadal surface temperature forecast. Using the LIM, hindcast skills comparable to and sometimes even better than the skill of (coupled) Global Circulation Models (GCM's) from phase 5 of the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project (CMIP5). Nevertheless, the short range exponential temporal decorrelations implicit in the LIM models are unrealistic (the true decorrelations are closer to long range power laws), and - as a consequence - the useful limit to the forecast horizon is roughly one year: it enormously underestimates the memory of the system. In presentation, we make a scaling analogue of the LIM: ScaLIng Macroweather Model (SLIMM) that exploits the power law (scaling) behavior in time of the temperature field and consequently, make use of the long history dependence of the data to improve the skill. The results predicted analytically by the model have been tested by performing actual hindcasts in different 5º x 5º regions on the planet using the Twentieth Century Reanalysis as a reference datasets. As a first step, we removed the anthropogenic component of each time series based on its sensitivity to equivalent CO2 concentration for the last 130 years, the residues are our estimates of the natural variability that SLIMM predicts. This residues were treated as fractional Gaussian noise processes with scaling exponent H between -0.5 and 0. The value of H for each grid-point can be obtained directly from the data. We report maps of theoretical skill predicted by the model and we

  10. Transfer function modeling of the monthly accumulated rainfall series over the Iberian Peninsula

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mateos, Vidal L.; Garcia, Jose A.; Serrano, Antonio; De la Cruz Gallego, Maria [Departamento de Fisica, Universidad de Extremadura, Badajoz (Spain)

    2002-10-01

    In order to improve the results given by Autoregressive Moving-Average (ARMA) modeling for the monthly accumulated rainfall series taken at 19 observatories of the Iberian Peninsula, a Discrete Linear Transfer Function Noise (DLTFN) model was applied taking the local pressure series (LP), North Atlantic sea level pressure series (SLP) and North Atlantic sea surface temperature (SST) as input variables, and the rainfall series as the output series. In all cases, the performance of the DLTFN models, measured by the explained variance of the rainfall series, is better than the performance given by the ARMA modeling. The best performance is given by the models that take the local pressure as the input variable, followed by the sea level pressure models and the sea surface temperature models. Geographically speaking, the models fitted to those observatories located in the west of the Iberian Peninsula work better than those on the north and east of the Peninsula. Also, it was found that there is a region located between 0 N and 20 N, which shows the highest cross-correlation between SST and the peninsula rainfalls. This region moves to the west and northwest off the Peninsula when the SLP series are used. [Spanish] Con el objeto de mejorar los resultados porporcionados por los modelos Autorregresivo Media Movil (ARMA) ajustados a las precipitaciones mensuales acumuladas registradas en 19 observatorios de la Peninsula Iberica se han usado modelos de funcion de transferencia (DLTFN) en los que se han empleado como variable independiente la presion local (LP), la presion a nivel del mar (SLP) o la temperatura de agua del mar (SST) en el Atlantico Norte. En todos los casos analizados, los resultados obtenidos con los modelos DLTFN, medidos mediante la varianza explicada por el modelo, han sido mejores que los resultados proporcionados por los modelos ARMA. Los mejores resultados han sido dados por aquellos modelos que usan la presion local como variable de entrada, seguidos

  11. Output fields from the NOAA WAVEWATCH III® wave model monthly hindcasts for 2007-03 (NODC Accession 0089833)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The NOAA WAVEWATCH III® hindcast dataset comprises output fields from the monthly WAVEWATCH III® hindcast model runs conducted at the National Centers for...

  12. Output fields from the NOAA WAVEWATCH III® wave model monthly hindcasts for 2007-02 (NODC Accession 0089832)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The NOAA WAVEWATCH III® hindcast dataset comprises output fields from the monthly WAVEWATCH III® hindcast model runs conducted at the National Centers for...

  13. Monthly urban (municipal and industrial use) pumpage for the Central Valley Hydrologic Model (CVHM) by Water Balance Subregion (WBS)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This digital dataset contains the monthly urban (municipal and industrial use) pumpage for the Central Valley Hydrologic Model (CVHM) by Water Balance Subregion...

  14. Output fields from the NOAA WAVEWATCH III® wave model monthly hindcasts for 2009-04 (NODC Accession 0089858)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The NOAA WAVEWATCH III® hindcast dataset comprises output fields from the monthly WAVEWATCH III® hindcast model runs conducted at the National Centers for...

  15. Output fields from the NOAA WAVEWATCH III® wave model monthly hindcasts for 2015-06 (NCEI Accession 0130740)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The NOAA WAVEWATCH III® hindcast dataset comprises output fields from the monthly WAVEWATCH III® hindcast model runs conducted at the National Centers for...

  16. Output fields from the NOAA WAVEWATCH III® wave model monthly hindcasts for 2012-02 (NODC Accession 0089892)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The NOAA WAVEWATCH III® hindcast dataset comprises output fields from the monthly WAVEWATCH III® hindcast model runs conducted at the National Centers for...

  17. Output fields from the NOAA WAVEWATCH III® wave model monthly hindcasts for 2010-03 (NODC Accession 0089869)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The NOAA WAVEWATCH III® hindcast dataset comprises output fields from the monthly WAVEWATCH III® hindcast model runs conducted at the National Centers for...

  18. Output fields from the NOAA WAVEWATCH III® wave model monthly hindcasts for 2014-09 (NODC Accession 0125935)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The NOAA WAVEWATCH III® hindcast dataset comprises output fields from the monthly WAVEWATCH III® hindcast model runs conducted at the National Centers for...

  19. Output fields from the NOAA WAVEWATCH III® wave model monthly hindcasts for 2010-12 (NODC Accession 0089878)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The NOAA WAVEWATCH III® hindcast dataset comprises output fields from the monthly WAVEWATCH III® hindcast model runs conducted at the National Centers for...

  20. Output fields from the NOAA WAVEWATCH III® wave model monthly hindcasts for 2013-10 (NODC Accession 0115066)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The NOAA WAVEWATCH III® hindcast dataset comprises output fields from the monthly WAVEWATCH III® hindcast model runs conducted at the National Centers for...

  1. Output fields from the NOAA WAVEWATCH III® wave model monthly hindcasts for 2006-05 (NODC Accession 0089823)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The NOAA WAVEWATCH III® hindcast dataset comprises output fields from the monthly WAVEWATCH III® hindcast model runs conducted at the National Centers for...

  2. Monthly water balance model for climate change analysis in agriculture with R

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalicz, Péter; Herceg, András; Gribovszki, Zoltán

    2015-04-01

    For Hungary regional climate models projections suggest a warmer climate and some changes in annual precipitation distribution. These changes force the whole agrarian sector to consider the traditional cropping technologies. This situation is more serious in forestry because some forest populations are on their xeric distributional limits (Gálos et. al, 2014). Additionally, a decision has an impact sometimes longer than one hundred years. To support the stakeholder there is a project which develops a GIS (Geographic Information System) based decision support system. Hydrology plays significant role in this system because water is often one of the most important limiting factor in Hungary. A modified Thorntwaite-type monthly water balance model was choosen to produce hydrological estimations for the GIS modules. This model is calibrated with the available data between 2000 and 2008. Beside other meteorological data we used mainly an actual evapotranspiration map in the calibration phase, which was derived with the Complementary-relationship-based evapotranspiration mapping (CREMAP; Szilágyi and Kovács, 2011) technique. The calibration process is pixel based and it has several stochastic steps. We try to find a flexible solution for the model implementation which easy to automatize and can be integrate in GIS systems. The open source R programming language was selected which well satisfied these demands. The result of this development is summarized as an R package. This publication has been supported by AGRARKLIMA.2 VKSZ_12-1-2013-0034 project. References Gálos B., Antal V., Czimber K., Mátyás Cs. (2014) Forest ecosystems, sewage works and droughts - possibilities for climate change adaptation. In: Santamarta J.C., Hernandez-Gutiérrez L.E., Arraiza M.P. (eds) 2014. Natural Hazards and Climate Change/Riesgos Naturales y Cambio Climático. Madrid: Colegio de Ingenieros de Montes. ISBN 978-84-617-1060-7, D.L. TF 565-2014, 91-104 pp Szilágyi J., Kovács Á. (2011

  3. Comparison of forecasts of mean monthly water level in the Paraguay River, Brazil, from two fractionally differenced models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prass, Taiane S.; Bravo, Juan Martin; Clarke, Robin T.; Collischonn, Walter; Lopes, SíLvia R. C.

    2012-05-01

    The paper compares forecasts of mean monthly water levels up to six months ahead at Ladário, on the Upper Paraguay River, Brazil, estimated from two long-range dependence models. In one of them, the marked seasonal cycle was removed and a fractionally differenced model was fitted to the transformed series. In the other, a seasonal fractionally differenced model was fitted to water levels without transformation. Forecasts from both models for periods up to six months ahead were compared with forecasts given by simpler "short-range dependence" Box-Jenkins models, one fitted to the transformed series, the other a seasonal autoregressive moving average (ARMA) model. Estimates of parameters in the four models (two "long-range dependence", two "short-range dependence") were updated at six-monthly intervals over a 20 year period, and forecasts were compared using root mean square errors (rmse) between water-level forecasts and observed levels. As judged by rmse, performances of the two long-range dependence models, and of the ARMA (1,1) short-range dependence model, were very similar; all three out-performed the seasonal short-range dependence ARMA model. There was evidence that all models performed better during recession periods, than on the hydrograph rising limb.

  4. Monthly variation of trace metals in North Sea sediments. From experimental data to modeling calculations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lourino-Cabana, B; Billon, G; Lesven, L; Sabbe, K; Gillan, D-C; Gao, Y; Leermakers, M; Baeyens, W

    2014-10-15

    Seasonal variation in trace metal contamination in surface sediments was studied through high resolution profiles assessed monthly by DGT probes in muddy sediments of the North Sea. General parameters such as pH, temperature, dissolved oxygen and sulfides were also recorded to estimate their role in the speciation of trace metals. Experimental data were included in a thermodynamic equilibrium model to calculate major (geo)chemical processes at the water-sediment interface and to predict the fate of the trace metals in case of (physico-)chemical changes. Results showed lowest Fe, Co, Ni and Cd concentrations in summer, which are most probably due to the very high sulfide concentrations according to our theoretical calculations. Cu and Pb behavior were found to be less influenced by sulfides, since they are also strongly associated to organic matter. The whole set of results clearly indicated that metal speciation in these sediments is controlled by sulfides and OM contents. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Parameter regionalization of a monthly water balance model for the conterminous United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bock, Andrew R.; Hay, Lauren E.; McCabe, Gregory J.; Markstrom, Steven L.; Atkinson, R. Dwight

    2016-07-01

    A parameter regionalization scheme to transfer parameter values from gaged to ungaged areas for a monthly water balance model (MWBM) was developed and tested for the conterminous United States (CONUS). The Fourier Amplitude Sensitivity Test, a global-sensitivity algorithm, was implemented on a MWBM to generate parameter sensitivities on a set of 109 951 hydrologic response units (HRUs) across the CONUS. The HRUs were grouped into 110 calibration regions based on similar parameter sensitivities. Subsequently, measured runoff from 1575 streamgages within the calibration regions were used to calibrate the MWBM parameters to produce parameter sets for each calibration region. Measured and simulated runoff at the 1575 streamgages showed good correspondence for the majority of the CONUS, with a median computed Nash-Sutcliffe efficiency coefficient of 0.76 over all streamgages. These methods maximize the use of available runoff information, resulting in a calibrated CONUS-wide application of the MWBM suitable for providing estimates of water availability at the HRU resolution for both gaged and ungaged areas of the CONUS.

  6. Comprehensive modeling of monthly mean soil temperature using multivariate adaptive regression splines and support vector machine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehdizadeh, Saeid; Behmanesh, Javad; Khalili, Keivan

    2017-07-01

    Soil temperature (T s) and its thermal regime are the most important factors in plant growth, biological activities, and water movement in soil. Due to scarcity of the T s data, estimation of soil temperature is an important issue in different fields of sciences. The main objective of the present study is to investigate the accuracy of multivariate adaptive regression splines (MARS) and support vector machine (SVM) methods for estimating the T s. For this aim, the monthly mean data of the T s (at depths of 5, 10, 50, and 100 cm) and meteorological parameters of 30 synoptic stations in Iran were utilized. To develop the MARS and SVM models, various combinations of minimum, maximum, and mean air temperatures (T min, T max, T); actual and maximum possible sunshine duration; sunshine duration ratio (n, N, n/N); actual, net, and extraterrestrial solar radiation data (R s, R n, R a); precipitation (P); relative humidity (RH); wind speed at 2 m height (u 2); and water vapor pressure (Vp) were used as input variables. Three error statistics including root-mean-square-error (RMSE), mean absolute error (MAE), and determination coefficient (R 2) were used to check the performance of MARS and SVM models. The results indicated that the MARS was superior to the SVM at different depths. In the test and validation phases, the most accurate estimations for the MARS were obtained at the depth of 10 cm for T max, T min, T inputs (RMSE = 0.71 °C, MAE = 0.54 °C, and R 2 = 0.995) and for RH, V p, P, and u 2 inputs (RMSE = 0.80 °C, MAE = 0.61 °C, and R 2 = 0.996), respectively.

  7. MULTI-WAVELENGTH OBSERVATIONS OF COMET C/2011 L4 (PAN-STARRS)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Bin; Keane, Jacqueline; Meech, Karen [NASA Astrobiology Institute, University of Hawaii, Honolulu, HI 96822 (United States); Owen, Tobias; Wainscoat, Richard, E-mail: yangbin@ifa.hawaii.edu [Institute for Astronomy, University of Hawaii, Honolulu, HI 96822 (United States)

    2014-04-01

    The dynamically new comet C/2011 L4 (Pan-STARRS) is one of the brightest comets observed since the great comet C/1995 O1 (Hale-Bopp). Here, we present our multi-wavelength observations of C/2011 L4 during its in-bound passage to the inner solar system. A strong absorption band of water ice at 2.0 μm was detected in the near-infrared spectra, obtained with the 8 m Gemini-North and 3 m Infrared Telescope Facility Telescopes. The companion 1.5 μm band of water ice, however, was not observed. Spectral modeling shows that the absence of the 1.5 μm feature can be explained by the presence of sub-micron-sized fine ice grains. No gas lines (i.e., CN, HCN, or CO) were observed pre-perihelion in either the optical or the submillimeter. We derived 3σ upper limits for the CN and CO production rates. The comet exhibited a very strong continuum in the optical and its slope seemed to become redder as the comet approached the Sun. Our observations suggest that C/2011 L4 is an unusually dust-rich comet with a dust-to-gas mass ratio >4.

  8. Crop weather models of corn and soybeans for Agrophysical Units (APU's) in Iowa using monthly meteorological predictors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leduc, S. (Principal Investigator)

    1982-01-01

    Models based on multiple regression were developed to estimate corn and soybean yield from weather data for agrophysical units (APU) in Iowa. The predictor variables are derived from monthly average temperature and monthly total precipitation data at meteorological stations in the cooperative network. The models are similar in form to the previous models developed for crop reporting districts (CRD). The trends and derived variables were the same and the approach to select the significant predictors was similar to that used in developing the CRD models. The APU's were selected to be more homogeneous with respect crop to production than the CRDs. The APU models are quite similar to the CRD models, similar explained variation and number of predictor variables. The APU models are to be independently evaluated and compared to the previously evaluated CRD models. That comparison should indicate the preferred model area for this application, i.e., APU or CRD.

  9. Monthly river flow forecasting using artificial neural network and support vector regression models coupled with wavelet transform

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalteh, Aman Mohammad

    2013-04-01

    Reliable and accurate forecasts of river flow is needed in many water resources planning, design development, operation and maintenance activities. In this study, the relative accuracy of artificial neural network (ANN) and support vector regression (SVR) models coupled with wavelet transform in monthly river flow forecasting is investigated, and compared to regular ANN and SVR models, respectively. The relative performance of regular ANN and SVR models is also compared to each other. For this, monthly river flow data of Kharjegil and Ponel stations in Northern Iran are used. The comparison of the results reveals that both ANN and SVR models coupled with wavelet transform, are able to provide more accurate forecasting results than the regular ANN and SVR models. However, it is found that SVR models coupled with wavelet transform provide better forecasting results than ANN models coupled with wavelet transform. The results also indicate that regular SVR models perform slightly better than regular ANN models.

  10. Modeling and Prediction of Monthly Total Ozone Concentrations by Use of an Artificial Neural Network Based on Principal Component Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chattopadhyay, Surajit; Chattopadhyay, Goutami

    2012-10-01

    In the work discussed in this paper we considered total ozone time series over Kolkata (22°34'10.92″N, 88°22'10.92″E), an urban area in eastern India. Using cloud cover, average temperature, and rainfall as the predictors, we developed an artificial neural network, in the form of a multilayer perceptron with sigmoid non-linearity, for prediction of monthly total ozone concentrations from values of the predictors in previous months. We also estimated total ozone from values of the predictors in the same month. Before development of the neural network model we removed multicollinearity by means of principal component analysis. On the basis of the variables extracted by principal component analysis, we developed three artificial neural network models. By rigorous statistical assessment it was found that cloud cover and rainfall can act as good predictors for monthly total ozone when they are considered as the set of input variables for the neural network model constructed in the form of a multilayer perceptron. In general, the artificial neural network has good potential for predicting and estimating monthly total ozone on the basis of the meteorological predictors. It was further observed that during pre-monsoon and winter seasons, the proposed models perform better than during and after the monsoon.

  11. Secondary Evaluations of MTA 36-Month Outcomes: Propensity Score and Growth Mixture Model Analyses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swanson, James M.; Hinshaw, Stephen P.; Arnold, L. Eugene; Gibbons, Robert D.; Marcus, Sue; Hur, Kwan; Jensen, Peter S.; Vitiello, Benedetto; Abikoff, Howard B.: Greenhill, Laurence L.; Hechtman, Lily; Pelham, William E.; Wells, Karen C.; Conners, C. Keith; March, John S.; Elliott, Glen R.; Epstein, Jeffery N.; Hoagwood, Kimberly; Hoza, Betsy; Molina, Brooke S. G.; Newcorn, Jeffrey H.; Severe, Joanne B.; Wigal, Timothy

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate two hypotheses: that self-selection bias contributed to lack of medication advantage at the 36-month assessment of the Multimodal Treatment Study of Children With ADHD (MTA) and that overall improvement over time obscured treatment effects in subgroups with different outcome trajectories. Method: Propensity score analyses,…

  12. A Conditionally Beta Distributed Time-Series Model With Application to Monthly US Corporate Default Rates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Thor Pajhede

    2017-01-01

    . (2016) in examining the conditional independence hypothesis of Lando and Nielsen (2010). Empirically we find that; (1) the current default rate influence the default rate of the following periods even when conditioning on explanatory variables. (2) The 12 month lag is highly significant in explaining...

  13. Analysis of star camera errors in GRACE data and their impact on monthly gravity field models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Inacio, P.M.G.; Ditmar, P.G.; Klees, R.; Hashemifarahani, H.

    2015-01-01

    Star cameras (SCs) on board the GRACE satellites provide information about the attitudes of the spacecrafts. This information is needed to reduce the K-band ranging data to the centre of mass of the satellites. In this paper, we analyse GRACE SC errors using two months of real data of the primary an

  14. Secondary Evaluations of MTA 36-Month Outcomes: Propensity Score and Growth Mixture Model Analyses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swanson, James M.; Hinshaw, Stephen P.; Arnold, L. Eugene; Gibbons, Robert D.; Marcus, Sue; Hur, Kwan; Jensen, Peter S.; Vitiello, Benedetto; Abikoff, Howard B.: Greenhill, Laurence L.; Hechtman, Lily; Pelham, William E.; Wells, Karen C.; Conners, C. Keith; March, John S.; Elliott, Glen R.; Epstein, Jeffery N.; Hoagwood, Kimberly; Hoza, Betsy; Molina, Brooke S. G.; Newcorn, Jeffrey H.; Severe, Joanne B.; Wigal, Timothy

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate two hypotheses: that self-selection bias contributed to lack of medication advantage at the 36-month assessment of the Multimodal Treatment Study of Children With ADHD (MTA) and that overall improvement over time obscured treatment effects in subgroups with different outcome trajectories. Method: Propensity score analyses,…

  15. Regulation of human adenovirus alternative RNA splicing by the adenoviral L4-33K and L4-22K proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biasiotto, Roberta; Akusjärvi, Göran

    2015-01-28

    Adenovirus makes extensive use of alternative RNA splicing to produce a complex set of spliced viral mRNAs. Studies aimed at characterizing the interactions between the virus and the host cell RNA splicing machinery have identified three viral proteins of special significance for the control of late viral gene expression: L4-33K, L4-22K, and E4-ORF4. L4-33K is a viral alternative RNA splicing factor that controls L1 alternative splicing via an interaction with the cellular protein kinases Protein Kinase A (PKA) and DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PK). L4-22K is a viral transcription factor that also has been implicated in the splicing of a subset of late viral mRNAs. E4-ORF4 is a viral protein that binds the cellular protein phosphatase IIA (PP2A) and controls Serine/Arginine (SR)-rich protein activity by inducing SR protein dephosphorylation. The L4-33K, and most likely also the L4-22K protein, are highly phosphorylated in vivo. Here we will review the function of these viral proteins in the post-transcriptional control of adenoviral gene expression and further discuss the significance of potential protein kinases phosphorylating the L4-33K and/or L4-22K proteins.

  16. Assessment of the potential forecasting skill of a global hydrological model in reproducing the occurrence of monthly flow extremes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Candogan Yossef, N.A.N.N.; Beek, L.P.H. van; Kwadijk, J.C.J.; Bierkens, M.F.P.

    2012-01-01

    As an initial step in assessing the prospect of using global hydrological models (GHMs) for hydrological forecasting, this study investigates the skill of the GHM PCRGLOBWB in reproducing the occurrence of past extremes in monthly discharge on a global scale. Global terrestrial hydrology from 1958

  17. EGSIEM: Combination of GRACE monthly gravity models on normal equation level

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Ulrich; Jean, Yoomin; Jäggi, Adrian; Mayer-Gürr, Torsten; Neumayer, Hans; Lemoine, Jean-Michel

    2016-04-01

    One of the three geodetic services to be realized in the frame of the EGSIEM project is a scientific combination service. Each associated processing center (AC) will follow a set of common processing standards but will apply its own, independent analysis method. Therefore the quality, robustness and reliability of the combined monthly gravity fields is expected to improve significantly compared to the individual solutions. The Monthly GRACE gravity fields of all ACs are combined on normal equation level. The individual normal equations are weighted depending on pairwise comparisons of the individual gravity field solutions. To derive these weights and for quality control of the individual contributions first a combination of the monthly gravity fields on solution level is performed. The concept of weighting and of the combination on normal equation level is introduced and the formats used for normal equation exchange and gravity field solutions is described. First results of the combination on normal equation level are presented and compared to the corresponding combinations on solution level. EGSIEM has an open data policy and all processing centers of GRACE gravity fields are invited to participate in the combination.

  18. The apolipoprotein-AI mimetic peptide L4F at a modest dose does not attenuate weight gain, inflammation, or atherosclerosis in LDLR-null mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michelle M Averill

    Full Text Available High density lipoprotein (HDL cholesterol levels are inversely related to cardiovascular disease risk and associated with a reduced risk of type 2 diabetes. Apolipoprotein A-I (apoA-I; major HDL protein mimetics have been reported to reduce atherosclerosis and decrease adiposity. This study investigated the effect of L4F mimetic peptide and apoA-I overexpression on weight gain, insulin resistance, and atherosclerosis in an LDL receptor deficient (Ldlr-/- model fed a high fat high sucrose with cholesterol (HFHSC diet.Studies in differentiated 3T3-L1 adipocytes tested whether L4F could inhibit palmitate-induced adipocyte inflammation. In vivo studies used male Ldlr-/- mice fed a HFHSC diet for 12 weeks and were injected daily with L4F (100 µg/mouse subcutaneously during the last 8 weeks. Wild-type and apoA-I overexpressing Ldlr-/- mice were fed HFHSC diet for 16 weeks.Neither L4F administration nor apoA-I overexpression affected weight gain, total plasma cholesterol or triglycerides in our studies. While pre-treatment of 3T3-L1 adipocytes with either L4F or HDL abolished palmitate-induced cytokine expression in vitro, L4F treatment did not affect circulating or adipose tissue inflammatory markers in vivo. Neither L4F administration nor apoA-I overexpression affected glucose tolerance. ApoA-I overexpression significantly reduced atherosclerotic lesion size, yet L4F treatment did not affect atherosclerosis.Our results suggest that neither L4F (100 µg/day/mouse nor apoA-I overexpression affects adiposity or insulin resistance in this model. We also were unable to confirm a reduction in atherosclerosis with L4F in our particular model. Further studies on the effect of apoA-I mimetics on atherosclerosis and insulin resistance in a variety of dietary contexts are warranted.

  19. Assessment and validation of prognostic models for poor functional recovery 12 months after whiplash injury: a multicentre inception cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sterling, Michele; Hendrikz, Joan; Kenardy, Justin; Kristjansson, Eythor; Dumas, Jean-Pierre; Niere, Ken; Cote, Julie; Deserres, Sophie; Rivest, Karine; Jull, Gwendolen

    2012-08-01

    Uncertainty surrounds prognostic factors after whiplash injury. Previously we identified a prognostic model for 6-month pain-related disability in a cohort of 80 participants with acute whiplash. Predictors included initial disability, older age, decreased cold pain thresholds, decreased neck rotation movement, posttraumatic stress symptoms and decreased sympathetic vasoconstriction. The objective of this study was to externally validate this model. In a multicentre inception cohort study, 286 participants with acute whiplash (I, II or III) were assessed at <3 weeks and 12 months after injury. The Neck Disability Index (NDI) was the outcome. Observed and predicted NDI scores were generated using the published equation of the original model. Model discrimination between participants with no or mild disability from those with moderate to severe disability was examined by receiver operating characteristic curves. Initial NDI and cold pain threshold predicted current observed 12-month NDI scores (r(2) = 0.50, 95% confidence interval 0.42 to 0.58). There was a significant site effect, and the estimated marginal mean ± SE of 12-month NDI for Iceland (27.6 ± 1.79%) was higher than the other 3 sites (Melbourne 11.2 ± 5.03%, Canada 16.4 ± 2.36%, Brisbane 16.8 ± 1.17%). After adjusting for site, age and Impact of Events Scale scores regained significance (r(2) = 0.56, 95% confidence interval 0.48 to 0.64). The tested model was not precise in predicting NDI as a continuous variable. However, it found good accuracy to discriminate participants with moderate to severe disability at 12 months (area under the receiver operating characteristic curve 0.89 [95% confidence interval 0.84-0.94], P<.001) which is clinically useful.

  20. A joint stochastic-deterministic approach for long-term and short-term modelling of monthly flow rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stojković, Milan; Kostić, Srđan; Plavšić, Jasna; Prohaska, Stevan

    2017-01-01

    The authors present a detailed procedure for modelling of mean monthly flow time-series using records of the Great Morava River (Serbia). The proposed procedure overcomes a major challenge of other available methods by disaggregating the time series in order to capture the main properties of the hydrologic process in both long-run and short-run. The main assumption of the conducted research is that a time series of monthly flow rates represents a stochastic process comprised of deterministic, stochastic and random components, the former of which can be further decomposed into a composite trend and two periodic components (short-term or seasonal periodicity and long-term or multi-annual periodicity). In the present paper, the deterministic component of a monthly flow time-series is assessed by spectral analysis, whereas its stochastic component is modelled using cross-correlation transfer functions, artificial neural networks and polynomial regression. The results suggest that the deterministic component can be expressed solely as a function of time, whereas the stochastic component changes as a nonlinear function of climatic factors (rainfall and temperature). For the calibration period, the results of the analysis infers a lower value of Kling-Gupta Efficiency in the case of transfer functions (0.736), whereas artificial neural networks and polynomial regression suggest a significantly better match between the observed and simulated values, 0.841 and 0.891, respectively. It seems that transfer functions fail to capture high monthly flow rates, whereas the model based on polynomial regression reproduces high monthly flows much better because it is able to successfully capture a highly nonlinear relationship between the inputs and the output. The proposed methodology that uses a combination of artificial neural networks, spectral analysis and polynomial regression for deterministic and stochastic components can be applied to forecast monthly or seasonal flow rates.

  1. Implementation and evaluation of a monthly water balance model over the US on an 800 m grid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hostetler, S. W.; Alder, J. R.

    2016-12-01

    We simulate the 1950-2010 water balance for the conterminous U.S. (CONUS) with a monthly water balance model (MWBM) using the 800 m Parameter-elevation Regression on Independent Slopes Model (PRISM) data set as model input. We employed observed snow and streamflow data sets to guide modification of the snow and potential evapotranspiration components in the default model and to evaluate model performance. Based on various metrics and sensitivity tests, the modified model yields reasonably good simulations of seasonal snowpack in the West (range of bias of ±50 mm at 68% of 713 SNOTEL sites), the gradients and magnitudes of actual evapotranspiration, and runoff (median correlation of 0.83 and median Nash-Sutcliff efficiency of 0.6 between simulated and observed annual time series at 1427 USGS gage sites). The model generally performs well along the Pacific Coast, the high elevations of the Basin and Range and over the Midwest and East, but not as well over the dry areas of the Southwest and upper Plains regions due, in part, to the apportioning of direct versus delayed runoff. Sensitivity testing and application of the MWBM to simulate the future water balance at four National Parks when driven by 30 climate models from the Climate Model Intercomparison Program Phase 5 (CMIP5) demonstrate that the model is useful for evaluating first-order, climate driven hydrologic change on monthly and annual time scales.

  2. ON STRONG SIGNALS OF MONTHLY PRECIPITATION ANOMALIES IN EARLY RAINING SEASON OF GUANGDONG AND CONCEPTUAL MODELS OF PREDICTION

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    林爱兰

    2002-01-01

    Reanalysis data from NCEP/NCAR are used to systematically study preceding signals of monthly precipitation anomalies in the early raining season of Guangdong province, from the viewpoints of 500-hPa geopotential height field, outgoing longwave radiation (OLR) field, sea surface temperature (SST) and fourteen indexes of general circulation depicting atmosphere activity at high, middle and low latitutes. Being multiple tools of information, a number of conceptual models are formulated that are useful for prediction of the magnitude of monthly precipitation (drought, flood and normal conditionss).

  3. A hybrid approach to monthly streamflow forecasting: Integrating hydrological model outputs into a Bayesian artificial neural network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Humphrey, Greer B.; Gibbs, Matthew S.; Dandy, Graeme C.; Maier, Holger R.

    2016-09-01

    Monthly streamflow forecasts are needed to support water resources decision making in the South East of South Australia, where baseflow represents a significant proportion of the total streamflow and soil moisture and groundwater are important predictors of runoff. To address this requirement, the utility of a hybrid monthly streamflow forecasting approach is explored, whereby simulated soil moisture from the GR4J conceptual rainfall-runoff model is used to represent initial catchment conditions in a Bayesian artificial neural network (ANN) statistical forecasting model. To assess the performance of this hybrid forecasting method, a comparison is undertaken of the relative performances of the Bayesian ANN, the GR4J conceptual model and the hybrid streamflow forecasting approach for producing 1-month ahead streamflow forecasts at three key locations in the South East of South Australia. Particular attention is paid to the quantification of uncertainty in each of the forecast models and the potential for reducing forecast uncertainty by using the hybrid approach is considered. Case study results suggest that the hybrid models developed in this study are able to take advantage of the complementary strengths of both the ANN models and the GR4J conceptual models. This was particularly the case when forecasting high flows, where the hybrid models were shown to outperform the two individual modelling approaches in terms of the accuracy of the median forecasts, as well as reliability and resolution of the forecast distributions. In addition, the forecast distributions generated by the hybrid models were up to 8 times more precise than those based on climatology; thus, providing a significant improvement on the information currently available to decision makers.

  4. Evaluation of Thompson-type trend and monthly weather data models for corn yields in Iowa, Illinois, and Indiana

    Science.gov (United States)

    French, V. (Principal Investigator)

    1982-01-01

    An evaluation was made of Thompson-Type models which use trend terms (as a surrogate for technology), meteorological variables based on monthly average temperature, and total precipitation to forecast and estimate corn yields in Iowa, Illinois, and Indiana. Pooled and unpooled Thompson-type models were compared. Neither was found to be consistently superior to the other. Yield reliability indicators show that the models are of limited use for large area yield estimation. The models are objective and consistent with scientific knowledge. Timely yield forecasts and estimates can be made during the growing season by using normals or long range weather forecasts. The models are not costly to operate and are easy to use and understand. The model standard errors of prediction do not provide a useful current measure of modeled yield reliability.

  5. Spinopelvic balance evaluation of patients with degenerative spondylolisthesis L4L5 and L4L5 herniated disc who underwent surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viviane Regina Hernandez Nunes

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT OBJECTIVE: To correlate spinopelvic balance with the development of degenerative spondylolisthesis and disk herniation. METHODS: This was a descriptive retrospective study that evaluated 60 patients in this hospital, 30 patients with degenerative spondylolisthesis at the L4-L5 level and 30 with herniated disk at the L4-L5 level, all of whom underwent Surgical treatment. RESULTS: Patients with lumbar disk herniation at L4-L5 level had a mean tilt of 8.06, mean slope of 36.93, and mean PI of 45. In patients with degenerative spondylolisthesis at the L4-L5 level, a mean tilt of 22.1, mean slope of 38.3, and mean PI of 61.4 were observed. CONCLUSION: This article reinforces the finding that the high mean tilt and PI are related to the onset of degenerative spondylolisthesis, and also concluded that the same angles, when low, increase the risk for disk herniation.

  6. Modeling the extrinsic incubation of Dirofilaria immitis in South America based on monthly and continuous climatic data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuervo, Pablo F; Rinaldi, Laura; Cringoli, Giuseppe

    2015-04-15

    The spread and recrudescence of dirofilariosis across several regions, either caused by Dirofilaria immitis or D. repens, responds to many factors. Building upon the temperature model by Slocombe et al. (1989), a number of studies have been performed to generate predictive models for dirofilariosis. These studies have demonstrated the length of transmission periods and the number of Dirofilaria generations supported throughout several regions of the world (either at large or at small-scale). The usual procedure have proved to be extremely time consuming, as it appears impractical when assessing potential transmission at large scale, such as at a country or large-scale level. Due to the increasing need to suggest standardized surveillance protocols and apply adequate preventive measures at national and regional levels, a model for calculation of Dirofilaria HDUs based on monthly data was adapted for large-scale regional use. The models proposed are based on both point data (meteorological stations) and interpolated climate data layers (WorldClim). Three different models (daily and monthly models based on point data, and monthly model based on continuous data) were developed and compared statistically. When compared with the results from the classical daily model, the monthly models proposed accurately predicted the locations were extrinsic incubation was possible. These models proved to be adequate for the regional analysis of the extrinsic incubation of D. immitis and, hence, the relative risk of transmission in South America. Further, these models confirm that favorable temperatures for heartworm transmission in South America are present in most of the countries. D. immitis extrinsic incubation follows a seasonal pattern in Argentina, Chile, Uruguay, eastern Paraguay and southeastern Brazil; while in northern half of South America (less than 25° S) transmission may occur year-round. Moreover, high risk areas suitable for dirofilariasis transmission are not

  7. An extreme learning machine model for the simulation of monthly mean streamflow water level in eastern Queensland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deo, Ravinesh C; Şahin, Mehmet

    2016-02-01

    A predictive model for streamflow has practical implications for understanding the drought hydrology, environmental monitoring and agriculture, ecosystems and resource management. In this study, the state-or-art extreme learning machine (ELM) model was utilized to simulate the mean streamflow water level (Q WL) for three hydrological sites in eastern Queensland (Gowrie Creek, Albert, and Mary River). The performance of the ELM model was benchmarked with the artificial neural network (ANN) model. The ELM model was a fast computational method using single-layer feedforward neural networks and randomly determined hidden neurons that learns the historical patterns embedded in the input variables. A set of nine predictors with the month (to consider the seasonality of Q WL); rainfall; Southern Oscillation Index; Pacific Decadal Oscillation Index; ENSO Modoki Index; Indian Ocean Dipole Index; and Nino 3.0, Nino 3.4, and Nino 4.0 sea surface temperatures (SSTs) were utilized. A selection of variables was performed using cross correlation with Q WL, yielding the best inputs defined by (month; P; Nino 3.0 SST; Nino 4.0 SST; Southern Oscillation Index (SOI); ENSO Modoki Index (EMI)) for Gowrie Creek, (month; P; SOI; Pacific Decadal Oscillation (PDO); Indian Ocean Dipole (IOD); EMI) for Albert River, and by (month; P; Nino 3.4 SST; Nino 4.0 SST; SOI; EMI) for Mary River site. A three-layer neuronal structure trialed with activation equations defined by sigmoid, logarithmic, tangent sigmoid, sine, hardlim, triangular, and radial basis was utilized, resulting in optimum ELM model with hard-limit function and architecture 6-106-1 (Gowrie Creek), 6-74-1 (Albert River), and 6-146-1 (Mary River). The alternative ELM and ANN models with two inputs (month and rainfall) and the ELM model with all nine inputs were also developed. The performance was evaluated using the mean absolute error (MAE), coefficient of determination (r (2)), Willmott's Index (d), peak deviation (P dv), and Nash

  8. Parameter-elevation Regressions on Independent Slopes Model Monthly Climate Data for the Continental United States.

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This dataset was created using the PRISM (Parameter-elevation Regressions on Independent Slopes Model) climate mapping system, developed by Dr. Christopher Daly,...

  9. Uncertainty in a monthly water balance model using the generalized likelihood uncertainty estimation methodology

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Diego Rivera; Yessica Rivas; Alex Godoy

    2015-02-01

    Hydrological models are simplified representations of natural processes and subject to errors. Uncertainty bounds are a commonly used way to assess the impact of an input or model architecture uncertainty in model outputs. Different sets of parameters could have equally robust goodness-of-fit indicators, which is known as Equifinality. We assessed the outputs from a lumped conceptual hydrological model to an agricultural watershed in central Chile under strong interannual variability (coefficient of variability of 25%) by using the Equifinality concept and uncertainty bounds. The simulation period ran from January 1999 to December 2006. Equifinality and uncertainty bounds from GLUE methodology (Generalized Likelihood Uncertainty Estimation) were used to identify parameter sets as potential representations of the system. The aim of this paper is to exploit the use of uncertainty bounds to differentiate behavioural parameter sets in a simple hydrological model. Then, we analyze the presence of equifinality in order to improve the identification of relevant hydrological processes. The water balance model for Chillan River exhibits, at a first stage, equifinality. However, it was possible to narrow the range for the parameters and eventually identify a set of parameters representing the behaviour of the watershed (a behavioural model) in agreement with observational and soft data (calculation of areal precipitation over the watershed using an isohyetal map). The mean width of the uncertainty bound around the predicted runoff for the simulation period decreased from 50 to 20 m3s−1 after fixing the parameter controlling the areal precipitation over the watershed. This decrement is equivalent to decreasing the ratio between simulated and observed discharge from 5.2 to 2.5. Despite the criticisms against the GLUE methodology, such as the lack of statistical formality, it is identified as a useful tool assisting the modeller with the identification of critical parameters.

  10. The impact of orbital sampling, monthly averaging and vertical resolution on climate chemistry model evaluation with satellite observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. M. Aghedo

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Ensemble climate model simulations used for the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC assessments have become important tools for exploring the response of the Earth System to changes in anthropogenic and natural forcings. The systematic evaluation of these models through global satellite observations is a critical step in assessing the uncertainty of climate change projections. This paper presents the technical steps required for using nadir sun-synchronous infrared satellite observations for multi-model evaluation and the uncertainties associated with each step. This is motivated by need to use satellite observations to evaluate climate models. We quantified the implications of the effect of satellite orbit and spatial coverage, the effect of variations in vertical sensitivity as quantified by the observation operator and the impact of averaging the operators for use with monthly-mean model output. We calculated these biases in ozone, carbon monoxide, atmospheric temperature and water vapour by using the output from two global chemistry climate models (ECHAM5-MOZ and GISS-PUCCINI and the observations from the Tropospheric Emission Spectrometer (TES instrument on board the NASA-Aura satellite from January 2005 to December 2008.

    The results show that sampling and monthly averaging of the observation operators produce zonal-mean biases of less than ±3 % for ozone and carbon monoxide throughout the entire troposphere in both models. Water vapour sampling zonal-mean biases were also within the insignificant range of ±3 % (that is ±0.14 g kg−1 in both models. Sampling led to a temperature zonal-mean bias of ±0.3 K over the tropical and mid-latitudes in both models, and up to −1.4 K over the boundary layer in the higher latitudes. Using the monthly average of temperature and water vapour operators lead to large biases over the boundary layer in the southern-hemispheric higher latitudes and in the upper

  11. The impact of orbital sampling, monthly averaging and vertical resolution on climate chemistry model evaluation with satellite observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. M. Aghedo

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Ensemble climate model simulations used for the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC assessments have become important tools for exploring the response of the Earth System to changes in anthropogenic and natural forcings. The systematic evaluation of these models through global satellite observations is a critical step in assessing the uncertainty of climate change projections. This paper presents the technical steps required for using nadir sun-synchronous infrared satellite observations for multi-model evaluation and the uncertainties associated with each step. This is motivated by need to use satellite observations to evaluate climate models. We quantified the implications of the effect of satellite orbit and spatial coverage, the effect of variations in vertical sensitivity as quantified by the observation operator and the impact of averaging the operators for use with monthly-mean model output. We calculated these biases in ozone, carbon monoxide, atmospheric temperature and water vapour by using the output from two global chemistry climate models (ECHAM5-MOZ and GISS-PUCCINI and the observations from the Tropospheric Emission Spectrometer (TES satellite from January 2005 to December 2008.

    The results show that sampling and monthly averaging of the observation operators produce biases of less than ±3% for ozone and carbon monoxide throughout the entire troposphere in both models. Water vapour sampling biases were also within the insignificant range of ±3% (that is ±0.14 g kg−1 in both models. Sampling led to a temperature bias of ±0.3 K over the tropical and mid-latitudes in both models, and up to −1.4 K over the boundary layer in the higher latitudes. Using the monthly average of temperature and water vapour operators lead to large biases over the boundary layer in the southern-hemispheric higher latitudes and in the upper troposphere, respectively. Up to 8% bias was calculated in the upper

  12. Monthly errors

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — The 2006 monthly average statistical metrics for 2m Q (g kg-1) domain-wide for the base and MODIS WRF simulations against MADIS observations. This dataset is...

  13. Application of IEUBK model in lead risk assessment of children aged 61–84 months old in central China

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Yanyan [MOE Key Lab of Environment and Health, Institute of Environmental Medicine, School of Public Health, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science & Technology, Wuhan, Hubei (China); Hu, Jia [Suzhou Center for Disease Prevention and Control, Suzhou, Jiangsu (China); Wu, Wei [MOE Key Lab of Environment and Health, Institute of Environmental Medicine, School of Public Health, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science & Technology, Wuhan, Hubei (China); Liu, Shuyun [Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, School of Public Health, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science & Technology, Wuhan, Hubei (China); Li, Mei [Hanyang Center for Disease Prevention and Control, Wuhan, Hubei (China); Yao, Na; Chen, Jianwei [MOE Key Lab of Environment and Health, Institute of Environmental Medicine, School of Public Health, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science & Technology, Wuhan, Hubei (China); Ye, Linxiang [Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, School of Public Health, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science & Technology, Wuhan, Hubei (China); Wang, Qi, E-mail: lwq95@126.com [MOE Key Lab of Environment and Health, Institute of Environmental Medicine, School of Public Health, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science & Technology, Wuhan, Hubei (China); Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, School of Public Health, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science & Technology, Wuhan, Hubei (China); Zhou, Yikai, E-mail: zhouyk@mails.tjmu.edu.cn [MOE Key Lab of Environment and Health, Institute of Environmental Medicine, School of Public Health, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science & Technology, Wuhan, Hubei (China)

    2016-01-15

    Few studies have focused on the accuracy of using the Integrated Exposure Uptake Biokinetic (IEUBK) model in Chinese children with site- and age-specific exposure data. This study aimed to validate the accuracy and sensitivity of the IEUBK model in lead risk assessment of Chinese children aged 61–84 months old. A total of 760 children were enrolled from two respective counties in Central China by using random cluster sampling method. Blood lead levels (BLLs) of all subjects were determined using graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry, as well as that in the environmental media, such as air, drinking water, soil, dust and food. Age- and site-specific time-activity patterns and water consumption were evaluated by using questionnaires for children. Exposure parameters including outdoor and indoor activity time, ventilation rate and water consumption in this study were different from the default values of the IEUBK model. Statistical analysis revealed no significant differences between the predicted and observed BLLs. Diet and soil/dust lead intake contributed approximately 83.39% (57.40%–93.84% range) and 15.18% (3.25%–41.60% range) of total lead intake, respectively. These findings showed that the IEUBK model is suitable for lead risk assessment of Chinese children aged 61–84 months old and diet acts as an important lead source. - Highlights: • The first time to fit and discuss the IEUBK model in China based on comprehensive local children exposure parameters. • Two different exposure scenarios to apply the IEUBK model in different conditions. • The first time to report the ventilation rate in Chinese children aged 61 to 84 months. • Highlight the role of dietary to lead intake for Chinese children.

  14. Validation of CRASH Model in Prediction of 14-day Mortality and 6-month Unfavorable Outcome of Head Trauma Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashemi, Behrooz; Amanat, Mahnaz; Baratloo, Alireza; Forouzanfar, Mohammad Mehdi; Rahmati, Farhad; Motamedi, Maryam; Safari, Saeed

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: To date, many prognostic models have been proposed to predict the outcome of patients with traumatic brain injuries. External validation of these models in different populations is of great importance for their generalization. The present study was designed, aiming to determine the value of CRASH prognostic model in prediction of 14-day mortality (14-DM) and 6-month unfavorable outcome (6-MUO) of patients with traumatic brain injury. Methods: In the present prospective diagnostic test study, calibration and discrimination of CRASH model were evaluated in head trauma patients referred to the emergency department. Variables required for calculating CRASH expected risks (ER), and observed 14-DM and 6-MUO were gathered. Then ER of 14-DM and 6-MUO were calculated. The patients were followed for 6 months and their 14-DM and 6-MUO were recorded. Finally, the correlation of CRASH ER and the observed outcome of the patients was evaluated. The data were analyzed using STATA version 11.0. Results: In this study, 323 patients with the mean age of 34.0 ± 19.4 years were evaluated (87.3% male). Calibration of the basic and CT models in prediction of 14-day and 6-month outcome were in the desirable range (P < 0.05). Area under the curve in the basic model for prediction of 14-DM and 6-MUO were 0.92 (95% CI: 0.89-0.96) and 0.92 (95% CI: 0.90-0.95), respectively. In addition, area under the curve in the CT model for prediction of 14-DM and 6-MUO were 0.93 (95% CI: 0.91-0.97) and 0.93 (95% CI: 0.91-0.96), respectively. There was no significant difference between the discriminations of the two models in prediction of 14-DM (p = 0.11) and 6-MUO (p = 0.1). Conclusion: The results of the present study showed that CRASH prediction model has proper discrimination and calibration in predicting 14-DM and 6-MUO of head trauma patients. Since there was no difference between the values of the basic and CT models, using the basic model is recommended to simplify the risk

  15. Postprocessing of simulated precipitation for impact research in West Africa. Part I: model output statistics for monthly data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paeth, Heiko [University of Wuerzburg, Institute of Geography, Wuerzburg (Germany)

    2011-04-15

    Rainfall represents an important factor in agriculture and food security, particularly, in the low latitudes. Climatological and hydrological studies which attempt to diagnose the hydrological cycle, require high-quality precipitation data. In West Africa, like in many parts of the world, the density of observational data is low and climate models are needed in order to perform homogeneous and complete data sets. However, climate models tend to produce systematic errors, especially, in terms of rainfall and cloud processes, which are usually approximated by physical parameterizations. In this study, a 25-year climatology of monthly precipitation in West Africa is presented, derived from a regional climate model simulation, and evaluated with respect to observational data. It is found that the model systematically underestimates the rainfall amount and variability and does not capture some details of the seasonal cycle in sub-Saharan West Africa. Thus, in its present form the precipitation climatology is not appropriate to draw a realistic picture of the hydrological cycle in West Africa nor to serve as input data for impact research. Therefore, a statistical model is developed in order to adjust the simulated rainfall data to the characteristics of observed precipitation. Assuming that the regional climate model is much more reliable in terms of atmospheric circulation and thermodynamics, model output statistics is used to correct simulated rainfall by means of other simulated parameters of the near-surface climate like temperature, sea level pressure and wind components. Monthly data is adjusted by a cross-validated multiple regression model. The resulting adjusted rainfall climatology reveals a substantial improvement in terms of the model deficiencies mentioned above. In part II of this publication, the characteristics of simulated daily precipitation is adapted to station data by applying a weather generator. Once the postprocessing approach is trained, it can

  16. Traumatic lumbar spondylolisthesis without facet fracture at L4/L5. A case report and literature review

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Dominique N’Dri-Oka; Souleymane Issa Sarki; Landry Konan; Yacouba Haro

    2016-01-01

    L4–L5 traumatic spondylolisthesis has been rarely reported in the literature. At lumbar spine level traumatic dislocation lesion realizes“traumatic spondylolisthesis or traumatic bilateral lumbar facet locked syndrome”. The aim of the present paper is to report this rare lesion and discuss its mechanism and management. A case report is followed by Literature review made on Medline and scholar google database from 2000 to 2015. The case report concerned a 33-year-old man, who refused to wear a seat belt, injured his lumbar spine following a motor vehicle accident. L4-L5 spondylolisthesis occurred after the vehicle rolled over several times. Sixteen months after the accident the patient had a favorable outcome. Literature review on Medline and scholar google database from 2000 to 2015 was carried out and five cases of traumatic spondylolisthesis were found. The Sex ratio was 3/2. Surgical treatment consisted of posterolateral interbody fusion. Traumatic lumbar spine spondylolisthesis is rare. When it occurs, it is always associated with vertebral lumbar fracture. L4-L5 traumatic spondylolisthesis was caused by a high-energy mechanism and improper use of seat belt.

  17. Validation of CRASH Model in Prediction of 14-day Mortality and 6-month Unfavorable Outcome of Head Trauma Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Behrooz Hashemi

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: To date, many prognostic models have been proposed to predict the outcome of patients withtraumatic brain injuries. External validation of these models in different populations is of great importancefor their generalization. The present study was designed, aiming to determine the value of CRASH prognosticmodel in prediction of 14-day mortality (14-DM and 6-month unfavorable outcome (6-MUO of patients withtraumatic brain injury. Methods: In the present prospective diagnostic test study, calibration and discriminationof CRASH model were evaluated in head trauma patients referred to the emergency department. Variablesrequired for calculating CRASH expected risks (ER, and observed 14-DM and 6-MUO were gathered. Then ERof 14-DM and 6-MUO were calculated. The patients were followed for 6 months and their 14-DM and 6-MUOwere recorded. Finally, the correlation of CRASH ER and the observed outcome of the patients was evaluated.The data were analyzed using STATA version 11.0. Results: In this study, 323 patients with the mean age of 34.0´s 19.4 years were evaluated (87.3% male. Calibration of the basic and CT models in prediction of 14-day and6-month outcome were in the desirable range (P Ç 0.05. Area under the curve in the basic model for predictionof 14-DM and 6-MUO were 0.92 (95% CI: 0.89–0.96 and 0.92 (95% CI: 0.90–0.95, respectively. In addition,area under the curve in the CT model for prediction of 14-DM and 6-MUO were 0.93 (95% CI: 0.91–0.97 and0.93 (95% CI: 0.91–0.96, respectively. There was no significant difference between the discriminations of thetwo models in prediction of 14-DM (p Æ 0.11 and 6-MUO (p Æ 0.1. Conclusion: The results of the presentstudy showed that CRASH prediction model has proper discrimination and calibration in predicting 14-DMand6-MUO of head trauma patients. Since there was no difference between the values of the basic and CT models,using the basic model is recommended to simplify the risk

  18. Modeling the monthly mean soil-water balance with a statistical-dynamical ecohydrology model as coupled to a two-component canopy model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. P. Kochendorfer

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available The statistical-dynamical annual water balance model of Eagleson (1978 is a pioneering work in the analysis of climate, soil and vegetation interactions. This paper describes several enhancements and modifications to the model that improve its physical realism at the expense of its mathematical elegance and analytical tractability. In particular, the analytical solutions for the root zone fluxes are re-derived using separate potential rates of transpiration and bare-soil evaporation. Those potential rates, along with the rate of evaporation from canopy interception, are calculated using the two-component Shuttleworth-Wallace (1985 canopy model. In addition, the soil column is divided into two layers, with the upper layer representing the dynamic root zone. The resulting ability to account for changes in root-zone water storage allows for implementation at the monthly timescale. This new version of the Eagleson model is coined the Statistical-Dynamical Ecohydrology Model (SDEM. The ability of the SDEM to capture the seasonal dynamics of the local-scale soil-water balance is demonstrated for two grassland sites in the US Great Plains. Sensitivity of the results to variations in peak green leaf area index (LAI suggests that the mean peak green LAI is determined by some minimum in root zone soil moisture during the growing season. That minimum appears to be close to the soil matric potential at which the dominant grass species begins to experience water stress and well above the wilting point, thereby suggesting an ecological optimality hypothesis in which the need to avoid water-stress-induced leaf abscission is balanced by the maximization of carbon assimilation (and associated transpiration. Finally, analysis of the sensitivity of model-determined peak green LAI to soil texture shows that the coupled model is able to reproduce the so-called "inverse texture effect", which consists of the observation that natural vegetation in dry climates tends

  19. Modeling the monthly mean soil-water balance with a statistical-dynamical ecohydrology model as coupled to a two-component canopy model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. P. Kochendorfer

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available The statistical-dynamical annual water balance model of Eagleson (1978 is a pioneering work in the analysis of climate, soil and vegetation interactions. This paper describes several enhancements and modifications to the model that improve its physical realism at the expense of its mathematical elegance and analytical tractability. In particular, the analytical solutions for the root zone fluxes are re-derived using separate potential rates of transpiration and bare-soil evaporation. Those potential rates, along with the rate of evaporation from canopy interception, are calculated using the two-component Shuttleworth-Wallace (1985 canopy model. In addition, the soil column is divided into two layers, with the upper layer representing the dynamic root zone. The resulting ability to account for changes in root-zone water storage allows for implementation at the monthly timescale. This new version of the Eagleson model is coined the Statistical-Dynamical Ecohydrology Model (SDEM. The ability of the SDEM to capture the seasonal dynamics of the local-scale soil-water balance is demonstrated for two grassland sites in the US Great Plains. Sensitivity of the results to variations in peak green Leaf Area Index (LAI suggests that the mean peak green LAI is determined by some minimum in root zone soil moisture during the growing season. That minimum appears to be close to the soil matric potential at which the dominant grass species begins to experience water stress and well above the wilting point, thereby suggesting an ecological optimality hypothesis in which the need to avoid water-stress-induced leaf abscission is balanced by the maximization of carbon assimilation (and associated transpiration. Finally, analysis of the sensitivity of model-determined peak green LAI to soil texture shows that the coupled model is able to reproduce the so-called "inverse texture effect", which consists of the observation that natural vegetation in dry climates tends

  20. Attributing runoff changes to climate variability and human activities: uncertainty analysis using four monthly water balance models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Shuai; Xiong, Lihua; Li, Hong-Yi; Leung, L. Ruby; Demissie, Yonas

    2015-05-26

    Hydrological simulations to delineate the impacts of climate variability and human activities are subjected to uncertainties related to both parameter and structure of the hydrological models. To analyze the impact of these uncertainties on the model performance and to yield more reliable simulation results, a global calibration and multimodel combination method that integrates the Shuffled Complex Evolution Metropolis (SCEM) and Bayesian Model Averaging (BMA) of four monthly water balance models was proposed. The method was applied to the Weihe River Basin (WRB), the largest tributary of the Yellow River, to determine the contribution of climate variability and human activities to runoff changes. The change point, which was used to determine the baseline period (1956-1990) and human-impacted period (1991-2009), was derived using both cumulative curve and Pettitt’s test. Results show that the combination method from SCEM provides more skillful deterministic predictions than the best calibrated individual model, resulting in the smallest uncertainty interval of runoff changes attributed to climate variability and human activities. This combination methodology provides a practical and flexible tool for attribution of runoff changes to climate variability and human activities by hydrological models.

  1. Isospin breaking and radiative corrections in K{sub l4} decays; Brisure d'isospin et corrections radiatives au processus K{sub l4}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cuplov, V

    2004-04-15

    This thesis is dedicated to the impact of electromagnetic corrections on the decays of K{sub l4}. 2 types of electromagnetic contributions have to be considered: first the exchange of virtual photons and secondly the non-perturbative part of meson-photon interactions. We have also considered the effects of isospin breaking. We have shown that the isospin breaking and the electromagnetic corrections affect K{sub l4} decays in the neutral and mixed channels (respectively by 8% and -2%), while the charged channel is unaffected. It also appears that the tree approximation for the computation of the decay rates, is not accurate enough to explain experimental data. In the second part of this work, we give the analytical expressions of the F and G form factors associated with the amplitude of the K{sub l4} process in the charged mode. Infra-red divergencies counterbalance each other in the decay rates calculation when we consider the process K{sub l4{gamma}} where 1 photon is emitted with an energy below the sensitivity of the detector. We have found that the calculation in one loop order represents 75% of the measured value. The impact of radiative corrections is about 0.9% while the isospin breaking effect is about 1.6 per cent.

  2. COMPASS: A computational model to predict changes in MMSE scores 24-months after initial assessment of Alzheimer’s disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Fan; Panwar, Bharat; Dodge, Hiroko H.; Li, Hongdong; Hampstead, Benjamin M.; Albin, Roger L.; Paulson, Henry L.; Guan, Yuanfang

    2016-01-01

    We present COMPASS, a COmputational Model to Predict the development of Alzheimer’s diSease Spectrum, to model Alzheimer’s disease (AD) progression. This was the best-performing method in recent crowdsourcing benchmark study, DREAM Alzheimer’s Disease Big Data challenge to predict changes in Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE) scores over 24-months using standardized data. In the present study, we conducted three additional analyses beyond the DREAM challenge question to improve the clinical contribution of our approach, including: (1) adding pre-validated baseline cognitive composite scores of ADNI-MEM and ADNI-EF, (2) identifying subjects with significant declines in MMSE scores, and (3) incorporating SNPs of top 10 genes connected to APOE identified from functional-relationship network. For (1) above, we significantly improved predictive accuracy, especially for the Mild Cognitive Impairment (MCI) group. For (2), we achieved an area under ROC of 0.814 in predicting significant MMSE decline: our model has 100% precision at 5% recall, and 91% accuracy at 10% recall. For (3), “genetic only” model has Pearson’s correlation of 0.15 to predict progression in the MCI group. Even though addition of this limited genetic model to COMPASS did not improve prediction of progression of MCI group, the predictive ability of SNP information extended beyond well-known APOE allele. PMID:27703197

  3. Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) Mission Level 4 Carbon (L4_C) Product Specification Document

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glassy, Joe; Kimball, John S.; Jones, Lucas; Reichle, Rolf H.; Ardizzone, Joseph V.; Kim, Gi-Kong; Lucchesi, Robert A.; Smith, Edmond B.; Weiss, Barry H.

    2015-01-01

    This is the Product Specification Document (PSD) for Level 4 Surface and Root Zone Soil Moisture (L4_SM) data for the Science Data System (SDS) of the Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) project. The L4_SM data product provides estimates of land surface conditions based on the assimilation of SMAP observations into a customized version of the NASA Goddard Earth Observing System, Version 5 (GEOS-5) land data assimilation system (LDAS). This document applies to any standard L4_SM data product generated by the SMAP Project.

  4. Spatial validation of large scale land surface models against monthly land surface temperature patterns using innovative performance metrics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koch, Julian; Siemann, Amanda; Stisen, Simon; Sheffield, Justin

    2016-04-01

    Land surface models (LSMs) are a key tool to enhance process understanding and to provide predictions of the terrestrial hydrosphere and its atmospheric coupling. Distributed LSMs predict hydrological states and fluxes, such as land surface temperature (LST) or actual evapotranspiration (aET), at each grid cell. LST observations are widely available through satellite remote sensing platforms that enable comprehensive spatial validations of LSMs. In spite of the availability of LST data, most validation studies rely on simple cell to cell comparisons and thus do not regard true spatial pattern information. This study features two innovative spatial performance metrics, namely EOF- and connectivity-analysis, to validate predicted LST patterns by three LSMs (Mosaic, Noah, VIC) over the contiguous USA. The LST validation dataset is derived from global High-Resolution-Infrared-Radiometric-Sounder (HIRS) retrievals for a 30 year period. The metrics are bias insensitive, which is an important feature in order to truly validate spatial patterns. The EOF analysis evaluates the spatial variability and pattern seasonality, and attests better performance to VIC in the warm months and to Mosaic and Noah in the cold months. Further, more than 75% of the LST variability can be captured by a single pattern that is strongly driven by air temperature. The connectivity analysis assesses the homogeneity and smoothness of patterns. The LSMs are most reliable at predicting cold LST patterns in the warm months and vice versa. Lastly, the coupling between aET and LST is investigated at flux tower sites and compared against LSMs to explain the identified LST shortcomings.

  5. Analysis of plant available water in the context of climate change using Thornthwaite type monthly water balance model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herceg, Andras; Gribovszki, Zoltan; Kalicz, Peter

    2016-04-01

    The hydrological impact of climate change can be dramatic. The primary objective of this paper was to analyze plant available water in the context of climate change using Thornthwaite type monthly water balance calibrated by remote sensing based ET maps. The calibrated model was used for projection on the basis of 4 climate model datasets. The 3 periods of projection were: 2010-2040, 2040-2070, and 2070-2100. The benefit of this method is its robust build up, which can be applied if temperature and precipitation time series are accessible. The key parameter is the water storage capacity of the soil (SOILMAX), which can be calibrated using the actual available evapotranspiration data. If the soil's physical properties are available, the maximal rooting depth is also projectable. Plant available water was evaluated for future scenarios focusing water stress periods. For testing the model, a dataset of an agricultural parcel next to Mosonmagyaróvár and a dataset of a small forest covered catchment next to Sopron were successfully used. Each of the models projected slightly ascending evapotranspiration values (+7 percent), but strongly decreasing soil moisture values (-15 percent) for the 21st century. The soil moisture minimum values (generally appeared at the end of the summer) reduced more than 50 percent which indicate almost critical water stress for vegetation. This research has been supported by Agroclimate.2 VKSZ_12-1-2013-0034 project.

  6. Parental delay or refusal of vaccine doses, childhood vaccination coverage at 24 months of age, and the Health Belief Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Philip J; Humiston, Sharon G; Marcuse, Edgar K; Zhao, Zhen; Dorell, Christina G; Howes, Cynthia; Hibbs, Beth

    2011-01-01

    We evaluated the association between parents' beliefs about vaccines, their decision to delay or refuse vaccines for their children, and vaccination coverage of children at aged 24 months. We used data from 11,206 parents of children aged 24-35 months at the time of the 2009 National Immunization Survey interview and determined their vaccination status at aged 24 months. Data included parents' reports of delay and/or refusal of vaccine doses, psychosocial factors suggested by the Health Belief Model, and provider-reported up-to-date vaccination status. In 2009, approximately 60.2% of parents with children aged 24-35 months neither delayed nor refused vaccines, 25.8% only delayed, 8.2% only refused, and 5.8% both delayed and refused vaccines. Compared with parents who neither delayed nor refused vaccines, parents who delayed and refused vaccines were significantly less likely to believe that vaccines are necessary to protect the health of children (70.1% vs. 96.2%), that their child might get a disease if they aren't vaccinated (71.0% vs. 90.0%), and that vaccines are safe (50.4% vs. 84.9%). Children of parents who delayed and refused also had significantly lower vaccination coverage for nine of the 10 recommended childhood vaccines including diphtheria-tetanus-acellular pertussis (65.3% vs. 85.2%), polio (76.9% vs. 93.8%), and measles-mumps-rubella (68.4% vs. 92.5%). After adjusting for sociodemographic differences, we found that parents who were less likely to agree that vaccines are necessary to protect the health of children, to believe that their child might get a disease if they aren't vaccinated, or to believe that vaccines are safe had significantly lower coverage for all 10 childhood vaccines. Parents who delayed and refused vaccine doses were more likely to have vaccine safety concerns and perceive fewer benefits associated with vaccines. Guidelines published by the American Academy of Pediatrics may assist providers in responding to parents who may delay

  7. EX1504L4 Dive03 Ancillary Data Collection including reports, kmls, spreadsheets, images and data

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Standard suite of ancillary data files generated through a scripting process following an ROV dive on NOAA Ship Okeanos Explorer during EX1504L4: Campaign to Address...

  8. EX1504L4 Dive07 Ancillary Data Collection including reports, kmls, spreadsheets, images and data

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Standard suite of ancillary data files generated through a scripting process following an ROV dive on NOAA Ship Okeanos Explorer during EX1504L4: Campaign to Address...

  9. EX0909L4 Water Column Summary Report and Profile Data Collection

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — A complete set of water column profile data and CTD Summary Report (if generated) generated by the Okeanos Explorer during EX0909L4: Mapping Field Trials -...

  10. EX1504L4 Dive06 Ancillary Data Collection including reports, kmls, spreadsheets, images and data

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Standard suite of ancillary data files generated through a scripting process following an ROV dive on NOAA Ship Okeanos Explorer during EX1504L4: Campaign to Address...

  11. EX1504L4 Dive11 Ancillary Data Collection including reports, kmls, spreadsheets, images and data

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Standard suite of ancillary data files generated through a scripting process following an ROV dive on NOAA Ship Okeanos Explorer during EX1504L4: Campaign to Address...

  12. EX1504L4 Dive01 Ancillary Data Collection including reports, kmls, spreadsheets, images and data

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Standard suite of ancillary data files generated through a scripting process following an ROV dive on NOAA Ship Okeanos Explorer during EX1504L4: Campaign to Address...

  13. EX1504L4 Dive10 Ancillary Data Collection including reports, kmls, spreadsheets, images and data

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Standard suite of ancillary data files generated through a scripting process following an ROV dive on NOAA Ship Okeanos Explorer during EX1504L4: Campaign to Address...

  14. EX1504L4 Dive02 Ancillary Data Collection including reports, kmls, spreadsheets, images and data

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Standard suite of ancillary data files generated through a scripting process following an ROV dive on NOAA Ship Okeanos Explorer during EX1504L4: Campaign to Address...

  15. EX1504L4 Dive13 Ancillary Data Collection including reports, kmls, spreadsheets, images and data

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Standard suite of ancillary data files generated through a scripting process following an ROV dive on NOAA Ship Okeanos Explorer during EX1504L4: Campaign to Address...

  16. EX1504L4 Dive12 Ancillary Data Collection including reports, kmls, spreadsheets, images and data

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Standard suite of ancillary data files generated through a scripting process following an ROV dive on NOAA Ship Okeanos Explorer during EX1504L4: Campaign to Address...

  17. EX1504L4 Water Column Summary Report and Profile Data Collection

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — A complete set of water column profile data and CTD Summary Report (if generated) generated by the Okeanos Explorer during EX1504L4: Campaign to Address Pacific...

  18. EX1504L4 Dive04 Ancillary Data Collection including reports, kmls, spreadsheets, images and data

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Standard suite of ancillary data files generated through a scripting process following an ROV dive on NOAA Ship Okeanos Explorer during EX1504L4: Campaign to Address...

  19. EX1504L4 Dive09 Ancillary Data Collection including reports, kmls, spreadsheets, images and data

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Standard suite of ancillary data files generated through a scripting process following an ROV dive on NOAA Ship Okeanos Explorer during EX1504L4: Campaign to Address...

  20. EX1504L4 Dive05 Ancillary Data Collection including reports, kmls, spreadsheets, images and data

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Standard suite of ancillary data files generated through a scripting process following an ROV dive on NOAA Ship Okeanos Explorer during EX1504L4: Campaign to Address...

  1. EX1504L4 Dive08 Ancillary Data Collection including reports, kmls, spreadsheets, images and data

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Standard suite of ancillary data files generated through a scripting process following an ROV dive on NOAA Ship Okeanos Explorer during EX1504L4: Campaign to Address...

  2. A Real-Time Programmer's Tour of General-Purpose L4 Microkernels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruocco Sergio

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract L4-embedded is a microkernel successfully deployed in mobile devices with soft real-time requirements. It now faces the challenges of tightly integrated systems, in which user interface, multimedia, OS, wireless protocols, and even software-defined radios must run on a single CPU. In this paper we discuss the pros and cons of L4-embedded for real-time systems design, focusing on the issues caused by the extreme speed optimisations it inherited from its general-purpose ancestors. Since these issues can be addressed with a minimal performance loss, we conclude that, overall, the design of real-time systems based on L4-embedded is possible, and facilitated by a number of design features unique to microkernels and the L4 family.

  3. Exploiting the atmosphere's memory for monthly, seasonal and interannual temperature forecasting using Scaling LInear Macroweather Model (SLIMM)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Rio Amador, Lenin; Lovejoy, Shaun

    2016-04-01

    . The corresponding space-time model (the ScaLIng Macroweather Model (SLIMM) is thus only multifractal in space where the spatial intermittency is associated with different climate zones. SLIMM exploits the power law (scaling) behavior in time of the temperature field and uses the long historical memory of the temperature series to improve the skill. The only model parameter is the fluctuation scaling exponent, H (usually in the range -0.5 - 0), which is directly related to the skill and can be obtained from the data. The results predicted analytically by the model have been tested by performing actual hindcasts in different 5° x 5° regions covering the planet using ERA-Interim, 20CRv2 and NCEP/NCAR reanalysis as reference datasets. We report maps of theoretical skill predicted by the model and we compare it with actual skill based on hindcasts for monthly, seasonal and annual resolutions. We also present maps of calibrated probability hindcasts with their respective validations. Comparisons between our results using SLIMM, some other stochastic autoregressive model, and hindcasts from the Canadian Seasonal to Interannual Prediction System (CanSIPS) and the National Centers for Environmental Prediction (NCEP)'s model CFSv2, are also shown. For seasonal temperature forecasts, SLIMM outperforms the GCM based forecasts in over 90% of the earth's surface. SLIMM forecasts can be accessed online through the site: http://www.to_be_announced.mcgill.ca.

  4. Transfer orbits to L4 with a solar sail in the Earth-Sun system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farrés, Ariadna

    2017-08-01

    Solar sails are enablers for long interplanetary transfers, but also offer many advantages in Libration Point Orbits missions. The extra effect of the Solar Radiation Pressure allows a space vehicle, by changing the sail orientation, to be artificially displaced from the classical Lagrangian equilibrium points, L1 , … ,L5 , as well perturbed from the Lyapunov, Halo and Lissajous orbits that appear around them. Most of these equilibrium points are linearly unstable and have stable and unstable invariant manifolds associated with them. In this paper we explore the possibilities that these invariant manifolds offer to navigate in a natural way around a circular, restricted, three-body system. We take the Earth-Sun Restricted Three Body Problem as a model and, for different fixed sail orientations, we compute the stable and unstable manifolds associated with the equilibrium points of the system. We find natural trajectories that allow the vehicle to move around the family of equilibria in a controlled way and to go from a region close to L1 or L2 to a region close to L4.

  5. Erythromycin resistance by L4/L22 mutations and resistance masking by drug efflux pump deficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lovmar, Martin; Nilsson, Karin; Lukk, Eliisa; Vimberg, Vladimir; Tenson, Tanel; Ehrenberg, Måns

    2009-01-01

    We characterized the effects of classical erythromycin resistance mutations in ribosomal proteins L4 and L22 of the large ribosomal subunit on the kinetics of erythromycin binding. Our data are consistent with a mechanism in which the macrolide erythromycin enters and exits the ribosome through the nascent peptide exit tunnel, and suggest that these mutations both impair passive transport through the tunnel and distort the erythromycin-binding site. The growth-inhibitory action of erythromycin was characterized for bacterial populations with wild-type and L22-mutated ribosomes in drug efflux pump deficient and proficient backgrounds. The L22 mutation conferred reduced erythromycin susceptibility in the drug efflux pump proficient, but not deficient, background. This ‘masking' of drug resistance by pump deficiency was reproduced by modelling with input data from our biochemical experiments. We discuss the general principles behind the phenomenon of drug resistance ‘masking', and highlight its potential importance for slowing down the evolution of drug resistance among pathogens. PMID:19197244

  6. Statistical comparison of models for estimating the monthly average daily diffuse radiation at a subtropical African site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bashahu, M. [University of Burundi, Bujumbura (Burundi). Institute of Applied Pedagogy, Department of Physics and Technology

    2003-07-01

    Nine correlations have been developed in this paper to estimate the monthly average diffuse radiation for Dakar, Senegal. A 16-year period data on the global (H) and diffuse (H{sub d}) radiation, together with data on the bright sunshine hours (N), the fraction of the sky's (Ne/8), the water vapour pressure in the air (e) and the ambient temperature (T) have been used for that purpose. A model inter-comparison based on the MBE, RMSE and t statistical tests has shown that estimates in any of the obtained correlations are not significantly different from their measured counterparts, thus all the nine models are recommended for the aforesaid location. Three of them should be particularly selected for their simplicity, universal applicability and high accuracy. Those are simple linear correlations between K{sub d} and N/N{sub d}, Ne/8 or K{sub t}. Even presenting adequate performance, the remaining correlations are either simple but less accurate, or multiple or nonlinear regressions needing one or two input variables. (author)

  7. Modeling Monthly Variation of Culex tarsalis (Diptera: Culicidae Abundance and West Nile Virus Infection Rate in the Canadian Prairies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philip S. Curry

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The Canadian prairie provinces of Alberta, Saskatchewan, and Manitoba have generally reported the highest human incidence of West Nile virus (WNV in Canada. In this study, environmental and biotic factors were used to predict numbers of Culex tarsalis Coquillett, which is the primary mosquito vector of WNV in this region, and prevalence of WNV infection in Cx. tarsalis in the Canadian prairies. The results showed that higher mean temperature and elevated time lagged mean temperature were associated with increased numbers of Cx. tarsalis and higher WNV infection rates. However, increasing precipitation was associated with higher abundance of Cx. tarsalis and lower WNV infection rate. In addition, this study found that increased temperature fluctuation and wetland land cover were associated with decreased infection rate in the Cx. tarsalis population. The resulting monthly models can be used to inform public health interventions by improving the predictions of population abundance of Cx. tarsalis and the transmission intensity of WNV in the Canadian prairies. Furthermore, these models can also be used to examine the potential effects of climate change on the vector population abundance and the distribution of WNV.

  8. Modeling monthly variation of Culex tarsalis (Diptera: Culicidae) abundance and West Nile Virus infection rate in the Canadian Prairies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chen-Chih; Epp, Tasha; Jenkins, Emily; Waldner, Cheryl; Curry, Philip S; Soos, Catherine

    2013-07-22

    The Canadian prairie provinces of Alberta, Saskatchewan, and Manitoba have generally reported the highest human incidence of West Nile virus (WNV) in Canada. In this study, environmental and biotic factors were used to predict numbers of Culex tarsalis Coquillett, which is the primary mosquito vector of WNV in this region, and prevalence of WNV infection in Cx. tarsalis in the Canadian prairies. The results showed that higher mean temperature and elevated time lagged mean temperature were associated with increased numbers of Cx. tarsalis and higher WNV infection rates. However, increasing precipitation was associated with higher abundance of Cx. tarsalis and lower WNV infection rate. In addition, this study found that increased temperature fluctuation and wetland land cover were associated with decreased infection rate in the Cx. tarsalis population. The resulting monthly models can be used to inform public health interventions by improving the predictions of population abundance of Cx. tarsalis and the transmission intensity of WNV in the Canadian prairies. Furthermore, these models can also be used to examine the potential effects of climate change on the vector population abundance and the distribution of WNV.

  9. Traumatic posterior L4-L5 fracture dislocation of the lumbar spine: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zarate-Kalfopulos, Baron; Romero-Vargas, Samuel; Alcántara-Canseco, Cesar; Rosales-Olivarez, Luis Miguel; Alpizar-Aguirre, Armando; Reyes-Sánchez, Alejandro

    2012-12-01

    Study Design Case report. Objective The diagnosis and surgical management of a patient with traumatic bilateral posterior dislocation of L4-L5 is presented with a thorough review of the existing literature. Summary of Background Data Traumatic dislocation of L4-L5 has been reported in the English literature in only five cases; of these, only two were retrolisthesis. Methods A 20-year-old patient was involved in a high-energy vehicular accident and presented with back pain and inability to ambulate. Neurological assessment showed motor strength grade 2/5 in the proximal lower-extremity muscle groups (L1-L3 myotomes) and 0/5 strength distally (L4-S1 myotomes); in addition, incontinence of sphincters was found. X-rays and computed tomography (CT) scan revealed a three-column ligamentous injury with posterior fracture-dislocation of the L4 vertebral body with complete posterior displacement of L4 to L5 vertebral body. The patient underwent posterior approach with reduction, transpedicular fixation, and posterolateral fusion with autologous bone graft. Results At 1-year follow-up, the patient had recovered muscular strength in proximal lower-extremities muscle groups, sphincter function had fully recovered, and he was able to ambulate with crutches. There was no recovery of distal extremity sensorimotor function. Plain radiograph and CT scan showed good alignment and progressive maturation of his fusion procedure. Conclusion Traumatic retrolisthesis of L4-L5 is a high-energy unstable fracture; reduction of the dislocation is challenging because of the heavy forces acting in the lower lumbar spine. Instrumented fusion restores alignment and maintains segmental stability.

  10. Circular orbit spacecraft control at the L4 point using Lyapunov functions

    CERN Document Server

    Agrawal, Rachana

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this work is to demonstrate the utility of Lyapunov functions in control synthesis for the purpose of maintaining and stabilizing a spacecraft in a circular orbit around the L4 point in the circular restricted three body problem (CRTBP). Incorporating the requirements of a fixed radius orbit and a desired angular momentum, a Lyapunov function is constructed and the requisite analysis is performed to obtain a controller. Asymptotic stability is proved in a defined region around the L4 point using LaSalle's principle.

  11. 26 CFR 1.167(l)-4 - Public utility property; election to use asset depreciation range system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... depreciation range system. 1.167(l)-4 Section 1.167(l)-4 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT... Individuals and Corporations § 1.167(l)-4 Public utility property; election to use asset depreciation range system. (a) Application of section 167(l) to certain property subject to asset depreciation range...

  12. Developing empirical monthly groundwater recharge equations based on modeling and remote sensing data - Modeling future groundwater recharge to predict potential climate change impacts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gemitzi, Alexandra; Ajami, Hoori; Richnow, Hans-Hermann

    2017-03-01

    Groundwater recharge is one of main components of the water budget that is difficult to quantify due to complexity of recharge processes and limited observations. In the present work a simple regression equation for monthly groundwater recharge estimation is developed by relating simulated recharge from a calibrated Soil and Water Assessment tool (SWAT) model to effective precipitation. Monthly groundwater recharge and actual evapotranspiration (AET) were computed by applying a calibrated (SWAT) model for a ten year period (2005-2015) in Vosvozis river basin in NE Greece. SWAT actual evapotranspiration (AET) results were compared to remotely sensed AET values from the MODerate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS), indicating the integrity of the modeling process. Water isotopes of 2H and 18O, originally presented herein, were used to infer recharge resources in the basin and provided additional evidence of the applicability of the developed formula. Results showed that the developed recharge estimation method can be effectively applied using MODIS evapotranspiration data, without having to adhere to numerical modeling which is many times constrained by the lack of available data especially in poorly gauged basins. Future trends of groundwater recharge up to 2100 using an ensemble of five downscaled climate change projections indicated that annual recharge will increase up to the middle of the present century and gradually decrease thereafter. However, the predicted magnitude is highly variable depending on the Global Climate Model (GCM) used. While winter recharge will likely increase in the future, summer recharge is expected to decrease as a result of temperature rise in the future.

  13. An improved GRACE monthly gravity field solution by modeling the non-conservative acceleration and attitude observation errors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Qiujie; Shen, Yunzhong; Chen, Wu; Zhang, Xingfu; Hsu, Houze

    2016-06-01

    The main contribution of this study is to improve the GRACE gravity field solution by taking errors of non-conservative acceleration and attitude observations into account. Unlike previous studies, the errors of the attitude and non-conservative acceleration data, and gravity field parameters, as well as accelerometer biases are estimated by means of weighted least squares adjustment. Then we compute a new time series of monthly gravity field models complete to degree and order 60 covering the period Jan. 2003 to Dec. 2012 from the twin GRACE satellites' data. The derived GRACE solution (called Tongji-GRACE02) is compared in terms of geoid degree variances and temporal mass changes with the other GRACE solutions, namely CSR RL05, GFZ RL05a, and JPL RL05. The results show that (1) the global mass signals of Tongji-GRACE02 are generally consistent with those of CSR RL05, GFZ RL05a, and JPL RL05; (2) compared to CSR RL05, the noise of Tongji-GRACE02 is reduced by about 21 % over ocean when only using 300 km Gaussian smoothing, and 60 % or more over deserts (Australia, Kalahari, Karakum and Thar) without using Gaussian smoothing and decorrelation filtering; and (3) for all examples, the noise reductions are more significant than signal reductions, no matter whether smoothing and filtering are applied or not. The comparison with GLDAS data supports that the signals of Tongji-GRACE02 over St. Lawrence River basin are close to those from CSR RL05, GFZ RL05a and JPL RL05, while the GLDAS result shows the best agreement with the Tongji-GRACE02 result.

  14. Cytotoxicity of poly(96L/4D-lactide) : the influence of degradation and sterilization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cordewener, FW; Joziasse, CAP; Schmitz, JP; Bos, RRM; Rozema, FR; Pennings, AJ

    2000-01-01

    The cytotoxicity of poly(96L/4D-lactide) (PLA96), and of its accumulated degradation products, was investigated following different sterilization methods and pre-determined heat-accelerated degradation intervals. PLA96 samples sterilized by either steam, ethylene oxide, or gamma irradiation were

  15. Functional changes associated with the sequential transformation of L′4 into L4 pyruvate kinase

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sprengers, E.D.; Staal, Gerard E.J.

    1979-01-01

    The functional changes, associated with the sequential transformation of L′4 into L4 pyruvate kinase (ATP:pyruvate 2-O-phosphotransferase, EC 2.7.1.40) were studied. L′4 enzyme from human erythrocytes shows strong hysteretic behaviour: the initial rate of the enzyme preincubated with an unsaturating

  16. L-(4-/sup 11/C)aspartic acid: enzymatic synthesis, myocardial uptake, and metabolism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barrio, J.R.; Egbert, J.E.; Henze, E.; Schelbert, H.R.; Baumgartner, F.J.

    1982-01-01

    Sterile, pyrogen-free L-(4-/sup 11/C)aspartic acid was prepared from /sup 11/CO/sub 2/ using phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase and glutamic/oxaloacetic acid transaminase immobilized on Sepharose supports to determine if it is a useful indicator for in vivo, noninvasive determination of myocardial metabolism. An intracoronary bolus injection of L-(4-/sup 11/C)aspartic acid into dog myocardium showed a triexponential clearance curve with maximal production of /sup 11/CO/sub 2/ 100 s after injection. Inactivation of myocardial transaminase activity modified the tracer clearance and inhibited the production of /sup 11/CO/sub 2/. Positron-computed tomography imaging showed that the /sup 11/C activities retained in rhesus monkey myocardium are higher than those observed in dog heart after intravenous injection of L-(4-/sup 11/C)aspartic acid. These findings demonstrated the rapid incorporation of the carbon skeleton of L-aspartic acid into the tricarboxylic acid cycle after enzymatic transamination in myocardium and suggested that L-(4-/sup 11/C)aspartic acid could be of value for in vivo, noninvasive assessment of local myocardial metabolism.

  17. A Comprehensive Modeling Study on Regional Climate Model (RCM Application — Regional Warming Projections in Monthly Resolutions under IPCC A1B Scenario

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Md. Mujibur Rahman

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Some of the major dimensions of climate change include increase in surface temperature, longer spells of droughts in significant portions of the world, associated higher evapotranspiration rates, and so on. It is therefore essential to comprehend the future possible scenario of climate change in terms of global warming. A high resolution limited area Regional Climate Model (RCM can produce reasonably appropriate projections to be used for climate-scenario generation in country-scale. This paper features the development of future surface temperature projections for Bangladesh on monthly resolution for each year from 2011 to 2100 applying Providing Regional Climates for Impacts Studies (PRECIS, and it explains in detail the modeling processes including the model features, domain size selection, bias identification as well as construction of change field for the concerned climatic variable, in this case, surface temperature. PRECIS was run on a 50 km horizontal grid-spacing under the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC A1B scenario and it was found to perform reasonably well in simulating future surface temperature of Bangladesh. The linear regression between observed and model simulated results of monthly average temperatures, within the 30-year period from 1971 to 2000, gives a high correlation of 0.93. The applied change field in average annual temperature shows only 0.5 °C–1 °C deviation from the observed values over the period from 2005 to 2008. Eventually, from the projected average temperature change during the years 1971–2000, it is apparent that warming in Bangladesh prevails invariably every month, which might eventually result in an average annual increase of 4 °C by the year 2100. Calculated anomalies in country-average annual temperature mostly remain on the positive side throughout the period of 2071–2100 indicating an overall up-shift. Apart from these quantitative analyses of temporal changes of temperature

  18. Human impact parameterization in global hydrological models improves estimates of monthly discharges and hydrological extremes: a multi-model validation study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veldkamp, Ted; Ward, Philip; de Moel, Hans; Aerts, Jeroen; Muller Schmied, Hannes; Portmann, Felix; Zhao, Fang; Gerten, Dieter; Masaki, Yoshimitsu; Pokhrel, Yadu; Satoh, Yusuke; Gosling, Simon; Zaherpour, Jamal; Wada, Yoshihide

    2017-04-01

    Human impacts on freshwater resources and hydrological features form the core of present-day water related hazards, like flooding, droughts, water scarcity, and water quality issues. Driven by the societal and scientific needs to correctly model such water related hazards a fair amount of resources has been invested over the past decades to represent human activities and their interactions with the hydrological cycle in global hydrological models (GHMs). Use of these GHMs - including the human dimension - is widespread, especially in water resources research. Evaluation or comparative assessments of the ability of such GHMs to represent real-world hydrological conditions are, unfortunately, however often limited to (near-)natural river basins. Such studies are, therefore, not able to test the model representation of human activities and its associated impact on estimates of freshwater resources or assessments of hydrological extremes. Studies that did perform a validation exercise - including the human dimension and looking into managed catchments - either focused only on one hydrological model, and/or incorporated only a few data points (i.e. river basins) for validation. To date, a comprehensive comparative analysis that evaluates whether and where incorporating the human dimension actually improves the performance of different GHMs with respect to their representation of real-world hydrological conditions and extremes is missing. The absence of such study limits the potential benchmarking of GHMs and their outcomes in hydrological hazard and risk assessments significantly, potentially hampering incorporation of GHMs and their modelling results in actual policy making and decision support with respect to water resources management. To address this issue, we evaluate in this study the performance of five state-of-the-art GHMs that include anthropogenic activities in their modelling scheme, with respect to their representation of monthly discharges and hydrological

  19. A diagnosis challenge-L4 nerve root compression as the initial presentation of chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cojocaru, Inimioara Mihaela; Alexianu, Marilena; Bastian, Alexandra; Sapira, Violeta; Herţea, Cristina; Cojocaru, M

    2012-01-01

    The authors present the case of a 65-year-old woman who was admitted for paraparesis and paresthesias in the inferior limbs. The neurological examination revealed the difficulty in extension of the right foot and of the right toe, accompanied by paresthesias located in the anterolateral area of the right leg, dorsum and plantar area of the foot, the reduction of the right knee jerk, and of the ankle tendon jerk both sides. The vertebro-spinal MRI showed lumbar canal stenosis with L4 intraforaminal compression on the right, and L2-L3 on the left. CSF examination revealed mild increase in protein concentration. The morphological picture of the sural nerve biopsy was compatible with a chronic inflammatory neuropathy and severe muscular lesions of neurogenic origin were observed on right gastrocnemius muscle biopsy. The diagnosis of chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (CIDP) was established. Solu-medrol (0.5 g/d)-5 days, then medrol (prednisolone) was done, followed by improving of the symptomatology. For the relapse of the disease intravenous immunoglobulins (IVIG)-0.4 g/kg/d-5 days was the elective treatment. Six months later she presented a new relapse. IVIG were administered with the remission of the sensitive symptoms. A chronic treatment with medrol was recommended. The diagnosis of L4 disc herniation was obvious in the studied case, but the electroneurographic examination brought extra data for the associated diagnosis of CIDP whose onset was asymmetrical and initially paucisymptomatic. Neither the electroneurographic examination nor the CSF examination were total relevant for CIDP, imposing the sural nerve biopsy. The diagnosis of CIDP involves a team-work composed of neurologist, electroneurophysiologist and neuropathologist.

  20. A Model for Predicting Risk of Serious Bacterial Infection in Febrile Infants Younger Than 3 Months of Age

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chun-Jen Chen

    2009-10-01

    Conclusion: These findings suggest that sex, serum CRP concentration and spun urine WBC count can be used to accurately predict SBI in febrile infants aged less than 3 months of age. [J Chin Med Assoc 2009;72(10:521–526

  1. Field line distribution of density at L=4.8 inferred from observations by CLUSTER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Schäfer

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available For two events observed by the CLUSTER spacecraft, the field line distribution of mass density ρ was inferred from Alfvén wave harmonic frequencies and compared to the electron density ne from plasma wave data and the oxygen density nO+ from the ion composition experiment. In one case, the average ion mass M≈ρ/ne was about 5 amu (28 October 2002, while in the other it was about 3 amu (10 September 2002. Both events occurred when the CLUSTER 1 (C1 spacecraft was in the plasmatrough. Nevertheless, the electron density ne was significantly lower for the first event (ne=8 cm−3 than for the second event (ne=22 cm−3, and this seems to be the main difference leading to a different value of M. For the first event (28 October 2002, we were able to measure the Alfvén wave frequencies for eight harmonics with unprecedented precision, so that the error in the inferred mass density is probably dominated by factors other than the uncertainty in frequency (e.g., magnetic field model and theoretical wave equation. This field line distribution (at L=4.8 was very flat for magnetic latitude |MLAT|≲20° but very steeply increasing with respect to |MLAT| for |MLAT|≳40°. The total variation in ρ was about four orders of magnitude, with values at large |MLAT| roughly consistent with ionospheric values. For the second event (10 September 2002, there was a small local maximum in mass density near the magnetic equator. The inferred mass density decreases to a minimum 23% lower than the equatorial value at |MLAT|=15.5°, and then steeply increases as one moves along the field line toward the ionosphere. For this event we were also able to examine the spatial dependence of the electron density using measurements of ne from all four CLUSTER spacecraft. Our analysis indicates that the density varies with L at L~5 roughly like L−4, and that ne is also locally peaked at the magnetic equator, but with a smaller peak. The value of ne reaches a density minimum

  2. Using tensor hypercontraction density fitting to achieve an O(L^4) CISD algorithm

    CERN Document Server

    Shenvi, Neil; Yang, Weitao

    2012-01-01

    Recently, Hohenstein et al[1] introduced tensor hypercontraction density fitting to decompose the rank-4 electron repulsion integral tensor as the product of five rank-2 tensors. In this paper, we use this methodology to construct an algorithm which calculates the approximate ground state energy in O(L^4) operations. We test our method using several small molecules and show that we quickly approach the CISD limit with a small number of auxiliary functions.

  3. Genetic and bibliographic information: Epb4.1l4a [GenLibi

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Epb4.1l4a erythrocyte protein band 4.1-like 4a mouse melanoma (MeSH) Neoplasms (C04) > Neoplasms by Histolog...10) Neoplasms (C04) > Neoplasms by Histologic Type (C04.557) > Neoplasms, Nerve T... > Melanoma (C04.557.580.625.650.510) Neoplasms (C04) > Neoplasms by Histologic Type (C04.557) > Nevi and Melanomas (C04.557.665) > Melanoma (C04.557.665.510) 00A0707216 ...

  4. A home assistance model for dementia: outcome in patients with mild-to-moderate Alzheimer's disease after three months

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriele Carbone

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The treatment of dementias, which are currently incurable pathologies, requires an approach to care that involves both the patients and their families. The effect of alternative interventions, besides the pharmacological approach, therefore warrants evaluation. In this paper, we describe one such intervention, which was provided by our home care team for Alzheimer's Disease. Patients were granted a three-month period of home care assistance, which included physical and cognitive rehabilitation as well as interventions on the home environment and the family, such as psychological support for the main caregivers. The assistance was provided in thrice-weekly sessions, each lasting six hours. Twenty-two patients (age 78.4±6.5 yrs, all of whom had received a diagnosis of probable AD, were enrolled. There was a statistically significant improvement in the NPI score (p = 0.004, Barthel index (p = 0.01, Tinetti's scale (p = 0.013 and CBI score (p = 0.016 at the end of the 3-month treatment period. The patients' caregivers also reported a significant improvement in the physical and social burden at the CBI at the end of the period of home care assistance (p = 0.026 and p = 0.006. In a further evaluation performed 3 months after the end of the treatment period, the beneficial effect previously observed in both patients and caregivers was no longer present.

  5. Fracture of the L-4 vertebral body after use of a stand-alone interbody fusion device in degenerative spondylolisthesis for anterior L3-4 fixation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Yoon-Kwang; Jang, Ju-Hee; Lee, Choon-Dae; Lee, Sang-Ho

    2014-06-01

    Many studies attest to the excellent results achieved using anterior lumbar interbody fusion (ALIF) for degenerative spondylolisthesis. The purpose of this report is to document a rare instance of L-4 vertebral body fracture following use of a stand-alone interbody fusion device for L3-4 ALIF. The patient, a 55-year-old man, had suffered intractable pain of the back, right buttock, and left leg for several weeks. Initial radiographs showed Grade I degenerative spondylolisthesis, with instability in the sagittal plane (upon 15° rotation) and stenosis of central and both lateral recesses at the L3-4 level. Anterior lumbar interbody fusion of the affected vertebrae was subsequently conducted using a stand-alone cage/plate system. Postoperatively, the severity of spondylolisthesis diminished, with resolution of symptoms. However, the patient returned 2 months later with both leg weakness and back pain. Plain radiographs and CT indicated device failure due to anterior fracture of the L-4 vertebral body, and the spondylolisthesis had recurred. At this point, bilateral facetectomies were performed, with reduction/fixation of L3-4 by pedicle screws. Again, degenerative spondylolisthesis improved postsurgically and symptoms eased, with eventual healing of the vertebral body fracture. This report documents a rare instance of L-4 vertebral body fracture following use of a stand-alone device for ALIF at L3-4, likely as a consequence of angular instability in degenerative spondylolisthesis. Under such conditions, additional pedicle screw fixation is advised.

  6. Long-term stability, reproducibility, and statistical sensitivity of a telemetry-instrumented dog model: A 27-month longitudinal assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fryer, Ryan M; Ng, Khing Jow; Chi, Liguo; Jin, Xidong; Reinhart, Glenn A

    2015-01-01

    ICH guidelines, as well as best-practice and ethical considerations, provide strong rationale for use of telemetry-instrumented dog colonies for cardiovascular safety assessment. However, few studies have investigated the long-term stability of cardiovascular function at baseline, reproducibility in response to pharmacologic challenge, and maintenance of statistical sensitivity to define the usable life of the colony. These questions were addressed in 3 identical studies spanning 27months and were performed in the same colony of dogs. Telemetry-instrumented dogs (n=4) received a single dose of dl-sotalol (10mg/kg, p.o.), a β1 adrenergic and IKr blocker, or vehicle, in 3 separate studies spanning 27months. Systemic hemodynamics, cardiovascular function, and ECG parameters were monitored for 18h post-dose; plasma drug concentrations (Cp) were measured at 1, 3, 5, and 24h post-dose. Baseline hemodynamic/ECG values were consistent across the 27-month study with the exception of modest age-dependent decreases in heart rate and the corresponding QT-interval. dl-Sotalol elicited highly reproducible effects in each study. Reductions in heart rate after dl-sotalol treatment ranged between -22 and -32 beats/min, and slight differences in magnitude could be ascribed to variability in dl-sotalol Cp (range=3230-5087ng/mL); dl-sotalol also reduced LV-dP/dtmax 13-22%. dl-Sotalol increased the slope of the PR-RR relationship suggesting inhibition of AV-conduction. Increases in the heart-rate corrected QT-interval were not significantly different across the 3 studies and results of a power analysis demonstrated that the detection limit for QTc values was not diminished throughout the 27month period and across a range of power assumptions despite modest, age-dependent changes in heart rate. These results demonstrate the long-term stability of a telemetry dog colony as evidenced by a stability of baseline values, consistently reproducible response to pharmacologic challenge and no

  7. Hydrologic consistency as a basis for assessing complexity of monthly water balance models for the continental United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez, Guillermo F.; Gupta, Hoshin V.

    2011-12-01

    Methods to select parsimonious and hydrologically consistent model structures are useful for evaluating dominance of hydrologic processes and representativeness of data. While information criteria (appropriately constrained to obey underlying statistical assumptions) can provide a basis for evaluating appropriate model complexity, it is not sufficient to rely upon the principle of maximum likelihood (ML) alone. We suggest that one must also call upon a "principle of hydrologic consistency," meaning that selected ML structures and parameter estimates must be constrained (as well as possible) to reproduce desired hydrological characteristics of the processes under investigation. This argument is demonstrated in the context of evaluating the suitability of candidate model structures for lumped water balance modeling across the continental United States, using data from 307 snow-free catchments. The models are constrained to satisfy several tests of hydrologic consistency, a flow space transformation is used to ensure better consistency with underlying statistical assumptions, and information criteria are used to evaluate model complexity relative to the data. The results clearly demonstrate that the principle of consistency provides a sensible basis for guiding selection of model structures and indicate strong spatial persistence of certain model structures across the continental United States. Further work to untangle reasons for model structure predominance can help to relate conceptual model structures to physical characteristics of the catchments, facilitating the task of prediction in ungaged basins.

  8. Main field and secular variation candidate models for the 12th IGRF generation after 10 months of Swarm measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saturnino, Diana; Langlais, Benoit; Civet, François; Thébault, Erwan; Mandea, Mioara

    2015-06-01

    We describe the main field and secular variation candidate models for the 12th generation of the International Geomagnetic Reference Field model. These two models are derived from the same parent model, in which the main field is extrapolated to epoch 2015.0 using its associated secular variation. The parent model is exclusively based on measurements acquired by the European Space Agency Swarm mission between its launch on 11/22/2013 and 09/18/2014. It is computed up to spherical harmonic degree and order 25 for the main field, 13 for the secular variation, and 2 for the external field. A selection on local time rather than on true illumination of the spacecraft was chosen in order to keep more measurements. Data selection based on geomagnetic indices was used to minimize the external field contributions. Measurements were screened and outliers were carefully removed. The model uses magnetic field intensity measurements at all latitudes and magnetic field vector measurements equatorward of 50° absolute quasi-dipole magnetic latitude. A second model using only the vertical component of the measured magnetic field and the total intensity was computed. This companion model offers a slightly better fit to the measurements. These two models are compared and discussed.We discuss in particular the quality of the model which does not use the full vector measurements and underline that this approach may be used when only partial directional information is known. The candidate models and their associated companion models are retrospectively compared to the adopted IGRF which allows us to criticize our own choices.

  9. Application of GRACE to the assessment of model-based estimates of monthly Greenland Ice Sheet mass balance (2003-2012)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlegel, Nicole-Jeanne; Wiese, David N.; Larour, Eric Y.; Watkins, Michael M.; Box, Jason E.; Fettweis, Xavier; van den Broeke, Michiel R.

    2016-09-01

    Quantifying the Greenland Ice Sheet's future contribution to sea level rise is a challenging task that requires accurate estimates of ice sheet sensitivity to climate change. Forward ice sheet models are promising tools for estimating future ice sheet behavior, yet confidence is low because evaluation of historical simulations is challenging due to the scarcity of continental-wide data for model evaluation. Recent advancements in processing of Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) data using Bayesian-constrained mass concentration ("mascon") functions have led to improvements in spatial resolution and noise reduction of monthly global gravity fields. Specifically, the Jet Propulsion Laboratory's JPL RL05M GRACE mascon solution (GRACE_JPL) offers an opportunity for the assessment of model-based estimates of ice sheet mass balance (MB) at ˜ 300 km spatial scales. Here, we quantify the differences between Greenland monthly observed MB (GRACE_JPL) and that estimated by state-of-the-art, high-resolution models, with respect to GRACE_JPL and model uncertainties. To simulate the years 2003-2012, we force the Ice Sheet System Model (ISSM) with anomalies from three different surface mass balance (SMB) products derived from regional climate models. Resulting MB is compared against GRACE_JPL within individual mascons. Overall, we find agreement in the northeast and southwest where MB is assumed to be primarily controlled by SMB. In the interior, we find a discrepancy in trend, which we presume to be related to millennial-scale dynamic thickening not considered by our model. In the northwest, seasonal amplitudes agree, but modeled mass trends are muted relative to GRACE_JPL. Here, discrepancies are likely controlled by temporal variability in ice discharge and other related processes not represented by our model simulations, i.e., hydrological processes and ice-ocean interaction. In the southeast, GRACE_JPL exhibits larger seasonal amplitude than predicted by the

  10. A model for estimating rains' area, using the dependence of the time correlation of sites' monthly precipitation totals on the distance between sites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walanus, Adam; Cebulska, Marta; Twardosz, Robert

    2016-05-01

    Based on the monthly precipitation series from 16 sites (in the Polish Carpathian Mountains), of 132 years' length, a relatively precise scatterplot of correlation coefficients between sites versus distance between sites is obtained. The "rains" of Gaussian shape, in the spatial sense, are a good model, which produces a scatterplot very closely resembling the observed one. The essential parameter of the model is the area covered by the modeled rains, which results to be of order 30-50 km, though with about a twice lower value for the N-S direction.

  11. Underlying dynamics of typical fluctuations of an emerging market price index: The Heston model from minutes to months

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vicente, Renato; de Toledo, Charles M.; Leite, Vitor B. P.; Caticha, Nestor

    2006-02-01

    We investigate the Heston model with stochastic volatility and exponential tails as a model for the typical price fluctuations of the Brazilian São Paulo Stock Exchange Index (IBOVESPA). Raw prices are first corrected for inflation and a period spanning 15 years characterized by memoryless returns is chosen for the analysis. Model parameters are estimated by observing volatility scaling and correlation properties. We show that the Heston model with at least two time scales for the volatility mean reverting dynamics satisfactorily describes price fluctuations ranging from time scales larger than 20 min to 160 days. At time scales shorter than 20 min we observe autocorrelated returns and power law tails incompatible with the Heston model. Despite major regulatory changes, hyperinflation and currency crises experienced by the Brazilian market in the period studied, the general success of the description provided may be regarded as an evidence for a general underlying dynamics of price fluctuations at intermediate mesoeconomic time scales well approximated by the Heston model. We also notice that the connection between the Heston model and Ehrenfest urn models could be exploited for bringing new insights into the microeconomic market mechanics.

  12. Underlying Dynamics of Typical Fluctuations of an Emerging Market Price Index: The Heston Model from Minutes to Months

    CERN Document Server

    Vicente, R; Leite, V B P; Caticha, N; Vicente, Renato; Toledo, Charles M. de; Leite, Vitor B.P.; Caticha, Nestor

    2006-01-01

    We investigate the Heston model with stochastic volatility and exponential tails as a model for the typical price fluctuations of the Brazilian S\\~ao Paulo Stock Exchange Index (IBOVESPA). Raw prices are first corrected for inflation and a period spanning 15 years characterized by memoryless returns is chosen for the analysis. Model parameters are estimated by observing volatility scaling and correlation properties. We show that the Heston model with at least two time scales for the volatility mean reverting dynamics satisfactorily describes price fluctuations ranging from time scales larger than 20 minutes to 160 days. At time scales shorter than 20 minutes we observe autocorrelated returns and power law tails incompatible with the Heston model. Despite major regulatory changes, hyperinflation and currency crises experienced by the Brazilian market in the period studied, the general success of the description provided may be regarded as an evidence for a general underlying dynamics of price fluctuations at i...

  13. Photometry of comet C/2011 L4 (PANSTARRS) at 4.4 - 4.2 AU heliocentric distances

    CERN Document Server

    Ivanova, Oleksandra; Golovin, Alex

    2015-01-01

    We present an analysis of the photometric data of comet C/2011 L4 (PANSTARRS) observed at heliocentric distance of 4.4 - 4.2 AU. The comet C/2011 L4 (PANSTARRS) shows one significant activity, despite of its quite large heliocentric distance. The color indexes, dust mass-loss rates and radius of the comet are measured.

  14. Lightcurves of Jovian Trojan Asteroids from the Center for Solar System Studies: L4 Greek Camp and Spies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephens, Robert D.; Coley, Daniel R.; Warner, Brian D.; French, Linda, M.

    2016-10-01

    Jovian Trojan asteroids larger than ~ 30 km were studied from the Center for Solar System Studies (CS3, MPC U81). Lightcurves for 30 Trojan asteroids in the L4 (Greek) cloud were between May and June 2016. These were mostly from the L4 "Greek" cloud, but several were L5 "Trojan" cloud lightcurves not previously published.

  15. Integrating Map Algebra and Statistical Modeling for Spatio-Temporal Analysis of Monthly Mean Daily Incident Photosynthetically Active Radiation (PAR) over a Complex Terrain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evrendilek, Fatih

    2007-01-01

    This study aims at quantifying spatio-temporal dynamics of monthly mean daily incident photosynthetically active radiation (PAR) over a vast and complex terrain such as Turkey. The spatial interpolation method of universal kriging, and the combination of multiple linear regression (MLR) models and map algebra techniques were implemented to generate surface maps of PAR with a grid resolution of 500 × 500 m as a function of five geographical and 14 climatic variables. Performance of the geostatistical and MLR models was compared using mean prediction error (MPE), root-mean-square prediction error (RMSPE), average standard prediction error (ASE), mean standardized prediction error (MSPE), root-mean-square standardized prediction error (RMSSPE), and adjusted coefficient of determination (R2adj.). The best-fit MLR- and universal kriging-generated models of monthly mean daily PAR were validated against an independent 37-year observed dataset of 35 climate stations derived from 160 stations across Turkey by the Jackknifing method. The spatial variability patterns of monthly mean daily incident PAR were more accurately reflected in the surface maps created by the MLR-based models than in those created by the universal kriging method, in particular, for spring (May) and autumn (November). The MLR-based spatial interpolation algorithms of PAR described in this study indicated the significance of the multifactor approach to understanding and mapping spatio-temporal dynamics of PAR for a complex terrain over meso-scales.

  16. Discriminant models to estimate the body weight loss after a six-month long diet and exercise-based intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rojo-Tirado, Miguel A; Benito, Pedro J; Peinado, Ana B; Zapico, Augusto G; Calderón, Franciso J

    2016-01-01

    The main concern of the people who follow a weight loss program is the body weight loss, independently of the body composition. The aim of this study was to create a mathematical model able to discriminate the body weight change based on initial body composition variables. The study included 239 overweight and obese participants (18-50 years; Body Mass Index (BMI)>25 and loss, during twenty-four weeks while having 25-30% caloric restriction. Two multivariate discriminant models were performed taking into account the groups below and above the mean body weight change. The discriminant models obtained could discriminate the body weight change with a 65-70% of correct classification. BW, fat-free mass (FFM), and fat mass (FM) were shown to be the most discriminant variables for the discriminant models. People having higher FM and FFM at the beginning of an intervention will lose a greater amount of weight until the end of it.

  17. A dispersive treatment of Kl4 decays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Colangelo, Gilberto [Univ. of Bern, Bern (Switzerland); Passemar, Emilie [Indiana Univ., Bloomington, IN (United States); Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States); Stoffer, Peter [Univ. of Bern, Bern (Switzerland); Univ. of Bonn, Bonn (Germany)

    2015-04-28

    Kl4 decays offer several reasons of interest: they allow an accurate measurement of ππ-scattering lengths; they provide the best source for the determination of some low-energy constants of xPT; one form factor is directly related to the chiral anomaly, which can be measured here. We present a dispersive treatment of Kl4 decays that provides a resummation of ππ- and Kπ-rescattering effects. In addition, the free parameters of the dispersion relation are fitted to the data of the high-statistics experiments E865 and NA48/2. The matching toxPT at NLO and NNLO enables us to determine the LECs Lr1, Lr2 and Lr3. With recently published data from NA48/2, the LEC Lr9 can be determined as well. In contrast to a pure chiral treatment, the dispersion relation describes the observed curvature of one of the form factors, which we understand as a rescattering effect beyond NNLO.

  18. Multilevel Thoracolumbar Spondylolysis with Spondylolisthesis at L4 on L5.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Whoan Jeang; Song, Young Dong; Choy, Won Sik

    2015-09-01

    A 24-year-old male patient was initially evaluated for persistent back pain. The visual analogue scale (VAS) score was 7 points. Physical examination revealed a decreased range of lumbar spinal motion, which caused pain. Simple X-ray revealed Meyerding grade 1 spondylolisthesis at L4 on L5, with mild dome-shaped superior endplate and consecutive multilevel spondylolysis at T12-L5. Standing anteroposterior and lateral views of the entire spine revealed normal balance of sagittal and coronal alignment. A computed tomography scan revealed bilateral spondylolysis at T12-L4, left unilateral spondylolysis at L5, and spina bifida at L5 to sacral region. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed mild dural ectasia at the lumbar region. Due to the absence of any neurological symptoms, the patient was managed conservatively. He was rested a few weeks with corset brace and physiotherapy. After treatment, his back pain improved, VAS score changed from 7 to 2, and he was able to return to normal activity.

  19. Transit Timing Observations from Kepler: VI. Transit Timing Variation Candidates in the First Seventeen Months from Polynomial Models

    CERN Document Server

    Ford, Eric B; Rowe, Jason F; Steffen, Jason H; Barclay, Thomas; Batalha, Natalie M; Borucki, William J; Bryson, Stephen T; Caldwell, Douglas A; Fabrycky, Daniel C; Gautier, Thomas N; Holman, Matthew J; Ibrahim, Khadeejah A; Kjeldsen, Hans; Kinemuchi, Karen; Koch, David G; Lissauer, Jack J; Still, Martin; Tenenbaum, Peter; Uddin, Kamal; Welsh, William

    2012-01-01

    Transit timing variations provide a powerful tool for confirming and characterizing transiting planets, as well as detecting non-transiting planets. We report the results an updated TTV analysis for 822 planet candidates (Borucki et al. 2011; Batalha et al. 2012) based on transit times measured during the first seventeen months of Kepler observations (Rowe et al 2012). We present 35 TTV candidates (4.1% of suitable data sets) based on long-term trends and 153 mostly weaker TTV candidates (18% of suitable data sets) based on excess scatter of TTV measurements about a linear ephemeris. We anticipate that several of these planet candidates could be confirmed and perhaps characterized with more detailed TTV analyses using publicly available Kepler observations. For many others, Kepler has observed a long-term TTV trend, but an extended Kepler mission will be required to characterize the system via TTVs. We find that the occurence rate of planet candidates that show TTVs is significantly increased (~60%-76%) for p...

  20. Sampling Errors in Monthly Rainfall Totals for TRMM and SSM/I, Based on Statistics of Retrieved Rain Rates and Simple Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, Thomas L.; Kundu, Prasun K.; Einaudi, Franco (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Estimates from TRMM satellite data of monthly total rainfall over an area are subject to substantial sampling errors due to the limited number of visits to the area by the satellite during the month. Quantitative comparisons of TRMM averages with data collected by other satellites and by ground-based systems require some estimate of the size of this sampling error. A method of estimating this sampling error based on the actual statistics of the TRMM observations and on some modeling work has been developed. "Sampling error" in TRMM monthly averages is defined here relative to the monthly total a hypothetical satellite permanently stationed above the area would have reported. "Sampling error" therefore includes contributions from the random and systematic errors introduced by the satellite remote sensing system. As part of our long-term goal of providing error estimates for each grid point accessible to the TRMM instruments, sampling error estimates for TRMM based on rain retrievals from TRMM microwave (TMI) data are compared for different times of the year and different oceanic areas (to minimize changes in the statistics due to algorithmic differences over land and ocean). Changes in sampling error estimates due to changes in rain statistics due 1) to evolution of the official algorithms used to process the data, and 2) differences from other remote sensing systems such as the Defense Meteorological Satellite Program (DMSP) Special Sensor Microwave/Imager (SSM/I), are analyzed.

  1. On the Origins of Disorganized Attachment and Internal Working Models: Paper II. An Empirical Microanalysis of 4-Month Mother-Infant Interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beebe, Beatrice; Lachmann, Frank; Markese, Sara; Buck, Karen A; Bahrick, Lorraine E; Chen, Henian; Cohen, Patricia; Andrews, Howard; Feldstein, Stanley; Jaffe, Joseph

    2012-01-01

    A microanalysis of 4-month mother-infant face-to-face communication predicted 12-month infant disorganized (vs. secure) attachment outcomes in an urban community sample. We documented a dyadic systems view of the roles of both partners, the roles of both self- and interactive contingency, and the importance of attention, orientation and touch, and as well as facial and vocal affect, in the co-construction of attachment disorganization. The analysis of different communication modalities identified striking intrapersonal and interpersonal intermodal discordance or conflict, in the context of intensely distressed infants, as the central feature of future disorganized dyads at 4 months. Lowered maternal contingent coordination, and failures of maternal affective correspondence, constituted maternal emotional withdrawal from distressed infants. This maternal withdrawal compromises infant interactive agency and emotional coherence. We characterize of the nature of emerging internal working models of future disorganized infants as follows: Future disorganized infants represent states of not being sensed and known by their mothers, particularly in moments of distress; they represent confusion about both their own and their mothers' basic emotional organization, and about their mothers' response to their distress. This internal working model sets a trajectory in development which may disturb the fundamental integration of the person. The remarkable specificity of our findings has the potential to lead to more finely-focused clinical interventions.

  2. Observation of Two New L4 Neptune Trojans in the Dark Energy Survey Supernova Fields

    CERN Document Server

    Gerdes, D W; Bernstein, G M; Sako, M; Adams, F; Goldstein, D; Kessler, R; Abbott, T; Abdalla, F B; Allam, S; Benoit-Lévy, A; Bertin, E; Brooks, D; Buckley-Geer, E; Burke, D L; Capozzi, D; Rosell, A Carnero; Kind, M Carrasco; Carretero, J; Cunha, C E; D'Andrea, C B; da Costa, L N; DePoy, D L; Desai, S; Dietrich, J P; Doel, P; Eifler, T F; Neto, A Fausti; Flaugher, B; Frieman, J; Gaztanaga, E; Gruen, D; Gruendl, R A; Gutierrez, G; Honscheid, K; James, D J; Kuehn, K; Kuropatkin, N; Lahav, O; Li, T S; Maia, M A G; March, M; Martini, P; Miller, C J; Miquel, R; Nichol, R C; Nord, B; Ogando, R; Plazas, A A; Romer, A K; Roodman, A; Sanchez, E; Santiago, B; Schubnell, M; Sevilla-Noarbe, I; Smith, R C; Soares-Santos, M; Sobreira, F; Suchyta, E; Swanson, M E C; Tarlé, G; Thaler, J; Walker, A R; Wester, W; Zhang, Y

    2015-01-01

    We report the discovery of the eighth and ninth known Trojans in stable orbits around Neptune's leading Lagrange point, L4. The objects 2014 QO$_{441}$ and 2014 QP$_{441}$ were detected in data obtained during the 2013-14 and 2014-15 observing seasons by the Dark Energy Survey, using the Dark Energy Camera (DECam) on the 4-meter Blanco telescope at Cerro Tololo Inter-American Observatory. Both are in high-inclination orbits (18.8$^{\\circ}$ and 19.4$^{\\circ}$ respectively). With an eccentricity of 0.104, 2014 QO$_{441}$ has the most eccentric orbit of the eleven known stable Neptune Trojans. Here we describe the search procedure and investigate the objects' long-term dynamical stability and physical properties.

  3. Size of isospin breaking in charged $K_{l4}$ decay

    CERN Document Server

    Nehme, A

    2005-01-01

    We evaluate the size of isospin breaking corrections to form factors f and g of the K/sub l4/ decay process K/sup +/ to pi /sup +/ pi /sup -/l/sup +/vl which is actually measured by the extended NA48 setup at CERN. We found that, keeping apart the effect of Coulomb interaction, isospin breaking does not affect the moduli. This is due to the cancellation between corrections of electromagnetic origin and those generated by the difference between up and down quark masses. On the other hand, electromagnetism affects considerably the phases if the infrared divergence is dropped out using a minimal subtraction scheme. Consequently, the greatest care must be taken in the extraction of pi pi phase shifts from experiment.

  4. Modelling of the monthly and daily behaviour of the runoff of the Xallas river using Box-Jenkins and neural networks methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castellano-Méndez, María.; González-Manteiga, Wenceslao; Febrero-Bande, Manuel; Manuel Prada-Sánchez, José; Lozano-Calderón, Román

    2004-08-01

    This paper presents a study of the hydrological behaviour of the Xallas river basin in the northwest of Spain, based on modelling the performance of the runoff produced by the river at different temporal scales. For monthly mean runoff as well as mean rainfall forecasting, Box-Jenkins models have been used. For short-term daily flow predictions, two statistical techniques were tested and compared: the classic statistical Box-Jenkins models and artificial neural networks (ANNs). The performance of the ANN was an improvement on the Box-Jenkins results. The neural networks capability of modelling a complex rainfall-runoff relationship has been observed. Although the neural network's performance was not satisfactory for detecting some peak flows, the results were most promising.

  5. Monthly Meteorological Reports

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Monthly forms that do not fit into any regular submission. Tabulation sheets and generic monthly forms designed to capture miscellaneous monthly observations.

  6. Tolerance Analysis and Control on L4 Length for 244.5 mm BC Casing%244.5mm管偏梯形螺纹接头L4长度公差分析及控制

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吕拴录; 姬丙寅; 杨成新; 文志明; 张锋; 徐永康; 樊文刚

    2012-01-01

    某油田在检验一批244.5 mm偏梯形螺纹接头套管时发现,管端至螺纹消失点的长度L4比公称值小25.22 mm.虽然API SPEC 5B对套管偏梯形外螺纹接头L4没有规定公差,但依据APISPEC 5CT和油田规定的外径公差可以推算结果,L4的上偏差为39.11 mm(7.7扣),下偏差为一17.39 mm(3.42扣).分析结果表明:该批套管L4实际公差已经超过推算出的L4负公差,使套管接头密封性能降低22.0%,并降低了螺纹连接强度.%It was found that the total length end of pipe to vanish point L4 is less 25. 22 mm of casing connection than that of the normal dimension specified in API SPEC 5B for 244. 5mm buttress thread casing during inspection in one oil field. Though L4 tolerance is not specified in API SPEC 5B,but it is considered that L4 tolerance can be deduced per outside diameter tolerance in accordance with API SPEC 5CT and the oil field specification, the calculation result is that the upper deviation and lower deviation of L, is +39.11mm (7. 7 thread) and ?7. 39mm (3. 42 thread) .respectively. The actual L, is shorter than the lower deviation that will decrease 22% of seal performance of casing connection,and reduce the tension strength of casing connection.

  7. Chandra Observations of Comets C/2012 S1 (ISON) and C/2011 L4 (PanSTARRS)

    CERN Document Server

    Snios, Bradford; Lisse, Carey M; Wolk, Scott J; Dennerl, Konrad; Combi, Michael R

    2016-01-01

    We present our results on the Chandra X-ray Observatory Advanced CCD Imaging Spectrometer (ACIS) observations of the bright Oort Cloud comets C/2012 S1 (ISON) and C/2011 L4 (PanSTARRS). ISON was observed between 2013 October 31-November 06 during variable speed solar wind (SW), and PanSTARRS was observed between 2013 April 17-23 during fast SW. ISON produced an extended parabolic X-ray morphology consistent with a collisionally thick coma, while PanSTARRS demonstrated only a diffuse X-ray-emitting region. We consider these emissions to be from charge exchange (CX) and model each comet's emission spectrum from first principles accordingly. Our model agrees with the observational spectra and also generates composition ratios for heavy, highly charged SW ions interacting with the cometary atmosphere. We compare our derived SW ion compositions to observational data and find a strong agreement between them. These results further demonstrate the utility of CX emissions as a remote diagnostics tool of both astrophys...

  8. A Monthly-Step Water Balance Model to Evaluate the Hydrological Effects of Climate Change on a Regional Scale for Irrigation Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herceg, A.; Kalicz, P.; Kisfaludi, B.; Gribovszki, Z.

    2016-12-01

    Current and ongoing changes in the climate are typified by a rise in global temperatures. Climate change can have a dramatic impact on the water cycle. The aim of this paper was to develop a model based on Thornthwaite-type monthly water balance estimations. The main goals were to calibrate the model parameters using a remote sensing-based evapotranspiration dataset. The calibrated model was used for projection on the basis of four climate model datasets (remo, dmihirham5, smhirca.bcm, knmiracmo2). The four main projection periods were: 1980-2010, 2010-2040, 2040-2070, and 2070-2100. The advantage of this model is its robust structure. It can be applied if temperature and precipitation time series are available. The key parameter is the water storage capacity of the soil (SOILMAX), which can be calibrated using the actual evapotranspiration data available. If the physical properties of the soil are known, the maximal rooting depth is also projectable. The model can be primarily used at the catchment level or for areas without additional amounts of water from below. For testing the model, a mixed parcel of land that is used as a cornfield near Mosonmagyaróvár and a small, forest-covered catchment near Sopron were successfully used as the datasets. Furthermore, we determined the water stress with the calculation of the relative extractable water (REW), soil water deficit (SWD), and the water stress index (IS).

  9. Hypermetabolic state in the 7-month-old triple transgenic mouse model of Alzheimer's disease and the effect of lipoic acid: a 13C-NMR study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sancheti, Harsh; Patil, Ishan; Kanamori, Keiko; Díaz Brinton, Roberta; Zhang, Wei; Lin, Ai-Ling; Cadenas, Enrique

    2014-11-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is characterized by age-dependent biochemical, metabolic, and physiologic changes. These age-dependent changes ultimately converge to impair cognitive functions. This study was carried out to examine the metabolic changes by probing glucose and tricarboxylic acid cycle metabolism in a 7-month-old triple transgenic mouse model of AD (3xTg-AD). The effect of lipoic acid, an insulin-mimetic agent, was also investigated to examine its ability in modulating age-dependent metabolic changes. Seven-month-old 3xTg-AD mice were given intravenous infusion of [1-(13)C]glucose followed by an ex vivo (13)C nuclear magnetic resonance to determine the concentrations of (13)C-labeled isotopomers of glutamate, glutamine, aspartate, gamma aminobutyric acid, and N-acetylaspartate. An intravenous infusion of [1-(13)C]glucose+[1,2-(13)C]acetate was given for different periods of time to distinguish neuronal and astrocytic metabolism. Enrichments of glutamate, glutamine, and aspartate were calculated after quantifying the total ((12)C+(13)C) concentrations by high-performance liquid chromatography. A hypermetabolic state was clearly evident in 7-month-old 3xTg-AD mice in contrast to the hypometabolic state reported earlier in 13-month-old mice. Hypermetabolism was evidenced by prominent increase of (13)C labeling and enrichment in the 3xTg-AD mice. Lipoic acid feeding to the hypermetabolic 3xTg-AD mice brought the metabolic parameters to the levels of nonTg mice.

  10. Application of the Artificial Neural Network model for prediction of monthly Standardized Precipitation and Evapotranspiration Index using hydrometeorological parameters and climate indices in eastern Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deo, Ravinesh C.; Şahin, Mehmet

    2015-07-01

    The forecasting of drought based on cumulative influence of rainfall, temperature and evaporation is greatly beneficial for mitigating adverse consequences on water-sensitive sectors such as agriculture, ecosystems, wildlife, tourism, recreation, crop health and hydrologic engineering. Predictive models of drought indices help in assessing water scarcity situations, drought identification and severity characterization. In this paper, we tested the feasibility of the Artificial Neural Network (ANN) as a data-driven model for predicting the monthly Standardized Precipitation and Evapotranspiration Index (SPEI) for eight candidate stations in eastern Australia using predictive variable data from 1915 to 2005 (training) and simulated data for the period 2006-2012. The predictive variables were: monthly rainfall totals, mean temperature, minimum temperature, maximum temperature and evapotranspiration, which were supplemented by large-scale climate indices (Southern Oscillation Index, Pacific Decadal Oscillation, Southern Annular Mode and Indian Ocean Dipole) and the Sea Surface Temperatures (Nino 3.0, 3.4 and 4.0). A total of 30 ANN models were developed with 3-layer ANN networks. To determine the best combination of learning algorithms, hidden transfer and output functions of the optimum model, the Levenberg-Marquardt and Broyden-Fletcher-Goldfarb-Shanno (BFGS) quasi-Newton backpropagation algorithms were utilized to train the network, tangent and logarithmic sigmoid equations used as the activation functions and the linear, logarithmic and tangent sigmoid equations used as the output function. The best ANN architecture had 18 input neurons, 43 hidden neurons and 1 output neuron, trained using the Levenberg-Marquardt learning algorithm using tangent sigmoid equation as the activation and output functions. An evaluation of the model performance based on statistical rules yielded time-averaged Coefficient of Determination, Root Mean Squared Error and the Mean Absolute

  11. Evaluation of SDSM developed by annual and monthly sub-models for downscaling temperature and precipitation in the Jhelum basin, Pakistan and India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahmood, Rashid; Babel, Mukand S.

    2013-07-01

    The study evaluates statistical downscaling model (SDSM) developed by annual and monthly sub-models for downscaling maximum temperature, minimum temperature, and precipitation, and assesses future changes in climate in the Jhelum River basin, Pakistan and India. Additionally, bias correction is applied on downscaled climate variables. The mean explained variances of 66, 76, and 11 % for max temperature, min temperature, and precipitation, respectively, are obtained during calibration of SDSM with NCEP predictors, which are selected through a quantitative procedure. During validation, average R 2 values by the annual sub-model (SDSM-A)—followed by bias correction using NCEP, H3A2, and H3B2—lie between 98.4 and 99.1 % for both max and min temperature, and 77 to 85 % for precipitation. As for the monthly sub-model (SDSM-M), followed by bias correction, average R 2 values lie between 98.5 and 99.5 % for both max and min temperature and 75 to 83 % for precipitation. These results indicate a good applicability of SDSM-A and SDSM-M for downscaling max temperature, min temperature, and precipitation under H3A2 and H3B2 scenarios for future periods of the 2020s, 2050s, and 2080s in this basin. Both sub-models show a mean annual increase in max temperature, min temperature, and precipitation. Under H3A2, and according to both sub-models, changes in max temperature, min temperature, and precipitation are projected as 0.91-3.15 °C, 0.93-2.63 °C, and 6-12 %, and under H3B2, the values of change are 0.69-1.92 °C, 0.56-1.63 °C, and 8-14 % in 2020s, 2050s, and 2080s. These results show that the climate of the basin will be warmer and wetter relative to the baseline period. SDSM-A, most of the time, projects higher changes in climate than SDSM-M. It can also be concluded that although SDSM-A performed well in predicting mean annual values, it cannot be used with regard to monthly and seasonal variations, especially in the case of precipitation unless correction is applied.

  12. Investigation of market efficiency and Financial Stability between S&P 500 and London Stock Exchange: Monthly and yearly Forecasting of Time Series Stock Returns using ARMA model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rounaghi, Mohammad Mahdi; Nassir Zadeh, Farzaneh

    2016-08-01

    We investigated the presence and changes in, long memory features in the returns and volatility dynamics of S&P 500 and London Stock Exchange using ARMA model. Recently, multifractal analysis has been evolved as an important way to explain the complexity of financial markets which can hardly be described by linear methods of efficient market theory. In financial markets, the weak form of the efficient market hypothesis implies that price returns are serially uncorrelated sequences. In other words, prices should follow a random walk behavior. The random walk hypothesis is evaluated against alternatives accommodating either unifractality or multifractality. Several studies find that the return volatility of stocks tends to exhibit long-range dependence, heavy tails, and clustering. Because stochastic processes with self-similarity possess long-range dependence and heavy tails, it has been suggested that self-similar processes be employed to capture these characteristics in return volatility modeling. The present study applies monthly and yearly forecasting of Time Series Stock Returns in S&P 500 and London Stock Exchange using ARMA model. The statistical analysis of S&P 500 shows that the ARMA model for S&P 500 outperforms the London stock exchange and it is capable for predicting medium or long horizons using real known values. The statistical analysis in London Stock Exchange shows that the ARMA model for monthly stock returns outperforms the yearly. ​A comparison between S&P 500 and London Stock Exchange shows that both markets are efficient and have Financial Stability during periods of boom and bust.

  13. POTASSIUM DETECTION AND LITHIUM DEPLETION IN COMETS C/2011 L4 (PANSTARRS) AND C/1965 S1 (IKEYA-SEKI)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fulle, M.; Molaro, P. [INAF-Osservatorio Astronomico, Via Tiepolo 11, I-34143 Trieste (Italy); Buzzi, L.; Valisa, P., E-mail: fulle@oats.inaf.it [Societa Astronomica Schiaparelli, Via Beato Angelico 1, Varese (Italy)

    2013-07-10

    On 2013 March 21, high-resolution slit spectrographs of the comet C/2011 L4 (Panstarrs), at a heliocentric distance r = 0.46 AU, were obtained at the Osservatorio Astronomico Campo dei Fiori, Italy. Emission lines of sodium were the strongest in the spectrum as is common in comets, but potassium lines were also detected. These have rarely been observed in comets since the apparition of the brightest comet C/1965 S1 (Ikeya-Seki). Lithium was not detected and stringent upper limits of its abundance compared to other alkali were derived. We obtain the abundance ratios Na/K = 54 {+-} 14 and Na/Li {>=}810{sup 3}. In addition to Mercury's exosphere (Leblanc and Doressoundiram), we show that photoionization at the beginning of the alkali tails may increase the solar ratio Na/K = 15.5 (Asplund et al.) by a factor three, close to that required to match the observed value. In the same tail position, the Na/Li ratio increases only by a factor two, very far from the factor {>=}8 required to match an original meteoritic ratio. We apply the same model to similar alkali data (Preston) of the comet C/1965 S1 (Ikeya-Seki) and obtain consistent results. An original solar Na/K ratio fits the observed value at the beginning of the alkali tails within the slit size, whereas Li is depleted by a factor {>=}8.

  14. Highly concentrated nebular noble gases in porous nanocarbon separates from the Saratov (L4) meteorite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amari, Sachiko [McDonnell Center for the Space Sciences and the Physics Department, Washington University, St. Louis, MO 63130 (United States); Matsuda, Jun-ichi [Department of Earth and Space Science, Osaka University, Osaka 560-0043 (Japan); Stroud, Rhonda M. [Code 6360, Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC 20375 (United States); Chisholm, Matthew F., E-mail: sa@wuphys.wustl.edu [Materials Science and Technology Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States)

    2013-11-20

    The majority of heavy noble gases (Ar, Kr, and Xe) in primitive meteorites are stored in a poorly understood phase called Q. Although Q is thought to be carbonaceous, the full identity of the phase has remained elusive for almost four decades. In order to better characterize phase Q and, in turn, the early solar nebula, we separated carbon-rich fractions from the Saratov (L4) meteorite. We chose this meteorite because Q is most resistant in thermal alteration among carbonaceous noble gas carriers in meteorites and we hoped that, in this highly metamorphosed meteorite, Q would be present but not diamond: these two phases are very difficult to separate from each other. One of the fractions, AJ, has the highest {sup 132}Xe concentration of 2.1 × 10{sup –6} cm{sup 3} STP g{sup –1}, exceeding any Q-rich fractions that have yet been analyzed. Transmission electron microscopy studies of the fraction AJ and a less Q-rich fraction AI indicate that they both are primarily porous carbon that consists of domains with short-range graphene orders, with variable packing in three dimensions, but no long-range graphitic order. The relative abundance of Xe and C atoms (6:10{sup 9}) in the separates indicates that individual noble gas atoms are associated with only a minor component of the porous carbon, possibly one or more specific arrangements of the nanoparticulate graphene.

  15. Model to Estimate Monthly Time Horizons for Application of DEA in Selection of Stock Portfolio and for Maintenance of the Selected Portfolio

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Claudio Isaias

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In the selecting of stock portfolios, one type of analysis that has shown good results is Data Envelopment Analysis (DEA. It, however, has been shown to have gaps regarding its estimates of monthly time horizons of data collection for the selection of stock portfolios and of monthly time horizons for the maintenance of a selected portfolio. To better estimate these horizons, this study proposes a model of mathematical programming binary of minimization of square errors. This model is the paper’s main contribution. The model’s results are validated by simulating the estimated annual return indexes of a portfolio that uses both horizons estimated and of other portfolios that do not use these horizons. The simulation shows that portfolios with both horizons estimated have higher indexes, on average 6.99% per year. The hypothesis tests confirm the statistically significant superiority of the results of the proposed mathematical model’s indexes. The model’s indexes are also compared with portfolios that use just one of the horizons estimated; here the indexes of the dual-horizon portfolios outperform the single-horizon portfolios, though with a decrease in percentage of statistically significant superiority.

  16. Three-Month Real-Time Dengue Forecast Models: An Early Warning System for Outbreak Alerts and Policy Decision Support in Singapore

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Yuan; Liu, Xu; Kok, Suet-Yheng; Rajarethinam, Jayanthi; Liang, Shaohong; Yap, Grace; Chong, Chee-Seng; Lee, Kim-Sung; Tan, Sharon S.Y.; Chin, Christopher Kuan Yew; Lo, Andrew; Kong, Waiming; Ng, Lee Ching; Cook, Alex R.

    2015-01-01

    Background: With its tropical rainforest climate, rapid urbanization, and changing demography and ecology, Singapore experiences endemic dengue; the last large outbreak in 2013 culminated in 22,170 cases. In the absence of a vaccine on the market, vector control is the key approach for prevention. Objectives: We sought to forecast the evolution of dengue epidemics in Singapore to provide early warning of outbreaks and to facilitate the public health response to moderate an impending outbreak. Methods: We developed a set of statistical models using least absolute shrinkage and selection operator (LASSO) methods to forecast the weekly incidence of dengue notifications over a 3-month time horizon. This forecasting tool used a variety of data streams and was updated weekly, including recent case data, meteorological data, vector surveillance data, and population-based national statistics. The forecasting methodology was compared with alternative approaches that have been proposed to model dengue case data (seasonal autoregressive integrated moving average and step-down linear regression) by fielding them on the 2013 dengue epidemic, the largest on record in Singapore. Results: Operationally useful forecasts were obtained at a 3-month lag using the LASSO-derived models. Based on the mean average percentage error, the LASSO approach provided more accurate forecasts than the other methods we assessed. We demonstrate its utility in Singapore’s dengue control program by providing a forecast of the 2013 outbreak for advance preparation of outbreak response. Conclusions: Statistical models built using machine learning methods such as LASSO have the potential to markedly improve forecasting techniques for recurrent infectious disease outbreaks such as dengue. Citation: Shi Y, Liu X, Kok SY, Rajarethinam J, Liang S, Yap G, Chong CS, Lee KS, Tan SS, Chin CK, Lo A, Kong W, Ng LC, Cook AR. 2016. Three-month real-time dengue forecast models: an early warning system for outbreak

  17. CHANDRA OBSERVATIONS OF COMETS C/2012 S1 (ISON) AND C/2011 L4 (PanSTARRS)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Snios, Bradford; Kharchenko, Vasili [Department of Physics, University of Connecticut, Storrs, CT 06269 (United States); Lisse, Carey M. [Planetary Exploration Group, Space Department, Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory, Laurel, MD 20723 (United States); Wolk, Scott J. [Chandra X-Ray Observatory Center, Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Dennerl, Konrad [Max-Planck-Institut für extraterrestrische Physik, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Combi, Michael R. [Department of Climate and Space Sciences and Engineering, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States)

    2016-02-20

    We present our results on the Chandra X-ray Observatory Advanced CCD Imaging Spectrometer (ACIS) observations of the bright Oort Cloud comets C/2012 S1 (ISON) and C/2011 L4 (PanSTARRS). ISON was observed between 2013 October 31–November 06 during variable speed solar wind (SW), and PanSTARRS was observed between 2013 April 17–23 during fast SW. ISON produced an extended parabolic X-ray morphology consistent with a collisionally thick coma, while PanSTARRS demonstrated only a diffuse X-ray-emitting region. We consider these emissions to be from charge exchange (CX) and model each comet's emission spectrum from first principles accordingly. Our model agrees with the observational spectra and also generates composition ratios for heavy, highly charged SW ions interacting with the cometary atmosphere. We compare our derived SW ion compositions to observational data and find a strong agreement between them. These results further demonstrate the utility of CX emissions as a remote diagnostics tool of both astrophysical plasma interaction and SW composition. In addition, we observe potential soft X-ray emissions via ACIS around 0.2 keV from both comets that are correlated in intensity to the hard X-ray emissions between 0.4–1.0 keV. We fit our CX model to these emissions, but our lack of a unique solution at low energies makes it impossible to conclude if they are cometary CX in origin. Finally, we discuss probable emission mechanism sources for the soft X-rays and explore new opportunities these findings present in understanding cometary emission processes via Chandra.

  18. Chandra Observations of Comets C/2012 S1 (ISON) and C/2011 L4 (PanSTARRS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snios, Bradford; Kharchenko, Vasili; Lisse, Carey M.; Wolk, Scott J.; Dennerl, Konrad; Combi, Michael R.

    2016-02-01

    We present our results on the Chandra X-ray Observatory Advanced CCD Imaging Spectrometer (ACIS) observations of the bright Oort Cloud comets C/2012 S1 (ISON) and C/2011 L4 (PanSTARRS). ISON was observed between 2013 October 31-November 06 during variable speed solar wind (SW), and PanSTARRS was observed between 2013 April 17-23 during fast SW. ISON produced an extended parabolic X-ray morphology consistent with a collisionally thick coma, while PanSTARRS demonstrated only a diffuse X-ray-emitting region. We consider these emissions to be from charge exchange (CX) and model each comet's emission spectrum from first principles accordingly. Our model agrees with the observational spectra and also generates composition ratios for heavy, highly charged SW ions interacting with the cometary atmosphere. We compare our derived SW ion compositions to observational data and find a strong agreement between them. These results further demonstrate the utility of CX emissions as a remote diagnostics tool of both astrophysical plasma interaction and SW composition. In addition, we observe potential soft X-ray emissions via ACIS around 0.2 keV from both comets that are correlated in intensity to the hard X-ray emissions between 0.4-1.0 keV. We fit our CX model to these emissions, but our lack of a unique solution at low energies makes it impossible to conclude if they are cometary CX in origin. Finally, we discuss probable emission mechanism sources for the soft X-rays and explore new opportunities these findings present in understanding cometary emission processes via Chandra.

  19. Dynamic stabilization for L4-5 spondylolisthesis: comparison with minimally invasive transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion with more than 2 years of follow-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuo, Chao-Hung; Chang, Peng-Yuan; Wu, Jau-Ching; Chang, Hsuan-Kan; Fay, Li-Yu; Tu, Tsung-Hsi; Cheng, Henrich; Huang, Wen-Cheng

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE In the past decade, dynamic stabilization has been an emerging option of surgical treatment for lumbar spondylosis. However, the application of this dynamic construct for mild spondylolisthesis and its clinical outcomes remain uncertain. This study aimed to compare the outcomes of Dynesys dynamic stabilization (DDS) with minimally invasive transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (MI-TLIF) for the management of single-level spondylolisthesis at L4-5. METHODS This study retrospectively reviewed 91 consecutive patients with Meyerding Grade I spondylolisthesis at L4-5 who were managed with surgery. Patients were divided into 2 groups: DDS and MI-TLIF. The DDS group was composed of patients who underwent standard laminectomy and the DDS system. The MI-TLIF group was composed of patients who underwent MI-TLIF. Clinical outcomes were evaluated by visual analog scale for back and leg pain, Oswestry Disability Index, and Japanese Orthopaedic Association scores at each time point of evaluation. Evaluations included radiographs and CT scans for every patient for 2 years after surgery. RESULTS A total of 86 patients with L4-5 spondylolisthesis completed the follow-up of more than 2 years and were included in the analysis (follow-up rate of 94.5%). There were 64 patients in the DDS group and 22 patients in the MI-TLIF group, and the overall mean follow-up was 32.7 months. Between the 2 groups, there were no differences in demographic data (e.g., age, sex, and body mass index) or preoperative clinical evaluations (e.g., visual analog scale back and leg pain, Oswestry Disability Index, and Japanese Orthopaedic Association scores). The mean estimated blood loss of the MI-TLIF group was lower, whereas the operation time was longer compared with the DDS group (both p spondylolisthesis at L4-5. DDS might be an alternative to standard arthrodesis in mild lumbar spondylolisthesis. However, unlike fusion, dynamic implants have issues of wearing and loosening in the long term

  20. Study on the relationship between sacroiliac joint dysfunction and L4/5 lumbar disc herniation%骶髂关节紊乱与L4~5椎间盘突出的关系研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    师宁宁; 沈国权; 何水勇

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To study on the relationship between sacroiliac joint dysfunction and L4/5 lumbar disc herniation ( LDH). Methods:One hundred and twenty-nine LDH patients were divided into 2 groups,61 patients with L4/5 LDH were included into observation group,while the others with L5S1 LDH were included into control group. The risk for L4/5 LDH caused by sacroiliac joint dysfunction was assessed through case-control study. The relative factors of L4/5 LDH were determined through epidemiologic investigation, then the independent variables were screened through single factor analysis, and the risk factors for L4/5 LDH were determined through logistic regression analysis finally. Results;It was proved that sacroiliac joint dysfunction was the risk factor for L4/5 LDH according to the findings of case-control study( OR =2. 310,P =0. 030). Seventeen factors were determined to have relation with L4/5 LDH through the epidemiologic investigation. After single factor screening,7 independent variables, including age, Patrick sign,lumbago, waist tenderness, lumbar scoliosis, uneven iliac crest and abnormal lumbosacral angle,were analyzed through logistic regression analysis. The results showed that such factors were the risk factors for L4/5 LDH as lumbago ( Oft =3. 924, P = 0. 088) , lumbar scoliosis (Oft =3. 308, P =0.072) .uneven iliac crest (Oft = 21. 376, P = 0. 002) and abnormal lumbosacral angle( Oft =2. 212 ,P =0. 057 ) ,and the uneven iliac crest was the high risk factor. Conclusion;The sacroiliac joint dysfunction is the risk factor for L4/5 LDH, and the uneven iliac crest is the high risk factor.%目的:研究骶髂关节紊乱与L4~5椎间盘突出的关系.方法:将129例腰椎间盘突出症患者分为2组,L4~5椎间盘突出的61例患者纳入观察组,L5S1椎间盘突出的68例患者纳入对照组.采用病例对照研究的方法计算骶髂关节紊乱对L4~5椎间盘突出症发病的危险度.采用流行病学调查的方法确定L4~5椎间盘

  1. Monthly Weather Review

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Supplements to the Monthly Weather Review publication. The Weather Bureau published the Monthly weather review Supplement irregularly from 1914 to 1949. The...

  2. Proposing Chinese Pharmacists Month

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    @@ Dear Pharmacists: Today I would like to share with you about the American Pharmacists Month which is celebrated in October every year.This month-long observance is promoted by American Pharmacist Association.

  3. Hourly model to estimate solar global radiation for all months of the year for Botucatu, Sao Paulo State; Modelos horarios para estimativa da radiacao solar global para todos os meses do ano para Botucatu-SP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laperuta Filho, Jayme; Lunardi, Dalva M. Cury [UNESP, Botucatu, SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Ciencias Agronomicas

    1997-12-31

    The objective of this work was establish and daily models for estimate of solar global radiation for the months of the year, in Botucatu-SP 22 deg C 52`S,48 deg C 26`W Grw). The obtention of these models showed be viable high degree of reliability considering that they are specific for hours and months that originated them. The coefficients a and b presented monthly and hourly variations, taking into account that b showed higher relative variability than a. In all months studied, the linear adjustment was not appropriate before 7 a.m and after 5 p.m. (author) 7 refs., 5 tabs.

  4. Psychosocial predator-based animal model of PTSD produces physiological and behavioral sequelae and a traumatic memory four months following stress onset.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zoladz, Phillip R; Park, Collin R; Fleshner, Monika; Diamond, David M

    2015-08-01

    We have a well-established animal model of PTSD composed of predator exposure administered in conjunction with social instability that produces PTSD-like behavioral and physiological abnormalities one month after stress initiation. Here, we assessed whether the PTSD-like effects would persist for at least 4months after the initiation of the psychosocial stress regimen. Adult male Sprague-Dawley rats were exposed to either 2 or 3 predator-based fear conditioning sessions. During each session, rats were placed in a chamber for a 3-min period that terminated with a 30-s tone, followed by 1h of immobilization of the rats during cat exposure (Day 1). All rats in the stress groups received a second fear conditioning session 10days later (Day 11). Half of the stress rats received a third fear conditioning session 3weeks later (Day 32). The two cat-exposed groups were also exposed to daily unstable housing conditions for the entire duration of the psychosocial stress regimen. The control group received stable (conventional) housing conditions and an equivalent amount of chamber exposure on Days 1, 11 and 32, without cat exposure. Behavioral testing commenced for all groups on Day 116. The stress groups demonstrated increased anxiety on the elevated plus maze, impaired object recognition memory and robust contextual and cued fear conditioned memory 3months after the last conditioning session. Combined data from the two stress groups revealed lower post-stress corticosterone levels and greater diastolic blood pressure relative to the control group. These findings indicate that predator-based psychosocial stress produces persistent PTSD-like physiological and behavioral abnormalities that may provide insight into the neurobiological and endocrine sequelae in traumatized people with PTSD.

  5. Existence and Stability the Lagrangian point $L_4$ for the Earth-Sun system under a relativistic framework

    CERN Document Server

    Perdomo, Oscar M

    2016-01-01

    It is well known that, from the Newtonian point of view, the Lagrangian point $L_4$ in the circular restricted three body is stable if $\\mu< \\frac{1}{18}(9-\\sqrt{19})\\approx 0.03852$. In this paper we will provide a formula that allows us to compute the eigenvalues of the matrix that determines the stability of the equilibrium points of a family of ordinary differential equations. As an application we will show that, under the relativistic framework, the Lagrangian point $L_4$ is also stable for the Sun-Earth system. Similar arguments show the stability for $L_4$ not only for the Sun-Earth system but for systems coming from a range of values for $\\mu$ similar to those in the Newtonian restricted three body problem.

  6. Traumatic Posterior L4–L5 Fracture Dislocation of the Lumbar Spine: A Case Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zarate-Kalfopulos, Baron; Romero-Vargas, Samuel; Alcántara-Canseco, Cesar; Rosales-Olivarez, Luis Miguel; Alpizar-Aguirre, Armando; Reyes-Sánchez, Alejandro

    2012-01-01

    Study Design Case report. Objective The diagnosis and surgical management of a patient with traumatic bilateral posterior dislocation of L4–L5 is presented with a thorough review of the existing literature. Summary of Background Data Traumatic dislocation of L4–L5 has been reported in the English literature in only five cases; of these, only two were retrolisthesis. Methods A 20-year-old patient was involved in a high-energy vehicular accident and presented with back pain and inability to ambulate. Neurological assessment showed motor strength grade 2/5 in the proximal lower-extremity muscle groups (L1–L3 myotomes) and 0/5 strength distally (L4–S1 myotomes); in addition, incontinence of sphincters was found. X-rays and computed tomography (CT) scan revealed a three-column ligamentous injury with posterior fracture-dislocation of the L4 vertebral body with complete posterior displacement of L4 to L5 vertebral body. The patient underwent posterior approach with reduction, transpedicular fixation, and posterolateral fusion with autologous bone graft. Results At 1-year follow-up, the patient had recovered muscular strength in proximal lower-extremities muscle groups, sphincter function had fully recovered, and he was able to ambulate with crutches. There was no recovery of distal extremity sensorimotor function. Plain radiograph and CT scan showed good alignment and progressive maturation of his fusion procedure. Conclusion Traumatic retrolisthesis of L4–L5 is a high-energy unstable fracture; reduction of the dislocation is challenging because of the heavy forces acting in the lower lumbar spine. Instrumented fusion restores alignment and maintains segmental stability. PMID:24353974

  7. The significance of the interception in a Thornthwaite-type monthly step water balance model in context of the climate change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herceg, András; Kalicz, Péter; Kisfaludi, Balázs

    2017-04-01

    The hydrological impacts of the climate change can be dramatic. Our main purpose is the methodical improvement of a previously established Thornthwaite-type monthly step water balance model, which takes the interception item into account, and compare the results of the evapotranspiration and the soil moisture projections for the 21st century of the original and the upgraded models. Both of the models will be calibrated and validated (using remote-sensed actual evapotranspiration data, called CREMAP) and requires only temperature and precipitation time series as inputs. The projections based on 4 bias-corrected regional climate models databases (FORESEE), and the 3 investigation periods are: 2015-2045, 2045-2075, and 2070-2100. The key parameter is the water storage capacity of the soil, which can be also calibrated using the actual evapotranspiration data. The maximal rooting depth is determinable if the physical properties of the soil are available. The interception can be ranges from 5-40% of gross precipitation, which rate are differing in the various plant communities. Generally, the forests canopy intercepts considerable amounts of rainfall and evaporates back into the atmosphere during and after precipitation event. Leaf area index (LAI) is one of the most significant factor, which determine the canopies storage capacity. Here, MODIS sensor based LAI time series are applied to estimate the storage capacity. A forest covered experimental catchment is utilized for testing the models near to Sopron, Hungary. The projections will expected to demonstrate increasing actual evapotranspiration values, but decreasing trends for the 10 percentile minimum soil moisture values at the end of the 21st century in both model runs. The seasonal periodicity of evapotranspiration may demonstrates the maximums in June or July, while in case of the soil moisture it may shows minimum values in autumn. With the comparison of the two model runs, we expect lower soil water storage

  8. Benchmarking monthly homogenization algorithms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. K. C. Venema

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available The COST (European Cooperation in Science and Technology Action ES0601: Advances in homogenization methods of climate series: an integrated approach (HOME has executed a blind intercomparison and validation study for monthly homogenization algorithms. Time series of monthly temperature and precipitation were evaluated because of their importance for climate studies and because they represent two important types of statistics (additive and multiplicative. The algorithms were validated against a realistic benchmark dataset. The benchmark contains real inhomogeneous data as well as simulated data with inserted inhomogeneities. Random break-type inhomogeneities were added to the simulated datasets modeled as a Poisson process with normally distributed breakpoint sizes. To approximate real world conditions, breaks were introduced that occur simultaneously in multiple station series within a simulated network of station data. The simulated time series also contained outliers, missing data periods and local station trends. Further, a stochastic nonlinear global (network-wide trend was added.

    Participants provided 25 separate homogenized contributions as part of the blind study as well as 22 additional solutions submitted after the details of the imposed inhomogeneities were revealed. These homogenized datasets were assessed by a number of performance metrics including (i the centered root mean square error relative to the true homogeneous value at various averaging scales, (ii the error in linear trend estimates and (iii traditional contingency skill scores. The metrics were computed both using the individual station series as well as the network average regional series. The performance of the contributions depends significantly on the error metric considered. Contingency scores by themselves are not very informative. Although relative homogenization algorithms typically improve the homogeneity of temperature data, only the best ones improve

  9. Traumatic Posterior L4–L5 Fracture Dislocation of the Lumbar Spine: A Case Report

    OpenAIRE

    Zarate-Kalfopulos, Baron; Romero-Vargas, Samuel; Alcántara-Canseco, Cesar; Rosales-Olivarez, Luis Miguel; Alpizar-Aguirre, Armando; Reyes-Sánchez,Alejandro

    2012-01-01

    Study Design Case report. Objective The diagnosis and surgical management of a patient with traumatic bilateral posterior dislocation of L4–L5 is presented with a thorough review of the existing literature. Summary of Background Data Traumatic dislocation of L4–L5 has been reported in the English literature in only five cases; of these, only two were retrolisthesis. Methods A 20-year-old patient was involved in a high-energy vehicular accident and presented with back pain and inability to amb...

  10. Estimation of Genetic Parameters for First Lactation Monthly Test-day Milk Yields using Random Regression Test Day Model in Karan Fries Cattle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Ajay; Singh, Avtar; Singh, Manvendra; Prakash, Ved; Ambhore, G. S.; Sahoo, S. K.; Dash, Soumya

    2016-01-01

    A single trait linear mixed random regression test-day model was applied for the first time for analyzing the first lactation monthly test-day milk yield records in Karan Fries cattle. The test-day milk yield data was modeled using a random regression model (RRM) considering different order of Legendre polynomial for the additive genetic effect (4th order) and the permanent environmental effect (5th order). Data pertaining to 1,583 lactation records spread over a period of 30 years were recorded and analyzed in the study. The variance component, heritability and genetic correlations among test-day milk yields were estimated using RRM. RRM heritability estimates of test-day milk yield varied from 0.11 to 0.22 in different test-day records. The estimates of genetic correlations between different test-day milk yields ranged 0.01 (test-day 1 [TD-1] and TD-11) to 0.99 (TD-4 and TD-5). The magnitudes of genetic correlations between test-day milk yields decreased as the interval between test-days increased and adjacent test-day had higher correlations. Additive genetic and permanent environment variances were higher for test-day milk yields at both ends of lactation. The residual variance was observed to be lower than the permanent environment variance for all the test-day milk yields. PMID:26954137

  11. Exploiting an ensemble of regional climate models to provide robust estimates of projected changes in monthly temperature and precipitation probability distribution functions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tapiador, Francisco J.; Sanchez, Enrique; Romera, Raquel (Inst. of Environmental Sciences, Univ. of Castilla-La Mancha (UCLM), 45071 Toledo (Spain)). e-mail: francisco.tapiador@uclm.es

    2009-07-01

    Regional climate models (RCMs) are dynamical downscaling tools aimed to improve the modelling of local physical processes. Ensembles of RCMs are widely used to improve the coarse-grain estimates of global climate models (GCMs) since the use of several RCMs helps to palliate uncertainties arising from different dynamical cores and numerical schemes methods. In this paper, we analyse the differences and similarities in the climate change response for an ensemble of heterogeneous RCMs forced by one GCM (HadAM3H), and one emissions scenario (IPCC's SRES-A2 scenario). As a difference with previous approaches using PRUDENCE database, the statistical description of climate characteristics is made through the spatial and temporal aggregation of the RCMs outputs into probability distribution functions (PDF) of monthly values. This procedure is a complementary approach to conventional seasonal analyses. Our results provide new, stronger evidence on expected marked regional differences in Europe in the A2 scenario in terms of precipitation and temperature changes. While we found an overall increase in the mean temperature and extreme values, we also found mixed regional differences for precipitation

  12. Structural-equation-modelling of the tropism impact on achieving viral suppression within six months in naïve HIV patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlo Mengoli

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Aim of the study was to evaluate the relevance of baseline (BL plasma tropism of HIV on the achievement of a viral suppression within six months of antiviral therapy (ARV in naïve patients by a structural-equation-modelling. Materials and Methods: Two-hundred and twenty-seven patients were enrolled; viral tropism on plasma was determined at baseline (BL by sequencing and interpretation by genotopheno algorithm. Booster atazanavir or lopinavir , or efavirenz or nevirapine were used, in combination with either abacavir/lamivudine or tenofovir-emtricitabine. Results: X4-tropism correlate negatively with CD4 cell count at BL and follow-up (FU, and CD4 correlate negatively with BL-plasma viremia (PLV. BL-PLV correlate positively with FU-PLV. We have developed the hypothesis that the variables BL-CD4 and BL-PLV represent a mediators chain among X4-tropism and outcome of plasma viraemia at six months. This model, after structural-equation-modelling (SEM, Stata13, is shown in Figure 1. The indirect effect of X4-tropism on Fup-PLV is significant (p<0.01 but about 10 fold lower than the direct effect by BL-PLV. X4-tropism also has a direct negative effect on BL-CD4 (p<0.001 and an indirect positive effect on BL-PLV (p<0.001, irrespective of the drug regimen. Path model explaining direct and mediated effects of “tro (tropism,” “gender,” “age,” “cd0 (BL-CD4” and “lrna0 (BL-PLV” on the final outcome (“lrna1-Fup-PLV,” where “tro,” “gender,” and “age” are exogenous, cd0 and lrna0 are endogenous (mediators. Numbers on the arrows indicate direct effects. Circles indicate residuals related to endogenous/dependent variables; numbers near to circles are the corresponding variances. Conclusions: This model shows the relevance of BL-tropism on the outcome of plasma viraemia in naïve patients after six months of therapy, irrespective of drug regimen used. Figure 1. Path analysis model explaining direct and mediated

  13. Statistical downscaling of general-circulation-model- simulated average monthly air temperature to the beginning of flowering of the dandelion (Taraxacum officinale) in Slovenia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergant, Klemen; Kajfež-Bogataj, Lučka; Črepinšek, Zalika

    2002-02-01

    Phenological observations are a valuable source of information for investigating the relationship between climate variation and plant development. Potential climate change in the future will shift the occurrence of phenological phases. Information about future climate conditions is needed in order to estimate this shift. General circulation models (GCM) provide the best information about future climate change. They are able to simulate reliably the most important mean features on a large scale, but they fail on a regional scale because of their low spatial resolution. A common approach to bridging the scale gap is statistical downscaling, which was used to relate the beginning of flowering of Taraxacum officinale in Slovenia with the monthly mean near-surface air temperature for January, February and March in Central Europe. Statistical models were developed and tested with NCAR/NCEP Reanalysis predictor data and EARS predictand data for the period 1960-1999. Prior to developing statistical models, empirical orthogonal function (EOF) analysis was employed on the predictor data. Multiple linear regression was used to relate the beginning of flowering with expansion coefficients of the first three EOF for the Janauary, Febrauary and March air temperatures, and a strong correlation was found between them. Developed statistical models were employed on the results of two GCM (HadCM3 and ECHAM4/OPYC3) to estimate the potential shifts in the beginning of flowering for the periods 1990-2019 and 2020-2049 in comparison with the period 1960-1989. The HadCM3 model predicts, on average, 4 days earlier occurrence and ECHAM4/OPYC3 5 days earlier occurrence of flowering in the period 1990-2019. The analogous results for the period 2020-2049 are a 10- and 11-day earlier occurrence.

  14. Development/global validation of a 6-month-old pediatric head finite element model and application in investigation of drop-induced infant head injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhigang; Luo, Xiao; Zhang, Jinhuan

    2013-12-01

    Drop is a frequent cause for infant head injury. To date, finite element (FE) modeling was gradually used to investigate child head dynamic response under drop impact conditions, however, two shortages still exist on this topic: (1) due to ethical reasons, none of developed 6-month-old (6MO) head FE model was found to be quantitatively validated against child cadaver tests at similar age group; (2) drop height and impact surface stiffness effects on infant head responses were not comprehensively investigated. In this study, motivated by the recently published material properties of soft tissues (skull and suture, etc.) and reported pediatric head global cadaver tests, a 6MO child head FE model was developed and simulated results compared with the child cadaver experimental data under compression and drop conditions. Comparison of results indicated that the FE model showed a fairly good biofidelic behavior in most dynamic responses. The validated FE model was further used to investigate effects of different drop heights and impact surface stiffness on the head dynamic responses. Numerical results show that the pediatric head mechanical parameters (peak acceleration, HIC, maximal vonMises stress and maximal first principal strain of skull) keep increasing with the increase in drop height, and exhibit "logarithmic function" shapes at "fast-slow" trends with increase in impact surface stiffness. Based on above analysis, the regressions were conducted to describe the relationship between drop height and impact surface stiffness and head global injury predictors (head peak acceleration, HIC, etc.). This paper provides a fundamental study of child head injury mechanism and protection under drop conditions.

  15. Estimation of monthly global solar irradiation using the Hargreaves-Samani model and an artificial neural network for the state of Alagoas in northeastern Brazil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyra, Gustavo Bastos; Zanetti, Sidney Sára; Santos, Anderson Amorim Rocha; de Souza, José Leonaldo; Lyra, Guilherme Bastos; Oliveira-Júnior, José Francisco; Lemes, Marco Antônio Maringolo

    2016-08-01

    The monthly global solar irradiation ( H g) was estimated using the Hargreaves-Samani model (HS) with three different approaches for determining the k r coefficient and using an artificial neural network (ANN). The data consisted of long-term climate series measured at eight conventional meteorological stations in the state of Alagoas and its borders in northeastern Brazil. The approaches to determine the k r coefficient of the HS model included (i) the method proposed by Hargreaves (1994) (0.190 and 0.162 for coastal and interior regions, respectively), (ii) a method analogous to the previous except with altitude correction, and (iii) k r fitted with local climatic data. A new spatial interpolation method is also proposed to determine k r as a function of geographical coordinates and altitude. The fitted local values of k r (0.168-0.179 and 0.189-0.231 for interior and coastal stations, respectively) exhibited a strong dependence ( r 2 = 0.81) on latitude, longitude, and altitude. The estimates of H g obtained with the HS model using fitted local values of k r and those using the ANN were similar (determination coefficient - r 2 = 0.75 and Willmontt agreement coefficient - d = 0.93) and better than those from the HS model using an altitude-corrected k r ( r 2 = 0.68 and d = 0.90) or the values proposed by Hargreaves (1994) ( r 2 = 0.57 and d = 0.85). The estimates of H g were less accurate and precise for the coastal stations, where cloudiness and humidity are high and the thermal amplitude is small.

  16. COSMIC monthly progress report

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-01-01

    Activities of the Computer Software Management and Information Center (COSMIC) are summarized for the month of May 1994. Tables showing the current inventory of programs available from COSMIC are presented and program processing and evaluation activities are summarized. Nine articles were prepared for publication in the NASA Tech Brief Journal. These articles (included in this report) describe the following software items: (1) WFI - Windowing System for Test and Simulation; (2) HZETRN - A Free Space Radiation Transport and Shielding Program; (3) COMGEN-BEM - Composite Model Generation-Boundary Element Method; (4) IDDS - Interactive Data Display System; (5) CET93/PC - Chemical Equilibrium with Transport Properties, 1993; (6) SDVIC - Sub-pixel Digital Video Image Correlation; (7) TRASYS - Thermal Radiation Analyzer System (HP9000 Series 700/800 Version without NASADIG); (8) NASADIG - NASA Device Independent Graphics Library, Version 6.0 (VAX VMS Version); and (9) NASADIG - NASA Device Independent Graphics Library, Version 6.0 (UNIX Version). Activities in the areas of marketing, customer service, benefits identification, maintenance and support, and dissemination are also described along with a budget summary.

  17. Hispanic Heritage Month

    Science.gov (United States)

    York, Sherry

    2004-01-01

    Hispanic heritage month is from September 15 to October 15. One problem that arises when grouping people into categories such as Hispanic or Latino is stereotyping, stereotypes can be promoted or used in this Hispanic month to promote a greater understanding of Latino cultures.

  18. Progress report, 24 months

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juhl, Thomas Winther; Nielsen, Jakob Skov

    The work performed during the past 12 months (months 13 – 24) of the project has included the conclusion of Task 1 – Fundamental Studies and Task 2 – Multimirror Cutting Head Design. Work on Task 3 – Compact Cutting Head Design, and Task 4 – Interface Design has been carried out and the tests...... of the multimirror cutting head have been started....

  19. Progress report, 36 months

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juhl, Thomas Winther; Nielsen, Jakob Skov

    The work performed during the past 12 months (months 13 – 24) of the project has included the conclusion of Task 1 – Fundamental Studies and Task 2 – Multimirror Cutting Head Design. Work on Task 3 – Compact Cutting Head Design, and Task 4 – Interface Design has been carried out and the tests...... of the multimirror cutting head have been started....

  20. Progress report, 36 months

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juhl, Thomas Winther; Nielsen, Jakob Skov

    The work performed during the past 12 months (months 13 – 24) of the project has included the conclusion of Task 1 – Fundamental Studies and Task 2 – Multimirror Cutting Head Design. Work on Task 3 – Compact Cutting Head Design, and Task 4 – Interface Design has been carried out and the tests of ...

  1. Progress report, 24 months

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juhl, Thomas Winther; Nielsen, Jakob Skov

    The work performed during the past 12 months (months 13 – 24) of the project has included the conclusion of Task 1 – Fundamental Studies and Task 2 – Multimirror Cutting Head Design. Work on Task 3 – Compact Cutting Head Design, and Task 4 – Interface Design has been carried out and the tests of ...

  2. Lentiviral-mediated gene therapy results in sustained expression of β-glucuronidase for up to 12 months in the gus(mps/mps) and up to 18 months in the gus(tm(L175F)Sly) mouse models of mucopolysaccharidosis type VII.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derrick-Roberts, Ainslie L K; Pyragius, Carmen E; Kaidonis, Xenia M; Jackson, Matilda R; Anson, Donald S; Byers, Sharon

    2014-09-01

    A number of mucopolysaccharidosis type VII (MPS VII) mouse models with different levels of residual enzyme activity have been created replicating the range of clinical phenotypes observed in human MPS VII patients. In this study, a lentivirus encoding murine β-glucuronidase was administered intravenously at birth to both the severe (Gus(mps/mps) strain) and attenuated (Gus(tm(L175F)Sly) strain) mouse models of MPS VII. Circulating enzyme levels were normalized in the Gus(mps/mps) mice and were 3.5-fold higher than normal in the Gus(tm(L175F)Sly) mouse 12 and 18 months after administration. Tissue β-glucuronidase activity increased over untreated levels in all tissues evaluated in both strains at 12 months, and the elevated level was maintained in Gus(tm(L175F)Sly) tissues at 18 months. These elevated enzyme levels reduced glycosaminoglycan storage in the liver, spleen, kidney, and heart in both models. Bone mineral volume decreased toward normal in both models after 12 months of therapy and after 18 months in the Gus(tm(L175F)Sly) mouse. Open-field exploration was improved in 18-month-old treated Gus(tm(L175F)Sly) mice, while spatial learning improved in both 12- and 18-month-old treated Gus(tm(L175F)Sly) mice. Overall, neonatal administration of lentiviral gene therapy resulted in sustained enzyme expression for up to 18 months in murine models of MPS VII. Significant improvements in biochemistry and enzymology as well as functional improvement of bone and behavior deficits in the Gus(tm(L175F)Sly) model were observed. Therapy significantly increased the lifespan of Gus(mps/mps) mice, with 12 months being the longest reported lentiviral treatment for this strain. It is important to assess the long-term outcome on enzyme levels and effect on pathology for lentiviral gene therapy to be a potential therapy for MPS patients.

  3. SU-D-204-05: Fitting Four NTCP Models to Treatment Outcome Data of Salivary Glands Recorded Six Months After Radiation Therapy for Head and Neck Tumors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mavroidis, P; Price, A; Kostich, M; Green, R; Das, S; Marks, L; Chera, B [University North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC (United States); Amdur, R; Mendenhall, W [University of Florida, Gainesville, FL (United States); Sheets, N [University of North Carolina, Raleigh, NC (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To estimate the radiobiological parameters of four popular NTCP models that describe the dose-response relations of salivary glands to the severity of patient reported dry mouth 6 months post chemo-radiotherapy. To identify the glands, which best correlate with the manifestation of those clinical endpoints. Finally, to evaluate the goodness-of-fit of the NTCP models. Methods: Forty-three patients were treated on a prospective multiinstitutional phase II study for oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma. All the patients received 60 Gy IMRT and they reported symptoms using the novel patient reported outcome version of the CTCAE. We derived the individual patient dosimetric data of the parotid and submandibular glands (SMG) as separate structures as well as combinations. The Lyman-Kutcher-Burman (LKB), Relative Seriality (RS), Logit and Relative Logit (RL) NTCP models were used to fit the patients data. The fitting of the different models was assessed through the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC) and the Odds Ratio methods. Results: The AUC values were highest for the contralateral parotid for Grade ≥ 2 (0.762 for the LKB, RS, Logit and 0.753 for the RL). For the salivary glands the AUC values were: 0.725 for the LKB, RS, Logit and 0.721 for the RL. For the contralateral SMG the AUC values were: 0.721 for LKB, 0.714 for Logit and 0.712 for RS and RL. The Odds Ratio for the contralateral parotid was 5.8 (1.3–25.5) for all the four NTCP models for the radiobiological dose threshold of 21Gy. Conclusion: It was shown that all the examined NTCP models could fit the clinical data well with very similar accuracy. The contralateral parotid gland appears to correlated best with the clinical endpoints of severe/very severe dry mouth. An EQD2Gy dose of 21Gy appears to be a safe threshold to be used as a constraint in treatment planning.

  4. Six months later: Testing the Coulomb stress change model by examining calculations made immediately after the 12 May, 2008 Ms=8.0 Wenchuan earthquake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parsons, T.; Ji, C.; Kirby, E.

    2008-12-01

    On the 12th of May, 2008 a devastating Ms=8.0 earthquake struck the eastern edge of the Tibetan Plateau, collapsing buildings and killing thousands in major cities aligned along the western Sichuan basin in China. After a high-magnitude earthquake like the 12 May event, rearrangement of stresses in the crust commonly causes subsequent damaging earthquakes. The Sichuan basin and surroundings are crossed by major active strike-slip and thrust faults. By 72 hours after the earthquake, coseismic stress changes were calculated on models of those faults, with many showing significant stress increases. Rapid mapping of stress changes was intended to locate fault sections with relatively higher odds of producing the largest aftershocks and to enable prospective testing of the static-stress triggering hypothesis. A recent prospective test of the method was conducted by McCloskey et al. [2005] after the great 2004 Sumatra earthquake, and was validated by a M=8.7 shock that struck three months later in a region calculated to have been stressed by the mainshock. Our test begins at the time peer review was completed, 38 days after the mainshock on 19 June, 2008. Thus aftershocks occurring between that time and the present can be used for prospective testing. As of this writing, in our test region magnitude greater than 4.0 aftershocks have been largely confined to the mainshock rupture zone, with virtually no activity on Sichuan basin faults with calculated stress increases. Examination of magnitude-frequency behavior of the aftershocks suggests either a corner magnitude at about magnitude 6, or a deficiency in the magnitude greater than 6 range. This experiment is ongoing, and time will tell if the Coulomb model is confirmed in the Sichuan region; our conclusion at present is that there has been no validation, and that use of a generalized aftershock forecast model would have been sufficient.

  5. Determinants of complementary feeding practices among mothers of 6–24 months failure to thrive children based on behavioral analysis phase of PRECEDE model, Tehran

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shams, Nasibeh; Mostafavi, Firoozeh; Hassanzadeh, Akbar

    2016-01-01

    Background: This study intended to clarify the determining factors of complementary feeding practices among Tehran 6–24 months failure to thrive children in order to use the results for planning the interventions to reduce the possible adverse effects. Materials and Methods: In this study, 132 mothers of three medical and health centers were chosen by random sampling among those centers operating under the supervision of south of Tehran District Health Center and study data were collected from them. A valid and reliable questionnaire as a data collection instrument developed based on behavioral analysis phase of PRECEDE model. Spearman and Pearson's correlation coefficient test were used to determine the statistical relationship between factors associated with complementary feeding practices among mothers. Results: The mothers’ knowledge was as follows: 0.8%, 20.4%, and 78.8% of them were good, medium, and poor, respectively. Mean scores for the mothers’ performance in terms of supplementary feeding was 66.8. Pearson correlation indicated a positive and significant correlation between the mothers’ performance with enabling and reinforcing factors, but there wasn’t any significant relationship between the mothers’ performance and knowledge about complementary feeding. Conclusions: According to the obtained results, reinforcing factors, and enabling factors are associated with the mothers’ performance in terms of complementary feeding. Hence, attention to these issues is essential for better health interventions planning. PMID:27500177

  6. Determinants of complementary feeding practices among mothers of 6-24 months failure to thrive children based on behavioral analysis phase of PRECEDE model, Tehran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shams, Nasibeh; Mostafavi, Firoozeh; Hassanzadeh, Akbar

    2016-01-01

    This study intended to clarify the determining factors of complementary feeding practices among Tehran 6-24 months failure to thrive children in order to use the results for planning the interventions to reduce the possible adverse effects. In this study, 132 mothers of three medical and health centers were chosen by random sampling among those centers operating under the supervision of south of Tehran District Health Center and study data were collected from them. A valid and reliable questionnaire as a data collection instrument developed based on behavioral analysis phase of PRECEDE model. Spearman and Pearson's correlation coefficient test were used to determine the statistical relationship between factors associated with complementary feeding practices among mothers. The mothers' knowledge was as follows: 0.8%, 20.4%, and 78.8% of them were good, medium, and poor, respectively. Mean scores for the mothers' performance in terms of supplementary feeding was 66.8. Pearson correlation indicated a positive and significant correlation between the mothers' performance with enabling and reinforcing factors, but there wasn't any significant relationship between the mothers' performance and knowledge about complementary feeding. According to the obtained results, reinforcing factors, and enabling factors are associated with the mothers' performance in terms of complementary feeding. Hence, attention to these issues is essential for better health interventions planning.

  7. Vascular replacement using a layered elastin-collagen vascular graft in a porcine model: one week patency versus one month occlusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koens, M J W; Krasznai, A G; Hanssen, A E J; Hendriks, T; Praster, R; Daamen, W F; van der Vliet, J A; van Kuppevelt, T H

    2015-01-01

    A persistent clinical demand exists for a suitable arterial prosthesis. In this study, a vascular conduit mimicking the native 3-layered artery, and constructed from the extracellular matrix proteins type I collagen and elastin, was evaluated for its performance as a blood vessel equivalent. A tubular 3-layered graft (elastin-collagen-collagen) was prepared using highly purified type I collagen fibrils and elastin fibers, resembling the 3-layered native blood vessel architecture. The vascular graft was crosslinked and heparinised (37 ± 4 μg heparin/mg graft), and evaluated as a vascular graft using a porcine bilateral iliac artery model. An intra-animal comparison with clinically-used heparinised ePTFE (Propaten®) was made. Analyses included biochemical characterization, duplex scanning, (immuno)histochemistry and scanning electron microscopy. The tubular graft was easy to handle with adequate suturability. Implantation resulted in pulsating grafts without leakage. One week after implantation, both ePTFE and the natural acellular graft had 100% patencies on duplex scanning. Grafts were partially endothelialised (Von Willebrand-positive endothelium with a laminin-positive basal membrane layer). After one month, layered thrombi were found in the natural (4/4) and ePTFE graft (1/4), resulting in occlusion which in case of the natural graft is likely due to the porosity of the inner elastin layer. In vivo application of a molecularly-defined tubular graft, based on nature's matrix proteins, for vascular surgery is feasible.

  8. Pressure-induced low-lying phonon modes softening and enhanced thermal resistance in β -M g2A l4S i5O18

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yiran; Tian, Zhilin; Luo, Yixiu; Wang, Jiemin; Sun, Luchao; Zheng, Liya; Wang, Jingyang

    2017-02-01

    Lattice thermal conductivities of β -M g2A l4S i5O18 were predicted at various hydrostatic pressures based on some theoretical models. An abnormal decrement on lattice thermal conductivity is observed for compressed crystal structure. A rigorous analysis of structural stability, bonding characteristics, vibration modes, group velocities, and mode Grüneisen parameters helps us to recognize the origin of this anomalous behavior. We attribute the negative dependent trend to the softening of low frequency phonons and strengthening of anharmonicity at elevated pressure, both of which arise from the specific corner-linked tetrahedral framework in the crystal structure. To validate theoretical calculations, we synthesized pure and dense β -M g2A l4S i5O18 ceramic by using a two-step processing method and determined its intrinsic lattice thermal conductivity by successfully eliminating the phonon scattering from defects and high-temperature thermal radiation. The experimental intrinsic values agreed quite well with the theoretical predictions. This paper reports an anomalous pressure-induced reduction of lattice thermal conductivity and also provides a key insight into the interesting phonon modification mechanism through tailoring the crystal structure of complex compounds.

  9. TARP Monthly Housing Scorecard

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of the Treasury — Treasury and the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) jointly produce a Monthly Housing Scorecard on the health of the nation’s housing market. The...

  10. Lightship Monthly Observations

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Daily Weather Observations (Monthly Form 1001) from lightship stations in the United States. Please see the 'Surface Weather Observations (1001)' library for more...

  11. Oceanographic Monthly Summary

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic Monthly Summary contains sea surface temperature (SST) analyses on both regional and ocean basin scales for the Atlantic, Pacific, and Indian Oceans....

  12. 模拟L4,5椎间盘脱出前路植入两种椎间融合器压缩应力应变的分析%Analyzing Compression Stress-strain by Analoging Implanting Two Interbody Fusion through L4,5 Disc Prolapse Anterior

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴丹凯; 李新颖; 李鹏

    2012-01-01

    To research the straining ..stressing distribution law of each measuring point of adjacent segment through implanting two kinds of inter - vertebral fusion cage into L4.5 inter - vertebral space in strain electrical measurement method, we could comparatively analyze the influence to the stress and strain of adjacent segments after implanting two inter - body fusion into L4.5 intervertebral space. 15 specimens of 3 months old 、body weight 90 - 100kg calf lumbar vertebrae ( L2.5) were token, then randomly divided into 5 normal control group 、5 L4.5 inter - vertebral disc implantation of xenogeneic bone cylindrical interbody fusion device group and 5 L4.5 inter -vertebral disc implantation of xenogeneic bone flat square inter - vertebral fusion device group. After resistance strain gauges being pasted in different parts of adjacent segments of each specimen L4.5 gap (front and rear) , we measured all straining value of each group specimen measuring point in a compressed state. The value of stress from the group of implanting xenograft bone cylindrical inter - body fusion and the group of implanting xenograft bone flat square column inter - body fusion were greater than that of normal control group ( P <0.05 ). The straining、 stressing value from the group of implanting xenograft bone cylindrical inter - body fusion device were greater than the group of implanting xenograft bone flat square intervertebral fusion device ( P < 0. 05 ) . After implanting inter - vertebral disc inter - vertebral fusion device, under compressive stressing, the value of adjacent segment changed. The implantation of inter -vertebral fusion device has played a great limited role in variation of adjacent segment stress. After implanting inter - body fusion, the variation of adjacent segment stress is an important reason to the degeneration of adjacent segments.%以应变电测量的方法研究二种椎间融合器植入L4.5椎间隙后,相邻节段各测点的应变、应力分布规

  13. Gene therapy rescues cone structure and function in the 3-month-old rd12 mouse: a model for midcourse RPE65 leber congenital amaurosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xia; Li, Wensheng; Dai, Xufeng; Kong, Fansheng; Zheng, Qinxiang; Zhou, Xiangtian; Lü, Fan; Chang, Bo; Rohrer, Bärbel; Hauswirth, William W; Qu, Jia; Pang, Ji-jing

    2011-01-01

    RPE65 function is necessary in the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) to generate chromophore for all opsins. Its absence results in vision loss and rapid cone degeneration. Recent Leber congenital amaurosis type 2 (LCA with RPE65 mutations) phase I clinical trials demonstrated restoration of vision on RPE65 gene transfer into RPE cells overlying cones. In the rd12 mouse, a naturally occurring model of RPE65-LCA early cone degeneration was observed; however, some peripheral M-cones remained. A prior study showed that AAV-mediated RPE65 expression can prevent early cone degeneration. The present study was conducted to test whether the remaining cones in older rd12 mice can be rescued. Subretinal treatment with the scAAV5-smCBA-hRPE65 vector was initiated at postnatal day (P)14 and P90. After 2 months, electroretinograms were recorded, and cone morphology was analyzed by using cone-specific peanut agglutinin and cone opsin-specific antibodies. Cone degeneration started centrally and spread ventrally, with cells losing cone-opsin staining before that for the PNA-lectin-positive cone sheath. Gene therapy starting at P14 resulted in almost wild-type M- and S-cone function and morphology. Delaying gene-replacement rescued the remaining M-cones, and most important, more M-cone opsin-positive cells were identified than were present at the onset of gene therapy, suggesting that opsin expression could be reinitiated in cells with cone sheaths. The results support and extend those of the previous study that gene therapy can stop early cone degeneration, and, more important, they provide proof that delayed treatment can restore the function and morphology of the remaining cones. These results have important implications for the ongoing LCA2 clinical trials.

  14. Prediction of Malaysian monthly GDP

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hin, Pooi Ah; Ching, Soo Huei; Yeing, Pan Wei

    2015-12-01

    The paper attempts to use a method based on multivariate power-normal distribution to predict the Malaysian Gross Domestic Product next month. Letting r(t) be the vector consisting of the month-t values on m selected macroeconomic variables, and GDP, we model the month-(t+1) GDP to be dependent on the present and l-1 past values r(t), r(t-1),…,r(t-l+1) via a conditional distribution which is derived from a [(m+1)l+1]-dimensional power-normal distribution. The 100(α/2)% and 100(1-α/2)% points of the conditional distribution may be used to form an out-of sample prediction interval. This interval together with the mean of the conditional distribution may be used to predict the month-(t+1) GDP. The mean absolute percentage error (MAPE), estimated coverage probability and average length of the prediction interval are used as the criterions for selecting the suitable lag value l-1 and the subset from a pool of 17 macroeconomic variables. It is found that the relatively better models would be those of which 2 ≤ l ≤ 3, and involving one or two of the macroeconomic variables given by Market Indicative Yield, Oil Prices, Exchange Rate and Import Trade.

  15. B_l4 decays and the extraction of |V_ub|

    CERN Document Server

    Kang, Xian-Wei; Hanhart, Christoph; Meißner, Ulf-G

    2013-01-01

    The Cabibbo-Kobayashi-Maskawa matrix element |V_ub| is not well-determined yet. It can be extracted from both inclusive or exclusive decays, like B --> pi (rho) l nu-bar_l. However, both of them so far suffer from a large model dependence. In this article, we propose to extract |V_ub| from the four-body semileptonic decay B --> pi pi l nu-bar_l, where the form factors for the pion-pion system are treated in dispersion theory. This is a model-independent approach that takes into account the pi-pi rescattering effects, as well as the effect of the rho meson. We demonstrate that both finite-width effects of the rho meson as well as scalar pi-pi contributions can be considered completely in this way.

  16. Development of a sequence characteristic amplified region marker linked to the L4 locus conferring broad spectrum resistance to tobamoviruses in pepper plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyun Jung; Han, Jung-Heon; Yoo, Jae Hyoung; Cho, Hwa Jin; Kim, Byung-Dong

    2008-04-30

    To develop molecular markers linked to the L4 locus conferring resistance to tobamovirus pathotypes in pepper plants, we performed AFLP with 512 primer combinations for susceptible (S pool) and resistant (R pool) DNA bulks against pathotype 1.2 of pepper mild mottle virus. Each bulk was made by pooling the DNA of five homozygous individuals from a T10 population, which was a near-isogenic BC4F2 generation for the L4 locus. A total of 19 primer pairs produced scorable bands in the R pool. Further screening with these primer pairs was done on DNA bulks from T102, a BC10F2 derived from T10 by back crossing. Three AFLP markers were finally selected and designated L4-a, L4-b and L4-c. L4-a and L4-c each underwent one recombination event, whereas no recombination for L4-b was seen in 20 individuals of each DNA bulk. Linkage analysis of these markers in 112 F2 T102 individuals showed that they were each within 2.5 cM of the L4 locus. L4-b was successfully converted into a simple 340-bp SCAR marker, designated L4SC340, which mapped 1.8 cM from the L4 locus in T102 and 0.9 cM in another BC10F2 population, T101. We believe that this newly characterized marker will improve selection of tobamovirus resistance in pepper plants by reducing breeding cost and time.

  17. Lagrange L4/L5 points and the origin of our Moon and Saturn's moons and rings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gott, J Richard

    2005-12-01

    The current standard theory of the origin of the Moon is that the Earth was hit by a giant impactor the size of Mars causing ejection of debris from its mantle that coalesced to form the moon; but where did this Mars-sized impactor come from? Isotopic evidence suggests that it came from 1 AU radius in the solar nebula, and computer simulations are consistent with its approaching Earth on a zero-energy parabolic trajectory. How could such a large object form at 1 AU in a quiescent disk of planetesimals without having already collided with the Earth at an earlier epoch before having the chance to grow large? Belbruno and Gott propose that the giant impactor could have formed in a stable orbit from debris at the Earth's Lagrange point L(5) (or L(4)). It would grow quietly by accretion at L(5) (or L(4)), but eventually gravitational perturbations by other growing planetesimals would kick it out into a horseshoe orbit and finally into a chaotic creeping orbit, which Belbruno and Gott show would, with high probability, hit the Earth on a near zero-energy parabolic trajectory. We can see other examples of this phenomenon occurring in the solar system. Asteroid 2002AA29 is in a horseshoe orbit relative to the Earth that looks exactly like the horseshoe orbits that Belbruno and Gott found for objects that had been perturbed from L(4)/L(5). The regular moons of Saturn are made of ice and have the same albedo as the ring particles (ice chunks, plus some dust). We (J. R. Gott, R. Vanderbei, and E. Belbruno) propose that the regular icy moons of Saturn (out to the orbit of Titan), which are all in nearly circular orbits, formed out of a thin disk of planetesimals (ice chunks) rather like the rings of Saturn today only larger in extent. In such a situation formation of objects at L(4)/L(5) might be expected. Indeed, Saturn's moon Dione is accompanied by moons (Helene and Polydeuces) at both L(4) and L(5) Lagrange points, and Saturn's moon Tethys is also accompanied by moons

  18. The irre cell recognition module (IRM) protein Kirre is required to form the reciprocal synaptic network of L4 neurons in the Drosophila lamina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lüthy, Kevin; Ahrens, Birgit; Rawal, Shilpa; Lu, Zhiyuan; Tarnogorska, Dorota; Meinertzhagen, Ian A; Fischbach, Karl-Friedrich

    2014-01-01

    Each neuropil module, or cartridge, in the fly's lamina has a fixed complement of cells. Of five types of monopolar cell interneurons, only L4 has collaterals that invade neighboring cartridges. In the proximal lamina, these collaterals form reciprocal synapses with both the L2 of their own cartridge and the L4 collateral branches from two other neighboring cartridges. During synaptogenesis, L4 collaterals strongly express the cell adhesion protein Kirre, a member of the irre cell recognition module (IRM) group of proteins ( Fischbach et al., 2009 , J Neurogenet, 23, 48-67). The authors show by mutant analysis and gene knockdown techniques that L4 neurons develop their lamina collaterals in the absence of this cell adhesion protein. Using electron microscopy (EM), the authors demonstrate, however, that without Kirre protein these L4 collaterals selectively form fewer synapses. The collaterals of L4 neurons of various genotypes reconstructed from serial-section EM revealed that the number of postsynaptic sites was dramatically reduced in the absence of Kirre, almost eliminating any synaptic input to L4 neurons. A significant reduction of presynaptic sites was also detected in kirre(0) mutants and gene knockdown flies using RNA interference. L4 neuron reciprocal synapses are thus almost eliminated. A presynaptic marker, Brp-short(GFP) confirmed these data using confocal microscopy. This study reveals that removing Kirre protein specifically disrupts the functional L4 synaptic network in the Drosophila lamina.

  19. Monthly energy review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-12-01

    This document presents an overview of the Energy Information Administration`s (EIA) recent monthly energy statistics. The statistics cover the major activities of U.S. production, consumption, trade, stocks, and prices for petroleum, natural gas, coal, electricity, and nuclear energy. Also included are international energy and thermal and metric conversion factors.

  20. Photos of the month

    CERN Multimedia

    Claudia Marcelloni de Oliveira

    Congratulations to Adele Rimoldi, ATLAS physicist from Pavia, who ran her first marathon in New York last month. Adele completed the 42.2 km in a time of 4:49:19. She sure makes it look easy!!! The ATLAS pixel service quarter panel in SR1

  1. Monthly Energy Review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-05-28

    This publication presents an overview of the Energy information Administration`s recent monthly energy statistics. The statistics cover the major activities of US production, consumption, trade, stocks, and prices for petroleum, natural gas, coal, electricity, and nuclear energy. Also included are international energy and thermal and metric conversion factors. Two brief ``energy plugs`` (reviews of EIA publications) are included, as well.

  2. Overview of SMOS L4 products under development and implementation at CATDS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bitar, Ahmad Al; Kerr, Yann; Merlin, Olivier; Tomer, Sat; Molero, Beatriz; Chone, Audrey; Cabot, François; Wigneron, Jean-Pierre; Cherchali, Selma

    2014-05-01

    Higher end level 4 products for EOS (Earth observation satellites) are products obtained from the combination of sensors data with other sensors or models. Those products are obtained from the extension of remote sensing application studies to wider conditions and regions. This study concerns the SMOS (Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity) level 4 products. Several level 4 products using the SMOS data are under development in the framework of the CATDS (Centre Aval de Traitement des Données SMOS), the French national effort into the development of level 3 (time synthesis) and level 4 (higher-end products). Those products can be divided into two groups: Enhanced resolution products: Higher resolution products obtained from the combination of optical, thermal and microwave remote sensing products, Synergetic higher resolution products obtained from the combination of radar and microwave soil moisture products over India. Extreme event products: Global drought index obtained from the insertion of SMOS soil moisture L3 products and climate data from NCEP and ECMWF into a double bucket model, Flood prediction and monitoring at large scale based on the use of forecast precipitation data and SMOS soil moisture data before and during the flood events. A selection of those products like enhance drought index, Dispatch products, enhanced rainfall products are being implemented in an operational context . In this study the different algorithms behind each product are presented and detailed. Synthetic validation results and demonstration studies are shown, and quantitative comparison to other products are shown. Keywords: SMOS, SMAP, microwave, level 4, soil moisture, flooding, drought, Dispatch, disaggregation

  3. Your Child's Development: 9 Months

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... For Parents MORE ON THIS TOPIC Your Baby's Growth: 9 Months Your Baby's Hearing, Vision, and Other Senses: 9 Months Your Child's Checkup: 9 Months Medical Care and Your 8- to 12-Month-Old Feeding Your 8- to 12-Month-Old Sleep and Your 8- to 12-Month-Old Contact ...

  4. Modeling the Spatial and Temporal Variation of Monthly and Seasonal Precipitation on the Nevada Test Site and Vicinity, 1960-2006

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blainey, Joan B.; Webb, Robert H.; Magirl, Christopher S.

    2007-01-01

    The Nevada Test Site (NTS), located in the climatic transition zone between the Mojave and Great Basin Deserts, has a network of precipitation gages that is unusually dense for this region. This network measures monthly and seasonal variation in a landscape with diverse topography. Precipitation data from 125 climate stations on or near the NTS were used to spatially interpolate precipitation for each month during the period of 1960 through 2006 at high spatial resolution (30 m). The data were collected at climate stations using manual and/or automated techniques. The spatial interpolation method, applied to monthly accumulations of precipitation, is based on a distance-weighted multivariate regression between the amount of precipitation and the station location and elevation. This report summarizes the temporal and spatial characteristics of the available precipitation records for the period 1960 to 2006, examines the temporal and spatial variability of precipitation during the period of record, and discusses some extremes in seasonal precipitation on the NTS.

  5. L4 Milestone Report for MixEOS 2016 experiments and simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loomis, Eric Nicholas [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Bradley, Paul Andrew [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Merritt, Elizabeth Catherine [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Guzik, Joyce Ann [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Denne, Patrick Hagen [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-08-01

    Accurate simulations of fluid and plasma flows require accurate thermodynamic properties of the fluids or plasmas. This thermodynamic information is represented by the equations of state of the materials. For pure materials, the equations of state may be represented by analytical models for idealized circumstances, or by tabular means, such as the Sesame tables. However, when a computational cell has a mixture of two or more fluids, the equations of state are not well understood, particularly under the circumstances of high energy densities. This is a particularly difficult issue for Eulerian codes, wherein mixed cells arise simply due to the advection process. LANL Eulerian codes typically assume an “Amagat’s Law” (or Law of Partial Volumes) for the mixture in which the pressures and temperatures of fluids are at an equilibrium that is consistent with the fluids being segregated within the cell. However, for purposes of computing other EOS properties, e.g., bulk modulus, or sound speed, the fluids are considered to be fully “mixed”. LANL has also been investigating implementing instead “Dalton’s Law” in which the total pressure is considered to be the sum of the partial pressures within the cell. For ideal gases, these two laws give the same result. Other possibilities are nonpressure- temperature-equilibrated approaches in which the two fluids are not assumed to “mix” at all, and the EOS properties of the cell are computed from, say, volume-weighted averages of the individual fluid properties. The assumption of the EOS properties within a mixed cell can have a pronounced effect on the behavior of the cell, resulting in, for example, different shock speeds, pressures, temperatures and densities within the cell. There is no apparent consensus as to which approach is best under HED conditions, though we note that under typical atmospheric and near atmospheric conditions the differences may be slight.

  6. Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) Mission Level 4 Surface and Root Zone Soil Moisture (L4_SM) Product Specification Document

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reichle, Rolf H.; Ardizzone, Joseph V.; Kim, Gi-Kong; Lucchesi, Robert A.; Smith, Edmond B.; Weiss, Barry H.

    2015-01-01

    This is the Product Specification Document (PSD) for Level 4 Surface and Root Zone Soil Moisture (L4_SM) data for the Science Data System (SDS) of the Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) project. The L4_SM data product provides estimates of land surface conditions based on the assimilation of SMAP observations into a customized version of the NASA Goddard Earth Observing System, Version 5 (GEOS-5) land data assimilation system (LDAS). This document applies to any standard L4_SM data product generated by the SMAP Project. The Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) mission will enhance the accuracy and the resolution of space-based measurements of terrestrial soil moisture and freeze-thaw state. SMAP data products will have a noteworthy impact on multiple relevant and current Earth Science endeavors. These include: Understanding of the processes that link the terrestrial water, the energy and the carbon cycles, Estimations of global water and energy fluxes over the land surfaces, Quantification of the net carbon flux in boreal landscapes Forecast skill of both weather and climate, Predictions and monitoring of natural disasters including floods, landslides and droughts, and Predictions of agricultural productivity. To provide these data, the SMAP mission will deploy a satellite observatory in a near polar, sun synchronous orbit. The observatory will house an L-band radiometer that operates at 1.40 GHz and an L-band radar that operates at 1.26 GHz. The instruments will share a rotating reflector antenna with a 6 meter aperture that scans over a 1000 km swath.

  7. Petroleum marketing monthly

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-07-01

    Petroleum Marketing Monthly (PPM) provides information and statistical data on a variety of crude oils and refined petroleum products. The publication presents statistics on crude oil costs and refined petroleum products sales for use by industry, government, private sector analysts, educational institutions, and consumers. Data on crude oil include the domestic first purchase price, the f.o. b. and landed cost of imported crude oil, and the refiners` acquisition cost of crude oil. Refined petroleum product sales data include motor gasoline, distillates, residuals, aviation fuels, kerosene, and propane. The Petroleum Marketing Division, Office of Oil and Gas, Energy Information Administration ensures the accuracy, quality, and confidentiality of the published data in the Petroleum Marketing Monthly.

  8. Petroleum marketing monthly

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-02-01

    The Petroleum Marketing Monthly (PMM) provides information and statistical data on a variety of crude oils and refined petroleum products. The publication presents statistics on crude oil costs and refined petroleum products sales for use by industry, government, private sector analysts, educational institutions, and consumers. Data on crude oil include the domestic first purchase price, the f.o.b. and landed cost of imported crude oil, and the refiners acquisition cost of crude oil. Refined petroleum product sales data include motor gasoline, distillates, residuals, aviation fuels, kerosene, and propane. The Petroleum Marketing Division, Office of Oil and Gas, Energy Information Administration ensures the accuracy, quality, and confidentiality of the published data in the Petroleum Marketing Monthly.

  9. Electric power monthly

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-08-01

    The Energy Information Administration (EIA) prepares the Electric Power Monthly (EPM) for a wide audience including Congress, Federal and State agencies, the electric utility industry, and the general public. This publication provides monthly statistics for net generation, fossil fuel consumption and stocks, quantity and quality of fossil fuels, cost of fossil fuels, electricity sales, revenue, and average revenue per kilowatthour of electricity sold. Data on net generation, fuel consumption, fuel stocks, quantity and cost of fossil fuels are also displayed for the North American Electric Reliability Council (NERC) regions. The EIA publishes statistics in the EPM on net generation by energy source, consumption, stocks, quantity, quality, and cost of fossil fuels; and capability of new generating units by company and plant. The purpose of this publication is to provide energy decisionmakers with accurate and timely information that may be used in forming various perspectives on electric issues that lie ahead.

  10. Electric power monthly

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, Sandra R.; Johnson, Melvin; McClevey, Kenneth; Calopedis, Stephen; Bolden, Deborah

    1992-05-01

    The Electric Power Monthly is prepared by the Survey Management Division; Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternate Fuels, Energy Information Administration (EIA), Department of Energy. This publication provides monthly statistics at the national, Census division, and State levels for net generation, fuel consumption, fuel stocks, quantity and quality of fuel, cost of fuel, electricity sales, revenue, and average revenue per kilowatthour of electricity sold. Data on net generation, fuel consumption, fuel stocks, quantity and cost of fuel are also displayed for the North American Electric Reliability Council (NERC) regions. Additionally, statistics by company and plant are published in the EPM on capability of new plants, new generation, fuel consumption, fuel stocks, quantity and quality of fuel, and cost of fuel.

  11. Chandra Observations of Comets C/2012 S1 (ISON) and C/2011 L4 (PanSTARRS)

    OpenAIRE

    Snios, Bradford; Kharchenko, Vasili; Lisse, Carey M.; Wolk, Scott J.; Dennerl, Konrad; Combi, Michael R.

    2016-01-01

    We present our results on the Chandra X-ray Observatory Advanced CCD Imaging Spectrometer (ACIS) observations of the bright Oort Cloud comets C/2012 S1 (ISON) and C/2011 L4 (PanSTARRS). ISON was observed between 2013 October 31-November 06 during variable speed solar wind (SW), and PanSTARRS was observed between 2013 April 17-23 during fast SW. ISON produced an extended parabolic X-ray morphology consistent with a collisionally thick coma, while PanSTARRS demonstrated only a diffuse X-ray-emi...

  12. Parallax of the L4.5 dwarf 2M1821$+$14 from high-precision astrometry with OSIRIS at GTC

    CERN Document Server

    Sahlmann, J; Bouy, H; Martín, E L; Queloz, D; Ségransan, D; Osorio, M R Zapatero

    2015-01-01

    We used the OSIRIS camera at the 10.4 m Gran Telescopio Canarias (GTC) to monitor the astrometric motion of the L4.5 dwarf 2M1821$+$14 over 17 months. The astrometric residuals of eleven epochs have a r.m.s. dispersion of 0.4 mas, which is larger than the average precision of 0.23 mas per epoch and hints towards an additional signal or excess noise. Comparison of the point-spread-functions in OSIRIS and FORS2/VLT images reveals no differences critical for high-precision astrometry, despite the GTC's segmented primary mirror. We attribute the excess noise to an unknown effect that may be uncovered with additional data. For 2M1821$+$14, we measured a relative parallax of $106.15 \\pm 0.18$ mas and determined a correction of $0.50\\pm0.05$ mas to absolute parallax, leading to a distance of $9.38 \\pm0.03$ pc. We excluded at 3-$\\sigma$ confidence the presence of a companion to 2M1821$+$14 down to a mass ratio of 0.1 ($\\approx 5\\, M_\\mathrm{Jupiter}$) with a period of 50--1000 days and a separation of 0.1--0.7 au. Th...

  13. A TGF-B homologue identified from Ascaris suum 4th stage larvae (L4): Evidence for development-related transcription and incomplete gene splicing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ascaris species represent the most prevalent parasitic worm infecting humans and swine worldwide. During the infection process, A. suum L4 establish in the jejunum and develop into adults. However, a large percentage of L4 spontaneously cure to the ileum at 14 to 21 days after inoculation (dpi), and...

  14. Anhedonic-like traits and lack of affective deficits in 18-month-old C57BL/6 mice: Implications for modeling elderly depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malatynska, Ewa; Steinbusch, Harry W M; Redkozubova, Olga; Bolkunov, Alexei; Kubatiev, Aslan; Yeritsyan, Naira B; Vignisse, Julie; Bachurin, Sergei; Strekalova, Tatyana

    2012-08-01

    The prevalence of depression increases with aging. We hypothesized that like humans, old animals exhibit anhedonic-like behavior, along with signs of behavioral despair. In rodents, anhedonia, a reduced sensitivity to reward, which is listed as a core feature of major depression in the DSM-IVR, can be measured by a decrease in intake of and preference for sweet solutions. Here, sucrose intake, forced swimming, immobility in the modified tail suspension test, novelty exploration, grooming, anxiety and locomotor activity were compared in naïve 3- and 18-month-old male C57BL/6 mice. The absolute amounts and the ratio of consumed 1% sucrose solution to water intake was significantly smaller in 18-month-old mice than in 3-month-old mice. The consumption of 5%-sucrose solution requiring high levels of drinking effort, novelty exploration in two setups and grooming behavior in the splash test were reduced in older animals. Analysis of other behaviors suggested that the above-mentioned signs of anhedonic-like traits were unlikely to be attributable to the potential effect of aging on metabolic needs for water, taste perception, motor capabilities or the induction of essential anxiety and neophobia. A 4-week treatment with the antidepressant imipramine (7mg/kg/day) or dimebon, a compound with suggested neuroprotective proneurogenic properties (1mg/kg/day) restored sucrose intake and preference in 18-month-old mice. Meanwhile, young and old mice showed no differences in the parameters of behavioral despair evaluated in the forced swim and modified tail suspension tests. Thus, the behavioral profile of aged mice parallels that of humans with elderly depression, in whom the symptoms of hedonic deficits typically outweigh affective disturbances. The assessment of anhedonic-like traits with the sucrose preference test in 18-month-old mice will be useful in preclinical studies of elderly depression.

  15. Chinese Auto's Production & Sales Dropped on a Month-on-month Basis in October%Chinese Auto's Production & Sales Dropped on a Month-on-month Basis in October

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ming Xuan

    2011-01-01

    In October, the production and sales of Chinese auto de- creased a little compared with that of last month, with most auto models worse than that of last month; the production and sale were over 15 million units from January to October, which dropped a little of the month-on-month growth compared with that of 9 months before. Details are as follows:

  16. Biallelic expression of Tssc4, Nap1l4, Phlda2 and Osbpl5 in adult cattle

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Mengnan Wang; Dongjie Li; Mingyue Zhang; Wenzhi Yang; Guojiang Wu; Yali Cui; Shijie Li

    2015-09-01

    Genomic imprinting of the Cdkn1c/Kcnq1ot1 region shows lack of conservation between human and mouse. This region has been reported to be associated with Beckwith–Wiedemann syndrome (BWS) and cancer. To increase our understanding of imprinted genes in bovine Cdkn1c/Kcnq1ot1 imprinting cluster, we assessed the imprinting status of four cattle genes (Tssc4, Nap1l4, Phlda2 and Osbpl5) in seven types of tissues: heart, liver, spleen, lung, kidney, skeletal muscle and subcutaneous fat using polymorphism-based sequencing approach. It was found that all the four genes showed biallelic expression in tissues in which transcripts were detected. Nap1l4 and Tssc4 were detected in all examined tissues, while the expression of Phlda2 and Osbpl5 was tissue-specific. Phlda2 was not detected in heart and subcutaneous fat, and Osbpl5 was not detected in spleen and skeletal muscle. In addition, identification of species-specific imprinted genes is necessary to understand the evolution of genomic imprinting and to elucidate mechanisms leading to allele-specific expression.

  17. Comet C/2011 L4 (PanStarrs): Small nucleus, fast rotator and dust rich comet observed after perihelion

    CERN Document Server

    Scarmato, Toni

    2016-01-01

    Orbital elements of C2011 L4 (PanStarrs) Oort cloud comet, computed by MPC (Minor Planet Center, Minor Planet Electronic Circular 2012-T08), show that the closest approach to the Sun occurred on 2013 March 10th, at about 0.3 A.U., then about 4,51x10^7 km. Discovered by Richard Wainscoat (Institute for Astronomy, University of Hawaii) on four CCD images taken with the 1.8-m "Pan-STARRS 1" telescope at Haleakala taken on 2011 June 6th. My first observation of the comet was on 2013 March 10th whit the comet visible in the twilight. I did the following visual estimation; Mar. 10.73,-1.0*,5'(T. Scarmato, Calabria, Italy, 7x50 binoculars; altitude 7 deg, tail 1 deg in pa 140 deg), reported to the ICQ (International Comet Quarterly). Easy comet in 7x50 binoculars I started to see C/2011 L4 at 18:35 L.T. when the comet was at about 7{\\deg} above the horizon. I saw a tail long about 1,5{\\deg} in pa 140{\\deg} with a coma well condensed and large about 5'. I followed the comet until to the set at 18:55 L.T., still clear...

  18. Petroleum marketing monthly

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-11-01

    The Petroleum Marketing Monthly (PMM) provides information and statistical data on a variety of crude oils and refined petroleum products. The publication presents statistics on crude oil costs and refined petroleum products sales for use by industry, government, private sector analysts, educational institutions, and consumers. Data on crude oil include the domestic first purchase price, the f.o.b. and landed cost of imported crude oil, and the refiners` acquisition cost of crude oil. Refined petroleum product sales data include motor gasoline, distillates, residuals, aviation fuels, kerosene, and propane. The Petroleum Marketing Division, Office of Oil and Gas, Energy Information Administration ensures the accuracy, quality, and confidentiality of the published data.

  19. Patterns of Daily Duration and Frequency of Breastfeeding among Exclusively Breastfed Infants in Shiraz, Iran, A 6-Month Follow-up Study Using Bayesian Generalized Linear Mixed Models

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: Despite numerous studies on the benefits of exclusive breastfeeding during the first half year of life, little information is available on actual breastfeeding practices in terms of daily duration and frequency of suckling. This study proposes to determine daily breastfeeding patterns among exclusively breastfed infants from birth to six months. Subject and Methods: An observational prospective follow-up study of daily feeding practices among exclusively breastfed infants was co...

  20. Mapping monthly rainfall erosivity in Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ballabio, C; Meusburger, K; Klik, A

    2017-01-01

    Rainfall erosivity as a dynamic factor of soil loss by water erosion is modelled intra-annually for the first time at European scale. The development of Rainfall Erosivity Database at European Scale (REDES) and its 2015 update with the extension to monthly component allowed to develop monthly and...

  1. Commissioners' Monthly Case Activity Report

    Data.gov (United States)

    Occupational Safety and Health Review Commission — Total cases pending at the beginning of the month, total cases added to the docket during the month, total cases disposed of during the month, and total cases...

  2. Lumbar disc degeneration below a long arthrodesis (performed for scoliosis in adults) to L4 or L5.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harding, Ian J; Charosky, Sebastian; Vialle, Raphael; Chopin, Daniel H

    2008-02-01

    A retrospective analysis of adults treated with long instrumented fusion for scoliosis from the thoracic spine proximally to L4 or L5. To evaluate the long-term clinical outcomes as well as radiological changes in distal unfused mobile segments and to evaluate factors that may predispose to distal disc degeneration and/or poor outcome. A total of 151 mobile segments in 85 patients (65 female), mean age 43.2 (range 21-68), were studied. Curve type, number of fused levels and pelvic incidence were recorded. Clinical outcome was measured using the Whitecloud function scale and disc degeneration using the UCLA disc degeneration score. Spinal balance, local segmental angulations and lumbar lordosis were measured pre- and post-operatively as well as at the most recent follow up--mean 9.3 years (range 7-19). A total of 62% of patients had a good or excellent outcome. Eleven had a poor outcome of which ten underwent extension of fusion--five for pain alone, three for pain with stenosis and two for pseudarthroses. Pre-operative disc degeneration was often asymmetric and was slightly greater in older patients. Overall, there was a significant deterioration in disc degeneration (P < 0.0001) that did not correlate with clinical outcome. Disc degeneration correlated with the recent sagittal balance (Anova F = 14.285, P < 0.001) and the most recent lordosis (Anova F = 4.057, P = 0.048). The post-operative sagittal balance and local L5-S1 sagittal angulation correlated to L4 and L5 degeneration, respectively. There was no correlation between degeneration and age, pre-operative degenerative score, pelvic incidence, sacral slope, number of fused levels or distal level of fusion. Disc degeneration does occur below an arthrodesis for scoliosis in adults which does not correlate with clinical outcome. The correlation of loss of sagittal balance with disc degeneration may be as a result of degeneration causing the loss of balance or vice versa, i.e. sagittal imbalance causing

  3. Enhancement by LDL of transfer of L-4F and oxidized lipids to HDL in C57BL/6J mice and human plasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meriwether, David; Imaizumi, Satoshi; Grijalva, Victor; Hough, Greg; Vakili, Ladan; Anantharamaiah, G M; Farias-Eisner, Robin; Navab, Mohamad; Fogelman, Alan M; Reddy, Srinivasa T; Shechter, Ishaiahu

    2011-10-01

    The apoA-I mimetic peptide L-4F [(Ac-D-W-F-K-A-F-Y-D-K-V-A-E-K-F-K-E-A-F-NH2) synthesized from all L-amino acids] has shown potential for the treatment of a variety of diseases. Here, we demonstrate that LDL promotes association between L-4F and HDL. A 2- to 3-fold greater association of L-4F with human HDL was observed in the presence of human LDL as compared with HDL by itself. This association further increased when LDL was supplemented with the oxidized lipid 15S-hydroxy-5Z, 8Z, 11Z, 13E-eicosatetraenoic acid (15HETE). Additionally, L-4F significantly (P = 0.02) promoted the transfer of 15HETE from LDL to HDL. The transfer of L-4F from LDL to HDL was demonstrated both in vitro and in C57BL/6J mice. L-4F, injected into C57BL/6J mice, associated rapidly with HDL and was then cleared quickly from the circulation. Similarly, L-4F loaded onto human HDL and injected into C57BL/6J mice was cleared quickly with T(1/2) = 23.6 min. This was accompanied by a decline in human apoA-I with little or no effect on the mouse apoA-I. Based on these results, we propose that i) LDL promotes the association of L-4F with HDL and ii) in the presence of L-4F, oxidized lipids in LDL are rapidly transferred to HDL allowing these oxidized lipids to be acted upon by HDL-associated enzymes and/or cleared from the circulation.

  4. Anticancer Potencies of Pt(II) - and Pd(II)-linked M2L4 Coordination Capsules with Improved Selectivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmedova, Anife; Momekova, Denitsa; Yamashina, Masahiro; Shestakova, Pavletta; Momekov, Georgi; Akita, Munetaka; Yoshizawa, Michito

    2016-02-18

    Pt(II) - and Pd(II)-linked M2 L4 coordination capsules, providing a confined cavity encircled by polyaromatic frameworks, exhibit anticancer activities superior to cisplatin against two types of leukemic cells (HL-60 and SKW-3) and pronounced toxicity against cisplatin-resistant cells (HL-60/CDDP). Notably, the cytotoxic selectivities of the Pt(II) and Pd(II) capsules toward cancerous cells are up to 5.3-fold higher than that of cisplatin, as estimated through the non-malignant/malignant-cells toxicity ratio employing normal kidney cells (HEK-293). In addition, the anticancer activity of the coordination capsules can be easily altered upon encapsulation of organic guest molecules.

  5. Association Between Lumbar Spine Sagittal Alignment and L4-L5 Disc Degeneration Among Asymptomatic Young Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menezes-Reis, Rafael; Bonugli, Gustavo Perazzoli; Dalto, Vitor Faeda; da Silva Herrero, Carlos Fernando Pereira; Defino, Helton Luiz Aparecido; Nogueira-Barbosa, Marcello Henrique

    2016-09-15

    Cross-sectional observational study on the relationship between the degrees of disc degeneration and sagittal alignment in asymptomatic healthy individuals. This study sought to determine whether the sagittal spine alignment subtype is related to the prevalence of lumbar disc degeneration. Sagittal balance and spinopelvic parameters might be risk factors for disc degeneration. A total of 70 asymptomatic participants (36 women and 34 men) without regular physical activity were categorized according to the four subtypes of sagittal alignment proposed by Roussouly. All participants underwent magnetic resonance imaging of the lumbar spine (1.5T) and panoramic radiography of the spine. The degree of disc degeneration was graded using T2-weighted images according to the Pfirrmann classification. Spinopelvic parameters and vertebral curvatures were measured on digital panoramic radiographs using Surgimap software. Interobserver analyses for the Pfirrmann classification and spinopelvic parameters were assessed using the weighted Kappa and intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC), respectively. The Kappa associated with disc degeneration classification was 0.79 (95% confidence intervals 0.72-0.87). The ICCs were excellent, with small confidence intervals for all spinopelvic parameters. The type II group (flat lordosis) showed a higher frequency of degenerated discs at L4-L5 (P = 0.03) than the type IV group (long and curved lumbar spine). No significant differences in disc degeneration were observed among the four subtypes at the other disc levels. We found a negative, moderate correlation between the spinopelvic parameters and the occurrence of disc degeneration in the type II group. The Roussouly subtype II sagittal alignment is significantly associated with disc degeneration at L4-L5 in asymptomatic young adults. Our results support the hypothesis that spinal sagittal alignment plays a role in early disc degeneration. 3.

  6. Applied technology section. Monthly report, December 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buckner, M.R.

    1994-01-28

    This monthly report contains abstracts of the progress made in various projects from the applied technology section at the Savannah River Plant. Research areas include engineering modeling and simulation, applied physics, experimental thermal hydraulics, and packaging and transportation.

  7. Modification of polyethylene glycol onto solid lipid nanoparticles encapsulating a novel chemotherapeutic agent (PK-L4 to enhance solubility for injection delivery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fang YP

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Yi-Ping Fang,1 Pao-Chu Wu,2 Yaw-Bin Huang,3 Cherng-Chyi Tzeng,4 Yeh-Long Chen,4 Yu-Han Hung,2 Ming-Jun Tsai,5,6 Yi-Hung Tsai31Department of Biotechnology, Yuanpei University, Hsinchu, Taiwan; 2School of Pharmacy, College of Pharmacy, Kaohsiung Medical University, Kaohsiung, Taiwan; 3Graduate Institute of Clinical Pharmacy, College of Pharmacy, Kaohsiung Medical University, Kaohsiung, Taiwan; 4School of Medicinal and Applied Chemistry, College of Life Science, Kaohsiung Medical University, Kaohsiung, Taiwan; 5Department of Neurology, China Medical University Hospital, Taichung, Taiwan; 6School of Medicine, Medical College, China Medical University, Taichung, TaiwanBackground: The synthetic potential chemotherapeutic agent 3-Chloro-4-[(4-methoxyphenylamino]furo[2,3-b]quinoline (PK-L4 is an analog of amsacrine. The half-life of PK-L4 is longer than that of amsacrine; however, PK-L4 is difficult to dissolve in aqueous media, which is problematic for administration by intravenous injection.Aims: To utilize solid lipid nanoparticles (SLNs modified with polyethylene glycol (PEG to improve the delivery of PK-L4 and investigate its biodistribution behavior after intravenous administration.Results: The particle size of the PK-L4-loaded SLNs was 47.3 nm and the size of the PEGylated form was smaller, at 28 nm. The entrapment efficiency (EE% of PK-L4 in SLNs with and without PEG showed a high capacity of approximately 100% encapsulation. Results also showed that the amount of PK-L4 released over a prolonged period from SLNs both with and without PEG was comparable to the non-formulated group, with 16.48% and 30.04%, respectively, of the drug being released, which fit a zero-order equation. The half-maximal inhibitory concentration values of PK-L4-loaded SLNs with and those without PEG were significantly reduced by 45%–64% in the human lung carcinoma cell line (A549, 99% in the human breast adenocarcinoma cell line with estrogen receptor (MCF7, and 95% in

  8. Petroleum supply monthly

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-10-01

    The Petroleum Supply Monthly (PSM) is one of a family of four publications produced by the Petroleum Supply Division within the Energy Information Administration (EIA) reflecting different levels of data timeliness and completeness. The other publications are the Weekly Petroleum Status Report (WPSR), the Winter Fuels Report, and the Petroleum Supply Annual (PSA). Data presented in the PSM describe the supply and disposition of petroleum products in the United States and major US geographic regions. The data series describe production, imports and exports, inter-Petroleum Administration for Defense (PAD) District movements, and inventories by the primary suppliers of petroleum products in the United States (50 States and the District of Columbia). The reporting universe includes those petroleum sectors in primary supply. Included are: petroleum refiners, motor gasoline blends, operators of natural gas processing plants and fractionators, inter-PAD transporters, importers, and major inventory holders of petroleum products and crude oil. When aggregated, the data reported by these sectors approximately represent the consumption of petroleum products in the United States.

  9. Petroleum Supply Monthly

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-02-01

    The Petroleum Supply Monthly (PSM) is one of a family of four publications produced by the Petroleum Supply Division within the Energy Information Administration (EIA) reflecting different levels of data timeliness and completeness. The other publications are the Weekly Petroleum Status Report (WPSR), the Winter Fuels Report, and the Petroleum Supply Annual (PSA). Data presented in the PSM describe the supply and disposition of petroleum products in the United States and major U.S. geographic regions. The data series describe production, imports and exports, inter-Petroleum Administration for Defense (PAD) District movements, and inventories by the primary suppliers of petroleum products in the United States (50 States and the District of Columbia). The reporting universe includes those petroleum sectors in primary supply. Included are: petroleum refiners, motor gasoline blenders, operators of natural gas processing plants and fractionators, inter-PAD transporters, importers, and major inventory holders of petroleum products and crude oil. When aggregated, the data reported by these sectors approximately represent the consumption of petroleum products in the United States. Data presented in the PSM are divided into two sections: Summary Statistics and Detailed Statistics.

  10. Design of Brushless DC Motor Control System Based on R5F212L4%基于R5F212L4的无刷直流电动机控制系统设计

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴军; 钟名宏; 杜泽华

    2013-01-01

    针对有霍尔无刷直流电动机,提出一种以R5F212L4为核心,基于速度反馈PI控制、位置反馈及相电流相位反馈三闭环SVPWM的驱动系统.提出系统的控制策略及硬件实现;分析传感器安装误差对转子角度测量的影响,提出可以减小测量误差的计算方法;设计并实现系统硬件电路及程序调试.实验证明系统性能稳定,噪声小,实现无级调速等优点,同时可以方便地添加所需功能模块,在中小功率无刷直流电动机应用,如空调、冰箱、风扇等高端家用电器中有明显优势.

  11. Cold months in a warming climate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Räisänen, Jouni; Ylhäisi, Jussi S.

    2011-11-01

    The frequency of cold months in the 21st century is studied using the CMIP3 ensemble of climate model simulations, using month-, location- and model-specific threshold temperatures derived from the simulated 20th century climate. Unsurprisingly, cold months are projected to become less common, but not non-existent, under continued global warming. As a multi-model mean over the global land area excluding Antarctica and under the SRES A1B scenario, 14% of the months during the years 2011-2050 are simulated to be colder than the 20th century median for the same month, 1.3% colder than the 10th percentile, and 0.1% record cold. The geographic and seasonal variations in the frequency of cold months are strongly modulated by variations in the magnitude of interannual variability. Thus, for example, cold months are most infrequently simulated over the tropical oceans where the variability is smallest, not over the Arctic where the warming is largest.

  12. 长江上游月降水人工神经网络预测模型%ARTIFICIAL NEURAL NETWORK MODELS FOR FORECASTING MONTHLY PRECIPITATION IN THE UPPER YANGTZE RIVER

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    冯亚文; 任国玉; 张丽; 罗华超

    2011-01-01

    Monthly precipitation forecast for the upper Yangtze River is very essential to the water resources management for the entire Yangtze River basin. Three typical meteorological stations were selected respectively in three different climatic zones. All the selected stations contained nearly 60 years of monthly precipitation records in the upper Yangtze River. This paper estimated the month of precipitation and precipitation time delay parameter, and established monthly precipitation forecasting model using back-propagation neural network, radial basis function neural network, generalized regression neural network and multiple linear regression method respectively, to predict the precipitation of coming month. Then, the mean square error and coefficient of determination were used to verify the simulation accuracy of various models and the model simulation results. The results show that artificial neural network prediction model is superior to multiple linear regression in general. Especially, the performance of the back-propagation neural network is better than the others. It can be determined as an effective monthly precipitation methods for the upper Yangtze River after determining reasonable input variables and network structure.%长江上游月降水量预测对于三峡库区及整个长江流域水资源管理具有重要意义.根据长江上游不同气候区降水差异,选取玉树、九龙和宜宾3个代表性气象站点近60 a的月降水量数据,运用反向传播神经网络、径向基函数神经网络、广义回归神经网络和多元线性回归法,确定降水时滞和降水月份,建立月降水预测模型,来预测未来一个月的降水量,并采用均方误差和判定系数来验证和对比各种模型的模拟效果.结果显示:人工神经网络模型总体上优于多元线性回归,特别是反向传播种经网络的模拟结果各站表现较好,在确定合理的输入变量和网络结构后,可以尝试作为长江上游各站月降水预测模型.

  13. Dynamics of High-Velocity Evanescent Clumps [HVECs] Emitted from Comet C/2011 L4 as Observed by STEREO

    CERN Document Server

    Raouafi, N -E; Stenborg, G; Jones, G H; Schmidt, C A

    2015-01-01

    High-quality white-light images from the SECCHI/HI-1 telescope onboard STEREO-B reveal high-velocity evanescent clumps [HVECs] expelled from the coma of the C/2011 L4 [Pan-STARRS] comet. Animated images provide evidence of highly dynamic ejecta moving near-radially in the anti-sunward direction. The bulk speed of the clumps at their initial detection in the HI1-B images range from $200-400$ km s$^{-1}$ followed by an appreciable acceleration up to speeds of $450-600$ km s$^{-1}$, which are typical of slow to intermediate solar wind speeds. The clump velocities do not exceed these limiting values and seem to reach a plateau. The images also show that the clumps do not expand as they propagate. Order of magnitude calculations show that ionized single atoms or molecules accelerate too quickly compared to observations, while dust grains micron sized or larger accelerate too slowly. We find that neutral Na, Li, K, or Ca atoms with $\\beta>50$ could possibly fit the observations. Just as likely, we find that an inte...

  14. Computer Modeling Assisted Design of Monodisperse PLGA Microspheres with Controlled Porosity Affords Zero Order Release of an Encapsulated Macromolecule for 3 Months

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kazazi-Hyseni, Filis; Landin, Mariana; Lathuile, Audrey; Veldhuis, Gert J.; Rahimian, Sima; Hennink, Wim E.; Kok, Robbert Jan; van Nostrum, Cornelus F.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose The aim of this study was the development of poly(D,L-lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA) microspheres with controlled porosity, to obtain microspheres that afford continuous release of a macromolecular model compound (blue dextran). Methods PLGA microspheres with a size of around 40 μm and narrow

  15. Application of GRACE to the assessment of model-based estimates of monthly Greenland Ice Sheet mass balance (2003-2012)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schlegel, Nicole Jeanne; Wiese, David N.; Larour, Eric Y.; Watkins, Michael M.; Box, Jason E.; Fettweis, Xavier; Van Den Broeke, Michiel R.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/073765643

    2016-01-01

    Quantifying the Greenland Ice Sheet's future contribution to sea level rise is a challenging task that requires accurate estimates of ice sheet sensitivity to climate change. Forward ice sheet models are promising tools for estimating future ice sheet behavior, yet confidence is low because evaluati

  16. Diagnostic model of 3-D circulation in the Arabian Sea and western equatorial Indian Ocean: Results of monthly mean sea surface topography

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Bahulayan, N.; Shaji, C.

    -frog numerical scheme, the sea surface topography equation is solved by successive over-relaxation technique. Model has 18 levels in the vertical with a maximum depth of 900 meters, a resolution of 1 degrees in the latitute and longitude directions and is forced...

  17. Electronic Services Monthly MI Report

    Data.gov (United States)

    Social Security Administration — This electronic services monthly MI report contains monthly MI data for most public facing online online applications such as iClaim, electronic access, Mobile wage...

  18. Less invasive corrective surgery using oblique lateral interbody fusion (OLIF) including L5-S1 fusion for severe lumbar kyphoscoliosis due to L4 compression fracture in a patient with Parkinson's disease: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wakita, Hiromasa; Shiga, Yasuhiro; Ohtori, Seiji; Kubota, Go; Inage, Kazuhide; Sainoh, Takeshi; Sato, Jun; Fujimoto, Kazuki; Yamauchi, Kazuyo; Nakamura, Junichi; Takahashi, Kazuhisa; Toyone, Tomoaki; Aoki, Yasuchika; Inoue, Gen; Miyagi, Masayuki; Orita, Sumihisa

    2015-04-07

    Corrective surgery for kyphoscoliosis patients tend to be highly invasive due to osteotomy. The present case introduce less invasive corrective surgery using anterior oblique lateral interbody fusion (OLIF) technique. An 80-year-old Japanese man with a history of Parkinson's disease presented to our hospital because of severe kyphoscoliosis and gait disturbance. Considering the postsurgical complications due to osteotomy, we performed an anterior-posterior combined corrective fusion surgery: OLIF of Lumbar (L) 2-3, L3-4, and L4-5 (Medtronic Sofamor Danek, Memphis, TN, USA) followed by L5-Sacral (S) 1 anterior lumbar fusion via the OLIF approach using an anterior intervertebral cage, and posterior L3-4 and L4-5 facetectomy and posterior fusion using percutaneous pedicle screws from Thoracic (T) 10 to S1 with a T-9 hook system. The surgery was performed in a less invasive manner with no osteotomy, and it improved the sagittal alignments with moderate restoration, which improved the patient's posture and gait disturbance. The patient showed transient muscle weakness of proximal lower extremity contralateral side to the surgical site, which fully recovered by physical rehabilitation 3 months after the surgery. The surgical corrective procedure using the minimally invasive OLIF method including L5-S1 fusion showed a great advantage in treating degenerative kyphoscoliosis in a Parkinson's disease patient in its less-invasive approac.

  19. Photograph of the month

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-12-01

    Multiple slickenline sets formed during a single deformation event in an Oligocene ignimbrite in Santa Maria de Río, Mesa central, Mexico. More than four planes with normal slip are observed in a quite small area. The dips of normal faults vary from 82° to 48°. The range of the pitch angles of slickenlines is 65°-84°. These results indicate that the faults formed under a normal fault regime. The distribution of fault strikes indicates that Anderson's theory cannot explain the formation of these faults in a single tectonic event. Also, the fault pattern is not in orthorhombic symmetry. In this way, they do not obey the three-dimensional deformation model of Reches (Reches 1983, Tectonophysics 95, 111). This fault pattern could be explained by interaction of pre-existing planes (Nieto-Samaniego et al. 1997, Tectonophysics 270,197), progressive rotation of planes and/or changes in applied principal stresses (e.g. Xu et al. 2010, Stress and Earthquakes, 739). 14Q 0320703, N2412628. Photograph © Shunshan Xu, UNAM. Mexico.

  20. Your Baby's Growth: 3 Months

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... to Be Smart About Social Media Your Baby's Growth: 3 Months KidsHealth > For Parents > Your Baby's Growth: 3 Months Print A A A What's in ... months of life are a period of rapid growth. Your baby will gain about 1 to 1½ ...

  1. Monthly energy review, August 1997

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-08-01

    The Monthly Energy Review for the month of August 1997, presents an overview of the Energy Information Administration`s recent monthly energy statistics. The statistics cover the major activities of U.S. production, consumption, trade, stocks, and prices for petroleum, natural gas, coal, electricity, and nuclear energy. Also included are international energy and thermal and metric conversion factors.

  2. Biomechanical study of dynamic changes in L4-L5 foramen surface area in flexion and extension after implantation of four interspinous process devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirsch, C; Breque, C; Ragot, S; Pascal-Mousselard, H; Richer, J-P; Scepi, M; Khiami, F

    2015-04-01

    Lumbar spinal stenosis is a major public health issue. Interspinous devices implanted using minimally invasive techniques may constitute an alternative to the reference standard of bony decompression with or without intervertebral fusion. However, their indications remain unclear, due to a paucity of clinical and biomechanical data. Our objective was to evaluate the effects of four interspinous process devices implanted at L4-L5 on the intervertebral foramen surface areas at the treated and adjacent levels, in flexion and in extension. Six fresh frozen human cadaver lumbar spines (L2-sacrum) were tested on a dedicated spinal loading frame, in flexion and extension, from 0 to 10 N·m, after preparation and marking of the L3-L4, L4-L5, and L5-S1 foramina. Stereoscopic 3D images were acquired at baseline then after implantation at L4-L5 of each of the four devices (Inspace(®), Synthes; X-Stop(®), Medtronic; Wallis(®), Zimmer; and Diam(®), Medtronic). The surface areas of the three foramina of interest were computed. All four devices significantly opened the L4-L5 foramen in extension. The effects in flexion separated the devices into two categories. With the two devices characterized by fixation in the spinous processes (Wallis(®) and Diam(®)), the L4-L5 foramen opened only in extension; whereas with the other two devices (X-Stop(®) and Inspace(®)), the L4-L5 foramen opened not only in extension, but also in flexion and in the neutral position. None of the devices implanted at L4-L5 modified the size of the L3-L4 foramen. X-Stop(®) and Diam(®) closed the L5-S1 foramen in extension, whereas the other two devices had no effect at this level. Our results demonstrate that interspinous process devices modify the surface area of the interspinous foramina in vitro. Clinical studies are needed to clarify patient selection criteria for interspinous process device implantation. Level IV. Investigating an orthopaedic device. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All

  3. Nucleus pulposus deformation in response to rotation at L1-2 and L4-5.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fazey, Peter J; Song, Swithin; Price, Roger I; Singer, Kevin P

    2013-06-01

    Spinal rotation couples with lateral flexion as a composite movement. Few data report the in vivo mechanical deformation of the nucleus pulposus following sustained rotation. MRI provides a non-invasive method of examining nucleus pulposus deformation by mapping the hydration signal distribution within the intervertebral disc. T1 weighted coronal and sagittal lumbar images and T2 weighted axial images at L1-2 and L4-5 were obtained from 10 asymptomatic subjects (mean age 29, range: 24-34 years) in sustained flexed and extended positions plus combined positions of left rotation with flexion and extension. Nucleus pulposus deformation was tracked by mapping the change in hydration profiles from coronal and sagittal pixel measurements. An average sagittal change in position of 44° (SD 14.5°) from flexion to extension was recorded between L1 and S1 (range: 18°- 60°) resulting in a mean anterior nucleus pulposus deformation of 16% of disc hydration profile (range: 3.5%-19%) in 19/20 discs. When rotation was combined with either flexion or extension, mean coronal deformation was 4.8% (SD-5.1%; range: 0.4%-15%). Lateral nucleus pulposus deformation direction varied in rotation (44% deformed left and 56% deformed right). Intersegmental lateral flexion direction more strongly predicted nucleus pulposus deformation direction with 75% deforming contralaterally. Nucleus pulposus deformation direction in young subjects was more predictable following sagittal position change than in rotation combined with flexion or extension. Deformation magnitude was reduced in rotated positions. Intersegmental lateral flexion was a stronger predictor of nucleus pulposus deformation direction. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. A 17-Month Review of the Care Model, Service Structure, and Design of THRIVE, a Community Mental Health Initiative in Northern Singapore.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheang, K M; Cheok, C C S

    2015-12-01

    Effective delivery of psychiatric care requires the development of a range of services. The existing Singapore health care system provides a comprehensive range of psychiatric services based in restructured hospitals. The Ministry of Health Community Mental Health Masterplan (2012-2017) aims to build novel services for the community. This Masterplan envisions the development of ASCATs (Assessment Shared Care Teams) and COMITs (Community Intervention Teams) to build the capacity and capability for psychiatric care to be delivered outside the hospital in the community. A community mental health plan comprising a fast access clinic, internet-delivered self-help and building a community network of providers was devised for the North of Singapore through the THRIVE (Total Health Rich In Vitality and Energy) programme. This article provides an introduction to the care model, service structure and design of the THRIVE, and reviews its milestones and achievements from its inception in August 2012 until December 2013.

  5. Vaccinia virus protein A3 is required for the production of normal immature virions and for the encapsidation of the nucleocapsid protein L4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jesus, Desyree Murta; Moussatche, Nissin; McFadden, Baron B D; Nielsen, Casey Paulasue; D'Costa, Susan M; Condit, Richard C

    2015-07-01

    Maturation of the vaccinia virion is an intricate process that results in the organization of the viroplasm contained in immature virions into the lateral bodies, core wall and nucleocapsid observed in the mature particles. It is unclear how this organization takes place and studies with mutants are indispensable in understanding this process. By characterizing an inducible mutant in the A3L gene, we revealed that A3, an inner core wall protein, is important for formation of normal immature viruses and also for the correct localization of L4, a nucleocapsid protein. L4 did not accumulate in the viral factories in the absence of A3 and was not encapsidated in the particles that do not contain A3. These data strengthen our previously suggested hypothesis that A3 and L4 interact and that this interaction is critical for proper formation of the core wall and nucleocapsid.

  6. Water Production in Comets C/2011 L4 (PanSTARRS) and C/2012 F6 (Lemmon) with SOHO/SWAN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Combi, M.; Bertaux, J.-L.; Quémerais, E.; Ferron, S.; Mäkinen, J. T. T.; Aptekar, G.

    2013-09-01

    Comets C/2011 L4 (PanSTARRS) and C/2012 F6 (Lemmon) were observed throughout their 2013 apparitions with the SWAN all-sky Lyman-α camera on the Solar and Heliosphere Observatory (SOHO) satellite, which has been in a halo orbit around the L1 Earth-Sun Lagrange point since early 1996. The maximum production rates were ~1 x 1030 molecules s-1 for both comets. The activities of both comets were asymmetric about perihelion. C/2011 L4 (PanSTARRS) was more active before perihelion but C/2012 F6 (Lemmon) was more active after perihelion.

  7. The first month of the 2016 central Italy seismic sequence: fast determination of time domain moment tensors and finite fault model analysis of the ML 5.4 aftershock

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Scognamiglio

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available We present the revised Time Domain Moment Tensor (TDMT catalogue for earthquakes with M_L larger than 3.6 of the first month of the ongoing Amatrice seismic sequence (August 24th - September 25th. Most of the retrieved focal mechanisms show NNW–SSE striking normal faults in agreement with the main NE-SW extensional deformation of Central Apennines. We also report a preliminary finite fault model analysis performed on the larger aftershock of this period of the sequence (M_w 5.4 and discuss the obtained results in the framework of aftershocks distribution.

  8. Natural Gas Monthly, October 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-11-10

    The (NGM) Natural Gas Monthly highlights activities, events, and analyses of interest to public and private sector organizations associated with the natural gas industry. Volume and price data are presented each month for natural gas production, distribution, consumption, and interstate pipeline activities. Producer-related activities and underground storage data are also reported. From time to time, the NGM features articles designed to assist readers in using and interpreting natural gas information. This month`s feature articles are: US Production of Natural Gas from Tight Reservoirs: and Expanding Rule of Underground Storage.

  9. Natural gas monthly, May 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-05-25

    The Natural Gas Monthly (NGM) highlights activities, events, and analyses of interest to public and private sector organizations associated with the natural gas industry. Volume and price data are presented each month for natural gas production, distribution, consumption, and interstate pipeline activities. Producer-related activities and underground storage data are also reported. From time to time, the NGM features articles designed to assist readers in using and interpreting natural gas information. The featured articles for this month are: Opportunities with fuel cells, and revisions to monthly natural gas data.

  10. Monthly energy review, January 1998

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-01-01

    This report presents an overview of recent monthly energy statistics. Major activities covered include production, consumption, trade, stocks, and prices for fossil fuels, electricity, and nuclear energy.

  11. Natural gas monthly, July 1997

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-07-01

    The Natural Gas Monthly (NGM) highlights activities, events, and analyses of interest to public and private sector organizations associated with the natural gas industry. Volume and price data are presented each month for natural gas production, distribution, consumption, and interstate pipeline activities. Producer-related activities and underground storage data are also reported. From time to time, the NGM features articles designed to assist readers in using and interpreting natural gas information. The feature article this month is entitled ``Intricate puzzle of oil and gas reserves growth.`` A special report is included on revisions to monthly natural gas data. 6 figs., 24 tabs.

  12. Monthly Program Cost Report (MPCR)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Veterans Affairs — The Monthly Program Cost Report (MPCR) replaces the Cost Distribution Report (CDR). The MPCR provides summary information about Veterans Affairs operational costs,...

  13. Mapping monthly rainfall erosivity in Europe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballabio, Cristiano; Borrelli, Pasquale; Spinoni, Jonathan; Meusburger, Katrin; Michaelides, Silas; Beguería, Santiago; Klik, Andreas; Petan, Sašo; Janeček, Miloslav; Olsen, Preben; Aalto, Juha; Lakatos, Mónika; Rymszewicz, Anna; Dumitrescu, Alexandru; Tadić, Melita Perčec; Diodato, Nazzareno; Kostalova, Julia; Rousseva, Svetla; Banasik, Kazimierz; Alewell, Christine; Panagos, Panos

    2017-02-01

    Rainfall erosivity as a dynamic factor of soil loss by water erosion is modelled intra-annually for the first time at European scale. The development of Rainfall Erosivity Database at European Scale (REDES) and its 2015 update with the extension to monthly component allowed to develop monthly and seasonal R-factor maps and assess rainfall erosivity both spatially and temporally. During winter months, significant rainfall erosivity is present only in part of the Mediterranean countries. A sudden increase of erosivity occurs in major part of European Union (except Mediterranean basin, western part of Britain and Ireland) in May and the highest values are registered during summer months. Starting from September, R-factor has a decreasing trend. The mean rainfall erosivity in summer is almost 4 times higher (315MJmmha(-1)h(-1)) compared to winter (87MJmmha(-1)h(-1)). The Cubist model has been selected among various statistical models to perform the spatial interpolation due to its excellent performance, ability to model non-linearity and interpretability. The monthly prediction is an order more difficult than the annual one as it is limited by the number of covariates and, for consistency, the sum of all months has to be close to annual erosivity. The performance of the Cubist models proved to be generally high, resulting in R(2) values between 0.40 and 0.64 in cross-validation. The obtained months show an increasing trend of erosivity occurring from winter to summer starting from western to Eastern Europe. The maps also show a clear delineation of areas with different erosivity seasonal patterns, whose spatial outline was evidenced by cluster analysis. The monthly erosivity maps can be used to develop composite indicators that map both intra-annual variability and concentration of erosive events. Consequently, spatio-temporal mapping of rainfall erosivity permits to identify the months and the areas with highest risk of soil loss where conservation measures should be

  14. Monthly energy review, November 1998

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-11-01

    The Monthly Energy Review (MER) presents an overview of the Energy Information Administration`s recent monthly energy statistics. The statistics cover the major activities of US production, consumption, trade, stocks, and prices for petroleum, natural gas, coal, electricity, and nuclear energy. Also included are international energy and thermal and metric conversion factors. 37 figs., 61 tabs.

  15. Natural gas monthly, February 1999

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1999-02-01

    The Natural Gas Monthly (NGM) highlights activities, events, and analyses of interest to public and private sector organizations associated with the natural gas industry. Volume and price data are presented each month for natural gas production, distribution, consumption, and interstate pipeline activities. Producer-related activities and underground storage data are also reported. 6 figs., 28 tabs.

  16. Monthly energy review: April 1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-04-01

    This monthly report presents an overview of energy statistics. The statistics cover the major activities of US production, consumption, trade, stocks, and prices for petroleum, natural gas, coal, electricity, and nuclear energy. A section is also included on international energy. The feature paper which is included each month is entitled ``Energy equipment choices: Fuel costs and other determinants.`` 37 figs., 59 tabs.

  17. ULTRAPLATE 30 month management report

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jens Dahl

    2003-01-01

    In the period from month 24 to month 30 focus has been on the work-package 3 activities concerning optimisation of the newly developed ULTRAPLATE technology towards specific industrial applications. Three main application areas have been pursued: 1) High- speed plating of lead free solder contact...

  18. Your Baby's Growth: 5 Months

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... to Be Smart About Social Media Your Baby's Growth: 5 Months KidsHealth > For Parents > Your Baby's Growth: 5 Months Print A A A What's in ... your child's birth, the doctor has been recording growth in weight, length, and head size (circumference) during ...

  19. Monthly energy review, November 1997

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-11-01

    The Monthly Energy Review (MER) presents an overview of the Energy Information Administration`s recent monthly energy statistics. The statistics cover the major activities of US production, consumption, trade, stocks, and prices for petroleum, natural gas, coal, electricity, and nuclear energy. Also included are international energy and thermal and metric conversion factors. 37 figs., 91 tabs.

  20. Natural gas monthly, November 1998

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-11-01

    The Natural Gas Monthly (NGM) highlights activities, events, and analyses of interest to public and private sector organizations associated with the natural gas industry. Volume and price data are presented each month for natural gas production, distribution, consumption, and interstate pipeline activities. Producer-related activities and underground storage data are also reported. 6 figs., 27 tabs.

  1. Natural gas monthly, January 1999

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1999-02-01

    The Natural Gas Monthly (NGM) highlights activities, events, and analyses of interest to public and private sector organizations associated with the natural gas industry. Volume and price data are presented each month for natural gas production, distribution, consumption, and interstate pipeline activities. Producer-related activities and underground storage data are also reported. 6 figs., 28 tabs.

  2. Monthly energy review, October 1998

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-10-01

    The Monthly Energy Review (MER) presents an overview of the Energy Information Administration`s recent monthly energy statistics. The statistics cover the major activities of US production, consumption, trade, stocks, and prices for petroleum, natural gas, coal, electricity, and nuclear energy. Also included are international energy and thermal and metric conversion factors. 37 figs., 61 tabs.

  3. Monthly energy review, June 1998

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-06-01

    The Monthly Energy Review (MER) presents an overview of the Energy Information Administration`s recent monthly energy statistics. The statistics cover the major activities of US production, consumption, trade, stocks, and prices for petroleum, natural gas, coal, electricity, and nuclear energy. Also included are international energy and thermal and metric conversion factors. 36 figs., 61 tabs.

  4. Monthly energy review, May 1999

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1999-05-01

    The Monthly Energy Review (MER) presents an overview of the Energy Information Administration`s recent monthly energy statistics. The statistics cover the major activities of US production, consumption, trade, stocks, and prices for petroleum, natural gas, coal, electricity, and nuclear energy. Also included are international energy and thermal and metric conversion factors. 37 figs., 61 tabs.

  5. Monthly energy review, January 1999

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1999-01-01

    The Monthly Energy Review (MER) presents an overview of the Energy Information Administration`s recent monthly energy statistics. The statistics cover the major activities of US production, consumption, trade, stocks, and prices for petroleum, natural gas, coal, electricity, and nuclear energy. Also included are international energy and thermal and metric conversion factors. 37 figs., 61 tabs.

  6. Monthly energy review, February 1999

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1999-02-01

    The Monthly Energy Review (MER) presents an overview of the Energy Information Administration`s recent monthly energy statistics. The statistics cover the major activities of US production, consumption, trade, stocks, and prices for petroleum, natural gas, coal, electricity, and nuclear energy. Also included are international energy and thermal and metric conversion factors. 37 figs., 73 tabs.

  7. Monthly energy review, March 1999

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1999-03-01

    The Monthly Energy Review (MER) presents an overview of the Energy Information Administration`s recent monthly energy statistics. The statistics cover the major activities of US production, consumption, trade, stocks, and prices for petroleum, natural gas, coal, electricity, and nuclear energy. Also included are international energy and thermal and metric conversion factors. 37 figs., 74 tabs.

  8. Natural gas monthly, December 1998

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-12-01

    The Natural Gas Monthly (NGM) highlights activities, events, and analyses of interest to public and private sector organizations associated with the natural gas industry. Volume and price data are presented each month for natural gas production, distribution, consumption, and interstate pipeline activities. Producer-related activities and underground storage data are also reported. 6 figs., 28 tabs.

  9. Left behind by Birth Month

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solli, Ingeborg Foldøy

    2017-01-01

    Utilizing comprehensive administrative data from Norway I investigate long-term birth month effects. I demonstrate that the oldest children in class have a substantially higher GPA than their younger peers. The birth month differences are larger for low-SES children. Furthermore, I find that the youngest children in class are lagging significantly…

  10. Monthly Energy Review, February 1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-02-26

    This monthly publication presents an overview of EIA`s recent monthly energy statistics, covering the major activities of U.S. production, consumption, trade, stocks, and prices for petroleum, natural gas, coal, electricity, and nuclear energy. Also included are international energy and thermal and metric conversion factors. Two brief descriptions (`energy plugs`) on two EIA publications are presented at the start.

  11. Haida Months of the Year.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cogo, Robert

    Students are introduced to Haida vocabulary in this booklet which briefly describes the seasons and traditional seasonal activities of Southeastern Alaska Natives. The first section lists the months in English and Haida; e.g., January is "Taan Kungaay," or "Bear Hunting Month." The second section contains seasonal names in…

  12. Monthly energy review, November 1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-11-01

    The Monthly Energy Review (MER) presents an overview of the Energy Information Administration`s recent monthly energy statistics. The statistics cover the major activities of US production, consumption, trade, stocks, and prices for petroleum, natural gas, coal, electricity, and nuclear energy. Also included are international energy and thermal and metric conversion factors. 75 tabs.

  13. Monthly energy review, July 1998

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-07-01

    The Monthly Energy Review (MER) presents an overview of the Energy Information Administration`s recent monthly energy statistics. The statistics cover the major activities of US production, consumption, trade, stocks, and prices for petroleum, natural gas, coal, electricity, and nuclear energy. Also included are international energy and thermal and metric conversion factors. 37 figs. 73 tabs.

  14. Predicting Language Learners' Grades in the L1, L2, L3 and L4: The Effect of Some Psychological and Sociocognitive Variables

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dewaele, Jean-Marc

    2007-01-01

    This study of 89 Flemish high-school students' grades for L1 (Dutch), L2 (French), L3 (English) and L4 (German) investigates the effects of three higher-level personality dimensions (psychoticism, extraversion, neuroticism), one lower-level personality dimension (foreign language anxiety) and sociobiographical variables (gender, social class) on…

  15. Detection of l=4 and l=5 modes in 12 years of solar VIRGO-SPM data --- Tests on Kepler observations of 16 Cyg A and B

    CERN Document Server

    Lund, Mikkel Nørup; Christensen-Dalsgaard, Jørgen; Handberg, Rasmus; Aguirre, Victor Silva

    2014-01-01

    We present the detection of l=4 and l=5 modes in power spectra of the Sun, constructed from 12 yr full-disk VIRGO-SPM data sets. A method for enhancing the detectability of these modes in asteroseismic targets is presented and applied to Kepler data of the two solar analogues 16 Cyg A and B. For these targets we see indications of a signal from l=4 modes, while nothing is yet seen for l=5 modes. We further simulate the power spectra of these stars and from this we estimate that it should indeed be possible to see such indications of l=4 modes at the present length of the data sets. In the simulation process we briefly look into the apparent misfit between observed and calculated mode visibilities. We predict that firm detections of at least l=4 should be possible in any case at the end of the Kepler mission. For l=5 we do not predict any firm detections from Kepler data.

  16. 77 FR 207 - National Mentoring Month, 2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-03

    ... with positive role models, foster leadership skills, and put them on the path to success in school and... with a mentor. Last January, we partnered with businesses across America to launch the Corporate... hereby proclaim January 2012 as National Mentoring Month. I call upon public officials, business and...

  17. Applied technology section. Monthly report, March 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buckner, M.R.

    1994-04-20

    This is a monthly report giving the details on research currently being conducted at the Savannah River Technology Center. The following are areas of the research, engineering modeling and simulation, applied statistics, applied physics,experimental thermal hydraulics,and packaging and transportation.

  18. Natural gas monthly, May 1997

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-05-01

    The Natural Gas Monthly highlights activities, events, and analyses of interest to public and private sector organizations associated with the natural gas industry. Volume and price data are presented each month for natural gas production, distribution, consumption, and interstate pipeline activities. Producer-related activities and underground storage data are also reported. From time to time, the NGM features articles designed to assist readers in using and interpreting natural gas information. The feature article this month is ``Restructuring energy industries: Lessons from natural gas.`` 6 figs., 26 tabs.

  19. Natural gas monthly, June 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-06-01

    The Natural Gas Monthly (NGM) highlights activities, events, and analyses of interest to public and private sector organizations associated with the natural gas industry. Volume and price data are presented each month for natural gas production, distribution, consumption, and interstate pipeline activities. Producer-related activities and underground storage data are also reported. From time to time, the NGM features articles designed to assist readers in using and interpreting natural gas information. The feature article this month is the executive summary from Natural Gas 1994: Issues and Trends. 6 figs., 31 tabs.

  20. Natural gas monthly, January 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-02-01

    The Natural Gas Monthly (NGM) highlights activities, events, and analyses of interest to public and private sector organizations associated with the natural gas industry. Volume and price data are presented each month for natural gas production, distribution, consumption, and interstate pipeline activities. Producer-related activities and underground storage data are also reported. From time to time, the NGM features articles designed to assist readers in using and interpreting natural gas information. The featured article for this month is on US coalbed methane production.

  1. Natural gas monthly, December 1997

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-12-01

    The Natural Gas Monthly highlights activities, events, and analyses of interest to public and private sector organizations associated with the natural gas industry. Volume and price data are presented each month for natural gas production, distribution, consumption, and interstate pipeline activities. Producer-related activities and underground storage data are also reported. From time to time, the NGM features articles designed to assist readers in using and interpreting natural gas information. The article this month is entitled ``Recent Trends in Natural Gas Spot Prices.`` 6 figs., 27 tabs.

  2. A 4-D Climatology (1979-2009) of the Monthly Tropospheric Aerosol Optical Depth Distribution over the Mediterranean Region from a Comparative Evaluation and Blending of Remote Sensing and Model Products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nabat, P.; Somot, S.; Mallet, M.; Chiapello, I; Morcrette, J. J.; Solomon, F.; Szopa, S.; Dulac, F; Collins, W.; Ghan, S.; Horowitz, L. W.; Lamarque, J. F.; Lee, Y. H.; Naik, V.; Nagashima, T.; Shindell, D.; Skeie, R.

    2013-01-01

    Since the 1980s several spaceborne sensors have been used to retrieve the aerosol optical depth (AOD) over the Mediterranean region. In parallel, AOD climatologies coming from different numerical model simulations are now also available, permitting to distinguish the contribution of several aerosol types to the total AOD. In this work, we perform a comparative analysis of this unique multiyear database in terms of total AOD and of its apportionment by the five main aerosol types (soil dust, seasalt, sulfate, black and organic carbon). We use 9 different satellite-derived monthly AOD products: NOAA/AVHRR, SeaWiFS (2 products), TERRA/MISR, TERRA/MODIS, AQUA/MODIS, ENVISAT/MERIS, PARASOL/POLDER and MSG/SEVIRI, as well as 3 more historical datasets: NIMBUS7/CZCS, TOMS (onboard NIMBUS7 and Earth- Probe) and METEOSAT/MVIRI. Monthly model datasets include the aerosol climatology from Tegen et al. (1997), the climate-chemistry models LMDz-OR-INCA and RegCM-4, the multi-model mean coming from the ACCMIP exercise, and the reanalyses GEMS and MACC. Ground-based Level- 2 AERONET AOD observations from 47 stations around the basin are used here to evaluate the model and satellite data. The sensor MODIS (on AQUA and TERRA) has the best average AOD scores over this region, showing a relevant spatio-temporal variability and highlighting high dust loads over Northern Africa and the sea (spring and summer), and sulfate aerosols over continental Europe (summer). The comparison also shows limitations of certain datasets (especially MERIS and SeaWiFS standard products). Models reproduce the main patterns of the AOD variability over the basin. The MACC reanalysis is the closest to AERONET data, but appears to underestimate dust over Northern Africa, where RegCM-4 is found closer to MODIS thanks to its interactive scheme for dust emissions. The vertical dimension is also investigated using the CALIOP instrument. This study confirms differences of vertical distribution between dust

  3. A 4-D climatology (1979–2009 of the monthly tropospheric aerosol optical depth distribution over the Mediterranean region from a comparative evaluation and blending of remote sensing and model products

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Nabat

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Since the 1980s several spaceborne sensors have been used to retrieve the aerosol optical depth (AOD over the Mediterranean region. In parallel, AOD climatologies coming from different numerical model simulations are now also available, permitting to distinguish the contribution of several aerosol types to the total AOD. In this work, we perform a comparative analysis of this unique multi-year database in terms of total AOD and of its apportionment by the five main aerosol types (soil dust, sea-salt, sulfate, black and organic carbon. We use 9 different satellite-derived monthly AOD products: NOAA/AVHRR, SeaWiFS (2 products, TERRA/MISR, TERRA/MODIS, AQUA/MODIS, ENVISAT/MERIS, PARASOL/POLDER and MSG/SEVIRI, as well as 3 more historical datasets: NIMBUS7/CZCS, TOMS (onboard NIMBUS7 and Earth-Probe and METEOSAT/MVIRI. Monthly model datasets include the aerosol climatology from Tegen et al. (1997, the climate-chemistry models LMDz-OR-INCA and RegCM-4, the multi-model mean coming from the ACCMIP exercise, and the reanalyses GEMS and MACC. Ground-based Level-2 AERONET AOD observations from 47 stations around the basin are used here to evaluate the model and satellite data. The sensor MODIS (on AQUA and TERRA has the best average AOD scores over this region, showing a relevant spatio-temporal variability and highlighting high dust loads over Northern Africa and the sea (spring and summer, and sulfate aerosols over continental Europe (summer. The comparison also shows limitations of certain datasets (especially MERIS and SeaWiFS standard products. Models reproduce the main patterns of the AOD variability over the basin. The MACC reanalysis is the closest to AERONET data, but appears to underestimate dust over Northern Africa, where RegCM-4 is found closer to MODIS thanks to its interactive scheme for dust emissions. The vertical dimension is also investigated using the CALIOP instrument. This study confirms differences of vertical distribution between

  4. US Monthly Pilot Balloon Observations

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Monthly winds aloft summary forms summarizing Pilot Balloon observational data for the United States. Generally labeled as Form 1114, and then transitioning to Form...

  5. Monthly energy review, August 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-08-26

    This publication presents information for the month of August, 1993 on the following: Energy overview; energy consumption; petroleum; natural gas; oil and gas resource development; coal; electricity; nuclear energy; energy prices, and international energy.

  6. Monthly Energy Review, July 1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1992-07-27

    The Monthly Energy Review is prepared by the Energy Information Administration. Topics discussed include: Energy Overview, Energy Consumption, Petroleum, Natural Gas, Oil and Gas Resource Development, Coal, Electricity, Nuclear Energy, Energy Prices, International Energy. (VC)

  7. Monthly energy review, July 1997

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-07-01

    This document presents an overview of recent monthly energy statistics. Activities covered include: U.S. production, consumption, trade, stock, and prices for petroleum, coal, natural gas, electricity, and nuclear energy.

  8. Monthly energy review, August 1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-08-01

    This report presents an overview of recent monthly energy statistics. The statistics cover the major activities of U.S. production, consumption, trade, stocks, and prices for petroleum, coal, natural gas, electricity, and nuclear energy.

  9. Monthly energy review, August 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-08-26

    This publication presents information for the month of August, 1993 on the following: Energy overview; energy consumption; petroleum; natural gas; oil and gas resource development; coal; electricity; nuclear energy; energy prices, and international energy.

  10. Your Child's Development: 15 Months

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Child Too Busy? Helping Your Child Adjust to Preschool School Lunches Kids and Food: 10 Tips for Parents Healthy Habits for TV, Video Games, and the Internet Your Child's Development: 15 Months KidsHealth > For Parents > Your Child's Development: ...

  11. Your Child's Development: 6 Months

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Child Too Busy? Helping Your Child Adjust to Preschool School Lunches Kids and Food: 10 Tips for Parents Healthy Habits for TV, Video Games, and the Internet Your Child's Development: 6 Months KidsHealth > For Parents > Your Child's Development: ...

  12. Your Child's Development: 2 Months

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Child Too Busy? Helping Your Child Adjust to Preschool School Lunches Kids and Food: 10 Tips for Parents Healthy Habits for TV, Video Games, and the Internet Your Child's Development: 2 Months KidsHealth > For Parents > Your Child's Development: ...

  13. Monthly energy review, August 1998

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-08-01

    The Monthly Energy Review (MER) presents an overview of the Energy Information Administration`s recent monthly energy statistics. The statistics cover the major activities of US production, consumption, trade, stocks, and prices for petroleum, natural gas, coal, electricity, and nuclear energy. Also included are international energy and thermal and metric conversion factors. The MER is intended for use by Members of Congress, Federal and State agencies, energy analysts, and the general public. 37 figs., 73 tabs.

  14. Natural gas monthly, July 1998

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-07-01

    The Natural Gas Monthly (NGM) highlights activities, events, and analyses of interest to public and private sector organizations associated with the natural gas industry. Volume and price data are presented each month for natural gas production, distribution, consumption, and interstate pipeline activities. Producer-related activities and underground storage data are also reported. From time to time, the NGM features articles designed to assist readers in using and interpreting natural gas information. 6 figs., 25 tabs.

  15. Natural gas monthly, June 1999

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1999-06-01

    The Natural Gas Monthly (NGM) highlights activities, events, and analyses of interest to public and private sector organizations associated with the natural gas industry. Volume and price data are presented each month for natural gas production, distribution, consumption, and interstate pipeline activities. Producer-related activities and underground storage data are also reported. From time to time, the NGM features articles designed to assist readers in using and interpreting natural gas information. 6 figs., 25 tabs.

  16. Natural gas monthly, August 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-08-24

    The Natural Gas Monthly (NGM) highlights activities, events, and analyses of interest to public and private sector organizations associated with the natural gas industry. Volume and price data are presented each month for natural gas production, distribution, consumption, and interstate pipeline activities. Producer-related activities and underground storage data are also reported. From time to time, the NGM features articles designed to assist readers in using and interpreting natural gas information.

  17. Natural gas monthly, June 1998

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-06-01

    The Natural Gas Monthly (NGM) highlights activities, events, and analyses of interest to public and private sector organizations associated with the natural gas industry. Volume and price data are presented each month for natural gas production, distribution, consumption, and interstate pipeline activities. Producer-related activities and underground storage data are also reported. From time to time, the NGM features articles designed to assist readers in using and interpreting natural gas information. 6 figs., 27 tabs.

  18. Natural gas monthly, April 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-04-26

    The National Gas Monthly (NGM) highlights activities, events, and analyses of interest to public and private sector organizations associated with the natural gas industry. Volume and price data are presented each month for natural gas production, distribution, consumption, and interstate pipeline activities. Producer-related activities and underground storage data are also reported. From time to time, the NGM features articles designed to assist readers in using and interpreting natural gas information.

  19. Natural gas monthly, September 1998

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-09-01

    The National Gas Monthly (NGM) highlights activities, events, and analyses of interest to public and private sector organizations associated with the natural gas industry. Volume and price data are presented each month for natural gas production, distribution, consumption, and interstate pipeline activities. Producer-related activities and underground storage data are also reported. From time to time, the NGM features articles designed to assist readers in using and interpreting natural gas information. 6 figs., 27 tabs.

  20. Natural gas monthly, June 1997

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-06-01

    The Natural Gas Monthly (NGM) highlights activities, events, and analyses of interest to public and private sector organizations associated with the natural gas industry. Volume and price data are presented each month for natural gas production, distribution, consumption, and interstate pipeline activities. Producer-related activities and underground storage data are also reported. From time to time, the NGM features articles designed to assist readers in using and interpreting natural gas information. 6 figs., 24 tabs.

  1. Natural gas monthly, October 1998

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-10-01

    The Natural Gas Monthly (NGM) highlights activities, events, and analyses of interest to public and private sector organizations associated with the natural gas industry. Volume and price data are presented each month for natural gas production, distribution, consumption, and interstate pipeline activities. Producer-related activities and underground storage data are also reported. From time to time, the NGM features articles designed to assist readers in using and interpreting natural gas information. 6 figs., 27 tabs.

  2. Monthly energy review, April 1998

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-04-01

    This report presents an overview of the Energy Information Administration`s recent monthly energy statistics. The statistics cover the major activities of U.S. production, consumption, trade, stocks, and prices for petroleum, natural gas, coal, electricity, and nuclear energy. Also included are international energy data. A brief summary of the monthly and historical comparison data is provided in Section 1 of the report. A highlight section of the report provides an assessment of summer 1997 motor gasoline price increases.

  3. Monthly energy review, April 1999

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1999-04-01

    The Monthly Energy Review (MER) presents an overview of the Energy Information Administration`s recent monthly energy statistics. The statistics cover the major activities of US production, consumption, trade, stocks, and prices for petroleum, natural gas, coal, electricity, and nuclear energy. Also included are international energy and thermal and metric conversion factors. The MER is intended for use by Members of Congress, Federal and State agencies, energy analysts, and the general public.

  4. Natural gas monthly, May 1999

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1999-05-01

    The Natural Gas Monthly (NGM) highlights activities, events, and analyses of interest to public and private sector organizations associated with the natural gas industry. Volume and price data are presented each month for natural gas production, distribution, consumption, and interstate pipeline activities. Producer-related activities and underground storage data are also reported. From time to time the NGM features articles designed to assist readers in using and interpreting natural gas information. 6 figs., 27 tabs.

  5. Natural gas monthly: December 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-12-01

    The Natural Gas Monthly (NGM) highlights activities, events, and analyses of interest to public and private sector organizations associated with the natural gas industry. Volume and price data are presented each month for natural gas production, distribution, consumption, and interstate pipeline activities. Producer-related activities and underground storage data are also reported. Articles are included which are designed to assist readers in using and interpreting natural gas information.

  6. Natural gas monthly, July 1998

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-07-01

    The Natural Gas Monthly (NGM) highlights activities, events, and analyses of interest to public and private sector organizations associated with the natural gas industry. Volume and price data are presented each month for natural gas production, distribution, consumption, and interstate pipeline activities. Producer-related activities and underground storage data are also reported. From time to time, the NGM features articles designed to assist readers in using and interpreting natural gas information. 6 figs., 25 tabs.

  7. Natural Gas Monthly, March 1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-03-25

    The Natural Gas Monthly (NGM) highlights activities, events, and analyses of interest to public and private sector organizations associated with the natural gas industry. Volume and price data are presented each month for natural gas production, distribution, consumption, and interstate pipeline activities. Producer-related activities and underground storage data are also reported. From time to time, the NGM features articles designed to assist readers in using and interpreting natural gas information.

  8. Natural gas monthly, July 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-07-20

    The Natural Gas Monthly (NGM) highlights activities, events, and analyses of interest to public and private sector organizations associated with the natural gas industry. Volume and price data are presented each month for natural gas production, distribution, consumption, and interstate pipeline activities. Producer-related activities and underground storage data are also reported. From time to time, the NGM features articles designed to assist readers in using and interpreting natural gas information.

  9. Natural gas monthly, November 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-11-29

    The Natural Gas Monthly (NGM) highlights activities, events, and analyses of interest to public and private sector organizations associated with the natural gas industry. Volume and price data are presented each month for natural gas production, distribution, consumption, and interstate pipeline activities. Producer-related activities and underground state data are also reported. From time to time, the NGM features articles designed to assist readers in using and interpreting natural gas information.

  10. Natural gas monthly, October 1995

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-10-23

    The Natural Gas Monthly highlights activities, events, and analyses of interest to public and private sector organizations associated with the natural gas industry. Volume and price data are presented each month for natural gas production, distribution, consumption, and interstate pipeline activities. Producer-related activities and underground storage data are also reported. A glossary of the terms used in this report is provided to assist readers in understanding the data presented in this publication. 6 figs., 30 tabs.

  11. Evaluation of forecast skill of monthly rainfall over Northeast China using multi-models%多模式对东北地区月降水预测性能对比评估

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李永生; 段春锋; 王莹

    2016-01-01

    基于中国、美国、欧洲和日本的4种气候模式对1983—2010年东北地区降水的回报试验结果,利用2011—2014年东北地区业务应用的结果和国家气象信息中心提供的东北地区172个气象站的观测资料,采用距平相关系数(ACC)、趋势异常综合评分(Ps)和距平符号一致率(Pc)3种定量方法对比评估了4种模式对东北地区月降水的预测性能。结果表明:EC模式和CFSv 2模式与BCC模式和TCC模式相比,EC模式和CFSv 2模式对东北地区月降水的总体预测效果较好,具有一定的预测技巧。从空间上来看,CFSv 2模式各月Pc的分布存在较明显的差异,模式仍有较大的改进空间。CFSv 2模式对东北地区初夏典型旱涝年具有一定的预测能力,对典型涝年的预测效果优于典型旱年。%The prediction skill of four climate models for monthly rainfall over Northeast China was evaluated using three qualitative evaluation methods,i.e.,anomaly correlation coefficient (ACC),trend anomaly inspection evalu-ation (Ps)and anomaly symbol consistency rate (Pc).Many data were used in this study,including 172 meteoro-logical stations over Northeast China supplied by the National Meteorological Information Center,the hindcast ex-perimental results of rainfall over Northeast China from 1983 to 2010 according to four climate models from Chi-na,America,Japan and Europe,and the operational application results over Northeast China from 201 1 to 2014. The results indicate that the monthly rainfall prediction skills of EC (European Center for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts)and CFSv 2 (Coupled Forecast System Model Version 2)models are better than those of BCC (Bei-jing Climate Center)and TCC (Tokyo Climate Center)models.Looking at the spatial distribution,there is a sig-nificant difference in the distribution of each monthly Pc for CFSv 2 model,indicating that this model has a big space for its improvement.The CFSv 2 model has

  12. A 4-D climatology (1979–2009 of the monthly aerosol optical depth distribution over the Mediterranean region from a comparative evaluation and blending of remote sensing and model products

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Nabat

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Since the 1980s several spaceborne sensors have been used to retrieve the aerosol optical depth (AOD over the Mediterranean region. In parallel, AOD climatologies coming from different numerical model simulations are now also available, permitting to distinguish the contribution of several aerosol types to the total AOD. In this work, we perform a comparative analysis of this unique multi-year database in terms of total AOD and of its apportionment by the five main aerosol types (soil dust, sea-salt, sulfate, black and organic carbon. We use 8 different satellite-derived monthly AOD products: NOAA/AVHRR, SeaWiFS, TERRA/MISR, TERRA/MODIS, AQUA/MODIS, ENVISAT/MERIS, PARASOL/POLDER and MSG/SEVIRI, as well as 3 more historical data sets: NIMBUS7/CZCS, NIMBUS7/TOMS and METEOSAT/MVIRI. Monthly model datasets include the aerosol climatology from Tegen et al. (1997, the climate-chemistry models LMDz-OR-INCA and RegCM-4, and the reanalyses GEMS and MACC. Ground-based Level-2 AERONET AOD observations from 47 stations around the basin are used here to evaluate the model and satellite data. The sensor MODIS (on AQUA and TERRA has the best average AOD scores over this region, showing a relevant spatio-temporal variability and highlighting high dust loads over Northern Africa and the sea (spring and summer, and sulfate aerosols over continental Europe (summer. The comparison also shows limitations of certain data sets (especially MERIS and SeaWiFS standard products. Models reproduce the main patterns of the AOD variability over the basin. The MACC reanalysis is the closest to AERONET data but appears to underestimate dust over Northern Africa, where RegCM-4 is found closer to MODIS thanks to its interactive scheme for dust emissions. The vertical dimension is also investigated using the CALIOP instrument. This study confirms differences between dust aerosols which can be lifted up to 5000 m, and other continental and marine aerosols which are confined in the

  13. Forecasting Monthly Prices of Japanese Logs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tetsuya Michinaka

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Forecasts of prices can help industries in their risk management. This is especially true for Japanese logs, which experience sharp fluctuations in price. In this research, the authors used an exponential smoothing method (ETS and autoregressive integrated moving average (ARIMA models to forecast the monthly prices of domestic logs of three of the most important species in Japan: sugi (Japanese cedar, Cryptomeria japonica D. Don, hinoki (Japanese cypress, Chamaecyparis obtusa (Sieb. et Zucc. Endl., and karamatsu (Japanese larch, Larix kaempferi (Lamb. Carr.. For the 12-month forecasting periods, forecasting intervals of 80% and 95% were given. By measuring the accuracy of forecasts of 12- and 6-month forecasting periods, it was found that ARIMA gave better results than did the ETS in the majority of cases. However, the combined method of averaging ETS and ARIMA forecasts gave the best results for hinoki in several cases.

  14. Herpes Zoster in a 3-month-old infant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Duarte Malveiro

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Herpes Zoster (HZ is rare in infancy and results from reactivation of varicella-zoster virus, latent in the dorsal root ganglia of sensory or cranial nerves after primary infection (chickenpox. Case Report: We describe the case of an healthy infant, three months old, without previous clinical symptoms of chickenpox, in spite of having contacted with the disease at two weeks of life. She was hospitalized for vesicular-papular rash involving unilaterally dermatomes L4 and L5 and was treated with acyclovir with good clinical outcome. Conclusion: The immaturity of the immune system and the interference of maternal antibodies contribute to the manifestation of HZ in the first year of life. In a previously healthy child it is not recommended the exclusion of underlying immunodeficiency or malignant disease.

  15. Comparison of the effects of educational programs on the development of infants aged 1-3 months based on the BASNEF model and application of acupressure on the GB-21 point

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marzieh Akbarzadeh

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Breastfeeding plays a pivotal role in the promotion of health and prevention of psychological problems in children. This study aimed to compare the effects of breastfeeding educational programs on the development of infants aged 1-3 months based on the model of Belief, Attitude, Subjective Norm, and Enabling Factors (BASNEF and application of acupressure on the GB-21 point. Methods: This quasi-experimental study was conducted on 150 pregnant women (gestational age: 36-41 weeks receiving care in the educational clinics affiliated to Shiraz University of Medical Sciences, Iran. Subjects were divided into two intervention groups (educational and acupressure and one control group. In intervention groups, in addition to routine prenatal care, pregnant women received training based on the BASNEF model and instructed acupressure. Mothers in the control group received only standard care during pregnancy. After the intervention, data were collected using Denver developmental screening test. Data analysis was performed in SPSS V.16 using one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA. Results: Among developmental gross motor skills, a significant difference was observed between the intervention and control groups regarding the ability to breast lift by relying on the arm (P=0.016. In terms of fine motor skills, a significant difference was observed in holding the rattle by infant (P=0.034. Moreover, time of acquiring individual and social developmental skills was higher in intervention groups compared to the control group. However, the difference was not statistically significant (P≥0.05. Therefore, no significant differences were observed between the two interventional groups in this regard (P≥0.05. Conclusion: According to the results of this study, instructed acupressure on the GB-21 pointcould improve some gross motor and fine motor skills in infants. Therefore, it is recommended that the developmental indicators in infants aged 1-3 months be evaluated in

  16. Electric power monthly, May 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-05-01

    The Electric Power Monthly (EPM) presents monthly electricity statistics. The purpose of this publication is to provide energy decisionmakers with accurate and timely information that may be used in forming various perspectives on electric issues that lie ahead. Data in this report are presented for a wide audience including Congress, Federal and State agencies, the electric utility industry, and the general public. This publication provides monthly statistics for net generation, fossil fuel consumption and stocks, quantity and quality of fossil fuels, cost of fossil fuels, electricity sales, revenue, and average revenue per kilowatthour of electricity sold. Statistics by company and plant are published on the capability of new generating units, net generation, fuel consumption, fuel stocks, quantity and quality of fuel, and cost of fossil fuels.

  17. Electric power monthly, August 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-08-13

    The Electric Power Monthly (EPM) presents monthly electricity statistics. The purpose of this publication is to provide energy decisionmakers with accurate and timely information that may be used in forming various perspectives on electric issues that lie ahead. The EPM is prepared by the Survey Management Division; Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternate Fuels, Energy Information Administration (EIA), Department of Energy. This publication provides monthly statistics at the US, Census division, and State levels for net generation, fossil fuel consumption and stocks, quantity and quality of fossil fuels, cost of fossil fuels, electricity sales, revenue, and average revenue per kilowatthour of electricity sold. Data on net generation, fuel consumption, fuel stocks, quantity and cost of fossil fuels are also displayed for the North American Electric Reliability Council (NERC) regions.

  18. Natural gas monthly, April 1998

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-04-01

    This issue of the Natural Gas Monthly presents the most recent estimates of natural gas data from the Energy Information Administration (EIA). Estimates extend through April 1998 for many data series. The report highlights activities, events, and analyses of interest to public and private sector organizations associated with the natural gas industry. Volume and price data are presented each month for natural gas production, distribution, consumption, and interstate pipeline activities. Producer-related activities and underground storage data are also reported. From time to time, feature articles are presented designed to assist readers in using and interpreting natural gas information. This issue contains the special report, ``Natural Gas 1997: A Preliminary Summary.`` This report provides information on natural gas supply and disposition for the year 1997, based on monthly data through December from EIA surveys. 6 figs., 28 tabs.

  19. Electric power monthly, April 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-04-01

    The Electric Power Monthly (EPM) presents monthly electricity statistics. The purpose of this publication is to provide energy decisionmakers with accurate and timely information that may be used in forming various perspectives on electric issues that lie ahead. This publication provides monthly statistics at the U.S., Census division, and State levels for net generation, fossil fuel consumption and stocks, quantity and quality of fossil fuels, cost of fossil fuels, electricity sales, revenue, and average revenue per kilowatthour of electricity sold. Data on net generation, fuel consumption, fuel stocks, quantity and cost of fossil fuels are also displayed for the North American Electric Reliability Council (NERC) regions. This April 1994 issue contains 1993 year-end data and data through January 1994.

  20. Electric power monthly, September 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-09-17

    The Electric Power Monthly (EPM) presents monthly electricity statistics. The purpose of this publication is to provide energy decisionmakers with accurate and timely information that may be used in forming various perspectives on electric issues that lie ahead. The EPM is prepared by the Survey Management Division; Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternate Fuels, Energy Information Administration (EIA), Department of Energy. This publication provides monthly statistics at the US, Census division, and State levels for net generation, fossil fuel consumption and stocks, quantity and quality of fossil fuels, cost of fossil fuels, electricity sales, revenue, and average revenue per kilowatthour of electricity sold. Data on net generation, fuel consumption, fuel stocks, quantity and cost of fossil fuels are also displayed for the North American Electric Reliability Council (NERC) regions.

  1. Radiological observation of the spondylolisthesis: The comparison between L4-L5 and L5-S1 spondylolisthesis in plain film and myelographic of findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bae, K. S.; Jo, H. G.; Chung, M. C.; Choi, D. L.; Kim, K. J. [Soonchunhyang University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1983-12-15

    Spondylolisthesis is displacement of one vertebra upon the other with bony defect of neural arch or elongation of the pars interarticularis. Radiological findings of 35 confirmed cases of spondylolisthesis on plain film and myelogram were reviewed. We also compared the size and contour of slipped vertebra, and myelographic findings between L4-L5 (12 cases) and L5-S1 (23 cases) listhesis. The results were as follows: 1. Average of posterior wedging index of the body, foreward displacement, narrowing of intervertebral disc space and the degenerative changes are more severe in L5-S1 spondylolisthesis. 2. Hyperplastic changes of slipped vertebra are more severe in L5-S1 listhesis. 3. Incidence of spina bifida is not co-related between L4-L5 and L5-SI listhesis. 4. Arthrosis of the intervertebral joint appears both below and above the level of L5-S1 listhesis, but rare in L4-L5 listhesis. 5. The L5 root seems to be the one most often affected in lumber spondylolisthesis on myelogram. 6. The diagnosis of intervertebral disc herniation is less relable in patient with listhesis than in patients without listhesis.

  2. Water Production in Comets C/2011 l4 (PanSTARRS) and C/2012 f6 (Lemmon) from observations with SOHO/SWAN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Combi, M. R.; Bertaux, J.-L.; Quémerais, E.; Ferron, S.; Mäkinen, J. T. T.; Aptekar, G.

    2014-06-01

    Comets C/2011 L4 (PanSTARRS) and C/2012 F6 (Lemmon) were observed throughout their 2012-2013 apparitions with the Solar Wind Anisotropies (SWAN) all-sky hydrogen Lyα camera on board the Solar and Heliosphere Observatory (SOHO) satellite. SOHO has been in a halo orbit around the L1 Earth-Sun Lagrange point since early 1996 and has been observing the interplanetary medium and comets beginning with C/1996 B2 (Hyakutake). The global water production from these comets was determined from an analysis of the SWAN Lyα camera observations. Comet C/2011 L4 (PanSTARRS), which reached its perihelion distance of 0.302 AU on 2013 March 10.17, was observed on 50 days between 2013 January 29 and April 30. Comet C/2012 F6 (Lemmon), which reached its perihelion distance of 0.731 AU on 2013 March 24.51, was observed on 109 days between 2012 November 29 and 2013 June 31. The maximum water production rates were ~1 × 1030 molecules s-1 for both comets. The activities of both comets were asymmetric about perihelion. C/2011 L4 (PanSTARRS) was more active before perihelion than after, but C/2012 F6 (Lemmon) was more active after perihelion than before.

  3. Electric power monthly, April 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-05-07

    The Electric Power Monthly is prepared by the Survey Management Division; Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternate Fuels, Energy Information Administration (EIA), Department of Energy. This publication provides monthly statistics at the US, Census division, and State levels for net generation, fossil fuel consumption and stocks, quantity and quality of fossil fuels, cost of fossil fuels, electricity sales, revenue, and average revenue per kilowatthour of electricity sold. Data on net generation, fuel consumption, fuel stocks, quantity and cost of fossil fuels are also displayed for the North American Electric Reliability Council (NERC) regions.

  4. Natural gas monthly, August 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-08-25

    The Natural Gas Monthly (NGM) is prepared in the Data Operations Branch of the Reserves and Natural Gas Division, Office of Oil and Gas, Energy Information Administration (EIA), US Department of Energy (DOE). The NGM highhghts activities, events, and analyses of interest to public and private sector organizations associated with the natural gas industry. Volume and price data are presented each month for natural gas production, distribution, consumption, and interstate pipeline activities. Producer-related activities and underground storage data are also reported. From time to time, the NGM features articles designed to assist readers in using and interpreting natural gas information.

  5. Natural gas monthly, March 1997

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-03-01

    The Natural Gas Monthly (NGM) highlights activities, events, and analyses of interest to public and private sector organizations associated with the natural gas industry. Volume and price data are presented each month for natural gas production, distribution, consumption, and interstate pipeline activities. Producer-related activities and underground storage data are also reported. From time to time, the NGM features articles designed to assist readers in using and interpreting natural gas information. The feature article is entitled ``Natural gas analysis and geographic information systems.`` 6 figs., 27 tabs.

  6. Natural gas monthly, October 1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-10-01

    The Natural Gas Monthly (NGM) is prepared in the Data Operations Branch of the Reserves and Natural Gas Division, Office of Oil and Gas, Energy Information Administration (EIA), U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). The NGM highlights activities, events, and analyses of interest to public and private sector organizations associated with the natural gas industry. Volume and price data are presented each month for natural gas production, distribution, consumption, and interstate pipeline activities. Producer-related activities and underground storage data are also reported. From time to time, the NGM features articles designed to assist readers in using and interpreting natural gas information.

  7. Natural gas monthly, April 1999

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1999-05-06

    The Natural Gas Monthly (NGM) highlights activities, events, and analyses of interest to public and private sector organizations associated with the natural gas industry. Volume and price data are presented each month for natural gas production, distribution, consumption, and interstate pipeline activities. Producer-related activities and underground storage data are also reported. From time to time, the NGM features articles designed to assist readers in using and interpreting natural gas information. There are two feature articles in this issue: Natural gas 1998: Issues and trends, Executive summary; and Special report: Natural gas 1998: A preliminary summary. 6 figs., 28 tabs.

  8. Electric power monthly, June 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-06-01

    The Electric Power Monthly (EPM) presents monthly electricity statistics. The purpose of this publication is to provide energy decisionmakers with accurate and timely information that may be used in forming various perspectives on electric issues that lie ahead. Data in this report are presented for a wide audience including Congress, Federal and State agencies, the electric utility industry, and the general public. The EIA collected the information in this report to fulfill its data collection and dissemination responsibilities as specified in the Federal Energy Administration Act of 1974 (Public Law 93-275) as amended.

  9. Monthly energy review, June 1999

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1999-06-01

    The Monthly Energy Review (MER) presents an overview of the Energy Information Administration`s recent monthly energy statistics. The statistics cover the major activities of US production, consumption, trade, stocks, and prices for petroleum, natural gas, coal, electricity, and nuclear energy. Also included are international energy and thermal and metric conversion factors. The MER is intended for use by Members of Congress, Federal and State agencies, energy analysts, and the general public. EIA welcomes suggestions from readers regarding data series in the MER and in other EIA publications. 37 figs., 61 tabs.

  10. Natural gas monthly, April 1997

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-04-01

    The Natural Gas Monthly (NGM) highlights activities, events, and analyses of interest to public and private sector organizations associated with the natural gas industry. Volume and price data are present3ed each month for natural gas production, distribution, consumption, and interstate pipeline activities. Producer-related activities and underground storage data are also reported. From time to time, the NGM features articles designed to assist readers in using and interpreting natural gas information. The feature article is entitled ``Natural gas pipeline and system expansions.`` 6 figs., 27 tabs.

  11. ULTRAPLATE 30 month management report

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jens Dahl

    2003-01-01

    In the period from month 24 to month 30 focus has been on the work-package 3 activities concerning optimisation of the newly developed ULTRAPLATE technology towards specific industrial applications. Three main application areas have been pursued: 1) High- speed plating of lead free solder contacts......, 2) electroforming of tools for moulding of low-cost precision polymer devices and 3) deposition of magnetic alloys to be used in new planar micro-devices. Within each of the three studied application areas, the targeted output is a finished demonstrator to show the potential of the new ULTRAPLATE...

  12. Monthly energy review, July 1999

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1999-07-01

    The Monthly Energy Review (MER) presents an overview of the Energy Information Administration`s recent monthly energy statistics. The statistics cover the major activities of US production, consumption, trade, stocks, and prices for petroleum, natural gas, coal, electricity, and nuclear energy. Also included are international energy and thermal and metric conversion factors. The MER is intended for use by Members of Congress, Federal and State agencies, energy analysts, and the general public. EIA welcomes suggestions from readers regarding data series in the MER and in other EIA publications. 37 figs., 75 tabs.

  13. Electric power monthly, August 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-08-24

    The Electric Power Monthly (EPM) presents monthly electricity statistics. The purpose of this publication is to provide energy decisionmakers with accurate and timely information that may be used in forming various perspectives on electric issues that lie ahead. Data in this report are presented for a wide audience including Congress, Federal and State agencies, the electric utility industry, and the general public. The EIA collected the information in this report to fulfill its data collection and dissemination responsibilities as specified in the Federal Energy Administration Act of 1974 (Public Law 93-275) as amended.

  14. Electric power monthly, May 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-05-25

    The Electric Power Monthly (EPM) is prepared by the Survey Management Division; Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternate Fuels, Energy Information Administration (EIA), Department of Energy. This publication provides monthly statistics at the US, Census division, and State levels for net generation, fossil fuel consumption and stocks, quantity and quality of fossil fuels, cost of fossil fuels, electricity sales, revenue, and average revenue per kilowatthour of electricity sold. Data on net generation, fuel consumption, fuel stocks, quantity and cost of fossil fuels are also displayed for the North American Electric Reliability Council (NERC) regions.

  15. Electric power monthly, July 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-07-29

    The Electric Power Monthly (EPM) presents monthly electricity statistics. The purpose of this publication is to provide energy decisionmakers with accurate and timely information that may be used in forming various perspectives on electric issues that lie ahead. Data in this report are presented for a wide audience including Congress, Federal and State agencies, the electric utility industry, and the general public. The EIA collected the information in this report to fulfill its data collection and dissemination responsibilities as specified in the Federal Energy Administration Act of 1974 (Public Law 93-275) as amended.

  16. Duration of immunity of a multivalent (DHPPi/L4R) canine vaccine against four Leptospira serovars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Stephen; Stirling, Catrina; Thomas, Anne; King, Vickie; Plevová, Edita; Chromá, Ludmila; Siedek, Elisabeth; Illambas, Joanna; Salt, Jeremy; Sture, Gordon

    2013-06-28

    Despite effective vaccines against common Leptospira serovars, the development of new products with long duration of immunity is still important to protect dogs against leptospirosis. The results from four challenge studies performed one year after vaccination of dogs with a multivalent vaccine containing four Leptospira antigens are reported. Six week old dogs received two vaccinations, three weeks apart, and were challenged 367 days later. Clinical observations were recorded, while blood (culture, biochemistry and haematology), urine (culture) and liver and kidney (culture) samples were collected throughout the study or at necropsy. All control dogs remained seronegative until challenge, when they seroconverted. Antibody titres to Leptospira antigens were seen in vaccinated dogs 21 days after first vaccination and peaked three to six weeks after the second vaccination. Titres decreased in all studies over the following 12 months, until challenge when anamnestic responses were observed. In all studies control dogs demonstrated various abnormal clinical signs, while no vaccinated dogs were affected; differences between groups were only significant following L. bratislava challenge. Analysis of blood cultures showed all control and five of the 24 vaccinated dogs were Leptospira positive after challenge; all studies showed significant differences between treatment groups in mean number of days with positive cultures. Significant differences between vaccinated and control groups in mean number of days with positive urine cultures were also observed, with all non-vaccinated and one vaccinated dog Leptospira positive. The urine culture positive vaccinated dog also gave positive culture from kidney and liver samples. All except one control dog also showed positive Leptospira isolation from kidney or liver, with significant differences between vaccinated and control groups observed. The results demonstrate that administration of a new vaccine to six week old puppies

  17. Multi-month prescriptions, fast-track refills, and community ART groups: results from a process evaluation in Malawi on using differentiated models of care to achieve national HIV treatment goals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prust, Margaret L; Banda, Clement K; Nyirenda, Rose; Chimbwandira, Frank; Kalua, Thokozani; Jahn, Andreas; Eliya, Michael; Callahan, Katie; Ehrenkranz, Peter; Prescott, Marta R; McCarthy, Elizabeth A; Tagar, Elya; Gunda, Andrews

    2017-07-21

    In order to facilitate scale-up of antiretroviral therapy (ART) in Malawi, innovative and pragmatic models have been developed to optimize the efficiency of HIV service delivery. In particular, three models of differentiated care have emerged for stable patients: adjusted appointment spacing through multi-month scripting (MMS); fast-track drug refills (FTRs) on alternating visits; and community ART groups (CAGs) where group members rotate in collecting medications at the facility for all members. This study aimed to assess the extent to which ART patients in Malawi are differentiated based on clinical stability and describe the characteristics and costs associated with the models of differentiated care offered. A mixed methods process evaluation was conducted from 30 purposefully selected ART facilities. Cross-sectional data for this evaluation was collected between February and May 2016. The following forms of data collection are reported here: structured surveys with 136 health care workers; reviews of 75,364 patient clinical records; 714 observations of visit time and flow; and 30 questionnaires on facility characteristics. Among ART patients, 77.5% (95% confidence interval [CI] 74.1-80.6) were eligible for differentiated models of care based on criteria for clinical stability from national guidelines. Across all facilities, 69% of patients were receiving MMS. In facilities offering FTRs and CAGs, 67% and 6% of patients were enrolled in the models, respectively. However, eligibility criteria were used inconsistently: 72.9% (95% CI 66.3-78.6) of eligible patients and 42.3% (95% CI 33.1-52.0) ineligible patients received MMS. Results indicated that patient travel and time costs were reduced by 67%, and the unit costs of ART service delivery through the MMS, FTR and CAG models were similar, representing a reduction of approximately 10% in the annual unit cost of providing care to stable patients that receive no model. MMS is being implemented nationally and has

  18. Natural gas monthly, August 1990

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1990-11-05

    This report highlights activities, events, and analyses of interest to public and private sector oganizations associated with the natural gas industry. Volume and price data are presented each month for natural gas production, distribution, consumption, and interstate pipeline activities. Producer-related activities and underground storage data are also reported. 33 tabs.

  19. Monthly energy review, January 1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-01-01

    This document presents an overview of the Energy Information Administration`s recent monthly energy statistics. The statistics cover the major activities of U.S. production, consumption, trade, stocks, and prices for petroleum,natural gas, coal, electricity, and nuclear energy. Also included are international energy and thermal metric conversion factors.

  20. Monthly energy review, July 1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-07-01

    This document presents an overview of the recent monthly energy statistics from the Energy Information Administration (EIA). Statistical data covers activities of U.S. production, consumption, trade, stocks, and prices for fossil fuels , nuclear energy, and electricity. Also included are international energy and thermal and metric conversion factors.

  1. Monthly energy review, November 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-11-24

    The Monthly Energy Review gives information on production, distribution, and consumption for various energy sources, e.g. petroleum, natural gas, oil, coal, electricity, and nuclear energy. Some data is also included on international energy sources and supplies, the import of petroleum products into the US and pricing and reserves data (as applicable) for the various sources of energy listed above.

  2. Monthly energy review, November 1995

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-11-01

    This document presents an overview of the Energy Information Administration`s recent monthly energy statistics. The statistics cover the major activities of US production, consumption, trade, stocks, and prices for petroleum, natural gas, coal, electricity, and nuclear energy. International energy and thermal and metric conversion factors are included.

  3. Monthly energy review, April 1997

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-04-01

    This report presents an overview of monthly energy statistics. The statistics cover the major activities of U.S. production, consumption, trade, stocks, and prices for petroleum, natural gas, coal, electricity, and nuclear energy. International energy and thermal metric conversion factors are included.

  4. Monthly energy review, October 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-10-26

    The Monthly Energy Review gives information on production, distribution, and consumption for various energy sources, e.g. petroleum, natural gas, oil, coal, electricity, and nuclear energy. Some data is also included on international energy sources and supplies, the import of petroleum products into the US and pricing and reserves data (as applicable) for the various sources of energy listed above.

  5. Monthly energy review, June 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-06-25

    The Monthly Energy Review provides an overview of the production, distribution, and consumption of energy derived from petroleum, natural gas, coal, electricity, and nuclear energy. It also discusses oil and gas resource development, energy prices, and issues relevant to international energy markets.

  6. Periodic progress report, 12 months

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juhl, Thomas Winther; Nielsen, Jakob Skov

    The work performed during the first 12 months of the project started with the establishment of the cutting theory for the cutting of heavy sections (phase 1). Phase 2 comprises the design of the first laboratory version cutting head with optics, nozzle systems and interfaces for the various...

  7. Monthly energy review, April 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-04-01

    The Monthly Energy Review contains statistical data on the following: energy consumption, petroleum, natural gas, oil and gas resource development, coal, electricity, nuclear energy, energy prices, and international energy. In addition, an energy overview is provided, and, for the April issue, Energy use and carbon emissions; Some international comparisons.

  8. Hepatitis Awareness Month PSA (:30)

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2011-05-11

    May is National Hepatitis Awareness Month. This 30 second PSA discusses hepatitis and encourages listners to talk to their health care professional about getting tested.  Created: 5/11/2011 by National Center for HIV/AIDS, Viral Hepatitis, STD, and TB Prevention.   Date Released: 5/11/2011.

  9. Monthly energy review, March 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-03-29

    The Monthly Energy Review provides information on production, distribution, consumption, prices, imports, and exports for the following US energy sources: petroleum; petroleum products; natural gas; coal; electricity; and nuclear energy. The section on international energy contains data for world crude oil production and consumption, petroleum stocks in OECD countries, and nuclear electricity gross generation.

  10. Monthly energy review, December 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-12-22

    This document provides data on monthly energy use and fossil fuels. The following sections are included: Highlights: Emissions of greenhouse gases in the United States 1985--1990; Highlights: assessment of energy use in multibuilding facilities; energy overview; energy consumption; petroleum; natural gas; oil and gas resource development; coal; electricity; nuclear energy; energy prices; and international energy.

  11. Periodic progress report, 12 months

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juhl, Thomas Winther; Nielsen, Jakob Skov

    The work performed during the first 12 months of the project started with the establishment of the cutting theory for the cutting of heavy sections (phase 1). Phase 2 comprises the design of the first laboratory version cutting head with optics, nozzle systems and interfaces for the various machi...

  12. Monthly energy review, October 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-10-26

    The Monthly Energy Review gives information on production, distribution, and consumption for various energy sources, e.g. petroleum, natural gas, oil, coal, electricity, and nuclear energy. Some data is also included on international energy sources and supplies, the import of petroleum products into the US and pricing and reserves data (as applicable) for the various sources of energy listed above.

  13. Monthly energy review, June 1990

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1990-09-26

    The Monthly Energy Review presents current data on production, consumption, stocks, imports, exports, and prices of the principal energy commodities in the United States. Also included are data on international production of crude oil, consumption of petroleum products, petroleum stocks, and production of electricity from nuclear-powered facilities.

  14. Your Child's Development: 1 Month

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Child Too Busy? Helping Your Child Adjust to Preschool School Lunches Kids and Food: 10 Tips for Parents Healthy Habits for TV, Video Games, and the Internet Your Child’s Development: 1 Month KidsHealth > For Parents > Your Child’s Development: ...

  15. Electric Power Monthly, July 1990

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1990-10-12

    The Electric Power Monthly (EPM) is prepared by the Electric Power Division; Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternate Fuels, Energy Information Administration (EIA), Department of Energy. This publication provides monthly statistics at the national, Census division, and State levels for net generation, fuel consumption, fuel stocks, quantity and quality of fuel, cost of fuel, electricity sales, and average revenue per kilowatthour of electricity sold. Data on net generation are also displayed at the North American Electric Reliability Council (NERC) region level. Additionally, company and plant level information are published in the EPM on capability of new plants, net generation, fuel consumption, fuel stocks, quantity and quality of fuel, and cost in fuel. Quantity, quality, and cost of fuel data lag the net generation, fuel consumption, fuel stocks, electricity sales, and average revenue per kilowatthour data by 1 month. This difference in reporting appears in the national, Census division, and State level tables. However, at the plant level, all statistics presented are for the earlier month for the purpose of comparison. 12 refs., 4 figs., 48 tabs.

  16. Electric power monthly, March 1995

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-03-20

    This report for March 1995, presents monthly electricity statistics for a wide audience including Congress, Federal and State agencies, the electric utility industry, and the general public. The purpose of this publication is to provide energy decisionmakers with accurate and timely information that may be used in forming various perspectives on electric issues that lie ahead.

  17. Natural gas monthly, July 1990

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1990-10-03

    This report highlights activities, events, and analyses of interest to public and private sector organizations associated with the natural gas industry. Volume and price data are presented each month for natural gas production, distribution, consumption, and interstate pipeline activities. Producer-related activities and underground storage data are also reported. A glossary is included. 7 figs., 33 tabs.

  18. STD Awareness Month PSA (:30)

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2011-04-19

    April is National STD Awareness Month. STDs can affect anyone. Many STDs don't have symptoms so it's important to get tested.  Created: 4/19/2011 by National Center for HIV/AIDS, Viral Hepatitis, STD, and TB Prevention.   Date Released: 4/19/2011.

  19. Your Child's Development: 1 Year (12 Months)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Kids For Parents MORE ON THIS TOPIC Your Child's Checkup: 1 Year (12 Months) Your Baby's Growth: 12 Months Your Baby's Hearing, Vision, and Other Senses: 12 Months Sleep and Your 8- to 12-Month-Old Growth ...

  20. Petroleum supply monthly, March 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-03-30

    Data presented in the Petroleum Supply Monthly (PSM) describe the supply and disposition of petroleum products in the United States and major US geographic regions. The data series describe production, imports and exports, inter-Petroleum Administration for Defense (PAD) District movements, and inventories by the primary suppliers of petroleum products in the United States (50 States and the District of Columbia). The reporting universe includes those petroleum sectors in primary supply. Included are: petroleum refiners, motor gasoline blenders, operators of natural gas processing plants and fractionators, inter-PAD transporters, importers, and major inventory holders of petroleum products and crude oil. When aggregated, the data reported by these sectors approximately represent the consumption of petroleum products in the United States. Data presented in the PSM are divided into two sections: Summary Statistics and Detailed Statistics. The tables and figures in the Summary Statistics section of the PSM present a time series of selected petroleum data on a US level. Most time series include preliminary estimates for one month based on the Weekly Petroleum Supply Reporting System; statistics based on the most recent data from the Monthly Petroleum Supply Reporting System (MPSRS); and statistics published in prior issues of the PSM and PSA. The Detailed Statistics tables of the PSM present statistics for the most current month available as well as year-to-date. In most cases, the statistics are presented for several geographic areas -- the United States (50 States and the District of Columbia), five PAD Districts, and 12 Refining Districts. At the US and PAD District level, the total volume and the daily rate of activities are presented. The statistics are developed from monthly survey forms submitted by respondents to the EIA and from data provided from other sources.

  1. Petroleum supply monthly, June 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-06-28

    Data presented in the Petroleum Supply Monthly (PSM) describe the supply and disposition of petroleum products in the United States and major US geographic regions. The data series describe production, imports and exports, inter-Petroleum Administration for Defense (PAD) District movements, and inventories by the primary suppliers of petroleum products in the United States (50 States and the District of Columbia). The reporting universe includes those petroleum sectors in primary supply. Included are: petroleum refiners, motor gasoline blenders, operators of natural gas processing plants and fractionators, inter-PAD transporters, importers, and major inventory holders of petroleum products and crude oil. When aggregated, the data reported by these sectors approximately represent the consumption of petroleum products in the United States. Data presented in the PSM are divided into two sections: Summary Statistics and Detailed Statistics. The tables and figures ih the Summary Statistics section of the PSM present a time series of selected petroleum data on a US level. Most time series include preliminary estimates for one month based on the Weekly Petroleum Supply Reporting System; statistics based on the most recent data from the Monthly Petroleum Supply Reporting System (MPSRS); and statistics published in prior issues of the PSM and PSA. The Detailed Statistics tables of the PSM present statistics for the most current month available as well as year-to-date. In most cases, the statistics are presented for several geographic areas - - the United States (50 States and the District of Columbia), five PAD Districts, and 12 Refining Districts. At the US and PAD District level, the total volume and the daily rate of activities are presented. The statistics are developed from monthly survey forms submitted by respondents to the EIA and from data provided firom other sources.

  2. Electric power monthly, July 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-07-01

    The Electric Power Monthly (EPM) presents monthly electricity statistics. The purpose of this publication is to provide energy decisionmakers with accurate and timely information that may be used in forming various perspectives on electric issues that lie ahead. Data in this report are presented for a wide audience including Congress, Federal and State agencies, the electric utility industry, and the general public. The EIA collected the information in this report to fulfill its data collection and dissemination responsibilities as specified in the Federal Energy Administration Act of 1974 (Public Law 93-275) as amended. The EPM is prepared by the Survey Management Division; Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternate Fuels, Energy Information Administration (EIA), Department of Energy. This publication provides monthly statistics at the US, Census division, and State levels for net generation, fossil fuel consumption and stocks, quantity and quality of fossil fuels, cost of fossil fuels, electricity sales, revenue, and average revenue per kilowatthour of electricity sold. Data on net generation, fuel consumption, fuel stocks, quantity and cost of fossil fuels are also displayed for the North American Electric Reliability Council (NERC) regions. Statistics by company and plant are published in the EPM on the capability of new generating units, net generation, fuel consumption, fuel stocks, quantity and quality of fuel, and cost of fossil fuels. Data on quantity, quality, and cost of fossil fuels lag data on net generation, fuel consumption, fuel stocks, electricity sales, and average revenue per kilowatthour by 1 month. This difference in reporting appears in the US, Census division, and State level tables. However, for purposes of comparison, plant-level data are presented for the earlier month.

  3. Modelación de valores extremos: Un análisis preliminar de la precipitación mensual en La Habana; Extreme-value modelling: A preliminary analysis of monthly precipitation at Havana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jesper Ryden

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available El análisis estadístico de valores extremos es de suma importancia en muchos campos de la ingeniería.Este trabajo es una breve introducción a la modelación con distribución  de valores extremos. Consisteen la presentación de dos métodos básicos comúnmente empleados en el modelado de valores extremospara analizar el problema típico de estimación de valores de retorno. Como ilustración de los métodos,se investiga un conjunto de datos de la precipitación mensual en La Habana. Statistical analysis of extreme values is of importance in many fields of engineering. This paper willserve as a brief introduction to modelling with extreme-value distributions. A presentation of two common,basic methods is given to analyse the standard problem in extreme-value modelling of estimation of returnvalues. As an illustration of the methods, a data set of monthly precipitation at Havana is investigated.

  4. Contribution of myelunated fibers from spinal L4, L5 and L6 nerves to the sciatic nerve and its main branches in the adult rat Contribución de fibras mielínicas provenientes de los nervios espinales lumbares L4, L5 y L6 al nervio ciático de rata adulta y sus ramas principales

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan D. Robles

    2000-04-01

    Full Text Available The rat sciatic nerve is composed by the L4, L5 and L6 lumbar spinal nerves. However, the contribution in myelinated fibers originating from these nerves along this nervous trunk has not yet been defined. In the present study, the L4, L5 and L4-L5 spinal nerves were selectively transected. After one week the sciatic, tibial, sural and peroneal nerves were dissected. These samples were fixed and processed for optical microscopy, and both degenerated and normal myelinated fibers were counted in toluidine blue-stained semi-thin sections. L4 contributed with myelinated fibers mainly to the peroneal nerve, and L5 to the sciatic, tibial and sural nerves. In general, the contribution of L6 was smaller and variable along the nervous trunk in comparison to the other two spinal branches. Our results give key information for further studies looking to correlate the contribution of spinal nerves making part of the sciatic nerve and its main branches with hind limb function. El nervio ciático de la rata está formado por los nervios espinales (ne lumbares L4, L5 y L6. Sin embargo, aún no se ha definido el aporte en fibras mielínicas de estos nervios espinales a lo largo del tronco nervioso. En este estudio se transectaron selectivamente los NE L4, L5 y L4-L5. Luego de una semana se disecaron los nervios ciático, tibial, sural y peroneal. Estas muestras se fijaron y procesaron para microscopía óptica y a partir de cortes coloreados con azul de toluidina se contaron las fibras mielínicas degeneradas y normales. L4 contribuyó con fibras mielínicas principalmente al nervio peroneal y L5 a los nervios ciático, tibial y sural. En general, el aporte de L6 fue menor y variable a lo largo del tronco nervioso comparado con las otras dos ramas espinales. Nuestros resultados brindan información valiosa para posteriores estudios que busquen correlacionar la contribución de los nervios espinales que componen el ciático y sus ramas principales con la funci

  5. Monthly, global emissions of carbon dioxide from fossil fuel consumption

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andres, R.J.; Gregg, Jay Sterling; Losey, L.

    2011-01-01

    This paper examines available data, develops a strategy and presents a monthly, global time series of fossil-fuel carbon dioxide emissions for the years 1950–2006. This monthly time series was constructed from detailed study of monthly data from the 21 countries that account for approximately 80...... reproduces monthly patterns in the data and the global monthly pattern of emissions is relatively insensitive to the exact proxy assignments used. The data and results presented here should lead to a better understanding of global and regional carbon cycles, especially when the mass data are combined...... with the stable carbon isotope data in atmospheric transport models....

  6. [Primary anthelminthic screening on the L4 and L5 developmental stages of the lungworm, Dictyocaulus viviparus, in guinea pigs].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinkorová, J; Prokopic, J

    1989-03-01

    The study was aimed at expanding the primary anthelmintic screening to cover a model of the group of pulmonary nematodes; in this particular case to introduce the lungworm, D. viviparus, in laboratory animals. A method of primary screening for the fourth and fifth larval states of D. viviparus in guinea-pigs was worked out after the selection of a suitable laboratory host. In the primary screening, three well-known anthelmintics of the benzimidazol series, including fenbendazole, mebendazole and levamisol, were tested by the method of controlled test. The anthelmintics were administered at the recommended doses of 7.5 and 10.0 mg per kg of live weight for two days in succession. The effectiveness of the control of the 4th and 5th larval states of D. viviparus was 93.4% in fenbendazole, 89.0% in mebendazole, and 89.9% in levamisol. It is confirmed by the results of the trials that guinea-pigs can be used for the testing model of the lungworm, D. viviparus, in anthelmintic screening.

  7. Forecast of Frost Days Based on Monthly Temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castellanos, M. T.; Tarquis, A. M.; Morató, M. C.; Saa-Requejo, A.

    2009-04-01

    Although frost can cause considerable crop damage and mitigation practices against forecasted frost exist, frost forecasting technologies have not changed for many years. The paper reports a new method to forecast the monthly number of frost days (FD) for several meteorological stations at Community of Madrid (Spain) based on successive application of two models. The first one is a stochastic model, autoregressive integrated moving average (ARIMA), that forecasts monthly minimum absolute temperature (tmin) and monthly average of minimum temperature (tminav) following Box-Jenkins methodology. The second model relates these monthly temperatures to minimum daily temperature distribution during one month. Three ARIMA models were identified for the time series analyzed with a stational period correspondent to one year. They present the same stational behavior (moving average differenced model) and different non-stational part: autoregressive model (Model 1), moving average differenced model (Model 2) and autoregressive and moving average model (Model 3). At the same time, the results point out that minimum daily temperature (tdmin), for the meteorological stations studied, followed a normal distribution each month with a very similar standard deviation through years. This standard deviation obtained for each station and each month could be used as a risk index for cold months. The application of Model 1 to predict minimum monthly temperatures showed the best FD forecast. This procedure provides a tool for crop managers and crop insurance companies to asses the risk of frost frequency and intensity, so that they can take steps to mitigate against frost damage and estimated the damage that frost would cost. This research was supported by Comunidad de Madrid Research Project 076/92. The cooperation of the Spanish National Meteorological Institute and the Spanish Ministerio de Agricultura, Pesca y Alimentation (MAPA) is gratefully acknowledged.

  8. Natural Gas Monthly August 1998

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-08-01

    The Natural Gas Monthly (NGM) highlights activities, events, and analyses of interest to public and private sector organizations associated with the natural gas industry. Volume and price data are presented each month for natural gas production, distribution, consumption, and interstate pipeline activities. Producer-related activities and underground storage data are also reported. From time to time, the NGM features articles designed to assist readers in using and interpreting natural gas information. Explanatory notes supplement the information found in tables of the report. A description of the data collection surveys that support the NGM is provided. A glossary of the terms used in this report is also provided to assist readers in understanding the data presented in this publication.

  9. Natural gas monthly, August 1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-08-01

    This analysis presents the most recent data on natural gas prices, supply, and consumption from the Energy Information Administration (EIA). The presentation of the latest monthly data is followed by an update on natural gas markets. The markets section examines the behavior of daily spot and futures prices based on information from trade press, as well as regional, weekly data on natural gas storage from the American Gas Association (AGA). This {open_quotes}Highlights{close_quotes} closes with a special section comparing and contrasting EIA and AGA storage data on a monthly and regional basis. The regions used are those defined by the AGA for their weekly data collection effort: the Producing Region, the Consuming Region East, and the Consuming Region West. While data on working gas levels have tracked fairly closely between the two data sources, differences have developed recently. The largest difference is in estimates of working gas levels in the East consuming region during the heating season.

  10. Monthly energy review, March 1998

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-03-01

    The Monthly Energy Review (MER) presents an overview of the Energy Information Administration`s recent monthly energy statistics. The statistics cover the major activities of U.S. production, consumption, trade, stocks, and prices for petroleum, natural gas, coal, electricity, and nuclear energy. Also included are international energy and thermal and metric conversion factors. Energy production during December 1997 totaled 5.9 quadrillion Btu, a 2.8 percent increase from the level of production during December 1996. Coal production increased 9.5 percent, natural gas production increased 3.9 percent, and production of crude oil and natural gas plant liquids decreased 1.1 percent. All other forms of energy production combined were down 6.9 percent from the level of production during December 1996.

  11. Natural gas monthly, October 1991

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1991-11-05

    The Natural Gas Monthly (NGM) is prepared in the Data Operations Branch of the Reserves and Natural Gas Division, Office of Oil and Gas, Energy Information Administration (EIA), US Department of Energy (DOE). The NGM highlights activities, events, and analyses of interest to public and private sector organizations associated with the natural gas industry. Volume and price data are presented each month for natural gas production, distribution, consumption, and interstate pipeline activities. Producer-related activities and underground storage data are also reported. The data in this publication are collected on surveys conducted by the EIA to fulfill its responsibilities for gathering and reporting energy data. Some of the data are collected under the authority of the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC), an independent commission within the DOE, which has jurisdiction primarily in the regulation of electric utilities and the interstate natural gas industry. Geographic coverage is the 50 States and the District of Columbia. 16 figs., 33 tabs.

  12. Petroleum marketing monthly, September 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-09-01

    The Petroleum Marketing Monthly (PMM) provides information and statistical data on a variety of crude oils and refined petroleum products. The publication presents statistics on crude oil costs and refined petroleum product sales for use by industry, government, private sector analysts, educational institutions, and consumers. Data on crude oil include the domestic first purchase price, the f.o.b. and landed cost of imported crude oil, and the refiners` acquisition cost of crude oil. Refined petroleum product sales data include motor gasoline, distillates, residuals, aviation fuels, kerosene, and propane. The Petroleum Marketing Division, Office of Oil and Gas, Energy Information Administration ensures the accuracy, quality, and confidentiality of the published data in the Petroleum Marketing Monthly.

  13. Petroleum marketing monthly, June 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-06-01

    The Petroleum Marketing Monthly (PMM) provides information and statistical data on a variety of crude oils and refined petroleum products. The publication presents statistics on crude oil costs and refined petroleum products sales for use by industry, government, private sector analysts, educational institutions, and consumers. Data on crude oil include the domestic first purchase price, the f.o.b. and landed cost of imported crude oil, and the refiners` acquisition cost of crude oil. Refined petroleum product sales data include motor gasoline, distillates, residuals, aviation fuels, kerosene, and propane. Monthly statistics on purchases of crude oil and sales of petroleum products are presented in five sections: Summary Statistics; Crude Oil Prices; Prices of Petroleum Products; Volumes of Petroleum Products; and Prime Supplier Sales Volumes of Petroleum Products for Local Consumption. The feature article is entitled ``The Second Oxygenated Gasoline Season.`` 7 figs., 50 tabs.

  14. Natural gas monthly, February 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-02-25

    The NGM highlights activities, events, and analyses of interest to public and private sector organizations associated with the natural gas industry. Volume and price data are presented each month for natural gas production, distribution, consumption, and interstate pipeline activities. Producer-related activities and underground storage data are also reported. The NGM also features articles designed to assist readers in using and interpreting natural gas information.

  15. Monthly energy review, October 1997

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-10-01

    This document presents an overview of the Energy Information Administration`s recent monthly energy statistics. The statistics cover the major activities of U.S. production, consumption, trade, stocks, and prices for petroleum, natural gas, coal, electricity, and nuclear energy. Information is also provided for oil and gas resource development. International energy statistics are given for petroleum production, consumption, and stocks, and for nuclear electricity gross generation. 37 figs., 61 tabs.

  16. Laser fusion monthly -- August 1980

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahlstrom, H.G. [ed.

    1980-08-01

    This report documents the monthly progress for the laser fusion research at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. First it gives facilities report for both the Shiva and Argus projects. Topics discussed include; laser system for the Nova Project; the fusion experiments analysis facility; optical/x-ray streak camera; Shiva Dante System temporal response; 2{omega}{sub 0} experiment; and planning for an ICF engineering test facility.

  17. Introducing 'Image of the Month'

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brian, Jones

    2016-04-01

    The Editors of Sedimentary Geology are pleased to announce the establishment of an 'Image of the Month', to appear in each issue of the journal. The idea is to publish outstanding examples of sedimentary features, at all scales, as a means of increasing their visibility and so promoting further discussion and exchange of ideas within the community. The image could be at the scale of satellite image, aerial photograph, outcrop, specimen or thin section.

  18. Monthly energy review, December 1995

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-12-21

    This publication presents an overview of EIA`s recent monthly energy statistics. The statistics cover the major activities of US production, consumption, trade, stocks, and prices for petroleum, natural gas, coal, electricity, and nuclear energy. Also included are international energy and thermal and metric conversion factors. An energy preview of alternative fuel providers vehicle fleet surveys is included. The publication is intended for use by members of Congress, Federal and State agencies, energy analysts, and the general public.

  19. Electric power monthly, May 1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-05-01

    This publication presents monthly electricity statistics for a wide audience including Congress, Federal and Stage agencies, the electric utility industry, and the general public. Purpose is to provide energy decisionmakers with accurate and timely information that may be used in forming various perspectives on electric issues that lie ahead. EIA collected the information to fulfill its data collection and dissemination responsibilities in Federal Energy Administration Act of 1974 (Public Law 93-275) as amended.

  20. Electric Power monthly, November 1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-11-01

    This publication presents monthly electricity statistics for a wide audience including Congress, Federal and state agencies, the electric utility industry, and the general public. Purpose is to provide energy decisionmakers with accurate and timely information that may be used in forming various perspectives on electric issues that lie ahead. EIA collected the information in this report to fulfill its data collection and dissemination responsibilities as specified in the Federal Energy Administration Act of 1974 (Public Law 93-275) as amended.

  1. Natural gas monthly, March 1998

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-03-01

    The March 1998 edition of the Natural Gas Monthly highlights activities, events, and analyses associated with the natural gas industry. Volume and price data are presented for natural gas production, distribution, consumption, and interstate pipeline activities. Producer-related activities and underground storage data are also reported. This report also features an article on the correction of errors in the drilling activity estimates series, and in-depth drilling activity data. 6 figs., 28 tabs.

  2. Natural gas monthly, March 1998

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-03-01

    The March 1998 edition of the Natural Gas Monthly highlights activities, events, and analyses associated with the natural gas industry. Volume and price data are presented for natural gas production, distribution, consumption, and interstate pipeline activities. Producer-related activities and underground storage data are also reported. This report also features an article on the correction of errors in the drilling activity estimates series, and in-depth drilling activity data. 6 figs., 28 tabs.

  3. Electric power monthly, October 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-10-20

    The Electric Power Monthly (EPM) presents monthly electricity statistics. The purpose of this publication is to provide energy decisionmakers with accurate and timely information that may be used in forming various perspectives on electric issues that lie ahead. Data in this report are presented for a wide audience including Congress, Federal and State agencies, the electric utility industry, and the general public. The EIA collected the information in this report to fulfill its data collection and dissemination responsibilities as specified in the Federal Energy Administration Act of 1974 (Public Law 93-275) as amended. This publication provides monthly statistics at the US, Census division, and State levels for net generation, fossil fuel consumption and stocks, quantity and quality of fossil fuels, cost of fossil fuels, electricity sales, revenue, and average revenue per kilowatthour of electricity sold. Data on net generation, fuel consumption, fuel stocks, quantity and cost of fossil fuels are also displayed for the North American Electric Reliability Council (NERC) regions. Statistics by company and plant are published in the EPM on the capability of new generating units, net generation, fuel consumption, fuel stocks, quantity and quality of fuel, and cost of fossil fuels.

  4. Natural gas monthly, March 1999

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1999-03-01

    This issue of the Natural Gas Monthly contains estimates for March 1999 for many natural gas data series at the national level. Estimates of national natural gas prices are available through December 1998 for most series. Highlights of the data contained in this issue are listed below. Preliminary data indicate that the national average wellhead price for 1998 declined to 16% from the previous year ($1.96 compared to $2.32 per thousand cubic feet). At the end of March, the end of the 1998--1999 heating season, the level of working gas in underground natural gas storage facilities is estimated to be 1,354 billion cubic feet, 169 billion cubic feet higher than at the end of March 1998. Gas consumption during the first 3 months of 1999 is estimated to have been 179 billion cubic feet higher than in the same period in 1998. Most of this increase (133 billion cubic feet) occurred in the residential sector due to the cooler temperatures in January and February compared to the same months last year. According to the National Weather Service, heating degree days in January 1999 were 15% greater than the previous year while February recorded a 5% increase.

  5. Electric power monthly, February 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-02-16

    The Electric Power Monthly (EMP) presents monthly electricity statistics. The purpose of this publication is to provide energy decisionmakers with accurate and timely information that may be used in forming various perspectives on electric issues that lie ahead. Data in this report are presented for a wide audience including Congress, Federal and State agencies, the electric utility industry, and the general public. The EIA collected the information in this report to fulfill its data collection and dissemination responsibilities as specified in the Federal Energy Administration Act of 1974 (Public Law 93-275) as amended. This publication provides monthly statistics at the US, Census division, and State levels for net generation, fossil fuel consumption and stocks, quantity and quality of fossil fuels, cost of electricity sales, revenue, and average revenue per kilowatthour of electricity sold. Data on net generation, fuel consumption, fuel stocks, quantity and cost of fossil fuels are also displayed for the North American Electric Reliability Council (NERC) regions. Statistics by company and plant are published in the EPM on the capability of new generating units, net generation, fuel consumption, fuel stocks, quantity and quality of fuel, and cost of fossil fuels.

  6. Electric power monthly, January 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-01-26

    The Electric Power Monthly (EPM) presents monthly electricity statistics. The purpose of this publication is to provide energy decisionmakers with accurate and timely information that may be used in forming various perspectives on electric issues that lie ahead. Data in this report are presented for a wide audience including Congress, Federal and State agencies, the electric utility industry, and the general public. The EIA collected the information in this report to fulfill its data collection and dissemination responsibilities as specified in the Federal Energy Administration Act of 1974 (Public Law 93-275) as amended. This publication provides monthly statistics at the US Census division, and State levels for net generation, fossil fuel consumption and stocks, quantity and quality of fossil fuels, cost of fossil fuels, electricity sales, revenue, and average revenue per kilowatthour of electricity sold. Data on net generation, fuel consumption, fuel stocks, quantity and cost of fossil fuels are also displayed for the North American Electric Reliability Council (NERC) regions. Statistics by company and plant are published in the EPM on the capability of new generating units, net generation, fuel consumption, fuel stocks, quantity and quality of fuel, and cost of fossil fuels.

  7. Electric Power Monthly, June 1990

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1990-09-13

    The EPM is prepared by the Electric Power Division; Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternate Fuels, Energy Information Administration (EIA), Department of Energy. This publication provides monthly statistics at the national, Census division, and State levels for net generation, fuel consumption, fuel stocks, quantity and quality of fuel, electricity sales, and average revenue per kilowatthour of electricity sold. Data on net generation are also displayed at the North American Electric Reliability Council (NERC) region level. Additionally, company and plant level information are published in the EPM on capability of new plants, net generation, fuel consumption, fuel stocks, quantity and quality of fuel, and cost of fuel. Quantity, quality, and cost of fuel data lag the net generation, fuel consumption, fuel stocks, electricity sales, and average revenue per kilowatthour data by 1 month. This difference in reporting appears in the national, Census division, and State level tables. However, at the plant level, all statistics presented are for the earlier month for the purpose of comparison. 40 tabs.

  8. DESIGNING A MODERN LABORATORY FOR URBAN COMBAT TRAINING (L4UCT. A PROJECT MANAGEMENT METHODOLOGY BASED APPROACH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dorel BADEA

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the essential coordinates of the project concerning the achievement of feasible versions in terms of their design and functions of a laboratory for urban operations for cadets, with high potential for implementation in military higher education institutions. Data to identify the optimal correlation (in terms of technical, system and operational views between game and simulation, applicable in the military field, based on the use of available airsoft weapons and specialized software existing on the specialized market for military and / or civilian use are envisaged. Our approach for this project maintains the common areas (resources, rules, actors in the professional civil literature and the types of simulation defined in military documents: real simulation (it implies real people operating real systems, virtual simulation (it implies real people operating simulated systems and constructive simulation (models and simulations which imply simulated people operating simulated systems, with real people setting the premises but not determining in any way the outcome of the simulation.

  9. The vascular imageological anatomy anterior to L4/5 disc and laparoscopic surgical strategies%L4/5椎间盘前方大血管的影像解剖及腹腔镜下手术应对策略

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘金伟; 管明强; 李卫; 丁自海

    2015-01-01

    Objective To provide coping strategies for laparoscopic operation by observation and classification of the imaging morphology of large vessels in anterior to L4 / 5 disc. Methods The MRI axial images of L4 / 5 disc in 257 cases were collected and examined. The bifurcation of abdominal aorta (AB) and convergence of common iliac vein (CCIV) at the level of L4 / 5 disc was then identified and classified. Since the operation approach was especially complex for patients whose abdominal aorta has divaricated while iliac vein has not converged at the level of L4 / 5 disc ( " i + α" combination), these patients were emphatically studied. Composition of " intervascular window" (IVW) was identified and the distance between vessels on both sides of IVW was measured in the axial image through the center of L4 / 5 disc. Differences of IVW value according to gender and age were further explored. The axial images of L4 / 5 disc were vertically divided into four equal parts. The operational space was quantified according to the relationship between the three dividing lines and the large vessels in anterior to L4 / 5 . Patients were then divided into four types according to the size and location of the operation space. Laparoscopic L4 / 5 disc surgery could be performed on patients of A, B1, C1 type. Finally, the coping strategies for laparoscopic operation of different types were explored in accordance with Kleeman′s approach classification. Results At the level of L4 / 5 disc, abdominal aorta had divaricated in 82. 49 % (212 / 257) of the cases while iliac vein had not converged in 43. 58 % (112 / 257) of the cases. " i + α" combination was identified in 43. 58% (112 / 257) of the cases. Both sides of the IVW, the common iliac vein accounted for 94. 64% on the left side, While the iliac artery accounted for 93. 75% . The IVW size of this combination was (0. 42 + 0. 70) cm. There was no significant difference between the sexes (t = - 1. 29, P > 0. 05), and no significant

  10. SIMP J2154–1055: A NEW LOW-GRAVITY L4β BROWN DWARF CANDIDATE MEMBER OF THE ARGUS ASSOCIATION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gagné, Jonathan; Lafrenière, David; Doyon, René; Artigau, Étienne; Malo, Lison; Robert, Jasmin; Nadeau, Daniel [Département de Physique, Université de Montréal, C.P. 6128 Succ. Centre-ville, Montréal, QC H3C 3J7 (Canada)

    2014-09-01

    We present SIMP J21543454–1055308, a new L4β brown dwarf identified in the SIMP survey that displays signs of low gravity in its near-infrared spectrum. Using BANYAN II, we show that it is a candidate member of the Argus association, albeit with a 21% probability that it is a contaminant from the field. Measurements of radial velocity and parallax will be needed to verify its membership. If it is a member of Argus (age 30-50 Myr), then this object would have a planetary mass of 10 ± 0.5 M {sub Jup}.

  11. SIMP J2154-1055: A New Low-Gravity L4$\\beta$ Brown Dwarf Candidate Member of the Argus Association

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    We present SIMP J21543454-1055308, a new L4$\\beta$ brown dwarf identified in the Sondage Infrarouge de Mouvement Propre (SIMP) survey that displays signs of low gravity in its near-infrared spectrum. Using the Bayesian Analysis for Nearby Young AssociatioNs II (BANYAN II), we show that it is a candidate member of the Argus association, albeit with a 21% probability that it is a contaminant from the field. Measurements of radial velocity and parallax will be needed to verify its membership. If...

  12. SIMP J2154-1055: A New Low-gravity L4β Brown Dwarf Candidate Member of the Argus Association

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gagné, Jonathan; Lafrenière, David; Doyon, René; Artigau, Étienne; Malo, Lison; Robert, Jasmin; Nadeau, Daniel

    2014-09-01

    We present SIMP J21543454-1055308, a new L4β brown dwarf identified in the SIMP survey that displays signs of low gravity in its near-infrared spectrum. Using BANYAN II, we show that it is a candidate member of the Argus association, albeit with a 21% probability that it is a contaminant from the field. Measurements of radial velocity and parallax will be needed to verify its membership. If it is a member of Argus (age 30-50 Myr), then this object would have a planetary mass of 10 ± 0.5 M Jup.

  13. Chronic lumbar epidural hematoma in a patient suffering with spondylolytic spondylolisthesis at the L4-5 level: a case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Hyeon Seon; Lee, Sang Ho; Lie, Wei Chiang; Park, Jee Young [Wooridul Spine Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Sang Yeun [Chuk Spine Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2006-11-15

    Nontraumatic spinal epidural hematoma (SEH) is a rare condition and the exact cause of the hemorrhage in SEH had never been established. However, there have been a few recent reports on some types of the epidural hematoma with a detectable origin of hemorrhage. We encountered a case of chronic SEH in a patient who had spondylolytic spondylolisthesis, which is also a rare condition to be associated with SEH. We report here on the radiologic findings of a case of chronic epidural hematoma in a patient who had spondylolytic spondylolisthesis at the L4-5 level, and we include a review of the related literatures.

  14. Determinación de las propiedades mecánicas de unidades de columna anterior y unidades funcionales del segmento lumbar porcino L3-L4

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    Los especímenes porcinos han demostrado ser una excelente opción para la experimentación de la columna vertebral, ya que tanto anatómica como biomecánicamente tienen similitudes con los humanos. No obstante, existen diferencias que deben ser tomadas en cuenta cuando se comparan ambos especímenes. El objetivo de este estudio es realizar pruebas de compresión axial a Unidades de Columna Anterior (UCA’s) y a Unidades Funcionales (UF’s) del segmento lumbar porcino L3-L4, para determinar el coefic...

  15. A New Critical Value Concerning the Genealogy of Long Period Families at L4 in the Restricted Three-body Problem

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xi-Yun Hou; Lin Liu

    2008-01-01

    We found another critical mass ratio value μ between μ4 and μ5 concerning the genealogy of the long period family around the equilateral equilibrium point L4 in the re-stricted three-body problem. This value has not been pointed out before. We used numerical computations to show how the long period family evolves around this critical value. The case is similar to that of the critical values between μ2 and μ4, with slight difference in evolution details.

  16. Atmospheric removal times of the aerosol-bound radionuclides 137Cs and 131I during the months after the Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear power plant accident – a constraint for air quality and climate models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Wotawa

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Caesium-137 (137Cs and iodine-131 (131I are radionuclides of particular concern during nuclear accidents, because they are emitted in large amounts and are of significant health impact. 137Cs and 131I attach to the ambient accumulation-mode (AM aerosols and share their fate as the aerosols are removed from the atmosphere by scavenging within clouds, precipitation and dry deposition. Here, we estimate their removal times from the atmosphere using a unique high-precision global measurement data set collected over several months after the accident at the Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear power plant in March 2011. The noble gas xenon-133 (133Xe, also released during the accident, served as a passive tracer of air mass transport for determining the removal times of 137Cs and 131I via the decrease in the measured ratios 137Cs/133Xe and 131I/133Xe over time. After correction for radioactive decay, the 137Cs/133Xe ratios reflect the removal of aerosols by wet and dry deposition, whereas the 131I/133Xe ratios are also influenced by aerosol production from gaseous 131I. We find removal times for 137Cs of 10.0–13.9 days and for 131I of 17.1–24.2 days during April and May 2011. We discuss possible caveats (e.g. late emissions, resuspension that can affect the results, and compare the 137Cs removal times with observation-based and modeled aerosol lifetimes. Our 137Cs removal time of 10.0–13.9 days should be representative of a "background" AM aerosol well mixed in the extratropical Northern Hemisphere troposphere. It is expected that the lifetime of this vertically mixed background aerosol is longer than the lifetime of AM aerosols originating from surface sources. However, the substantial difference to the mean lifetimes of AM aerosols obtained from aerosol models, typically in the range of 3–7 days, warrants further research on the cause of this discrepancy. Too short modeled AM aerosol lifetimes would have serious implications for air quality and

  17. Atmospheric removal times of the aerosol-bound radionuclides 137Cs and 131I during the months after the Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear power plant accident - a constraint for air quality and climate models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kristiansen, N. I.; Stohl, A.; Wotawa, G.

    2012-05-01

    Caesium-137 (137Cs) and iodine-131 (131I) are radionuclides of particular concern during nuclear accidents, because they are emitted in large amounts and are of significant health impact. 137Cs and 131I attach to the ambient accumulation-mode (AM) aerosols and share their fate as the aerosols are removed from the atmosphere by scavenging within clouds, precipitation and dry deposition. Here, we estimate their removal times from the atmosphere using a unique high-precision global measurement data set collected over several months after the accident at the Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear power plant in March 2011. The noble gas xenon-133 (133Xe), also released during the accident, served as a passive tracer of air mass transport for determining the removal times of 137Cs and 131I via the decrease in the measured ratios 137Cs/133Xe and 131I/133Xe over time. After correction for radioactive decay, the 137Cs/133Xe ratios reflect the removal of aerosols by wet and dry deposition, whereas the 131I/133Xe ratios are also influenced by aerosol production from gaseous 131I. We find removal times for 137Cs of 10.0-13.9 days and for 131I of 17.1-24.2 days during April and May 2011. We discuss possible caveats (e.g. late emissions, resuspension) that can affect the results, and compare the 137Cs removal times with observation-based and modeled aerosol lifetimes. Our 137Cs removal time of 10.0-13.9 days should be representative of a "background" AM aerosol well mixed in the extratropical Northern Hemisphere troposphere. It is expected that the lifetime of this vertically mixed background aerosol is longer than the lifetime of AM aerosols originating from surface sources. However, the substantial difference to the mean lifetimes of AM aerosols obtained from aerosol models, typically in the range of 3-7 days, warrants further research on the cause of this discrepancy. Too short modeled AM aerosol lifetimes would have serious implications for air quality and climate model predictions.

  18. Petroleum marketing monthly, November 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-11-09

    The Petroleum Marketing Monthly (PMM) is designed to give information and statistical data about a variety of crude oils and refined petroleum products. The publication provides statistics on crude oil costs and refined petroleum products sales for use by industry, government, private sector analysts, educational institutions, and consumers. Data on crude oil include the domestic first purchase price, the f.o.b. and landed costs of imported crude oil, and the refiner`s acquisition cost of crude oil. Sales data for motor gasoline, distillates, residuals, aviation fuels, kerosene, and propane are presented.

  19. Monthly energy review, September 1997

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-09-01

    This publication presents an overview of the Energy Information Administration`s recent monthly energy statistics. The statistics cover the major activities of U.S. production, consumption, trade, stocks, and prices for petroleum, natural gas, coal, electricity, and nuclear energy. Information is also provided on international energy, including petroleum production, consumption, and stocks and nuclear electricity gross generation. This issues provides a brief industry overview and a detailed analysis of the spring 1996 gasoline price runup, crude oil supply issues, U.S. crude oil imports, petroleum stocks, futures markets, refining cash margin trends, and the financial performance of U.S. refining and marketing firms. 37 figs., 73 tabs.

  20. Petroleum supply monthly: December 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-12-01

    Data are presented which describe the supply and disposition of petroleum products in the United States and major U.S. geographic regions. The data series describe production, imports and exports, inter-Petroleum Administration for Defense (PAD) District movements, and inventories by the primary suppliers of petroleum products in the United States. Data are presented in two sections: Summary Statistics, presenting a time series of selected petroleum data on a U.S. level, and Detailed Statistics, presenting statistics for the most current month available as well as year to date.

  1. Petroleum marketing monthly, October 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-10-07

    The Petroleum Marketing Monthly (PMM) is designed to give information and statistical data about a variety of crude oils and refined petroleum products. The publication provides statistics on crude oil and refined petroleum products sales for use by industry, government, private sector analysts, educational institutions, and consumers. Data on crude oil include the domestic first purchase prices, the f.o b. and landed cost of imported crude oil, and the refiners` acquisition cost of crude oil. Sales data for motor gasoline, distillates residuals, aviation fuels, kerosene, and propane are presented.

  2. Petroleum marketing monthly, August 1990

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1990-11-07

    The Petroleum Marketing Monthly (PMM) is designed to give information and statistical data about a variety of crude oils and refined petroleum products. The publication provides statistics on crude oil costs and refined petroleum products sales for use by industry, government, private sector analysts, educational institutions, and consumers. Data on crude oil include the domestic first purchase price, the f.o.b. and landed cost of imported crude oil, and the refiners' acquisition cost of crude oil. Sales data for motor gasoline, distillates, residuals, aviation fuels, kerosene, and propane are presented. 12 figs., 49 tabs.

  3. Petroleum supply monthly, April 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-04-01

    Data presented in the Petroleum Supply Monthly (PSM) describe the supply and disposition of petroleum products in the United States and major US geographical regions. The data series describe production, imports and exports, inter-Petroleum Administration for Defense (PAD) District movements, and inventories by the primary suppliers of petroleum products in the US. The reporting universe includes those petroleum sectors in primary supply. Included are: petroleum refiners, motor gasoline blenders, operators of natural gas processing plants and fractionators, inter-PAD transporters, importers, and major inventory holders of petroleum products and crude oil. When aggregated, the data reported by these sectors approximately represent the consumption of petroleum products in the US.

  4. Petroleum marketing monthly, February 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-02-25

    The Petroleum Marketing Monthly is designed to give information and statistical data about a variety of crude oils and refined petroleum products. The publication provides statistics on crude oil costs and refined petroleum products sales for use by industry, government, private sector analysts, educational institutions, and consumers. Data on crude oil include the domestic first purchase price, the f.o.b. and landed cost of imported crude oil, and the refiner`s acquisition cost of crude oil. Sales data for motor gasoline, distillates, residuals, aviation fuels, kerosene, and propane are presented.

  5. Petroleum marketing monthly, August 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-08-10

    The Petroleum Marketing Monthly (PMM) is designed to give information and statistical data about a variety of crude oils and refined petroleum products. The publication provides statistics on crude oil costs and refined petroleum products sales for use by industry, government, private sector analysts, educational institutions, and consumers. Data on crude oil include the domestic first purchase price, the f.o.b. and landed cost of imported crude oil, and the refiners` acquisition cost of crude oil. Sales data for motor gasoline, distillates, residuals, aviation fuels, kerosene, and propane are presented.

  6. Best pictures of the month

    CERN Multimedia

    Claudia Marcelloni de Oliveira

    The last sector of the Big Muon Wheels was brought to the cavern in the morning of September 20... ... installed on one of the Big Muon Wheels during the same afternoon... ... just in time to sqeeze lots of people in between two of the all-completed Big Muon Wheels on the 21st of September to celebrate the installation of the last sector. Installation of the first ATLAS small wheel in building 191 on September 10. Some of the people involved in the construction and installation of the chambers on the first ATLAS small wheel in building 191 celebrating its completion on September 20. After hearing that the rock band The Police played in Geneva last month, Muriel got inspired and decided to become a rock star, just like one of her favorites, Keith Richards from the Rolling Stones. Special accomplishment of the month: (top) Martina Hurwitz (#908) and Monica Dunford (680), both from the Chicago University group, completed the Lausanne Marathon on October 21 in 4h 4...

  7. Petroleum supply monthly, April 1990

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1990-06-26

    The Petroleum Supply Monthly (PSM) is one of a family of three publications produced by the Petroleum Supply Division within the Energy Information Administration (EIA) reflecting different levels of data timeliness and completeness. The other two publications are the Weekly Petroleum Status Report (WPSR) and the Petroleum Supply Annual (PSA). Data presented in the Petroleum Supply Monthly describe (PSM) the supply and disposition of petroleum products in the United States and major US geographic regions. The data series describe production, imports and exports, inter-Petroleum Administration for Defense (PAD) District movements, and inventories by the primary suppliers of petroleum products in the United States (50 States and the District of Columbia). The reporting universe includes those petroleum sectors in Primary Supply.'' Included are: petroleum refiners, motor gasoline blenders, operators of natural gas processing plants and fractionators, inter-PAD transporters, importers, and major inventory holders of petroleum products and crude oil. When aggregated, the data reported by these sectors approximately represent the consumption of petroleum products in the United States. Data presented in the PSM are divided into two sections: (1) the Summary Statistics and (2) the Detailed Statistics.

  8. Natural gas monthly, February 1998

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-02-01

    This issue of the Natural Gas Monthly (NGM) presents the most recent estimates of natural gas data from the Energy Information Administration. Estimates extend through February 1998 for many data series, and through November 1997 for most natural gas prices. Highlights of the natural gas data contained in this issue are: Preliminary estimates for January and February 1998 show that dry natural gas production, net imports, and consumption are all within 1 percent of their levels in 1997. Warmer-than-normal weather in recent months has resulted in lower consumption of natural gas by the residential sector and lower net withdrawals of gas from under round storage facilities compared with a year ago. This has resulted in an estimate of the amount of working gas in storage at the end of February 1998 that is 18 percent higher than in February 1997. The national average natural gas wellhead price is estimated to be $3.05 per thousand cubic feet in November 1997, 7 percent higher than in October. The cumulative average wellhead price for January through November 1997 is estimated to be $2.42 per thousand cubic feet, 17 percent above that of the same period in 1996. This price increase is far less than 36-percent rise that occurred between 1995 and 1996. 6 figs., 26 tabs.

  9. Monthly streamflow forecasting in the Rhine basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schick, Simon; Rössler, Ole; Weingartner, Rolf

    2017-04-01

    Forecasting seasonal streamflow of the Rhine river is of societal relevance as the Rhine is an important water way and water resource in Western Europe. The present study investigates the predictability of monthly mean streamflow at lead times of zero, one, and two months with the focus on potential benefits by the integration of seasonal climate predictions. Specifically, we use seasonal predictions of precipitation and surface air temperature released by the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF) for a regression analysis. In order to disentangle forecast uncertainty, the 'Reverse Ensemble Streamflow Prediction' framework is adapted here to the context of regression: By using appropriate subsets of predictors the regression model is constrained to either the initial conditions, the meteorological forcing, or both. An operational application is mimicked by equipping the model with the seasonal climate predictions provided by ECMWF. Finally, to mitigate the spatial aggregation of the meteorological fields the model is also applied at the subcatchment scale, and the resulting predictions are combined afterwards. The hindcast experiment is carried out for the period 1982-2011 in cross validation mode at two gauging stations, namely the Rhine at Lobith and Basel. The results show that monthly forecasts are skillful with respect to climatology only at zero lead time. In addition, at zero lead time the integration of seasonal climate predictions decreases the mean absolute error by 5 to 10 percentage compared to forecasts which are solely based on initial conditions. This reduction most likely is induced by the seasonal prediction of precipitation and not air temperature. The study is completed by bench marking the regression model with runoff simulations from ECMWFs seasonal forecast system. By simply using basin averages followed by a linear bias correction, these runoff simulations translate well to monthly streamflow. Though the regression model

  10. Seasonality, nonstationarity and the forecasting of monthly time series

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ph.H.B.F. Franses (Philip Hans)

    1991-01-01

    textabstractWe focus on two forecasting models for a monthly time series. The first model requires that the variable is first order and seasonally differenced. The second model considers the series only in its first differences, while seasonality is modeled with a constant and seasonal dummies. A me

  11. Seasonality, nonstationarity and the forecasting of monthly time series

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ph.H.B.F. Franses (Philip Hans)

    1991-01-01

    textabstractWe focus on two forecasting models for a monthly time series. The first model requires that the variable is first order and seasonally differenced. The second model considers the series only in its first differences, while seasonality is modeled with a constant and seasonal dummies. A me

  12. Seasonality, nonstationarity and the forecasting of monthly time series

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ph.H.B.F. Franses (Philip Hans)

    1991-01-01

    textabstractWe focus on two forecasting models for a monthly time series. The first model requires that the variable is first order and seasonally differenced. The second model considers the series only in its first differences, while seasonality is modeled with a constant and seasonal dummies. A

  13. The contractile properties of the medial gastrocnemius motor units innervated by L4 and L5 spinal nerves in the rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Celichowski, Jan; Taborowska, Malwina

    2011-01-01

    When a muscle innervation originates from more than one spinal cord segment, the injury of one of the respective ventral roots evokes an overload, and alters the activity and properties of the remaining motor units. However, it is not well documented if the three types of motor units are equally represented within the innervating ventral roots. Single motor units in the rat medial gastrocnemius muscle were studied and their contractile properties as well as distribution of different types of motor units belonging to subpopulations innervated by axons in L4 and L5 ventral roots were analyzed. The composition of the three physiological types of motor units in the two subpopulations was similar. Force parameters were similar for motor units belonging to the two subpopulations. However, the twitch time parameters were slightly longer in L4 in comparison to L5 motor units although the difference was significant only for fast resistant to fatigue motor units. The force-frequency relationships in the two subpopulations of motor units were not different. Concluding, the two subpopulations of motor units in the studied muscle differ in the number of motor units, but contain similar proportions of the three physiological types of these units and their contractile properties are similar. Therefore, the injury of one ventral root evokes various degrees of muscle denervation, but is non-selective in relation to the three types of motor units.

  14. Artificial Neural Network for Monthly Rainfall Rate Prediction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purnomo, H. D.; Hartomo, K. D.; Prasetyo, S. Y. J.

    2017-03-01

    Rainfall rate forecasting plays an important role in various human activities. Rainfall forecasting is a challenging task due to the uncertainty of natural phenomena. In this paper, two neural network models are proposed for monthly rainfall rate forecasting. The performance of the proposed model is assesses based on monthly rainfall rate in Ampel, Boyolali, from 2001-2013. The experiment results show that the accuracy of the first model is much better than the accuracy of the second model. Its average accuracy is just above 98%, while the accuracy of the second model is approximately 75%. In additional, both models tend to perform better when the fluctuation of rainfall is low.

  15. Monthly Narrative: Canaan National Wildlife Refuge 2007

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This monthly narrative report for Canaan Valley National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments month by month in 2007 from January through July. The report...

  16. Petroleum supply monthly, July 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-07-29

    Data presented in the Petroleum Supply Monthly (PSM) describe the supply and disposition of petroleum products in the United States and major US geographic regions. The data series describe production, imports and exports, inter-Petroleum Administration for Defense (PAD) District movements, and inventories by the primary suppliers of petroleum products in the United States (50 States and the District of Columbia). The reporting universe includes those petroleum sectors in primary supply. Included are: Petroleum refiners, motor gasoline blenders, operators of natural gas processing plants and fractionators, inter-PAD transporters, importers, and major inventory holders of petroleum products and crude oil. When aggregated, the data reported by these sectors approximately represent the consumption of petroleum products in the United States.

  17. Petroleum supply monthly, August 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-09-01

    This publication the Petroleum Supply Monthly (PSM) is one of a family of four publications produced by the Petroleum Supply Division within the Energy Information Administration (EIA) reflecting different levels of data timeliness and completeness. The other publications are the Weekly Petroleum Status Report, (WPSR), the Winter Fuels Report, and the Petroleum Supply Annual (PSA). Data presented describe the supply and disposition of petroleum products in the United States and major US geographic regions. The data series describe production, imports and exports, inter-Petroleum Administration for Defense (PAD) District movements, and inventories by the primary suppliers of petroleum products in the United States (50 States and the District of Columbia). The reporting universe includes those petroleum sectors in primary supply. Included are: petroleum refiners, motor gasoline blenders, operators of natural gas processing plants and fractionators, inter-PAD transporters, importers, and major inventory holders of petroleum products and crude oil. Data presented are divided into Summary Statistics and Detailed Statistics.

  18. Petroleum supply monthly, August 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-08-26

    Data presented in the Petroleum Supply Monthly (PSM) describe the supply and disposition of petroleum products in the United States and major US geographic regions. The data series describe production, imports and exports, inter-Petroleum Administration for Defense (PAD) District movements, and inventories by the primary suppliers of petroleum products in the United States (50 States and the District of Columbia). The reporting universe includes those petroleum sectors in primary supply. Included are: petroleum refiners, motor gasoline blenders, operators of natural gas processing plants and fractionators, inter-PAD transporters, importers, and major inventory holders of petroleum products and crude oil. When aggregated, the data reported by these sectors approximately represent the consumption of petroleum products in the United States. Data presented in the PSM are divided into two sections: Summary Statistics and Detailed Statistics.

  19. Petroleum supply monthly, August 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-09-01

    This publication the Petroleum Supply Monthly (PSM) is one of a family of four publications produced by the Petroleum Supply Division within the Energy Information Administration (EIA) reflecting different levels of data timeliness and completeness. The other publications are the Weekly Petroleum Status Report, (WPSR), the Winter Fuels Report, and the Petroleum Supply Annual (PSA). Data presented describe the supply and disposition of petroleum products in the United States and major US geographic regions. The data series describe production, imports and exports, inter-Petroleum Administration for Defense (PAD) District movements, and inventories by the primary suppliers of petroleum products in the United States (50 States and the District of Columbia). The reporting universe includes those petroleum sectors in primary supply. Included are: petroleum refiners, motor gasoline blenders, operators of natural gas processing plants and fractionators, inter-PAD transporters, importers, and major inventory holders of petroleum products and crude oil. Data presented are divided into Summary Statistics and Detailed Statistics.

  20. Petroleum marketing monthly, March 1995

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-03-10

    This report for March 1995, provides information and statistical data on a variety of crude oils and refined petroleum products. The publication presents statistics on crude oil costs and refined petroleum products sales for use by industry, government, private sector analysts, educational institutions, and consumers. Data on crude oil include the domestic first purchase price, the f.o.b. and landed cost of imported crude oil, and the refiners` acquisition cost of crude oil. Refined petroleum product sales data include motor gasoline, distillates, residuals, aviation fuels, kerosene, and propane. The Petroleum Marketing Division, Office of Oil and Gas, Energy Information Administration ensures the accuracy, quality, and confidentiality of the published data in the Petroleum Marketing Monthly. A glossary is included.

  1. Le Bonheur Childrens Hospital CHAMPS Program in Memphis, Tennessee Recognized with the 2015 National Environmental Leadership Award by EPA Memphis Program Recognized as National Model for Asthma Care During Asthma Awareness Month

    Science.gov (United States)

    05/05/15 - ATLANTA - One in ten kids in America suffers from asthma, and communities of color and low-income families are disproportionately impacted. During Asthma Awareness Month, EPA recognizes Le Bonheur Children's Hospital CHAMPS Program in Memp

  2. 76 FR 68609 - Military Family Month, 2011

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-04

    ... Proclamation 8746--National Diabetes Month, 2011 Proclamation 8747--National Entrepreneurship Month, 2011... dedicated to doing more for our military families by enhancing learning opportunities for our military...

  3. Normalised monthly shortage curves: a contribution for a better understanding of monthly rain deficit in Western Europe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez, M. D.; Lana, X.; Burgueño, A.; Serra, C.

    2012-05-01

    A new approach to the statistics of rainfall shortage at monthly scale in Western Europe is obtained from precipitation records of 115 gauges over the twentieth century. In this paper, a month is considered to have rainfall deficit when its rain amount is below the 50th percentile of the respective calendar month. The monthly shortage, MS, for every month with deficit is then computed as the absolute value of the difference between its monthly amount and the corresponding truncation level. The cumulative distributions of monthly shortage, CMS, and number of shortage months, CNM, constitute a new description of the monthly rainfall deficit. Both CMS and CNM distributions fit well to a Weibull model. Using the analogy to the normalised daily rainfall curves formulation, NRC, the relationship between CMS and CNM, named as normalised shortage curve, NSC, is modelled by the same function applied to NRCs. Similarly to NRCs, the behaviour of the NSCs strongly depends on the coefficient of variation of the monthly shortage, CVMS. Four coordinates characterising every NSC are then introduced: the CMS percentile associated with the median of CNM; the CNM percentile related to the median of CMS; and the percentiles of CMS and CNM for the average monthly shortage. In this way, the degree of asymmetric distribution of the monthly deficit is quantified. With the aim of performing a clustering process based on these four coordinates, a principal component analysis, is previously applied to remove redundancies, being obtained two uncorrelated principal components, PCs, characterising every NSC. An average linkage algorithm is then applied to these two PCs, leading to obtain spatially coherent groups of gauges with very similar NSC patterns. This clustering process permits to discard latitude and vicinity to the Atlantic Ocean or the Mediterranean Sea as main factors conditioning the monthly shortage regime.

  4. Lumbar Plexus Anatomy within the Psoas Muscle: Implications for the Transpsoas Lateral Approach to the L4-L5 Disc%腰大肌内腰神经丛解剖:L4-5椎间盘经腰大肌外侧入路的可行性研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Timothy T. Davis; Hyun W. Bae; MAJ James M. Mok; Alexandre Rasouli; Rick B. Delamarter; 彭宝淦

    2012-01-01

    背景:在脊柱微创手术中,经腰大肌外侧手术途径可取代直接前路手术.然而,采用外侧手术途径,术后常发现大腿疼痛,麻木,或者无力.本文进行尸体解剖研究的目的是提供与经腰大肌外侧手术途径相关的腰丛解剖.方法:对18个尸体解剖标本进行腰丛解剖学研究.将穿刺针于正中冠状位水平扎入L2-3,L3-4和L4-5椎间盘内.观察穿刺针近端神经结构及其它解剖结构的关系.结果:18个标本中,其中13个标本L2-4神经根分出后,在L4-5椎间盘水平形成股神经.在所有标本中,股神经经过椎间盘背侧或正对中点.在3个标本中,针使股神经移位或接近股神经.其中13个标本在L4-5椎间盘水平发现股神经在穿刺针和L4-5椎间盘背侧面之间.结论:由于近端的神经因素,尤其是股神经,正对L4-5椎间盘中央,对L4-5椎间盘经腰大肌外侧入路可能引起在牵开扩张的过程中可能引起术中神经结构从其解剖路径中移位.因此,在扩张牵开的过程中,尤其在L4-5椎间盘经腰大肌外侧途径时,应非常小心.临床相关性:在L4-5椎间盘经腰大肌外侧手术路径中,由于股神经的位置和手术扩张牵开器的大小,股神经有术中损伤的危险.

  5. Serine 192 in the tiny RS repeat of the adenoviral L4-33K splicing enhancer protein is essential for function and reorganization of the protein to the periphery of viral replication centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Östberg, Sara; Törmänen Persson, Heidi; Akusjärvi, Göran

    2012-11-25

    The adenovirus L4-33K protein is a key regulator involved in the temporal shift from early to late pattern of mRNA expression from the adenovirus major late transcription unit. L4-33K is a virus-encoded alternative splicing factor, which enhances processing of 3' splice sites with a weak sequence context. Here we show that L4-33K expressed from a plasmid is localized at the nuclear margin of uninfected cells. During an infection L4-33K is relocalized to the periphery of E2A-72K containing viral replication centers. We also show that serine 192 in the tiny RS repeat of the conserved carboxy-terminus of L4-33K, which is critical for the splicing enhancer function of L4-33K, is necessary for the nuclear localization and redistribution of the protein to viral replication sites. Collectively, our results show a good correlation between the activity of L4-33K as a splicing enhancer protein and its localization to the periphery of viral replication centers.

  6. Towards combined global monthly gravity field solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaeggi, Adrian; Meyer, Ulrich; Beutler, Gerhard; Weigelt, Matthias; van Dam, Tonie; Mayer-Gürr, Torsten; Flury, Jakob; Flechtner, Frank; Dahle, Christoph; Lemoine, Jean-Michel; Bruinsma, Sean

    2014-05-01

    Currently, official GRACE Science Data System (SDS) monthly gravity field solutions are generated independently by the Centre for Space Research (CSR) and the German Research Centre for Geosciences (GFZ). Additional GRACE SDS monthly fields are provided by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) for validation and outside the SDS by a number of other institutions worldwide. Although the adopted background models and processing standards have been harmonized more and more by the various processing centers during the past years, notable differences still exist and the users are more or less left alone with a decision which model to choose for their individual applications. This procedure seriously limits the accessibility of these valuable data. Combinations are well established in the area of other space geodetic techniques, such as the Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSS), Satellite Laser Ranging (SLR), and Very Long Baseline Interferometry (VLBI). Regularly comparing and combining space-geodetic products has tremendously increased the usefulness of the products in a wide range of disciplines and scientific applications. Therefore, we propose in a first step to mutually compare the large variety of available monthly GRACE gravity field solutions, e.g., by assessing the signal content over selected regions, by estimating the noise over the oceans, and by performing significance tests. We make the attempt to assign different solution characteristics to different processing strategies in order to identify subsets of solutions, which are based on similar processing strategies. Using these subsets we will in a second step explore ways to generate combined solutions, e.g., based on a weighted average of the individual solutions using empirical weights derived from pair-wise comparisons. We will also assess the quality of such a combined solution and discuss the potential benefits for the GRACE and GRACE-FO user community, but also address minimum processing

  7. Average monthly and annual climate maps for Bolivia

    KAUST Repository

    Vicente-Serrano, Sergio M.

    2015-02-24

    This study presents monthly and annual climate maps for relevant hydroclimatic variables in Bolivia. We used the most complete network of precipitation and temperature stations available in Bolivia, which passed a careful quality control and temporal homogenization procedure. Monthly average maps at the spatial resolution of 1 km were modeled by means of a regression-based approach using topographic and geographic variables as predictors. The monthly average maximum and minimum temperatures, precipitation and potential exoatmospheric solar radiation under clear sky conditions are used to estimate the monthly average atmospheric evaporative demand by means of the Hargreaves model. Finally, the average water balance is estimated on a monthly and annual scale for each 1 km cell by means of the difference between precipitation and atmospheric evaporative demand. The digital layers used to create the maps are available in the digital repository of the Spanish National Research Council.

  8. Natural gas monthly, January 1997

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-01-01

    This publication, the Natural Gas Monthly, presents the most recent data on natural gas supply, consumption, and prices from the Energy Information Administration (EIA). Of special interest in this issue are two articles summarizing reports recently published by EIA. The articles are {open_quotes}Natural Gas Productive Capacity{close_quotes} and {open_quotes}Outlook for Natural Gas Through 2015,{close_quotes} both of which precede the {open_quotes}Highlights{close_quotes} section. With this issue, January 1997, changes have been made to the format of the Highlights section and to several of the tabular and graphical presentations throughout the publication. The changes to the Highlights affect the discussion of developments in the industry and the presentation of weekly storage data. An overview of the developments in the industry is now presented in a brief summary followed by specific discussions of supply, end-use consumption, and prices. Spot and futures prices are discussed as appropriate in the Price section, together with wellhead and consumer prices.

  9. Petroleum supply monthly, October 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-10-26

    The Petroleum Supply Monthly (PSM) is one of a family of four publications produced by the Petroleum Supply Division within the Energy Information Administration (EIA) reflecting different levels of data timeliness and completeness. The other publications are the Weekly Petroleum Status Report (WPSR), the Winter Fuels Report, and the Petroleum Supply Annual (PSA). Data presented in the PSM describe the supply and disposition of petroleum products in the United States and major US geographic regions. The data series describe production, imports and exports, inter-Petroleum Administration for Defense (PAD) District movements, and inventories by the primary suppliers of petroleum products in the United States (50 States and the District of Columbia). The reporting universe includes those petroleum sectors in primary supply. Included are: petroleum refiners, motor gasoline blenders, operators of natural gas processing plants and fractionators, inter-PAD transporters, importers, and major inventory holders of petroleum products and crude oil. When aggregated, the data reported by these sectors approximately represent the consumption of petroleum products in the United States. Data presented in the PSM are divided into two sections: Summary Statistics and Detailed Statistics.

  10. Monthly Energy Review, February 1998

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-02-01

    This report presents an overview of recent monthly energy statistics. Energy production during November 1997 totaled 5.6 quadrillion Btu, a 0.3-percent decrease from the level of production during November 1996. Natural gas production increased 2.8 percent, production of crude oil and natural gas plant liquids decreased 1.7 percent, and coal production decreased 1.6 percent. All other forms of energy production combined were down 1.1 percent from the level of production during November 1996. Energy consumption during November 1997 totaled 7.5 quadrillion Btu, 0.1 percent above the level of consumption during November 1996. Consumption of natural gas increased 1.5 percent, consumption of coal fell 0.3 percent, while consumption of petroleum products decreased 0.2 percent. Consumption of all other forms of energy combined decreased 0.8 percent from the level 1 year earlier. Net imports of energy during November 1997 totaled 1.7 quadrillion Btu, 8.6 percent above the level of net imports 1 year earlier. Net imports of petroleum increased 6.3 percent, and net imports of natural gas were up 1.2 percent. Net exports of coal fell 17.8 percent from the level in November 1996.

  11. Petroleum Supply Monthly, August 1990

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1990-10-30

    The Petroleum Supply Monthly (PSM) is one of a family of three publications produced by the Petroleum Supply Division within the Energy Information administration (EIA) reflecting different levels of data timeliness and completeness. The other two publications are the Weekly Petroleum Status Report (WPSR) and the Petroleum Supply Annual (PSA). Data presented in the PSM describe the supply and disposition of petroleum products in the United States and major US geographic regions. The data series describe production, imports and exports, inter-Petroleum Administration for Defense (PAD) district movements, and inventories by the primary suppliers of petroleum products in the United States (50 States and the District of Columbia). The reporting universe includes those petroleum sectors in Primary Supply. Included are: petroleum refiners, motor gasoline blenders, operators of natural gas processing plants and fractionators, inter-PAD transporters, importers, and major inventory holders of petroleum products and crude oil. When aggregated, the data reported by these sectors approximately represent the consumption of petroleum products in the United States. Data presented in the PSM are divided into two sections (1) the Summary Statistics and (2) the Detailed Statistics.

  12. Petroleum supply monthly, January 1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-02-15

    The Petroleum Supply Monthly (PSM) is one of a family of four publications produced by the Petroleum Supply Division within the Energy Information Administration (EIA) reflecting different levels of data timeliness and completeness. The other publications are the Weekly Petroleum Status Report (WPSR), the Winter Fuels Report, and the Petroleum Supply Annual (PSA). Data presented in the PSM describe the supply and disposition of petroleum products in the United States and major US geographic regions. The data series describe production, imports and exports, inter-Petroleum Administration for Defense (PAD) District movements, and inventories by the primary suppliers of petroleum products in the United States (50 States and the District of Columbia). The reporting universe includes those petroleum sectors in primary supply. Included are: petroleum refiners, motor gasoline blenders, operators of natural gas processing plants and fractionators, inter-PAD transporters, importers, and major inventory holders of petroleum products and crude oil. When aggregated, the data reported by these sectors approximately represent the consumption of petroleum products in the United States. Data presented in the PSM are divided into two sections: Summary Statistics and Detailed Statistics.

  13. Petroleum supply monthly, May 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-05-27

    The Petroleum Supply Monthly (PSM) is one of a family of four publications produced by the Petroleum Supply Division within the Energy Information Administration (EIA) reflecting different levels of data timeliness and completeness. The other publications are the Weekly Petroleum Status Report (WPSR), the Winter Fuels Report, and the Petroleum supply annual (PSA). Data presented in the PSM describe the supply and disposition of petroleum products in the United States and major US geographic regions. The data series describe production, imports and exports, inter-Petroleum Administration for Defense (PAD) District movements, and inventories by the primary suppliers of petroleum products in the United States (50 States and the District of columbia). The reporting universe includes those petroleum sectors in primary supply. Included are: petroleum refiners, motor gasoline blenders, operators of natural gas processing plants and fractionators, inter-PAD transporters, importers, and major inventory holders of petroleum products and crude oil. When aggregated, the data reported by these sectors approximately represent the consumption of petroleum products in the United States. Data presented in the PSM are divided into two sections: Summary Statistics and Detailed Statistics.

  14. Petroleum supply monthly, June 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-06-28

    The Petroleum Supply Monthly (PSM) is one of a family of four publications produced by the Petroleum Supply Division within the Energy Information Administration (EIA) reflecting different levels of data timeliness and completeness. The other publications are the Weekly Petroleum Status Report (WPSR), the Winter Fuels Report, and the Petroleum Supply Annual (PSA). Data presented in the PSM describe the supply and disposition of petroleum products in the United States and major US geographic regions. The data series describe production, imports and exports, inter-Petroleum Administration for Defense (PAD) District movements, and inventories by the primary suppliers of petroleum products in the United States (50 States and the District of Columbia). The reporting universe includes those petroleum sectors in primary supply. Included are: petroleum refiners, motor gasoline blenders, operators of natural gas processing plants and fractionators, inter-PAD transporters, importers, and major inventory holders of petroleum products and crude oil. When aggregated, the data reported by these sectors approximately represent the consumption of petroleum products in the United States. Data presented in the PSM are divided into two sections: Summary Statistics and Detailed Statistics.

  15. Petroleum supply monthly, July 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-07-26

    The Petroleum Supply Monthly (PSM) is one of a family of four publications produced by the Petroleum Supply Division within the Energy Information Administration (EIA) reflecting different levels of data timeliness and completeness. The other publications are the Weekly Petroleum Status Report (WPSR), the Winter Fuels Report, and the Petroleum Supply Annual (PSA). Data presented in the PSM describe the supply and disposition of petroleum products in the United States and major US geographic regions. The data series describe production, imports and exports, inter-Petroleum Administration for Defense (PAD) District movements, and inventories by the primary suppliers of petroleum products in the United States (50 States and the District of Columbia). The reporting universe includes those petroleum sectors in primary supply. Included are: petroleum refiners, motor gasoline blenders, operators of natural gas processing plants and fractionators, inter-PAD transporters, importers, and major inventory holders of petroleum products and crude oil. When aggregated, the data reported by these sectors approximately represent the consumption of petroleum products in the United States. Data presented in the PSM are divided into two sections: Summary Statistics and Detailed Statistics.

  16. Natural gas monthly, November 1997

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-11-01

    This issue of the Natural Gas Monthly presents the most recent estimates of natural gas data from the Energy Information Administration. Estimates extend through November for many data series, and through August for most natural gas prices. Highlights of the most recent data estimates are: (1) Preliminary estimates of dry natural gas production and total consumption available through November 1997 indicate that both series are on track to end the year at levels close to those of 1996. Cumulative dry production is one-half percent higher than in 1996 and consumption is one-half percent lower. (2) Natural gas production is estimated to be 52.6 billion cubic feet per day in November 1997, the highest rate since March 1997. (3) After falling 8 percent in July 1997, the national average wellhead price rose 10 percent in August 1997, reaching an estimated $2.21 per thousand cubic feet. (4) Milder weather in November 1997 compared to November 1996 has resulted in significantly lower levels of residential consumption of natural gas and net storage withdrawls than a year ago. The November 1997 estimates of residential consumption and net withdrawls are 9 and 20 percent lower, respectively, than in November 1996.

  17. Lumbosacral lipomyelomeningocele with anomalous osseous limb in a 3-month-old female

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sean L. Wilkes, MS, ALM

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A patient with lipomyelomeningocele (known in utero presented for MRI characterization prior to surgical procedure at three months of age. Cross-sectional imaging revealed a spinal dysraphism of the lower lumbar spine, with a posterior spinal defect spanning L4 to S2 subcutaneous fat intrusion, and distal spinal cord extrusion. An osseous excrescence was also appreciated, articulating with the left iliac bone. This case demonstrates the youngest known lipomyelomeningocele with accessory limb and the abnormal growth of multiple tissue types at the site of spinal dysraphism—a potential consequence of dedifferentiated cell proliferation originating from a secondary neural tube defect or rachipagus parasitic twinning.

  18. SIMP J2154-1055: A New Low-Gravity L4$\\beta$ Brown Dwarf Candidate Member of the Argus Association

    CERN Document Server

    Gagné, Jonathan; Doyon, René; Artigau, Étienne; Malo, Lison; Robert, Jasmin; Nadeau, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    We present SIMP J21543454-1055308, a new L4$\\beta$ brown dwarf identified in the Sondage Infrarouge de Mouvement Propre (SIMP) survey that display signs of low gravity in its near-infrared spectrum. Using the Bayesian Analysis for Nearby Young AssociatioNs II (BANYAN II), we show that it is a candidate member of the Argus association, albeit with a 21% probability that it is a contaminant from the field. Measurements of radial velocity and parallax will be needed to verify its membership. If it is a member of Argus (age 30-50 Myr), then this object would have a planetary mass of 10 $\\pm$ 0.5 $M_{\\mathrm{Jup}}$.

  19. 75 FR 1263 - National Mentoring Month, 2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-08

    ... Mentoring Month, 2010 Proclamation 8471--National Slavery and Human Trafficking Prevention Month, 2010 #0... of January 4, 2010 National Mentoring Month, 2010 By the President of the United States of America A... have an enormous, lasting effect on a child's life. During National Mentoring Month, we recognize those...

  20. Application of PIMS Software in Monthly Planning of Refinery Production

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    This article describes the application of the PIMS software in formulating monthly refining production plan. Application of the PIMS software can help to solve a series of problems related with monthly plan of refining production such as optimized selection of crude and feedstocks, optimized selection of production scale and processing scheme, identification of bottlenecks and their mitigation,optimized selection of turnaround time and optimized selection of operating regime, which have increased the economic benefits of refining enterprises. With the further development and improvement of models the PIMS software will play an increasingly important role in formulating monthly plans of refining operations and production management at refineries. This article also explores the problems existing in refinery monthly planning, and has made recommendations on developing and improving models and reporting system, enhancement of basic data acquisition, model maintenance personnel and staff training.

  1. l475bs.m77t - MGD77 data file for Geophysical data from field activity L-4-75-BS in Bering Sea, Aleutian Basin, Alaska from 09/07/1975 to 09/18/1975

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Single-beam bathymetry, gravity, and magnetic data along with DGPS navigation data was collected as part of field activity L-4-75-BS in Bering Sea, Aleutian Basin,...

  2. l477nc.m77t - MGD77 data file for Geophysical data from field activity L-4-77-NC in Northern California from 05/10/1977 to 05/21/1977

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Single-beam bathymetry, gravity, and magnetic data along with DGPS navigation data was collected as part of field activity L-4-77-NC in Northern California from...

  3. l477nc.m77t - MGD77 data file for Geophysical data from field activity L-4-77-NC in Northern California from 05/10/1977 to 05/21/1977

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Single-beam bathymetry, gravity, and magnetic data along with DGPS navigation data was collected as part of field activity L-4-77-NC in Northern California from...

  4. l478bs.m77t - MGD77 data file for Geophysical data from field activity L-4-78-BS in Bering Sea, Alaska from 07/08/1978 to 08/01/1978

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Single-beam bathymetry, gravity, and magnetic data along with DGPS navigation data was collected as part of field activity L-4-78-BS in Bering Sea, Alaska from...

  5. l483bs.m77t - MGD77 data file for Geophysical data from field activity L-4-83-BS in Bering Sea, Alaska from 09/16/1983 to 10/02/1983

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Single-beam bathymetry, gravity, and magnetic data along with DGPS navigation data was collected as part of field activity L-4-83-BS in Bering Sea, Alaska from...

  6. l483bs.m77t - MGD77 data file for Geophysical data from field activity L-4-83-BS in Bering Sea, Alaska from 09/16/1983 to 10/02/1983

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Single-beam bathymetry, gravity, and magnetic data along with DGPS navigation data was collected as part of field activity L-4-83-BS in Bering Sea, Alaska from...

  7. l476wg.m77t - MGD77 data file for Geophysical data from field activity L-4-76-WG in Western Gulf of Alaska from 06/26/1976 to 07/25/1976

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Single-beam bathymetry, magnetics, gravity data along with DGPS navigation data was collected as part of field activity L-4-76-WG in Western Gulf of Alaska from...

  8. l478bs.m77t - MGD77 data file for Geophysical data from field activity L-4-78-BS in Bering Sea, Alaska from 07/08/1978 to 08/01/1978

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Single-beam bathymetry, gravity, and magnetic data along with DGPS navigation data was collected as part of field activity L-4-78-BS in Bering Sea, Alaska from...

  9. l475bs.m77t - MGD77 data file for Geophysical data from field activity L-4-75-BS in Bering Sea, Aleutian Basin, Alaska from 09/07/1975 to 09/18/1975

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Single-beam bathymetry, gravity, and magnetic data along with DGPS navigation data was collected as part of field activity L-4-75-BS in Bering Sea, Aleutian Basin,...

  10. l476wg.m77t - MGD77 data file for Geophysical data from field activity L-4-76-WG in Western Gulf of Alaska from 06/26/1976 to 07/25/1976

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Single-beam bathymetry, magnetics, gravity data along with DGPS navigation data was collected as part of field activity L-4-76-WG in Western Gulf of Alaska from...

  11. Laser fusion monthly, February 1981

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahlstrom, H.G.

    1981-02-01

    This report is divided into the following sections: (1) facility reports (Argus and Shiva); (2) Nova project; and (3) fusion experiments. In the Fusion Experiments section of this report, the author describes the results of a series of experiments on Shiva which further the understanding of the production and transport of suprathermal electrons. He found that of the suprathermal electrons which strike a laser irradiated disk target or which interact with the rear surface of a half Cairn hohlraum target, a significant fraction of these electrons orbit the target and strike the rear of the disk. These results have significant implications in the interpretation and modeling of the laser irradiated target experiments.

  12. Effect of radiographic parameters on the 4th lumbar degenerative spondylolisthesis%影像学参数对L4椎体发生退变性滑脱的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王永江

    2015-01-01

    Objective To investigate the impact of radiographic parameters on the 4th lumbar (L4) degenera-tive spondylolisthesis (DLS). Methods From May 2012 to September 2014, 56 patients with L4 degenerative spondy-lolisthesis were enrolled in DLS group, and 56 healthy volunteers were recruited in control group. The participants in both the two groups underwent lumbar lateral X-ray, CT and bone density examination. A series of radiographic pa-rameters were measured on the basis of X-ray and CT results. Logistic regression analysis was used to analyze the risk radiographic parameters of development of DLS. Results In DLS group, 49 cases of L4 spondylolisthesis were classi-fied into gradeⅠand 7 cases of L4 spondylolisthesis were classified into gradeⅡ, with the average Boxall index of (0.195±0.041). Compared with the control group, disc height, L4 vertebral size, disc index and vertebral bone miner-al density of DLS group were significantly lower (P<0.05), but L4 vertebra inclination angle, lumbar lordosis, pelvic incidence, lumbosacral angle of the DLS group were significantly larger (P<0.05). Patients in DLS group had more sagittally orientated facet joints, more significant facet joints tropism and more horizontally orientated pedicle-facet angle than the control group (P<0.05). Logistic regression analysis showed that disc index, L4 vertebral body size, L4 vertebra tilt, lumbar lordosis, pelvic incidence angle and facet joints were the risk factors of the L4 spondylolisthesis. Conclusion Low disc index, smaller L4 vertebral size, larger L4 vertebra inclination angle, lumbar lordosis, pelvic in-cidence angle and orientated facet joints are the risk factors of the development of L4 degenerative spondylolisthesis.%目的:探讨影像学参数对第4腰椎(L4)退变性滑脱(DLS))的影响。方法选取我院2012年5月至2014年9月收治的L4椎体发生DLS的患者56例为DLS组,同期健康体检的志愿者56例为对照组。两组研究对象均行腰椎正

  13. 76 FR 68619 - National Entrepreneurship Month, 2011

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-04

    ... Documents#0;#0; ] Proclamation 8747 of November 1, 2011 National Entrepreneurship Month, 2011 By the... companies, and through events like Global Entrepreneurship Week, which begins on November 14, we can ensure... November 2011 as National Entrepreneurship Month. I call upon all Americans to commemorate this month...

  14. Expression of alpha-fetoprotein messenger RNA in BEL-7404 human hepatoma cells and effect of L-4-oxalysine on the expression

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1998-01-01

    AIM To investigate alpha-fetoprotein (AFP) mRNA expression in BEL-7404 human hepatoma cells and the effect of L-4-oxalysine (OXL) on the expression.METHODS BEl-7404 human hepatoma cells were maintained in RPMI 1640 media. Human AFP cDNA probe was labelled with digoxigenin-11-dUTP by the random primer labelling method. The expression of AFP mRNA in Bel-7404 cells was determined by an in situ hybridization technique with digoxigenin-labelled human AFP cDNA probe. The positive intensities of AFP mRNA in cells were analyzed by microspectrophotometer and expressed as absorbance at 470nm. For the experiment with OXL, cells were incubated with various concentrations of the agent for 72h.RESULTS Essentially all the hepatoma cells contained AFP mRNA in the cytoplasm, although in various amounts. The specificity of the hybridization reaction was confirmed by control experiments in which the use of RNase-treated BEL-7404 cells, non-AFP-producing cells (HL-60 human leukemia cells) or a nonspecific cDNA probe resulted in negative hybridization. When the cells were treated with OXL (25, 50mg/L), the content of AFP mRNA in the cytoplasm was decreased with the inhibition percentages of 34.3% and 70.1%, respectively (P<0.05).CONCLUSION AFP mRNA was expressed in BEL-7404 human hepatoma cells and OXL suppressed AFP mRNA expression in the cells.

  15. A Theoretical Study of Addition Reactions of L4M(M = Rh, Ir) and L2M(M = Pd, Pt) to Li+@C60.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Ming-Chung; Sharma, Akhilesh Kumar; Sameera, W M Chamil; Morokuma, Keiji; Su, Ming-Der

    2017-03-16

    The addition reaction of M(Cl)(CO)(PPh3)2 (M = Rh, Ir) and M(PPh3)2 (M = Pd, Pt) fragments with X@C60 (X = 0, Li+) were characterized by density functional theory (DFT) and the artificial force-induced reaction (AFIR) method. The calculated free energy profiles suggested that the η2[6:6]-addition is the most favorable reaction, which is consistent with the experimental observations. In the presence of Li+ ion, the reaction is highly exothermic, leading to η2[6:6] product of L4IrLi+@C60. In contrast, an endothermic reaction was observed in the absence of a Li+ ion. The encapsulated Li+ ion can enhance the thermodynamic stability of the η2[6:6] product. The energy decomposition analysis showed that the interaction between metal fragment and X@C60 fragment is the key for the thermodynamic stability. Among the group IA and IIA metal cations, Be2+ encapsulation is the best candidate for the development of new fullerene-transition metal complexes, which will be useful for future potential applications such as solar cells, catalysts, and electronic devices.

  16. Discovery of an L4 beta Candidate Member of Argus in the Planetary Mass Regime: Wise J231921.92+764544.4

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castro, Philip J.; Gizis, John E.

    2016-01-01

    We present the discovery of a young L dwarf, WISE J231921.92+764544.4, identified by comparing the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE) All-Sky Catalog to the Two Micron All Sky Survey (2MASS). A medium-resolution optical spectrum provides a spectral type of L4β, with a photometric distance estimate of 26.1 ± 4.4 pc. The red WISE W1 - W2 color provides additional evidence of youth, while the 2MASS J - Ks color does not. WISE J231921.92+764544.4 is a candidate member of the young moving group Argus, with the space motion and position of WISE J231921.92+764544.4 giving a probability of 79% for membership in Argus and a probability of 21% as a field object, based on BANYAN II. WISE J231921.92+764544.4 has a mass of 12.1 ± 0.4 {M}{Jup} based on membership in Argus, within the planetary mass regime.

  17. Discovery of an L4$\\beta$ Candidate Member of Argus in the Planetary Mass Regime: WISE J231921.92+764544.4

    CERN Document Server

    Castro, Philip J

    2015-01-01

    We present the discovery of a young L dwarf, WISE J231921.92+764544.4, identified by comparing the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE) All-Sky Catalog to the Two Micron All Sky Survey (2MASS). A medium-resolution optical spectrum provides a spectral type of L4$\\beta$, with a photometric distance estimate of 26.1$\\pm$4.4 pc. The red WISE $W1-W2$ color provides additional evidence of youth, while the 2MASS $J-K_{\\rm s}$ color does not. WISE J231921.92+764544.4 is a candidate member of the young moving group Argus, with the space motion and position of WISE J231921.92+764544.4 giving a probability of 79% membership in Argus and a probability of 21% as a field object, based on BANYAN II. WISE J231921.92+764544.4 has a mass of 12.1$\\pm$0.4 M$_{\\rm Jup}$ based on membership in Argus, within the planetary mass regime.

  18. Determinación de las propiedades mecánicas de unidades de columna anterior y unidades funcionales del segmento lumbar porcino L3-L4

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricardo Gustavo Rodríguez-Cañizo

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Los especímenes porcinos han demostrado ser una excelente opción para la experimentación de la columna vertebral, ya que tanto anatómica como biomecánicamente tienen similitudes con los humanos. No obstante, existen diferencias que deben ser tomadas en cuenta cuando se comparan ambos especímenes. El objetivo de este estudio es realizar pruebas de compresión axial a Unidades de Columna Anterior (UCA’s y a Unidades Funcionales (UF’s del segmento lumbar porcino L3-L4, para determinar el coeficiente de rigidez y comparar los resultados obtenidos con la información encontrada en la literatura para el caso humano. Los resultados mostraron que las UF’s soportan aproximadamente un 22% más de carga en comparación con las UCA’s, lo cual se aproxima al 18% encontrado para el caso humano. Se concluye por lo tanto, que principalmente características como la morfometría vertebral, influye de manera directa en las propiedades mecánicas de las UCA’s y las UF’s.

  19. METHODOLOGICAL PROPOSAL FOR COMPILING THE ILO UNEMPLOYMENT WITH MONTHLY PERIODICITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia PISICĂ

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Development of methodology for deriving the monthly unemployment statistics directly from the quarterly Labour Force Survey (LFS results by econometric modeling meets the requirements of insuring the information on short-term needed for employment policies, aiming to achieve the objectives of Europe 2020. Estimated monthly data series according to the methodology allow assessment of short-term trends in unemployment measured according to the criteria of the International Labour Organisation (ILO in terms of comparability with European statistics.

  20. 12-Month-Olds Produce Others' Intended but Unfulfilled Acts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielsen, Mark

    2009-01-01

    Following Meltzoff's (1995) behavioral reenactment paradigm, this study investigated the ability of 12-month-olds (N = 44) to reproduce a model's attempted-but-failed actions on objects. Testing was conducted using a novel set of objects designed to enable young infants to readily identify the potential outcome of the model's actions. Infants who…